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Sample records for canola oil fuel

  1. Influence of Blending Canola, Palm, Soybean, and Sunflower Oil Methyl Esters on Fuel Properties of Bioiesel

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Single, binary, ternary, and quaternary mixtures of canola (low erucic acid rapeseed), palm, soybean, and sunflower (high oleic acid) oil methyl esters (CME, PME, SME, and SFME, respectively) were prepared and important fuel properties measured, such as oil stability index (OSI), cold filter pluggin...

  2. Canola Oil Fuel Cell Demonstration: Volume 2 - Market Availability of Agricultural Crops for Fuel Cell Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    canola, crambe, mus- tard, rapeseed, safflower , and sunflower. These six species were selected for evaluation based on the production requirements for...each crop. By comparison, other less-known crops such as camelina are poorly defined in terms of production. Crops such as safflower and sunflower...are also as well known as canola. Consequently, more variables are used to define ca- nola, flax, safflower , and sunflower. Crops with relatively

  3. 75 FR 59622 - Supplemental Determination for Renewable Fuels Produced Under the Final RFS2 Program From Canola Oil

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-28

    ... biofuel production pathways, including those involving palm oil, woody biomass and sorghum. We issued a... assumptions, and proposed lifecycle GHG assessment, for canola oil biodiesel. EPA provided a 30- day public... assumptions that were used in the lifecycle modeling of canola oil biodiesel. The public comments received...

  4. Influence of extended storage on fuel properties of methyl esters prepared from canola, palm, soybean, and sunflower oils

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fatty acid methyl esters prepared from canola, palm, soybean, and sunflower oils by homogenous base-catalyzed methanolysis were stored for 12 months at three constant temperatures (-15, 22, and 40 deg C) and properties such as oxidative stability, acid value, kinematic viscosity, low temperature ope...

  5. Evidence of health benefits of canola oil

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Lin; Allemekinders, Hanja; Dansby, Angela; Campbell, Lisa; Durance-Tod, Shaunda; Berger, Alvin; Jones, Peter JH

    2013-01-01

    Canola oil-based diets have been shown to reduce plasma cholesterol levels in comparison with diets containing higher levels of saturated fatty acids. Consumption of canola oil also influences biological functions that affect various other biomarkers of disease risk. Previous reviews have focused on the health effects of individual components of canola oil. Here, the objective is to address the health effects of intact canola oil, as this has immediate practical implications for consumers, nutritionists, and others deciding which oil to consume or recommend. A literature search was conducted to examine the effects of canola oil consumption on coronary heart disease, insulin sensitivity, lipid peroxidation, inflammation, energy metabolism, and cancer cell growth. Data reveal substantial reductions in total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, as well as other positive actions, including increased tocopherol levels and improved insulin sensitivity, compared with consumption of other dietary fat sources. In summary, growing scientific evidence supports the use of canola oil, beyond its beneficial actions on circulating lipid levels, as a health-promoting component of the diet. PMID:23731447

  6. Evidence of health benefits of canola oil.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lin; Allemekinders, Hanja; Dansby, Angela; Campbell, Lisa; Durance-Tod, Shaunda; Berger, Alvin; Jones, Peter J H

    2013-06-01

    Canola oil-based diets have been shown to reduce plasma cholesterol levels in comparison with diets containing higher levels of saturated fatty acids. Consumption of canola oil also influences biological functions that affect various other biomarkers of disease risk. Previous reviews have focused on the health effects of individual components of canola oil. Here, the objective is to address the health effects of intact canola oil, as this has immediate practical implications for consumers, nutritionists, and others deciding which oil to consume or recommend. A literature search was conducted to examine the effects of canola oil consumption on coronary heart disease, insulin sensitivity, lipid peroxidation, inflammation, energy metabolism, and cancer cell growth. Data reveal substantial reductions in total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, as well as other positive actions, including increased tocopherol levels and improved insulin sensitivity, compared with consumption of other dietary fat sources. In summary, growing scientific evidence supports the use of canola oil, beyond its beneficial actions on circulating lipid levels, as a health-promoting component of the diet.

  7. Canola Oil Fuel Cell Demonstration. Volume 1. Literature Review of Current Reformer Technologies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-08-01

    into their base components. CH,,, -> nC + (t)H 2 This technique has a long history and has been used to convert relatively dirty fuels into clean fuels...can be converted to SI units as follows: Multiply By To Obtain acres 4,046.873 square meters cubic feet 0.02831685 cubic meters cubic inches...devices that convert chemical energy to electrical energy with very high efficiency. Due to their electrochemical conversion, fuel cell systems

  8. Production of biodiesel fuel from canola oil with dimethyl carbonate using an active sodium methoxide catalyst prepared by crystallization.

    PubMed

    Kai, Takami; Mak, Goon Lum; Wada, Shohei; Nakazato, Tsutomu; Takanashi, Hirokazu; Uemura, Yoshimitsu

    2014-07-01

    In this study, a novel method for the production of biodiesel under mild conditions using fine particles of sodium methoxide formed in dimethyl carbonate (DMC) is proposed. Biodiesel is generally produced from vegetable oils by the transesterification of triglycerides with methanol. However, this reaction produces glycerol as a byproduct, and raw materials are not effectively utilized. Transesterification with DMC has recently been studied because glycerol is not formed in the process. Although solid-state sodium methoxide has been reported to be inactive for this reaction, the catalytic activity dramatically increased with the preparation of fine catalyst powders by crystallization. The transesterification of canola oil with DMC was studied using this catalyst for the preparation of biodiesel. A conversion greater than 96% was obtained at 65°C for 2h with a 3:1M ratio of DMC and oil and 2.0 wt% catalyst. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Canola Oil Fuel Cell Demonstration: Volume 3 - Technical, Commercialization, and Application Issues Associated with Harvested Biomass

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-17

    defense and civilian power generation applications. ERDC/CERL SR-06-41 5 Mode of Technology Transfer This report will be made accessible through...consider them as an en- ergy crop. Although there have also been reports of experimental-size soy- bean plantings in Montana, soybeans do not do well in...been reported that oilseed crushing plants with a capacity above 10 million gal of oil per year generally use solvent extraction systems. In con

  10. Preparation and properties evaluation of biolubricants derived from canola oil and canola biodiesel.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rajesh V; Somidi, Asish K R; Dalai, Ajay K

    2015-04-01

    This study demonstrates the evaluation and comparison of the lubricity properties of the biolubricants prepared from the feed stocks such as canola oil and canola biodiesel. Biolubricant from canola biodiesel has a low cloud and pour point properties, better friction and antiwear properties, low phase transition temperature, is less viscous, and has the potential to substitute petroleum-based automotive lubricants. Biolubricant from canola oil has high thermal stability and is more viscous and more effective at higher temperature conditions. This study elucidates that both the biolubricants are attractive, renewable, and ecofriendly substitutes for the petroleum-based lubricants.

  11. Effects of canola and corn oil mimetic on Jurkat cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The Western diet is high in omega-6 fatty acids and low in omega-3 fatty acids. Canola oil contains a healthier omega 3 to omega 6 ratio than corn oil. Jurkat T leukemia cells were treated with free fatty acids mixtures in ratios mimicking that found in commercially available canola oil (7% α-linolenic, 30% linoleic, 54% oleic) or corn oil (59% linoleic, 24% oleic) to determine the cell survival or cell death and changes in expression levels of inflammatory cytokines and receptors following oil treatment. Methods Fatty acid uptake was assessed by gas chromatography. Cell survival and cell death were evaluated by cell cycle analyses, propidium-iodide staining, trypan blue exclusion and phosphatidylserine externalization. mRNA levels of inflammatory cytokines and receptors were assessed by RT-PCR. Results There was a significant difference in the lipid profiles of the cells after treatment. Differential action of the oils on inflammatory molecules, following treatment at non-cytotoxic levels, indicated that canola oil mimetic was anti-inflammatory whereas corn oil mimetic was pro-inflammatory. Significance These results indicate that use of canola oil in the diet instead of corn oil might be beneficial for diseases promoted by inflammation. PMID:21631947

  12. Effects of different forms of canola oil fatty acids plus canola meal on milk composition and physical properties of butter.

    PubMed

    Bayourthe, C; Enjalbert, F; Moncoulon, R

    2000-04-01

    Twenty multiparous Holstein cows were used in a 16-wk trial. A block of 10 cows received a control diet, based on corn silage, and the other block of 10 cows successively received four diets with 1) an extruded blend of canola meal and canola seeds, 2) canola meal and whole canola seeds, 3) canola meal and ground canola seeds, or 4) canola meal and calcium salts of canola oil fatty acids. Canola fat represented about 2% of dietary dry matter. Compared to control cows, treated cows had similar dry matter intake, milk production, and daily milk output of true protein or fat. Protein contents of milk was decreased by all treatments, with a lower effect of extruded or whole canola seeds. Milk fat contents was lowered by all treatments, extruded seeds and calcium salts resulting in most important effects. All treatments lowered the percentage of fatty acids with 12 to 16 carbons in milk fat, increased C18:0 and cis-C18:1 percentages, and the proportion of liquid fat in butter between 0 and 12 degrees C. Calcium salts and, to a lesser extent extruded seeds, resulted in most important improvements of milk fatty acid profile and butter softness, whereas whole seeds had low effects.

  13. Food safety and health effects of canola oil.

    PubMed

    Dupont, J; White, P J; Johnston, K M; Heggtveit, H A; McDonald, B E; Grundy, S M; Bonanome, A

    1989-10-01

    Canola oil is a newly marketed vegetable oil for use in salads and for cooking that contains 55% of the monounsaturated fatty acid; oleic acid, 25% linoleic acid and 10% alpha-linolenate [polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA)], and only 4% of the saturated fatty acids (SFAs) that have been implicated as factors in hypercholesterolemia. It is expressed from a cultivar of rapeseed that was selectively bred from old varieties in Canada to be very low in erucic acid--a fatty acid suspected to have pathogenic potential in diets high in the original rapeseed oil in experimental animals. Canola oil is free of those problems. It is the most widely consumed food oil in Canada, and has been approved for Generally Recognized as Safe (GRAS) status by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) of the United States Department of Health and Human Services. The fatty acid composition of canola oil is consistent with its use as a substitute for SFAs, in meeting the dietary goals recommended by many health associations: an average diet containing about 30% of calories as fat made up of less than 10% SFAs, 8-10% PUFAs in a ratio of linoleic to linolenic acids between 4:1 and 10:1, the remainder being monounsaturated fatty acids. No single oil meets these current recommendations for ratios of PUFA/monounsaturated/polyunsaturated fatty acid ratios as the sole source of cooking and salad oil.

  14. Canola-Based Automotive Oil Research and Development

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, Ira N.; Kammerman, Steven B.

    2009-12-07

    This research project establishes data on the ability of the bioindustry to provide sufficient production of Canola/rapeseed, functioning as a biolubricant, to replace petroleum-based automotive lubricants at competitive prices. In 2005 total sales for lubricants amounted to 2.5 billion gallons. Research was also conducted to determine the attitudes toward adoption of bioproducts, specifically among industries that are large-scale users of automotive lubricants, including government and private industry users. The green technology industry, or bioindustry, uses a variety of plant- and crop-based resources, known as biomass, to produce energy, fuel and many different bioproducts. Rapeseed is categorized as a lignocellulosic biomass. High erucic acid rapeseed is not intended for human consumption thereby negating the food vs. fuel issue that arose with the increased production of corn as a feedstock for use in ethanol. Key findings show that the oil from Canola/rapeseed provides about twice the yield than soybean oil. These seeds also have significantly higher natural lubricity than petroleum, enabling Canola/rapeseed to function in many different capacities where oxidation issues are critical. It also has the most positive energy balance of all common vegetable oils, making it an excellent potential replacement for petroleum-based fuels as well. As a rotating crop, it enhances farm lands, thereby increasing subsequent yields of barley and wheat, thus increasing profit margins. Petroleum-based bioproducts negatively impact the environment by releasing greenhouse gases, sulfur, heavy metals and other pollutants into the air, ground and water. Replacing these products with bio-alternatives is a significant step toward preserving the country’s natural resources and the environment. Further to this, promoting the growth of the green biotechnology industry will strengthen the nation’s economy, creating jobs in the agriculture, science and engineering sectors, while

  15. Effects of canola and high-oleic-acid canola oils on abdominal fat mass in individuals with central obesity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoran; Kris-Etherton, Penny M; West, Sheila G; Lamarche, Benoît; Jenkins, David J A; Fleming, Jennifer A; McCrea, Cindy E; Pu, Shuaihua; Couture, Patrick; Connelly, Philip W; Jones, Peter J H

    2016-11-01

    To determine the effect of diets low in saturated fatty acids and high in monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA) or polyunsaturated fatty acids on body composition in participants at risk for metabolic syndrome (MetS). This study was a randomized, crossover, controlled feeding study. Participants (n = 101, ages 49.5 ± 1.2, BMI 29.4 ± 0.4 kg/m(2) ) were randomized to five isocaloric diets containing treatment oils: Canola, CanolaOleic, CanolaDHA, Corn/Safflower, and Flax/Safflower. Each diet period was 4 weeks followed by a 2- to 4-week washout period. Canola (3.1 kg, P = 0.026) and CanolaOleic oil diets (3.09 kg, P = 0.03) reduced android fat mass compared with the Flax/Saff oil diet (3.2 kg), particularly in men. The decrease in abdominal fat mass was correlated with the reduction in blood pressure after the Canola (systolic blood pressure: r = 0.26, P = 0.062; diastolic blood pressure: r = 0.38, P = 0.0049) and CanolaOleic oil diets (systolic blood pressure: r = 0.39 P = 0.004; diastolic blood pressure: r = 0.45, P = 0.0006). The decrease in abdominal fat mass also was associated with a reduction in triglyceride levels after the CanolaOleic oil diet (r = 0.42, P = 0.002). Diets high in MUFA (compared with PUFA) reduced central obesity with an accompanying improvement in MetS risk factors. Diets high in MUFA may be beneficial for treating and perhaps preventing MetS. © 2016 The Obesity Society.

  16. Frying stability of rapeseed Kizakinonatane (Brassica napus) oil in comparison with canola oil.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jin-Kui; Zhang, Han; Tsuchiya, Tomohiro; Akiyama, Yoshinobu; Chen, Jie-Yu

    2015-04-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the frying performance of Kizakinonatane (Brassica napus) oil during deep-fat frying of frozen French fries with/without replenishment. Commercial regular canola oil was used for comparison. The frying oils were used during intermittent frying of frozen French fries at 180, 200, and 220 ℃ for 7 h daily over four consecutive days. The Kizakinonatane oil exhibited lower levels of total polar compounds, carbonyl value, and viscosity as well as comparable color (optical density) values to that of the canola oil. The monounsaturated fatty acid/polyunsaturated fatty acid ratios were lower than that of canola oil, whereas the polyunsaturated fatty acid/saturated fatty acid ratios are higher than that of canola oil after heating. Results showed that fresh Kizakinonatane oil contains higher levels of acid value, viscosity, optical density values, tocopherols, and total phenolics contents than that of canola oil. Replenishment with fresh oil had significant effects on all chemical and physical parameters, except the acid value of the Kizakinonatane oil during frying processes. Based on the results, the Kizakinonatane oil is inherently suitable for preparing deep-fried foods at high temperatures. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  17. Canola, corn and vegetable oils as alternative for wheat germ oil in fruit fly liquid larval diets

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Four wheat germ oil alternatives (corn oil, vegetable oil, canola oil with 10% vitamin E, and canola oil with 20% vitamin E) purchased from a Hawaii local supermarket were added into a fruit fly liquid larval diet as a supplement for rearing fruit fly larvae and were evaluated for the possibility to...

  18. Salt Loading in Canola Oil Fed SHRSP Rats Induces Endothelial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Papazzo, Annateresa; Conlan, Xavier A.; Lexis, Louise; Charchar, Fadi J.; Lewandowski, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to determine if 50 days of canola oil intake in the absence or presence of salt loading affects: (1) antioxidant and oxidative stress markers, (2) aortic mRNA of NADPH oxidase (NOX) subunits and superoxide dismutase (SOD) isoforms and (3) endothelial function in SHRSP rats. SHRSP rats were fed a diet containing 10 wt/wt% soybean oil or 10 wt/wt% canola oil, and given tap water or water containing 1% NaCl for 50 days. Without salt, canola oil significantly increased RBC SOD, plasma cholesterol and triglycerides, aortic p22phox, NOX2 and CuZn-SOD mRNA, and decreased RBC glutathione peroxidase activity. With salt, canola oil reduced RBC SOD and catalase activity, LDL-C, and p22phox mRNA compared with canola oil alone, whereas plasma malondialdehyde (MDA) was reduced and RBC MDA and LDL-C were higher. With salt, the canola oil group had significantly reduced endothelium-dependent vasodilating responses to ACh and contractile responses to norepinephrine compared with the canola oil group without salt and to the WKY rats. These results indicate that ingestion of canola oil increases O2− generation, and that canola oil ingestion in combination with salt leads to endothelial dysfunction in the SHRSP model. PMID:23762494

  19. IMPACTS OF IRON, NUTRIENTS, AND MINERAL FINES ON ANAEROBIC BIODEGRADATION OF CANOLA OIL IN FRESHWATER SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Factors affecting anaerobic biodegradation kinetics of canola oil in freshwater sediments were investigated. An optimum dose of ferric hydroxide (10.5 g Fe(III)·kg-1 sediment) was found to stimulate anaerobic biodegradation of canola oil (18.6 g oil kg-1). ...

  20. IMPACTS OF IRON, NUTRIENTS, AND MINERAL FINES ON ANAEROBIC BIODEGRADATION OF CANOLA OIL IN FRESHWATER SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Factors affecting anaerobic biodegradation kinetics of canola oil in freshwater sediments were investigated. An optimum dose of ferric hydroxide (10.5 g Fe(III)·kg-1 sediment) was found to stimulate anaerobic biodegradation of canola oil (18.6 g oil kg-1). ...

  1. Performance of Regular and Modified Canola and Soybean Oils in Rotational Frying.

    PubMed

    Przybylski, Roman; Gruczynska, Eliza; Aladedunye, Felix

    2013-01-01

    Canola and soybean oils both regular and with modified fatty acid compositions by genetic modifications and hydrogenation were compared for frying performance. The frying was conducted at 185 ± 5 °C for up to 12 days where French fries, battered chicken and fish sticks were fried in succession. Modified canola oils, with reduced levels of linolenic acid, accumulated significantly lower amounts of polar components compared to the other tested oils. Canola oils generally displayed lower amounts of oligomers in their polar fraction. Higher rates of free fatty acids formation were observed for the hydrogenated oils compared to the other oils, with canola frying shortening showing the highest amount at the end of the frying period. The half-life of tocopherols for both regular and modified soybean oils was 1-2 days compared to 6 days observed for high-oleic low-linolenic canola oil. The highest anisidine values were observed for soybean oil with the maximum reached on the 10th day of frying. Canola and soybean frying shortenings exhibited a faster rate of color formation at any of the frying times. The high-oleic low-linolenic canola oil exhibited the greatest frying stability as assessed by polar components, oligomers and non-volatile carbonyl components formation. Moreover, food fried in the high-oleic low-linolenic canola oil obtained the best scores in the sensory acceptance assessment.

  2. Modification of fatty acid composition in broiler chickens fed canola oil.

    PubMed

    Gallardo, María A; Pérez, Druso D; Leighton, Federico M

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the possibility of modifying the composition of fat tissue in broiler chickens fed canola oil, which is high in monounsaturated fatty acids. 128 one-day old broiler chickens, randomly assigned into 4 groups of 32 chicks each, received one of four diets containing 15% oil with different percentages of canola oil (diet 1: 0% canola oil, diet 2: 5% canola oil, diet 3: 10% canola oil and diet 4: 15% canola oil), for 31 days. Each group was divided into 4 subgroups of 8 chicks. The birds were sacrificed at day 45 to obtain tissue samples. The fatty acid composition was measured in meat (legs and breasts), fat (abdominal and subcutaneous) and plasma. An increase in oleic acid (p<0.01) was detected, as well as a decrease in linoleic acid (p<0.01), together with a slight increase in α-linolenic acid (p<0.05) with a higher percentage of canola oil. The composition of fat tissue was more representative of the dietary fatty acids than muscle tissue. In conclusion, canola oil increased the content of omega 9 and omega 3 fatty acids and decreased the content of omega 6 fatty acids in meat, fat and plasma in broiler chickens.

  3. Evaluation of canola oil oleogels with candelilla wax as an alternative to shortening in baked goods

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The oleogels of canola oil with candelilla wax were prepared and utilized as a shortening replacer to produce cookies with a high level of unsaturated fatty acids. The incorporation of candelilla wax (3 and 6% by weight) to canola oil produced the oleogels with solid-like properties. The firmness of...

  4. Adhesion-preventing properties of 4% icodextrin and canola oil: a comparative experimental study.

    PubMed

    Yigitler, Cengizhan; Karakas, Dursun Ozgur; Kucukodaci, Zafer; Cosar, Alpaslan; Gülec, Bülent; Akin, Mehmet Levhi

    2012-11-01

    Postsurgical abdominal adhesions are common, serious postoperative complications. The present study compared the usefulness of 4% icodextrin and canola oil in preventing postoperative peritoneal adhesions. Twenty-four Wistar albino rats were divided into three groups. Following a laparotomy, a serosal abrasion was made by brushing the cecum, and 3 mL of 0.9% NaCl, 4% icodextrin, or 3 mL of canola oil were intraperitoneally administered for the control, icodextrin, and canola oil groups, respectively. The abdomen was then closed. All of the rats were sacrificed at day 10. Macroscopic, histopathological, and biochemical evaluations were performed. The results were statistically analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and ANOVA tests. Macroscopic analyses revealed that both canola oil and 4% icodextrin reduced adhesion formation, but the difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.17). The histopathological examinations revealed no significant differences in terms of giant cell, lymphocyte/plasmocyte, neutrophil, ICAM1, or PECAM1 scores. However, both canola oil and 4% icodextrin significantly reduced fibrosis (p = 0.025). In the canola oil group, the histiocytic reactions were significantly increased (p = 0.001), and the hydroxyproline levels were significantly lower than those in the other groups (p = 0.034). In the present study, canola oil was determined to be superior to 4% icodextrin in lowering hydroxyproline levels and increasing histiocytic reactions. Considering these results, we believe that canola oil is a promising agent for preventing adhesion formation.

  5. Nondestructive NMR determination of oil composition in transformed canola seeds.

    PubMed

    Hutton, W C; Garbow, J R; Hayes, T R

    1999-12-01

    Magic-angle spinning (MAS) 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a convenient method for nondestructive, quantitative characterization of seed oil composition. We describe results for intact hybrid and transformed canola seeds. The MAS 13C NMR technique complements and agrees with gas chromatography results. The spectral resolution approaches that of neat, liquid oils. MAS 13C NMR data allow quantitative analysis of major oil components, including saturates and oleic, linoleic, and linolenic acyl chains. 13C NMR directly and quantitatively elucidates, triglyceride regiochemistry and acyl chain cis-trans isomers that cannot be quickly detected by other methods. MAS 13C NMR can serve as the primary method for development of near-infrared seed oil calibrations. These NMR methods are nondestructive and attractive for plant-breeding programs or other studies (e.g., functional genomics) where loss of seed viability is inconvenient.

  6. Effect of Drying Operating Conditions on Canola Oil Tocopherol Content.

    PubMed

    Laoretani, Daniela; Fernández, María; Crapiste, Guillermo; Nolasco, Susana

    2014-03-27

    The aim of this work was to evaluate two operating parameters of seed drying (temperature and initial moisture content) on the tocopherol content of canola oil. The raw material was characterized by moisture, oil, protein, crude fiber and ash content. Seeds at 13.6% and 22.7% moisture content (dry basis, db) were dried at temperatures in the range of 35-100 °C to a safe storage moisture of 7% db. Oil was extracted from each treated sample. The oil extracted from the samples dried at the extreme temperatures was analyzed by means of the acidity value, peroxide index and fatty acid composition, finding no significant differences among treatments or among untreated and treated samples. Tocopherol contents in the oils obtained for all the assayed temperatures were determined. Differences were found for the samples with 22.7% (db) initial moisture content. Except at 35 °C, temperature affected negatively the oil tocopherol content. However, when 13.6% (db) moisture seeds were processed, no significant differences were observed in the amount of this minor oil component among assays.

  7. Effect of some isothiocyanates on the hydrogenation of canola oil

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, V.; de Man, J.M.

    1987-06-01

    Sulfur compounds were added to refined and bleached canola oil before hydrogenation in the form of allyl, heptyl and 2-phenethyl isothiocyanates, and the effects on hydrogenation rate, solid fat content and percentage trans fatty acids were determined. The poisoning effect was most pronounced with allyl isothiocyanate and least phenethyl isothiocyanate. As the amount of added sulfur increased, the hydrogenation rate decreased. Of the three isothiocyanates used, allyl isothiocyanate caused formation of larger amounts of trans isomers. An increased sulfur level in the oil resulted in increased solid fat content and trans isomer level. Allyl isothiocyanate also caused formation of larger amounts of solid fat than other isothiocyanates at all levels of sulfur addition. (Refs. 24).

  8. Lipase-catalysed interesterification between canola oil and fully hydrogenated canola oil in contact with supercritical carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Jenab, Ehsan; Temelli, Feral; Curtis, Jonathan M

    2013-12-01

    The processing parameters in enzymatic reactions using CO2-expanded (CX) lipids have strong effects on the physical properties of liquid phase, degree of interesterification, and physicochemical properties of the final reaction products. CX-canola oil and fully hydrogenated canola oil (FHCO) were interesterified using Lipozyme TL IM in a high pressure stirred batch reactor. The effects of immobilised enzyme load, pressure, substrate ratio and reaction time on the formation of mixed triacylglycerols (TG) from trisaturated and triunsaturated TG were investigated. The optimal immobilised enzyme load, pressure, substrate ratio and time for the degree of interesterification to reach the highest equilibrium state were 6% (w/v) of initial substrates, 10 MPa, blend with 30% (w/w) of FHCO and 2h, respectively. The physicochemical properties of the initial blend and interesterified products with different FHCO ratios obtained at optimal reaction conditions were determined in terms of TG composition, thermal behaviour and solid fat content (SFC). The amounts of saturated and triunsaturated TG decreased while the amounts of mixed TG increased as a result of interesterification. Thus, the interesterified product had a lower melting point, and broader melting and plasticity ranges compared to the initial blends. These findings are important for better understanding of CX-lipid reactions and for optimal formulation of base-stocks of margarine and confectionary fats to meet industry demands.

  9. DHA-enriched high–oleic acid canola oil improves lipid profile and lowers predicted cardiovascular disease risk in the canola oil multicenter randomized controlled trial123

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Peter JH; Senanayake, Vijitha K; Pu, Shuaihua; Jenkins, David JA; Connelly, Philip W; Lamarche, Benoît; Couture, Patrick; Charest, Amélie; Baril-Gravel, Lisa; West, Sheila G; Liu, Xiaoran; Fleming, Jennifer A; McCrea, Cindy E; Kris-Etherton, Penny M

    2014-01-01

    Background: It is well recognized that amounts of trans and saturated fats should be minimized in Western diets; however, considerable debate remains regarding optimal amounts of dietary n−9, n−6, and n−3 fatty acids. Objective: The objective was to examine the effects of varying n−9, n−6, and longer-chain n−3 fatty acid composition on markers of coronary heart disease (CHD) risk. Design: A randomized, double-blind, 5-period, crossover design was used. Each 4-wk treatment period was separated by 4-wk washout intervals. Volunteers with abdominal obesity consumed each of 5 identical weight-maintaining, fixed-composition diets with one of the following treatment oils (60 g/3000 kcal) in beverages: 1) conventional canola oil (Canola; n−9 rich), 2) high–oleic acid canola oil with docosahexaenoic acid (CanolaDHA; n−9 and n−3 rich), 3) a blend of corn and safflower oil (25:75) (CornSaff; n−6 rich), 4) a blend of flax and safflower oils (60:40) (FlaxSaff; n−6 and short-chain n−3 rich), or 5) high–oleic acid canola oil (CanolaOleic; highest in n−9). Results: One hundred thirty individuals completed the trial. At endpoint, total cholesterol (TC) was lowest after the FlaxSaff phase (P < 0.05 compared with Canola and CanolaDHA) and highest after the CanolaDHA phase (P < 0.05 compared with CornSaff, FlaxSaff, and CanolaOleic). Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol were highest, and triglycerides were lowest, after CanolaDHA (P < 0.05 compared with the other diets). All diets decreased TC and LDL cholesterol from baseline to treatment endpoint (P < 0.05). CanolaDHA was the only diet that increased HDL cholesterol from baseline (3.5 ± 1.8%; P < 0.05) and produced the greatest reduction in triglycerides (−20.7 ± 3.8%; P < 0.001) and in systolic blood pressure (−3.3 ± 0.8%; P < 0.001) compared with the other diets (P < 0.05). Percentage reductions in Framingham 10-y CHD risk scores (FRS) from

  10. DHA-enriched high-oleic acid canola oil improves lipid profile and lowers predicted cardiovascular disease risk in the canola oil multicenter randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Jones, Peter J H; Senanayake, Vijitha K; Pu, Shuaihua; Jenkins, David J A; Connelly, Philip W; Lamarche, Benoît; Couture, Patrick; Charest, Amélie; Baril-Gravel, Lisa; West, Sheila G; Liu, Xiaoran; Fleming, Jennifer A; McCrea, Cindy E; Kris-Etherton, Penny M

    2014-07-01

    It is well recognized that amounts of trans and saturated fats should be minimized in Western diets; however, considerable debate remains regarding optimal amounts of dietary n-9, n-6, and n-3 fatty acids. The objective was to examine the effects of varying n-9, n-6, and longer-chain n-3 fatty acid composition on markers of coronary heart disease (CHD) risk. A randomized, double-blind, 5-period, crossover design was used. Each 4-wk treatment period was separated by 4-wk washout intervals. Volunteers with abdominal obesity consumed each of 5 identical weight-maintaining, fixed-composition diets with one of the following treatment oils (60 g/3000 kcal) in beverages: 1) conventional canola oil (Canola; n-9 rich), 2) high-oleic acid canola oil with docosahexaenoic acid (CanolaDHA; n-9 and n-3 rich), 3) a blend of corn and safflower oil (25:75) (CornSaff; n-6 rich), 4) a blend of flax and safflower oils (60:40) (FlaxSaff; n-6 and short-chain n-3 rich), or 5) high-oleic acid canola oil (CanolaOleic; highest in n-9). One hundred thirty individuals completed the trial. At endpoint, total cholesterol (TC) was lowest after the FlaxSaff phase (P < 0.05 compared with Canola and CanolaDHA) and highest after the CanolaDHA phase (P < 0.05 compared with CornSaff, FlaxSaff, and CanolaOleic). Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol were highest, and triglycerides were lowest, after CanolaDHA (P < 0.05 compared with the other diets). All diets decreased TC and LDL cholesterol from baseline to treatment endpoint (P < 0.05). CanolaDHA was the only diet that increased HDL cholesterol from baseline (3.5 ± 1.8%; P < 0.05) and produced the greatest reduction in triglycerides (-20.7 ± 3.8%; P < 0.001) and in systolic blood pressure (-3.3 ± 0.8%; P < 0.001) compared with the other diets (P < 0.05). Percentage reductions in Framingham 10-y CHD risk scores (FRS) from baseline were greatest after CanolaDHA (-19.0 ± 3.1%; P < 0.001) than after

  11. Oil-structuring characterization of natural waxes in canola oil oleogels: Rheological, thermal, and oxidative properties

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Natural waxes (candelilla wax, carnauba wax, and beeswax) were utilized as canola oil structurants to produce oleogels and their physicochemical properties were evaluated from rheological, thermal, and oxidative points of view. The oleogels with candelilla wax exhibited the highest hardness, followe...

  12. Adhesion-preventing properties of 4% icodextrin and canola oil: a comparative experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Yigitler, Cengizhan; Karakas, Dursun Ozgur; Kucukodacı, Zafer; Cosar, Alpaslan; Gülec, Bülent; Akin, Mehmet Levhi

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Postsurgical abdominal adhesions are common, serious postoperative complications. The present study compared the usefulness of 4% icodextrin and canola oil in preventing postoperative peritoneal adhesions. METHODS: Twenty-four Wistar albino rats were divided into three groups. Following a laparotomy, a serosal abrasion was made by brushing the cecum, and 3 mL of 0.9% NaCl, 4% icodextrin, or 3 mL of canola oil were intraperitoneally administered for the control, icodextrin, and canola oil groups, respectively. The abdomen was then closed. All of the rats were sacrificed at day 10. Macroscopic, histopathological, and biochemical evaluations were performed. The results were statistically analyzed using Kruskal–Wallis and ANOVA tests. RESULTS: Macroscopic analyses revealed that both canola oil and 4% icodextrin reduced adhesion formation, but the difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.17). The histopathological examinations revealed no significant differences in terms of giant cell, lymphocyte/plasmocyte, neutrophil, ICAM1, or PECAM1 scores. However, both canola oil and 4% icodextrin significantly reduced fibrosis (p = 0.025). In the canola oil group, the histiocytic reactions were significantly increased (p = 0.001), and the hydroxyproline levels were significantly lower than those in the other groups (p = 0.034). CONCLUSIONS: In the present study, canola oil was determined to be superior to 4% icodextrin in lowering hydroxyproline levels and increasing histiocytic reactions. Considering these results, we believe that canola oil is a promising agent for preventing adhesion formation. PMID:23184208

  13. Chemical interesterification of blends of palm stearin, coconut oil, and canola oil: physicochemical properties.

    PubMed

    Soares, Fabiana Andreia Schäfer De Martini; da Silva, Roberta Claro; Hazzan, Márcia; Capacla, Isabele Renata; Viccola, Elise Raduan; Maruyama, Jessica Mayumi; Gioielli, Luiz Antonio

    2012-02-15

    trans-Free interesterified fat was produced for possible usage as a margarine. Palm stearin, coconut oil, and canola oil were used as substrates for chemical interesterification. The main aim of the present study was to evaluate the physicochemical properties of blends of palm stearin, coconut oil, and canola oil submitted to chemical interesterification using sodium methoxide as the catalyst. The original and interesterified blends were examined for fatty acid composition, softening and melting points, solid fat content, and consistency. Chemical interesterification reduced softening and melting points, consistency, and solid fat content. The interesterified fats showed desirable physicochemical properties for possible use as a margarine. Therefore, our result suggested that the interesterified fat without trans-fatty acids could be used as an alternative to partially hydrogenated fat.

  14. Ultrasonic free fatty acids esterification in tobacco and canola oil.

    PubMed

    Boffito, D C; Galli, F; Pirola, C; Bianchi, C L; Patience, G S

    2014-11-01

    Ultrasound accelerates the free fatty acids esterification rate by reducing the mass transfer resistance between methanol in the liquid phase and absorbed organic species on Amberlyst®46 catalyst. The reaction rates of canola oil is three times greater than for tobacco seed oil but half the reaction rate of pure oleic acid as measured in a batch reactor. The beneficial effects of ultrasound vs. the conventional approach are more pronounced at lower temperatures (20°C and 40°C vs. 63°C): at 20°C, the free fatty acids conversion reaches 68% vs. 23% with conventional mechanical stirring. The increased conversion is attributed to acoustic cavitation that increases mass transfer in the vicinity of the active sites. The Eley-Rideal kinetic model in which the concentration of the reacting species is expressed taking into account the mass transfer between the phases is in excellent agreement with the experimental data. Ultrasound increases the mass transfer coefficient in the tobacco oil 6 and 4.1 fold at 20°C and 40°C, respectively. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Some rape/canola seed oils: fatty acid composition and tocopherols.

    PubMed

    Matthaus, Bertrand; Özcan, Mehmet Musa; Al Juhaimi, Fahad

    2016-03-01

    Seed samples of some rape and canola cultivars were analysed for oil content, fatty acid and tocopherol profiles. Gas liquid chromotography and high performance liquid chromotography were used for fatty acid and tocopherol analysis, respectively. The oil contents of rape and canola seeds varied between 30.6% and 48.3% of the dry weight (p<0.05). The oil contents of rapeseeds were found to be high compared with canola seed oils. The main fatty acids in the oils are oleic (56.80-64.92%), linoleic (17.11-20.92%) and palmitic (4.18-5.01%) acids. A few types of tocopherols were found in rape and canola oils in various amounts: α-tocopherol, γ-tocopherol, δ-tocopherol, β-tocopherol and α-tocotrienol. The major tocopherol in the seed oils of rape and canola cultivars were α-tocopherol (13.22-40.01%) and γ-tocopherol (33.64-51.53%) accompanied by α-T3 (0.0-1.34%) and δ-tocopherol (0.25-1.86%) (p<0.05). As a result, the present study shows that oil, fatty acid and tocopherol contents differ significantly among the cultivars.

  16. Quality evaluation of noble mixed oil blended with palm and canola oil.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyesook; Lee, Eunji; Lee, Kwang-Geun

    2014-01-01

    Noble blended oils (canola: palm oil = 3:7, 4:6, 5:5, 6:4 and 7:3) were prepared and their frying qualities were evaluated. Frying qualities such as fatty acid composition, acid value, peroxide value, viscosity, smoke point, color, antioxidant activity, and sensory evaluation were measured to elucidate the optimum blend ratio of canola and palm oil. The ratio of unsaturated to saturated fatty acid of the blended oils was higher than that of palm oil after frying 50 times. The blended oil (3:7, Ca: Pa) had a relatively high oxidative stability and its peroxide values were 44.2-70.7 meq/kg after frying. The 3:7 (Ca: Pa) blended oil had excellent flavor, taste, and texture compared to those of the other frying oils as a result of a sensory evaluation of raw and fried potatoes. The results suggest that the 3:7 (Ca: Pa) blended oil is a good alternative oil for frying potatoes.

  17. Liquid transportation fuels from algal oils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Daichuan

    Liquid transportation fuels from renewable sources are becoming more prominent and important in modem society. Processing of hydrocarbon oils from algae has not been studied in detail in the past, so components which have been proposed for incorporation in algal oils via genetic engineering, such as cuparene, farnesene, phytol and squalene, have been subjected to processing via catalytic cracking in a pulse reactor at different temperatures. The cracking results showed that liquid products contained numerous high octane molecules which make it feasible for use in automobiles. Additionally, canola oil, chosen as an algal oil model compound, was studied as a feed for catalytic cracking in a fixed-bed reactor at atmospheric pressure over different types of zeolites. The results showed that MFI catalysts gave the highest yield of gasoline range products and lowest coke formation. Gallium loaded MFI zeolites increased the total aromatics yield for the canola oil cracking relative to the acid form of the zeolite. Finally, algal oils were cracked on several selected zeolites, and the results showed the same trend as canola oil cracking. MFI gave the highest gasoline yield (43.8 wt%) and lowest coke (4.7 wt%). The total aromatics yield from algae oil cracking is improved 7.8 wt% when MFI is loaded with gallium.

  18. Short Distance Standoff Raman Detection of Extra Virgin Olive Oil Adulterated with Canola and Grapeseed Oils.

    PubMed

    Farley, Carlton; Kassu, Aschalew; Bose, Nayana; Jackson-Davis, Armitra; Boateng, Judith; Ruffin, Paul; Sharma, Anup

    2016-12-12

    A short distance standoff Raman technique is demonstrated for detecting economically motivated adulteration (EMA) in extra virgin olive oil (EVOO). Using a portable Raman spectrometer operating with a 785 nm laser and a 2-in. refracting telescope, adulteration of olive oil with grapeseed oil and canola oil is detected between 1% and 100% at a minimum concentration of 2.5% from a distance of 15 cm and at a minimum concentration of 5% from a distance of 1 m. The technique involves correlating the intensity ratios of prominent Raman bands of edible oils at 1254, 1657, and 1441 cm(-1) to the degree of adulteration. As a novel variation in the data analysis technique, integrated intensities over a spectral range of 100 cm(-1) around the Raman line were used, making it possible to increase the sensitivity of the technique. The technique is demonstrated by detecting adulteration of EVOO with grapeseed and canola oils at 0-100%. Due to the potential of this technique for making measurements from a convenient distance, the short distance standoff Raman technique has the promise to be used for routine applications in food industry such as identifying food items and monitoring EMA at various checkpoints in the food supply chain and storage facilities.

  19. Differential effects of dietary canola and soybean oil intake on oxidative stress in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Canola oil shortens the life span of stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive (SHRSP) rats compared with rats fed soybean oil when given as the sole dietary lipid source. One possible mechanism leading to the damage and deterioration of organs due to canola oil ingestion is oxidative stress. This study investigated the effect of canola oil intake on oxidative stress in this animal model. Method Male SHRSP rats, were fed a defatted control diet containing 10% wt/wt soybean oil or a defatted treatment diet containing 10% wt/wt canola oil, and given water containing 1% NaCl. Blood pressure was measured weekly. Blood was collected prior to beginning the diets and at the end of completion of the study for analysis of red blood cell (RBC) antioxidant enzymes, RBC and plasma malondialdehyde (MDA), plasma 8-isoprostane and plasma lipids. Results Canola oil ingestion significantly decreased the life span of SHRSP rats compared with soybean oil, 85.8 ± 1.1 and 98.3 ± 3.4 days, respectively. Systolic blood pressure increased over time with a significant difference between the diets at the 6th week of feeding. Canola oil ingestion significantly reduced RBC superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and catalase activities, total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol compared with soybean oil. There were no significant differences in RBC MDA concentration between canola oil fed and soybean oil fed rats. In contrast, plasma MDA and 8-isoprostane concentration was significantly lower in the canola oil group compared to the soybean oil group. Conclusion In conclusion, canola oil ingestion shortens the life span of SHRSP rats and leads to changes in oxidative status, despite an improvement in the plasma lipids. PMID:21669000

  20. Stabilization of fish oil-in-water emulsions with oleosin extracted from canola meal.

    PubMed

    Wijesundera, Chakra; Boiteau, Thomas; Xu, Xinqing; Shen, Zhiping; Watkins, Peter; Logan, Amy

    2013-09-01

    International dietary guidelines advocate replacement of saturated and trans fat in food with unsaturated oils. Also, there is growing interest in incorporating highly unsaturated omega-3 oils in to food products due to beneficial health effects. A major obstacle to incorporating highly unsaturated oils in to food products is the extreme susceptibility to oxidative deterioration. Oil bodies were prepared from tuna oil, oleosin, and phospholipid mimicking natural oil bodies within oilseed. Oleosin was extracted from canola (Brassica napus) meal by solubilization in aqueous sodium hydroxide (pH 12) and subsequent precipitation at its isoelectric point of pH 6.5. The tuna oil artificial oil bodies (AOBs) readily dispersed in water to produce oil-in-water (o/w) emulsions, which did not coalesce on storage and were amenable to pasteurization using standard conditions. Accelerated oxidation studies showed that these AOB emulsions were substantially more resistant to lipid oxidation than o/w emulsions prepared from tuna oil using Tween40, sodium caseinate, and commercial canola protein isolate, respectively. There is potential to use commercial canola meal, which is cheap and abundant, as a natural source of oleosin for the preparation of physically and oxidatively stable food emulsions containing highly unsaturated oils.

  1. Chemical and physical properties of butterfat-vegetable oil blend spread prepared with enzymatically transesterified canola oil and caprylic acid.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung Hee; Akoh, Casimir C

    2005-06-15

    Structured Lipid was synthesized from canola oil and caprylic acid with sn-1,3 specific lipase from Rhizomucor miehei. Cold spreadable butter was made by blending butterfat with the SL at a weight ratio of 80:20. Its chemical and physical properties were compared with pure butter and butterfat-canola oil 80:20 blend spread. The butterfat-SL blend had lower contents of hypercholesterolemic fatty acids (FAs) and the lowest atherogenic index (AI) as compared to the others. Melting and crystallization behaviors of butterfat-SL blend were similar to those of butterfat-canola oil blend above 0 degrees C. It showed solid fat contents (SFCs) similar to butterfat-canola oil blend but lower than pure butterfat. The butterfat-SL blend was shown to crystallize in the beta' form. There were no differences between the hardness of butterfat-SL blend spread and butterfat-canola oil blend spread. Rheological analysis showed that butterfat-SL blend spread lost its elastic behavior at 5 degrees C, a lower temperature than pure butter.

  2. Vegetable Oil Derived Fuels for Civil Works Diesel Engine Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-01

    linseed, peanut, canola (low-eruec rapeseed), safflower , sesame, soybean, and sunflower. 4 Extensive research has been done to determine which...substitutes for conventional petroleum derived diesel fuels. Soybean, sunflower, safflower , and peanut oils were among the potential alternatives. Jn general

  3. A Canola Oil-Supplemented Diet Prevents Type I Diabetes-Caused Lipotoxicity and Renal Dysfunction in a Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Cano-Europa, Edgar; Ortiz-Butron, Rocio; Camargo, Estela Melendez; Esteves-Carmona, María Miriam; Oliart-Ros, Rosa Maria; Blas-Valdivia, Vanessa; Franco-Colin, Margarita

    2016-11-01

    We investigated the effect of a canola oil-supplemented diet on the metabolic state and diabetic renal function of a type I diabetes experimental model. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups: (1) normoglycemic+chow diet, (2) normoglycemic+a canola oil-supplemented chow diet, (3) diabetic+chow diet, and (4) diabetic+a canola oil-supplemented chow diet. For 15 weeks, animals were fed a diet of Purina rat chow alone or supplemented with 30% canola oil. Energetic intake, water intake, body weight, and adipose tissue fat pad were measured; renal function, electrolyte balance, glomerular filtration rate, and the plasmatic concentration of free fatty acids, cholesterol, triglycerides, and glucose were evaluated. The mesenteric, retroperitoneal, and epididymal fat pads were dissected and weighed. The kidneys were used for lipid peroxidation (LP) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) quantifications. Diabetic rats fed with a canola oil-supplemented diet had higher body weights, were less hyperphagic, and their mesenteric, retroperitoneal, and epididymal fat pads weighed more than diabetic rats on an unsupplemented diet. The canola oil-supplemented diet decreased plasmatic concentrations of free fatty acids, triglycerides, and cholesterol; showed improved osmolarity, water clearances, and creatinine depuration; and had decreased LP and ROS. A canola oil-supplemented diet decreases hyperphagia and prevents lipotoxicity and renal dysfunction in a type I diabetes mellitus model.

  4. Chemical modification of nanocellulose with canola oil fatty acid methyl ester

    Treesearch

    Liqing Wei; Umesh P. Agarwal; Kolby C. Hirth; Laurent M. Matuana; Ronald C. Sabo; Nicole M. Stark

    2017-01-01

    Cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs), produced from dissolving wood pulp, were chemically functionalized by transesterification with canola oil fatty acid methyl ester (CME). CME performs as both the reaction reagent and solvent. Transesterified CNC (CNCFE) was characterized for their chemical structure, morphology, crystalline structure, thermal stability, and hydrophobicity...

  5. Production of glycerol-free biofuel from canola oil and dimethyl carbonate using triazabicyclodecene in homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Mohammad Rafiqul

    Due to the increasing awareness of the dwindling fossil fuel resources and environmental issues, biofuel became an alternative renewable fuel to meet the steady increase of energy consumption and environmental demands. This work was designed to produce biofuel free from glycerol, soap, catalyst and wastes from canola oil and dimethyl carbonate (DMC) using an organocatalyst, triazabicyclodecene (TBD). To achieve these goals, several interconnected research activities were undertaken. First, a flow sheet was developed for the process and operating criteria were identified by laboratory experimentation verified with Aspen Plus. Mass and energy integration studies were performed to minimize the consumption of materials and energy utilities. Next, kinetics of canola oil transesterification using TBD as homogeneous catalyst in dimethyl carbonate has been investigated and a model was developed. Kinetics data were vital in process assessment and kinetics model was essential in the study of chemical reaction and catalyst development. Finally, a heterogeneous catalyst was developed for use as a biofuel catalyst through the immobilization of TBD into MgAl layered double hydroxides (LDHs) which can combine the advantages of homogeneous catalysis with the best properties of heterogeneous materials.

  6. High-oleic canola oil consumption enriches LDL particle cholesteryl oleate content and reduces LDL proteoglycan binding in humans

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Peter J. H.; MacKay, Dylan. S.; Senanayake, Vijitha K.; Pu, Shuaihua; Jenkins, David J. A.; Connelly, Philip W.; Lamarche, Benoît; Couture, Patrick; Kris-Etherton, Penny M.; West, Sheila G.; Liu, Xiaoran; Fleming, Jennifer A.; Hantgan, Roy R.; Rudel, Lawrence L.

    2015-01-01

    Oleic acid consumption is considered cardio-protective according to studies conducted examining effects of the Mediterranean diet. However, animal models have shown that oleic acid consumption increases LDL particle cholesteryl oleate content which is associated with increased LDL-proteoglycan binding and atherosclerosis. The objective was to examine effects of varying oleic, linoleic and docosahexaenoic acid consumption on human LDL-proteoglycan binding in a non-random subset of the Canola Oil Multi-center Intervention Trial (COMIT) participants. COMIT employed a randomized, double-blind, five-period, cross-over trial design. Three of the treatment oil diets; 1) a blend of corn/safflower oil (25:75); 2) high oleic canola oil; and 3) DHA-enriched high oleic canola oil were selected for analysis of LDL-proteoglycan binding in 50 participants exhibiting good compliance. LDL particles were isolated from frozen plasma by gel filtration chromatography and LDL cholesteryl esters quantified by mass-spectrometry. LDL-proteoglycan binding was assessed using surface plasmon resonance. LDL particle cholesterol ester fatty acid composition was sensitive to the treatment fatty acid compositions, with the main fatty acids in the treatments increasing in the LDL cholesterol esters. The corn/safflower oil and high-oleic canola oil diets lowered LDL-proteoglycan binding relative to their baseline values (p=0.0005 and p=0.0012, respectively). At endpoint, high-oleic canola oil feeding resulted in lower LDL-proteoglycan binding than corn/safflower oil (p=0.0243) and DHA-enriched high oleic canola oil (p=0.0249), although high-oleic canola oil had the lowest binding at baseline (p=0.0344). Our findings suggest that high-oleic canola oil consumption in humans increases cholesteryl oleate percentage in LDL, but in a manner not associated with a rise in LDL-proteoglycan binding. PMID:25528432

  7. High-oleic canola oil consumption enriches LDL particle cholesteryl oleate content and reduces LDL proteoglycan binding in humans.

    PubMed

    Jones, Peter J H; MacKay, Dylan S; Senanayake, Vijitha K; Pu, Shuaihua; Jenkins, David J A; Connelly, Philip W; Lamarche, Benoît; Couture, Patrick; Kris-Etherton, Penny M; West, Sheila G; Liu, Xiaoran; Fleming, Jennifer A; Hantgan, Roy R; Rudel, Lawrence L

    2015-02-01

    Oleic acid consumption is considered cardio-protective according to studies conducted examining effects of the Mediterranean diet. However, animal models have shown that oleic acid consumption increases LDL particle cholesteryl oleate content which is associated with increased LDL-proteoglycan binding and atherosclerosis. The objective was to examine effects of varying oleic, linoleic and docosahexaenoic acid consumption on human LDL-proteoglycan binding in a non-random subset of the Canola Oil Multi-center Intervention Trial (COMIT) participants. COMIT employed a randomized, double-blind, five-period, cross-over trial design. Three of the treatment oil diets: 1) a blend of corn/safflower oil (25:75); 2) high oleic canola oil; and 3) DHA-enriched high oleic canola oil were selected for analysis of LDL-proteoglycan binding in 50 participants exhibiting good compliance. LDL particles were isolated from frozen plasma by gel filtration chromatography and LDL cholesteryl esters quantified by mass-spectrometry. LDL-proteoglycan binding was assessed using surface plasmon resonance. LDL particle cholesterol ester fatty acid composition was sensitive to the treatment fatty acid compositions, with the main fatty acids in the treatments increasing in the LDL cholesterol esters. The corn/safflower oil and high-oleic canola oil diets lowered LDL-proteoglycan binding relative to their baseline values (p = 0.0005 and p = 0.0012, respectively). At endpoint, high-oleic canola oil feeding resulted in lower LDL-proteoglycan binding than corn/safflower oil (p = 0.0243) and DHA-enriched high oleic canola oil (p = 0.0249), although high-oleic canola oil had the lowest binding at baseline (p = 0.0344). Our findings suggest that high-oleic canola oil consumption in humans increases cholesteryl oleate percentage in LDL, but in a manner not associated with a rise in LDL-proteoglycan binding.

  8. Use of Raman spectroscopy for determining erucic acid content in canola oil.

    PubMed

    Durakli Velioglu, Serap; Temiz, Havva Tumay; Ercioglu, Elif; Velioglu, Hasan Murat; Topcu, Ali; Boyaci, Ismail Hakki

    2017-04-15

    This study presents a novel method to determine erucic acid in canola oil samples by using Raman spectroscopy and chemometric analysis. The oil mixtures were prepared at various concentrations of erucic acid ranging from 0% to 33.56% (w/w) through binary combinations of different oils. In order to predict erucic acid content, Raman spectroscopy and GC results were correlated by means of partial least squares analysis. High coefficient of determination values was obtained for both calibration and validation data sets, which are 0.990 and 0.982, respectively. The results of the present study reveal the potential of Raman spectroscopy for rapid determination (45s) of erucic acid in canola oil. Further research would be useful to improve the method to put it forward as an alternative to GC in the erucic acid analysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Vegetable oil fuel standards

    SciTech Connect

    Pryde, E.H.

    1982-01-01

    Suggested standards for vegetable oils and ester fuels, as well as ASTM specifications for No. 2 diesel oil are given. The following physical properties were discussed: cetane number, cloud point, distillation temperatures, flash point, pour point, turbidity, viscosity, free fatty acids, iodine value, phosphorus, and wax. It was apparent that vegetable oils and their esters cannot meet ASTM specifications D975 for No. 2 diesel oil for use in the diesel engine. Vegetable oil modification or engine design modification may make it possible eventually for vegetable oils to become suitable alternative fuels. Vegetable oils must be recognized as experimental fuels until modifications have been tested thoroughly and generally accepted. 1 table. (DP)

  10. Time-Series Analyses of Transcriptomes and Proteomes Reveal Molecular Networks Underlying Oil Accumulation in Canola

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Huafang; Cui, Yixin; Ding, Yijuan; Mei, Jiaqin; Dong, Hongli; Zhang, Wenxin; Wu, Shiqi; Liang, Ying; Zhang, Chunyu; Li, Jiana; Xiong, Qing; Qian, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the regulation of lipid metabolism is vital for genetic engineering of canola (Brassica napus L.) to increase oil yield or modify oil composition. We conducted time-series analyses of transcriptomes and proteomes to uncover the molecular networks associated with oil accumulation and dynamic changes in these networks in canola. The expression levels of genes and proteins were measured at 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks after pollination (WAP). Our results show that the biosynthesis of fatty acids is a dominant cellular process from 2 to 6 WAP, while the degradation mainly happens after 6 WAP. We found that genes in almost every node of fatty acid synthesis pathway were significantly up-regulated during oil accumulation. Moreover, significant expression changes of two genes, acetyl-CoA carboxylase and acyl-ACP desaturase, were detected on both transcriptomic and proteomic levels. We confirmed the temporal expression patterns revealed by the transcriptomic analyses using quantitative real-time PCR experiments. The gene set association analysis show that the biosynthesis of fatty acids and unsaturated fatty acids are the most significant biological processes from 2-4 WAP and 4-6 WAP, respectively, which is consistent with the results of time-series analyses. These results not only provide insight into the mechanisms underlying lipid metabolism, but also reveal novel candidate genes that are worth further investigation for their values in the genetic engineering of canola. PMID:28119706

  11. Time-Series Analyses of Transcriptomes and Proteomes Reveal Molecular Networks Underlying Oil Accumulation in Canola.

    PubMed

    Wan, Huafang; Cui, Yixin; Ding, Yijuan; Mei, Jiaqin; Dong, Hongli; Zhang, Wenxin; Wu, Shiqi; Liang, Ying; Zhang, Chunyu; Li, Jiana; Xiong, Qing; Qian, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the regulation of lipid metabolism is vital for genetic engineering of canola (Brassica napus L.) to increase oil yield or modify oil composition. We conducted time-series analyses of transcriptomes and proteomes to uncover the molecular networks associated with oil accumulation and dynamic changes in these networks in canola. The expression levels of genes and proteins were measured at 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks after pollination (WAP). Our results show that the biosynthesis of fatty acids is a dominant cellular process from 2 to 6 WAP, while the degradation mainly happens after 6 WAP. We found that genes in almost every node of fatty acid synthesis pathway were significantly up-regulated during oil accumulation. Moreover, significant expression changes of two genes, acetyl-CoA carboxylase and acyl-ACP desaturase, were detected on both transcriptomic and proteomic levels. We confirmed the temporal expression patterns revealed by the transcriptomic analyses using quantitative real-time PCR experiments. The gene set association analysis show that the biosynthesis of fatty acids and unsaturated fatty acids are the most significant biological processes from 2-4 WAP and 4-6 WAP, respectively, which is consistent with the results of time-series analyses. These results not only provide insight into the mechanisms underlying lipid metabolism, but also reveal novel candidate genes that are worth further investigation for their values in the genetic engineering of canola.

  12. SRC Residual fuel oils

    DOEpatents

    Tewari, Krishna C.; Foster, Edward P.

    1985-01-01

    Coal solids (SRC) and distillate oils are combined to afford single-phase blends of residual oils which have utility as fuel oils substitutes. The components are combined on the basis of their respective polarities, that is, on the basis of their heteroatom content, to assure complete solubilization of SRC. The resulting composition is a fuel oil blend which retains its stability and homogeneity over the long term.

  13. Quality of ω-3 fatty acid enriched low-fat chicken meat patties incorporated with selected levels of linseed flour/oil and canola flour/oil.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ripudaman; Chatli, Manish K; Biswas, Ashim K; Sahoo, Jhari

    2014-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the nutritional, processing and sensory characteristics of low-fat ω-3 enriched fatty acids chicken meat patties (CMP) prepared with the incorporation of 4% linseed flour (T1), 2% canola flour (T2), 3% linseed oil (T3), and 4% canola oil (T4) and to estimate their cost of production. The total fat and crude fiber content was increased (P < 0.05) with the incorporation of linseed flour. The emulsion stability and cooking yield was greater (P < 0.05) in T4 among all the treatments. The percent shrinkage was lower (P < 0.05) in linseed/canola oil incorporated CMP than their respective flours. The colour and appearance and flavour scores were lower (P < 0.05) in canola flour than canola oil incorporated CMP. The texture scores were not influenced (P < 0.05) in linseed-and canola-treated products. The overall acceptability was greatest (P < 0.05) in T4 whereas, lowest (P < 0.05) in T2 among all treated products. The cost of production was increased by 3-5% with the incorporation of linseed and canola oil whereas it was almost same for control and linseed flour.

  14. Textural and viscoelastic properties of pork frankfurters containing canola-olive oils, rice bran, and walnut.

    PubMed

    Álvarez, D; Xiong, Y L; Castillo, M; Payne, F A; Garrido, M D

    2012-09-01

    Textural, rheological and microstructural properties of frankfurters made with 20% pork backfat, 20% canola or 20% canola-olive (3:1) oils, including rice bran (RB) and walnut extract (WE) as macronutrients (2.5%) were investigated. Textural parameters, including hardness, gumminess and rupture-force, were highly (P<0.05) influenced by the fat-oil composition. Addition of RB or WE in vegetable oil emulsions improved textural consistency (P<0.05). However, RB addition reduced gelling capacity, suggesting antagonistic interactions between fiber and oil droplets. Vegetable oil addition favored gel network formation, and, when combined with WE, showed the highest improvement of gel elasticity. These textural and gelling properties were corroborated by frankfurter micrographs, which revealed interactions between vegetable oils, RB, or WE with protein matrix and fat globules affecting these parameters. The results suggest that functional plant-derived ingredients can be valuable to the modification of frankfurter formulations for improved nutrition and as well as textural quality. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Vegetable oil fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    Fifty contributions (presentations) involving more than one hundred people worldwide were given at the International Conference on Plant and Vegetable Oils as Fuels. The proceedings were in Fargo, North Dakota, from August 2-4, 1982. The conference helped to promote renewable fuels, bio-oils, from plant and vegetable oils. Separate abstracts were prepared for 44 items for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  16. Rheological Properties of Vegetable Oil-Diesel Fuel Blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, Z.; Nguyen, Q. D.

    2008-07-01

    Straight vegetable oils provide cleaner burning and renewable alternatives to diesel fuels, but their inherently high viscosities compared to diesel are undesirable for diesel engines. Lowering the viscosity can be achieved by either increasing the temperature of the oil or by blending it with diesel fuel, or both. In this work the viscosity of diesel fuel and vegetable oil mixtures at differing compositions is measured as a function of temperature to determine a viscosity-temperature-composition relationship for use in design and optimization of heating and fuel injection systems. The oils used are olive, soybean, canola and peanut oils which are commercially available. All samples tested between 20°C and 80°C exhibit time-independent Newtonian behaviour. A modified Arrhenius relationship has been developed to predict the viscosity of the mixtures as functions of temperature and composition.

  17. A simplified UV spectrometric method for determination of peroxide value in thermally oxidized canola oil.

    PubMed

    Talpur, M Younis; Sherazi, S T H; Mahesar, S A; Bhutto, Aijaz A

    2010-03-15

    The aim of present study was to develop a simple method on UV spectrometer for the determination of peroxide value (PV) of the frying oil. The basis of the PV determination was the stoichiometric reaction of triphenylphosphine (TPP) with the hydroperoxides present in frying oil to produce triphenylphosphine oxide (TPPO), which exhibits a readily measurable absorption band at 240 nm by ultraviolet region. The PV ranged between 0.15 and 11.66 meq. of active oxygen per kilogram of oil as the canola oil was heated from 0 to 12h in the fryer at 180 degrees C. The proposed method was correlated with official AOCS titration method and best correlation coefficient (R(2)=0.99525) was achieved, proving that there is no significant difference in the results. Therefore, developed method could serve as an alternative to the titration method, for the determination of PV in frying oils.

  18. Fuel properties of cottonseed oil

    SciTech Connect

    Karaosmanoglu, F.; Tueter, M.; Goellue, E.; Yanmaz, S.; Altintig, E.

    1999-11-01

    The use of vegetable oils as fuel alternatives has an exceptional importance in the field of research. In this study, evaluation possibilities of cottonseed oil have been investigated as an alternative candidate for diesel fuel and fuel oil. The fuel property tests were performed according to standard analysis methods for oil and fuel. An overall evaluation of the results indicates that cottonseed oil can be proposed as a possible green substitute for fuel.

  19. Fuel oil poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Substances called hydrocarbons are the harmful ingredients in fuel oil. ... Gummin DD. Hydrocarbons. In: Adams JG, ed. Emergency Medicine . 2nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2013:chap 152. Lee DC. Hydrocarbons. ...

  20. Canola oil rich in oleic acid improves diastolic heart function in diet-induced obese rats.

    PubMed

    Thandapilly, Sijo Joseph; Raj, Pema; Louis, Xavier Lieben; Perera, Danielle; Yamanagedara, Prasanga; Zahradka, Peter; Taylor, Carla G; Netticadan, Thomas

    2017-05-01

    Obesity is a leading cause of cardiovascular disease. It directly affects heart structure and function and contributes to heart failure. Diet is a major factor involved in the development of obesity along with genetic factors. We examined the effects of monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acid-rich oils on cardiac structure and function in the diet-induced rodent model of obesity (DIO). Obese prone (OP) rats were fed a high-fat diet (HF; 55% of kcal) for 12 weeks; Sprague-Dawley rats fed commercial chow served as control. Echocardiography was performed to assess the cardiac structure and function in all rats at 12 weeks. OP rats fed the HF diet showed significant impairment in diastolic function compared to control rats. The HF diet containing high oleic canola oil significantly improved diastolic function of OP rats compared to the HF diet with lard. In conclusion, canola oil rich in oleic acid, when incorporated into an HF diet, prevents the development of diastolic dysfunction in DIO rats.

  1. Enrichment of tocopherols and phytosterols in canola oil during seed germination.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haiyan; Vasanthan, Thava; Wettasinghe, Mahinda

    2007-01-24

    The effect of canola (Brassica napus L.) seed germination under illuminated and dark environments on the total concentration and the composition of tocopherols and phytosterols in seedlings and extracted oil were investigated. During the first 10 days of germination, a decrease in gamma-tocopherol was offset by an increase in alpha-tocopherol, indicating the interconversion of these isomers. From day 10 to day 20 under illumination, there was a net increase in alpha-tocopherol and total tocopherols suggesting the synthesis of new tocopherols, whereas there was no net increase in tocopherols in dark. Tocopherols were mainly concentrated in the leafy seedling tops rather than in the non-photosynthesizing bottoms, whereas phytosterols were equally distributed across both sections. The total tocopherol content of oil extracted from 20-day-old seedlings was 4.3- to 6.5-fold higher than that of intact seeds. On a dry seedling basis, the content and composition of phytosterols did not change significantly (p > 0.05) over the sprouting period, but the concentration of total phytosterols in the oil fraction increased 4.2- to 5.2-fold. The concentration of these valuable phytochemicals in the oil fraction is largely due to the depletion of oil reserves during germination, as well as the de novo synthesis of new alpha-tocopherol stimulated by the presence of light. Germination may represent a viable means to naturally concentrate these high-value constituents in canola oil, offering improvements in oil quality based on the nutritional value and oxidative protection offered by tocopherols and the health benefits provided by both tocopherols and phytosterols.

  2. Fat reduction in comminuted meat products-effects of beef fat, regular and pre-emulsified canola oil.

    PubMed

    Youssef, M K; Barbut, S

    2011-04-01

    The effects of fat reduction (25.0%, 17.5%, and 10.0%) and substituting beef fat with canola oil or pre-emulsified canola oil (using soy protein isolate, sodium caseinate or whey protein isolate) on cooking loss, texture and color of comminuted meat products were investigated. Reducing fat from 25 to 10% increased cooking loss and decreased hardness. Canola oil or pre-emulsified treatments showed a positive effect on improving yield and restoring textural parameters. Using sodium caseinate to pre-emulsify the oil resulted in the highest hardness value. Cohesiveness was affected by fat type and level. The color of reduced fat meat batters was darker for all, except the beef fat treatments. Using canola oil or pre-emulsified oil resulted in a significant reduction in redness. The results show that pre-emulsification can offset some of the changes in reduced fat meat products when more water is used to substitute for the fat and that pre-emulsification can also help to produce a more stable meat matrix.

  3. Effect of dietary canola oil on long-chain omega-3 fatty acid content in broiler hearts.

    PubMed

    Gregory, M K; Geier, M S; Gibson, R A; James, M J

    2014-04-01

    Young and healthy broilers are susceptible to sudden death syndrome (SDS), which is caused by cardiac arrhythmia. The long-chain 'fish-type' omega-3 fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), have cardioprotective anti-arrhythmic effects in animals and humans. Raising the cardiac level of EPA and DHA in chickens may protect against SDS. However, fish oil as a source of EPA and DHA in poultry feed is costly and introduces undesirable properties to the meat. Whilst omega-3 vegetable oils, such as canola oil, are cheaper and do not have a strong odour, they contain the short-chain fatty acid α-linolenic acid, which requires conversion to EPA and DHA after ingestion. We investigated the capacity for dietary canola oil to elevate cardiac EPA and DHA in broilers. Broilers were fed with diets containing either 3% canola oil or tallow, which is currently used in some commercial feeds. Upon completion of a 42 day feeding trial, canola oil significantly increased EPA and EPA + DHA in heart phospholipids relative to tallow. The elevation in cardiac EPA and EPA + DHA may provide anti-arrhythmic effects and protect against SDS in poultry. This proof-of-concept biochemical study suggests that a larger study to assess the clinical outcome of SDS may be warranted.

  4. Vegetable oil as fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-11-01

    A review is presented of various experiments undertaken over the past few years in the U.S. to test the performance of vegetable oils in diesel engines, mainly with a view to on-farm energy self-sufficiency. The USDA Northern Regional Research Center in Peoria, Illinois, is screening native U.S. plant species as potential fuel oil sources.

  5. Effect of canola oil emulsion injection on processing characteristics and consumer acceptability of three muscles from mature beef.

    PubMed

    Pietrasik, Z; Wang, H; Janz, J A M

    2013-02-01

    The study was undertaken to investigate the impact of the combined effect of blade tenderization and canola oil emulsion injection on processing yield and eating quality-related parameters of selected loin and hip muscles (longissimus lumborum, LL, biceps femoris, BF and semimembranosus, SM) from over thirty month (OTM) cattle. Canola oil emulsion injection significantly reduced shear force, increased sensory scores for juiciness and tenderness, and made connective tissue less perceptible. Targeted levels of omega-3 fatty acids can be achieved by the inclusion of canola oil containing marinades/emulsions at levels sufficient to retain omega-3 fatty acids in cooked product. All consumer acceptability attributes of OTM muscles were improved with the use of canola oil emulsion injection treatments without compromising colour although slightly decreasing oxidative stability of BF muscle. Injection of omega-3 oil emulsions in combination with blade tenderization can be effectively utilized to enrich injected products in essential fatty acids and enhance eating quality of OTM beef. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A simplified FTIR chemometric method for simultaneous determination of four oxidation parameters of frying canola oil.

    PubMed

    Talpur, M Younis; Hassan, S Sara; Sherazi, S T H; Mahesar, S A; Kara, Huseyin; Kandhro, Aftab A; Sirajuddin

    2015-01-01

    Transmission Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic method using 100 μm KCl cell was applied for the determination of total polar compounds (TPC), carbonyl value (CV), conjugated diene (CD) and conjugated triene (CT) in canola oil (CLO) during potato chips frying at 180 °C. The calibration models were developed for TPC, CV, CD and CT using partial least square (PLS) chemometric technique. Excellent regression coefficients (R(2)) and root mean square error of prediction values for TPC, CV, CD and CT were found to be 0.999, 0.992, 0.998 and 0.999 and 0.809, 0.690, 1.26 and 0.735, respectively. The developed calibration models were applied on samples of canola oil drawn during potato chips frying process. A linear relationship was obtained between CD and TPC with a good correlation of coefficient (R(2)=0.9816). Results of the study clearly indicated that transmission FTIR-PLS method could be used for quick and precise evaluation of oxidative changes during the frying process without using any organic solvent. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Synthesis and Characterization of Canola Oil-Stearic Acid-Based Trans-Free Structured Lipids for Possible Margarine Application

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Incorporation of stearic acid into canola oil to produce trans-free structured lipid (SL) as a healthy alternative to partially hydrogenated fats for margarine formulation was investigated. Response surface methodology was used to study the effects of lipozyme RM IM from Rhizomucor miehei and Candi...

  8. Comparison antioxidant activity of Tarom Mahali rice bran extracted from different extraction methods and its effect on canola oil stabilization.

    PubMed

    Farahmandfar, Reza; Asnaashari, Maryam; Sayyad, Ruhollah

    2015-10-01

    In this study, Tarom Mahali rice bran extracts by ultrasound assisted and traditional solvent (ethanol and ethanol: water (50:50)) extraction method were compared. The total phenolic and tocopherol content and antioxidant activity of the extracts was determined and compared with TBHQ by DPPH assay and β-carotene bleaching method. The results show that the extract from ethanol: water (50:50) ultrasonic treatment with high amount of phenols (919.66 mg gallic acid/g extract, tocopherols (438.4 μg α-tocopherol/ mL extract) indicated the highest antioxidant activity (80.36 % radical scavenging and 62.69 % β-carotene-linoleic bleaching) and thermal stability (4.95 h) at 120 °C in canola oil. Being high in antioxidant and antiradical potential and high content of phenolic and tocopherol compounds of ethanol: water (50:50) ultrasonic extract caused to evaluate its thermal stability at 180 °C in canola oil during frying process. So, different concentrations of Tarom Mahali rice bran extract (100, 800, and 1200 ppm) were added to canola oil. TBHQ at 100 ppm served as standard besides the control. Free fatty acids (FFAs), Peroxide value (PV), carbonyl value (CV), total polar compounds (TPC) and oxidative stability index (OSI) were taken as parameters for evaluation of effectiveness of Tarom Mahali rice bran extract in stabilization of canola oil. Results from different parameters were in agreement with each other, suggesting that 800 ppm of the extract could act better than 100 ppm TBHQ in inhibition of lipid oxidation in canola oil during frying process and can be used as predominant alternative of synthetic antioxidants.

  9. Effects of canola oil dilution on anhydrous milk fat crystallization and fractionation behavior.

    PubMed

    Wright, A J; Batte, H D; Marangoni, A G

    2005-06-01

    Blends of anhydrous milk fat (AMF) and canola oil (CO) were cooled from 35 to 5 degrees C at 0.1 degrees C/min, held for 24 h, and centrifuged to separate the liquid and crystalline fractions. The blends' crystallization behaviors and microstructures depended on the level of CO present. Onset and half times of crystallization reflected a slower crystallization mechanism at higher levels of CO dilution. These differences were accompanied by a change in microstructure from large spherulites to smaller particles. The biggest change occurred between the 1:4 and 1:5 blends. Canola oil dilution also influenced the polymorphism of milk fat. Whereas only the beta' polymorph was observed in the crystallized 1:2 blend, the beta polymorph predominated in the 1:8 blend. Some solubilization of AMF solids into CO was observed. This increased gradually with increasing CO concentration. Compositional analysis revealed the exchange of AMF and CO species between the liquid and crystalline fractions. The crystalline fractions were slightly enriched in AMF triacylglycerols, particularly with the more dilute blends (1:7 and 1:8). Large amounts of oil were trapped in the crystalline fractions, particularly for the concentrated AMF:CO blends where the beta' crystals and spherulitic microstructures were observed. Although the solid fat content profiles of the fractionated blends were marginally higher than those of the starting blends, the samples were very soft and oily. This strategy of using CO to fractionate milk fat was limited by the poor separation of solids and liquid during centrifugation.

  10. Cholesterol lowering effects of nuts compared with a Canola oil enriched cereal of similar fat composition.

    PubMed

    Chisholm, A; Mc Auley, K; Mann, J; Williams, S; Skeaff, M

    2005-08-01

    Small quantities of nuts protect against subsequent cardiovascular risk. There is speculation that the cholesterol lowering effect associated with nut consumption arises primarily from the fatty acid composition of nuts but may be caused by some other component. To evaluate this possibility we compared the effect of various nuts, against a Canola oil based cereal with a comparable fatty acid profile, on lipids, lipoproteins and fatty acids to determine whether the fatty acid profile of nuts explains their cholesterol lowering effects. Twenty-eight men and women with mean (s.d.) levels of total and low density lipoprotein cholesterol of 6.0 (1.1) mmol/L, and 4.1 (1.0) mmol/L, respectively and a mean body mass index (BMI) of 26.9 (3.2) kg/m2 took part in a randomised cross over trial. For two periods of six weeks, separated by a four-week washout, participants were asked to consume a low saturated fat diet, which included either 30 g/d nuts (nut diet) or one serving of a cereal containing Canola oil (cereal diet). There were no significant differences in the lipids, lipoproteins, plasma fatty acids or other variables between the two diets at the end of the study. Total cholesterol (TC) and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) were lower on both experimental diets than at baseline, 0.51 mmol/L and 0.40 mmol/L (p<0.001, p<0.01), respectively on the nut diet and 0.42 mmol/L and 0.37 mmol/L (p<0.001, p<0.01), respectively on the cereal diet. A 30 g serving of nuts, or a serving of a Canola oil enriched cereal with a similar fatty acid composition reduced total and LDL cholesterol to a similar extent when consumed as part of a lipid lowering diet. Results suggest that foods with a similar fatty acid composition to nuts can produce comparable decreases in lipoprotein mediated cardiovascular risk.

  11. Vegetable oil fuels: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Karaosmanoglu, F.

    1999-04-01

    Using vegetable oils as fuel alternatives has economic, environmental, and energy benefits for Turkey. The present work provides insight to the status of vegetable oil fuels in Turkey. A brief historical background of the issue, as well as an up to date review of the research carried out on vegetable oil fuels, is given and the future of their production and application is discussed.

  12. Comparison of Pure Palm Olein Oil, Hydrogenated Oil-Containing Palm, and Canola on Serum Lipids and Lipid Oxidation Rate in Rats Fed with these Oils.

    PubMed

    Amini, Seyed-Asadollah; Ghatreh-Samani, Keihan; Habibi-Kohi, Arash; Jafari, Laleh

    2017-02-01

    Due to increased consumption of canola oil and hydrogenated oil containing palm and palm olein, and their possible effects on serum lipoproteins, the present study was conducted to determine the effects of these oils on lipids and lipid oxidation level. In this experimental study, 88 Wistar rats were randomly assigned to four groups. Control group (A) was on a normal diet. Groups B, C, and D, in addition to normal diet, were fed with hydrogenated oil-contained palm oil, pure palm olein oil, and canola oil, respectively for 4 weeks. Serum Biochemical factors [total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), LDL, HDL, LDL/HDL ratio, oxLDL, paraoxanase-1 (PON1), and malondialdehyde (MDA)] were measured. The lowest mean serum TC was seen in the control group and the highest in the group B. There were differences in TC, TG, HDL, MDA, and PON1 between the control group and other groups (P<0.001). The lowest and highest LDL/HDL ratios were observed in the group C and the control group, respectively. Significant differences were seen in OxLDL and PON1 between the control group and other three groups (P<0.05), while there were no significant differences in oxLDL and PON1 among the other three groups (P>0.05). MDA was higher in groups C and D. Canola oil, hydrogenated oil-containing palm and palm olein may increase atherosclerosis risk through decreasing PON1 activity and elevating oxLDL. Palm olein oils in rats' diets cause a considerable decrease in LDL and help to increase HDL.

  13. Antioxidative and antimutagenic activities of 4-vinyl-2,6-dimethoxyphenol (canolol) isolated from canola oil.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, Hideo; Kanazawa, Ayako; Wakamatu, Daisuke; Morimura, Shigeru; Kida, Kenji; Akaike, Takaaki; Maeda, Hiroshi

    2004-07-14

    A potent antioxidative compound in crude canola oil, canolol, was recently identified, and reported herein are studies of its scavenging capacity against the endogenous mutagen peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)). ONOO(-) is generated by the reaction between superoxide anion radical and nitric oxide, both of which are produced by inflammatory leukocytes. Among various antioxidative substances of natural or synthetic origin, canolol was one of the most potent antimutagenic compounds when Salmonella typhimurium TA102 was used in the modified Ames test. Its potency was higher than that of flavonoids (e.g., rutin) and alpha-tocopherol and was equivalent to that of ebselen. Canolol suppressed ONOO(-)-induced bactericidal action. It also reduced intracellular oxidative stress and apoptosis in human cancer SW480 cells when used at a concentration below 20 microM under H(2)O(2)-induced oxidative stress. In addition, canolol suppressed plasmid DNA (pUC19) strand breakage induced by ONOO(-), as revealed by agarose gel electrophoresis.

  14. Microencapsulation of canola oil by lentil protein isolate-based wall materials.

    PubMed

    Chang, C; Varankovich, N; Nickerson, M T

    2016-12-01

    The overall goal was to encapsulate canola oil using a mixture of lentil protein isolate and maltodextrin with/without lecithin and/or sodium alginate by spray drying. Initially, emulsion and microcapsule properties as a function of oil (20%-30%), protein (2%-8%) and maltodextrin concentration (9.5%-18%) were characterized by emulsion stability, droplet size, viscosity, surface oil and entrapment efficiency. Microcapsules with 20% oil, 2% protein and 18% maltodextrin were shown to have the highest entrapment efficiency, and selected for further re-design using different preparation conditions and wall ingredients (lentil protein isolate, maltodextrin, lecithin and/or sodium alginate). The combination of the lentil protein, maltodextrin and sodium alginate represented the best wall material to produce microcapsules with the highest entrapment efficiency (∼88%). The lentil protein-maltodextrin-alginate microcapsules showed better oxidative stability and had a stronger wall structure than the lentil protein-maltodextrin microcapsules. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. 75 FR 43522 - Notice of Supplemental Determination for Renewable Fuels Produced Under the Final RFS2 Program...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-26

    ... completed an assessment for an additional renewable fuel pathway, canola oil biodiesel. This Notice of Data... lifecycle analysis of canola oil biodiesel. DATES: Comments must be received on or before August 25, 2010... transportation fuels, including gasoline and diesel fuel or renewable fuels such as ethanol and biodiesel...

  16. The effect of palm oil or canola oil on feedlot performance, plasma and tissue fatty acid profile and meat quality in goats.

    PubMed

    Karami, M; Ponnampalam, E N; Hopkins, D L

    2013-06-01

    Twenty-four entire male Kacang kid goats were fed diets containing 3% canola (n=12) or palm oil (n=12) supplements for 16 weeks. The goats had an initial live weight of 14.2±1.46 kg and were fed a mixed ration ad libitum (10.4 MJ/ME and 14% crude protein). There was no difference in feedlot performance due to diet. Inclusion of canola oil reduced (P<0.05) kidney fat weight and increased (P<0.05) linolenic acid (18:3n-3) concentration in the blood plasma, m. longissimus lumborum (LL), liver, and kidney. The palm oil diet increased (P<0.05) myristic (14:0) and palmitic (16:0) acid content in the blood, but this did not alter these fatty acids in the LL muscle. Lipid oxidative substances in the liver and LL from palm oil fed kids were higher (P<0.05) than those from canola supplemented kids. The incorporation of canola oil into the goats' diet increased muscle omega-3 fatty acid content, but lipid oxidation was lowered in the blood and muscle LL. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of long-term optional ingestion of canola oil, grape seed oil, corn oil and yogurt butter on serum, muscle and liver cholesterol status in rats.

    PubMed

    Asadi, Farzad; Shahriari, Ali; Chahardah-Cheric, Marjan

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of long-term optional intake of vegetable oils (canola, grape seed, corn) and yogurt butter on the serum, liver and muscle cholesterol status. Twenty-five male Wistar rats were randomly categorized into five groups (n=5) as follows: control, canola oil, grape seed oil, corn oil and manually prepared yogurt butter. In each group, 24h two bottle choice (oil and water) tests were performed for 10 weeks. Serum cholesterol values showed a trend to decrease in grape seed oil, corn oil and yogurt butter groups compared to the control. Optional intake of yogurt butter made a significant increase in HDL-C values (42.34+/-9.98 mg/dL) yet decrease in LDL-C values (11.68+/-2.06 mg/dL) compared to the corresponding control (19.07+/-3.51; 30.96+/-6.38 mg/dL, respectively). Furthermore, such findings were concomitant with a significant decrease in the liver TC levels (1.75+/-0.31 mg/g liver) and an increase in the muscle TC levels (1.85+/-0.32 mg/g liver) compared to the corresponding control (2.43+/-0.31; 0.94+/-0.14 mg/g liver, respectively). Optional intake of manually prepared yogurt butter has more beneficial effects on serum lipoprotein cholesterol values with some alterations in the liver and muscle cholesterol states than the vegetable oils.

  18. Interactions between Obesity Status and Dietary Intake of Monounsaturated and Polyunsaturated Oils on Human Gut Microbiome Profiles in the Canola Oil Multicenter Intervention Trial (COMIT)

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Shuaihua; Khazanehei, Hamidreza; Jones, Peter J.; Khafipour, Ehsan

    2016-01-01

    Long-term dietary fatty acid intake is believed to induce changes in the human gut microbiome which might be associated with human health or obesity status; however, considerable debate remains regarding the most favorable ratios of fatty acids to optimize these processes. The objective of this sub-study of a double-blinded randomized crossover clinical study, the canola oil multi-center intervention trial, was to investigate effects of five different novel oil blends fed for 30 days each on the intestinal microbiota in 25 volunteers with risk of metabolic syndrome. The 60 g treatments included three MUFA-rich diets: (1) conventional canola oil (Canola); (2) DHA-enriched high oleic canola oil (CanolaDHA); (3) high oleic canola oil (CanolaOleic); and two PUFA-rich diets: (4) a blend of corn/safflower oil (25:75) (CornSaff); and (5) a blend of flax/safflower oil (60:40) (FlaxSaff). Stool samples were collected at the end of each period. DNA was extracted and amplified for 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing. A total of 17 phyla and 187 genera were identified. While five novel oil treatments failed to alter bacterial phyla composition, obese participants resulted in a higher proportion of Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes than overweight or normal weight groups (P = 0.01). Similarly at the genus level, overall bacterial distribution was highly associated with subjects’ body mass index (BMI). Treatment effects were observed between MUFA- and PUFA-rich diets, with the three MUFA diets elevating Parabacteroides, Prevotella, Turicibacter, and Enterobacteriaceae’s populations, while the two PUFA-rich diets favored the higher abundance of Isobaculum. High MUFA content feedings also resulted in an increase of Parabacteroides and a decrease of Isobaculum in obese, but not overweight subjects. Data suggest that BMI is a predominant factor in characterization of human gut microbiota profile, and that MUFA-rich and PUFA-rich diets impact the composition of gut microbiota at lower

  19. Impact of endogenous canola phenolics on the oxidative stability of oil-in-water emulsions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the antioxidative effect of phenolics naturally present in canola seeds and meal. Individual phenolics were extracted from ground, defatted canola seeds and meal. Fractionated extracts rich in sinapic acid, sinapine or canolol as well as a non-fractionated ext...

  20. Monola oil versus canola oil as a fish oil replacer in rainbow trout feeds: effects on growth, fatty acid metabolism and final eating quality.

    PubMed

    Turchini, G M; Moretti, V M; Hermon, K; Caprino, F; Busetto, M L; Bellagamba, F; Rankin, T; Keast, R S J; Francis, D S

    2013-11-15

    Monola oil, a high oleic acid canola cultivar, and canola oil were evaluated as replacers of fish oil at three levels of inclusion (60%, 75% and 90%) in rainbow trout diets. After a 27-week grow-out cycle, the diet-induced effects on growth, fatty acid metabolism and final eating quality were assessed. Overall, no effects were noted for growth, feed utilisation or fish biometry, and the fatty acid composition of fish fillets mirrored that of the diets. Dietary treatments affected fillet lipid oxidation (free malondialdehyde), pigmentation and flavour volatile compounds, but only minor effects on sensorial attributes were detected. Ultimately, both oils were demonstrated to possess, to differing extents, suitable qualities to adequately replace fish oil from the perspective of fish performance and final product quality. However, further research is required to alleviate on-going issues associated with the loss of health promoting attributes (n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids) of final farmed products. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Pineapple by-product and canola oil as partial fat replacers in low-fat beef burger: Effects on oxidative stability, cholesterol content and fatty acid profile.

    PubMed

    Selani, Miriam M; Shirado, Giovanna A N; Margiotta, Gregório B; Rasera, Mariana L; Marabesi, Amanda C; Piedade, Sonia M S; Contreras-Castillo, Carmen J; Canniatti-Brazaca, Solange G

    2016-05-01

    The effect of freeze-dried pineapple by-product and canola oil as fat replacers on the oxidative stability, cholesterol content and fatty acid profile of low-fat beef burgers was evaluated. Five treatments were performed: conventional (CN, 20% fat) and four low-fat formulations (10% fat): control (CT), pineapple by-product (PA), canola oil (CO), and pineapple by-product and canola oil (PC). Low-fat cooked burgers showed a mean cholesterol content reduction of 9.15% compared to the CN. Canola oil addition improved the fatty acid profile of the burgers, with increase in the polyunsaturated/saturated fatty acids ratio and decrease in the n-6/n-3 ratio, in the atherogenic and thrombogenic indexes. The oxidative stability of the burgers was affected by the vegetable oil addition. However, at the end of the storage time (120 days), malonaldehyde values of CO and PC were lower than the threshold for the consumer's acceptance. Canola oil, in combination with pineapple by-product, can be considered promising fat replacers in the development of healthier burgers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of Two Traditional Chinese Cooking Oils, Canola and Pork, on pH and Cholic Acid Content of Faeces and Colon Tumorigenesis in Kunming Mice.

    PubMed

    He, Xiao-Qiong; Duan, Jia-Li; Zhou, Jin; Song, Zhong-Yu; Cichello, Simon Angelo

    2015-01-01

    Faecal pH and cholate are two important factors that can affect colon tumorigenesis, and can be modified by diet. In this study, the effects of two Chinese traditional cooking oils (pork oil and canola/rapeseed oil) on the pH and the cholic acid content in feces, in addition to colon tumorigenesis, were studied in mice. Kunming mice were randomized into various groups; negative control group (NCG), azoxymethane control group (ACG), pork oil group (POG), and canola oil Ggroup (COG). Mice in the ACG were fed a basic rodent chow; mice in POG and COG were given 10% cooking oil rodent chow with the respective oil type. All mice were given four weekly AOM (azoxymethane) i.p. injections (10 mg/kg). The pH and cholic acid of the feces were examined every two weeks. Colon tumors, aberrant crypt foci and organ weights were examined 32 weeks following the final AOM injection. The results showed that canola oil significantly decreased faecal pH in female mice (P<0.05), but had no influence on feces pH in male mice (P>0.05). Pork oil significantly increased the feces pH in both male and female mice (P<0.05). No significant change was found in feces cholic acid content when mice were fed 10% pork oil or canola oil compared with the ACG. Although Kunming mice were not susceptible to AOM-induced tumorigenesis in terms of colon tumor incidence, pork oil significantly increased the ACF number in male mice. Canola oil showed no influence on ACF in either male or female mice. Our results indicate that cooking oil effects faecal pH, but does not affect the faecal cholic acid content and thus AOM-induced colon neoplastic ACF is modified by dietary fat.

  3. Effect of microwave heating on the quality characteristics of canola oil in presence of palm olein.

    PubMed

    Ali, M Abbas; Nouruddeen, Zahrau Bamalli; Muhamad, Ida Idayu; Latip, Razam Abd; Othman, Noor Hidayu

    2013-01-01

    Microwave heating is one of the most attractive cooking methods for food preparation, commonly employed in households and especially in restaurants for its high speed and convenience. The chemical constituents of oils that degrade during microwave heating do so at rates that vary with heating temperature and time in a similar manner to other type of processing methods. The rate of quality characteristics of the oil depends on the fatty acid composition and the minor components during heating. Addition of oxidative-stable palm olein (PO) to heat sensitive canola oil (CO), may affect the quality characteristics of CO during microwave heating. The aim of this study was to evaluate how heat treatments by microwave oven affect the quality of CO in presence of PO. The blend was prepared in the volume ratio of 40:60 (PO:CO, PC). Microwave heating test was performed for different periods (2, 4, 8, 12, 16 and 20 min) at medium power setting for the samples of CO and PC. The changes in quality characteristics of the samples during heating were determined by analytical and instrumental methods. In this study, refractive index, free fatty acid content, peroxide value, p-anisidine value, TOTOX value, specific extinction, viscosity, polymer content, polar compounds and food oil sensor value of the oils all increased, whereas iodine value and C₁₈.₂ /C₁₆:₀ ratio decreased as microwave heating progressed. Based on the most oxidative stability criteria, PO addition led to a slower deterioration of CO at heating temperatures. The effect of microwave heating on the fatty acid composition of the samples was not remarkable. PO addition decelerated the formation of primary and secondary oxidation products in CO. However, effect of adding PO to CO on the formation of free fatty acids and polymers during microwave treatment was not significant (P < 0.05). No significant difference in food oil sensor value was detected between CO and PC throughout the heating periods. Microwave

  4. Processing sunflower oil for fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Backer, L.F.; Jacobsen, L.; Olson, C.

    1982-05-01

    Research on processing of sunflower seed for oil was initiated to evaluate the equipment that might adapt best to on-farm or small factory production facilities. The first devices identified for evaluation were auger press expeller units, primary oil cleaning equipment, and final filters. A series of standard finishing filtration tests were carried out on sunflower oil and sunflower oil - diesel fuel blends using sunflower oil from four different sources.

  5. A rapid method for the simultaneous quantification of the major tocopherols, carotenoids, free and esterified sterols in canola (Brassica napus) oil using normal phase liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Flakelar, Clare L; Prenzler, Paul D; Luckett, David J; Howitt, Julia A; Doran, Gregory

    2017-01-01

    A normal phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method was developed to simultaneously quantify several prominent bioactive compounds in canola oil vis. α-tocopherol, γ-tocopherol, δ-tocopherol, β-carotene, lutein, β-sitosterol, campesterol and brassicasterol. The use of sequential diode array detection (DAD) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) allowed direct injection of oils, diluted in hexane without derivatisation or saponification, greatly reducing sample preparation time, and permitting the quantification of both free sterols and intact sterol esters. Further advantages over existing methods included increased analytical selectivity, and a chromatographic run time substantially less than other reported normal phase methods. The HPLC-DAD-MS/MS method was applied to freshly extracted canola oil samples as well as commercially available canola, palm fruit, sunflower and olive oils. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales

    EIA Publications

    2016-01-01

    Provides information, illustrations and state-level statistical data on end-use sales of kerosene; No.1, No. 2, and No. 4 distillate fuel oil; and residual fuel oil. State-level kerosene sales include volumes for residential, commercial, industrial, farm, and all other uses. State-level distillate sales include volumes for residential, commercial, industrial, oil company, railroad, vessel bunkering, military, electric utility, farm, on-highway, off-highway construction, and other uses. State-level residual fuel sales include volumes for commercial, industrial, oil company, vessel bunkering, military, electric utility, and other uses.

  7. trans-Free margarines prepared with canola oil/palm stearin/palm kernel oil-based structured lipids.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung Hee; Lumor, Stephen E; Akoh, Casimir C

    2008-09-10

    Structured lipids (SLs) for formulating trans-free margarines were synthesized by lipase-catalyzed interesterification of the blends of canola oil (CO), palm stearin (PS), and palm kernel oil (PKO) in weight ratios (CO/PS/PKO) of 40:60:0, 40:50:10, 40:40:20, 40:30:30, 50:30:20, and 60:25:15. The atherogenicity was determined using fatty acid profiles. We also determined the physical properties (melting/crystallization profiles, solid fat content, polymorphism, and microstructure) of SLs and the textural properties of margarines made with the SLs. The SLs from the 50:30:20 and 60:25:15 blends had atherogenic indices similar to or lower than those of the commercial trans (CTMF) and similar to the trans-free margarine fats (CTFMF). SLs from the blends with PKO contained a wide range of fatty acids (C6-C20) and had more beta' than beta polymorphs. Margarines made with SLs from 50:30:20 and 60:25:15 blends possessed similar hardness, adhesiveness, or cohesiveness to margarines made with CTMF and CTFMF, respectively. Therefore, CO/PS/PKO-based SLs were suitable for formulating trans-free margarines with low atherogenicity and desirable textural properties.

  8. Canola Oil in Lactating Dairy Cow Diets Reduces Milk Saturated Fatty Acids and Improves Its Omega-3 and Oleic Fatty Acid Content

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    To produce milk that is healthier for human consumption, the present study evaluated the effect of including canola oil in the diet of dairy cows on milk production and composition as well as the nutritional quality of this milk fat. Eighteen Holstein cows with an average daily milk yield of 22 (± 4) kg/d in the middle stage of lactation were used. The cows were distributed in 6 contemporary 3x3 Latin squares consisting of 3 periods and 3 treatments: control diet (without oil), 3% inclusion of canola oil in the diet and 6% inclusion of canola oil in the diet (dry matter basis). The inclusion of 6% canola oil in the diet of lactating cows linearly reduced the milk yield by 2.51 kg/d, short-chain fatty acids (FA) by 41.42%, medium chain FA by 27.32%, saturated FA by 20.24%, saturated/unsaturated FA ratio by 39.20%, omega-6/omega-3 ratio by 39.45%, and atherogenicity index by 48.36% compared with the control treatment. Moreover, with the 6% inclusion of canola oil in the diet of cows, there was an increase in the concentration of long chain FA by 45.91%, unsaturated FA by 34.08%, monounsaturated FA by 40.37%, polyunsaturated FA by 17.88%, milk concentration of omega-3 by 115%, rumenic acid (CLA) by 16.50%, oleic acid by 44.87% and h/H milk index by 94.44% compared with the control treatment. Thus, the inclusion of canola oil in the diet of lactating dairy cows makes the milk fatty acid profile nutritionally healthier for the human diet; however, the lactating performance of dairy cows is reduce. PMID:27015405

  9. Canola Oil in Lactating Dairy Cow Diets Reduces Milk Saturated Fatty Acids and Improves Its Omega-3 and Oleic Fatty Acid Content.

    PubMed

    Welter, Katiéli Caroline; Martins, Cristian Marlon de Magalhães Rodrigues; de Palma, André Soligo Vizeu; Martins, Mellory Martinson; Dos Reis, Bárbara Roqueto; Schmidt, Bárbara Laís Unglaube; Saran Netto, Arlindo

    2016-01-01

    To produce milk that is healthier for human consumption, the present study evaluated the effect of including canola oil in the diet of dairy cows on milk production and composition as well as the nutritional quality of this milk fat. Eighteen Holstein cows with an average daily milk yield of 22 (± 4) kg/d in the middle stage of lactation were used. The cows were distributed in 6 contemporary 3x3 Latin squares consisting of 3 periods and 3 treatments: control diet (without oil), 3% inclusion of canola oil in the diet and 6% inclusion of canola oil in the diet (dry matter basis). The inclusion of 6% canola oil in the diet of lactating cows linearly reduced the milk yield by 2.51 kg/d, short-chain fatty acids (FA) by 41.42%, medium chain FA by 27.32%, saturated FA by 20.24%, saturated/unsaturated FA ratio by 39.20%, omega-6/omega-3 ratio by 39.45%, and atherogenicity index by 48.36% compared with the control treatment. Moreover, with the 6% inclusion of canola oil in the diet of cows, there was an increase in the concentration of long chain FA by 45.91%, unsaturated FA by 34.08%, monounsaturated FA by 40.37%, polyunsaturated FA by 17.88%, milk concentration of omega-3 by 115%, rumenic acid (CLA) by 16.50%, oleic acid by 44.87% and h/H milk index by 94.44% compared with the control treatment. Thus, the inclusion of canola oil in the diet of lactating dairy cows makes the milk fatty acid profile nutritionally healthier for the human diet; however, the lactating performance of dairy cows is reduce.

  10. Effect of a 6-month intervention with cooking oils containing a high concentration of monounsaturated fatty acids (olive and canola oils) compared with control oil in male Asian Indians with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Nigam, Priyanka; Bhatt, Suryaprakash; Misra, Anoop; Chadha, Davinder S; Vaidya, Meera; Dasgupta, Jharna; Pasha, Qadar M A

    2014-04-01

    We investigated the effects of dietary intervention with canola or olive oil in comparison with commonly used refined oil in Asian Indians with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). This was a 6-month intervention study including 93 males with NAFLD, matched for age and body mass index (BMI). Subjects were randomized into three groups to receive olive oil (n=30), canola oil (n=33), and commonly used soyabean/safflower oil (control; n=30) as cooking medium (not exceeding 20 g/day) along with counseling for therapeutic lifestyle changes. The BMI, fasting blood glucose (FBG) and insulin levels, lipids, homeostasis model of assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), HOMA denoting β-cell function (HOMA-βCF), and disposition index (DI) were measured at pre- and post-intervention. Data were analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's Honestly Significant Difference multiple comparison test procedures. Olive oil intervention led to a significant decrease in weight and BMI (ANOVA, P=0.01) compared with the control oil group. In a comparison of olive and canola oil, a significant decrease in fasting insulin level, HOMA-IR, HOMA-βCF, and DI (P<0.001) was observed in the olive oil group. Pre- and post-intervention analysis revealed a significant increase in high-density lipoprotein level (P=0.004) in the olive oil group and a significant decrease in FBG (P=0.03) and triglyceride (P=0.02) levels in the canola oil group. The pre- and post-intervention difference in liver span was significant only in the olive (1.14 ± 2 cm; P<0.05) and canola (0.66 ± 0.33 cm; P<0.05) oil groups. In the olive and canola oil groups, post-intervention grading of fatty liver was reduced significantly (grade I, from 73.3% to 23.3% and from 60.5% to 20%, respectively [P<0.01]; grade II, from 20% to 10% and from 33.4% to 3.3%, respectively [P<0.01]; and grade III, from 6.7% to none and from 6.1% to none, respectively). In contrast, in the control oil group no significant

  11. Use of differential scanning calorimetry to detect canola oil (Brassica napus L.) adulterated with lard stearin.

    PubMed

    Marikkar, Jalaldeen Mohammed Nazrim; Rana, Sohel

    2014-01-01

    A study was conducted to detect and quantify lard stearin (LS) content in canola oil (CaO) using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Authentic samples of CaO were obtained from a reliable supplier and the adulterant LS were obtained through a fractional crystallization procedure as reported previously. Pure CaO samples spiked with LS in levels ranging from 5 to 15% (w/w) were analyzed using DSC to obtain their cooling and heating profiles. The results showed that samples contaminated with LS at 5% (w/w) level can be detected using characteristic contaminant peaks appearing in the higher temperature regions (0 to 70°C) of the cooling and heating curves. Pearson correlation analysis of LS content against individual DSC parameters of the adulterant peak namely peak temperature, peak area, peak onset temperature indicated that there were strong correlations between these with the LS content of the CaO admixtures. When these three parameters were engaged as variables in the execution of the stepwise regression procedure, predictive models for determination of LS content in CaO were obtained. The predictive models obtained with single DSC parameter had relatively lower coefficient of determination (R(2) value) and higher standard error than the models obtained using two DSC parameters in combination. This study concluded that the predictive models obtained with peak area and peak onset temperature of the adulteration peak would be more accurate for prediction of LS content in CaO based on the highest coefficient of determination (R(2) value) and smallest standard error.

  12. Value-added potential of expeller-pressed canola oil refining: characterization of sinapic acid derivatives and tocopherols from byproducts.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yougui; Thiyam-Hollander, Usha; Barthet, Veronique J; Aachary, Ayyappan A

    2014-10-08

    Valuable phenolic antioxidants are lost during oil refining, but evaluation of their occurrence in refining byproducts is lacking. Rapeseed and canola oil are both rich sources of sinapic acid derivatives and tocopherols. The retention and loss of sinapic acid derivatives and tocopherols in commercially produced expeller-pressed canola oils subjected to various refining steps and the respective byproducts were investigated. Loss of canolol (3) and tocopherols were observed during bleaching (84.9%) and deodorization (37.6%), respectively. Sinapic acid (2) (42.9 μg/g), sinapine (1) (199 μg/g), and canolol (344 μg/g) were found in the refining byproducts, namely, soap stock, spent bleaching clay, and wash water, for the first time. Tocopherols (3.75 mg/g) and other nonidentified phenolic compounds (2.7 mg sinapic acid equivalent/g) were found in deodistillates, a byproduct of deodorization. DPPH radical scavenging confirmed the antioxidant potential of the byproducts. This study confirms the value-added potential of byproducts of refining as sources of endogenous phenolics.

  13. Fuel oil quality task force

    SciTech Connect

    Laisy, J.; Turk, V.

    1997-09-01

    In April, 1996, the R.W. Beckett Corporation became aware of a series of apparently unrelated symptoms that made the leadership of the company concerned that there could be a fuel oil quality problem. A task force of company employees and industry consultants was convened to address the topic of current No. 2 heating oil quality and its effect on burner performance. The task force studied changes in fuel oil specifications and trends in properties that have occurred over the past few years. Experiments were performed at Beckett and Brookhaven National Laboratory to understand the effect of changes in some fuel oil properties. Studies by other groups were reviewed, and field installations were inspected to gain information about the performance of fuel oil that is currently being used in the U.S. and Canada. There was a special concern about the use of red dye in heating oils and the impact of sulfur levels due to the October, 1993 requirement of low sulfur (<0.05%) for on-highway diesel fuel. The results of the task force`s efforts were published in July, 1996. The primary conclusion of the task force was that there is not a crisis or widespread general problem with fuel oil quality. Localized problems that were seen may have been related to refinery practices and/or non-traditional fuel sources. System cleanliness is very important and the cause of many oil burner system problems. Finally, heating oil quality should get ongoing careful attention by Beckett engineering personnel and heating oil industry groups.

  14. Dietary high oleic canola oil supplemented with docosahexaenoic acid attenuates plasma proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin type 9 (PCSK9) levels in participants with cardiovascular disease risk: A randomized control trial.

    PubMed

    Pu, Shuaihua; Rodríguez-Pérez, Celia; Ramprasath, Vanu Ramkumar; Segura-Carretero, Antonio; Jones, Peter J H

    2016-12-01

    Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) is a novel circulating protein which plays an important role in regulation of cholesterol metabolism by promoting hepatic LDL receptor degradation. However, the action of dietary fat composition on PCSK9 levels remains to be fully elucidated. The objective was to investigate the action of different dietary oils on circulating PCSK9 levels in the Canola Oil Multicenter Intervention Trial (COMIT). COMIT employed a double-blinded crossover randomized control design, consisting of five 30-d treatment periods. Diets were provided based on a 3000Kcal/d intake, including a 60g/d treatment of conventional canola oil (Canola), a high oleic canola/DHA oil blend (CanolaDHA), a corn/safflower oil blend (CornSaff), a flax/safflower oil blend (FlaxSaff) or a high oleic canola oil (CanolaOleic). Plasma PCSK9 levels were assessed using ELISA at the end of each phase. Lipid profiles (n=84) showed that CanolaDHA feeding resulted in the highest (P<0.05) serum total cholesterol (TC, 5.06±0.09mmol/L) and LDL-cholesterol levels (3.15±0.08mmol/L) across all five treatments. CanolaDHA feeding also produced the lowest (P<0.05) plasma PCSK9 concentrations (216.42±8.77ng/mL) compared to other dietary oil treatments. Plasma PCSK9 levels positively correlated (P<0.05) with serum TC, LDL-cholesterol, apolipoprotein A, and apolipoprotein B levels but did not correlate to HDL-cholesterol levels. Results indicate that post-treatment response in PCSK9 may be altered with the CanolaDHA diet. In conclusion, the elevated LDL-C levels from a DHA oil treatment may not be relevant for the observed decline in PCSK9 levels.

  15. Lipase-Catalyzed Glycerolysis of Soybean and Canola Oils in a Free Organic Solvent System Assisted by Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Remonatto, Daniela; Santin, Claudia M Trentin; Valério, Alexsandra; Lerin, Lindomar; Batistella, Luciane; Ninow, Jorge Luiz; de Oliveira, J Vladimir; de Oliveira, Débora

    2015-06-01

    This work shows new and promising experimental data of soybean oil and canola oil glycerolysis using Novozym 435 enzyme as catalyst in a solvent-free system using ultrasound bath for the emulsifier, monoglyceride (MAG), and diacylglycerol (DAG) production. The experiments were conducted in batch mode to study the influence of process variables as temperature (40 to 70 °C), immobilized enzyme content (2.5 to 10 wt%, relative to substrates), molar ratio glycerol/oil (0.8:1 to 3:1), agitation (0 to 1200 rpm) and ultrasound intensity (0 to 132 W cm(-2)). Highest yields of DAG+MAG (75 wt%) were obtained with molar ratio glycerol/canola oil 0.8:1, 70 °C, 900 rpm, 120 min of reaction time, 10 wt% of enzyme concentration, and 52.8 W cm(-2) of ultrasound intensity. When soybean oil was used, the best results in terms of DAG+MAGs (65 wt%) were using molar ratio of glycerol/soybean oil 0.8:1, 70 °C, 900 rpm, 90 min of reaction time, 10 wt% of enzyme content, and 40 % of ultrasound intensity (52.8 W cm(-2)). The results showed that the lipase-catalyzed glycerolysis in a solvent-free system with ultrasound bath can be a potential route for high content production of DAGs and MAGs.

  16. Effects of Replacing Pork Back Fat with Canola and Flaxseed Oils on Physicochemical Properties of Emulsion Sausages from Spent Layer Meat

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Ki Ho; Utama, Dicky Tri; Lee, Seung Gyu; An, Byoung Ki; Lee, Sung Ki

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of canola and flaxseed oils on the physicochemical properties and sensory quality of emulsion-type sausage made from spent layer meat. Three types of sausage were manufactured with different fat sources: 20% pork back fat (CON), 20% canola oil (CA) and 20% flaxseed oil (FL). The pH value of the CA was significantly higher than the others (p<0.05). The highest water holding capacity was also presented for CA; in other words, CA demonstrated a significantly lower water loss value among the treatments (p<0.05). CA had the highest lightness value (p<0.05). However, FL showed the highest yellowness value (p<0.05) because of its own high-density yellow color. The texture profile of the treatments manufactured with vegetable oils showed higher values than for the CON (p<0.05); furthermore, CA had the highest texture profile values (p<0.05) among the treatments. The replacement of pork back fat with canola and flaxseed oils in sausages significantly increased the omega-3 fatty acid content (p<0.05) over 15 to 86 times, respectively. All emulsion sausages containing vegetable oil exhibited significantly lower values for saturated fatty acid content and the omega-6 to omega-3 ratios compared to CON (p<0.05). The results show that using canola or flaxseed oils as a pork fat replacer has a high potential to produce healthier products, and notably, the use of canola oil produced characteristics of great emulsion stability and sensory quality. PMID:27004822

  17. Effects of Replacing Pork Back Fat with Canola and Flaxseed Oils on Physicochemical Properties of Emulsion Sausages from Spent Layer Meat.

    PubMed

    Baek, Ki Ho; Utama, Dicky Tri; Lee, Seung Gyu; An, Byoung Ki; Lee, Sung Ki

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of canola and flaxseed oils on the physicochemical properties and sensory quality of emulsion-type sausage made from spent layer meat. Three types of sausage were manufactured with different fat sources: 20% pork back fat (CON), 20% canola oil (CA) and 20% flaxseed oil (FL). The pH value of the CA was significantly higher than the others (p<0.05). The highest water holding capacity was also presented for CA; in other words, CA demonstrated a significantly lower water loss value among the treatments (p<0.05). CA had the highest lightness value (p<0.05). However, FL showed the highest yellowness value (p<0.05) because of its own high-density yellow color. The texture profile of the treatments manufactured with vegetable oils showed higher values than for the CON (p<0.05); furthermore, CA had the highest texture profile values (p<0.05) among the treatments. The replacement of pork back fat with canola and flaxseed oils in sausages significantly increased the omega-3 fatty acid content (p<0.05) over 15 to 86 times, respectively. All emulsion sausages containing vegetable oil exhibited significantly lower values for saturated fatty acid content and the omega-6 to omega-3 ratios compared to CON (p<0.05). The results show that using canola or flaxseed oils as a pork fat replacer has a high potential to produce healthier products, and notably, the use of canola oil produced characteristics of great emulsion stability and sensory quality.

  18. Field evaluation of neem and canola oil for the selective control of the honey bee (Hymenoptera: Apidae) mite parasites Varroa jacobsoni (Acari: Varroidae) and Acarapis woodi (Acari: Tarsonemidae).

    PubMed

    Melathopoulos, A P; Winston, M L; Whittington, R; Higo, H; Le Doux, M

    2000-06-01

    Neem oil, neem extract (neem-aza), and canola oil were evaluated for the management of the honey bee mite parasites Varroa jacobsoni (Oudemans) and Acarapis woodi (Rennie) in field experiments. Spraying neem oil on bees was more effective at controlling V. jacobsoni than feeding oil in a sucrose-based matrix (patty), feeding neem-aza in syrup, or spraying canola oil. Neem oil sprays also protected susceptible bees from A. woodi infestation. Only neem oil provided V. jacobsoni control comparable to the known varroacide formic acid, but it was not as effective as the synthetic product Apistan (tau-fluvalinate). Neem oil was effective only when sprayed six times at 4-d intervals and not when applied three times at 8-d intervals. Neem oil spray treatments had no effect on adult honey bee populations, but treatments reduced the amount of sealed brood in colonies by 50% and caused queen loss at higher doses. Taken together, the results suggest that neem and canola oil show some promise for managing honey bee parasitic mites, but the negative effects of treatments to colonies and the lower efficacy against V. jacobsoni compared with synthetic acaricides may limit their usefulness to beekeepers.

  19. Optimization of the canola oil based vitamin E nanoemulsions stabilized by food grade mixed surfactants using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Mehmood, Tahir

    2015-09-15

    The objective of the present study was to prepare canola oil based vitamin E nanoemulsions by using food grade mixed surfactants (Tween:80 and lecithin; 3:1) to replace some concentration of nonionic surfactants (Tween 80) with natural surfactant (soya lecithin) and to optimize their preparation conditions. RBD (Refined, Bleached and Deodorized) canola oil and vitamin E acetate were used in water/vitamin E/oil/surfactant system due to their nutritional benefits and oxidative stability, respectively. Response surface methodology (RSM) was used to optimize the preparation conditions. The effects of homogenization pressure (75-155MPa), oil concentrations (4-12% w/w), surfactant concentrations (3-11% w/w) and vitamin E acetate contents (0.4-1.2% w/w) on the particle size and emulsion stability were studied. RSM analysis has shown that the experimental data could be fitted well into second-order polynomial model with the coefficient of determinations of 0.9464 and 0.9278 for particle size and emulsion stability, respectively. The optimum values of independent variables were 135MPa homogenization pressure, 6.18% oil contents, 6.39% surfactant concentration and 1% vitamin E acetate concentration. The optimized response values for particle size and emulsion stability were 150.10nm and 0.338, respectively. Whereas, the experimental values for particle size and nanoemulsion stability were 156.13±2.3nm and 0.328±0.015, respectively. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Assessment of the antioxidant activity of Bifurcaria bifurcata aqueous extract on canola oil. Effect of extract concentration on the oxidation stability and volatile compound generation during oil storage.

    PubMed

    Agregán, Rubén; Lorenzo, José M; Munekata, Paulo E S; Dominguez, Ruben; Carballo, Javier; Franco, Daniel

    2017-09-01

    In this research the antioxidant activity of water extracts of Bifurcaria bifurcata (BBE) at different dose against butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) was evaluated in canola oil. Water extracts were firstly characterized in terms of total solid and polyphenolic compound contents, and their antioxidant activity together with that of BHT was evaluated using several in vitro tests (DPPH, ABTS, ORAC and FRAP). Next, the progress of lipid oxidation was assessed in canola oil added with five BBE concentrations (200, 400, 600, 800 and 1000ppm) and two BHT concentrations (50 and 200ppm) using an accelerated oxidation test. The progress in lipid oxidation was monitored by assessing some chemical indices (peroxide value, p-anisidine value, and conjugated dienes) during oil storage and some volatile compounds at the end of the storage period. BBE showed a significant antioxidant effect, being this ability concentration-dependent. The extent of lipid oxidation was inversely related to BBE dose, specially with regard to primary oxidation products. At the highest level of BBE, significant decreases of primary and secondary oxidation products, with respect to the control, were obtained with reduction percentages of 71.53%, 72.78%, 68.17% and 71.3% for peroxides, conjugated dienes, p-anisidine and TOTOX values, respectively. A level of 600ppm or higher concentration of the extract inhibits the lipid oxidation in a similar way than BHT at 200ppm. Regarding the inhibition of the formation of volatile compounds, both BBE and BHT strongly inhibited the formation of volatiles during oil storage, being this inhibition similar for all the concentrations of BBE and BHT essayed. Overall, results indicated that BBE can be used as a potential natural additive for improving oxidative stability of canola oil. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Effects of pineapple byproduct and canola oil as fat replacers on physicochemical and sensory qualities of low-fat beef burger.

    PubMed

    Selani, Miriam M; Shirado, Giovanna A N; Margiotta, Gregório B; Saldaña, Erick; Spada, Fernanda P; Piedade, Sonia M S; Contreras-Castillo, Carmen J; Canniatti-Brazaca, Solange G

    2016-02-01

    Pineapple byproduct and canola oil were evaluated as fat replacers on physicochemical and sensory characteristics of low-fat burgers. Five treatments were performed: conventional (CN, 20% fat) and four low-fat formulations (10% fat): control (CT), pineapple byproduct (PA), canola oil (CO), pineapple byproduct and canola oil (PC). Higher water and fat retention and lower cooking loss and diameter reduction were found in burgers with byproduct addition. In raw burgers, byproduct incorporation reduced L*, a*, and C* values, but these alterations were masked after cooking, leading to products similar to CN. Low-fat treatments were harder, chewier, and more cohesive than full-fat burgers. However, in Warner Bratzler shear measurements, PA and PC were as tender as CN. In QDA, no difference was found between CN and PC. Pineapple byproducts along with canola oil are promising fat replacers in beef burgers. In order to increase the feasibility of use of pineapple byproduct in the meat industry, alternative processes of byproduct preparation should be evaluated in future studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Co-utilization of canola oil and glucose on the production of a surfactant by Candida lipolytica.

    PubMed

    Sarubbo, Leonie A; Farias, Charles B B; Campos-Takaki, Galba Maria

    2007-01-01

    Candida lipolytica synthesized a surfactant in a cultivation medium supplemented with canola oil and glucose as carbon sources. Measurements of biosurfactant production and surface tension indicated that the biosurfactant was produced at 48 h of fermentation. The surface-active species is constituted by the protein-lipid-polysaccharide complex in nature. The cell-free broth was particularly influenced by the addition of salt, the pH and temperature depending on the emulsified substrate (hexadecane or a vegetable oil). After comparison between ethyl acetate and mixtures of chloroform and methanol as solvent systems for surfactant recovery, it was found that ethyl acetate was able to extract crude surfactant material with high product recovery (8.0 g/L). The isolated biosurfactant decreased the surface tension to values of 30 mN/m at the critical micelle concentration. Emulsification properties of the biosurfactant produced were compared to those of commercial emulsifiers and other microbial surfactants.

  3. Diesel fuels from vegetable oils

    SciTech Connect

    Schwab, A.W.; Bagby, M.O.; Freedman, B.

    1986-03-01

    Vegetable oils have heat contents approximately 90% that of diesel fuel and are potential alternate fuel candidates. A major obstacle deterring their use in the direct-injection diesel engine is their inherent high viscosities which are nearly 10 times that of diesel fuel. Solution to the viscosity problem has been approached in three ways: 1) microemulsification, 2) pyrolysis, and 3) transesterification. Microemulsification with short chain alcohols such as methanol and ethanol yields fuels that are clear, thermodynamically stable liquid systems with viscosities near the ASTM specified range for number2 diesel fuel. These micellar systems may be formulated ionically or nonionically. The alcohols are attractive from an economic as well as a renewable resource viewpoint. Methanol has an economic advantage over ethanol, and it can be derived from a large variety of base stocks. These include biomass, municipal waste, natural gas being flared at refineries and from coal. Pyrolysis of vegetable oils is another approach to lowering their viscosity. Soybean and safflower oils were thermally decomposed in both air and nitrogen to obtain fuels for the diesel engine. Using standard ASTM distillation conditions, yields of pyrolysis products were about 75%. GS-MS analysis of the distillates showed the presence of alkanes, alkenes, aromatics, and carboxylic acids with carbon numbers ranging from 4 to more than 20. Fuel properties of the thermal decomposition products were substantially improved as evaluated by lower viscosities and higher cetane numbers compared to the unpyrrolyzed vegetable oils. Simple esters from transesterification of vegetable oils perform well in engine tests, and thus show good promise as an alternative or emergency fuel for diesel engines.

  4. Volatile Oxidation Compounds and Stability of Safflower, Sesame and Canola Cold-Pressed Oils as Affected by Thermal and Microwave Treatments.

    PubMed

    Kiralan, Mustafa; Ramadan, Mohamed Fawzy

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the effect of heating and microwave treatment on the levels of volatile oxidation products and the stability of safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.), sesame (Sesamum indicum) and canola (Brassica napus L.) cold-pressed oils. Cold-pressed oils were subjected to conventional heating (oven test) using air-forced oven at 60°C and microwave heating for 2 and 4 min. The changes in conjugated diene (CD) and conjugated triene (CT) values were monitored during treatments. As expected, heating generates an increase in CD and CT values. The volatile compounds in treated oils were determined using solid phase micro-extraction-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (SPME-GC/MS). The obtained GC/MS data were used to characterize volatile compounds of cold-pressed oils during heating and microeave treatments. Under oven conditions, 2-heptenal and 2,4-heptadienal isomers were identified as major components in canola oil, while hexanal and 2-heptenal were found in high levels in safflower and sesame oils. Among volatiles, p-cymene was the dominant compound found in microwave-treated canola oil. In addition, hexanal and 2-hexenal were found at high amounts upon microwave treatment especially after 4 min of application.

  5. Effect of lowering the glycemic load with canola oil on glycemic control and cardiovascular risk factors: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, David J A; Kendall, Cyril W C; Vuksan, Vladimir; Faulkner, Dorothea; Augustin, Livia S A; Mitchell, Sandra; Ireland, Christopher; Srichaikul, Korbua; Mirrahimi, Arash; Chiavaroli, Laura; Blanco Mejia, Sonia; Nishi, Stephanie; Sahye-Pudaruth, Sandhya; Patel, Darshna; Bashyam, Balachandran; Vidgen, Edward; de Souza, Russell J; Sievenpiper, John L; Coveney, Judy; Josse, Robert G; Leiter, Lawrence A

    2014-07-01

    Despite their independent cardiovascular disease (CVD) advantages, effects of α-linolenic acid (ALA), monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA), and low-glycemic-load (GL) diets have not been assessed in combination. We therefore determined the combined effect of ALA, MUFA, and low GL on glycemic control and CVD risk factors in type 2 diabetes. The study was a parallel design, randomized trial wherein each 3-month treatment was conducted in a Canadian academic center between March 2011 and September 2012 and involved 141 participants with type 2 diabetes (HbA1c 6.5%-8.5% [48-69 mmol/mol]) treated with oral antihyperglycemic agents. Participants were provided with dietary advice on either a low-GL diet with ALA and MUFA given as a canola oil-enriched bread supplement (31 g canola oil per 2,000 kcal) (test) or a whole-grain diet with a whole-wheat bread supplement (control). The primary outcome was HbA1c change. Secondary outcomes included calculated Framingham CVD risk score and reactive hyperemia index (RHI) ratio. Seventy-nine percent of the test group and 90% of the control group completed the trial. The test diet reduction in HbA1c units of -0.47% (-5.15 mmol/mol) (95% CI -0.54% to -0.40% [-5.92 to -4.38 mmol/mol]) was greater than that for the control diet (-0.31% [-3.44 mmol/mol] [95% CI -0.38% to -0.25% (-4.17 to -2.71 mmol/mol)], P = 0.002), with the greatest benefit observed in those with higher systolic blood pressure (SBP). Greater reductions were seen in CVD risk score for the test diet, whereas the RHI ratio increased for the control diet. A canola oil-enriched low-GL diet improved glycemic control in type 2 diabetes, particularly in participants with raised SBP, whereas whole grains improved vascular reactivity. © 2014 by the American Diabetes Association.

  6. Alternative Fuels (Briefing Charts)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-19

    feedstock for HRJ, plant cost for F-T) Courtesy AFRL, Dr. Tim Edwards Unclassified • Agricultural crop oils ( canola , jatropha, soy, palm, etc...dioxide emissions Security of crude oil questioned Qatar GTL Production * Fuels produced from seeds and other organic sources such as Soybean Methyl Ester...Fuels Focus  Various conversion processes  Upgraded to meet fuel specs Diverse energy sources Petroleum Crude Oil Petroleum based Single Fuel in the

  7. Effect of supplementation of fish and canola oil in the diet on milk Fatty Acid composition in early lactating holstein cows.

    PubMed

    Vafa, Toktam S; Naserian, Abbas A; Heravi Moussavi, Ali R; Valizadeh, Reza; Mesgaran, Mohsen Danesh

    2012-03-01

    This study examined the effects of supplementation of fish oil and canola oil in the diet on milk yield, milk components and fatty acid composition of Holstein dairy cows in early lactation. Eight multiparous early lactation Holstein cows (42±12 DIM, 40±6 kg daily milk yield) were fed a total mixed ration supplemented with either 0% oil (Control), 2% fish oil (FO), 1% canola oil +1% fish oil (FOCO), or 2% canola oil (CO) according to a double 4×4 Latin square design. Each period lasted 3 wk; experimental analyses were restricted to the last week of each period. Supplemental oils were added to a basal diet which was formulated according to NRC (2001) and consisted of 20% alfalfa, 20% corn silage and 60% concentrate. Milk yield was similar between diets (p>0.05), but dry matter intake (DMI) was lower (p<0.05) in cows fed FO diet compared to other diets. Milk fat percentage and daily yield decreased (p<0.01) with the supplementation of fish and canola oil. The daily yield and percentage of milk protein, lactose and solids-not-fat (SNF) were not affected by diets (p>0.05). The proportion (g/100 g fatty acids) of short chain fatty acids (SCFA) decreased and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) increased (p<0.05) in milk of all cows fed diets supplemented with oil. The proportions of 6:0, 8:0, 10:0 12:0 and 14:0 fatty acids in milk fat decreased (p<0.01) for all diets supplemented with oil, but the proportions of 14:1, 16:0 and 16:1 fatty acids were not affected by diets (p>0.05). The proportion of trans(t)-18:1 increased (p<0.01) in milk fat of cows fed FO and FOCO diets, but CO diet had the highest proportion of cis(c)-11 18:1 (p<0.01). The concentration of t-10, c-12 18:2, c-9 t-11 18:2, 18:3, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6) increased (p<0.05) in FO and FOCO diets in comparison with the other two diets. These data indicate that including fish oil in combination with canola oil significantly modifies the fatty acid composition of

  8. Effect of Supplementation of Fish and Canola Oil in the Diet on Milk Fatty Acid Composition in Early Lactating Holstein Cows

    PubMed Central

    Vafa, Toktam S.; Naserian, Abbas A.; Heravi Moussavi, Ali R.; Valizadeh, Reza; Mesgaran, Mohsen Danesh

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the effects of supplementation of fish oil and canola oil in the diet on milk yield, milk components and fatty acid composition of Holstein dairy cows in early lactation. Eight multiparous early lactation Holstein cows (42±12 DIM, 40±6 kg daily milk yield) were fed a total mixed ration supplemented with either 0% oil (Control), 2% fish oil (FO), 1% canola oil +1% fish oil (FOCO), or 2% canola oil (CO) according to a double 4×4 Latin square design. Each period lasted 3 wk; experimental analyses were restricted to the last week of each period. Supplemental oils were added to a basal diet which was formulated according to NRC (2001) and consisted of 20% alfalfa, 20% corn silage and 60% concentrate. Milk yield was similar between diets (p>0.05), but dry matter intake (DMI) was lower (p<0.05) in cows fed FO diet compared to other diets. Milk fat percentage and daily yield decreased (p<0.01) with the supplementation of fish and canola oil. The daily yield and percentage of milk protein, lactose and solids-not-fat (SNF) were not affected by diets (p>0.05). The proportion (g/100 g fatty acids) of short chain fatty acids (SCFA) decreased and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) increased (p<0.05) in milk of all cows fed diets supplemented with oil. The proportions of 6:0, 8:0, 10:0 12:0 and 14:0 fatty acids in milk fat decreased (p<0.01) for all diets supplemented with oil, but the proportions of 14:1, 16:0 and 16:1 fatty acids were not affected by diets (p>0.05). The proportion of trans(t)-18:1 increased (p<0.01) in milk fat of cows fed FO and FOCO diets, but CO diet had the highest proportion of cis(c)-11 18:1 (p<0.01). The concentration of t-10, c-12 18:2, c-9 t-11 18:2, 18:3, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6) increased (p<0.05) in FO and FOCO diets in comparison with the other two diets. These data indicate that including fish oil in combination with canola oil significantly modifies the fatty acid composition of

  9. Similar changes in clinical and pathological parameters in Wistar Kyoto rats after a 13-week dietary intake of canola oil or a fatty acid composition-based interesterified canola oil mimic.

    PubMed

    Ohara, Naoki; Naito, Yukiko; Kasama, Kikuko; Shindo, Tomoko; Yoshida, Hiromichi; Nagata, Tomoko; Okuyama, Harumi

    2009-01-01

    Canola oil (CO) given as a dietary fat deteriorates hypertension-related condition and shortens the life of stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP). Although substances other than fatty acids have been presumed as causatives, CO mimics consisting of oils other than CO also shorten the life. In this study we intended to examine whether or not fatty acid composition unique to CO participates in the adverse effect. CO or an interesterified CO mimic (ICOM) consisting of safflower oil, flaxseed oil and erucic acid was fed as a dietary fat for 13 weeks to Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats, and clinical and pathological signs were compared. WKY rats were used to avoid the difficulty in evaluating the results in SHRSP due to irregular deterioration in conditions by stroke. Compared to a standard diet, both diets containing CO or ICOM similarly elevated blood pressure, increased plasma lipids, activated hepatic glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, decreased platelets, shortened blood coagulation times and induced abnormalities in the kidney. Thus, CO-specific fatty acid composition appeared to affect the pathophysiology of the rat and produce consequent aggravation of pathological status, especially in SHRSP. However, the existence of causative factors other than fatty acids was suggested by increased neutrophil count exclusively induced by CO.

  10. Diesel engine combustion of sunflower oil fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Zubik, J.; Sorenson, S.C.; Goering, C.E.

    1984-09-01

    The performance, combustion, and exhaust emissions of diesel fuel, a blend of 25% sunflower oil in diesel fuel, and sunflower oil methyl ester have been compared. All fuels performed satisfactorily in a direct injection diesel engine, with the fuels derived from sunflower oil giving somewhat higher cylinder pressures and rates of pressure rise due to a higher percentage of 'premixed' burning than the diesel fuel. General performance and emissions characteristics of the two fuels were comparable, with the oil based fuels giving lower smoke readings. 15 references.

  11. Modification of oil and glucosinolate content in canola seeds with altered expression of Brassica napus LEAFY COTYLEDON1.

    PubMed

    Elahi, Nosheen; Duncan, Robert W; Stasolla, Claudio

    2016-03-01

    Over the last few decades, research focusing on canola (Brassica napus L.) seed oil content and composition has expanded. Oil production and accumulation are influenced by genes participating in embryo and seed development. The Arabidopsis LEAFY COTYLEDON1 (LEC1) is a well characterized regulator of embryo development that also enhances the expression of genes involved in fatty acid (FA) synthesis. B. napus lines over-expressing or down-regulating BnLEC1 were successfully generated by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The constitutive expression of BnLEC1 in B. napus var. Polo, increased seed oil content by 7-16%, while the down-regulation of BnLEC1 in B. napus var. Topas reduced oil content by 9-12%. Experimental manipulation of BnLEC1 caused transcriptional changes in enzymes participating in sucrose metabolism, glycolysis, and FA biosynthesis, suggesting an enhanced carbon flux towards FA biosynthesis in tissues over-expressing BnLEC1. The increase in oil content induced by BnLEC1 was not accompanied by alterations in FA composition, oil nutritional value or glucosinolate (GLS) levels. Suppression of BnLEC1 reduced seed oil accumulation and elevated the level of GLS possibly through the transcriptional regulation of BnST5a (Sulphotransferase5a), the last GLS biosynthetic enzyme. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that experimental alterations of BnLEC1 expression can be used to influence oil production and quality in B. napus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Fuel-efficient lubricating oil

    SciTech Connect

    Erdman, T.R.

    1986-04-22

    A method is described of improving the fuel economy of an internal combustion engine comprising lubricating the crankcase of the engine with a lubricating composition consisting of a hydrocarbon oil of lubricating viscosity and from 15 to 25 millimols per kilogram of zinc O,O-di(2-ethylhexyl)phosphorodithioate and from 0.25 to 2 weight percent of pentaerythritol monooleate.

  13. Textural, physicochemical and sensory properties compensation of fat replacing in pork liver pâté incorporating emulsified canola oil.

    PubMed

    Morales-Irigoyen, E E; Severiano-Pérez, P; Rodriguez-Huezo, M E; Totosaus, A

    2012-08-01

    Saturated animal fat was replaced in pork pâté with pre-emulsified canola in a 3% sodium caseinate/0.5% xanthan gum solution in order to obtain a stable oily phase. Fat was replaced with different proportions of emulsified canola oil. The inclusion of emulsified oil in pâté enhanced cocking yield and moisture but increased fluids release. Nonetheless, total fat content remained practically constant, meaning no detrimental effect on caloric content. Replacing 50% of lard with emulsified oil did not affect color of the samples. Texture was improved since emulsified oil addition resulted in softer and more spreadable pâté. Samples with 50% of emulsified oil were more stable to lipid oxidation at 8 days of storage, with lower thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances and volatile compounds resulting from oxidation reactions. Emulsified canola can be employed to replace fat until 50% in pâté or liver sausage with good functional properties, improving texture and reducing lipids rancidity.

  14. Fuel detergent compositions containing lubricating oil

    SciTech Connect

    Bagnetto, L.J.

    1982-04-20

    A motor fuel additive composition comprising a fuel detergent composition and a lubricating oil is disclosed. In preferred embodiments aminosuccinimide and amide-sulfonate fuel additive compositions are combined with lubricating oil in a fuel composition which exhibits reduced formation of engine deposits, particularly under additive-overdose conditions.

  15. Energy accounting for eleven vegetable oil fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Goering, C.E.; Daugherty, M.J.

    1982-09-01

    Energy inputs and outputs were comparatively analyzed for 11 vegetable oil fuels. Three-year average prices and production quantities were also compared. All nonirrigated oil crops had favorable energy ratios. Soybean, peanut and sunflower oils were the most promising as domestic fuel sources. Rapeseed oil would also be promising if significant domestic production can be established.

  16. Effect of soybean lecithin on iron-catalyzed or chlorophyll-photosensitized oxidation of canola oil emulsion.

    PubMed

    Choe, Jeesu; Oh, Boyoung; Choe, Eunok

    2014-11-01

    The effect of soybean lecithin addition on the iron-catalyzed or chlorophyll-photosensitized oxidation of emulsions consisting of purified canola oil and water (1:1, w/w) was studied based on headspace oxygen consumption using gas chromatography and hydroperoxide production using the ferric thiocyanate method. Addition levels of iron sulfate, chlorophyll, and soybean lecithin were 5, 4, and 350 mg/kg, respectively. Phospholipids (PLs) during oxidation of the emulsions were monitored by high performance liquid chromatography. Addition of soybean lecithin to the emulsions significantly reduced and decelerated iron-catalyzed oil oxidation by lowering headspace oxygen consumption and hydroperoxide production. However, soybean lecithin had no significant antioxidant effect on chlorophyll-photosensitized oxidation of the emulsions. PLs in soybean lecithin added to the emulsions were degraded during both oxidation processes, although there was little change in PL composition. Among PLs in soybean lecithin, phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylinositol were degraded the fastest in the iron-catalyzed and the chlorophyll-photosensitized oxidation, respectively. The results suggest that addition of soybean lecithin as an emulsifier can also improve the oxidative stability of oil in an emulsion. © 2014 Institute of Food Technologists®

  17. Intestinal absorption and lymphatic transport of a high gamma-linolenic acid canola oil in lymph fistula Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Tso, Patrick; Ding, Kexi; DeMichele, Stephen; Huang, Yung-Sheng

    2002-02-01

    A new canola strain capable of producing >30% gamma-linolenic acid [GLA, 18:3(n-6)] in the seed oil has been developed in our laboratories. This study compares the intestinal absorption and lymphatic transport of this newly developed high GLA content canola oil (HGCO) with traditional GLA-rich borage oil (BO) using a lymph fistula rat model. To assess the extent that 1 mL of GLA in the supplemented oil was absorbed and transported, the fatty acid compositions of triglycerides in mesenteric lymph were compared over a 24-h collection period. The digestion, uptake and lymphatic transport of HGCO and the normal physiologic changes associated with fat absorption (e.g., lymph flow and an increase in lymphatic endogenous lipids outputs, triglycerides, cholesterol and phospholipids) were similar in the HGCO-and the BO-fed rats. The original differences in gamma-linolenic acid content in HGCO and BO were preserved in the fatty acid composition of the rats' lymph lipid. We conclude that the HGCO derived from the genetically modified canola plant is absorbed and transported into lymph similarly to BO.

  18. Triacylglycerol composition, physico-chemical characteristics and oxidative stability of interesterified canola oil and fully hydrogenated cottonseed oil blends.

    PubMed

    Imran, Muhammad; Nadeem, Muhammad

    2015-10-29

    Partial hydrogenation process is used worldwide to produce shortening, baking, and pastry margarines for food applications. However, demand for such products is decreased during last decade due to their possible links to consumer health and disease. This has raised the need to replace hydrogenation with alternative acceptable interesterification process which has advantage in context of modifying the physico-chemical properties of edible fat-based products. Therefore, the main mandate of research was the development of functional fat through chemical interesterification of canola oil (CaO) and fully hydrogenated cottonseed oil (FHCSO) mixtures. Blends were prepared in the proportions of 75:25 (T1), 50:50 (T2) and 25:75 (T3) of CaO:FHCSO (w/w). Interesterification was performed using sodium methoxide (0.2 %) as catalyst at 120 °C, under reduced pressure and constant agitation for 60 minutes. The non-interesterified and interesterified CaO:FHCSO blends were evaluated for triacylglycerol (TAG) composition, physico-chemical characteristics, oxidative stability and consumer acceptability at 0, 30 and 60 days of storage interval. The oleic acid (58.3 ± 0.6 %) was predominantly present in CaO while the contents of stearic acid (72 ± 0.8 %) were significantly higher in FHCSO. Maximum trisaturated (S3) contents (63.9 ± 0.5 %) were found in T3 while monounsaturated (S2U), diunsaturated (U2S) and triunsaturated (U3) contents were quite low in T2 and T3 before interesterification. A marked reduction in S3 and U3 contents with concomitant increase in S2U and U2S contents was observed for all CaO:FHCSO blends on interesterification. During storage, the changes in S3, S2U and U2S contents were not found significant (p ≥ 0.05). However, maximum decrease 13 %, 7.5 and 5.6 % in U3 contents for T1, T2 and T3 was noted after 60-days of interesterification, respectively. The Lovibond color R, melting point, refractive index, specific gravity, peroxide and free

  19. Fuel and fuel blending components from biomass derived pyrolysis oil

    DOEpatents

    McCall, Michael J.; Brandvold, Timothy A.; Elliott, Douglas C.

    2012-12-11

    A process for the conversion of biomass derived pyrolysis oil to liquid fuel components is presented. The process includes the production of diesel, aviation, and naphtha boiling point range fuels or fuel blending components by two-stage deoxygenation of the pyrolysis oil and separation of the products.

  20. Fuel oil and kerosene sales 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1998-08-01

    The Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales 1997 report provides information, illustrations and state-level statistical data on end-use sales of kerosene; No. 1, No. 2, and No. 4 distillate fuel oil; and residual fuel oil. State-level kerosene sales include volumes for residential, commercial, industrial, farm, and all other uses. State-level distillate sales include volumes for residential, commercial, industrial, oil company, railroad, vessel bunkering, military, electric utility, farm, on-highway, off highway construction, and other uses. State-level residual fuel sales include volumes for commercial, industrial, oil company, vessel bunkering, military, electric utility, and other uses. 24 tabs.

  1. Enhanced seed oil production in canola by conditional expression of Brassica napus LEAFY COTYLEDON1 and LEC1-LIKE in developing seeds.

    PubMed

    Tan, Helin; Yang, Xiaohui; Zhang, Fengxia; Zheng, Xiu; Qu, Cunmin; Mu, Jinye; Fu, Fuyou; Li, Jiana; Guan, Rongzhan; Zhang, Hongsheng; Wang, Guodong; Zuo, Jianru

    2011-07-01

    The seed oil content in oilseed crops is a major selection trait to breeders. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), LEAFY COTYLEDON1 (LEC1) and LEC1-LIKE (L1L) are key regulators of fatty acid biosynthesis. Overexpression of AtLEC1 and its orthologs in canola (Brassica napus), BnLEC1 and BnL1L, causes an increased fatty acid level in transgenic Arabidopsis plants, which, however, also show severe developmental abnormalities. Here, we use truncated napin A promoters, which retain the seed-specific expression pattern but with a reduced expression level, to drive the expression of BnLEC1 and BnL1L in transgenic canola. Conditional expression of BnLEC1 and BnL1L increases the seed oil content by 2% to 20% and has no detrimental effects on major agronomic traits. In the transgenic canola, expression of a subset of genes involved in fatty acid biosynthesis and glycolysis is up-regulated in developing seeds. Moreover, the BnLEC1 transgene enhances the expression of several genes involved in Suc synthesis and transport in developing seeds and the silique wall. Consistently, the accumulation of Suc and Fru is increased in developing seeds of the transgenic rapeseed, suggesting the increased carbon flux to fatty acid biosynthesis. These results demonstrate that BnLEC1 and BnL1L are reliable targets for genetic improvement of rapeseed in seed oil production.

  2. Diet containing low n-6/n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids ratio, provided by canola oil, alters body composition and bone quality in young rats.

    PubMed

    Costa, Carlos Alberto Soares da; Carlos, Aluana Santana; Gonzalez, Gabrielle de Paula Lopes; Reis, Rejane Pontes Gaspar; Ribeiro, Mariana Dos Santos; Dos Santos, Aline de Sousa; Monteiro, Alexandra Maria Vieira; de Moura, Egberto Gaspar; Nascimento-Saba, Celly Cristina Alves do

    2012-03-01

    Adipocytes and osteoblasts were derived from a common progenitor, and canola oil intake may have an adipogenic and osteogenic effect. Thus, our objective was to evaluate the effect on adipocyte, lipid profile, glucose homeostasis, and bone of canola oil as main lipid source on the diet during development. After weaning, rats were divided into two groups (n = 10 per group): control (S) and experimental (C) diets containing 7 mL/100 g soybean or canola oil, respectively. At 60 days, body composition, liver and intra-abdominal fat mass, adipocyte morphology, serum analysis, femur and lumbar vertebras density by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and computed tomography were determined. Differences were considered significant with P < 0.05. C group showed the following: lower liver (-12%) and intra-abdominal fat mass (-19%) area of adipocyte (-60%), cholesterol (-33%), insulin (-22%), lower total body (-9%) and spine (-33%) bone mineral content and bone area (-7 and -24%, respectively), femur mass (-9%), width of the diaphysis (-6%), femur (-10%) and lumbar vertebrae bone mineral density (-9%), and radiodensity of femoral head (-8%). The lower intra-abdominal adiposity could have more beneficial effects in a short term, since it can be associated with a better insulin sensitivity and lipid profile, than the small reduction in femur and lumbar vertebra density. However, it has to be considered the incremental effect of this reduction along the aging process.

  3. Enhanced Seed Oil Production in Canola by Conditional Expression of Brassica napus LEAFY COTYLEDON1 and LEC1-LIKE in Developing Seeds1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Helin; Yang, Xiaohui; Zhang, Fengxia; Zheng, Xiu; Qu, Cunmin; Mu, Jinye; Fu, Fuyou; Li, Jiana; Guan, Rongzhan; Zhang, Hongsheng; Wang, Guodong; Zuo, Jianru

    2011-01-01

    The seed oil content in oilseed crops is a major selection trait to breeders. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), LEAFY COTYLEDON1 (LEC1) and LEC1-LIKE (L1L) are key regulators of fatty acid biosynthesis. Overexpression of AtLEC1 and its orthologs in canola (Brassica napus), BnLEC1 and BnL1L, causes an increased fatty acid level in transgenic Arabidopsis plants, which, however, also show severe developmental abnormalities. Here, we use truncated napin A promoters, which retain the seed-specific expression pattern but with a reduced expression level, to drive the expression of BnLEC1 and BnL1L in transgenic canola. Conditional expression of BnLEC1 and BnL1L increases the seed oil content by 2% to 20% and has no detrimental effects on major agronomic traits. In the transgenic canola, expression of a subset of genes involved in fatty acid biosynthesis and glycolysis is up-regulated in developing seeds. Moreover, the BnLEC1 transgene enhances the expression of several genes involved in Suc synthesis and transport in developing seeds and the silique wall. Consistently, the accumulation of Suc and Fru is increased in developing seeds of the transgenic rapeseed, suggesting the increased carbon flux to fatty acid biosynthesis. These results demonstrate that BnLEC1 and BnL1L are reliable targets for genetic improvement of rapeseed in seed oil production. PMID:21562329

  4. Fuel oil and kerosene sales, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-22

    Despite the rise in petroleum products prices, a colder-than-normal winter in the latter part of 1989 spurred an increase in demand for distillate fuel oils. The shipping and electric utilities industries contributed to a significant rise in demand for both distillate and residual fuels oils in 1989. A total of 72.9 billion gallons of fuel oil and kerosene were sold to consumers in 1989, an increase of 3.0 percent over 1988 sales volumes. Of all fuel oil sold during 1989, distillate fuel oil accounted for 68.3 percent, which was an increase over 1988 when distillate fuel oil accounted for 67.2 percent of all fuel oil products sold in the United States. Residual fuel oil's share of total fuel oil sold fell slightly to 29.9 percent from 30.7 percent in 1988. Kerosene followed with a 1.8 percent share, also falling from the previous year when it accounted for a 2.1 percent share of total fuel oil sold. 3 figs., 24 tabs.

  5. Effect of high-oleic canola and flaxseed oils on energy expenditure and body composition in hypercholesterolemic subjects.

    PubMed

    Gillingham, Leah G; Robinson, Kimberley S; Jones, Peter J H

    2012-11-01

    The fatty acid profile of dietary fats may contribute to its channelling toward oxidation versus storage, influencing energy and weight balance. Our objective was to compare the effects of diets enriched with high-oleic canola oil (HOCO), alone or blended with flaxseed oil (FXCO), on energy expenditure, substrate utilization, and body composition versus a typical Western diet (WD). Using a randomized crossover design, 34 hypercholesterolemic subjects (n=22 females) consumed 3 controlled diets for 28 days containing ~49% energy from carbohydrate, 14% energy from protein, and 37% energy from fat, of which 70% of fat was provided by HOCO rich in oleic acid, FXCO rich in alpha-linolenic acid, or WD rich in saturated fat. Indirect calorimetry measured energy expenditure and substrate oxidation. Body composition was analyzed by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. After 28 days, resting and postprandial energy expenditure and substrate oxidation were not different after consumption of the HOCO or FXCO diets compared with a typical Western diet. No significant changes in body composition measures were observed between diets. However, the android-to-gynoid ratio tended to increase (P=.055) after the FXCO diet compared with the HOCO diet. The data suggest that substituting a typical Western dietary fatty acid profile with HOCO or FXCO does not significantly modulate energy expenditure, substrate oxidation or body composition in hypercholesterolemic males and females. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Peanut oil as an emergency diesel fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Goodrum, J.W.

    1983-06-01

    Two elements of an emergency fuel system are discussed. A CeCoCo mechanical oil expeller's efficiency is related to temperature, moisture, and pressure conditions. Durability test on 20:80 and 80:20 peanut oil: diesel blends show injector coking and effects on exhaust temperature, specific fuel, and crankcase oil.

  7. 30 CFR 56.6309 - Fuel oil requirements for ANFO.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... that of No. 2 diesel oil (125 °F) shall not be used to prepare ammonium nitrate-fuel oil, except that.... (b) Waste oil, including crankcase oil, shall not be used to prepare ammonium nitrate-fuel oil....

  8. 30 CFR 56.6309 - Fuel oil requirements for ANFO.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... that of No. 2 diesel oil (125 °F) shall not be used to prepare ammonium nitrate-fuel oil, except that.... (b) Waste oil, including crankcase oil, shall not be used to prepare ammonium nitrate-fuel oil....

  9. 30 CFR 56.6309 - Fuel oil requirements for ANFO.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... that of No. 2 diesel oil (125 °F) shall not be used to prepare ammonium nitrate-fuel oil, except that.... (b) Waste oil, including crankcase oil, shall not be used to prepare ammonium nitrate-fuel oil....

  10. 30 CFR 56.6309 - Fuel oil requirements for ANFO.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... that of No. 2 diesel oil (125 °F) shall not be used to prepare ammonium nitrate-fuel oil, except that.... (b) Waste oil, including crankcase oil, shall not be used to prepare ammonium nitrate-fuel oil....

  11. Comparative analysis of plant oil based fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Ziejewski, M.; Goettler, H.J.; Haines, H.; Huong, C.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents the evaluation results from the analysis of different blends of fuels using the 13-mode standard SAE testing method. Six high oleic safflower oil blends, six ester blends, six high oleic sunflower oil blends, and six sunflower oil blends were used in this portion of the investigation. Additionally, the results from the repeated 13-mode tests for all the 25/75% mixtures with a complete diesel fuel test before and after each alternative fuel are presented.

  12. Influence of supplemental canola or soybean oil on milk yield, fatty acid profile and postpartum weight changes in grazing dairy goats.

    PubMed

    Lerma-Reyes, Israel; Mendoza-Martínez, G D; Rojo-Rubio, Rolando; Mejia, Mario; Garcia-Lopez, Juan Carlos; Lee-Rangel, Hector Aaron

    2017-06-27

    This experiment was designed to evaluate the effect of supplementation with soybean or canola oil on milk production and the composition of long chain fatty acids as well as weight changes in the goats and their kids. Thirty nine mulitparous crossed Alpine x Nubian goats (initial BW 43.5 ± 1.7 kg) from the day of parturition were assigned to the treatments: grazing control (n=15); grazing plus 20 mL/goat/d of supplemental soybean oil (n=12); and grazing plus 20 mL/goat/d of supplemental canola oil (n=12). The vegetable oil supplementation reduced weight losses in lactating goats (CI: -0.060 vs. 0.090 kg/d; P=0.03) but did not improve milk production or affect kids' growth. The content of C4, C6, C8, C10, C11, C14, and C18: 1n9t in the milk was increased (P <0.05) with respect to control. However, C12, C14, C16, C18, C18: 1n9c, C18: 2n6c and C18: 3n3 were reduced (P <0.05) in supplemented goats. Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) was increased (P <0.05) in goats supplemented with oils compared to the control group. Supplementation with 20 ml/d of soybean or canola oil did not affect milk production or kids' performance; however, it increased CLA concentration and reduced the reduced weight losses in lactating goats.

  13. Effect of consuming novel foods consisting high oleic canola oil, barley β-glucan, and DHA on cardiovascular disease risk in humans: the CONFIDENCE (Canola Oil and Fibre with DHA Enhanced) study - protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Ramprasath, Vanu R; Thandapilly, Sijo J; Yang, Shuo; Abraham, Anjalika; Jones, Peter J H; Ames, Nancy

    2015-10-31

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) has been identified as a major contributor to the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Current recommendations for dietary management of people with MetS involve quantitative and qualitative modifications of food intake, such as high consumption of vegetables, fruits, and whole grain foods. The results from our previous human trials revealed the potential of the dietary components high-oleic acid canola oil (HOCO)-docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and high molecular weight barley β-glucan individually in managing CVD risk factors. Foods with a combination of HOCO-DHA and barley β-glucan have never been tested for their effects on CVD risk. The objective is to determine the effects of consuming novel foods HOCO-DHA, and barley β-glucan on managing CVD risk factors in people with MetS. We are conducting a randomized, single-blind crossover trial with four treatment phases of 28 days each separated by a 4-week washout interval. Participants (n=35) will be provided with weight-maintaining, healthy balanced diet recommendations according to their energy requirements during the intervention periods. Participants will receive muffins and cookies as treatment foods in a random order and will consume at least one meal per day at the research center under supervision. The four treatments include muffins and cookies consisting of (1) all-purpose flour and HOCO-DHA (50 g/day); (2) barley flour (4.36 g/day of β-glucan) and a blend of sunflower oil, safflower oil, and butter as control oil (50 g/day); (3) barley flour (4.36 g/day of β-glucan) and HOCO-DHA (50 g/day; dosage of DHA would be 3 g/day); and (4) all-purpose flour and control oil (50 g/day). At the beginning and end of each phase, we will evaluate anthropometrics; systolic and diastolic blood pressure; blood lipid profile; low-density lipoprotein subfractions and particle size; 10-year Framingham CVD risk score; inflammatory status; and plasma and red blood cell fatty acid profiles

  14. ADM. Tanks: from left to right: fuel oil tank, fuel ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    ADM. Tanks: from left to right: fuel oil tank, fuel pump house (TAN-611), engine fuel tank, water pump house, water storage tank. Camera facing northwest. Not edge of shielding berm at left of view. Date: November 25, 1953. INEEL negative no. 9217 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  15. Recent advances in canola meal utilization in swine nutrition.

    PubMed

    Mejicanos, G; Sanjayan, N; Kim, I H; Nyachoti, C M

    2016-01-01

    Canola meal is derived from the crushing of canola seed for oil extraction. Although it has been used in swine diets for a long time, its inclusion levels have been limited due to concerns regarding its nutritive value primarily arising from results of early studies showing negative effects of dietary canola meal inclusion in swine diets. Such effects were attributable to the presence of anti-nutritional factors (ANF; notably glucosinolates) in canola meal. However, due to advances in genetic improvements of canola that have led to production of cultivars with significantly lower ANF content and improved processing procedures, canola meal with a superior nutritive value for non-ruminant animals is now available. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to review the recent studies in the use of canola meal as feedstuff for swine, the factors influencing its use and the strategies to overcome them. First a historical overview of the development of canola is provided.

  16. Straight Vegetable Oil as a Diesel Fuel?

    SciTech Connect

    2014-01-01

    Biodiesel, a renewable fuel produced from animal fats or vegetable oils, is popular among many vehicle owners and fleet managers seeking to reduce emissions and support U.S. energy security. Questions sometimes arise about the viability of fueling vehicles with straight vegetable oil (SVO), or waste oils from cooking and other processes, without intermediate processing. But SVO and waste oils differ from biodiesel (and conventional diesel) in some important ways and are generally not considered acceptable vehicle fuels for large-scale or long-term use.

  17. Vegetable oils

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Biodiesel is a technically competitive alternative to petroleum-derived diesel fuel. It can be obtained from commodity oils and fats such as soybean, sunflower, canola or tallow. However, the available amounts of these biodiesel feedstocks do not suffice to satisfy the long-term need for biodiesel...

  18. Engine wear and lubricating oil contamination from plant oil fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Darcey, C.L.; LePori, W.A.; Yarbrough, C.M.

    1982-12-01

    Engine disassembly with wear measurements, and lubricating oil analysis were used to determine wear rates on a one cylinder diesel engine. Results are reported from short duration tests on the wear rates of various levels of processed sunflower oil, a 25% blend with diesel fuel, and processed cottonseed oil.

  19. Antioxidant activities and interactions of alpha- and gamma-tocopherols within canola and soybean oil emulsions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The effect of differing concentrations and ratios of alpha- and gamma-TOH on oxidative stability over time was determined by measuring the development of hydroperoxides and volatile secondary oxidation products (hexanal) within a series of oil-in-water (o/w) emulsion systems produced from both canol...

  20. Plasma fatty acid changes following consumption of dietary oils containing n-3, n-6, and n-9 fatty acids at different proportions: preliminary findings of the Canola Oil Multicenter Intervention Trial (COMIT)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Canola Oil Multicenter Intervention Trial (COMIT) was a randomized controlled crossover study designed to evaluate the effects of five diets that provided different oils and/or oil blends on cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in individuals with abdominal obesity. The present objective is to report preliminary findings on plasma fatty acid profiles in volunteers with abdominal obesity, following the consumption of diets enriched with n-3, n-6 and n-9 fatty acids. Methods COMIT was conducted at three clinical sites, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, Québec City, Québec, Canada and University Park, Pennsylvania, United States. Inclusion criteria were at least one of the followings: waist circumference (≥90 cm for males and ≥84 cm for females), and at least one other criterion: triglycerides ≥1.7 mmol/L, high density lipoprotein cholesterol <1 mmol/L (males) or <1.3 mmol/L (females), blood pressure ≥130 mmHg (systolic) and/or ≥85 mmHg (diastolic), and glucose ≥5.5 mmol/L. Weight-maintaining diets that included shakes with one of the dietary oil blends were provided during each of the five 30-day dietary phases. Dietary phases were separated by four-week washout periods. Treatment oils were canola oil, high oleic canola oil, high oleic canola oil enriched with docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), flax oil and safflower oil blend, and corn oil and safflower oil blend. A per protocol approach with a mixed model analysis was decided to be appropriate for data analysis. Results One hundred and seventy volunteers were randomized and 130 completed the study with a dropout rate of 23.5%. The mean plasma total DHA concentrations, which were analyzed among all participants as a measure of adherence, increased by more than 100% in the DHA-enriched phase, compared to other phases, demonstrating excellent dietary adherence. Conclusions Recruitment and retention strategies were effective in achieving a sufficient number of participants who completed the study

  1. Effects of blend of canola oil and palm oil on nutrient intake and digestibility, growth performance, rumen fermentation and fatty acids in goats.

    PubMed

    Adeyemi, Kazeem Dauda; Sazili, Awis Qurni; Ebrahimi, Mahdi; Samsudin, Anjas Asmara; Alimon, Abd Rasak; Karim, Roselina; Karsani, Saiful Anuar; Sabow, Azad Behnan

    2016-09-01

    The study examined the effects of blend of 80% canola oil and 20% palm oil (BCPO) on nutrient intake and digestibility, growth performance, rumen fermentation and fatty acids (FA) in goats. Twenty-four Boer bucks were randomly assigned to diets containing 0, 4 and 8% BCPO on a dry matter basis, fed for 100 days and slaughtered. Diet did not affect feed efficiency, growth performance, intake and digestibility of all nutrients except ether extract. Intakes and digestibilities of ether extract, unsaturated fatty acids (FA) and total FA were higher (P < 0.05) while digestibility of C18:0 was lower (P < 0.05) in oil-fed goats than the control goats. Total volatile FA, acetate, butyrate, acetate/propionate ratio and methane decreased (P < 0.05) with increasing BCPO but propionate, NH3 -N and rumen pH did not differ between diets. Ruminal concentration of C18:0, n-3 FA and total FA increased (P < 0.05) while C12:0, C14:0, C15:0 and n-6 FA decreased with increasing BCPO. Analysis of the FA composition of Triceps brachii muscle showed that concentrations of C16:0, C14:0 and C18:2n-6 were lower (P < 0.05) while C18:1n-9, C18:3n-3 and C20:5n-3 were higher in oil-fed goats compared with control goats. Dietary BCPO altered muscle lipids without having detrimental effects on nutrient intake and digestibility and growth performance in goats. © 2015 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  2. Effect of replacing solvent-extracted canola meal with high-oil traditional canola, high-oleic acid canola, or high-erucic acid rapeseed meals on rumen fermentation, digestibility, milk production, and milk fatty acid composition in lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Hristov, A N; Domitrovich, C; Wachter, A; Cassidy, T; Lee, C; Shingfield, K J; Kairenius, P; Davis, J; Brown, J

    2011-08-01

    The objective of this experiment was to investigate the effects of replacing conventional, solvent-extracted canola meal (control; CTRL) with high oil content; conventional, mechanically extracted canola meal (CMEC); high-oleic, low polyunsaturated fatty acid (FA) canola meal (HOLL); and high-erucic acid, low-glucosinolate rapeseed meal (RPS) on rumen function, digestibility, milk production, and milk FA composition in lactating dairy cows. The experimental design was a replicated 4×4 Latin square with 8 lactating dairy cows. Four of the cows were ruminally cannulated. All oilseed meals were included at approximately 12 to 13% of dietary dry matter (DM). Crude protein and fat concentrations (% of DM) of the meals were 43 and 3.1%, 32.8 and 16.1%, 45.2 and 13.7%, and 34.3 and 17.9% for CTRL, CMEC, HOLL, and RPS, respectively. All diets were formulated to supply net energy of lactation in excess of requirements. The CMEC and RPS diets were predicted to be about 1% deficient in metabolizable protein. Relative to the CTRL, inclusion of high-oil seed meals in the diet lowered ruminal acetate concentration and the molar acetate:propionate ratio and decreased DM intake. Milk yield generally followed DM intake and was lower for CMEC and RPS than the CTRL. Treatments had no effect on milk composition, other than an increase in milk urea nitrogen concentration for HOLL. Fat-corrected milk (3.5%) feed efficiency was increased by HOLL and RPS compared with CTRL. Urinary urea nitrogen losses were increased by HOLL, which, as a consequence, increased the ammonia-emitting potential of manure. The ratio of milk N-to-N intake was greater for CMEC and RPS. Replacing solvent-extracted canola meal with the high-oil meal decreased milk fat 12:0, 14:0, 16:0, and total saturated FA content and enhanced cis-9 18:1 and total monounsaturated FA concentrations. Relative to the CTRL, canola increased total trans FA in milk, whereas inclusion of HOLL in the diet increased trans-11 18:1 and

  3. Fuel oil and kerosene sales 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    This publication contains the 1995 survey results of the ``Annual Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales Report`` (Form EIA-821). This is the seventh year that the survey data have appeared in a separate publication. Except for the kerosene and on-highway diesel information, data presented in Tables 1 through 12 (Sales of Fuel Oil and Kerosene) present results of the EIA-821 survey. Tables 13 through 24 (Adjusted Sales of Fuel Oil and Kerosene) include volumes that are based on the EIA-821 survey but have been adjusted to equal the product supplied volumes published in the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). 24 tabs.

  4. Chemical profile, energy values, and protein molecular structure characteristics of biofuel/bio-oil co-products (carinata meal) in comparison with canola meal.

    PubMed

    Xin, Hangshu; Yu, Peiqiang

    2013-04-24

    To our knowledge, little information exists on nutritive values and molecular structural characteristics associated with protein biopolymers of carinata meal from biofuel and bio-oil processing. The objectives of this study were to investigate (1) chemical compositions; (2) protein and carbohydrate subfractions partitioned by the Cornell Net Carbohydrate and Protein System (CNCPS); (3) truly digestible nutrients and energy values; (4) protein conformation spectral characteristics using the ATR-FT/IR technique; and (5) the correlation between protein intrinsic structural features and nutrient profiles of carinata meal in comparison with conventional canola meal as references. The results showed that carinata meal was higher (p < 0.05) in soluble crude protein (SCP, 55.6% CP) and nonprotein nitrogen (NPN, 38.5% CP) and lower in acid detergent insoluble crude protein (ADICP, 1.3% CP) compared to canola meal. Although no differences were found in CP and carbohydrate (CHO) contents, CNCPS protein and carbohydrate subfractions were different (p < 0.05) between carinata meal and canola meal. Carinata meal has similar contents of total digestible nutrient (TDN) and predicted energy values to canoal meal (p > 0.05). As for protein spectral features, much greater IR absorbance in amide I height and area as well as α-helix and β-sheet height for carinata meal by 20-31% (p < 0.05) was found compared with canola meal; however, results from agglomerative hierarchical cluster analysis (CLA) and principal component analysis (PCA) indicated these two meals could not be distinguished completely within the protein spectrum (ca. 1728-1478 cm(-1)). Additionally, close correlations were observed between protein structural parameters and protein nutrient profiles and subfractions. All the comparisons between carinata meal and canola meal in our study indicated that carinata meal could be used as a potential high-protein supplement source for ruminants. Further study is needed on more

  5. 30 CFR 56.6309 - Fuel oil requirements for ANFO.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fuel oil requirements for ANFO. 56.6309 Section... § 56.6309 Fuel oil requirements for ANFO. (a) Liquid hydrocarbon fuels with flash points lower than that of No. 2 diesel oil (125 °F) shall not be used to prepare ammonium nitrate-fuel oil, except that...

  6. 14 CFR 25.343 - Design fuel and oil loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Design fuel and oil loads. 25.343 Section... Design fuel and oil loads. (a) The disposable load combinations must include each fuel and oil load in... this subpart. In addition— (1) The structure must be designed for a condition of zero fuel and oil...

  7. 14 CFR 25.343 - Design fuel and oil loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Design fuel and oil loads. 25.343 Section... Design fuel and oil loads. (a) The disposable load combinations must include each fuel and oil load in... this subpart. In addition— (1) The structure must be designed for a condition of zero fuel and oil...

  8. 30 CFR 57.6309 - Fuel oil requirements for ANFO.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Fuel oil requirements for ANFO. 57.6309 Section... Transportation-Surface and Underground § 57.6309 Fuel oil requirements for ANFO. (a) Liquid hydrocarbon fuels... nitrate-fuel oil, except that diesel fuels with flash points no lower than 100 °F may be used at...

  9. 30 CFR 57.6309 - Fuel oil requirements for ANFO.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fuel oil requirements for ANFO. 57.6309 Section... Transportation-Surface and Underground § 57.6309 Fuel oil requirements for ANFO. (a) Liquid hydrocarbon fuels... nitrate-fuel oil, except that diesel fuels with flash points no lower than 100 °F may be used at...

  10. 30 CFR 57.6309 - Fuel oil requirements for ANFO.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fuel oil requirements for ANFO. 57.6309 Section... Transportation-Surface and Underground § 57.6309 Fuel oil requirements for ANFO. (a) Liquid hydrocarbon fuels... nitrate-fuel oil, except that diesel fuels with flash points no lower than 100 °F may be used at...

  11. Military jet fuel from shale oil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coppola, E. N.

    1980-01-01

    Investigations leading to a specification for aviation turbine fuel produced from whole crude shale oil are described. Refining methods involving hydrocracking, hydrotreating, and extraction processes are briefly examined and their production capabilities are assessed.

  12. Fuel oil and kerosene sales 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-29

    This publication contains the 1992 survey results of the ``Annual Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales Report`` (Form EIA-821). This is the fourth year that the survey data have appeared in a separate publication. Prior to the 1989 report, the statistics appeared in the Petroleum Marketing Annual (PMA) for reference year 1988 and the Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM for reference years 1984 through 1987. The 1992 edition marks the ninth annual presentation of the results of the ongoing ``Annual Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales Report`` survey. Except for the kerosene and on-highway diesel information, data presented in Tables 1 through 12 (Sales of Fuel Oil and Kerosene) present results of the EIA-821 survey. Tables 13 through 24 (Adjusted Sales of Fuel Oil and Kerosene) include volumes that are based on the EIA-821 survey but have been adjusted to equal the products supplied volumes published in the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA).

  13. Fuel oil and kerosene sales 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-10-03

    This publication contains the 1993 survey results of the ``Annual Fuel Oil and Kerosene, Sales Report`` (Form EIA-821). This is the fifth year that the survey data have appeared in a separate publication. Prior to the 1989 report, the statistics appeared in the Petroleum Marketing Annual (PMA) for reference year 1988 and the Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM) for reference years 1984 through 1987. The 1993 edition marks the 10th annual presentation of the results of the ongoing ``Annual Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales Report`` survey. Except for the kerosene and on-highway diesel information, data presented in Tables 1 through 12 (Sales of Fuel Oil and Kerosene) present results of the EIA-821 survey. Tables 13 through 24 (Adjusted Sales of Fuel Oil and Kerosene) include volumes that are based on the EIA-821 survey but have been adjusted to equal the products supplied volumes published in the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA).

  14. Heterologous expression of phaC2 gene and poly-3-hydroxyalkanoate production by recombinant Cupriavidus necator strains using canola oil as carbon source.

    PubMed

    Valdés, J; Kutralam-Muniasamy, G; Vergara-Porras, B; Marsch, R; Pérez-Guevara, F; López-Cuellar, M R

    2017-08-19

    Many heterologous transformation studies have been carried out using the Cupriavidus necator PHB(-4) strain to investigate the expression characteristics of various polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthase enzymes. In this study, we generated a recombinant C. necator PHB(-4) strain by transforming a plasmid (pMRC03) harbouring the synthetic phaC2 gene of Pseudomonas putida CA-3. Under conditions favourable for expression of the phaC2 P.putCA-3 gene, canola oil was used as carbon source for the synthesis of PHAs. The expressed synthase polymerised monomers of 3-hydroxybutyrate (3-HB), 3-hydroxyvalerate (3-HV) and 3-hydroxyhexanoate (3-HHx) in the recombinant C. necator PHB(-4) (pMRC03) strain. We then co-expressed the phaC2P.putCA-3 gene with the native phaC1C.ne gene in wild type Cupriavidus necator H16 (C. necator H16 (pMRC03)). This co-expression produced a PHA blend of 3-HB, 3-HV, 3-HHx and 3-hydroxyoctanoate (3-HO) monomers in the presence of canola oil. Gas chromatography analysis revealed the presence of 94mol% 3-HB, 1mol% 3-HV, 4mol% 3-HHx and 1mol% 3-HO in a tetra-polymer. Thus, we confirmed that a synthetic phaC2 gene encoding the synthase enzyme is functionally active with substrates ranging from short to medium chain length PHAs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Evaluation of alkyl esters from Camelina sativa oil as biodiesel and as blend components in ultra low-sulfur diesel fuel.

    PubMed

    Moser, Bryan R; Vaughn, Steven F

    2010-01-01

    Methyl and ethyl esters were prepared from camelina [Camelina sativa (L.) Crantz] oil by homogenous base-catalyzed transesterification for evaluation as biodiesel fuels. Camelina oil contained high percentages of linolenic (32.6 wt.%), linoleic (19.6 wt.%), and oleic (18.6 wt.%) acids. Consequently, camelina oil methyl and ethyl esters (CSME and CSEE) exhibited poor oxidative stabilities and high iodine values versus methyl esters prepared from canola, palm, and soybean oils (CME, PME, and SME). Other fuel properties of CSME and CSEE were similar to CME, PME, and SME, such as low temperature operability, acid value, cetane number, kinematic viscosity, lubricity, sulfur and phosphorous contents, as well as surface tension. As blend components in ultra low-sulfur diesel fuel, CSME and CSEE were essentially indistinguishable from SME and soybean oil ethyl ester blends with regard to low temperature operability, kinematic viscosity, lubricity, and surface tension.

  16. Rapeseed and safflower oils as diesel fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, C.L.; Haines, H.; Chase, C.

    1993-12-31

    During the past decade the US has become increasingly dependent upon imported oil to meet our energy demands. Nearly 50 percent of our US consumption of petroleum is imported. Research has shown that agricultural crops can be used to reduce this dependence. Vegetable oil as an alternative fuel has been under study at the Univ. of Idaho since 1979. Since then the Idaho research team has pioneered the use of rapeseed oil as a diesel fuel substitute. Idaho`s interdisciplinary team includes plant breeding, plant modification, process development and scale-up, engine testing, and economics. Researchers in Montana have studied safflower oil as a potential diesel fuel replacement since 1983. This project, aimed for use of safflower oil in railroad engines, involves genetics, agronomics, economics and contract engine testing.

  17. Fuel oil and kerosene sales 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-27

    This publication contains the 1994 survey results of the ``Annual Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales Report`` (Form EIA-821). This is the sixth year that the survey data have appeared in a separate publication. Prior to the 1989 report, the statistics appeared in the Petroleum Marketing Annual (PMA)for reference year 1988 and the Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM) for reference years 1984 through 1987. The 1994 edition marks the 11th annual presentation of the results of the ongoing ``Annual Fuel Oil and Kerosene Sales Report`` survey. Distillate and residual fuel oil sales continued to move in opposite directions during 1994. Distillate sales rose for the third year in a row, due to a growing economy. Residual fuel oil sales, on the other hand, declined for the sixth year in a row, due to competitive natural gas prices, and a warmer heating season than in 1993. Distillate fuel oil sales increased 4.4 percent while residual fuel oil sales declined 1.6 percent. Kerosene sales decreased 1.4 percent in 1994.

  18. 33 CFR 155.320 - Fuel oil and bulk lubricating oil discharge containment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fuel oil and bulk lubricating oil... VESSELS Vessel Equipment § 155.320 Fuel oil and bulk lubricating oil discharge containment. (a) A ship of... area under or around each fuel oil or bulk lubricating oil tank vent, overflow, and fill pipe, that: (1...

  19. 33 CFR 155.320 - Fuel oil and bulk lubricating oil discharge containment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fuel oil and bulk lubricating oil... VESSELS Vessel Equipment § 155.320 Fuel oil and bulk lubricating oil discharge containment. (a) A ship of... area under or around each fuel oil or bulk lubricating oil tank vent, overflow, and fill pipe, that: (1...

  20. 33 CFR 155.320 - Fuel oil and bulk lubricating oil discharge containment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Fuel oil and bulk lubricating oil... VESSELS Vessel Equipment § 155.320 Fuel oil and bulk lubricating oil discharge containment. (a) A ship of... area under or around each fuel oil or bulk lubricating oil tank vent, overflow, and fill pipe, that: (1...

  1. 33 CFR 155.320 - Fuel oil and bulk lubricating oil discharge containment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Fuel oil and bulk lubricating oil... VESSELS Vessel Equipment § 155.320 Fuel oil and bulk lubricating oil discharge containment. (a) A ship of... area under or around each fuel oil or bulk lubricating oil tank vent, overflow, and fill pipe, that: (1...

  2. Filtration test of sunflower oil for fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, J.C.; Backer, L.F.

    1983-01-01

    A filtration system was developed to test for particulate matter in 1.6 liter samples of fuel. Four micron, absolute, filter paper was used. Four alkali refined sunflower oils, two of which were also dewaxed, were tested along with 50:50% and 25:75% blends with No. 2-D diesel fuel. The two sunflower oils that were not dewaxed were darker and cloudier than the dewaxed oils and clogged the test filter in less than 10 minutes. Clogging also occurred for the 50:50% and 25:75% blends of these oils at all temperatures and pressures tested. The two dewaxed sunflower oils did not clog the filter in the ten minute tests. The flow rates of the latter two oils and their blends decreased only slightly with time.

  3. Biodiesel Derived from a Source Enriched in Palmitoleic Acid, Macadamia Nut Oil

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Biodiesel is an alternative diesel fuel commonly produced from commodity vegetable oils such as palm, rapeseeed (canola) and soybean. These oils generally have fatty acid profiles that vary within the range of C16 and C18 fatty acids. Thus, the biodiesel fuels derived from these oils possess the c...

  4. Testing and preformance measurement of straight vegetable oils as an alternative fuel for diesel engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshminarayanan, Arunachalam

    Rising fuel prices, growing energy demand, concerns over domestic energy security and global warming from greenhouse gas emissions have triggered the global interest in bio-energy and bio-fuel crop development. Backlash from these concerns can result in supply shocks of traditional fossil fuels and create immense economic pressure. It is thus widely argued that bio-fuels would particularly benefit developing countries by off-setting their dependencies on imported petroleum. Domestically, the transportation sector accounts for almost 40% of liquid fuel consumption, while on-farm application like tractors and combines for agricultural purposes uses close to an additional 18%. It is estimated that 40% of the farm budget can be attributed to the fuel costs. With the cost of diesel continuously rising, farmers are now looking at using Straight Vegetable Oil (SVO) as an alternative fuel by producing their own fuel crops. This study evaluates conventional diesel compared to the use of SVO like Camelina, Canola and Juncea grown on local farms in Colorado for their performance and emissions on a John Deere 4045 Tier-II engine. Additionally, physical properties like density and viscosity, metal/mineral content, and cold flow properties like CFPP and CP of these oils were measured using ASTM standards and compared to diesel. It was found that SVOs did not show significant differences compared to diesel fuel with regards to engine emissions, but did show an increase in thermal efficiency. Therefore, this study supports the continued development of SVO production as a viable alternative to diesel fuels, particularly for on-farm applications. The need for providing and developing a sustainable, economic and environmental friendly fuel alternative has taken an aggressive push which will require a strong multidisciplinary education in the field of bio-energy. Commercial bio-energy development has the potential to not only alleviate the energy concerns, but also to give renewed

  5. Effects of high-gamma-linolenic acid canola oil compared with borage oil on reproduction, growth, and brain and behavioral development in mice.

    PubMed

    Wainwright, Patricia E; Huang, Yung-Sheng; DeMichele, Stephen J; Xing, HuaCheng; Liu, Jim-Wen; Chuang, Lu-Te; Biederman, Jessica

    2003-02-01

    Previous research in rats and mice has suggested that gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) derived from borage oil (BO: 23% GLA) may be an appropriate source for increasing levels of long-chain n-6 FA in the developing brain. Recently, transgenic technology has made available a highly enriched GLA seed oil from the canola plant (HGCO: 36% GLA). The first objective of this study was to compare the effects of diets containing equal levels of GLA (23%) from either BO or HGCO on reproduction, pup development, and pup brain FA composition in mice. The second objective was to compare the effects of the HGCO diluted to 23% GLA (GLA-23) with those of undiluted HGCO containing 36% GLA (GLA-36). The diets were fed to the dams prior to conception and throughout pregnancy and lactation, as well as to the pups after weaning. The behavioral development of the pups was measured 12 d after birth, and anxiety in the adult male offspring was assessed using the plus maze. The findings show that despite equivalent levels of GLA, GLA-23 differed from BO in that it reduced pup body weight and was associated with a slight increase in neonatal pup attrition. However, there were no significant effects on pup behavioral development or on performance in the plus maze. An increase in dietary GLA resulted in an increase in brain 20:4n-6 and 22:4n-6, with a corresponding decrease in 22:6n-3. Again, despite their similar levels of GLA, these effects tended to be larger in GLA-23 than in BO. In comparison with GLA-23, GLA-36 had larger effects on growth and brain FA composition but no differences with respect to effects on reproduction and behavioral development. These findings suggest that the HGCO can be used as an alternative source of GLA.

  6. Sunflower oil methyl ester as diesel fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Hassett, D.J.; Hasan, R.A.

    1982-01-01

    Methyl ester formation represents one approach to overcome the problems associated with the relatively high viscosity of sunflower oil when used as a diesel fuel replacement. Sunflower oil methyl ester is being prepared at the University of North Dakota Engieering Experiment Station. Physical and chemical properties of this material at varying levels of refinement and purity will be used to define fuel properties. Engine testing is being carried out to determine if the fouling characteristics of methyl ester are significantly less than those of sunflower oil. 1 figure, 1 table.

  7. Effect-directed analysis of cold-pressed hemp, flax and canola seed oils by planar chromatography linked with (bio)assays and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Teh, Sue-Siang; Morlock, Gertrud E

    2015-11-15

    Cold-pressed hemp, flax and canola seed oils are healthy oils for human consumption as these are rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids and bioactive phytochemicals. However, bioactive information on the food intake side is mainly focused on target analysis. For more comprehensive information with regard to effects, single bioactive compounds present in the seed oil extracts were detected by effect-directed assays, like bioassays or an enzymatic assay, directly linked with chromatography and further characterized by mass spectrometry. This effect-directed analysis is a streamlined method for the analysis of bioactive compounds in the seed oil extracts. All effective compounds with regard to the five assays or bioassays applied were detected in the samples, meaning also bioactive breakdown products caused during oil processing, residues or contaminants, aside the naturally present bioactive phytochemicals. The investigated cold-pressed oils contained compounds that exert antioxidative, antimicrobial, acetylcholinesterase inhibitory and estrogenic activities. This effect-directed analysis can be recommended for bioactivity profiling of food to obtain profound effect-directed information on the food intake side.

  8. Oil-fueled equipment research: program plan

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchinson, R.A.

    1986-09-01

    The purpose of this document is to define the basis for a US Department of Energy (DOE) program for oil-fueled equipment research. The needs for an benefits of the technical research are explained, and a research plan is presented. This program was developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) with assistance from Steven Winters Associates and input from Brookhaven National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and many representatives of the heating-oil and oil-fueled equipment industries. The private sector input was extensive, obtained through a series of workshops and formal and informal surveys. The planning effort was directed by the Building Equipment Division of the DOE Office of Buildings and Community Systems. The objective of the oil-fueled equipment research program is to develop the technological basis for new equipment and operating strategies based on improved understanding of oil-burning fundamentals. The program will provide the oil-fueled equipment industry with the basis for developing a new, high-tech generation of equipment, and the oil distributors and equipment installers and consumers with improved knowledge of how best to install and operate such equipment.

  9. Effect of Tocotrienols enriched canola oil on glycemic control and oxidative status in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: A randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Vafa, Mohammadreza; Haghighat, Neda; Moslehi, Nazanin; Eghtesadi, Shahriar; Heydari, Iraj

    2015-01-01

    Background: Tocotrienols have been shown to improve glycemic control and redox balance in an animal study, but their effects on patients with diabetes are unknown. The study aimed to investigate whether tocotrienols improves glycemic control, insulin sensitivity, and oxidative stress in individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Materials and Methods: This study was a double-blinded, placebo-controlled, randomized trial. A total of 50 patients, aged 35-60 years, with T2DM treated by noninsulin hypoglycemic drugs were randomly assigned to receive either 15 mL/day tocotrienols (200 mg) enriched canola oil (n = 25) or pure canola oil (n = 25) for 8 weeks. Fasting blood sugar (FBS), fasting insulin, total antioxidant capacity (TAC), malondialdehyde (MDA), and homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) were determined before and after the intervention. The data were compared between and within groups, before and after the intervention. Results: Baseline characteristics of participants including age, sex, physical activity, disease duration, and type of drug consumption were not significantly different between the two groups. In tocotrienol enriched canola oil, FBS (mean percent change: –15.4% vs. 3.9%; P = 0.006) and MDA (median percent change: –35.6% vs. 16.3%; P = 0.003) were significantly reduced while TAC was significantly increased (median percent change: 21.4% vs. 2.3%; P = 0.001) compared to pure canola oil. At the end of the study, patients who treated with tocotrienols had lower FBS (P = 0.023) and MDA (P = 0.044) compared to the pure canola oil group. However, tocotrienols had no effect on insulin concentrations and HOMA-IR. Conclusion: Tocotrienols can improve FBS concentrations and modifies redox balance in T2DM patients with poor glycemic control and can be considered in combination with hypoglycemic drugs to better control of T2DM. PMID:26600828

  10. Peanut varieties: potential for fuel oil

    SciTech Connect

    Hammons, R.O.

    1981-01-01

    Research is beginning in farm crushing of peanuts into fuel oil, the high-protein residue being used as livestock feed. Thirty peanut genotypes were investigated for oil and protein yields in field trials in Georgia. For 11 varieties in an irrigated test, mean oil contents (dry base) were in the 49.7-52.7% range, and the level of protein was in the 22.60-26.70% range. Wider variations in oil and protein contents were found in 19 other genotypes selected for possible use as an oil crop. Breeding for high oil yield has not been practiced in US peanut breeding programs. Convergent improvement to attain higher levels of oil content, shell-out percentage, and stable yield will require 6-10 generations of crossing, backcrossing, selection, and testing.

  11. Consider Upgrading Pyrolysis Oils Into Renewale Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Holmgren, J.; Marinangeli, R.; Nair, P.; Elliott, D.; Bain, R.

    2008-09-01

    To enable a sustained supply of biomass-based transportation fuels, the capability to process feedstocks outside the food chain must be developed. Significant industry efforts are underway to develop these new technologies, such as converting cellulosic wastes to ethanol. An alternate route being pursued involves using a fast pyrolysis operation to generate pyrolysis oil (pyoil for short). Current efforts are focused on developing a thermochemical platform to convert pyoils to renewable gasoline, diesel and jet fuel. The fuels produced will be indistinguishable from their fossil fuel counterparts and, therefore, will be compatible with existing transport and distribution infrastructure.

  12. Abdominal adiposity, insulin and bone quality in young male rats fed a high-fat diet containing soybean or canola oil

    PubMed Central

    da Costa, Carlos Alberto Soares; Carlos, Aluana Santana; de Sousa dos Santos, Aline; Monteiro, Alexandra Maria Vieira; de Moura, Egberto Gaspar; Nascimento-Saba, Celly Cristina Alves

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: A low ratio of omega-6/omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids is associated with healthy bone properties. However, fatty diets can induce obesity. Our objective was to evaluate intra-abdominal adiposity, insulin, and bone growth in rats fed a high-fat diet containing low ratios of omega-6/omega-3 provided in canola oil. METHODS: After weaning, rats were grouped and fed either a control diet (7S), a high-fat diet containing soybean oil (19S) or a high-fat diet of canola oil (19C) until they were 60 days old. Differences were considered to be significant if p<0.05. RESULTS: After 60 days, the 19S and 19C groups showed more energy intake, body density growth and intra-abdominal fat mass. However, the 19S group had a higher area (200%) and a lower number (44%) of adipocytes, while the 7S and 19C groups did not differ. The serum concentrations of glucose and insulin and the insulin resistance index were significantly increased in the 19C group (15%, 56%, and 78%, respectively) compared to the 7S group. Bone measurements of the 19S and 19C groups showed a higher femur mass (25%) and a higher lumbar vertebrae mass (11%) and length (5%). Computed tomography analysis revealed more radiodensity in the proximal femoral epiphysis and lumbar vertebrae of 19C group compared to the 7S and 19S groups. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that the amount and source of fat used in the diet after weaning increase body growth and fat depots and affect insulin resistance and, consequently, bone health. PMID:22012056

  13. Upgrading of raw oil into advanced fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    The overall objective of the research effort is the determination of the minimum processing requirements to produce high energy density fuels (HEDF) having acceptable fuel specifications. The program encompasses assessing current technology capability; selecting acceptable processing and refining schemes; and generating samples of advanced test fuels. The Phase I Baseline Program is intended to explore the processing alternatives for producing advanced HEDF from two raw synfuel feedstocks, one from Mild Coal Gasification as exemplified by the COALITE process and one from Colorado shale oil. Eight key tasks have been identified as follows: (1) Planning and Environmental Permitting; (2) Transporting and Storage of Raw Fuel Sources and Products; (3) Screening of Processing and Upgrading Schemes; (4) Proposed Upgrading Schemes for Advanced Fuel; (5) Upgrading of Raw Oil into Advanced Fuel (6) Packaging and Shipment of Advanced Fuels; (7) Updated Technical and Economic Assessment; and, (8) Final Report of Phase I Efforts. This topical report summarizes the operations and results of the Phase I Task 5 sample preparation program. The specific objectives of Task 5 were to: Perform laboratory characterization tests on the raw COALITE feed, the intermediate liquids to the required hydroprocessing units and final advanced fuels and byproducts; and produce a minimum of 25-gal of Category I test fuel for evaluation by DOE and its contractors.

  14. Transesterification of vegetable oils for fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Kusy, P.F.

    1982-01-01

    A continuous procedure was developed and tested, in a stepwise manner, for the transesterification of soybean and sunflower oils using ethanol. Good yields of ethyl soyate and sunflowerate were achieved, and the products made agreed very closely with those made by a direct esterification of the acids of vegetable oils and ethanol. The viscosity of the esters was considerably less than that of the oils and more nearly like that of diesel fuel. Because the ethyl soyate and sunflowerate have many components which solidify at relatively high temperatures, cloud points of the fuels are about 8 to 12/sup 0/C, which indicates they would not be readily usable at or below that temperature without dilution with No. 1 or No. 2 diesel fuel and/or the addition of additives. 3 figures, 7 tables.

  15. Comparison of growth and fatty acid metabolism in rats fed diets containing equal levels of gamma-linolenic acid from high gamma-linolenic acid canola oil or borage oil.

    PubMed

    Palombo, J D; DeMichele, S J; Liu, J W; Bistrian, B R; Huang, Y S

    2000-09-01

    We have utilized transgenic technology to develop a new source of gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) using the canola plant as a host. The aim of the present study was to compare the growth and fatty acid metabolism in rats fed equal amounts of GLA obtained from the transgenic canola plant relative to GLA from the borage plant. Young male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 10/group) were randomized and fed a purified AIN93G diet (10% lipid by weight) containing either a mixture of high GLA canola oil (HGCO) and corn oil or a control diet containing borage oil (BO) for 6 wk. GLA accounted for 23%, of the triglyceride fatty acids in both diets. Growth and diet consumption were monitored every 2-3 d throughout the study. At study termination, the fatty acid composition of the liver and plasma phospholipids was analyzed by gas chromatography. The growth and diet consumption of the HGCO group were similar to the BO group. There were no adverse effects of either diet on the general health or appearance of the rats, or on the morphology of the major organs. There was no significant difference between the diet groups for total percentage of n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids present in either the total or individual phospholipid fractions of liver or plasma. The relative percentage of GLA and its main metabolite, arachidonic acid, in each phospholipid fraction of liver or plasma were also similar between groups. The percentage of 18:2n-6 in liver phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylinositol/serine was higher (P < 0.05) and 22:5n-6 was lower in the HGCO group than the BO group. This finding could be attributed to the higher 18:3n-3 content in the HGCO diet than the BO diet. Results from this long-term feeding study of rats show for the first time that a diet containing transgenically modified canola oil was well-tolerated, and had similar biological effects, i.e., growth characteristics and hepatic metabolism of n-6 fatty acids, as a diet containing borage oil.

  16. Moringa Oleifera Oil: A Possible Source of Biodiesel

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Biodiesel is an alternative to petroleum-based conventional diesel fuel and is defined as the mono-alkyl esters of vegetable oils and animal fats. Biodiesel has been prepared from numerous vegetable oils, such as canola (rapeseed), cottonseed, palm, peanut, soybean and sunflower oils as well as a v...

  17. Analysis of yield and oil from a series of canola breeding trials. Part I. Fitting factor analytic mixed models with pedigree information.

    PubMed

    Beeck, C P; Cowling, W A; Smith, A B; Cullis, B R

    2010-11-01

    In this paper multiplicative mixed models have been used for the analysis of multi-environment trial (MET) data for canola oil and grain yield. Information on pedigrees has been included to allow for the modelling of additive and nonadditive genetic effects. The MET data set included a total of 19 trials (synonymous with sites or environments), which were sown across southern Australia in 2007 and 2008. Each trial was designed as a p-rep design using DiGGeR with the default prespecified spatial model. Lines in their first year of testing were unreplicated, whereas there were two or three replications of advanced lines or varieties. Pedigree information on a total of 578 entries was available, and there were 69 entries that had unknown pedigrees. The degree of inbreeding varied from 0 (55 entries) to nearly fully inbred (337 entries). Subsamples of 2 g harvested grain were taken from each plot for determination of seed oil percentage by near infrared reflectance spectroscopy. The MET analysis for both yield and oil modelled genetic effects in different trials using factor analytic models and the residual plot effects for each trial were modelled using spatial techniques. Models in which pedigree information was included provided significantly better fits to both yield and oil data.

  18. Process and composition for stabilized distillate fuel oils

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, D.K.

    1987-03-10

    A process is described for stabilizing distillate fuel oil which comprises adding to the fuel oil an effective stabilizing amount of a mixture of (a) N-(2-aminoethyl)piperazine, (b) triethylenetetramine, and (c) N,N-diethylhydroxylamine.

  19. Process and composition for color stabilized distillate fuel oils

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, D.K.

    1987-03-03

    A process is described for inhibiting color deterioration of distillate fuel oil which comprises adding to the fuel oil an effective inhibiting amount of a mixture of (a) N-(2-aminoethyl) piperazine and (b) N, N-diethylhydroxylamine.

  20. Bunker C. fuel oil reduces mallard egg hatchability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Szaro, R.C.

    1979-01-01

    Assessment of the effect of Bunker C fuel oil on artificially-incubated mallard eggs. Eggshell applications of 5-50 ul of Bunker C fuel oil were made on day 8 of incubation; measured hatching success.

  1. Carcass traits, meat yield and fatty acid composition of adipose tissues and Supraspinatus muscle in goats fed blend of canola oil and palm oil.

    PubMed

    Adeyemi, K D; Ebrahimi, M; Samsudin, A A; Sabow, A B; Sazili, A Q

    2015-01-01

    Dietary fats can alter the deposition and distribution of body fats in ruminants. The deposition and distribution of body fat play a vital role in the quality of ruminant carcasses and are of great commercial value since they influence the profitability and consumer acceptability of ruminant meat. The current study examined the effects of dietary blend of 80 % canola oil and 20 % palm oil (BCPO) on carcass characteristics, meat yield and accretion of fatty acid (FA) in subcutaneous, omental, perirenal, and mesentery adipose depots and m. supraspinatus (SS) in goats. Twenty four Boer crossbred bucks (BW 20.54 ± 0.47 kg) were randomly assigned to diets containing on DM basis 0, 4 and 8 % BCPO, fed for 100 d and harvested. Diet had no effect (P > 0.05) on slaughter weight, dressing percentage, carcass and non-carcass components, meat yield, color, moisture and carotenoid contents and weight of adipose tissues in goats. The proportion of C18:1n-9 and cis-9 trans-11 CLA in the omental, perirenal and SS was higher (P < 0.05) in goats fed 4 and 8 % BCPO compared with the control goats. Dietary BCPO reduced (P < 0.05) the proportion of C14:0 in the omental, perirenal and mesentery depots, C18:0 in the perirenal depot, C16:0 in the SS and C16:1n-7 in the SS, omental and perirenal tissues. Dietary BCPO enhanced the proportion of C18:1 trans-11 Vaccenic and C18:3n-3 in SS and C20:5n-3 in SS and mesentery depot. No significant changes were found in the FA composition of subcutaneous depot. Results indicate that dietary BCPO can be utilized to alter the FA composition of adipose tissues without detrimental effects on carcass characteristics in goats. Nonetheless, dietary BCPO is not an effective repartitioning agent for body fats in goats.

  2. 46 CFR 58.01-10 - Fuel oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Fuel oil. 58.01-10 Section 58.01-10 Shipping COAST GUARD... SYSTEMS General Requirements § 58.01-10 Fuel oil. (a) The following limits apply to the use of oil as fuel: (1) Except as otherwise permitted by this section, no fuel oil with a flashpoint of less than 60...

  3. 46 CFR 58.01-10 - Fuel oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Fuel oil. 58.01-10 Section 58.01-10 Shipping COAST GUARD... SYSTEMS General Requirements § 58.01-10 Fuel oil. (a) The following limits apply to the use of oil as fuel: (1) Except as otherwise permitted by this section, no fuel oil with a flashpoint of less than 60...

  4. 46 CFR 58.01-10 - Fuel oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fuel oil. 58.01-10 Section 58.01-10 Shipping COAST GUARD... SYSTEMS General Requirements § 58.01-10 Fuel oil. (a) The following limits apply to the use of oil as fuel: (1) Except as otherwise permitted by this section, no fuel oil with a flashpoint of less than 60...

  5. 46 CFR 58.01-10 - Fuel oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Fuel oil. 58.01-10 Section 58.01-10 Shipping COAST GUARD... SYSTEMS General Requirements § 58.01-10 Fuel oil. (a) The following limits apply to the use of oil as fuel: (1) Except as otherwise permitted by this section, no fuel oil with a flashpoint of less than 60...

  6. 46 CFR 58.01-10 - Fuel oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Fuel oil. 58.01-10 Section 58.01-10 Shipping COAST GUARD... SYSTEMS General Requirements § 58.01-10 Fuel oil. (a) The following limits apply to the use of oil as fuel: (1) Except as otherwise permitted by this section, no fuel oil with a flashpoint of less than 60...

  7. 30 CFR 57.6309 - Fuel oil requirements for ANFO.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fuel oil requirements for ANFO. 57.6309 Section... Transportation-Surface and Underground § 57.6309 Fuel oil requirements for ANFO. (a) Liquid hydrocarbon fuels with flash points lower than that of No. 2 diesel oil (125 °F) shall not be used to prepare ammonium...

  8. 46 CFR 169.234 - Integral fuel oil tank examinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Integral fuel oil tank examinations. 169.234 Section 169... VESSELS Inspection and Certification Drydocking Or Hauling Out § 169.234 Integral fuel oil tank examinations. (a) Each fuel oil tank with at least one side integral to the vessel's hull and located within...

  9. 77 FR 39745 - Fuel Oil Systems for Emergency Power Supplies

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-05

    ... Commission's requirements regarding fuel oil systems for safety-related emergency diesel generators and oil-fueled gas turbine generators, including assurance of adequate fuel oil quality. DATES: Submit comments... Diesel Generators'' dated April 1979. This guide describes a method that the NRC staff considers...

  10. 46 CFR 169.234 - Integral fuel oil tank examinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Integral fuel oil tank examinations. 169.234 Section 169... VESSELS Inspection and Certification Drydocking Or Hauling Out § 169.234 Integral fuel oil tank examinations. (a) Each fuel oil tank with at least one side integral to the vessel's hull and located...

  11. 46 CFR 169.234 - Integral fuel oil tank examinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Integral fuel oil tank examinations. 169.234 Section 169... VESSELS Inspection and Certification Drydocking Or Hauling Out § 169.234 Integral fuel oil tank examinations. (a) Each fuel oil tank with at least one side integral to the vessel's hull and located...

  12. 46 CFR 169.234 - Integral fuel oil tank examinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Integral fuel oil tank examinations. 169.234 Section 169... VESSELS Inspection and Certification Drydocking Or Hauling Out § 169.234 Integral fuel oil tank examinations. (a) Each fuel oil tank with at least one side integral to the vessel's hull and located...

  13. 46 CFR 169.234 - Integral fuel oil tank examinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Integral fuel oil tank examinations. 169.234 Section 169... VESSELS Inspection and Certification Drydocking Or Hauling Out § 169.234 Integral fuel oil tank examinations. (a) Each fuel oil tank with at least one side integral to the vessel's hull and located...

  14. Landfill gas, canola, and biodiesel. Working towards a sustainable system [Snohomish County Biodiesel Project

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Terrill; Carveth, Deanna

    2010-02-01

    Snohomish County in western Washington State began converting its vehicle fleet to use a blend of biodiesel and petroleum diesel in 2005. As prices for biodiesel rose due to increased demand for this cleaner-burning fuel, Snohomish County looked to its farmers to grow this fuel locally. Suitable seed crops that can be crushed to extract oil for use as biodiesel feedstock include canola, mustard, and camelina. The residue, or mash, has high value as an animal feed. County farmers began with 52 acres of canola and mustard crops in 2006, increasing to 250 acres and 356 tons in 2008. In 2009, this number decreased to about 150 acres and 300 tons due to increased price for mustard seed.

  15. 40 CFR 89.330 - Lubricating oil and test fuels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Lubricating oil and test fuels. 89.330... Equipment Provisions § 89.330 Lubricating oil and test fuels. (a) Lubricating oil. Use the engine lubricating oil for testing that meets the requirements as specified by the manufacturer for a particular...

  16. 40 CFR 89.330 - Lubricating oil and test fuels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Lubricating oil and test fuels. 89.330... Equipment Provisions § 89.330 Lubricating oil and test fuels. (a) Lubricating oil. Use the engine lubricating oil for testing that meets the requirements as specified by the manufacturer for a particular...

  17. Mixed fuel composition. [fuel oil, coal powder, and polymer

    SciTech Connect

    Igarashi, T.; Ukigai, T.; Yamamura, M.

    1982-07-13

    A mixed fuel composition comprises (A) a fuel oil, (B) a coal powder having an (H)/(C) ratio according to the coalification band method in the range of 0.4-0.75 and an (O)/(C) ratio in the range of 0.09-0.18 and (C) a partially amidated copolymer obtained by reacting a copolymer of a polymerizable, unsaturated hydrocarbon and maleic anhydride with an aliphatic amine of 2-36 carbon-atoms or a salt thereof as a stabilizer.

  18. Agricultural waste derived fuel from oil meal and waste cooking oil.

    PubMed

    Chang, Fang-Chih; Tsai, Ming-Jer; Ko, Chun-Han

    2017-05-27

    Oil meal is a by-product of the oil industry (peanut meal, sesame meal, and camellia meal). Oil is extracted from seeds, and the leftover meal is then pelletized, and this process generates a large amount of waste oil meal in Taiwan. In this study, peanut meal, sesame meal, and camellia meal derived fuels were prepared from the waste oil meal with waste cooking oil. The combustion behaviors of the oil meal derived fuels were also investigated. The characteristics of the derived fuel made from oil meal with waste cooking oil showed that the ash content is less than 10% and its calorific value reached 5000 kcal/kg. Additionally, the activation energy of the oil meal and waste cooking oil was analyzed by the Kissinger method. The results show that the fuel prepared in this work from the oil meal mixed with waste cooking oil is suitable for use as an alternative fuel and also avoids food safety issues.

  19. Influences of Fuel Additive, Crude Palm and Waste Cooking Oil on Emission Characteristics of Small Diesel Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalid, Amir; Jaat, Norrizam; Manshoor, Bukhari; Zaman, Izzuddin; Sapit, Azwan; Razali, Azahari; Basharie, Mariam

    2017-08-01

    Major research has been conducted on the use of input products, such as rapeseed, canola, soybean, sunflower oil, waste cooking oil (WCO), crude palm oil (CPO) and crude jatropha oil as alternative fuels. Biodiesel is renewable, biodegradable and oxygenated, where it can be easily adopted by current existing conventional diesel engine without any major modification of the engine. To meet the future performance and emission regulations, is urged to improve the performance and exhaust emissions from biodiesel fuels. Hence, further investigation have been carried out on the emission characteristics of small diesel engine that fuelled by variant blending ratio of WCO and CPO with booster additive. For each of the biodiesel blends ratio from 5 to 15 percent volume which are WCO5, WCO10 and WCO15 for WCO biodiesel and CPO5, CPO10 and CPO15 for CPO biodiesel. The exhaust emissions were measured at engine speeds varied at 2000 rpm and 2500 rpm with different booster additive volume DRA (biodiesel without additive), DRB (0.2 ml) and DRC (0.4 ml). Emissions characteristics that had been measured were Hydrocarbon (HC), Carbon Monoxide (CO), Carbon Dioxide (CO2), Nitrogen Oxide (NOx), and smoke opacity. The results showed that increased of blending ratio with booster additive volume significantly decreased the CO emission, while increased in NOx and CO2 due to changes of fuel characteristics in biodiesel fuel blends.

  20. Proceedings of the 1995 SAE alternative fuels conference. P-294

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    This volume contains 32 papers and five panel discussions related to the fuel substitution of trucks, automobiles, buses, cargo handling equipment, diesel passenger cars, and pickup trucks. Fuels discussed include liquefied natural gas, natural gas, ethanol fuels, methanol fuels, dimethyl ether, methyl esters from various sources (rape oil, used cooking oils, soya, and canola oils), hydrogen fuels, and biodiesel. Other topics include fuel cell powered vehicles, infrastructure requirements for fuel substitution, and economics. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  1. Interactions between canola meal and flaxseed oil in the diets of White Lohmann hens on fatty acid profile and sensory characteristics of table eggs.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Erin M; Ryland, Donna; Aliani, Michel; House, James D

    2016-08-01

    The current study was designed to assess the fatty acid composition and sensory attributes of eggs procured from hens consuming diets containing canola meal (CM) and/or flax oil (FO). A total of 96 group-caged White Lohmann hens received 1 of 4 isonitrogenous and isoenergetic diets for a period of 4 weeks. Diets were arranged in a 2 × 2 factorial design, containing 24% canola meal, 7.5% flax oil, both, or neither (control). All yolk fatty acids were affected by flax oil inclusion, with the exception of stearic acid (SA) and docosapentaenoic acid (DPA). Only SA was affected by CM inclusion. Additionally, significant interactions between CM and FO were observed for linoleic acid (LA) and total omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), with DPA approaching significance (P = 0.069). Trained panelists (n = 8) evaluated 7 aroma ('egg', 'creamy', 'buttery', 'salty', 'sweet', 'barny', and 'oceanic') and 6 flavor ('egg', 'creamy', 'buttery', 'salty', 'brothy', and 'oceanic') attributes of cooked egg product. No significant differences (P > 0.05) in aroma attributes were found between eggs from different dietary treatments. However, egg, creamy, buttery, and oceanic flavors were significantly different between the dietary treatments (P < 0.05). While oceanic flavor significantly increased with inclusion of FO, egg and creamy flavors showed a significant decrease (P < 0.05). Although CM addition alone did not result in significant sensory changes, the pairing of CM and FO resulted in even greater sensory changes than using FO alone, specifically with regard to egg flavor. Results from partial least squares analyses showed a strong association between oceanic flavor and omega-3 PUFA. Oppositely, egg, creamy, and buttery flavors were more correlated with the presence of omega-6 PUFA and palmitic acid. This experiment provides evidence that the interaction between CM and FO in the White Lohmann hen diet results in sensory changes of cooked eggs associated in

  2. The effect of low calorie structured lipid palm mid fraction, virgin coconut oil and canola oil blend on rats body weight and plasma profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakar, Aftar Mizan Abu; Ayob, Mohd Khan; Maskat, Mohamad Yusof

    2016-11-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the effect of low calorie cocoa butter substitutes, the structured lipids (SLs) on rats' body weight and plasma lipid levels. The SLs were developed from a ternary blending of palm mid fraction (PMF), virgin coconut oil (VCO) and canola oil (CO). The optimized blends were then underwent enzymatic acidolysisusing sn-1,3-specific lipase. This process produced A12, a SL which hasa solid fat content almost comparable to cocoa butter but has low calories. Therefore, it has a high potential to be used for cocoa butter substitute with great nutritional values. Fourty two Sprague Dawley rats were divided into 6 groups and were force feed for a period of 2 months (56 days) and the group were Control 1(rodent chow), Control 2(cocoa butter), Control 3(PMF:VCO:CO 90:5:5 - S3 blend), High doseSL (A12:C8+S3), Medium dose SL (A12:C8+S3) and Low dose SL (A12:C8+S3). The body weight of each rat was recorded once daily. The plasma profile of treated and control rats, which comprised of total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and triglyceride was measured on day 0 (baseline) and day 56 (post-treatment). Low calorie structured lipid (SL) was synthesized through acidolysis reaction using sn 1-3-specific lipase of ThermomycesLanuginos (TLIM) among 25 samples with optimum parameter obtained from the RSM. Blood samples for plasma separation were collected using cardiac puncture and requiring anesthesia via tail vein(Anesthetics for rats: Ketamine/Xylazine) for day 0 and day 56. Results of the study showed that rats in group 1 and group 2 has gained weight by 1.66 g and 4.75 g respectively and showed significant difference (p<0.05). In contrast, G3, G4, G5 and G6 showed significant difference (p<0.05) with weight loss by 2.16 g, 10.71g, 7.27 g and 3.23 g respectively 7.27 g and 3.23 g respectively after the treatment. Biochemical analyses on the ratsplasma lipid revealed that the total blood cholesterol content of rats fed with either low

  3. Peanut, soybean and cottonseed oil as diesel fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Mazed, M.A.; Summers, J.D.; Batchelder, D.G.

    1985-09-01

    Two single cylinder diesel engines burning three vegetable oils, and their blends with diesel fuel, were evaluated and compared to engines burning a reference diesel fuel (Phillips No. 2). Tests were conducted determining power output, fuel consumption, thermal efficiency and exhaust smoke. Using the three vegetable oils and their blends with No. 2 diesel fuel, maximum changes of 5%, 14%, 10%, and 40% were observed in power, fuel consumption by mass, thermal efficiency, and exhaust smoke, respectively. 41 references.

  4. Conversion of waste plastics to fuel oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roaper, R. B.; Bhatia, J.

    1981-10-01

    Most of the plastics in use in the world today are produced from crude oil. This increased use of plastics results in an increased generation of discard and waste. In the case of thermoplastics, the types which constitute the bulk of the plastics in high volume use, it is theoretically possible to recycle discard and waste into virgin plastics. However, due to type incompatibility, and contamination with foreign materials, this approach has not proven economically feasible except for a smal quantity of the discard and waste stream. A pyrolysis process was successfully demonstrated which converted atactic polypropylene, APP, to fuel oil and a small fraction of fuel gas. In the current program, a commercial plant, with capacity of 17,000,000 lb/year feedstock, was designed for the pyrolysis of APP waste to fuel oil. In addition, the feasibility of this approach was extended to waste or discarded isotactic polypropylene, PP, and low density polyethylene, LDPE, through pilot plant work, process design, and economic considerations.

  5. Maximizing the stability of pyrolysis oil/diesel fuel emulsions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Several emulsions consisting of biomass pyrolysis oil (bio-oil) in diesel fuel were produced and analyzed for stability over time. An ultrasonic probe was used to generate microscopic droplets of bio-oil suspended in diesel fuel, and this emulsion was stabilized using surfactant chemicals. The most...

  6. Effect of sunflower oil on a diesel fuel system

    SciTech Connect

    Kucera, H.; Schunk, S.; Pratt, G.

    1982-05-01

    A typical farm tractor diesel fuel system (injection pump, fuel lines, filters and injectors) was tested on a test stand at various temperatures using sunflower oil, diesel fuel, and mixtures of the two as fuels. Measurements taken included fuel volume delivered by the injector line pressure at the injector, pressure drop across the filter, transfer pump pressure, and fuel injection timing. Results indicate that low percentages of sunflower oil may be used successfully in the system under summer conditions. Design changes to the system may be necessary for higher percentages of sunflower oil and cold conditions.

  7. Emissions tradeoffs among alternative marine fuels: total fuel cycle analysis of residual oil, marine gas oil, and marine diesel oil.

    PubMed

    Corbett, James J; Winebrake, James J

    2008-04-01

    Worldwide concerns about sulfur oxide (SOx) emissions from ships are motivating the replacement of marine residual oil (RO) with cleaner, lower-sulfur fuels, such as marine gas oil (MGO) and marine diesel oil (MDO). Vessel operators can use MGO and MDO directly or blended with RO to achieve environmental and economic objectives. Although expected to be much cleaner in terms of criteria pollutants, these fuels require additional energy in the upstream stages of the fuel cycle (i.e., fuel processing and refining), and thus raise questions about the net impacts on greenhouse gas emissions (primarily carbon dioxide [CO2]) because of production and use. This paper applies the Total Energy and Environmental Analysis for Marine Systems (TEAMS) model to conduct a total fuel cycle analysis of RO, MGO, MDO, and associated blends for a typical container ship. MGO and MDO blends achieve significant (70-85%) SOx emissions reductions compared with RO across a range of fuel quality and refining efficiency assumptions. We estimate CO2 increases of less than 1% using best estimates of fuel quality and refinery efficiency parameters and demonstrate how these results vary based on parameter assumptions. Our analysis suggests that product refining efficiency influences the CO2 tradeoff more than differences in the physical and energy parameters of the alternative fuels, suggesting that modest increases in CO2 could be offset by efficiency improvements at some refineries. Our results help resolve conflicting estimates of greenhouse gas tradeoffs associated with fuel switching and other emissions control policies.

  8. 46 CFR 97.15-55 - Requirements for fuel oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Requirements for fuel oil. 97.15-55 Section 97.15-55... OPERATIONS Tests, Drills, and Inspections § 97.15-55 Requirements for fuel oil. (a) It shall be the duty of the chief engineer to cause an entry in the log to be made of each supply of fuel oil received...

  9. 46 CFR 196.15-55 - Requirements for fuel oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Requirements for fuel oil. 196.15-55 Section 196.15-55... Test, Drills, and Inspections § 196.15-55 Requirements for fuel oil. (a) It shall be the duty of the chief engineer to cause an entry in the log to be made of each supply of fuel oil received on...

  10. 46 CFR 196.15-55 - Requirements for fuel oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Requirements for fuel oil. 196.15-55 Section 196.15-55... Test, Drills, and Inspections § 196.15-55 Requirements for fuel oil. (a) It shall be the duty of the chief engineer to cause an entry in the log to be made of each supply of fuel oil received on...

  11. 46 CFR 196.15-55 - Requirements for fuel oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Requirements for fuel oil. 196.15-55 Section 196.15-55... Test, Drills, and Inspections § 196.15-55 Requirements for fuel oil. (a) It shall be the duty of the chief engineer to cause an entry in the log to be made of each supply of fuel oil received on...

  12. 46 CFR 78.17-75 - Requirements for fuel oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Requirements for fuel oil. 78.17-75 Section 78.17-75..., Drills, and Inspections § 78.17-75 Requirements for fuel oil. (a) It shall be the duty of the chief engineer to cause an entry in the log be made of each supply of fuel oil received on board, stating...

  13. 46 CFR 196.15-55 - Requirements for fuel oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Requirements for fuel oil. 196.15-55 Section 196.15-55... Test, Drills, and Inspections § 196.15-55 Requirements for fuel oil. (a) It shall be the duty of the chief engineer to cause an entry in the log to be made of each supply of fuel oil received on...

  14. 46 CFR 97.15-55 - Requirements for fuel oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Requirements for fuel oil. 97.15-55 Section 97.15-55... OPERATIONS Tests, Drills, and Inspections § 97.15-55 Requirements for fuel oil. (a) It shall be the duty of the chief engineer to cause an entry in the log to be made of each supply of fuel oil received on...

  15. 46 CFR 78.17-75 - Requirements for fuel oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Requirements for fuel oil. 78.17-75 Section 78.17-75..., Drills, and Inspections § 78.17-75 Requirements for fuel oil. (a) It shall be the duty of the chief engineer to cause an entry in the log be made of each supply of fuel oil received on board, stating the...

  16. 46 CFR 78.17-75 - Requirements for fuel oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Requirements for fuel oil. 78.17-75 Section 78.17-75..., Drills, and Inspections § 78.17-75 Requirements for fuel oil. (a) It shall be the duty of the chief engineer to cause an entry in the log be made of each supply of fuel oil received on board, stating the...

  17. 46 CFR 97.15-55 - Requirements for fuel oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Requirements for fuel oil. 97.15-55 Section 97.15-55... OPERATIONS Tests, Drills, and Inspections § 97.15-55 Requirements for fuel oil. (a) It shall be the duty of the chief engineer to cause an entry in the log to be made of each supply of fuel oil received on...

  18. 46 CFR 78.17-75 - Requirements for fuel oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Requirements for fuel oil. 78.17-75 Section 78.17-75..., Drills, and Inspections § 78.17-75 Requirements for fuel oil. (a) It shall be the duty of the chief engineer to cause an entry in the log be made of each supply of fuel oil received on board, stating the...

  19. 46 CFR 196.15-55 - Requirements for fuel oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Requirements for fuel oil. 196.15-55 Section 196.15-55... Test, Drills, and Inspections § 196.15-55 Requirements for fuel oil. (a) It shall be the duty of the chief engineer to cause an entry in the log to be made of each supply of fuel oil received on board...

  20. 46 CFR 125.115 - Oil fuel tank protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Oil fuel tank protection. 125.115 Section 125.115... Oil fuel tank protection. (a) An OSV of at least 6,000 GT ITC (500 GRT if GT ITC is not assigned) that is delivered after August 1, 2010, with an aggregate capacity of 600 cubic meters or more of oil fuel...

  1. 19 CFR 10.62 - Bunker fuel oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Bunker fuel oil. 10.62 Section 10.62 Customs... Equipment for Vessels § 10.62 Bunker fuel oil. (a) Withdrawal under section 309, Tariff Act of 1930, as... section 309, Tariff Act of 1930, as amended (19 U.S.C. 1309), when all the bunker fuel oil in a Customs...

  2. 19 CFR 10.62 - Bunker fuel oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Bunker fuel oil. 10.62 Section 10.62 Customs... Equipment for Vessels § 10.62 Bunker fuel oil. (a) Withdrawal under section 309, Tariff Act of 1930, as... section 309, Tariff Act of 1930, as amended (19 U.S.C. 1309), when all the bunker fuel oil in a Customs...

  3. 19 CFR 10.62 - Bunker fuel oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Bunker fuel oil. 10.62 Section 10.62 Customs... Equipment for Vessels § 10.62 Bunker fuel oil. (a) Withdrawal under section 309, Tariff Act of 1930, as... section 309, Tariff Act of 1930, as amended (19 U.S.C. 1309), when all the bunker fuel oil in a Customs...

  4. 19 CFR 10.62 - Bunker fuel oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Bunker fuel oil. 10.62 Section 10.62 Customs... Equipment for Vessels § 10.62 Bunker fuel oil. (a) Withdrawal under section 309, Tariff Act of 1930, as... section 309, Tariff Act of 1930, as amended (19 U.S.C. 1309), when all the bunker fuel oil in a Customs...

  5. 46 CFR 97.15-55 - Requirements for fuel oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Requirements for fuel oil. 97.15-55 Section 97.15-55... OPERATIONS Tests, Drills, and Inspections § 97.15-55 Requirements for fuel oil. (a) It shall be the duty of the chief engineer to cause an entry in the log to be made of each supply of fuel oil received...

  6. 46 CFR 97.15-55 - Requirements for fuel oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Requirements for fuel oil. 97.15-55 Section 97.15-55... OPERATIONS Tests, Drills, and Inspections § 97.15-55 Requirements for fuel oil. (a) It shall be the duty of the chief engineer to cause an entry in the log to be made of each supply of fuel oil received...

  7. 19 CFR 10.62 - Bunker fuel oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bunker fuel oil. 10.62 Section 10.62 Customs... Equipment for Vessels § 10.62 Bunker fuel oil. (a) Withdrawal under section 309, Tariff Act of 1930, as... section 309, Tariff Act of 1930, as amended (19 U.S.C. 1309), when all the bunker fuel oil in a...

  8. 46 CFR 78.17-75 - Requirements for fuel oil.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Requirements for fuel oil. 78.17-75 Section 78.17-75..., Drills, and Inspections § 78.17-75 Requirements for fuel oil. (a) It shall be the duty of the chief engineer to cause an entry in the log be made of each supply of fuel oil received on board, stating...

  9. Results of industrial tests of carbonate additive to fuel oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zvereva, E. R.; Dmitriev, A. V.; Shageev, M. F.; Akhmetvalieva, G. R.

    2017-08-01

    Fuel oil plays an important role in the energy balance of our country. The quality of fuel oil significantly affects the conditions of its transport, storage, and combustion; release of contaminants to atmosphere; and the operation of main and auxiliary facilities of HPPs. According to the Energy Strategy of Russia for the Period until 2030, the oil-refining ratio gradually increases; as a result, the fraction of straight-run fuel oil in heavy fuel oils consistently decreases, which leads to the worsening of performance characteristics of fuel oil. Consequently, the problem of the increase in the quality of residual fuel oil is quite topical. In this paper, it is suggested to treat fuel oil by additives during its combustion, which would provide the improvement of ecological and economic indicators of oil-fired HPPs. Advantages of this method include simplicity of implementation, low energy and capital expenses, and the possibility to use production waste as additives. In the paper, the results are presented of industrial tests of the combustion of fuel oil with the additive of dewatered carbonate sludge, which is formed during coagulation and lime treatment of environmental waters on HPPs. The design of a volume delivery device is developed for the steady additive input to the boiler air duct. The values are given for the main parameters of the condition of a TGM-84B boiler plant. The mechanism of action of dewatered carbonate sludge on sulfur oxides, which are formed during fuel oil combustion, is considered. Results of industrial tests indicate the decrease in the mass fraction of discharged sulfur oxides by 36.5%. Evaluation of the prevented damage from sulfur oxide discharged into atmospheric air shows that the combustion of the fuel oil of 100 brand using carbonate sludge as an additive (0.1 wt %) saves nearly 6 million rubles a year during environmental actions at the consumption of fuel oil of 138240 t/year.

  10. Proximate composition, phenolic content and in vitro antioxidant activity of aqueous extracts of the seaweeds Ascophyllum nodosum, Bifurcaria bifurcata and Fucus vesiculosus. Effect of addition of the extracts on the oxidative stability of canola oil under accelerated storage conditions.

    PubMed

    Agregán, Rubén; Munekata, Paulo E; Domínguez, Ruben; Carballo, Javier; Franco, Daniel; Lorenzo, José M

    2017-09-01

    Extracts from three macroalgae species (Ascophyllum nodosum (ANE), Bifurcaria bifurcata (BBE) and Fucus vesiculosus (FVE)) were tested for proximate composition (total solid, protein and total carbohydrate contents), total phenols content (TPC), and for their antioxidant activities in vitro in comparison to that of BHT compound by using four different assays (ABTS radical cation decolouration, DPPH free radical scavenging activity, ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) and oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC)). The inclusion of the extracts as oil stabilizers in canola oil in substitution of the synthetic antioxidant (BHT) was also evaluated by assessing lipid oxidation parameters (peroxide value (PV), p-anisidine value (AV), TBARS value, conjugated dienes (CD) and TOTOX index) under accelerated storage conditions (16days, 60°C). There was an inverse relationship between total solid content and total polyphenols content in the seaweed extracts. FVE showed an intermediate TPC (1.15g PGE/100g extract), but it presented the highest in vitro antioxidant activity when measured using the ABTS, DPPH and FRAP tests. BBE, that displayed the highest TPC (1.99g PGE/100g extract), only showed the highest in vitro antioxidant activity when measured using the ORAC test. ANE showed the lowest TPC and the lowest antioxidant activity in all the tests performed. The seaweed extracts added in a 500ppm concentration significantly reduced the oxidation during canola oil storage at 60°C, being this antioxidant effect significantly higher than that of BHT added at 50ppm. Results indicate that seaweed extracts can effectively inhibit the oxidation of canola oil and they can be a healthier alternative to the synthetic antioxidants in the oil industry. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Improved Soybean Oil for Biodiesel Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Tom Clemente; Jon Van Gerpen

    2007-11-30

    lead to job creation in rural areas of the country and help stimulate the agricultural economy. Moreover, production of soybean with enhanced oil quality for biodiesel may increase the attractiveness of this renewable, environmentally friendly fuel.

  12. Sunflower oil as a fuel for compression ignition engines

    SciTech Connect

    Tahir, A.R.; Lapp, H.M.; Buchanan, L.C.

    1982-01-01

    Sunflower oil has emerged among the vegetable oils as potential fuel alternatives. The Province of Manitoba is the major producer of sunflower oil in Canada. This study was initiated to investigate the fuel-related physical properties and performance characteristics in compression ignition engines. The results for sunflower oil were summarized and compared with No. 2 diesel fuel. The most detrimental parameter in the use of sunflower oil is its higher viscosity which is about 14 times higher than diesel fuel at 37.78/sup 0/C. The problem of higher viscosity can be solved by transesterification of sunflower oil to its methyl ester. The cetane number of sunflower oil is a little less than the minimum value of 40 for No. 2 diesel fuel. Specific fuel consumption was higher due to its lower energy value whereas thermal efficiency was satisfactory when compared with No. 2 diesel fuel. Oxidation of sunflower oil left heavy gum and wax deposits on the stationary engine parts and the test bench equipment. Lower levels of corrosion can be expected on metal parts due to the lower sulfur content in the sunflower oil. Fire hazards associated with fuel handling will be reduced because of the higher flash point of sunflower oil. 5 figures, 4 tables. (DP)

  13. Microbial Deterioration of Marine Diesel Fuel from Oil Shale.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-04-09

    eesar mnd Identify by block rumlber) Microbial deterioration DFM Cladosporium resinae Oil shale Synthetic fuel *QNjd&Sp. ACoal Fungi Seawater Petroleum...well in the synthetic fuel as in fuel derived from petroleum. Growth of certain strains of the fungus, Cladosporium resinae , was initially... resina ., and a yeast (Candida sp.) but no inhibition was noted with another shale oil fuel from which the nitrogen constituents ware almost completely

  14. Effects of No. 2 fuel oil on common eider eggs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Albers, P.H.; Szaro, R.C.

    1978-01-01

    An oil spill near a breeding colony could result in the transfer of oil from the plumage and feet of incubating birds to their eggs. Microlitre amounts of No. 2 fuel oil were applied externally to common eider eggs in an island breeding colony in Maine. Clutches of eggs treated with 20 ?l of fuel oil had significantly greater embryonic mortality than the control clutches when they were examined 7 days after treatment. The results are similar to those of an earlier study of artificially incubated common eider eggs and indicate that nest site conditions do not affect embryotoxicity of No. 2 fuel oil.

  15. Investigation of Fuel Oil/Lube Oil Spray Fires On Board Vessels. Volume 3.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-11-01

    U.S. Coast Guard Research and Development Center 1082 Shennecossett Road, Groton, CT 06340-6096 Report No. CG-D-01-99, III Investigation of Fuel ...4. Title and Subtitle Investigation of Fuel Oil/Lube Oil Spray Fires On Board Vessels - Volume Appendix C: LMIS Events and Associated Event Trees...measures (technological advancements as well as safety management systems) for preventing or mitigating the impacts of fuel oil or lube oil spray fires on

  16. Conversion of Extracted Oil Cake Fibers into Bioethanol Including DDGS, Canola, Sunflower, Seasame, Soy, and Peanut for Integrated Biodiesel Processing

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We have come up with a novel integrated approach where biodiesel processing can be potentially done in-house by producing ethanol from edible oilseeds after hexane extraction to remove residual oil. In addition, we have demonstrated how ethanol could be manufactured from widely available oil cakes ...

  17. Entry and retention of methanol fuel in engine oil

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, S.E.; Smolenski, D.J.; Clark, S.L.

    1988-01-01

    To ensure that vehicles do not suffer adverse consequences when high-methanol-content fuel (M100 or M85) is used, it is important to understand the ways that the use of this fuel affects various vehicle systems. For that reason, some of the changes which occur in the engine oil when using methanol fuel were investigated. During a single cold start with an extended cranking time, as much as six percent fuel entered the engine oil. Over a 15-minute period, the lubricating medium changed from engine oil to an oil-methanol-water emulsion. With multiple cold starts followed by a five-minute trip and ambient temperatures near freezing, the oil contained 19 percent volatile contamination. In addition, the oil contained elevated levels of water, lead, iron, chromium, and aluminum. Efforts need to be directed toward reducing the adverse consequences of methanol fuel.

  18. Effect of long-term dietary supplementation of high-gamma-linolenic canola oil versus borage oil on growth, hematology, serum biochemistry, and N-6 fatty acid metabolism in rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jim-Wen; DeMichele, Stephen J; Palombo, John; Chuang, Lu-Te; Hastilow, Christine; Bobik, Emil; Huang, Yung-Sheng

    2004-06-16

    Dietary supplementation of a high-gamma-linolenic acid canola oil (HGCO) containing approximately 36% (w/w) of gamma-linolenic acid (GLA, 18:3n-6) from the seeds of a genetically transformed canola strain, was assessed for its long-term biological effects. Growing Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 30) were fed a purified AIN93G diet containing 5, 10, or 15% (w/w) of HGCO as the fat source. For comparison, a separate group of rats (n = 10) was given the diet containing 15% (w/w) of borage oil (BO), which contained 22% (w/w) of GLA. After 12 weeks of feeding, the growth, relative organ weights, hematology, and serum biochemistry were found to be similar among rats fed the 5, 10, and 15% HGCO diets. The GLA levels in plasma and liver phospholipids (PL) were also similar. However, the levels of GLA in peripheral tissues (muscle PL and adipose triacylglycerols) were significantly higher in rats fed the 10 and 15% HGCO diets than those fed the 5% HGCO diet. When the above biologic parameters were compared between the 15% HGCO and 15% BO dietary groups, there were no significant differences except for lower final body weights and higher tissue levels of GLA, dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid (20:3n-6) and arachidonic acid (20:4n-6) in the 15% HGCO dietary group as compared with the 15% BO dietary group. This is due to a higher GLA content and possibly a more favorable stereospecific distribution of GLA in HGCO. Overall, long-term (12-week) feeding with diets containing up to 15% HGCO resulted in no adverse effects on growth, organ weight, hematology and serum biochemistry as compared to the diet containing 15% BO, suggesting that HGCO may be a safe alternative source of GLA.

  19. Comparing liquid-fuel costs: grain alcohol versus sunflower oil

    SciTech Connect

    Reining, R.C.; Tyner, W.E.

    1983-08-01

    This paper compares the technical and economic feasibility of small-scale production of fuel grade grain alcohol with sunflower oil. Three scales of ethanol and sunflower oil production are modeled, and sensitivity analysis is conducted for various operating conditions and costs. The general conclusion is that sunflower oil costs lass to produce than 'Lcohol. Government subsidies for alcohol, but not sunflower oil, could cause adoption of more expensive alcohol in place of cheaper sunflower oil. However, neither sunflower oil nor alcohol are competitive with diesel fuel. 7 references, 6 tables

  20. Comparing liquid fuel costs: grain alcohol versus sunflower oil

    SciTech Connect

    Reining, R.C.; Tyner, W.E.

    1983-08-01

    This paper compares the technical and economic feasibility of small-scale production of fuel grade grain alcohol with sunflower oil. Three scales of ethanol and sunflower oil production are modeled, and sensitivity analysis is conducted for various operating conditions and costs. The general conclusion is that sunflower oil costs less to produce than alcohol. Government subsidies for alcohol, but not sunflower oil, could cause adoption of more expensive alcohol in place of cheaper sunflower oil. However, neither sunflower oil nor alcohol are competitive with diesel fuel. 7 references.

  1. 77 FR 48177 - Fuel Oil Systems for Emergency Power Supplies

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-13

    ... COMMISSION Fuel Oil Systems for Emergency Power Supplies AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Draft... Regulatory Commission (NRC or the Commission) issued Draft Regulatory Guide, DG- 1282, ``Fuel Oil Systems for Emergency Power Supplies,'' in the Federal Register for a 60 day public comment period. The NRC is extending...

  2. 78 FR 36278 - Fuel Oil Systems for Emergency Power Supplies

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-17

    ... COMMISSION Fuel Oil Systems for Emergency Power Supplies AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION... Regulatory Guide (RG) 1.137, ``Fuel Oil Systems for Emergency Power Supplies.'' Revision 2 of RG 1.137... systems for emergency diesel generators used in nuclear power plants. The methods described in ANSI/ANS 59...

  3. 40 CFR 89.330 - Lubricating oil and test fuels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE NONROAD COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Emission Test Equipment Provisions § 89.330 Lubricating oil and test fuels. (a) Lubricating oil. Use the engine... that use sulfur-sensitive emission-control technology, the diesel test fuel is the ultra low-sulfur...

  4. Report on the Procurement and Delivery of Fuel Oil.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, William M.; Baacke, Clifford M.

    Annual use of fuel oil for heating schools and other facilities of the Montgomery County (Maryland) Public Schools, Montgomery County Government, and Montgomery College exceeds four-million gallons. This report examines the processes by which purchases and distributions of fuel oil are made, makes recommendations based on the examination, and…

  5. Tires fuel oil field cement manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Caveny, B.; Ashford, D.; Garcia, J.G.; Hammack, R.

    1998-08-31

    In a new process, waste automobile tires added to the fuel mix of gas, coal, and coke help fire kilns to produce API-quality oil field cement. Capital Cement uses this process in its cement-manufacturing plant in San Antonio, in which it also produces construction cement. The tires provide a lower-cost fuel and boost the temperature at a critical stage in the kiln burn process. Also, steel-belted tires add iron content to the mix. According to lab results, tire-burned cement slurries will perform the same as conventionally burned cement slurries. Actual field applications have proven that cement produced by burning tires performs no different than conventionally produced slurries. Capital`s plant uses both dry and wet processes, with separate kilns running both processes at the same time. Cement clinker is partially fired by waste tires in both kiln processes. The tires represent 12% of the fuel consumed by the plant, a number that is expected to increase. Capital burns about 200 tires/hr, or about 1.6 million tires/year.

  6. The Effects of Tocotrienols Added to Canola Oil on Microalbuminuria, Inflammation, and Nitrosative Stress in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes: A Randomized, Double-blind, Placebo-controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Haghighat, Neda; Vafa, Mohammadreza; Eghtesadi, Shahryar; Heidari, Iraj; Hosseini, Aghafatemeh; Rostami, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Background: Tocotrienols (T3) were neglected in the past; today, get attentions due to their antioxidant and none-antioxidant activity. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of the daily intake of 200 mg T3 added in canola oil over 8 weeks on microalbuminuria, inflammation, and nitrosative stress in type 2 diabetic patients. Methods: This study was a double-blinded, placebo-controlled, randomized trial. A total of 50 patients with T2DM and FBS >126 mg/dl treated by non-insulin hypoglycemic drugs were randomly assigned to receive either 15 ml T3-enriched canola oil (200 mg/day T3) or pure canola oil for 8 weeks. Urine microalbumin, volume and creatinine levels, serum hs-CRP, and nitric oxide (NO) levels were measured before and after intervention. Results: From 50 patients participated in this study, 44 completed the study. There were no significant differences in baseline characteristics, dietary intake, and physical activity between groups. Urine microalbumin and serum hs-CRP were declined significantly in T3-treated group. At the end of the study, patients who treated with T3 had lower urine microalbumin (11 (9, 25) vs. 22 (15, 39.75) nmol/dl, P = 0.003) and hs-CRP changes (−10.91 ± 15.5 vs. −9.88 ± 27.5 Pg/ml, P = 0.048) than control group. A non-significant decrease was also observed in serum NO level in T3-treated group with no changes in urine volume and creatinine levels. Conclusions: These findings indicate that T3 leads to ameliorate proteinuria and can protect the kidney against inflammation (hs-CRP) and nitrosative stress (NO). PMID:24932394

  7. 40 CFR 279.72 - On-specification used oil fuel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false On-specification used oil fuel. 279.72... (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF USED OIL Standards for Used Oil Fuel Marketers § 279.72 On-specification used oil fuel. (a) Analysis of used oil fuel. A generator, transporter, processor/re-refiner, or...

  8. 40 CFR 279.72 - On-specification used oil fuel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false On-specification used oil fuel. 279.72... (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF USED OIL Standards for Used Oil Fuel Marketers § 279.72 On-specification used oil fuel. (a) Analysis of used oil fuel. A generator, transporter, processor/re-refiner,...

  9. 40 CFR 279.72 - On-specification used oil fuel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false On-specification used oil fuel. 279.72... (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF USED OIL Standards for Used Oil Fuel Marketers § 279.72 On-specification used oil fuel. (a) Analysis of used oil fuel. A generator, transporter, processor/re-refiner,...

  10. 40 CFR 279.72 - On-specification used oil fuel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false On-specification used oil fuel. 279.72... (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF USED OIL Standards for Used Oil Fuel Marketers § 279.72 On-specification used oil fuel. (a) Analysis of used oil fuel. A generator, transporter, processor/re-refiner,...

  11. 29 CFR 779.361 - Classification of other fuel oil sales.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    .... 4, No. 5, and No. 6 fuel oil as these heavy oils are “special purpose” goods to which the retail... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Classification of other fuel oil sales. 779.361 Section 779... Establishments Liquefied-Petroleum-Gas and Fuel Oil Dealers § 779.361 Classification of other fuel oil sales....

  12. 29 CFR 779.361 - Classification of other fuel oil sales.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    .... 4, No. 5, and No. 6 fuel oil as these heavy oils are “special purpose” goods to which the retail... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Classification of other fuel oil sales. 779.361 Section 779... Establishments Liquefied-Petroleum-Gas and Fuel Oil Dealers § 779.361 Classification of other fuel oil sales....

  13. 29 CFR 779.361 - Classification of other fuel oil sales.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    .... 4, No. 5, and No. 6 fuel oil as these heavy oils are “special purpose” goods to which the retail... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Classification of other fuel oil sales. 779.361 Section 779... Establishments Liquefied-Petroleum-Gas and Fuel Oil Dealers § 779.361 Classification of other fuel oil sales....

  14. Interesterification of engkabang (Shorea macrophylla) fat--canola oil blend with lipase from Candida antarctica to simulate the properties of lard.

    PubMed

    Illiyin, Mohamed Roslan Nur; Marikkar, Jalaldeen Mohamed Nazrim; Loke, Mei Key; Shuhaimi, Musthafa; Mahiran, Basri; Miskandar, Mat Saari

    2014-01-01

    A study was carried out to compare the composition and thermal properties of lard (LD) and engkabang fat (EF) - canola oil (CaO) blend interesterified with Candida antartica lipase (C. antartica). A fat blend EF-4 (40% EF in CaO) was prepared and interesterified using C. antartica lipase at 60°C for different time intervals (6 h, 12 h and 24 h) with 200 rpm agitation. The fat blends before and after interesterification were compared to LD with respect to their slip melting points (SMP), fatty acid and triacyglycerol (TAG) compositions, melting, solidification and polymorphic properties. Result showed that the slip melting point (SMP) of the fat blend interesterified for 6 h was the closest to that of LD. The solid fat content (SFC) values of fat blends interesterified for 12 and 24 h were found to become equal to those of LD within the temperature range of 0 to 20°C. In addition, all three interesterified blends had SFC values similar to those of LD within the temperature range of 30-40°C. According to thermal analysis, the transition of the fat blend interesterified for 24 h appearing at -2.39°C was similar to the low melting thermal transition of LD and the transition of the fat blend interesterified for 12 h appearing at 26.25°C was similar to the high melting thermal transition of LD. However, there is no compatibility between LD and all three interesterified blends with regard to polymorphic behaviour.

  15. Crop sequence effects on root maggot (Diptera: Anthomyiidae: Delia spp.) infestations in canola.

    PubMed

    Dosdall, L M; Harker, K N; O'Donovan, J T; Blackshaw, R E; Kutcher, H R; Gan, Y; Johnson, E N

    2012-08-01

    Strong market demand for canola, Brassica napus L., has prompted some western Canadian producers to increase the frequency of this crop in rotations with other crop species, but the impact of this practice on canola insect pests has not been determined. Here, we investigate 12 cropping sequences involving canola over a 3-yr period (2008-2010 inclusive) at five locations across western Canada. Cropping sequences varied from continuous production of two herbicide-tolerant canola varieties, to production in two of 3 yr, to canola production in one of the 3 yr. Treatments analyzed were the frequency and timing of canola within the rotational sequence. Damage by larvae of root maggots (Diptera: Anthomyiidae: Delia spp.) to canola taproots increased as the study progressed, particularly in 2010 after canola had been grown continuously for 3 yr. Yield declined with continuous canola production, and differences were greatest in 2010. At mean canola crop prices for 2010, the yield reduction from continuous production amounted to economic losses of approximately Can$282-$377/ha. Crop quality, in terms of oil and protein concentrations of harvested seed, was affected more by crop variety than cropping sequence. Crop sequence effects for root maggot damage, yield, and seed quality were relatively stable in the presence of environmental (location) variation. Results of our study suggest that continuous canola production could be unsustainable over the long-term even though market forces currently provide incentive for this practice.

  16. Vegetable oil as an agricultural fuel for the Pacific Northwest

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, C.L.; Auld, D.L.; Thomas, V.M.; Withers, R.V.; Smith, S.M.; Bettis, B.L.

    1981-02-01

    Five million barrels of liquid fuel are needed annually for the continued production of agricultural commoditiese on the 12.7 million cultivated acres in the Pacific Northwest Region. Because most energy intensive operations in the agricultural industry are done by diesel engines, the technology to produce a substitute for diesel must be developed and vegetable oil appears to hold great promise as an alternative fuel. The vegetable oils potential as an alternative liquid fuel in the region is described. Rapidly rising fuel costs could make this new fuel not only economically feasible but necessary to ensure the region's continued agriculture production.

  17. Sunflower oil methyl ester as a diesel fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Hassett, D.J.; Hasan, A.R.

    1983-06-01

    The University of North Dakota Engineering Experiment Station is currently engaged in research to investigate the chemistry, fuel performance, and economics of chemically modified sunflower oil for use as an emergency replacement diesel fuel Physical and chemical properties of this fuel at varying levels of refinement are being used to determine fuel properties. Engine testing carried out to date indicates that unrefined methyl ester, defined as at least 90 percent methyl ester with unreacted or partially reacted sunflower oil as the remainder, has about the same tendency to foul engines as Number 2 diesel fuel.

  18. Used sunflower oil as an alternative fuel for diesel engines

    SciTech Connect

    Cigizoglu, K.B.; Oezaktas, T.; Karaosmanoglu, F.

    1997-07-01

    Used sunflower oil was blended with grade No. 2-D diesel fuel at a ratio of 20/80 (v/v). The fuel blend was tested in a diesel engine with a precombustion chamber at speeds between 1,200 and 2,100 rpm. The fuel blend and the diesel fuel were rated according to standard test methods. It was found that for short-term use the fuel blend has characteristics similar to those of the baseline diesel fuel and that it displayed less smoke emission than the diesel fuel.

  19. Alternative fuel properties of tall oil fatty acid methyl ester-diesel fuel blends.

    PubMed

    Altiparmak, Duran; Keskin, Ali; Koca, Atilla; Gürü, Metin

    2007-01-01

    In this experimental work, tall oil methyl ester-diesel fuel blends as alternative fuels for diesel engines were studied. Tall oil methyl ester was produced by reacting tall oil fatty acids with methyl alcohol under optimum conditions. The blends of tall oil methyl ester-diesel fuel were tested in a direct injection diesel engine at full load condition. The effects of the new fuel blends on the engine performance and exhaust emission were tested. It was observed that the engine torque and power output with tall oil methyl ester-diesel fuel blends increased up to 6.1% and 5.9%, respectively. It was also seen that CO emissions decreased to 38.9% and NO(x) emissions increased up to 30% with the new fuel blends. The smoke opacity did not vary significantly.

  20. Rapid screening of biologically modified vegetable oils for fuel performance

    SciTech Connect

    Geller, D.P.; Goodrum, J.W.; Campbell, C.C.

    1999-08-01

    A process for the rapid screening of alternative diesel fuel performance was applied to analogues of genetically modified vegetable oils and a mixture with no. 2 diesel fuel. The oils examined contained 60 to 70% of low molecular weight, short-chain, saturated triglycerides compared to the 1 to 2% found in traditional vegetable oils. These oils have relatively low viscosity that is predicted to enhance their performance as alternative diesel fuels. The screening process utilizes an engine torque test sequence that accelerates the tendency of diesel fuels to coke fuel injectors, a key indicator of fuel performance. The results of the tests were evaluated using a computer vision system for the rapid quantification of injector coking. The results of the screen were compared to those using no. 2 diesel fuel as a baseline. Coke deposition from the modified vegetable oil analogues was not found to be significantly different than deposition from diesel fuel. Suggestions are made to guide further modification of vegetable oil biosynthesis for the production of alternative diesel fuel.

  1. Full chain life cycle assessment of greenhouse gases and energy demand for canola-derived jet fuel in North Dakota, United States

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The success of long-term sustainable biofuel production on agricultural lands is still questionable. To this end, we investigated the effects of crop prices on the changes of agricultural land use for biofuel canola production in three wheat crop management zones in North Dakota. The effects of cano...

  2. Commercial Approval Plan for Synthetic Jet Fuel from Hydrotreated Fats and Oils

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-18

    the fatty acid (FAME) that comes from the triglycerides that compose the organic oil. The HRJ SPKs are deoxygenated materials that are processed in...should be on both fatty acid size and origin. A good cross section would be algae, three (3) vegetable oil with a range of fatty acid MWs (example...coconut, soy, canola ) and yellow grease derived HRJ SPKs. With the number of entities currently pursuing this goal, no single group should have to

  3. 46 CFR 30.10-48a - Oil fuel unit-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Oil fuel unit-TB/ALL. 30.10-48a Section 30.10-48a...-48a Oil fuel unit—TB/ALL. The term oil fuel unit means the equipment used for the preparation of oil fuel for delivery to an oil fired boiler, the equipment used for the preparation of heated oil fuel for...

  4. 46 CFR 30.10-48a - Oil fuel unit-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Oil fuel unit-TB/ALL. 30.10-48a Section 30.10-48a...-48a Oil fuel unit—TB/ALL. The term oil fuel unit means the equipment used for the preparation of oil fuel for delivery to an oil fired boiler, the equipment used for the preparation of heated oil fuel...

  5. 46 CFR 30.10-48a - Oil fuel unit-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Oil fuel unit-TB/ALL. 30.10-48a Section 30.10-48a...-48a Oil fuel unit—TB/ALL. The term oil fuel unit means the equipment used for the preparation of oil fuel for delivery to an oil fired boiler, the equipment used for the preparation of heated oil fuel...

  6. 46 CFR 30.10-48a - Oil fuel unit-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Oil fuel unit-TB/ALL. 30.10-48a Section 30.10-48a...-48a Oil fuel unit—TB/ALL. The term oil fuel unit means the equipment used for the preparation of oil fuel for delivery to an oil fired boiler, the equipment used for the preparation of heated oil fuel...

  7. Dietary rapeseed/canola-oil supplementation reduces serum lipids and liver enzymes and alters postprandial inflammatory responses in adipose tissue compared to olive-oil supplementation in obese men.

    PubMed

    Kruse, Michael; von Loeffelholz, Christian; Hoffmann, Daniela; Pohlmann, Antje; Seltmann, Anne-Cathrin; Osterhoff, Martin; Hornemann, Silke; Pivovarova, Olga; Rohn, Sascha; Jahreis, Gerhard; Pfeiffer, Andreas F H

    2015-03-01

    Obesity is associated with hyperlipidemia, hepatic steatosis, and low-grade inflammation. Studies have shown that MUFA as well as PUFA have beneficial effects on blood lipids and the inflammatory state. This study investigates the effects of a daily supplementation of either 50 g of rapeseed/canola (RA) or olive (OL) oil over 4 wk on serum lipids, serum liver enzymes, and inflammatory gene expression in subcutaneous (s. c.) adipose tissue in obese men. Consuming RA resulted in increased serum n-3 fatty acids and a reduction in total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and serum aspartate aminotransferase compared to OL. In s. c. adipose tissue, gene expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL6 was reduced in RA compared to OL. However, after 4 h after a test meal, containing the appropriate oil, white bread, and 400 mL of liquid diet drink (835 kcal in total), gene expression of IL6, IL1B, and EMR1 (egf-like module containing Mucin-like hormone receptor-like 1) was increased in RA and of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (CCL2) in both RA and OL. This demonstrates that consuming RA for 4 wk improves serum lipids, liver enzymes, and basal inflammation in s. c. adipose tissue, but it mediates an acute pro-inflammatory response in adipose tissue upon consuming a meal. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Decreasing fuel-oil consumption through feedback and social commendation.

    PubMed

    Seaver, W B; Patterson, A H

    1976-01-01

    The energy crisis of the winter of 1973-74 led to severe shortages of fuel oil for home heating and a government request for voluntary conservation by the oil consumer. This experiment tested two methods of facilitating fuel-oil conservation. Home fuel-oil consumers were randomly assigned to one of three experimental groups: feedback of information on rate of oil use, feedback plus commendation for reduced consumption, or a no-treatment control. The consumption rate for the feedback plus commendation group was significantly lower than that of either the informational feedback group or the control group. The informational feedback group did not differ from the control group. The results suggest that feedback alone may not result in oil conservation, but that feedback combined with commendation can produce socially significant savings.

  9. Simulation of Gravity Feed Oil for Areoplane Fuel Transfer System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Y. G.; Liu, Z. X.; Huang, S. Q.; Xu, T.

    Generally, it has two different ways for fuel transfer for areoplane, the simplest one is by gravity, and another is by pumps. But the simplest one mighte change to the vital method in some situation, such as electrical and mechanical accident. So the study of gravity feed oil is aslo important. Past calculations assumed that, under gravity feed, only one fuel tank in aircraft supplies the fuel needed for preventing extremely serious accident to happen. Actually, gravity feed oil is a transient process, all fuel tanks compete for supplying oil and there must have several fuel tanks offering oil simultaneously. The key problems to calculate gravity feed oil are the sumulation of the multiple-branch and transient process. Firstly, we presented mathematical models for oil flow through pipes, non-working pupms and check valves, ect. Secondly, On the basis of flow network theory and time difference method, we established a new calculation method for gravity feed oil of aeroplane fuel system. This model can solve the multiple-branch and transient process simulation of gravity feed oil. Our method takes into consideration all fuel tanks and therefore, we believe, our method is intrinsically superior to traditional methods and is closer to understanding the real seriousness of the oil supply situation. Finally, we give a numerical example using the new method for a certain type of aircraft under gravity feed. achieved the variations of oil level and flow mass per second of each oil tanks which showed in Figures below. These variations show preliminarily that our proposed method of calculations is satisfactory.

  10. Application of game theory in decision making strategy: Does gas fuel industry need to kill oil based fuel industry?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azmi, Abdul Luky Shofi'ul; Prabandari, Dyah Lusiana; Hakim, Muhammad Lintang Islami

    2017-03-01

    Even though conversion of oil based fuel (Bahan Bakar Minyak) into gas fuel (Bahan Bakar Gas) for transportation (both land and sea) is one of the priority programs of the government of Indonesia, rules that have been established merely basic rules of gas fuel usage license for transportation, without discussing position of gas fuel related to oil based fuel in detail. This paper focus on possible strategic behavior of the key players in the oil-gas fuel conversion game, who will be impacted by the position of gas fuel as complement or substitution of oil based fuel. These players include industry of oil based fuel, industry of gas fuel, and the government. Modeling is made based on two different conditions: government plays a passive role and government plays an active role in legislating additional rules that may benefit industry of gas fuel. Results obtained under a passive government is that industry of oil based fuel need to accommodate the presence of industry of gas fuel, and industry of gas fuel does not kill/ eliminate the oil based fuel, or gas fuel serves as a complement. While in an active government, the industry of oil based fuel need to increase its negotiation spending in the first phase so that the additional rule that benefitting industry of gas fuel would not be legislated, while industry of gas fuel chooses to indifferent; however, in the last stage, gas fuel turned to be competitive or choose its role to be substitution.

  11. 29 CFR 779.361 - Classification of other fuel oil sales.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Establishments Liquefied-Petroleum-Gas and Fuel Oil Dealers § 779.361 Classification of other fuel oil sales. (a) Sales of fuel oil (as differentiated from sales of butane and propane gases) are classified as retail... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Classification of other fuel oil sales. 779.361 Section 779...

  12. 29 CFR 779.361 - Classification of other fuel oil sales.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Establishments Liquefied-Petroleum-Gas and Fuel Oil Dealers § 779.361 Classification of other fuel oil sales. (a) Sales of fuel oil (as differentiated from sales of butane and propane gases) are classified as retail... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Classification of other fuel oil sales. 779.361 Section 779...

  13. 46 CFR 31.10-24 - Integral fuel oil tank examinations-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Integral fuel oil tank examinations-T/ALL. 31.10-24... CERTIFICATION Inspections § 31.10-24 Integral fuel oil tank examinations—T/ALL. (a) Each fuel oil tank with at least one side integral to the vessel's hull and located within the hull (integral fuel oil tank)...

  14. 46 CFR 31.10-24 - Integral fuel oil tank examinations-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Integral fuel oil tank examinations-T/ALL. 31.10-24... CERTIFICATION Inspections § 31.10-24 Integral fuel oil tank examinations—T/ALL. (a) Each fuel oil tank with at least one side integral to the vessel's hull and located within the hull (integral fuel oil tank)...

  15. 46 CFR 31.10-24 - Integral fuel oil tank examinations-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Integral fuel oil tank examinations-T/ALL. 31.10-24... CERTIFICATION Inspections § 31.10-24 Integral fuel oil tank examinations—T/ALL. (a) Each fuel oil tank with at least one side integral to the vessel's hull and located within the hull (integral fuel oil tank)...

  16. 46 CFR 31.10-24 - Integral fuel oil tank examinations-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Integral fuel oil tank examinations-T/ALL. 31.10-24... CERTIFICATION Inspections § 31.10-24 Integral fuel oil tank examinations—T/ALL. (a) Each fuel oil tank with at least one side integral to the vessel's hull and located within the hull (integral fuel oil tank)...

  17. Vegetable oils: Precombustion characteristics and performance as diesel fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Bagby, M.O.

    1986-03-01

    Vegetable oils show technical promise as alternative fuels for diesel engines and have good potential as emergency fuels. Realistically, vegetable oils cause a number of problems when used in direct-injection diesel engines, generally attributable to inefficient combustion. At least partially responsible for poor combustion of neat vegetable oils are their high viscosity and non-volatility. To improve combustion several somewhat empirical approaches involving both chemical and physical modifications have been investigated by endurance tests in a variety of engines. Using the EMA 200 h engine screening test, several fuels show technical promise. These include methyl, ethyl, and butyl esters; high-oleic oils:diesel blend (1:3); diesel:soybean oil:butanol:cetane improver (33:33:33:1); and microemulsion fuels (diesel:soybean oil:190 proff ethanol:butanol, 50:25:5:20) and (soybean oil:methanol:2-octanol:cetane improver, 53:13:33:1). Using a pressure vessel, fuel injection system, and high speed motion picture camera, fuel injection characteristics of vegetable oils, e.g., soybean, sunflower, cottonseed, and peanut, have been observed in a quiescent nitrogen atmosphere at 480/sup 0/C and 4.1MPa. Their injection and atomization characteristics are markedly different from those of petroleum derived diesel fuels. Heating the vegetable oils to lower their viscosities increased spray penetration rate, reduced spray cone angles, and resulted in spray characteristics resembling those of diesel fuel. Significant chemical changes occurred following injection. Samples collected at about 400 microseconds after the injection event consisted of appreciable quantities of C/sub 4/-C/sub 16/ hydrocarbons, and free carboxyl groups were present.

  18. Vegetable oil or diesel fuel-a flexible option

    SciTech Connect

    Suda, K.J.

    1984-02-01

    Vegetable oils provide diesel engine performance similar to that obtained with diesel fuel, and this has been documented in many prior publications. Because they are potentially interchangeable with diesel fuel, interest has focused on vegetable oils as short-range alternate fuels. However, engine durability when burning vegetable oils may be adversely affected depending on the type of combustion system employed. Laboratory and field experimental tests have identified the prechamber engine as having the greatest short-range potential for using vegetable oil fuels. Performance and durability at low engine ratings are essentially the same as expected for operation on diesel fuel. However, at high engine ratings piston ring and cylinder linear wear are greater than expected for operation on diesel fuel. A laboratory program was successfully completed which resulted in a combustion system that would allow the higher rated prechamber engines to achieve normal life when burning 100% soybean oil. Fluid model tests utilizing high speed photography, single-cylinder engine tests utilizing fuel tracers, and a 200-hour multicylinder durability test were included. Extended endurance tests and experience with other vegetable oils are still required.

  19. Compression ignition engine fuel properties of a used sunflower oil-diesel fuel blend

    SciTech Connect

    Oezaktas, T.

    2000-05-01

    Vegetable oils may be used with dilution modification technique as an alternative diesel fuel. In this study, a used sunflower oil-diesel fuel blend (20:80 {nu}/{nu}%) was investigated in a Pancar Motor E-108-type diesel engine to observe engine characteristics and exhaust emission. The effect of the compression ratio on ignition delay characteristics and smoke emissions of blend fuel was determined in this CFR engine. The results of fuel blends were compared with the reference grade No. 2-D diesel fuel.

  20. Pyrolytic Waste Plastic Oil and Its Diesel Blend: Fuel Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Sultana, M.; Al-Mamun, M. R.; Hasan, M. R.

    2016-01-01

    The authors introduced waste plastic pyrolysis oil (WPPO) as an alternative fuel characterized in detail and compared with conventional diesel. High density polyethylene, HDPE, was pyrolyzed in a self-designed stainless steel laboratory reactor to produce useful fuel products. HDPE waste was completely pyrolyzed at 330–490°C for 2-3 hours to obtain solid residue, liquid fuel oil, and flammable gaseous hydrocarbon products. Comparison of the fuel properties to the petrodiesel fuel standards ASTM D 975 and EN 590 revealed that the synthetic product was within all specifications. Notably, the fuel properties included a kinematic viscosity (40°C) of 1.98 cSt, density of 0.75 gm/cc, sulphur content of 0.25 (wt%), and carbon residue of 0.5 (wt%), and high calorific value represented significant enhancements over those of conventional petroleum diesel fuel. PMID:27433168

  1. Pyrolytic Waste Plastic Oil and Its Diesel Blend: Fuel Characterization.

    PubMed

    Khan, M Z H; Sultana, M; Al-Mamun, M R; Hasan, M R

    2016-01-01

    The authors introduced waste plastic pyrolysis oil (WPPO) as an alternative fuel characterized in detail and compared with conventional diesel. High density polyethylene, HDPE, was pyrolyzed in a self-designed stainless steel laboratory reactor to produce useful fuel products. HDPE waste was completely pyrolyzed at 330-490°C for 2-3 hours to obtain solid residue, liquid fuel oil, and flammable gaseous hydrocarbon products. Comparison of the fuel properties to the petrodiesel fuel standards ASTM D 975 and EN 590 revealed that the synthetic product was within all specifications. Notably, the fuel properties included a kinematic viscosity (40°C) of 1.98 cSt, density of 0.75 gm/cc, sulphur content of 0.25 (wt%), and carbon residue of 0.5 (wt%), and high calorific value represented significant enhancements over those of conventional petroleum diesel fuel.

  2. Advanced Diesel Oil Fuel Processor Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-06-01

    Fuel Cell Power Plants ," EPRI Report EM-2686, Octobe: 1982. 4. R. G. Minet and D. Warren, "Evaluation of Hybrid TER-1,TR Fuel Processor," EPRI Report ...EM-2096, October 1981. 5. R. G. Minet and D. Warren, "Assessment of Fuel Processing aysiems for Dispersed Fuel Cell Power Plants ,’ EPRI Report EM...34Fuel Processor Development for !i.- MW Fuel Cell Power Plants ,4 EPRI Report EM-1123, July 1985. 9. M. HI. Hyman, "Simulate Methane Reformer

  3. 21. Power plant engine fuel oil piping diagrams, sheet 83 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. Power plant engine fuel oil piping diagrams, sheet 83 of 130 - Naval Air Station Fallon, Power Plant, 800 Complex, off Carson Road near intersection of Pasture & Berney Roads, Fallon, Churchill County, NV

  4. 38. Concrete foundations of the fuel oil pit west of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. Concrete foundations of the fuel oil pit west of the tool storage building between the north and south roundhouses. - Central Railroad of New Jersey, Engine Terminal, Jersey City, Hudson County, NJ

  5. Determination of Sulfur in Fuel Oils: An Instrumental Analysis Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Richard C.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Chromatographic techniques are used in conjunction with a Parr oxygen combustion bomb to determine sulfur in fuel oils. Experimental procedures and results are discussed including an emphasis on safety considerations. (SK)

  6. Determination of Sulfur in Fuel Oils: An Instrumental Analysis Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Richard C.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Chromatographic techniques are used in conjunction with a Parr oxygen combustion bomb to determine sulfur in fuel oils. Experimental procedures and results are discussed including an emphasis on safety considerations. (SK)

  7. Cost of synthetic fuels in relation to oil prices - revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, E.J.

    1984-07-01

    The belief that oil prices drive the cost factors of synthetic fuels makes the economic analysis of these types of facilities certain and straightforward. The certainty, however, is neither logical nor mathematically correct. The expected costs of energy from synthetic fuels processes have undoubtably increased over time, but to infer that continued increases will make synthetic fuels always uncompetitive, regardless of the price of oil, is false. The task of estimating the economic feasibility of synthetic fuels processes or any technological process is difficult. Although the hypothesis may be appealing, there is no reason to believe that oil price increases cause increases in the expected cost of synthetic fuels. 11 references, 3 figures, 5 tables.

  8. Yield, irrigation response, and water productivity of deficit to fully irrigated spring canola

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Canola (Brassica napus) is an oil-seed crop that is adapted to the northern High Plains of the USA and is considered a viable rotational and biofuel crop. However, decreased ground water allocations have necessitated determining the impact of limited irrigation on canola productivity. The objectives...

  9. Synthesis and characterization of vegetable oil derived esters: evaluation for their diesel additive properties.

    PubMed

    Dmytryshyn, S L; Dalai, A K; Chaudhari, S T; Mishra, H K; Reaney, M J

    2004-03-01

    Trans-esterification of four vegetable oils; canola oil, greenseed canola oil from heat-damaged seeds, processed waste fryer grease and unprocessed waste fryer grease, was carried out using methanol, and KOH as catalyst. The methyl esters of the corresponding oils were separated from the crude glycerol, purified, and characterized by various methods to evaluate their densities, viscosities, iodine values, acid numbers, cloud points, pour points and gross heat of combustion, fatty acid and lipid compositions, lubricity properties, and thermal properties. The fatty acid composition suggests that 80-85% of the ester was from unsaturated acids. Substantial decrease in density and viscosity of the methyl esters compared to their corresponding oils suggested that the oils were in their mono or di glyceride form. The lubricity of the methyl esters, when blended at 1 vol% treat rate with ISOPAR M reference fuel, showed that the canola methyl ester enhanced the fuel's lubricity number. From the analyses performed, it was determined that the ester with the most potential for being an additive or a substitute for diesel fuel is the canola methyl ester, whose physical and chemical characteristics are similar to diesel fuel.

  10. 33 CFR 155.320 - Fuel oil and bulk lubricating oil discharge containment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fuel oil and bulk lubricating oil discharge containment. 155.320 Section 155.320 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION OIL OR HAZARDOUS MATERIAL POLLUTION PREVENTION REGULATIONS FOR...

  11. Marketable transport fuels made from Julia Creek shale oil

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-03-01

    CSR Limited and the CSIRO Division of Energy Chemistry have been working on the problem of producing refined products from the Julia Creek deposit in Queensland, Australia. Two samples of shale oil, retorted at different temperatures from Julia Creek oil shale, were found to differ markedly in aromaticity. Using conventional hydrotreating technology, high quality jet and diesel fuels could be made from the less aromatic oil. Naphtha suitable for isomerization and reforming to gasoline could be produced from both oils. This paper discusses oil properties, stabilization of topped crudes, second stage hydrotreatment, and naphtha hydrotreating. 1 figure, 4 tables.

  12. Fuel properties of bituminous coal and pyrolytic oil mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamdan, Hazlin; Sharuddin, Munawar Zaman; Daud, Ahmad Rafizan Mohamad; Syed-Hassan, Syed Shatir A.

    2014-10-01

    Investigation on the thermal decomposition kinetics of coal-biooil slurry (CBS) fuel prepared at different ratios (100:0,70:30,60:40,0:100) was conducted using a Thermogravimetric Analyzer (TGA). The materials consisted of Clermont bituminous coal (Australia) and bio-oil (also known as pyrolytic oil) from the source of Empty Fruit Bunch (EFB) that was thermally converted by means of pyrolysis. Thermal decomposition of CBS fuel was performed in an inert atmosphere (50mL/min nitrogen) under non-isothermal conditions from room temperature to 1000°C at heating rate of 10°C/min. The apparent activation energy (Ea.) and pre-exponential factor (A) were calculated from the experimental results by using an Arrhenius-type kinetic model which first-order decomposition reaction was assumed. All kinetic parameters were tabulated based on the TG data obtained from the experiment. It was found that, the CBS fuel has higher reactivity than Clermont coal fuel during pyrolysis process, as the addition of pyrolytic oil will reduce the Ea values of the fuel. The thermal profiles of the mixtures showed potential trends that followed the characteristics of an ideal slurry fuel where high degradation rate is desirable. Among the mixture, the optimum fuel was found at the ratio of 60:40 of pyrolytic oil/coal mixtures with highest degradation rate. These findings may contribute to the development of a slurry fuel to be used in the vast existing conventional power plants.

  13. 30 CFR 57.6309 - Fuel oil requirements for ANFO.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 57.6309 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Transportation-Surface and Underground § 57.6309 Fuel oil requirements for ANFO. (a) Liquid hydrocarbon fuels...

  14. 32 CFR 855.18 - Aviation fuel and oil purchases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Aviation fuel and oil purchases. 855.18 Section 855.18 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE AIRCRAFT CIVIL AIRCRAFT USE OF UNITED STATES AIR FORCE AIRFIELDS Civil Aircraft Landing Permits § 855.18 Aviation fuel...

  15. 32 CFR 855.18 - Aviation fuel and oil purchases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aviation fuel and oil purchases. 855.18 Section 855.18 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE AIRCRAFT CIVIL AIRCRAFT USE OF UNITED STATES AIR FORCE AIRFIELDS Civil Aircraft Landing Permits § 855.18 Aviation fuel...

  16. 32 CFR 855.18 - Aviation fuel and oil purchases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Aviation fuel and oil purchases. 855.18 Section 855.18 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE AIRCRAFT CIVIL AIRCRAFT USE OF UNITED STATES AIR FORCE AIRFIELDS Civil Aircraft Landing Permits § 855.18 Aviation fuel...

  17. 32 CFR 855.18 - Aviation fuel and oil purchases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Aviation fuel and oil purchases. 855.18 Section 855.18 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE AIRCRAFT CIVIL AIRCRAFT USE OF UNITED STATES AIR FORCE AIRFIELDS Civil Aircraft Landing Permits § 855.18 Aviation fuel...

  18. 32 CFR 855.18 - Aviation fuel and oil purchases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Aviation fuel and oil purchases. 855.18 Section 855.18 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE AIRCRAFT CIVIL AIRCRAFT USE OF UNITED STATES AIR FORCE AIRFIELDS Civil Aircraft Landing Permits § 855.18 Aviation fuel...

  19. Distillate Fuel Oil Assessment for Winter 1996-1997

    EIA Publications

    1997-01-01

    This article describes findings of an analysis of the current low level of distillate stocks which are available to help meet the demand for heating fuel this winter, and presents a summary of the Energy Information Administration's distillate fuel oil outlook for the current heating season under two weather scenarios.

  20. Viscosity of diesel engine fuel oil under pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hersey, Mayo D

    1929-01-01

    In the development of Diesel engine fuel injection systems it is necessary to have an approximate knowledge of the absolute viscosity of the fuel oil under high hydrostatic pressures. This report presents the results of experimental tests conducted by Mr. Jackson Newton Shore, utilizing the A.S.M.E. high pressure equipment.

  1. XAFS SPECTROSCOPY RESULTS FOR PM SAMPLES FROM RESIDUAL FUEL OIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS spectroscopy data were obtained from particulate samples produced by the combustion of residual fuel oil in a 732-kW fire-tube boiler at EPA's National Risk Management Research Laboratory in North Carolina. Residual oil flyash (ROFA) from fo...

  2. XAFS SPECTROSCOPY RESULTS FOR PM SAMPLES FROM RESIDUAL FUEL OIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS spectroscopy data were obtained from particulate samples produced by the combustion of residual fuel oil in a 732-kW fire-tube boiler at EPA's National Risk Management Research Laboratory in North Carolina. Residual oil flyash (ROFA) from fo...

  3. Fractionation of Diesel Fuel from Petroleum and Paraho Shale Oils.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-10-01

    Maryland 20084 z FRACTIONATION OF DIESEL FUEL FROM PETROLEUM AND PARAHO SHALE OILS by Dr. Charles F. Hammer Department of Chemistry Georgetown University...been develope.-d to separate diesel fuels into neutral water soluhieus. acidic components, basic components, saturated hydro- carhons, substituted...benzenes, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and polar neutrals. A samp1jl e of conventitonal petroleum d iesel fuel and a sample o~f di(LSt- fulj der ive

  4. Biodiesel from plant seed oils as an alternate fuel for compression ignition engines-a review.

    PubMed

    Vijayakumar, C; Ramesh, M; Murugesan, A; Panneerselvam, N; Subramaniam, D; Bharathiraja, M

    2016-12-01

    The modern scenario reveals that the world is facing energy crisis due to the dwindling sources of fossil fuels. Environment protection agencies are more concerned about the atmospheric pollution due to the burning of fossil fuels. Alternative fuel research is getting augmented because of the above reasons. Plant seed oils (vegetable oils) are cleaner, sustainable, and renewable. So, it can be the most suitable alternative fuel for compression ignition (CI) engines. This paper reviews the availability of different types of plant seed oils, several methods for production of biodiesel from vegetable oils, and its properties. The different types of oils considered in this review are cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL) oil, ginger oil, eucalyptus oil, rice bran oil, Calophyllum inophyllum, hazelnut oil, sesame oil, clove stem oil, sardine oil, honge oil, polanga oil, mahua oil, rubber seed oil, cotton seed oil, neem oil, jatropha oil, egunsi melon oil, shea butter, linseed oil, Mohr oil, sea lemon oil, pumpkin oil, tobacco seed oil, jojoba oil, and mustard oil. Several methods for production of biodiesel are transesterification, pre-treatment, pyrolysis, and water emulsion are discussed. The various fuel properties considered for review such as specific gravity, viscosity, calorific value, flash point, and fire point are presented. The review also portrays advantages, limitations, performance, and emission characteristics of engine using plant seed oil biodiesel are discussed. Finally, the modeling and optimization of engine for various biofuels with different input and output parameters using artificial neural network, response surface methodology, and Taguchi are included.

  5. Comparison between Canadian Canola Harvest and Export Surveys.

    PubMed

    Barthet, Véronique J

    2016-07-20

    Parameters, such as oil, protein, glucosinolates, chlorophyll content and fatty acid composition, were determined using reference methods for both harvest survey samples and Canadian Canola exports. Canola harvest survey and export data were assessed to evaluate if canola harvest survey data can be extrapolated to predict the quality of the Canadian canola exports. There were some differences in some measured parameters between harvest and export data, while other parameters showed little difference. Protein content and fatty acid composition showed very similar data for harvest and export averages. Canadian export data showed lower oil content when compared to the oil content of harvest survey was mainly due to a diluting effect of dockage in the export cargoes which remained constant over the years (1.7% to 1.9%). Chlorophyll was the least predictable parameter; dockage quality as well as commingling of the other grades in Canola No. 1 Canada affected the chlorophyll content of the exports. Free fatty acids (FFA) were also different for the export and harvest survey. FFA levels are affected by storage conditions; they increase during the shipping season and, therefore, are difficult to predict from their harvest survey averages.

  6. Verifying a Simplified Fuel Oil Field Measurement Protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Hugh; Dentz, Jordan; Doty, Chris

    2013-07-01

    The Better Buildings program is a U.S. Department of Energy program funding energy efficiency retrofits in buildings nationwide. The program is in need of an inexpensive method for measuring fuel oil consumption that can be used in evaluating the impact that retrofits have in existing properties with oil heat. This project developed and verified a fuel oil flow field measurement protocol that is cost effective and can be performed with little training for use by the Better Buildings program as well as other programs and researchers.

  7. Verifying a Simplified Fuel Oil Flow Field Measurement Protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, H.; Dentz, J.; Doty, C.

    2013-07-01

    The Better Buildings program is a U.S. Department of Energy program funding energy efficiency retrofits in buildings nationwide. The program is in need of an inexpensive method for measuring fuel oil consumption that can be used in evaluating the impact that retrofits have in existing properties with oil heat. This project developed and verified a fuel oil flow field measurement protocol that is cost effective and can be performed with little training for use by the Better Buildings program as well as other programs and researchers.

  8. Apparatus for reforming fuel oil wherein ultrasonic waves are utilized

    SciTech Connect

    Kunishio, M.; Shirai, K.; Takezi, H.

    1981-08-04

    An apparatus for reforming fuel oil wherein ultrasonic waves are utilized. The apparatus comprises a closed vessel, a rotary collector formed in a cylindrical shape, an inlet conduit for supplying fuel oil to be reformed into the vessel, an outlet conduit for delivering reformed oil from the vessel, and a ultrasonic irradiating device. The rotary collector has a layered mesh structure of a fine mesh, preferably of mesh size between 2 mu M and 20 mu m, mounted thereon so that sludge contained in the fuel oil to be reformed is collected on the layered mesh structure. One end of a horn connected to the ultrasonic wave irradiating device faces the layered mesh structure forming a small gap therebetween so that the sludge collected on the layered mesh structure is dissociated by the ultrasonic waves.

  9. Impact of a high-fat diet containing canola or soybean oil on body development and bone; parameters in adult male rats.

    PubMed

    Soares da Costa, Carlos Alberto; De Sousa dos Santos, Aline; Santana Carlos, Aluana; Lopes Gonzalez, Gabrielle de Paula; Pontes Gaspar Reis, Rejane; Carneiro, Cynthia; Soares Alves, Sanderson; Pereira Albuquerque, Karine; Alves da Silva, Paula Cristina; Cavalcante Ribeiro, Danielle; Teles Boaventura, Gilson; de Moura, Egberto Gaspar; Alves do Nascimento-Saba, Celly Cristina

    2015-05-01

    Introducción: El papel del ácido graso en la prevención o la progresión de las enfermedades crónicas ha generado un interés significativo por parte de los investigadores. Por lo tanto, nuestro objetivo fue evaluar los efectos a largo plazo de la dieta alta en grasas que contienen soja o aceite de canola en los parámetros de desarrollo del cuerpo y los huesos de ratas macho. Métodos: Después del destete, las ratas se agruparon y se alimentaron con una dieta control (7S) o una dieta alta en grasa que contiene soja (19S) o aceite de canola (19C). Fémur y vértebras lumbares (LV4) estructura se determinaron a los 180 días por absorciometría dual de rayos X y tomografía computarizada. Resultados: Los grupos mostraron similares ingesta de alimentos, la masa corporal y el desarrollo de longitud. Los parámetros óseos de la 19C fueron similares al grupo control, mientras que los 19S mostró parámetros óseos inferiores en comparación con los otros grupos. Conclusiones: La dieta alta en grasas que contiene aceite de soja fue desfavorable a la estructura ósea, mientras que el aceite de canola contribuyó salud de los huesos en la etapa adulta de la vida.

  10. A technique to measure fuel oil viscosity in a fuel power plant.

    PubMed

    Delgadillo, Miguel Angel; Ibargüengoytia, Pablo H; García, Uriel A

    2016-01-01

    The viscosity measurement and control of fuel oil in power plants is very important for a proper combustion. However, the conventional viscometers are only reliable for a short period of time. This paper proposes an on-line analytic viscosity evaluation based on energy balance applied to a piece of tube entering the fuel oil main heater and a new control strategy for temperature control. This analytic evaluation utilizes a set of temperature versus viscosity graphs were defined during years of analysis of fuel oil in Mexican power plants. Also the temperature set-point for the fuel oil main heater output is obtained by interpolating in the corresponding graph. Validation tests of the proposed analytic equations were carried out in the Tuxpan power plant in Veracruz, Mexico.

  11. Peak oil demand: the role of fuel efficiency and alternative fuels in a global oil production decline.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Adam R; Millard-Ball, Adam; Ganser, Matthew; Gorelick, Steven M

    2013-07-16

    Some argue that peak conventional oil production is imminent due to physical resource scarcity. We examine the alternative possibility of reduced oil use due to improved efficiency and oil substitution. Our model uses historical relationships to project future demand for (a) transport services, (b) all liquid fuels, and (c) substitution with alternative energy carriers, including electricity. Results show great increases in passenger and freight transport activity, but less reliance on oil. Demand for liquids inputs to refineries declines significantly after 2070. By 2100 transport energy demand rises >1000% in Asia, while flattening in North America (+23%) and Europe (-20%). Conventional oil demand declines after 2035, and cumulative oil production is 1900 Gbbl from 2010 to 2100 (close to the U.S. Geological Survey median estimate of remaining oil, which only includes projected discoveries through 2025). These results suggest that effort is better spent to determine and influence the trajectory of oil substitution and efficiency improvement rather than to focus on oil resource scarcity. The results also imply that policy makers should not rely on liquid fossil fuel scarcity to constrain damage from climate change. However, there is an unpredictable range of emissions impacts depending on which mix of substitutes for conventional oil gains dominance-oil sands, electricity, coal-to-liquids, or others.

  12. 33 CFR 157.33 - Water ballast in fuel oil tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Water ballast in fuel oil tanks... OIL IN BULK Vessel Operation § 157.33 Water ballast in fuel oil tanks. A new vessel may not carry ballast water in a fuel oil tank....

  13. 33 CFR 157.33 - Water ballast in fuel oil tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Water ballast in fuel oil tanks... OIL IN BULK Vessel Operation § 157.33 Water ballast in fuel oil tanks. A new vessel may not carry ballast water in a fuel oil tank....

  14. Waste cooking oil as source for renewable fuel in Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allah, F. Um Min; Alexandru, G.

    2016-08-01

    Biodiesel is non-toxic renewable fuel which has the potential to replace diesel fuel with little or no modifications in diesel engine. Waste cooking oil can be used as source to produce biodiesel. It has environmental and economic advantages over other alternative fuels. Biodiesel production from transesterification is affected by water content, type f alcohol, catalyst type and concentration, alcohol to oil ratio, temperature, reaction rate, pH, free fatty acid (FFA) and stirrer speed. These parameters and their effect on transesterification are discussed in this paper. Properties of biodiesel obtained from waste cooking oil are measured according to local standards by distributor and their comparison with European biodiesel standard is also given in this paper. Comparison has shown that these properties lie within the limits of the EN 14214 standard. Furthermore emission performance of diesel engine for biodiesel-diesel blends has resulted in reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. Romanian fuel market can ensure energy security by mixing fuel share with biodiesel produced from waste cooking oil. Life cycle assessment of biodiesel produced from waste cooking oil has shown its viability economically and environmentally.

  15. Upgrading of raw oil into advanced fuel. Task 5

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    The overall objective of the research effort is the determination of the minimum processing requirements to produce high energy density fuels (HEDF) having acceptable fuel specifications. The program encompasses assessing current technology capability; selecting acceptable processing and refining schemes; and generating samples of advanced test fuels. The Phase I Baseline Program is intended to explore the processing alternatives for producing advanced HEDF from two raw synfuel feedstocks, one from Mild Coal Gasification as exemplified by the COALITE process and one from Colorado shale oil. Eight key tasks have been identified as follows: (1) Planning and Environmental Permitting; (2) Transporting and Storage of Raw Fuel Sources and Products; (3) Screening of Processing and Upgrading Schemes; (4) Proposed Upgrading Schemes for Advanced Fuel; (5) Upgrading of Raw Oil into Advanced Fuel (6) Packaging and Shipment of Advanced Fuels; (7) Updated Technical and Economic Assessment; and, (8) Final Report of Phase I Efforts. This topical report summarizes the operations and results of the Phase I Task 5 sample preparation program. The specific objectives of Task 5 were to: Perform laboratory characterization tests on the raw COALITE feed, the intermediate liquids to the required hydroprocessing units and final advanced fuels and byproducts; and produce a minimum of 25-gal of Category I test fuel for evaluation by DOE and its contractors.

  16. Fuel quality issues in the oil heat industry

    SciTech Connect

    Litzke, Wai-Lin

    1992-12-01

    The quality of fuel oil plays an essential role in combustion performance and efficient operation of residential heating equipment. With the present concerns by the oil-heat industry of declining fuel-oil quality, a study was initiated to identify the factors that have brought about changes in the quality of distillate fuel. A background of information will be provided to the industry, which is necessary to deal with the problems relating to the fuel. The high needs for servicing heating equipment are usually the result of the poor handling characteristics of the fuel during cold weather, the buildup of dirt and water in storage tanks, and microbial growth. A discussion of how to deal with these problems is presented in this paper. The effectiveness of fuel additives to control these problems of quality is also covered to help users better understand the functions and limitations of chemical treatment. Test data have been collected which measure and compare changes in the properties of fuel using selected additives.

  17. Recycling used palm oil and used engine oil to produce white bio oil, bio petroleum diesel and heavy fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-abbas, Mustafa Hamid; Ibrahim, Wan Aini Wan; Sanagi, Mohd. Marsin

    2012-09-01

    Recycling waste materials produced in our daily life is considered as an additional resource of a wide range of materials and it conserves the environment. Used engine oil and used cooking oil are two oils disposed off in large quantities as a by-product of our daily life. This study aims at providing white bio oil, bio petroleum diesel and heavy fuel from the disposed oils. Toxic organic materials suspected to be present in the used engine oil were separated using vacuum column chromatography to reduce the time needed for the separation process and to avoid solvent usage. The compounds separated were detected by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and found to contain toxic aromatic carboxylic acids. Used cooking oils (thermally cracked from usage) were collected and separated by vacuum column chromatography. White bio oil produced was examined by GC-MS. The white bio oil consists of non-toxic hydrocarbons and is found to be a good alternative to white mineral oil which is significantly used in food industry, cosmetics and drugs with the risk of containing polycyclic aromatic compounds which are carcinogenic and toxic. Different portions of the used cooking oil and used engine were mixed to produce several blends for use as heavy oil fuels. White bio oil was used to produce bio petroleum diesel by blending it with petroleum diesel and kerosene. The bio petroleum diesel produced passed the PETRONAS flash point and viscosity specification test. The heat of combustion of the two blends of heavy fuel produced was measured and one of the blends was burned to demonstrate its burning ability. Higher heat of combustion was obtained from the blend containing greater proportion of used engine oil. This study has provided a successful recycled alternative for white bio oil, bio petroleum fuel and diesel which can be an energy source.

  18. Sunflower seed oil: automotive fuel source. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Denny, W.M.

    1984-01-01

    The intent of this portion of the project has to demonstrate the feasibility of utilizing sunflower seed oil as an alternate fuel for the spark ignition engine. The research was limited to small, one cylinder, air-cooled engines that are very common on the market place. Conventional fuels, such as gasoline, kerosene, diesel fuel blended with the sunflower oil were used. Sunfuel, sunflower oil, is difficult to procure and relatively expensive at approximately $4.00/gal. The research was unconcerned with how readily available or how competitively priced it was against petroleum products. All of the effort was to assume it was available and cost effective. We concentrated on making it burn in the heat engine and achieved it with marginal success. The review of the literature which was carried on concurrently with the research indicates several problems associated with producing Sunfuel.

  19. High temperature corrosion enhanced by residual fuel oil ash deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Wong-Moreno, A.; Martinez, Y.M.; Martinez, L.

    1994-12-31

    Boiler steel tubes in Mexican electric power plants are reported to be highly sensitive to high temperature corrosion enhanced by liquid phase fuel oil ash deposits. The combustion of fuel oils with high asphaltene and other vanadium and sulphur rich-compounds produces ash deposits on tube surfaces. This paper is devoted to a study of the influence of nine fuel oil ash deposits with V/(Na+S) atomic ratios ranging from 0.68 to 47.3, on the high temperature corrosion of tube stainless steels 304H, 321H, 316H, 347H, 310 and 446 and low and medium chromium steels T11, T22 and T9. The steel surfaces were exposed to the ash deposits at temperatures ranging between 440C and 650C. The deposits and the exposed surfaces were characterized employing conventional chemical analysis, X-ray diffraction, SEM and X-ray microanalysis.

  20. Unraveling heavy oil desulfurization chemistry: targeting clean fuels.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Tushar V; Parrott, Stephen; Johnson, Byron

    2008-03-15

    The sulfur removal chemistry of heavy oils has been unraveled by systematically investigating several heavy oils with an extremely wide range of properties. The heavy oil feed and product properties have been characterized by advanced analytical methods, and these properties have been related to the sulfur conversion data observed in pilot hydrotreating units. These studies coupled with kinetic treatment of the data have revealed that the desulfurization chemistry of heavy oils is essentially controlled by the strongly inhibiting three and larger ring aromatic hydrocarbon content and surprisingly not by the content of the "hard-to-remove" sulfur compounds. Such enhanced understanding of the heavy oil sulfur removal is expected to open new avenues for catalyst/process optimization for heavy oil desulfurization and thereby assist the efficent production of clean transporation fuels.

  1. Do Oil Exports Fuel Defense Spending?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-01

    defense spending , and there were years when defense expenditures actually increased. Additionally, in countries that did... spending , especially defense expenditures , but such is not always the case. One can study the impact of oil revenues on defense spending by using a...oil revenue levels and levels of military expenditures , however, appear weak, meaning that attempts to limit defense spending by tinkering with

  2. Thermal Effects by Firing Oil Shale Fuel in CFB Boilers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neshumayev, D.; Ots, A.; Parve, T.; Pihu, T.; Plamus, K.; Prikk, A.

    It is well known that during firing of oil shale fuel the amount of heat released during its combustion per kg of fuel is significantly affected by the endothermic and exothermic processes taking place in mineral matter. These thermal effects are calcite and dolomite decomposing, marcasite FeS2 oxidising, CaO sulphation and formation of the new minerals. The given paper deals with the experimental study of the influence of these thermal effects of oil shale fuel having different heating value on total amount of heat released during combustion in calorimetric bomb, circulating fluidized bed (CFB) and pulverized-firing boiler (PFB). The large-scale (250 MWth) experiments were performed in the K11-1 CFB boiler of the Balti Power Plant. During experiments low heating value of a fuel varied within the range 8.5-11 MJ/kg. At the end some conclusions were drawn.

  3. Crude oil and finished fuel storage stability: An annotated review

    SciTech Connect

    Whisman, M.L.; Anderson, R.P.; Woodward, P.W.; Giles, H.N.

    1991-01-01

    A state-of-the-art review and assessment of storage effects on crude oil and product quality was undertaken through a literature search by computer accessing several data base sources. Pertinent citations from that literature search are tabulated for the years 1980 to the present. This 1990 revision supplements earlier reviews by Brinkman and others which covered stability publications through 1979 and an update in 1983 by Goetzinger and others that covered the period 1952--1982. For purposes of organization, citations are listed in the current revision chronologically starting with the earliest 1980 publications. The citations have also been divided according to primary subject matter. Consequently 11 sections appear including: alternate fuels, gasoline, distillate fuel, jet fuel, residual fuel, crude oil, biodegradation, analyses, reaction mechanisms, containment, and handling and storage. Each section contains a brief narrative followed by all the citations for that category.

  4. Palm Oil

    MedlinePlus

    ... A deficiency, cancer, brain disease, aging; and treating malaria, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and cyanide poisoning. ... oils, such as soybean, canola, or sunflower oil. Malaria. Some research suggests that dietary consumption of palm ...

  5. Fuel oil-induced adrenal hypertrophy in ranch mink (Mustela vison): effects of sex, fuel oil weathering, and response to adrenocorticotropic hormone.

    PubMed

    Mohr, F C; Lasley, B; Bursian, S

    2010-01-01

    Environmental contamination by petroleum hydrocarbons from anthropogenic sources can be a cause of stress for free-ranging wildlife. The response of wildlife to chemical contaminants requires that the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis be precisely regulated to allow for proper glucocorticoid-mediated adaptive responses. Chronic oral exposure to low concentrations of bunker C fuel oil causes the development of adrenal hypertrophy in male ranch mink (Mustela vison) without increasing serum or fecal glucocorticoid concentrations. This hypertrophy is an adaptive response to fuel oil-induced adrenal insufficiency. To determine if the same phenomenon occurs in female mink or male mink exposed to artificially weathered fuel oil, female mink were fed 0 ppm (mineral oil) or 420 ppm fuel oil and male mink were exposed to 0 ppm, 420 ppm fuel oil, or 480 ppm artificially weathered fuel oil in the diet for 60-62 days. At the end of the exposure, serum glucocorticoid concentrations were assayed along with body and organ weight measurements. Fecal glucocorticoid concentrations were assayed at time points throughout the exposure. Male mink fed fuel oil or weathered fuel oil and female mink fed fuel oil had adrenal enlargement without any significant increases in the serum or fecal concentration of glucocorticoids, which is consistent with fuel oil-induced adrenal insufficiency. To address the physiological consequences of adrenal insufficiency, fuel oil-exposed male mink were administered an adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) stimulation test. Fuel oil-exposed animals had a smaller incremental increase in serum glucocorticoid concentration after ACTH challenge compared to control animals. Our findings provide further evidence that the HPA axis of fuel oil-exposed animals is compromised and, therefore, not able to respond appropriately to the diverse stressors found in the environment.

  6. Parameters Affecting the Characteristics of Oil Shale-Derived Fuels.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-01

    syncrude), or refined directly into liquid fuels and petrochemicals . The gaseous products can also be used as fuels in or near the retorting plant , or... petrochemical industry in the Rocky Mountain region, but this remains to be seen. The use of shale oil as a refinery feedstock for the production of...were conducted on bench-scale equipment under carefully controlled conditions. If present or future petrochem - ical plants do not have the capability

  7. Polymerization of sunflower oil diesel fuel: Copper catalysis in contaminated lubrication oil

    SciTech Connect

    Jette, S.J.; Shaffer, D.L.

    1988-01-01

    Diesel lubrication oil contaminated with sunflower oil fuel was exposed to conditions simulating an engine crankcase environment to study the role of copper catalysts in oil mixture thickening. Trace levels of dissolved copper species appear to dominate catalysis of triglyceride autooxidative polymerization with metallic copper surface seemingly only functioning as a dissolution interface. The importance of soluble copper forms was confirmed by replacing copper foil catalysts with a soluble complex, cupric acetylacetonate, to yield equivalent viscosity increases.

  8. 76 FR 47423 - Aviation Fuel and Oil Operating Limitations; Policy Memorandum

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-05

    ... (ECO) when evaluating compliance with the standards for aviation fuel and oil operating limitations... Certification Office (ECO) when evaluating compliance with the standards for aviation fuel and oil operating...

  9. Diesel Fuel from Used Frying Oil

    PubMed Central

    Buczek, Bronislaw

    2014-01-01

    New conversion technologies of used edible oils and waste animal fats into a biofuel appropriate for use in standard diesel engines have been developed, taking into consideration environmental requirements and improvement in the economics of current trans-esterification technologies. The variation in the properties of substrates made from used rape oil after treatment with mixed adsorbents (active carbon, magnesium silicate) was studied in this work. The obtained results are compared with the quality requirements for the substrates used in Vogel & Noot GmbH technology for transesterification of oils and fats. PMID:24574908

  10. Some physiochemical tests of sunflower oil and no. 2 diesel oil as fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Ramdeen, P.; Backer, L.F.; Kaufman, K.R.; Kucera, H.L.; Moilanen, C.W.

    1982-05-01

    The suitability of sunflower oil as a fuel for diesel engines was evaluated by determining the physiochemical properties of sunflower oil, No. 2 diesel and blends of both. This evaluation was accomplished by determining the American Petroleum Institute (API) gravity, cetane rating, heat of combustion, kinematic viscosity, pour point, cloud point, and water content of these fuels using methods specified by the American Society of Testing Materials (ASTM) for diesel fuels. These tests for petroleum products are designed to standardize results so comparisons can be made from one laboratory to another.

  11. Combustion fundamentals of pyrolysis oil based fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Calabria, R.; Chiariello, F.; Massoli, P.

    2007-04-15

    The combustion behavior of emulsions of pyrolysis oil in commercial diesel oil was studied. The emulsions were different in terms of concentration and size of the dispersed phase. The study was carried out in a single droplet combustion chamber. The size of droplets varied between 400 {mu}m and 1200 {mu}m. They were suspended to a bare thermocouple and, hence, their temperature during combustion was measured. High-speed digital shadowgraphy was used to follow droplets evolution. The main features of the droplet combustion were recognized. The general combustion behavior of emulsions is intermediate with respect to pure PO and commercial diesel oil. Emulsion droplets underwent strong swelling and microexplosion phenomena. However, under the investigated conditions, the microexplosions were ineffective in destroying droplets. The size distribution of the dispersed PO droplets in the range 3-10 {mu}m was not effective either for determining the overall thermal behavior or for the efficacy of the microexplosions. The homogeneous combustion phase resulted identical for emulsions and diesel oil despite the emulsions composition (i.e., concentration of oil, surfactant and co-surfactant, as well as the size of the oil droplets in the emulsion) and the different structure of the flame and also its time and spatial evolution. (author)

  12. Refining of Military Jet Fuels from Shale Oil. Part II. Volume II. (In Situ Shale Oil Process Data).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-01

    5624K Turbine Fuel JP-5 Military Specification MIL-T-5624H Turbine Fuel JP-7 Military Specification MIL-T-38219 Turbine Fuel JP-8 Military Specification...MIL-T-83133 Turbine Fuel Ko Rate Constant lb Pound LCO Light Cycle Oil LHSV Liquid Hourly Space Velocity LPG Liquefied Petroleum Gas LV% Liquid...demonstrate that this oil is an acceptable feedstock for EXTRACTACRACKING. Further, specification JP- 4 and JP-8 turbine fuels were produced from these

  13. Performance and emissions characteristics of a naturally aspirated diesel engine with vegetable oil fuels - 2

    SciTech Connect

    Humke, A.L.; Barsic, N.J.

    1981-01-01

    A naturally aspirated, direct injected diesel engine was used to evaluate the performance and emissions characteristics of a crude soybean oil, a 50 percent (by volume) mixture of crude soybean oil and no. 2 diesel fuel, and a degummed soybean oil. The data were compared with previous tests conducted on the same engine using diesel fuel, crude sunflower oil and a 50 percent mixture of crude sunflower oil and diesel fuel. 18 refs.

  14. Influence of dietary canola oil and palm oil blend and refrigerated storage on fatty acids, myofibrillar proteins, chemical composition, antioxidant profile and quality attributes of semimembranosus muscle in goats.

    PubMed

    Adeyemi, Kazeem D; Sabow, Azad B; Shittu, Rafiat M; Karim, Roselina; Sazili, Awis Q

    2015-01-01

    Improving the unsaturated fatty acid content of ruminant meat is essential due to the generally saturated nature of fatty acids in ruminant meat and the negative effects this can have on human health. Nonetheless, enhancing the unsaturated fatty acid content of ruminant meat can have adverse effects on the shelf life and quality attributes of the meat. This study assessed the effects of dietary 80 % canola oil and 20 % palm oil blend (CPOB) on fatty acid composition, antioxidants, oxidative spoilage, cholesterol and physicochemical properties of semimembranosus (SM) muscle from goats. Twenty four Boer bucks were randomly assigned to diets containing on dry matter basis 0, 4 and 8 % CPOB, fed for 100 d and slaughtered. The carcasses were subjected to a 7 d postmortem refrigerated storage. All analyses were conducted on the SM muscle. Diet had no effect (P > 0.05) on the concentration of free thiol and carbonyl and the band intensity of myosin heavy chain, actin and troponin T. The muscle glycogen, pH, water holding capacity, tenderness, glutathione peroxidase (GPX) activity, total carotenoid, δ-tocopherol, cholesterol and proximate composition did not differ (P > 0.05) between diets. The SM muscle from goats fed 4 and 8 % CPOB had lower (P < 0.05) concentration of C14:0 and C16:0 and higher (P < 0.05) concentration of C18:1 trans-11, C18:1ω-9, C18:3ω-3, C20:5ω-3 and C22:5ω-3 than the SM muscle from the control goats. Dietary CPOB increased (P < 0.05) the concentration of α and γ tocopherol and meat redness (a*) on d 1 and 4 postmortem. Regardless of diet, antioxidant vitamins, and shear force decreased (P < 0.05) while drip loss, lipid and protein oxidation increased (P < 0.05) as postmortem storage progressed. Results evince that dietary CPOB can be used as a management tool to enhance the beneficial fatty acids and antioxidant contents of chevon without deleterious effects on its physicochemical properties and shelf life.

  15. Compatibility Assessment of Fuel System Elastomers with Bio-oil and Diesel Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Kass, Michael D.; Janke, Christopher J.; Connatser, Raynella M.; Lewis, Samuel A.; Keiser, James R.; Gaston, Katherine

    2016-08-18

    Bio-oil derived via fast pyrolysis is being developed as a renewable fuel option for petroleum distillates. The compatibility of neat bio-oil with six elastomer types was evaluated against the elastomer performance in neat diesel fuel, which served as the baseline. The elastomers included two fluorocarbons, six acrylonitrile butadiene rubbers (NBRs), and one type each of fluorosilicone, silicone, styrene butadiene rubber (SBR), polyurethane, and neoprene. Specimens of each material were exposed to the liquid and gaseous phases of the test fuels for 4 weeks at 60 degrees C, and properties in the wetted and dried states were measured. Exposure to bio-oil produced significant volume expansion in the fluorocarbons, NBRs, and fluorosilicone; however, excessive swelling (over 80%) was only observed for the two fluorocarbons and two NBR grades. The polyurethane specimens were completely degraded by the bio-oil. In contrast, both silicone and SBR exhibited lower swelling levels in bio-oil compared to neat diesel fuel. The implication is that, while polyurethane and fluorocarbon may not be acceptable seal materials for bio-oils, silicone may offer a lower cost alternative.

  16. Compatibility Assessment of Fuel System Elastomers with Bio-oil and Diesel Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Kass, Michael D.; Janke, Christopher J.; Connatser, Raynella M.; Lewis, Samuel A.; Keiser, James R.; Gaston, Katherine

    2016-07-12

    Here we report that bio-oil derived via fast pyrolysis is being developed as a renewable fuel option for petroleum distillates. The compatibility of neat bio-oil with six elastomer types was evaluated against the elastomer performance in neat diesel fuel, which served as the baseline. The elastomers included two fluorocarbons, six acrylonitrile butadiene rubbers (NBRs), and one type each of fluorosilicone, silicone, styrene butadiene rubber (SBR), polyurethane, and neoprene. Specimens of each material were exposed to the liquid and gaseous phases of the test fuels for 4 weeks at 60 °C, and properties in the wetted and dried states were measured. Exposure to bio-oil produced significant volume expansion in the fluorocarbons, NBRs, and fluorosilicone; however, excessive swelling (over 80%) was only observed for the two fluorocarbons and two NBR grades. The polyurethane specimens were completely degraded by the bio-oil. In contrast, both silicone and SBR exhibited lower swelling levels in bio-oil compared to neat diesel fuel. The implication is that, while polyurethane and fluorocarbon may not be acceptable seal materials for bio-oils, silicone may offer a lower cost alternative.

  17. Compatibility Assessment of Fuel System Elastomers with Bio-oil and Diesel Fuel

    DOE PAGES

    Kass, Michael D.; Janke, Christopher J.; Connatser, Raynella M.; ...

    2016-07-12

    Here we report that bio-oil derived via fast pyrolysis is being developed as a renewable fuel option for petroleum distillates. The compatibility of neat bio-oil with six elastomer types was evaluated against the elastomer performance in neat diesel fuel, which served as the baseline. The elastomers included two fluorocarbons, six acrylonitrile butadiene rubbers (NBRs), and one type each of fluorosilicone, silicone, styrene butadiene rubber (SBR), polyurethane, and neoprene. Specimens of each material were exposed to the liquid and gaseous phases of the test fuels for 4 weeks at 60 °C, and properties in the wetted and dried states were measured.more » Exposure to bio-oil produced significant volume expansion in the fluorocarbons, NBRs, and fluorosilicone; however, excessive swelling (over 80%) was only observed for the two fluorocarbons and two NBR grades. The polyurethane specimens were completely degraded by the bio-oil. In contrast, both silicone and SBR exhibited lower swelling levels in bio-oil compared to neat diesel fuel. The implication is that, while polyurethane and fluorocarbon may not be acceptable seal materials for bio-oils, silicone may offer a lower cost alternative.« less

  18. Compatibility Assessment of Fuel System Elastomers with Bio-oil and Diesel Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Kass, Michael D.; Janke, Christopher J.; Connatser, Raynella M.; Lewis, Samuel A.; Keiser, James R.; Gaston, Katherine

    2016-07-12

    Here we report that bio-oil derived via fast pyrolysis is being developed as a renewable fuel option for petroleum distillates. The compatibility of neat bio-oil with six elastomer types was evaluated against the elastomer performance in neat diesel fuel, which served as the baseline. The elastomers included two fluorocarbons, six acrylonitrile butadiene rubbers (NBRs), and one type each of fluorosilicone, silicone, styrene butadiene rubber (SBR), polyurethane, and neoprene. Specimens of each material were exposed to the liquid and gaseous phases of the test fuels for 4 weeks at 60 °C, and properties in the wetted and dried states were measured. Exposure to bio-oil produced significant volume expansion in the fluorocarbons, NBRs, and fluorosilicone; however, excessive swelling (over 80%) was only observed for the two fluorocarbons and two NBR grades. The polyurethane specimens were completely degraded by the bio-oil. In contrast, both silicone and SBR exhibited lower swelling levels in bio-oil compared to neat diesel fuel. The implication is that, while polyurethane and fluorocarbon may not be acceptable seal materials for bio-oils, silicone may offer a lower cost alternative.

  19. 46 CFR 31.10-24 - Integral fuel oil tank examinations-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Integral fuel oil tank examinations-T/ALL. 31.10-24 Section 31.10-24 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Inspections § 31.10-24 Integral fuel oil tank examinations—T/ALL. (a) Each fuel oil tank with...

  20. 46 CFR 167.15-40 - Integral fuel oil tank examinations-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Integral fuel oil tank examinations-T/ALL. 167.15-40... PUBLIC NAUTICAL SCHOOL SHIPS Inspections § 167.15-40 Integral fuel oil tank examinations—T/ALL. (a) Each fuel oil tank with at least one side integral to the vessel's hull and located within the...

  1. 46 CFR 167.15-40 - Integral fuel oil tank examinations-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Integral fuel oil tank examinations-T/ALL. 167.15-40... PUBLIC NAUTICAL SCHOOL SHIPS Inspections § 167.15-40 Integral fuel oil tank examinations—T/ALL. (a) Each fuel oil tank with at least one side integral to the vessel's hull and located within the...

  2. 46 CFR 167.15-40 - Integral fuel oil tank examinations-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Integral fuel oil tank examinations-T/ALL. 167.15-40... PUBLIC NAUTICAL SCHOOL SHIPS Inspections § 167.15-40 Integral fuel oil tank examinations—T/ALL. (a) Each fuel oil tank with at least one side integral to the vessel's hull and located within the...

  3. 46 CFR 167.15-40 - Integral fuel oil tank examinations-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Integral fuel oil tank examinations-T/ALL. 167.15-40... PUBLIC NAUTICAL SCHOOL SHIPS Inspections § 167.15-40 Integral fuel oil tank examinations—T/ALL. (a) Each fuel oil tank with at least one side integral to the vessel's hull and located within the...

  4. 14 CFR 25.343 - Design fuel and oil loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Design fuel and oil loads. 25.343 Section 25.343 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... the wing at limit loads corresponding to— (i) A maneuvering load factor of +2.25; and (ii) The...

  5. 14 CFR 25.343 - Design fuel and oil loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Design fuel and oil loads. 25.343 Section 25.343 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... conditions of § 25.341(a) but assuming 85% of the design velocities prescribed in § 25.341(a)(4). (2) Fatigue...

  6. 14 CFR 25.343 - Design fuel and oil loads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Design fuel and oil loads. 25.343 Section 25.343 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... conditions of § 25.341(a) but assuming 85% of the design velocities prescribed in § 25.341(a)(4). (2) Fatigue...

  7. Other Alternative Diesel Fuels from Vegetable Oils and Animal Fats

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The energy crises of the 1970’s and early 1980’s provided impetus for developing alternative diesel fuels from vegetable oils and animal fats. Other driving forces may be derived from the Clean Air Act and its amendments and farmers desire to develop new uses for surplus agricultural commodities. ...

  8. View from southwest to northeast of fuel oil pump station, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View from southwest to northeast of fuel oil pump station, showing cooling towers to right. The tops of liquid nitrogen storage tanks A & B can be seen above the station roof. In the foreground, left to right, can be seen the covers for diesel fuel tanks no's 9 (structure #819), 8 (#818), 7 (#817), and 6 (#816). At right of center, next to the station, are no's 1 (#803) and 2 (#804). In the distant background are no's 3 (#806), 4 (#807), 5 (#808). No's 3 and 4 are 12,000-gallon tanks, the rest hold 50,000 gallons each - Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, Fuel Oil Pump Station, In Limited Access Area between Service Roads A & D, Nekoma, Cavalier County, ND

  9. Compression-ignition engine performance with undoped and doped fuel oils and alcohol mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Charles S; Foster, Hampton H

    1939-01-01

    Several fuel oils, doped fuel oils, and mixtures of alcohol and fuel oil were tested in a high-speed, single-cylinder, compression-ignition engine to determine power output, fuel consumption, and ignition and combustion characteristics. Fuel oils or doped fuel oils of high octane number had shorter ignition lags, lower rates of pressure rise, and gave smoother engine operation than fuel oils or doped fuel oils of low octane number. Higher engine rotative speeds and boost pressures resulted in smoother engine operation and permitted the use of fuel oils of relatively low octane number. Although the addition of a dope to a fuel oil decreased the ignition lag and the rate of pressure rise, the ensuing rate of combustion was somewhat slower than for the undoped fuel oil so that the effectiveness of combustion was practically unchanged. Alcohol used as an auxiliary fuel, either as a mixture or by separate injection, increased the rates of pressure rise and induced roughness. In general, the power output decreased as the proportion of alcohol increased and, below maximum power, varied with the heating value of the total fuel charge.

  10. Save Money with This Fuel Oil Spec

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fallon, Irving

    1978-01-01

    As part of an overall energy management program, the central steam plant at the University of Connecticut at Storrs has a fuel contract method in which vendors bid on a specification based on heating value as opposed to just volume. (Author/MLF)

  11. Save Money with This Fuel Oil Spec

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fallon, Irving

    1978-01-01

    As part of an overall energy management program, the central steam plant at the University of Connecticut at Storrs has a fuel contract method in which vendors bid on a specification based on heating value as opposed to just volume. (Author/MLF)

  12. Rape oil methyl ester (RME) and used cooking oil methyl ester (UOME) as alternative fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Hohl, G.H.

    1995-12-31

    The author presents a review about the fleet tests carried out by the Austrian Armed Forces concerning the practical application of a vegetable oil, i.e Rape Oil Methyl Ester (RME) and Used Cooking Oil Methyl Ester (UOME) as alternative fuels for vehicles under military conditions, and reviews other research results carried out in Austria. As a result of over-production in Western European agriculture, the increase in crop yields has led to tremendous surpluses. Alternative agricultural products have been sought. One alternative can be seen in biological fuel production for tractors, whereby the farmer is able to produce his own fuel supply as was the case when he previously provided self-made feed for his horses. For the market introduction different activities were necessary. A considerable number of institutes and organizations including the Austrian Armed Forces have investigated, tested and developed these alternative fuels. The increasing disposal problems of used cooking oil have initiated considerations for its use. The recycling of this otherwise waste product, and its preparation for use as an alternative fuel to diesel oil, seems to be most promising.

  13. Automatic stability analyzer of heavy fuel oils

    SciTech Connect

    Pilvioe, O.

    1995-04-01

    NESTE has a long history in development of production process and in the improvement of product quality by increasing automated quality adjustment and control. The objective has been to raise production efficiency and to ensure the maintenance of quality levels when using different crude oil grades, and to make economically such products that meet the requirements of the market.

  14. Transesterified sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) seed oil as a biodiesel fuel.

    PubMed

    Saydut, Abdurrahman; Duz, M Zahir; Kaya, Canan; Kafadar, Aylin Beycar; Hamamci, Candan

    2008-09-01

    The sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) oil was extracted from the seeds of the sesame that grows in Diyarbakir, SE Anatolia of Turkey. Sesame seed oil was obtained in 58wt/wt%, by traditional solvent extraction. The methylester of sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) seed oil was prepared by transesterification of the crude oil. Transesterification shows improvement in fuel properties of sesame seed oil. This study supports the production of biodiesel from sesame seed oil as a viable alternative to the diesel fuel.

  15. Field endurance test of diesel engines fueled with sunflower oil/diesel fuel blends

    SciTech Connect

    German, T.J.; Kaufman, K.R.; Pratt, G.L.; Derry, J.

    1985-01-01

    Four John Deere and two J.I. Case tractors were fueled with 25% or 50% blends of alkali-refined, winterized sunflower oil and No. 2 diesel fuel while in farm service. All engines were turbocharged, direct injection diesel engines and each was operated for approximately 1000 hours. No power losses were detected during the test period. However, one engine experienced camshaft/valve train failure while in service. Engine deposits were measured according to the CRC Diesel Engine Rating system after the test period was completed. Statistical analysis revealed heavier deposits in most areas of the combustion chamber of the three engines fueled with the 50% sunflower oil/50% No. 2 diesel fuel blend. No detrimental engine deposits due to differences in engine size were observed. No injector coking problems or ring sticking problems were encountered. Bearing wear was normal.

  16. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon body residues and lysosomal membrane destabilization in mussels exposed to the Dubai Star bunker fuel oil (intermediate fuel oil 380) spill in San Francisco Bay.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hyun-Min; Stanton, Beckye; McBride, Toby; Anderson, Michael J

    2014-05-01

    Following the spill of bunker fuel oil (intermediate fuel oil 380, approximately 1500-3000 L) into San Francisco Bay in October 2009, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) concentrations in mussels from moderately oiled areas increased up to 87 554 ng/g (dry wt) and, 3 mo later, decreased to concentrations found in mussels collected prior to oiling, with a biological half-life of approximately 16 d. Lysosomal membrane destabilization increased in mussels with higher PAH body burdens.

  17. CONVERTING PYROLYSIS OILS TO RENEWABLE TRANSPORT FUELS: PROCESSING CHALLENGES & OPPORTUNITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Holmgren, Jennifer; Nair, Prabhakar N.; Elliott, Douglas C.; Bain, Richard; Marinangelli, Richard

    2008-03-11

    To enable a sustained supply of biomass-based transportation fuels, the capability to process feedstocks outside the food chain must be developed. Significant industry efforts are underway to develop these new technologies, such as converting cellulosic wastes to ethanol. UOP, in partnership with U.S. Government labs, NREL and PNNL, is developing an alternate route using cellulosic feedstocks. The waste biomass is first subjected to a fast pyrolysis operation to generate pyrolysis oil (pyoil for short). Current efforts are focused on developing a thermochemical platform to convert pyoils to renewable gasoline, diesel and jet fuel. The fuels produced will be indistinguishable from their fossil fuel counterparts and, therefore, will be compatible with existing transport and distribution infrastructure.

  18. Electrocatalytic upgrading of biomass pyrolysis oils to chemical and fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Chun Ho

    The present project's aim is to liquefy biomass through fast pyrolysis and then upgrade the resulting "bio-oil" to renewable fuels and chemicals by intensifying its energy content using electricity. This choice reflects three points: (a) Liquid hydrocarbons are and will long be the most practical fuels and chemical feedstocks because of their energy density (both mass and volume basis), their stability and relative ease of handling, and the well-established infrastructure for their processing, distribution and use; (b) In the U.S., the total carbon content of annually harvestable, non-food biomass is significantly less than that in a year's petroleum usage, so retention of plant-captured carbon is a priority; and (c) Modern technologies for conversion of sunlight into usable energy forms---specifically, electrical power---are already an order of magnitude more efficient than plants are at storing solar energy in chemical form. Biomass fast pyrolysis (BFP) generates flammable gases, char, and "bio-oil", a viscous, corrosive, and highly oxygenated liquid consisting of large amounts of acetic acid and water together with hundreds of other organic compounds. With essentially the same energy density as biomass and a tendency to polymerize, this material cannot practically be stored or transported long distances. It must be upgraded by dehydration, deoxygenation, and hydrogenation to make it both chemically and energetically compatible with modern vehicles and fuels. Thus, this project seeks to develop low cost, general, scalable, robust electrocatalytic methods for reduction of bio-oil into fuels and chemicals.

  19. Effect of moisture content on the microbial activity in JP-5 fuel oil.

    PubMed

    Yang, S S; Chen, C Y; Sung, Y; Lin, Y T

    1992-11-01

    The water solubility of JP-5 fuel oil was found to be proportional to the reciprocal of absolute temperature from 0 degree C to 60 degrees C. Water in the fuel oil would become condensed once the temperature was shifted from a high temperature to low temperature. During the storage, condensed water was precipitated in the bottom of the tank. Both the static and the dynamic dehumidification processes with molecular sieve could reduce the moisture content of fuel oil to less than 5 ppm. However, pre-dried fuel oil had a mildly hydroscopic phenomenon at relatively high humidity condition. The spores of contaminated microbes could survive in the fuel oil with 5 to 80 ppm of moisture content. High moisture content of fuel oil was not favorable to the spore survival. Penicillium sp. could survive in the fuel oil longer than Cladosporium resinae.

  20. Direct oxidation of waste vegetable oil in solid-oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Z. F.; Kumar, R.; Thakur, S. T.; Rudnick, L. R.; Schobert, H.; Lvov, S. N.

    Solid-oxide fuel cells with ceria, ceria-Cu, and ceria-Rh anode were demonstrated to generate stable electric power with waste vegetable oil through direct oxidation of the fuel. The only pre-treatment to the fuel was a filtration to remove particulates. The performance of the fuel cell was stable over 100 h for the waste vegetable oil without dilution. The generated power was up to 0.25 W cm -2 for ceria-Rh fuel cell. This compares favorably with previously studied hydrocarbon fuels including jet fuels and Pennsylvania crude oil.

  1. Alternative diesel fuel study on four different types of vegetable oils of Turkish origin

    SciTech Connect

    Oezaktas, T.; Cigizoglu, K.B.; Karaosmanoglu, F.

    1997-02-01

    Four different types of vegetable oils of Turkish origin (sunflower, corn, soybean, and olive oil) were blended with grade 2-D diesel fuel at a ratio of 20/80 (v/v). Blends were investigated in a diesel engine with a precombustion chamber at speeds between 1,200 and 2,100 rpm. Vegetable oils, diesel fuel, and fuel blends were characterized according to standard test methods. It was found that for short-term use, the fuel blends have engine characteristics similar to the baseline diesel fuel. Fuel blends also display less smoke emissions than diesel fuel.

  2. Oil Price Uncertainty, Transport Fuel Demand and Public Health.

    PubMed

    He, Ling-Yun; Yang, Sheng; Chang, Dongfeng

    2017-03-01

    Based on the panel data of 306 cities in China from 2002 to 2012, this paper investigates China's road transport fuel (i.e., gasoline and diesel) demand system by using the Almost Ideal Demand System (AIDS) and the Quadratic AIDS (QUAIDS) models. The results indicate that own-priceelasticitiesfordifferentvehiclecategoriesrangefrom-1.215to-0.459(byAIDS)andfrom -1.399 to-0.369 (by QUAIDS). Then, this study estimates the air pollution emissions (CO, NOx and PM2.5) and public health damages from the road transport sector under different oil price shocks. Compared to the base year 2012, results show that a fuel price rise of 30% can avoid 1,147,270 tonnes of pollution emissions; besides, premature deaths and economic losses decrease by 16,149 cases and 13,817.953 million RMB yuan respectively; while based on the non-linear health effect model, the premature deaths and total economic losses decrease by 15,534 and 13,291.4 million RMB yuan respectively. Our study combines the fuel demand and health evaluation models and is the first attempt to address how oil price changes influence public health through the fuel demand system in China. Given its serious air pollution emission and substantial health damages, this paper provides important insights for policy makers in terms of persistent increasing in fuel consumption and the associated health and economic losses.

  3. Oil Price Uncertainty, Transport Fuel Demand and Public Health

    PubMed Central

    He, Ling-Yun; Yang, Sheng; Chang, Dongfeng

    2017-01-01

    Based on the panel data of 306 cities in China from 2002 to 2012, this paper investigates China’s road transport fuel (i.e., gasoline and diesel) demand system by using the Almost Ideal Demand System (AIDS) and the Quadratic AIDS (QUAIDS) models. The results indicate that own-price elasticities for different vehicle categories range from −1.215 to −0.459 (by AIDS) and from −1.399 to −0.369 (by QUAIDS). Then, this study estimates the air pollution emissions (CO, NOx and PM2.5) and public health damages from the road transport sector under different oil price shocks. Compared to the base year 2012, results show that a fuel price rise of 30% can avoid 1,147,270 tonnes of pollution emissions; besides, premature deaths and economic losses decrease by 16,149 cases and 13,817.953 million RMB yuan respectively; while based on the non-linear health effect model, the premature deaths and total economic losses decrease by 15,534 and 13,291.4 million RMB yuan respectively. Our study combines the fuel demand and health evaluation models and is the first attempt to address how oil price changes influence public health through the fuel demand system in China. Given its serious air pollution emission and substantial health damages, this paper provides important insights for policy makers in terms of persistent increasing in fuel consumption and the associated health and economic losses. PMID:28257076

  4. 46 CFR 30.10-48 - Oil fuel-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Oil fuel-TB/ALL. 30.10-48 Section 30.10-48 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-48 Oil fuel—TB/ALL. The term oil fuel means oil used as fuel for machinery in the vessel in which it...

  5. 46 CFR 30.10-48 - Oil fuel-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Oil fuel-TB/ALL. 30.10-48 Section 30.10-48 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-48 Oil fuel—TB/ALL. The term oil fuel means oil used as fuel for machinery in the vessel in which it is...

  6. 46 CFR 30.10-48 - Oil fuel-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Oil fuel-TB/ALL. 30.10-48 Section 30.10-48 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-48 Oil fuel—TB/ALL. The term oil fuel means oil used as fuel for machinery in the vessel in which it is...

  7. 46 CFR 30.10-48 - Oil fuel-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Oil fuel-TB/ALL. 30.10-48 Section 30.10-48 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-48 Oil fuel—TB/ALL. The term oil fuel means oil used as fuel for machinery in the vessel in which it...

  8. 46 CFR 30.10-48 - Oil fuel-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Oil fuel-TB/ALL. 30.10-48 Section 30.10-48 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-48 Oil fuel—TB/ALL. The term oil fuel means oil used as fuel for machinery in the vessel in which it...

  9. 46 CFR 30.10-48a - Oil fuel unit-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Oil fuel unit-TB/ALL. 30.10-48a Section 30.10-48a Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-48a Oil fuel unit—TB/ALL. The term oil fuel unit means the equipment used for the preparation of oil...

  10. Degradation of fuel oil in salt marsh soils affected by the Prestige oil spill.

    PubMed

    Vega, Flora A; Covelo, Emma F; Reigosa, Manuel J; Andrade, María Luisa

    2009-07-30

    We assessed natural degradation of fuel oil in three marshes from Galicia (Spain) affected by the Prestige oil spill (Baldaio, Barizo, and Muxía). Soil samples collected from polluted and unpolluted areas on four different dates were used to determine total petroleum hydrocarbon content and fuel-oil components. Natural degradation was monitored by analysing changes in the proportion of saturated hydrocarbons, aromatics, asphaltenes and resins in the soils, and also by evaluating the degree of depletion of saturated hydrocarbons on each sampling date. We additionally assessed the phytoremediation potential of Lolium perenne, L., Convolvulus arvensis L. and Raphanus raphanistrum L. All marsh soils exhibited natural degradation of saturated and aromatic hydrocarbons to between 85 and 95% in most cases. In contrast, asphaltenes and resins were degraded to a lesser extent (viz. 64-76% in Barizo 1, Muxía and Traba; 39-44% in Baldaio; and only 12% in Barizo 2, where flooding by the river continues to introduce balls of fuel oil into the soil). Monitoring analyses revealed natural degradation to be dependent on the thickness of the pollutant layer. Field plots sown with L. perenne L. exhibited no significant differences in fuel-oil degradation from untreated plots.

  11. Fuel properties of Brassica juncea oil methyl esters blended with ultra-low sulfur diesel fuel

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Brassica juncea is a drought-tolerant member of the Brassicaceae plant family with high oil content and a short growing season that is tolerant of low quality soils. It was investigated as a feedstock for production of biodiesel along with evaluation of subsequent fuel properties, both neat and in b...

  12. Cooking with Healthier Fats and Oils

    MedlinePlus

    ... use fats and oils, choose those with less saturated fat, trans fat, and cholesterol. Choose Less Often Choose More Often Percent of Saturated Fat Canola Oil Safflower Oil Sesame Oil Sunflower Oil ...

  13. Fuel oil and other products from wood wastes

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    Under a project recently funded by the Southeastern Regional Biomass Energy Program (SERBEP), Environmental Resource Services, Inc., (ERS), of Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, will build a plant to manufacture a high-grade fuel (bio-fuel) and other products from wood and other wastes. The plant will be part of a waste recycling center that ERS plans to construct at Anniston, Alabama. ERS will use a proprietary technology developed by Ensyn{trademark} Technologies of Ottawa, Canada to manufacture the bio-fuel. Ensyn`s{trademark} Rapid Thermal Process{trademark} (RPT{trademark}) is commercially available with plants in Canada, the US, Italy, and a plant in Finland under construction. The RTP{trademark} technology produces a light-weight fuel similar to Number 2 fuel oil in consistency. The bio-fuel can be more easily transported, handled, and fired than solid wood wastes. The process also does not have significant emissions and does not require a high volume of material be processed to be economical. Plants are available in the form of factory-built modules that can cost-effectively process 100 tons per day of feedstock.

  14. Environmental effects of soil contamination by shale fuel oils.

    PubMed

    Kanarbik, Liina; Blinova, Irina; Sihtmäe, Mariliis; Künnis-Beres, Kai; Kahru, Anne

    2014-10-01

    Estonia is currently one of the leading producers of shale oils in the world. Increased production, transportation and use of shale oils entail risks of environmental contamination. This paper studies the behaviour of two shale fuel oils (SFOs)--'VKG D' and 'VKG sweet'--in different soil matrices under natural climatic conditions. Dynamics of SFOs' hydrocarbons (C10-C40), 16 PAHs, and a number of soil heterotrophic bacteria in oil-spiked soils was investigated during the long-term (1 year) outdoor experiment. In parallel, toxicity of aqueous leachates of oil-spiked soils to aquatic organisms (crustaceans Daphnia magna and Thamnocephalus platyurus and marine bacteria Vibrio fischeri) and terrestrial plants (Sinapis alba and Hordeum vulgare) was evaluated. Our data showed that in temperate climate conditions, the degradation of SFOs in the oil-contaminated soils was very slow: after 1 year of treatment, the decrease of total hydrocarbons' content in the soil did not exceed 25 %. In spite of the comparable chemical composition of the two studied SFOs, the VKG sweet posed higher hazard to the environment than the heavier fraction (VKG D) due to its higher mobility in the soil as well as higher toxicity to aquatic and terrestrial species. Our study demonstrated that the correlation between chemical parameters (such as total hydrocarbons or total PAHs) widely used for the evaluation of the soil pollution levels and corresponding toxicity to aquatic and terrestrial organisms was weak.

  15. Nutrient demand in bioventing of fuel oil pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Breedveld, G.D.; Hauge, A.; Olstad, G.; Briseid, T.

    1995-12-31

    The effect of nutrient addition on bioventing of fuel oil pollution in an artificially polluted sandy soil has been studied at different experimental scales to assess the predictive value of laboratory treatability studies. The results of batch studies, laboratory column studies, and pilot-scale field tests (10 tons of soil) were compared. The qualitative response to nutrient addition was comparable in all experiments. Without nutrient addition, a minimal respiration rate was observed. With nutrient addition, respiration rates increased almost instantaneously. The highest rates were observed in the batch studies. The column study and pilot-scale field test indicated similar respiration rates, at approximately one sixth the respiration rates in the batch study. Respiration rates in the pilot-scale field study decreased during the winter season. Analysis of the residual oil composition in soil samples showed a relation between the degree of weathering, measured as the n-C{sub 17}/pristane and n-C{sub 18}/phytane ratio, and nutrient addition. Lower n-C{sub 17}/pristane ratios were observed at higher total nitrogen content. After 1 year of bioventing with nutrient addition, a 66% reduction in TPH content was observed. Without nutrient addition, the residual oil still closely resembled the original fuel oil product, with only minor removal of the light-end compounds.

  16. Vegetable oils as an on the farm diesel fuel substitute: the North Carolina situation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Harwood, H.J.

    1981-06-01

    The state-of-the-art of using vegetable oil as a diesel fuel alternative is reviewed. Particular emphasis has been placed on using vegetable oil in farm vehicles as an emergency fuel which may be produced on-farm. The following are reviewed: the mechanical feasibility, on-farm fuel production, and economic analysis.

  17. 76 FR 49525 - Advisory Circular 20-24C, Approval of Propulsion Fuels and Lubricating Oils

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-10

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Advisory Circular 20-24C, Approval of Propulsion Fuels and Lubricating... Propulsion Fuels and Lubricating Oils. This AC provides guidance on regulations and policy applicable to... aircraft, engines, or APUs to operate with specified propulsion fuels and lubricating oils. DATES:...

  18. 40 CFR 279.72 - On-specification used oil fuel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false On-specification used oil fuel. 279.72 Section 279.72 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF USED OIL Standards for Used Oil Fuel Marketers § 279.72...

  19. No. 2 fuel oil decreases embryonic survival of great black-backed gulls

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coon, N.C.; Albers, P.H.; Szaro, R.C.

    1979-01-01

    Field study of the effects of No. 2 fuel oil applications to the eggs of great black-backed gulls on an island off the coast of Maine. Fuel oil applied in amounts of either 5 or 20 ul. All eggs opened 8 da later. Measured survival and estimated age of embryo at time of egg oiling.

  20. Experimental plan for the fuel-oil study

    SciTech Connect

    Ternes, M.P.; Levins, W.P.; Brown, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    An up-to-date assessment of the Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) is being performed by the US Department of Energy WAP Division and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Five studies form the evaluation. Major goals of the Fuel-Oil Study are to estimate the fuel oil saved by the WAP in the Northeast during the 1990 and 1991 program years, identify and quantify non-energy impacts of the WAP, assess the cost effectiveness of the WAP within this submarket, and assess factors which may cause savings and cost effectiveness to vary. The study will only analyze single-family houses in the nine states in the Northeast census region and will be carried out over two heating seasons (1990 and 1991 WAP program years). A split-winter, pre- and post-weatherization experimental design with a control group will be used. Houses will be monitored over one winter. Energy conservation measures will be installed in the weatherized houses in January of each winter by the local WAP subgrantee. One hundred twenty five weatherized houses and 75 control houses will be monitored over the 1990--1991 winter; a different set of 200 houses will be monitored over the 1991--1992 winter. The houses will be evenly distributed among 25 subgrantees. Space-heating fuel-oil consumption, indoor temperature, and outdoor temperature data will be collected for all houses. Fuel-oil delivery data will be collected for each house monitored over the 1990--1991 winter for at least a year before weatherization. The delivery data will be analyzed to determine if the accuracy of the study can be improved by collecting fuel-oil delivery data on a larger sample of houses over the 1991--1992 winter. Detailed survey information will be obtained on all the houses. This information includes descriptive details of the house and its mechanical systems, details on household size and other demographics, and occupant answers to questions regarding comfort, safety, and operation of their space-heating system and house.

  1. Nutritional evaluation of canola meals produced from new varieties of canola seeds for poultry.

    PubMed

    Chen, X; Parr, C; Utterback, P; Parsons, C M

    2015-05-01

    This study evaluated the nutritional value of 14 canola meals from new varieties of canola and compared them to conventional canola meal samples and soybean meals in chickens. Five experiments that included different sources of canola meals or soybean meals were conducted. For each experiment, a precision-fed rooster assay with conventional or cecectomized roosters was conducted to determine TMEn or amino acid digestibility. Analyzed nutritional composition of the canola meal samples indicated increases in crude protein and amino acids for all test canola meals (49.41 to 50.58% crude protein on a dry matter basis) compared to conventional canola meals (40.73 to 43.01%). All test canola meals also contained lower amounts of neutral detergent fiber and acid detergent fiber. Most test canola meals had significantly higher TMEn values than the conventional canola meals (P < 0.05), but all were lower than the soybean meal (P < 0.05). The test canola meals had higher amino acid digestibility coefficients than conventional canola meals in Experiments 1, 2, and 4 (P < 0.05), and higher concentrations of digestible amino acids in all 5 experiments. The results of this study indicated that nutritional value of the canola meal from new varieties of canola was greater than conventional canola meal for poultry. © 2015 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  2. Impacts of the Weatherization Assistance Program in fuel-oil heated houses

    SciTech Connect

    Levins, W.P.; Ternes, M.P.

    1994-09-01

    The U.S. DOE Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) Division requested Oak Ridge National Laboratory to help design and conduct an up-to-date assessment of the Program. The evaluation includes five separate studies; the fuel oil study is the subject of this paper. The primary goal of the fuel-oil study was to provide a region-wide estimate of the space-heating fuel oil saved by the Program in the Northeast during the 1991 and 1992 program years. Other goals include assessing the cost effectiveness of the Program within the fuel-oil submarket, and identifying factors which caused fuel-oil savings to vary. This paper reports only the highlights from the fuel-oil study`s final report.

  3. Effects of Turbulence on the Combustion Properties of Partially Premixed Flames of Canola Methyl Ester and Diesel Blends

    DOE PAGES

    Dhamale, N.; Parthasarathy, R. N.; Gollahalli, S. R.

    2011-01-01

    Canola methyl ester (CME) is a biofuel that is a renewable alternative energy resource and is produced by the transesterification of canola oil. The objective of this study was to document the effects of turbulence on the combustion characteristics of blends of CME and No 2 diesel fuel in a partially-premixed flame environment. The experiments were conducted with mixtures of pre-vaporized fuel and air at an initial equivalence ratio of 7 and three burner exit Reynolds numbers, 2700, 3600, and 4500. Three blends with 25, 50, and 75% volume concentration of CME were studied. The soot volume fraction was highestmore » for the pure diesel flames and did not change significantly with Reynolds number due to the mutually compensating effects of increased carbon input rate and increased air entrainment as the Reynolds number was increased. The global NOx emission index was highest and the CO emission index was the lowest for the pure CME flame, and varied non-monotonically with biofuel content in the blend The mean temperature and the NOx concentration at three-quarter flame height were generally correlated, indicating that the thermal mechanism of NOx formation was dominant in the turbulent biofuel flames also.« less

  4. Processing conditions affect nutrient digestibility of cold-pressed canola cake for grower pigs.

    PubMed

    Seneviratne, R W; Beltranena, E; Newkirk, R W; Goonewardene, L A; Zijlstra, R T

    2011-08-01

    Cold-pressed canola cake is a coproduct of biodiesel production that contains more residual oil than expeller-pressed and solvent-extracted canola meal. Cold-pressed canola cake might be an attractive feedstuff for swine due to local availability from small plants. However, the nutritional quality and content of anti-nutritional factors of cold-pressed canola cake are poorly defined and vary with processing conditions. This experiment evaluated cold-pressed canola cake processed using 4 different conditions: a nonheated and heated barrel at slow and fast screw speed in a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement. Seven ileally cannulated barrows (26 kg of BW) were fed twice daily at 2.8 × maintenance diets containing either 44% of 1 of the 4 cold-pressed canola cake samples, expeller-pressed canola meal, canola seed, or an N-free diet in a 7 × 7 Latin square. The objectives were to measure the energy and AA digestibility and to calculate standardized ileal digestible (SID) AA and NE content. Each 9-d experimental period consisted of a 5-d diet adaptation, followed by 2-d feces and 2-d ileal digesta collections, and 7 observations per diet were obtained. Cold-pressed canola cake contained 41% CP, 16% ether extract, and 5 µmol of total glucosinolates/g (DM basis). Both apparent ileal digestibility (AID) and total tract energy digestibility of energy in cold-pressed canola cake was 36% greater (P < 0.05) in heated vs. nonheated conditions and 8% greater (P < 0.05) in fast vs. slow screw speed without interaction, indicating that heat enhanced energy digestibility. The AID of energy of cold-pressed canola cake was 13 and 118% greater (P < 0.01) than expeller-pressed canola meal and canola seed, respectively. Heat and speed interacted (P < 0.05) for SID of AA of test ingredients, but effects were not consistent among AA. The DE and calculated NE content of cold-pressed canola cake was 0.73 and 0.52 Mcal/kg greater (P=0.001; DM basis), respectively, than expeller-pressed canola

  5. Fuel characteristics pertinent to the design of aircraft fuel systems, Supplement I : additional information on MIL-F-7914(AER) grade JP-5 fuel and several fuel oils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnett, Henry C; Hibbard, Robert R

    1953-01-01

    Since the release of the first NACA publication on fuel characteristics pertinent to the design of aircraft fuel systems (NACA-RM-E53A21), additional information has become available on MIL-F7914(AER) grade JP-5 fuel and several of the current grades of fuel oils. In order to make this information available to fuel-system designers as quickly as possible, the present report has been prepared as a supplement to NACA-RM-E53A21. Although JP-5 fuel is of greater interest in current fuel-system problems than the fuel oils, the available data are not as extensive. It is believed, however, that the limited data on JP-5 are sufficient to indicate the variations in stocks that the designer must consider under a given fuel specification. The methods used in the preparation and extrapolation of data presented in the tables and figures of this supplement are the same as those used in NACA-RM-E53A21.

  6. Performance of hybrid ball bearings in oil and jet fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Schrader, S.M.; Pfaffenberger, E.E. )

    1992-07-01

    A 308-size hybrid ball bearing, with ceramic balls and steel rings, was tested using a diester oil and gas turbine fuel as lubricants at several speeds and loads. Heat generation data from this test work was then correlated with the heat generation model from a widely used computer code. The ability of this hybrid split inner ring bearing design to endure thrust reversals, which are expected in many turbine applications, was demonstrated. Finally, the bearing was successfully endurance tested in JP-10 fuel for 25 hours at 7560 N axial load and 36,000 rpm. This work has successfully demonstrated the technology necessary to use fuel-lubricated hybrid bearings in limited-life gas turbine engine applications such as missiles, drones, and other unmanned air vehicles (UAVs). In addition, it has provided guidance for use in designing such bearing systems. As a result, the benefits of removing the conventional oil lubricant system, i.e., design simplification and reduced maintenance, can be realized. 6 refs.

  7. Performance of hybrid ball bearings in oil and jet fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrader, Stephen M.; Pfaffenberger, Eugene E.

    1992-07-01

    A 308-size hybrid ball bearing, with ceramic balls and steel rings, was tested using a diester oil and gas turbine fuel as lubricants at several speeds and loads. Heat generation data from this test work was then correlated with the heat generation model from a widely used computer code. The ability of this hybrid split inner ring bearing design to endure thrust reversals, which are expected in many turbine applications, was demonstrated. Finally, the bearing was successfully endurance tested in JP-10 fuel for 25 hours at 7560 N axial load and 36,000 rpm. This work has successfully demonstrated the technology necessary to use fuel-lubricated hybrid bearings in limited-life gas turbine engine applications such as missiles, drones, and other unmanned air vehicles (UAVs). In addition, it has provided guidance for use in designing such bearing systems. As a result, the benefits of removing the conventional oil lubricant system, i.e., design simplification and reduced maintenance, can be realized.

  8. Crude oil and finished fuel storage stability: an annotated review

    SciTech Connect

    Brinkman, D.W.; Bowden, J.N.; Giles, H.N.

    1980-02-01

    The Bartlesville Energy Technology Center (BETC) of the Deopartment of Energy (DOE) and the US Army Fuels and Lubricants Research laboratory (AFLRL) at Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) have been working together on a support effort for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Office (SPRO) of DOE. One task within this effort was a detailed literature survey of previous experiences in long-term storage of crude oil and finished fuels with an emphasis on underground storage. Based on the discussion presented in this review, in the limited number of cases reported, the refinability of crude oil was not significantly affected by prolonged storage. It was found that most crudes will deposit a sludge during storage which may interfere with withdrawal pumping. This sludge is probably composed of wax, sediment, water, and possibly asphaltenes. Emulsions of the water-oil interface have been reported after prolonged storage which have been attributed to action of centrifugal pumps used to remove accumulated seepage water. It is possible that these emulsions resulted from biological activity, such as the anaerobic activity reported, but no hydrogen sulfide production was observed.

  9. Fuel and lubricant additives from acid treated mixtures of vegetable oil derived amides and esters

    SciTech Connect

    Bonazza, B.R.; Devault, A.N.

    1981-05-26

    Vegetable oils such as corn oil, peanut oil, and soy oil are reacted with polyamines to form a mixture containing amides, imides, half esters, and glycerol with subsequent treatment with a strong acid such as sulfonic acid to produce a product mix that has good detergent properties in fuels and lubricants.

  10. Direct Utilization of Crude Oils as Fuels in U.S. Army Diesel Engines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-06-01

    availability of crude oil properties throughout the world were investigated, and these properties were divided into two groups (1) Those properties which...of crude oil use on engine subsystem hardware such as fuel filters and fuel injection pumps were investigated, with particular attention being paid...CLR diesel engine operating on various crude oils. Performance data, wear, and deposition effects of crude oil use were obtained using the TACOM

  11. Distillate fuel-oil processing for phosphoric acid fuel-cell power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Ushiba, K. K.

    1980-02-01

    The current efforts to develop distillate oil-steam reforming processes are reviewed, and the applicability of these processes for integration with the fuel cell are discussed. The development efforts can be grouped into the following processing approaches: high-temperature steam reforming (HTSR); autothermal reforming (ATR); autothermal gasification (AG); and ultra desulfurization followed by steam reforming. Sulfur in the feed is a key problem in the process development. A majority of the developers consider sulfur as an unavoidable contaminant of distillate fuel and are aiming to cope with it by making the process sulfur-tolerant. In the HTSR development, the calcium aluminate catalyst developed by Toyo Engineering represents the state of the art. United Technology (UTC), Engelhard, and Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) are also involved in the HTSR research. The ATR of distillate fuel is investigated by UTC and JPL. The autothermal gasification (AG) of distillate fuel is being investigated by Engelhard and Siemens AG. As in the ATR, the fuel is catalytically gasified utilizing the heat generated by in situ partial combustion of feed, however, the goal of the AG is to accomplish the initial breakdown of the feed into light gases and not to achieve complete conversion to CO and H/sub 2/. For the fuel-cell integration, a secondary reforming of the light gases from the AG step is required. Engelhard is currently testing a system in which the effluent from the AG section enters the steam-reforming section, all housed in a single vessel. (WHK)

  12. Assessing fuel spill risks in polar waters: Temporal dynamics and behaviour of hydrocarbons from Antarctic diesel, marine gas oil and residual fuel oil.

    PubMed

    Brown, Kathryn E; King, Catherine K; Kotzakoulakis, Konstantinos; George, Simon C; Harrison, Peter L

    2016-09-15

    As part of risk assessment of fuel oil spills in Antarctic and subantarctic waters, this study describes partitioning of hydrocarbons from three fuels (Special Antarctic Blend diesel, SAB; marine gas oil, MGO; and intermediate grade fuel oil, IFO 180) into seawater at 0 and 5°C and subsequent depletion over 7days. Initial total hydrocarbon content (THC) of water accommodated fraction (WAF) in seawater was highest for SAB. Rates of THC loss and proportions in equivalent carbon number fractions differed between fuels and over time. THC was most persistent in IFO 180 WAFs and most rapidly depleted in MGO WAF, with depletion for SAB WAF strongly affected by temperature. Concentration and composition remained proportionate in dilution series over time. This study significantly enhances our understanding of fuel behaviour in Antarctic and subantarctic waters, enabling improved predictions for estimates of sensitivities of marine organisms to toxic contaminants from fuels in the region. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in fuel-oil contaminated soils, Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Aislabie, J; Balks, M; Astori, N; Stevenson, G; Symons, R

    1999-12-01

    Where fuel oil spills have occurred on Antarctic soils polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) may accumulate. Surface and subsurface soil samples were collected from fuel spill sites up to 30 years old, and from nearby control sites, and analysed for the 16 PAHs on the USEPA priority pollutants list, as well as for two methyl substituted naphthalenes, 1-methylnaphthalene and 2-methylnaphthalene. PAH levels ranged from 41-8105 ng g-1 of dried soil in the samples from contaminated sites and were below detection limits in control site samples. PAH were detected in surface soils and had migrated to lower depths in the contaminated soil. The predominant PAH detected were naphthalene and its methyl derivatives.

  14. Rheological properties of peanut oil-diesel fuel blends

    SciTech Connect

    Goodrum, J.W.; Law, S.E.

    1982-07-01

    Basic physical properties of peanut oil-diesel fuel blends were experimentally determined to help establish suitability for use in compression-ignition engines. For volumetric proportions of peanut oil ranging in 20 percent increments from 0 percent to 100 percent, the continuously varying properties at 21/sup 0/C were found to range as follows: heating value - 45.8 to 40.3 MJ/kg; specific gravity - 0.848 to 0.915; surface tension - 28.3 to 35.6 mN/m; and kinematic viscosity - 3.8 to 7.0 cSt. Dynamic viscosity measured as a function of shear rate over a 0/sup 0/C to 80/sup 0/C temperature range indicated nonNewtonian flow properties at shear rates less than 3/s.

  15. Storage of Residual Fuel Oil in Underground Unlined Rock Caverns.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    Francaise des Petroles BP, Elf Union, Shell Francaise, and Compagnie Francaise de Raffinage (Total). The company and its subsidiaries were formed with...DEC 80 D C BANKS UNCLASSIFIED WES/NP/S4.-8O-19 ti. LE VEL MISCELLANEOUS PAPER GL-80-19 31 STORAGE OF RESIDUAL FUEL OIL IN UNDERGROUND UNLINED ROCK...Ruimaia.~ indl a riiirI( le ol Air in1 wi r’ hve en coIit’Icted to enc1ouraige muiliriershnpl I[I the i 5kRM. 1) By Innf t-Ii .fi’ I ’I.]%- I "W

  16. An environmentally benign soybean derived fuel as a blending stock or replacement for home heating oil.

    PubMed

    Mushrush, G; Beal, E J; Spencer, G; Wynne, J H; Lloyd, C L; Hughes, J M; Walls, C L; Hardy, D R

    2001-05-01

    The use of bio-derived materials both as fuels and/or as blending stocks becomes more attractive as the price of middle distillate fuels, especially home heating oil, continues to rise. Historically, many biomass and agricultural derived materials have been suggested. One of the most difficult problems encountered with home heating oil is that of storage stability. High maintenance costs associated with home heating oil are, in large part, because of this stability problem. In the present research, Soygold, a soybean derived fuel, was added in concentrations of 10%-20% to both a stable middle distillate fuel and an unstable home heating oil. Fuel instability in this article will be further related to the organo-nitrogen compounds present. The soy-fuel mixtures proved stable, and the addition of the soy liquid enhanced both the combustion properties, and dramatically improved the stability of the unstable home heating oil.

  17. Fuel oil effect on the population growth, species diversity and chlorophyll (a) content of freshwater microalgae.

    PubMed

    El-Dib, M A; Abou-Waly, H F; El-Naby, A H

    2001-06-01

    Fresh water algae were subjected to different concentrations (0.03, 0.07, 0.12, 0.25 and 0.5 g x l(-1)) of aqueous extract of reference fuel oil (EPA, USA, API Oil No. 2, 38% aromatic, 1274). Significant decrease in Chlorophyll. (a) was observed as the concentration of fuel oil was increased. The EC50 value of fuel oil after 7 days was 0.29 g x l(-1). Total algal counts and growth rate decreased in response to the studied fuel oil. High diversity values in diatoms were observed in all treated aqueous cultures. High concentrations of fuel oil significantly decreased carbohydrate and protein contents of algal cells.

  18. Toxicity of water-soluble fractions of biodiesel fuels derived from castor oil, palm oil, and waste cooking oil.

    PubMed

    Leite, Maria Bernadete Neiva Lemos; de Araújo, Milena Maria Sampaio; Nascimento, Iracema Andrade; da Cruz, Andrea Cristina Santos; Pereira, Solange Andrade; do Nascimento, Núbia Costa

    2011-04-01

    Concerns over the sustained availability of fossil fuels and their impact on global warming and pollution have led to the search for fuels from renewable sources to address worldwide rising energy demands. Biodiesel is emerging as one of the possible solutions for the transport sector. It shows comparable engine performance to that of conventional diesel fuel, while reducing greenhouse gas emissions. However, the toxicity of products and effluents from the biodiesel industry has not yet been sufficiently investigated. Brazil has a very high potential as a biodiesel producer, in view of its climatic conditions and vast areas for cropland, with consequent environmental risks because of possible accidental biodiesel spillages into water bodies and runoff to coastal areas. This research determined the toxicity to two marine organisms of the water-soluble fractions (WSF) of three different biodiesel fuels obtained by methanol transesterification of castor oil (CO), palm oil (PO), and waste cooking oil (WCO). Microalgae and sea urchins were used as the test organisms, respectively, for culture-growth-inhibition and early-life-stage-toxicity tests. The toxicity levels of the analyzed biodiesel WSF showed the highest toxicity for the CO, followed by WCO and the PO. Methanol was the most prominent contaminant; concentrations increased over time in WSF samples stored up to 120 d.

  19. Effect of some Turkish vegetable oil-diesel fuel blends on exhaust emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Ergeneman, M.; Oezaktas, T.; Cigizoglu, K.B.; Karaosmanoglu, F.; Arslan, E.

    1997-10-01

    For different types of vegetable oils of Turkish origin (sunflower, corn, soybean, and olive oil) were blended with grade No. 2-D diesel fuel at a ratio of 20/80 (v/v). The effect of the compression ratio on exhaust emissions is investigated in an American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM)-cooperative fuel research (CFR) engine working with the mentioned fuel blends and a baseline diesel fuel. A decrease in soot, CO, CO{sub 2}, and HC emissions and an increase in NO{sub x} emissions have been observed for fuel blends compared to diesel fuel.

  20. Laser-induced fluorescence fiber optic probe measurement of oil dilution by fuel

    DOEpatents

    Parks, II, James E [Knoxville, TN; Partridge, Jr., William P [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-11-23

    Apparatus for detecting fuel in oil includes an excitation light source in optical communication with an oil sample for exposing the oil sample to excitation light in order to excite the oil sample from a non-excited state to an excited state and a spectrally selective device in optical communication with the oil sample for detecting light emitted from the oil sample as the oil sample returns from the excited state to a non-excited state to produce spectral indicia that can be analyzed to determine the presence of fuel in the oil sample. A method of detecting fuel in oil includes the steps of exposing a oil sample to excitation light in order to excite the oil sample from a non-excited state to an excited state, as the oil sample returns from the excited state to a non-excited state, detecting light emitted from the oil sample to produce spectral indicia; and analyzing the spectral indicia to determine the presence of fuel in the oil sample.

  1. Aerosol emissions of a ship diesel engine operated with diesel fuel or heavy fuel oil.

    PubMed

    Streibel, Thorsten; Schnelle-Kreis, Jürgen; Czech, Hendryk; Harndorf, Horst; Jakobi, Gert; Jokiniemi, Jorma; Karg, Erwin; Lintelmann, Jutta; Matuschek, Georg; Michalke, Bernhard; Müller, Laarnie; Orasche, Jürgen; Passig, Johannes; Radischat, Christian; Rabe, Rom; Reda, Ahmed; Rüger, Christopher; Schwemer, Theo; Sippula, Olli; Stengel, Benjamin; Sklorz, Martin; Torvela, Tiina; Weggler, Benedikt; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2017-04-01

    Gaseous and particulate emissions from a ship diesel research engine were elaborately analysed by a large assembly of measurement techniques. Applied methods comprised of offline and online approaches, yielding averaged chemical and physical data as well as time-resolved trends of combustion by-products. The engine was driven by two different fuels, a commonly used heavy fuel oil (HFO) and a standardised diesel fuel (DF). It was operated in a standardised cycle with a duration of 2 h. Chemical characterisation of organic species and elements revealed higher concentrations as well as a larger number of detected compounds for HFO operation for both gas phase and particulate matter. A noteworthy exception was the concentration of elemental carbon, which was higher in DF exhaust aerosol. This may prove crucial for the assessment and interpretation of biological response and impact via the exposure of human lung cell cultures, which was carried out in parallel to this study. Offline and online data hinted at the fact that most organic species in the aerosol are transferred from the fuel as unburned material. This is especially distinctive at low power operation of HFO, where low volatility structures are converted to the particulate phase. The results of this study give rise to the conclusion that a mere switching to sulphur-free fuel is not sufficient as remediation measure to reduce health and environmental effects of ship emissions.

  2. Catalytic transformation of waste polymers to fuel oil.

    PubMed

    Keane, Mark A

    2009-01-01

    Waste not, want not: The increase in waste polymer generation, which continues to exceed recycle, represents a critical environmental burden. However, plastic waste may be viewed as a potential resource and, with the correct treatment, can serve as hydrocarbon raw material or as fuel oil, as described in this Minireview.Effective waste management must address waste reduction, reuse, recovery, and recycle. The consumption of plastics continues to grow, and, while plastic recycle has seen a significant increase since the early 1990s, consumption still far exceeds recycle. However, waste plastic can be viewed as a potential resource and can serve, with the correct treatment, as hydrocarbon raw material or as fuel oil. This Minireview considers the role of catalysis in waste polymer reprocessing and provides a critical overview of the existing waste plastic treatment technologies. Thermal pyrolysis results in a random scissioning of the polymer chains, generating products with varying molecular weights. Catalytic degradation provides control over the product composition/distribution and serves to lower significantly the degradation temperature. Incineration of waste PVC is very energy demanding and can result in the formation of toxic chloro emissions. The efficacy of a catalytic transformation of PVC is also discussed.

  3. Application of bioventing at a fuel oil impacted site

    SciTech Connect

    Reisinger, H.J.; Massengill, D.G.

    1994-12-31

    Misdelivery of approximately 8,700 gallons of fuel oil into an underground storage tank compliance monitoring well at a manufacturing facility in the Piedmont Physiographic Province of Virginia resulted in contamination of site soils and ground water. Attempts to remediate the site using conventional ground-water pump and treat technology succeeded in containing the fuel oil within the site boundaries, but did little to remove soil residual and dissolved phase hydrocarbon. Bioventing was considered as an option to address the residual hydrocarbon in the vadose zone. Results of a pilot test suggested that a viable indigenous population of heterotrophic organisms capable of utilizing hydrocarbon as a cell growth and energy source was present in the subsurface. Based on this conclusion and the data generated in the pilot test, a bioventing system was designed and installed at the site. At the conclusion of six months of operation, 6,097 kg of hydrocarbon were removed by in situ biodegradation, 30 kg by vacuum extraction, and 4 kg by separate recovery.

  4. Thioether-functionalized vegetable oils: Metal-absorbing biobased ligands

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Vegetable oils containing thioether groups have been synthesized and used to effectively remove a heavy metal ion from an aqueous solution. The use of thioether-functionalized corn oil (TF-corn oil) and thioether-functionalized canola oil (TF-canola oil) were both effective in the extraction of Ag+ ...

  5. Effects of chronic ingestion of No. 2 fuel oil on mallard ducklings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Szaro, R.C.; Hensler, G.L.; Heinz, G.H.

    1981-01-01

    No. 2 fuel oil was fed to mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) ducklings in concentrations of 0.5 and 5.0% of the diet from hatching to 18 wk of age to assess the effects of chronic oil ingestion during early development. Five growth parameters (body weight, wing length, ninth primary length, tarsal length, and bill length) were depressed in birds receiving a diet containing 5% fuel oil. There was no oil-related mortality. The 5% fuel oil diet impaired avoidance behavior of 9-d-old mallard ducklings compared with controls or ducklings fed 0.5% oil. Open-field activity was greatly increased in 16-wk-old ducklings fed 5.0% oil. Liver hypertrophy and splenic atrophy were gross evidences of pathological effects in birds on the 5.0% oil diet. More subtle effects included biochemical lesions that resulted in the elevation of plasma alanine aminotransferase and ornithine carbamoyltransferase activity.

  6. Laboratory endurance testing of a 25/75 sunflower oil-diesel fuel blend treated with fuel additives

    SciTech Connect

    Ziejewski, M.; Kaufman, K.R.; Tupa, R.C.

    1984-01-01

    The engine performance and durability effects of a barium smoke suppressant additive, Lubrizol 565, and an ashless polymeric additive, Lubrizol 552, in a 25-75 blend (v/v) of alkali refined sunflower oil with diesel fuel were investigated. The study was performed on a direct injected, turbocharged, and intercooled diesel engine. These additives were tested in an attempt to reduce carbon buildup problems observed while using an untreated 25-75 blend of sunflower oil and diesel fuel.

  7. The prestige oil spill. I. Biodegradation of a heavy fuel oil under simulated conditions.

    PubMed

    Díez, Sergi; Sabatté, Jordi; Viñas, Marc; Bayona, Josep M; Solanas, Anna M; Albaigés, Joan

    2005-09-01

    In vitro biodegradation of the Prestige heavy fuel oil has been carried out using two microbial consortia obtained by enrichment in different substrates to simulate its environmental fate and potential utility for bioremediation. Different conditions, such as incubation time (i.e., 20 or 40 d), oil weathering, and addition of an oleophilic fertilizer (S200), were evaluated. Weathering slowed down the degradation of the fuel oil, probably because of the loss of lower and more labile components, but the addition of S200 enhanced significantly the extension of the biodegradation. n-Alkanes, alkylcyclohexanes, alkylbenzenes, and the two- to three-ring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were degraded in 20 or 40 d of incubation of the original oil, whereas the biodegradation efficiency decreased for higher PAHs and with the increase of alkylation. Molecular markers were degraded according to the following sequence: Acyclic isoprenoids > diasteranes > C27-steranes > betabeta-steranes > homohopanes > monoaromatic steranes > triaromatic steranes. Isomeric selectivity was observed within the C1- and C2-phenanthrenes, dibenzothiophenes, pyrenes, and chrysenes, providing source and weathering indices for the characterization of the heavy oil spill. Acyclic isoprenoids, C27-steranes, C1- and C2-naphthalenes, phenanthrenes, and dibenzothiophenes were degraded completely when S200 was used. The ratios of the C2- and C3-alkyl homologues of fluoranthene/pyrene and chrysene/benzo[a]anthracene are proposed as source ratios in moderately degraded oils. The 4-methylpyrene and 3-methylchrysene were refractory enough to serve as conserved internal markers in assessing the degradation of the aromatic fraction in a manner similar to that of hopane, as used for the aliphatic fraction.

  8. Diesel fuel oil for increasing mountain pine beetle mortality in felled logs

    Treesearch

    S. A. Mata; J. M. Schmid; D. A. Leatherman

    2002-01-01

    Diesel fuel oil was applied to mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins) infested bolts of ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Lawson) in early June. Just prior to the fuel oil application and 6 weeks later, 0.5 ft2 bark samples were removed from each bolt and the numbers of live beetles counted....

  9. Vegetable oils and animal fats for diesel fuels: a systems study

    SciTech Connect

    Lipinsky, E.S.; Kresovich, S.; Wagner, C.K.; Appelbaum, H.R.; McClure, T.A.; Otis, J.L.; Trayser, D.A.

    1982-01-01

    This paper provided some information on the possible use of vegetable oils and animal fats as substitute fuels and as emergency diesel fuels in the United States. This paper is confined to using triglyceride fuels in agricultural, automotive, and highway transportation applications. Satisfactory substitution of petroleum-based diesel fuels with triglyceride-based fuels requires the development of an integrated system for the production, processing, and end use of the new fuels on a basis that is both technically attractive and economically rewarding to all of the elements of the system. The three subsystems, the farms that produce oilseed crops, the production of triglycerides and protein, and the manufacturers of the diesel engines and the owners of the present stock of auto-ignition engines, are discussed. It was concluded that vegetable oils and animal fats have substantial prospects as long-term substitutes for diesel fuels. If special auto-ignition engines were developed to handle vegetable oils, on-farm production and use might succeed. In the absence of such engine development, it is likely that large, centralized facilities to manufacture vegetable oils and their methylesters will be the successful processing route. Vegetable oils are likely to succeed first in geographical areas with benign climates. Vegetable oils and animal fats have limited prospects as diesel fuels for acute emergencies. The high viscosity of vegetable oils and the necessity to make substantial capital investments to obtain oils from oilseeds render the system relatively inflexible. 4 tables. (DP)

  10. THE INFLUENCE OF CARBON BURNOUT ON SUBMICRON PARTICLE FORMATION FROM EMULSIFIED FUEL OIL COMBUSTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of an examination of particle behavior and particle size distributions from the combustion of different fuel oils and emulsified fuels in three experimental combusators. Results indicate that improved carbon (C) burnout from fule oil combustion, either by...

  11. THE INFLUENCE OF CARBON BURNOUT ON SUBMICRON PARTICLE FORMATION FROM EMULSIFIED FUEL OIL COMBUSTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of an examination of particle behavior and particle size distributions from the combustion of different fuel oils and emulsified fuels in three experimental combusators. Results indicate that improved carbon (C) burnout from fule oil combustion, either by...

  12. 32 CFR 766.13 - Sale of aviation fuel, oil, services and supplies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sale of aviation fuel, oil, services and... MISCELLANEOUS RULES USE OF DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY AVIATION FACILITIES BY CIVIL AIRCRAFT § 766.13 Sale of aviation fuel, oil, services and supplies. (a) General policy. In accordance with sections 1107 and 1108...

  13. 32 CFR 766.13 - Sale of aviation fuel, oil, services and supplies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Sale of aviation fuel, oil, services and... MISCELLANEOUS RULES USE OF DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY AVIATION FACILITIES BY CIVIL AIRCRAFT § 766.13 Sale of aviation fuel, oil, services and supplies. (a) General policy. In accordance with sections 1107 and 1108...

  14. 32 CFR 766.13 - Sale of aviation fuel, oil, services and supplies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sale of aviation fuel, oil, services and... MISCELLANEOUS RULES USE OF DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY AVIATION FACILITIES BY CIVIL AIRCRAFT § 766.13 Sale of aviation fuel, oil, services and supplies. (a) General policy. In accordance with sections 1107 and 1108...

  15. 32 CFR 766.13 - Sale of aviation fuel, oil, services and supplies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sale of aviation fuel, oil, services and... MISCELLANEOUS RULES USE OF DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY AVIATION FACILITIES BY CIVIL AIRCRAFT § 766.13 Sale of aviation fuel, oil, services and supplies. (a) General policy. In accordance with sections 1107 and 1108...

  16. 32 CFR 766.13 - Sale of aviation fuel, oil, services and supplies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sale of aviation fuel, oil, services and... MISCELLANEOUS RULES USE OF DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY AVIATION FACILITIES BY CIVIL AIRCRAFT § 766.13 Sale of aviation fuel, oil, services and supplies. (a) General policy. In accordance with sections 1107 and 1108...

  17. 46 CFR 56.50-65 - Burner fuel-oil service systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... service systems. (a) All discharge piping from the fuel oil service pumps to burners must be seamless... application may be used when approved by the Marine Safety Center. Tubing fittings must be of the flared type... copper nickel. (b)(1) All vessels having oil fired boilers must have at least two fuel service...

  18. Will biodiesel derived from algal oils live up to its promise? A fuel property assessment

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Algae have been attracting considerable attention as a source of biodiesel recently. This attention is largely due to the claimed high production potential of algal oils while circumventing the food vs. fuel issue. However, the properties of biodiesel fuels derived from algal oils have been only spa...

  19. 46 CFR 167.15-40 - Integral fuel oil tank examinations-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Integral fuel oil tank examinations-T/ALL. 167.15-40 Section 167.15-40 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS PUBLIC NAUTICAL SCHOOL SHIPS Inspections § 167.15-40 Integral fuel oil tank examinations—T/ALL. (a)...

  20. Chemmotology: Effect of ultrasound on collodial structure of marine fuel oils

    SciTech Connect

    Dolomatov, M.Yu.; Gordeev, V.N.; Kavyev, A.G.

    1995-01-01

    The high-viscosity fuel oils used by the river fleet are metastable, coarsely dispersed colloidal systems, and hence may lose their aggregative stability during storage, treatment, and use. This paper reports on the influence of ultrasonic exposure, temperature, and component composition of marine fuel oils on their colloidal structure, and on the kinetics of changes in colloidal structure.

  1. Natural sunlight and residual fuel oils are an acutely lethal combination for fish embryos.

    PubMed

    Hatlen, Kristin; Sloan, Catherine A; Burrows, Douglas G; Collier, Tracy K; Scholz, Nathaniel L; Incardona, John P

    2010-08-01

    The majority of studies characterizing the mechanisms of oil toxicity in fish embryos and larvae have focused largely on unrefined crude oil. Few studies have addressed the toxicity of modern bunker fuels, which contain residual oils that are the highly processed and chemically distinct remains of the crude oil refinement process. Here we use zebrafish embryos to investigate potential toxicological differences between unrefined crude and residual fuel oils, and test the effects of sunlight as an additional stressor. Using mechanically dispersed oil preparations, the embryotoxicity of two bunker oils was compared to a standard crude oil from the Alaska North Slope. In the absence of sunlight, all three oils produced the stereotypical cardiac toxicity that has been linked to the fraction of tricyclic aromatic compounds in an oil mixture. However, the cardiotoxicity of bunker oils did not correlate strictly with the concentrations of tricyclic compounds. Moreover, when embryos were sequentially exposed to oil and natural sunlight, the bunker oils produced a rapid onset cell-lethal toxicity not observed with crude oil. To investigate the chemical basis of this differential toxicity, a GC/MS full scan analysis was used to identify a range of compounds that were enriched in the bunker oils. The much higher phototoxic potential of chemically distinct bunker oils observed here suggests that this mode of action should be considered in the assessment of bunker oil spill impacts, and indicates the need for a broader approach to understanding the aquatic toxicity of different oils.

  2. Algae oil: a sustainable renewable fuel of future.

    PubMed

    Paul Abishek, Monford; Patel, Jay; Prem Rajan, Anand

    2014-01-01

    A nonrenewable fuel like petroleum has been used from centuries and its usage has kept on increasing day by day. This also contributes to increased production of greenhouse gases contributing towards global issues like global warming. In order to meet environmental and economic sustainability, renewable, carbon neutral transport fuels are necessary. To meet these demands microalgae are the key source for production of biodiesel. These microalgae do produce oil from sunlight like plants but in a much more efficient manner. Biodiesel provides more environmental benefits, and being a renewable resource it has gained lot of attraction. However, the main obstacle to commercialization of biodiesel is its cost and feasibility. Biodiesel is usually used by blending with petro diesel, but it can also be used in pure form. Biodiesel is a sustainable fuel, as it is available throughout the year and can run any engine. It will satisfy the needs of the future generation to come. It will meet the demands of the future generation to come.

  3. Algae Oil: A Sustainable Renewable Fuel of Future

    PubMed Central

    Paul Abishek, Monford; Prem Rajan, Anand

    2014-01-01

    A nonrenewable fuel like petroleum has been used from centuries and its usage has kept on increasing day by day. This also contributes to increased production of greenhouse gases contributing towards global issues like global warming. In order to meet environmental and economic sustainability, renewable, carbon neutral transport fuels are necessary. To meet these demands microalgae are the key source for production of biodiesel. These microalgae do produce oil from sunlight like plants but in a much more efficient manner. Biodiesel provides more environmental benefits, and being a renewable resource it has gained lot of attraction. However, the main obstacle to commercialization of biodiesel is its cost and feasibility. Biodiesel is usually used by blending with petro diesel, but it can also be used in pure form. Biodiesel is a sustainable fuel, as it is available throughout the year and can run any engine. It will satisfy the needs of the future generation to come. It will meet the demands of the future generation to come. PMID:24883211

  4. Performance, durability and low temperature evaluation of sunflower oil as a diesel fuel extender

    SciTech Connect

    Baranescu, R.A.; Lusco, J.J.

    1982-01-01

    The paper presents the results of a research project to evaluate performance and durability of direct injection turbocharged diesel engines using sunflower oil and blends thereof. Alcaline refined sunflower oil and three different blends of sunflower oil and diesel fuel were comparatively tested against No. 2 diesel fuel for: physical and chemical characteristics, fuel injection system performance, short term engine performance, propensity to nozzle deposits buildup, limited durability operation and low temperature starting capability. Results are presented for the various phases of the project and correlations between the fuel characteristics and engine accept-ability are discussed. 19 figures, 2 tables.

  5. Biophenols and antioxidant properties of Australian canola meal.

    PubMed

    Obied, Hassan K; Song, Yi; Foley, Sonia; Loughlin, Michael; Rehman, Ata-ur; Mailer, Rodney; Masud, Tariq; Agboola, Samson

    2013-09-25

    During the extraction of canola oil, large quantities of meal are produced. Extracting biophenols from Australian canola meal (ACM) adds value to an otherwise low-value agro-industrial byproduct. This study examined the biophenol content and the antioxidant activity of ACM, the impact of extraction conditions, and varietal differences. Sinapine was the principal biophenol in ACM. In crude and hydrolyzed extracts, 31 compounds were identified: 2 dihexosides, 2 organic acids, 4 glucosinolates, 17 sinapic acid derivatives, 2 cyclic spermidine alkaloids, caffeic acid and its dihexoside, kaempferol, and its C-glucoside. ACM showed significant free radical scavenging activity in DPPH(•) and ABTS(•+) assays. Sinapine was the chief contributor to ACM antioxidant activity, whereas kaempferol sinapoyl triglucoside isomer was the most potent antioxidant. Biophenol content ranged between 12.8 and 15.4 mg GAE/g DW. Differences among studied cultivars were generally quantitative. The Tarcoola cultivar showed the highest biophenol content and antioxidant activity.

  6. Fatty acid composition of canola (Brassica napus L.), as affected by agronomical, genotypic and environmental parameters.

    PubMed

    Omidi, Heshmat; Tahmasebi, Zeinaldin; Naghdi Badi, Hassan Ali; Torabi, Hossein; Miransari, Mohammad

    2010-03-01

    Vegetable oils with a high relative amount of unsaturated fatty acids are of great significance for human health. There is not any data on the effects of tillage practices on fatty acid composition of canola (Brassica napus L.). Hence, in a 2-year split plot experiment, the effects of different tillage systems (no (NT), minimum (MT) and conventional tillage (CT)), canola genotypes (Hyola 401 (V1) and PF (V2)) and sowing dates (including Sep. 8, 23 and Oct. 7) on the fatty acid composition of canola were evaluated. Tillage practices and the combination of canola genotypes and sowing dates were randomized to the main and sub-plots, respectively. The highest oleic acid content was the result of combining NT, V1 and Sep. 23, and the lowest was related to the combination of CT, V2 and Oct. 7. While the combination of NT, V1 and D1 resulted in the highest amount of unsaturated fatty acids, this amount was the lowest for the combination of CT, V2 and Sep. 23. For the selection of an appropriate canola producing strategy, all these parameters must be taken into account. The combination of NT, V1 and Sep. 23 may be the most favorable cropping strategy for canola production under a Mediterranean climate. Copyright 2009 Académie des sciences. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Engineering evaluation of plant oils as diesel fuel. Final report. Vol. I

    SciTech Connect

    Engler, C.R.; Johnson, L.A.; Lepori, W.A.; Yarbrough, C.M.

    1983-09-13

    This project includes evaluations of cottonseed oils and sunflower oil ethyl esters in both direct injection and precombustion chamber design diesel engines. It is one part of a major research program at Texas A and M University to study the technical feasibility of using plant oils or animal fats as alternative diesel fuels. Goals for the overall program are to define physical and chemical characteristics and optimum processing methods required for high quality alternative diesel fuels from plant or animal oils and to investigate effects of engine design on alternative fuel performance. This report describes work done under the current contract which includes evaluations of cottonseed oils and sunflower oil interesterified with ethanol as alternative diesel fuels. 15 figures, 18 tables.

  8. Toxicity of Water Accommodated Fractions of Estonian Shale Fuel Oils to Aquatic Organisms.

    PubMed

    Blinova, Irina; Kanarbik, Liina; Sihtmäe, Mariliis; Kahru, Anne

    2016-02-01

    Estonia is the worldwide leading producer of the fuel oils from the oil shale. We evaluated the ecotoxicity of water accommodated fraction (WAF) of two Estonian shale fuel oils ("VKG D" and "VKG sweet") to aquatic species belonging to different trophic levels (marine bacteria, freshwater crustaceans and aquatic plants). Artificial fresh water and natural lake water were used to prepare WAFs. "VKG sweet" (lower density) proved more toxic to aquatic species than "VKG D" (higher density). Our data indicate that though shale oils were very toxic to crustaceans, the short-term exposure of Daphnia magna to sub-lethal concentrations of shale fuel oils WAFs may increase the reproductive potential of survived organisms. The weak correlation between measured chemical parameters (C10-C40 hydrocarbons and sum of 16 PAHs) and WAF's toxicity to studied species indicates that such integrated chemical parameters are not very informative for prediction of shale fuel oils ecotoxicity.

  9. Properties of Portland cement mortars incorporating high amounts of oil-fuel ashes

    SciTech Connect

    Paya, J.; Borrachero, M.V.; Monzo, J.; Bonilla, M.

    1999-06-01

    The residue of oil-fuel burned at the electrical power plant of Grao de Castellon (Spain) has been incorporated in Portland cement mortar and concrete. The used oil-fuel ash (OFA) had a high percentage of magnesium compounds because of magnesium oxide addition for removing slag and ashes from boilers and pipes. Several studies had been carried out on stabilization of toxic metals also occurring in oil-fuel ashes (particularly vanadium and nickel), by mixing with coal fly ashes and cement. In this case, the presence of magnesium compounds in the composition of the studied oil-fuel ashes could alter the mechanical and chemical properties of the cement matrix in fresh and hardened mortar and concrete. The authors present here the chemical, physical and mineralogical characterization of oil-fuel ashes and the behavior of Portland cement mortars incorporating high amounts of these oil-fuel ashes. The study includes workability, water demand, setting time, expansion and compressive strength developments. Preliminary results demonstrate a high absorption of water by oil-fuel ash particles, which promotes an increase in the water/cement ratio for a given workability. Acceleration of Portland cement/oil-fuel ash particles, which promotes an increase in the water/cement ratio for a given workability. Acceleration of Portland cement/oil-fuel ash pastes setting times was observed, due to the presence of carbonates. On the other hand, no significant expansion in specimens due to the presence of magnesium compounds was detected and, consequently, mechanical properties of hardened mortars containing oil-fuel ashes did not decrease with curing time. Compressive strengths for mortars containing OFA were much lower, however, than control mortar samples.

  10. Biodiesel: The use of vegetable oils and their derivatives as alternative diesel fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Knothe, G.; Bagby, M.O.

    1996-10-01

    Vegetable oils and their derivatives (especially methyl esters), commonly referred to as {open_quotes}biodiesel{close_quotes}, are prominent candidates as alternative diesel fuels. They have advanced from being purely experimental fuels to initial stages of commercialization. They are technically competitive with or offer technical advantages compared to conventional diesel fuel. Besides being a renewable resource, biodiesel reduces most emissions while engine performance and fuel economy are nearly identical compared to conventional fuels. Several problems, however, remain, which include economics, combustion, some emissions, lube oil contamination, and low-temperature properties. An overview on all the mentioned aspects of biodiesel will be presented.

  11. Synthesis of biodiesel fuel from safflower oil using various reaction parameters.

    PubMed

    Meka, Pavan Kumar; Tripathi, Vinay; Singh, R P

    2006-01-01

    Biodiesel fuel is gaining more and more importance because of the depletion and uncontrollable prices of fossil fuel resources. The use of vegetable oil and their derivatives as alternatives for diesel fuel is the best answer and as old as Diesel Engine. Chemically biodiesel fuel is the mono alkyl esters of fatty acids derived from renewable feed stocks like vegetable oils and animal fats. Safflower oil contains 75-80% of linoleic acid; the presence of this unsaturated fatty acid is useful in alleviating low temperature properties like pour point, cloud point and cold filter plugging point. In this paper we studied the effect of various parameters such as temperature, molar ratio (oil to alcohol), and concentration of catalyst on synthesis of biodiesel fuel from safflower oil. The better suitable conditions of 1:6 molar ratio (oil to alcohol), 60 degrees C temperature and catalyst concentration of 2% (by wt. of oil) were determined. The finally obtained biodiesel fuel was analyzed for fatty acid composition by GLC and some other properties such as flash point, specific gravity and acid value were also determined. From the results it was clear that the produced biodiesel fuel was with in the recommended standards of biodiesel fuel with 96.8% yield.

  12. Economic implications for the potential development of a vegetable oil fuel industry

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, J.R.; Schneeberger, K.C.

    1982-01-01

    The purposes in this paper were to (1) summarize the domestic and international oilseed situation with emphasis on trends which will affect the long-run supply and demand for oilseeds; (2) describe the existing oilseeds processing sector so as to focus on the existing linkage between food and potential fuel markets for vegetable oils; and (3) present a basic framework for analyzing the supply, demand, and price effects of significant use of vegetable oil as a fuel. The major determinants of demand worldwide for vegetable oils are price, incomes, and population. Government programs of taxes, quotas, or subsidies could affect vegetable oil supply and/or demand. International trade practices could change; altering the flow of oils between markets. The likely impact of a developing vegetable oils fuel market would be to increase vegetable oil prices. The size of the increase will depend on how large the fuel market demand ultimately becomes, and thus on the price of diesel fuel. It will also depend on how well oilseed production can be adapted, technologically, and in acreage, to meet the needs of a large fuels market while maintaining its critical role in the foods sector. There are many uncertainties in assessing the economic picture for vegetable oil use as a diesel fuel substitute. 1 figure, 3 tables. (DP)

  13. Effects of No. 2 fuel oil on hatchability of marine and estuarine bird eggs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, D.H.; King, K.A.; Coon, N.C.

    1979-01-01

    Eggs of Louisiana herons, sandwich terns, and laughing gulls were oiled with either 0, 5, or 20 microliter of No. 2 fuel oil in the field and in the laboratory. After 5 days of natural incubation, field-oiled and control eggs were opened and embryonic mortality was determined. No. 2 fuel oil produced 61% mortality in Louisiana heron eggs, 56% in sandwich tern eggs, and 83% in laughing gull eggs. Hatching success of artificially incubated, oiled eggs appeared to be lower than in control eggs. However, stress during shipment to the laboratory and problems within the incubator probably contributed to reduced hatchability in both groups.

  14. Long term performance of a sunflower oil/diesel fuel blend

    SciTech Connect

    Ziejewski, M.; Kaufman, K.R.

    1982-05-01

    The purpose of this project was to study the effects of a 50 percent blend by volume of sunflower oil in No. 2 diesel fuel used in a diesel test engine of current design. Specifically, this investigation covered the effect of the fuel blend on engine durability and the functioning of the different fuels in the diesel engine injection system.

  15. Microemulsions from vegetable oil and lower alcohol with octanol surfactant as alternative fuel for diesel engines

    SciTech Connect

    Schwab, A. W.; Pryde, E. H.

    1985-12-10

    Hybrid fuel microemulsions are prepared from vegetable oil, methanol or ethanol, A straight-chain isomer of octanol, and optionally water. The fuels are characterized by a relatively high water tolerance, acceptable viscosity, and performance properties comparable to No. 2 diesel fuel.

  16. Physicochemical characterizations of nano-palm oil fuel ash

    SciTech Connect

    Rajak, Mohd Azrul Abdul; Majid, Zaiton Abdul; Ismail, Mohammad

    2015-07-22

    Palm Oil Fuel Ash (POFA) is known as a good supplementary cementing material due to its siliceous-rich content. The application of nanotechnology in the pozzolanic materials could invent new functions in the efficiency of physical and chemical properties of materials. Thus, the present study aims to generate nano-sized POFA and characterize the physicochemical properties of nano-palm oil fuel ash (nPOFA). The nPOFA was prepared by mechanically grinding micro POFA using a high intensity ball milling for 6 hours. The physicochemical properties of nPOFA were characterized via X-Ray Fluoresence (XRF), Scanning Emission microscopy- Energy Dispersive X-Ray (SEM-EDX), Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). The particle size of nPOFA acquired from TEM analysis was in the range of 20 nm to 90 nm, while the average crystallite size calculated from XRD diffractogram was 61.5 nm. The resulting nPOFA has a BET surface area of 145.35 m{sup 2}/g, which is more than 85% increment in surface area compared to micro-sized POFA. The morphology and elemental studies showed the presence of spherical as well as irregularly shaped and fine nPOFA particles contains with high silicon content. The presence of α-quartz as the major phase of the nPOFA was identified through XRD analysis. The study concludes that nPOFA has the potential as a supplementary cementing material due to the high silica content, high surface area and the unique behaviors of nano-structured particles.

  17. Properties and performance testing with blends of biomass alcohols, vegetable oils and diesel fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Vinyard, S.; Hawkins, L.; Renoll, E.S.; Bunt, R.C.; Goodling, J.S.

    1982-01-01

    This paper is a presentation of results from three related efforts to determine the technical feasibility of using alcohols and vegetable oils blended with Diesel oil as fuel for unmodified compression ignition engines. Several different vegetable oils were successfully tested in a single cylinder engine. Sunflower oil was blended from 50% to 80% by volume with Diesel fuel and used in a multicylinder engine. Thermophysical property data were gathered on pure and blended fuels and are reported. A spray parameter, epsilon, was found which would predict the necessary change in valve opening pressure to render the atomization of the new fuel similar to that for which the injection system was designed. Engine testing showed that fuel consumption was substantially reduced upon setting the injectors at the new VOP. 2 figures, 1 table.

  18. Breakup mechanisms of electrostatic atomization of corn oil and diesel fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malkawi, G.; Yarin, A. L.; Mashayek, F.

    2010-09-01

    High-viscosity organic oils may be considered as an alternative to the ordinary diesel fuel. These organic oils and the diesel fuel are all Newtonian liquids; however, viscosity values of the organic oils are more than 20 times higher than that of the diesel fuel. In the present work, the electrostatic atomization of corn oil jets is studied and compared to the electrostatic atomization of diesel fuel jets. The experimental data revealed that in addition to the varicose breakup of straight jets, bending modes set in and grow in conjunction with the varicose undulations. Bending instability, kindred to the aerodynamically-driven bending instability of high-speed liquid jets moving in air, and to the electrically-driven bending instability of polymer jets in electrospinning, is significantly more pronounced in the case of the highly-viscous corn oil jets than in diesel jets. The experimental results are interpreted using the theory of bending instability developed previously for electrospinning.

  19. Molecular and systems approaches towards drought-tolerant canola crops.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Mengmeng; Monroe, J Grey; Suhail, Yasir; Villiers, Florent; Mullen, Jack; Pater, Dianne; Hauser, Felix; Jeon, Byeong Wook; Bader, Joel S; Kwak, June M; Schroeder, Julian I; McKay, John K; Assmann, Sarah M

    2016-06-01

    1169 I. 1170 II. 1170 III. 1172 IV. 1176 V. 1181 VI. 1182 1183 References 1183 SUMMARY: Modern agriculture is facing multiple challenges including the necessity for a substantial increase in production to meet the needs of a burgeoning human population. Water shortage is a deleterious consequence of both population growth and climate change and is one of the most severe factors limiting global crop productivity. Brassica species, particularly canola varieties, are cultivated worldwide for edible oil, animal feed, and biodiesel, and suffer dramatic yield loss upon drought stress. The recent release of the Brassica napus genome supplies essential genetic information to facilitate identification of drought-related genes and provides new information for agricultural improvement in this species. Here we summarize current knowledge regarding drought responses of canola, including physiological and -omics effects of drought. We further discuss knowledge gained through translational biology based on discoveries in the closely related reference species Arabidopsis thaliana and through genetic strategies such as genome-wide association studies and analysis of natural variation. Knowledge of drought tolerance/resistance responses in canola together with research outcomes arising from new technologies and methodologies will inform novel strategies for improvement of drought tolerance and yield in this and other important crop species.

  20. Catalytic co-pyrolysis of waste vegetable oil and high density polyethylene for hydrocarbon fuel production.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yunpu; Dai, Leilei; Fan, Liangliang; Cao, Leipeng; Zhou, Yue; Zhao, Yunfeng; Liu, Yuhuan; Ruan, Roger

    2017-03-01

    In this study, a ZrO2-based polycrystalline ceramic foam catalyst was prepared and used in catalytic co-pyrolysis of waste vegetable oil and high density polyethylene (HDPE) for hydrocarbon fuel production. The effects of pyrolysis temperature, catalyst dosage, and HDPE to waste vegetable oil ratio on the product distribution and hydrocarbon fuel composition were examined. Experimental results indicate that the maximum hydrocarbon fuel yield of 63.1wt. % was obtained at 430°C, and the oxygenates were rarely detected in the hydrocarbon fuel. The hydrocarbon fuel yield increased when the catalyst was used. At the catalyst dosage of 15wt.%, the proportion of alkanes in the hydrocarbon fuel reached 97.85wt.%, which greatly simplified the fuel composition and improved the fuel quality. With the augment of HDPE to waste vegetable oil ratio, the hydrocarbon fuel yield monotonously increased. At the HDPE to waste vegetable oil ratio of 1:1, the maximum proportion (97.85wt.%) of alkanes was obtained. Moreover, the properties of hydrocarbon fuel were superior to biodiesel and 0(#) diesel due to higher calorific value, better low-temperature low fluidity, and lower density and viscosity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Chemical fate of Bunker C fuel oil in a subtropical marine environment

    SciTech Connect

    Wetzel, D.L.; Van Vleet, E.S.

    1996-12-31

    On August 10, 1993, a major oil spill occurred when approximately 1.2 million liters of Bunker C (No. 6) fuel oil spilled from the fuel tanker Bouchard 155 after it collided with the phosphate freighter Balsa 37 in a shipping channel at the entrance to Tampa Bay, Florida. Although early hydrodynamic conditions with ebbing tides caused most of the oil to be carried several kilometers out of Tampa Bay and into the Gulf of Mexico, subsequent onshore winds and spring tides caused significant quantities of the oil to be deposited on nearby beaches and in mangrove, seagrass and estuarine habitats north of the mouth of Tampa Bay.

  2. Adelphi-Goddard emulsified fuel project. [using water/oil emulsions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Thermal efficiency and particle emissions were studied using water/oil emulsions. These studies were done using number 2 and number 6 fuel oil. The number 6 oil had a sulfur content greater than one percent and experiments were conducted to remove the sulfur dioxide from the stack gases. Test findings include: (1) emulsion effected a reduction in soot at a low excess air levels; (2) a steam atomizing system will produce a water/oil emulsion. The fuel in the study was emulsified in the steam atomization process, hence, pre-emulsification did not yield a dramatic reduction in soot or an increase in thermal efficiency.

  3. New diagnostic ratios based on phenanthrenes and anthracenes for effective distinguishing heavy fuel oils from crude oils.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haijiang; Wang, Chuanyuan; Zhao, Ruxiang; Yin, Xiaonan; Zhou, Hongyang; Tan, Liju; Wang, Jiangtao

    2016-05-15

    The heavy fuel oils (HFOs) and crude oils are the main oil types in the marine oil spill accidents in China. It is usually a challenge to distinguish the HFOs from crude oils due to the highly similar physicochemical characteristics. In this paper, the distributions of phenanthrene (Phe), anthracene (Ant), methyl-phenanthrene (MP) and methyl-anthracene (MA) in hundreds of HFOs and crude oils samples which were collected from all over the world were characterized. Nine new diagnostic indexes, such as Ant/(Ant+Phe) and other eight diagnostic ratios based on the MP isomers and MA, were developed for effective distinguishing HFOs from crude oils. The histogram with normal fit plots, the double ratio plots and Bayes discriminant analysis (BDA) method were employed to illustrate the effectiveness of the new diagnostic indexes. BDA model based on nine new diagnostic indexes demonstrated high precision with discriminant ratio which lay between 93.92% and 99.32%.

  4. The use of saponified vegetable oil distillates/ethanol microcellular solution as a diesel fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Savage, L.D.; Birell, S.; Goering, C.E.

    1988-01-01

    Vegetable oils are considered possible replacement fuels for diesel engines; however, past research has shown that long term engine durability is adversely affected by the use of these fuels. Most researchers have attempted to reduce the problems associated with vegetable oil fuels either by the formation of vegetable oil/diesel blends or the esterfication of the vegetable oils. In this investigation of an alternative approach, the performance of saponified soybean oil/aqueous ethanol microcellular solutions were tested in a single-cylinder, direct injection, air-cooled diesel engine. The products of the pyrolytic distillation of crude soybean oil were mixed with 150 proof ethanol in the ratio of 4:1 by volume and saponified with anhydrous ammonia gas. This ''parent fuel'' was then diluted with 150 proof ethanol to obtain two test fuels, one with 30 percent ethanol concentration and the other with 40 percent ethanol concentration. The fuels were used in the engine under various loads at two speeds, and the performance was compared to the performance using No. 2-D commercial diesel fuel.

  5. Emulsions of crude glycerin from biodiesel processing with fuel oil for industrial heating.

    PubMed

    Mize, Hannah E; Lucio, Anthony J; Fhaner, Cassie J; Pratama, Fredy S; Robbins, Lanny A; Karpovich, David S

    2013-02-13

    There is considerable interest in using crude glycerin from biodiesel production as a heating fuel. In this work crude glycerin was emulsified into fuel oil to address difficulties with ignition and sustained combustion. Emulsions were prepared with several grades of glycerin and two grades of fuel oil using direct and phase inversion emulsification. Our findings reveal unique surfactant requirements for emulsifying glycerin into oil; these depend on the levels of several contaminants, including water, ash, and components in MONG (matter organic non-glycerin). A higher hydrophile-lipophile balance was required for a stable emulsion of crude glycerin in fuel oil compared to water in fuel oil. The high concentration of salts from biodiesel catalysts generally hindered emulsion stability. Geometric close-packing of micelles was carefully balanced to mechanically stabilize emulsions while also enabling low viscosity for pumping and fuel injection. Phase inversion emulsification produced more stable emulsions than direct emulsification. Emulsions were tested successfully as fuel for a waste oil burner.

  6. Chemical composition of tall oil-based cetane enhancer for diesel fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Y.; Wong, A.; Monnier, J.

    1993-12-31

    Tall oil is a co-product of the manufacture of kraft softwood pulp. The principal constituents of tall oil are unsaturated C{sub 18} fatty acids, resin acids and unsaponifiables such as diterpenic alcohols/aldehydes. Tall oil has been shown to be an economical feedstock for the manufacture of cetane enhancer for diesel fuels, using the proprietary CANMET (Canada Centre for Mineral and Energy Technology) technology. Under a joint R&D project between Arbokem Inc./BC Chemicals Ltd. and CANMET, pilot plant tests were conducted recently at the CANMET Energy Research Labs. in Ottawa. The results showed that tall oil could by hydroprocessed efficiently to yield a valuable fuel blending agent. When this product was mixed with conventional diesel fuel, the cetane number of the diesel fuel increased linearly with the addition of the product. Chemical analysis including chromatography-mass spectrometry has confirmed high conversion of tall oil components into straight-chain alkanes. A small amount of cyclic hydrocarbons and sulphur components were present in the tall oil-based diesel enhancer. Preliminary results indicate that this type of cetane enhancer would provide additional technical benefits. The low aromatics content of the tall oil-based cetane enhancer would significantly reduce aromatics in the final diesel fuel blend. Diesel engines operating on such fuel blends would have a lower propensity to form particulates and NO{sub x}.

  7. Determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in diesel exhaust particulate matter and diesel fuel oil.

    PubMed

    Obuchi, A; Aoyama, H; Ohi, A; Ohuchi, H

    1984-11-16

    Clean-up procedures were developed for a method for determining the amount of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in diesel exhaust particulate matter and in diesel fuel oils using reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). They were based mainly on the elimination of insoluble matter and aliphatic compounds that affect the performance of HPLC, from the dichloromethane extracts of particulate matter or from oils, with the aid of a disposable preparation column containing reversed-phase packings (Sep-Pak C18). Using these procedures, it is possible to detect 1 ng of benzo(a)pyrene in 30 mg of particulate matter with more than a 97% recovery or 0.5 ng in 50 microliters of oil with 91% recovery. Examples of analyses are given for particulate matter emitted from a diesel test engine and for diesel fuel oils, such as gas oil, residual oil and coal-liquefied oil.

  8. Usability of food industry waste oils as fuel for diesel engines.

    PubMed

    Winfried, Russ; Roland, Meyer-Pittroff; Alexander, Dobiasch; Jürgen, Lachenmaier-Kölch

    2008-02-01

    Two cogeneration units were each fitted with a prechamber (IDI) diesel engine in order to test the feasibility of using waste oils from the food industry as a fuel source, and additionally to test emissions generated by the combustion of these fuels. Esterified waste oils and animal fats as well as mustard oil were tested and compared to the more or less "common" fuels: diesel, rapeseed oil and rapeseed methyl ester. The results show that, in principle, each of these fuels is suitable for use in a prechamber diesel engine. Engine performance can be maintained at a constant level. Without catalytic conversion, the nitrogen oxides emissions were comparable. A significant reduction in NO(x) was achieved through the injection of urea. Combining a urea injection with the SCR catalytic converter reduced NO(x) emissions between 53% and 67%. The carbon monoxide emissions from waste oils are not significantly different from those of "common" fuels and can be reduced the same way as of hydrocarbon emissions, through utilization of a catalytic converter. The rate of carbon monoxide reduction by catalytic conversion was 84-86%. A lower hydrocarbon concentration was associated with fuels of agricultural origin. With the catalytic converter a reduction of 29-42% achieved. Each prechamber diesel engine exhibited its own characteristic exhaust, which was independent of fuel type. The selective catalytic reduction of the exhaust emissions can be realized without restriction using fuels of agricultural origin.

  9. Chronic toxicity of heavy fuel oils to fish embryos using multiple exposure scenarios.

    PubMed

    Martin, Jonathan D; Adams, Julie; Hollebone, Bruce; King, Thomas; Brown, R Stephen; Hodson, Peter V

    2014-03-01

    The chronic toxicity to rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) embryos of heavy fuel oil (HFO) 6303, weathered HFO 6303, HFO 7102, and medium South American (MESA) crude oil was assessed by different exposure regimes. These included water accommodated fractions (WAF; water in contact with floating oil), chemically enhanced WAF (CEWAF; oil dispersed with Corexit 9500), and effluent from columns of gravel coated with stranded oil. Heavy fuel oil WAF was nontoxic and did not contain detectable concentrations of hydrocarbons, likely because the high density and viscosity of HFO prevented droplet formation. In contrast, chemically dispersed HFO and effluent from columns of stranded HFO contained measurable concentrations of alkyl polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), coincident with embryo toxicity. These exposure regimes enhanced the surface area of oil in contact with water, facilitating oil-water partitioning of hydrocarbons. Heavy fuel oil was consistently more toxic to fish than crude oil and the rank order of alkyl PAH concentrations in whole oil were sufficient to explain the rank order of toxicity, regardless of exposure method. Thus, the propensity of HFO to sink and strand in spawning shoals creates a long-term risk to developing fish because of the sustained release of PAHs from HFO to interstitial waters. Further, PAH monitoring is key to accurate risk assessment. © 2013 SETAC.

  10. VARIABLE FIRING RATE OIL BURNER USING PULSE FUEL FLOW CONTROL.

    SciTech Connect

    KRISHNA,C.R.; BUTCHER,T.A.; KAMATH,B.R.

    2004-10-01

    The residential oil burner market is currently dominated by the pressure-atomized retention head burner, which has an excellent reputation for reliability and efficiency. In this burner, oil is delivered to a fuel nozzle at pressures from 100 to 150 psi. In addition, to atomizing the fuel, the small, carefully controlled size of the nozzle exit orifice serves to control the burner firing rate. Burners of this type are currently available at firing rates of more than 0.5 gallons-per-hour (70,000 Btu/hr). Nozzles have been made for lower firing rates, but experience has shown that such nozzles suffer rapid fouling of the necessarily small passages, leading to bad spray patterns and poor combustion performance. Also, traditionally burners and the nozzles are oversized to exceed the maximum demand. Typically, this is figured as follows. The heating load of the house on the coldest day for the location is considered to define the maximum heat load. The contractor or installer adds to this to provide a safety margin and for future expansion of the house. If the unit is a boiler that provides domestic hot water through the use of a tankless heating coil, the burner capacity is further increased. On the contrary, for a majority of the time, the heating system is satisfying a much smaller load, as only rarely do all these demands add up. Consequently, the average output of the heating system has to be much less than the design capacity and this is accomplished by start and stop cycling operation of the system so that the time-averaged output equals the demand. However, this has been demonstrated to lead to overall efficiencies lower than the steady-state efficiency. Therefore, the two main reasons for the current practice of using oil burners much larger than necessary for space heating are the unavailability of reliable low firing rate oil burners and the desire to assure adequate input rate for short duration, high draw domestic hot water loads. One approach to solve this

  11. Evaluation of Biomass-Derived Distillate Fuel as Renewable Heating Oil

    SciTech Connect

    Mante, Ofei D.; Butcher, Thomas A.; Wei, George; Trojanowski, Rebecca; Sanchez, Vicente

    2015-09-18

    The utilization of advanced biofuels in stationary applications, such as home heating, is considered as an early entry point for biomass-derived fuels into the distillate fuel market sector. Two renewable fuels produced by a biomass fluidized catalytic cracking (BFCC) process, followed by hydroprocessing and fractionation, were tested. The evaluation was performed on a pure (100%) distillate fraction, 50% blend of the distillate fraction with petroleum-based heating oil, and 20% blend of a heavier gas oil fraction. Combustion experiments were carried out in a transparent quartz chamber and a typical oil-fired residential boiler. The flame stability, size, and shape produced by the fuels were examined. The flue gas was analyzed for O2, CO, NOx, and smoke. The elastomer compatibility test was performed with nitrile slabs at 43 °C for 1 month. Fuel stability was examined at 80 °C for 1 week. The results from the combustion studies suggest that the distillate fuel blends could be used as alternative fuels to No. 2 heating oil, even up to 100% without any operational issues. The distillate fuels were found to be stable. and the nitrile slab volume swell (~10%) suggests that the fuel could be compatible to legacy elastomers.

  12. Evaluation of Biomass-Derived Distillate Fuel as Renewable Heating Oil

    DOE PAGES

    Mante, Ofei D.; Butcher, Thomas A.; Wei, George; ...

    2015-09-18

    The utilization of advanced biofuels in stationary applications, such as home heating, is considered as an early entry point for biomass-derived fuels into the distillate fuel market sector. Two renewable fuels produced by a biomass fluidized catalytic cracking (BFCC) process, followed by hydroprocessing and fractionation, were tested. The evaluation was performed on a pure (100%) distillate fraction, 50% blend of the distillate fraction with petroleum-based heating oil, and 20% blend of a heavier gas oil fraction. Combustion experiments were carried out in a transparent quartz chamber and a typical oil-fired residential boiler. The flame stability, size, and shape produced bymore » the fuels were examined. The flue gas was analyzed for O2, CO, NOx, and smoke. The elastomer compatibility test was performed with nitrile slabs at 43 °C for 1 month. Fuel stability was examined at 80 °C for 1 week. The results from the combustion studies suggest that the distillate fuel blends could be used as alternative fuels to No. 2 heating oil, even up to 100% without any operational issues. The distillate fuels were found to be stable. and the nitrile slab volume swell (~10%) suggests that the fuel could be compatible to legacy elastomers.« less

  13. Impacts of Biodiesel Fuel Blends Oil Dilution on Light-Duty Diesel Engine Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, M. J.; Alleman, T. L.; Luecke, J.; McCormick, R. L.

    2009-08-01

    Assesses oil dilution impacts on a diesel engine operating with a diesel particle filter, NOx storage, a selective catalytic reduction emission control system, and a soy-based 20% biodiesel fuel blend.

  14. Three Shell Oil Company Affiliates Settle with EPA Over Violations of Vehicle Fuel Standards

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    WASHINGTON - The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) today announced a settlement with three companies affiliated with Shell Oil Company to resolve Clean Air Act violations, including selling gasoline and diesel fuel that did not conform to f

  15. Evaluation of fuel economy differences on a 1978 Volvo for two different motor oils. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Penninga, T.J.; Lawrence, D.

    1980-11-01

    This report presents the results which were gathered to determine the fuel economy difference between a low viscosity multigrade, synthetic motor oil and a straight 30 weight motor oil. The test vehicle was a 1978 Volvo which was modified to give consistent vehicle emissions and fuel economy. The car was tested with each oil at ambient temperatures of 40 degrees F, 75 degrees F and 90 degrees F. The low viscosity synthetic showed no improvement on the Federal Test Procedure (FTP) at 40 degrees F and 90 degrees F and a .74% increase in fuel economy for the 75 degrees F tests. The Highway Fuel Economy Tests (HFET) showed a 2.13% increase at 40 degrees F, 2.48% increase at 75 degrees F, and 2.71% at 90 degrees F for the low viscosity synthetic multigrade oil.

  16. Utilization of sunflower seed oil as a renewable fuel for diesel engines

    SciTech Connect

    Bruwer, J.J.; van der Boshoff, B.; Hugo, F.J.C.; Fuls, J.; Hawkins, C.; van der Walt, A.N.; Engelbrecht, A.; du Plessis, L.M.

    1981-01-01

    Research, using several makes of diesel engine, showed that sunflower seed oil, and particularly an ethyl ester mixture, has the potential to extend diesel fuel provided solutions are found for injector coking problems. (MHR)

  17. Conversion of crop seed oils to jet fuel and associated methods

    DOEpatents

    Ginosar, Daniel M.; Petkovic, Lucia M.; Thompson, David N.

    2010-05-18

    Aspects of the invention include methods to produce jet fuel from biological oil sources. The method may be comprised of two steps: hydrocracking and reforming. The process may be self-sufficient in heat and hydrogen.

  18. The toxicological effects of heavy fuel oil category substances.

    PubMed

    McKee, Richard H; Reitman, Fred; Schreiner, Ceinwen; White, Russell; Charlap, Jeffrey H; O'Neill, Thomas P; Goyak, Katy Olsavsky

    2014-01-01

    Heavy fuel oil (HFO) category substances are used to manufacture HFO, a product used in industrial boilers and marine diesel engines. Commercial HFOs and blending stream components are substances of complex and variable composition, composed of C20 to >C50 hydrocarbons, although lower molecular weight material may be added to reduce viscosity and improve flow characteristics. An HFO blending stream (catalytically cracked clarified oil [CCCO]) was tested for target organ and developmental toxicity in rats following repeated dermal administration at doses of 5, 25, or 50 mg/kg/d. In the repeated dose study, there was evidence of increased liver weights, reduced thymus weights, and reductions in hematological parameters with an overall no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) of 5 mg/kg/d. In the developmental toxicity test, there were significant reductions in fetal survival, significant increases in resorption frequency, and significantly reduced fetal weights with an overall NOAEL of 5 mg/kg/d. These target organ and developmental effects are associated with the types and levels of aromatic constituents in these substances. Among HFO blending streams, CCCOs have the highest levels of aromatics and, because they produce the characteristic toxicological effects at the lowest levels, are considered as "reasonable worst-case examples" for this group of substances. Other HFO category members with lower levels of aromatics produce similar effects but have higher NOAELs. The potential for target organ and developmental effects of other HFO category members can be predicted from information on the types and levels of the aromatic constituents present in these substances.

  19. Using ATR-FT/IR to detect carbohydrate-related molecular structure features of carinata meal and their in situ residues of ruminal fermentation in comparison with canola meal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Hangshu; Yu, Peiqiang

    2013-10-01

    There is no information on the co-products from carinata bio-fuel and bio-oil processing (carinata meal) in molecular structural profiles mainly related to carbohydrate biopolymers in relation to ruminant nutrition. Molecular analyses with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT/IR) technique with attenuated total reflectance (ATR) and chemometrics enable to detect structural features on a molecular basis. The objectives of this study were to: (1) determine carbohydrate conformation spectral features in original carinata meal, co-products from bio-fuel/bio-oil processing; and (2) investigate differences in carbohydrate molecular composition and functional group spectral intensities after in situ ruminal fermentation at 0, 12, 24 and 48 h compared to canola meal as a reference. The molecular spectroscopic parameters of carbohydrate profiles detected were structural carbohydrates (STCHO, mainly associated with hemi-cellulosic and cellulosic compounds; region and baseline ca. 1483-1184 cm-1), cellulosic compounds (CELC, region and baseline ca. 1304-1184 cm-1), total carbohydrates (CHO, region and baseline ca. 1193-889 cm-1) as well as the spectral ratios calculated based on respective spectral intensity data. The results showed that the spectral profiles of carinata meal were significantly different from that of canola meal in CHO 2nd peak area (center at ca. 1091 cm-1, region: 1102-1083 cm-1) and functional group peak intensity ratios such as STCHO 1st peak (ca. 1415 cm-1) to 2nd peak (ca. 1374 cm-1) height ratio, CHO 1st peak (ca. 1149 cm-1) to 3rd peak (ca. 1032 cm-1) height ratio, CELC to total CHO area ratio and STCHO to CELC area ratio, indicating that carinata meal may not in full accord with canola meal in carbohydrate utilization and availability in ruminants. Carbohydrate conformation and spectral features were changed by significant interaction of meal type and incubation time and almost all the spectral parameters were significantly decreased (P < 0

  20. Using ATR-FT/IR to detect carbohydrate-related molecular structure features of carinata meal and their in situ residues of ruminal fermentation in comparison with canola meal.

    PubMed

    Xin, Hangshu; Yu, Peiqiang

    2013-10-01

    There is no information on the co-products from carinata bio-fuel and bio-oil processing (carinata meal) in molecular structural profiles mainly related to carbohydrate biopolymers in relation to ruminant nutrition. Molecular analyses with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT/IR) technique with attenuated total reflectance (ATR) and chemometrics enable to detect structural features on a molecular basis. The objectives of this study were to: (1) determine carbohydrate conformation spectral features in original carinata meal, co-products from bio-fuel/bio-oil processing; and (2) investigate differences in carbohydrate molecular composition and functional group spectral intensities after in situ ruminal fermentation at 0, 12, 24 and 48 h compared to canola meal as a reference. The molecular spectroscopic parameters of carbohydrate profiles detected were structural carbohydrates (STCHO, mainly associated with hemi-cellulosic and cellulosic compounds; region and baseline ca. 1483-1184 cm(-1)), cellulosic compounds (CELC, region and baseline ca. 1304-1184 cm(-1)), total carbohydrates (CHO, region and baseline ca. 1193-889cm(-1)) as well as the spectral ratios calculated based on respective spectral intensity data. The results showed that the spectral profiles of carinata meal were significantly different from that of canola meal in CHO 2nd peak area (center at ca. 1091 cm(-1), region: 1102-1083 cm(-1)) and functional group peak intensity ratios such as STCHO 1st peak (ca. 1415 cm(-1)) to 2nd peak (ca. 1374 cm(-1)) height ratio, CHO 1st peak (ca. 1149 cm(-1)) to 3rd peak (ca. 1032 cm(-1)) height ratio, CELC to total CHO area ratio and STCHO to CELC area ratio, indicating that carinata meal may not in full accord with canola meal in carbohydrate utilization and availability in ruminants. Carbohydrate conformation and spectral features were changed by significant interaction of meal type and incubation time and almost all the spectral parameters were significantly

  1. Production of hydrocarbon fuels from pyrolysis of soybean oils using a basic catalyst.

    PubMed

    Xu, Junming; Jiang, Jianchun; Sun, Yunjuan; Chen, Jie

    2010-12-01

    Triglycerides obtained from animals and plants have attracted great attention from researchers for developing an environmental friendly and high-quality fuel, free of nitrogen and sulfur. In the present work, the production of biofuel by catalytic cracking of soybean oil over a basic catalyst in a continuous pyrolysis reactor at atmospheric pressure has been studied. Experiments were designed to study the effect of different types of catalysts on the yield and acid value of the diesel and gasoline fractions from the pyrolytic oil. It was found that basic catalyst gave a product with relatively low acid number. These pyrolytic oils were also further reacted with alcohol in order to decrease their acid value. After esterification, the physico-chemical properties of these biofuels were characterized, and compared with Chinese specifications for conventional diesel fuels. The results showed that esterification of pyrolytic oil from triglycerides represents an alternative technique for producing biofuels from soybean oils with characteristics similar to those of petroleum fuels.

  2. Processing Of Neem And Jatropha Methyl Esters -Alternative Fuels From Vegetable Oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramasubramanian, S.; Manavalan, S.; Gnanavel, C.; Balakrishnan, G.

    2017-03-01

    Biodiesel is an alternative fuel for diesel engine. The methyl esters of vegetable oils, known as biodiesel are becoming increasingly popular because of their low environmental impact and potential as a green alternative fuel for diesel engine. This paper deals with the manufacturing process of Biodiesel from jatropha and neem oil. Biodiesel was prepared from neem oil and jatropha oil, the transestrified having kinematic viscosity of 3 & 2.6 centistokes, methanol ratio is 6:1 & 5.1respectively. The secondary solution is preheated at 65 C & 60 C and reaction temperature is maintained at 60C & 55 C and reaction time is 60 minutes approximately with NaOH catalyst and low viscosity oil is allowed to settle 24 hours. The average yield of neem and jatropha methyl esters was about 85%. These methyl esters shows excellent alternative under optimum condition for fossil fuels.

  3. Zero Gap Propagation Testing of Propellant - No. 2 Fuel Oil Slurries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    ZERO GAP PROPAGATION TESTING OF PROPELLANT- No. 2 FUEL OIL SLURRIES * Prepared by: Tennessee Valley Authority National Fertilizer and Environmental...FINAL REPORT ’TTS (aI-hI’-- ZERO GAP PROPAGATION TESTING OF ...Availability Cod.,PROPELLANT-NO. 2 FUEL OIL SLURRIES DIU! t speoi8a N V. M. N orwood...Valley Authority National Fertilizer and Environmental Research Center Muscle Shoals, Alabama 35660-1010 I Prepared for United States Army To’xic and

  4. Sedimentation Of Oil-MIneral Aggregates For Remediation Of Vegetable Oil Spills

    EPA Science Inventory

    A response alternative for floating vegetable oil spills based on sedimentation of negatively buoyant oil-mineral aggregrates followed by anaerobic biodegradation in the sediments is under investigation. Sedimentation of floating canola oil by interaction with montmorillonite wa...

  5. Sedimentation Of Oil-MIneral Aggregates For Remediation Of Vegetable Oil Spills

    EPA Science Inventory

    A response alternative for floating vegetable oil spills based on sedimentation of negatively buoyant oil-mineral aggregrates followed by anaerobic biodegradation in the sediments is under investigation. Sedimentation of floating canola oil by interaction with montmorillonite wa...

  6. Gas phase carbonyl compounds in ship emissions: Differences between diesel fuel and heavy fuel oil operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reda, Ahmed A.; Schnelle-Kreis, J.; Orasche, J.; Abbaszade, G.; Lintelmann, J.; Arteaga-Salas, J. M.; Stengel, B.; Rabe, R.; Harndorf, H.; Sippula, O.; Streibel, T.; Zimmermann, R.

    2014-09-01

    Gas phase emission samples of carbonyl compounds (CCs) were collected from a research ship diesel engine at Rostock University, Germany. The ship engine was operated using two different types of fuels, heavy fuel oil (HFO) and diesel fuel (DF). Sampling of CCs was performed from diluted exhaust using cartridges and impingers. Both sampling methods involved the derivatization of CCs with 2,4-Dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH). The CCs-hydrazone derivatives were analyzed by two analytical techniques: High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Diode Array Detector (HPLC-DAD) and Gas Chromatography-Selective Ion Monitoring-Mass Spectrometry (GC-SIM-MS). Analysis of DNPH cartridges by GC-SIM-MS method has resulted in the identification of 19 CCs in both fuel operations. These CCs include ten aliphatic aldehydes (formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, propanal, isobutanal, butanal, isopentanal, pentanal, hexanal, octanal, nonanal), three unsaturated aldehydes (acrolein, methacrolein, crotonaldehyde), three aromatic aldehyde (benzaldehyde, p-tolualdehyde, m,o-molualdehyde), two ketones (acetone, butanone) and one heterocyclic aldehyde (furfural). In general, all CCs under investigation were detected with higher emission factors in HFO than DF. The total carbonyl emission factor was determined and found to be 6050 and 2300 μg MJ-1 for the operation with HFO and DF respectively. Formaldehyde and acetaldehyde were found to be the dominant carbonyls in the gas phase of ship engine emission. Formaldehyde emissions factor varied from 3500 μg MJ-1 in HFO operation to 1540 μg MJ-1 in DF operation, which is 4-30 times higher than those of other carbonyls. Emission profile contribution of CCs showed also a different pattern between HFO and DF operation. The contribution of formaldehyde was found to be 58% of the emission profile of HFO and about 67% of the emission profile of DF. Acetaldehyde showed opposite behavior with higher contribution of 16% in HFO compared to 11% for DF. Heavier carbonyls

  7. Influence of fatty acid methyl esters from hydroxylated vegetable oils on diesel fuel lubricity.

    PubMed

    Goodrum, John W; Geller, Daniel P

    2005-05-01

    Current and future regulations on the sulfur content of diesel fuel have led to a decrease in lubricity of these fuels. This decreased lubricity poses a significant problem as it may lead to wear and damage of diesel engines, primarily fuel injection systems. Vegetable oil based diesel fuel substitutes (biodiesel) have been shown to be clean and effective and may increase overall lubricity when added to diesel fuel at nominally low levels. Previous studies on castor oil suggest that its uniquely high level of the hydroxy fatty acid ricinoleic acid may impart increased lubricity to the oil and its derivatives as compared to other vegetable oils. Likewise, the developing oilseed Lesquerella may also increase diesel lubricity through its unique hydroxy fatty acid composition. This study examines the effect of castor and Lesquerella oil esters on the lubricity of diesel fuel using the High-Frequency Reciprocating Rig (HFRR) test and compares these results to those for the commercial vegetable oil derivatives soybean and rapeseed methyl esters.

  8. The Effects of Fuel and Cylinder Gas Densities on the Characteristics of Fuel Sprays for Oil Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joachim, W F; Beardsley, Edward G

    1928-01-01

    This investigation was conducted as a part of a general research on fuel-injection engines for aircraft. The purpose of the investigation was to determine the effects of fuel and cylinder gas densities with several characteristics of fuel sprays for oil engines. The start, growth, and cut-off of single fuel sprays produced by automatic injection valves were recorded on photographic film by means of special high-speed motion-picture apparatus. This equipment, which has been described in previous reports, is capable of taking twenty-five consecutive pictures of the moving spray at the rate of 4,000 per second. The penetrations of the fuel sprays increased and the cone angles and relative distributions decreased with increase in the specific gravity of the fuel. The density of the gas into which the fuel sprays were injected controlled their penetration. This was the only characteristic of the chamber gas that had a measurable effect upon the fuel sprays. Application of fuel-spray penetration data to the case of an engine, in which the pressure is rising during injection, indicated that fuel sprays may penetrate considerably farther than when injected into a gas at a density equal to that of the gas in an engine cylinder at top center.

  9. SHORT HYPOCOTYL UNDER BLUE1 or HAIKU2 mixepression alters canola and Arabidopsis seed development.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yu-Guo; Sun, Qing-Bin; Kang, Xiao-Jun; Chen, Chang-Bin; Ni, Min

    2016-01-01

    Canola (Brassica napus) is a widely cultivated species and provides important resources of edible vegetable oil, biodiesel production and animal feed. Seed development in Arabidopsis and canola shares a similar path: an early proliferation of endosperm to form a large seed cavity, followed by a second phase in which the embryo grows to replace the endosperm. In Arabidopsis, the seed reaches almost its final volume before the enlargement of the embryo. SHORT HYPOCOTYL UNDER BLUE1 (SHB1) is a key regulatory gene of seed development with a broad expression beyond endosperm development. By contrast, its two target genes, MINISEED3 (MINI3) and HAIKU2 (IKU2), are narrowly expressed in early developing endosperm and early embryo. We overexpressed SHB1 in canola to explore the possibility of altering seed development. As an alternative strategy, we expressed the canola IKU2 ortholog in Arabidopsis endosperm under the control of a stronger MINI3 promoter. SHB1 targeted canola orthologs of Arabidopsis MINI3 and IKU2 and caused a significantly increased seed mass. Overaccumulation of IKU2 in the early stage of Arabidopsis seed development also significantly increased the final seed mass. Our studies provide a strong case for increasing the final seed mass by manipulating endosperm proliferation at a rather early developmental stage in crops. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  10. Microbial oil - A plausible alternate resource for food and fuel application.

    PubMed

    Bharathiraja, B; Sridharan, Sridevi; Sowmya, V; Yuvaraj, D; Praveenkumar, R

    2017-06-01

    Microbes have recourse to low-priced substrates like agricultural wastes and industrial efflux. A pragmatic approach towards an emerging field- the exploitation of microbial oils for biodiesel production, pharmaceutical and cosmetic applications, food additives, biopolymer production will be of immense remunerative significance in the near future. Due to high free fatty acid, nutritive content and simpler solvent extraction processes of microbial oils with plant oil, microbial oils can back plant oils in food applications. The purpose of this review is to evaluate the opulence of lipid production in native and standard micro-organisms and also to emphasize the vast array of applications including food and fuel by obtaining maximum yield.

  11. Waste Vegetable Oil as an Alternative Fuel for Diesel Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    the technology is many years from maturity and a full working system is even further away. Prototype electric vehicles from General Motors , Smart...diesel fuel or alternative fuel if the fuel is used in an on- road motor vehicle (Defense Energy Support Center, 2008). The only exemption is for...inside the fuel tanker trucks and on base storage tanks is the property of DESC. The Air Force owns the fuel when it is pumped into an airplane, motor

  12. Performance of an IDI Engine Fueled with Fatty Acid Methyl Esters Formulated from Cotton Seeds Oils

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study evaluates the performance of an indirect injection (IDI) diesel engine fueled with cottonseed biodiesel while assessing the IDI engine multi-fuel capability. Millions of tons of cotton seeds are available in the southeast of the USA every year and they contain oils that can be transesteri...

  13. Coriander Seed Oil Methyl Esters as Biodiesel Fuel: Unique Fatty Acid Composition and Excellent Oxidative Stability

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.) seed oil methyl esters were prepared and evaluated as an alternative biodiesel fuel and contained an unusual fatty acid (FA) hitherto unreported as the principle component in biodiesel fuels: petroselinic (6Z-octadecenoic; 68.5 wt %) acid. Most of the remaining FA...

  14. 76 FR 44506 - Petition Requesting Non-See-Through Packaging for Torch Fuel and Lamp Oil

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-26

    ... to lamp oils, which includes torch fuels.'' Petitioner's son died after ingesting torch fuel from a... parties may obtain a copy of the petition by writing or calling the Office of the Secretary, U.S. Consumer... Web site at: http://www.cpsc.gov . Dated: July 18, 2011. Todd A. Stevenson, Secretary, U.S. Consumer...

  15. 33 CFR 157.33 - Water ballast in fuel oil tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Water ballast in fuel oil tanks. 157.33 Section 157.33 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION RULES FOR THE PROTECTION OF THE MARINE ENVIRONMENT RELATING TO TANK VESSELS CARRYING OIL IN BULK Vessel Operation § 157.33...

  16. 33 CFR 157.33 - Water ballast in fuel oil tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Water ballast in fuel oil tanks. 157.33 Section 157.33 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION RULES FOR THE PROTECTION OF THE MARINE ENVIRONMENT RELATING TO TANK VESSELS CARRYING OIL IN BULK Vessel Operation § 157.33...

  17. 33 CFR 157.33 - Water ballast in fuel oil tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Water ballast in fuel oil tanks. 157.33 Section 157.33 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION RULES FOR THE PROTECTION OF THE MARINE ENVIRONMENT RELATING TO TANK VESSELS CARRYING OIL IN BULK Vessel Operation § 157.33...

  18. Diesel Engine Endurance Tests Using JP-8 Fuel Blended With Used Engine Oil.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-07-01

    of used oil, and each gallon of used oil consumed as fuel is equal to one less gallon of JP-8 purchased. in FORWORD /ACKNOWLEDGMENTS This work was...CECEREN P O BOX 9005 CHAMPAIGN IL 61826-9005 DIR AMC FAST PROGRAM 10101 GRIDLEY RD STE 104 FT BELVOIR VA 22060-5818 CDR I CORPS AND FT LEWIS ATTN

  19. Effects of No. 2 Fuel Oil, Nigerian Crude Oil, and Used Crankcase Oil on Attached Algal Communities: Acute and Chronic Toxicity of Water-Soluble Constituents

    PubMed Central

    Bott, Thomas L.; Rogenmuser, Kurt

    1978-01-01

    Water extracts of a no. 2 fuel oil, a Nigerian crude oil, and used crankcase oil were examined for their effects on algal communities in experiments lasting several weeks conducted under near-natural conditions. No. 2 fuel oil extracts depressed algal biomass (chlorophyll a) and resulted in blue-green algal (cyanobacterial) dominance and decreased diatom occurrence. Changes in concentrations of chlorophyll c, which was specific for diatoms in this work, and phycocyanin, which was specific for blue-green algae, confirmed the observations. Used crankcase oil extracts also depressed biomass, but Nigerian crude extracts did not, and both these extracts had less effect on community composition than did no. 2 fuel oil extracts. Photosynthetic 14C incorporation was both stimulated and depressed by exposure to extracts with hydrocarbon concentrations 0.038 to 0.124 mg/liter. Short-term exposure to higher concentrations (1.17 to 15.30 mg of hydrocarbons per liter) of no. 2 fuel oil extracts depressed photosynthetic 14C incorporation by Vaucheria-dominated communities in all tests but one. Toxicity was greater from extracts prepared in the light than from extracts prepared in the dark. PMID:16345329

  20. Optical and microwave remote sensing of wheat and canola

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hochheim, Klaus

    The primary focus of this research is the evaluation of RADARSAT-1 (5.3 GHz HH) data to: (1) understand the nature of seasonal backscatter from wheat and canola; and (2) determine the extent to which RADARSAT can discriminate variations in biomass at the field scale. This research is necessary because managers, scientists and agricultural producers locally require better information on production related parameters and regionally need to assess the impacts of climate variability on the grain and oil seed producing regions of the Great Plains. In support of the first objective, detailed vertically stratified seasonal representations of wheat and canola representing low and high biomass canopies were generated. These data were used to develop an adaptive multi-layer (4 layer) volumetric moisture model parameterized for wheat and canola to gain an understanding of the nature of RADARSAT-1 backscatter. The model generates a measure referred to as the TMc (total effective volumetric moisture) that is correlated to RADARSAT-1 backscatter. The model results for wheat were highly correlated to backscatter (r 2 = 0.67--0.97). The results suggest a relatively high extinction coefficient for high biomass wheat canopies. The seasonal backscatter over wheat is bimodal, with the green leafy portion of the canopy driving early season backscatter, and heads driving the end of season backscatter. The early season model results for canola were less promising (r 2 = 0.46) suggesting the need to integrate a scattering model based on leaf geometry early in the growing season. Later in the season, when pods dominated the canopy, the volumetric model worked much better (r2 = 0.94). The seasonal backscatter profile for canola was very distinct from wheat. Early season backscatter was driven by the leafy portion of the canopy, maximum backscatter as associated with the reproductive period (pod development). Results associated with objective 2 showed that RADARSAT-1 has a potential to map

  1. Effects of external applications of fuel oil on hatchability of mallard eggs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Albers, P.H.; Wolfe, Douglas A.

    1977-01-01

    An experiment was performed to determine the toxicity of oil to incubating eggs. Number 2 fuel oil, a mixture of 9 paraffin compounds, and propylene glycol were applied to the surface of artificially incubated mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) eggs. Embryonic mortality was significantly greater (P 0.01) from the control. Thus, the transfer of even small quantities of oil to the egg surface is sufficient to reduce hatchability.

  2. Utilization of Navy-Generated Waste Oils as Boiler Fuel-Economic Analysis and Laboratory Tests.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-01

    01M i AI . 5 PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER CLABORATORY TESTS 9. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS, 1 1. CONTROLLING OF FICE N AME AND ADDRESS...generated waste oils is reported. Estimates show that between 5 % and 1 3% of the Navy boiler fuel requirements (excluding coal) may be met by...Waste Oils 2. Combustion I. Z0838-01-002 I Feasibility of utilizing Navy-generated waste oils is reported. Estimates show that between 5 % and 13% of

  3. Effects of type of canola protein supplement on ruminal fermentation and nutrient flow to the duodenum in beef heifers.

    PubMed

    Gozho, G N; McKinnon, J J; Christensen, D A; Racz, V; Mutsvangwa, T

    2009-10-01

    Ruminal fermentation, nutrient digestion, and flows to the duodenum in growing cattle fed differently produced canola protein supplements were studied in a 4 x 4 Latin square design using Speckle Park heifers (initial BW = 451 +/- 26 kg). Canola protein supplement treatments consisted of the following: 1) 8.78% regular canola meal (RCM); 2) 9.25% RCM plus 1.80% canola oil (RCMO); 3) 11.1% canola presscake from biodiesel oil extraction (CPC); and 4) 8.14% high ruminally undegradable protein (RUP) canola meal (RUCM) plus 1.32% canola oil (RUCMO). Experimental diets also contained 39.9, 40.2, 39.9, and 39.9% barley grain; 31.7, 31.4, 31.2, and 31.4% barley silage; and 17.5, 15.2, 15.6, and 16.5% oat hulls for the RCM, RCMO, CPC, and RUCMO diets, respectively. Feeding the CPC, RCMO, and RUCMO diets decreased (P < or = 0.05) ruminal NH(3)-N concentration compared with feeding the RCM diet. Compared with the RCM diet, adding canola oil in the RCMO diet or residual oil in the CPC diet resulted in greater ruminal concentrations of propionate (P < or = 0.09). Additionally, feeding the RCMO diet also resulted in greater ruminal concentrations of acetate (P = 0.07), valerate (P = 0.06), and total VFA (P = 0.07) compared with the RCM diet. Also, compared with the RCM diet, heifers on the RUCMO diet had decreased acetate (P = 0.02) concentrations. The changes in ruminal concentrations of acetate and propionate resulted in reduced acetate:propionate ratios in the RCMO (P = 0.08), CPC (P = 0.02), and RUCMO (P < 0.01) diets. Ruminal digestion and flows of nutrients to the duodenum were not affected by dietary treatment. However, adding canola oil to the RCMO and RUCMO dietary treatments decreased the digestibility of ADF (P < or = 0.08) and NDF (P < or = 0.08) in the total tract compared with the RCM diet. Total tract digestibility of OM was also decreased (P = 0.02) in heifers fed the RUCMO compared with the RCM diet. Notwithstanding the different processing methods employed in

  4. Life cycle assessment of camelina oil derived biodiesel and jet fuel in the Canadian Prairies.

    PubMed

    Li, Xue; Mupondwa, Edmund

    2014-05-15

    This study evaluated the environmental impact of biodiesel and hydroprocessed renewable jet fuel derived from camelina oil in terms of global warming potential, human health, ecosystem quality, and energy resource consumption. The life cycle inventory is based on production activities in the Canadian Prairies and encompasses activities ranging from agricultural production to oil extraction and fuel conversion. The system expansion method is used in this study to avoid allocation and to credit input energy to co-products associated with the products displaced in the market during camelina oil extraction and fuel processing. This is the preferred allocation method for LCA analysis in the context of most renewable and sustainable energy programs. The results show that greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from 1 MJ of camelina derived biodiesel ranged from 7.61 to 24.72 g CO2 equivalent and 3.06 to 31.01 kg CO2/MJ equivalent for camelina HRJ fuel. Non-renewable energy consumption for camelina biodiesel ranged from 0.40 to 0.67 MJ/MJ; HRJ fuel ranged from -0.13 to 0.52 MJ/MJ. Camelina oil as a feedstock for fuel production accounted for the highest contribution to overall environmental performance, demonstrating the importance of reducing environmental burdens during the agricultural production process. Attaining higher seed yield would dramatically lower environmental impacts associated with camelina seed, oil, and fuel production. The lower GHG emissions and energy consumption associated with camelina in comparison with other oilseed derived fuel and petroleum fuel make camelina derived fuel from Canadian Prairies environmentally attractive.

  5. Conversion of vegetable oils and animal fats into paraffinic cetane enhancers for diesel fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, A.; Feng, Y.; Hogan, E.

    1995-11-01

    The two principal methods of producing biodiesel fuels are (a) transesterification of vegetable oils and animal fats with a monohydric alcohol, and (b) direct hydrotreating of tree oils, vegetable oils and animal fats. The patented hydrotreating technology is based on the catalytic processing of biomass oils and fats with hydrogen, under elevated temperature and pressure conditions. The typical mix of hydrotreated products is as follows: 5-15% light distillate (naphta), 40-60% middle distillate (cetane), 5-15% heavy distillate and 5-10% burner gas. The naptha fraction may be used as a gasoline supplement. The middle distillate is designed for use as a cetane booster for diesel fuels. Both heavy distillate and light hydrocarbon gases are usable as power boiler fuels. Typically, the cetane enhancer would be admixed with diesel fuel in the range of 5 to 30% by volume. This new diesel blend meets the essential quality characteristics of the basic diesel fuel, for direct use in diesel engines without any modifications. The basic hydrotreatment technology has been evaluated further in the laboratory on degummed soya oil, yellow grease and animal tallow. The preliminary findings suggest that the technology can provide efficient conversion of these materials into cetane enhancers for diesel fuels.

  6. Preliminary Investigation for Engine Performance by Using Tire-Derived Pyrolysis Oil-Diesel Blended Fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rofiqul, Islam M.; Haniu, Hiroyuki; Alam, Beg R.; Takai, Kazunori

    In the first phase of the present study, the pyrolysis oil derived from light automotive tire waste has been characterized including fuel properties, elemental analyses, FT-IR, 1H-NMR, GC-MS and distillation. The studies on the oil show that it can be used as liquid fuel with a gross calorific value (GCV) of 42.00 MJ/kg and empirical formula of CH1.27O0.025N0.006. In the second phase of the investigation, the performance of a diesel engine was studied blending the pyrolysis oil with diesel fuel in different ratios. The experimental results show that the bsfc of pyrolysis oil-diesel blended fuels slightly increases and hence the brake thermal efficiency decreases compared to those of neat diesel. The pyrolysis oil-diesel blends show lower carbon monoxide (CO) emission but higher oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emissions than those of neat diesel. However, NOx emissions with pyrolysis oil-diesel blended fuels reduced when EGR was applied.

  7. Chronic oral exposure to bunker C fuel oil causes adrenal insufficiency in ranch mink (Mustela vison).

    PubMed

    Mohr, F C; Lasley, B; Bursian, S

    2008-02-01

    Animals living in the near-shore marine environment are predisposed to contact with chemical contaminants through land- and ocean-based activities. The release of petroleum hydrocarbons into the marine environment is a stressor to this environment and its resident wildlife. The stress response to chemical threats is dependent on an intact hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, which also may be a target to the effects of these chemicals. Ranch mink (Mustela vison) were used as surrogates for sea otters (Enhydra lutris) to examine the development of adrenal hypertrophy after chronic, oral exposure to low concentrations of bunker C fuel oil. Animals were fed three different concentrations of fuel oil (48, 520, and 908 ppm) or mineral oil (control) for 60-62 days. At the end of the exposure, blood and fecal samples were collected and organs were weighed and examined microscopically. In all fuel oil groups, exposure resulted in adrenal hypertrophy, an adaptation suggestive of adrenal activation. However, concentrations of serum and fecal glucocorticoids and serum progesterone were not elevated over control values. Hematologic parameters and serum chemistries showed no changes consistent with increased adrenal activity. In addition, adrenal glands from animals fed the higher concentrations of fuel oil contained large numbers of heavily vacuolated cells. We conclude that petroleum hydrocarbons are inducing an adrenal insufficiency that leads to the adaptive enlargement of the gland. This would increase the susceptibility of fuel oil-exposed animals to the deleterious effects of other environmental stressors.

  8. Identification and characterization of CBL and CIPK gene families in canola (Brassica napus L.)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Canola (Brassica napus L.) is one of the most important oil-producing crops in China and worldwide. The yield and quality of canola is frequently threatened by environmental stresses including drought, cold and high salinity. Calcium is a ubiquitous intracellular secondary messenger in plants. Calcineurin B-like proteins (CBLs) are Ca2+ sensors and regulate a group of Ser/Thr protein kinases called CBL-interacting protein kinases (CIPKs). Although the CBL-CIPK network has been demonstrated to play crucial roles in plant development and responses to various environmental stresses in Arabidopsis, little is known about their function in canola. Results In the present study, we identified seven CBL and 23 CIPK genes from canola by database mining and cloning of cDNA sequences of six CBLs and 17 CIPKs. Phylogenetic analysis of CBL and CIPK gene families across a variety of species suggested genome duplication and diversification. The subcellular localization of three BnaCBLs and two BnaCIPKs were determined using green fluorescence protein (GFP) as the reporter. We also demonstrated interactions between six BnaCBLs and 17 BnaCIPKs using yeast two-hybrid assay, and a subset of interactions were further confirmed by bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC). Furthermore, the expression levels of six selected BnaCBL and 12 BnaCIPK genes in response to salt, drought, cold, heat, ABA, methyl viologen (MV) and low potassium were examined by quantitative RT-PCR and these CBL or CIPK genes were found to respond to multiple stimuli, suggesting that the canola CBL-CIPK network may be a point of convergence for several different signaling pathways. We also performed a comparison of interaction patterns and expression profiles of CBL and CIPK in Arabidospsis, canola and rice, to examine the differences between orthologs, highlighting the importance of studying CBL-CIPK in canola as a prerequisite for improvement of this crop. Conclusions Our findings indicate that

  9. NMR sensor for onboard ship detection of catalytic fines in marine fuel oils.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Morten K; Vinding, Mads S; Bakharev, Oleg N; Nesgaard, Tomas; Jensen, Ole; Nielsen, Niels Chr

    2014-08-05

    A mobile, low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) sensor for onboard, inline detection of catalytic fines in fuel oil in the shipping industry is presented as an alternative to onshore laboratory measurements. Catalytic fines (called cat fines) are aluminosilicate zeolite catalysts utilized in the oil cracking process at refineries. When present in fuel oil, cat fines cause abrasive wear of engine parts and may ultimately lead to engine breakdown with large economical consequences, thereby motivating methods for inline measurements. Here, we report on a robust, mobile, and low-cost (27)Al NMR sensor for continuous online measurement of the level of catalytic fines in fuel oil onboard ships. The sensor enables accurate measurements of aluminum (catalytic fines) in ppm concentrations in good agreement with commercial laboratory reference measurements.

  10. Toxicity and sublethal effects of No. 2 fuel oil on the supralittoral isopod Lygia exotica.

    PubMed

    Dillon, T M; Neff, J M; Warner, J S

    1978-09-01

    1. No. 2 fuel oil was of relatively low toxicity to the intertidal isopod Lygia exotica as indicated by the TLm values of over 100% for the WSF and 73 ppm at 24 and 48 hours and 36.5 ppm at 96 hours for the OWD. 2. Respiration was not significantly affected by short term exposure to several concentrations of No. 2 fuel oil prepared as either a WSF or OWD. 3. Lygia contamined by a spill of No. 2 fuel oil and Bunker C residual oil contained high concentrations of dibenzothiophenes. It is not known whether the dibenzothiophenes were accumulated by the Lygia tissues or absorbed to the exoskeleton. Therefore, the high mortality of Lygia following the spill cannot yet be attributed to the dibenzothiophenes.

  11. Simple test for toxicity of number 2 fuel oil and oil dispersants to embryos of grass shrimp, palaemonetes pugio

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, W.S.; Foss, S.S.

    1993-01-01

    A simple test, using embryos of the grass shrimp Palaemonetes pugio, was employed to determine the toxicity of two commercial oil dispersants (Corexit 7664 and Corexit 9527) and toxicity of the water soluble fraction of Number 2 fuel oil (WSF oil) prepared with and without the addition of the dispersants. Tests revealed P. pugio embryos were similar to previously measured life stages in their sensitivity to WSF oil prepared without dispersants. They were approximately ten times more sensitive to water soluble fractions of dispersed oil, which may have been due to the approximately ten-fold increases in total hydrocarbons measured analytically. Both temperatures and salinity of the sea water affected toxicity of WSF prepared with dispersants, the most obvious effect being earlier onset of mortalities at higher temperatures. (Copyright (c) 1993 Pergamon Press Ltd.)

  12. Polypropylene oil as fuel for solid oxide fuel cell with samarium doped-ceria (SDC)-carbonate as electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syahputra, R. J. E.; Rahmawati, F.; Prameswari, A. P.; Saktian, R.

    2017-03-01

    The research focusses on converting polypropylene oil as pyrolysis product of polypropylene plastic into an electricity. The converter was a direct liquid fuel-solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) with cerium oxide based material as electrolyte. The polypropylene vapor flowed into fuel cell, in the anode side and undergo oxidation reaction, meanwhile, the Oxygen in atmosphere reduced into oxygen ion at cathode. The fuel cell test was conducted at 400 - 600 °C. According to GC-MS analysis, the polypropylene oil consist of C8 to C27 hydrocarbon chain. The XRD analysis result shows that Na2CO3 did not change the crystal structure of SDC even increases the electrical conductivity. The maximum power density is 0.079 mW.cm-2 at 773 K. The open circuite voltage is 0.77 volt. Chemical stability test by analysing the single cell at before and after fuel cell test found that ionic migration occured during fuel cell operation. It is supported by the change of elemental composition in the point position of electrolyte and at the electrolyte-electrode interface

  13. Carbohydrate Content and Enzyme Metabolism in Developing Canola Siliques.

    PubMed Central

    King, S. P.; Lunn, J. E.; Furbank, R. T.

    1997-01-01

    Little biochemical information is available on carbohydrate metabolism in developing canola (Brassica napus L.) silique (pod) wall and seed tissues. This research examines the carbohydrate contents and sucrose (Suc) metabolic enzyme activities in different aged silique wall and seed tissues during oil filling. The silique wall partitioned photosynthate into Suc over starch and predominantly accumulated hexose. The silique wall hexose content and soluble acid invertase activity rapidly fell as embryos progressed from the early- to late-cotyledon developmental stages. A similar trend was not evident for alkaline invertase, Suc synthase (SuSy), and Suc-phosphate synthase. Silique wall SuSy activities were much higher than source leaves at all times and may serve to supply the substrate for secondary cell wall thickening. In young seeds starch was the predominant accumulated carbohydrate over the sampled developmental range. Seed hexose levels dropped as embryos developed from the early- to midcotyledon stage. Hexose and starch were localized to the testa or liquid endosperm, whereas Suc was evenly distributed among seed components. With the switch to oil accumulation, seed SuSy activity increased by 3.6-fold and soluble acid invertase activity decreased by 76%. These data provide valuable baseline knowledge for the genetic manipulation of canola seed carbon partitioning. PMID:12223695

  14. Ways of solving environmental problems while transferring the boilers for burning water-bitumen mixture instead of fuel oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotler, V. R.; Sosin, D. V.

    2009-03-01

    Information concerning a new kind (for Russia) of liquid fuel, i.e., water-bitumen mixture (orimulsion), is presented. The application of the new fuel instead of the fuel oil at a boiler of a power unit of 350-MW capacity makes it possible to decrease sufficiently the expenditures for fuel while keeping the main environmental indices.

  15. An FTIR method for the analysis of crude and heavy fuel oil asphaltenes to assist in oil fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Riley, Brenden J; Lennard, Chris; Fuller, Stephen; Spikmans, Val

    2016-09-01

    A proof-of-concept spectroscopic method for crude and heavy fuel oil asphaltenes was developed to complement existing methods for source determination of oil spills. Current methods rely on the analysis of the volatile fraction of oils by Gas Chromatography (GC), whilst the non-volatile fraction, including asphaltenes, is discarded. By discarding the non-volatile fraction, important oil fingerprinting information is potentially lost. Ten oil samples representing various geographical regions were used in this study. The asphaltene fraction was precipitated from the oils using excess n-pentane, and analysed by Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR). Based on visual interpretation of FTIR spectra along with peak height ratio comparisons, all ten oil samples could be differentiated from one another. Furthermore, ATR-FTIR was not able to differentiate a weathered crude oil sample from its source sample, demonstrating significant potential for the application of asphaltenes in oil fingerprinting. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. 77 FR 19663 - Notice of Data Availability Concerning Renewable Fuels Produced from Palm Oil Under the RFS...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-02

    ... time to balance these needs. Accordingly, the public comment period for the palm oil NODA is extended... AGENCY Notice of Data Availability Concerning Renewable Fuels Produced from Palm Oil Under the RFS... Produced from Palm Oil under the RFS Program'' (the notice is herein referred to as the ``palm oil...

  17. 77 FR 8254 - Notice of Data Availability Concerning Renewable Fuels Produced From Palm Oil Under the RFS...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-14

    ... of time to balance these needs. Accordingly, the public comment period for the palm oil NODA is... AGENCY Notice of Data Availability Concerning Renewable Fuels Produced From Palm Oil Under the RFS... Produced From Palm Oil Under the RFS Program'' (the notice is herein referred to as the ``palm oil...

  18. Relative bioavailability and toxicity of fuel oils leaking from World War II shipwrecks.

    PubMed

    Faksness, Liv-Guri; Daling, Per; Altin, Dag; Dolva, Hilde; Fosbæk, Bjørn; Bergstrøm, Rune

    2015-05-15

    The Norwegian Authorities have classified 30 WWII shipwrecks to have a considerable potential for pollution to the environment, based on the location and condition of the wreck and the types and amount of fuel. Oil thus far has been removed from eight of these shipwrecks. The water accommodated fractions of oils from two British wrecks and two German wrecks have been studied with special emphasis on chemistry and biological effects (algae growth (Skeletonema costatum) and copepod mortality (Calanus finmarchicus)). Chemical analyses were also performed on three additional German wreck oils. The results from these studies show that the coal based oils from German WWII shipwrecks have higher toxicity to marine organisms than the mineral oils from the British shipwrecks. The potential for higher impact on the marine environment of coal based oils has resulted in an altering of the priority list for oil recovery from WWII wrecks by the authorities.

  19. Rapid engine test to measure injector fouling in diesel engines using vegetable oil fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Korus, R.A.; Jaiduk, J.; Peterson, C.L.

    1985-11-01

    Short engine tests were used to determine the rate of carbon deposition on direct injection diesel nozzles. Winter rape, high-oleic and high-linoleic safflower blends with 50% diesel were tested for carbon deposit and compared to that with D-2 Diesel Control Fuel. Deposits were greatest with the most unsaturated fuel, high-linoleic safflower, and least with winter rape. All vegetable oil blends developed power similar to diesel fueled engines with a 6 to 8% greater fuel consumption. 8 references.

  20. Effects of dietary supplementation of coriander oil, in canola oil diets, on the metabolism of [1-(14)C] 18:3n-3 and [1-(14)C] 18:2n-6 in rainbow trout hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Randall, K M; Drew, M D; Øverland, M; Østbye, T-K; Bjerke, M; Vogt, G; Ruyter, B

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of petroselinic acid, found in coriander oil, on the ability of rainbow trout hepatocytes to increase the production of eicosapentaenoic acid (20:5n-3; EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (22:6n-3; DHA) from [1-(14)C] α-linolenic acid (18:3n-3; ALA) and to reduce the production of arachidonic acid (20:4n-6; ARA) from [1-(14)C] 18:2n-6. Addition of coriander oil increased the production of 22:6n-3, from [1-(14)C] 18:3n-3, at the 0.5 and 1.0% inclusion levels and reduced the conversion of [1-(14)C] 18:2n-6 to 20:4n-6. β-Oxidation was significantly increased at the 1.5% inclusion level for [1-(14)C] 18:2n-6, however β-oxidation for [1-(14)C] 18:3n-3 only showed an increasing trend. Acetate, a main breakdown product of fatty acids (FA) via peroxisomal β-oxidation, decreased three-fold for [1-(14)C] 18:2n-6 and nearly doubled for [1-(14)C] 18:3n-3 when coriander was added at a 1.5% inclusion level. Acyl coenzyme A oxidase (ACO) enzyme activity showed no significant differences between treatments. Relative gene expression of ∆6 desaturase decreased with addition of coriander oil compared to the control. The addition of petroselinic acid via coriander oil to vegetable oil (VO) based diets containing no fishmeal (FM) or fish oil (FO), significantly increased the production of anti-inflammatory precursor 22:6n-3 (P=0.011) and decreased pro-inflammatory precursor 20:4n-6 (P=0.023) in radiolabelled hepatocytes of rainbow trout. © 2013.