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Sample records for cantilever cross-arch fixed

  1. Early loading of four or five Astra Tech fixtures with a fixed cross-arch restoration in the mandible.

    PubMed

    Collaert, Bruno; De Bruyn, Hugo

    2002-01-01

    A change in implant placement has emerged recently from two-stage to one-stage surgery and to earlier and even immediate loading of the fixtures. The aim of this study was to verify whether four or five fixtures installed in the edentulous mandible were suitable for early loading with a cross-arch fixed restoration. In 25 consecutively treated patients (28-88 yr), four or five Astra Tech fixtures (Mölndal, Sweden) were installed in edentulous mandibles. During the same surgical procedure, the abutments were connected. An impression was taken immediately after surgery. All patients received a fixed prosthetic rehabilitation of 10 to 12 teeth made of a cast metal framework and acrylic teeth/gingiva within a month. The fixtures were followed up clinically and radiographically for 7 to 24 months. Bone level was measured from the most coronal point of the vertical part of the fixture to the most apical bone level mesially or distally. No fixtures were lost during follow-up. No postoperative complications occurred. Radiographic analysis showed a mean bone level of 0.6 mm after 7 to 12 months. Fixtures followed up from 13 to 18 and 19 to 24 months showed a mean bone level of 0.7 mm. Around two fixtures, the bone level was found at the first implant thread. All other fixtures showed the bone level somewhere along the vertical unthreaded part of the fixture. Early loading within 1 month of four or five Astra Tech fixtures in the edentulous mandible is a predictable procedure for a follow-up period of 6 to 24 months.

  2. Immediate loading of two (fixed-on-2) vs four (fixed-on-4) implants placed with a flapless technique supporting mandibular cross-arch fixed prostheses: 3-year results from a pilot randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Cannizzaro, Gioacchino; Felice, Pietro; Gherlone, Enrico; Barausse, Carlo; Ferri, Vittorio; Leone, Michele; Trullenque-Eriksson, Anna; Esposito, Marco

    To evaluate the outcome of two vs four implants placed flapless in fully edentulous mandibles and immediately restored with metal-resin screw-retained cross-arch prostheses. A total of 60 patients from two different centres were randomised: 30 to the fixed-on-2 group and 30 to the fixed-on-4 group according to a parallel group design. To be immediately loaded implants had to be inserted with a minimum torque of 40 Newton/cm (Ncm). Outcome measures were prosthesis and implant failures, complications, and marginal bone level changes. Flaps were raised in 18 patients. Two implants in two patients did not reach the planned insertion torque and were replaced immediately by larger diameter ones. Three years after loading, two patients dropped out from the fixed-on-2 group and one from the fixed-on-4 group. No implant failure or prosthetic failure occurred. A total of 12 fixed-on-2 patients were affected by one complication each vs 13 fixed-on-4 patients. There were no statistically significant differences for complications between groups (difference in proportion = -0.03; 95% CI -29 to 0.22; P [Fisher's exact test] =1.000). There were no statistically significant differences for marginal peri-implant bone loss between the two groups (mean difference = 0.14; CI 95% -0.17 to 0.45; P [ANCOVA] = 0.356), with both groups losing marginal bone in a statistically significant way (1.70 mm for fixed-on-2 implants and 1.56 mm for fixed-on-4 implants). There were statistically significant differences between the two centres, with more bone being lost for the Bologna centre (2.18 vs 1.13 mm; P (ANCOVA) < 0.001). Up to 3 years after loading, these preliminary results suggest that immediately loaded mandibular cross-arch fixed prostheses can be supported by only two dental implants. Longer follow-ups (about 10 years) are needed to properly evaluate this therapeutic option. Conflict of interest statement: This study was completely self

  3. 26. DETAIL OF SOUTH CANTILEVER FIXED BEARING AT PIER No. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. DETAIL OF SOUTH CANTILEVER FIXED BEARING AT PIER No. 5 AND CONNECTION L-16, LOOKING NORTHEAST - Jackson's Ferry Bridge, Route 52 over New River, 6.3 miles south of Route 94, Austinville, Wythe County, VA

  4. Immediate loading of 2 (all-on-2) versus 4 (all-on-4) implants placed with a flapless technique supporting mandibular cross-arch fixed prostheses: preliminary results from a pilot randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Cannizzaro, Gioacchino; Felice, Pietro; Soardi, Elisa; Ferri, Vittorio; Leone, Michele; Esposito, Marco

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical outcome of 2 implants versus 4 implants placed flapless in fully edentulous mandibles and immediately restored with metal-resin screw-retained cross-arch prostheses. Sixty patients from two different centres were randomised: 30 to the allon- 2 group and 30 to the all-on-4 group. To be immediately loaded, implants had to be inserted with a minimum torque of 40 Ncm. Outcome measures were prosthesis and implant failures, and biological and biomechanical complications. Flaps were raised in 18 patients. Two implants in 2 patients did not reach the planned insertion torque and were immediately replaced by larger diameter ones. Four months after loading, no drop-out or implant failure occurred. One biomechanical complication occurred in the all-on-2 group versus 4 in the all-on-4 group. There were no statistically significant differences between groups for complications. There were no differences between centres. These very preliminary results, just 4 months after loading, suggest that immediately loaded mandibular cross-arch fixed dental prostheses can be supported by only 2 dental implants. Longer follow-ups (around 10 years) are needed to understand whether cross-arch mandibular prostheses can be successfully supported by only 2 dental implants.

  5. Immediate loading of two (fixed-on-2) versus three (fixed-on-3) implants placed flapless supporting cross-arch fixed prostheses: One-year results from a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Cannizzaro, Gioacchino; Loi, Ignazio; Viola, Paolo; Ferri, Vittorio; Leone, Michele; Trullenque-Eriksson, Anna; Esposito, Marco

    To evaluate the outcome of two (fixed-on-2 = FO2) versus three (fixed-on-3 = FO3) implants placed flapless in fully edentulous jaws and immediately restored with metal-resin screw-retained crossarch prostheses. Forty edentulous or to be rendered edentulous patients (20 in the maxilla and 20 in the mandible) were randomised to the FO2 group (20 patients: 10 in the maxilla and 10 in the mandible) and to the FO3 group (20 patients: 10 in the maxilla and 10 in the mandible) according to a parallel group design. To be immediately loaded, implants had to be inserted with a minimum torque of 60 Ncm. Outcome measures were prosthesis and implant failures, complications and periimplant marginal bone level changes evaluated up to 1-year post-loading. Flaps were raised in four patients and two prostheses were loaded early at 8 weeks in the FO2 group. One year after loading no dropout or implant failure occurred, however one FO2 maxillary prosthesis had to be remade because of repeated screw-loosening (risk difference = 0.05; 95% CI: -0.05 to 0.15; Fisher's exact test P = 1.000). Three FO2 patients were affected by complications versus five FO3 patients (risk difference = -0.1; 95% CI: -0.35 to 0.15; Fisher's exact test; P = 0.695). There were no statistically significant differences for prosthetic failures and complications between groups. There were no statistically significant differences for marginal peri-implant bone levels between the two groups (estimate of the difference = 0.031 mm; 95% Cl: -0.22 to 0.28; P (ancova) = 0.803), with both groups losing marginal bone in a statistically significant way (0.27 mm for FO2 patients and 0.24 mm for FO3 patients). These preliminary results suggest that immediately loaded cross-arch prostheses can be supported by only two or three dental implants at least up to 1-year post-loading. Longer follow-ups are needed to properly evaluate both these therapeutic options.

  6. Immediate loading of fixed cross-arch prostheses supported by flapless-placed supershort or long implants: 1-year results from a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Cannizzaro, Gioacchino; Felice, Pietro; Buti, Jacopo; Leone, Michele; Ferri, Vittorio; Esposito, Marco

    2015-01-01

    To compare the outcome of cross-arch prostheses supported either by supershort (5 mm) or long (11.5 mm) implants, placed flapless and immediately restored with metal-resin screw-retained cross-arch prostheses. Thirty patients with edentulous (or to be rendered edentulous) mandibles and 30 with edentulous maxillas, who had sufficient bone to allow the placement of four and six implants respectively, which were at least 11.5 mm-long, were randomised according to a parallel group design into 2 equal groups, where they received either 5 mm or 11.5 mm-long implants at one centre. Implants with a diameter of 5 mm, were to be placed flapless with an insertion torque of at least 50 Ncm. Mandibles received four implants between the mental foramina. Implants were to be immediately loaded with metal-resin-definitive prostheses on the same day of implant placement. Patients were followed up to 1 year after loading and the outcome measures were: prosthesis and implant failures, complications, and peri-implant marginal bone level changes. No patients dropped-out. Two prostheses were remade, one on short maxillary implants and one on long mandibular implants. Two 5 mm maxillary implants which did not achieve 50 Ncm torque in soft bone of one patient, but were immediately loaded anyway, failed after 3 weeks compared to one mandibular 11.5 mm-long implant that failed after 60 days. Two complications occurred in each group. There were no statistically significant differences for prosthesis failures, implant failures and complications. Patients with mandibular short implants lost on average 0.08 mm of peri-implant bone at 1 year and patients with long mandibular implants lost 0.51 mm. Patients with short maxillary implants lost on average 0.15 mm of peri-implant bone at 1 year and patients with long maxillary implants lost 0.62 mm. Short implants showed less bone loss when compared to long implants and the differences up to 1 year were statistically significant both in maxillae (mean

  7. Immediate loading of two flapless placed mandibular implants supporting cross-arch fixed prostheses: A 5-year follow-up prospective single cohort study.

    PubMed

    Cannizzaro, Gioacchino; Felice, Pietro; Lazzarini, Matteo; Ferri, Vittorio; Leone, Michele; Trullenque-Eriksson, Anna; Esposito, Marco

    To evaluate the clinical outcome of two implants placed flapless in fully edentulous mandibles and immediately restored with metal-resin screw-retained cross-arch prostheses 5 years after loading. Eighty consecutive patients were recruited. To be immediately loaded, implants had to be inserted with a minimum torque of 80 Ncm. Forty-six laser-welded titanium and 34 cast silver-palladium frameworks with resin teeth were initially delivered within 8 and 48 h, respectively. Outcome measures, evaluated by two independent assessors included prosthesis and implant failures, complications, marginal bone level changes, implant stability quotient (ISQ) values and patient satisfaction. Five years after loading one patient did not return to the control and 10 prostheses were remade. Two implants failed early in two patients, but they were successfully replaced. Thirty-six complications occurred in 28 patients but were all successfully treated. After 5 years, mean marginal bone loss was 0.69 mm, mean ISQ values decreased from 75.4 to 73.8, and all patients were fully satisfied with the therapy. A post-hoc comparison between the outcome of laser-welded and cast frameworks showed that laser-welded frameworks were affected by significantly more complications (19 patients out of 46 and 6 patients out of 34, respectively; difference in proportion = 0.23, 95% CI: 0.03 to 0.43; Pearson's chi-square test, P = 0.032), therefore such a framework construction should be considered as a long-term temporary prosthesis and not a definitive prosthesis. Immediately loaded mandibular cross-arch prostheses can be supported by only two implants up to 5 years, if made with a robust cast framework. Longer follow-ups (around 10 years) are still needed to know the prognosis of this treatment modality.

  8. Five-Year Results of a Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Patients Rehabilitated with Immediately Loaded Maxillary Cross-Arch Fixed Dental Prosthesis Supported by Four or Six Implants Placed Using Guided Surgery.

    PubMed

    Tallarico, Marco; Meloni, Silvio Mario; Canullo, Luigi; Caneva, Martina; Polizzi, Giovanni

    2016-10-01

    To compare the 5-year clinical and radiological outcomes of patients rehabilitated with four or six implants placed using guided surgery and immediate function concept. Forty patients randomly received four (All-on-4) or six (All-on-6) immediately loaded implants, placed using guided surgery, to support a cross-arch fixed dental prosthesis. Outcome measures were survival rates of implants and prostheses, complications, peri-implant marginal bone loss, and periodontal parameters. No drop-out occurred. Seven implants failed at the 5-year follow-up examination: six in the All-on-6 group (5%) and one in the All-on-4 group (1.25%), with no statistically significant differences (p = .246). No prosthetic failure occurred. Both group experienced some technical and biologic complications with no statistically significant differences between groups (p = .501). All-on-4 treatment concept demonstrated a trend of more complications during the entire follow-up period. A trend of more implant failure was experienced for the All-on-6 treatment concept. Marginal bone loss (MBL) from baseline to the 5-year follow-up was not statistically different between All-on-4 (1.71 ± 0.42 mm) and All-on-6 (1.51 ± 0.36 mm) groups (p = .12). For periodontal parameters, there were no differences between groups (p > .05). Both approaches may represent a predictable treatment option for the rehabilitation of complete edentulous patients in the medium term. Longer randomized controlled studies are needed to confirm these results. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Clinical performance of cantilevered fixed dental prostheses abutments in the shortened dental arch.

    PubMed

    Sasse, Martin; Kern, Matthias; Marré, Birgit; Walter, Michael H

    2014-03-01

    This article is part of a randomized clinical trial on different treatments in the shortened dental arch (SDA). It focused on the abutment tooth prognosis with cantilevered fixed dental prostheses (CFDPs). Sixty-two patients with a bilaterally SDA up to the first or second premolar in the mandible or maxilla were evaluated. In 57 of 124 quadrants, second premolars were replaced by a CFDP (cantilever group). In the remaining 67 quadrants, a natural second premolar was present and thus no need for a CFDP was given (non-cantilever group). Patients were recalled annually up to 5 years. The mean observation period was 56.3 months (min. 3.0, max. 76.2, SD 16.1). Kaplan-Meier survival rates concerning tooth loss and tooth fracture were 93.9%/94.0% in the cantilever group and 91.9%/92.8% in the non-cantilever group. Differences between both groups were not significant. The survival rate concerning loss of retention of CFDP retainers was 92.1% in the cantilever group. After 5 years of clinical service, CFDPs for the replacement of the second premolar showed no negative impact on the abutment tooth prognosis. Cantilevered fixed dental prostheses present a viable treatment option in the shortened dental arch without compromising the medium-term abutment tooth prognosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Assessment of various factors for feasibility of fixed cantilever bridge: a review study.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ashu; Rahul, G R; Poduval, Soorya T; Shetty, Karunakar

    2012-01-01

    Cantilever fixed partial dentures are defined as having one or more abutments at one end of the prosthesis while the other end is unsupported. Much controversy without documentary evidence has surrounded this prosthesis. Despite negative arguments, the cantilever prosthesis has been used extensively by the clinicians. If used nonjudiciously without following proper guidelines these might lead to some complications. Although complications may be an indication that clinical failure has occurred, this is not typically the case. It is also possible that complications may reflect substandard care. Apart from the substandard care, the unique arrangement of the abutments and pontic also accounts for the prime disadvantage: the creation of a class I lever system. When the cantilevered pontic is placed under occlusal function, forces are placed on the abutments. There are various criteria and factors necessary for a successful cantilever fixed partial denture (FPD). The purpose of this paper is to discuss briefly various factors involved in the planning of a cantilever fixed partial denture.

  11. Assessment of Various Factors for Feasibility of Fixed Cantilever Bridge: A Review Study

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ashu; Rahul, G. R.; Poduval, Soorya T.; Shetty, Karunakar

    2012-01-01

    Cantilever fixed partial dentures are defined as having one or more abutments at one end of the prosthesis while the other end is unsupported. Much controversy without documentary evidence has surrounded this prosthesis. Despite negative arguments, the cantilever prosthesis has been used extensively by the clinicians. If used nonjudiciously without following proper guidelines these might lead to some complications. Although complications may be an indication that clinical failure has occurred, this is not typically the case. It is also possible that complications may reflect substandard care. Apart from the substandard care, the unique arrangement of the abutments and pontic also accounts for the prime disadvantage: the creation of a class I lever system. When the cantilevered pontic is placed under occlusal function, forces are placed on the abutments. There are various criteria and factors necessary for a successful cantilever fixed partial denture (FPD). The purpose of this paper is to discuss briefly various factors involved in the planning of a cantilever fixed partial denture. PMID:22461987

  12. Implant-supported fixed cantilever prosthesis in partially edentulous jaws: a cohort prospective study.

    PubMed

    Romeo, Eugenio; Tomasi, Cristiano; Finini, Igor; Casentini, Paolo; Lops, Diego

    2009-11-01

    Reconstructive procedures present a higher rate of biological costs due to the necessity of bone harvest and grafts, use of semipermeable barriers etc. On the hand, implant supported cantilever prostheses could allow a simpler rehabilitation procedure. The aim of the present study was to assess the clinical outcome of patients treated with implant-supported fixed partial dentures (FPD) with cantilever after a mean follow-up time of 8 years. The study included 45 consecutive partially edentulous patients treated between January 1994 and August 2006 with 59 partial cantilever fixed prostheses supported by 116 ITI implants. The primary outcome variable considered was the presence of complications at the subject and bridge level; the secondary outcome variable was marginal bone loss (MBL). The frequency of complications was analyzed according to cantilever location and opposite dentition and tested by Fisher's exact test. A multilevel regression model was constructed to analyze the factors influencing MBL with three levels: subject as the highest, and then implant and site. During the follow-up period, 11 implants showed a bone loss exceeding the limit for success, out of which two implants showed an infection of the peri-implant tissue. After an average observation of 8.2 years of cantilever prostheses loading, the implant success and survival rates were 90.5% and 100%, respectively. Besides, the prosthetic success and survival rate were 57.7% and 100%, respectively. None of the predictors included in the multilevel model presented a significant impact on the bone loss between baseline and the follow-up examination. The authors concluded that the prognosis of implant-supported FPDs and marginal bone loss at implants were not influenced by the position or the length of the cantilever, the location of the bridge and type of opposite dentition. Implant-supported fixed cantilever prosthesis can be considered a suitable treatment choice.

  13. Long-term evaluation of cantilevered versus fixed-fixed resin-bonded fixed partial dentures for missing maxillary incisors.

    PubMed

    Botelho, Michael G; Chan, Alex W K; Leung, Nic C H; Lam, Walter Y H

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate the long-term longevity and patient-reported outcomes of two-unit cantilevered (CL2) and three-unit fixed-fixed (FF3) resin-bonded fixed partial dentures (RBFPDs) for the replacement of a maxillary permanent incisor. Twenty-eight subjects were randomly assigned to receive either a CL2 or FF3 RBFPD placed by one operator. Prosthesis longevity was determined by clinical examination and history. Success was defined as absence of complications requiring intervention and survival as retention of the original prosthesis in mouth. Subjects' satisfaction was assessed using visual analogue scale (VAS) and oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) using Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-49). Outcomes were analysed with t-test/Mann-Whitney U test, chi-square and log-rank test at significance level α=0.05. Twenty-two subjects were reviewed. Thirteen of fifteen CL2 and ten of fourteen FF3 RBFPDs were examined (79.3 percent response rate) with a mean service life of 216.5±20.8months. All CL2 RBFPDs survived with no complications while only 10 percent of FF3 experienced no complications and only 50 percent of them survived (both P=0.000). CL2 had a significantly better success and survival rate than FF3 (P=0.000 and P=0.009, respectively). There was no significant difference in subjects' satisfaction and OHRQoL apart from CL2 group subjects had a higher satisfaction in cleaning of the prosthesis (84.1±13.6) than FF3 group (72.6±11.7) (P=0.05). Two-unit cantilevered RBFPDs were observed to have a significantly better success and survival than the FF3 design for the replacement of a maxillary incisor. Good patient-reported outcomes have been found for RBFPDs in single-tooth replacement in aesthetic zone. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Survival and complication rates of implant-supported fixed partial dentures with cantilevers: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Zurdo, José; Romão, Cristina; Wennström, Jan L

    2009-09-01

    The objective of the present systematic review was to analyze the potential effect of incorporation of cantilever extensions on the survival rate of implant-supported fixed partial dental prostheses (FPDPs) and the incidence of technical and biological complications, as reported in longitudinal studies with at least 5 years of follow-up. A MEDLINE search was conducted up to and including November 2008 for longitudinal studies with a mean follow-up period of at least 5 years. Two reviewers performed screening and data abstraction independently. Prosthesis-based data on survival/failure rate, technical complications (prosthesis-related problems, implant loss) and biological complications (marginal bone loss) were analyzed. The search provided 103 titles with abstract. Full-text analysis was performed of 12 articles, out of which three were finally included. Two of the studies had a prospective or retrospective case-control design, whereas the third was a prospective cohort study. The 5-year survival rate of cantilever FPDPs varied between 89.9% and 92.7% (weighted mean 91.9%), with implant fracture as the main cause for failures. The corresponding survival rate for FPDPs without cantilever extensions was 96.3-96.2% (weighted mean 95.8%). Technical complications related to the supra-constructions in the three included studies were reported to occur at a frequency of 13-26% (weighted mean 20.3%) for cantilever FPDPs compared with 0-12% (9.7%) for non-cantilever FPDPs. The most common complications were minor porcelain fractures and bridge-screw loosening. For cantilever FPDPs, the 5-year event-free survival rate varied between 66.7% and 79.2% (weighted mean 71.7%) and between 83.1% and 96.3% (weighted mean 85.9%) for non-cantilever FPDPs. No statistically significant differences were reported with regard to peri-implant bone-level change between the two prosthetic groups, either at the prosthesis or at the implant level. Data on implant-supported FPDPs with cantilever

  15. [Clinical application of anterior all-ceramic cantilevered resin-bonded fixed partial dentures].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Nie, Yu-Guang; Xie, Qiu-Fei

    2008-04-01

    To explore a fabricating method of incisor all-ceramic cantilevered resin-bonded fixed partial denture (RBFPD) and evaluate their clinical performances. All-ceramic cantilevered RBFPDs were made to replace 1 missing incisor in each of 10 patients. The RBFPDs with lingual surface retainer were made of Empress II ceramic materials and luted with resin cement. The prostheses were examined at 2 weeks, 1 year and 2 years after denture insertion. Examining criteria included: fracture of bridge, marginal adaptation, secondary caries, and color match. The average follow-up period was 14. 7 months. No framework fracture and retainer debonding were observed and marginal adaptation was evaluated as good. Seven RBFPDs matched the color of adjacent teeth, and other three did not match well but within the acceptable range of tooth shade difference. The results of this preliminary study suggest that the clinical performances of all-ceramic cantilevered RBFPDs are good in short-term evaluation, but their long-term success needs to be further investigated.

  16. Treatment Outcomes of Cantilever Fixed Partial Dentures on Vital Abutment Teeth: A Retrospective Analysis.

    PubMed

    Rehmann, Peter; Podhorsky, Anke; Wöstmann, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    This retrospective clinical study evaluated the long-term outcomes of cantilever fixed partial dentures (CFPDs) and the factors influencing their survival probability. The study is based on a convenience sample of 57 patients who received 71 CFPDs on a total of 176 vital abutment teeth. The mean survival time of the CFPDs was calculated using a Kaplan-Meier estimate. The following variables were analyzed as covariates of the survival function (logrank test, P < .05): sex, denture location, number and distribution (Kennedy Class) of the abutment teeth, dentition in the opposing arch (removable dentures, fixed partial dentures, or natural dentition), position of the cantilever unit (mesial or distal), and participation in follow-up visits. The mean observation period was 3.2 ± 2.8 years (maximum 10.7 years). During the observation period, 22.5% (n = 16) of the CFPDs ceased functioning. The calculated outcome probability was 93.0% after 5 years and 84.5% after 8 years. The number of abutment teeth was the only parameter that significantly (P < .05) impacted this probability. The survival rate of CFPDs on vital abutment teeth is comparable to that of conventional fixed partial dentures. Thus, CFPDs on vital abutments are an acceptable alternative to removable dentures.

  17. Effect of cantilever length and alloy framework on the stress distribution in peri-implant area of cantilevered implant-supported fixed partial dentures.

    PubMed

    Suedam, Valdey; Moretti Neto, Rafael Tobias; Sousa, Edson Antonio Capello; Rubo, José Henrique

    2016-04-01

    Because many mechanical variables are present in the oral cavity, the proper load transfer between the prosthesis and the bone is important for treatment planning and for the longevity of the implant-supported fixed partial denture. Objectives To verify the stress generated on the peri-implant area of cantilevered implant-supported fixed partial dentures and the potential effects of such variable. Material and Methods A U-shaped polyurethane model simulating the mandibular bone containing two implants (Ø 3.75 mm) was used. Six groups were formed according to the alloy's framework (CoCr or PdAg) and the point of load application (5 mm, 10 mm and 15 mm of cantilever arm). A 300 N load was applied in pre-determined reference points. The tension generated on the mesial, lingual, distal and buccal sides of the peri-implant regions was assessed using strain gauges. Results Two-way ANOVA and Tukey statistical tests were applied showing significant differences (p<0.05) between the groups. Pearson correlation test (p<0.05) was applied showing positive correlations between the increase of the cantilever arm and the deformation of the peri-implant area. Conclusions This report demonstrated the CoCr alloy shows larger compression values compared to the PdAg alloy for the same distances of cantilever. The point of load application influences the deformation on the peri-implant area, increasing in accordance with the increase of the lever arm.

  18. Effect of cantilever length and alloy framework on the stress distribution in peri-implant area of cantilevered implant-supported fixed partial dentures

    PubMed Central

    SUEDAM, Valdey; MORETTI, Rafael Tobias; SOUSA, Edson Antonio Capello; RUBO, José Henrique

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Because many mechanical variables are present in the oral cavity, the proper load transfer between the prosthesis and the bone is important for treatment planning and for the longevity of the implant-supported fixed partial denture. Objectives To verify the stress generated on the peri-implant area of cantilevered implant-supported fixed partial dentures and the potential effects of such variable. Material and Methods A U-shaped polyurethane model simulating the mandibular bone containing two implants (Ø 3.75 mm) was used. Six groups were formed according to the alloy’s framework (CoCr or PdAg) and the point of load application (5 mm, 10 mm and 15 mm of cantilever arm). A 300 N load was applied in pre-determined reference points. The tension generated on the mesial, lingual, distal and buccal sides of the peri-implant regions was assessed using strain gauges. Results Two-way ANOVA and Tukey statistical tests were applied showing significant differences (p<0.05) between the groups. Pearson correlation test (p<0.05) was applied showing positive correlations between the increase of the cantilever arm and the deformation of the peri-implant area. Conclusions This report demonstrated the CoCr alloy shows larger compression values compared to the PdAg alloy for the same distances of cantilever. The point of load application influences the deformation on the peri-implant area, increasing in accordance with the increase of the lever arm. PMID:27119758

  19. Performance of zirconia ceramic cantilever fixed dental prostheses: 3-year results from a prospective, randomized, controlled pilot study.

    PubMed

    Zenthöfer, Andreas; Ohlmann, Brigitte; Rammelsberg, Peter; Bömicke, Wolfgang

    2015-07-01

    Little is known about the clinical performance of ceramic cantilever fixed dental prostheses on natural teeth. The purpose of this randomized controlled pilot study was to evaluate the clinical performance of ceramic and metal ceramic cantilever fixed dental prostheses (CFDPs) after 3 years of service. Twenty-one participants were randomly allocated to 2 treatment groups. Participants in the ceramic (ZC) group (n=11) each received 1 CFDP made of yttria-stabilized, tetragonal zirconia polycrystal; the others (n=10) were fitted with a metal ceramic (MC) CFDP. All CFDPs were retained by 2 complete crown abutments and replaced 1 tooth. The clinical target variables were survival, incidence of complications, probing pocket depth (PPD), probing attachment level (PAL), plaque index (PI), gingival index (GI), and esthetic performance as rated by the participants. The United States Public Health Service (USPHS) criteria were used to evaluate chipping, retention, color, marginal integrity, and secondary caries. Descriptive statistics and nonparametric analyses were applied to the target variables in the 2 groups. The esthetic performance of the CFDPs was also visualized by using a pyramid comparison. The overall survival of the CFDPs was 100% in both groups. During the 3-year study, 6 clinically relevant complications requiring aftercare were observed among 5 participants (4 in the ZC group and 2 in the MC group). Changes in the PI, GI, PPD, and PAL of the abutment teeth were similar for both groups (P>.05). The participants regarded the esthetic performance of ZC-CFDPs and MC-CFDPs as satisfactory. Within the 3-year observation period, the clinical performance of MC-FDPs and ZC-FDPs was acceptable. More extensive research with larger sample sizes is encouraged, however, to confirm the evaluation of the survival of Y-TZP hand-veneered cantilever FPDs. Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Implant-supported fixed cantilever prosthesis: the impact on bone stress deformity.

    PubMed

    Gvetadze, R Sh; Fedorovsky, A N; Kozlova, L S; Shirokov, Yu Yu

    2016-01-01

    Jaw fragment with complete absence of 3 teeth in the chewing area was simulated with masticatory loads corresponding to different types of antagonists: full dentures, partial dentures, intact teeth, implant-refained restavations. Simulated consoled elements of different lengths and sizes of dental implants. The analysis of the stress-deformation state of the teeth construction in the ANSYS program. As a result, it was found that with increasing length of the cantilever element 2 times - stress in the bone grows almost linearly. By reducing the diameter of the implant - is quadratic.

  1. Three-dimensional finite element analysis of zirconia all-ceramic cantilevered fixed partial dentures with different framework designs.

    PubMed

    Miura, Shoko; Kasahara, Shin; Yamauchi, Shinobu; Egusa, Hiroshi

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study were: to perform stress analyses using three-dimensional finite element analysis methods; to analyze the mechanical stress of different framework designs; and to investigate framework designs that will provide for the long-term stability of both cantilevered fixed partial dentures (FPDs) and abutment teeth. An analysis model was prepared for three units of cantilevered FPDs that assume a missing mandibular first molar. Four types of framework design (Design 1, basic type; Design 2, framework width expanded buccolingually by 2 mm; Design 3, framework height expanded by 0.5 mm to the occlusal surface side from the end abutment to the connector area; and Design 4, a combination of Designs 2 and 3) were created. Two types of framework material (yttrium-oxide partially stabilized zirconia and a high precious noble metal gold alloy) and two types of abutment material (dentin and brass) were used. In the framework designs, Design 1 exhibited the highest maximum principal stress value for both zirconia and gold alloy. In the abutment tooth, Design 3 exhibited the highest maximum principal stress value for all abutment teeth. In the present study, Design 4 (the design with expanded framework height and framework width) could contribute to preventing the concentration of stress and protecting abutment teeth. © 2017 Eur J Oral Sci.

  2. Three-Dimensional Finite Element Analysis of Anterior Two-Unit Cantilever Resin-Bonded Fixed Dental Prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Shinya, Akikazu; Lassila, Lippo V. J.; Vallittu, Pekka K.; Kleverlaan, Cornelis J.; Feilzer, Albert J.; De Moor, Roeland J. G.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of different framework materials on biomechanical behaviour of anterior two-unit cantilever resin-bonded fixed dental prostheses (RBFDPs). A three-dimensional finite element model of a two-unit cantilever RBFDP replacing a maxillary lateral incisor was created. Five framework materials were evaluated: direct fibre-reinforced composite (FRC-Z250), indirect fibre-reinforced composite (FRC-ES), gold alloy (M), glass ceramic (GC), and zirconia (ZI). Finite element analysis was performed and stress distribution was evaluated. A similar stress pattern, with stress concentrations in the connector area, was observed in RBFDPs for all materials. Maximal principal stress showed a decreasing order: ZI > M > GC > FRC-ES > FRC-Z250. The maximum displacement of RBFDPs was higher for FRC-Z250 and FRC-ES than for M, GC, and ZI. FE analysis depicted differences in location of the maximum stress at the luting cement interface between materials. For FRC-Z250 and FRC-ES, the maximum stress was located in the upper part of the proximal area of the retainer, whereas, for M, GC, and ZI, the maximum stress was located at the cervical outline of the retainer. The present study revealed differences in biomechanical behaviour between all RBFDPs. The general observation was that a RBFDP made of FRC provided a more favourable stress distribution. PMID:25879077

  3. Bone level change at implant-supported fixed partial dentures with and without cantilever extension after 5 years in function.

    PubMed

    Wennström, Jan; Zurdo, Jose; Karlsson, Stig; Ekestubbe, Annika; Gröndahl, Kerstin; Lindhe, Jan

    2004-12-01

    The aim of this study was to retrospectively analyze whether the inclusion of cantilever extensions increased the amount of marginal bone loss at free-standing, implant-supported, fixed partial dentures (FPDs) over a 5-year period of functional loading. The patient material comprised 45 periodontally treated, partially dentate patients with a total of 50 free-standing FPDs supported by implants of the Astra Tech System. Following FPD placement (baseline) the patients were enrolled in an individually designed supportive care program. A set of criteria was collected at baseline to characterize the FPDs. The primary outcome variable was change in peri-implant bone level from the time of FPD placement to the 5-year follow-up examination. The comparison between FPDs with and without cantilevers was performed at three levels: FPD level, implant level, and surface level. Bivariate analysis was performed by the use of the Mann-Whitney U-test and stepwise regression analysis was utilized to evaluate the potential influence of confounding factors on the change in peri-implant bone level. The overall mean marginal bone loss for the implant-supported FPDs after 5 years in function was 0.4 mm (SD, 0.76). The bone level change at FPDs placed in the maxilla was significantly greater than that for FPDs in the mandible (0.6 versus 0.2 mm; p<0.05). No statistically significant differences were found with regard to peri-implant bone level change over the 5 years between FPDs with and without cantilevers at any of the levels of comparisons. The multivariate analysis revealed that the variables jaw of treatment and smoking had a significant influence on peri-implant bone level change on the FPD level, but not on the implant or surface levels. The model explained only 10% of the observed variance in the bone level change. The study failed to demonstrate that the presence of cantilever extensions in an FPD had an effect on peri-implant bone loss.

  4. Prosthetic rehabilitation following lateral resection of the mandible with a long cantilever implant-supported fixed prosthesis: A 3-year clinical report.

    PubMed

    Maroulakos, Georgios; Nagy, William W; Ahmed, Ayman; Artopoulou, Ioli I

    2017-04-28

    This clinical report describes the prosthetic management of the surgical reconstruction of a patient after mandibular resection. Complete oral rehabilitation was achieved with a maxillary complete denture and a mandibular implant-supported fixed prosthesis with a custom titanium framework and a long unilateral cantilever. Copyright © 2017 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Minimally invasive preparation and design of a cantilevered, all-ceramic, resin-bonded, fixed partial denture in the esthetic zone: a case report and descriptive review.

    PubMed

    Barwacz, Christopher A; Hernandez, Marcela; Husemann, R Henry

    2014-01-01

    Resin-bonded, fixed partial dentures have the potential to offer a minimally invasive, fixed-prosthetic approach to tooth replacement in patients who may not be candidates for implant therapy. However, traditional preparation protocols often recommend extensive preparation designs on two abutment teeth, thereby potentially compromising the long-term health of the adjacent abutments and often resulting in unilateral debonding of one of the retainers in the long term. In light of advances in high-strength ceramic systems capable of being reliably bonded to tooth structure and offering improved esthetic outcomes, as well as clinical and case-series research demonstrating improved survivability of cantilevered resin-bonded fixed partial dentures, new preparation designs and methodologies can be advocated. The following case report demonstrates the clinical application of sonoabrasion, coupled with a dental operating microscope, to minimally prepare a single abutment for a cantilevered, all-ceramic resin-bonded fixed partial denture. Relevant historic and contemporary literature regarding double versus single-retainer resin-bonded fixed partial dentures are reviewed, as well as clinical conditions that are most favorable for such restorations to have an optimal long-term prognosis. If appropriate clinical conditions exist, a cantilevered, all-ceramic, resin-bonded, fixed partial denture may be the most conservative means of tooth replacement in a patient who is not a candidate for an endosseous implant. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Inlay-retained cantilever fixed dental prostheses to substitute a single premolar: impact of zirconia framework design after dynamic loading.

    PubMed

    Shahin, Ramez; Tannous, Fahed; Kern, Matthias

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this in-vitro study was to evaluate the influence of the framework design on the durability of inlay-retained cantilever fixed dental prostheses (IR-FDPs), made from zirconia ceramic, after artificial ageing. Forty-eight caries-free human premolars were prepared as abutments for all-ceramic cantilevered IR-FDPs using six framework designs: occlusal-distal (OD) inlay, OD inlay with an oral retainer wing, OD inlay with two retainer wings, mesial-occlusal-distal (MOD) inlay, MOD inlay with an oral retainer ring, and veneer partial coping with a distal box (VB). Zirconia IR-FDPs were fabricated via computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology. The bonding surfaces were air-abraded (50 μm alumina/0.1 MPa), and the frameworks were bonded with adhesive resin cement. Specimens were stored for 150 d in a 37°C water bath during which they were thermocycled between 5 and 55°C for 37,500 cycles; thereafter, they were exposed to 600,000 cycles of dynamic loading with a 5-kg load in a chewing simulator. All surviving specimens were loaded onto the pontic and tested until failure using a universal testing machine. The mean failure load of the groups ranged from 260.8 to 746.7 N. Statistical analysis showed that both MOD groups exhibited significantly higher failure loads compared with the other groups (i.e. the three OD groups and the VB group) and that there was no significant difference in the failure load among the OD groups and the VB group. In conclusion, zirconia IR-FDPs with a modified design exhibited promising failure modes.

  7. [Influence of retainer design on fixation strength of resin-bonded glass fiber reinforced composite fixed cantilever dentures].

    PubMed

    Petrikas, O A; Voroshilin, Iu G; Petrikas, I V

    2013-01-01

    Fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) fixed partial dentures (FPD) have become an accepted part of the restorative dentist's armamentarium. The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the influence of retainer design on the strength of two-unit cantilever resin-bonded glass FRC-FPDs. Four retainer designs were tested: a dual wing, a dual wing + horizontal groove, a dual wing + occlusal rest and a step-box. Of each design on 7 human mandibular molars, FRC-FPDs of a premolar size were produced. The FRC framework was made of resin Revolution (Kerr) impregnated glass fibers (GlasSpan, GlasSpan) and veneered with hybrid resin composite (Charisma, Kulzer). Revolution (Kerr) was used as resin luting cement. FRC-FPDs were loaded to failure in a universal testing machine. T (Student's)-test was used to evaluate the data. The four designs were analyzed with finite element analysis (FEA) to reveal the stress distribution within the tooth/restoration complex. Significantly lower fracture strengths were observed with inlay-retained FPDs (step-box: 172±11 N) compared to wing-retained FPDs (p<0.05) (a dual wing + horizontal groove 222±9 N). The highest fracture strengths were observed with dual wing + occlusal rest FPDs: 250±10 N compared to inlay-retained FPDs (p<0.001) and wing-retained FPDs (p<0.001). FEA showed more favorable stress distributions within the tooth/restoration complex for dual wing retainers+ occlusal rest FPDs. There was stress concentration around connectors and retainers near connectors. A dual-wing retainer with occlusal rest is the optimal design for replacement of a single premolar by means of a two-unit cantilever FRC-FPDs.

  8. INFLUENCE OF DIFFERENT CANTILEVER EXTENSIONS AND GLASS OR POLYARAMID REINFORCEMENT FIBERS ON FRACTURE STRENGTH OF IMPLANT-SUPPORTED TEMPORARY FIXED PROSTHESIS

    PubMed Central

    Colán Guzmán, Paola; de Freitas, Fernando Furtado Antunes; Ferreira, Paulo Martins; de Freitas, César Antunes; Reis, Kátia Rodrigues

    2008-01-01

    In long-term oral rehabilitation treatments, resistance of provisional crowns is a very important factor, especially in cases of an extensive edentulous distal space. The aim of this laboratorial study was to evaluate an acrylic resin cantilever-type prosthesis regarding the flexural strength of its in-balance portion as a function of its extension variation and reinforcement by two types of fibers (glass and polyaramid), considering that literature is not conclusive on this subject. Each specimen was composed by 3 total crowns at its mesial portion, each one attached to an implant component (abutment), while the distal portion (cantilever) had two crowns. Each specimen was constructed by injecting acrylic resin into a two-part silicone matrix placed on a metallic base. In each specimen, the crowns were fabricated with either acrylic resin (control group) or acrylic resin reinforced by glass (Fibrante, Angelus) or polyaramide (Kevlar 49, Du Pont) fibers. Compression load was applied on the cantilever, in a point located 7, 14 or 21 mm from the distal surface of the nearest crown with abutment, to simulate different extensions. The specimen was fixed on the metallic base and the force was applied until fracture in a universal test machine. Each one of the 9 sub-groups was composed by 10 specimens. Flexural strength means (in kgf) for the distances of 7, 14 and 21 mm were, respectively, 28.07, 8.27 and 6.39 for control group, 31.89, 9.18 and 5.16 for Kevlar 49 and 30.90, 9.31 and 6.86 for Fibrante. Data analysis ANOVA showed statistically significant difference (p<0.05) only regarding cantilever extension. Tukey's test detected significantly higher flexural strength for the 7 mm-distance, followed by 14 and 21 mm. Fracture was complete only on specimens of non-reinforced groups. PMID:19089201

  9. Cantilever biosensors.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Jürgen

    2008-07-01

    This review will provide a general introduction to the field of cantilever biosensors by discussing the basic principles and the basic technical background necessary to understand and evaluate this class of sensors. Microfabricated cantilever sensors respond to changes in their environment or changes on their surface with a mechanical bending in the order of nanometers which can easily be detected. They are able to detect pH and temperature changes, the formation of self-assembled monolayers, DNA hybridization, antibody-antigen interactions, or the adsorption of bacteria. The review will focus on the surface stress mode of microfabricated cantilever arrays and their application as biosensors in molecular life science. A general background on biosensors, an overview of the different modes of operation of cantilever sensors and some details on sensor functionalization will be given. Finally, key experiments and current theoretical efforts to describe the surface stress mode of cantilever sensors will be discussed.

  10. Compliant cantilevered micromold

    DOEpatents

    Morales, Alfredo Martin; Domeier, Linda A.; Gonzales, Marcela G.; Keifer, Patrick N.; Garino, Terry Joseph

    2006-08-15

    A compliant cantilevered three-dimensional micromold is provided. The compliant cantilevered micromold is suitable for use in the replication of cantilevered microparts and greatly simplifies the replication of such cantilevered parts. The compliant cantilevered micromold may be used to fabricate microparts using casting or electroforming techniques. When the compliant micromold is used to fabricate electroformed cantilevered parts, the micromold will also comprise an electrically conducting base formed by a porous metal substrate that is embedded within the compliant cantilevered micromold. Methods for fabricating the compliant cantilevered micromold as well as methods of replicating cantilevered microparts using the compliant cantilevered micromold are also provided.

  11. Stress Distribution in Bone and Implants in Mandibular 6-Implant-Supported Cantilevered Fixed Prosthesis: A 3D Finite Element Study.

    PubMed

    Padhye, Omkar Vinayak; Herekar, Manisha; Patil, Viraj; Mulani, Shahnawaz; Sethi, Megha; Fernandes, Aquaviva

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate by a 3-dimensional finite element analysis the load transmission to periimplant bone by a framework supported by 6 implants placed in an edentulous mandible and to compare the stress distribution for varying cantilever lengths. A computerized model of the anterior segment of a mandible with a 6-implant-supported bridge was created in software. The length of the cantilever segment was considered as 10, 15, and 20 mm. A 150 N load was applied to the terminal point of the cantilever segment, and Von Mises stresses were analyzed along implants, framework, and bone. When the cantilever length was increased from 10 to 20 mm, the stress increased 79.66% in the framework, 68.16% in implants, and 59.96% and 52.81% in cortical and cancellous bones, respectively. The greatest amount of stress was seen around the distal-most region of the distal-most implant. The framework absorbed the maximum amount of stresses followed by the implants, cortical bone, and cancellous bone. Extension of the cantilever beyond 15 mm could lead to greater stress in the lingual cortical plate, which could compromise the integrity of the implants.

  12. Single-tooth replacement in the anterior arch by means of a cantilevered IPS e.max Press veneer-retained fixed partial denture: case series of 35 patients.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qiang; Chen, Lei; Tian, Lili; Xu, Baohua

    2013-01-01

    This case series study evaluated the clinical outcomes of cantilevered veneer-retained fixed partial dentures (VRFPDs) fabricated with IPS e.max Press for single-tooth replacement in the anterior arch. A total of 35 patients were treated with VRFPDs, including 17 cases in the maxilla and 18 in the mandible. The patients were evaluated at baseline and annually from October 2005 to July 2011 for the integrity of the VRFPDs, proximal contacts, occulsal relationships, pulp vitality, and tooth mobility. The degree of satisfaction was indicated with a visual analog scale. During a mean observation time of 46.57 months, 35 VRFPDs on vital abutment teeth did not exhibit postoperative sensitivity or secondary caries. No fractures or chipping of the restorations occurred within the course of the evaluation. No patient complained of food impaction. One cantilevered pontic needed adjustment on the incisal edge due to premature contacts after the 3-year recall examination. Cantilevered IPS e.max Press VRFPDs should be considered a minimally invasive, single-tooth restorative strategy in the anterior or first premolar area. Longer observation periods are necessary before this type of restorative design can be recommended as a general conservative procedure.

  13. Immediately loaded distally cantilevered fixed mandibular prostheses supported by four implants placed in both in fresh extraction and healed sites: 2-year results from a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Krennmair, Stefan; Seemann, Rudolf; Weinländer, Michael; Krennmair, Gerald; Piehslinger, Eva

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the outcome of immediately loaded distally cantilevered mandibular full-arch prostheses according to the 'all-on-four' concept supported by implants placed in both fresh extraction and healed sites. A prospective study was conducted in 24 patients with extraction of all remaining mandibular teeth and placement of 4 implants per patient (2 mesial axial and 2 distal tilted) for full-arch mandibular restorations. Implants were inserted in fresh extraction sockets 2.3 ± 1.0 per patient and 1.7 ± 1.0 implants in healed sites. Implants placed in fresh extraction sites (n = 55) were significantly (P <0.01) more deeply inserted than implants (n = 41) placed in healed sites (peri-implant alveolar crest: +1.6 ± 0.8 mm vs +0.6 ± 0.7 mm). Patients received an immediate provisional fixed dental prosthesis and, 3 months later, a definite resin veneered prosthesis with metal framework. At the 12-and 24-month follow-up, patients were evaluated for implants and prosthesis success, for prosthodontic maintenance efforts and patient satisfaction. At both follow-up examinations, peri-implant marginal bone level, implant pocket depth, plaque, bleeding, gingival and calculus indices were evaluated and compared between implants placed in fresh extraction and healed sites. At the 24-month follow-up, no implant failed and all prostheses were stable. There were five fractures of the provisional prosthesis in 5 patients but no fracture of the definite prostheses. For the definite prostheses, 15 acrylic teeth had to be renewed/repaired (in 10 patients) and 18 patients presented the need for the implant-supported prosthesis to be rebased. Peri-implant marginal bone level after 12 and 24 months was -0.18 ± 0.20 mm and -0.40 ± 0.29 mm for all implants (P <0.001) representing bone level differences of 0.35 mm between implants placed in healed and post-extractive sites at both the 1st year (95%-CI:-0.49 to -0.20) and the 2nd year (95%-CI: -0.57 to -0.14) assessment. Plaque (1st

  14. Piezoelectric cantilever sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Wan Y. (Inventor); Shih, Wei-Heng (Inventor); Shen, Zuyan (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A piezoelectric cantilever with a non-piezoelectric, or piezoelectric tip useful as mass and viscosity sensors. The change in the cantilever mass can be accurately quantified by monitoring a resonance frequency shift of the cantilever. For bio-detection, antibodies or other specific receptors of target antigens may be immobilized on the cantilever surface, preferably on the non-piezoelectric tip. For chemical detection, high surface-area selective absorbent materials are coated on the cantilever tip. Binding of the target antigens or analytes to the cantilever surface increases the cantilever mass. Detection of target antigens or analytes is achieved by monitoring the cantilever's resonance frequency and determining the resonance frequency shift that is due to the mass of the adsorbed target antigens on the cantilever surface. The use of a piezoelectric unimorph cantilever allows both electrical actuation and electrical sensing. Incorporating a non-piezoelectric tip (14) enhances the sensitivity of the sensor. In addition, the piezoelectric cantilever can withstand damping in highly viscous liquids and can be used as a viscosity sensor in wide viscosity range.

  15. A Weed Cantilever

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Elhannan L.; Padalino, John

    1977-01-01

    Describes the Environmental Action Task activity, which may be used as a recreational game or an environmental perception experience, may be conducted indoors or out-of-doors, using weed stems (or spaghetti) and masking tape to construct a cantilever. Small groups of children work together to make the cantilever with the longest arm. Further…

  16. Cross-arch arrangement in complete denture prosthesis to manage an edentulous patient with oral submucous fibrosis and abnormal jaw relation

    PubMed Central

    Tambe, Abhijit; Patil, Sanjayagouda B; Bhat, Sudhakara; Badadare, Mokshada M

    2014-01-01

    A patient with oral submucous fibrosis and resorbed ridges poses a challenge for prosthodontic rehabilitation because of the limited mouth opening and fibrotic mucosa. The fabrication of prosthesis is very difficult due to abnormal jaw relations, influencing the long-term prognosis of the patient. To present a case of oral submucous fibrosis with severely resorbed edentulous ridges which was successfully managed by adopting a modified technique in fabricating a complete denture prosthesis. A 55-year-old female patient with completely edentulous maxillary and mandibular arches diagnosed with oral submucous fibrosis was rehabilitated with complete dentures by recording neutral zone for resorbed mandibular ridge and by arranging the posterior teeth in cross arch relation for compensation of the abnormal jaw relations. The cross-arch arrangement of posterior teeth provides a more stable and retentive complete denture prosthesis for patients with severely resorbed ridges and a wider mandibular arch. PMID:25239981

  17. The effect of different restorative and abutment materials on marginal and internal adaptation of three-unit cantilever implant-supported fixed partial dentures: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Kahramanoğlu, Erkut; Kulak-Özkan, Yasemin

    2013-12-01

    Passive fit is generally assumed to be a significant prerequisite for long-term implant success. The aim of this study was to evaluate the precision fit of three-unit implant-supported fixed partial dentures with different restorative and abutment materials on two implant systems: the Straumann and Astra Tech. Two mandibular epoxy resin models (one for each implant system) were fabricated, and two implants were inserted at the first and second molar region. Poly(vinyl siloxane) impression material was used to make the dental impression. For each implant system, fifteen models were fabricated, and each group was divided into three subgroups (group 1: titanium abutment with metal framework, group 2: titanium abutment with zirconium framework, group 3: zirconium abutment with zirconium framework). The replica technique was used to examine the marginal and internal gap values. For each restoration, 20 measurements were performed, totaling 1200 measurements for all groups. Data were evaluated statistically using ANOVA and LSD post hoc test (p < 0.05). The highest values at internal adaptation measurements were found at the occlusal surface for all groups. When the mean values of the marginal measurements were assessed, the lowest measurements were found in group 3 (51.416 μm), and the highest values were found in group 1 (79.394 μm). There were statistically significant differences between subgroups for marginal measurements (p < 0.05). As included in our study, marginal measurement values were found to be 46 to 87 μm. The marginal discrepancy of the tested materials could be considered clinically acceptable. © 2013 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  18. Nanomechanical Cantilever Array Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Hans; Hegner, Martin; Gerber, Christoph

    Microfabricated cantilever sensors have attracted much interest in recent years as devices for the fast and reliable detection of small concentrations of molecules in air and solution. In addition to application of such sensors for gas and chemical-vapor sensing, for example as an artificial nose, they have also been employed to measure physical properties of tiny amounts of materials in miniaturized versions of conventional standard techniques such as calorimetry, thermogravimetry, weighing, photothermal spectroscopy, as well as for monitoring chemical reactions such as catalysis on small surfaces. In the past few years, the cantilever-sensor concept has been extended to biochemical applications and as an analytical device for measurements of biomaterials. Because of the label-free detection principle of cantilever sensors, their small size and scalability, this kind of device is advantageous for diagnostic applications and disease monitoring, as well as for genomics or proteomics purposes. The use of microcantilever arrays enables detection of several analytes simultaneously and solves the inherent problem of thermal drift often present when using single microcantilever sensors, as some of the cantilevers can be used as sensor cantilevers for detection, and other cantilevers serve as passivated reference cantilevers that do not exhibit affinity to the molecules to be detected.

  19. Adaptive control of force microscope cantilever dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, S. E.; Dougherty, W. M.; Garbini, J. L.; Sidles, J. A.

    2007-09-01

    Magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) and other emerging scanning probe microscopies entail the detection of attonewton-scale forces. Requisite force sensitivities are achieved through the use of soft force microscope cantilevers as high resonant-Q micromechanical oscillators. In practice, the dynamics of these oscillators are greatly improved by the application of force feedback control computed in real time by a digital signal processor (DSP). Improvements include increased sensitive bandwidth, reduced oscillator ring up/down time, and reduced cantilever thermal vibration amplitude. However, when the cantilever tip and the sample are in close proximity, electrostatic and Casimir tip-sample force gradients can significantly alter the cantilever resonance frequency, foiling fixed-gain narrow-band control schemes. We report an improved, adaptive control algorithm that uses a Hilbert transform technique to continuously measure the vibration frequency of the thermally-excited cantilever and seamlessly adjust the DSP program coefficients. The closed-loop vibration amplitude is typically 0.05 nm. This adaptive algorithm enables narrow-band formally-optimal control over a wide range of resonance frequencies, and preserves the thermally-limited signal to noise ratio (SNR).

  20. Method for providing a compliant cantilevered micromold

    DOEpatents

    Morales, Alfredo M.; Domeier, Linda A.; Gonzales, Marcela G.; Keifer, Patrick N.; Garino, Terry J.

    2008-12-16

    A compliant cantilevered three-dimensional micromold is provided. The compliant cantilevered micromold is suitable for use in the replication of cantilevered microparts and greatly simplifies the replication of such cantilevered parts. The compliant cantilevered micromold may be used to fabricate microparts using casting or electroforming techniques. When the compliant micromold is used to fabricate electroformed cantilevered parts, the micromold will also comprise an electrically conducting base formed by a porous metal substrate that is embedded within the compliant cantilevered micromold. Methods for fabricating the compliant cantilevered micromold as well as methods of replicating cantilevered microparts using the compliant cantilevered micromold are also provided.

  1. Systematic review of the survival rate and the biological, technical, and aesthetic complications of fixed dental prostheses with cantilevers on implants reported in longitudinal studies with a mean of 5 years follow-up.

    PubMed

    Romeo, E; Storelli, S

    2012-10-01

    A systematic review was carried out to evaluate the success and survival rate of implants supporting cantilever prosthesis, as well as the incidence of technical and biological complications. A MEDLINE search was conducted up to December 2011 for studies with a mean follow-up of 5 years or more. Two independent reviewers screened the retrieved articles and extracted the data independently. Data on survival, failure, mechanical/technical and biological complications were analyzed. One-hundred and sixty articles were selected as abstract. Only 18 underwent a full-text analysis and only six were included in the study. The estimated cumulative survival rate of implants supporting cantilevered prosthesis was 98.9% (95% CI: 97.4-99.5%), whereas ICFDP survival was estimated to be about 97.1% (95% CI: 90.1-99.2%). Implant failures before prosthetic delivery were not considered. Biological complications were estimated to be 5.7% (95% CI: 4.2-7.6%) at implant level after 5 years. Technical complications were analyzed: the most common complications were veneer fractures (5-year estimate: 10.1%; 95% CI: 3.7-16.5%) and abutment screw fractures (5-year estimate: 1.6%; 95% CI: 0.8-3.5%). Decementation and screw loosening were estimated to be at 5 years 5.9% (95% CI: 1.7-16.8%) and 7.9% (95% CI: 3.2-18.2%), respectively. Implant fracture was rare (5-year estimate: 0.7%; 95% CI: 0.1-4.7%); no framework fracture was reported. Radiographic bone level changes did not yield statistically significant differences. No aesthetic outcome was reported. ICFDPS can be considered a reliable treatment: the systematic review assessed that there is no increase in complication rate due to the presence of the cantilever. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  2. Gland With Cantilever Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, Patrick B.

    1989-01-01

    Single-piece gland forms tight seal on probe or tube containing liquid or gas at high pressure. Gland and probe align as assembled by simple torquing procedure. Disconnected easily and reused at same site. Made from any of wide variety of materials so compatible with application. Cantilever ring at top of gland bites into wall of tube or probe, sealing it. Wall of tube or probe must be thick enough to accommodate deformation without rupturing. Maximum deformation designed in coordination with seating and deformation of boss or conical seal.

  3. Cantilever clamp fitting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, Patrick B. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A device is disclosed for sealing and clamping a cylindrical element which is to be attached to an object such as a wall, a pressurized vessel or another cylindrical element. The device includes a gland having an inner cylindrical wall, which is threaded at one end and is attached at a bendable end to a deformable portion, which in turn is attached to one end of a conical cantilever structure. The other end of the cantilever structure connects at a bendable area to one end of an outer cylindrical wall. The opposite end of cylindrical wall terminates in a thickened portion, the radially outer surface of which is adapted to accommodate a tool for rotating the gland. The terminal end of cylindrical wall also includes an abutment surface, which is adapted to engage a seal, which in turn engages a surface of a receiver. The receiver further includes a threaded portion for engagement with the threaded portion of gland whereby a tightening rotation of gland relative to receiver will cause relative movement between cylindrical walls and of gland. This movement causes a rotation of the conical structure and thus a bending action at bending area and at the bending end of the upper end of inner cylindrical wall. These rotational and bending actions result in a forcing of the deformable portion radially inwardly so as to contact and deform a pipe. This forcible contact creates a seal between gland and pipe, and simultaneously clamps the pipe in position.

  4. Biosensors based on cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Mar; Carrascosa, Laura G; Zinoviev, Kiril; Plaza, Jose A; Lechuga, Laura M

    2009-01-01

    Microcantilevers based-biosensors are a new label-free technique that allows the direct detection of biomolecular interactions in a label-less way and with great accuracy by translating the biointeraction into a nanomechanical motion. Low cost and reliable standard silicon technologies are widely used for the fabrication of cantilevers with well-controlled mechanical properties. Over the last years, the number of applications of these sensors has shown a fast growth in diverse fields, such as genomic or proteomic, because of the biosensor flexibility, the low sample consumption, and the non-pretreated samples required. In this chapter, we report a dedicated design and a fabrication process of highly sensitive microcantilever silicon sensors. We will describe as well an application of the device in the environmental field showing the immunodetection of an organic toxic pesticide as an example. The cantilever biofunctionalization process and the subsequent pesticide determination are detected in real time by monitoring the nanometer-scale bending of the microcantilever due to a differential surface stress generated between both surfaces of the device.

  5. Cantilever epitaxial process

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, Carol I.; Follstaedt, David M.; Mitchell, Christine C.; Han, Jung

    2003-07-29

    A process of growing a material on a substrate, particularly growing a Group II-VI or Group III-V material, by a vapor-phase growth technique where the growth process eliminates the need for utilization of a mask or removal of the substrate from the reactor at any time during the processing. A nucleation layer is first grown upon which a middle layer is grown to provide surfaces for subsequent lateral cantilever growth. The lateral growth rate is controlled by altering the reactor temperature, pressure, reactant concentrations or reactant flow rates. Semiconductor materials, such as GaN, can be produced with dislocation densities less than 10.sup.7 /cm.sup.2.

  6. 77 FR 826 - Cantilever Capital, LLC and Cantilever Group, LLC; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-06

    ... COMMISSION Cantilever Capital, LLC and Cantilever Group, LLC; Notice of Application December 29, 2011. AGENCY: Securities and Exchange Commission (``Commission''). ACTIONS: Notice of application for an order under... Cantilever Group, LLC (the ``Adviser''). Summary of Application: Cantilever, or any successor to Cantilever...

  7. Chemical sensor with oscillating cantilevered probe

    DOEpatents

    Adams, Jesse D

    2013-02-05

    The invention provides a method of detecting a chemical species with an oscillating cantilevered probe. A cantilevered beam is driven into oscillation with a drive mechanism coupled to the cantilevered beam. A free end of the oscillating cantilevered beam is tapped against a mechanical stop coupled to a base end of the cantilevered beam. An amplitude of the oscillating cantilevered beam is measured with a sense mechanism coupled to the cantilevered beam. A treated portion of the cantilevered beam is exposed to the chemical species, wherein the cantilevered beam bends when exposed to the chemical species. A second amplitude of the oscillating cantilevered beam is measured, and the chemical species is determined based on the measured amplitudes.

  8. Mechanical behavior simulation of MEMS-based cantilever beam using COMSOL multiphysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acheli, A.; Serhane, R.

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents the studies of mechanical behavior of MEMS cantilever beam made of poly-silicon material, using the coupling of three application modes (plane strain, electrostatics and the moving mesh) of COMSOL Multi-physics software. The cantilevers playing a key role in Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) devices (switches, resonators, etc) working under potential shock. This is why they require actuation under predetermined conditions, such as electrostatic force or inertial force. In this paper, we present mechanical behavior of a cantilever actuated by an electrostatic force. In addition to the simplification of calculations, the weight of the cantilever was not taken into account. Different parameters like beam displacement, electrostatics force and stress over the beam have been calculated by finite element method after having defining the geometry, the material of the cantilever model (fixed at one of ends but is free to move otherwise) and his operational space.

  9. Mechanical behavior simulation of MEMS-based cantilever beam using COMSOL multiphysics

    SciTech Connect

    Acheli, A. Serhane, R.

    2015-03-30

    This paper presents the studies of mechanical behavior of MEMS cantilever beam made of poly-silicon material, using the coupling of three application modes (plane strain, electrostatics and the moving mesh) of COMSOL Multi-physics software. The cantilevers playing a key role in Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) devices (switches, resonators, etc) working under potential shock. This is why they require actuation under predetermined conditions, such as electrostatic force or inertial force. In this paper, we present mechanical behavior of a cantilever actuated by an electrostatic force. In addition to the simplification of calculations, the weight of the cantilever was not taken into account. Different parameters like beam displacement, electrostatics force and stress over the beam have been calculated by finite element method after having defining the geometry, the material of the cantilever model (fixed at one of ends but is free to move otherwise) and his operational space.

  10. High throughput reproducible cantilever functionalization

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Barbara R; Lee, Ida

    2014-01-21

    A method for functionalizing cantilevers is provided that includes providing a holder having a plurality of channels each having a width for accepting a cantilever probe and a plurality of probes. A plurality of cantilever probes are fastened to the plurality of channels of the holder by the spring clips. The wells of a well plate are filled with a functionalization solution, wherein adjacent wells in the well plate are separated by a dimension that is substantially equal to a dimension separating adjacent channels of the plurality of channels. Each cantilever probe that is fastened within the plurality of channels of the holder is applied to the functionalization solution that is contained in the wells of the well plate.

  11. High throughout reproducible cantilever functionalization

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Barbara R; Lee, Ida

    2014-11-25

    A method for functionalizing cantilevers is provided that includes providing a holder having a plurality of channels each having a width for accepting a cantilever probe and a plurality of probes. A plurality of cantilever probes are fastened to the plurality of channels of the holder by the spring clips. The wells of a well plate are filled with a functionalization solution, wherein adjacent wells in the well plate are separated by a dimension that is substantially equal to a dimension separating adjacent channels of the plurality of channels. Each cantilever probe that is fastened within the plurality of channels of the holder is applied to the functionalization solution that is contained in the wells of the well plate.

  12. Orthodontic Traction of Impacted Canine Using Cantilever

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, João Roberto; Cassano, Daniel Serra; Bianchi, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    The impaction of the maxillary canines causes relevant aesthetic and functional problems. The multidisciplinary approach to the proper planning and execution of orthodontic traction of the element in question is essential. Many strategies are cited in the literature; among them is the good biomechanical control in order to avoid possible side effects. The aim of this paper is to present a case report in which a superior canine impacted by palatine was pulled out with the aid of the cantilever on the Segmented Arch Technique (SAT) concept. A 14.7-year-old female patient appeared at clinic complaining about the absence of the upper right permanent canine. The proposed treatment prioritized the traction of the upper right canine without changing the occlusion and aesthetics. For this, it only installed the upper fixed appliance (Roth with slot 0.018), opting for SAT in order to minimize unwanted side effects. The use of cantilever to the traction of the upper right canine has enabled an efficient and predictable outcome, because it is of statically determined mechanics. PMID:27800192

  13. Multidomain piezo-ceramic cantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedorook, David P.

    PZT-5H is a ferroelectric and piezoelectric material that has many applications that are the subjects of current research. As a ferroelectric, PZT-5H has a permanent electrical polarization that arises from ferroelectric domains. In this thesis, numerical simulations were conducted via the well know Finite Element Method of several types of piezoelectric cantilevers that were made of PIC-181, a high quality PZT-5H made in Germany. Single crystal cantilever models with multiple polarization vectors were investigated with Q factors ranging from Q = 50 to Q = 1200, where the acoustical displacements were calculated. Further, the displacements were calculated for a multidomain cantilever model with inversely poled domains and uniform electrode configuration as well as a single crystal cantilever model with uniformly poled crystal and bipolar electrode configuration. It was shown that cantilevers that are less oblong in shape could benefit from the bipolar electrode configuration in applications where size may be an important parameter, for instance in small flying robotic insects. From the experimental measurements of the resonance and anti-resonance frequencies in various PIC-181 samples, the radial and longitudinal components of speed of sound in material were calculated. Experimental results of longitudinal speed of sound differed from the accepted value of 4.6 km/s by 1.6 % error.

  14. Investigation on Phase Shifting Effect on The Voltage Output of Piezoelectric Cantilever Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, B. Y.; Leong, K. S.

    2017-06-01

    This paper analyses the phase shifting of the output waveform produced by piezoelectric cantilevers under a range of vibration frequencies. The phase shift of four piezoelectric cantilevers with different resonant frequency are inspected while it is excited with the vibration from the electrodynamics shaker at a range of frequencies from 100 Hz to 500 Hz with the acceleration level (g-force) fixed at constant magnitude of 1g-level (9.81 m/s2). Time different and Lissajous pattern methods were used in this research to measure the phase shift of the output waveform. Both methods show similar result where the major phase shift happened at the resonant frequency of respective cantilevers. The phase difference remains low around 0 degrees or in other term in phase before the resonant frequency of the cantilever. When the frequency of the vibration source approaches the resonant frequency of respective cantilever, the phase different start to increase rapidly and reach 180 degree which is out of phase after the resonant frequency. This major phase shifting contributes to the significant rise of the gap in between the peaks formed when multiple piezoelectric cantilevers are connected together. As a result, it indirectly improves the output performance of the piezoelectric cantilevers array.

  15. Cantilevered probe detector with piezoelectric element

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Jesse D; Sulchek, Todd A; Feigin, Stuart C

    2014-04-29

    A disclosed chemical detection system for detecting a target material, such as an explosive material, can include a cantilevered probe, a probe heater coupled to the cantilevered probe, and a piezoelectric element disposed on the cantilevered probe. The piezoelectric element can be configured as a detector and/or an actuator. Detection can include, for example, detecting a movement of the cantilevered probe or a property of the cantilevered probe. The movement or a change in the property of the cantilevered probe can occur, for example, by adsorption of the target material, desorption of the target material, reaction of the target material and/or phase change of the target material. Examples of detectable movements and properties include temperature shifts, impedance shifts, and resonant frequency shifts of the cantilevered probe. The overall chemical detection system can be incorporated, for example, into a handheld explosive material detection system.

  16. Cantilevered probe detector with piezoelectric element

    DOEpatents

    Adams, Jesse D; Sulchek, Todd A; Feigin, Stuart C

    2013-04-30

    A disclosed chemical detection system for detecting a target material, such as an explosive material, can include a cantilevered probe, a probe heater coupled to the cantilevered probe, and a piezoelectric element disposed on the cantilevered probe. The piezoelectric element can be configured as a detector and/or an actuator. Detection can include, for example, detecting a movement of the cantilevered probe or a property of the cantilevered probe. The movement or a change in the property of the cantilevered probe can occur, for example, by adsorption of the target material, desorption of the target material, reaction of the target material and/or phase change of the target material. Examples of detectable movements and properties include temperature shifts, impedance shifts, and resonant frequency shifts of the cantilevered probe. The overall chemical detection system can be incorporated, for example, into a handheld explosive material detection system.

  17. Cantilevered probe detector with piezoelectric element

    DOEpatents

    Adams, Jesse D.; Sulchek, Todd A.; Feigin, Stuart C.

    2010-04-06

    A disclosed chemical detection system for detecting a target material, such as an explosive material, can include a cantilevered probe, a probe heater coupled to the cantilevered probe, and a piezoelectric element disposed on the cantilevered probe. The piezoelectric element can be configured as a detector and/or an actuator. Detection can include, for example, detecting a movement of the cantilevered probe or a property of the cantilevered probe. The movement or a change in the property of the cantilevered probe can occur, for example, by adsorption of the target material, desorption of the target material, reaction of the target material and/or phase change of the target material. Examples of detectable movements and properties include temperature shifts, impedance shifts, and resonant frequency shifts of the cantilevered probe. The overall chemical detection system can be incorporated, for example, into a handheld explosive material detection system.

  18. Cantilevered probe detector with piezoelectric element

    DOEpatents

    Adams, Jesse D; Sulchek, Todd A; Feigin, Stuart C

    2013-04-30

    A disclosed chemical detection system for detecting a target material, such as an explosive material, can include a cantilevered probe, a probe heater coupled to the cantilevered probe, and a piezoelectric element disposed on the cantilevered probe. The piezoelectric element can be configured as a detector and/or an actuator. Detection can include, for example, detecting a movement of the cantilevered probe or a property of the cantilevered probe. The movement or a change in the property of the cantilevered probe can occur, for example, by adsorption of the target material, desorption of the target material, reaction of the target material and/or phase change of the target material. Examples of detectable movements and properties include temperature shifts, impedance shifts, and resonant frequency shifts of the cantilevered probe. The overall chemical detection system can be incorporated, for example, into a handheld explosive material detection system.

  19. Cantilevered probe detector with piezoelectric element

    DOEpatents

    Adams, Jesse D [Reno, NV; Sulchek, Todd A [Oakland, CA; Feigin, Stuart C [Reno, NV

    2012-07-10

    A disclosed chemical detection system for detecting a target material, such as an explosive material, can include a cantilevered probe, a probe heater coupled to the cantilevered probe, and a piezoelectric element disposed on the cantilevered probe. The piezoelectric element can be configured as a detector and/or an actuator. Detection can include, for example, detecting a movement of the cantilevered probe or a property of the cantilevered probe. The movement or a change in the property of the cantilevered probe can occur, for example, by adsorption of the target material, desorption of the target material, reaction of the target material and/or phase change of the target material. Examples of detectable movements and properties include temperature shifts, impedance shifts, and resonant frequency shifts of the cantilevered probe. The overall chemical detection system can be incorporated, for example, into a handheld explosive material detection system.

  20. Retrospective clinical study of single-retainer cantilever anterior and posterior glass-ceramic resin-bonded fixed dental prostheses at a mean follow-up of 6 years.

    PubMed

    Sailer, Irena; Bonani, Tom; Brodbeck, Urs; Hämmerle, Christoph Hans Franz

    2013-01-01

    To retrospectively evaluate the 6-year survival rates and technical/ biologic complication rates of single-retainer glass-ceramic resin-bonded fixed dental prostheses (RBFDPs). Forty patients with 49 anterior/posterior glass-ceramic RBFDPs were included. The RBFDPs replaced 11 maxillary/mandibular central incisors, 18 lateral incisors, 18 premolars, and 2 molars. Patients willing to participate were clinically and radiologically examined. The technical outcome was assessed with modified United States Public Health Service criteria. Fracture and/or chipping of the restoration, occlusal wear, marginal adaptation, marginal discoloration, shape, surface texture, and esthetic integration were recorded. Tooth vitality and postoperative sensitivity were tested. The following biologic parameters were assessed at test and control teeth: probing pocket depth, gingival recession, attachment loss, bleeding on probing, furcation involvement, and periodontal mobility. Statistical analysis was performed with exact 95% confidence intervals to relative frequencies and the paired t test. Twenty-eight patients with 35 RBFDPs participated. The mean follow-up of the RBFDPs was 6 years. Twelve patients with 14 RBFDPs were not willing to participate or not available. No catastrophic failures occurred. The 6-year survival rate of the examined RBFDPs was 100%. No debonding was recorded. Chipping of the ceramic was found in 5.7% of the RBFDPs. Biologic outcomes were similar at test and control teeth. Glass-ceramic RBFDPs exhibited promising clinical outcomes in both anterior and posterior regions.

  1. Tunnel junctions, cantilevers, and potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, Shawn

    We have developed a process for making sub-micrometer dimensional cantilevers, clamped beams, and more complicate electro-mechanical structures that carry integrated electrical leads. Such objects are perhaps useful as test structures for connecting to and measuring the electrical properties of molecular sized objects, as high frequency electromechanical components for radio and microwave frequency applications, and as sensor components for studying the fluctuation physics of small machines. Our process uses two realigned electron-beam lithography steps, a thin film angled deposition system, and differential removal of sacrificial aluminum layers to produce freely suspended sub-micron electromechanical components. We have produced cantilevers and beams on a variety of substrates (silica, silicon, and poly-imide) and have produced insulating, conductive, and multi-layer mechanical structures. We have measured mechanical resonances in the 10 MHz range by electrostatically actuating the cantilevers while in a magnetic field (3500 gauss) and measuring the voltage that results across the front edge of the cantilever. Two structures are fabricated sharing a common ground so that a balanced detection technique can be used to eliminate background signals. Due to the square dependence of the electrostatic force on the voltage, they can be resonated by a drive voltage of 1/2 the natural frequency or at the natural frequency. Two separate attempts have been made to apply these resonators. First, a process was developed to integrate a tunnel junction with the cantilever. These devices can possibly be used for probing small-scale systems such as molecules. We have verified the exponential variation of the tunneling resistance with both substrate flex and electrostatic gating. Second, a novel gate structure was developed to create a double potential well for resonator motion. This is accomplished by placing a multilayer structure in front of the hairpin cantilever consisting two

  2. 13. VIEW OF PIER 2, SHOWING FIXED SHOES, THE SOUTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. VIEW OF PIER 2, SHOWING FIXED SHOES, THE SOUTH GIRDER (PANELS 3 & 2), AND CANTILEVER BRACKETS & HANDRAIL, LOOKING NORTHWEST Harms - Benton Street Bridge, Spanning Iowa River at Benton Street, Iowa City, Johnson County, IA

  3. 16. PIER CAP DETAIL, SHOWING EXPANSION AND FIXED BEARING SHOES, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. PIER CAP DETAIL, SHOWING EXPANSION AND FIXED BEARING SHOES, BOTTOM CHORD / END POST CONNECTION AND CANTILEVERED SIDEWALK. VIEW TO WEST. - Holbrook Bridge, Spanning Little Colorado River at AZ 77, Holbrook, Navajo County, AZ

  4. Design for minimizing fracture risk of all-ceramic cantilever dental bridge.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhongpu; Zhou, Shiwei; Li, Eric; Li, Wei; Swain, Michael V; Li, Qing

    2015-01-01

    Minimization of the peak stresses and fracture incidence induced by mastication function is considered critical in design of all-ceramic dental restorations, especially for cantilever fixed partial dentures (FPDs). The focus of this study is on developing a mechanically-sound optimal design for all-ceramic cantilever dental bridge in a posterior region. The topology optimization procedure in association with Extended Finite Element Method (XFEM) is implemented here to search for the best possible distribution of porcelain and zirconia materials in the bridge structure. The designs with different volume fractions of zirconia are considered. The results show that this new methodology is capable of improving FPD design by minimizing incidence of crack in comparison with the initial design. Potentially, it provides dental technicians with a new design tool to develop mechanically sound cantilever fixed partial dentures for more complicated clinical situation.

  5. Multiwell micromechanical cantilever array reader for biotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, R.; Best, A.; Berger, R.; Cherian, S.; Lorenzoni, S.; Macis, E.; Raiteri, R.; Cain, R.

    2007-08-01

    We use a multiwell micromechanical cantilever sensor (MCS) device to measure surface stress changes induced by specific adsorption of molecules. A multiplexed assay format facilitates the monitoring of the bending of 16 MCSs in parallel. The 16 MCSs are grouped within four separate wells. Each well can be addressed independently by different analyte liquids. This enables functionalization of MCS separately by flowing different solutions through each well. In addition, each well contains a fixed reference mirror which allows measuring the absolute bending of MCS. In addition, the mirror can be used to follow refractive index changes upon mixing of different solutions. The effect of the flow rate on the MCS bending change was found to be dependent on the absolute bending value of MCS. Experiments and finite element simulations of solution exchange in wells were performed. Both revealed that one solution can be exchanged by another one after 200μl volume has flown through. Using this device, the adsorption of thiolated DNA molecules and 6-mercapto-1-hexanol on gold surfaces was performed to test the nanomechanical response of MCS.

  6. Micromechanical cantilevers and scanning probe microscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Scott A.; Xu, Yang; MacDonald, Noel C.

    1995-09-01

    We have fabricated two microelectromechanical scanning tunneling microscopes (Micro- STMs) with 3D (xyz) actuators and integrated high aspects ratio tips. The reduction in the size of scanning probe microscopes allows for faster scanning speeds, array architectures, and massively parallel operation. The two Micro-STMs are fabricated from single crystal silicon using the high-aspect-ratio SCREAM process and are small enough to be used in array architectures. The torsional cantilever design used for out-of-plane (z) motion can be easily be adapted to scanning force microscopy. Typical atomic force microscope cantilevers have spring constants on the order of 0.01 - 10 N/m. To produce cantilevers with lower spring constants, ordinary thin film techniques would require longer (several mm) and thinner (sub- micrometers ) cantilevers. A mechanical analysis of torsional cantilevers reveals that high aspect ratio rectangular beams, such as the ones we fabricate, are easily twisted. By using the torsional design, we can achieve lower spring constants (10-1 - 10-7 N/m) without having to make a very thin film cantilever. We have demonstrated torsional cantilevers with spring constants on the order of 10-2 N/m. These cantilevers can be used as extremely sensitive force sensors for atomic force microscopy.

  7. Cantilevers orthodontics forces measured by fiber sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Neblyssa; Milczewski, Maura S.; de Oliveira, Valmir; Guariza Filho, Odilon; Lopes, Stephani C. P. S.; Kalinowski, Hypolito J.

    2015-09-01

    Fibers Bragg Gratings were used to evaluate the transmission of the forces generates by orthodontic mechanic based one and two cantilevers used to move molars to the upright position. The results showed levels forces of approximately 0,14N near to the root of the molar with one and two cantilevers.

  8. Prototype cantilevers for quantitative lateral force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Reitsma, Mark G.; Gates, Richard S.; Friedman, Lawrence H.; Cook, Robert F.

    2011-09-15

    Prototype cantilevers are presented that enable quantitative surface force measurements using contact-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM). The ''hammerhead'' cantilevers facilitate precise optical lever system calibrations for cantilever flexure and torsion, enabling quantifiable adhesion measurements and friction measurements by lateral force microscopy (LFM). Critically, a single hammerhead cantilever of known flexural stiffness and probe length dimension can be used to perform both a system calibration as well as surface force measurements in situ, which greatly increases force measurement precision and accuracy. During LFM calibration mode, a hammerhead cantilever allows an optical lever ''torque sensitivity'' to be generated for the quantification of LFM friction forces. Precise calibrations were performed on two different AFM instruments, in which torque sensitivity values were specified with sub-percent relative uncertainty. To examine the potential for accurate lateral force measurements using the prototype cantilevers, finite element analysis predicted measurement errors of a few percent or less, which could be reduced via refinement of calibration methodology or cantilever design. The cantilevers are compatible with commercial AFM instrumentation and can be used for other AFM techniques such as contact imaging and dynamic mode measurements.

  9. Resonance response of scanning force microscopy cantilevers

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, G.Y.; Warmack, R.J.; Thundat, T.; Allison, D.P. ); Huang, A. )

    1994-08-01

    A variational method is used to calculate the deflection and the fundamental and harmonic resonance frequencies of commercial V-shaped and rectangular atomic force microscopy cantilevers. The effective mass of V-shaped cantilevers is roughly half that calculated for the equivalent rectangular cantilevers. Damping by environmental gases, including air, nitrogen, argon, and helium, affects the frequency of maximum response and to a much greater degree the quality factor [ital Q]. Helium has the lowest viscosity, resulting in the highest [ital Q], and thus provides the best sensitivity in noncontact force microscopy. Damping in liquids is dominated by an increase in effective mass of the cantilever due to an added mass of the liquid being dragged with that cantilever.

  10. Oscillations of end loaded cantilever beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macho-Stadler, E.; Elejalde-García, M. J.; Llanos-Vázquez, R.

    2015-09-01

    This article presents several simple experiments based on changing transverse vibration frequencies in a cantilever beam, when acted on by an external attached mass load at the free end. By using a mechanical wave driver, available in introductory undergraduate laboratories, we provide various experimental results for end loaded cantilever beams that fit reasonably well into a linear equation. The behaviour of the cantilever beam’s weak-damping resonance response is studied for the case of metal resonance strips. As the mass load increases, a more pronounced decrease occurs in the fundamental frequency of beam vibration. It is important to note that cantilever construction is often used in architectural design and engineering construction projects but current analysis also predicts the influence of mass load on the sound generated by musical free reeds with boundary conditions similar to a cantilever beam.

  11. Finite element analysis of implant-supported prosthesis with pontic and cantilever in the posterior maxilla.

    PubMed

    de Souza Batista, Victor Eduardo; Verri, Fellippo Ramos; Almeida, Daniel Augusto de Faria; Santiago Junior, Joel Ferreira; Lemos, Cleidiel Aparecido Araújo; Pellizzer, Eduardo Piza

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of pontic and cantilever designs (mesial and distal) on 3-unit implant-retained prosthesis at maxillary posterior region verifying stress and strain distributions on bone tissue (cortical and trabecular bones) and stress distribution in abutments, implants and fixation screws, under axial and oblique loadings, by 3D finite element analysis. Each model was composed of a bone block presenting right first premolar to the first molar, with three or two external hexagon implants (4.0 × 10 mm), supporting a 3-unit splinted dental fixed dental prosthesis with the variations: M1 - three implants supporting splinted crowns; M2 - two implants supporting prosthesis with central pontic; M3 - two implants supporting prosthesis with mesial cantilever; M4 - two implants supporting prosthesis with distal cantilever. The applied forces were 400 N axial and 200 N oblique. The von Mises criteria was used to evaluate abutments, implants and fixation screws and maximum principal stress and microstrain criteria were used to evaluate the bone tissue. The decrease of the number of implants caused an unfavorable biomechanical behavior for all structures (M2, M3, M4). For two implant-supported prostheses, the use of the central pontic (M2) showed stress and strain distributions more favorable in the analyzed structures. The use of cantilever showed unfavorable biomechanical behavior (M3 and M4), mainly for distal cantilever (M4). The use of three implants presented lower values of stress and strain on the analyzed structures. Among two implant-supported prostheses, prostheses with cantilever showed unfavorable biomechanical behavior in the analyzed structures, especially for distal cantilever.

  12. Efficiency improvement in the cantilever photothermal excitation method using a photothermal conversion layer.

    PubMed

    Inada, Natsumi; Asakawa, Hitoshi; Kobayashi, Taiki; Fukuma, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Photothermal excitation is a cantilever excitation method that enables stable and accurate operation for dynamic-mode AFM measurements. However, the low excitation efficiency of the method has often limited its application in practical studies. In this study, we propose a method for improving the photothermal excitation efficiency by coating cantilever backside surface near its fixed end with colloidal graphite as a photothermal conversion (PTC) layer. The excitation efficiency for a standard cantilever of PPP-NCHAuD with a spring constant of ≈40 N/m and a relatively stiff cantilever of AC55 with a spring constant of ≈140 N/m were improved by 6.1 times and 2.5 times, respectively, by coating with a PTC layer. We experimentally demonstrate high stability of the PTC layer in liquid by AFM imaging of a mica surface with atomic resolution in phosphate buffer saline solution for more than 2 h without any indication of possible contamination from the coating. The proposed method, using a PTC layer made of colloidal graphite, greatly enhances photothermal excitation efficiency even for a relatively stiff cantilever in liquid.

  13. Efficiency improvement in the cantilever photothermal excitation method using a photothermal conversion layer

    PubMed Central

    Inada, Natsumi; Kobayashi, Taiki; Fukuma, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Summary Photothermal excitation is a cantilever excitation method that enables stable and accurate operation for dynamic-mode AFM measurements. However, the low excitation efficiency of the method has often limited its application in practical studies. In this study, we propose a method for improving the photothermal excitation efficiency by coating cantilever backside surface near its fixed end with colloidal graphite as a photothermal conversion (PTC) layer. The excitation efficiency for a standard cantilever of PPP-NCHAuD with a spring constant of ≈40 N/m and a relatively stiff cantilever of AC55 with a spring constant of ≈140 N/m were improved by 6.1 times and 2.5 times, respectively, by coating with a PTC layer. We experimentally demonstrate high stability of the PTC layer in liquid by AFM imaging of a mica surface with atomic resolution in phosphate buffer saline solution for more than 2 h without any indication of possible contamination from the coating. The proposed method, using a PTC layer made of colloidal graphite, greatly enhances photothermal excitation efficiency even for a relatively stiff cantilever in liquid. PMID:27335733

  14. Generation of squeezing: magnetic dipoles on cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seok, Hyojun; Singh, Swati; Steinke, Steven; Meystre, Pierre

    2011-05-01

    We investigate the generation of motional squeezed states in a nano-mechanical cantilever. Our model system consists of a nanoscale cantilever - whose center-of-mass motion is initially cooled to its quantum mechanical ground state - magnetically coupled a classically driven mechanical tuning fork. We show that the magnetic dipole-dipole interaction can produce significant phonon squeezing of the center-of-mass motion of the cantilever, and evaluate the effect of various dissipation channels, including the coupling of the cantilever to a heat bath and phase and amplitude fluctuations in the oscillating field driving the tuning fork. US National Science Foundation, the US Army Research Office, DARPA ORCHID program through a grant from AFOSR.

  15. Grating Loaded Cantilevers for Displacement Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karademir, Ertugrul; Olcum, Selim; Atalar, Abdullah; Aydinli, Atilla

    2010-03-01

    A cantilever with a grating coupler engraved on its tip is used for measuring displacement. The coupled light in the cantilever is guided to a single mode optical waveguide defined at the base of the cantilever. The grating period is 550 nm and is fabricated on a SOI wafer using nanoimprint lithography. The waveguide and the cantilever are defined by an RIE and cantilevers released by KOH and HF solutions. Light with 1550 nm wavelength, is directed onto the grating coupler and detected at the cleaved end of the SOI waveguide. The angle of incidence is controlled by a motorized rotary stage. Light couples into the waveguide at a characteristic angle with a full width at half maximum of approximately 6.9 mrads translating into a Q factor of 87.5. The displacement sensitivity is measured by driving the cantilever with a frequency controlled piezoelectric element. The modulation of the light at the waveguide output is lock-in detected by a biased infrared detector. The resulting 43%mrad-1 sensitivity can be increased with further optimization.

  16. Torsion and transverse bending of cantilever plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reissner, Eric; Stein, Manuel

    1951-01-01

    The problem of combined bending and torsion of cantilever plates of variable thickness, such as might be considered for solid thin high-speed airplane or missile wings, is considered in this paper. The deflections of the plate are assumed to vary linearly across the chord; minimization of the potential energy by means of the calculus of variations then leads to two ordinary linear differential equations for the bending deflections and the twist of the plate. Because the cantilever is analyzed as a plate rather than as a beam, the effect of constraint against axial warping in torsion is inherently included. The application of this method to specific problems involving static deflection, vibration, and buckling of cantilever plates is presented. In the static-deflection problems, taper and sweep are considered.

  17. 2. DETAIL OF STRUCTURAL SYSTEM FOR CANTILEVERED HOG RUN; BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. DETAIL OF STRUCTURAL SYSTEM FOR CANTILEVERED HOG RUN; BUILDING 168 (1960 HOG KILL) IS BENEATH HOG RUN - Rath Packing Company, Cantilevered Hog Run, Sycamore Street between Elm & Eighteenth Streets, Waterloo, Black Hawk County, IA

  18. Physics-based signal processing algorithms for micromachined cantilever arrays

    DOEpatents

    Candy, James V; Clague, David S; Lee, Christopher L; Rudd, Robert E; Burnham, Alan K; Tringe, Joseph W

    2013-11-19

    A method of using physics-based signal processing algorithms for micromachined cantilever arrays. The methods utilize deflection of a micromachined cantilever that represents the chemical, biological, or physical element being detected. One embodiment of the method comprises the steps of modeling the deflection of the micromachined cantilever producing a deflection model, sensing the deflection of the micromachined cantilever and producing a signal representing the deflection, and comparing the signal representing the deflection with the deflection model.

  19. Self-heating in piezoresistive cantilevers

    PubMed Central

    Doll, Joseph C.; Corbin, Elise A.; King, William P.; Pruitt, Beth L.

    2011-01-01

    We report experiments and models of self-heating in piezoresistive microcantilevers that show how cantilever measurement resolution depends on the thermal properties of the surrounding fluid. The predicted cantilever temperature rise from a finite difference model is compared with detailed temperature measurements on fabricated devices. Increasing the fluid thermal conductivity allows for lower temperature operation for a given power dissipation, leading to lower force and displacement noise. The force noise in air is 76% greater than in water for the same increase in piezoresistor temperature. PMID:21731884

  20. Soft Body Impact of Cantilever Beams.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-01

    SOFT BODY IMPACT OF CANTILEVER BEAMS.(U) MAR S0 J D SHARP N CLASSIFIED AFML-TR-79169 NL mmh"hllhmlhlhlu BBBBhBBhmBhBBl EEEIIIIIIIIIIE IIIIIIIIIII- t...1 . 1111122 OO 136 IIIIIT 111111.25 11 1.4 111111.6 MfEROCOPY RESOLUTI(%, USI CIIARI NAINA I’ M \\I W I IA~NPAR\\I’l ’ AFML-TR-79-4169 SOFT BODY IMPACT ...document. AIR FORCE/56780/18 June 1980 -400 SECURITY CLASSIFICATION Of THIS PAGE (Ma.n. Dat. Enterod), EDISRCIN jOFT BODY IMPACT OF CANTILEVER B EAI4’ Oct

  1. A study of cantilever-free instrumentation for nanoscale magnetic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altemus, Bruce Adair

    The evolution of the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) into the Magnetic Force Microscope (MFM) and Magnetic Resonance Force Microscope (MRFM) has had a substantial impact on the characterization of nanoscale phenomena. Detection of 10-17 Newtons per root Hertz has occurred with use of an ultra-sensitive cantilever along with optical interferometry methods within these geometries. The sensitivity of these platforms is dependent on the characteristics of the cantilever, where increased length and a low Young's modulus increase the force sensitivity (meters/newtons). Using IC fabrication techniques, the realization of generating cantilevers with this sensitivity is feasible, but stress compensation layers are required to prevent the free end from curling. Aside from the difficultly in fabrication, the cantilever based approach has one fixed spring constant yielding a finite detectable magnetic force range. An alternative approach incorporating the magnetic levitation of a magnet with an integrated reflector, known as the birdie, has been investigated. The goals of the cantilever-free instrumentation are two fold: (1) To replace the traditional cantilever with a magnetically levitated birdie (which will be scaled down to investigate nanoscale phenomena) through the creation of a virtual cantilever; (2) Investigate the detectable magnetic force range (tunability) of the virtual cantilever. The first 1-D milli-levitation platform has been fabricated and its preliminary characterization has been performed, showing a minimum detectable force in the nano-Newton range with a 10X tunability in spring constant. This high degree of force sensitivity and tunability confirms the design and enables the use for magnetic sample investigation. To further increase the utility of the cantilever-free approach, the birdie has been magnetically levitated in 3D by control circuitry that has been developed and characterized. The magnetic behavior of the custom designed X, Y and Z coil sets

  2. Note: Improved calibration of atomic force microscope cantilevers using multiple reference cantilevers

    SciTech Connect

    Sader, John E.; Friend, James R.

    2015-05-15

    Overall precision of the simplified calibration method in J. E. Sader et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 103705 (2012), Sec. III D, is dominated by the spring constant of the reference cantilever. The question arises: How does one take measurements from multiple reference cantilevers, and combine these results, to improve uncertainty of the reference cantilever’s spring constant and hence the overall precision of the method? This question is addressed in this note. Its answer enables manufacturers to specify of a single set of data for the spring constant, resonant frequency, and quality factor, from measurements on multiple reference cantilevers. With this data set, users can trivially calibrate cantilevers of the same type.

  3. Calibration of higher eigenmodes of cantilevers

    SciTech Connect

    Labuda, Aleksander; Kocun, Marta; Walsh, Tim; Meinhold, Jieh; Proksch, Tania; Meinhold, Waiman; Anderson, Caleb; Proksch, Roger; Lysy, Martin

    2016-07-15

    A method is presented for calibrating the higher eigenmodes (resonant modes) of atomic force microscopy cantilevers that can be performed prior to any tip-sample interaction. The method leverages recent efforts in accurately calibrating the first eigenmode by providing the higher-mode stiffness as a ratio to the first mode stiffness. A one-time calibration routine must be performed for every cantilever type to determine a power-law relationship between stiffness and frequency, which is then stored for future use on similar cantilevers. Then, future calibrations only require a measurement of the ratio of resonant frequencies and the stiffness of the first mode. This method is verified through stiffness measurements using three independent approaches: interferometric measurement, AC approach-curve calibration, and finite element analysis simulation. Power-law values for calibrating higher-mode stiffnesses are reported for several cantilever models. Once the higher-mode stiffnesses are known, the amplitude of each mode can also be calibrated from the thermal spectrum by application of the equipartition theorem.

  4. Forced Vibrations of a Cantilever Beam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Repetto, C. E.; Roatta, A.; Welti, R. J.

    2012-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental solutions for vibrations of a vertical-oriented, prismatic, thin cantilever beam are studied. The beam orientation is "downwards", i.e. the clamped end is above the free end, and it is subjected to a transverse movement at a selected frequency. Both the behaviour of the device driver and the beam's weak-damping…

  5. Forced Vibrations of a Cantilever Beam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Repetto, C. E.; Roatta, A.; Welti, R. J.

    2012-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental solutions for vibrations of a vertical-oriented, prismatic, thin cantilever beam are studied. The beam orientation is "downwards", i.e. the clamped end is above the free end, and it is subjected to a transverse movement at a selected frequency. Both the behaviour of the device driver and the beam's weak-damping…

  6. Calibration of higher eigenmodes of cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labuda, Aleksander; Kocun, Marta; Lysy, Martin; Walsh, Tim; Meinhold, Jieh; Proksch, Tania; Meinhold, Waiman; Anderson, Caleb; Proksch, Roger

    2016-07-01

    A method is presented for calibrating the higher eigenmodes (resonant modes) of atomic force microscopy cantilevers that can be performed prior to any tip-sample interaction. The method leverages recent efforts in accurately calibrating the first eigenmode by providing the higher-mode stiffness as a ratio to the first mode stiffness. A one-time calibration routine must be performed for every cantilever type to determine a power-law relationship between stiffness and frequency, which is then stored for future use on similar cantilevers. Then, future calibrations only require a measurement of the ratio of resonant frequencies and the stiffness of the first mode. This method is verified through stiffness measurements using three independent approaches: interferometric measurement, AC approach-curve calibration, and finite element analysis simulation. Power-law values for calibrating higher-mode stiffnesses are reported for several cantilever models. Once the higher-mode stiffnesses are known, the amplitude of each mode can also be calibrated from the thermal spectrum by application of the equipartition theorem.

  7. Direct and alignment-insensitive measurement of cantilever curvature

    SciTech Connect

    Hermans, Rodolfo I.; Aeppli, Gabriel; Bailey, Joe M.

    2013-07-15

    We analytically derive and experimentally demonstrate a method for the simultaneous measurement of deflection for large arrays of cantilevers. The Fresnel diffraction patterns of a cantilever independently reveal tilt, curvature, cubic, and higher order bending of the cantilever. It provides a calibrated absolute measurement of the polynomial coefficients describing the cantilever shape, without careful alignment and could be applied to several cantilevers simultaneously with no added complexity. We show that the method is easily implemented, works in both liquid media and in air, for a broad range of displacements and is especially suited to the requirements for multi-marker biosensors.

  8. Improved atomic force microscopy cantilever performance by partial reflective coating

    PubMed Central

    Miyahara, Yoichi; Aeschimann, Laure; Grütter, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Summary Optical beam deflection systems are widely used in cantilever based atomic force microscopy (AFM). Most commercial cantilevers have a reflective metal coating on the detector side to increase the reflectivity in order to achieve a high signal on the photodiode. Although the reflective coating is usually much thinner than the cantilever, it can still significantly contribute to the damping of the cantilever, leading to a lower mechanical quality factor (Q-factor). In dynamic mode operation in high vacuum, a cantilever with a high Q-factor is desired in order to achieve a lower minimal detectable force. The reflective coating can also increase the low-frequency force noise. In contact mode and force spectroscopy, a cantilever with minimal low-frequency force noise is desirable. We present a study on cantilevers with a partial reflective coating on the detector side. For this study, soft (≈0.01 N/m) and stiff (≈28 N/m) rectangular cantilevers were used with a custom partial coating at the tip end of the cantilever. The Q-factor, the detection and the force noise of fully coated, partially coated and uncoated cantilevers are compared and force distance curves are shown. Our results show an improvement in low-frequency force noise and increased Q-factor for the partially coated cantilevers compared to fully coated ones while maintaining the same reflectivity, therefore making it possible to combine the best of both worlds. PMID:26199849

  9. Improved atomic force microscopy cantilever performance by partial reflective coating.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Zeno; Miyahara, Yoichi; Aeschimann, Laure; Grütter, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Optical beam deflection systems are widely used in cantilever based atomic force microscopy (AFM). Most commercial cantilevers have a reflective metal coating on the detector side to increase the reflectivity in order to achieve a high signal on the photodiode. Although the reflective coating is usually much thinner than the cantilever, it can still significantly contribute to the damping of the cantilever, leading to a lower mechanical quality factor (Q-factor). In dynamic mode operation in high vacuum, a cantilever with a high Q-factor is desired in order to achieve a lower minimal detectable force. The reflective coating can also increase the low-frequency force noise. In contact mode and force spectroscopy, a cantilever with minimal low-frequency force noise is desirable. We present a study on cantilevers with a partial reflective coating on the detector side. For this study, soft (≈0.01 N/m) and stiff (≈28 N/m) rectangular cantilevers were used with a custom partial coating at the tip end of the cantilever. The Q-factor, the detection and the force noise of fully coated, partially coated and uncoated cantilevers are compared and force distance curves are shown. Our results show an improvement in low-frequency force noise and increased Q-factor for the partially coated cantilevers compared to fully coated ones while maintaining the same reflectivity, therefore making it possible to combine the best of both worlds.

  10. Aptamer-based cantilever array sensors for oxytetracycline detection.

    PubMed

    Hou, Hui; Bai, Xiaojing; Xing, Chunyan; Gu, Ningyu; Zhang, Bailin; Tang, Jilin

    2013-02-19

    We present a new method for specific detection of oxytetracycline (OTC) at nanomolar concentrations based on a microfabricated cantilever array. The sensing cantilevers in the array are functionalized with self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of OTC-specific aptamer, which acts as a recognition molecule for OTC. While the reference cantilevers in the array are functionalized with 6-mercapto-1-hexanol SAMs to eliminate the influence of environmental disturbances. The cantilever sensor shows a good linear relationship between the deflection amplitude and the OTC concentration in the range of 1.0-100 nM. The detection limit of the cantilever array sensor is as low as 0.2 nM, which is comparable to some traditional methods. Other antibiotics such as doxycycline and tetracycline do not cause significant deflection of the cantilevers. It is demonstrated that the cantilever array sensors can be used as a powerful tool to detect drugs with high sensitivity and selectivity.

  11. Linear and Nonlinear Photoinduced Deformations of Cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbett, D.; Warner, M.

    2007-10-01

    Glassy and elastomeric nematic networks with dye molecules present can be very responsive to illumination, huge reversible strains being possible. If absorption is appreciable, strain decreases with depth into a cantilever, leading to bend that is the basis of micro-opto-mechanical systems (MOMS). Bend actually occurs even when Beer’s law suggests a tiny penetration of light into a heavily dye-doped system. We model the nonlinear opto-elastic processes behind this effect. In the regime of cantilever thickness giving optimal bending for a given incident light intensity, there are three neutral surfaces. In practice such nonlinear absorptive effects are very important since heavily doped systems are commonly used.

  12. Cantilever mounted resilient pad gas bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etsion, I. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A gas-lubricated bearing is described, employing at least one pad mounted on a rectangular cantilever beam to produce a lubricating wedge between the face of the pad and a moving surface. The load-carrying and stiffness characteristics of the pad are related to the dimensions and modulus of elasticity of the beam. The bearing is applicable to a wide variety of types of hydrodynamic bearings.

  13. A gap method for increasing the sensitivity of cantilever biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leahy, Stephane; Lai, Yongjun

    2017-08-01

    Dynamic-mode cantilever biosensors are an attractive technology for biological sensing. However, researchers are constantly seeking ways to increase their sensitivity, especially in liquids, in order to rapidly detect biological particles in dilute samples. Here, we investigate a novel gap method for increasing their sensitivity. We design cantilevers with a micron-sized gap between their free end and a supporting structure that constrains the motion of individual particles deposited across the gap. When individual particles are deposited across the gap, they form a bridge between the free end of the cantilever and the supporting structure and generate fundamental resonant frequency shifts that are two orders of magnitude higher than when they are deposited on conventional cantilevers. Through experiments and simulation in air, we show that cantilevers based on the gap method rely on stiffness-change instead of mass-change, and that they are significantly more sensitive than conventional cantilevers.

  14. Understanding interferometry for micro-cantilever displacement detection.

    PubMed

    von Schmidsfeld, Alexander; Nörenberg, Tobias; Temmen, Matthias; Reichling, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Interferometric displacement detection in a cantilever-based non-contact atomic force microscope (NC-AFM) operated in ultra-high vacuum is demonstrated for the Michelson and Fabry-Pérot modes of operation. Each mode is addressed by appropriately adjusting the distance between the fiber end delivering and collecting light and a highly reflective micro-cantilever, both together forming the interferometric cavity. For a precise measurement of the cantilever displacement, the relative positioning of fiber and cantilever is of critical importance. We describe a systematic approach for accurate alignment as well as the implications of deficient fiber-cantilever configurations. In the Fabry-Pérot regime, the displacement noise spectral density strongly decreases with decreasing distance between the fiber-end and the cantilever, yielding a noise floor of 24 fm/Hz(0.5) under optimum conditions.

  15. Understanding interferometry for micro-cantilever displacement detection

    PubMed Central

    Nörenberg, Tobias; Temmen, Matthias; Reichling, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Summary Interferometric displacement detection in a cantilever-based non-contact atomic force microscope (NC-AFM) operated in ultra-high vacuum is demonstrated for the Michelson and Fabry–Pérot modes of operation. Each mode is addressed by appropriately adjusting the distance between the fiber end delivering and collecting light and a highly reflective micro-cantilever, both together forming the interferometric cavity. For a precise measurement of the cantilever displacement, the relative positioning of fiber and cantilever is of critical importance. We describe a systematic approach for accurate alignment as well as the implications of deficient fiber–cantilever configurations. In the Fabry–Pérot regime, the displacement noise spectral density strongly decreases with decreasing distance between the fiber-end and the cantilever, yielding a noise floor of 24 fm/Hz0.5 under optimum conditions. PMID:27547601

  16. Automatic Optical Crack Tracking for Double Cantilever Beam Specimens

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    TECHN ICAL ART IC LE Automatic Optical Crack Tracking for Double Cantilever Beam Specimens B. Krull1,2, J. Patrick2,3, K. Hart2,4, S. White2,4, and N...Reinforced Composites, Mode I Fracture, Double Cantilever Beam , Machine Vision Correspondence N.R. Sottos, Department of Materials Science and...which contains a manual procedure to obtain GIc values from crack length data using a double cantilever beam (DCB) specimen. In this study, a custom

  17. Improved Force Spectroscopy Using Focused-Ion-Beam-Modified Cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Faulk, J K; Edwards, D T; Bull, M S; Perkins, T T

    2017-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is widely used in biophysics, including force-spectroscopy studies of protein folding and protein-ligand interactions. The precision of such studies increases with improvements in the underlying quality of the data. Currently, data quality is limited by the mechanical properties of the cantilever when using a modern commercial AFM. The key tradeoff is force stability vs short-term force precision and temporal resolution. Here, we present a method that avoids this compromise: efficient focused-ion-beam (FIB) modification of commercially available cantilevers. Force precision is improved by reducing the cantilever's hydrodynamic drag, and force stability is improved by reducing the cantilever stiffness and by retaining a cantilever's gold coating only at its free end. When applied to a commonly used short cantilever (L=40μm), we achieved sub-pN force precision over 5 decades of bandwidth (0.01-1000Hz) without significantly sacrificing temporal resolution (~75μs). Extending FIB modification to an ultrashort cantilever (L=9μm) also improved force precision and stability, while maintaining 1-μs-scale temporal resolution. Moreover, modifying ultrashort cantilevers also eliminated their inherent underdamped high-frequency motion and thereby avoided applying a rapidly oscillating force across the stretched molecule. Importantly, fabrication of FIB-modified cantilevers is accessible after an initial investment in training. Indeed, undergraduate researchers routinely modify 2-4 cantilevers per hour with the protocol detailed here. Furthermore, this protocol offers the individual user the ability to optimize a cantilever for a particular application. Hence, we expect FIB-modified cantilevers to improve AFM-based studies over broad areas of biophysical research. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Reconstructing the distributed force on an atomic force microscope cantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Ryan; Killgore, Jason

    2017-03-01

    A methodology is developed to reconstruct the force applied to an atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever given the shape in which it vibrates. This is accomplished by rewriting Bernoulli-Euler beam theory such that the force on the cantilever is approximated as a linear superposition of the theoretical cantilever eigenmodes. The weighting factors in this summation are calculated from the amplitude and phase measured along the length of the cantilever. The accuracy of the force reconstruction is shown to depend on the frequency at which the measurement is performed, the number of discrete points measured along the length of the cantilever, and the signal-to-noise ratio of the measured signal. In contrast to other AFM force reconstruction techniques, this method can reconstruct the distribution of force applied over the length of the AFM cantilever. However, this method performs poorly for localized forces applied to the cantilever, such as is typical of most tip-sample interaction forces. Proof of concept experiments are performed on an electrostatically excited cantilever and the expected force distribution is recovered. This force reconstruction technique offers previously unavailable insight into the distributed forces experienced by an AFM cantilever.

  19. Reconstructing the distributed force on an atomic force microscope cantilever.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Ryan; Killgore, Jason

    2017-03-10

    A methodology is developed to reconstruct the force applied to an atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever given the shape in which it vibrates. This is accomplished by rewriting Bernoulli-Euler beam theory such that the force on the cantilever is approximated as a linear superposition of the theoretical cantilever eigenmodes. The weighting factors in this summation are calculated from the amplitude and phase measured along the length of the cantilever. The accuracy of the force reconstruction is shown to depend on the frequency at which the measurement is performed, the number of discrete points measured along the length of the cantilever, and the signal-to-noise ratio of the measured signal. In contrast to other AFM force reconstruction techniques, this method can reconstruct the distribution of force applied over the length of the AFM cantilever. However, this method performs poorly for localized forces applied to the cantilever, such as is typical of most tip-sample interaction forces. Proof of concept experiments are performed on an electrostatically excited cantilever and the expected force distribution is recovered. This force reconstruction technique offers previously unavailable insight into the distributed forces experienced by an AFM cantilever.

  20. Lorentz force actuation of a heated atomic force microscope cantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Byeonghee; Prater, Craig B.; King, William P.

    2012-02-01

    We report Lorentz force-induced actuation of a silicon microcantilever having an integrated resistive heater. Oscillating current through the cantilever interacts with the magnetic field around a NdFeB permanent magnet and induces a Lorentz force that deflects the cantilever. The same current induces cantilever heating. With AC currents as low as 0.2 mA, the cantilever can be oscillated as much as 80 nm at resonance with a DC temperature rise of less than 5 °C. By comparison, the AC temperature variation leads to a thermomechanical oscillation that is about 1000 times smaller than the Lorentz deflection at the cantilever resonance. The cantilever position in the nonuniform magnetic field affects the Lorentz force-induced deflection, with the magnetic field parallel to the cantilever having the largest effect on cantilever actuation. We demonstrate how the cantilever actuation can be used for imaging, and for measuring the local material softening temperature by sensing the contact resonance shift.

  1. Extensive fixed partial dentures on mandibular canine teeth: a 5-year recall study.

    PubMed

    Carlson, B R; Yontchev, E; Carlsson, G E

    1989-01-01

    Twelve patients were followed for 5 years after treatment with a 12-unit cantilever fixed partial denture on the mandibular canines opposed by a complete maxillary denture. Two fixed dentures had to be removed, one because of an abutment tooth root-fracture and one because of rapid marginal bone loss in a terminal stage of leukemia. Caries and periodontal lesions were rare, but other complications, principally related to endodontics, occurred. All complications were amenable to standard treatment procedures. Extensive mandibular cantilever fixed partial dentures may be used in the rehabilitation of patients with a very reduced dentition and a history of difficulties in adapting to removable dentures.

  2. Design of prosthetic cantilever bridgework supported by osseointegrated implants using the finite element method.

    PubMed

    Young, F A; Williams, K R; Draughn, R; Strohaver, R

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to establish a design procedure for fixed metal prostheses supported by osseointegrated implants in order to prevent permanent deformation and hence failure following loading. Previously, the cantilever cross-sectional shape in the buccal lingual plane has been based on clinical experience and subjectivity. This work has relied on the use of linear elastic finite element analysis in order to generate a maximum effective stress at which permanent deformation commences on loading. A number of different cross-sectional shapes were investigated, both of conventional design as well as new innovative possibilities. Both straight and curved cantilever beams 26 mm long were examined. The design failure chosen was based on a von Mises plastic collapse principle by comparing the calculated effective stresses with the yield stress of the metal in simple tension. It was found that the "L" shaped design was more rigid than other designs for a given mass, while a framework based on an open "I" section offers good possibilities particularly when used as curved shapes. Assuming a failure criterion based on the von Mises principle, then "L" shaped Co/Cr or stainless steel frameworks, typically 26 mm of cantilever span, undergo permanent deformation at end loadings between 130 and 140 N depending on section curvature. Since it is known biting loads can exceed these values, good design is critical if such failures are to be avoided.

  3. Resonating cantilever mass sensor with mechanical on-plane excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teva, Jordi; Abadal, Gabriel; Jordà, Xavier; Borrise, Xavier; Davis, Zachary; Barniol, Nuria

    2003-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to report the experimental setup designed, developed and tested in order to achieve the first vibrating mode of a lateral cantilever with mechanical excitation. The on-plane oscillating cantilever is the basis of a proposed mass sensor with an expected resolution in the atto-gram scale. In a first system design, the cantilever is driven electrostatically by an electrode, which is placed parallel to the cantilever. The cantilever is driven to its first resonant mode applying an AC voltage between the cantilever and a driver. Also, a DC voltage is applied to increase the system response. The signal read-out of the transducer is the capacitive current of the cantilever-driver system. The mass sensor proposed, based on this cantilever-driver structure (CDS), is integrated with a CMOS circuitry in order to minimize the parasitic capacitances, that in this case take special relevance because of the low level output current coming from the transducer. Moreover, the electrostatic excitation introduces a parasitic current that overlaps the current due to the resonance. The mechanical excitation is an alternative excitation method which aim is to eliminate the excitation current. Here we describe the experimental facilities developed to achieve mechanical excitation and report preliminary results obtained by this excitation technique. The results are complemented with dynamic simulations of an equivalent system model that are in accordance with the experimental values.

  4. 11. VIEW, LOOKING SOUTHEAST, ALONG CENTERLINE FROM SOUTH CANTILEVER TOWARD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. VIEW, LOOKING SOUTHEAST, ALONG CENTERLINE FROM SOUTH CANTILEVER TOWARD TOWARD NORTH PORTAL. Note vertical displacement in deck caused by partial collapse at point of connection between south cantilever arm and suspended span. - Smith River Bridge, CA State Highway 199 Spanning Smith River, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

  5. Interlaboratory round robin on cantilever calibration for AFM force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    te Riet, Joost; Katan, Allard J; Rankl, Christian; Stahl, Stefan W; van Buul, Arend M; Phang, In Yee; Gomez-Casado, Alberto; Schön, Peter; Gerritsen, Jan W; Cambi, Alessandra; Rowan, Alan E; Vancso, G Julius; Jonkheijm, Pascal; Huskens, Jurriaan; Oosterkamp, Tjerk H; Gaub, Hermann; Hinterdorfer, Peter; Figdor, Carl G; Speller, Sylvia

    2011-12-01

    Single-molecule force spectroscopy studies performed by Atomic Force Microscopes (AFMs) strongly rely on accurately determined cantilever spring constants. Hence, to calibrate cantilevers, a reliable calibration protocol is essential. Although the thermal noise method and the direct Sader method are frequently used for cantilever calibration, there is no consensus on the optimal calibration of soft and V-shaped cantilevers, especially those used in force spectroscopy. Therefore, in this study we aimed at establishing a commonly accepted approach to accurately calibrate compliant and V-shaped cantilevers. In a round robin experiment involving eight different laboratories we compared the thermal noise and the Sader method on ten commercial and custom-built AFMs. We found that spring constants of both rectangular and V-shaped cantilevers can accurately be determined with both methods, although the Sader method proved to be superior. Furthermore, we observed that simultaneous application of both methods on an AFM proved an accurate consistency check of the instrument and thus provides optimal and highly reproducible calibration. To illustrate the importance of optimal calibration, we show that for biological force spectroscopy studies, an erroneously calibrated cantilever can significantly affect the derived (bio)physical parameters. Taken together, our findings demonstrated that with the pre-established protocol described reliable spring constants can be obtained for different types of cantilevers. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Analysis of wood cantilever loaded at free end

    Treesearch

    Jen Y. Liu; Douglas R. Rammer

    2003-01-01

    A wood cantilever loaded at the free end was analyzed using the anisotropic elasticity theory. This report presents a two-dimensional numerical example of a Sitka spruce cantilever in the longitudinal-radial plane. When the grain slope is zero, ie., the beam axis coincides with the longitudinal axis of wood, the stresses in the beam and the deflection of the beam are...

  7. Study of Silicon Cantilevers by the Photoacoustic Elastic Bending Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todorovic, D. M.; Rabasovic, M. D.; Markushev, D. D.; Jovic, V.; Radulovic, K. T.

    2017-03-01

    Rectangular silicon cantilevers are studied by the photoacoustic (PA) elastic bending method. Experimental signals versus modulation frequency of the excitation optical beam are measured and analyzed in a frequency range from 20 Hz to 50 000 Hz. The procedure for experimental signal correction to eliminate the frequency characteristics of the measuring system is given. The corrected experimental signal shows a good correlation with theoretically calculated PA signal at frequencies below 32 000 Hz. The corrected experimental PA elastic bending signals for cantilevers with different thicknesses are analyzed. The experimental results allow identifying the resonant frequency (the first resonant mode) of the cantilever vibrations. These values are in good agreement with the theoretically computed values. A theoretical model of the optically excited Si cantilever is derived, taking into account plasmaelastic, thermoelastic, and thermodiffusion mechanisms. Dynamic relations for the amplitude and phase of electronic and thermal elastic vibrations in optically excited cantilevers are derived. The theoretical model is compared to the experimental results.

  8. Multimodal cantilevers with novel piezoelectric layer topology for sensitivity enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Ruppert, Michael G; Yong, Yuen Kuan

    2017-01-01

    Self-sensing techniques for atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers have several advantageous characteristics compared to the optical beam deflection method. The possibility of down scaling, parallelization of cantilever arrays and the absence of optical interference associated imaging artifacts have led to an increased research interest in these methods. However, for multifrequency AFM, the optimization of the transducer layout on the cantilever for higher order modes has not been addressed. To fully utilize an integrated piezoelectric transducer, this work alters the layout of the piezoelectric layer to maximize both the deflection of the cantilever and measured piezoelectric charge response for a given mode with respect to the spatial distribution of the strain. On a prototype cantilever design, significant increases in actuator and sensor sensitivities were achieved for the first four modes without any substantial increase in sensor noise. The transduction mechanism is specifically targeted at multifrequency AFM and has the potential to provide higher resolution imaging on higher order modes. PMID:28326225

  9. Cantilever transducers as a platform for chemical and biological sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrik, Nickolay V.; Sepaniak, Michael J.; Datskos, Panos G.

    2004-07-01

    Since the late 1980s there have been spectacular developments in micromechanical or microelectro-mechanical (MEMS) systems which have enabled the exploration of transduction modes that involve mechanical energy and are based primarily on mechanical phenomena. As a result an innovative family of chemical and biological sensors has emerged. In this article, we discuss sensors with transducers in a form of cantilevers. While MEMS represents a diverse family of designs, devices with simple cantilever configurations are especially attractive as transducers for chemical and biological sensors. The review deals with four important aspects of cantilever transducers: (i) operation principles and models; (ii) microfabrication; (iii) figures of merit; and (iv) applications of cantilever sensors. We also provide a brief analysis of historical predecessors of the modern cantilever sensors.

  10. Serial weighting of micro-objects with resonant microchanneled cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ossola, Dario; Dörig, Pablo; Vörös, János; Zambelli, Tomaso; Vassalli, Massimo

    2016-10-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilevers have proven to be very effective mass sensors. The attachment of a small mass to a vibrating cantilever produces a resonance frequency shift that can be monitored, providing the ability to measure mass changes down to a few molecules resolution. Nevertheless, the lack of a practical method to handle the catch and release process required for dynamic weighting of microobjects strongly hindered the application of the technology beyond proof of concept measurements. Here, a method is proposed in which FluidFM hollow cantilevers are exploited to overcome the standard limitations of AFM-based mass sensors, providing high throughput single object weighting with picogram accuracy. The extension of the dynamic models of AFM cantilevers to hollow cantilevers was discussed and the effectiveness of mass weighting in air was validated on test samples.

  11. Cantilever arrays with self-aligned nanotips of uniform height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koelmans, W. W.; Peters, T.; Berenschot, E.; de Boer, M. J.; Siekman, M. H.; Abelmann, L.

    2012-04-01

    Cantilever arrays are employed to increase the throughput of imaging and manipulation at the nanoscale. We present a fabrication process to construct cantilever arrays with nanotips that show a uniform tip-sample distance. Such uniformity is crucial, because in many applications the cantilevers do not feature individual tip-sample spacing control. Uniform cantilever arrays lead to very similar tip-sample interaction within an array, enable non-contact modes for arrays and give better control over the load force in contact modes. The developed process flow uses a single mask to define both tips and cantilevers. An additional mask is required for the back side etch. The tips are self-aligned in the convex corner at the free end of each cantilever. Although we use standard optical contact lithography, we show that the convex corner can be sharpened to a nanometre scale radius by an isotropic underetch step. The process is robust and wafer-scale. The resonance frequencies of the cantilevers within an array are shown to be highly uniform with a relative standard error of 0.26% or lower. The tip-sample distance within an array of up to ten cantilevers is measured to have a standard error around 10 nm. An imaging demonstration using the AFM shows that all cantilevers in the array have a sharp tip with a radius below 10 nm. The process flow for the cantilever arrays finds application in probe-based nanolithography, probe-based data storage, nanomanufacturing and parallel scanning probe microscopy.

  12. [Fixed restorations of a dentition with reduced periodontal support in partially edentulous patients].

    PubMed

    De Boever, J A

    1990-05-01

    Placing restorations in patients who have a limited number of teeth and reduced periodontal support is no longer controversial, given careful selection of patients, preprosthetic periodontal treatment, and a thorough maintenance program. In this paper, attention is drawn to general prosthetic planning, including the use of long-span bridges. Because of increased tooth mobility, cross-arch stabilization of the bridges with interlocks or with postsolder connections is advocated. The framework should be rigid enough to avoid deflection of the bridges. Preparation of the vital and nonvital abutment teeth needs much attention. To avoid using a removable prosthesis, a cantilever bridge can be used, but it makes the construction more prone to fracture. A number of periodontal-prosthetic patients demonstrate a "posterior collapsed bite." Rehabilitation requires the restoration at a "new" vertical dimension of occlusion. This can be done, without functional hazards, in a one-step clinical procedure. A long functional adaptation period is unnecessary. The treatment outcome of furcations is not always predictable. Therefore, hemisection or amputation are often the treatments of choice. On these hemisected roots, bridges can be made and successfully maintained. Finally, it should be stressed that not all teeth have to be replaced: a premolar, shortened-arch occlusion is often sufficient for adequate function.

  13. In-situ piezoresponse force microscopy cantilever mode shape profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Proksch, R.

    2015-08-21

    The frequency-dependent amplitude and phase in piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) measurements are shown to be a consequence of the Euler-Bernoulli (EB) dynamics of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever beams used to make the measurements. Changes in the cantilever mode shape as a function of changes in the boundary conditions determine the sensitivity of cantilevers to forces between the tip and the sample. Conventional PFM and AFM measurements are made with the motion of the cantilever measured at one optical beam detector (OBD) spot location. A single OBD spot location provides a limited picture of the total cantilever motion, and in fact, experimentally observed cantilever amplitude and phase are shown to be strongly dependent on the OBD spot position for many measurements. In this work, the commonly observed frequency dependence of PFM response is explained through experimental measurements and analytic theoretical EB modeling of the PFM response as a function of both frequency and OBD spot location on a periodically poled lithium niobate sample. One notable conclusion is that a common choice of OBD spot location—at or near the tip of the cantilever—is particularly vulnerable to frequency dependent amplitude and phase variations stemming from dynamics of the cantilever sensor rather than from the piezoresponse of the sample.

  14. In-situ piezoresponse force microscopy cantilever mode shape profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proksch, R.

    2015-08-01

    The frequency-dependent amplitude and phase in piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) measurements are shown to be a consequence of the Euler-Bernoulli (EB) dynamics of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever beams used to make the measurements. Changes in the cantilever mode shape as a function of changes in the boundary conditions determine the sensitivity of cantilevers to forces between the tip and the sample. Conventional PFM and AFM measurements are made with the motion of the cantilever measured at one optical beam detector (OBD) spot location. A single OBD spot location provides a limited picture of the total cantilever motion, and in fact, experimentally observed cantilever amplitude and phase are shown to be strongly dependent on the OBD spot position for many measurements. In this work, the commonly observed frequency dependence of PFM response is explained through experimental measurements and analytic theoretical EB modeling of the PFM response as a function of both frequency and OBD spot location on a periodically poled lithium niobate sample. One notable conclusion is that a common choice of OBD spot location—at or near the tip of the cantilever—is particularly vulnerable to frequency dependent amplitude and phase variations stemming from dynamics of the cantilever sensor rather than from the piezoresponse of the sample.

  15. Pulling on super paramagnetic beads with micro cantilevers: single molecule mechanical assay application.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Romina; Aguilar Sandoval, Felipe; Wilson, Christian A M; Melo, Francisco

    2015-07-22

    This paper demonstrates that it is possible to trap and release a super paramagnetic micro bead by fixing three super paramagnetic micro beads in a triangular array at the sensitive end of a micro cantilever, and by simply switching on/off an external magnetic field. To provide evidence of this principle we trap a micro bead that is attached to the free end of single DNA molecule and that has been previously fixed at the other end to a glass surface, using the standard sample preparation protocol of magnetic tweezers assays. The switching process is reversible which preserves the integrity of the tethered molecule, and a local force applied over the tethered bead excludes the neighbouring beads from the magnetic trap. We have developed a quadrature phase interferometer which is able to perform under fluid environments to accurately measure small deflections, which permits the exploration of DNA elasticity. Our results agree with measurements from magnetic tweezer assays performed under similar conditions. Furthermore, compared to the magnetic tweezer methodology, the combination of the magnetic trap with a suitable measurement system for cantilever deflection, allows for the exploration of a wide range of forces using a local method that has an improved temporal resolution.

  16. Forced vibrations of a cantilever beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Repetto, C. E.; Roatta, A.; Welti, R. J.

    2012-09-01

    The theoretical and experimental solutions for vibrations of a vertical-oriented, prismatic, thin cantilever beam are studied. The beam orientation is ‘downwards’, i.e. the clamped end is above the free end, and it is subjected to a transverse movement at a selected frequency. Both the behaviour of the device driver and the beam's weak-damping resonance response are compared for the case of an elastic beam made from PVC plastic excited over a frequency range from 1 to 30 Hz. The current analysis predicts the presence of ‘pseudo-nodes’ in the normal modes of oscillation. It is important to note that our results were obtained using very simple equipment, present in the teaching laboratory.

  17. Cantilevered multilevel LIGA devices and methods

    DOEpatents

    Morales, Alfredo Martin; Domeier, Linda A.

    2002-01-01

    In the formation of multilevel LIGA microstructures, a preformed sheet of photoresist material, such as polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) is patterned by exposure through a mask to radiation, such as X-rays, and developed using a developer to remove the exposed photoresist material. A first microstructure is then formed by electroplating metal into the areas from which the photoresist has been removed. Additional levels of microstructure are added to the initial microstructure by covering the first microstructure with a conductive polymer, machining the conductive polymer layer to reveal the surface of the first microstructure, sealing the conductive polymer and surface of the first microstructure with a metal layer, and then forming the second level of structure on top of the first level structure. In such a manner, multiple layers of microstructure can be built up to allow complex cantilevered microstructures to be formed.

  18. Continuously tunable terahertz metamaterial employing magnetically actuated cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Ozbey, Burak; Aktas, Ozgur

    2011-03-28

    Terahertz metamaterial structures that employ flexing microelectromechanical cantilevers for tuning the resonance frequency of an electric split-ring resonator are presented. The tuning cantilevers are coated with a magnetic thin-film and are actuated by an external magnetic field. The use of cantilevers enables continuous tuning of the resonance frequency over a large frequency range. The use of an externally applied magnetic field for actuation simplifies the metamaterial structure and its use for sensor or filter applications. A structure for minimizing the actuating field is derived. The dependence of the tunable bandwidth on frequency is discussed.

  19. Characterization of magnetically actuated resonant cantilevers in viscous fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vančura, Cyril; Lichtenberg, Jan; Hierlemann, Andreas; Josse, Fabien

    2005-10-01

    The vibration behavior of magnetically actuated resonant microcantilevers immersed in viscous fluids has been studied. A dependence of the resonance frequency and the quality factor (Q factor) on the fluid properties, such as density and viscosity and on the cantilever geometry is described. Various cantilever geometries are analyzed in pure water and glycerol solutions, and the results are explained in terms of the added displaced fluid mass and the fluid damping force for both the resonance frequency and the quality factor. An in-depth knowledge and understanding of such systems is necessary when analyzing resonant cantilevers as biochemical sensors in liquid environments.

  20. An approach towards 3D sensitive AFM cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koops, Richard; Fokkema, Vincent

    2014-04-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) tapping mode is a highly sensitive local probing technique that is very useful to study and measure surface properties down to the atomic scale. The tapping mode is mostly implemented using the resonance of the first bending mode of the cantilever and therefore provides sensitivity mainly along the direction of this oscillation. Driven by the semiconductor industry, there is an increasing need for accurate measurements of nanoscale structures for side wall characterization by AFM that requires additional sensitivity in the lateral direction. The conventional tapping mode has been augmented by various authors, for example by tilting the cantilever system (Cho et al 2011 Rev. Sci. Instrum. 82 023707) to access the sidewall or using a torsion mode (Dai et al 2011 Meas. Sci. Technol. 22 094009) of the cantilever to provide additional lateral sensitivity. These approaches however trade lateral sensitivity for vertical sensitivity or still lack sensitivity in the remaining lateral direction. We present an approach towards true 3D sensitivity for AFM cantilevers based on simultaneous excitation and optical detection of multiple cantilever resonance modes along three axes. Tuning the excitation of the cantilever to specific frequencies provides a mechanism to select only those cantilever modes that have the desired characteristics. Additionally, cantilever engineering has been used to design and create a substructure within the cantilever that has been optimized for specific resonance behavior around 4 MHz. In contrast to the conventional approach of using a piezo to actuate the cantilever modulation, we present results on photo-thermal excitation using an intensity modulated low-power laser source. By tightly focusing the excitation spot on the cantilever we were able to attain a deflection efficiency of 0.7 nm µW-1 for the first bending mode. The presented approach results in an efficient all optical excitation and deflection detection

  1. Voltage generation of piezoelectric cantilevers by laser heating

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Chun-Yi; Liu, Wei-Hung; Chen, Yang-Fang; Shih, Wan Y.; Gao, Xiaotong; Shih, Wei-Heng

    2012-01-01

    Converting ambient thermal energy into electricity is of great interest in harvesting energy from the environment. Piezoelectric cantilevers have previously been shown to be an effective biosensor and a tool for elasticity mapping. Here we show that a single piezoelectric (lead-zirconate titanate (PZT)) layer cantilever can be used to convert heat to electricity through pyroelectric effect. Furthermore, piezoelectric-metal (PZT-Ti) bi-layer cantilever showed an enhanced induced voltage over the single PZT layer alone due to the additional piezoelectric effect. This type of device can be a way for converting heat energy into electricity. PMID:23258941

  2. Piezoresistive cantilever array sensor for consolidated bioprocess monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Seonghwan Sam; Rahman, Touhidur; Senesac, Larry R; Davison, Brian H; Thundat, Thomas George

    2009-01-01

    Cellulolytic microbes occur in diverse natural niches and are being screened for industrial modification and utility. A microbe for Consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) development can rapidly degrade pure cellulose and then ferment the resulting sugars into fuels. To identify and screen for novel microbes for CBP, we have developed a piezoresistive cantilever array sensor which is capable of simultaneous monitoring of glucose and ethanol concentration changes in a phosphate buffer solution. 4-mercaptophenylboronic acid (4-MPBA) and polyethyleneglycol (PEG)-thiol are employed to functionalize each piezoresistive cantilever for glucose and ethanol sensing, respectively. Successful concentration measurements of glucose and ethanol with minimal interferences are obtained with our cantilever array sensor.

  3. Energy harvesting from radio frequency propagation using piezoelectric cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Mahmoud Al; Alshareef, H. N.

    2012-02-01

    This work reports an induced strain in a piezoelectric cantilever due to radio frequency signal propagation. The piezoelectric actuator is coupled to radio frequency (RF) line through a gap of 0.25 mm. When a voltage signal of 10 Vpp propagates in the line it sets an alternating current in the actuator electrodes. This flowing current drives the piezoelectric cantilever to mechanical movement, especially when the frequency of the RF signal matches the mechanical resonant frequency of the cantilever. Output voltage signals versus frequency for both mechanical vibrational and RF signal excitations have been measured using different loads.

  4. View from underneath bridge on west side shows cantilevered steel ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View from underneath bridge on west side shows cantilevered steel supports for sidewalk above. - Raging River Bridge No. 234A, Preston-Fall City Road & Southeast Forty-fourth Place, Fall City, King County, WA

  5. 14. DETAIL VIEW OF THE CANTILEVER & 'S' BRACKETS AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. DETAIL VIEW OF THE CANTILEVER & 'S' BRACKETS AND THE SOUTH HANDRAIL, PANEL 1, NEAR THE SOUTHEAST ABUTMENT, LOOKING NORTHWEST Harms - Benton Street Bridge, Spanning Iowa River at Benton Street, Iowa City, Johnson County, IA

  6. 22. DETAIL OF EAST (CANADIAN) CANTILEVER AND ANCHOR ARMS OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. DETAIL OF EAST (CANADIAN) CANTILEVER AND ANCHOR ARMS OF MAIN SPAN, SHOWING PIER C. VIEW TO NORTH. - Blue Water Bridge, Spanning St. Clair River at I-69, I-94, & Canadian Route 402, Port Huron, St. Clair County, MI

  7. 21. DETAIL OF WEST (AMERICAN) CANTILEVER AND ANCHOR ARMS OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. DETAIL OF WEST (AMERICAN) CANTILEVER AND ANCHOR ARMS OF MAIN SPAN, SHOWING PIER M. VIEW TO NORTH. - Blue Water Bridge, Spanning St. Clair River at I-69, I-94, & Canadian Route 402, Port Huron, St. Clair County, MI

  8. Superstructure Main Bridge, Cross Sections, Cantilever Structure Huey ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Superstructure - Main Bridge, Cross Sections, Cantilever Structure - Huey P. Long Bridge, Spanning Mississippi River approximately midway between nine & twelve mile points upstream from & west of New Orleans, Jefferson, Jefferson Parish, LA

  9. OBLIQUE VIEW OF THE NORTHEAST SIDE. NOTE THE CANTILEVERED CANOPY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OBLIQUE VIEW OF THE NORTHEAST SIDE. NOTE THE CANTILEVERED CANOPY OVER THE FRONT DOOR AND BELT COURSE OF THREE FLARED BANDS. VIEW FACING SOUTHEAST. - Hickam Field, Officers' Housing Type M, 113 Beard Avenue, Honolulu, Honolulu County, HI

  10. DETAIL OF CANTILEVERED MEZZANINE OBSERVATION ROOM ON SOUTH WEST CORNER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF CANTILEVERED MEZZANINE OBSERVATION ROOM ON SOUTH- WEST CORNER OF BUILDING. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Plattsburgh Air Force Base, Base Engineer Pavement & Grounds Facility, Off Colorado Street, Plattsburgh, Clinton County, NY

  11. 258. Dennis Hill, Photographer April 1998 VIEW OF CANTILEVER TRUSS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    258. Dennis Hill, Photographer April 1998 VIEW OF CANTILEVER TRUSS ANCHOR ARM AT PIERS E- AND E-2, SOUTH SIDE, FACING NORTH. - San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge, Spanning San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  12. 4. SIDE VIEW OF BRIDGE, LOOKING SOUTHWEST, SHOWING ARCHES, CANTILEVERED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. SIDE VIEW OF BRIDGE, LOOKING SOUTHWEST, SHOWING ARCHES, CANTILEVERED WALKWAY, DECK BEAMS AND STREAMBED - Benson Street Concrete Bowstring Bridge, Spanning Mill Creek at Benson Street, Lockland, Hamilton County, OH

  13. 7. Detail of sidewalk cantilevers and walkway between viaduct and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Detail of sidewalk cantilevers and walkway between viaduct and livestock exchange building. View to southwest. - South Omaha Union Stock Yards, Buckingham Road Viaduct, Twenty-ninth Street spanning Stockyard Cattle Pens, Omaha, Douglas County, NE

  14. DETAIL OF SOUTH SAN GABRIEL RIVER BRIDGE, CANTILEVER SPAN CONNECTION, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF SOUTH SAN GABRIEL RIVER BRIDGE, CANTILEVER SPAN CONNECTION, LOOKING NORTHWEST. - South San Gabriel River Bridge, Spanning South Fork of San Gabriel River at Georgetown at Business Route 35, Georgetown, Williamson County, TX

  15. DETAIL OF NORTH SAN GABRIEL RIVER BRIDGE, CANTILEVER SPAN CONNECTION, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF NORTH SAN GABRIEL RIVER BRIDGE, CANTILEVER SPAN CONNECTION, LOOKING SOUTHEAST. - North San Gabriel River Bridge, Spanning North Fork of San Gabriel River at Business Route 35, Georgetown, Williamson County, TX

  16. 20. DETAIL OF WEST ANCHOR SPAN, CANTILEVER ARMS AND WEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. DETAIL OF WEST ANCHOR SPAN, CANTILEVER ARMS AND WEST HALF OF SUSPENDED SPAN OF THROUGH TRUSS. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - MacArthur Bridge, Spanning Mississippi River on Highway 34 between IA & IL, Burlington, Des Moines County, IA

  17. 29. DECK / WEB / LATERAL BRACING DETAIL OF CANTILEVER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. DECK / WEB / LATERAL BRACING DETAIL OF CANTILEVER ARM OF THROUGH TRUSS. VIEW TO WEST. - MacArthur Bridge, Spanning Mississippi River on Highway 34 between IA & IL, Burlington, Des Moines County, IA

  18. MEMS Cantilever Sensor for THz Photoacoustic Chemical Sensing and Spectroscopy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-26

    texture for the preferential crystal formation of the PZT. Deposited by chemical solution deposition (sol-gel), a 1 μm thick PZT film was used as the...constructed out of stainless steel . The test chamber consisted of two segments; a front and back half with the cantilever sensor mounted in between them...that can be used with a piezoelectric cantilever design. A single 1/4 in stainless steel vacuum line connection is also welded to the PA chamber

  19. Harmonic detection of resonance in micro- and nano-cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaillard, Jay B.

    Over the past decade there has been an explosion in the study of cantilevered beams on the micron and submicron dimension. The applications and research that involve these structures include state-of-the-art electronic components, sensors, and more recently, studies aimed at elucidating the mechanical properties of cantilevered carbon nanotubes and semiconducting nanowires. In nanoelectro-mechanical systems (NEMS), it is desirable to develop a capacitive readout method involving only two electrodes that are fully compliant with standard CMOS technology. However, the main drawback with this method is the ability to detect resonance in the presence of parasitic capacitance, which is due to the fringing electric fields present between the electrodes (cantilever and the counter electrode). The work presented in this thesis deals with the electrical actuation/detection of mechanical resonance in individual micron and sub-micron sized cantilevers. The aim is to overcome parasitic capacitance which masks the detection of resonance signal in these cantilevers thereby increasing the signal-to-background ratio (SBR). In our method, a silicon microcantilever, or cantilevered multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT), is placed close to a counter electrode whose potential is varied at a frequency o. An electrical signal comes from the flow of charge on and off of the cantilever when o equals a resonant frequency o 0 of the cantilever. Higher harmonics of o0 are measured to overcome the parasitic capacitance. This technique, termed harmonic detection of resonance (HDR), allows detection at frequencies well removed from the driving frequency thereby increasing the SBR by ~3 orders of magnitude. It is shown that HDR allows the detection of resonance even in multi-walled carbon nanotubes, which have diameters on the order of 50 nm. Furthermore, superharmonics inherent to electrostatic actuation, are shown to occur at driving frequencies of o0/n where n = 1,2,3,....

  20. Improved Sensitivity MEMS Cantilever Sensor for Terahertz Photoacoustic Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Coutu, Ronald A; Medvedev, Ivan R; Petkie, Douglas T

    2016-02-19

    In this paper, a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) cantilever sensor was designed, modeled and fabricated to measure the terahertz (THz) radiation induced photoacoustic (PA) response of gases under low vacuum conditions. This work vastly improves cantilever sensitivity over previous efforts, by reducing internal beam stresses, minimizing out of plane beam curvature and optimizing beam damping. In addition, fabrication yield was improved by approximately 50% by filleting the cantilever's anchor and free end to help reduce high stress areas that occurred during device fabrication and processing. All of the cantilever sensors were fabricated using silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers and tested in a custom built, low-volume, vacuum chamber. The resulting cantilever sensors exhibited improved signal to noise ratios, sensitivities and normalized noise equivalent absorption (NNEA) coefficients of approximately 4.28 × 10(-10) cm(-1)·WHz(-1/2). This reported NNEA represents approximately a 70% improvement over previously fabricated and tested SOI cantilever sensors for THz PA spectroscopy.

  1. Atomic force microscope cantilever calibration using a focused ion beam.

    PubMed

    Slattery, Ashley D; Quinton, Jamie S; Gibson, Christopher T

    2012-07-20

    A calibration method is presented for determining the spring constant of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers, which is a modification of the established Cleveland added mass technique. A focused ion beam (FIB) is used to remove a well-defined volume from a cantilever with known density, substantially reducing the uncertainty usually present in the added mass method. The technique can be applied to any type of AFM cantilever; but for the lowest uncertainty it is best applied to silicon cantilevers with spring constants above 0.7 N m(-1), where uncertainty is demonstrated to be typically between 7 and 10%. Despite the removal of mass from the cantilever, the calibration method presented does not impair the probes' ability to acquire data. The technique has been extensively tested in order to verify the underlying assumptions in the method. This method was compared to a number of other calibration methods and practical improvements to some of these techniques were developed, as well as important insights into the behavior of FIB modified cantilevers. These results will prove useful to research groups concerned with the application of microcantilevers to nanoscience, in particular for cases where maintaining pristine AFM tip condition is critical.

  2. Piezoresistive cantilever force-clamp system

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sung-Jin; Petzold, Bryan C.; Pruitt, Beth L.; Goodman, Miriam B.

    2011-04-15

    We present a microelectromechanical device-based tool, namely, a force-clamp system that sets or ''clamps'' the scaled force and can apply designed loading profiles (e.g., constant, sinusoidal) of a desired magnitude. The system implements a piezoresistive cantilever as a force sensor and the built-in capacitive sensor of a piezoelectric actuator as a displacement sensor, such that sample indentation depth can be directly calculated from the force and displacement signals. A programmable real-time controller operating at 100 kHz feedback calculates the driving voltage of the actuator. The system has two distinct modes: a force-clamp mode that controls the force applied to a sample and a displacement-clamp mode that controls the moving distance of the actuator. We demonstrate that the system has a large dynamic range (sub-nN up to tens of {mu}N force and nm up to tens of {mu}m displacement) in both air and water, and excellent dynamic response (fast response time, <2 ms and large bandwidth, 1 Hz up to 1 kHz). In addition, the system has been specifically designed to be integrated with other instruments such as a microscope with patch-clamp electronics. We demonstrate the capabilities of the system by using it to calibrate the stiffness and sensitivity of an electrostatic actuator and to measure the mechanics of a living, freely moving Caenorhabditis elegans nematode.

  3. Measurement of Mechanical Properties of Cantilever Shaped Materials

    PubMed Central

    Finot, Eric; Passian, Ali; Thundat, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Microcantilevers were first introduced as imaging probes in Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) due to their extremely high sensitivity in measuring surface forces. The versatility of these probes, however, allows the sensing and measurement of a host of mechanical properties of various materials. Sensor parameters such as resonance frequency, quality factor, amplitude of vibration and bending due to a differential stress can all be simultaneously determined for a cantilever. When measuring the mechanical properties of materials, identifying and discerning the most influential parameters responsible for the observed changes in the cantilever response are important. We will, therefore, discuss the effects of various force fields such as those induced by mass loading, residual stress, internal friction of the material, and other changes in the mechanical properties of the microcantilevers. Methods to measure variations in temperature, pressure, or molecular adsorption of water molecules are also discussed. Often these effects occur simultaneously, increasing the number of parameters that need to be concurrently measured to ensure the reliability of the sensors. We therefore systematically investigate the geometric and environmental effects on cantilever measurements including the chemical nature of the underlying interactions. To address the geometric effects we have considered cantilevers with a rectangular or circular cross section. The chemical nature is addressed by using cantilevers fabricated with metals and/or dielectrics. Selective chemical etching, swelling or changes in Young's modulus of the surface were investigated by means of polymeric and inorganic coatings. Finally to address the effect of the environment in which the cantilever operates, the Knudsen number was determined to characterize the molecule-cantilever collisions. Also bimaterial cantilevers with high thermal sensitivity were used to discern the effect of temperature variations. When appropriate

  4. The stability of a flexible cantilever in viscous channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cisonni, Julien; Lucey, Anthony D.; Elliott, Novak S. J.; Heil, Matthias

    2017-05-01

    Most studies of the flow-induced flutter instability of a flexible cantilever have assumed inviscid flow because of the high flow speeds and the large scale of the structures encountered in the wide range of applications of this fluid-structure interaction (FSI) system. However, for instance, in the fields of energy harvesting and biomechanics, low flow speeds and small- and micro-scale systems can give relatively low Reynolds numbers so that fluid viscosity needs to be explicitly accounted for to provide reliable predictions of channel-immersed-cantilever stability. In this study, we employ a numerical model coupling the Navier-Stokes equations and a one-dimensional elastic beam model. We conduct a parametric investigation to determine the conditions leading to flutter instability of a slender flexible cantilever immersed in two-dimensional viscous channel flow for Reynolds numbers lower than 1000. The large set of numerical simulations carried out allows predictions of the influence of decreasing Reynolds numbers and of the cantilever confinement on the single-mode neutral stability of the FSI system and on the pre- and post-critical cantilever motion. This model's predictions are also compared to those of a FSI model containing a two-dimensional solid model in order to assess, primarily, the effect of the cantilever slenderness in the simulations. Results show that an increasing contribution of viscosity to the hydrodynamic forces significantly alters the instability boundaries. In general, a decrease in Reynolds number is predicted to produce a stabilisation of the FSI system, which is more pronounced for high fluid-to-solid mass ratios. For particular fluid-to-solid mass ratios, viscous effects can lower the critical velocity and lead to a change in the first unstable structural mode. However, at constant Reynolds number, the effects of viscosity on the system stability are diminished by the confinement of the cantilever, which strengthens the importance of

  5. The multiple cantilever system: a solution for a failed precision attachment denture case.

    PubMed

    Schweikert, E D

    1999-01-01

    Multiple-cantilevered pontic bridges can be a great alternative to dental implants and distal extension prostheses. Dental hygiene must be considered the most important factor in preserving the status quo of the permanent restoration. Traumatic occlusion, which can occur because of the widened periodontal space and greater mobility of a multiple-cantilever bridge, is not automatically a sign of failure. As long as the mobility of the fixed bridge does not increase and the patient can function and feel comfortable with it, a successful therapy can be concluded. If marginal periodontitis exists, destruction of the cervical ligaments, bone resorption, and apical migration of the epithelium will occur. Through loss of the supportive structures, hypermobility will increase. If the destructive factors of marginal periodontitis are not eliminated, the hypermobility can interfere with masticatory function. It is important that patients be made aware of this possibility. Regular recalls in the beginning of the maintenance program will emphasize the importance of the home-care system.

  6. Load transfer in tilted implants with varying cantilever lengths in an all-on-four situation.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, A O; Padmanabhan, T V; Mohamed, K; Natarajan, S; Elavia, U

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate if tilting of the distal implant at different angulations (30° and 40°) with different cantilever lengths (4 mm and 12 mm) affects the stress and strain distribution in an 'all-on-four' situation. A completely edentulous mandible was modelled with four tapered implants placed within the interforaminal region to receive an all acrylic fixed prosthesis. The two posterior implants were tilted at an angle of 30° and 40°. The prosthesis cantilever was given two different variables of 4 mm and 12 mm. For all models, the equivalent von Mises stress and strain was analysed using three-dimensional finite element analysis. Statistical significance (p < 0.05) was seen when a comparison was made for the stress developed on the implant and cortical bone between the 30° and 40° distally tilted posterior implants in both situations. No significance was seen in the trabecular bone and on the strain developed in these situations. The study shows that increasing the tilt of the distal implants does not increase the stress significantly. It also shows that the architecture of the mandible plays a major role during treatment planning of a completely edentulous patient. © 2012 Australian Dental Association.

  7. SiC-Based Miniature High-Temperature Cantilever Anemometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okojie, Robert S.; Fralick, Gustave; Saad, George J.

    2004-01-01

    The figure depicts a miniature cantilever-type anemometer that has been developed as a prototype of compact, relatively nonintrusive anemometers that can function at temperatures up to 600 C and that can be expected to be commercially mass-producible at low cost. The design of this anemometer, and especially the packaging aspect of the design, is intended to enable measurement of turbulence in the high-temperature, high-vibration environment of a turbine engine or in any similar environment. The main structural components of the anemometer include a single-crystal SiC cantilever and two polycrystalline SiC clamping plates, all made from chemical-vapor-deposited silicon carbide. Fabrication of these components from the same basic material eliminates thermal-expansion mismatch, which has introduced spurious thermomechanical stresses in cantilever-type anemometers of prior design. The clamping plates are heavily oxidized to improve electrical insulation at high temperature. A cavity that serves as a receptacle for the clamped end of the cantilever is etched into one end of one clamping plate. Trenches that collectively constitute a socket for a multipin electrical plug (for connection to external electronic circuitry) are etched into the opposite end of this clamping plate. Metal strips for electrical contact are deposited on one face of the other clamping plate. Piezoresistive single-crystal SiC thin-film strain gauges are etched in the n-type SiC epilayer in a Wheatstone-bridge configuration. Metal contact pads on the cantilever that extend into the clamping-receptacle area, are obtained by deposition and patterning using standard semiconductor photolithography and etching methods. The cantilever and the two clamping plates are assembled into a sandwich structure that is then clamped in a stainless-steel housing. The Wheatstone- bridge carrying SiC cantilever with the metal contact pads on the piezoresistors is slid into the receptacle in the bottom clamping plate

  8. Tuning the Spring Constant of Cantilever-free Probe Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichelsdoerfer, Daniel J.; Brown, Keith A.; Boya, Radha; Shim, Wooyoung; Mirkin, Chad A.

    2013-03-01

    The versatility of atomic force microscope (AFM) based techniques such as scanning probe lithography is due in part to the utilization of a cantilever that can be fabricated to match a desired application. In contrast, cantilever-free scanning probe lithography utilizes a low cost array of probes on a compliant backing layer that allows for high throughput nanofabrication but lacks the tailorability afforded by the cantilever in traditional AFM. Here, we present a method to measure and tune the spring constant of probes in a cantilever-free array by adjusting the mechanical properties of the underlying elastomeric layer. Using this technique, we are able to fabricate large-area silicon probe arrays with spring constants that can be tuned in the range from 7 to 150 N/m. This technique offers an advantage in that the spring constant depends linearly on the geometry of the probe, which is in contrast to traditional cantilever-based lithography where the spring constant varies as the cube of the beam width and thickness. To illustrate the benefit of utilizing a probe array with a lower spring constant, we pattern a block copolymer on a delicate 50 nm thick silicon nitride window.

  9. Experimental investigation of fatigue in a cantilever energy harvesting beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avvari, Panduranga Vittal; Yang, Yaowen; Liu, Peiwen; Soh, Chee Kiong

    2015-03-01

    Over the last decade, cantilever energy harvesters gained immense popularity owing to the simplicity of the design and piezoelectric energy harvesting (PEH) using the cantilever design has undergone considerable evolution. The major drawback of a vibrating cantilever beam is its vulnerability to fatigue over a period of time. This article brings forth an experimental investigation into the phenomenon of fatigue of a PEH cantilever beam. As there has been very little literature reported in this area, an effort has been made to scrutinize the damage due to fatigue in a linear vibrating cantilever PEH beam consisting of an aluminum substrate with a piezoelectric macro-fiber composite (MFC) patch attached near the root of the beam and a tip mass attached to the beam. The beam was subjected to transverse vibrations and the behavior of the open circuit voltage was recorded with passing time. Moreover, electro-mechanical admittance readings were obtained periodically using the same MFC patch as a Structural health monitoring (SHM) sensor to assess the health of the PEH beam. The results show that with passing time the PEH beam underwent fatigue in both the substrate and MFC, which is observed in a complimentary trend in the voltage and admittance readings. The claim is further supported using the variation of root mean square deviation (RMSD) of the real part of admittance (conductance) readings. Thus, this study concludes that the fatigue issue should be addressed in the design of PEH for long term vibration energy harvesting.

  10. High resolved velocity measurements using Laser Cantilever Anemometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puczylowski, Jaroslaw; Hölling, Michael; Peinke, Joachim

    2016-11-01

    We have developed a new anemometer, namely the 2d-LCA (2d-Laser-Cantilever-Anemometer), that is capable of performing high resolved velocity measurements in fluids. The anemometer uses a micostructured cantilever made of silicon as a sensing element. The specific shape and the small dimensions (about 150µm) of the cantilever allow for precise measurements of two velocity component at a temporal resolution of about 150kHz. The angular acceptance range is 180° in total. The 2d-LCA is a simple to use alternative to x-wires and can be used in many areas of operation including measurements in liquids or in particle-laden flows. Unlike hot-wires, the resolution power of the 2d-LCA does not decrease with increasing flow velocity, making it particularly suitable for measurements in high-speed flows. In the recent past new cantilever designs were implemented with the goal to further improve the angular resolution and increase the stability. In addition, we have designed more robust cantilevers for measurements in rough environments such as offshore areas. Successful comparative measurements with hot-wires have been carried out in order to assess the performance of the 2d-LCA.

  11. Nonlinear resonances of a single-wall carbon nanotube cantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, I. K.; Lee, S. I.

    2015-03-01

    The dynamics of an electrostatically actuated carbon nanotube (CNT) cantilever are discussed by theoretical and numerical approaches. Electrostatic and intermolecular forces between the single-walled CNT and a graphene electrode are considered. The CNT cantilever is analyzed by the Euler-Bernoulli beam theory, including its geometric and inertial nonlinearities, and a one-mode projection based on the Galerkin approximation and numerical integration. Static pull-in and pull-out behaviors are adequately represented by an asymmetric two-well potential with the total potential energy consisting of the CNT elastic energy, electrostatic energy, and the Lennard-Jones potential energy. Nonlinear dynamics of the cantilever are simulated under DC and AC voltage excitations and examined in the frequency and time domains. Under AC-only excitation, a superharmonic resonance of order 2 occurs near half of the primary frequency. Under both DC and AC loads, the cantilever exhibits linear and nonlinear primary and secondary resonances depending on the strength of the excitation voltages. In addition, the cantilever has dynamic instabilities such as periodic or chaotic tapping motions, with a variation of excitation frequency at the resonance branches. High electrostatic excitation leads to complex nonlinear responses such as softening, multiple stability changes at saddle nodes, or period-doubling bifurcation points in the primary and secondary resonance branches.

  12. A miniaturized ferrule-top optical cantilever for vibration measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Xu, S. M.; Sun, J. N.; Tang, Y. Q.; Dong, F. Z.

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we propose techniques to design and fabricate polymer micro-cantilevers for attachment onto the end of standard single mode fibers using laser machining. The polymer cantilever is fabricated by laser micro-machining a sheet of polymer into the required shape and then bonded onto the top of a ceramic ferrule by photo resist as a flat supporting and bonding layer. The dimension of resulting cantilever is 1.2 mm long, 300 μm wide, and 25 μm thick. In this work we describe the fabrication of single sensors, however the process could be scaled to offer a route towards mass production. Cantilever vibration caused by vibration signal are monitored by a DFB laser based phase interrogation system. Proof-of-concept experiments show that the sensor is capable of detecting vibration signal with a frequency range of 0-800Hz. By using thinner polymer sheet and machining longer cantilever, the frequency response range can be extended up to a few kHz.

  13. Defect reduction in gallium nitride using cantilever epitaxy.

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Christine Charlotte

    2003-08-01

    Cantilever epitaxy (CE) has been developed to produce GaN on sapphire with low dislocation densities as needed for improved devices. The basic mechanism of seeding growth on sapphire mesas and lateral growth of cantilevers until they coalesce has been modified with an initial growth step at 950 C. This step produces a gable with (11{bar 2}2) facets over the mesas, which turns threading dislocations from vertical to horizontal in order to reduce the local density above mesas. This technique has produced material with densities as low as 2-3x10{sup 7}/cm{sup 2} averaged across extended areas of GaN on sapphire, as determined with AFM, TEM and cathodoluminescence (CL). This density is about two orders of magnitude below that of conventional planar growths; these improvements suggest that locating wide-area devices across both cantilever and mesa regions is possible. However, the first implementation of this technique also produced a new defect: cracks at cantilever coalescences with associated arrays of lateral dislocations. These defects have been labeled 'dark-block defects' because they are non-radiative and appear as dark rectangles in CL images. Material has been grown that does not have dark-block defects. Examination of the evolution of the cantilever films for many growths, both partial and complete, indicates that producing a film without these defects requires careful control of growth conditions and crystal morphology at multiple steps. Their elimination enhances optical emission and uniformity over large (mm) size areas.

  14. Efficiency enhancement of a cantilever-based vibration energy harvester.

    PubMed

    Kubba, Ali E; Jiang, Kyle

    2013-12-23

    Extracting energy from ambient vibration to power wireless sensor nodes has been an attractive area of research, particularly in the automotive monitoring field. This article reports the design, analysis and testing of a vibration energy harvesting device based on a miniature asymmetric air-spaced cantilever. The developed design offers high power density, and delivers electric power that is sufficient to support most wireless sensor nodes for structural health monitoring (SHM) applications. The optimized design underwent three evolutionary steps, starting from a simple cantilever design, going through an air-spaced cantilever, and ending up with an optimized air-spaced geometry with boosted power density level. Finite Element Analysis (FEA) was used as an initial tool to compare the three geometries' stiffness (K), output open-circuit voltage (V(ave)), and average normal strain in the piezoelectric transducer (ε(ave)) that directly affect its output voltage. Experimental tests were also carried out in order to examine the energy harvesting level in each of the three designs. The experimental results show how to boost the power output level in a thin air-spaced cantilever beam for energy within the same space envelope. The developed thin air-spaced cantilever (8.37 cm3), has a maximum power output of 2.05 mW (H = 29.29 μJ/cycle).

  15. Improved Sensitivity MEMS Cantilever Sensor for Terahertz Photoacoustic Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Coutu, Ronald A.; Medvedev, Ivan R.; Petkie, Douglas T.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) cantilever sensor was designed, modeled and fabricated to measure the terahertz (THz) radiation induced photoacoustic (PA) response of gases under low vacuum conditions. This work vastly improves cantilever sensitivity over previous efforts, by reducing internal beam stresses, minimizing out of plane beam curvature and optimizing beam damping. In addition, fabrication yield was improved by approximately 50% by filleting the cantilever’s anchor and free end to help reduce high stress areas that occurred during device fabrication and processing. All of the cantilever sensors were fabricated using silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers and tested in a custom built, low-volume, vacuum chamber. The resulting cantilever sensors exhibited improved signal to noise ratios, sensitivities and normalized noise equivalent absorption (NNEA) coefficients of approximately 4.28 × 10−10 cm−1·WHz−1/2. This reported NNEA represents approximately a 70% improvement over previously fabricated and tested SOI cantilever sensors for THz PA spectroscopy. PMID:26907280

  16. SU-8 hollow cantilevers for AFM cell adhesion studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Vincent; Behr, Pascal; Drechsler, Ute; Polesel-Maris, Jérôme; Potthoff, Eva; Vörös, Janos; Zambelli, Tomaso

    2016-05-01

    A novel fabrication method was established to produce flexible, transparent, and robust tipless hollow atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilevers made entirely from SU-8. Channels of 3 μm thickness and several millimeters length were integrated into 12 μm thick and 40 μm wide cantilevers. Connected to a pressure controller, the devices showed high sealing performance with no leakage up to 6 bars. Changing the cantilever lengths from 100 μm to 500 μm among the same wafer allowed the targeting of various spring constants ranging from 0.5 to 80 N m-1 within a single fabrication run. These hollow polymeric AFM cantilevers were operated in the optical beam deflection configuration. To demonstrate the performance of the device, single-cell force spectroscopy experiments were performed with a single probe detaching in a serial protocol more than 100 Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells from plain glass and glass coated with polydopamine while measuring adhesion forces in the sub-nanoNewton range. SU-8 now offers a new alternative to conventional silicon-based hollow cantilevers with more flexibility in terms of complex geometric design and surface chemistry modification.

  17. Efficiency Enhancement of a Cantilever-Based Vibration Energy Harvester

    PubMed Central

    Kubba, Ali E.; Jiang, Kyle

    2014-01-01

    Extracting energy from ambient vibration to power wireless sensor nodes has been an attractive area of research, particularly in the automotive monitoring field. This article reports the design, analysis and testing of a vibration energy harvesting device based on a miniature asymmetric air-spaced cantilever. The developed design offers high power density, and delivers electric power that is sufficient to support most wireless sensor nodes for structural health monitoring (SHM) applications. The optimized design underwent three evolutionary steps, starting from a simple cantilever design, going through an air-spaced cantilever, and ending up with an optimized air-spaced geometry with boosted power density level. Finite Element Analysis (FEA) was used as an initial tool to compare the three geometries' stiffness (K), output open-circuit voltage (Vave), and average normal strain in the piezoelectric transducer (εave) that directly affect its output voltage. Experimental tests were also carried out in order to examine the energy harvesting level in each of the three designs. The experimental results show how to boost the power output level in a thin air-spaced cantilever beam for energy within the same space envelope. The developed thin air-spaced cantilever (8.37 cm3), has a maximum power output of 2.05 mW (H = 29.29 μJ/cycle). PMID:24366177

  18. Global consequences of a local Casimir force: Adhered cantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svetovoy, V. B.; Melenev, A. E.; Lokhanin, M. V.; Palasantzas, G.

    2017-07-01

    Although stiction is a cumbersome problem for microsystems, it stimulates investigations of surface adhesion. In fact, the shape of an adhered cantilever carries information of the adhesion energy that locks one end to the substrate. We demonstrate here that the system is also sensitive to the dispersion forces that are operative very close to the point of contact, but their contribution to the shape is maximum at about one third of the unadhered length. When the force exceeds a critical value, the cantilever does not lose stability but settles at a smaller unadhered length, whose relation to adhesion energy is only slightly affected by the force. Our calculations suggest the use of adhered cantilevers to measure the dispersion forces at short separations, where other methods suffer from jump-to-contact instability. Simultaneous measurement of the force and adhesion energy allows the separation of the dispersion contribution to the surface adhesion.

  19. Shear force microscopy using piezoresistive cantilevers in surface metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotszalk, Teodor; Kopiec, Daniel; Sierakowski, Andrzej; Janus, Paweł; Grabiec, Piotr; Rangelow, Ivo W.

    2014-09-01

    In this article we describe application of piezoresistive cantilevers in surface investigations carried out with the use of shear force microscopy (ShFM). The novel piezoresistive cantilevers integrate a Wheatstone piezoresistive bridge was used to detect the cantilever deflection, thermal deflection detector and planar tip protruding out of the spring beam. Because the planar tip deflection can be detected and controlled electronically the described technology is very flexible and can be applied in many surface investigations. In this article we will present operation theory of the described solution, experimental setup, methods for calibration of the tip deflection detection and actuation The analysis will be illustrated with example results of topography measurements performed using the described technology.

  20. Improved Noninterferometric Test of Collapse Models Using Ultracold Cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinante, A.; Mezzena, R.; Falferi, P.; Carlesso, M.; Bassi, A.

    2017-09-01

    Spontaneous collapse models predict that a weak force noise acts on any mechanical system, as a consequence of the collapse of the wave function. Significant upper limits on the collapse rate have been recently inferred from precision mechanical experiments, such as ultracold cantilevers and the space mission LISA Pathfinder. Here, we report new results from an experiment based on a high-Q cantilever cooled to millikelvin temperatures, which is potentially able to improve the current bounds on the continuous spontaneous localization (CSL) model by 1 order of magnitude. High accuracy measurements of the cantilever thermal fluctuations reveal a nonthermal force noise of unknown origin. This excess noise is compatible with the CSL heating predicted by Adler. Several physical mechanisms able to explain the observed noise have been ruled out.

  1. Improved Noninterferometric Test of Collapse Models Using Ultracold Cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Vinante, A; Mezzena, R; Falferi, P; Carlesso, M; Bassi, A

    2017-09-15

    Spontaneous collapse models predict that a weak force noise acts on any mechanical system, as a consequence of the collapse of the wave function. Significant upper limits on the collapse rate have been recently inferred from precision mechanical experiments, such as ultracold cantilevers and the space mission LISA Pathfinder. Here, we report new results from an experiment based on a high-Q cantilever cooled to millikelvin temperatures, which is potentially able to improve the current bounds on the continuous spontaneous localization (CSL) model by 1 order of magnitude. High accuracy measurements of the cantilever thermal fluctuations reveal a nonthermal force noise of unknown origin. This excess noise is compatible with the CSL heating predicted by Adler. Several physical mechanisms able to explain the observed noise have been ruled out.

  2. Influence of different cantilever extensions and glass or polyaramide reinforcement fibers on fracture strength of implant-supported temporary.

    PubMed

    Colán Guzmán, Paola; Freitas, Fernando Furtado Antunes de; Ferreira, Paulo Martins; Freitas, César Antunes de; Reis, Kátia Rodrigues

    2008-01-01

    In long-term oral rehabilitation treatments, resistance of provisional crowns is a very important factor, especially in cases of an extensive edentulous distal space. The aim of this laboratorial study was to evaluate an acrylic resin cantilever-type prosthesis regarding the flexural strength of its in-balance portion as a function of its extension variation and reinforcement by two types of fibers (glass and polyaramid), considering that literature is not conclusive on this subject. Each specimen was composed by 3 total crowns at its mesial portion, each one attached to an implant component (abutment), while the distal portion (cantilever) had two crowns. Each specimen was constructed by injecting acrylic resin into a two-part silicone matrix placed on a metallic base. In each specimen, the crowns were fabricated with either acrylic resin (control group) or acrylic resin reinforced by glass (Fibrante, Angelus) or polyaramide (Kevlar 49, Du Pont) fibers. Compression load was applied on the cantilever, in a point located 7, 14 or 21 mm from the distal surface of the nearest crown with abutment, to simulate different extensions. The specimen was fixed on the metallic base and the force was applied until fracture in a universal test machine. Each one of the 9 sub-groups was composed by 10 specimens. Flexural strength means (in kgf) for the distances of 7, 14 and 21 mm were, respectively, 28.07, 8.27 and 6.39 for control group, 31.89, 9.18 and 5.16 for Kevlar 49 and 30.90, 9.31 and 6.86 for Fibrante. Data analysis ANOVA showed statistically significant difference (p<0.05) only regarding cantilever extension. Tukey's test detected significantly higher flexural strength for the 7 mm-distance, followed by 14 and 21 mm. Fracture was complete only on specimens of non-reinforced groups.

  3. Modal analysis of a cantilever beam by use of Brillouin based distributed dynamic strain measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minardo, Aldo; Coscetta, Agnese; Pirozzi, Salvatore; Bernini, Romeo; Zeni, Luigi

    2012-12-01

    In this work we report an experimental modal analysis of a cantilever beam, carried out by use of a Brillouin optical time-domain analysis (BOTDA) setup operated at a fixed pump-probe frequency shift. The employed technique permitted us to carry out distributed strain measurements along the vibrating beam at a maximum acquisition rate of 108 Hz. The mode shapes of the first three bending modes (1.7, 10.8, 21.6 Hz) were measured for the structure under test. The good agreement between the experimental and numerical results based on a finite-element method (FEM) analysis demonstrates that Brillouin based distributed sensors are well suited to perform the modal analysis of a vibrating structure. This type of analysis may be useful for applications in structural health monitoring where changes in mode shapes are used as indicators of the damage to the structure.

  4. Shape memory alloy actuation effect on subsonic static aeroelastic deformation of composite cantilever plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, A. M. H.; Majid, D. L. Abdul; Abdullah, E. J.

    2016-10-01

    Shape memory alloy (SMA) is one of the smart materials that have unique properties and used recently in several aerospace applications. SMAs are metallic alloys that can recover permanent strains when they are heated above a certain temperature. In this study, the effects of SMA actuation on the composite plate under subsonic aeroelastic conditions are examined. The wind tunnel test is carried out for two configurations of a cantilever shape memory alloy composite plate with a single SMA wire fixed eccentrically. Strain gage data for both bending and torsional strain are recorded and demonstrated during the aeroelastic test for active and non-active SMA wire in two locations. The cyclic actuation of the SMA wire embedded inside the composite plate is also investigated during the aeroelastic test. The results show reduction in both bending and torsional strain of the composite plate after activation of the SMA wire during the wind tunnel test.

  5. Current integration force and displacement self-sensing method for cantilevered piezoelectric actuators

    SciTech Connect

    Ivan, Ioan Alexandru; Rakotondrabe, Micky; Lutz, Philippe; Chaillet, Nicolas

    2009-12-15

    This paper presents a new method of self-sensing both of the displacement and the external applied force at the tip of piezoelectric cantilevers. Integrated electric current across piezoelectric actuators is compensated against material nonlinearities (creep, hysteresis) to provide reliable information. We propose to compensate the hysteresis by using the Prandtl-Ishlinskii static approach while an auto regressive and moving average exogenous (ARMAX) model is used to minimize the creep influence. The quasistatic estimation, electronic circuit, and aspects related to long-term charge preservations are described or referenced. As an experiment, we tested the actuator entering in contact with a fixed force sensor. An input signal of 20 V peak-to-peak (10% of maximum range) led to force self-sensing errors inferior to {+-}8%. A final discussion about method accuracy and its limitations is made.

  6. Accurate spring constant calibration for very stiff atomic force microscopy cantilevers

    SciTech Connect

    Grutzik, Scott J.; Zehnder, Alan T.; Gates, Richard S.; Gerbig, Yvonne B.; Smith, Douglas T.; Cook, Robert F.

    2013-11-15

    There are many atomic force microscopy (AFM) applications that rely on quantifying the force between the AFM cantilever tip and the sample. The AFM does not explicitly measure force, however, so in such cases knowledge of the cantilever stiffness is required. In most cases, the forces of interest are very small, thus compliant cantilevers are used. A number of methods have been developed that are well suited to measuring low stiffness values. However, in some cases a cantilever with much greater stiffness is required. Thus, a direct, traceable method for calibrating very stiff (approximately 200 N/m) cantilevers is presented here. The method uses an instrumented and calibrated nanoindenter to determine the stiffness of a reference cantilever. This reference cantilever is then used to measure the stiffness of a number of AFM test cantilevers. This method is shown to have much smaller uncertainty than previously proposed methods. An example application to fracture testing of nanoscale silicon beam specimens is included.

  7. Accurate spring constant calibration for very stiff atomic force microscopy cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grutzik, Scott J.; Gates, Richard S.; Gerbig, Yvonne B.; Smith, Douglas T.; Cook, Robert F.; Zehnder, Alan T.

    2013-11-01

    There are many atomic force microscopy (AFM) applications that rely on quantifying the force between the AFM cantilever tip and the sample. The AFM does not explicitly measure force, however, so in such cases knowledge of the cantilever stiffness is required. In most cases, the forces of interest are very small, thus compliant cantilevers are used. A number of methods have been developed that are well suited to measuring low stiffness values. However, in some cases a cantilever with much greater stiffness is required. Thus, a direct, traceable method for calibrating very stiff (approximately 200 N/m) cantilevers is presented here. The method uses an instrumented and calibrated nanoindenter to determine the stiffness of a reference cantilever. This reference cantilever is then used to measure the stiffness of a number of AFM test cantilevers. This method is shown to have much smaller uncertainty than previously proposed methods. An example application to fracture testing of nanoscale silicon beam specimens is included.

  8. Accurate spring constant calibration for very stiff atomic force microscopy cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Grutzik, Scott J; Gates, Richard S; Gerbig, Yvonne B; Smith, Douglas T; Cook, Robert F; Zehnder, Alan T

    2013-11-01

    There are many atomic force microscopy (AFM) applications that rely on quantifying the force between the AFM cantilever tip and the sample. The AFM does not explicitly measure force, however, so in such cases knowledge of the cantilever stiffness is required. In most cases, the forces of interest are very small, thus compliant cantilevers are used. A number of methods have been developed that are well suited to measuring low stiffness values. However, in some cases a cantilever with much greater stiffness is required. Thus, a direct, traceable method for calibrating very stiff (approximately 200 N/m) cantilevers is presented here. The method uses an instrumented and calibrated nanoindenter to determine the stiffness of a reference cantilever. This reference cantilever is then used to measure the stiffness of a number of AFM test cantilevers. This method is shown to have much smaller uncertainty than previously proposed methods. An example application to fracture testing of nanoscale silicon beam specimens is included.

  9. Scanning conductance microscopy investigations on fixed human chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Clausen, Casper Hyttel; Lange, Jacob Moresco; Jensen, Linda Boye; Shah, Pranjul Jaykumar; Dimaki, Maria Ioannou; Svendsen, Winnie Edith

    2008-02-01

    Scanning conductance microscopy investigations were carried out in air on human chromosomes fixed on pre-fabricated SiO2 surfaces with a backgate. The point of the investigation was to estimate the dielectric constant of fixed human chromosomes in order to use it for microfluidic device optimization. The phase shift caused by the electrostatic forces, together with geometrical measurements of the atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever and the chromosomes were used to estimate a value for the dielectric constant of different human chromosomes.

  10. Free torsional vibrations of tapered cantilever I-beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, C. Kameswara; Mirza, S.

    1988-08-01

    Torsional vibration characteristics of linearly tapered cantilever I-beams have been studied by using the Galerkin finite element method. A third degree polynomial is assumed for the angle of twist. The analysis presented is valid for long beams and includes the effect of warping. The individual as well as combined effects of linear tapers in the width of the flanges and the depth of the web on the torsional vibration of cantilever I-beams are investigated. Numerical results generated for various values of taper ratios are presented in graphical form.

  11. Magnetostriction-driven cantilevers for dynamic atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penedo, M.; Fernández-Martínez, I.; Costa-Krämer, J. L.; Luna, M.; Briones, F.

    2009-10-01

    An actuation mode is presented to drive the mechanical oscillation of cantilevers for dynamic atomic force microscopy. The method is based on direct mechanical excitation of the cantilevers coated with amorphous Fe-B-N thin films, by means of the film magnetostriction, i.e., the dimensional change in the film when magnetized. These amorphous magnetostrictive Fe-B-N thin films exhibit soft magnetic properties, excellent corrosion resistance in liquid environments, nearly zero accumulated stress when properly deposited, and good chemical stability. We present low noise and high resolution topographic images acquired in liquid environment to demonstrate the method capability.

  12. A surface-acoustic-wave-based cantilever bio-sensor.

    PubMed

    De Simoni, Giorgio; Signore, Giovanni; Agostini, Matteo; Beltram, Fabio; Piazza, Vincenzo

    2015-06-15

    A scalable surface-acoustic-wave- (SAW-) based cantilevered device for portable bio-chemical sensing applications is presented. Even in the current, proof-of-principle implementation this architecture is shown to outperform commercial quartz-crystal microbalances in terms of sensitivity. Adhesion of analytes on a functionalized surface of the cantilever shifts the resonant frequency of a SAW-generating transducer due to the stress-induced variation of the speed of surface acoustic modes. We discuss the relevance of this approach for diagnostics applications based on miniaturized devices.

  13. Cantilever's behavior in the AC mode of an AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Nunes, V.B.; Zanette, S.I.; Caride, A.O.; Prioli, R.; Rivas, A.M.F

    2003-03-15

    In this paper, a model with a small number of parameters is used to simulate the motion of a cantilever in the AC mode of an atomic force microscope (AFM). The results elucidate the transition dependence-from noncontact to tapping operating mode-on the height of the contamination layer and on the stiffness of the sample.

  14. Multiferroic cantilever for power generation using dual functionality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Reema; Tomar, Monika; Rammohan, S.; Katiyar, R. S.; Gupta, Vinay

    2016-11-01

    Lead zirconate titanate (PZT)/Ni cantilevers have been developed using the pulsed laser deposition technique for harnessing magnetic as well as mechanical energy. High voltage (1.2 mV, 1.8 mV, and 8.5 mV) and power density (1100, 2400, and 3600 mW/m3) were generated across the PZT/Ni cantilevers (in 3-3 mode) having PZT thin films deposited at 100 mTorr, 200 mTorr, and 300 mTorr oxygen pressures, respectively, at their respective resonance frequencies with 0.5 g acceleration. Maximum power response (3600 mW/m3) was observed at a load resistance of 100 kΩ for the cantilever having PZT film deposited at 300 mTorr oxygen pressure, which is manifested to the efficient ferroelectric and ferromagnetic properties of PZT/Ni system. The power generated from the PZT/Ni cantilever was further enhanced to 18 700 mW/m3 by superimposing magnetic energy with mechanical vibrations. These results are extremely promising for the realization of an efficient energy harvester utilizing both magnetic and mechanical energy.

  15. Strategy Guideline: Quality Management in Existing Homes - Cantilever Floor Example

    SciTech Connect

    Taggart, J.; Sikora, J.; Wiehagen, J.; Wood, A.

    2011-12-01

    This guideline is designed to highlight the QA process that can be applied to any residential building retrofit activity. The cantilevered floor retrofit detailed in this guideline is included only to provide an actual retrofit example to better illustrate the QA activities being presented.

  16. Piezoresistive Cantilever Performance—Part I: Analytical Model for Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sung-Jin; Doll, Joseph C.; Pruitt, Beth L.

    2010-01-01

    An accurate analytical model for the change in resistance of a piezoresistor is necessary for the design of silicon piezoresistive transducers. Ion implantation requires a high-temperature oxidation or annealing process to activate the dopant atoms, and this treatment results in a distorted dopant profile due to diffusion. Existing analytical models do not account for the concentration dependence of piezoresistance and are not accurate for nonuniform dopant profiles. We extend previous analytical work by introducing two nondimensional factors, namely, the efficiency and geometry factors. A practical benefit of this efficiency factor is that it separates the process parameters from the design parameters; thus, designers may address requirements for cantilever geometry and fabrication process independently. To facilitate the design process, we provide a lookup table for the efficiency factor over an extensive range of process conditions. The model was validated by comparing simulation results with the experimentally determined sensitivities of piezoresistive cantilevers. We performed 9200 TSUPREM4 simulations and fabricated 50 devices from six unique process flows; we systematically explored the design space relating process parameters and cantilever sensitivity. Our treatment focuses on piezoresistive cantilevers, but the analytical sensitivity model is extensible to other piezoresistive transducers such as membrane pressure sensors. PMID:20336183

  17. Detail view inside cantilever truss over main channel, showing lower ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view inside cantilever truss over main channel, showing lower chord and lateral bracing. Note webbing between diagonal eye-bars at right. Pennsylvania Turnpike Bridge in background. - Bessemer & Lake Erie Railroad, Allegheny River Bridge, Spanning Allegheny River, East of Pennsylvania Turnpike (I-76), Oakmont, Allegheny County, PA

  18. Cantilever deflection associated with hybridization of monomolecular DNA film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yue; Ganapathysubramanian, Baskar; Shrotriya, Pranav

    2012-04-01

    Recent experiments show that specific binding between a ligand and surface immobilized receptor, such as hybridization of single stranded DNA immobilized on a microcantilever surface, leads to cantilever deflection. The binding-induced deflection may be used as a method for detection of biomolecules, such as pathogens and biohazards. Mechanical deformation induced due to hybridization of surface-immobilized DNA strands is a commonly used system to demonstrate the efficacy of microcantilever sensors. To understand the mechanism underlying the cantilever deflections, a theoretical model that incorporates the influence of ligand/receptor complex surface distribution and empirical interchain potential is developed to predict the binding-induced deflections. The cantilever bending induced due to hybridization of DNA strands is predicted for different receptor immobilization densities, hybridization efficiencies, and spatial arrangements. Predicted deflections are compared with experimental reports to validate the modeling assumptions and identify the influence of various components on mechanical deformation. Comparison of numerical predictions and experimental results suggest that, at high immobilization densities, hybridization-induced mechanical deformation is determined, primarily by immobilization density and hybridization efficiency, whereas, at lower immobilization densities, spatial arrangement of hybridized chains need to be considered in determining the cantilever deflection.

  19. Performance evaluation of perforated micro-cantilevers for MEMS applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swamy, Kenkere Balashanthamurthy Mruthyunjaya; Mukherjee, Banibrata; Ali Syed Mohammed, Zishan; Chakraborty, Suman; Sen, Siddhartha

    2014-04-01

    Miniaturized cantilevers are one of the elementary structures that are widely used in many micro-devices and systems. The dynamic performance of micro-cantilevers having process dictated through perforations is investigated. High-aspect ratio, long silicon cantilevers, intended for improved performance through lowered stiffness are designed with a series of through holes and simulated along with similar nonperforated/solid cantilevers for comparison. A few perforated structures are also fabricated using silicon-on-insulator-based multiproject MEMS processes from MEMSCAP Inc. (Durham, North Carolina) by reduced mask level and eliminating complex substrate trenching step. The dynamic behavior of these fabricated structures is experimentally studied for both in-plane and out-of-plane directions. It is shown that, due to the presence of perforations, stiffness in planar direction is lightly affected, whereas in out-of-plane direction it is significantly reduced by >35%. Similarly, the variation of damping in both perforated and nonperforated beams, too, is thoroughly analyzed for the first few modes of vibration. Nevertheless, their frequency response variation of <10% for modal frequencies in both planar and out-of-plane directions as compared to the nonperforated counterparts, points to potential applications in several micro-systems including those based on comb drives.

  20. Deconvolution of calcium fluorescent indicator signal from AFM cantilever reflection.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Ayon, G Monserratt; Oliver, David J; Grutter, Peter H; Komarova, Svetlana V

    2012-08-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) can be combined with fluorescence microscopy to measure the changes in intracellular calcium levels (indicated by fluorescence of Ca²⁺ sensitive dye fluo-4) in response to mechanical stimulation performed by AFM. Mechanical stimulation using AFM is associated with cantilever movement, which may interfere with the fluorescence signal. The motion of the AFM cantilever with respect to the sample resulted in changes of the reflection of light back to the sample and a subsequent variation in the fluorescence intensity, which was not related to changes in intracellular Ca²⁺ levels. When global Ca²⁺ responses to a single stimulation were assessed, the interference of reflected light with the fluorescent signal was minimal. However, in experiments where local repetitive stimulations were performed, reflection artifacts, correlated with cantilever motion, represented a significant component of the fluorescent signal. We developed a protocol to correct the fluorescence traces for reflection artifacts, as well as photobleaching. An added benefit of our method is that the cantilever reflection in the fluorescence recordings can be used for precise temporal correlation of the AFM and fluorescence measurements.

  1. DETAIL OF FRONT ENTRY AT UNIT B. SHOWING THE CANTILEVERED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF FRONT ENTRY AT UNIT B. SHOWING THE CANTILEVERED CONCRETE CANOPY WITH ROUNDED CORNERS, STEPPED DOORWAY SURROUND, AND BAY WINDOW. NOTE THE DECORATIVE GRILLE AT THE VENT OF THE SECOND FLOOR CLOSET. VIEW FACING NORTH. - Hickam Field, Officers' Housing Type N, 204B Second Street, Honolulu, Honolulu County, HI

  2. Sensitivity measurement of a cantilever-based surface stress sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haag, Ann-Lauriene; Schumacher, Zeno; Grutter, Peter

    2016-10-01

    A detailed analysis of the temporal surface stress evolution for potential-driven adsorption of ions is discussed. A gold-coated cantilever is used to simultaneously measure the change in surface stress as well as the current response during an applied potential step. In this electrochemical configuration, the cantilever acts as the working electrode, a platinum wire as the counter electrode, and the Ag/AgCl (sat. KCl) electrode as the reference electrode. To study the time-dependent signal and the sensitivity of the cantilever response, the frequency of the potential step applied to the cantilever is varied from 1 s to 0.1 ms. First, a comparison between a strong adsorbing (chloride Cl-) and a weak adsorbing ion (perchlorate ClO 4- ) in a 1 mM solution is presented. Next, the linear relationship between surface stress and charge density is measured for these fast potential steps. The slope of this fit is defined as the sensitivity of the system and is shown to increase for shorter potential pulses. Finally, the behaviour of the surface stress and current for consecutive applied potential steps is studied.

  3. 13. DETAIL OF SOUTH PIER TOP (WEST SIDE) AND CANTILEVERED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. DETAIL OF SOUTH PIER TOP (WEST SIDE) AND CANTILEVERED SIDEWALK. LOOKING NORTH. - Route 31 Bridge, New Jersey Route 31, crossing disused main line of Central Railroad of New Jersey (C.R.R.N.J.) (New Jersey Transit's Raritan Valley Line), Hampton, Hunterdon County, NJ

  4. A new detection system for extremely small vertically mounted cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Antognozzi, M; Ulcinas, A; Picco, L; Simpson, S H; Heard, P J; Szczelkun, M D; Brenner, B; Miles, M J

    2008-09-24

    Detection techniques currently used in scanning force microscopy impose limitations on the geometrical dimensions of the probes and, as a consequence, on their force sensitivity and temporal response. A new technique, based on scattered evanescent electromagnetic waves (SEW), is presented here that can detect the displacement of the extreme end of a vertically mounted cantilever. The resolution of this method is tested using different cantilever sizes and a theoretical model is developed to maximize the detection sensitivity. The applications presented here clearly show that the SEW detection system enables the use of force sensors with sub-micron size, opening new possibilities in the investigation of biomolecular systems and high speed imaging. Two types of cantilevers were successfully tested: a high force sensitivity lever with a spring constant of 0.17 pN nm(-1) and a resonant frequency of 32 kHz; and a high speed lever with a spring constant of 50 pN nm(-1) and a resonant frequency of 1.8 MHz. Both these force sensors were fabricated by modifying commercial microcantilevers in a focused ion beam system. It is important to emphasize that these modified cantilevers could not be detected by the conventional optical detection system used in commercial atomic force microscopes.

  5. 69. COMPLETED 'A' FRAME STRUCTURE LOOKING NORTHWEST SHOWING CANTILEVERED WALKWAYS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    69. COMPLETED 'A' FRAME STRUCTURE LOOKING NORTHWEST SHOWING CANTILEVERED WALKWAYS, 'CROWS NEST', CAMERA TOWER, COUNTERWEIGHT CAR AND ROADWAY ARCH, April 30, 1948. (Original photograph in possession of Dave Willis, San Diego, California.) - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Variable Angle Launcher, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  6. Note: A resonating reflector-based optical system for motion measurement in micro-cantilever arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Sathishkumar, P.; Punyabrahma, P.; Sri Muthu Mrinalini, R.; Jayanth, G. R.

    2015-09-15

    A robust, compact optical measurement unit for motion measurement in micro-cantilever arrays enables development of portable micro-cantilever sensors. This paper reports on an optical beam deflection-based system to measure the deflection of micro-cantilevers in an array that employs a single laser source, a single detector, and a resonating reflector to scan the measurement laser across the array. A strategy is also proposed to extract the deflection of individual cantilevers from the acquired data. The proposed system and measurement strategy are experimentally evaluated and demonstrated to measure motion of multiple cantilevers in an array.

  7. Simultaneous liquid viscosity and density determination with piezoelectric unimorph cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Wan Y.; Li, Xiaoping; Gu, Huiming; Shih, Wei-Heng; Aksay, Ilhan A.

    2001-01-01

    We have examined both experimentally and theoretically a piezoelectric unimorph cantilever as a liquid viscosity-and-density sensor. The fabricated piezoelectric unimorph consisted of a PbOṡZrO2ṡTiO2 (PZT) layer on a thin stainless-steel plate. In addition to a driving electrode, a sensing electrode was placed on top of the PZT layer, permitting the direct measurement of the resonance frequency. The cantilever was tested using water-glycerol solutions of different compositions. In all three of the tested modes, the resonance frequency decreased while the width of the resonance peak increased with increasing glycerol content. To account for the liquid effect, we consider the cantilever as a sphere of radius R oscillating in a liquid. By including the high and low frequency terms in the induced mass and the damping coefficient of the liquid, we show that for a given liquid density and viscosity the oscillating-sphere model predicts a resonance frequency and peak width that closely agree with experiment. Furthermore, the viscosity and the density of a liquid have been determined simultaneously using the experimentally measured resonance frequency and peak width as inputs to the oscillating-sphere model. The calculated liquid viscosity and density closely agreed with the known values, indicating that our cantilever-based sensor is effective in determining viscosity and density, simultaneously. We also show that scaling analysis predicts an increase in the width of the resonance peak with decreasing cantilever size, an observation in agreement with the large peak widths observed for microcantilevers.

  8. Effect of continuous longitudinal glass fiber reinforcement on the cantilever beam strength of particulate filler composites.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Hun; Christopher Watts, David

    2006-11-01

    The objective of this in vitro study was to investigate the effect of continuous longitudinal glass fibers on the bending properties of particulate filler composite resins. Four particulate filler composite resins (Tetric Ceram, Point 4, Z250, P60) and one continuous longitudinal glass fiber material (everStick) as reinforcement were selected. Three groups of beam specimens (5 x 5 x 25 mm) for each material were fabricated. For group I, specimens were not reinforced with fibers and were tested as the control group. For group II, specimens were reinforced with 2 layers of the fiber (6.5 vol%), and for group III with 3 layers (9.8 vol%). The specimens were stored at 37 degrees C for 30 days. One end of the beam specimen (14 mm) was fixed in a device, while the other (11 mm) was left free. Cantilever beam strength was measured using a universal testing machine, loading at a distance of 10 mm from the upright support through a steel ball of 2 mm diameter. The loads and deflection at initial failure and at final failure for each specimen were recorded. The data were statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA and the multiple comparison Scheffé test (alpha = 0.05). The bending moments of particulate filler composite at final failure, when reinforced with 3 layers of the glass fibers (272.4-325.2 Ncm), were significantly higher than for the composites without fibers. However, the materials reinforced with 3 layers of fibers were not significantly different from the materials reinforced with 2 layers of fibers (234.1-282.6 Ncm). The materials reinforced with 3 layers of fibers exhibited severe deflection at final failure, ranging from 2.8 mm to 3.4 mm. The bending moments of the particulate composites increased linearly with the weight fraction of the fillers, but there was no linear correlation between them when reinforced with fibers. The cantilever beam strength of the particulate filler composites increased significantly when layers of fibers were added and as the

  9. Topography imaging with a heated atomic force microscope cantilever in tapping mode.

    PubMed

    Park, Keunhan; Lee, Jungchul; Zhang, Zhuomin M; King, William P

    2007-04-01

    This article describes tapping mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) using a heated AFM cantilever. The electrical and thermal responses of the cantilever were investigated while the cantilever oscillated in free space or was in intermittent contact with a surface. The cantilever oscillates at its mechanical resonant frequency, 70.36 kHz, which is much faster than its thermal time constant of 300 micros, and so the cantilever operates in thermal steady state. The thermal impedance between the cantilever heater and the sample was measured through the cantilever temperature signal. Topographical imaging was performed on silicon calibration gratings of height 20 and 100 nm. The obtained topography sensitivity is as high as 200 microVnm and the resolution is as good as 0.5 nmHz(1/2), depending on the cantilever power. The cantilever heating power ranges 0-7 mW, which corresponds to a temperature range of 25-700 degrees C. The imaging was performed entirely using the cantilever thermal signal and no laser or other optics was required. As in conventional AFM, the tapping mode operation demonstrated here can suppress imaging artifacts and enable imaging of soft samples.

  10. Modular apparatus for electrostatic actuation of common atomic force microscope cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Long, Christian J; Cannara, Rachel J

    2015-07-01

    Piezoelectric actuation of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers often suffers from spurious mechanical resonances in the loop between the signal driving the cantilever and the actual tip motion. These spurious resonances can reduce the accuracy of AFM measurements and in some cases completely obscure the cantilever response. To address these limitations, we developed a specialized AFM cantilever holder for electrostatic actuation of AFM cantilevers. The holder contains electrical contacts for the AFM cantilever chip, as well as an electrode (or electrodes) that may be precisely positioned with respect to the back of the cantilever. By controlling the voltages on the AFM cantilever and the actuation electrode(s), an electrostatic force is applied directly to the cantilever, providing a near-ideal transfer function from drive signal to tip motion. We demonstrate both static and dynamic actuations, achieved through the application of direct current and alternating current voltage schemes, respectively. As an example application, we explore contact resonance atomic force microscopy, which is a technique for measuring the mechanical properties of surfaces on the sub-micron length scale. Using multiple electrodes, we also show that the torsional resonances of the AFM cantilever may be excited electrostatically, opening the door for advanced dynamic lateral force measurements with improved accuracy and precision.

  11. Label-free detection of kanamycin using aptamer-based cantilever array sensor.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xiaojing; Hou, Hui; Zhang, Bailin; Tang, Jilin

    2014-06-15

    A label-free detection method of kanamycin using aptamer-based cantilever array sensor was developed. The cantilever array was composed of sensing cantilevers and reference cantilevers. This configuration allowed direct detection of individual cantilever deflections and subsequent determination of differential deflection of sensing/reference cantilever pair. The sensing cantilevers were functionalized with kanamycin aptamer, which was used as receptor molecules while the reference cantilevers were modified with 6-mercapto-1-hexanol (MCH) to eliminate the influence of environmental disturbances. The kanamycin-aptamer interaction induced a change in cantilever surface stress, which caused a differential deflection between the sensing and reference cantilever pair. The surface stress change was linear with kanamycin concentration over the range of 100 μM-10mM with a correlation coefficient of 0.995. A detection limit of 50 μM was obtained, at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. The sensor also showed good selectivity against other antibiotics such as neomycin, ribostamycin and chloramphenicol. The facile method for kanamycin detection may have great potential for investigating more other molecules.

  12. Modular apparatus for electrostatic actuation of common atomic force microscope cantilevers

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Christian J.; Cannara, Rachel J.

    2015-07-15

    Piezoelectric actuation of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers often suffers from spurious mechanical resonances in the loop between the signal driving the cantilever and the actual tip motion. These spurious resonances can reduce the accuracy of AFM measurements and in some cases completely obscure the cantilever response. To address these limitations, we developed a specialized AFM cantilever holder for electrostatic actuation of AFM cantilevers. The holder contains electrical contacts for the AFM cantilever chip, as well as an electrode (or electrodes) that may be precisely positioned with respect to the back of the cantilever. By controlling the voltages on the AFM cantilever and the actuation electrode(s), an electrostatic force is applied directly to the cantilever, providing a near-ideal transfer function from drive signal to tip motion. We demonstrate both static and dynamic actuations, achieved through the application of direct current and alternating current voltage schemes, respectively. As an example application, we explore contact resonance atomic force microscopy, which is a technique for measuring the mechanical properties of surfaces on the sub-micron length scale. Using multiple electrodes, we also show that the torsional resonances of the AFM cantilever may be excited electrostatically, opening the door for advanced dynamic lateral force measurements with improved accuracy and precision.

  13. Selective enhancement of individual cantilever high resonance modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penedo, Marcos; Hormeño, Silvia; Prieto, Patricia; Alvaro, Raquel; Anguita, José; Briones, Fernando; Luna, Mónica

    2015-12-01

    Multifrequency atomic force microscopy (AFM) in liquid media where several eigenmodes or harmonics are simultaneously excited is improving the performance of the scanning probe techniques in biological studies. As a consequence, an important effort is being made to search for a reliable, efficient and strong cantilever high mode excitation method that operates in liquids. In this work we present (theoretical and experimentally) a technique for improving the efficiency of the most common excitation methods currently used in AFM operated in liquids: photothermal, torque (MAC Mode™) and magnetostriction. By etching specific areas of the cantilever coating, the oscillation amplitude (both flexural and torsional) of each specific eigenmode increases, leading to an improvement in signal to noise ratio of the multifrequency techniques. As an alternative, increment in high mode oscillation amplitude is also obtained by Ga+ ion implantation in the specific areas of the magnetic material.

  14. Limit cycle oscillation of a fluttering cantilever plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowell, Earl; Ye, Weiliang

    1991-01-01

    A response of a cantilever plate in high supersonic flow to a disturbance is considered. The Rayleigh-Ritz method is used to solve the nonlinear oscillation of a fluttering plate. It is found that the length-to-width ratio for a cantilever plate has a great effect on flutter amplitude of the limit cycle. For small length-to-width ratio, the dominant chordwise modes are translation and rotation. It is suggested that higher bending modes must be included to obtain an accurate prediction of the flutter onset and limit cycle oscillation. For large length-to-width ratio, significant chordwise bending is apparent in the flutter motion, with the trailing edge area having the largest motion.

  15. Sacrificial layer for the fabrication of electroformed cantilevered LIGA microparts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, Alfredo M.; Aigeldinger, Georg; Bankert, Michelle A.; Domeier, Linda A.; Hachman, John T.; Hauck, Cheryl; Keifer, Patrick N.; Krafcik, Karen L.; McLean, Dorrance E.; Yang, Peter C.

    2003-01-01

    The use of silver filled PMMA as a sacrificial layer for the fabrication of multilevel LIGA microparts is presented. In this technique, a bottom level of standard electroformed LIGA parts is first produced on a metallized substrate such as a silicon wafer. A methyl methacrylate formulation mixed with silver particles is then cast and polymerized around the bottom level of metal parts to produce a conducting sacrificial layer. A second level of PMMA x-ray resist is adhered to the bottom level of metal parts and conducting PMMA and patterned to form another level of electroformed features. This presentation will discuss some the requirements for the successful fabrication of multilevel, cantilevered LIGA microparts. It will be shown that by using a silver filled PMMA, a sacrificial layer can be quickly applied around LIGA components; cantilevered microparts can be electroformed; and the final parts can be quickly released by dissolving the sacrificial layer in acetone.

  16. Controlled generation of intrinsic localized modes in microelectromechanical cantilever arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qingfei; Lai, Ying-Cheng; Dietz, David

    2010-12-01

    We propose a scheme to induce intrinsic localized modes (ILMs) at an arbitrary site in microelectromechanical cantilever arrays. The idea is to locate the particular cantilever beam in the array that one wishes to drive to an oscillating state with significantly higher amplitude than the average and then apply small adjustments to the electrical signal that drives the whole array system. Our scheme is thus a global closed-loop control strategy. We argue that the dynamical mechanism on which our global driving scheme relies is spatiotemporal chaos and we develop a detailed analysis based on the standard averaging method in nonlinear dynamics to understand the working of our control scheme. We also develop a Markov model to characterize the transient time required for inducing ILMs.

  17. Vibrations of cantilevered shallow cylindrical shells of rectangular planform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leissa, A. W.; Lee, J. K.; Wang, A. J.

    1981-01-01

    A cantilevered, shallow shell of circular cylindrical curvature and rectangular planform exhibits free vibration behavior which differs considerably from that of a cantilevered beam or of a flat plate. Some numerical results can be found for the problem in the previously published literature, mainly obtained by using various finite element methods. The present paper is the first definitive study of the problem, presenting accurate non-dimensional frequency parameters for wide ranges of aspect ratio, shallowness ratio and thickness ratio. The analysis is based upon shallow shell theory. Numerical results are obtained by using the Ritz method, with algebraic polynomial trial functions for the displacements. Convergence is investigated, with attention being given both to the number of terms taken for each co-ordinate direction and for each of the three components of displacement. Accuracy of the results is also established by comparison with finite element results for shallow shells and with other accurate flat plate solutions.

  18. Laser Actuation of Cantilevers for Picometre Amplitude Dynamic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Drew R.; Tayati, Ponlawat; An, Hongjie; Lam, Ping Koy; Craig, Vincent S. J.; Senden, Tim J.

    2014-01-01

    As nanoscale and molecular devices become reality, the ability to probe materials on these scales is increasing in importance. To address this, we have developed a dynamic force microscopy technique where the flexure of the microcantilever is excited using an intensity modulated laser beam to achieve modulation on the picoscale. The flexure arises from thermally induced bending through differential expansion and the conservation of momentum when the photons are reflected and absorbed by the cantilever. In this study, we investigated the photothermal and photon pressure responses of monolithic and layered cantilevers using a modulated laser in air and immersed in water. The developed photon actuation technique is applied to the stretching of single polymer chains. PMID:24993548

  19. Vibrations of cantilevered shallow cylindrical shells of rectangular planform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leissa, A. W.; Lee, J. K.; Wang, A. J.

    1981-10-01

    A cantilevered, shallow shell of circular cylindrical curvature and rectangular planform exhibits free vibration behavior which differs considerably from that of a cantilevered beam or of a flat plate. Some numerical results can be found for the problem in the previously published literature, mainly obtained by using various finite element methods. The present paper is the first definitive study of the problem, presenting accurate non-dimensional frequency parameters for wide ranges of aspect ratio, shallowness ratio and thickness ratio. The analysis is based upon shallow shell theory. Numerical results are obtained by using the Ritz method, with algebraic polynomial trial functions for the displacements. Convergence is investigated, with attention being given both to the number of terms taken for each co-ordinate direction and for each of the three components of displacement. Accuracy of the results is also established by comparison with finite element results for shallow shells and with other accurate flat plate solutions.

  20. Direct and quantitative broadband absorptance spectroscopy with multilayer cantilever probes

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, Wei-Chun; Tong, Jonathan Kien-Kwok; Liao, Bolin; Chen, Gang

    2015-04-21

    A system for measuring the absorption spectrum of a sample is provided that includes a broadband light source that produces broadband light defined within a range of an absorptance spectrum. An interferometer modulates the intensity of the broadband light source for a range of modulation frequencies. A bi-layer cantilever probe arm is thermally connected to a sample arm having at most two layers of materials. The broadband light modulated by the interferometer is directed towards the sample and absorbed by the sample and converted into heat, which causes a temperature rise and bending of the bi-layer cantilever probe arm. A detector mechanism measures and records the deflection of the probe arm so as to obtain the absorptance spectrum of the sample.

  1. Cantilever spring constant calibration using laser Doppler vibrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ohler, Benjamin

    2007-06-15

    Uncertainty in cantilever spring constants is a critical issue in atomic force microscopy (AFM) force measurements. Though numerous methods exist for calibrating cantilever spring constants, the accuracy of these methods can be limited by both the physical models themselves as well as uncertainties in their experimental implementation. Here we report the results from two of the most common calibration methods, the thermal tune method and the Sader method. These were implemented on a standard AFM system as well as using laser Doppler vibrometry (LDV). Using LDV eliminates some uncertainties associated with optical lever detection on an AFM. It also offers considerably higher signal to noise deflection measurements. We find that AFM and LDV result in similar uncertainty in the calibrated spring constants, about 5%, using either the thermal tune or Sader methods provided that certain limitations of the methods and instrumentation are observed.

  2. Frequency Response of Nanoelectromechanical Cantilevers Operating in Fluid

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-08-01

    losses. These losses can be computed using the Navier - Stokes equations on the cantilever cross- section. [9]- [12] Navier - Stokes solvers have been...frequency ω: )sin()( tFtF o ω= . (8) The viscous drag force is computed by solving the time- dependent Navier - Stokes ...Solution of the velocity and pressure using a time- dependent Navier - Stokes algorithm. 2. Computation of the fluid force, spring force, and

  3. Accurate Method for Determining Adhesion of Cantilever Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Michalske, T.A.; de Boer, M.P.

    1999-01-08

    Using surface micromachined samples, we demonstrate the accurate measurement of cantilever beam adhesion by using test structures which are adhered over long attachment lengths. We show that this configuration has a deep energy well, such that a fracture equilibrium is easily reached. When compared to the commonly used method of determining the shortest attached beam, the present method is much less sensitive to variations in surface topography or to details of capillary drying.

  4. Optical fiber accelerometer based on a silicon micromachined cantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malki, Abdelrafik; Lecoy, Pierre; Marty, Jeanine; Renouf, Christine; Ferdinand, Pierre

    1995-12-01

    An intensity-modulated fiber-optic accelerometer based on backreflection effects has been manufactured and tested. It uses a multimode fiber placed at a spherical mirror center, and the beam intensity is modulated by a micromachined silicon cantilever. This device has applications as an accelerometer and vibrometer for rotating machines. It exhibits an amplitude linearity of +/-1.2% in the range of 0.1-22 m s-2, a frequency linearity of +/-1% in the

  5. Carbon nanotube cantilevers on self-aligned copper silicide nanobeams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parajuli, Omkar; Kumar, Nitin; Kipp, Dylan; Hahm, Jong-in

    2007-04-01

    In this letter, the authors describe both a growth method for self-aligning copper silicide (Cu3Si) nanobeams and their use as active catalysts for carbon nanotube (CNT) synthesis via chemical vapor deposition. In the unique geometry of these useful structures, CNT cantilevers are anchored firmly to the Cu3Si nanobeams. The resulting CNT-Cu3Si structures may improve accuracy and reliability of CNT applications in nanoelectromechanical systems.

  6. Direct Measurement of Lateral Force Using Dual Cantilevers

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Makoto; Ichikawa, Masaya; Miura, Kouji

    2012-01-01

    We have constructed an experimental system to measure a piconewton lateral force using dual cantilevers which cross with each other. The resolution of the lateral force is estimated to be 3.3 p ± 0.2 pN, which is comparable to forces due to thermal fluctuation. This experimental apparatus works so easily that it will enable us to determine forces during nano-manipulation and nano-tribological measurements. PMID:22737001

  7. Apertureless cantilever-free pen arrays for scanning photochemical printing.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yu; Xie, Zhuang; Brown, Keith A; Park, Daniel J; Zhou, Xiaozhu; Chen, Peng-Cheng; Hirtz, Michael; Lin, Qing-Yuan; Dravid, Vinayak P; Schatz, George C; Zheng, Zijian; Mirkin, Chad A

    2015-02-25

    A novel, apertureless, cantilever-free pen array can be used for dual scanning photochemical and molecular printing. Serial writing with light is enabled by combining self-focusing pyramidal pens with an opaque backing between pens. The elastomeric pens also afford force-tuned illumination and simultaneous delivery of materials and optical energy. These attributes make the technique a promising candidate for maskless high-resolution photopatterning and combinatorial chemistry.

  8. A prospective clinical trial of single Astra Tech 4.0 or 5.0 diameter implants used to support two-unit cantilever bridges: results after 3 years.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Richard M; Howe, Leslie C; Palmer, Paul J; Wilson, Ron

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the use of a single Astra Tech implant to support a two-unit cantilever fixed dental prosthesis. Twenty-nine subjects with an edentulous space (at least equivalent to two bicuspid units) in the premolar/molar segments of the maxilla or mandible with opposing natural teeth or a fixed/removable prosthesis were treated. They were provided with either a 4 or 5.0 mm diameter fixture MT OsseoSpeed. Prostheses were constructed using a cast-to abutment as a one-piece unit with porcelain fused to precious metal to allow direct screw retention. Subjects expressed a high satisfaction with treatment, including appearance and function. The most important complication was abutment screw loosening. It occurred as a single episode in four subjects and in another six subjects the loosening was recurrent. Bone levels were stable and there were no significant differences in radiographic bone height between cantilever and non-cantilever sides of the implant at any time point. Single implants can be successfully used to support two-unit cantilever FDPs in the premolar region. A common factor could not be identified in relation to abutment screw loosening. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  9. Polymeric cantilever integrated with PDMS/graphene composite strain sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Young-Soo; Gwak, Min-Joo; Lee, Dong-Weon

    2016-10-01

    This paper describes the mechanical and electrical characteristics of a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) cantilever integrated with a high-sensitivity strain sensor. The strain sensor is fabricated using PDMS and graphene flakes that are uniformly distributed in the PDMS. In order to prepare PDMS/graphene composite with uniform resistance, a tetrahydrofuran solution is used to decrease the viscosity of a PDMS base polymer solution. A horn-type sonicator is then used to mix the base polymer with graphene flakes. Low viscosity of the base polymer solution improves the reliability and reproducibility of the PDMS/graphene composite for strain sensor applications. After dicing the composite into the desired sensor shape, a tensile test is performed. The experimental results show that the composite with a concentration of 30 wt.% exhibits a linear response up to a strain rate of 9%. The graphene concentration of the prepared materials affects the gauge factor, which at 20% graphene concentration reaches about 50, and with increasing graphene concentration to 30% decreases to 9. Furthermore, photolithography, PDMS casting, and a stencil process are used to fabricate a PDMS cantilever with an integrated strain sensor. The change in resistance of the integrated PDMS/graphene sensor is characterized with respect to the displacement of the cantilever of within 500 μm. The experimental results confirmed that the prepared PDMS/graphene based sensor has the potential for high-sensitive biosensor applications.

  10. Polymeric cantilever integrated with PDMS/graphene composite strain sensor.

    PubMed

    Choi, Young-Soo; Gwak, Min-Joo; Lee, Dong-Weon

    2016-10-01

    This paper describes the mechanical and electrical characteristics of a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) cantilever integrated with a high-sensitivity strain sensor. The strain sensor is fabricated using PDMS and graphene flakes that are uniformly distributed in the PDMS. In order to prepare PDMS/graphene composite with uniform resistance, a tetrahydrofuran solution is used to decrease the viscosity of a PDMS base polymer solution. A horn-type sonicator is then used to mix the base polymer with graphene flakes. Low viscosity of the base polymer solution improves the reliability and reproducibility of the PDMS/graphene composite for strain sensor applications. After dicing the composite into the desired sensor shape, a tensile test is performed. The experimental results show that the composite with a concentration of 30 wt.% exhibits a linear response up to a strain rate of 9%. The graphene concentration of the prepared materials affects the gauge factor, which at 20% graphene concentration reaches about 50, and with increasing graphene concentration to 30% decreases to 9. Furthermore, photolithography, PDMS casting, and a stencil process are used to fabricate a PDMS cantilever with an integrated strain sensor. The change in resistance of the integrated PDMS/graphene sensor is characterized with respect to the displacement of the cantilever of within 500 μm. The experimental results confirmed that the prepared PDMS/graphene based sensor has the potential for high-sensitive biosensor applications.

  11. A cantilever-free approach to dot-matrix nanoprinting

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Keith A.; Eichelsdoerfer, Daniel J.; Shim, Wooyoung; Rasin, Boris; Radha, Boya; Liao, Xing; Schmucker, Abrin L.; Liu, Guoliang; Mirkin, Chad A.

    2013-01-01

    Scanning probe lithography (SPL) is a promising candidate approach for desktop nanofabrication, but trade-offs in throughput, cost, and resolution have limited its application. The recent development of cantilever-free scanning probe arrays has allowed researchers to define nanoscale patterns in a low-cost and high-resolution format, but with the limitation that these are duplication tools where each probe in the array creates a copy of a single pattern. Here, we report a cantilever-free SPL architecture that can generate 100 nanometer-scale molecular features using a 2D array of independently actuated probes. To physically actuate a probe, local heating is used to thermally expand the elastomeric film beneath a single probe, bringing it into contact with the patterning surface. Not only is this architecture simple and scalable, but it addresses fundamental limitations of 2D SPL by allowing one to compensate for unavoidable imperfections in the system. This cantilever-free dot-matrix nanoprinting will enable the construction of surfaces with chemical functionality that is tuned across the nano- and macroscales. PMID:23861495

  12. Vibrating cantilever beam in a flowing soap film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajjanapu, Veera; Ward, Thomas

    2016-11-01

    We present an experimental study of the interaction between a flexible cantilever beam and a flowing fluid medium using a soap film. The vertically falling soap film is capable of attaining speeds ranging from 1.5 - 3 m/s with an operating test section width of 7.5 cm. Experiments were conducted for flexible cantilever beams of length L <= 10 mm yielding Reynolds number 5000 < Re < 10000 and of cantilever beam thickness ranging from 0.03 - 0.08 mm were placed at angles of attack ranging from 10° - 50°. We visualize the beam displacements and wake with a high-speed camera. Assuming small vibrational amplitudes, we consider the Euler-Bernoulli beam theory to understand the dynamics. From the analysis we find that the normalized average displacement is linear with respect to the square of the free-stream velocity. The vibrational amplitude is also discussed using a similar scaling. Finally, visualization of the downstream vortex structure is related to a beams displacement and vibrational frequency using dimensional analysis.

  13. Contractile cell forces deform macroscopic cantilevers and quantify biomaterial performance.

    PubMed

    Allenstein, U; Mayr, S G; Zink, M

    2015-07-07

    Cells require adhesion to survive, proliferate and migrate, as well as for wound healing and many other functions. The strength of contractile cell forces on an underlying surface is a highly relevant quantity to measure the affinity of cells to a rigid surface with and without coating. Here we show with experimental and theoretical studies that these forces create surface stresses that are sufficient to induce measurable bending of macroscopic cantilevers. Since contractile forces are linked to the formation of focal contacts, results give information on adhesion promoting qualities and allow a comparison of very diverse materials. In exemplary studies, in vitro fibroblast adhesion on the magnetic shape memory alloy Fe-Pd and on the l-lysine derived plasma-functionalized polymer PPLL was determined. We show that cells on Fe-Pd are able to induce surface stresses three times as high as on pure titanium cantilevers. A further increase was observed for PPLL, where the contractile forces are four times higher than on the titanium reference. In addition, we performed finite element simulations on the beam bending to back up the calculation of contractile forces from cantilever bending under non-homogenous surface stress. Our findings consolidate the role of contractile forces as a meaningful measure of biomaterial performance.

  14. Vibration analysis of magnetostrictive thin-film composite cantilever actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yan; Shang, Xinchun

    2016-09-01

    The transverse vibration of a composed cantilever beam with magnetostrictive layer is analyzed, which is employed to simulate dynamic response of an actuator. The high-order shear deformation theory of beam and the coupling magnetoelastic constitutive relationship are introduced to construct the governing equations, all interface conditions between magnetostrictive film and elastic substrate as well as the free stress condition on the top and bottom surfaces of the beam can be satisfied. In order to demonstrate validity of the presented mathematical modeling, the verification examples are also given. Furthermore, the effect of geometry and material parameters on dynamic characteristics of magnetostrictive cantilever beam, such as the nature frequency and amplitude, is discussed. Moreover, through computing the magneto-mechanical coupling factor of the beam structure, the variation tendency curves of the factor along with different parameters and frequencies of magnetostrictive cantilever beam actuator have been presented. These numerical results should be useful for the design of beam-type with magnetostrictive thin-film actuators.

  15. SU8 diaphragm micropump with monolithically integrated cantilever check valves.

    PubMed

    Ezkerra, Aitor; Fernández, Luis José; Mayora, Kepa; Ruano-López, Jesús Miguel

    2011-10-07

    This paper presents a SU8 unidirectional diaphragm micropump with embedded out-of-plane cantilever check valves. The device represents a reliable and low-cost solution for integration of microfluidic control in lab-on-a-chip devices. Its planar architecture allows monolithic definition of its components in a single step and potential integration with previously reported PCR, electrophoresis and flow-sensing SU8 microdevices. Pneumatic actuation is applied on a PDMS diaphragm, which is bonded to the SU8 body at wafer level, further enhancing its integration and mass production capabilities. The cantilever check valves move synchronously with the diaphragm, feature fast response (10ms), low dead volume (86nl) and a 94% flow blockage up to 300kPa. The micropump achieves a maximum flow rate of 177 μl min(-1) at 6 Hz and 200 kPa with an effective area of 10 mm(2). The device is reliable, self-priming and tolerant to particles and big bubbles. To the knowledge of the authors, this is the first micropump in SU8 with monolithically integrated cantilever check valves.

  16. An antibody-sensitized microfabricated cantilever for the growth detection of Aspergillus niger spores.

    PubMed

    Nugaeva, Natalia; Gfeller, Karin Y; Backmann, Natalia; Düggelin, Marcel; Lang, Hans Peter; Güntherodt, Hans-Joachim; Hegner, Martin

    2007-02-01

    We demonstrate a new sensitive biosensor for detection of vital fungal spores of Aspergillus niger. The biosensor is based on silicon microfabricated cantilever arrays operated in dynamic mode. The change in resonance frequency of the sensor is a function of mass binding to the cantilever surface. For specific A. niger spore immobilization on the cantilever, each cantilever was individually coated with anti-Aspergillus niger polyclonal antibodies. We demonstrate the detection of single A. niger spores and their subsequent growth on the functionalized cantilever surface by online measurements of resonance frequency shifts. The new biosensor operating in humid air allows quantitative and qualitative detection of A. niger spores as well as detection of vital, functional spores in situ within approximately 4 h. The detection limit of the sensor is 103 CFU mL-1. Mass sensitivity of the cantilever sensor is approximately 53 pg Hz-1.

  17. Investigations on antibody binding to a micro-cantilever coated with a BAM pesticide residue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bache, Michael; Taboryski, Rafael; Schmid, Silvan; Aamand, Jens; Jakobsen, Mogens Havsteen

    2011-05-01

    The attachment of an antibody to an antigen-coated cantilever has been investigated by repeated experiments, using a cantilever-based detection system by Cantion A/S. The stress induced by the binding of a pesticide residue BAM (2,6 dichlorobenzamide) immobilized on a cantilever surface to anti-BAM antibody is measured using the CantiLab4© system from Cantion A/S with four gold-coated cantilevers and piezo resistive readout. The detection mechanism is in principle label-free, but fluorescent-marked antibodies have been used to subsequently verify the binding on the cantilever surface. The bending and increase in mass of each cantilever has also been investigated using a light interferometer and a Doppler Vibrometer. The system has been analyzed during repeated measurements to investigate whether the CantiLab4© system is a suited platform for a pesticide assay system.

  18. Cantilever Wings for Modern Aircraft: Some Aspects of Cantilever Wing Construction with Special Reference to Weight and Torsional Stiffness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stieger, H J

    1929-01-01

    In the foregoing remarks I have made an attempt to touch on some of the structural problems met with in cantilever wings, and dealt rather fully with a certain type of single-spar construction. The experimental test wing was a first attempt to demonstrate the principles of this departure from orthodox methods. The result was a wing both torsionally stiff and of light weight - lighter than a corresponding biplane construction.

  19. Performance of pre-deformed flexible piezoelectric cantilever in energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Pengyingkai; Sui, Li; Shi, Gengchen; Liu, Guohua

    2016-05-01

    This paper proposes a novel structure for pre-rolled flexible piezoelectric cantilevers that use wind energy to power a submunition electrical device. Owing to the particular installation position and working environment, the submunition piezoelectric cantilever should be rolled when not working, but this pre-rolled state can alter the energy harvesting performance. Herein, a working principle and installation method for piezoelectric cantilevers used in submunitions are introduced. To study the influence of the pre-rolled state, pre-rolled piezoelectric cantilevers of different sizes were fabricated and their performances were studied using finite element analysis simulations and experiments. The simulation results show that the resonance frequency and stiffness of the pre-rolled structure is higher than that of a flat structure. Results show that, (1) for both the pre-rolled and flat cantilever, the peak voltage will increase with the wind speed. (2) The pre-rolled cantilever has a higher critical wind speed than the flat cantilever. (3) For identical wind speeds and cantilever sizes, the peak voltage of the flat cantilever (45 V) is less than that of the pre-rolled cantilever (56 V). (4) Using a full-bridge rectifier, the output of the pre-rolled cantilever can sufficiently supply a 10 μF capacitor, whose output voltage may be up to 23 V after 10 s. These results demonstrate that the pre-rolled piezoelectric cantilever and its installation position used in this work are more suitable for submunition, and its output sufficiently meets submunition requirements.

  20. Integrated cantilever fabrication and system development for ultrasonic and acoustic scanning probe microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Stephen; Sankaran, Balasubramanian; Altemus, Bruce; Xu, Bai; Geer, Robert

    2005-05-01

    Although the conventional optical lever technology typically used for scanning probe microscope applications has proven highly sensitive, accurate, and cost effective for most applications involving micromachined cantilever deflection measurements, frequency limitations and space needs limit its applicability to emerging ultrasonic-based SPM applications. Recently, the fabrication of cantilevers integrated with actuation and sensing components has opened avenues for feedback-based driving of micromachined cantilevers at higher-order resonance frequencies while sensing average deflection without the need for an optical deflection pathway for average deflection sensing. The work presented here will review recent efforts by our group in fabricating micromachined cantilevers with integrated piezoresistive deflection-sensing components combined with integrated ZnO actuation layers to induce cantilever deflection. These cantilevers are being fabricated for use in a heterodyne force microscopy system (HFM) to enable SPM imaging contrast based on viscoelastic response of a surface in contact with a micromachined tip wherein active-feedback technology is being applied to maintain ultrasonic tip excitation at higher order cantilever resonances. The first and second-pass fabrication results will be presented and reviewed regarding cantilever release and ZnO actuator (and electrode) fabrication. Dynamic response data from these structures, measured via laser Doppler vibrometery reveal the expected resonance structure for a cantilever of these dimensions.

  1. Large Area Microcorrals and Cavity Formation on Cantilevers using a Focused Ion Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Britt, David W.

    2011-09-14

    We utilize focused ion beam (FIB) to explore various sputtering parameters to form large area microcorrals and cavities on cantilevers. Microcorrals were rapidly created by modifying ion beam blur and overlaps. Modification in FIB sputtering parameters affects the periodicity and shape of corral microstructure. Cantilever deflections show ion beam amorphization effects as a function of sputtered area and cantilever base cavities with or without side walls. The FIB sputtering parameters address a method for rapid creation of a cantilever tensiometer with integrated fluid storage and delivery.

  2. Multi-directional energy harvesting by piezoelectric cantilever-pendulum with internal resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, J.; Tang, J.

    2015-11-23

    This letter reports a piezoelectric cantilever-pendulum design for multi-directional energy harvesting. A pendulum is attached to the tip of a piezoelectric cantilever-type energy harvester. This design aims at taking advantage of the nonlinear coupling between the pendulum motion in 3-dimensional space and the beam bending vibration at resonances. Experimental studies indicate that, under properly chosen parameters, 1:2 internal resonance can be induced, which enables the multi-directional energy harvesting with a single cantilever. The advantages of the design with respect to traditional piezoelectric cantilever are examined.

  3. Improved transfer process for fabrication of cantilever with precise air-gap formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanazawa, Shusuke; Kusaka, Yasuyuki; Yamamoto, Noritaka; Ushijima, Hirobumi

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, an improved transfer process to fabricate a cantilever structure with a precise air gap is reported. For this fabrication, a planar imprinting method was used and the drying conditions of the cantilever precursor ink were controlled. The air gap between the cantilevered top and bottom electrodes was formed with an estimated error of less than 3%. An operational force gauge with a changeable capacitance was obtained by applying a force to the cantilevered top electrode. This process can facilitate the eco-friendly fabrication of micro-devices with three-dimensional structures.

  4. Bi-harmonic cantilever design for improved measurement sensitivity in tapping-mode atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Loganathan, Muthukumaran; Bristow, Douglas A

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents a method and cantilever design for improving the mechanical measurement sensitivity in the atomic force microscopy (AFM) tapping mode. The method uses two harmonics in the drive signal to generate a bi-harmonic tapping trajectory. Mathematical analysis demonstrates that the wide-valley bi-harmonic tapping trajectory is as much as 70% more sensitive to changes in the sample topography than the standard single-harmonic trajectory typically used. Although standard AFM cantilevers can be driven in the bi-harmonic tapping trajectory, they require large forcing at the second harmonic. A design is presented for a bi-harmonic cantilever that has a second resonant mode at twice its first resonant mode, thereby capable of generating bi-harmonic trajectories with small forcing signals. Bi-harmonic cantilevers are fabricated by milling a small cantilever on the interior of a standard cantilever probe using a focused ion beam. Bi-harmonic drive signals are derived for standard cantilevers and bi-harmonic cantilevers. Experimental results demonstrate better than 30% improvement in measurement sensitivity using the bi-harmonic cantilever. Images obtained through bi-harmonic tapping exhibit improved sharpness and surface tracking, especially at high scan speeds and low force fields.

  5. Bi-harmonic cantilever design for improved measurement sensitivity in tapping-mode atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Loganathan, Muthukumaran; Bristow, Douglas A.

    2014-04-15

    This paper presents a method and cantilever design for improving the mechanical measurement sensitivity in the atomic force microscopy (AFM) tapping mode. The method uses two harmonics in the drive signal to generate a bi-harmonic tapping trajectory. Mathematical analysis demonstrates that the wide-valley bi-harmonic tapping trajectory is as much as 70% more sensitive to changes in the sample topography than the standard single-harmonic trajectory typically used. Although standard AFM cantilevers can be driven in the bi-harmonic tapping trajectory, they require large forcing at the second harmonic. A design is presented for a bi-harmonic cantilever that has a second resonant mode at twice its first resonant mode, thereby capable of generating bi-harmonic trajectories with small forcing signals. Bi-harmonic cantilevers are fabricated by milling a small cantilever on the interior of a standard cantilever probe using a focused ion beam. Bi-harmonic drive signals are derived for standard cantilevers and bi-harmonic cantilevers. Experimental results demonstrate better than 30% improvement in measurement sensitivity using the bi-harmonic cantilever. Images obtained through bi-harmonic tapping exhibit improved sharpness and surface tracking, especially at high scan speeds and low force fields.

  6. Note: Lateral force microscope calibration using multiple location pivot loading of rectangular cantilevers

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Koo-Hyun; Reitsma, Mark G.

    2010-02-15

    This note outlines a calibration method for atomic force microscope friction measurement that uses the ''pivot'' method of [Bogdanovic et al., Colloids Surf. B 19, 397 (2000)] to generate optical lever sensitivities for known torque applied to rectangular cantilevers. We demonstrate the key calibration parameter to be a linear function of the position at which it is determined along the length of the cantilevers. In this way the optical lever system can be calibrated for cantilever torque by applying loads at locations along the length of a cantilever, away from the integrated tip, so that issues such as tip damage or interference can be avoided.

  7. Long-term observations of extensive fixed partial dentures on mandibular canine teeth.

    PubMed

    Carlson, B R; Yontchev, E

    1996-03-01

    Twelve patients were followed for 15 years after treatment with a 12-unit cantilever fixed partial denture on the mandibular canines opposite to a complete maxillary denture. Four constructions failed and had to be removed but four were still in function after 15 years. Four patients died during the observation period still wearing their constructions. Endodontic complications, pulpal necrosis and loss of retention of posts were the most frequent, while caries and periodontal lesions were rare. The maintenance costs over the years were fairly low even compared to maintenance costs for patients treated with implants. Extensive mandibular cantilever fixed partial dentures may be used in the rehabilitation of patients with a very reduced dentition and a history of difficulties adapting to removable dentures.

  8. Nonlinear Dynamics of Cantilever-Sample Interactions in Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H.; Cantrell, Sean A.

    2010-01-01

    The interaction of the cantilever tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM) with the sample surface is obtained by treating the cantilever and sample as independent systems coupled by a nonlinear force acting between the cantilever tip and a volume element of the sample surface. The volume element is subjected to a restoring force from the remainder of the sample that provides dynamical equilibrium for the combined systems. The model accounts for the positions on the cantilever of the cantilever tip, laser probe, and excitation force (if any) via a basis set of set of orthogonal functions that may be generalized to account for arbitrary cantilever shapes. The basis set is extended to include nonlinear cantilever modes. The model leads to a pair of coupled nonlinear differential equations that are solved analytically using a matrix iteration procedure. The effects of oscillatory excitation forces applied either to the cantilever or to the sample surface (or to both) are obtained from the solution set and applied to the to the assessment of phase and amplitude signals generated by various acoustic-atomic force microscope (A-AFM) modalities. The influence of bistable cantilever modes of on AFM signal generation is discussed. The effects on the cantilever-sample surface dynamics of subsurface features embedded in the sample that are perturbed by surface-generated oscillatory excitation forces and carried to the cantilever via wave propagation are accounted by the Bolef-Miller propagating wave model. Expressions pertaining to signal generation and image contrast in A-AFM are obtained and applied to amplitude modulation (intermittent contact) atomic force microscopy and resonant difference-frequency atomic force ultrasonic microscopy (RDF-AFUM). The influence of phase accumulation in A-AFM on image contrast is discussed, as is the effect of hard contact and maximum nonlinearity regimes of A-AFM operation.

  9. Nonlinear Dynamics of Cantilever-Sample Interactions in Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H.; Cantrell, Sean A.

    2010-01-01

    The interaction of the cantilever tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM) with the sample surface is obtained by treating the cantilever and sample as independent systems coupled by a nonlinear force acting between the cantilever tip and a volume element of the sample surface. The volume element is subjected to a restoring force from the remainder of the sample that provides dynamical equilibrium for the combined systems. The model accounts for the positions on the cantilever of the cantilever tip, laser probe, and excitation force (if any) via a basis set of set of orthogonal functions that may be generalized to account for arbitrary cantilever shapes. The basis set is extended to include nonlinear cantilever modes. The model leads to a pair of coupled nonlinear differential equations that are solved analytically using a matrix iteration procedure. The effects of oscillatory excitation forces applied either to the cantilever or to the sample surface (or to both) are obtained from the solution set and applied to the to the assessment of phase and amplitude signals generated by various acoustic-atomic force microscope (A-AFM) modalities. The influence of bistable cantilever modes of on AFM signal generation is discussed. The effects on the cantilever-sample surface dynamics of subsurface features embedded in the sample that are perturbed by surface-generated oscillatory excitation forces and carried to the cantilever via wave propagation are accounted by the Bolef-Miller propagating wave model. Expressions pertaining to signal generation and image contrast in A-AFM are obtained and applied to amplitude modulation (intermittent contact) atomic force microscopy and resonant difference-frequency atomic force ultrasonic microscopy (RDF-AFUM). The influence of phase accumulation in A-AFM on image contrast is discussed, as is the effect of hard contact and maximum nonlinearity regimes of A-AFM operation.

  10. Probing model tumor interfacial properties using piezoelectric cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yegingil, Hakki; Shih, Wan Y.; Shih, Wei-Heng

    2010-09-01

    Invasive malignant breast cancers are typically branchy and benign breast tumors are typically smooth. It is of interest to characterize tumor branchiness (roughness) to differentiate invasive malignant breast cancer from noninvasive ones. In this study, we examined the shear modulus (G) to elastic modulus (E) ratio, G /E, as a quantity to describe model tumor interfacial roughness using a piezoelectric cantilever capable of measuring both tissue elastic modulus and tissue shear modulus. The piezoelectric cantilever used had two lead zirconate titanate layers to facilitate all-electrical elastic (shear) modulus measurements using one single device. We constructed model tissues with tumors by embedding one-dimensional (1D) corrugated inclusions and three-dimensional (3D) spiky-ball inclusions made of modeling clay in gelatin. We showed that for smooth inclusions, G /E was 0.3 regardless of the shear direction. In contrast, for a 1D corrugated rough inclusion G /E was 0.3 only when the shear was parallel to corrugation and G /E increased with an increasing angle between the shear direction and the corrugation. When the shear was perpendicular to corrugation, G /E became >0.7. For 3D isotropic spiky-ball inclusions we showed that the G /E depended on the degree of the roughness. Using the ratio s /r of the spike length (s) to the overall inclusion radius (r) as a roughness parameter, we showed that for inclusions with s /r larger than or equal to 0.28, the G /E ratio over the inclusions was larger than 0.7 whereas for inclusions with s /r less than 0.28, the G /E decreased with decreasing s /r to around 0.3 at s /r=0. In addition, we showed that the depth limit of the G /E measurement is twice the width of the probe area of the piezoelectric cantilever.

  11. On numerical nonlinear analysis of highly flexible spinning cantilevers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Utku, S.; El-Essawi, M.; Salama, M.

    1981-01-01

    The general nonlinear discretized equations of motion of spinning elastic solids and structures are derived as a set of nonlinear ordinary differential equations for the case when the strain-displacement and velocity-displacement relations are nonlinear up to the second order. It is shown that the cost of generation of such equations is proportional to the fourth power of the number of degrees of freedom. A computer program is written to automatically generate the equations for the case of spinning cantilevers with initial imperfections. The types and the number of the coordinate functions used in the trial solution are parameters of the program.

  12. APPARATUS FOR NON-DESTRUCTIVE INSPECTION OF CANTILEVERED MEMBERS

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, E.R.; Mahoney, C.H.; Lay, C.R.

    1961-10-24

    An apparatus for non-destructive inspection of cantilevered members, such as compressor blades, is described. The member under inspection is vibrated with a regulated source of air under pressure. The amplitude of vibration of the member is maintained at its natural frequency. The frequency of vibration of the member is measured. An indication of an excessive decay or erratic shifting in the measured frequency above an allowable hysteretic decay is provided as an indication of a fault in the member. The member is vibrated for a selected test period. (AEC)

  13. Piezoelectric Bimorph Cantilever for Vibration-Producing-Hydrogen

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jun; Wu, Zheng; Jia, Yanmin; Kan, Junwu; Cheng, Guangming

    2013-01-01

    A device composed of a piezoelectric bimorph cantilever and a water electrolysis device was fabricated to realize piezoelectrochemical hydrogen production. The obvious output of the hydrogen and oxygen through application of a mechanical vibration of ∼0.07 N and ∼46.2 Hz was observed. This method provides a cost-effective, recyclable, environment-friendly and simple way to directly split water for hydrogen fuels by scavenging mechanical waste energy forms such as noise or traffic vibration in the environment. PMID:23271601

  14. Heater-Integrated Cantilevers for Nano-Samples Thermogravimetric Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Toffoli, Valeria; Carrato, Sergio; Lee, Dongkyu; Jeon, Sangmin; Lazzarino, Marco

    2013-01-01

    The design and characteristics of a micro-system for thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) in which heater, temperature sensor and mass sensor are integrated into a single device are presented. The system consists of a suspended cantilever that incorporates a microfabricated resistor, used as both heater and thermometer. A three-dimensional finite element analysis was used to define the structure parameters. TGA sensors were fabricated by standard microlithographic techniques and tested using milli-Q water and polyurethane microcapsule. The results demonstrated that our approach provides a faster and more sensitive TGA with respect to commercial systems.

  15. Double Cantilever Beam Fracture Toughness Testing of Several Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessler, Jeff A.; Adams, Donald F.

    1992-01-01

    Double-cantilever beam fracture toughness tests were performed by the Composite Materials Research Group on several different unidirectional composite materials provided by NASA Langley Research Center. The composite materials consisted of Hercules IM-7 carbon fiber and various matrix resin formulations. Multiple formulations of four different families of matrix resins were tested: LaRC - ITPI, LaRC - IA, RPT46T, and RP67/RP55. Report presents the materials tested and pertinent details supplied by NASA. For each material, three replicate specimens were tested. Multiple crack extensions were performed on each replicate.

  16. Determination of a cantilever's mechanical impedance using photon momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, Paul R.; Shaw, Gordon A.; Pratt, Jon R.

    2013-05-01

    We report the use of photon momentum as a means to measure the mechanical impedance of a mechanical oscillator with traceability to the International System of Units (SI). The optical power of a fiber coupled superluminous light emitting diode is modulated at a rms optical power of 6.5 mW, driving the cantilever at a rms value of over 10 nm on resonance in vacuum (10-3 Pa). The experimentally determined mechanical impedance of the oscillator is fit to a damped harmonic oscillator response, and the stiffness is found to be in excellent agreement with the value obtained from an SI-traceable nanoindenter.

  17. On use of double cantilever beam for coatings and adhesion tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troczynski, Tom; Camire, Jean

    1995-05-01

    The compliance model of Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) for testing coatings and adhesion has been proposed and verified experimentally. The model is based on the assumption that the coating modifies the stiffness of a foundation of DCB onto which the beam is fixed, according to a simple series-spring law. The model includes multi-coated specimens, in particular the specimen with thermal sprayed ceramic coating, with an additional layer of epoxy adhesive for attachment of a symmetrical DCB arm. It was found, that the compliance of DCB specimens with a coating is significantly increased for a coating thickness larger than approximately 1% of the arm thickness, and a coating Young's modulus smaller than approximately 50% of the arm modulus. The model results, verified by experiment, have profound consequences on calculations of the strain energy release rate in fracture tests for coatings, brazed joints etc. The total compliance of the arm and coating assembly scales with the coating stiffness, and thus the model can be utilised for rigidity evaluation of a variety of coatings on standard substrates, e.g. paints or polymer coatings on metals.

  18. Measuring true Young's modulus of a cantilevered nanowire: effect of clamping on resonance frequency.

    PubMed

    Qin, Qingquan; Xu, Feng; Cao, Yongqing; Ro, Paul I; Zhu, Yong

    2012-08-20

    The effect of clamping on resonance frequency and thus measured Young's modulus of nanowires (NWs) is systematically investigated via a combined experimental and simulation approach. ZnO NWs are used in this work as an example. The resonance tests are performed in situ inside a scanning electron microscope and the NWs are cantilevered on a tungsten probe by electron-beam-induced deposition (EBID) of hydrocarbon. EBID is repeated several times to deposit more hydrocarbons at the same location. The resonance frequency increases with the increasing clamp size until approaching that under the "fixed" boundary condition. The critical clamp size is identified as a function of NW diameter and NW Young's modulus. This work: 1) exemplifies the importance of considering the effect of clamping in measurements of Young's modulus using the resonance method, and 2) demonstrates that the true Young's modulus can be measured if the critical clamp size is reached. Design guidelines on the critical clamp size are provided. Such design guidelines can be extended to other one-dimensional nanostructures such as carbon nanotubes. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Structure–performance relationships for cantilever-type piezoelectric energy harvesters

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Kyung-Hoon E-mail: spriya@vt.edu; Park, Hwi-Yeol; Heo, Jin S.; Priya, Shashank E-mail: spriya@vt.edu

    2014-05-28

    This study provides comprehensive analysis of the structure–performance relationships in cantilever-type piezoelectric energy harvesters. It provides full understanding of the effect of all the practical global control variables on the harvester performance. The control variables considered for the analysis were material parameters, areal and volumetric dimensions, and configuration of the inactive and active layers. Experimentally, the output power density of the harvester was maximum when the shape of the beam was close to a square for a constant bending stiffness and a fixed beam area. Through analytical modeling of the effective stiffness for the piezoelectric bimorph, the conditions for enhancing the bending stiffness within the same beam volume as that of a conventional bimorph were identified. The harvester configuration with beam aspect ratio of 0.86 utilizing distributed inactive layers exhibited an giant output power of 52.5 mW and power density of 28.5 mW cm{sup −3} at 30 Hz under 6.9 m s{sup −2} excitation. The analysis further indicates that the trend in the output power with varying damping ratio is dissimilar to that of the efficiency. In order to realize best performance, the harvester should be designed with respect to maximizing the magnitude of output power.

  20. Energy harvesting of cantilever beam system with linear and nonlinear piezoelectric model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borowiec, Marek

    2015-11-01

    The nonlinear beam with vertical combined excitations is proposed as an energy harvester. The nonlinearities are included both, in the beam model and also in the electrical subsystem. The system is modelled as a cantilever beam with included a tip mass and piezoelectric patches which convert the bending strains induced by both, the harmonic and the additive stochastic forces. The excitation affects in vertical directions by kinematic forcing into electrical charge. The first main goal is to analyse the dynamics of the electro-mechanical beam system and the influence of the mixed excitation forces into an effectiveness of the energy harvesting. Overcoming the potential barrier by the beam system is also analysed, where large output amplitudes occur. Such region of the vibration affects more power generation, which is crucial in terms of load resistors sensitivities. By increasing the additive noise level with fixed harmonic force it is observed the transition from single well oscillations to inter-well stochastic jumps. The second mail goal is analysing the influence of the piezoelectric nonlinear characteristic and compare the results to the linear piezoelectric cases. The output power is measured during different system behaviours provided by different piezoelectric characteristic as well as introduced stochastic components by modulated tip mass of the system.

  1. Cantilevered bimorph-based scanner for high speed atomic force microscopy with large scanning range.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yusheng; Shang, Guangyi; Cai, Wei; Yao, Jun-en

    2010-05-01

    A cantilevered bimorph-based resonance-mode scanner for high speed atomic force microscope (AFM) imaging is presented. The free end of the bimorph is used for mounting a sample stage and the other one of that is fixed on the top of a conventional single tube scanner. High speed scanning is realized with the bimorph-based scanner vibrating at resonant frequency driven by a sine wave voltage applied to one piezolayer of the bimorph, while slow scanning is performed by the tube scanner. The other piezolayer provides information on vibration amplitude and phase of the bimorph itself simultaneously, which is used for real-time data processing and image calibration. By adjusting the free length of the bimorph, the line scan rate can be preset ranging from several hundred hertz to several kilohertz, which would be beneficial for the observation of samples with different properties. Combined with a home-made AFM system and a commercially available data acquisition card, AFM images of various samples have been obtained, and as an example, images of the silicon grating taken at a line rate of 1.5 kHz with the scan size of 20 microm are given. By manually moving the sample of polished Al foil surface while scanning, the capability of dynamic imaging is demonstrated.

  2. Cantilever-beam dynamic modulus for wood composite products. Part 1, apparatus

    Treesearch

    Chris Turk; John F. Hunt; David J. Marr

    2008-01-01

    A cantilever-beam vibration-testing apparatus has been developed to provide a means of dynamic and non-destructive evaluation of modulus of elasticity for small samples of wood or wood-composite material. The apparatus applies a known displacement to a cantilever beam and then releases the beam into its natural first-mode vibration and records displacement as a...

  3. Switching through intermediate states seen in a single nickel nanorod by cantilever magnetometry

    PubMed Central

    Lee, SangGap; Moore, Eric W.; Hickman, Steven A.; Longenecker, Jonilyn G.; Marohn, John A.

    2012-01-01

    In-plane to out-of-plane magnetization switching in a single nickel nanorod affixed to an attonewton-sensitivity cantilever was studied at cryogenic temperatures. We observe multiple sharp, simultaneous transitions in cantilever frequency, dissipation, and frequency jitter associated with magnetic switching through distinct intermediate states. These findings suggest a new route for detecting magnetic fields at the nanoscale. PMID:22566714

  4. Decoupled cantilever arms for highly versatile and sensitive temperature and heat flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burg, Brian R.; Tong, Jonathan K.; Hsu, Wei-Chun; Chen, Gang

    2012-10-01

    Microfabricated cantilever beams have been used in microelectromechanical systems for a variety of sensor and actuator applications. Bimorph cantilevers accurately measure temperature change and heat flux with resolutions several orders of magnitude higher than those of conventional sensors such as thermocouples, semiconductor diodes, as well as resistance and infrared thermometers. The use of traditional cantilevers, however, entails a series of important measurement limitations, because their interactions with the sample and surroundings often create parasitic deflection forces and the typical metal layer degrades the thermal sensitivity of the cantilever. The paper introduces a design to address these issues by decoupling the sample and detector section of the cantilever, along with a thermomechanical model, the fabrication, system integration, and characterization. The custom-designed bi-arm cantilever is over one order of magnitude more sensitive than current commercial cantilevers due to the significantly reduced thermal conductance of the cantilever sample arm. The rigid and immobile sample section offers measurement versatility ranging from photothermal absorption, near-field thermal radiation down to contact, conduction, and material thermal characterization measurements in nearly identical configurations.

  5. Silicon cantilever functionalization for cellulose-specific chemical force imaging of switchgrass

    DOE PAGES

    Lee, Ida; Evans, Barbara R.; Foston, Marcus B.; ...

    2015-05-08

    A method for direct functionalization of silicon and silicon nitride cantilevers with bifunctional silanes was tested with model surfaces to determine adhesive forces for different hydrogen-bonding chemistries. Application for biomass surface characterization was tested by mapping switchgrass and isolated switchgrass cellulose in topographic and force-volume mode using a cellulose-specific cantilever.

  6. Transmission electron microscopy of deformed Ti-6Al-4 V micro-cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Rengen; Gong, Jicheng; Wilkinson, Angus J.; Jones, Ian P.

    2012-09-01

    Single α-β colony micro-cantilevers were machined from a polycrystalline commercial Ti-6Al-4 V sample using a focussed ion beam. Each cantilever contained several alpha lamellae separated by thin fillets of beta. A nanoindenter was used to perform micro-bending tests. The a3 prismatic slip system was selectively activated in the cantilevers by controlling the crystal orientation along the micro-cantilever. Specimens for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were prepared using a dual-beam focussed ion beam from a series of micro-cantilevers deformed to various extents. Bright field scanning transmission electron microscopy (BF-STEM) was used to investigate the processes of slip nucleation, propagation and transmission through the α/β interface. The cantilevers had an equilateral triangular cross-section with the bar at the top and the apex at the bottom. The compressive stresses developed near the apex were thus twice the tensile stresses near the top. Dislocations initiate first from the bottom and then from the top and move toward the neutral line. Even in the sample with a small deflection, i.e. 0.5 µm, dislocations were observed at the bottom of the cantilever, but dislocations were not observed at the top until the deflection reached 3 µm. Pile-ups pushed the dislocations past the neutral line when the micro-cantilevers were deflected to more than 4 µm.

  7. Ultrananocrystalline Diamond Cantilever Wide Dynamic Range Acceleration/Vibration /Pressure Sensor

    DOEpatents

    Krauss, Alan R.; Gruen, Dieter M.; Pellin, Michael J.; Auciello, Orlando

    2003-09-02

    An ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) element formed in a cantilever configuration is used in a highly sensitive, ultra-small sensor for measuring acceleration, shock, vibration and static pressure over a wide dynamic range. The cantilever UNCD element may be used in combination with a single anode, with measurements made either optically or by capacitance. In another embodiment, the cantilever UNCD element is disposed between two anodes, with DC voltages applied to the two anodes. With a small AC modulated voltage applied to the UNCD cantilever element and because of the symmetry of the applied voltage and the anode-cathode gap distance in the Fowler-Nordheim equation, any change in the anode voltage ratio V1/V2 required to maintain a specified current ratio precisely matches any displacement of the UNCD cantilever element from equilibrium. By measuring changes in the anode voltage ratio required to maintain a specified current ratio, the deflection of the UNCD cantilever can be precisely determined. By appropriately modulating the voltages applied between the UNCD cantilever and the two anodes, or limit electrodes, precise independent measurements of pressure, uniaxial acceleration, vibration and shock can be made. This invention also contemplates a method for fabricating the cantilever UNCD structure for the sensor.

  8. Ultrananocrystalline diamond cantilever wide dynamic range acceleration/vibration/pressure sensor

    DOEpatents

    Krauss, Alan R.; Gruen, Dieter M.; Pellin, Michael J.; Auciello, Orlando

    2002-07-23

    An ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) element formed in a cantilever configuration is used in a highly sensitive, ultra-small sensor for measuring acceleration, shock, vibration and static pressure over a wide dynamic range. The cantilever UNCD element may be used in combination with a single anode, with measurements made either optically or by capacitance. In another embodiment, the cantilever UNCD element is disposed between two anodes, with DC voltages applied to the two anodes. With a small AC modulated voltage applied to the UNCD cantilever element and because of the symmetry of the applied voltage and the anode-cathode gap distance in the Fowler-Nordheim equation, any change in the anode voltage ratio V1/N2 required to maintain a specified current ratio precisely matches any displacement of the UNCD cantilever element from equilibrium. By measuring changes in the anode voltage ratio required to maintain a specified current ratio, the deflection of the UNCD cantilever can be precisely determined. By appropriately modulating the voltages applied between the UNCD cantilever and the two anodes, or limit electrodes, precise independent measurements of pressure, uniaxial acceleration, vibration and shock can be made. This invention also contemplates a method for fabricating the cantilever UNCD structure for the sensor.

  9. Extending the lower limits of force detection using micromachined silicon cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stowe, Timothy David

    2000-09-01

    The force resolution of a micromachined cantilever is ultimately limited by thermal contact with the surrounding environment and the intrinsic energy dissipation within the cantilever. By optimizing the cantilever geometry to reduce energy dissipation, this thesis demonstrates that a force resolution of 1.7 × 10-18N/ Hz can be achieved in a low temperature vacuum environment. This force resolution represents a world record for microcantilever-based force detection. In order to optimize the cantilever design, a custom micromachining process was developed for fabricating free-standing single-crystal-silicon cantilevers as thin as 400 angstroms. For such thin cantilevers, surface- related energy dissipation was shown to limit the low temperature mechanical Q. Methods for reducing the surface disorder by removing the native surface oxide typically resulted in a four-fold increase in Q and therefore improved force resolution. The fabricated cantilevers typically had spring constants less than 10 -4 N/m, or a hundred times lower than the spring constants of cantilevers commonly used in scanning probe microscopy. When used in scanning probe microscopy experiments, the cantilevers were aligned perpendicular to the sample surface in order to eliminate the problem of tip-to-sample snap-in. This novel geometry allowed the study of lateral forces between the cantilever tip and the sample. Changes in the cantilever resonant frequency were shown to predominately reflect the electrostatic nature of the surface being investigated. One surface interaction that was investigated in detail was the reduction of cantilever Q near various surfaces in vacuum. This non-contact dissipative phenomenon was related to electrical losses caused by induced charge motion in the sample and/or in the cantilever tip. In silicon samples, a quantitative theory relating the additional surface-induced cantilever damping to the electrical power dissipated was developed. Furthermore

  10. Effect of veneering material on the deformation suffered by implant-supported fixed prosthesis framework

    PubMed Central

    GRANDO, Antônio Francisco; REZENDE, Carlos Eduardo Edwards; SOUSA, Edson Antônio Capello; RUBO, José Henrique

    2014-01-01

    Knowing how stresses are dissipated on the fixed implant-supported complex allows adequate treatment planning and better choice of the materials used for prosthesis fabrication. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the deformation suffered by cantilevered implant-supported fixed prostheses frameworks cast in silver-palladium alloy and coated with two occlusal veneering materials: acrylic resin or porcelain. Material and Methods Two strain gauges were bonded to the inferior surface of the silver-palladium framework and two other were bonded to the occlusal surface of the prosthesis framework covered with ceramic and acrylic resin on each of its two halves. The framework was fixed to a metallic master model and a 35.2 N compression force was applied to the cantilever at 10, 15 and 20 mm from the most distal implant. The measurements of deformation by compression and tension were obtained. The statistical 2-way ANOVA test was used for individual analysis of the experiment variables and the Tukey test was used for the interrelation between all the variables (material and distance of force application). Results The results showed that both variables had influence on the studied factors (deformation by compression and tension). Conclusion The ceramic coating provided greater rigidity to the assembly and therefore less distortion compared with the uncoated framework and with the resin-coated framework. The cantilever arm length also influenced the prosthesis rigidity, causing higher deformation the farther the load was applied from the last implant. PMID:25025562

  11. Note: Calibration of atomic force microscope cantilevers using only their resonant frequency and quality factor

    SciTech Connect

    Sader, John E.; Friend, James R.

    2014-11-15

    A simplified method for calibrating atomic force microscope cantilevers was recently proposed by Sader et al. [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 103705 (2012); Sec. III D] that relies solely on the resonant frequency and quality factor of the cantilever in fluid (typically air). This method eliminates the need to measure the hydrodynamic function of the cantilever, which can be time consuming given the wide range of cantilevers now available. Using laser Doppler vibrometry, we rigorously assess the accuracy of this method for a series of commercially available cantilevers and explore its performance under non-ideal conditions. This shows that the simplified method is highly accurate and can be easily implemented to perform fast, robust, and non-invasive spring constant calibration.

  12. Temperature effects in Au piezoresistors integrated in SU-8 cantilever chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, A.; Hansen, O.; Hales, J.; Boisen, A.

    2006-12-01

    We present a cantilever-based biosensor chip made for the detection of biochemical molecules. The device is fabricated entirely in the photosensitive polymer SU-8 except for integrated piezoresistors made of Au. The integrated piezoresistors are used to monitor the surface stress changes due to binding of biomolecules on the surface of the cantilever. Here we present the characterization of the chip with respect to temperature changes in the surrounding environment. Furthermore, self-heating of the piezoresistors due to the applied voltage over the resistors is investigated including the temperature increase of the cantilever surfaces. The obtained results indicate that although low voltages of about 0.5-1 V are required to avoid self-heating of the cantilevers, surface stress changes below 1 mN m-1 can still be detected. The results are compared to previously presented results for Si-based cantilevers.

  13. Vibration energy harvester with sustainable power based on a single-crystal piezoelectric cantilever array.

    PubMed

    Kim, Moonkeun; Lee, Sang-Kyun; Ham, Yong-Hyun; Yang, Yil Suk; Kwon, Jong-Kee; Kwon, Kwang-Ho

    2012-08-01

    We designed and fabricated a bimorph cantilever array for sustainable power with an integrated Cu proof mass to obtain additional power and current. We fabricated a cantilever system using single-crystal piezoelectric material and compared the calculations for single and arrayed cantilevers to those obtained experimentally. The vibration energy harvester had resonant frequencies of 60.4 and 63.2 Hz for short and open circuits, respectively. The damping ratio and quality factor of the cantilever device were 0.012 and 41.66, respectively. The resonant frequency at maximum average power was 60.8 Hz. The current and highest average power of the harvester array were found to be 0.728 mA and 1.61 mW, respectively. The sustainable maximum power was obtained after slightly shifting the short-circuit frequency. In order to improve the current and power using an array of cantilevers, we also performed energy conversion experiments.

  14. A cantilever based optical fiber acoustic sensor fabricated by femtosecond laser micromachining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jie; Yuan, Lei; Huang, Jie; Xiao, Hai

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we present a pure silica micro-cantilever based optical fiber sensor for acoustic wave detection. The cantilever is directly fabricated by fs laser micromachining on an optical fiber tip functioning as an inline Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI). The applied acoustic wave pressurizes the micro-cantilever beam and the corresponding dynamic signals can be probed by the FPI. The thickness, length, and width of the micro-cantilever beam can be flexibly designed and fabricated so that the sensitivity, frequency response, and the total measurement range can be varied to fit many practical applications. Experimental results will be presented and analyzed. Due to the assembly free fabrication of the fs-laser, multiple micro-cantilever beams could be potentially fabricated in/on a single optical fiber for quasi-distributed acoustic mapping with high spatial resolution.

  15. Cantilever bending based on humidity-actuated mesoporous silica/silicon bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Ganser, Christian; Fritz-Popovski, Gerhard; Morak, Roland; Sharifi, Parvin; Marmiroli, Benedetta; Sartori, Barbara; Amenitsch, Heinz; Griesser, Thomas; Teichert, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Summary We use a soft templating approach in combination with evaporation induced self-assembly to prepare mesoporous films containing cylindrical pores with elliptical cross-section on an ordered pore lattice. The film is deposited on silicon-based commercial atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers using dip coating. This bilayer cantilever is mounted in a humidity controlled AFM, and its deflection is measured as a function of relative humidity. We also investigate a similar film on bulk silicon substrate using grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS), in order to determine nanostructural parameters of the film as well as the water-sorption-induced deformation of the ordered mesopore lattice. The strain of the mesoporous layer is related to the cantilever deflection using simple bilayer bending theory. We also develop a simple quantitative model for cantilever deflection which only requires cantilever geometry and nanostructural parameters of the porous layer as input parameters. PMID:27335753

  16. Detection of atomic force microscopy cantilever displacement with a transmitted electron beam.

    PubMed

    Wagner, R; Woehl, T J; Keller, R R; Killgore, J P

    2016-07-25

    The response time of an atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever can be decreased by reducing cantilever size; however, the fastest AFM cantilevers are currently nearing the smallest size that can be detected with the conventional optical lever approach. Here, we demonstrate an electron beam detection scheme for measuring AFM cantilever oscillations. The oscillating AFM tip is positioned perpendicular to and in the path of a stationary focused nanometer sized electron beam. As the tip oscillates, the thickness of the material under the electron beam changes, causing a fluctuation in the number of scattered transmitted electrons that are detected. We demonstrate detection of sub-nanometer vibration amplitudes with an electron beam, providing a pathway for dynamic AFM with cantilevers that are orders of magnitude smaller and faster than the current state of the art.

  17. Detection of atomic force microscopy cantilever displacement with a transmitted electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, R.; Woehl, T. J.; Keller, R. R.; Killgore, J. P.

    2016-07-01

    The response time of an atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever can be decreased by reducing cantilever size; however, the fastest AFM cantilevers are currently nearing the smallest size that can be detected with the conventional optical lever approach. Here, we demonstrate an electron beam detection scheme for measuring AFM cantilever oscillations. The oscillating AFM tip is positioned perpendicular to and in the path of a stationary focused nanometer sized electron beam. As the tip oscillates, the thickness of the material under the electron beam changes, causing a fluctuation in the number of scattered transmitted electrons that are detected. We demonstrate detection of sub-nanometer vibration amplitudes with an electron beam, providing a pathway for dynamic AFM with cantilevers that are orders of magnitude smaller and faster than the current state of the art.

  18. Finite element modeling of atomic force microscopy cantilever dynamics during video rate imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Howard-Knight, J. P.; Hobbs, J. K.

    2011-04-01

    A dynamic finite element model has been constructed to simulate the behavior of low spring constant atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers used for imaging at high speed without active feedback as in VideoAFM. The model is tested against experimental data collected at 20 frame/s and good agreement is found. The complex dynamics of the cantilever, consisting of traveling waves coming from the tip sample interaction, reflecting off the cantilever-substrate junction, and interfering with new waves created at the tip, are revealed. The construction of the image from this resulting nonequilibrium cantilever deflection is also examined. Transient tip-sample forces are found to reach values up to 260 nN on a calibration grid sample, and the maximum forces do not always correspond to the position of steepest features as a result of energy stored in the cantilever.

  19. Controlling the opto-mechanics of a cantilever in an interferometer via cavity loss

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidsfeld, A. von Reichling, M.

    2015-09-21

    In a non-contact atomic force microscope, based on interferometric cantilever displacement detection, the optical return loss of the system is tunable via the distance between the fiber end and the cantilever. We utilize this for tuning the interferometer from a predominant Michelson to a predominant Fabry-Pérot characteristics and introduce the Fabry-Pérot enhancement factor as a quantitative measure for multibeam interference in the cavity. This experimentally easily accessible and adjustable parameter provides a control of the opto-mechanical interaction between the cavity light field and the cantilever. The quantitative assessment of the light pressure acting on the cantilever oscillating in the cavity via the frequency shift allows an in-situ measurement of the cantilever stiffness with remarkable precision.

  20. The importance of cantilever dynamics in the interpretation of Kelvin probe force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Satzinger, Kevin J.; Brown, Keith A.; Westervelt, Robert M.

    2012-01-01

    A realistic interpretation of the measured contact potential difference (CPD) in Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) is crucial in order to extract meaningful information about the sample. Central to this interpretation is a method to include contributions from the macroscopic cantilever arm, as well as the cone and sharp tip of a KPFM probe. Here, three models of the electrostatic interaction between a KPFM probe and a sample are tested through an electrostatic simulation and compared with experiment. In contrast with previous studies that treat the KPFM cantilever as a rigid object, we allow the cantilever to bend and rotate; accounting for cantilever bending provides the closest agreement between theory and experiment. We demonstrate that cantilever dynamics play a major role in CPD measurements and provide a simulation technique to explore this phenomenon. PMID:23093809

  1. Controlling the opto-mechanics of a cantilever in an interferometer via cavity loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Schmidsfeld, A.; Reichling, M.

    2015-09-01

    In a non-contact atomic force microscope, based on interferometric cantilever displacement detection, the optical return loss of the system is tunable via the distance between the fiber end and the cantilever. We utilize this for tuning the interferometer from a predominant Michelson to a predominant Fabry-Pérot characteristics and introduce the Fabry-Pérot enhancement factor as a quantitative measure for multibeam interference in the cavity. This experimentally easily accessible and adjustable parameter provides a control of the opto-mechanical interaction between the cavity light field and the cantilever. The quantitative assessment of the light pressure acting on the cantilever oscillating in the cavity via the frequency shift allows an in-situ measurement of the cantilever stiffness with remarkable precision.

  2. Detection of atomic force microscopy cantilever displacement with a transmitted electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, R.; Woehl, T. J.; Keller, R. R.; Killgore, J. P.

    2016-07-25

    The response time of an atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever can be decreased by reducing cantilever size; however, the fastest AFM cantilevers are currently nearing the smallest size that can be detected with the conventional optical lever approach. Here, we demonstrate an electron beam detection scheme for measuring AFM cantilever oscillations. The oscillating AFM tip is positioned perpendicular to and in the path of a stationary focused nanometer sized electron beam. As the tip oscillates, the thickness of the material under the electron beam changes, causing a fluctuation in the number of scattered transmitted electrons that are detected. We demonstrate detection of sub-nanometer vibration amplitudes with an electron beam, providing a pathway for dynamic AFM with cantilevers that are orders of magnitude smaller and faster than the current state of the art.

  3. Massively Multiplexed Cantilever-free Scanning Probe Lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Keith A.; Eichelsdoerfer, Daniel J.; Shim, Wooyoung; Boya, Radha; Schmucker, Abrin L.; Liu, Guoliang; Mirkin, Chad A.

    2013-03-01

    Cantilever-free scanning probe lithography has emerged as a low-cost technique for rapidly patterning nanoscale materials. In this architecture, an array of probes is fabricated on a soft backing layer that provides mechanical compliance to each probe while an underlying hard surface maintains the structural integrity of the array. One drawback of this technique is that each probe in the array acts simultaneously and thus generates a copy of the same pattern. Here, we discuss recent efforts to incorporate heaters into these probe arrays so that when a given heater is activated, the thermal expansion of the elastomer actuates a single tip. We find thermal actuation to be powerful enough to actuate individual tips over 4 μm with minimal crosstalk, fast enough to actuate on relevant time scales (20 ms), and scalable by virtue of being electrically addressable. Furthermore, tuning the individual heaters allows for variability in the arrays to be compensated for precisely, resulting in high quality nanopatterning. The addition of tunable actuators transforms cantilever-free scanning probe lithography into a technique capable of true desktop nanofabrication.

  4. Instability of a cantilevered flexible plate in viscous channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balint, T. S.; Lucey, A. D.

    2005-10-01

    The stability of a flexible cantilevered plate in viscous channel flow is studied as a representation of the dynamics of the human upper airway. The focus is on instability mechanisms of the soft palate (flexible plate) that cause airway blockage during sleep. We solve the Navier Stokes equations for flow with Reynolds numbers up to 1500 fully coupled with the dynamics of the plate motion solved using finite-differences. The study is 2-D and based upon linearized plate mechanics. When both upper and lower airways are open, the plate is found to lose its stability through a flutter mechanism and a critical Reynolds number exists. When one airway is closed, the plate principally loses its stability through a divergence mechanism and a critical flow speed exists. However, below the divergence-onset flow speed, flutter can exist for low levels of structural damping in the flexible plate. Our results serve to extend understanding of flow-induced instability of cantilevered flexible plates and will ultimately improve the diagnosis and treatment of upper-airway disorders.

  5. Comparisons between membrane, bridge and cantilever miniaturized resistive vacuum gauges.

    PubMed

    Punchihewa, Kasun Gardiye; Zaker, Evan; Kuljic, Rade; Banerjee, Koushik; Dankovic, Tatjana; Feinerman, Alan; Busta, Heinz

    2012-01-01

    Using bulk micromachining, meander-shaped resistor elements consisting of 20 nm Cr and 200 nm Au were fabricated on 1 μm thick silicon nitride membranes, bridges, and cantilevers. The resistance change as a function of pressure depends strongly on the thermal resistance of the two metal lines connecting the heated resistor to the silicon bulk (cold junction) and on the thermal resistance of the silicon nitride. Relative resistance changes ranging from about 3% (small membrane) to 20% (bridge) per mW of input power were obtained when operating the devices in constant voltage mode. The pressure where maximum sensitivity of these gauges occurs depends on the distance 'd' between the periphery of the heated resistor element and the silicon cold junction. Devices with 'd' ranging from 50 μm to 1,200 μm were fabricated. Assuming that pressures can be reliably measured above the 10% and below the 90% points of the resistance versus pressure curve, the range of these devices is about two orders of magnitude. By integrating two devices, one with d = 65 μm and one with d = 1,200 μm on the same chip and connecting them in series, the range can be increased by about a factor of three. By fabricating the cantilever devices so that they curl upon release, it will be shown that these devices also exhibit larger range due to varying 'd'.

  6. The stress intensity factor for the double cantilever beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichter, W. B.

    1983-01-01

    Fourier transforms and the Wiener-Hopf technique are used in conjunction with plane elastostatics to examine the singular crack tip stress field in the double cantilever beam (DCB) specimen. In place of the Dirac delta function, a family of functions which duplicates the important features of the concentrated forces without introducing unmanageable mathematical complexities is used as a loading function. With terms of order h-squared/a-squared retained in the series expansion, the dimensionless stress intensity factor is found to be K (h to the 1/2)/P = 12 to the 1/2 (a/h + 0.6728 + 0.0377 h-squared/a-squared), in which P is the magnitude of the concentrated forces per unit thickness, a is the distance from the crack tip to the points of load application, and h is the height of each cantilever beam. The result is similar to that obtained by Gross and Srawley by fitting a line to discrete results from their boundary collocation analysis.

  7. Assessment of insulated conductive cantilevers for biology and electrochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frederix, Patrick L. T. M.; Gullo, Maurizio R.; Akiyama, Terunobu; Tonin, Andreas; de Rooij, Nicolaas F.; Staufer, Urs; Engel, Andreas

    2005-08-01

    This paper describes the characterization and application of electrically insulated conductive tips mounted on a cantilever for use in an atomic force microscope and operated in liquid. These multifunctional probes were microfabricated and designed for measurements on biological samples in buffer solution, but they can also be employed for electrochemical applications, in particular scanning electrochemical microscopy. The silicon nitride based cantilevers had a spring constant <=0.1 N m-1 and a conductive tip, which was insulated except at the apex. The conductive core of the tip consisted of a metal, e.g. platinum silicide, and exhibited a typical radius of 15 nm. The mechanical and electrical characterization of the probe is presented and discussed. First measurements on the hexagonally packed intermediate layer of Deinococcus radiodurans demonstrated the possibility to adjust the image contrast by applying a voltage between a support and the conductive tip and to measure variations of less than 1 pA in faradaic current with a lateral resolution of 7.8 nm.

  8. Electromechanical decoupled model for cantilever-beam piezoelectric energy harvesters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, T.; Yan, Z.; Hajj, M.

    2016-09-01

    Analysis of cantilever-based piezoelectric energy harvesting systems is usually performed using coupled equations that represent the mechanical displacement and the voltage output. These equations are then solved simultaneously. In contrast to this representation, we use analytical solutions of the governing equation to derive an algebraic equation of the power as a function of the beam displacement, electromechanical coefficients, and the load resistance. Such an equation can be more useful in the design of such harvesters. Particularly, the mechanical displacement is computed from a mechanical governing equation with modified natural frequency and damping ratio that account for the electromechanical coupling. The voltage and the harvested power are then obtained by relating them directly to the mechanical displacement. We validate the proposed analysis by comparing its solution including the tip displacement and harvested power with those of numerical simulations of the governing equations. To demonstrate the generality of the proposed approach, we consider the cases of base excitation, galloping, and autoparametric vibration. The model proposed in this study simplifies the electromechanical coupling problem for practical applications of cantilever-beam piezoelectric energy harvesting systems.

  9. Cantilever detection of electron spin resonance in the terahertz region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Hideyuki; Ohmichi, Eiji; Ohta, Hitoshi

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) is used in a wide range of research areas. Most commercially available spectrometers operate at the X- band (~10 GHz). However, high-frequency ESR (>100 GHz) has many advantages, such as the high spectral resolution, the ESR detection beyond the zero-field splitting etc. We report the cantilever detection of electron spin resonance in the terahertz region. This technique mechanically detects ESR as a change in magnetic torque that acts on the cantilever, while the conventional method, such as the cavity perturbation and the transmission method, directly measures the absorption of electromagnetic wave power. Backward wave oscillators (BWO) were used as THz-wave sources. Despite the small sample mass (m = 4 μg) and low power output of the BWO (P < 4 mW above 1 THz), we observed ESR absorption of Co Tutton salt, Co(NH4)2(SO4)2 .6H2O, in frequencies of up to 1.1 THz. Spin sensitivity was estimated to be the order of 1011-1012 spins/gauss above 1 THz. This technique will not only broaden the scope of ESR spectroscopy application but also lead to high-spectral-resolution ESR imaging.[1] H. Takahashi, E. Ohmichi and H. Ohta, Appl. Phys. Lett. 107, 182405 (2015).

  10. Performance characteristics of valveless and cantilever-valve micropump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukur, A. F. M.; Sabani, N.; Taib, B. N.; Azidin, M. A. M.; Shahimin, M. M.

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents comparison between two classes of micropump which are valveless micropump and cantilever-valve micropump. These micropumps consist of basic components which are diaphragm, pumping chamber, actuation mechanism, inlet and outlet. Piezoelectric actuation is carried out by applying pressure on the micropump diaphragm to produce deflection. The micropumps studied in this paper had been designed with specific diaphragm thickness and diameter; while varying the materials, pressure applied and liquid types used. The outer dimension for both micropumps is 4mm × 4mm × 0.5mm with diameter and thickness of the diaphragm are 3.8mm and 20μm respectively. Valveless micropump was shown in this paper to have better performance in mechanical and fluid analysis in terms of maximum deflection and maximum flow rate at actuation pressure 30kPa vis-à-vis cantilever-valve micropump. Valveless micropump was shown in this study to have maximum diaphragm deflection of 183.06μm and maximum flow rate with 191.635μL/s at actuation pressure 30kPa using silicon dioxide as material.

  11. Impact of fixed implant prosthetics using the 'all-on-four' treatment concept on speech intelligibility, articulation and oromyofunctional behaviour.

    PubMed

    Van Lierde, K M; Browaeys, H; Corthals, P; Matthys, C; Mussche, P; Van Kerckhove, E; De Bruyn, H

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this case control study is to determine the impact of screw-retained fixed cross-arch prostheses, supported by four osseointegrated implants, on articulation and oromyofunctional behaviour. Objective (acoustic analysis) and subjective assessment techniques were used to determine the overall intelligibility, phonetic characteristics and oromyofunctional behaviour at an average period of 7.3 months after placement of the fixed implant prosthesis in 15 patients and 9 age-matched controls with intact dentition and without prosthetic appliances. Overall satisfaction with the prosthesis was 87%, but 53% of the subjects mentioned an impact on speech. 87% of the subjects presented with one or more distortions of the consonants. The most common distortions were distortions of the sound /s/ (sigmatismus simplex, 40% and sigmatismus stridens, 33%), simplex /z/ (27%), insufficient frication of /f/ (20%), /[symbol in text]/ (20%), addental production of /d/ (20%), /t/ (20%) or /s/ sound (13%) and devoiced /d/ (7%). In the control group, no articulation disorders were noted. Oromyofunctional behaviour in both groups was normal. To what extent motor-oriented speech therapy (with focus on tongue function) immediately after periodontal treatment (after wound healing) would decrease the persistent phonetic distortions is a subject for further research.

  12. Fast nanotopography imaging using a high speed cantilever with integrated heater-thermometer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byeonghee; Somnath, Suhas; King, William P

    2013-04-05

    This paper presents a high speed tapping cantilever with an integrated heater-thermometer for fast nanotopography imaging. The cantilever is much smaller and faster than previous heated cantilevers, with a length of 35 μm and a resonant frequency of 1.4 MHz. The mechanical response time is characterized by scanning over a backward-facing step of height 20 nm. The mechanical response time is 77 μs in air and 448 μs in water, which compares favorably to the fastest commercial cantilevers that do not have integrated heaters. The doped silicon cantilever is designed with an integrated heater that can heat and cool in about 10 μs and can operate in both air and water. We demonstrate standard laser-based topography imaging along with thermal topography imaging, when the cantilever is actuated via the piezoelectric shaker in an atomic force microscope system and when it is actuated by Lorentz forces. The cantilever can perform thermal topography imaging in tapping mode with an imaging resolution of 7 nm at a scan speed of 1.46 mm s(-1).

  13. Multiple label-free biodetection and quantitative DNA-binding assays on a nanomechanical cantilever array.

    PubMed

    McKendry, Rachel; Zhang, Jiayun; Arntz, Youri; Strunz, Torsten; Hegner, Martin; Lang, Hans Peter; Baller, Marko K; Certa, Ulrich; Meyer, Ernst; Güntherodt, Hans-Joachim; Gerber, Christoph

    2002-07-23

    We report a microarray of cantilevers to detect multiple unlabeled biomolecules simultaneously at nanomolar concentrations within minutes. Ligand-receptor binding interactions such as DNA hybridization or protein recognition occurring on microfabricated silicon cantilevers generate nanomechanical bending, which is detected optically in situ. Differential measurements including reference cantilevers on an array of eight sensors can sequence-specifically detect unlabeled DNA targets in 80-fold excess of nonmatching DNA as a background and discriminate 3' and 5' overhangs. Our experiments suggest that the nanomechanical motion originates from predominantly steric hindrance effects and depends on the concentration of DNA molecules in solution. We show that cantilever arrays can be used to investigate the thermodynamics of biomolecular interactions mechanically, and we have found that the specificity of the reaction on a cantilever is consistent with solution data. Hence cantilever arrays permit multiple binding assays in parallel and can detect femtomoles of DNA on the cantilever at a DNA concentration in solution of 75 nM.

  14. Multiple label-free biodetection and quantitative DNA-binding assays on a nanomechanical cantilever array

    PubMed Central

    McKendry, Rachel; Zhang, Jiayun; Arntz, Youri; Strunz, Torsten; Hegner, Martin; Lang, Hans Peter; Baller, Marko K.; Certa, Ulrich; Meyer, Ernst; Güntherodt, Hans-Joachim; Gerber, Christoph

    2002-01-01

    We report a microarray of cantilevers to detect multiple unlabeled biomolecules simultaneously at nanomolar concentrations within minutes. Ligand-receptor binding interactions such as DNA hybridization or protein recognition occurring on microfabricated silicon cantilevers generate nanomechanical bending, which is detected optically in situ. Differential measurements including reference cantilevers on an array of eight sensors can sequence-specifically detect unlabeled DNA targets in 80-fold excess of nonmatching DNA as a background and discriminate 3′ and 5′ overhangs. Our experiments suggest that the nanomechanical motion originates from predominantly steric hindrance effects and depends on the concentration of DNA molecules in solution. We show that cantilever arrays can be used to investigate the thermodynamics of biomolecular interactions mechanically, and we have found that the specificity of the reaction on a cantilever is consistent with solution data. Hence cantilever arrays permit multiple binding assays in parallel and can detect femtomoles of DNA on the cantilever at a DNA concentration in solution of 75 nM. PMID:12119412

  15. Nondestructive and noncontact method for determining the spring constant of rectangular cantilevers

    SciTech Connect

    Golovko, Dmytro S.; Haschke, Thomas; Wiechert, Wolfgang; Bonaccurso, Elmar

    2007-04-15

    We present here an experimental setup and suggest an extension to the long existing added-mass method for the calibration of the spring constant of atomic force microscope cantilevers. Instead of measuring the resonance frequency shift that results from attaching particles of known masses to the end of cantilevers, we load them with water microdrops generated by a commercial inkjet dispenser. Such a device is capable of generating drops, and thus masses, of extremely reproducible size. This makes it an ideal tool for calibration tasks. Moreover, the major advantage of water microdrops is that they allow for a nearly contactless calibration: no mechanical micromanipulation of particles on cantilevers is required, neither for their deposition nor for removal. After some seconds the water drop is completely evaporated, and no residues are left on the cantilever surface or tip. We present two variants: we vary the size of the drops and deposit them at the free end of the cantilever, or we keep the size of the drops constant and vary their position along the cantilever. For the second variant, we implemented also numerical simulations. Spring constants measured by this method are comparable to results obtained by the thermal noise method, as we demonstrate for six different cantilevers.

  16. Spring constant calibration of atomic force microscope cantilevers of arbitrary shape

    SciTech Connect

    Sader, John E.; Sanelli, Julian A.; Adamson, Brian D.; Bieske, Evan J.; Monty, Jason P.; Marusic, Ivan; Wei Xingzhan; Mulvaney, Paul; Crawford, Simon A.; Friend, James R.

    2012-10-15

    The spring constant of an atomic force microscope cantilever is often needed for quantitative measurements. The calibration method of Sader et al. [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 70, 3967 (1999)] for a rectangular cantilever requires measurement of the resonant frequency and quality factor in fluid (typically air), and knowledge of its plan view dimensions. This intrinsically uses the hydrodynamic function for a cantilever of rectangular plan view geometry. Here, we present hydrodynamic functions for a series of irregular and non-rectangular atomic force microscope cantilevers that are commonly used in practice. Cantilever geometries of arrow shape, small aspect ratio rectangular, quasi-rectangular, irregular rectangular, non-ideal trapezoidal cross sections, and V-shape are all studied. This enables the spring constants of all these cantilevers to be accurately and routinely determined through measurement of their resonant frequency and quality factor in fluid (such as air). An approximate formulation of the hydrodynamic function for microcantilevers of arbitrary geometry is also proposed. Implementation of the method and its performance in the presence of uncertainties and non-idealities is discussed, together with conversion factors for the static and dynamic spring constants of these cantilevers. These results are expected to be of particular value to the design and application of micro- and nanomechanical systems in general.

  17. Fast nanotopography imaging using a high speed cantilever with integrated heater-thermometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Byeonghee; Somnath, Suhas; King, William P.

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents a high speed tapping cantilever with an integrated heater-thermometer for fast nanotopography imaging. The cantilever is much smaller and faster than previous heated cantilevers, with a length of 35 μm and a resonant frequency of 1.4 MHz. The mechanical response time is characterized by scanning over a backward-facing step of height 20 nm. The mechanical response time is 77 μs in air and 448 μs in water, which compares favorably to the fastest commercial cantilevers that do not have integrated heaters. The doped silicon cantilever is designed with an integrated heater that can heat and cool in about 10 μs and can operate in both air and water. We demonstrate standard laser-based topography imaging along with thermal topography imaging, when the cantilever is actuated via the piezoelectric shaker in an atomic force microscope system and when it is actuated by Lorentz forces. The cantilever can perform thermal topography imaging in tapping mode with an imaging resolution of 7 nm at a scan speed of 1.46 mm s-1.

  18. Nondestructive testing and hardness measurement based on contact resonance of piezoelectric cantilevers (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Faxin; Fu, Ji

    2016-04-01

    A suitable defect identification parameter is very important in the field of nondestructive testing (NDT). In this work, we proposed a NDT method which detects the sample's local contact stiffness (LCS) based on the contact resonance of a piezoelectric cantilever. Firstly, through finite element analysis we showed that LCS is quite sensitive to typical defects including debonding, voids, cracks and inclusions, making it a good identification parameter. Secondly, a homemade NDT system containing a piezoelectric unimorph cantilever was assembled to detect the sample's LCS by tracking the contact resonance frequency (CRF) of the cantilever-sample system based on strain signals. Testing results indicated that this NDT system could detect the above mentioned defects efficiently. The cantilever-stiffness dependent detection sensitivity was specially investigated and the stiffer cantilevers were found to be more sensitive to small defects. Then, a piezoelectric bimorph cantilever was fabricated and the electromechanical impedance, other than the strain signals, was measured to track the CRF of the cantilever-system. The LCS is then derived by using the equivalent-circuit model. The electromechanical impedance based NDT system is more compact and can be further developed to be a portable device. Finally, a Vicker indenter is fabricated onto the bimorph tip and the contact area is derived from the measured LCS. Thus the NDT system turns to be a hardness tester without any optical devices. It is very useful for in-situ testing or testing on inner surfaces where conventional hardness tester is not applicable.

  19. Imaging via complete cantilever dynamic detection: General dynamic mode imaging and spectroscopy in scanning probe microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Somnath, Suhas; Collins, Liam; Matheson, Michael A.; Sukumar, Sreenivas R.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Jesse, Stephen

    2016-09-08

    We develop and implement a multifrequency spectroscopy and spectroscopic imaging mode, referred to as general dynamic mode (GDM), that captures the complete spatially- and stimulus dependent information on nonlinear cantilever dynamics in scanning probe microscopy (SPM). GDM acquires the cantilever response including harmonics and mode mixing products across the entire broadband cantilever spectrum as a function of excitation frequency. GDM spectra substitute the classical measurements in SPM, e.g. amplitude and phase in lock-in detection. Here, GDM is used to investigate the response of a purely capacitively driven cantilever. We use information theory techniques to mine the data and verify the findings with governing equations and classical lock-in based approaches. We explore the dependence of the cantilever dynamics on the tip–sample distance, AC and DC driving bias. This approach can be applied to investigate the dynamic behavior of other systems within and beyond dynamic SPM. In conclusion, GDM is expected to be useful for separating the contribution of different physical phenomena in the cantilever response and understanding the role of cantilever dynamics in dynamic AFM techniques.

  20. Imaging via complete cantilever dynamic detection: general dynamic mode imaging and spectroscopy in scanning probe microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somnath, Suhas; Collins, Liam; Matheson, Michael A.; Sukumar, Sreenivas R.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Jesse, Stephen

    2016-10-01

    We develop and implement a multifrequency spectroscopy and spectroscopic imaging mode, referred to as general dynamic mode (GDM), that captures the complete spatially- and stimulus dependent information on nonlinear cantilever dynamics in scanning probe microscopy (SPM). GDM acquires the cantilever response including harmonics and mode mixing products across the entire broadband cantilever spectrum as a function of excitation frequency. GDM spectra substitute the classical measurements in SPM, e.g. amplitude and phase in lock-in detection. Here, GDM is used to investigate the response of a purely capacitively driven cantilever. We use information theory techniques to mine the data and verify the findings with governing equations and classical lock-in based approaches. We explore the dependence of the cantilever dynamics on the tip–sample distance, AC and DC driving bias. This approach can be applied to investigate the dynamic behavior of other systems within and beyond dynamic SPM. GDM is expected to be useful for separating the contribution of different physical phenomena in the cantilever response and understanding the role of cantilever dynamics in dynamic AFM techniques.

  1. Imaging via complete cantilever dynamic detection: General dynamic mode imaging and spectroscopy in scanning probe microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Somnath, Suhas; Collins, Liam; Matheson, Michael A.; Sukumar, Sreenivas R.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Jesse, Stephen

    2016-09-08

    We develop and implement a multifrequency spectroscopy and spectroscopic imaging mode, referred to as general dynamic mode (GDM), that captures the complete spatially- and stimulus dependent information on nonlinear cantilever dynamics in scanning probe microscopy (SPM). GDM acquires the cantilever response including harmonics and mode mixing products across the entire broadband cantilever spectrum as a function of excitation frequency. GDM spectra substitute the classical measurements in SPM, e.g. amplitude and phase in lock-in detection. Here, GDM is used to investigate the response of a purely capacitively driven cantilever. We use information theory techniques to mine the data and verify the findings with governing equations and classical lock-in based approaches. We explore the dependence of the cantilever dynamics on the tip–sample distance, AC and DC driving bias. This approach can be applied to investigate the dynamic behavior of other systems within and beyond dynamic SPM. In conclusion, GDM is expected to be useful for separating the contribution of different physical phenomena in the cantilever response and understanding the role of cantilever dynamics in dynamic AFM techniques.

  2. Accurate Calibration and Uncertainty Estimation of the Normal Spring Constant of Various AFM Cantilevers

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yunpeng; Wu, Sen; Xu, Linyan; Fu, Xing

    2015-01-01

    Measurement of force on a micro- or nano-Newton scale is important when exploring the mechanical properties of materials in the biophysics and nanomechanical fields. The atomic force microscope (AFM) is widely used in microforce measurement. The cantilever probe works as an AFM force sensor, and the spring constant of the cantilever is of great significance to the accuracy of the measurement results. This paper presents a normal spring constant calibration method with the combined use of an electromagnetic balance and a homemade AFM head. When the cantilever presses the balance, its deflection is detected through an optical lever integrated in the AFM head. Meanwhile, the corresponding bending force is recorded by the balance. Then the spring constant can be simply calculated using Hooke’s law. During the calibration, a feedback loop is applied to control the deflection of the cantilever. Errors that may affect the stability of the cantilever could be compensated rapidly. Five types of commercial cantilevers with different shapes, stiffness, and operating modes were chosen to evaluate the performance of our system. Based on the uncertainty analysis, the expanded relative standard uncertainties of the normal spring constant of most measured cantilevers are believed to be better than 2%. PMID:25763650

  3. Accurate calibration and uncertainty estimation of the normal spring constant of various AFM cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Song, Yunpeng; Wu, Sen; Xu, Linyan; Fu, Xing

    2015-03-10

    Measurement of force on a micro- or nano-Newton scale is important when exploring the mechanical properties of materials in the biophysics and nanomechanical fields. The atomic force microscope (AFM) is widely used in microforce measurement. The cantilever probe works as an AFM force sensor, and the spring constant of the cantilever is of great significance to the accuracy of the measurement results. This paper presents a normal spring constant calibration method with the combined use of an electromagnetic balance and a homemade AFM head. When the cantilever presses the balance, its deflection is detected through an optical lever integrated in the AFM head. Meanwhile, the corresponding bending force is recorded by the balance. Then the spring constant can be simply calculated using Hooke's law. During the calibration, a feedback loop is applied to control the deflection of the cantilever. Errors that may affect the stability of the cantilever could be compensated rapidly. Five types of commercial cantilevers with different shapes, stiffness, and operating modes were chosen to evaluate the performance of our system. Based on the uncertainty analysis, the expanded relative standard uncertainties of the normal spring constant of most measured cantilevers are believed to be better than 2%.

  4. Spring constant calibration of atomic force microscope cantilevers of arbitrary shape.

    PubMed

    Sader, John E; Sanelli, Julian A; Adamson, Brian D; Monty, Jason P; Wei, Xingzhan; Crawford, Simon A; Friend, James R; Marusic, Ivan; Mulvaney, Paul; Bieske, Evan J

    2012-10-01

    The spring constant of an atomic force microscope cantilever is often needed for quantitative measurements. The calibration method of Sader et al. [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 70, 3967 (1999)] for a rectangular cantilever requires measurement of the resonant frequency and quality factor in fluid (typically air), and knowledge of its plan view dimensions. This intrinsically uses the hydrodynamic function for a cantilever of rectangular plan view geometry. Here, we present hydrodynamic functions for a series of irregular and non-rectangular atomic force microscope cantilevers that are commonly used in practice. Cantilever geometries of arrow shape, small aspect ratio rectangular, quasi-rectangular, irregular rectangular, non-ideal trapezoidal cross sections, and V-shape are all studied. This enables the spring constants of all these cantilevers to be accurately and routinely determined through measurement of their resonant frequency and quality factor in fluid (such as air). An approximate formulation of the hydrodynamic function for microcantilevers of arbitrary geometry is also proposed. Implementation of the method and its performance in the presence of uncertainties and non-idealities is discussed, together with conversion factors for the static and dynamic spring constants of these cantilevers. These results are expected to be of particular value to the design and application of micro- and nanomechanical systems in general.

  5. Imaging via complete cantilever dynamic detection: General dynamic mode imaging and spectroscopy in scanning probe microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Somnath, Suhas; Collins, Liam; Matheson, Michael A.; ...

    2016-09-08

    We develop and implement a multifrequency spectroscopy and spectroscopic imaging mode, referred to as general dynamic mode (GDM), that captures the complete spatially- and stimulus dependent information on nonlinear cantilever dynamics in scanning probe microscopy (SPM). GDM acquires the cantilever response including harmonics and mode mixing products across the entire broadband cantilever spectrum as a function of excitation frequency. GDM spectra substitute the classical measurements in SPM, e.g. amplitude and phase in lock-in detection. Here, GDM is used to investigate the response of a purely capacitively driven cantilever. We use information theory techniques to mine the data and verify themore » findings with governing equations and classical lock-in based approaches. We explore the dependence of the cantilever dynamics on the tip–sample distance, AC and DC driving bias. This approach can be applied to investigate the dynamic behavior of other systems within and beyond dynamic SPM. In conclusion, GDM is expected to be useful for separating the contribution of different physical phenomena in the cantilever response and understanding the role of cantilever dynamics in dynamic AFM techniques.« less

  6. Clinical audit of posterior three-unit fixed-movable resin-bonded fixed partial dentures - A retrospective, preliminary clinical investigation.

    PubMed

    Botelho, Michael G; Dyson, John E; Mui, Thomas H F; Lam, Walter Y H

    2017-02-01

    Two-unit cantilevered resin-bonded fixed partial dentures (RBFPDs) have higher retention rates over longer span fixed-fixed RBFPDs. It has been hypothesized that interabutment stresses associated with fixed-fixed designs cause prosthesis debonds therefore for the replacement of molar-sized and longer spans, non-rigid connectors have been used to allow independent movement between two abutment teeth. This preliminary study evaluates the clinical longevity and subjects' satisfaction of three-unit fixed-movable (FM3) RBFPDs provided at a dental teaching hospital. Subjects who had received FM3 RBFPD(s) in the posterior region were clinically reviewed for complications. History of any debonds and subjects' satisfaction to the prosthesis was recorded. Time-to-debond (retention rate) and time-to-loss (survival rate) of these prostheses were presented in life tables. Ninety-eight prostheses in 84 subjects were examined. Their mean service life was 31.8 months (SD 11.5, range 3-67 months). Twenty-two prostheses had a history of debond, resulting in a retention proportion of 77.6%; seventeen of these were rebonded and still present at the time of review. One prosthesis was lost after extraction of a periodontally-involved abutment tooth, giving a survival proportion of 93.9%. High subject satisfaction and no adverse outcome were reported. Three-unit fixed-movable RBFPDs have a shorter success than two-unit cantilevered RBFPDs. However, non-rigid connectors allow the possibility of rebonding giving satisfactory short-term survival rate. Further research is needed to investigate their long-term efficacy. Three-unit fixed-movable RBFPDs incorporating non-rigid connectors may be a feasible option for replacement of molar-size pontic in the posterior region. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Bending stresses due to torsion in cantilever box beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, Paul

    1935-01-01

    The paper beings with a brief discussion on the origin of the bending stresses in cantilever box beams under torsion. A critical survey of existing theory is followed by a summary of design formulas; this summary is based on the most complete solution published but omits all refinements considered unnecessary at the present state of development. Strain-gage tests made by NACA to obtained some experimental verification of the formulas are described next. Finally, the formulas are applied to a series of box beams previously static-tested by the U.S. Army Air Corps; the results show that the bending stresses due to torsion are responsible to a large extent for the free-edge type of failure frequently experienced in these tests.

  8. Flat plate solar collector with a cantilevered mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, S.; Larson, D.C.

    1981-01-01

    The use of flat booster mirrors with flat plate collectors provides moderate solar flux concentration and enhanced performance especially when the mirrors are seasonally adjusted. Curved mirrors provide higher flux concentration and a practical system has been developed where the booster mirror is bent elastically. The system employs a single cantilever mirror which is located below a conventional flat plate collector. The mirror is clamped at the base of the collector panel and its free end is deflected upward; a smaller deflection is used in the fall and winter than in the spring and summer. The prototype system consists of a 0.9 by 2.5 m collector panel mounted on its side (horizontal fluid flow) and a 2.7 by 2.5 m elastic mirror. The mirror is made with aluminum sheet with an adherent aluminized acrylic film. The system has been designed for mounting on horizontal surfaces at latitudes of 10 to 50/sup 0/.

  9. Probing Mechanics of Crumpled Two-Dimensional Membranes and Cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholl, Ryan; Conley, Hiram; Lavrik, Nickolay; Vlassiouk, Ivan; Puzyrev, Yevgeniy; Sreenivas, Vijayashree Parsi; Pantelides, Sokrates; Bolotin, Kirill

    Two-dimensional materials (2DMs) are inevitably crumpled in the out-of-plane direction due to both static wrinkling associated with uneven stresses and dynamic wrinkling resulting from flexural phonons. Here, we investigate the effect of this crumpling on mechanical properties of 2DMs - in-plane stiffness and bending rigidity. To carry out these measurements, we developed techniques to fabricate graphene membranes and singly clamped graphene cantilevers that are stable in vacuum and air. The measurements are performed by actuating these devices electrostatically and monitoring their displacement via sensitive interferometric profilometry both at room and low temperatures. We find that crumpling lowers the in-plane stiffness and strongly increases the bending rigidity of 2DMs. Furthermore, we unravel the relative contribution of static and dynamic wrinkling to observed renormalization of the effective mechanical constants.

  10. Interdisciplinary cantilever physics: Elasticity of carrot, celery, and plasticware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pestka, Kenneth A.

    2014-05-01

    This article presents several simple cantilever-based experiments using common household items (celery, carrot, and a plastic spoon) that are appropriate for introductory undergraduate laboratories or independent student projects. By applying Hooke's law and Euler beam theory, students are able to determine Young's modulus, fracture stress, yield stress, strain energy, and sound speed of these apparently disparate materials. In addition, a cellular foam elastic model is introduced—applicable to biologic materials as well as an essential component in the development of advanced engineering composites—that provides a mechanism to determine Young's modulus of the cell wall material found in celery and carrot. These experiments are designed to promote exploration of the similarities and differences between common inorganic and organic materials, fill a void in the typical undergraduate curriculum, and provide a foundation for more advanced material science pursuits within biology, botany, and food science as well as physics and engineering.

  11. Photothermal cantilever deflection spectroscopy of a photosensitive polymer

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, Minhyuk; Lee, Dongkyu; Jung, Namchul; Jeon, Sangmin; Kim, Seonghwan; Chae, Inseok; Thundat, Thomas

    2012-05-14

    The mechanical and chemical information of a poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) film on a microcantilever were simultaneously acquired by photothermal cantilever deflection spectroscopy as a function of ultraviolet (UV) irradiation time. Nanomechanical infrared (IR) spectra from the PMMA-coated microcantilever agreed well with the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) spectra of PMMA on gold-coated silicon wafer. The decreasing intensities of nanomechanical IR peaks represent chemical as well as mechanical information of UV radiation-induced photodegradation processes in the PMMA which cannot be obtained by a conventional FTIR technique. The observed decrease in the resonance frequency of the microcantilever is related to the change in the Young's modulus of the PMMA under UV exposure.

  12. Strategy Guideline: Quality Management in Existing Homes; Cantilever Floor Example

    SciTech Connect

    Taggart, J.; Sikora, J.; Wiehagen, J.; Wood, A.

    2011-12-01

    This guideline is designed to highlight the QA process that can be applied to any residential building retrofit activity. The cantilevered floor retrofit detailed in this guideline is included only to provide an actual retrofit example to better illustrate the QA activities being presented. The goal of existing home high performing remodeling quality management systems (HPR-QMS) is to establish practices and processes that can be used throughout any remodeling project. The research presented in this document provides a comparison of a selected retrofit activity as typically done versus that same retrofit activity approached from an integrated high performance remodeling and quality management perspective. It highlights some key quality management tools and approaches that can be adopted incrementally by a high performance remodeler for this or any high performance retrofit. This example is intended as a template and establishes a methodology that can be used to develop a portfolio of high performance remodeling strategies.

  13. Independent Component Analysis of Nanomechanical Responses of Cantilever Arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Archibald, Richard K; Datskos, Panos G; Noid, Don W; Lavrik, Nickolay V

    2007-01-01

    The ability to detect and identify chemical and biological elements in air or liquid environments is of far reaching importance. Performing this task using technology that minimally impacts the perceived environment is the ultimate goal. The development of functionalized cantilever arrays with nanomechanical sensing is an important step towards this ambition. This report couples the feature extraction abilities of Independent Component Analysis (ICA) and the classification techniques of neural networks to analyze the signals produced by microcantilever-array-based nanomechanical sensors. The unique capabilities of this analysis unleash the potential of this sensing technology to accurately determine the identities and concentrations of the components of chemical mixtures. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the knowledge of how the sensor array reacts to individual analytes in isolation is sufficient information to decode mixtures of analytes - a substantial benefit, significantly increasing the analytical utility of these sensing devices.

  14. Strain engineering of diamond silicon vacancy centers in MEMS cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meesala, Srujan; Sohn, Young-Ik; Atikian, Haig; Holzgrafe, Jeffrey; Zhang, Mian; Burek, Michael; Loncar, Marko

    2016-05-01

    The silicon vacancy (SiV) center in diamond has recently attracted attention as a solid state quantum emitter due to its attractive optical properties. We fabricate diamond MEMS cantilevers, and use electrostatic actuation to apply controlled strain fields to single SiV centers implanted in these devices. The strain response of the four electronic transitions of the SiV at 737 nm is measured via cryogenic (4 K) photoluminescence excitation. We demonstrate over 300 GHz of tuning for the mean transition frequency between the ground and excited states, and over 100 GHz of tuning for the orbital splittings within the ground and excited states. The interaction Hamiltonian for strain fields is inferred, and large strain susceptibilities of the order 1 PHz/strain are measured. We discuss prospects to utilize our device to reduce phonon-induced decoherence in SiV spin qubits, and to exploit the large strain susceptibilities for hybrid quantum systems based on nanomechanical resonators.

  15. Modeling and experimental vibration analysis of nanomechanical cantilever active probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehi-Khojin, Amin; Bashash, Saeid; Jalili, Nader

    2008-08-01

    Nanomechanical cantilever (NMC) active probes have recently received increased attention in a variety of nanoscale sensing and measurement applications. Current modeling practices call for a uniform cantilever beam without considering the intentional jump discontinuities associated with the piezoelectric layer attachment and the NMC cross-sectional step. This paper presents a comprehensive modeling framework for modal characterization and dynamic response analysis of NMC active probes with geometrical discontinuities. The entire length of the NMC is divided into three segments of uniform beams followed by applying appropriate continuity conditions. The characteristics matrix equation is then used to solve for system natural frequencies and mode shapes. Using an equivalent electromechanical moment of a piezoelectric layer, forced motion analysis of the system is carried out. An experimental setup consisting of a commercial NMC active probe from Veeco and a state-of-the-art microsystem analyzer, the MSA-400 from Polytec, is developed to verify the theoretical developments proposed here. Using a parameter estimation technique based on minimizing the modeling error, optimal values of system parameters are identified. Mode shapes and the modal frequency response of the system for the first three modes determined from the proposed model are compared with those obtained from the experiment and commonly used theory for uniform beams. Results indicate that the uniform beam model fails to accurately predict the actual system response, especially in multiple-mode operation, while the proposed discontinuous beam model demonstrates good agreement with the experimental data. Such detailed and accurate modeling framework can lead to significant enhancement in the sensitivity of piezoelectric-based NMC sensors for use in variety of sensing and imaging applications.

  16. Novel printing process for the fabrication of cantilever structures by the partially controlled sintering of ink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanazawa, Shusuke; Kusaka, Yasuyuki; Yamamoto, Noritaka; Ushijima, Hirobumi

    2017-01-01

    We present a novel process for manufacturing cantilever structures by the additive stacking of ink layers. The three-dimensional transfer of printed mechanical parts was achieved by optimizing the ink-sintering conditions to guarantee the structural integrity of the printed parts and provide adequate differences in adhesion strengths between the receiver and donor interfaces. A metal-insulator-metal cantilever structure with a bottom electrode, air insulator, and cantilevered top electrode was fabricated on a flexible film, forming a successful capacitive bending sensor for use on human bodies. This process allows highly efficient device fabrication in the MEMS field.

  17. Fast optical cooling of a nanomechanical cantilever by a dynamical Stark-shift gate.

    PubMed

    Yan, Leilei; Zhang, Jian-Qi; Zhang, Shuo; Feng, Mang

    2015-10-12

    The efficient cooling of nanomechanical resonators is essential to exploration of quantum properties of the macroscopic or mesoscopic systems. We propose such a laser-cooling scheme for a nanomechanical cantilever, which works even for the low-frequency mechanical mode and under weak cooling lasers. The cantilever is coupled by a diamond nitrogen-vacancy center under a strong magnetic field gradient and the cooling is assisted by a dynamical Stark-shift gate. Our scheme can effectively enhance the desired cooling efficiency by avoiding the off-resonant and undesired carrier transitions, and thereby cool the cantilever down to the vicinity of the vibrational ground state in a fast fashion.

  18. Fast optical cooling of a nanomechanical cantilever by a dynamical Stark-shift gate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Leilei; Zhang, Jian-Qi; Zhang, Shuo; Feng, Mang

    2015-10-01

    The efficient cooling of nanomechanical resonators is essential to exploration of quantum properties of the macroscopic or mesoscopic systems. We propose such a laser-cooling scheme for a nanomechanical cantilever, which works even for the low-frequency mechanical mode and under weak cooling lasers. The cantilever is coupled by a diamond nitrogen-vacancy center under a strong magnetic field gradient and the cooling is assisted by a dynamical Stark-shift gate. Our scheme can effectively enhance the desired cooling efficiency by avoiding the off-resonant and undesired carrier transitions, and thereby cool the cantilever down to the vicinity of the vibrational ground state in a fast fashion.

  19. Spatial spectrograms of vibrating atomic force microscopy cantilevers coupled to sample surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Ryan; Raman, Arvind; Proksch, Roger

    2013-12-23

    Many advanced dynamic Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) techniques such as contact resonance, force modulation, piezoresponse force microscopy, electrochemical strain microscopy, and AFM infrared spectroscopy exploit the dynamic response of a cantilever in contact with a sample to extract local material properties. Achieving quantitative results in these techniques usually requires the assumption of a certain shape of cantilever vibration. We present a technique that allows in-situ measurements of the vibrational shape of AFM cantilevers coupled to surfaces. This technique opens up unique approaches to nanoscale material property mapping, which are not possible with single point measurements alone.

  20. Integrated MOSFET-Embedded-Cantilever-Based Biosensor Characteristic for Detection of Anthrax Simulant

    SciTech Connect

    Mostafa, Salwa; Lee, Ida; Islam, Syed K; Eliza, Sazia A.; Shekhawat, Gajendra; Dravid, Vinayak; Tulip, Fahmida S

    2011-01-01

    In this work, MOSFET-embedded cantilevers are configured as microbial sensors for detection of anthrax simulants, Bacillus thuringiensis. Anthrax simulants attached to the chemically treated gold-coated cantilever cause changes in the MOSFET drain current due to the bending of the cantilever which indicates the detection of anthrax simulant. Electrical properties of the anthrax simulant are also responsible for the change in the drain current. The test results suggest a detection range of 10 L of stimulant test solution (a suspension population of 1.3 107 colony-forming units/mL diluted in 40% ethanol and 60% deionized water) with a linear response of 31 A/ L.

  1. Super-resolution optical microscopy based on scannable cantilever-combined microsphere.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuying; Zhang, Dongxian; Zhang, Haijun; Han, Xu; Xu, Rui

    2015-12-01

    We report an ingenious method of super-resolution optical microscopy utilizing scannable cantilever-combined microsphere. By scanning the microsphere over the sample surface in a cantilever-combined microsphere-sample contact state, super-resolution images can be acquired at arbitrary sample regions through near-field information collection by the microsphere. In addition, such a state can effectively reduce the possibility of breaking the cantilever and damaging the microsphere or sample surface. This work has developed a new method and technique of sub-diffraction-limit optical microscopy, and can be practically applied in various fields of micro/nanoscopy.

  2. A Compact, Low-Power Cantilever-Based Sensor Array for Chemical Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Loui, A; Ratto, T; Wilson, T; Mukerjee, E; Hu, Z; Sulchek, T; Hart, B

    2007-02-22

    A compact and low-power cantilever-based sensor array has been developed and used to detect various vapor analytes. This device employs sorptive polymers that are deposited onto piezoresistive cantilevers. We have successfully detected several organic vapors, representing a breadth of chemical properties and over a range of concentrations. Comparisons of the polymer/vapor partition coefficient to the cantilever deflection responses show that a simple linear relationship does not exist, emphasizing the need to develop an appropriate functional model to describe the chemical-to-mechanical transduction that is unique to this sensing modality.

  3. Atomic force microscopy: Loading position dependence of cantilever spring constants and detector sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakarelski, Ivan U.; Edwards, Scott A.; Dagastine, Raymond R.; Chan, Derek Y. C.; Stevens, Geoffrey W.; Grieser, Franz

    2007-11-01

    A simple and accurate experimental method is described for determining the effective cantilever spring constant and the detector sensitivity of atomic force microscopy cantilevers on which a colloidal particle is attached. By attaching large (approximately 85μm diameter) latex particles at various positions along the V-shaped cantilevers, we demonstrate how the normal and lateral spring constants as well as the sensitivity vary with loading position. Comparison with an explicit point-load theoretical model has also been used to verify the accuracy of the method.

  4. Atomic force microscopy: loading position dependence of cantilever spring constants and detector sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Vakarelski, Ivan U; Edwards, Scott A; Dagastine, Raymond R; Chan, Derek Y C; Stevens, Geoffrey W; Grieser, Franz

    2007-11-01

    A simple and accurate experimental method is described for determining the effective cantilever spring constant and the detector sensitivity of atomic force microscopy cantilevers on which a colloidal particle is attached. By attaching large (approximately 85 microm diameter) latex particles at various positions along the V-shaped cantilevers, we demonstrate how the normal and lateral spring constants as well as the sensitivity vary with loading position. Comparison with an explicit point-load theoretical model has also been used to verify the accuracy of the method.

  5. Air-spaced PDMS piezo-electret cantilevers for vibration energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kachroudi, A.; Basrour, S.; Rufer, L.; Jomni, F.

    2016-11-01

    This paper reports a design of a new prototype of air-spaced cantilevers made from a micro-structured PDMS piezo-electret material for accelerometer and energy harvesting applications. The test performed on these cantilevers in a sensor mode exhibits a stable sensitivity of 385 mV/g for a frequency ranging from 5 Hz to 200 Hz that encompass most macro-scale vibrations. In the energy harvesting mode, the cantilever generates a power of 103 nW with a load resistance of 217 MΩ.

  6. Static deflection analysis of non prismatic multilayer p-NEMS cantilevers under electrical load

    SciTech Connect

    Pavithra, M.; Muruganand, S.

    2016-04-13

    Deflection of Euler-Bernoulli non prismatic multilayer piezoelectric nano electromechanical (p-NEMS) cantilever beams have been studied theoretically for various profiles of p-NEMS cantilevers by applying the electrical load. This problem has been answered by applying the boundary conditions derived by simple polynomials. This method is applied for various profiles like rectangular and trapezoidal by varying the thickness of the piezoelectric layer as well as the material. The obtained results provide the better deflection for trapezoidal profile with ZnO piezo electric layer of suitable nano cantilevers for nano scale applications.

  7. Approach to nonphotoperturbed differential capacitance measurements: A front-wing cantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, M. N.; Chen, C. Y.; Huang, W. J.; Cheng, T. C.

    2005-07-01

    We have developed a front-wing (FW) cantilever structure that can significantly suppress photoperturbation effects during scanning capacitance microscopy (SCM) and scanning capacitance spectroscopy (SCS) measurements. The FW cantilever provides an effective shadow area that fully covers the scan region, allowing us to synchronously obtain SCM images and the corresponding topographic images without photoperturbation problems. Nonphotoperturbed differential capacitance characteristics versus tip biases were also obtained for SCS by the use of these FW cantilevers. This means that nonphotoperturbed SCM and SCS measurements can be carried out during the typical SCM operations.

  8. Resonant interaction of trapped cold atoms with a magnetic cantilever tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montoya, Cris; Valencia, Jose; Geraci, Andrew; Eardley, Matthew; Kitching, John

    2015-05-01

    We report the resonant coupling of laser cooled trapped Rb atoms to a micro-cantilever with a magnetic tip. An atom chip is used to trap, cool, and transport the atoms to the tip of the cantilever. The capacitively-driven cantilever oscillation produces Zeeman state transitions which result in a loss of population in the trap. In a suitably scaled setup, mechanical resonators could be used to probe and manipulate atomic spins with nanometer spatial resolution and single-spin sensitivity; this technique may enable new approaches in neutral-atom quantum computation, quantum simulation, or precision sensing.

  9. Experimental determination of the spring constant of an individual multiwalled carbon nanotube cantilever using fluorescence measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Soongeun; Park, Hyojun; Shim, Hyung Cheoul; Lee, Hyung Woo; Kwak, Yoon Keun; Kim, Soohyun

    2009-07-01

    We report an experimental method to determine the spring constant of a multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) cantilever as a mechanical piconewton force transducer. Electrostatic actuation was employed to investigate the mechanical properties of a MWNT cantilever. In order to measure nanotube's deflection during actuation, fluorescent dyes were noncovalently attached to the end of the nanotubes. Also, the length dependence of the spring constant is studied by adjusting the length of MWNT via electrochemical etching. The results show that the spring constant of a MWNT cantilever is as small as 0.001 N/m and tunable in the range of 0.001-0.05 N/m.

  10. Strong electromechanical coupling of an atomic force microscope cantilever to a quantum dot.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Steven D; Cockins, Lynda; Miyahara, Yoichi; Grütter, Peter; Clerk, Aashish A

    2010-01-08

    We present theoretical and experimental results on the mechanical damping of an atomic force microscope cantilever strongly coupled to a self-assembled InAs quantum dot. When the cantilever oscillation amplitude is large, its motion dominates the charge dynamics of the dot which in turn leads to nonlinear, amplitude-dependent damping of the cantilever. We observe highly asymmetric line shapes of Coulomb blockade peaks in the damping that reflect the degeneracy of energy levels on the dot. Furthermore, we predict that excited state spectroscopy is possible by studying the damping versus oscillation amplitude, in analogy with varying the amplitude of an ac gate voltage.

  11. Nanoscale deflection detection of a cantilever-based biosensor using MOSFET structure: A theoretical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paryavi, Mohsen; Montazeri, Abbas; Tekieh, Tahereh; Sasanpour, Pezhman

    2016-10-01

    A novel method for detection of biological species based on measurement of cantilever deflection has been proposed and numerically evaluated. Employing the cantilever as a moving gate of a MOSFET structure, its deflection can be analyzed via current characterization of the MOSFET consequently. Locating the cantilever as a suspended gate of a MOSFET on a substrate, the distance between cantilever and oxide layer will change the carrier concentration. Accordingly, it will be resulted in different current voltage characteristics of the device which can be easily measured using simple apparatuses. In order to verify the proposed method, the performance of system has been theoretically analyzed using COMSOL platform. The simulation results have confirmed the performance and sensitivity of the proposed method.

  12. Fabrication, characterization, and simulation of a cantilever-based airflow sensor integrated with optical fiber.

    PubMed

    Cheri, M Sadegh; Latifi, Hamid; Aghbolagh, F Beygi Azar; Naeini, O R Ranjbar; Taghavi, Majid; Ghaderi, Mohammadamir

    2013-05-10

    In this paper, we present the fabrication and packaging of a cantilever-based airflow sensor integrated with optical fiber. The sensor consists of a micro Fabry-Perot (FP) cavity including a fiber and a micro cantilever that is fabricated using the photolithography method. Airflow causes a small deflection of the micro cantilever and changes the cavity length of the FP, which makes the fringe shift. The pressure distribution and velocity streamlines across the cantilever resulted from the airflow in the channel have been simulated by the finite element method. The experimental results demonstrate that the sensor has a linear sensitivity of 190 [fringe shift (pm)] per (l/min) and a minimum detectable airflow change of 0.05 (l/min).

  13. A direct micropipette-based calibration method for atomic force microscope cantilevers

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Baoyu; Yu, Yan; Yao, Da-Kang; Shao, Jin-Yu

    2009-01-01

    In this report, we describe a direct method for calibrating atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers with the micropipette aspiration technique (MAT). A closely fitting polystyrene bead inside a micropipette is driven by precisely controlled hydrostatic pressures to apply known loads on the sharp tip of AFM cantilevers, thus providing a calibration at the most functionally relevant position. The new method is capable of calibrating cantilevers with spring constants ranging from 0.01 to hundreds of newtons per meter. Under appropriate loading conditions, this new method yields measurement accuracy and precision both within 10%, with higher performance for softer cantilevers. Furthermore, this method may greatly enhance the accuracy and precision of calibration for colloidal probes. PMID:19566228

  14. Label-free protein assay based on a nanomechanical cantilever array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arntz, Y.; Seelig, J. D.; Lang, H. P.; Zhang, J.; Hunziker, P.; Ramseyer, J. P.; Meyer, E.; Hegner, M.; Gerber, Ch

    2003-01-01

    We demonstrate continuous label-free detection of two cardiac biomarker proteins (creatin kinase and myoglobin) using an array of microfabricated cantilevers functionalized with covalently anchored anti-creatin kinase and anti-myoglobin antibodies. This method allows biomarker proteins to be detected via measurement of surface stress generated by antigen-antibody molecular recognition. Reference cantilevers are used to eliminate thermal drifts, undesired chemical reactions and turbulences from injections of liquids by calculating differential deflection signals with respect to sensor cantilevers. The sensitivity achieved for myoglobin detection is below 20 µg ml-1. Both myoglobin and creatin kinase could be detected independently using cantilevers functionalized with the corresponding antibodies, in unspecific protein background. This approach permits the use of up to seven different antigen-antibody reactions simultaneously, including an additional thermomechanical and chemical in situ reference. Applications lie in the field of early and rapid diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction.

  15. Indium phosphide-based monolithically integrated PIN waveguide photodiode readout for resonant cantilever sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Siwak, N. P.; Fan, X. Z.; Ghodssi, R.; Kanakaraju, S.; Richardson, C. J. K.

    2014-10-06

    An integrated photodiode displacement readout scheme for a microelectromechanical cantilever waveguide resonator sensing platform is presented. III-V semiconductors are used to enable the monolithic integration of passive waveguides with active optical components. This work builds upon previously demonstrated results by measuring the displacement of cantilever waveguide resonators with on-chip waveguide PIN photodiodes. The on-chip integration of the readout provides an additional 70% improvement in mass sensitivity compared to off-chip photodetector designs due to measurement stability and minimized coupling loss. In addition to increased measurement stability, reduced packaging complexity is achieved due to the simplicity of the readout design. We have fabricated cantilever waveguides with integrated photodetectors and experimentally characterized these cantilever sensors with monolithically integrated PIN photodiodes.

  16. Static deflection measurements of cantilever arrays reveal polymer film expansion and contraction.

    PubMed

    Snow, David; Weeks, Brandon L; Kim, Dae Jung; Loui, Albert; Hart, Bradley R; Hope-Weeks, Louisa J

    2007-12-15

    An optical static method of detection is used to interpret surface stress induced bending related to cantilevers coated on one side with poly(vinyl alcohol), poly(vinyl butyral-co-vinyl alcohol-co-vinyl acetate), and poly(vinyl chloride-co-vinyl acetate-co-2-hydroxypropyl acrylate), or respectively, PVA, PVB, and PVC, and exposed to various solvent vapors. Results indicate that the adsorption and surface interactions of the different solvent vapors that cause polymer swelling and shrinking lead to rearrangements, which have been shown to change the elastic properties of the polymer film, and subsequently, the spring constant of the polymer coated cantilever. Static deflection measurements allow the direction of cantilever bending to be determined, which adds a new dimension of usefulness for surface functionalized cantilevers as transducers in the development of novel microelectromechanical systems (MEMS).

  17. 25. DETAIL OF SOUTH CANTILEVER ANCHOR ARM CONNECTION L1 AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. DETAIL OF SOUTH CANTILEVER ANCHOR ARM CONNECTION L-1 AND LINK EXPANSION BEARING, LOOKING SOUTHEAST - Jackson's Ferry Bridge, Route 52 over New River, 6.3 miles south of Route 94, Austinville, Wythe County, VA

  18. Electrothermally driven high-frequency piezoresistive SiC cantilevers for dynamic atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Boubekri, R.; Cambril, E.; Couraud, L.; Bernardi, L.; Madouri, A.; Portail, M.; Chassagne, T.; Moisson, C.; Zielinski, M.; Jiao, S.; Michaud, J.-F.; Alquier, D.; Bouloc, J.; Nony, L.; Bocquet, F.; Loppacher, C.

    2014-08-07

    Cantilevers with resonance frequency ranging from 1 MHz to 100 MHz have been developed for dynamic atomic force microscopy. These sensors are fabricated from 3C-SiC epilayers grown on Si(100) substrates by low pressure chemical vapor deposition. They use an on-chip method both for driving and sensing the displacement of the cantilever. A first gold metallic loop deposited on top of the cantilever is used to drive its oscillation by electrothermal actuation. The sensing of this oscillation is performed by monitoring the resistance of a second Au loop. This metallic piezoresistive detection method has distinct advantages relative to more common semiconductor-based schemes. The optimization, design, fabrication, and characteristics of these cantilevers are discussed.

  19. Electromechanical properties of single-walled carbon nanotube devices on micromachined cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Eun-Kyoung; Park, Chan-Hyun; Lee, Jung A.; Kim, Min-Seok; Lee, Kwang-Cheol; So, Hye-Mi; Ahn, Chiwon; Chang, Hyunju; Kong, Ki-jeong; Kim, Ju-Jin; Lee, Jeong-O.

    2012-11-01

    We have investigated the electromechanical properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) by constructing carbon nanotube transistors on micro-cantilevers. SWNTs and ultra-long carbon nanotubes (UNTs) were grown on free-standing Si3N4 membranes by using chemical vapor deposition, and electrical contacts were generated with electron beam lithography and lift-off. The cantilevers bearing SWNT devices were micromachined so that hybrid cantilevers with various spring constants were fabricated. To measure the electromechanical properties of the SWNTs, precisely controlled forces were generated by a microbalance and applied to the hybrid cantilever devices. Upon bending, the conductances of the metallic and large-gap semiconducting UNTs showed no notable change, whereas the conductances of the small-gap semiconducting UNTs and networks of SWNTs increased. Numerical simulations of bended SWNT made using a multiscale simulator supported the hypothesis that the small-gap semiconducting SWNTs undergo a metallic transformation upon bending.

  20. Analytic and laser vibrometry study of squeeze film damping of MEMS cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignola, Joseph F.; Judge, John A.; Lawrence, Eric; Jarzynski, Jacek; Houston, Brian

    2006-06-01

    This study compares theoretical predictions to experimental measurements of squeeze film damping of MEMS cantilevers in a fluid environment. A series of MEMS cantilevers were fabricated on a silicon wafer. Each of the silicon beams was 2 μm thick and 18 μm wide. The lengths range from 100 to 800 μm and the air-filled gap between the cantilever and the substrate was 6 μm. An analytic model for squeeze film damping was used to predict the corresponding quality factor Q squeeze film (the ratio of the mechanical energy stored in the oscillator to the energy dissipated per cycle) for these cantilevers. The results from the modeling are compared to experimental results obtained using a Polytec MSA-400 Micro System Analyzer.

  1. Use of self-actuating and self-sensing cantilevers for imaging biological samples in fluid

    PubMed Central

    Barbero, R J; Deutschinger, A; Todorov, V; Gray, D S; Belcher, A M; Rangelow, I W; Youcef-Toumi, K

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present a detailed investigation into the suitability of atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilevers with integrated deflection sensor and micro-actuator for imaging of soft biological samples in fluid. The Si cantilevers are actuated using a micro-heater at the bottom end of the cantilever. Sensing is achieved through p-doped resistors connected in a Wheatstone bridge. We investigated the influence of the water on the cantilever dynamics, the actuation and the sensing mechanisms, as well as the crosstalk between sensing and actuation. Successful imaging of yeast cells in water using the integrated sensor and actuator shows the potential of the combination of this actuation and sensing method. This constitutes a major step towards the automation and miniaturization required to establish AFM in routine biomedical diagnostics and in vivo applications. PMID:19801750

  2. A direct micropipette-based calibration method for atomic force microscope cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Baoyu; Yu, Yan; Yao, Da-Kang; Shao, Jin-Yu

    2009-06-01

    In this report, we describe a direct method for calibrating atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers with the micropipette aspiration technique (MAT). A closely fitting polystyrene bead inside a micropipette is driven by precisely controlled hydrostatic pressures to apply known loads on the sharp tip of AFM cantilevers, thus providing a calibration at the most functionally relevant position. The new method is capable of calibrating cantilevers with spring constants ranging from 0.01 to hundreds of newtons per meter. Under appropriate loading conditions, this new method yields measurement accuracy and precision both within 10%, with higher performance for softer cantilevers. Furthermore, this method may greatly enhance the accuracy and precision of calibration for colloidal probes.

  3. Laser controlled coupled cantilevers for precise measurements and energy transfer (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Gengyu

    2016-09-01

    Coupled cantilevers are trapped by laser in a 3-mirror configuration. We studied the signal transduction between the cantilevers by laser control. A force or displacement sensor with such laser trapping technique could achieve much higher sensitivity, as high as 3-4 orders as compared to a single cantilever. We also studied the energy transfer processes by laser trapping and manipulation. Rabi oscillations are observed. Quantum analog Landau-Zener Tunneling and Landau-Zener-Stuckelburg interferometry are realized in the classical regime. We have proved that the energy or signals could be transferred from one cantilever to the other in the real-space by laser manipulation. Laser manipulated coupled cantilvers have great potentials in precision measurements and in quantum information processing.

  4. Spatial nonlinear dynamics near principal parametric resonance for a fluid-conveying cantilever pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folley, C. N.; Bajaj, A. K.

    2005-12-01

    Flow-induced vibrations of a fluid-conveying cantilever pipe are examined theoretically under the condition that the fluid velocity has a small harmonic pulsatile component. More specifically, the case of principal parametric resonance is considered for the pipe free to undergo three-dimensional motions. The mean flow is considered to be near the critical flow rate at which the tube undergoes a Hopf bifurcation into self-excited oscillations. When the governing equations of motion for the tube with steady flow are reduced to those on the center manifold in the neighborhood of Hopf bifurcation, the normal form equations are O(2)-equivariant. The weak harmonic fluctuations due to pulsatile flow result in symmetry-breaking terms in the normal form. The eigenvalues of an O(2)-equivariant system undergoing a symmetry-breaking Hopf bifurcation have multiplicity two. When an additive linear term, arising from time-periodic modulations of the original dynamic system, is introduced into the normal form, the symmetry-breaking bifurcation structure for the trivial solution splits into three categories: a steady-state bifurcation giving rise to standing wave fixed-point solutions, a Hopf bifurcation giving rise to two-frequency solutions, and an O(2)-Takens Bogdanov bifurcation. The resulting dynamics in each case are studied along with secondary and tertiary bifurcations. The dynamics of the tube system are studied as a function of the mean flow rate and the frequency of flow fluctuations. Amplitude response diagrams constructed for a specific example tube system using the continuation and bifurcation analysis software package AUTO illustrate the variety of possible behaviors.

  5. Investigation of polymer derived ceramics cantilevers for application of high speed atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chia-Yun

    High speed Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) has a wide variety of applications ranging from nanomanufacturing to biophysics. In order to have higher scanning speed of certain AFM modes, high resonant frequency cantilevers are needed; therefore, the goal of this research is to investigate using polymer derived ceramics for possible applications in making high resonant frequency AFM cantilevers using complex cross sections. The polymer derived ceramic that will be studied, is silicon carbide. Polymer derived ceramics offer a potentially more economic fabrication approach for MEMS due to their relatively low processing temperatures and ease of complex shape design. Photolithography was used to make the desired cantilever shapes with micron scale size followed by a wet etching process to release the cantilevers from the substrates. The whole manufacturing process we use borrow well-developed techniques from the semiconducting industry, and as such this project also could offer the opportunity to reduce the fabrication cost of AFM cantilevers and MEMS in general. The characteristics of silicon carbide made from the precursor polymer, SMP-10 (Starfire Systems), were studied. In order to produce high qualities of silicon carbide cantilevers, where the major concern is defects, proper process parameters needed to be determined. Films of polymer derived ceramics often have defects due to shrinkage during the conversion process. Thus control of defects was a central issue in this study. A second, related concern was preventing oxidation; the polymer derived ceramics we chose is easily oxidized during processing. Establishing an environment without oxygen in the whole process was a significant challenge in the project. The optimization of the parameters for using photolithography and wet etching process was the final and central goal of the project; well established techniques used in microfabrication were modified for use in making the cantilever in the project. The techniques

  6. MEMS-based silicon cantilevers with integrated electrothermal heaters for airborne ultrafine particle sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasisto, Hutomo Suryo; Merzsch, Stephan; Waag, Andreas; Peiner, Erwin

    2013-05-01

    The development of low-cost and low-power MEMS-based cantilever sensors for possible application in hand-held airborne ultrafine particle monitors is described in this work. The proposed resonant sensors are realized by silicon bulk micromachining technology with electrothermal excitation, piezoresistive frequency readout, and electrostatic particle collection elements integrated and constructed in the same sensor fabrication process step of boron diffusion. Built-in heating resistor and full Wheatstone bridge are set close to the cantilever clamp end for effective excitation and sensing, respectively, of beam deflection. Meanwhile, the particle collection electrode is located at the cantilever free end. A 300 μm-thick, phosphorus-doped silicon bulk wafer is used instead of silicon-on-insulator (SOI) as the starting material for the sensors to reduce the fabrication costs. To etch and release the cantilevers from the substrate, inductively coupled plasma (ICP) cryogenic dry etching is utilized. By controlling the etching parameters (e.g., temperature, oxygen content, and duration), cantilever structures with thicknesses down to 10 - 20 μm are yielded. In the sensor characterization, the heating resistor is heated and generating thermal waves which induce thermal expansion and further cause mechanical bending strain in the out-of-plane direction. A resonant frequency of 114.08 +/- 0.04 kHz and a quality factor of 1302 +/- 267 are measured in air for a fabricated rectangular cantilever (500x100x13.5 μm3). Owing to its low power consumption of a few milliwatts, this electrothermal cantilever is suitable for replacing the current external piezoelectric stack actuator in the next generation of the miniaturized cantilever-based nanoparticle detector (CANTOR).

  7. A Novel Approach to the Sensing of Liquid Density Using a Plastic Optical Fibre Cantilever Beam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulkarni, Atul; Kim, Youngjin; Kim, Taesung

    2009-01-01

    This article reports for the first time the use of a plastic optical fibre (POF) cantilever beam to measure the density of a liquid. The sensor is based on the Archimedes buoyancy principle. The sensor consists of a POF bonded on the surface of a metal beam in the form of a cantilever configuration, and at the free end of the beam a displacer is…

  8. Quantitative measurement of in-plane cantilever torsion for calibrating lateral piezoresponse force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Hyunwoo; Hong, Seungbum; No, Kwangsoo

    2011-11-01

    A simple quantitative measurement procedure of in-plane cantilever torsion for calibrating lateral piezoresponse force microscopy is presented. This technique enables one to determine the corresponding lateral inverse optical lever sensitivity (LIOLS) of the cantilever on the given sample. Piezoelectric coefficient, d31 of BaTiO3 single crystal (-81.62 ± 40.22 pm/V) which was calculated using the estimated LIOLS was in good agreement with the reported value in literature.

  9. A Novel Approach to the Sensing of Liquid Density Using a Plastic Optical Fibre Cantilever Beam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulkarni, Atul; Kim, Youngjin; Kim, Taesung

    2009-01-01

    This article reports for the first time the use of a plastic optical fibre (POF) cantilever beam to measure the density of a liquid. The sensor is based on the Archimedes buoyancy principle. The sensor consists of a POF bonded on the surface of a metal beam in the form of a cantilever configuration, and at the free end of the beam a displacer is…

  10. Quantitative measurement of in-plane cantilever torsion for calibrating lateral piezoresponse force microscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, H.; Hong, S.; No, K.

    2011-01-01

    A simple quantitative measurement procedure of in-plane cantilever torsion for calibrating lateral piezoresponse force microscopy is presented. This technique enables one to determine the corresponding lateral inverse optical lever sensitivity (LIOLS) of the cantilever on the given sample. Piezoelectric coefficient, d{sub 31} of BaTiO{sub 3} single crystal (-81.62 {+-} 40.22 pm/V) which was calculated using the estimated LIOLS was in good agreement with the reported value in literature.

  11. Effect of cantilever length on stress distribution around implants in mandibular overdentures supported by two and three implants

    PubMed Central

    Ebadian, Behnaz; Mosharraf, Ramin; Khodaeian, Niloufar

    2016-01-01

    Objective: There is no definitive study comparing stress distribution around two versus three implants in implant-retained overdentures with different cantilever length. The purpose of this finite element study was to evaluate stress pattern around the implants of the 2 or 3 implant- supported mandibular overdenture with different cantilevered length. Materials and Methods: The models used in this study were 2 and 3 implant-supported overdenture with bar and clip attachment system on an edentulous mandibular arch. Each model was modified according to cantilever length (0 mm, 7 mm, and 13 mm); thus, 6 models were obtained. The vertical load of 15 and 30 pounds were applied unilaterally to the first molar and 15 pounds to the first premolar, and the stress in bone was analyzed. Results: With increasing cantilever length, no similar stress pattern changes were observed in different areas, but in most instances, an increase in cantilever length did not increase the stress around the implant adjacent to cantilever. Conclusions: Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that increasing of cantilever length in mandibular overdentures retained by 2–3 implants did not cause distinct increasing in stress, especially around the implant adjacent to cantilever, it may be helpful to use cantilever in cases of mandibular overdenture supported by splinted implants with insufficient retention and stability. Based on the findings of this study, optimal cantilever length in mandibular overdenture cannot be determined. PMID:27403049

  12. Model-based Processing of Micro-cantilever Sensor Arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Tringe, J W; Clague, D S; Candy, J V; Lee, C L; Rudd, R E; Burnham, A K

    2004-11-17

    We develop a model-based processor (MBP) for a micro-cantilever array sensor to detect target species in solution. After discussing the generalized framework for this problem, we develop the specific model used in this study. We perform a proof-of-concept experiment, fit the model parameters to the measured data and use them to develop a Gauss-Markov simulation. We then investigate two cases of interest: (1) averaged deflection data, and (2) multi-channel data. In both cases the evaluation proceeds by first performing a model-based parameter estimation to extract the model parameters, next performing a Gauss-Markov simulation, designing the optimal MBP and finally applying it to measured experimental data. The simulation is used to evaluate the performance of the MBP in the multi-channel case and compare it to a ''smoother'' (''averager'') typically used in this application. It was shown that the MBP not only provides a significant gain ({approx} 80dB) in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), but also consistently outperforms the smoother by 40-60 dB. Finally, we apply the processor to the smoothed experimental data and demonstrate its capability for chemical detection. The MBP performs quite well, though it includes a correctable systematic bias error. The project's primary accomplishment was the successful application of model-based processing to signals from micro-cantilever arrays: 40-60 dB improvement vs. the smoother algorithm was demonstrated. This result was achieved through the development of appropriate mathematical descriptions for the chemical and mechanical phenomena, and incorporation of these descriptions directly into the model-based signal processor. A significant challenge was the development of the framework which would maximize the usefulness of the signal processing algorithms while ensuring the accuracy of the mathematical description of the chemical-mechanical signal. Experimentally, the difficulty was to identify and characterize the non

  13. Atomic force microscope cantilever spring constant evaluation for higher mode oscillations: A kinetostatic method

    SciTech Connect

    Tseytlin, Yakov M.

    2008-02-15

    Our previous study of the particle mass sensor has shown a large ratio (up to thousands) between the spring constants of a rectangular cantilever in higher mode vibration and at the static bending or natural mode vibration. This has been proven by us through the derived nodal point position equation. That solution is good for a cantilever with the free end in noncontact regime and the probe shifted from the end to an effective section and contacting a soft object. Our further research shows that the same nodal position equation with the proper frequency equations may be used for the same spring constant ratio estimation if the vibrating at higher mode cantilever's free end has a significant additional mass clamped to it or that end is in permanent contact with an elastic or hard measurand object (reference cantilever). However, in the latter case, the spring constant ratio is much smaller (in tens) than in other mentioned cases at equal higher (up to fourth) vibration modes. We also present the spring constant ratio for a vibrating at higher eigenmode V-shaped cantilever, which is now in wide use for atomic force microscopy. The received results on the spring constant ratio are in good (within a few percent) agreement with the theoretical and experimental data published by other researchers. The knowledge of a possible spring constant transformation is important for the proper calibration and use of an atomic force microscope with vibrating cantilever in the higher eigenmodes for measurement and imaging with enlarged resolution.

  14. Minimizing tip-sample forces and enhancing sensitivity in atomic force microscopy with dynamically compliant cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keyvani, Aliasghar; Sadeghian, Hamed; Tamer, Mehmet Selman; Goosen, Johannes Frans Loodewijk; van Keulen, Fred

    2017-06-01

    Due to the harmonic motion of the cantilever in Tapping Mode Atomic Force Microscopy, it is seemingly impossible to estimate the tip-sample interactions from the motion of the cantilever. Not directly observing the interaction force, it is possible to damage the surface or the tip by applying an excessive mechanical load. The tip-sample interactions scale with the effective stiffness of the probe. Thus, the reduction of the mechanical load is usually limited by the manufacturability of low stiffness probes. However, the one-to-one relationship between spring constant and applied force only holds when higher modes of the cantilever are not excited. In this paper, it is shown that, by passively tuning higher modes of the cantilever, it is possible to reduce the peak repulsive force. These tuned probes can be dynamically more compliant than conventional probes with the same static spring constant. Both theoretical and experimental results show that a proper tuning of dynamic modes of cantilevers reduces the contact load and increases the sensitivity considerably. Moreover, due to the contribution of higher modes, the tuned cantilevers provide more information on the tip-sample interaction. This extra information from the higher harmonics can be used for mapping and possibly identification of material properties of samples.

  15. Study of node and mass sensitivity of resonant mode based cantilevers with concentrated mass loading

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Kewei Chai, Yuesheng; Fu, Jiahui

    2015-12-15

    Resonant-mode based cantilevers are an important type of acoustic wave based mass-sensing devices. In this work, the governing vibration equation of a bi-layer resonant-mode based cantilever attached with concentrated mass is established by using a modal analysis method. The effects of resonance modes and mass loading conditions on nodes and mass sensitivity of the cantilever were theoretically studied. The results suggested that the node did not shift when concentrated mass was loaded on a specific position. Mass sensitivity of the cantilever was linearly proportional to the square of the point displacement at the mass loading position for all the resonance modes. For the first resonance mode, when mass loading position x{sub c} satisfied 0 < x{sub c} < ∼ 0.3l (l is the cantilever beam length and 0 represents the rigid end), mass sensitivity decreased as the mass increasing while the opposite trend was obtained when mass loading satisfied ∼0.3l ≤ x{sub c} ≤ l. Mass sensitivity did not change when concentrated mass was loaded at the rigid end. This work can provide scientific guidance to optimize the mass sensitivity of a resonant-mode based cantilever.

  16. Determining the thermal expansion coefficient of thin films for a CMOS MEMS process using test cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Chao-Lin; Tsai, Ming-Han; Fang, Weileun

    2015-02-01

    Many standard CMOS processes, provided by existing foundries, are available. These standard CMOS processes, with stacking of various metal and dielectric layers, have been extensively applied in integrated circuits as well as micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS). It is of importance to determine the material properties of the metal and dielectric films to predict the performance and reliability of micro devices. This study employs an existing approach to determine the coefficients of thermal expansion (CTEs) of metal and dielectric films for standard CMOS processes. Test cantilevers with different stacking of metal and dielectric layers for standard CMOS processes have been designed and implemented. The CTEs of standard CMOS films can be determined from measurements of the out-of-plane thermal deformations of the test cantilevers. To demonstrate the feasibility of the present approach, thin films prepared by the Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacture Company 0.35 μm 2P4M CMOS process are characterized. Eight test cantilevers with different stacking of CMOS layers and an auxiliary Si cantilever on a SOI wafer are fabricated. The equivalent elastic moduli and CTEs of the CMOS thin films including the metal and dielectric layers are determined, respectively, from the resonant frequency and static thermal deformation of the test cantilevers. Moreover, thermal deformations of cantilevers with stacked layers different to those of the test beams have been employed to verify the measured CTEs and elastic moduli.

  17. Micromachined cantilevers-on-membrane topology for broadband vibration energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Yu; Du, Sijun; Seshia, Ashwin A.

    2016-12-01

    The overwhelming majority of microelectromechanical piezoelectric vibration energy harvesting topologies have been based on cantilevers, doubly-clamped beams or basic membranes. While these conventional designs offer simplicity, their broadband responses have been limited thus far. This paper investigates the feasibility of a new integrated cantilevers-on-membrane design that explores the optimisation of piezoelectric strain distribution and improvement of the broadband power output. While a classic membrane has the potential to offer a broader resonant peak than its cantilever counterpart, the inclusion of a centred proof mass compromises its otherwise high strain energy regions. The proposed topology addresses this issue by relocating the proof mass onto subsidiary cantilevers and combines the merits of both the membrane and the cantilever designs. Numerical simulations, constructed using fitted values based on finite element models, were used to investigate the broadband response of the proposed design in contrast to a classic plain membrane. Experimentally, when subjected to a band-limited white noise excitation, the new cantilevers-on-membrane harvester exhibited nearly two fold power output enhancement when compared to a classic plain membrane harvester of a comparable size.

  18. Micro electro-mechanical system piezoelectric cantilever array for a broadband vibration energy harvester.

    PubMed

    Chun, Inwoo; Lee, Hyun-Woo; Kwon, Kwang-Ho

    2014-12-01

    Limited energy sources of ubiquitous sensor networks (USNs) such as fuel cells and batteries have grave drawbacks such as the need for replacements and re-charging owing to their short durability and environmental pollution. Energy harvesting which is converting environmental mechanical vibration into electrical energy has been researched with some piezoelectric materials and various cantilever designs to increase the efficiency of energy-harvesting devices. In this study, we focused on an energy-harvesting cantilever with a broadband vibration frequency. We fabricated a lead zirconate titanate (PZT) cantilever array with various Si proof masses on small beams (5.5 mm x 0.5 mm x 0.5 mm). We obtained broadband resonant frequencies ranging between 127 Hz and 136 Hz using a micro electro-mechanical system (MEMS) process. In order to obtain broadband resonant characteristics, the cantilever array was comprised of six cantilevers with different resonant frequencies. We obtained an output power of about 2.461 μW at an acceleration of 0.23 g and a resistance of 4 kΩ. The measured bandwidth of the resonant frequency was approximately 9 Hz (127-136 Hz), which is about six times wider than the bandwidth of a single cantilever.

  19. Microdrops on atomic force microscope cantilevers: evaporation of water and spring constant calibration.

    PubMed

    Bonaccurso, Elmar; Butt, Hans-Jürgen

    2005-01-13

    The evaporation of water drops with radii approximately 20 microm was investigated experimentally by depositing them onto atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers and measuring the deflection versus time. Because of the surface tension of the liquid, the Laplace pressure inside the drop, and the change of interfacial stress at the solid-liquid interface, the cantilever is deflected by typically a few hundred nanometers. The experimental results are in accordance with an analytic theory developed. The evaporation process could be monitored with high accuracy even at the last stage of evaporation because (1) cantilever deflections can be measured with nanometer resolution and (2) the time resolution, given by the inverse of the resonance frequency of the cantilever of approximately 0.3 ms, is much faster than the typical evaporation time of 1 s. Experimental results indicate that evaporation of the last thin layer of water is significantly slower than the rest of the drop, which can be due to surface forces. This drop-on-cantilever system can also be used to analyze the drop impact dynamics on a surface and to determine the spring constant of cantilevers.

  20. Cancelation of thermally induced frequency shifts in bimaterial cantilevers by nonlinear optomechanical interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vy, Nguyen Duy; Tri Dat, Le; Iida, Takuya

    2016-08-01

    Bimaterial cantilevers have recently been used in, for example, the calorimetric analysis with picowatt resolution in microscopic space based on state-of-the-art atomic force microscopes. However, thermally induced effects usually change physical properties of the cantilevers, such as the resonance frequency, which reduce the accuracy of the measurements. Here, we propose an approach to circumvent this problem that uses an optical microcavity formed between a metallic layer coated on the back of the cantilever and one coated at the end of an optical fiber irradiating the cantilever. In addition to increasing the sensitivity, the optical rigidity of this system diminishes the thermally induced frequency shift. For a coating thickness of several tens of nanometers, the input power is 5-10 μW. These values can be evaluated from parameters derived by directly irradiating the cantilever in the absence of the microcavity. The system has the potential of using the cantilever both as a thermometer without frequency shifting and as a sensor with nanometer-controlled accuracy.

  1. Cancelation of thermally induced frequency shifts in bimaterial cantilevers by nonlinear optomechanical interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Vy, Nguyen Duy; Tri Dat, Le; Iida, Takuya

    2016-08-01

    Bimaterial cantilevers have recently been used in, for example, the calorimetric analysis with picowatt resolution in microscopic space based on state-of-the-art atomic force microscopes. However, thermally induced effects usually change physical properties of the cantilevers, such as the resonance frequency, which reduce the accuracy of the measurements. Here, we propose an approach to circumvent this problem that uses an optical microcavity formed between a metallic layer coated on the back of the cantilever and one coated at the end of an optical fiber irradiating the cantilever. In addition to increasing the sensitivity, the optical rigidity of this system diminishes the thermally induced frequency shift. For a coating thickness of several tens of nanometers, the input power is 5–10 μW. These values can be evaluated from parameters derived by directly irradiating the cantilever in the absence of the microcavity. The system has the potential of using the cantilever both as a thermometer without frequency shifting and as a sensor with nanometer-controlled accuracy.

  2. A method for atomic force microscopy cantilever stiffness calibration under heavy fluid loading.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Scott J; Cole, Daniel G; Clark, Robert L

    2009-12-01

    This work presents a method for force calibration of rectangular atomic force microscopy (AFM) microcantilevers under heavy fluid loading. Theoretical modeling of the thermal response of microcantilevers is discussed including a fluid-structure interaction model of the cantilever-fluid system that incorporates the results of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. This model is curve fit to the measured thermal response of a cantilever in de-ionized water and a cost function is used to quantify the difference between the theoretical model and measured data. The curve fit is performed in a way that restricts the search space to parameters that reflect heavy fluid loading conditions. The resulting fitting parameters are used to calibrate the cantilever. For comparison, cantilevers are calibrated using Sader's method in air and the thermal noise method in both air and water. For a set of eight cantilevers ranging in stiffness from 0.050 to 5.8 N/m, the maximum difference between Sader's calibration performed in air and the new method performed in water was 9.4%. A set of three cantilevers that violate the aspect ratio assumption associated with the fluid loading model (length-to-width ratios less than 3.5) ranged in stiffness from 0.85 to 4.7 N/m and yielded differences as high as 17.8%.

  3. Fabrication of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) cantilevers for photoacoustic (PA) detection of terahertz (THz) radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newberry, R.; Glauvitz, N.; Coutu, R. A.; Medvedev, I. R.; Petkie, D.

    2014-03-01

    Historically, spectroscopy has been a cumbersome endeavor due to the relatively large sizes (3ft - 100ft in length) of modern spectroscopy systems. Taking advantage of the photoacoustic effect would allow for much smaller absorption chambers since the photoacoustic (PA) effect is independent of the absorption path length. In order to detect the photoacoustic waves being generated, a photoacoustic microphone would be required. This paper reports on the fabrication efforts taken in order to create microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) cantilevers for the purpose of sensing photoacoustic waves generated via terahertz (THz) radiation passing through a gaseous sample. The cantilevers are first modeled through the use of the finite element modeling software, CoventorWare®. The cantilevers fabricated with bulk micromachining processes and are 7x2x0.010mm on a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafer which acts as the physical structure of the cantilever. The devices are released by etching through the wafer's backside and etching through the buried oxide with hydrofluoric acid. The cantilevers are placed in a test chamber and their vibration and deflection are measured via a Michelson type interferometer that reflects a laser off a gold tip evaporated onto the tip of the cantilever. The test chamber is machined from stainless steel and housed in a THz testing environment at Wright State University. Fabricated devices have decreased residual stress and larger radii of curvatures by approximately 10X.

  4. Innovative multi-cantilever array sensor system with MOEMS read-out

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivaldi, F.; Bieniek, T.; Janus, P.; Grabiec, P.; Majstrzyk, W.; Kopiec, D.; Gotszalk, T.

    2016-11-01

    Cantilever based sensor system are a well-established sensor family exploited in several every-day life applications as well as in high-end research areas. The very high sensitivity of such systems and the possibility to design and functionalize the cantilevers to create purpose built and highly selective sensors have increased the interest of the scientific community and the industry in further exploiting this promising sensors type. Optical deflection detection systems for cantilever sensors provide a reliable, flexible method for reading information from cantilevers with the highest sensitivity. However the need of using multi-cantilever arrays in several fields of application such as medicine, biology or safety related areas, make the optical method less suitable due to its structural complexity. Working in the frame of a the Joint Undertaking project Lab4MEMS II our group proposes a novel and innovative approach to solve this issue, by integrating a Micro-Opto-Electro-Mechanical-System (MOEMS) with dedicated optics, electronics and software with a MOEMS micro-mirror, ultimately developed in the frame of Lab4MEMSII. In this way we are able to present a closely packed, lightweight solution combining the advantages of standard optical read-out systems with the possibility of recording multiple read-outs from large cantilever arrays quasi simultaneously.

  5. Measurement of Cantilever's Spring Constant with Cms Electrostatic Force Standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Sheng-Jui; Pan, Sheau-Shi; Yeh, Yu-Shan; Lin, Yi-Ching

    The mechanical property is one of the important parameters for evaluating micro/nano-scale materials. The measurement of micro/nano-mechanical property usually involves measurements of small displacement and force. To provide a traceable force standard in micro/nano-newton level, we have developed a force measurement system based on electrostatic sensing and actuation techniques. The system mainly consists of a monolithic flexure stage, a three-electrode capacitor and a digital controller. The three-electrode capacitor is utilized as a position sensor, and at the same time an electrostatic force actuator. The force under measurement is balanced by a compensation electrostatic force which is traceable to electrical and length standards. A commercial cantilever-type micro-force probe was used in this calibration experiment. The force probe was brought to contact with and press into the load button (a ruby sphere) of the force measurement system by a closed-loop controlled z-scanner. The spring constant was obtained from the average slope determined from measured force-displacement curves and was found to be (2.26 ± 0.01) N/m where the given uncertainty is one standard deviation. We have successfully demonstrated the calibration of the microforce probe using our self-developed electrostatic sensing and actuating force measurement system. The measured spring constant is consistent with the manufacturer's specification, and the relative standard deviation is less than 0.5%. Note from Publisher: This article contains the abstract only.

  6. A single nano cantilever as a reprogrammable universal logic gate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chappanda, K. N.; Ilyas, S.; Kazmi, S. N. R.; Holguin-Lerma, J.; Batra, N. M.; Costa, P. M. F. J.; Younis, M. I.

    2017-04-01

    The current transistor-based computing circuits use multiple interconnected transistors to realize a single Boolean logic gate. This leads to higher power requirements and delayed computing. Transistors are not suitable for applications in harsh environments and require complicated thermal management systems due to excessive heat dissipation. Also, transistor circuits lack the ability to dynamically reconfigure their functionality in real time, which is desirable for enhanced computing capability. Further, the miniaturization of transistors to improve computational power is reaching its ultimate physical limits. As a step towards overcoming the limitations of transistor-based computing, here we demonstrate a reprogrammable universal Boolean logic gate based on a nanoelectromechanical cantilever (NC) oscillator. The fundamental XOR, AND, NOR, OR and NOT logic gates are condensed in a single NC, thereby reducing electrical interconnects between devices. The device is dynamically switchable between any logic gates at the same drive frequency without the need for any change in the circuit. It is demonstrated to operate at elevated temperatures minimizing the need for thermal management systems. It has a tunable bandwidth of 5 MHz enabling parallel and dynamically reconfigurable logic device for enhanced computing.

  7. A cantilevered flexible cylinder in cross-flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Jessica; Smits, Alexander; Stone, Howard

    2011-11-01

    Biological fluid-structure interactions of high aspect ratio bluff bodies are commonplace: flow around tall plants; flow through arrays of sensory vibrissae, antennae, and hairs. In this study, we seek insight to this class of problems by generalizing the flow configuration to uniform flow past a flexible cantilevered cylinder. Experiments were conducted for ReD = 100-500. Cylinders deflected with the flow and demonstrated multimodal oscillations in both the streamwise and transverse directions. Oscillation frequencies were correlated with vortex shedding frequencies, but low oscillation frequencies (sub-1 Hz), which were not apparently vortex- induced, were also present. Two ReD regimes were noted in which the vortex shedding frequency remained relatively constant with ReD , while the two regimes were separated by an intermediate transition region. This feature results in an apparently linear relationship between St and ReD in each regime. Hydrogen bubble visualization showed strong three-dimensionality in the wake, as well as a diversity of wake structures varying with ReD . NSF-GRFP

  8. Vibration suppression of a skew cantilever plate using PZT patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pai, Perngjin F.; Rommel, Bernd; Naser, Ahmad S.; Schulz, Mark J.

    1998-07-01

    We investigate the control of steady-state vibrations of a cantilevered skew isotropic plate by using nonlinear saturation phenomena and PZT (lead zirconate titanate) patches as sensors and actuators. Modal testing and finite- element analysis are performed to study the bending- torsional dynamic characteristics due to the non-rectangular plate geometry. The control method uses linear second-order controllers coupled to the plate via quadratic terms to establish energy bridges between the plate and controllers. Each linear second-order controller is designed to have a 1:2 internal resonance with one of the plate vibration modes and hence is able to exchange energy with the plate at or around the specific modal frequency. Because of quadratic nonlinearities and 1:2 internal resonances, saturation phenomena exist and are used to suppress modal vibrations. To test this control technique in an efficient and systematic way, we built a digital control system that consists of SIMULINK modeling software and a dSPACE DS1102 controller in a pentium computer. Both numerical and experimental results show that this nonlinear control method is robust in suppression steady-state resonant vibrations without significant spill-over effects.

  9. Investigation of fiber bridging in double cantilever beam specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.; Managalgiri, P. D.

    1986-01-01

    The possibility to eliminate fiber bridging or at least to reduce it, and to evaluate an alternative approach for determination of in situ mode 7 fracture toughness values of composite matrix materials were investigated. Double cantilever beam (DCB) specimens were made using unidirectional lay-ups of T6C/Hx205 composite material in which the delaminating halves were placed at angles of 0, 1.5, and 3 degrees to each other. The small angles between the delaminating plies were used to avoid fiber nesting without significantly affecting mode I teflon insert. The DCB specimens were fabricated and it was found that: (1) the extent which fiber bridging and interlaminar toughness increase with crack length can be reduced by slight cross ply at the delamination plane to reduce fiber nesting; (2) some fiber bridging may occur even in the absence of fiber nesting; (3) the first values of toughness measured ahead of the thin teflon insert are very close to the toughness of the matrix material with no fiber bridging; (4) thin adhesive bondline of matrix material appears to give toughness values equal to the interlaminar toughness of the composite matrix without fiber bridging.

  10. Advanced structural optimization of a heliostat with cantilever arms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanov, Dimitar; Zlatanov, Hristo

    2016-05-01

    The weight of the support structure of heliostats, CPV and PV trackers is important cost element of a solar plant and reducing it will improve the economic viability of a solar project. Heliostats with rectangular area (1 to 5 in 1 m² steps; 5 to 150 in 5 m² steps) and aspect ratios (0.5, 1.0, 1.2, 1.5, 2.0) were investigated under various winds speeds (0, 5 to 100 in 5 m/s steps), wind direction (0 to 180° in 15° steps) and elevation positions (0 to 90° in 10° steps). Each load case was run with three different cantilever arms. The inclination angle of the chords and bracings was chosen so as to fulfill the geometrical boundary condition. Stress and buckling validations were performed according to Eurocode. The results of research carried out can be used to determine the specific weight of a heliostat in kg/m² as a function of the wind speed, tracker area and tracker aspect ratio. Future work should investigate the impact of using cold formed structural hollow sections and cross sections with thinner wall thickness which is not part of EN 10210.

  11. Enhancing amplitudes of higher-order eigenmodes of atomic force microscope cantilevers by laser for better mass sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Chu Manh; Duy Vy, Nguyen; Dat, Le Tri; Iida, Takuya

    2017-06-01

    We theoretically study the dynamics of an atomic force microscope cantilever under various irradiation configurations of a laser. By conveying a stream of photons and its momenta, the laser beam whose geometrical intensity profile has a Gaussian form will exert a nonuniform radiation pressure on the cantilever surface and modify its vibration. The dependences of cantilever modeshapes on the laser spot position and waist reveal a possibility of diminishing or exciting a specific eigenmode. For cantilevers of ˜200 µm length, the vibration amplitude of higher-order eigenmodes can be increased 4-5 times. This implies the change in cantilever effective mass once the interaction with the ambient is taken into account. The study gives a deeper understanding of soft cantilever dynamics in liquids and can be applied in the modern measurement configuration where high frequencies are required.

  12. Two or three machined vs roughened surface dental implants loaded immediately supporting total fixed prostheses: 1-year results from a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Cannizzaro, Gioacchino; Gastaldi, Giorgio; Gherlone, Enrico; Vinci, Raffaele; Loi, Ignazio; Trullenque-Eriksson, Anna; Esposito, Marco

    2017-01-01

    To compare implants with machined vs roughened surfaces placed flapless in totally edentulous jaws and immediately restored with metal-resin screw-retained cross-arch prostheses. Mandibles were rehabilitated with two implants (Fixed-on-2 or Fo2) and maxillae with three implants (Fixed-on-3 or Fo3). Forty edentulous or to be rendered edentulous patients (20 in the mandible and 20 in the maxilla) were randomised to the machined group (20 patients: 10 mandibles and 10 maxillae) and to the roughened group (20 patients: 10 mandibles and 10 maxillae) according to a parallel group design. To be immediately loaded implants had to be inserted with a minimum torque of 60 Ncm. Outcome measures were prosthesis and implant failures, complications and peri-implant marginal bone level changes evaluated up to 1 year post-loading. Flaps were raised in four patients from the machined group. Four prostheses on machined implants and three on roughened implants were delayed for loading because a sufficient insertion torque was not obtained. There were no dropouts 1 year after loading. Two maxillary machined implants were lost in two patients (difference in proportions = 0.10; 95% CI = -0.03 to 0.23; P (Fisher's exact test) = 0.487); one maxillary Fo3 prosthesis on machined implants and one mandibular Fo2 prosthesis on roughened implants had to be remade (difference in proportions = 0; 95% CI = -0.14 to 0.14; P (Fisher's exact test) = 1.000). Five patients with machined implants had six complications vs seven patients who had eight complications at roughened implants (difference in proportions = -0.10; 95% CI = -0.38 to 0.18; P (Fisher's exact test) = 0.731). There were no statistically significant differences for implant failures, prosthetic failures or complications between groups. There were no statistically significant differences for marginal peri-implant bone levels between the two groups (estimate of the difference = -0.06 mm; 95% CI = -0.23 to 0.10; P (ANCOVA) = 0.445), with

  13. Clinical performance of anterior resin-bonded fixed dental prostheses with different framework designs: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ya-Ru; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Zhang, Qin; Li, Xiang-Xia; Blatz, Markus B; Jian, Yu-Tao; Zhao, Ke

    2016-04-01

    To systematically review the failure rate and complications of different framework designs of resin-bonded fixed dental prostheses (RBFDPs) in the anterior region. A systematic search for clinical studies on RBFDPs published prior to December 2014 in Medline/PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library databases was conducted and complemented by a manual search. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) as well as prospective and retrospective cohort studies that compared at least two RBFDP framework designs with a minimum of 2 years follow up were included in this review. The quality of the included studies were assessed using the Newcastle-Ottawa scale for cohort studies and Cochrane Handbook for RCT. Prostheses-based data on reported failure rate/survival rate, debonding, and fractures were analyzed by meta-analysis. Of 1010 screened articles, one RCT and 4 cohort studies fit the inclusion criteria and were included in the meta-analysis. All included articles have a high risk of bias. Failure rates of single-retainer cantilever RBFDPs were lower than two-retainer fixed-fixed RBFDPs (OR 0.42, 95% CI 0.19-0.94, P=0.04). Metal-ceramic RBFDPs showed no difference of failure rates between cantilever RBFDPs and two-retainer fixed-fixed RBFDPs (OR 0.93, 95% CI 0.33-2.63, P=0.89). Debonding was not significantly different between cantilever RBFDPs and two-retainer fixed-fixed RBFDPs (OR 0.61, 95% CI 0.23-1.60, P=0.32). Metal-ceramic RBFDPs showed no difference of debonding between cantilever RBFDPs and two-retainer fixed-fixed RBFDPs (OR 0.81, 95% CI 0.28-2.34, P=0.70,). Within the limitations of the present study, cantilever RBFDPs demonstrate lower clinical failure than two-retainer RBFDPs in the anterior region. The failure of metal-ceramic RBFDPs is independent of the framework design, while the failure of all-ceramic RBFDPs with different designs has not been clear yet. Based on the principle of minimally invasive treatment, less number of retainers is recommended for RBFDPs

  14. Integrated motion measurement illustrated by a cantilever beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Örtel, T.; Wagner, J. F.; Saupe, F.

    2013-01-01

    The combination of inertial sensors and satellite navigation receivers like those of GPS (Global Positioning System) represents a very typical integrated navigation system. Integrated navigation is the most common example of integrated motion measurement determining the translational and angular position, velocity, and acceleration of a vehicle. Traditionally, this object is assumed to be a rigid body and the signals of its closely spaced sensors are referenced to a single point of the structure. During periods of low vehicle dynamics such common navigation systems typically show stability problems due to a loss of observability of some of the motion variables. The range of applications for integrated navigation systems can be expanded due to the continuously increasing performance of data processing and cheap sensors. Further, it can be shown that the stability of such a navigation system (i. e. of the motion observer employed for the system, typically a Kalman filter) can be sustained by distributing appropriately additional sensors over the vehicle structures at distinct locations. This comprises the compensation of drift effects of the system by adding sensors that are drift-free and the guarantee of the observability of all estimated motion components. Large structures like airplanes, space stations, skyscrapers, and tower cranes with distributed sensors, however, have to take the flexibility of the structure into account. This includes an appropriate kinematical model of the structure. In this case, the theory of integrated systems has to be expanded to flexible structures. On the other hand, the additional system information obtained can be used not only for vehicle guidance but also for structural control. Within this work individual kinematical models especially of a cantilever beam, idealizing e.g. the wing of an airplane, are developed and investigated with regard to the observability of the motion variables to guarantee a stable integrated system

  15. Synthesis of Si nanowires for MEMS cantilever sensor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokes, S. M.; Arnold, Stephen

    2004-12-01

    We present a new approach for growing Si nanowires directly from a silicon substrate, without the use of a metal catalyst, silicon vapor or CVD gasses. The growth can be performed in a furnace type configuration at moderate temperatures or in localized regions by resistive heating. Since the silicon wires grow directly from the silicon substrate, they do not need to be manipulated nor aligned for subsequent applications. Wires in the 20-50 nm diameter range with lengths over 80 μm can be grown by this technique. We have studied the effects of various growth parameters, including temperature, substrate orientation, initial sample cleaning and carrier gasses. Results indicate that most important parameters in the growth of the nanowires are the surface cleaning, the temperature and the type of carrier gas used. A model is proposed, which involves an oxide catalyst for the process, with the growth of the nanowires enabled by a significantly enhanced silicon surface diffusion process, due to adsorption of hydrogen gas on the substrate surface. These nanowires can be grown locally by resistive heating, and thus they are ideal candidates for direct growth on a MEMS cantilever sensor, where the Si nanowire growth can be performed in such a way that the rest of the structure remains at low temperature, reducing the chance of high temperature damage of already processed regions. The wires, once formed on the MEMS device, can be used as adsorption sites for an NRL sorptive polymer, which is currently being used for nerve gas detection. The addition of the nanowires enhances the surface area significantly and thereby it is expected to improve the detection capability of the MEMS structure.

  16. MicroCantilever (MC) based nanomechanical sensor for detection of molecular interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Kyung

    2011-01-01

    Specific aims of this study are to investigate the mechanism governing surface stress generation associated with chemical or molecular binding on functionalized microcantilevers. Formation of affinity complexes on cantilever surfaces leads to charge redistribution, configurational change and steric hindrance between neighboring molecules resulting in surface stress change and measureable cantilever deformation. A novel interferometry technique employing two adjacent micromachined cantilevers (a sensing/reference pair) was utilized to measure the cantilever deformation. The sensing principle is that binding/reaction of specific chemical or biological species on the sensing cantilever transduces to mechanical deformation. The differential bending of the sensing cantilever respect to the reference cantilever ensures that measured response is insensitive to environmental disturbances. As a proof of principle for the measurement technique, surface stress changes associated with: self-assembly of alkanethiol, hybridization of ssDNA, and the formation of cocaine-aptamer complexes were measured. Dissociation constant (Kd) for each molecular reaction was utilized to estimate the surface coverage of affinity complexes. In the cases of DNA hybridization and cocaine-aptamer binding, measured surface stress was found to be dependent on the surface coverage of the affinity complexes. In order to achieve a better sensitivity for DNA hybridization, immobilization of receptor molecules was modified to enhance the deformation of underlying surface. Single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) strands with thiol-modification on both 3-foot and 5-foot ends were immobilized on the gold surface such that both ends are attached to the gold surface. Immobilization condition was controlled to obtain similar receptor density as single-thiolated DNA strands. Hybridization of double-thiolated DNA strands leads to an almost two orders of magnitude increase in cantilever deformation. In both DNA

  17. A calibration method for lateral forces for use with colloidal probe force microscopy cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintanilla, M. A. S.; Goddard, D. T.

    2008-02-01

    A calibration method is described for colloidal probe cantilevers that enables friction force measurements obtained using lateral force microscopy (LFM) to be quantified. The method is an adaptation of the lever method of Feiler et al. [A. Feiler, P. Attard, and I. Larson, Rev. Sci. Instum. 71, 2746 (2000)] and uses the advantageous positioning of probe particles that are usually offset from the central axis of the cantilever. The main sources of error in the calibration method are assessed, in particular, the potential misalignment of the long axis of the cantilever that ideally should be perpendicular to the photodiode detector. When this is not taken into account, the misalignment is shown to have a significant effect on the cantilever torsional stiffness but not on the lateral photodiode sensitivity. Also, because the friction signal is affected by the topography of the substrate, the method presented is valid only against flat substrates. Two types of particles, 20μm glass beads and UO3 agglomerates attached to silicon tapping mode cantilevers were used to test the method against substrates including glass, cleaved mica, and UO2 single crystals. Comparisons with the lateral compliance method of Cain et al. [R. G. Cain, S. Biggs, and N. W. Page, J. Colloid Interface Sci. 227, 55 (2000)] are also made.

  18. Micromechanical cantilever array sensors for selective fungal immobilization and fast growth detection.

    PubMed

    Nugaeva, Natalia; Gfeller, Karin Y; Backmann, Natalija; Lang, Hans Peter; Düggelin, Marcel; Hegner, Martin

    2005-12-15

    We demonstrate the use of micromechanical cantilever arrays for selective immobilization and fast quantitative detection of vital fungal spores. Micro-fabricated uncoated as well as gold-coated silicon cantilevers were functionalized with concanavalin A, fibronectin or immunoglobulin G. In our experiments two major morphological fungal forms were used--the mycelial form Aspergillus niger and the unicellular yeast form Saccharomyces cerevisiae, as models to explore a new method for growth detection of eukaryotic organisms using cantilever arrays. We exploited the specific biomolecular interactions of surface grafted proteins with the molecular structures on the fungal cell surface. It was found that these proteins have different affinities and efficiencies to bind the spores. Maximum spore immobilization, germination and mycelium growth was observed on the immunoglobulin G functionalized cantilever surfaces. We show that spore immobilization and germination of the mycelial fungus A. niger and yeast S. cerevisiae led to shifts in resonance frequency within a few hours as measured by dynamically operated cantilever arrays, whereas conventional techniques would require several days. The biosensor could detect the target fungi in a range of 10(3) - 10(6) CFUml(-1). The measured shift is proportional to the mass of single fungal spores and can be used to evaluate spore contamination levels. Applications lie in the field of medical and agricultural diagnostics, food- and water-quality monitoring.

  19. Development of the magnetic force-induced dual vibration energy harvester using a unimorph cantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umaba, M.; Nakamachi, E.; Morita, Y.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, a high frequency piezoelectric energy harvester converted from the human low vibrated motion energy was newly developed. This hybrid energy harvester consists of the unimorph piezoelectric cantilever, the pendulum and a pair of permanent magnets. One magnet was attached at the edge of cantilever, and the counterpart magnet at the edge of pendulum. The mechanical energy provided through the human walking motion, which is a typical ubiquitous existence of vibration, is converted to the electric energy via the piezoelectric unimorph cantilever vibration. At first, we studied the energy convert mechanism and analyze the performance of novel energy harvester, where the resonance free vibration of unimorph piezoelectric cantilever generated a high electric power. Next, we equipped the counterpart permanent magnet at the edge of pendulum, which vibrates with a very low frequency caused by the human walking. Then the counterpart magnet was set at the edge of unimorph piezoelectric cantilever, which vibrated with a high frequency. This low-to-high frequency convert "dual vibration system" can be characterized as an enhanced energy harvester. We examined and obtained average values of voltage and power in this system, as 8.31 mV and 0.33 μW. Those results show the possibility to apply for the energy harvester in the portable and implantable Bio-MEMS devices.

  20. Acoustofluidic particle trapping, manipulation, and release using dynamic-mode cantilever sensors.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Blake N; Mutharasan, Raj

    2016-12-19

    We show here that dynamic-mode cantilever sensors enable acoustofluidic fluid mixing and trapping of suspended particles as well as the rapid manipulation and release of trapped micro-particles via mode switching in liquid. Resonant modes of piezoelectric cantilever sensors over the 0 to 8 MHz frequency range are investigated. Sensor impedance response, flow visualization studies using dye and micro-particle tracers (100 μm diameter), and finite element simulations of cantilever modal mechanics and acoustic streaming show fluid mixing and particle trapping configurations depend on the resonant mode shape. We found trapped particles could be: (1) rapidly manipulated on millimeter length scales, and (2) released from the cantilever surface after trapping by switching between low- and high-order resonant modes (less than 250 kHz and greater than 1 MHz, respectively). Such results suggest a potentially promising future for dynamic-mode cantilevers in separations, pumping and mixing applications as well as acoustofluidic-enhanced sensing applications.

  1. Design of piezoelectric MEMS cantilever for low-frequency vibration energy harvester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takei, Ryohei; Makimoto, Natsumi; Okada, Hironao; Itoh, Toshihiro; Kobayashi, Takeshi

    2016-06-01

    We report the design of piezoelectric MEMS cantilevers formed on a silicon-on-insulator wafer to efficiently harvest electrical power from harmonic vibration with a frequency of approximately 30 Hz. Numerical simulation indicates that a >4-µm-thick top silicon layer and >3-µm-thick piezoelectric film are preferable to maximize the output electrical power. An in-plane structure of the cantilever is also designed retaining the footprint of the cantilever. The simulation results indicate that the output power is maximized when the length ratio of the proof mass to the cantilever beam is 1.5. To ensure the accuracy of the simulation, we fabricated and characterized cantilevers with a 10-µm-thick top silicon layer and a 1.8-µm-thick piezoelectric film, resulting in 0.21 µW at a vibration of 0.5 m/s2 and 25.1 Hz. The measured output power is in agreement with the simulated value, meaning that the design is significantly reliable for low-frequency vibration energy harvesters.

  2. Measurement and reliability issues in resonant mode cantilever for bio-sensing application in fluid medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kathel, G.; Shajahan, M. S.; Bhadra, P.; Prabhakar, A.; Chadha, A.; Bhattacharya, E.

    2016-09-01

    Cantilevers immersed in liquid experience viscous damping and hydrodynamic loading. We report on the use of such cantilevers, operating in the dynamic mode with, (i) frequency sweeping and (ii) phase locked loop methods. The solution to reliability issues such as random drift in the resonant peak values, and interference of spurious modes in the resonance frequency spectrum, are explained based on the actuation signal provided and laser spot size. The laser beam spot size and its position on the cantilever were found to have an important role, on the output signal and resonance frequency. We describe a method to distinguish the normal modes from the spurious modes for a cantilever. Uncertainties in the measurements define the lower limit of mass detection (m min). The minimum detection limits of the two measurement methods are investigated by measuring salt adsorption from phosphate buffer solution, as an example, a mass of 14 pg was measured using the 14th transverse mode of a 500~μ m  ×  100 μm  ×  1 μm silicon cantilever. The optimized measurement was used to study the interaction between antibody and antigen.

  3. Numerical investigation of band gaps in 3D printed cantilever-in-mass metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Awais; Li, Bing; Tan, K. T.

    2016-01-01

    In this research, the negative effective mass behavior of elastic/mechanical metamaterials is exhibited by a cantilever-in-mass structure as a proposed design for creating frequency stopping band gaps, based on local resonance of the internal structure. The mass-in-mass unit cell model is transformed into a cantilever-in-mass model using the Bernoulli-Euler beam theory. An analytical model of the cantilever-in-mass structure is derived and the effects of geometrical dimensions and material parameters to create frequency band gaps are examined. A two-dimensional finite element model is created to validate the analytical results, and excellent agreement is achieved. The analytical model establishes an easily tunable metamaterial design to realize wave attenuation based on locally resonant frequency. To demonstrate feasibility for 3D printing, the analytical model is employed to design and fabricate 3D printable mechanical metamaterial. A three-dimensional numerical experiment is performed using COMSOL Multiphysics to validate the wave attenuation performance. Results show that the cantilever-in-mass metamaterial is capable of mitigating stress waves at the desired resonance frequency. Our study successfully presents the use of one constituent material to create a 3D printed cantilever-in-mass metamaterial with negative effective mass density for stress wave mitigation purposes. PMID:27329828

  4. Numerical investigation of band gaps in 3D printed cantilever-in-mass metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qureshi, Awais; Li, Bing; Tan, K. T.

    2016-06-01

    In this research, the negative effective mass behavior of elastic/mechanical metamaterials is exhibited by a cantilever-in-mass structure as a proposed design for creating frequency stopping band gaps, based on local resonance of the internal structure. The mass-in-mass unit cell model is transformed into a cantilever-in-mass model using the Bernoulli-Euler beam theory. An analytical model of the cantilever-in-mass structure is derived and the effects of geometrical dimensions and material parameters to create frequency band gaps are examined. A two-dimensional finite element model is created to validate the analytical results, and excellent agreement is achieved. The analytical model establishes an easily tunable metamaterial design to realize wave attenuation based on locally resonant frequency. To demonstrate feasibility for 3D printing, the analytical model is employed to design and fabricate 3D printable mechanical metamaterial. A three-dimensional numerical experiment is performed using COMSOL Multiphysics to validate the wave attenuation performance. Results show that the cantilever-in-mass metamaterial is capable of mitigating stress waves at the desired resonance frequency. Our study successfully presents the use of one constituent material to create a 3D printed cantilever-in-mass metamaterial with negative effective mass density for stress wave mitigation purposes.

  5. Design Optimization of PZT-Based Piezoelectric Cantilever Beam by Using Computational Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jihoon; Park, Sanghyun; Lim, Woochul; Jang, Junyong; Lee, Tae Hee; Hong, Seong Kwang; Song, Yewon; Sung, Tae Hyun

    2016-08-01

    Piezoelectric energy harvesting is gaining huge research interest since it provides high power density and has real-life applicability. However, investigative research for the mechanical-electrical coupling phenomenon remains challenging. Many researchers depend on physical experiments to choose devices with the best performance which meet design objectives through case analysis; this involves high design costs. This study aims to develop a practical model using computer simulations and to propose an optimized design for a lead zirconate titanate (PZT)-based piezoelectric cantilever beam which is widely used in energy harvesting. In this study, the commercial finite element (FE) software is used to predict the voltage generated from vibrations of the PZT-based piezoelectric cantilever beam. Because the initial FE model differs from physical experiments, the model is calibrated by multi-objective optimization to increase the accuracy of the predictions. We collect data from physical experiments using the cantilever beam and use these experimental results in the calibration process. Since dynamic analysis in the FE analysis of the piezoelectric cantilever beam with a dense step size is considerably time-consuming, a surrogate model is employed for efficient optimization. Through the design optimization of the PZT-based piezoelectric cantilever beam, a high-performance piezoelectric device was developed. The sensitivity of the variables at the optimum design is analyzed to suggest a further improved device.

  6. Signal enhancement in cantilever magnetometry based on a co-resonantly coupled sensor

    PubMed Central

    Körner, Julia; Reiche, Christopher F; Gemming, Thomas; Büchner, Bernd; Gerlach, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    Summary Cantilever magnetometry is a measurement technique used to study magnetic nanoparticles. With decreasing sample size, the signal strength is significantly reduced, requiring advances of the technique. Ultrathin and slender cantilevers can address this challenge but lead to increased complexity of detection. We present an approach based on the co-resonant coupling of a micro- and a nanometer-sized cantilever. Via matching of the resonance frequencies of the two subsystems we induce a strong interplay between the oscillations of the two cantilevers, allowing for a detection of interactions between the sensitive nanocantilever and external influences in the amplitude response curve of the microcantilever. In our magnetometry experiment we used an iron-filled carbon nanotube acting simultaneously as nanocantilever and magnetic sample. Measurements revealed an enhancement of the commonly used frequency shift signal by five orders of magnitude compared to conventional cantilever magnetometry experiments with similar nanomagnets. With this experiment we do not only demonstrate the functionality of our sensor design but also its potential for very sensitive magnetometry measurements while maintaining a facile oscillation detection with a conventional microcantilever setup. PMID:27547621

  7. Position and mode dependent optical detection back-action in cantilever beam resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, T.; Schmid, S.; Dohn, S.; Sader, J. E.; Boisen, A.; Villanueva, L. G.

    2017-03-01

    Optical detection back-action in cantilever resonant or static detection presents a challenge when striving for state-of-the-art performance. The origin and possible routes for minimizing optical back-action have received little attention in literature. Here, we investigate the position and mode dependent optical back-action on cantilever beam resonators. A high power heating laser (100 µW) is scanned across a silicon nitride cantilever while its effect on the first three resonance modes is detected via a low-power readout laser (1 µW) positioned at the cantilever tip. We find that the measured effect of back-action is not only dependent on position but also the shape of the resonance mode. Relevant silicon nitride material parameters are extracted by fitting finite element (FE) simulations to the temperature-dependent frequency response of the first three modes. In a second round of simulations, using the extracted parameters, we successfully fit the FEM results with the measured mode and position dependent back-action. From the simulations, we can conclude that the observed frequency tuning is due to temperature induced changes in stress. Effects of changes in material properties and dimensions are negligible. Finally, different routes for minimizing the effect of this optical detection back-action are described, allowing further improvements of cantilever-based sensing in general.

  8. Cantilever-based mass sensor for immunodetection of multiple bioactive targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Tang; Xu, Bai; Welch, John; Castracane, James

    2003-12-01

    We are investigating the development of a rapid and highly sensitive detection method for immunoreactive substances combining MEMS (Micro Electro Mechanical Systems) technology and the appropriate immune stimulant or response factors. Cantilevers of micrometer scale can be used for trace detection of mass change. When a layer of an antigenic substance is covalently deposited, the cantilever is capable of capturing antibodies from samples with high affinity and specificity. The antigen/antibody binding causes multiple physical changes in the cantilever device, including a shift of effective mass and a change in surface tension. The change of effective mass consequently induces a shift in the cantilever"s natural resonant frequency. By monitoring these changes with an optical readout mechanism, the presence of immunoreactive targets in the sample can be detected. This detection method can be used for various types of targets with immunoreactivity and therefore is potentially applicable in hazardous substance monitoring and disease diagnosis. In our effort, phoS1, an antigen shed by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB), is utilized for rapid and economic TB detection.

  9. Cantilever-based mass sensor for immunodetection of multiple bioactive targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Tang; Xu, Bai; Welch, John; Castracane, James

    2004-01-01

    We are investigating the development of a rapid and highly sensitive detection method for immunoreactive substances combining MEMS (Micro Electro Mechanical Systems) technology and the appropriate immune stimulant or response factors. Cantilevers of micrometer scale can be used for trace detection of mass change. When a layer of an antigenic substance is covalently deposited, the cantilever is capable of capturing antibodies from samples with high affinity and specificity. The antigen/antibody binding causes multiple physical changes in the cantilever device, including a shift of effective mass and a change in surface tension. The change of effective mass consequently induces a shift in the cantilever"s natural resonant frequency. By monitoring these changes with an optical readout mechanism, the presence of immunoreactive targets in the sample can be detected. This detection method can be used for various types of targets with immunoreactivity and therefore is potentially applicable in hazardous substance monitoring and disease diagnosis. In our effort, phoS1, an antigen shed by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB), is utilized for rapid and economic TB detection.

  10. Effect of Chamber Pressure on the Vibrational Properties of Micro- and Nano-Cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keskar, Gayatri; Gaillard, Jay; Taylor, Jonathan; Skove, Malcolm; Rao, Apparao

    2007-03-01

    We have studied the nonlinear dynamics of micro- and nano-cantilevers under varying ambient conditions using the Harmonic Detection of Resonance technique (HDR)^1. In our studies, a cantilever is either microstructure shaped like a diving board, or a cantilevered MWNT. In this work, we report the dependence of the amplitude and Q of a silicon microcantilever (300 μm long, 35 μm wide, 2 μm thick) on ambient pressure. An environment of air at a pressure of 10-3 Torr gives a high quality factor of ˜7000. The response of higher harmonics of the ac voltage that drives the cantilever is also observed with varying chamber pressure. An investigation of the influence of ac and dc voltages on sensitivity shows very good agreement with a model calculation. The shift in the resonant frequency of cantilevers under different environments such as helium, air and argon at different pressures will be discussed. References: 1. J. Gaillard, M. J. Skove, R. Ciocan, and A. M. Rao, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 77, 073907 (2006). Contact Info: arao@clemson.edu

  11. Fabrication and characterization of large arrays of mesoscopic gold rings on large-aspect-ratio cantilevers

    SciTech Connect

    Ngo, D. Q.; Petković, I. Lollo, A.; Castellanos-Beltran, M. A.; Harris, J. G. E.

    2014-10-15

    We have fabricated large arrays of mesoscopic metal rings on ultrasensitive cantilevers. The arrays are defined by electron beam lithography and contain up to 10{sup 5} rings. The rings have a circumference of 1 μm, and are made of ultrapure (6N) Au that is deposited onto a silicon-on-insulator wafer without an adhesion layer. Subsequent processing of the SOI wafer results in each array being supported at the end of a free-standing cantilever. To accommodate the large arrays while maintaining a low spring constant, the cantilevers are nearly 1 mm in both lateral dimensions and 100 nm thick. The extreme aspect ratio of the cantilevers, the large array size, and the absence of a sticking layer are intended to enable measurements of the rings' average persistent current in the presence of relatively small magnetic fields. We describe the motivation for these measurements, the fabrication of the devices, and the characterization of the cantilevers' mechanical properties. We also discuss the devices' expected performance in measurements of .

  12. A calibration method for lateral forces for use with colloidal probe force microscopy cantilevers

    SciTech Connect

    Quintanilla, M. A. S.; Goddard, D. T.

    2008-02-15

    A calibration method is described for colloidal probe cantilevers that enables friction force measurements obtained using lateral force microscopy (LFM) to be quantified. The method is an adaptation of the lever method of Feiler et al. [A. Feiler, P. Attard, and I. Larson, Rev. Sci. Instum. 71, 2746 (2000)] and uses the advantageous positioning of probe particles that are usually offset from the central axis of the cantilever. The main sources of error in the calibration method are assessed, in particular, the potential misalignment of the long axis of the cantilever that ideally should be perpendicular to the photodiode detector. When this is not taken into account, the misalignment is shown to have a significant effect on the cantilever torsional stiffness but not on the lateral photodiode sensitivity. Also, because the friction signal is affected by the topography of the substrate, the method presented is valid only against flat substrates. Two types of particles, 20 {mu}m glass beads and UO{sub 3} agglomerates attached to silicon tapping mode cantilevers were used to test the method against substrates including glass, cleaved mica, and UO{sub 2} single crystals. Comparisons with the lateral compliance method of Cain et al. [R. G. Cain, S. Biggs, and N. W. Page, J. Colloid Interface Sci. 227, 55 (2000)] are also made.

  13. On the classification of normalized natural frequencies for damage detection in cantilever beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahak, Mustapha; Touat, Noureddine; Benseddiq, Noureddine

    2017-08-01

    The presence of a damage on a beam causes changes in the physical properties, which introduce flexibility, and reduce the natural frequencies of the beam. Based on this, a new method is proposed to locate the damage zone in a cantilever beam. In this paper, the cantilever beam is discretized into a number of zones, where each zone has a specific classification of the first four normalized natural frequencies. The damaged zone is distinguished by only the classification of the normalized frequencies of the structure. In the case when the damage is symmetric to the vibration node, we use the unchanged natural frequency as a second information to obtain a more accurate location. The effectiveness of the proposed method is shown by a numerical simulation with ANSYS software and experimental investigation of a cantilever beam with different damage.

  14. Method and apparatus for sensing the natural frequency of a cantilevered body

    DOEpatents

    Duncan, Michael G.

    2000-01-01

    A method and apparatus for measuring the natural resonant frequency of a spring element by monitoring a phase difference between an output signal from the spring element and an input signal to the spring element and by adjusting frequency of the input signal until a detected phase difference signals that the natural resonant frequency has been reached. The method and apparatus are applied to a micro-cantilevered elements used to measure gas compositions and concentrations. Such elements are provided with coatings that absorb gas to cause deflections and changes in the mass or spring constant of the cantilevered element. These changes correspond to changes in the natural resonant frequency of the cantilevered element which are measured using the method and apparatus described herein.

  15. Fabrication of high-density cantilever arrays and through-wafer interconnects

    SciTech Connect

    A. Harley, J.; Abdollahi-Alibeik, S.; Chow, E. M.; Kenney, T. W.; McCarthy, A. M.; McVittie, J. P.; Partridge; Quate, C. F.; Soh, H. T.

    1998-11-03

    Processes to fabricate dense, dry released microstructures with electrical connections on the opposite side of the wafer are described. A 10 x 10 array of silicon and polysilicon cantilevers with high packing density (5 tips/mm2) and high uniformity (<10 µm length variation across the wafer) are demonstrated. The cantilever release process uses a deep SF6/C4F8, plasma etch followed by a HBr plasma etch to accurately release cantilevers. A process for fabricating electrical contacts through the backside of the wafer is also described. Electrodeposited resist, conformal CVD metal deposition and deep SF6/C4F8 plasma etching are used to make 30 µm/side square vias each of which has a resistance of 50 m(omega).

  16. Active vibration control of flexible cantilever plates using piezoelectric materials and artificial neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdeljaber, Osama; Avci, Onur; Inman, Daniel J.

    2016-02-01

    The study presented in this paper introduces a new intelligent methodology to mitigate the vibration response of flexible cantilever plates. The use of the piezoelectric sensor/actuator pairs for active control of plates is discussed. An intelligent neural network based controller is designed to control the optimal voltage applied on the piezoelectric patches. The control technique utilizes a neurocontroller along with a Kalman Filter to compute the appropriate actuator command. The neurocontroller is trained based on an algorithm that incorporates a set of emulator neural networks which are also trained to predict the future response of the cantilever plate. Then, the neurocontroller is evaluated by comparing the uncontrolled and controlled responses under several types of dynamic excitations. It is observed that the neurocontroller reduced the vibration response of the flexible cantilever plate significantly; the results demonstrated the success and robustness of the neurocontroller independent of the type and distribution of the excitation force.

  17. High-speed imaging upgrade for a standard sample scanning atomic force microscope using small cantilevers

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Jonathan D.; Nievergelt, Adrian; Erickson, Blake W.; Yang, Chen; Dukic, Maja; Fantner, Georg E.

    2014-09-15

    We present an atomic force microscope (AFM) head for optical beam deflection on small cantilevers. Our AFM head is designed to be small in size, easily integrated into a commercial AFM system, and has a modular architecture facilitating exchange of the optical and electronic assemblies. We present two different designs for both the optical beam deflection and the electronic readout systems, and evaluate their performance. Using small cantilevers with our AFM head on an otherwise unmodified commercial AFM system, we are able to take tapping mode images approximately 5–10 times faster compared to the same AFM system using large cantilevers. By using additional scanner turnaround resonance compensation and a controller designed for high-speed AFM imaging, we show tapping mode imaging of lipid bilayers at line scan rates of 100–500 Hz for scan areas of several micrometers in size.

  18. Design optimization of piezoresistive cantilevers for force sensing in air and water

    PubMed Central

    Doll, Joseph C.; Park, Sung-Jin; Pruitt, Beth L.

    2009-01-01

    Piezoresistive cantilevers fabricated from doped silicon or metal films are commonly used for force, topography, and chemical sensing at the micro- and macroscales. Proper design is required to optimize the achievable resolution by maximizing sensitivity while simultaneously minimizing the integrated noise over the bandwidth of interest. Existing analytical design methods are insufficient for modeling complex dopant profiles, design constraints, and nonlinear phenomena such as damping in fluid. Here we present an optimization method based on an analytical piezoresistive cantilever model. We use an existing iterative optimizer to minimimize a performance goal, such as minimum detectable force. The design tool is available as open source software. Optimal cantilever design and performance are found to strongly depend on the measurement bandwidth and the constraints applied. We discuss results for silicon piezoresistors fabricated by epitaxy and diffusion, but the method can be applied to any dopant profile or material which can be modeled in a similar fashion or extended to other microelectromechanical systems. PMID:19865512

  19. Evaluation of critical interlaminar SIF of DCB specimen made of slender cantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, S. K.; Kumar, Prashant; Kishore, N. N.; Potty, P. K. Kesavan

    1995-02-01

    A method has been developed involving combined numerical and experimental techniques to evaluate interlaminar fracture toughness (K(sub 1c)) of the double cantilever beam specimen with slender cantilevers. Using FEM, a relationship is developed between the critical stress intensity factor and strain at a point near the crack tip. The strain is measured through a strain gauge of 0.2 mm gauge length. The location and the orientation for the strain gauge are optimized by the numerical analysis. Experiments were conducted on a DCB specimen prepared by bonding two thin plates of a hardened steel alloy. K(sub 1c) of the interlaminar crack was determined by (1) the combined numencal and experimental technique knowing the strain near the crack tip; and (2) the numerical method knowing the loads at the cantilever ends. The experimental results were found to be within 18 percent of the predicted values.

  20. Gravimetric measurements with use of a cantilever for controlling of electrochemical deposition processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokaryn, Piotr; Janus, Pawel; Zajac, Jerzy; Sierakowski, Andrzej; Domanski, Krzysztof; Grabiec, Piotr

    2016-11-01

    In this paper we describe the method for monitoring the progress of electrochemical deposition process. The procedure allows to control the deposition of metals as well as conductive polymers on metallic seed layer. The method is particularly useful to very thin layers (1-10 nm) of deposited medium which mechanical or optical methods are troublesome for. In this method deposit is grown on the target and on the test silicon micro-cantilever with a metal pad. Galvanic deposition on the cantilever causes the change of its mass and consequently the change of its resonance frequency. Changes of the frequency is measured with laser vibro-meter then the layer thicknesses can be estimated basing on the cantilever calibration curve. Applying this method for controlling of gold deposition on platinum seed layer, for improving the properties of the biochemical sensors, is described in this paper.

  1. Vertical chip-to-chip coupling between silicon photonic integrated circuits using cantilever couplers.

    PubMed

    Sun, Peng; Reano, Ronald M

    2011-02-28

    We demonstrate vertical chip-to-chip light coupling using silicon strip waveguide cantilever couplers. The guided-wave couplers consist of silicon strip waveguides embedded within silicon dioxide cantilevers. The cantilevers deflect 90° out-of-plane via residual stress, allowing vertical light coupling between separate chips. A chip-to-chip coupling loss of 2.5 dB per connection is measured for TE polarization and 1.1 dB for TM polarization at 1550 nm wavelength. The coupling loss varies by less than±0.8 dB within the wavelength range from 1500 nm to 1565 nm for both polarizations. The couplers enable broadband and compact system architectures involving high speed vertical data transport between photonic integrated circuits.

  2. Fast optical cooling of a nanomechanical cantilever by a dynamical Stark-shift gate

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Leilei; Zhang, Jian-Qi; Zhang, Shuo; Feng, Mang

    2015-01-01

    The efficient cooling of nanomechanical resonators is essential to exploration of quantum properties of the macroscopic or mesoscopic systems. We propose such a laser-cooling scheme for a nanomechanical cantilever, which works even for the low-frequency mechanical mode and under weak cooling lasers. The cantilever is coupled by a diamond nitrogen-vacancy center under a strong magnetic field gradient and the cooling is assisted by a dynamical Stark-shift gate. Our scheme can effectively enhance the desired cooling efficiency by avoiding the off-resonant and undesired carrier transitions, and thereby cool the cantilever down to the vicinity of the vibrational ground state in a fast fashion. PMID:26455901

  3. Design and experimental evaluation of flextensional-cantilever based piezoelectric transducers for flow energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyeong Jae; Sherrit, Stewart; Tosi, Luis Phillipe; Colonius, Tim

    2016-04-01

    Cantilever type piezoelectric harvesters, such as bimorphs, are typically used for vibration induced energy harvesting. However, a major drawback of a piezoelectric bimorph is its brittle nature in harsh environments, precipitating short life-times as well as output power degradation. The emphasis in this work is to design robust, highly efficient piezoelectric harvesters that are capable of generating electrical power in the milliwatt range. Various harvesters were modeled, designed and prototyped, and the flextensional actuator based harvester, where the metal cantilever is mounted and coupled between two flextensional actuators, was found to be a viable alternative to the cantilever type piezoelectric harvesters. Preliminary tests show that these devices equipped with 5x5x36 mm two piezoelectric PZT stacks can produce greater than 50 mW of power under air flow induced vibrations.

  4. Lateral force microscope calibration using a modified atomic force microscope cantilever

    SciTech Connect

    Reitsma, M. G.

    2007-10-15

    A proof-of-concept study is presented for a prototype atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever and associated calibration procedure that provide a path for quantitative friction measurement using a lateral force microscope (LFM). The calibration procedure is based on the method proposed by Feiler et al. [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 71, 2746 (2000)] but allows for calibration and friction measurements to be carried out in situ and with greater precision. The modified AFM cantilever is equipped with lateral lever arms that facilitate the application of normal and lateral forces, comparable to those acting in a typical LFM friction experiment. The technique allows the user to select acceptable precision via a potentially unlimited number of calibration measurements across the full working range of the LFM photodetector. A microfabricated version of the cantilever would be compatible with typical commercial AFM instrumentation and allow for common AFM techniques such as topography imaging and other surface force measurements to be performed.

  5. The dynamic behavior of a cantilever beam coupled to a non-ideal unbalanced motor through numerical and experimental analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, P. J. P.; Silveira, M.; Pontes Junior, B. R.; Balthazar, J. M.

    2014-09-01

    An excitation force that is not influenced by the system state is said to be an ideal energy source. In real situations, a direct and feedback coupling between the excitation source and the system must always exist at a certain level. This manifestation of the law of conservation of energy is known as the Sommerfeld effect. In the case of obtaining a mathematical model for such a system, additional equations are usually necessary to describe the vibration sources with limited power and its coupling with the mechanical system. In this work, a cantilever beam and a non-ideal DC motor fixed to its free end are analyzed. The motor has an unbalanced mass that provides excitation to the system which is proportional to the current applied to the motor. During the coast up operation of the motor, if the drive power is increased slowly, making the excitation frequency pass through the first natural frequency of the beam, the DC motor speed will remain the same until it suddenly jumps to a much higher value (simultaneously its amplitude jumps to a much lower value) upon exceeding a critical input power. It was found that the Sommerfeld effect depends on some system parameters and the motor operational procedures. These parameters are explored to avoid the resonance capture in the Sommerfeld effect. Numerical simulations and experimental tests are used to help gather insight of this dynamic behavior.

  6. Dynamic characterization of small fibers based on the flexural vibrations of a piezoelectric cantilever probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaofei; Ye, Xuan; Li, Xide

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we present a cantilever-probe system excited by a piezoelectric actuator, and use it to measure the dynamic mechanical properties of a micro- and nanoscale fiber. Coupling the fiber to the free end of the cantilever probe, we found the dynamic stiffness and damping coefficient of the fiber from the resonance frequency and the quality factor of the fiber-cantilever-probe system. The properties of Bacillus subtilis fibers measured using our proposed system agreed with tensile measurements, validating our method. Our measurements show that the piezoelectric actuator coupled to cantilever probe can be made equivalent to a clamped cantilever with an effective length, and calculated results show that the errors of measured natural frequency of the system can be ignored if the coupled fiber has an inclination angle of alignment of less than 10°. A sensitivity analysis indicates that the first or second resonant mode is the sensitive mode to test the sample’s dynamic stiffness, while the damping property has different sensitivities for the first four modes. Our theoretical analysis demonstrates that the double-cantilever probe is also an effective sensitive structure that can be used to perform dynamic loading and characterize dynamic response. Our method has the advantage of using amplitude-frequency curves to obtain the dynamic mechanical properties without directly measuring displacements and forces as in tensile tests, and it also avoids the effects of the complex surface structure and deformation presenting in contact resonance method. Our method is effective for measuring the dynamic mechanical properties of fiber-like one-dimensional (1D) materials.

  7. Growth and sculpting of Co nano-strings on Si micro-cantilevers: magneto-mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Madurga, V; Favieres, C; Vergara, J

    2010-03-05

    Si micro-cantilevers were coated with Co nano-strings, which were simultaneously grown and sculpted during off-normal pulsed laser deposition. The surface morphology of micro-cantilevers with longitudinal or transverse nano-strings was analysed by scanning tunnelling microscopy. Magnetic anisotropy was detected with a magnetization direction parallel to the nano-strings. The two micro-cantilever types exhibited different mechanical behaviours when placed in a non-uniform magnetic field. By varying the relative position of the micro-cantilever with respect to the gradient direction of this field, a split in the resonant frequency shift of the micro-cantilevers was generated, depending on the direction of magnetic anisotropy. Discrimination was achieved between the micro-cantilevers with transverse nano-strings and the micro-cantilevers with longitudinal nano-strings. The lowest limit of magnetic moment for distinction between these covered micro-cantilevers was 10(-8) emu. The possible benefits of these magneto-mechanical properties for the biological, chemical and physical applications of some nano-mechanical devices are pointed out.

  8. Design and fabrication of vibration based energy harvester using microelectromechanical system piezoelectric cantilever for low power applications.

    PubMed

    Kim, Moonkeun; Lee, Sang-Kyun; Yang, Yil Suk; Jeong, Jaehwa; Min, Nam Ki; Kwon, Kwang-Ho

    2013-12-01

    We fabricated dual-beam cantilevers on the microelectromechanical system (MEMS) scale with an integrated Si proof mass. A Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 (PZT) cantilever was designed as a mechanical vibration energy-harvesting system for low power applications. The resonant frequency of the multilayer composition cantilevers were simulated using the finite element method (FEM) with parametric analysis carried out in the design process. According to simulations, the resonant frequency, voltage, and average power of a dual-beam cantilever was 69.1 Hz, 113.9 mV, and 0.303 microW, respectively, at optimal resistance and 0.5 g (gravitational acceleration, m/s2). Based on these data, we subsequently fabricated cantilever devices using dual-beam cantilevers. The harvested power density of the dual-beam cantilever compared favorably with the simulation. Experiments revealed the resonant frequency, voltage, and average power density to be 78.7 Hz, 118.5 mV, and 0.34 microW, respectively. The error between the measured and simulated results was about 10%. The maximum average power and power density of the fabricated dual-beam cantilever at 1 g were 0.803 microW and 1322.80 microW cm(-3), respectively. Furthermore, the possibility of a MEMS-scale power source for energy conversion experiments was also tested.

  9. Cantilever Beam Static and Dynamic Response Comparison with Mid-Point Bending for Thin MDF composite Panels

    Treesearch

    John F. Hunt; Houjiang Zhang; Zhiren Guo; Feng Fu

    2013-01-01

    A new cantilever beam apparatus has been developed to measure static and vibrational properties of small and thin samples of wood or composite panels. The apparatus applies a known displacement to a cantilever beam, measures its static load, then releases it into its natural first mode of transverse vibration. Free vibrational tip displacements as a function of time...

  10. Future Fixed Target Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Melnitchouk, Wolodymyr

    2009-01-01

    We review plans for future fixed target lepton- and hadron-scattering facilities, including the 12 GeV upgraded CEBAF accelerator at Jefferson Lab, neutrino beam facilities at Fermilab, and the antiproton PANDA facility at FAIR. We also briefly review recent theoretical developments which will aid in the interpretation of the data expected from these facilities.

  11. Fixing Dataset Search

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynnes, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Three current search engines are queried for ozone data at the GES DISC. The results range from sub-optimal to counter-intuitive. We propose a method to fix dataset search by implementing a robust relevancy ranking scheme. The relevancy ranking scheme is based on several heuristics culled from more than 20 years of helping users select datasets.

  12. Fixed mount wavefront sensor

    DOEpatents

    Neal, Daniel R.

    2000-01-01

    A rigid mount and method of mounting for a wavefront sensor. A wavefront dissector, such as a lenslet array, is rigidly mounted at a fixed distance relative to an imager, such as a CCD camera, without need for a relay imaging lens therebetween.

  13. In vacuo elastodynamics of a flexible cantilever for wideband energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, D.; Erturk, A.

    2016-04-01

    We explore the potential for bandwidth enhancement by merely exploiting the hardening nonlinearity of a flexible cantilever. To date, this cubic hardening behavior has been minor due to dissipative effects, especially fluid drag. The goal here is to minimize the fluid damping and thereby achieve the jump phenomenon. A vacuum setup that is compatible with the armature of a long-stroke shaker is employed. Experiments are conducted for a range of air pressure and base excitation levels. The overall nonlinear non-conservative elastodynamics of the cantilever is also modeled and experimentally validated by empirically accounting for fluid damping.

  14. Detecting the golgi protein 73 of liver cancer with micro cantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thanh Tuyen Le, Thi; Pham, Van Tho; Nhat Khoa Phan, Thanh; Binh Pham, Van; Thao Le, Van; Hien Tong, Duy

    2014-12-01

    Golgi protein 73 (GP73) is a potential serum biomarker used in diagnosing human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Compared to alpha-fetoprotein, detection of GP73 is expected to give better sensitivity and specificity and thus offers a better method for diagnosis of HCC at an early stage. In this paper, silicon nitride microcantilever was used to detect GP73. The cantilever was modified through many steps to contain antibody of GP73. The result shows that the cantilever can be used as a label-free sensor to detect this kind of biomarker.

  15. Fast optical cooling of nanomechanical cantilever with the dynamical Zeeman effect.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian-Qi; Zhang, Shuo; Zou, Jin-Hua; Chen, Liang; Yang, Wen; Li, Yong; Feng, Mang

    2013-12-02

    We propose an efficient optical electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) cooling scheme for a cantilever with a nitrogen-vacancy center attached in a non-uniform magnetic field using dynamical Zeeman effect. In our scheme, the Zeeman effect combined with the quantum interference effect enhances the desired cooling transition and suppresses the undesired heating transitions. As a result, the cantilever can be cooled down to nearly the vibrational ground state under realistic experimental conditions within a short time. This efficient optical EIT cooling scheme can be reduced to the typical EIT cooling scheme under special conditions.

  16. Microfabricated Cantilevers Based on Sputtered Thin-Film Ni50Ti50 Shape Memory Alloy (SMA)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    Ni50Ti50 Cantilever 2 3. Results and Discussion 3 3.1 Wet-Etch Patterning NiTi 3 3.2 Dry-Etch Release of NiTi Devices 5 3.3 Thermal Actuation of... NiTi Cantilevers 6 4. Conclusions 8 5. References 9 List of Symbols, Abbreviations, and Acronyms 11 Distribution List 12 iv List of Figures...2 Fig. 2 SEMs after the NiTi wet-etch patterning with HF .................................3 Fig. 3 SEMs after NiTi wet

  17. Characterization of a two-dimensional cantilever array with through-wafer electrical interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, Eugene M.; Yaralioglu, Goksen G.; Quate, Calvin F.; Kenny, Thomas W.

    2002-01-01

    The characterization of two-dimensional micromachined silicon cantilever arrays with integrated through-wafer electrical interconnects is presented. The approach addresses alignment and density issues associated with operating two-dimensional scanning probe arrays. The tungsten based interconnect (30 μm diameter, 1 Ω resistance) is shown not to degrade the sensitivity of the piezoresistive deflection sensor embedded on each cantilever. Operation of the array (up to 2×7) as a microscope for imaging large areas (3.8×0.45 mm2) and with vertical row stitching is demonstrated with images of samples orders of magnitude larger than images possible with standard atomic force microscope techniques.

  18. Novel Method of Measuring Cantilever Deflection during an AFM Force Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Hlady, V.; Pierce, M.; Pungor, A.

    2012-01-01

    A combination of a reflection interference contrast microscope (RICM) and the atomic force microscope (AFM) was used to monitor the cantilever–surface separation distance during force measurements using the streptavidin–biotin recognition pairs. The RICM showed that the cantilever loses contact with the surface before the final rupture of the adhesive bonds is measured by the AFM detection system. This finding suggests that the immobilization of biotin by physisorbed albumin and subsequent binding of streptavidin might have created a cross-linked protein network whose cohesion is tested by the AFM cantilever with the immobilized biotin ligands. PMID:25132721

  19. Vibrations of cantilevered circular cylindrical shells Shallow versus deep shell theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. K.; Leissa, A. W.; Wang, A. J.

    1983-01-01

    Free vibrations of cantilevered circular cylindrical shells having rectangular planforms are studied in this paper by means of the Ritz method. The deep shell theory of Novozhilov and Goldenveizer is used and compared with the usual shallow shell theory for a wide range of shell parameters. A thorough convergence study is presented along with comparisons to previously published finite element solutions and experimental results. Accurately computed frequency parameters and mode shapes for various shell configurations are presented. The present paper appears to be the first comprehensive study presenting rigorous comparisons between the two shell theories in dealing with free vibrations of cantilevered cylindrical shells.

  20. Note: Aligned deposition and modal characterization of micron and submicron poly(methyl methacyrlate) fiber cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Nain, Amrinder S; Filiz, Sinan; Ozdoganlar, O Burak; Sitti, Metin; Amon, Cristina

    2010-01-01

    Polymeric micro-/nanofibers are finding increasing use as sensors for novel applications. Here, we demonstrate the ability to deposit an array of poly(methyl methacyrlate) fibers with micron and submicron diameters in aligned configurations on customized piezoelectric shakers. Using lateral motion of an atomic force microscope tip, fibers are broken to obtain fiber cantilevers of high aspect ratio (length/diameter > 20). The resonant frequencies of fabricated microfiber cantilevers are experimentally measured using a laser Doppler vibrometer. An average Young's modulus of 3.5 GPa and quality factor of 20 were estimated from the experimentally obtained frequency responses.

  1. Performance evaluation and parametric analysis on cantilevered ramp injector in supersonic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei; Li, Shi-bin; Yan, Li; Wang, Zhen-guo

    2013-03-01

    The cantilevered ramp injector is one of the most promising candidates for the mixing enhancement between the fuel and the supersonic air, and its parametric analysis has drawn an increasing attention of researchers. The flow field characteristics and the drag force of the cantilevered ramp injector in the supersonic flow with the freestream Mach number 2.0 have been investigated numerically, and the predicted injectant mole fraction and static pressure profiles have been compared with the available experimental data in the open literature. At the same time, the grid independency analysis has been performed by using the coarse, the moderate and the refined grid scales, and the influence of the turbulence model on the flow field of the cantilevered ramp injector has been carried on as well. Further, the effects of the swept angle, the ramp angle and the length of the step on the performance of the cantilevered ramp injector have been discussed subsequently. The obtained results show that the grid scale has only a slight impact on the flow field of the cantilevered ramp injector except in the region near the fuel injector, and the predicted results show reasonable agreement with the experimental data. Additionally, the turbulence model makes a slight difference to the numerical results, and the results obtained by the RNG k-ɛ and SST k-ω turbulence models are almost the same. The swept angle and the ramp angle have the same impact on the performance of the cantilevered ramp injector, and the kidney-shaped plume is formed with shorter distance with the increase of the swept and ramp angles. At the same time, the shape of the injectant mole fraction contour at X/H=6 goes through a transition from a peach-shaped plume to a kidney-shaped plume, and the cantilevered ramp injector with larger swept and ramp angles has the higher mixing efficiency and the larger drag force. The length of the step has only a slight impact on the drag force performance of the cantilevered

  2. Fiber Bragg grating sensor based on cantilever structure embedded in polymer 3D printed material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, Rita; Tavares, R.; Silva, S. O.; Abreu, P.; Restivo, Maria T.; Frazão, O.

    2017-04-01

    A cantilever structure in 3D printed based on a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor embedded in polymer material is proposed. The FBG sensor was embedded in 3D printed coating and was tested under three physical parameters: displacement, temperature and vibration. The sensor was tested in displacement in two different regions of the cantilever, namely, on its midpoint and end point. The maximum displacement sensitivity achieved was (3 +/- 0.1) pm/mm for end point displacement, and a temperature sensitivity of (30 +/- 1) pm/°C was also attained. In the case of vibration measurements it was possible to obtain a 10.23Hz-low frequency oscillation.

  3. Silicon cantilever sensor for micro-/nanoscale dimension and force metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peiner, Erwin; Doering, Lutz; Balke, Michael; Christ, Andreas

    2007-05-01

    A piezoresistive silicon cantilever-type tactile sensor was described as well as its application for dimensional metrology with micro components and as a transferable force standard in the micro-to-nano Newton range. As an example for tactile probing metrology the novel cantilever sensor was used for surface scanning with calibrated groove and roughness artifacts. Force metrology was addressed based on calibration procedures which were developed for commercial stylus instruments as well as for glass pipettes designed for the characterization of the vital forces of isolated cells.

  4. Resonant interaction of trapped cold atoms with a magnetic cantilever tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montoya, Cris; Valencia, Jose; Geraci, Andrew A.; Eardley, Matthew; Moreland, John; Hollberg, Leo; Kitching, John

    2015-06-01

    Magnetic resonance in an ensemble of laser-cooled trapped Rb atoms is excited using a microcantilever with a magnetic tip. The cantilever is mounted on a multilayer chip designed to capture, cool, and magnetically transport cold atoms. The coupling is observed by measuring the loss from a magnetic trap as the oscillating cantilever induces Zeeman-state transitions in the atoms. Interfacing cold atoms with mechanical devices could enable probing and manipulating atomic spins with nanometer spatial resolution and single-spin sensitivity, leading to new capabilities in quantum computation, quantum simulation, and precision sensing.

  5. Study of Effects of Sweep on the Flutter of Cantilever Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmby, J G; Cunningham, H J; Garrick, I E

    1951-01-01

    An experimental and analytical investigation of the flutter of sweptback cantilever wings is reported. The experiments employed groups of wings swept back by rotating and by shearing. The angle of sweep range from 0 degree to 60 degrees and Mach numbers extended to approximately 0.85. A theoretical analysis of the air forces on an oscillating swept wing of high length-chord ratio is developed, and the approximations inherent in the assumptions are discussed. Comparison with experiment indicates that the analysis developed in the present report is satisfactory for giving the main effects of sweep, at least for nearly uniform cantilever wings of high and moderate length-chord ratios.

  6. Large-signal model of a resonating cantilever-based transducer for system level electrical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verd, Jaume; Teva, Jordi; Abadal, Gabriel; Perez-Murano, Francesc; Esteve, Jaume; Barniol, Nuria

    2005-07-01

    In this work, we present a non-linear electromechanical model of an electrostatically excited cantilever that can be used to perform system level electrical simulations. This model is implemented by using an analog hardware description language (VHDL-AMS) that allows its use in a common IC CAD environment like CADENCE. Small-signal and large-signal simulations are performed and the results are compared with a simple linear model (RLC//C) showing the benefits of this model. This model is validated by its fit with the experimental results obtained from a monolithic sub-micrometer cantilever based sensor

  7. Rehabilitation of the maxillary arch after bone graft using immediate loading with implant-supported fixed restoration.

    PubMed

    Margonar, Rogério; Queiroz, Thallita P; Marcantonio, Élcio; Luvizuto, Eloá R; Faloni, Ana Paula de Souza; Betoni, Walter; Gasparini, Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    Moderate and controlled loading environments support or enhance osteogenesis, and, consequently, a high degree of bone-to-implant contact can be acquired. This is because when osteoprogenitor cells are exposed to limited physical deformation, their differentiation into osteoblasts is enhanced. Then, some range of microstrain is considered advantageous for bone ingrowth and osseointegration. The primary stability has been considered one of the main clinical means of controlling micromotion between the implant and the forming interfacial tissue, which helps to establish the proper mechanical environment for osteogenesis. Based on the biological aspects of immediate loading (IL), the objective of this study is to present a clinical case of maxillary arch rehabilitation using immediate loading with implant-supported fixed restoration after bone graft. Ten dental implants were placed in the maxilla 6 months after the autogenous bone graft, removed from the mandible (bilateral oblique line and chin), followed by the installation of an immediate-load fixed cross-arch implant-supported restoration because primary stability was reached for 8 implants. In addition, instructions about masticatory function and how it is related to interfacial micromotion were addressed and emphasized to the patient. The reasons for the IL were further avoidance of an interim healing phase, a potential reduction in the number of clinical interventions for the patient, and aesthetic reasons. After monitoring the rehabilitation for 8 years, the authors can conclude that maxillary IL can be performed followed by a well-established treatment planning based on computed tomography, providing immediate esthetics and function to the patient even when autogenous bone graft was previously performed in the maxilla.

  8. Fixed solar collection system

    SciTech Connect

    Tipton, H.R.

    1984-07-31

    A fixed solar energy collector system has facing panels of different size forming a Vee-shaped trough open at its base and supporting a plurality of highly reflective convex reflectors strategically disposed upon said panels in reflective relationship to a plurality of Fresnel lenses positioned at the base of the trough. A suitable reflector, disposed beneath the Fresnel lenses, directs the reflected energy to a heat-needy target.

  9. Fixed pitch wind turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fenn, D. B.; Viterna, L. A.

    1978-01-01

    Wind turbines designed for fixed pitch operation offer potential reductions in the cost of the machine by eliminating many costly components. It was shown that a rotor can be designed which produces the same energy annually as Mod-0 but which regulates its power automatically by progressively stalling the blades as wind speed increases. Effects of blade twist, taper, root cutout, and airfoil shape on performance are discussed as well as various starting technqiues.

  10. Neutrophilic Fixed Drug Eruption.

    PubMed

    Waldman, Leah; Reddy, Swathi B; Kassim, Andrea; Dettloff, Jennifer; Reddy, Vijaya B

    2015-07-01

    Fixed drug eruption (FDE) is a cutaneous reaction to a medication that recurs in the same fairly localized site with each exposure to the offending drug. The classical histopathologic findings in FDE consist of an interface dermatitis with predominantly lymphocytic inflammatory cell infiltrate. An unusual case of FDE in a 27-year-old pregnant woman who presented with widespread lesions and a predominantly neutrophilic infiltrate on histopathologic examination is reported.

  11. A case study of analysis methods for large deflections of a cantilever beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, L. D.

    1994-01-01

    A load case study of geometric nonlinear large deflections of a cantilever beam is presented. The bending strain must remain elastic. Closed form solution and finite element methods of analysis are illustrated and compared for three common load cases. A nondimensional nomogram for each case is presented in the summary.

  12. 16 CFR Figure 1 to Part 1512 - Bicycle Front Fork Cantilever Bending Test Rig

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Bicycle Front Fork Cantilever Bending Test Rig 1 Figure 1 to Part 1512 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BICYCLES Pt. 1512, Fig. 1 Figure 1 to Part 1512—Bicycle...

  13. 16 CFR Figure 1 to Part 1512 - Bicycle Front Fork Cantilever Bending Test Rig

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Bicycle Front Fork Cantilever Bending Test Rig 1 Figure 1 to Part 1512 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BICYCLES Pt. 1512, Fig. 1 Figure 1 to Part 1512—Bicycle...

  14. 16 CFR Figure 1 to Part 1512 - Bicycle Front Fork Cantilever Bending Test Rig

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Bicycle Front Fork Cantilever Bending Test Rig 1 Figure 1 to Part 1512 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BICYCLES Pt. 1512, Fig. 1 Figure 1 to Part 1512—Bicycle...

  15. 16 CFR Figure 1 to Part 1512 - Bicycle Front Fork Cantilever Bending Test Rig

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Bicycle Front Fork Cantilever Bending Test Rig 1 Figure 1 to Part 1512 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BICYCLES Pt. 1512, Fig. 1 Figure 1 to Part 1512—Bicycle...

  16. 16 CFR Figure 1 to Part 1512 - Bicycle Front Fork Cantilever Bending Test Rig

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Bicycle Front Fork Cantilever Bending Test Rig 1 Figure 1 to Part 1512 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BICYCLES Pt. 1512, Fig. 1 Figure 1 to Part 1512—Bicycle...

  17. Asymmetric resonance frequency analysis of in-plane electrothermal silicon cantilevers for nanoparticle sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertke, Maik; Hamdana, Gerry; Wu, Wenze; Marks, Markus; Suryo Wasisto, Hutomo; Peiner, Erwin

    2016-10-01

    The asymmetric resonance frequency analysis of silicon cantilevers for a low-cost wearable airborne nanoparticle detector (Cantor) is described in this paper. The cantilevers, which are operated in the fundamental in-plane resonance mode, are used as a mass-sensitive microbalance. They are manufactured out of bulk silicon, containing a full piezoresistive Wheatstone bridge and an integrated thermal heater for reading the measurement output signal and stimulating the in-plane excitation, respectively. To optimize the sensor performance, cantilevers with different cantilever geometries are designed, fabricated and characterized. Besides the resonance frequency, the quality factor (Q) of the resonance curve has a high influence concerning the sensor sensitivity. Because of an asymmetric resonance behaviour, a novel fitting function and method to extract the Q is created, different from that of the simple harmonic oscillator (SHO). For testing the sensor in a long-term frequency analysis, a phase- locked loop (PLL) circuit is employed, yielding a frequency stability of up to 0.753 Hz at an Allan variance of 3.77 × 10-6. This proposed asymmetric resonance frequency analysis method is expected to be further used in the process development of the next-generation Cantor.

  18. Direct-write nanoscale printing of nanogranular tunnelling strain sensors for sub-micrometre cantilevers

    PubMed Central

    Dukic, Maja; Winhold, Marcel; Schwalb, Christian H.; Adams, Jonathan D.; Stavrov, Vladimir; Huth, Michael; Fantner, Georg E.

    2016-01-01

    The sensitivity and detection speed of cantilever-based mechanical sensors increases drastically through size reduction. The need for such increased performance for high-speed nanocharacterization and bio-sensing, drives their sub-micrometre miniaturization in a variety of research fields. However, existing detection methods of the cantilever motion do not scale down easily, prohibiting further increase in the sensitivity and detection speed. Here we report a nanomechanical sensor readout based on electron co-tunnelling through a nanogranular metal. The sensors can be deposited with lateral dimensions down to tens of nm, allowing the readout of nanoscale cantilevers without constraints on their size, geometry or material. By modifying the inter-granular tunnel-coupling strength, the sensors' conductivity can be tuned by up to four orders of magnitude, to optimize their performance. We show that the nanoscale printed sensors are functional on 500 nm wide cantilevers and that their sensitivity is suited even for demanding applications such as atomic force microscopy. PMID:27666316

  19. Flexural Vibration Test of a Cantilever Beam with a Force Sensor: Fast Determination of Young's Modulus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Digilov, Rafael M.

    2008-01-01

    We describe a simple and very inexpensive undergraduate laboratory experiment for fast determination of Young's modulus at moderate temperatures with the aid of a force sensor. A strip-shaped specimen rigidly bolted to the force sensor forms a clamped-free cantilever beam. Placed in a furnace, it is subjected to free-bending vibrations followed by…

  20. High Performance Open Loop Control of Scanning with a Small Cylindrical Cantilever Beam.

    PubMed

    Kundrat, Matthew J; Reinhall, Per G; Lee, Cameron M; Seibel, Eric J

    2011-04-11

    The steady state response motion of a base excited cantilever beam with circular cross-section excited by a unidirectional displacement will fall along a straight line. However, achieving straight-line motion with a real cantilever beam of circular cross-section is difficult to accomplish. This is due to the fact that nonlinear effects, small deviations from circularity, asymmetric boundary conditions, and actuator cross coupling can induce whirling. The vast majority of previous work on cantilever beam whirling has focused on the effects of system nonlinearities. We show that whirling is a much broader problem in the design of resonant beam scanners in that the onset of whirling does not depend on large amplitude of motion. Rather, whirling is the norm in real systems due to small system asymmetries and actuator cross coupling. It is therefore necessary to control the growth of the whirling motion when a unidirectional beam motion is desired. We have developed a novel technique to identify the two eigen directions of the beam. Base excitation generated by virtual electrodes along these orthogonal eigen axes of the cantilever beam system generates tip vibration without whirl. This leads to accurate open loop control of the motion of the beam through the combined actuation of two pairs of orthogonally placed actuator electrodes.

  1. Digital control of force microscope cantilevers using a field programmable gate array.

    PubMed

    Jacky, Jonathan P; Garbini, Joseph L; Ettus, Matthew; Sidles, John A

    2008-12-01

    This report describes a cantilever controller for magnetic resonance force microscopy based on a field programmable gate array, along with the hardware and software used to integrate the controller into an experiment. The controller is assembled from a low-cost commercially available software defined radio device and libraries of open-source software. The controller includes a digital filter comprising two cascaded second-order sections ("biquads"), which together can implement transfer functions for optimal cantilever controllers. An appendix in this report shows how to calculate filter coefficients for an optimal controller from measured cantilever characteristics. The controller also includes an input multiplexer and adder used in calibration protocols. Filter coefficients and multiplexer settings can be set and adjusted by control software while an experiment is running. The input is sampled at 64 MHz; the sampling frequency in the filters can be divided down under software control to achieve a good match with filter characteristics. Data reported here were sampled at 500 kHz, chosen for acoustic cantilevers with resonant frequencies near 8 kHz. Inputs are digitized with 12 bit resolution, and outputs are digitized with 14 bits. The experiment software is organized as a client and server to make it easy to adapt the controller to different experiments. The server encapsulates the details of controller hardware organization, connection technology, filter architecture, and number representation. The same server could be used in any experiment, while a different client encodes the particulars of each experiment.

  2. Comparison of Five Topologies of Cantilever-based MEMS Piezoelectric Vibration Energy Harvesters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Y.; Seshia, A. A.

    2014-11-01

    In the realm of MEMS piezoelectric vibration energy harvesters, cantilever-based designs are by far the most popular. Despite being deceptively simple, the active piezoelectric area near the clamped end is able to accumulate maximum strain-generated-electrical-charge, while the free end is able to accommodate a proof mass without compromising the effective area of the piezoelectric generator since it experiences minimal strain anyway. While other contending designs do exist, this paper investigates five micro-cantilever (MC) topologies, namely: a plain MC, a tapered MC, a lined MC, a holed MC and a coupled MC, in order to assess their relative performance as an energy harvester. Although a classical straight and plain MC offers the largest active piezoelectric area, alternative MC designs can potentially offer higher average mechanical strain distribution for a given mechanical loading. Numerical simulation and experimental comparison of these 5 MCs (0.5 μ AlN on 10 μm Si) with the same practical dimensions of 500 μm and 2000 μm, suggest a cantilever with a coupled subsidiary cantilever yield the best power performance, closely followed by the classical plain topology.

  3. An analytic model for accurate spring constant calibration of rectangular atomic force microscope cantilevers

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rui; Ye, Hongfei; Zhang, Weisheng; Ma, Guojun; Su, Yewang

    2015-01-01

    Spring constant calibration of the atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever is of fundamental importance for quantifying the force between the AFM cantilever tip and the sample. The calibration within the framework of thin plate theory undoubtedly has a higher accuracy and broader scope than that within the well-established beam theory. However, thin plate theory-based accurate analytic determination of the constant has been perceived as an extremely difficult issue. In this paper, we implement the thin plate theory-based analytic modeling for the static behavior of rectangular AFM cantilevers, which reveals that the three-dimensional effect and Poisson effect play important roles in accurate determination of the spring constants. A quantitative scaling law is found that the normalized spring constant depends only on the Poisson’s ratio, normalized dimension and normalized load coordinate. Both the literature and our refined finite element model validate the present results. The developed model is expected to serve as the benchmark for accurate calibration of rectangular AFM cantilevers. PMID:26510769

  4. An analytic model for accurate spring constant calibration of rectangular atomic force microscope cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Rui; Ye, Hongfei; Zhang, Weisheng; Ma, Guojun; Su, Yewang

    2015-10-01

    Spring constant calibration of the atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever is of fundamental importance for quantifying the force between the AFM cantilever tip and the sample. The calibration within the framework of thin plate theory undoubtedly has a higher accuracy and broader scope than that within the well-established beam theory. However, thin plate theory-based accurate analytic determination of the constant has been perceived as an extremely difficult issue. In this paper, we implement the thin plate theory-based analytic modeling for the static behavior of rectangular AFM cantilevers, which reveals that the three-dimensional effect and Poisson effect play important roles in accurate determination of the spring constants. A quantitative scaling law is found that the normalized spring constant depends only on the Poisson’s ratio, normalized dimension and normalized load coordinate. Both the literature and our refined finite element model validate the present results. The developed model is expected to serve as the benchmark for accurate calibration of rectangular AFM cantilevers.

  5. All-Optical Cantilever-Enhanced Photoacoustic Spectroscopy in the Open Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Wei; Zhu, Yong; Lin, Cheng; Tian, Li; Xu, Zhuwen; Nong, Jinpeng

    2015-06-01

    A novel all-optical cantilever-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy technique for trace gas detection in the open environment is proposed. A cantilever is set off-beam to "listen to" the photoacoustic signal, and an improved quadrature-point stabilization Fabry-Perot demodulation unit is used to pick up the vibration signal of the acoustic transducer instead of a complicated Michelson interferometer. The structure parameters of the cantilever are optimized to make the sensing system work more stably and reliably using a finite element method, which is then fabricated by surface micro-machining technology. Finally, related experiments are carried out to detect the absorption of water vapor at one atmosphere in the open environment. It was found that the normalized noise-equivalent absorption coefficient obtained by a traditional Fabry-Perot demodulation unit is , while that by a quadrature- point stabilization Fabry-Perot demodulation unit is , which indicates that the sensitivity is increased by a factor of 3.1 using improved cantilever-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy.

  6. Direct-write nanoscale printing of nanogranular tunnelling strain sensors for sub-micrometre cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dukic, Maja; Winhold, Marcel; Schwalb, Christian H.; Adams, Jonathan D.; Stavrov, Vladimir; Huth, Michael; Fantner, Georg E.

    2016-09-01

    The sensitivity and detection speed of cantilever-based mechanical sensors increases drastically through size reduction. The need for such increased performance for high-speed nanocharacterization and bio-sensing, drives their sub-micrometre miniaturization in a variety of research fields. However, existing detection methods of the cantilever motion do not scale down easily, prohibiting further increase in the sensitivity and detection speed. Here we report a nanomechanical sensor readout based on electron co-tunnelling through a nanogranular metal. The sensors can be deposited with lateral dimensions down to tens of nm, allowing the readout of nanoscale cantilevers without constraints on their size, geometry or material. By modifying the inter-granular tunnel-coupling strength, the sensors' conductivity can be tuned by up to four orders of magnitude, to optimize their performance. We show that the nanoscale printed sensors are functional on 500 nm wide cantilevers and that their sensitivity is suited even for demanding applications such as atomic force microscopy.

  7. An analytic model for accurate spring constant calibration of rectangular atomic force microscope cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui; Ye, Hongfei; Zhang, Weisheng; Ma, Guojun; Su, Yewang

    2015-10-29

    Spring constant calibration of the atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever is of fundamental importance for quantifying the force between the AFM cantilever tip and the sample. The calibration within the framework of thin plate theory undoubtedly has a higher accuracy and broader scope than that within the well-established beam theory. However, thin plate theory-based accurate analytic determination of the constant has been perceived as an extremely difficult issue. In this paper, we implement the thin plate theory-based analytic modeling for the static behavior of rectangular AFM cantilevers, which reveals that the three-dimensional effect and Poisson effect play important roles in accurate determination of the spring constants. A quantitative scaling law is found that the normalized spring constant depends only on the Poisson's ratio, normalized dimension and normalized load coordinate. Both the literature and our refined finite element model validate the present results. The developed model is expected to serve as the benchmark for accurate calibration of rectangular AFM cantilevers.

  8. Optimal placement and active vibration control for piezoelectric smart flexible cantilever plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Zhi-cheng; Zhang, Xian-min; Wu, Hong-xin; Zhang, Hong-hua

    2007-04-01

    Some flexible appendages of spacecraft are cantilever plate structures, such as sun plate and satellite antenna. Thus, vibration problem will be caused by parameter uncertainties and environmental disturbances. In this paper, piezoelectric ceramics patches are used as sensors and actuators to suppress the vibration of the smart flexible clamped plate. Firstly, modal equations and piezoelectric control equations of cantilever plate are derived. Secondly, an optimal placement method for the locations of piezoelectric actuators and sensors is developed based on the degree of observability and controllability indices for cantilever plate. The bending and torsional modes are decoupled by the proposed method using bandwidth Butterworth filter. Thirdly, an efficient control method by combining positive position feedback and proportional-derivative control is proposed for vibration reduction. The analytical results for modal frequencies, transient responses and control responses are carried out. Finally, an experimental setup of piezoelectric smart plate is designed and built up. The modal frequencies and damping ratios of the plate setup are obtained by identification method. Also, the experimental studies on vibration control of the cantilever plate including bending modes and torsional modes are conducted. The analytical and experimental results demonstrate that the presented control method is feasible, and the optimal placement method is effective.

  9. Analysis of Cantilever-Beam Bending Stress Relaxation Properties of Thin Wood Composites

    Treesearch

    John F. Hunt; Houjiang Zhang; Yan Huang

    2015-01-01

    An equivalent strain method was used to analyze and determine material relaxation properties for specimens from particleboard, high density fiberboard, and medium density fiberboard. Cantilever beams were clamped and then deflected to 11 m and held for either 2 h or 3 h, while the load to maintain that deflection was measured vs. time. Plots of load relaxation for each...

  10. Piezoresistive AFM cantilevers surpassing standard optical beam deflection in low noise topography imaging

    PubMed Central

    Dukic, Maja; Adams, Jonathan D.; Fantner, Georg E.

    2015-01-01

    Optical beam deflection (OBD) is the most prevalent method for measuring cantilever deflections in atomic force microscopy (AFM), mainly due to its excellent noise performance. In contrast, piezoresistive strain-sensing techniques provide benefits over OBD in readout size and the ability to image in light-sensitive or opaque environments, but traditionally have worse noise performance. Miniaturisation of cantilevers, however, brings much greater benefit to the noise performance of piezoresistive sensing than to OBD. In this paper, we show both theoretically and experimentally that by using small-sized piezoresistive cantilevers, the AFM imaging noise equal or lower than the OBD readout noise is feasible, at standard scanning speeds and power dissipation. We demonstrate that with both readouts we achieve a system noise of ≈0.3 Å at 20 kHz measurement bandwidth. Finally, we show that small-sized piezoresistive cantilevers are well suited for piezoresistive nanoscale imaging of biological and solid state samples in air. PMID:26574164

  11. Direct-write nanoscale printing of nanogranular tunnelling strain sensors for sub-micrometre cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Dukic, Maja; Winhold, Marcel; Schwalb, Christian H; Adams, Jonathan D; Stavrov, Vladimir; Huth, Michael; Fantner, Georg E

    2016-09-26

    The sensitivity and detection speed of cantilever-based mechanical sensors increases drastically through size reduction. The need for such increased performance for high-speed nanocharacterization and bio-sensing, drives their sub-micrometre miniaturization in a variety of research fields. However, existing detection methods of the cantilever motion do not scale down easily, prohibiting further increase in the sensitivity and detection speed. Here we report a nanomechanical sensor readout based on electron co-tunnelling through a nanogranular metal. The sensors can be deposited with lateral dimensions down to tens of nm, allowing the readout of nanoscale cantilevers without constraints on their size, geometry or material. By modifying the inter-granular tunnel-coupling strength, the sensors' conductivity can be tuned by up to four orders of magnitude, to optimize their performance. We show that the nanoscale printed sensors are functional on 500 nm wide cantilevers and that their sensitivity is suited even for demanding applications such as atomic force microscopy.

  12. Flexural Vibration Test of a Cantilever Beam with a Force Sensor: Fast Determination of Young's Modulus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Digilov, Rafael M.

    2008-01-01

    We describe a simple and very inexpensive undergraduate laboratory experiment for fast determination of Young's modulus at moderate temperatures with the aid of a force sensor. A strip-shaped specimen rigidly bolted to the force sensor forms a clamped-free cantilever beam. Placed in a furnace, it is subjected to free-bending vibrations followed by…

  13. Digital control of force microscope cantilevers using a field programmable gate array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacky, Jonathan P.; Garbini, Joseph L.; Ettus, Matthew; Sidles, John A.

    2008-12-01

    This report describes a cantilever controller for magnetic resonance force microscopy based on a field programmable gate array, along with the hardware and software used to integrate the controller into an experiment. The controller is assembled from a low-cost commercially available software defined radio device and libraries of open-source software. The controller includes a digital filter comprising two cascaded second-order sections ("biquads"), which together can implement transfer functions for optimal cantilever controllers. An appendix in this report shows how to calculate filter coefficients for an optimal controller from measured cantilever characteristics. The controller also includes an input multiplexer and adder used in calibration protocols. Filter coefficients and multiplexer settings can be set and adjusted by control software while an experiment is running. The input is sampled at 64 MHz; the sampling frequency in the filters can be divided down under software control to achieve a good match with filter characteristics. Data reported here were sampled at 500 kHz, chosen for acoustic cantilevers with resonant frequencies near 8 kHz. Inputs are digitized with 12 bit resolution, and outputs are digitized with 14 bits. The experiment software is organized as a client and server to make it easy to adapt the controller to different experiments. The server encapsulates the details of controller hardware organization, connection technology, filter architecture, and number representation. The same server could be used in any experiment, while a different client encodes the particulars of each experiment.

  14. Determining shear modulus of thin wood composite materials using a cantilever beam vibration method

    Treesearch

    Cheng Guan; Houjiang Zhang; John F. Hunt; Haicheng Yan

    2016-01-01

    Shear modulus (G) of thin wood composite materials is one of several important indicators that characterizes mechanical properties. However, there is not an easy method to obtain this value. This study presents the use of a newly developed cantilever beam free vibration test apparatus to detect in-plane G of thin wood composite...

  15. SEMICONDUCTOR TECHNOLOGY Supercritical carbon dioxide process for releasing stuck cantilever beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hui; Chaoqun, Gao; Lei, Wang; Yupeng, Jing

    2010-10-01

    The multi-SCCO2 (supercritical carbon dioxide) release and dry process based on our specialized SCCO2 semiconductor process equipment is investigated and the releasing mechanism is discussed. The experiment results show that stuck cantilever beams were held up again under SCCO2 high pressure treatment and the repeatability of this process is nearly 100%.

  16. A simulation of the performance of a self-tuning energy harvesting cantilever beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, J. L.; Bonello, P.; Alalwan, M.

    2016-09-01

    A vibration energy harvester is typically a cantilever beam made up of one or two layers of piezoelectric material that is clamped at one end to a vibrating host structure. The harvester is typically tuned to the frequency of the ambient vibration to ensure maximum power generation. One method to ensure that the system stays tuned in the presence of a varying frequency is to attach a mass to the cantilever and apply a control system to adjust its position along the cantilever according to the ambient frequency. This paper presents a simulation of the performance of such a system, based on a distributed parameter electromechanical model of the sliding-mass beam. A variety of control systems are used to adjust the position of the movable mass during operation and are compared for their efficacy in maintaining resonance over a varying excitation frequency. It was found that the resonance frequency of a bimorph cantilever VEH (Vibration Energy Harvester) could be successfully tuned over a wide frequency range. Moreover, it is also found that much of the voltage output reduction at higher frequencies could be compensated for by a separate control system used to adjust the capacitor load.

  17. Shape effect of torsional resonance mode AFM cantilevers operated in fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haochih Liu, Bernard; Chuang, Sheng-Kai; Lowai Huang, Allison

    2014-09-01

    Nanoscale resolution, high scanning rate, and non-destructive measurement are highly desirable attributes for imagining living cells in fluids. Torsional resonance (TR) mode is a promising approach that can satisfy these requirements. In this study, we have fabricated scanning probes with suitable cantilever designs for use in TR mode in fluids, using computer simulation as an aid in the design and fabrication iterations. Several geometrical parameters of cantilevers were considered and simulated for mechanical properties and dynamic characteristics, and selected designs were fabricated for performance evaluation. The influences of design parameters on scan performance were investigated by statistical analysis. Based on this approach, we designed and fabricated optimal cantilevers that can be operated in TR mode in water with high quality (Q) factor (˜60), high resonance frequency (˜240 kHz), and low spring constant (˜0.14 N m-1). Overall, O-shape cantilevers have demonstrated superior Q factors to typical rectangular shape, A-shape and V-shape designs.

  18. Piezoresistive AFM cantilevers surpassing standard optical beam deflection in low noise topography imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dukic, Maja; Adams, Jonathan D.; Fantner, Georg E.

    2015-11-01

    Optical beam deflection (OBD) is the most prevalent method for measuring cantilever deflections in atomic force microscopy (AFM), mainly due to its excellent noise performance. In contrast, piezoresistive strain-sensing techniques provide benefits over OBD in readout size and the ability to image in light-sensitive or opaque environments, but traditionally have worse noise performance. Miniaturisation of cantilevers, however, brings much greater benefit to the noise performance of piezoresistive sensing than to OBD. In this paper, we show both theoretically and experimentally that by using small-sized piezoresistive cantilevers, the AFM imaging noise equal or lower than the OBD readout noise is feasible, at standard scanning speeds and power dissipation. We demonstrate that with both readouts we achieve a system noise of ≈0.3 Å at 20 kHz measurement bandwidth. Finally, we show that small-sized piezoresistive cantilevers are well suited for piezoresistive nanoscale imaging of biological and solid state samples in air.

  19. Piezoresistive AFM cantilevers surpassing standard optical beam deflection in low noise topography imaging.

    PubMed

    Dukic, Maja; Adams, Jonathan D; Fantner, Georg E

    2015-11-17

    Optical beam deflection (OBD) is the most prevalent method for measuring cantilever deflections in atomic force microscopy (AFM), mainly due to its excellent noise performance. In contrast, piezoresistive strain-sensing techniques provide benefits over OBD in readout size and the ability to image in light-sensitive or opaque environments, but traditionally have worse noise performance. Miniaturisation of cantilevers, however, brings much greater benefit to the noise performance of piezoresistive sensing than to OBD. In this paper, we show both theoretically and experimentally that by using small-sized piezoresistive cantilevers, the AFM imaging noise equal or lower than the OBD readout noise is feasible, at standard scanning speeds and power dissipation. We demonstrate that with both readouts we achieve a system noise of ≈0.3 Å at 20 kHz measurement bandwidth. Finally, we show that small-sized piezoresistive cantilevers are well suited for piezoresistive nanoscale imaging of biological and solid state samples in air.

  20. Solid-State Lighting: Cantilever Epitaxy Process Wins R&D 100 Award

    SciTech Connect

    2012-04-19

    Sandia National Laboratories received an R&D 100 Award from R&D Magazine for development of a new process for growing gallium nitride on an etched sapphire substrate. The process, called cantilever epitaxy, promises to make brighter and more efficient green, blue, and white LEDs.

  1. Real-time measurement of flow rate in microfluidic devices using a cantilever-based optofluidic sensor.

    PubMed

    Cheri, Mohammad Sadegh; Latifi, Hamid; Sadeghi, Jalal; Moghaddam, Mohammadreza Salehi; Shahraki, Hamidreza; Hajghassem, Hasan

    2014-01-21

    Real-time and accurate measurement of flow rate is an important reqirement in lab on a chip (LOC) and micro total analysis system (μTAS) applications. In this paper, we present an experimental and numerical investigation of a cantilever-based optofluidic flow sensor for this purpose. Two sensors with thin and thick cantilevers were fabricated by engraving a 2D pattern of cantilever/base on two polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) slabs using a CO2 laser system and then casting a 2D pattern with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). The basic working principle of the sensor is the fringe shift of the Fabry-Pérot (FP) spectrum due to a changing flow rate. A Finite Element Method (FEM) is used to solve the three dimensional (3D) Navier-Stokes and structural deformation equations to simulate the pressure distribution, velocity and cantilever deflection results of the flow in the channel. The experimental results show that the thin and thick cantilevers have a minimum detectable flow change of 1.3 and 4 (μL min(-1)) respectively. In addition, a comparison of the numerical and experimental deflection of the cantilever has been done to obtain the effective Young's modulus of the thin and thick PDMS cantilevers.

  2. An experimentally validated bimorph cantilever model for piezoelectric energy harvesting from base excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erturk, A.; Inman, D. J.

    2009-02-01

    Piezoelectric transduction has received great attention for vibration-to-electric energy conversion over the last five years. A typical piezoelectric energy harvester is a unimorph or a bimorph cantilever located on a vibrating host structure, to generate electrical energy from base excitations. Several authors have investigated modeling of cantilevered piezoelectric energy harvesters under base excitation. The existing mathematical modeling approaches range from elementary single-degree-of-freedom models to approximate distributed parameter solutions in the sense of Rayleigh-Ritz discretization as well as analytical solution attempts with certain simplifications. Recently, the authors have presented the closed-form analytical solution for a unimorph cantilever under base excitation based on the Euler-Bernoulli beam assumptions. In this paper, the analytical solution is applied to bimorph cantilever configurations with series and parallel connections of piezoceramic layers. The base excitation is assumed to be translation in the transverse direction with a superimposed small rotation. The closed-form steady state response expressions are obtained for harmonic excitations at arbitrary frequencies, which are then reduced to simple but accurate single-mode expressions for modal excitations. The electromechanical frequency response functions (FRFs) that relate the voltage output and vibration response to translational and rotational base accelerations are identified from the multi-mode and single-mode solutions. Experimental validation of the single-mode coupled voltage output and vibration response expressions is presented for a bimorph cantilever with a tip mass. It is observed that the closed-form single-mode FRFs obtained from the analytical solution can successfully predict the coupled system dynamics for a wide range of electrical load resistance. The performance of the bimorph device is analyzed extensively for the short circuit and open circuit resonance

  3. Pressure dependence of the quality factor of a micromachined cantilever in rarefied gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stifter, Michael; Sachse, Matthias; Sauter, Thilo; Hortschitz, Wilfried; Keplinger, Franz

    2012-05-01

    We present a study of the damping behavior of monocrystalline silicon cantilevers in different rarefied gas regimes. Mechanical quality factors Q were analyzed at controlled ambient pressures in the range of 0.01 Pa to 100 Pa. Emphasis was laid on the investigation of the fundamental vibration mode. Hence, the test structures were harmonically excited by the Lorentz force acting on the current carrying lead attached to the top surface of the cantilever. The micromachined clamped-free cantilevers featuring a length of 2 mm, a width of 1.5 mm and a thickness of 20 μm, were manufactured in SOI technology. The experimental results were compared with existing theories revealing an underestimate of the damping parameter for the Knudsen range Kn = 0.1 to 10. So far, squeeze-film damping by free molecular flow and kinetic damping were taken into account in damping models for the quasi-molecular regime. However, our measurements indicate that also the ongoing molecular flow around the test structures has to be considered. Hence the damping coefficient has to be calculated with methods of the free molecular aerodynamics. Thus, we used an algorithm based on the random walk model that allows the usage of already available knowledge in the field of Direct Simulation Monte Carlo. With this approach the quality factor of a squeezed-film damped cantilever in the quasi-molecular regime was derived. The results were compared with the most recent stochastic model, where the theoretical predictions and the experimental investigations indicate significant squeezing up to a Knudsen number of 10. In a superposition of both damping mechanisms, kinetic and squeeze-film damping, a satisfactory characterization of the damping behavior of an oscillating cantilever in the quasi-molecular regime with Knudsen numbers in the range of 10 down to 0.02 was achieved.

  4. Near-Field Acoustical Imaging using Lateral Bending Mode of Atomic Force Microscope Cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caron, A.; Rabe, U.; Rödel, J.; Arnold, W.

    Scanning probe microscopy techniques enable one to investigate surface properties such as contact stiffness and friction between the probe tip and a sample with nm resolution. So far the bending and the torsional eigenmodes of an atomic force microscope cantilever have been used to image variations of elasticity and shear elasticity, respectively. Such images are near-field images with the resolution given by the contact radius typically between 10 nm and 50 nm. We show that the flexural modes of a cantilever oscillating in the width direction and parallel to the sample surface can also be used for imaging. Additional to the dominant in-plane component of the oscillation, the lateral modes exhibit a vertical component as well, provided there is an asymmetry in the cross-section of the cantilever or in its suspension. The out-of-plane deflection renders the lateral modes detectable by the optical position sensors used in atomic force microscopes. We studied cracks which were generated by Vickers indents, in submicro- and nanocrystalline ZrO2. Images of the lateral contact stiffness were obtained by vibrating the cantilever close to a contact-resonance frequency. A change in contact stiffness causes a shift of the resonant frequency and hence a change of the cantilever vibration amplitude. The lateral contact-stiffness images close to the crack faces display a contrast that we attribute to altered elastic properties indicating a process zone. This could be caused by a stress-induced phase transformation during crack propagation. Using the contact mode of an atomic force microscope, we measured the crack-opening displacement as a function of distance from the crack tip, and we determined the crack-tip toughness Ktip. Furthermore, K1c was inferred from the length of radial cracks of Vickers indents that were measured using classical scanning acoustic microscopy

  5. Characterization of piesoelectric ZnO thin films and the fabrication of piezoelectric micro-cantilevers

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Raegan Lynn

    2005-01-01

    In Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), a microcantilever is raster scanned across the surface of a sample in order to obtain a topographical image of the sample's surface. In a traditional, optical AFM, the sample rests on a bulk piezoelectric tube and a control loop is used to control the tip-sample separation by actuating the piezo-tube. This method has several disadvantages--the most noticeable one being that response time of the piezo-tube is rather long which leads to slow imaging speeds. One possible solution aimed at improving the speed of imaging is to incorporate a thin piezoelectric film on top of the cantilever beam. This design not only improves the speed of imaging because the piezoelectric film replaces the piezo-tube as an actuator, but the film can also act as a sensor. In addition, the piezoelectric film can excite the cantilever beam near its resonance frequency. This project aims to fabricate piezoelectric microcantilevers for use in the AFM. Prior to fabricating the cantilevers and also part of this project, a systematic study was performed to examine the effects of deposition conditions on the quality of piezoelectric ZnO thin films deposited by RF sputtering. These results will be presented. The deposition parameters that produced the highest quality ZnO film were used in the fabrication of the piezoelectric cantilevers. Unfortunately, the fabricated cantilevers warped due to the intrinsic stress of the ZnO film and were therefore not usable in the AFM. The complete fabrication process will be detailed, the results will be discussed and reasons for the warping will be examined.

  6. Molecularly imprinted polymer based micromechanical cantilever sensor system for the selective determination of ciprofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Okan, Meltem; Sari, Esma; Duman, Memed

    2017-02-15

    The main objective of this study is to develop molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) based micromechanical cantilever sensor system that has high specificity, fast response time and is easily applicable by user for the detection of ciprofloxacin (CPX) molecule in water resources. Highly specific CPX imprinted nanoparticles were synthesized by miniemulsion polymerization technique. The average size of the synthesized nanoparticles was measured about 160nm with high monodispersivity. Covalent and monolayer binding of the MIP nanoparticles on cantilevers was provided by EDC/NHS activation. Validation of the developed cantilever nanosensor was performed in air with dip-and-dry technique by employing the dynamic sensing mode. According to the results obtained, micromechanical cantilever sensor system worked linearly for the concentration range of 1.5-150.9μM. This concentration range resulted with 18.4-48.9pg mass load on the MIP modified cantilever. The sensitivity of the developed sensor was calculated as 2.6Hz/pg. To control the specificity of MIPs, a different antibiotic enrofloxacin (ENF), with a similar physical and chemical structure with CPX, was used, which showed 7 folds low binding affinity. The developed highly specific microcantilever sensor has a response time of approximately 2min and is reusable up to 4 times. The results indicate that the MIP based AFM nanosensor has high sensitivity for the CPX molecule. This combination of MIP nanoparticles with micromechanical sensors is one of the pioneer studies in the mass sensing applications. This fast, low cost and highly sensitive CPX specific MIP nanoparticle based nanosensor developed in this research have the potential to pave the way for further studies.

  7. A wall shear stress sensor using a pair of sidewall doped cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Thanh-Vinh; Kazama, Ryohei; Takahashi, Hidetoshi; Takahata, Tomoyuki; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Shimoyama, Isao

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, we report on a micro-electro mechanical system (MEMS)-based piezoresistive sensor for measuring shear stress induced by an airflow. The advantages of the proposed sensor include a simple sensing method and a high resonance frequency due to the small size of the sensing elements. Our sensor consists of a pair of 3 µm thick cantilevers with piezoresistors formed on the sidewall of their hinges to detect lateral deformation in the cantilevers induced by an airflow. Each cantilever has a 200 µm  ×  400 µm plate supported by two 150 µm long, 4 µm wide beams. The piezoresistors on the two cantilevers are designed to deform in opposite manners when a shear stress is applied and in the same manner when a pressure is applied. Therefore, the applied shear stress can be detected from the difference in the responses of the two cantilevers without becoming conflated with pressure. In this paper, the design, fabrication and evaluation of the proposed sensor are reported and compared to numerical simulation results. From the experimental results, the resolution of the sensor and its first resonance frequency are 1.3 Pa and 3.9 kHz, respectively. Moreover, we show that the effect of temperature on the readout of the sensor can be eliminated using a temperature-compensating piezoresistor fabricated on the same sensor chip. Finally, using the fabricated sensor, the measurement of the shear stress induced by an airflow with velocity between  -10 and 10 m s-1 is demonstrated.

  8. [Loading and strength of single- and multi-unit fixed dental prostheses. 1. Retention and resistance].

    PubMed

    de Baat, C; Witter, D J; Meijers, C C A J; Vergoossen, E L M; Creugers, N H J

    2014-03-01

    The degree to which single- and multi-unit fixed dental prostheses are able to withstand loading forces is dependent, among other things, on the quality of their retention and resistance. The quality of the retention and resistance of the configuration of an abutment tooth prepared for a metal and metal-ceramic single-unit fixed dental prosthesis is determined by the configuration's convergence angle, the height, the volume, the interocclusal space, the cervical outline design, the additional preparations, the quality of the (build-up) restoration, and the surface roughness. A silicate ceramic single-unit fixed dental prosthesis is attached through adhesion using a composite cement, but the retention and resistance of an oxide ceramic single-unit fixed dental prosthesis is dependent on the abutment tooth configuration. Most types of multi-unit fixed dental prosthesis have the following additional retention and resistance determining factors: the position in the occlusal system, the number of abutment teeth and their mutual configurations, and the length of (cantilever) pontics. A resin-bonded fixed partial denture's retention and resistance are determined by its bonding as well as its enamel surface coverage and its resistance preparations.

  9. Fixed solar energy concentrator

    SciTech Connect

    Houghton, A.J.; Knasel, T.M.

    1981-01-20

    An apparatus for the concentration of solar energy upon a fixed array of solar cells is disclosed. A transparent material is overlayed upon the cell array, and a diffuse reflective coating is applied to the surface area of the transparent medium in between cells. Radiant light, which reflects through the transparent layer and does not fall directly incident to a cell surface is reflected by the coating layer in an approximate cosine pattern. Thereafter, such light undergoes internal reflection and rediffusion until subsequently it either strikes a solar cell surface or is lost through the upper surface of the transparent material.

  10. MEMS with integrated CMOS read-out circuit based on sub-micrometric cantilevers array for multiple sensing (Invited Paper)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villarroya, Maria; Verd, Jaume; Teva, Jordi; Abadal, Gabriel; Figueras, Eduard; Perez-Murano, Francesc; Esteve, Jaume; Barniol, Nuria

    2005-07-01

    A Micro Electro Mechanical System (MEMS) for mass detection is presented. It has been developed by the monolithic integration of the mechanical transducer with the CMOS control circuit. The sensor transducer consists on an array of four resonating cantilevers; oscillation is achieved by electrostatic excitation. The independent control on each cantilever of the arrays allows multiple sensing on a single device. The microresonators are fabricated on polysilicon in a compatibilized process with the front-end CMOS circuitry. The readout of the cantilevers oscillation is achieved by a current amplifier. Expected Mass resolution in air is 80 ag/Hz.

  11. Electromechanical model of a resonating nano-cantilever-based sensor for high-resolution and high-sensitivity mass detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abadal, G.; Davis, Z. J.; Helbo, B.; Borrisé, X.; Ruiz, R.; Boisen, A.; Campabadal, F.; Esteve, J.; Figueras, E.; Pérez-Murano, F.; Barniol, N.

    2001-06-01

    A simple linear electromechanical model for an electrostatically driven resonating cantilever is derived. The model has been developed in order to determine dynamic quantities such as the capacitive current flowing through the cantilever-driver system at the resonance frequency, and it allows us to calculate static magnitudes such as position and voltage of collapse or the voltage versus deflection characteristic. The model is used to demonstrate the theoretical sensitivity on the attogram scale of a mass sensor based on a nanometre-scale cantilever, and to analyse the effect of an extra feedback loop in the control circuit to increase the Q factor.

  12. Evaluation of static measurement in piezoelectric cantilever sensors using a charge integration technique for chemical and biological detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isarakorn, D.; Linder, M.; Briand, D.; de Rooij, N. F.

    2010-07-01

    In this paper, we introduce a charge integrator as a read-out system for piezoelectric cantilever sensors. The charge integrator is used to monitor the surface charge induced by piezoelectric materials as a function of mechanical stress. This technique improves the response of piezoelectric cantilever sensors in low-frequency measurements, which makes them suitable for chemical and biological detection. Furthermore, it is capable of real-time, portable and all-electrical detection. The detection of alkanethiols on the Au-coated piezoelectric cantilevers is demonstrated to verify the concept.

  13. V-shaped metallic-wire cantilevers for combined atomic force microscopy and Fowler-Nordheim imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Charles A.; Workman, Richard K.; Yao, Xiaowei; Hunt, Jeffery P.; Sarid, Dror

    1998-12-01

    A method for fabricating V-shaped cantilevers from a flattened Pt/Ir metal wire for combined atomic force microscopy and Fowler-Nordheim imaging is described. These novel cantilevers have been found to be more robust then conventional ones used for scanning capacitance and magnetic force microscopy as their conductivity is maintained even after a large number of surface scans. The use of a V-shaped geometry improves on earlier single-beam geometries by reducing rms imaging noise. Characterization of these cantilevers and combined atomic force microscopy and Fowler-Nordheim images are reported.

  14. Optical and mechanical detection of near-field light by atomic force microscopy using a piezoelectric cantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satoh, Nobuo; Kobayashi, Kei; Watanabe, Shunji; Fujii, Toru; Matsushige, Kazumi; Yamada, Hirofumi

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we developed an atomic force microscopy (AFM) system with scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM) using a microfabricated force-sensing cantilever with a lead zirconate titanate (PZT) thin film. Both optical and mechanical detection techniques were adopted in SNOM to detect scattered light induced by the interaction of the PZT cantilever tip apex and evanescent light, and SNOM images were obtained for each detection scheme. The mechanical detection technique did allow for a clear observation of the light scattered from the PZT cantilever without the interference observed by the optical detection technique, which used an objective lens, a pinhole, and a photomultiplier tube.

  15. Recent Advances in Cantilever-Free Scanning Probe Lithography: High-Throughput, Space-Confined Synthesis of Nanostructures and Beyond.

    PubMed

    He, Qiyuan; Tan, Chaoliang; Zhang, Hua

    2017-05-23

    Scalability is the major challenge for scanning probe lithography (SPL). Recently developed cantilever-free scanning probe technologies provide a solution to the issue of scalability by incorporating massive arrays of polymer pens, which fundamentally overcome the low-throughput nature of SPL. The further development of cantilever-free SPL brings up a variety of applications in electronics, biology, and chemical synthesis. In this Perspective, we highlight the space-confined synthesis of complex nanostructures enabled by different types of cantilever-free SPL technologies.

  16. Note: Determination of torsional spring constant of atomic force microscopy cantilevers: combining normal spring constant and classical beam theory.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Asencio, R; Thormann, E; Rutland, M W

    2013-09-01

    A technique has been developed for the calculation of torsional spring constants for AFM cantilevers based on the combination of the normal spring constant and plate/beam theory. It is easy to apply and allow the determination of torsional constants for stiff cantilevers where the thermal power spectrum is difficult to obtain due to the high resonance frequency and low signal/noise ratio. The applicability is shown to be general and this simple approach can thus be used to obtain torsional constants for any beam shaped cantilever.

  17. Biomechanical comparison of axial and tilted implants for mandibular full-arch fixed prostheses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyea-Soon; Kim, Yu-Lee; Bae, Ji-Myung; Cho, Hye-Won

    2011-01-01

    Controversy exists regarding the "All-on-Four" concept for a mandibular full-arch fixed prosthesis. The purpose of this study was to examine photoelastically the effect of the inclination of the two distal implants according to the All-on-Four concept on the stress distribution within the supporting structure. Two photoelastic models of a human edentulous mandible were fabricated. Each model had four screw-type implants embedded in the interforaminal area. The two distal implants were placed axially in one model and tilted 30 degrees distally in the other model. Two cantilevered acrylic resin prostheses, which used angulated abutments for the distal tilted implants and straight abutments for the axial implants, were fabricated and delivered. Vertical loads of 13 kg were applied at three loading points on the prosthesis: the central fossa of the first molar, the distal fossa of the first premolar, and the distal fossa of the second premolar. Stresses that developed in the supporting structure were monitored photoelastically and recorded photographically. Whereas all cantilever loadings concentrated the stresses at the distal crest of the distal implant sites in both models, the posterior tilting of distal implants splinted in a full-arch fixed prosthesis did not increase the stresses in bone around the distal implants versus the axial-implant model. Within the limitations of this photoelastic stress analysis, the use of tilted implants reduced the maximum stress in the distal crestal bone of the distal implant by approximately 17% relative to the axial implants.

  18. Fixed Sagittal Plane Imbalance

    PubMed Central

    Savage, Jason W.; Patel, Alpesh A.

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Literature review. Objective To discuss the evaluation and management of fixed sagittal plane imbalance. Methods A comprehensive literature review was performed on the preoperative evaluation of patients with sagittal plane malalignment, as well as the surgical strategies to address sagittal plane deformity. Results Sagittal plane imbalance is often caused by de novo scoliosis or iatrogenic flat back deformity. Understanding the etiology and magnitude of sagittal malalignment is crucial in realignment planning. Objective parameters have been developed to guide surgeons in determining how much correction is needed to achieve favorable outcomes. Currently, the goals of surgery are to restore a sagittal vertical axis < 5 cm, pelvic tilt < 20 degrees, and lumbar lordosis equal to pelvic incidence ± 9 degrees. Conclusion Sagittal plane malalignment is an increasingly recognized cause of pain and disability. Treatment of sagittal plane imbalance varies according to the etiology, location, and severity of the deformity. Fixed sagittal malalignment often requires complex reconstructive procedures that include osteotomy correction. Reestablishing harmonious spinopelvic alignment is associated with significant improvement in health-related quality-of-life outcome measures and patient satisfaction. PMID:25396111

  19. Fixed sagittal plane imbalance.

    PubMed

    Savage, Jason W; Patel, Alpesh A

    2014-12-01

    Study Design Literature review. Objective To discuss the evaluation and management of fixed sagittal plane imbalance. Methods A comprehensive literature review was performed on the preoperative evaluation of patients with sagittal plane malalignment, as well as the surgical strategies to address sagittal plane deformity. Results Sagittal plane imbalance is often caused by de novo scoliosis or iatrogenic flat back deformity. Understanding the etiology and magnitude of sagittal malalignment is crucial in realignment planning. Objective parameters have been developed to guide surgeons in determining how much correction is needed to achieve favorable outcomes. Currently, the goals of surgery are to restore a sagittal vertical axis < 5 cm, pelvic tilt < 20 degrees, and lumbar lordosis equal to pelvic incidence ± 9 degrees. Conclusion Sagittal plane malalignment is an increasingly recognized cause of pain and disability. Treatment of sagittal plane imbalance varies according to the etiology, location, and severity of the deformity. Fixed sagittal malalignment often requires complex reconstructive procedures that include osteotomy correction. Reestablishing harmonious spinopelvic alignment is associated with significant improvement in health-related quality-of-life outcome measures and patient satisfaction.

  20. Apparatus for fixing latency

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R [Provo, UT; Bartholomew, David B [Springville, UT; Moon, Justin [Bountiful, UT; Koehler, Roger O [Provo, UT

    2009-09-08

    An apparatus for fixing computational latency within a deterministic region on a network comprises a network interface modem, a high priority module and at least one deterministic peripheral device. The network interface modem is in communication with the network. The high priority module is in communication with the network interface modem. The at least one deterministic peripheral device is connected to the high priority module. The high priority module comprises a packet assembler/disassembler, and hardware for performing at least one operation. Also disclosed is an apparatus for executing at least one instruction on a downhole device within a deterministic region, the apparatus comprising a control device, a downhole network, and a downhole device. The control device is near the surface of a downhole tool string. The downhole network is integrated into the tool string. The downhole device is in communication with the downhole network.

  1. Fixed Access Network Sharing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornaglia, Bruno; Young, Gavin; Marchetta, Antonio

    2015-12-01

    Fixed broadband network deployments are moving inexorably to the use of Next Generation Access (NGA) technologies and architectures. These NGA deployments involve building fiber infrastructure increasingly closer to the customer in order to increase the proportion of fiber on the customer's access connection (Fibre-To-The-Home/Building/Door/Cabinet… i.e. FTTx). This increases the speed of services that can be sold and will be increasingly required to meet the demands of new generations of video services as we evolve from HDTV to "Ultra-HD TV" with 4k and 8k lines of video resolution. However, building fiber access networks is a costly endeavor. It requires significant capital in order to cover any significant geographic coverage. Hence many companies are forming partnerships and joint-ventures in order to share the NGA network construction costs. One form of such a partnership involves two companies agreeing to each build to cover a certain geographic area and then "cross-selling" NGA products to each other in order to access customers within their partner's footprint (NGA coverage area). This is tantamount to a bi-lateral wholesale partnership. The concept of Fixed Access Network Sharing (FANS) is to address the possibility of sharing infrastructure with a high degree of flexibility for all network operators involved. By providing greater configuration control over the NGA network infrastructure, the service provider has a greater ability to define the network and hence to define their product capabilities at the active layer. This gives the service provider partners greater product development autonomy plus the ability to differentiate from each other at the active network layer.

  2. The multi-position calibration of the stiffness for atomic-force microscope cantilevers based on vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yelong; Song, Le; Hu, Gang; Cai, Xue; Liu, Hongguang; Ma, Jinyu; Zhao, Meirong; Fang, Fengzhou

    2015-05-01

    Calibration of the stiffness of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers is critical for industry and academic research. The multi-position calibration method for AFM cantilevers based on vibration is investigated. The position providing minimum uncertainty is deduced. The validity of the multi-position approach is shown via theoretical and experimental means. We applied it to the recently developed vibration method using an AFM cantilever with a normal stiffness of 0.1 N m-1. The standard deviation of the measured stiffness is 0.002 N m-1 with a mean value of 0.189 N m-1 and the relative combined uncertainty is approximately 7%, which is better than the approach using the single position at the tip of the cantilever.

  3. Mass determination and sensitivity based on resonance frequency changes of the higher flexural modes of cantilever sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkin, John D.; Hähner, Georg

    2011-03-01

    Micro- and nanocantilevers are increasingly employed as mass sensors. Most studies consider the first flexural mode and adsorbed masses that are either discretely attached or homogeneously distributed along the entire length of the cantilever. We derive general expressions that allow for the determination of the total attached mass with any mass distribution along the cantilever length and all flexural modes. The expressions are valid for all cantilevers whose flexural deflection can be described by a one-dimensional function. This approach includes the most common types of microcantilevers, namely, rectangular, picket, and V-shaped. The theoretical results are compared with experimental data up to the fourth flexural mode obtained from thermal noise spectra of rectangular and V-shaped cantilevers.

  4. Investigation of the Frequency Shift of a SAD Circuit Loop and the Internal Micro-Cantilever in a Gas Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Liu; Zhao, Jiahao; Yu, Shijie; Li, Peng; You, Zheng

    2010-01-01

    Micro-cantilever sensors for mass detection using resonance frequency have attracted considerable attention over the last decade in the field of gas sensing. For such a sensing system, an oscillator circuit loop is conventionally used to actuate the micro-cantilever, and trace the frequency shifts. In this paper, gas experiments are introduced to investigate the mechanical resonance frequency shifts of the micro-cantilever within the circuit loop(mechanical resonance frequency, MRF) and resonating frequency shifts of the electric signal in the oscillator circuit (system working frequency, SWF). A silicon beam with a piezoelectric zinc oxide layer is employed in the experiment, and a Self-Actuating-Detecting (SAD) circuit loop is built to drive the micro-cantilever and to follow the frequency shifts. The differences between the two resonating frequencies and their shifts are discussed and analyzed, and a coefficient α related to the two frequency shifts is confirmed. PMID:22163588

  5. Design and analysis of a self-biased broadband magnetoelectric cantilever operated at multi-frequency windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, J. N.; Xin, C. Z.; Ma, J.; Lin, Y. H.; Nan, C. W.

    2017-03-01

    Magnetoelectric (ME) composites with self-biased and wide resonance frequency band properties are promising candidates for magnetic field sensor and energy harvester. Here, we present a ME cantilever by in-series connecting a few SrFe12O19/Metglas/Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 components. Due to the in-built magnetic bias of SrFe12O19, the ME cantilever shows self-biased property. Meanwhile, by merging the resonance responses of the in-series ME components together, the ME cantilever presents multi-wide resonance bands (i.e., 500 Hz ˜ 700 Hz, 3.3 kHz ˜ 4.4 kHz and 44 kHz ˜ 70 kHz). In these three wide frequency windows, the ME voltage coefficients (α V) of the ME cantilever are higher than 40 mV/Oe, 115 mV/Oe and 400 mV/Oe, respectively.

  6. Investigation of the frequency shift of a SAD circuit loop and the internal micro-cantilever in a gas sensor.

    PubMed

    Guan, Liu; Zhao, Jiahao; Yu, Shijie; Li, Peng; You, Zheng

    2010-01-01

    Micro-cantilever sensors for mass detection using resonance frequency have attracted considerable attention over the last decade in the field of gas sensing. For such a sensing system, an oscillator circuit loop is conventionally used to actuate the micro-cantilever, and trace the frequency shifts. In this paper, gas experiments are introduced to investigate the mechanical resonance frequency shifts of the micro-cantilever within the circuit loop(mechanical resonance frequency, MRF) and resonating frequency shifts of the electric signal in the oscillator circuit (system working frequency, SWF). A silicon beam with a piezoelectric zinc oxide layer is employed in the experiment, and a Self-Actuating-Detecting (SAD) circuit loop is built to drive the micro-cantilever and to follow the frequency shifts. The differences between the two resonating frequencies and their shifts are discussed and analyzed, and a coefficient α related to the two frequency shifts is confirmed.

  7. Investigation of static and dynamic behavior of functionally graded piezoelectric actuated Poly-Si micro cantilever probe

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, Vibhuti Bhushan; Parashar, Sandeep Kumar

    2016-04-13

    In the present paper a novel functionally graded piezoelectric (FGP) actuated Poly-Si micro cantilever probe is proposed for atomic force microscope. The shear piezoelectric coefficient d{sub 15} has much higher value than coupling coefficients d{sub 31} and d{sub 33}, hence in the present work the micro cantilever beam actuated by d{sub 15} effect is utilized. The material properties are graded in the thickness direction of actuator by a simple power law. A three dimensional finite element analysis has been performed using COMSOL Multiphysics® (version 4.2) software. Tip deflection and free vibration analysis for the micro cantilever probe has been done. The results presented in the paper shall be useful in the design of micro cantilever probe and their subsequent utilization in atomic force microscopes.

  8. Precise and direct method for the measurement of the torsion spring constant of the atomic force microscopy cantilevers

    SciTech Connect

    Jarząbek, D. M.

    2015-01-15

    A direct method for the evaluation of the torsional spring constants of the atomic force microscope cantilevers is presented in this paper. The method uses a nanoindenter to apply forces at the long axis of the cantilever and in the certain distance from it. The torque vs torsion relation is then evaluated by the comparison of the results of the indentations experiments at different positions on the cantilever. Next, this relation is used for the precise determination of the torsional spring constant of the cantilever. The statistical analysis shows that the standard deviation of the calibration measurements is equal to approximately 1%. Furthermore, a simple method for calibration of the photodetector’s lateral response is proposed. The overall procedure of the lateral calibration constant determination has the accuracy approximately equal to 10%.

  9. Precise and direct method for the measurement of the torsion spring constant of the atomic force microscopy cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Jarząbek, D M

    2015-01-01

    A direct method for the evaluation of the torsional spring constants of the atomic force microscope cantilevers is presented in this paper. The method uses a nanoindenter to apply forces at the long axis of the cantilever and in the certain distance from it. The torque vs torsion relation is then evaluated by the comparison of the results of the indentations experiments at different positions on the cantilever. Next, this relation is used for the precise determination of the torsional spring constant of the cantilever. The statistical analysis shows that the standard deviation of the calibration measurements is equal to approximately 1%. Furthermore, a simple method for calibration of the photodetector's lateral response is proposed. The overall procedure of the lateral calibration constant determination has the accuracy approximately equal to 10%.

  10. Precise and direct method for the measurement of the torsion spring constant of the atomic force microscopy cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarząbek, D. M.

    2015-01-01

    A direct method for the evaluation of the torsional spring constants of the atomic force microscope cantilevers is presented in this paper. The method uses a nanoindenter to apply forces at the long axis of the cantilever and in the certain distance from it. The torque vs torsion relation is then evaluated by the comparison of the results of the indentations experiments at different positions on the cantilever. Next, this relation is used for the precise determination of the torsional spring constant of the cantilever. The statistical analysis shows that the standard deviation of the calibration measurements is equal to approximately 1%. Furthermore, a simple method for calibration of the photodetector's lateral response is proposed. The overall procedure of the lateral calibration constant determination has the accuracy approximately equal to 10%.

  11. Sensitivity analysis of rectangular atomic force microscope cantilevers immersed in liquids based on the modified couple stress theory.

    PubMed

    Lee, Haw-Long; Chang, Win-Jin

    2016-01-01

    The modified couple stress theory is adopted to study the sensitivity of a rectangular atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever immersed in acetone, water, carbon tetrachloride (CCl4), and 1-butanol. The theory contains a material length scale parameter and considers the size effect in the analysis. However, this parameter is difficult to obtain via experimental measurements. In this study, a conjugate gradient method for the parameter estimation of the frequency equation is presented. The optimal method provides a quantitative approach for estimating the material length scale parameter based on the modified couple stress theory. The results show that the material length scale parameter of the AFM cantilever immersed in acetone, CCl4, water, and 1-butanol is 0, 25, 116.3, and 471 nm, respectively. In addition, the vibration sensitivities of the AFM cantilever immersed in these liquids are investigated. The results are useful for the design of AFM cantilevers immersed in liquids.

  12. SU-8 Cantilevers for Bio/chemical Sensing; Fabrication, Characterisation and Development of Novel Read-out Methods

    PubMed Central

    Nordström, Maria; Keller, Stephan; Lillemose, Michael; Johansson, Alicia; Dohn, Søren; Haefliger, Daniel; Blagoi, Gabriela; Havsteen-Jakobsen, Mogens; Boisen, Anja

    2008-01-01

    Here, we present the activities within our research group over the last five years with cantilevers fabricated in the polymer SU-8. We believe that SU-8 is an interesting polymer for fabrication of cantilevers for bio/chemical sensing due to its simple processing and low Young's modulus. We show examples of different integrated read-out methods and their characterisation. We also show that SU-8 cantilevers have a reduced sensitivity to changes in the environmental temperature and pH of the buffer solution. Moreover, we show that the SU-8 cantilever surface can be functionalised directly with receptor molecules for analyte detection, thereby avoiding gold-thiol chemistry. PMID:27879783

  13. Retrospective, cross-sectional study on immediately loaded implant-supported mandibular fixed complete-arch prostheses fabricated with the passive fit cementation technique.

    PubMed

    Able, Francine Baldin; de Mattias Sartori, Ivete Aparecida; Thomé, Geninho; Moreira Melo, Ana Cláudia

    2017-05-05

    Mandibular fixed complete-arch dental prostheses on dental implants have been benefiting patients for a long time, but problems with passive fitting between the metallic framework of the prostheses and the implants might influence its long-term success. The purpose of this cross-sectional study of immediately loaded mandibular fixed complete-arch dental prostheses was to evaluate the survival and success rates of prostheses, the survival rates of dental implants, the occurrence of complications in the prostheses and implants, participant satisfaction, and the association between cantilever length and prosthesis complications. Data were collected from the participants' records. The exposure variables were participant related (sex and age) and treatment related (number of implants and length of cantilever). The outcome variables were the survival and success of the prostheses and implants, complications, and participant satisfaction. The Fisher or chi-square tests was used for the association between 2 qualitative variables (α=.05). Two hundred ninety consecutive participants (1429 implants) with a mean follow-up time of 4.4 years were included. The survival rate for the prostheses was 98.6 and the success rate was 96.6%. The implant survival rate was 99.6%. Sixty-seven participants experienced a prosthetic complication, the most common being tooth fracture. Only 2.45% (n=35) of the implants were associated with screw loosening. Of the total number of participants, 86.9% were completely satisfied with their treatment. The length of the cantilever (up to 25 mm) was not associated with complications (P>.05). Implant-supported mandibular fixed complete-arch dental prostheses fabricated with a passive fit technique provide successful treatment for patients with edentulism. The success and survival rates of implants and prostheses were high. Only straightforward complications were observed. Cantilever length was not associated with complications. Copyright © 2017

  14. Comparing AFM cantilever stiffness measured using the thermal vibration and the improved thermal vibration methods with that of an SI traceable method based on MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, Uwe; Gao, Sai; Engl, Wolfgang; Sulzbach, Thomas; Stahl, Stefan W.; Milles, Lukas F.; Nesterov, Vladimir; Li, Zhi

    2017-03-01

    PTB has developed a new contact based method for the traceable calibration of the normal stiffness of AFM cantilevers in the range from 0.03 N m‑1 to 300 N m‑1 to the SI units based on micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) actuators. This method is evaluated by comparing the measured cantilever stiffness with that measured by PTB’s new primary nanonewton force facility and by PTB’s microforce measuring device. The MEMS system was used to calibrate the stiffness of cantilevers in two case studies. One set of cantilevers for applications in biophysics was calibrated using the well-known thermal vibration method and the second set of cantilevers was calibrated by a cantilever manufacturer who applied an improved thermal vibration method based on calibrated reference cantilevers for the cantilever stiffness calibration. The comparison revealed a stiffness deviation of  +7.7% for the cantilevers calibrated using the thermal vibration method and a deviation of  +6.9% for the stiffnesses of the cantilevers calibrated using the improved thermal vibration method.

  15. Clustering mechanism of ethanol-water mixtures investigated with photothermal microfluidic cantilever deflection spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoraishi, M. S.; Hawk, J. E.; Phani, Arindam; Khan, M. F.; Thundat, T.

    2016-04-01

    The infrared-active (IR) vibrational mode of ethanol (EtOH) associated with the asymmetrical stretching of the C-C-O bond in pico-liter volumes of EtOH-water binary mixtures is calorimetrically measured using photothermal microfluidic cantilever deflection spectroscopy (PMCDS). IR absorption by the confined liquid results in wavelength dependent cantilever deflections, thus providing a complementary response to IR absorption revealing a complex dipole moment dependence on mixture concentration. Solvent-induced blue shifts of the C-C-O asymmetric vibrational stretch for both anti and gauche conformers of EtOH were precisely monitored for EtOH concentrations ranging from 20–100% w/w. Variations in IR absorption peak maxima show an inverse dependence on induced EtOH dipole moment (μ) and is attributed to the complex clustering mechanism of EtOH-water mixtures.

  16. The output characteristic of cantilever-like tactile sensor based on the inverse magnetostrictive effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Lili; Wang, Bowen; Wang, Qilong; Han, Jianhui; Cao, Shuying

    2017-05-01

    The output characteristic model of a magnetostrictive cantilever-like tactile sensor has been founded based on the inverse-magnetostrictive effect, the flexure mode, and the Jiles-Atherton model. The magnetostrictive sensor has been designed and an output voltage is analyzed under the conditions of bias magnetic field, contact pressure and deflection of cantilever beam. The experiment has been performed to determine the relation among the induced output voltage, bias magnetic field, and pressure. It is found that the peak of the induced output voltage increases with an increasing pressure under the bias magnetic field of 4.8kA/m. The experimental result agrees well with the theoretical one and it means that the model can describe the relation among the induced output voltage, bias magnetic field, and pressure. The sensor with a Galfenol sheet may hold potentials in sample characterization and deformation predication in artificial intelligence area.

  17. Device for filamentous fungi growth monitoring using the multimodal frequency response of cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Maloney, N; Lukacs, G; Ball, S L; Hegner, M

    2014-01-01

    Filamentous fungi cause opportunistic infections in hospital patients. A fast assay to detect viable spores is of great interest. We present a device that is capable of monitoring fungi growth in real time via the dynamic operation of cantilevers in an array. The ability to detect minute frequency shifts for higher order flexural resonance modes is demonstrated using hydrogel functionalised cantilevers. The use of higher order resonance modes sees the sensor dependent mass responsivity enhanced by a factor of 13 in comparison to measurements utilizing the fundamental resonance mode only. As a proof of principle measurement, Aspergillus niger growth is monitored using the first two flexural resonance modes. The detection of single spore growth within 10 h is reported for the first time. The ability to detect and monitor the growth of single spores, within a small time frame, is advantageous in both clinical and industrial settings.

  18. Enhancement of Frequency Stability Using Synchronization of a Cantilever Array for MEMS-Based Sensors.

    PubMed

    Torres, Francesc; Uranga, Arantxa; Riverola, Martí; Sobreviela, Guillermo; Barniol, Núria

    2016-10-13

    Micro and nano electromechanical resonators have been widely used as single or multiple-mass detection sensors. Smaller devices with higher resonance frequencies and lower masses offer higher mass responsivities but suffer from lower frequency stability. Synchronization phenomena in multiple MEMS resonators have become an important issue because they allow frequency stability improvement, thereby preserving mass responsivity. The authors present an array of five cantilevers (CMOS-MEMS system) that are forced to vibrate synchronously to enhance their frequency stability. The frequency stability has been determined in closed-loop configuration for long periods of time by calculating the Allan deviation. An Allan deviation of 0.013 ppm (@ 1 s averaging time) for a 1 MHz cantilever array MEMS system was obtained at the synchronized mode, which represents a 23-fold improvement in comparison with the non-synchronized operation mode (0.3 ppm).

  19. Device for filamentous fungi growth monitoring using the multimodal frequency response of cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloney, N.; Lukacs, G.; Ball, S. L.; Hegner, M.

    2014-01-01

    Filamentous fungi cause opportunistic infections in hospital patients. A fast assay to detect viable spores is of great interest. We present a device that is capable of monitoring fungi growth in real time via the dynamic operation of cantilevers in an array. The ability to detect minute frequency shifts for higher order flexural resonance modes is demonstrated using hydrogel functionalised cantilevers. The use of higher order resonance modes sees the sensor dependent mass responsivity enhanced by a factor of 13 in comparison to measurements utilizing the fundamental resonance mode only. As a proof of principle measurement, Aspergillus niger growth is monitored using the first two flexural resonance modes. The detection of single spore growth within 10 h is reported for the first time. The ability to detect and monitor the growth of single spores, within a small time frame, is advantageous in both clinical and industrial settings.

  20. Computational model for noncontact atomic force microscopy: energy dissipation of cantilever.

    PubMed

    Senda, Yasuhiro; Blomqvist, Janne; Nieminen, Risto M

    2016-09-21

    We propose a computational model for noncontact atomic force microscopy (AFM) in which the atomic force between the cantilever tip and the surface is calculated using a molecular dynamics method, and the macroscopic motion of the cantilever is modeled by an oscillating spring. The movement of atoms in the tip and surface is connected with the oscillating spring using a recently developed coupling method. In this computational model, the oscillation energy is dissipated, as observed in AFM experiments. We attribute this dissipation to the hysteresis and nonconservative properties of the interatomic force that acts between the atoms in the tip and sample surface. The dissipation rate strongly depends on the parameters used in the computational model.

  1. Aeroelastic Flutter Behavior of a Cantilever and Elastically Mounted Plate within a Nozzle-Diffuser Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosi, Luis Phillipe; Colonius, Tim; Lee, Hyeong Jae; Sherrit, Stewart; Jet Propulsion Laboratory Collaboration; California Institute of Technology Collaboration

    2016-11-01

    Aeroelastic flutter arises when the motion of a structure and its surrounding flowing fluid are coupled in a constructive manner, causing large amplitudes of vibration in the immersed solid. A cantilevered beam in axial flow within a nozzle-diffuser geometry exhibits interesting resonance behavior that presents good prospects for internal flow energy harvesting. Different modes can be excited as a function of throat velocity, nozzle geometry, fluid and cantilever material parameters. Similar behavior has been also observed in elastically mounted rigid plates, enabling new designs for such devices. This work explores the relationship between the aeroelastic flutter instability boundaries and relevant non-dimensional parameters via experiments, numerical, and stability analyses. Parameters explored consist of a non-dimensional stiffness, a non-dimensional mass, non-dimensional throat size, and Reynolds number. A map of the system response in this parameter space may serve as a guide to future work concerning possible electrical output and failure prediction in harvesting devices.

  2. Fabrication of cantilever probes with integrated piezoresistive read-out and built-in piezoelectric actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Steve; Altemus, Bruce; Sankaran, Balasubramanian; Tokranova, Natalya; Geer, Robert; Castracane, James; Xu, Bai

    2005-01-01

    Micromachined cantilevers used as force probes in atomic force microscopy are extremely sensitive to a variety of environment factors such as acoustic noise, temperature and humidity. This unwanted interference can be exploited to produce highly sensitive systems with proper design and under precise conditions. In this paper, we report the development of a new generic process for the fabrication of a microprobe with integrated piezoresistive read-out and built-in piezoelectric actuators. The mechanical performance of cantilever probes of various dimensions was studied. The result from the Finite Element Analysis (FEA) was compared to the experimental results. Application of this probe in a nondestructive, general-purpose, near-field nanomechanical imaging system will be discussed.

  3. Development of low noise cantilever deflection sensor for multienvironment frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuma, Takeshi; Kimura, Masayuki; Kobayashi, Kei; Matsushige, Kazumi; Yamada, Hirofumi

    2005-05-15

    We have developed a low noise cantilever deflection sensor with a deflection noise density of 17 fm/{radical}(Hz) by optimizing the parameters used in optical beam deflection (OBD) method. Using this sensor, we have developed a multienvironment frequency-modulation atomic force microscope (FM-AFM) that can achieve true molecular resolution in various environments such as in moderate vacuum, air, and liquid. The low noise characteristic of the deflection sensor makes it possible to obtain a maximum frequency sensitivity limited by the thermal Brownian motion of the cantilever in every environment. In this paper, the major noise sources in OBD method are discussed in both theoretical and experimental aspects. The excellent noise performance of the deflection sensor is demonstrated in deflection and frequency measurements. True molecular-resolution FM-AFM images of a polydiacetylene single crystal taken in vacuum, air, and water are presented.

  4. Nanoporous-Gold-Based Hybrid Cantilevered Actuator Dealloyed and Driven by A Modified Rotary Triboelectric Nanogenerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuequan; Liu, Mengmeng; Huang, Baisheng; Liu, Hong; Hu, Weiguo; Shao, Li-Hua; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-04-01

    We firstly designed an electrochemical system for dealloying to synthesize nanoporous gold (NPG) and also driving the novel NPG based actuator by utilizing a modified rotary triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG). Compared to the previous reported TENG whose outputs decline due to temperature rising resulting from electrodes friction, the modified TENG with a cooling system has stable output current and voltage increased by 14% and 20%, respectively. The novel cantilevered hybrid actuator characterised by light-weight (ca. 3 mg) and small volume (ca. 30 mm × 2 mm × 10 μm) is driven by a microcontroller modulated TENG with the displacement of 2.2 mm, which is about 106 times larger than that of traditional cantilever using planar surfaces. The energy conversion efficiencies defined as the energy consumed during dealloying and actuation compared with the output of TENG are 47% and 56.7%, respectively.

  5. Nanoporous-Gold-Based Hybrid Cantilevered Actuator Dealloyed and Driven by A Modified Rotary Triboelectric Nanogenerator

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuequan; Liu, Mengmeng; Huang, Baisheng; Liu, Hong; Hu, Weiguo; Shao, Li-Hua; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-01-01

    We firstly designed an electrochemical system for dealloying to synthesize nanoporous gold (NPG) and also driving the novel NPG based actuator by utilizing a modified rotary triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG). Compared to the previous reported TENG whose outputs decline due to temperature rising resulting from electrodes friction, the modified TENG with a cooling system has stable output current and voltage increased by 14% and 20%, respectively. The novel cantilevered hybrid actuator characterised by light-weight (ca. 3 mg) and small volume (ca. 30 mm × 2 mm × 10 μm) is driven by a microcontroller modulated TENG with the displacement of 2.2 mm, which is about 106 times larger than that of traditional cantilever using planar surfaces. The energy conversion efficiencies defined as the energy consumed during dealloying and actuation compared with the output of TENG are 47% and 56.7%, respectively. PMID:27063987

  6. Rapid detection of bacterial resistance to antibiotics using AFM cantilevers as nanomechanical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longo, G.; Alonso-Sarduy, L.; Rio, L. Marques; Bizzini, A.; Trampuz, A.; Notz, J.; Dietler, G.; Kasas, S.

    2013-07-01

    The widespread misuse of drugs has increased the number of multiresistant bacteria, and this means that tools that can rapidly detect and characterize bacterial response to antibiotics are much needed in the management of infections. Various techniques, such as the resazurin-reduction assays, the mycobacterial growth indicator tube or polymerase chain reaction-based methods, have been used to investigate bacterial metabolism and its response to drugs. However, many are relatively expensive or unable to distinguish between living and dead bacteria. Here we show that the fluctuations of highly sensitive atomic force microscope cantilevers can be used to detect low concentrations of bacteria, characterize their metabolism and quantitatively screen (within minutes) their response to antibiotics. We applied this methodology to Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, showing that live bacteria produced larger cantilever fluctuations than bacteria exposed to antibiotics. Our preliminary experiments suggest that the fluctuation is associated with bacterial metabolism.

  7. Multi-resonant wideband energy harvester based on a folded asymmetric M-shaped cantilever

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Meng; Mao, Haiyang; Li, Zhigang; Liu, Ruiwen; Ming, Anjie; Ou, Yi; Ou, Wen

    2015-07-15

    This article reports a compact wideband piezoelectric vibration energy harvester consisting of three proof masses and an asymmetric M-shaped cantilever. The M-shaped beam comprises a main beam and two folded and dimension varied auxiliary beams interconnected through the proof mass at the end of the main cantilever. Such an arrangement constitutes a three degree-of-freedom vibrating body, which can tune the resonant frequencies of its first three orders close enough to obtain a utility wide bandwidth. The finite element simulation results and the experimental results are well matched. The operation bandwidth comprises three adjacent voltage peaks on account of the frequency interval shortening mechanism. The result shows that the proposed piezoelectric energy harvester could be efficient and adaptive in practical vibration circumstance based on multiple resonant modes.

  8. Measuring the resonant vibration of a sessile droplet using MEMS based cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Thanh-Vinh; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Shimoyama, Isao

    2015-11-01

    We directly measure the normal force distribution on the contact area during the 1st mode resonant vibration of a droplet using an array of MEMS based cantilever. The measurement result shows that the normal force change is the largest at the periphery of the contact area. The ratio between the amplitude of the normal force change at the periphery of the contact area over that at the center of the contact area was approximately 20 times, in the case of 1.8 μL water droplet whose equilibrium contact angle is 140 degrees. We also demonstrate a method to estimate viscosity based on the measurement of the droplet vibration using MEMS cantilevers. The proposed method is able to estimate viscosity using less than 3 μL sample and has a simple operating principle. We believe that this method is suitable for point-of-care testing and characterization of chemical and biological solutions.

  9. An Euler-Bernoulli second strain gradient beam theory for cantilever sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiot, F.

    2013-04-01

    This paper derives an Euler-Bernoulli beam theory for isotropic elastic materials based on a second strain gradient description. As such a description has been proved to allow for the definition of surface tension for solids, the equations satisfied by a beam featuring a through-thickness cohesion modulus gradient are established in order to describe the behaviour of micro cantilever sensors. Closed-form solutions are given for mechanical and chemical loadings. It is then shown that the involved material parameters seem virtually identifiable from full-field measurements and that the shape of the displacement field resulting from a chemical loading depends on the cantilever's thickness as well as on the material parameters. This makes such a theory potentially able to explain some of the experimental results found in the literature.

  10. A method to measure cellular adhesion utilizing a polymer micro-cantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaitas, Angelo; Malhotra, Ricky; Pienta, Kenneth

    2013-09-01

    In the present study we engineered a micro-machined polyimide cantilever with an embedded sensing element to investigate cellular adhesion, in terms of its relative ability to stick to a cross-linker, 3,3'-dithiobis[sulfosuccinimidylpropionate], coated on the cantilever surface. To achieve this objective, we investigated adhesive properties of three human prostate cancer cell lines, namely, a bone metastasis derived human prostate cancer cell line (PC3), a brain metastasis derived human prostate cancer cell line (DU145), and a subclone of PC3 (PC3-EMT14). We found that PC3-EMT14, which displays a mesenchymal phenotype, has the least adhesion compared to PC3 and DU145, which exhibit an epithelial phenotype.

  11. A virtual instrument to standardise the calibration of atomic force microscope cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Sader, John E; Borgani, Riccardo; Gibson, Christopher T; Haviland, David B; Higgins, Michael J; Kilpatrick, Jason I; Lu, Jianing; Mulvaney, Paul; Shearer, Cameron J; Slattery, Ashley D; Thorén, Per-Anders; Tran, Jim; Zhang, Heyou; Zhang, Hongrui; Zheng, Tian

    2016-09-01

    Atomic force microscope (AFM) users often calibrate the spring constants of cantilevers using functionality built into individual instruments. This calibration is performed without reference to a global standard, hindering the robust comparison of force measurements reported by different laboratories. Here, we describe a virtual instrument (an internet-based initiative) whereby users from all laboratories can instantly and quantitatively compare their calibration measurements to those of others-standardising AFM force measurements-and simultaneously enabling non-invasive calibration of AFM cantilevers of any geometry. This global calibration initiative requires no additional instrumentation or data processing on the part of the user. It utilises a single website where users upload currently available data. A proof-of-principle demonstration of this initiative is presented using measured data from five independent laboratories across three countries, which also allows for an assessment of current calibration.

  12. Clustering mechanism of ethanol-water mixtures investigated with photothermal microfluidic cantilever deflection spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ghoraishi, M. S.; Hawk, J. E.; Phani, Arindam; Khan, M. F.; Thundat, T.

    2016-01-01

    The infrared-active (IR) vibrational mode of ethanol (EtOH) associated with the asymmetrical stretching of the C-C-O bond in pico-liter volumes of EtOH-water binary mixtures is calorimetrically measured using photothermal microfluidic cantilever deflection spectroscopy (PMCDS). IR absorption by the confined liquid results in wavelength dependent cantilever deflections, thus providing a complementary response to IR absorption revealing a complex dipole moment dependence on mixture concentration. Solvent-induced blue shifts of the C-C-O asymmetric vibrational stretch for both anti and gauche conformers of EtOH were precisely monitored for EtOH concentrations ranging from 20–100% w/w. Variations in IR absorption peak maxima show an inverse dependence on induced EtOH dipole moment (μ) and is attributed to the complex clustering mechanism of EtOH-water mixtures. PMID:27046089

  13. Experimental characterization of cantilever-type piezoelectric generator operating at resonance for vibration energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanini, Roberto; Quattrocchi, Antonino

    2016-06-01

    A cantilever-type resonant piezoelectric generator (RPG) has been designed by gluing a PZT patch working in d31 mode onto a glass fibre reinforced composite cantilever beam with a discrete mass applied on its free end. The electrical and dynamic behaviour of the RPG prototype has been investigated by carrying out laboratory tests aimed to assess the effect of definite design parameters, specifically the electric resistance load and the excitation frequency. Results showed that an optimum resistance load exists, at which power generation is maximized. Moreover, it has been showed that power generation is strongly influenced by the vibration frequency highlighting that, at resonance, output power can be increased by more than one order of magnitude. Possible applications include inertial resonant harvester for energy recovery from vibrating machines, sea waves or wind flux and self-powering of wireless sensor nodes.

  14. Experimental characterization of cantilever-type piezoelectric generator operating at resonance for vibration energy harvesting

    SciTech Connect

    Montanini, Roberto Quattrocchi, Antonino

    2016-06-28

    A cantilever-type resonant piezoelectric generator (RPG) has been designed by gluing a PZT patch working in d{sub 31} mode onto a glass fibre reinforced composite cantilever beam with a discrete mass applied on its free end. The electrical and dynamic behaviour of the RPG prototype has been investigated by carrying out laboratory tests aimed to assess the effect of definite design parameters, specifically the electric resistance load and the excitation frequency. Results showed that an optimum resistance load exists, at which power generation is maximized. Moreover, it has been showed that power generation is strongly influenced by the vibration frequency highlighting that, at resonance, output power can be increased by more than one order of magnitude. Possible applications include inertial resonant harvester for energy recovery from vibrating machines, sea waves or wind flux and self-powering of wireless sensor nodes.

  15. High-speed force mapping on living cells with a small cantilever atomic force microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Braunsmann, Christoph; Seifert, Jan; Rheinlaender, Johannes; Schäffer, Tilman E.

    2014-07-15

    The imaging speed of the wide-spread force mapping mode for quantitative mechanical measurements on soft samples in liquid with the atomic force microscope (AFM) is limited by the bandwidth of the z-scanner and viscous drag forces on the cantilever. Here, we applied high-speed, large scan-range atomic force microscopy and small cantilevers to increase the speed of force mapping by ≈10−100 times. This allowed resolving dynamic processes on living mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Cytoskeleton reorganization during cell locomotion, growth of individual cytoskeleton fibers, cell blebbing, and the formation of endocytic pits in the cell membrane were observed. Increasing the force curve rate from 2 to 300 Hz increased the measured apparent Young's modulus of the cells by about 10 times, which facilitated force mapping measurements at high speed.

  16. Note: A high-performance, low-cost laser shutter using a piezoelectric cantilever actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowden, W.; Hill, I. R.; Baird, P. E. G.; Gill, P.

    2017-01-01

    We report the design and characterization of an optical shutter based on a piezoelectric cantilever. Compared to conventional electro-magnetic shutters, the device has intrinsically low power and is acoustically quiet. The cantilever position is controlled by a high-voltage op-amp circuit for easy tuning of the range of travel, and mechanical slew rate, which enables a factor of 30 reduction in mechanical noise compared to a rapidly switched device. We achieve shuttering rise and fall times of 11 μs, corresponding to mechanical slew rates of 1.3 ms-1, with a timing jitter of less than 1 μs. When used to create optical pulses, we achieve minimum pulse durations of 250 μs. The reliability of the shutter was investigated by operating continuously for one week at 10 Hz switching rate. After this period, neither the shutter delay or actuation speed had changed by a measurable amount.

  17. Cantilever-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy applied in the research of natural and synthetic calcium phosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brangule, A.; Gross, K. A.; Stepanova, V.

    2017-04-01

    This study demonstrates the significant potential of cantilever-enhanced Fourier transform infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy (FTIR PAS) principles. The improved sensitivity and reproducibility of this method presents a potent tool in the study of biomaterials. The article discusses aspects of the application of cantilever-enhanced FTIR PAS in the research of natural and biological calcium phosphate and the statistical evaluation of the FTIR PAS sampling method. The improved constructions of the FTIR PAS accessory reduce limitations of the conventional capacitive microphone and provide a sensitive tool for samples or processes unreachable by more traditional transmittance methods, or ATR sampling technique. The most common and important applications have been discussed in-depth to show the wide range of problems solved by FTIR PAS.

  18. Numerical analysis of dynamic force spectroscopy using the torsional harmonic cantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solares, Santiago D.; Hölscher, Hendrik

    2010-02-01

    A spectral analysis method has been recently introduced by Stark et al (2002 Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 99 8473-8) and implemented by Sahin et al (2007 Nat. Nanotechnol. 2 507-14) using a T-shaped cantilever design, the torsional harmonic cantilever (THC), which is capable of performing simultaneous tapping-mode atomic force microscopy imaging and force spectroscopy. Here we report on numerical simulations of the THC system using a simple dual-mass flexural-torsional model, which is applied in combination with Fourier data processing software to illustrate the spectroscopy process for quality factors corresponding to liquid, air and vacuum environments. We also illustrate the acquisition of enhanced topographical images and deformed surface contours under the application of uniform forces, and compare the results to those obtained with a previously reported linear dual-spring-mass model.

  19. Recording oscillations of sub-micron size cantilevers by extreme ultraviolet Fourier transform holography.

    PubMed

    Monserud, Nils C; Malm, Erik B; Wachulak, Przemyslaw W; Putkaradze, Vakhtang; Balakrishnan, Ganesh; Chao, Weilun; Anderson, Erik; Carlton, David; Marconi, Mario C

    2014-02-24

    We recorded the fast oscillation of sub-micron cantilevers using time-resolved extreme ultraviolet (EUV) Fourier transform holography. A tabletop capillary discharge EUV laser with a wavelength of 46.9 nm provided a large flux of coherent illumination that was split using a Fresnel zone plate to generate the object and the reference beams. The reference wave was produced by the first order focus while a central opening in the zone plate provided a direct illumination of the cantilevers. Single-shot holograms allowed for the composition of a movie featuring the fast oscillation. Three-dimensional displacements of the object were determined as well by numerical back-propagation, or "refocusing" of the electromagnetic fields during the reconstruction of a single hologram.

  20. Modeling and simulation of the bending behavior of electrically-stimulated cantilevered hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attaran, Abdolhamid; Brummund, Jörg; Wallmersperger, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    A systematic development of a chemo-electro-mechanical continuum model—for the application of electrically-stimulated cantilevered hydrogels—and its numerical implementation are presented in this work. The governing equations are derived within the framework of the continuum mechanics of mixtures. The finite element method is then utilized for the numerical treatment of the model. For the numerical simulation a cantilevered strip of an anionic hydrogel immersed in a NaCl solution bath is considered. An electric field is applied to electrically stimulate the aforementioned hydrogel. The application of the electric field alters the initial concentrations of the ionic species due to the chemo-electrical coupling. The gradual increase in the applied electric field leads to the bending movement of the hydrogel. Concluding, the presented multi-field continuum model is capable of simulating hydrogel bending actuators and also more complex systems e.g. gel finger grippers.