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Sample records for cantilever cross-arch fixed

  1. Assessment of various factors for feasibility of fixed cantilever bridge: a review study.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ashu; Rahul, G R; Poduval, Soorya T; Shetty, Karunakar

    2012-01-01

    Cantilever fixed partial dentures are defined as having one or more abutments at one end of the prosthesis while the other end is unsupported. Much controversy without documentary evidence has surrounded this prosthesis. Despite negative arguments, the cantilever prosthesis has been used extensively by the clinicians. If used nonjudiciously without following proper guidelines these might lead to some complications. Although complications may be an indication that clinical failure has occurred, this is not typically the case. It is also possible that complications may reflect substandard care. Apart from the substandard care, the unique arrangement of the abutments and pontic also accounts for the prime disadvantage: the creation of a class I lever system. When the cantilevered pontic is placed under occlusal function, forces are placed on the abutments. There are various criteria and factors necessary for a successful cantilever fixed partial denture (FPD). The purpose of this paper is to discuss briefly various factors involved in the planning of a cantilever fixed partial denture.

  2. Effect of cantilever length and alloy framework on the stress distribution in peri-implant area of cantilevered implant-supported fixed partial dentures

    PubMed Central

    SUEDAM, Valdey; MORETTI, Rafael Tobias; SOUSA, Edson Antonio Capello; RUBO, José Henrique

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Because many mechanical variables are present in the oral cavity, the proper load transfer between the prosthesis and the bone is important for treatment planning and for the longevity of the implant-supported fixed partial denture. Objectives To verify the stress generated on the peri-implant area of cantilevered implant-supported fixed partial dentures and the potential effects of such variable. Material and Methods A U-shaped polyurethane model simulating the mandibular bone containing two implants (Ø 3.75 mm) was used. Six groups were formed according to the alloy’s framework (CoCr or PdAg) and the point of load application (5 mm, 10 mm and 15 mm of cantilever arm). A 300 N load was applied in pre-determined reference points. The tension generated on the mesial, lingual, distal and buccal sides of the peri-implant regions was assessed using strain gauges. Results Two-way ANOVA and Tukey statistical tests were applied showing significant differences (p<0.05) between the groups. Pearson correlation test (p<0.05) was applied showing positive correlations between the increase of the cantilever arm and the deformation of the peri-implant area. Conclusions This report demonstrated the CoCr alloy shows larger compression values compared to the PdAg alloy for the same distances of cantilever. The point of load application influences the deformation on the peri-implant area, increasing in accordance with the increase of the lever arm. PMID:27119758

  3. Implant-supported fixed cantilever prosthesis: the impact on bone stress deformity.

    PubMed

    Gvetadze, R Sh; Fedorovsky, A N; Kozlova, L S; Shirokov, Yu Yu

    2016-01-01

    Jaw fragment with complete absence of 3 teeth in the chewing area was simulated with masticatory loads corresponding to different types of antagonists: full dentures, partial dentures, intact teeth, implant-refained restavations. Simulated consoled elements of different lengths and sizes of dental implants. The analysis of the stress-deformation state of the teeth construction in the ANSYS program. As a result, it was found that with increasing length of the cantilever element 2 times - stress in the bone grows almost linearly. By reducing the diameter of the implant - is quadratic.

  4. Three-dimensional finite element analysis of zirconia all-ceramic cantilevered fixed partial dentures with different framework designs.

    PubMed

    Miura, Shoko; Kasahara, Shin; Yamauchi, Shinobu; Egusa, Hiroshi

    2017-03-17

    The purpose of this study were: to perform stress analyses using three-dimensional finite element analysis methods; to analyze the mechanical stress of different framework designs; and to investigate framework designs that will provide for the long-term stability of both cantilevered fixed partial dentures (FPDs) and abutment teeth. An analysis model was prepared for three units of cantilevered FPDs that assume a missing mandibular first molar. Four types of framework design (Design 1, basic type; Design 2, framework width expanded buccolingually by 2 mm; Design 3, framework height expanded by 0.5 mm to the occlusal surface side from the end abutment to the connector area; and Design 4, a combination of Designs 2 and 3) were created. Two types of framework material (yttrium-oxide partially stabilized zirconia and a high precious noble metal gold alloy) and two types of abutment material (dentin and brass) were used. In the framework designs, Design 1 exhibited the highest maximum principal stress value for both zirconia and gold alloy. In the abutment tooth, Design 3 exhibited the highest maximum principal stress value for all abutment teeth. In the present study, Design 4 (the design with expanded framework height and framework width) could contribute to preventing the concentration of stress and protecting abutment teeth.

  5. Three-Dimensional Finite Element Analysis of Anterior Two-Unit Cantilever Resin-Bonded Fixed Dental Prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Shinya, Akikazu; Lassila, Lippo V. J.; Vallittu, Pekka K.; Kleverlaan, Cornelis J.; Feilzer, Albert J.; De Moor, Roeland J. G.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of different framework materials on biomechanical behaviour of anterior two-unit cantilever resin-bonded fixed dental prostheses (RBFDPs). A three-dimensional finite element model of a two-unit cantilever RBFDP replacing a maxillary lateral incisor was created. Five framework materials were evaluated: direct fibre-reinforced composite (FRC-Z250), indirect fibre-reinforced composite (FRC-ES), gold alloy (M), glass ceramic (GC), and zirconia (ZI). Finite element analysis was performed and stress distribution was evaluated. A similar stress pattern, with stress concentrations in the connector area, was observed in RBFDPs for all materials. Maximal principal stress showed a decreasing order: ZI > M > GC > FRC-ES > FRC-Z250. The maximum displacement of RBFDPs was higher for FRC-Z250 and FRC-ES than for M, GC, and ZI. FE analysis depicted differences in location of the maximum stress at the luting cement interface between materials. For FRC-Z250 and FRC-ES, the maximum stress was located in the upper part of the proximal area of the retainer, whereas, for M, GC, and ZI, the maximum stress was located at the cervical outline of the retainer. The present study revealed differences in biomechanical behaviour between all RBFDPs. The general observation was that a RBFDP made of FRC provided a more favourable stress distribution. PMID:25879077

  6. [Influence of retainer design on fixation strength of resin-bonded glass fiber reinforced composite fixed cantilever dentures].

    PubMed

    Petrikas, O A; Voroshilin, Iu G; Petrikas, I V

    2013-01-01

    Fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) fixed partial dentures (FPD) have become an accepted part of the restorative dentist's armamentarium. The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the influence of retainer design on the strength of two-unit cantilever resin-bonded glass FRC-FPDs. Four retainer designs were tested: a dual wing, a dual wing + horizontal groove, a dual wing + occlusal rest and a step-box. Of each design on 7 human mandibular molars, FRC-FPDs of a premolar size were produced. The FRC framework was made of resin Revolution (Kerr) impregnated glass fibers (GlasSpan, GlasSpan) and veneered with hybrid resin composite (Charisma, Kulzer). Revolution (Kerr) was used as resin luting cement. FRC-FPDs were loaded to failure in a universal testing machine. T (Student's)-test was used to evaluate the data. The four designs were analyzed with finite element analysis (FEA) to reveal the stress distribution within the tooth/restoration complex. Significantly lower fracture strengths were observed with inlay-retained FPDs (step-box: 172±11 N) compared to wing-retained FPDs (p<0.05) (a dual wing + horizontal groove 222±9 N). The highest fracture strengths were observed with dual wing + occlusal rest FPDs: 250±10 N compared to inlay-retained FPDs (p<0.001) and wing-retained FPDs (p<0.001). FEA showed more favorable stress distributions within the tooth/restoration complex for dual wing retainers+ occlusal rest FPDs. There was stress concentration around connectors and retainers near connectors. A dual-wing retainer with occlusal rest is the optimal design for replacement of a single premolar by means of a two-unit cantilever FRC-FPDs.

  7. Inlay-retained cantilever fixed dental prostheses to substitute a single premolar: impact of zirconia framework design after dynamic loading.

    PubMed

    Shahin, Ramez; Tannous, Fahed; Kern, Matthias

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this in-vitro study was to evaluate the influence of the framework design on the durability of inlay-retained cantilever fixed dental prostheses (IR-FDPs), made from zirconia ceramic, after artificial ageing. Forty-eight caries-free human premolars were prepared as abutments for all-ceramic cantilevered IR-FDPs using six framework designs: occlusal-distal (OD) inlay, OD inlay with an oral retainer wing, OD inlay with two retainer wings, mesial-occlusal-distal (MOD) inlay, MOD inlay with an oral retainer ring, and veneer partial coping with a distal box (VB). Zirconia IR-FDPs were fabricated via computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology. The bonding surfaces were air-abraded (50 μm alumina/0.1 MPa), and the frameworks were bonded with adhesive resin cement. Specimens were stored for 150 d in a 37°C water bath during which they were thermocycled between 5 and 55°C for 37,500 cycles; thereafter, they were exposed to 600,000 cycles of dynamic loading with a 5-kg load in a chewing simulator. All surviving specimens were loaded onto the pontic and tested until failure using a universal testing machine. The mean failure load of the groups ranged from 260.8 to 746.7 N. Statistical analysis showed that both MOD groups exhibited significantly higher failure loads compared with the other groups (i.e. the three OD groups and the VB group) and that there was no significant difference in the failure load among the OD groups and the VB group. In conclusion, zirconia IR-FDPs with a modified design exhibited promising failure modes.

  8. Cantilever biosensors.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Jürgen

    2008-07-01

    This review will provide a general introduction to the field of cantilever biosensors by discussing the basic principles and the basic technical background necessary to understand and evaluate this class of sensors. Microfabricated cantilever sensors respond to changes in their environment or changes on their surface with a mechanical bending in the order of nanometers which can easily be detected. They are able to detect pH and temperature changes, the formation of self-assembled monolayers, DNA hybridization, antibody-antigen interactions, or the adsorption of bacteria. The review will focus on the surface stress mode of microfabricated cantilever arrays and their application as biosensors in molecular life science. A general background on biosensors, an overview of the different modes of operation of cantilever sensors and some details on sensor functionalization will be given. Finally, key experiments and current theoretical efforts to describe the surface stress mode of cantilever sensors will be discussed.

  9. Compliant cantilevered micromold

    DOEpatents

    Morales, Alfredo Martin; Domeier, Linda A.; Gonzales, Marcela G.; Keifer, Patrick N.; Garino, Terry Joseph

    2006-08-15

    A compliant cantilevered three-dimensional micromold is provided. The compliant cantilevered micromold is suitable for use in the replication of cantilevered microparts and greatly simplifies the replication of such cantilevered parts. The compliant cantilevered micromold may be used to fabricate microparts using casting or electroforming techniques. When the compliant micromold is used to fabricate electroformed cantilevered parts, the micromold will also comprise an electrically conducting base formed by a porous metal substrate that is embedded within the compliant cantilevered micromold. Methods for fabricating the compliant cantilevered micromold as well as methods of replicating cantilevered microparts using the compliant cantilevered micromold are also provided.

  10. Piezoelectric cantilever sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Wan Y. (Inventor); Shih, Wei-Heng (Inventor); Shen, Zuyan (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A piezoelectric cantilever with a non-piezoelectric, or piezoelectric tip useful as mass and viscosity sensors. The change in the cantilever mass can be accurately quantified by monitoring a resonance frequency shift of the cantilever. For bio-detection, antibodies or other specific receptors of target antigens may be immobilized on the cantilever surface, preferably on the non-piezoelectric tip. For chemical detection, high surface-area selective absorbent materials are coated on the cantilever tip. Binding of the target antigens or analytes to the cantilever surface increases the cantilever mass. Detection of target antigens or analytes is achieved by monitoring the cantilever's resonance frequency and determining the resonance frequency shift that is due to the mass of the adsorbed target antigens on the cantilever surface. The use of a piezoelectric unimorph cantilever allows both electrical actuation and electrical sensing. Incorporating a non-piezoelectric tip (14) enhances the sensitivity of the sensor. In addition, the piezoelectric cantilever can withstand damping in highly viscous liquids and can be used as a viscosity sensor in wide viscosity range.

  11. A Weed Cantilever

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Elhannan L.; Padalino, John

    1977-01-01

    Describes the Environmental Action Task activity, which may be used as a recreational game or an environmental perception experience, may be conducted indoors or out-of-doors, using weed stems (or spaghetti) and masking tape to construct a cantilever. Small groups of children work together to make the cantilever with the longest arm. Further…

  12. Nanomechanical Cantilever Array Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Hans; Hegner, Martin; Gerber, Christoph

    Microfabricated cantilever sensors have attracted much interest in recent years as devices for the fast and reliable detection of small concentrations of molecules in air and solution. In addition to application of such sensors for gas and chemical-vapor sensing, for example as an artificial nose, they have also been employed to measure physical properties of tiny amounts of materials in miniaturized versions of conventional standard techniques such as calorimetry, thermogravimetry, weighing, photothermal spectroscopy, as well as for monitoring chemical reactions such as catalysis on small surfaces. In the past few years, the cantilever-sensor concept has been extended to biochemical applications and as an analytical device for measurements of biomaterials. Because of the label-free detection principle of cantilever sensors, their small size and scalability, this kind of device is advantageous for diagnostic applications and disease monitoring, as well as for genomics or proteomics purposes. The use of microcantilever arrays enables detection of several analytes simultaneously and solves the inherent problem of thermal drift often present when using single microcantilever sensors, as some of the cantilevers can be used as sensor cantilevers for detection, and other cantilevers serve as passivated reference cantilevers that do not exhibit affinity to the molecules to be detected.

  13. Adaptive control of force microscope cantilever dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, S. E.; Dougherty, W. M.; Garbini, J. L.; Sidles, J. A.

    2007-09-01

    Magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) and other emerging scanning probe microscopies entail the detection of attonewton-scale forces. Requisite force sensitivities are achieved through the use of soft force microscope cantilevers as high resonant-Q micromechanical oscillators. In practice, the dynamics of these oscillators are greatly improved by the application of force feedback control computed in real time by a digital signal processor (DSP). Improvements include increased sensitive bandwidth, reduced oscillator ring up/down time, and reduced cantilever thermal vibration amplitude. However, when the cantilever tip and the sample are in close proximity, electrostatic and Casimir tip-sample force gradients can significantly alter the cantilever resonance frequency, foiling fixed-gain narrow-band control schemes. We report an improved, adaptive control algorithm that uses a Hilbert transform technique to continuously measure the vibration frequency of the thermally-excited cantilever and seamlessly adjust the DSP program coefficients. The closed-loop vibration amplitude is typically 0.05 nm. This adaptive algorithm enables narrow-band formally-optimal control over a wide range of resonance frequencies, and preserves the thermally-limited signal to noise ratio (SNR).

  14. Method for providing a compliant cantilevered micromold

    DOEpatents

    Morales, Alfredo M.; Domeier, Linda A.; Gonzales, Marcela G.; Keifer, Patrick N.; Garino, Terry J.

    2008-12-16

    A compliant cantilevered three-dimensional micromold is provided. The compliant cantilevered micromold is suitable for use in the replication of cantilevered microparts and greatly simplifies the replication of such cantilevered parts. The compliant cantilevered micromold may be used to fabricate microparts using casting or electroforming techniques. When the compliant micromold is used to fabricate electroformed cantilevered parts, the micromold will also comprise an electrically conducting base formed by a porous metal substrate that is embedded within the compliant cantilevered micromold. Methods for fabricating the compliant cantilevered micromold as well as methods of replicating cantilevered microparts using the compliant cantilevered micromold are also provided.

  15. Gland With Cantilever Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, Patrick B.

    1989-01-01

    Single-piece gland forms tight seal on probe or tube containing liquid or gas at high pressure. Gland and probe align as assembled by simple torquing procedure. Disconnected easily and reused at same site. Made from any of wide variety of materials so compatible with application. Cantilever ring at top of gland bites into wall of tube or probe, sealing it. Wall of tube or probe must be thick enough to accommodate deformation without rupturing. Maximum deformation designed in coordination with seating and deformation of boss or conical seal.

  16. Cantilever clamp fitting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, Patrick B. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A device is disclosed for sealing and clamping a cylindrical element which is to be attached to an object such as a wall, a pressurized vessel or another cylindrical element. The device includes a gland having an inner cylindrical wall, which is threaded at one end and is attached at a bendable end to a deformable portion, which in turn is attached to one end of a conical cantilever structure. The other end of the cantilever structure connects at a bendable area to one end of an outer cylindrical wall. The opposite end of cylindrical wall terminates in a thickened portion, the radially outer surface of which is adapted to accommodate a tool for rotating the gland. The terminal end of cylindrical wall also includes an abutment surface, which is adapted to engage a seal, which in turn engages a surface of a receiver. The receiver further includes a threaded portion for engagement with the threaded portion of gland whereby a tightening rotation of gland relative to receiver will cause relative movement between cylindrical walls and of gland. This movement causes a rotation of the conical structure and thus a bending action at bending area and at the bending end of the upper end of inner cylindrical wall. These rotational and bending actions result in a forcing of the deformable portion radially inwardly so as to contact and deform a pipe. This forcible contact creates a seal between gland and pipe, and simultaneously clamps the pipe in position.

  17. Cantilever epitaxial process

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, Carol I.; Follstaedt, David M.; Mitchell, Christine C.; Han, Jung

    2003-07-29

    A process of growing a material on a substrate, particularly growing a Group II-VI or Group III-V material, by a vapor-phase growth technique where the growth process eliminates the need for utilization of a mask or removal of the substrate from the reactor at any time during the processing. A nucleation layer is first grown upon which a middle layer is grown to provide surfaces for subsequent lateral cantilever growth. The lateral growth rate is controlled by altering the reactor temperature, pressure, reactant concentrations or reactant flow rates. Semiconductor materials, such as GaN, can be produced with dislocation densities less than 10.sup.7 /cm.sup.2.

  18. Chemical sensor with oscillating cantilevered probe

    DOEpatents

    Adams, Jesse D

    2013-02-05

    The invention provides a method of detecting a chemical species with an oscillating cantilevered probe. A cantilevered beam is driven into oscillation with a drive mechanism coupled to the cantilevered beam. A free end of the oscillating cantilevered beam is tapped against a mechanical stop coupled to a base end of the cantilevered beam. An amplitude of the oscillating cantilevered beam is measured with a sense mechanism coupled to the cantilevered beam. A treated portion of the cantilevered beam is exposed to the chemical species, wherein the cantilevered beam bends when exposed to the chemical species. A second amplitude of the oscillating cantilevered beam is measured, and the chemical species is determined based on the measured amplitudes.

  19. Mechanical behavior simulation of MEMS-based cantilever beam using COMSOL multiphysics

    SciTech Connect

    Acheli, A. Serhane, R.

    2015-03-30

    This paper presents the studies of mechanical behavior of MEMS cantilever beam made of poly-silicon material, using the coupling of three application modes (plane strain, electrostatics and the moving mesh) of COMSOL Multi-physics software. The cantilevers playing a key role in Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) devices (switches, resonators, etc) working under potential shock. This is why they require actuation under predetermined conditions, such as electrostatic force or inertial force. In this paper, we present mechanical behavior of a cantilever actuated by an electrostatic force. In addition to the simplification of calculations, the weight of the cantilever was not taken into account. Different parameters like beam displacement, electrostatics force and stress over the beam have been calculated by finite element method after having defining the geometry, the material of the cantilever model (fixed at one of ends but is free to move otherwise) and his operational space.

  20. High throughput reproducible cantilever functionalization

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Barbara R; Lee, Ida

    2014-01-21

    A method for functionalizing cantilevers is provided that includes providing a holder having a plurality of channels each having a width for accepting a cantilever probe and a plurality of probes. A plurality of cantilever probes are fastened to the plurality of channels of the holder by the spring clips. The wells of a well plate are filled with a functionalization solution, wherein adjacent wells in the well plate are separated by a dimension that is substantially equal to a dimension separating adjacent channels of the plurality of channels. Each cantilever probe that is fastened within the plurality of channels of the holder is applied to the functionalization solution that is contained in the wells of the well plate.

  1. High throughout reproducible cantilever functionalization

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Barbara R; Lee, Ida

    2014-11-25

    A method for functionalizing cantilevers is provided that includes providing a holder having a plurality of channels each having a width for accepting a cantilever probe and a plurality of probes. A plurality of cantilever probes are fastened to the plurality of channels of the holder by the spring clips. The wells of a well plate are filled with a functionalization solution, wherein adjacent wells in the well plate are separated by a dimension that is substantially equal to a dimension separating adjacent channels of the plurality of channels. Each cantilever probe that is fastened within the plurality of channels of the holder is applied to the functionalization solution that is contained in the wells of the well plate.

  2. Orthodontic Traction of Impacted Canine Using Cantilever

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, João Roberto; Cassano, Daniel Serra; Bianchi, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    The impaction of the maxillary canines causes relevant aesthetic and functional problems. The multidisciplinary approach to the proper planning and execution of orthodontic traction of the element in question is essential. Many strategies are cited in the literature; among them is the good biomechanical control in order to avoid possible side effects. The aim of this paper is to present a case report in which a superior canine impacted by palatine was pulled out with the aid of the cantilever on the Segmented Arch Technique (SAT) concept. A 14.7-year-old female patient appeared at clinic complaining about the absence of the upper right permanent canine. The proposed treatment prioritized the traction of the upper right canine without changing the occlusion and aesthetics. For this, it only installed the upper fixed appliance (Roth with slot 0.018), opting for SAT in order to minimize unwanted side effects. The use of cantilever to the traction of the upper right canine has enabled an efficient and predictable outcome, because it is of statically determined mechanics. PMID:27800192

  3. Multidomain piezo-ceramic cantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedorook, David P.

    PZT-5H is a ferroelectric and piezoelectric material that has many applications that are the subjects of current research. As a ferroelectric, PZT-5H has a permanent electrical polarization that arises from ferroelectric domains. In this thesis, numerical simulations were conducted via the well know Finite Element Method of several types of piezoelectric cantilevers that were made of PIC-181, a high quality PZT-5H made in Germany. Single crystal cantilever models with multiple polarization vectors were investigated with Q factors ranging from Q = 50 to Q = 1200, where the acoustical displacements were calculated. Further, the displacements were calculated for a multidomain cantilever model with inversely poled domains and uniform electrode configuration as well as a single crystal cantilever model with uniformly poled crystal and bipolar electrode configuration. It was shown that cantilevers that are less oblong in shape could benefit from the bipolar electrode configuration in applications where size may be an important parameter, for instance in small flying robotic insects. From the experimental measurements of the resonance and anti-resonance frequencies in various PIC-181 samples, the radial and longitudinal components of speed of sound in material were calculated. Experimental results of longitudinal speed of sound differed from the accepted value of 4.6 km/s by 1.6 % error.

  4. Precise atomic force microscope cantilever spring constant calibration using a reference cantilever array.

    PubMed

    Gates, Richard S; Reitsma, Mark G

    2007-08-01

    A method for calibrating the stiffness of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers is demonstrated using an array of uniform microfabricated reference cantilevers. A series of force-displacement curves was obtained using a commercial AFM test cantilever on the reference cantilever array, and the data were analyzed using an implied Euler-Bernoulli model to extract the test cantilever spring constant from linear regression fitting. The method offers a factor of 5 improvement over the precision of the usual reference cantilever calibration method and, when combined with the Systeme International traceability potential of the cantilever array, can provide very accurate spring constant calibrations.

  5. Cantilevered probe detector with piezoelectric element

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Jesse D; Sulchek, Todd A; Feigin, Stuart C

    2014-04-29

    A disclosed chemical detection system for detecting a target material, such as an explosive material, can include a cantilevered probe, a probe heater coupled to the cantilevered probe, and a piezoelectric element disposed on the cantilevered probe. The piezoelectric element can be configured as a detector and/or an actuator. Detection can include, for example, detecting a movement of the cantilevered probe or a property of the cantilevered probe. The movement or a change in the property of the cantilevered probe can occur, for example, by adsorption of the target material, desorption of the target material, reaction of the target material and/or phase change of the target material. Examples of detectable movements and properties include temperature shifts, impedance shifts, and resonant frequency shifts of the cantilevered probe. The overall chemical detection system can be incorporated, for example, into a handheld explosive material detection system.

  6. Cantilevered probe detector with piezoelectric element

    DOEpatents

    Adams, Jesse D.; Sulchek, Todd A.; Feigin, Stuart C.

    2010-04-06

    A disclosed chemical detection system for detecting a target material, such as an explosive material, can include a cantilevered probe, a probe heater coupled to the cantilevered probe, and a piezoelectric element disposed on the cantilevered probe. The piezoelectric element can be configured as a detector and/or an actuator. Detection can include, for example, detecting a movement of the cantilevered probe or a property of the cantilevered probe. The movement or a change in the property of the cantilevered probe can occur, for example, by adsorption of the target material, desorption of the target material, reaction of the target material and/or phase change of the target material. Examples of detectable movements and properties include temperature shifts, impedance shifts, and resonant frequency shifts of the cantilevered probe. The overall chemical detection system can be incorporated, for example, into a handheld explosive material detection system.

  7. Cantilevered probe detector with piezoelectric element

    DOEpatents

    Adams, Jesse D; Sulchek, Todd A; Feigin, Stuart C

    2013-04-30

    A disclosed chemical detection system for detecting a target material, such as an explosive material, can include a cantilevered probe, a probe heater coupled to the cantilevered probe, and a piezoelectric element disposed on the cantilevered probe. The piezoelectric element can be configured as a detector and/or an actuator. Detection can include, for example, detecting a movement of the cantilevered probe or a property of the cantilevered probe. The movement or a change in the property of the cantilevered probe can occur, for example, by adsorption of the target material, desorption of the target material, reaction of the target material and/or phase change of the target material. Examples of detectable movements and properties include temperature shifts, impedance shifts, and resonant frequency shifts of the cantilevered probe. The overall chemical detection system can be incorporated, for example, into a handheld explosive material detection system.

  8. Cantilevered probe detector with piezoelectric element

    DOEpatents

    Adams, Jesse D [Reno, NV; Sulchek, Todd A [Oakland, CA; Feigin, Stuart C [Reno, NV

    2012-07-10

    A disclosed chemical detection system for detecting a target material, such as an explosive material, can include a cantilevered probe, a probe heater coupled to the cantilevered probe, and a piezoelectric element disposed on the cantilevered probe. The piezoelectric element can be configured as a detector and/or an actuator. Detection can include, for example, detecting a movement of the cantilevered probe or a property of the cantilevered probe. The movement or a change in the property of the cantilevered probe can occur, for example, by adsorption of the target material, desorption of the target material, reaction of the target material and/or phase change of the target material. Examples of detectable movements and properties include temperature shifts, impedance shifts, and resonant frequency shifts of the cantilevered probe. The overall chemical detection system can be incorporated, for example, into a handheld explosive material detection system.

  9. 16. PIER CAP DETAIL, SHOWING EXPANSION AND FIXED BEARING SHOES, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. PIER CAP DETAIL, SHOWING EXPANSION AND FIXED BEARING SHOES, BOTTOM CHORD / END POST CONNECTION AND CANTILEVERED SIDEWALK. VIEW TO WEST. - Holbrook Bridge, Spanning Little Colorado River at AZ 77, Holbrook, Navajo County, AZ

  10. 13. VIEW OF PIER 2, SHOWING FIXED SHOES, THE SOUTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. VIEW OF PIER 2, SHOWING FIXED SHOES, THE SOUTH GIRDER (PANELS 3 & 2), AND CANTILEVER BRACKETS & HANDRAIL, LOOKING NORTHWEST Harms - Benton Street Bridge, Spanning Iowa River at Benton Street, Iowa City, Johnson County, IA

  11. Tunnel junctions, cantilevers, and potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, Shawn

    We have developed a process for making sub-micrometer dimensional cantilevers, clamped beams, and more complicate electro-mechanical structures that carry integrated electrical leads. Such objects are perhaps useful as test structures for connecting to and measuring the electrical properties of molecular sized objects, as high frequency electromechanical components for radio and microwave frequency applications, and as sensor components for studying the fluctuation physics of small machines. Our process uses two realigned electron-beam lithography steps, a thin film angled deposition system, and differential removal of sacrificial aluminum layers to produce freely suspended sub-micron electromechanical components. We have produced cantilevers and beams on a variety of substrates (silica, silicon, and poly-imide) and have produced insulating, conductive, and multi-layer mechanical structures. We have measured mechanical resonances in the 10 MHz range by electrostatically actuating the cantilevers while in a magnetic field (3500 gauss) and measuring the voltage that results across the front edge of the cantilever. Two structures are fabricated sharing a common ground so that a balanced detection technique can be used to eliminate background signals. Due to the square dependence of the electrostatic force on the voltage, they can be resonated by a drive voltage of 1/2 the natural frequency or at the natural frequency. Two separate attempts have been made to apply these resonators. First, a process was developed to integrate a tunnel junction with the cantilever. These devices can possibly be used for probing small-scale systems such as molecules. We have verified the exponential variation of the tunneling resistance with both substrate flex and electrostatic gating. Second, a novel gate structure was developed to create a double potential well for resonator motion. This is accomplished by placing a multilayer structure in front of the hairpin cantilever consisting two

  12. Design for minimizing fracture risk of all-ceramic cantilever dental bridge.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhongpu; Zhou, Shiwei; Li, Eric; Li, Wei; Swain, Michael V; Li, Qing

    2015-01-01

    Minimization of the peak stresses and fracture incidence induced by mastication function is considered critical in design of all-ceramic dental restorations, especially for cantilever fixed partial dentures (FPDs). The focus of this study is on developing a mechanically-sound optimal design for all-ceramic cantilever dental bridge in a posterior region. The topology optimization procedure in association with Extended Finite Element Method (XFEM) is implemented here to search for the best possible distribution of porcelain and zirconia materials in the bridge structure. The designs with different volume fractions of zirconia are considered. The results show that this new methodology is capable of improving FPD design by minimizing incidence of crack in comparison with the initial design. Potentially, it provides dental technicians with a new design tool to develop mechanically sound cantilever fixed partial dentures for more complicated clinical situation.

  13. Multiwell micromechanical cantilever array reader for biotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, R.; Best, A.; Berger, R.; Cherian, S.; Lorenzoni, S.; Macis, E.; Raiteri, R.; Cain, R.

    2007-08-01

    We use a multiwell micromechanical cantilever sensor (MCS) device to measure surface stress changes induced by specific adsorption of molecules. A multiplexed assay format facilitates the monitoring of the bending of 16 MCSs in parallel. The 16 MCSs are grouped within four separate wells. Each well can be addressed independently by different analyte liquids. This enables functionalization of MCS separately by flowing different solutions through each well. In addition, each well contains a fixed reference mirror which allows measuring the absolute bending of MCS. In addition, the mirror can be used to follow refractive index changes upon mixing of different solutions. The effect of the flow rate on the MCS bending change was found to be dependent on the absolute bending value of MCS. Experiments and finite element simulations of solution exchange in wells were performed. Both revealed that one solution can be exchanged by another one after 200μl volume has flown through. Using this device, the adsorption of thiolated DNA molecules and 6-mercapto-1-hexanol on gold surfaces was performed to test the nanomechanical response of MCS.

  14. Prototype cantilevers for quantitative lateral force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Reitsma, Mark G.; Gates, Richard S.; Friedman, Lawrence H.; Cook, Robert F.

    2011-09-15

    Prototype cantilevers are presented that enable quantitative surface force measurements using contact-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM). The ''hammerhead'' cantilevers facilitate precise optical lever system calibrations for cantilever flexure and torsion, enabling quantifiable adhesion measurements and friction measurements by lateral force microscopy (LFM). Critically, a single hammerhead cantilever of known flexural stiffness and probe length dimension can be used to perform both a system calibration as well as surface force measurements in situ, which greatly increases force measurement precision and accuracy. During LFM calibration mode, a hammerhead cantilever allows an optical lever ''torque sensitivity'' to be generated for the quantification of LFM friction forces. Precise calibrations were performed on two different AFM instruments, in which torque sensitivity values were specified with sub-percent relative uncertainty. To examine the potential for accurate lateral force measurements using the prototype cantilevers, finite element analysis predicted measurement errors of a few percent or less, which could be reduced via refinement of calibration methodology or cantilever design. The cantilevers are compatible with commercial AFM instrumentation and can be used for other AFM techniques such as contact imaging and dynamic mode measurements.

  15. Cantilevers orthodontics forces measured by fiber sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Neblyssa; Milczewski, Maura S.; de Oliveira, Valmir; Guariza Filho, Odilon; Lopes, Stephani C. P. S.; Kalinowski, Hypolito J.

    2015-09-01

    Fibers Bragg Gratings were used to evaluate the transmission of the forces generates by orthodontic mechanic based one and two cantilevers used to move molars to the upright position. The results showed levels forces of approximately 0,14N near to the root of the molar with one and two cantilevers.

  16. Oscillations of end loaded cantilever beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macho-Stadler, E.; Elejalde-García, M. J.; Llanos-Vázquez, R.

    2015-09-01

    This article presents several simple experiments based on changing transverse vibration frequencies in a cantilever beam, when acted on by an external attached mass load at the free end. By using a mechanical wave driver, available in introductory undergraduate laboratories, we provide various experimental results for end loaded cantilever beams that fit reasonably well into a linear equation. The behaviour of the cantilever beam’s weak-damping resonance response is studied for the case of metal resonance strips. As the mass load increases, a more pronounced decrease occurs in the fundamental frequency of beam vibration. It is important to note that cantilever construction is often used in architectural design and engineering construction projects but current analysis also predicts the influence of mass load on the sound generated by musical free reeds with boundary conditions similar to a cantilever beam.

  17. Resonance response of scanning force microscopy cantilevers

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, G.Y.; Warmack, R.J.; Thundat, T.; Allison, D.P. ); Huang, A. )

    1994-08-01

    A variational method is used to calculate the deflection and the fundamental and harmonic resonance frequencies of commercial V-shaped and rectangular atomic force microscopy cantilevers. The effective mass of V-shaped cantilevers is roughly half that calculated for the equivalent rectangular cantilevers. Damping by environmental gases, including air, nitrogen, argon, and helium, affects the frequency of maximum response and to a much greater degree the quality factor [ital Q]. Helium has the lowest viscosity, resulting in the highest [ital Q], and thus provides the best sensitivity in noncontact force microscopy. Damping in liquids is dominated by an increase in effective mass of the cantilever due to an added mass of the liquid being dragged with that cantilever.

  18. Efficiency improvement in the cantilever photothermal excitation method using a photothermal conversion layer.

    PubMed

    Inada, Natsumi; Asakawa, Hitoshi; Kobayashi, Taiki; Fukuma, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Photothermal excitation is a cantilever excitation method that enables stable and accurate operation for dynamic-mode AFM measurements. However, the low excitation efficiency of the method has often limited its application in practical studies. In this study, we propose a method for improving the photothermal excitation efficiency by coating cantilever backside surface near its fixed end with colloidal graphite as a photothermal conversion (PTC) layer. The excitation efficiency for a standard cantilever of PPP-NCHAuD with a spring constant of ≈40 N/m and a relatively stiff cantilever of AC55 with a spring constant of ≈140 N/m were improved by 6.1 times and 2.5 times, respectively, by coating with a PTC layer. We experimentally demonstrate high stability of the PTC layer in liquid by AFM imaging of a mica surface with atomic resolution in phosphate buffer saline solution for more than 2 h without any indication of possible contamination from the coating. The proposed method, using a PTC layer made of colloidal graphite, greatly enhances photothermal excitation efficiency even for a relatively stiff cantilever in liquid.

  19. Generation of squeezing: magnetic dipoles on cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seok, Hyojun; Singh, Swati; Steinke, Steven; Meystre, Pierre

    2011-05-01

    We investigate the generation of motional squeezed states in a nano-mechanical cantilever. Our model system consists of a nanoscale cantilever - whose center-of-mass motion is initially cooled to its quantum mechanical ground state - magnetically coupled a classically driven mechanical tuning fork. We show that the magnetic dipole-dipole interaction can produce significant phonon squeezing of the center-of-mass motion of the cantilever, and evaluate the effect of various dissipation channels, including the coupling of the cantilever to a heat bath and phase and amplitude fluctuations in the oscillating field driving the tuning fork. US National Science Foundation, the US Army Research Office, DARPA ORCHID program through a grant from AFOSR.

  20. Grating Loaded Cantilevers for Displacement Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karademir, Ertugrul; Olcum, Selim; Atalar, Abdullah; Aydinli, Atilla

    2010-03-01

    A cantilever with a grating coupler engraved on its tip is used for measuring displacement. The coupled light in the cantilever is guided to a single mode optical waveguide defined at the base of the cantilever. The grating period is 550 nm and is fabricated on a SOI wafer using nanoimprint lithography. The waveguide and the cantilever are defined by an RIE and cantilevers released by KOH and HF solutions. Light with 1550 nm wavelength, is directed onto the grating coupler and detected at the cleaved end of the SOI waveguide. The angle of incidence is controlled by a motorized rotary stage. Light couples into the waveguide at a characteristic angle with a full width at half maximum of approximately 6.9 mrads translating into a Q factor of 87.5. The displacement sensitivity is measured by driving the cantilever with a frequency controlled piezoelectric element. The modulation of the light at the waveguide output is lock-in detected by a biased infrared detector. The resulting 43%mrad-1 sensitivity can be increased with further optimization.

  1. 2. DETAIL OF STRUCTURAL SYSTEM FOR CANTILEVERED HOG RUN; BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. DETAIL OF STRUCTURAL SYSTEM FOR CANTILEVERED HOG RUN; BUILDING 168 (1960 HOG KILL) IS BENEATH HOG RUN - Rath Packing Company, Cantilevered Hog Run, Sycamore Street between Elm & Eighteenth Streets, Waterloo, Black Hawk County, IA

  2. Physics-based signal processing algorithms for micromachined cantilever arrays

    DOEpatents

    Candy, James V; Clague, David S; Lee, Christopher L; Rudd, Robert E; Burnham, Alan K; Tringe, Joseph W

    2013-11-19

    A method of using physics-based signal processing algorithms for micromachined cantilever arrays. The methods utilize deflection of a micromachined cantilever that represents the chemical, biological, or physical element being detected. One embodiment of the method comprises the steps of modeling the deflection of the micromachined cantilever producing a deflection model, sensing the deflection of the micromachined cantilever and producing a signal representing the deflection, and comparing the signal representing the deflection with the deflection model.

  3. Self-heating in piezoresistive cantilevers

    PubMed Central

    Doll, Joseph C.; Corbin, Elise A.; King, William P.; Pruitt, Beth L.

    2011-01-01

    We report experiments and models of self-heating in piezoresistive microcantilevers that show how cantilever measurement resolution depends on the thermal properties of the surrounding fluid. The predicted cantilever temperature rise from a finite difference model is compared with detailed temperature measurements on fabricated devices. Increasing the fluid thermal conductivity allows for lower temperature operation for a given power dissipation, leading to lower force and displacement noise. The force noise in air is 76% greater than in water for the same increase in piezoresistor temperature. PMID:21731884

  4. A study of cantilever-free instrumentation for nanoscale magnetic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altemus, Bruce Adair

    The evolution of the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) into the Magnetic Force Microscope (MFM) and Magnetic Resonance Force Microscope (MRFM) has had a substantial impact on the characterization of nanoscale phenomena. Detection of 10-17 Newtons per root Hertz has occurred with use of an ultra-sensitive cantilever along with optical interferometry methods within these geometries. The sensitivity of these platforms is dependent on the characteristics of the cantilever, where increased length and a low Young's modulus increase the force sensitivity (meters/newtons). Using IC fabrication techniques, the realization of generating cantilevers with this sensitivity is feasible, but stress compensation layers are required to prevent the free end from curling. Aside from the difficultly in fabrication, the cantilever based approach has one fixed spring constant yielding a finite detectable magnetic force range. An alternative approach incorporating the magnetic levitation of a magnet with an integrated reflector, known as the birdie, has been investigated. The goals of the cantilever-free instrumentation are two fold: (1) To replace the traditional cantilever with a magnetically levitated birdie (which will be scaled down to investigate nanoscale phenomena) through the creation of a virtual cantilever; (2) Investigate the detectable magnetic force range (tunability) of the virtual cantilever. The first 1-D milli-levitation platform has been fabricated and its preliminary characterization has been performed, showing a minimum detectable force in the nano-Newton range with a 10X tunability in spring constant. This high degree of force sensitivity and tunability confirms the design and enables the use for magnetic sample investigation. To further increase the utility of the cantilever-free approach, the birdie has been magnetically levitated in 3D by control circuitry that has been developed and characterized. The magnetic behavior of the custom designed X, Y and Z coil sets

  5. Note: Improved calibration of atomic force microscope cantilevers using multiple reference cantilevers

    SciTech Connect

    Sader, John E.; Friend, James R.

    2015-05-15

    Overall precision of the simplified calibration method in J. E. Sader et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 103705 (2012), Sec. III D, is dominated by the spring constant of the reference cantilever. The question arises: How does one take measurements from multiple reference cantilevers, and combine these results, to improve uncertainty of the reference cantilever’s spring constant and hence the overall precision of the method? This question is addressed in this note. Its answer enables manufacturers to specify of a single set of data for the spring constant, resonant frequency, and quality factor, from measurements on multiple reference cantilevers. With this data set, users can trivially calibrate cantilevers of the same type.

  6. Forced Vibrations of a Cantilever Beam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Repetto, C. E.; Roatta, A.; Welti, R. J.

    2012-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental solutions for vibrations of a vertical-oriented, prismatic, thin cantilever beam are studied. The beam orientation is "downwards", i.e. the clamped end is above the free end, and it is subjected to a transverse movement at a selected frequency. Both the behaviour of the device driver and the beam's weak-damping…

  7. Calibration of higher eigenmodes of cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labuda, Aleksander; Kocun, Marta; Lysy, Martin; Walsh, Tim; Meinhold, Jieh; Proksch, Tania; Meinhold, Waiman; Anderson, Caleb; Proksch, Roger

    2016-07-01

    A method is presented for calibrating the higher eigenmodes (resonant modes) of atomic force microscopy cantilevers that can be performed prior to any tip-sample interaction. The method leverages recent efforts in accurately calibrating the first eigenmode by providing the higher-mode stiffness as a ratio to the first mode stiffness. A one-time calibration routine must be performed for every cantilever type to determine a power-law relationship between stiffness and frequency, which is then stored for future use on similar cantilevers. Then, future calibrations only require a measurement of the ratio of resonant frequencies and the stiffness of the first mode. This method is verified through stiffness measurements using three independent approaches: interferometric measurement, AC approach-curve calibration, and finite element analysis simulation. Power-law values for calibrating higher-mode stiffnesses are reported for several cantilever models. Once the higher-mode stiffnesses are known, the amplitude of each mode can also be calibrated from the thermal spectrum by application of the equipartition theorem.

  8. Direct and alignment-insensitive measurement of cantilever curvature

    SciTech Connect

    Hermans, Rodolfo I.; Aeppli, Gabriel; Bailey, Joe M.

    2013-07-15

    We analytically derive and experimentally demonstrate a method for the simultaneous measurement of deflection for large arrays of cantilevers. The Fresnel diffraction patterns of a cantilever independently reveal tilt, curvature, cubic, and higher order bending of the cantilever. It provides a calibrated absolute measurement of the polynomial coefficients describing the cantilever shape, without careful alignment and could be applied to several cantilevers simultaneously with no added complexity. We show that the method is easily implemented, works in both liquid media and in air, for a broad range of displacements and is especially suited to the requirements for multi-marker biosensors.

  9. Improved atomic force microscopy cantilever performance by partial reflective coating

    PubMed Central

    Miyahara, Yoichi; Aeschimann, Laure; Grütter, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Summary Optical beam deflection systems are widely used in cantilever based atomic force microscopy (AFM). Most commercial cantilevers have a reflective metal coating on the detector side to increase the reflectivity in order to achieve a high signal on the photodiode. Although the reflective coating is usually much thinner than the cantilever, it can still significantly contribute to the damping of the cantilever, leading to a lower mechanical quality factor (Q-factor). In dynamic mode operation in high vacuum, a cantilever with a high Q-factor is desired in order to achieve a lower minimal detectable force. The reflective coating can also increase the low-frequency force noise. In contact mode and force spectroscopy, a cantilever with minimal low-frequency force noise is desirable. We present a study on cantilevers with a partial reflective coating on the detector side. For this study, soft (≈0.01 N/m) and stiff (≈28 N/m) rectangular cantilevers were used with a custom partial coating at the tip end of the cantilever. The Q-factor, the detection and the force noise of fully coated, partially coated and uncoated cantilevers are compared and force distance curves are shown. Our results show an improvement in low-frequency force noise and increased Q-factor for the partially coated cantilevers compared to fully coated ones while maintaining the same reflectivity, therefore making it possible to combine the best of both worlds. PMID:26199849

  10. Aptamer-based cantilever array sensors for oxytetracycline detection.

    PubMed

    Hou, Hui; Bai, Xiaojing; Xing, Chunyan; Gu, Ningyu; Zhang, Bailin; Tang, Jilin

    2013-02-19

    We present a new method for specific detection of oxytetracycline (OTC) at nanomolar concentrations based on a microfabricated cantilever array. The sensing cantilevers in the array are functionalized with self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of OTC-specific aptamer, which acts as a recognition molecule for OTC. While the reference cantilevers in the array are functionalized with 6-mercapto-1-hexanol SAMs to eliminate the influence of environmental disturbances. The cantilever sensor shows a good linear relationship between the deflection amplitude and the OTC concentration in the range of 1.0-100 nM. The detection limit of the cantilever array sensor is as low as 0.2 nM, which is comparable to some traditional methods. Other antibiotics such as doxycycline and tetracycline do not cause significant deflection of the cantilevers. It is demonstrated that the cantilever array sensors can be used as a powerful tool to detect drugs with high sensitivity and selectivity.

  11. Linear and Nonlinear Photoinduced Deformations of Cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbett, D.; Warner, M.

    2007-10-01

    Glassy and elastomeric nematic networks with dye molecules present can be very responsive to illumination, huge reversible strains being possible. If absorption is appreciable, strain decreases with depth into a cantilever, leading to bend that is the basis of micro-opto-mechanical systems (MOMS). Bend actually occurs even when Beer’s law suggests a tiny penetration of light into a heavily dye-doped system. We model the nonlinear opto-elastic processes behind this effect. In the regime of cantilever thickness giving optimal bending for a given incident light intensity, there are three neutral surfaces. In practice such nonlinear absorptive effects are very important since heavily doped systems are commonly used.

  12. Cantilever mounted resilient pad gas bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etsion, I. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A gas-lubricated bearing is described, employing at least one pad mounted on a rectangular cantilever beam to produce a lubricating wedge between the face of the pad and a moving surface. The load-carrying and stiffness characteristics of the pad are related to the dimensions and modulus of elasticity of the beam. The bearing is applicable to a wide variety of types of hydrodynamic bearings.

  13. Understanding interferometry for micro-cantilever displacement detection

    PubMed Central

    Nörenberg, Tobias; Temmen, Matthias; Reichling, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Summary Interferometric displacement detection in a cantilever-based non-contact atomic force microscope (NC-AFM) operated in ultra-high vacuum is demonstrated for the Michelson and Fabry–Pérot modes of operation. Each mode is addressed by appropriately adjusting the distance between the fiber end delivering and collecting light and a highly reflective micro-cantilever, both together forming the interferometric cavity. For a precise measurement of the cantilever displacement, the relative positioning of fiber and cantilever is of critical importance. We describe a systematic approach for accurate alignment as well as the implications of deficient fiber–cantilever configurations. In the Fabry–Pérot regime, the displacement noise spectral density strongly decreases with decreasing distance between the fiber-end and the cantilever, yielding a noise floor of 24 fm/Hz0.5 under optimum conditions. PMID:27547601

  14. Understanding interferometry for micro-cantilever displacement detection.

    PubMed

    von Schmidsfeld, Alexander; Nörenberg, Tobias; Temmen, Matthias; Reichling, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Interferometric displacement detection in a cantilever-based non-contact atomic force microscope (NC-AFM) operated in ultra-high vacuum is demonstrated for the Michelson and Fabry-Pérot modes of operation. Each mode is addressed by appropriately adjusting the distance between the fiber end delivering and collecting light and a highly reflective micro-cantilever, both together forming the interferometric cavity. For a precise measurement of the cantilever displacement, the relative positioning of fiber and cantilever is of critical importance. We describe a systematic approach for accurate alignment as well as the implications of deficient fiber-cantilever configurations. In the Fabry-Pérot regime, the displacement noise spectral density strongly decreases with decreasing distance between the fiber-end and the cantilever, yielding a noise floor of 24 fm/Hz(0.5) under optimum conditions.

  15. Reconstructing the distributed force on an atomic force microscope cantilever.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Ryan; Killgore, Jason

    2017-03-10

    A methodology is developed to reconstruct the force applied to an atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever given the shape in which it vibrates. This is accomplished by rewriting Bernoulli-Euler beam theory such that the force on the cantilever is approximated as a linear superposition of the theoretical cantilever eigenmodes. The weighting factors in this summation are calculated from the amplitude and phase measured along the length of the cantilever. The accuracy of the force reconstruction is shown to depend on the frequency at which the measurement is performed, the number of discrete points measured along the length of the cantilever, and the signal-to-noise ratio of the measured signal. In contrast to other AFM force reconstruction techniques, this method can reconstruct the distribution of force applied over the length of the AFM cantilever. However, this method performs poorly for localized forces applied to the cantilever, such as is typical of most tip-sample interaction forces. Proof of concept experiments are performed on an electrostatically excited cantilever and the expected force distribution is recovered. This force reconstruction technique offers previously unavailable insight into the distributed forces experienced by an AFM cantilever.

  16. Reconstructing the distributed force on an atomic force microscope cantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Ryan; Killgore, Jason

    2017-03-01

    A methodology is developed to reconstruct the force applied to an atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever given the shape in which it vibrates. This is accomplished by rewriting Bernoulli–Euler beam theory such that the force on the cantilever is approximated as a linear superposition of the theoretical cantilever eigenmodes. The weighting factors in this summation are calculated from the amplitude and phase measured along the length of the cantilever. The accuracy of the force reconstruction is shown to depend on the frequency at which the measurement is performed, the number of discrete points measured along the length of the cantilever, and the signal-to-noise ratio of the measured signal. In contrast to other AFM force reconstruction techniques, this method can reconstruct the distribution of force applied over the length of the AFM cantilever. However, this method performs poorly for localized forces applied to the cantilever, such as is typical of most tip–sample interaction forces. Proof of concept experiments are performed on an electrostatically excited cantilever and the expected force distribution is recovered. This force reconstruction technique offers previously unavailable insight into the distributed forces experienced by an AFM cantilever.

  17. [Fixed restorations of a dentition with reduced periodontal support in partially edentulous patients].

    PubMed

    De Boever, J A

    1990-05-01

    Placing restorations in patients who have a limited number of teeth and reduced periodontal support is no longer controversial, given careful selection of patients, preprosthetic periodontal treatment, and a thorough maintenance program. In this paper, attention is drawn to general prosthetic planning, including the use of long-span bridges. Because of increased tooth mobility, cross-arch stabilization of the bridges with interlocks or with postsolder connections is advocated. The framework should be rigid enough to avoid deflection of the bridges. Preparation of the vital and nonvital abutment teeth needs much attention. To avoid using a removable prosthesis, a cantilever bridge can be used, but it makes the construction more prone to fracture. A number of periodontal-prosthetic patients demonstrate a "posterior collapsed bite." Rehabilitation requires the restoration at a "new" vertical dimension of occlusion. This can be done, without functional hazards, in a one-step clinical procedure. A long functional adaptation period is unnecessary. The treatment outcome of furcations is not always predictable. Therefore, hemisection or amputation are often the treatments of choice. On these hemisected roots, bridges can be made and successfully maintained. Finally, it should be stressed that not all teeth have to be replaced: a premolar, shortened-arch occlusion is often sufficient for adequate function.

  18. 11. VIEW, LOOKING SOUTHEAST, ALONG CENTERLINE FROM SOUTH CANTILEVER TOWARD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. VIEW, LOOKING SOUTHEAST, ALONG CENTERLINE FROM SOUTH CANTILEVER TOWARD TOWARD NORTH PORTAL. Note vertical displacement in deck caused by partial collapse at point of connection between south cantilever arm and suspended span. - Smith River Bridge, CA State Highway 199 Spanning Smith River, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

  19. Interlaboratory round robin on cantilever calibration for AFM force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    te Riet, Joost; Katan, Allard J; Rankl, Christian; Stahl, Stefan W; van Buul, Arend M; Phang, In Yee; Gomez-Casado, Alberto; Schön, Peter; Gerritsen, Jan W; Cambi, Alessandra; Rowan, Alan E; Vancso, G Julius; Jonkheijm, Pascal; Huskens, Jurriaan; Oosterkamp, Tjerk H; Gaub, Hermann; Hinterdorfer, Peter; Figdor, Carl G; Speller, Sylvia

    2011-12-01

    Single-molecule force spectroscopy studies performed by Atomic Force Microscopes (AFMs) strongly rely on accurately determined cantilever spring constants. Hence, to calibrate cantilevers, a reliable calibration protocol is essential. Although the thermal noise method and the direct Sader method are frequently used for cantilever calibration, there is no consensus on the optimal calibration of soft and V-shaped cantilevers, especially those used in force spectroscopy. Therefore, in this study we aimed at establishing a commonly accepted approach to accurately calibrate compliant and V-shaped cantilevers. In a round robin experiment involving eight different laboratories we compared the thermal noise and the Sader method on ten commercial and custom-built AFMs. We found that spring constants of both rectangular and V-shaped cantilevers can accurately be determined with both methods, although the Sader method proved to be superior. Furthermore, we observed that simultaneous application of both methods on an AFM proved an accurate consistency check of the instrument and thus provides optimal and highly reproducible calibration. To illustrate the importance of optimal calibration, we show that for biological force spectroscopy studies, an erroneously calibrated cantilever can significantly affect the derived (bio)physical parameters. Taken together, our findings demonstrated that with the pre-established protocol described reliable spring constants can be obtained for different types of cantilevers.

  20. Resonating cantilever mass sensor with mechanical on-plane excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teva, Jordi; Abadal, Gabriel; Jordà, Xavier; Borrise, Xavier; Davis, Zachary; Barniol, Nuria

    2003-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to report the experimental setup designed, developed and tested in order to achieve the first vibrating mode of a lateral cantilever with mechanical excitation. The on-plane oscillating cantilever is the basis of a proposed mass sensor with an expected resolution in the atto-gram scale. In a first system design, the cantilever is driven electrostatically by an electrode, which is placed parallel to the cantilever. The cantilever is driven to its first resonant mode applying an AC voltage between the cantilever and a driver. Also, a DC voltage is applied to increase the system response. The signal read-out of the transducer is the capacitive current of the cantilever-driver system. The mass sensor proposed, based on this cantilever-driver structure (CDS), is integrated with a CMOS circuitry in order to minimize the parasitic capacitances, that in this case take special relevance because of the low level output current coming from the transducer. Moreover, the electrostatic excitation introduces a parasitic current that overlaps the current due to the resonance. The mechanical excitation is an alternative excitation method which aim is to eliminate the excitation current. Here we describe the experimental facilities developed to achieve mechanical excitation and report preliminary results obtained by this excitation technique. The results are complemented with dynamic simulations of an equivalent system model that are in accordance with the experimental values.

  1. Study of Silicon Cantilevers by the Photoacoustic Elastic Bending Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todorovic, D. M.; Rabasovic, M. D.; Markushev, D. D.; Jovic, V.; Radulovic, K. T.

    2017-03-01

    Rectangular silicon cantilevers are studied by the photoacoustic (PA) elastic bending method. Experimental signals versus modulation frequency of the excitation optical beam are measured and analyzed in a frequency range from 20 Hz to 50 000 Hz. The procedure for experimental signal correction to eliminate the frequency characteristics of the measuring system is given. The corrected experimental signal shows a good correlation with theoretically calculated PA signal at frequencies below 32 000 Hz. The corrected experimental PA elastic bending signals for cantilevers with different thicknesses are analyzed. The experimental results allow identifying the resonant frequency (the first resonant mode) of the cantilever vibrations. These values are in good agreement with the theoretically computed values. A theoretical model of the optically excited Si cantilever is derived, taking into account plasmaelastic, thermoelastic, and thermodiffusion mechanisms. Dynamic relations for the amplitude and phase of electronic and thermal elastic vibrations in optically excited cantilevers are derived. The theoretical model is compared to the experimental results.

  2. Multimodal cantilevers with novel piezoelectric layer topology for sensitivity enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Ruppert, Michael G; Yong, Yuen Kuan

    2017-01-01

    Self-sensing techniques for atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers have several advantageous characteristics compared to the optical beam deflection method. The possibility of down scaling, parallelization of cantilever arrays and the absence of optical interference associated imaging artifacts have led to an increased research interest in these methods. However, for multifrequency AFM, the optimization of the transducer layout on the cantilever for higher order modes has not been addressed. To fully utilize an integrated piezoelectric transducer, this work alters the layout of the piezoelectric layer to maximize both the deflection of the cantilever and measured piezoelectric charge response for a given mode with respect to the spatial distribution of the strain. On a prototype cantilever design, significant increases in actuator and sensor sensitivities were achieved for the first four modes without any substantial increase in sensor noise. The transduction mechanism is specifically targeted at multifrequency AFM and has the potential to provide higher resolution imaging on higher order modes. PMID:28326225

  3. Serial weighting of micro-objects with resonant microchanneled cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ossola, Dario; Dörig, Pablo; Vörös, János; Zambelli, Tomaso; Vassalli, Massimo

    2016-10-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilevers have proven to be very effective mass sensors. The attachment of a small mass to a vibrating cantilever produces a resonance frequency shift that can be monitored, providing the ability to measure mass changes down to a few molecules resolution. Nevertheless, the lack of a practical method to handle the catch and release process required for dynamic weighting of microobjects strongly hindered the application of the technology beyond proof of concept measurements. Here, a method is proposed in which FluidFM hollow cantilevers are exploited to overcome the standard limitations of AFM-based mass sensors, providing high throughput single object weighting with picogram accuracy. The extension of the dynamic models of AFM cantilevers to hollow cantilevers was discussed and the effectiveness of mass weighting in air was validated on test samples.

  4. Optical racetrack resonator transduction of nanomechanical cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Sauer, V T K; Diao, Z; Freeman, M R; Hiebert, W K

    2014-02-07

    Optomechanical transduction has demonstrated its supremacy in probing nanomechanical displacements. In order to apply nano-optomechanical systems (NOMS) as force and mass sensors, knowledge about the transduction responsivity (i.e. the change in measured optical transmission with nanomechanical displacement) and its tradeoffs with system design is paramount. We compare the measured responsivities of NOMS devices with varying length, optomechanical coupling strength gom, and optical cavity properties. Cantilever beams 1.5 to 5 μm long are fabricated 70 to 160 nm from a racetrack resonator optical cavity and their thermomechanical (TM) noise signals are measured. We derive a generic expression for the transduction responsivity of the NOMS in terms of optical and mechanical system parameters such as finesse, optomechanical coupling constant, and interaction length. The form of the expression holds direct insight as to how these parameters affect the responsivity. With this expression, we obtain the optomechanical coupling constants using only measurements of the TM noise power spectra and optical cavity transmission slopes. All optical pump/probe operation is also demonstrated in our side-coupled cantilever-racetrack NOMS. Finally, to assess potential operation in a gas sensing environment, the TM noise signal of a device is measured at atmospheric pressure.

  5. Ultrasensitive Silicon Cantilever for Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stowe, Timothy; Yasumura, Kevin; Thomas, Kenny; Daniel, Rugar

    1996-03-01

    A new type of ultrasensitive high Q scanning force probe has been developed which is capable of measuring forces smaller than 10-16 N in vacuum at a few degK. These single crystal silicon probes are 500 Åto 1700 Åthick and have in-plane tips with a radius of curvature under 90 nm. Because of their low spring constant (10-4 N/m) these cantilevers were placed normal to the sample surface thereby avoiding tip crashes due to snap in and were vibrated in the pendulum mode. Cantilever amplitude was detected using a fiber interferometer. Measurements of the Q vs. distance from sample surfaces in vacuum and nonlinear effects have been obtained. Measurements Q vs. temperature and ways of improving the Q will be discussed. This scanning force probe may be used to extend the spatial resolution and force sensitivity of Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy. This research has been partially supported by the Fannie-Hertz Foundation.

  6. Cantilever arrays with self-aligned nanotips of uniform height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koelmans, W. W.; Peters, T.; Berenschot, E.; de Boer, M. J.; Siekman, M. H.; Abelmann, L.

    2012-04-01

    Cantilever arrays are employed to increase the throughput of imaging and manipulation at the nanoscale. We present a fabrication process to construct cantilever arrays with nanotips that show a uniform tip-sample distance. Such uniformity is crucial, because in many applications the cantilevers do not feature individual tip-sample spacing control. Uniform cantilever arrays lead to very similar tip-sample interaction within an array, enable non-contact modes for arrays and give better control over the load force in contact modes. The developed process flow uses a single mask to define both tips and cantilevers. An additional mask is required for the back side etch. The tips are self-aligned in the convex corner at the free end of each cantilever. Although we use standard optical contact lithography, we show that the convex corner can be sharpened to a nanometre scale radius by an isotropic underetch step. The process is robust and wafer-scale. The resonance frequencies of the cantilevers within an array are shown to be highly uniform with a relative standard error of 0.26% or lower. The tip-sample distance within an array of up to ten cantilevers is measured to have a standard error around 10 nm. An imaging demonstration using the AFM shows that all cantilevers in the array have a sharp tip with a radius below 10 nm. The process flow for the cantilever arrays finds application in probe-based nanolithography, probe-based data storage, nanomanufacturing and parallel scanning probe microscopy.

  7. In-situ piezoresponse force microscopy cantilever mode shape profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Proksch, R.

    2015-08-21

    The frequency-dependent amplitude and phase in piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) measurements are shown to be a consequence of the Euler-Bernoulli (EB) dynamics of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever beams used to make the measurements. Changes in the cantilever mode shape as a function of changes in the boundary conditions determine the sensitivity of cantilevers to forces between the tip and the sample. Conventional PFM and AFM measurements are made with the motion of the cantilever measured at one optical beam detector (OBD) spot location. A single OBD spot location provides a limited picture of the total cantilever motion, and in fact, experimentally observed cantilever amplitude and phase are shown to be strongly dependent on the OBD spot position for many measurements. In this work, the commonly observed frequency dependence of PFM response is explained through experimental measurements and analytic theoretical EB modeling of the PFM response as a function of both frequency and OBD spot location on a periodically poled lithium niobate sample. One notable conclusion is that a common choice of OBD spot location—at or near the tip of the cantilever—is particularly vulnerable to frequency dependent amplitude and phase variations stemming from dynamics of the cantilever sensor rather than from the piezoresponse of the sample.

  8. In-situ piezoresponse force microscopy cantilever mode shape profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proksch, R.

    2015-08-01

    The frequency-dependent amplitude and phase in piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) measurements are shown to be a consequence of the Euler-Bernoulli (EB) dynamics of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever beams used to make the measurements. Changes in the cantilever mode shape as a function of changes in the boundary conditions determine the sensitivity of cantilevers to forces between the tip and the sample. Conventional PFM and AFM measurements are made with the motion of the cantilever measured at one optical beam detector (OBD) spot location. A single OBD spot location provides a limited picture of the total cantilever motion, and in fact, experimentally observed cantilever amplitude and phase are shown to be strongly dependent on the OBD spot position for many measurements. In this work, the commonly observed frequency dependence of PFM response is explained through experimental measurements and analytic theoretical EB modeling of the PFM response as a function of both frequency and OBD spot location on a periodically poled lithium niobate sample. One notable conclusion is that a common choice of OBD spot location—at or near the tip of the cantilever—is particularly vulnerable to frequency dependent amplitude and phase variations stemming from dynamics of the cantilever sensor rather than from the piezoresponse of the sample.

  9. Cantilevered multilevel LIGA devices and methods

    DOEpatents

    Morales, Alfredo Martin; Domeier, Linda A.

    2002-01-01

    In the formation of multilevel LIGA microstructures, a preformed sheet of photoresist material, such as polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) is patterned by exposure through a mask to radiation, such as X-rays, and developed using a developer to remove the exposed photoresist material. A first microstructure is then formed by electroplating metal into the areas from which the photoresist has been removed. Additional levels of microstructure are added to the initial microstructure by covering the first microstructure with a conductive polymer, machining the conductive polymer layer to reveal the surface of the first microstructure, sealing the conductive polymer and surface of the first microstructure with a metal layer, and then forming the second level of structure on top of the first level structure. In such a manner, multiple layers of microstructure can be built up to allow complex cantilevered microstructures to be formed.

  10. Forced vibrations of a cantilever beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Repetto, C. E.; Roatta, A.; Welti, R. J.

    2012-09-01

    The theoretical and experimental solutions for vibrations of a vertical-oriented, prismatic, thin cantilever beam are studied. The beam orientation is ‘downwards’, i.e. the clamped end is above the free end, and it is subjected to a transverse movement at a selected frequency. Both the behaviour of the device driver and the beam's weak-damping resonance response are compared for the case of an elastic beam made from PVC plastic excited over a frequency range from 1 to 30 Hz. The current analysis predicts the presence of ‘pseudo-nodes’ in the normal modes of oscillation. It is important to note that our results were obtained using very simple equipment, present in the teaching laboratory.

  11. Continuously tunable terahertz metamaterial employing magnetically actuated cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Ozbey, Burak; Aktas, Ozgur

    2011-03-28

    Terahertz metamaterial structures that employ flexing microelectromechanical cantilevers for tuning the resonance frequency of an electric split-ring resonator are presented. The tuning cantilevers are coated with a magnetic thin-film and are actuated by an external magnetic field. The use of cantilevers enables continuous tuning of the resonance frequency over a large frequency range. The use of an externally applied magnetic field for actuation simplifies the metamaterial structure and its use for sensor or filter applications. A structure for minimizing the actuating field is derived. The dependence of the tunable bandwidth on frequency is discussed.

  12. Characterization of magnetically actuated resonant cantilevers in viscous fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vančura, Cyril; Lichtenberg, Jan; Hierlemann, Andreas; Josse, Fabien

    2005-10-01

    The vibration behavior of magnetically actuated resonant microcantilevers immersed in viscous fluids has been studied. A dependence of the resonance frequency and the quality factor (Q factor) on the fluid properties, such as density and viscosity and on the cantilever geometry is described. Various cantilever geometries are analyzed in pure water and glycerol solutions, and the results are explained in terms of the added displaced fluid mass and the fluid damping force for both the resonance frequency and the quality factor. An in-depth knowledge and understanding of such systems is necessary when analyzing resonant cantilevers as biochemical sensors in liquid environments.

  13. Piezoresistive cantilever array sensor for consolidated bioprocess monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Seonghwan Sam; Rahman, Touhidur; Senesac, Larry R; Davison, Brian H; Thundat, Thomas George

    2009-01-01

    Cellulolytic microbes occur in diverse natural niches and are being screened for industrial modification and utility. A microbe for Consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) development can rapidly degrade pure cellulose and then ferment the resulting sugars into fuels. To identify and screen for novel microbes for CBP, we have developed a piezoresistive cantilever array sensor which is capable of simultaneous monitoring of glucose and ethanol concentration changes in a phosphate buffer solution. 4-mercaptophenylboronic acid (4-MPBA) and polyethyleneglycol (PEG)-thiol are employed to functionalize each piezoresistive cantilever for glucose and ethanol sensing, respectively. Successful concentration measurements of glucose and ethanol with minimal interferences are obtained with our cantilever array sensor.

  14. DETAIL OF CANTILEVERED MEZZANINE OBSERVATION ROOM ON SOUTH WEST CORNER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF CANTILEVERED MEZZANINE OBSERVATION ROOM ON SOUTH- WEST CORNER OF BUILDING. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Plattsburgh Air Force Base, Base Engineer Pavement & Grounds Facility, Off Colorado Street, Plattsburgh, Clinton County, NY

  15. 258. Dennis Hill, Photographer April 1998 VIEW OF CANTILEVER TRUSS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    258. Dennis Hill, Photographer April 1998 VIEW OF CANTILEVER TRUSS ANCHOR ARM AT PIERS E- AND E-2, SOUTH SIDE, FACING NORTH. - San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge, Spanning San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  16. View from underneath bridge on west side shows cantilevered steel ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View from underneath bridge on west side shows cantilevered steel supports for sidewalk above. - Raging River Bridge No. 234A, Preston-Fall City Road & Southeast Forty-fourth Place, Fall City, King County, WA

  17. Superstructure Main Bridge, Cross Sections, Cantilever Structure Huey ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Superstructure - Main Bridge, Cross Sections, Cantilever Structure - Huey P. Long Bridge, Spanning Mississippi River approximately midway between nine & twelve mile points upstream from & west of New Orleans, Jefferson, Jefferson Parish, LA

  18. 14. DETAIL VIEW OF THE CANTILEVER & 'S' BRACKETS AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. DETAIL VIEW OF THE CANTILEVER & 'S' BRACKETS AND THE SOUTH HANDRAIL, PANEL 1, NEAR THE SOUTHEAST ABUTMENT, LOOKING NORTHWEST Harms - Benton Street Bridge, Spanning Iowa River at Benton Street, Iowa City, Johnson County, IA

  19. 20. DETAIL OF WEST ANCHOR SPAN, CANTILEVER ARMS AND WEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. DETAIL OF WEST ANCHOR SPAN, CANTILEVER ARMS AND WEST HALF OF SUSPENDED SPAN OF THROUGH TRUSS. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - MacArthur Bridge, Spanning Mississippi River on Highway 34 between IA & IL, Burlington, Des Moines County, IA

  20. 29. DECK / WEB / LATERAL BRACING DETAIL OF CANTILEVER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. DECK / WEB / LATERAL BRACING DETAIL OF CANTILEVER ARM OF THROUGH TRUSS. VIEW TO WEST. - MacArthur Bridge, Spanning Mississippi River on Highway 34 between IA & IL, Burlington, Des Moines County, IA

  1. Harmonic detection of resonance in micro- and nano-cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaillard, Jay B.

    Over the past decade there has been an explosion in the study of cantilevered beams on the micron and submicron dimension. The applications and research that involve these structures include state-of-the-art electronic components, sensors, and more recently, studies aimed at elucidating the mechanical properties of cantilevered carbon nanotubes and semiconducting nanowires. In nanoelectro-mechanical systems (NEMS), it is desirable to develop a capacitive readout method involving only two electrodes that are fully compliant with standard CMOS technology. However, the main drawback with this method is the ability to detect resonance in the presence of parasitic capacitance, which is due to the fringing electric fields present between the electrodes (cantilever and the counter electrode). The work presented in this thesis deals with the electrical actuation/detection of mechanical resonance in individual micron and sub-micron sized cantilevers. The aim is to overcome parasitic capacitance which masks the detection of resonance signal in these cantilevers thereby increasing the signal-to-background ratio (SBR). In our method, a silicon microcantilever, or cantilevered multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT), is placed close to a counter electrode whose potential is varied at a frequency o. An electrical signal comes from the flow of charge on and off of the cantilever when o equals a resonant frequency o 0 of the cantilever. Higher harmonics of o0 are measured to overcome the parasitic capacitance. This technique, termed harmonic detection of resonance (HDR), allows detection at frequencies well removed from the driving frequency thereby increasing the SBR by ~3 orders of magnitude. It is shown that HDR allows the detection of resonance even in multi-walled carbon nanotubes, which have diameters on the order of 50 nm. Furthermore, superharmonics inherent to electrostatic actuation, are shown to occur at driving frequencies of o0/n where n = 1,2,3,....

  2. Atomic force microscope cantilever calibration using a focused ion beam.

    PubMed

    Slattery, Ashley D; Quinton, Jamie S; Gibson, Christopher T

    2012-07-20

    A calibration method is presented for determining the spring constant of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers, which is a modification of the established Cleveland added mass technique. A focused ion beam (FIB) is used to remove a well-defined volume from a cantilever with known density, substantially reducing the uncertainty usually present in the added mass method. The technique can be applied to any type of AFM cantilever; but for the lowest uncertainty it is best applied to silicon cantilevers with spring constants above 0.7 N m(-1), where uncertainty is demonstrated to be typically between 7 and 10%. Despite the removal of mass from the cantilever, the calibration method presented does not impair the probes' ability to acquire data. The technique has been extensively tested in order to verify the underlying assumptions in the method. This method was compared to a number of other calibration methods and practical improvements to some of these techniques were developed, as well as important insights into the behavior of FIB modified cantilevers. These results will prove useful to research groups concerned with the application of microcantilevers to nanoscience, in particular for cases where maintaining pristine AFM tip condition is critical.

  3. Measurement of Mechanical Properties of Cantilever Shaped Materials

    PubMed Central

    Finot, Eric; Passian, Ali; Thundat, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Microcantilevers were first introduced as imaging probes in Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) due to their extremely high sensitivity in measuring surface forces. The versatility of these probes, however, allows the sensing and measurement of a host of mechanical properties of various materials. Sensor parameters such as resonance frequency, quality factor, amplitude of vibration and bending due to a differential stress can all be simultaneously determined for a cantilever. When measuring the mechanical properties of materials, identifying and discerning the most influential parameters responsible for the observed changes in the cantilever response are important. We will, therefore, discuss the effects of various force fields such as those induced by mass loading, residual stress, internal friction of the material, and other changes in the mechanical properties of the microcantilevers. Methods to measure variations in temperature, pressure, or molecular adsorption of water molecules are also discussed. Often these effects occur simultaneously, increasing the number of parameters that need to be concurrently measured to ensure the reliability of the sensors. We therefore systematically investigate the geometric and environmental effects on cantilever measurements including the chemical nature of the underlying interactions. To address the geometric effects we have considered cantilevers with a rectangular or circular cross section. The chemical nature is addressed by using cantilevers fabricated with metals and/or dielectrics. Selective chemical etching, swelling or changes in Young's modulus of the surface were investigated by means of polymeric and inorganic coatings. Finally to address the effect of the environment in which the cantilever operates, the Knudsen number was determined to characterize the molecule-cantilever collisions. Also bimaterial cantilevers with high thermal sensitivity were used to discern the effect of temperature variations. When appropriate

  4. Piezoresistive cantilever force-clamp system

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sung-Jin; Petzold, Bryan C.; Pruitt, Beth L.; Goodman, Miriam B.

    2011-04-15

    We present a microelectromechanical device-based tool, namely, a force-clamp system that sets or ''clamps'' the scaled force and can apply designed loading profiles (e.g., constant, sinusoidal) of a desired magnitude. The system implements a piezoresistive cantilever as a force sensor and the built-in capacitive sensor of a piezoelectric actuator as a displacement sensor, such that sample indentation depth can be directly calculated from the force and displacement signals. A programmable real-time controller operating at 100 kHz feedback calculates the driving voltage of the actuator. The system has two distinct modes: a force-clamp mode that controls the force applied to a sample and a displacement-clamp mode that controls the moving distance of the actuator. We demonstrate that the system has a large dynamic range (sub-nN up to tens of {mu}N force and nm up to tens of {mu}m displacement) in both air and water, and excellent dynamic response (fast response time, <2 ms and large bandwidth, 1 Hz up to 1 kHz). In addition, the system has been specifically designed to be integrated with other instruments such as a microscope with patch-clamp electronics. We demonstrate the capabilities of the system by using it to calibrate the stiffness and sensitivity of an electrostatic actuator and to measure the mechanics of a living, freely moving Caenorhabditis elegans nematode.

  5. Scanning conductance microscopy investigations on fixed human chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Clausen, Casper Hyttel; Lange, Jacob Moresco; Jensen, Linda Boye; Shah, Pranjul Jaykumar; Dimaki, Maria Ioannou; Svendsen, Winnie Edith

    2008-02-01

    Scanning conductance microscopy investigations were carried out in air on human chromosomes fixed on pre-fabricated SiO2 surfaces with a backgate. The point of the investigation was to estimate the dielectric constant of fixed human chromosomes in order to use it for microfluidic device optimization. The phase shift caused by the electrostatic forces, together with geometrical measurements of the atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever and the chromosomes were used to estimate a value for the dielectric constant of different human chromosomes.

  6. The multiple cantilever system: a solution for a failed precision attachment denture case.

    PubMed

    Schweikert, E D

    1999-01-01

    Multiple-cantilevered pontic bridges can be a great alternative to dental implants and distal extension prostheses. Dental hygiene must be considered the most important factor in preserving the status quo of the permanent restoration. Traumatic occlusion, which can occur because of the widened periodontal space and greater mobility of a multiple-cantilever bridge, is not automatically a sign of failure. As long as the mobility of the fixed bridge does not increase and the patient can function and feel comfortable with it, a successful therapy can be concluded. If marginal periodontitis exists, destruction of the cervical ligaments, bone resorption, and apical migration of the epithelium will occur. Through loss of the supportive structures, hypermobility will increase. If the destructive factors of marginal periodontitis are not eliminated, the hypermobility can interfere with masticatory function. It is important that patients be made aware of this possibility. Regular recalls in the beginning of the maintenance program will emphasize the importance of the home-care system.

  7. SiC-Based Miniature High-Temperature Cantilever Anemometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okojie, Robert S.; Fralick, Gustave; Saad, George J.

    2004-01-01

    The figure depicts a miniature cantilever-type anemometer that has been developed as a prototype of compact, relatively nonintrusive anemometers that can function at temperatures up to 600 C and that can be expected to be commercially mass-producible at low cost. The design of this anemometer, and especially the packaging aspect of the design, is intended to enable measurement of turbulence in the high-temperature, high-vibration environment of a turbine engine or in any similar environment. The main structural components of the anemometer include a single-crystal SiC cantilever and two polycrystalline SiC clamping plates, all made from chemical-vapor-deposited silicon carbide. Fabrication of these components from the same basic material eliminates thermal-expansion mismatch, which has introduced spurious thermomechanical stresses in cantilever-type anemometers of prior design. The clamping plates are heavily oxidized to improve electrical insulation at high temperature. A cavity that serves as a receptacle for the clamped end of the cantilever is etched into one end of one clamping plate. Trenches that collectively constitute a socket for a multipin electrical plug (for connection to external electronic circuitry) are etched into the opposite end of this clamping plate. Metal strips for electrical contact are deposited on one face of the other clamping plate. Piezoresistive single-crystal SiC thin-film strain gauges are etched in the n-type SiC epilayer in a Wheatstone-bridge configuration. Metal contact pads on the cantilever that extend into the clamping-receptacle area, are obtained by deposition and patterning using standard semiconductor photolithography and etching methods. The cantilever and the two clamping plates are assembled into a sandwich structure that is then clamped in a stainless-steel housing. The Wheatstone- bridge carrying SiC cantilever with the metal contact pads on the piezoresistors is slid into the receptacle in the bottom clamping plate

  8. SU-8 hollow cantilevers for AFM cell adhesion studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Vincent; Behr, Pascal; Drechsler, Ute; Polesel-Maris, Jérôme; Potthoff, Eva; Vörös, Janos; Zambelli, Tomaso

    2016-05-01

    A novel fabrication method was established to produce flexible, transparent, and robust tipless hollow atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilevers made entirely from SU-8. Channels of 3 μm thickness and several millimeters length were integrated into 12 μm thick and 40 μm wide cantilevers. Connected to a pressure controller, the devices showed high sealing performance with no leakage up to 6 bars. Changing the cantilever lengths from 100 μm to 500 μm among the same wafer allowed the targeting of various spring constants ranging from 0.5 to 80 N m-1 within a single fabrication run. These hollow polymeric AFM cantilevers were operated in the optical beam deflection configuration. To demonstrate the performance of the device, single-cell force spectroscopy experiments were performed with a single probe detaching in a serial protocol more than 100 Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells from plain glass and glass coated with polydopamine while measuring adhesion forces in the sub-nanoNewton range. SU-8 now offers a new alternative to conventional silicon-based hollow cantilevers with more flexibility in terms of complex geometric design and surface chemistry modification.

  9. Efficiency enhancement of a cantilever-based vibration energy harvester.

    PubMed

    Kubba, Ali E; Jiang, Kyle

    2013-12-23

    Extracting energy from ambient vibration to power wireless sensor nodes has been an attractive area of research, particularly in the automotive monitoring field. This article reports the design, analysis and testing of a vibration energy harvesting device based on a miniature asymmetric air-spaced cantilever. The developed design offers high power density, and delivers electric power that is sufficient to support most wireless sensor nodes for structural health monitoring (SHM) applications. The optimized design underwent three evolutionary steps, starting from a simple cantilever design, going through an air-spaced cantilever, and ending up with an optimized air-spaced geometry with boosted power density level. Finite Element Analysis (FEA) was used as an initial tool to compare the three geometries' stiffness (K), output open-circuit voltage (V(ave)), and average normal strain in the piezoelectric transducer (ε(ave)) that directly affect its output voltage. Experimental tests were also carried out in order to examine the energy harvesting level in each of the three designs. The experimental results show how to boost the power output level in a thin air-spaced cantilever beam for energy within the same space envelope. The developed thin air-spaced cantilever (8.37 cm3), has a maximum power output of 2.05 mW (H = 29.29 μJ/cycle).

  10. Nonlinear resonances of a single-wall carbon nanotube cantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, I. K.; Lee, S. I.

    2015-03-01

    The dynamics of an electrostatically actuated carbon nanotube (CNT) cantilever are discussed by theoretical and numerical approaches. Electrostatic and intermolecular forces between the single-walled CNT and a graphene electrode are considered. The CNT cantilever is analyzed by the Euler-Bernoulli beam theory, including its geometric and inertial nonlinearities, and a one-mode projection based on the Galerkin approximation and numerical integration. Static pull-in and pull-out behaviors are adequately represented by an asymmetric two-well potential with the total potential energy consisting of the CNT elastic energy, electrostatic energy, and the Lennard-Jones potential energy. Nonlinear dynamics of the cantilever are simulated under DC and AC voltage excitations and examined in the frequency and time domains. Under AC-only excitation, a superharmonic resonance of order 2 occurs near half of the primary frequency. Under both DC and AC loads, the cantilever exhibits linear and nonlinear primary and secondary resonances depending on the strength of the excitation voltages. In addition, the cantilever has dynamic instabilities such as periodic or chaotic tapping motions, with a variation of excitation frequency at the resonance branches. High electrostatic excitation leads to complex nonlinear responses such as softening, multiple stability changes at saddle nodes, or period-doubling bifurcation points in the primary and secondary resonance branches.

  11. Experimental investigation of fatigue in a cantilever energy harvesting beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avvari, Panduranga Vittal; Yang, Yaowen; Liu, Peiwen; Soh, Chee Kiong

    2015-03-01

    Over the last decade, cantilever energy harvesters gained immense popularity owing to the simplicity of the design and piezoelectric energy harvesting (PEH) using the cantilever design has undergone considerable evolution. The major drawback of a vibrating cantilever beam is its vulnerability to fatigue over a period of time. This article brings forth an experimental investigation into the phenomenon of fatigue of a PEH cantilever beam. As there has been very little literature reported in this area, an effort has been made to scrutinize the damage due to fatigue in a linear vibrating cantilever PEH beam consisting of an aluminum substrate with a piezoelectric macro-fiber composite (MFC) patch attached near the root of the beam and a tip mass attached to the beam. The beam was subjected to transverse vibrations and the behavior of the open circuit voltage was recorded with passing time. Moreover, electro-mechanical admittance readings were obtained periodically using the same MFC patch as a Structural health monitoring (SHM) sensor to assess the health of the PEH beam. The results show that with passing time the PEH beam underwent fatigue in both the substrate and MFC, which is observed in a complimentary trend in the voltage and admittance readings. The claim is further supported using the variation of root mean square deviation (RMSD) of the real part of admittance (conductance) readings. Thus, this study concludes that the fatigue issue should be addressed in the design of PEH for long term vibration energy harvesting.

  12. Improved Sensitivity MEMS Cantilever Sensor for Terahertz Photoacoustic Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Coutu, Ronald A.; Medvedev, Ivan R.; Petkie, Douglas T.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) cantilever sensor was designed, modeled and fabricated to measure the terahertz (THz) radiation induced photoacoustic (PA) response of gases under low vacuum conditions. This work vastly improves cantilever sensitivity over previous efforts, by reducing internal beam stresses, minimizing out of plane beam curvature and optimizing beam damping. In addition, fabrication yield was improved by approximately 50% by filleting the cantilever’s anchor and free end to help reduce high stress areas that occurred during device fabrication and processing. All of the cantilever sensors were fabricated using silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers and tested in a custom built, low-volume, vacuum chamber. The resulting cantilever sensors exhibited improved signal to noise ratios, sensitivities and normalized noise equivalent absorption (NNEA) coefficients of approximately 4.28 × 10−10 cm−1·WHz−1/2. This reported NNEA represents approximately a 70% improvement over previously fabricated and tested SOI cantilever sensors for THz PA spectroscopy. PMID:26907280

  13. High resolved velocity measurements using Laser Cantilever Anemometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puczylowski, Jaroslaw; Hölling, Michael; Peinke, Joachim

    2016-11-01

    We have developed a new anemometer, namely the 2d-LCA (2d-Laser-Cantilever-Anemometer), that is capable of performing high resolved velocity measurements in fluids. The anemometer uses a micostructured cantilever made of silicon as a sensing element. The specific shape and the small dimensions (about 150µm) of the cantilever allow for precise measurements of two velocity component at a temporal resolution of about 150kHz. The angular acceptance range is 180° in total. The 2d-LCA is a simple to use alternative to x-wires and can be used in many areas of operation including measurements in liquids or in particle-laden flows. Unlike hot-wires, the resolution power of the 2d-LCA does not decrease with increasing flow velocity, making it particularly suitable for measurements in high-speed flows. In the recent past new cantilever designs were implemented with the goal to further improve the angular resolution and increase the stability. In addition, we have designed more robust cantilevers for measurements in rough environments such as offshore areas. Successful comparative measurements with hot-wires have been carried out in order to assess the performance of the 2d-LCA.

  14. Efficiency Enhancement of a Cantilever-Based Vibration Energy Harvester

    PubMed Central

    Kubba, Ali E.; Jiang, Kyle

    2014-01-01

    Extracting energy from ambient vibration to power wireless sensor nodes has been an attractive area of research, particularly in the automotive monitoring field. This article reports the design, analysis and testing of a vibration energy harvesting device based on a miniature asymmetric air-spaced cantilever. The developed design offers high power density, and delivers electric power that is sufficient to support most wireless sensor nodes for structural health monitoring (SHM) applications. The optimized design underwent three evolutionary steps, starting from a simple cantilever design, going through an air-spaced cantilever, and ending up with an optimized air-spaced geometry with boosted power density level. Finite Element Analysis (FEA) was used as an initial tool to compare the three geometries' stiffness (K), output open-circuit voltage (Vave), and average normal strain in the piezoelectric transducer (εave) that directly affect its output voltage. Experimental tests were also carried out in order to examine the energy harvesting level in each of the three designs. The experimental results show how to boost the power output level in a thin air-spaced cantilever beam for energy within the same space envelope. The developed thin air-spaced cantilever (8.37 cm3), has a maximum power output of 2.05 mW (H = 29.29 μJ/cycle). PMID:24366177

  15. Tuning the Spring Constant of Cantilever-free Probe Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichelsdoerfer, Daniel J.; Brown, Keith A.; Boya, Radha; Shim, Wooyoung; Mirkin, Chad A.

    2013-03-01

    The versatility of atomic force microscope (AFM) based techniques such as scanning probe lithography is due in part to the utilization of a cantilever that can be fabricated to match a desired application. In contrast, cantilever-free scanning probe lithography utilizes a low cost array of probes on a compliant backing layer that allows for high throughput nanofabrication but lacks the tailorability afforded by the cantilever in traditional AFM. Here, we present a method to measure and tune the spring constant of probes in a cantilever-free array by adjusting the mechanical properties of the underlying elastomeric layer. Using this technique, we are able to fabricate large-area silicon probe arrays with spring constants that can be tuned in the range from 7 to 150 N/m. This technique offers an advantage in that the spring constant depends linearly on the geometry of the probe, which is in contrast to traditional cantilever-based lithography where the spring constant varies as the cube of the beam width and thickness. To illustrate the benefit of utilizing a probe array with a lower spring constant, we pattern a block copolymer on a delicate 50 nm thick silicon nitride window.

  16. Defect reduction in gallium nitride using cantilever epitaxy.

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Christine Charlotte

    2003-08-01

    Cantilever epitaxy (CE) has been developed to produce GaN on sapphire with low dislocation densities as needed for improved devices. The basic mechanism of seeding growth on sapphire mesas and lateral growth of cantilevers until they coalesce has been modified with an initial growth step at 950 C. This step produces a gable with (11{bar 2}2) facets over the mesas, which turns threading dislocations from vertical to horizontal in order to reduce the local density above mesas. This technique has produced material with densities as low as 2-3x10{sup 7}/cm{sup 2} averaged across extended areas of GaN on sapphire, as determined with AFM, TEM and cathodoluminescence (CL). This density is about two orders of magnitude below that of conventional planar growths; these improvements suggest that locating wide-area devices across both cantilever and mesa regions is possible. However, the first implementation of this technique also produced a new defect: cracks at cantilever coalescences with associated arrays of lateral dislocations. These defects have been labeled 'dark-block defects' because they are non-radiative and appear as dark rectangles in CL images. Material has been grown that does not have dark-block defects. Examination of the evolution of the cantilever films for many growths, both partial and complete, indicates that producing a film without these defects requires careful control of growth conditions and crystal morphology at multiple steps. Their elimination enhances optical emission and uniformity over large (mm) size areas.

  17. Shape memory alloy actuation effect on subsonic static aeroelastic deformation of composite cantilever plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussein, A. M. H.; Majid, D. L. Abdul; Abdullah, E. J.

    2016-10-01

    Shape memory alloy (SMA) is one of the smart materials that have unique properties and used recently in several aerospace applications. SMAs are metallic alloys that can recover permanent strains when they are heated above a certain temperature. In this study, the effects of SMA actuation on the composite plate under subsonic aeroelastic conditions are examined. The wind tunnel test is carried out for two configurations of a cantilever shape memory alloy composite plate with a single SMA wire fixed eccentrically. Strain gage data for both bending and torsional strain are recorded and demonstrated during the aeroelastic test for active and non-active SMA wire in two locations. The cyclic actuation of the SMA wire embedded inside the composite plate is also investigated during the aeroelastic test. The results show reduction in both bending and torsional strain of the composite plate after activation of the SMA wire during the wind tunnel test.

  18. Modal analysis of a cantilever beam by use of Brillouin based distributed dynamic strain measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minardo, Aldo; Coscetta, Agnese; Pirozzi, Salvatore; Bernini, Romeo; Zeni, Luigi

    2012-12-01

    In this work we report an experimental modal analysis of a cantilever beam, carried out by use of a Brillouin optical time-domain analysis (BOTDA) setup operated at a fixed pump-probe frequency shift. The employed technique permitted us to carry out distributed strain measurements along the vibrating beam at a maximum acquisition rate of 108 Hz. The mode shapes of the first three bending modes (1.7, 10.8, 21.6 Hz) were measured for the structure under test. The good agreement between the experimental and numerical results based on a finite-element method (FEM) analysis demonstrates that Brillouin based distributed sensors are well suited to perform the modal analysis of a vibrating structure. This type of analysis may be useful for applications in structural health monitoring where changes in mode shapes are used as indicators of the damage to the structure.

  19. Influence of different cantilever extensions and glass or polyaramide reinforcement fibers on fracture strength of implant-supported temporary.

    PubMed

    Colán Guzmán, Paola; Freitas, Fernando Furtado Antunes de; Ferreira, Paulo Martins; Freitas, César Antunes de; Reis, Kátia Rodrigues

    2008-01-01

    In long-term oral rehabilitation treatments, resistance of provisional crowns is a very important factor, especially in cases of an extensive edentulous distal space. The aim of this laboratorial study was to evaluate an acrylic resin cantilever-type prosthesis regarding the flexural strength of its in-balance portion as a function of its extension variation and reinforcement by two types of fibers (glass and polyaramid), considering that literature is not conclusive on this subject. Each specimen was composed by 3 total crowns at its mesial portion, each one attached to an implant component (abutment), while the distal portion (cantilever) had two crowns. Each specimen was constructed by injecting acrylic resin into a two-part silicone matrix placed on a metallic base. In each specimen, the crowns were fabricated with either acrylic resin (control group) or acrylic resin reinforced by glass (Fibrante, Angelus) or polyaramide (Kevlar 49, Du Pont) fibers. Compression load was applied on the cantilever, in a point located 7, 14 or 21 mm from the distal surface of the nearest crown with abutment, to simulate different extensions. The specimen was fixed on the metallic base and the force was applied until fracture in a universal test machine. Each one of the 9 sub-groups was composed by 10 specimens. Flexural strength means (in kgf) for the distances of 7, 14 and 21 mm were, respectively, 28.07, 8.27 and 6.39 for control group, 31.89, 9.18 and 5.16 for Kevlar 49 and 30.90, 9.31 and 6.86 for Fibrante. Data analysis ANOVA showed statistically significant difference (p<0.05) only regarding cantilever extension. Tukey's test detected significantly higher flexural strength for the 7 mm-distance, followed by 14 and 21 mm. Fracture was complete only on specimens of non-reinforced groups.

  20. Shear force microscopy using piezoresistive cantilevers in surface metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotszalk, Teodor; Kopiec, Daniel; Sierakowski, Andrzej; Janus, Paweł; Grabiec, Piotr; Rangelow, Ivo W.

    2014-09-01

    In this article we describe application of piezoresistive cantilevers in surface investigations carried out with the use of shear force microscopy (ShFM). The novel piezoresistive cantilevers integrate a Wheatstone piezoresistive bridge was used to detect the cantilever deflection, thermal deflection detector and planar tip protruding out of the spring beam. Because the planar tip deflection can be detected and controlled electronically the described technology is very flexible and can be applied in many surface investigations. In this article we will present operation theory of the described solution, experimental setup, methods for calibration of the tip deflection detection and actuation The analysis will be illustrated with example results of topography measurements performed using the described technology.

  1. A surface-acoustic-wave-based cantilever bio-sensor.

    PubMed

    De Simoni, Giorgio; Signore, Giovanni; Agostini, Matteo; Beltram, Fabio; Piazza, Vincenzo

    2015-06-15

    A scalable surface-acoustic-wave- (SAW-) based cantilevered device for portable bio-chemical sensing applications is presented. Even in the current, proof-of-principle implementation this architecture is shown to outperform commercial quartz-crystal microbalances in terms of sensitivity. Adhesion of analytes on a functionalized surface of the cantilever shifts the resonant frequency of a SAW-generating transducer due to the stress-induced variation of the speed of surface acoustic modes. We discuss the relevance of this approach for diagnostics applications based on miniaturized devices.

  2. Magnetostriction-driven cantilevers for dynamic atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penedo, M.; Fernández-Martínez, I.; Costa-Krämer, J. L.; Luna, M.; Briones, F.

    2009-10-01

    An actuation mode is presented to drive the mechanical oscillation of cantilevers for dynamic atomic force microscopy. The method is based on direct mechanical excitation of the cantilevers coated with amorphous Fe-B-N thin films, by means of the film magnetostriction, i.e., the dimensional change in the film when magnetized. These amorphous magnetostrictive Fe-B-N thin films exhibit soft magnetic properties, excellent corrosion resistance in liquid environments, nearly zero accumulated stress when properly deposited, and good chemical stability. We present low noise and high resolution topographic images acquired in liquid environment to demonstrate the method capability.

  3. Free torsional vibrations of tapered cantilever I-beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, C. Kameswara; Mirza, S.

    1988-08-01

    Torsional vibration characteristics of linearly tapered cantilever I-beams have been studied by using the Galerkin finite element method. A third degree polynomial is assumed for the angle of twist. The analysis presented is valid for long beams and includes the effect of warping. The individual as well as combined effects of linear tapers in the width of the flanges and the depth of the web on the torsional vibration of cantilever I-beams are investigated. Numerical results generated for various values of taper ratios are presented in graphical form.

  4. DETAIL OF FRONT ENTRY AT UNIT B. SHOWING THE CANTILEVERED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF FRONT ENTRY AT UNIT B. SHOWING THE CANTILEVERED CONCRETE CANOPY WITH ROUNDED CORNERS, STEPPED DOORWAY SURROUND, AND BAY WINDOW. NOTE THE DECORATIVE GRILLE AT THE VENT OF THE SECOND FLOOR CLOSET. VIEW FACING NORTH. - Hickam Field, Officers' Housing Type N, 204B Second Street, Honolulu, Honolulu County, HI

  5. Strategy Guideline: Quality Management in Existing Homes - Cantilever Floor Example

    SciTech Connect

    Taggart, J.; Sikora, J.; Wiehagen, J.; Wood, A.

    2011-12-01

    This guideline is designed to highlight the QA process that can be applied to any residential building retrofit activity. The cantilevered floor retrofit detailed in this guideline is included only to provide an actual retrofit example to better illustrate the QA activities being presented.

  6. 13. DETAIL OF SOUTH PIER TOP (WEST SIDE) AND CANTILEVERED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. DETAIL OF SOUTH PIER TOP (WEST SIDE) AND CANTILEVERED SIDEWALK. LOOKING NORTH. - Route 31 Bridge, New Jersey Route 31, crossing disused main line of Central Railroad of New Jersey (C.R.R.N.J.) (New Jersey Transit's Raritan Valley Line), Hampton, Hunterdon County, NJ

  7. Performance evaluation of perforated micro-cantilevers for MEMS applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swamy, Kenkere Balashanthamurthy Mruthyunjaya; Mukherjee, Banibrata; Ali Syed Mohammed, Zishan; Chakraborty, Suman; Sen, Siddhartha

    2014-04-01

    Miniaturized cantilevers are one of the elementary structures that are widely used in many micro-devices and systems. The dynamic performance of micro-cantilevers having process dictated through perforations is investigated. High-aspect ratio, long silicon cantilevers, intended for improved performance through lowered stiffness are designed with a series of through holes and simulated along with similar nonperforated/solid cantilevers for comparison. A few perforated structures are also fabricated using silicon-on-insulator-based multiproject MEMS processes from MEMSCAP Inc. (Durham, North Carolina) by reduced mask level and eliminating complex substrate trenching step. The dynamic behavior of these fabricated structures is experimentally studied for both in-plane and out-of-plane directions. It is shown that, due to the presence of perforations, stiffness in planar direction is lightly affected, whereas in out-of-plane direction it is significantly reduced by >35%. Similarly, the variation of damping in both perforated and nonperforated beams, too, is thoroughly analyzed for the first few modes of vibration. Nevertheless, their frequency response variation of <10% for modal frequencies in both planar and out-of-plane directions as compared to the nonperforated counterparts, points to potential applications in several micro-systems including those based on comb drives.

  8. Sensitivity measurement of a cantilever-based surface stress sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haag, Ann-Lauriene; Schumacher, Zeno; Grutter, Peter

    2016-10-01

    A detailed analysis of the temporal surface stress evolution for potential-driven adsorption of ions is discussed. A gold-coated cantilever is used to simultaneously measure the change in surface stress as well as the current response during an applied potential step. In this electrochemical configuration, the cantilever acts as the working electrode, a platinum wire as the counter electrode, and the Ag/AgCl (sat. KCl) electrode as the reference electrode. To study the time-dependent signal and the sensitivity of the cantilever response, the frequency of the potential step applied to the cantilever is varied from 1 s to 0.1 ms. First, a comparison between a strong adsorbing (chloride Cl-) and a weak adsorbing ion (perchlorate ClO 4- ) in a 1 mM solution is presented. Next, the linear relationship between surface stress and charge density is measured for these fast potential steps. The slope of this fit is defined as the sensitivity of the system and is shown to increase for shorter potential pulses. Finally, the behaviour of the surface stress and current for consecutive applied potential steps is studied.

  9. Cantilever's behavior in the AC mode of an AFM

    SciTech Connect

    Nunes, V.B.; Zanette, S.I.; Caride, A.O.; Prioli, R.; Rivas, A.M.F

    2003-03-15

    In this paper, a model with a small number of parameters is used to simulate the motion of a cantilever in the AC mode of an atomic force microscope (AFM). The results elucidate the transition dependence-from noncontact to tapping operating mode-on the height of the contamination layer and on the stiffness of the sample.

  10. Multiferroic cantilever for power generation using dual functionality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Reema; Tomar, Monika; Rammohan, S.; Katiyar, R. S.; Gupta, Vinay

    2016-11-01

    Lead zirconate titanate (PZT)/Ni cantilevers have been developed using the pulsed laser deposition technique for harnessing magnetic as well as mechanical energy. High voltage (1.2 mV, 1.8 mV, and 8.5 mV) and power density (1100, 2400, and 3600 mW/m3) were generated across the PZT/Ni cantilevers (in 3-3 mode) having PZT thin films deposited at 100 mTorr, 200 mTorr, and 300 mTorr oxygen pressures, respectively, at their respective resonance frequencies with 0.5 g acceleration. Maximum power response (3600 mW/m3) was observed at a load resistance of 100 kΩ for the cantilever having PZT film deposited at 300 mTorr oxygen pressure, which is manifested to the efficient ferroelectric and ferromagnetic properties of PZT/Ni system. The power generated from the PZT/Ni cantilever was further enhanced to 18 700 mW/m3 by superimposing magnetic energy with mechanical vibrations. These results are extremely promising for the realization of an efficient energy harvester utilizing both magnetic and mechanical energy.

  11. Cantilever deflection associated with hybridization of monomolecular DNA film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yue; Ganapathysubramanian, Baskar; Shrotriya, Pranav

    2012-04-01

    Recent experiments show that specific binding between a ligand and surface immobilized receptor, such as hybridization of single stranded DNA immobilized on a microcantilever surface, leads to cantilever deflection. The binding-induced deflection may be used as a method for detection of biomolecules, such as pathogens and biohazards. Mechanical deformation induced due to hybridization of surface-immobilized DNA strands is a commonly used system to demonstrate the efficacy of microcantilever sensors. To understand the mechanism underlying the cantilever deflections, a theoretical model that incorporates the influence of ligand/receptor complex surface distribution and empirical interchain potential is developed to predict the binding-induced deflections. The cantilever bending induced due to hybridization of DNA strands is predicted for different receptor immobilization densities, hybridization efficiencies, and spatial arrangements. Predicted deflections are compared with experimental reports to validate the modeling assumptions and identify the influence of various components on mechanical deformation. Comparison of numerical predictions and experimental results suggest that, at high immobilization densities, hybridization-induced mechanical deformation is determined, primarily by immobilization density and hybridization efficiency, whereas, at lower immobilization densities, spatial arrangement of hybridized chains need to be considered in determining the cantilever deflection.

  12. Note: A resonating reflector-based optical system for motion measurement in micro-cantilever arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Sathishkumar, P.; Punyabrahma, P.; Sri Muthu Mrinalini, R.; Jayanth, G. R.

    2015-09-15

    A robust, compact optical measurement unit for motion measurement in micro-cantilever arrays enables development of portable micro-cantilever sensors. This paper reports on an optical beam deflection-based system to measure the deflection of micro-cantilevers in an array that employs a single laser source, a single detector, and a resonating reflector to scan the measurement laser across the array. A strategy is also proposed to extract the deflection of individual cantilevers from the acquired data. The proposed system and measurement strategy are experimentally evaluated and demonstrated to measure motion of multiple cantilevers in an array.

  13. Simultaneous liquid viscosity and density determination with piezoelectric unimorph cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Wan Y.; Li, Xiaoping; Gu, Huiming; Shih, Wei-Heng; Aksay, Ilhan A.

    2001-01-01

    We have examined both experimentally and theoretically a piezoelectric unimorph cantilever as a liquid viscosity-and-density sensor. The fabricated piezoelectric unimorph consisted of a PbOṡZrO2ṡTiO2 (PZT) layer on a thin stainless-steel plate. In addition to a driving electrode, a sensing electrode was placed on top of the PZT layer, permitting the direct measurement of the resonance frequency. The cantilever was tested using water-glycerol solutions of different compositions. In all three of the tested modes, the resonance frequency decreased while the width of the resonance peak increased with increasing glycerol content. To account for the liquid effect, we consider the cantilever as a sphere of radius R oscillating in a liquid. By including the high and low frequency terms in the induced mass and the damping coefficient of the liquid, we show that for a given liquid density and viscosity the oscillating-sphere model predicts a resonance frequency and peak width that closely agree with experiment. Furthermore, the viscosity and the density of a liquid have been determined simultaneously using the experimentally measured resonance frequency and peak width as inputs to the oscillating-sphere model. The calculated liquid viscosity and density closely agreed with the known values, indicating that our cantilever-based sensor is effective in determining viscosity and density, simultaneously. We also show that scaling analysis predicts an increase in the width of the resonance peak with decreasing cantilever size, an observation in agreement with the large peak widths observed for microcantilevers.

  14. Modular apparatus for electrostatic actuation of common atomic force microscope cantilevers

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Christian J.; Cannara, Rachel J.

    2015-07-15

    Piezoelectric actuation of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers often suffers from spurious mechanical resonances in the loop between the signal driving the cantilever and the actual tip motion. These spurious resonances can reduce the accuracy of AFM measurements and in some cases completely obscure the cantilever response. To address these limitations, we developed a specialized AFM cantilever holder for electrostatic actuation of AFM cantilevers. The holder contains electrical contacts for the AFM cantilever chip, as well as an electrode (or electrodes) that may be precisely positioned with respect to the back of the cantilever. By controlling the voltages on the AFM cantilever and the actuation electrode(s), an electrostatic force is applied directly to the cantilever, providing a near-ideal transfer function from drive signal to tip motion. We demonstrate both static and dynamic actuations, achieved through the application of direct current and alternating current voltage schemes, respectively. As an example application, we explore contact resonance atomic force microscopy, which is a technique for measuring the mechanical properties of surfaces on the sub-micron length scale. Using multiple electrodes, we also show that the torsional resonances of the AFM cantilever may be excited electrostatically, opening the door for advanced dynamic lateral force measurements with improved accuracy and precision.

  15. Label-free detection of kanamycin using aptamer-based cantilever array sensor.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xiaojing; Hou, Hui; Zhang, Bailin; Tang, Jilin

    2014-06-15

    A label-free detection method of kanamycin using aptamer-based cantilever array sensor was developed. The cantilever array was composed of sensing cantilevers and reference cantilevers. This configuration allowed direct detection of individual cantilever deflections and subsequent determination of differential deflection of sensing/reference cantilever pair. The sensing cantilevers were functionalized with kanamycin aptamer, which was used as receptor molecules while the reference cantilevers were modified with 6-mercapto-1-hexanol (MCH) to eliminate the influence of environmental disturbances. The kanamycin-aptamer interaction induced a change in cantilever surface stress, which caused a differential deflection between the sensing and reference cantilever pair. The surface stress change was linear with kanamycin concentration over the range of 100 μM-10mM with a correlation coefficient of 0.995. A detection limit of 50 μM was obtained, at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. The sensor also showed good selectivity against other antibiotics such as neomycin, ribostamycin and chloramphenicol. The facile method for kanamycin detection may have great potential for investigating more other molecules.

  16. Modular apparatus for electrostatic actuation of common atomic force microscope cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Long, Christian J; Cannara, Rachel J

    2015-07-01

    Piezoelectric actuation of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers often suffers from spurious mechanical resonances in the loop between the signal driving the cantilever and the actual tip motion. These spurious resonances can reduce the accuracy of AFM measurements and in some cases completely obscure the cantilever response. To address these limitations, we developed a specialized AFM cantilever holder for electrostatic actuation of AFM cantilevers. The holder contains electrical contacts for the AFM cantilever chip, as well as an electrode (or electrodes) that may be precisely positioned with respect to the back of the cantilever. By controlling the voltages on the AFM cantilever and the actuation electrode(s), an electrostatic force is applied directly to the cantilever, providing a near-ideal transfer function from drive signal to tip motion. We demonstrate both static and dynamic actuations, achieved through the application of direct current and alternating current voltage schemes, respectively. As an example application, we explore contact resonance atomic force microscopy, which is a technique for measuring the mechanical properties of surfaces on the sub-micron length scale. Using multiple electrodes, we also show that the torsional resonances of the AFM cantilever may be excited electrostatically, opening the door for advanced dynamic lateral force measurements with improved accuracy and precision.

  17. Direct and quantitative broadband absorptance spectroscopy with multilayer cantilever probes

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, Wei-Chun; Tong, Jonathan Kien-Kwok; Liao, Bolin; Chen, Gang

    2015-04-21

    A system for measuring the absorption spectrum of a sample is provided that includes a broadband light source that produces broadband light defined within a range of an absorptance spectrum. An interferometer modulates the intensity of the broadband light source for a range of modulation frequencies. A bi-layer cantilever probe arm is thermally connected to a sample arm having at most two layers of materials. The broadband light modulated by the interferometer is directed towards the sample and absorbed by the sample and converted into heat, which causes a temperature rise and bending of the bi-layer cantilever probe arm. A detector mechanism measures and records the deflection of the probe arm so as to obtain the absorptance spectrum of the sample.

  18. Vibrations of cantilevered shallow cylindrical shells of rectangular planform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leissa, A. W.; Lee, J. K.; Wang, A. J.

    1981-01-01

    A cantilevered, shallow shell of circular cylindrical curvature and rectangular planform exhibits free vibration behavior which differs considerably from that of a cantilevered beam or of a flat plate. Some numerical results can be found for the problem in the previously published literature, mainly obtained by using various finite element methods. The present paper is the first definitive study of the problem, presenting accurate non-dimensional frequency parameters for wide ranges of aspect ratio, shallowness ratio and thickness ratio. The analysis is based upon shallow shell theory. Numerical results are obtained by using the Ritz method, with algebraic polynomial trial functions for the displacements. Convergence is investigated, with attention being given both to the number of terms taken for each co-ordinate direction and for each of the three components of displacement. Accuracy of the results is also established by comparison with finite element results for shallow shells and with other accurate flat plate solutions.

  19. Controlled generation of intrinsic localized modes in microelectromechanical cantilever arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qingfei; Lai, Ying-Cheng; Dietz, David

    2010-12-01

    We propose a scheme to induce intrinsic localized modes (ILMs) at an arbitrary site in microelectromechanical cantilever arrays. The idea is to locate the particular cantilever beam in the array that one wishes to drive to an oscillating state with significantly higher amplitude than the average and then apply small adjustments to the electrical signal that drives the whole array system. Our scheme is thus a global closed-loop control strategy. We argue that the dynamical mechanism on which our global driving scheme relies is spatiotemporal chaos and we develop a detailed analysis based on the standard averaging method in nonlinear dynamics to understand the working of our control scheme. We also develop a Markov model to characterize the transient time required for inducing ILMs.

  20. Cantilever spring constant calibration using laser Doppler vibrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ohler, Benjamin

    2007-06-15

    Uncertainty in cantilever spring constants is a critical issue in atomic force microscopy (AFM) force measurements. Though numerous methods exist for calibrating cantilever spring constants, the accuracy of these methods can be limited by both the physical models themselves as well as uncertainties in their experimental implementation. Here we report the results from two of the most common calibration methods, the thermal tune method and the Sader method. These were implemented on a standard AFM system as well as using laser Doppler vibrometry (LDV). Using LDV eliminates some uncertainties associated with optical lever detection on an AFM. It also offers considerably higher signal to noise deflection measurements. We find that AFM and LDV result in similar uncertainty in the calibrated spring constants, about 5%, using either the thermal tune or Sader methods provided that certain limitations of the methods and instrumentation are observed.

  1. Laser Actuation of Cantilevers for Picometre Amplitude Dynamic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Drew R.; Tayati, Ponlawat; An, Hongjie; Lam, Ping Koy; Craig, Vincent S. J.; Senden, Tim J.

    2014-01-01

    As nanoscale and molecular devices become reality, the ability to probe materials on these scales is increasing in importance. To address this, we have developed a dynamic force microscopy technique where the flexure of the microcantilever is excited using an intensity modulated laser beam to achieve modulation on the picoscale. The flexure arises from thermally induced bending through differential expansion and the conservation of momentum when the photons are reflected and absorbed by the cantilever. In this study, we investigated the photothermal and photon pressure responses of monolithic and layered cantilevers using a modulated laser in air and immersed in water. The developed photon actuation technique is applied to the stretching of single polymer chains. PMID:24993548

  2. Sacrificial layer for the fabrication of electroformed cantilevered LIGA microparts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, Alfredo M.; Aigeldinger, Georg; Bankert, Michelle A.; Domeier, Linda A.; Hachman, John T.; Hauck, Cheryl; Keifer, Patrick N.; Krafcik, Karen L.; McLean, Dorrance E.; Yang, Peter C.

    2003-01-01

    The use of silver filled PMMA as a sacrificial layer for the fabrication of multilevel LIGA microparts is presented. In this technique, a bottom level of standard electroformed LIGA parts is first produced on a metallized substrate such as a silicon wafer. A methyl methacrylate formulation mixed with silver particles is then cast and polymerized around the bottom level of metal parts to produce a conducting sacrificial layer. A second level of PMMA x-ray resist is adhered to the bottom level of metal parts and conducting PMMA and patterned to form another level of electroformed features. This presentation will discuss some the requirements for the successful fabrication of multilevel, cantilevered LIGA microparts. It will be shown that by using a silver filled PMMA, a sacrificial layer can be quickly applied around LIGA components; cantilevered microparts can be electroformed; and the final parts can be quickly released by dissolving the sacrificial layer in acetone.

  3. Vibrations of cantilevered shallow cylindrical shells of rectangular planform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leissa, A. W.; Lee, J. K.; Wang, A. J.

    1981-10-01

    A cantilevered, shallow shell of circular cylindrical curvature and rectangular planform exhibits free vibration behavior which differs considerably from that of a cantilevered beam or of a flat plate. Some numerical results can be found for the problem in the previously published literature, mainly obtained by using various finite element methods. The present paper is the first definitive study of the problem, presenting accurate non-dimensional frequency parameters for wide ranges of aspect ratio, shallowness ratio and thickness ratio. The analysis is based upon shallow shell theory. Numerical results are obtained by using the Ritz method, with algebraic polynomial trial functions for the displacements. Convergence is investigated, with attention being given both to the number of terms taken for each co-ordinate direction and for each of the three components of displacement. Accuracy of the results is also established by comparison with finite element results for shallow shells and with other accurate flat plate solutions.

  4. Cantilever spring constant calibration using laser Doppler vibrometry.

    PubMed

    Ohler, Benjamin

    2007-06-01

    Uncertainty in cantilever spring constants is a critical issue in atomic force microscopy (AFM) force measurements. Though numerous methods exist for calibrating cantilever spring constants, the accuracy of these methods can be limited by both the physical models themselves as well as uncertainties in their experimental implementation. Here we report the results from two of the most common calibration methods, the thermal tune method and the Sader method. These were implemented on a standard AFM system as well as using laser Doppler vibrometry (LDV). Using LDV eliminates some uncertainties associated with optical lever detection on an AFM. It also offers considerably higher signal to noise deflection measurements. We find that AFM and LDV result in similar uncertainty in the calibrated spring constants, about 5%, using either the thermal tune or Sader methods provided that certain limitations of the methods and instrumentation are observed.

  5. Automatic Optical Crack Tracking for Double Cantilever Beam Specimens

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    TECHN ICAL ART IC LE Automatic Optical Crack Tracking for Double Cantilever Beam Specimens B. Krull1,2, J. Patrick2,3, K. Hart2,4, S. White2,4, and N...computer program with edge detection software rapidly, automatically, and accurately tracks the crack front in translucent DCB specimens by optically ...through the DCB, crack length is optically determined from hand-marked delineations along the profile (side) of each sample. Continuous crack length

  6. Frequency Response of Nanoelectromechanical Cantilevers Operating in Fluid

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-08-01

    losses. These losses can be computed using the Navier - Stokes equations on the cantilever cross- section. [9]- [12] Navier - Stokes solvers have been...frequency ω: )sin()( tFtF o ω= . (8) The viscous drag force is computed by solving the time- dependent Navier - Stokes ...Solution of the velocity and pressure using a time- dependent Navier - Stokes algorithm. 2. Computation of the fluid force, spring force, and

  7. Accurate Method for Determining Adhesion of Cantilever Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Michalske, T.A.; de Boer, M.P.

    1999-01-08

    Using surface micromachined samples, we demonstrate the accurate measurement of cantilever beam adhesion by using test structures which are adhered over long attachment lengths. We show that this configuration has a deep energy well, such that a fracture equilibrium is easily reached. When compared to the commonly used method of determining the shortest attached beam, the present method is much less sensitive to variations in surface topography or to details of capillary drying.

  8. Apertureless cantilever-free pen arrays for scanning photochemical printing.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yu; Xie, Zhuang; Brown, Keith A; Park, Daniel J; Zhou, Xiaozhu; Chen, Peng-Cheng; Hirtz, Michael; Lin, Qing-Yuan; Dravid, Vinayak P; Schatz, George C; Zheng, Zijian; Mirkin, Chad A

    2015-02-25

    A novel, apertureless, cantilever-free pen array can be used for dual scanning photochemical and molecular printing. Serial writing with light is enabled by combining self-focusing pyramidal pens with an opaque backing between pens. The elastomeric pens also afford force-tuned illumination and simultaneous delivery of materials and optical energy. These attributes make the technique a promising candidate for maskless high-resolution photopatterning and combinatorial chemistry.

  9. Carbon nanotube cantilevers on self-aligned copper silicide nanobeams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parajuli, Omkar; Kumar, Nitin; Kipp, Dylan; Hahm, Jong-in

    2007-04-01

    In this letter, the authors describe both a growth method for self-aligning copper silicide (Cu3Si) nanobeams and their use as active catalysts for carbon nanotube (CNT) synthesis via chemical vapor deposition. In the unique geometry of these useful structures, CNT cantilevers are anchored firmly to the Cu3Si nanobeams. The resulting CNT-Cu3Si structures may improve accuracy and reliability of CNT applications in nanoelectromechanical systems.

  10. Optical fiber accelerometer based on a silicon micromachined cantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malki, Abdelrafik; Lecoy, Pierre; Marty, Jeanine; Renouf, Christine; Ferdinand, Pierre

    1995-12-01

    An intensity-modulated fiber-optic accelerometer based on backreflection effects has been manufactured and tested. It uses a multimode fiber placed at a spherical mirror center, and the beam intensity is modulated by a micromachined silicon cantilever. This device has applications as an accelerometer and vibrometer for rotating machines. It exhibits an amplitude linearity of +/-1.2% in the range of 0.1-22 m s-2, a frequency linearity of +/-1% in the

  11. Direct Measurement of Lateral Force Using Dual Cantilevers

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Makoto; Ichikawa, Masaya; Miura, Kouji

    2012-01-01

    We have constructed an experimental system to measure a piconewton lateral force using dual cantilevers which cross with each other. The resolution of the lateral force is estimated to be 3.3 p ± 0.2 pN, which is comparable to forces due to thermal fluctuation. This experimental apparatus works so easily that it will enable us to determine forces during nano-manipulation and nano-tribological measurements. PMID:22737001

  12. Impact of fixed implant prosthetics using the 'all-on-four' treatment concept on speech intelligibility, articulation and oromyofunctional behaviour.

    PubMed

    Van Lierde, K M; Browaeys, H; Corthals, P; Matthys, C; Mussche, P; Van Kerckhove, E; De Bruyn, H

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this case control study is to determine the impact of screw-retained fixed cross-arch prostheses, supported by four osseointegrated implants, on articulation and oromyofunctional behaviour. Objective (acoustic analysis) and subjective assessment techniques were used to determine the overall intelligibility, phonetic characteristics and oromyofunctional behaviour at an average period of 7.3 months after placement of the fixed implant prosthesis in 15 patients and 9 age-matched controls with intact dentition and without prosthetic appliances. Overall satisfaction with the prosthesis was 87%, but 53% of the subjects mentioned an impact on speech. 87% of the subjects presented with one or more distortions of the consonants. The most common distortions were distortions of the sound /s/ (sigmatismus simplex, 40% and sigmatismus stridens, 33%), simplex /z/ (27%), insufficient frication of /f/ (20%), /[symbol in text]/ (20%), addental production of /d/ (20%), /t/ (20%) or /s/ sound (13%) and devoiced /d/ (7%). In the control group, no articulation disorders were noted. Oromyofunctional behaviour in both groups was normal. To what extent motor-oriented speech therapy (with focus on tongue function) immediately after periodontal treatment (after wound healing) would decrease the persistent phonetic distortions is a subject for further research.

  13. SU8 diaphragm micropump with monolithically integrated cantilever check valves.

    PubMed

    Ezkerra, Aitor; Fernández, Luis José; Mayora, Kepa; Ruano-López, Jesús Miguel

    2011-10-07

    This paper presents a SU8 unidirectional diaphragm micropump with embedded out-of-plane cantilever check valves. The device represents a reliable and low-cost solution for integration of microfluidic control in lab-on-a-chip devices. Its planar architecture allows monolithic definition of its components in a single step and potential integration with previously reported PCR, electrophoresis and flow-sensing SU8 microdevices. Pneumatic actuation is applied on a PDMS diaphragm, which is bonded to the SU8 body at wafer level, further enhancing its integration and mass production capabilities. The cantilever check valves move synchronously with the diaphragm, feature fast response (10ms), low dead volume (86nl) and a 94% flow blockage up to 300kPa. The micropump achieves a maximum flow rate of 177 μl min(-1) at 6 Hz and 200 kPa with an effective area of 10 mm(2). The device is reliable, self-priming and tolerant to particles and big bubbles. To the knowledge of the authors, this is the first micropump in SU8 with monolithically integrated cantilever check valves.

  14. Vibration analysis of magnetostrictive thin-film composite cantilever actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yan; Shang, Xinchun

    2016-09-01

    The transverse vibration of a composed cantilever beam with magnetostrictive layer is analyzed, which is employed to simulate dynamic response of an actuator. The high-order shear deformation theory of beam and the coupling magnetoelastic constitutive relationship are introduced to construct the governing equations, all interface conditions between magnetostrictive film and elastic substrate as well as the free stress condition on the top and bottom surfaces of the beam can be satisfied. In order to demonstrate validity of the presented mathematical modeling, the verification examples are also given. Furthermore, the effect of geometry and material parameters on dynamic characteristics of magnetostrictive cantilever beam, such as the nature frequency and amplitude, is discussed. Moreover, through computing the magneto-mechanical coupling factor of the beam structure, the variation tendency curves of the factor along with different parameters and frequencies of magnetostrictive cantilever beam actuator have been presented. These numerical results should be useful for the design of beam-type with magnetostrictive thin-film actuators.

  15. A cantilever-free approach to dot-matrix nanoprinting

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Keith A.; Eichelsdoerfer, Daniel J.; Shim, Wooyoung; Rasin, Boris; Radha, Boya; Liao, Xing; Schmucker, Abrin L.; Liu, Guoliang; Mirkin, Chad A.

    2013-01-01

    Scanning probe lithography (SPL) is a promising candidate approach for desktop nanofabrication, but trade-offs in throughput, cost, and resolution have limited its application. The recent development of cantilever-free scanning probe arrays has allowed researchers to define nanoscale patterns in a low-cost and high-resolution format, but with the limitation that these are duplication tools where each probe in the array creates a copy of a single pattern. Here, we report a cantilever-free SPL architecture that can generate 100 nanometer-scale molecular features using a 2D array of independently actuated probes. To physically actuate a probe, local heating is used to thermally expand the elastomeric film beneath a single probe, bringing it into contact with the patterning surface. Not only is this architecture simple and scalable, but it addresses fundamental limitations of 2D SPL by allowing one to compensate for unavoidable imperfections in the system. This cantilever-free dot-matrix nanoprinting will enable the construction of surfaces with chemical functionality that is tuned across the nano- and macroscales. PMID:23861495

  16. Polymeric cantilever integrated with PDMS/graphene composite strain sensor.

    PubMed

    Choi, Young-Soo; Gwak, Min-Joo; Lee, Dong-Weon

    2016-10-01

    This paper describes the mechanical and electrical characteristics of a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) cantilever integrated with a high-sensitivity strain sensor. The strain sensor is fabricated using PDMS and graphene flakes that are uniformly distributed in the PDMS. In order to prepare PDMS/graphene composite with uniform resistance, a tetrahydrofuran solution is used to decrease the viscosity of a PDMS base polymer solution. A horn-type sonicator is then used to mix the base polymer with graphene flakes. Low viscosity of the base polymer solution improves the reliability and reproducibility of the PDMS/graphene composite for strain sensor applications. After dicing the composite into the desired sensor shape, a tensile test is performed. The experimental results show that the composite with a concentration of 30 wt.% exhibits a linear response up to a strain rate of 9%. The graphene concentration of the prepared materials affects the gauge factor, which at 20% graphene concentration reaches about 50, and with increasing graphene concentration to 30% decreases to 9. Furthermore, photolithography, PDMS casting, and a stencil process are used to fabricate a PDMS cantilever with an integrated strain sensor. The change in resistance of the integrated PDMS/graphene sensor is characterized with respect to the displacement of the cantilever of within 500 μm. The experimental results confirmed that the prepared PDMS/graphene based sensor has the potential for high-sensitive biosensor applications.

  17. Vibrating cantilever beam in a flowing soap film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajjanapu, Veera; Ward, Thomas

    2016-11-01

    We present an experimental study of the interaction between a flexible cantilever beam and a flowing fluid medium using a soap film. The vertically falling soap film is capable of attaining speeds ranging from 1.5 - 3 m/s with an operating test section width of 7.5 cm. Experiments were conducted for flexible cantilever beams of length L <= 10 mm yielding Reynolds number 5000 < Re < 10000 and of cantilever beam thickness ranging from 0.03 - 0.08 mm were placed at angles of attack ranging from 10° - 50°. We visualize the beam displacements and wake with a high-speed camera. Assuming small vibrational amplitudes, we consider the Euler-Bernoulli beam theory to understand the dynamics. From the analysis we find that the normalized average displacement is linear with respect to the square of the free-stream velocity. The vibrational amplitude is also discussed using a similar scaling. Finally, visualization of the downstream vortex structure is related to a beams displacement and vibrational frequency using dimensional analysis.

  18. Polymeric cantilever integrated with PDMS/graphene composite strain sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Young-Soo; Gwak, Min-Joo; Lee, Dong-Weon

    2016-10-01

    This paper describes the mechanical and electrical characteristics of a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) cantilever integrated with a high-sensitivity strain sensor. The strain sensor is fabricated using PDMS and graphene flakes that are uniformly distributed in the PDMS. In order to prepare PDMS/graphene composite with uniform resistance, a tetrahydrofuran solution is used to decrease the viscosity of a PDMS base polymer solution. A horn-type sonicator is then used to mix the base polymer with graphene flakes. Low viscosity of the base polymer solution improves the reliability and reproducibility of the PDMS/graphene composite for strain sensor applications. After dicing the composite into the desired sensor shape, a tensile test is performed. The experimental results show that the composite with a concentration of 30 wt.% exhibits a linear response up to a strain rate of 9%. The graphene concentration of the prepared materials affects the gauge factor, which at 20% graphene concentration reaches about 50, and with increasing graphene concentration to 30% decreases to 9. Furthermore, photolithography, PDMS casting, and a stencil process are used to fabricate a PDMS cantilever with an integrated strain sensor. The change in resistance of the integrated PDMS/graphene sensor is characterized with respect to the displacement of the cantilever of within 500 μm. The experimental results confirmed that the prepared PDMS/graphene based sensor has the potential for high-sensitive biosensor applications.

  19. Investigations on antibody binding to a micro-cantilever coated with a BAM pesticide residue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bache, Michael; Taboryski, Rafael; Schmid, Silvan; Aamand, Jens; Jakobsen, Mogens Havsteen

    2011-05-01

    The attachment of an antibody to an antigen-coated cantilever has been investigated by repeated experiments, using a cantilever-based detection system by Cantion A/S. The stress induced by the binding of a pesticide residue BAM (2,6 dichlorobenzamide) immobilized on a cantilever surface to anti-BAM antibody is measured using the CantiLab4© system from Cantion A/S with four gold-coated cantilevers and piezo resistive readout. The detection mechanism is in principle label-free, but fluorescent-marked antibodies have been used to subsequently verify the binding on the cantilever surface. The bending and increase in mass of each cantilever has also been investigated using a light interferometer and a Doppler Vibrometer. The system has been analyzed during repeated measurements to investigate whether the CantiLab4© system is a suited platform for a pesticide assay system.

  20. Performance of pre-deformed flexible piezoelectric cantilever in energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Pengyingkai; Sui, Li; Shi, Gengchen; Liu, Guohua

    2016-05-01

    This paper proposes a novel structure for pre-rolled flexible piezoelectric cantilevers that use wind energy to power a submunition electrical device. Owing to the particular installation position and working environment, the submunition piezoelectric cantilever should be rolled when not working, but this pre-rolled state can alter the energy harvesting performance. Herein, a working principle and installation method for piezoelectric cantilevers used in submunitions are introduced. To study the influence of the pre-rolled state, pre-rolled piezoelectric cantilevers of different sizes were fabricated and their performances were studied using finite element analysis simulations and experiments. The simulation results show that the resonance frequency and stiffness of the pre-rolled structure is higher than that of a flat structure. Results show that, (1) for both the pre-rolled and flat cantilever, the peak voltage will increase with the wind speed. (2) The pre-rolled cantilever has a higher critical wind speed than the flat cantilever. (3) For identical wind speeds and cantilever sizes, the peak voltage of the flat cantilever (45 V) is less than that of the pre-rolled cantilever (56 V). (4) Using a full-bridge rectifier, the output of the pre-rolled cantilever can sufficiently supply a 10 μF capacitor, whose output voltage may be up to 23 V after 10 s. These results demonstrate that the pre-rolled piezoelectric cantilever and its installation position used in this work are more suitable for submunition, and its output sufficiently meets submunition requirements.

  1. Bi-harmonic cantilever design for improved measurement sensitivity in tapping-mode atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Loganathan, Muthukumaran; Bristow, Douglas A

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents a method and cantilever design for improving the mechanical measurement sensitivity in the atomic force microscopy (AFM) tapping mode. The method uses two harmonics in the drive signal to generate a bi-harmonic tapping trajectory. Mathematical analysis demonstrates that the wide-valley bi-harmonic tapping trajectory is as much as 70% more sensitive to changes in the sample topography than the standard single-harmonic trajectory typically used. Although standard AFM cantilevers can be driven in the bi-harmonic tapping trajectory, they require large forcing at the second harmonic. A design is presented for a bi-harmonic cantilever that has a second resonant mode at twice its first resonant mode, thereby capable of generating bi-harmonic trajectories with small forcing signals. Bi-harmonic cantilevers are fabricated by milling a small cantilever on the interior of a standard cantilever probe using a focused ion beam. Bi-harmonic drive signals are derived for standard cantilevers and bi-harmonic cantilevers. Experimental results demonstrate better than 30% improvement in measurement sensitivity using the bi-harmonic cantilever. Images obtained through bi-harmonic tapping exhibit improved sharpness and surface tracking, especially at high scan speeds and low force fields.

  2. Large Area Microcorrals and Cavity Formation on Cantilevers using a Focused Ion Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Britt, David W.

    2011-09-14

    We utilize focused ion beam (FIB) to explore various sputtering parameters to form large area microcorrals and cavities on cantilevers. Microcorrals were rapidly created by modifying ion beam blur and overlaps. Modification in FIB sputtering parameters affects the periodicity and shape of corral microstructure. Cantilever deflections show ion beam amorphization effects as a function of sputtered area and cantilever base cavities with or without side walls. The FIB sputtering parameters address a method for rapid creation of a cantilever tensiometer with integrated fluid storage and delivery.

  3. Bi-harmonic cantilever design for improved measurement sensitivity in tapping-mode atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Loganathan, Muthukumaran; Bristow, Douglas A.

    2014-04-15

    This paper presents a method and cantilever design for improving the mechanical measurement sensitivity in the atomic force microscopy (AFM) tapping mode. The method uses two harmonics in the drive signal to generate a bi-harmonic tapping trajectory. Mathematical analysis demonstrates that the wide-valley bi-harmonic tapping trajectory is as much as 70% more sensitive to changes in the sample topography than the standard single-harmonic trajectory typically used. Although standard AFM cantilevers can be driven in the bi-harmonic tapping trajectory, they require large forcing at the second harmonic. A design is presented for a bi-harmonic cantilever that has a second resonant mode at twice its first resonant mode, thereby capable of generating bi-harmonic trajectories with small forcing signals. Bi-harmonic cantilevers are fabricated by milling a small cantilever on the interior of a standard cantilever probe using a focused ion beam. Bi-harmonic drive signals are derived for standard cantilevers and bi-harmonic cantilevers. Experimental results demonstrate better than 30% improvement in measurement sensitivity using the bi-harmonic cantilever. Images obtained through bi-harmonic tapping exhibit improved sharpness and surface tracking, especially at high scan speeds and low force fields.

  4. Note: Lateral force microscope calibration using multiple location pivot loading of rectangular cantilevers

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Koo-Hyun; Reitsma, Mark G.

    2010-02-15

    This note outlines a calibration method for atomic force microscope friction measurement that uses the ''pivot'' method of [Bogdanovic et al., Colloids Surf. B 19, 397 (2000)] to generate optical lever sensitivities for known torque applied to rectangular cantilevers. We demonstrate the key calibration parameter to be a linear function of the position at which it is determined along the length of the cantilevers. In this way the optical lever system can be calibrated for cantilever torque by applying loads at locations along the length of a cantilever, away from the integrated tip, so that issues such as tip damage or interference can be avoided.

  5. Multi-directional energy harvesting by piezoelectric cantilever-pendulum with internal resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, J.; Tang, J.

    2015-11-23

    This letter reports a piezoelectric cantilever-pendulum design for multi-directional energy harvesting. A pendulum is attached to the tip of a piezoelectric cantilever-type energy harvester. This design aims at taking advantage of the nonlinear coupling between the pendulum motion in 3-dimensional space and the beam bending vibration at resonances. Experimental studies indicate that, under properly chosen parameters, 1:2 internal resonance can be induced, which enables the multi-directional energy harvesting with a single cantilever. The advantages of the design with respect to traditional piezoelectric cantilever are examined.

  6. Integrated cantilever fabrication and system development for ultrasonic and acoustic scanning probe microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Stephen; Sankaran, Balasubramanian; Altemus, Bruce; Xu, Bai; Geer, Robert

    2005-05-01

    Although the conventional optical lever technology typically used for scanning probe microscope applications has proven highly sensitive, accurate, and cost effective for most applications involving micromachined cantilever deflection measurements, frequency limitations and space needs limit its applicability to emerging ultrasonic-based SPM applications. Recently, the fabrication of cantilevers integrated with actuation and sensing components has opened avenues for feedback-based driving of micromachined cantilevers at higher-order resonance frequencies while sensing average deflection without the need for an optical deflection pathway for average deflection sensing. The work presented here will review recent efforts by our group in fabricating micromachined cantilevers with integrated piezoresistive deflection-sensing components combined with integrated ZnO actuation layers to induce cantilever deflection. These cantilevers are being fabricated for use in a heterodyne force microscopy system (HFM) to enable SPM imaging contrast based on viscoelastic response of a surface in contact with a micromachined tip wherein active-feedback technology is being applied to maintain ultrasonic tip excitation at higher order cantilever resonances. The first and second-pass fabrication results will be presented and reviewed regarding cantilever release and ZnO actuator (and electrode) fabrication. Dynamic response data from these structures, measured via laser Doppler vibrometery reveal the expected resonance structure for a cantilever of these dimensions.

  7. Nonlinear Dynamics of Cantilever-Sample Interactions in Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantrell, John H.; Cantrell, Sean A.

    2010-01-01

    The interaction of the cantilever tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM) with the sample surface is obtained by treating the cantilever and sample as independent systems coupled by a nonlinear force acting between the cantilever tip and a volume element of the sample surface. The volume element is subjected to a restoring force from the remainder of the sample that provides dynamical equilibrium for the combined systems. The model accounts for the positions on the cantilever of the cantilever tip, laser probe, and excitation force (if any) via a basis set of set of orthogonal functions that may be generalized to account for arbitrary cantilever shapes. The basis set is extended to include nonlinear cantilever modes. The model leads to a pair of coupled nonlinear differential equations that are solved analytically using a matrix iteration procedure. The effects of oscillatory excitation forces applied either to the cantilever or to the sample surface (or to both) are obtained from the solution set and applied to the to the assessment of phase and amplitude signals generated by various acoustic-atomic force microscope (A-AFM) modalities. The influence of bistable cantilever modes of on AFM signal generation is discussed. The effects on the cantilever-sample surface dynamics of subsurface features embedded in the sample that are perturbed by surface-generated oscillatory excitation forces and carried to the cantilever via wave propagation are accounted by the Bolef-Miller propagating wave model. Expressions pertaining to signal generation and image contrast in A-AFM are obtained and applied to amplitude modulation (intermittent contact) atomic force microscopy and resonant difference-frequency atomic force ultrasonic microscopy (RDF-AFUM). The influence of phase accumulation in A-AFM on image contrast is discussed, as is the effect of hard contact and maximum nonlinearity regimes of A-AFM operation.

  8. APPARATUS FOR NON-DESTRUCTIVE INSPECTION OF CANTILEVERED MEMBERS

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, E.R.; Mahoney, C.H.; Lay, C.R.

    1961-10-24

    An apparatus for non-destructive inspection of cantilevered members, such as compressor blades, is described. The member under inspection is vibrated with a regulated source of air under pressure. The amplitude of vibration of the member is maintained at its natural frequency. The frequency of vibration of the member is measured. An indication of an excessive decay or erratic shifting in the measured frequency above an allowable hysteretic decay is provided as an indication of a fault in the member. The member is vibrated for a selected test period. (AEC)

  9. Heater-Integrated Cantilevers for Nano-Samples Thermogravimetric Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Toffoli, Valeria; Carrato, Sergio; Lee, Dongkyu; Jeon, Sangmin; Lazzarino, Marco

    2013-01-01

    The design and characteristics of a micro-system for thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) in which heater, temperature sensor and mass sensor are integrated into a single device are presented. The system consists of a suspended cantilever that incorporates a microfabricated resistor, used as both heater and thermometer. A three-dimensional finite element analysis was used to define the structure parameters. TGA sensors were fabricated by standard microlithographic techniques and tested using milli-Q water and polyurethane microcapsule. The results demonstrated that our approach provides a faster and more sensitive TGA with respect to commercial systems.

  10. On numerical nonlinear analysis of highly flexible spinning cantilevers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Utku, S.; El-Essawi, M.; Salama, M.

    1981-01-01

    The general nonlinear discretized equations of motion of spinning elastic solids and structures are derived as a set of nonlinear ordinary differential equations for the case when the strain-displacement and velocity-displacement relations are nonlinear up to the second order. It is shown that the cost of generation of such equations is proportional to the fourth power of the number of degrees of freedom. A computer program is written to automatically generate the equations for the case of spinning cantilevers with initial imperfections. The types and the number of the coordinate functions used in the trial solution are parameters of the program.

  11. Piezoelectric Bimorph Cantilever for Vibration-Producing-Hydrogen

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jun; Wu, Zheng; Jia, Yanmin; Kan, Junwu; Cheng, Guangming

    2013-01-01

    A device composed of a piezoelectric bimorph cantilever and a water electrolysis device was fabricated to realize piezoelectrochemical hydrogen production. The obvious output of the hydrogen and oxygen through application of a mechanical vibration of ∼0.07 N and ∼46.2 Hz was observed. This method provides a cost-effective, recyclable, environment-friendly and simple way to directly split water for hydrogen fuels by scavenging mechanical waste energy forms such as noise or traffic vibration in the environment. PMID:23271601

  12. Double Cantilever Beam Fracture Toughness Testing of Several Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessler, Jeff A.; Adams, Donald F.

    1992-01-01

    Double-cantilever beam fracture toughness tests were performed by the Composite Materials Research Group on several different unidirectional composite materials provided by NASA Langley Research Center. The composite materials consisted of Hercules IM-7 carbon fiber and various matrix resin formulations. Multiple formulations of four different families of matrix resins were tested: LaRC - ITPI, LaRC - IA, RPT46T, and RP67/RP55. Report presents the materials tested and pertinent details supplied by NASA. For each material, three replicate specimens were tested. Multiple crack extensions were performed on each replicate.

  13. Structure–performance relationships for cantilever-type piezoelectric energy harvesters

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Kyung-Hoon E-mail: spriya@vt.edu; Park, Hwi-Yeol; Heo, Jin S.; Priya, Shashank E-mail: spriya@vt.edu

    2014-05-28

    This study provides comprehensive analysis of the structure–performance relationships in cantilever-type piezoelectric energy harvesters. It provides full understanding of the effect of all the practical global control variables on the harvester performance. The control variables considered for the analysis were material parameters, areal and volumetric dimensions, and configuration of the inactive and active layers. Experimentally, the output power density of the harvester was maximum when the shape of the beam was close to a square for a constant bending stiffness and a fixed beam area. Through analytical modeling of the effective stiffness for the piezoelectric bimorph, the conditions for enhancing the bending stiffness within the same beam volume as that of a conventional bimorph were identified. The harvester configuration with beam aspect ratio of 0.86 utilizing distributed inactive layers exhibited an giant output power of 52.5 mW and power density of 28.5 mW cm{sup −3} at 30 Hz under 6.9 m s{sup −2} excitation. The analysis further indicates that the trend in the output power with varying damping ratio is dissimilar to that of the efficiency. In order to realize best performance, the harvester should be designed with respect to maximizing the magnitude of output power.

  14. On use of double cantilever beam for coatings and adhesion tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troczynski, Tom; Camire, Jean

    1995-05-01

    The compliance model of Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) for testing coatings and adhesion has been proposed and verified experimentally. The model is based on the assumption that the coating modifies the stiffness of a foundation of DCB onto which the beam is fixed, according to a simple series-spring law. The model includes multi-coated specimens, in particular the specimen with thermal sprayed ceramic coating, with an additional layer of epoxy adhesive for attachment of a symmetrical DCB arm. It was found, that the compliance of DCB specimens with a coating is significantly increased for a coating thickness larger than approximately 1% of the arm thickness, and a coating Young's modulus smaller than approximately 50% of the arm modulus. The model results, verified by experiment, have profound consequences on calculations of the strain energy release rate in fracture tests for coatings, brazed joints etc. The total compliance of the arm and coating assembly scales with the coating stiffness, and thus the model can be utilised for rigidity evaluation of a variety of coatings on standard substrates, e.g. paints or polymer coatings on metals.

  15. Cantilevered bimorph-based scanner for high speed atomic force microscopy with large scanning range.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yusheng; Shang, Guangyi; Cai, Wei; Yao, Jun-en

    2010-05-01

    A cantilevered bimorph-based resonance-mode scanner for high speed atomic force microscope (AFM) imaging is presented. The free end of the bimorph is used for mounting a sample stage and the other one of that is fixed on the top of a conventional single tube scanner. High speed scanning is realized with the bimorph-based scanner vibrating at resonant frequency driven by a sine wave voltage applied to one piezolayer of the bimorph, while slow scanning is performed by the tube scanner. The other piezolayer provides information on vibration amplitude and phase of the bimorph itself simultaneously, which is used for real-time data processing and image calibration. By adjusting the free length of the bimorph, the line scan rate can be preset ranging from several hundred hertz to several kilohertz, which would be beneficial for the observation of samples with different properties. Combined with a home-made AFM system and a commercially available data acquisition card, AFM images of various samples have been obtained, and as an example, images of the silicon grating taken at a line rate of 1.5 kHz with the scan size of 20 microm are given. By manually moving the sample of polished Al foil surface while scanning, the capability of dynamic imaging is demonstrated.

  16. Energy harvesting of cantilever beam system with linear and nonlinear piezoelectric model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borowiec, Marek

    2015-11-01

    The nonlinear beam with vertical combined excitations is proposed as an energy harvester. The nonlinearities are included both, in the beam model and also in the electrical subsystem. The system is modelled as a cantilever beam with included a tip mass and piezoelectric patches which convert the bending strains induced by both, the harmonic and the additive stochastic forces. The excitation affects in vertical directions by kinematic forcing into electrical charge. The first main goal is to analyse the dynamics of the electro-mechanical beam system and the influence of the mixed excitation forces into an effectiveness of the energy harvesting. Overcoming the potential barrier by the beam system is also analysed, where large output amplitudes occur. Such region of the vibration affects more power generation, which is crucial in terms of load resistors sensitivities. By increasing the additive noise level with fixed harmonic force it is observed the transition from single well oscillations to inter-well stochastic jumps. The second mail goal is analysing the influence of the piezoelectric nonlinear characteristic and compare the results to the linear piezoelectric cases. The output power is measured during different system behaviours provided by different piezoelectric characteristic as well as introduced stochastic components by modulated tip mass of the system.

  17. Decoupled cantilever arms for highly versatile and sensitive temperature and heat flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burg, Brian R.; Tong, Jonathan K.; Hsu, Wei-Chun; Chen, Gang

    2012-10-01

    Microfabricated cantilever beams have been used in microelectromechanical systems for a variety of sensor and actuator applications. Bimorph cantilevers accurately measure temperature change and heat flux with resolutions several orders of magnitude higher than those of conventional sensors such as thermocouples, semiconductor diodes, as well as resistance and infrared thermometers. The use of traditional cantilevers, however, entails a series of important measurement limitations, because their interactions with the sample and surroundings often create parasitic deflection forces and the typical metal layer degrades the thermal sensitivity of the cantilever. The paper introduces a design to address these issues by decoupling the sample and detector section of the cantilever, along with a thermomechanical model, the fabrication, system integration, and characterization. The custom-designed bi-arm cantilever is over one order of magnitude more sensitive than current commercial cantilevers due to the significantly reduced thermal conductance of the cantilever sample arm. The rigid and immobile sample section offers measurement versatility ranging from photothermal absorption, near-field thermal radiation down to contact, conduction, and material thermal characterization measurements in nearly identical configurations.

  18. Silicon cantilever functionalization for cellulose-specific chemical force imaging of switchgrass

    DOE PAGES

    Lee, Ida; Evans, Barbara R.; Foston, Marcus B.; ...

    2015-05-08

    A method for direct functionalization of silicon and silicon nitride cantilevers with bifunctional silanes was tested with model surfaces to determine adhesive forces for different hydrogen-bonding chemistries. Application for biomass surface characterization was tested by mapping switchgrass and isolated switchgrass cellulose in topographic and force-volume mode using a cellulose-specific cantilever.

  19. Switching through intermediate states seen in a single nickel nanorod by cantilever magnetometry

    PubMed Central

    Lee, SangGap; Moore, Eric W.; Hickman, Steven A.; Longenecker, Jonilyn G.; Marohn, John A.

    2012-01-01

    In-plane to out-of-plane magnetization switching in a single nickel nanorod affixed to an attonewton-sensitivity cantilever was studied at cryogenic temperatures. We observe multiple sharp, simultaneous transitions in cantilever frequency, dissipation, and frequency jitter associated with magnetic switching through distinct intermediate states. These findings suggest a new route for detecting magnetic fields at the nanoscale. PMID:22566714

  20. Ultrananocrystalline Diamond Cantilever Wide Dynamic Range Acceleration/Vibration /Pressure Sensor

    DOEpatents

    Krauss, Alan R.; Gruen, Dieter M.; Pellin, Michael J.; Auciello, Orlando

    2003-09-02

    An ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) element formed in a cantilever configuration is used in a highly sensitive, ultra-small sensor for measuring acceleration, shock, vibration and static pressure over a wide dynamic range. The cantilever UNCD element may be used in combination with a single anode, with measurements made either optically or by capacitance. In another embodiment, the cantilever UNCD element is disposed between two anodes, with DC voltages applied to the two anodes. With a small AC modulated voltage applied to the UNCD cantilever element and because of the symmetry of the applied voltage and the anode-cathode gap distance in the Fowler-Nordheim equation, any change in the anode voltage ratio V1/V2 required to maintain a specified current ratio precisely matches any displacement of the UNCD cantilever element from equilibrium. By measuring changes in the anode voltage ratio required to maintain a specified current ratio, the deflection of the UNCD cantilever can be precisely determined. By appropriately modulating the voltages applied between the UNCD cantilever and the two anodes, or limit electrodes, precise independent measurements of pressure, uniaxial acceleration, vibration and shock can be made. This invention also contemplates a method for fabricating the cantilever UNCD structure for the sensor.

  1. Ultrananocrystalline diamond cantilever wide dynamic range acceleration/vibration/pressure sensor

    DOEpatents

    Krauss, Alan R.; Gruen, Dieter M.; Pellin, Michael J.; Auciello, Orlando

    2002-07-23

    An ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) element formed in a cantilever configuration is used in a highly sensitive, ultra-small sensor for measuring acceleration, shock, vibration and static pressure over a wide dynamic range. The cantilever UNCD element may be used in combination with a single anode, with measurements made either optically or by capacitance. In another embodiment, the cantilever UNCD element is disposed between two anodes, with DC voltages applied to the two anodes. With a small AC modulated voltage applied to the UNCD cantilever element and because of the symmetry of the applied voltage and the anode-cathode gap distance in the Fowler-Nordheim equation, any change in the anode voltage ratio V1/N2 required to maintain a specified current ratio precisely matches any displacement of the UNCD cantilever element from equilibrium. By measuring changes in the anode voltage ratio required to maintain a specified current ratio, the deflection of the UNCD cantilever can be precisely determined. By appropriately modulating the voltages applied between the UNCD cantilever and the two anodes, or limit electrodes, precise independent measurements of pressure, uniaxial acceleration, vibration and shock can be made. This invention also contemplates a method for fabricating the cantilever UNCD structure for the sensor.

  2. Detection of atomic force microscopy cantilever displacement with a transmitted electron beam.

    PubMed

    Wagner, R; Woehl, T J; Keller, R R; Killgore, J P

    2016-07-25

    The response time of an atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever can be decreased by reducing cantilever size; however, the fastest AFM cantilevers are currently nearing the smallest size that can be detected with the conventional optical lever approach. Here, we demonstrate an electron beam detection scheme for measuring AFM cantilever oscillations. The oscillating AFM tip is positioned perpendicular to and in the path of a stationary focused nanometer sized electron beam. As the tip oscillates, the thickness of the material under the electron beam changes, causing a fluctuation in the number of scattered transmitted electrons that are detected. We demonstrate detection of sub-nanometer vibration amplitudes with an electron beam, providing a pathway for dynamic AFM with cantilevers that are orders of magnitude smaller and faster than the current state of the art.

  3. Detection of atomic force microscopy cantilever displacement with a transmitted electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, R.; Woehl, T. J.; Keller, R. R.; Killgore, J. P.

    2016-07-01

    The response time of an atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever can be decreased by reducing cantilever size; however, the fastest AFM cantilevers are currently nearing the smallest size that can be detected with the conventional optical lever approach. Here, we demonstrate an electron beam detection scheme for measuring AFM cantilever oscillations. The oscillating AFM tip is positioned perpendicular to and in the path of a stationary focused nanometer sized electron beam. As the tip oscillates, the thickness of the material under the electron beam changes, causing a fluctuation in the number of scattered transmitted electrons that are detected. We demonstrate detection of sub-nanometer vibration amplitudes with an electron beam, providing a pathway for dynamic AFM with cantilevers that are orders of magnitude smaller and faster than the current state of the art.

  4. Tuning a racetrack ring resonator by an integrated dielectric MEMS cantilever.

    PubMed

    Abdulla, S M C; Kauppinen, L J; Dijkstra, M; de Boer, M J; Berenschot, E; Jansen, H V; de Ridder, R M; Krijnen, G J M

    2011-08-15

    The principle, fabrication and characterization of a dielectric MEMS cantilever located a few 100 nm above a racetrack ring resonator are presented. After fabrication of the resonators on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers in a foundry process, the cantilevers were integrated by surface micromachining techniques. Off-state deflections of the cantilevers have been optimized to appropriately position them near the evanescent field of the resonator. Using electrostatic actuation, moving the cantilevers into this evanescent field, the propagation properties of the ring waveguide are modulated. We demonstrate 122 pm tuning of the resonance wavelength of the optical ring resonator (in the optical C-band) without change of the optical quality factor, on application of 9 V to a 40 µm long cantilever. This compact integrated device can be used for tuning/switching a specific wavelength, with very little energy for operation and negligible cross talk with surrounding devices.

  5. A cantilever based optical fiber acoustic sensor fabricated by femtosecond laser micromachining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jie; Yuan, Lei; Huang, Jie; Xiao, Hai

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we present a pure silica micro-cantilever based optical fiber sensor for acoustic wave detection. The cantilever is directly fabricated by fs laser micromachining on an optical fiber tip functioning as an inline Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI). The applied acoustic wave pressurizes the micro-cantilever beam and the corresponding dynamic signals can be probed by the FPI. The thickness, length, and width of the micro-cantilever beam can be flexibly designed and fabricated so that the sensitivity, frequency response, and the total measurement range can be varied to fit many practical applications. Experimental results will be presented and analyzed. Due to the assembly free fabrication of the fs-laser, multiple micro-cantilever beams could be potentially fabricated in/on a single optical fiber for quasi-distributed acoustic mapping with high spatial resolution.

  6. Note: Calibration of atomic force microscope cantilevers using only their resonant frequency and quality factor

    SciTech Connect

    Sader, John E.; Friend, James R.

    2014-11-15

    A simplified method for calibrating atomic force microscope cantilevers was recently proposed by Sader et al. [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 103705 (2012); Sec. III D] that relies solely on the resonant frequency and quality factor of the cantilever in fluid (typically air). This method eliminates the need to measure the hydrodynamic function of the cantilever, which can be time consuming given the wide range of cantilevers now available. Using laser Doppler vibrometry, we rigorously assess the accuracy of this method for a series of commercially available cantilevers and explore its performance under non-ideal conditions. This shows that the simplified method is highly accurate and can be easily implemented to perform fast, robust, and non-invasive spring constant calibration.

  7. Cantilever bending based on humidity-actuated mesoporous silica/silicon bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Ganser, Christian; Fritz-Popovski, Gerhard; Morak, Roland; Sharifi, Parvin; Marmiroli, Benedetta; Sartori, Barbara; Amenitsch, Heinz; Griesser, Thomas; Teichert, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Summary We use a soft templating approach in combination with evaporation induced self-assembly to prepare mesoporous films containing cylindrical pores with elliptical cross-section on an ordered pore lattice. The film is deposited on silicon-based commercial atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers using dip coating. This bilayer cantilever is mounted in a humidity controlled AFM, and its deflection is measured as a function of relative humidity. We also investigate a similar film on bulk silicon substrate using grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS), in order to determine nanostructural parameters of the film as well as the water-sorption-induced deformation of the ordered mesopore lattice. The strain of the mesoporous layer is related to the cantilever deflection using simple bilayer bending theory. We also develop a simple quantitative model for cantilever deflection which only requires cantilever geometry and nanostructural parameters of the porous layer as input parameters. PMID:27335753

  8. Vibration energy harvester with sustainable power based on a single-crystal piezoelectric cantilever array.

    PubMed

    Kim, Moonkeun; Lee, Sang-Kyun; Ham, Yong-Hyun; Yang, Yil Suk; Kwon, Jong-Kee; Kwon, Kwang-Ho

    2012-08-01

    We designed and fabricated a bimorph cantilever array for sustainable power with an integrated Cu proof mass to obtain additional power and current. We fabricated a cantilever system using single-crystal piezoelectric material and compared the calculations for single and arrayed cantilevers to those obtained experimentally. The vibration energy harvester had resonant frequencies of 60.4 and 63.2 Hz for short and open circuits, respectively. The damping ratio and quality factor of the cantilever device were 0.012 and 41.66, respectively. The resonant frequency at maximum average power was 60.8 Hz. The current and highest average power of the harvester array were found to be 0.728 mA and 1.61 mW, respectively. The sustainable maximum power was obtained after slightly shifting the short-circuit frequency. In order to improve the current and power using an array of cantilevers, we also performed energy conversion experiments.

  9. Controlling the opto-mechanics of a cantilever in an interferometer via cavity loss

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidsfeld, A. von Reichling, M.

    2015-09-21

    In a non-contact atomic force microscope, based on interferometric cantilever displacement detection, the optical return loss of the system is tunable via the distance between the fiber end and the cantilever. We utilize this for tuning the interferometer from a predominant Michelson to a predominant Fabry-Pérot characteristics and introduce the Fabry-Pérot enhancement factor as a quantitative measure for multibeam interference in the cavity. This experimentally easily accessible and adjustable parameter provides a control of the opto-mechanical interaction between the cavity light field and the cantilever. The quantitative assessment of the light pressure acting on the cantilever oscillating in the cavity via the frequency shift allows an in-situ measurement of the cantilever stiffness with remarkable precision.

  10. Controlling the opto-mechanics of a cantilever in an interferometer via cavity loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Schmidsfeld, A.; Reichling, M.

    2015-09-01

    In a non-contact atomic force microscope, based on interferometric cantilever displacement detection, the optical return loss of the system is tunable via the distance between the fiber end and the cantilever. We utilize this for tuning the interferometer from a predominant Michelson to a predominant Fabry-Pérot characteristics and introduce the Fabry-Pérot enhancement factor as a quantitative measure for multibeam interference in the cavity. This experimentally easily accessible and adjustable parameter provides a control of the opto-mechanical interaction between the cavity light field and the cantilever. The quantitative assessment of the light pressure acting on the cantilever oscillating in the cavity via the frequency shift allows an in-situ measurement of the cantilever stiffness with remarkable precision.

  11. The stress intensity factor for the double cantilever beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichter, W. B.

    1983-01-01

    Fourier transforms and the Wiener-Hopf technique are used in conjunction with plane elastostatics to examine the singular crack tip stress field in the double cantilever beam (DCB) specimen. In place of the Dirac delta function, a family of functions which duplicates the important features of the concentrated forces without introducing unmanageable mathematical complexities is used as a loading function. With terms of order h-squared/a-squared retained in the series expansion, the dimensionless stress intensity factor is found to be K (h to the 1/2)/P = 12 to the 1/2 (a/h + 0.6728 + 0.0377 h-squared/a-squared), in which P is the magnitude of the concentrated forces per unit thickness, a is the distance from the crack tip to the points of load application, and h is the height of each cantilever beam. The result is similar to that obtained by Gross and Srawley by fitting a line to discrete results from their boundary collocation analysis.

  12. Instability of a cantilevered flexible plate in viscous channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balint, T. S.; Lucey, A. D.

    2005-10-01

    The stability of a flexible cantilevered plate in viscous channel flow is studied as a representation of the dynamics of the human upper airway. The focus is on instability mechanisms of the soft palate (flexible plate) that cause airway blockage during sleep. We solve the Navier Stokes equations for flow with Reynolds numbers up to 1500 fully coupled with the dynamics of the plate motion solved using finite-differences. The study is 2-D and based upon linearized plate mechanics. When both upper and lower airways are open, the plate is found to lose its stability through a flutter mechanism and a critical Reynolds number exists. When one airway is closed, the plate principally loses its stability through a divergence mechanism and a critical flow speed exists. However, below the divergence-onset flow speed, flutter can exist for low levels of structural damping in the flexible plate. Our results serve to extend understanding of flow-induced instability of cantilevered flexible plates and will ultimately improve the diagnosis and treatment of upper-airway disorders.

  13. Performance characteristics of valveless and cantilever-valve micropump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukur, A. F. M.; Sabani, N.; Taib, B. N.; Azidin, M. A. M.; Shahimin, M. M.

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents comparison between two classes of micropump which are valveless micropump and cantilever-valve micropump. These micropumps consist of basic components which are diaphragm, pumping chamber, actuation mechanism, inlet and outlet. Piezoelectric actuation is carried out by applying pressure on the micropump diaphragm to produce deflection. The micropumps studied in this paper had been designed with specific diaphragm thickness and diameter; while varying the materials, pressure applied and liquid types used. The outer dimension for both micropumps is 4mm × 4mm × 0.5mm with diameter and thickness of the diaphragm are 3.8mm and 20μm respectively. Valveless micropump was shown in this paper to have better performance in mechanical and fluid analysis in terms of maximum deflection and maximum flow rate at actuation pressure 30kPa vis-à-vis cantilever-valve micropump. Valveless micropump was shown in this study to have maximum diaphragm deflection of 183.06μm and maximum flow rate with 191.635μL/s at actuation pressure 30kPa using silicon dioxide as material.

  14. Electromechanical decoupled model for cantilever-beam piezoelectric energy harvesters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, T.; Yan, Z.; Hajj, M.

    2016-09-01

    Analysis of cantilever-based piezoelectric energy harvesting systems is usually performed using coupled equations that represent the mechanical displacement and the voltage output. These equations are then solved simultaneously. In contrast to this representation, we use analytical solutions of the governing equation to derive an algebraic equation of the power as a function of the beam displacement, electromechanical coefficients, and the load resistance. Such an equation can be more useful in the design of such harvesters. Particularly, the mechanical displacement is computed from a mechanical governing equation with modified natural frequency and damping ratio that account for the electromechanical coupling. The voltage and the harvested power are then obtained by relating them directly to the mechanical displacement. We validate the proposed analysis by comparing its solution including the tip displacement and harvested power with those of numerical simulations of the governing equations. To demonstrate the generality of the proposed approach, we consider the cases of base excitation, galloping, and autoparametric vibration. The model proposed in this study simplifies the electromechanical coupling problem for practical applications of cantilever-beam piezoelectric energy harvesting systems.

  15. Assessment of insulated conductive cantilevers for biology and electrochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frederix, Patrick L. T. M.; Gullo, Maurizio R.; Akiyama, Terunobu; Tonin, Andreas; de Rooij, Nicolaas F.; Staufer, Urs; Engel, Andreas

    2005-08-01

    This paper describes the characterization and application of electrically insulated conductive tips mounted on a cantilever for use in an atomic force microscope and operated in liquid. These multifunctional probes were microfabricated and designed for measurements on biological samples in buffer solution, but they can also be employed for electrochemical applications, in particular scanning electrochemical microscopy. The silicon nitride based cantilevers had a spring constant <=0.1 N m-1 and a conductive tip, which was insulated except at the apex. The conductive core of the tip consisted of a metal, e.g. platinum silicide, and exhibited a typical radius of 15 nm. The mechanical and electrical characterization of the probe is presented and discussed. First measurements on the hexagonally packed intermediate layer of Deinococcus radiodurans demonstrated the possibility to adjust the image contrast by applying a voltage between a support and the conductive tip and to measure variations of less than 1 pA in faradaic current with a lateral resolution of 7.8 nm.

  16. Massively Multiplexed Cantilever-free Scanning Probe Lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Keith A.; Eichelsdoerfer, Daniel J.; Shim, Wooyoung; Boya, Radha; Schmucker, Abrin L.; Liu, Guoliang; Mirkin, Chad A.

    2013-03-01

    Cantilever-free scanning probe lithography has emerged as a low-cost technique for rapidly patterning nanoscale materials. In this architecture, an array of probes is fabricated on a soft backing layer that provides mechanical compliance to each probe while an underlying hard surface maintains the structural integrity of the array. One drawback of this technique is that each probe in the array acts simultaneously and thus generates a copy of the same pattern. Here, we discuss recent efforts to incorporate heaters into these probe arrays so that when a given heater is activated, the thermal expansion of the elastomer actuates a single tip. We find thermal actuation to be powerful enough to actuate individual tips over 4 μm with minimal crosstalk, fast enough to actuate on relevant time scales (20 ms), and scalable by virtue of being electrically addressable. Furthermore, tuning the individual heaters allows for variability in the arrays to be compensated for precisely, resulting in high quality nanopatterning. The addition of tunable actuators transforms cantilever-free scanning probe lithography into a technique capable of true desktop nanofabrication.

  17. Cantilever detection of electron spin resonance in the terahertz region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Hideyuki; Ohmichi, Eiji; Ohta, Hitoshi

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) is used in a wide range of research areas. Most commercially available spectrometers operate at the X- band (~10 GHz). However, high-frequency ESR (>100 GHz) has many advantages, such as the high spectral resolution, the ESR detection beyond the zero-field splitting etc. We report the cantilever detection of electron spin resonance in the terahertz region. This technique mechanically detects ESR as a change in magnetic torque that acts on the cantilever, while the conventional method, such as the cavity perturbation and the transmission method, directly measures the absorption of electromagnetic wave power. Backward wave oscillators (BWO) were used as THz-wave sources. Despite the small sample mass (m = 4 μg) and low power output of the BWO (P < 4 mW above 1 THz), we observed ESR absorption of Co Tutton salt, Co(NH4)2(SO4)2 .6H2O, in frequencies of up to 1.1 THz. Spin sensitivity was estimated to be the order of 1011-1012 spins/gauss above 1 THz. This technique will not only broaden the scope of ESR spectroscopy application but also lead to high-spectral-resolution ESR imaging.[1] H. Takahashi, E. Ohmichi and H. Ohta, Appl. Phys. Lett. 107, 182405 (2015).

  18. Imaging via complete cantilever dynamic detection: general dynamic mode imaging and spectroscopy in scanning probe microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somnath, Suhas; Collins, Liam; Matheson, Michael A.; Sukumar, Sreenivas R.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Jesse, Stephen

    2016-10-01

    We develop and implement a multifrequency spectroscopy and spectroscopic imaging mode, referred to as general dynamic mode (GDM), that captures the complete spatially- and stimulus dependent information on nonlinear cantilever dynamics in scanning probe microscopy (SPM). GDM acquires the cantilever response including harmonics and mode mixing products across the entire broadband cantilever spectrum as a function of excitation frequency. GDM spectra substitute the classical measurements in SPM, e.g. amplitude and phase in lock-in detection. Here, GDM is used to investigate the response of a purely capacitively driven cantilever. We use information theory techniques to mine the data and verify the findings with governing equations and classical lock-in based approaches. We explore the dependence of the cantilever dynamics on the tip–sample distance, AC and DC driving bias. This approach can be applied to investigate the dynamic behavior of other systems within and beyond dynamic SPM. GDM is expected to be useful for separating the contribution of different physical phenomena in the cantilever response and understanding the role of cantilever dynamics in dynamic AFM techniques.

  19. Nondestructive testing and hardness measurement based on contact resonance of piezoelectric cantilevers (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Faxin; Fu, Ji

    2016-04-01

    A suitable defect identification parameter is very important in the field of nondestructive testing (NDT). In this work, we proposed a NDT method which detects the sample's local contact stiffness (LCS) based on the contact resonance of a piezoelectric cantilever. Firstly, through finite element analysis we showed that LCS is quite sensitive to typical defects including debonding, voids, cracks and inclusions, making it a good identification parameter. Secondly, a homemade NDT system containing a piezoelectric unimorph cantilever was assembled to detect the sample's LCS by tracking the contact resonance frequency (CRF) of the cantilever-sample system based on strain signals. Testing results indicated that this NDT system could detect the above mentioned defects efficiently. The cantilever-stiffness dependent detection sensitivity was specially investigated and the stiffer cantilevers were found to be more sensitive to small defects. Then, a piezoelectric bimorph cantilever was fabricated and the electromechanical impedance, other than the strain signals, was measured to track the CRF of the cantilever-system. The LCS is then derived by using the equivalent-circuit model. The electromechanical impedance based NDT system is more compact and can be further developed to be a portable device. Finally, a Vicker indenter is fabricated onto the bimorph tip and the contact area is derived from the measured LCS. Thus the NDT system turns to be a hardness tester without any optical devices. It is very useful for in-situ testing or testing on inner surfaces where conventional hardness tester is not applicable.

  20. Imaging via complete cantilever dynamic detection: General dynamic mode imaging and spectroscopy in scanning probe microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Somnath, Suhas; Collins, Liam; Matheson, Michael A.; Sukumar, Sreenivas R.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Jesse, Stephen

    2016-09-08

    We develop and implement a multifrequency spectroscopy and spectroscopic imaging mode, referred to as general dynamic mode (GDM), that captures the complete spatially- and stimulus dependent information on nonlinear cantilever dynamics in scanning probe microscopy (SPM). GDM acquires the cantilever response including harmonics and mode mixing products across the entire broadband cantilever spectrum as a function of excitation frequency. GDM spectra substitute the classical measurements in SPM, e.g. amplitude and phase in lock-in detection. Here, GDM is used to investigate the response of a purely capacitively driven cantilever. We use information theory techniques to mine the data and verify the findings with governing equations and classical lock-in based approaches. We explore the dependence of the cantilever dynamics on the tip–sample distance, AC and DC driving bias. This approach can be applied to investigate the dynamic behavior of other systems within and beyond dynamic SPM. In conclusion, GDM is expected to be useful for separating the contribution of different physical phenomena in the cantilever response and understanding the role of cantilever dynamics in dynamic AFM techniques.

  1. Imaging via complete cantilever dynamic detection: General dynamic mode imaging and spectroscopy in scanning probe microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Somnath, Suhas; Collins, Liam; Matheson, Michael A.; ...

    2016-09-08

    We develop and implement a multifrequency spectroscopy and spectroscopic imaging mode, referred to as general dynamic mode (GDM), that captures the complete spatially- and stimulus dependent information on nonlinear cantilever dynamics in scanning probe microscopy (SPM). GDM acquires the cantilever response including harmonics and mode mixing products across the entire broadband cantilever spectrum as a function of excitation frequency. GDM spectra substitute the classical measurements in SPM, e.g. amplitude and phase in lock-in detection. Here, GDM is used to investigate the response of a purely capacitively driven cantilever. We use information theory techniques to mine the data and verify themore » findings with governing equations and classical lock-in based approaches. We explore the dependence of the cantilever dynamics on the tip–sample distance, AC and DC driving bias. This approach can be applied to investigate the dynamic behavior of other systems within and beyond dynamic SPM. In conclusion, GDM is expected to be useful for separating the contribution of different physical phenomena in the cantilever response and understanding the role of cantilever dynamics in dynamic AFM techniques.« less

  2. Fast nanotopography imaging using a high speed cantilever with integrated heater-thermometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Byeonghee; Somnath, Suhas; King, William P.

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents a high speed tapping cantilever with an integrated heater-thermometer for fast nanotopography imaging. The cantilever is much smaller and faster than previous heated cantilevers, with a length of 35 μm and a resonant frequency of 1.4 MHz. The mechanical response time is characterized by scanning over a backward-facing step of height 20 nm. The mechanical response time is 77 μs in air and 448 μs in water, which compares favorably to the fastest commercial cantilevers that do not have integrated heaters. The doped silicon cantilever is designed with an integrated heater that can heat and cool in about 10 μs and can operate in both air and water. We demonstrate standard laser-based topography imaging along with thermal topography imaging, when the cantilever is actuated via the piezoelectric shaker in an atomic force microscope system and when it is actuated by Lorentz forces. The cantilever can perform thermal topography imaging in tapping mode with an imaging resolution of 7 nm at a scan speed of 1.46 mm s-1.

  3. Nondestructive and noncontact method for determining the spring constant of rectangular cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Golovko, Dmytro S; Haschke, Thomas; Wiechert, Wolfgang; Bonaccurso, Elmar

    2007-04-01

    We present here an experimental setup and suggest an extension to the long existing added-mass method for the calibration of the spring constant of atomic force microscope cantilevers. Instead of measuring the resonance frequency shift that results from attaching particles of known masses to the end of cantilevers, we load them with water microdrops generated by a commercial inkjet dispenser. Such a device is capable of generating drops, and thus masses, of extremely reproducible size. This makes it an ideal tool for calibration tasks. Moreover, the major advantage of water microdrops is that they allow for a nearly contactless calibration: no mechanical micromanipulation of particles on cantilevers is required, neither for their deposition nor for removal. After some seconds the water drop is completely evaporated, and no residues are left on the cantilever surface or tip. We present two variants: we vary the size of the drops and deposit them at the free end of the cantilever, or we keep the size of the drops constant and vary their position along the cantilever. For the second variant, we implemented also numerical simulations. Spring constants measured by this method are comparable to results obtained by the thermal noise method, as we demonstrate for six different cantilevers.

  4. Fast nanotopography imaging using a high speed cantilever with integrated heater-thermometer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byeonghee; Somnath, Suhas; King, William P

    2013-04-05

    This paper presents a high speed tapping cantilever with an integrated heater-thermometer for fast nanotopography imaging. The cantilever is much smaller and faster than previous heated cantilevers, with a length of 35 μm and a resonant frequency of 1.4 MHz. The mechanical response time is characterized by scanning over a backward-facing step of height 20 nm. The mechanical response time is 77 μs in air and 448 μs in water, which compares favorably to the fastest commercial cantilevers that do not have integrated heaters. The doped silicon cantilever is designed with an integrated heater that can heat and cool in about 10 μs and can operate in both air and water. We demonstrate standard laser-based topography imaging along with thermal topography imaging, when the cantilever is actuated via the piezoelectric shaker in an atomic force microscope system and when it is actuated by Lorentz forces. The cantilever can perform thermal topography imaging in tapping mode with an imaging resolution of 7 nm at a scan speed of 1.46 mm s(-1).

  5. Nondestructive and noncontact method for determining the spring constant of rectangular cantilevers

    SciTech Connect

    Golovko, Dmytro S.; Haschke, Thomas; Wiechert, Wolfgang; Bonaccurso, Elmar

    2007-04-15

    We present here an experimental setup and suggest an extension to the long existing added-mass method for the calibration of the spring constant of atomic force microscope cantilevers. Instead of measuring the resonance frequency shift that results from attaching particles of known masses to the end of cantilevers, we load them with water microdrops generated by a commercial inkjet dispenser. Such a device is capable of generating drops, and thus masses, of extremely reproducible size. This makes it an ideal tool for calibration tasks. Moreover, the major advantage of water microdrops is that they allow for a nearly contactless calibration: no mechanical micromanipulation of particles on cantilevers is required, neither for their deposition nor for removal. After some seconds the water drop is completely evaporated, and no residues are left on the cantilever surface or tip. We present two variants: we vary the size of the drops and deposit them at the free end of the cantilever, or we keep the size of the drops constant and vary their position along the cantilever. For the second variant, we implemented also numerical simulations. Spring constants measured by this method are comparable to results obtained by the thermal noise method, as we demonstrate for six different cantilevers.

  6. Spring constant calibration of atomic force microscope cantilevers of arbitrary shape

    SciTech Connect

    Sader, John E.; Sanelli, Julian A.; Adamson, Brian D.; Bieske, Evan J.; Monty, Jason P.; Marusic, Ivan; Wei Xingzhan; Mulvaney, Paul; Crawford, Simon A.; Friend, James R.

    2012-10-15

    The spring constant of an atomic force microscope cantilever is often needed for quantitative measurements. The calibration method of Sader et al. [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 70, 3967 (1999)] for a rectangular cantilever requires measurement of the resonant frequency and quality factor in fluid (typically air), and knowledge of its plan view dimensions. This intrinsically uses the hydrodynamic function for a cantilever of rectangular plan view geometry. Here, we present hydrodynamic functions for a series of irregular and non-rectangular atomic force microscope cantilevers that are commonly used in practice. Cantilever geometries of arrow shape, small aspect ratio rectangular, quasi-rectangular, irregular rectangular, non-ideal trapezoidal cross sections, and V-shape are all studied. This enables the spring constants of all these cantilevers to be accurately and routinely determined through measurement of their resonant frequency and quality factor in fluid (such as air). An approximate formulation of the hydrodynamic function for microcantilevers of arbitrary geometry is also proposed. Implementation of the method and its performance in the presence of uncertainties and non-idealities is discussed, together with conversion factors for the static and dynamic spring constants of these cantilevers. These results are expected to be of particular value to the design and application of micro- and nanomechanical systems in general.

  7. Spring constant calibration of atomic force microscope cantilevers of arbitrary shape.

    PubMed

    Sader, John E; Sanelli, Julian A; Adamson, Brian D; Monty, Jason P; Wei, Xingzhan; Crawford, Simon A; Friend, James R; Marusic, Ivan; Mulvaney, Paul; Bieske, Evan J

    2012-10-01

    The spring constant of an atomic force microscope cantilever is often needed for quantitative measurements. The calibration method of Sader et al. [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 70, 3967 (1999)] for a rectangular cantilever requires measurement of the resonant frequency and quality factor in fluid (typically air), and knowledge of its plan view dimensions. This intrinsically uses the hydrodynamic function for a cantilever of rectangular plan view geometry. Here, we present hydrodynamic functions for a series of irregular and non-rectangular atomic force microscope cantilevers that are commonly used in practice. Cantilever geometries of arrow shape, small aspect ratio rectangular, quasi-rectangular, irregular rectangular, non-ideal trapezoidal cross sections, and V-shape are all studied. This enables the spring constants of all these cantilevers to be accurately and routinely determined through measurement of their resonant frequency and quality factor in fluid (such as air). An approximate formulation of the hydrodynamic function for microcantilevers of arbitrary geometry is also proposed. Implementation of the method and its performance in the presence of uncertainties and non-idealities is discussed, together with conversion factors for the static and dynamic spring constants of these cantilevers. These results are expected to be of particular value to the design and application of micro- and nanomechanical systems in general.

  8. Independent Component Analysis of Nanomechanical Responses of Cantilever Arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Archibald, Richard K; Datskos, Panos G; Noid, Don W; Lavrik, Nickolay V

    2007-01-01

    The ability to detect and identify chemical and biological elements in air or liquid environments is of far reaching importance. Performing this task using technology that minimally impacts the perceived environment is the ultimate goal. The development of functionalized cantilever arrays with nanomechanical sensing is an important step towards this ambition. This report couples the feature extraction abilities of Independent Component Analysis (ICA) and the classification techniques of neural networks to analyze the signals produced by microcantilever-array-based nanomechanical sensors. The unique capabilities of this analysis unleash the potential of this sensing technology to accurately determine the identities and concentrations of the components of chemical mixtures. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the knowledge of how the sensor array reacts to individual analytes in isolation is sufficient information to decode mixtures of analytes - a substantial benefit, significantly increasing the analytical utility of these sensing devices.

  9. Strategy Guideline: Quality Management in Existing Homes; Cantilever Floor Example

    SciTech Connect

    Taggart, J.; Sikora, J.; Wiehagen, J.; Wood, A.

    2011-12-01

    This guideline is designed to highlight the QA process that can be applied to any residential building retrofit activity. The cantilevered floor retrofit detailed in this guideline is included only to provide an actual retrofit example to better illustrate the QA activities being presented. The goal of existing home high performing remodeling quality management systems (HPR-QMS) is to establish practices and processes that can be used throughout any remodeling project. The research presented in this document provides a comparison of a selected retrofit activity as typically done versus that same retrofit activity approached from an integrated high performance remodeling and quality management perspective. It highlights some key quality management tools and approaches that can be adopted incrementally by a high performance remodeler for this or any high performance retrofit. This example is intended as a template and establishes a methodology that can be used to develop a portfolio of high performance remodeling strategies.

  10. Strain engineering of diamond silicon vacancy centers in MEMS cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meesala, Srujan; Sohn, Young-Ik; Atikian, Haig; Holzgrafe, Jeffrey; Zhang, Mian; Burek, Michael; Loncar, Marko

    2016-05-01

    The silicon vacancy (SiV) center in diamond has recently attracted attention as a solid state quantum emitter due to its attractive optical properties. We fabricate diamond MEMS cantilevers, and use electrostatic actuation to apply controlled strain fields to single SiV centers implanted in these devices. The strain response of the four electronic transitions of the SiV at 737 nm is measured via cryogenic (4 K) photoluminescence excitation. We demonstrate over 300 GHz of tuning for the mean transition frequency between the ground and excited states, and over 100 GHz of tuning for the orbital splittings within the ground and excited states. The interaction Hamiltonian for strain fields is inferred, and large strain susceptibilities of the order 1 PHz/strain are measured. We discuss prospects to utilize our device to reduce phonon-induced decoherence in SiV spin qubits, and to exploit the large strain susceptibilities for hybrid quantum systems based on nanomechanical resonators.

  11. Photothermal cantilever deflection spectroscopy of a photosensitive polymer

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, Minhyuk; Lee, Dongkyu; Jung, Namchul; Jeon, Sangmin; Kim, Seonghwan; Chae, Inseok; Thundat, Thomas

    2012-05-14

    The mechanical and chemical information of a poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) film on a microcantilever were simultaneously acquired by photothermal cantilever deflection spectroscopy as a function of ultraviolet (UV) irradiation time. Nanomechanical infrared (IR) spectra from the PMMA-coated microcantilever agreed well with the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) spectra of PMMA on gold-coated silicon wafer. The decreasing intensities of nanomechanical IR peaks represent chemical as well as mechanical information of UV radiation-induced photodegradation processes in the PMMA which cannot be obtained by a conventional FTIR technique. The observed decrease in the resonance frequency of the microcantilever is related to the change in the Young's modulus of the PMMA under UV exposure.

  12. Flat plate solar collector with a cantilevered mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, S.; Larson, D.C.

    1981-01-01

    The use of flat booster mirrors with flat plate collectors provides moderate solar flux concentration and enhanced performance especially when the mirrors are seasonally adjusted. Curved mirrors provide higher flux concentration and a practical system has been developed where the booster mirror is bent elastically. The system employs a single cantilever mirror which is located below a conventional flat plate collector. The mirror is clamped at the base of the collector panel and its free end is deflected upward; a smaller deflection is used in the fall and winter than in the spring and summer. The prototype system consists of a 0.9 by 2.5 m collector panel mounted on its side (horizontal fluid flow) and a 2.7 by 2.5 m elastic mirror. The mirror is made with aluminum sheet with an adherent aluminized acrylic film. The system has been designed for mounting on horizontal surfaces at latitudes of 10 to 50/sup 0/.

  13. Interdisciplinary cantilever physics: Elasticity of carrot, celery, and plasticware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pestka, Kenneth A.

    2014-05-01

    This article presents several simple cantilever-based experiments using common household items (celery, carrot, and a plastic spoon) that are appropriate for introductory undergraduate laboratories or independent student projects. By applying Hooke's law and Euler beam theory, students are able to determine Young's modulus, fracture stress, yield stress, strain energy, and sound speed of these apparently disparate materials. In addition, a cellular foam elastic model is introduced—applicable to biologic materials as well as an essential component in the development of advanced engineering composites—that provides a mechanism to determine Young's modulus of the cell wall material found in celery and carrot. These experiments are designed to promote exploration of the similarities and differences between common inorganic and organic materials, fill a void in the typical undergraduate curriculum, and provide a foundation for more advanced material science pursuits within biology, botany, and food science as well as physics and engineering.

  14. Modeling and experimental vibration analysis of nanomechanical cantilever active probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehi-Khojin, Amin; Bashash, Saeid; Jalili, Nader

    2008-08-01

    Nanomechanical cantilever (NMC) active probes have recently received increased attention in a variety of nanoscale sensing and measurement applications. Current modeling practices call for a uniform cantilever beam without considering the intentional jump discontinuities associated with the piezoelectric layer attachment and the NMC cross-sectional step. This paper presents a comprehensive modeling framework for modal characterization and dynamic response analysis of NMC active probes with geometrical discontinuities. The entire length of the NMC is divided into three segments of uniform beams followed by applying appropriate continuity conditions. The characteristics matrix equation is then used to solve for system natural frequencies and mode shapes. Using an equivalent electromechanical moment of a piezoelectric layer, forced motion analysis of the system is carried out. An experimental setup consisting of a commercial NMC active probe from Veeco and a state-of-the-art microsystem analyzer, the MSA-400 from Polytec, is developed to verify the theoretical developments proposed here. Using a parameter estimation technique based on minimizing the modeling error, optimal values of system parameters are identified. Mode shapes and the modal frequency response of the system for the first three modes determined from the proposed model are compared with those obtained from the experiment and commonly used theory for uniform beams. Results indicate that the uniform beam model fails to accurately predict the actual system response, especially in multiple-mode operation, while the proposed discontinuous beam model demonstrates good agreement with the experimental data. Such detailed and accurate modeling framework can lead to significant enhancement in the sensitivity of piezoelectric-based NMC sensors for use in variety of sensing and imaging applications.

  15. Air-spaced PDMS piezo-electret cantilevers for vibration energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kachroudi, A.; Basrour, S.; Rufer, L.; Jomni, F.

    2016-11-01

    This paper reports a design of a new prototype of air-spaced cantilevers made from a micro-structured PDMS piezo-electret material for accelerometer and energy harvesting applications. The test performed on these cantilevers in a sensor mode exhibits a stable sensitivity of 385 mV/g for a frequency ranging from 5 Hz to 200 Hz that encompass most macro-scale vibrations. In the energy harvesting mode, the cantilever generates a power of 103 nW with a load resistance of 217 MΩ.

  16. Atomic force microscopy: Loading position dependence of cantilever spring constants and detector sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakarelski, Ivan U.; Edwards, Scott A.; Dagastine, Raymond R.; Chan, Derek Y. C.; Stevens, Geoffrey W.; Grieser, Franz

    2007-11-01

    A simple and accurate experimental method is described for determining the effective cantilever spring constant and the detector sensitivity of atomic force microscopy cantilevers on which a colloidal particle is attached. By attaching large (approximately 85μm diameter) latex particles at various positions along the V-shaped cantilevers, we demonstrate how the normal and lateral spring constants as well as the sensitivity vary with loading position. Comparison with an explicit point-load theoretical model has also been used to verify the accuracy of the method.

  17. Atomic force microscopy: loading position dependence of cantilever spring constants and detector sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Vakarelski, Ivan U; Edwards, Scott A; Dagastine, Raymond R; Chan, Derek Y C; Stevens, Geoffrey W; Grieser, Franz

    2007-11-01

    A simple and accurate experimental method is described for determining the effective cantilever spring constant and the detector sensitivity of atomic force microscopy cantilevers on which a colloidal particle is attached. By attaching large (approximately 85 microm diameter) latex particles at various positions along the V-shaped cantilevers, we demonstrate how the normal and lateral spring constants as well as the sensitivity vary with loading position. Comparison with an explicit point-load theoretical model has also been used to verify the accuracy of the method.

  18. Resonant interaction of trapped cold atoms with a magnetic cantilever tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montoya, Cris; Valencia, Jose; Geraci, Andrew; Eardley, Matthew; Kitching, John

    2015-05-01

    We report the resonant coupling of laser cooled trapped Rb atoms to a micro-cantilever with a magnetic tip. An atom chip is used to trap, cool, and transport the atoms to the tip of the cantilever. The capacitively-driven cantilever oscillation produces Zeeman state transitions which result in a loss of population in the trap. In a suitably scaled setup, mechanical resonators could be used to probe and manipulate atomic spins with nanometer spatial resolution and single-spin sensitivity; this technique may enable new approaches in neutral-atom quantum computation, quantum simulation, or precision sensing.

  19. A Compact, Low-Power Cantilever-Based Sensor Array for Chemical Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Loui, A; Ratto, T; Wilson, T; Mukerjee, E; Hu, Z; Sulchek, T; Hart, B

    2007-02-22

    A compact and low-power cantilever-based sensor array has been developed and used to detect various vapor analytes. This device employs sorptive polymers that are deposited onto piezoresistive cantilevers. We have successfully detected several organic vapors, representing a breadth of chemical properties and over a range of concentrations. Comparisons of the polymer/vapor partition coefficient to the cantilever deflection responses show that a simple linear relationship does not exist, emphasizing the need to develop an appropriate functional model to describe the chemical-to-mechanical transduction that is unique to this sensing modality.

  20. Integrated MOSFET-Embedded-Cantilever-Based Biosensor Characteristic for Detection of Anthrax Simulant

    SciTech Connect

    Mostafa, Salwa; Lee, Ida; Islam, Syed K; Eliza, Sazia A.; Shekhawat, Gajendra; Dravid, Vinayak; Tulip, Fahmida S

    2011-01-01

    In this work, MOSFET-embedded cantilevers are configured as microbial sensors for detection of anthrax simulants, Bacillus thuringiensis. Anthrax simulants attached to the chemically treated gold-coated cantilever cause changes in the MOSFET drain current due to the bending of the cantilever which indicates the detection of anthrax simulant. Electrical properties of the anthrax simulant are also responsible for the change in the drain current. The test results suggest a detection range of 10 L of stimulant test solution (a suspension population of 1.3 107 colony-forming units/mL diluted in 40% ethanol and 60% deionized water) with a linear response of 31 A/ L.

  1. Approach to nonphotoperturbed differential capacitance measurements: A front-wing cantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, M. N.; Chen, C. Y.; Huang, W. J.; Cheng, T. C.

    2005-07-01

    We have developed a front-wing (FW) cantilever structure that can significantly suppress photoperturbation effects during scanning capacitance microscopy (SCM) and scanning capacitance spectroscopy (SCS) measurements. The FW cantilever provides an effective shadow area that fully covers the scan region, allowing us to synchronously obtain SCM images and the corresponding topographic images without photoperturbation problems. Nonphotoperturbed differential capacitance characteristics versus tip biases were also obtained for SCS by the use of these FW cantilevers. This means that nonphotoperturbed SCM and SCS measurements can be carried out during the typical SCM operations.

  2. Spatial spectrograms of vibrating atomic force microscopy cantilevers coupled to sample surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Ryan; Raman, Arvind; Proksch, Roger

    2013-12-23

    Many advanced dynamic Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) techniques such as contact resonance, force modulation, piezoresponse force microscopy, electrochemical strain microscopy, and AFM infrared spectroscopy exploit the dynamic response of a cantilever in contact with a sample to extract local material properties. Achieving quantitative results in these techniques usually requires the assumption of a certain shape of cantilever vibration. We present a technique that allows in-situ measurements of the vibrational shape of AFM cantilevers coupled to surfaces. This technique opens up unique approaches to nanoscale material property mapping, which are not possible with single point measurements alone.

  3. Fast optical cooling of a nanomechanical cantilever by a dynamical Stark-shift gate.

    PubMed

    Yan, Leilei; Zhang, Jian-Qi; Zhang, Shuo; Feng, Mang

    2015-10-12

    The efficient cooling of nanomechanical resonators is essential to exploration of quantum properties of the macroscopic or mesoscopic systems. We propose such a laser-cooling scheme for a nanomechanical cantilever, which works even for the low-frequency mechanical mode and under weak cooling lasers. The cantilever is coupled by a diamond nitrogen-vacancy center under a strong magnetic field gradient and the cooling is assisted by a dynamical Stark-shift gate. Our scheme can effectively enhance the desired cooling efficiency by avoiding the off-resonant and undesired carrier transitions, and thereby cool the cantilever down to the vicinity of the vibrational ground state in a fast fashion.

  4. Fast optical cooling of a nanomechanical cantilever by a dynamical Stark-shift gate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Leilei; Zhang, Jian-Qi; Zhang, Shuo; Feng, Mang

    2015-10-01

    The efficient cooling of nanomechanical resonators is essential to exploration of quantum properties of the macroscopic or mesoscopic systems. We propose such a laser-cooling scheme for a nanomechanical cantilever, which works even for the low-frequency mechanical mode and under weak cooling lasers. The cantilever is coupled by a diamond nitrogen-vacancy center under a strong magnetic field gradient and the cooling is assisted by a dynamical Stark-shift gate. Our scheme can effectively enhance the desired cooling efficiency by avoiding the off-resonant and undesired carrier transitions, and thereby cool the cantilever down to the vicinity of the vibrational ground state in a fast fashion.

  5. Novel printing process for the fabrication of cantilever structures by the partially controlled sintering of ink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanazawa, Shusuke; Kusaka, Yasuyuki; Yamamoto, Noritaka; Ushijima, Hirobumi

    2017-01-01

    We present a novel process for manufacturing cantilever structures by the additive stacking of ink layers. The three-dimensional transfer of printed mechanical parts was achieved by optimizing the ink-sintering conditions to guarantee the structural integrity of the printed parts and provide adequate differences in adhesion strengths between the receiver and donor interfaces. A metal-insulator-metal cantilever structure with a bottom electrode, air insulator, and cantilevered top electrode was fabricated on a flexible film, forming a successful capacitive bending sensor for use on human bodies. This process allows highly efficient device fabrication in the MEMS field.

  6. Super-resolution optical microscopy based on scannable cantilever-combined microsphere.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuying; Zhang, Dongxian; Zhang, Haijun; Han, Xu; Xu, Rui

    2015-12-01

    We report an ingenious method of super-resolution optical microscopy utilizing scannable cantilever-combined microsphere. By scanning the microsphere over the sample surface in a cantilever-combined microsphere-sample contact state, super-resolution images can be acquired at arbitrary sample regions through near-field information collection by the microsphere. In addition, such a state can effectively reduce the possibility of breaking the cantilever and damaging the microsphere or sample surface. This work has developed a new method and technique of sub-diffraction-limit optical microscopy, and can be practically applied in various fields of micro/nanoscopy.

  7. Experimental determination of the spring constant of an individual multiwalled carbon nanotube cantilever using fluorescence measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Soongeun; Park, Hyojun; Shim, Hyung Cheoul; Lee, Hyung Woo; Kwak, Yoon Keun; Kim, Soohyun

    2009-07-01

    We report an experimental method to determine the spring constant of a multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) cantilever as a mechanical piconewton force transducer. Electrostatic actuation was employed to investigate the mechanical properties of a MWNT cantilever. In order to measure nanotube's deflection during actuation, fluorescent dyes were noncovalently attached to the end of the nanotubes. Also, the length dependence of the spring constant is studied by adjusting the length of MWNT via electrochemical etching. The results show that the spring constant of a MWNT cantilever is as small as 0.001 N/m and tunable in the range of 0.001-0.05 N/m.

  8. Electromechanical properties of single-walled carbon nanotube devices on micromachined cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Eun-Kyoung; Park, Chan-Hyun; Lee, Jung A.; Kim, Min-Seok; Lee, Kwang-Cheol; So, Hye-Mi; Ahn, Chiwon; Chang, Hyunju; Kong, Ki-jeong; Kim, Ju-Jin; Lee, Jeong-O.

    2012-11-01

    We have investigated the electromechanical properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) by constructing carbon nanotube transistors on micro-cantilevers. SWNTs and ultra-long carbon nanotubes (UNTs) were grown on free-standing Si3N4 membranes by using chemical vapor deposition, and electrical contacts were generated with electron beam lithography and lift-off. The cantilevers bearing SWNT devices were micromachined so that hybrid cantilevers with various spring constants were fabricated. To measure the electromechanical properties of the SWNTs, precisely controlled forces were generated by a microbalance and applied to the hybrid cantilever devices. Upon bending, the conductances of the metallic and large-gap semiconducting UNTs showed no notable change, whereas the conductances of the small-gap semiconducting UNTs and networks of SWNTs increased. Numerical simulations of bended SWNT made using a multiscale simulator supported the hypothesis that the small-gap semiconducting SWNTs undergo a metallic transformation upon bending.

  9. Indium phosphide-based monolithically integrated PIN waveguide photodiode readout for resonant cantilever sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Siwak, N. P.; Fan, X. Z.; Ghodssi, R.; Kanakaraju, S.; Richardson, C. J. K.

    2014-10-06

    An integrated photodiode displacement readout scheme for a microelectromechanical cantilever waveguide resonator sensing platform is presented. III-V semiconductors are used to enable the monolithic integration of passive waveguides with active optical components. This work builds upon previously demonstrated results by measuring the displacement of cantilever waveguide resonators with on-chip waveguide PIN photodiodes. The on-chip integration of the readout provides an additional 70% improvement in mass sensitivity compared to off-chip photodetector designs due to measurement stability and minimized coupling loss. In addition to increased measurement stability, reduced packaging complexity is achieved due to the simplicity of the readout design. We have fabricated cantilever waveguides with integrated photodetectors and experimentally characterized these cantilever sensors with monolithically integrated PIN photodiodes.

  10. Use of self-actuating and self-sensing cantilevers for imaging biological samples in fluid

    PubMed Central

    Barbero, R J; Deutschinger, A; Todorov, V; Gray, D S; Belcher, A M; Rangelow, I W; Youcef-Toumi, K

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present a detailed investigation into the suitability of atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilevers with integrated deflection sensor and micro-actuator for imaging of soft biological samples in fluid. The Si cantilevers are actuated using a micro-heater at the bottom end of the cantilever. Sensing is achieved through p-doped resistors connected in a Wheatstone bridge. We investigated the influence of the water on the cantilever dynamics, the actuation and the sensing mechanisms, as well as the crosstalk between sensing and actuation. Successful imaging of yeast cells in water using the integrated sensor and actuator shows the potential of the combination of this actuation and sensing method. This constitutes a major step towards the automation and miniaturization required to establish AFM in routine biomedical diagnostics and in vivo applications. PMID:19801750

  11. Analytic and laser vibrometry study of squeeze film damping of MEMS cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignola, Joseph F.; Judge, John A.; Lawrence, Eric; Jarzynski, Jacek; Houston, Brian

    2006-06-01

    This study compares theoretical predictions to experimental measurements of squeeze film damping of MEMS cantilevers in a fluid environment. A series of MEMS cantilevers were fabricated on a silicon wafer. Each of the silicon beams was 2 μm thick and 18 μm wide. The lengths range from 100 to 800 μm and the air-filled gap between the cantilever and the substrate was 6 μm. An analytic model for squeeze film damping was used to predict the corresponding quality factor Q squeeze film (the ratio of the mechanical energy stored in the oscillator to the energy dissipated per cycle) for these cantilevers. The results from the modeling are compared to experimental results obtained using a Polytec MSA-400 Micro System Analyzer.

  12. A direct micropipette-based calibration method for atomic force microscope cantilevers

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Baoyu; Yu, Yan; Yao, Da-Kang; Shao, Jin-Yu

    2009-01-01

    In this report, we describe a direct method for calibrating atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers with the micropipette aspiration technique (MAT). A closely fitting polystyrene bead inside a micropipette is driven by precisely controlled hydrostatic pressures to apply known loads on the sharp tip of AFM cantilevers, thus providing a calibration at the most functionally relevant position. The new method is capable of calibrating cantilevers with spring constants ranging from 0.01 to hundreds of newtons per meter. Under appropriate loading conditions, this new method yields measurement accuracy and precision both within 10%, with higher performance for softer cantilevers. Furthermore, this method may greatly enhance the accuracy and precision of calibration for colloidal probes. PMID:19566228

  13. Label-free protein assay based on a nanomechanical cantilever array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arntz, Y.; Seelig, J. D.; Lang, H. P.; Zhang, J.; Hunziker, P.; Ramseyer, J. P.; Meyer, E.; Hegner, M.; Gerber, Ch

    2003-01-01

    We demonstrate continuous label-free detection of two cardiac biomarker proteins (creatin kinase and myoglobin) using an array of microfabricated cantilevers functionalized with covalently anchored anti-creatin kinase and anti-myoglobin antibodies. This method allows biomarker proteins to be detected via measurement of surface stress generated by antigen-antibody molecular recognition. Reference cantilevers are used to eliminate thermal drifts, undesired chemical reactions and turbulences from injections of liquids by calculating differential deflection signals with respect to sensor cantilevers. The sensitivity achieved for myoglobin detection is below 20 µg ml-1. Both myoglobin and creatin kinase could be detected independently using cantilevers functionalized with the corresponding antibodies, in unspecific protein background. This approach permits the use of up to seven different antigen-antibody reactions simultaneously, including an additional thermomechanical and chemical in situ reference. Applications lie in the field of early and rapid diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction.

  14. Static deflection measurements of cantilever arrays reveal polymer film expansion and contraction.

    PubMed

    Snow, David; Weeks, Brandon L; Kim, Dae Jung; Loui, Albert; Hart, Bradley R; Hope-Weeks, Louisa J

    2007-12-15

    An optical static method of detection is used to interpret surface stress induced bending related to cantilevers coated on one side with poly(vinyl alcohol), poly(vinyl butyral-co-vinyl alcohol-co-vinyl acetate), and poly(vinyl chloride-co-vinyl acetate-co-2-hydroxypropyl acrylate), or respectively, PVA, PVB, and PVC, and exposed to various solvent vapors. Results indicate that the adsorption and surface interactions of the different solvent vapors that cause polymer swelling and shrinking lead to rearrangements, which have been shown to change the elastic properties of the polymer film, and subsequently, the spring constant of the polymer coated cantilever. Static deflection measurements allow the direction of cantilever bending to be determined, which adds a new dimension of usefulness for surface functionalized cantilevers as transducers in the development of novel microelectromechanical systems (MEMS).

  15. Nanoscale deflection detection of a cantilever-based biosensor using MOSFET structure: A theoretical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paryavi, Mohsen; Montazeri, Abbas; Tekieh, Tahereh; Sasanpour, Pezhman

    2016-10-01

    A novel method for detection of biological species based on measurement of cantilever deflection has been proposed and numerically evaluated. Employing the cantilever as a moving gate of a MOSFET structure, its deflection can be analyzed via current characterization of the MOSFET consequently. Locating the cantilever as a suspended gate of a MOSFET on a substrate, the distance between cantilever and oxide layer will change the carrier concentration. Accordingly, it will be resulted in different current voltage characteristics of the device which can be easily measured using simple apparatuses. In order to verify the proposed method, the performance of system has been theoretically analyzed using COMSOL platform. The simulation results have confirmed the performance and sensitivity of the proposed method.

  16. Laser controlled coupled cantilevers for precise measurements and energy transfer (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Gengyu

    2016-09-01

    Coupled cantilevers are trapped by laser in a 3-mirror configuration. We studied the signal transduction between the cantilevers by laser control. A force or displacement sensor with such laser trapping technique could achieve much higher sensitivity, as high as 3-4 orders as compared to a single cantilever. We also studied the energy transfer processes by laser trapping and manipulation. Rabi oscillations are observed. Quantum analog Landau-Zener Tunneling and Landau-Zener-Stuckelburg interferometry are realized in the classical regime. We have proved that the energy or signals could be transferred from one cantilever to the other in the real-space by laser manipulation. Laser manipulated coupled cantilvers have great potentials in precision measurements and in quantum information processing.

  17. Electrothermally driven high-frequency piezoresistive SiC cantilevers for dynamic atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Boubekri, R.; Cambril, E.; Couraud, L.; Bernardi, L.; Madouri, A.; Portail, M.; Chassagne, T.; Moisson, C.; Zielinski, M.; Jiao, S.; Michaud, J.-F.; Alquier, D.; Bouloc, J.; Nony, L.; Bocquet, F.; Loppacher, C.

    2014-08-07

    Cantilevers with resonance frequency ranging from 1 MHz to 100 MHz have been developed for dynamic atomic force microscopy. These sensors are fabricated from 3C-SiC epilayers grown on Si(100) substrates by low pressure chemical vapor deposition. They use an on-chip method both for driving and sensing the displacement of the cantilever. A first gold metallic loop deposited on top of the cantilever is used to drive its oscillation by electrothermal actuation. The sensing of this oscillation is performed by monitoring the resistance of a second Au loop. This metallic piezoresistive detection method has distinct advantages relative to more common semiconductor-based schemes. The optimization, design, fabrication, and characteristics of these cantilevers are discussed.

  18. Effect of cantilever length on stress distribution around implants in mandibular overdentures supported by two and three implants

    PubMed Central

    Ebadian, Behnaz; Mosharraf, Ramin; Khodaeian, Niloufar

    2016-01-01

    Objective: There is no definitive study comparing stress distribution around two versus three implants in implant-retained overdentures with different cantilever length. The purpose of this finite element study was to evaluate stress pattern around the implants of the 2 or 3 implant- supported mandibular overdenture with different cantilevered length. Materials and Methods: The models used in this study were 2 and 3 implant-supported overdenture with bar and clip attachment system on an edentulous mandibular arch. Each model was modified according to cantilever length (0 mm, 7 mm, and 13 mm); thus, 6 models were obtained. The vertical load of 15 and 30 pounds were applied unilaterally to the first molar and 15 pounds to the first premolar, and the stress in bone was analyzed. Results: With increasing cantilever length, no similar stress pattern changes were observed in different areas, but in most instances, an increase in cantilever length did not increase the stress around the implant adjacent to cantilever. Conclusions: Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that increasing of cantilever length in mandibular overdentures retained by 2–3 implants did not cause distinct increasing in stress, especially around the implant adjacent to cantilever, it may be helpful to use cantilever in cases of mandibular overdenture supported by splinted implants with insufficient retention and stability. Based on the findings of this study, optimal cantilever length in mandibular overdenture cannot be determined. PMID:27403049

  19. A Novel Approach to the Sensing of Liquid Density Using a Plastic Optical Fibre Cantilever Beam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulkarni, Atul; Kim, Youngjin; Kim, Taesung

    2009-01-01

    This article reports for the first time the use of a plastic optical fibre (POF) cantilever beam to measure the density of a liquid. The sensor is based on the Archimedes buoyancy principle. The sensor consists of a POF bonded on the surface of a metal beam in the form of a cantilever configuration, and at the free end of the beam a displacer is…

  20. Quantitative measurement of in-plane cantilever torsion for calibrating lateral piezoresponse force microscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, H.; Hong, S.; No, K.

    2011-01-01

    A simple quantitative measurement procedure of in-plane cantilever torsion for calibrating lateral piezoresponse force microscopy is presented. This technique enables one to determine the corresponding lateral inverse optical lever sensitivity (LIOLS) of the cantilever on the given sample. Piezoelectric coefficient, d{sub 31} of BaTiO{sub 3} single crystal (-81.62 {+-} 40.22 pm/V) which was calculated using the estimated LIOLS was in good agreement with the reported value in literature.

  1. Quantitative measurement of in-plane cantilever torsion for calibrating lateral piezoresponse force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Hyunwoo; Hong, Seungbum; No, Kwangsoo

    2011-11-01

    A simple quantitative measurement procedure of in-plane cantilever torsion for calibrating lateral piezoresponse force microscopy is presented. This technique enables one to determine the corresponding lateral inverse optical lever sensitivity (LIOLS) of the cantilever on the given sample. Piezoelectric coefficient, d31 of BaTiO3 single crystal (-81.62 ± 40.22 pm/V) which was calculated using the estimated LIOLS was in good agreement with the reported value in literature.

  2. MEMS-based silicon cantilevers with integrated electrothermal heaters for airborne ultrafine particle sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasisto, Hutomo Suryo; Merzsch, Stephan; Waag, Andreas; Peiner, Erwin

    2013-05-01

    The development of low-cost and low-power MEMS-based cantilever sensors for possible application in hand-held airborne ultrafine particle monitors is described in this work. The proposed resonant sensors are realized by silicon bulk micromachining technology with electrothermal excitation, piezoresistive frequency readout, and electrostatic particle collection elements integrated and constructed in the same sensor fabrication process step of boron diffusion. Built-in heating resistor and full Wheatstone bridge are set close to the cantilever clamp end for effective excitation and sensing, respectively, of beam deflection. Meanwhile, the particle collection electrode is located at the cantilever free end. A 300 μm-thick, phosphorus-doped silicon bulk wafer is used instead of silicon-on-insulator (SOI) as the starting material for the sensors to reduce the fabrication costs. To etch and release the cantilevers from the substrate, inductively coupled plasma (ICP) cryogenic dry etching is utilized. By controlling the etching parameters (e.g., temperature, oxygen content, and duration), cantilever structures with thicknesses down to 10 - 20 μm are yielded. In the sensor characterization, the heating resistor is heated and generating thermal waves which induce thermal expansion and further cause mechanical bending strain in the out-of-plane direction. A resonant frequency of 114.08 +/- 0.04 kHz and a quality factor of 1302 +/- 267 are measured in air for a fabricated rectangular cantilever (500x100x13.5 μm3). Owing to its low power consumption of a few milliwatts, this electrothermal cantilever is suitable for replacing the current external piezoelectric stack actuator in the next generation of the miniaturized cantilever-based nanoparticle detector (CANTOR).

  3. Model-based Processing of Micro-cantilever Sensor Arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Tringe, J W; Clague, D S; Candy, J V; Lee, C L; Rudd, R E; Burnham, A K

    2004-11-17

    We develop a model-based processor (MBP) for a micro-cantilever array sensor to detect target species in solution. After discussing the generalized framework for this problem, we develop the specific model used in this study. We perform a proof-of-concept experiment, fit the model parameters to the measured data and use them to develop a Gauss-Markov simulation. We then investigate two cases of interest: (1) averaged deflection data, and (2) multi-channel data. In both cases the evaluation proceeds by first performing a model-based parameter estimation to extract the model parameters, next performing a Gauss-Markov simulation, designing the optimal MBP and finally applying it to measured experimental data. The simulation is used to evaluate the performance of the MBP in the multi-channel case and compare it to a ''smoother'' (''averager'') typically used in this application. It was shown that the MBP not only provides a significant gain ({approx} 80dB) in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), but also consistently outperforms the smoother by 40-60 dB. Finally, we apply the processor to the smoothed experimental data and demonstrate its capability for chemical detection. The MBP performs quite well, though it includes a correctable systematic bias error. The project's primary accomplishment was the successful application of model-based processing to signals from micro-cantilever arrays: 40-60 dB improvement vs. the smoother algorithm was demonstrated. This result was achieved through the development of appropriate mathematical descriptions for the chemical and mechanical phenomena, and incorporation of these descriptions directly into the model-based signal processor. A significant challenge was the development of the framework which would maximize the usefulness of the signal processing algorithms while ensuring the accuracy of the mathematical description of the chemical-mechanical signal. Experimentally, the difficulty was to identify and characterize the non

  4. Microdrops on atomic force microscope cantilevers: evaporation of water and spring constant calibration.

    PubMed

    Bonaccurso, Elmar; Butt, Hans-Jürgen

    2005-01-13

    The evaporation of water drops with radii approximately 20 microm was investigated experimentally by depositing them onto atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers and measuring the deflection versus time. Because of the surface tension of the liquid, the Laplace pressure inside the drop, and the change of interfacial stress at the solid-liquid interface, the cantilever is deflected by typically a few hundred nanometers. The experimental results are in accordance with an analytic theory developed. The evaporation process could be monitored with high accuracy even at the last stage of evaporation because (1) cantilever deflections can be measured with nanometer resolution and (2) the time resolution, given by the inverse of the resonance frequency of the cantilever of approximately 0.3 ms, is much faster than the typical evaporation time of 1 s. Experimental results indicate that evaporation of the last thin layer of water is significantly slower than the rest of the drop, which can be due to surface forces. This drop-on-cantilever system can also be used to analyze the drop impact dynamics on a surface and to determine the spring constant of cantilevers.

  5. Study of node and mass sensitivity of resonant mode based cantilevers with concentrated mass loading

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Kewei Chai, Yuesheng; Fu, Jiahui

    2015-12-15

    Resonant-mode based cantilevers are an important type of acoustic wave based mass-sensing devices. In this work, the governing vibration equation of a bi-layer resonant-mode based cantilever attached with concentrated mass is established by using a modal analysis method. The effects of resonance modes and mass loading conditions on nodes and mass sensitivity of the cantilever were theoretically studied. The results suggested that the node did not shift when concentrated mass was loaded on a specific position. Mass sensitivity of the cantilever was linearly proportional to the square of the point displacement at the mass loading position for all the resonance modes. For the first resonance mode, when mass loading position x{sub c} satisfied 0 < x{sub c} < ∼ 0.3l (l is the cantilever beam length and 0 represents the rigid end), mass sensitivity decreased as the mass increasing while the opposite trend was obtained when mass loading satisfied ∼0.3l ≤ x{sub c} ≤ l. Mass sensitivity did not change when concentrated mass was loaded at the rigid end. This work can provide scientific guidance to optimize the mass sensitivity of a resonant-mode based cantilever.

  6. Electrothermal piezoresistive cantilever resonators for personal measurements of nanoparticles in workplace exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasisto, Hutomo Suryo; Wu, Wenze; Uhde, Erik; Waag, Andreas; Peiner, Erwin

    2015-05-01

    Low-cost and low-power piezoresistive cantilever resonators with integrated electrothermal heaters are developed to support the sensing module enhancement of the second generation of handheld cantilever-based airborne nanoparticle (NP) detector (CANTOR-2). These sensors are used for direct-reading of exposure to carbon engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) at indoor workplaces. The cantilever structures having various shapes of free ends are created using silicon bulk micromachining technologies (i.e, rectangular, hammer-head, triangular, and U-shaped cantilevers). For a complete wearable CANTOR-2, all components of the proposed detector can be grouped into two main units depending on their packaging placements (i.e., the NP sampler head and the electronics mounted in a handy-format housing). In the NP sampler head, a miniaturized electrophoretic aerosol sampler and a resonant silicon cantilever mass sensor are employed to collect the ENPs from the air stream to the cantilever surfaces and measuring their mass concentration, respectively. After calibration, the detected ENP mass concentrations of CANTOR-2 show a standard deviation from fast mobility particle sizer (FMPS, TSI 3091) of 8-14%.

  7. Cancelation of thermally induced frequency shifts in bimaterial cantilevers by nonlinear optomechanical interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vy, Nguyen Duy; Tri Dat, Le; Iida, Takuya

    2016-08-01

    Bimaterial cantilevers have recently been used in, for example, the calorimetric analysis with picowatt resolution in microscopic space based on state-of-the-art atomic force microscopes. However, thermally induced effects usually change physical properties of the cantilevers, such as the resonance frequency, which reduce the accuracy of the measurements. Here, we propose an approach to circumvent this problem that uses an optical microcavity formed between a metallic layer coated on the back of the cantilever and one coated at the end of an optical fiber irradiating the cantilever. In addition to increasing the sensitivity, the optical rigidity of this system diminishes the thermally induced frequency shift. For a coating thickness of several tens of nanometers, the input power is 5-10 μW. These values can be evaluated from parameters derived by directly irradiating the cantilever in the absence of the microcavity. The system has the potential of using the cantilever both as a thermometer without frequency shifting and as a sensor with nanometer-controlled accuracy.

  8. Fabrication of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) cantilevers for photoacoustic (PA) detection of terahertz (THz) radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newberry, R.; Glauvitz, N.; Coutu, R. A.; Medvedev, I. R.; Petkie, D.

    2014-03-01

    Historically, spectroscopy has been a cumbersome endeavor due to the relatively large sizes (3ft - 100ft in length) of modern spectroscopy systems. Taking advantage of the photoacoustic effect would allow for much smaller absorption chambers since the photoacoustic (PA) effect is independent of the absorption path length. In order to detect the photoacoustic waves being generated, a photoacoustic microphone would be required. This paper reports on the fabrication efforts taken in order to create microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) cantilevers for the purpose of sensing photoacoustic waves generated via terahertz (THz) radiation passing through a gaseous sample. The cantilevers are first modeled through the use of the finite element modeling software, CoventorWare®. The cantilevers fabricated with bulk micromachining processes and are 7x2x0.010mm on a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafer which acts as the physical structure of the cantilever. The devices are released by etching through the wafer's backside and etching through the buried oxide with hydrofluoric acid. The cantilevers are placed in a test chamber and their vibration and deflection are measured via a Michelson type interferometer that reflects a laser off a gold tip evaporated onto the tip of the cantilever. The test chamber is machined from stainless steel and housed in a THz testing environment at Wright State University. Fabricated devices have decreased residual stress and larger radii of curvatures by approximately 10X.

  9. Micromachined cantilevers-on-membrane topology for broadband vibration energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Yu; Du, Sijun; Seshia, Ashwin A.

    2016-12-01

    The overwhelming majority of microelectromechanical piezoelectric vibration energy harvesting topologies have been based on cantilevers, doubly-clamped beams or basic membranes. While these conventional designs offer simplicity, their broadband responses have been limited thus far. This paper investigates the feasibility of a new integrated cantilevers-on-membrane design that explores the optimisation of piezoelectric strain distribution and improvement of the broadband power output. While a classic membrane has the potential to offer a broader resonant peak than its cantilever counterpart, the inclusion of a centred proof mass compromises its otherwise high strain energy regions. The proposed topology addresses this issue by relocating the proof mass onto subsidiary cantilevers and combines the merits of both the membrane and the cantilever designs. Numerical simulations, constructed using fitted values based on finite element models, were used to investigate the broadband response of the proposed design in contrast to a classic plain membrane. Experimentally, when subjected to a band-limited white noise excitation, the new cantilevers-on-membrane harvester exhibited nearly two fold power output enhancement when compared to a classic plain membrane harvester of a comparable size.

  10. Atomic force microscope cantilever spring constant evaluation for higher mode oscillations: A kinetostatic method

    SciTech Connect

    Tseytlin, Yakov M.

    2008-02-15

    Our previous study of the particle mass sensor has shown a large ratio (up to thousands) between the spring constants of a rectangular cantilever in higher mode vibration and at the static bending or natural mode vibration. This has been proven by us through the derived nodal point position equation. That solution is good for a cantilever with the free end in noncontact regime and the probe shifted from the end to an effective section and contacting a soft object. Our further research shows that the same nodal position equation with the proper frequency equations may be used for the same spring constant ratio estimation if the vibrating at higher mode cantilever's free end has a significant additional mass clamped to it or that end is in permanent contact with an elastic or hard measurand object (reference cantilever). However, in the latter case, the spring constant ratio is much smaller (in tens) than in other mentioned cases at equal higher (up to fourth) vibration modes. We also present the spring constant ratio for a vibrating at higher eigenmode V-shaped cantilever, which is now in wide use for atomic force microscopy. The received results on the spring constant ratio are in good (within a few percent) agreement with the theoretical and experimental data published by other researchers. The knowledge of a possible spring constant transformation is important for the proper calibration and use of an atomic force microscope with vibrating cantilever in the higher eigenmodes for measurement and imaging with enlarged resolution.

  11. Innovative multi-cantilever array sensor system with MOEMS read-out

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivaldi, F.; Bieniek, T.; Janus, P.; Grabiec, P.; Majstrzyk, W.; Kopiec, D.; Gotszalk, T.

    2016-11-01

    Cantilever based sensor system are a well-established sensor family exploited in several every-day life applications as well as in high-end research areas. The very high sensitivity of such systems and the possibility to design and functionalize the cantilevers to create purpose built and highly selective sensors have increased the interest of the scientific community and the industry in further exploiting this promising sensors type. Optical deflection detection systems for cantilever sensors provide a reliable, flexible method for reading information from cantilevers with the highest sensitivity. However the need of using multi-cantilever arrays in several fields of application such as medicine, biology or safety related areas, make the optical method less suitable due to its structural complexity. Working in the frame of a the Joint Undertaking project Lab4MEMS II our group proposes a novel and innovative approach to solve this issue, by integrating a Micro-Opto-Electro-Mechanical-System (MOEMS) with dedicated optics, electronics and software with a MOEMS micro-mirror, ultimately developed in the frame of Lab4MEMSII. In this way we are able to present a closely packed, lightweight solution combining the advantages of standard optical read-out systems with the possibility of recording multiple read-outs from large cantilever arrays quasi simultaneously.

  12. Fixing Dataset Search

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynnes, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Three current search engines are queried for ozone data at the GES DISC. The results range from sub-optimal to counter-intuitive. We propose a method to fix dataset search by implementing a robust relevancy ranking scheme. The relevancy ranking scheme is based on several heuristics culled from more than 20 years of helping users select datasets.

  13. Future Fixed Target Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Melnitchouk, Wolodymyr

    2009-01-01

    We review plans for future fixed target lepton- and hadron-scattering facilities, including the 12 GeV upgraded CEBAF accelerator at Jefferson Lab, neutrino beam facilities at Fermilab, and the antiproton PANDA facility at FAIR. We also briefly review recent theoretical developments which will aid in the interpretation of the data expected from these facilities.

  14. Fixed mount wavefront sensor

    DOEpatents

    Neal, Daniel R.

    2000-01-01

    A rigid mount and method of mounting for a wavefront sensor. A wavefront dissector, such as a lenslet array, is rigidly mounted at a fixed distance relative to an imager, such as a CCD camera, without need for a relay imaging lens therebetween.

  15. A cantilevered flexible cylinder in cross-flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Jessica; Smits, Alexander; Stone, Howard

    2011-11-01

    Biological fluid-structure interactions of high aspect ratio bluff bodies are commonplace: flow around tall plants; flow through arrays of sensory vibrissae, antennae, and hairs. In this study, we seek insight to this class of problems by generalizing the flow configuration to uniform flow past a flexible cantilevered cylinder. Experiments were conducted for ReD = 100-500. Cylinders deflected with the flow and demonstrated multimodal oscillations in both the streamwise and transverse directions. Oscillation frequencies were correlated with vortex shedding frequencies, but low oscillation frequencies (sub-1 Hz), which were not apparently vortex- induced, were also present. Two ReD regimes were noted in which the vortex shedding frequency remained relatively constant with ReD , while the two regimes were separated by an intermediate transition region. This feature results in an apparently linear relationship between St and ReD in each regime. Hydrogen bubble visualization showed strong three-dimensionality in the wake, as well as a diversity of wake structures varying with ReD . NSF-GRFP

  16. A single nano cantilever as a reprogrammable universal logic gate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chappanda, K. N.; Ilyas, S.; Kazmi, S. N. R.; Holguin-Lerma, J.; Batra, N. M.; Costa, P. M. F. J.; Younis, M. I.

    2017-04-01

    The current transistor-based computing circuits use multiple interconnected transistors to realize a single Boolean logic gate. This leads to higher power requirements and delayed computing. Transistors are not suitable for applications in harsh environments and require complicated thermal management systems due to excessive heat dissipation. Also, transistor circuits lack the ability to dynamically reconfigure their functionality in real time, which is desirable for enhanced computing capability. Further, the miniaturization of transistors to improve computational power is reaching its ultimate physical limits. As a step towards overcoming the limitations of transistor-based computing, here we demonstrate a reprogrammable universal Boolean logic gate based on a nanoelectromechanical cantilever (NC) oscillator. The fundamental XOR, AND, NOR, OR and NOT logic gates are condensed in a single NC, thereby reducing electrical interconnects between devices. The device is dynamically switchable between any logic gates at the same drive frequency without the need for any change in the circuit. It is demonstrated to operate at elevated temperatures minimizing the need for thermal management systems. It has a tunable bandwidth of 5 MHz enabling parallel and dynamically reconfigurable logic device for enhanced computing.

  17. Advanced structural optimization of a heliostat with cantilever arms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanov, Dimitar; Zlatanov, Hristo

    2016-05-01

    The weight of the support structure of heliostats, CPV and PV trackers is important cost element of a solar plant and reducing it will improve the economic viability of a solar project. Heliostats with rectangular area (1 to 5 in 1 m² steps; 5 to 150 in 5 m² steps) and aspect ratios (0.5, 1.0, 1.2, 1.5, 2.0) were investigated under various winds speeds (0, 5 to 100 in 5 m/s steps), wind direction (0 to 180° in 15° steps) and elevation positions (0 to 90° in 10° steps). Each load case was run with three different cantilever arms. The inclination angle of the chords and bracings was chosen so as to fulfill the geometrical boundary condition. Stress and buckling validations were performed according to Eurocode. The results of research carried out can be used to determine the specific weight of a heliostat in kg/m² as a function of the wind speed, tracker area and tracker aspect ratio. Future work should investigate the impact of using cold formed structural hollow sections and cross sections with thinner wall thickness which is not part of EN 10210.

  18. Fixed solar collection system

    SciTech Connect

    Tipton, H.R.

    1984-07-31

    A fixed solar energy collector system has facing panels of different size forming a Vee-shaped trough open at its base and supporting a plurality of highly reflective convex reflectors strategically disposed upon said panels in reflective relationship to a plurality of Fresnel lenses positioned at the base of the trough. A suitable reflector, disposed beneath the Fresnel lenses, directs the reflected energy to a heat-needy target.

  19. MicroCantilever (MC) based nanomechanical sensor for detection of molecular interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Kyung

    2011-01-01

    Specific aims of this study are to investigate the mechanism governing surface stress generation associated with chemical or molecular binding on functionalized microcantilevers. Formation of affinity complexes on cantilever surfaces leads to charge redistribution, configurational change and steric hindrance between neighboring molecules resulting in surface stress change and measureable cantilever deformation. A novel interferometry technique employing two adjacent micromachined cantilevers (a sensing/reference pair) was utilized to measure the cantilever deformation. The sensing principle is that binding/reaction of specific chemical or biological species on the sensing cantilever transduces to mechanical deformation. The differential bending of the sensing cantilever respect to the reference cantilever ensures that measured response is insensitive to environmental disturbances. As a proof of principle for the measurement technique, surface stress changes associated with: self-assembly of alkanethiol, hybridization of ssDNA, and the formation of cocaine-aptamer complexes were measured. Dissociation constant (Kd) for each molecular reaction was utilized to estimate the surface coverage of affinity complexes. In the cases of DNA hybridization and cocaine-aptamer binding, measured surface stress was found to be dependent on the surface coverage of the affinity complexes. In order to achieve a better sensitivity for DNA hybridization, immobilization of receptor molecules was modified to enhance the deformation of underlying surface. Single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) strands with thiol-modification on both 3-foot and 5-foot ends were immobilized on the gold surface such that both ends are attached to the gold surface. Immobilization condition was controlled to obtain similar receptor density as single-thiolated DNA strands. Hybridization of double-thiolated DNA strands leads to an almost two orders of magnitude increase in cantilever deformation. In both DNA

  20. Position and mode dependent optical detection back-action in cantilever beam resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, T.; Schmid, S.; Dohn, S.; Sader, J. E.; Boisen, A.; Villanueva, L. G.

    2017-03-01

    Optical detection back-action in cantilever resonant or static detection presents a challenge when striving for state-of-the-art performance. The origin and possible routes for minimizing optical back-action have received little attention in literature. Here, we investigate the position and mode dependent optical back-action on cantilever beam resonators. A high power heating laser (100 µW) is scanned across a silicon nitride cantilever while its effect on the first three resonance modes is detected via a low-power readout laser (1 µW) positioned at the cantilever tip. We find that the measured effect of back-action is not only dependent on position but also the shape of the resonance mode. Relevant silicon nitride material parameters are extracted by fitting finite element (FE) simulations to the temperature-dependent frequency response of the first three modes. In a second round of simulations, using the extracted parameters, we successfully fit the FEM results with the measured mode and position dependent back-action. From the simulations, we can conclude that the observed frequency tuning is due to temperature induced changes in stress. Effects of changes in material properties and dimensions are negligible. Finally, different routes for minimizing the effect of this optical detection back-action are described, allowing further improvements of cantilever-based sensing in general.

  1. A calibration method for lateral forces for use with colloidal probe force microscopy cantilevers

    SciTech Connect

    Quintanilla, M. A. S.; Goddard, D. T.

    2008-02-15

    A calibration method is described for colloidal probe cantilevers that enables friction force measurements obtained using lateral force microscopy (LFM) to be quantified. The method is an adaptation of the lever method of Feiler et al. [A. Feiler, P. Attard, and I. Larson, Rev. Sci. Instum. 71, 2746 (2000)] and uses the advantageous positioning of probe particles that are usually offset from the central axis of the cantilever. The main sources of error in the calibration method are assessed, in particular, the potential misalignment of the long axis of the cantilever that ideally should be perpendicular to the photodiode detector. When this is not taken into account, the misalignment is shown to have a significant effect on the cantilever torsional stiffness but not on the lateral photodiode sensitivity. Also, because the friction signal is affected by the topography of the substrate, the method presented is valid only against flat substrates. Two types of particles, 20 {mu}m glass beads and UO{sub 3} agglomerates attached to silicon tapping mode cantilevers were used to test the method against substrates including glass, cleaved mica, and UO{sub 2} single crystals. Comparisons with the lateral compliance method of Cain et al. [R. G. Cain, S. Biggs, and N. W. Page, J. Colloid Interface Sci. 227, 55 (2000)] are also made.

  2. Cantilever-based mass sensor for immunodetection of multiple bioactive targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Tang; Xu, Bai; Welch, John; Castracane, James

    2003-12-01

    We are investigating the development of a rapid and highly sensitive detection method for immunoreactive substances combining MEMS (Micro Electro Mechanical Systems) technology and the appropriate immune stimulant or response factors. Cantilevers of micrometer scale can be used for trace detection of mass change. When a layer of an antigenic substance is covalently deposited, the cantilever is capable of capturing antibodies from samples with high affinity and specificity. The antigen/antibody binding causes multiple physical changes in the cantilever device, including a shift of effective mass and a change in surface tension. The change of effective mass consequently induces a shift in the cantilever"s natural resonant frequency. By monitoring these changes with an optical readout mechanism, the presence of immunoreactive targets in the sample can be detected. This detection method can be used for various types of targets with immunoreactivity and therefore is potentially applicable in hazardous substance monitoring and disease diagnosis. In our effort, phoS1, an antigen shed by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB), is utilized for rapid and economic TB detection.

  3. Cantilever-based mass sensor for immunodetection of multiple bioactive targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Tang; Xu, Bai; Welch, John; Castracane, James

    2004-01-01

    We are investigating the development of a rapid and highly sensitive detection method for immunoreactive substances combining MEMS (Micro Electro Mechanical Systems) technology and the appropriate immune stimulant or response factors. Cantilevers of micrometer scale can be used for trace detection of mass change. When a layer of an antigenic substance is covalently deposited, the cantilever is capable of capturing antibodies from samples with high affinity and specificity. The antigen/antibody binding causes multiple physical changes in the cantilever device, including a shift of effective mass and a change in surface tension. The change of effective mass consequently induces a shift in the cantilever"s natural resonant frequency. By monitoring these changes with an optical readout mechanism, the presence of immunoreactive targets in the sample can be detected. This detection method can be used for various types of targets with immunoreactivity and therefore is potentially applicable in hazardous substance monitoring and disease diagnosis. In our effort, phoS1, an antigen shed by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB), is utilized for rapid and economic TB detection.

  4. Numerical investigation of band gaps in 3D printed cantilever-in-mass metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qureshi, Awais; Li, Bing; Tan, K. T.

    2016-06-01

    In this research, the negative effective mass behavior of elastic/mechanical metamaterials is exhibited by a cantilever-in-mass structure as a proposed design for creating frequency stopping band gaps, based on local resonance of the internal structure. The mass-in-mass unit cell model is transformed into a cantilever-in-mass model using the Bernoulli-Euler beam theory. An analytical model of the cantilever-in-mass structure is derived and the effects of geometrical dimensions and material parameters to create frequency band gaps are examined. A two-dimensional finite element model is created to validate the analytical results, and excellent agreement is achieved. The analytical model establishes an easily tunable metamaterial design to realize wave attenuation based on locally resonant frequency. To demonstrate feasibility for 3D printing, the analytical model is employed to design and fabricate 3D printable mechanical metamaterial. A three-dimensional numerical experiment is performed using COMSOL Multiphysics to validate the wave attenuation performance. Results show that the cantilever-in-mass metamaterial is capable of mitigating stress waves at the desired resonance frequency. Our study successfully presents the use of one constituent material to create a 3D printed cantilever-in-mass metamaterial with negative effective mass density for stress wave mitigation purposes.

  5. Effect of Chamber Pressure on the Vibrational Properties of Micro- and Nano-Cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keskar, Gayatri; Gaillard, Jay; Taylor, Jonathan; Skove, Malcolm; Rao, Apparao

    2007-03-01

    We have studied the nonlinear dynamics of micro- and nano-cantilevers under varying ambient conditions using the Harmonic Detection of Resonance technique (HDR)^1. In our studies, a cantilever is either microstructure shaped like a diving board, or a cantilevered MWNT. In this work, we report the dependence of the amplitude and Q of a silicon microcantilever (300 μm long, 35 μm wide, 2 μm thick) on ambient pressure. An environment of air at a pressure of 10-3 Torr gives a high quality factor of ˜7000. The response of higher harmonics of the ac voltage that drives the cantilever is also observed with varying chamber pressure. An investigation of the influence of ac and dc voltages on sensitivity shows very good agreement with a model calculation. The shift in the resonant frequency of cantilevers under different environments such as helium, air and argon at different pressures will be discussed. References: 1. J. Gaillard, M. J. Skove, R. Ciocan, and A. M. Rao, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 77, 073907 (2006). Contact Info: arao@clemson.edu

  6. Design Optimization of PZT-Based Piezoelectric Cantilever Beam by Using Computational Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jihoon; Park, Sanghyun; Lim, Woochul; Jang, Junyong; Lee, Tae Hee; Hong, Seong Kwang; Song, Yewon; Sung, Tae Hyun

    2016-08-01

    Piezoelectric energy harvesting is gaining huge research interest since it provides high power density and has real-life applicability. However, investigative research for the mechanical-electrical coupling phenomenon remains challenging. Many researchers depend on physical experiments to choose devices with the best performance which meet design objectives through case analysis; this involves high design costs. This study aims to develop a practical model using computer simulations and to propose an optimized design for a lead zirconate titanate (PZT)-based piezoelectric cantilever beam which is widely used in energy harvesting. In this study, the commercial finite element (FE) software is used to predict the voltage generated from vibrations of the PZT-based piezoelectric cantilever beam. Because the initial FE model differs from physical experiments, the model is calibrated by multi-objective optimization to increase the accuracy of the predictions. We collect data from physical experiments using the cantilever beam and use these experimental results in the calibration process. Since dynamic analysis in the FE analysis of the piezoelectric cantilever beam with a dense step size is considerably time-consuming, a surrogate model is employed for efficient optimization. Through the design optimization of the PZT-based piezoelectric cantilever beam, a high-performance piezoelectric device was developed. The sensitivity of the variables at the optimum design is analyzed to suggest a further improved device.

  7. Acoustofluidic particle trapping, manipulation, and release using dynamic-mode cantilever sensors.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Blake N; Mutharasan, Raj

    2016-12-19

    We show here that dynamic-mode cantilever sensors enable acoustofluidic fluid mixing and trapping of suspended particles as well as the rapid manipulation and release of trapped micro-particles via mode switching in liquid. Resonant modes of piezoelectric cantilever sensors over the 0 to 8 MHz frequency range are investigated. Sensor impedance response, flow visualization studies using dye and micro-particle tracers (100 μm diameter), and finite element simulations of cantilever modal mechanics and acoustic streaming show fluid mixing and particle trapping configurations depend on the resonant mode shape. We found trapped particles could be: (1) rapidly manipulated on millimeter length scales, and (2) released from the cantilever surface after trapping by switching between low- and high-order resonant modes (less than 250 kHz and greater than 1 MHz, respectively). Such results suggest a potentially promising future for dynamic-mode cantilevers in separations, pumping and mixing applications as well as acoustofluidic-enhanced sensing applications.

  8. Fabrication and characterization of large arrays of mesoscopic gold rings on large-aspect-ratio cantilevers

    SciTech Connect

    Ngo, D. Q.; Petković, I. Lollo, A.; Castellanos-Beltran, M. A.; Harris, J. G. E.

    2014-10-15

    We have fabricated large arrays of mesoscopic metal rings on ultrasensitive cantilevers. The arrays are defined by electron beam lithography and contain up to 10{sup 5} rings. The rings have a circumference of 1 μm, and are made of ultrapure (6N) Au that is deposited onto a silicon-on-insulator wafer without an adhesion layer. Subsequent processing of the SOI wafer results in each array being supported at the end of a free-standing cantilever. To accommodate the large arrays while maintaining a low spring constant, the cantilevers are nearly 1 mm in both lateral dimensions and 100 nm thick. The extreme aspect ratio of the cantilevers, the large array size, and the absence of a sticking layer are intended to enable measurements of the rings' average persistent current in the presence of relatively small magnetic fields. We describe the motivation for these measurements, the fabrication of the devices, and the characterization of the cantilevers' mechanical properties. We also discuss the devices' expected performance in measurements of .

  9. Numerical investigation of band gaps in 3D printed cantilever-in-mass metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Awais; Li, Bing; Tan, K. T.

    2016-01-01

    In this research, the negative effective mass behavior of elastic/mechanical metamaterials is exhibited by a cantilever-in-mass structure as a proposed design for creating frequency stopping band gaps, based on local resonance of the internal structure. The mass-in-mass unit cell model is transformed into a cantilever-in-mass model using the Bernoulli-Euler beam theory. An analytical model of the cantilever-in-mass structure is derived and the effects of geometrical dimensions and material parameters to create frequency band gaps are examined. A two-dimensional finite element model is created to validate the analytical results, and excellent agreement is achieved. The analytical model establishes an easily tunable metamaterial design to realize wave attenuation based on locally resonant frequency. To demonstrate feasibility for 3D printing, the analytical model is employed to design and fabricate 3D printable mechanical metamaterial. A three-dimensional numerical experiment is performed using COMSOL Multiphysics to validate the wave attenuation performance. Results show that the cantilever-in-mass metamaterial is capable of mitigating stress waves at the desired resonance frequency. Our study successfully presents the use of one constituent material to create a 3D printed cantilever-in-mass metamaterial with negative effective mass density for stress wave mitigation purposes. PMID:27329828

  10. Signal enhancement in cantilever magnetometry based on a co-resonantly coupled sensor

    PubMed Central

    Körner, Julia; Reiche, Christopher F; Gemming, Thomas; Büchner, Bernd; Gerlach, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    Summary Cantilever magnetometry is a measurement technique used to study magnetic nanoparticles. With decreasing sample size, the signal strength is significantly reduced, requiring advances of the technique. Ultrathin and slender cantilevers can address this challenge but lead to increased complexity of detection. We present an approach based on the co-resonant coupling of a micro- and a nanometer-sized cantilever. Via matching of the resonance frequencies of the two subsystems we induce a strong interplay between the oscillations of the two cantilevers, allowing for a detection of interactions between the sensitive nanocantilever and external influences in the amplitude response curve of the microcantilever. In our magnetometry experiment we used an iron-filled carbon nanotube acting simultaneously as nanocantilever and magnetic sample. Measurements revealed an enhancement of the commonly used frequency shift signal by five orders of magnitude compared to conventional cantilever magnetometry experiments with similar nanomagnets. With this experiment we do not only demonstrate the functionality of our sensor design but also its potential for very sensitive magnetometry measurements while maintaining a facile oscillation detection with a conventional microcantilever setup. PMID:27547621

  11. Measurement and reliability issues in resonant mode cantilever for bio-sensing application in fluid medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kathel, G.; Shajahan, M. S.; Bhadra, P.; Prabhakar, A.; Chadha, A.; Bhattacharya, E.

    2016-09-01

    Cantilevers immersed in liquid experience viscous damping and hydrodynamic loading. We report on the use of such cantilevers, operating in the dynamic mode with, (i) frequency sweeping and (ii) phase locked loop methods. The solution to reliability issues such as random drift in the resonant peak values, and interference of spurious modes in the resonance frequency spectrum, are explained based on the actuation signal provided and laser spot size. The laser beam spot size and its position on the cantilever were found to have an important role, on the output signal and resonance frequency. We describe a method to distinguish the normal modes from the spurious modes for a cantilever. Uncertainties in the measurements define the lower limit of mass detection (m min). The minimum detection limits of the two measurement methods are investigated by measuring salt adsorption from phosphate buffer solution, as an example, a mass of 14 pg was measured using the 14th transverse mode of a 500~μ m  ×  100 μm  ×  1 μm silicon cantilever. The optimized measurement was used to study the interaction between antibody and antigen.

  12. Development of the magnetic force-induced dual vibration energy harvester using a unimorph cantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umaba, M.; Nakamachi, E.; Morita, Y.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, a high frequency piezoelectric energy harvester converted from the human low vibrated motion energy was newly developed. This hybrid energy harvester consists of the unimorph piezoelectric cantilever, the pendulum and a pair of permanent magnets. One magnet was attached at the edge of cantilever, and the counterpart magnet at the edge of pendulum. The mechanical energy provided through the human walking motion, which is a typical ubiquitous existence of vibration, is converted to the electric energy via the piezoelectric unimorph cantilever vibration. At first, we studied the energy convert mechanism and analyze the performance of novel energy harvester, where the resonance free vibration of unimorph piezoelectric cantilever generated a high electric power. Next, we equipped the counterpart permanent magnet at the edge of pendulum, which vibrates with a very low frequency caused by the human walking. Then the counterpart magnet was set at the edge of unimorph piezoelectric cantilever, which vibrated with a high frequency. This low-to-high frequency convert "dual vibration system" can be characterized as an enhanced energy harvester. We examined and obtained average values of voltage and power in this system, as 8.31 mV and 0.33 μW. Those results show the possibility to apply for the energy harvester in the portable and implantable Bio-MEMS devices.

  13. Fixed solar energy concentrator

    SciTech Connect

    Houghton, A.J.; Knasel, T.M.

    1981-01-20

    An apparatus for the concentration of solar energy upon a fixed array of solar cells is disclosed. A transparent material is overlayed upon the cell array, and a diffuse reflective coating is applied to the surface area of the transparent medium in between cells. Radiant light, which reflects through the transparent layer and does not fall directly incident to a cell surface is reflected by the coating layer in an approximate cosine pattern. Thereafter, such light undergoes internal reflection and rediffusion until subsequently it either strikes a solar cell surface or is lost through the upper surface of the transparent material.

  14. Lateral force microscope calibration using a modified atomic force microscope cantilever

    SciTech Connect

    Reitsma, M. G.

    2007-10-15

    A proof-of-concept study is presented for a prototype atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever and associated calibration procedure that provide a path for quantitative friction measurement using a lateral force microscope (LFM). The calibration procedure is based on the method proposed by Feiler et al. [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 71, 2746 (2000)] but allows for calibration and friction measurements to be carried out in situ and with greater precision. The modified AFM cantilever is equipped with lateral lever arms that facilitate the application of normal and lateral forces, comparable to those acting in a typical LFM friction experiment. The technique allows the user to select acceptable precision via a potentially unlimited number of calibration measurements across the full working range of the LFM photodetector. A microfabricated version of the cantilever would be compatible with typical commercial AFM instrumentation and allow for common AFM techniques such as topography imaging and other surface force measurements to be performed.

  15. Evaluation of critical interlaminar SIF of DCB specimen made of slender cantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, S. K.; Kumar, Prashant; Kishore, N. N.; Potty, P. K. Kesavan

    1995-02-01

    A method has been developed involving combined numerical and experimental techniques to evaluate interlaminar fracture toughness (K(sub 1c)) of the double cantilever beam specimen with slender cantilevers. Using FEM, a relationship is developed between the critical stress intensity factor and strain at a point near the crack tip. The strain is measured through a strain gauge of 0.2 mm gauge length. The location and the orientation for the strain gauge are optimized by the numerical analysis. Experiments were conducted on a DCB specimen prepared by bonding two thin plates of a hardened steel alloy. K(sub 1c) of the interlaminar crack was determined by (1) the combined numencal and experimental technique knowing the strain near the crack tip; and (2) the numerical method knowing the loads at the cantilever ends. The experimental results were found to be within 18 percent of the predicted values.

  16. Fabrication of high-density cantilever arrays and through-wafer interconnects

    SciTech Connect

    A. Harley, J.; Abdollahi-Alibeik, S.; Chow, E. M.; Kenney, T. W.; McCarthy, A. M.; McVittie, J. P.; Partridge; Quate, C. F.; Soh, H. T.

    1998-11-03

    Processes to fabricate dense, dry released microstructures with electrical connections on the opposite side of the wafer are described. A 10 x 10 array of silicon and polysilicon cantilevers with high packing density (5 tips/mm2) and high uniformity (<10 µm length variation across the wafer) are demonstrated. The cantilever release process uses a deep SF6/C4F8, plasma etch followed by a HBr plasma etch to accurately release cantilevers. A process for fabricating electrical contacts through the backside of the wafer is also described. Electrodeposited resist, conformal CVD metal deposition and deep SF6/C4F8 plasma etching are used to make 30 µm/side square vias each of which has a resistance of 50 m(omega).

  17. Fast optical cooling of a nanomechanical cantilever by a dynamical Stark-shift gate

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Leilei; Zhang, Jian-Qi; Zhang, Shuo; Feng, Mang

    2015-01-01

    The efficient cooling of nanomechanical resonators is essential to exploration of quantum properties of the macroscopic or mesoscopic systems. We propose such a laser-cooling scheme for a nanomechanical cantilever, which works even for the low-frequency mechanical mode and under weak cooling lasers. The cantilever is coupled by a diamond nitrogen-vacancy center under a strong magnetic field gradient and the cooling is assisted by a dynamical Stark-shift gate. Our scheme can effectively enhance the desired cooling efficiency by avoiding the off-resonant and undesired carrier transitions, and thereby cool the cantilever down to the vicinity of the vibrational ground state in a fast fashion. PMID:26455901

  18. Vertical chip-to-chip coupling between silicon photonic integrated circuits using cantilever couplers.

    PubMed

    Sun, Peng; Reano, Ronald M

    2011-02-28

    We demonstrate vertical chip-to-chip light coupling using silicon strip waveguide cantilever couplers. The guided-wave couplers consist of silicon strip waveguides embedded within silicon dioxide cantilevers. The cantilevers deflect 90° out-of-plane via residual stress, allowing vertical light coupling between separate chips. A chip-to-chip coupling loss of 2.5 dB per connection is measured for TE polarization and 1.1 dB for TM polarization at 1550 nm wavelength. The coupling loss varies by less than±0.8 dB within the wavelength range from 1500 nm to 1565 nm for both polarizations. The couplers enable broadband and compact system architectures involving high speed vertical data transport between photonic integrated circuits.

  19. Active vibration control of flexible cantilever plates using piezoelectric materials and artificial neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdeljaber, Osama; Avci, Onur; Inman, Daniel J.

    2016-02-01

    The study presented in this paper introduces a new intelligent methodology to mitigate the vibration response of flexible cantilever plates. The use of the piezoelectric sensor/actuator pairs for active control of plates is discussed. An intelligent neural network based controller is designed to control the optimal voltage applied on the piezoelectric patches. The control technique utilizes a neurocontroller along with a Kalman Filter to compute the appropriate actuator command. The neurocontroller is trained based on an algorithm that incorporates a set of emulator neural networks which are also trained to predict the future response of the cantilever plate. Then, the neurocontroller is evaluated by comparing the uncontrolled and controlled responses under several types of dynamic excitations. It is observed that the neurocontroller reduced the vibration response of the flexible cantilever plate significantly; the results demonstrated the success and robustness of the neurocontroller independent of the type and distribution of the excitation force.

  20. Gravimetric measurements with use of a cantilever for controlling of electrochemical deposition processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokaryn, Piotr; Janus, Pawel; Zajac, Jerzy; Sierakowski, Andrzej; Domanski, Krzysztof; Grabiec, Piotr

    2016-11-01

    In this paper we describe the method for monitoring the progress of electrochemical deposition process. The procedure allows to control the deposition of metals as well as conductive polymers on metallic seed layer. The method is particularly useful to very thin layers (1-10 nm) of deposited medium which mechanical or optical methods are troublesome for. In this method deposit is grown on the target and on the test silicon micro-cantilever with a metal pad. Galvanic deposition on the cantilever causes the change of its mass and consequently the change of its resonance frequency. Changes of the frequency is measured with laser vibro-meter then the layer thicknesses can be estimated basing on the cantilever calibration curve. Applying this method for controlling of gold deposition on platinum seed layer, for improving the properties of the biochemical sensors, is described in this paper.

  1. Method and apparatus for sensing the natural frequency of a cantilevered body

    DOEpatents

    Duncan, Michael G.

    2000-01-01

    A method and apparatus for measuring the natural resonant frequency of a spring element by monitoring a phase difference between an output signal from the spring element and an input signal to the spring element and by adjusting frequency of the input signal until a detected phase difference signals that the natural resonant frequency has been reached. The method and apparatus are applied to a micro-cantilevered elements used to measure gas compositions and concentrations. Such elements are provided with coatings that absorb gas to cause deflections and changes in the mass or spring constant of the cantilevered element. These changes correspond to changes in the natural resonant frequency of the cantilevered element which are measured using the method and apparatus described herein.

  2. Accurate and precise calibration of AFM cantilever spring constants using laser Doppler vibrometry.

    PubMed

    Gates, Richard S; Pratt, Jon R

    2012-09-21

    Accurate cantilever spring constants are important in atomic force microscopy both in control of sensitive imaging and to provide correct nanomechanical property measurements. Conventional atomic force microscope (AFM) spring constant calibration techniques are usually performed in an AFM. They rely on significant handling and often require touching the cantilever probe tip to a surface to calibrate the optical lever sensitivity of the configuration. This can damage the tip. The thermal calibration technique developed for laser Doppler vibrometry (LDV) can be used to calibrate cantilevers without handling or touching the tip to a surface. Both flexural and torsional spring constants can be measured. Using both Euler-Bernoulli modeling and an SI traceable electrostatic force balance technique as a comparison we demonstrate that the LDV thermal technique is capable of providing rapid calibrations with a combination of ease, accuracy and precision beyond anything previously available.

  3. High-speed imaging upgrade for a standard sample scanning atomic force microscope using small cantilevers

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Jonathan D.; Nievergelt, Adrian; Erickson, Blake W.; Yang, Chen; Dukic, Maja; Fantner, Georg E.

    2014-09-15

    We present an atomic force microscope (AFM) head for optical beam deflection on small cantilevers. Our AFM head is designed to be small in size, easily integrated into a commercial AFM system, and has a modular architecture facilitating exchange of the optical and electronic assemblies. We present two different designs for both the optical beam deflection and the electronic readout systems, and evaluate their performance. Using small cantilevers with our AFM head on an otherwise unmodified commercial AFM system, we are able to take tapping mode images approximately 5–10 times faster compared to the same AFM system using large cantilevers. By using additional scanner turnaround resonance compensation and a controller designed for high-speed AFM imaging, we show tapping mode imaging of lipid bilayers at line scan rates of 100–500 Hz for scan areas of several micrometers in size.

  4. Design optimization of piezoresistive cantilevers for force sensing in air and water

    PubMed Central

    Doll, Joseph C.; Park, Sung-Jin; Pruitt, Beth L.

    2009-01-01

    Piezoresistive cantilevers fabricated from doped silicon or metal films are commonly used for force, topography, and chemical sensing at the micro- and macroscales. Proper design is required to optimize the achievable resolution by maximizing sensitivity while simultaneously minimizing the integrated noise over the bandwidth of interest. Existing analytical design methods are insufficient for modeling complex dopant profiles, design constraints, and nonlinear phenomena such as damping in fluid. Here we present an optimization method based on an analytical piezoresistive cantilever model. We use an existing iterative optimizer to minimimize a performance goal, such as minimum detectable force. The design tool is available as open source software. Optimal cantilever design and performance are found to strongly depend on the measurement bandwidth and the constraints applied. We discuss results for silicon piezoresistors fabricated by epitaxy and diffusion, but the method can be applied to any dopant profile or material which can be modeled in a similar fashion or extended to other microelectromechanical systems. PMID:19865512

  5. The dynamic behavior of a cantilever beam coupled to a non-ideal unbalanced motor through numerical and experimental analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonçalves, P. J. P.; Silveira, M.; Pontes Junior, B. R.; Balthazar, J. M.

    2014-09-01

    An excitation force that is not influenced by the system state is said to be an ideal energy source. In real situations, a direct and feedback coupling between the excitation source and the system must always exist at a certain level. This manifestation of the law of conservation of energy is known as the Sommerfeld effect. In the case of obtaining a mathematical model for such a system, additional equations are usually necessary to describe the vibration sources with limited power and its coupling with the mechanical system. In this work, a cantilever beam and a non-ideal DC motor fixed to its free end are analyzed. The motor has an unbalanced mass that provides excitation to the system which is proportional to the current applied to the motor. During the coast up operation of the motor, if the drive power is increased slowly, making the excitation frequency pass through the first natural frequency of the beam, the DC motor speed will remain the same until it suddenly jumps to a much higher value (simultaneously its amplitude jumps to a much lower value) upon exceeding a critical input power. It was found that the Sommerfeld effect depends on some system parameters and the motor operational procedures. These parameters are explored to avoid the resonance capture in the Sommerfeld effect. Numerical simulations and experimental tests are used to help gather insight of this dynamic behavior.

  6. Dynamic characterization of small fibers based on the flexural vibrations of a piezoelectric cantilever probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaofei; Ye, Xuan; Li, Xide

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we present a cantilever-probe system excited by a piezoelectric actuator, and use it to measure the dynamic mechanical properties of a micro- and nanoscale fiber. Coupling the fiber to the free end of the cantilever probe, we found the dynamic stiffness and damping coefficient of the fiber from the resonance frequency and the quality factor of the fiber-cantilever-probe system. The properties of Bacillus subtilis fibers measured using our proposed system agreed with tensile measurements, validating our method. Our measurements show that the piezoelectric actuator coupled to cantilever probe can be made equivalent to a clamped cantilever with an effective length, and calculated results show that the errors of measured natural frequency of the system can be ignored if the coupled fiber has an inclination angle of alignment of less than 10°. A sensitivity analysis indicates that the first or second resonant mode is the sensitive mode to test the sample’s dynamic stiffness, while the damping property has different sensitivities for the first four modes. Our theoretical analysis demonstrates that the double-cantilever probe is also an effective sensitive structure that can be used to perform dynamic loading and characterize dynamic response. Our method has the advantage of using amplitude-frequency curves to obtain the dynamic mechanical properties without directly measuring displacements and forces as in tensile tests, and it also avoids the effects of the complex surface structure and deformation presenting in contact resonance method. Our method is effective for measuring the dynamic mechanical properties of fiber-like one-dimensional (1D) materials.

  7. Design and fabrication of vibration based energy harvester using microelectromechanical system piezoelectric cantilever for low power applications.

    PubMed

    Kim, Moonkeun; Lee, Sang-Kyun; Yang, Yil Suk; Jeong, Jaehwa; Min, Nam Ki; Kwon, Kwang-Ho

    2013-12-01

    We fabricated dual-beam cantilevers on the microelectromechanical system (MEMS) scale with an integrated Si proof mass. A Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 (PZT) cantilever was designed as a mechanical vibration energy-harvesting system for low power applications. The resonant frequency of the multilayer composition cantilevers were simulated using the finite element method (FEM) with parametric analysis carried out in the design process. According to simulations, the resonant frequency, voltage, and average power of a dual-beam cantilever was 69.1 Hz, 113.9 mV, and 0.303 microW, respectively, at optimal resistance and 0.5 g (gravitational acceleration, m/s2). Based on these data, we subsequently fabricated cantilever devices using dual-beam cantilevers. The harvested power density of the dual-beam cantilever compared favorably with the simulation. Experiments revealed the resonant frequency, voltage, and average power density to be 78.7 Hz, 118.5 mV, and 0.34 microW, respectively. The error between the measured and simulated results was about 10%. The maximum average power and power density of the fabricated dual-beam cantilever at 1 g were 0.803 microW and 1322.80 microW cm(-3), respectively. Furthermore, the possibility of a MEMS-scale power source for energy conversion experiments was also tested.

  8. Growth and sculpting of Co nano-strings on Si micro-cantilevers: magneto-mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Madurga, V; Favieres, C; Vergara, J

    2010-03-05

    Si micro-cantilevers were coated with Co nano-strings, which were simultaneously grown and sculpted during off-normal pulsed laser deposition. The surface morphology of micro-cantilevers with longitudinal or transverse nano-strings was analysed by scanning tunnelling microscopy. Magnetic anisotropy was detected with a magnetization direction parallel to the nano-strings. The two micro-cantilever types exhibited different mechanical behaviours when placed in a non-uniform magnetic field. By varying the relative position of the micro-cantilever with respect to the gradient direction of this field, a split in the resonant frequency shift of the micro-cantilevers was generated, depending on the direction of magnetic anisotropy. Discrimination was achieved between the micro-cantilevers with transverse nano-strings and the micro-cantilevers with longitudinal nano-strings. The lowest limit of magnetic moment for distinction between these covered micro-cantilevers was 10(-8) emu. The possible benefits of these magneto-mechanical properties for the biological, chemical and physical applications of some nano-mechanical devices are pointed out.

  9. In vacuo elastodynamics of a flexible cantilever for wideband energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, D.; Erturk, A.

    2016-04-01

    We explore the potential for bandwidth enhancement by merely exploiting the hardening nonlinearity of a flexible cantilever. To date, this cubic hardening behavior has been minor due to dissipative effects, especially fluid drag. The goal here is to minimize the fluid damping and thereby achieve the jump phenomenon. A vacuum setup that is compatible with the armature of a long-stroke shaker is employed. Experiments are conducted for a range of air pressure and base excitation levels. The overall nonlinear non-conservative elastodynamics of the cantilever is also modeled and experimentally validated by empirically accounting for fluid damping.

  10. Vibrations of cantilevered circular cylindrical shells Shallow versus deep shell theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. K.; Leissa, A. W.; Wang, A. J.

    1983-01-01

    Free vibrations of cantilevered circular cylindrical shells having rectangular planforms are studied in this paper by means of the Ritz method. The deep shell theory of Novozhilov and Goldenveizer is used and compared with the usual shallow shell theory for a wide range of shell parameters. A thorough convergence study is presented along with comparisons to previously published finite element solutions and experimental results. Accurately computed frequency parameters and mode shapes for various shell configurations are presented. The present paper appears to be the first comprehensive study presenting rigorous comparisons between the two shell theories in dealing with free vibrations of cantilevered cylindrical shells.

  11. Resonant interaction of trapped cold atoms with a magnetic cantilever tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montoya, Cris; Valencia, Jose; Geraci, Andrew A.; Eardley, Matthew; Moreland, John; Hollberg, Leo; Kitching, John

    2015-06-01

    Magnetic resonance in an ensemble of laser-cooled trapped Rb atoms is excited using a microcantilever with a magnetic tip. The cantilever is mounted on a multilayer chip designed to capture, cool, and magnetically transport cold atoms. The coupling is observed by measuring the loss from a magnetic trap as the oscillating cantilever induces Zeeman-state transitions in the atoms. Interfacing cold atoms with mechanical devices could enable probing and manipulating atomic spins with nanometer spatial resolution and single-spin sensitivity, leading to new capabilities in quantum computation, quantum simulation, and precision sensing.

  12. Note: Aligned deposition and modal characterization of micron and submicron poly(methyl methacyrlate) fiber cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Nain, Amrinder S; Filiz, Sinan; Ozdoganlar, O Burak; Sitti, Metin; Amon, Cristina

    2010-01-01

    Polymeric micro-/nanofibers are finding increasing use as sensors for novel applications. Here, we demonstrate the ability to deposit an array of poly(methyl methacyrlate) fibers with micron and submicron diameters in aligned configurations on customized piezoelectric shakers. Using lateral motion of an atomic force microscope tip, fibers are broken to obtain fiber cantilevers of high aspect ratio (length/diameter > 20). The resonant frequencies of fabricated microfiber cantilevers are experimentally measured using a laser Doppler vibrometer. An average Young's modulus of 3.5 GPa and quality factor of 20 were estimated from the experimentally obtained frequency responses.

  13. Performance evaluation and parametric analysis on cantilevered ramp injector in supersonic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei; Li, Shi-bin; Yan, Li; Wang, Zhen-guo

    2013-03-01

    The cantilevered ramp injector is one of the most promising candidates for the mixing enhancement between the fuel and the supersonic air, and its parametric analysis has drawn an increasing attention of researchers. The flow field characteristics and the drag force of the cantilevered ramp injector in the supersonic flow with the freestream Mach number 2.0 have been investigated numerically, and the predicted injectant mole fraction and static pressure profiles have been compared with the available experimental data in the open literature. At the same time, the grid independency analysis has been performed by using the coarse, the moderate and the refined grid scales, and the influence of the turbulence model on the flow field of the cantilevered ramp injector has been carried on as well. Further, the effects of the swept angle, the ramp angle and the length of the step on the performance of the cantilevered ramp injector have been discussed subsequently. The obtained results show that the grid scale has only a slight impact on the flow field of the cantilevered ramp injector except in the region near the fuel injector, and the predicted results show reasonable agreement with the experimental data. Additionally, the turbulence model makes a slight difference to the numerical results, and the results obtained by the RNG k-ɛ and SST k-ω turbulence models are almost the same. The swept angle and the ramp angle have the same impact on the performance of the cantilevered ramp injector, and the kidney-shaped plume is formed with shorter distance with the increase of the swept and ramp angles. At the same time, the shape of the injectant mole fraction contour at X/H=6 goes through a transition from a peach-shaped plume to a kidney-shaped plume, and the cantilevered ramp injector with larger swept and ramp angles has the higher mixing efficiency and the larger drag force. The length of the step has only a slight impact on the drag force performance of the cantilevered

  14. Silicon cantilever sensor for micro-/nanoscale dimension and force metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peiner, Erwin; Doering, Lutz; Balke, Michael; Christ, Andreas

    2007-05-01

    A piezoresistive silicon cantilever-type tactile sensor was described as well as its application for dimensional metrology with micro components and as a transferable force standard in the micro-to-nano Newton range. As an example for tactile probing metrology the novel cantilever sensor was used for surface scanning with calibrated groove and roughness artifacts. Force metrology was addressed based on calibration procedures which were developed for commercial stylus instruments as well as for glass pipettes designed for the characterization of the vital forces of isolated cells.

  15. Characterization of a two-dimensional cantilever array with through-wafer electrical interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, Eugene M.; Yaralioglu, Goksen G.; Quate, Calvin F.; Kenny, Thomas W.

    2002-01-01

    The characterization of two-dimensional micromachined silicon cantilever arrays with integrated through-wafer electrical interconnects is presented. The approach addresses alignment and density issues associated with operating two-dimensional scanning probe arrays. The tungsten based interconnect (30 μm diameter, 1 Ω resistance) is shown not to degrade the sensitivity of the piezoresistive deflection sensor embedded on each cantilever. Operation of the array (up to 2×7) as a microscope for imaging large areas (3.8×0.45 mm2) and with vertical row stitching is demonstrated with images of samples orders of magnitude larger than images possible with standard atomic force microscope techniques.

  16. Large-signal model of a resonating cantilever-based transducer for system level electrical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verd, Jaume; Teva, Jordi; Abadal, Gabriel; Perez-Murano, Francesc; Esteve, Jaume; Barniol, Nuria

    2005-07-01

    In this work, we present a non-linear electromechanical model of an electrostatically excited cantilever that can be used to perform system level electrical simulations. This model is implemented by using an analog hardware description language (VHDL-AMS) that allows its use in a common IC CAD environment like CADENCE. Small-signal and large-signal simulations are performed and the results are compared with a simple linear model (RLC//C) showing the benefits of this model. This model is validated by its fit with the experimental results obtained from a monolithic sub-micrometer cantilever based sensor

  17. Detecting the golgi protein 73 of liver cancer with micro cantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thanh Tuyen Le, Thi; Pham, Van Tho; Nhat Khoa Phan, Thanh; Binh Pham, Van; Thao Le, Van; Hien Tong, Duy

    2014-12-01

    Golgi protein 73 (GP73) is a potential serum biomarker used in diagnosing human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Compared to alpha-fetoprotein, detection of GP73 is expected to give better sensitivity and specificity and thus offers a better method for diagnosis of HCC at an early stage. In this paper, silicon nitride microcantilever was used to detect GP73. The cantilever was modified through many steps to contain antibody of GP73. The result shows that the cantilever can be used as a label-free sensor to detect this kind of biomarker.

  18. Fast optical cooling of nanomechanical cantilever with the dynamical Zeeman effect.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian-Qi; Zhang, Shuo; Zou, Jin-Hua; Chen, Liang; Yang, Wen; Li, Yong; Feng, Mang

    2013-12-02

    We propose an efficient optical electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) cooling scheme for a cantilever with a nitrogen-vacancy center attached in a non-uniform magnetic field using dynamical Zeeman effect. In our scheme, the Zeeman effect combined with the quantum interference effect enhances the desired cooling transition and suppresses the undesired heating transitions. As a result, the cantilever can be cooled down to nearly the vibrational ground state under realistic experimental conditions within a short time. This efficient optical EIT cooling scheme can be reduced to the typical EIT cooling scheme under special conditions.

  19. Study of Effects of Sweep on the Flutter of Cantilever Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmby, J G; Cunningham, H J; Garrick, I E

    1951-01-01

    An experimental and analytical investigation of the flutter of sweptback cantilever wings is reported. The experiments employed groups of wings swept back by rotating and by shearing. The angle of sweep range from 0 degree to 60 degrees and Mach numbers extended to approximately 0.85. A theoretical analysis of the air forces on an oscillating swept wing of high length-chord ratio is developed, and the approximations inherent in the assumptions are discussed. Comparison with experiment indicates that the analysis developed in the present report is satisfactory for giving the main effects of sweep, at least for nearly uniform cantilever wings of high and moderate length-chord ratios.

  20. Apparatus for fixing latency

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Bartholomew, David B.; Moon, Justin; Koehler, Roger O.

    2009-09-08

    An apparatus for fixing computational latency within a deterministic region on a network comprises a network interface modem, a high priority module and at least one deterministic peripheral device. The network interface modem is in communication with the network. The high priority module is in communication with the network interface modem. The at least one deterministic peripheral device is connected to the high priority module. The high priority module comprises a packet assembler/disassembler, and hardware for performing at least one operation. Also disclosed is an apparatus for executing at least one instruction on a downhole device within a deterministic region, the apparatus comprising a control device, a downhole network, and a downhole device. The control device is near the surface of a downhole tool string. The downhole network is integrated into the tool string. The downhole device is in communication with the downhole network.

  1. Fixed Access Network Sharing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornaglia, Bruno; Young, Gavin; Marchetta, Antonio

    2015-12-01

    Fixed broadband network deployments are moving inexorably to the use of Next Generation Access (NGA) technologies and architectures. These NGA deployments involve building fiber infrastructure increasingly closer to the customer in order to increase the proportion of fiber on the customer's access connection (Fibre-To-The-Home/Building/Door/Cabinet… i.e. FTTx). This increases the speed of services that can be sold and will be increasingly required to meet the demands of new generations of video services as we evolve from HDTV to "Ultra-HD TV" with 4k and 8k lines of video resolution. However, building fiber access networks is a costly endeavor. It requires significant capital in order to cover any significant geographic coverage. Hence many companies are forming partnerships and joint-ventures in order to share the NGA network construction costs. One form of such a partnership involves two companies agreeing to each build to cover a certain geographic area and then "cross-selling" NGA products to each other in order to access customers within their partner's footprint (NGA coverage area). This is tantamount to a bi-lateral wholesale partnership. The concept of Fixed Access Network Sharing (FANS) is to address the possibility of sharing infrastructure with a high degree of flexibility for all network operators involved. By providing greater configuration control over the NGA network infrastructure, the service provider has a greater ability to define the network and hence to define their product capabilities at the active layer. This gives the service provider partners greater product development autonomy plus the ability to differentiate from each other at the active network layer.

  2. Solid-State Lighting: Cantilever Epitaxy Process Wins R&D 100 Award

    SciTech Connect

    2012-04-19

    Sandia National Laboratories received an R&D 100 Award from R&D Magazine for development of a new process for growing gallium nitride on an etched sapphire substrate. The process, called cantilever epitaxy, promises to make brighter and more efficient green, blue, and white LEDs.

  3. Asymmetric resonance frequency analysis of in-plane electrothermal silicon cantilevers for nanoparticle sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertke, Maik; Hamdana, Gerry; Wu, Wenze; Marks, Markus; Suryo Wasisto, Hutomo; Peiner, Erwin

    2016-10-01

    The asymmetric resonance frequency analysis of silicon cantilevers for a low-cost wearable airborne nanoparticle detector (Cantor) is described in this paper. The cantilevers, which are operated in the fundamental in-plane resonance mode, are used as a mass-sensitive microbalance. They are manufactured out of bulk silicon, containing a full piezoresistive Wheatstone bridge and an integrated thermal heater for reading the measurement output signal and stimulating the in-plane excitation, respectively. To optimize the sensor performance, cantilevers with different cantilever geometries are designed, fabricated and characterized. Besides the resonance frequency, the quality factor (Q) of the resonance curve has a high influence concerning the sensor sensitivity. Because of an asymmetric resonance behaviour, a novel fitting function and method to extract the Q is created, different from that of the simple harmonic oscillator (SHO). For testing the sensor in a long-term frequency analysis, a phase- locked loop (PLL) circuit is employed, yielding a frequency stability of up to 0.753 Hz at an Allan variance of 3.77 × 10-6. This proposed asymmetric resonance frequency analysis method is expected to be further used in the process development of the next-generation Cantor.

  4. Piezoresistive AFM cantilevers surpassing standard optical beam deflection in low noise topography imaging

    PubMed Central

    Dukic, Maja; Adams, Jonathan D.; Fantner, Georg E.

    2015-01-01

    Optical beam deflection (OBD) is the most prevalent method for measuring cantilever deflections in atomic force microscopy (AFM), mainly due to its excellent noise performance. In contrast, piezoresistive strain-sensing techniques provide benefits over OBD in readout size and the ability to image in light-sensitive or opaque environments, but traditionally have worse noise performance. Miniaturisation of cantilevers, however, brings much greater benefit to the noise performance of piezoresistive sensing than to OBD. In this paper, we show both theoretically and experimentally that by using small-sized piezoresistive cantilevers, the AFM imaging noise equal or lower than the OBD readout noise is feasible, at standard scanning speeds and power dissipation. We demonstrate that with both readouts we achieve a system noise of ≈0.3 Å at 20 kHz measurement bandwidth. Finally, we show that small-sized piezoresistive cantilevers are well suited for piezoresistive nanoscale imaging of biological and solid state samples in air. PMID:26574164

  5. Direct-write nanoscale printing of nanogranular tunnelling strain sensors for sub-micrometre cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Dukic, Maja; Winhold, Marcel; Schwalb, Christian H; Adams, Jonathan D; Stavrov, Vladimir; Huth, Michael; Fantner, Georg E

    2016-09-26

    The sensitivity and detection speed of cantilever-based mechanical sensors increases drastically through size reduction. The need for such increased performance for high-speed nanocharacterization and bio-sensing, drives their sub-micrometre miniaturization in a variety of research fields. However, existing detection methods of the cantilever motion do not scale down easily, prohibiting further increase in the sensitivity and detection speed. Here we report a nanomechanical sensor readout based on electron co-tunnelling through a nanogranular metal. The sensors can be deposited with lateral dimensions down to tens of nm, allowing the readout of nanoscale cantilevers without constraints on their size, geometry or material. By modifying the inter-granular tunnel-coupling strength, the sensors' conductivity can be tuned by up to four orders of magnitude, to optimize their performance. We show that the nanoscale printed sensors are functional on 500 nm wide cantilevers and that their sensitivity is suited even for demanding applications such as atomic force microscopy.

  6. Direct-write nanoscale printing of nanogranular tunnelling strain sensors for sub-micrometre cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dukic, Maja; Winhold, Marcel; Schwalb, Christian H.; Adams, Jonathan D.; Stavrov, Vladimir; Huth, Michael; Fantner, Georg E.

    2016-09-01

    The sensitivity and detection speed of cantilever-based mechanical sensors increases drastically through size reduction. The need for such increased performance for high-speed nanocharacterization and bio-sensing, drives their sub-micrometre miniaturization in a variety of research fields. However, existing detection methods of the cantilever motion do not scale down easily, prohibiting further increase in the sensitivity and detection speed. Here we report a nanomechanical sensor readout based on electron co-tunnelling through a nanogranular metal. The sensors can be deposited with lateral dimensions down to tens of nm, allowing the readout of nanoscale cantilevers without constraints on their size, geometry or material. By modifying the inter-granular tunnel-coupling strength, the sensors' conductivity can be tuned by up to four orders of magnitude, to optimize their performance. We show that the nanoscale printed sensors are functional on 500 nm wide cantilevers and that their sensitivity is suited even for demanding applications such as atomic force microscopy.

  7. Digital control of force microscope cantilevers using a field programmable gate array.

    PubMed

    Jacky, Jonathan P; Garbini, Joseph L; Ettus, Matthew; Sidles, John A

    2008-12-01

    This report describes a cantilever controller for magnetic resonance force microscopy based on a field programmable gate array, along with the hardware and software used to integrate the controller into an experiment. The controller is assembled from a low-cost commercially available software defined radio device and libraries of open-source software. The controller includes a digital filter comprising two cascaded second-order sections ("biquads"), which together can implement transfer functions for optimal cantilever controllers. An appendix in this report shows how to calculate filter coefficients for an optimal controller from measured cantilever characteristics. The controller also includes an input multiplexer and adder used in calibration protocols. Filter coefficients and multiplexer settings can be set and adjusted by control software while an experiment is running. The input is sampled at 64 MHz; the sampling frequency in the filters can be divided down under software control to achieve a good match with filter characteristics. Data reported here were sampled at 500 kHz, chosen for acoustic cantilevers with resonant frequencies near 8 kHz. Inputs are digitized with 12 bit resolution, and outputs are digitized with 14 bits. The experiment software is organized as a client and server to make it easy to adapt the controller to different experiments. The server encapsulates the details of controller hardware organization, connection technology, filter architecture, and number representation. The same server could be used in any experiment, while a different client encodes the particulars of each experiment.

  8. Piezoresistive AFM cantilevers surpassing standard optical beam deflection in low noise topography imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dukic, Maja; Adams, Jonathan D.; Fantner, Georg E.

    2015-11-01

    Optical beam deflection (OBD) is the most prevalent method for measuring cantilever deflections in atomic force microscopy (AFM), mainly due to its excellent noise performance. In contrast, piezoresistive strain-sensing techniques provide benefits over OBD in readout size and the ability to image in light-sensitive or opaque environments, but traditionally have worse noise performance. Miniaturisation of cantilevers, however, brings much greater benefit to the noise performance of piezoresistive sensing than to OBD. In this paper, we show both theoretically and experimentally that by using small-sized piezoresistive cantilevers, the AFM imaging noise equal or lower than the OBD readout noise is feasible, at standard scanning speeds and power dissipation. We demonstrate that with both readouts we achieve a system noise of ≈0.3 Å at 20 kHz measurement bandwidth. Finally, we show that small-sized piezoresistive cantilevers are well suited for piezoresistive nanoscale imaging of biological and solid state samples in air.

  9. Piezoresistive AFM cantilevers surpassing standard optical beam deflection in low noise topography imaging.

    PubMed

    Dukic, Maja; Adams, Jonathan D; Fantner, Georg E

    2015-11-17

    Optical beam deflection (OBD) is the most prevalent method for measuring cantilever deflections in atomic force microscopy (AFM), mainly due to its excellent noise performance. In contrast, piezoresistive strain-sensing techniques provide benefits over OBD in readout size and the ability to image in light-sensitive or opaque environments, but traditionally have worse noise performance. Miniaturisation of cantilevers, however, brings much greater benefit to the noise performance of piezoresistive sensing than to OBD. In this paper, we show both theoretically and experimentally that by using small-sized piezoresistive cantilevers, the AFM imaging noise equal or lower than the OBD readout noise is feasible, at standard scanning speeds and power dissipation. We demonstrate that with both readouts we achieve a system noise of ≈0.3 Å at 20 kHz measurement bandwidth. Finally, we show that small-sized piezoresistive cantilevers are well suited for piezoresistive nanoscale imaging of biological and solid state samples in air.

  10. Comparison of Five Topologies of Cantilever-based MEMS Piezoelectric Vibration Energy Harvesters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Y.; Seshia, A. A.

    2014-11-01

    In the realm of MEMS piezoelectric vibration energy harvesters, cantilever-based designs are by far the most popular. Despite being deceptively simple, the active piezoelectric area near the clamped end is able to accumulate maximum strain-generated-electrical-charge, while the free end is able to accommodate a proof mass without compromising the effective area of the piezoelectric generator since it experiences minimal strain anyway. While other contending designs do exist, this paper investigates five micro-cantilever (MC) topologies, namely: a plain MC, a tapered MC, a lined MC, a holed MC and a coupled MC, in order to assess their relative performance as an energy harvester. Although a classical straight and plain MC offers the largest active piezoelectric area, alternative MC designs can potentially offer higher average mechanical strain distribution for a given mechanical loading. Numerical simulation and experimental comparison of these 5 MCs (0.5 μ AlN on 10 μm Si) with the same practical dimensions of 500 μm and 2000 μm, suggest a cantilever with a coupled subsidiary cantilever yield the best power performance, closely followed by the classical plain topology.

  11. Direct-write nanoscale printing of nanogranular tunnelling strain sensors for sub-micrometre cantilevers

    PubMed Central

    Dukic, Maja; Winhold, Marcel; Schwalb, Christian H.; Adams, Jonathan D.; Stavrov, Vladimir; Huth, Michael; Fantner, Georg E.

    2016-01-01

    The sensitivity and detection speed of cantilever-based mechanical sensors increases drastically through size reduction. The need for such increased performance for high-speed nanocharacterization and bio-sensing, drives their sub-micrometre miniaturization in a variety of research fields. However, existing detection methods of the cantilever motion do not scale down easily, prohibiting further increase in the sensitivity and detection speed. Here we report a nanomechanical sensor readout based on electron co-tunnelling through a nanogranular metal. The sensors can be deposited with lateral dimensions down to tens of nm, allowing the readout of nanoscale cantilevers without constraints on their size, geometry or material. By modifying the inter-granular tunnel-coupling strength, the sensors' conductivity can be tuned by up to four orders of magnitude, to optimize their performance. We show that the nanoscale printed sensors are functional on 500 nm wide cantilevers and that their sensitivity is suited even for demanding applications such as atomic force microscopy. PMID:27666316

  12. High Performance Open Loop Control of Scanning with a Small Cylindrical Cantilever Beam.

    PubMed

    Kundrat, Matthew J; Reinhall, Per G; Lee, Cameron M; Seibel, Eric J

    2011-04-11

    The steady state response motion of a base excited cantilever beam with circular cross-section excited by a unidirectional displacement will fall along a straight line. However, achieving straight-line motion with a real cantilever beam of circular cross-section is difficult to accomplish. This is due to the fact that nonlinear effects, small deviations from circularity, asymmetric boundary conditions, and actuator cross coupling can induce whirling. The vast majority of previous work on cantilever beam whirling has focused on the effects of system nonlinearities. We show that whirling is a much broader problem in the design of resonant beam scanners in that the onset of whirling does not depend on large amplitude of motion. Rather, whirling is the norm in real systems due to small system asymmetries and actuator cross coupling. It is therefore necessary to control the growth of the whirling motion when a unidirectional beam motion is desired. We have developed a novel technique to identify the two eigen directions of the beam. Base excitation generated by virtual electrodes along these orthogonal eigen axes of the cantilever beam system generates tip vibration without whirl. This leads to accurate open loop control of the motion of the beam through the combined actuation of two pairs of orthogonally placed actuator electrodes.

  13. Flexural Vibration Test of a Cantilever Beam with a Force Sensor: Fast Determination of Young's Modulus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Digilov, Rafael M.

    2008-01-01

    We describe a simple and very inexpensive undergraduate laboratory experiment for fast determination of Young's modulus at moderate temperatures with the aid of a force sensor. A strip-shaped specimen rigidly bolted to the force sensor forms a clamped-free cantilever beam. Placed in a furnace, it is subjected to free-bending vibrations followed by…

  14. All-Optical Cantilever-Enhanced Photoacoustic Spectroscopy in the Open Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Wei; Zhu, Yong; Lin, Cheng; Tian, Li; Xu, Zhuwen; Nong, Jinpeng

    2015-06-01

    A novel all-optical cantilever-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy technique for trace gas detection in the open environment is proposed. A cantilever is set off-beam to "listen to" the photoacoustic signal, and an improved quadrature-point stabilization Fabry-Perot demodulation unit is used to pick up the vibration signal of the acoustic transducer instead of a complicated Michelson interferometer. The structure parameters of the cantilever are optimized to make the sensing system work more stably and reliably using a finite element method, which is then fabricated by surface micro-machining technology. Finally, related experiments are carried out to detect the absorption of water vapor at one atmosphere in the open environment. It was found that the normalized noise-equivalent absorption coefficient obtained by a traditional Fabry-Perot demodulation unit is , while that by a quadrature- point stabilization Fabry-Perot demodulation unit is , which indicates that the sensitivity is increased by a factor of 3.1 using improved cantilever-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy.

  15. A simulation of the performance of a self-tuning energy harvesting cantilever beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, J. L.; Bonello, P.; Alalwan, M.

    2016-09-01

    A vibration energy harvester is typically a cantilever beam made up of one or two layers of piezoelectric material that is clamped at one end to a vibrating host structure. The harvester is typically tuned to the frequency of the ambient vibration to ensure maximum power generation. One method to ensure that the system stays tuned in the presence of a varying frequency is to attach a mass to the cantilever and apply a control system to adjust its position along the cantilever according to the ambient frequency. This paper presents a simulation of the performance of such a system, based on a distributed parameter electromechanical model of the sliding-mass beam. A variety of control systems are used to adjust the position of the movable mass during operation and are compared for their efficacy in maintaining resonance over a varying excitation frequency. It was found that the resonance frequency of a bimorph cantilever VEH (Vibration Energy Harvester) could be successfully tuned over a wide frequency range. Moreover, it is also found that much of the voltage output reduction at higher frequencies could be compensated for by a separate control system used to adjust the capacitor load.

  16. SEMICONDUCTOR TECHNOLOGY Supercritical carbon dioxide process for releasing stuck cantilever beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hui; Chaoqun, Gao; Lei, Wang; Yupeng, Jing

    2010-10-01

    The multi-SCCO2 (supercritical carbon dioxide) release and dry process based on our specialized SCCO2 semiconductor process equipment is investigated and the releasing mechanism is discussed. The experiment results show that stuck cantilever beams were held up again under SCCO2 high pressure treatment and the repeatability of this process is nearly 100%.

  17. 16 CFR Figure 1 to Part 1512 - Bicycle Front Fork Cantilever Bending Test Rig

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Bicycle Front Fork Cantilever Bending Test Rig 1 Figure 1 to Part 1512 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BICYCLES Pt. 1512, Fig. 1 Figure 1 to Part 1512—Bicycle...

  18. 16 CFR Figure 1 to Part 1512 - Bicycle Front Fork Cantilever Bending Test Rig

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Bicycle Front Fork Cantilever Bending Test Rig 1 Figure 1 to Part 1512 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BICYCLES Pt. 1512, Fig. 1 Figure 1 to Part 1512—Bicycle...

  19. 16 CFR Figure 1 to Part 1512 - Bicycle Front Fork Cantilever Bending Test Rig

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Bicycle Front Fork Cantilever Bending Test Rig 1 Figure 1 to Part 1512 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BICYCLES Pt. 1512, Fig. 1 Figure 1 to Part 1512—Bicycle...

  20. 16 CFR Figure 1 to Part 1512 - Bicycle Front Fork Cantilever Bending Test Rig

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Bicycle Front Fork Cantilever Bending Test Rig 1 Figure 1 to Part 1512 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BICYCLES Pt. 1512, Fig. 1 Figure 1 to Part 1512—Bicycle...

  1. 16 CFR Figure 1 to Part 1512 - Bicycle Front Fork Cantilever Bending Test Rig

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Bicycle Front Fork Cantilever Bending Test Rig 1 Figure 1 to Part 1512 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR BICYCLES Pt. 1512, Fig. 1 Figure 1 to Part 1512—Bicycle...

  2. An analytic model for accurate spring constant calibration of rectangular atomic force microscope cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui; Ye, Hongfei; Zhang, Weisheng; Ma, Guojun; Su, Yewang

    2015-10-29

    Spring constant calibration of the atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever is of fundamental importance for quantifying the force between the AFM cantilever tip and the sample. The calibration within the framework of thin plate theory undoubtedly has a higher accuracy and broader scope than that within the well-established beam theory. However, thin plate theory-based accurate analytic determination of the constant has been perceived as an extremely difficult issue. In this paper, we implement the thin plate theory-based analytic modeling for the static behavior of rectangular AFM cantilevers, which reveals that the three-dimensional effect and Poisson effect play important roles in accurate determination of the spring constants. A quantitative scaling law is found that the normalized spring constant depends only on the Poisson's ratio, normalized dimension and normalized load coordinate. Both the literature and our refined finite element model validate the present results. The developed model is expected to serve as the benchmark for accurate calibration of rectangular AFM cantilevers.

  3. Configurable hot spot fixing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajiwara, Masanari; Kobayashi, Sachiko; Mashita, Hiromitsu; Aburada, Ryota; Furuta, Nozomu; Kotani, Toshiya

    2014-03-01

    Hot spot fixing (HSF) method has been used to fix many hot spots automatically. However, conventional HSF based on a biasing based modification is difficult to fix many hot spots under a low-k1 lithography condition. In this paper we proposed a new HSF, called configurable hotspot fixing system. The HSF has two major concepts. One is a new function to utilize vacant space around a hot spot by adding new patterns or extending line end edges around the hot spot. The other is to evaluate many candidates at a time generated by the new functions. We confirmed the proposed HSF improves 73% on the number of fixing hot spots and reduces total fixing time by 50% on a device layout equivalent to 28nm-node. The result shows the proposed HSF is effective for layouts under the low-k1 lithography condition.

  4. Pressure dependence of the quality factor of a micromachined cantilever in rarefied gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stifter, Michael; Sachse, Matthias; Sauter, Thilo; Hortschitz, Wilfried; Keplinger, Franz

    2012-05-01

    We present a study of the damping behavior of monocrystalline silicon cantilevers in different rarefied gas regimes. Mechanical quality factors Q were analyzed at controlled ambient pressures in the range of 0.01 Pa to 100 Pa. Emphasis was laid on the investigation of the fundamental vibration mode. Hence, the test structures were harmonically excited by the Lorentz force acting on the current carrying lead attached to the top surface of the cantilever. The micromachined clamped-free cantilevers featuring a length of 2 mm, a width of 1.5 mm and a thickness of 20 μm, were manufactured in SOI technology. The experimental results were compared with existing theories revealing an underestimate of the damping parameter for the Knudsen range Kn = 0.1 to 10. So far, squeeze-film damping by free molecular flow and kinetic damping were taken into account in damping models for the quasi-molecular regime. However, our measurements indicate that also the ongoing molecular flow around the test structures has to be considered. Hence the damping coefficient has to be calculated with methods of the free molecular aerodynamics. Thus, we used an algorithm based on the random walk model that allows the usage of already available knowledge in the field of Direct Simulation Monte Carlo. With this approach the quality factor of a squeezed-film damped cantilever in the quasi-molecular regime was derived. The results were compared with the most recent stochastic model, where the theoretical predictions and the experimental investigations indicate significant squeezing up to a Knudsen number of 10. In a superposition of both damping mechanisms, kinetic and squeeze-film damping, a satisfactory characterization of the damping behavior of an oscillating cantilever in the quasi-molecular regime with Knudsen numbers in the range of 10 down to 0.02 was achieved.

  5. Near-Field Acoustical Imaging using Lateral Bending Mode of Atomic Force Microscope Cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caron, A.; Rabe, U.; Rödel, J.; Arnold, W.

    Scanning probe microscopy techniques enable one to investigate surface properties such as contact stiffness and friction between the probe tip and a sample with nm resolution. So far the bending and the torsional eigenmodes of an atomic force microscope cantilever have been used to image variations of elasticity and shear elasticity, respectively. Such images are near-field images with the resolution given by the contact radius typically between 10 nm and 50 nm. We show that the flexural modes of a cantilever oscillating in the width direction and parallel to the sample surface can also be used for imaging. Additional to the dominant in-plane component of the oscillation, the lateral modes exhibit a vertical component as well, provided there is an asymmetry in the cross-section of the cantilever or in its suspension. The out-of-plane deflection renders the lateral modes detectable by the optical position sensors used in atomic force microscopes. We studied cracks which were generated by Vickers indents, in submicro- and nanocrystalline ZrO2. Images of the lateral contact stiffness were obtained by vibrating the cantilever close to a contact-resonance frequency. A change in contact stiffness causes a shift of the resonant frequency and hence a change of the cantilever vibration amplitude. The lateral contact-stiffness images close to the crack faces display a contrast that we attribute to altered elastic properties indicating a process zone. This could be caused by a stress-induced phase transformation during crack propagation. Using the contact mode of an atomic force microscope, we measured the crack-opening displacement as a function of distance from the crack tip, and we determined the crack-tip toughness Ktip. Furthermore, K1c was inferred from the length of radial cracks of Vickers indents that were measured using classical scanning acoustic microscopy

  6. An experimentally validated bimorph cantilever model for piezoelectric energy harvesting from base excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erturk, A.; Inman, D. J.

    2009-02-01

    Piezoelectric transduction has received great attention for vibration-to-electric energy conversion over the last five years. A typical piezoelectric energy harvester is a unimorph or a bimorph cantilever located on a vibrating host structure, to generate electrical energy from base excitations. Several authors have investigated modeling of cantilevered piezoelectric energy harvesters under base excitation. The existing mathematical modeling approaches range from elementary single-degree-of-freedom models to approximate distributed parameter solutions in the sense of Rayleigh-Ritz discretization as well as analytical solution attempts with certain simplifications. Recently, the authors have presented the closed-form analytical solution for a unimorph cantilever under base excitation based on the Euler-Bernoulli beam assumptions. In this paper, the analytical solution is applied to bimorph cantilever configurations with series and parallel connections of piezoceramic layers. The base excitation is assumed to be translation in the transverse direction with a superimposed small rotation. The closed-form steady state response expressions are obtained for harmonic excitations at arbitrary frequencies, which are then reduced to simple but accurate single-mode expressions for modal excitations. The electromechanical frequency response functions (FRFs) that relate the voltage output and vibration response to translational and rotational base accelerations are identified from the multi-mode and single-mode solutions. Experimental validation of the single-mode coupled voltage output and vibration response expressions is presented for a bimorph cantilever with a tip mass. It is observed that the closed-form single-mode FRFs obtained from the analytical solution can successfully predict the coupled system dynamics for a wide range of electrical load resistance. The performance of the bimorph device is analyzed extensively for the short circuit and open circuit resonance

  7. Characterization of piesoelectric ZnO thin films and the fabrication of piezoelectric micro-cantilevers

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Raegan Lynn

    2005-01-01

    In Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), a microcantilever is raster scanned across the surface of a sample in order to obtain a topographical image of the sample's surface. In a traditional, optical AFM, the sample rests on a bulk piezoelectric tube and a control loop is used to control the tip-sample separation by actuating the piezo-tube. This method has several disadvantages--the most noticeable one being that response time of the piezo-tube is rather long which leads to slow imaging speeds. One possible solution aimed at improving the speed of imaging is to incorporate a thin piezoelectric film on top of the cantilever beam. This design not only improves the speed of imaging because the piezoelectric film replaces the piezo-tube as an actuator, but the film can also act as a sensor. In addition, the piezoelectric film can excite the cantilever beam near its resonance frequency. This project aims to fabricate piezoelectric microcantilevers for use in the AFM. Prior to fabricating the cantilevers and also part of this project, a systematic study was performed to examine the effects of deposition conditions on the quality of piezoelectric ZnO thin films deposited by RF sputtering. These results will be presented. The deposition parameters that produced the highest quality ZnO film were used in the fabrication of the piezoelectric cantilevers. Unfortunately, the fabricated cantilevers warped due to the intrinsic stress of the ZnO film and were therefore not usable in the AFM. The complete fabrication process will be detailed, the results will be discussed and reasons for the warping will be examined.

  8. Molecularly imprinted polymer based micromechanical cantilever sensor system for the selective determination of ciprofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Okan, Meltem; Sari, Esma; Duman, Memed

    2017-02-15

    The main objective of this study is to develop molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) based micromechanical cantilever sensor system that has high specificity, fast response time and is easily applicable by user for the detection of ciprofloxacin (CPX) molecule in water resources. Highly specific CPX imprinted nanoparticles were synthesized by miniemulsion polymerization technique. The average size of the synthesized nanoparticles was measured about 160nm with high monodispersivity. Covalent and monolayer binding of the MIP nanoparticles on cantilevers was provided by EDC/NHS activation. Validation of the developed cantilever nanosensor was performed in air with dip-and-dry technique by employing the dynamic sensing mode. According to the results obtained, micromechanical cantilever sensor system worked linearly for the concentration range of 1.5-150.9μM. This concentration range resulted with 18.4-48.9pg mass load on the MIP modified cantilever. The sensitivity of the developed sensor was calculated as 2.6Hz/pg. To control the specificity of MIPs, a different antibiotic enrofloxacin (ENF), with a similar physical and chemical structure with CPX, was used, which showed 7 folds low binding affinity. The developed highly specific microcantilever sensor has a response time of approximately 2min and is reusable up to 4 times. The results indicate that the MIP based AFM nanosensor has high sensitivity for the CPX molecule. This combination of MIP nanoparticles with micromechanical sensors is one of the pioneer studies in the mass sensing applications. This fast, low cost and highly sensitive CPX specific MIP nanoparticle based nanosensor developed in this research have the potential to pave the way for further studies.

  9. Simple Robust Fixed Lag Smoothing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-02

    SIMPLE ROBUST FIXED LAG SMOOTHING by ~N. D. Le R.D. Martin 4 TECHNICAL RlEPORT No. 149 December 1988 Department of Statistics, GN-22 Accesion For...frLsD1ist Special A- Z Simple Robust Fixed Lag Smoothing With Application To Radar Glint Noise * N. D. Le R. D. Martin Department of Statistics, GN...smoothers. The emphasis here is on fixed-lag smoothing , as opposed to the use of existing robust fixed interval smoothers (e.g., as in Martin, 1979

  10. V-shaped metallic-wire cantilevers for combined atomic force microscopy and Fowler-Nordheim imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Charles A.; Workman, Richard K.; Yao, Xiaowei; Hunt, Jeffery P.; Sarid, Dror

    1998-12-01

    A method for fabricating V-shaped cantilevers from a flattened Pt/Ir metal wire for combined atomic force microscopy and Fowler-Nordheim imaging is described. These novel cantilevers have been found to be more robust then conventional ones used for scanning capacitance and magnetic force microscopy as their conductivity is maintained even after a large number of surface scans. The use of a V-shaped geometry improves on earlier single-beam geometries by reducing rms imaging noise. Characterization of these cantilevers and combined atomic force microscopy and Fowler-Nordheim images are reported.

  11. Electromechanical model of a resonating nano-cantilever-based sensor for high-resolution and high-sensitivity mass detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abadal, G.; Davis, Z. J.; Helbo, B.; Borrisé, X.; Ruiz, R.; Boisen, A.; Campabadal, F.; Esteve, J.; Figueras, E.; Pérez-Murano, F.; Barniol, N.

    2001-06-01

    A simple linear electromechanical model for an electrostatically driven resonating cantilever is derived. The model has been developed in order to determine dynamic quantities such as the capacitive current flowing through the cantilever-driver system at the resonance frequency, and it allows us to calculate static magnitudes such as position and voltage of collapse or the voltage versus deflection characteristic. The model is used to demonstrate the theoretical sensitivity on the attogram scale of a mass sensor based on a nanometre-scale cantilever, and to analyse the effect of an extra feedback loop in the control circuit to increase the Q factor.

  12. Optical and mechanical detection of near-field light by atomic force microscopy using a piezoelectric cantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satoh, Nobuo; Kobayashi, Kei; Watanabe, Shunji; Fujii, Toru; Matsushige, Kazumi; Yamada, Hirofumi

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we developed an atomic force microscopy (AFM) system with scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM) using a microfabricated force-sensing cantilever with a lead zirconate titanate (PZT) thin film. Both optical and mechanical detection techniques were adopted in SNOM to detect scattered light induced by the interaction of the PZT cantilever tip apex and evanescent light, and SNOM images were obtained for each detection scheme. The mechanical detection technique did allow for a clear observation of the light scattered from the PZT cantilever without the interference observed by the optical detection technique, which used an objective lens, a pinhole, and a photomultiplier tube.

  13. MEMS with integrated CMOS read-out circuit based on sub-micrometric cantilevers array for multiple sensing (Invited Paper)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villarroya, Maria; Verd, Jaume; Teva, Jordi; Abadal, Gabriel; Figueras, Eduard; Perez-Murano, Francesc; Esteve, Jaume; Barniol, Nuria

    2005-07-01

    A Micro Electro Mechanical System (MEMS) for mass detection is presented. It has been developed by the monolithic integration of the mechanical transducer with the CMOS control circuit. The sensor transducer consists on an array of four resonating cantilevers; oscillation is achieved by electrostatic excitation. The independent control on each cantilever of the arrays allows multiple sensing on a single device. The microresonators are fabricated on polysilicon in a compatibilized process with the front-end CMOS circuitry. The readout of the cantilevers oscillation is achieved by a current amplifier. Expected Mass resolution in air is 80 ag/Hz.

  14. Note: Determination of torsional spring constant of atomic force microscopy cantilevers: combining normal spring constant and classical beam theory.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Asencio, R; Thormann, E; Rutland, M W

    2013-09-01

    A technique has been developed for the calculation of torsional spring constants for AFM cantilevers based on the combination of the normal spring constant and plate/beam theory. It is easy to apply and allow the determination of torsional constants for stiff cantilevers where the thermal power spectrum is difficult to obtain due to the high resonance frequency and low signal/noise ratio. The applicability is shown to be general and this simple approach can thus be used to obtain torsional constants for any beam shaped cantilever.

  15. Fixed points of quantum gravity.

    PubMed

    Litim, Daniel F

    2004-05-21

    Euclidean quantum gravity is studied with renormalization group methods. Analytical results for a nontrivial ultraviolet fixed point are found for arbitrary dimensions and gauge fixing parameters in the Einstein-Hilbert truncation. Implications for quantum gravity in four dimensions are discussed.

  16. Precise and direct method for the measurement of the torsion spring constant of the atomic force microscopy cantilevers

    SciTech Connect

    Jarząbek, D. M.

    2015-01-15

    A direct method for the evaluation of the torsional spring constants of the atomic force microscope cantilevers is presented in this paper. The method uses a nanoindenter to apply forces at the long axis of the cantilever and in the certain distance from it. The torque vs torsion relation is then evaluated by the comparison of the results of the indentations experiments at different positions on the cantilever. Next, this relation is used for the precise determination of the torsional spring constant of the cantilever. The statistical analysis shows that the standard deviation of the calibration measurements is equal to approximately 1%. Furthermore, a simple method for calibration of the photodetector’s lateral response is proposed. The overall procedure of the lateral calibration constant determination has the accuracy approximately equal to 10%.

  17. SU-8 Cantilevers for Bio/chemical Sensing; Fabrication, Characterisation and Development of Novel Read-out Methods

    PubMed Central

    Nordström, Maria; Keller, Stephan; Lillemose, Michael; Johansson, Alicia; Dohn, Søren; Haefliger, Daniel; Blagoi, Gabriela; Havsteen-Jakobsen, Mogens; Boisen, Anja

    2008-01-01

    Here, we present the activities within our research group over the last five years with cantilevers fabricated in the polymer SU-8. We believe that SU-8 is an interesting polymer for fabrication of cantilevers for bio/chemical sensing due to its simple processing and low Young's modulus. We show examples of different integrated read-out methods and their characterisation. We also show that SU-8 cantilevers have a reduced sensitivity to changes in the environmental temperature and pH of the buffer solution. Moreover, we show that the SU-8 cantilever surface can be functionalised directly with receptor molecules for analyte detection, thereby avoiding gold-thiol chemistry. PMID:27879783

  18. Design and analysis of a self-biased broadband magnetoelectric cantilever operated at multi-frequency windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, J. N.; Xin, C. Z.; Ma, J.; Lin, Y. H.; Nan, C. W.

    2017-03-01

    Magnetoelectric (ME) composites with self-biased and wide resonance frequency band properties are promising candidates for magnetic field sensor and energy harvester. Here, we present a ME cantilever by in-series connecting a few SrFe12O19/Metglas/Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 components. Due to the in-built magnetic bias of SrFe12O19, the ME cantilever shows self-biased property. Meanwhile, by merging the resonance responses of the in-series ME components together, the ME cantilever presents multi-wide resonance bands (i.e., 500 Hz ˜ 700 Hz, 3.3 kHz ˜ 4.4 kHz and 44 kHz ˜ 70 kHz). In these three wide frequency windows, the ME voltage coefficients (α V) of the ME cantilever are higher than 40 mV/Oe, 115 mV/Oe and 400 mV/Oe, respectively.

  19. Investigation of the Frequency Shift of a SAD Circuit Loop and the Internal Micro-Cantilever in a Gas Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Liu; Zhao, Jiahao; Yu, Shijie; Li, Peng; You, Zheng

    2010-01-01

    Micro-cantilever sensors for mass detection using resonance frequency have attracted considerable attention over the last decade in the field of gas sensing. For such a sensing system, an oscillator circuit loop is conventionally used to actuate the micro-cantilever, and trace the frequency shifts. In this paper, gas experiments are introduced to investigate the mechanical resonance frequency shifts of the micro-cantilever within the circuit loop(mechanical resonance frequency, MRF) and resonating frequency shifts of the electric signal in the oscillator circuit (system working frequency, SWF). A silicon beam with a piezoelectric zinc oxide layer is employed in the experiment, and a Self-Actuating-Detecting (SAD) circuit loop is built to drive the micro-cantilever and to follow the frequency shifts. The differences between the two resonating frequencies and their shifts are discussed and analyzed, and a coefficient α related to the two frequency shifts is confirmed. PMID:22163588

  20. Mass determination and sensitivity based on resonance frequency changes of the higher flexural modes of cantilever sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkin, John D.; Hähner, Georg

    2011-03-01

    Micro- and nanocantilevers are increasingly employed as mass sensors. Most studies consider the first flexural mode and adsorbed masses that are either discretely attached or homogeneously distributed along the entire length of the cantilever. We derive general expressions that allow for the determination of the total attached mass with any mass distribution along the cantilever length and all flexural modes. The expressions are valid for all cantilevers whose flexural deflection can be described by a one-dimensional function. This approach includes the most common types of microcantilevers, namely, rectangular, picket, and V-shaped. The theoretical results are compared with experimental data up to the fourth flexural mode obtained from thermal noise spectra of rectangular and V-shaped cantilevers.

  1. Sensitivity analysis of rectangular atomic force microscope cantilevers immersed in liquids based on the modified couple stress theory.

    PubMed

    Lee, Haw-Long; Chang, Win-Jin

    2016-01-01

    The modified couple stress theory is adopted to study the sensitivity of a rectangular atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilever immersed in acetone, water, carbon tetrachloride (CCl4), and 1-butanol. The theory contains a material length scale parameter and considers the size effect in the analysis. However, this parameter is difficult to obtain via experimental measurements. In this study, a conjugate gradient method for the parameter estimation of the frequency equation is presented. The optimal method provides a quantitative approach for estimating the material length scale parameter based on the modified couple stress theory. The results show that the material length scale parameter of the AFM cantilever immersed in acetone, CCl4, water, and 1-butanol is 0, 25, 116.3, and 471 nm, respectively. In addition, the vibration sensitivities of the AFM cantilever immersed in these liquids are investigated. The results are useful for the design of AFM cantilevers immersed in liquids.

  2. Comparing AFM cantilever stiffness measured using the thermal vibration and the improved thermal vibration methods with that of an SI traceable method based on MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, Uwe; Gao, Sai; Engl, Wolfgang; Sulzbach, Thomas; Stahl, Stefan W.; Milles, Lukas F.; Nesterov, Vladimir; Li, Zhi

    2017-03-01

    PTB has developed a new contact based method for the traceable calibration of the normal stiffness of AFM cantilevers in the range from 0.03 N m‑1 to 300 N m‑1 to the SI units based on micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) actuators. This method is evaluated by comparing the measured cantilever stiffness with that measured by PTB’s new primary nanonewton force facility and by PTB’s microforce measuring device. The MEMS system was used to calibrate the stiffness of cantilevers in two case studies. One set of cantilevers for applications in biophysics was calibrated using the well-known thermal vibration method and the second set of cantilevers was calibrated by a cantilever manufacturer who applied an improved thermal vibration method based on calibrated reference cantilevers for the cantilever stiffness calibration. The comparison revealed a stiffness deviation of  +7.7% for the cantilevers calibrated using the thermal vibration method and a deviation of  +6.9% for the stiffnesses of the cantilevers calibrated using the improved thermal vibration method.

  3. Fixed drug eruption to sitagliptin.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Mrinal; Gupta, Anish

    2015-01-01

    Fixed drug eruption is a common adverse effect seen with various drugs notably antibiotics, antiepileptics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Herein we report a case of Sitagliptin induced fixed drug eruption in a 46 year old female who developed circumscribed, erythematous macules all over the body within one week of initiation of Sitagliptin. The lesions resolved with residual hyperpigmentation on cessation of the drug. The diagnosis was confirmed by an oral provocation test which led to a reactivation of the lesions. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of fixed drug eruption to Sitagliptin reported in the literature.

  4. Fixed drug eruption to propofol.

    PubMed

    Allchurch, L G V; Crilly, H

    2014-11-01

    We present a case of fixed drug eruption to propofol following a series of sedations of a patient for a number of day case procedures. The patient experienced oedema and blistering of his penis, increasing in severity and duration following each subsequent exposure. The diagnosis was confirmed by punch biopsy following an intravenous challenge test with propofol. Whilst reports of fixed drug eruptions to anaesthetic induction agents are uncommon, a number of drugs used commonly by anaesthetists are known triggers. We discuss fixed drug eruptions in relation to anaesthetic practice, aiming to raise awareness of this adverse drug reaction.

  5. High speed tapping mode atomic force microscopy in liquid using an insulated piezoelectric cantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, B.; Sulchek, T.; Murray, K.; York, D.; Jones, M.; Manning, L.; Malekos, S.; Beneschott, B.; Adams, J. D.; Cavazos, H.; Minne, S. C.

    2003-11-01

    Quicker imaging times for tapping mode atomic force microscopy in liquid could provide a real-time imaging tool for studying dynamic phenomena in physiological conditions. We demonstrate faster imaging speed using microcantilevers with integrated piezoelectric actuators. The exposed electric components of the cantilever necessitate an insulation scheme for use in liquid; three coating schemes have been tested. Preliminary tapping mode images have been taken using the insulated microactuator to simultaneously vibrate and actuate the cantilever over topographical features in liquid, including a high speed image of steps on a mica surface in water and an image of two e coli bacteria taken in saline solution at 75.5 μm/s, a threefold improvement in bandwidth versus conventional piezotube actuators.

  6. Clustering mechanism of ethanol-water mixtures investigated with photothermal microfluidic cantilever deflection spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoraishi, M. S.; Hawk, J. E.; Phani, Arindam; Khan, M. F.; Thundat, T.

    2016-04-01

    The infrared-active (IR) vibrational mode of ethanol (EtOH) associated with the asymmetrical stretching of the C-C-O bond in pico-liter volumes of EtOH-water binary mixtures is calorimetrically measured using photothermal microfluidic cantilever deflection spectroscopy (PMCDS). IR absorption by the confined liquid results in wavelength dependent cantilever deflections, thus providing a complementary response to IR absorption revealing a complex dipole moment dependence on mixture concentration. Solvent-induced blue shifts of the C-C-O asymmetric vibrational stretch for both anti and gauche conformers of EtOH were precisely monitored for EtOH concentrations ranging from 20–100% w/w. Variations in IR absorption peak maxima show an inverse dependence on induced EtOH dipole moment (μ) and is attributed to the complex clustering mechanism of EtOH-water mixtures.

  7. A method to measure cellular adhesion utilizing a polymer micro-cantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaitas, Angelo; Malhotra, Ricky; Pienta, Kenneth

    2013-09-01

    In the present study we engineered a micro-machined polyimide cantilever with an embedded sensing element to investigate cellular adhesion, in terms of its relative ability to stick to a cross-linker, 3,3'-dithiobis[sulfosuccinimidylpropionate], coated on the cantilever surface. To achieve this objective, we investigated adhesive properties of three human prostate cancer cell lines, namely, a bone metastasis derived human prostate cancer cell line (PC3), a brain metastasis derived human prostate cancer cell line (DU145), and a subclone of PC3 (PC3-EMT14). We found that PC3-EMT14, which displays a mesenchymal phenotype, has the least adhesion compared to PC3 and DU145, which exhibit an epithelial phenotype.

  8. Multi-resonant wideband energy harvester based on a folded asymmetric M-shaped cantilever

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Meng; Mao, Haiyang; Li, Zhigang; Liu, Ruiwen; Ming, Anjie; Ou, Yi; Ou, Wen

    2015-07-15

    This article reports a compact wideband piezoelectric vibration energy harvester consisting of three proof masses and an asymmetric M-shaped cantilever. The M-shaped beam comprises a main beam and two folded and dimension varied auxiliary beams interconnected through the proof mass at the end of the main cantilever. Such an arrangement constitutes a three degree-of-freedom vibrating body, which can tune the resonant frequencies of its first three orders close enough to obtain a utility wide bandwidth. The finite element simulation results and the experimental results are well matched. The operation bandwidth comprises three adjacent voltage peaks on account of the frequency interval shortening mechanism. The result shows that the proposed piezoelectric energy harvester could be efficient and adaptive in practical vibration circumstance based on multiple resonant modes.

  9. A virtual instrument to standardise the calibration of atomic force microscope cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sader, John E.; Borgani, Riccardo; Gibson, Christopher T.; Haviland, David B.; Higgins, Michael J.; Kilpatrick, Jason I.; Lu, Jianing; Mulvaney, Paul; Shearer, Cameron J.; Slattery, Ashley D.; Thorén, Per-Anders; Tran, Jim; Zhang, Heyou; Zhang, Hongrui; Zheng, Tian

    2016-09-01

    Atomic force microscope (AFM) users often calibrate the spring constants of cantilevers using functionality built into individual instruments. This calibration is performed without reference to a global standard, hindering the robust comparison of force measurements reported by different laboratories. Here, we describe a virtual instrument (an internet-based initiative) whereby users from all laboratories can instantly and quantitatively compare their calibration measurements to those of others—standardising AFM force measurements—and simultaneously enabling non-invasive calibration of AFM cantilevers of any geometry. This global calibration initiative requires no additional instrumentation or data processing on the part of the user. It utilises a single website where users upload currently available data. A proof-of-principle demonstration of this initiative is presented using measured data from five independent laboratories across three countries, which also allows for an assessment of current calibration.

  10. Increasing Energy-harvesting ability of piezoelectric unimorph cantilevers using Spring Supports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyung Bum; Nahm, San; Sung, Tae Hyun; Paik, Jong Hoo; Kim, Hyoung Jae

    2016-06-01

    We fabricated a spring-supported piezoelectric unimorph cantilever (SPUC) with enhanced energy-harvesting characteristics by using a 0.69Pb(Zr0.47Ti0.53)O3-0.31Pb(Ni0.6Zn0.4)1/3Nb2/3)O3 + CuO (0.5 mol%) thick film sintered at 950 °C; a spring having a spring constant of 14,320 N/m was used as the cantilever support. The SPUC could generate an output power as high as 29 mW with a spring constant of 14,320 N/m across a resistance of 150 kΩ; this corresponded to a power density of 34 mW/cm3. We, therefore, that the thus-fabricated SPUCs when supported by a spring can harvest increased levels of energy.

  11. Natural vibrations of shear deformable cantilevered skewed trapezoidal and triangular thick plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGee, O. G.; Butalia, T. S.

    1992-12-01

    The efficacy of higher-order shear deformable, C exp 0, continuous, Lagrangian isoparametric plate finite element analyses has been demonstrated on cantilevered skewed (parallelogram) thick plates. The present work extends the method to include skewed thick plates having trapezoidal and triangular planforms. Extensive and accurate nondimensional frequency tables and graphical charts are presented for a series of trapezoidal plates showing the effect of aspect ratio, chord ratio, thickness ratio, and skew angle. The need for the present higher-order shear deformable plate finite element method for skewed trapezoidal plate vibrations increases as the skew angle increases and as the aspect ratio, chord ratio, and thickness ratio decreases. Some theoretical and experimental data hitherto published for delta and skewed triangular cantilevered plates are compared with results obtained using the present finite element method.

  12. Note: A high-performance, low-cost laser shutter using a piezoelectric cantilever actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowden, W.; Hill, I. R.; Baird, P. E. G.; Gill, P.

    2017-01-01

    We report the design and characterization of an optical shutter based on a piezoelectric cantilever. Compared to conventional electro-magnetic shutters, the device has intrinsically low power and is acoustically quiet. The cantilever position is controlled by a high-voltage op-amp circuit for easy tuning of the range of travel, and mechanical slew rate, which enables a factor of 30 reduction in mechanical noise compared to a rapidly switched device. We achieve shuttering rise and fall times of 11 μs, corresponding to mechanical slew rates of 1.3 ms-1, with a timing jitter of less than 1 μs. When used to create optical pulses, we achieve minimum pulse durations of 250 μs. The reliability of the shutter was investigated by operating continuously for one week at 10 Hz switching rate. After this period, neither the shutter delay or actuation speed had changed by a measurable amount.

  13. Modeling and simulation of the bending behavior of electrically-stimulated cantilevered hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attaran, Abdolhamid; Brummund, Jörg; Wallmersperger, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    A systematic development of a chemo-electro-mechanical continuum model—for the application of electrically-stimulated cantilevered hydrogels—and its numerical implementation are presented in this work. The governing equations are derived within the framework of the continuum mechanics of mixtures. The finite element method is then utilized for the numerical treatment of the model. For the numerical simulation a cantilevered strip of an anionic hydrogel immersed in a NaCl solution bath is considered. An electric field is applied to electrically stimulate the aforementioned hydrogel. The application of the electric field alters the initial concentrations of the ionic species due to the chemo-electrical coupling. The gradual increase in the applied electric field leads to the bending movement of the hydrogel. Concluding, the presented multi-field continuum model is capable of simulating hydrogel bending actuators and also more complex systems e.g. gel finger grippers.

  14. Numerical analysis of dynamic force spectroscopy using the torsional harmonic cantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solares, Santiago D.; Hölscher, Hendrik

    2010-02-01

    A spectral analysis method has been recently introduced by Stark et al (2002 Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 99 8473-8) and implemented by Sahin et al (2007 Nat. Nanotechnol. 2 507-14) using a T-shaped cantilever design, the torsional harmonic cantilever (THC), which is capable of performing simultaneous tapping-mode atomic force microscopy imaging and force spectroscopy. Here we report on numerical simulations of the THC system using a simple dual-mass flexural-torsional model, which is applied in combination with Fourier data processing software to illustrate the spectroscopy process for quality factors corresponding to liquid, air and vacuum environments. We also illustrate the acquisition of enhanced topographical images and deformed surface contours under the application of uniform forces, and compare the results to those obtained with a previously reported linear dual-spring-mass model.

  15. An Euler-Bernoulli second strain gradient beam theory for cantilever sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiot, F.

    2013-04-01

    This paper derives an Euler-Bernoulli beam theory for isotropic elastic materials based on a second strain gradient description. As such a description has been proved to allow for the definition of surface tension for solids, the equations satisfied by a beam featuring a through-thickness cohesion modulus gradient are established in order to describe the behaviour of micro cantilever sensors. Closed-form solutions are given for mechanical and chemical loadings. It is then shown that the involved material parameters seem virtually identifiable from full-field measurements and that the shape of the displacement field resulting from a chemical loading depends on the cantilever's thickness as well as on the material parameters. This makes such a theory potentially able to explain some of the experimental results found in the literature.

  16. Development of low noise cantilever deflection sensor for multienvironment frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuma, Takeshi; Kimura, Masayuki; Kobayashi, Kei; Matsushige, Kazumi; Yamada, Hirofumi

    2005-05-01

    We have developed a low noise cantilever deflection sensor with a deflection noise density of 17fm/√Hz by optimizing the parameters used in optical beam deflection (OBD) method. Using this sensor, we have developed a multienvironment frequency-modulation atomic force microscope (FM-AFM) that can achieve true molecular resolution in various environments such as in moderate vacuum, air, and liquid. The low noise characteristic of the deflection sensor makes it possible to obtain a maximum frequency sensitivity limited by the thermal Brownian motion of the cantilever in every environment. In this paper, the major noise sources in OBD method are discussed in both theoretical and experimental aspects. The excellent noise performance of the deflection sensor is demonstrated in deflection and frequency measurements. True molecular-resolution FM-AFM images of a polydiacetylene single crystal taken in vacuum, air, and water are presented.

  17. Enhancement of Frequency Stability Using Synchronization of a Cantilever Array for MEMS-Based Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Francesc; Uranga, Arantxa; Riverola, Martí; Sobreviela, Guillermo; Barniol, Núria

    2016-01-01

    Micro and nano electromechanical resonators have been widely used as single or multiple-mass detection sensors. Smaller devices with higher resonance frequencies and lower masses offer higher mass responsivities but suffer from lower frequency stability. Synchronization phenomena in multiple MEMS resonators have become an important issue because they allow frequency stability improvement, thereby preserving mass responsivity. The authors present an array of five cantilevers (CMOS-MEMS system) that are forced to vibrate synchronously to enhance their frequency stability. The frequency stability has been determined in closed-loop configuration for long periods of time by calculating the Allan deviation. An Allan deviation of 0.013 ppm (@ 1 s averaging time) for a 1 MHz cantilever array MEMS system was obtained at the synchronized mode, which represents a 23-fold improvement in comparison with the non-synchronized operation mode (0.3 ppm). PMID:27754377

  18. Measuring the resonant vibration of a sessile droplet using MEMS based cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Thanh-Vinh; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Shimoyama, Isao

    2015-11-01

    We directly measure the normal force distribution on the contact area during the 1st mode resonant vibration of a droplet using an array of MEMS based cantilever. The measurement result shows that the normal force change is the largest at the periphery of the contact area. The ratio between the amplitude of the normal force change at the periphery of the contact area over that at the center of the contact area was approximately 20 times, in the case of 1.8 μL water droplet whose equilibrium contact angle is 140 degrees. We also demonstrate a method to estimate viscosity based on the measurement of the droplet vibration using MEMS cantilevers. The proposed method is able to estimate viscosity using less than 3 μL sample and has a simple operating principle. We believe that this method is suitable for point-of-care testing and characterization of chemical and biological solutions.

  19. Clustering mechanism of ethanol-water mixtures investigated with photothermal microfluidic cantilever deflection spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ghoraishi, M. S.; Hawk, J. E.; Phani, Arindam; Khan, M. F.; Thundat, T.

    2016-01-01

    The infrared-active (IR) vibrational mode of ethanol (EtOH) associated with the asymmetrical stretching of the C-C-O bond in pico-liter volumes of EtOH-water binary mixtures is calorimetrically measured using photothermal microfluidic cantilever deflection spectroscopy (PMCDS). IR absorption by the confined liquid results in wavelength dependent cantilever deflections, thus providing a complementary response to IR absorption revealing a complex dipole moment dependence on mixture concentration. Solvent-induced blue shifts of the C-C-O asymmetric vibrational stretch for both anti and gauche conformers of EtOH were precisely monitored for EtOH concentrations ranging from 20–100% w/w. Variations in IR absorption peak maxima show an inverse dependence on induced EtOH dipole moment (μ) and is attributed to the complex clustering mechanism of EtOH-water mixtures. PMID:27046089

  20. High-speed force mapping on living cells with a small cantilever atomic force microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Braunsmann, Christoph; Seifert, Jan; Rheinlaender, Johannes; Schäffer, Tilman E.

    2014-07-15

    The imaging speed of the wide-spread force mapping mode for quantitative mechanical measurements on soft samples in liquid with the atomic force microscope (AFM) is limited by the bandwidth of the z-scanner and viscous drag forces on the cantilever. Here, we applied high-speed, large scan-range atomic force microscopy and small cantilevers to increase the speed of force mapping by ≈10−100 times. This allowed resolving dynamic processes on living mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Cytoskeleton reorganization during cell locomotion, growth of individual cytoskeleton fibers, cell blebbing, and the formation of endocytic pits in the cell membrane were observed. Increasing the force curve rate from 2 to 300 Hz increased the measured apparent Young's modulus of the cells by about 10 times, which facilitated force mapping measurements at high speed.

  1. A virtual instrument to standardise the calibration of atomic force microscope cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Sader, John E; Borgani, Riccardo; Gibson, Christopher T; Haviland, David B; Higgins, Michael J; Kilpatrick, Jason I; Lu, Jianing; Mulvaney, Paul; Shearer, Cameron J; Slattery, Ashley D; Thorén, Per-Anders; Tran, Jim; Zhang, Heyou; Zhang, Hongrui; Zheng, Tian

    2016-09-01

    Atomic force microscope (AFM) users often calibrate the spring constants of cantilevers using functionality built into individual instruments. This calibration is performed without reference to a global standard, hindering the robust comparison of force measurements reported by different laboratories. Here, we describe a virtual instrument (an internet-based initiative) whereby users from all laboratories can instantly and quantitatively compare their calibration measurements to those of others-standardising AFM force measurements-and simultaneously enabling non-invasive calibration of AFM cantilevers of any geometry. This global calibration initiative requires no additional instrumentation or data processing on the part of the user. It utilises a single website where users upload currently available data. A proof-of-principle demonstration of this initiative is presented using measured data from five independent laboratories across three countries, which also allows for an assessment of current calibration.

  2. Aeroelastic Flutter Behavior of a Cantilever and Elastically Mounted Plate within a Nozzle-Diffuser Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosi, Luis Phillipe; Colonius, Tim; Lee, Hyeong Jae; Sherrit, Stewart; Jet Propulsion Laboratory Collaboration; California Institute of Technology Collaboration

    2016-11-01

    Aeroelastic flutter arises when the motion of a structure and its surrounding flowing fluid are coupled in a constructive manner, causing large amplitudes of vibration in the immersed solid. A cantilevered beam in axial flow within a nozzle-diffuser geometry exhibits interesting resonance behavior that presents good prospects for internal flow energy harvesting. Different modes can be excited as a function of throat velocity, nozzle geometry, fluid and cantilever material parameters. Similar behavior has been also observed in elastically mounted rigid plates, enabling new designs for such devices. This work explores the relationship between the aeroelastic flutter instability boundaries and relevant non-dimensional parameters via experiments, numerical, and stability analyses. Parameters explored consist of a non-dimensional stiffness, a non-dimensional mass, non-dimensional throat size, and Reynolds number. A map of the system response in this parameter space may serve as a guide to future work concerning possible electrical output and failure prediction in harvesting devices.

  3. Catalyst-induced growth of carbon nanotubes on tips of cantilevers and nanowires

    DOEpatents

    Lee, James Weifu; Lowndes, Douglas H.; Merkulov, Vladimir I.; Eres, Gyula; Wei, Yayi; Greenbaum, Elias; Lee, Ida

    2004-06-29

    A method is described for catalyst-induced growth of carbon nanotubes, nanofibers, and other nanostructures on the tips of nanowires, cantilevers, conductive micro/nanometer structures, wafers and the like. The method can be used for production of carbon nanotube-anchored cantilevers that can significantly improve the performance of scaning probe microscopy (AFM, EFM etc). The invention can also be used in many other processes of micro and/or nanofabrication with carbon nanotubes/fibers. Key elements of this invention include: (1) Proper selection of a metal catalyst and programmable pulsed electrolytic deposition of the desired specific catalyst precisely at the tip of a substrate, (2) Catalyst-induced growth of carbon nanotubes/fibers at the catalyst-deposited tips, (3) Control of carbon nanotube/fiber growth pattern by manipulation of tip shape and growth conditions, and (4) Automation for mass production.

  4. Experimental characterization of cantilever-type piezoelectric generator operating at resonance for vibration energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanini, Roberto; Quattrocchi, Antonino

    2016-06-01

    A cantilever-type resonant piezoelectric generator (RPG) has been designed by gluing a PZT patch working in d31 mode onto a glass fibre reinforced composite cantilever beam with a discrete mass applied on its free end. The electrical and dynamic behaviour of the RPG prototype has been investigated by carrying out laboratory tests aimed to assess the effect of definite design parameters, specifically the electric resistance load and the excitation frequency. Results showed that an optimum resistance load exists, at which power generation is maximized. Moreover, it has been showed that power generation is strongly influenced by the vibration frequency highlighting that, at resonance, output power can be increased by more than one order of magnitude. Possible applications include inertial resonant harvester for energy recovery from vibrating machines, sea waves or wind flux and self-powering of wireless sensor nodes.

  5. Device for filamentous fungi growth monitoring using the multimodal frequency response of cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloney, N.; Lukacs, G.; Ball, S. L.; Hegner, M.

    2014-01-01

    Filamentous fungi cause opportunistic infections in hospital patients. A fast assay to detect viable spores is of great interest. We present a device that is capable of monitoring fungi growth in real time via the dynamic operation of cantilevers in an array. The ability to detect minute frequency shifts for higher order flexural resonance modes is demonstrated using hydrogel functionalised cantilevers. The use of higher order resonance modes sees the sensor dependent mass responsivity enhanced by a factor of 13 in comparison to measurements utilizing the fundamental resonance mode only. As a proof of principle measurement, Aspergillus niger growth is monitored using the first two flexural resonance modes. The detection of single spore growth within 10 h is reported for the first time. The ability to detect and monitor the growth of single spores, within a small time frame, is advantageous in both clinical and industrial settings.

  6. Computational model for noncontact atomic force microscopy: energy dissipation of cantilever.

    PubMed

    Senda, Yasuhiro; Blomqvist, Janne; Nieminen, Risto M

    2016-09-21

    We propose a computational model for noncontact atomic force microscopy (AFM) in which the atomic force between the cantilever tip and the surface is calculated using a molecular dynamics method, and the macroscopic motion of the cantilever is modeled by an oscillating spring. The movement of atoms in the tip and surface is connected with the oscillating spring using a recently developed coupling method. In this computational model, the oscillation energy is dissipated, as observed in AFM experiments. We attribute this dissipation to the hysteresis and nonconservative properties of the interatomic force that acts between the atoms in the tip and sample surface. The dissipation rate strongly depends on the parameters used in the computational model.

  7. Fabrication of cantilever probes with integrated piezoresistive read-out and built-in piezoelectric actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Steve; Altemus, Bruce; Sankaran, Balasubramanian; Tokranova, Natalya; Geer, Robert; Castracane, James; Xu, Bai

    2005-01-01

    Micromachined cantilevers used as force probes in atomic force microscopy are extremely sensitive to a variety of environment factors such as acoustic noise, temperature and humidity. This unwanted interference can be exploited to produce highly sensitive systems with proper design and under precise conditions. In this paper, we report the development of a new generic process for the fabrication of a microprobe with integrated piezoresistive read-out and built-in piezoelectric actuators. The mechanical performance of cantilever probes of various dimensions was studied. The result from the Finite Element Analysis (FEA) was compared to the experimental results. Application of this probe in a nondestructive, general-purpose, near-field nanomechanical imaging system will be discussed.

  8. Simultaneous Scanning Ion Conductance Microscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy with Microchanneled Cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ossola, Dario; Dorwling-Carter, Livie; Dermutz, Harald; Behr, Pascal; Vörös, János; Zambelli, Tomaso

    2015-12-01

    We combined scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) into a single tool using AFM cantilevers with an embedded microchannel flowing into the nanosized aperture at the apex of the hollow pyramid. An electrode was positioned in the AFM fluidic circuit connected to a second electrode in the bath. We could thus simultaneously measure the ionic current and the cantilever bending (in optical beam deflection mode). First, we quantitatively compared the SICM and AFM contact points on the approach curves. Second, we estimated where the probe in SICM mode touches the sample during scanning on a calibration grid and applied the finding to image a network of neurites on a Petri dish. Finally, we assessed the feasibility of a double controller using both the ionic current and the deflection as input signals of the piezofeedback. The experimental data were rationalized in the framework of finite elements simulations.

  9. Nanoporous-Gold-Based Hybrid Cantilevered Actuator Dealloyed and Driven by A Modified Rotary Triboelectric Nanogenerator

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuequan; Liu, Mengmeng; Huang, Baisheng; Liu, Hong; Hu, Weiguo; Shao, Li-Hua; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-01-01

    We firstly designed an electrochemical system for dealloying to synthesize nanoporous gold (NPG) and also driving the novel NPG based actuator by utilizing a modified rotary triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG). Compared to the previous reported TENG whose outputs decline due to temperature rising resulting from electrodes friction, the modified TENG with a cooling system has stable output current and voltage increased by 14% and 20%, respectively. The novel cantilevered hybrid actuator characterised by light-weight (ca. 3 mg) and small volume (ca. 30 mm × 2 mm × 10 μm) is driven by a microcontroller modulated TENG with the displacement of 2.2 mm, which is about 106 times larger than that of traditional cantilever using planar surfaces. The energy conversion efficiencies defined as the energy consumed during dealloying and actuation compared with the output of TENG are 47% and 56.7%, respectively. PMID:27063987

  10. Nanoporous-Gold-Based Hybrid Cantilevered Actuator Dealloyed and Driven by A Modified Rotary Triboelectric Nanogenerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuequan; Liu, Mengmeng; Huang, Baisheng; Liu, Hong; Hu, Weiguo; Shao, Li-Hua; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-04-01

    We firstly designed an electrochemical system for dealloying to synthesize nanoporous gold (NPG) and also driving the novel NPG based actuator by utilizing a modified rotary triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG). Compared to the previous reported TENG whose outputs decline due to temperature rising resulting from electrodes friction, the modified TENG with a cooling system has stable output current and voltage increased by 14% and 20%, respectively. The novel cantilevered hybrid actuator characterised by light-weight (ca. 3 mg) and small volume (ca. 30 mm × 2 mm × 10 μm) is driven by a microcontroller modulated TENG with the displacement of 2.2 mm, which is about 106 times larger than that of traditional cantilever using planar surfaces. The energy conversion efficiencies defined as the energy consumed during dealloying and actuation compared with the output of TENG are 47% and 56.7%, respectively.

  11. Development of low noise cantilever deflection sensor for multienvironment frequency-modulation atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuma, Takeshi; Kimura, Masayuki; Kobayashi, Kei; Matsushige, Kazumi; Yamada, Hirofumi

    2005-05-15

    We have developed a low noise cantilever deflection sensor with a deflection noise density of 17 fm/{radical}(Hz) by optimizing the parameters used in optical beam deflection (OBD) method. Using this sensor, we have developed a multienvironment frequency-modulation atomic force microscope (FM-AFM) that can achieve true molecular resolution in various environments such as in moderate vacuum, air, and liquid. The low noise characteristic of the deflection sensor makes it possible to obtain a maximum frequency sensitivity limited by the thermal Brownian motion of the cantilever in every environment. In this paper, the major noise sources in OBD method are discussed in both theoretical and experimental aspects. The excellent noise performance of the deflection sensor is demonstrated in deflection and frequency measurements. True molecular-resolution FM-AFM images of a polydiacetylene single crystal taken in vacuum, air, and water are presented.

  12. The influence of the parasitic current on the nonlinear electrical response of capacitively sensed cantilever resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal-Álvarez, Gabriel; Torres, Francesc; Barniol, Núria; Gottlieb, Oded

    2015-04-01

    The influence of the parasitic feedthrough current on the nonlinear electrical response of capacitively sensed cantilever resonators is analyzed theoretically and experimentally. We show that the parasitic current strongly affects the shape of the nonlinear electrical frequency response of such devices. Specifically, we demonstrate that in the electrical measurement, the directions of the jumps from the different transitions between branches of stable solutions depend on the parasitic current and are independent of the jumps directions in the mechanical domain. As a consequence, the nonlinear electrical frequency response of cantilevers with capacitive readout presents three different hysteretic cycle topologies: counterclockwise, bow tie, and clockwise. This is in contrast with the only one topology (counterclockwise) that appears in the nonlinear mechanical frequency response.

  13. Effect of cantilever geometry on the optical lever sensitivities and thermal noise method of the atomic force microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Sader, John E.; Lu, Jianing; Mulvaney, Paul

    2014-11-15

    Calibration of the optical lever sensitivities of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers is especially important for determining the force in AFM measurements. These sensitivities depend critically on the cantilever mode used and are known to differ for static and dynamic measurements. Here, we calculate the ratio of the dynamic and static sensitivities for several common AFM cantilevers, whose shapes vary considerably, and experimentally verify these results. The dynamic-to-static optical lever sensitivity ratio is found to range from 1.09 to 1.41 for the cantilevers studied – in stark contrast to the constant value of 1.09 used widely in current calibration studies. This analysis shows that accuracy of the thermal noise method for the static spring constant is strongly dependent on cantilever geometry – neglect of these dynamic-to-static factors can induce errors exceeding 100%. We also discuss a simple experimental approach to non-invasively and simultaneously determine the dynamic and static spring constants and optical lever sensitivities of cantilevers of arbitrary shape, which is applicable to all AFM platforms that have the thermal noise method for spring constant calibration.

  14. A theoretical study of a nano-opto-mechanical sensor using a photonic crystal-cantilever cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Depeng; Liu, Peng; Ho, Kai-Ming; Dong, Liang

    2012-07-09

    In this simulation study, integration of a nanocantilever inside a two-dimensional (2D) photonic crystal (PC) cavity resulted in a unique photonic crystal-cantilever cavity (PC3), where the cantilever served as a tunable mechanical defect of the PC slab. Strong nano-opto-mechanical interactions between the cantilever and the defect-mode field inside the PC3 gave rise to a high sensitivity of the resonance wavelength to surface stress-induced cantilever deflection. Mechanical and optical responses of the PC3 to surface stress changes on the cantilever surface were studied by using a finite-element method (FEM) and a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, respectively. Theoretical analysis revealed that the devised PC3 sensor could resolve a conservative minimum surface stress at the level of ~0.8 mN m−1, representing state-of-the-art cantilever sensor performance. Also, the PC3 sensor design used an ultracompact structure with an on-chip optical length of only several microns, while a conventional reflected laser beam detection scheme requires a ~1 m long free-space optical path.

  15. Rapid serial prototyping of magnet-tipped attonewton-sensitivity cantilevers by focused ion beam manipulation1

    PubMed Central

    Longenecker, Jonilyn G.; Moore, Eric W.; Marohn, John A.

    2011-01-01

    The authors report a method for rapidly prototyping attonewton-sensitivity cantilevers with custom-fabricated tips and illustrate the method by preparing tips consisting of a magnetic nanorod overhanging the leading edge of the cantilevers. Micron-long nickel nanorods with widths of 120–220 nm were fabricated on silicon chips by electron beam lithography, deposition, and lift-off. Each silicon chip, with its integral nanomagnet, was attached serially to a custom-fabricated attonewton-sensitivity cantilever using focused ion beam manipulation. The magnetic nanorod tips were prepared with and without an alumina capping layer, and the minimum detectable force and tip magnetic moment of the resulting cantilevers was characterized by cantilever magnetometry. The results indicate that this serial but high-yield approach is an effective way to rapidly prepare and characterize magnetic tips for the proposed single-electron-spin and single-proton magnetic resonance imaging experiments. The approach also represents a versatile route for affixing essentially any vacuum-compatible sample to the leading edge of an attonewton-sensitivity cantilever. PMID:23028212

  16. Study of thermal and acoustic noise interferences in low stiffness atomic force microscope cantilevers and characterization of their dynamic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Boudaoud, Mokrane; Haddab, Yassine; Le Gorrec, Yann; Lutz, Philippe

    2012-01-15

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is a powerful tool for the measurement of forces at the micro/nano scale when calibrated cantilevers are used. Besides many existing calibration techniques, the thermal calibration is one of the simplest and fastest methods for the dynamic characterization of an AFM cantilever. This method is efficient provided that the Brownian motion (thermal noise) is the most important source of excitation during the calibration process. Otherwise, the value of spring constant is underestimated. This paper investigates noise interference ranges in low stiffness AFM cantilevers taking into account thermal fluctuations and acoustic pressures as two main sources of noise. As a result, a preliminary knowledge about the conditions in which thermal fluctuations and acoustic pressures have closely the same effect on the AFM cantilever (noise interference) is provided with both theoretical and experimental arguments. Consequently, beyond the noise interference range, commercial low stiffness AFM cantilevers are calibrated in two ways: using the thermal noise (in a wide temperature range) and acoustic pressures generated by a loudspeaker. We then demonstrate that acoustic noises can also be used for an efficient characterization and calibration of low stiffness AFM cantilevers. The accuracy of the acoustic characterization is evaluated by comparison with results from the thermal calibration.

  17. Measurement and Evaluation of the Gas Density and Viscosity of Pure Gases and Mixtures Using a Micro-Cantilever Beam.

    PubMed

    Badarlis, Anastasios; Pfau, Axel; Kalfas, Anestis

    2015-09-22

    Measurement of gas density and viscosity was conducted using a micro-cantilever beam. In parallel, the validity of the proposed modeling approach was evaluated. This study also aimed to widen the database of the gases on which the model development of the micro-cantilever beams is based. The density and viscosity of gases are orders of magnitude lower than liquids. For this reason, the use of a very sensitive sensor is essential. In this study, a micro-cantilever beam from the field of atomic force microscopy was used. Although the current cantilever was designed to work with thermal activation, in the current investigation, it was activated with an electromagnetic force. The deflection of the cantilever beam was detected by an integrated piezo-resistive sensor. Six pure gases and sixteen mixtures of them in ambient conditions were investigated. The outcome of the investigation showed that the current cantilever beam had a sensitivity of 240 Hz/(kg/m³), while the accuracy of the determined gas density and viscosity in ambient conditions reached ±1.5% and ±2.0%, respectively.

  18. Batch-fabrication of cantilevered magnets on attonewton-sensitivity mechanical oscillators for scanned-probe nanoscale magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Hickman, Steven A; Moore, Eric W; Lee, SangGap; Longenecker, Jonilyn G; Wright, Sarah J; Harrell, Lee E; Marohn, John A

    2010-12-28

    We have batch-fabricated cantilevers with ∼100 nm diameter nickel nanorod tips and force sensitivities of a few attonewtons at 4.2 K. The magnetic nanorods were engineered to overhang the leading edge of the cantilever, and consequently the cantilevers experience what we believe is the lowest surface noise ever achieved in a scanned probe experiment. Cantilever magnetometry indicated that the tips were well magnetized, with a ≤ 20 nm dead layer; the composition of the dead layer was studied by electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy. In what we believe is the first demonstration of scanned probe detection of electron-spin resonance from a batch-fabricated tip, the cantilevers were used to observe electron-spin resonance from nitroxide spin labels in a film via force-gradient-induced shifts in cantilever resonance frequency. The magnetic field dependence of the magnetic resonance signal suggests a nonuniform tip magnetization at an applied field near 0.6 T.

  19. Effect of cantilever geometry on the optical lever sensitivities and thermal noise method of the atomic force microscope.

    PubMed

    Sader, John E; Lu, Jianing; Mulvaney, Paul

    2014-11-01

    Calibration of the optical lever sensitivities of atomic force microscope (AFM) cantilevers is especially important for determining the force in AFM measurements. These sensitivities depend critically on the cantilever mode used and are known to differ for static and dynamic measurements. Here, we calculate the ratio of the dynamic and static sensitivities for several common AFM cantilevers, whose shapes vary considerably, and experimentally verify these results. The dynamic-to-static optical lever sensitivity ratio is found to range from 1.09 to 1.41 for the cantilevers studied - in stark contrast to the constant value of 1.09 used widely in current calibration studies. This analysis shows that accuracy of the thermal noise method for the static spring constant is strongly dependent on cantilever geometry - neglect of these dynamic-to-static factors can induce errors exceeding 100%. We also discuss a simple experimental approach to non-invasively and simultaneously determine the dynamic and static spring constants and optical lever sensitivities of cantilevers of arbitrary shape, which is applicable to all AFM platforms that have the thermal noise method for spring constant calibration.

  20. Dynamically forced cantilever system: A piezo-polymer characterization tool with possible application for micromechanical HF resonator devices

    SciTech Connect

    Schwoediauer, Reinhard

    2005-04-01

    A cantilever system, driven to a dynamically forced oscillation by a small piezoelectric specimen is presented as a simple and accurate tool to determine the converse dynamic piezocoefficient up to several kHz. The piezoelectric sample is mounted on top of a reflective cantilever where it is free to oscillate without any mechanical constraint. A Nomarsky-interferometer detects the induced cantilever displacement. The presented technique is especially suited for a precise characterization of small and soft piezoelectric polymer-samples with rough surfaces. The capability of the dynamically forced cantilever principle is demonstrated with a LiNbO{sub 3} crystal and with a porous ferroelectretic polypropylene foam. Results from measurements between 400 Hz and 5 kHz were found to be in excellent agreement with published values. Additionally, the dynamically forced cantilever principle may possibly improve the sensitivity of some micromechanical cantilever-sensors and it could also be interesting for the design of enhanced micromechanical high frequency mixer filters. Some ideas about are briefly presented.

  1. Measurement and Evaluation of the Gas Density and Viscosity of Pure Gases and Mixtures Using a Micro-Cantilever Beam

    PubMed Central

    Badarlis, Anastasios; Pfau, Axel; Kalfas, Anestis

    2015-01-01

    Measurement of gas density and viscosity was conducted using a micro-cantilever beam. In parallel, the validity of the proposed modeling approach was evaluated. This study also aimed to widen the database of the gases on which the model development of the micro-cantilever beams is based. The density and viscosity of gases are orders of magnitude lower than liquids. For this reason, the use of a very sensitive sensor is essential. In this study, a micro-cantilever beam from the field of atomic force microscopy was used. Although the current cantilever was designed to work with thermal activation, in the current investigation, it was activated with an electromagnetic force. The deflection of the cantilever beam was detected by an integrated piezo-resistive sensor. Six pure gases and sixteen mixtures of them in ambient conditions were investigated. The outcome of the investigation showed that the current cantilever beam had a sensitivity of 240 Hz/(kg/m3), while the accuracy of the determined gas density and viscosity in ambient conditions reached ±1.5% and ±2.0%, respectively. PMID:26402682

  2. Segmentation of a Vibro-Shock Cantilever-Type Piezoelectric Energy Harvester Operating in Higher Transverse Vibration Modes.

    PubMed

    Zizys, Darius; Gaidys, Rimvydas; Dauksevicius, Rolanas; Ostasevicius, Vytautas; Daniulaitis, Vytautas

    2015-12-23

    The piezoelectric transduction mechanism is a common vibration-to-electric energy harvesting approach. Piezoelectric energy harvesters are typically mounted on a vibrating host structure, whereby alternating voltage output is generated by a dynamic strain field. A design target in this case is to match the natural frequency of the harvester to the ambient excitation frequency for the device to operate in resonance mode, thus significantly increasing vibration amplitudes and, as a result, energy output. Other fundamental vibration modes have strain nodes, where the dynamic strain field changes sign in the direction of the cantilever length. The paper reports on a dimensionless numerical transient analysis of a cantilever of a constant cross-section and an optimally-shaped cantilever with the objective to accurately predict the position of a strain node. Total effective strain produced by both cantilevers segmented at the strain node is calculated via transient analysis and compared to the strain output produced by the cantilevers segmented at strain nodes obtained from modal analysis, demonstrating a 7% increase in energy output. Theoretical results were experimentally verified by using open-circuit voltage values measured for the cantilevers segmented at optimal and suboptimal segmentation lines.

  3. Endonuclease-based logic gates and sensors using magnetic force-amplified readout of DNA scission on cantilevers.

    PubMed

    Weizmann, Yossi; Elnathan, Roey; Lioubashevski, Oleg; Willner, Itamar

    2005-09-14

    The endonuclease scission of magnetic particles functionalized with sequence-specific DNAs, which are associated on cantilevers, is followed by the magnetic force-amplified readout of the reactions by the nano-mechanical deflection/retraction of the cantilevers. The systems are employed to develop AND or OR logic gates and to detect single base mismatch specificity of the endonucleases. The two endonucleases EcoRI (E(A)) and AscI (E(B)) are used as inputs. The removal of magnetic particles linked to the cantilever by the duplexes 1/1a and 2/2a via the simultaneous cleavage of the DNAs by E(A) and E(B) leads to the retraction of the magnetically deflected cantilever and to the establishment of the "AND" gate. The removal of the magnetic particles linked to the cantilevers by the duplex 3/3a by either E(A) or E(B) leads to the retraction of the magnetically deflected cantilever and to the establishment of the "OR" gate. The magnetic force-amplified readout of endonuclease activities is also employed to reveal single base mismatch specificity of the biocatalysts.

  4. A soft-polymer piezoelectric bimorph cantilever-actuated peristaltic micropump.

    PubMed

    Graf, Neil J; Bowser, Michael T

    2008-10-01

    A peristaltic micropump was fabricated and characterized. The micropump was fabricated using soft lithography, and actuated using piezoelectric bimorph cantilevers. The micropump channel was formed by bonding two layers of PDMS, mixed at 5:1 and 30:1 ratios. The channel was fabricated in the 5:1 layer using replica molding (REM), where a very simple and inexpensive template was made by straddling a 75 microm wire over a glass substrate, followed by covering and smoothing over the wire with a piece of aluminium foil. Not only was this template inexpensive and extremely simple to fabricate, it also created a rounded cross-sectional geometry which is favorable for complete valve shutoff. The cantilevers were driven at Vp=+/-90 V with amplified square wave signals generated by a virtual function generator created in LabVIEW. Connections to the micropump were made by placing capillary tubes in the channel, and then sealed between the two layers of PDMS. Machined aluminium clamps were adhered to the tips of the cantilevers with general purpose adhesive. These clamps allowed for aluminium valves, with finely machined tips of dimensions 3 mm by 200 microm, to be held firmly in place. The variables characterized for this micropump were flow rate, maximum attainable backpressure, free cantilever deflection, valve shutoff, and valve leakage. Three actuation patterns with phase differences of 60, 90, and 120 degrees were compared for flow rate and maximum backpressure. It was determined that the 120 degrees signal outperformed the 60 degrees and 90 degrees signals for both maximum flowrate and maximum attainable backpressure. The maximum and minimum flowrates demonstrated by the micropump were 289 nL min(-1) and 53 nL min(-1), respectively. The maximum backpressure attained was 35 300 Pa. It was also demonstrated that the valves fully closed the channels upon actuation, with minimal observed leakage.

  5. An approximate solution for the free vibrations of rotating uniform cantilever beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, D. A.

    1973-01-01

    Approximate solutions are obtained for the uncoupled frequencies and modes of rotating uniform cantilever beams. The frequency approximations for flab bending, lead-lag bending, and torsion are simple expressions having errors of less than a few percent over the entire frequency range. These expressions provide a simple way of determining the relations between mass and stiffness parameters and the resultant frequencies and mode shapes of rotating uniform beams.

  6. A macroscopic non-destructive testing system based on the cantilever-sample contact resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Ji; Lin, Lizhi; Zhou, Xilong; Li, Yingwei; Li, Faxin

    2012-12-01

    Detecting the inside or buried defects in materials and structures is always a challenge in the field of nondestructive testing (NDT). In this paper, enlightened by the operation principle of the contact resonance force microscopy or atomic force acoustic microscopy (AFAM), we proposed a macroscopic NDT system based on contact resonance of the cantilever-sample surface to detect the local stiffness variations in materials or structures. We fabricated a piezoelectric unimorph with the dimension typically of 150 mm × 8 mm × 2 mm to act as a macroscopic cantilever, whose flexural mode vibration was driven by a wideband power amplifier together with a signal generator. The vibration signal of the macroscopic cantilever is detected by a high sensitive strain gauge bonded on the cantilever surface which is much more stable than the laser diode sensor in AFAM, thus making it very suitable for outdoor operations. Scanning is realized by a three-dimensional motorized stage with the Z axis for pressing force setting. The whole system is controlled by a LabVIEW-based homemade software. Like the AFAM, this NDT system can also work in two modes, i.e., the single-frequency mode and the resonance-tracking mode. In the latter mode, the contact stiffness at each pixel of the sample can be obtained by using the measured contact resonance frequency and a beam dynamics model. Testing results of this NDT system on a grid structure with an opaque panel show that in both modes the prefabricated defect beneath the panel can be detected and the grid structures can be clearly "seen," which indicates the validity of this NDT system. The sensitivity of this NDT system was also examined.

  7. Actuating Mechanism and Design of a Cylindrical Traveling Wave Ultrasonic Motor Using Cantilever Type Composite Transducer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yingxiang; Chen, Weishan; Liu, Junkao; Shi, Shengjun

    2010-01-01

    Background Ultrasonic motors (USM) are based on the concept of driving the rotor by a mechanical vibration excited on the stator via piezoelectric effect. USM exhibit merits such as simple structure, quick response, quiet operation, self-locking when power off, nonelectromagnetic radiation and higher position accuracy. Principal Findings A cylindrical type traveling wave ultrasonic motor using cantilever type composite transducer was proposed in this paper. There are two cantilevers on the outside surface of cylinder, four longitudinal PZT ceramics are set between the cantilevers, and four bending PZT ceramics are set on each outside surface of cantilevers. Two degenerate flexural vibration modes spatially and temporally orthogonal to each other in the cylinder are excited by the composite transducer. In this new design, a single transducer can excite a flexural traveling wave in the cylinder. Thus, elliptical motions are achieved on the teeth. The actuating mechanism of proposed motor was analyzed. The stator was designed with FEM. The two vibration modes of stator were degenerated. Transient analysis was developed to gain the vibration characteristic of stator, and results indicate the motion trajectories of nodes on the teeth are nearly ellipses. Conclusions The study results verify the feasibility of the proposed design. The wave excited in the cylinder isn't an ideal traveling wave, and the vibration amplitudes are inconsistent. The distortion of traveling wave is generated by the deformation of bending vibration mode of cylinder, which is caused by the coupling effect between the cylinder and transducer. Analysis results also prove that the objective motions of nodes on the teeth are three-dimensional vibrations. But, the vibration in axial direction is minute compared with the vibrations in circumferential and radial direction. The results of this paper can guide the development of this new type of motor. PMID:20368809

  8. Approximate calculation of multispar cantilever and semicantilever wings with parallel ribs under direct and indirect loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanger, Eugen

    1932-01-01

    A method is presented for approximate static calculation, which is based on the customary assumption of rigid ribs, while taking into account the systematic errors in the calculation results due to this arbitrary assumption. The procedure is given in greater detail for semicantilever and cantilever wings with polygonal spar plan form and for wings under direct loading only. The last example illustrates the advantages of the use of influence lines for such wing structures and their practical interpretation.

  9. Global nonlinear electroelastic dynamics of a bimorph piezoelectric cantilever for energy harvesting, sensing, and actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leadenham, Stephen; Erturk, Alper

    2014-04-01

    Inherent nonlinearities of piezoelectric materials are inevitably pronounced in various engineering applications such as sensing, actuation, their combined applications for vibration control, and most recently, energy harvesting from dynamical systems. The existing literature focusing on the dynamics of electroelastic structures made of piezoelectric materials have explored such nonlinearities in a disconnected way for the separate problems of mechanical and electrical excitation such that nonlinear resonance trends have been assumed to be due to different additional terms in constitutive equations by different researchers. Similar manifestations of softening nonlinearities have been attributed to purely elastic nonlinear terms, coupling nonlinearities, hysteresis, or a combination of these effects, by various authors. However, a reliable nonlinear constitutive equation for a given piezoelectric material is expected to be rather unique and valid regardless of the application, e.g. energy harvesting, sensing, or actuation. A systematic approach focusing on the two-way coupling can result in a sound mathematical framework. To this end, the present work investigates the nonlinear dynamic behavior of a bimorph piezoelectric cantilever under low-to-high mechanical and electrical excitation levels in energy harvesting, sensing, and actuation. A physical model is proposed including both ferroelastic hysteresis, stiffness, and electromechanical coupling nonlinearities. A lumped parameter electroelastic model is developed by accounting for these nonlinearities to analyze the primary resonance of a cantilever using the method of harmonic balance. Strong agreement between the model and experimental investigation is found, providing solid evidence that the the dominant source of observed softening nonlinear effects in geometrically linear piezolectric cantilever beams is well represented by a quadratic term resulting from ferroelastic hysteresis. Electromechanical coupling and

  10. Operating characteristics of a cantilever-mounted resilient-pad gas-lubricated thrust bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Z. N.

    1979-01-01

    A resilient-pad gas thrust bearing consisting of pads mounted on cantilever beams was tested to determine its operating characteristic. The bearing was run at a thrust load of 74 newtons to a speed of 17000 rpm. The pad film thickness and bearing friction torque were measured and compared with theory. The measured film thickness was less than that predicted by theory. The bearing friction torque was greater than that predicted by theory.

  11. Analysis and design of a cantilever-mounted resilient-pad gas-lubricated thrust bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etsion, I.

    1976-01-01

    A thrust bearing consisting of pads mounted on resilient, metallic, cantilever beams is described and analyzed. Compliance and stiffness of the bearing assembly are discussed, and the effects of bearing design parameters on performance are shown. After the general analysis, a design example is presented for a flat sector-shaped gas bearing. A special case where zero axial movement of the runner can be obtained is pointed out.

  12. Feedback Control of Vibrations in a Micromachined Cantilever Beam with Electrostatic Actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P. K. C.

    1998-06-01

    The problem of feedback control of vibrations in a micromachined cantilever beam with nonlinear electrostatic actuators is considered. Various forms of nonlinear feedback controls depending on localized spatial averages of the beam velocity and displacement near the beam tip are derived by considering the time rate-of-change of the total energy of the beam. The physical implementation of the derived feedback controls is discussed briefly. The dynamic behaviour of the beam with the derived feedback controls is determined by computer simulation.

  13. Multi-material bio-fabrication of hydrogel cantilevers and actuators with stereolithography.

    PubMed

    Chan, Vincent; Jeong, Jae Hyun; Bajaj, Piyush; Collens, Mitchell; Saif, Taher; Kong, Hyunjoon; Bashir, Rashid

    2012-01-07

    Cell-based biohybrid actuators are integrated systems that use biological components including proteins and cells to power material components by converting chemical energy to mechanical energy. The latest progress in cell-based biohybrid actuators has been limited to rigid materials, such as silicon and PDMS, ranging in elastic moduli on the order of mega (10(6)) to giga (10(9)) Pascals. Recent reports in the literature have established a correlation between substrate rigidity and its influence on the contractile behavior of cardiomyocytes (A. J. Engler, C. Carag-Krieger, C. P. Johnson, M. Raab, H. Y. Tang and D. W. Speicher, et al., J. Cell Sci., 2008, 121(Pt 22), 3794-3802, P. Bajaj, X. Tang, T. A. Saif and R. Bashir, J. Biomed. Mater. Res., Part A, 2010, 95(4), 1261-1269). This study explores the fabrication of a more compliant cantilever, similar to that of the native myocardium, with elasticity on the order of kilo (10(3)) Pascals. 3D stereolithographic technology, a layer-by-layer UV polymerizable rapid prototyping system, was used to rapidly fabricate multi-material cantilevers composed of poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) and acrylic-PEG-collagen (PC) mixtures. The incorporation of acrylic-PEG-collagen into PEGDA-based materials enhanced cell adhesion, spreading, and organization without altering the ability to vary the elastic modulus through the molecular weight of PEGDA. Cardiomyocytes derived from neonatal rats were seeded on the cantilevers, and the resulting stresses and contractile forces were calculated using finite element simulations validated with classical beam equations. These cantilevers can be used as a mechanical sensor to measure the contractile forces of cardiomyocyte cell sheets, and as an early prototype for the design of optimal cell-based biohybrid actuators.

  14. Large deflections of a cantilever beam under arbitrarily directed tip load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccomb, H. E., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The nonlinear beam equation was integrated numerically in a direct fashion to obtain results for large deflections of cantilevers under tip loads of arbitrary direction. A short BASIC computer program for performing this integration is presented. Results for selected load cases are presented. The numerical process is performed rapidly on a modern microcomputer, and comparisons with results from closed form solutions show that the process is accurate.

  15. Fixed exanthema from systemic tobramycin.

    PubMed

    García-Rubio, I; Martínez-Cócera, C; Robledo Echarren, T; Vázquez Cortés, S

    2006-01-01

    Eye drops contain several ophthalmic medications which can produce allergic reactions. We report the case of a patient with contact dermatitis from neomycin and a probable fixed exanthema after parenteral administration of tobramycin who tolerated topical tobramycin and other aminoglycosides.

  16. Cantilevered single walled boron nitride nanotube based nanomechanical resonators of zigzag and armchair forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchal, Mitesh B.; Upadhyay, S. H.

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, the dynamic response analysis of single walled boron nitride nanotubes (SWBNNTs) has been done using a finite element method (FEM). To this end, different types of zigzag and armchair layups of SWBNNTs are considered with cantilever configuration to analyze the mass detection application, as a SWBNNT based nanomechanical resonator. Using three dimensional elastic beams and point masses, single walled boron nitride nanotubes are approximated as atomistic finite element models. Implementing the finite element simulation approach, the resonant frequency of cantilevered nanotubes obtained and observed the shifts in it mainly due to an additional nanoscale mass to the nanotube tip. The effect on resonant frequency shift due to dimensional variation in terms of length as well as diameter is explored by considering different aspect ratios of nanotubes. The effect of intermediate landing positions of added mass on resonant frequency shift is also analyzed by considering excitations of different modes of vibration. Also, the effect of chiralities compared for resonant frequency variations to check the effect on sensitivity due to different forms of SWBNNTs. The present approach is found to be effectual in terms of dealing different chiralities, boundary conditions and consideration of added mass to analyze the dynamic behavior of cantilevered SWBNNT based nanomechanical resonators. The simulation results are compared with the analytical results based on continuum mechanics and found in good agreement as one of the toolkits for systematic analysis approach for novel design of SWBNNT based nanomechanical resonators for wide range of applications.

  17. Analysis of the actuating effects of triple-layer piezoelectric cantilevers considering electromechanical coupling correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Li Jiao; Pan, Cheng Liang; Pan, Qiao Sheng

    2017-02-01

    A dynamic analytical model is developed to predict the performance of a triple-layer piezoelectric cantilever as actuators in relation to materials with large piezoelectric and electromechanical coupling (EMC) coefficients under axial stress and plane strain conditions. The dynamic electromechanical behavior of a symmetrical triple-layer piezoelectric cantilever (STLPC) actuator is investigated. The analytical model of STLPC based on electromechanical coupling correction coefficient (EMCC) is established in one-dimensional (1D) form and applied to 1D and 2D deformations. Furthermore, the theoretical analysis of the EMCC model is critically evaluated and compared with the simulations using a finite element method (FEM). Results show that the EMCC model can be accurately applied to analyze the actuation performance of STLPC. Analyzed results show that the proposed model is accurately applied to large and small piezoelectric coupling conditions. The piezoelectric cantilever with large piezoelectric and EMC coefficients can be accurately analyzed by the proposed model accounted for small EMC condition in a traditional model. Design optimization based on actuators is also discussed. Optimal thickness ratios between elastic and piezoelectric layers are effectively calculated and obtained.

  18. Theoretical and applied research on bistable dual-piezoelectric-cantilever vibration energy harvesting toward realistic ambience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Y.; Leng, Y.; Javey, A.; Tan, D.; Liu, J.; Fan, S.; Lai, Z.

    2016-11-01

    Pink noise, which is similar to realistic ambient noise, is normally used to simulate ambience where a piezoelectric energy harvesting system (PEHS) is set up. However, pink noise with standard spectral representation can only be used to simulate excitations assumed to possess constant intensity, whereas realistic ambient noise normally appears with a random spectrum and varying intensity in terms of different locations and time. The output performance of conventional bistable magnetic repulsive energy harvesters is significantly affected by the ambience intensity. Considering this fact, a model bistable dual-piezoelectric-cantilever energy harvester (DPEH) is developed in this study to achieve optimal broadband energy harvesting under a varying-intensity realistic circumstance. We utilized various realistic ambient conditions as excitations to obtain the DPEH energy harvesting performance for theoretical and applied study. The elastically supported PEHS has been proven to be more adaptive to realistic ambience with significant or medium intensity variation, but is less qualified for realistic ambience with constant intensity compared with the rigidly supported PEHS (RPEHS). Fortunately, the dual-piezoelectric-cantilever energy harvesting system is superior to the RPEHS under all circumstances because the dual-piezoelectric cantilevers are efficiently utilized for electromechanical energy conversion to realize optimal energy harvesting.

  19. Cantilever energy effects on bimodal AFM: phase and amplitude contrast of multicomponent samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Ishita; Yablon, Dalia G.

    2013-11-01

    Bimodal atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a recently developed technique of dynamic AFM where a higher eigenmode of the cantilever is simultaneously excited along with the fundamental eigenmode. The effects of different operating parameters while imaging an impact copolymer blend of polypropylene (PP) and ethylene-propylene (E-P) rubber in bimodal mode are explored through experiments and numerical simulations. The higher mode amplitude and phase contrasts between the two components of the sample reverse at different points as the free amplitude of the higher eigenmode is increased. Three different regimes are identified experimentally depending on the relative contrast between the PP and the E-P rubber. It is observed that the kinetic energy and free air drive input energy of the two cantilever eigenmodes play a role in determining the regimes of operation. Numerical simulations conducted with appropriate tip-sample interaction forces support the experimental results. An understanding of these regimes and the associated cantilever dynamics will guide a rational approach towards selecting appropriate operating parameters.

  20. Cantilever energy effects on bimodal AFM: phase and amplitude contrast of multicomponent samples.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Ishita; Yablon, Dalia G

    2013-11-29

    Bimodal atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a recently developed technique of dynamic AFM where a higher eigenmode of the cantilever is simultaneously excited along with the fundamental eigenmode. The effects of different operating parameters while imaging an impact copolymer blend of polypropylene (PP) and ethylene-propylene (E-P) rubber in bimodal mode are explored through experiments and numerical simulations. The higher mode amplitude and phase contrasts between the two components of the sample reverse at different points as the free amplitude of the higher eigenmode is increased. Three different regimes are identified experimentally depending on the relative contrast between the PP and the E-P rubber. It is observed that the kinetic energy and free air drive input energy of the two cantilever eigenmodes play a role in determining the regimes of operation. Numerical simulations conducted with appropriate tip-sample interaction forces support the experimental results. An understanding of these regimes and the associated cantilever dynamics will guide a rational approach towards selecting appropriate operating parameters.

  1. Microfluidic cantilever detects bacteria and measures their susceptibility to antibiotics in small confined volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etayash, Hashem; Khan, M. F.; Kaur, Kamaljit; Thundat, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    In the fight against drug-resistant bacteria, accurate and high-throughput detection is essential. Here, a bimaterial microcantilever with an embedded microfluidic channel with internal surfaces chemically or physically functionalized with receptors selectively captures the bacteria passing through the channel. Bacterial adsorption inside the cantilever results in changes in the resonance frequency (mass) and cantilever deflection (adsorption stress). The excitation of trapped bacteria using infrared radiation (IR) causes the cantilever to deflect in proportion to the infrared absorption of the bacteria, providing a nanomechanical infrared spectrum for selective identification. We demonstrate the in situ detection and discrimination of Listeria monocytogenes at a concentration of single cell per μl. Trapped Escherichia coli in the microchannel shows a distinct nanomechanical response when exposed to antibiotics. This approach, which combines enrichment with three different modes of detection, can serve as a platform for the development of a portable, high-throughput device for use in the real-time detection of bacteria and their response to antibiotics.

  2. A Novel Micro-cantilever Based Angular Speed Sensor Controlled Piezoelectrically and Tuned by Electrostatic Actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah-Mohammadi-Azar, A.; Shabani, R.; Rezazadeh, G.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper a novel sensor is proposed to measure rotational shafts speed. The sensor is composed of a micro-cantilever, with a piezoelectric actuator layer on the upper surface and a sensor layer on the lower surface. The sensor is attached to the shaft while the deflection of the micro-cantilever, due to centrifugal force of the rotating shaft, is actively controlled. Therefore the sensor deflection is suppressed and the controller output or the piezoelectric actuating voltage is employed to measure the angular speed of the shaft (Force balance technique). The micro-cantilever is symmetrically located between two electrodes giving it a wider operating range and also increasing its sensitivity. Imposing different electrostatic bias voltages alters the equivalent stiffness of the structure and consequently affects the micro-beam deflections and the controller outputs. Simulation results reveal that for lower velocities the resolution increases by increasing the bias voltages. It is shown that decreasing the micro-beam length increases the measurable velocity range and conversely decreasing the electrodes gap decreases the maximum measurable speed.

  3. Utilization of Microscale Silicon Cantilevers to Assess Cellular Contractile Function In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Alec S.T.; Long, Christopher J.; McAleer, Christopher; Bobbitt, Nathaniel; Srinivasan, Balaji; Hickman, James J.

    2014-01-01

    The development of more predictive and biologically relevant in vitro assays is predicated on the advancement of versatile cell culture systems which facilitate the functional assessment of the seeded cells. To that end, microscale cantilever technology offers a platform with which to measure the contractile functionality of a range of cell types, including skeletal, cardiac, and smooth muscle cells, through assessment of contraction induced substrate bending. Application of multiplexed cantilever arrays provides the means to develop moderate to high-throughput protocols for assessing drug efficacy and toxicity, disease phenotype and progression, as well as neuromuscular and other cell-cell interactions. This manuscript provides the details for fabricating reliable cantilever arrays for this purpose, and the methods required to successfully culture cells on these surfaces. Further description is provided on the steps necessary to perform functional analysis of contractile cell types maintained on such arrays using a novel laser and photo-detector system. The representative data provided highlights the precision and reproducible nature of the analysis of contractile function possible using this system, as well as the wide range of studies to which such technology can be applied. Successful widespread adoption of this system could provide investigators with the means to perform rapid, low cost functional studies in vitro, leading to more accurate predictions of tissue performance, disease development and response to novel therapeutic treatment. PMID:25350792

  4. Use of thermal cycling to reduce adhesion of OTS coated coated MEMS cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Shaikh M.; Phinney, Leslie M.

    2003-01-01

    °Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) have enormous potential to contribute in diverse fields such as automotive, health care, aerospace, consumer products, and biotechnology, but successful commercial applications of MEMS are still small in number. Reliability of MEMS is a major impediment to the commercialization of laboratory prototypes. Due to the multitude of MEMS applications and the numerous processing and packaging steps, MEMS are exposed to a variety of environmental conditions, making the prediction of operational reliability difficult. In this paper, we investigate the effects of operating temperature on the in-use adhesive failure of electrostatically actuated MEMS microcantilevers coated with octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) films. The cantilevers are subjected to repeated temperature cycles and electrostatically actuated at temperatures between 25°C and 300°C in ambient air. The experimental results indicate that temperature cycling of the OTS coated cantilevers in air reduces the sticking probability of the microcantilevers. The sticking probability of OTS coated cantilevers was highest during heating, which decreased during cooling, and was lowest during reheating. Modifications to the OTS release method to increase its yield are also discussed.

  5. Compact cantilever couplers for low-loss fiber coupling to silicon photonic integrated circuits.

    PubMed

    Wood, Michael; Sun, Peng; Reano, Ronald M

    2012-01-02

    We demonstrate coupling from tapered optical fibers to 450 nm by 250 nm silicon strip waveguides using compact cantilever couplers. The couplers consist of silicon inverse width tapers embedded within silicon dioxide cantilevers. Finite difference time domain simulations are used to design the length of the silicon inverse width taper to as short as 6.5 μm for a cantilever width of 2 μm. Modeling of various strip waveguide taper profiles shows reduced coupling losses for a quadratic taper profile. Infrared measurements of fabricated devices demonstrate average coupling losses of 0.62 dB per connection for the quasi-TE mode and 0.50 dB per connection for the quasi-TM mode across the optical telecommunications C band. In the wavelength range from 1477 nm to 1580 nm, coupling losses for both polarizations are less than 1 dB per connection. The compact, broadband, and low-loss coupling scheme enables direct access to photonic integrated circuits on an entire chip surface without the need for dicing or cleaving the chip.

  6. Atomic Force Microscope Cantilever Flexural Stiffness Calibration: Toward a Standard Traceable Method

    PubMed Central

    Gates, Richard S.; Reitsma, Mark G.; Kramar, John A.; Pratt, Jon R.

    2011-01-01

    The evolution of the atomic force microscope into a useful tool for measuring mechanical properties of surfaces at the nanoscale has spurred the need for more precise and accurate methods for calibrating the spring constants of test cantilevers. Groups within international standards organizations such as the International Organization for Standardization and the Versailles Project on Advanced Materials and Standards (VAMAS) are conducting studies to determine which methods are best suited for these calibrations and to try to improve the reproducibility and accuracy of these measurements among different laboratories. This paper expands on a recent mini round robin within VAMAS Technical Working Area 29 to measure the spring constant of a single batch of triangular silicon nitride cantilevers sent to three international collaborators. Calibration techniques included reference cantilever, added mass, and two forms of thermal methods. Results are compared to measurements traceable to the International System of Units provided by an electrostatic force balance. A series of guidelines are also discussed for procedures that can improve the running of round robins in atomic force microscopy. PMID:26989594

  7. Development of fiber optic ferrule-top cantilevers for sensing and beam-steering applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruca, G.; Chavan, D.; Cipullo, A.; Babaei Gavan, K.; De Filippis, F.; Minardo, A.; Rector, J.; Heek, K.; Zeni, L.; Iannuzzi, D.

    2012-04-01

    Ferrule-top (FT) cantilevers are a new generation of all optical micromechanical sensors obtained by carving microstructures on the top of ferrule terminated fibers. In this paper, we will demonstrate how this plug and play design can be used for the development of a new generation of sensors and actuators for harsh environments, where commercially available devices would be prone to failure. Ferrule-top sensors can work in two main modes - static and dynamic. The static mode is based on recording elastic deflection of the cantilever; the dynamic mode relies on tracking changes in its mechanical properties (resonance frequency, quality factor). Depending on the application, one can choose which mode is most suitable or combine both to achieve best performance. We will illustrate the relation between specific measured quantity (humidity, flow) and the behavior of the sensor. Further, we will show the setup in which the sensor can be actuated using light, giving the possibility to excite the cantilever without any electronics on the sensing head. This technique might by use for the development of fully optical beamsteering microdevices.

  8. Application of a passive/active autoparametric cantilever beam absorber with PZT actuator for Duffing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva-Navarro, G.; Abundis-Fong, H. F.; Vazquez-Gonzalez, B.

    2013-04-01

    An experimental investigation is carried out on a cantilever-type passive/active autoparametric vibration absorber, with a PZT patch actuator, to be used in a primary damped Duffing system. The primary system consists of a mass, viscous damping and a cubic stiffness provided by a soft helical spring, over which is mounted a cantilever beam with a PZT patch actuator actively controlled to attenuate harmonic and resonant excitation forces. With the PZT actuator on the cantilever beam absorber, cemented to the base of the beam, the auto-parametric vibration absorber is made active, thus enabling the possibility to control the effective stiffness and damping associated to the passive absorber and, as a consequence, the implementation of an active vibration control scheme able to preserve, as possible, the autoparametric interaction as well as to compensate varying excitation frequencies and parametric uncertainty. This active vibration absorber employs feedback information from a high resolution optical encoder on the primary Duffing system and an accelerometer on the tip beam absorber, a strain gage on the base of the beam, feedforward information from the excitation force and on-line computations from the nonlinear approximate frequency response, parameterized in terms of a proportional gain provided by a voltage input to the PZT actuator, thus modifying the closed-loop dynamic stiffness and providing a mechanism to asymptotically track an optimal, robust and stable attenuation solution on the primary Duffing system. Experimental results are included to describe the dynamic and robust performance of the overall closed-loop system.

  9. Coupled molecular and cantilever dynamics model for frequency-modulated atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Klocke, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Summary A molecular dynamics model is presented, which adds harmonic potentials to the atomic interactions to mimic the elastic properties of an AFM cantilever. It gives new insight into the correlation between the experimentally monitored frequency shift and cantilever damping due to the interaction between tip atoms and scanned surface. Applying the model to ionic crystals with rock salt structure two damping mechanisms are investigated, which occur separately or simultaneously depending on the tip position. These mechanisms are adhesion hysteresis on the one hand and lateral excitations of the cantilever on the other. We find that the short range Lennard-Jones part of the atomic interaction alone is sufficient for changing the predominant mechanism. When the long range ionic interaction is switched off, the two damping mechanisms occur with a completely different pattern, which is explained by the energy landscape for the apex atom of the tip. In this case the adhesion hysteresis is always associated with a distinct lateral displacement of the tip. It is shown how this may lead to a systematic shift between the periodic patterns obtained from the frequency and from the damping signal, respectively. PMID:27335760

  10. Field investigation of a vibration monitoring wireless sensor network on a huge cantilever structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, H. F.; Liu, J. L.; Ni, Y. Q.; Zhu, D. P.

    2011-04-01

    To advance wireless structural monitoring systems mature into a reliable substitute to wired structural monitoring systems, efforts should be paid to investigate their in-field performance on real civil structures, especially complex mega structures. This study carries out an investigation into a vibration monitoring wireless sensor network (WSN) for modal identification of a huge cantilever structure. The testbed under study is the New Headquarters of Shenzhen Stock Exchange (NHSSE). One outstanding feature of NHSSE is its huge floating platform, which is a steel truss structure with an overall plan dimension of 98x162 m and a total height of 24 m. It overhangs from the main tower 36 m along the long axis and 22 m along the short axis at a height of 36 m above the ground, making it the largest cantilever structure in the world. Recognizing the uniqueness of this floating platform, the performance of the WSN for ambient vibration measurement of this structure is examined. A preliminary two-point simultaneous acceleration measurement using the WSN is reported in this paper. The preliminary study demonstrates that the WSN is capable of measuring the ambient vibration and identifying the modal properties of a huge cantilever structure.

  11. A paper-based cantilever array sensor: Monitoring volatile organic compounds with naked eye.

    PubMed

    Fraiwan, Arwa; Lee, Hankeun; Choi, Seokheun

    2016-09-01

    Volatile organic compound (VOC) detection is critical for controlling industrial and commercial emissions, environmental monitoring, and public health. Simple, portable, rapid and low-cost VOC sensing platforms offer the benefits of on-site and real-time monitoring anytime and anywhere. The best and most practically useful approaches to monitoring would include equipment-free and power-free detection by the naked eye. In this work, we created a novel, paper-based cantilever sensor array that allows simple and rapid naked-eye VOC detection without the need for power, electronics or readout interface/equipment. This simple VOC detection method was achieved using (i) low-cost paper materials as a substrate and (ii) swellable thin polymers adhered to the paper. Upon exposure to VOCs, the polymer swelling adhered to the paper-based cantilever, inducing mechanical deflection that generated a distinctive composite pattern of the deflection angles for a specific VOC. The angle is directly measured by the naked eye on a 3-D protractor printed on a paper facing the cantilevers. The generated angle patterns are subjected to statistical algorithms (linear discriminant analysis (LDA)) to classify each VOC sample and selectively detect a VOC. We classified four VOC samples with 100% accuracy using LDA.

  12. Peculiarities of the Third Natural Frequency Vibrations of a Cantilever for the Improvement of Energy Harvesting

    PubMed Central

    Ostasevicius, Vytautas; Janusas, Giedrius; Milasauskaite, Ieva; Zilys, Mindaugas; Kizauskiene, Laura

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on several aspects extending the dynamical efficiency of a cantilever beam vibrating in the third mode. A few ways of producing this mode stimulation, namely vibro-impact or forced excitation, as well as its application for energy harvesting devices are proposed. The paper presents numerical and experimental analyses of novel structural dynamics effects along with an optimal configuration of the cantilever beam. The peculiarities of a cantilever beam vibrating in the third mode are related to the significant increase of the level of deformations capable of extracting significant additional amounts of energy compared to the conventional harvester vibrating in the first mode. Two types of a piezoelectric vibrating energy harvester (PVEH) prototype are analysed in this paper: the first one without electrode segmentation, while the second is segmented using electrode segmentation at the strain nodes of the third vibration mode to achieve effective operation at the third resonant frequency. The results of this research revealed that the voltage generated by any segment of the segmented PVEH prototype excited at the third resonant frequency demonstrated a 3.4–4.8-fold increase in comparison with the non-segmented prototype. Simultaneously, the efficiency of the energy harvester prototype also increased at lower resonant frequencies from 16% to 90%. The insights presented in the paper may serve for the development and fabrication of advanced piezoelectric energy harvesters which would be able to generate a considerably increased amount of electrical energy independently of the frequency of kinematical excitation. PMID:26029948

  13. Coupled molecular and cantilever dynamics model for frequency-modulated atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Klocke, Michael; Wolf, Dietrich E

    2016-01-01

    A molecular dynamics model is presented, which adds harmonic potentials to the atomic interactions to mimic the elastic properties of an AFM cantilever. It gives new insight into the correlation between the experimentally monitored frequency shift and cantilever damping due to the interaction between tip atoms and scanned surface. Applying the model to ionic crystals with rock salt structure two damping mechanisms are investigated, which occur separately or simultaneously depending on the tip position. These mechanisms are adhesion hysteresis on the one hand and lateral excitations of the cantilever on the other. We find that the short range Lennard-Jones part of the atomic interaction alone is sufficient for changing the predominant mechanism. When the long range ionic interaction is switched off, the two damping mechanisms occur with a completely different pattern, which is explained by the energy landscape for the apex atom of the tip. In this case the adhesion hysteresis is always associated with a distinct lateral displacement of the tip. It is shown how this may lead to a systematic shift between the periodic patterns obtained from the frequency and from the damping signal, respectively.

  14. Microfluidic cantilever detects bacteria and measures their susceptibility to antibiotics in small confined volumes

    PubMed Central

    Etayash, Hashem; Khan, M. F.; Kaur, Kamaljit; Thundat, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    In the fight against drug-resistant bacteria, accurate and high-throughput detection is essential. Here, a bimaterial microcantilever with an embedded microfluidic channel with internal surfaces chemically or physically functionalized with receptors selectively captures the bacteria passing through the channel. Bacterial adsorption inside the cantilever results in changes in the resonance frequency (mass) and cantilever deflection (adsorption stress). The excitation of trapped bacteria using infrared radiation (IR) causes the cantilever to deflect in proportion to the infrared absorption of the bacteria, providing a nanomechanical infrared spectrum for selective identification. We demonstrate the in situ detection and discrimination of Listeria monocytogenes at a concentration of single cell per μl. Trapped Escherichia coli in the microchannel shows a distinct nanomechanical response when exposed to antibiotics. This approach, which combines enrichment with three different modes of detection, can serve as a platform for the development of a portable, high-throughput device for use in the real-time detection of bacteria and their response to antibiotics. PMID:27698375

  15. Cantilever RF-MEMS for monolithic integration with phased array antennas on a PCB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar-Armenta, C. J.; Porter, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    This article presents the development and operation of a novel electrostatic metal-to-metal contact cantilever radio-frequency microelectromechanical system (RF-MEMS) switch for monolithic integration with microstrip phased array antennas (PAAs) on a printed circuit board. The switch is fabricated using simple photolithography techniques on a Rogers 4003c substrate, with a footprint of 200 µm × 100 µm, based on a 1 µm-thick copper cantilever. An alternative wet-etching technique for effectively releasing the cantilever is described. Electrostatic and electromagnetic measurements show that the RF-MEMS presents an actuation voltage of 90 V for metal-to-metal contact, an isolation of -8.7 dB, insertion loss of -2.5 dB and a return loss of -15 dB on a 50 Ω microstrip line at 12.5 GHz. For proof-of-concept, a beam-steering 2 × 2 microstrip PAA, based on two 1-bit phase shifters suitable for the monolithic integration of the RF-MEMS, has been designed and measured at 12.5 GHz. Measurements show that the beam-steering system presents effective radiation characteristics with scanning capabilities from broadside towards 29° in the H-plane.

  16. Nanomechanical modeling of a (100)[001] crack in a single crystal bcc iron cantilever beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skogsrud, Jørn; Jørum, Marie; Thaulow, Christian

    2017-02-01

    An atomistic model of a fully 3D, nano-sized, pre-cracked cantilever beam has been made and MD simulations have been performed to deflect the beam and initiate crack growth. The crucial process zone in front of the crack has been investigated with respect to linear elastic and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics and plastic deformation mechanisms such as dislocations and twinning. The effect of crack geometry and loading rate has been studied. Two crack geometries were compared, one atomically sharp and one blunted. The sharper crack was shown to lead to a cleaner crack extension on (110)-planes, while the rounded crack showed extension along the initial (100)-plane in accordance with experiments on micro-sized 3 wt% Si α-Fe cantilevers. The effect of strain rate was also investigated, and it was found that lower strain rate correlated better with experimental observations. However, the strain rate used is still several magnitudes higher than for experiments, limiting the usefulness of strain rate observations for predicting behavior in experiments. A brief post-deformation comparison between simulations and SEM-images of focused ion beam-fabricated micro-cantilevers was also done, showing possible signs of similar deformation mechanisms and dislocation systems between them.

  17. Material Transport and Synthesis by Cantilever-free Scanning Probe Lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Xing

    Reliably synthesizing and transporting materials in nanoscale is the key question in many fields of nanotechnology. Cantilever-free scanning probe lithography, by replacing fragile and costly cantilevers with a robust and low cost elastomeric structure, fundamentally solved the low-throughput nature of scanning probe lithography, which has great potential to be a powerful and point-of-use tool for high throughput synthesis of various kinds of nanomaterials. Two nanolithographic methods, polymer pen lithography (PPL) and beam pen lithography (BPL), have been developed based on the cantilever-free architecture to directly deliver materials and transfer energy to substrates, respectively. The first portion of my thesis, including chapter two and chapter three, addresses major challenges remaining in the cantilever-free scanning probe lithographic techniques. Chapter two details the role of contact force in polymer pen lithography. A geometric model was developed to quantitatively explain the relationship between the z-piezo extension, the contact force and the resulted feature size. With such a model, force can be used as the in-situ feedback during the patterning and a new method for leveling the pen arrays was developed, which utilizes the total force between the pen arrays and the surface to achieve leveling with a tilt of less than 0.004°. In chapter three, massively multiplexed near-field photolithography has been demonstrated by combining BPL with a batch method to fabricate nanometer scale apertures in parallel fashion and a strategy to individually actuation of each pen in the pen array are discussed. This transformative combination enables one to writing arbitrary patterns composed of diffraction-unlimited features over square centimeter areas that are in registry with existing patterns and nanostructures, creating a unified tool for constructing and studying nanomaterials. The second portion of this thesis focuses on applications of cantilever-free scanning

  18. Resonant-cantilever bio/chemical sensors with an integrated heater for both resonance exciting optimization and sensing repeatability enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Haitao; Li, Xinxin; Gan, Xiaohua; Liu, Yongjing; Liu, Xiang; Xu, Pengcheng; Li, Jungang; Liu, Min

    2009-04-01

    With an integrated resonance exciting heater and a self-sensing piezoresistor, resonant micro-cantilever bio/chemical sensors are optimally designed and fabricated by micromachining techniques. This study is emphasized on the optimization of the integrated heating resistor. Previous research has put the heater at either the cantilever clamp end, the midpoint or the free end. Aiming at sufficiently high and stable resonant amplitude, our research indicates that the optimized location of the thermal-electric exciting resistor is the clamp end instead of other positions. By both theoretical analysis and resonance experiments where three heating resistors are placed at the three locations of the fabricated cantilever, it is clarified that the clamp end heating provides the most efficient resonance excitation in terms of resonant amplitude, Q-factor and resonance stability. Besides, the optimized combination of dc bias and ac voltage is determined by both analysis and experimental verification. With the optimized heating excitation, the resonant cantilever is used for biotin-avidin-specific detection, resulting in a ±0.1 Hz ultra-low noise floor of the frequency signal and a 130 fg mass resolution. In addition to resonance excitation, the heater is used to heat up the cantilever for speed-up desorption after detection that helps rapid and repeated sensing to chemical vapor. The clamp end is determined (by simulation) as the optimal heating location for uniform temperature distribution on the cantilever. Using the resonant cantilever, a rapid and repeated sensing experiment on dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) vapor shows that a short-period heating at the detection interval significantly quickens the signal recovery and enhances the sensing repeatability.

  19. Fatigue study and improve reliability of cantilever type micro piezoelectric energy harvesters reinforced with flexible adhesive conductive tape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, T. K.; Hsieh, Y. C.; Chen, C. T.; Chen, J. J.; Wu, W. J.

    2016-04-01

    Cantilever type piezoelectric energy harvester (PEH) is widely adopted in the design of vibration energy harvesters because of simple, effective and easy to fabricate. When the PEH is working under excitation of continuous vibration sources, like mounting on motors, reliability and durability is a major concern. The failure mode and fatigue issues will be important design considerations in field applications. Since the largest strain of a cantilever structure is located in the clamping position of fixed end, the location is therefore the weakest point of the structure and the hot zone of mechanical cracks. The failure mode due to fatigue under long time excitation of vibration sources is typically continuously developing small cracks on the piezoelectric PZT films till tearing the surface electrodes and caused open circuit to the output circuitry. Therefore, extending the lifetime with minimize the surface electrodes cracking becomes a key point for field applications. Previously, we focused on the output performance of PEH. At PowerMEMS 2014 [1], we presented a high performance PEH based on PZT thin films fabricated with a homemade PZT deposition equipment on stainless steel substrates. We confirmed that the stainless steel based PEH can generate better output power than silicon based devices under the same vibration excitation levels, and also the stainless based PEH can have longer lifetime when excited at higher vibration levels due to better mechanical strength. In this study, we tried to further reinforce the PEH with a conductive adhesive tape sticking on the surface electrode near the clamping position. We investigated the change of failure mode and mechanical behaviors, including the frequency bandwidth and non-linearity of the piezoelectric energy harvester. The PEH devices was mounted on a shaker for long time testing with vibration frequency set around 120Hz at 0.5g, 0.6g, and 0.7g acceleration vibration levels. The electrodes of the PEH device were

  20. Evidence of the big fix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamada, Yuta; Kawai, Hikaru; Kawana, Kiyoharu

    2014-06-01

    We give an evidence of the Big Fix. The theory of wormholes and multiverse suggests that the parameters of the Standard Model are fixed in such a way that the total entropy at the late stage of the universe is maximized, which we call the maximum entropy principle. In this paper, we discuss how it can be confirmed by the experimental data, and we show that it is indeed true for the Higgs vacuum expectation value vh. We assume that the baryon number is produced by the sphaleron process, and that the current quark masses, the gauge couplings and the Higgs self-coupling are fixed when we vary vh. It turns out that the existence of the atomic nuclei plays a crucial role to maximize the entropy. This is reminiscent of the anthropic principle, however it is required by the fundamental law in our case.

  1. Mobile versus fixed site lithotripsy.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, C.; Burgess, N. A.; Feneley, R. C.; Matthews, P. N.

    1991-01-01

    The efficacy of a mobile Dornier HM4 lithotriptor, was compared with that of a fixed site Siemens Lithostar. A total of 115 calculi in 98 patients were treated, 55 on the mobile Dornier and 60 on the Lithostar. The groups were similar except for stone size, the mean of the Lithostar group being 11 mm compared with 7.7 mm in the Dornier group. Fragmentation rates were not significantly different, 88% and 75% on the mobile and fixed site machines, respectively and, at 3 months follow-up 66% and 46% were stone free or with fragments of less than 2 mm. There were no serious complications, and the incidence of mild complications was similar in the two groups. We conclude that the mobile Dornier HM4 is an effective lithotriptor and can offer several advantages over fixed site machines. PMID:1929134

  2. Biomechanical aspects of the optimal number of implants to carry a cross-arch full restoration.

    PubMed

    Brunski, John B

    2014-01-01

    A proper definition of the 'optimal' number of implants to support a full arch prosthesis should go beyond solely a listing of the number of implants used in a treatment plan; it should be based upon a biomechanical analysis that takes into account several factors: the locations of the implants in the jaw; the quality and quantity of bone into which they are placed; the loads (forces and moments) that develop on the implants; the magnitudes of stress and strain that develop in the interfacial bone as well as in the implants and prosthesis; and the relationship of the stresses and strains to limits for the materials involved. Overall, determining an 'optimal' number of implants to use in a patient is a biomechanical design problem. This paper discusses some of the approaches that are already available to aid biomechanically focused clinical treatment planning. A number of examples are presented to illustrate how relatively simple biomechanical analyses - e.g. the Skalak model - as well as more complex analyses (e.g. finite element modelling) can be used to assess the pros and cons of various arrangements of implants to support fullarch prostheses. Some of the examples considered include the use of 4 rather than 6 implants to span the same arc-length in a jaw, and the pros and cons of using tilted implants as in the 'all-on-4' approach. In evaluating the accuracy of the various biomechanical analyses, it is clear that our current prediction methods are not always perfectly accurate in vivo, although they can provide a reasonably approximate analysis of a treatment plan in many situations. In the current era of cone beam computerised tomography (CT) scans of patients in the dental office, there is significant promise for finite element analyses (FEA) based on anatomically-accurate input data. However, at the same time it has to be recognised that effective use of FEA software requires a reasonable engineering background, especially insofar as interpretations of the clinical significance of stresses and strains in bone and prosthetic materials.

  3. Increased imaging speed and force sensitivity for bio-applications with small cantilevers using a conventional AFM setup

    PubMed Central

    Leitner, Michael; Fantner, Georg E.; Fantner, Ernest J.; Ivanova, Katerina; Ivanov, Tzvetan; Rangelow, Ivo; Ebner, Andreas; Rangl, Martina; Tang, Jilin; Hinterdorfer, Peter

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrate the increased performance in speed and sensitivity achieved by the use of small AFM cantilevers on a standard AFM system. For this, small rectangular silicon oxynitride cantilevers were utilized to arrive at faster atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging times and more sensitive molecular recognition force spectroscopy (MRFS) experiments. The cantilevers we used had lengths between 13 and 46 μm, a width of about 11 μm, and a thickness between 150 and 600 nm. They were coated with chromium and gold on the backside for a better laser reflection. We characterized these small cantilevers through their frequency spectrum and with electron microscopy. Due to their small size and high resonance frequency we were able to increase the imaging speed by a factor of 10 without any loss in resolution for images from several μm scansize down to the nanometer scale. This was shown on bacterial surface layers (s-layer) with tapping mode under aqueous, near physiological conditions and on nuclear membranes in contact mode in ambient environment. In addition, we showed that single molecular forces can be measured with an up to 5 times higher force sensitivity in comparison to conventional cantilevers with similar spring constants. PMID:22721963

  4. Calibration of measurement sensitivities of multiple micro-cantilever dynamic modes in atomic force microscopy using a contact detection method

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Zhen; Jeong, Younkoo; Menq, Chia-Hsiang

    2013-02-15

    An accurate experimental method is proposed for on-spot calibration of the measurement sensitivities of multiple micro-cantilever dynamic modes in atomic force microscopy. One of the key techniques devised for this method is a reliable contact detection mechanism that detects the tip-surface contact instantly. At the contact instant, the oscillation amplitude of the tip deflection, converted to that of the deflection signal in laser reading through the measurement sensitivity, exactly equals to the distance between the sample surface and the cantilever base position. Therefore, the proposed method utilizes the recorded oscillation amplitude of the deflection signal and the base position of the cantilever at the contact instant for the measurement sensitivity calibration. Experimental apparatus along with various signal processing and control modules was realized to enable automatic and rapid acquisition of multiple sets of data, with which the calibration of a single dynamic mode could be completed in less than 1 s to suppress the effect of thermal drift and measurement noise. Calibration of the measurement sensitivities of the first and second dynamic modes of three micro-cantilevers having distinct geometries was successfully demonstrated. The dependence of the measurement sensitivity on laser spot location was also experimentally investigated. Finally, an experiment was performed to validate the calibrated measurement sensitivity of the second dynamic mode of a micro-cantilever.

  5. Fiber-top and ferrule-top cantilevers for atomic force microscopy and scanning near field optical microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavan, Dhwajal; Gruca, Grzegorz; van de Watering, Tomek; Heeck, Kier; Rector, Jan; Slaman, Martin; Andres, Dieter; Tiribilli, Bruno; Margheri, Giancarlo; Iannuzzi, Davide

    2012-04-01

    Fiber-top and ferrule-top cantilevers (FTC) are a new generation of all optical, monolithic, self-aligned microdevices. They are obtained by carving a cantilever on the cleaved end of an optical fiber (fiber-top) or on a ferrule terminated fiber (ferrule-top). FTCs rely on Fabry-Perot interferometry to measure the deflection of the cantilever with subnanometer deflection sensitivity. FTCs specially developed for scanning probe microscopy are equipped with a sharp tip that has the dual function of probing the topography and collecting/emitting light. We perform the scanning probe microscopy using these probes in air, liquid and at low temperature (12°K). The light emission/collection functionality of FTC probes also allows one to combine scanning near field optical microscopy (SNOM) and optical transmission microscopy with contact and non-contact mode atomic force microscopy (AFM). This makes FTCs ideal for AFM+SNOM on soft samples, polymers and biological specimen, where bent fiber probes and tuning fork based systems would not be recommended because of the high stiffness of those probes. We demonstrate here the capability of fiber-top cantilevers to measure deflection and collect near field optical signal, and also the capability of ferrule-top cantilevers for simultaneous optical transmission microscopy and topography of SNOM gratings. Thanks to their unique features, FTCs also open up possibilities for UV nanolithography and on-demand optical excitation at nanoscale.

  6. Calibration of measurement sensitivities of multiple micro-cantilever dynamic modes in atomic force microscopy using a contact detection method.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen; Jeong, Younkoo; Menq, Chia-Hsiang

    2013-02-01

    An accurate experimental method is proposed for on-spot calibration of the measurement sensitivities of multiple micro-cantilever dynamic modes in atomic force microscopy. One of the key techniques devised for this method is a reliable contact detection mechanism that detects the tip-surface contact instantly. At the contact instant, the oscillation amplitude of the tip deflection, converted to that of the deflection signal in laser reading through the measurement sensitivity, exactly equals to the distance between the sample surface and the cantilever base position. Therefore, the proposed method utilizes the recorded oscillation amplitude of the deflection signal and the base position of the cantilever at the contact instant for the measurement sensitivity calibration. Experimental apparatus along with various signal processing and control modules was realized to enable automatic and rapid acquisition of multiple sets of data, with which the calibration of a single dynamic mode could be completed in less than 1 s to suppress the effect of thermal drift and measurement noise. Calibration of the measurement sensitivities of the first and second dynamic modes of three micro-cantilevers having distinct geometries was successfully demonstrated. The dependence of the measurement sensitivity on laser spot location was also experimentally investigated. Finally, an experiment was performed to validate the calibrated measurement sensitivity of the second dynamic mode of a micro-cantilever.

  7. Study of sensitivity and noise in the piezoelectric self-sensing and self-actuating cantilever with an integrated Wheatstone bridge circuit.

    PubMed

    Shin, ChaeHo; Jeon, InSu; Khim, Zheong G; Hong, J W; Nam, HyoJin

    2010-03-01

    A detection method using a self-sensing cantilever is more desirable than other detection methods (optical fiber and laser beam bounce detection) that are bulky and require alignment. The advantage of the self-sensing cantilever is its simplicity, particularly its simple structure. It can be used for the construction of an atomic force microscopy system with a vacuum, fluids, and a low temperature chamber. Additionally, the self-actuating cantilever can be used for a high speed scanning system because the bandwidth is larger than the bulk scanner. Frequently, ZnO film has been used as an actuator in a self-actuating cantilever. In this paper, we studied the characteristics of the self-sensing and self-actuating cantilever with an integrated Wheatstone bridge circuit substituting the ZnO film with a lead zirconate titanate (PZT) film as the actuator. We can reduce the leakage current (to less than 10(-4) A/cm(2)) in the PZT cantilever and improve sensor sensitivity through a reduction of noise level from the external sensor circuit using the Wheatstone bridge circuit embedded into the cantilever. The self-sensing and actuating cantilever with an integrated Wheatstone bridge circuit was compared with a commercial self-sensing cantilever or self-sensing and actuating cantilever without an integrated Wheatstone bridge circuit. The measurement results have shown that sensing the signal to noise level and the minimum detectable deflection improved to 4.78 mV and 1.18 nm, respectively. We believe that this cantilever allows for easier system integration and miniaturization, provides better controllability and higher scan speeds, and offers the potential for full automation.

  8. Fixed drug eruption to tartrazine.

    PubMed

    Orchard, D C; Varigos, G A

    1997-11-01

    An 11-year-old girl with a recurrent fixed drug eruption to tartrazine on the dorsum of the left hand is presented. Oral provocation tests to both the suspected food, an artificially coloured cheese crisp, and to tartrazine were positive. This case highlights fire need to consider artificial flavours, colours and preservatives as potential culprits in classic drug eruptions.

  9. Fixed Costs and Hours Constraints

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, William R.

    2011-01-01

    Hours constraints are typically identified by worker responses to questions asking whether they would prefer a job with more hours and more pay or fewer hours and less pay. Because jobs with different hours but the same rate of pay may be infeasible when there are fixed costs of employment or mandatory overtime premia, the constraint in those…

  10. Principle design and actuation of a dual chamber electromagnetic micropump with coaxial cantilever valves.

    PubMed

    Zordan, Enrico; Amirouche, Farid; Zhou, Yu

    2010-02-01

    This paper deals with the design and characterization of an electromagnetic actuation micropump with superimposed dual chambers. An integral part of microfluidic system includes micropumps which have become a critical design focus and have the potential to alter treatment and drug delivery requirements to patients. In this paper, conceptual design of variable geometrical nozzle/diffuser elements, coaxial cantilever valve, is proposed. It takes advantages of cantilever fluctuating valves with preset geometry to optimize and control fluid flow. The integration of this conceptual valve into a dual chamber micropump has increased the flow rate when compared to a single chamber micropump. This technique also allows for the fluid flow to be actively controlled by adjusting the movement of the intermediate membrane and the cantilever valves due to their fast response and large deflection properties when subjected to an electromagnetic field. To ensure reliability and performance of both the membrane and electromagnets, finite element method was used to perform the stress-strain analysis and optimize the membrane structure and electromagnet configuration. The frequency-dependent flow rates and backpressure are investigated for different frequencies by varying the applied currents from 1A to 1.75A. The current micropump design exhibits a backpressure of 58 mmH(2)O and has a water flow rate that reaches maximum at 1.985 ml/s under a 1.75A current with a resonance frequency of 45 Hz. This proposed micropump while at its initial prototype stage can satisfy the requirements of wide flow rate drug delivery applications. Its controllability and process design are attractive for high volume fabrication and low cost.

  11. Nanomechanical assessment of human and murine collagen fibrils via atomic force microscopy cantilever-based nanoindentation.

    PubMed

    Andriotis, Orestis G; Manuyakorn, Wiparat; Zekonyte, Jurgita; Katsamenis, Orestis L; Fabri, Sebastien; Howarth, Peter H; Davies, Donna E; Thurner, Philipp J

    2014-11-01

    The nanomechanical assessment of collagen fibrils via atomic force microscopy (AFM) is of increasing interest within the biomedical research community. In contrast to conventional nanoindentation there exists no common standard for conducting experiments and analysis of data. Currently used analysis approaches vary between studies and validation of quantitative results is usually not performed, which makes comparison of data from different studies difficult. Also there are no recommendations with regards to the maximum indentation depth that should not be exceeded to avoid substrate effects. Here we present a methodology and analysis approach for AFM cantilever-based nanoindentation experiments that allows efficient use of captured data and relying on a reference sample for determination of tip shape. Further we show experimental evidence that maximum indentation depth on collagen fibrils should be lower than 10-15% of the height of the fibril to avoid substrate effects and we show comparisons between our and other approaches used in previous works. While our analysis approach yields similar values for indentation modulus compared to the Oliver-Pharr method we found that Hertzian analysis yielded significantly lower values. Applying our approach we successfully and efficiently indented collagen fibrils from human bronchi, which were about 30 nm in size, considerably smaller compared to collagen fibrils obtained from murine tail-tendon. In addition, derived mechanical parameters of collagen fibrils are in agreement with data previously published. To establish a quantitative validation we compared indentation results from conventional and AFM cantilever-based nanoindentation on polymeric samples with known mechanical properties. Importantly we can show that our approach yields similar results when compared to conventional nanoindentation on polymer samples. Introducing an approach that is reliable, efficient and taking into account the AFM tip shape, we anticipate

  12. An elastography method based on the scanning contact resonance of a piezoelectric cantilever

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Ji; Li, Faxin

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Most tissues may become significantly stiffer than their normal states when there are lesions inside. The tissue's modulus can then act as an identification parameter for clinic diagnosis of tumors or fibrosis, which leads to elastography. This study introduces a novel elastography method that can be used for modulus imaging of superficial organs. Methods: This method is based on the scanning contact-resonance of a unimorph piezoelectric cantilever. The cantilever vibrates in its bending mode with the tip pressed tightly on the sample. The contact resonance frequency of the cantilever-sample system is tracked at each scanning point, from which the sample's modulus can be derived based on a beam dynamic model and a contact mechanics model. Scanning is performed by a three-dimensional motorized stage and the whole system is controlled by a homemade software program based on LabVIEW. Results: Testing onin vitro beef tissues indicates that the fat and the muscle can be easily distinguished using this system, and the accuracy of the modulus measurement can be comparable with that of nanoindentation. Imaging on homemade gelatin phantoms shows that the depth information of the abnormalities can be qualitatively obtained by varying the pressing force. The detection limit of this elastography method is specially examined both experimentally and numerically. Results show that it can detect the typical lesions in superficial organs with the depth of several centimeters. The lateral resolution of this elastography method/system is better than 0.5 mm, and could be further enhanced by using more scanning points. Conclusions: The proposed elastography system can be regarded as a sensitive palpation robot, which may be very promising in early diagnosis of tumors in superficial organs such as breast and thyroid.

  13. Position and mass determination of multiple particles using cantilever based mass sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Dohn, Soeren; Schmid, Silvan; Boisen, Anja; Amiot, Fabien

    2010-07-26

    Resonant microcantilevers are highly sensitive to added masses and have the potential to be used as mass-spectrometers. However, making the detection of individual added masses quantitative requires the position determination for each added mass. We derive expressions relating the position and mass of several added particles to the resonant frequencies of a cantilever, and an identification procedure valid for particles with different masses is proposed. The identification procedure is tested by calculating positions and mass of multiple microparticles with similar mass positioned on individual microcantilevers. Excellent agreement is observed between calculated and measured positions and calculated and theoretical masses.

  14. Application of GRASP (General Rotorcraft Aeromechanical Stability Program) to nonlinear analysis of a cantilever beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinnant, Howard E.; Hodges, Dewey H.

    1987-01-01

    The General Rotorcraft Aeromechanical Stability Program (GRASP) was developed to analyse the steady-state and linearized dynamic behavior of rotorcraft in hovering and axial flight conditions. Because of the nature of problems GRASP was created to solve, the geometrically nonlinear behavior of beams is one area in which the program must perform well in order to be of any value. Numerical results obtained from GRASP are compared to both static and dynamic experimental data obtained for a cantilever beam undergoing large displacements and rotations caused by deformations. The correlation is excellent in all cases.

  15. A numerical method for determining the natural vibration characteristics of rotating nonuniform cantilever blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, W. F., Jr.; Malatino, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    A method is presented for determining the free vibration characteristics of a rotating blade having nonuniform spanwise properties and cantilever boundary conditions. The equations which govern the coupled flapwise, chordwise, and torsional motion of such a blade are solved using an integrating matrix method. By expressing the equations of motion and matrix notation, utilizing the integrating matrix as an operator, and applying the boundary conditions, the equations are formulated into an eigenvalue problem whose solutions may be determined by conventional methods. Computer results are compared with experimental data.

  16. Diameter-dependent dissipation of vibration energy of cantilevered multiwall carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Sawaya, Shintaro; Arie, Takayuki; Akita, Seiji

    2011-04-22

    This study investigated the mechanical properties of vibrating cantilevered multiwall carbon nanotubes in terms of energy loss in a vibrating nanotube. Young's moduli of the nanotubes show a clear dependence of the perfection of the sp(2) carbon network, as determined from Raman spectroscopy. The energy loss corresponding to the inverse of the quality factor increases with increasing tube diameter, although the nanotube maintains high mechanical strength around 0.5 TPa. This fact implies that the vibration energy is dissipated mainly not by defects, but by van der Waals interactions between walls.

  17. Nonlinear Elastic J-Integral Measurements in Mode I Using a Tapered Double Cantilever Beam Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macon, David J.

    2006-01-01

    An expression for the J-integral of a nonlinear elastic material is derived for an advancing crack in a tapered double cantilever beam fracture specimen. The elastic and plastic fracture energies related to the test geometry and how these energies correlates to the crack position are discussed. The dimensionless shape factors eta(sub el and eta(sub p) are shown to be equivalent and the deformation J-integral is analyzed in terms of the eta(sub el) function. The fracture results from a structural epoxy are interpreted using the discussed approach. The magnitude of the plastic dissipation is found to strongly depend upon the initial crack shape.

  18. Characterization of Interlaminar Crack Growth in Composites with the Double Cantilever Beam Specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunston, D. L.

    1984-01-01

    A project to examine the double cantilever beam specimen as a quantitative test method to assess the resistance of various composite materials to interlaminar crack growth is discussed. A second objective is to investigate the micromechanics of failure for composites with tough matrix resins from certain generic types of polymeric systems: brittle thermosets, toughened thermosets, and thermoplastics. Emphasis is given to a discussion of preliminary results in two areas: the effects of temperature and loading rate for woven composites, and the effects of matrix toughening in woven and unidirectional composites.

  19. Dynamic behavior of continuous cantilevered pipes conveying fluid near critical velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rousselet, J.; Herrmann, G.

    1981-01-01

    The plane motion of a cantilevered pipe conveying fluid is examined when the flow velocity is in the neighborhood of that generating flutter. In contrast to previous studies, the flow velocity is not prescribed as a constant, but is determined from the laws of motion. A system of two nonlinear partial differential equations which are coupled through the nonlinear terms is thereby obtained. The solution is found by the use of the Krylov-Bogoliubov averaging method and the results are discussed indicating the effect of nonlinearities.

  20. Effect of Surface Layer on Electromechanical Stability of Tweezers and Cantilevers Fabricated from Conductive Cylindrical Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keivani, Maryam; Koochi, Ali; Sedighi, Hamid M.; Abadyan, Mohamadreza; Farrokhabadi, Amin; Shahedin, Abed Moheb

    2016-12-01

    Herein, the impact of surface layer on the stability of nanoscale tweezers and cantilevers fabricated from nanowires with cylindrical cross section is studied. A modified continuum based on the Gurtin-Murdoch surface elasticity is applied for incorporating the presence of surface layer. Considering the cylindrical geometry of the nanowire, the presence of the Coulomb attraction and dispersion forces are incorporated in the derived formulations. Three different approaches, i.e. numerical differential quadrature method (DQM), an approximated homotopy perturbation method (HPM) and developing lumped parameter model (LPM) have been employed to solve the governing equations. The impact of surface layer on the instability of the system is demonstrated.

  1. Cantilever anemometer based on a superconducting micro-resonator: application to superfluid turbulence.

    PubMed

    Salort, J; Monfardini, A; Roche, P-E

    2012-12-01

    We present a new type of cryogenic local velocity probe that operates in liquid helium (1 K < T < 4.2 K) and achieves a spatial resolution of ≈ 0.1 mm. The operating principle is based on the deflection of a micro-machined silicon cantilever which reflects the local fluid velocity. Deflection is probed using a superconducting niobium micro-resonator sputtered on the sensor and used as a strain gauge. We present the working principle and the design of the probe, as well as calibration measurements and velocity spectra obtained in a turbulent helium flow above and below the superfluid transition.

  2. A versatile cantilever beam magnetometer for ex situ characterization of magnetic materials.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, R; Sarkar, A; Das, A K

    2012-01-01

    We have designed, fabricated, and made operational an ex situ cantilever beam magnetometer (CBM), which is versatile in the sense that it can measure most of the magnetic properties of a material in all probable shapes. The working principle of a CBM is discussed considering the magnetic torque into the beam theory. The individual components of the instrument are described in details and experiments were performed on the bulk materials, pellets of nanoparticles, ribbon samples, and thin films, and the magnetization, magnetostriction, and magnetocrystalline anisotropy were studied. This magnetometer is inexpensive, but versatile and would be suitable for the research as well as teaching laboratories.

  3. Analysis of 2-spar cantilever wings with special reference to torsion and load transference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, Paul

    1936-01-01

    This report deals with the analysis of 2-spar cantilever wings in torsion, taking cognizance of the fact that the spars are not independent, but are interconnected by ribs and other structural members. The principles of interaction are briefly explained, showing that the mutual relief action occurring depends on the "pure torsional stiffness" of the wing cross section. Various practical methods of analysis are outlined. The "Friedrichs-Von Karman equations" are shown to require the least amount of labor. Numerical examples by the several methods of analysis are given and the agreement between the calculation and experiment is shown.

  4. Thermoelastic Analysis of a Vibrating TiB/Ti Cantilever Beam Using Differential Thermography

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, Larry; Wyen, Travis; Byrd, Alex

    2008-02-15

    Differential thermography has been used to detect the fluctuating temperatures due the thermoelastic effect for a number of years. This paper examines functionally graded TiB/Ti cantilever beams excited on an electromechanical shaker in fully reversed bending. Finite difference analysis of specimens was used to look at the effect of heat conduction, convection and the fundamental frequency on the surface temperature distribution and compared to experimental data. The thermoelastic effect was also used to detect cracking and the stress field at the tip of the fixture during fatigue.

  5. CONDENSED MATTER: STRUCTURE, MECHANICAL AND THERMAL PROPERTIES: Analogies between a Meniscus and a Cantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jian-Lin

    2009-11-01

    Systematic and quantitative analyses of exact analogies between a meniscus and an elastica are performed. It is shown that the two governing equations take the same style after coordinate translation and scale transformation. The morphologies of the liquid bridge and the cantilever are calculated in terms of elliptic integrations, which can be reduced to the same shape after converting the boundary conditions. The present analyses can make us grasp the nature of this physical phenomenon deeply and show some inspiration for designing the analogy experiments. Moreover, the calculated results are helpful to engineering applications, such as design and fabrication of MEMS, and micro-manipulations in micro/nano-technology.

  6. SEM in situ MiniCantilever Beam Bending of U-10Mo/Zr/Al Fuel Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Mook, William; Baldwin, Jon K.; Martinez, Ricardo M.; Mara, Nathan A.

    2014-06-16

    In this work, the fracture behavior of Al/Zr and Zr/dU-10Mo interfaces was measured via the minicantilever bend technique. The energy dissipation rates were found to be approximately 3.7-5 mj/mm2 and 5.9 mj/mm2 for each interface, respectively. It was found that in order to test the Zr/U-10Mo interface, location of the hinge of the cantilever was a key parameter. While this test could be adapted to hot cell use through careful alignment fixturing and measurement of crack lengths with an optical microscope (as opposed to SEM, which was used here out of convenience), machining of the cantilevers via MiniMill in such a way as to locate the interfaces at the cantilever hinge, as well as proper placement of a femtosecond laser notch will continue to be key challenges in a hot cell environment.

  7. Determination of Young's modulus of epoxy coated polyethylene micro-cantilever using phase-shift shadow moiré method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, J. H.; Ratnam, M. M.; Azid, I. A.; Mutharasu, D.

    2011-11-01

    Young's moduli of various epoxy coated polyethylene terephthalate (PET) micro-cantilevers were determined from the deflection results obtained using the phase-shift shadow moiré (PSSM) method. The filler materials for epoxy coatings were aluminum and graphite powders that were mixed with epoxy at various percentages. Young's moduli were calculated from theory based on the deflection results. The PET micro-cantilever coated with aluminum-epoxy coating showed increasing value of Young's modulus when the ratios of the aluminum-epoxy were increased. The graphite-epoxy coating on the PET micro-cantilever also showed the same trend. The experimental results also show that Young's modulus of the graphite-epoxy coating is higher than aluminum-epoxy coating in comparison at the same mixing ratio.

  8. In silico modeling and investigation of self-heating effects in composite nano cantilever biosensors with integrated piezoresistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, Ribu; Ravi Sankar, A.

    2017-03-01

    Over the years, piezoresistive nano cantilever sensors have been extensively investigated for various biological sensing applications. Piezoresistive cantilever sensor is a composite structure with different materials constituting its various layers. Design and modeling of such sensors become challenging since their response is governed by the interplay between their geometrical and constituent material parameters. Even though, piezoresistive nano cantilever biosensors have several advantages, they suffer from a limitation in the form of self-heating induced inaccuracy which is seldom considered in design stages. Although, a few simplified mathematical models have been reported which incorporate the self-heating effect, several assumptions made in the modeling stages result in inaccuracy in predicting sensor terminal response. In this paper, we model and investigate the effect of self-heating on the thermo-electro-mechanical response of piezoresistive cantilever sensors as a function of the relative geometries of the piezoresistor and the cantilever platform. Finite element method (FEM) based numerical computations are used to model the target-receptor interactions induced surface stress response in steady state and maximize the electrical sensitivity to thermal sensitivity ratio of the sensor. Simulation results show that the conduction mode of heat transfer is the dominant heat transfer mechanism. Furthermore, the isolation and immobilization layers play a critical role in determining the thermal sensitivity of the sensor. It is found that the shorter and wider cantilever platforms are more suitable to reduce self-heating induced inaccuracies. In addition, results depict that the piezoresistor width plays a more dominant role in determining the thermal drift induced inaccuracies compared to the piezoresistor length. It is found that for surface stress sensors at large piezoresistor width, the electrical sensitivity to thermal sensitivity ratio improves.

  9. An equation-based nonlinear model for non-flat MEMS fixed-fixed beams with non-vertical anchoring supports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Juan; Garg, Anurag; Kovacs, Andrew; Bajaj, Anil K.; Peroulis, Dimitrios

    2015-05-01

    Anchor supports in MEMS beams are often far from the ideally assumed built-in or step-up conditions. Practical fabrication processes often result in non-vertical anchoring supports (referred to as inclined supports in the following text) which significantly influence the post-release performance of the beam. This paper brings attention to the presence of the inclined supports in surface micromachined fixed-fixed beams and models the mechanical and electromechanical effects of inclined supports for the first time. Specifically, we calculate and validate the effects of residual stress and loading on the post-release beam behavior including their nonlinear large-displacement characteristics. In addition the model accounts for non-flat beam profiles caused by residual stress and/or a non-flat sacrificial layer profile. Inclined supports are modeled as cantilever beams connected to a horizontal beam. The Euler-Bernoulli equations for all beams are simultaneously solved to calculate the axial stress of the horizontal beam and the axial, translational, and rotational compliance of the supports. Nonlinear effects due to stretching and residual stress are also included. The calculated beam displacements agree with FEM models to within 1.1% in both the linear and nonlinear regimes. Furthermore, experimentally-obtained displacements of six fabricated beams with inclined supports agree to within 5.2% with the presented model.

  10. Out-of-resonance vibration modulation of ultrasound with a nonlinear oscillator for microcrack detection in a cantilever beam

    SciTech Connect

    He, Qingbo Xu, Yanyan; Lu, Siliang; Dai, Daoyi

    2014-04-28

    This Letter reports an out-of-resonance vibro-acoustic modulation (VAM) effect in nonlinear ultrasonic evaluation of a microcracked cantilever beam. We design a model to involve the microcracked cantilever beam in a nonlinear oscillator system whose dynamics is introduced to extend the operating vibration excitation band of the VAM out of resonance. The prototype model exhibits an effective bandwidth four times that of the traditional linear model. The reported VAM effect allows efficiently enhancing the detection, localization, and imaging of various types of microcracks in solid materials at out-of-resonance vibration excitation frequencies.

  11. Variable delivery, fixed displacement pump

    SciTech Connect

    Sommars, Mark F.

    2001-01-01

    A variable delivery, fixed displacement pump comprises a plurality of pistons reciprocated within corresponding cylinders in a cylinder block. The pistons are reciprocated by rotation of a fixed angle swash plate connected to the pistons. The pistons and cylinders cooperate to define a plurality of fluid compression chambers each have a delivery outlet. A vent port is provided from each fluid compression chamber to vent fluid therefrom during at least a portion of the reciprocal stroke of the piston. Each piston and cylinder combination cooperates to close the associated vent port during another portion of the reciprocal stroke so that fluid is then pumped through the associated delivery outlet. The delivery rate of the pump is varied by adjusting the axial position of the swash plate relative to the cylinder block, which varies the duration of the piston stroke during which the vent port is closed.

  12. The influence of a Si cantilever tip with/without tungsten coating on noncontact atomic force microscopy imaging of a Ge(001) surface.

    PubMed

    Naitoh, Yoshitaka; Kinoshita, Yukinori; Jun Li, Yan; Kageshima, Masami; Sugawara, Yasuhiro

    2009-07-01

    A sharp probe tip with atomic scale stability is essential and desirable for noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) studies at the atomic scale. We observed a Ge(001) surface using both a Si cantilever and a tungsten coated Si cantilever at room temperature in order to investigate the influence of the tip apex structure on the NC-AFM images. By using the Si cantilever, we first obtained four types of image at the atomic scale which can be explained assuming a dimer structure on the tip apex. On the other hand, the home-made tungsten coated tip, which has atomic scale stability and high electric conductivity, imaged the so-called ordered c(4 x 2) structure without any artifacts. The tungsten coated cantilever was found to have significantly higher performance for NC-AFM studies at the atomic scale than the Si cantilever.

  13. Fixed-film biological processes

    SciTech Connect

    Josephson, J.

    1982-07-01

    During the 1970's, interest in fixed-film biological (FFB) processes for wastewater treatment has increased markedly. One reason for this is that these systems have a potential for considerable energy savings, as compared to conventional suspended-growth or activated-sludge systems, and certain FFB processes may eventually become energy producers. In this article, FFB processes are reviewed. Aerobic and anaerobic FFB systems are discussed and compared, along with a discussion of the toxic substances produced by FFB processes.

  14. Fixed target flammable gas upgrades

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, R.; Squires, B.; Gasteyer, T.; Richardson, R.

    1996-12-01

    In the past, fixed target flammable gas systems were not supported in an organized fashion. The Research Division, Mechanical Support Department began to support these gas systems for the 1995 run. This technical memo describes the new approach being used to supply chamber gasses to fixed target experiments at Fermilab. It describes the engineering design features, system safety, system documentation and performance results. Gas mixtures provide the medium for electron detection in proportional and drift chambers. Usually a mixture of a noble gas and a polyatomic quenching gas is used. Sometimes a small amount of electronegative gas is added as well. The mixture required is a function of the specific chamber design, including working voltage, gain requirements, high rate capability, aging and others. For the 1995 fixed target run all the experiments requested once through gas systems. We obtained a summary of problems from the 1990 fixed target run and made a summary of the operations logbook entries from the 1991 run. These summaries primarily include problems involving flammable gas alarms, but also include incidents where Operations was involved or informed. Usually contamination issues were dealt with by the experimenters. The summaries are attached. We discussed past operational issues with the experimenters involved. There were numerous incidents of drift chamber failure where contaminated gas was suspect. However analyses of the gas at the time usually did not show any particular problems. This could have been because the analysis did not look for the troublesome component, the contaminant was concentrated in the gas over the liquid and vented before the sample was taken, or that contaminants were drawn into the chambers directly through leaks or sub-atmospheric pressures. After some study we were unable to determine specific causes of past contamination problems, although in argon-ethane systems the problems were due to the ethane only.

  15. Seatbelt submarining injury and its prevention countermeasures: How a cantilever seat pan structure exacerbate submarining

    PubMed Central

    Thorbole, Chandrashekhar K.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study and a case report was to demonstrate seat belt webbing induced injury due to seatbelt submarining during the frontal motor vehicle crash. Submarining is an undesired phenomenon during a frontal crash scenario and is dependent on design features of the seat pan and seatbelt system. The lack of adequate anti-submarining features at any seating position with three-point restraint can cause abdominal solid and hollow organ injuries. This paper reports a case of submarining and factors that exacerbated this phenomenon leading to critical occupant abdominal injury. This case report and the following injury causation analysis demonstrate the shortcomings of a cantilever seat pan design in context to the occupant safety. The inadequate seat pan anti-submarining feature in association with lack of seatbelt load-limiter and Pretensioner reduces the level of occupant protection offered by the seat belt system in the rear seat. This case report shows the dangers of cantilever seat pan design and its association with increased risk of submarining causing severe abdominal injuries. PMID:26985421

  16. Design and experimental research on cantilever accelerometer based on fiber Bragg grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Longhai; Jiang, Qi; Li, Yibin; Song, Rui

    2016-06-01

    Currently, an acceleration sensor based on fiber Bragg grating (FBG) has been widely used. A cantilever FBG accelerometer is designed. The simulation of this structure was implemented by finite element software (ANSYS) to analyze its sensing performance parameters. And then the optimized structure was produced and calibration experiments were conducted. On the basis of simulation, optical fiber is embedded in the inner tank of the vibrating mass, and Bragg grating is suspended above the cantilever structure, which can effectively avoid the phenomenon of center wavelength chirp or broadening, and greatly improve the sensitivity of the sensor. The experimental results show that the FBG accelerometer exhibits a sensitivity of 75 pm/(m/s2) (100 Hz) and dynamic range of 60 dB. Its linearity error is <2.31% and repeatability error is <2.76%. And the resonant frequency is ˜125 Hz. The simulation results match the experimental results to demonstrate the good performance of FBG accelerometer, which is expected to be used in the actual project.

  17. Evaluation of the split cantilever beam for Mode 3 delamination testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Roderick H.

    1989-01-01

    A test rig for testing a thick split cantilever beam for scissoring delamination (mode 3) fracture toughness was developed. A 3-D finite element analysis was conducted on the test specimen to determine the strain energy release rate, G, distribution along the delamination front. The virtual crack closure technique was used to calculate the G components resulting from interlaminar tension, GI, interlaminar sliding shear, GII, and interlaminar tearing shear, GIII. The finite element analysis showed that at the delamination front no GI component existed, but a GII component was present in addition to a GIII component. Furthermore, near the free edges, the GII component was significantly higher than the GIII component. The GII/GIII ratio was found to increase with delamination length but was insensitive to the beam depth. The presence of GII at the delamination front was verified experimentally by examination of the failure surfaces. At the center of the beam, where the failure was in mode 3, there was significant fiber bridging. However, at the edges of the beam where the failure was in mode 3, there was no fiber bridging and mode 2 shear hackles were observed. Therefore, it was concluded that the split cantilever beam configuration does not represent a pure mode 3 test. The experimental work showed that the mode 2 fracture toughness, GIIc, must be less than the mode 3 fracture toughness, GIIIc. Therefore, a conservative approach to characterizing mode 3 delamination is to equate GIIIc to GIIc.

  18. Fiber faceplate modulation readout in Bi-material micro-cantilever mirror array imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, Mei; Xia, Zhengzheng; Liu, Ming; Dong, Liquan; Liu, Xiaohua; Zhao, Yuejin

    2016-05-01

    Fiber faceplate modulation was applied to read out the precise actuation of silicon-based, surface micro-fabricated cantilever mirrors array in optical imaging system. The faceplate was made by ordered bundles consisting of as many as ten thousands fibers. The transmission loss of an individual fiber in the bundles was 0.35dB/cm and the cross talk between neighboring fibers in the faceplate was about 15%. Micro-cantilever mirrors array (Focal-Plane Array (FPA)) which composed of two-level bi-material pixels, absorb incident infrared flux and result in a temperature increase. The temperature distribution of incident flux transformed to the deformation distribution in FPA which has a very big difference in coefficients of thermal expansion. FPA plays the roles of target sensing and has the characteristics of high detection sensitivity. Instead of general filter such as knife edge or pinhole, fiber faceplate modulate the beam reflected by the units of FPA. An optical readout signal brings a visible spectrum into pattern recognition system, yielding a visible image on monitor. Thermal images at room temperature have been obtained. The proposed method permits optical axis compact and image noise suppression.

  19. Flutter and divergence instability of the multi-cracked cantilever beam-column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caddemi, S.; Caliò, I.; Cannizzaro, F.

    2014-03-01

    For conservative systems instability can occur only by divergence and the presence of damage can produce both a reduction of the buckling loads and modification of the corresponding mode shapes, depending on the positions and intensities of the damage distribution. For nonconservative systems instability is found to occur by divergence, flutter, or both, characterised by multiple stable and unstable ranges of the loads whose boundary can be altered by the damage distribution. This paper focuses on the stability behaviour of multi-cracked cantilever Euler beam-column subjected to conservative or nonconservative axial loads. The exact flutter and divergence critical loads are obtained by means of the exact closed form solution of the multi-cracked beam-column, derived by the authors in a previous paper. The extensive numerical applications, reported in the paper, aimed at evaluating the influence of several damage scenarios for different values of the degree of nonconservativeness. It is shown how the presence of damage can strongly modify the ranges of divergence and flutter critical loads of the corresponding undamaged cantilever column, which has been the subject of several papers starting from the Pflüger paradoxical results.

  20. Influence of axial loads on the nonplanar vibrations of cantilever beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, Eulher C.; Gonçalves, Paulo B.; Del Prado, Zenón; Rega, Giuseppe

    2012-11-01

    The three-dimensional motions of cantilever beams have been extensively studied in the past. This structural element can be found in several applications, including MEMS and NEMS. In many applications the beam is subjected to axial loads which can play an important role in the dynamics of very slender beams. In this paper a cantilever inextensible beam subject to a concentrated axial load and a lateral harmonic excitation is investigated. Special attention is given to the effect of axial load on the frequency-amplitude relation, bifurcations and instabilities of the beam, a problem not tackled in the previous literature on this subject. To this aim, the nonlinear integro-differential equations describing the flexural-flexural-torsional couplings of the beam are used, together with the Galerkin method, to obtain a set of discretized equations of motion, which are in turn solved by numerical integration using the Runge-Kutta method. Both inertial and geometric nonlinearities are considered in the present analysis. Due to symmetries of the beam cross section, the beam exhibits a 1:1 internal resonance which has an important role on the nonlinear oscillations and bifurcation scenario. The results show that the axial load influences the stiffness of the beam changing its nonlinear behavior from hardening to softening. A detailed parametric analysis using several tools of nonlinear dynamics, unveils the complex dynamics of the beam in the parametric or external resonance regions. Bifurcations leading to multiple coexisting solutions are observed.

  1. A Micro-Cantilever Based Photoacoustic Detector of Terahertz Radiation for Chemical Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glauvitz, Nathan E.; Coutu, Ronald A. Coutu, Jr.; Kistler, Michael N.; Hamilton, Ryan F.; Petkie, Douglas T.; Medvedev, Ivan R.

    2013-06-01

    In this paper we describe a novel photoacoustic detector that can detect radiation in the Terahertz/sub-millimeter (THz/smm) spectral range, is immune to the effect of standing waves, and potentially can have spectral response that is independent of the absorption path length, thus offering crucial advantages for acquisition of THz/smm molecular spectra. The photoacoustic effect occurs when the energy from electromagnetic waves is absorbed by molecules and collisionally transferred into translational energy, thus resulting in local heating induced by the radiation. If radiation produced by the source is modulated, an acoustic wave results which can be detected by a pressure sensitive device such as a microphone or a cantilever. This transduction of the THz signal into a photoacoustic wave is what makes this approach insensitive to the detrimental standing waves associated with traditional THz sensors and allows for a significant reduction in the size of the absorption cell. A Microelectromechanical system (MEMS) cantilever pressure sensor was designed, modeled, fabricated, and tested for sensing the photoacoustic response of gases to THz/smm radiation. Here we present our manufacturing, experimental set-up and most recent spectroscopic results, which demonstrate the capabilities of this spectroscopic technique.

  2. Orientation dependent cantilever torque magnetometry in high magnetic fields and low lemperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaparala, M. V.

    1996-03-01

    The measurement of the magnetic torque τ, as a function of the orientation of the field with respect to the sample axes θ, is a very sensitive and direct method for measuring the anisotropy of magnetic thin films, high Tc superconductors, and other anisotropic systems. With traditional torque magnetometers the limitations of the available sample volume at cryogenic temperature has necessitated the use of a horizontal field, split coil magnets. While solenoid coil vertical field magnets provide much higher fields, the sample space limitations have excluded their use in these measurements. We have designed and built a rotator for the high field magnets at NHMFL that will accomodate the single crystal silicon cantilever magnetometer(M. Chaparala, O.H. Chung and M.J. Naughton, A.I.P. Conf. Proc. 273, 407 (1992).). With this setup we have extended the range of torque magnetometry to high magnetic fields (20T) and low temperatures (0.5K). The setup has an ultimate angular resolution of about a millidegree. I will summarize on the design and performance of this rotator/cantilever torque magnetometer combination and present the results of the the torque measurements on a Tl_2212 single crystal.

  3. Crack Identification of Cantilever Plates Based on a Kriging Surrogate Model.

    PubMed

    Gao, Haiyang; Guo, Xinglin; Ouyang, Huajiang; Han, Fang

    2013-10-01

    This work presents an effective method to identify the tip locations of an internal crack in cantilever plates based on a Kriging surrogate model. Samples of varying crack parameters (tip locations) and their corresponding root mean square (RMS) of random responses are used to construct the initial Kriging surrogate model. Moreover, the pseudo excitation method (PEM) is employed to speed up the spectral analysis. For identifying crack parameters based on the constructed Kriging model, a robust stochastic particle swarm optimization (SPSO) algorithm is adopted for enhancing the global searching ability. To improve the accuracy of the surrogate model without using extensive samples, a small number of samples are first used. Then an optimal point-adding process is carried out to reduce computational cost. Numerical studies of a cantilever plate with an internal crack are performed. The effectiveness and efficiency of this method are demonstrated by the identified results. The effect of initial sampling size on the precision of the identified results is also investigated.

  4. Efficiency improvement of a cantilever-type energy harvester using torsional vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, In-Ho; Jang, Seon-Jun; Koo, Jeong-Hoi; Jung, Hyung-Jo

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, a piezoelectric vibrational energy harvester utilizing coupled bending and torsional vibrations is investigated. The proposed system consists of a cantilever-type substrate covered by the piezoelectric ceramic and a proof mass which is perpendicularly connected to the free end of the cantilever beam by a rigid bar. While the natural frequency and output voltage of the conventional system are affected by bending deformation of the piezoelectric plate, the proposed system makes use of its twisting deformation. The natural frequency of the device can be significantly decreased by manipulating the location of the proof mass on the rigid bar. In order to validate the performance of the proposed energy harvester, numerical simulations and vertical shaker tests are carried out. It is demonstrated that the proposed energy harvester can shift down its resonant frequency considerably and generate much higher output power than the conventional system. It is, therefore, concluded that the proposed energy harvester utilizing the coupled bending and torsional vibrations can be effectively applied to low-frequency vibration situations.

  5. Fast on-wafer electrical, mechanical, and electromechanical characterization of piezoresistive cantilever force sensors.

    PubMed

    Tosolini, G; Villanueva, L G; Perez-Murano, F; Bausells, J

    2012-01-01

    Validation of a technological process requires an intensive characterization of the performance of the resulting devices, circuits, or systems. The technology for the fabrication of micro and nanoelectromechanical systems (MEMS and NEMS) is evolving rapidly, with new kind of device concepts for applications like sensing or harvesting are being proposed and demonstrated. However, the characterization tools and methods for these new devices are still not fully developed. Here, we present an on-wafer, highly precise, and rapid characterization method to measure the mechanical, electrical, and electromechanical properties of piezoresistive cantilevers. The setup is based on a combination of probe-card and atomic force microscopy technology, it allows accessing many devices across a wafer and it can be applied to a broad range of MEMS and NEMS. Using this setup we have characterized the performance of multiple submicron thick piezoresistive cantilever force sensors. For the best design we have obtained a force sensitivity Re(F) = 158μV/nN, a noise of 5.8 μV (1 Hz-1 kHz) and a minimum detectable force of 37 pN with a relative standard deviation of σ(r) ≈ 8%. This small value of σ(r), together with a high fabrication yield >95%, validates our fabrication technology. These devices are intended to be used as bio-molecular detectors for the measurement of intermolecular forces between ligand and receptor molecule pairs.

  6. Insulated Conducting Cantilevered Nanotips and Two-Chamber Recording System for High Resolution Ion Sensing AFM

    PubMed Central

    Meckes, Brian; Arce, Fernando Teran; Connelly, Laura S.; Lal, Ratnesh

    2014-01-01

    Biological membranes contain ion channels, which are nanoscale pores allowing controlled ionic transport and mediating key biological functions underlying normal/abnormal living. Synthetic membranes with defined pores are being developed to control various processes, including filtration of pollutants, charge transport for energy storage, and separation of fluids and molecules. Although ionic transport (currents) can be measured with single channel resolution, imaging their structure and ionic currents simultaneously is difficult. Atomic force microscopy enables high resolution imaging of nanoscale structures and can be modified to measure ionic currents simultaneously. Moreover, the ionic currents can also be used to image structures. A simple method for fabricating conducting AFM cantilevers to image pore structures at high resolution is reported. Tungsten microwires with nanoscale tips are insulated except at the apex. This allows simultaneous imaging via cantilever deflections in normal AFM force feedback mode as well as measuring localized ionic currents. These novel probes measure ionic currents as small as picoampere while providing nanoscale spatial resolution surface topography and is suitable for measuring ionic currents and conductance of biological ion channels. PMID:24663394

  7. Stiffening and damping capacity of an electrostatically tuneable functional composite cantilever beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginés, R.; Bergamini, A.; Motavalli, M.; Ermanni, P.

    2015-09-01

    The damping capacity of a novel composite film, designed to exhibit high dielectric strength and a high friction coefficient for an electrostatic tuneable friction damper, is tested on a cantilever beam. Such a system consists of a carbon fibre reinforced polymer stiffening element which is reversibly laminated onto a host structure with a dielectric material by means of electrostatic fields. Damping is achieved when the maximum shear at the interface between the stiffening element and structure exceeds the shear strength of the electrostatically laminated interface. The thin films tested consist of barium titanate particles and alumina platelets in an epoxy matrix. Their high dielectric constant and high coefficient of friction compared to a commercial available polymer film, polyvinylidene fluoride, lead to a reduction of the required electric field to stiffen and damp the cantilever beam. Reducing the operating voltage affects different aspects of the studied damper. The cost of possible applications of the frictional damper can be reduced, as the special components necessary at high voltages become redundant. Furthermore, the enhanced security positively affects the damping system’s appeal as an alternative damping method.

  8. Electric force microscopy of semiconductors: theory of cantilever frequency fluctuations and noncontact friction.

    PubMed

    Lekkala, Swapna; Marohn, John A; Loring, Roger F

    2013-11-14

    An electric force microscope employs a charged atomic force microscope probe in vacuum to measure fluctuating electric forces above the sample surface generated by dynamics of molecules and charge carriers. We present a theoretical description of two observables in electric force microscopy of a semiconductor: the spectral density of cantilever frequency fluctuations (jitter), which are associated with low-frequency dynamics in the sample, and the coefficient of noncontact friction, induced by higher-frequency motions. The treatment is classical-mechanical, based on linear response theory and classical electrodynamics of diffusing charges in a dielectric continuum. Calculations of frequency jitter explain the absence of contributions from carrier dynamics to previous measurements of an organic field effect transistor. Calculations of noncontact friction predict decreasing friction with increasing carrier density through the suppression of carrier density fluctuations by intercarrier Coulomb interactions. The predicted carrier density dependence of the friction coefficient is consistent with measurements of the dopant density dependence of noncontact friction over Si. Our calculations predict that in contrast to the measurement of cantilever frequency jitter, a noncontact friction measurement over an organic semiconductor could show appreciable contributions from charge carriers.

  9. Electric force microscopy of semiconductors: Theory of cantilever frequency fluctuations and noncontact friction

    SciTech Connect

    Lekkala, Swapna; Marohn, John A.; Loring, Roger F.

    2013-11-14

    An electric force microscope employs a charged atomic force microscope probe in vacuum to measure fluctuating electric forces above the sample surface generated by dynamics of molecules and charge carriers. We present a theoretical description of two observables in electric force microscopy of a semiconductor: the spectral density of cantilever frequency fluctuations (jitter), which are associated with low-frequency dynamics in the sample, and the coefficient of noncontact friction, induced by higher-frequency motions. The treatment is classical-mechanical, based on linear response theory and classical electrodynamics of diffusing charges in a dielectric continuum. Calculations of frequency jitter explain the absence of contributions from carrier dynamics to previous measurements of an organic field effect transistor. Calculations of noncontact friction predict decreasing friction with increasing carrier density through the suppression of carrier density fluctuations by intercarrier Coulomb interactions. The predicted carrier density dependence of the friction coefficient is consistent with measurements of the dopant density dependence of noncontact friction over Si. Our calculations predict that in contrast to the measurement of cantilever frequency jitter, a noncontact friction measurement over an organic semiconductor could show appreciable contributions from charge carriers.

  10. Experimental study of a vortex ring impacting a smart material-based cantilevered plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Sean; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2011-11-01

    Recent developments in lightweight smart materials have generated scientific and technological advancements in small scale energy harvesting for powering low-consumption electronic devices. Often, energy is harvested from base excitation of a cantilevered smart material strip. In this case, the encompassing fluid acts as a passive damper, reducing the vibration amplitude and frequency, which reduces the harvesting capacity. By comparison, relatively few research efforts to date have explored the feasibility of using smart materials for harvesting energy directly from fluid motion. In this paper we employ vortex rings as the source from which to extract energy and use an ionic polymer metal composite (IPMC) strip in a cantilevered configuration as the harvesting device. Vortex rings, generated using a piston/cylinder arrangement submersed in water, are fired at the IPMC harvester and the resulting impact is recorded using a high speed video camera. The vortex ring propagation and circulation are estimated using flow visualization and particle image velocimetry. The plate deflection and electrical output are recorded as functions of time and correlated to the vortex strength and geometry.

  11. Cantilever tilt causing amplitude related convolution in dynamic mode atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunmei; Sun, Jielin; Itoh, Hiroshi; Shen, Dianhong; Hu, Jun

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that the topography in atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a convolution of the tip's shape and the sample's geometry. The classical convolution model was established in contact mode assuming a static probe, but it is no longer valid in dynamic mode AFM. It is still not well understood whether or how the vibration of the probe in dynamic mode affects the convolution. Such ignorance complicates the interpretation of the topography. Here we propose a convolution model for dynamic mode by taking into account the typical design of the cantilever tilt in AFMs, which leads to a different convolution from that in contact mode. Our model indicates that the cantilever tilt results in a dynamic convolution affected by the absolute value of the amplitude, especially in the case that corresponding contact convolution has sharp edges beyond certain angle. The effect was experimentally demonstrated by a perpendicular SiO(2)/Si super-lattice structure. Our model is useful for quantitative characterizations in dynamic mode, especially in probe characterization and critical dimension measurements.

  12. Mechanical properties of graphene cantilever from atomic force microscopy and density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Rasuli, R; Iraji Zad, A; Ahadian, M M

    2010-05-07

    We have studied the mechanical properties of a few-layer graphene cantilever (FLGC) using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The mechanical properties of the suspended FLGC over an open hole have been derived from the AFM data. Force displacement curves using the Derjaguin-Müller-Toporov (DMT) and the massless cantilever beam models yield a Young modulus of E(c) approximately 37, E(a) approximately 0.7 TPa and a Hamakar constant of approximately 3 x 10( - 18) J. The threshold force to shear the FLGC was determined from a breaking force and modeling. In addition, we studied a graphene nanoribbon (GNR), which is a system similar to the FLGC; using density functional theory (DFT). The in-plane Young's modulus for the GNRs were calculated from the DFT outcomes approximately 0.82 TPa and the results were compared with the experiment. We found that the Young's modulus and the threshold shearing force are dependent on the direction of applied force and the values are different for zigzag edge and armchair edge GNRs.

  13. All-phononic amplification in coupled cantilever arrays based on gap soliton dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malishava, Merab

    2017-02-01

    We present a mechanism of amplification of phonons by phonons on the basis of nonlinear band-gap transmission phenomenon. As a concept the idea may be applied to the various number of systems; however we introduce the specific idea of creating an amplification scenario in the chain of coupled cantilever arrays. One chain is driven at the constant frequency located in the upper band of the ladder system, thus no wave enters the system. However the frequency is specifically chosen to be very close to the maximum value of the frequency corresponding to the dispersion relation of the system. An amplification scenario happens when a counter phase pulse of the same frequency with a small amplitude is introduced to the second chain. If both signals exceed a threshold amplitude for the band-gap transmission a large amplitude soliton enters the system—therefore we have an amplifier. Although the concept may be applied in a variety of contexts, all-optical or all-magnonic systems, we choose the system of coupled cantilever arrays and represent a clear example of the application of the presented conceptual idea. Logical operations is the other probable field, where such a mechanism could be used, which might significantly broaden the horizon of the considered applications of band-gap soliton dynamics.

  14. Analyzing the vibrational response of an AFM cantilever in liquid with the consideration of tip mass by comparing the hydrodynamic and contact repulsive force models in higher modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korayem, Moharam Habibnejad; Nahavandi, Amir

    2017-04-01

    This paper investigates the vibration of a tapping-mode Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) cantilever covered with two whole piezoelectric layers in a liquid medium. The authors of this article have already modeled the vibration of a cantilever immersed in liquid over rough surfaces. Five new ideas have been considered for improving the results of the previous work. Mass and damping of a cantilever probe tip have been considered. Since the probe tip of an AFM cantilever has a mass, which can itself affect the natural frequency of vibration, the significance of this mass has been explored. Also, two hydrodynamic force models for analyzing the mass and damping added to a cantilever in liquid medium have been evaluated. In modeling the vibration of a cantilever in liquid, simplifications are made to the theoretical equations used in the modeling, which may make the obtained results different from those in the real case. So, two hydrodynamic force models are introduced and compared with each other. In addition to the already introduced DMT model, the JKR model has been proposed. The forces acting on a probe tip have attractive and repulsive effects. The attractive Van der Waals force can vary depending on the surface smoothness or roughness, and the repulsive contact force, which is independent of the type of surface roughness and usually varies with the hardness or softness of a surface. When the first mode is used in the vibration of an AFM cantilever, the changes of the existing physical parameters in the simulation do not usually produce a significant difference in the response. Thus, three cantilever vibration modes have been investigated. Finally, an analytical approach for obtaining the response of equations is presented which solves the resulting motion equation by the Laplace method and, thus, a time function is obtained for cantilever deflection is determined. Also, using the COMSOL software to model a cantilever in a liquid medium, the computed natural

  15. Analysis the effect of different geometries of AFM's cantilever on the dynamic behavior and the critical forces of three-dimensional manipulation.

    PubMed

    Korayem, Moharam Habibnejad; Saraie, Maniya B; Saraee, Mahdieh B

    2017-01-13

    An important challenge when using an atomic force microscope (AFM) is to be able to control the force exerted by the AFM for performing various tasks. Nevertheless, the exerted force is proportional to the deflection of the AFM cantilever, which itself is affected by a cantilever's stiffness coefficient. Many papers have been published so far on the methods of obtaining the stiffness coefficients of AFM cantilevers in 2D; however, a comprehensive model is yet to be presented on 3D cantilever motion. The discrepancies between the equations of the 2D and 3D analysis are due to the number and direction of forces and moments that are applied to a cantilever. Moreover, in the 3D analysis, contrary to the 2D analysis, due to the interaction between the forces and moments applied on a cantilever, its stiffness values cannot be separately expressed for each direction; and instead, a stiffness matrix should be used to correctly derive the relevant equations. In this paper, 3D stiffness coefficient matrices have been obtained for three common cantilever geometries including the rectangular, V-shape and dagger-shape cantilevers. The obtained equations are validated by two methods. In the first approach, the Finite Element Method is combined with the cantilever deflection values computed by using the obtained stiffness matrices. In the second approach, by reducing the problem's parameters, the forces applied on a cantilever along different directions are compared with each other in 2D and 3D cases. Then the 3D manipulation of a stiff nanoparticle is modeled and simulated by using the stiffness matrices obtained for the three cantilever geometries. The obtained results indicate that during the manipulation process, the dagger-shaped and rectangular cantilevers exert the maximum and minimum amounts of forces on the stiff nanoparticle, respectively. Also, by examining the effects of different probe tip geometries, it is realized that a probe tip of cylindrical geometry exerts the

  16. A scanning probe microscope for magnetoresistive cantilevers utilizing a nested scanner design for large-area scans

    PubMed Central

    Förste, Alexander; Tavassolizadeh, Ali; Rott, Karsten; Meyners, Dirk; Gröger, Roland; Reiss, Günter; Quandt, Eckhard; Schimmel, Thomas; Hölscher, Hendrik

    2015-01-01

    Summary We describe an atomic force microscope (AFM) for the characterization of self-sensing tunneling magnetoresistive (TMR) cantilevers. Furthermore, we achieve a large scan-range with a nested scanner design of two independent piezo scanners: a small high resolution scanner with a scan range of 5 × 5 × 5 μm3 is mounted on a large-area scanner with a scan range of 800 × 800 × 35 μm3. In order to characterize TMR sensors on AFM cantilevers as deflection sensors, the AFM is equipped with a laser beam deflection setup to measure the deflection of the cantilevers independently. The instrument is based on a commercial AFM controller and capable to perform large-area scanning directly without stitching of images. Images obtained on different samples such as calibration standard, optical grating, EPROM chip, self-assembled monolayers and atomic step-edges of gold demonstrate the high stability of the nested scanner design and the performance of self-sensing TMR cantilevers. PMID:25821686

  17. A scanning probe microscope for magnetoresistive cantilevers utilizing a nested scanner design for large-area scans.

    PubMed

    Meier, Tobias; Förste, Alexander; Tavassolizadeh, Ali; Rott, Karsten; Meyners, Dirk; Gröger, Roland; Reiss, Günter; Quandt, Eckhard; Schimmel, Thomas; Hölscher, Hendrik

    2015-01-01

    We describe an atomic force microscope (AFM) for the characterization of self-sensing tunneling magnetoresistive (TMR) cantilevers. Furthermore, we achieve a large scan-range with a nested scanner design of two independent piezo scanners: a small high resolution scanner with a scan range of 5 × 5 × 5 μm(3) is mounted on a large-area scanner with a scan range of 800 × 800 × 35 μm(3). In order to characterize TMR sensors on AFM cantilevers as deflection sensors, the AFM is equipped with a laser beam deflection setup to measure the deflection of the cantilevers independently. The instrument is based on a commercial AFM controller and capable to perform large-area scanning directly without stitching of images. Images obtained on different samples such as calibration standard, optical grating, EPROM chip, self-assembled monolayers and atomic step-edges of gold demonstrate the high stability of the nested scanner design and the performance of self-sensing TMR cantilevers.

  18. Lead-Free Piezoelectric MEMS Energy Harvesters of (K,Na)NbO3 Thin Films on Stainless Steel Cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujiura, Yuichi; Suwa, Eisaku; Kurokawa, Fumiya; Hida, Hirotaka; Suenaga, Kazufumi; Shibata, Kenji; Kanno, Isaku

    2013-09-01

    We fabricated piezoelectric MEMS energy harvesters (EHs) of lead-free (K,Na)NbO3 (KNN) thin films on microfabricated stainless steel cantilevers. The use of metal substrates makes it possible to fabricate thin cantilevers owing to a large fracture toughness compared with Si substrates. KNN films were directly deposited onto Pt-coated stainless steel cantilevers by rf-magnetron sputtering, thereby simplifying the fabrication process of the EHs. From XRD measurement, we confirmed that the KNN films on Pt-coated stainless steel cantilevers had a perovskite structure with a preferential (001) orientation. The transverse piezoelectric coefficient e31f and relative dielectric constant ɛr were measured to be -3.8 C/m2 and 409, respectively. From the evaluation of the power generation performance of a KNN thin-film EH (length: 7.5 mm, width: 5.0 mm, weight of tip mass: 25 mg), we obtained a large average output power of 1.6 µW under vibration at 393 Hz and 10 m/s2.

  19. High-throughput characterization of stresses in thin film materials libraries using Si cantilever array wafers and digital holographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Y. W.; Hamann, S.; Ehmann, M.; Ludwig, A.

    2011-06-01

    We report the development of an advanced high-throughput stress characterization method for thin film materials libraries sputter-deposited on micro-machined cantilever arrays consisting of around 1500 cantilevers on 4-inch silicon-on-insulator wafers. A low-cost custom-designed digital holographic microscope (DHM) is employed to simultaneously monitor the thin film thickness, the surface topography and the curvature of each of the cantilevers before and after deposition. The variation in stress state across the thin film materials library is then calculated by Stoney's equation based on the obtained radii of curvature of the cantilevers and film thicknesses. DHM with nanometer-scale out-of-plane resolution allows stress measurements in a wide range, at least from several MPa to several GPa. By using an automatic x-y translation stage, the local stresses within a 4-inch materials library are mapped with high accuracy within 10 min. The speed of measurement is greatly improved compared with the prior laser scanning approach that needs more than an hour of measuring time. A high-throughput stress measurement of an as-deposited Fe-Pd-W materials library was evaluated for demonstration. The fast characterization method is expected to accelerate the development of (functional) thin films, e.g., (magnetic) shape memory materials, whose functionality is greatly stress dependent.

  20. Multi-cracks identification method for cantilever beam structure with variable cross-sections based on measured natural frequency changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kai; Yan, Xiaojun

    2017-01-01

    Cantilever beam's crack identification can provide critical information which is helpful to determine whether the structure be healthy or not. Among all crack identification methods, the methods based on measured structure's natural frequency changes own advantages of simplicity and easy for operation in practical engineering. To accurately identify multi-cracks' characteristics for cantilever beam structure with variable cross-sections, a mathematical model, which is based on the concept of modal strain energy, is established in this investigation. And to obtain cantilever beam's natural frequency result with higher resolution, a signal processing method based on Hilbert-Huang Transform (HHT) is also proposed, which can overcome the disadvantage of fast Fourier transform (FFT) in the aspect of frequency resolution and incapability of handling nonlinear vibration caused by crack breathing phenomenon. Based on above mathematical model and signal processing method, the method of identifying multi-cracks on cantilever beam with variable cross-sections is presented. To verify the accuracy of this multi-cracks identification method, experimental examples are conducted, and the results show that the method proposed in this investigation can accurately identify the cracks' characteristics, including their locations and relative depths.

  1. Method of mechanical holding of cantilever chip for tip-scan high-speed atomic force microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuda, Shingo; Uchihashi, Takayuki; Ando, Toshio

    2015-06-15

    In tip-scan atomic force microscopy (AFM) that scans a cantilever chip in the three dimensions, the chip body is held on the Z-scanner with a holder. However, this holding is not easy for high-speed (HS) AFM because the holder that should have a small mass has to be able to clamp the cantilever chip firmly without deteriorating the Z-scanner’s fast performance, and because repeated exchange of cantilever chips should not damage the Z-scanner. This is one of the reasons that tip-scan HS-AFM has not been established, despite its advantages over sample stage-scan HS-AFM. Here, we present a novel method of cantilever chip holding which meets all conditions required for tip-scan HS-AFM. The superior performance of this novel chip holding mechanism is demonstrated by imaging of the α{sub 3}β{sub 3} subcomplex of F{sub 1}-ATPase in dynamic action at ∼7 frames/s.

  2. High-throughput characterization of stresses in thin film materials libraries using Si cantilever array wafers and digital holographic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lai, Y W; Hamann, S; Ehmann, M; Ludwig, A

    2011-06-01

    We report the development of an advanced high-throughput stress characterization method for thin film materials libraries sputter-deposited on micro-machined cantilever arrays consisting of around 1500 cantilevers on 4-inch silicon-on-insulator wafers. A low-cost custom-designed digital holographic microscope (DHM) is employed to simultaneously monitor the thin film thickness, the surface topography and the curvature of each of the cantilevers before and after deposition. The variation in stress state across the thin film materials library is then calculated by Stoney's equation based on the obtained radii of curvature of the cantilevers and film thicknesses. DHM with nanometer-scale out-of-plane resolution allows stress measurements in a wide range, at least from several MPa to several GPa. By using an automatic x-y translation stage, the local stresses within a 4-inch materials library are mapped with high accuracy within 10 min. The speed of measurement is greatly improved compared with the prior laser scanning approach that needs more than an hour of measuring time. A high-throughput stress measurement of an as-deposited Fe-Pd-W materials library was evaluated for demonstration. The fast characterization method is expected to accelerate the development of (functional) thin films, e.g., (magnetic) shape memory materials, whose functionality is greatly stress dependent.

  3. Fabrication and tests of a MEMS-based double-beam cantilever flow sensor with clarifying of temperature effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Junguo; Segawa, Takehiko; Ikehara, Tsuyoshi; Yoshida, Hiro; Kikushima, Yoshihiro; Abe, Hiroyuki; Meada, Ryutaro

    2005-02-01

    This paper presents the fabrication process of a MEMS-based cantilever flow sensor (CFS) with double cantilever beams and the test results of CFS in a wind-tunnel. Four boron-doped piezoresistive strain gauges at the base of each cantilever beam compose the four arms of the Wheatstone bridge. The output of CFS will change signs as piezoresistors at the base of the cantilever beam undergo compressive or tensile stresses. Analyses and experimental results suggest that double-beam CFS can be applied not only as a flow direction discriminator but also as a wall skin-friction sensor, which could be used in the system of active flow control for drag reduction and separation suppression in the boundary layers on a wing section. Temperature effect is commonly encountered in the application of MEMS-based piezoresistive strain gauges. By comparing the outputs of CFS when front side and back side of it facing the flow respectively, we are able to clarify the contribution of temperature effect on the output of CFS sensor and give more accurate results on flow measurement.

  4. Micromachined lead zirconium titanate thin-film-cantilever-based acoustic emission sensor with poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) actuator for increasing contact pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Guo-Hua; Chen, Wei-Ming

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents an innovative acousticemission (AE) sensor with a cantilever sensing structure. A hydrothermal lead zirconium titanate (PZT) film was deposited on the cantilever for AE sensing, and an SU8 micropillar at the free end of the cantilever served as an AE wave coupler; in addition, a poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-based thermoresponsive actuator was integrated with the cantilever to increase the contact pressure exerted on the target. The AE sensor showed higher performance compared with an existing commercial AE sensor. Micromachining technology was used to fabricate AE sensors, and an array of four sensors was fabricated on a 50 μm thick titanium substrate of dimensions 15 mm × 15 mm. The piezoelectric properties of the hydrothermal PZT film were verified by electrically driving the cantilever and measuring the displacement; the piezoelectric constant d 31 of the cantilever was 2.43 pC N-1. The output force of the sensing cantilever generated by activating the thermoresponsive actuator was determined. For an electrical power input of 2.5 W, the maximum force output at the SU8 micropillar was 1 N. This force corresponded to the application of a pressure of 1.4 MPa on the target. Pencil lead break tests were conducted to determine and compare the performance of the proposed AE sensor with commercial sensors. Here, experimental and theoretical discussions on the effect of the activation of the thermoresponsive actuator of the proposed AE sensor on AE detection are presented.

  5. Fixed Target Collisions at STAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meehan, Kathryn C.

    2016-12-01

    The RHIC Beam Energy Scan (BES) program was proposed to look for the turn-off of signatures of the quark gluon plasma (QGP), search for a possible QCD critical point, and study the nature of the phase transition between hadronic and partonic matter. Previous results have been used to claim that the onset of deconfinement occurs at a center-of-mass energy of 7 GeV. Data from lower energies are needed to test if this onset occurs. The goal of the STAR Fixed-Target Program is to extend the collision energy range in BES II to energies that are likely below the onset of deconfinement. Currently, STAR has inserted a gold target into the beam pipe and conducted test runs at center-of-mass energies of 3.9 and 4.5 GeV. Tests have been done with both Au and Al beams. First physics results from a Coulomb potential analysis of Au + Au fixed-target collisions are presented and are found to be consistent with results from previous experiments. Furthermore, the Coulomb potential, which is sensitive to the Z of the projectile and degree of baryonic stopping, will be compared to published results from the AGS.

  6. A micro-cantilever sensor chip based on contact angle analysis for a label-free troponin I immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Yin, Tsung-I; Zhao, Yunpeng; Horak, Josef; Bakirci, Huseyin; Liao, Hsin-Hao; Tsai, Hann-Huei; Juang, Ying-Zong; Urban, Gerald

    2013-03-07

    Cantilever sensors have been extensively explored as a promising technique for real-time and label-free analyses in biological systems. A major sensing principle utilized by state-of-the-art cantilever sensors is based on analyte-induced surface stress changes, which result in static bending of a cantilever. The sensor performance, however, suffers from the intrinsically small change in surface stress induced by analytes, especially for molecular recognition such as antigen-antibody binding. Through the contact angle change on a tailored solid surface, it is possible to convert a tiny surface stress into a capillary force-a much larger physical quantity needed for a practical sensor application. In this work, a micro-cantilever sensor based on contact angle analysis (CAMCS) was proposed to effectively enhance the sensitivity of a sensor in proportion to the square of the length to thickness ratio of the cantilever structure. CAMCS chips were fabricated using a standard complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) process to demonstrate a 1250-fold enhancement in the sensitivity of surface stress to bioanalyte adsorption using a piezoresistive sensing method. A real-time and label-free troponin I (cTnI) immunoassay, which is now widely used in clinics and considered a gold standard for the early diagnosis and prognosis of cardiovascular disease, was performed to demonstrate cTnI detection levels as low as 1 pg mL(-1). The short detection time of this assay was within several minutes, which matches the detection time of commercially available instruments that are based on fluorescence-labeling techniques.

  7. 46 CFR 170.235 - Fixed ballast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... shifting of position. (b) Fixed ballast may not be removed from a vessel or relocated unless approved by the Coast Guard Marine Safety Center. However, ballast may be temporarily moved for vessel examination... ALL INSPECTED VESSELS Special Installations § 170.235 Fixed ballast. (a) Fixed ballast, if used,...

  8. 46 CFR 170.235 - Fixed ballast.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... shifting of position. (b) Fixed ballast may not be removed from a vessel or relocated unless approved by the Coast Guard Marine Safety Center or the ABS. However, ballast may be temporarily moved for vessel... ALL INSPECTED VESSELS Special Installations § 170.235 Fixed ballast. (a) Fixed ballast, if used,...

  9. Focused Ion Beam patterning of suspended graphene for cantilever and kirigami devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, Peter; Huang, Pinshane; Blees, Melina; Barnard, Arthur; Muller, David; McEuen, Paul

    2014-03-01

    We have developed techniques that use a Focused Ion Beam (FIB) to cut and manipulate suspended graphene. Using a dual-beam FIB, we can make cuts with a resolution of tens of nanometers, manipulate and pick up finished devices using a micromanipulator, and remove device and micromanipulator from the vacuum chamber. Remarkably, we have demonstrated that singly clamped graphene cantilevers can be fabricated reliably and are robust enough to be freely manipulated in air. This gives us the potential to perform novel electrostatic and mechanical measurements of graphene. Using the FIB's direct writing capabilities, we are also able to cut out more complex shapes, drawing inspiration from kirigami, the art of paper cutting. Using specific cuts, we can create soft in-plane springs, which might be used to study tension. This exploration of the fabrication and manipulation of graphene in three dimensions is a promising new avenue toward harnessing graphene's unique properties, and also holds promise for other 2D materials.

  10. Wafer-level vacuum packaging for an optical readout bi-material cantilever infrared FPA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuyu; Zhou, Xiaoxiong; Yu, Xiaomei

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we report the design and fabrication of an uncooled infrared (IR) focal plane array (FPA) on quartz substrate and the wafer-level vacuum packaging for the IR FPA in view of an optical readout method. This FPA is composed of bi-material cantilever array which fabricated by the Micro-Electro Mechanical System (MEMS) technology, and the wafer-level packaging of the IR FPA is realized based on AuSn solder bonding technique. The interface of soldering is observed by scan electron microscope (SEM), which indicates that bonding interface is smooth and with no bubbles. The air leakage rate of packaged FPA is measured to be 1.3×10-9 atm·cc/s.

  11. Measurement of cantilever vibration using impedance-loaded surface acoustic wave sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oishi, Masaki; Hamashima, Hiromitsu; Kondoh, Jun

    2016-07-01

    In this study, an impedance-loaded surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor was demonstrated to monitor the vibration frequency. Commercialized pressure sensors and a variable capacitor were chosen as external sensors, which were connected to a reflector on a SAW device. As the reflection coefficient of the reflector depended on the impedance, the echo amplitude was influenced by changes in the impedance of the external sensor. The vibration frequency of the cantilever was determined by monitoring the echo amplitude of the SAW device. Moreover, the attenuation constant of an envelope was estimated. The results of our feasibility study indicate that the impedance-loaded SAW sensor can be applied as a detector for structural health monitoring.

  12. Adaptation of the IBM ECR (electric cantilever robot) robot to plutonium processing applications

    SciTech Connect

    Armantrout, G.A.; Pedrotti, L.R. ); Halter, E.A.; Crossfield, M. )

    1990-12-01

    The changing regulatory climate in the US is adding increasing incentive to reduce operator dose and TRU waste for DOE plutonium processing operations. To help achieve that goal the authors have begun adapting a small commercial overhead gantry robot, the IBM electric cantilever robot (ECR), to plutonium processing applications. Steps are being taken to harden this robot to withstand the dry, often abrasive, environment within a plutonium glove box and to protect the electronic components against alpha radiation. A mock-up processing system for the reduction of the oxide to a metal was prepared and successfully demonstrated. Design of a working prototype is now underway using the results of this mock-up study. 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. The width-tapered double cantilever beam for interlaminar fracture testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bascom, W. D.; Jensen, R. M.; Bullman, G. W.; Hunston, D. L.

    1984-01-01

    The width-tapered double-cantilever-beam (WTDCB) specimen configuration used to determine the Mode-I interlaminar fracture energy (IFE) of composites has special advantages for routine development work and for quality-assurance purposes. These advantages come primarily from the simplicity of testing and the fact that the specimen is designed for constant change in compliance with crack length, so that the computation of Mode-I IFE is independent of crack length. In this paper, a simplified technique for fabrication and testing WTDCB specimens is described. Also presented are the effects of fiber orientation and specimen dimensions, a comparison of data obtained using the WTDCB specimens and other specimen geometries, and comparison of data obtained at different laboratories. It is concluded that the WTDCB gives interlaminar Mode-I IFE essentially equal to other type specimens, and that it can be used for rapid screening in resin-development work and for quality assurance of composite materials.

  14. Finite difference analysis of torsional vibrations of pretwisted, rotating, cantilever beams with effects of warping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subrahmanyam, K. B.; Kaza, K. R. V.

    1985-03-01

    Theoretical natural frequencies of the first three modes of torsional vibration of pre-twisted, rotating cantilever beams are determined for various thickness and aspect ratios. Conclusions concerning individual and collective effects of warping, pretwist, tension-torsion coupling and tennis racket effect (twist-rotational coupling) terms on the natural frequencies are drawn from numerical results obtained by using a finite difference procedure with first order central differences. The relative importance of structural warping, inertial warping, pretwist, tension-torsion and twist-rotational coupling terms is discussed for various rotational speeds. The accuracy of results obtained by using the finite difference approach is verified by a comparison with the exact solution for specialized simple cases of the equation of motion used in this paper.

  15. Measurement of thin film adhesion by single cantilever beam method equipped with adjustable jig

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Dong-Kil; Lee, Jung-Ju; Hawong, Jai-Sug

    2015-03-01

    A new method to measure the tensile adhesion of thin film was proposed. A single cantilever beam method was used and an efficient adjustable jig was designed to minimize errors induced by misalignment of specimen. Applied load and displacement were recorded by data acquisition system. The dimensions of the specimen and conditions of test were preexamined by finite element analysis. Developed method was applied to measure the adhesion of thin film adhesive. Test results were independent of initial deviation of specimen alignment and showed consistent value with respect to crack length. Compared with shear test method, it was shown that the shear adhesion included the effect of thickness of adhesive, however, tensile adhesion was independent of the thickness of adhesive.

  16. High temperature performance of a piezoelectric micro cantilever for vibration energy harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arroyo, E.; Jia, Y.; Du, S.; Chen, ST; Seshia, A.

    2016-11-01

    Energy harvesters withstanding high temperatures could provide potentially unlimited energy to sensor nodes placed in harsh environments, where manual maintenance is difficult and costly. Experimental results on a classical microcantilever show a 67% drop of the maximum power when the temperature is increased up to 160 °C. This decrease is investigated using a lumped-parameters model which takes into account variations in material parameters with temperature, damping increase and thermal stresses induced by mismatched thermal coefficients in a composite cantilever. The model allows a description of the maximum power evolution as a function of temperature and input acceleration. Simulation results further show that an increase in damping and the apparition of thermal stresses are contributing to the power drop at 59% and 13% respectively.

  17. Real-time moving horizon estimation for a vibrating active cantilever

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdollahpouri, Mohammad; Takács, Gergely; Rohaľ-Ilkiv, Boris

    2017-03-01

    Vibrating structures may be subject to changes throughout their operating lifetime due to a range of environmental and technical factors. These variations can be considered as parameter changes in the dynamic model of the structure, while their online estimates can be utilized in adaptive control strategies, or in structural health monitoring. This paper implements the moving horizon estimation (MHE) algorithm on a low-cost embedded computing device that is jointly observing the dynamic states and parameter variations of an active cantilever beam in real time. The practical behavior of this algorithm has been investigated in various experimental scenarios. It has been found, that for the given field of application, moving horizon estimation converges faster than the extended Kalman filter; moreover, it handles atypical measurement noise, sensor errors or other extreme changes, reliably. Despite its improved performance, the experiments demonstrate that the disadvantage of solving the nonlinear optimization problem in MHE is that it naturally leads to an increase in computational effort.

  18. Note: High-efficiency broadband acoustic energy harvesting using Helmholtz resonator and dual piezoelectric cantilever beams

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Aichao; Li, Ping Wen, Yumei; Lu, Caijiang; Peng, Xiao; He, Wei; Zhang, Jitao; Wang, Decai; Yang, Feng

    2014-06-15

    A high-efficiency broadband acoustic energy harvester consisting of a compliant-top-plate Helmholtz resonator (HR) and dual piezoelectric cantilever beams is proposed. Due to the high mechanical quality factor of beams and the strong multimode coupling of HR cavity, top plate and beams, the high efficiency in a broad bandwidth is obtained. Experiment exhibits that the proposed harvester at 170–206 Hz has 28–188 times higher efficiency than the conventional harvester using a HR with a piezoelectric composite diaphragm. For input acoustic pressure of 2.0 Pa, the proposed harvester exhibits 0.137–1.43 mW output power corresponding to 0.035–0.36 μW cm{sup −3} volume power density at 170–206 Hz.

  19. Note: High-efficiency broadband acoustic energy harvesting using Helmholtz resonator and dual piezoelectric cantilever beams.

    PubMed

    Yang, Aichao; Li, Ping; Wen, Yumei; Lu, Caijiang; Peng, Xiao; He, Wei; Zhang, Jitao; Wang, Decai; Yang, Feng

    2014-06-01

    A high-efficiency broadband acoustic energy harvester consisting of a compliant-top-plate Helmholtz resonator (HR) and dual piezoelectric cantilever beams is proposed. Due to the high mechanical quality factor of beams and the strong multimode coupling of HR cavity, top plate and beams, the high efficiency in a broad bandwidth is obtained. Experiment exhibits that the proposed harvester at 170-206 Hz has 28-188 times higher efficiency than the conventional harvester using a HR with a piezoelectric composite diaphragm. For input acoustic pressure of 2.0 Pa, the proposed harvester exhibits 0.137-1.43 mW output power corresponding to 0.035-0.36 μW cm(-3) volume power density at 170-206 Hz.

  20. An improved finite-difference analysis of uncoupled vibrations of tapered cantilever beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subrahmanyam, K. B.; Kaza, K. R. V.

    1983-01-01

    An improved finite difference procedure for determining the natural frequencies and mode shapes of tapered cantilever beams undergoing uncoupled vibrations is presented. Boundary conditions are derived in the form of simple recursive relations involving the second order central differences. Results obtained by using the conventional first order central differences and the present second order central differences are compared, and it is observed that the present second order scheme is more efficient than the conventional approach. An important advantage offered by the present approach is that the results converge to exact values rapidly, and thus the extrapolation of the results is not necessary. Consequently, the basic handicap with the classical finite difference method of solution that requires the Richardson's extrapolation procedure is eliminated. Furthermore, for the cases considered herein, the present approach produces consistent lower bound solutions.

  1. Interaction of a highly flexible cantilever beam with grid-generated turbulent flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goushcha, Oleg; Andreopoulos, Yiannis

    2016-11-01

    Experiments have been performed to study the fluid-structure interaction of a flexible cantilever beam with the free end facing upstream in anisotropic turbulent flow. Velocity fluctuations in the wind tunnel flow were generated by a turbulence grid. Time-Resolved Particle Image Velocimetry (TR-PIV) techniques were used to acquire velocity data on the plane of a CW laser illumination. Forces exerted on the beam were estimated based on the PIV data by analytically solving the Pressure Poisson Equation (PPE). Two types of interaction were observed. At a lower Reynolds number, fluid forces excite the beam into oscillations of small magnitude. At higher Reynolds number, the excitation is stronger, deflecting the beam sufficiently to cause flow separation and vortex shedding on one side of the beam. The resultant vortices exert additional forces on the beam producing large magnitude oscillations of the beam.

  2. Optimum Design of Cantilevered Microprobes for Inspecting Lcd Panels and Measurement of Contacting Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Cheol; Kim, Kwang-Joong

    Fine pitch microprobe arrays are microneedle-like probes for inspecting the pixels of LCD panels or IC. They are usually made of multi-layers of metallic, nonmetallic, or combination of the two. The design requirement for a contacting force is less than 2 gf and a deflection should be less than 100 µm. Many microprobe shapes satisfying the design requirements are possible. A cantilever-type microprobe having many needles was chosen and optimized in this study. Several candidate shapes were chosen using topology and shape optimization technique subjected to design requirements. Then, the microprobe arrays were fabricated using the process applied for MEMS fabrication and they were made of BeNi, BeCu, or Si. The contact probing forces and deflections were measured for checking the results from optimum design by newly developed measuring equipment in our laboratory. Numerical and experimental results were compared and both showed a good correlation.

  3. Piezoelectric Cantilever Biosensors for Label-free, Real-time Detection of DNA and RNA.

    PubMed

    Haring, Alexander P; Cesewski, Ellen; Johnson, Blake N

    2017-01-01

    This chapter reviews the design, fabrication, characterization, and application of piezoelectric-excited millimeter-sized cantilever (PEMC) sensors. The sensor transduction mechanism, sensing principle, and mode of operation are discussed. Bio-recognition strategies and surface functionalization methods for detection of DNA and RNA are discussed with a focus on self-assembly-based approaches. Methods for the verification of biosensor response via secondary binding assays, reversible binding assays, and the integration of complementary transduction mechanisms are presented. Sensing applications for medical diagnostics, food safety, and environmental monitoring are provided. PEMC sensor technology provides a robust platform for the real-time, label-free detection of DNA and RNA in complex matrices over nanomolar (nM) to attomolar (aM) concentration ranges.

  4. Analysis of three-dimensional effects in oscillating cantilevers immersed in viscous fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Facci, Andrea L.; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, we numerically study the flow physics induced by the flexural vibration of a thin cantilever plate submerged in a viscous and otherwise quiescent fluid. The computational fluid dynamics simulations are based on a finite volume approximation of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. We perform a detailed parametric study on relevant nondimensional parameters, including plate aspect ratio, oscillatory Reynolds number, and relative vibration amplitude, to investigate their effects on the hydrodynamic load experienced by the structure and its thrust production. Numerical results are validated with experimental data on underwater vibration of ionic polymer metal composites and used to ascertain the accuracy of theoretical findings from reduced order models available in the literature.

  5. Simulation of an ultralow-power power management circuit for MEMS cantilever piezoelectric vibration energy harvesters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takei, Ryohei; Okada, Hironao; Makimoto, Natsumi; Itoh, Toshihiro; Kobayashi, Takeishi

    2016-10-01

    We developed a power management circuit for piezoelectric microelectromechanical system cantilever vibration energy harvesters (VEHs) with ultralow-power consumption. The power management circuit was effective in a wireless vibration monitoring system. To operate the system, ultralow-power electronics were required because only a small amount of electrical power was generated from the faint environmental vibration. Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 (PZT) and aluminum nitride (AlN) VEHs were fabricated and their equivalent circuits were extracted from output voltage measurements. The power management circuit was simulated using the extracted circuits. The simulation suggested that the power management circuit can be driven by a vibration acceleration of 1.0 m/s2 by lowering the power consumption of the power management circuit using existing electronics.

  6. Spectroscopic Studies of Human Hair, Nail, and Saliva Samples Using a Cantilever-Based Photoacoustic Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehtinen, Jaakko

    2013-09-01

    In infrared spectroscopy human hair has normally been studied using attenuated total reflectance or diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy, for which the sample preparation methods can lead to problems of reproducibility. Definite information could be obtained by studying intact individual hair fibers, but the small diameter of hair fibers and the lack of sensitivity make such measurement difficult. A highly detailed infrared spectrum of human hair has been measured using a cantilever-based photoacoustic detection. The spectrum can be obtained even if a piece of hair as small as 1 cm is used as a sample. Photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) is a well-established technique in many areas, but very little has been published in the research of proteins. Two simple applications of PAS for human hair, as well as measurements with different types of proteins, are presented in this paper.

  7. Free vibrations of a cantilevered SWCNT with distributed mass in the presence of nonlocal effect.

    PubMed

    De Rosa, M A; Lippiello, M; Martin, H D

    2015-01-01

    The Hamilton principle is applied to deduce the free vibration frequencies of a cantilever single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) in the presence of an added mass, which can be distributed along an arbitrary part of the span. The nonlocal elasticity theory by Eringen has been employed, in order to take into account the nanoscale effects. An exact formulation leads to the equations of motion, which can be solved to give the frequencies and the corresponding vibration modes. Moreover, two approximate semianalytical methods are also illustrated, which can provide quick parametric relationships. From a more practical point of view, the problem of detecting the mass of the attached particle has been solved by calculating the relative frequency shift due to the presence of the added mass: from it, the mass value can be easily deduced. The paper ends with some numerical examples, in which the nonlocal effects are thoroughly investigated.

  8. Multifunctional cantilever-free scanning probe arrays coated with multilayer graphene

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Wooyoung; Brown, Keith A.; Zhou, Xiaozhu; Rasin, Boris; Liao, Xing; Mirkin, Chad A.

    2012-01-01

    Scanning probe instruments have expanded beyond their traditional role as imaging or “reading” tools and are now routinely used for “writing.” Although a variety of scanning probe lithography techniques are available, each one imposes different requirements on the types of probes that must be used. Additionally, throughput is a major concern for serial writing techniques, so for a scanning probe lithography technique to become widely applied, there needs to be a reasonable path toward a scalable architecture. Here, we use a multilayer graphene coating method to create multifunctional massively parallel probe arrays that have wear-resistant tips of uncompromised sharpness and high electrical and thermal conductivities. The optical transparency and mechanical flexibility of graphene allow this procedure to be used for coating exceptionally large, cantilever-free arrays that can pattern with electrochemical desorption and thermal, in addition to conventional, dip-pen nanolithography. PMID:23086161

  9. Mimicking the cochlear amplifier in a cantilever beam using nonlinear velocity feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joyce, Bryan S.; Tarazaga, Pablo A.

    2014-07-01

    The mammalian cochlea exhibits a nonlinear amplification which allows mammals to detect a large range of sound pressure levels while maintaining high frequency sensitivity. This work seeks to mimic the cochlea’s nonlinear amplification in a mechanical system. A nonlinear, velocity-based feedback control law is applied to a cantilever beam with piezoelectric actuators. The control law reduces the linear viscous damping of the system while introducing a cubic damping term. The result is a system which is positioned close to a Hopf bifurcation. Modelling and experimental results show that the beam with this control law undergoes a one-third amplitude scaling near the resonance frequency and an amplitude-dependent bandwidth. Both behaviors are characteristic of data obtained from the mammalian cochlea. This work could provide insight on the biological cochlea while producing bio-inspired sensors with a large dynamic range and sharp frequency sensitivity.

  10. Identification of an unknown source term in a vibrating cantilevered beam from final overdetermination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasanov, Alemdar

    2009-11-01

    Inverse problems of determining the unknown source term F(x, t) in the cantilevered beam equation utt = (EI(x)uxx)xx + F(x, t) from the measured data μ(x) := u(x, T) or ν(x) := ut(x, T) at the final time t = T are considered. In view of weak solution approach, explicit formulae for the Fréchet gradients of the cost functionals J1(F) = ||u(x, T; w) - μ(x)||20 and J2(F) = ||ut(x, T; w) - ν(x)||20 are derived via the solutions of corresponding adjoint (backward beam) problems. The Lipschitz continuity of the gradients is proved. Based on these results the gradient-type monotone iteration process is constructed. Uniqueness and ill-conditionedness of the considered inverse problems are analyzed.

  11. Sizing Single Cantilever Beam Specimens for Characterizing Facesheet/Core Peel Debonding in Sandwich Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratcliffe, James G.

    2010-01-01

    This paper details part of an effort focused on the development of a standardized facesheet/core peel debonding test procedure. The purpose of the test is to characterize facesheet/core peel in sandwich structure, accomplished through the measurement of the critical strain energy release rate associated with the debonding process. The specific test method selected for the standardized test procedure utilizes a single cantilever beam (SCB) specimen configuration. The objective of the current work is to develop a method for establishing SCB specimen dimensions. This is achieved by imposing specific limitations on specimen dimensions, with the objectives of promoting a linear elastic specimen response, and simplifying the data reduction method required for computing the critical strain energy release rate associated with debonding. The sizing method is also designed to be suitable for incorporation into a standardized test protocol. Preliminary application of the resulting sizing method yields practical specimen dimensions.

  12. Investigating the molecular mechanisms of in-plane mechanochemistry on cantilever arrays.

    PubMed

    Watari, Moyu; Galbraith, Jane; Lang, Hans-Peter; Sousa, Marilyne; Hegner, Martin; Gerber, Christoph; Horton, Mike A; McKendry, Rachel A

    2007-01-24

    Free-standing cantilevers, which directly translate specific biochemical reactions into micromechanical motion, have recently attracted much attention as label-free biosensors and micro/nano robotic devices. To exploit this mechanochemical sensing technology, it is essential to develop a fundamental understanding of the origins of surface stress. Here we report a detailed study into the molecular basis of stress generation in aqueous environments focusing on the pH titration of model mercaptohexadecanoic acid self-assembled monolayers (SAMs), using in situ reference cantilevers coated with nonionizable hexadecanethiol SAMs. Semiautomated data analysis and a statistical model were developed to quantify cyclic deprotonation/protonation reactions on multiple arrays. In-plane force titrations were found to have the sensitivity to detect ionic hydrogen bond formation between protonated and nonprotonated carboxylic acid groups in the proximity of the surface pK1/2, which generated a mean tensile differential surface stress of +1.2 +/- 0.3 mN/m at pH 6.0, corresponding to 1 pN attractive force between two adjacent MHA molecules. Conversely, the magnitude of compressive differential surface stress was found to increase progressively with pH >/= 7.0, reaching a maximum of -14.5 +/- 0.5 mN/m at pH 9.0, attributed to enhanced electrostatic repulsion between deprotonated carboxylic acid groups. However, striking differences were observed in the micromechanical responses to different ionic strength and ion species present in the aqueous environment, highlighting the critical role of counter- and co-ions on surface stress. Our findings provide fundamental insights into the molecular mechanisms of in-plane mechanochemistry, which may be exploited for biosensing and nanoactuation applications.

  13. Double Cantilever Beam and End Notched Flexure Fracture Toughness Testing of Two Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessler, Jeff A.; Adams, Donald F.

    1993-01-01

    Two different unidirectional composite materials were provided by NASA Langley Research Center and tested by the Composite Materials Research Group within the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Wyoming. Double cantilever beam and end notched flexure tests were performed to measure the mode I (crack opening) and mode II (sliding or shear) interlaminar fracture toughness of the two materials. The two composites consisted of IM7 carbon fiber combined with either RP46 resin toughened with special formulation of LaRC IA resin, known as JJS1356; or PES chain extended thermoplastic resin known as JJS1361. Double Cantilever Beam Specimen Configuration and Test Methods As received from NASA, the test specimens were nominally 0.5 inch wide, 6 inches long, and 0.2 inch thick. A 1 inch long Kapton insert at the midplane of one end of the specimen (placed during laminate fabrication) facilitated crack initiation and extension. It was noted that the specimens provided were smaller than the nominal 1.5 inch wide, 9.0 inch long configuration specified. Similarly, the Kapton inserts were of greater length than those in the present specimens. Hence, the data below should not be compared directly to those generated with the referenced methods. No preconditioning was performed on the specimens prior to testing. In general, the methodology was used for the present work. Crack opening loads were introduced to the specimens via piano hinges attached to the main specimen faces at a single end of each specimen. Hinges were bolted to the specimens using the technique presented. The cracks were extended a small distance from the end of the Kapton insert prior to testing. Just before precracking, the sides of the specimens were coated with water-soluble typewriter correction fluid to aid in crack visualization. Scribe marks were then made in the coating at half-inch intervals.

  14. High-speed tapping-mode atomic force microscopy using a Q-controlled regular cantilever acting as the actuator: Proof-of-principle experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Balantekin, M.; Satır, S.; Torello, D.; Değertekin, F. L.

    2014-12-15

    We present the proof-of-principle experiments of a high-speed actuation method to be used in tapping-mode atomic force microscopes (AFM). In this method, we do not employ a piezotube actuator to move the tip or the sample as in conventional AFM systems, but, we utilize a Q-controlled eigenmode of a cantilever to perform the fast actuation. We show that the actuation speed can be increased even with a regular cantilever.

  15. Modelling and characterization of the roof tile-shaped modes of AlN-based cantilever resonators in liquid media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Díez, V.; Hernando-García, J.; Toledo, J.; Manzaneque, T.; Kucera, M.; Pfusterschmied, G.; Schmid, U.; Sánchez-Rojas, J. L.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, roof tile-shaped modes of MEMS (micro electro-mechanical systems) cantilever resonators with various geometries and mode orders are analysed. These modes can be efficiently excited by a thin piezoelectric film and a properly designed top electrode. The electrical and optical characterization of the resonators are performed in liquid media and the device performance is evaluated in terms of quality factor, resonant frequency and motional conductance. A quality factor as high as 165 was measured in isopropanol for a cantilever oscillating in the seventh order roof tile-shaped mode at 2 MHz. To support the results of the experimental characterization, a 2D finite element method simulation model is presented and studied. An analytical model for the estimation of the motional conductance was also developed and validated with the experimental measurements.

  16. Determination of the Mode I Interlaminar Fracture Toughness by Using a Nonlinear Double-Cantilever Beam Specimen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavelko, V.; Lapsa, K.; Pavlovskis, P.

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study is estimation of the effect of large deflections of a double-cantilever beam (DCB) on the accuracy of determination of the mode I interlaminar fracture toughness GIc of layered composites by using the nonlinear theory of bending of beams. The differential equation of the deflection curve of arm of the DCB specimen in the natural form was used to analyze the strain energy of the specimen and its strain energy release rate GI upon propagation of delamination under the action of cleavage forces at the ends of cantilevers. An algorithm for calculating the strain energy and its release rate in the DCB specimens is realized in the form of a MATLAB code. An experimental study was carried out on DCB specimens of a highly flexible carbon/epoxy laminate. The validity of the nonlinear model developed is demonstrated. The standard methods used to determine GIc are refined for the case of highly flexible specimens.

  17. A frequency independent approximation and a sliding mode control scheme for a system of a micro-cantilever beam.

    PubMed

    Vagia, Marialena

    2012-03-01

    In the present article, a sliding mode controller is proposed for a micro-cantilever beam (μCB) with fringing and squeezed film damping effects. The narrow micro-cantilever beam can move via the application of an external electrically induced force. The introduction of the squeezed film parameters results in a frequency-dependent nonlinear system. Particular attention, has been paid, in order to approximate the frequency dependent μCB model, with a valid, frequency independent one, that would be incorporated in the design of a robust sliding mode controller. The suggested control technique enables compact realization of a robust controller tolerant in device characteristics' variations, nonlinearities and types of inherent instabilities. Robustness of the proposed control scheme against disturbances is proved by Lyapunov's second method. In addition, bifurcation analysis is carried on the beam's nonlinear model, and numerous simulation test cases are presented in order to test the suggested modeling and control techniques.

  18. Integrated cantilever sensors with a torsional resonance mode for ultraresoluble on-the-spot bio/chemical detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Dazhong; Li, Xinxin; Bao, Hanhan; Zhang, Zhixiang; Wang, Yuelin; Yu, Haitao; Zuo, Guomin

    2007-01-01

    Torsion-mode resonance is built in an integrated cantilever sensor for ultraresoluble detection of specifically bio/chemical mass adsorption. The superior mass resolution of the torsion-mode cantilever to a conventional bending-mode one is verified by energy-dissipation analysis and Q-factor simulation. With integrated transverse piezoresistance for frequency-shift signal readout and Lorentz force for resonance excitation, the torsion-mode sensor is optimally designed for high sensitivity. The microfabricated torsion-mode sensor is measured with a high close-loop Q factor in air. By Allan-variance analysis for the measured frequency stability, 23fg resolution is obtained for the torsion-mode sensor, which is much improved compared to the 313fg for the conventional flexure-mode sensor. The torsional sensor is used to recognize biotin-avidin specific combination, resulting in 443Hz frequency shift for 50μM streptavidin solution.

  19. Single stage evaluation of highly loaded high Mach number compressor stages. 6: Data and performance of cantilevered stator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrow, A. S.

    1972-01-01

    A compressor stage with a rotor tip speed of 1600 ft/sec was tested to evaluate its performance with a cantilevered stator and a rotating inner shroud beneath the stator. Both the rotor blades and the stator vanes were composed of multiple circular arc airfoil sections. Comparison of data taken during this test of the cantilevered stator and previous tests with the same compressor and airfoil geometry in a shroud stator configuration showed only slight differences in stage performance with no significant effect on overall efficiency. However, the severity of the stator wake near the rotating hub was decreased at all flows including the near surge condition. Stall and wise open discharge corrected weight flows were the same as for the shrouded stator configuration.

  20. Effect of surface stress on stress intensity factors of a nanoscale crack via double cantilever beam model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua; Li, Xianfang; Tang, Guojin; Shen, Zhibin

    2013-01-01

    This paper studies the influence of surface elasticity on crack growth for a nanoscale crack advance. A crack is modeled as a double cantilever beam with consideration of surface stress. Using the Euler-Bernoulli beam theory incorporating with surface effects, a governing equation of static bending is derived and bending solution of a cantilever nanowire is obtained for a concentrated force at the free end. Based on the viewpoint of energy balance, the elastic strain energy is given and energy release rate is determined. The influences of the Surface stress and the surface elasticity on crack growth are discussed. Obtained results indicate that consideration of the surface effects decreases stress intensity factors or energy release rates. The residual surface tension impedes propagation of a nanoscale crack and apparent fracture toughness of nanoscale materials is effectively enhanced.