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Sample records for capability arac response

  1. The atmospheric release advisory capability (ARAC): A federal emergency response capability

    SciTech Connect

    Dickerson, M.H.; Sullivan, T.J.

    1988-03-01

    The Atmospheric Release Capability (ARAC) is a Department of Energy (DOE)-sponsored emergency-response service set up to provide real-time prediction of the dose levels and the extent of surface contamination resulting from a broad range of possible occurrences (accidents, spills, extortion threats involving nuclear material, reentry of nuclear-powered satellites, and atmospheric nuclear tests) that could involve the release of airborne radioactive material. During the past decade, ARAC has responded to more than 150 real-time situations, including exercises. The most notable responses include the Three Mile Island accident in Pennsylvania, the Titan II missile accident in Arkansas, the reentry of the USSR's COSMOS-954 into the atmosphere over Canada, the accidental release of uranium hexafluoride from the Sequoyah Facility accident in Oklahoma, and, most recently, the Chernobyl reactor accident in the Soviet Union. ARAC currently supports the emergency-preparedness plans at 50 Department of Defense (DOD) and DOE sites within the US and also responds to accidents that happen elsewhere. Our ARAC center serves as the focal point for data acquisition, data analysis and assessments during a response, using a computer-based communication network to acquire real-time weather data from the accident site and the surrounding region, as well as pertinent accident information. Its three-dimensional computer models for atmospheric dispersion, MATHEW and ADPIC, digest all this information and produce the predictions used in accident assessment. 9 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Exploring ARAC Support of U.S. Coast Guard Planning and Response Capability

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, M.S.; Baskett, R.; Ellis, J. S.

    2001-07-01

    The U.S. Coast Guard is responsible for the protection of the marine environment from spills of oil and hazardous material. The USCG responsibilities include responding to oil and chemical spills from ships as well as from sources ashore. While responding to a spill, The USCG Marine Safety Offices and Detachments, and the National Strike Force (NSF) depend on interagency support from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and state and local agencies. Currently, the USCG depends on NOAA Scientific Support Coordinators for predicting and assessing atmospheric releases of hazardous material. NOAA has several computer models that the Coast Guard can access in the event of a chemical release into the atmosphere or an in situ oil burn. However, the Department of Energy operates a more powerful modeling system called the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC). Located at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, California, ARAC offers a complex multiscale model in a system that is simple for the end user to operate. The applicability of ARAC to Coast Guard operations is the subject of this study.

  3. Optimization aspects of the ARAC real-time radiological emergency response system

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, S.S.; Sullivan, T.J.

    1985-07-01

    The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) project at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory responds to radiological emergencies throughout the Continental United States. Using complex three-dimensional dispersion models to account for the effects of complex meteorology and regional terrain, ARAC simulates the release of radioactive materials and provides dispersion, deposition, and dose calculations that are displayed over local geographic features for use by authorities at the accident/release site. ARAC's response is ensured by a software system that (1) makes optimal use of dispersion models, (2) minimizes the time required to provide projections, and (3) maximizes the fault-tolerance of the system. In this paper we describe ARAC's goals and functionality and the costs associated with its development and use. Specifically, we address optimizations in ARAC notifications, meteorological data collection, the determination of site- and problem-specific parameters, the generation of site-specific topography and geography, the running of models, and the distribution of ARAC products. We also discuss the backup features employed to ensure ARAC's ability to respond.

  4. Heterodimers reveal that two arabinose molecules are required for the normal arabinose response of AraC.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Michael E; Schleif, Robert

    2012-10-16

    AraC protein, which regulates expression of the l-arabinose operon in Escherichia coli, is a dimer whose DNA binding affinity for pairs of DNA half-sites is controlled by arabinose. Here we have addressed the question of whether the arabinose response of AraC requires the binding of one or two molecules of arabinose. This was accomplished by measuring the DNA dissociation rates of wild-type AraC and heterodimeric AraC constructs in which one subunit is capable of binding arabinose and the other subunit does not bind arabinose. Solutions consisting entirely of heterodimers were formed by spontaneous subunit exchange between two different homodimers, with heterodimers being trapped by the formation of an intersubunit disulfide bond between cysteine residues strategically positioned within the dimerization interface. We found that the normal arabinose response of AraC requires the binding of two arabinose molecules. These results provide additional constraints on mechanistic models for the action of AraC.

  5. Incorporation of an explosive cloud rise code into ARAC's (Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability) ADPIC transport and diffusion model

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, K.T.; Freis, R.P. ); Nasstrom, J.S. )

    1990-04-01

    The US Department of Energy's Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) supports various government agencies by modeling the transport and diffusion of radiological material released into the atmosphere. ARAC provides this support principally in the form of computer-generated isopleths of radionuclide concentrations. In order to supply these concentration estimates in a timely manner, a suite of operational computer models is maintained by the ARAC staff. One primary tools used by ARAC is the ADPIC transport and diffusion computer model. This three-dimensional, particle-in-cell code simulates the release of a pollutant into the atmosphere, by injecting marker particles into a gridded, mass-consistent modeled wind field. The particles are then moved through the gridded domain by applying the appropriate advection, diffusion, and gravitational fall velocities. A cloud rise module has been incorporated into ARAC's ADPIC dispersion model to allow better simulation of particle distribution early after an explosive release of source material. The module is based on the conservation equations of mass, momentum, and energy, which are solved for the cloud radius, height, temperature, and velocity as a function of time. 6 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. ARAC: a centralized computer assisted emergency planning, response, and assessment system for atmospheric releases of toxic material

    SciTech Connect

    Dickerson, M.H.; Knox, J.B.

    1986-10-01

    The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) is an emergency planning, response, and assessment service, developed by the US Departments of Energy and Defense, and focused, thus far, on atmospheric releases of nuclear material. For the past 14 years ARAC has responded to over 150 accidents, potential accidents, and major exercises. The most notable accident responses are the COSMOS 954 reentry, the Three Mile Island (TMI-2) accident and subsequent purge of /sup 85/Kr from the containment vessel, the recent UF/sub 6/ accident at the Kerr-McGee Plant, Gore, Oklahoma, and the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident in the Soviet Union. Based on experience in the area of emergency response, developed during the past 14 years, this paper describes the cost effectiveness and other advantages of a centralized emergency planning, response, and assessment service for atmospheric releases of nuclear material.

  7. Dose refinement. ARAC's role

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, J. S.; Sullivan, T. J.; Baskett, R. L.

    1998-06-01

    The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC), located at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, since the late 1970's has been involved in assessing consequences from nuclear and other hazardous material releases into the atmosphere. ARAC's primary role has been emergency response. However, after the emergency phase, there is still a significant role for dispersion modeling. This work usually involves refining the source term and, hence, the dose to the populations affected as additional information becomes available in the form of source term estimates release rates, mix of material, and release geometry and any measurements from passage of the plume and deposition on the ground. Many of the ARAC responses have been documented elsewhere. 1 Some of the more notable radiological releases that ARAC has participated in the post-emergency phase have been the 1979 Three Mile Island nuclear power plant (NPP) accident outside Harrisburg, PA, the 1986 Chernobyl NPP accident in the Ukraine, and the 1996 Japan Tokai nuclear processing plant explosion. ARAC has also done post-emergency phase analyses for the 1978 Russian satellite COSMOS 954 reentry and subsequent partial burn up of its on board nuclear reactor depositing radioactive materials on the ground in Canada, the 1986 uranium hexafluoride spill in Gore, OK, the 1993 Russian Tomsk-7 nuclear waste tank explosion, and lesser releases of mostly tritium. In addition, ARAC has performed a key role in the contingency planning for possible accidental releases during the launch of spacecraft with radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) on board (i.e. Galileo, Ulysses, Mars-Pathfinder, and Cassini), and routinely exercises with the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) in preparation for offsite consequences of radiological releases from NPPs and nuclear weapon accidents or incidents. Several accident post-emergency phase assessments are discussed in this paper in order to illustrate

  8. Using the /phi/resund experimental data to evaluate the ARAC emergency response models

    SciTech Connect

    Gudiksen, P.H.; Gryning, S.E.

    1988-07-01

    A series of meteorological and tracer experiments, was conducted during May and June 1984 over the 20-km wide /O/resund strait between Denmark and Sweden for the purpose of studying atmospheric dispersion processes over cold water and warm land surfaces and providing the data needed to evaluate meso-scale models in a coastal environment. In concert with these objectives the data from these experiments have been used as part of a continuing effort to evaluate the capability of the three-dimensional MATHEW/ADPIC (M/A) atmospheric dispersion models to simulate pollutant transport and diffusion characteristics of the atmospheric during a wide variety of meteorological conditions. Since previous studies have focused primarily on M/A model evaluations over rolling and complex terrain at inland sites, the /O/resund experiments provide a unique opportunity to evaluate the models in a coastal environment. The M/A models are used by the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC), developed by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, for performing real-time assessments of the environmental consequences of potential or actual releases of radioactivity into the atmosphere. These assessments include estimation of radiation doses to nearby population centers and of the extent of surface contamination. Model evaluations, using field experimental data such as those generated by the /O/resund experiments, serve as a basis for providing emergency response managers with estimated of the uncertainties associated with accident consequence assessments. This report provides a brief description of the /O/resund experiments, the current understanding of the meteorological processes governing pollutant dispersion over the /O/resund strait, and the results of the M/A model simulations of these experiments. 11 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  9. ARAC: A unique command and control resource

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, M.M.; Baskett, R.L.; Ellis, J.S.

    1996-04-01

    The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is a centralized federal facility designed to provide real-time, world-wide support to military and civilian command and control centers by predicting the impacts of inadvertent or intentional releases of nuclear, biological, or chemical materials into the atmosphere. ARAC is a complete response system consisting of highly trained and experienced personnel, continually updated computer models, redundant data collection systems, and centralized and remote computer systems. With over 20 years of experience responding to domestic and international incidents, strong linkages with the Department of Defense, and the ability to conduct classified operations, ARAC is a unique command and control resource.

  10. ARAC: A flexible real-time dose consequence assessment system

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, J.S.; Sullivan, T.J.

    1993-10-07

    Since its beginning, the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC), an emergency radiological dose assessment service of the US Government, has been called on to do consequence assessments for releases into the atmosphere of radionuclides and a variety of other substances. Some of the more noteworthy emergency responses have been for the Three Mile Island and Chernobyl nuclear power reactor accidents, and more recently, for a cloud of gases from a rail-car spill into the Sacramento river of the herbicide metam sodium, smoke from hundreds of burning oil wells in Kuwait, and ash clouds from the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo. The spatial scales of these responses range from local, to regional, to global, and the response periods from hours, to weeks, to months. Because of the variety of requirements of each unique assessment, ARAC has developed and maintains a flexible system of people, computer software and hardware.

  11. NNSA/NV Consequence Management Capabilities for Radiological Emergency Response

    SciTech Connect

    D. R. Bowman

    2002-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office (NNSA/NV) provides an integrated Consequence Management (CM) response capability for the (NNSA) in the event of a radiological emergency. This encompasses planning, technical operations, and home team support. As the lead organization for CM planning and operations, NNSA/NV coordinates the response of the following assets during the planning and operational phases of a radiological accident or incident: (1) Predictive dispersion modeling through the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the High Consequence Assessment Group at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); (2) Regional radiological emergency assistance through the eight Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) regional response centers; (3) Medical advice and assistance through the Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site (REAC/TS) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee; (4) Aerial radiological mapping using the fixed-wing and rotor-wing aircraft of the Aerial Measuring System (AMS); (5) Consequence Management Planning Teams (CMPT) and Consequence Management Response Teams (CMRT) to provide CM field operations and command and control. Descriptions of the technical capabilities employed during planning and operations are given below for each of the elements comprising the integrated CM capability.

  12. Design of an ectoine-responsive AraC mutant and its application in metabolic engineering of ectoine biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Zhang, Shan; Jiang, Peixia; Yao, Jun; He, Yongzhi; Chen, Lincai; Gui, Xiwu; Dong, Zhiyang; Tang, Shuang-Yan

    2015-07-01

    Advanced high-throughput screening methods for small molecules may have important applications in the metabolic engineering of the biosynthetic pathways of these molecules. Ectoine is an excellent osmoprotectant that has been widely used in cosmetics. In this study, the Escherichia coli regulatory protein AraC was engineered to recognize ectoine as its non-natural effector and to activate transcription upon ectoine binding. As an endogenous reporter of ectoine, the mutated AraC protein was successfully incorporated into high-throughput screening of ectoine hyper-producing strains. The ectoine biosynthetic cluster from Halomonas elongata was cloned into E. coli. By engineering the rate-limiting enzyme L-2,4-diaminobutyric acid (DABA) aminotransferase (EctB), ectoine production and the specific activity of the EctB mutant were increased. Thus, these results demonstrated the effectiveness of engineering regulatory proteins into sensitive and rapid screening tools for small molecules and highlighted the importance and efficacy of directed evolution strategies applied to the engineering of genetic components for yield improvement in the biosynthesis of small molecules.

  13. ARAC dispersion modeling of the August 1998 Tracy, California tire fire

    SciTech Connect

    Aluzzi, F J; Baskett, R L; Bowen, B M; Foster, C S; Pace, J C; Pobanz, B; Vogt, P J

    1998-08-28

    At about 4:30 pm PDT on Friday, August 7, 1998 a fire ignited the large tire disposal pit of Royster Tire Co. on Macarthur Drive about 5 km (3 miles) south of downtown Tracy, California. While providing on-scene mutual aid late Friday night, the LLNL Fire Department called and requested that the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) make a plume forecast for Saturday. The response team in the field was interested in the forecasted location as well as an estimate of potential health effects on the following day. Not having any previous experience with tire fire source terms, ARAC assessors used a constant unit source rate (1 g/s) of particulate and produced plots showing only the location of the ground-level normalized time-integrated air concentrations from the smoke plume. Very early Saturday morning the assessors faxed plots of ground-level smoke air concentrations forecasted for Saturday from 6 am through 6 pm PDT to the Tracy Fire Emergency Operations Center. (As a part of standard procedure, before delivering the plots, the assessors notified ARAC's DOE sponsor.) Fortunately due to the intense heat from the fire, the dense black smoke immediately lofted into the air preventing high ground-level concentrations close to the tire dump. Later on Saturday morning ARAC forecasted a second set of plume integrated air concentrations for Sunday. By Monday the intensity of the fire lessened, and ARAC's support was no longer requested. Following ARAC's response, we made a third calculation on a large scale of the continuous smoke dispersion for 3 days after the fire. A newspaper photograph showed the plume initially rising toward the northeast and the upper part of the smoke cloud turning counterclockwise toward the north. Winds from ARAC's mesoscale prognostic model reproduced this plume structure, while data from the Friday afternoon sounding from Oakland did not. On the 250 km scale, using gridded wind outputs from our mesoscale forecast model to initialize

  14. Solar mechanics thermal response capabilities.

    SciTech Connect

    Dobranich, Dean D.

    2009-07-01

    In many applications, the thermal response of structures exposed to solar heat loads is of interest. Solar mechanics governing equations were developed and integrated with the Calore thermal response code via user subroutines to provide this computational simulation capability. Solar heat loads are estimated based on the latitude and day of the year. Vector algebra is used to determine the solar loading on each face of a finite element model based on its orientation relative to the sun as the earth rotates. Atmospheric attenuation is accounted for as the optical path length varies from sunrise to sunset. Both direct and diffuse components of solar flux are calculated. In addition, shadowing of structures by other structures can be accounted for. User subroutines were also developed to provide convective and radiative boundary conditions for the diurnal variations in air temperature and effective sky temperature. These temperature boundary conditions are based on available local weather data and depend on latitude and day of the year, consistent with the solar mechanics formulation. These user subroutines, coupled with the Calore three-dimensional thermal response code, provide a complete package for addressing complex thermal problems involving solar heating. The governing equations are documented in sufficient detail to facilitate implementation into other heat transfer codes. Suggestions for improvements to the approach are offered.

  15. Constitutive mutations in the Escherichia coli AraC protein.

    PubMed

    Dirla, Stephanie; Chien, John Yeh-Heng; Schleif, Robert

    2009-04-01

    The Escherichia coli AraC protein represses and induces the araBAD operon in response to the absence or presence of l-arabinose. Constitutive mutations in the AraC gene no longer require the presence of l-arabinose to convert AraC from its repressing to its inducing state. Such mutations were isolated directly by virtue of their constitutivity or by their resistance to the nonmetabolizable arabinose analog, d-fucose. The majority of the constitutive mutations lie within the same residues of the N-terminal regulatory arm of AraC. Two, however, were found in the core of the dimerization domain. As predicted by the light switch mechanism of AraC, constitutive mutations increase the susceptibility of the N-terminal arms to digestion by trypsin or chymotrypsin, suggesting that these mutations weaken or disrupt the arm structure required for repression by AraC. Fluorescence, circular dichroism, and cysteine reactivity measurements show that the constitutive mutations in the core of the dimerization domain lead to a weakening of the support for the arms and reduce the stability of the minus-arabinose arm structure. These mutations also weaken the interaction between the two-helix bundle and the beta-barrel subdomains of the dimerization domain and reduce the structural stability of the beta-barrels.

  16. Evaluation of the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability emergency response model for explosive sources

    SciTech Connect

    Baskett, R.L.; Freis, R.P.; Nasstrom, J.S.

    1993-10-07

    The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) uses a modeling system to calculate the impact of accidental radiological or toxic releases to the atmosphere anywhere in the world. Operated for the US Departments of Energy and Defense, ARAC has responded to over 60 incidents in the past 18 years, and conducts over 100 exercises each year. Explosions are one of the most common mechanisms by which toxic particulates are injected into the atmosphere during accidents. Automated algorithms with default assumptions have been developed to estimate the source geometry and the amount of toxic material aerosolized. The paper examines the sensitivity of ARAC`s dispersion model to the range of input values for explosive sources, and analyzes the model`s accuracy using two field measurement programs.

  17. AraC protein, regulation of the l-arabinose operon in Escherichia coli, and the light switch mechanism of AraC action.

    PubMed

    Schleif, Robert

    2010-09-01

    This review covers the physiological aspects of regulation of the arabinose operon in Escherichia coli and the physical and regulatory properties of the operon's controlling gene, araC. It also describes the light switch mechanism as an explanation for many of the protein's properties. Although many thousands of homologs of AraC exist and regulate many diverse operons in response to many different inducers or physiological states, homologs that regulate arabinose-catabolizing genes in response to arabinose were identified. The sequence similarities among them are discussed in light of the known structure of the dimerization and DNA-binding domains of AraC.

  18. Activation of ara operons by a truncated AraC protein does not require inducer.

    PubMed

    Menon, K P; Lee, N L

    1990-05-01

    The araC gene of Escherichia coli encodes a protein that binds the inducer L-arabinose to activate the transcription of three ara operons. In a study to determine the functional domains within the AraC protein, we have generated a set of overlapping deletions from the proximal end of the araC gene. We found that the removal of up to nearly 60% of the coding sequence of this protein still allows transcriptional activation of the ara operons in vivo, up to 27% that of the wild type. These truncated proteins, however, no longer require arabinose for induction. The ligand-induced conformational change apparently either releases or unmasks an existing functional domain within AraC, rather than generating a new conformation that is required for activation of the promoter of araBAD. Since the truncated protein of the mutant C154 (which lacks 153 amino acid residues from the N terminus) retains DNA binding specificity, the DNA-recognition domain is localized in the C-terminal half of the AraC protein. Truncated proteins were unable to repress araBAD or araC in vivo, even though they were able to bind all ara operators. We propose that the N-terminal half of AraC is essential for the formation of the DNA loops that are responsible for repression of araBAD and for autoregulation of araC.

  19. ARAC simulations of the ash plume from the December 1997 eruption of Soufriere Hills Volcano, Montserrat

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, J S; Lefevre, R J; Pace, J C; Vogt, P J; Voight, B

    1998-10-01

    Ash clouds generated by erupting volcanoes represent a serious hazard to military and civil aviation. The dispersion modeling system of the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) has been used to model the cloud resulting from the eruption of the Soufriere Hills volcano, Montserrat in December 1997. A clone of parts of the ARAC system, now being installed at the Air Force Weather Agency (AFWA), will enable AFWA to provide hazard guidance to military operations in the vicinity of erupting volcanoes. This paper presents ARAC's modeling results and discusses potential application of similar calculations for AFWA support during future events.

  20. The role of rigidity in DNA looping-unlooping by AraC.

    PubMed

    Harmer, T; Wu, M; Schleif, R

    2001-01-16

    We applied two experiments useful in the study of ligand-regulated DNA binding proteins to AraC, the dimeric regulator of the Escherichia coli l-arabinose operon. In the absence of arabinose, AraC prefers to loop DNA by binding to two half-sites that are separated by 210 base pairs, and in the presence of arabinose it prefers to bind to adjacently located half-sites. The basis for this ligand-regulated shift in binding appears to result from a shift in the rigidity of the system, where rigidity both in AraC protein in the absence of arabinose, and in the DNA are required to generate the free energy differences that produce the binding preferences. Eliminating the dimerization domains and connecting the two DNA binding domains of AraC by a flexible peptide linker should provide a protein whose behavior mimics that of AraC when there is no interaction between its dimerization and DNA binding domains. The resulting protein bound to adjacent half-sites on the DNA, like AraC protein in the presence of arabinose. When the two double-stranded DNA half-sites were connected by 24 bases of single-stranded, flexible DNA, wild-type AraC protein bound to the DNA in the presence and absence of arabinose with equal affinity, showing that AraC modulates its DNA binding affinity in response to arabinose by shifting the relative positions of its DNA binding domains. These results are consistent with the light switch mechanism for the action of AraC, refine the model, and extend the range of experimental tests to which it has been subjected.

  1. Enhancement of the Philippines Disaster Response Capability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-15

    the barangay largely depends on the elected leaders. Aldea (1995)21 identified some deficiencies in the NDCC such as lack of direction...Luzon Earthquake,” (Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology, Manila, 2001). 21 Elma C. Aldea , Enhancing Disaster Response Capabilities of

  2. 78 FR 63901 - Onsite Emergency Response Capabilities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-25

    ... actions stemming from the NRC's lessons-learned efforts associated with the March 2011 Fukushima Dai-ichi... Regulations (10 CFR) to strengthen and integrate onsite emergency response capabilities, the NRC is making... public availability the regulatory basis to strengthen and integrate onsite emergency...

  3. The ARAC-RODOS-WSPEEDI Information Exchange Project

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, T J

    1999-09-01

    Under the auspices of a US DOE-JAPAN Memorandum of Understanding JAERI and LLNL agreed to develop and evaluate a prototype information exchange protocol for nuclear accident emergency situations. This project received some interest from the US DOS and FEMA as it fits nicely under the umbrella of the G-7's GEMINI (Global Emergency Management Information Network Initiative) project. Because of LLNL/ARAC and JAERV WSPEEDI interest in nuclear accident consequence assessment and hazard prediction on all scales, to include global, we were happy to participate. Subsequent to the Spring 1997 RODOS-ARAC Workshop a Memorandum of Agreement was developed to enhance mutual collaboration on matters of emergency systems development. In the summer of 1998 the project leaders of RODOS, WSPEEDI and ARAC met at FZK and agreed to join in a triangular collaboration on the development and demonstration of an emergency information exchange protocol. JAERI and FZK are engaged in developing a formal cooperation agreement. The purpose of this project is to evaluate the prototype information protocol application for technical feasibility and mutual benefit through simulated (real) event; quick exchange of atmospheric modeling products and environmental data during emergencies, distribution of predicted results to other countries having no prediction capabilities, and utilization of the link for collaborative studies.

  4. AraC regulatory protein mutants with altered effector specificity.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shuang-Yan; Fazelinia, Hossein; Cirino, Patrick C

    2008-04-16

    The AraC regulatory protein of the Escherichia coli ara operon has been engineered to activate transcription in response to D-arabinose and not in response to its native effector L-arabinose. Two different AraC mutant libraries, each with four randomized binding pocket residues, were subjected to FACS-mediated dual screening using a GFP reporter. Both libraries yielded mutants with the desired switch in effector specificity, and one mutant we describe maintains tight repression in the absence of effector. The presence of 100 mM L-arabinose does not influence the response of the reported mutants to D-arabinose, and the mutants are not induced by other sugars tested (D-xylose, D-fucose, D-lyxose). Co-expression of the FucP transporter in E. coli enabled induction by D-arabinose in the 0.1 mM range. Our results demonstrate the power of dual screening for altering AraC inducer specificity and represent steps toward the design of customized in vivo molecular reporters and gene switches for metabolic engineering.

  5. 77 FR 56909 - Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee (ARAC); Renewal

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-14

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee (ARAC); Renewal AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Renewal. SUMMARY: The FAA announces the charter renewal of the Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee (ARAC), a Federal Advisory Committee that works...

  6. In vitro correlates of low dose ara-C efficacy: clinical, cytogenetic, and bone marrow culture analysis.

    PubMed

    Weisdorf, D J; Perri, R T; Arthur, D C; Machnicki, J L; Oken, M M; Miller, W J

    1987-05-01

    Low-dose Ara-C (10 mg/m2 subcutaneously bid) has been used as an alternative therapy for acute nonlymphocytic leukemia (ANLL) and myelodysplastic syndromes. We sought to define its therapeutic mechanism by assessing clinical and cytogenetic responses to treatment in conjunction with careful in vitro study of both morphologic and functional characteristics of bone marrow cells cultured with Ara-C. Sixteen patients (12 ANLL, four myelodysplastic syndrome) were treated. All developed pancytopenia and 11 of 12 had bone marrow hypoplasia during treatment. Four had a meaningful clinical response while five more showed in vivo leukemic cell sensitivity to low-dose Ara-C. Seven showed no response. Cells with cytogenetic abnormalities were either decreased in number or eradicated during clinical improvement. Liquid culture of marrow mononuclear cells with Ara-C (.033-.333 micrograms/ml X 7 days) produced little evidence of morphologic or functional differentiation (ten of 11 studied). No functional maturation was observed in cells from clinically responding patients. We conclude that low-dose Ara-C is modestly effective for some patients with ANLL or myelodysplasia. However, no evidence for in vivo leukemic differentiation is suggested by either in vitro culture studies or cytogenetic correlates of clinical response. In vitro marrow culture studies failed to predict clinical response to Ara-C.

  7. Purification of the araC protein.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, G; Clemetson, K J; Santi, D V; Englesberg, E

    1971-09-01

    The araC gene product, a regulatory protein required for expression of the L-arabinose operon, has been purified by affinity chromatography on Sepharose 4B to which 4-aminophenyl-beta-D-6-deoxygalactopyranoside (an anti-inducer of the L-arabinose operon) had been covalently attached by means of a 4-aminophenylbutanamido side chain. Evidence is presented showing that the protein binds specifically to ara DNA.

  8. 77 FR 23161 - Onsite Emergency Response Capabilities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-18

    ... Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident in Japan. DATES: Submit comments by June 18, 2012. Comments.... Background: Fukushima Dai-ichi and the NRC Regulatory Response III. Background: Onsite Emergency Response.... Background: Fukushima Dai-ichi and the NRC Regulatory Response On March 11, 2011, a magnitude 9.0...

  9. 78 FR 68774 - Onsite Emergency Response Capabilities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-15

    .... Background As a result of the events at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant in 2011, the NRC's Near... Enhancing Reactor Safety in the 21st Century: The Near-Term Task Force Review of Insights from the Fukushima...-0137, ``Prioritization of Recommended Actions to be Taken in Response to Fukushima Lessons...

  10. Minicomputer Capabilities Related to Meteorological Aspects of Emergency Response

    SciTech Connect

    Rarnsdell, J. V.; Athey, G. F.; Ballinger, M. Y.

    1982-02-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide the NRC staff involved in reviewing licensee emergency response plans with background information on the capabilities of minicomputer systems that are related to the collection and dissemination of meteorological infonmation. The treatment of meteorological information by organizations with existing emergency response capabilities is described, and the capabilities, reliability and availability of minicomputers and minicomputer systems are discussed.

  11. Elucidating residue roles in engineered variants of AraC regulatory protein

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shuang-Yan; Cirino, Patrick C

    2010-01-01

    The AraC regulatory protein was previously engineered to control gene expression specifically in response to d-arabinose and not the native effector l-arabinose (Tang et al., J Am Chem Soc 2008;130:5267–5271). Mutations were targeted in the ligand-binding pocket and on the AraC N-terminal arm, which plays an important role in maintaining repressing or activating conformations in the absence or presence of effector, respectively. In this study, we analyze the contributions of individual mutations toward the overall mutant functions in an attempt to streamline future AraC design efforts. For a variety of point mutants, we quantify the induced expression response to d-arabinose (level of leaky expression, induction fold, half-maximal dose response, and effector specificity) and the binding affinity of the purified ligand-binding domain for d-arabinose. We find that mutations introduced in the N-terminal arm (design Position 8) strengthen the induction response, most likely by weakening interactions with the DNA-binding domain, but are not involved in ligand binding. Meanwhile, binding pocket mutations occurring further away from the arm (Positions 80 and 82) primarily contribute to maintaining repression in the absence of effector and do not show response to d-arabinose without the accompanying mutations. Combinations of mutations cooperatively couple molecular recognition to transcriptional activation, demonstrating the complexity of the AraC regulatory switch and the power of combinatorial protein design to alter effector specificity while maintaining regulatory function. PMID:20014443

  12. Unmanned and Unattended Response Capability for Homeland Defense

    SciTech Connect

    BENNETT, PHIL C.

    2002-11-01

    An analysis was conducted of the potential for unmanned and unattended robotic technologies for forward-based, immediate response capabilities that enables access and controlled task performance. The authors analyze high-impact response scenarios in conjunction with homeland security organizations, such as the NNSA Office of Emergency Response, the FBI, the National Guard, and the Army Technical Escort Unit, to cover a range of radiological, chemical and biological threats. They conducted an analysis of the potential of forward-based, unmanned and unattended robotic technologies to accelerate and enhance emergency and crisis response by Homeland Defense organizations. Response systems concepts were developed utilizing new technologies supported by existing emerging threats base technologies to meet the defined response scenarios. These systems will pre-position robotic and remote sensing capabilities stationed close to multiple sites for immediate action. Analysis of assembled systems included experimental activities to determine potential efficacy in the response scenarios, and iteration on systems concepts and remote sensing and robotic technologies, creating new immediate response capabilities for Homeland Defense.

  13. Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project: Infrastructure Enhancements and New Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bezos-OConnor, Gaudy M.

    2015-01-01

    This oral presentation highlights the technical investments the NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation Project under the Integrated Systems Research Program within ARMD made during FY10-FY14 to upgrade/enhance the NASA infrastructure/testing assets and new capabilities required to mature the ERA N=2 Portfolio of airframe and propulsion technologies to TRL 5/6.

  14. Emergency Response Capability Baseline Needs Assessment - Requirements Document

    SciTech Connect

    Sharry, John A.

    2016-10-04

    This document was prepared by John A. Sharry, LLNL Fire Marshal and LLNL Division Leader for Fire Protection and reviewed by LLNL Emergency Management Department Head James Colson. The document follows and expands upon the format and contents of the DOE Model Fire Protection Baseline Capabilities Assessment document contained on the DOE Fire Protection Web Site, but only addresses emergency response.

  15. The challenge of emergency response dispersion models on the meso-gamma urban scale: A case study of the July 26, 1993 Oleum tank car spill in Richmond, California

    SciTech Connect

    Baskett, R.L.; Vogt, P.J.; Schalk, W.W.; Pobanz, B.M.; Foster, C.S.; Ellis, J.S.

    1994-08-01

    This paper presents a recent case study that illustrates the difficulty of modeling accidental toxic releases in urban area. On the morning of July 26, 1993, oleum was accidentally released from a railroad tank car in Richmond, California. State and local agencies requested real-time modeling from the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Although the ARAC`s with the US Department of Energy is for nuclear materials, the team responded to the accident under an Agreement in Principle with the State of California. ARAC provided model plots describing the location and progress of the toxic cloud to the agencies managing the response. The primary protective action for the public was to shelter in place. Highways, rail lines and public transportation were blocked. The incident was significant, enough that over 24,000 people sought medical attention within the week following the release.

  16. Using genome-wide CRISPR library screening with library resistant DCK to find new sources of Ara-C drug resistance in AML

    PubMed Central

    Kurata, Morito; Rathe, Susan K.; Bailey, Natashay J.; Aumann, Natalie K.; Jones, Justine M.; Veldhuijzen, G. Willemijn; Moriarity, Branden S.; Largaespada, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) can display de novo or acquired resistance to cytosine arabinoside (Ara-C), a primary component of induction chemotherapy. To identify genes capable of independently imposing Ara-C resistance, we applied a genome-wide CRISPR library to human U937 cells and exposed to them to Ara-C. Interestingly, all drug resistant clones contained guide RNAs for DCK. To avoid DCK gene modification, gRNA resistant DCK cDNA was created by the introduction of silent mutations. The CRISPR screening was repeated using the gRNA resistant DCK, and loss of SLC29A was identified as also being capable of conveying Ara-C drug resistance. To determine if loss of Dck results in increased sensitivity to other drugs, we conducted a screen of 446 FDA approved drugs using two Dck-defective BXH-2 derived murine AML cell lines and their Ara-C sensitive parental lines. Both cell lines showed an increase in sensitivity to prednisolone. Guide RNA resistant cDNA rescue was a legitimate strategy and multiple DCK or SLC29A deficient human cell clones were established with one clone becoming prednisolone sensitive. Dck-defective leukemic cells may become prednisolone sensitive indicating prednisolone may be an effective adjuvant therapy in some cases of DCK-negative AML. PMID:27808171

  17. Using genome-wide CRISPR library screening with library resistant DCK to find new sources of Ara-C drug resistance in AML.

    PubMed

    Kurata, Morito; Rathe, Susan K; Bailey, Natashay J; Aumann, Natalie K; Jones, Justine M; Veldhuijzen, G Willemijn; Moriarity, Branden S; Largaespada, David A

    2016-11-03

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) can display de novo or acquired resistance to cytosine arabinoside (Ara-C), a primary component of induction chemotherapy. To identify genes capable of independently imposing Ara-C resistance, we applied a genome-wide CRISPR library to human U937 cells and exposed to them to Ara-C. Interestingly, all drug resistant clones contained guide RNAs for DCK. To avoid DCK gene modification, gRNA resistant DCK cDNA was created by the introduction of silent mutations. The CRISPR screening was repeated using the gRNA resistant DCK, and loss of SLC29A was identified as also being capable of conveying Ara-C drug resistance. To determine if loss of Dck results in increased sensitivity to other drugs, we conducted a screen of 446 FDA approved drugs using two Dck-defective BXH-2 derived murine AML cell lines and their Ara-C sensitive parental lines. Both cell lines showed an increase in sensitivity to prednisolone. Guide RNA resistant cDNA rescue was a legitimate strategy and multiple DCK or SLC29A deficient human cell clones were established with one clone becoming prednisolone sensitive. Dck-defective leukemic cells may become prednisolone sensitive indicating prednisolone may be an effective adjuvant therapy in some cases of DCK-negative AML.

  18. Oil spill response capabilities in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Westermeyer, W.E. )

    1991-02-01

    The Exxon Valdez incident has been a catalyst for the US to reexamine its technology and policies for fighting oil spills. Many organizations are now at work on the problems highlighted by this sill, including federal and state agencies and the oil industry. It is hoped that the attention generated by the Exxon Valdez will result in fewer spills and a greatly improved capability to fight the ones that will still occur. Cleaning up a discharge of millions of gallons of oil at sea under even moderate environmental conditions is an extraordinary problem. Current national capabilities to respond effectively to such an accident are marginal at best. Response technologies must and will improve, but in addition and perhaps more importantly, many improvements can be made in the way the country has organized itself to fight major spills. Nonetheless, prevention is still the best medicine.

  19. Emergency Response Capability Baseline Needs Assessment Compliance Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Sharry, John A.

    2013-09-16

    This document is the second of a two-part analysis of Emergency Response Capabilities of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The first part, 2013 Baseline Needs Assessment Requirements Document established the minimum performance criteria necessary to meet mandatory requirements. This second part analyses the performance of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory Emergency Management Department to the contents of the Requirements Document. The document was prepared based on an extensive review of information contained in the 2009 BNA, the 2012 BNA document, a review of Emergency Planning Hazards Assessments, a review of building construction, occupancy, fire protection features, dispatch records, LLNL alarm system records, fire department training records, and fire department policies and procedures.

  20. Aviation System Analysis Capability Quick Response System Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Eileen; Villani, James A.; Ritter, Paul

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to present the additions and modifications made to the Aviation System Analysis Capability (ASAC) Quick Response System (QRS) in FY 1997 in support of the ASAC ORS development effort. This document contains an overview of the project background and scope and defines the QRS. The document also presents an overview of the Logistics Management Institute (LMI) facility that supports the QRS, and it includes a summary of the planned additions to the QRS in FY 1998. The document has five appendices.

  1. Quantifying human response capabilities towards tsunami threats at community level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Post, J.; Mück, M.; Zosseder, K.; Wegscheider, S.; Taubenböck, H.; Strunz, G.; Muhari, A.; Anwar, H. Z.; Birkmann, J.; Gebert, N.

    2009-04-01

    Decision makers at the community level need detailed information on tsunami risks in their area. Knowledge on potential hazard impact, exposed elements such as people, critical facilities and lifelines, people's coping capacity and recovery potential are crucial to plan precautionary measures for adaptation and to mitigate potential impacts of tsunamis on society and the environment. A crucial point within a people-centred tsunami risk assessment is to quantify the human response capabilities towards tsunami threats. Based on this quantification and spatial representation in maps tsunami affected and safe areas, difficult-to-evacuate areas, evacuation target points and evacuation routes can be assigned and used as an important contribution to e.g. community level evacuation planning. Major component in the quantification of human response capabilities towards tsunami impacts is the factor time. The human response capabilities depend on the estimated time of arrival (ETA) of a tsunami, the time until technical or natural warning signs (ToNW) can be received, the reaction time (RT) of the population (human understanding of a tsunami warning and the decision to take appropriate action), the evacuation time (ET, time people need to reach a safe area) and the actual available response time (RsT = ETA - ToNW - RT). If RsT is larger than ET, people in the respective areas are able to reach a safe area and rescue themselves. Critical areas possess RsT values equal or even smaller ET and hence people whin these areas will be directly affected by a tsunami. Quantifying the factor time is challenging and an attempt to this is presented here. The ETA can be derived by analyzing pre-computed tsunami scenarios for a respective area. For ToNW we assume that the early warning center is able to fulfil the Indonesian presidential decree to issue a warning within 5 minutes. RT is difficult as here human intrinsic factors as educational level, believe, tsunami knowledge and experience

  2. ARAC dispersion modeling support for January-March 1995 Vandenberg AFB launches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskett, R. L.; Pace, J. C.

    1995-05-01

    The Glory Trip (GT) 17-PA Peacekeeper launch originally scheduled at Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB) between 15 and 20 November 1994 was cancelled based on modeled toxic exhaust cloud calculations. The Missile Flight Control Branch, 30th Space Wing Safety Office (30 SW/SEY), made several successive 'No Go' decisions using Version 7.05 Rocket Exhaust Effluent Dispersion Model (REEDM) with forecasted meteorological conditions. REEDM runs made from T-14 hours to T-30 minutes predicted that ground-level concentrations of hydrogen chloride (HCl) gas from the catastrophic abort case would exceed 5 ppM, the 'instantaneous' ambient air concentration 'Tier 2' limit at that time, modeled as a peak 1-minute cloud centerline concentration. Depending on the forecasted wind direction and speed at launch time, this limit was predicted to be exceeded sometimes at Base Housing, approximately 10 km southeast of the launch, and during other launch windows at the town of Casmalia, about 5 km east- southeast. In late December 1994, the LLNL Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) program modeled the aborted November 1994 Peacekeeper launch and compared its results with REEDM. This initial comparison showed that the ARAC model predicted values about 1/3 as large as REEDM for the limiting case at Base Housing. Subsequently ARAC was asked to provide real-time modeling support to 30 SW/SEY during the rescheduled Peacekeeper GT 17-PA launch in January 1995 and two Minuteman launches in February and March. This report first briefly discusses the model differences and then summarizes the results of the three supported launches.

  3. ARAC dispersion modeling support for January--March 1995 Vandenberg AFB launches

    SciTech Connect

    Baskett, R.L.; Pace, J.C.

    1995-05-01

    The Glory Trip (GT) 17-PA Peacekeeper launch originally scheduled at Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB) between 15 and 20 November 1994 was cancelled based on modeled toxic exhaust cloud calculations. The Missile Flight Control Branch, 30th Space Wing Safety Office (30 SW/SEY), made several successive ``No Go`` decisions using Version 7. 05 Rocket Exhaust Effluent Dispersion Model (REEDM) with forecasted meteorological conditions. REEDM runs made from T-14 hours to T-30 minutes predicted that ground-level concentrations of hydrogen chloride (HCl) gas from the catastrophic abort case would exceed 5 ppM, the ``instantaneous`` ambient air concentration ``Tier 2`` limit at that time, modeled as a peak 1-minute cloud centerline concentration. Depending on the forecasted wind direction and speed at launch time, this limit was predicted to be exceeded sometimes at Base Housing, approximately 10 km southeast of the launch, and during other launch windows at the town of Casmalia, about 5 km east- southeast. In late December 1994, the LLNL Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) program modeled the aborted November 1994 Peacekeeper launch and compared its results with REEDM. This initial comparison showed that the ARAC model predicted values about 1/3 as large as REEDM for the limiting case at Base Housing. Subsequently ARAC was asked to provide real-time modeling support to 30 SW/SEY during the rescheduled Peacekeeper GT 17-PA launch in January 1995 and two Minuteman launches in February and March. This report first briefly discusses the model differences and then summarizes the results of the three supported launches.

  4. Emergency Response Capability Baseline Needs Assessment - Compliance Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Sharry, John A.

    2016-09-01

    This document was prepared by John A. Sharry, LLNL Fire Marshal and Division Leader for Fire Protection and was reviewed by LLNL Emergency Management Department Head, James Colson. This document is the second of a two-part analysis on Emergency Response Capabilities of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The first part, 2016 Baseline Needs Assessment Requirements Document established the minimum performance criteria necessary to meet mandatory requirements. This second part analyses the performance of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory Emergency Management Department to the contents of the Requirements Document. The document was prepared based on an extensive review of information contained in the 2016 BNA, a review of Emergency Planning Hazards Assessments, a review of building construction, occupancy, fire protection features, dispatch records, LLNL alarm system records, fire department training records, and fire department policies and procedures. The 2013 BNA was approved by NNSA’s Livermore Field Office on January 22, 2014.

  5. Smart responsive microcapsules capable of recognizing heavy metal ions.

    PubMed

    Pi, Shuo-Wei; Ju, Xiao-Jie; Wu, Han-Guang; Xie, Rui; Chu, Liang-Yin

    2010-09-15

    Smart responsive microcapsules capable of recognizing heavy metal ions are successfully prepared with oil-in-water-in-oil double emulsions as templates for polymerization in this study. The microcapsules are featured with thin poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-benzo-18-crown-6-acrylamide) (P(NIPAM-co-BCAm)) membranes, and they can selectively recognize special heavy metal ions such as barium(II) or lead(II) ions very well due to the "host-guest" complexation between the BCAm receptors and barium(II) or lead(II) ions. The stable BCAm/Ba(2+) or BCAm/Pb(2+) complexes in the P(NIPAM-co-BCAm) membrane cause a positive shift of the volume phase transition temperature of the crosslinked P(NIPAM-co-BCAm) hydrogel to a higher temperature, and the repulsion among the charged BCAm/Ba(2+) or BCAm/Pb(2+) complexes and the osmotic pressure within the P(NIPAM-co-BCAm) membranes result in the swelling of microcapsules. Induced by recognizing barium(II) or lead(II) ions, the prepared microcapsules with P(NIPAM-co-BCAm) membranes exhibit isothermal and significant swelling not only in outer and inner diameters but also in the membrane thickness. The proposed microcapsules in this study are highly attractive for developing smart sensors and/or carriers for detection and/or elimination of heavy metal ions.

  6. Atmospheric release advisory capability pilot project at two nuclear power plants and associated state offices of emergency preparedness. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, L.C.

    1983-01-01

    A project to demonstrate the feasibility of utilizing Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) limited service with commercial nuclear power plants and their associated state offices of emergency preparedness is discussed. Preliminary planning, installation and testing of the ARAC site facilities at Indian Point Nucler Power Station, New York State; at New York State Office of Emergency Preparedness, Albany, New York; at Rancho Seco Nuclear Generating Station, California; and at the State of California Office of Emergency Services, Sacramento, California, are summarized. ARAC participation in the Robert E. Ginna nuclear generating plant accident in New York on January 25, 1982, is discussed. The ARAC system is evaluated with emphasis on communications, the suite of models contained within the ARAC system, and the staff. The implications of this project in designing the next-generation ARAC system to service federal and state needs are assessed.

  7. In vitro activation of the transcription of araBAD operon by araC activator.

    PubMed

    Lee, N; Wilcox, G; Gielow, W; Arnold, J; Cleary, P; Englesberg, E

    1974-03-01

    The transcription of araBAD operon requires araC activator and cyclic AMP. D-Fucose inhibits ara mRNA synthesis. Our results indicate that the positive control by araC activator is exerted at the level of transcription.

  8. Arm-domain interactions in AraC.

    PubMed

    Saviola, B; Seabold, R; Schleif, R F

    1998-05-08

    N-terminal deletions extending beyond the sixth amino acid of the Escherichia coli regulator of the l-arabinose operon, AraC, were found to generate constitutive regulatory behavior of the promoter pBAD. Mutagenesis of the DNA coding for the first 20 amino acids of the protein and screening for constitutives yielded mutants across the region whereas screening for mutants that cannot induce pBAD, even in the presence of arabinose, yielded none. These results indicate that the N-terminal arm is not essential for transcription activation, but that it plays an important and active role in holding the system in a non-activating state. Despite the fact that arabinose binds to the N-terminal domain of AraC, mutations were found in the C-terminal domain that weaken the binding of arabinose to the protein. The effects of the mutations could be suppressed by specific mutation in the N-terminal arm or by deletion of the arm. These results, in conjunction with the crystal structures of the N-terminal domain determined in the presence and absence of arabinose, indicate that in the absence of arabinose, the N-terminal arms of the protein bind to the C-terminal DNA binding domains to hold them in a state where the protein prefers to loop. When arabinose is added, the arms are pulled off the C-terminal domains, thereby releasing them to bind to adjacently located DNA half-sites and activate transcription.

  9. Traffic model by braking capability and response time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyun Keun; Kim, Jeenu; Kim, Youngho; Lee, Choong-Ki

    2015-06-01

    We propose a microscopic traffic model where the update velocity is determined by the deceleration capacity and response time. It is found that there is a class of collisions that cannot be distinguished by simply comparing the stop positions. The model generates the safe, comfortable, and efficient traffic flow in numerical simulations with a reasonable values of the parameters, and this is analytically supported. Our approach provides a new perspective in modeling traffic-flow safety and worrying situations like lane changing.

  10. SRNL EMERGENCY RESPONSE CAPABILITY FOR ATMOSPHERIC CONTAMINANT RELEASES

    SciTech Connect

    Koffman, L; Chuck Hunter, C; Robert Buckley, R; Robert Addis, R

    2006-07-12

    Emergency response to an atmospheric release of chemical or radiological contamination is enhanced when plume predictions, field measurements, and real-time weather information are integrated into a geospatial framework. The Weather Information and Display (WIND) System at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) utilizes such an integrated framework. The rapid availability of predictions from a suite of atmospheric transport models within this geospatial framework has proven to be of great value to decision makers during an emergency involving an atmospheric contaminant release.

  11. Gene activation by the AraC protein can be inhibited by DNA looping between AraC and a LexA repressor that interacts with AraC: possible applications as a two-hybrid system.

    PubMed

    Kornacker, M G; Remsburg, B; Menzel, R

    1998-11-01

    The Escherichia coli activator and repressor proteins AraC and LexA bind DNA as homodimers. Here we show that their heterodimerization through fused cognate dimerization domains results in repression of AraC-dependent gene activation by LexA. Repression also requires a LexA operator half-site located several helical turns downstream of the AraC operator. This requirement for a specific spatial organization of the operators suggests the formation of a DNA loop between operator-bound Ara/LexA heterodimers, and we propose that heterodimerization with the AraC hybrid provides co-operativity for operator binding and repression by the LexA hybrid. Consistent with a mechanism that involves DNA looping, repression increases when the E. coli DNA looping and transcriptional effector protein IHF binds between the AraC and LexA operators. Thus, we have combined the functions of three distinct transcriptional effector proteins to achieve a new mode of gene regulation by DNA looping, in which the activator protein is an essential part of the repressor complex. The flexibility of the DNA loop may facilitate this novel combinatorial arrangement of those proteins on the DNA. The requirement for protein interactions between the AraC and LexA hybrids for gene regulation suggests that this regulatory circuit may prove useful as an E. coli-based two-hybrid system.

  12. Characterisation of a putative AraC transcriptional regulator from Mycobacterium smegmatis

    PubMed Central

    Evangelopoulos, Dimitrios; Gupta, Antima; Lack, Nathan A.; Maitra, Arundhati; ten Bokum, Annemieke M.C.; Kendall, Sharon; Sim, Edith; Bhakta, Sanjib

    2014-01-01

    Summary MSMEG_0307 is annotated as a transcriptional regulator belonging to the AraC protein family and is located adjacent to the arylamine N-acetyltransferase (nat) gene in Mycobacterium smegmatis, in a gene cluster, conserved in most environmental mycobacterial species. In order to elucidate the function of the AraC protein from the nat operon in M. smegmatis, two conserved palindromic DNA motifs were identified using bioinformatics and tested for protein binding using electrophoretic mobility shift assays with a recombinant form of the AraC protein. We identified the formation of a DNA:AraC protein complex with one of the motifs as well as the presence of this motif in 20 loci across the whole genome of M. smegmatis, supporting the existence of an AraC controlled regulon. To characterise the effects of AraC in the regulation of the nat operon genes, as well as to gain further insight into its function, we generated a ΔaraC mutant strain where the araC gene was replaced by a hygromycin resistance marker. The level of expression of the nat and MSMEG_0308 genes was down-regulated in the ΔaraC strain when compared to the wild type strain indicating an activator effect of the AraC protein on the expression of the nat operon genes. PMID:25443504

  13. A functional single-nucleotide polymorphism in the human cytidine deaminase gene contributing to ara-C sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Yue, Lijie; Saikawa, Yutaka; Ota, Kazuhisa; Tanaka, Motohiro; Nishimura, Ryosei; Uehara, Takahiro; Maeba, Hideaki; Ito, Takashi; Sasaki, Takuma; Koizumi, Shoichi

    2003-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that analyses of drug targets for polymorphism will help to establish gene-based information for the treatment of cancer patients, we investigated the functional single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the human cytidine deaminase (HDCA) gene. The cDNAs from 52 leukaemia/lymphoma samples and 169 control blood samples were direct-sequenced and analysed for the polymorphisms. Three different polymorphisms (A79C, G208A and T435C) were identified in the coding region of the HDCA gene and displayed allelic frequencies of 20.1%, 4.3% and 70.1%, respectively. No association with susceptibility to disease was observed. A novel polymorphism, G208A produced an alanine to threonine substitution (A70T) within the conserved catalytic domain. By introduction of the polymorphic HCDA genes into the yeast CDA-null mutants, the HCDA-70T showed 40% and 32% activity of prototype for cytidine and ara-C substrates, respectively (P < 0.01). The ara-C IC50 value of the yeast transformants carrying HCDA-70T was 757 +/- 33 micromol and was significantly lower (P < 0.01) than that of prototype (941 +/- 58 micromol). This study demonstrated a population characterized with 208A genotype for, which potentially leads one more sensitive to ara-C treatment than prototype. Accumulation of polymorphisms in the genes responsible for drug metabolism and determination of polymorphism-induced biological variations could provide the additional therapeutic strategies in risk-stratified protocols for the treatment of childhood malignancies.

  14. A Highly Capable Year 6 Student's Response to a Challenging Mathematical Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livy, Sharyn; Holmes, Marilyn; Ingram, Naomi; Linsell, Chris; Sullivan, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Highly capable mathematics students are not usually considered strugglers. This paper reports on a case study of a Year 6 student, Debbie, her response to a lesson, and her learning involving a challenging mathematical task. Debbie, usually a highly capable student, struggled to complete a challenging mathematical task by herself, but as the…

  15. AraC protein contacts asymmetric sites in the Escherichia coli araFGH promoter.

    PubMed

    Lu, Y; Flaherty, C; Hendrickson, W

    1992-12-05

    AraC protein regulates the transcription of arabinose transport and catabolic operons in Escherichia coli through interaction with specific DNA sequences in the promoter regions of the operons. The interaction of AraC protein with two binding sites in the araFGH promoter was determined and compared to previously studied AraC binding sites in the araBAD promoter. Methylation and ethylation interference assays show that AraC protein binds along one side of the DNA to four adjacent major groove regions at each of the araFG1 and araFG2 sites. Mutations within any of the four regions of araFG1 greatly reduce protein binding in vitro. The promoter function in vivo is also greatly reduced, indicating that all four regions of the binding site are required. The chemical interference and genetic data, combined with the consensus sequence for AraC protein binding to ara promoters, support a binding motif in which two directly repeated units each span two adjacent turns of the DNA helix. The function of the two AraC binding sites was also examined. The proximal araFG1 site is required for promoter activation, whereas the distal araFG2 site has only a slight effect on the promoter activity.

  16. Development, Verification and Validation of Enclosure Radiation Capabilities in the CHarring Ablator Response (CHAR) Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salazar, Giovanni; Droba, Justin C.; Oliver, Brandon; Amar, Adam J.

    2016-01-01

    With the recent development of multi-dimensional thermal protection system (TPS) material response codes including the capabilities to account for radiative heating is a requirement. This paper presents the recent efforts to implement such capabilities in the CHarring Ablator Response (CHAR) code developed at NASA's Johnson Space Center. This work also describes the different numerical methods implemented in the code to compute view factors for radiation problems involving multiple surfaces. Furthermore, verification and validation of the code's radiation capabilities are demonstrated by comparing solutions to analytical results, to other codes, and to radiant test data.

  17. Aviation System Analysis Capability Quick Response System Report for Fiscal Year 1998

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ege, Russell; Villani, James; Ritter, Paul

    1999-01-01

    This document presents the additions and modifications made to the Quick Response System (QRS) in FY 1998 in support of the ASAC QRS development effort. this Document builds upon the Aviation System Analysis Capability Quick Responses System Report for Fiscal Year 1997.

  18. ARAC dispersion modeling of the July 26, 1993 oleum tank car spill in Richmond, California

    SciTech Connect

    Baskett, R.L.; Vogt, P.J.; Schalk, W.W. III; Pobanz, B.M.

    1994-02-03

    This report presents the results from the real-time response on the day of the spill followed by a re-assessment of the spill. Worst-case source terms and readily available meteorological data (met data) were used for the real-time response. ARAC employs a three-dimensional, diagnostic, finite-difference dispersion modeling system for estimating the consequences from accidental atmospheric releases. MATHEW (Mass-Adjusted Three- Dimensional Wind field), a Eulerian wind field code, and ADPIC (Atmospheric Diffusion by Particle-In-Cell), a hybrid Eulerian-Lagrangian dispersion model, from the core of the system. For a particular incident a model grid is selected to encompass the area of concern and is generated using underlying terrain from on-line data. Meteorological data from multiple surface and upper air stations are automatically acquired in real time primarily from local airports and formatted to initialize the wind field model. Dispersion parameters are determined from meteorological data and the source term from available information. The system is designed to simulate releases from single or multiple radioactive releases, such as ventings, spills, fires, or explosions. Solid and liquid aerosols and neutrally-buoyant gases are modeled. Particle size distributions are input for each aerosol source and modeled using gravitational settling and wet and dry deposition, if applicable. The system can be readily applied to neutrally-bouyant, nonradioactive chemical releases which do not undergo significant physical or chemical conversion processes.

  19. Computational and experimental investigation of constitutive behavior in AraC.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Mary; Gullotti, David; Damjanovic, Ana; Cheng, Ann; Dirla, Stephanie; Schleif, Robert

    2014-12-01

    Many mutations in the N-terminal arm of AraC result in constitutive behavior in which transcription of the araBAD genes occurs even in the absence of arabinose. To begin to understand the mechanism underlying this class of mutations, we used molecular dynamics with self-guided Langevin dynamics to simulate (1) wild-type (WT) AraC, (2) known constitutive mutants resulting from alterations in the regulatory arm, particularly alanine and glycine substitutions at residue 8 because P8G is constitutive, whereas P8A behaves like wild type, and (3) selected variant AraC proteins containing alterations in the dimerization core. In all of the constitutive arm mutants, but not the WT protein, residues 37-42, which are located in the core of the dimerization domain, became restructured. This raised the question of whether or not these structural changes are an obligatory component of constitutivity. Using molecular dynamics, we identified alterations in the core that produced a similar restructuring. The corresponding mutants were constructed and their ara constitutivity status was determined experimentally. Because the core mutants were not found to be constitutive, we conclude that restructuring of core residues 37-42 does not, itself, lead to constitutivity of AraC. The available data lead to the hypothesis that the interaction of the N-terminal arm with something other than the front lip is the primary determinant of the inducing versus repressing state of AraC.

  20. Event Response by Observatory-based Autonomous Underwater Vehicles: Scientific Need and Technological Capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoerger, D. R.; Bradley, A. M.

    2001-12-01

    Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs) operated from a subsea observatory can provide crucial capabilities for observing dynamic events, such as the large plumes that accompany tectonic or volcanic events. An AUV docked to an observatory node could be recharged and while docked would have continuous communication with researchers ashore. Such a vehicle could reach an event long before we could mount a response with a ship and perhaps quicker than could an AUV launched from an aircraft. Autonomous Underwater Vehicles can be built in a variety of shapes and sizes, which translate into a wide range of capabilities in terms of speed, range, maneuverability, and payload. Likewise, we have a variety of choices for the design of docking stations, navigational infrastructure, in-situ sensing systems and communications capability. All these elements also greatly drive the cost of an AUV, and the best approach could entail providing a mix of vehicles with complementary capabilities. This presentation examines how observatory system architecture, AUV performance characteristics, and sensing capabilities will effect our ability to achieve scientific goals during an event response. This presentation aims to promote a dialogue between engineers and scientists to determine how such an observatory capability can best address scientific needs.

  1. Development and Verification of Enclosure Radiation Capabilities in the CHarring Ablator Response (CHAR) Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salazar, Giovanni; Droba, Justin C.; Oliver, Brandon; Amar, Adam J.

    2016-01-01

    With the recent development of multi-dimensional thermal protection system (TPS) material response codes, the capability to account for surface-to-surface radiation exchange in complex geometries is critical. This paper presents recent efforts to implement such capabilities in the CHarring Ablator Response (CHAR) code developed at NASA's Johnson Space Center. This work also describes the different numerical methods implemented in the code to compute geometric view factors for radiation problems involving multiple surfaces. Verification of the code's radiation capabilities and results of a code-to-code comparison are presented. Finally, a demonstration case of a two-dimensional ablating cavity with enclosure radiation accounting for a changing geometry is shown.

  2. Ship Response Capability Models for Counter-Piracy Patrols in the Gulf of Aden

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    exhibit one of six possible readiness states that can fit into one of four categories 8: (a) All helicopters at high alert level ( HHH ) (b) Two...Coordinated 30 min Uncoordinated 30 min Coordinated Figure 16: Effect of helicopter readiness on response capabilities. configurations HHH , HHL and HLH

  3. 30 CFR 254.45 - Verifying the capabilities of your response equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... accordance with MMS-approved test criteria. You may use the document “Test Protocol for the Evaluation of Oil... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Verifying the capabilities of your response equipment. 254.45 Section 254.45 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE...

  4. Directed evolution of AraC for improved compatibility of arabinose- and lactose-inducible promoters.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Kuk; Chou, Howard H; Pfleger, Brian F; Newman, Jack D; Yoshikuni, Yasuo; Keasling, Jay D

    2007-09-01

    Synthetic biological systems often require multiple, independently inducible promoters in order to control the expression levels of several genes; however, cross talk between the promoters limits this ability. Here, we demonstrate the directed evolution of AraC to construct an arabinose-inducible (P(BAD)) system that is more compatible with IPTG (isopropyl-beta-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside) induction of a lactose-inducible (P(lac)) system. The constructed system is 10 times more sensitive to arabinose and tolerates IPTG significantly better than the wild type. Detailed studies indicate that the AraC dimerization domain and C terminus are important for the increased sensitivity of AraC to arabinose.

  5. Responsibility, capability, and Active SETI: Policy, law, ethics, and communication with extraterrestrial intelligence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakoch, Douglas A.

    2011-02-01

    With recently growing interest in the Active Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI), in which humankind would send intentional signals to extraterrestrial civilizations, there have been increased concerns about appropriate policy, as well as the role of space law and ethics in guiding such activities. Implicit in these discussions are notions of responsibility and capability that affect judgments about whether humans or other civilizations should initiate transmissions. Existing protocols that guide SETI research address transmissions from Earth, but there is debate over whether these guidelines should inform de novo transmissions as well. Relevant responsibilities to address include (1) looking out for the interests of humankind as a whole, (2) being truthful in interstellar messages, and (3) benefiting extraterrestrial civilizations. Our capabilities as a species and a civilization affect how well we can fulfill responsibilities, as seen when we consider whether we will be able to reach consensus about message contents (and whether that would be desirable), and whether we have the capacity to decode messages from beings that rely on different sensory modalities. The interplay of these responsibilities and capabilities suggests that humankind should place increased emphasis on Active SETI.

  6. Cyclophosphamide, ara-C and topotecan (CAT) for patients with refractory or relapsed acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Cortes, J; Estey, E; Beran, M; O'Brien, S; Giles, F; Koller, C; Keating, M; Kantarjian, H

    2000-02-01

    Topotecan is a topoisomerase I inhibitor with significant activity in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome and chronic myelomonocytic leukemia. Pre-clinical data suggest a synergistic activity with DNA damaging agents such as cyclophosphamide, where topotecan might prevent the repair of cyclophosphamide-induced DNA damage. We thus designed a combination including cyclophosphamide 500 mg/m2 every 12 hours given on days 1 to 3; topotecan 1.25 mg/m2/day by continuous infusion on days 2 to 6, and cytosine arabinoside (ara-C) 2 g/m2 over 4 hours daily for 5 days on days 2 to 6 (CAT). Sixty six (63 evaluable) patients were treated. Fifty two patients had refractory (n=12) or relapsed (n=40) acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), and eleven had acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) (refractory n=3, relapsed n=8); their median age was 57 years (range, 18 to 79 years). Eleven patients (17%) achieved a complete remission (CR), and two patients (3%) had a hematologic improvement (HI; met all criteria for CR except for platelets < 100x10(9)/L), for an overall response rate of 20%. Responses occurred in 12 of 52 AML patients (23%), including 10 CR (19%) and 2 HI (4%), and in 1 of 11 patients with ALL (9%). Myelosuppression was universal; there were 23 episodes of pneumonia or sepsis and 18 episodes of fever of unknown origin complicating 74 courses of CAT. Non-hematologic toxicity was mostly gastrointestinal, including nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and mucositis, but was severe in only 8%. In summary, the CAT regimen is well tolerated and has significant anti-leukemia activity which warrants further investigation.

  7. A new and unexpected domain-domain interaction in the AraC protein.

    PubMed

    Cole, Stephanie Dirla; Schleif, Robert

    2012-05-01

    An interaction between the dimerization domains and DNA binding domains of the dimeric AraC protein has previously been shown to facilitate repression of the Escherichia coli araBAD operon by AraC in the absence of arabinose. A new interaction between the domains of AraC in the presence of arabinose is reported here, the regulatory consequences of which are unknown. Evidence for the interaction is the following: the dissociation rate of arabinose-bound AraC from half-site DNA is considerably faster than that of free DNA binding domain, and the affinity of the dimerization domains for arabinose is increased when half-site DNA is bound. In addition, an increase in the fluorescence intensity of tryptophan residues located in the arabinose-bound dimerization domain is observed upon binding of half-site DNA to the DNA binding domains. Direct physical evidence of the new domain-domain interaction is demonstrated by chemical crosslinking and NMR experiments.

  8. Structure and properties of a truely apo form of AraC dimerization domain.

    PubMed

    Weldon, John E; Rodgers, Michael E; Larkin, Christopher; Schleif, Robert F

    2007-02-15

    The arabinose-binding pockets of wild type AraC dimerization domains crystallized in the absence of arabinose are occupied with the side chains of Y31 from neighboring domains. This interaction leads to aggregation at high solution concentrations and prevents determination of the structure of truely apo AraC. In this work we found that the aggregation does not significantly occur at physiological concentrations of AraC. We also found that the Y31V mutation eliminates the self-association, but does not affect regulation properties of the protein. At the same time, the mutation allows crystallization of the dimerization domain of the protein with only solvent in the arabinose-binding pocket. Using a distance difference method suitable for detecting and displaying even minor structural variation among large groups of similar structures, we find that there is no significant structural change in the core of monomers of the AraC dimerization domain resulting from arabinose, fucose, or tyrosine occupancy of the ligand-binding pocket. A slight change is observed in the relative orientation of monomers in the dimeric form of the domain upon the binding of arabinose but its significance cannot yet be assessed.

  9. A survey of pandemic influenza preparedness and response capabilities in Chicago area hospital security departments.

    PubMed

    Kimmerly, David P

    2009-01-01

    This article is a summary based on a December 2007 paper prepared by the author in partial fulfillment of the requirements for a master's degree in business and organizational security management at Webster University. The project described was intended to assess Chicago-area healthcare organization security departments' preparedness and response capabilities for a potential influenza pandemic. While the author says healthcare organizations are learning from the pandemics of the past, little research has been conducted on the requirements necessary within hospital security departments. The article explores staffing, planning, preparation and response capabilities within a healthcare security context to determine existing resources available to the healthcare security community. Eleven completed surveys were received from hospital security managers throughout the geographical Chicago area. They reveal that hospital security managers are conscious of the risks of a pandemic influenza outbreak. Yet, it was found that several gaps existed within hospital security department staffing and response capabilities, as hospital security departments may not have the available resources necessary to adequately maintain their operations during a pandemic incident.

  10. Hazards Response of Energetic Materials - Developing a Predictive Capability for Initiation and Reaction under Multiple Stimuli

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols III, A L; Wallin, B K; Maienschein, J L; Reaugh, J E; Yoh, J J; McClelland, M E

    2005-04-15

    We present our approach to develop a predictive capability for hazards--thermal and nonshock impact--response of energetic material systems based on: (A) identification of relevant processes; (B) characterization of the relevant properties; (C) application of property data to predictive models; and (D) application of the models into predictive simulation. This paper focuses on the last two elements above, while a companion paper by Maienschein et al focuses on the first two elements. We outline models to describe the both the microscopic evolution of hot spots for detonation response and thermal kinetic models used to model slow heat environments. We show examples of application to both types of environments.

  11. The International Space Station: New Capabilities for Disaster Response and Humanitarian Aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stefanov, William

    2012-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) has been acquiring Earth imagery since 2000, primarily in the form of astronaut photography using hand-held film and digital cameras. Recent additions of more sophisticated multispectral and hyperspectral sensor systems have expanded both the capabilities and relevance of the ISS to basic research, applied Earth science, and development of new sensor technologies. Funding opportunities established within NASA, the US National Laboratories and the international partner organizations have generated instrument proposals that will further enhance these capabilities. With both internal and external sensor location options, and the availability of both automated and human-tended operational environments, the ISS is a unique platform within the constellation of Earth-observing satellites currently in orbit. Current progress and challenges associated with development of ISS terrestrial remote sensing capabilities in the area of disaster response and support of relief efforts will be presented. The ISS orbit allows for imaging of the Earth's surface at varying times of day and night, providing opportunities for data collection over approximately 95% of the populated regions. These opportunities are distinct from--yet augment--the data collection windows for the majority of sensors on polar-orbiting satellites. In addition to this potential for "being in the right place at the right time" to collect critical information on an evolving disaster, the presence of a human crew also allows for immediate recognition of an event from orbit, notification of relevant organizations on the ground, and re-tasking of available remote sensing resources to support humanitarian response and relief efforts. Challenges to establishing an integrated response capability are both technical (coordination of sensor targeting and data collection, rapid downlink and posting of data to a central accessible hub, timely generation and distribution of relevant data

  12. Survey of state and tribal emergency response capabilities for radiological transportation incidents

    SciTech Connect

    Vilardo, F J; Mitter, E L; Palmer, J A; Briggs, H C; Fesenmaier, J

    1990-05-01

    This publication is the final report of a project to survey the fifty states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and selected Indian Tribal jurisdictions to ascertain their emergency-preparedness planning and capabilities for responding to transportation incidents involving radioactive materials. The survey was conducted to provide the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and other federal agencies with information concerning the current level of emergency-response preparedness of the states and selected tribes and an assessment of the changes that have occurred since 1980. There have been no major changes in the states' emergency-response planning strategies and field tactics. The changes noted included an increased availability of dedicated emergency-response vehicles, wider availability of specialized radiation-detection instruments, and higher proportions of police and fire personnel with training in the handling of suspected radiation threats. Most Indian tribes have no capability to evaluate suspected radiation threats and have no formal relations with emergency-response personnel in adjacent states. For the nation as a whole, the incidence of suspected radiation threats declined substantially from 1980 to 1988. 58 tabs.

  13. A Comprehensive Evaluation System for Military Hospitals' Response Capability to Bio-terrorism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Jiang, Nan; Shao, Sicong; Zheng, Tao; Sun, Jianzhong

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this study is to establish a comprehensive evaluation system for military hospitals' response capacity to bio-terrorism. Literature research and Delphi method were utilized to establish the comprehensive evaluation system for military hospitals' response capacity to bio-terrorism. Questionnaires were designed and used to survey the status quo of 134 military hospitals' response capability to bio-terrorism. Survey indicated that factor analysis method was suitable to for analyzing the comprehensive evaluation system for military hospitals' response capacity to bio-terrorism. The constructed evaluation system was consisted of five first-class and 16 second-class indexes. Among them, medical response factor was considered as the most important factor with weight coefficient of 0.660, followed in turn by the emergency management factor with weight coefficient of 0.109, emergency management consciousness factor with weight coefficient of 0.093, hardware support factor with weight coefficient of 0.078, and improvement factor with weight coefficient of 0.059. The constructed comprehensive assessment model and system are scientific and practical.

  14. Comparing the response of PSD-capable plastic scintillator to standard liquid scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolf, Richard S.; Hutcheson, Anthony L.; Gwon, Chul; Phlips, Bernard F.; Wulf, Eric A.

    2015-06-01

    This work discusses a test campaign to characterize the response of the recently developed plastic scintillator with pulse shape discrimination (PSD) capabilities (EJ-299-33). PSD is a property exhibited by certain types of scintillating material in which incident stimuli (fast neutrons or γ rays) can be separated by exploiting differences in the scintillation light pulse tail. Detector geometries used were: a 10 cm×10 cm×10 cm cube and a 10-cm diameter×10-cm long cylinder. EJ-301 and EJ-309 liquid scintillators with well-known responses were also tested. The work was conducted at the University of Massachusetts Lowell Van De Graaff accelerator. The facility accelerated protons on a thin Li target to yield quasi-monoenergetic neutrons from the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction (Q-value: -1.644 MeV). Collimated fast neutrons were obtained by placing detectors behind a neutron spectrometer. Rotating the spectrometer, and thus changing the neutron energy, allowed us to achieve 0.5-3.2 MeV neutrons in 200-300 keV steps. Data were acquired through a flash analog-to-digital converter (ADC) capable of performing digital PSD measurements. By using the PSD technique to separate the neutron events from unwanted γ background, we constructed a pulse height spectrum at each energy. Obtaining a relationship of the relative light output versus energy allowed us to construct the response function for the EJ-299-33 and liquid scintillator. The EJ-299-33 response in terms of electron equivalent energy (Ee.e.) vs. proton equivalent energy (Ep.e.), how it compared with the standard xylene-based EJ-301 (or, NE-213/BC-501 A equivalent) and EJ-309 liquid scintillator response, and how the EJ-301 and EJ-309 compared, are presented. We find that the EJ-299-33 demonstrated a lower light output by up to 40% for <1.0 MeV neutrons; and ranging between a 5-35% reduction for 2.5-3.0 MeV neutrons compared to the EJ-301/309, depending on the scintillator and geometry. Monte Carlo modeling techniques were

  15. Suppressed nonsense mutations in the araC gene of Escherichia coli provide three novel variant proteins.

    PubMed

    Schecter, J B

    1983-06-01

    A total of 400 suppressible mutations have been isolated in the araC gene of Escherichia coli. Based on deletion mapping, growth patterns when suppressed, and intragenic recombination, 37 mutants have been determined to contain unique mutations. Rapid plate assays were developed to test for each of the three AraC protein functions: inducing araBAD, repressing araBAD, and araC self-repression. The 185 mutant proteins, resulting from 37 mutants each suppressed by five different suppressors, were assayed for each of the three AraC functions. These plate assays showed that: (i) for each function, some areas of the gene map are more sensitive to mutation than other areas, and (ii) three of the mutant AraC proteins were unlike previously characterized AraC mutants. Enzyme assays on the mutant proteins confirmed their novel character. The first mutant cannot induce araBAD but retains the capacity to perform both repression functions; and the second and third can each perform one of the two repression functions better than it can perform the other. These characteristics suggest that previously proposed models of ara regulation are incomplete.

  16. FLT3-ITD drives Ara-C resistance in leukemic cells via the induction of RUNX3.

    PubMed

    Damdinsuren, Anar; Matsushita, Hiromichi; Ito, Masatoshi; Tanaka, Masayuki; Jin, Guilan; Tsukamoto, Hideo; Asai, Satomi; Ando, Kiyoshi; Miyachi, Hayato

    2015-12-01

    Internal tandem duplication (ITD) mutations of the FLT3 gene (FLT3-ITD) are well known to correlate with a poor prognosis in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We previously reported that FLT3-ITD confers resistance to cytosine arabinoside (Ara-C), a key cytotoxic agent in AML treatments. In order to elucidate the detailed molecular mechanisms underlying the Ara-C resistance induced by FLT3-ITD, we performed a microarray gene expression analysis of the human leukemic cell line K562 transduced with FLT3-ITD (K562/FLT3-ITD) and identified RUNX3 as a downstream target of FLT3-ITD. The transcriptional induction of the RUNX3 expression by FLT3-ITD was noted on a Luciferase assay. The knockdown of the RUNX3 expression in the K562/FLT3-ITD cells increased the sensitivity to Ara-C, and the exogenous expression of RUNX3 per se resulted in the enhancement of Ara-C resistance in the K562 cells. A relationship between the FLT3-ITD-induced RUNX3 expression and Ara-C resistance was also observed in AML cells with an endogenous FLT3-ITD expression. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that RUNX3 is a prerequisite for Ara-C resistance via FLT3-ITD signaling.

  17. Understanding the Basis of a Class of Paradoxical Mutations in AraC through Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Damjanovic, Ana; Miller, Benjamin T.; Schleif, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Most mutations at position 15 in the N-terminal arm of the regulatory protein AraC leave the protein incapable of responding to arabinose and inducing the proteins required for arabinose catabolism. Mutations at other positions of the arm do not have this behavior. Simple energetic analysis of the interactions between the arm and bound arabinose do not explain the uninducibility of AraC with mutations at position 15. Extensive molecular dynamics simulations, carried out largely on the Open Science Grid, were done of the wild type protein with and without bound arabinose and of all possible mutations at position 15, many of which were constructed and measured for this work. Good correlation was found for deviation of arm position during the simulations and inducibility as measured in vivo of the same mutant proteins. Analysis of the molecular dynamics trajectories revealed that preservation of the shape of the arm is critical to inducibility. To maintain the correct shape of the arm, the strengths of three interactions observed to be strong in simulations of the wild type AraC protein need to be preserved. These interactions are between arabinose and residue 15, arabinose and residues 8–9, and residue 13 and residue 15.The latter interaction is notable because residues L9, Y13, F15, W95, and Y97 form a hydrophobic cluster which needs to be preserved for retention of the correct shape. PMID:23150197

  18. Unclassified Computing Capability: User Responses to a Multiprogrammatic and Institutional Computing Questionnaire

    SciTech Connect

    McCoy, M; Kissel, L

    2002-01-29

    We are experimenting with a new computing model to be applied to a new computer dedicated to that model. Several LLNL science teams now have computational requirements, evidenced by the mature scientific applications that have been developed over the past five plus years, that far exceed the capability of the institution's computing resources. Thus, there is increased demand for dedicated, powerful parallel computational systems. Computation can, in the coming year, potentially field a capability system that is low cost because it will be based on a model that employs open source software and because it will use PC (IA32-P4) hardware. This incurs significant computer science risk regarding stability and system features but also presents great opportunity. We believe the risks can be managed, but the existence of risk cannot be ignored. In order to justify the budget for this system, we need to make the case that it serves science and, through serving science, serves the institution. That is the point of the meeting and the White Paper that we are proposing to prepare. The questions are listed and the responses received are in this report.

  19. Aviation System Analysis Capability (ASAC) Quick Response System (QRS) Test Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Eileen; Villani, James A.; Ritter, Paul

    1997-01-01

    This document is the Aviation System Analysis Capability (ASAC) Quick Response System (QRS) Test Report. The purpose of this document is to present the results of the QRS unit and system tests in support of the ASAC QRS development effort. This document contains an overview of the project background and scope, defines the QRS system and presents the additions made to the QRS this year, explains the assumptions, constraints, and approach used to conduct QRS Unit and System Testing, and presents the schedule used to perform QRS Testing. The document also presents an overview of the Logistics Management Institute (LMI) Test Facility and testing environment and summarizes the QRS Unit and System Test effort and results.

  20. Building a Capabilities Network to Improve Disaster Preparation Efforts in the European Command (EUCOM) Area of Responsibility

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-01

    responsibilities under national and international law . Capabilities shall be compatible, through 3 interoperable and complementary solutions, to...address community-health concerns around the globe. Capabilities:  Care Kits - Put together by volunteers and sent to H2H global distribution...local leaders and organizations which advocate for their communities and promote general warfare.  Provide health kits , baby kits , and emergency

  1. Cloned, CD117 selected human amniotic fluid stem cells are capable of modulating the immune response.

    PubMed

    Moorefield, Emily C; McKee, Elizabeth E; Solchaga, Luis; Orlando, Guisseppe; Yoo, James J; Walker, Steve; Furth, Mark E; Bishop, Colin E

    2011-01-01

    Amniotic fluid stem (AFS) cells are broadly multipotent, can be expanded extensively in culture, are not tumorigenic and can be readily cryopreserved for cell banking. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) show immunomodulatory activity and secrete a wide spectrum of cytokines and chemokines that suppress inflammatory responses, block mixed lymphocyte reactions (MLR) and other immune reactions, and have proven therapeutic against conditions such as graft-versus-host disease. AFS cells resemble MSCs in many respects including surface marker expression and differentiation potential. We therefore hypothesized that AFS cells may exhibit similar immunomodulatory capabilities. We present data to demonstrate that direct contact with AFS cells inhibits lymphocyte activation. In addition, we show that cell-free supernatants derived from AFS cells primed with total blood monocytes or IL-1β, a cytokine released by monocytes and essential in mediation of the inflammatory response, also inhibited lymphocyte activation. Further investigation of AFS cell-free supernatants by protein array revealed secretion of multiple factors in common with MSCs that are known to be involved in immune regulation including growth related oncogene (GRO) and monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP) family members as well as interleukin-6 (IL-6). AFS cells activated by PBMCs released several additional cytokines as compared to BM-MSCs, including macrophage inflammatory protein-3α (MIP-3α), MIP-1α and Activin. AFS cells also released higher levels of MCP-1 and lower levels of MCP-2 compared to BM-MSCs in response to IL-1β activation. This suggests that there may be some AFS-specific mechanisms of inhibition of lymphocyte activation. Our results indicate that AFS cells are able to suppress inflammatory responses in vitro and that soluble factors are an essential component in the communication between lymphocytes and AFS cells. Their extensive self-renewal capacity, possibility for banking and absence of

  2. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Emergency Response Capability Baseline Needs Assessment Requirement Document

    SciTech Connect

    Sharry, J A

    2009-12-30

    This revision of the LLNL Fire Protection Baseline Needs Assessment (BNA) was prepared by John A. Sharry, LLNL Fire Marshal and LLNL Division Leader for Fire Protection and reviewed by Martin Gresho, Sandia/CA Fire Marshal. The document follows and expands upon the format and contents of the DOE Model Fire Protection Baseline Capabilities Assessment document contained on the DOE Fire Protection Web Site, but only address emergency response. The original LLNL BNA was created on April 23, 1997 as a means of collecting all requirements concerning emergency response capabilities at LLNL (including response to emergencies at Sandia/CA) into one BNA document. The original BNA documented the basis for emergency response, emergency personnel staffing, and emergency response equipment over the years. The BNA has been updated and reissued five times since in 1998, 1999, 2000, 2002, and 2004. A significant format change was performed in the 2004 update of the BNA in that it was 'zero based.' Starting with the requirement documents, the 2004 BNA evaluated the requirements, and determined minimum needs without regard to previous evaluations. This 2010 update maintains the same basic format and requirements as the 2004 BNA. In this 2010 BNA, as in the previous BNA, the document has been intentionally divided into two separate documents - the needs assessment (1) and the compliance assessment (2). The needs assessment will be referred to as the BNA and the compliance assessment will be referred to as the BNA Compliance Assessment. The primary driver for separation is that the needs assessment identifies the detailed applicable regulations (primarily NFPA Standards) for emergency response capabilities based on the hazards present at LLNL and Sandia/CA and the geographical location of the facilities. The needs assessment also identifies areas where the modification of the requirements in the applicable NFPA standards is appropriate, due to the improved fire protection provided, the

  3. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Emergency Response Capability 2009 Baseline Needs Assessment Performance Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Sharry, J A

    2009-12-30

    This document was prepared by John A. Sharry, LLNL Fire Marshal and Division Leader for Fire Protection and was reviewed by Sandia/CA Fire Marshal, Martin Gresho. This document is the second of a two-part analysis of Emergency Response Capabilities of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The first part, 2009 Baseline Needs Assessment Requirements Document established the minimum performance criteria necessary to meet mandatory requirements. This second part analyses the performance of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory Emergency Management Department to the contents of the Requirements Document. The document was prepared based on an extensive review of information contained in the 2004 BNA, a review of Emergency Planning Hazards Assessments, a review of building construction, occupancy, fire protection features, dispatch records, LLNL alarm system records, fire department training records, and fire department policies and procedures. On October 1, 2007, LLNL contracted with the Alameda County Fire Department to provide emergency response services. The level of service called for in that contract is the same level of service as was provided by the LLNL Fire Department prior to that date. This Compliance Assessment will evaluate fire department services beginning October 1, 2008 as provided by the Alameda County Fire Department.

  4. Providing Reliability Services through Demand Response: A Prelimnary Evaluation of the Demand Response Capabilities of Alcoa Inc.

    SciTech Connect

    Starke, Michael R; Kirby, Brendan J; Kueck, John D; Todd, Duane; Caulfield, Michael; Helms, Brian

    2009-02-01

    Demand response is the largest underutilized reliability resource in North America. Historic demand response programs have focused on reducing overall electricity consumption (increasing efficiency) and shaving peaks but have not typically been used for immediate reliability response. Many of these programs have been successful but demand response remains a limited resource. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) report, 'Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering' (FERC 2006) found that only five percent of customers are on some form of demand response program. Collectively they represent an estimated 37,000 MW of response potential. These programs reduce overall energy consumption, lower green house gas emissions by allowing fossil fuel generators to operate at increased efficiency and reduce stress on the power system during periods of peak loading. As the country continues to restructure energy markets with sophisticated marginal cost models that attempt to minimize total energy costs, the ability of demand response to create meaningful shifts in the supply and demand equations is critical to creating a sustainable and balanced economic response to energy issues. Restructured energy market prices are set by the cost of the next incremental unit of energy, so that as additional generation is brought into the market, the cost for the entire market increases. The benefit of demand response is that it reduces overall demand and shifts the entire market to a lower pricing level. This can be very effective in mitigating price volatility or scarcity pricing as the power system responds to changing demand schedules, loss of large generators, or loss of transmission. As a global producer of alumina, primary aluminum, and fabricated aluminum products, Alcoa Inc., has the capability to provide demand response services through its manufacturing facilities and uniquely through its aluminum smelting facilities. For a typical aluminum smelter, electric power

  5. Mechanism of araC autoregulation and the domains of two overlapping promoters, Pc and PBAD, in the L-arabinose regulatory region of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Lee, N L; Gielow, W O; Wallace, R G

    1981-02-01

    The DNA-protein contact sites in the ara regulatory region, which contains the promoters for araBAD and araC, have been determined for araC protein, the cyclic AMP-binding protein, and RNA polymerase, by using the methylation protection and DNase I protection methods. The functional significance of binding was assessed by correlating the state of occupancy of these sites with promoter activity in transcription initiation. Our results suggest that the basis for araC autoregulation is that araC protein, in either its activator (P2) or repressor (P1) form, acts as a repressor for araC, by binding to the RNA polymerase attachment site at the araC promoter. We also found that the araC and araBAD promoters share a common site of positive control by the cyclic AMP-binding protein, located 90 bases from the araBAD and 60 bases from the araC transcriptional start points. A model for the mechanism of regulation of araBAD and araC expression by the catabolite gene-activator protein, P1, and Pe is proposed. An earlier model proposed by Ogden et al. [Ogden S., Haggerty, D., Stoner, C. M., Kolodrubetz, D. & Schleif, R. (1980) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci, USA 77, 3346-3350] is discussed in the light of the data presented in this paper.

  6. Pre-PCR processing in bioterrorism preparedness: improved diagnostic capabilities for laboratory response networks.

    PubMed

    Hedman, Johannes; Knutsson, Rickard; Ansell, Ricky; Rådström, Peter; Rasmusson, Birgitta

    2013-09-01

    Diagnostic DNA analysis using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has become a valuable tool for rapid detection of biothreat agents. However, analysis is often challenging because of the limited size, quality, and purity of the biological target. Pre-PCR processing is an integrated concept in which the issues of analytical limit of detection and simplicity for automation are addressed in all steps leading up to PCR amplification--that is, sampling, sample treatment, and the chemical composition of PCR. The sampling method should maximize target uptake and minimize uptake of extraneous substances that could impair the analysis--so-called PCR inhibitors. In sample treatment, there is a trade-off between yield and purity, as extensive purification leads to DNA loss. A cornerstone of pre-PCR processing is to apply DNA polymerase-buffer systems that are tolerant to specific sample impurities, thereby lowering the need for expensive purification steps and maximizing DNA recovery. Improved awareness among Laboratory Response Networks (LRNs) regarding pre-PCR processing is important, as ineffective sample processing leads to increased cost and possibly false-negative or ambiguous results, hindering the decision-making process in a bioterrorism crisis. This article covers the nature and mechanisms of PCR-inhibitory substances relevant for agroterrorism and bioterrorism preparedness, methods for quality control of PCR reactions, and applications of pre-PCR processing to optimize and simplify the analysis of various biothreat agents. Knowledge about pre-PCR processing will improve diagnostic capabilities of LRNs involved in the response to bioterrorism incidents.

  7. Arac/XylS family of transcriptional regulators.

    PubMed Central

    Gallegos, M T; Schleif, R; Bairoch, A; Hofmann, K; Ramos, J L

    1997-01-01

    The ArC/XylS family of prokaryotic positive transcriptional regulators includes more than 100 proteins and polypeptides derived from open reading frames translated from DNA sequences. Members of this family are widely distributed and have been found in the gamma subgroup of the proteobacteria, low- and high-G + C-content gram-positive bacteria, and cyanobacteria. These proteins are defined by a profile that can be accessed from PROSITE PS01124. Members of the family are about 300 amino acids long and have three main regulatory functions in common: carbon metabolism, stress response, and pathogenesis. Multiple alignments of the proteins of the family define a conserved stretch of 99 amino acids usually located at the C-terminal region of the regulator and connected to a nonconserved region via a linker. The conserved stretch contains all the elements required to bind DNA target sequences and to activate transcription from cognate promoters. Secondary analysis of the conserved region suggests that it contains two potential alpha-helix-turn-alpha-helix DNA binding motifs. The first, and better-fitting motif is supported by biochemical data, whereas existing biochemical data neither support nor refute the proposal that the second region possesses this structure. The phylogenetic relationship suggests that members of the family have recruited the nonconserved domain(s) into a series of existing domains involved in DNA recognition and transcription stimulation and that this recruited domain governs the role that the regulator carries out. For some regulators, it has been demonstrated that the nonconserved region contains the dimerization domain. For the regulators involved in carbon metabolism, the effector binding determinants are also in this region. Most regulators belonging to the AraC/XylS family recognize multiple binding sites in the regulated promoters. One of the motifs usually overlaps or is adjacent to the -35 region of the cognate promoters. Footprinting

  8. Pinctada margaritifera responses to temperature and pH: Acclimation capabilities and physiological limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Moullac, Gilles; Soyez, Claude; Latchere, Oihana; Vidal-Dupiol, Jeremie; Fremery, Juliette; Saulnier, Denis; Lo Yat, Alain; Belliard, Corinne; Mazouni-Gaertner, Nabila; Gueguen, Yannick

    2016-12-01

    The pearl culture is one of the most lucrative aquacultures worldwide. In many South Pacific areas, it depends on the exploitation of the pearl oyster Pinctada margaritifera and relies entirely on the environmental conditions encountered in the lagoon. In this context, assessing the impact of climatic stressors, such as global warming and ocean acidification, on the functionality of the resource in terms of renewal and exploitation is fundamental. In this study, we experimentally addressed the impact of temperature (22, 26, 30 and 34 °C) and partial pressure of carbon dioxide pCO2 (294, 763 and 2485 μatm) on the biomineralization and metabolic capabilities of pearl oysters. While the energy metabolism was strongly dependent on temperature, results showed its independence from pCO2 levels; no interaction between temperature and pCO2 was revealed. The energy metabolism, ingestion, oxygen consumption and, hence, the scope for growth (SFG) were maximised at 30 °C and dramatically fell at 34 °C. Biomineralization was examined through the expression measurement of nine mantle's genes coding for shell matrix proteins involved in the formation of calcitic prisms and/or nacreous shell structures; significant changes were recorded for four of the nine (Pmarg-Nacrein A1, Pmarg-MRNP34, Pmarg-Prismalin 14 and Pmarg-Aspein). These changes showed that the maximum and minimum expression of these genes was at 26 and 34 °C, respectively. Surprisingly, the modelled thermal optimum for biomineralization (ranging between 21.5 and 26.5 °C) and somatic growth and reproduction (28.7 °C) appeared to be significantly different. Finally, the responses to high temperatures were contextualised with the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) projections, which highlighted that pearl oyster stocks and cultures would be severely threatened in the next decade.

  9. Building a Capabilities Network to Improve Disaster Preparation Effort in the Pacific Command Area of Responsibility

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    efforts, identification of the organizations that are available and the capabilities that they can provide is essential. This research identifies and...military. We also analyzed the financial status of the NGOs for a better understanding. The end result of the research is to provide PACOM...are available and the capabilities that they can provide is essential. This research identifies and analyzes 27 nongovernmental organizations (NGOs

  10. In vivo regulation of the Escherichia coli araC promoter.

    PubMed

    Hahn, S; Schleif, R

    1983-08-01

    The ara pC promoter is known to be derepressed about fivefold for 20 to 30 min after the addition of arabinose. This transient derepression was studied by using araC::Mu lac insertions and araC-lacZ gene fusions. In strains containing increased levels of araC protein, the pC promoter became progressively less derepressible, but the ara pBAD promoter remained normally inducible. Repression of pC was reestablished 20 min after induction in araB mutants, but did not occur in arabinose-transport-deficient mutants. Finally, mutant araCc proteins which normally do not repress pC did so in the presence of arabinose.

  11. Dominance relationships among mutant alleles of regulatory gene araC in the Escherichia coli B/R L-arabinose operon.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, D E

    1986-11-01

    The araBAD operon of Escherichia coli B/r is positively and negatively regulated by the araC+ regulatory protein. Mutations in gene araC can result in a variety of different regulatory phenotypes: araC null mutants (those carrying a null allele exhibiting no repressor or activator activity) are unable to achieve operon induction; araC-constitutive (araCc) mutants are partially constitutive, inducible by D-fucose, and resistant to catabolite repression; araCh mutants are hypersensitive to catabolite repression; and araCi mutants are resistant to catabolite repression. Various mutant alleles of gene araC were cloned into a derivative of plasmid pBR322 by in vivo recombination. Various heterozygous araC allelic combinations were constructed by transformation. Analysis of isomerase (araA) specific activity levels under various growth conditions indicated the following dominance relationships with regard to sensitivity to catabolite repression: araCh greater than araC+ greater than (araCc and araCi) greater than araC. It was concluded that the araCh protein may form a repressor complex that is refractory to removal by cyclic AMP receptor protein-cyclic AMP complex. This was interpreted in terms of the known nucleoprotein interactions between ara regulatory proteins and ara regulatory DNA.

  12. Time of appearance and distribution of cells capable of secondary immune response following primary immunization

    PubMed Central

    Vischer, T. L.; Stastny, P.

    1967-01-01

    Immunological memory was studied by measurement of tritiated thymidine incorporation in tissue culture. After primary immunization with keyhole limpet haemocyanin (KLH) secondary responsiveness could be detected as early as the 2nd day after immunization with Freund's adjuvant into the footpads and on the 4th day after injection of KLH intravenously. In each case immunological memory developed first in the area of the injection, that is, the popliteal lymph nodes after footpad immunization and the spleen after intravenous injection. The secondary response could also be detected in the lymphoid cells of the blood. Cell suspensions enriched in small lymphocytes showed a similar reactivity. Cells from the thymus, however, did not develop immunological memory. Rabbits immunized with BSA showed a relatively weaker response which was clearly detectable only when Freund's adjuvant was used for immunization. The results suggest that a response essentially of a secondary type may play an important role in what is usually considered the primary immune response. PMID:6027423

  13. Assessment of Disaster Relief Preparedness Capabilities Networks in the EUCOM, PACOM, and SOUTHCOM Areas of Responsibility

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    International RNRN Registered Nurse Response Network SCM supply chain management SOUTHCOM U.S. Southern Command UCSD PDS University of California San...cooperates with local bishops, district superintendents, and church leaders to help them develop their own response mechanisms. (Daniels, 2012, p. 18) http...conducts humanitarian assistance programs in more than 35 countries. (Harper et al. , 2013, p. 17) http://www.projecthope.org Registered Nurse

  14. SAVANNAH RIVER SITE CAPABILITIES FOR CONDUCTING INGESTION PATHWAY CONSEQUENCE ASSESSMENTS FOR EMERGENCY RESPONSE

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, C

    2007-12-11

    Potential airborne releases of radioactivity from facilities operated for the U. S. Department of Energy at the Savannah River Site could pose significant consequences to the public through the ingestion pathway. The Savannah River National Laboratory has developed a suite of technologies needed to conduct assessments of ingestion dose during emergency response, enabling emergency manager at SRS to develop initial protective action recommendation for state agencies early in the response and to make informed decisions on activation of additional Federal assets that would be needed to support long-term monitoring and assessment activities.

  15. Negative regulation of L-arabinose metabolism in Bacillus subtilis: characterization of the araR (araC) gene.

    PubMed

    Sá-Nogueira, I; Mota, L J

    1997-03-01

    The Bacillus subtilis araC locus, mapped at about 294 degrees on the genetic map, was defined by mutations conferring an Ara- phenotype to strains bearing the metabolic araA, araB, and araD wild-type alleles (located at about 256 degrees on the genetic map) and by mutants showing constitutive expression of the three genes. In previous work, it has been postulated that the gene in which these mutations lie exerts its effect on the ara metabolic operon in trans, and this locus was named araC by analogy to the Escherichia coli regulatory gene. Here, we report the cloning and sequencing of the araC locus. This region comprises two open reading frames with divergently arranged promoters, the regulatory gene, araC, encoding a 41-kDa polypeptide, and a partially cloned gene, termed araE, which most probably codes for a permease involved in the transport of L-arabinose. The DNA sequence of araC revealed that its putative product is very similar to a number of bacterial negative regulators (the GalR-LacI family). However, a helix-turn-helix motif was identified in the N-terminal region by its identity to the consensus signature sequence of another group of repressors, the GntR family. The lack of similarity between the predicted primary structure of the product encoded by the B. subtilis regulatory gene and the AraC regulator from E. coli and the apparently different modes of action of these two proteins lead us to propose a new name, araR, for this gene. The araR gene is monocistronic, and the promoter region contains -10 and -35 regions (as determined by primer extension analysis) similar to those recognized by RNA polymerase containing the major vegetative cell sigma factor sigmaA. An insertion-deletion mutation in the araR gene leads to constitutive expression of the L-arabinose metabolic operon. We demonstrate that the araR gene codes for a negative regulator of the ara operon and that the expression of araR is repressed by its own product.

  16. Psychological Factors Capable of Preventing the Inhibition of Antibody Responses in Separated Infant Monkeys.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coe, Christopher L.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Capacity of infant monkeys to mount an antibody response to viral challenge was evaluated after monkeys' removal from their mothers in several social and physical environments. Results indicated that trauma of separation was reduced when infants were familiar with the separation environment or familiar social companions were available. (PCB)

  17. An Evacuation Emergency Response Model Coupling Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability Output.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-10

    concentration contours coupled with the SMI evacuation model were calculated by using the MATHEW and ADPIC codes. The evacuation emergency response...2 M ATH EW . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 2 ADPIC ...CDC 7600 computer within a matter of minutes MATHEW and ADPIC codes. These two models after the computer center is notified, are described briefly

  18. 30 CFR 254.45 - Verifying the capabilities of your response equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL-SPILL RESPONSE REQUIREMENTS FOR FACILITIES LOCATED SEAWARD OF THE... Protocol for the Evaluation of Oil-Spill Containment Booms,” available from BSEE, for guidance. Performance... document “Suggested Test Protocol for the Evaluation of Oil Spill Skimmers for the OCS,” available...

  19. 30 CFR 254.45 - Verifying the capabilities of your response equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL-SPILL RESPONSE REQUIREMENTS FOR FACILITIES LOCATED SEAWARD OF THE... Protocol for the Evaluation of Oil-Spill Containment Booms,” available from BSEE, for guidance. Performance... document “Suggested Test Protocol for the Evaluation of Oil Spill Skimmers for the OCS,” available...

  20. Alternatives to Contingency Response Group Organization: Tradeoffs to Balance Capability and Capacity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-13

    limitation to this research is found in the use of historical demand data to determine required manning levels. Although historical demand most...Air Force Institute of Technology Graduate Research Paper (GRP). Bufford’s 2008 GRP, “Contingency Response Groups: How Many Do We Really Need” uses ...CR subject matter experts. Before discussing the purpose and questions of the interviews, it is important to discuss why the researcher used a semi

  1. United We Stand, Divided We Fall: Increasing Response Capability in Kentucky through Regionalization and Leadership

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    made. This research will help national leaders to recognize the gap between the theory and practice. 13 II. LITERATURE REVIEW The following...throughout a region” (United States House of Representatives, 2004, p. 15). 1. Adaptive Leadership In “Complexity Leadership Theory : An Interactive...significant role in the ice storm response. Public health nurses worked in shelters; environmentalists were called upon to ensure that restaurants with

  2. Low-dose Ara-C in myelodysplastic syndromes and acute nonlymphoid leukemia. Experience with seven patients.

    PubMed

    Bruzzese, L; Abbadessa, A; Ottaiano, L; Arcidiacone, G

    1987-01-01

    Seven patients were treated with low dose Ara-C (LDAC). Five patients had acute nonlymphoid leukemia (ANLL), two patients had myelodisplastic syndrome (MDS): refractory anemia (RA) and refractory anemia with excess of blasts in transformation (RAEB-t). Ara-C treatment was given by s.c. injections at a dose of 10-11 mg/m2 every 12 h and only on two occasions by continuous infusion. No improvement, or limited improvement, was observed in five patients and they died of leukemia or of disease-related complications. Two patients with ANLL achieved remission: the first patient after bone marrow aplasia, the second without aplasia but with morphologic evidence of granulocytic differentiation of leukemic cells.

  3. Understanding the Value of a Computer Emergency Response Capability for Nuclear Security

    SciTech Connect

    Gasper, Peter Donald; Rodriguez, Julio Gallardo

    2015-06-01

    The international nuclear community has a great understanding of the physical security needs relating to the prevention, detection, and response of malicious acts associated with nuclear facilities and radioactive material. International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Nuclear Security Recommendations (INFCIRC_225_Rev 5) outlines specific guidelines and recommendations for implementing and maintaining an organization’s nuclear security posture. An important element for inclusion into supporting revision 5 is the establishment of a “Cyber Emergency Response Team (CERT)” focused on the international communities cybersecurity needs to maintain a comprehensive nuclear security posture. Cybersecurity and the importance of nuclear cybersecurity require that there be a specific focus on developing an International Nuclear CERT (NS-CERT). States establishing contingency plans should have an understanding of the cyber threat landscape and the potential impacts to systems in place to protect and mitigate malicious activities. This paper will outline the necessary components, discuss the relationships needed within the international community, and outline a process by which the NS-CERT identifies, collects, processes, and reports critical information in order to establish situational awareness (SA) and support decision-making

  4. Highly Lewis Acidic Arylboronate Esters Capable of Colorimetric Turn-On Response.

    PubMed

    Oehlke, Alexander; Auer, Alexander A; Schreiter, Katja; Friebe, Nadine; Spange, Stefan

    2015-12-01

    A series of boronate-π-acceptor compounds containing different types of π bridges (1,4-phenylen or thien-2,5-diyl or furan-2,5-diyl) that link the switchable boronate ester group with the efficient TCF acceptor group (TCF=2-dicyanomethylen-3-cyano-4,5,5-trimethyl-2,5-dihydrofuran) has been synthesized. A TCF chromophore of this type undergoes transition to a donor-π-acceptor compound upon coordination of Lewis bases at the Lewis acidic boron center, which is accompanied by an enhanced intramolecular charge-transfer interaction. The Lewis acid character has been investigated by spectroscopic measurements (UV/Vis, NMR spectroscopies) as well as DFT and ab initio-based calculations. It is shown that the TCF acceptor group and thiophene or furan π-bridges directly bound to the boron atom cooperatively increase the Lewis acidity. UV/Vis titration experiments confirm fluoride binding constants in the range of up to 10(8)  M(-1) in CH2 Cl2 . In addition to the strong boron fluoride binding motif, Lewis interactions also occur with weaker Lewis bases, such as pyridine or aliphatic alcohols. The unique combination of chromophoric and Lewis acidic properties is responsible for the intense colorimetric turn-on response detectable after complex formation.

  5. Sound localization and auditory response capabilities in round goby (Neogobius melanostomus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollo, Audrey K.; Higgs, Dennis M.

    2005-04-01

    A fundamental role in vertebrate auditory systems is determining the direction of a sound source. While fish show directional responses to sound, sound localization remains in dispute. The species used in the current study, Neogobius melanostomus (round goby) uses sound in reproductive contexts, with both male and female gobies showing directed movement towards a calling male. The two-choice laboratory experiment was used (active versus quiet speaker) to analyze behavior of gobies in response to sound stimuli. When conspecific male spawning sounds were played, gobies moved in a direct path to the active speaker, suggesting true localization to sound. Of the animals that responded to conspecific sounds, 85% of the females and 66% of the males moved directly to the sound source. Auditory playback of natural and synthetic sounds showed differential behavioral specificity. Of gobies that responded, 89% were attracted to the speaker playing Padogobius martensii sounds, 87% to 100 Hz tone, 62% to white noise, and 56% to Gobius niger sounds. Swimming speed, as well as mean path angle to the speaker, will be presented during the presentation. Results suggest a strong localization of the round goby to a sound source, with some differential sound specificity.

  6. JS-K, an arylating nitric oxide (NO) donor, has synergistic anti-leukemic activity with cytarabine (ARA-C).

    PubMed

    Shami, Paul J; Maciag, Anna E; Eddington, Jordan K; Udupi, Vidya; Kosak, Ken M; Saavedra, Joseph E; Keefer, Larry K

    2009-11-01

    We have designed prodrugs that release nitric oxide (NO) on metabolism by glutathione S-transferases (GST). This design exploits the upregulation of GST in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells. O(2)-(2,4-dinitrophenyl) 1-[(4-ethoxycarbonyl)piperazin-1-yl]diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate (JS-K, a member of this class) has potent anti-leukemic activity. HL-60 myeloid leukemia cells were used for in vitro studies of the combination of JS-K with daunorubicin (DAUNO), cytarabine (ARA-C) or etoposide (ETOP) using the median effect method to determine synergistic, antagonistic, or additive effects. Combinations of JS-K added simultaneously, 2h before or 2h after the other compounds were used. JS-K and DAUNO were antagonistic in all three drug sequences. JS-K and ETOP were also antagonistic but to a lesser degree. JS-K and ARA-C showed strong synergy. The combination index at the 50% fraction affected was 0.37+/-0.23, 0.24+/-0.27, and 0.15+/-0.11 for simultaneous, JS-K first and ARA-C first additions, respectively. JS-K by itself induced DNA strand breaks at relatively high concentrations. However, at submicromolar concentrations, it significantly augmented ARA-C-induced DNA strand breaks. NMR spectroscopy revealed no evidence of chemical interaction between JS-K and the other chemotherapeutic agents. We conclude that ARA-C and JS-K have synergistic anti-leukemic activity and warrant further exploration in combination.

  7. Arabinose-induced binding of AraC protein to araI2 activates the araBAD operon promoter.

    PubMed

    Lee, N; Francklyn, C; Hamilton, E P

    1987-12-01

    The state of Escherichia coli araI DNA occupancy by AraC protein has been found to change from a two-turn to a four-turn occupancy upon the addition of the inducer arabinose. The araI site is separable into two contiguous regions, araI1 and araI2. araI1 binds both ligand-bound and ligand-free AraC protein, whereas araI2 binds AraC protein in the presence of arabinose only. A mutation in araI and a known mutation in araC led to the loss of araI2 binding, while binding to araI1 was unaffected. Both mutants failed to activate the promoter of the araBAD operon. We propose that araI2 occupancy by AraC protein leads to RNA polymerase recognition of the araBAD promoter and that araI1 acts as a switch mechanism allowing both the repressor and the activator forms of AraC protein to regulate the araBAD promoter.

  8. Reactive Oxygen Species and Glutathione Dual Redox-Responsive Supramolecular Assemblies with Controllable Release Capability.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yang; Ju, Xin; Ding, Li-Sheng; Zhang, Sheng; Li, Bang-Jing

    2017-02-08

    A dual redox and biorelevant triggered supramolecular system is developed through noncovalent supramolecular inclusion interactions between the ferrocene (Fc) modified on camptothecin (CPT) and β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) at the end of methoxy polyethylene glycol (mPEG). With these two segments, a stable noncovalent supramolecular structure, i.e., mPEG-β-CD/Fc-CPT, can be formed, and then self-assembled into micellar structures in water. Interestingly, these supramolecular micelles showed uniform sphere structure, high and constant drug loading content, hyper-fast redox-responsive drug release, and exhibited equal cellular proliferation inhibition toward A549 cancer cells. The cytotoxicity evaluation of mPEG-β-CD also indicated good biocompatibility. In vivo results revealed the mPEG-β-CD/Fc-CPT nanoparticles had higher in vivo efficacy without side effects. It is anticipated this supramolecular complex may serve as a new kind of promising alternative for drug delivery systems.

  9. Air quality modeling for emergency response applications. [MATHEW; ADPIC; FEM3

    SciTech Connect

    Gudiksen, P.H.; Chan, S.T.; Knox, J.B.; Dickerson, M.H.; Lange, R.

    1985-12-01

    The three-dimensional diagnostic wind field model (MATHEW) and the particle-in-cell transport and diffusion model (ADPIC) are used by the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) for real-time assessments of the consequences from accidental releases of radioactivity into the atmosphere. For the dispersion of hazardous heavier-than-air gases, a time-dependent, three-dimensional finite element model (FEM3) is used. These models have been evaluated extensively against a wide spectrum of field experiments involving the release of chemically inert tracers or heavier-than-air gases. The results reveal that the MATHEW/ADPIC models are capable of simulating the spatial and temporal distributions of tracer concentration to within a factor of 2 for 50% of the measured tracer concentrations for near surface releases in relatively flat terrain and within a factor of 2 for 20% of the comparisons for elevated releases in complex terrain. The FEM3 model produces quite satisfactory simulations of the spatial and temporal distributions of heavier-than-air gases, typically within a kilometer of the release point. The ARAC consists of a centralized computerized emergency response system that is capable of supporting up to 100 sites and providing real-time predictions of the consequence of transportation accidents that may occur anywhere. It utilizes pertinent accident information, local and regional meteorology, and terrain as input to the MATHEW/ADPIC models for the consequence analysis. It has responded to over 150 incidents and exercises over the past decade.

  10. Perception-response speed and driving capabilities of brain-damaged and older drivers.

    PubMed

    Korteling, J E

    1990-02-01

    Three experiments including reaction time (RT) tasks and driving tasks were conducted to identify variables that may be sensitive to the effects of brain damage or aging and to determine how RT tasks relate to driving performance. In Experiment 1 mean RTs of the brain-damaged and older subjects disproportionately increased relative to those of controls, with increasing difference between subsequent compound stimuli. In Experiment 2 response accuracy of brain-damaged subjects deteriorated more than that of controls when the similarity of a task to actual driving increased. In Experiment 3 brain-damaged patients were slower and less accurate than the controls on all measures of a platoon car-following task, whereas the older subjects were only less accurate. Compared with those of the controls, brake RTs of neither the older subjects nor the patients were disproportionately affected by increasing task load. Performance on the platoon driving task could be successfully predicted by a laboratory RT task on time estimation only for the brain-damaged subjects.

  11. Choline Catabolism in Burkholderia thailandensis Is Regulated by Multiple Glutamine Amidotransferase 1-Containing AraC Family Transcriptional Regulators

    PubMed Central

    Nock, Adam M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Burkholderia thailandensis is a soil-dwelling bacterium that shares many metabolic pathways with the ecologically similar, but evolutionarily distant, Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Among the diverse nutrients it can utilize is choline, metabolizable to the osmoprotectant glycine betaine and subsequently catabolized as a source of carbon and nitrogen, similar to P. aeruginosa. Orthologs of genes in the choline catabolic pathway in these two bacteria showed distinct differences in gene arrangement as well as an additional orthologous transcriptional regulator in B. thailandensis. In this study, we showed that multiple glutamine amidotransferase 1 (GATase 1)-containing AraC family transcription regulators (GATRs) are involved in regulation of the B. thailandensis choline catabolic pathway (gbdR1, gbdR2, and souR). Using genetic analyses and sequencing the transcriptome in the presence and absence of choline, we identified the likely regulons of gbdR1 (BTH_II1869) and gbdR2 (BTH_II0968). We also identified a functional ortholog for P. aeruginosa souR, a GATR that regulates the metabolism of sarcosine to glycine. GbdR1 is absolutely required for expression of the choline catabolic locus, similar to P. aeruginosa GbdR, while GbdR2 is important to increase expression of the catabolic locus. Additionally, the B. thailandensis SouR ortholog (BTH_II0994) is required for catabolism of choline and its metabolites as carbon sources, whereas in P. aeruginosa, SouR function can by bypassed by GbdR. The strategy employed by B. thailandensis represents a distinct regulatory solution to control choline catabolism and thus provides both an evolutionary counterpoint and an experimental system to analyze the acquisition and regulation of this pathway during environmental growth and infection. IMPORTANCE Many proteobacteria that occupy similar environmental niches have horizontally acquired orthologous genes for metabolism of compounds useful in their shared environment. The

  12. Assessment of human immediate response capability related to tsunami threats in Indonesia at a sub-national scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Post, J.; Wegscheider, S.; Mück, M.; Zosseder, K.; Kiefl, R.; Steinmetz, T.; Strunz, G.

    2009-07-01

    Human immediate response is contextualized into different time compartments reflecting the tsunami early warning chain. Based on the different time compartments the available response time and evacuation time is quantified. The latter incorporates accessibility of safe areas determined by a hazard assessment, as well as environmental and demographic impacts on evacuation speed properties assessed using a Cost Distance Weighting GIS approach. Approximately 4.35 million Indonesians live in tsunami endangered areas on the southern coasts of Sumatra, Java and Bali and have between 20 and 150 min to reach a tsunami-safe area. Most endangered areas feature longer estimated-evacuation times and hence the population possesses a weak immediate response capability leaving them more vulnerable to being directly impacted by a tsunami. At a sub-national scale these hotspots were identified and include: the Mentawai islands off the Sumatra coast, various sub-districts on Sumatra and west and east Java. Based on the presented approach a temporal dynamic estimation of casualties and displacements as a function of available response time is obtained for the entire coastal area. As an example, a worst case tsunami scenario for Kuta (Bali) results in casualties of 25 000 with an optimal response time (direct evacuation when receiving a tsunami warning) and 120 000 for minimal response time (no evacuation). The estimated casualties correspond well to observed/reported values and overall model uncertainty is low with a standard error of 5%. The results obtained allow for prioritization of intervention measures such as early warning chain, evacuation and contingency planning, awareness and preparedness strategies down to a sub-district level and can be used in tsunami early warning decision support.

  13. Performance Characterization of a Novel Plasma Thruster to Provide a Revolutionary Operationally Responsive Space Capability with Micro- and Nano-Satellites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-24

    RESPONSIVE SPACE CAPABILITY WITH MICRO - AND NANO -SATELLITES THESIS Presented to the Faculty Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics Graduate...CAPABILITY WITH MICRO - AND NANO -SATELLITES I. Introduction The extraordinary cost associated with placing space vehicles into orbit (~12,000...Capability with Micro - and Nano -Satellites 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) de La Harpe

  14. [Clinical study on regimen cyclophosphamide, Ara-C and topotecan (CAT) in treatment of patients with refractory or relapsed acute myelogenous leukemia].

    PubMed

    Qin, Tie-Jun; Xu, Ze-Feng; Wang, Jin-Yu; Zhou, Chun-Lin; Xiao, Zhi-Jian

    2009-10-01

    Up to now, no consensus has been reached on the standard salvage regimen for patients with refractory or relapsed acute myeloid leukemia (AML). This study was purposed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of combination chemotherapy composing of cyclophosphamide (Cy), cytosine arabinoside (Ara-C) and topotecan (CAT regimen) for 37 refractory or relapsed AML patients. The dosing regimen was as follows: Cy 300 mg/m2 by intravenous infusion, every 12 hours on days 1-3, topotecan 1.25 mg/m2 by intravenous continuous infusion over 6 hours daily on days 2 to 6, Ara-C 500 mg/m2 by intravenous infusion over 2 hours daily for 5 days on days 2-6. The results showed that all patients completed one cycle of chemotherapy. 12 patients (32.4%) achieved complete remission (CR), 2 (5.4%) achieved partial remission (PR), and the 23 remaining patients achieved no remission (NR). The overall response rate (RR) was 37.8%. Among 18 relapsed cases, 6 cases had CR (33.3%), 2 cases achieved PR (11.1%), and 10 cases were with NR (55.6%). Among 19 refractory cases, 6 had CR (31.6%), and 13 (68.4%) were with NR. There was no statistically significant difference in RR between refractory and relapsed groups (31.6% and 44.4%, respectively) (p=0.42). Myelosuppression was universal. Mild non-hematologic toxicities were mainly gastrointestinal, as nausea, vomiting, diarrhea. The incidence of severe (grade III-IV) non-hematologic toxicity, such as oral mucositis and infection was 37.8% and 86.5% respectively. Only one patient died of severe infection during the observation (within 28 days from start of chemotherapy). The time of median follow-up was 4 (0-33) months, the median overall survival (OS) was 4 (1.8-6.2) months. The median OS for responders was longer than that for non-responders (9 vs 2 months respectively, p=0.00). In conclusion, the CAT regimen of lower dose is well tolerated and has certain anti-leukemia effect, and worthy to be further investigated.

  15. Broad-host-range expression vectors that carry the L-arabinose-inducible Escherichia coli araBAD promoter and the araC regulator.

    PubMed

    Newman, J R; Fuqua, C

    1999-02-18

    We describe the development and analysis of broad-host-range (BHR) cloning vectors that carry the araC-PBAD controlled expression cassette from Escherichia coli. These plasmids are designed to facilitate l-arabinose-responsive control of target genes in a variety of Gram-negative bacterial hosts. BHR PBAD::lacZ fusions were used to analyze the utility of this controlled expression system in the plant pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens. In A. tumefaciens, the level of control afforded is significant, although less stringent than that observed in E. coli. The BHR PBAD vectors offer a useful alternative to currently used controlled expression systems, and can be employed in conjunction with other regulated promoters to simultaneously regulate expression of multiple genes. Addition of a variety of carbon sources, namely C4 acids and the anti-inducer d-fucose, allows modulation of l-arabinose induction. Activation of PBAD expression in A. tumefaciens requires a plasmid-borne copy of araC, and is not affected by endogenous regulators.

  16. Construction of a pulse-coupled dipole network capable of fear-like and relief-like responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lungsi Sharma, B.

    2016-07-01

    The challenge for neuroscience as an interdisciplinary programme is the integration of ideas among the disciplines to achieve a common goal. This paper deals with the problem of deriving a pulse-coupled neural network that is capable of demonstrating behavioural responses (fear-like and relief-like). Current pulse-coupled neural networks are designed mostly for engineering applications, particularly image processing. The discovered neural network was constructed using the method of minimal anatomies approach. The behavioural response of a level-coded activity-based model was used as a reference. Although the spiking-based model and the activity-based model are of different scales, the use of model-reference principle means that the characteristics that is referenced is its functional properties. It is demonstrated that this strategy of dissection and systematic construction is effective in the functional design of pulse-coupled neural network system with nonlinear signalling. The differential equations for the elastic weights in the reference model are replicated in the pulse-coupled network geometrically. The network reflects a possible solution to the problem of punishment and avoidance. The network developed in this work is a new network topology for pulse-coupled neural networks. Therefore, the model-reference principle is a powerful tool in connecting neuroscience disciplines. The continuity of concepts and phenomena is further maintained by systematic construction using methods like the method of minimal anatomies.

  17. Effects of light intensity on growth, immune responses, antioxidant capability and disease resistance of juvenile blunt snout bream Megalobrama amblycephala.

    PubMed

    Tian, Hong-Yan; Zhang, Ding-Dong; Xu, Chao; Wang, Fei; Liu, Wen-Bin

    2015-12-01

    Light is necessary for many fish species to develop and grow normally since most fishes are visual feeders. However, too intense light may be stressful or even lethal. Thus, this study was conducted to evaluate the effect of light intensity on growth, immune response, antioxidant capability and disease resistance of juvenile blunt snout bream Megalobrama amblycephala. Fish (18.04 ± 0.22 g) randomly divided into 5 groups were exposed to a range of light intensities (100, 200, 400, 800 and 1600 lx) in cultures for 8 weeks. After the feeding trial, fish were challenged by Aeromonas hydrophila and cumulative mortality was recorded for the next 96 h. The results demonstrated that fish subjected to 400 lx showed the greatest weight gain (125.70 ± 5.29%). Plasma levels of glucose and lactate increased with light intensity rising from 100 lx to 1600 lx while the lowest plasma levels of cortisol was observed at 400 lx group. Post-challenged haemato-immunological parameters (including plasma lysozyme and alternative complement activities, as well as plasma nitric oxide level and globulin contents) improved with light intensity increasing from 100 lx to 400 lx, and then decreased with further increasing light intensity. However, antioxidant biomarkers such as liver catalase and malondialdehyde showed an opposite trend with immune response with the lowest values observed at 400 lx groups. The application of light intensity at 1600 lx significantly lowered liver glutathione activity to 76.78 ± 6.91 μmol g(-1). Within a range of light intensity from 100 to 400 lx, no differences were observed in liver total superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities while they were significantly higher at 800 and 1600 lx. After challenge, the lowest mortality was observed in fish exposed to 400 lx. It was significantly lower than that of fish exposed to 100 and 1600 lx. The results of the present study indicated that high light intensities (more than 800 lx) not only produced

  18. An optimized peptide vaccine strategy capable of inducing multivalent CD8+ T cell responses with potent antitumor effects

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyun-Il; Jung, Soo-Hyun; Sohn, Hyun-Jung; Celis, Esteban; Kim, Tai-Gyu

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic cancer vaccines are an attractive alternative to conventional therapies for treating malignant tumors, and successful tumor eradication depends primarily on obtaining high numbers of long-lasting tumor-reactive CD8+ T cells. Dendritic cell (DC)-based vaccines constitute a promising approach for treating cancer, but in most instances low immune responses and suboptimal therapeutic effects are achieved indicating that further optimization is required. We describe here a novel vaccination strategy with peptide-loaded DCs followed by a mixture of synthetic peptides, polyinosine-polycytidylic acid (poly-IC) and anti-CD40 antibodies (TriVax) for improving the immunogenicity and therapeutic efficacy of DC-based vaccines in a melanoma mouse model. TriVax immunization 7–12 d after priming with antigen-loaded DCs generated large numbers of long-lasting multiple antigen-specific CD8+ T cells capable of recognizing tumor cells. These responses were far superior to those generated by homologous immunizations with either TriVax or DCs. CD8+ T cells but not CD4+ T cells or NK cells mediated the therapeutic efficacy of this heterologous prime-boost strategy. Moreover, combinations of this vaccination regimen with programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) blockade or IL2 anti-IL2 antibody complexes led to complete disease eradication and survival enhancement in melanoma-bearing mice. The overall results suggest that similar strategies would be applicable for the design of effective therapeutic vaccination for treating viral diseases and various cancers, which may circumvent current limitations of cell-based cancer vaccines. PMID:26451316

  19. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Induce Peculiar Alternatively Activated Macrophages Capable of Dampening Both Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Chiossone, Laura; Conte, Romana; Spaggiari, Grazia Maria; Serra, Martina; Romei, Cristina; Bellora, Francesca; Becchetti, Flavio; Andaloro, Antonio; Moretta, Lorenzo; Bottino, Cristina

    2016-07-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) support hematopoiesis and exert immunoregulatory activities. Here, we analyzed the functional outcome of the interactions between MSCs and monocytes/macrophages. We showed that MSCs supported the survival of monocytes that underwent differentiation into macrophages, in the presence of macrophage colony-stimulating factor. However, MSCs skewed their polarization toward a peculiar M2-like functional phenotype (M(MSC) ), through a prostaglandin E2-dependent mechanism. M(MSC) were characterized by high expression of scavenger receptors, increased phagocytic capacity, and high production of interleukin (IL)-10 and transforming growth factor-β. These cytokines contributed to the immunoregulatory properties of M(MSC) , which differed from those of typical IL-4-induced macrophages (M2). In particular, interacting with activated natural killer (NK) cells, M(MSC) inhibited both the expression of activating molecules such as NKp44, CD69, and CD25 and the production of IFNγ, while M2 affected only IFNγ production. Moreover, M(MSC) inhibited the proliferation of CD8(+) T cells in response to allogeneic stimuli and induced the expansion of regulatory T cells (Tregs). Toll-like receptor engagement reverted the phenotypic and functional features of M(MSC) to those of M1 immunostimulatory/proinflammatory macrophages. Overall our data show that MSCs induce the generation of a novel type of alternatively activated macrophages capable of suppressing both innate and adaptive immune responses. These findings may help to better understand the role of MSCs in healthy tissues and inflammatory diseases including cancer, and provide clues for novel therapeutic approaches. Stem Cells 2016;34:1909-1921.

  20. Galleria mellonella larvae are capable of sensing the extent of priming agent and mounting proportionatal cellular and humoral immune responses.

    PubMed

    Wu, Gongqing; Xu, Li; Yi, Yunhong

    2016-06-01

    Larvae of Galleria mellonella are useful models for studying the innate immunity of invertebrates or for evaluating the virulence of microbial pathogens. In this work, we demonstrated that prior exposure of G. mellonella larvae to high doses (1×10(4), 1×10(5) or 1×10(6) cells/larva) of heat-killed Photorhabdus luminescens TT01 increases the resistance of larvae to a lethal dose (50 cells/larva) of viable P. luminescens TT01 infection administered 48h later. We also found that the changes in immune protection level were highly correlated to the changes in levels of cellular and humoral immune parameters when priming the larvae with different doses of heat-killed P. luminescens TT01. Priming the larvae with high doses of heat-killed P. luminescens TT01 resulted in significant increases in the hemocytes activities of phagocytosis and encapsulation. High doses of heat-killed P. luminescens TT01 also induced an increase in total hemocyte count and a reduction in bacterial density within the larval hemocoel. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis showed that genes coding for cecropin and gallerimycin and galiomycin increased in expression after priming G. mellonella with heat-killed P. luminescens TT01. All the immune parameters changed in a dose-dependent manner. These results indicate that the insect immune system is capable of sensing the extent of priming agent and mounting a proportionate immune response.

  1. Interaction between mutant alleles of araC of the Escherichia coli B/r L-arabinose operon.

    PubMed

    Sheppard, D E; Eleuterio, M; Falgout, B

    1979-09-01

    Strains were constructed that contain mutational alterations affecting two distinct functional domains within the araC gene protein. The araCi (catabolite repression insensitivity) and araCh (catabolite repression hypersensitivity) mutations were used to alter the catabolite repression sensitivity domain, and mutation to D-fucose resistance was used to alter the inducer binding domain. araCh, D-fucose-resistant double mutants never exhibited constitutive ara operon expression, whereas all of the araCi, D-fucose-resistant double mutants did exhibit constitutivity. When L-arabinose was used as an inducer, most of the double mutants exhibited the sensitivity to catabolite repression associated with the araCi or araCh mutation. However, when D-fucose was used as an inducer, changes in sensitivity to catabolite repression were observed that were attributed to interactions between the two protein domains. The roles of catabolite activator protein and araC gene protein in the induction of the araBAD operon were discussed.

  2. The adult pituitary shows stem/progenitor cell activation in response to injury and is capable of regeneration.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qiuli; Gremeaux, Lies; Luque, Raul M; Liekens, Daisy; Chen, Jianghai; Buch, Thorsten; Waisman, Ari; Kineman, Rhonda; Vankelecom, Hugo

    2012-07-01

    The pituitary gland constitutes, together with the hypothalamus, the regulatory core of the endocrine system. Whether the gland is capable of cell regeneration after injury, in particular when suffered at adult age, is unknown. To investigate the adult pituitary's regenerative capacity and the response of its stem/progenitor cell compartment to damage, we constructed a transgenic mouse model to conditionally destroy pituitary cells. GHCre/iDTR mice express diphtheria toxin (DT) receptor after transcriptional activation by Cre recombinase, which is driven by the GH promoter. Treatment with DT for 3 d leads to gradual GH(+) (somatotrope) cell obliteration with a final ablation grade of 80-90% 1 wk later. The stem/progenitor cell-clustering side population promptly expands after injury, concordant with the immediate increase in Sox2(+) stem/progenitor cells. In addition, folliculo-stellate cells, previously designated as pituitary stem/progenitor cells and significantly overlapping with Sox2(+) cells, also increase in abundance. In situ examination reveals expansion of the Sox2(+) marginal-zone niche and appearance of remarkable Sox2(+) cells that contain GH. When mice are left after the DT-provoked lesion, GH(+) cells considerably regenerate during the following months. Double Sox2(+)/GH(+) cells are observed throughout the regenerative period, suggesting recovery of somatotropes from stem/progenitor cells, as further supported by 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) pulse-chase lineage tracing. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that the adult pituitary gland holds regenerative competence and that tissue repair follows prompt activation and plausible involvement of the stem/progenitor cells.

  3. The DNA loop model for ara repression: AraC protein occupies the proposed loop sites in vivo and repression-negative mutations lie in these same sites.

    PubMed

    Martin, K; Huo, L; Schleif, R F

    1986-06-01

    Two sets of experiments have been performed to test the DNA loop model of repression of the araBAD operon of Escherichia coli. First, dimethyl sulfate methylation protection measurements on normally growing cells show that the AraC regulatory protein occupies the araI site in the presence and absence of the inducer arabinose. Similarly, the araO2 site is shown to be occupied by AraC protein in the presence and absence of arabinose; however, its occupancy by AraC is greatly reduced when araI and adjacent sequences are deleted. Thus, AraC protein binds to araO2 cooperatively with some other component of the ara system located at least 60 base pairs away. Second, the mutational analysis presented here shows that the DNA components required for repression of araBAD are araI, araO2, and perhaps the araBAD operon RNA polymerase binding site.

  4. The pharmacologic basis for the efficacy of high-dose Ara-C and sequential asparaginase in adult acute myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed Central

    Capizzi, R. L.; White, C.

    1988-01-01

    Dose-related effects of ara-C include overcoming a relative transport impediment in human leukemia cells. This result then allows intracellular metabolism and incorporation into DNA to proceed to the maximum extent possible. In addition, the increased synthesis of ara-CDP-choline associated with these high doses may serve as an alternate substrate for phosphatidyl choline synthesis, which may contribute to membrane fragility and cell lysis. HiDAC also serves as a "prodrug" for high concentrations of ara-U, which in turn diminishes ara-C catabolism with a prolonged gamma phase of systemic clearance and also causes cytostasis in S-phase with enhanced anabolism and cytotoxicity of subsequent doses of ara-C. This metabolite/drug interaction could be termed "self-potentiation," a feature which contributes to the overall activity of HiDAC. Asparaginase enhances these effects in a schedule-dependent fashion by lowering the cellular pool size of dCTP and consequent enhanced metabolism of ara-C. The therapeutic benefit of these pharmacologic manipulations has been verified in a randomized clinical trial in patients with acute myelogenous leukemia. PMID:3163212

  5. Distributed emergency response system to model dispersion and deposition of atmospheric releases

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, S.S.

    1985-04-01

    Aging hardware and software and increasing commitments by the Departments of Energy and Defense have led us to develop a new, expanded system to replace the existing Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) system. This distributed, computer-based, emergency response system is used by state and federal agencies to assess the environmental health hazards resulting from an accidental release of radioactive material into the atmosphere. Like its predecessor, the expanded system uses local meteorology (e.g., wind speed and wind direction), as well as terrain information, to simulate the transport and dispersion of the airborne material. The system also calculates deposition and dose and displays them graphically over base maps of the local geography for use by on-site authorities. This paper discusses the limitations of the existing ARAC system. It also discusses the components and functionality of the new system, the technical difficulties encountered and resolved in its design and implementation, and the software methodologies and tools employed in its development.

  6. Combination of interferon alpha with either Ara-C or ATRA in vitro reduces the selective action of interferon against CML CFU-GM.

    PubMed

    Marley, S B; Davidson, R J; Goldman, J M; Gordon, M Y

    2000-08-01

    Although interferon (IFN)-alpha has no specific inhibitory effect on the plating efficiency of granulocyte-macrophage colony-forming cells (CFU-GM) from patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML), it does selectively inhibit the replating ability (secondary colony formation) of CML CFU-GM. Thus, amplification of CFU-GM may be a target for IFN-alpha and other agents used in the treatment of CML. Here we examined whether cytarabine (Ara-C) or all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) exert similar effects and whether they might in combination with IFN-alpha enhance its efficacy. We found that Ara-C preferentially inhibits the formation of CML CFU-GM compared to normal CFU-GM, but this inhibition was not increased by addition of IFN-alpha. When Ara-C was added to cultures containing IFN-alpha, the inhibition of replating by CML progenitors was abrogated. ATRA increased significantly the plating efficiency of normal CFU-GM. The addition of IFN-alpha to ATRA had no effect on CML or normal colony numbers. However, addition of ATRA to cultures containing IFN-alpha reversed the selective inhibition of CML CFU-GM replating seen in cultures containing IFN-alpha alone. In four IFN-alpha/Ara-C experiments, secondary CML patient-derived colonies were examined by fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH). All of them were Ph chromosome positive. No significant effects on CFU-GM production were observed when CML primitive haemopoietic progenitor cells were investigated in a delta (delta) assay. Thus we conclude that combining IFN-alpha with Ara-C or ATRA neutralises the effect of IFN-alpha on CML CFU-GM. This observation provides a rationale for treating patients with alternating courses of IFN-alpha and Ara-C or ATRA, rather than giving either of these two agents in combination with IFN-alpha.

  7. Decreased survival in normal karyotype AML with single-nucleotide polymorphisms in genes encoding the AraC metabolizing enzymes cytidine deaminase and 5'-nucleotidase.

    PubMed

    Falk, Ingrid Jakobsen; Fyrberg, Anna; Paul, Esbjörn; Nahi, Hareth; Hermanson, Monica; Rosenquist, Richard; Höglund, Martin; Palmqvist, Lars; Stockelberg, Dick; Wei, Yuan; Gréen, Henrik; Lotfi, Kourosh

    2013-12-01

    De novo acute myeloid leukemia with normal karyotype (NK-AML) comprises a large group of patients with no common cytogenetic alterations and with a large variation in treatment response. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes related to the metabolism of the nucleoside analogue AraC, the backbone in AML treatment, might affect drug sensitivity and treatment outcome. Therefore, SNPs may serve as prognostic biomarkers aiding clinicians in individualized treatment decisions, with the aim of improving patient outcomes. We analyzed polymorphisms in genes encoding cytidine deaminase (CDA 79A>C rs2072671 and -451C>T rs532545), 5'-nucleotidase (cN-II 7A>G rs10883841), and deoxycytidine kinase (DCK 3'UTR 948T>C rs4643786) in 205 de novo NK-AML patients. In FLT3-internal tandem duplication (ITD)-positive patients, the CDA 79C/C and -451T/T genotypes were associated with shorter overall survival compared to other genotypes (5 vs. 24 months, P < 0.001 and 5 vs. 23 months, P = 0.015, respectively), and this was most pronounced in FLT3-ITD-positive/NPM1-positive patients. We observed altered in vitro sensitivity to topoisomerase inhibitory drugs, but not to nucleoside analogues, and a decrease in global DNA methylation in cells carrying both CDA variant alleles. A shorter survival was also observed for the cN-II variant allele, but only in FLT3-ITD-negative patients (25 vs. 31 months, P = 0.075). Our results indicate that polymorphisms in genes related to nucleoside analog drug metabolism may serve as prognostic markers in de novo NK-AML.

  8. Capability Disillusionment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-01

    Defense AT&L: July–August 2011 22 Capability Disillusionment Cochrane is an operations research analyst and has worked for the past 6 years at the... Disillusionment 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7...unsup- ported by either academic investigation or practical utility. The definition of “capability” in the literature suggests that capabilities are

  9. UK Capability in Languages: Response from the Centre for Language in Education to the Nuffield Languages Inquiry. Occasional Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southampton Univ. (England). Centre for Language Education.

    This paper responds to the Nuffield Languages Inquiry regarding the following: what language capabilities the United Kingdom (UK) will need in the next 20 years to fulfill its economic, strategic, social, and cultural goals and aspirations; the extent to which current policies and arrangements meet these needs; and strategic planning and…

  10. Computational fluid dynamics modeling for emergency preparedness & response

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R.L.; Albritton, J.R.; Ermak, D.L.; Kim, J.

    1995-07-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has played an increasing role in the improvement of atmospheric dispersion modeling. This is because many dispersion models are now driven by meteorological fields generated from CFD models or, in numerical weather prediction`s terminology, prognostic models. Whereas most dispersion models typically involve one or a few scalar, uncoupled equations, the prognostic equations are a set of highly-coupled, nonlinear equations whose solution requires a significant level of computational power. Until recently, such computer power could be found only in CRAY-class supercomputers. Recent advances in computer hardware and software have enabled modestly-priced, high performance, workstations to exhibit the equivalent computation power of some mainframes. Thus desktop-class machines that were limited to performing dispersion calculations driven by diagnostic wind fields may now be used to calculate complex flows using prognostic CFD models. The Atmospheric Release and Advisory Capability (ARAC) program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has, for the past several years, taken advantage of the improvements in hardware technology to develop a national emergency response capability based on executing diagnostic models on workstations. Diagnostic models that provide wind fields are, in general, simple to implement, robust and require minimal time for execution. Such models have been the cornerstones of the ARAC operational system for the past ten years. Kamada (1992) provides a review of diagnostic models and their applications to dispersion problems. However, because these models typically contain little physics beyond mass-conservation, their performance is extremely sensitive to the quantity and quality of input meteorological data and, in spite of their utility, can be applied with confidence to only modestly complex flows.

  11. Space station capability for research in rotational hypogravity. [to study human physiological responses to rotational acceleration stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, G.

    1973-01-01

    Certain capabilities provided in preliminary designs of orbital space stations for research in rotational hypogravity are outlined. Also indicated are alternative configurations that are being considered. Principal addresses are members of an international community of physiologists whose work in earth oriented, as well as space oriented, physiology can be supported through observation under the background environment of null gravity. Their participation in originating and devising advanced experiments and in developing requirements is expected to enhance final design of the selected space station and to make the research program more meaningful.

  12. Effect of mutations in the cyclic AMP receptor protein-binding site on araBAD and araC expression.

    PubMed

    Stoltzfus, L; Wilcox, G

    1989-02-01

    Maximum expression of the adjacent but divergently transcribed araBAD operon and araC gene requires the presence of cyclic AMP (cAMP) and the cAMP receptor protein (CRP). DNase I protection studies have previously revealed a high-affinity CRP-binding site in the ara regulatory region. Deletion mutations introduced into this site resulted in reduced expression of araBAD and araC. However, other experiments have demonstrated that spacing changes in the ara regulatory region may have multiple effects due to disruption of a DNA loop. Thus, the deletions could have destroyed the CRP-binding site, the ability to form a loop, or both. In the present study, substitution mutations were introduced into the CRP site in order to avoid creating spacing changes. We found that a 3-base-pair substitution resulted in a 30% reduction in araBAD expression, whereas a 6-base-pair substitution resulted in an 80% reduction. Both of these substitution mutations reduced araC expression threefold. We conclude that CRP bound to this site regulates expression in both directions. We found that a spacing change in the CRP site does not alter araBAD expression any more than does a substitution mutation.

  13. Surviving the Storm : Expanding Public Health’s Capabilities in Response to the Increasing Threats Posed by Novel Viruses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    hyper-immune response (also known as “cytokine storm”) to novel or pandemic strain viruses with which states could supplement their existing stockpiles...PHP), Epidemiology, Medications, Therapies, Antivirals, Antibiotics, Statins, Corticosteroids, Interferons, Herbal Medications 15. NUMBER OF...novel or pandemic strain viruses with which states could supplement their existing stockpiles? This research explores six classes of medications that

  14. Universal Documentation System Handbook. Volume 3. Response Formats and Instructions; Statement of Capability, Program Support Plan/Operations Directive

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-08-01

    and number, link, channel and segment . List the calibration and deflection ao racies that will be provided. 0 188 CLASSIFICATIQn: * * * * * * PROGRAM...cmmunLications responses for facsimile transmission requirements which are specified in the PRD/CR. Longlines are csidere as those circuits geograpically

  15. A critical examination of the predictive capabilities of a new type of general laminated plate theory in the inelastic response regime

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Todd O

    2008-01-01

    Recently, a new type of general, multiscale plate theory was developed for application to the analysis of the history-dependent response of laminated plates (Williams). In particular, the history-dependent behavior in a plate was considered to arise from both delamination effects as well as history-dependent material point responses (such as from viscoelasticity, viscoplasticity, damage, etc.). The multiscale nature of the theoretical framework is due to the use of a superposition of both general global and local displacement effects. Using this global-local displacement field the governing equations of the theory are obtained by satisfying the governing equations of nonlinear continuum mechanics referenced to the initial configuration. In order to accomplish the goal of conducting accurate analyses in the history-dependent response regimes the formulation of the theory has been carried out in a sufficiently general fashion that any cohesive zone model (CZM) and any history-dependent constitutive model for a material point can be incorporated into the analysis without reformulation. Recently, the older multiscale theory of Williams has been implemented into the finite element (FE) framework by Mourad et al. and the resulting capabilities where used to shown that in a qualitative sense it is important that the local fields be accurately obtained in order to correctly predict even the overall response characteristics of a laminated plate in the inelastic regime. The goal of this work is to critically examine the predictive capabilities of this theory, as well as the older multiscale theory of Williams and other types of laminated plate theories, with recently developed exact solutions for the response of inelastic plates in cylindrical bending (Williams). These exact solutions are valid for both nonlinear CZMs as well as inelastic material responses obtained from different constitutive theories. In particular, the accuracy with which the different plate theories

  16. Dual-mass vibratory rate gyroscope with suppressed translational acceleration response and quadrature-error correction capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, William A. (Inventor); Juneau, Thor N. (Inventor); Lemkin, Mark A. (Inventor); Roessig, Allen W. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A microfabricated vibratory rate gyroscope to measure rotation includes two proof-masses mounted in a suspension system anchored to a substrate. The suspension has two principal modes of compliance, one of which is driven into oscillation. The driven oscillation combined with rotation of the substrate about an axis perpendicular to the substrate results in Coriolis acceleration along the other mode of compliance, the sense-mode. The sense-mode is designed to respond to Coriolis accelerationwhile suppressing the response to translational acceleration. This is accomplished using one or more rigid levers connecting the two proof-masses. The lever allows the proof-masses to move in opposite directions in response to Coriolis acceleration. The invention includes a means for canceling errors, termed quadrature error, due to imperfections in implementation of the sensor. Quadrature-error cancellation utilizes electrostatic forces to cancel out undesired sense-axis motion in phase with drive-mode position.

  17. Alizarin Complexone Functionalized Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles: A Smart System Integrating Glucose-Responsive Double-Drugs Release and Real-Time Monitoring Capabilities.

    PubMed

    Zou, Zhen; He, Dinggeng; Cai, Linli; He, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Kemin; Yang, Xue; Li, Liling; Li, Siqi; Su, Xiaoya

    2016-04-06

    The outstanding progress of nanoparticles-based delivery systems capable of releasing hypoglycemic drugs in response to glucose has dramatically changed the outlook of diabetes management. However, the developed glucose-responsive systems have not offered real-time monitoring capabilities for accurate quantifying hypoglycemic drugs released. In this study, we present a multifunctional delivery system that integrates both delivery and monitoring issues using glucose-triggered competitive binding scheme on alizarin complexone (ALC) functionalized mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN). In this system, ALC is modified on the surface of MSN as the signal reporter. Gluconated insulin (G-Ins) is then introduced onto MSN-ALC via benzene-1,4-diboronic acid (BA) mediated esterification reaction, where G-Ins not only blocks drugs inside the mesopores but also works as a hypoglycemic drug. In the absence of glucose, the sandwich-type boronate ester structure formed by BA binding to the diols of ALC and G-Ins remains intact, resulting in an fluorescence emission peak at 570 nm and blockage of pores. Following a competitive binding, the presence of glucose cause the dissociation of boronate ester between ALC and BA, which lead to the pores opening and disappearance of fluorescence. As proof of concept, rosiglitazone maleate (RSM), an insulin-sensitizing agent, was doped into the MSN to form a multifunctional MSN (RSM@MSN-ALC-BA-Ins), integrating with double-drugs loading, glucose-responsive performance, and real-time monitoring capability. It has been demonstrated that the glucose-responsive release behaviors of insulin and RSM in buffer or in human serum can be quantified in real-time through evaluating the changes of fluorescence signal. We believe that this developed multifunctional system can shed light on the invention of a new generation of smart nanoformulations for optical diagnosis, individualized treatment, and noninvasive monitoring of diabetes management.

  18. Responses of a novel salt-tolerant Streptomyces albidoflavus DUT_AHX capable of degrading nitrobenzene to salinity stress.

    PubMed

    Ai, Haixin; Zhou, Jiti; Lu, Hong; Guo, Jianbo

    2009-02-01

    A novel salt-tolerant strain DUT_AHX, which was capable of utilizing nitrobenzene (NB) as the sole carbon source, was isolated from NB-contaminated soil. Furthermore, it was identified as Streptomyces albidoflavus on the basis of physiological and biochemical tests and 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequence analysis. It can grow in the presence of NaCl up to 12% (w/v) or NB up to 900 mg/l in mineral salts basal (MSB) medium. The exogenously added osmoprotectants such as glycin, glutamic acid, proline, betaine and ectoine can improve growth of strain DUT_AHX in the presence of 10% (w/v) NaCl. NB-grown cells of strain DUT_AHX in modified MSB medium can degrade NB with the concomitant release of ammonia. Moreover, crude extracts of NB-grown strain DUT_AHX mainly contained 2-aminophenol 1,6-dioxygenase activity. These indicate that NB degradation by strain DUT_AHX might involve a partial reductive pathway. The proteins induced by salinity stress or NB were analyzed by native-gradient polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-PAGE. In NB-induced proteins de novo, 141 kDa protein on the native-gradient PAGE gel was excised and electroeluted. Furthermore, enzyme tests exhibit the 2-aminophenol 1,6-dioxygenase activity of purified 141 kDa protein is 11-fold that of the cell-free extracts. The exploitation of strain DUT_AHX in salinity stress will be a remarkable improvement in NB bioremediation and wastewater treatment in high salinity.

  19. Effect of external disturbances and data rate on the response of an automatic landing system capable of curved trajectories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherman, W. L.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of steady wind, turbulence, data sample rate, and control-actuator natural frequency on the response of a possible automatic landing system were investigated in a nonstatistical study. The results indicate that the system, which interfaces with the microwave landing system, functions well in winds and turbulence as long as the guidance law contains proper compensation for wind. The system response was satisfactory down to five data samples per second, which makes the system compatible with the microwave landing system. No adverse effects were observed when actuator natural frequency was lowered. For limiting cases, those cases where the roll angle goes to zero just as the airplane touches down, the basic method for computing the turn-algorithm gains proved unsatisfactory and unacceptable landings resulted. Revised computation methods gave turn-algorithm gains that resulted in acceptable landings. The gains provided by the new method also improved the touchdown conditions for acceptable landings over those obtained when the gains were determined by the old method.

  20. Myogenic-induced mesenchymal stem cells are capable of modulating the immune response by regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Sunyoung; Lim, Hyun Ju; Jackson, John D; Atala, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Cell therapy for patients who have intractable muscle disorders may require highly regenerative cells from young, healthy allogeneic donors. Mesenchymal stem cells are currently under clinical investigation because they are known to induce muscle regeneration and believed to be immune privileged, thus making them suitable for allogeneic applications. However, it is unclear whether allogeneic and myogenic-induced mesenchymal stem cells retain their immunomodulatory characteristics. Therefore, our aim was to evaluate the effects of mesenchymal stem cell differentiation on the immune characteristics of cells in vitro. We investigated the immunologic properties of mesenchymal stem cells after myogenic induction. Mesenchymal stem cells were obtained from C57BL/6 mice and the C3H/10T1/2 murine mesenchymal stem cell line. Two different 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine doses (0.5 and 3 µM) were evaluated for their effects on mesenchymal stem cell skeletal myogenic differentiation potential, immune antigen expression, and mixed lymphocytic reactions. Using a mixed lymphocytic reaction, we determined the optimal splenocyte proliferation inhibition dose. The induction of regulatory T cells was markedly increased by the addition of 3 µM 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine–treated mesenchymal stem cells. Myogenic-induced mesenchymal stem cells do not elicit alloreactive lymphocyte proliferative responses and are able to modulate immune responses. These findings support the hypothesis that myogenic-induced mesenchymal stem cells may be transplantable across allogeneic barriers. PMID:24555015

  1. Effects of dietary fructooligosaccharide levels and feeding modes on growth, immune responses, antioxidant capability and disease resistance of blunt snout bream (Megalobrama amblycephala).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chun-Nuan; Li, Xiang-Fei; Jiang, Guang-Zhen; Zhang, Ding-Dong; Tian, Hong-Yan; Li, Jun-Yi; Liu, Wen-Bin

    2014-12-01

    This study aimed to determine the effects of fructooligosaccharide (FOS) levels and its feeding modes on growth, immune response, antioxidant capability and disease resistance of blunt snout bream (Megalobrama amblycephala). Fish (12.5 ± 0.5 g) were subjected to three FOS levels (0, 0.4% and 0.8%) and two feeding modes (supplementing FOS continuously and supplementing FOS two days interval 5 days) according to a 3 × 2 factorial design. At the end of 8-week feeding trial, fish were challenged by Aeromonas hydrophila with concentration of 1 × 10(5) CFU mL(-1) and mortality was recorded for the next 96 h. Fish fed 0.4% FOS continuously (D2) and fish fed the basal diet for 5 days followed by 0.8% FOS for 2 days (D5) showed admirable growth performance. The highest plasma lysozyme, acid phosphatase and myeloperoxidase activities as well as complement component 3, total protein and immunoglobulin M (IgM) levels were all observed in fish fed D5. They were significantly higher (P < 0.05) than those of the control group and/or fish fed 0.8% FOS continuously, but exhibited no statistical difference (P > 0.05) with that of fish fed D2. A similar trend was also observed in antioxidant capability as well as the expression of Leap-I and Leap-Ⅱ. Mortality showed an opposite trend with the immune response with the lowest rate observed in fish fed D5. The results indicated that diet supplementing FOS in appropriate levels and feeding modes could improve the growth, immune response and antioxidant capability of fish, as might consequently lead to enhanced disease resistance. It can be speculated that the basal diet for 5 days followed by 0.8% FOS for 2 days was most suitable for blunt snout bream.

  2. Effects of Control-Response Characteristics on the Capability of Helicopter for Use as a Gun Platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pegg, Robert J.; Connor, Andrew B.

    1960-01-01

    An investigation with a variable-stability helicopter was undertaken to ascertain the steadiness and ability to "hold on" to the target of a helicopter employed as a gun platform. Simulated tasks were per formed under differing flight conditions with the control-response characteristics of the helicopter varied for each task. The simulated gun-platform mission included: Variations of headings with respect to wind, constant altitude and "swing around" to a wind heading of 0 deg, and increases in altitude while performing a swing around to a wind heading of 0 deg. The results showed that increases in control power and damping increased pilot ability to hold on to the target with fewer yawing oscillations and in a shorter time. The results also indicated that wind direction must be considered in accuracy assessment. Greatest accuracy throughout these tests was achieved by aiming upwind.

  3. Identification of a prostate-specific membrane antigen-derived peptide capable of eliciting both cellular and humoral immune responses in HLA-A24+ prostate cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Kazuhiko; Noguchi, Masanori; Itoh, Kyogo; Harada, Mamoru

    2003-07-01

    We tried to identify prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA)-derived peptides capable of eliciting both cellular and humoral immune responses in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and plasma of HLA-A24(+) prostate cancer patients, respectively. For cellular response, peptide-specific and prostate cancer-reactive responses of in vitro-stimulated PBMCs were examined with regard to interferon (IFN)-gamma production and cytotoxicity against both a parental HLA-A24(-) prostate cancer cell line (PC-93) and an HLA-A24-expressing transfectant cell line (PC93-A24). For humoral response, patients' plasma was tested for reactivity to the peptides by means of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Among 13 PSMA peptides, PSMA 624-632 peptide induced peptide-specific and tumor-reactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) most effectively. The PSMA 624-632 peptide-stimulated PBMCs from either healthy donors or prostate cancer patients produced a significant level of IFN-gamma in response to prostate cancer cells in an HLA-A24-restricted manner, and also showed a higher level of cytotoxicity against PC93-A24 than against PC93. Antibodies to the PSMA 624-632 peptide, but not to any others, were detected in prostate cancer patients. These results demonstrate that the PSMA 624-632 peptide could be an appropriate molecule for use in specific immunotherapy of HLA-A24(+) patients with prostate cancer.

  4. Hitchhiker capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldsmith, Theodore C.

    1988-01-01

    A carrier system has been developed for economical and quick response flight of small attached payloads on the space shuttle. Hitchhiker can accommodate up to 750 lb of customer payloads in canisters or mounted to an exposed side-mount plate, or up to 1200 lb mounted on a cross-bay structure. The carrier connects to the orbiter's electrical systems and provides up to six customers with standard electrical services including power, real time telemetry and commands. A transparent data and command system concept is employed to allow the customer to easily use his own ground support equipment and personnel to control his payload during integration and flight operations. A general description of the Hitchhiker program and the Shuttle Payload of Opportunity Carrier (SPOC) is given and future enhancements are outlined.

  5. Primary cultured astrocytes from old rats are capable to activate the Nrf2 response against MPP+ toxicity after tBHQ pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Alarcón-Aguilar, Adriana; Luna-López, Armando; Ventura-Gallegos, José L; Lazzarini, Roberto; Galván-Arzate, Sonia; González-Puertos, Viridiana Y; Morán, Julio; Santamaría, Abel; Königsberg, Mina

    2014-08-01

    Astrocytes are key players for brain physiology, protecting neurons by releasing antioxidant enzymes; however, they are also susceptible to damage by neurotoxins. Nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like 2 (Nrf2) is a central regulator of the antioxidant response, and therefore, pharmacologic inducers are often used to activate this transcription factor to induce cellular protection. To date, it still remains unknown if cells from aged animals are capable of developing this response. Therefore, the purpose of this work was to determine if cortical astrocytes derived from old rats are able to respond to tertbuthyl-hydroquinene (tBHQ) pretreatment and stimulate the Nrf2-antioxidant response pathway to induce an antioxidant strategy against MPP+ toxicity, one of the most used molecules to model Parkinson's disease. Our results show that, although astrocytes from adult and old rats were more susceptible to MPP+ toxicity than astrocytes from newborn rats, when pretreated with tertbuthyl-hydroquinene, they were able to transactivate Nrf2, increasing antioxidant enzymes and developing cellular protection. These results are discussed in terms of the doses used to create protective responses.

  6. De novo AML patients with favourable-intermediate karyotype may benefit from the addition of low-dose gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO) to fludarabine, Ara-C and idarubicin (FLAI): a contribution to the reopened "GO question".

    PubMed

    Clavio, Marino; Cruciani, Fabio; Minetto, Paola; Guolo, Fabio; Ballerini, Filippo; Marani, Carlo; De Astis, Enrico; Aquino, Sara; Bergamaschi, Micaela; Mitscheunig, Laura; Grasso, Raffaella; Colombo, Nicoletta; Ghiggi, Chiara; Lovera, Davide; Pastori, Giordana; Avenoso, Daniele; Miglino, Maurizio; Gobbi, Marco

    2013-10-01

    We report the final results of a prospective trial testing the combination of fludarabine, Ara-C and idarubicin (FLAI) followed by low-dose gemtuzumab ozogamicin (FLAI-GO) in 85 patients aged 60 years or more with CD33+ acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). Median age was 68 years (60-82); karyotype was unfavourable in 21 patients (24%), intermediate in 63 (74%) and favourable in 1 (2%). There were five therapy-related deaths. Of the 80 evaluable patients, 47 achieved complete response (CR) (58%); CR rates were 65 and 32% in good-intermediate/poor karyotype patients, respectively. Median length of CR was 7 months (3-76). The cumulative incidence of relapse was 84% with an actuarial survival of 50.3% at 1 year and 14.4% at 2 years. The study control population is an unselected consecutive historic cohort of 104 patients treated with the FLAI regimen, who were matched for age and prognostic factors. CR rates after FLAI-GO and FLAI were comparable. However, patients with de novo AML and intermediate-favourable karyotype receiving GO had a significantly lower risk of relapse at 2 years as compared to patients not receiving GO (n = 77) (40 vs 80%, p = 0.01) and significantly better disease-free survival (p = 0.018) and overall survival (p = 0.022).

  7. Emergency Medical Response Capability Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-07-01

    IEB identifier. 38 I Analysis Number Analysis Subject Data as of 4/827 Diuretics June 1969 Sodium Mercaptomerin Ethacrynic Acid Spironolactone...Polymyxin B Spectinomycin 11/526 Chloroform November 1959 12/764 Analgesics, Non-Narcotic Sept. 1967 Aniline Derivatives Acetylsalicylic Acid Other...Salicylic Acid Derivatives Propoxyphene 13/897 Anesthetics March 1972 Inhalation Diethyl Ether Halothane Cyclopropane Nitrous Oxide Methoxyflurance

  8. The discriminant capabilities of stability measures, trunk kinematics, and step kinematics in classifying successful and failed compensatory stepping responses by young adults.

    PubMed

    Crenshaw, Jeremy R; Rosenblatt, Noah J; Hurt, Christopher P; Grabiner, Mark D

    2012-01-03

    This study evaluated the discriminant capability of stability measures, trunk kinematics, and step kinematics to classify successful and failed compensatory stepping responses. In addition, the shared variance between stability measures, step kinematics, and trunk kinematics is reported. The stability measures included the anteroposterior distance (d) between the body center of mass and the stepping limb toe, the margin of stability (MOS), as well as time-to-boundary considering velocity (TTB(v)), velocity and acceleration (TTB(a)), and MOS (TTB(MOS)). Kinematic measures included trunk flexion angle and angular velocity, step length, and the time after disturbance onset of recovery step completion. Fourteen young adults stood on a treadmill that delivered surface accelerations necessitating multiple forward compensatory steps. Thirteen subjects fell from an initial disturbance, but recovered from a second, identical disturbance. Trunk flexion velocity at completion of the first recovery step and trunk flexion angle at completion of the second step had the greatest overall classification of all measures (92.3%). TTB(v) and TTB(a) at completion of both steps had the greatest classification accuracy of all stability measures (80.8%). The length of the first recovery step (r ≤ 0.70) and trunk flexion angle at completion of the second recovery step (r ≤ -0.54) had the largest correlations with stability measures. Although TTB(v) and TTB(a) demonstrated somewhat smaller discriminant capabilities than trunk kinematics, the small correlations between these stability measures and trunk kinematics (|r| ≤ 0.52) suggest that they reflect two important, yet different, aspects of a compensatory stepping response.

  9. Proliferative characteristics of intestinal stem cells. Response and protection to high-energy or fission spectrum neutrons or photons. Technical report, 1 December 1983-1 December 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, W.R.

    1986-04-30

    Cytosine Arabinoside (Ara/C) is an S-phase cytoxic agent. Since nearly half the proliferating cells in the murine crypt are in the S phase, Ara/c treatment, the clonogenic cells (the cells responsible for tissue regeneration) in the crypt are considerably less sensitive to photon radiation than colonogenic cells of control animals. Evidence suggests that the reason for this radioprotection by a toxic agent is the Ara/c-induced alteration in the cell age distribution of the clonogenic cells. Normally, the clonogenic cells are in a G/sub 1/ or G/sub 0/ stage of the cell cycle and are unaffected directly by Ara/c; however, following Ara/c treatment of an animal, the clonogenic cells enter the cell cycle. By 12 hours, the clonogenic cells proceed in a partially synchronized fashion to a mid toi late S phase of the cell cycle where they are less sensitive. WR-2721 appears to protect cells from radiation throughout the cell cycle and most likely acts through a mechanism different from Ara/c. Results of this contrast showed that the combination of Ara/c and WR-2721 protected the gut from photon injury to a greater extent than each agent alone. The protection from Fermilab neutrons by the combination was slightly better than each agent and there was no additional protection of Ara/c combined with WR-2721 for injury by JANUS fission spectrum neutrons. These treatments did not alter the animal response at doses in the bone marrow lethal range.

  10. Annual Report to The President and The Congress of the Advisory Panel to Assess Domestic Response Capabilities for Terrorism Involving Weapons of Mass Destruction (2nd). II. Toward a National Strategy for Combating Terrorism

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    bioterrorist attacks. That review will include capabilities for surveillance and response for plant and animal diseases, laboratory protocols and...First Report, pp. 13-14. 77 Including the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, the Food Safety Inspection Service, and the Agricultural Research...Response Capabilities for Terrorism Involving Weapons of Mass Destruction Abbreviations BSD Biosensor Systems Design, Inc. B W Biological Weapons CB

  11. D-Fucose as a gratuitous inducer of the L-arabinose operon in strains of Escherichia coli B-r mutant in gene araC.

    PubMed

    Beverin, S; Sheppard, D E; Park, S S

    1971-07-01

    d-Fucose, a nonmetabolizable analogue of l-arabinose, prevents growth of Escherichia coli B/r on a mineral salts medium plus l-arabinose by inhibiting induction of the l-arabinose operon. Mutations giving rise to d-fucose resistance map in gene araC and result in constitutive expression of the l-arabinose operon. Most of these mutations also permit d-fucose to serve as a gratuitous inducer. It is concluded that d-fucose-resistant mutants produce an araC gene product with an altered inducer specificity. Addition of l-arabinose to cells induced with the gratuitous inducer, d-fucose, resulted in severe transient repression of operon expression followed by permanent catabolite repression. Transient repression but no permanent catabolite repression was obtained when cells unable to metabolize l-arabinose were employed. It is concluded that transport of l-arabinose alone is sufficient to achieve transient repression of its own operon, but that metabolism of l-arabinose must occur to achieve permanent catabolite repression of the l-arabinose operon. This general effect has been termed "self-catabolite repression."

  12. Enhanced Rescue Lift Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Larry A.

    2007-01-01

    The evolving and ever-increasing demands of emergency response and disaster relief support provided by rotorcraft dictate, among other things, the development of enhanced rescue lift capability for these platforms. This preliminary analysis is first-order in nature but provides considerable insight into some of the challenges inherent in trying to effect rescue using a unique form of robotic rescue device deployed and operated from rotary-wing aerial platforms.

  13. Elongation Factor Tu and Heat Shock Protein 70 Are Membrane-Associated Proteins from Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae Capable of Inducing Strong Immune Response in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Fei; He, Jinyan; Navarro-Alvarez, Nalu; Xu, Jian; Li, Xia; Li, Peng; Wu, Wenxue

    2016-01-01

    Chronic non-progressive pneumonia, a disease that has become a worldwide epidemic has caused considerable loss to sheep industry. Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae (M. ovipneumoniae) is the causative agent of interstitial pneumonia in sheep, goat and bighorn. We here have identified by immunogold and immunoblotting that elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) and heat shock protein 70 (HSP 70) are membrane-associated proteins on M. ovipneumonaiea. We have evaluated the humoral and cellular immune responses in vivo by immunizing BALB/c mice with both purified recombinant proteins rEF-Tu and rHSP70. The sera of both rEF-Tu and rHSP70 treated BALB/c mice demonstrated increased levels of IgG, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-12(p70), IL-4, IL-5 and IL-6. In addition, ELISPOT assay showed significant increase in IFN-γ+ secreting lymphocytes in the rHSP70 group when compared to other groups. Collectively our study reveals that rHSP70 induces a significantly better cellular immune response in mice, and may act as a Th1 cytokine-like adjuvant in immune response induction. Finally, growth inhibition test (GIT) of M. ovipneumoniae strain Y98 showed that sera from rHSP70 or rEF-Tu-immunized mice inhibited in vitro growth of M. ovipneumoniae. Our data strongly suggest that EF-Tu and HSP70 of M. ovipneumoniae are membrane-associated proteins capable of inducing antibody production, and cytokine secretion. Therefore, these two proteins may be potential candidates for vaccine development against M. ovipneumoniae infection in sheep. PMID:27537186

  14. Elongation Factor Tu and Heat Shock Protein 70 Are Membrane-Associated Proteins from Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae Capable of Inducing Strong Immune Response in Mice.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Fei; He, Jinyan; Navarro-Alvarez, Nalu; Xu, Jian; Li, Xia; Li, Peng; Wu, Wenxue

    2016-01-01

    Chronic non-progressive pneumonia, a disease that has become a worldwide epidemic has caused considerable loss to sheep industry. Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae (M. ovipneumoniae) is the causative agent of interstitial pneumonia in sheep, goat and bighorn. We here have identified by immunogold and immunoblotting that elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) and heat shock protein 70 (HSP 70) are membrane-associated proteins on M. ovipneumonaiea. We have evaluated the humoral and cellular immune responses in vivo by immunizing BALB/c mice with both purified recombinant proteins rEF-Tu and rHSP70. The sera of both rEF-Tu and rHSP70 treated BALB/c mice demonstrated increased levels of IgG, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-12(p70), IL-4, IL-5 and IL-6. In addition, ELISPOT assay showed significant increase in IFN-γ+ secreting lymphocytes in the rHSP70 group when compared to other groups. Collectively our study reveals that rHSP70 induces a significantly better cellular immune response in mice, and may act as a Th1 cytokine-like adjuvant in immune response induction. Finally, growth inhibition test (GIT) of M. ovipneumoniae strain Y98 showed that sera from rHSP70 or rEF-Tu-immunized mice inhibited in vitro growth of M. ovipneumoniae. Our data strongly suggest that EF-Tu and HSP70 of M. ovipneumoniae are membrane-associated proteins capable of inducing antibody production, and cytokine secretion. Therefore, these two proteins may be potential candidates for vaccine development against M. ovipneumoniae infection in sheep.

  15. SAMHD1 is a biomarker for cytarabine response and a therapeutic target in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Constanze; Oellerich, Thomas; Baldauf, Hanna-Mari; Schwarz, Sarah-Marie; Thomas, Dominique; Flick, Robert; Bohnenberger, Hanibal; Kaderali, Lars; Stegmann, Lena; Cremer, Anjali; Martin, Margarethe; Lohmeyer, Julian; Michaelis, Martin; Hornung, Veit; Schliemann, Christoph; Berdel, Wolfgang E; Hartmann, Wolfgang; Wardelmann, Eva; Comoglio, Federico; Hansmann, Martin-Leo; Yakunin, Alexander F; Geisslinger, Gerd; Ströbel, Philipp; Ferreirós, Nerea; Serve, Hubert; Keppler, Oliver T; Cinatl, Jindrich

    2017-02-01

    The nucleoside analog cytarabine (Ara-C) is an essential component of primary and salvage chemotherapy regimens for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). After cellular uptake, Ara-C is converted into its therapeutically active triphosphate metabolite, Ara-CTP, which exerts antileukemic effects, primarily by inhibiting DNA synthesis in proliferating cells. Currently, a substantial fraction of patients with AML fail to respond effectively to Ara-C therapy, and reliable biomarkers for predicting the therapeutic response to Ara-C are lacking. SAMHD1 is a deoxynucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) triphosphohydrolase that cleaves physiological dNTPs into deoxyribonucleosides and inorganic triphosphate. Although it has been postulated that SAMHD1 sensitizes cancer cells to nucleoside-analog derivatives through the depletion of competing dNTPs, we show here that SAMHD1 reduces Ara-C cytotoxicity in AML cells. Mechanistically, dGTP-activated SAMHD1 hydrolyzes Ara-CTP, which results in a drastic reduction of Ara-CTP in leukemic cells. Loss of SAMHD1 activity-through genetic depletion, mutational inactivation of its triphosphohydrolase activity or proteasomal degradation using specialized, virus-like particles-potentiates the cytotoxicity of Ara-C in AML cells. In mouse models of retroviral AML transplantation, as well as in retrospective analyses of adult patients with AML, the response to Ara-C-containing therapy was inversely correlated with SAMHD1 expression. These results identify SAMHD1 as a potential biomarker for the stratification of patients with AML who might best respond to Ara-C-based therapy and as a target for treating Ara-C-refractory AML.

  16. AIR VEHICLE INTEGRATION AND TECHNOLOGY RESEARCH (AVIATR) Task Order 0015: Predictive Capability for Hypersonic Structural Response and Life Prediction: Phase 1-Identification of Knowledge Gaps, Volume 1: Nonproprietary Version

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    AFRL-RB-WP-TR-2010-3068,V1 AIR VEHICLE INTEGRATION AND TECHNOLOGY RESEARCH (AVIATR) Task Order 0015: Predictive Capability for Hypersonic ...Order 0015: Predictive Capability for Hypersonic Structural Response and Life Prediction: Phase 1-Identification of Knowledge Gaps, Volume 1...AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION The Boeing Company M/C 110-SK56 2600 Westminster Avenue Seal Beach , CA 90740 REPORT NUMBER 9

  17. [Potential Carbon Fixation Capability of Non-photosynthetic Microbial Community at Different Depth of the South China Sea and Its Response to Different Electron Donors].

    PubMed

    Fang, Feng; Wang, Lei; Xi, Xue-fei; Hu, Jia-jun; Fu, Xiao-hua; Lu, Bing; Xu, Dian-sheng

    2015-05-01

    The seawater samples collected from many different areas with different depth in the South China Sea were cultivated using different electron donors respectively. And the variation in the potential carbon fixation capability ( PCFC ) of non-photosynthetic microbial community (NPMC) in seawater with different depth was determined after a cycle of cultivation through the statistic analysis. In addition, the cause for the variation was clarified through analyzing key gene abundance regarding CO2 fixation and characteristics of seawater with different depth. The result showed that the PCFCs of NPMC in seawater with different depth were generally low and had no significant difference when using NaNO2 as the electron donor. The PCFC of NPMC in surface seawater was higher than that in deep seawater when using H2 as the electron donor, on the contrary, the PCFC of NPMC in deep seawater was higher than that in surface seawater when using Na2S2O3 as the electron donor. The abundance of the main CO2 fixation gene cbbL in surface seawater was higher than that in deep seawater while the cbbM gene abundance in deep seawater was higher than that in surface seawater. Most hydrogen-oxidizing bacteria had the cbbL gene, and most sulfur bacteria had the cbbM gene. The tendency of seawater cbbL/cbbM gene abundance with the change of depth revealed that there were different kinds of bacteria accounting for the majority in NPMC fixing CO2 at different depth of ocean, which led to different response of PCFC of NPMC at different depth of the sea to different electron donors. The distributions of dissolved oxygen and inorganic carbon concentration with the change of the depth of the sea might be an important reason leading to the difference of NPMC structure and even the difference of PCFC at different depth of the sea.

  18. Comparison of estimation capabilities of response surface methodology (RSM) with artificial neural network (ANN) in lipase-catalyzed synthesis of palm-based wax ester

    PubMed Central

    Basri, Mahiran; Rahman, Raja Noor Zaliha Raja Abd; Ebrahimpour, Afshin; Salleh, Abu Bakar; Gunawan, Erin Ryantin; Rahman, Mohd Basyaruddin Abd

    2007-01-01

    Background Wax esters are important ingredients in cosmetics, pharmaceuticals, lubricants and other chemical industries due to their excellent wetting property. Since the naturally occurring wax esters are expensive and scarce, these esters can be produced by enzymatic alcoholysis of vegetable oils. In an enzymatic reaction, study on modeling and optimization of the reaction system to increase the efficiency of the process is very important. The classical method of optimization involves varying one parameter at a time that ignores the combined interactions between physicochemical parameters. RSM is one of the most popular techniques used for optimization of chemical and biochemical processes and ANNs are powerful and flexible tools that are well suited to modeling biochemical processes. Results The coefficient of determination (R2) and absolute average deviation (AAD) values between the actual and estimated responses were determined as 1 and 0.002844 for ANN training set, 0.994122 and 1.289405 for ANN test set, and 0.999619 and 0.0256 for RSM training set respectively. The predicted optimum condition was: reaction time 7.38 h, temperature 53.9°C, amount of enzyme 0.149 g, and substrate molar ratio 1:3.41. The actual experimental percentage yield was 84.6% at optimum condition, which compared well to the maximum predicted value by ANN (83.9%) and RSM (85.4%). The order of effective parameters on wax ester percentage yield were; respectively, time with 33.69%, temperature with 30.68%, amount of enzyme with 18.78% and substrate molar ratio with 16.85%, whereas R2 and AAD were determined as 0.99998696 and 1.377 for ANN, and 0.99991515 and 3.131 for RSM respectively. Conclusion Though both models provided good quality predictions in this study, yet the ANN showed a clear superiority over RSM for both data fitting and estimation capabilities. PMID:17760990

  19. Lunar Capabilities Roadmap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, G. Y.; Lawrence, D. J.; Neal, C. R.; Clark, P. E.; Green, R. O.; Horanyi, M.; Johnson, M. D.; Kelso, R. M.; Sultana, M.; Thompson, D. R.

    2016-11-01

    A Lunar Capabilities Roadmap (LCR) is required to highlight capabilities critical for science and exploration of the Moon as well as beyond. The LCR will focus mainly on capabilities with examples of specific technologies to satisfy those needs.

  20. The Flt3 Internal Tandem Duplication Alters Chemotherapy Response In Vitro and In Vivo in a p53-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Pardee, Timothy S.; Zuber, Johannes; Lowe, Scott W.

    2011-01-01

    Objective The FLT3 internal tandem duplication (Flt3-ITD) confers a worse prognosis for patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML); however, the mechanisms involved are unknown. As AML is treated with cytarabine (Ara-C) and an anthracycline we sought to determine the effects of the Flt3-ITD on response to these agents. Methods A genetically defined mouse model of AML was used to examine the effects of the Flt3-ITD on response to cytarabine and doxorubicin in vitro and in vivo. Results In vitro, the Flt3-ITD conferred resistance to doxorubicin and doxorubicin plus Ara-C, but sensitivity to Ara-C alone. This resistance was reversible by the Flt3-ITD inhibitor sorafenib. The Flt3-ITD did not affect DNA damage levels following treatment but was associated with increased levels of p53. The p53 response was critical to the observed changes as the Flt3-ITD had no effect on chemotherapy response in the setting of p53 null AML. In vivo, the Flt3-ITD accelerated engraftment that was partially reversible by Ara-C but not doxorubicin. Additionally, Ara-C provided a significant reduction in disease burden and a survival advantage that was not increased by the addition of doxorubicin. Doxorubicin alone lead to only minimal disease reduction and no survival benefit. Conclusions These data demonstrate that the Flt3-ITD confers sensitivity to cytarabine, but resistance to doxorubicin in a manner that depends on p53. Thus, patients with Flt3-ITD positive AML may not benefit from treatment with an anthracycline. PMID:21288478

  1. Underwater Shock-Induced Responses of Stiffened Flat Plates: An Investigation Into the Predictive Capabilities of the USA-STAGS Code.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-01

    tourmaline crystal pressure gages rated to 10,000 psi. 34 The response ratio, R is a function of the decay constant for the charge, a, divided by the...twelve channel Ampex FR 1300 tape recorders. Calibration levels for the tourmaline crystal pressure gages were all set at the 10,000 psi theoretical...Accuracy and Response of Tourmaline Gages for Measurement of Underwater Explosion Phenomena, by Ronald B. Tussing, 1 July 1982. 17. Geers, T. L., Lockheed

  2. DNA prime Listeria boost induces a cellular immune response to SIV antigens in the rhesus macaque model that is capable of limited suppression of SIV239 viral replication.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Jean D; Robinson, Tara M; Maciag, Paulo C; Peng, Xiaohui; Johnson, Ross S; Pavlakis, George; Lewis, Mark G; Shen, Anding; Siliciano, Robert; Brown, Charles R; Weiner, David B; Paterson, Yvonne

    2005-03-01

    DNA vaccines and recombinant Listeria monocytogenes that express and secrete SIV Gag and Env antigens were combined in a nonhuman primate prime-boost immunogenicity study followed by a challenge with SIV239. We report that recombinant DNA vaccine delivered intramuscularly, and recombinant L. monocytogenes delivered orally each individually have the ability to induce CD8+ and CD4+ T cell immune responses in a nonhuman primate. Four rhesus monkeys were immunized at weeks 0, 4, 8, and 12 with the pCSIVgag and pCSIVenv DNA plasmids and boosted with SIV expressing L. monocytogenes vaccines at weeks 16, 20, and 28. Four rhesus monkeys received only the L. monocytogenes vaccines at weeks 16, 20, and 28. A final group of monkeys served as a control group. Blood samples were taken before vaccination and 2 weeks post each injection and analyzed by ELISPOT for CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses. Moderate vaccine induced SIV-specific cellular immune responses were observed following immunization with either DNA or L. monocytogenes vectors. However, the SIV antigen-specific immune responses were significantly increased when Rhesus macaques were primed with SIV DNA vaccines and boosted with the SIV expressing L. monocytogenes vectors. In addition, the combined vaccine was able to impact SIV239 viral replication following an intrarectal challenge. This study demonstrates for the first time that oral L. monocytogenes can induce a cellular immune response in a nonhuman primate and is able to enhance the efficacy of a DNA vaccine as well as provide modest protection against SIV239 challenge.

  3. Widening Participation; Widening Capability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Melanie

    2008-01-01

    This paper proposes that widening participation in higher education might distinctively be conceptualised beyond economically driven human capital outcomes, as a matter of widening capability. Specifically, the paper proposes forming the capability of students to become and to be "strong evaluators", able to make reflexive and informed…

  4. Testing and technical capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Morrow, R.W.; Dill, M.S.

    1984-05-01

    Capabilities of the following are outlined: state-of-the-art-services, measurement control and capabilities coordination, sampling and standard section, analytical technology section, environmental-industrial hygiene section, spectrochemical section, inorganic and production control section, instrumentation and control section, instrument technology, and mass spectrometry-isotopic section.

  5. XRCF Testing Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reily, Cary; Kegely, Jeff; Burdine, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Space Optics Manufacturing Technology Center's X-ray Calibration Facility has been recently modified to test Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) developmental mirrors at cryogenic temperatures (35 degrees Kelvin) while maintaining capability for performance testing of x-ray optics and detectors. The facility's current cryo-optical testing capability and potential modifications for future support of NGST will be presented.

  6. Metrology measurement capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Shroyer, K.

    1997-02-01

    Since 1958, the AlliedSignal Federal Manufacturing and Technologies (FM and T) Metrology Department has developed measurement technology and calibration capability in four major areas of measurement: (1) mechanical; (2) environmental, gas, liquid; (3) electrical (D.C., A.C., RF/Microwave); and (4) optical and radiation. The capabilities developed include unique capabilities in many areas of measurement and engineering expertise to develop measurement techniques and resolve measurement problems in these major areas. A strong audit function has been developed to provide a means to evaluate the calibration programs of the suppliers and internal calibration organizations. This evaluation includes measurement audits and technical surveys. The requirements placed on metrology require traceability of measurements to the National Institute of Standards and Technology or to nationally recognized methods or natural phenomena. A description of Metrology capabilities, traceability flow charts, and the measurement uncertainty of each of the measurement capabilities is contained in the report.

  7. A new class of inhibitors of the AraC family virulence regulator Vibrio cholerae ToxT

    PubMed Central

    Woodbrey, Anne K.; Onyango, Evans O.; Pellegrini, Maria; Kovacikova, Gabriela; Taylor, Ronald K.; Gribble, Gordon W.; Kull, F. Jon

    2017-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae is responsible for the diarrheal disease cholera that infects millions of people worldwide. While vaccines protecting against cholera exist, and oral rehydration therapy is an effective treatment method, the disease will remain a global health threat until long-term solutions such as improved sanitation and access to clean water become widely available. Because of this, there is a pressing need for potent therapeutics that can either mitigate cholera symptoms, or act prophylactically to prevent the virulent effects of a cholera infection. Here we report the design, synthesis, and characterization of a set of compounds that bind and inhibit ToxT, the transcription factor that directly regulates the two primary V. cholerae virulence factors. Using the folded structure of the monounsaturated fatty acid observed in the X-ray structure of ToxT as a template, we designed ten novel compounds that inhibit the virulence cascade to a greater degree than any known inhibitor. Our findings provide a structural and functional basis for the development of viable antivirulence therapeutics that combat cholera and, potentially, other forms of bacterial pathogenic disease. PMID:28332578

  8. Responses of Mikania micrantha, an invasive weed to elevated CO₂: induction of β-caryophyllene synthase, changes in emission capability and allelopathic potential of β-caryophyllene.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui-Long; Staehelin, Christian; Peng, Shao-Lin; Wang, Wen-Tian; Xie, Xi-Mei; Lu, Hui-Ning

    2010-10-01

    To better understand the effect of predicted elevated levels of carbon dioxide (CO₂) on an invasive weed Mikania micrantha, we constructed a suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH) library from the leaves of M. micrantha exposed to CO₂ at 350 and 750 ppm for 6 d, and isolated a novel gene named β-caryophyllene synthase. β-Caryophyllene synthase catalyses the conversion of farnesyl diphosphate to β-caryophyllene, a volatile sesquiterpene with allelopathic potential. Real-time PCR analysis revealed that gene expression of β-caryophyllene synthase in M. micrantha leaves was strongly induced in response to elevated CO₂. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and gas chromatography (GC) analyses showed that emission levels of β-caryophyllene from leaves of M. micrantha increased when exposed to 750 ppm CO₂. Bioassays showed that phytotoxicity of β-caryophyllene against Raphanus sativus, Brassica campestris, Lactuca sativa, and M. micrantha was dose-dependent and varied with the receptor plants and concentrations of CO₂. β-Caryophyllene displayed higher phytotoxic effects at 750 ppm than those at 350 ppm CO₂, especially on R. sativus. These results suggest that elevated atmospheric CO₂ levels may enhance biosynthesis and phytotoxicity of allelochemicals in M. micrantha, one of the worst invasive weeds in the world, which in turn might enhance its potential allelopathic effect on neighboring native plants if released in bioactive concentrations. Further investigations are required to determine the adaptive responses of both invasive and native plants to a gradual increase of atmospheric CO₂ to 750 ppm predicted over a 100 year period.

  9. KSC Technical Capabilities Website

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nufer, Brian; Bursian, Henry; Brown, Laurette L.

    2010-01-01

    This document is the website pages that review the technical capabilities that the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has for partnership opportunities. The purpose of this information is to make prospective customers aware of the capabilities and provide an opportunity to form relationships with the experts at KSC. The technical capabilities fall into these areas: (1) Ground Operations and Processing Services, (2) Design and Analysis Solutions, (3) Command and Control Systems / Services, (4) Materials and Processes, (5) Research and Technology Development and (6) Laboratories, Shops and Test Facilities.

  10. 3-Substituted Biquinolinium Inhibitors of AraC Family Transcriptional Activator VirF from S. flexneri Obtained Through In Situ Chemical Ionization of 3,4-Disubstituted Dihydroquinolines

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Prashi; Li, Jiaqin; Porubsky, Patrick; Neuenswander, Benjamin; Egan, Susan M.; Aubé, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    During a structure–activity relationship optimization campaign to develop an inhibitor of AraC family transcriptional activators, we discovered an unexpected transformation of a previously reported inhibitor that occurs under the assay conditions. Once placed in the assay media, the 3, 4-disubstituted dihydroquinoline core of the active analogue rapidly undergoes a decomposition reaction to a quaternary 3-substituted biquinolinium. Further examination established an SAR for this chemotype while also demonstrating its resilience to irreversible binding of biologically relevant nucleophiles. PMID:25258678

  11. Adaptive capability as indicated by endocrine and biochemical responses of Malpura ewes subjected to combined stresses (thermal and nutritional) in a semi-arid tropical environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sejian, Veerasamy; Maurya, Vijai P.; Naqvi, Sayeed M. K.

    2010-11-01

    A study was conducted to assess the effect of combined stresses (thermal and nutritional) on endocrine and biochemical responses in Malpura ewes. Twenty eight adult Malpura ewes (average body weight 33.56 kg) were used in the present study. The ewes were divided into four groups viz., GI ( n = 7; control), GII ( n = 7; thermal stress), GIII ( n = 7; nutritional stress) and GIV ( n = 7; combined stress). The animals were stall fed with a diet consisting of 60% roughage and 40% concentrate. GI and GII ewes were provided with ad libitum feeding while GIII and GIV ewes were provided with restricted feed (30% intake of GI ewes) to induce nutritional stress. GII and GIV ewes were kept in climatic chamber at 40°C and 55% RH for 6 h a day between 1000 hours and 1600 hours to induce thermal stress. The study was conducted for a period of two estrus cycles. The parameters studied were Hb, PCV, glucose, total protein, total cholesterol, ACP, ALP, cortisol, T4, T3, and insulin. Combined stress significantly ( P < 0.05) affected all parameters studied. Furthermore, the results revealed that, compared to thermal stress, nutritional stress had a less significant effect on the parameters studied. However, when both these stresses were coupled, they had a severe impact on all the parameters studied in these ewes. It can be concluded from this study that two stressors occurring simultaneously may impact severely on the biological functions necessary to maintain homeostasis in sheep.

  12. Engineering Capabilities and Partnerships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poulos, Steve

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the engineering capabilities at Johnson Space Center, The presentation also reviews the partnerships that have resulted in successfully designed and developed projects that involved commercial and educational institutions.

  13. Remote Controlled Orbiter Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garske, Michael; delaTorre, Rafael

    2007-01-01

    The Remote Control Orbiter (RCO) capability allows a Space Shuttle Orbiter to perform an unmanned re-entry and landing. This low-cost capability employs existing and newly added functions to perform key activities typically performed by flight crews and controllers during manned re-entries. During an RCO landing attempt, these functions are triggered by automation resident in the on-board computers or uplinked commands from flight controllers on the ground. In order to properly route certain commands to the appropriate hardware, an In-Flight Maintenance (IFM) cable was developed. Currently, the RCO capability is reserved for the scenario where a safe return of the crew from orbit may not be possible. The flight crew would remain in orbit and await a rescue mission. After the crew is rescued, the RCO capability would be used on the unmanned Orbiter in an attempt to salvage this national asset.

  14. Metrology measurement capability

    SciTech Connect

    Shroyer, K.

    1995-01-01

    During the past 36 years, the Kansas City Division`s (KCD) Metrology Department has developed measurement technology and calibration capability in four major areas of measurement: (1) Mechanical; (2) Environmental, Gas, Liquid; Electrical (D.C., A.C., RF/Microwave); and (3) Optical and Radiation. The capabilities developed include unique capabilities in many areas of measurement and engineering expertise to develop measurement techniques and resolve measurement problems in these major areas. KCD Metrology was established in 1958 to provide a measurement base for the Kansas City Plant. The Metrology Engineering Department provides the expertise to develop measurement capabilities for virtually any type of measurement which falls into the broad areas listed above. The engineering staff currently averages almost 19 years of measurement experience. A strong audit function has been developed to provide a means to evaluate the calibration programs of our suppliers and internal calibration organizations. This evaluation includes measurement audits and technical surveys. The requirements placed on Metrology require traceability of measurements to the National Institute of Standards and Technology or to nationally recognized methods or natural phenomena. A description of Metrology capabilities, traceability flow charts, and the measurement uncertainty of each of the measurement capabilities is contained in the following pages.

  15. Metrology measurement capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shroyer, K.

    1995-01-01

    During the past 36 years, the Kansas City Division's (KCD) Metrology Department has developed measurement technology and calibration capability in four major areas of measurement: (1) Mechanical; (2) Environmental, Gas, Liquid; Electrical (D.C., A.C., RF/Microwave); and (3) Optical and Radiation. The capabilities developed include unique capabilities in many areas of measurement and engineering expertise to develop measurement techniques and resolve measurement problems in these major areas. KCD Metrology was established in 1958 to provide a measurement base for the Kansas City Plant. The Metrology Engineering Department provides the expertise to develop measurement capabilities for virtually any type of measurement which falls into the broad areas listed above. The engineering staff currently averages almost 19 years of measurement experience. A strong audit function has been developed to provide a means to evaluate the calibration programs of our suppliers and internal calibration organizations. This evaluation includes measurement audits and technical surveys. The requirements placed on Metrology require traceability of measurements to the National Institute of Standards and Technology or to nationally recognized methods or natural phenomena. A description of Metrology capabilities, traceability flow charts, and the measurement uncertainty of each of the measurement capabilities is contained in the following pages.

  16. Metrology measurement capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, L.M.

    1997-06-01

    Since 1958, the AlliedSignal Federal Manufacturing and Technologies (FM and T) Metrology Department has developed measurement technology and calibration capability in four major areas of measurement: mechanical; environmental, gas, liquid; electrical (D.C., A.C., RF/microwave); and optical and radiation. The capabilities developed include unique capabilities in many areas of measurement and engineering expertise to develop measurement techniques and resolve measurement problems in these major areas. FM and T Metrology was established in 1958 to provide a measurement base for the Department of energy`s Kansas City Plant. The Metrology Engineering Department provides the expertise to develop measurement capabilities for virtually any type of measurement which falls into the broad areas listed above. The engineering staff currently averages almost 16 years of measurement experience. A strong audit function has been developed to provide a means to evaluate the calibration programs of the suppliers and internal calibration organizations. This evaluation includes measurement audits and technical surveys. The requirements placed on Metrology require traceability of measurements to the National Institute of Standards and Technology or to nationally recognized methods or natural phenomena. A description of Metrology capabilities, traceability flow charts, and the measurement uncertainty of each of the measurement capabilities is contained in this report.

  17. Space Logistics: Launch Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furnas, Randall B.

    1989-01-01

    The current maximum launch capability for the United States are shown. The predicted Earth-to-orbit requirements for the United States are presented. Contrasting the two indicates the strong National need for a major increase in Earth-to-orbit lift capability. Approximate weights for planned payloads are shown. NASA is studying the following options to meet the need for a new heavy-lift capability by mid to late 1990's: (1) Shuttle-C for near term (include growth versions); and (2) the Advanced Lauching System (ALS) for the long term. The current baseline two-engine Shuttle-C has a 15 x 82 ft payload bay and an expected lift capability of 82,000 lb to Low Earth Orbit. Several options are being considered which have expanded diameter payload bays. A three-engine Shuttle-C with an expected lift of 145,000 lb to LEO is being evaluated as well. The Advanced Launch System (ALS) is a potential joint development between the Air Force and NASA. This program is focused toward long-term launch requirements, specifically beyond the year 2000. The basic approach is to develop a family of vehicles with the same high reliability as the Shuttle system, yet offering a much greater lift capability at a greatly reduced cost (per pound of payload). The ALS unmanned family of vehicles will provide a low end lift capability equivalent to Titan IV, and a high end lift capability greater than the Soviet Energia if requirements for such a high-end vehicle are defined.In conclusion, the planning of the next generation space telescope should not be constrained to the current launch vehicles. New vehicle designs will be driven by the needs of anticipated heavy users.

  18. Retinoic acid conjugates as potential antitumor agents: synthesis and biological activity of conjugates with Ara-A, Ara-C, 3(2H)-furanone, and aniline mustard moieties.

    PubMed

    Manfredini, S; Simoni, D; Ferroni, R; Bazzanini, R; Vertuani, S; Hatse, S; Balzarini, J; De Clercq, E

    1997-11-07

    In a dual targeting approach, to explore the ability of tretinoin (all-trans-retinoic acid) to behave as a covalent carrier for cytotoxic entities, conjugates of retinoic acid with a few representative molecules, being important examples of antitumor pharmacophores (i.e., nucleoside analogues and alkylating agents), have been synthesized and tested for their cytostatic and differentiating activity. All compounds were stable to in vitro hydrolysis in human plasma and more lipophilic than the parent compounds, thus consenting enhanced uptake into the cells. Among the nucleoside analogues the Ara-C derivatives 3 and 6 and the Ara-A derivative 7 proved the most cytostatic (IC50 < 0.32 microgram/mL) resulting from 25- to > 144-fold more active (Ara-A derivatives) or at least as equally active (Ara-C derivatives) as compared to the parent nucleosides. Compound 3, endowed with a highly lipophilic silyl moiety at the 3' and 5' positions, showed the highest differentiating activity (54% and 44% differentiated HL-60 cells at 0.2 and 0.05 microgram/mL respectively). With regard to the retinoic acid conjugates of alkylating agents, compound 10 was the most cytostatic agent (IC50 < 0.32 microgram/mL) and the most potent differentiating agent (33-34% at 0.32 and 0.08 microgram/mL). These structures may also be regarded as analogs of either retinoic acid or the cytotoxic compound.

  19. Metrology Measurement Capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Glen E. Gronniger

    2007-10-02

    This document contains descriptions of Federal Manufacturing & Technologies (FM&T) Metrology capabilities, traceability flow charts, and the measurement uncertainty of each measurement capability. Metrology provides NIST traceable precision measurements or equipment calibration for a wide variety of parameters, ranges, and state-of-the-art uncertainties. Metrology laboratories conform to the requirements of the Department of Energy Development and Production Manual Chapter 13.2, ANSI/ISO/IEC ANSI/ISO/IEC 17025:2005, and ANSI/NCSL Z540-1. FM&T Metrology laboratories are accredited by NVLAP for the parameters, ranges, and uncertainties listed in the specific scope of accreditation under NVLAP Lab code 200108-0. See the Internet at http://ts.nist.gov/Standards/scopes/2001080.pdf. These parameters are summarized. The Honeywell Federal Manufacturing & Technologies (FM&T) Metrology Department has developed measurement technology and calibration capability in four major fields of measurement: (1) Mechanical; (2) Environmental, Gas, Liquid; (3) Electrical (DC, AC, RF/Microwave); and (4) Optical and Radiation. Metrology Engineering provides the expertise to develop measurement capabilities for virtually any type of measurement in the fields listed above. A strong audit function has been developed to provide a means to evaluate the calibration programs of our suppliers and internal calibration organizations. Evaluation includes measurement audits and technical surveys.

  20. Exploration Medical Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, Sharmila; Baumann, David; Wu, Jimmy; Barsten, Kristina

    2010-01-01

    Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC) is an element of NASA's Human Research Program (HRP). ExMC's goal is to address the risk of the Inability to Adequately Recognize or Treat an Ill or Injured Crewmember. This poster highlights the approach ExMC has taken to address this goal and our current areas of interest. The Space Medicine Exploration Medical Condition List (SMEMCL) was created to identify medical conditions of concern during exploration missions. The list was derived from space flight medical incidents, the shuttle medical checklist, the International Space Station medical checklist, and expert opinion. The conditions on the list were prioritized according to mission type by a panel comprised of flight surgeons, physician astronauts, engineers, and scientists. From the prioritized list, the ExMC element determined the capabilities needed to address the medical conditions of concern. Where such capabilities were not currently available, a gap was identified. The element s research plan outlines these gaps and the tasks identified to achieve the desired capabilities for exploration missions. This poster is being presented to inform the audience of the gaps and tasks being investigated by ExMC and to encourage discussions of shared interests and possible future collaborations.

  1. 78 FR 1154 - Onsite Emergency Response Capabilities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-08

    ... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION section of this document. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Robert H. Beall, Office of...-415-3874; email: Robert.Beall@nrc.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Accessing Information and... Agencywide Documents Access and Management System (ADAMS): You may access publicly available documents...

  2. Capitalizing on capabilities.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Dave; Smallwood, Norm

    2004-06-01

    By making the most of organizational capabilities--employees' collective skills and fields of expertise--you can dramatically improve your company's market value. Although there is no magic list of proficiencies that every organization needs in order to succeed, the authors identify 11 intangible assets that well-managed companies tend to have: talent, speed, shared mind-set and coherent brand identity, accountability, collaboration, learning, leadership, customer connectivity, strategic unity, innovation, and efficiency. Such companies typically excel in only three of these capabilities while maintaining industry parity in the other areas. Organizations that fall below the norm in any of the 11 are likely candidates for dysfunction and competitive disadvantage. So you can determine how your company fares in these categories (or others, if the generic list doesn't suit your needs), the authors explain how to conduct a "capabilities audit," describing in particular the experiences and findings of two companies that recently performed such audits. In addition to highlighting which intangible assets are most important given the organization's history and strategy, this exercise will gauge how well your company delivers on its capabilities and will guide you in developing an action plan for improvement. A capabilities audit can work for an entire organization, a business unit, or a region--indeed, for any part of a company that has a strategy to generate financial or customer-related results. It enables executives to assess overall company strengths and weaknesses, senior leaders to define strategy, midlevel managers to execute strategy, and frontline leaders to achieve tactical results. In short, it helps turn intangible assets into concrete strengths.

  3. Metrology Measurement Capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, L.M.

    2003-11-12

    This document contains descriptions of Federal Manufacturing & Technologies (FM&T) Metrology capabilities, traceability flow charts, and the measurement uncertainty of each measurement capability. Metrology provides NIST traceable precision measurements or equipment calibration for a wide variety of parameters, ranges, and state-of-the-art uncertainties. Metrology laboratories conform to the requirements of the Department of Energy Development and Production Manual Chapter 8.4, ANSI/ISO/IEC ANSI/ISO/IEC 17025:2000, and ANSI/NCSL Z540-1 (equivalent to ISO Guide 25). FM&T Metrology laboratories are accredited by NVLAP for the parameters, ranges, and uncertainties listed in the specific scope of accreditation under NVLAP Lab code 200108-0. See the Internet at http://ts.nist.gov/ts/htdocs/210/214/scopes/2001080.pdf. These parameters are summarized in the table at the bottom of this introduction.

  4. Metrology Measurement Capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, L.M.

    2000-03-23

    This document contains descriptions of Federal Manufacturing and Technologies (FM and T) Metrology capabilities, traceability flow charts, and the measurement uncertainty of each measurement capability. Metrology provides NIST traceable precision measurements or equipment calibration for a wide variety of parameters, ranges, and state-of-the-art uncertainties in laboratories that conform to the requirements of the Department of Energy Development and Production Manual Chapter 8.4, and ANSI/NCSL Z540-1 (equivalent to ISO Guide 25). FM and T Metrology laboratories are accredited by NVLAP for the parameters, ranges, and uncertainties listed in the specific scope of accreditation under NVLAP Lab code 200108-0. These parameters are summarized.

  5. Layered Composite Analysis Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanaswami, R.; Cole, J. G.

    1985-01-01

    Laminated composite material construction is gaining popularity within industry as an attractive alternative to metallic designs where high strength at reduced weights is of prime consideration. This has necessitated the development of an effective analysis capability for the static, dynamic and buckling analyses of structural components constructed of layered composites. Theoretical and user aspects of layered composite analysis and its incorporation into CSA/NASTRAN are discussed. The availability of stress and strain based failure criteria is described which aids the user in reviewing the voluminous output normally produced in such analyses. Simple strategies to obtain minimum weight designs of composite structures are discussed. Several example problems are presented to demonstrate the accuracy and user convenient features of the capability.

  6. Group Capability Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olejarski, Michael; Appleton, Amy; Deltorchio, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    The Group Capability Model (GCM) is a software tool that allows an organization, from first line management to senior executive, to monitor and track the health (capability) of various groups in performing their contractual obligations. GCM calculates a Group Capability Index (GCI) by comparing actual head counts, certifications, and/or skills within a group. The model can also be used to simulate the effects of employee usage, training, and attrition on the GCI. A universal tool and common method was required due to the high risk of losing skills necessary to complete the Space Shuttle Program and meet the needs of the Constellation Program. During this transition from one space vehicle to another, the uncertainty among the critical skilled workforce is high and attrition has the potential to be unmanageable. GCM allows managers to establish requirements for their group in the form of head counts, certification requirements, or skills requirements. GCM then calculates a Group Capability Index (GCI), where a score of 1 indicates that the group is at the appropriate level; anything less than 1 indicates a potential for improvement. This shows the health of a group, both currently and over time. GCM accepts as input head count, certification needs, critical needs, competency needs, and competency critical needs. In addition, team members are categorized by years of experience, percentage of contribution, ex-members and their skills, availability, function, and in-work requirements. Outputs are several reports, including actual vs. required head count, actual vs. required certificates, CGI change over time (by month), and more. The program stores historical data for summary and historical reporting, which is done via an Excel spreadsheet that is color-coded to show health statistics at a glance. GCM has provided the Shuttle Ground Processing team with a quantifiable, repeatable approach to assessing and managing the skills in their organization. They now have a common

  7. Cooperative Engagement Capability (CEC)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    Selected Acquisition Report (SAR) RCS: DD-A&T(Q&A)823-582 Cooperative Engagement Capability (CEC) As of FY 2017 President’s Budget Defense...RDT&E - Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation SAR - Selected Acquisition Report SCP - Service Cost Position TBD - To Be Determined TY - Then...JLENS), and select coalition partners into a single fire control quality air track picture. Radar measurement data from individual CUs within a CEC

  8. Current Range Safety Capabilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-02-01

    mission objectives, to prevent personnel injury , to minimize property damage, and to preclude incidents having the potential for international... high -speed film cameras in 16 mm, 35 mm, and 70 mm formats. These cameras can operate at frame rates from 6 to 40,000 frames per second. * Bowen ribbon...90, 180, and 360 frames per second. * Ultra- high -speed cameras capable of rates up to 4,500,000 frames per second in the framing mode or write records

  9. Ada Compiler Evaluation Capability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-05-01

    library functions may be available (and necessary) to exploit the vector processing capabilities. * Very Long Instruction Word (VLIW) machine...interested in how well the target machine instructions are utilized: Are available idioms exploited ? To answer this question, specific test problems...different pages) will also be referenced every fourth operation. This pattern can be exploited by locking the root and perhaps the first level directory

  10. Joint Forces Capabilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    for countering the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction (WMD) in space. The Space Operations Center ( SPOC ), USSPACECOM is the single point...of contact for assessing space capabilities. Combatant commanders, subordinate JFCs, and Services can access this information from the SPOC via the...special operations forces SPOC Space Operations Center SSBN fleet ballistic missile submarine SST space support team UJTL Universal Joint Task List UN

  11. Review of CFD Capabilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    growth in wind tunnel testing requirements – Increasingly sensitive/complex designs require more testing/analysis for success … – But, for fixed- wing ...been used to maintain an essentially constant number of wind tunnel test hours for the last 30 years. Also, while the number of different wing designs...not addressed directly • This study did not evaluate wind tunnel facilities or their capabilities – Comparisons between CFD and wind tunnel testing

  12. National transportable telecommunications capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boheim, Kenneth B.; Bach, Beverly

    1991-01-01

    The chance to integrate two emerging telecommunications technologies together, the Ku-band satellite communication (SATCOM) and cellular, offered the unique opportunity to package a truly stand-alone capability to reconstitute telecommuications service. Terrestrial cellular telephone services have proven to be an essential tool for dealing with local emergencies to the extent that they survive and remain operable, as in the San Francisco earthquake. Cellular telephones can provide emergency coordinators the flexibility of wireless mobility in the field via the Public Switched Network (PSN) to coordinate emergency services. However, not all areas are covered by cellular service; existing cellular and PSN service availability could be limited by the congestion and competition for the dial tone that occurs in emergencies. It was realized that a critical need exists for a rapidly deployable stand-alone cellular capability coupled with alternate connectivity to bypass congested or damaged PSN links. Existing commercial Ku-band satellite communications have provided alternate routing links in some cases to support emergency communications. An emergency operational capability was conceived that integrates these technologies into a rapidly deployable and transportable package that provides both local and long distance telephone services to an area that has suffered widespread telecommunications outages or has been totally isolated from the world.

  13. Structural reliability assessment capability in NESSUS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millwater, H.; Wu, Y.-T.

    1992-01-01

    The principal capabilities of NESSUS (Numerical Evaluation of Stochastic Structures Under Stress), an advanced computer code developed for probabilistic structural response analysis, are reviewed, and its structural reliability assessed. The code combines flexible structural modeling tools with advanced probabilistic algorithms in order to compute probabilistic structural response and resistance, component reliability and risk, and system reliability and risk. An illustrative numerical example is presented.

  14. Graphical Visualization of Human Exploration Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodgers, Erica M.; Williams-Byrd, Julie; Arney, Dale C.; Simon, Matthew A.; Williams, Phillip A.; Barsoum, Christopher; Cowan, Tyler; Larman, Kevin T.; Hay, Jason; Burg, Alex

    2016-01-01

    NASA's pioneering space strategy will require advanced capabilities to expand the boundaries of human exploration on the Journey to Mars (J2M). The Evolvable Mars Campaign (EMC) architecture serves as a framework to identify critical capabilities that need to be developed and tested in order to enable a range of human exploration destinations and missions. Agency-wide System Maturation Teams (SMT) are responsible for the maturation of these critical exploration capabilities and help formulate, guide and resolve performance gaps associated with the EMC-identified capabilities. Systems Capability Organization Reporting Engine boards (SCOREboards) were developed to integrate the SMT data sets into cohesive human exploration capability stories that can be used to promote dialog and communicate NASA's exploration investments. Each SCOREboard provides a graphical visualization of SMT capability development needs that enable exploration missions, and presents a comprehensive overview of data that outlines a roadmap of system maturation needs critical for the J2M. SCOREboards are generated by a computer program that extracts data from a main repository, sorts the data based on a tiered data reduction structure, and then plots the data according to specified user inputs. The ability to sort and plot varying data categories provides the flexibility to present specific SCOREboard capability roadmaps based on customer requests. This paper presents the development of the SCOREboard computer program and shows multiple complementary, yet different datasets through a unified format designed to facilitate comparison between datasets. Example SCOREboard capability roadmaps are presented followed by a discussion of how the roadmaps are used to: 1) communicate capability developments and readiness of systems for future missions, and 2) influence the definition of NASA's human exploration investment portfolio through capability-driven processes. The paper concludes with a description

  15. IAC - INTEGRATED ANALYSIS CAPABILITY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frisch, H. P.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of the Integrated Analysis Capability (IAC) system is to provide a highly effective, interactive analysis tool for the integrated design of large structures. With the goal of supporting the unique needs of engineering analysis groups concerned with interdisciplinary problems, IAC was developed to interface programs from the fields of structures, thermodynamics, controls, and system dynamics with an executive system and database to yield a highly efficient multi-disciplinary system. Special attention is given to user requirements such as data handling and on-line assistance with operational features, and the ability to add new modules of the user's choice at a future date. IAC contains an executive system, a data base, general utilities, interfaces to various engineering programs, and a framework for building interfaces to other programs. IAC has shown itself to be effective in automatic data transfer among analysis programs. IAC 2.5, designed to be compatible as far as possible with Level 1.5, contains a major upgrade in executive and database management system capabilities, and includes interfaces to enable thermal, structures, optics, and control interaction dynamics analysis. The IAC system architecture is modular in design. 1) The executive module contains an input command processor, an extensive data management system, and driver code to execute the application modules. 2) Technical modules provide standalone computational capability as well as support for various solution paths or coupled analyses. 3) Graphics and model generation interfaces are supplied for building and viewing models. Advanced graphics capabilities are provided within particular analysis modules such as INCA and NASTRAN. 4) Interface modules provide for the required data flow between IAC and other modules. 5) User modules can be arbitrary executable programs or JCL procedures with no pre-defined relationship to IAC. 6) Special purpose modules are included, such as MIMIC (Model

  16. Quantifying Capability Vectors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-06-01

    at night. The components that enable this capability are a 12-V dry cell battery, a lightbulb , cables, and an on/off switch. The battery is hooked...to the lightbulb by conducting cables. The cables electrically connect the battery to the lightbulb , with the on/off switch connected in-between to...Finally, each succeeding cell that is drained Switch + 1 + -T vT v Ti -T i-T / -T k Lightbulb Dry Cells Figure 2. Components Which Enable the

  17. Adaptive capability as indicated by behavioral and physiological responses, plasma HSP70 level, and PBMC HSP70 mRNA expression in Osmanabadi goats subjected to combined (heat and nutritional) stressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shilja, Shaji; Sejian, V.; Bagath, M.; Mech, A.; David, C. G.; Kurien, E. K.; Varma, Girish; Bhatta, Raghavendra

    2016-09-01

    A study was conducted to assess the impact of heat and nutritional stress simultaneously on the adaptive capability as indicated by behavioral and physiological responses, plasma heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) level, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) HSP70 gene expression in goats. Twenty-four adult Osmanabadi bucks (average body weight (BW) 16.0 kg) were used in the present study. The bucks were divided into four groups viz., C ( n = 6; control), HS ( n = 6; heat stress), NS ( n = 6; nutritional stress), and CS ( n = 6; combined stress). The study was conducted for a period of 45 days. C and HS bucks had ad libitum access to their feed while NS and CS bucks were under restricted feed (30 % intake of C bucks) to induce nutritional stress. The HS and CS bucks were exposed to solar radiation for 6 h a day between 10:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. to induce heat stress. The data was analyzed using repeated measures analysis of variance. The standing time differed significantly ( P < 0.01) between ad libitum fed groups (C and HS) and restricted feeding groups (NS and CS). The highest ( P < 0.01) lying time was recorded in the CS group while the lowest in the C and HS groups. The highest ( P < 0.01) drinking frequency was also recorded in the CS group. Water intake recorded was significantly ( P < 0.01) higher in both the HS and CS groups. The highest respiration rate (RR), pulse rate (PR), and rectal temperature (RT) during the afternoon were also recorded in the CS group. Further, skin temperature of the head, flank, and scrotum during the afternoon was also higher ( P < 0.01) in the CS group. In addition, both plasma HSP70 concentration and PBMC HSP70 messenger RNA (mRNA) transcript expression were also significantly ( P < 0.01) higher in the CS group. It can be concluded from this study that when two stressors occur simultaneously, they may have severe impact on adaptive capabilities of Osmanabadi bucks as compared to that would occur individually. Further, the

  18. Modelling and Analysis Capabilities for Lightweight Masts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-02-01

    Defence R&D Canada National Défense Defence nationale Modelling and Analysis Capabilities for Lightweight Masts T.S. Koko , D.P. Brennan, X. Luo, M.E...Modelling and Analysis Capabilities for Lightweight Masts T. S. Koko , D. P. Brennan, X. Luo, M. E. Norwood, L. Jiang, and U. O. Akpan... Koko The scientific or technical validity of this Contract Report is entirely the responsibility of the contractor and the contents do not necessarily

  19. Heterogeneity in chemical mutagen-induced chromosome damage after G2 phase exposure to bleomycin, ara-C and gentian violet in cultured lymphocytes of beta-thalassaemia traits.

    PubMed

    Krishnaja, A P; Sharma, N K

    1995-09-01

    Chemical mutagen-induced chromosome damage was analysed in cultured peripheral blood lymphocytes from beta-thalassaemia traits and healthy individuals. This was promoted by the fact that beta-thalassaemia trait is present in 1-17% of different population groups in India. To study mutagen-induced chromosome instability, G2 lymphocytes were exposed to bleomycin, ara-C or gentian violet in 48-h cultures. Spontaneous chromosome aberration frequencies in lymphocytes from beta-thalassaemia traits were found to be in the normal range. In all three clastogen-treated lymphocytes from beta-thalassaemia traits, there is a degree of hypersensitivity, when the results are averaged over a number of individuals, but some individuals overlap within the normal range. The heterogeneity in chemical mutagen sensitivity observed in beta-thalassaemia traits is discussed in terms of the oxidative damage consequent on the genetic and biochemical features peculiar to the beta-thalassaemia trait cell.

  20. Türk Lise Öğrencilerinde Okul Terkinin Yordanması: Aracı ve Etkileşim Değişkenleri ile Bir Model Testi

    PubMed Central

    Özer, Arif; Gençtanirim, Dilek; Ergene, Tuncay

    2011-01-01

    Bu araştırmada ilk olarak, dürtüsel davranma ile okulu terk etme riski arasındaki ilişkiye disiplin cezası almanın, antisosyal davranışların ve sigara-alkol kullanımının aracılık edip etmediği incelenmiştir. İkinci olarak, öğretmen desteği ve antisosyal davranış etkileşiminin okulu terk etme riski üzerindeki etkisi test edilmiştir. Araştırma grubunu 2009-2010 yılında Ankara İlinde genel liselere devam eden 478 öğrenci oluşturmuştur. Sonuçlar okulu terk etme riskini aile ve arkadaş desteğinin azalttığını, dürtüsel davranmanın ise artırdığını göstermiştir. Ayrıca disiplin cezası, alkol-sigara kullanma ve antisosyal davranışlar okulu terk etme riskini artıran aracı değişkenlerdir. Antisosyal davranışlarla okulu terk etme arasındaki ilişki öğretmen desteğine bağlı olarak değişmektedir. Öğrencilerin cinsiyet ve başarıları ile okulu terk etme riskleri arasında anlamlı bir ilişki bulunmamaktadır. PMID:22003257

  1. Facility capability assessment.

    PubMed

    McCandless, J

    1994-06-01

    An inspection and evaluation procedure has been developed to assess the capabilities of contract toxicology laboratories. This procedure has been used for the inspection of 18 different contract toxicology laboratories. There are 10 areas inspected: 1. Facility 2. Personnel 3. Operations 4. Animals/Animal Care 5. Standard Operating Procedures 6. Quality Assurance 7. Equipment 8. Test Article 9. Data 10. Archives. Each of these areas is divided into categories with each category divided further into specific topics. Points are assigned to each topic. The points earned by the laboratory reflect the inspector's assessment of the laboratory's quality in each area. Area scores are added and a percentage score for the facility is calculated. This approach provides a clear distinction among the laboratories evaluated. The facility inspection and rating system played an important role in screening laboratories when the author worked for the Atlantic Richfield Company (ARCO) corporate toxicology department. It highlighted strengths and weaknesses of individual laboratories.

  2. PHOBOS physics capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, M.D.

    1995-07-15

    PHOBOS is the name of a detector and of a research program to study systematically the physics of relativistic heavy-ion collisions over a large range of impact parameters and nuclear species. Collisions with a center mass energy of 200 A GeV at RHIC are expected to produce the highest energy densities ever accessible in the laboratory. In this writeup, the authors outline the physics capabilities of the PHOBOS detector and describe the detector design in terms of the general philosophy behind the PHOBOS research program. In order to make the discussion concrete, they then focus on two specific examples of physics measurements that they plan to make at RHIC: dN/d{eta} for charged particles and the mass spectrum from {phi} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup {minus}} decays.

  3. PHOBICS physics capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, M.D.

    1995-12-31

    PHOBOS is the name of a detector and of a research program to study systematically the physics of relativistic heavy-ion collisions over a large range of impact parameters and nuclear species. Collisions with a center of mass energy of 200 A GeV at RHIC are expected to produce the highest energy densities ever accessible in the laboratory. In this writeup, we outline the physics capabilities of the PHOBOS detector and describe the detector design in terms of the general philosophy behind the PHOBOS research program. In order to make the discussion concrete, we then focus on two specific examples of physics measurements that we plan to make at RHIC: dN/d{zeta} for charged particles and the mass spectrum from {phi}{r_arrow} K{sup +}K{sup -} decays.

  4. Nonintrusive subsurface surveying capability

    SciTech Connect

    Tunnell, T.W.; Cave, S.P.

    1994-06-01

    This presentation describes the capabilities of a ground-pentrating radar (GPR) system developed by EG&G Energy Measurements (EM), a prime contractor to the Department of Energy (DOE). The focus of the presentation will be on the subsurface survey of DOE site TA-21 in Los Alamos, New Mexico. EG&G EM developed the system for the Department of Defense. The system is owned by the Department of the Army and currently resides at KO in Albuquerque. EM is pursuing efforts to transfer this technology to environmental applications such as waste-site characterization with DOE encouragement. The Army has already granted permission to use the system for the waste-site characterization activities.

  5. General shape optimization capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chargin, Mladen K.; Raasch, Ingo; Bruns, Rudolf; Deuermeyer, Dawson

    1991-01-01

    A method is described for calculating shape sensitivities, within MSC/NASTRAN, in a simple manner without resort to external programs. The method uses natural design variables to define the shape changes in a given structure. Once the shape sensitivities are obtained, the shape optimization process is carried out in a manner similar to property optimization processes. The capability of this method is illustrated by two examples: the shape optimization of a cantilever beam with holes, loaded by a point load at the free end (with the shape of the holes and the thickness of the beam selected as the design variables), and the shape optimization of a connecting rod subjected to several different loading and boundary conditions.

  6. Capability 9.4 Servicing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moe, Rud

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents viewgraphs on capability structure 9.4 servicing. The topics include: 1) Servicing Description; 2) Benefits of Servicing; 3) Drivers & Assumptions for Servicing; 4) Capability Breakdown Structure 9.4 Servicing; 5) Roadmap for Servicing; 6) 9.4 Servicing Critical Gaps; 7) Capability 9.4 Servicing; 8) Capability 9.4.1 Inspection; 9) State-of-the-Art /Maturity Level /Capabilities for 9.4.1 Inspection; 10) Capability 9.4.2 Diagnostics; 11) State-of-the-Art/Maturity Level /Capabilities for 9.4.2 Diagnostics; 12) Capability 9.4.3 Perform Planned Maintenance; 13) State-of-the-Art /Maturity Level /Capabilities for 9.4.3 Perform Planned Maintenance; 14) Capability 9.4.4 Perform Unplanned Repair; 15) State-of-the-Art /Maturity Level /Capabilities for 9.4.4 Perform Unplanned Repair; 16) Capability 9.4.5 Install Upgrade; 17) Capability 9.4.5 Install Upgrade; 18) State-of-the-Art /Maturity Level /Capabilities for 9.4.5 Install Upgrade; 19) Capability 9.4.6 Planning, Logistics, Training; and 20) State-of-the-Art /Maturity Level /Capabilities for 9.4.6 Planning, Logistics, & Training;

  7. Enhanced ocean observational capability

    SciTech Connect

    Volpe, A M; Esser, B K

    2000-01-10

    Coastal oceans are vital to world health and sustenance. Technology that enables new observations has always been the driver of discovery in ocean sciences. In this context, we describe the first at sea deployment and operation of an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICPMS) for continuous measurement of trace elements in seawater. The purpose of these experiments was to demonstrate that an ICPMS could be operated in a corrosive and high vibration environment with no degradation in performance. Significant advances occurred this past year due to ship time provided by Scripps Institution of Oceanography (UCSD), as well as that funded through this project. Evaluation at sea involved performance testing and characterization of several real-time seawater analysis modes. We show that mass spectrometers can rapidly, precisely and accurately determine ultratrace metal concentrations in seawater, thus allowing high-resolution mapping of large areas of surface seawater. This analytical capability represents a significant advance toward real-time observation and understanding of water mass chemistry in dynamic coastal environments. In addition, a joint LLNL-SIO workshop was convened to define and design new technologies for ocean observation. Finally, collaborative efforts were initiated with atmospheric scientists at LLNL to identify realistic coastal ocean and river simulation models to support real-time analysis and modeling of hazardous material releases in coastal waterways.

  8. Mobile systems capability plan

    SciTech Connect

    1996-09-01

    This plan was prepared to initiate contracting for and deployment of these mobile system services. 102,000 cubic meters of retrievable, contact-handled TRU waste are stored at many sites around the country. Also, an estimated 38,000 cubic meters of TRU waste will be generated in the course of waste inventory workoff and continuing DOE operations. All the defense TRU waste is destined for disposal in WIPP near Carlsbad NM. To ship TRU waste there, sites must first certify that the waste meets WIPP waste acceptance criteria. The waste must be characterized, and if not acceptable, subjected to additional processing, including repackaging. Most sites plan to use existing fixed facilities or open new ones between FY1997-2006 to perform these functions; small-quantity sites lack this capability. An alternative to fixed facilities is the use of mobile systems mounted in trailers or skids, and transported to sites. Mobile systems will be used for all characterization and certification at small sites; large sites can also use them. The Carlsbad Area Office plans to pursue a strategy of privatization of mobile system services, since this offers a number of advantages. To indicate the possible magnitude of the costs of deploying mobile systems, preliminary estimates of equipment, maintenance, and operating costs over a 10-year period were prepared and options for purchase, lease, and privatization through fixed-price contracts considered.

  9. Advanced CLIPS capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Gary

    1991-01-01

    The C Language Integrated Production System (CLIPS) is a forward chaining rule based language developed by NASA. CLIPS was designed specifically to provide high portability, low cost, and easy integration with external systems. The current release of CLIPS, version 4.3, is being used by over 2500 users throughout the public and private community. The primary addition to the next release of CLIPS, version 5.0, will be the CLIPS Object Oriented Language (COOL). The major capabilities of COOL are: class definition with multiple inheritance and no restrictions on the number, types, or cardinality of slots; message passing which allows procedural code bundled with an object to be executed; and query functions which allow groups of instances to be examined and manipulated. In addition to COOL, numerous other enhancements were added to CLIPS including: generic functions (which allow different pieces of procedural code to be executed depending upon the types or classes of the arguments); integer and double precision data type support; multiple conflict resolution strategies; global variables; logical dependencies; type checking on facts; full ANSI compiler support; and incremental reset for rules.

  10. A real-time emergency response workstation using a 3-D numerical model initialized with sodar

    SciTech Connect

    Lawver, B.S.; Sullivan, T.J.; Baskett, R.L.

    1993-01-28

    Many emergency response dispersion modeling systems provide simple Gaussian models driven by single meteorological tower inputs to estimate the downwind consequences from accidental spills or stack releases. Complex meteorological or terrain settings demand more sophisticated resolution of the three-dimensional structure of the atmosphere to reliably calculate plume dispersion. Mountain valleys and sea breeze flows are two common examples of such settings. To address these complexities, the authors have implemented the three-dimensional diagnostic MATHEW mass-adjusted wind field and ADPIC particle-in-cell dispersion models on a workstation for use in real-time emergency response modeling. MATHEW/ADPIC have shown their utility in a variety of complex settings over the last 15 years within the Department of Energy`s Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) project. The models are initialized using an array of surface wind measurements from meteorological towers coupled with vertical profiles from an acoustic sounder (sodar). The workstation automatically acquires the meteorological data every 15 minutes. A source term is generated using either defaults or a real-time stack monitor. Model outputs include contoured isopleths displayed on site geography or plume densities shown over 3-D color shaded terrain. The models are automatically updated every 15 minutes to provide the emergency response manager with a continuous display of potentially hazardous ground-level conditions if an actual release were to occur. Model run time is typically less than 2 minutes on 6 megaflop ({approximately}30 MIPS) workstations. Data acquisition, limited by dial-up modem communications, requires 3 to 5 minutes.

  11. Generating color terrain images in an emergency response system

    SciTech Connect

    Belles, R.D.

    1985-08-01

    The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) provides real-time assessments of the consequences resulting from an atmospheric release of radioactive material. In support of this operation, a system has been created which integrates numerical models, data acquisition systems, data analysis techniques, and professional staff. Of particular importance is the rapid generation of graphical images of the terrain surface in the vicinity of the accident site. A terrain data base and an associated acquisition system have been developed that provide the required terrain data. This data is then used as input to a collection of graphics programs which create and display realistic color images of the terrain. The graphics system currently has the capability of generating color shaded relief images from both overhead and perspective viewpoints within minutes. These images serve to quickly familiarize ARAC assessors with the terrain near the release location, and thus permit them to make better informed decisions in modeling the behavior of the released material. 7 refs., 8 figs.

  12. Leak detection capability in CANDU reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Azer, N.; Barber, D.H.; Boucher, P.J.

    1997-04-01

    This paper addresses the moisture leak detection capability of Ontario Hydro CANDU reactors which has been demonstrated by performing tests on the reactor. The tests confirmed the response of the annulus gas system (AGS) to the presence of moisture injected to simulate a pressure tube leak and also confirmed the dew point response assumed in leak before break assessments. The tests were performed on Bruce A Unit 4 by injecting known and controlled rates of heavy water vapor. To avoid condensation during test conditions, the amount of moisture which could be injected was small (2-3.5 g/hr). The test response demonstrated that the AGS is capable of detecting and annunciating small leaks. Thus confidence is provided that it would alarm for a growing pressure tube leak where the leak rate is expected to increase to kg/hr rapidly. The measured dew point response was close to that predicted by analysis.

  13. LANL Analytical and Radiochemistry Capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Steiner, Robert E.; Burns, Carol J.; Lamont, Stephen P.; Tandon, Lav

    2012-07-27

    The overview of this presentation is: (1) Introduction to nonproliferation efforts; (2) Scope of activities Los Alamos National Laboratory; (3) Facilities for radioanalytical work at LANL; (4) Radiochemical characterization capabilities; and (5) Bulk chemical and materials analysis capabilities.

  14. Small rover exploration capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salotti, Jean-Marc; Laithier, Corentin; Machut, Benoit; Marie, Aurélien; Bruneau, Audrey; Grömer, Gernot; Foing, Bernard H.

    2015-05-01

    For a human mission to the Moon or Mars, an important question is to determine the best strategy for the choice of surface vehicles. Recent studies suggest that the first missions to Mars will be strongly constrained and that only small unpressurized vehicles will be available. We analyze the exploration capabilities and limitations of small surface vehicles from the user perspective. Following the “human centered design” paradigm, the team focused on human systems interactions and conducted the following experiments: - Another member of our team participated in the ILEWG EuroMoonMars 2013 simulation at the Mars Desert Research Station in Utah during the same period of time. Although the possible traverses were restricted, a similar study with analog space suits and quads has been carried out. - Other experiments have been conducted in an old rock quarry close to Bordeaux, France. An expert in the use of quads for all types of terrains performed a demonstration and helped us to characterize the difficulties, the risks and advantages and drawbacks of different vehicles and tools. The vehicles that will be used on the surface of Mars have not been defined yet. Nevertheless, the results of our project already show that using a light and unpressurized vehicle (in the order of 150 kg) for the mobility on the Martian surface can be a true advantage. Part of the study was dedicated to the search for appropriate tools that could be used to make

  15. Advanced capability RFID system

    DOEpatents

    Gilbert, Ronald W.; Steele, Kerry D.; Anderson, Gordon A.

    2007-09-25

    A radio-frequency transponder device having an antenna circuit configured to receive radio-frequency signals and to return modulated radio-frequency signals via continuous wave backscatter, a modulation circuit coupled to the antenna circuit for generating the modulated radio-frequency signals, and a microprocessor coupled to the antenna circuit and the modulation circuit and configured to receive and extract operating power from the received radio-frequency signals and to monitor inputs on at least one input pin and to generate responsive signals to the modulation circuit for modulating the radio-frequency signals. The microprocessor can be configured to generate output signals on output pins to associated devices for controlling the operation thereof. Electrical energy can be extracted and stored in an optional electrical power storage device.

  16. Integrated Urban Dispersion Modeling Capability

    SciTech Connect

    Kosovic, B; Chan, S T

    2003-11-03

    Numerical simulations represent a unique predictive tool for developing a detailed understanding of three-dimensional flow fields and associated concentration distributions from releases in complex urban settings (Britter and Hanna 2003). The accurate and timely prediction of the atmospheric dispersion of hazardous materials in densely populated urban areas is a critical homeland and national security need for emergency preparedness, risk assessment, and vulnerability studies. The main challenges in high-fidelity numerical modeling of urban dispersion are the accurate prediction of peak concentrations, spatial extent and temporal evolution of harmful levels of hazardous materials, and the incorporation of detailed structural geometries. Current computational tools do not include all the necessary elements to accurately represent hazardous release events in complex urban settings embedded in high-resolution terrain. Nor do they possess the computational efficiency required for many emergency response and event reconstruction applications. We are developing a new integrated urban dispersion modeling capability, able to efficiently predict dispersion in diverse urban environments for a wide range of atmospheric conditions, temporal and spatial scales, and release event scenarios. This new computational fluid dynamics capability includes adaptive mesh refinement and it can simultaneously resolve individual buildings and high-resolution terrain (including important vegetative and land-use features), treat complex building and structural geometries (e.g., stadiums, arenas, subways, airplane interiors), and cope with the full range of atmospheric conditions (e.g. stability). We are developing approaches for seamless coupling with mesoscale numerical weather prediction models to provide realistic forcing of the urban-scale model, which is critical to its performance in real-world conditions.

  17. Capabilities and Incapabilities of the Capabilities Approach to Health Justice.

    PubMed

    Selgelid, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    This first part of this article critiques Sridhar Venkatapuram's conception of health as a capability. It argues that Venkatapuram relies on the problematic concept of dignity, implies that those who are unhealthy lack lives worthy of dignity (which seems politically incorrect), sets a low bar for health, appeals to metaphysically problematic thresholds, fails to draw clear connections between appealed-to capabilities and health, and downplays the importance/relevance of health functioning. It concludes by questioning whether justice entitlements should pertain to the capability for health versus health achievements, challenging Venkatapuram's claims about the strength of health entitlements, and demonstrating that the capabilities approach is unnecessary to address social determinants of health.

  18. Facility Interface Capability Assessment (FICA) project report

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, R.B.; MacDonald, R.R.; Viebrock, J.M.; Mote, N.

    1995-09-01

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) is responsible for developing the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) to accept spent nuclear fuel from commercial facilities. The objective of the Facility Interface Capability Assessment (FICA) project was to assess the capability of each commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) storage facility, at which SNF is stored, to handle various SNF shipping casks. The purpose of this report is to present and analyze the results of the facility assessments completed within the FICA project. During Phase 1, the data items required to complete the facility assessments were identified and the database for the project was created. During Phase 2, visits were made to 122 facilities on 76 sites to collect data and information, the database was updated, and assessments of the cask-handling capabilities at each facility were performed. Each assessment of cask-handling capability contains three parts: the current capability of the facility (planning base); the potential enhanced capability if revisions were made to the facility licensing and/or administrative controls; and the potential enhanced capability if limited physical modifications were made to the facility. The main conclusion derived from the planning base assessments is that the current facility capabilities will not allow handling of any of the FICA Casks at 49 of the 122 facilities evaluated. However, consideration of potential revisions and/or modifications showed that all but one of the 49 facilities could be adapted to handle at least one of the FICA Casks. For this to be possible, facility licensing, administrative controls, and/or physical aspects of the facility would need to be modified.

  19. Transit satellite system timing capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finsod, T. D.

    1978-01-01

    Current time transfer capabilities of the Transit Satellite System are reviewed. Potential improvements in the changes in equipment and operational procedures using operational satellites are discussed.

  20. Facility Interface Capability Assessment (FICA) summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Viebrock, J.M.; Mote, N.; Pope, R.B.

    1992-05-01

    The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) is responsible for developing the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) to accept spent nuclear fuel from the commercial facilities. In support of the development of the CRWMS, OCRWM sponsored the Facility Interface Capability Assessment (FICA) project. The objective of this project was to assess the capability of each commercial facility to handle various spent nuclear fuel shipping casks. The purpose of this report is to summarize the results of the facility assessments completed within the FICA project. The project was conducted in two phases. During Phase I, the data items required to complete the facility assessments were identified and the data base for the project was created. During Phase II, visits were made to 122 facilities on 76 sites to collect data and information, the data base was updated, and assessments of the cask-handling capabilities at each facility were performed.

  1. Influences of mechanical exposure biographies on physical capabilities of workers from automotive industry - a study on possible dose-response relationships and consequences for short and long term job rotation.

    PubMed

    Rademacher, Holger; Bruder, Ralph; Sinn-Behrendt, Andrea; Landau, Kurt

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a field study in production areas of a vehicle manufacturing plant, where 106 male workers (aged from 20 to 63 years) were examined and interviewed by the authors. Aim of study was to identify relationships between specific physical worker capabilities and doses of mechanical exposures using self-developed standardized questionnaires as well as a battery of work-specific tests. The dependent variables are different "physical capabilities", classified using a five-point rating scale with regard to the grade of limitation of the respective capability. Independent variables are "age" and specific "mechanical exposures". Several exposures were combined and multiplied with their respective durations in order to determine doses on three different body regions - back, shoulder-neck and upper limbs. There are significant positive correlations between "age" and "dose of mechanical exposure on back/shoulder-neck/upper limbs region". The analysis of the relationship between dose of exposure and different capabilities to lift or reposition loads (with variable weight) shows weak significant correlations for all three body regions. Data analysis shows no significant correlations between any dose of mechanical exposure and capabilities to work in awkward body postures.These results should be considered in age management programs when scheduling future employee assignments to workplaces, especially for production systems where manual handling tasks are dominant.

  2. Indigenous Research Capability in Aotearoa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ormond, Adreanne; Williams, Les R. Tumoana

    2013-01-01

    This article begins by considering the general nature of capability, from some dictionary meanings, then extends to theoretical perspectives related to the capability approach. As a consequence, we arrive at an operational definition that emphasises the ability to solve problems in a systematic way that brings transformation. In these terms,…

  3. Connecting Curriculum, Capabilities and Careers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Ian; Depasquale, James

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The reported research aims to examine the extent to which sustainability capabilities have been delivered by a specific example of Education for Sustainability (EfS) and Education for Sustainable Development (ESD), and how important the capabilities have been in the workplace. Design/methodology/approach Students who participated in an…

  4. NASA Capability Roadmaps Executive Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willcoxon, Rita; Thronson, Harley; Varsi, Guilio; Mueller, Robert; Regenie, Victoria; Inman, Tom; Crooke, Julie; Coulter, Dan

    2005-01-01

    This document is the result of eight months of hard work and dedication from NASA, industry, other government agencies, and academic experts from across the nation. It provides a summary of the capabilities necessary to execute the Vision for Space Exploration and the key architecture decisions that drive the direction for those capabilities. This report is being provided to the Exploration Systems Architecture Study (ESAS) team for consideration in development of an architecture approach and investment strategy to support NASA future mission, programs and budget requests. In addition, it will be an excellent reference for NASA's strategic planning. A more detailed set of roadmaps at the technology and sub-capability levels are available on CD. These detailed products include key driving assumptions, capability maturation assessments, and technology and capability development roadmaps.

  5. MCNP: Multigroup/adjoint capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, J.C.; Redmond, E.L. II; Palmtag, S.P.; Hendricks, J.S.

    1994-04-01

    This report discusses various aspects related to the use and validity of the general purpose Monte Carlo code MCNP for multigroup/adjoint calculations. The increased desire to perform comparisons between Monte Carlo and deterministic codes, along with the ever-present desire to increase the efficiency of large MCNP calculations has produced a greater user demand for the multigroup/adjoint capabilities. To more fully utilize these capabilities, we review the applications of the Monte Carlo multigroup/adjoint method, describe how to generate multigroup cross sections for MCNP with the auxiliary CRSRD code, describe how to use the multigroup/adjoint capability in MCNP, and provide examples and results indicating the effectiveness and validity of the MCNP multigroup/adjoint treatment. This information should assist users in taking advantage of the MCNP multigroup/adjoint capabilities.

  6. Capability 9.2 Mobility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zakrasjek, June

    2005-01-01

    Modern operational concepts require significant bandwidths and multipoint communication capabilities. Provide voice, video and data communications among vehicles moving along the surface, vehicles in suborbital transport or reconnaissance, surface elements, and home planet facilities.

  7. Soviet Naval War Fighting Capabilities,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-10-01

    This paper attempts to determine the levels of major Soviet combat forces in each of the ocean areas of the world and assess the capability of those forces to conduct warfighting operations from a standing, walking, or running start.

  8. Capability Test Design and Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-13

    UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Joint Test and Evaluation Methodology (JTEM),Washington,DC,20301 8. PERFORMING...refinement process for testing in a joint environment (TIJE) 2. Review the methods and processes for an evaluation strategy refinement process 3...Environment System Design Document (SDD) JTEM Capability Test Methodology (CTM) v2.0 Event Management Plan Test Plan Joint Capability Evaluation (JCE

  9. Earth Science Capability Demonstration Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cobleigh, Brent

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation reviewing the Earth Science Capability Demonstration Project is shown. The contents include: 1) ESCD Project; 2) Available Flight Assets; 3) Ikhana Procurement; 4) GCS Layout; 5) Baseline Predator B Architecture; 6) Ikhana Architecture; 7) UAV Capability Assessment; 8) The Big Picture; 9) NASA/NOAA UAV Demo (5/05 to 9/05); 10) NASA/USFS Western States Fire Mission (8/06); and 11) Suborbital Telepresence.

  10. Capabilities of electrodynamic shakers when used for mechanical shock testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keegan, W. B.

    1973-01-01

    The results of a research task to investigate the capabilities of electrodynamic vibrators (shakers) to perform mechanical shock tests are presented. The simulation method employed was that of developing a transient whose shock response spectrum matched the desired shock response spectrum. Areas investigated included the maximum amplitude capabilities of the shaker systems, the ability to control the shape of the resultant shock response spectrum, the response levels induced at frequencies outside the controlled bandwidth, and the nonlinearities in structural response induced by a change in test level.

  11. Can capabilities be self-reported? A think aloud study

    PubMed Central

    Al-Janabi, Hareth; Keeley, Thomas; Mitchell, Paul; Coast, Joanna

    2013-01-01

    Direct assessment of capability to function may be useful in healthcare settings, but poses many challenges. This paper reports a first investigation of the feasibility of individuals self-reporting their capabilities and the meaning of the responses. The study was conducted in 2010, using think-aloud interviews with participants in the UK. The findings of the study suggest that the majority of participants were able to comprehend questions about their capabilities, felt able to judge their own capability wellbeing and provided responses in line with this judgement. In a number of cases, for example in relation to ‘autonomy’, participants highlighted that their capability was potentially greater than their functioning. The findings also show varying interpretations of the capability concept, with some participants finding the capability concept unintuitive in relation to specific aspects of life (in particular, ‘attachment’). The findings suggest that guiding individuals in the process of identifying their capabilities may be important in generating consistent responses to capability questions. PMID:23631786

  12. Vulnerability, Health Agency and Capability to Health.

    PubMed

    Straehle, Christine

    2016-01-01

    One of the defining features of the capability approach (CA) to health, as developed in Venkatapuram's book Health Justice, is its aim to enable individual health agency. Furthermore, the CA to health hopes to provide a strong guideline for assessing the health-enabling content of social and political conditions. In this article, I employ the recent literature on the liberal concept of vulnerability to assess the CA. I distinguish two kinds of vulnerability. Considering circumstantial vulnerability, I argue that liberal accounts of vulnerability concerned with individual autonomy, align with the CA to health. Individuals should, as far as possible, be able to make health-enabling decisions about their lives, and their capability to do so should certainly not be hindered by public policy. The CA to health and a vulnerability-based analysis then work alongside to define moral responsibilities and designate those who hold them. Both approaches demand social policy to address circumstances that hinder individuals from taking health-enabling decisions. A background condition of vulnerability, on the other hand, even though it hampers the capability for health, does not warrant the strong moral claim proposed by the CA to health to define health as a meta-capability that should guide social policy. Nothing in our designing social policy could change the challenge to health agency when we deal with background conditions of vulnerability.

  13. Accelerator and electrodynamics capability review

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Kevin W

    2010-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) uses capability reviews to assess the science, technology and engineering (STE) quality and institutional integration and to advise Laboratory Management on the current and future health of the STE. Capability reviews address the STE integration that LANL uses to meet mission requirements. The Capability Review Committees serve a dual role of providing assessment of the Laboratory's technical contributions and integration towards its missions and providing advice to Laboratory Management. The assessments and advice are documented in reports prepared by the Capability Review Committees that are delivered to the Director and to the Principal Associate Director for Science, Technology and Engineering (PADSTE). Laboratory Management will use this report for STE assessment and planning. LANL has defined fifteen STE capabilities. Electrodynamics and Accelerators is one of the seven STE capabilities that LANL Management (Director, PADSTE, technical Associate Directors) has identified for review in Fiscal Year (FY) 2010. Accelerators and electrodynamics at LANL comprise a blend of large-scale facilities and innovative small-scale research with a growing focus on national security applications. This review is organized into five topical areas: (1) Free Electron Lasers; (2) Linear Accelerator Science and Technology; (3) Advanced Electromagnetics; (4) Next Generation Accelerator Concepts; and (5) National Security Accelerator Applications. The focus is on innovative technology with an emphasis on applications relevant to Laboratory mission. The role of Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) in support of accelerators/electrodynamics will be discussed. The review provides an opportunity for interaction with early career staff. Program sponsors and customers will provide their input on the value of the accelerator and electrodynamics capability to the Laboratory mission.

  14. Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Chris

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the author's response to the reviews of his book, "The Good Life of Teaching: An Ethics of Professional Practice." He begins by highlighting some of the main concerns of his book. He then offers a brief response, doing his best to address the main criticisms of his argument and noting where the four reviewers (Charlene…

  15. Towards expanding megasonic cleaning capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Zhenxing; Ferstl, Berthold; Oetter, Günter; Dietze, Uwe; Samayoa, Martin; Dattilo, Davide

    2016-10-01

    Megasonic cleaning remains the industry's workhorse technology for particle removal on advanced 193i and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) photomasks. Several megasonic cleaning technologies and chemistries have been proposed and implemented over the years in diverse production environments. The operational range of these process technologies, over a wide array of applications, is ultimately defined by measurable capability limits. As geometries continue to scale-down and new materials are introduced, existing cleaning technologies will naturally fade out of range and new capability is ultimately required. This paper presents a novel fundamental approach for expanding cleaning capability by use of high-frequency megasonics and tenside-based additives (BASF SELECTIPUR C-series). To this end, a sonoluminescence-based experimental test bench was configured to characterize and study the effects of various process parameters on cleaning performance, with a particular emphasis on cavitation-induced damage and enhancement of particle removal capabilities. The results from the fundamental studies provide a path forward towards delivering new cleaning capability by enabling high-frequency megasonic systems and tenside-based additives.

  16. Exploring unconventional capabilities of holographic tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, R. J.; Pagliusi, P.; Provenzano, C.; Cipparrone, G.

    2011-06-01

    We report an investigation of manipulation and trapping capabilities of polarization holographic tweezers. A polarization gradient connected with a modulation of the ellipticity shows an optical force related to the polarization of the light that can influence optically isotropic particles. While in the case of birefringent particles an unconventional trapping in circularly polarized fringes is observed. A liquid crystal emulsion has been adopted to investigate the capabilities of the holographic tweezers. The unusual trapping observed for rotating bipolar nematic droplets has suggested the involvement of the lift hydrodynamic force responsible of the Magnus effect, originating from the peculiar optical force field. We show that the Magnus force which is ignored in the common approach can contribute to unconventional optohydrodynamic trapping and manipulation.

  17. Physical capability scale: psychometric testing.

    PubMed

    Resnick, Barbara; Boltz, Marie; Galik, Elizabeth; Wells, Chris

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the psychometric testing of the Basic Physical Capability Scale. The study was a secondary data analysis of combined data sets from three studies. Study participants included 93 older adults, recruited from 2 acute-care settings and 110 older adults living in long-term care facilities. Rasch analysis was used for the testing of the measurement model. There was some support for construct validity based on the fit of the items to the scale across both samples. In addition, there was support for hypothesis testing as physical function was significantly associated with physical capability. There was evidence for internal consistency (Alpha coefficients of .77-.83) and interrater reliability based on an intraclass correlation of .81. This study provided preliminary support for the reliability and validity of the Basic Physical Capability Scale, and guidance for scale revisions and continued use.

  18. A Bayesian-style approach to estimating LISA science capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, John; Marsat, Sylvain

    2017-01-01

    A full understanding of LISA's science capability will require accurate models of incident waveform signals and the instrumental response. While Fisher matrix analysis is useful for some estimates, a Bayesian characterization of simulated probability distributions is needed for understanding important cases at the limit of LISA's capability. We apply fast analysis algorithms enabling accurate treatment using EOB waveforms with relevant higher modes and the full-featured LISA response to study these aspects of LISA science capability. Supported by NASA grant 11-ATP-046.

  19. NUCLEAR INCIDENT CAPABILITIES, KNOWLEDGE & ENABLER LEVERAGING

    SciTech Connect

    Kinney, J.; Newman, J.; Goodwyn, A.; Dewes, J.

    2011-04-18

    The detonation of a 10 Kiloton Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) is a serious scenario that the United States must be prepared to address. The likelihood of a single nuclear bomb exploding in a single city is greater today than at the height of the Cold War. Layered defenses against domestic nuclear terrorism indicate that our government continues to view the threat as credible. The risk of such an event is further evidenced by terrorists desire to acquire nuclear weapons. The act of nuclear terrorism, particularly an act directed against a large population center in the United States, will overwhelm the capabilities of many local and state governments to respond, and will seriously challenge existing federal response capabilities. A 10 Kiloton IND detonation would cause total infrastructure damage in a 3-mile radius and levels of radiation spanning out 3,000 square miles. In a densely populated urban area, the anticipated casualties would be in excess of several hundred thousand. Although there would be enormous loss of life, housing and infrastructure, an IND detonation is a recoverable event. We can reduce the risk of these high-consequence, nontraditional threats by enhancing our nuclear detection architecture and establishing well planned and rehearsed plans for coordinated response. It is also important for us to identify new and improved ways to foster collaboration regarding the response to the IND threat to ensure the demand and density of expertise required for such an event is postured and prepared to mobilize, integrate, and support a myriad of anticipated challenges. We must be prepared to manage the consequences of such an event in a deliberate manner and get beyond notions of total devastation by adopting planning assumptions around survivability and resiliency. Planning for such a scenario needs to be decisive in determining a response based on competencies and desired outcomes. It is time to synthesize known threats and plausible consequences into

  20. Medical vest broadens treatment capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, G. S.

    1970-01-01

    Universal sized vest, with specially tailored pockets designed to hold medical supplies, provides first aid/first care medical teams with broadened on-site capability. Vest is made of nylon, tough fibrous materials, and polyvinyl chloride. Design facilitates rapid donning, doffing, and adjustment.

  1. Research for new UAV capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.; Leadabrand, R.

    1996-07-01

    This paper discusses research for new Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) capabilities. Findings indicate that UAV performance could be greatly enhanced by modest research. Improved sensors and communications enhance near term cost effectiveness. Improved engines, platforms, and stealth improve long term effectiveness.

  2. A comparison of clofarabine with ara-C, each in combination with daunorubicin as induction treatment in older patients with acute myeloid leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Burnett, A K; Russell, N H; Hills, R K; Kell, J; Nielsen, O J; Dennis, M; Cahalin, P; Pocock, C; Ali, S; Burns, S; Freeman, S; Milligan, D; Clark, R E

    2017-01-01

    The study was designed to compare clofarabine plus daunorubicin vs daunorubicin/ara-C in older patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Eight hundred and six untreated patients in the UK NCRI AML16 trial with AML/high-risk MDS (median age, 67 years; range 56–84) and normal serum creatinine were randomised to two courses of induction chemotherapy with either daunorubicin/ara-C (DA) or daunorubicin/clofarabine (DClo). Patients were also included in additional randomisations; ± one dose of gemtuzumab ozogamicin in course 1; 2v3 courses and ± azacitidine maintenance. The primary end point was overall survival. The overall response rate was 69% (complete remission (CR) 60% CRi 9%), with no difference between DA (71%) and DClo (66%). There was no difference in 30-/60-day mortality or toxicity: significantly more supportive care was required in the DA arm even though platelet and neutrophil recovery was significantly slower with DClo. There were no differences in cumulative incidence of relapse (74% vs 68% hazard ratio (HR) 0.93 (0.77–1.14), P=0.5); survival from relapse (7% vs 9% HR 0.96 (0.77–1.19), P=0.7); relapse-free (31% vs 32% HR 1.02 (0.83–1.24), P=0.9) or overall survival (23% vs 22% HR 1.08 (0.93–1.26), P=0.3). Clofarabine 20 mg/m2 given for 5 days with daunorubicin is not superior to ara-C+daunorubicin as induction for older patients with AML/high-risk MDS. PMID:27624670

  3. Machine Learning Capabilities of a Simulated Cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Hausknecht, Matthew; Li, Wen-Ke; Mauk, Michael; Stone, Peter

    2017-03-01

    This paper describes the learning and control capabilities of a biologically constrained bottom-up model of the mammalian cerebellum. Results are presented from six tasks: 1) eyelid conditioning; 2) pendulum balancing; 3) proportional-integral-derivative control; 4) robot balancing; 5) pattern recognition; and 6) MNIST handwritten digit recognition. These tasks span several paradigms of machine learning, including supervised learning, reinforcement learning, control, and pattern recognition. Results over these six domains indicate that the cerebellar simulation is capable of robustly identifying static input patterns even when randomized across the sensory apparatus. This capability allows the simulated cerebellum to perform several different supervised learning and control tasks. On the other hand, both reinforcement learning and temporal pattern recognition prove problematic due to the delayed nature of error signals and the simulator's inability to solve the credit assignment problem. These results are consistent with previous findings which hypothesize that in the human brain, the basal ganglia is responsible for reinforcement learning, while the cerebellum handles supervised learning.

  4. LOFT Augmented Operator Capability Program

    SciTech Connect

    Hollenbeck, D.A.; Krantz, E.A.; Hunt, G.L.; Meyer, O.R.

    1980-01-01

    The outline of the LOFT Augmented Operator Capability Program is presented. This program utilizes the LOFT (Loss-of-Fluid Test) reactor facility which is located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and the LOFT operational transient experiment series as a test bed for methods of enhancing the reactor operator's capability for safer operation. The design of an Operational Diagnotics and Display System is presented which was backfit to the existing data acquisition computers. Basic color-graphic displays of the process schematic and trend type are presented. In addition, displays were developed and are presented which represent safety state vector information. A task analysis method was applied to LOFT reactor operating procedures to test its usefulness in defining the operator's information needs and workload.

  5. Human-Centered Design Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitts, David J.; Howard, Robert

    2009-01-01

    For NASA, human-centered design (HCD) seeks opportunities to mitigate the challenges of living and working in space in order to enhance human productivity and well-being. Direct design participation during the development stage is difficult, however, during project formulation, a HCD approach can lead to better more cost-effective products. HCD can also help a program enter the development stage with a clear vision for product acquisition. HCD tools for clarifying design intent are listed. To infuse HCD into the spaceflight lifecycle the Space and Life Sciences Directorate developed the Habitability Design Center. The Center has collaborated successfully with program and project design teams and with JSC's Engineering Directorate. This presentation discusses HCD capabilities and depicts the Center's design examples and capabilities.

  6. Determining your organization's 'risk capability'.

    PubMed

    Hannah, Bill; Hancock, Melinda

    2014-05-01

    An assessment of a provider's level of risk capability should focus on three key elements: Business intelligence, including sophisticated analytical models that can offer insight into the expected cost and quality of care for a given population. Clinical enterprise maturity, marked by the ability to improve health outcomes and to manage utilization and costs to drive change. Revenue transformation, emphasizing the need for a revenue cycle platform that allows for risk acceptance and management and that provides incentives for performance against defined objectives.

  7. Exploration Medical Capability - Technology Watch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krihak, Michael; Watkins, Sharmila; Barr, Yael; Barsten, Kristina; Fung, Paul; Baumann, David

    2011-01-01

    The objectives of the Technology Watch process are to identify emerging, high-impact technologies that augment current ExMC development efforts, and to work with academia, industry, and other government agencies to accelerate the development of medical care and research capabilities for the mitigation of potential health issues that could occur during space exploration missions. The establishment of collaborations with these entities is beneficial to technology development, assessment and/or insertion. Such collaborations also further NASA s goal to provide a safe and healthy environment for human exploration. The Tech Watch project addresses requirements and capabilities identified by knowledge and technology gaps that are derived from a discrete set of medical conditions that are most likely to occur on exploration missions. These gaps are addressed through technology readiness level assessments, market surveys, collaborations and distributed innovation opportunities. Ultimately, these gaps need to be closed with respect to exploration missions, and may be achieved through technology development projects. Information management is a key aspect to this process where Tech Watch related meetings, research articles, collaborations and partnerships are tracked by the HRP s Exploration Medical Capabilities (ExMC) Element. In 2011, ExMC will be introducing the Tech Watch external website and evidence wiki that will provide access to ExMC technology and knowledge gaps, technology needs and requirements documents.

  8. DOE's Computer Incident Advisory Capability (CIAC)

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, E.

    1990-09-01

    Computer security is essential in maintaining quality in the computing environment. Computer security incidents, however, are becoming more sophisticated. The DOE Computer Incident Advisory Capability (CIAC) team was formed primarily to assist DOE sites in responding to computer security incidents. Among CIAC's other responsibilities are gathering and distributing information to DOE sites, providing training workshops, coordinating with other agencies, response teams, and vendors, creating guidelines for incident handling, and developing software tools. CIAC has already provided considerable assistance to DOE sites faced with virus infections and worm and hacker attacks, has issued over 40 information bulletins, and has developed and presented a workshop on incident handling. CIAC's experience in helping sites has produced several lessons learned, including the need to follow effective procedures to avoid virus infections in small systems and the need for sound password management and system administration in networked systems. CIAC's activity and scope will expand in the future. 4 refs.

  9. Stability and control of VTOL capable airships in hovering flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curtiss, H. C., Jr.; Sumantran, V.

    1985-01-01

    The stability and control characteristics of an airship equipped with lifting rotors to provide a modest VTOL capability are discussed. The rotors are used for control and maneuvering in near-hovering flight. Configurations with two, three, and four lifting rotors are examined and compared with respect to control capabilities and dynamic response characteristics. Linearized models of the dynamics are employed for this study. A new approach to the prediction of rotor derivatives for operation near zero thrust in hover is presented. It is found that all three configurations have similar control and response characteristics. The responses are characterized by long time constants and low levels of angular damping.

  10. The Capabilities of Space Stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Over the past two years the U.S. space station program has evolved to a three-phased international program, with the first phase consisting of the use of the U.S. Space Shuttle and the upgrading and use of the Russian Mir Space Station, and the second and third phases consisting of the assembly and use of the new International Space Station. Projected capabilities for research, and plans for utilization, have also evolved and it has been difficult for those not directly involved in the design and engineering of these space stations to learn and understand their technical details. The Committee on the Space Station of the National Research Council, with the concurrence of NASA, undertook to write this short report in order to provide concise and objective information on space stations and platforms -- with emphasis on the Mir Space Station and International Space Station -- and to supply a summary of the capabilities of previous, existing, and planned space stations. In keeping with the committee charter and with the task statement for this report, the committee has summarized the research capabilities of five major space platforms: the International Space Station, the Mir Space Station, the Space Shuttle (with a Spacelab or Spacehab module in its cargo bay), the Space Station Freedom (which was redesigned to become the International Space Station in 1993 and 1994), and Skylab. By providing the summary, together with brief descriptions of the platforms, the committee hopes to assist interested readers, including scientists and engineers, government officials, and the general public, in evaluating the utility of each system to meet perceived user needs.

  11. Drop Tower and Aircraft Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, David L.

    2015-01-01

    This presentation is a brief introduction to existing capabilities in drop towers and low-gravity aircraft that will be presented as part of a Symposium: Microgravity Platforms Other Than the ISS, From Users to Suppliers which will be a half day program to bring together the international community of gravity-dependent scientists, program officials and technologists with the suppliers of low gravity platforms (current and future) to focus on the future requirements and use of platforms other than the International Space Station (ISS).

  12. Space Shuttle mission extension capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fraser, W. M., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Space Shuttle missions are currently limited to 11 days, primarily due to depletion of the power reactants (hydrogen and oxygen). A power system Mission Extension Kit (MEK) is described which could provide the capability to stay on orbit 10 additional days. These extra days would benefit Space Station construction and missions such as materials processing, earth and celestial observation, and life science studies (Spacelab). Other constraints to longer missions which may dictate minor Orbiter modifications will be discussed. The power system MEK is particularly desirable because of its existing flight qualified hardware which can be delivered within 3 to 4 years.

  13. Test Laboratory Facilities and Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Jeff

    2004-01-01

    The Test Laboratory at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, located inside the boundaries of 40,000 acre Redstone Arsenal military reservation, has over 50 test facilities across 400+ acres, many inside an additional secure, fenced area. About 150 Government and 250 contractor personnel operate test facilities capable of all types of propulsion and structural testing, from small components to engine systems and structural strength/dynamic and environmental testing. We have tremendous engineering expertise in research, evaluation, analysis, design and development, and test of space transportation systems, subsystems, and components.

  14. Tsunami disaster risk management capabilities in Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marios Karagiannis, Georgios; Synolakis, Costas

    2015-04-01

    Greece is vulnerable to tsunamis, due to the length of the coastline, its islands and its geographical proximity to the Hellenic Arc, an active subduction zone. Historically, about 10% of all world tsunamis occur in the Mediterranean region. Here we review existing tsunami disaster risk management capabilities in Greece. We analyze capabilities across the disaster management continuum, including prevention, preparedness, response and recovery. Specifically, we focus on issues like legal requirements, stakeholders, hazard mitigation practices, emergency operations plans, public awareness and education, community-based approaches and early-warning systems. Our research is based on a review of existing literature and official documentation, on previous projects, as well as on interviews with civil protection officials in Greece. In terms of tsunami disaster prevention and hazard mitigation, the lack of tsunami inundation maps, except for some areas in Crete, makes it quite difficult to get public support for hazard mitigation practices. Urban and spatial planning tools in Greece allow the planner to take into account hazards and establish buffer zones near hazard areas. However, the application of such ordinances at the local and regional levels is often difficult. Eminent domain is not supported by law and there are no regulatory provisions regarding tax abatement as a disaster prevention tool. Building codes require buildings and other structures to withstand lateral dynamic earthquake loads, but there are no provisions for resistance to impact loading from water born debris Public education about tsunamis has increased during the last half-decade but remains sporadic. In terms of disaster preparedness, Greece does have a National Tsunami Warning Center (NTWC) and is a Member of UNESCO's Tsunami Program for North-eastern Atlantic, the Mediterranean and connected seas (NEAM) region. Several exercises have been organized in the framework of the NEAM Tsunami Warning

  15. The polarimetric capabilities of NICMOS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hines, D. C.; Schmidt, G. D.; Lytle, Dyer

    1997-01-01

    The polarimetric capabilities of Near-Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS) are demonstrated from data obtained during the Early Release Observations of IRC+10216 and CRL 2688 (the Egg Nebula). Preflight Thermal Vacuum tests revealed that each polarizer has a unique polarizing efficiency, and that the position angle offsets differ from the nominal positions of O deg, 120 deg and 240 deg. Therefore an algorithm different from that of an ideal polarizer is required for proper reduction of astronomical polarimetry data. We discuss this new algorithm and the results of its application to NICMOS data. We also present preliminary estimates of the Instrumental Polarization, the sensitivity of the grisms to polarized light, and the accuracy of NICMOS imaging polarimetry for faint and low polarization objects. Finally, we suggest strategies for maximizing the success of NICMOS polarimetry observations.

  16. Satellite Servicing Capabilities Office Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Sean

    2015-01-01

    While at the KSC, I was given the opportunity of assisting the Satellite Servicing Capabilities Office (SSCO) specifically the Propellant Transfer System (PTS) lead by my mentor, Brian Nufer. While waiting to test different components in the PTS, I was able to assist with testing for the Hose Management Assembly (HMA) and was able to work on a simulation in Labview. For the HMA, I was able to help with testing of a coating as well as to help test the durability of the pinch rollers in space. In Labview, I experimented with building a simulation for the PTS, to show where fluids and gases were flowing depending on which valves in the PTS were opened. Not all of the integrated parts required assembly level testing, which allowed me to test these parts individually by myself and document the results. I was also able to volunteer to assist project NEO, allowing me to gain some knowledge of cryogenic fluid systems.

  17. Titan II secondary payload capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butts, Aubrey J.; Nance, Milo; Odle, Roger C.

    Small satellite programs are often faced with the prospect of flying as a secondary payload because of size or funding considerations. This paper discusses a concept for flying such payloads on flights already scheduled on the Titan II SLV program over the next decade. The Titan II has the capability of inserting over 4200 lbs into LEO and larger payloads on ballistic trajectories from which higher orbits can be achieved when kick motors are used. Orbit changes are possible depending on the specific altitudes and payloads involved. Of the existing 13 remaining missions currently scheduled to fly on the Titan II SLV, excess performance is available on several missions that could be used to insert secondary payloads of up to 3000 lbs into their final orbit. This paper outlines an approach that would implement a secondary payload mission and allow small satellites to schedule a launch at a predetermined date through the year 2000.

  18. Self-engineering capabilities of bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Levine, Herbert

    2005-01-01

    Under natural growth conditions, bacteria can utilize intricate communication capabilities (e.g. quorum-sensing, chemotactic signalling and plasmid exchange) to cooperatively form (self-organize) complex colonies with elevated adaptability—the colonial pattern is collectively engineered according to the encountered environmental conditions. Bacteria do not genetically store all the information required for creating all possible patterns. Instead, additional information is cooperatively generated as required for the colonial self-organization to proceed. We describe how complex colonial forms (patterns) emerge through the communication-based singular interplay between individual bacteria and the colony. Each bacterium is, by itself, a biotic autonomous system with its own internal cellular informatics capabilities (storage, processing and assessment of information). These afford the cell plasticity to select its response to biochemical messages it receives, including self-alteration and the broadcasting of messages to initiate alterations in other bacteria. Hence, new features can collectively emerge during self-organization from the intracellular level to the whole colony. The cells thus assume newly co-generated traits and abilities that are not explicitly stored in the genetic information of the individuals. PMID:16849231

  19. Enhancing capabilities in health professions education

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Susan J.; Siddiqui, Zarrin S.; Jonas-Dwyer, Diana R.D.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This article documents the results of ongoing summative program evaluation of a suite of postgraduate courses at The University of Western Australia designed to enhance the educational capabilities, academic leadership and scholarly output of health professionals. Methods Commencing students were invited to participate in this descriptive, longitudinal study that surveyed students at commencement and subsequently over a seven year period. Data was collected at baseline and follow-up in relation to the respondents’ educational leadership responsibilities, promotions, involvement in new educational programs, and recognition for contributions towards student learning, educational scholarly outputs and involvement in training programs. Results The respondents came from a wide range of health professions and worked in various roles, with a quarter already holding leadership positions. During the follow-up period, half reported receiving a new promotion or moving to new positions requiring educational leadership. Those identifying as being involved with the development of new educational programs doubled and 34% received a new teaching award. Scholarly productivity doubled with 45% giving an oral presentation related to education, 21% publishing and 29% being successful in obtaining funding related to an education project.  Conclusions These postgraduate courses in health professions education appear to be positively influencing graduates’ capabilities, especially in the areas of educational leadership skills and scholarly productivity. For those looking to develop a community of leaders in health professions education, the authors offer some suggestions. PMID:26590857

  20. Debating space security: Capabilities and vulnerabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankaran, Jaganath

    The U.S. position in the debate on space security has been that (1) space-based systems could be developed and used to obtain decisive warfighting superiority over an adversary, and (2) these space-based systems, because they might give such an inordinate advantage over any adversary, will be attacked. The Russians and Chinese, in contrast, claim to be threatened by U.S. aspirations in space but deny that they pose a serious threat to U.S. space-based systems. They view the development of advanced military space systems by the United States as evidence of a growing gap of military capabilities limited only by technological—not political—constraints. They argue that U.S. missile defense systems operating in coordination with advanced satellite sensors would weaken their nuclear retaliatory potential. This dissertation argues that the positions held by both of these parties are more extreme than warranted. An analytical evaluation quickly narrows the touted capabilities and assumed vulnerabilities of space systems to a much smaller set of concerns that can be addressed by collaboration. Chapter 2: Operationally Responsive Space (ORS): Is 24/7 Warfighter Support Feasible? demonstrates the infeasibility of dramatically increasing U.S. warfighting superiority by using satellites. Chapter 3: What Can be Achieved by Attacking Satellites? makes the case that although U.S. armed forces rely extensively on its satellite infrastructure, that does not immediately make them desirable targets. The functions performed by military satellites are diffused among large constellations with redundancies. Also, some of the functions performed by these satellites can be substituted for by other terrestrial and aerial systems. Chapter 4: The Limits of Chinese Anti-Satellite Missiles demonstrates that anti-satellite (ASAT) intercepts are very complex under realistic conditions and that a potential adversary with space capabilities comparable to China's has very limited capability to

  1. NASA Dryden's UAS Service Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    The vision of NASA s Dryden Flight Research Center is to "fly what others only imagine." Its mission is to advance technology and science through flight. Objectives supporting the mission include performing flight research and technology integration to revolutionize aviation and pioneer aerospace technology, validating space exploration concepts, conducting airborne remote sensing and science missions, and supporting operations of the Space Shuttle and the International Space Station. A significant focus of effort in recent years has been on Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS), both in support of the Airborne Science Program and as research vehicles to advance the state of the art in UAS. Additionally, the Center has used its piloted aircraft in support of UAS technology development. In order to facilitate greater access to the UAS expertise that exists at the Center, that expertise has been organized around three major capabilities. The first is access to high-altitude, long-endurance UAS. The second is the establishment of a test range for small UAS. The third is safety case assessment support.

  2. OPSAID improvements and capabilities report.

    SciTech Connect

    Halbgewachs, Ronald D.; Chavez, Adrian R.

    2011-08-01

    Process Control System (PCS) and Industrial Control System (ICS) security is critical to our national security. But there are a number of technological, economic, and educational impediments to PCS owners implementing effective security on their systems. Sandia National Laboratories has performed the research and development of the OPSAID (Open PCS Security Architecture for Interoperable Design), a project sponsored by the US Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (DOE/OE), to address this issue. OPSAID is an open-source architecture for PCS/ICS security that provides a design basis for vendors to build add-on security devices for legacy systems, while providing a path forward for the development of inherently-secure PCS elements in the future. Using standardized hardware, a proof-of-concept prototype system was also developed. This report describes the improvements and capabilities that have been added to OPSAID since an initial report was released. Testing and validation of this architecture has been conducted in another project, Lemnos Interoperable Security Project, sponsored by DOE/OE and managed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL).

  3. RAF and JTF Capable HQs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-01

    of how America has postured forces, and then explains the interconnection between the Joint Vision 2020 , the Army Vision , and RAF concept to ensure...establishes shared vision and trust earlier during steady state activities. The RAF concept, Defense Strategic Guidance, Joint Vision 2020 , and the Army Vision ... vision of being “globally responsive and regionally engaged” with reduced means in forces, headquarters, and budgets. For the last decade the U.S. Army

  4. Special Operations Forces--Responsive, Capable, and Ready

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-05-01

    called "Desert One." our earlier abilities to execute bold and daring sLrikes were left warting . The American public wanted to know why and the...irregolais on Koh Tang island. A ,ore realistic DIA esti•nate of 150 to 200 enemy troops never ree!ched the Marines. -- The entire inission lacked quick

  5. Consolidating AMC’s Contingency Response Capabilities: A Delphi Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-19

    Integration-Guard-Active-Components Schmidt, R. (1997). Managing Delphi Surveys Using Nonparametric Statistical Techniques . Decision Science, 763-774...A DELPHI STUDY GRADUATE RESEARCH PAPER Presented to the Faculty Department of Operational Sciences Graduate School of Engineering and Management Air...21 Delphi Technique

  6. Request and Requirements Development Process for Operationally Responsive Space Capabilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    Degree. The views expressed in this student academic research paper are those of the author and do not reflect the official policy or position of the...NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) U.S. Army War College 122 Forbes Avenue Carlisle, PA 17013 10 ...official policy or position of the Department of the Army, Department of Defense, or the U.S. Government. U.S. Army War College CARLISLE BARRACKS

  7. Strategic Responsiveness - Does Joint Force Capability Support National Security Strategy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    Carlisle Barracks, PA 17013-5050 USAWC CLASS OF 2009 The U.S. Army War College is accredited by the Commission on Higher Education of the Middle State... accrediting agency recognized by the U.S. Secretary of Education and the Council for Higher Education Accreditation . REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form...of the Master of Strategic Studies Degree. The U.S. Army War College is accredited by the Commission on Higher Education of the Middle States

  8. Sense and Respond Logistics: Integrating Prediction, Responsiveness, and Control Capabilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    distribution of smaller increments of resources as they are needed or consumed ). CSC2 is key to this transformation. The Air Force vision of the CSC2...that firms have designed lean supply chains to be resilient to business disruptions,12 but it has been shown that resiliency for firms may not...management.13 In the military case, the Air Force is the sole user and provider and thus the business notions of resiliency may not be entirely

  9. Sustaining Statewide Disaster Response Capabilities from a Fire Service Perspective

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    quote was taken from an abstract written by Jena Baker McNeill , who is a Senior Policy Analyst for homeland security for the Heritage Foundation... McNeill , 2011). The President’s 2012 budget request would maintain homeland security funding at current levels, but the budget request would increase...of Arts (Security Studies)). Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, California. (743227784). McNeill , J. B. (2011). Checkbook homeland security

  10. Low Cost Sensors-Current Capabilities and Gaps

    EPA Science Inventory

    1. Present the findings from the a recent technology review of gas and particulate phase sensors 2. Focus on the lower-cost sensors 3. Discuss current capabilities, estimated range of measurement, selectivity, deployment platforms, response time, and expected range of acceptabl...

  11. Defining and Demonstrating Capabilities for Experience-Based Narrative Memory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    LABORATORY INFORMATION DIRECTORATE DEFINING & DEMONSTRATING CAPABILITIES FOR EXPERIENCE-BASED NARRATIVE MEMORY MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE...DTIC) (http://www.dtic.mil). AFRL-RI-RS-TR-2011-203 HAS BEEN REVIEWED AND IS APPROVED FOR PUBLICATION IN ACCORDANCE WITH ASSIGNED...hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing

  12. 47 CFR 95.655 - Frequency capability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Frequency capability. 95.655 Section 95.655... SERVICES Technical Regulations Certification Requirements § 95.655 Frequency capability. (a) No transmitter will be certificated for use in the CB service if it is equipped with a frequency capability not...

  13. 47 CFR 95.655 - Frequency capability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Frequency capability. 95.655 Section 95.655... SERVICES Technical Regulations Certification Requirements § 95.655 Frequency capability. (a) No transmitter will be certificated for use in the CB service if it is equipped with a frequency capability not...

  14. 47 CFR 95.655 - Frequency capability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Frequency capability. 95.655 Section 95.655... SERVICES Technical Regulations Certification Requirements § 95.655 Frequency capability. (a) No transmitter will be certificated for use in the CB service if it is equipped with a frequency capability not...

  15. 47 CFR 95.655 - Frequency capability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency capability. 95.655 Section 95.655... SERVICES Technical Regulations Certification Requirements § 95.655 Frequency capability. (a) No transmitter will be certificated for use in the CB service if it is equipped with a frequency capability not...

  16. 47 CFR 95.655 - Frequency capability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency capability. 95.655 Section 95.655... SERVICES Technical Regulations Certification Requirements § 95.655 Frequency capability. (a) No transmitter will be certificated for use in the CB service if it is equipped with a frequency capability not...

  17. Organisational Capability--What Does It Mean?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), 2006

    2006-01-01

    Organisational capability is rapidly becoming recognized as the key to organizational success. However, the lack of research on it has been well documented in the literature, and organizational capability remains an elusive concept. Yet an understanding of organizational capability can offer insights into how RTOs might work most effectively,…

  18. Russian research capabilities: Findings of site visits

    SciTech Connect

    Wester, D.W.

    1994-02-01

    In June 1993, a proposal was presented to the International Environmental Institute (IEI) in Kennewick, Washington, to establish cooperation and coordination to further pursue the interests of the United States of America and the Republic of Russia in the application and promotion of environmental technology; characterization, treatment, handling, isolation, and disposal of hazardous and radioactive materials; conversion of defense sites to other purposes; and technology transfer, cooperative programs, joint technology development and contractual research. In response to this proposal, IEI and Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) jointly provided funding to send Dr. Dennis W. Wester on a fact-finding mission to Novosibirsk, Moscow, and St. Petersburg, Russia. The trip covered a period of eight weeks, six of which were spent in Novosibirsk and adjoining or related cities and one of which was spent in each of Moscow and St. Petersburg. The general objectives of the trip were to establish a basis for cooperation between IEI and the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS) for future coordination of mutual interests and objectives such as technology acquisition, development, demonstration, application, and commercialization; use of capabilities and assets developed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the RAS; and expediting of cooperative agreements, personnel exchanges, joint ventures and other contractual relationships. The particular objectives of this trip were to evaluate the capabilities of the RAS to satisfy the technology needs associated with the cleanup of the Hanford Site and similar sites in the U.S. and to evaluate the expediency of establishing an IEI presence in Russia.

  19. Facility Interface Capability Assessment (FICA) user manual

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, R.B.; MacDonald, R.R.; Massaglia, J.L.; Williamson, D.A.; Viebrock, J.M.; Mote, N.

    1995-09-01

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) is responsible for developing the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) to accept spent nuclear fuel from commercial facilities. The objective of the Facility Interface Capability Assessment (FICA) project was to assess the capability of each commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) storage facility, at which SNF is stored, to handle various SNF shipping casks. The purpose of this report is describe the FICA computer software and to provide the FICA user with a guide on how to use the FICA system. The FICA computer software consists of two executable programs: the FICA Reactor Report program and the FICA Summary Report program (written in the Ca-Clipper version 5.2 development system). The complete FICA software system is contained on either a 3.5 in. (double density) or a 5.25 in. (high density) diskette and consists of the two FICA programs and all the database files (generated using dBASE III). The FICA programs are provided as ``stand alone`` systems and neither the Ca-Clipper compiler nor dBASE III is required to run the FICA programs. The steps for installing the FICA software system and executing the FICA programs are described in this report. Instructions are given on how to install the FICA software system onto the hard drive of the PC and how to execute the FICA programs from the FICA subdirectory on the hard drive. Both FICA programs are menu driven with the up-arrow and down-arrow keys used to move the cursor to the desired selection.

  20. Polymers with integrated sensing capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunzelman, Jill Nicole

    This dissertation is focused on the creation and characterization of new types of chromogenic polymers, which change their absorption and/or fluorescence characteristics in response to an external stimulus. These optical sensor materials rely on chromophores that display pronounced color changes upon self-assembly as a result of charge-transfer interactions and/or conformational changes. When these chromophores are incorporated into a polymer of interest, the relative amounts of dispersed and aggregated molecules (and therefore their optical appearance) can be initially tuned by controlling the extent of aggregation via the materials composition and the processing protocol employed; the phase-behavior is changed in a predefined manner upon exposure to a specific stimulus. This sensing scheme was exploited in a number of different polymer matrices, leading to a variety of sensor types including mechanochromic, thermochromic, moisture-sensing, and shape-memory materials that allow visualization of the set/release temperature. Important design fundamentals of "aggregachromic" sensor dyes are discussed and chemical structure is related to type of interactions (hydrophobic, pi-pi, charge-transfer) and self-assembly/color relationships. The knowledge is used to control behavior such as piezochromism, aggregation rate, and intramolecular-excimer-formation.

  1. Requirements Development for Interoperability Simulation Capability for Law Enforcement

    SciTech Connect

    Holter, Gregory M.

    2004-05-19

    The National Counterdrug Center (NCC) was initially authorized by Congress in FY 1999 appropriations to create a simulation-based counterdrug interoperability training capability. As the lead organization for Research and Analysis to support the NCC, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was responsible for developing the requirements for this interoperability simulation capability. These requirements were structured to address the hardware and software components of the system, as well as the deployment and use of the system. The original set of requirements was developed through a process of conducting a user-based survey of requirements for the simulation capability, coupled with an analysis of similar development efforts. The user-based approach ensured that existing concerns with respect to interoperability within the law enforcement community would be addressed. Law enforcement agencies within the designated pilot area of Cochise County, Arizona, were surveyed using interviews and ride-alongs during actual operations. The results of this survey were then accumulated, organized, and validated with the agencies to ensure the accuracy of the results. These requirements were then supplemented by adapting operational requirements from existing systems to ensure system reliability and operability. The NCC adopted a development approach providing incremental capability through the fielding of a phased series of progressively more capable versions of the system. This allowed for feedback from system users to be incorporated into subsequent revisions of the system requirements, and also allowed the addition of new elements as needed to adapt the system to broader geographic and geopolitical areas, including areas along the southwest and northwest U.S. borders. This paper addresses the processes used to develop and refine requirements for the NCC interoperability simulation capability, as well as the response of the law enforcement community to the use of

  2. Business Systems Branch Abilities, Capabilities, and Services Web Page

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cortes-Pena, Aida Yoguely

    2009-01-01

    During the INSPIRE summer internship I acted as the Business Systems Branch Capability Owner for the Kennedy Web-based Initiative for Communicating Capabilities System (KWICC), with the responsibility of creating a portal that describes the services provided by this Branch. This project will help others achieve a clear view ofthe services that the Business System Branch provides to NASA and the Kennedy Space Center. After collecting the data through the interviews with subject matter experts and the literature in Business World and other web sites I identified discrepancies, made the necessary corrections to the sites and placed the information from the report into the KWICC web page.

  3. Refueling machine with relative positioning capability

    DOEpatents

    Challberg, Roy Clifford; Jones, Cecil Roy

    1998-01-01

    A refueling machine having relative positioning capability for refueling a nuclear reactor. The refueling machine includes a pair of articulated arms mounted on a refueling bridge. Each arm supports a respective telescoping mast. Each telescoping mast is designed to flex laterally in response to application of a lateral thrust on the end of the mast. A pendant mounted on the end of the mast carries an air-actuated grapple, television cameras, ultrasonic transducers and waterjet thrusters. The ultrasonic transducers are used to detect the gross position of the grapple relative to the bail of a nuclear fuel assembly in the fuel core. The television cameras acquire an image of the bail which is compared to a pre-stored image in computer memory. The pendant can be rotated until the television image and the pre-stored image match within a predetermined tolerance. Similarly, the waterjet thrusters can be used to apply lateral thrust to the end of the flexible mast to place the grapple in a fine position relative to the bail as a function of the discrepancy between the television and pre-stored images.

  4. Refueling machine with relative positioning capability

    DOEpatents

    Challberg, R.C.; Jones, C.R.

    1998-12-15

    A refueling machine is disclosed having relative positioning capability for refueling a nuclear reactor. The refueling machine includes a pair of articulated arms mounted on a refueling bridge. Each arm supports a respective telescoping mast. Each telescoping mast is designed to flex laterally in response to application of a lateral thrust on the end of the mast. A pendant mounted on the end of the mast carries an air-actuated grapple, television cameras, ultrasonic transducers and waterjet thrusters. The ultrasonic transducers are used to detect the gross position of the grapple relative to the bail of a nuclear fuel assembly in the fuel core. The television cameras acquire an image of the bail which is compared to a pre-stored image in computer memory. The pendant can be rotated until the television image and the pre-stored image match within a predetermined tolerance. Similarly, the waterjet thrusters can be used to apply lateral thrust to the end of the flexible mast to place the grapple in a fine position relative to the bail as a function of the discrepancy between the television and pre-stored images. 11 figs.

  5. Fused Reality for Enhanced Flight Test Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachelder, Ed; Klyde, David

    2011-01-01

    The feasibility of using Fused Reality-based simulation technology to enhance flight test capabilities has been investigated. In terms of relevancy to piloted evaluation, there remains no substitute for actual flight tests, even when considering the fidelity and effectiveness of modern ground-based simulators. In addition to real-world cueing (vestibular, visual, aural, environmental, etc.), flight tests provide subtle but key intangibles that cannot be duplicated in a ground-based simulator. There is, however, a cost to be paid for the benefits of flight in terms of budget, mission complexity, and safety, including the need for ground and control-room personnel, additional aircraft, etc. A Fused Reality(tm) (FR) Flight system was developed that allows a virtual environment to be integrated with the test aircraft so that tasks such as aerial refueling, formation flying, or approach and landing can be accomplished without additional aircraft resources or the risk of operating in close proximity to the ground or other aircraft. Furthermore, the dynamic motions of the simulated objects can be directly correlated with the responses of the test aircraft. The FR Flight system will allow real-time observation of, and manual interaction with, the cockpit environment that serves as a frame for the virtual out-the-window scene.

  6. Patient accounting systems: needs and capabilities.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, O G; Collignon, S

    1987-09-01

    In the first article of this series, it was stated that most finance executives are not very satisfied with the performance of their current patient accounting systems. What steps can a patient accounting system planner take to help ensure the system selected will garner high ratings from managers and users? Two primarily steps need to be taken. First, the planner needs to perform a thorough evaluation of both near- and long-term patient accounting requirements. He should determine which features and functions are most critical and ensure they are incorporated as selection criteria. The planner should also incorporate institutional planning into that process, such as planned expansion of facilities or services, to ensure that the system selected has the growth potential, interfacing capabilities, and flexibility to respond to the changing environment. Then, once system needs are fully charted, the planner should educate himself about the range of patient accounting system solutions available. The data show that most financial managers lack knowledge about most of the major patient accounting system vendors in the marketplace. Once vendors that offer systems that seemingly could meet needs are identified, the wise system planner will also want to obtain information from users about those vendors, to determine whether the systems perform as described and whether the vendor has been responsive to the needs of its customers. This step is a particularly important part of the planning process, because the data also show that users of some systems are significantly more satisfied than users of other patient accounting systems.

  7. Robotic Access to Planetary Surfaces Capability Roadmap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    A set of robotic access to planetary surfaces capability developments and supporting infrastructure have been identified. Reference mission pulls derived from ongoing strategic planning. Capability pushes to enable broader mission considerations. Facility and flight test capability needs. Those developments have been described to the level of detail needed for high-level planning. Content and approach. Readiness and metrics. Rough schedule and cost. Connectivity to mission concepts.

  8. Defence Capability Plan 2006-2016

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-14

    Version Points of Contact Phase 8B Capability Staff: Defence Materiel Organisation: Squadron Leader Greg Trott Ms Katrina Burzynski (02) 6265...Capability Plan 2006 – 2016 Public Version 0 Points of Contact Phase 7 Capability Staff: Defence Materiel Organisation: Major Paul Randall Mr Ross...Staff: Defence Materiel Organisation: Major Paul Randall Lieutenant Colonel Duncan Roach (02) 6265 4441 (03) 9282 5380 LAND 58 Phase 3 Weapon

  9. Stiff DAE integrator with sensitivity analysis capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Serban, R.

    2007-11-26

    IDAS is a general purpose (serial and parallel) solver for differential equation (ODE) systems with senstivity analysis capabilities. It provides both forward and adjoint sensitivity analysis options.

  10. 15 CFR 970.402 - Technological capability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL DATA SERVICE DEEP SEABED MINING REGULATIONS FOR EXPLORATION LICENSES Certification of Applications § 970.402 Technological capability. (a) Before the Administrator may certify an application for...

  11. Facility research capabilities at Louisiana State University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitehurst, C. A.

    1974-01-01

    Efforts of LSU are reported to develop research capabilities for supporting the NASA Mississippi Test Facility. Research activities reported include remote sensing technology and salt water encroachment.

  12. 77 FR 56251 - Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee (ARAC); New Task Assignment for the ARAC: Establishment of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-12

    ... in developing the content of these materials, and methodologies for developing better test item bank... for review and revision of these materials. (4) Proposed knowledge test item bank questions that are... recommended ways to ensure that the FAA's airman testing and training materials better support reduction...

  13. The Load Capability of Piezoelectric Single Crystal Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Tian-Bing; Su, Ji; Jiang, Xiaoning; Rehrig, Paul W.; Hackenberger, Wesley S.

    2006-01-01

    Piezoelectric lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate (PMN-PT) single crystal is one of the most promising materials for electromechanical device applications due to its high electrical field induced strain and high electromechanical coupling factor. PMN-PT single crystal-based multilayer stack actuators and multilayer stack-based flextensional actuators have exhibited high stroke and high displacement-voltage ratios. The actuation capabilities of these two actuators were evaluated using a newly developed method based upon a laser vibrometer system under various loading conditions. The measured displacements as a function of mechanical loads at different driving voltages indicate that the displacement response of the actuators is approximately constant under broad ranges of mechanical load. The load capabilities of these PMN-PT single crystal-based actuators and the advantages of the capability for applications will be discussed.

  14. The Load Capability of Piezoelectric Single Crystal Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Tian-Bing; Su, Ji; Jiang, Xiaoning; Rehrig, Paul W.; Hackenberger, Wesley S.

    2007-01-01

    Piezoelectric lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate (PMN-PT) single crystal is one of the most promising materials for electromechanical device applications due to its high electrical field induced strain and high electromechanical coupling factor. PMN-PT single crystal-based multilayer stack actuators and multilayer stack-based flextensional actuators have exhibited high stroke and high displacement-voltage ratios. The actuation capabilities of these two actuators were evaluated using a newly developed method based upon a laser vibrometer system under various loading conditions. The measured displacements as a function of mechanical loads at different driving voltages indicate that the displacement response of the actuators is approximately constant under broad ranges of mechanical load. The load capabilities of these PMN-PT single crystal-based actuators and the advantages of the capability for applications will be discussed.

  15. The Renovation and Future Capabilities of the Thacher Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neill, Katie; Osuna, Natalie; Edwards, Nick; Klink, Douglas; Swift, Jonathan; Vyhnal, Chris; Meyer, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    The Thacher School is in the process of renovating the campus observatory with a new meter class telescope and full automation capabilities for the purpose of scientific research and education. New equipment on site has provided a preliminary site characterization including seeing and V-band sky brightness measurements. These data, along with commissioning data from the MINERVA project (which uses comparable hardware) are used to estimate the capabilities of the observatory once renovation is complete. Our V-band limiting magnitude is expected to be better than 21.3 for a one minute integration time, and we estimate that milli-magnitude precision photometry will be possible for a V=14.5 point source over approximately 5 min timescales. The quick response, autonomous operation, and multi-band photometric capabilities of the renovated observatory will make it a powerful follow-up science facility for exoplanets, eclipsing binaries, near-Earth objects, stellar variability, and supernovae.

  16. Presto 4.20 user's guide : addendum for shock capabilities.

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, Benjamin Whiting

    2011-06-01

    This is an addendum to the Presto 4.20 User's Guide to document additional capabilities that are available for use in the Presto{_}ITAR code that are not available for use in the standard version of Presto. Presto{_}ITAR is an enhanced version of Presto that provides capabilities that make it regulated under the U.S. Department of State's International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR) export-control rules. This code is part of the Vivace product, and is only distributed to entities that comply with ITAR regulations. The enhancements primarily focus on material models that include an energy-dependent pressure response, appropriate for very large deformations and strain rates. Since this is an addendum to the standard Presto User's Guide, please refer to that document first for general descriptions of code capability and use. This addendum documents material models and element features that support energy-dependent material models.

  17. Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability Pilot Project at Two Nuclear Power Plants and Associated State Offices of Emergency Preparedness.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    CPS andiPs..................4 MATHEW. .. ....... .......... 5 ADPIC . ... ........ ......... 5 PATRIC .. .. ........ ......... 5 III. Utilization of...due to a unit release rate. All contours are calculated by employing the MATHEW/ ADPIC codes ..... .. ...................... ... 15 8. Representative...ARAC model calculations employing MATHEW/ ADPIC codes during the January 19, 1982, test at Rancho Seco. (a) Deposition of 1-131 for a unit source rate

  18. 47 CFR 95.649 - Power capability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Power capability. 95.649 Section 95.649... SERVICES Technical Regulations Certification Requirements § 95.649 Power capability. No CB, R/C, LPRS, FRS, MedRadio, MURS, or WMTS unit shall incorporate provisions for increasing its transmitter power to...

  19. 47 CFR 95.649 - Power capability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Power capability. 95.649 Section 95.649... SERVICES Technical Regulations Certification Requirements § 95.649 Power capability. No CB, R/C, LPRS, FRS, MedRadio, MURS, or WMTS unit shall incorporate provisions for increasing its transmitter power to...

  20. 47 CFR 95.649 - Power capability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Power capability. 95.649 Section 95.649... SERVICES Technical Regulations Certification Requirements § 95.649 Power capability. No CB, R/C, LPRS, FRS, MedRadio, MURS, or WMTS unit shall incorporate provisions for increasing its transmitter power to...

  1. 47 CFR 95.649 - Power capability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Power capability. 95.649 Section 95.649... SERVICES Technical Regulations Certification Requirements § 95.649 Power capability. No CB, R/C, LPRS, FRS, MedRadio, MURS, or WMTS unit shall incorporate provisions for increasing its transmitter power to...

  2. 47 CFR 95.649 - Power capability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Power capability. 95.649 Section 95.649... SERVICES Technical Regulations Certification Requirements § 95.649 Power capability. No CB, R/C, LPRS, FRS, MedRadio, MURS, or WMTS unit shall incorporate provisions for increasing its transmitter power to...

  3. Space Communications Capability Roadmap Interim Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spearing, Robert; Regan, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Contents include the following: Identify the need for a robust communications and navigation architecture for the success of exploration and science missions. Describe an approach for specifying architecture alternatives and analyzing them. Establish a top level architecture based on a network of networks. Identify key enabling technologies. Synthesize capability, architecture and technology into an initial capability roadmap.

  4. Action Learning, Performativity and Negative Capability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edmonstone, John

    2016-01-01

    The paper examines the concept of negative capability as a human capacity for containment and contrasts it with well-valued positive capability as expressed through performativity in organisations and society. It identifies the problem of dispersal--the complex ways we behave in order to avoid the emotional challenges of living with uncertainty.…

  5. Defining and Assessing Enterprise Capability in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Peter; Hughes, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the development of an instrument for assessing enterprise capability in schools. The approach to assessing enterprise capability builds on previous work by including three dimensions: self-efficacy, aspirations and knowledge and awareness. We find significant but weak associations between these three constructs suggesting that…

  6. Curriculum Mapping to Embed Graduate Capabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spencer, David; Riddle, Matthew; Knewstubb, Bernadette

    2012-01-01

    Graduate capabilities are an essential aspect of undergraduate development in higher education. Accordingly, La Trobe University's "Design for learning" has identified particular university-wide graduate capabilities and required all faculties to explicitly embed these in their curricula. The Faculty of Law and Management developed an approach to…

  7. Adult Financial Capability Framework. Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basic Skills Agency, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Both the Financial Services Authority and the Basic Skills Agency are committed to supporting those individuals and organisations working to improve the financial capability of themselves and others. The development of the National Strategy for Financial Capability, coordinated by the Financial Services Authority, and the commissioning of a…

  8. Building Organisational Capability the Private Provider Way

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guthrie, Hugh

    2008-01-01

    Organisational capability is recognised as a key to organisational success. The combination of human capital (peoples' skills and knowledge), social capital (relationships between people) and organisational capital (the organisation's processes), is central to building an organisation's capability. This paper, presented at the 2008 annual…

  9. Capability and Health Functioning in Ethiopian Households

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mabsout, Ramzi

    2011-01-01

    From a recent Ethiopian representative household survey this paper empirically operationalizes concepts from the capability approach to shed light on the relationship between conversion factors, capability inputs and health functionings. The subjects of the study are women in partnership. The results suggest their health functionings are…

  10. Capabilities and Contributions of Unwed Fathers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lerman, Robert I.

    2010-01-01

    Young, minority, and poorly educated fathers in fragile families have little capacity to support their children financially and are hard-pressed to maintain stability in raising those children. In this article, Robert Lerman examines the capabilities and contributions of unwed fathers, how their capabilities and contributions fall short of those…

  11. Cultivating Human Capabilities in Venturesome Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogan, Padraig

    2013-01-01

    The notion of competencies has been a familiar feature of educational reform policies for decades. In this essay, Padraig Hogan begins by highlighting the contrasting notion of capabilities, pioneered by the research of Amartya Sen and Martha Nussbaum. An educational variant of the notion of capabilities then becomes the basis for exploring…

  12. 14 CFR 145.215 - Capability list.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Capability list. 145.215 Section 145.215 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SCHOOLS AND OTHER CERTIFICATED AGENCIES REPAIR STATIONS Operating Rules § 145.215 Capability list. (a)...

  13. A framework for offshore vendor capability development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusuf Wibisono, Yogi; Govindaraju, Rajesri; Irianto, Dradjad; Sudirman, Iman

    2016-02-01

    Offshore outsourcing is a common practice conducted by companies, especially in developed countries, by relocating one or more their business processes to other companies abroad, especially in developing countries. This practice grows rapidly owing to the ease of accessing qualified vendors with a lower cost. Vendors in developing countries compete more intensely to acquire offshore projects. Indonesia is still below India, China, Malaysia as main global offshore destinations. Vendor capability is among other factors that contribute to the inability of Indonesian vendor in competing with other companies in the global market. Therefore, it is essential to study how to increase the vendor's capability in Indonesia, in the context of global offshore outsourcing. Previous studies on the vendor's capability mainly focus on capabilities without considering the dynamic of capabilities due to the environmental changes. In order to be able to compete with competitors and maintain the competitive advantage, it is necessary for vendors to develop their capabilities continuously. The purpose of this study is to develop a framework that describes offshore vendor capability development along the client-vendor relationship stages. The framework consists of three main components, i.e. the stages of client-vendor relationship, the success of each stage, and the capabilities of vendor at each stage.

  14. Analytical Chemistry Core Capability Assessment - Preliminary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Barr, Mary E.; Farish, Thomas J.

    2012-05-16

    The concept of 'core capability' can be nebulous one. Even at a fairly specific level, where core capability equals maintaining essential services, it is highly dependent upon the perspective of the requestor. Samples are submitted to analytical services because the requesters do not have the capability to conduct adequate analyses themselves. Some requests are for general chemical information in support of R and D, process control, or process improvement. Many analyses, however, are part of a product certification package and must comply with higher-level customer quality assurance requirements. So which services are essential to that customer - just those for product certification? Does the customer also (indirectly) need services that support process control and improvement? And what is the timeframe? Capability is often expressed in terms of the currently utilized procedures, and most programmatic customers can only plan a few years out, at best. But should core capability consider the long term where new technologies, aging facilities, and personnel replacements must be considered? These questions, and a multitude of others, explain why attempts to gain long-term consensus on the definition of core capability have consistently failed. This preliminary report will not try to define core capability for any specific program or set of programs. Instead, it will try to address the underlying concerns that drive the desire to determine core capability. Essentially, programmatic customers want to be able to call upon analytical chemistry services to provide all the assays they need, and they don't want to pay for analytical chemistry services they don't currently use (or use infrequently). This report will focus on explaining how the current analytical capabilities and methods evolved to serve a variety of needs with a focus on why some analytes have multiple analytical techniques, and what determines the infrastructure for these analyses. This information will be

  15. National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) Capabilities for Homeland Security

    SciTech Connect

    Sugiyama, G; Nasstrom, J; Baskett, R; Simpson, M

    2010-03-08

    The Department of Energy's National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) provides critical information during hazardous airborne releases as part of an integrated national preparedness and response strategy. Located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, NARAC provides 24/7 tools and expert services to map the spread of hazardous material accidentally or intentionally released into the atmosphere. NARAC graphical products show affected areas and populations, potential casualties, and health effect or protective action guideline levels. LLNL experts produce quality-assured analyses based on field data to assist decision makers and responders. NARAC staff and collaborators conduct research and development into new science, tools, capabilities, and technologies in strategically important areas related to airborne transport and fate modeling and emergency response. This paper provides a brief overview of some of NARAC's activities, capabilities, and research and development.

  16. Towards an automated intelligence product generation capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Alison M.; Hawes, Timothy W.; Nolan, James J.

    2015-05-01

    Creating intelligence information products is a time consuming and difficult process for analysts faced with identifying key pieces of information relevant to a complex set of information requirements. Complicating matters, these key pieces of information exist in multiple modalities scattered across data stores, buried in huge volumes of data. This results in the current predicament analysts find themselves; information retrieval and management consumes huge amounts of time that could be better spent performing analysis. The persistent growth in data accumulation rates will only increase the amount of time spent on these tasks without a significant advance in automated solutions for information product generation. We present a product generation tool, Automated PrOduct Generation and Enrichment (APOGEE), which aims to automate the information product creation process in order to shift the bulk of the analysts' effort from data discovery and management to analysis. APOGEE discovers relevant text, imagery, video, and audio for inclusion in information products using semantic and statistical models of unstructured content. APOGEEs mixed-initiative interface, supported by highly responsive backend mechanisms, allows analysts to dynamically control the product generation process ensuring a maximally relevant result. The combination of these capabilities results in significant reductions in the time it takes analysts to produce information products while helping to increase the overall coverage. Through evaluation with a domain expert, APOGEE has been shown the potential to cut down the time for product generation by 20x. The result is a flexible end-to-end system that can be rapidly deployed in new operational settings.

  17. A Strategic Capability Review of the Georgian Armed Forces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-14

    Georgia, the borders are not too far from neighboring countries so WMD effects may pose risks to the other countries in the region including the...Georgia.12 This intervention will threaten National Interests and may put under risk National Values of Georgia. Nature of the Conflict/Likely Nature...Support YTL : 1 In recent years, Georgia is trying to develop its own defense manufacturing capabilities in response to the de facto restrictions on the

  18. A Systems Engineering Capability Maturity Model, Version 1.1,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-11-01

    Ongoing Skills and Knowledge 4-113 PA 18: Coordinate with Suppliers 4-120 Part 3: Appendices Appendix A Appendix B Appendix C Appendix D...Ward-Callan, C. Wasson, A. Wilbur, A.M. Wilhite, R. Williams, H. Wilson, D. Zaugg, and C. Zumba . continued on next page SM CMM and Capability...Model (SE-CMM) was developed as a response to industry requests for assistance in coordinating and publishing a model that would foster improvement

  19. Mobile Munitions Assessment System Field Capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    A. M. Snyder; D. A. Verrill; K. D. Watts

    1999-05-27

    The US has developed, stored, tested, and conducted disposal operations on various forms of chemical munitions for several decades. The remnants of these activities have resulted in the presence of suspect CWM at more than 200 sites in the US, the District of Columbia, and the US Virgin Islands. An advanced Mobile Munitions Assessment System (Phase II MMAS) has been designed, fabricated, assembled, and tested by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory under contract to the US Army's Project Manager for Non-Stockpile Chemical Materiel for use in the assessment and characterization of ''non-stockpile'' chemical warfare materiel (CWM). The Phase II MMAS meets the immediate need to augment response equipment currently used by the US Army with a system that includes state-of-the-art assessment equipment and advanced sensors. The Phase II MMAS will be used for response to known storage and remediation sites. This system is designed to identify the munition type; evaluate the condition of the CWM; evaluate the environmental conditions in the vicinity of the CWM; determine if fuzes, bursters, or safety and arming devices are in place; identify the chemical fill; provide other data (e.g., meteorological data) necessary for assessing the risk associated with handling, transporting, and disposing of CWM; and record the data on a dedicated computer system. The Phase II MMAS is capable of over-the-road travel and air transport to any site for conducting rigorous assessments of suspect CWM. The Phase II MMAS utilizes a specially-designed commercial motor home to provide a means to transport an interactive network of non-intrusive characterization and assessment equipment. The assessment equipment includes radiography systems, a gamma densitometer system, a Portable Isotopic Neutron Spectroscopy (PINS) system, a Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS) system, air monitoring equipment (i.e., M-90s and a field ion spectroscopy system), and a phase determination

  20. Community psychology and the capabilities approach.

    PubMed

    Shinn, Marybeth

    2015-06-01

    What makes for a good life? The capabilities approach to this question has much to offer community psychology, particularly with respect to marginalized groups. Capabilities are freedoms to engage in valued social activities and roles-what people can do and be given both their capacities, and environmental opportunities and constraints. Economist Amartya Sen's focus on freedoms and agency resonates with psychological calls for empowerment, and philosopher Martha Nussbaum's specification of requirements for a life that is fully human provides an important guide for social programs. Community psychology's focus on mediating structures has much to offer the capabilities approach. Parallels between capabilities, as enumerated by Nussbaum, and settings that foster positive youth development, as described in a National Research Council Report (Eccles and Gootman (Eds) in Community programs to promote youth development. National Academy Press, Washington, 2002) suggest extensions of the approach to children. Community psychologists can contribute to theory about ways to create and modify settings to enhance capabilities as well as empowerment and positive youth development. Finally, capabilities are difficult to measure, because they involve freedoms to choose but only choices actually made or enacted can be observed. The variation in activities or goals across members of a setting provides a measure of the capabilities that the setting fosters.

  1. Community Psychology and the Capabilities Approach

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    What makes for a good life? The capabilities approach to this question has much to offer community psychology, particularly with respect to marginalized groups. Capabilities are freedoms to engage in valued social activities and roles—what people can do and be given both their capacities, and environmental opportunities and constraints. Economist Amartya Sen’s focus on freedoms and agency resonates with psychological calls for empowerment, and philosopher Martha Nussbaum’s specification of requirements for a life that is fully human provides an important guide for social programs. Community psychology’s focus on mediating structures has much to offer the capabilities approach. Parallels between capabilities, as enumerated by Nussbaum, and settings that foster positive youth development, as described in a National Research Council Report (Eccles and Gootman (Eds) in Community programs to promote youth development. National Academy Press, Washington, 2002) suggest extensions of the approach to children. Community psychologists can contribute to theory about ways to create and modify settings to enhance capabilities as well as empowerment and positive youth development. Finally, capabilities are difficult to measure, because they involve freedoms to choose but only choices actually made or enacted can be observed. The variation in activities or goals across members of a setting provides a measure of the capabilities that the setting fosters. PMID:25822113

  2. CTH reference manual : composite capability and technologies.

    SciTech Connect

    Key, Christopher T.; Schumacher, Shane C.

    2009-02-01

    The composite material research and development performed over the last year has greatly enhanced the capabilities of CTH for non-isotropic materials. The enhancements provide the users and developers with greatly enhanced capabilities to address non-isotropic materials and their constitutive model development. The enhancements to CTH are intended to address various composite material applications such as armor systems, rocket motor cases, etc. A new method for inserting non-isotropic materials was developed using Diatom capabilities. This new insertion method makes it possible to add a layering capability to a shock physics hydrocode. This allows users to explicitly model each lamina of a composite without the overhead of modeling each lamina as a separate material to represent a laminate composite. This capability is designed for computational speed and modeling efficiency when studying composite material applications. In addition, the layering capability also allows a user to model interlaminar mechanisms. Finally, non-isotropic coupling methods have been investigated. The coupling methods are specific to shock physics where the Equation of State (EOS) is used with a nonisotropic constitutive model. This capability elastically corrects the EOS pressure (typically isotropic) for deviatoric pressure coupling for non-isotropic materials.

  3. Demonstration of capabilities of high temperature composites analyzer code HITCAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singhal, Surendra N.; Lackney, Joseph J.; Chamis, Christos C.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.

    1990-01-01

    The capabilities a high temperature composites analyzer code, HITCAN which predicts global structural and local stress-strain response of multilayered metal matrix composite structures, are demonstrated. The response can be determined both at the constituent (fiber, matrix, and interphase) and the structure level and includes the fabrication process effects. The thermo-mechanical properties of the constituents are considered to be nonlinearly dependent on several parameters including temperature, stress, and stress rate. The computational procedure employs an incremental iterative nonlinear approach utilizing a multifactor-interactive constituent material behavior model. Various features of the code are demonstrated through example problems for typical structures.

  4. International Space Station Capabilities and Payload Accommodations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kugler, Justin; Jones, Rod; Edeen, Marybeth

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the research facilities and capabilities of the International Space Station. The station can give unique views of the Earth, as it provides coverage of 85% of the Earth's surface and 95% of the populated landmass every 1-3 days. The various science rack facilities are a resource for scientific research. There are also external research accom0dations. The addition of the Japanese Experiment Module (i.e., Kibo) will extend the science capability for both external payloads and internal payload rack locations. There are also slides reviewing the post shuttle capabilities for payload delivery.

  5. Photovoltaic Systems Test Facilities: Existing capabilities compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volkmer, K.

    1982-01-01

    A general description of photovoltaic systems test facilities (PV-STFs) operated under the U.S. Department of Energy's photovoltaics program is given. Descriptions of a number of privately operated facilities having test capabilities appropriate to photovoltaic hardware development are given. A summary of specific, representative test capabilities at the system and subsystem level is presented for each listed facility. The range of system and subsystem test capabilities available to serve the needs of both the photovoltaics program and the private sector photovoltaics industry is given.

  6. NASA capabilities roadmap: advanced telescopes and observatories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinberg, Lee D.

    2005-01-01

    The NASA Advanced Telescopes and Observatories (ATO) Capability Roadmap addresses technologies necessary for NASA to enable future space telescopes and observatories collecting all electromagnetic bands, ranging from x-rays to millimeter waves, and including gravity-waves. It has derived capability priorities from current and developing Space Missions Directorate (SMD) strategic roadmaps and, where appropriate, has ensured their consistency with other NASA Strategic and Capability Roadmaps. Technology topics include optics; wavefront sensing and control and interferometry; distributed and advanced spacecraft systems; cryogenic and thermal control systems; large precision structure for observatories; and the infrastructure essential to future space telescopes and observatories.

  7. The Impact of IT Capability on Employee Capability, Customer Value, Customer Satisfaction, and Business Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chae, Ho-Chang

    2009-01-01

    This study empirically examines the impact of IT capability on firms' performance and evaluates whether firms' IT capabilities play a role in improving employee capability, customer value, customer satisfaction, and ultimately business performance. The results were based on comparing the business performance of the IT leader companies with that of…

  8. Benefits to society of bioinspired flight capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thakoor, S.; Zornetzer, S.; Lay, N.; Chahl, J.; Hine, B.

    2003-01-01

    This paper highlights how in just about 100 years since the first successful flight took place at Kitty Hawk, our recent developments using inspiration from biology are enabling us to demonstrate flight capability for Mars exploration.

  9. Shear-Joint Capability Versus Bolt Clearance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, H. M.

    1994-01-01

    NASA Technical Memorandum presents theoretical study of relationships between load-bearing capabilities of shear joints that comprise plates clamped together by multiple bolts and clearances between bolts and boltholes in those joints.

  10. Building Airport Surface HITL Simulation Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chinn, Fay Cherie

    2016-01-01

    FutureFlight Central is a high fidelity, real-time simulator designed to study surface operations and automation. As an air traffic control tower simulator, FFC allows stakeholders such as the FAA, controllers, pilots, airports, and airlines to develop and test advanced surface and terminal area concepts and automation including NextGen and beyond automation concepts and tools. These technologies will improve the safety, capacity and environmental issues facing the National Airspace system. FFC also has extensive video streaming capabilities, which combined with the 3-D database capability makes the facility ideal for any research needing an immersive virtual and or video environment. FutureFlight Central allows human in the loop testing which accommodates human interactions and errors giving a more complete picture than fast time simulations. This presentation describes FFCs capabilities and the components necessary to build an airport surface human in the loop simulation capability.

  11. Assessing Contractor Capabilities for Streamlined Site Investigations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The purpose of this document is to familiarize and encourage brownfields decision makers to investigate and employ innovative methods for characterizing their sites, to assist brownfields decision makers in assessing contractors' capabilities.

  12. Core Technical Capability Laboratory Management System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaykhian, Linda; Dugger, Curtis; Griffin, Laurie

    2008-01-01

    The Core Technical Capability Lab - oratory Management System (CTCLMS) consists of dynamically generated Web pages used to access a database containing detailed CTC lab data with the software hosted on a server that allows users to have remote access.

  13. Evolutionary Algorithm for Calculating Available Transfer Capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šošić, Darko; Škokljev, Ivan

    2013-09-01

    The paper presents an evolutionary algorithm for calculating available transfer capability (ATC). ATC is a measure of the transfer capability remaining in the physical transmission network for further commercial activity over and above already committed uses. In this paper, MATLAB software is used to determine the ATC between any bus in deregulated power systems without violating system constraints such as thermal, voltage, and stability constraints. The algorithm is applied on IEEE 5 bus system and on IEEE 30 bus system.

  14. Systems test facilities existing capabilities compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, R.

    1981-01-01

    Systems test facilities (STFS) to test total photovoltaic systems and their interfaces are described. The systems development (SD) plan is compilation of existing and planned STFs, as well as subsystem and key component testing facilities. It is recommended that the existing capabilities compilation is annually updated to provide and assessment of the STF activity and to disseminate STF capabilities, status and availability to the photovoltaics program.

  15. Cyber Capabilities for Global Strike in 2035

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-15

    operations force, by treating cyber warfare capabilities in the same manner as it treats its other weapon systems. It argues that despite preconceptions of...As such, while automation is required, cyber warfare will be much more manpower intensive than is currently understood, and will require a force that...constantly keeping cyber warfare capabilities in pace with the technologies of the environment.This paper reaches these conclusions by first providing a

  16. Annual Industrial Capabilities Report to Congress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-02-01

    developing a sixth functional capability: Net Centric Operations. The new paradigm requires a redefinition and reassessment of the industrial base...of the defense industrial base to develop and provide functional, operational effects-based warfighting capabilities. This study concluded that...vernacular. It is the explicit purpose of the Defense Industrial Base Capabilites Study (DIBCS) series, launched in 2003 by the Office of the Under

  17. Reactive capability limitation of synchronous machines

    SciTech Connect

    Adibi, M.M. ); Milanicz, D.P. )

    1994-02-01

    Achievable generator reactive capability (GRC) is generally much less than indicated by manufacturers' reactive capability curves, due to constraints imposed by plant auxiliaries and the power system itself. The nature of these constraints is explained and a method for calculating them is provided and verified by field tests on a unit at high and low system voltage levels. Several recommendations are made to enhance the GRC of the tested unit.

  18. The New MCNP6 Depletion Capability

    SciTech Connect

    Fensin, Michael Lorne; James, Michael R.; Hendricks, John S.; Goorley, John T.

    2012-06-19

    The first MCNP based inline Monte Carlo depletion capability was officially released from the Radiation Safety Information and Computational Center as MCNPX 2.6.0. Both the MCNP5 and MCNPX codes have historically provided a successful combinatorial geometry based, continuous energy, Monte Carlo radiation transport solution for advanced reactor modeling and simulation. However, due to separate development pathways, useful simulation capabilities were dispersed between both codes and not unified in a single technology. MCNP6, the next evolution in the MCNP suite of codes, now combines the capability of both simulation tools, as well as providing new advanced technology, in a single radiation transport code. We describe here the new capabilities of the MCNP6 depletion code dating from the official RSICC release MCNPX 2.6.0, reported previously, to the now current state of MCNP6. NEA/OECD benchmark results are also reported. The MCNP6 depletion capability enhancements beyond MCNPX 2.6.0 reported here include: (1) new performance enhancing parallel architecture that implements both shared and distributed memory constructs; (2) enhanced memory management that maximizes calculation fidelity; and (3) improved burnup physics for better nuclide prediction. MCNP6 depletion enables complete, relatively easy-to-use depletion calculations in a single Monte Carlo code. The enhancements described here help provide a powerful capability as well as dictate a path forward for future development to improve the usefulness of the technology.

  19. The new MCNP6 depletion capability

    SciTech Connect

    Fensin, M. L.; James, M. R.; Hendricks, J. S.; Goorley, J. T.

    2012-07-01

    The first MCNP based in-line Monte Carlo depletion capability was officially released from the Radiation Safety Information and Computational Center as MCNPX 2.6.0. Both the MCNP5 and MCNPX codes have historically provided a successful combinatorial geometry based, continuous energy, Monte Carlo radiation transport solution for advanced reactor modeling and simulation. However, due to separate development pathways, useful simulation capabilities were dispersed between both codes and not unified in a single technology. MCNP6, the next evolution in the MCNP suite of codes, now combines the capability of both simulation tools, as well as providing new advanced technology, in a single radiation transport code. We describe here the new capabilities of the MCNP6 depletion code dating from the official RSICC release MCNPX 2.6.0, reported previously, to the now current state of MCNP6. NEA/OECD benchmark results are also reported. The MCNP6 depletion capability enhancements beyond MCNPX 2.6.0 reported here include: (1) new performance enhancing parallel architecture that implements both shared and distributed memory constructs; (2) enhanced memory management that maximizes calculation fidelity; and (3) improved burnup physics for better nuclide prediction. MCNP6 depletion enables complete, relatively easy-to-use depletion calculations in a single Monte Carlo code. The enhancements described here help provide a powerful capability as well as dictate a path forward for future development to improve the usefulness of the technology. (authors)

  20. Health, vital goals, and central human capabilities.

    PubMed

    Venkatapuram, Sridhar

    2013-06-01

    I argue for a conception of health as a person's ability to achieve or exercise a cluster of basic human activities. These basic activities are in turn specified through free-standing ethical reasoning about what constitutes a minimal conception of a human life with equal human dignity in the modern world. I arrive at this conception of health by closely following and modifying Lennart Nordenfelt's theory of health which presents health as the ability to achieve vital goals. Despite its strengths I transform Nordenfelt's argument in order to overcome three significant drawbacks. Nordenfelt makes vital goals relative to each community or context and significantly reflective of personal preferences. By doing so, Nordenfelt's conception of health faces problems with both socially relative concepts of health and subjectively defined wellbeing. Moreover, Nordenfelt does not ever explicitly specify a set of vital goals. The theory of health advanced here replaces Nordenfelt's (seemingly) empty set of preferences and society-relative vital goals with a human species-wide conception of basic vital goals, or 'central human capabilities and functionings'. These central human capabilities come out of the capabilities approach (CA) now familiar in political philosophy and economics, and particularly reflect the work of Martha Nussbaum. As a result, the health of an individual should be understood as the ability to achieve a basic cluster of beings and doings-or having the overarching capability, a meta-capability, to achieve a set of central or vital inter-related capabilities and functionings.

  1. Open architecture for rapid deployment of capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glassman, Jacob

    2016-05-01

    Modern warfare has drastically changed from conventional to non-conventional and from fixed threats to dynamic ones over the past several decades. This unprecedented fundamental shift has now made our adversaries and their weapons more nebulous and ever changing. Our current acquisition system however is not suited to develop, test and deploy essential capability to counter these dynamic threats in time to combat them. This environment requires a new infrastructure in our system design to rapidly adopt capabilities that we do not currently plan for or even know about. The key to enabling this rapid implementation is Open Architecture in acquisition. The DoD has shown it can rapidly prototype capabilities such as unmanned vehicles but has severely struggled in moving from the prototyping to deployment. A major driver of this disconnect is the lack of established infrastructure to employ said capability such as launch and recovery systems and command and control. If we are to be successful in transitioning our rapid capability to the warfighter we must implement established well defined interfaces and enabling technologies to facilitate the rapid adoption of capability so the warfighter has the tools to effectively counter the threat.

  2. Balancing Petroleum Force Structure/Capabilities between Active and Reserve Components

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    control, quality surveillance, and engineering oversight of Inland Petroleum Distribution ( IPDS ) capabilities, thereby allowing the Army to execute Title...distribution, command and control, quality surveillance, and engineering oversight of Inland Petroleum Distribution ( IPDS ) capabilities, thereby allowing the... IPDS ) enables the Army to meet the vast majority of requirements associated with its Title X responsibilities. The system was initially developed in

  3. ASSESSING AUDITORY CAPABILITIES IN YOUNG CHILDREN

    PubMed Central

    Eisenberg, Laurie S.; Martinez, Amy S.; Boothroyd, Arthur

    2007-01-01

    Objective Early detection of hearing loss in infants and toddlers has created a need for age-appropriate tests of auditory perceptual capabilities. This article describes a progressive test battery we have developed to evaluate phonetic contrast perception, phoneme recognition, and word recognition in children 6 months to 5 years. This battery is part of a clinical research protocol designed to track auditory development in this population. Methods The progressive test battery originated from a model of auditory perceptual development to assess phonetic discrimination and word recognition. Phonetic discrimination is evaluated using the Battery of Auditory Speech Perception Tests for Infants and Toddlers (BATIT). The BATIT is composed of four measures (VRASPAC, PLAYSPAC, OLIMSPAC, and VIDSPAC) intended to assess the child’s ability to distinguish between phonologically significant contrasts using developmentally appropriate tasks. Designed for children aged 6 months and up, performance is represented either by percent correct or by the level of confidence that the child’s responses are not random. Phoneme and word recognition are assessed in children 4 years and older using lists of consonant-vowel-consonant (CVC) phonemes in words and lexically controlled words both in and out of sentence context (LEXSEN). Results Cross-sectional data show that children with normal hearing may be assessed by the age of 7 months on VRASPAC; by 3 years on PLAYSPAC and OLIMSPAC; and by 4 to 5 years on VIDSPAC, CVC phonemes in words, and LEXSEN words in isolation and in sentences. Data from infants with hearing loss showed that VRASPAC was sensitive to degree of hearing loss, but performance with normally hearing children on this test declined after 12 months of age. Conclusion Assessment of phonetic discrimination and word recognition is, for the most part, attainable in young children using a progressive test battery, but none of the tests used here was effective between 1 and 3

  4. Rotordynamics on the PC: Further Capabilities of ARDS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, David P.

    1997-01-01

    Rotordynamics codes for personal computers are now becoming available. One of the most capable codes is Analysis of RotorDynamic Systems (ARDS) which uses the component mode synthesis method to analyze a system of up to 5 rotating shafts. ARDS was originally written for a mainframe computer but has been successfully ported to a PC; its basic capabilities for steady-state and transient analysis were reported in an earlier paper. Additional functions have now been added to the PC version of ARDS. These functions include: 1) Estimation of the peak response following blade loss without resorting to a full transient analysis; 2) Calculation of response sensitivity to input parameters; 3) Formulation of optimum rotor and damper designs to place critical speeds in desirable ranges or minimize bearing loads; 4) Production of Poincard plots so the presence of chaotic motion can be ascertained. ARDS produces printed and plotted output. The executable code uses the full array sizes of the mainframe version and fits on a high density floppy disc. Examples of all program capabilities are presented and discussed.

  5. Structures and Materials Experimental Facilities and Capabilities Catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horta, Lucas G. (Compiler); Kurtz-Husch, Jeanette D. (Compiler)

    2000-01-01

    The NASA Center of Excellent for Structures and Materials at Langley Research Center is responsible for conducting research and developing useable technology in the areas of advanced materials and processing technologies, durability, damage tolerance, structural concepts, advanced sensors, intelligent systems, aircraft ground operations, reliability, prediction tools, performance validation, aeroelastic response, and structural dynamics behavior for aerospace vehicles. Supporting the research activities is a complementary set of facilities and capabilities documented in this report. Because of the volume of information, the information collected was restricted in most cases to one page. Specific questions from potential customers or partners should be directed to the points of contacts provided with the various capabilities. Grouping of the equipment is by location as opposed to function. Geographical information of the various buildings housing the equipment is also provided. Since this is the first time that such an inventory is ever collected at Langley it is by no means complete. It is estimated that over 90 percent of the equipment capabilities at hand are included but equipment is continuously being updated and will be reported in the future.

  6. Cyclic AMP Receptor Protein and RhaR Synergistically Activate Transcription from the l-Rhamnose-Responsive rhaSR Promoter in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Wickstrum, Jason R.; Santangelo, Thomas J.; Egan, Susan M.

    2005-01-01

    The Escherichia coli rhaSR operon encodes two AraC family transcription activator proteins, RhaS and RhaR, which regulate expression of the l-rhamnose catabolic regulon in response to l-rhamnose availability. RhaR positively regulates rhaSR in response to l-rhamnose, and RhaR activation can be enhanced by the cyclic AMP (cAMP) receptor protein (CRP) protein. CRP is a well-studied global transcription regulator that binds to DNA as a dimer and activates transcription in the presence of cAMP. We investigated the mechanism of CRP activation at rhaSR both alone and in combination with RhaR in vivo and in vitro. Base pair substitutions at potential CRP binding sites in the rhaSR-rhaBAD intergenic region demonstrate that CRP site 3, centered at position −111.5 relative to the rhaSR transcription start site, is required for the majority of the CRP-dependent activation of rhaSR. DNase I footprinting confirms that CRP binds to site 3; CRP binding to the other potential CRP sites at rhaSR was not detected. We show that, at least in vitro, CRP is capable of both RhaR-dependent and RhaR-independent activation of rhaSR from a total of three transcription start sites. In vitro transcription assays indicate that the carboxy-terminal domain of the alpha subunit (α-CTD) of RNA polymerase is at least partially dispensable for RhaR-dependent activation but that the α-CTD is required for CRP activation of rhaSR. Although CRP requires the presence of RhaR for efficient in vivo activation of rhaSR, DNase I footprinting assays indicated that cooperative binding between RhaR and CRP does not make a significant contribution to the mechanism of CRP activation at rhaSR. It therefore appears that CRP activates transcription from rhaSR as it would at simple class I promoters, albeit from a relatively distant position. PMID:16166533

  7. Geometry and gravity influences on strength capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poliner, Jeffrey; Wilmington, Robert P.; Klute, Glenn K.

    1994-01-01

    Strength, defined as the capability of an individual to produce an external force, is one of the most important determining characteristics of human performance. Knowledge of strength capabilities of a group of individuals can be applied to designing equipment and workplaces, planning procedures and tasks, and training individuals. In the manned space program, with the high risk and cost associated with spaceflight, information pertaining to human performance is important to ensuring mission success and safety. Knowledge of individual's strength capabilities in weightlessness is of interest within many areas of NASA, including workplace design, tool development, and mission planning. The weightless environment of space places the human body in a completely different context. Astronauts perform a variety of manual tasks while in orbit. Their ability to perform these tasks is partly determined by their strength capability as demanded by that particular task. Thus, an important step in task planning, development, and evaluation is to determine the ability of the humans performing it. This can be accomplished by utilizing quantitative techniques to develop a database of human strength capabilities in weightlessness. Furthermore, if strength characteristics are known, equipment and tools can be built to optimize the operators' performance. This study examined strength in performing a simple task, specifically, using a tool to apply a torque to a fixture.

  8. Los Alamos upgrade in metallographic capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Ledbetter, J.M.; Dowler, K.E.; Cook, J.H.

    1985-01-01

    The Los Alamos Wing 9 Hot Cell Facility is in the process of upgrading their metallographic sample preparation and examination capability. The present capability to grind, polish and etch samples from reactor fuels and materials has been in operation for 18 years. Macro photography and alpha and beta-gamma autoradiography are an important part of this capability. Some of the fast breeder reactor experiments have contained sodium as a coolant. Therefore, the capability to distill sodium from some samples scheduled for microstructural examinations is a requirement. Since the reactor fuel samples are highly radioactive and contain plutonium, either as fabricated or as a result of breeding during reactor service, these samples must be handled in shielded hot cells containing alpha boxes to isolate the plutonium and hazardous fission products from personnel and the environment. The present equipment that was designed and built into those alpha boxes has functioned very well for the past 18 years. During that time the technicians have thought of ways to improve the equipment to do the work faster and safer. These ideas and ideas that have been developed during the design of new alpha boxes and new equipment for microstructural sample preparation have provided the concepts for the capability to perform the work faster and maintain the equipment in a safer manner.

  9. Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC) Projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Jimmy; Watkins, Sharmila; Baumann, David

    2010-01-01

    During missions to the Moon or Mars, the crew will need medical capabilities to diagnose and treat disease as well as for maintaining their health. The Exploration Medical Capability Element develops medical technologies, medical informatics, and clinical capabilities for different levels of care during space missions. The work done by team members in this Element is leading edge technology, procedure, and pharmacological development. They develop data systems that protect patient's private medical information, aid in the diagnosis of medical conditions, and act as a repository of relevant NASA life sciences experimental studies. To minimize the medical risks to crew health the physicians and scientists in this Element develop models to quantify the probability of medical events occurring during a mission. They define procedures to treat an ill or injured crew member who does not have access to an emergency room and who must be cared for in a microgravity environment where both liquids and solids behave differently than on Earth. To support the development of these medical capabilities, the Element manages the development of medical technologies that prevent, monitor, diagnose, and treat an ill or injured crewmember. The Exploration Medical Capability Element collaborates with the National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI), the Department of Defense, other Government-funded agencies, academic institutions, and industry.

  10. An innovative approach to capability-based emergency operations planning

    PubMed Central

    Keim, Mark E

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the innovative use information technology for assisting disaster planners with an easily-accessible method for writing and improving evidence-based emergency operations plans. This process is used to identify all key objectives of the emergency response according to capabilities of the institution, community or society. The approach then uses a standardized, objective-based format, along with a consensus-based method for drafting capability-based operational-level plans. This information is then integrated within a relational database to allow for ease of access and enhanced functionality to search, sort and filter and emergency operations plan according to user need and technological capacity. This integrated approach is offered as an effective option for integrating best practices of planning with the efficiency, scalability and flexibility of modern information and communication technology.

  11. IP address management : augmenting Sandia's capabilities through open source tools.

    SciTech Connect

    Nayar, R. Daniel

    2005-08-01

    Internet Protocol (IP) address management is an increasingly growing concern at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the networking community as a whole. The current state of the available IP addresses indicates that they are nearly exhausted. Currently SNL doesn't have the justification to obtain more IP address space from Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA). There must exist a local entity to manage and allocate IP assignments efficiently. Ongoing efforts at Sandia have been in the form of a multifunctional database application notably known as Network Information System (NWIS). NWIS is a database responsible for a multitude of network administrative services including IP address management. This study will explore the feasibility of augmenting NWIS's IP management capabilities utilizing open source tools. Modifications of existing capabilities to better allocate available IP address space are studied.

  12. NASA ATP Force Measurement Technology Capability Strategic Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhew, Ray D.

    2008-01-01

    The Aeronautics Test Program (ATP) within the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) initiated a strategic planning effort to re-vitalize the force measurement capability within NASA. The team responsible for developing the plan included members from three NASA Centers (Langley, Ames and Glenn) as well as members from the Air Force s Arnold Engineering and Development Center (AEDC). After visiting and discussing force measurement needs and current capabilities at each participating facility as well as selected force measurement companies, a strategic plan was developed to guide future NASA investments. This paper will provide the details of the strategic plan and include asset management, organization and technology research and development investment priorities as well as efforts to date.

  13. Current capability of a matured disposable acoustic sensor network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beale, D. A. R.; Geddes, N. J., II; Hume, A.; Gray, A. J.

    2006-05-01

    In response to the needs of the UK MOD QinetiQ have designed, developed and trialled an ad-hoc, self organising network of acoustic nodes for in-depth deployment that can detect and track military targets in a range of environments and for all types of weapon locating. Research conducted has shown that disposable technologies are sufficiently mature to provide a useful military capability. Work this year has included a 3 month series of trials to exercise the prototype equipment and has provided an indication of in-service capability across a broad range of environments. This paper will discuss the scientific approach that was applied to the development of the equipment, from early laboratory development through to the prototype sensor network deployment in operationally representative environments. Highlights from the trials have been provided. New findings from the fusion of a low cost thermal imager that can be cued by the acoustic network are also discussed.

  14. Effect of present technology on airship capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madden, R. T.

    1975-01-01

    The effect is presented of updating past airship designs using current materials and propulsion systems to determine new airship performance and productivity capabilities. New materials and power plants permit reductions in the empty weights and increases in the useful load capabilities of past airship designs. The increased useful load capability results in increased productivity for a given range, i.e., either increased payload at the same operating speed or increased operating speed for the same payload weight or combinations of both. Estimated investment costs and operating costs are presented to indicate the significant cost parameters in estimating transportation costs of payloads in cents per ton mile. Investment costs are presented considering production lots of 1, 10 and 100 units. Operating costs are presented considering flight speeds and ranges.

  15. Stakeholder Alignment and Changing Geospatial Information Capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, S.; Cutcher-Gershenfeld, J.; King, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    Changing geospatial information capabilities can have major economic and social effects on activities such as drought monitoring, weather forecasts, agricultural productivity projections, water and air quality assessments, the effects of forestry practices and so on. Whose interests are served by such changes? Two common mistakes are assuming stability in the community of stakeholders and consistency in stakeholder behavior. Stakeholder communities can reconfigure dramatically as some leave the discussion, others enter, and circumstances shift — all resulting in dynamic points of alignment and misalignment . New stakeholders can bring new interests, and existing stakeholders can change their positions. Stakeholders and their interests need to be be considered as geospatial information capabilities change, but this is easier said than done. New ways of thinking about stakeholder alignment in light of changes in capability are presented.

  16. Ascent aeromaneuvering capabilities of transatmospheric vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menees, Gene P.; Tauber, Michael E.; Wilson, John T.; Adelman, Henry G.

    1987-01-01

    The low-earth orbit rendezvous capability of a conceptual transatmospheric vehicle is analyzed for two endo-/exo-atmospheric ascent missions. Both cases involve coasting aerodynamic maneuvers starting from the burn-out conditions corresponding to air-breathing propulsion systems that achieve orbital velocity within the atmosphere. The powered phase of the ascent trajectories approximate constant dynamic pressure, fuel-efficient flightpaths typically flown by supersonic aircraft. The aeromaneuvering coast phases of the ascent include both coplanar (to determine altitude capability without plane-inclination changes) and aeroturning to LEO rendezvous at 400 km altitude (to assess plane-change capability). The coast-phase ascent maneuvers are correlated with G-load requirements and aerothermodynamic heating characteristics at two critical locations on the vehicle surface (i.e., the nose stagnation point and the body centerline). The results are correlated and recommendations are made concerning thermal protection and structural requirements.

  17. Grid sensitivity capability for large scale structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagendra, Gopal K.; Wallerstein, David V.

    1989-01-01

    The considerations and the resultant approach used to implement design sensitivity capability for grids into a large scale, general purpose finite element system (MSC/NASTRAN) are presented. The design variables are grid perturbations with a rather general linking capability. Moreover, shape and sizing variables may be linked together. The design is general enough to facilitate geometric modeling techniques for generating design variable linking schemes in an easy and straightforward manner. Test cases have been run and validated by comparison with the overall finite difference method. The linking of a design sensitivity capability for shape variables in MSC/NASTRAN with an optimizer would give designers a powerful, automated tool to carry out practical optimization design of real life, complicated structures.

  18. Improving Social Security's Financial Capability Assessments.

    PubMed

    Appelbaum, Paul S; Birkenmaier, Julie; Norman, Marc

    2016-07-01

    When Social Security beneficiaries are incapable of managing their benefits, the agency can appoint a representative payee to administer benefits on their behalf. A committee of the Institute of Medicine was asked by the Social Security Administration to review the process by which financial capability determinations are made and to recommend improvements. The committee's conclusions and recommendations include the following: giving priority to real-world financial performance in assessing capability, providing clearer instructions to informants, developing systematic approaches to identifying beneficiaries at risk of incapability, exploring the use of a supervised direct payment option, and instituting regular data collection to assist in improving operations.

  19. Trends in Microfabrication Capabilities & Device Architectures.

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Todd; Jones, Adam; Lentine, Tony; Mudrick, John; Okandan, Murat; Rodrigues, Arun

    2015-06-01

    The last two decades have seen an explosion in worldwide R&D, enabling fundamentally new capabilities while at the same time changing the international technology landscape. The advent of technologies for continued miniaturization and electronics feature size reduction, and for architectural innovations, will have many technical, economic, and national security implications. It is important to anticipate possible microelectronics development directions and their implications on US national interests. This report forecasts and assesses trends and directions for several potentially disruptive microfabrication capabilities and device architectures that may emerge in the next 5-10 years.

  20. Advancing Test Capabilities at NASA Wind Tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, James

    2015-01-01

    NASA maintains twelve major wind tunnels at three field centers capable of providing flows at 0.1 M 10 and unit Reynolds numbers up to 45106m. The maintenance and enhancement of these facilities is handled through a unified management structure under NASAs Aeronautics and Evaluation and Test Capability (AETC) project. The AETC facilities are; the 11x11 transonic and 9x7 supersonic wind tunnels at NASA Ames; the 10x10 and 8x6 supersonic wind tunnels, 9x15 low speed tunnel, Icing Research Tunnel, and Propulsion Simulator Laboratory, all at NASA Glenn; and the National Transonic Facility, Transonic Dynamics Tunnel, LAL aerothermodynamics laboratory, 8 High Temperature Tunnel, and 14x22 low speed tunnel, all at NASA Langley. This presentation describes the primary AETC facilities and their current capabilities, as well as improvements which are planned over the next five years. These improvements fall into three categories. The first are operations and maintenance improvements designed to increase the efficiency and reliability of the wind tunnels. These include new (possibly composite) fan blades at several facilities, new temperature control systems, and new and much more capable facility data systems. The second category of improvements are facility capability advancements. These include significant improvements to optical access in wind tunnel test sections at Ames, improvements to test section acoustics at Glenn and Langley, the development of a Supercooled Large Droplet capability for icing research, and the development of an icing capability for large engine testing. The final category of improvements consists of test technology enhancements which provide value across multiple facilities. These include projects to increase balance accuracy, provide NIST-traceable calibration characterization for wind tunnels, and to advance optical instruments for Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) validation. Taken as a whole, these individual projects provide significant

  1. Assured load carrying capability and capacity credit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pape, H.

    1981-04-01

    The determination of assured load carrying capability and the capacity credit for use in planning windpowered electric generation facilities is considered. Calculation of the available capacity of thermal power plants is described and compared with calculation of available capacity for wind turbines, taking into account outages caused by the unavailability of the primary energy, wind. The assured load carrying capability of power plants is defined. An operational definition of the capacity credit of wind turbines as related to a fixed time t Epsilon T is presented and extended to the period T.

  2. Cloud-based Architecture Capabilities Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Vang, Leng; Prescott, Steven R; Smith, Curtis

    2014-09-01

    In collaborating scientific research arena it is important to have an environment where analysts have access to a shared of information documents, software tools and be able to accurately maintain and track historical changes in models. A new cloud-based environment would be accessible remotely from anywhere regardless of computing platforms given that the platform has available of Internet access and proper browser capabilities. Information stored at this environment would be restricted based on user assigned credentials. This report reviews development of a Cloud-based Architecture Capabilities (CAC) as a web portal for PRA tools.

  3. Advances in Computational Capabilities for Hypersonic Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Ajay; Gnoffo, Peter A.; Moss, James N.; Drummond, J. Philip

    1997-01-01

    The paper reviews the growth and advances in computational capabilities for hypersonic applications over the period from the mid-1980's to the present day. The current status of the code development issues such as surface and field grid generation, algorithms, physical and chemical modeling, and validation is provided. A brief description of some of the major codes being used at NASA Langley Research Center for hypersonic continuum and rarefied flows is provided, along with their capabilities and deficiencies. A number of application examples are presented, and future areas of research to enhance accuracy, reliability, efficiency, and robustness of computational codes are discussed.

  4. Preseason Perceived Physical Capability and Previous Injury

    PubMed Central

    Sciascia, Aaron; Haegele, Lauren E.; Lucas, Jean; Uhl, Timothy L.

    2015-01-01

    Context  Patient opinion about the ability to perform athletic maneuvers is important after injury; however, prospective assessment of self-perceived physical capability for athletes before the beginning of a season is lacking. Objective  To perform a descriptive analysis of knee, shoulder, and elbow self-perceived measures of physical capability specific to athletics and to compare the measures between athletes with and without a history of injury. Design  Cross-sectional study. Setting  Preparticipation physical examinations. Patients or Other Participants  A total of 738 collegiate athletes (486 men, 251 women; age = 19 ± 1 years) were administered questionnaires after receiving medical clearance to participate in their sports. Of those athletes, 350 reported a history of injury. Main Outcome Measure(s)  Athletes self-reported a history of knee, shoulder, or elbow injury. Perceived physical capability of the 3 joints was evaluated using the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score Sport and Recreation Function and Knee-Related Quality of Life subscales and the Kerlan-Jobe Orthopaedic Clinic Shoulder and Elbow Score. We conducted nonparametric analysis to determine if scores differed between athletes with and without a history of injury. Results  Median values for the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score Sports and Recreation Function and Knee-Related Quality of Life subscales and the Kerlan-Jobe Orthopaedic Clinic Shoulder and Elbow Score for all athletes were 100. Median values for perceived physical capability of athletes with a history of injury were 3 to 12 points lower for each questionnaire before the start of the season (P < .001). Conclusions  Our study provided descriptive values for individual perceived knee, shoulder, and elbow physical capability of collegiate athletes participating in 19 sports. Athletes who did not report previous injuries perceived their physical capabilities to be nearly perfect, which could set the

  5. NPSS Overview to TAFW Multidisciplinary Simulation Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owen, Karl

    2002-01-01

    The Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS) is a concerted effort by NASA Glenn Research Center, the aerospace industry, and academia to develop an advanced engineering environment or integrated collection of software programs for the analysis and design of aircraft engines and, eventually, space transportation components. NPSS is now being applied by GE ground power to ground power generation with the view of expanding the capability to nontraditional power plant applications (example: fuel cells) and NPSS has an interest in in-space power and will be developing those simulation capabilities.

  6. Future capabilities for the Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berner, J. B.; Bryant, S. H.; Andrews, K. S.

    2004-01-01

    This paper will look at three new capabilities that are in different stages of development. First, turbo decoding, which provides improved telemetry performance for data rates up to about 1 Mbps, will be discussed. Next, pseudo-noise ranging will be presented. Pseudo-noise ranging has several advantages over the current sequential ranging, anmely easier operations, improved performance, and the capability to be used in a regenerative implementation on a spacecraft. Finally, Low Density Parity Check decoding will be discussed. LDPC codes can provide performance that matches or slightly exceed turbo codes, but are designed for use in the 10 Mbps range.

  7. Heterogeneous parallel programming capability. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Flower, J.W.; Kolawa, A.

    1990-11-30

    In creating a heterogeneous parallel processing capability we are really trying to approach three basic problems with current systems: (1) Supercomputer and parallel computer hardware architectures vary widely but need to support one or two fairly standard programming languages and programming models. A particularly important issue concerns the short life cycle of individual hardware designs; (2) Many algorithms require capabilities beyond the reach of single superconducters but could be approached by several machines working together; and (3) Performing a given task requires integration of a system that may contain many components in addition to the super or parallel computer itself. Peripherals from many different manufacturers must be incorporated.

  8. Defense Industrial Base Capabilities Study: Force Application

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-10-01

    Industrial Base Capabilities 10 to adjust our industrial capability assessments to reflect the latest evolution of the Department’s concepts...engineering services for the UK Fraunhofer AIS N/A Sankt Augustin, Germany 8,725 $705.5 www.ais.fraunhofer.de Robotics Iguana Robotics 1999 Urbana, IL...Augustin, Germany 8,725 $705.5 www.ais.fraunhofer.de Robotics Iguana Robotics 1999 Urbana, IL N/A N/A www.iguana-robotics.com Manufacture advanced

  9. Servicing Capability for the Evolutionary Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alcorn, George; Corbo, Jim; Martin, Deborah; Levin, Lenny

    1990-01-01

    User servicing for Space Station Freedom (SSF) will span an evolutionary period paralleling that of the station's growth plan. This will include a baseline servicing configuration followed by a final growth phase in which all user servicing requirements are satisfied. Although the basic requirements for user servicing are not station configuration dependent, the emphasis placed on different aspects of servicing may change with the eventual SSF growth objectives. This paper will discuss the servicing requirements and how they will be satisfied by Freedom baseline and growth capabilities. The accomodation of the growth servicing elements will be addressed, including the required hooks and scars to implement these growth servicing capabilities.

  10. Mathematical Model for Mapping Students' Cognitive Capability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tambunan, Hardi

    2016-01-01

    The quality mapping of educational unit program is important issue in education in Indonesia today in an effort to improve the quality of education. The objective of this study is to make a mathematical model to find out the map of students' capability in mathematics. It has been made a mathematical model to be used in the mapping of students'…

  11. Truth and the Capability of Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinchliffe, Geoffrey

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines learning as a capability, taking as its starting point the work of Amartya Sen and Martha Nussbaum. The paper is concerned to highlight the relation between learning and truth, and it does so by examining the idea of a genealogy of truth and also Donald Davidson's coherence theory. Thus the notion of truth is understood to be…

  12. Descriptions of positron defect analysis capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, R.H.

    1994-10-01

    A series of descriptive papers and graphics appropriate for distribution to potential collaborators has been assembled. These describe the capabilities for defect analysis using positron annihilation spectroscopy. The application of positrons to problems in the polymer and semiconductor industries is addressed.

  13. Assessing Enterprise Capability: Guidance for Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Foundation for Educational Research, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This document offers guidance to schools on how assessment can support enterprise education. It presents the interim findings from research carried out by the National Foundation for Educational Research (NFER) for the Department for Education and Skills (DfES) in secondary schools in England. Enterprise capability is the key outcome of enterprise…

  14. Cosmopolitan Capabilities in the HE Language Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crosbie, Veronica

    2014-01-01

    This study, concerning the development of cosmopolitan citizenship, draws on theories of human development and capabilities (Sen 1999; Nussbaum 2000) from a social justice perspective, where individual wellbeing is articulated as having the freedom to live a life of one's choosing. In the context of an English to Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL)…

  15. Supersonic Particle Impact Test Capabilities: Investigative Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosales, Keisa

    2007-01-01

    NASA Johnson Space Center White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) performed particle impact flow tests to determine the maximum capabilities of the particle impact test systems in different configurations. Additional flow tests were performed to determine the target pressures at given upstream conditions to supplement the WSTF data located in ASTM Manual 36 (2000).

  16. Defense Acquisition Structures and Capabilities Review

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    requirements, budget, industry, and organizations. See Defense Acquisition Transformation Report to Congress, John Warner National Defense Authorization Act...Shortage of Skills and Talent. 3 Defense Acquisition Transformation Report to Congress, John Warner National Defense Authorization Act, Fiscal Year...Capabilities, Final Report, January 2004. 28 Secretary of Defense, Defense Acquisition Transformation Report to Congress, John War- ner National Defense

  17. Laser tracking system with automatic reacquisition capability.

    PubMed

    Johnson, R E; Weiss, P F

    1968-06-01

    A laser based tracking system is described that has the capability of automatically performing an acquisition search to locate the target. This work is intended for precision launch phase tracking of the Saturn V launch vehicle. System tracking accuracies limited only by the atmosphere have been demonstrated, as has acquisition over a 1 degrees x 1 degrees field of view.

  18. TOMCAT: An Obsolescence Management Capability Assessment Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero Rojo, F. J.; Baguley, P.; Shaikh, N.; Roy, R.; Kelly, S.

    2012-05-01

    As the UK Ministry of Defence (MoD) moves away from the traditional support contracts to contracting for availability/capability, it is essential that the MoD has confidence in Industry's capability to manage the risk of obsolescence. For this purpose, it was necessary to develop a set of metrics to demonstrate it. The eight key elements identified are as follows: obsolescence management governance; supplier; design for obsolescence; risk assessment; obsolescence monitoring; communication; and obsolescence resolution process. Each one was assessed, ranked, and was further broken down into major constituents. They formed the basis of the final 25 metrics, which were then ranked and weighted accordingly. These metrics are embedded into the Total Obsolescence Management Capability Assessment Tool (TOMCAT), which provides a mean for contractors to perform self-assessment and for the MoD to set obsolescence management capability improvement targets. This tool was subjected to rigorous industry scrutiny through different means, including workshops and piloting sessions, which led to refining the TOMCAT tool and the way in which the metrics are formulated. This tool has been developed as a web based application. The MoD is planning to standardise its usage by incorporating it to the obsolescence management policy for defence contracting.

  19. Capability Development at Imperial Oil Resources Ltd.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellerington, David; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Striving to be learning organization, Imperial Oil of Canada focused on organizational, divisional, and individual capability development. Lessons learned include the following: (1) all levels of employees are potential professionals; (2) learning must be continuous; (3) intrinsic motivation and commitment are essential; and (4) organizational…

  20. Space Launch Initiative: New Capabilities - New Horizons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dumbacher, Daniel; Smith, Dennis E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents NASA's Space Launch Initiative (SLI) with new capabilities and new horizons. The topics include: 1) Integrated Space Transportation Plan; 2) SLI: The Work of a Nation; 3) SLI Goals and Status; 4) Composites and Materials; and 5) SLI and DOD/USAF Collaboration. This paper is in viewgraph form.

  1. Negative Capability? Measuring the Unmeasurable in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unterhalter, Elaine

    2017-01-01

    This introductory article to the special issue of "Comparative Education" on measuring the unmeasurable in education considers measurement as reflecting facts and uncertainties. The notion of negative capability is used metaphorically to depict some limits of what is measurable, and portray aspects of the process of education, associated…

  2. Fuel Fabrication Capability Research and Development Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Senor, David J.; Burkes, Douglas

    2013-06-28

    The purpose of this document is to provide a comprehensive review of the mission of the Fuel Fabrication Capability (FFC) within the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) Convert Program, along with research and development (R&D) needs that have been identified as necessary to ensuring mission success. The design and fabrication of successful nuclear fuels must be closely linked endeavors.

  3. Aviation System Analysis Capability Executive Assistant Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Eileen; Kostiuk, Peter

    1999-01-01

    This document describes the analyses that may be incorporated into the Aviation System Analysis Capability Executive Assistant. The document will be used as a discussion tool to enable NASA and other integrated aviation system entities to evaluate, discuss, and prioritize analyses.

  4. Plutonium Oxide Process Capability Work Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, David E.; Tingey, Joel M.

    2014-02-28

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked to develop a Pilot-scale Plutonium-oxide Processing Unit (P3U) providing a flexible capability to produce 200g (Pu basis) samples of plutonium oxide using different chemical processes for use in identifying and validating nuclear forensics signatures associated with plutonium production. Materials produced can also be used as exercise and reference materials.

  5. Human Capital, (Human) Capabilities and Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le Grange, L.

    2011-01-01

    In this article I initiate a debate into the (de)merits of human capital theory and human capability theory and discuss implications of the debate for higher education. Human capital theory holds that economic growth depends on investment in education and that economic growth is the basis for improving the quality of human life. Human capable…

  6. 15 CFR 970.402 - Technological capability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Technological capability. 970.402 Section 970.402 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE GENERAL REGULATIONS OF...

  7. 15 CFR 970.402 - Technological capability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Technological capability. 970.402 Section 970.402 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE GENERAL REGULATIONS OF...

  8. 15 CFR 970.402 - Technological capability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Technological capability. 970.402 Section 970.402 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE GENERAL REGULATIONS OF...

  9. 15 CFR 970.402 - Technological capability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Technological capability. 970.402 Section 970.402 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE GENERAL REGULATIONS OF...

  10. Unifying Capability Integration Analysis - Initial Insights

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    requiring different protocols for information passing and handling. This was caused by the rather compressed timeframe available to do this post-processing...included, denoted by , Cij’, is defined as Nd A Cij’ = Cij (1-(Did Ckd ...dependency on the capability associated with Deficiency d and Ckd was the closure of Deficiency d provided the selection of one its alternatives, specifically

  11. Space shuttle performance capabilities, revision 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babb, G. R.

    1972-01-01

    The space shuttle performance capabilities and proposed space shuttle missions are discussed. The performance requirements of the space shuttle are described in terms of three reference missions. Mission requirements are defined by spacecraft or net payload weight and by orbital specifications or space destination. The predicted performance of various space shuttle configurations are analyzed.

  12. Developing an operational capabilities index of the emergency services sector.

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, M.J.; Eaton, L.K.; Shoemaker, Z.M.; Fisher, R.E.; Veselka, S.N.; Wallace, K.E.; Petit, F.D.

    2012-02-20

    In order to enhance the resilience of the Nation and its ability to protect itself in the face of natural and human-caused hazards, the ability of the critical infrastructure (CI) system to withstand specific threats and return to normal operations after degradation must be determined. To fully analyze the resilience of a region and the CI that resides within it, both the actual resilience of the individual CI and the capability of the Emergency Services Sector (ESS) to protect against and respond to potential hazards need to be considered. Thus, a regional resilience approach requires the comprehensive consideration of all parts of the CI system as well as the characterization of emergency services. This characterization must generate reproducible results that can support decision making with regard to risk management, disaster response, business continuity, and community planning and management. To address these issues, Argonne National Laboratory, in collaboration with the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Sector Specific Agency - Executive Management Office, developed a comprehensive methodology to create an Emergency Services Sector Capabilities Index (ESSCI). The ESSCI is a performance metric that ranges from 0 (low level of capabilities) to 100 (high). Because an emergency services program has a high ESSCI, however, does not mean that a specific event would not be able to affect a region or cause severe consequences. And because a program has a low ESSCI does not mean that a disruptive event would automatically lead to serious consequences in a region. Moreover, a score of 100 on the ESSCI is not the level of capability expected of emergency services programs; rather, it represents an optimal program that would rarely be observed. The ESSCI characterizes the state of preparedness of a jurisdiction in terms of emergency and risk management. Perhaps the index's primary benefit is that it can systematically capture, at a given point in time, the

  13. Ensuring US National Aeronautics Test Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, Timothy J.

    2010-01-01

    U.S. leadership in aeronautics depends on ready access to technologically advanced, efficient, and affordable aeronautics test capabilities. These systems include major wind tunnels and propulsion test facilities and flight test capabilities. The federal government owns the majority of the major aeronautics test capabilities in the United States, primarily through the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Department of Defense (DoD). However, changes in the Aerospace landscape, primarily the decrease in demand for testing over the last 20 years required an overarching strategy for management of these national assets. Therefore, NASA established the Aeronautics Test Program (ATP) as a two-pronged strategic initiative to: (1) retain and invest in NASA aeronautics test capabilities considered strategically important to the agency and the nation, and (2) establish a strong, high level partnership with the DoD. Test facility utilization is a critical factor for ATP because it relies on user occupancy fees to recover a substantial part of the operations costs for its facilities. Decreasing utilization is an indicator of excess capacity and in some cases low-risk redundancy (i.e., several facilities with basically the same capability and overall low utilization). However, low utilization does not necessarily translate to lack of strategic importance. Some facilities with relatively low utilization are nonetheless vitally important because of the unique nature of the capability and the foreseeable aeronautics testing needs. Unfortunately, since its inception, the customer base for ATP has continued to shrink. Utilization of ATP wind tunnels has declined by more than 50% from the FY 2006 levels. This significant decrease in customer usage is attributable to several factors, including the overall decline in new programs and projects in the aerospace sector; the impact of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) on the design, development, and research

  14. Food product tracing technology capabilities and interoperability.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Tejas; Zhang, Jianrong Janet

    2013-12-01

    identify the supply-chain partner who provided the information prior to sharing this information with product tracing technology providers. The 9 traceability solution providers who agreed to participate in this project have their systems deployed in a wide range of sectors within the food industry including, but not limited to, livestock, dairy, produce, fruits, seafood, meat, and pork; as well as in pharmaceutical, automotive, retail, and other industries. Some have also been implemented across the globe including Canada, China, USA, Norway, and the EU, among others. This broad commercial use ensures that the findings of this work are applicable to a broad spectrum of the food system. Six of the 9 participants successfully completed the data entry phase of this test. To verify successful data entry for these 6, a demo or screenshots of the data set from each system's user interface was requested. Only 4 of the 6 were able to provide us with this evidence for verification. Of the 6 that completed data entry and moved on to the scenarios phase of the test, 5 were able to provide us with the responses to the scenarios. Time metrics were useful for evaluating the scalability and usability of each technology. Scalability was derived from the time it took to enter the nonstandardized data set into the system (ranges from 7 to 11 d). Usability was derived from the time it took to query the scenarios and provide the results (from a few hours to a week). The time was measured in days it took for the participants to respond after we supplied them all the information they would need to successfully execute each test/scenario. Two of the technology solution providers successfully implemented and participated in a proof-of-concept interoperable framework during Year 2 of this study. While not required, they also demonstrated this interoperability capability on the FSMA-mandated food product tracing pilots for the U.S. FDA. This has significant real-world impact since the

  15. Threshold Capabilities: Threshold Concepts and Knowledge Capability Linked through Variation Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baillie, Caroline; Bowden, John A.; Meyer, Jan H. F.

    2013-01-01

    The Threshold Capability Integrated Theoretical Framework (TCITF) is presented as a framework for the design of university curricula, aimed at developing graduates' capability to deal with previously unseen situations in their professional, social, and personal lives. The TCITF is a new theoretical framework derived from, and heavily dependent…

  16. Toward a US National Air Quality Forecast Capability: Current and Planned Capabilities

    EPA Science Inventory

    As mandated by Congress, NOAA is establishing a US national air quality forecast capability. This capability is being built with EPA, to provide air quality forecast information with enough accuracy and lead-time so that people can take actions to limit harmful effects of poor a...

  17. Aeroheating Mapping to Thermal Model for Autonomous Aerobraking Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amundsen, Ruth M.

    2010-01-01

    Thermal modeling has been performed to evaluate the potential for autonomous aerobraking of a spacecraft in the atmosphere of a planet. As part of this modeling, the aeroheating flux during aerobraking must be applied to the spacecraft solar arrays to evaluate their thermal response. On the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) mission, this was done via two separate thermal models and an extensive suite of mapping scripts. That method has been revised, and the thermal analysis of an aerobraking pass can now be accomplished via a single thermal model, using a new capability in the Thermal Desktop software. This capability, Boundary Condition Mapper, has the ability to input heating flux files that vary with time, position on the solar array, and with the skin temperature. A recently added feature to the Boundary Condition Mapper is that this module can also utilize files that describe the variation of aeroheating over the surface with atmospheric density (rather than time); this is the format of the MRO aeroheating files. This capability has allowed a huge streamlining of the MRO thermal process, simplifying the procedure for importing new aeroheating files and trajectory information. The new process, as well as the quantified time savings, is described.

  18. Advanced-capability alkaline fuel cell powerplant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deronck, Henry J.

    The alkaline fuel cell powerplant utilized in the Space Shuttle Orbiter has established an excellent performance and reliability record over the past decade. Recent AFC technology programs have demonstrated significant advances in cell durability and power density. These capabilities provide the basis for substantial improvement of the Orbiter powerplant, enabling new mission applications as well as enhancing performance in the Orbiter. Improved durability would extend the powerplant's time between overhaul fivefold, and permit longer-duration missions. The powerplant would also be a strong candidate for lunar/planetary surface power systems. Higher power capability would enable replacement of the Orbiter's auxiliary power units with electric motors, and benefits mass-critical applications such as the National AeroSpace Plane.

  19. Shear joint capability versus bolt clearance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, H. M.

    1992-01-01

    The results of a conservative analysis approach into the determination of shear joint strength capability for typical space-flight hardware as a function of the bolt-hole clearance specified in the design are presented. These joints are comprised of high-strength steel fasteners and abutments constructed of aluminum alloys familiar to the aerospace industry. A general analytical expression was first arrived at which relates bolt-hole clearance to the bolt shear load required to place all joint fasteners into a shear transferring position. Extension of this work allowed the analytical development of joint load capability as a function of the number of fasteners, shear strength of the bolt, bolt-hole clearance, and the desired factor of safety. Analysis results clearly indicate that a typical space-flight hardware joint can withstand significant loading when less than ideal bolt hole clearances are used in the design.

  20. Fission Matrix Capability for MCNP Monte Carlo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Forrest; Carney, Sean; Kiedrowski, Brian; Martin, William

    2014-06-01

    We describe recent experience and results from implementing a fission matrix capability into the MCNP Monte Carlo code. The fission matrix can be used to provide estimates of the fundamental mode fission distribution, the dominance ratio, the eigenvalue spectrum, and higher mode forward and adjoint eigenfunctions of the fission neutron source distribution. It can also be used to accelerate the convergence of the power method iterations and to provide basis functions for higher-order perturbation theory. The higher-mode fission sources can be used in MCNP to determine higher-mode forward fluxes and tallies, and work is underway to provide higher-mode adjoint-weighted fluxes and tallies. Past difficulties and limitations of the fission matrix approach are overcome with a new sparse representation of the matrix, permitting much larger and more accurate fission matrix representations. The new fission matrix capabilities provide a significant advance in the state-of-the-art for Monte Carlo criticality calculations.

  1. Satellite instrument provides nighttime sensing capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2012-12-01

    "This is not your father's low-light sensor," Steve Miller, senior research scientist and deputy director of the Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere at Colorado State University, Fort Collins, said at a 5 December news briefing at the AGU Fall Meeting. He and others at the briefing were showing off the nighttime sensing capability of the day/night band of the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) of instruments onboard the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) Earth-observing research satellite, a joint NASA and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) satellite that was launched on 28 October 2011. Noting that low-light satellite technology has been available for about 40 years, Miller said that the VIIRS day/night band "is truly a paradigm shift in the technology and capability."

  2. NASA DOEPOD NDE Capabilities Data Book

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Generazio, Edward R.

    2015-01-01

    This data book contains the Directed Design of Experiments for Validating Probability of Detection (POD) Capability of NDE Systems (DOEPOD) analyses of the nondestructive inspection data presented in the NTIAC, Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) Capabilities Data Book. DOEPOD is designed as a decision support system to validate inspection system, personnel, and protocol demonstrating 0.90 POD with 95% confidence at critical flaw sizes, a90/95. Although 0.90 POD with 95% confidence at critical flaw sizes is often stated as an inspection requirement in inspection documents, including NASA Standards, NASA critical aerospace applications have historically only accepted 0.978 POD or better with a 95% one-sided lower confidence bound exceeding 0.90 at critical flaw sizes, a90/95.

  3. Guidelines and Capabilities for Designing Human Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Christopher S.; Burnett, Rebeka; Charles, John; Cucinotta, Frank; Fullerton, Richard; Goodman, Jerry R.; Griffith, Anthony D., Sr.; Kosmo, Joseph J.; Perchonok, Michele; Railsback, Jan; Rajulu, Sudhakar; Stilwell, Don; Thomas, Gretchen; Tri, Terry; Joshi, Jitendra; Wheeler, Ray; Rudisill, Marianne; Wilson, John; Mueller, Alyssa; Simmons, Anne

    2003-01-01

    These guidelines and capabilities identify the points of intersection between human spaceflight crews and mission considerations such as architecture, vehicle design, technologies, operations, and science requirements. In these chapters, we will provide clear, top-level guidelines for human-related exploration studies and technology research that will address common questions and requirements. As a result, we hope that ongoing mission trade studies will consider common, standard, and practical criteria for human interfaces.

  4. Recombinant organisms capable of fermenting cellobiose

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Lai, Xiaokuang; Moniruzzaman, Mohammed; York, Sean W.

    2000-01-01

    This invention relates to a recombinant microorganism which expresses pyruvate decarboxylase, alcohol dehydrogenase, Klebsiella phospho-.beta.-glucosidase and Klebsiella (phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system) cellobiose-utilizing Enzyme II, wherein said phospho-.beta.-glucosidase and said (phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase) cellobiose-utilizing Enzyme II are heterologous to said microorganism and wherein said microorganism is capable of utilizing both hemicellulose and cellulose, including cellobiose, in the production of ethanol.

  5. Sensor capabilities for the HERMIES experimental robot

    SciTech Connect

    Killough, S.M.; Hamel, W.R.

    1988-01-01

    The Center for Engineering Systems Advanced Research at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has developed an experimental robot, the HERMIES, to test artificial intelligence concepts. This paper describes the capabilities provided for navigation and control. The authors conclude that the sensor suite, which enables the robot to recognize, locate, and grasp objects, makes HERMIES IIB a powerful tool for robotics and artificial intelligence research. 7 refs., 11 figs.

  6. Servicers system demonstration plan and capability development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bulboaca, M. A.; Cuseo, J. A.; Derocher, W. L., Jr.; Maples, R. W.; Reynolds, P. C.; Sterrett, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    A plan for the demonstration of the exchange of Multi-Mission Modular Spacecraft (MMS) modules using the servicer mechanism Engineering Test Unit (ETU) was prepared and executed. The plan included: establishment of requirements, conceptual design, selection of MMS spacecraft mockup configuration, selection of MMS module mockup configuration, evaluation of adequacy of ETU load capability, and selection of a stowage rack arrangement. The MMS module exchange demonstration mockup equipment was designed, fabricated, checked out, shipped, installed, and demonstrated.

  7. Asymmetrical Warfare, Transformation, and Foreign Language Capability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    Indonesia − Indonesian/ Javanese • Malaysia − Malay Sources of Foreign Language Capability: Strengths and Weaknesses Expanding foreign language...knowing our enemy” requires understanding the culture , politics, and re- ligion of the terrorists, which in turn requires experts in their language...Understanding the ideology of our present enemies, and thereby what moti- vates their desire to kill, requires understanding culture and politics, which

  8. Assessing Full Spectrum BCT Engineer Capability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-12

    volcano mine systems, six Mongoose MICLIC trailers, six HMEEs, six DEUCEs, one Bobcat skid steer tractor, four rapidly emplaced bridge systems (REBS), six...provide obstacle reduction capability. The full width plows and Mongoose MICLIC explosive 50 line clearing charges on the ABVs and the mine...rollers, plows, and Mongoose MICLIC systems for lane reduction. The Mobility Support Platoon of the SBCT engineer company has one hundred feet of Medium

  9. Capabilities of the thermal acoustic fatigue apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clevenson, S. A.; Daniels, E. F.

    1992-01-01

    The Thermal Acoustic Fatigue Apparatus (TAFA) is a facility for applying intense noise and heat to small test panels. Modifications to TAFA have increased the heating capability to 44 BTU/(ft.-sec.), making it possible to heat test panels to 2000 F and concurrently apply 168 dB of noise. Results of acoustic and thermal surveys are shown. Two test items, a 0.09 in. steel panel and an insulated panel, were used in the thermal survey.

  10. PTTI Capabilities of the Modernized LORAN System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    is steered to UTC by the LORAN signal (Figure 11). ANTENNA INTERFACE E -FIELD ANTENNA BIAS SELECT BANDPASS FILTER ATTENUATOR AMPLIFIER LOWPASS...A. Lombardi, T. Celano, and E . D. Powers, 2005, “The Potential Role of Enhanced LORAN -C in the National Timing Infrastructure,” in Proceedings of...40th Annual Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) Meeting 507 PTTI CAPABILITIES OF THE MODERNIZED LORAN SYSTEM Kirk Montgomery

  11. Range Atmospheric and Oceanic Environmental Support Capabilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    Acquisition Systems DASS Doppler Acoustic Sounding System DBASI Digital Barometer Altimeter Setting Indicator DoD Department of Defense DRWP Doppler radar...instruments used in support of weather related efforts: (1) Doppler Acoustic Sounding System ( DASS ) is capable of measuring the atmospheric...A Shamir, and L Adleman) wind towers consist of 26 towers placed in strategic locations throughout the range. The standard 54 ft towers employ a

  12. Mixed waste treatment capabilities at Envirocare

    SciTech Connect

    Rafati, A.

    1994-12-31

    This presentation gives an overview of the business achievements and presents a corporate summary for the whole handling company Envirocare located in Clive, Utah. This company operates a permitted low-level radioactive and mixed waste facility which handles waste from the United States Department of Energy, Environmental Protection Agency, Department of Defense, and Fortune 500 companies. A description of business services and treatment capabilities is presented.

  13. Manufacturing fuel-switching capability, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    Historically, about one-third of all energy consumed in the United States has been used by manufacturers. About one-quarter of manufacturing energy is used as feedstocks and raw material inputs that are converted into nonenergy products; the remainder is used for its energy content. During 1988, the most recent year for which data are available, manufacturers consumed 15.5 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) of energy to produce heat and power and to generate electricity. The manufacturing sector also has widespread capabilities to switch from one fuel to another for either economic or emergency reasons. There are numerous ways to define fuel switching. For the purposes of the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS), fuel switching is defined as the capability to substitute one energy source for another within 30 days with no significant modifications to the fuel-consuming equipment, while keeping production constant. Fuel-switching capability allows manufacturers substantial flexibility in choosing their mix of energy sources. The consumption of a given energy source can be maximized if all possible switching into that energy source takes place. The estimates in this report are based on data collected on the 1988 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS), Forms 846 (A through C). The EIA conducts this national sample survey of manufacturing energy consumption on a triennial basis. The MECS is the only comprehensive source of national-level data on energy-related information for the manufacturing industries. The MECS was first conducted in 1986 to collect data for 1985. This report presents information on the fuel-switching capabilities of manufacturers in 1988. This report is the second of a series based on the 1988 MECS. 8 figs., 31 tabs.

  14. The Chinese Navy: Expanding Capabilities, Evolving Roles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    submarines (the Soryu) equipped with the Stirling engine for air-independent propul- sion (AIP). At least four boats in this class are under... Stirling AIP system. It also operates two indig- enously designed and constructed Endurance-class landing ships, each capable of carrying 350 troops, 18...lp-x.htm>. 23 Tim Fish, “Seoul Commissions Type 214 Sub,” Jane’s Defence Weekly, January 23, 2008. 24 Robert Karnoil, “Team Prepares for 2007 Start on

  15. Satellite-based Tropical Cyclone Monitoring Capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, J.; Richardson, K.; Surratt, M.; Yang, S.; Lee, T. F.; Sampson, C. R.; Solbrig, J.; Kuciauskas, A. P.; Miller, S. D.; Kent, J.

    2012-12-01

    Satellite remote sensing capabilities to monitor tropical cyclone (TC) location, structure, and intensity have evolved by utilizing a combination of operational and research and development (R&D) sensors. The microwave imagers from the operational Defense Meteorological Satellite Program [Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and the Special Sensor Microwave Imager Sounder (SSMIS)] form the "base" for structure observations due to their ability to view through upper-level clouds, modest size swaths and ability to capture most storm structure features. The NASA TRMM microwave imager and precipitation radar continue their 15+ yearlong missions in serving the TC warning and research communities. The cessation of NASA's QuikSCAT satellite after more than a decade of service is sorely missed, but India's OceanSat-2 scatterometer is now providing crucial ocean surface wind vectors in addition to the Navy's WindSat ocean surface wind vector retrievals. Another Advanced Scatterometer (ASCAT) onboard EUMETSAT's MetOp-2 satellite is slated for launch soon. Passive microwave imagery has received a much needed boost with the launch of the French/Indian Megha Tropiques imager in September 2011, basically greatly supplementing the very successful NASA TRMM pathfinder with a larger swath and more frequent temporal sampling. While initial data issues have delayed data utilization, current news indicates this data will be available in 2013. Future NASA Global Precipitation Mission (GPM) sensors starting in 2014 will provide enhanced capabilities. Also, the inclusion of the new microwave sounder data from the NPP ATMS (Oct 2011) will assist in mapping TC convective structures. The National Polar orbiting Partnership (NPP) program's VIIRS sensor includes a day night band (DNB) with the capability to view TC cloud structure at night when sufficient lunar illumination exits. Examples highlighting this new capability will be discussed in concert with additional data fusion efforts.

  16. Amphibious Operations: Ensuring Capabilities to Assure Access

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-05

    component of the .US National Security Strategy. 8 The international resistance to support US operations overtly further reinforces and validates the...operations considering the likelihood of continued resistance by neighboring states adjacent to crises areas. The capability to project power from the sea...the region of transition between the global commons and the shore, are an important factor in bridging the space between international waters and dry

  17. Transportation capabilities of the existing cask fleet

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, P.E.; Joy, D.S.; Wankerl, M.W.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes a number of scenarios estimating the amount of spent nuclear fuel that could be transported to a Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) Facility by various combinations of existing cask fleets. To develop the scenarios, the data provided by the Transportation System Data Base (TSDB) were modified to reflect the additional time for cask turnaround resulting from various startup and transportation issues. With these more realistic speed and cask-handling assumptions, the annual transportation capability of a fleet consisting of all of the existing casks is approximately 46 metric tons of uranium (MTU). The most likely fleet of existing casks that would be made available to the Department of Energy (DOE) consists of two rail, three overweight truck, and six legal weight truck casks. Under the same transportation assumptions, this cask fleet is capable of approximately transporting 270 MTU/year. These ranges of capability is a result of the assumptions pertaining to the number of casks assumed to be available. It should be noted that this assessment assumes additional casks based on existing certifications are not fabricated. 5 refs., 4 tabs.

  18. Graphical workstation capability for reliability modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bavuso, Salvatore J.; Koppen, Sandra V.; Haley, Pamela J.

    1992-01-01

    In addition to computational capabilities, software tools for estimating the reliability of fault-tolerant digital computer systems must also provide a means of interfacing with the user. Described here is the new graphical interface capability of the hybrid automated reliability predictor (HARP), a software package that implements advanced reliability modeling techniques. The graphics oriented (GO) module provides the user with a graphical language for modeling system failure modes through the selection of various fault-tree gates, including sequence-dependency gates, or by a Markov chain. By using this graphical input language, a fault tree becomes a convenient notation for describing a system. In accounting for any sequence dependencies, HARP converts the fault-tree notation to a complex stochastic process that is reduced to a Markov chain, which it can then solve for system reliability. The graphics capability is available for use on an IBM-compatible PC, a Sun, and a VAX workstation. The GO module is written in the C programming language and uses the graphical kernal system (GKS) standard for graphics implementation. The PC, VAX, and Sun versions of the HARP GO module are currently in beta-testing stages.

  19. Satellite broadcasting - Capabilities for public service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsten, R. B.

    1975-01-01

    Satellite broadcast services to support health-care and educational transmissions must work with small, low-cost terminals in allocated radio-frequency bands. The ATS-6 spacecraft has successfully demonstrated such capability in the bands of non-technical users. It supports interactive television broadcasting to simple, low-cost terminals in a nationwide series of experiments in the delivery of health-care and educational services. ATS-6 achieves this capability with a very large antenna and moderate transmitter power. The coverage limitations inherent in this approach will be overcome by the joint U.S.-Canadian Communications Technology Satellite to be launched in December 1975. The CTS will demonstrate broadcast capability with new, high-power technology in a newly-allocated radio-frequency band. This will make it possible to use smaller antennas, greatly enlarging the area coverage available to the many nontechnical experimenters using CTS for their own needs. A practical application of these technologies is now in development for operational broadcasting services in Japan.

  20. Evaluating scatterometry 3D capabilities for EUV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jie; Kritsun, Oleg; Dasari, Prasad; Volkman, Catherine; Wallow, Tom; Hu, Jiangtao

    2013-04-01

    Optical critical dimension (OCD) metrology using scatterometry has been demonstrated to be a viable solution for fast and non-destructive in-line process control and monitoring. As extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) is more widely adopted to fabricate smaller and smaller patterns for electronic devices, scatterometry faces new challenges due to several reasons. For 14nm node and beyond, the feature size is nearly an order of magnitude smaller than the shortest wavelength used in scatterometry. In addition, thinner resist layer is used in EUVL compared with conventional lithography, which leads to reduced measurement sensitivity. Despite these difficulties, tolerance has reduced for smaller feature size. In this work we evaluate 3D capability of scatterometry for EUV process using spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE). Three types of structures, contact holes, tip-to-tip, and tip-to-edge, are studied to test CD and end-gap metrology capabilities. The wafer is processed with focus and exposure matrix. Good correlations to CD-SEM results are achieved and good dynamic precision is obtained for all the key parameters. In addition, the fit to process provides an independent method to evaluate data quality from different metrology tools such as OCD and CDSEM. We demonstrate 3D capabilities of scatterometry OCD metrology for EUVL using spectroscopic ellipsometry, which provides valuable in-line metrology for CD and end-gap control in electronic circuit fabrications.

  1. Walking capabilities of Gregor controlled through Walknet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arena, Paolo; Patané, Luca; Schilling, Malte; Schmitz, Josef

    2007-05-01

    Locomotion control of legged robots is nowadays a field in continuous evolution. In this work a bio-inspired control architecture based on the stick insect is applied to control the hexapod robot Gregor. The control scheme is an extension of Walknet, a decentralized network inspired by the stick insect, that on the basis of local reflexes generates the control signals needed to coordinate locomotion in hexapod robots. Walknet has been adapted to the specific mechanical structure of Gregor that is characterized by specialized legs and a sprawled posture. In particular an innovative hind leg geometry, inspired by the cockroach, has been considered to improve climbing capabilities. The performances of the new control architecture have been evaluated in dynamic simulation environments. The robot has been endowed with distance and contact sensors for obstacle detection. A heading control is used to avoid large obstacles, and an avoidance reflex, as can be found in stick insects, has been introduced to further improve climbing capabilities of the structure. The reported results, obtained in different environmental configurations, stress the adaptive capabilities of the Walknet approach: Even in unpredictable and cluttered environments the walking behaviour of the simulated robot and the robot prototype, controlled through a FPGA based board, remained stable.

  2. Heutagogic approach to developing capable learners.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Reem Rachel; Komattil, Ramnarayan

    2017-03-01

    The twenty-first century higher education sector has come a long way after undergoing continuous metamorphosis from pedagogy to andragogy. Most of the educational approaches adopted in medical schools are directed towards developing more of competencies and less of capability, which is the ability to use competencies in novel contexts. Competencies alone are not sufficient to thrive in the present day work place as medical profession subsumes complex contexts; it is in this scenario that, medical educators are entrusted with the challenging task of developing "capable learners". In the heutagogical approach, learners are required to decide upon what to learn and how to learn and therefore the control of the learning process is on the learner and the role of the teacher becomes that of a navigator. This paper highlights the current higher educational practices based on heutagogy, considers its application in the context of Problem-based learning and also discusses a few challenges in incorporating this approach in the existing undergraduate medical curriculum. The article proposes the use of social media in order to support learner autonomy, which in turn improves learners' cognitive engagement with content and tasks, thereby assisting the development of attributes associated with capability.

  3. Capability Investment Strategy to Enable JPL Future Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lincoln, William; Merida, Sofia; Adumitroaie, Virgil; Weisbin, Charles R.

    2006-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) formulates and conducts deep space missions for NASA (the National Aeronautics and Space Administration). The Chief Technologist of JPL has responsibility for strategic planning of the laboratory's advanced technology program to assure that the required technological capabilities to enable future missions are ready as needed. The responsibilities include development of a Strategic Plan (Antonsson, E., 2005). As part of the planning effort, a structured approach to technology prioritization, based upon the work of the START (Strategic Assessment of Risk and Technology) (Weisbin, C.R., 2004) team, was developed. The purpose of this paper is to describe this approach and present its current status relative to the JPL technology investment.

  4. Capabilities Roadmap Briefings to the National Research Council

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    High energy power and propulsion capability roadmap - general background and introduction. Advanced telescopes and observatories and scientific instruments and sensors capability roadmaps - general background and introduction. Space communications capability roadmap interim review. Robotic access to planetary surface capability roadmap. Human health and support systems capability roadmap progress review.

  5. Development and Testing of EFIT 3D Equilibrium Reconstruction Capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lao, L. L.; Ferraro, N. M.; Strait, E. J.; Turnbull, A. D.; King, J. D.

    2014-10-01

    Recent development and testing of EFIT capability to reconstruct tokamak 3D perturbed equilibrium are described. The 3D extension is based on an expansion of the MHD equations to account for the 3D effects. EFIT uses the cylindrical coordinate system and can include magnetic island and stochastic effects. Several linearization schemes are being explored to improve the EFIT 3D perturbed solutions. Algorithms are also being developed to allow EFIT to reconstruct 3D perturbed equilibria directly making use of plasma response to 3D perturbations from the MARS or M3D-C1 MHD codes. Other efforts include testing of the new EFIT 3D capability using simulated magnetic data based on response calculations from MARS and M3D-C1, and performing detailed benchmarking calculations against other 3D codes such as VMEC/V3FIT. Reconstruction examples using EFIT and the new DIII-D 3D magnetic measurements to reconstruct 3D perturbed experimental equilibria using well-diagnosed discharges from DIII-D error field, RWM, and RMP experiments will be presented. Work supported by the US DOE under DE-FC02-04ER54698 and DE-FG02-95ER54309.

  6. Medical Data Architecture Project Capabilities and Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middour, C.; Krihak, M.; Lindsey, A.; Marker, N.; Wolfe, S.; Winther, S.; Ronzano, K.; Bolles, D.; Toscano, W.; Shaw, T.

    2017-01-01

    Mission constraints will challenge the delivery of medical care on a long-term, deep space exploration mission. This type of mission will be restricted in the availability of medical knowledge, skills, procedures and resources to prevent, diagnose, and treat in-flight medical events. Challenges to providing medical care are anticipated, including resource and resupply constraints, delayed communications and no ability for medical evacuation. The Medical Data Architecture (MDA) project will enable medical care capability in this constrained environment. The first version of the system, called "Test Bed 1," includes capabilities for automated data collection, data storage and data retrieval to provide information to the Crew Medical Officer (CMO). Test Bed 1 seeks to establish a data architecture foundation and develop a scalable data management system through modular design and standardized interfaces. In addition, it will demonstrate to stakeholders the potential for an improved, automated, flow of data to and from the medical system over the current methods employed on the International Space Station (ISS). It integrates a set of external devices, software and processes, and a Subjective, Objective, Assessment, and Plan (SOAP) note commonly used by clinicians. Medical data like electrocardiogram plots, heart rate, skin temperature, respiration rate, medications taken, and more are collected from devices and stored in the Electronic Medical Records (EMR) system, and reported to crew and clinician. Devices integrated include the Astroskin biosensor vest and IMED CARDIAX electrocardiogram (ECG) device with INEED MD ECG Glove, and the NASA-developed Medical Dose Tracker application. The system is designed to be operated as a standalone system, and can be deployed in a variety of environments, from a laptop to a data center. The system is primarily composed of open-source software tools, and is designed to be modular, so new capabilities can be added. The software

  7. Aerothermodynamic Flight Simulation Capabilities for Aerospace Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Charles G.

    1998-01-01

    Aerothermodynamics, encompassing aerodynamics, aeroheating, and fluid dynamics and physical processes, is the genesis for the design and development of advanced space transportation vehicles and provides crucial information to other disciplines such as structures, materials, propulsion, avionics, and guidance, navigation and control. Sources of aerothermodynamic information are ground-based facilities, Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) and engineering computer codes, and flight experiments. Utilization of this aerothermodynamic triad provides the optimum aerothermodynamic design to safely satisfy mission requirements while reducing design conservatism, risk and cost. The iterative aerothermodynamic process for initial screening/assessment of aerospace vehicle concepts, optimization of aerolines to achieve/exceed mission requirements, and benchmark studies for final design and establishment of the flight data book are reviewed. Aerothermodynamic methodology centered on synergism between ground-based testing and CFD predictions is discussed for various flow regimes encountered by a vehicle entering the Earth s atmosphere from low Earth orbit. An overview of the resources/infrastructure required to provide accurate/creditable aerothermodynamic information in a timely manner is presented. Impacts on Langley s aerothermodynamic capabilities due to recent programmatic changes such as Center reorganization, downsizing, outsourcing, industry (as opposed to NASA) led programs, and so forth are discussed. Sample applications of these capabilities to high Agency priority, fast-paced programs such as Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV)/X-33 Phases I and 11, X-34, Hyper-X and X-38 are presented and lessons learned discussed. Lastly, enhancements in ground-based testing/CFD capabilities necessary to partially/fully satisfy future requirements are addressed.

  8. Aviation System Analysis Capability Executive Assistant Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Eileen; Villani, James A.; Osman, Mohammed; Godso, David; King, Brent; Ricciardi, Michael

    1998-01-01

    In this technical document, we describe the design developed for the Aviation System Analysis Capability (ASAC) Executive Assistant (EA) Proof of Concept (POC). We describe the genesis and role of the ASAC system, discuss the objectives of the ASAC system and provide an overview of components and models within the ASAC system, and describe the design process and the results of the ASAC EA POC system design. We also describe the evaluation process and results for applicable COTS software. The document has six chapters, a bibliography, three appendices and one attachment.

  9. New multivariable capabilities of the INCA program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Frank H.; Downing, John P.; Thorpe, Christopher J.

    1989-01-01

    The INteractive Controls Analysis (INCA) program was developed at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center to provide a user friendly, efficient environment for the design and analysis of control systems, specifically spacecraft control systems. Since its inception, INCA has found extensive use in the design, development, and analysis of control systems for spacecraft, instruments, robotics, and pointing systems. The (INCA) program was initially developed as a comprehensive classical design analysis tool for small and large order control systems. The latest version of INCA, expected to be released in February of 1990, was expanded to include the capability to perform multivariable controls analysis and design.

  10. Building HR capability in health care organizations.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Naresh

    2006-01-01

    The current human resource (HR) management practices in health care are consistent with the industrial model of management. However, health care organizations are not factories. They are highly knowledge-intensive and service-oriented entities and thus require a different set of HR practices and systems to support them. Drawing from the resource-based theory, I argue that HRs are a potent weapon of competitive advantage for health care organizations and propose a five-dimensional conception of HR capability for harnessing HRs in health care organizations. The significant complementarities that exist between HRs and information technologies for delivering safer and better quality of patient care are also discussed.

  11. Molecular Contamination Investigation Facility (MCIF) Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soules, David M.

    2013-01-01

    This facility was used to guide the development of ASTM E 1559 center dot Multiple Quartz Crystal Microbalances (QCMs), large sample and spectral effects capability center dot Several instrumented, high vacuum chamber systems are used to evaluate the molecular outgassing characteristics of materials, flight components and other sensitive surfaces. Test materials for spacecraft/instrument selection center.Test flight components for acceptable molecular outgas levels center dot Determine time/temperature vacuum bake-out requirements center. Data used to set limits for use of materials and specific components center. Provide Input Data to Contamination Transport Models -Applied to numerous flight projects over the past 20 years.

  12. Aviation System Analysis Capability Executive Assistant Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Eileen; Villani, James A.; Anderson, Kevin; Book, Paul

    1999-01-01

    In this technical document, we describe the development of the Aviation System Analysis Capability (ASAC) Executive Assistant (EA) Proof of Concept (POC) and Beta version. We describe the genesis and role of the ASAC system, discuss the objectives of the ASAC system and provide an overview of components and models in the ASAC system, and describe the design process and the results of the ASAC EA POC and Beta system development. We also describe the evaluation process and results for applicable COTS software. The document has seven chapters, a bibliography, and two appendices.

  13. Characteristics of Incinerators with Heat Recovery Capability.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-04-01

    p" R. Ducey U G. Schanche D A wide range of equipment is available for incinerating wastes and recovering the heat released as useful energy. These...With Heat Recovery Capability (Unclassified) 12 PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) K. Griggs; G. Chamberlin; R. Ducey ; C. Schanche-A 1aTPOFRPR13TIECOVERED 14DATE OF...for the plant site. 2 R. A. Ducey , et al., Heat Recovery Incineration: A Summary of Operational Ex- perience, Special Report E-85/06/ADA152236 (USA

  14. Capabilities of the Amateur-Science Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchheim, Robert

    2016-06-01

    Devoted non-professional astronomers can offer useful service to researchers by collecting data that can’t be fit into funded observing programs, pursuing low-probability-of-success projects, stretching the limits of commercial technology, and mentoring the next generation of scientists. These individuals are performing photometry of stars and asteroids, astrometry of visual binary systems, and spectroscopy of variable stars. This report will illustrate some of the activities being done by the small-telescope research community-of-practice, and offer suggestions on how to take advantage of their capabilities and enthusiasm.

  15. Synthetic aperture radar capabilities in development

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.

    1994-11-15

    The Imaging and Detection Program (IDP) within the Laser Program is currently developing an X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) to support the Joint US/UK Radar Ocean Imaging Program. The radar system will be mounted in the program`s Airborne Experimental Test-Bed (AETB), where the initial mission is to image ocean surfaces and better understand the physics of low grazing angle backscatter. The Synthetic Aperture Radar presentation will discuss its overall functionality and a brief discussion on the AETB`s capabilities. Vital subsystems including radar, computer, navigation, antenna stabilization, and SAR focusing algorithms will be examined in more detail.

  16. RHIC CRITICAL POINT SEARCH: ASSESSING STARs CAPABILITIES.

    SciTech Connect

    SORENSEN,P.

    2006-07-03

    In this report we discuss the capabilities and limitations of the STAR detector to search for signatures of the QCD critical point in a low energy scan at RHIC. We find that a RHIC low energy scan will cover a broad region of interest in the nuclear matter phase diagram and that the STAR detector--a detector designed to measure the quantities that will be of interest in this search--will provide new observables and improve on previous measurements in this energy range.

  17. [Capabilities and perspectives of dermatoglyphics in medicine].

    PubMed

    Bozhchenko, A P; Tolmachev, I A; Tolmacheva, E B; Isakov, V D

    2008-12-01

    In the article were given general beliefs about dermatoglyphics and it's place in medicine. Was shown a capability of using the dermatoglyphics methods in the clinic in diagnostics of diseases, in the professional selection system, and also in judicial medicine at personal identifications and determination of parenthood. Was given an evaluation of some position of Law "On fingerprint" from the point of view of its efficiency in the process of identification of the personality of dieds in the regional armed conflict on the Northern Caucasus.

  18. Marshall Space Flight Center Test Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Jeffrey T.

    2005-01-01

    The Test Laboratory at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has over 50 facilities across 400+ acres inside a secure, fenced facility. The entire Center is located inside the boundaries of Redstone Arsenal, a 40,000 acre military reservation. About 150 Government and 250 contractor personnel operate facilities capable of all types of propulsion and structural testing, from small components to engine systems and structural strength, structural dynamic and environmental testing. We have tremendous engineering expertise in research, evaluation, analysis, design and development, and test of space transportation systems, subsystems, and components.

  19. Human Research Program Exploration Medical Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barsten, Kristina

    2010-01-01

    NASA s Human Research Program (HRP) conducts and coordinates research projects that provide human health and performance countermeasures, knowledge, technologies, and tools to enable safe, reliable, and productive human space exploration. The Program is divided into 6 major elements, which a) Provide the Program s knowledge and capabilities to conduct research, addressing the human health and performance risks. b) Advance the readiness levels of technology and countermeasures to the point of transfer to the customer programs and organizations. The National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) is a partner with the HRP in developing a successful research program. 3

  20. Social Media in Emergency Management: Capability Assessment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-01

    implementing an effective capability is resolving how to bridge the command-and- control , hierarchical culture of emergency management organizations to...intentionally left blank. ii DRDC-RDDC-2014-R16 Résumé …….. Les organismes de gestion des urgences et de première intervention de partout dans le...organismes de gestion des urgences n’ont pas encore pleinement adopté l’usage des médias sociaux. Dans le présent rapport, nous tentons de déterminer

  1. China's ASAT Weapon: Capabilities and the Potential Threat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forden, Geoffrey

    2008-04-01

    Much has been said about China's 11 January 2007 test of an anti-satellite (ASAT) weapon but few analysts have based their comments on a scientific determination of the weapons capabilities. This paper presents such an analysis derived from the observed pattern of debris, as observed by NORAD and posted on-line by NASA. It is clear that this was a direct hit-to-kill weapon (as opposed to a fragmentation-type explosive warhead), it massed about 600 kg, and was capable of accelerations of at least 6 Gs. It can be inferred with a reasonable degree of confidence that it used an on-board optical tracker, most likely operating in visible light. Furthermore, since the closing speed between the target satellite and the interceptor was 8 km/s during the test, this weapon could be used to attack satellites at higher altitude orbits, such as NAVSTAR/GPS and geostationary satellites that include communications and early warning satellites. This test produced ten times as many pieces of debris as an earlier US hit-to-kill ASAT test which, because of their higher altitudes, will last thousands of years---hundreds of times longer than the debris in the US test. China's test increased the chances of some low earth orbit satellite being hit by a piece of debris by 50%, from about 12% to 18% each year. Given this weapon's capabilities, it is possible to ``war game'' what an all-out Chinese ASAT attack would look like and what responses the US could take. (It is important to emphasize that this is a capabilities-based exercise and not based on Chinese intentions.) If China did launch such an attack, it could eliminate a large fraction of US military satellites in low earth orbit including photo-reconnaissance and electronic intelligence satellites, but not all of them, in the first 24 hours; the requirement that the target satellites be illuminated by the sun limits the attack. Furthermore, the US could maneuver its LEO satellites in the first hours of the attack and greatly

  2. Exploiting EIS/Hinode Imaging Diagnostic Capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio; Warren, H. P.

    2009-05-01

    Using a wide slit, also called slot, the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer, on-board Hinode, is capable of obtaining relatively fast (1-3 min) simultaneous monochromatic images of various spectral lines with different formation temperatures ranging 0.4-3 MK. This mode allows us to study morphology and dynamics of solar coronal and transition region structures across the temperature spectrum in a similar way to an EUV imager. This is achieved at the expense of spectral resolution. In this paper we investigate the plasma diagnostic capabilities of these spectrally pure images.Wide slit images can be interpreted as a superposition of simultaneous narrow slit spectra from adjacent solar positions. From the comparison of consecutive narrow slit rasters and wide slit images, we demonstrate that by making simple assumptions it is possible to extract the narrow slit spectra out of the slot images. This encouraging result opens up the door for plasma diagnostics, like electron density from spectral line ratios and differential emission measure analysis, for solar dynamic events. Various examples, as well as the limitations and validity of the assumptions, are discussed.

  3. Stennis Space Center Verification & Validation Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagnutti, Mary; Ryan, Robert E.; Holekamp, Kara; ONeal, Duane; Knowlton, Kelly; Ross, Kenton; Blonski, Slawomir

    2005-01-01

    Scientists within NASA s Applied Sciences Directorate have developed a well-characterized remote sensing Verification & Validation (V&V) site at the John C. Stennis Space Center (SSC). This site enables the in-flight characterization of satellite and airborne high spatial and moderate resolution remote sensing systems and their products. The smaller scale of the newer high resolution remote sensing systems allows scientists to characterize geometric, spatial, and radiometric data properties using a single V&V site. The targets and techniques used to characterize data from these newer systems can differ significantly from the techniques used to characterize data from the earlier, coarser spatial resolution systems. Scientists are also using the SSC V&V site to characterize thermal infrared systems and active lidar systems. SSC employs geodetic targets, edge targets, radiometric tarps, atmospheric monitoring equipment, and thermal calibration ponds to characterize remote sensing data products. The SSC Instrument Validation Lab is a key component of the V&V capability and is used to calibrate field instrumentation and to provide National Institute of Standards and Technology traceability. This poster presents a description of the SSC characterization capabilities and examples of calibration data.

  4. Toward a Public Toxicogenomics Capability for Supporting ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A publicly available toxicogenomics capability for supporting predictive toxicology and meta-analysis depends on availability of gene expression data for chemical treatment scenarios, the ability to locate and aggregate such information by chemical, and broad data coverage within chemical, genomics, and toxicological information domains. This capability also depends on common genomics standards, protocol description, and functional linkages of diverse public Internet data resources. We present a survey of public genomics resources from these vantage points and conclude that, despite progress in many areas, the current state of the majority of public microarray databases is inadequate for supporting these objectives, particularly with regard to chemical indexing. To begin to address these inadequacies, we focus chemical annotation efforts on experimental content contained in the two primary public genomic resources: ArrayExpress and Gene Expression Omnibus. Automated scripts and extensive manual review were employed to transform free-text experiment descriptions into a standardized, chemically indexed inventory of experiments in both resources. These files, which include top-level summary annotations, allow for identification of current chemical-associated experimental content, as well as chemical-exposure–related (or

  5. Tonopah Test Range capabilities: technical manual

    SciTech Connect

    Manhart, R.L.

    1982-11-01

    This manual describes Tonopah Test Range (TTR), defines its testing capabilities, and outlines the steps necessary to schedule tests on the Range. Operated by Sandia National Laboratories, TTR is a major test facility for DOE-funded weapon programs. The Range presents an integrated system for ballistic test vehicle tracking and data acquisition. Multiple radars, optical trackers, telemetry stations, a central computer complex, and combined landline/RF communications systems assure full Range coverage for any type of test. Range operations are conducted by a department within Sandia's Field Engineering Directorate. While the overall Range functions as a complete system, it is operationally divided into the Test Measurements, Instrumentation Development, and Range Operations divisions. The primary function of TTR is to support DOE weapons test activities. Management, however, encourages other Government agencies and their contractors to schedule tests on the Range which can make effective use of its capabilities. Information concerning Range use by organizations outside of DOE is presented. Range instrumentation and support facilities are described in detail. This equipment represents the current state-of-the-art and reflects a continuing commitment by TTR management to field the most effective tracking and data acquisition system available.

  6. Stennis Space Center Verification & Validation Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagnutti, Mary; Ryan, Robert E.; Holekamp, Kara; O'Neal, Duane; Knowlton, Kelly; Ross, Kenton; Blonski, Slawomir

    2007-01-01

    Scientists within NASA#s Applied Research & Technology Project Office (formerly the Applied Sciences Directorate) have developed a well-characterized remote sensing Verification & Validation (V&V) site at the John C. Stennis Space Center (SSC). This site enables the in-flight characterization of satellite and airborne high spatial resolution remote sensing systems and their products. The smaller scale of the newer high resolution remote sensing systems allows scientists to characterize geometric, spatial, and radiometric data properties using a single V&V site. The targets and techniques used to characterize data from these newer systems can differ significantly from the techniques used to characterize data from the earlier, coarser spatial resolution systems. Scientists have used the SSC V&V site to characterize thermal infrared systems. Enhancements are being considered to characterize active lidar systems. SSC employs geodetic targets, edge targets, radiometric tarps, atmospheric monitoring equipment, and thermal calibration ponds to characterize remote sensing data products. Similar techniques are used to characterize moderate spatial resolution sensing systems at selected nearby locations. The SSC Instrument Validation Lab is a key component of the V&V capability and is used to calibrate field instrumentation and to provide National Institute of Standards and Technology traceability. This poster presents a description of the SSC characterization capabilities and examples of calibration data.

  7. Small, Low Cost, Launch Capability Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    A recent explosion in nano-sat, small-sat, and university class payloads has been driven by low cost electronics and sensors, wide component availability, as well as low cost, miniature computational capability and open source code. Increasing numbers of these very small spacecraft are being launched as secondary payloads, dramatically decreasing costs, and allowing greater access to operations and experimentation using actual space flight systems. While manifesting as a secondary payload provides inexpensive rides to orbit, these arrangements also have certain limitations. Small, secondary payloads are typically included with very limited payload accommodations, supported on a non interference basis (to the prime payload), and are delivered to orbital conditions driven by the primary launch customer. Integration of propulsion systems or other hazardous capabilities will further complicate secondary launch arrangements, and accommodation requirements. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Marshall Space Flight Center has begun work on the development of small, low cost launch system concepts that could provide dedicated, affordable launch alternatives to small, high risk university type payloads and spacecraft. These efforts include development of small propulsion systems and highly optimized structural efficiency, utilizing modern advanced manufacturing techniques. This paper outlines the plans and accomplishments of these efforts and investigates opportunities for truly revolutionary reductions in launch and operations costs. Both evolution of existing sounding rocket systems to orbital delivery, and the development of clean sheet, optimized small launch systems are addressed.

  8. Low background screening capability in the UK

    SciTech Connect

    Ghag, Chamkaur

    2015-08-17

    Low background rare event searches in underground laboratories seeking observation of direct dark matter interactions or neutrino-less double beta decay have the potential to profoundly advance our understanding of the physical universe. Successful results from these experiments depend critically on construction from extremely radiologically clean materials and accurate knowledge of subsequent low levels of expected background. The experiments must conduct comprehensive screening campaigns to reduce radioactivity from detector components, and these measurements also inform detailed characterisation and quantification of background sources and their impact, necessary to assign statistical significance to any potential discovery. To provide requisite sensitivity for material screening and characterisation in the UK to support our rare event search activities, we have re-developed our infrastructure to add ultra-low background capability across a range of complementary techniques that collectively allow complete radioactivity measurements. Ultra-low background HPGe and BEGe detectors have been installed at the Boulby Underground Laboratory, itself undergoing substantial facility re-furbishment, to provide high sensitivity gamma spectroscopy in particular for measuring the uranium and thorium decay series products. Dedicated low-activity mass spectrometry instrumentation has been developed at UCL for part per trillion level contaminant identification to complement underground screening with direct U and Th measurements, and meet throughput demands. Finally, radon emanation screening at UCL measures radon background inaccessible to gamma or mass spectrometry techniques. With this new capability the UK is delivering half of the radioactivity screening for the LZ dark matter search experiment.

  9. Systems Engineering for Space Exploration Medical Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mindock, Jennifer; Reilly, Jeffrey; Urbina, Michelle; Hailey, Melinda; Rubin, David; Reyes, David; Hanson, Andrea; Burba, Tyler; McGuire, Kerry; Cerro, Jeffrey; Middour, Chris

    2017-01-01

    Human exploration missions to beyond low Earth orbit destinations such as Mars will present significant new challenges to crew health management during a mission compared to current low Earth orbit operations. For the medical system, lack of consumable resupply, evacuation opportunities, and real-time ground support are key drivers toward greater autonomy. Recognition of the limited mission and vehicle resources available to carry out exploration missions motivates the Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC) Element's approach to enabling the necessary autonomy. The Element's work must integrate with the overall exploration mission and vehicle design efforts to successfully provide exploration medical capabilities. ExMC is applying systems engineering principles and practices to accomplish its integrative goals. This paper discusses the structured and integrative approach that is guiding the medical system technical development. Assumptions for the required levels of care on exploration missions, medical system guiding principles, and a Concept of Operations are early products that capture and clarify stakeholder expectations. Mobel-Based Systems Engineering techniques are then applied to define medical system behavior and architecture. Interfaces to other flight and ground systems, and within the medical system are identified and defined. Initial requirements and traceability are established, which sets the stage for identification of future technology development needs. An early approach for verification and validation, taking advantage of terrestrial and near-Earth exploration system analogs, is also defined to further guide system planning and development.

  10. Building EOS capability for Malaysia - the options

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subari, M. D.; Hassan, A.

    2014-06-01

    Earth observation satellite (EOS) is currently a major tool to monitor earth dynamics and increase human understanding of earth surface process. Since the early 80s, Malaysia has been using EOS images for various applications, such as weather forecasting, land use mapping, agriculture, environment monitoring and others. Until now, all EOS images were obtained from foreign satellite systems. Realising on the strategic need of having its own capability, Malaysia embarked into EOS development programs in the early 90s. Starting with TiungSAT-1, a micro-satellite carrying small camera, then followed by RazakSAT, a small satellite carrying 2.5 m panchromatic (PAN) medium-aperture-camera, the current satellite program development, the RazakSAT-2, designed to carry a 1.0 m high resolution PAN and 4.0m multi-spectral camera, would become a strategic initiative of the government in developing and accelerating the nation's capability in the area of satellite technology and its application. Would this effort continue until all needs of the remote sensing community being fulfilled by its own EOS? This paper will analyze the intention of the Malaysian government through its National Space Policy and other related policy documents, and proposes some policy options on this. Key factors to be considered are specific data need of the EOS community, data availability and the more subjective political motivations such as national pride.

  11. Collaborative environments for capability-based planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McQuay, William K.

    2005-05-01

    Distributed collaboration is an emerging technology for the 21st century that will significantly change how business is conducted in the defense and commercial sectors. Collaboration involves two or more geographically dispersed entities working together to create a "product" by sharing and exchanging data, information, and knowledge. A product is defined broadly to include, for example, writing a report, creating software, designing hardware, or implementing robust systems engineering and capability planning processes in an organization. Collaborative environments provide the framework and integrate models, simulations, domain specific tools, and virtual test beds to facilitate collaboration between the multiple disciplines needed in the enterprise. The Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) is conducting a leading edge program in developing distributed collaborative technologies targeted to the Air Force's implementation of systems engineering for a simulation-aided acquisition and capability-based planning. The research is focusing on the open systems agent-based framework, product and process modeling, structural architecture, and the integration technologies - the glue to integrate the software components. In past four years, two live assessment events have been conducted to demonstrate the technology in support of research for the Air Force Agile Acquisition initiatives. The AFRL Collaborative Environment concept will foster a major cultural change in how the acquisition, training, and operational communities conduct business.

  12. NASA DOE POD NDE Capabilities Data Book

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Generazio, Edward R.

    2015-01-01

    This data book contains the Directed Design of Experiments for Validating Probability of Detection (POD) Capability of NDE Systems (DOEPOD) analyses of the nondestructive inspection data presented in the NTIAC, Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) Capabilities Data Book, 3rd ed., NTIAC DB-97-02. DOEPOD is designed as a decision support system to validate inspection system, personnel, and protocol demonstrating 0.90 POD with 95% confidence at critical flaw sizes, a90/95. The test methodology used in DOEPOD is based on the field of statistical sequential analysis founded by Abraham Wald. Sequential analysis is a method of statistical inference whose characteristic feature is that the number of observations required by the procedure is not determined in advance of the experiment. The decision to terminate the experiment depends, at each stage, on the results of the observations previously made. A merit of the sequential method, as applied to testing statistical hypotheses, is that test procedures can be constructed which require, on average, a substantially smaller number of observations than equally reliable test procedures based on a predetermined number of observations.

  13. Control Requirements to Support Manual Piloting Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merancy, Nujoud; Chevray, Kay; Gonzalez, Rodolfo; Madsen, Jennifer; Spehar, Pete

    2013-01-01

    The manual piloting requirements specified under the NASA Constellation Program involved Cooper-Harper ratings, which are a qualitative and subjective evaluation from experienced pilots. This type of verification entails a significant investment of resources to assess a completed design and is not one that can easily or meaningfully be applied upfront in the design phase. The evolution of the Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle Program to include an independently developed propulsion system from an international partner makes application of Cooper-Harper based design requirements inadequate. To mitigate this issue, a novel solution was developed to reformulate the necessary piloting capability into quantifiable requirements. A trio of requirements was designed which specify control authority, precision, and impulse residuals enabling propulsion design within specified guidance and control boundaries. These requirements have been evaluated against both the existing Orion design and the proposed ESA design and have been found to achieve the desired specificity. The requirement set is capable of being applied to the development of other spacecraft in support of manual piloting.

  14. Improving the Agency's Software Acquisition Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hankinson, Allen

    2003-01-01

    External development of software has oftc n led to unsatisfactory results and great frustration for the assurE 7ce community. Contracts frequently omit critical assuranc 4 processes or the right to oversee software development activitie: At a time when NASA depends more and more on software to in plement critical system functions, combination of three factors ex; cerbate this problem: I ) the ever-increasing trend to acquire rather than develop software in-house, 2) the trend toward performance based contracts, and 3) acquisition vehicles that only state softwar 2 requirements while leaving development standards and assur! ince methodologies up to the contractor. We propose to identify specific methods at d tools that NASA projects can use to mitigate the adverse el ects of the three problems. TWO broad classes of methoddt ols will be explored. The first will be those that provide NASA p ojects with insight and oversight into contractors' activities. The st cond will be those that help projects objectively assess, and thus i nprwe, their software acquisition capability. Of particular interest is the Software Engineering Institute's (SEI) Software Acqt isition Capability Maturity Model (SA-CMMO).

  15. Increasing the Capabilities of the Oral Surgery Team With a RN

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    Sedation, DENCOM 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF 18. NUMBER 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON a. REPORT b. ABSTRACT c . THIS PAGE ABSTRACT...54 Appendix B: Stakeholder Analysis 55 Appendix C : SWOT 56 References 57 Increasing the capabilities 5 Introduction Oral health is an essential part...and nurse education programs, critical to the sustainment of medical capabilities in the civilian healthcare system as well as the military. c

  16. NASA's Space Launch System: An Evolving Capability for Exploration An Evolving Capability for Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creech, Stephen D.; Crumbly, Christopher M.; Robinson, Kimerly F.

    2016-01-01

    A foundational capability for international human deep-space exploration, NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) vehicle represents a new spaceflight infrastructure asset, creating opportunities for mission profiles and space systems that cannot currently be executed. While the primary purpose of SLS, which is making rapid progress towards initial launch readiness in two years, will be to support NASA's Journey to Mars, discussions are already well underway regarding other potential utilization of the vehicle's unique capabilities. In its initial Block 1 configuration, capable of launching 70 metric tons (t) to low Earth orbit (LEO), SLS is capable of propelling the Orion crew vehicle to cislunar space, while also delivering small CubeSat-class spacecraft to deep-space destinations. With the addition of a more powerful upper stage, the Block 1B configuration of SLS will be able to deliver 105 t to LEO and enable more ambitious human missions into the proving ground of space. This configuration offers opportunities for launching co-manifested payloads with the Orion crew vehicle, and a class of secondary payloads, larger than today's CubeSats. Further upgrades to the vehicle, including advanced boosters, will evolve its performance to 130 t in its Block 2 configuration. Both Block 1B and Block 2 also offer the capability to carry 8.4- or 10-m payload fairings, larger than any contemporary launch vehicle. With unmatched mass-lift capability, payload volume, and C3, SLS not only enables spacecraft or mission designs currently impossible with contemporary EELVs, it also offers enhancing benefits, such as reduced risk, operational costs and/or complexity, shorter transit time to destination or launching large systems either monolithically or in fewer components. This paper will discuss both the performance and capabilities of Space Launch System as it evolves, and the current state of SLS utilization planning.

  17. A Roadmap for NEAMS Capability Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Bernholdt, David E

    2011-11-01

    The vision of the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) program is to bring truly predictive modeling and simulation (M&S) capabilities to the nuclear engineering community in order to enable a new approach to the design and analysis of nuclear energy systems. From its inception, the NEAMS program has always envisioned a broad user base for its software and scientific products, including researchers within the DOE complex, nuclear industry technology developers and vendors, and operators. However activities to date have focused almost exclusively on interactions with NEAMS sponsors, who are also near-term users of NEAMS technologies. The task of the NEAMS Capability Transfer (CT) program element for FY2011 is to develop a comprehensive plan to support the program's needs for user outreach and technology transfer. In order to obtain community input to this plan, a 'NEAMS Capability Transfer Roadmapping Workshop' was held 4-5 April 2011 in Chattanooga, TN, and is summarized in this report. The 30 workshop participants represented the NEAMS program, the DOE and industrial user communities, and several outside programs. The workshop included a series of presentations providing an overview of the NEAMS program and presentations on the user outreach and technology transfer experiences of (1) The Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) program, (2) The Standardized Computer Analysis for Licensing Evaluation (SCALE) project, and (3) The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL), followed by discussion sessions. Based on the workshop and other discussions throughout the year, we make a number of recommendations of key areas for the NEAMS program to develop the user outreach and technology transfer activities: (1) Engage not only DOE, but also industrial users sooner and more often; (2) Engage with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to facilitate their understanding and acceptance of NEAMS approach to predictive M&S; (3) Place

  18. Materials Capability Review Los Alamos National Laboratory May 4-7, 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Antoniette J

    2009-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) uses external peer review to measure and continuously improve the quality of its science, technology and engineering (STE). LANL uses capability reviews to assess the STE quality and institutional integration and to advise Laboratory Management on the current and future health of the STE. Capability reviews address the STE integration that LANL uses to meet mission requirements. STE capabilities are define to cut across directorates providing a more holistic view of the STE quality, integration to achieve mission requirements, and mission relevance. The scope of these capabilities necessitate that there will be significant overlap in technical areas covered by capability reviews (e.g ., materials research and weapons science and engineering). In addition, LANL staff may be reviewed in different capability reviews because of their varied assignments and expertise. LANL plans to perform a complete review of the Laboratory's STE capabilities (hence staff) in a three-year cycle. The principal product of an external review is a report that includes the review committee's assessments, commendations, and recommendations for STE. The Capability Review Committees serve a dual role of providing assessment of the Laboratory's technical contributions and integration towards its missions and providing advice to Laboratory Management. The assessments and advice are documented in reports prepared by the Capability Review Committees that are delivered to the Director and to the Principal Associate Director for Science, Technology and Engineering (PADSTE). This report will be used by Laboratory Management for STE assessment and planning. The report is also provided to the Department of Energy (DOE) as part of LANL's Annual Performance Plan and to the Los Alamos National Security (LANS) LLC's Science and Technology Committee (STC) as part of its responsibilities to the LANS Board of Governors. LANL has defined fourteen STE capabilities. Table 1

  19. Ripcord release capability of female parachutists.

    PubMed

    Bullock, M I

    1978-10-01

    With the growth in popularity of skydiving as a sport has come an associated increase in parachuting accidents, some of them due to failure to deploy the main or reserve parachutes. The absence of appropriate strength data has prompted a study of the pull force capabilities of female parachutists on a ripcord release in varying positions. Pull forces exerted for periods of 0.25, 1, 1.5, 2, and 2.5 s during a 5-s pull are presented in percentile form. A substantial percentage of female parachutists could not exert the maximum ripcord release pull force permitted by the relevant parachute specification. The relatively low level of strength exhibited by the weakest groups of the population emphasizes the need for such basic information in equipment design.

  20. Capability 9.3 Assembly and Deployment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorsey, John

    2005-01-01

    Large space systems are required for a range of operational, commercial and scientific missions objectives however, current launch vehicle capacities substantially limit the size of space systems (on-orbit or planetary). Assembly and Deployment is the process of constructing a spacecraft or system from modules which may in turn have been constructed from sub-modules in a hierarchical fashion. In-situ assembly of space exploration vehicles and systems will require a broad range of operational capabilities, including: Component transfer and storage, fluid handling, construction and assembly, test and verification. Efficient execution of these functions will require supporting infrastructure, that can: Receive, store and protect (materials, components, etc.); hold and secure; position, align and control; deploy; connect/disconnect; construct; join; assemble/disassemble; dock/undock; and mate/demate.

  1. Space Station Freedom capabilities for users

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, William W. L.; Snyder, Robert S.; Willenberg, Harvey J.

    1991-01-01

    Space Station Freedom's major objectives are to prepare for human space exploration by providing a long-duration, continuously habitable spacecraft in low earth orbit for physiology studies and for development of systems to support human presence in space and to enable laboratory and observational research in space. As a result of restructuring and the preliminary design review, designs of Space Station Freedom architecture and systems have progressed to the point where the accommodations for users can be well described. These capabilities are enumerated, covering such important resources as power and cooling, rack volume and external accommodations, crew time, data and command rates, and acceleration environment. Related items such as total energy, data management systems, and interfaces, station attitude, payload transportation, and on board and ground facilities are considered.

  2. SAGE III capabilities and global change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormick, M. Patrick

    1991-01-01

    The science objectives of the satellite-borne SAGE III are presented as they pertain to detecting global change. SAGE III is the proposed follow on and improved version of SAM II, SAGE I and SAGE II which have measured stratospheric and, in some cases, tropospheric species since late 1978. Specifically, SAGE III will measure profiles of aerosols, ozone, water vapor, nitrogen dioxide and trioxide, neutral density, temperature, clouds, and chlorine dioxide using the solar and lunar occultation techniques. These techniques are inherently self-calibrating, provide high vertical resolution, and use well-behaved data retrievals making them ideal for trend detection and global change studies. The potential capabilities of SAGE III are illustrated by using data and results from SAM II, SAGE I and SAGE II.

  3. IAC-1.5 - INTEGRATED ANALYSIS CAPABILITY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vos, R. G.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of the Integrated Analysis Capability (IAC) system is to provide a highly effective, interactive analysis tool for the integrated design of large structures. IAC was developed to interface programs from the fields of structures, thermodynamics, controls, and system dynamics with an executive system and a database to yield a highly efficient multi-disciplinary system. Special attention is given to user requirements such as data handling and on-line assistance with operational features, and the ability to add new modules of the user's choice at a future date. IAC contains an executive system, a database, general utilities, interfaces to various engineering programs, and a framework for building interfaces to other programs. IAC has shown itself to be effective in automating data transfer among analysis programs. The IAC system architecture is modular in design. 1) The executive module contains an input command processor, an extensive data management system, and driver code to execute the application modules. 2) Technical modules provide standalone computational capability as well as support for various solution paths or coupled analyses. 3) Graphics and model generation modules are supplied for building and viewing models. 4) Interface modules provide for the required data flow between IAC and other modules. 5) User modules can be arbitrary executable programs or JCL procedures with no pre-defined relationship to IAC. 6) Special purpose modules are included, such as MIMIC (Model Integration via Mesh Interpolation Coefficients), which transforms field values from one model to another; LINK, which simplifies incorporation of user specific modules into IAC modules; and DATAPAC, the National Bureau of Standards statistical analysis package. The IAC database contains structured files which provide a common basis for communication between modules and the executive system, and can contain unstructured files such as NASTRAN checkpoint files, DISCOS plot files

  4. A New HST FGS Astrometry Capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, Arthur J.; Nelan, E. P.

    2014-01-01

    A new HST FGS Astrometry capability is available and was tested on-orbit. This new observing mode employs a series of grids, each composed of 351 x 351 horizontal and vertical steps , offset in such as way as to densely sample the 2-dimensional intensity profile of the collimated beam of a point source over the 5x5 arc second instantaneous field of view (IFOV) of the FGS. Observations have been executed to observe Beta Lupe with the F5ND filter and HD209458 with the F583W and Pupil filters. This calibration supports the construction of models needed to analyze FGS Transfer mode science data for widely separated binary systems and for observations that have more than one or two objects in the IFOV. Preliminary results using this new calibration will be demonstrated on a binary system with a third-light source present in the beam.

  5. Plant Pathogen Forensics: Capabilities, Needs, and Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, J.; Bender, C.; Budowle, B.; Cobb, W. T.; Gold, S. E.; Ishimaru, C. A.; Luster, D.; Melcher, U.; Murch, R.; Scherm, H.; Seem, R. C.; Sherwood, J. L.; Sobral, B. W.; Tolin, S. A.

    2006-01-01

    A biological attack on U.S. crops, rangelands, or forests could reduce yield and quality, erode consumer confidence, affect economic health and the environment, and possibly impact human nutrition and international relations. Preparedness for a crop bioterror event requires a strong national security plan that includes steps for microbial forensics and criminal attribution. However, U.S. crop producers, consultants, and agricultural scientists have traditionally focused primarily on strategies for prevention and management of diseases introduced naturally or unintentionally rather than on responding appropriately to an intentional pathogen introduction. We assess currently available information, technologies, and resources that were developed originally to ensure plant health but also could be utilized for postintroduction plant pathogen forensics. Recommendations for prioritization of efforts and resource expenditures needed to enhance our plant pathogen forensics capabilities are presented. PMID:16760310

  6. Overview of WFIRST-AFTA Mission Capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehrels, Neil

    2014-06-01

    Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST), the top-priority mission in the 2010 Astronomy & Astrophysics Decadal Survey, is now planned to use an already-built 2.4m telescope obtained from the National Reconnaissance Organization. This telescope provides image clarity similar to HST, but with an optical design and array of new-generation H4RG infrared detectors that enables imaging of 100 times the area of HST in a single exposure. This wide-field IR instrument will provide galaxy surveys and supernova monitoring for dark energy studies that are significantly deeper than those planned by other observatories. A microlensing survey of the galactic bulge will give a census of exoplanets that is at larger distance to the Kepler sample. A coronagraph instrument will directly image ice and gas giant planets, and circumstellar disks. There will be significant opportunities for guest observer science. The talk will summarize capabilities and current status.

  7. NASA Biomedical Informatics Capabilities and Needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson-Throop, Kathy A.

    2009-01-01

    To improve on-orbit clinical capabilities by developing and providing operational support for intelligent, robust, reliable, and secure, enterprise-wide and comprehensive health care and biomedical informatics systems with increasing levels of autonomy, for use on Earth, low Earth orbit & exploration class missions. Biomedical Informatics is an emerging discipline that has been defined as the study, invention, and implementation of structures and algorithms to improve communication, understanding and management of medical information. The end objective of biomedical informatics is the coalescing of data, knowledge, and the tools necessary to apply that data and knowledge in the decision-making process, at the time and place that a decision needs to be made.

  8. Servicer system demonstration plan and capability development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    An orbital maneuvering vehicle (OMV) front end kit is defined which is capable of performing in-situ fluid resupply and modular maintenance of free flying spacecraft based on the integrated orbital servicing system (IOSS) concept. The compatibility of the IOSS to perform gas and fluid umbilical connect and disconnect functions utilizing connect systems currently available or in development is addressed. A series of tasks involving on-orbit servicing and the engineering test unit (ETU) of the on-orbit service were studied. The objective is the advancement of orbital servicing by expanding the Spacecraft Servicing Demonstration Plan (SSDP) to include detail demonstration planning using the Multimission Modular Spacecraft (MMS) and upgrading the ETU control.

  9. A database management capability for Ada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Arvola; Danberg, SY; Fox, Stephen; Landers, Terry; Nori, Anil; Smith, John M.

    1986-01-01

    The data requirements of mission critical defense systems have been increasing dramatically. Command and control, intelligence, logistics, and even weapons systems are being required to integrate, process, and share ever increasing volumes of information. To meet this need, systems are now being specified that incorporate data base management subsystems for handling storage and retrieval of information. It is expected that a large number of the next generation of mission critical systems will contain embedded data base management systems. Since the use of Ada has been mandated for most of these systems, it is important to address the issues of providing data base management capabilities that can be closely coupled with Ada. A comprehensive distributed data base management project has been investigated. The key deliverables of this project are three closely related prototype systems implemented in Ada. These three systems are discussed.

  10. The NICER mission: Status and technical capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarty, Deepto; Arzoumanian, Zaven; Gendreau, Keith

    2016-07-01

    NASA's Neutron Star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER), in development for deployment to the International Space Station as an external attached payload, will address decades-old questions about the structure, dynamics, and energetics of neutron stars through high-precision timing of the soft X-ray emissions of rotation- and accretion-powered pulsars. NICER's performance in timing, spectroscopy, and high-throughput sensitivity to 0.2-12 keV X-rays represents a substantial enhancement over existing capabilities, enabling a rich diversity of investigations in both neutron star science as well as broader X-ray astrophysics, the latter through an approved Guest Observer program. This talk briefly summarizes the NICER design and the status of hardware fabrication and testing, currently on pace to deliver the NICER payload for its planned launch in early 2017.

  11. Intelsat VII communications capabilities and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Nabi, T.; Koh, E.; Kennedy, D.

    This paper describes the general characteristics of the Intelsat VII communications payload and analyzes the suitability of its design for digital transmission, for efficient incorporation of small earth stations into the Intelsat network, and for a relatively straightforward transition from the current Intelsat VA/VI configuration. An overview is presented of the comunications performance of the Intelsat VII satellite for the more important Intelsat digital and analog services, and earth stations standards. Specifically, the advantages, in terms of performance and capabilities, of the improved transponder linearity characteristics associated with the C-Band SSPA's and the K(u)-Band linearized TWTA's are addressed. The enhanced ability of this spacecraft to provide bandwidth where required from several possible orbital locations is discussed.

  12. The Boeing plastic analysis capability for engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vos, R. G.

    1976-01-01

    The current BOPACE program is described as a nonlinear stress analysis program, which is based on a family of isoparametric finite elements. The theoretical, user, programmer, preprocessing aspects are discussed, and example problems are included. New features in the current program version include substructuring, an out-of-core Gauss wavefront equation solver, multipoint constraints, combined material and geometric nonlinearities, automatic calculation of inertia effects, provision for distributed as well as concentrated mechanical loads, follower forces, singular crack-tip elements, the SAIL automatic generation capability, and expanded user control over input quantity definition, output selection, and program execution. BOPACE is written in FORTRAN 4 and is currently available for both the IBM 360/370 and the UNIVAC 1108 machines.

  13. Turbine vane with high temperature capable skins

    DOEpatents

    Morrison, Jay A [Oviedo, FL

    2012-07-10

    A turbine vane assembly includes an airfoil extending between an inner shroud and an outer shroud. The airfoil can include a substructure having an outer peripheral surface. At least a portion of the outer peripheral surface is covered by an external skin. The external skin can be made of a high temperature capable material, such as oxide dispersion strengthened alloys, intermetallic alloys, ceramic matrix composites or refractory alloys. The external skin can be formed, and the airfoil can be subsequently bi-cast around or onto the skin. The skin and the substructure can be attached by a plurality of attachment members extending between the skin and the substructure. The skin can be spaced from the outer peripheral surface of the substructure such that a cavity is formed therebetween. Coolant can be supplied to the cavity. Skins can also be applied to the gas path faces of the inner and outer shrouds.

  14. Verification of New Floating Capabilities in FAST v8: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Wendt, F.; Robertson, A.; Jonkman, J.; Hayman, G.

    2015-01-01

    In the latest release of NREL's wind turbine aero-hydro-servo-elastic simulation software, FAST v8, several new capabilities and major changes were introduced. FAST has been significantly altered to improve the simulator's modularity and to include new functionalities in the form of modules in the FAST v8 framework. This paper is focused on the improvements made for the modeling of floating offshore wind systems. The most significant change was to the hydrodynamic load calculation algorithms, which are embedded in the HydroDyn module. HydroDyn is now capable of applying strip-theory (via an extension of Morison's equation) at the member level for user-defined geometries. Users may now use a strip-theory-only approach for applying the hydrodynamic loads, as well as the previous potential-flow (radiation/diffraction) approach and a hybrid combination of both methods (radiation/diffraction and the drag component of Morison's equation). Second-order hydrodynamic implementations in both the wave kinematics used by the strip-theory solution and the wave-excitation loads in the potential-flow solution were also added to HydroDyn. The new floating capabilities were verified through a direct code-to-code comparison. We conducted a series of simulations of the International Energy Agency Wind Task 30 Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration Continuation (OC4) floating semisubmersible model and compared the wind turbine response predicted by FAST v8, the corresponding FAST v7 results, and results from other participants in the OC4 project. We found good agreement between FAST v7 and FAST v8 when using the linear radiation/diffraction modeling approach. The strip-theory-based approach inherently differs from the radiation/diffraction approach used in FAST v7 and we identified and characterized the differences. Enabling the second-order effects significantly improved the agreement between FAST v8 and the other OC4 participants.

  15. In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) Capability Roadmap Progress Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Gerald B.; Duke, Michael

    2005-01-01

    A progress review on In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) capability is presented. The topics include: 1) In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) Capability Roadmap: Level 1; 2) ISRU Emphasized Architecture Overview; 3) ISRU Capability Elements: Level 2 and below; and 4) ISRU Capability Roadmap Wrap-up.

  16. Overview of ASC Capability Computing System Governance Model

    SciTech Connect

    Doebling, Scott W.

    2012-07-11

    This document contains a description of the Advanced Simulation and Computing Program's Capability Computing System Governance Model. Objectives of the Governance Model are to ensure that the capability system resources are allocated on a priority-driven basis according to the Program requirements; and to utilize ASC Capability Systems for the large capability jobs for which they were designed and procured.

  17. Nuclear Data Needs and Capabilities for Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D.

    2015-05-27

    In July 2014, DOE NP carried out a review of the US Nuclear Data Program. This led to several recommendations, including that the USNDP should “devise effective and transparent mechanisms to solicit input and feedback from all stakeholders on nuclear data needs and priorities.” The review also recommended that USNDP pursue experimental activities of relevance to nuclear data; the revised 2014 Mission Statement accordingly states that the USNDP uses “targeted experimental studies” to address gaps in nuclear data. In support of these recommendations, DOE NP requested that USNDP personnel organize a Workshop on Nuclear Data Needs and Capabilities for Applications (NDNCA). This Workshop was held at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) on 27-29 May 2015. The goal of the NDNCA Workshop was to compile nuclear data needs across a wide spectrum of applied nuclear science, and to provide a summary of associated capabilities (accelerators, reactors, spectrometers, etc.) available for the required measurements. The first two days of the workshop consisted of 25 plenary talks by speakers from 16 different institutions, on nuclear energy (NE), national security (NS), isotope production (IP), and industrial applications (IA). There were also shorter “capabilities” talks that described the experimental facilities and instrumentation available for the measurement of nuclear data. This was followed by a third day of topic-specific “breakout” sessions and a final closeout session. The agenda and copies of these talks are available online at http://bang.berkeley.edu/events/NDNCA/agenda. The importance of nuclear data to both basic and applied nuclear science was reflected in the fact that while the impetus for the workshop arose from the 2014 USNDP review, joint sponsorship for the workshop was provided by the Nuclear Science and Security Consortium, a UC-Berkeley based organization funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA).

  18. Demonstration of Hazardous Hypervelocity Test Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriquez, Karen M.

    1991-01-01

    NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) participated in a joint test program with NASA JSC Hypervelocity Impact Research Laboratory (HIRL) to determine if JSC was capable of performing hypervelocity impact tests on hazardous targets. Seven pressurized vessels were evaluated under hypervelocity impact conditions. The vessels were tested with various combinations of liquids and gasses at various pressures. Results from the evaluation showed that vessels containing 100-percent pressurized gas sustained more severe damage and had a higher potential for damaging nearby equipment, than vessels containing 75-percent liquid, 25-percent inert pressurized gas. Two water-filled test vessels, one of which was placed behind an aluminum shield, failed by bulging and splitting open at the impact point; pressure was relieved without the vessel fragmenting or sustaining internal damage. An additional water-filled test vessel, placed a greater distance behind an aluminum shield, sustained damage that resembled a shotgun blast, but did not bulge or split open; again, pressure was relieved without the vessel fragmenting. Two test vessels containing volatile liquids (nitro methane and hydrazine) also failed by bulging and splitting open; neither liquid detonated under hypervelocity test conditions. A test vessel containing nitrogen gas failed by relieving pressure through a circular entry hole; multiple small penetrations opposite the point of entry provided high velocity target debris to surrounding objects. A high-pressure oxygen test vessel fragmented upon impact; the ensuing fire and high velocity fragments caused secondary damage to surrounding objects. The results from the evaluation of the pressurized vessels indicated that JSC is capable of performing hypervelocity impact tests on hazardous targets.

  19. RELAP-7 Beta Release: Summary of Capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Martineau, Richard C.; Zhang, Hongbin; Zhao, Haihua

    2014-12-01

    RELAP-7 is a nuclear systems safety analysis code being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Building upon the decades of software development at the INL, we began the development of RELAP-7 in 2011 to support the Risk Informed Safety Margins Characterization (RISMC) Pathway. As part of this development, the first lines of RELAP-7 code were committed to the software revision control repository on November 7th, 2011. The overall design goal of RELAP-7 is to take advantage of the previous thirty years of advancements in computer architecture, software design, numerical methods, and physical models in order to provide capabilities needed for the RISMC methodology and to support nuclear power safety analysis. RELAP-7 is built using the INL’s modern scientific software development framework, MOOSE (Multi-physics Object Oriented Simulation Environment). MOOSE provides improved numerical calculations (including higher-order integration in both space and time, yielding converged second-order accuracy). The RELAP-7 code structure is based on multiple physical component models such as pipes, junctions, pumps, etc. Each component can have options for different fluid models such as single- and two-phase flow. This component-based and physics-based software architecture allows RELAP-7 to adopt different physical models for different applications. A relatively new two-phase hydrodynamic model, termed the ''7-Equation model'' for two phasic pressures, velocities, energies, and volumetric fraction, is incorporated into RELAP-7 for liquid-gas (water-steam) flows. This new model allows second-order integration because it is well-posed, which will reduce the numerical error associated with traditional systems analysis codes. In this paper, we provide a RELAP-7 capability list describing analysis features, range of applicability, and reactor components that will be available for the December 15th, 2014 beta release of the software.

  20. Joint demilitarization technology test and demonstration capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, S.M.; Byrd, E.R.; Decker, M.W.

    1998-12-31

    This paper provides a review of the two components of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) Demilitarization test and demonstration capabilities. Part one is a general discussion of the NTS and the many assets it offers to the Demilitarization community; and more specifically, a discussion of the NTS Open Burn/Open Detonation (OB/OD) test facility. The NTS Joint Demilitarization Technology (JDT) OB/OD Test Chamber is located at the X Tunnel facility which as been designed and constructed to contain and characterize the effluent from demilitarization activities. X Tunnel consists of a large test chamber capable of withstanding a 3,000 pound net explosive weight detonation or up to a static pressure of well over 100 pounds per square inch. The test chamber is fully instrumented to measure and collect gas and particulate samples as well as to monitor shock phenomenology. Part two is a discussion of the NTS Tactical Demilitarization Demonstration (TaDD) program currently planned for the Area 11 Technical Facility. This project will produce equipment that can dispose of unneeded tactical military rocket motors in a safe, environmentally-friendly, and timely fashion. The initial effort is the development of a demilitarization system for the disposal of excess Shillelagh missiles at the Anniston Army Depot. The prototype for this system will be assembled at the Area 11 facility taking advantage of the inherent infrastructure and proximity to numerous existing structures. Upon completion of testing, the prototype facility will become the test bed for future tactical disposal development activities. It is expected that the research and development techniques, prototype testing and production processes, and expertise developed during the Shillelagh disposal program will be applicable to follow-on tactical missile disposal programs, but with significant cost and schedule advantages.

  1. Environmental Response Laboratory Network

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The ERLN as a national network of laboratories that can be ramped up as needed to support large scale environmental responses. It integrates capabilities of existing public and private sector labs, providing consistent capacity and quality data.

  2. Environmental Response Team

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This website will serve as a resource directory of the Environmental Response Team's roles and capabilities as well as list contacts for each discipline to provide information to EPA personnel and the public.

  3. Human Planetary Landing System (HPLS) Capability Roadmap NRC Progress Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manning, Rob; Schmitt, Harrison H.; Graves, Claude

    2005-01-01

    Capability Roadmap Team. Capability Description, Scope and Capability Breakdown Structure. Benefits of the HPLS. Roadmap Process and Approach. Current State-of-the-Art, Assumptions and Key Requirements. Top Level HPLS Roadmap. Capability Presentations by Leads. Mission Drivers Requirements. "AEDL" System Engineering. Communication & Navigation Systems. Hypersonic Systems. Super to Subsonic Decelerator Systems. Terminal Descent and Landing Systems. A Priori In-Situ Mars Observations. AEDL Analysis, Test and Validation Infrastructure. Capability Technical Challenges. Capability Connection Points to other Roadmaps/Crosswalks. Summary of Top Level Capability. Forward Work.

  4. Characterizing the Temperature Discrimination Capability of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, M.; Kashyap, V.; Boerner, P.

    2008-05-01

    The Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) will be one of the instrument packages on-board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), due to launch in late 2008. This instrument will image the full solar disk in each of eight UV and EUV passbands, with a resolution of about one arc-second and a cadence of 10 seconds. Six of these passbands are dominated by Fe lines, thus minimizing the effect of abundance uncertainties while permitting thermal diagnostic analysis of solar coronal plasma across a range of log T = 5.6 to greater than 7.3. Using the method of Singular Value Decomposition (SVD), we characterize the temperature discrimination capability of the AIA passbands when used as a set. Upper and lower thresholds can be placed on the useful temperature range. Furthermore, we consider how AIA's thermal diagnostic capability is uneven across the useful temperature response range. This information can be useful in designing thermal studies that determine the most robust temperature solutions.

  5. Overview of NASA MSFC IEC Federated Engineering Collaboration Capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moushon, Brian; McDuffee, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    The MSFC IEC federated engineering framework is currently developing a single collaborative engineering framework across independent NASA centers. The federated approach allows NASA centers the ability to maintain diversity and uniqueness, while providing interoperability. These systems are integrated together in a federated framework without compromising individual center capabilities. MSFC IEC's Federation Framework will have a direct affect on how engineering data is managed across the Agency. The approach is directly attributed in response to the Columbia Accident Investigation Board (CAB) finding F7.4-11 which states the Space Shuttle Program has a wealth of data sucked away in multiple databases without a convenient way to integrate and use the data for management, engineering, or safety decisions. IEC s federated capability is further supported by OneNASA recommendation 6 that identifies the need to enhance cross-Agency collaboration by putting in place common engineering and collaborative tools and databases, processes, and knowledge-sharing structures. MSFC's IEC Federated Framework is loosely connected to other engineering applications that can provide users with the integration needed to achieve an Agency view of the entire product definition and development process, while allowing work to be distributed across NASA Centers and contractors. The IEC DDMS federation framework eliminates the need to develop a single, enterprise-wide data model, where the goal of having a common data model shared between NASA centers and contractors is very difficult to achieve.

  6. Biodegradable and radically polymerized elastomers with enhanced processing capabilities.

    PubMed

    Ifkovits, Jamie L; Padera, Robert F; Burdick, Jason A

    2008-09-01

    The development of biodegradable materials with elastomeric properties is beneficial for a variety of applications, including for use in the engineering of soft tissues. Although others have developed biodegradable elastomers, they are restricted by their processing at high temperatures and under vacuum, which limits their fabrication into complex scaffolds. To overcome this, we have modified precursors to a tough biodegradable elastomer, poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS) with acrylates to impart control over the crosslinking process and allow for more processing options. The acrylated-PGS (Acr-PGS) macromers are capable of crosslinking through free radical initiation mechanisms (e.g., redox and photo-initiated polymerizations). Alterations in the molecular weight and % acrylation of the Acr-PGS led to changes in formed network mechanical properties. In general, Young's modulus increased with % acrylation and the % strain at break increased with molecular weight when the % acrylation was held constant. Based on the mechanical properties, one macromer was further investigated for in vitro and in vivo degradation and biocompatibility. A mild to moderate inflammatory response typical of implantable biodegradable polymers was observed, even when formed as an injectable system with redox initiation. Moreover, fibrous scaffolds of Acr-PGS and a carrier polymer, poly(ethylene oxide), were prepared via an electrospinning and photopolymerization technique and the fiber morphology was dependent on the ratio of these components. This system provides biodegradable polymers with tunable properties and enhanced processing capabilities towards the advancement of approaches in engineering soft tissues.

  7. Development of a mobile research flight test support capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhea, Donald C.; Moore, Archie L.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents the approach taken by the NASA Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR) of the Ames Research Center (ARC) to develop and utilize mobile systems to satisfy unique real-time research flight test requirements of research projects such as the advanced fighter technology integration (AFTI) F-16, YAV-8B Harrier, F-18 high-alpha research vehicle (HARV), XV-15, and the UH-60 Black Hawk. The approach taken is cost-effective, staff efficient, technologically current, and provides a safe and effective research flight test environment to support a highly complex set of real-time requirements including the areas of tracking and data acquisition, communications (audio and video) and real-time processing and display, postmission processing, and command uplink. The development of this capability has been in response to the need for rapid deployment at varied site locations with full real-time comutation and display capability. This paper will discuss the requirements, implementation and growth plan for mobile systems development within the NASA Western Aeronautical Test Range.

  8. Development of a mobile research flight test support capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhea, Donald C.; Moore, Archie L.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents the approach taken by the NASA Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR) of the Ames Research Center to develop and utilize mobile systems to satisfy unique real-time research flight test requirements of research projects such as the advanced fighter technology integration (AFTI)F-16, YAV-8B Harrier, F-18 high-alpha research vehicle (HARV), XV-15, and the UH-60 Black Hawk. The approach taken is cost-effective, staff efficient, technologically current, and provides a safe and effective research flight test environment to support a highly complex set of real-time requirements including the areas of tracking and data acquisition, communications (audio and video) and real-time processing and display, postmission processing, and command uplink. The development of this capability has been in response to the need for rapid deployment at varied site locations with full real-time computations and display capability. This paper will discuss the requirements, implementation and growth plan for mobile systems development within the NASA Western Aeronautical Test Range.

  9. Maintaining US Space Weather Capabilities after DMSP: Research to Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machuzak, J. S.; Gentile, L. C.; Burke, W. J.; Holeman, E. G.; Ober, D. M.; Wilson, G. R.

    2012-12-01

    The first Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) spacecraft was launched in 1972; the last is scheduled to fly in 2020. Presently, there is no replacement for the space-weather monitoring sensors that now fly on DMSP. The present suite has provided comprehensive, long-term records that constitute a critical component of the US space weather corporate memory. Evolving operational needs and research accomplishments justify continued collection of space environmental data. Examples include measurements to: (1) Monitor the Dst index in real time as a driver of next-generation satellite drag models; (2) Quantify electromagnetic energy fluxes from deep space to the ionosphere/ thermosphere that heat neutrals, drive disturbance-dynamo winds and degrade precise orbit determinations; (3) Determine strengths of stormtime electric fields at high and low latitudes that lead to severe blackouts and spacecraft anomalies; (4) Specify variability of plasma density irregularities, equatorial plasma bubbles, and the Appleton anomaly to improve reliability of communication, navigation and surveillance links; (5) Characterize energetic particle fluxes responsible for auroral clutter and radar degradation; (6) Map regions of L-Band scintillation for robust GPS applications; and (7) Update the World Magnetic Field Model needed to maintain guidance system superiority. These examples illustrate the utility of continued space environment awareness. Comprehensive assessments of both operational requirements and research advances are needed to make informed selections of sensors and spacecraft that support future capabilities. A proposed sensor set and satellite constellation to provide the needed measurement capabilities will be presented.

  10. Capabilities and limitations of atmospheric transmission field measurement systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweibaum, F. M.; Lucia, L. V.; Lamontagne, J. J.; Kozlowski, A. T.

    1981-01-01

    The major subject of the paper is advancing atmospheric transmission field measurement systems in response to new requirements. From the viewpoint of a complete field system installation, attention is given to the nature of the measurement and the capabilities and limitations in sensitivity, stability, and the time required for individual measurements. From the same system viewpoint calibration is reviewed with regard to concept, techniques, uncertainties and assumptions. Examples are given of system advances and these include making real-time measurements with automatic high-speed scanning, high sensitivity, wide spectral range and remote control. Special measurement conditions that are described include those encountered on the battlefield, in fog and precipitation, and in the presence of countermeasures.

  11. LANL capabilities towards bioenergy and biofuels programs

    SciTech Connect

    Olivares, Jose A; Park, Min S; Unkefer, Clifford J; Bradbury, Andrew M; Waldo, Geoffrey S

    2009-01-01

    LANL invented technology for increasing growth and productivity of photosysnthetic organisms, including algae and higher plants. The technology has been extensively tested at the greenhouse and field scale for crop plants. Initial bioreactor testing of its efficacy on algal growth has shown promising results. It increases algal growth rates even under optimwn nutrient supply and careful pH control with CO{sub 2} continuously available. The technology uses a small organic molecule, applied to the plant surfaces or added to the algal growth medium. CO{sub 2} concentration is necessary to optimize algal production in either ponds or reactors. LANL has successfully designed, built and demonstrated an effective, efficient technology using DOE funding. Such a system would be very valuable for capitalizing on local inexpensive sources of CO{sub 2} for algal production operations. Furthermore, our protein engineering team has a concept to produce highly stable carbonic anhydyrase (CA) enzyme, which could be very useful to assure maximum utilization of the CO{sub 2} supply. Stable CA could be used either imnlobilized on solid supports or engineered into the algal strain. The current technologies for harvesting the algae and obtaining the lipids do not meet the needs for rapid, low cost separations for high volumes of material. LANL has obtained proof of concept for the high volume flowing stream concentration of algae, algal lysis and separation of the lipid, protein and water fractions, using acoustic platforms. This capability is targeted toward developing biosynthetics, chiral syntheses, high throughput protein expression and purification, organic chemistry, recognition ligands, and stable isotopes geared toward Bioenergy applications. Areas of expertise include stable isotope chemistry, biomaterials, polymers, biopolymers, organocatalysis, advanced characterization methods, and chemistry of model compounds. The ultimate realization of the ability to design and

  12. Precision Departure Release Capability (PDRC) Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelland, Shawn A.; Capps, Richard; Day, Kevin Brian; Kistler, Matthew Stephen; Gaither, Frank; Juro, Greg

    2013-01-01

    After takeoff, aircraft must merge into en route (Center) airspace traffic flows that may be subject to constraints that create localized demand/capacity imbalances. When demand exceeds capacity, Traffic Management Coordinators (TMCs) and Frontline Managers (FLMs) often use tactical departure scheduling to manage the flow of departures into the constrained Center traffic flow. Tactical departure scheduling usually involves a Call for Release (CFR) procedure wherein the Tower must call the Center to coordinate a release time prior to allowing the flight to depart. In present-day operations release times are computed by the Center Traffic Management Advisor (TMA) decision support tool, based upon manual estimates of aircraft ready time verbally communicated from the Tower to the Center. The TMA-computed release time is verbally communicated from the Center back to the Tower where it is relayed to the Local controller as a release window that is typically three minutes wide. The Local controller will manage the departure to meet the coordinated release time window. Manual ready time prediction and verbal release time coordination are labor intensive and prone to inaccuracy. Also, use of release time windows adds uncertainty to the tactical departure process. Analysis of more than one million flights from January 2011 indicates that a significant number of tactically scheduled aircraft missed their en route slot due to ready time prediction uncertainty. Uncertainty in ready time estimates may result in missed opportunities to merge into constrained en route flows and lead to lost throughput. Next Generation Air Transportation System plans call for development of Tower automation systems capable of computing surface trajectory-based ready time estimates. NASA has developed the Precision Departure Release Capability (PDRC) concept that improves tactical departure scheduling by automatically communicating surface trajectory-based ready time predictions and departure

  13. Precision Departure Release Capability (PDRC) Technology Description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelland, Shawn A.; Capps, Richard; Day, Kevin; Robinson, Corissia; Null, Jody R.

    2013-01-01

    After takeoff, aircraft must merge into en route (Center) airspace traffic flows which may be subject to constraints that create localized demand-capacity imbalances. When demand exceeds capacity, Traffic Management Coordinators (TMCs) often use tactical departure scheduling to manage the flow of departures into the constrained Center traffic flow. Tactical departure scheduling usually involves use of a Call for Release (CFR) procedure wherein the Tower must call the Center TMC to coordinate a release time prior to allowing the flight to depart. In present-day operations release times are computed by the Center Traffic Management Advisor (TMA) decision support tool based upon manual estimates of aircraft ready time verbally communicated from the Tower to the Center. The TMA-computed release is verbally communicated from the Center back to the Tower where it is relayed to the Local controller as a release window that is typically three minutes wide. The Local controller will manage the departure to meet the coordinated release time window. Manual ready time prediction and verbal release time coordination are labor intensive and prone to inaccuracy. Also, use of release time windows adds uncertainty to the tactical departure process. Analysis of more than one million flights from January 2011 indicates that a significant number of tactically scheduled aircraft missed their en route slot due to ready time prediction uncertainty. Uncertainty in ready time estimates may result in missed opportunities to merge into constrained en route flows and lead to lost throughput. Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) plans call for development of Tower automation systems capable of computing surface trajectory-based ready time estimates. NASA has developed the Precision Departure Release Capability (PDRC) concept that uses this technology to improve tactical departure scheduling by automatically communicating surface trajectory-based ready time predictions to the

  14. Assessment of Current Jet Noise Prediction Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Craid A.; Bridges, James E.; Khavaran, Abbas

    2008-01-01

    An assessment was made of the capability of jet noise prediction codes over a broad range of jet flows, with the objective of quantifying current capabilities and identifying areas requiring future research investment. Three separate codes in NASA s possession, representative of two classes of jet noise prediction codes, were evaluated, one empirical and two statistical. The empirical code is the Stone Jet Noise Module (ST2JET) contained within the ANOPP aircraft noise prediction code. It is well documented, and represents the state of the art in semi-empirical acoustic prediction codes where virtual sources are attributed to various aspects of noise generation in each jet. These sources, in combination, predict the spectral directivity of a jet plume. A total of 258 jet noise cases were examined on the ST2JET code, each run requiring only fractions of a second to complete. Two statistical jet noise prediction codes were also evaluated, JeNo v1, and Jet3D. Fewer cases were run for the statistical prediction methods because they require substantially more resources, typically a Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes solution of the jet, volume integration of the source statistical models over the entire plume, and a numerical solution of the governing propagation equation within the jet. In the evaluation process, substantial justification of experimental datasets used in the evaluations was made. In the end, none of the current codes can predict jet noise within experimental uncertainty. The empirical code came within 2dB on a 1/3 octave spectral basis for a wide range of flows. The statistical code Jet3D was within experimental uncertainty at broadside angles for hot supersonic jets, but errors in peak frequency and amplitude put it out of experimental uncertainty at cooler, lower speed conditions. Jet3D did not predict changes in directivity in the downstream angles. The statistical code JeNo,v1 was within experimental uncertainty predicting noise from cold subsonic

  15. Disability, Capability, and Special Education: Towards a Capability-Based Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reindal, Solveig Magnus

    2009-01-01

    The main objective of the article was to investigate the claim that the capability approach fares better with an understanding of disability as presented by the World Health Organization's "International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health" (ICF) than by the social model, which has been promoted within disability studies. Scholars…

  16. Developing the Capable Practitioner. Professional Capability through Higher Education. Teaching and Learning in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Reilly, Dave, Ed.; Cunningham, Lynne, Ed.; Lester, Stan, Ed.

    Nineteen papers address aspects of professional education in institutions of higher education from a British perspective. Papers are grouped into five sections addressing: the reflective practitioner, learner autonomy and action learning, assessing capability, professional bodies and the needs of employers, and values and models. Following a…

  17. Instrument Pointing Capabilities: Past, Present, and Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackmore, Lars; Murray, Emmanuell; Scharf, Daniel P.; Aung, Mimi; Bayard, David; Brugarolas, Paul; Hadaegh, Fred; Lee, Allan; Milman, Mark; Sirlin, Sam; Kang, Bryan

    2011-01-01

    This paper surveys the instrument pointing capabilities of past, present and future space telescopes and interferometers. As an important aspect of this survey, we present a taxonomy for "apples-to-apples" comparisons of pointing performances. First, pointing errors are defined relative to either an inertial frame or a celestial target. Pointing error can then be further sub-divided into DC, that is, steady state, and AC components. We refer to the magnitude of the DC error relative to the inertial frame as absolute pointing accuracy, and we refer to the magnitude of the DC error relative to a celestial target as relative pointing accuracy. The magnitude of the AC error is referred to as pointing stability. While an AC/DC partition is not new, we leverage previous work by some of the authors to quantitatively clarify and compare varying definitions of jitter and time window averages. With this taxonomy and for sixteen past, present, and future missions, pointing accuracies and stabilities, both required and achieved, are presented. In addition, we describe the attitude control technologies used to and, for future missions, planned to achieve these pointing performances.

  18. Guidelines and Capabilities for Designing Human Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The human element is likely the most complex and difficult one of mission design; it significantly influences every aspect of mission planning, from the basic parameters like duration to the more complex tradeoffs between mass, volume, power, risk, and cost. For engineers who rely on precise specifications in data books and other such technical references, dealing with the uncertainty and the variability of designing for human beings can be frustrating. When designing for the human element, questions arise more often than definitive answers. Nonetheless, we do not doubt that the most captivating discoveries in future space missions will necessitate human explorers. These guidelines and capabilities are meant to identify the points of intersection between humans and mission considerations such as architecture, vehicle design, technologies, operations, and science requirements. We seek to provide clear, top-level guidelines for human-related exploration studies and technology research that address common questions and requirements. As a result, we hope that ongoing mission trade studies consider common, standard, and practical criteria for human interfaces.

  19. A Moving Grid Capability for NPARC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, John W.

    1998-01-01

    Version 3.1 of the NPARC computational fluid dynamics flow solver introduces a capability to solve unsteady flow on moving multi-block, structured grids with nominally second-order time accuracy. The grid motion is due to segments of the boundary grid that translate and rotate in a rigid-body manner or deform. The grid is regenerated at each time step to accommodate the boundary grid motion. The flow equations and computational models sense the moving grid through the grid velocities, which are computed from a time-difference of the grids at two consecutive time levels. For three-dimensional flow domains, it is assumed that the grid retains a planar character with respect to one coordinate. The application and accuracy of NPARC v3.1 is demonstrated for flow about a flying wedge, rotating flap, a collapsing bump in a duct, and the upstart / restart flow in a variable-geometry inlet. The results compare well with analytic and experimental results.

  20. Argentine nuclear development: capabilities and implications

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, C.A.

    1984-01-01

    Complacency was shattered in 1974 by the Indian explosion of a nuclear device developed from a civil nuclear program. The fear of nuclear weapon spread led the international system to consider the other states that could develop devices from what were assumed to be peaceful nuclear programs. Many states of the non-nuclear ranks, often the more developed states of the Third World, resented the nuclear suppliers weapon holders dictating to the developing states the types of technology that these states could handle. Some of these developing states had highly sophisticated nuclear programs that no longer rely on the suppliers for assistance. These states are using the options that their nuclear developments present in an attempt to alter the international system, or the balance of power, that has existed since the end of World War II. Argentina's nuclear program has become one of the most-sophisticated in the Third World. This work discusses the implications of the country's present capabilities as they affect Argentine actions in the foreign policy areas of nuclear commerce and the international nuclear weapons non-proliferation regime.