Science.gov

Sample records for capacity mercury adsorption

  1. The adsorptive capacity of vapor-phase mercury chloride onto powdered activated carbon derived from waste tires

    SciTech Connect

    Hsun-Yu Lin; Chung-Shin Yuan; Chun-Hsin Wu; Chung-Hsuang Hung

    2006-11-15

    Injection of powdered activated carbon (PAC) upstream of particulate removal devices (such as electrostatic precipitator and baghouses) has been used effectively to remove hazardous air pollutants, particularly mercury containing pollutants, emitted from combustors and incinerators. Compared with commercial PACs (CPACs), an alternative PAC derived from waste tires (WPAC) was prepared for this study. The equilibrium adsorptive capacity of mercury chloride (HgCl{sub 2}) vapor onto the WPAC was further evaluated with a self-designed bench-scale adsorption column system. The adsorption temperatures investigated in the adsorption column were controlled at 25 and 150{sup o}C. The superficial velocity and residence time of the flow were 0.01 m/sec and 4 sec, respectively. The adsorption column tests were run under nitrogen gas flow. Experimental results showed that WPAC with higher Brunauer Emmett Teller (BET) surface area could adsorb more HgCl{sub 2} at room temperature. The equilibrium adsorptive capacity of HgCl{sub 2} for WPAC measured in this study was 1.49 x 10{sup -1} mg HgCl{sub 2}/g PAC at 25{sup o}C with an initial HgCl{sub 2} concentration of 25 {mu}g/m{sup 3}. With the increase of adsorption temperature {le} 150{sup o}C, the equilibrium adsorptive capacity of HgCl{sub 2} for WPAC was decreased to 1.34 x 10{sup -1} mg HgCl{sub 2}/g PAC. Furthermore, WPAC with higher sulfur contents could adsorb even more HgCl{sub 2}. It was demonstrated that the mechanisms for adsorbing HgCl{sub 2} onto WPAC were physical adsorption and chemisorption at 25 and 150{sup o}C, respectively. 35 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Determination of the adsorptive capacity and adsorption isotherm of vapor-phase mercury chloride on powdered activated carbon using thermogravimetric analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hsun-Yu Lin; Chung-Shin Yuan; Wei-Ching Chen; Chung-Hsuang Hung

    2006-11-15

    This study investigated the use of thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) to determine the adsorptive capacity and adsorption isotherm of vapor-phase mercury chloride on powdered activated carbon (PAC). The technique is commonly applied to remove mercury-containing air pollutants from gas streams emitted from municipal solid waste incinerators. An alternative form of powdered activated carbon derived from a pyrolyzed tire char was prepared for use herein. The capacity of waste tire-derived PAC to adsorb vapor-phase HgCl{sub 2} was successfully measured using a self-designed TGA adsorption system. Experimental results showed that the maximum adsorptive capacities of HgCl{sub 2} were 1.75, 0.688, and 0.230 mg of HgCl{sub 2} per gram of powdered activated carbon derived from carbon black at 30, 70, and 150{sup o} for 500 {mu}g/m{sup 3} of HgCl{sub 2}, respectively. Four adsorption isotherms obtained using the Langmuir, Freundlich, Redlich-Peterson, and Brunauer-Emmett-eller (BET) models were used to simulate the adsorption of HgCl{sub 2}. The comparison of experimental data associated with the four adsorption isotherms indicated that BET fit the experimental results better than did the other isotherms at 30{sup o}, whereas the Freundlich isotherm fit the experimental results better at 70 and 150{sup o}. Furthermore, the calculations of the parameters associated with Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms revealed that the adsorption of HgCl{sub 2} by PAC-derived carbon black favored adsorption at various HgCl{sub 2} concentrations and temperatures. 35 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Removal of mercury by adsorption: a review.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jin-Gang; Yue, Bao-Yu; Wu, Xiong-Wei; Liu, Qi; Jiao, Fei-Peng; Jiang, Xin-Yu; Chen, Xiao-Qing

    2016-03-01

    Due to natural and production activities, mercury contamination has become one of the major environmental problems over the world. Mercury contamination is a serious threat to human health. Among the existing technologies available for mercury pollution control, the adsorption process can get excellent separation effects and has been further studied. This review is attempted to cover a wide range of adsorbents that were developed for the removal of mercury from the year 2011. Various adsorbents, including the latest adsorbents, are presented along with highlighting and discussing the key advancements on their preparation, modification technologies, and strategies. By comparing their adsorption capacities, it is evident from the literature survey that some adsorbents have shown excellent potential for the removal of mercury. However, there is still a need to develop novel, efficient adsorbents with low cost, high stability, and easy production and manufacture for practical utility. PMID:26620868

  4. Effects of sulfur impregnation temperature on the properties and mercury adsorption capacities of activated carbon fibers (ACFs).

    PubMed

    Hsi, H C; Rood, M J; Rostam-Abadi, M; Chen, S; Chang, R

    2001-07-01

    Laboratory studies were conducted to determine the role of sulfur functional groups and micropore surface area of carbon-based adsorbents on the adsorption of Hg0 from simulated coal combustion flue gases. In this study, raw activated carbon fibers that are microporous (ACF-20) were impregnated with elemental sulfur between 250 and 650 degrees C. The resulting samples were saturated with respect to sulfur content. Total sulfur content of the sulfur impregnated ACF samples decreased with increasing impregnation temperatures from 250 and 500 degrees C and then remained constant to 650 degrees C. Results from sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (S-XANES) spectroscopy showed that sulfur impregnated on the ACF samples was in both elemental and organic forms. As sulfur impregnation temperature increased, however, the relative amounts of elemental sulfur decreased with a concomitant increase in the amount of organic sulfur. Thermal analyses and mass spectrometry revealed that sulfur functional groups formed at higher impregnation temperatures were more thermally stable. In general, sulfur impregnation decreased surface area and increased equilibrium Hg0 adsorption capacity when compared to the raw ACF sample. The ACF sample treated with sulfur at 400 degrees C had a surface area of only 94 m2/g compared to the raw ACF sample's surface area of 1971 m2/g, but at least 86% of this sample's surface area existed as micropores and it had the largest equilibrium Hg0 adsorption capacities (2211-11,343 micrograms/g). Such a result indicates that 400 degrees C is potentially an optimal sulfur impregnation temperature for this ACF. Sulfur impregnated on the ACF that was treated at 400 degrees C was in both elemental and organic forms. Thermal analyses and CS2 extraction tests suggested that elemental sulfur was the main form of sulfur affecting the Hg0 adsorption capacity. These findings indicate that both the presence of elemental sulfur on the adsorbent and a

  5. Effects of sulfur impregnation temperature on the properties and mercury adsorption capacities of activated carbon fibers (ACFs)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hsi, H.-C.; Rood, M.J.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Chen, S.; Chang, R.

    2001-01-01

    Laboratory studies were conducted to determine the role of sulfur functional groups and micropore surface area of carbon-based adsorbents on the adsorption of Hg0 from simulated coal combustion flue gases. In this study, raw activated carbon fibers that are microporous (ACF-20) were impregnated with elemental sulfur between 250 and 650 ??C. The resulting samples were saturated with respect to sulfur content. Total sulfur content of the sulfur impregnated ACF samples decreased with increasing impregnation temperatures from 250 and 500 ??C and then remained constant to 650 ??C. Results from sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (S-XANES) spectroscopy showed that sulfur impregnated on the ACF samples was in both elemental and organic forms. As sulfur impregnation temperature increased, however, the relative amounts of elemental sulfur decreased with a concomitant increase in the amount of organic sulfur. Thermal analyses and mass spectrometry revealed that sulfur functional groups formed at higher impregnation temperatures were more thermally stable. In general, sulfur impregnation decreased surface area and increased equilibrium Hg0 adsorption capacity when compared to the raw ACF sample. The ACF sample treated with sulfur at 400 ??C had a surface area of only 94 m2/g compared to the raw ACF sample's surface area of 1971 m2/g, but at least 86% of this sample's surface area existed as micropores and it had the largest equilibrium Hg0adsorption capacities (2211-11343 ??g/g). Such a result indicates that 400 ??C is potentially an optimal sulfur impregnation temperature for this ACF. Sulfur impregnated on the ACF that was treated at 400 ??C was in both elemental and organic forms. Thermal analyses and CS2extraction tests suggested that elemental sulfur was the main form of sulfur affecting the Hg0 adsorption capacity. These findings indicate that both the presence of elemental sulfur on the adsorbent and a microporous structure are important properties for

  6. Preparation of hybrid organic-inorganic mesoporous silicas applied to mercury removal from aqueous media: Influence of the synthesis route on adsorption capacity and efficiency.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Quintanilla, Damián; Sánchez, Alfredo; Sierra, Isabel

    2016-06-15

    New hybrid organic-inorganic mesoporous silicas were prepared by employing three different synthesis routes and mercury adsorption studies were done in aqueous media using the batch technique. The organic ligands employed for the functionalization were derivatives of 2-mercaptopyrimidine or 2-mercaptothiazoline, and the synthesis pathways used were post-synthesis, post-synthesis with surface ion-imprinting and co-condensation with ion-imprinting. The incorporation of functional groups and the presence of ordered mesopores in the organosilicas was confirmed by XRD, TEM and SEM, nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms, (13)C MAS-NMR, (29)Si MAS-NMR, elemental and thermogravimetric analysis. The highest adsorption capacity and selectivity observed was for the material functionalized with 2-mercaptothiazoline ligand by means the co-condensation with ion-imprinting route (1.03 mmol g(-1) at pH 6). The prepared material could be potential sorbent for the extraction of this heavy metal from environmental and drinking waters. PMID:27023632

  7. Preparation of hybrid organic-inorganic mesoporous silicas applied to mercury removal from aqueous media: Influence of the synthesis route on adsorption capacity and efficiency.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Quintanilla, Damián; Sánchez, Alfredo; Sierra, Isabel

    2016-06-15

    New hybrid organic-inorganic mesoporous silicas were prepared by employing three different synthesis routes and mercury adsorption studies were done in aqueous media using the batch technique. The organic ligands employed for the functionalization were derivatives of 2-mercaptopyrimidine or 2-mercaptothiazoline, and the synthesis pathways used were post-synthesis, post-synthesis with surface ion-imprinting and co-condensation with ion-imprinting. The incorporation of functional groups and the presence of ordered mesopores in the organosilicas was confirmed by XRD, TEM and SEM, nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms, (13)C MAS-NMR, (29)Si MAS-NMR, elemental and thermogravimetric analysis. The highest adsorption capacity and selectivity observed was for the material functionalized with 2-mercaptothiazoline ligand by means the co-condensation with ion-imprinting route (1.03 mmol g(-1) at pH 6). The prepared material could be potential sorbent for the extraction of this heavy metal from environmental and drinking waters.

  8. Mercury adsorption properties of sulfur-impregnated adsorbents

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hsi, N.-C.; Rood, M.J.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Chen, S.; Chang, R.

    2002-01-01

    Carbonaceous and noncarbonaceous adsorbents were impregnated with elemental sulfur to evaluate the chemical and physical properties of the adsorbents and their equilibrium mercury adsorption capacities. Simulated coal combustion flue gas conditions were used to determine the equilibrium adsorption capacities for Hg0 and HgCl2 gases to better understand how to remove mercury from gas streams generated by coal-fired utility power plants. Sulfur was deposited onto the adsorbents by monolayer surface deposition or volume pore filling. Sulfur impregnation increased the total sulfur content and decreased the total and micropore surface areas and pore volumes for all of the adsorbents tested. Adsorbents with sufficient amounts of active adsorption sites and sufficient microporous structure had mercury adsorption capacities up to 4,509 ??g Hg/g adsorbent. Elemental sulfur, organic sulfur, and sulfate were formed on the adsorbents during sulfur impregnation. Correlations were established with R2>0.92 between the equilibrium Hg0/HgCl2 adsorption capacities and the mass concentrations of elemental and organic sulfur. This result indicates that elemental and organic sulfur are important active adsorption sites for Hg0 and HgCl2.

  9. Aqueous mercury adsorption by activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Hadi, Pejman; To, Ming-Ho; Hui, Chi-Wai; Lin, Carol Sze Ki; McKay, Gordon

    2015-04-15

    Due to serious public health threats resulting from mercury pollution and its rapid distribution in our food chain through the contamination of water bodies, stringent regulations have been enacted on mercury-laden wastewater discharge. Activated carbons have been widely used in the removal of mercuric ions from aqueous effluents. The surface and textural characteristics of activated carbons are the two decisive factors in their efficiency in mercury removal from wastewater. Herein, the structural properties and binding affinity of mercuric ions from effluents have been presented. Also, specific attention has been directed to the effect of sulfur-containing functional moieties on enhancing the mercury adsorption. It has been demonstrated that surface area, pore size, pore size distribution and surface functional groups should collectively be taken into consideration in designing the optimal mercury removal process. Moreover, the mercury adsorption mechanism has been addressed using equilibrium adsorption isotherm, thermodynamic and kinetic studies. Further recommendations have been proposed with the aim of increasing the mercury removal efficiency using carbon activation processes with lower energy input, while achieving similar or even higher efficiencies.

  10. Vapor-phase elemental mercury adsorption by residual carbon separated from fly ash.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Gang; Chen, Chang-He; Kolker, Kruse H

    2005-01-01

    The adsorption capacity for vapor-phase elemental mercury (Hg0) of residual carbon separated from fly ash was studied in an attempt for the control of elemental mercury emissions from combustion processes. At low mercury concentrations (< 200 microg/m3), unburned carbon had higher adsorption capacity than commercial activated carbon. The adsorbality of unburned carbon was also found to be source dependent. Isotherms of FS carbon (separated from fly ash of a power plant of Shishi in Fujian Province) were similar to those classified as type II. Isotherms of XJ carbon (separated from fly ash of a power plant of Jingcheng in Shanxi Province) were more like those classified as type II. Due to the relatively low production costs, these residual carbons would likely be considerably more cost-effective for the full-scale removal of mercury from combustion flue gases than other technology.

  11. Enhancement of elemental mercury adsorption by silver supported material.

    PubMed

    Khunphonoi, Rattabal; Khamdahsag, Pummarin; Chiarakorn, Siriluk; Grisdanurak, Nurak; Paerungruang, Adjana; Predapitakkun, Somrudee

    2015-06-01

    Mercury, generally found in natural gas, is extremely hazardous. Although average mercury levels are relatively low, they are further reduced to comply with future mercury regulations, which are stringent in order to avoid releasing to the environment. Herein, vapor mercury adsorption was therefore investigated using two kinds of supports, granular activated carbon (GAC) and titanium dioxide (TiO2). Both supports were impregnated by silver (5 and 15 wt.%), before testing against a commercial adsorbent (sulfur-impregnated activated carbon, SAC). The adsorption isotherm, kinetics, and its thermodynamics of mercury adsorption were reported. The results revealed that Langmuir isotherm provided a better fit to the experimental data. Pseudo second-order was applicable to describe adsorption kinetics. The higher uniform Ag dispersion was a key factor for the higher mercury uptake. TiO2 supported silver adsorbent showed higher mercury adsorption than the commercial one by approximately 2 times. Chemisorption of mercury onto silver active sites was confirmed by an amalgam formation found in the spent adsorbents.

  12. ELEMENTAL MERCURY ADSORPTION BY ACTIVATED CARBON TREATED WITH SULFURIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of a study of the adsorption of elemental mercury at 125 C by a sulfuric-acid (H2S04, 50% w/w/ solution)-treated carbon for the removal of mercury from flue gas. The pore structure of the sample was characterized by nitrogen (N2) at -196 C and the t-plot m...

  13. Use of adsorption process to remove organic mercury thimerosal from industrial process wastewater.

    PubMed

    Velicu, Magdalena; Fu, Hongxiang; Suri, Rominder P S; Woods, Kevin

    2007-09-30

    Carbon adsorption process is tested for removal of high concentration of organic mercury (thimerosal) from industrial process wastewater, in batch and continuously flow through column systems. The organic mercury concentration in the process wastewater is about 1123 mg/L due to the thimerosal compound. Four commercially available adsorbents are tested for mercury removal and they are: Calgon F-400 granular activated carbon (GAC), CB II GAC, Mersorb GAC and an ion-exchange resin Amberlite GT73. The adsorption capacity of each adsorbent is described by the Freundlich isotherm model at pH 3.0, 9.5 and 11.0 in batch isotherm experiments. Acidic pH was favorable for thimerosal adsorption onto the GACs. Columns-in-series experiments are conducted with 30-180 min empty bed contact times (EBCTs). Mercury breakthrough of 30 mg/L occurred after about 47 h (96 Bed Volume Fed (BVF)) of operation, and 97 h (197 BVF) with 120 min EBCT and 180 min EBCT, respectively. Most of the mercury removal is attributed to the 1st adsorbent column. Increase in contact time by additional adsorbent columns did not lower the effluent mercury concentration below 30 mg/L. However, at a lower influent wastewater pH 3, the mercury effluent concentration decreased to less than 7 mg/L for up to 90 h of column operation (183 BVF). PMID:17459583

  14. Gas adsorption capacity of wood pellets

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yazdanpanah, F.; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine; Lim, C. Jim; Lau, A.; Bi, X. T.

    2016-02-03

    In this paper, temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) analysis was used to measure and analyze the adsorption of off-gases and oxygen by wood pellets during storage. Such information on how these gases interact with the material helps in the understanding of the purging/stripping behavior of off-gases to develop effective ventilation strategies for wood pellets. Steam-exploded pellets showed the lowest carbon dioxide (CO2) uptake compared to the regular and torrefied pellets. The high CO2 adsorption capacity of the torrefied pellets could be attributed to their porous structure and therefore greater available surface area. Quantifying the uptake of carbon monoxide by pellets was challengingmore » due to chemical adsorption, which formed a strong bond between the material and carbon monoxide. The estimated energy of desorption for CO (97.8 kJ/mol) was very high relative to that for CO2 (7.24 kJ/mol), demonstrating the mechanism of chemical adsorption and physical adsorption for CO and CO2, respectively. As for oxygen, the strong bonds that formed between the material and oxygen verified the existence of chemical adsorption and formation of an intermediate material.« less

  15. Adsorption enhancement of elemental mercury onto sulphur-functionalized silica gel adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Johari, Khairiraihanna; Saman, Norasikin; Mat, Hanapi

    2014-01-01

    In this study, elemental mercury (EM) adsorbents were synthesized using tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) and 3-mercaptopropyl trimethoxysilane as silica precursors. The synthesized silica gel (SG)-TEOS was further functionalized through impregnation with elemental sulphur and carbon disulphide (CS2). The SG adsorbents were then characterized by using scanning electron microscope, Fourier transform infra-red spectrophotometer, nitrogen adsorption/desorption, and energy-dispersive X-ray diffractometer. The EM adsorption of the SG adsorbents was determined using fabricated fixed-bed adsorber. The EM adsorption results showed that the sulphur-functionalized SG adsorbents had a greater Hgo breakthrough adsorption capacity, confirming that the presence of sulphur in silica matrices can improve Hgo adsorption performance due to their high affinity towards mercury. The highest Hgo adsorption capacity was observed for SG-TEOS(CS2) (82.62 microg/g), which was approximately 2.9 times higher than SG-TEOS (28.47 microg/g). The rate of Hgo adsorption was observed higher for sulphur-impregnated adsorbents, and decreased with the increase in the bed temperatures.

  16. Mechanisms of CPB Modified Zeolite on Mercury Adsorption in Simulated Wastewater.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiang; Huang, Hui; Huang, Rong; Zhang, Jinzhong; Hao, Shuoshuo; Shen, Yuanyuan; Chen, Hong

    2016-06-01

    A systematic study was carried out to analyze the effects of mercury(II) adsorption by surface modified zeolite (SMZ) and adsorption mechanism. Cetylpyridinium bromide (CPB) was used to prepare SMZ. The characterization methods by means of powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), scanning electron microscope (SEM) showed that both the surface and internal zeolite were covered with CPB molecules, but the main binding sites were surface. Results showed that the organic carbon and cation exchange capacity of the SMZ were 7.76 times and 4.22 times higher than those of natural zeolite (NZ), respectively. Zeta potentials before and after modification were measured at -7.80 mV and -30.27 mV, respectively. Moreover, the saturation adsorptive capacity of SMZ was 16.35 times higher than NZ in mercury-containing wastewater. The possible mechanisms of mercury elimination were surface adsorption, hydrophobic interaction, ion exchange, electricity neutralization. The adsorption process was affected little by competitive ions.

  17. Adsorption of mercury from water by modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes: adsorption behaviour and interference resistance by coexisting anions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Paris Honglay; Hsu, Cheng-Feng; Tsai, David Dah-wei; Lu, Yen-Ming; Huang, Winn-Jung

    2014-08-01

    This investigation reports the use of modified multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with various functional groups for adsorbing inorganic divalent mercury (Hg(II)) from water samples. To elucidate the behaviours and mechanisms of Hg(II) adsorption by modified MWCNTs, their adsorption capacity was studied by considering adsorption isotherms and kinetics. Particular attention was paid to interference of coexisting inorganic ions with Hg(II) adsorption. The results reveal that functionalization with oxygen-containing groups improved the Hg(II) adsorption capacity of the MWCNTs. Kinetic analysis demonstrated that the adsorption of Hg(II) by MWCNTs was closely described by the pseudo-second-order and Elovich models, suggesting that the adsorption of Hg(II) by MWCNTs was significantly affected by chemical adsorption. The kinetic results were also analysed using the intraparticle diffusion model, which revealed that intraparticle diffusion was not the only rate-controlling mechanism. The adsorption of Hg(II) on MWCNTs fell drastically as the ionic strength increased from 0 to 1.0mol/L chloride ions, and declined significantly as the pH increased from 2.2 to 10.5. The elemental maps obtained by energy-dispersive spectrometer (EDS) revealed the formation of surface complexes of chloride ions with functional groups on MWCNTs, which reduced the number of available sites for the adsorption of Hg(II) and strengthened the repulsive forces between Hg(II) and MWCNTs. The EDS results suggest that chloride ions are important in controlling Hg(II) speciation and adsorption on the surfaces of MWCNTs.

  18. Density functional theory study of mercury adsorption on metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Steckel, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    Density functional theory _DFT_ calculations are used to characterize the interaction of mercury with copper, nickel, palladium, platinum, silver, and gold surfaces. Mercury binds relatively strongly to all the metal surfaces studied, with binding energies up to _1 eV for Pt and Pd. DFT calculations underestimate the energy of adsorption with respect to available experimental data. Plane-wave DFT results using the local density approximation and the Perdew-Wang 1991 and Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof parametrizations of the generalized gradient approximation indicate that binding of mercury at hollow sites is preferred over binding at top orbridge sites. The interaction with mercury in order of increasing reactivity over the six metals studied is Ag_Au_Cu_Ni_Pt_Pd. Binding is stronger on the _001_ faces of the metal surfaces, where mercury issituated in fourfold hollow sites as opposed to the threefold hollow sites on _111_ faces. In general, mercury adsorption leads to decreases in the work function; adsorbate-induced work function changes are particularly dramatic on Pt.

  19. Density functional theory study of mercury adsorption on metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Steckel, Janice A.

    2008-03-10

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations are used to characterize the interaction of mercury with copper, nickel, palladium, platinum, silver, and gold surfaces. Mercury binds relatively strongly to all the metal surfaces studied, with binding energies up to ~1eV for Pt and Pd. DFT calculations underestimate the energy of adsorption with respect to available experimental data. Plane-wave DFT results using the local density approximation and the Perdew-Wang 1991 and Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof parametrizations of the generalized gradient approximation indicate that binding of mercury at hollow sites is preferred over binding at top or bridge sites. The interaction with mercury in order of increasing reactivity over the six metals studied is Agmercury is situated in fourfold hollow sites as opposed to the threefold hollow sites on (111) faces. Finally, in general, mercury adsorption leads to decreases in the work function; adsorbate-induced work function changes are particularly dramatic on Pt.

  20. Development of coconut pith chars towards high elemental mercury adsorption performance - Effect of pyrolysis temperatures.

    PubMed

    Johari, Khairiraihanna; Saman, Norasikin; Song, Shiow Tien; Cheu, Siew Chin; Kong, Helen; Mat, Hanapi

    2016-08-01

    In this study, chars from coconut pith (CP) were prepared aiming for superior adsorption towards elemental mercury (Hg(o)). The yield, proximate analysis, textural characteristics, surface functional groups and elemental composition analyses of the chars produced at pyrolysis temperature of 300 °C, 500 °C, 700 °C and 900 °C were compared. The surface area, pore volume, ash and carbon content of chars increased, while the yield and moisture content decreased with increasing pyrolysis temperatures. The changing of physical and chemical properties of the chars produced at variety pyrolysis temperature was much effect on the Hg(o) adsorption performance and definitely provides important information on the Hg(o) adsorption mechanism. The highest Hg(o) adsorption capacity was observed for CP900 (6067.49 μg/g), followed by CP700 (2395.98 μg/g), CP500 (289.76 μg/g), CP300 (1.68 μg/g), and CP (0.73 μg/g). The equilibrium data were well described by the Freundlich adsorption isotherm model. The pseudo-second order best described the kinetic data of the Hg(o) adsorption onto CP and CP300. For chars produced at higher pyrolysis temperature, however, the pseudo-zero order and pseudo-second order fitted well for the adsorption and breakthrough regions, respectively. The Hg(o) adsorption capacity of chars obtained from high pyrolysis temperature of CP significantly outperformed the commercial activated carbon (Darco KB-B) as well as superior to chars reported in the literature indicating the CP can be used as a precursor for preparation of chars as elemental mercury adsorbents. PMID:27160635

  1. Development of coconut pith chars towards high elemental mercury adsorption performance - Effect of pyrolysis temperatures.

    PubMed

    Johari, Khairiraihanna; Saman, Norasikin; Song, Shiow Tien; Cheu, Siew Chin; Kong, Helen; Mat, Hanapi

    2016-08-01

    In this study, chars from coconut pith (CP) were prepared aiming for superior adsorption towards elemental mercury (Hg(o)). The yield, proximate analysis, textural characteristics, surface functional groups and elemental composition analyses of the chars produced at pyrolysis temperature of 300 °C, 500 °C, 700 °C and 900 °C were compared. The surface area, pore volume, ash and carbon content of chars increased, while the yield and moisture content decreased with increasing pyrolysis temperatures. The changing of physical and chemical properties of the chars produced at variety pyrolysis temperature was much effect on the Hg(o) adsorption performance and definitely provides important information on the Hg(o) adsorption mechanism. The highest Hg(o) adsorption capacity was observed for CP900 (6067.49 μg/g), followed by CP700 (2395.98 μg/g), CP500 (289.76 μg/g), CP300 (1.68 μg/g), and CP (0.73 μg/g). The equilibrium data were well described by the Freundlich adsorption isotherm model. The pseudo-second order best described the kinetic data of the Hg(o) adsorption onto CP and CP300. For chars produced at higher pyrolysis temperature, however, the pseudo-zero order and pseudo-second order fitted well for the adsorption and breakthrough regions, respectively. The Hg(o) adsorption capacity of chars obtained from high pyrolysis temperature of CP significantly outperformed the commercial activated carbon (Darco KB-B) as well as superior to chars reported in the literature indicating the CP can be used as a precursor for preparation of chars as elemental mercury adsorbents.

  2. Adsorption of mercury in coal-fired power plants gypsum slurry on TiO2/chitosan composite material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, P.; Gao, B. B.; Gao, J. Q.; Zhang, K.; Chen, Y. J.; Yang, Y. P.; Chen, H. W.

    2016-07-01

    In this study, a simple method was used to prepare a chitosan adsorbent to mix with KI and TiO2. Gravimetric analysis (TG), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were used to characterize the samples before and after adsorption of Hg2+. A mercury adsorption experiment was also conducted in the gypsum slurry. The results show that using hydrobromic acid as a solvent of adsorbent resulted in a better adsorption effect than using acetic acid alone. Also, the sample (CS-KI/TiO2-HBr) had a maximum mercury adsorption capacity when the pH=5 and the t=50°C. The characterization experiments showed that the thermal stability of composite materials declined and the TiO2 uniformly dispersed in the surface of the samples with a lamellar structure, generating a lot of cracks and recesses that increased the reactive sites. Furthermore, when the TiO2 reacted with CS, it resulted in Ti-C, Ti-O and Ti-N bonds. The Br- can prevent the growth of TiO2 crystal grains and strengthen the ability of I- to remove mercury. The adsorption isotherm and kinetic results indicated that the adsorption behaviour of CS-KI/TiO2-HBr as it removes Hg2+ is an inhomogeneous multilayer adsorption process. The surface adsorption and intraparticle diffusion effects are both important in the Hg2+ adsorption process.

  3. Thorough removal of inorganic and organic mercury from aqueous solutions by adsorption on Lemna minor powder.

    PubMed

    Li, Shun-Xing; Zheng, Feng-Ying; Yang, Huang; Ni, Jian-Cong

    2011-02-15

    The adsorption ability of duckweed (Lemna minor) powders for removing inorganic and organic mercury (methyl and ethyl mercury) has been studied using cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometry. The optimal adsorption conditions were: (a) the pH value of the solution 7.0 for inorganic and ethyl mercury, 9.0 for methyl mercury, and (b) equilibrium adsorption time 10, 20, and 40 min for inorganic mercury, methyl mercury, and ethyl mercury, respectively. After adsorption by L. minor powder for 40 min, when the initial concentrations of inorganic and organic mercury were under 12.0 μg L(-1) and 50.0 μg L(-1), respectively, the residual concentrations of mercury could meet the criterion of drinking water (1.0 μg L(-1)) and the permitted discharge limit of wastewater (10.0 μg L(-1)) set by China and USEPA, respectively. Thorough removal of both inorganic and organic mercury from aqueous solutions was reported for the first time. The significant adsorption sites were C-O-P and phosphate groups by the surface electrostatic interactions with aqueous inorganic and organic mercury cations, and then the selective adsorption was resulted from the strong chelating interaction between amine groups and mercury on the surface of L. minor cells.

  4. Adsorption of mercury on laterite from Guizhou Province, China.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaohong; Zhu, Lijun; Guo, Baiwei; He, Shouyang

    2008-01-01

    The adsorption behaviors of Hg(II) on laterite from Guizhou Province, China, were studied and the adsorption mechanism was discussed. The results showed that different mineral compositons in the laterite will cause differences in the adsorption capacity of laterite to Hg(II). Illite and non-crystalloids are the main contributors to enhancing the adsorption capacity of laterite to Hg(II). The pH of the solution is an important factor affecting the adsorption of Hg(II) on laterite. The alkalescent environment (pH 7-9) is favorable to the adsorption of Hg(II). The amount of adsorbed Hg(II) increases with increasing pH. When the pH reaches a certain value, the amount of the adsorbed Hg(II) will reach the maximum level. The amount of adsorbed Hg(II) decreases with increasing pH. The optimal pHs of laterite and kaolinite are 9 and 8, respectively. The optimal initial concentrations of Hg(II) on laterite and kaolinite are 250 and 200 microg/ml, respectively. The adsorption isotherms were described by the Langmuir model. The adsorption of Hg(II) on laterite is a quick process while that of Hg(II) on kaolinite is a slow reaction. Laterite from Guizhou Province is a promising environmental material which can be used in the removal of Hg(II) from wastewater. PMID:19202872

  5. Adsorption of mercury on laterite from Guizhou Province, China.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaohong; Zhu, Lijun; Guo, Baiwei; He, Shouyang

    2008-01-01

    The adsorption behaviors of Hg(II) on laterite from Guizhou Province, China, were studied and the adsorption mechanism was discussed. The results showed that different mineral compositons in the laterite will cause differences in the adsorption capacity of laterite to Hg(II). Illite and non-crystalloids are the main contributors to enhancing the adsorption capacity of laterite to Hg(II). The pH of the solution is an important factor affecting the adsorption of Hg(II) on laterite. The alkalescent environment (pH 7-9) is favorable to the adsorption of Hg(II). The amount of adsorbed Hg(II) increases with increasing pH. When the pH reaches a certain value, the amount of the adsorbed Hg(II) will reach the maximum level. The amount of adsorbed Hg(II) decreases with increasing pH. The optimal pHs of laterite and kaolinite are 9 and 8, respectively. The optimal initial concentrations of Hg(II) on laterite and kaolinite are 250 and 200 microg/ml, respectively. The adsorption isotherms were described by the Langmuir model. The adsorption of Hg(II) on laterite is a quick process while that of Hg(II) on kaolinite is a slow reaction. Laterite from Guizhou Province is a promising environmental material which can be used in the removal of Hg(II) from wastewater.

  6. Synthesis, characterization, and mercury adsorption properties of hybrid mesoporous aluminosilicate sieve prepared with fly ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Minmin; Hou, Li-an; Xi, Beidou; Zhao, Ying; Xia, Xunfeng

    2013-05-01

    A novel hybrid mesoporous aluminosilicate sieve (HMAS) was prepared with fly ash and impregnated with zeolite A precursors. This improved the mercury adsorption of HMAS compared to original MCM-41. The HMAS was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorption-desorption, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analysis, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images and 29Si and 27Al magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) spectra. These showed that the HMAS structure was still retained after impregnated with zeolite A. But the surface area and pore diameter of HMAS decreased due to pore blockage. Adsorption of mercury from aqueous solution was studied on untreated MCM-41and HMAS. The mercury adsorption rate of HMAS was higher than that of origin MCM-41. The adsorption of mercury was investigated on HMAS regarding the pH of mercury solution, initial mercury concentration, and the reaction temperature. The experimental data fit well to Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models. The Dublin-Radushkevich isotherm and the characterization show that the mercury adsorption on HMAS involved the ion-exchange mechanisms. In addition, the thermodynamic parameters suggest that the adsorption process was endothermic in nature. The adsorption of mercury on HMAS followed the first order kinetics.

  7. Characteristics and stability of mercury vapor adsorption over two kinds of modified semicoke.

    PubMed

    Huawei, Zhang; Xiuli, Liu; Li, Wang; Peng, Liang

    2014-01-01

    In an attempt to produce effective and lower price gaseous Hg(0) adsorbents, two methods of HCl and KMnO4/heat treatment were used respectively for the surface modification of liginite semicoke from inner Mongolia. The different effects of modification process on the surface physical and chemical properties were analyzed. The characteristics and stability of mercury vapor adsorption over two kinds of modified semicoke were investigated. The results indicated that modification process caused lower micropore quantity and volume capacity of semicoke; the C-Cl functional groups, C=O bond and delocalized electron π on the surface of Cl-SC, the amorphous higher valency Mn (x+) , and O=C-OH functional groups on the surface of Mn-H-SC were the active sites for oxidation and adsorption of gaseous Hg(0). Modification process led to higher mercury removal efficiency of semicoke at 140°C and reduced the stability of adsorbed mercury of semicoke in simulated water circumstance simultaneously. PMID:25309948

  8. Characteristics and stability of mercury vapor adsorption over two kinds of modified semicoke.

    PubMed

    Huawei, Zhang; Xiuli, Liu; Li, Wang; Peng, Liang

    2014-01-01

    In an attempt to produce effective and lower price gaseous Hg(0) adsorbents, two methods of HCl and KMnO4/heat treatment were used respectively for the surface modification of liginite semicoke from inner Mongolia. The different effects of modification process on the surface physical and chemical properties were analyzed. The characteristics and stability of mercury vapor adsorption over two kinds of modified semicoke were investigated. The results indicated that modification process caused lower micropore quantity and volume capacity of semicoke; the C-Cl functional groups, C=O bond and delocalized electron π on the surface of Cl-SC, the amorphous higher valency Mn (x+) , and O=C-OH functional groups on the surface of Mn-H-SC were the active sites for oxidation and adsorption of gaseous Hg(0). Modification process led to higher mercury removal efficiency of semicoke at 140°C and reduced the stability of adsorbed mercury of semicoke in simulated water circumstance simultaneously.

  9. Characteristics and Stability of Mercury Vapor Adsorption over Two Kinds of Modified Semicoke

    PubMed Central

    Huawei, Zhang; Xiuli, Liu; Li, Wang; Peng, Liang

    2014-01-01

    In an attempt to produce effective and lower price gaseous Hg0 adsorbents, two methods of HCl and KMnO4/heat treatment were used respectively for the surface modification of liginite semicoke from inner Mongolia. The different effects of modification process on the surface physical and chemical properties were analyzed. The characteristics and stability of mercury vapor adsorption over two kinds of modified semicoke were investigated. The results indicated that modification process caused lower micropore quantity and volume capacity of semicoke; the C-Cl functional groups, C=O bond and delocalized electron π on the surface of Cl-SC, the amorphous higher valency Mnx+, and O=C–OH functional groups on the surface of Mn-H-SC were the active sites for oxidation and adsorption of gaseous Hg0. Modification process led to higher mercury removal efficiency of semicoke at 140°C and reduced the stability of adsorbed mercury of semicoke in simulated water circumstance simultaneously. PMID:25309948

  10. Synthesis, characterization, and mercury adsorption properties of hybrid mesoporous aluminosilicate sieve prepared with fly ash

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Minmin; Hou, Li-an; Xi, Beidou; Zhao, Ying; Xia, Xunfeng

    2013-01-01

    A novel hybrid mesoporous aluminosilicate sieve (HMAS) was prepared with fly ash and impregnated with zeolite A precursors. This improved the mercury adsorption of HMAS compared to original MCM-41. The HMAS was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorption–desorption, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analysis, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images and 29Si and 27Al magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) spectra. These showed that the HMAS structure was still retained after impregnated with zeolite A. But the surface area and pore diameter of HMAS decreased due to pore blockage. Adsorption of mercury from aqueous solution was studied on untreated MCM-41and HMAS. The mercury adsorption rate of HMAS was higher than that of origin MCM-41. The adsorption of mercury was investigated on HMAS regarding the pH of mercury solution, initial mercury concentration, and the reaction temperature. The experimental data fit well to Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models. The Dublin–Radushkevich isotherm and the characterization show that the mercury adsorption on HMAS involved the ion-exchange mechanisms. In addition, the thermodynamic parameters suggest that the adsorption process was endothermic in nature. The adsorption of mercury on HMAS followed the first order kinetics. PMID:23687400

  11. Evaluation of the potassium adsorption capacity of a potassium adsorption filter during rapid blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, H; Akatsuka, Y; Muramatsu, C; Isogai, S; Sugiura, Y; Arakawa, S; Murayama, M; Kurahashi, M; Takasuga, H; Oshige, T; Yuba, T; Mizuta, S; Emi, N

    2015-05-01

    The concentration of extracellular potassium in red blood cell concentrates (RCCs) increases during storage, leading to risk of hyperkalemia. A potassium adsorption filter (PAF) can eliminate the potassium at normal blood transfusion. This study aimed to investigate the potassium adsorption capacity of a PAF during rapid blood transfusion. We tested several different potassium concentrations under a rapid transfusion condition using a pressure bag. The adsorption rates of the 70-mEq/l model were 76·8%. The PAF showed good potassium adsorption capacity, suggesting that this filter may provide a convenient method to prevent hyperkalemia during rapid blood transfusion.

  12. [Simulation study on the effect of salinity on the adsorption behavior of mercury in wastewater-irrigated area].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Shun-An; Li, Xiao-Hua; Xu, Zhi-Yu

    2014-05-01

    This study was designed to pinpoint the impact of salinity ( NaCl and Na2SO4, added at salinity levels of 0-5%, respectively) on the adsorption behavior of mercury in wastewater-irrigated areas of Tianjin City by batch and kinetic experiments. The results showed that, the Langmuir isotherm and the Elovich equation can well fitted batch and kinetic experimental data, respectively. As NaCI spiked in soil, Hg( II) adsorption capacity and strength had marked decreases, from 868.64 mgkg-1 and 1. 32 at control to 357.48 mgkg-1 and 0.63 at 5% salinity level of NaCI, respectively. As Na2SO4 spiked in soil, Hg(II) adsorption capacity (parameter qm in Langmuir isotherm) and strength (parameter k in Langmuir isotherm) changed slightly, from 868.64 mg kg-1 and 1.32 at control to 739.44 mg.kg-1 and 1. 18 at 5% salinity level of Na2 SO4, respectively. Kinetic data showed that, Hg( II) adsorption rate (parameter b in Elovich equation) in soil was not influenced by Na2SO, addition. However, the addition of NaC1 had a great effect on mercury adsorption rate. Hg(II ) adsorption capacity as a function of CI- or SO(2-)(4) content in soil could be simulated by the natural logarithm model, while Hg( II ) adsorption rate as a function of CI- content in soil could be simulated by the linear model. The study manifested that NaCI can significantly increase migration of Hg( II ) in the soil irrigated with wastewater, which may enhance Hg( II) bioavailability in the soil and cause a hazard to surface water. Especially, it will be harmful to human body through the food chain. PMID:25055690

  13. Evaluating the Adsorptive Capacities of Chemsorb 1000 and Chemsorb 1425

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monje, Oscar Alberto Monje; Surma, Jan M.; Johnsey, Marissa N.; Melendez, Orlando

    2014-01-01

    The Air Revitalization Lab at KSC tested Chemsorb 1000 and 1425, two candidate sorbents for use in future air revitalization technologies being evaluated by the ARREM project. Chemsorb 1000 and 1425 are granular coconut-shell activated carbon sorbents produced by Molecular Products, Inc. that may be used in the TCCS. Chemsorb 1000 is a high grade activated carbon for organic vapor adsorption. In contrast, Chemsorb 1425 is a high-grade impregnated activated carbon for adsorption of airborne ammonia and amines. Chemsorb 1000 was challenged with simulated spacecraft gas streams in order to determine its adsorptive capacities for mixtures of volatile organics compounds. Chemsorb 1425 was challenged with various NH3 concentrations to determine its adsorptive capacity.

  14. High capacity adsorption media and method of producing

    DOEpatents

    Tranter, Troy J.; Mann, Nicholas R.; Todd, Terry A.; Herbst, Ronald S.

    2010-10-05

    A method of producing an adsorption medium to remove at least one constituent from a feed stream. The method comprises dissolving and/or suspending at least one metal compound in a solvent to form a metal solution, dissolving polyacrylonitrile into the metal solution to form a PAN-metal solution, and depositing the PAN-metal solution into a quenching bath to produce the adsorption medium. The at least one constituent, such as arsenic, selenium, or antimony, is removed from the feed stream by passing the feed stream through the adsorption medium. An adsorption medium having an increased metal loading and increased capacity for arresting the at least one constituent to be removed is also disclosed. The adsorption medium includes a polyacrylonitrile matrix and at least one metal hydroxide incorporated into the polyacrylonitrile matrix.

  15. High capacity adsorption media and method of producing

    DOEpatents

    Tranter, Troy J.; Herbst, R. Scott; Mann, Nicholas R.; Todd, Terry A.

    2008-05-06

    A method of producing an adsorption medium to remove at least one constituent from a feed stream. The method comprises dissolving at least one metal compound in a solvent to form a metal solution, dissolving polyacrylonitrile into the metal solution to form a PAN-metal solution, and depositing the PAN-metal solution into a quenching bath to produce the adsorption medium. The at least one constituent, such as arsenic, selenium, or antimony, is removed from the feed stream by passing the feed stream through the adsorption medium. An adsorption medium having an increased metal loading and increased capacity for arresting the at least one constituent to be removed is also disclosed. The adsorption medium includes a polyacrylonitrile matrix and at least one metal hydroxide incorporated into the polyacrylonitrile matrix.

  16. Modeling and Experimental Studies of Mercury Oxidation and Adsorption in a Fixed-Bed Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Buitrago, Paula A.; Morrill, Mike; Lighty, JoAnn S.; Silcox, Geoffrey D.

    2009-06-15

    This report presents experimental and modeling mercury oxidation and adsorption data. Fixed-bed and single-particle models of mercury adsorption were developed. The experimental data were obtained with two reactors: a 300-W, methane-fired, tubular, quartz-lined reactor for studying homogeneous oxidation reactions and a fixed-bed reactor, also of quartz, for studying heterogeneous reactions. The latter was attached to the exit of the former to provide realistic combustion gases. The fixed-bed reactor contained one gram of coconut-shell carbon and remained at a temperature of 150°C. All methane, air, SO2, and halogen species were introduced through the burner to produce a radical pool representative of real combustion systems. A Tekran 2537A Analyzer coupled with a wet conditioning system provided speciated mercury concentrations. At 150°C and in the absence of HCl or HBr, the mercury uptake was about 20%. The addition of 50 ppm HCl caused complete capture of all elemental and oxidized mercury species. In the absence of halogens, SO2 increased the mercury adsorption efficiency to up to 30 percent. The extent of adsorption decreased with increasing SO2 concentration when halogens were present. Increasing the HCl concentration to 100 ppm lessened the effect of SO2. The fixed-bed model incorporates Langmuir adsorption kinetics and was developed to predict adsorption of elemental mercury and the effect of multiple flue gas components. This model neglects intraparticle diffusional resistances and is only applicable to pulverized carbon sorbents. It roughly describes experimental data from the literature. The current version includes the ability to account for competitive adsorption between mercury, SO2, and NO2. The single particle model simulates in-flight sorbent capture of elemental mercury. This model was developed to include Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms, rate equations, sorbent feed rate, and

  17. Simultaneous Removal of NOx and Mercury in Low Temperature Selective Catalytic and Adsorptive Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Neville G. Pinto; Panagiotis G. Smirniotis

    2006-03-31

    The results of a 18-month investigation to advance the development of a novel Low Temperature Selective Catalytic and Adsorptive Reactor (LTSCAR), for the simultaneous removal of NO{sub x} and mercury (elemental and oxidized) from flue gases in a single unit operation located downstream of the particulate collectors, are reported. In the proposed LTSCAR, NO{sub x} removal is in a traditional SCR mode but at low temperature, and, uniquely, using carbon monoxide as a reductant. The concomitant capture of mercury in the unit is achieved through the incorporation of a novel chelating adsorbent. As conceptualized, the LTSCAR will be located downstream of the particulate collectors (flue gas temperature 140-160 C) and will be similar in structure to a conventional SCR. That is, it will have 3-4 beds that are loaded with catalyst and adsorbent allowing staged replacement of catalyst and adsorbent as required. Various Mn/TiO{sub 2} SCR catalysts were synthesized and evaluated for their ability to reduce NO at low temperature using CO as the reductant. It has been shown that with a suitably tailored catalyst more than 65% NO conversion with 100% N{sub 2} selectivity can be achieved, even at a high space velocity (SV) of 50,000 h-1 and in the presence of 2 v% H{sub 2}O. Three adsorbents for oxidized mercury were developed in this project with thermal stability in the required range. Based on detailed evaluations of their characteristics, the mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (MPTS) adsorbent was found to be most promising for the capture of oxidized mercury. This adsorbent has been shown to be thermally stable to 200 C. Fixed-bed evaluations in the targeted temperature range demonstrated effective removal of oxidized mercury from simulated flue gas at very high capacity ({approx}>58 mg Hg/g adsorbent). Extension of the capability of the adsorbent to elemental mercury capture was pursued with two independent approaches: incorporation of a novel nano-layer on the surface of the

  18. Enhancing the adsorption of vapor-phase mercury chloride with an innovative composite sulfur-impregnated activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Ie, Iau-Ren; Chen, Wei-Chin; Yuan, Chung-Shin; Hung, Chung-Hsuang; Lin, Yuan-Chung; Tsai, Hsieh-Hung; Jen, Yi-Shiu

    2012-05-30

    Mercury chloride (HgCl(2)) is the major mercury derivate emitted from municipal solid waste incinerators, which has high risk to the environment and human health. This study investigated the adsorption of vapor-phase HgCl(2) with an innovative composite sulfurized activated carbon (AC), which was derived from the pyrolysis, activation, and sulfurization of waste tires. The composite sulfur-impregnation process impregnated activated carbon with aqueous-phase sodium sulfide (Na(2)S) and followed with vapor-phase elemental sulfur (S(0)). Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was applied to investigate the adsorptive capacity of vapor-phase HgCl(2) using the composite sulfurized AC. The operating parameters included the types of composite sulfurized AC, the adsorption temperature, and the influent HgCl(2) concentration. Experimental results indicated that the sulfur-impregnation process could increase the sulfur content of the sulfurized AC, but decreased its specific surface area. This study further revealed that the composite sulfurized AC impregnated with aqueous-phase Na(2)S and followed with vapor-phase S(0) (Na(2)S+S(0) AC) had much higher saturated adsorptive capacity of HgCl(2) than AC impregnated in the reverse sequence (S(0)+Na(2)S AC). A maximum saturated adsorptive capacity of HgCl(2) up to 5236 μg-HgCl(2)/g-C was observed for the composite Na(2)S+S(0) AC, which was approximately 2.00 and 3.17 times higher than those for the single Na(2)S and S(0) ACs, respectively.

  19. Evaluation of the adsorption capacity of alkali-treated waste materials for the adsorption of sulphamethoxazole.

    PubMed

    Kurup, Lisha

    2012-01-01

    The present work is to develop potential adsorbents from waste material and employ them for the removal of a hazardous antibacterial, sulphamethoxazole, from the wastewater by the Adsorption technique. The Adsorption technique was used to impound the dangerous antibiotics from wastewater using Deoiled Soya (DOS), an agricultural waste, and Water Hyacinth (WH), a prolific colonizer. The adsorption capacity of these adsorbents was further enhanced by treating them with sodium hydroxide solution and it was seen that the adsorption capacity increases by 10 to 25%. Hence a comparative account of the adsorption studies of all the four adsorbents, i.e. DOS, Alkali-treated DOS, WH and Alkali-treated Water Hyacinth has been discussed in this paper. Different isotherms like Freundlich, Langmuir and Dubinin-Radushkevich were also deduced from the adsorption data. Isotherm studies were in turn used in estimating the thermodynamic parameters. DOS showed sorption capacity of 0.0007 mol g(-1) while Alkali-treated Deoiled Soya exhibited 0.0011 mol g(-1) of sorption capacity, which reveals that the adsorption is higher in case of alkali-treated adsorbent. The mean sorption energy (E) was obtained between 9 and 12 kJ mol, which shows that the reaction proceeds by ion exchange reaction. Kinetic study reveals that the reaction follows pseudo-second-order rate equation. Moreover, mass transfer studies performed for the ongoing processes show that the mass transfer coefficient obtained for alkali-treated moieties was higher than the parent moieties. The breakthrough curves plotted from the column studies show percentage saturation of 90-98%. About 87-97% of sulphamethoxazole was recovered from column by desorption. PMID:22508113

  20. Characteristic and mercury adsorption of activated carbon produced by CO2 of chicken waste.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yaji; Jin, Baosheng; Zhong, Zhaoping; Zhong, Wenqi; Xiao, Rui

    2008-01-01

    Preparation of activated carbon from chicken waste is a promising way to produce a useful adsorbent for Hg removal. A three-stage activation process (drying at 200 degrees C, pyrolysis in N2 atmosphere, followed by CO2 activation) was used for the production of activated samples. The effects of carbonization temperature (400-600 degrees C), activation temperature (700-900 degrees C), and activation time (1-2.5 h) on the physicochemical properties (weight-loss and BET surface) of the prepared carbon were investigated. Adsorptive removal of mercury from real flue gas onto activated carbon has been studied. The activated carbon from chicken waste has the same mercury capacity as commercial activated carbon (Darco LH) (Hg(v): 38.7% vs. 53.5%, Hg(0): 50.5% vs. 68.8%), although its surface area is around 10 times smaller, 89.5 m2/g vs. 862 m2/g. The low cost activated carbon can be produced from chicken waste, and the procedure is suitable.

  1. Multifractal analysis of soil porosity based on mercury porosimetry and nitrogen adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paz-Ferreiro, J.; Vidal Vázquez, E.; Miranda, J. G. V.

    2009-04-01

    The soil pore space is composed of a continuum of pores extremely variable in size which include structures smaller than nanometres and as large as macropores > 20 mm in diameter, i.e. with an upper size limit of the order of centimetres. Thus, a ratio of at least 106 is displayed in soil pore sizes. Soil pore size distribution directly influences many soil physical, chemical and biological properties. Characterization of soil structure may be achieved by pore size distribution analysis. There is not a unique method for determining soil pore size distributions all over the size scale. Mercury injection porosimetry and N2 adsorption isotherms are techniques commonly used for assessing equivalent pore size diameters in selected ranges. The Hg injection technique provides pore size distributions in the range from about 50 nm to 100 m, whereas N2 adsorption isotherms may be used for finer pores ranging in size from about 2 to 500 nm. In this work, multifractal formalism has been used to describe Hg injection porosimetry and N2 adsorption isotherms measured in a Mollisol and in a Vertisol with four different soil use intensities, ranging from native, never cultivated, land to continuous cropping. Three samples per treatment were analyzed resulting in a total of twelve samples per soil. All the Hg injection curves and N2 adsorption isotherms exhibited multifractal behaviour as shown by singularity spectra and Rényi dimension spectra. The capacity dimension, D0, for both Hg injection and N2 adsorption data sets was not significantly different from 1.00. However, significantly different values of entropy dimension, D1, and correlation dimension, D2, were obtained for mercury injection and nitrogen adsorption experimental data. For instance, entropy dimension, D1, values extracted from multifractal spectra of Hg intrusion porosimetry were on average 0.913 and varied from 0.889 to 0.939. However, the corresponding figures for N2 adsorption isotherms were on average 0

  2. Multiscale characterization of pore size distributions using mercury porosimetry and nitrogen adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paz-Ferreiro, J.; Tarquis, A. M.; Miranda, J. G. V.; Vidal Vázquez, E.

    2009-04-01

    The soil pore space is a continuum extremely variable in size, including structures smaller than nanometres and as large as macropores or cracks with millimetres or even centimetres size. Pore size distributions (PSDs) affects important soil functions, such as those related with transmission and storage of water, and root growth. Direct and indirect measurements of PSDs are becoming increasingly used to characterize soil structure. Mercury injection porosimetry and nitrogen adsorption isotherms are techniques commonly employed for assessing equivalent pore size diameters in the range from about 50 nm to 100 m and 2 to 500 nm, respectively. The multifractal formalism was used to describe Hg injection curves and N2 adsorption isotherms from two series of a Mollisol cultivated under no tillage and minimum tillage. Soil samples were taken from 0-10, 10-20 and 20-30 cm depths in two experimental fields located in the north of Buenos Aires and South of Santa Fe provinces, Argentina. All the data sets analyzed from the two studied soil attributes showed remarkably good scaling trends as assessed by singularity spectrum and generalized dimension spectrum. Both, experimental Hg injection curves and N2 adsorption isotherms could be fitted reasonably well with multifractal models. A wide variety of singularity and generalized dimension spectra was found for the variables. The capacity dimensions, D0, for both Hg injection and N2 adsorption data were not significantly different from the Euclidean dimension. However, the entropy dimension, D1, and correlation dimension, D2, obtained from mercury injection and nitrogen adsorption data showed significant differences. So, D1 values were on average 0.868 and varied from 0.787 to 0.925 for Hg intrusion curves. Entropy dimension, D1, values for N2 adsorption isotherms were on average 0.582 significantly lower than those obtained when using the former technique. Twenty-three out of twenty-four N2 isotherms had D1 values in a

  3. Toxicity and accumulation of mercury in three species of crabs with different osmoregulatory capacities

    SciTech Connect

    Bianchini, A.; Gilles, R.

    1996-07-01

    Synergism between mercury and salinity has been shown in invertebrates. Two authors have tied to correlate salinity effects with a higher or lower accumulation of mercury. Zauke, demonstrated lower mercury levels in several benthic invertebrates from limnic regions of the Elbe estuary when compared to those from Marine regions. On the other hand, Kendall did not report any significant difference in mercury concentrations in benthic macroinvertebrates throughout a salinity gradient in two estuaries from Georgia. In species hyperosmoregulating in diluted media, it could, however, be considered that the high water turnover would favor mercury accumulation. In this context, one could also expect a relationship between environmental salinity and mercury toxicity in different euryhaline species depending on their osmoregulatory capacities. We have tested this hypothesis analyzing the toxic effects and accumulation of mercury in three euryhaline crabs presenting different osmoregulatory capacities: Eriocheir sinensis (strong hyperosmoregulator), Carcinus maenas (weak hyperosmoregulator) and Cancer pagurus (osmoconformer). 16 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Effect of calcium on adsorption capacity of powdered activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Shang, Junteng; Wang, Ying; Li, Yansheng; Gao, Hong

    2013-12-01

    We investigated the effect of calcium ion on the adsorption of humic acid (HA) (as a target pollutant) by powered activated carbon. The HA adsorption isotherms at different pH and kinetics of two different solutions including HA alone and HA doped Ca(2+), were performed. It was showed that the adsorption capacity of powdered activated carbon (PAC) for HA was markedly enhanced when Ca(2+) was doped into HA. Also, HA and Ca(2+) taken as nitrate were tested on the uptake of each other respectively and it was showed that the adsorbed amounts of both of them were significantly promoted when HA and calcium co-existed. Furthermore, the adsorbed amount of HA slightly decreased with the increasing of Ca(2+) concentration, whereas the amount of calcium increased with the increasing of HA concentration, but all above the amounts without addition. Finally, the change of pH before and after adsorption process is studied. In the two different solutions including HA alone and HA doped Ca(2+), pH had a small rise, but the extent of pH of later solution was bigger. PMID:25078809

  5. THE EFFECT OF ACTIVATED CARBON SURFACE MOISTURE ON LOW TEMPERATURE MERCURY ADSORPTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Experiments with elemental mercury (Hg0) adsorption by activated carbons were performed using a bench-scale fixed-bed reactor at room temperature (27 degrees C) to determine the role of surface moisture in capturing Hg0. A bituminous-coal-based activated carbon (BPL) and an activ...

  6. EFFECT OF MOISTURE ON ADSORPTION OF ELEMENTAL MERCURY BY ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses experiments using activated carbon to capture elemental mercury (Hgo), and a bench-scale dixed-bed reactor and a flow reactor to determine the role of surface moisture in Hgo adsorption. Three activated-carbon samples, with different pore structure and ash co...

  7. IMPORTANCE OF ACTIVATED CARBON'S OXYGEN SURFACE FUNCTIONAL GROUPS ON ELEMENTAL MERCURY ADSORPTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of varying physical and chemical properties of activated carbons on adsorption of elemental mercury [Hg(0)] was studied by treating two activated carbons to modify their surface functional groups and pore structures. Heat treatment (1200 K) in nitrogen (N2), air oxidat...

  8. ROLE OF HCL IN ADSORPTION OF ELEMENTAL MERCURY VAPOR BY CALCIUM-BASED SORBENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of a study to identify active sites and surface functional groups that may contribute to the adsorption of elemental mercury (Hg?) by relatively inexpensive calcium (Ca)-based sorbents. (NOTE: Hg? capture has been mostly investigated using high-surface-ar...

  9. Modeling and Experimental Studies of Mercury Oxidation and Adsorption in a Fixed-Bed and Entrained-Flow Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Buitrago, Paula A.; Morrill, Mike; Lighty, JoAnn S.; Silcox, Geoffrey D.

    2009-06-01

    This report presents experimental and modeling mercury oxidation and adsorption data. Fixed-bed and single-particle models of mercury adsorption were developed. The experimental data were obtained with two reactors: a 300-W, methane-fired, tubular, quartz-lined reactor for studying homogeneous oxidation reactions and a fixed-bed reactor, also of quartz, for studying heterogeneous reactions. The latter was attached to the exit of the former to provide realistic combustion gases. The fixed-bed reactor contained one gram of coconut-shell carbon and remained at a temperature of 150°C. All methane, air, SO2, and halogen species were introduced through the burner to produce a radical pool representative of real combustion systems. A Tekran 2537A Analyzer coupled with a wet conditioning system provided speciated mercury concentrations. At 150°C and in the absence of HCl or HBr, the mercury uptake was about 20%. The addition of 50 ppm HCl caused complete capture of all elemental and oxidized mercury species. In the absence of halogens, SO2 increased the mercury adsorption efficiency to up to 30 percent. The extent of adsorption decreased with increasing SO2 concentration when halogens were present. Increasing the HCl concentration to 100 ppm lessened the effect of SO2. The fixed-bed model incorporates Langmuir adsorption kinetics and was developed to predict adsorption of elemental mercury and the effect of multiple flue gas components. This model neglects intraparticle diffusional resistances and is only applicable to pulverized carbon sorbents. It roughly describes experimental data from the literature. The current version includes the ability to account for competitive adsorption between mercury, SO2, and NO2. The single particle model simulates in-flight sorbent capture of elemental mercury. This model was developed to include Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms, rate equations, sorbent feed rate, and

  10. Textural properties of raw carbon nanotubes by nitrogen adsorption and mercury porosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossuot, Ch.; Bister, G.; Fonseca, A.; Nagy, J. B.; Pirard, J.-P.

    2001-11-01

    A sample of raw material made by catalytic decomposition of methane and containing a fraction of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) was studied. Interpretation of mercury porosimetry and nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms was difficult because the purity of carbon nanotubes, thermogravimetry revealed, was rather poor. Indeed, the raw material was made up by carbon soot, graphitic disordered carbon, damaged nanotubes, SWNTs and catalyst residues. The raw material was mainly microporous with some mesopores.

  11. Adsorption of organic molecules at the mercury-solution interface: effect of anion specific adsorption on double layer properties. [Benzyl alcohol

    SciTech Connect

    Buckfelder, J.J. III

    1980-08-01

    Adsorption of iso-pentanol, pentanoic acid, and benzyl alcohol at the mercury-solution interface was studied in HC1O/sub 4/, H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, NaNO/sub 3/, and NaF electrolytes. The Frumkin isotherm equation Ba = (theta/(1-theta))exp(2..cap alpha..theta) together with the implied charge vs. surface excess relation: q = (1-theta)q/sub w/ + thetaQ were used to analyze the experimental data. Linear charge vs surface excess plots were obtained for the aliphatic compounds over the entire potential region studied; for benzyl alcohol, plots were linear only at anodic potentials. The slopes of these lines agreed with those predicted by the above equation, with Q = C/sub org/(V-V/sub n/), for cathodic potentials. At potentials anodic to the electrocapillary maximum, deviations between experimental and theoretical slopes appeared. In the model proposed, the double layer consists of two parts. The layer closest to the surface is restricted to water molecules and specifically adsorbed ions. The second layer contains organic molecules exclusively; any charge necessary to balance the surface charge is considered to be in a monolayer adjacent to the organic layer. From the slope of the charge vs surface excess plots, it is possible to calculate the charge on the covered portion of the surface and then calculate the amount of specific adsorption. The relative amounts of specific adsorption are in agreement with known strengths of adsorption of the anions of the electrolyte. Capacity curves were also calculated and were in good agreement with experimental curves.

  12. High-capacity adsorption of aniline using surface modification of lignocellulose-biomass jute fibers.

    PubMed

    Gao, Da-Wen; Hu, Qi; Pan, Hongyu; Jiang, Jiping; Wang, Peng

    2015-10-01

    Pyromellitic dianhydride (PMDA) modified jute fiber (MJF) were prepared with microwave treatment to generate a biosorbent for aniline removal. The characterization of the biosorbent was investigated by SEM, BET and FT-IR analysis to discuss the adsorption mechanism. The studies of various factors influencing the adsorption behavior indicated that the optimum dosage for aniline adsorption was 3g/L, the maximum adsorption capacity was observed at pH 7.0 and the adsorption process is spontaneous and endothermic. The aniline adsorption follows the pseudo second order kinetic model and Langmuir isotherm model. Moreover, the biosorbent could be regenerated through the desorption of aniline by using 0.5M HCl solution, and the adsorption capacity after regeneration is even higher than that of virgin MJF. All these results prove MJF is a promising adsorbent for aniline removal in wastewater.

  13. High-capacity adsorption of aniline using surface modification of lignocellulose-biomass jute fibers.

    PubMed

    Gao, Da-Wen; Hu, Qi; Pan, Hongyu; Jiang, Jiping; Wang, Peng

    2015-10-01

    Pyromellitic dianhydride (PMDA) modified jute fiber (MJF) were prepared with microwave treatment to generate a biosorbent for aniline removal. The characterization of the biosorbent was investigated by SEM, BET and FT-IR analysis to discuss the adsorption mechanism. The studies of various factors influencing the adsorption behavior indicated that the optimum dosage for aniline adsorption was 3g/L, the maximum adsorption capacity was observed at pH 7.0 and the adsorption process is spontaneous and endothermic. The aniline adsorption follows the pseudo second order kinetic model and Langmuir isotherm model. Moreover, the biosorbent could be regenerated through the desorption of aniline by using 0.5M HCl solution, and the adsorption capacity after regeneration is even higher than that of virgin MJF. All these results prove MJF is a promising adsorbent for aniline removal in wastewater. PMID:26172392

  14. Mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Vilas, F.; Chapman, C.R.; Matthews, M.S.

    1988-01-01

    Papers are presented on future observations of and missions to Mercury, the photometry and polarimetry of Mercury, the surface composition of Mercury from reflectance spectrophotometry, the Goldstone radar observations of Mercury, the radar observations of Mercury, the stratigraphy and geologic history of Mercury, the geomorphology of impact craters on Mercury, and the cratering record on Mercury and the origin of impacting objects. Consideration is also given to the tectonics of Mercury, the tectonic history of Mercury, Mercury's thermal history and the generation of its magnetic field, the rotational dynamics of Mercury and the state of its core, Mercury's magnetic field and interior, the magnetosphere of Mercury, and the Mercury atmosphere. Other papers are on the present bounds on the bulk composition of Mercury and the implications for planetary formation processes, the building stones of the planets, the origin and composition of Mercury, the formation of Mercury from planetesimals, and theoretical considerations on the strange density of Mercury.

  15. Removal of mercury(II) ions in aqueous solution using the peel biomass of Pachira aquatica Aubl: kinetics and adsorption equilibrium studies.

    PubMed

    Santana, Andrea J; dos Santos, Walter N L; Silva, Laiana O B; das Virgens, Cesário F

    2016-05-01

    Mercury is a highly toxic substance that is a health hazard to humans. This study aims to investigate powders obtained from the peel of the fruit of Pachira aquatica Aubl, in its in natura and/or acidified form, as an adsorbent for the removal of mercury ions in aqueous solution. The materials were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. The infrared spectra showed bands corresponding to the axial deformation of carbonyls from carboxylic acids, the most important functional group responsible for fixing the metal species to the adsorbent material. The thermograms displayed mass losses related to the decomposition of three major components, i.e., hemicellulose, cellulose, and lignin. The adsorption process was evaluated using cold-vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry (CV AFS) and cold-vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CV AAS). Three isotherm models were employed. The adsorption isotherm model, Langmuir-Freundlich, best represented the adsorption process, and the maximum adsorption capacity was predicted to be 0.71 and 0.58 mg g(-1) at 25 °C in nature and acidified, respectively. Adsorption efficiencies were further tested on real aqueous wastewater samples, and removal of Hg(II) was recorded as 69.6 % for biomass acidified and 76.3 % for biomass in nature. Results obtained from sorption experiments on real aqueous wastewater samples revealed that recovery of the target metal ions was very satisfactory. The pseudo-second-order model showed the best correlation to the experimental data. The current findings showed that the investigated materials are potential adsorbents for mercury(II) ion removal in aqueous solution, with acidified P. aquatica Aubl being the most efficient adsorbent.

  16. Removal of mercury(II) ions in aqueous solution using the peel biomass of Pachira aquatica Aubl: kinetics and adsorption equilibrium studies.

    PubMed

    Santana, Andrea J; dos Santos, Walter N L; Silva, Laiana O B; das Virgens, Cesário F

    2016-05-01

    Mercury is a highly toxic substance that is a health hazard to humans. This study aims to investigate powders obtained from the peel of the fruit of Pachira aquatica Aubl, in its in natura and/or acidified form, as an adsorbent for the removal of mercury ions in aqueous solution. The materials were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. The infrared spectra showed bands corresponding to the axial deformation of carbonyls from carboxylic acids, the most important functional group responsible for fixing the metal species to the adsorbent material. The thermograms displayed mass losses related to the decomposition of three major components, i.e., hemicellulose, cellulose, and lignin. The adsorption process was evaluated using cold-vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry (CV AFS) and cold-vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CV AAS). Three isotherm models were employed. The adsorption isotherm model, Langmuir-Freundlich, best represented the adsorption process, and the maximum adsorption capacity was predicted to be 0.71 and 0.58 mg g(-1) at 25 °C in nature and acidified, respectively. Adsorption efficiencies were further tested on real aqueous wastewater samples, and removal of Hg(II) was recorded as 69.6 % for biomass acidified and 76.3 % for biomass in nature. Results obtained from sorption experiments on real aqueous wastewater samples revealed that recovery of the target metal ions was very satisfactory. The pseudo-second-order model showed the best correlation to the experimental data. The current findings showed that the investigated materials are potential adsorbents for mercury(II) ion removal in aqueous solution, with acidified P. aquatica Aubl being the most efficient adsorbent. PMID:27084802

  17. [Use of mercury porosimetry, assisted by nitrogen adsorption in the investigation of the pore structure of tablets].

    PubMed

    Szepes, Anikó; Kovács, József; Szabóné Revész, Piroska

    2006-01-01

    The microstructure of pharmaceutical solid dosage forms (porosity, pore volume-size distribution, specific surface area) can be investigated by different methods. Mercury porosimetry and nitrogen gas adsorption have been widely used to characterize the pore structure of tablets because these methods enable the determination of porosity and pore size distribution in one step. The two techniques are based on different physical interactions and cover specific ranges of pore size. Mercury porosimetry determines mesopores and macropores, whereas gas adsorption covers the micropore range. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the compression force and the structure of tablets containing theophylline. The porosity parameters determined with mercury porosimetry and nitrogen adsorption were compared. The results indicated a good correlation between the applied compression forces and the porosity parameters of the tablets. The pore volume-size distributions, the pore size frequencies and the specific surface areas obtained with mercury porosimetry and nitrogen adsorption were not equal, which can be attributed to the different measurement ranges and to the complexity of the pore structures. Our results allow the conclusion that mercury porosimetry, assisted by nitrogen adsorption as a complementary technique, is an acceptable method to achieve a proper characterization of the internal structure of tablets. PMID:17094658

  18. Modeling of mercury oxidation and adsorption by cupric chloride-impregnated carbon sorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.S.; Lee, J.Y.; Khang, S.J.; Keener, T.C.

    2009-10-15

    Cupric chloride-impregnated activated carbon sorbents (CuCl{sub 2}-ACs) showed good performance in Hg{sup 0} oxidation and adsorption in previously published entrained-flow test results. In addition, our previous studies indicated that Hg{sup 0} is oxidized by CuCl{sub 2}-ACs and the resultant oxidized mercury is readsorbed onto the sorbents. This study conducted mathematical modeling to interpret. these previous results and better understand the Hg{sup 0} oxidation and adsorption mechanism of CuCl{sub 2}-ACs. As a result the mathematical modeling results confirmed that Hg{sup 0} oxidation by CuCl{sub 2}-ACs is determined by the injection level of CuCl{sub 2} impregnated onto the sorbents. An increase in Cu Cl{sub 2} loading in CuCl{sub 2}-ACs was found to increase Hg{sup 0} oxidation but very slightly increased Hg adsorption because an increase in Cu Cl{sub 2} loading decreased the active CuCl{sub 2}-free carbon sites available for the readsorption of resultant oxidized mercury on the surfaces and inside the pores.

  19. Predicting the adsorption capacity and isotherm curvature of organic compounds onto activated carbons in natural waters.

    PubMed

    Hung, H W; Lin, T F

    2006-03-01

    A simple approach to predict the adsorption capacity and isotherm curvature of organic compounds onto activated carbon in natural water was investigated. A combination of the well-known equivalent background compound (EBC), and the simplified competitive adsorption model (SCAM) was employed to delineate the equilibrium capacity. This SCAM-EBC approach may reduce the numerical and experimental effort to obtain the parameters required to predict the adsorption capacity for a specific adsorption system. Several sets of experimental data, including weakly adsorbing (MTBE), strongly adsorbing compounds (TCP, atrazine, and chloroform), and two taste and odor causing compounds (MIB and geosmin) onto different activated carbons in three natural waters and a synthetic groundwater, were tested to verify the SCAM-EBC approach. Based on the approach, a parameter, called relative adsorptivity, describing the adsorption preference of the adsorbent between EBC and the target compound was employed to simulate the isotherm curvature in natural water. The relative adsorptivity of the SCAM-EBC approach is constant and can be directly obtained from the SCAM-EBC parameters in a specific adsorption system. The potential and extent of isotherm curvature can be simulated by only changing the parameter of relative adsorptivity. The marked isotherm curvature was found while the relative adsorptivity is larger than 2.0 to 4.0 for all the systems tested.

  20. Mass transfer within electrostatic precipitators: in-flight adsorption of mercury by charged suspended particulates

    SciTech Connect

    Herek L. Clack

    2006-06-01

    Electrostatic precipitation is the dominant method of particulate control used for coal combustion, and varying degrees of mercury capture and transformation have been reported across ESPs. Nevertheless, the fate of gas-phase mercury within an ESP remains poorly understood. The present analysis focuses on the gas-particle mass transfer that occurs within a charged aerosol in an ESP. As a necessary step in gas-phase mercury adsorption or transformation, gas-particle mass transfer - particularly in configurations other than fixed beds - has received far less attention than studies of adsorption kinetics. Our previous analysis showed that only a small fraction of gas-phase mercury entering an ESP is likely to be adsorbed by collected particulate matter on the plate electrodes. The present simplified analysis provides insight into gas-particle mass transfer within an ESP under two limiting conditions: laminar and turbulent fluid flows. The analysis reveals that during the process of particulate collection, gas-particle mass transfer can be quite high, easily exceeding the mass transfer to ESP plate electrodes in most cases. Decreasing particle size, increasing particle mass loading, and increasing temperature all result in increased gas-particle mass transfer. The analysis predicts significantly greater gas-particle mass transfer in the laminar limit than in the turbulent limit; however, the differences become negligible under conditions where other factors, such as total mass of suspended particulates, are the controlling mass transfer parameters. Results are compared to selected pilot- and full-scale sorbent injection data. 41 refs., 5 figs.

  1. Capability of defective graphene-supported Pd13 and Ag13 particles for mercury adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meeprasert, Jittima; Junkaew, Anchalee; Rungnim, Chompoonut; Kunaseth, Manaschai; Kungwan, Nawee; Promarak, Vinich; Namuangruk, Supawadee

    2016-02-01

    Reactivity of single-vacancy defective graphene (DG) and DG-supported Pdn and Agn (n = 1, 13) for mercury (Hg0) adsorption has been studied using density functional theory calculation. The results show that Pdn binds defective site of DG much stronger than the Agn, while metal nanocluster binds DG stronger than single metal atom. Metal clustering affects the adsorption ability of Pd composite while that of Ag is comparatively less. The binding strength of -8.49 eV was found for Pd13 binding on DG surface, indicating its high stability. Analyses of structure, energy, partial density of states, and d-band center (ɛd) revealed that the adsorbed metal atom or cluster enhances the reactivity of DG toward Hg adsorption. In addition, the Hg adsorption ability of Mn-DG composite is found to be related to the ɛd of the deposited Mn, in which the closer ɛd of Mn to the Fermi level correspond to the higher adsorption strength of Hg on Mn-DG composite. The order of Hg adsorption strength on Mn-DG composite are as follows: Pd13 (-1.68 eV) >> Ag13 (-0.67 eV) ∼ Ag1 (-0.69 eV) > Pd1 (-0.62 eV). Pd13-DG composite is therefore more efficient sorbent for Hg0 removal in terms of high stability and high adsorption reactivity compared to the Ag13. Further design of highly efficient carbon based sorbents should be focused on tailoring the ɛd of deposited metals.

  2. Mercury

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the lungs Medicine to remove mercury and heavy metals from the body INORGANIC MERCURY For inorganic mercury ... Baum CR. Mercury: Heavy metals and inorganic agents. In: Shannon MW, ... Haddad and Winchester's Clinical Management of Poisoning and ...

  3. Modeling high adsorption capacity and kinetics of organic macromolecules on super-powdered activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Yoshihiko; Ando, Naoya; Yoshida, Tomoaki; Kurotobi, Ryuji; Matsushita, Taku; Ohno, Koichi

    2011-02-01

    The capacity to adsorb natural organic matter (NOM) and polystyrene sulfonates (PSSs) on small particle-size activated carbon (super-powdered activated carbon, SPAC) is higher than that on larger particle-size activated carbon (powdered-activated carbon, PAC). Increased adsorption capacity is likely attributable to the larger external surface area because the NOM and PSS molecules do not completely penetrate the adsorbent particle; they preferentially adsorb near the outer surface of the particle. In this study, we propose a new isotherm equation, the Shell Adsorption Model (SAM), to explain the higher adsorption capacity on smaller adsorbent particles and to describe quantitatively adsorption isotherms of activated carbons of different particle sizes: PAC and SPAC. The SAM was verified with the experimental data of PSS adsorption kinetics as well as equilibrium. SAM successfully characterized PSS adsorption isotherm data for SPACs and PAC simultaneously with the same model parameters. When SAM was incorporated into an adsorption kinetic model, kinetic decay curves for PSSs adsorbing onto activated carbons of different particle sizes could be simultaneously described with a single kinetics parameter value. On the other hand, when SAM was not incorporated into such an adsorption kinetic model and instead isotherms were described by the Freundlich model, the kinetic decay curves were not well described. The success of the SAM further supports the adsorption mechanism of PSSs preferentially adsorbing near the outer surface of activated carbon particles. PMID:21172719

  4. Structural properties and adsorption capacity of holocellulose aerogels synthesized from an alkali hydroxide-urea solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Gu-Joong; Kim, Dae-Young; Hwang, Jae-Hyun; Kang, Joo-Hyon

    2014-05-01

    A tulip tree was used to synthesize a holocellulose aerogel from an aqueous alkali hydroxide-urea solution with the substitution of an organic solvent followed by freeze-drying. For comparison, the synthesized holocellulose aerogels were divided into two groups according to the source of the hydrogel, an upper suspended layer and a bottom concentrated layer of the centrifuged solution of cellulose and NaOH/urea solvents. We investigated the effects of the temperature of the pre-cooled NaOH/urea solution ( i.e., dissolution temperature) on the pore structure and the adsorption capacity of the holocellulose aerogel. A nano-fibrillar network structure of the holocellulose aerogel was observed, with little morphological difference in pore structure for different dissolution temperatures. Both micropores and mesopores were observed in the holocellulose aerogel. The specific surface area of the holocellulose aerogel was generally greater at lower dissolution temperatures. In a series of adsorption tests using methylene blue, the holocellulose aerogel showed the greatest adsorption capacity at the lowest dissolution temperature tested (-2°C). However, the dissolution temperature generally had little effect on the adsorption capacity. The holocellulose aerogel produced from the upper suspended layer of the centrifuged hydrogel solution showed a greater porosity and adsorption capacity than the one produced from the bottom concentrated layer. Overall, the aerogel made by utilizing a delignified tulip tree display a high surface area and a high adsorption property, indicating its possible application in eco-friendly adsorption materials.

  5. Influence of anions on methylpyridinium ion adsorption on the mercury electrode in aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Gerovich, V.M.; Damaskin, B.B.; Ermolin, V.B.

    1987-02-01

    The adsorption behavior of aromatic and heterocyclic cations is known to be determined by image forces on one hand and by pi-electron interaction on the other. The first factor is effective at the negatively charged surface of the mercury electrode whereas the second factor is effective at the positively charged surface where the forces of pi-electron interaction are in opposition to the electrostatic repulsion forces of the cations. The authors of this paper study the adsorption of methylpyridinium as the aromatic cation in combination with persulfate, chlorine, bromine, and iodine as the anions. The potential range studied was limited on the anodic side by a potential of -0.1 eV, since the values of interfacial tension were poorly reproducible at more positive potentials, and on the cathodic side by a potential of -1.1 eV, since methylpyridinium is reduced at more negative potentials. It is found that the halide ions, owing to the possible formation of charge transfer complexes, have an even stronger effect on the adsorption behavior of organic cations than that observed previously for tetraalkylammonium ions.

  6. Modeling the adsorption of mercury(II) on (hydr)oxides. 2: {alpha}-FeOOH (goethite) and amorphous silica

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnissel-Gissinger, P.; Alnot, M.; Ehrhardt, J.J.; Lickes, J.P.; Behra, P.

    1999-07-15

    The surface complexation model is used to describe sorption experiments of inorganic mercury(II) in the presence of an amorphous silica, Aerosil 200, or an iron (hydr)oxide, the goethite {alpha}-FeOOH (Bayferrox 910). In the simulations, one assumes the formation of a monodentate surface complex {triple_bond}S{single_bond}OHgOH and {triple_bond}S{single_bond}OHgCl, when chlorides are present in solution. Participation of the complex {triple_bond}S{single_bond}OHgCl has been especially evidenced. Comparisons with other data from the literature have been made to investigate the influence of the nature of the oxide on the mechanism of mercury(II) adsorption. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to characterize the surface of the (hydr)oxides prior to adsorption and to observe when possible the mercury surface compounds.

  7. Enhancement of the anionic dye adsorption capacity of clinoptilolite by Fe(3+)-grafting.

    PubMed

    Akgül, Murat

    2014-02-28

    In this paper, a batch system was applied to study the adsorption behavior of congo red (CR) on raw and modified clinoptilolites. Raw clinoptilolite (Raw-CL) was treated with Fe(NO3)3 in ethanol to obtain its iron-grafted form (Fe-CL). Adsorbents were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), thermogravimetric/differential thermal analysis (TG/DTA), zeta-potential measurement and N2 gas adsorption-desorption techniques. Effects of the experimental parameters (initial pH, dye concentration, temperature and adsorption time) were investigated to find optimum conditions that result in highest adsorption capacity for CR removal. The obtained results suggest that the solution pH appears to be a key factor of the CR adsorption process. The maximum dye adsorption was achieved with Fe-CL adsorbent at pH ∼6.3 and the corresponding adsorption capacity was found to be 36.7mg/g, which is higher than that of its raw counterpart (16.9mg/g). A significant decrease in CR removal was given by Fe-CL between pH 7 and 11 opposite to Raw-CL which has nearly constant qe in the same pH range. The Fe(3+)-grafting increased the zeta potential of raw clinoptilolite, leading to a higher adsorption capacity compared to that of unfunctionalized adsorbent. Also, temperature change was found to have a significant effect on the adsorption process. PMID:24413045

  8. Ultrahigh CO2 adsorption capacity on carbon molecular sieves at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Silvestre-Albero, Joaquín; Wahby, Anass; Sepúlveda-Escribano, Antonio; Martínez-Escandell, Manuel; Kaneko, Katsumi; Rodríguez-Reinoso, Francisco

    2011-06-28

    Although metal-organic framework (MOF) materials have been postulated as superior to any other sorbent for CO(2) adsorption at room temperature, here we prove that the appropriate selection of the raw material and the synthesis conditions allows the preparation of carbon molecular sieves (CMSs) with adsorption capacity, on a volumetric basis, highly exceeding those reported in the literature for MOFs. Furthermore, the excellent sorption properties of CMSs over the whole pressure range (up to 50 bar) are fully reversible after different adsorption/desorption cycles.

  9. Comparison of multifractal parameters form adsorption isotherms, desorption isotherms and mercury intrusion curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paz-Ferreiro, Jorge; Mon, Rodolfo; Vidal Vázquez, Eva

    2013-04-01

    The soil pore space is composed of a continuum of pores extremely variable in size, which range from equivalent diameter sizes smaller than nanometers to an upper limit of the order of centimeters. So, it is quite typical for soil pore space to display a size range of more than a factor of 106 in scale. Nitrogen sorption and mercury injection provide pores size distributions in the range from about 0.1 to 0.001 μm and 150 to 0.005 μm, respectively. The aims of this study were to evaluate the scaling properties of nitrogen adsorption isotherms (NAI), nitrogen desorption isotherms (NDI) and mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) curves of agricultural soils from "La Pampa húmeda", in the north of Buenos Aires and south of Santa Fé provinces, Argentina. Both NAIs, NDIs and MIPs exhibited multifractal behavior but its scaling properties were different so that the multifractality index, assessed by the width of the generalized dimension and the singularity spectra ranked as follows: NAI > NDI > MIP. Also, parameterization by the Hurst exponent indicates NAIs were less persistent than NDIs and in turn, these were less persistent than MIPs. The multfractal approach was useful to characterize the heterogeneity of various domains of the soil nano- micro- and mesopore system at the scale of small aggregates.

  10. Correlation and prediction of adsorption capacity and affinity of aromatic compounds on carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wenhao; Yang, Kun; Chen, Wei; Wang, Wendi; Zhang, Jie; Lin, Daohui; Xing, Baoshan

    2016-01-01

    Adsorption of 22 nonpolar and polar aromatic compounds on 10 carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with various diameters, lengths and surface oxygen-containing group contents was investigated to develop predictive correlations for adsorption, using the isotherm fitting of Polanyi theory-based Dubinin-Ashtakhov (DA) model. Adsorption capacity of aromatic compounds on CNTs is negatively correlated with melting points of aromatic compounds, and surface oxygen-containing group contents and surface area ratios of mesopores to total pores of CNTs, but positively correlated with total surface area of CNTs. Adsorption affinity is positively correlated with solvatochromic parameters of aromatic compounds, independent of tube lengths and surface oxygen-containing group contents of CNTs, but negatively correlated with surface area ratios of mesopores to total pores of CNTs. The correlations of adsorption capacity and adsorption affinity with properties of both aromatic compounds and CNTs clearly have physical significance, can be used successfully with DA model to predict adsorption of aromatic compounds on CNTs from the well-known physiochemical properties of aromatic compounds (i.e., solvatochromic parameters, melting points) and CNTs (i.e., surface area and total acidic group contents), and thus can facilitate the environmental application of CNTs as sorbents and environmental risk assessment of both aromatic contaminants and CNTs.

  11. Carbon nanotube membranes with ultrahigh specific adsorption capacity for water desalination and purification.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hui Ying; Han, Zhao Jun; Yu, Siu Fung; Pey, Kin Leong; Ostrikov, Kostya; Karnik, Rohit

    2013-01-01

    Development of technologies for water desalination and purification is critical to meet the global challenges of insufficient water supply and inadequate sanitation, especially for point-of-use applications. Conventional desalination methods are energy and operationally intensive, whereas adsorption-based techniques are simple and easy to use for point-of-use water purification, yet their capacity to remove salts is limited. Here we report that plasma-modified ultralong carbon nanotubes exhibit ultrahigh specific adsorption capacity for salt (exceeding 400% by weight) that is two orders of magnitude higher than that found in the current state-of-the-art activated carbon-based water treatment systems. We exploit this adsorption capacity in ultralong carbon nanotube-based membranes that can remove salt, as well as organic and metal contaminants. These ultralong carbon nanotube-based membranes may lead to next-generation rechargeable, point-of-use potable water purification appliances with superior desalination, disinfection and filtration properties. PMID:23941894

  12. Carbon nanotube membranes with ultrahigh specific adsorption capacity for water desalination and purification.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hui Ying; Han, Zhao Jun; Yu, Siu Fung; Pey, Kin Leong; Ostrikov, Kostya; Karnik, Rohit

    2013-01-01

    Development of technologies for water desalination and purification is critical to meet the global challenges of insufficient water supply and inadequate sanitation, especially for point-of-use applications. Conventional desalination methods are energy and operationally intensive, whereas adsorption-based techniques are simple and easy to use for point-of-use water purification, yet their capacity to remove salts is limited. Here we report that plasma-modified ultralong carbon nanotubes exhibit ultrahigh specific adsorption capacity for salt (exceeding 400% by weight) that is two orders of magnitude higher than that found in the current state-of-the-art activated carbon-based water treatment systems. We exploit this adsorption capacity in ultralong carbon nanotube-based membranes that can remove salt, as well as organic and metal contaminants. These ultralong carbon nanotube-based membranes may lead to next-generation rechargeable, point-of-use potable water purification appliances with superior desalination, disinfection and filtration properties.

  13. Mercury

    MedlinePlus

    Mercury is an element that is found in air, water and soil. It has several forms. Metallic mercury is a shiny, silver-white, odorless liquid. If ... with other elements to form powders or crystals. Mercury is in many products. Metallic mercury is used ...

  14. Investigation of Morphology and Hydrogen Adsorption Capacity of Disordered Carbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Lilin; Melnichenko, Yuri; Gallego, Nidia; Contescu, Cristian

    2014-03-01

    We have applied small angle neutron scattering (SANS) technique to study the morphologies and hydrogen adsorption capabilities of wood-based ultramicroporous carbon and poly(furfuryl alcohol) derived carbon. The Polydispersed Spherical model and chord length analysis of the scattering profiles were performed to obtain morphological parameters such as average pore size and pore size distribution of the dry carbons, which agreed reasonably well with the independent gas sorption measurements. The hydrogen physisorbed in these two carbons at room temperature and moderate pressures was investigated by In-situ SANS measurements. The experimental data analyzed using a modified Kalliat model for decoupling scattering contributions from pores with different sizes indicates that the molecular hydrogen condenses preferentially in narrow micropores at all measured pressures, which supports the theoretical prediction by quantum mechanical and thermodynamical models.

  15. Innate stimulatory capacity of high molecular weight transition metals Au (gold) and Hg (mercury).

    PubMed

    Rachmawati, Dessy; Alsalem, Inás W A; Bontkes, Hetty J; Verstege, Marleen I; Gibbs, Sue; von Blomberg, B M E; Scheper, Rik J; van Hoogstraten, Ingrid M W

    2015-03-01

    Nickel, cobalt and palladium ions can induce an innate immune response by triggering Toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 which is present on dendritic cells (DC). Here we studied mechanisms of action for DC immunotoxicity to gold and mercury. Next to gold (Na3Au (S2O3)2⋅2H2O) and mercury (HgCl2), nickel (NiCl2) was included as a positive control. MoDC activation was assessed by release of the pro-inflammatory mediator IL-8. Also PBMC were studied, and THP-1 cells were used as a substitution for DC for evaluation of cytokines and chemokines, as well as phenotypic, alterations in response to gold and mercury. Our results showed that both Na3Au (S2O3)2⋅2H2O and HgCl2 induce substantial release of IL-8, but not IL-6, CCL2 or IL-10, from MoDc, PBMC, or THP-1 cells. Also gold and, to a lesser extent mercury, caused modest dendritic cell maturation as detected by increased membrane expression of CD40 and CD80. Both metals thus show innate immune response capacities, although to a lower extent than reported earlier for NiCl2, CoCl2 and Na2 [PdCl4]. Importantly, the gold-induced response could be ascribed to TLR3 rather than TLR4 triggering, whereas the nature of the innate mercury response remains to be clarified. In conclusion both gold and mercury can induce innate immune responses, which for gold could be ascribed to TLR3 dependent signalling. These responses are likely to contribute to adaptive immune responses to these metals, as reflected by skin and mucosal allergies.

  16. Adsorption of selected pharmaceuticals and an endocrine disrupting compound by granular activated carbon. 1. Adsorption capacity and kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Z.; Peldszus, S.; Huck, P.M.

    2009-03-01

    The adsorption of two representative PhACs (naproxen and carbamazepine) and one EDC (nonylphenol) were evaluated on two granular activated carbons (GAC) namely coal-based Calgon Filtrasorb 400 and coconut shell-based PICA CTIF TE. The primary objective was to investigate preloading effects by natural organic matter (NOM) on adsorption capacity and kinetics under conditions and concentrations (i.e., ng/L) relevant for drinking water treatment. Isotherms demonstrated that all compounds were significantly negatively impacted by NOM fouling. Adsorption capacity reduction was most severe for the acidic naproxen, followed by the neutral carbamazepine and then the more hydrophobic nonylphenol. The GAC with the wider pore size distribution had considerably greater NOM loading, resulting in lower adsorption capacity. Different patterns for the change in Freundlich KF and 1/n with time revealed different competitive mechanisms for the different compounds. Mass transport coefficients determined by short fixed-bed (SFB) tests with virgin and preloaded GAC demonstrated that film diffusion primarily controls mass transfer on virgin and preloaded carbon. Naproxen suffered the greatest deteriorative effect on kinetic parameters due to preloading, followed by carbamazepine, and then nonylphenol. A type of surface NOM/biofilm, which appeared to add an additional mass transfer resistance layer and thus reduce film diffusion, was observed. In addition, electrostatic interactions between NOM/biofilm and the investigated compounds are proposed to contribute to the reduction of film diffusion. A companion paper building on this work describes treatability studies in pilot-scale GAC adsorbers and the effectiveness of a selected fixed-bed model. 32 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Influence of in situ biofilm coverage on the radionuclide adsorption capacity of subsurface granite.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Craig; Jakobsson, Anna-Maria; Pedersen, Karsten

    2007-02-01

    Any migration of radionuclides from nuclear waste repositories is expected to be mitigated by adsorption to the host rocks surrounding hydraulically conductive fractures. Fluid rock interfaces are considered to be important barriers for nuclear waste disposal schemes but their adsorptive capacity can be affected by the growth of microbial biofilms. This study indicates that biofilms growing on fracture surfaces decrease the rocks adsorption capacity for migrating radionuclides except for trivalent species. Potential suppression of adsorption by biofilms should, therefore, be accounted for in performance safety assessment models. In this study, the adsorptive capacity of in situ anaerobic biofilms grown 450 m underground on either glass or granite slides was compared to the capacity of the same surfaces without biofilms. Surfaces were exposed to the radiotracers 60Co(II), 147Pm(III), 241Am(III), 234Th(IV), and 237Np(V) for a period of 660 h in a pH neutral anaerobic synthetic groundwater. Adsorption was investigated at multiple time points over the 660 h using liquid scintillation and ICP-MS. Results indicate that these surfaces adsorb between 0 and 85% of the added tracers under the conditions of the specific experiments. After 660 h, the distribution coefficients, R (ratio between what is sorbed and what is left in the aqueous phase), approached 3 x 10(4) m for 60Co, 3 x 10(5) m for 147Pm and 241Am, 1 x 10(6)m for 234Th, and 1 x 10(3) m for 237Np. The highest rate of adsorption was during the first 200 h of the adsorption experiments and started to approach equilibrium after 500 h. Adsorption to colloids and precipitates contributed to decreases of up to 20% in the available 60Co, 147Pm, 241Am, and 237Np in the adsorption systems. In the 234Th system 95% of the aqueous 234Th was removed by adsorbing to colloids. Although the range of Rvalues for each surface tested generally overlapped, the biofilms consistently demonstrated lower R values except for the trivalant

  18. [Surface characteristics of alkali modified activated carbon and the adsorption capacity of methane].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meng-Zhu; Li, Lin; Liu, Jun-Xin; Sun, Yong-Jun; Li, Guo-Bin

    2013-01-01

    Coconut shell based activated carbon was modified by alkali with different concentrations. The surface structures of tested carbons were observed and analyzed by SEM and BET methods. Boehm's titration and SEM/EDS methods were applied to assay the functional groups and elements on the carbon surface. The adsorption of methane on tested carbons was investigated and adsorption behavior was described by the adsorption isotherms. Results showed that surface area and pore volume of modified carbon increased and surface oxygen groups decreased as the concentration of the alkali used increased, with no obvious change in pore size. When concentration of alkali was higher than 3.3 mol x L(-1), the specific surface area and pore volume of modified carbon was larger than that of original carbon. Methane adsorption capacity of alkali modified carbon increased 24%. Enlargement of surface area and pore volume, reduction of surface oxygen groups will benefit to enhance the methane adsorption ability on activated carbon. Adsorption behavior of methane followed the Langmuir isotherm and the adsorption coefficient was 163.7 m3 x mg(-1).

  19. Effect of purity on adsorption capacities of a Mars-like clay mineral at different pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Traci; Mcdoniel, Bridgett; Bustin, Roberta; Allton, Judith H.

    1992-01-01

    There has been considerable interest in adsorption of carbon dioxide on Marslike clay minerals. Some estimates of the carbon dioxide reservoir capacity of the martian regolith were calculated from the amount of carbon dioxide adsorbed on the ironrich smectite nontronite under martian conditions. The adsorption capacity of pure nontronite could place upper limits on the regolith carbon dioxide reservoir, both at present martian atmospheric pressure and at the postulated higher pressures required to permit liquid water on the surface. Adsorption of carbon dioxide on a Clay Mineral Society standard containing nontronite was studied over a wide range of pressures in the absence of water. Similar experiments were conducted on the pure nontronite extracted from the natural sample. Heating curves were obtained to help characterize and determine the purity of the clay sample.

  20. Fugitive gas adsorption capacity of biomass and animal-manure derived biochars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This research characterized and investigated ammonia and hydrogen sulfide gas adsorption capacities of low- and high-temperature biochars made from wood shavings and chicken litter. The biochar samples were activated with steam or phosphoric acid. The specific surface areas and pore volumes of the a...

  1. Ammonia adsorption capacity of biomass and animal-manure derived biochars

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this research was to characterize and investigate ammonia and hydrogen sulfide gas adsorption capacities of low- and high-temperature biochars made from wood shavings and chicken litter. The biochar samples were activated with steam or phosphoric acid. The specific surface areas and...

  2. Characteristics of fly ashes from full-scale coal-fired power plants and their relationship to mercury adsorption

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Y.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Chang, R.; Richardson, C.; Paradis, J.

    2007-01-01

    Nine fly ash samples were collected from the particulate collection devices (baghouse or electrostatic precipitator) of four full-scale pulverized coal (PC) utility boilers burning eastern bituminous coals (EB-PC ashes) and three cyclone utility boilers burning either Powder River Basin (PRB) coals or PRB blends,(PRB-CYC ashes). As-received fly ash samples were mechanically sieved to obtain six size fractions. Unburned carbon (UBC) content, mercury content, and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET)-N2 surface areas of as-received fly ashes and their size fractions were measured. In addition, UBC particles were examined by scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission microscopy, and thermogravimetry to obtain information on their surface morphology, structure, and oxidation reactivity. It was found that the UBC particles contained amorphous carbon, ribbon-shaped graphitic carbon, and highly ordered graphite structures. The mercury contents of the UBCs (Hg/UBC, in ppm) in raw ash samples were comparable to those of the UBC-enriched samples, indicating that mercury was mainly adsorbed on the UBC in fly ash. The UBC content decreased with a decreasing particle size range for all nine ashes. There was no correlation between the mercury and UBC contents of different size fractions of as-received ashes. The mercury content of the UBCs in each size fraction, however, generally increased with a decreasing particle size for the nine ashes. The mercury contents and surface areas of the UBCs in the PRB-CYC ashes were about 8 and 3 times higher than UBCs in the EB-PC ashes, respectively. It appeared that both the particle size and surface area of UBC could contribute to mercury capture. The particle size of the UBC in PRB-CYC ash and thus the external mass transfer was found to be the major factor impacting the mercury adsorption. Both the particle size and surface reactivity of the UBC in EB-PC ash, which generally had a lower carbon oxidation reactivity than the PRB

  3. Effect of surface area and chemisorbed oxygen on the SO2 adsorption capacity of activated char

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lizzio, A.A.; DeBarr, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether activated char produced from Illinois coal could be used effectively to remove sulfur dioxide from coal combustion flue gas. Chars were prepared from a high-volatile Illinois bituminous coal under a wide range of pyrolysis and activation conditions. A novel char preparation technique was developed to prepare chars with SO2 adsorption capacities significantly greater than that of a commercial activated carbon. In general, there was no correlation between SO2 adsorption capacity and surface area. Temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) was used to determine the nature and extent of carbon-oxygen (C-O) complexes formed on the char surface. TPD data revealed that SO2 adsorption was inversely proportional to the amount of C-O complex. The formation of a stable C-O complex during char preparation may have served only to occupy carbon sites that were otherwise reactive towards SO2 adsorption. A fleeting C(O) complex formed during SO2 adsorption is postulated to be the reaction intermediate necessary for conversion of SO2 to H2SO4. Copyright ?? 1996 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  4. Influence of the inherent properties of drinking water treatment residuals on their phosphorus adsorption capacities.

    PubMed

    Bai, Leilei; Wang, Changhui; He, Liansheng; Pei, Yuansheng

    2014-12-01

    Batch experiments were conducted to investigate the phosphorus (P) adsorption and desorption on five drinking water treatment residuals (WTRs) collected from different regions in China. The physical and chemical characteristics of the five WTRs were determined. Combined with rotated principal component analysis, multiple regression analysis was used to analyze the relationship between the inherent properties of the WTRs and their P adsorption capacities. The results showed that the maximum P adsorption capacities of the five WTRs calculated using the Langmuir isotherm ranged from 4.17 to 8.20mg/g at a pH of 7 and further increased with a decrease in pH. The statistical analysis revealed that a factor related to Al and 200 mmol/L oxalate-extractable Al (Alox) accounted for 36.5% of the variations in the P adsorption. A similar portion (28.5%) was attributed to an integrated factor related to the pH, Fe, 200 mmol/L oxalate-extractable Fe (Feox), surface area and organic matter (OM) of the WTRs. However, factors related to other properties (Ca, P and 5 mmol/L oxalate-extractable Fe and Al) were rejected. In addition, the quantity of P desorption was limited and had a significant negative correlation with the (Feox+Alox) of the WTRs (p<0.05). Overall, WTRs with high contents of Alox, Feox and OM as well as large surface areas were proposed to be the best choice for P adsorption in practical applications.

  5. Experimental and theoretical investigations of mercury adsorption on hematite (1-102) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, J.; Wilcox, J.; Jew, A. D.; Rupp, E. C.; Brown, G. E.

    2013-12-01

    Fly ash is a primary byproduct of the coal combustion process. The release of fly ash into the environment and its use in consumer products are public health concerns because of the presence of toxic trace metals and metalloids, such as mercury (Hg), selenium (Se), and arsenic (As), which may exist as components of fly ash, partition onto fly ash as it cools, or is lost to the environment through smoke stacks in a vapor phase. Therefore, it is important to understand the components of fly ash and their interaction with trace metals. In this study, calculations using density functional theory (DFT) were carried out in conjunction with experimental studies to investigate the interaction between Hg and hematite, an important mineral component of fly ash. Our experimental study, designed to simulate Hg sorption in a coal-fired power plant exhaust system, involved exposure of the fine fraction of bituminous coal fly ash (≤ 0.1 μm) to methane combustion flue gas, supplemented with SO2, NOx, HCl, and Hg in a packed-bed reactor. Sorption reaction products were characterized by synchrotron-based x-ray fluorescence mapping (s-XRF), x-ray diffraction (XRD), and extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. Preliminary s-XRF results showed that Hg in the sample is correlated with Fe, S, Cl, Br, and to a lesser extent with Se and As. From the XRD analysis, the dominant mineral phases detected were quartz, iron oxide (hematite), and various sulfate-bearing cements. Based on the experimental results, DFT studies were carried out to investigate the adsorption of Hg on hematite (α-Fe2O3) (1-102) surfaces. The two α-Fe2O3 (1-102) surfaces modeled consisted of two different surface terminations: (1) M2-clean, which corresponds to the oxygen terminated r-cut surface with the first layer of cations removed and no hydroxyl group and (2) M2-OH2-OH which has bihydroxylated top oxygen atoms and a second layer of hydroxylated oxygen atoms. These surface terminations

  6. The effect of natural organic matter on the adsorption of mercury to bacterial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunham-Cheatham, Sarrah; Mishra, Bhoopesh; Myneni, Satish; Fein, Jeremy B.

    2015-02-01

    We investigated the ability of non-metabolizing Bacillus subtilis, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, and Geobacter sulfurreducens bacterial species to adsorb mercury in the absence and presence of Suwanee River fulvic acid (FA). Bulk adsorption and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) experiments were conducted at three pH conditions, and the results indicate that the presence of FA decreases the extent of Hg adsorption to biomass under all of the pH conditions studied. Hg XAS results show that the presence of FA does not alter the binding environment of Hg adsorbed onto the biomass regardless of pH or FA concentration, indicating that ternary bacteria-Hg-FA complexes do not form to an appreciable extent under the experimental conditions, and that Hg binding on the bacteria is dominated by sulfhydryl binding. We used the experimental results to calculate apparent partition coefficients, Kd, for Hg under each experimental condition. The calculations yield similar coefficients for Hg onto each of the bacterial species studies, suggesting there is no significant difference in Hg partitioning between the three bacterial species. The calculations also indicate similar coefficients for Hg-bacteria and Hg-FA complexes. S XAS measurements confirm the presence of sulfhydryl sites on both the FA and bacterial cells, and demonstrate the presence of a wide range of S moieties on the FA in contrast to the bacterial biomass, whose S sites are dominated by thiols. Our results suggest that although FA can compete with bacterial binding sites for aqueous Hg, because of the relatively similar partition coefficients for the types of sorbents, the competition is not dominated by either bacteria or FA unless the concentration of one type of site greatly exceeds that of the other.

  7. Mercury reduction and cell-surface adsorption by Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Haiyan; Lin, Hui; Zheng, Wang; Feng, Xinbin; Liang, Liyuan; Elias, Dwayne A; Gu, Baohua

    2013-01-01

    Both reduction and surface adsorption of mercuric mercury [Hg(II)] are found to occur simultaneously on G. sulfurreducens PCA cells under dark, anaerobic conditions. Reduction of Hg(II) to elemental Hg(0) initially follows a pseudo-first order kinetics with a half-life of < 2 h in the presence of 50 nM Hg(II) and 1011 cells L-1 in a phosphate buffer (pH 7.4). Multiple gene deletions of the outer membrane cytochromes in this organism resulted in decrease in reduction rate from ~ 0.3 to 0.05 h-1, and reduction was nearly absent with heat-killed cells or in the cell filtrate. Adsorption of Hg(II) by cells is found to compete with, and thus inhibit, Hg(II) reduction. Depending on the Hg to cell ratio, maximum Hg(II) reduction was observed at about 5 10-19 mol Hg cell-1, but reduction terminated at a low Hg to cell ratio (< 10-20 mol Hg cell-1). This inhibitory effect is attributed to strong binding between Hg(II) and the thiol ( SH) functional groups on cells and validated by experiments in which the sorbed Hg(II) was readily exchanged by thiols (e.g., glutathione) but not by carboxylic ligands such as ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA). We suggest that coupled Hg(II)-cell interactions, i.e., reduction and surface binding, could be important in controlling Hg species transformation and bioavailability and should therefore be considered in microbial Hg(II) uptake and methylation studies.

  8. Nanosheet-structured boron nitride spheres with a versatile adsorption capacity for water cleaning.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fei; Yu, Jie; Ji, Xixi; Qian, Muqi

    2015-01-28

    Here, we report the synthesis of nanosheet-structured boron nitride spheres (NSBNSs) by a catalyzing thermal evaporation method from solid B powders. The NSBNSs consist of radially oriented ultrathin nanosheets with the sheet edges oriented on the surface. Formation of this unique structure occurs only at a certain reaction temperature. The diameter from 4 μm to 700 nm and the nanosheet thickness from 9.1 to 3.1 nm of the NSBNSs can be well-controlled by appropriately changing the mass ratio of boron powders and catalyst. The NSBNSs possess versatile adsorption capacity, exhibiting excellent adsorption performance for oil, dyes, and heavy metal ions from water. The oil uptake reaches 7.8 times its own weight. The adsorption capacities for malachite green and methylene blue are 324 and 233 mg/g, while those for Cu(2+), Pb(2+), and Cd(2+) are 678.7, 536.7, and 107.0 mg/g, respectively. The adsorption capacities of the NSBNSs for Cu(2+) and Pb(2+) are higher or much higher than those of the adsorbents reported previously. These results demonstrate the great potential of NSBNSs for water treatment and cleaning. PMID:25552343

  9. Powder-based adsorbents having high adsorption capacities for recovering dissolved metals and methods thereof

    DOEpatents

    Janke, Christopher J.; Dai, Sheng; Oyola, Yatsandra

    2016-05-03

    A powder-based adsorbent and a related method of manufacture are provided. The powder-based adsorbent includes polymer powder with grafted side chains and an increased surface area per unit weight to increase the adsorption of dissolved metals, for example uranium, from aqueous solutions. A method for forming the powder-based adsorbent includes irradiating polymer powder, grafting with polymerizable reactive monomers, reacting with hydroxylamine, and conditioning with an alkaline solution. Powder-based adsorbents formed according to the present method demonstrated a significantly improved uranium adsorption capacity per unit weight over existing adsorbents.

  10. Foam-based adsorbents having high adsorption capacities for recovering dissolved metals and methods thereof

    DOEpatents

    Janke, Christopher J.; Dai, Sheng; Oyola, Yatsandra

    2015-06-02

    Foam-based adsorbents and a related method of manufacture are provided. The foam-based adsorbents include polymer foam with grafted side chains and an increased surface area per unit weight to increase the adsorption of dissolved metals, for example uranium, from aqueous solutions. A method for forming the foam-based adsorbents includes irradiating polymer foam, grafting with polymerizable reactive monomers, reacting with hydroxylamine, and conditioning with an alkaline solution. Foam-based adsorbents formed according to the present method demonstrated a significantly improved uranium adsorption capacity per unit weight over existing adsorbents.

  11. Novel biosorbent with high adsorption capacity prepared by chemical modification of white pine (Pinus durangensis) sawdust. Adsorption of Pb(II) from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Salazar-Rabago, J J; Leyva-Ramos, R

    2016-03-15

    The natural sawdust (NS) from white pine (Pinus durangensis) was chemically modified by a hydrothermal procedure using citric, malonic and tartaric acids. The adsorption capacity of modified sawdust (MS) towards Pb(II) was considerably enhanced due to the introduction of carboxylic groups on the surface of MS during the modification, and the adsorption capacity was almost linearly dependent on the concentration of carboxylic sites. The NS surface was acidic, and the MS surface became more acidic after the modification. At T = 25 °C and pH = 5, the maximum adsorption capacity of the optimal MS towards Pb(II) was 304 mg/g, which is exceptionally high compared to NS and other MS reported previously. The adsorption capacity of MS was considerably reduced from 304 to 154 mg/g by decreasing the solution pH from 5 to 3 due to electrostatic interactions. The adsorption of Pb(II) on MS was reversible at pH = 2, but not at pH = 5. The contribution percentage of ion exchange to the overall adsorption capacity ranged from 70 to 99% and 10-66% at the initial pH of 3 and 5, respectively. Hence, the adsorption of Pb(II) on MS was mainly due to ion exchange at pH = 3 and to both ion exchange and electrostatic attraction at pH = 5.

  12. A Porous Aromatic Framework Constructed from Benzene Rings Has a High Adsorption Capacity for Perfluorooctane Sulfonate

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Qin; Zhao, Changwei; Liu, Guixia; Ren, Hao

    2016-01-01

    A low-cost and easily constructed porous aromatic framework (PAF-45) was successfully prepared using the Scholl reaction. PAF-45 was, for the first time, used to remove perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) from aqueous solution. Systematic experiments were performed to determine the adsorption capacity of PAF-45 for PFOS and to characterize the kinetics of the adsorption process. The adsorption of PFOS onto PAF-45 reached equilibrium in 30 min, and the adsorption capacity of PAF-45 for PFOS was excellent (5847 mg g−1 at pH 3). The amount of PFOS adsorbed by PAF-45 increased significantly as the cation (Na+, Mg2+, or Fe3+) concentration increased, which probably occurred because the cations enhanced the interactions between the negatively charged PFOS molecules and the positively charged PAF-45 surface. The cations Na+, Mg2+, and Fe3+ were found to form complexes with PFOS anions in solution. Density functional theory was used to identify the interactions between PFOS and Na+, Mg2+, and Fe3+. We expect that materials of the same type as PAF-45 could be useful adsorbents for removing organic pollutants from industrial wastewater and contaminated surface water. PMID:26843015

  13. A Porous Aromatic Framework Constructed from Benzene Rings Has a High Adsorption Capacity for Perfluorooctane Sulfonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Qin; Zhao, Changwei; Liu, Guixia; Ren, Hao

    2016-02-01

    A low-cost and easily constructed porous aromatic framework (PAF-45) was successfully prepared using the Scholl reaction. PAF-45 was, for the first time, used to remove perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) from aqueous solution. Systematic experiments were performed to determine the adsorption capacity of PAF-45 for PFOS and to characterize the kinetics of the adsorption process. The adsorption of PFOS onto PAF-45 reached equilibrium in 30 min, and the adsorption capacity of PAF-45 for PFOS was excellent (5847 mg g‑1 at pH 3). The amount of PFOS adsorbed by PAF-45 increased significantly as the cation (Na+, Mg2+, or Fe3+) concentration increased, which probably occurred because the cations enhanced the interactions between the negatively charged PFOS molecules and the positively charged PAF-45 surface. The cations Na+, Mg2+, and Fe3+ were found to form complexes with PFOS anions in solution. Density functional theory was used to identify the interactions between PFOS and Na+, Mg2+, and Fe3+. We expect that materials of the same type as PAF-45 could be useful adsorbents for removing organic pollutants from industrial wastewater and contaminated surface water.

  14. Prediction of activated carbon adsorption capacities for organic vapors using quantitative structure-activity relationship methods

    SciTech Connect

    Nirmalakhandan, N.N. ); Speece, R.E. )

    1993-08-01

    Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) methods were used to develop models to estimate and predict activated carbon adsorption capacities for organic vapors. Literature isothermal data from two sources for 22 organic contaminants on six different carbons were merged to form a training set of 75 data points. Two different QSAR approaches were evaluated: the molecular connectivity approach and the linear solvation energy relationship approach. The QSAR model developed in this study using the molecular connectivity approach was able to fit the experimental data with r = 0.96 and standard error of 0.09. The utility of the model was demonstrated by using predicted k values to calculate adsorption capacities of 12 chemicals on two different carbons and comparing them with experimentally determined values. 9 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  15. Dispersion of chitosan on perlite for enhancement of copper(II) adsorption capacity.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Shameem; Ghosh, Tushar K; Viswanath, Dabir S; Boddu, Veera M

    2008-04-01

    Chitosan coated perlite beads were prepared by drop-wise addition of slurry, made of chitosan dissolved in oxalic acid and perlite, to an alkaline bath (0.7 M NaOH). The beads that contained 32% chitosan enhanced the accessibility of OH and amine groups present in chitosan for adsorption of copper ions. The experiments using Cu(II) ions were carried out in the concentration range of 50-4100 mg/L (0.78-64.1 mmol/L). Adsorption capacity for Cu(II) was pH dependent and a maximum uptake of 104 mg/g of beads (325 mg/g of chitosan) was obtained at pH 4.5 when its equilibrium concentration in the solution was 812.5 mg/L at 298 K. The XPS and TEM data suggested that copper was mainly adsorbed as Cu(II) and was attached to amine groups. The adsorption data could be fitted to one-site Langmuir adsorption model. Anions in the solution had minimal effect on Cu(II) adsorption by chitosan coated perlite beads. EDTA was used effectively for the regeneration of the bed. The diffusion coefficient of Cu(II) onto chitosan coated beads was calculated from the breakthrough curve and was found to be 2.02 x 10(-8) cm(2)/s.

  16. Adsorptive behaviour of mercury on algal biomass: competition with divalent cations and organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Carro, Leticia; Barriada, José L; Herrero, Roberto; Sastre de Vicente, Manuel E

    2011-08-15

    Biosorption processes constitute an effective technique for mercury elimination. Sorption properties of native and acid-treated Sargassum muticum have been studied. Effect of pH, initial mercury concentration and contact time studies provided fundamental information about the sorption process. This information was used as the reference values to analyse mercury sorption under competition conditions. Saline effect has shown little influence in sorption, when only electrostatic modifications took place upon salt addition. On the contrary, if mercury speciation dramatically changed owing to the addition of an electrolyte, such as in the case of chloride salt, very large modifications in mercury sorption were observed. Competition with other divalent cations or organic compounds has shown little or none effect on mercury, indicating that a different mechanism is taking place during the removal of these pollutants. Finally, continuous flow experiments have clearly shown that a reduction process is also taking place during mercury removal. This fact is not obvious to elucidate under batch sorption experiments. Scanning Electron Microscopy analysis of the surface of the materials show deposits of mercury(I) and metallic mercury which is indicative of the reduction process proposed. PMID:21621916

  17. High-capacity adsorption of dissolved hexavalent chromium using amine-functionalized magnetic corn stalk composites.

    PubMed

    Song, Wen; Gao, Baoyu; Zhang, Tengge; Xu, Xing; Huang, Xin; Yu, Huan; Yue, Qinyan

    2015-08-01

    Easily separable amine-functionalized magnetic corn stalk composites (AF-MCS) were employed for effective adsorption and reduction of toxic hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] to nontoxic Cr(III). The saturated magnetization of AF-MCS reached 6.2emu/g, and as a result, it could be separated from aqueous solution by a magnetic process for its superparamagnetism. The studies of various factors influencing the sorption behavior indicated that the optimum AF-MCS dosage for Cr(VI) adsorption was 1g/L, and the maximum adsorption capacity was observed at pH 3.0. The chromium adsorption perfectly fitted the Langmuir isotherm model and pseudo second order kinetic model. Furthermore, characterization of AF-MCS was investigated by means of XRD, SEM, TEM, FT-IR, BET, VSM and XPS analysis to discuss the uptake mechanism. Basically, these results demonstrated that AF-MCS prepared in this work has shown its merit in effective removal of Cr(VI) and rapid separation from effluents simultaneously.

  18. MERCURY(II) ADSORPTION FROM WASTEWATERS USING A THIOL FUNCTIONAL ADSORBENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The removal of mercury(II) from wastewaters (coal-fired utility plant scrubber solutions) using a thiol functional organoceramic composite (SOL-AD-IV) is investigated. A simulant is employed as a surrogate to demonstrate the removal of mercury from real waste solutions. Equilibri...

  19. A review on modification methods to cellulose-based adsorbents to improve adsorption capacity.

    PubMed

    Hokkanen, Sanna; Bhatnagar, Amit; Sillanpää, Mika

    2016-03-15

    In recent decades, increased domestic, agricultural and industrial activities worldwide have led to the release of various pollutants, such as toxic heavy metals, inorganic anions, organics, micropollutants and nutrients into the aquatic environment. The removal of these wide varieties of pollutants for better quality of water for various activities is an emerging issue and a robust and eco-friendly treatment technology is needed for the purpose. It is well known that cellulosic materials can be obtained from various natural sources and can be employed as cheap adsorbents. Their adsorption capacities for heavy metal ions and other aquatic pollutants can be significantly affected upon chemical treatment. In general, chemically modified cellulose exhibits higher adsorption capacities for various aquatic pollutants than their unmodified forms. Numerous chemicals have been used for cellulose modifications which include mineral and organic acids, bases, oxidizing agent, organic compounds, etc. This paper reviews the current state of research on the use of cellulose, a naturally occurring material, its modified forms and their efficacy as adsorbents for the removal of various pollutants from waste streams. In this review, an extensive list of various cellulose-based adsorbents from literature has been compiled and their adsorption capacities under various conditions for the removal of various pollutants, as available in the literature, are presented along with highlighting and discussing the key advancement on the preparation of cellulose-based adsorbents. It is evident from the literature survey presented herein that modified cellulose-based adsorbents exhibit good potential for the removal of various aquatic pollutants. However, still there is a need to find out the practical utility of these adsorbents on a commercial scale, leading to the improvement of pollution control. PMID:26789698

  20. Unified method for the total pore volume and pore size distribution of hierarchical zeolites from argon adsorption and mercury intrusion.

    PubMed

    Kenvin, Jeffrey; Jagiello, Jacek; Mitchell, Sharon; Pérez-Ramírez, Javier

    2015-02-01

    A generalized approach to determine the complete distribution of macropores, mesopores, and micropores from argon adsorption and mercury porosimetry is developed and validated for advanced zeolite catalysts with hierarchically structured pore systems in powder and shaped forms. Rather than using a fragmented approach of simple overlays from individual techniques, a unified approach that utilizes a kernel constructed from model isotherms and model intrusion curves is used to calculate the complete pore size distribution and the total pore volume of the material. An added benefit of a single full-range pore size distribution is that the cumulative pore area and the area distribution are also obtained without the need for additional modeling. The resulting complete pore size distribution and the kernel accurately model both the adsorption isotherm and the mercury porosimetry. By bridging the data analysis of two primary characterization tools, this methodology fills an existing gap in the library of familiar methods for porosity assessment in the design of materials with multilevel porosity for novel technological applications.

  1. Intra- and inter-unit variation in fly ash petrography and mercury adsorption: Examples from a western Kentucky power station

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hower, J.C.; Finkelman, R.B.; Rathbone, R.F.; Goodman, J.

    2000-01-01

    Fly ash was collected from eight mechanical and 10 baghouse hoppers at each of the twin 150-MW wall-fired units in a western Kentucky power station. The fuel burned at that time was a blend of many low-sulfur, high-volatile bituminous Central Appalachian coals. The baghouse ash showed less variation between units than the mechanical hoppers. The mechanical fly ash, coarser than the baghouse ash, showed significant differences in the amount of total carbon and in the ratio of isotropic coke to both total carbon and total coke - the latter excluding inertinite and other unburned, uncoked coal. There was no significant variation in proportions of inorganic fly ash constituents. The inter-unit differences in the amount and forms of mechanical fly ash carbon appear to be related to differences in pulverizer efficiency, leading to greater amounts of coarse coal, therefore unburned carbon, in one of the units. Mercury capture is a function of both the total carbon content and the gas temperature at the point of fly ash separation, mercury content increasing with an increase in carbon for a specific collection system. Mercury adsorption on fly ash carbon increases at lower flue-gas temperatures. Baghouse fly ash, collected at a lower temperature than the higher-carbon mechanically separated fly ash, contains a significantly greater amount of Hg.

  2. Adsorption capacities of activated carbons for geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol vary with activated carbon particle size: Effects of adsorbent and adsorbate characteristics.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Yoshihiko; Nakao, Soichi; Sakamoto, Asuka; Taniguchi, Takuma; Pan, Long; Matsushita, Taku; Shirasaki, Nobutaka

    2015-11-15

    The adsorption capacities of nine activated carbons for geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol (MIB) were evaluated. For some carbons, adsorption capacity substantially increased when carbon particle diameter was decreased from a few tens of micrometers to a few micrometers, whereas for other carbons, the increase of adsorption capacity was small for MIB and moderate for geosmin. An increase of adsorption capacity was observed for other hydrophobic adsorbates besides geosmin and MIB, but not for hydrophilic adsorbates. The parameter values of a shell adsorption model describing the increase of adsorption capacity were negatively correlated with the oxygen content of the carbon among other characteristics. Low oxygen content indicated low hydrophilicity. The increase of adsorption capacity was related to the hydrophobic properties of both adsorbates and activated carbons. For adsorptive removal of hydrophobic micropollutants such as geosmin, it is therefore recommended that less-hydrophilic activated carbons, such as coconut-shell-based carbons, be microground to a particle diameter of a few micrometers to enhance their equilibrium adsorption capacity. In contrast, adsorption by hydrophilic carbons or adsorption of hydrophilic adsorbates occur in the inner pores, and therefore adsorption capacity is unchanged by particle size reduction. PMID:26302219

  3. Adsorption capacities of activated carbons for geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol vary with activated carbon particle size: Effects of adsorbent and adsorbate characteristics.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Yoshihiko; Nakao, Soichi; Sakamoto, Asuka; Taniguchi, Takuma; Pan, Long; Matsushita, Taku; Shirasaki, Nobutaka

    2015-11-15

    The adsorption capacities of nine activated carbons for geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol (MIB) were evaluated. For some carbons, adsorption capacity substantially increased when carbon particle diameter was decreased from a few tens of micrometers to a few micrometers, whereas for other carbons, the increase of adsorption capacity was small for MIB and moderate for geosmin. An increase of adsorption capacity was observed for other hydrophobic adsorbates besides geosmin and MIB, but not for hydrophilic adsorbates. The parameter values of a shell adsorption model describing the increase of adsorption capacity were negatively correlated with the oxygen content of the carbon among other characteristics. Low oxygen content indicated low hydrophilicity. The increase of adsorption capacity was related to the hydrophobic properties of both adsorbates and activated carbons. For adsorptive removal of hydrophobic micropollutants such as geosmin, it is therefore recommended that less-hydrophilic activated carbons, such as coconut-shell-based carbons, be microground to a particle diameter of a few micrometers to enhance their equilibrium adsorption capacity. In contrast, adsorption by hydrophilic carbons or adsorption of hydrophilic adsorbates occur in the inner pores, and therefore adsorption capacity is unchanged by particle size reduction.

  4. Adsorptive capacity and evolution of the pore structure of alumina on reaction with gaseous hydrogen fluoride.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Grant J; Agbenyegah, Gordon E K; Hyland, Margaret M; Metson, James B

    2015-05-19

    Brunauer-Emmet-Teller (BET) specific surface areas are generally used to gauge the propensity of uptake on adsorbents, with less attention paid to kinetic considerations. We explore the importance of such parameters by modeling the pore size distributions of smelter grade aluminas following HF adsorption, an industrially important process in gas cleaning at aluminum smelters. The pore size distributions of industrially fluorinated aluminas, and those contacted with HF in controlled laboratory trials, are reconstructed from the pore structure of the untreated materials when filtered through different models of adsorption. These studies demonstrate the presence of three distinct families of pores: those with uninhibited HF uptake, kinetically limited porosity, and pores that are surface blocked after negligible scrubbing. The surface areas of the inaccessible and blocked pores will overinflate estimates of the adsorption capacity of the adsorbate. We also demonstrate, contrary to conventional understanding, that porosity changes are attributed not to monolayer uptake but more reasonably to pore length attenuation. The model assumes nothing specific regarding the Al2O3-HF system and is therefore likely general to adsorbate/adsorbent phenomena.

  5. Volumetric Interpretation of Protein Adsorption: Capacity Scaling with Adsorbate Molecular Weight and Adsorbent Surface Energy

    PubMed Central

    Parhi, Purnendu; Golas, Avantika; Barnthip, Naris; Noh, Hyeran; Vogler, Erwin A.

    2009-01-01

    Silanized-glass-particle adsorbent capacities are extracted from adsorption isotherms of human serum albumin (HSA, 66 kDa), immunoglobulin G (IgG, 160 kDa), fibrinogen (Fib, 341 kDa), and immunoglobulin M (IgM, 1000 kDa) for adsorbent surface energies sampling the observable range of water wettability. Adsorbent capacity expressed as either mass-or-moles per-unit-adsorbent-area increases with protein molecular weight (MW) in a manner that is quantitatively inconsistent with the idea that proteins adsorb as a monolayer at the solution-material interface in any physically-realizable configuration or state of denaturation. Capacity decreases monotonically with increasing adsorbent hydrophilicity to the limit-of-detection (LOD) near τo = 30 dyne/cm (θ~65o) for all protein/surface combinations studied (where τo≡γlvocosθ is the water adhesion tension, γlvo is the interfacial tension of pure-buffer solution, and θ is the buffer advancing contact angle). Experimental evidence thus shows that adsorbent capacity depends on both adsorbent surface energy and adsorbate size. Comparison of theory to experiment implies that proteins do not adsorb onto a two-dimensional (2D) interfacial plane as frequently depicted in the literature but rather partition from solution into a three-dimensional (3D) interphase region that separates the physical surface from bulk solution. This interphase has a finite volume related to the dimensions of hydrated protein in the adsorbed state (defining “layer” thickness). The interphase can be comprised of a number of adsorbed-protein layers depending on the solution concentration in which adsorbent is immersed, molecular volume of the adsorbing protein (proportional to MW), and adsorbent hydrophilicity. Multilayer adsorption accounts for adsorbent capacity over-and-above monolayer and is inconsistent with the idea that protein adsorbs to surfaces primarily through protein/surface interactions because proteins within second (or higher

  6. Superior adsorption capacity of g-C₃N₄ for heavy metal ions from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Shen, Congcong; Chen, Changlun; Wen, Tao; Zhao, Zhiwei; Wang, Xiangke; Xu, Anwu

    2015-10-15

    In this work, graphitic-C3N4 (g-C3N4) was synthesized by a simple and environmentally friendly salt melt method, and characterized by using field-emission scanning and transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and N2 adsorption-desorption analysis. The as-prepared g-C3N4 was used as an adsorbent to remove heavy metal ions from aqueous solutions. The adsorption kinetics of Pb(II) and Cu(II) followed the pseudo-second-order model. The g-C3N4 exhibited much higher adsorption capacity toward heavy metal ions (1.36 mmol/g for Pb(II), 2.09 mmol/g for Cu(II), 1.00 mmol/g for Cd(II) and 0.64 mmol/g for Ni(II)) than other adsorbents. The adsorption of Pb(II) and Cu(II) on g-C3N4 was slightly affected by ionic strength at pH<5.0 and increased with the increase of ionic strength at pH>5.0. The inner-sphere surface complexation mechanism was suitable to explain the interaction between heavy metal ions and the nitrogen- and carbon-containing functional groups of the g-C3N4. The experimental results reveal that g-C3N4 is a potential adsorbent for the removal of heavy metal ions from large volumes of aqueous solutions.

  7. Diamine-appended metal-organic frameworks: enhanced formaldehyde-vapor adsorption capacity, superior recyclability and water resistibility.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhong; Wang, WenZhong; Jiang, Dong; Zhang, Ling; Zheng, Yali

    2016-07-28

    Capturing formaldehyde (HCHO) from indoor air with porous adsorbents still faces challenges due to their low uptake capacity, difficult regeneration, and especially, the sorption capacity reduction that is caused by the competitive adsorption of H2O when exposed to a humid atmosphere. In this work, MIL-101 is modified with ethylenediamine (ED) on its open-metal sites to substantially improve the HCHO adsorption properties. The HCHO uptake capacity of modified MIL-101 can be up to 5.49 mmol g(-1) in this study, which is among the highest-levels of various adsorbents reported thus far. Moreover, this modification both improved the material's recyclability and water resistibility, allowing for cyclic and selective tests with stable adsorption capacities, revealing the potential utility of amine-modified MOFs for indoor air purification. PMID:27338802

  8. Ultra-high adsorption capacity of zeolitic imidazole framework-67 (ZIF-67) for removal of malachite green from water.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kun-Yi Andrew; Chang, Hsuan-Ang

    2015-11-01

    Zeolitic imidazole frameworks (ZIFs), a new class of adsorbents, are proposed to adsorb Malachite Green (MG) in water. Particularly, ZIF-67 was selected owing to its stability in water and straightforward synthesis. The as-synthesized ZIF-67 was characterized and used to adsorb MG from water. Factors affecting the adsorption capacity were investigated including mixing time, temperature, the presence of salts and pH. The kinetics, adsorption isotherm and thermodynamics of the MG adsorption to ZIF-67 were also studied. The adsorption capacity of ZIF-67 for MG could be as high as 2430mgg(-1) at 20°C, which could be improved at the higher temperatures. Such an ultra-high adsorption capacity of ZIF-67 was almost 10-times of those of conventional adsorbents, including activated carbons and biopolymers. A mechanism for the high adsorption capacity was proposed and possibly attributed to the π-π stacking interaction between MG and ZIF-67. ZIF-67 also could be conveniently regenerated by washing with ethanol and the regeneration efficiency could remain 95% up to 4 cycles of the regeneration. ZIF-67 was also able to remove MG from the aquaculture wastewater, in which MG can be typically found. These features enable ZIF-67 to be one of the most effective and promising adsorbent to remove MG from water.

  9. Ultra-high adsorption capacity of zeolitic imidazole framework-67 (ZIF-67) for removal of malachite green from water.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kun-Yi Andrew; Chang, Hsuan-Ang

    2015-11-01

    Zeolitic imidazole frameworks (ZIFs), a new class of adsorbents, are proposed to adsorb Malachite Green (MG) in water. Particularly, ZIF-67 was selected owing to its stability in water and straightforward synthesis. The as-synthesized ZIF-67 was characterized and used to adsorb MG from water. Factors affecting the adsorption capacity were investigated including mixing time, temperature, the presence of salts and pH. The kinetics, adsorption isotherm and thermodynamics of the MG adsorption to ZIF-67 were also studied. The adsorption capacity of ZIF-67 for MG could be as high as 2430mgg(-1) at 20°C, which could be improved at the higher temperatures. Such an ultra-high adsorption capacity of ZIF-67 was almost 10-times of those of conventional adsorbents, including activated carbons and biopolymers. A mechanism for the high adsorption capacity was proposed and possibly attributed to the π-π stacking interaction between MG and ZIF-67. ZIF-67 also could be conveniently regenerated by washing with ethanol and the regeneration efficiency could remain 95% up to 4 cycles of the regeneration. ZIF-67 was also able to remove MG from the aquaculture wastewater, in which MG can be typically found. These features enable ZIF-67 to be one of the most effective and promising adsorbent to remove MG from water. PMID:25697373

  10. Influence of Environmental Factors on the Adsorption Capacity and Thermal Conductivity of Silica Nano-Porous Materials.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hu; Gu, Wei; Li, Ming-Jia; Fang, Wen-Zhen; Li, Zeng-Yao; Tao, Wen-Quan

    2015-04-01

    In this work, the influence of temperature and humidity environment on the water vapor adsorption capacity and effective thermal conductivity of silica nano-porous material is conducted within a relative humidity range from 15% to 90% at 25 °C, 40 °C and 55 °C, respectively. The experiment results show that both the temperature and relative humidity have significant influence on the adsorption capacity and effective thermal conductivity of silica nano-porous materials. The adsorption capacity and effective thermal conductivity increase with humidity because of the increases of water vapor concentration. The effective thermal conductivity increases linearly with adsorption saturation capacity at constant temperature. Because adsorption process is exothermic reaction, the increasing temperature is not conducive to the adsorption. But the effective thermal conductivity increases with the increment of temperature at the same water uptake because of the increment of water thermal conductivity with temperature Geometric models and unit cell structure are adopted to predict the effective thermal conductivity and comparisons with the experimental result are made, and for the case of moist silica nano-porous materials with high porosity no quantitative agreement is found. It is believed that the adsorbed water will fill in the nano-pores and gap and form lots of short cuts, leading to a significant reduction of the thermal resistance.

  11. Study on the Adsorption Capacities for Airborne Particulates of Landscape Plants in Different Polluted Regions in Beijing (China).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei-Kang; Wang, Bing; Niu, Xiang

    2015-08-14

    Urban landscape plants are an important component of the urban ecosystem, playing a significant role in the adsorption of airborne particulates and air purification. In this study, six common landscape plants in Beijing were chosen as research subjects, and the adsorption capacities for each different plant leaf and the effects of the leaf structures for the adsorption capacities for particulates were determined. Preliminary results show that needle-leaved tree species adsorbed more airborne particulates than broad-leaved tree species for the same leaf area. Pinus tabuliformis exhibits the highest adsorption capacity, at 3.89 ± 0.026 μg·cm(-2), almost two times as much as that of Populus tomentosa (2.00 ± 0.118 μg·cm(-2)). The adsorption capacities for PM10 of the same tree species leaves, in different polluted regions had significant differences, and the adsorption capacities for PM10 of the tree species leaf beside the Fifth Ring Road were higher than those of the tree species leaves in the Botanical Garden, although the adsorption capacities for PM2.5 of the same tree species in different polluted regions had no significant differences. By determining the soluble ion concentrations of the airborne particulates in two regions, it is suggested that the soluble ion concentrations of PM10 in the atmosphere in the Botanical Garden and beside the Fifth Ring Road have significant differences, while those of PM2.5 in the atmosphere had no significant differences. In different polluted regions there are significant adaptive changes to the leaf structures, and when compared with slightly polluted region, in the seriously polluted region the epidermis cells of the plant leaves shrinked, the surface textures of the leaves became rougher, and the stomas' frequency and the pubescence length increased. Even though the plant leaves exposed to the seriously polluted region changed significantly, these plants can still grow normally and healthily.

  12. Study on the Adsorption Capacities for Airborne Particulates of Landscape Plants in Different Polluted Regions in Beijing (China)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei-Kang; Wang, Bing; Niu, Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Urban landscape plants are an important component of the urban ecosystem, playing a significant role in the adsorption of airborne particulates and air purification. In this study, six common landscape plants in Beijing were chosen as research subjects, and the adsorption capacities for each different plant leaf and the effects of the leaf structures for the adsorption capacities for particulates were determined. Preliminary results show that needle-leaved tree species adsorbed more airborne particulates than broad-leaved tree species for the same leaf area. Pinus tabuliformis exhibits the highest adsorption capacity, at 3.89 ± 0.026 μg·cm−2, almost two times as much as that of Populus tomentosa (2.00 ± 0.118 μg·cm−2). The adsorption capacities for PM10 of the same tree species leaves, in different polluted regions had significant differences, and the adsorption capacities for PM10 of the tree species leaf beside the Fifth Ring Road were higher than those of the tree species leaves in the Botanical Garden, although the adsorption capacities for PM2.5 of the same tree species in different polluted regions had no significant differences. By determining the soluble ion concentrations of the airborne particulates in two regions, it is suggested that the soluble ion concentrations of PM10 in the atmosphere in the Botanical Garden and beside the Fifth Ring Road have significant differences, while those of PM2.5 in the atmosphere had no significant differences. In different polluted regions there are significant adaptive changes to the leaf structures, and when compared with slightly polluted region, in the seriously polluted region the epidermis cells of the plant leaves shrinked, the surface textures of the leaves became rougher, and the stomas’ frequency and the pubescence length increased. Even though the plant leaves exposed to the seriously polluted region changed significantly, these plants can still grow normally and healthily. PMID:26287227

  13. Suitability of adsorption isotherms for predicting the retention capacity of active slag filters removing phosphorus from wastewater.

    PubMed

    Pratt, C; Shilton, A

    2009-01-01

    Active slag filters are an emerging technology for removing phosphorus (P) from wastewater. A number of researchers have suggested that adsorption isotherms are a useful tool for predicting P retention capacity. However, to date the appropriateness of using isotherms for slag filter design remains unverified due to the absence of benchmark data from a full-scale, field filter operated to exhaustion. This investigation compared the isotherm-predicted P retention capacity of a melter slag with the P adsorption capacity determined from a full-scale, melter slag filter which had reached exhaustion after five years of successfully removing P from waste stabilization pond effluent. Results from the standard laboratory batch test showed that P adsorption correlated more strongly with the Freundlich Isotherm (R(2)=0.97, P<0.01) than the Langmuir Isotherm, a similar finding to previous studies. However, at a P concentration of 10 mg/L, typical of domestic effluent, the Freundlich equation predicted a retention capacity of 0.014 gP/kg slag; markedly lower than the 1.23 gP/kg slag adsorbed by the field filter. Clearly, the result generated by the isotherm bears no resemblance to actual field capacity. Scanning electron microscopy analysis revealed porous, reactive secondary minerals on the slag granule surfaces from the field filter which were likely created by weathering. This slow weathering effect, which generates substantial new adsorption sites, is not accounted for by adsorption isotherms rendering them ineffective in slag filter design. PMID:19403982

  14. Reservoir capacity estimates in shale plays based on experimental adsorption data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngo, Tan

    from different measurement techniques using representative fluids (such as CH4 and CO2) at elevated pressures, and the adsorbed density can range anywhere between the liquid and the solid state of the adsorbate. Whether these discrepancies are associated with the inherent heterogeneity of mudrocks and/or with poor data quality requires more experiments under well-controlled conditions. Nevertheless, it has been found in this study that methane GIP estimates can vary between 10-45% and 10-30%, respectively, depending on whether the free or the total amount of gas is considered. Accordingly, CO2 storage estimates range between 30-90% and 15-50%, due to the larger adsorption capacity and gas density at similar pressure and temperature conditions. A manometric system has been designed and built that allows measuring the adsorption of supercritical fluids in microporous materials. Preliminary adsorption tests have been performed using a microporous 13X zeolite and CO 2 as an adsorbing gas at a temperature of 25oC and 35oC and at pressures up to 500 psi. Under these conditions, adsorption is quantified with a precision of +/- 3%. However, relative differences up to 15-20% have been observed with respect to data published in the literature on the same adsorbent and at similar experimental conditions. While it cannot be fully explained with uncertainty analysis, this discrepancy can be reduced by improving experiment practice, thus including the application of a higher adsorbent's regeneration temperature, of longer equilibrium times and of a careful flushing of the system between the various experimental steps. Based on the results on 13X zeolite, virtual tests have been conducted to predict the performance of the manometric system to measure adsorption on less adsorbing materials, such as mudrocks. The results show that uncertainties in the estimated adsorbed amount are much more significant in shale material and they increase with increasing pressure. In fact, relative

  15. Adsorption of reovirus to clay minerals: effects of cation-exchange capacity, cation saturation, and surface area.

    PubMed Central

    Lipson, S M; Stotzky, G

    1983-01-01

    The adsorption of reovirus to clay minerals has been reported by several investigators, but the mechanisms defining this association have been studied only minimally. The purpose of this investigation was to elucidate the mechanisms involved with this interaction. More reovirus type 3 was adsorbed, in both distilled and synthetic estuarine water, by low concentrations of montmorillonite than by comparable concentrations of kaolinite containing a mixed complement of cations on the exchange complex. Adsorption to the clays was essentially immediate and was correlated with the cation-exchange capacity of the clays, indicating that adsorption was primarily to negatively charged sites on the clays. Adsorption was greater with low concentrations of clays in estuarine water than in distilled water, as the higher ionic strength of the estuarine water reduced the electrokinetic potential of both clay and virus particles. The addition of cations (as chloride salts) to distilled water enhanced adsorption, with divalent cations being more effective than monovalent cations and 10(-2) M resulting in more adsorption than 10(-3) M. Potassium ions suppressed reovirus adsorption to montmorillonite, probably by collapsing the clay lattices and preventing the expression of the interlayer-derived cation-exchange capacity. More virus was adsorbed by montmorillonite made homoionic to various mono-, di-, and trivalent cations (except by montmorillonite homoionic to potassium) than by comparable concentrations of kaolinite homoionic to the same cations. The sequence of the amount of adsorption to homoionic montmorillonite was Al greater than Ca greater than Mg greater than Na greater than K; the sequence of adsorption to kaolinite was Na greater than Al greater than Ca greater than Mg greater than K. The constant partition-type adsorption isotherms obtained when the clay concentration was maintained constant and the virus concentration was varied indicated that a fixed proportion of the

  16. Reservoir capacity estimates in shale plays based on experimental adsorption data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngo, Tan

    from different measurement techniques using representative fluids (such as CH4 and CO2) at elevated pressures, and the adsorbed density can range anywhere between the liquid and the solid state of the adsorbate. Whether these discrepancies are associated with the inherent heterogeneity of mudrocks and/or with poor data quality requires more experiments under well-controlled conditions. Nevertheless, it has been found in this study that methane GIP estimates can vary between 10-45% and 10-30%, respectively, depending on whether the free or the total amount of gas is considered. Accordingly, CO2 storage estimates range between 30-90% and 15-50%, due to the larger adsorption capacity and gas density at similar pressure and temperature conditions. A manometric system has been designed and built that allows measuring the adsorption of supercritical fluids in microporous materials. Preliminary adsorption tests have been performed using a microporous 13X zeolite and CO 2 as an adsorbing gas at a temperature of 25oC and 35oC and at pressures up to 500 psi. Under these conditions, adsorption is quantified with a precision of +/- 3%. However, relative differences up to 15-20% have been observed with respect to data published in the literature on the same adsorbent and at similar experimental conditions. While it cannot be fully explained with uncertainty analysis, this discrepancy can be reduced by improving experiment practice, thus including the application of a higher adsorbent's regeneration temperature, of longer equilibrium times and of a careful flushing of the system between the various experimental steps. Based on the results on 13X zeolite, virtual tests have been conducted to predict the performance of the manometric system to measure adsorption on less adsorbing materials, such as mudrocks. The results show that uncertainties in the estimated adsorbed amount are much more significant in shale material and they increase with increasing pressure. In fact, relative

  17. Evaluation of Adsorption Capacity of Montmorillonite and Aluminium-pillared Clay for Pb2+, Cu2+ and Zn2.

    PubMed

    Humelnicu, Doina; Ignat, Maria; Suchea, Mirela

    2015-01-01

    Adsorption capacity of the two adsorbents was investigated as a function of contact time between adsorbent and heavy metal ions solutions, the initial heavy metals concentration of the synthetic wastewater, pH value, temperature and adsorbent mass. Preliminary experiments at different pH values between 2.0 and 7.0 were performed, and were observed that maximum adsorption occurs at pH 5 for copper (q(max) = 92.59 mg · g(–1)), 6.0 for lead (qmax = 97.08 mg · g(–1)) and 6.5 for zinc ions (q(max) = 73.52 mg · g(–1)), respectively. The sorption capacity of studied adsorbents for Pb(2+), Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) was calculated using Langmuir and Freundlich models. Thermodynamic parameters – enthalpy change (ΔH(0)), entropychange (ΔS(0)) and free energy (ΔG(0)) – were calculated for predicting the nature of adsorption. Scanning electron micrograph(SEM) revealed changes in the surface morphology of the adsorbent as a result of heavy metal ions adsorption.EDS characterization confirmed qualitatively the presence of adsorbed species in the samples. On the basis of the obtained results the adsorption it was proposed an ordered adsorption: Pb(2+), Cu(2+) and Zn(2+), on the sorbents we investigated. PMID:26680724

  18. Preparation of mesoporous poly (acrylic acid)/SiO2 composite nanofiber membranes having adsorption capacity for indigo carmine dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ran; Jia, Min; Li, Fengting; Wang, Hongtao; Zhang, Bingru; Qiao, Junlian

    2012-03-01

    Mesoporous poly (acrylic acid)/SiO2 (PAA/SiO2) composite nanofiber membranes functionalized with mercapto groups were fabricated by a sol-gel electrospinning method, and their adsorption capacity for indigo carmine was investigated. The membranes were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy, x-ray powder diffraction (XRD), and nitrogen adsorption-desorption measurement. SEM and TEM observation results showed that the PAA/SiO2 fibers had diameters between 400-800 nm and mesopores with an average pore size of 3.88 nm. The specific surface area of the mesoporous nanofiber membranes was 514.89 m2/g. The characteristic peaks for mercapto group vibration in FTIR and Raman spectra demonstrated that the mercapto groups have been incorporated into the silica skeleton. The adsorption isotherm data of indigo carmine on the membranes fit well with Redlich-Peterson model, and the maximum adsorption capacity calculated was 523.11 mg/g. It was found that the removal rate of indigo carmine by the membranes reached a maximum of 98% in 90 min and the adsorption kinetics followed a pseudo-second-order model. The high adsorption capacity of PAA/SiO2 nanofiber membrane makes it a promising adsorbent for indigo carmine removal from the wastewater.

  19. Enhancing adsorption capacity of toxic malachite green dye through chemically modified breadnut peel: equilibrium, thermodynamics, kinetics and regeneration studies.

    PubMed

    Chieng, Hei Ing; Lim, Linda B L; Priyantha, Namal

    2015-01-01

    Breadnut skin, in both its unmodified (KS) and base-modified (BM-KS) forms, was investigated for its potential use as a low-cost adsorbent for the removal of toxic dye, malachite green (MG). Characterization of the adsorbents was carried out using scanning electron microscope, X-ray fluorescence and Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy. Batch adsorption experiments, carried out under optimized conditions, for the adsorption of MG were fitted using five isotherm models (Langmuir, Freundlich, Dubinin-Radushkevich, Temkin and Sips) and six error functions to determine the best-fit model. The adsorption capacity was greatly enhanced when breadnut skin was chemically modified with NaOH, leading to an adsorption capacity of 353.0 mg g(-1), that was far superior to most reported adsorbents for the removal of MG. Thermodynamics studies indicated that the adsorption of MG was spontaneous on KS and BM-KS, and the reactions were endothermic and exothermic, respectively. Kinetics studies showed that both followed the pseudo-second order. Regeneration experiments on BM-KS indicated that its adsorption capacity was still maintained at>90% even after five cycles. It can be concluded that NaOH-modified breadfruit skin has great potential to be utilized in real-life application as a low-cost adsorbent for the removal of MG in wastewater treatment.

  20. Enhancing adsorption capacity of toxic malachite green dye through chemically modified breadnut peel: equilibrium, thermodynamics, kinetics and regeneration studies.

    PubMed

    Chieng, Hei Ing; Lim, Linda B L; Priyantha, Namal

    2015-01-01

    Breadnut skin, in both its unmodified (KS) and base-modified (BM-KS) forms, was investigated for its potential use as a low-cost adsorbent for the removal of toxic dye, malachite green (MG). Characterization of the adsorbents was carried out using scanning electron microscope, X-ray fluorescence and Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy. Batch adsorption experiments, carried out under optimized conditions, for the adsorption of MG were fitted using five isotherm models (Langmuir, Freundlich, Dubinin-Radushkevich, Temkin and Sips) and six error functions to determine the best-fit model. The adsorption capacity was greatly enhanced when breadnut skin was chemically modified with NaOH, leading to an adsorption capacity of 353.0 mg g(-1), that was far superior to most reported adsorbents for the removal of MG. Thermodynamics studies indicated that the adsorption of MG was spontaneous on KS and BM-KS, and the reactions were endothermic and exothermic, respectively. Kinetics studies showed that both followed the pseudo-second order. Regeneration experiments on BM-KS indicated that its adsorption capacity was still maintained at>90% even after five cycles. It can be concluded that NaOH-modified breadfruit skin has great potential to be utilized in real-life application as a low-cost adsorbent for the removal of MG in wastewater treatment. PMID:25409587

  1. Preparation of a porous clay heterostructure and study of its adsorption capacity of phenol and chlorinated phenols from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Arellano-Cárdenas, Sofía; Gallardo-Velázquez, Tzayhrí; Osorio-Revilla, Guillermo; López-Cortez, Ma del Socorro

    2008-01-01

    A porous clay heterostructure (PCH) from a Mexican clay was prepared and characterized, and its aqueous phenol and dichlorophenols (DCPs) adsorption capacities were studied using a batch equilibrium technique. The PCH displayed a surface area of 305.5 m2/g, 37.2 A average porous diameter, and a basal space of 23.2 A. The adsorption capacity shown by the PCH for both phenol and DCPs from water (14.5 mg/g for phenol; 48.7 mg/g for 3,4-DCP; and 45.5 mg/g for 2,5-DCP) suggests that the PCH has both hydrophobic and hydrophilic characteristics, as a result of the presence of silanol and siloxane groups formed during the pillaring and calcination of the PCH. The values of maximal adsorption capacity for dichlorophenols were higher than those reported for aluminum pillared clays and some inorgano-organo clays and comparable with some ionic exchange resins.

  2. The adsorption behavior of mercury on the hematite (1-102) surface from coal-fired power plant emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, J. E.; Jew, A. D.; Rupp, E.; Aboud, S.; Brown, G. E.; Wilcox, J.

    2014-12-01

    One of the biggest environmental concerns caused by coal-fired power plants is the emission of mercury (Hg). Worldwide, 475 tons of Hg are released from coal-burning processes annually, comprising 24% of total anthropogenic Hg emissions. Because of the high toxicity of Hg species, US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed a standard on Hg and air toxic pollutants (Mercury and Air Toxics Standards, MATS) for new and existing coal-fired power plants in order to eliminate Hg in flue gas prior to release through the stack. To control the emission of Hg from coal-derived flue gas, it is important to understand the behavior, speciation of Hg as well as the interaction between Hg and solid materials, such as fly ash or metal oxides, in the flue gas stream. In this study, theoretical investigations using density functional theory (DFT) were carried out in conjunction with experiments to investigate the adsorption behavior of oxidized Hg on hematite (α-Fe2O3), an important mineral component of fly ash which readily sorbes Hg from flue gas. For DFT calculation, the two α-Fe2O3 (1-102) surfaces modeled consisted of two different surface terminations: (1) M2-clean, which corresponds to the oxygen-terminated surface with the first layer of cations removed and with no hydroxyl groups and (2) M2-OH2-OH, which has bihydroxylated top oxygen atoms and a second layer of hydroxylated oxygen atoms. These surface terminations were selected because both surfaces are highly stable in the temperature range of flue gases. The most probable adsorption sites of Hg, Cl and HgCl on the two α-Fe2O3 surface terminations were suggested based on calculated adsorption energies. Additionally, Bader charge and projected density of states (PDOS) analyses were conducted to characterize the oxidation state of adsorbates and their bonding interactions with the surfaces. Results indicate that oxidized Hg physically adsorbs on the M2-clean surface with a binding energy of -0.103 eV and that

  3. Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gault, D. E.; Burns, J. A.; Cassen, P.; Strom, R. G.

    1977-01-01

    Prior to the flight of the Mariner 10 spacecraft, Mercury was the least investigated and most poorly known terrestrial planet (Kuiper 1970, Devine 1972). Observational difficulties caused by its proximity to the Sun as viewed from Earth caused the planet to remain a small, vague disk exhibiting little surface contrast or details, an object for which only three major facts were known: 1. its bulk density is similar to that of Venus and Earth, much greater than that of Mars and the Moon; 2. its surface reflects electromagnetic radiation at all wavelengths in the same manner as the Moon (taking into account differences in their solar distances); and 3. its rotation period is in 2/3 resonance with its orbital period. Images obtained during the flyby by Mariner 10 on 29 March 1974 (and the two subsequent flybys on 21 September 1974 and 16 March 1975) revealed Mercury's surface in detail equivalent to that available for the Moon during the early 1960's from Earth-based telescopic views. Additionally, however, information was obtained on the planet's mass and size, atmospheric composition and density, charged-particle environment, and infrared thermal radiation from the surface, and most significantly of all, the existence of a planetary magnetic field that is probably intrinsic to Mercury was established. In the following, this new information is summarized together with results from theoretical studies and ground-based observations. In the quantum jumps of knowledge that have been characteristic of "space-age" exploration, the previously obscure body of Mercury has suddenly come into sharp focus. It is very likely a differentiated body, probably contains a large Earth-like iron-rich core, and displays a surface remarkably similar to that of the Moon, which suggests a similar evolutionary history.

  4. Metal and proton adsorption capacities of natural and cloned Sphagnum mosses.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Aridane G; Pokrovsky, Oleg S; Beike, Anna K; Reski, Ralf; Di Palma, Anna; Adamo, Paola; Giordano, Simonetta; Fernandez, J Angel

    2016-01-01

    Terrestrial mosses are commonly used as bioindicators of atmospheric pollution. However, there is a lack of standardization of the biomonitoring preparation technique and the efficiency of metal adsorption by various moss species is poorly known. This is especially true for in vitro-cultivated moss clones, which are promising candidates for a standardized moss-bag technique. We studied the adsorption of copper and zinc on naturally grown Sphagnum peat moss in comparison with in vitro-cultivated Sphagnum palustre samples in order to provide their physico-chemical characterization and to test the possibility of using cloned peat mosses as bioindicators within the protocol of moss-bag technique. We demonstrate that in vitro-grown clones of S. palustre exhibit acid-base properties similar to those of naturally grown Sphagnum samples, whereas the zinc adsorption capacity of the clones is approx. twice higher than that of the samples from the field. At the same time, the field samples adsorbed 30-50% higher amount of Cu(2+) compared to that of the clones. This contrast may be related to fine differences in the bulk chemical composition, specific surface area, morphological features, type and abundance of binding sites at the cell surfaces and in the aqueous solution of natural and cloned Sphagnum. The clones exhibited much lower concentration of most metal pollutants in their tissues relative to the natural samples thus making the former better indicators of low metal loading. Overall, in vitro-produced clones of S. palustre can be considered as an adequate, environmentally benign substitution for protected natural Sphagnum sp. samples to be used in moss-bags for atmospheric monitoring. PMID:26407060

  5. Comparative study on the adsorption capacity of raw and modified litchi pericarp for removing Cu(II) from solutions.

    PubMed

    Kong, Zhenglei; Li, Xiaochen; Tian, Jiyu; Yang, Jili; Sun, Shujuan

    2014-02-15

    The adsorption of Cu(II) onto raw litchi pericarp (LP) and modified litchi pericarp (MLP) as a function of pH, adsorbent dose and contact time, were investigated. Adsorption equilibrium isotherms, kinetics, and thermodynamics were studied to characterize the adsorption process. Leaching assays were also conducted to evaluate the potential contamination risk of LP and MLP to aqueous systems. The maximum adsorption of Cu(II) onto MLP was occurred at the pH of 6.0, adsorbent dose of 10.0 g/L, and contact time of 60 min, respectively. The adsorption process of Cu(II) onto LP and MLP were described well by both Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms, and the adsorption kinetics of Cu(II) on MLP was pseudo-second-order. Cu(II) adsorption onto LP and MLP are both exothermic, while it is spontaneous for MLP, and non-spontaneous for LP. The maximum adsorption capacity of Cu(II) onto MLP was 23.70 mg/g, which was about 2.7 times higher than that of LP. Additionally, as compared to LP, the leaching amounts of TOC, TN, and TP from MLP were significantly reduced by a percentage of 27.0%, 90.3%, and 35.3%, respectively. PMID:24473344

  6. Fiber-based adsorbents having high adsorption capacities for recovering dissolved metals and methods thereof

    DOEpatents

    Janke, Christopher J; Dai, Sheng; Oyola, Yatsandra

    2014-05-13

    A fiber-based adsorbent and a related method of manufacture are provided. The fiber-based adsorbent includes polymer fibers with grafted side chains and an increased surface area per unit weight over known fibers to increase the adsorption of dissolved metals, for example uranium, from aqueous solutions. The polymer fibers include a circular morphology in some embodiments, having a mean diameter of less than 15 microns, optionally less than about 1 micron. In other embodiments, the polymer fibers include a non-circular morphology, optionally defining multiple gear-shaped, winged-shaped or lobe-shaped projections along the length of the polymer fibers. A method for forming the fiber-based adsorbents includes irradiating high surface area polymer fibers, grafting with polymerizable reactive monomers, reacting the grafted fibers with hydroxylamine, and conditioning with an alkaline solution. High surface area fiber-based adsorbents formed according to the present method demonstrated a significantly improved uranium adsorption capacity per unit weight over existing adsorbents.

  7. Fiber-based adsorbents having high adsorption capacities for recovering dissolved metals and methods thereof

    DOEpatents

    Janke, Christopher J.; Dai, Sheng; Oyola, Yatsandra

    2016-09-06

    A fiber-based adsorbent and a related method of manufacture are provided. The fiber-based adsorbent includes polymer fibers with grafted side chains and an increased surface area per unit weight over known fibers to increase the adsorption of dissolved metals, for example uranium, from aqueous solutions. The polymer fibers include a circular morphology in some embodiments, having a mean diameter of less than 15 microns, optionally less than about 1 micron. In other embodiments, the polymer fibers include a non-circular morphology, optionally defining multiple gear-shaped, winged-shaped or lobe-shaped projections along the length of the polymer fibers. A method for forming the fiber-based adsorbents includes irradiating high surface area polymer fibers, grafting with polymerizable reactive monomers, reacting the grafted fibers with hydroxylamine, and conditioning with an alkaline solution. High surface area fiber-based adsorbents formed according to the present method demonstrated a significantly improved uranium adsorption capacity per unit weight over existing adsorbents.

  8. Porphyrin-Alkaline Earth MOFs with the Highest Adsorption Capacity for Methylene Blue.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yuxia; Sun, Junshan; Zhang, Daopeng; Qi, Dongdong; Jiang, Jianzhuang

    2016-04-25

    A series of four porphyrin-alkaline earth metal- organic frameworks [Mg(HDCPP)2 (DMF)2 ]n ⋅(H2 O)7 n (1), [Ca(HDCPP)2 (H2 O)2 ]n (DMF)1.5 n (2), [Sr(DCPP)(H2 O)(DMA)]n (3), and [Ba(DCPP)(H2 O)(DMA)]n (4) was isolated for the first time from solvothermal reaction between metal-free 5,15-di(4- carboxyphenyl)porphyrin (H2 DCPP) and alkaline earth ions. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis reveals the 2D and 3D supramolecular network with periodic nanosized porosity for 1/2 and 3/4, respectively. The whole series of MOFs, in particular, compounds 1 and 2 with intrinsic low molecular formula weight, exhibit superior adsorption performance for methylene blue (MB) with excellent capture capacity as represented by the thus far highest adsorption amount of 952 mg g(-1) for 2 and good selectivity, opening a new way for the potential application of the main group metal-based MOFs. PMID:27002679

  9. Mercury Adsorption and Oxidation over Cobalt Oxide Loaded Magnetospheres Catalyst from Fly Ash in Oxyfuel Combustion Flue Gas.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jianping; Zhao, Yongchun; Chang, Lin; Zhang, Junying; Zheng, Chuguang

    2015-07-01

    Cobalt oxide loaded magnetospheres catalyst from fly ash (Co-MF catalyst) showed good mercury removal capacity and recyclability under air combustion flue gas in our previous study. In this work, the Hg(0) removal behaviors as well as the involved reactions mechanism were investigated in oxyfuel combustion conditions. Further, the recyclability of Co-MF catalyst in oxyfuel combustion atmosphere was also evaluated. The results showed that the Hg(0) removal efficiency in oxyfuel combustion conditions was relative high compared to that in air combustion conditions. The presence of enriched CO2 (70%) in oxyfuel combustion atmosphere assisted the mercury oxidation due to the oxidation of function group of C-O formed from CO2. Under both atmospheres, the mercury removal efficiency decreased with the addition of SO2, NO, and H2O. However, the enriched CO2 in oxyfuel combustion atmosphere could somewhat weaken the inhibition of SO2, NO, and H2O. The multiple capture-regeneration cycles demonstrated that the Co-MF catalyst also present good regeneration performance in oxyfuel combustion atmosphere.

  10. Mercury Adsorption and Oxidation over Cobalt Oxide Loaded Magnetospheres Catalyst from Fly Ash in Oxyfuel Combustion Flue Gas.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jianping; Zhao, Yongchun; Chang, Lin; Zhang, Junying; Zheng, Chuguang

    2015-07-01

    Cobalt oxide loaded magnetospheres catalyst from fly ash (Co-MF catalyst) showed good mercury removal capacity and recyclability under air combustion flue gas in our previous study. In this work, the Hg(0) removal behaviors as well as the involved reactions mechanism were investigated in oxyfuel combustion conditions. Further, the recyclability of Co-MF catalyst in oxyfuel combustion atmosphere was also evaluated. The results showed that the Hg(0) removal efficiency in oxyfuel combustion conditions was relative high compared to that in air combustion conditions. The presence of enriched CO2 (70%) in oxyfuel combustion atmosphere assisted the mercury oxidation due to the oxidation of function group of C-O formed from CO2. Under both atmospheres, the mercury removal efficiency decreased with the addition of SO2, NO, and H2O. However, the enriched CO2 in oxyfuel combustion atmosphere could somewhat weaken the inhibition of SO2, NO, and H2O. The multiple capture-regeneration cycles demonstrated that the Co-MF catalyst also present good regeneration performance in oxyfuel combustion atmosphere. PMID:26024429

  11. In-Situ Ligand Formation-Driven Preparation of a Heterometallic Metal-Organic Framework for Highly Selective Separation of Light Hydrocarbons and Efficient Mercury Adsorption.

    PubMed

    Han, Yi; Zheng, Hao; Liu, Kang; Wang, Hongli; Huang, Hongliang; Xie, Lin-Hua; Wang, Lei; Li, Jian-Rong

    2016-09-01

    By means of the in situ ligand formation strategy and hard-soft acid-base (HSAB) theory, two types of independent In(COO)4 and Cu6S6 clusters were rationally embedded into the heterometallic metal-organic framework (HMOF) {[(CH3)2NH2]InCu4L4·xS}n (BUT-52). BUT-52 exhibits a three-dimensional (3D) anionic framework structure and has sulfur decorating the dumbbell-shaped cages with the external edges of 24 and 14 Å by the internal edges. Remarkably, because of the stronger charge-induced interactions between the charged MOF skeleton and the easily polarized C2 hydrocarbons (C2s), BUT-52 was used for C2s over CH4 and shows both high adsorption heats of C2s and selective separation abilities for C2s/CH4. Furthermore, BUT-52 also displays efficient mercury adsorption resulting from the stronger-binding ability beween the sulfur and the mercury and can remove 92% mercury from methanol solution even with the initial concentration as low as 100 mg/L. The results in this work indicate the feasibility of BUT-52 for the separation of light hydrocarbons and efficient adsorption/removal of mercury. PMID:27548083

  12. Copper Accumulation, Availability and Adsorption Capacity in Sandy Soils of Vineyards with Different Cultivation Duration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallmann, F. J. K.; Miotto, A.; Bender, M. A.; Gubiani, E.; Rheinheimer, D. D. S.; Kaminski, J.; Ceretta, C. A.; Šimůnek, J.

    2015-12-01

    Bordeaux mixture is a copper-based (Cu) fungicide and bactericide applied in vineyards to control plant diseases. Since it is applied several times per year, it accumulates in large quantities on plants and in soil. This study evaluates the Cu accumulation in, and desorption kinetics and adsorption capability of a sandy Ultisol in a natural field and in 3 vineyards for 5 (V1), 11 (V2), and 31 (V3) years in South of Brazil. Soil samples were collected in 8 depths (0-60 cm) of all four soil profiles, which all displayed similar soil properties. The following soil properties were measured: pH, organic matter (OM), soil bulk density, Cu total concentration, and Cu desorption and adsorption curves. A two first-order reactions model and the Langmuir isotherm were fitted to the desorption and adsorption curves, respectively. An increase in the total mass of Cu in the vineyards followed a linear regression curve, with an average annual increase of 7.15 kg ha-1. Cu accumulated down to a depth of 5, 20, and 30 cm in V1, V2 and V3, respectively, with the highest Cu content reaching 138.4 mg kg-1 in the 0-5 cm soil layer of V3. Cu desorption parameters showed a high correlation with its total concentration. Approximately 57 and 19% of total Cu were immediately and slowly available, respectively, indicating a high potential for plant absorption and/or downward movement. Cu concentrations extracted by EDTA from soil layers not affected by anthropogenic Cu inputs were very low. The maximum Cu adsorption capacity of the 0-5 and 5-10 cm soil layers increased with the vineyard age, reaching concentrations higher than 900 mg kg-1. This increase was highly related to OM and pH, which both increased with cultivation duration. Despite of low clay content of these soils, there is low risk of groundwater Cu contamination for actual conditions. However, high Cu concentrations in the surface layer of the long-term vineyards could cause toxicity problems for this and for companion crops.

  13. Changing the adsorption capacity of coal-based honeycomb monoliths for pollutant removal from liquid streams by controlling their porosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatica, José M.; Harti, Sanae; Vidal, Hilario

    2010-09-01

    Coal-based honeycomb monoliths extruded using methods developed for ceramic materials have been used to retain methylene blue and p-nitrophenol from aqueous solutions. The influence of the filters' thermal treatment on their textural properties and performance as adsorbents was examined. Characterization by N 2 physisorption, mercury porosimetry and scanning electron microscopy along with adsorption tests under dynamic conditions suggest that, depending on the pollutant and its initial concentration, it can be more convenient to previously submit the monoliths to a simple carbonization or to an additional activation, with or without preoxidation, as a consequence of their different resulting pore structures. Infrared spectroscopy indicates that their different adsorption behaviour seems not to be related to differences in their surface chemical groups. In addition, axial crushing tests show that the monoliths have an acceptable mechanical resistance for the application investigated.

  14. Volumetric Interpretation of Protein Adsorption: Ion-Exchange Adsorbent Capacity, Protein pI, and Interaction Energetics

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Hyeran; Yohe, Stefan; Vogler, Erwin A.

    2008-01-01

    Adsorption of lysozyme (Lys), human serum albumin (HSA), and immunoglobulin G (IgG) to anion- and cation-exchange resins is dominated by electrostatic interactions between protein and adsorbent. The solution-depletion method of measuring adsorption shows, however, that these proteins do not irreversibly adsorb to ion-exchange surfaces, even when the charge disparity between adsorbent and protein inferred from protein pI is large. Net-positively-charged Lys (pI = 11) and net-negatively-charged HSA (pI = 5.5) adsorb so strongly to sulfopropyl sepharose (SP; a negatively-charged, strong cation exchange resin, −0.22 mmol/mL exchange capacity) that both resist displacement by net-neutral IgG (pI = 7.0) in simultaneous adsorption-competition experiments. By contrast, IgG readily displaces both Lys and HSA adsorbed either to quarternary-ammonium sepharose (Q; a positively-charged, strong anion exchanger, + 0.22 mmol/mL exchange capacity) or octadecyl sepharose (ODS, a neutral hydrophobic resin, 0 mmol/mL exchange capacity). Thus it is concluded that adsorption results do not sensibly correlate with protein pI and that pI is actually a rather poor predictor of affinity for ion-exchange surfaces. Adsorption of Lys, HSA, and IgG to ion-exchange resins from stagnant solution leads to adsorbed multi-layers, into-or-onto which IgG adsorbs in adsorption-competition experiments. Comparison of adsorption to ion-exchange resins and neutral ODS leads to the conclusion that the apparent standard free-energy-of-adsorption ΔGadso of Lys, HSA, and IgG is not large in comparison to thermal energy due to energy-compensating interactions between water, protein, and ion-exchange surfaces that leaves a small net ΔGadso. Thus water is found to control protein adsorption to a full range of substratum types spanning hydrophobic (poorly water wettable) surfaces, hydrophilic surfaces bearing relatively-weak Lewis acid/base functionalities that wet with (hydrogen bond to) water but do not

  15. Cu(II) and Zn(II) adsorption capacity of three different clay liner materials.

    PubMed

    Musso, T B; Parolo, M E; Pettinari, G; Francisca, F M

    2014-12-15

    Sorption of Cu(II) and Zn(II) on three natural clays meeting the international requirements for use as liners was evaluated by means of batch tests. The purpose of this research was to determine the retention capacities of the clays for metal cations commonly present in urban solid waste leachates. The pH and ionic strength conditions were set at values frequently found in real leachates. The changes observed in the XRD patterns and FTIR spectra upon adsorption can be considered an evidence of clay-metal electrostatic interaction. The Langmuir model was found to best describe the sorption processes, offering maximum sorption capacities from 8.16 to 56.89 mg/g for Cu(II) and from 49.59 to 103.83 mg/g for Zn(II). All samples remove more Zn(II) than Cu(II), which may be related to the different geometry of the hydrated Cu(II) cation. The total amount of metal sorption was strongly influenced by the total specific surface area, the presence of carbonates and the smectite content of the clays. In addition to their known quality as physical barriers, the adsorbed amounts obtained indicate the suitability of the tested clays to contribute to the retardation of Cu(II) and Zn(II) transport through clay liners.

  16. Synthesis, characterisation and adsorption properties of a porous copper(II) 3D coordination polymer exhibiting strong binding enthalpy and adsorption capacity for carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Eckold, Pierre; Gee, William J; Hill, Matthew R; Batten, Stuart R

    2012-11-21

    The synthesis and characterisation of microporous coordination polymers containing copper(II) or cobalt(II) and 2-(pyridin-4-yl)malonaldehyde (Hpma) is described and the gas adsorption properties evaluated. Single-crystal X-ray structure determinations identified the structures as [M(pma)(2)]·2X (M = Cu, 1; Co, 2; X = MeOH, MeCN), which contain 3D networks with rutile topology and continuous 1D rectangular channels with diameters ranging from 3 to 4 Å. The materials exhibit low BET surface areas of 143 m(2) g(-1), but possess large capacities for carbon dioxide capture of 14.1 wt%. The small pore channels are shown to account for this, delivering a particularly strong binding enthalpy to adsorbed CO(2) of 38 kJ mol(-1), and a very large adsorption capacity relative to the low surface area.

  17. Surface-Energetic Heterogeneity of Nanoporous Solids for CO2 and CO Adsorption: The Key to an Adsorption Capacity and Selectivity at Low Pressures.

    PubMed

    Kim, Moon Hyeon; Cho, Il Hum; Choi, Sang Ok; Lee, In Soo

    2016-05-01

    This study has been focused on surface energetic heterogeneity of zeolite (H-mordenite, "HM"), activated carbon ("RB2") and metal-organic framework family ("Z1200") materials and their isotherm features in adsorption of CO2 and CO at 25 degrees C and low pressures ≤ 850 Torr. The nanoporous solids showed not only distinctive shape of adsorption isotherms for CO2 with relatively high polarizability and quadrupole moment but also different capacities in the CO2 adsorption. These differences between the adsorbents could be well correlated with their surface nonuniformity. The most heterogeneous surfaces were found with the HM that gave the highest CO2 uptake at all pressures allowed, while the Z1200 consisted of completely homogeneous surfaces and even CO2 adsorption linearly increased with pressure. An intermediate character was indicated on the surface of RB2 and thus this sorbent possessed isotherm features between the HM and Z1200 in CO2 adsorption. Such different surface energetics was fairly consistent with changes in CO2/CO selectivity on the nanoporous adsorbents up to equilibrated pressures near 850 Torr. PMID:27483776

  18. EFFECT OF HEAT ON THE ADSORPTION CAPACITY OF AN ACTIVATED CARBON FOR DECOLORIZING/DEODORIZING YELLOW ZEIN

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Freundlich model was evaluated for use to assess the effect of heat on the adsorption capacity of an activated carbon for decolorizing/deodorizing corn zein. Because zein protein and its color/odor components are all adsorbed by activated carbon, a method to monitor their removal was needed. Y...

  19. EFFECT OF MOLECULAR OXYGEN ON ADSORPTIVE CAPACITY AND EXTRACTION EFFICIENCY OF GRANULATED ACTIVATED CARBON FOR THREE ORTHO-SUBSTITUTED PHENOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adsorptive capacity of activated carbon for several organic compounds was found to be strongly influenced by the presence of molecular oxygen. This influence is manifested by the polymerization of adsorbate on the surface of activated carbon. As a result, GAC exhibits much high...

  20. Integrated Removal of NOx with Carbon Monoxide as Reductant, and Capture of Mercury in a Low Temperature Selective Catalytic and Adsorptive Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Neville Pinto; Panagiotis Smirniotis; Stephen Thiel

    2010-08-31

    Coal will likely continue to be a dominant component of power generation in the foreseeable future. This project addresses the issue of environmental compliance for two important pollutants: NO{sub x} and mercury. Integration of emission control units is in principle possible through a Low Temperature Selective Catalytic and Adsorptive Reactor (LTSCAR) in which NO{sub x} removal is achieved in a traditional SCR mode but at low temperature, and, uniquely, using carbon monoxide as a reductant. The capture of mercury is integrated into the same process unit. Such an arrangement would reduce mercury removal costs significantly, and provide improved control for the ultimate disposal of mercury. The work completed in this project demonstrates that the use of CO as a reductant in LTSCR is technically feasible using supported manganese oxide catalysts, that the simultaneous warm-gas capture of elemental and oxidized mercury is technically feasible using both nanostructured chelating adsorbents and ceria-titania-based materials, and that integrated removal of mercury and NO{sub x} is technically feasible using ceria-titania-based materials.

  1. Efficient Removal of Co2+ from Aqueous Solution by 3-Aminopropyltriethoxysilane Functionalized Montmorillonite with Enhanced Adsorption Capacity.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhujian; Wu, Pingxiao; Gong, Beini; Dai, Yaping; Chiang, Pen-Chi; Lai, Xiaolin; Yu, Guangwei

    2016-01-01

    To achieve a satisfactory removal efficiency of heavy metal ions from wastewater, silane-functionalized montmorillonite with abundant ligand-binding sites (-NH2) was synthesized as an efficient adsorbent. Ca-montmorillonite (Ca-Mt) was functionalized with 3-aminopropyl triethoxysilane (APTES) to obtain the APTES-Mt products (APTES1.0CEC-Mt, APTES2.0CEC-Mt, APTES3.0CEC-Mt, APTES4.0CEC-Mt) with enhanced adsorption capacity for Co2+. The physico-chemical properties of the synthesized adsorbents were characterized by spectroscopic and microscopic methods, and the results demonstrated that APTES was successfully intercalated into the gallery of Ca-Mt or grafted onto the surface of Ca-Mt through Si-O bonds. The effect of solution pH, ionic strength, temperature, initial concentrations and contact time on adsorption of Co2+ by APTES-Mt was evaluated. The results indicated that adsorption of Co2+ onto Ca-Mt, APTES1.0CEC-Mt and APTES2.0CEC-Mt can be considered to be a pseudo-second-order process. In contrast, adsorption of Co2+ onto APTES3.0CEC-Mt and APTES4.0CEC-Mt fitted well with the pseudo-first-order kinetics. The adsorption isotherms were described by the Langmuir model, and the maximum adsorption capacities of APTES1.0CEC-Mt, APTES2.0CEC-Mt, APTES3.0CEC-Mt and APTES4.0CEC-Mt were 25.1, 33.8, 61.6, and 61.9 mg·g-1, respectively. In addition, reaction temperature had no impact on the adsorption capacity, while both the pH and ionic strength significantly affected the adsorption process. A synergistic effect of ion exchange and coordination interactions on adsorption was observed, thereby leading to a significant enhancement of Co2+ adsorption by the composites. Thus, APTES-Mt could be a cost-effective and environmental-friendly adsorbent, with potential for treating Co2+-rich wastewater. PMID:27448094

  2. Efficient Removal of Co2+ from Aqueous Solution by 3-Aminopropyltriethoxysilane Functionalized Montmorillonite with Enhanced Adsorption Capacity.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhujian; Wu, Pingxiao; Gong, Beini; Dai, Yaping; Chiang, Pen-Chi; Lai, Xiaolin; Yu, Guangwei

    2016-01-01

    To achieve a satisfactory removal efficiency of heavy metal ions from wastewater, silane-functionalized montmorillonite with abundant ligand-binding sites (-NH2) was synthesized as an efficient adsorbent. Ca-montmorillonite (Ca-Mt) was functionalized with 3-aminopropyl triethoxysilane (APTES) to obtain the APTES-Mt products (APTES1.0CEC-Mt, APTES2.0CEC-Mt, APTES3.0CEC-Mt, APTES4.0CEC-Mt) with enhanced adsorption capacity for Co2+. The physico-chemical properties of the synthesized adsorbents were characterized by spectroscopic and microscopic methods, and the results demonstrated that APTES was successfully intercalated into the gallery of Ca-Mt or grafted onto the surface of Ca-Mt through Si-O bonds. The effect of solution pH, ionic strength, temperature, initial concentrations and contact time on adsorption of Co2+ by APTES-Mt was evaluated. The results indicated that adsorption of Co2+ onto Ca-Mt, APTES1.0CEC-Mt and APTES2.0CEC-Mt can be considered to be a pseudo-second-order process. In contrast, adsorption of Co2+ onto APTES3.0CEC-Mt and APTES4.0CEC-Mt fitted well with the pseudo-first-order kinetics. The adsorption isotherms were described by the Langmuir model, and the maximum adsorption capacities of APTES1.0CEC-Mt, APTES2.0CEC-Mt, APTES3.0CEC-Mt and APTES4.0CEC-Mt were 25.1, 33.8, 61.6, and 61.9 mg·g-1, respectively. In addition, reaction temperature had no impact on the adsorption capacity, while both the pH and ionic strength significantly affected the adsorption process. A synergistic effect of ion exchange and coordination interactions on adsorption was observed, thereby leading to a significant enhancement of Co2+ adsorption by the composites. Thus, APTES-Mt could be a cost-effective and environmental-friendly adsorbent, with potential for treating Co2+-rich wastewater.

  3. Efficient Removal of Co2+ from Aqueous Solution by 3-Aminopropyltriethoxysilane Functionalized Montmorillonite with Enhanced Adsorption Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhujian; Gong, Beini; Dai, Yaping; Chiang, Pen-Chi; Lai, Xiaolin; Yu, Guangwei

    2016-01-01

    To achieve a satisfactory removal efficiency of heavy metal ions from wastewater, silane-functionalized montmorillonite with abundant ligand-binding sites (-NH2) was synthesized as an efficient adsorbent. Ca-montmorillonite (Ca-Mt) was functionalized with 3-aminopropyl triethoxysilane (APTES) to obtain the APTES-Mt products (APTES1.0CEC-Mt, APTES2.0CEC-Mt, APTES3.0CEC-Mt, APTES4.0CEC-Mt) with enhanced adsorption capacity for Co2+. The physico-chemical properties of the synthesized adsorbents were characterized by spectroscopic and microscopic methods, and the results demonstrated that APTES was successfully intercalated into the gallery of Ca-Mt or grafted onto the surface of Ca-Mt through Si-O bonds. The effect of solution pH, ionic strength, temperature, initial concentrations and contact time on adsorption of Co2+ by APTES-Mt was evaluated. The results indicated that adsorption of Co2+ onto Ca-Mt, APTES1.0CEC-Mt and APTES2.0CEC-Mt can be considered to be a pseudo-second-order process. In contrast, adsorption of Co2+ onto APTES3.0CEC-Mt and APTES4.0CEC-Mt fitted well with the pseudo-first-order kinetics. The adsorption isotherms were described by the Langmuir model, and the maximum adsorption capacities of APTES1.0CEC-Mt, APTES2.0CEC-Mt, APTES3.0CEC-Mt and APTES4.0CEC-Mt were 25.1, 33.8, 61.6, and 61.9 mg·g-1, respectively. In addition, reaction temperature had no impact on the adsorption capacity, while both the pH and ionic strength significantly affected the adsorption process. A synergistic effect of ion exchange and coordination interactions on adsorption was observed, thereby leading to a significant enhancement of Co2+ adsorption by the composites. Thus, APTES-Mt could be a cost-effective and environmental-friendly adsorbent, with potential for treating Co2+-rich wastewater. PMID:27448094

  4. Textural characterization of native and n-alky-bonded silica monoliths by mercury intrusion/extrusion, inverse size exclusion chromatography and nitrogen adsorption.

    PubMed

    Thommes, M; Skudas, R; Unger, K K; Lubda, D

    2008-05-16

    Native and n-alkyl-bonded (n-octadecyl) monolithic silica rods with mesopores in the range between 10 and 25 nm and macropores in the range between 1.8 and 6.0 microm were examined by mercury intrusion/extrusion, inverse size exclusion chromatography (ISEC) and nitrogen sorption. Our results reveal very good agreement for the mesopore size distribution obtained from nitrogen adsorption (in combination with an advanced NLDFT analysis) and ISEC. Our studies highlight the importance of mercury porosimetry for the assessment of the macropore size distribution and show that mercury porosimetry is the only method which allows obtaining a combined and comprehensive structural characterization of macroporous/mesoporous silica monoliths. Our data clearly confirm that mercury porosimetry hysteresis and entrapment have different origin, and indicate the intrinsic nature of mercury porosimetry hysteresis in these silica monoliths. Within this context some silica monoliths show the remarkable result of no entrapment of mercury after extrusion from the mesopore system (i.e. for the first intrusion/extrusion cycle). The results of a systematic study of the mercury intrusion/extrusion behavior into native silica monoliths and monoliths with bonded n-alkyl groups reveals that the macro (through) pore structure, which controls the mass transfer to and from the mesopores, here mainly controls the entrapment behavior. Our data suggest that mercury intrusion/extrusion porosimetry does not only allow to obtain a comprehensive pore structure analysis, but can also serve as a tool to estimate the mass transport properties of silica monoliths to be employed in liquid-phase separation processes. PMID:18423477

  5. Mercury species, selenium, metallothioneins and glutathione in two dolphins from the southeastern Brazilian coast: Mercury detoxification and physiological differences in diving capacity.

    PubMed

    Kehrig, Helena A; Hauser-Davis, Rachel A; Seixas, Tercia G; Pinheiro, Ana Beatriz; Di Beneditto, Ana Paula M

    2016-06-01

    In the present study, the concentration of trace elements, total mercury (Hg) and selenium (Se) and mercury forms (MeHg, Hginorg and HgSe) in the vulnerable coastal dolphins Pontoporia blainvillei and Sotalia guianensis were appraised and compared, using metallothioneins (MT) and glutathione (GSH) as biomarkers for trace element exposure. The trace element concentrations varied between muscle and liver tissues, with liver of all dolphin specimens showing higher Hg and Se concentrations than those found in muscle. Hg, MeHg and Hginorg molar concentrations showed a clear increase with Se molar concentrations in the liver of both dolphins, and Se concentrations were higher than those of Hg on a molar basis. Se plays a relevant role in the detoxification of MeHg in the hepatic tissue of both dolphins, forming Hg-Se amorphous crystals in liver. In contrast, MT were involved in the detoxification process of Hginorg in liver. GSH levels in P. blainvillei and S. guianensis muscle tissue suggest that these dolphins have different diving capacities. Muscle Hg concentrations were associated to this tripeptide, which protects dolphin cells against Hg stress. PMID:27038210

  6. Protein adsorption to poly(ethylenimine)-modified Sepharose FF: I. a critical ionic capacity for drastically enhanced capacity and uptake kinetics.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lin-Ling; Tao, Shi-Peng; Dong, Xiao-Yan; Sun, Yan

    2013-08-30

    To explore the details of protein uptake to polymer-grafted ion exchangers, Sepharose FF was modified with poly(ethylenimine) (PEI) to prepare anion exchanger of 10 different ionic capacities (ICs, 100-1220mmol/L). Adsorption equilibria and kinetics of bovine serum albumin (BSA) were then studied. It is found that ionic capacity, i.e., the coupling density of PEI, had significant effect on both adsorption capacity (qm) and effective protein diffusivity (De). With increasing ionic capacity, the qm value increased rapidly at IC<260mmol/L and then increased slowly till reaching a plateau at IC=600mmol/L. In the IC range of 100-600mmol/L, however, the De values kept at a low level (De/D0<0.07); it first decreased from 0.05±0.01 at IC=100mmol/L to 0.01±0.01 at IC=260mmol/L and then increased to 0.06±0.01 at IC=600mmol/L. Thereafter, sharp increases of the qm and De values [36% (from 201 to 273mg/mL) and 670% (from 0.06±0.01 to 0.49±0.04), respectively] were observed in the narrow range of IC from 600 to 740mmol/L. Finally, at IC>740mmol/L, the qm value decreased significantly while the De value increased moderately with increasing the IC. The results indicate that PEI chains played an important role in protein adsorption and transport. In brief, there was a critical IC (cIC) or PEI chain density, above which protein adsorption and transport behaviors changed drastically. The cIC was identified to be about 600mmol/L. Estimation of PEI grafting-layer thickness suggests that PEI chains formed an extended three-dimensional grafting-layer at IC>cIC, which provided high flexibility as well as accessibility of the chains for protein binding. Therefore, at IC>cIC, the adjacent PEI chains became close and flexible enough, leading to facilitated transport of adsorbed protein molecules by the interactions of neighboring chains mediated by the bound molecules. It is regarded as "chain delivery" effect. At the same time, improved accessibility of binding sites led the

  7. Effect of different carbon nanotubes on cadmium toxicity to Daphnia magna: The role of catalyst impurities and adsorption capacity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinghao; Qu, Ruijuan; Liu, Jiaoqin; Wei, Zhongbo; Wang, Liansheng; Yang, Shaogui; Huang, Qingguo; Wang, Zunyao

    2016-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of four different carbon nanotubes single- and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs and MWCNTs) and hydroxylated and carboxylated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (OH-MWCNTs and COOH-MWCNTs) on Cd toxicity to the aquatic organism Daphnia magna. The acute toxicity results indicated that all CNTs could enhance the toxicity of Cd to D. magna. Furthermore, the filtrate toxicity and adsorption tests showed that the toxicity-increasing effect of SWCNTs and MWCNTs in the overall system was mainly caused by catalysts impurities from the pristine CNTs, whereas the greater adsorption of Cd onto OH-MWCNTs (30.52 mg/g) and COOH-MWCNTs (24.93 mg/g) was the key factor contributing to the enhanced toxicity. This result raised a concern that the metal catalyst impurities, adsorption capacities, and accumulation of waterborne CNTs were responsible for the toxicity of Cd to aquatic organism.

  8. Determination of the Antiretroviral Drug Acyclovir in Diluted Alkaline Electrolyte by Adsorptive Stripping Voltammetry at the Mercury Film Electrode

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Arnaldo Aguiar; Cordoves, Ana Isa Perez; Farias, Percio Augusto Mardini

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a stripping method for the determination of acyclovir at the submicromolar concentration level. This method is based on controlled adsorptive accumulation of acyclovir at thin-film mercury electrode, followed by a linear cyclic scan voltammetry measurement of the surface species. Optimal experimental conditions include a NaOH solution of 2.0 × 10−3 mol L−1 (supporting electrolyte), an accumulation potential of −0.40 V, and a scan rate of 100 mV s−1. The response of acyclovir is linear over the concentration range 0.02 to 0.12 ppm. For an accumulation time of 4 minutes, the detection limit was found to be 0.42 ppb (1.0 × 10−9 mol L−1). More convenient methods to measure the acyclovir in presence of the didanosine, efavirenz, nevirapine, nelfinavir, lamivudine, and zidovudine were also investigated. The utility of this method is demonstrated by the presence of acyclovir together with Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) or DNA. PMID:23761958

  9. Determination of Xanthine in the Presence of Hypoxanthine by Adsorptive Stripping Voltammetry at the Mercury Film Electrode

    PubMed Central

    Farias, Percio Augusto Mardini; Castro, Arnaldo Aguiar

    2014-01-01

    A stripping method for the determination of xanthine in the presence of hypoxanthine at the submicromolar concentration levels is described. The method is based on controlled adsorptive accumulation at the thin-film mercury electrode followed by a fast linear scan voltammetric measurement of the surface species. Optimum experimental conditions were found to be the use of 1.0 × 10−3 mol L−1 NaOH solution as supporting electrolyte, an accumulation potential of 0.00 V for xanthine and −0.50 V for hypoxanthine–copper, and a linear scan rate of 200 mV second−1. The response of xanthine is linear over the concentration ranges of 20–140 ppb. For an accumulation time of 30 minutes, the detection limit was found to be 36 ppt (2.3 × 10−10 mol L−1). Adequate conditions for measuring the xanthine in the presence of hypoxanthine, copper and other metals, uric acid, and other nitrogenated bases were also investigated. The utility of the method is demonstrated by the presence of xanthine associated with hypoxanthine, uric acid, nitrogenated bases, ATP, and ssDNA. PMID:24940040

  10. Characterization of the cation-binding capacity of a potassium-adsorption filter used in red blood cell transfusion.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takao; Muto, Shigeaki; Miyata, Yukio; Maeda, Takao; Odate, Takayuki; Shimanaka, Kimio; Kusano, Eiji

    2015-06-01

    A K(+) -adsorption filter was developed to exchange K(+) in the supernatant of stored irradiated red blood cells with Na(+) . To date, however, the filter's adsorption capacity for K(+) has not been fully evaluated. Therefore, we characterized the cation-binding capacity of this filter. Artificial solutions containing various cations were continuously passed through the filter in 30 mL of sodium polystyrene sulfonate at 10 mL/min using an infusion pump at room temperature. The cation concentrations were measured before and during filtration. When a single solution containing K(+) , Li(+) , H(+) , Mg(2+) , Ca(2+) , or Al(3+) was continuously passed through the filter, the filter adsorbed K(+) and the other cations in exchange for Na(+) in direct proportion to the valence number. The order of affinity for cation adsorption to the filter was Ca(2+) >Mg(2+) >K(+) >H(+) >Li(+) . In K(+) -saturated conditions, the filter also adsorbed Na(+) . After complete adsorption of these cations on the filter, their concentration in the effluent increased in a sigmoidal manner over time. Cations that were bound to the filter were released if a second cation was passed through the filter, despite the different affinities of the two cations. The ability of the filter to bind cations, especially K(+) , should be helpful when it is used for red blood cell transfusion at the bedside. The filter may also be useful to gain a better understanding of the pharmacological properties of sodium polystyrene sulfonate.

  11. Novel hollow microspheres of hierarchical zinc-aluminum layered double hydroxides and their enhanced adsorption capacity for phosphate in water.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jiabin; Yang, Siliang; Yu, Jiaguo; Shu, Zhan

    2011-09-15

    Hollow microspheres of hierarchical Zn-Al layered double hydroxides (LDHs) were synthesized by a simple hydrothermal method using urea as precipitating agent. The morphology and microstructure of the as-prepared samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms and fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. It was found that the morphology of hierarchical Zn-Al LDHs can be tuned from irregular platelets to hollow microspheres by simply varying concentrations of urea. The effects of initial phosphate concentration and contact time on phosphate adsorption using various Zn-Al LDHs and their calcined products (LDOs) were investigated from batch tests. Our results indicate that the equilibrium adsorption data were best fitted by Langmuir isothermal model, with the maximum adsorption capacity of 54.1-232 mg/g; adsorption kinetics follows the pseudo-second-order kinetic equation and intra-particle diffusion model. In addition, Zn-Al LDOs are shown to be effective adsorbents for removing phosphate from aqueous solutions due to their hierarchical porous structures and high specific surface areas.

  12. Predicting CH4 adsorption capacity of microporous carbon using N2 isotherm and a new analytical model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sun, Jielun; Chen, S.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Rood, M.J.

    1998-01-01

    A new analytical pore size distribution (PSD) model was developed to predict CH4 adsorption (storage) capacity of microporous adsorbent carbon. The model is based on a 3-D adsorption isotherm equation, derived from statistical mechanical principles. Least squares error minimization is used to solve the PSD without any pre-assumed distribution function. In comparison with several well-accepted analytical methods from the literature, this 3-D model offers relatively realistic PSD description for select reference materials, including activated carbon fibers. N2 and CH4 adsorption data were correlated using the 3-D model for commercial carbons BPL and AX-21. Predicted CH4 adsorption isotherms, based on N2 adsorption at 77 K, were in reasonable agreement with the experimental CH4 isotherms. Modeling results indicate that not all the pores contribute the same percentage Vm/Vs for CH4 storage due to different adsorbed CH4 densities. Pores near 8-9 A?? shows higher Vm/Vs on the equivalent volume basis than does larger pores.

  13. Hydrogen adsorption capacity of adatoms on double carbon vacancies of graphene: A trend study from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fair, K. M.; Cui, X. Y.; Li, L.; Shieh, C. C.; Zheng, R. K.; Liu, Z. W.; Delley, B.; Ford, M. J.; Ringer, S. P.; Stampfl, C.

    2013-01-01

    Structural stability and hydrogen adsorption capacity are two key quantities in evaluating the potential of metal-adatom decorated graphene for hydrogen storage and related devices. We have carried out extensive density functional theory calculations for the adsorption of hydrogen molecules on 12 different adatom (Ag, Au, Ca, Li, Mg, Pd, Pt, Sc, Sr, Ti, Y, and Zr) decorated graphene surfaces where the adatoms are found to be stabilized on double carbon vacancies, thus overcoming the “clustering problem” that occurs for adatoms on pristine graphene. Ca and Sr are predicted to bind the greatest number, namely six, of H2 molecules. We find an interesting correlation between the hydrogen capacity and the change of charge distribution with increasing H2 adsorption, where Ca, Li, Mg, Sc, Ti, Y, Sr, and Zr adatoms are partial electron donors and Ag, Au, Pd, and Pt are partial electron acceptors. The “18-electron rule” for predicting maximum hydrogen capacity is found not to be a reliable indicator for these systems.

  14. Adsorption of Pb(II) on mesoporous activated carbons fabricated from water hyacinth using H3PO4 activation: Adsorption capacity, kinetic and isotherm studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yang; Li, Shunxing; Chen, Jianhua; Zhang, Xueliang; Chen, Yiping

    2014-02-01

    Activated carbons with high mesoporosity and abundant oxygen-containing functional groups were prepared from water hyacinth using H3PO4 activation (WHAC) to eliminate Pb(II) in water. Characterizations of the WHAC were performed using Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The BET analysis showed that WHAC possesses a high mesoporosity (93.9%) with a BET surface area of 423.6 m2/g. The presence of oxygen-containing functional groups including hydroxyl, carbonyl, carboxyl and phosphate groups renders the WHAC a favorable adsorbent for Pb(II) with the maximum monolayer capacity (qm) 118.8 mg/g. The adsorption behavior follows pseudo-first order kinetic and Langmuir isotherm. The desorption study demonstrated that the WHAC could be readily regenerated using 0.1 M HCl (pH = 1.0). The desorbed WHAC could be reused at least six times without significant adsorption capacity reduction. The adsorption process was spontaneous and endothermic with ΔG (-0.27, -1.13, -3.02, -3.62, -5.54, and -9.31 kJ/mol) and ΔH (38.72 kJ/mol). Under the optimized conditions, a small amount of the adsorbent (1.0 g/L) could remove as much as 90.1% of Pb(II) (50 mg/L) in 20 min at pH 6.0 and temperature of 298 K. Therefore, the WHAC has a great potential to be an economical and efficient adsorbent in the treatment of lead-contaminated water.

  15. Effects of Igneous Intrusion on Microporosity and Gas Adsorption Capacity of Coals in the Haizi Mine, China

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the effects of igneous intrusions on pore structure and adsorption capacity of the Permian coals in the Huaibei Coalfield, China. Twelve coal samples were obtained at different distances from a ~120 m extremely thick sill. Comparisons were made between unaltered and heat-affected coals using geochemical data, pore-fracture characteristics, and adsorption properties. Thermal alteration occurs down to ~1.3 × sill thickness. Approaching the sill, the vitrinite reflectance (Ro) increased from 2.30% to 2.78%, forming devolatilization vacuoles and a fine mosaic texture. Volatile matter (VM) decreased from 17.6% to 10.0% and the moisture decreased from 3.0% to 1.6%. With decreasing distance to the sill, the micropore volumes initially increased from 0.0054 cm3/g to a maximum of 0.0146 cm3/g and then decreased to 0.0079 cm3/g. The results show that the thermal evolution of the sill obviously changed the coal geochemistry and increased the micropore volume and adsorption capacity of heat-affected coal (60–160 m from the sill) compared with the unaltered coals. The trap effect of the sill prevented the high-pressure gas from being released, forming gas pocket. Mining activities near the sill created a low pressure zone leading to the rapid accumulation of methane and gas outbursts in the Haizi Mine. PMID:24723841

  16. Effects of igneous intrusion on microporosity and gas adsorption capacity of coals in the Haizi Mine, China.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jingyu; Cheng, Yuanping

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the effects of igneous intrusions on pore structure and adsorption capacity of the Permian coals in the Huaibei Coalfield, China. Twelve coal samples were obtained at different distances from a ~120 m extremely thick sill. Comparisons were made between unaltered and heat-affected coals using geochemical data, pore-fracture characteristics, and adsorption properties. Thermal alteration occurs down to ~1.3 × sill thickness. Approaching the sill, the vitrinite reflectance (R(o)) increased from 2.30% to 2.78%, forming devolatilization vacuoles and a fine mosaic texture. Volatile matter (VM) decreased from 17.6% to 10.0% and the moisture decreased from 3.0% to 1.6%. With decreasing distance to the sill, the micropore volumes initially increased from 0.0054 cm(3)/g to a maximum of 0.0146 cm(3)/g and then decreased to 0.0079 cm(3)/g. The results show that the thermal evolution of the sill obviously changed the coal geochemistry and increased the micropore volume and adsorption capacity of heat-affected coal (60-160 m from the sill) compared with the unaltered coals. The trap effect of the sill prevented the high-pressure gas from being released, forming gas pocket. Mining activities near the sill created a low pressure zone leading to the rapid accumulation of methane and gas outbursts in the Haizi Mine.

  17. Effects of igneous intrusion on microporosity and gas adsorption capacity of coals in the Haizi Mine, China.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jingyu; Cheng, Yuanping

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the effects of igneous intrusions on pore structure and adsorption capacity of the Permian coals in the Huaibei Coalfield, China. Twelve coal samples were obtained at different distances from a ~120 m extremely thick sill. Comparisons were made between unaltered and heat-affected coals using geochemical data, pore-fracture characteristics, and adsorption properties. Thermal alteration occurs down to ~1.3 × sill thickness. Approaching the sill, the vitrinite reflectance (R(o)) increased from 2.30% to 2.78%, forming devolatilization vacuoles and a fine mosaic texture. Volatile matter (VM) decreased from 17.6% to 10.0% and the moisture decreased from 3.0% to 1.6%. With decreasing distance to the sill, the micropore volumes initially increased from 0.0054 cm(3)/g to a maximum of 0.0146 cm(3)/g and then decreased to 0.0079 cm(3)/g. The results show that the thermal evolution of the sill obviously changed the coal geochemistry and increased the micropore volume and adsorption capacity of heat-affected coal (60-160 m from the sill) compared with the unaltered coals. The trap effect of the sill prevented the high-pressure gas from being released, forming gas pocket. Mining activities near the sill created a low pressure zone leading to the rapid accumulation of methane and gas outbursts in the Haizi Mine. PMID:24723841

  18. A theoretical and experimental study on the P-adsorption capacity of Phoslock™

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamparas, Miltiadis; Gavriil, Gavriil; Coutelieris, Frank A.; Zacharias, Ierotheos

    2015-04-01

    The main objective of this study is to investigate the adsorption process from both experimental and modeling point of view of phosphate onto Phoslock™, an increasingly used worldwide restoration tool to control phosphorus from natural water ecosystems. Bench-scale batch experiments were performed to examine its efficiency as a phosphate adsorbent and detailed simulations were carried out, allowing for a deep insight of the removal process. The adsorption efficiency calculated by the simulations is 87.41%, being in excellent agreement with that experimentally measured (approx. 87%). However, it is important to notice the discrepancy between experimental measures and simulation estimates. Although the agreement is perfect for T = 25 °C, it becomes more and more poor as temperature decreases, approaching approx. 10% difference for the low temperature of 10 °C. This inconsistency between experiments and model can be attributed to the internal inefficiencies of unit cell approach, which in particular overestimates the adsorption efficiency.

  19. Age-dependent degradation of the protein adsorption capacity of titanium.

    PubMed

    Hori, N; Att, W; Ueno, T; Sato, N; Yamada, M; Saruwatari, L; Suzuki, T; Ogawa, T

    2009-07-01

    Reported bone-implant contact percentages are far below the ideal 100%. We tested a hypothesis that the protein adsorption capability of titanium, which is critical to the process of osseointegration, changes over time before its use. Machined, acid-etched, and sandblasted surfaces were prepared and stored under dark ambient conditions for 3 days, 1 week, or 4 weeks. For all surfaces, protein adsorption decreased as the storage time increased, and their decreasing rates were dependent on titanium topography. After 4 weeks, the amounts of albumin and fibronectin adsorbed by the acid-etched surface were only 20% and 35%, respectively, of that adsorbed by the fresh surface after 2 hours of incubation, and remained substantially low even after 24 hours. This time-dependent degradation in protein adsorption of titanium correlated with its naturally decreasing hydrophilicity, which was not observed for the nickel and chromium surfaces, indicating a titanium-specific biological aging.

  20. Method and apparatus for sampling atmospheric mercury

    DOEpatents

    Trujillo, Patricio E.; Campbell, Evan E.; Eutsler, Bernard C.

    1976-01-20

    A method of simultaneously sampling particulate mercury, organic mercurial vapors, and metallic mercury vapor in the working and occupational environment and determining the amount of mercury derived from each such source in the sampled air. A known volume of air is passed through a sampling tube containing a filter for particulate mercury collection, a first adsorber for the selective adsorption of organic mercurial vapors, and a second adsorber for the adsorption of metallic mercury vapor. Carbon black molecular sieves are particularly useful as the selective adsorber for organic mercurial vapors. The amount of mercury adsorbed or collected in each section of the sampling tube is readily quantitatively determined by flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometry.

  1. 2,4-D adsorption to biochars: effect of preparation conditions on equilibrium adsorption capacity and comparison with commercial activated carbon literature data.

    PubMed

    Kearns, J P; Wellborn, L S; Summers, R S; Knappe, D R U

    2014-10-01

    Batch isotherm experiments were conducted with chars to study adsorption of the herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D). Chars generated from corncobs, bamboo and wood chips in a laboratory pyrolyzer at 400-700 °C were compared with traditional kiln charcoals collected from villages in S/SE Asia and with activated carbons (ACs). 2,4-D uptake by laboratory chars obtained from bamboo and wood chips after 14 h of pyrolysis at 700 °C, from wood chips after 96 h of pyrolysis at 600 °C, and one of the field-collected chars (basudha) was comparable to ACs. H:C and O:C ratios declined with pyrolysis temperature and duration while surface area increased to >500 m(2)/g. Increasing pyrolysis intensity by increasing temperature and/or duration of heating was found to positively influence adsorption capacity yield (mg(2,4-D/g(feedstock))) over the range of conditions studied. Economic analysis showed that high temperature chars can be a cost-effective alternative to ACs for water treatment applications.

  2. 2,4-D adsorption to biochars: effect of preparation conditions on equilibrium adsorption capacity and comparison with commercial activated carbon literature data.

    PubMed

    Kearns, J P; Wellborn, L S; Summers, R S; Knappe, D R U

    2014-10-01

    Batch isotherm experiments were conducted with chars to study adsorption of the herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D). Chars generated from corncobs, bamboo and wood chips in a laboratory pyrolyzer at 400-700 °C were compared with traditional kiln charcoals collected from villages in S/SE Asia and with activated carbons (ACs). 2,4-D uptake by laboratory chars obtained from bamboo and wood chips after 14 h of pyrolysis at 700 °C, from wood chips after 96 h of pyrolysis at 600 °C, and one of the field-collected chars (basudha) was comparable to ACs. H:C and O:C ratios declined with pyrolysis temperature and duration while surface area increased to >500 m(2)/g. Increasing pyrolysis intensity by increasing temperature and/or duration of heating was found to positively influence adsorption capacity yield (mg(2,4-D/g(feedstock))) over the range of conditions studied. Economic analysis showed that high temperature chars can be a cost-effective alternative to ACs for water treatment applications. PMID:24934321

  3. Preparation of porous diatomite-templated carbons with large adsorption capacity and mesoporous zeolite K-H as a byproduct.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dong; Yuan, Weiwei; Deng, Liangliang; Yu, Wenbin; Sun, Hongjuan; Yuan, Peng

    2014-06-15

    In this study, KOH activation was performed to enhance the porosity of the diatomite-templated carbon and to increase its adsorption capacity of methylene blue (MB). In addition to serving as the activation agent, KOH was also used as the etchant to remove the diatomite templates. Zeolite K-H was synthesized as a byproduct via utilization of the resultant silicon- and potassium-containing solutions created from the KOH etching of the diatomite templates. The obtained diatomite-based carbons were composed of macroporous carbon pillars and tubes, which were derived from the replication of the diatomite templates and were well preserved after KOH activation. The abundant micropores in the walls of the carbon pillars and tubes were derived from the break and reconfiguration of carbon films during both the removal of the diatomite templates and KOH activation. Compared with the original diatomite-templated carbons and CO2-activated carbons, the KOH-activated carbons had much higher specific surface areas (988 m(2)/g) and pore volumes (0.675 cm(3)/g). Moreover, the KOH-activated carbons possessed larger MB adsorption capacity (the maximum Langmuir adsorption capacity: 645.2 mg/g) than those of the original carbons and CO2-activated carbons. These results showed that KOH activation was a high effective activation method. The zeolite K-H byproduct was obtained by utilizing the silicon- and potassium-containing solution as the silicon and potassium sources. The zeolite exhibited a stick-like morphology and possessed nanosized particles with a mesopore-predominant porous structure which was observed by TEM for the first time.

  4. KINETIC STUDY OF ADSORPTION AND TRANSFORMATION OF MERCURY ON FLY ASH PARTICLES IN AN ENTRAINED FLOW REACTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Experimental studies were performed to investigate the interactions of elemental mercury vapor with entrained fly ash particles from coal combustion in a flow reactor. The rate of transformation of elemental mercury on fly ash particles was evauated over the temperature range fro...

  5. PREDICTING THE ADSORPTION CAPACITY OF ACTIVATED CARBON FOR ORGANIC CONTAMINANTS FROM ADSORBENT AND ADSORBATE PROPERTIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) was developed and combined with the Polanyi-Dubinin-Manes model to predict adsorption isotherms of emerging contaminants on activated carbons with a wide range of physico-chemical properties. Affinity coefficients (βl

  6. Development of dry control technology for emissions of mercury in flue gas

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Hann S.; Wu, Jiann M.; Livengood, C.D.

    1995-06-01

    In flue gases from coal-combustion systems, mercury in either the elemental state or its chloride form (HgCl{sub 2}) can be predominant among all the possible mercury species present; this predominance largely depends on the chlorine-to-mercury ratio in the coal feeds. Conventional flue-gas cleanup technologies are moderately effective in controlling HgCl{sub 2} but are very poor at controlling elemental mercury. Experiments were conducted on the removal of elemental mercury vapor by means of a number of different types of sorbents, using a fixed-bed adsorption system. Of the four commercial activated carbons evaluated, the sulfur-treated carbon sample gives the best removal performance, with good mercury-sorption capacities. Promising removal results also have been obtained with low-cost minerals after chemical treatments. These inorganic sorbents could potentially be developed into a cost-effective alternative to activated carbons for mercury removal.

  7. Evaluation of phosphorus adsorption capacity of sesame straw biochar on aqueous solution: influence of activation methods and pyrolysis temperatures.

    PubMed

    Park, J H; Ok, Y S; Kim, S H; Cho, J S; Heo, J S; Delaune, R D; Seo, D C

    2015-12-01

    The phosphorus (P) adsorption characteristic of sesame straw biochar prepared with different activation agents and pyrolysis temperatures was evaluated. Between 0.109 and 0.300 mg L(-1) in the form of inorganic phosphate was released from raw sesame straw biochar in the first 1 h. The release of phosphate was significantly enhanced from 62.6 to 168.2 mg g(-1) as the pyrolysis temperature increased. Therefore, sesame straw biochar cannot be used as an adsorbent for P removal without change in the physicochemical characteristics. To increase the P adsorption of biochar in aqueous solution, various activation agents and pyrolysis temperatures were applied. The amount of P adsorbed from aqueous solution by biochar activated using different activation agents appeared in the order ZnCl2 (9.675 mg g(-1)) > MgO (8.669 mg g(-1)) ⋙ 0.1N-HCl > 0.1N-H2SO4 > K2SO4 ≥ KOH ≥ 0.1N-H3PO4, showing ZnCl2 to be the optimum activation agent. Higher P was adsorbed by the biochar activated using ZnCl2 under different pyrolysis temperatures in the order 600 °C > 500 °C > 400 °C > 300 °C. Finally, the amount of adsorbed P by activated biochar at different ratios of biochar to ZnCl2 appeared in the order 1:3 ≒ 1:1 > 3:1. As a result, the optimum ratio of biochar to ZnCl2 and pyrolysis temperature were found to be 1:1 and 600 °C for P adsorption, respectively. The maximum P adsorption capacity by activated biochar using ZnCl2 (15,460 mg kg(-1)) was higher than that of typical biochar, as determined by the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Therefore, the ZnCl2 activation of sesame straw biochar was suitable for the preparation of activated biochar for P adsorption.

  8. Synthesis, characterisation and methyl orange adsorption capacity of ferric oxide-biochar nano-composites derived from pulp and paper sludge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaukura, Nhamo; Murimba, Edna C.; Gwenzi, Willis

    2016-02-01

    A Fe2O3-biochar nano-composite (Fe2O3-BC) was prepared from FeCl3-impregnated pulp and paper sludge (PPS) by pyrolysis at 750 °C. The characteristics and methyl orange (MO) adsorption capacity of Fe2O3-BC were compared to that of unactivated biochar (BC). X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) confirmed the composite material was nano-sized. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy revealed the presence of hydroxyl and aromatic groups on BC and on Fe2O3-BC, but Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area and Barrett-Joyner-Halenda (BJH) porosity were lower for Fe2O3-BC than BC. Despite the lower BET surface area and porosity of Fe2O3-BC, its MO adsorption capacity was 52.79 % higher than that of BC. The equilibrium adsorption data were best represented by the Freundlich model with a maximum adsorption capacity of 20.53 mg g-1 at pH 8 and 30 min contact time. MO adsorption obeyed pseudo-second-order kinetics for both BC and Fe2O3-BC with R 2 values of 0.996 and 0.999, respectively. Higher MO adsorption capacity for Fe2O3-BC was attributed to the hybrid nature of the nano-composites; adsorption occurred on both biochar matrix and Fe2O3 nanocrystals. Gibbs free energy calculations confirmed the adsorption is energetically favourable and spontaneous with a high preference for adsorption on both adsorbents. The nano-composite can be used for the efficient removal of MO (>97 %) from contaminated wastewater.

  9. Determination of coalbed methane potential and gas adsorption capacity in Western Kentucky coals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mardon, S.M.; Takacs, K.G.; Hower, J.C.; Eble, C.F.; Mastalerz, Maria

    2006-01-01

    The Illinois Basin has not been developed for Coalbed Methane (CBM) production. It is imperative to determine both gas content and other parameters for the Kentucky portion of the Illinois Basin if exploration is to progress and production is to occur in this area. This research is part of a larger project being conducted by the Kentucky Geological Survey to evaluate the CBM production of Pennsylvanian-age western Kentucky coals in Ohio, Webster, and Union counties using methane adsorption isotherms, direct gas desorption measurements, and chemical analyses of coal and gas. This research will investigate relationships between CBM potential and petrographic, surface area, pore size, and gas adsorption isotherm analyses of the coals. Maceral and reflectance analyses are being conducted at the Center for Applied Energy Research. At the Indiana Geological Survey, the surface area and pore size of the coals will be analyzed using a Micrometrics ASAP 2020, and the CO2 isotherm analyses will be conducted using a volumetric adsorption apparatus in a water temperature bath. The aforementioned analyses will be used to determine site specific correlations for the Kentucky part of the Illinois Basin. The data collected will be compared with previous work in the Illinois Basin and will be correlated with data and structural features in the basin. Gas composition and carbon and hydrogen isotopic data suggest mostly thermogenic origin of coalbed gas in coals from Webster and Union Counties, Kentucky, in contrast to the dominantly biogenic character of coalbed gas in Ohio County, Kentucky.

  10. Synthesis of bilayer MoS{sub 2} nanosheets by a facile hydrothermal method and their methyl orange adsorption capacity

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Lijuan; Xu, Haiyan; Zhang, Dingke; Chen, Shijian

    2014-07-01

    Highlights: • Hexagonal phase of MoS{sub 2} nanosheets was synthesized by a facile hydrothermal method. • FE-SEM and TEM images show the sheets-like morphology of MoS{sub 2}. • Bilayer MoS{sub 2} can be grown under the optimized mole ratio of 2:1 of S:Mo at 180 °C for 50 h. • The MoS{sub 2} nanosheets possess high methyl orange adsorption capacity due to the large surface area. - Abstract: Molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}) nanosheets have received significant attention recently due to the potential applications for exciting physics and technology. Here we show that MoS{sub 2} nanosheets can be prepared by a facile hydrothermal method. The study of the properties of the MoS{sub 2} nanosheets prepared at different conditions suggests that the mole ratio of precursors and hydrothermal time significantly influences the purity, crystalline quality and thermal stability of MoS{sub 2}. X-ray diffraction, Raman spectra and transmission electron microscopy results indicate that bilayer MoS{sub 2} can be grown under an optimized mole ratio of 2:1 of S:Mo at 180 °C for 50 h. Moreover, such ultrathin nanosheets exhibit a prominent photoluminescence and possess high methyl orange adsorption capacity due to the large surface area, which can be potentially used in photodevice and photochemical catalyst.

  11. Zeolite Y Adsorbents with High Vapor Uptake Capacity and Robust Cycling Stability for Potential Applications in Advanced Adsorption Heat Pumps.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiansen; Narayanan, Shankar; Michaelis, Vladimir K; Ong, Ta-Chung; Keeler, Eric G; Kim, Hyunho; McKay, Ian S; Griffin, Robert G; Wang, Evelyn N

    2015-01-01

    Modular and compact adsorption heat pumps (AHPs) promise an energy-efficient alternative to conventional vapor compression based heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems. A key element in the advancement of AHPs is the development of adsorbents with high uptake capacity, fast intracrystalline diffusivity and durable hydrothermal stability. Herein, the ion exchange of NaY zeolites with ingoing Mg(2+) ions is systematically studied to maximize the ion exchange degree (IED) for improved sorption performance. It is found that beyond an ion exchange threshold of 64.1%, deeper ion exchange does not benefit water uptake capacity or characteristic adsorption energy, but does enhance the vapor diffusivity. In addition to using water as an adsorbate, the uptake properties of Mg,Na-Y zeolites were investigated using 20 wt.% MeOH aqueous solution as a novel anti-freeze adsorbate, revealing that the MeOH additive has an insignificant influence on the overall sorption performance. We also demonstrated that the labscale synthetic scalability is robust, and that the tailored zeolites scarcely suffer from hydrothermal stability even after successive 108-fold adsorption/desorption cycles. The samples were analyzed using N2 sorption, (27)Al/(29)Si MAS NMR spectroscopy, ICP-AES, dynamic vapor sorption, SEM, Fick's 2(nd) law and D-R equation regressions. Among these, close examination of sorption isotherms for H2O and N2 adsorbates allows us to decouple and extract some insightful information underlying the complex water uptake phenomena. This work shows the promising performance of our modified zeolites that can be integrated into various AHP designs for buildings, electronics, and transportation applications.

  12. Zeolite Y Adsorbents with High Vapor Uptake Capacity and Robust Cycling Stability for Potential Applications in Advanced Adsorption Heat Pumps.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiansen; Narayanan, Shankar; Michaelis, Vladimir K; Ong, Ta-Chung; Keeler, Eric G; Kim, Hyunho; McKay, Ian S; Griffin, Robert G; Wang, Evelyn N

    2015-01-01

    Modular and compact adsorption heat pumps (AHPs) promise an energy-efficient alternative to conventional vapor compression based heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems. A key element in the advancement of AHPs is the development of adsorbents with high uptake capacity, fast intracrystalline diffusivity and durable hydrothermal stability. Herein, the ion exchange of NaY zeolites with ingoing Mg(2+) ions is systematically studied to maximize the ion exchange degree (IED) for improved sorption performance. It is found that beyond an ion exchange threshold of 64.1%, deeper ion exchange does not benefit water uptake capacity or characteristic adsorption energy, but does enhance the vapor diffusivity. In addition to using water as an adsorbate, the uptake properties of Mg,Na-Y zeolites were investigated using 20 wt.% MeOH aqueous solution as a novel anti-freeze adsorbate, revealing that the MeOH additive has an insignificant influence on the overall sorption performance. We also demonstrated that the labscale synthetic scalability is robust, and that the tailored zeolites scarcely suffer from hydrothermal stability even after successive 108-fold adsorption/desorption cycles. The samples were analyzed using N2 sorption, (27)Al/(29)Si MAS NMR spectroscopy, ICP-AES, dynamic vapor sorption, SEM, Fick's 2(nd) law and D-R equation regressions. Among these, close examination of sorption isotherms for H2O and N2 adsorbates allows us to decouple and extract some insightful information underlying the complex water uptake phenomena. This work shows the promising performance of our modified zeolites that can be integrated into various AHP designs for buildings, electronics, and transportation applications. PMID:25395877

  13. Zeolite Y adsorbents with high vapor uptake capacity and robust cycling stability for potential applications in advanced adsorption heat pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Li, XS; Narayanan, S; Michaelis, VK; Ong, TC; Keeler, EG; Kim, H; Mckay, IS; Griffin, RG; Wang, EN

    2015-01-01

    Modular and compact adsorption heat pumps (AHPs) promise an energy-efficient alternative to conventional vapor compression based heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems. A key element in the advancement of AHPs is the development of adsorbents with high uptake capacity, fast intracrystalline diffusivity and durable hydrothermal stability. Herein, the ion exchange of NaY zeolites with ingoing Mg2+ ions is systematically studied to maximize the ion exchange degree (IED) for improved sorption performance. It is found that beyond an ion exchange threshold of 64.1%, deeper ion exchange does not benefit water uptake capacity or characteristic adsorption energy, but does enhance the vapor diffusivity. In addition to using water as an adsorbate, the uptake properties of Mg, Na-Y zeolites were investigated using 20 wt.% MeOH aqueous solution as a novel anti-freeze adsorbate, revealing that the MeOH additive has an insignificant influence on the overall sorption performance. We also demonstrated that the lab-scale synthetic scalability is robust, and that the tailored zeolites scarcely suffer from hydrothermal stability even after successive 108-fold adsorption/desorption cycles. The samples were analyzed using N-2 sorption, Al-27/Si-29 MAS NMR spectroscopy, ICP-AES, dynamic vapor sorption, SEM, Fick's 2nd law and D-R equation regressions. Among these, close examination of sorption isotherms for H2O and N-2 adsorbates allows us to decouple and extract some insightful information underlying the complex water uptake phenomena. This work shows the promising performance of our modified zeolites that can be integrated into various AHP designs for buildings, electronics, and transportation applications. (C) 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Zeolite Y Adsorbents with High Vapor Uptake Capacity and Robust Cycling Stability for Potential Applications in Advanced Adsorption Heat Pumps

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiansen; Narayanan, Shankar; Michaelis, Vladimir K.; Ong, Ta-Chung; Keeler, Eric G.; Kim, Hyunho; McKay, Ian S.; Griffin, Robert G.; Wang, Evelyn N.

    2014-01-01

    Modular and compact adsorption heat pumps (AHPs) promise an energy-efficient alternative to conventional vapor compression based heating, ventilation and air conditioning systems. A key element in the advancement of AHPs is the development of adsorbents with high uptake capacity, fast intracrystalline diffusivity and durable hydrothermal stability. Herein, the ion exchange of NaY zeolites with ingoing Mg2+ ions is systematically studied to maximize the ion exchange degree (IED) for improved sorption performance. It is found that beyond an ion exchange threshold of 64.1%, deeper ion exchange does not benefit water uptake capacity or characteristic adsorption energy, but does enhance the vapor diffusivity. In addition to using water as an adsorbate, the uptake properties of Mg,Na-Y zeolites were investigated using 20 wt.% MeOH aqueous solution as a novel anti-freeze adsorbate, revealing that the MeOH additive has an insignificant influence on the overall sorption performance. We also demonstrated that the labscale synthetic scalability is robust, and that the tailored zeolites scarcely suffer from hydrothermal stability even after successive 108-fold adsorption/desorption cycles. The samples were analyzed using N2 sorption, 27Al/29Si MAS NMR spectroscopy, ICP-AES, dynamic vapor sorption, SEM, Fick’s 2nd law and D-R equation regressions. Among these, close examination of sorption isotherms for H2O and N2 adsorbates allows us to decouple and extract some insightful information underlying the complex water uptake phenomena. This work shows the promising performance of our modified zeolites that can be integrated into various AHP designs for buildings, electronics, and transportation applications. PMID:25395877

  15. Fate and aqueous transport of mercury in light of the Clean Air Mercury Rule for coal-fired electric power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arzuman, Anry

    Mercury is a hazardous air pollutant emitted to the atmosphere in large amounts. Mercury emissions from electric power generation sources were estimated to be 48 metric tons/year, constituting the single largest anthropogenic source of mercury in the U.S. Settled mercury species are highly toxic contaminants of the environment. The newly issued Federal Clean Air Mercury Rule requires that the electric power plants firing coal meet the new Maximum Achievable Mercury Control Technology limit by 2018. This signifies that all of the air-phase mercury will be concentrated in solid phase which, based on the current state of the Air Pollution Control Technology, will be fly ash. Fly ash is utilized by different industries including construction industry in concrete, its products, road bases, structural fills, monifills, for solidification, stabilization, etc. Since the increase in coal combustion in the U.S. (1.6 percent/year) is much higher than the fly ash demand, large amounts of fly ash containing mercury and other trace elements are expected to accumulate in the next decades. The amount of mercury transferred from one phase to another is not a linear function of coal combustion or ash production, depends on the future states of technology, and is unknown. The amount of aqueous mercury as a function of the future removal, mercury speciation, and coal and aquifer characteristics is also unknown. This paper makes a first attempt to relate mercury concentrations in coal, flue gas, fly ash, and fly ash leachate using a single algorithm. Mercury concentrations in all phases were examined and phase transformation algorithms were derived in a form suitable for probabilistic analyses. Such important parameters used in the transformation algorithms as Soil Cation Exchange Capacity for mercury, soil mercury selectivity sequence, mercury activity coefficient, mercury retardation factor, mercury species soil adsorption ratio, and mercury Freundlich soil adsorption isotherm

  16. Separation of mercury from aqueous mercuric chloride solutions by onion skins

    SciTech Connect

    Asai, S.; Konishi, Y.; Tomisaki, H.; Nakanishi, M.

    1986-01-01

    The separation of mercury from aqueous HgCl/sub 2/ solutions by onion skins (outermost coat) was studied both experimentally and theoretically. The distribution equilibria were measured by the batchwise method. The experimental results revealed that onion skin is a useful material for separating mercury from aqueous systems. The distribution data obtained at 25/sup 0/C were analyzed by using the theory based on the law of mass action. The separation of dissolved mercury by onion skins was found to be a process accompanied by an ion-exchange reaction of the cationic complex HgCl/sup +/ and an adsorption of the neutral complex HgCl/sub 2/. The equilibrium constants of the ion-exchange and adsorption processes at 25/sup 0/C and the mercury-binding capacity of onion skins were determined. Further, it was found that the distribution equilibrium of mercury is comparatively insensitive to temperature.

  17. Biochar characteristics produced from food-processing products and their sorptive capacity for mercury and phenanthrene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fotopoulou, Kalliopi N.; Karapanagioti, Hrissi K.; Manariotis, Ioannis D.

    2015-04-01

    Various organic-rich wastes including wood chips, animal manure, and crop residues have been used for biochar production. Biochar is used as an additive to soils to sequester carbon and improve soil fertility but its use as a sorbent for environmental remediation processes is gaining increased attention. Surface properties such as point of zero charge, surface area and pore volume, surface topography, surface functional groups and acid-base behavior are important factors, which affect sorption efficiency. Understanding the surface alteration of biochars increases our understanding of the pollutant-sorbent interaction. The scope of the present work was to evaluate the effect of key characteristics of biochars on their sorptive properties. Raw materials for biochar production were evaluated including byproducts from brewering, coffee, wine, and olive oil industry. The charring process was performed at different temperatures under limited-oxygen conditions using specialized containers. The surface area, the pore volume, and the average pore size of the biochars were determined. Open surface area and micropore volume were determined using t-plot method and Harkins & Jura equation. Raw food-processing waste demonstrates low surface area that increases by 1 order of magnitude by thermal treatment up to 750oC. At temperatures from 750 up to 900oC, pyrolysis results to biochars with surface areas 210-700 m2/g. For the same temperature range, a high percentage (46 to73%) of the pore volume of the biochars is due to micropores. Positive results were obtained when high surface area biochars were tested for their ability to remove organic (i.e. phenanthrene) and inorganic (i.e. mercury) compounds from aqueous solutions. All these properties point to new materials that can effectively be used for environmental remediation.

  18. High surface-area amidoxime-based polymer fibers co-grafted with various acid monomers yielding increased adsorption capacity for the extraction of uranium from seawater.

    PubMed

    Oyola, Yatsandra; Dai, Sheng

    2016-06-01

    Uranium is dissolved in the ocean at a uniform concentration of 3.34 ppb, which translates to approximately 4-5 billion tons of uranium. The development of adsorbents that can extract uranium from seawater has been a long term goal, but the extremely dilute uranium concentration along with the competition of other metal salts (which are at higher concentrations) has hindered the development of an economical adsorption process. Several acid monomers were co-grafted with acrylonitrile (AN) to help increase the hydrophilicity of the adsorbent to improve access to the metal adsorption sites. Grafting various acid monomers on PE fibers was found to significantly affect the uranium adsorption in simulated seawater in the following order: acrylic acid (AA) < vinyl sulfonic acid (VSA) < methacrylic acid (MAA) < itaconic acid (ITA) < vinyl phosphonic acid (VPA). Interestingly, the uranium adsorption capacity significantly increased when Mohr's salt was added with acrylic acid, most likely due to the reduction of co-polymerization of the monomers. When testing under more realistic conditions, the acid-grafted PE fiber adsorbents were exposed to natural seawater (more dilute uranium), the uranium adsorption capacity increased in the following order: MAA < AA (Mohr's salt) < VSA < ITA (Mohr's salt) < ITA < VPA, which agreed well with the simulated seawater results. Characterization of the adsorbents indicated that the increase in uranium adsorption capacity with each acid monomer was related to higher grafting of AN and therefore a higher conversion to amidoxime (AO). PMID:27145863

  19. Effect of carboxyethylation degree on the adsorption capacity of Cu(II) by N-(2-carboxyethyl)chitosan from squid pens.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jun; Xie, Haihua; Ye, Hui; Xie, Tian; Lin, Yuecheng; Gong, Jinyan; Jiang, Chengjun; Wu, Yuanfeng; Liu, Shiwang; Cui, Yanli; Mao, Jianwei; Mei, Lehe

    2016-03-15

    Chitosan was prepared by N-deacetylation of squid pens β-chitin, and N-carboxyethylated chitosan (N-CECS) with different degrees of substitution (DS) were synthesized. DS values of N-CECS derivatives calculated by (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy were 0.60, 1.02 and 1.46, respectively. The adsorption capacity of Cu(II) by N-CECS correlated well with the DS and pH ranging from 3.2 to 5.8. The maximum Cu(II) adsorption capacity (qm) of all three N-CECS at pH 5.4 was 207.5mg g(-1), which was 1.4-fold higher than that of chitosan. The adsorption equilibrium process was better described by the Langmuir than Freundlich isotherm model. Adsorption of Cu(II) ion onto N-CECS followed a pseudo-second order mechanism with chemisorption as the rate-limiting step. In a ternary adsorption system, the adsorption capacity of Cu(II) by N-CECS also presented high values, and qm for Cu(II), Cd(II), and Pb(II) were 150.2, 28.8, and 187.9mg g(-1), respectively.

  20. SO 2 adsorption capacity of K 2CO 3-impregnated activated carbon as a function of K 2CO 3 content loaded by soaking and incipient wetness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortier, H.; Zelenietz, C.; Dahn, T. R.; Westreich, P.; Stevens, D. A.; Dahn, J. R.

    2007-01-01

    The SO 2 adsorption capacity of K 2CO 3-impregnated activated carbons, prepared by soaking carbon in large volumes of K 2CO 3 in solution of various concentrations, varies linearly with respect to the loading of K 2CO 3 on the carbon up to about 12% K 2CO 3 by weight. Above 12%, the capacity for SO 2 levels out and then decreases. This suggests that at high loadings the K 2CO 3 either aggregates and/or blocks pores of the activated carbon. In contrast, the adsorption capacity of carbons prepared by repeatedly (maximum of three times total) loading K 2CO 3 via incipient wetness is much larger than that of the soaked samples, up to 70% more, when the loading of K 2CO 3 is greater than 12%. Static and dynamic adsorption, DSC, SEM, EDX and incipient wetness studies of the samples show that the impregnant aggregates but does not block carbon pores.

  1. The Relative Influence of Turbulence and Turbulent Mixing on the Adsorption of Mercury within a Gas-Sorbent Suspension

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our previous investigations demonstrated that entrained flow or in-flight adsorption can be a more effective and flexible approach to trace gas adsorption than fixed sorbent beds. The present investigation establishes the turbulent mixing that accompanies sorbent injection is an ...

  2. Effects of Mn, Cu doping concentration to the properties of magnetic nanoparticles and arsenic adsorption capacity in wastewater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thi, Tran Minh; Trang, Nguyen Thi Huyen; Van Anh, Nguyen Thi

    2015-06-01

    The research results of Fe3O4 and Mn, Cu doped Fe3O4 nanomaterials synthesized by a chemical method for As(III) wastewater treatment are presented in this paper. The X-ray diffraction patterns and transmission electron microscopy images showed that samples had the cubic spinel structure with the grain sizes were varied from 9.4 nm to 18.1 nm. The results of vibrating sample magnetometer measurements at room temperature showed that saturation magnetic moments of Fe1-xCuxFe2O4 and Fe1-xMnxFe2O4 samples decreased from 65.9 emu/g to 53.2 emu/g and 65.9 emu/g to 61.5 emu/g, respectively, with the increase of Cu, Mn concentrations from 0.0 to 0.15. The nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherm of a typical Fe3O4 sample at 77 K was studied in order to investigate the surface and porous structure of nanoparticles by BET method. The specific surface area of Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles was calculated about of 100.2 m2/g. The pore size distribution of about 15-20 nm calculated by the BJH (Barrett, Joyner, and Halendar) method at a relative pressure P/P0 of about 1. Although the saturation magnetic moments of samples decreased when the increase of doping concentration, but the arsenic adsorption capacity of Cu doped Fe3O4 nanoparticles is better than that of Fe3O4 and Mn doped Fe3O4 nanoparticles in a solution with pH = 7. In the solution with a pH > 14, the arsenic adsorption of magnetic nanoparticles is insignificant.

  3. MOF-derived ZnO and ZnO@C composites with high photocatalytic activity and adsorption capacity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Seung Jae; Im, Ji Hyuk; Kim, Taehoon; Lee, Kunsil; Park, Chong Rae

    2011-02-15

    Nanostructured ZnO materials have unique and highly attractive properties and have inspired interest in their research and development. This paper presents a facile method for the preparation of novel ZnO-based nanostructured architectures using a metal organic framework (MOF) as a precursor. In this approach, ZnO nanoparticles and ZnO@C hybrid composites were produced under several heating and atmospheric (air or nitrogen) conditions. The resultant ZnO nanoparticles formed hierarchical aggregates with a three-dimensional cubic morphology, whereas ZnO@C hybrid composites consisted of faceted ZnO crystals embedded within a highly porous carbonaceous species, as determined by several characterization methods. The newly synthesized nanomaterials showed relatively high photocatalytic decomposition activity and significantly enhanced adsorption capacities for organic pollutants.

  4. Mercury Emission and Removal of a 135MW CFB Utility Boiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Y. F.; Zhuo, Y. Q.; Wang, Y. J.; Zhang, L.; Yang, L. G.; Zhao, C. S.

    To evaluate characteristic of the mercury emission and removal from a circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler, a representative 135 MW CFB utility boiler was selected to take the onsite measurement of mercury concentrations in feeding coal, bottom ash, fly ash and flue gas using the US EPA recommended Ontario Hydro Method (OHM). The results show that particulate mercury is of majority in flue gas of the CFB boiler. Mercury removal rate of the electrostatic precipitator (ESP) reaches 98%. Mercury emission concentration in stack is only 0.062μg/Nm3, and the mass proportion of mercury in bottom ash is less than 1%. It was found that the fly ashes were highly adsorptive to flue gas mercury because of its higher unburned carbon content. Adsorption effect is related to carbon pore structural properties of fly ash and temperature of flue gas. However mercury adsorption capacity by fly ash can not be improved any more when unburned carbon content in fly ash increases further.

  5. Estimating prion adsorption capacity of soil by BioAssay of Subtracted Infectivity from Complex Solutions (BASICS).

    PubMed

    Wyckoff, A Christy; Lockwood, Krista L; Meyerett-Reid, Crystal; Michel, Brady A; Bender, Heather; VerCauteren, Kurt C; Zabel, Mark D

    2013-01-01

    Prions, the infectious agent of scrapie, chronic wasting disease and other transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, are misfolded proteins that are highly stable and resistant to degradation. Prions are known to associate with clay and other soil components, enhancing their persistence and surprisingly, transmissibility. Currently, few detection and quantification methods exist for prions in soil, hindering an understanding of prion persistence and infectivity in the environment. Variability in apparent infectious titers of prions when bound to soil has complicated attempts to quantify the binding capacity of soil for prion infectivity. Here, we quantify the prion adsorption capacity of whole, sandy loam soil (SLS) typically found in CWD endemic areas in Colorado; and purified montmorillonite clay (Mte), previously shown to bind prions, by BioAssay of Subtracted Infectivity in Complex Solutions (BASICS). We incubated prion positive 10% brain homogenate from terminally sick mice infected with the Rocky Mountain Lab strain of mouse-adapted prions (RML) with 10% SLS or Mte. After 24 hours samples were centrifuged five minutes at 200 × g and soil-free supernatant was intracerebrally inoculated into prion susceptible indicator mice. We used the number of days post inoculation to clinical disease to calculate the infectious titer remaining in the supernatant, which we subtracted from the starting titer to determine the infectious prion binding capacity of SLS and Mte. BASICS indicated SLS bound and removed ≥ 95% of infectivity. Mte bound and removed lethal doses (99.98%) of prions from inocula, effectively preventing disease in the mice. Our data reveal significant prion-binding capacity of soil and the utility of BASICS to estimate prion loads and investigate persistence and decomposition in the environment. Additionally, since Mte successfully rescued the mice from prion disease, Mte might be used for remediation and decontamination protocols.

  6. Factors affecting mercury control in utility flue gas using sorbent injection

    SciTech Connect

    Carey, T.R.; Hargrove, O.W. Jr.; Richardson, C.F.; Chang, R.; Meserole, F.B.

    1997-12-31

    Mercury continues to be considered for possible regulation in the electric power industry under Title 3 of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. This possibility has generated interest in assessing whether cost-effective technologies exist for removing mercury from fossil-fired flue gas. One promising approach involves the direct injection of mercury sorbents, such as activated carbon, into the flue gas. Although this method has been effective at removing mercury in municipal waste incinerators, tests conducted to date on utility fossil-fired boilers show that mercury removal is much more difficult in utility flue gas. EPRI is conducting research to investigate mercury removal using sorbents. Bench-scale and pilot-scale tests have been conducted to determine the ability of different sorbents to remove mercury in simulated and actual flue gas streams. Bench-scale tests have investigated the effect of various sorbent and flue gas parameters on sorbent performance. These data are being used to develop a theoretical model for predicting mercury removal by sorbents at different conditions. The possibility of regenerating and recycling sorbents is also being evaluated. This paper describes the results of parametric bench-scale and pilot-scale tests investigating the removal of mercuric chloride and elemental mercury by activated carbon. Results obtained to date indicate that the adsorption capacity of a given sorbent is dependent on many factors, including the type of mercury being adsorbed, flue gas composition, and adsorption temperature. These data provide insight into potential mercury adsorption mechanisms and suggest that the removal of mercury involves both physical and chemical mechanisms. Understanding these effects is important since the performance of a given sorbent could vary significantly from site-to-site depending on coal- or gas-matrix composition.

  7. Preparation and evaluation of coal-derived activated carbons for removal of mercury vapor from simulated coal combustion flue fases

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hsi, H.-C.; Chen, S.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Rood, M.J.; Richardson, C.F.; Carey, T.R.; Chang, R.

    1998-01-01

    Coal-derived activated carbons (CDACs) were tested for their suitability in removing trace amounts of vapor-phase mercury from simulated flue gases generated by coal combustion. CDACs were prepared in bench-scale and pilot-scale fluidized-bed reactors with a three-step process, including coal preoxidation, carbonization, and then steam activation. CDACs from high-organicsulfur Illinois coals had a greater equilibrium Hg0 adsorption capacity than activated carbons prepared from a low-organic-sulfur Illinois coal. When a low-organic-sulfur CDAC was impregnated with elemental sulfur at 600 ??C, its equilibrium Hg0 adsorption capacity was comparable to the adsorption capacity of the activated carbon prepared from the high-organicsulfur coal. X-ray diffraction and sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure examinations showed that the sulfur in the CDACs was mainly in organic forms. These results suggested that a portion of the inherent organic sulfur in the starting coal, which remained in the CDACs, played an important role in adsorption of Hg0. Besides organic sulfur, the BET surface area and micropore area of the CDACs also influenced Hg0 adsorption capacity. The HgCl2 adsorption capacity was not as dependent on the surface area and concentration of sulfur in the CDACs as was adsorption of Hg0. The properties and mercury adsorption capacities of the CDACs were compared with those obtained for commercial Darco FGD carbon.

  8. High adsorption capacity of two Zn-based metal-organic frameworks by ultrasound assisted synthesis.

    PubMed

    Masoomi, Mohammad Yaser; Bagheri, Minoo; Morsali, Ali

    2016-11-01

    Micro- and nano-rods and plates of two 3D, porous Zn(II)-based metal-organic frameworks [Zn(oba)(4-bpdh)0.5]n·(DMF)1.5 (TMU-5) and [Zn(oba)(4-bpmb)0.5]n (DMF)1.5 (TMU-6) were prepared by sonochemical process and characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction and IR spectroscopy. These MOFs were synthesized using a non-linear dicarboxylate (H2oba=4,4-oxybisbenzoic acid) and two linear N-donor (4-bpdh=2,5-bis(4-pyridyl)-3,4-diaza-2,4-hexadiene and 4-bpmb=N(1),N(4)-bis((pyridin-4-yl)methylene)benzene-1,4-diamine) ligands by ultrasonic irradiation. Sonication time and concentration of initial reagents influencing size and morphology of nano-structured MOFs, were also studied. Calcination of TMU-5 and TMU-6 at 550°C under air atmosphere yields ZnO nanoparticles. TMU-5 and TMU-6 exhibited maximum percent adsorption of 96.2% and 92.8% of 100ppm rhodamine B dye, respectively, which obeys first order reaction kinetics.

  9. Novel regenerable sorbent based on Zr-Mn binary metal oxides for flue gas mercury retention and recovery.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jiangkun; Qu, Zan; Yan, Naiqiang; Yang, Shijian; Chen, Wanmiao; Hu, Lingang; Huang, Wenjun; Liu, Ping

    2013-10-15

    To capture and recover mercury from coal-fired flue gas, a series of novel regenerable sorbents based on Zr-Mn binary metal oxides were prepared and employed at a relatively low temperature. PXRD, TEM, TPR, XPS, and N2-adsorption methods were employed to characterize the sorbents. The Hg(0) adsorption performance of the sorbents was tested, and the effects of the main operation parameters and the gas components on the adsorption were investigated. Zr significantly improved the sorbent's mercury capacity, which was nearly 5mg/g for Zr0.5Mn0.5Oy. Furthermore, the spent sorbent could be regenerated by heating to 350°C, and the highly concentrated elemental mercury released could be facilely recycled. Therefore, a much greener process for mercury capture and recovery could be anticipated based on this regenerable sorbent. PMID:23933289

  10. Effects of Dendropanax morbifera Léveille extracts on cadmium and mercury secretion as well as oxidative capacity: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    SEO, JAE SAM; YOO, DAE YOUNG; JUNG, HYO YOUNG; KIM, DONG-WOO; HWANG, IN KOO; LEE, JONG YOUNG; MOON, SEUNG MYUNG

    2016-01-01

    In this randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled clinical trial, the effects of Dendropanax morbifera (D. morbifera) Léveille on heavy metal (cadmium and mercury) excretion as well as on lipid peroxidation and Cu, Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1) activity were investigated. For this study, tablets containing placebo or 300 mg of the leaf extract from D. morbifera Léveille were used. A total of 60 eligible healthy subjects were enrolled in this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. The differences in cadmium, mercury, and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels and SOD1 activity were measured in the serum 60 days after treatment with placebo or D. morbifera Léveille extracts. No significant differences between baseline characteristics and biochemical values were identified in subjects in the placebo and D. morbifera Léveille groups. Serum levels of cadmium, mercury and MDA decreased following consumption of D. morbifera Léveille extracts; however, no significant differences were identified. In addition, female, but not male, subjects who consumed D. morbifera Léveille extracts showed a significant increase in SOD1 activity. This result suggests that chronic consumption of D. morbifera Léveille extract can help to facilitate excretion of cadmium and mercury from serum and increase the antioxidant capacity in humans. PMID:27123258

  11. Mercury capture within coal-fired power plant electrostatic precipitators: model evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Clack, H.L.

    2009-03-01

    Efforts to reduce anthropogenic mercury emissions worldwide have recently focused on a variety of sources, including mercury emitted during coal combustion. Toward that end, much research has been ongoing seeking to develop new processes for reducing coal combustion mercury emissions. Among air pollution control processes that can be applied to coal-fired boilers, electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) are by far the most common, both on a global scale and among the principal countries of India, China, and the U.S. that burn coal for electric power generation. A previously reported theoretical model of in-flight mercury capture within ESPs is herein evaluated against data from a number of full-scale tests of activated carbon injection for mercury emissions control. By using the established particle size distribution of the activated carbon and actual or estimated values of its equilibrium mercury adsorption capacity, the incremental reduction in mercury concentration across each ESP can be predicted and compared to experimental results. Because the model does not incorporate kinetics associated with gas-phase mercury transformation or surface adsorption, the model predictions represent the mass-transfer-limited performance. Comparing field data to model results reveals many facilities performing at or near the predicted mass-transfer-limited maximum, particularly at low rates of sorbent injection. Where agreement is poor between field data and model predictions, additional chemical or physical phenomena may be responsible for reducing mercury removal efficiencies. 26 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  12. CO2 Adsorption in Low-Rank Coals: Progress Toward Assessing the National Capacity to Store CO2 in the Subsurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanton, R. W.; Burruss, R. C.; Flores, R. M.; Warwick, P. D.

    2001-05-01

    Subsurface environments for geologic storage of CO2 from combustion of fossil fuel include saline formations, depleted oil and gas reservoirs, and unmineable coalbeds. Of these environments, storage in petroleum reservoirs and coal beds offers a potential economic benefit of enhanced recovery of energy resources. Meaningful assessment of the volume and geographic distribution of storage sites requires quantitative estimates of geologic factors that control storage capacity. The factors that control the storage capacity of unmineable coalbeds are poorly understood. In preparation for a USGS assessment of CO2 storage capacity we have begun new measurements of CO2 and CH4 adsorption isotherms of low-rank coal samples from 4 basins. Initial results for 13 samples of low-rank coal beds from the Powder River Basin (9 subbituminous coals), Greater Green River Basin (1 subbituminous coal), Williston Basin (2 lignites) and the Gulf Coast (1 lignite) indicate that their adsorption capacity is up to 10 times higher than it is for CH4. These values contrast with published measurements of the CO2 adsorption capacity of bituminous coals from the Fruitland Formation, San Juan basin, and Gates Formation, British Columbia, that indicate about twice as much carbon dioxide as methane can be adsorbed on coals. Because CH4 adsorption isotherms are commonly measured on coals, CO2 adsorption capacity can be estimated if thecorrect relationship between the gases is known. However, use a factor to predict CO2 adsorption that is twice that of CH4 adsorption, which is common in the published literature, grossly underestimates the storage capacity of widely distributed, thick low-rank coal beds. Complete petrographic and chemical characterization of these low-rank coal samples is in progress. Significant variations in adsorption measurements among samples are depicted depending on the reporting basis used. Properties were measured on an "as received" (moist) basis but can be converted to a

  13. Development of a Novel Activated Carbon Based Adsorbents for control of Mercury Emissions from Coal-Fired Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Vidic, R.D.

    1997-03-17

    The overall objective of this study is to evaluate pertinent design and operational parameters that would enable successful application of activated carbon adsorption for the reduction of mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants. The study will evaluate the most suitable impregnate such as sulfur, chloride and other chelating agents for its ability to enhance the adsorptive capacity of activated carbon for mercury vapor under various process conditions. The main process variables to be evaluated include temperature, mercury concentration and speciation, relative humidity, oxygen content, and presence of S0{sub 2} and NO{sub x} in the flue gas. The optimal amount of impregnate for each of these carbons will be determined based on the exhibited performance. Another important parameter which governs the applicability of adsorption technology for the flue gas clean up is the rate at which vapor phase mercury is being removed from the flue gas by activated carbon. Therefore, the second part of this study will evaluate the adsorption kinetics using the impregnated activated carbons listed above. The rate of mercury uptake will also be evaluated under the process conditions that are representative of coal-fired power plants. Concerned with the ability of the adsorbed mercury to migrate back into the environment once saturated adsorbent is removed from the system, the study will also focus on the mercury desorption rate as a function of the type of impregnate, loading conditions, and the time of contact prior to disposal.

  14. Experimental study on mercury sorption by activated carbons and calcium hydroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Ghorishi, B.; Gullett, B.K.

    1997-12-01

    Title III of the 1990 Air Act Amendments (CAAA) requires the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to submit a study on 189 hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) from industrial sources. This study will include an emission and risk (to public health) assessment of the HAPs. Among the 189 HAPs, mercury has drawn special attention due to its increased levels in the environment and well-documented food chain transport and bioaccumulation. Mercury, present in hazardous/municipal wastes and in coal, is readily volatilized during combustion and incineration processes. Mercury is the most volatile among various trace metals, and major portions of it can pass through existing particulate control devices. A sorbent that can react with mercury can effectively shift this metal from the vapor phase to the particulate (sorbent) phase, facilitating its removal. Mercury control processes which use adsorption on dry sorbents do not pose the problem of treatment and stabilization of the waste liquid stream and, therefore, seem very attractive for coal combustors and hazardous/municipal waste incinerators. The need to develop mercury control technologies and the attractive features of adsorption processes on dry sorbents led researchers to focus their efforts on the evaluation of the adsorption kinetics and sorbent capacity of many different solid sorbents. Past research has identified two different classes of sorbents to be effective in mercury removal: activated carbons and calcium-based sorbents.

  15. Direct observation of solid-phase adsorbate concentration profile in powdered activated carbon particle to elucidate mechanism of high adsorption capacity on super-powdered activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Ando, Naoya; Matsui, Yoshihiko; Matsushita, Taku; Ohno, Koichi

    2011-01-01

    Decreasing the particle size of powdered activated carbon (PAC) by pulverization increases its adsorption capacities for natural organic matter (NOM) and polystyrene sulfonate (PSS, which is used as a model adsorbate). A shell adsorption mechanism in which NOM and PSS molecules do not completely penetrate the adsorbent particle and instead preferentially adsorb near the outer surface of the particle has been proposed as an explanation for this adsorption capacity increase. In this report, we present direct evidence to support the shell adsorption mechanism. PAC particles containing adsorbed PSS were sectioned with a focused ion beam, and the solid-phase PSS concentration profiles of the particle cross-sections were directly observed by means of field emission-scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (FE-SEM/EDXS). X-ray emission from sulfur, an index of PSS concentration, was higher in the shell region than in the inner region of the particles. The X-ray emission profile observed by EDXS did not agree completely with the solid-phase PSS concentration profile predicted by shell adsorption model analysis of the PSS isotherm data, but the observed and predicted profiles were not inconsistent when the analytical errors were considered. These EDXS results provide the first direct evidence that PSS is adsorbed mainly in the vicinity of the external surface of the PAC particles, and thus the results support the proposition that the increase in NOM and PSS adsorption capacity with decreasing particle size is due to the increase in external surface area on which the molecules can be adsorbed. PMID:20851447

  16. Regenerative process for removal of mercury and other heavy metals from gases containing H.sub.2 and/or CO

    DOEpatents

    Jadhav, Raja A.

    2009-07-07

    A method for removal of mercury from a gaseous stream containing the mercury, hydrogen and/or CO, and hydrogen sulfide and/or carbonyl sulfide in which a dispersed Cu-containing sorbent is contacted with the gaseous stream at a temperature in the range of about 25.degree. C. to about 300.degree. C. until the sorbent is spent. The spent sorbent is contacted with a desorbing gaseous stream at a temperature equal to or higher than the temperature at which the mercury adsorption is carried out, producing a regenerated sorbent and an exhaust gas comprising released mercury. The released mercury in the exhaust gas is captured using a high-capacity sorbent, such as sulfur-impregnated activated carbon, at a temperature less than about 100.degree. C. The regenerated sorbent may then be used to capture additional mercury from the mercury-containing gaseous stream.

  17. The role of counter ions in nano-hematite synthesis: Implications for surface area and selenium adsorption capacity.

    PubMed

    Lounsbury, Amanda W; Yamani, Jamila S; Johnston, Chad P; Larese-Casanova, Philip; Zimmerman, Julie B

    2016-06-01

    Nano metal oxides are of interest for aqueous selenium (Se) remediation, and as such, nano-hematite (nα-Fe2O3) was examined for use as a Se adsorbent. The effect of surface area on adsorption was also studied. nα-Fe2O3 particles were synthesized from Fe(NO3)3 and FeCl3 via forced hydrolysis. The resulting particles have similar sizes, morphologies, aggregate size, pore size, and PZC. The nα-Fe2O3 from FeCl3 (nα-Fe2O3-C) differs from the nα-Fe2O3 from Fe(NO3)3 (nα-Fe2O3-N) with a ∼25±2m(2)/g greater surface area. Selenite Se(IV) adsorption capacity on nα-Fe2O3 has a qmax ∼17mg/g for the freeze-dried and re-suspended nα-Fe2O3. The Δqmax for nα-Fe2O3 from Fe(NO3)3 and FeCl3 that remained in suspension was 4.6mg/g. For selenate Se(VI), the freeze-dried and re-suspended particles realize a Δqmax= 1.5mg/g for nα-Fe2O3 from Fe(NO3)3 and FeCl3. The nα-Fe2O3 from Fe(NO3)3 and FeCl3 that remained in suspension demonstrated Se(VI) Δqmax=5.4mg/g. In situ ATR-FTIR isotherm measurements completed for Se(VI) at a pH 6 suggest that Se(VI) forms primarily outer-sphere complexes with nα-Fe2O3 synthesized from both salts. PMID:26905609

  18. Removal performance of elemental mercury by low-cost adsorbents prepared through facile methods of carbonisation and activation of coconut husk.

    PubMed

    Johari, Khairiraihanna; Alias, Afidatul Shazwani; Saman, Norasikin; Song, Shiow Tien; Mat, Hanapi

    2015-01-01

    The preparation of chars and activated carbon as low-cost elemental mercury adsorbents was carried out through the carbonisation of coconut husk (pith and fibre) and the activation of chars with potassium hydroxide (KOH), respectively. The synthesised adsorbents were characterised by using scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and nitrogen adsorption/desorption analysis. The elemental mercury removal performance was measured using a conventional flow type packed-bed adsorber. The physical and chemical properties of the adsorbents changed as a result of the carbonisation and activation process, hence affecting on the extent of elemental mercury adsorption. The highest elemental mercury (Hg°) adsorption capacity was obtained for the CP-CHAR (3142.57 µg g(-1)), which significantly outperformed the pristine and activated carbon adsorbents, as well as higher than some adsorbents reported in the literature.

  19. Removal performance of elemental mercury by low-cost adsorbents prepared through facile methods of carbonisation and activation of coconut husk.

    PubMed

    Johari, Khairiraihanna; Alias, Afidatul Shazwani; Saman, Norasikin; Song, Shiow Tien; Mat, Hanapi

    2015-01-01

    The preparation of chars and activated carbon as low-cost elemental mercury adsorbents was carried out through the carbonisation of coconut husk (pith and fibre) and the activation of chars with potassium hydroxide (KOH), respectively. The synthesised adsorbents were characterised by using scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and nitrogen adsorption/desorption analysis. The elemental mercury removal performance was measured using a conventional flow type packed-bed adsorber. The physical and chemical properties of the adsorbents changed as a result of the carbonisation and activation process, hence affecting on the extent of elemental mercury adsorption. The highest elemental mercury (Hg°) adsorption capacity was obtained for the CP-CHAR (3142.57 µg g(-1)), which significantly outperformed the pristine and activated carbon adsorbents, as well as higher than some adsorbents reported in the literature. PMID:25492720

  20. A one-step thermal decomposition method to prepare anatase TiO2 nanosheets with improved adsorption capacities and enhanced photocatalytic activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenting; Shang, Chunli; Li, Xue

    2015-12-01

    Anatase TiO2 nanosheets (NSs) with high surface area have been prepared via a one-step thermal decomposition of titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) in oleylamine (OM), and their adsorption capacities and photocatalytic activities are investigated by using methylene blue (MB) and methyl orange (MO) as model pollutants. During the synthesis procedure, only one type of surfactant, oleylamine (OM), is used as capping agents and no other solvents are added. Structure and properties of the TiO2 NSs were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), N2 adsorption analysis, UV-vis spectrum, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Photoluminescence (PL) methods. The results indicate that the TiO2 NSs possess high surface area up to 378 m2 g-1. The concentration of capping agents is found to be a key factor controlling the morphology and crystalline structure of the product. Adsorption and photodegradation experiments reveal that the prepared TiO2 NSs possess high adsorption capacities of model pollutants MB and high photocatalytic activity, showing that TiO2 NSs can be used as efficient pollutant adsorbents and photocatalytic degradation catalysts of MB in wastewater treatment.

  1. Use of lipophilic ion adsorption isotherms to determine the surface area and the monolayer capacity of a chromatographic packing, as well as the thermodynamic equilibrium constant for its adsorption.

    PubMed

    Cecchi, T

    2005-04-29

    A method that champions the approaches of two independent research groups, to quantitate the chromatographic stationary phase surface available for lipophilic ion adsorption, is presented. For the first time the non-approximated expression of the electrostatically modified Langmuir adsorption isotherm was used. The non approximated Gouy-Chapman (G-C) theory equation was used to give the rigorous surface potential. The method helps model makers, interested in ionic interactions, determine whether the potential modified Langmuir isotherm can be linearized, and, accordingly, whether simplified retention equations can be properly used. The theory cultivated here allows the estimates not only of the chromatographically accessible surface area, but also of the thermodynamic equilibrium constant for the adsorption of the amphiphile, the standard free energy of its adsorption, and the monolayer capacity of the packing. In addition, it establishes the limit between a theoretical and an empirical use of the Freundlich isotherm to determine the surface area. Estimates of the parameters characterising the chromatographic system are reliable from the physical point of view, and this greatly validates the present comprehensive approach.

  2. Surfactant-free synthesis of octahedral ZnO/ZnFe2O4 heterostructure with ultrahigh and selective adsorption capacity of malachite green.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jue; Zeng, Min; Yu, Ronghai

    2016-01-01

    A new octahedral ZnO/ZnFe2O4 heterostructure has been fabricated through a facile surfactant-free solvothermal method followed by thermal treatment. It exhibits a record-high adsorption capacity (up to 4983.0 mg·g(-1)) of malachite green (MG), which is a potentially harmful dye in prevalence and should be removed from wastewater and other aqueous solutions before discharging into the environment. The octahedral ZnO/ZnFe2O4 heterostructure also demonstrates strong selective adsorption towards MG from two kinds of mixed solutions: MG/methyl orange (MO) and MG/rhodamine B (RhB) mixtures, indicating its promise in water treatment.

  3. Surfactant-free synthesis of octahedral ZnO/ZnFe2O4 heterostructure with ultrahigh and selective adsorption capacity of malachite green

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jue; Zeng, Min; Yu, Ronghai

    2016-01-01

    A new octahedral ZnO/ZnFe2O4 heterostructure has been fabricated through a facile surfactant-free solvothermal method followed by thermal treatment. It exhibits a record-high adsorption capacity (up to 4983.0 mg·g−1) of malachite green (MG), which is a potentially harmful dye in prevalence and should be removed from wastewater and other aqueous solutions before discharging into the environment. The octahedral ZnO/ZnFe2O4 heterostructure also demonstrates strong selective adsorption towards MG from two kinds of mixed solutions: MG/methyl orange (MO) and MG/rhodamine B (RhB) mixtures, indicating its promise in water treatment. PMID:27142194

  4. Surfactant-free synthesis of octahedral ZnO/ZnFe2O4 heterostructure with ultrahigh and selective adsorption capacity of malachite green

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jue; Zeng, Min; Yu, Ronghai

    2016-05-01

    A new octahedral ZnO/ZnFe2O4 heterostructure has been fabricated through a facile surfactant-free solvothermal method followed by thermal treatment. It exhibits a record-high adsorption capacity (up to 4983.0 mg·g‑1) of malachite green (MG), which is a potentially harmful dye in prevalence and should be removed from wastewater and other aqueous solutions before discharging into the environment. The octahedral ZnO/ZnFe2O4 heterostructure also demonstrates strong selective adsorption towards MG from two kinds of mixed solutions: MG/methyl orange (MO) and MG/rhodamine B (RhB) mixtures, indicating its promise in water treatment.

  5. Surfactant-free synthesis of octahedral ZnO/ZnFe2O4 heterostructure with ultrahigh and selective adsorption capacity of malachite green.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jue; Zeng, Min; Yu, Ronghai

    2016-01-01

    A new octahedral ZnO/ZnFe2O4 heterostructure has been fabricated through a facile surfactant-free solvothermal method followed by thermal treatment. It exhibits a record-high adsorption capacity (up to 4983.0 mg·g(-1)) of malachite green (MG), which is a potentially harmful dye in prevalence and should be removed from wastewater and other aqueous solutions before discharging into the environment. The octahedral ZnO/ZnFe2O4 heterostructure also demonstrates strong selective adsorption towards MG from two kinds of mixed solutions: MG/methyl orange (MO) and MG/rhodamine B (RhB) mixtures, indicating its promise in water treatment. PMID:27142194

  6. Ultrasond-assisted synthesis of Fe3O4/SiO2 core/shell with enhanced adsorption capacity for diazinon removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmany, Abbas; Mortazavi, Seyede Shima; Mahdavi, Hossein

    2016-10-01

    Fe3O4/SiO2 core/shell nanocrystals were synthesized by ultrasond-assisted procedure. The core/shell nanocrystals were characterized using XRD, FT-IR spectroscopy, SEM and BET. The BET analysis confirmed that iron oxide nanocrystal with the surface area of 208.0 m2/g can be used as an excellent adsorbent for organic and inorganic pollutants. The core/shell nanocrystal was used as an adsorbent for removal of insecticide O,O-diethyl-O[2-isopropyl-6-methylpyridimidinyl] phosphorothioate (diazinon). In continue the influence of different parameters such as pH, adsorbent dosage and shaking time on the adsorption capacity were studied. The experimental data were fitted well with the pseudo-second-order kinetic model (R2=0.9706). The adsorption isotherm was described well by Langmuir isotherm.

  7. Methane and carbon dioxide adsorption capacity of bituminous coals from the Ostrava-Karvina Coal District, Upper Silesian Basin, Czech Republic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weniger, P.; Busch, A.; Krooss, B. M.; Francu, J.; Francu, E.

    2009-04-01

    In the context of a joint Czech-German project, experimental and analytical methods are being applied to improve the understanding of compositional variation of coal-related gas in the SW part of the Upper Silesian Basin (Czech Republic). According to present understanding, the gas composition is controlled by generation (thermal vs. microbial), migration and adsorption/desorption processes. In particular the effects of the sorption processes on the chemical and isotopic composition of coal gases are only poorly explored. During the first stage of this project, the gas adsorption capacity has been determined for coal samples representing the paralic Ostrava Formation (Namurian A) and the limnic Karviná Formation (Namurian B-C). For this purpose, high pressure adsorption isotherms have been measured for methane and carbon dioxide on medium and low volatile bituminous coal (VRr 1.2-1.8%) from the production face of two collieries in the study area. Adsorption isotherms have been measured for pressures up to 25 MPa for CO2 and up to 17 MPa for methane at 20˚ C and 45˚ C. Isotherms were measured on dry, moisture-equilibrated and "as received" samples (moisture content: 0.5-1.7%, mineral-matter-free) using a manometric method. Sorption capacities for CH4 at 45˚ C ranged from 18 to 27 Std. cm3/g (0.7 to 1.1 mmol/g) coal, dry ash-free (daf), showing an increase of sorption capacity with increasing coal rank. For CO2, sorption capacities were generally higher than for methane, ranging from 35-40 Std. cm3/g (1.4-1.7 mmol/g) coal (daf). Equilibrium moisture contents, determined by a modified ASTM method, were significantly higher than the "as received" moisture. Sorption capacities measured on moisture-equilibrated samples were generally lower than those measured on dry or "as received" samples. Methane excess sorption isotherms show a type I Langmuir form and could be approximated using the Langmuir function. Excess sorption isotherms for CO2 show a decrease in

  8. Mercury emissions from coal combustion: modeling and comparison of Hg capture in a fabric filter versus an electrostatic precipitator.

    PubMed

    Scala, Fabrizio; Clack, Herek L

    2008-04-01

    Mercury emissions from coal combustion must be reduced, in response to new air quality regulations in the U.S. Although the most mature control technology is adsorption across a dust cake of powdered sorbent in a fabric filter (FF), most particulate control in the U.S. associated with coal combustion takes the form of electrostatic precipitation (ESP). Using recently developed models of mercury adsorption within an ESP and within a growing sorbent bed in a FF, parallel analyses of elemental mercury (Hg(0)) uptake have been conducted. The results show little difference between an ESP and a FF in absolute mercury removal for a low-capacity sorbent, with a high-capacity sorbent achieving better performance in the FF. Comparisons of fractional mercury uptake per-unit-pressure-drop provide a means for incorporating and comparing the impact of the much greater pressure drop of a FF as compared to an ESP. On a per-unit-pressure-drop basis, mercury uptake within an ESP exhibited better performance, particularly for the low-capacity sorbent and high mass loadings of both sorbents.

  9. Removal of mercury from an alumina refinery aqueous stream.

    PubMed

    Mullett, Mark; Tardio, James; Bhargava, Suresh; Dobbs, Charles

    2007-06-01

    Digestion condensate is formed as a by-product of the alumina refinery digestion process. The solution exhibits a high pH and is chemically reducing, containing many volatile species such as water, volatile organics, ammonia, and mercury. Because digestion condensate is chemically unique, an innovative approach was required to investigate mercury removal. The mercury capacity and adsorption kinetics were investigated using a number of materials including gold, silver and sulphur impregnated silica and a silver impregnated carbon. The results were compared to commercial sorbents, including extruded and powdered virgin activated carbons and a sulphur impregnated mineral. Nano-gold supported on silica (88% removal under batch conditions and 95% removal under flow conditions) and powdered activated carbon (91% under batch conditions and 98% removal under flow conditions) were the most effective materials investigated. The silver and sulphur impregnated materials were unstable in digestion condensate under the test conditions used.

  10. PREDICTING THE ADSORPTION CAPACITY OF ACTIVATED CARBON FOR EMERGING ORGANIC CONTAMINANTS FROM FUNDAMENTAL ADSORBENT AND ADSORBATE PROPERTIES - PRESENTATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) was developed and combined with the Polanyi-Dubinin-Manes model to predict adsorption isotherms of emerging contaminants on activated carbons with a wide range of physico-chemical properties. Affinity coefficients (βl

  11. High adsorptive γ-AlOOH(boehmite)@SiO2/Fe3O4 porous magnetic microspheres for detection of toxic metal ions in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yan; Yang, Ran; Zhang, Yong-Xing; Wang, Lun; Liu, Jin-Huai; Huang, Xing-Jiu

    2011-10-21

    γ-AlOOH(boehmite)@SiO(2)/Fe(3)O(4) porous magnetic microspheres with high adsorption capacity toward heavy metal ions were found to be useful for the simultaneous and selective electrochemical detection of five metal ions, such as ultratrace zinc(II), cadmium(II), lead(II), copper(II), and mercury(II), in drinking water.

  12. Adsorption of Hg(II) from aqueous solutions using TiO2 and titanate nanotube adsorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Muñoz, María-José; Arencibia, Amaya; Cerro, Luis; Pascual, Raquel; Melgar, Álvaro

    2016-03-01

    Titania and titanate nanotubes were evaluated as adsorbents for the removal of Hg(II) from aqueous solution. Commercial titanium dioxide (TiO2-P25, Evonik), a synthesized anatase sample obtained by the sol-gel method (TiO2-SG) and titanate nanotubes (TNT) prepared via hydrothermal treatment were compared. Mercury adsorption was analysed by kinetic and equilibrium experiments, studying the influence of pH and the type of adsorbents. The kinetics of Hg(II) adsorption on titania and titanate nanotubes could be well described by the pseudo-second order model. It was found that the process is generally fast with small differences between adsorbents, which cannot be explained by their dissimilarities in textural properties. Equilibrium isotherm data were best fitted with the Sips isotherm model. The maximum adsorption capacities of Hg(II) were achieved with titanate nanotubes sample, whereas between both titania samples, TiO2-SG exhibited the highest mercury uptake. For all adsorbents, adsorption capacities were enhanced as pH was increased, achieving at pH 10 Hg(II) adsorption capacities of 100, 121, and 140 mg g-1 for TiO2-P25, TiO2-SG, and TNT, respectively. Differences between samples were discussed in terms of their crystalline phase composition and chemical nature of both, mercury species and surface active sites.

  13. Hydrogen adsorption capacities of multi-walled boron nitride nanotubes and nanotube arrays: a grand canonical Monte Carlo study.

    PubMed

    Ahadi, Zohreh; Shadman, Muhammad; Yeganegi, Saeed; Asgari, Farid

    2012-07-01

    Hydrogen adsorption in multi-walled boron nitride nanotubes and their arrays was studied using grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation. The results show that hydrogen storage increases with tube diameter and the distance between the tubes in multi-walled boron nitride nanotube arrays. Also, triple-walled boron nitride nanotubes present the lowest level of hydrogen physisorption, double-walled boron nitride nanotubes adsorb hydrogen better when the diameter of the inner tube diameter is sufficiently large, and single-walled boron nitride nanotubes adsorb hydrogen well when the tube diameter is small enough. Boron nitride nanotube arrays adsorb hydrogen, but the percentage of adsorbed hydrogen (by weight) in boron nitride nanotube arrays is rather similar to that found in multi-walled boron nitride nanotubes. Also, when the Langmuir and Langmuir-Freundlich equations were fitted to the simulated data, it was found that multi-layer adsorptivity occurs more prominently as the number of walls and the tube diameter increase. However, in single-walled boron nitride nanotubes with a small diameter, the dominant mechanism is monolayer adsorptivity.

  14. Hydrogen adsorption capacities of multi-walled boron nitride nanotubes and nanotube arrays: a grand canonical Monte Carlo study.

    PubMed

    Ahadi, Zohreh; Shadman, Muhammad; Yeganegi, Saeed; Asgari, Farid

    2012-07-01

    Hydrogen adsorption in multi-walled boron nitride nanotubes and their arrays was studied using grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation. The results show that hydrogen storage increases with tube diameter and the distance between the tubes in multi-walled boron nitride nanotube arrays. Also, triple-walled boron nitride nanotubes present the lowest level of hydrogen physisorption, double-walled boron nitride nanotubes adsorb hydrogen better when the diameter of the inner tube diameter is sufficiently large, and single-walled boron nitride nanotubes adsorb hydrogen well when the tube diameter is small enough. Boron nitride nanotube arrays adsorb hydrogen, but the percentage of adsorbed hydrogen (by weight) in boron nitride nanotube arrays is rather similar to that found in multi-walled boron nitride nanotubes. Also, when the Langmuir and Langmuir-Freundlich equations were fitted to the simulated data, it was found that multi-layer adsorptivity occurs more prominently as the number of walls and the tube diameter increase. However, in single-walled boron nitride nanotubes with a small diameter, the dominant mechanism is monolayer adsorptivity. PMID:22160758

  15. Evaluation of adsorption capacities of humic acids extracted from Algerian soil on polyaniline for application to remove pollutants such as Cd(II), Zn(II) and Ni(II) and characterization with cavity microelectrode.

    PubMed

    Terbouche, Achour; Ramdane-Terbouche, Chafia Ait; Hauchard, Didier; Djebbar, Safia

    2011-01-01

    The adsorption capacities of new humic acids isolated from Yakouren forest (YHA) and Sahara (Tamenrasset: THA) soils (Algeria) and commercial humic acid (PFHA) on polyaniline emeraldine base (PEB) were studied at pH 6.6. Also the adsorption of heavy metals such as Cd2+, Zn2+ and Ni2+ on humic acid-polyaniline systems (HA-PEB) was investigated at the same conditions. HA-PEB compounds were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), infrared spectrometry and cavity microelectrode. In addition, batch adsorption and cavity microelectrode were used in the adsorption study of Cd2+, Zn2+ and Ni2+ on HA-PEB. To develop biocaptors of polluting metals using a cavity microelectrode modified by HA-PEB systems, the adsorption kinetic and adsorption capacity were investigated. The SEM analysis showed that the presence of humic acid affected the PEB surface and caused the formation of a granular morphology. The maximum adsorption capacities (q(max)) of PFHA, THA and YHA determined by adsorption isotherms were 91.31, 132.1 and 151.0 mg/g, respectively. Batch adsorption results showed that q(max) of Cd2+, Zn2+ and Ni2+ on HA-PEB followed the order: THA-PEB > YHA-PEB > PFHA-PEB. The voltammograms obtained with HA-PEB modified cavity microelectrode showed the appearance of new redox couples reflecting the adsorption of HA on PEB. Metal-humic acid-polyaniline voltammograms were characterized by appearance of oxidation-reduction couples or reduction wave corresponding to metal. Finally, the result may be exploited to develop a biocaptor based on the cavity microelectrode amended by THA-PEB and YHA-PEB.

  16. CTAB-assisted synthesis of mesoporous F-N-codoped TiO{sub 2} powders with high visible-light-driven catalytic activity and adsorption capacity

    SciTech Connect

    Xie Yi Zhao Xiujian Li Yuanzhi; Zhao Qingnan; Zhou Xuedong; Yuan Qihua

    2008-08-15

    This article describes the preparation of mesoporous rod-like F-N-codoped TiO{sub 2} powder photocatalysts with anatase phase via a sol-gel route at the temperature of 373 K, using cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) as surfactant. The as-prepared photocatalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and UV-visible diffuse reflectance spectra (UV-vis DRS). The results showed that the photocatalysts possessed a homogeneous pore diameter and a high surface area of 106.3-160.7 m{sup 3} g{sup -1}. The increasing CTAB reactive concentration extended the visible-light absorption up to 600 nm. The F-N-codoped TiO{sub 2} powders exhibited significant higher adsorption capacity for methyl orange (MO) than that of Degussa P25 and showed more than 6 times higher visible-light-induced catalytic degradation for MO than that of P25. - Graphical abstract: The introduction of surfactant CTAB not only extended the visible light absorption of mesoporous F-N-codoped TiO{sub 2} up to 600 nm but also significantly enhanced the adsorption capacity and visible-light-induced degradation for methyl orange. Mesoporous rod-like F-N-codoped TiO{sub 2} powder photocatalysts were synthesized via a sol-gel route at low temperature of 373 K.

  17. Enhanced capture of elemental mercury by bamboo-based sorbents.

    PubMed

    Tan, Zengqiang; Xiang, Jun; Su, Sheng; Zeng, Hancai; Zhou, Changsong; Sun, Lushi; Hu, Song; Qiu, Jianrong

    2012-11-15

    To develop cost-effective sorbent for gas-phase elemental mercury removal, the bamboo charcoal (BC) produced from renewable bamboo and KI modified BC (BC-I) were used for elemental mercury removal. The effect of NO, SO2 on gas-phase Hg0 adsorption by KI modified BC was evaluated on a fixed bed reactor using an online mercury analyzer. BET surface area analysis, temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to determine the pore structure and surface chemistry of the sorbents. The results show that KI impregnation reduced the sorbents' BET surface area and total pore volume compared with that of the original BC. But the BC-I has excellent adsorption capacity for elemental mercury at a relatively higher temperature of 140 °C and 180 °C. The presence of NO or SO2 could inhibit Hg0 capture, but BC-I has strong anti-poisoning ability. The specific reaction mechanism has been further analyzed.

  18. Enhanced capture of elemental mercury by bamboo-based sorbents.

    PubMed

    Tan, Zengqiang; Xiang, Jun; Su, Sheng; Zeng, Hancai; Zhou, Changsong; Sun, Lushi; Hu, Song; Qiu, Jianrong

    2012-11-15

    To develop cost-effective sorbent for gas-phase elemental mercury removal, the bamboo charcoal (BC) produced from renewable bamboo and KI modified BC (BC-I) were used for elemental mercury removal. The effect of NO, SO2 on gas-phase Hg0 adsorption by KI modified BC was evaluated on a fixed bed reactor using an online mercury analyzer. BET surface area analysis, temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to determine the pore structure and surface chemistry of the sorbents. The results show that KI impregnation reduced the sorbents' BET surface area and total pore volume compared with that of the original BC. But the BC-I has excellent adsorption capacity for elemental mercury at a relatively higher temperature of 140 °C and 180 °C. The presence of NO or SO2 could inhibit Hg0 capture, but BC-I has strong anti-poisoning ability. The specific reaction mechanism has been further analyzed. PMID:22995206

  19. Polyamine-Cladded 18-Ring-Channel Gallium Phosphites with High-Capacity Hydrogen Adsorption and Carbon Dioxide Capture.

    PubMed

    Sie, Ming-Jhe; Lin, Chia-Her; Wang, Sue-Lein

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we synthesized a unique inorganic framework bearing the largest 18-membered-ring channels in gallium phosphites, denoted as NTHU-15, which displayed genuine porosity even though large organic templates were present. The idea of using the "template-cladded" strategy succeeded in releasing channel space of up to ∼24% of the unit-cell volume as highly positive-charged organic templates were manipulated to cling to the anionic inorganic walls. NTHU-15 showed both high H2 uptake of 3.8 mmol/g at 77 K and effective CO2 adsorption of ∼2.4 mmol/g at 298 K, which surpassed those of all other known extra-large-channel inorganic framework structures. NTHU-15 has been successful at overcoming the long-standing problem of organic-templated extra-large-channel structures as opposed to a "true open" framework. Moreover, it realized practical gas sorption functionality in innovated metal phosphites. In view of its high stability in hot water and high selectivity for CO2 adsorption, NTHU-15 may be the first novel inorganic framework material to be applied to the field of flue gas cleaning. PMID:27181272

  20. Effect of cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide concentration on structure, morphology and carbon dioxide adsorption capacity of calcium hydroxide based sorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlaing, Nwe Ni; Vignesh, K.; Sreekantan, Srimala; Pung, Swee-Yong; Hinode, Hirofumi; Kurniawan, Winarto; Othman, Radzali; Thant, Aye Aye; Mohamed, Abdul Rahman; Salim, Chris

    2016-02-01

    Calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2) has been proposed as an important material for industrial, architectural, and environmental applications. In this study, calcium acetate was used as a precursor and cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) was used as a surfactant to synthesize Ca(OH)2 based adsorbents for carbon dioxide (CO2) capture. The effect of CTAB concentration (0.2-0.8 M) on the structure, morphology and CO2 adsorption performance of Ca(OH)2 was studied in detail. The synthesized samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), BET surfaced area and thermogravimetry-differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA) techniques. The phase purity, crystallite size, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area and CO2 adsorption performance of Ca(OH)2 precursor adsorbents were significantly increased when the concentration of CTAB was increased. XRD results showed that pure Ca(OH)2 phase was obtained at the CTAB concentration of 0.8 M. TGA results exhibited that 0.8 M of CTAB-assisted Ca(OH)2 precursor adsorbent possessed a residual carbonation conversion of ∼56% after 10 cycles.

  1. Comparison between the loading capacities of columns packed with partially and totally porous fine particles. What is the effective surface area available for adsorption?

    PubMed

    Gritti, Fabrice; Guiochon, Georges

    2007-12-28

    The adsorption isotherms of phenol, caffeine, insulin, and lysozyme were measured on two C(18)-bonded silica columns. The first one was packed with classical totally porous particles (3 microm Luna(2)-C(18)from Phenomenex, Torrance, CA, USA), the second one with shell particles (2.7 microm Halo-C(18) from Advanced Materials Technology, Wilmington, DE, USA). The measurements were made at room temperature (T=295+/-1K), using mainly frontal analysis (FA) and also elution by characteristic points (FACP) when necessary. The adsorption energy distributions (AEDs) were estimated by the iterative numerical expectation-maximization (EM) procedure and served to justify the choice of the best adsorption isotherm model for each compound. The best isotherm parameters were derived from either the best fit of the experimental data to a multi-Langmuir isotherm model (MLRA) or from the AED results (equilibrium constants and saturation capacities), when the convergence of the EM program was achieved. The experiments show than the loading capacity of the Luna column is more than twice that of the Halo column for low-molecular-weight compounds. This result was expected; it is in good agreement with the values of the accessible surface area of these two materials, which were calculated from the pore size volume distributions. The pore size volume distributions are validated by the excellent agreement between the calculated and measured exclusion volumes of polystyrene standards by inverse size exclusion chromatography (ISEC). In contrast, the loading capacity ratio of the two columns is 1.5 or less with insulin and lysozyme. This is due to a significant exclusion of these two proteins from the internal pore volumes of the two packing materials. This result raises the problem of the determination of the effective surface area of the packing material, particularly in the case of proteins. This area is about 40 and 30% of the total surface area for insulin and for lysozyme, respectively

  2. Capacity of adsorption of Pb2+ and Ni2+ from aqueous solutions by chitosan produced from silkworm chrysalides in different degrees of deacetylation.

    PubMed

    Paulino, Alexandre T; Guilherme, Marcos R; Reis, Adriano V; Tambourgi, Elias B; Nozaki, Jorge; Muniz, Edvani C

    2007-08-17

    The binding capacities of chitin (CT) and chitosan (CS) produced from silkworm chrysalides were investigated aiming at their future application in the removal of Pb2+ and Ni2+ from wastewaters. CS with 75% deacetylation degree (DD) exhibited good binding performance for Pb(2+), but bad efficiency for Ni2+. The maximum binding capacity obtained from isotherms for CS-Pb was 141.10 mg g(-1) and 52.81 mg g(-1) for CS-Ni. The binding capacities for CT were 32.01 mg g(-1) for Pb2+ and 61.24 mg g(-1) for Ni2+. The authors attribute these behaviors to two main factors: (i) the large ionic size of Pb2+ and (ii) the steric hindrance due to CT acetyl groups. Metal binding onto CS was evaluated by the Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm models. The parameter values obtained from the isotherm analysis confirmed that Pb2+ and Ni2+ interact differently with CS and that various factors influence their adsorption. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) showed that the thermal behavior of CS with 75% deacetylation degree was in the same profile of standard CS; however, the binding of the metals onto its structure affects the curve profile. PMID:17258857

  3. Surface catalyzed mercury transformation reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varanasi, Patanjali

    /m 3 using a diffusion tube as the source of Hg0(g). All experiments were conducted using 4% O2 in nitrogen mix as a reaction gas, and other reactants (HCl, H2O and SO2, NO 2, Br2) were added as required. The fixed bed reactor was operated over a temperature range of 200 to 400°C. In each experiment, the reactor effluent was analyzed using the modified Ontario-Hydro method. After each experiment, fly ash particles were also analyzed for mercury. The results show that the ability of fly ash to adsorb and/or oxidize mercury is primarily dependent on its carbon, iron and calcium content. There can be either one or more than one key component at a particular temperature and flue gas condition. Surface area played a secondary role in effecting the mercury transformations when compared to the concentration of the key component in the fly ash. Amount carbon and surface area played a key important role in the adsorption of mercury. Increased concentration of gases in the flue gas other than oxygen and nitrogen caused decreased the amount of mercury adsorbed on carbon surface. Mercury adsorption by iron oxide primarily depended on the crystalline structure of iron oxide. alpha-iron oxide had no effect on mercury adsorption or oxidation under most of the flue gas conditions, but gamma-iron oxide adsorbed mercury under most of the flue gas conditions. Bromine is a very good oxidizing agent for mercury. But in the presence of calcium oxide containing fly ashes, all the oxidized mercury would be reduced to elemental form. Among the catalysts, it was observed that presence of free lattice chlorine in the catalyst was very important for the oxidation of mercury. But instead of using the catalyst alone, using it along with carbon may better serve the purpose by providing the adsorption surface for mercury and also some extra surface area for the reaction to occur (especially for fly ashes with low surface area).

  4. Characterization of Fly Ash from Coal-Fired Power Plant and Their Properties of Mercury Retention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Ping; Jiang, Xiumin; Wu, Jiang; Pan, Weiguo; Ren, Jianxing

    2015-12-01

    Recent research has shown that fly ash may catalyze the oxidation of elemental mercury and facilitate its removal. However, the nature of mercury-fly ash interaction is still unknown, and the mechanism of mercury retention in fly ash needs to be investigated more thoroughly. In this work, a fly ash from a coal-fired power plant is used to characterize the inorganic and organic constituents and then evaluate its mercury retention capacities. The as-received fly ash sample is mechanically sieved to obtain five size fractions. Their characteristics are examined by loss on ignition (LOI), scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray detector (EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Raman spectra. The results show that the unburned carbon (UBC) content and UBC structural ordering decrease with a decreasing particle size for the five ashes. The morphologies of different size fractions of as-received fly ash change from the glass microspheres to irregular shapes as the particle size increases, but there is no correlation between particle size and mineralogical compositions in each size fraction. The adsorption experimental studies show that the mercury-retention capacity of fly ash depends on the particle size, UBC, and the type of inorganic constituents. Mercury retention of the types of sp2 carbon is similar to that of sp3 carbon.

  5. EVALUATING REGIONAL PREDICTIVE CAPACITY OF A PROCESS-BASED MERCURY EXPOSURE MODEL, REGIONAL-MERCURY CYCLING MODEL (R-MCM), APPLIED TO 91 VERMONT AND NEW HAMPSHIRE LAKES AND PONDS, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Regulatory agencies must develop fish consumption advisories for many lakes and rivers with limited resources. Process-based mathematical models are potentially valuable tools for developing regional fish advisories. The Regional Mercury Cycling model (R-MCM) was specifically d...

  6. Long-Life and High-Areal-Capacity Li-S Batteries Enabled by a Light-Weight Polar Host with Intrinsic Polysulfide Adsorption.

    PubMed

    Pang, Quan; Nazar, Linda F

    2016-04-26

    Lithium-sulfur batteries are attractive electrochemical energy storage systems due to their high theoretical energy density and very high natural abundance of sulfur. However, practically, Li-S batteries suffer from short cycling life and low sulfur utilization, particularly in the case of high-sulfur-loaded cathodes. Here, we report on a light-weight nanoporous graphitic carbon nitride (high-surface-area g-C3N4) that enables a sulfur electrode with an ultralow long-term capacity fade rate of 0.04% per cycle over 1500 cycles at a practical C/2 rate. More importantly, it exhibits good high-sulfur-loading areal capacity (up to 3.5 mAh cm(-2)) with stable cell performance. We demonstrate the strong chemical interaction of g-C3N4 with polysulfides using a combination of spectroscopic experimental studies and first-principles calculations. The 53.5% concentration of accessible pyridinic nitrogen polysulfide adsorption sites is shown to be key for the greatly improved cycling performance compared to that of N-doped carbons. PMID:26841116

  7. A new specific polymeric material for mercury speciation: Application to environmental and food samples.

    PubMed

    Zarco-Fernández, S; Mancheño, M J; Muñoz-Olivas, R; Cámara, C

    2015-10-15

    A new polymeric material (Patent: P201400535) highly specific for mercury is presented. Its great capability to pre-concentrate and selectively elute inorganic mercury and methylmercury are the main figures of merit. The polymer can be reused several times. To our knowledge, this is the only polymer proposed in the literature for direct inorganic mercury and methylmercury speciation without need of chromatography or quantification by difference. The polymer formation is based on the reaction of a vinyl derivative of 8-hydroxiquinoline as monomer, and 2-(Methacryloylamino) ethyl 2-Methyl Acrylate (NOBE) as co-monomer. Random radical polymerization by the precipitation method was carried out using Azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as initiator. The polymer was characterized by SEM and FTIR. Adsorption binding isotherms were evaluated using Langmuir and Freundlich models, showing high adsorption capacity for both inorganic and organic mercury species. The polymer was employed to sequentially determine inorganic mercury and methylmercury, using a solid phase extraction (SPE) scheme. Cross reactivity of several ions, as well as matrix effects from a high saline matrix like seawater was irrelevant as the retained fractions mostly eluted during the washing step. The procedure was first validated by analyzing a certified reference material (BCR 464) and finally applied to commercial fish samples. The speciation proposed procedure is cheap, fast, and easy to use and minimizes reagents waste.

  8. Mercury release from deforested soils triggered by base cation enrichment.

    PubMed

    Farella, N; Lucotte, M; Davidson, R; Daigle, S

    2006-09-01

    The Brazilian Amazon has experienced considerable colonization in the last few decades. Family agriculture based on slash-and-burn enables millions of people to live in that region. However, the poor nutrient content of most Amazonian soils requires cation-rich ashes from the burning of the vegetation biomass for cultivation to be successful, which leads to forest ecosystem degradation, soil erosion and mercury contamination. While recent studies have suggested that mercury present in soils was transferred towards rivers upon deforestation, little is known about the dynamics between agricultural land-use and mercury leaching. In this context, the present study proposes an explanation that illustrates how agricultural land-use triggers mercury loss from soils. This explanation lies in the competition between base cations and mercury in soils which are characterized by a low adsorption capacity. Since these soils are naturally very poor in base cations, the burning of the forest biomass suddenly brings high quantities of base cations to soils, destabilizing the previous equilibrium amongst cations. Base cation enrichment triggers mobility in soil cations, rapidly dislocating mercury atoms. This conclusion comes from principal component analyses illustrating that agricultural land-use was associated with base cation enrichment and mercury depletion. The overall conclusions highlight a pernicious cycle: while soil nutrient enrichment actually occurs through biomass burning, although on a temporary basis, there is a loss in Hg content, which is leached to rivers, entering the aquatic chain, and posing a potential health threat to local populations. Data presented here reflects three decades of deforestation activities, but little is known about the long-term impact of such a disequilibrium. These findings may have repercussions on our understanding of the complex dynamics of deforestation and agriculture worldwide. PMID:16781764

  9. Importance of elemental mercury in lake sediments.

    PubMed

    Bouffard, Ariane; Amyot, Marc

    2009-02-01

    Mercury (Hg) redox changes in sediments are poorly studied and understood, even though they potentially control Hg availability for methylation and can alter sediment-water Hg exchange. Elemental Hg (Hg(0)) concentrations in sediments of two Canadian Shield lakes were assessed by thermodesorption. Hg(0) concentrations in sediments varied between 6.3 and 60.3 pg g(-1) (wet weight) which represented 7.4-28.4% of total mercury (HgT) concentration. Hg(0) concentrations were similar in both lakes. Hg(0) was rapidly adsorbed on sediments in controlled adsorption experiments and surface sediments sampled in summer had a stronger affinity for Hg(0) than deeper sediments and sediments sampled in fall. This adsorption was positively correlated to organic matter content and negatively related to particle grain size, pH and oxygen concentration in overlying water. This study demonstrates that Hg(0) is a prevalent species in sediments, but not in porewater, because of the high sorptive capacity of sediments towards Hg(0). Its potential availability towards Hg methylating bacteria remains to be determined. PMID:19091379

  10. Importance of elemental mercury in lake sediments.

    PubMed

    Bouffard, Ariane; Amyot, Marc

    2009-02-01

    Mercury (Hg) redox changes in sediments are poorly studied and understood, even though they potentially control Hg availability for methylation and can alter sediment-water Hg exchange. Elemental Hg (Hg(0)) concentrations in sediments of two Canadian Shield lakes were assessed by thermodesorption. Hg(0) concentrations in sediments varied between 6.3 and 60.3 pg g(-1) (wet weight) which represented 7.4-28.4% of total mercury (HgT) concentration. Hg(0) concentrations were similar in both lakes. Hg(0) was rapidly adsorbed on sediments in controlled adsorption experiments and surface sediments sampled in summer had a stronger affinity for Hg(0) than deeper sediments and sediments sampled in fall. This adsorption was positively correlated to organic matter content and negatively related to particle grain size, pH and oxygen concentration in overlying water. This study demonstrates that Hg(0) is a prevalent species in sediments, but not in porewater, because of the high sorptive capacity of sediments towards Hg(0). Its potential availability towards Hg methylating bacteria remains to be determined.

  11. Mobility and adsorption capacity of Pb and Zn in a polluted soil from a road environment: laboratory batch experiments.

    PubMed

    Delmas, C; Larpin, L; Legret, M; Astruc, M

    2002-04-01

    A study of the mobility of lead and zinc in a contaminated soil from a road environment was conducted in order to evaluate the risk of groundwater contamination due to rainwater infiltration. The mobility of trace metals was evaluated using single chemical extractions and single-element sorption experiments. The distribution of trace metallic elements on the various soil fractions investigated with the use of sequential extractions, both before and after single extraction or sorption experiments, enabled the monitoring of changes in their localization. Metals are slightly extracted by sodium chloride solutions. High extraction yield was obtained for lead using EDTA. Lead was removed from the "acid-soluble", "reducible" and "oxidizable" fractions. In contrast, zinc was less dissolved by means of complexation with EDTA, yet it showed very high sensitivity to variations in pH. Following single extractions, metals were redistributed in the "exchangeable" fraction. Sorption experiments evaluated the capacity of the soil to retain additional lead and zinc inputs. The results reveal that pH influences the sorption of these metals and the initial pollution present in the soil may induce desorption phenomena with respect to zinc. The high initial concentrations present in the soil do not seem to prevent the retention of additional metal in significant quantities. Added metals were located in the "exchangeable", "add-soluble" and "reducible" fractions.

  12. Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWCNTs), as a Novel Sorbent for Determination of Mercury in Air

    PubMed Central

    Golbabaei, Farideh; Ebrahimi, Ali; Shirkhanloo, Hamid; Koohpaei, Alireza; Faghihi-Zarandi, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background: Based on the noticeable toxicity and numerous application of mercury in industries, removal of mercury vapor through sorbent is an important environmental challenge. Purpose of the Study: Due to their highly porous and hollow structure, large specific surface area, light mass density and strong interaction, Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWCNTs) sorbent were selected for this investigation. Methods: In this study, instrumental conditions, method procedure and different effective parameters such as adsorption efficiency, desorption capacity, time, temperature and repeatability as well as retention time of adsorbed mercury were studied and optimized. Also, mercury vapor was determined by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CV-AAS). Obtained data were analyzed by Independent T- test, Multivariate linear regression and one way–ANOVA finally. Results: For 80 mg nanotubes, working range of SWCNT were achieved 0.02-0.7 μg with linear range (R2=0.994). Our data revealed that maximum absorption capacity was 0.5 μg g-1 as well as limit of detection (LOD) for studied sorbent was 0.006 μg. Also, optimum time and temperature were reported, 10 min and 250 °C respectively. Retention time of mercury on CNTs for three weeks was over 90%. Results of repeated trials indicated that the CNTs had long life, so that after 30 cycles of experiments, efficiency was determined without performance loss. Conclusion: Results showed that carbon nanotubes have high potential for efficient extraction of mercury from air and can be used for occupational and environmental purposes. The study of adsorption properties of CNTs is recommended. PMID:26925918

  13. Immobilization of mercury by carboxymethyl cellulose stabilized iron sulfide nanoparticles: reaction mechanisms and effects of stabilizer and water chemistry.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yanyan; Liu, Yuanyuan; Xiong, Zhong; Zhao, Dongye

    2014-04-01

    Iron sulfide (FeS) nanoparticles were prepared with sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) as a stabilizer, and tested for enhanced removal of aqueous mercury (Hg(2+)). CMC at ≥0.03 wt % fully stabilized 0.5 g/L of FeS (i.e., CMC-to-FeS molar ratio ≥0.0006). FTIR spectra suggested that CMC molecules were attached to the nanoparticles through bidentate bridging and hydrogen bonding. Increasing the CMC-to-FeS molar ratio from 0 to 0.0006 enhanced mercury sorption capacity by 20%; yet, increasing the ratio from 0.0010 to 0.0025 diminished the sorption by 14%. FTIR and XRD analyses suggested that precipitation (formation of cinnabar and metacinnabar), ion exchange (formation of Hg0.89Fe0.11S), and surface complexation were important mechanisms for mercury removal. A pseudo-second-order kinetic model was able to interpret the sorption kinetics, whereas a dual-mode isotherm model was proposed to simulate the isotherms, which considers precipitation and adsorption. High mercury uptake was observed over the pH range of 6.5-10.5, whereas significant capacity loss was observed at pH < 6. High concentrations of Cl(-) (>106 mg/L) and organic matter (5 mg/L as TOC) modestly inhibited mercury uptake. The immobilized mercury remained stable when preserved for 2.5 years at pH above neutral. PMID:24568693

  14. Adsorption of Ag, Cu and Hg from aqueous solutions using expanded perlite.

    PubMed

    Ghassabzadeh, Hamid; Mohadespour, Ahmad; Torab-Mostaedi, Meisam; Zaheri, Parisa; Maragheh, Mohammad Ghannadi; Taheri, Hossein

    2010-05-15

    The aim of the present work was to investigate the ability of expanded perlite (EP) to remove of silver, copper and mercury ions from aqueous solutions. Batch adsorption experiments were carried out and the effect of pH, adsorbent dosage, contact time and temperature of solution on the removal process has been investigated. The optimum pH for the adsorption was found to be 6.5. Adsorption of these metal ions reached their equilibrium concentration in 120, 240 and 180 min for Ag (I), Cu (II) and Hg (II) ions, respectively. Experimental data were also evaluated in terms of kinetic characteristics of adsorption and it was found that adsorption process for these metal ions followed well pseudo-second-order kinetics. Using Langmuir isotherm model, maximum adsorption capacity of EP was found to be 8.46, 1.95 and 0.35 mg/g for Ag (I), Cu (II) and Hg (II) ions, respectively. Finally, the thermodynamic parameters including, the change of free energy (DeltaG degrees ), enthalpy (DeltaH degrees ) and entropy (DeltaS degrees ) of adsorption were calculated for each metal ion. The results showed that the adsorption of these metal ions on EP was feasible and exothermic at 20-50 degrees C.

  15. Mercury and Your Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Risk of Exposure to Mercury Learn About Mercury What is Mercury What is Metallic mercury? Toxicological Profile ToxFAQs Mercury Resources CDC’s National Biomonitoring Program Factsheet on Mercury ...

  16. [Mercury poisoning].

    PubMed

    Bensefa-Colas, L; Andujar, P; Descatha, A

    2011-07-01

    Mercury is a widespread heavy metal with potential severe impacts on human health. Exposure conditions to mercury and profile of toxicity among humans depend on the chemical forms of the mercury: elemental or metallic mercury, inorganic or organic mercury compounds. This article aims to reviewing and synthesizing the main knowledge of the mercury toxicity and its organic compounds that clinicians should know. Acute inhalation of metallic or inorganic mercury vapours mainly induces pulmonary diseases, whereas chronic inhalation rather induces neurological or renal disorders (encephalopathy and interstitial or glomerular nephritis). Methylmercury poisonings from intoxicated food occurred among some populations resulting in neurological disorders and developmental troubles for children exposed in utero. Treatment using chelating agents is recommended in case of symptomatic acute mercury intoxication; sometimes it improves the clinical effects of chronic mercury poisoning. Although it is currently rare to encounter situations of severe intoxication, efforts remain necessary to decrease the mercury concentration in the environment and to reduce risk on human health due to low level exposure (dental amalgam, fish contamination by organic mercury compounds…). In case of occupational exposure to mercury and its compounds, some disorders could be compensated in France. Clinicians should work with toxicologists for the diagnosis and treatment of mercury intoxication.

  17. Application of sulfur impregnated activated carbons for the control of mercury emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Vidic, R.D.; Liu, W.; Brown, T.D.

    1998-12-31

    The dynamics of granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorbers for the uptake of vapor-phase mercury was evaluated as a function of temperature, influent mercury concentration, and empty bed contact time. Sulfur-impregnated carbons exhibited enhanced mercury removal efficiency over virgin carbon due to formation of mercuric sulfide on the carbon surface. The effect of the sulfur impregnation method on mercury removal efficiency was examined through experiments conducted on commercially available sulfur-impregnated carbon (HGR) and carbon impregnated with sulfur in the laboratory (BPL-S). Although HGR and BPL-S possess similar sulfur contents, BPL-S is impregnated at a higher temperature which promotes a more uniform distribution of sulfur in the GAC pore structure. At low influent mercury concentrations and low temperatures, HGR and BPL-S performed similarly in the removal of mercury vapor. However, as the temperature was increased above the melting point of sulfur, the performance of HGR deteriorated significantly, while the performance of BPL-S slightly improved. For both HGR and BPL-S, the observed dynamic mercury adsorptive capacities were far below the capacities predicted by the stoichiometry of mercuric sulfide formation. In HGR carbon the sulfur is very accessible, but agglomeration which occurs at high temperatures causes the sulfur to become relatively unreactive. In BPL-S carbon, on the other hand, the sulfur remains in a highly reactive form, but its location deep in the internal pores makes it relatively inaccessible and susceptible to blockage by HgS formation. Impregnation temperature and the initial sulfur to carbon ratio (SCR) during the impregnation are the two key control parameters for the preparation of these new (BPL-S) sorbents. Higher impregnation temperatures can significantly enhance mercury removal capacity for adsorbents derived either from virgin or re-generated activated carbons. Large fraction of active sulfur atoms that are created at

  18. Carbonaceous materials for adsorptive refrigerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buczek, B.; Wolak, E.

    2012-06-01

    Carbon monoliths prepared from hard coal precursors were obtained. The porous structure of the monoliths was evaluated on the basis of nitrogen adsorption — desorption equilibrium data. The investigated monoliths have a well-developed microporous structure with significant specific surface area (S BET ). Equilibrium studies of methanol vapour adsorption were used to characterize the methanol adsorptive capacity that was determined using a volumetric method. The heat of wetting by methanol was determined in order to estimate the energetic effects of the adsorption process. The results of the investigations show that all monoliths exhibit high adsorption capacity and high heat of wetting with methanol.

  19. Preparation, characterization, and application of modified chitosan sorbents for elemental mercury removal

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, A.C.; Xiang, J.; Sun, L.S.; Hu, S.; Li, P.S.; Shi, J.M.; Fu, P.; Su, S.

    2009-05-15

    A series of raw, iodine (bromide) or/and sulfuric acid-modified chitosan sorbents were synthesized and comprehensively characterized by N{sub 2} isotherm adsorption/desorption method, TGA, FTIR, XRD, and XPS et al. Adsorption experiments of vapor-phase elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) were studied using the sorbents in a laboratory-scale fixed-bed reactor. The results revealed that porosities and specific surface areas of the sorbents decreased after modification. The sorbents operated stably at flue-gas temperature below 140{sup o}C. The chemical reactions of iodine and sulfate ion with the amide of chitosan occurred, and the I{sub 2} was found in the sorbents due to the presence of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. Fixed-bed adsorber tests showed that compared to raw chitosan, the bromide or iodine-modified chitosan could promote the efficiency of Hg{sub 0} capture more or less. Mercury removal efficiency could be significantly promoted when an appropriate content of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} was added, and the iodine and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} modified sorbents almost had a mercury removal efficiency of 100% for 3 h. The presence of moisture can increase the sorbent's capacity for mercury uptake due to the existence of active sites, such as sulfonate and amino group. The mercury breakthrough of modified chitosan sorbents decreased with increasing temperature. A reaction scheme that could explain the experimental results was presumed based on the characterizations and adsorption study.

  20. Different crystal-forms of one-dimensional MnO2 nanomaterials for the catalytic oxidation and adsorption of elemental mercury.

    PubMed

    Xu, Haomiao; Qu, Zan; Zhao, Songjian; Mei, Jian; Quan, Fuquan; Yan, Naiqiang

    2015-12-15

    MnO2 has been found to be a promising material to capture elemental mercury (Hg(0)) from waste gases. To investigate the structure effect on Hg(0) uptake, three types of one-dimensional (1D) MnO2 nano-particles, α-, β- and γ-MnO2, were successfully prepared and tested. The structures of α-, β- and γ-MnO2 were characterized by XRD, BET, TEM and SEM. The results indicate that α-, β- and γ-MnO2 were present in the morphologies of belt-, rod- and spindle-like 1D materials, respectively. These findings demonstrated noticeably different activities in capturing Hg(0), depending on the surface area and crystalline structure. The performance enhancement is in the order of: β-MnO2<γ-MnO2<α-MnO2 at 150°C. The mechanism for Hg(0) removal using MnO2 was discussed with the help of results from H2-TPR, XPS and Hg(0) removal experiments in the absence of O2. It was determined that the oxidizability of three forms of MnO2 increased as follows: β-MnO2<γ-MnO2<α-MnO2. The mechanism for Hg(0) capture was ascribed to the Hg(0) catalytic oxidation with the reduction of Mn(4+)→Mn(3+)→Mn(2+). Furthermore, the interaction forces between mercury and manganese oxide sites are demonstrated to increase in the following order: β-MnO2<γ-MnO2<α-MnO2 based on the desorption tests. PMID:26093358

  1. Got Mercury?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyers, Valerie E.; McCoy, J. Torin; Garcia, Hector D.; James, John T.

    2009-01-01

    Many of the operational and payload lighting units used in various spacecraft contain elemental mercury. If these devices were damaged on-orbit, elemental mercury could be released into the cabin. Although there are plans to replace operational units with alternate light sources, such as LEDs, that do not contain mercury, mercury-containing lamps efficiently produce high quality illumination and may never be completely replaced on orbit. Therefore, exposure to elemental mercury during spaceflight will remain possible and represents a toxicological hazard. Elemental mercury is a liquid metal that vaporizes slowly at room temperature. However, it may be completely vaporized at the elevated operating temperatures of lamps. Although liquid mercury is not readily absorbed through the skin or digestive tract, mercury vapors are efficiently absorbed through the respiratory tract. Therefore, the amount of mercury in the vapor form must be estimated. For mercury releases from lamps that are not being operated, we utilized a study conducted by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Quality to calculate the amount of mercury vapor expected to form over a 2-week period. For longer missions and for mercury releases occurring when lamps are operating, we conservatively assumed complete volatilization of the available mercury. Because current spacecraft environmental control systems are unable to remove mercury vapors, both short-term and long-term exposures to mercury vapors are possible. Acute exposure to high concentrations of mercury vapors can cause irritation of the respiratory tract and behavioral symptoms, such as irritability and hyperactivity. Chronic exposure can result in damage to the nervous system (tremors, memory loss, insomnia, etc.) and kidneys (proteinurea). Therefore, the JSC Toxicology Group recommends that stringent safety controls and verifications (vibrational testing, etc.) be applied to any hardware that contains elemental mercury that could yield

  2. Electronic storage capacity of ceria: role of peroxide in Aux supported on CeO2(111) facet and CO adsorption.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yinli; Li, Huiying; Yu, Jun; Mao, Dongsen; Lu, Guanzhong

    2015-11-01

    Density functional theory (DFT+U) was used to study the adsorption of Aux (x = 1-4) clusters on the defective CeO2(111) facet and CO adsorption on the corresponding Aux/CeO2-x catalyst, in this work Aux clusters are adsorbed onto the CeO2-x + superoxide/peroxide surface. When Au1 is supported on the CeO2(111) facet with an O vacancy, the strong electronegative Au(δ-) formed is not favorable for CO adsorption. When peroxide is adsorbed on the CeO2(111) facet with the O vacancy, Aux was oxidized, resulting in stable Aux adsorption on the defective ceria surface with peroxide, which promotes CO adsorption on the Aux/CeO2-x catalyst. With more Au atoms in supported Aux clusters, CO adsorption on this surface becomes stronger. During both the Au being supported on CeO2-x and CO being adsorbed on Aux/CeO2-x, CeO2 acts as an electron buffer that can store/release the electrons. These results provide a scientific understanding for the development of high-performance rare earth catalytic materials.

  3. COMBINED THEORETICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF MECHANISMS AND KINETICS OF VAPOR-PHASE MERCURY UPTAKE BY CARBONACOUES SURFACES

    SciTech Connect

    Radisav D. Vidic

    2002-05-01

    The first part of this study evaluated the application of a versatile optical technique to study the adsorption and desorption of model adsorbates representative of volatile polar (acetone) and non-polar (propane) organic compounds on a model carbonaceous surface under ultra high vacuum (UHV) conditions. The results showed the strong correlation between optical differential reflectance (ODR) and adsorbate coverage determined by temperature programmed desorption (TPD). ODR technique was proved to be a powerful tool to investigate surface adsorption and desorption from UHV to high pressure conditions. The effects of chemical functionality and surface morphology on the adsorption/desorption behavior of acetone, propane and mercury were investigated for two model carbonaceous surfaces, namely air-cleaved highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) and plasma-oxidized HOPG. They can be removed by thermal treatment (> 500 K). The presence of these groups almost completely suppresses propane adsorption at 90K and removal of these groups leads to dramatic increase in adsorption capacity. The amount of acetone adsorbed is independent of surface heat treatment and depends only on total exposure. The effects of morphological heterogeneity is evident for plasma-oxidized HOPG as this substrate provides greater surface area, as well as higher energy binding sites. Mercury adsorption at 100 K on HOPG surfaces with and without chemical functionalities and topological heterogeneity created by plasma oxidation occurs through physisorption. The removal of chemical functionalities from HOPG surface enhances mercury physisorption. Plasma oxidation of HOPG provides additional surface area for mercury adsorption. Mercury adsorption by activated carbon at atmospheric pressure occurs through two distinct mechanisms, physisorption below 348 K and chemisorption above 348 K. No significant impact of oxygen functionalities was observed in the chemisorption region. The key findings of this study

  4. Insights into the adsorption capacity and breakthrough properties of a synthetic zeolite against a mixture of various sulfur species at low ppb levels.

    PubMed

    Vellingiri, Kowsalya; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Kwon, Eilhann E; Deep, Akash; Jo, Sang-Hee; Szulejko, Jan E

    2016-01-15

    The sorptive removal properties of a synthetic A4 zeolite were evaluated against sulfur dioxide (SO2) and four reference reduced sulfur compounds (RSC: hydrogen sulfide (H2S), methanethiol (CH3SH), dimethyl sulfide (DMS, (CH3)2S), and dimethyl disulfide (DMDS, CH3SSCH3). To this end, a sorbent bed of untreated (as-received) A4 zeolite was loaded with gaseous standards at four concentration levels (10-100 part-per-billion (ppb (v/v)) at four different volumes (0.1, 0.2, 0.5, and 1 L increments) in both increasing (IO: 0.1-1.0 L) and decreasing volume order (DO: 1.0 to 0.1 L). Morphological properties were characterized by PXRD, FTIR, and BET analysis. The removal efficiency of SO2 decreased from 100% for all concentrations at 0.1 L (initial sample volume) to ∼82% (100 ppb) or ∼96% (10 ppb) at 3.6 L. In contrast, removal efficiency of RSC was near 100% at small loading volumes but then fell sharply, irrespective of concentration (10-100 ppb) (e.g., 32% (DMS) to 52% (H2S) at 100 ppb). The adsorption capacity of zeolite, if expressed in terms of solid-gas partition coefficient (e.g., similar to the Henry's law constant (mmol kg(-1) Pa(-1))), showed moderate variabilities with the standard concentration levels and S compound types such as the minimum of 2.03 for CH3SH (at 20 ppb) to the maximum of 13.9 for SO2 (at 10 ppb). It clearly demonstrated a notable distinction in the removal efficiency of A4 zeolite among the different S species in a mixture with enhanced removal efficiency of SO2 compared to the RSCs.

  5. Bone char surface modification by nano-gold coating for elemental mercury vapor removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assari, Mohamad javad; Rezaee, Abbas; Rangkooy, Hossinali

    2015-07-01

    The present work was done to develop a novel nanocomposite using bone char coated with nano-gold for capture of elemental mercury (Hg0) from air. The morphologies, structures, and chemical constitute of the prepared nanocomposite were evaluated by UV-VIS-NIR, dynamic light-scattering (DLS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The capture performance of nanocomposite was evaluated in a needle trap for mercury vapor. An on-line setup based on cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CVAAS) was designed for Hg0 determination. Dynamic capacity of nanocomposite for Hg0 was shown high efficient operating capacity of 586.7 μg/g. As temperature increases, the dynamic adsorption capacity of the nanocomposite was decreased, which are characteristics of physicosorption processes. It was found that the surface modification of bone char with nano-gold has various advantages such as high operating dynamic adsorption capacity and low cost preparation. It was also demonstrated that the developed nanocomposite is suitable for on-line monitoring of Hg0. It could be applied for the laboratory and field studies.

  6. Surfactant mediated synthesis of poly(acrylic acid) grafted xanthan gum and its efficient role in adsorption of soluble inorganic mercury from water.

    PubMed

    Pal, Abhijit; Majumder, Kunal; Bandyopadhyay, Abhijit

    2016-11-01

    Noble copolymers from xanthan gum (XG) and poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) were synthesised through surfactant mediated graft copolymerization. The copolymers were applied as a biosorbent for inorganic Hg(II) at higher concentration level (300ppm). The copolymers were characterized using different analytical techniques which showed, the grafting principally occurred across the amorphous region of XG. Measurement of zeta potential and hydrodynamic size indicated, the copolymers were strong polyanion and possessed greater hydrodynamic size (almost in all cases) than XG, despite a strong molecular degradation that took place simultaneously during grafting. In the dispersed form, all grades of the copolymer displayed higher adsorption capability than XG, however, the grade with maximum grafting produced the highest efficiency (68.03%). Manipulation produced further improvement in efficiency to 72.17% with the same copolymer after 75min at a pH of 5.0. The allowable biosorbent dose, however, was 1000ppm as determined from the experimental evidences. PMID:27516248

  7. Modeling study of natural emissions, source apportionment, and emission control of atmospheric mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shetty, Suraj K.

    ) and CAMNet (Canadian Atmospheric Mercury Measurement Network). The model estimated a total deposition of 474 Mg yr-1 to the CONUS (Contiguous United States) domain, with two-thirds being dry deposited. Reactive gaseous mercury contributed the most to 60% of deposition. Emission speciation distribution is a key factor for local deposition as contribution from large point sources can be as high as 75% near (< 100 km) the emission sources, indicating that emission reduction may result in direct deposition decrease near the source locations. Among the sources, BC contributes to about 68% to 91% of total deposition. Excluding the BC's contribution, EGU contributes to nearly 50% of deposition caused by CONUS emissions in the Northeast, Southeast and East Central regions, while emissions from natural processes are more important in the Pacific and West Central regions (contributing up to 40% of deposition). The modeling results implies that implementation of the new emission standards proposed by USEPA (United States Environmental Protection Agency) would significantly benefit regions that have larger contributions from EGU sources. Control of mercury emissions from coal combustion processes has attracted great attention due to its toxicity and the emission-control regulations and has lead to advancement in state-of-the-art control technologies that alleviate the impact of mercury on ecosystem and human health. This part of the work applies a sorption model to simulate adsorption of mercury in flue gases, onto a confined-bed of activated carbon. The model's performances were studied at various flue gas flow rates, inlet mercury concentrations and adsorption bed temperatures. The process simulated a flue gas, with inlet mercury concentration of 300 ppb, entering at a velocity of 0.3 m s-1 from the bottom into a fixed bed (inside bed diameter of 1 m and 3 m bed height; bed temperature of 25 °C) of activated carbon (particle size of 0.004 m with density of 0.5 g cm-3 and

  8. Got Mercury?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, Valerie E.; McCoy, Torin J.; Garcia, Hector D.; James, John T.

    2010-09-01

    Many lamps used in various spacecraft contain elemental mercury, which is efficiently absorbed by the lungs as a vapor. The liquid metal vaporizes slowly at room temperature, but may vaporize completely when lamps are operating. Because current spacecraft environmental control systems are unable to remove mercury vapors, we considered short-term and long-term exposures. We estimated mercury vapor releases from stowed lamps during missions lasting ≤ 30 days, whereas we conservatively assumed complete vaporization from stowed lamps during missions lasting > 30 days and from operating lamps regardless of mission duration. The toxicity of mercury and its lack of removal have led Johnson Space Center’s Toxicology Group to recommend stringent safety controls and verifications for hardware containing elemental mercury that could yield airborne mercury vapor concentrations > 0.1 mg/m3 in the total spacecraft atmosphere for exposures lasting ≤ 30 days, or concentrations > 0.01 mg/m3 for exposures lasting > 30 days.

  9. Potential anthropogenic mobilisation of mercury and arsenic from soils on mineralised rocks, Northland, New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Craw, D

    2005-02-01

    Eroded roots of hot spring systems in Northland, New Zealand consist of mineralised rocks containing sulfide minerals. Marcasite and cinnabar are the dominant sulfides with subordinate pyrite. Deep weathering and leached soil formation has occurred in a warm temperate to subtropical climate with up to 3 m/year rainfall. Decomposition of the iron sulfides in natural and anthropogenic rock exposures yields acid rock drainage with pH typically between 2 and 4, and locally down to pH 1. Soils and weathered rocks developed on basement greywacke have negligible acid neutralisation capacity. Natural rainforest soils have pH between 4 and 5 on unmineralised greywacke, and pH is as low as 3.5 in soils on mineralised rocks. Roads with aggregate made from mineralised rocks have pH near 3, and quarries from which the rock was extracted can have pH down to 1. Mineralised rocks are enriched in arsenic and mercury, both of which are environmentally available as solid solution impurities in iron sulfides and phosphate minerals. Base metals (Cu, Pb, Zn) are present at low levels in soils, at or below typical basement rock background. Decomposition of the iron sulfides releases the solid solution arsenic and mercury into the acid rock drainage solutions. Phosphate minerals release their impurities only under strongly acid conditions (pH<1). Arsenic and mercury are adsorbed on to iron oxyhydroxides in soils, concentrated in the C horizon, with up to 4000 ppm arsenic and 100 ppm mercury. Waters emanating from acid rock drainage areas have arsenic and mercury below drinking water limits. Leaching experiments and theoretical predictions indicate that both arsenic and mercury are least mobile in acid soils, at pH of c. 3-4. This optimum pH range for fixation of arsenic and mercury on iron oxyhydroxides in soils is similar to natural pH at the field site of this study. However, neutralisation of acid soils developed on mineralised rocks is likely to decrease adsorption and enhance

  10. Development of Nano-Sulfide Sorbent for Efficient Removal of Elemental Mercury from Coal Combustion Fuel Gas.

    PubMed

    Li, Hailong; Zhu, Lei; Wang, Jun; Li, Liqing; Shih, Kaimin

    2016-09-01

    The surface area of zinc sulfide (ZnS) was successfully enlarged using nanostructure particles synthesized by a liquid-phase precipitation method. The ZnS with the highest surface area (named Nano-ZnS) of 196.1 m(2)·g(-1) was then used to remove gas-phase elemental mercury (Hg(0)) from simulated coal combustion fuel gas at relatively high temperatures (140 to 260 °C). The Nano-ZnS exhibited far greater Hg(0) adsorption capacity than the conventional bulk ZnS sorbent due to the abundance of surface sulfur sites, which have a high binding affinity for Hg(0). Hg(0) was first physically adsorbed on the sorbent surface and then reacted with the adjacent surface sulfur to form the most stable mercury compound, HgS, which was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis and a temperature-programmed desorption test. At the optimal temperature of 180 °C, the equilibrium Hg(0) adsorption capacity of the Nano-ZnS (inlet Hg(0) concentration of 65.0 μg·m(-3)) was greater than 497.84 μg·g(-1). Compared with several commercial activated carbons used exclusively for gas-phase mercury removal, the Nano-ZnS was superior in both Hg(0) adsorption capacity and adsorption rate. With this excellent Hg(0) removal performance, noncarbon Nano-ZnS may prove to be an advantageous alternative to activated carbon for Hg(0) removal in power plants equipped with particulate matter control devices, while also offering a means of reusing fly ash as a valuable resource, for example as a concrete additive. PMID:27508312

  11. Development of Nano-Sulfide Sorbent for Efficient Removal of Elemental Mercury from Coal Combustion Fuel Gas.

    PubMed

    Li, Hailong; Zhu, Lei; Wang, Jun; Li, Liqing; Shih, Kaimin

    2016-09-01

    The surface area of zinc sulfide (ZnS) was successfully enlarged using nanostructure particles synthesized by a liquid-phase precipitation method. The ZnS with the highest surface area (named Nano-ZnS) of 196.1 m(2)·g(-1) was then used to remove gas-phase elemental mercury (Hg(0)) from simulated coal combustion fuel gas at relatively high temperatures (140 to 260 °C). The Nano-ZnS exhibited far greater Hg(0) adsorption capacity than the conventional bulk ZnS sorbent due to the abundance of surface sulfur sites, which have a high binding affinity for Hg(0). Hg(0) was first physically adsorbed on the sorbent surface and then reacted with the adjacent surface sulfur to form the most stable mercury compound, HgS, which was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis and a temperature-programmed desorption test. At the optimal temperature of 180 °C, the equilibrium Hg(0) adsorption capacity of the Nano-ZnS (inlet Hg(0) concentration of 65.0 μg·m(-3)) was greater than 497.84 μg·g(-1). Compared with several commercial activated carbons used exclusively for gas-phase mercury removal, the Nano-ZnS was superior in both Hg(0) adsorption capacity and adsorption rate. With this excellent Hg(0) removal performance, noncarbon Nano-ZnS may prove to be an advantageous alternative to activated carbon for Hg(0) removal in power plants equipped with particulate matter control devices, while also offering a means of reusing fly ash as a valuable resource, for example as a concrete additive.

  12. Efficient removal of mercury from aqueous solutions and industrial effluent.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Maria B P; Leal, Katia Z; Oliveira, Fernando J S; Sella, Silvia M; Vieira, Méri D; Marques, Elisa M D; Gomes, Vanessa A C

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the ability of a solid waste produced during beneficiation of ornamental rocks to remove mercury (Hg) from an industrial effluent and aqueous solutions under various conditions. Batch studies have been carried out by observing the effects of pH, concentration of the adsorbate, contact time, and so on. Various sorption isotherm models such as Langmuir, Freundlich, and Tóth have been applied for the adsorbent. Film and intraparticle diffusion were both found to be rate-limiting steps. Adsorption was properly described by the Freundlich model (capacity constant of 0.3090 (mg g(-1))(mg L(-1))(-1/n) and adsorption intensity indicator of 2.2939), which indicated a favorable sorption and encouraged subsequent studies for treatment of Hg-containing industrial effluent. Industrial effluent treatment efficiency reached Hg removals greater than 90% by using ornamental rock solid waste (ORSW). Besides, desorption studies indicated that the maximum recovery of mercury was 100 ± 2% for 1 mol L(-1) HNO3 and 74 ± 8% for 0.1 mol L(-1) HNO3. The ORSW could be reused thrice without significant difference on the Hg removal rate from industrial effluent. These findings place ORSW as a promising efficient and low-cost adsorbent for the removal of Hg from aqueous solutions and industrial effluent. PMID:26301849

  13. Efficient removal of mercury from aqueous solutions and industrial effluent.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Maria B P; Leal, Katia Z; Oliveira, Fernando J S; Sella, Silvia M; Vieira, Méri D; Marques, Elisa M D; Gomes, Vanessa A C

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the ability of a solid waste produced during beneficiation of ornamental rocks to remove mercury (Hg) from an industrial effluent and aqueous solutions under various conditions. Batch studies have been carried out by observing the effects of pH, concentration of the adsorbate, contact time, and so on. Various sorption isotherm models such as Langmuir, Freundlich, and Tóth have been applied for the adsorbent. Film and intraparticle diffusion were both found to be rate-limiting steps. Adsorption was properly described by the Freundlich model (capacity constant of 0.3090 (mg g(-1))(mg L(-1))(-1/n) and adsorption intensity indicator of 2.2939), which indicated a favorable sorption and encouraged subsequent studies for treatment of Hg-containing industrial effluent. Industrial effluent treatment efficiency reached Hg removals greater than 90% by using ornamental rock solid waste (ORSW). Besides, desorption studies indicated that the maximum recovery of mercury was 100 ± 2% for 1 mol L(-1) HNO3 and 74 ± 8% for 0.1 mol L(-1) HNO3. The ORSW could be reused thrice without significant difference on the Hg removal rate from industrial effluent. These findings place ORSW as a promising efficient and low-cost adsorbent for the removal of Hg from aqueous solutions and industrial effluent.

  14. Kinetic and thermodynamic studies of Hg(II) adsorption onto MCM-41 modified by ZnCl2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raji, Foad; Pakizeh, Majid

    2014-05-01

    Kinetics and thermodynamics of mercury ions sorption onto ZnCl2-MCM-41 sorbent were studied. Several rate models in the form of two main classes of mathematic kinetic models (adsorption reaction models and adsorption diffusion models) were investigated. Pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, Elovich, film and intraparticle diffusion models were used to analyze the kinetic data. Results showed that the pseudo-second order model can well describe the adsorption kinetic data. The thermodynamic parameters, such as Gibb's free energy change (ΔG°), standard enthalpy change (ΔH°) and standard entropy change (ΔS°) were also evaluated. Negative value of free energy at temperature range of 20-55 °C, indicates the spontaneous nature of Hg(II) sorption by ZnCl2-MCM-41 sorbent. The adsorption capacity which was found to decrease with temperature showed the exothermic nature of the mercury sorption process (ΔH° = -49.4 kJ mol-1). The negative ΔS° value (-148.9 J mol-1 K-1) revealed a decrease in the randomness at the solid/solution interface and also indicated the fast adsorption of the Hg(II) onto active sites.

  15. Extraction of mercury from groundwater using immobilized algae

    SciTech Connect

    Barkley, N.P. )

    1991-10-01

    Bio-Recovery Systems, Inc. conducted a project under the Emerging Technology portion of the United States Environmental Protection Agency's (EPAs) Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program to evaluate the ability of immobilized algae to adsorb mercury from contaminated groundwater in laboratory studies and pilot-scale field tests. Algal biomass was incorporated in a permeable polymeric matrix. The product, AlgaSORB, packed into adsorption columns, exhibited excellent flow characteristics, and functioned as a biological ion exchange resin. A sequence of eleven laboratory tests demonstrated the ability of this product to adsorb mercury from groundwater that contained high levels of total dissolved solids and hard water components. However, use of a single AlgaSORB preparation yielded nonrepeatable results with samples collected at different times of the year. The strategy of sequentially extracting the groundwater through two columns containing different preparations of AlgaSORB was developed and proved successful in laboratory and pilot-scale field tests. Field test results indicate that AlgaSORB could be economically competitive with ion exchange resins for removal of mercury, with the advantage that hardness and other dissolved solids do not appear to compete with heavy metals for binding capacity.

  16. Extraction of mercury from groundwater using immobilized algae.

    PubMed

    Barkley, N P

    1991-10-01

    Bio-Recovery Systems, Inc. conducted a project under the Emerging Technology portion of the United States Environmental Protection Agency's (EPAs) Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program to evaluate the ability of immobilized algae to adsorb mercury from contaminated groundwater in laboratory studies and pilot-scale field tests. Algal biomass was incorporated in a permeable polymeric matrix. The product, AlgaSORB, packed into adsorption columns, exhibited excellent flow characteristics, and functioned as a "biological" ion exchange resin. A sequence of eleven laboratory tests demonstrated the ability of this product to adsorb mercury from groundwater that contained high levels of total dissolved solids and hard water components. However, use of a single AlgaSORB preparation yielded nonrepeatable results with samples collected at different times of the year. The strategy of sequentially extracting the groundwater through two columns containing different preparations of AlgaSORB was developed and proved successful in laboratory and pilot-scale field tests. Field test results indicate that AlgaSORB could be economically competitive with ion exchange resins for removal of mercury, with the advantage that hardness and other dissolved solids do not appear to compete with heavy metals for binding capacity. PMID:1777231

  17. Mercury emissions from municipal solid waste combustors

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    This report examines emissions of mercury (Hg) from municipal solid waste (MSW) combustion in the United States (US). It is projected that total annual nationwide MSW combustor emissions of mercury could decrease from about 97 tonnes (1989 baseline uncontrolled emissions) to less than about 4 tonnes in the year 2000. This represents approximately a 95 percent reduction in the amount of mercury emitted from combusted MSW compared to the 1989 mercury emissions baseline. The likelihood that routinely achievable mercury emissions removal efficiencies of about 80 percent or more can be assured; it is estimated that MSW combustors in the US could prove to be a comparatively minor source of mercury emissions after about 1995. This forecast assumes that diligent measures to control mercury emissions, such as via use of supplemental control technologies (e.g., carbon adsorption), are generally employed at that time. However, no present consensus was found that such emissions control measures can be implemented industry-wide in the US within this time frame. Although the availability of technology is apparently not a limiting factor, practical implementation of necessary control technology may be limited by administrative constraints and other considerations (e.g., planning, budgeting, regulatory compliance requirements, etc.). These projections assume that: (a) about 80 percent mercury emissions reduction control efficiency is achieved with air pollution control equipment likely to be employed by that time; (b) most cylinder-shaped mercury-zinc (CSMZ) batteries used in hospital applications can be prevented from being disposed into the MSW stream or are replaced with alternative batteries that do not contain mercury; and (c) either the amount of mercury used in fluorescent lamps is decreased to an industry-wide average of about 27 milligrams of mercury per lamp or extensive diversion from the MSW stream of fluorescent lamps that contain mercury is accomplished.

  18. Water adsorption at high temperature on core samples from The Geysers geothermal field

    SciTech Connect

    Gruszkiewicz, M.S.; Horita, J.; Simonson, J.M.; Mesmer, R.E.

    1998-06-01

    The quantity of water retained by rock samples taken from three wells located in The Geysers geothermal reservoir, California, was measured at 150, 200, and 250 C as a function of pressure in the range 0.00 {le} p/p{sub 0} {le} 0.98, where p{sub 0} is the saturated water vapor pressure. Both adsorption (increasing pressure) and desorption (decreasing pressure) runs were made in order to investigate the nature and the extent of the hysteresis. Additionally, low temperature gas adsorption analyses were performed on the same rock samples. Nitrogen or krypton adsorption and desorption isotherms at 77 K were used to obtain BET specific surface areas, pore volumes and their distributions with respect to pore sizes. Mercury intrusion porosimetry was also used to obtain similar information extending to very large pores (macropores). A qualitative correlation was found between the surface properties obtained from nitrogen adsorption and the mineralogical and petrological characteristics of the solids. However, there is in general no proportionality between BET specific surface areas and the capacity of the rocks for water adsorption at high temperatures. The results indicate that multilayer adsorption rather than capillary condensation is the dominant water storage mechanism at high temperatures.

  19. ASSESSMENT OF LOW COST NOVEL SORBENTS FOR COAL-FIRED POWER PLANT MERCURY CONTROL

    SciTech Connect

    Sharon Sjostrom

    2002-02-22

    This is a Technical Report under a program funded by the Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to obtain the necessary information to assess the viability of lower cost alternatives to commercially available activated carbon for mercury control in coal-fired utilities. During this reporting period, several sorbent samples have been tested by URS in their laboratory fixed-bed system. The sorbents were evaluated under conditions simulating flue gas from power plants burning Powder River Basin (PRB) and low sulfur eastern bituminous coals. The equilibrium adsorption capacities of the sorbents for both elemental and oxidized mercury are presented. A team meeting discussing the overall program and meetings with Midwest Generation and Wisconsin Electric Power Company (WEPCO) concerning field testing occurred during this reporting period.

  20. Mercury capture in bench-scale absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Livengood, C.D.; Huang, H.S.; Mendelsohn, M.H.; Wu, J.M.

    1994-08-01

    This paper gives,a brief overview of research being conducted at Argonne National Laboratory on the capture of mercury by both dry sorbents and wet scrubbers. The emphasis in the research is on development of a better understanding of the key factors that control the capture of mercury. Future work is expected to utilize that information for the development of new or modified process concepts featuring enhanced mercury capture capabilities. The results and conclusions to date from the Argonne -research on dry sorbents can be summarized as follows: lime hydrates, either regular or high-surface-area, are `not effective in removing mercury; mercury removals are enhanced by the addition of activated carbon; mercury removals with activated carbon decrease with increasing temperature, larger particle size, and decreasing mercury concentration in the gas; and chemical pretreatment (e.g., with sulfur or (CaCl{sub 2}) can greatly increase the removal capacity of activated carbon. Preliminary results from the wet scrubbing research include: no removal of elemental mercury is obtained under normal scrubber operating conditions; mercury removal is improved by the addition of packing or production of smaller gas bubbles to increase the gas-liquid contact area; polysulfide solutions do not appear promising for enhancing mercury removal in typical FGC systems; stainless steel packing appears to have beneficial properties for mercury removal and should be investigated further; and other chemical additives may offer greatly enhanced removals.

  1. Biochar from malt spent rootlets for the removal of mercury from aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutsika, Lamprini; Manariotis, Ioannis; Karapanagioti, Hrissi K.

    2013-04-01

    Biochar is receiving increased attention as a promising material in environmental applications. It is obtained from the incomplete combustion of carbon-rich biomass under oxygen-limited conditions. One of the many proposed applications of biochars is the removal of metals (e.g., lead, mercury, etc.) from aqueous solutions. Mercury is one of the heavy metals of particular concern due to its toxicity even at relatively low concentration and thus, its removal from aqueous systems is desirable. Malt spent rootlets is a by-product formed during beer production, it is inexpensive and it is produced in high quantities. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the potential use of biochar, produced from malt spent rootlets, to remove mercury from aqueous solutions. Batch experiments were conducted at room temperature (25oC) to obtain the optimum sorption conditions under different pH values, biomass dose, contact time, and solution ionic strength. Sorption kinetics and equilibrium capacity constants were determined at the optimum pH value. Furthermore, the effect of different leaching solutions on mercury desorption from the biochar was examined. All studies with mercury and biochar were conducted at pH 5 that was determined to be the optimum pH for sorption. The proportion of mercury removal increased with the increased dose of the biochar, i.e. from 71% removal for biochar dose of 0.3 g/L, it reached almost 100% removal for biochar dose ˜1 g/L. Based on the isotherm data, the maximum biochar sorption capacity (qmax) for mercury was 99 mg/g. Based on the sorption kinetic data, (qmax) was achieved after 2 h; it should be mentioned that 30% of the (qmax) was observed within the first 5 min. Five leaching solutions were tested for mercury desorption (H2O, HCl, EDTA, NaCl and HNO3). HCl resulted in the highest extraction percentage of the sorbed mercury. The desorbing mercury percentages at 24 h for HCl concentrations 0.1, 0.2, 0.4, 0.8, and 2 M were 62, 59, 62, 69

  2. Micromechanism of sulfurizing activated carbon and its ability to adsorb mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Guofang; Xu, Minren; Liu, Qingcai; Yang, Jian; Ma, Dongran; Lu, Cunfang; Lan, Yuanpei

    2013-11-01

    To eliminate mercury from coal-fired flue gas, sulfurization of carbons has been found to be the most inexpensive approach to solve the problem of environment contamination by mercury. This study focuses on improving the adsorption capacity of activate carbon loaded with elemental sulfur as an active phase and further use in the removal of mercury vapors from fuel gas. In this paper, equipment such as the scanning electron microscope, specific surface area test machine and fluorescence spectrophotometer are employed to study the ability of the S-loaded activated carbon. The results show that unmodified activate carbon has smooth hole surface and uneven distributed hole size. Pore walls of activate carbon modified became rougher and the hole size distribution is asymmetrical. Sulfur is uniformly distributed and is mainly bonded on the surface of the skeleton of activate carbon. In addition, a small amount of granular sulfur was loaded on the surface of the pore walls. Higher temperature creates smaller pore size and larger microporous volume. Improving the process temperature is conducive to the development of micropore and the distribution of sulfur, and a larger amount of small molecular weight sulfur are created, which is helpful in the removal of HgO through chemical adsorption. The optimum modification temperature and holding time is 550 °C and 60 min, which creates the adsorbents of the max absorption capability of 1227.5 μg Hg/g.

  3. Impact of sulfur oxides on mercury capture by activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Presto, Albert A; Granite, Evan J

    2007-09-15

    Recent field tests of mercury removal with activated carbon injection (ACI) have revealed that mercury capture is limited in flue gases containing high concentrations of sulfur oxides (SOx). In order to gain a more complete understanding of the impact of SOx on ACl, mercury capture was tested under varying conditions of SO2 and SO3 concentrations using a packed bed reactor and simulated flue gas (SFG). The final mercury content of the activated carbons is independent of the SO2 concentration in the SFG, but the presence of SO3 inhibits mercury capture even at the lowest concentration tested (20 ppm). The mercury removal capacity decreases as the sulfur content of the used activated carbons increases from 1 to 10%. In one extreme case, an activated carbon with 10% sulfur, prepared by H2SO4 impregnation, shows almost no mercury capacity. The results suggest that mercury and sulfur oxides are in competition for the same binding sites on the carbon surface.

  4. Impact of Sulfur Oxides on Mercury Capture by Activated Carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Presto, A.A.; Granite, E.J.

    2007-09-15

    Recent field tests of mercury removal with activated carbon injection (ACI) have revealed that mercury capture is limited in flue gases containing high concentrations of sulfur oxides (SOx). In order to gain a more complete understanding of the impact of SOx on ACI, mercury capture was tested under varying conditions of SO2 and SO3 concentrations using a packed bed reactor and simulated flue gas (SFG). The final mercury content of the activated carbons is independent of the SO2 concentration in the SFG, but the presence of SO3 inhibits mercury capture even at the lowest concentration tested (20 ppm). The mercury removal capacity decreases as the sulfur content of the used activated carbons increases from 1 to 10%. In one extreme case, an activated carbon with 10% sulfur, prepared by H2SO4 impregnation, shows almost no mercury capacity. The results suggest that mercury and sulfur oxides are in competition for the same binding sites on the carbon surface.

  5. Removal of elemental mercury by iodine-modified rice husk ash sorbents.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Pengfei; Guo, Xin; Zheng, Chuguang

    2010-01-01

    Iodine-modified calcium-based rice husk ash sorbents (I2/CaO/RHA) were synthesized and characterized by X-ray diffraction, X-ray fluorescence, and N2 isotherm adsorption/desorption. Adsorption experiments of vapor-phase elemental mercury (Hg0) were performed in a laboratory-scale fixed-bed reactor. I2/CaO/RHA performances on Hg0 adsorption were compared with those of modified Ca-based fly ash sorbents (I2/CaO/FA) and modified fly ash sorbents (I2/FA). Effects of oxidant loading, supports, pore size distribution, iodine impregnation modes, and temperature were investigated as well to understand the mechanism in capturing Hg0. The modified sorbents exhibited reasonable efficiency for Hg0 removal under simulated flue gas. The surface area, pore size distribution, and iodine impregnation modes of the sorbents did not produce a strong effect on Hg0 capture efficiency, while fair correlation was observed between Hg0 uptake capacity and iodine concentration. Therefore, the content of I2 impregnated on the sorbents was identified as the most important factor influencing the capacity of these sorbents for Hg0 uptake. Increasing temperature in the range of 80-140 degrees C caused a rise in Hg0 removal. A reaction mechanism that may explain the experimental results was presumed based on the characterizations and adsorption study. PMID:21235196

  6. Determination of binding capacity and adsorption enthalpy between Human Glutamate Receptor (GluR1) peptide fragments and kynurenic acid by surface plasmon resonance experiments.

    PubMed

    Csapó, E; Majláth, Z; Juhász, Á; Roósz, B; Hetényi, A; Tóth, G K; Tajti, J; Vécsei, L; Dékány, I

    2014-11-01

    The interaction between kynurenic acid (KYNA) and two peptide fragments (ca. 30 residues) of Human Glutamate Receptor 201-300 (GluR1) using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy was investigated. Because of the medical interest in the neuroscience, GluR1 is one of the important subunits of the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors (AMPAR). AMPARs are ionotoropic glutamate receptors, which are mediating fast synaptic transmission and are crucial for plasticity in the brain. On the other hand, KYNA has been suggested to have neuroprotective activity and it has been considered for apply in therapy in certain neurobiological disorders. In this article the adsorption of the GluR1201-230 and GluR1231-259 peptides were studied on gold biosensor chip. The peptides were chemically bonded onto the gold surface via thiol group of L-cysteine resulted in the formation of peptide monolayer on the SPR chip surface. Because the GluR1231-259 peptide does not contain L-cysteine the Val256 was replaced by Cys256. The cross sectional area and the surface orientation of the studied peptides were determined by SPR and theoretical calculations (LOMETS) as well. The binding capability of KYNA on the peptide monolayer was studied in the concentration range of 0.1-5.0 mM using 150 mM NaCl ionic strength at pH 7.4 (±0.02) in phosphate buffer solutions. In order to determine the binding enthalpy the experiments were carried out between +10°C and +40°C. The heat of adsorption was calculated by using adsorption isotherms at different surface loading of KYNA on the SPR chip.

  7. Preparation of chitosan-graft-polyacrylamide magnetic composite microspheres for enhanced selective removal of mercury ions from water.

    PubMed

    Li, Kun; Wang, Yawen; Huang, Mu; Yan, Han; Yang, Hu; Xiao, Shoujun; Li, Aimin

    2015-10-01

    A novel magnetic composite microsphere based on polyacrylamide (PAM)-grafted chitosan and silica-coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles (CS-PAM-MCM) was successfully synthesized by a simple method. The molecular structure, surface morphology, and magnetic characteristics of the composite microsphere were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), vibrating-sample magnetometer (VSM), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The prepared CS-PAM-MCM was applied as an efficient adsorbent for the removal of copper(II), lead(II), and mercury(II) ions from aqueous solutions in respective single, binary, and ternary metal systems. Compared with chitosan magnetic composite microsphere (CS-MCM) without modification, CS-PAM-MCM showed improved adsorption capacity for each metal ion and highly selective adsorption for Hg from Pb and Cu. This improvement is attributed to the formation of stronger interactions between Hg and the amide groups of PAM branches for chelating effects. The adsorption isotherms of Hg/Cu and Hg/Pb binary metal systems onto CS-PAM-MCM are both well-described by extended and modified Langmuir models, indicating that the removal of the three aforementioned metal ions may follow a similar adsorption manner; that is, through a homogeneous monolayer chemisorption process. Furthermore, these magnetic adsorbents could be easily regenerated in EDTA aqueous solution and reused virtually without any adsorption capacity loss. PMID:26073848

  8. Got Mercury?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyers, Valerie; James, John T.; McCoy, Torin; Garcia, Hector

    2010-01-01

    Many lamps used in various spacecraft contain elemental mercury, which is efficiently absorbed through the lungs as a vapor. The liquid metal vaporizes slowly at room temperature, but may be completely vaporized when lamps are operating. Because current spacecraft environmental control systems are unable to remove mercury vapors, we considered short-term and long-term exposures. Using an existing study, we estimated mercury vapor releases from lamps that are not in operation during missions lasting less than or equal to 30 days; whereas we conservatively assumed complete vaporization from lamps that are operating or being used during missions lasing more than 30 days. Based on mercury toxicity, the Johnson Space Center's Toxicology Group recommends stringent safety controls and verifications for any hardware containing elemental mercury that could yield airborne mercury vapor concentrations greater than 0.1 mg/m3 in the total spacecraft atmosphere for exposures lasting less than or equal to 30 days, or concentrations greater than 0.01 mg/m3 for exposures lasting more than 30 days.

  9. Preparation of char from lotus seed biomass and the exploration of its dye removal capacity through batch and column adsorption studies.

    PubMed

    Nethaji, S; Sivasamy, A; Kumar, R Vimal; Mandal, A B

    2013-06-01

    Char was obtained from lotus seed biomass by a simple single-step acid treatment process. It was used as an adsorbent for the removal of malachite green dye (MG) from simulated dye bath effluent. The adsorbent was characterized for its surface morphology, surface functionalities, and zero point charge. Batch studies were carried out by varying the parameters such as initial aqueous pH, adsorbent dosage, adsorbent particle size, and initial adsorbate concentration. Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms were used to test the isotherm data and the Freundlich isotherm best fitted the data. Thermodynamic studies were carried out and the thermodynamic parameters such as ∆G, ∆H, and ∆S were evaluated. Adsorption kinetics was carried out and the data were tested with pseudofirst-order model, pseudosecond-order model, and intraparticle diffusion model. Adsorption of MG was not solely by intraparticle diffusion but film diffusion also played a major role. Continuous column experiments were also conducted using microcolumn and the spent adsorbent was regenerated using ethanol and was repeatedly used for three cycles in the column to determine the reusability of the regenerated adsorbent. The column data were modeled with the modeling equations such as Adam-Bohart model, Bed Depth Service Time (BDST) model, and Yoon-Nelson model for all the three cycles.

  10. Antarctic springtime depletion of atmospheric mercury.

    PubMed

    Ebinghaus, Ralf; Kock, Hans H; Temme, Christian; Einax, Jürgen W; Lowe, Astrid G; Richter, Andreas; Burrows, John P; Schroeder, William H

    2002-03-15

    Unlike other heavy metals that are inherently associated with atmospheric aerosols, mercury in ambient air exists predominantly in the gaseous elemental form. Because of its prolonged atmospheric residence time, elemental mercury vapor is distributed on a global scale. Recently, Canadian researchers have discovered that total gaseous mercury levels in the lower tropospheric boundary layer in the Canadian Arctic are often significantly depleted during the months after polar sunrise. A possible explanation may involve oxidation of elemental mercury, followed by adsorption and deposition of the oxidized form, leading to an increased input of atmospheric mercury into the Arctic ecosystem. Here we present the first continuous high-time-resolution measurements of total gaseous mercury in the Antarctic covering a 12-month period between January 2000 and January 2001 at the German Antarctic research station Neumayer (70 degrees 39' S, 8 degrees 15' W). We report that mercury depletion events also occur in the Antarctic after polar sunrise and compare our measurements with a data setfrom Alert, Nunavut, Canada. We also present indications that BrO radicals and ozone play a key role in the boundary-layer chemistry during springtime mercury depletion events in the Antarctic troposphere.

  11. Mercury control in 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Sjostrom, S.; Durham, M.; Bustard, J.; Martin, C.

    2009-07-15

    Although activated carbon injection (ACI) has been proven to be effective for many configurations and is a preferred option at many plants sufficient quantities of powdered activated coking (PAC) must be available to meet future needs. The authors estimate that upcoming federal and state regulations will result in tripling the annual US demand for activated carbon to nearly 1.5 billion lb from approximately 450 million lb. Rapid expansion of US production capacity is required. Many PAC manufacturers are discussing expansion of their existing production capabilities. One company, ADA Carbon Solutions, is in the process of constructing the largest activated carbon facility in North America to meet the future demand for PAC as a sorbent for mercury control. Emission control technology development and commercialization is driven by regulation and legislation. Although ACI will not achieve > 90% mercury control at every plant, the expected required MACT legislation level, it offers promise as a low-cost primary mercury control technology option for many configurations and an important trim technology for others. ACI has emerged as the clear mercury-specific control option of choice, representing over 98% of the commercial mercury control system orders to date. As state regulations are implemented and the potential for a federal rule becomes more imminent, suppliers are continuing to develop technologies to improve the cost effectiveness and limit the balance of plant impacts associated with ACI and are developing additional PAC production capabilities to ensure that the industry's needs are met. The commercialisation of ACI is a clear example of industry, through the dedication of many individuals and companies with support from the DOE and EPRI, meeting the challenge of developing cost-effectively reducing emissions from coal-fired power plants. 7 refs., 1 fig.

  12. Water adsorption at high temperature on core samples from The Geysers geothermal field

    SciTech Connect

    Gruszkiewicz, M.S.; Horita, J.; Simonson, J.M.; Mesmer, R.E.

    1998-06-01

    The quantity of water retained by rock samples taken from three wells located in The Geysers geothermal field, California, was measured at 150, 200, and 250 C as a function of steam pressure in the range 0.00 {le} p/p{sub 0} {le} 0.98, where p{sub 0} is the saturated water vapor pressure. Both adsorption and desorption runs were made in order to investigate the extent of the hysteresis. Additionally, low temperature gas adsorption analyses were made on the same rock samples. Mercury intrusion porosimetry was also used to obtain similar information extending to very large pores (macropores). A qualitative correlation was found between the surface properties obtained from nitrogen adsorption and the mineralogical and petrological characteristics of the solids. However, there was no direct correlation between BET specific surface areas and the capacity of the rocks for water adsorption at high temperatures. The hysteresis decreased significantly at 250 C. The results indicate that multilayer adsorption, rather than capillary condensation, is the dominant water storage mechanism at high temperatures.

  13. Mercury(II) and methyl mercury speciation on Streptococcus pyogenes loaded Dowex Optipore SD-2.

    PubMed

    Tuzen, Mustafa; Uluozlu, Ozgur Dogan; Karaman, Isa; Soylak, Mustafa

    2009-09-30

    A solid phase extraction procedure based on speciation of mercury(II) and methyl mercury on Streptococcus pyogenes immobilized on Dowex Optipore SD-2 has been established. Selective and sequential elution with 0.1 mol L(-1) HCl for methyl mercury and 2 mol L(-1) HCl for mercury(II) were performed at pH 8. The determination of mercury levels was performed by cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometry (CVAAS). Optimal analytical conditions including pH, amounts of biosorbent, sample volumes, etc., were investigated. The influences of the some alkaline and earth alkaline ions and some transition metals on the recoveries were also investigated. The capacity of biosorbent for mercury(II) and methyl mercury was 4.8 and 3.4 mg g(-1). The detection limit (3 sigma) of the reagent blank for mercury(II) and methyl mercury was 2.1 and 1.5 ng L(-1). Preconcentration factor was calculated as 25. The relative standard deviations of the procedure were below 7%. The validation of the presented procedure is performed by the analysis of standard reference material (NRCC-DORM 2 Dogfish Muscle). The procedure was successfully applied to the speciation of mercury(II) and methyl mercury in natural water and environmental samples.

  14. Oxidation of Mercury in Products of Coal Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Walsh; Giang Tong; Neeles Bhopatkar; Thomas Gale; George Blankenship; Conrad Ingram; Selasi Blavo Tesfamariam Mehreteab; Victor Banjoko; Yohannes Ghirmazion; Heng Ban; April Sibley

    2009-09-14

    Laboratory measurements of mercury oxidation during selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of nitric oxide, simulation of pilot-scale measurements of mercury oxidation and adsorption by unburned carbon and fly ash, and synthesis of new materials for simultaneous oxidation and adsorption of mercury, were performed in support of the development of technology for control of mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers and furnaces. Conversion of gas-phase mercury from the elemental state to water-soluble oxidized form (HgCl{sub 2}) enables removal of mercury during wet flue gas desulfurization. The increase in mercury oxidation in a monolithic V{sub 2}O{sub 5}-WO{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2} SCR catalyst with increasing HCl at low levels of HCl (< 10 ppmv) and decrease in mercury oxidation with increasing NH{sub 3}/NO ratio during SCR were consistent with results of previous work by others. The most significant finding of the present work was the inhibition of mercury oxidation in the presence of CO during SCR of NO at low levels of HCl. In the presence of 2 ppmv HCl, expected in combustion products from some Powder River Basin coals, an increase in CO from 0 to 50 ppmv reduced the extent of mercury oxidation from 24 {+-} 3 to 1 {+-} 4%. Further increase in CO to 100 ppmv completely suppressed mercury oxidation. In the presence of 11-12 ppmv HCl, increasing CO from 0 to {approx}120 ppmv reduced mercury oxidation from {approx}70% to 50%. Conversion of SO{sub 2} to sulfate also decreased with increasing NH{sub 3}/NO ratio, but the effects of HCl and CO in flue gas on SO{sub 2} oxidation were unclear. Oxidation and adsorption of mercury by unburned carbon and fly ash enables mercury removal in a particulate control device. A chemical kinetic mechanism consisting of nine homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions for mercury oxidation and removal was developed to interpret pilot-scale measurements of mercury oxidation and adsorption by unburned carbon and fly ash in experiments at pilot

  15. Mercury removal from coal combustion flue gas by modified fly ash.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenqing; Wang, Hairui; Zhu, Tingyu; Kuang, Junyan; Jing, Pengfei

    2013-02-01

    Fly ash is a potential alternative to activated carbon for mercury adsorption. The effects of physicochemical properties on the mercury adsorption performance of three fly ash samples were investigated. X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and other methods were used to characterize the samples. Results indicate that mercury adsorption on fly ash is primarily physisorption and chemisorption. High specific surface areas and small pore diameters are beneficial to efficient mercury removal. Incompletely burned carbon is also an important factor for the improvement of mercury removal efficiency, in particular. The C-M bond, which is formed by the reaction of C and Ti, Si and other elements, may improve mercury oxidation. The samples modified with CuBr2, CuCl2 and FeCl3 showed excellent performance for Hg removal, because the chlorine in metal chlorides acts as an oxidant that promotes the conversion of elemental mercury (Hg0) into its oxidized form (Hg2+). Cu2+ and Fe3+ can also promote Hg0 oxidation as catalysts. HCl and O2 promote the adsorption of Hg by modified fly ash, whereas SO2 inhibits the Hg adsorption because of competitive adsorption for active sites. Fly ash samples modified with CuBr2, CuCl2 and FeCl3 are therefore promising materials for controlling mercury emissions. PMID:23596961

  16. Mercury and autism: accelerating evidence?

    PubMed

    Mutter, Joachim; Naumann, Johannes; Schneider, Rainer; Walach, Harald; Haley, Boyd

    2005-10-01

    The causes of autism and neurodevelopmental disorders are unknown. Genetic and environmental risk factors seem to be involved. Because of an observed increase in autism in the last decades, which parallels cumulative mercury exposure, it was proposed that autism may be in part caused by mercury. We review the evidence for this proposal. Several epidemiological studies failed to find a correlation between mercury exposure through thimerosal, a preservative used in vaccines, and the risk of autism. Recently, it was found that autistic children had a higher mercury exposure during pregnancy due to maternal dental amalgam and thimerosal-containing immunoglobulin shots. It was hypothesized that children with autism have a decreased detoxification capacity due to genetic polymorphism. In vitro, mercury and thimerosal in levels found several days after vaccination inhibit methionine synthetase (MS) by 50%. Normal function of MS is crucial in biochemical steps necessary for brain development, attention and production of glutathione, an important antioxidative and detoxifying agent. Repetitive doses of thimerosal leads to neurobehavioral deteriorations in autoimmune susceptible mice, increased oxidative stress and decreased intracellular levels of glutathione in vitro. Subsequently, autistic children have significantly decreased level of reduced glutathione. Promising treatments of autism involve detoxification of mercury, and supplementation of deficient metabolites.

  17. Characterization of porous media properties and leaching capacity of spent oil shales

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, W.F.; Morelli, P.T.

    1981-01-01

    Porous media properties of spent oil shales have been determined in order to provide fundamental data needed to identify and predict the transport of leachates through surface piles or abandoned modified insitu retorts. Using high pressure mercury porosimetry, pore size distributions were measured. Specific surface areas were measured using both the mercury intrusion technique as well as BET (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller) nitrogen adsorption. Visual and chemical analyses were performed by scanning electron microscopy and x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. Leaching capacities of the various spent shale samples were measured using equilibrium leaching studies to determine Equilibrium Exchange Isotherms. Based on these characterization studies, fundamental modeling concepts have benn established for the transport of leachates through spent oil shales. 13 refs.

  18. Mercury Contamination

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Marcella R.

    2013-01-01

    IN BRIEF A residential elemental mercury contamination incident in Rhode Island resulted in the evacuation of an entire apartment complex. To develop recommendations for improved response, all response-related documents were examined; personnel involved in the response were interviewed; policies and procedures were reviewed; and environmental monitoring data were compiled from specific phases of the response for analysis of effect. A significant challenge of responding to residential elemental mercury contamination lies in communicating risk to residents affected py a HazMat spill. An ongoing, open and honest dialogue is emphasized where concerns of the public are heard and addressed, particularly when establishing and/or modifying policies and procedures for responding to residential elemental mercury contamination. PMID:23436951

  19. JV Task 5 - Evaluation of Residual Oil Fly Ash As A Mercury Sorbent For Coal Combustion Flue Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Patton

    2006-12-31

    The mercury adsorption capacity of a residual oil fly ash (ROFA) sample collected form Florida Power and Light Company's Port Everglades Power Plant was evaluated using a bituminous coal combustion flue gas simulator and fixed-bed testing protocol. A size-segregated (>38 {micro}g) fraction of ROFA was ground to a fine powder and brominated to potentially enhance mercury capture. The ROFA and brominated-ROFA were ineffective in capturing or oxidizing the Hg{sup 0} present in a simulated bituminous coal combustion flue gas. In contrast, a commercially available DARCO{reg_sign} FGD initially adsorbed Hg{sup 0} for about an hour and then catalyzed Hg{sup 0} oxidation to produce Hg{sup 2+}. Apparently, the unburned carbon in ROFA needs to be more rigorously activated in order for it to effectively capture and/or oxidize Hg{sup 0}.

  20. Hexagonal mesoporous silica modified with 2-mercaptothiazoline for removing mercury from water solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evangelista, Sheila M.; DeOliveira, Edimar; Castro, Gustavo R.; Zara, Luiz F.; Prado, Alexandre G. S.

    2007-05-01

    A method for the attachment of 2-mercaptothiazoline (MTZ) to modified silica gel has been developed. In the first step, a new silylant agent was synthesized, named SiMTZ, by the reaction between MTZ molecule and chloropropyltrimethoxysilane (SiCl). SiMTZ and tetraethylortosilicate were co-condensed in the presence of n-dodecylamine, a neutral surfactant template, to produce a modified ordered hexagonal mesoporous silica named HMTZ. The modified material contained 0.89 ± 0.03 mmol of 2-mercaptothiazoline per gram of silica. FT-IR, FT-Raman, 29Si- and 13C-NMR spectra were in agreement with the proposed structure of the modified mesoporous silica in the solid state. HMTZ material has been used for divalent mercury adsorption from aqueous solution at 298 ± 1 K. The series of adsorption isotherms were adjusted to a modified Langmuir equation. The maximum number of moles of mercury adsorbed gave 2.34 ± 0.09 mmol/g of material. The same interaction was followed by calorimetric titration on an isoperibol calorimeter. The HMTZ presented a high capacity for the removal of the contaminant mercury from water. The ΔH and Δ G values for the interaction were determined to be -56.34 ± 1.07 and -2.14 ± 0.11 kJ mol -1. This interaction process was accompanied by a decrease of entropy value (-182 J mol -1 K -1). Thus, the interaction between mercury and HMTZ resulted in a spontaneous thermodynamic system with a high favorable exothermic enthalpic effect.

  1. Mercury in mercury(II)-spiked soils is highly susceptible to plant bioaccumulation.

    PubMed

    Hlodák, Michal; Urík, Martin; Matúš, Peter; Kořenková, Lucia

    2016-01-01

    Heavy metal phytotoxicity assessments usually use soluble metal compounds in spiked soils to evaluate metal bioaccumulation, growth inhibition and adverse effects on physiological parameters. However, exampling mercury phytotoxicity for barley (Hordeum vulgare) this paper highlights unsuitability of this experimental approach. Mercury(II) in spiked soils is extremely bioavailable, and there experimentally determined bioaccumulation is significantly higher compared to reported mercury bioaccumulation efficiency from soils collected from mercury-polluted areas. Our results indicate this is not affected by soil sorption capacity, thus soil ageing and formation of more stable mercuric complexes with soil fractions is necessary for reasonable metal phytotoxicity assessments.

  2. Potential hazards of brominated carbon sorbents for mercury emission control.

    PubMed

    Bisson, Teresa M; Xu, Zhenghe

    2015-02-17

    Mercury is a toxic air pollutant, emitted from the combustion of coal. Activated Carbon (AC) or other carbon sorbent (CS) injection into coal combustion flue gases can remove elemental mercury through an adsorption process. Recently, a brominated CS with biomass ash as the carbon source (Br-Ash) was developed as an alternative for costly AC-based sorbent for mercury capture. After mercury capture, these sorbents are disposed in landfill, and the stability of bromine and captured mercury is of paramount importance. The objective of this study is to determine the fate of mercury and bromine from Br-Ash and brominated AC after their service. Mercury and bromine leaching tests were conducted using the standard toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP). The mercury was found to be stable on both the Br-Ash and commercial brominated AC sorbents, while the bromine leached into the aqueous phase considerably. Mercury pulse injection tests on the sorbent material after leaching indicate that both sorbents retain significant mercury capture capability even after the majority of bromine was removed. Testing of the Br-Ash sorbent over a wider range of pH and liquid:solid ratios resulted in leaching of <5% of mercury adsorbed on the Br-Ash. XPS analysis indicated more organically bound Br and less metal-Br bonds after leaching.

  3. Sorbents for the oxidation and removal of mercury

    DOEpatents

    Olson, Edwin S; Holmes, Michael J; Pavlish, John Henry

    2013-08-20

    A promoted activated carbon sorbent is described that is highly effective for the removal of mercury from flue gas streams. The sorbent comprises a new modified carbon form containing reactive forms of halogen and halides. Optional components may be added to increase reactivity and mercury capacity. These may be added directly with the sorbent, or to the flue gas to enhance sorbent performance and/or mercury capture. Mercury removal efficiencies obtained exceed conventional methods. The sorbent can be regenerated and reused. Sorbent treatment and preparation methods are also described. New methods for in-flight preparation, introduction, and control of the active sorbent into the mercury contaminated gas stream are described.

  4. Sorbents for the oxidation and removal of mercury

    DOEpatents

    Olson, Edwin S.; Holmes, Michael J.; Pavlish, John Henry

    2014-09-02

    A promoted activated carbon sorbent is described that is highly effective for the removal of mercury from flue gas streams. The sorbent comprises a new modified carbon form containing reactive forms of halogen and halides. Optional components may be added to increase reactivity and mercury capacity. These may be added directly with the sorbent, or to the flue gas to enhance sorbent performance and/or mercury capture. Mercury removal efficiencies obtained exceed conventional methods. The sorbent can be regenerated and reused. Sorbent treatment and preparation methods are also described. New methods for in-flight preparation, introduction, and control of the active sorbent into the mercury contaminated gas stream are described.

  5. Sorbents for the oxidation and removal of mercury

    DOEpatents

    Olson, Edwin S.; Holmes, Michael J.; Pavlish, John H.

    2012-05-01

    A promoted activated carbon sorbent is described that is highly effective for the removal of mercury from flue gas streams. The sorbent comprises a new modified carbon form containing reactive forms of halogen and halides. Optional components may be added to increase reactivity and mercury capacity. These may be added directly with the sorbent, or to the flue gas to enhance sorbent performance and/or mercury capture. Mercury removal efficiencies obtained exceed conventional methods. The sorbent can be regenerated and reused. Sorbent treatment and preparation methods are also described. New methods for in-flight preparation, introduction, and control of the active sorbent into the mercury contaminated gas stream are described.

  6. Sorbents for the oxidation and removal of mercury

    DOEpatents

    Olson, Edwin S.; Holmes, Michael J.; Pavlish, John H.

    2008-10-14

    A promoted activated carbon sorbent is described that is highly effective for the removal of mercury from flue gas streams. The sorbent comprises a new modified carbon form containing reactive forms of halogen and halides. Optional components may be added to increase reactivity and mercury capacity. These may be added directly with the sorbent, or to the flue gas to enhance sorbent performance and/or mercury capture. Mercury removal efficiencies obtained exceed conventional methods. The sorbent can be regenerated and reused. Sorbent treatment and preparation methods are also described. New methods for in-flight preparation, introduction, and control of the active sorbent into the mercury contaminated gas stream are described.

  7. Mercury, elemental

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Mercury , elemental ; CASRN 7439 - 97 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinoge

  8. Mercury's Messenger

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Clark R.

    2004-01-01

    Forty years after Mariner 2, planetary exploration has still only just begun, and many more missions are on drawing boards, nearing the launch pad, or even en route across interplanetary space to their targets. One of the most challenging missions that will be conducted this decade is sending the MESSENGER spacecraft to orbit the planet Mercury.…

  9. Revealing Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prockter, L. M.; Solomon, S. C.; Head, J. W.; Watters, T. R.; Murchie, S. L.; Robinson, M. S.; Chapman, C. R.; McNutt, R. L.

    2009-04-01

    The MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft, developed under NASA's Discovery Program, launched in August 2004. En route to insertion into orbit about Mercury in 2011, MESSENGER flies by Mercury three times. The first and second of these encounters were accomplished in January and October of 2008. These flybys viewed portions of Mercury's surface that were not observed by Mariner 10 during its reconnaissance of somewhat less than half of the planet in 1974-1975. All MESSENGER instruments operated during each flyby and returned a wealth of new data. Many of the new observations were focused on the planet's geology, including monochrome imaging at resolutions as high as 100 m/pixel, multispectral imaging in 11 filters at resolutions as high as 500 m/pixel, laser altimetry tracks extending over several thousands of kilometers, and high-resolution spectral measurements of several types of terrain. Here we present an overview of the first inferences on the global geology of Mercury from the MESSENGER observations. Whereas evidence for volcanism was equivocal from Mariner 10 data, the new MESSENGER images and altimetry provide compelling evidence that volcanism was widespread and protracted on Mercury. Color imaging reveals three common spectral units on the surface: a higher-reflectance, relatively red material occurring as a distinct class of smooth plains, typically with distinct embayment relationships interpreted to indicate volcanic emplacement; a lower-reflectance, relatively blue material typically excavated by impact craters and therefore inferred to be more common at depth; and a spectrally intermediate terrain that constitutes much of the uppermost crust. Three more minor spectral units are also seen: fresh crater ejecta, reddish material associated with rimless depressions interpreted to be volcanic centers, and high-reflectance deposits seen in some crater floors. Preliminary measurements of crater size

  10. Uptake of mercury by thiol-grafted chitosan gel beads.

    PubMed

    Merrifield, John D; Davids, William G; MacRae, Jean D; Amirbahman, Aria

    2004-07-01

    This study describes the synthesis and characterization of thiol-grafted chitosan beads for use as mercury (Hg) adsorbents. Chitosan flakes were dissolved and formed into spherical beads using a phase inversion technique, then crosslinked to improve their porosity and chemical stability. Cysteine was grafted onto the beads in order to improve the adsorption affinity of Hg to the beads. The beads possessed an average diameter of 3.2 mm, porosity of 0.9, specific surface area of approximately 100 m2/g, average pore size of approximately 120 angstroms, and specific gravity of 2.0. Equilibrium and kinetic uptake experiments were conducted to study the uptake of Hg by the beads. The adsorption capacity was approximately 8.0 mmol-Hg/g-dry beads at pH 7, and decreased with decreasing pH. Hg adsorption kinetics was modeled as radial pore diffusion into a spherical bead with nonlinear adsorption. Use of the nonlinear Freundlich isotherm in the diffusion equation allowed modeling of the uptake kinetics with a single tortuosity factor of 1.5 +/- 0.3 as the fitting parameter for all initial Hg concentrations, chitosan loadings, and agitation rates. At agitation rates of 50 and 75 rpm, where uptake rate was reduced significantly due to the boundary layer effect, the mass transfer coefficient at the outside boundary was also used as a fitting parameter to model the kinetic data. At agitation rates higher than 150 rpm, pore diffusion was the rate-limiting step. The beads exhibited a high initial uptake rate followed by a slower uptake rate suggesting pore diffusion as the rate-determining step especially at high agitation rates. Higher uptake rates observed in this study compared to those in a previous study of chitosan-based crab shells indicate that dissolution and gel formation increase the porosity and pore accessibility of chitosan.

  11. RECOVERY OF MERCURY FROM CONTAMINATED LIQUID WASTES

    SciTech Connect

    Robin M. Stewart

    1999-09-29

    magnetic field was evaluated. Field results indicated good removal of this mercury fraction from the Y-12 waters. In addition, this sorbent is easily regenerated by simply removing the magnetic field and flushing the columns with water. The fourth sorbent is still undergoing laboratory development, but results to date indicate exceptionally high mercury sorption capacity. The sorbent is capable of removing all forms of mercury typically present in natural and industrial waters, including Hg{sup 2+}, elemental mercury, methyl mercury, and colloidal mercury. The process possesses very fast kinetics, which allows for higher flow rates and smaller treatment units. These sorbent technologies, used in tandem or individually depending on the treatment needs, can provide DOE sites with a cost-effective method for reducing mercury concentrations to very low levels mandated by the regulatory community. In addition, the technologies do not generate significant amounts of secondary wastes for disposal. Furthermore, the need for improved water treatment technologies is not unique to the DOE. The new, stringent requirements on mercury concentrations impact other government agencies as well as the private sector. Some of the private-sector industries needing improved methods for removing mercury from water include mining, chloralkali production, chemical processing, and medical waste treatment. The next logical step is to deploy one or more of these sorbents at a contaminated DOE site or at a commercial facility needing improved mercury treatment technologies. A full-scale deployment is planned in fiscal year 2000.

  12. Utility flue gas mercury control via sorbent injection

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, R.; Carey, T.; Hargrove, B.

    1996-12-31

    The potential for power plant mercury control under Title III of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments generated significant interest in assessing whether cost effective technologies are available for removing the mercury present in fossil-fired power plant flue gas. One promising approach is the direct injection of mercury sorbents such as activated carbon into flue gas. This approach has been shown to be effective for mercury control from municipal waste incinerators. However, tests conducted to date on utility fossil-fired boilers show that it is much more difficult to remove the trace species of mercury present in flue gas. EPRI is conducting research in sorbent mercury control including bench-scale evaluation of mercury sorbent activity and capacity with simulated flue gas, pilot testing under actual flue gas conditions, evaluation of sorbent regeneration and recycle options, and the development of novel sorbents. A theoretical model that predicts maximum mercury removals achievable with sorbent injection under different operating conditions is also being developed. This paper presents initial bench-scale and model results. The results to date show that very fine and large amounts of sorbents are needed for mercury control unless long residence times are available for sorbent-mercury contact. Also, sorbent activity and capacity are highly dependent on flue gas composition, temperature, mercury species, and sorbent properties. 10 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Mercury's South Polar Region

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation shows 89 wide-angle camera (WAC) images of Mercury’s south polar region acquired by the Mercury Dual Imaging System (MDIS) over one complete Mercury solar day (176 Earth days). Thi...

  14. Dynamic competitive adsorption of bone-related proteins on calcium phosphate ceramic particles with different phase composition and microstructure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Zhang, Huijie; Zhu, Xiangdong; Fan, Hongsong; Fan, Yujiang; Zhang, Xingdong

    2013-08-01

    The biocompatibility and bioactivity of biomaterials used for hard tissue repair are closely related to their adsorption capacities for bone-related proteins. In the present study, three types of calcium phosphate (CaP) ceramic particles with different phase composition or microstructure were fabricated, and their protein adsorption abilities were investigated by a self-made device under the simulated dynamic physiological circumstance. The results of X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, mercury penetration test, and nitrogen sorption test showed that the irregular hydroxyapatite (HA) ceramic particles obtained by conventional drying and sintering (named as HA-C) had fewer micropores and lower specific surface area (SSA) than did the spherical HA or biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) ceramic particles made by spray drying and sintering (named as HA-S and BCP-S, respectively). The dynamic protein adsorption study proved that both the phase composition and microstructure of CaP ceramic particles affected their adsorption capacities for those bone-related proteins. The spherical HA-S and BCP-S particles with abundant micropores and high SSA showed higher adsorption of serum proteins, including fibronectin and vitronectin, than the irregular HA-C did. On the other hand, in spite of the relatively high concentration of bovine serum albumin (BSA) in the binary bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2)/BSA solution, BMP-2 adsorption on the three CaP ceramic particles increased with the increase in its initial concentration. Similarly, HA-S and BCP-S particles had a larger amount of the adsorbed BMP-2 per gram solid than HA-C did. Therefore, it could be believed that the difference of various CaP ceramics in the phase composition and microporous structure would affect their binding capacity for those bone-related proteins and thus lead to their difference in osteoinduction.

  15. Adsorbents for capturing mercury in coal-fired boiler flue gas.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hongqun; Xu, Zhenghe; Fan, Maohong; Bland, Alan E; Judkins, Roddie R

    2007-07-19

    This paper reviews recent advances in the research and development of sorbents used to capture mercury from coal-fired utility boiler flue gas. Mercury emissions are the source of serious health concerns. Worldwide mercury emissions from human activities are estimated to be 1000 to 6000 t/annum. Mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants are believed to be the largest source of anthropogenic mercury emissions. Mercury emissions from coal-fired utility boilers vary in total amount and speciation, depending on coal types, boiler operating conditions, and configurations of air pollution control devices (APCDs). The APCDs, such as fabric filter (FF) bag house, electrostatic precipitator (ESP), and wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD), can remove some particulate-bound and oxidized forms of mercury. Elemental mercury often escapes from these devices. Activated carbon injection upstream of a particulate control device has been shown to have the best potential to remove both elemental and oxidized mercury from the flue gas. For this paper, NORIT FGD activated carbon was extensively studied for its mercury adsorption behavior. Results from bench-, pilot- and field-scale studies, mercury adsorption by coal chars, and a case of lignite-burned mercury control were reviewed. Studies of brominated carbon, sulfur-impregnated carbon and chloride-impregnated carbon were also reviewed. Carbon substitutes, such as calcium sorbents, petroleum coke, zeolites and fly ash were analyzed for their mercury-adsorption performance. At this time, brominated activated carbon appears to be the best-performing mercury sorbent. A non-injection regenerable sorbent technology is briefly introduced herein, and the issue of mercury leachability is briefly covered. Future research directions are suggested.

  16. Removal and treatment of mercury contamination at gas processing facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Wilhelm, S.M.; McArthur, A.

    1995-12-01

    Processing of gas containing mercury invariably leads to contamination of equipment and can generate waste in the form of sludge and spent adsorbent materials. Occasional accidents can also lead to soil contamination. This paper reviews mercury contamination in the gas processing industry and discusses newly developed methods for clean-up and disposal of mercury waste. Research and development (sponsored by the Gas Research Institute) have produced new technology for mercury removal from complex matrices. Equipment decontamination is accomplished using chemical cleaning solutions that selectively oxidize and complex elemental mercury deposits. These cleaning formulations include aqueous base solutions containing iodine as the completing agent and organic (alcohol) base solutions using completing agents. Soil, sludge, and debris must be thermally processed to remove (recycle) mercury. Thermal systems use vacuum, inert gas, or air as the carder medium. If air is used, sulfur in the matrix is converted to SO{sub 2} and hydrocarbons are oxidized as well, depending upon design. Anaerobic thermal systems employ selective condensation and/or adsorption to separate sulfur and hydrocarbons from mercury. Spent adsorbent materials are also thermally processed using strictly anaerobic conditions to avoid exothermal reactions involving carbon. The regulatory climate relative to mercury is changing rapidly. Regulations covering treated debris and soils may require total mercury concentrations of less than 2 mg/kg for burial. Total mercury analysis rather than leaching procedure (TCLP) is becoming the norm in regulations and specifications. Sampling and analysis procedures for contaminated surfaces are under development.

  17. Assessing sorbent injection mercury control effectiveness in flue gas streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carey, T.R.; Richardson, C.F.; Chang, R.; Meserole, F.B.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Chen, S.

    2000-01-01

    One promising approach for removing mercury from coal-fired, utility flue gas involves the direct injection of mercury sorbents. Although this method has been effective at removing mercury in municipal waste incinerators, tests conducted to date on utility coal-fired boilers show that mercury removal is much more difficult in utility flue gas. EPRI is conducting research to investigate mercury removal using sorbents in this application. Bench-scale, pilot-scale, and field tests have been conducted to determine the ability of different sorbents to remove mercury in simulated and actual flue gas streams. This paper focuses on recent bench-scale and field test results evaluating the adsorption characteristics of activated carbon and fly ash and the use of these results to develop a predictive mercury removal model. Field tests with activated carbon show that adsorption characteristics measured in the lab agree reasonably well with characteristics measured in the field. However, more laboratory and field data will be needed to identify other gas phase components which may impact performance. This will allow laboratory tests to better simulate field conditions and provide improved estimates of sorbent performance for specific sites. In addition to activated carbon results, bench-scale and modeling results using fly ash are presented which suggest that certain fly ashes are capable of adsorbing mercury.

  18. The role of ammonia on mercury leaching from coal fly ash.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianmin; Wang, Tian; Mallhi, Harmanjit; Liu, Yu; Ban, Heng; Ladwig, Ken

    2007-11-01

    The Federal Clean Air Interstate Rule issued in March 2005 will result in many power plants employing ammonia-based technologies to control NO(x) emission. The Clean Air Mercury Rule, issued at the same time, will encourage many power plants to use various technologies to remove mercury from flue gas, generating fly ashes that contain elevated concentrations of mercury. Ammonia forms relatively strong complexes with mercury compared to most other cationic elements and, therefore, may change the leaching characteristics of mercury. Understanding the impact of ammonia on the leaching of mercury from fly ash is critical in predicting the potential environmental impact of future fly ash. Batch methods were used to investigate the ammonia impact on mercury leaching from fly ash under different pH conditions. The results indicated that mercury leaching without external ammonia addition is not significant. However, ammonia addition increased mercury leaching in the alkaline pH range, due to the formation of less adsorbable mercury-ammonia complexes. Washed ash released more mercury than the raw ash if the ammonia concentration is the same, mainly due to the dissolution of some ash components during washing which exposed more mercury on ash surface. Mercury adsorption data indicated that more than 90% of available mercury was adsorbed by fly ash even in the presence of 1000 mg l(-1) ammonia addition.

  19. Mass transfer within electrostatic precipitators: trace gas adsorption by sorbent-covered plate electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Herek L. Clack

    2006-06-15

    Varying degrees of mercury (Hg) capture have been reported within the electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) of coal-fired electric utility boilers. There has been some speculation that the adsorption takes place on the particulate-covered plate electrodes. This convective mass transfer analysis of laminar and turbulent channel flows provides the maximum potential for Hg adsorption by the plate electrodes within an ESP under those conditions. Mass transfer calculations, neglecting electro hydrodynamic (EHD) effects, reveal 65% removal of elemental Hg for a laminar flow within a 15-m-long channel of 0.2-m spacing and 42% removal for turbulent flow within a similar configuration. Both configurations represent specific collection areas (SCAs) that are significantly larger than conventional ESPs in use. Results reflecting more representative SCA values generally returned removal efficiencies of {lt}20%. EHD effects, although potentially substantial at low Reynolds numbers, diminish rapidly with increasing Reynolds number and become negligible at typical ESP operating conditions. The present results indicate maximum Hg removal efficiencies for ESPs that are much less than those observed in practice for comparable ESP operating conditions. Considering Hg adsorption kinetics and finite sorbent capacity in addition to the present mass transfer analyses would yield even lower adsorption efficiencies than the present results. In a subsequent paper, the author addresses the mass transfer potential presented by the charged, suspended particulates during their collection within an ESP and the role they potentially play in Hg capture within ESPs. 28 refs., 4 figs.

  20. Size-fractionation and characterization of landfill leachate and the improvement of Cu2+ adsorption capacity in soil and aged refuse.

    PubMed

    Lou, Ziyang; Chai, Xiaoli; Niu, Dongjie; Ou, Yuanyang; Zhao, Youcai

    2009-01-01

    Leachate was collected from an anaerobic lagoon at Shanghai Laogang refuse landfill, the largest landfill in China, and the sample was separated into six fractions using micro-filtration membranes, followed by ultra-filtration membranes. Several parameters of the samples were measured, including chemical oxygen demand (COD), total organic carbon (TOC), total solids (TS), pH, total phosphate (TP), total nitrogen (TN), fixed solids (FS), NH4+, orthophosphate, color, turbidity, and conductivity. These parameters were then quantitatively correlated with the molecular weight cutoff of the membrane used. Organic matter in the dissolved fraction (MW<1kDa) predominated in the leachate, accounting for 65% of TOC. Thermal infrared spectroscopy was used to characterize the filter residues. Asymmetric and symmetric stretching of methyl and methylene groups, and of functional groups containing nitrogen and oxygen atoms, were observed. In addition, the ability of two different samples to adsorb heavy metals was tested. Cu2+ was chosen as the representative heavy metal in this study, and the samples were soil; aged refuse, which had spent 8 years in a conventional sanitary landfill; and samples of soil and aged refuse treated for 48h with leachate in the ratio of 5g of sample per 50ml of leachate. Cu2+ uptake by the raw soil was approximately 4.60microg/g, while uptake by the leachate-contacted soil and leachate-contacted aged refuse were 5.66 and 5.11microg/g, respectively. These results show that the organic matter in the leachate enhanced the capacity of aqueous solutions to adsorb Cu2+.

  1. Size-fractionation and characterization of landfill leachate and the improvement of Cu{sup 2+} adsorption capacity in soil and aged refuse

    SciTech Connect

    Lou Ziyang; Chai Xiaoli; Niu Dongjie; Ou Yuanyang; Zhao Youcai

    2009-01-15

    Leachate was collected from an anaerobic lagoon at Shanghai Laogang refuse landfill, the largest landfill in China, and the sample was separated into six fractions using micro-filtration membranes, followed by ultra-filtration membranes. Several parameters of the samples were measured, including chemical oxygen demand (COD), total organic carbon (TOC), total solids (TS), pH, total phosphate (TP), total nitrogen (TN), fixed solids (FS), NH{sub 4}{sup +}, orthophosphate, color, turbidity, and conductivity. These parameters were then quantitatively correlated with the molecular weight cutoff of the membrane used. Organic matter in the dissolved fraction (MW < 1 kDa) predominated in the leachate, accounting for 65% of TOC. Thermal infrared spectroscopy was used to characterize the filter residues. Asymmetric and symmetric stretching of methyl and methylene groups, and of functional groups containing nitrogen and oxygen atoms, were observed. In addition, the ability of two different samples to adsorb heavy metals was tested. Cu{sup 2+} was chosen as the representative heavy metal in this study, and the samples were soil; aged refuse, which had spent 8 years in a conventional sanitary landfill; and samples of soil and aged refuse treated for 48 h with leachate in the ratio of 5 g of sample per 50 ml of leachate. Cu{sup 2+} uptake by the raw soil was {approx}4.60 {mu}g/g, while uptake by the leachate-contacted soil and leachate-contacted aged refuse were 5.66 and 5.11 {mu}g/g, respectively. These results show that the organic matter in the leachate enhanced the capacity of aqueous solutions to adsorb Cu{sup 2+}.

  2. Mercury Vapor Release from Broken Compact Fluorescent Lamps and In Situ Capture by New Nanomaterial Sorbents

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    The projected increase in the use of compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) motivates the development of methods to manage consumer exposure to mercury and its environmental release at the end of lamp life. This work characterizes the time-resolved release of mercury vapor from broken CFLs and from underlying substrates after removal of glass fragments to simulate cleanup. In new lamps, mercury vapor is released gradually in amounts that reach 1.3 mg or 30% of the total lamp inventory after four days. Similar time profiles but smaller amounts are released from spent lamps or from underlying substrates. Nanoscale formulations of S, Se, Cu, Ni, Zn, Ag, and WS2 are evaluated for capture of Hg vapor under these conditions and compared to conventional microscale formulations. Adsorption capacities range over 7 orders of magnitude, from 0.005 (Zn micropowder) to 188 000 μg/g (unstabilized nano-Se), depending on sorbent chemistry and particle size. Nanosynthesis offers clear advantages for most sorbent chemistries. Unstabilized nano-selenium in two forms (dry powder and impregnated cloth) was successfully used in a proof-of-principle test for the in situ, real-time suppression of Hg vapor escape following CFL fracture. PMID:18754507

  3. Mercury vapor release from broken compact fluorescent lamps and in situ capture by new nanomaterial sorbents.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Natalie C; Manchester, Shawn; Sarin, Love; Gao, Yuming; Kulaots, Indrek; Hurt, Robert H

    2008-08-01

    The projected increase in the use of compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) motivates the development of methods to manage consumer exposure to mercury and its environmental release at the end of lamp life. This work characterizes the time-resolved release of mercury vapor from broken CFLs and from underlying substrates after removal of glass fragments to simulate cleanup. In new lamps, mercury vapor is released gradually in amounts that reach 1.3 mg or 30% of the total lamp inventory after four days. Similar time profiles but smaller amounts are released from spent lamps or from underlying substrates. Nanoscale formulations of S, Se, Cu, Ni, Zn, Ag, and WS2 are evaluated for capture of Hg vapor under these conditions and compared to conventional microscale formulations. Adsorption capacities range over 7 orders of magnitude, from 0.005 (Zn micropowder) to 188 000 microg/g (unstabilized nano-Se), depending on sorbent chemistry and particle size. Nanosynthesis offers clear advantages for most sorbent chemistries. Unstabilized nano-selenium in two forms (dry powder and impregnated cloth) was successfully used in a proof-of-principle test for the in situ, real-time suppression of Hg vapor escape following CFL fracture.

  4. Accumulation and oxidation of elemental mercury in tropical soils.

    PubMed

    Soares, Liliane Catone; Egreja Filho, Fernando Barboza; Linhares, Lucília Alves; Windmoller, Cláudia Carvalhinho; Yoshida, Maria Irene

    2015-09-01

    The role of chemical and mineralogical soil properties in the retention and oxidation of atmospheric mercury in tropical soils is discussed based on thermal desorption analysis. The retention of gaseous mercury by tropical soils varied greatly both quantitatively and qualitatively with soil type. The average natural mercury content of soils was 0.08 ± 0.06 μg g(-1) with a maximum of 0.215 ± 0.009 μg g(-1). After gaseous Hg(0) incubation experiments, mercury content of investigated soils ranged from 0.6 ± 0.2 to 735 ± 23 μg g(-1), with a mean value of 44 ± 146 μg g(-1). Comparatively, A horizon of almost all soil types adsorbed more mercury than B horizon from the same soil, which demonstrates the key role of organic matter in mercury adsorption. In addition to organic matter, pH and CEC also appear to be important soil characteristics for the adsorption of mercury. All thermograms showed Hg(2+) peaks, which were predominant in most of them, indicating that elemental mercury oxidized in tropical soils. After four months of incubation, the thermograms showed oxidation levels from 70% to 100%. As none of the samples presented only the Hg(0) peak, and the soils retained varying amounts of mercury despite exposure under the same incubation conditions, it became clear that oxidation occurred on soil surface. Organic matter seemed to play a key role in mercury oxidation through complexation/stabilization of the oxidized forms. The lower percentages of available mercury (extracted with KNO3) in A horizons when compared to B horizons support this idea.

  5. Accumulation and oxidation of elemental mercury in tropical soils.

    PubMed

    Soares, Liliane Catone; Egreja Filho, Fernando Barboza; Linhares, Lucília Alves; Windmoller, Cláudia Carvalhinho; Yoshida, Maria Irene

    2015-09-01

    The role of chemical and mineralogical soil properties in the retention and oxidation of atmospheric mercury in tropical soils is discussed based on thermal desorption analysis. The retention of gaseous mercury by tropical soils varied greatly both quantitatively and qualitatively with soil type. The average natural mercury content of soils was 0.08 ± 0.06 μg g(-1) with a maximum of 0.215 ± 0.009 μg g(-1). After gaseous Hg(0) incubation experiments, mercury content of investigated soils ranged from 0.6 ± 0.2 to 735 ± 23 μg g(-1), with a mean value of 44 ± 146 μg g(-1). Comparatively, A horizon of almost all soil types adsorbed more mercury than B horizon from the same soil, which demonstrates the key role of organic matter in mercury adsorption. In addition to organic matter, pH and CEC also appear to be important soil characteristics for the adsorption of mercury. All thermograms showed Hg(2+) peaks, which were predominant in most of them, indicating that elemental mercury oxidized in tropical soils. After four months of incubation, the thermograms showed oxidation levels from 70% to 100%. As none of the samples presented only the Hg(0) peak, and the soils retained varying amounts of mercury despite exposure under the same incubation conditions, it became clear that oxidation occurred on soil surface. Organic matter seemed to play a key role in mercury oxidation through complexation/stabilization of the oxidized forms. The lower percentages of available mercury (extracted with KNO3) in A horizons when compared to B horizons support this idea. PMID:25950134

  6. Mercury's Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, J. A.

    1999-01-01

    Among the major discoveries made by the Mariner 10 mission to the inner planets was the existence of an intrinsic magnetic field at Mercury with a dipole moment of approx. 300 nT R(sup 3, sub M). This magnetic field is sufficient to stand off the solar wind at an altitude of about 1 R(sub M) (i.e. approx. 2439 km). Hence, Mercury possesses a 'magnetosphere' from which the so]ar wind plasma is largely excluded and within which the motion of charged particles is controlled by the planetary magnetic field. Despite its small size relative to the magnetospheres of the other planets, a Mercury orbiter mission is a high priority for the space physics community. The primary reason for this great interest is that Mercury unlike all the other planets visited thus far, lacks a significant atmosphere; only a vestigial exosphere is present. This results in a unique situation where the magnetosphere interacts directly with the outer layer of the planetary crust (i.e. the regolith). At all of the other planets the topmost regions of their atmospheres become ionized by solar radiation to form ionospheres. These planetary ionospheres then couple to electrodynamically to their magnetospheres or, in the case of the weakly magnetized Venus and Mars, directly to the solar wind. This magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling is mediated largely through field-aligned currents (FACs) flowing along the magnetic field lines linking the magnetosphere and the high-latitude ionosphere. Mercury is unique in that it is expected that FACS will be very short lived due to the low electrical conductivity of the regolith. Furthermore, at the earth it has been shown that the outflow of neutral atmospheric species to great altitudes is an important source of magnetospheric plasma (following ionization) whose composition may influence subsequent magnetotail dynamics. However, the dominant source of plasma for most of the terrestrial magnetosphere is the 'leakage'of solar wind across the magnetopause and more

  7. Mercury Control with Calcium-Based Sorbents and Oxidizing Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas K. Gale

    2005-07-01

    This Final Report contains the test descriptions, results, analysis, correlations, theoretical descriptions, and model derivations produced from many different investigations performed on a project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, to investigate calcium-based sorbents and injection of oxidizing agents for the removal of mercury. Among the technologies were (a) calcium-based sorbents in general, (b) oxidant-additive sorbents developed originally at the EPA, and (c) optimized calcium/carbon synergism for mercury-removal enhancement. In addition, (d) sodium-tetrasulfide injection was found to effectively capture both forms of mercury across baghouses and ESPs, and has since been demonstrated at a slipstream treating PRB coal. It has been shown that sodium-tetrasulfide had little impact on the foam index of PRB flyash, which may indicate that sodium-tetrasulfide injection could be used at power plants without affecting flyash sales. Another technology, (e) coal blending, was shown to be an effective means of increasing mercury removal, by optimizing the concentration of calcium and carbon in the flyash. In addition to the investigation and validation of multiple mercury-control technologies (a through e above), important fundamental mechanism governing mercury kinetics in flue gas were elucidated. For example, it was shown, for the range of chlorine and unburned-carbon (UBC) concentrations in coal-fired utilities, that chlorine has much less effect on mercury oxidation and removal than UBC in the flyash. Unburned carbon enhances mercury oxidation in the flue gas by reacting with HCl to form chlorinated-carbon sites, which then react with elemental mercury to form mercuric chloride, which subsequently desorbs back into the flue gas. Calcium was found to enhance mercury removal by stabilizing the oxidized mercury formed on carbon surfaces. Finally, a model was developed to describe these mercury adsorption, desorption, oxidation, and removal mechanisms, including

  8. Polymer adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joanny, Jean-Francois

    2008-03-01

    The aim of this talk is to review Pierre-Gilles deGennes' work on polymer adsorption and the impact that it has now in our understanding of this problem. We will first present the self-consistent mean-field theory and its applications to adsorption and depletion. De Gennes most important contribution is probably the derivation of the self-similar power law density profile for adsorbed polymer layers that we will present next, emphasizing the differences between the tail sections and the loop sections of the adsorbed polymers. We will then discuss the kinetics of polymer adsorption and the penetration of a new polymer chain in an adsobed layer that DeGennes described very elegantly in analogy with a quantum tunneling problem. Finally, we will discuss the role of polymer adsorption for colloid stabilization.

  9. MERCURY RESEARCH STRATEGY.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The USEPA's ORD is pleased to announce the availability of its Mercury Research Strategy. This strategy guides ORD's mercury research program and covers the FY2001-2005 time frame. ORD will use it to prepare a multi-year mercury research implementation plan in 2001. The Mercury R...

  10. Mercury contamination extraction

    DOEpatents

    Fuhrmann, Mark; Heiser, John; Kalb, Paul

    2009-09-15

    Mercury is removed from contaminated waste by firstly applying a sulfur reagent to the waste. Mercury in the waste is then permitted to migrate to the reagent and is stabilized in a mercury sulfide compound. The stable compound may then be removed from the waste which itself remains in situ following mercury removal therefrom.

  11. Phosphate adsorption on lanthanum loaded biochar.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhanghong; Shen, Dekui; Shen, Fei; Li, Tianyu

    2016-05-01

    To attain a low-cost and high-efficient phosphate adsorbent, lanthanum (La) loaded biochar (La-BC) prepared by a chemical precipitation method was developed. La-BC and its pristine biochar (CK-BC) were comparatively characterized using zeta potential, BET surface area, scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectrometer (SEM-EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The adsorption ability and the mechanisms during adsorption process for the La-BC samples were also investigated. La loaded on the surface of biochar can be termed as La-composites (such as LaOOH, LaONO3 and La(OH)3), leading to the decrease of negative charge and surface area of biochar. La-BC exhibited the high adsorption capacity to phosphate compared to CK-BC. Adsorption isotherm and adsorption kinetic studies showed that the Langmuir isotherm and second order model could well describe the adsorption process of La-BC, indicating that the adsorption was dominated by a homogeneous and chemical process. The calculated maximum adsorption capacity was as high as 46.37 mg g(-1) (computed in P). Thermodynamic analysis revealed that the adsorption was spontaneous and endothermic. SEM, XRD, XPS and FT-IR analysis suggested that the multi-adsorption mechanisms including precipitation, ligand exchange and complexation interactions can be evidenced during the phosphate adsorption process by La-composites in La-BC. PMID:26871732

  12. Mercury and health care.

    PubMed

    Rustagi, Neeti; Singh, Ritesh

    2010-08-01

    Mercury is toxic heavy metal. It has many characteristic features. Health care organizations have used mercury in many forms since time immemorial. The main uses of mercury are in dental amalgam, sphygmomanometers, and thermometers. The mercury once released into the environment can remain for a longer period. Both acute and chronic poisoning can be caused by it. Half of the mercury found in the atmosphere is human generated and health care contributes the substantial part to it. The world has awakened to the harmful effects of mercury. The World Health Organization and United Nations Environmental Programme (UNEP) have issued guidelines for the countries' health care sector to become mercury free. UNEP has formed mercury partnerships between governments and other stakeholders as one approach to reducing risks to human health and the environment from the release of mercury and its compounds to the environment. Many hospitals are mercury free now.

  13. Mercury and health care

    PubMed Central

    Rustagi, Neeti; Singh, Ritesh

    2010-01-01

    Mercury is toxic heavy metal. It has many characteristic features. Health care organizations have used mercury in many forms since time immemorial. The main uses of mercury are in dental amalgam, sphygmomanometers, and thermometers. The mercury once released into the environment can remain for a longer period. Both acute and chronic poisoning can be caused by it. Half of the mercury found in the atmosphere is human generated and health care contributes the substantial part to it. The world has awakened to the harmful effects of mercury. The World Health Organization and United Nations Environmental Programme (UNEP) have issued guidelines for the countries’ health care sector to become mercury free. UNEP has formed mercury partnerships between governments and other stakeholders as one approach to reducing risks to human health and the environment from the release of mercury and its compounds to the environment. Many hospitals are mercury free now. PMID:21120080

  14. Raw and Treated Rice Husks as Sorbents for Mercury Removal from Aqueous Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Befani, Maria R.; Manariotis, Ioannis D.; Karapanagioti, Hrissi K.; Quintero, César E.

    2014-05-01

    for further study: RH2, RHA3, RHA4, and RHA800. The batch adsorption kinetic experiments were performed at Co = 50 mg Hg(II)/L, pH 5, and values were taken periodically since the first 5 min until 480 h. The equilibrium was attained at 240 h for RHA3 and RHA4 and at 48 h for RH2 and RHA800. According to the kinetic data, the equilibrium adsorption capacities achieved were: 12 mg/g (RH2), 15 mg/g (RHA800), 27 mg/g (RHA3) and 61 mg/g (RHA4). Sorption kinetics was well described by the pseudo-second-order model. The mercury removal capacity was found to be in the following order: RHA4> RHA3> RHA300> RH3> RHA800> RH2> RH1. The pyrolysis of rice husk resulted in an increase of the specific surface area, which is very important for the removal of mercury. The sorption values achieved in the present study is lower compared with other mesoporous materials reported in literature. Nevertheless, the mercury sorption capacity values obtained are comparable with values found by other authors in similar conditions using rice husk and its ash.

  15. Mercury Quick Facts: Health Effects of Mercury Exposure

    MedlinePlus

    Mercury Quick Facts Health Effects of Mercury Exposure What is Elemental Mercury? Elemental (metallic) mercury is the shiny, silver-gray metal found in thermometers, barometers, and thermostats and other ...

  16. [Adsorption and Desorption Characteristics of Endosulfan in Purple Soil].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Zheng, Guo-can; Zhu, Heng; Zhang, Jin-zhong; Zhu, Xiu-ying; Hu, Shu-chun; Wu, Ya-lin

    2015-09-01

    In order to reveal the residual process of endosulfan in purple soil and protect soil ecological environment, the adsorption and desorption characteristics of endosulfan in purple soil were investigated, and effects of temperature, adsorbent amount, and initial pH of adsorption solution on the adsorption capacity were also examined by static adsorption and desorption experiments. The results showed that the adsorption kinetic process could be well described by the second-order kinetic equation with the initial rate constants of α-, β-endosulfan as 0. 157 and 0. 115 mg.(g.min)-1, respectively. The adsorption thermodynamic process could be well described by the Langmuir isotherm with the maximum adsorption capacities of α-, β-endosulfan as 0. 257 mg . g -1 and 0. 155 mg . g -1, respectively. The adsorption process of endosulfan in purple soil may be an exothermic physicochemical process, and is dominated by physical adsorption. Under the experimental conditions examined in this study, the initial pH of adsorption solution had a relative great influence on the adsorption capacity, whereas the temperature and adsorbent amount had no significant influence. The desorption experiments found that the maximum desorption capacities of α-, β-endosulfan adsorbed in purple soil were 0. 029 mg . g -1 and 0. 017 mg . g -1 at 6 and 4 h, and accounted for 10. 5% and 16. 1% in the maximum adsorption capacities, respectively. PMID:26717711

  17. [Adsorption and Desorption Characteristics of Endosulfan in Purple Soil].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Zheng, Guo-can; Zhu, Heng; Zhang, Jin-zhong; Zhu, Xiu-ying; Hu, Shu-chun; Wu, Ya-lin

    2015-09-01

    In order to reveal the residual process of endosulfan in purple soil and protect soil ecological environment, the adsorption and desorption characteristics of endosulfan in purple soil were investigated, and effects of temperature, adsorbent amount, and initial pH of adsorption solution on the adsorption capacity were also examined by static adsorption and desorption experiments. The results showed that the adsorption kinetic process could be well described by the second-order kinetic equation with the initial rate constants of α-, β-endosulfan as 0. 157 and 0. 115 mg.(g.min)-1, respectively. The adsorption thermodynamic process could be well described by the Langmuir isotherm with the maximum adsorption capacities of α-, β-endosulfan as 0. 257 mg . g -1 and 0. 155 mg . g -1, respectively. The adsorption process of endosulfan in purple soil may be an exothermic physicochemical process, and is dominated by physical adsorption. Under the experimental conditions examined in this study, the initial pH of adsorption solution had a relative great influence on the adsorption capacity, whereas the temperature and adsorbent amount had no significant influence. The desorption experiments found that the maximum desorption capacities of α-, β-endosulfan adsorbed in purple soil were 0. 029 mg . g -1 and 0. 017 mg . g -1 at 6 and 4 h, and accounted for 10. 5% and 16. 1% in the maximum adsorption capacities, respectively.

  18. Aerobic Mercury-resistant bacteria alter Mercury speciation and retention in the Tagus Estuary (Portugal).

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Neusa L; Canário, João; O'Driscoll, Nelson J; Duarte, Aida; Carvalho, Cristina

    2016-02-01

    Aerobic mercury-resistant bacteria were isolated from the sediments of two highly mercury-polluted areas of the Tagus Estuary (Barreiro and Cala do Norte) and one natural reserve area (Alcochete) in order to test their capacity to transform mercury. Bacterial species were identified using 16S rRNA amplification and sequencing techniques and the results indicate the prevalence of Bacillus sp. Resistance patterns to mercurial compounds were established by the determination of minimal inhibitory concentrations. Representative Hg-resistant bacteria were further tested for transformation pathways (reduction, volatilization and methylation) in cultures containing mercury chloride. Bacterial Hg-methylation was carried out by Vibrio fluvialis, Bacillus megaterium and Serratia marcescens that transformed 2-8% of total mercury into methylmercury in 48h. In addition, most of the HgR bacterial isolates showed Hg(2+)-reduction andHg(0)-volatilization resulting 6-50% mercury loss from the culture media. In summary, the results obtained under controlled laboratory conditions indicate that aerobic Hg-resistant bacteria from the Tagus Estuary significantly affect both the methylation and reduction of mercury and may have a dual face by providing a pathway for pollution dispersion while forming methylmercury, which is highly toxic for living organisms.

  19. Synthesis and application of ion-imprinted polymer nanoparticles for the extraction and preconcentration of mercury in water and food samples employing cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Roushani, Mahmoud; Abbasi, Shahryar; Khani, Hossein

    2015-09-01

    We describe a nanosized Hg(II)-imprinted polymer that was prepared from methacrylic acid as functional monomer, ethyleneglycol dimethacrylate as cross-linker, 2,2'-azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as radical initiator, 2, 2'-di pyrydyl amine as a specific ligand, and Hg (II) as the template ions by precipitation polymerization method in methanol as the progeny solvent. Batch adsorption experiments were carried out as a function of pH, Hg (II) imprinted polymer amount, adsorption and desorption time, volume, and concentration of eluent. The synthesized polymer particles were characterized physically and morphologically by using infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopic techniques. The maximum adsorption capacity of the ion-imprinted and non-imprinted sorbent was 27.96 and 7.89 mg g(-1), respectively. Under optimal conditions, the detection limit for mercury was 0.01 μg L(-1) and the relative standard deviation was 3.2 % (n = 6) at the 1.00 μg L(-1). The procedure was applied to determination of mercury in fish and water samples with satisfactory results.

  20. Mercury transformation and speciation in flue gases from anthropogenic emission sources: a critical review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Wang, S. X.; Wu, Q. R.; Wang, F. Y.; Lin, C.-J.; Zhang, L. M.; Hui, M. L.; Hao, J. M.

    2015-11-01

    Mercury transformation mechanisms and speciation profiles are reviewed for mercury formed in and released from flue gases of coal-fired boilers, non-ferrous metal smelters, cement plants, iron and steel plants, municipal solid waste incinerators, and biomass burning. Mercury in coal, ores and other raw materials is released to flue gases in the form of Hg0 during combustion or smelting in boilers, kilns or furnaces. Decreasing temperature from over 800 °C to below 300 °C in flue gases leaving boilers, kilns or furnaces promotes homogeneous and heterogeneous oxidation of gaseous elemental mercury (Hg0) to gaseous divalent mercury (Hg2+), with a portion of Hg2+ adsorbed onto fly ash to form particulate-bound mercury (Hgp). Halogen is the primary oxidizer for Hg0 in flue gases, and active components (e.g.,TiO2, Fe2O3, etc.) on fly ash promote heterogeneous oxidation and adsorption processes. In addition to mercury removal, mercury transformation also occurs when passing through air pollution control devices (APCDs), affecting the mercury speciation in flue gases. In coal-fired power plants, selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system promotes mercury oxidation by 34-85 %, electrostatic precipitator (ESP) and fabric filter (FF) remove over 99 % of Hgp, and wet flue gas desulfurization system (WFGD) captures 60-95 % of Hg2+. In non-ferrous metal smelters, most Hg0 is converted to Hg2+ and removed in acid plants (APs). For cement clinker production, mercury cycling and operational conditions promote heterogeneous mercury oxidation and adsorption. The mercury speciation profiles in flue gases emitted to the atmosphere are determined by transformation mechanisms and mercury removal efficiencies by various APCDs. For all the sectors reviewed in this study, Hgp accounts for less than 5 % in flue gases. In China, mercury emission has a higher fraction (66-82 % of total mercury) in flue gases from coal combustion, in contrast to a greater Hg2+ fraction (29-90 %) from non

  1. Global Trends in Mercury Management

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kyunghee

    2012-01-01

    The United Nations Environmental Program Governing Council has regulated mercury as a global pollutant since 2001 and has been preparing the mercury convention, which will have a strongly binding force through Global Mercury Assessment, Global Mercury Partnership Activities, and establishment of the Open-Ended Working Group on Mercury. The European Union maintains an inclusive strategy on risks and contamination of mercury, and has executed the Mercury Export Ban Act since December in 2010. The US Environmental Protection Agency established the Mercury Action Plan (1998) and the Mercury Roadmap (2006) and has proposed systematic mercury management methods to reduce the health risks posed by mercury exposure. Japan, which experienced Minamata disease, aims vigorously at perfection in mercury management in several ways. In Korea, the Ministry of Environment established the Comprehensive Plan and Countermeasures for Mercury Management to prepare for the mercury convention and to reduce risks of mercury to protect public health. PMID:23230466

  2. Global trends in mercury management.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae-Seon; Choi, Kyunghee

    2012-11-01

    The United Nations Environmental Program Governing Council has regulated mercury as a global pollutant since 2001 and has been preparing the mercury convention, which will have a strongly binding force through Global Mercury Assessment, Global Mercury Partnership Activities, and establishment of the Open-Ended Working Group on Mercury. The European Union maintains an inclusive strategy on risks and contamination of mercury, and has executed the Mercury Export Ban Act since December in 2010. The US Environmental Protection Agency established the Mercury Action Plan (1998) and the Mercury Roadmap (2006) and has proposed systematic mercury management methods to reduce the health risks posed by mercury exposure. Japan, which experienced Minamata disease, aims vigorously at perfection in mercury management in several ways. In Korea, the Ministry of Environment established the Comprehensive Plan and Countermeasures for Mercury Management to prepare for the mercury convention and to reduce risks of mercury to protect public health. PMID:23230466

  3. New Jersey mercury regulations

    SciTech Connect

    Elias, D.F.; Corbin, W.E.

    1996-12-31

    Mercury, or quicksilver, and its major ore cinnabar (HgS) have been known for thousands of years. Health effects from mercury such as dementia were known as early as the late 19th century ({open_quotes}mad as a hatter{close_quotes}). In the 1960`s and 1970`s, reported levels of mercury in tuna reawakened public awareness of mercury pollution. In the 1970`s, major epidemics of acute mercury poisoning were reported in Japan and Iraq. These incidents highlighted the extreme health risks, such as kidney damage, birth defects, and death, associated with severe mercury poisoning. Fetuses and young children are particularly vulnerable since mercury poisoning can damage growing neural tissues. Recently, the perception of mercury as a dangerous pollutant has been on the rise. Advisories warning the public to avoid or reduce the consumption of freshwater fish caught in specific waterbodies due to mercury contamination have been issued in numerous states. The discovery of mercury in {open_quotes}pristine{close_quotes} lakes in the United States, Canada, and Scandinavia, remote from industry and any known mercury sources, has focused attention on atmospheric emissions of mercury as potential significant sources of mercury.

  4. Removal of toxic mercury from petroleum oil by newly synthesized molecularly-imprinted polymer.

    PubMed

    Khairi, Nor Ain Shahera; Yusof, Nor Azah; Abdullah, Abdul Halim; Mohammad, Faruq

    2015-05-08

    In recent years, molecularly-imprinted polymers (MIPs) have attracted the attention of several researchers due to their capability for molecular recognition, easiness of preparation, stability and cost-effective production. By taking advantage of these facts, Hg(II) imprinted and non-imprinted copolymers were prepared by polymerizing mercury nitrate stock solution (or without it) with methacrylic acid (MAA), 2-hydroxyl ethyl methacrylate (HEMA), methanol and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) as the monomer, co-monomer solvent (porogen) and cross-linker, respectively. Thus, the formed Hg(II) imprinted polymer was characterized by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), Brunauer, Emmett and Teller (BET) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). The separation and preconcentration characteristics of Hg(II) imprinted polymer were investigated by solid phase extraction (SPE) procedures, and an optimal pH of 7 was investigated as ideal. The specific surface area of the Hg(II) imprinted polymer was found to be 19.45 m2/g with a size range from 100 to 140 µm in diameter. The maximum adsorption capacity was observed to be 1.11 mg/g of Hg(II) imprinted beads with 87.54% removal of Hg(II) ions within the first 5 min. The results of the study therefore confirm that the Hg(II) imprinted polymer can be used multiple times without significantly losing its adsorption capacity.

  5. Removal of Toxic Mercury from Petroleum Oil by Newly Synthesized Molecularly-Imprinted Polymer

    PubMed Central

    Khairi, Nor Ain Shahera; Yusof, Nor Azah; Abdullah, Abdul Halim; Mohammad, Faruq

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, molecularly-imprinted polymers (MIPs) have attracted the attention of several researchers due to their capability for molecular recognition, easiness of preparation, stability and cost-effective production. By taking advantage of these facts, Hg(II) imprinted and non-imprinted copolymers were prepared by polymerizing mercury nitrate stock solution (or without it) with methacrylic acid (MAA), 2-hydroxyl ethyl methacrylate (HEMA), methanol and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) as the monomer, co-monomer solvent (porogen) and cross-linker, respectively. Thus, the formed Hg(II) imprinted polymer was characterized by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), Brunauer, Emmett and Teller (BET) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). The separation and preconcentration characteristics of Hg(II) imprinted polymer were investigated by solid phase extraction (SPE) procedures, and an optimal pH of 7 was investigated as ideal. The specific surface area of the Hg(II) imprinted polymer was found to be 19.45 m2/g with a size range from 100 to 140 µm in diameter. The maximum adsorption capacity was observed to be 1.11 mg/g of Hg(II) imprinted beads with 87.54% removal of Hg(II) ions within the first 5 min. The results of the study therefore confirm that the Hg(II) imprinted polymer can be used multiple times without significantly losing its adsorption capacity. PMID:26006226

  6. Novel regenerable sorbent for mercury capture from flue gases of coal-fired power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Liu; David J.A. Kelly; Hongqun Yang; Christopher C.H. Lin; Steve M. Kuznicki; Zhenghe Xu

    2008-08-15

    A natural chabazite-based silver nanocomposite (AgMC) was synthesized to capture mercury from flue gases of coal-fired power plants. Silver nanoparticles were engineered on zeolite through ion-exchange of sodium ions with silver ions, followed by thermal annealing. Mercury sorption test using AgMC was performed at various temperatures by exposing it to either pulse injection of mercury or continuous mercury flow. A complete capture of mercury by AgMC was achieved up to a capture temperature of 250{sup o}C. Nano silver particles were shown to be the main active component for mercury capture by amalgamation mechanism. Compared with activated carbon-based sorbents, the sorbent prepared in this study showed a much higher mercury capture capacity and upper temperature limit for mercury capture. More importantly, the mercury captured by the spent AgMC could be easily released for safe disposal and the sorbent regenerated by simple heating at 400{sup o}C. Mercury capture tests performed in real flue gas environment showed a much higher level of mercury capture by AgMC than by other potential mercury sorbents tested. In our mercury capture tests, the AgMC exposed to real flue gases showed an increased mercury capture efficiency than the fresh AgMC. 38 refs., 6 figs.

  7. Novel regenerable sorbent for mercury capture from flue gases of coal-fired power plant.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Kelly, David J A; Yang, Hongqun; Lin, Christopher C H; Kuznicki, Steve M; Xu, Zhenghe

    2008-08-15

    A natural chabazite-based silver nanocomposite (AgMC) was synthesized to capture mercury from flue gases of coal-fired power plants. Silver nanoparticles were engineered on zeolite through ion-exchange of sodium ions with silver ions, followed by thermal annealing. Mercury sorption test using AgMC was performed at various temperatures by exposing it to either pulse injection of mercury or continuous mercury flow. A complete capture of mercury by AgMC was achieved up to a capture temperature of 250 degrees C. Nano silver particles were shown to be the main active component for mercury capture by amalgamation mechanism. Compared with activated carbon-based sorbents, the sorbent prepared in this study showed a much higher mercury capture capacity and upper temperature limit for mercury capture. More importantly, the mercury captured by the spent AgMC could be easily released for safe disposal and the sorbent regenerated by simple heating at 400 degrees C. Mercury capture tests performed in real flue gas environment showed a much higher level of mercury capture by AgMC than by other potential mercury sorbents tested. In our mercury capture tests, the AgMC exposed to real flue gases showed an increased mercury capture efficiency than the fresh AgMC.

  8. Nanosized cation-deficient Fe-Ti spinel: a novel magnetic sorbent for elemental mercury capture from flue gas.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shijian; Guo, Yongfu; Yan, Naiqiang; Wu, Daqing; He, Hongping; Qu, Zan; Yang, Chen; Zhou, Qin; Jia, Jinping

    2011-02-01

    Nonstoichiometric Fe-Ti spinel (Fe(3-x)Ti(x))(1-δ)O(4) has a large amount of cation vacancies on the surface, which may provide active sites for pollutant adsorption. Meanwhile, its magnetic property makes it separable from the complex multiphase system for recycling, and for safe disposal of the adsorbed toxin. Therefore, (Fe(3-x)Ti(x))(1-δ)O(4) may be a promising sorbent in environmental applications. Herein, (Fe(3-x)Ti(x))(1-δ)O(4) is used as a magnetically separable sorbent for elemental mercury capture from the flue gas of coal-fired power plants. (Fe(2)Ti)(0.8)O(4) shows a moderate capacity (about 1.0 mg g(-1) at 250 °C) for elemental mercury capture in the presence of 1000 ppmv of SO(2). Meanwhile, the sorbent can be readily separated from the fly ash using magnetic separation, leaving the fly ash essentially free of sorbent and adsorbed mercury. PMID:21250644

  9. Mercury transformation and speciation in flue gases from anthropogenic emission sources: a critical review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Wang, Shuxiao; Wu, Qingru; Wang, Fengyang; Lin, Che-Jen; Zhang, Leiming; Hui, Mulin; Yang, Mei; Su, Haitao; Hao, Jiming

    2016-02-01

    Mercury transformation mechanisms and speciation profiles are reviewed for mercury formed in and released from flue gases of coal-fired boilers, non-ferrous metal smelters, cement plants, iron and steel plants, waste incinerators, biomass burning and so on. Mercury in coal, ores, and other raw materials is released to flue gases in the form of Hg0 during combustion or smelting in boilers, kilns or furnaces. Decreasing temperature from over 800 °C to below 300 °C in flue gases leaving boilers, kilns or furnaces promotes homogeneous and heterogeneous oxidation of Hg0 to gaseous divalent mercury (Hg2+), with a portion of Hg2+ adsorbed onto fly ash to form particulate-bound mercury (Hgp). Halogen is the primary oxidizer for Hg0 in flue gases, and active components (e.g., TiO2, Fe2O3, etc.) on fly ash promote heterogeneous oxidation and adsorption processes. In addition to mercury removal, mercury transformation also occurs when passing through air pollution control devices (APCDs), affecting the mercury speciation in flue gases. In coal-fired power plants, selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system promotes mercury oxidation by 34-85 %, electrostatic precipitator (ESP) and fabric filter (FF) remove over 99 % of Hgp, and wet flue gas desulfurization system (WFGD) captures 60-95 % of Hg2+. In non-ferrous metal smelters, most Hg0 is converted to Hg2+ and removed in acid plants (APs). For cement clinker production, mercury cycling and operational conditions promote heterogeneous mercury oxidation and adsorption. The mercury speciation profiles in flue gases emitted to the atmosphere are determined by transformation mechanisms and mercury removal efficiencies by various APCDs. For all the sectors reviewed in this study, Hgp accounts for less than 5 % in flue gases. In China, mercury emission has a higher Hg0 fraction (66-82 % of total mercury) in flue gases from coal combustion, in contrast to a greater Hg2+ fraction (29-90 %) from non-ferrous metal smelting, cement and

  10. Physical adsorption strength in open systems.

    PubMed

    Knippenberg, M Todd; Stuart, Steven J; Cooper, Alan C; Pez, G P; Cheng, Hansong

    2006-11-23

    For a physical adsorption system, the distances of adsorbates from the surface of a substrate can vary significantly, depending on particle loading and interatomic interactions. Although the total adsorption energy is quantified easily, the normalized, per-particle adsorption energies are more ambiguous if some of these particles are far away from the surface and are interacting only weakly with the substrate. A simple analytical procedure is proposed to characterize the distance dependence of the physisorption strength and effective adsorption capacity. As an example, the method is utilized to describe H2 physisorption in a finite bundle of single-walled carbon nanotubes. PMID:17107125

  11. Mechanisms of mercury bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Essa, A M M; Macaskie, L E; Brown, N L

    2002-08-01

    Mercury is one of the most toxic heavy metals, and has significant industrial and agricultural uses. These uses have led to severe localized mercury pollution. Mercury volatilization after its reduction to the metallic form by mercury-resistant bacteria has been reported as a mechanism for mercury bioremediation [Brunke, Deckwer, Frischmuth, Horn, Lunsdorf, Rhode, Rohricht, Timmis and Weppen (1993) FEMS Microbiol. Rev. 11, 145-152; von Canstein, Timmis, Deckwer and Wagner-Dobler (1999) Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 65, 5279-5284]. The reduction/volatilization system requires to be studied further, in order to eliminate the escape of the metallic mercury into the environment. Recently we have demonstrated three different mechanisms for mercury detoxification in one organism, Klebsiella pneumoniae M426, which may increase the capture efficiency of mercury.

  12. Trapped-Mercury-Ion Frequency Standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Dick, G. John; Maleki, Lutfollah

    1991-01-01

    Report describes principle of operation, design, and results of initial measurements on trapped-mercury-ion frequency-standard apparatus at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. New frequency standard being developed. Based on linear ion trap described in (NPO-17758). Expected to show much better short-term frequency stability because of increased ion-storage capacity.

  13. Catalyst Additives to Enhance Mercury Oxidation and Capture

    SciTech Connect

    Jared W. Cannon; Thomas K. Gale

    2004-12-31

    Preliminary research has shown that SCR catalysts employed for nitrogen-oxide reduction can effectively oxidize mercury. This report discusses initial results from fundamental investigations into the behavior of mercury species in the presence of SCR catalysts at Southern Research Institute. Three different SCR catalysts are being studied. These are honeycomb-type, plate-type, and a hybrid-type catalyst. The catalysts are manufactured and supplied by Cormetech Inc., Hitachi America Ltd., and Haldor-Topsoe Inc., respectively. Test methods and experimental procedures were developed for current and future testing. The methods and procedures equalize factors influencing mercury adsorption and oxidation (surface area, catalyst activity, and pore structure) that normally differ for each catalyst type. Initial testing was performed to determine the time necessary for each catalyst to reach surface-adsorption equilibrium. In addition, the fraction of Hg oxidized by each of the SCR catalyst types is being investigated, for a given amount of catalyst and flow rate of mercury and flue gas. The next major effort will be to examine the kinetics of mercury oxidation across the SCR catalysts with respect to changes in mercury concentration and with respect to HCl concentration. Hg-sorption equilibrium times will also be investigated with respect to ammonia concentration in the simulated flue gas.

  14. Dental amalgam and mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Mackert, J.R. Jr. )

    1991-08-01

    This paper looks at the issues of the current amalgam controversy: the daily dose of mercury from amalgam, hypersensitivity to mercury, claims of adverse effects from amalgam mercury and alleged overnight 'cures.' In addition, the toxicity and allergenicity of the proposed alternative materials are examined with the same kind of scrutiny applied by the anti-amalgam group to dental amalgam. 100 references.

  15. Mercury Surveillance Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Background on mercury exposure is presented including forms, sources, permissible exposure limits, and physiological effects. The purpose of the Mercury Surveillance Program at LeRC is outlined, and the specifics of the Medical Surveillance Program for Mercury Exposure at LeRC are discussed.

  16. Protein Adsorption in Three Dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Vogler, Erwin A.

    2011-01-01

    Recent experimental and theoretical work clarifying the physical chemistry of blood-protein adsorption from aqueous-buffer solution to various kinds of surfaces is reviewed and interpreted within the context of biomaterial applications, especially toward development of cardiovascular biomaterials. The importance of this subject in biomaterials surface science is emphasized by reducing the “protein-adsorption problem” to three core questions that require quantitative answer. An overview of the protein-adsorption literature identifies some of the sources of inconsistency among many investigators participating in more than five decades of focused research. A tutorial on the fundamental biophysical chemistry of protein adsorption sets the stage for a detailed discussion of the kinetics and thermodynamics of protein adsorption, including adsorption competition between two proteins for the same adsorbent immersed in a binary-protein mixture. Both kinetics and steady-state adsorption can be rationalized using a single interpretive paradigm asserting that protein molecules partition from solution into a three-dimensional (3D) interphase separating bulk solution from the physical-adsorbent surface. Adsorbed protein collects in one-or-more adsorbed layers, depending on protein size, solution concentration, and adsorbent surface energy (water wettability). The adsorption process begins with the hydration of an adsorbent surface brought into contact with an aqueous-protein solution. Surface hydration reactions instantaneously form a thin, pseudo-2D interface between the adsorbent and protein solution. Protein molecules rapidly diffuse into this newly-formed interface, creating a truly 3D interphase that inflates with arriving proteins and fills to capacity within milliseconds at mg/mL bulk-solution concentrations CB. This inflated interphase subsequently undergoes time-dependent (minutes-to-hours) decrease in volume VI by expulsion of either-or-both interphase water and

  17. CRYOGENIC ADSORPTION OF HYDROGEN ISOTOPES OVER NANO-STRUCTURED MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, S.; Heung, L.

    2010-10-07

    Porous materials such as zeolites, activated carbon, silica gels, alumina and a number of industrial catalysts are compared and ranked for hydrogen and deuterium adsorption at liquid nitrogen temperature. All samples show higher D{sub 2} adsorption than that of H{sub 2}, in which a HY sample has the greatest isotopic effect while 13X has the highest hydrogen uptake capacity. Material's moisture content has significant impact to its hydrogen uptake. A material without adequate drying could result in complete loss of its adsorption capacity. Even though some materials present higher H{sub 2} adsorption capacity at full pressure, their adsorption at low vapor pressure may not be as good as others. Adsorption capacity in a dynamic system is much less than in a static system. A sharp desorption is also expected in case of temperature upset.

  18. Superior adsorption of pharmaceutical molecules by highly porous BN nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dan; Lei, Weiwei; Qin, Si; Klika, Karel D; Chen, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Highly porous boron nitride nanosheets (BNNSs) were tested as a re-usable adsorbent for the removal of pharmaceuticals from aqueous solution. The BNNSs exhibit both unprecedentedly high adsorption capacities and excellent recyclability while maintaining their high adsorption capacity by a simple regeneration process. These advantages render BNNSs a promising material for water remediation applications. PMID:26618906

  19. Retention of elemental mercury in fly ashes in different atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    M.A. Lopez-Anton; M. Diaz-Somoano; M.R. Martinez-Tarazona

    2007-01-15

    Mercury is an extremely volatile element, which is emitted from coal combustion to the environment mostly in the vapor phase. To avoid the environmental problems that the toxic species of this element may cause, control technologies for the removal of mercury are necessary. Recent research has shown that certain fly ash materials have an affinity for mercury. Moreover, it has been observed that fly ashes may catalyze the oxidation of elemental mercury and facilitate its capture. However, the exact nature of Hg-fly ash interactions is still unknown, and mercury oxidation through fly ash needs to be investigated more thoroughly. In this work, the influence of a gas atmosphere on the retention of elemental mercury on fly ashes of different characteristics was evaluated. The retention capacity was estimated comparatively in inert and two gas atmospheres containing species present in coal gasification and coal combustion. Fly ashes produced in two pulverized coal combustion (PCC) plants, produced from coals of different rank (CTA and CTSR), and a fly ash (CTP) produced in a fluidized bed combustion (FBC) plant were used as raw materials. The mercury retention capacity of these fly ashes was compared to the retention obtained in different activated carbons. Although the capture of mercury is very similar in the gasification atmosphere and N{sub 2}, it is much more efficient in a coal combustion retention, being greater in fly ashes from PCC than those from FBC plants. 22 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Mercury pollution in China

    SciTech Connect

    Gui-Bin Jiang; Jian-Bo Shi; Xin-Bin Feng

    2006-06-15

    With a long history of mercury mining and use and a rapidly growing economy that relies heavily on coal for heat and energy, China faces an enormous challenge to reduce pollution from this toxic metal. The authors delineate what is known about the extent of the problem, regulatory steps are being taken to reduce mercury pollution, and next steps for environmental researchers. It addresses issues of mercury pollution from mercury and gold mining, coal combustion and the chemical industry. Data on dietary intake of mercury is also reported. 50 refs., 2 figs., 2 photos.

  1. Phytoremediation of Ionic and Methyl Mercury P

    SciTech Connect

    Meagher, Richard B.

    1999-06-01

    Our long-term goal is to enable highly productive plant species to extract, resist, detoxify, and/or sequester toxic heavy metal pollutants as an environmentally friendly alternative to physical remediation methods. We have focused this phytoremediation research on soil and water-borne ionic and methylmercury. Mercury pollution is a serious world-wide problem affecting the health of human and wild-life populations. Methylmercury, produced by native bacteria at mercury-contaminated wetland sites, is a particularly serious problem due to its extreme toxicity and efficient biomagnification in the food chain. We engineered several plant species (e.g., Arabidopsis, tobacco, canola, yellow poplar, rice) to express the bacterial genes, merB and/or merA, under the control of plant regulatory sequences. These transgenic plants acquired remarkable properties for mercury remediation. (1) Transgenic plants expressing merB (organomercury lyase) extract methylmercury from their growth substrate and degrade it to less toxic ionic mercury. They grow on concentrations of methylmercury that kill normal plants and accumulate low levels of ionic mercury. (2) Transgenic plants expressing merA (mercuric ion reductase) extract and electrochemically reduce toxic, reactive ionic mercury to much less toxic and volatile metallic mercury. This metal transformation is driven by the powerful photosynthetic reducing capacity of higher plants that generates excess NADPH using solar energy. MerA plants grow vigorously on levels of ionic mercury that kill control plants. Plants expressing both merB and merA degrade high levels of methylmercury and volatilize metallic mercury. These properties were shown to be genetically stable for several generations in the two plant species examined. Our work demonstrates that native trees, shrubs, and grasses can be engineered to remediate the most abundant toxic mercury pollutants. Building on these data our working hypothesis for the next grant period is that

  2. Adsorption of phenolic compound by aged-refuse.

    PubMed

    Xiaoli, Chai; Youcai, Zhao

    2006-09-01

    The adsorption of phenol, 2-chlorophenol, 4-chlorophenol and 2,4-dichlorophenol by aged-refuse has been studied. Adsorption isotherms have been determined for phenol, 2-chlorophenol, 4-chlorophenol and 2,4-dichlorophenol and the data fits well to the Freundlich equation. The chlorinated phenols are absorbed more strongly than the phenol and the adsorption capacity has an oblivious relationship with the numbers and the position of chlorine subsistent. The experiment data suggests that both the partition function and the chemical adsorption involve in the adsorption process. Pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order model were applied to investigate the kinetics of the adsorption and the results show that it fit the pseudo-second-order model. More than one step involves in the adsorption process and the overall rate of the adsorption process appears to be controlled by the chemical reaction. The thermodynamic analysis indicates that the adsorption is spontaneous and endothermic.

  3. Changing patterns in the use, recycling, and material substitution of mercury in the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilburn, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Environmental concerns have led to numerous regulations that have dramatically decreased the reported production and use of mercury in the United States since the 1980s. Government legislation and subsequent industry actions have led to increased collection of mercury-containing materials and the recovery of mercury through recycling. Mercury emissions have been reduced and effective alternatives to mercury products have been developed for many applications. This study updates and quantifies the changes in demand, supply, use, and material flow for mercury in various sectors in the United States that have taken place since 1996. Nearly all primary mercury produced in the United States is derived as a byproduct of processing of gold and silver ore in Nevada. Since 2001, annual production of mercury from gold and silver mining in Nevada has decreased by 22 percent overall because ore from greater depths containing low grade mercury is recovered, and mercury emissions from this source have decreased by 95 percent as a result of increased regulation and improved collection and suppression technology. The distribution of consumption of mercury in the United States has changed as a result of regulation (elimination of large-scale mercury use in the paint and battery sectors), reduction by consumers (decommissioning of mercury-cell chloralkali manufacturing capacity), and technological advances (improvements in dental, lighting, and wiring sectors). Mercury use in the chloralkali sector, the leading end-use sector in the United States in 1996, has declined by 98 percent from 136 metric tons (t) in 1996 to about 0.3 t in 2010 because of increased processing and recycling efficiencies and plant closures or conversion to other technologies. As plants were closed, mercury recovered from the infrastructure of decommissioned plants has been exported, making the United States a net exporter of mercury, even though no mercury has been produced as the primary product from mines in

  4. Use of an integrated mercury food web model for ecological risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Hunter, John G; Burger, Joanna; Cooper, Keith R

    2003-07-01

    We developed an integrated food web model for mercury, using the CATS (Contaminants in Aquatic and Terrestrial ecoSytems) model developed by Traas and co-workers (Traas, T.P.; Stäb, J.A.; Kramer, P.R.G.; Cofino, W.P.; Aldenberg, T. Modeling and risk assessment of tributyltin accumulation in the food web of a shallow freshwater lake. Environ. Sci. Technol. 1996, 30 (4), 1227-1237). It was translated into the MatLab mathematical programming language and been adapted for the modeling of mercury. Mercury CATS now models four species of mercury (unreactive mercury, zero valent mercury, divalent mercury, and methylmercury) and their environmental and interactions using the mercury speciation kinetics model article by Bale (Bale, A.E. Modeling aquatic mercury fate in Clear Lake, Calif. J. Env. Eng. 2000, 126 (2), 153-163.) as a guideline. The mercury cycling kinetics include methylation of divalent mercury, photo-oxidation of zero valent mercury, reduction of divalent mercury, adsorption and desorption of divalent and methylmercury, volatilization of zero valent mercury, and uptake into the food web. A lake food web consisting of phytoplankton, rooted vegetation, zooplankton, crayfish, freshwater clams, amphipods, chironomids, eels, killifish, bass, and ospreys traces growth of the various compartments, uptake of both divalent and methylmercury, and the movement of both divalent and methylmercury through the food web via feeding relationships. This model design is sufficiently flexible that the incorporation of new scientific information can be easily done as our understanding of both the organisms and mercury's environmental chemistry increases. PMID:12916846

  5. [Removal Characteristics of Elemental Mercury by Mn-Ce/molecular Sieve].

    PubMed

    Tan, Zeng-qiang; Niu, Guo-ping; Chen, Xiao-wen; An, Zhen

    2015-06-01

    The impregnation method was used to support molecular sieve with active manganese and cerium components to obtain a composite molecular sieve catalyst. The mercury removal performance of the catalyst was studied with a bench-scale setup. XPS analysis was used to characterize the sample before and after the modification in order to study the changes in the active components of the catalyst prepared. The results showed that the catalyst carrying manganese and cerium components had higher oxidation ability of elemental mercury in the temperature range of 300 degrees C - 450 degrees C, especially at 450 degrees C, the oxidation efficiency of elemental mercury was kept above 80%. The catalyst had more functional groups that were conducive to the oxidation of elemental mercury, and the mercury removal mainly depended on the chemical adsorption. The SO2 and NO in flue gas could inhibit the oxidation of elemental mercury to certain extent. PMID:26387298

  6. Mercury's Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peale, S. J.

    2005-05-01

    In determining Mercury's core structure from its rotational properties, the location of Cassini state 1 is crucial. Convincing radar evidence indicates that the mantle rests on a liquid layer (Margot et al. 2005), but there are no empirical constraints on the moment of inertia C/MR2, which constraints must wait for the determination of the gravitational coefficients J2 and C22 from the MESSENGER orbiting spacecraft, and an accurate determination of the obliquity of the Cassini state. Tidal and core-mantle dissipation drive the spin to the Cassini state with a time scale O(105) years, so the spin should occupy the Cassini state and thereby define its obliquity---unless there has been a recent excitation of a free precession of the spin. Another way the spin might be displaced from the Cassini state is if the variations in the orbital elements, which change the position of the Cassini state, cause the spin axis to lag behind as it attempts to follow the state. Fortunately, the solid angle the spin axis encloses as it precesses around the Cassini state is an adiabatic invariant, and it is conserved if the orbital element variations are slow compared to the precession rate. As the precession period is O(1000) years, and the time scales of orbital parameter variations are O(105) years, the spin axis should remain very close to the Cassini state if it were ever close. But how close is close? The increasing precision of the radar and eventual spacecraft measurements warrants a check on the likely proximity of the spin axis to the Cassini state. By numerically following the positions of the spin axis and Cassini state with orbital parameters varying with time scales and amplitudes comparable to the real variations, we show that the spin should remain within 1″ of the Cassini state once dissipative torques bring it there. The current spin axis position should thus define the Cassini state sufficiently to put reasonably tight constraints on the core structure

  7. Adsorption characteristics of siloxanes in landfill gas by the adsorption equilibrium test

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Sangchul; Namkoong, Wan; Kang, Jeong-Hee; Park, Jin-Kyu; Lee, Namhoon

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • Equilibrium test was attempted to evaluate adsorption characteristics of siloxane. • L2 had higher removal efficiency in carbon compared to noncarbon adsorbents. • Total adsorption capacity of siloxane was 300 mg/g by coal activated carbon. • Adsorption characteristics rely on size of siloxane molecule and adsorbent pore. • Conversion of siloxane was caused by adsorption of noncarbon adsorbents. - Abstract: Due to the increase in energy cost by constantly high oil prices and the obligation to reduce greenhouse effect gases, landfill gas is frequently used as an alternative energy source for producing heat and electricity. Most of landfill gas utility facilities, however, are experiencing problems controlling siloxanes from landfill gas as their catalytic oxidizers are becoming fouled by silicon dioxide dust. To evaluate adsorption characteristics of siloxanes, an adsorption equilibrium test was conducted and parameters in the Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms were analyzed. Coconut activated carbon (CA1), coal activated carbon (CA2), impregnated activated carbon (CA3), silicagel (NCA1), and activated alumina (NCA2) were used for the adsorption of the mixed siloxane which contained hexamethyldisiloxane (L2), octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4), and decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5). L2 had higher removal efficiency in noncarbon adsorbents compared to carbon adsorbents. The application of Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm demonstrated that coconut based CA1 and CA3 provided higher adsorption capacity on L2. And CA2 and NCA1 provided higher adsorption capacity on D4 and D5. Based on the experimental results, L2, D4, and D5 were converted by adsorption and desorption in noncarbon adsorbents. Adsorption affinity of siloxane is considered to be affect by the pore size distribution of the adsorbents and by the molecular size of each siloxane.

  8. Mercury Report-Children's exposure to elemental mercury

    MedlinePlus

    ... PDF - 781KB] En Español [PDF - 6.6MB] What did ATSDR find? For children, most elemental mercury exposures ... that exposed children to elemental mercury. The report did not include a review of mercury exposures from ...

  9. Protein Adsorption in Three Dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Vogler, Erwin A.

    2011-01-01

    Recent experimental and theoretical work clarifying the physical chemistry of blood-protein adsorption from aqueous-buffer solution to various kinds of surfaces is reviewed and interpreted within the context of biomaterial applications, especially toward development of cardiovascular biomaterials. The importance of this subject in biomaterials surface science is emphasized by reducing the “protein-adsorption problem” to three core questions that require quantitative answer. An overview of the protein-adsorption literature identifies some of the sources of inconsistency among many investigators participating in more than five decades of focused research. A tutorial on the fundamental biophysical chemistry of protein adsorption sets the stage for a detailed discussion of the kinetics and thermodynamics of protein adsorption, including adsorption competition between two proteins for the same adsorbent immersed in a binary-protein mixture. Both kinetics and steady-state adsorption can be rationalized using a single interpretive paradigm asserting that protein molecules partition from solution into a three-dimensional (3D) interphase separating bulk solution from the physical-adsorbent surface. Adsorbed protein collects in one-or-more adsorbed layers, depending on protein size, solution concentration, and adsorbent surface energy (water wettability). The adsorption process begins with the hydration of an adsorbent surface brought into contact with an aqueous-protein solution. Surface hydration reactions instantaneously form a thin, pseudo-2D interface between the adsorbent and protein solution. Protein molecules rapidly diffuse into this newly-formed interface, creating a truly 3D interphase that inflates with arriving proteins and fills to capacity within milliseconds at mg/mL bulk-solution concentrations CB. This inflated interphase subsequently undergoes time-dependent (minutes-to-hours) decrease in volume VI by expulsion of either-or-both interphase water and

  10. Mercury Calibration System

    SciTech Connect

    John Schabron; Eric Kalberer; Joseph Rovani; Mark Sanderson; Ryan Boysen; William Schuster

    2009-03-11

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Performance Specification 12 in the Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR) states that a mercury CEM must be calibrated with National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST)-traceable standards. In early 2009, a NIST traceable standard for elemental mercury CEM calibration still does not exist. Despite the vacature of CAMR by a Federal appeals court in early 2008, a NIST traceable standard is still needed for whatever regulation is implemented in the future. Thermo Fisher is a major vendor providing complete integrated mercury continuous emissions monitoring (CEM) systems to the industry. WRI is participating with EPA, EPRI, NIST, and Thermo Fisher towards the development of the criteria that will be used in the traceability protocols to be issued by EPA. An initial draft of an elemental mercury calibration traceability protocol was distributed for comment to the participating research groups and vendors on a limited basis in early May 2007. In August 2007, EPA issued an interim traceability protocol for elemental mercury calibrators. Various working drafts of the new interim traceability protocols were distributed in late 2008 and early 2009 to participants in the Mercury Standards Working Committee project. The protocols include sections on qualification and certification. The qualification section describes in general terms tests that must be conducted by the calibrator vendors to demonstrate that their calibration equipment meets the minimum requirements to be established by EPA for use in CAMR monitoring. Variables to be examined include linearity, ambient temperature, back pressure, ambient pressure, line voltage, and effects of shipping. None of the procedures were described in detail in the draft interim documents; however they describe what EPA would like to eventually develop. WRI is providing the data and results to EPA for use in developing revised experimental procedures and realistic acceptance criteria based on

  11. Synthesis and characterization of LTA nanozeolite using barley husk silica: Mercury removal from standard and real solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Azizi, Seyed Naser; Dehnavi, Ahmad Roozbehani; Joorabdoozha, Amir

    2013-05-15

    Highlights: ► Silica extraction from barley husk with high purity for the synthesis of A nanozeolite. ► Free template A nanozeolite synthesized via new source of silica at low temperature. ► Optimization of SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Na{sub 2}O/SiO{sub 2} ratios, temperature and time of the synthesis. ► Utilizing of synthesized A nanozeolite for mercury removal from aqueous solutions. ► Mercury removal at optimized pH, contact time and adsorbent dose from real solution. - Abstract: In this study, synthesized Lined Type A (LTA) nanozeolite from barley husk silica (BHS) was used for mercury removal from standard and real aqueous solutions. The BHS in amorphous phase with 80% purity was extracted from barley husk ash (BHA), and used effectively as a new source of silica for the synthesis of NaA nanozeolite. The NaA nanocrystal in pure phase has been synthesized at low temperature, without adding any organic additives. The effects of heating time, reaction temperature, SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and Na{sub 2}O/SiO{sub 2} mole ratios on the crystallization of NaA nanozeolite were studied. The adsorption capacity of mercury (II) was studied as a function of pH, contact time, and amount of adsorbent. The crystallization of NaA nanozeolite from BHS was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX), Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET), and FTIR techniques. Moreover, concentration of Hg{sup 2+} ions in the aqueous solutions was analyzed by hydride generation atomic absorption spectroscopy method (HG-AAS). The standard and real samples analysis showed that NaA nanozeolite is capable of Hg{sup 2+} ions removal from the aqueous solutions. Efficiency of mercury (II) adsorption from real solutions onto the nano-sized NaA zeolite was 98%.

  12. Mercury: The World Closest to the Sun.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cordell, Bruce M.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses various topics related to the geology of Mercury including the origin of Mercury's magnetism, Mercury's motions, volcanism, scarps, and Mercury's violent birth and early life. Includes a table comparing Mercury's orbital and physical data to that of earth's. (JN)

  13. Formation of nanocolloidal metacinnabar in mercury-DOM-sulfide systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gerbig, C.A.; Kim, C.S.; Stegemeier, J.P.; Ryan, J.N.; Aiken, G.R.

    2011-01-01

    Direct determination of mercury (Hg) speciation in sulfide-containing environments is confounded by low mercury concentrations and poor analytical sensitivity. Here we report the results of experiments designed to assess mercury speciation at environmentally relevant ratios of mercury to dissolved organic matter (DOM) (i.e., <4 nmol Hg (mg DOM)-1) by combining solid phase extraction using C18 resin with extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. Aqueous Hg(II) and a DOM isolate were equilibrated in the presence and absence of 100 ??M total sulfide. In the absence of sulfide, mercury adsorption to the resin increased as the Hg:DOM ratio decreased and as the strength of Hg-DOM binding increased. EXAFS analysis indicated that in the absence of sulfide, mercury bonds with an average of 2.4 ?? 0.2 sulfur atoms with a bond length typical of mercury-organic thiol ligands (2.35 ??). In the presence of sulfide, mercury showed greater affinity for the C18 resin, and its chromatographic behavior was independent of Hg:DOM ratio. EXAFS analysis showed mercury-sulfur bonds with a longer interatomic distance (2.51-2.53 ??) similar to the mercury-sulfur bond distance in metacinnabar (2.53 ??) regardless of the Hg:DOM ratio. For all samples containing sulfide, the sulfur coordination number was below the ideal four-coordinate structure of metacinnabar. At a low Hg:DOM ratio where strong binding DOM sites may control mercury speciation (1.9 nmol mg -1) mercury was coordinated by 2.3 ?? 0.2 sulfur atoms, and the coordination number rose with increasing Hg:DOM ratio. The less-than-ideal coordination numbers indicate metacinnabar-like species on the nanometer scale, and the positive correlation between Hg:DOM ratio and sulfur coordination number suggests progressively increasing particle size or crystalline order with increasing abundance of mercury with respect to DOM. In DOM-containing sulfidic systems nanocolloidal metacinnabar-like species may form, and these

  14. Effective removal of mercury(II) ions from chlor-alkali industrial wastewater using 2-mercaptobenzamide modified itaconic acid-grafted-magnetite nanocellulose composite.

    PubMed

    Anirudhan, T S; Shainy, F

    2015-10-15

    A novel adsorbent, 2-mercaptobenzamide modified itaconic acid-grafted-magnetite nanocellulose composite [P(MB-IA)-g-MNCC] was synthesized for adsorbing mercury(II) [Hg(II)] ions selectively from aqueous solutions. Fourier transforms infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and thermogravimetric studies were performed to characterize the adsorbent. The optimum pH for Hg(II) adsorption was found to be 8.0, and the adsorption attained equilibrium within 60 min. The kinetic data were found to follow pseudo-second-order which assumes the ion exchange followed by complexation mechanism. The temperature dependence indicates an exothermic process. The well agreement of equilibrium data with Freundlich adsorption model confirms the multilayer coverage of Hg(II) onto P(MB-IA)-g-MNCC. The maximum adsorption capacity was found to be 240.0 mg/g. Complete removal of Hg(II) from aqueous solution was possible with an adsorbent dosage of 2.0 g/L. Spent adsorbent was effectively degenerated with 0.1M HCl. The present investigation shows that P(MB-IA)g-MNCC is a promising adsorbent for the removal and recovery of Hg(II) ions from aqueous solutions. PMID:26086434

  15. Process for low mercury coal

    DOEpatents

    Merriam, N.W.; Grimes, R.W.; Tweed, R.E.

    1995-04-04

    A process is described for producing low mercury coal during precombustion procedures by releasing mercury through discriminating mild heating that minimizes other burdensome constituents. Said mercury is recovered from the overhead gases by selective removal. 4 figures.

  16. Process for low mercury coal

    DOEpatents

    Merriam, Norman W.; Grimes, R. William; Tweed, Robert E.

    1995-01-01

    A process for producing low mercury coal during precombustion procedures by releasing mercury through discriminating mild heating that minimizes other burdensome constituents. Said mercury is recovered from the overhead gases by selective removal.

  17. Enhanced sorption of mercury from compact fluorescent bulbs and contaminated water streams using functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Avinash; Vidyarthi, S R; Sankararamakrishnan, Nalini

    2014-06-15

    Three different functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes were prepared, namely, oxidized CNTs (CNT-OX), iodide incorporated MWCNT (CNT-I) and sulfur incorporated MWCNT (CNT-S). The as prepared adsorbents were structurally characterized by various spectral techniques like scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDAX), Brunauer, Emmett, and Teller (BET) surface area analyzer, Fourier transform infra red (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy. Loading of iodide and sulfur was evident from the EDAX graphs. The adsorption properties of Hg(2+) as a function of pH, contact time and initial metal concentration were characterized by Cold vapor AAS. The adsorption kinetics fitted the Pseudo second order kinetics and equilibrium was reached within 90 min. The experimental data were modeled with Langmuir, Freundlich, Dubinin-Redushkevich and Temkin isotherms and various isotherm parameters were evaluated. It was found that the mercury adsorption capacity for the prepared adsorbents were in the order of CNT-S>CNT-I>CNT-OX>CNT. Studies have been conducted to demonstrate the applicability of the sorbent toward the removal of Hg(0) from broken compact fluorescent light (CFL) bulbs and Hg(II) from contaminated water streams.

  18. Mercury removal using ground and calcined mussel shell.

    PubMed

    Peña-Rodríguez, Susana; Bermúdez-Couso, Alipio; Nóvoa-Muñoz, Juan Carlos; Arias-Estévez, Manuel; Fernández-Sanjurjo, María J; Alvarez-Rodríguez, Esperanza; Núñez-Delgado, Avelino

    2013-12-01

    We determined mercury retention on calcined and ground mussel shell, in presence and absence of phosphate, using batch and stirred flow chamber experiments. In batch experiments the calcined shell exhibited higher Hg adsorption, with good fitting to Freundlich equation (R2: 0.925-0.978); the presence of phosphate increased Hg adsorption; mercury desorption was 13% or lower, diminishing up to 2% under the presence of phosphates. In stirred flow chamber experiments calcined shell retained more Hg than ground shells (6300 vs. 4000-5200 micromol/kg); Hg retention increased an additional 40% on calcined shell and up to an additional 70% on ground shells when phosphates were present; mercury desorption was quite similar in all shell types (20%-34%), increasing up to 49%-60% in ground shells when phosphates were present. The higher Hg adsorption on calcined shell would be related to its calcite and dolomite concentrations; mercury-phosphate interactions would cause the increase in Hg retention when phosphates are present. Data on Hg desorption suggest that Hg retention was not easily reversible after batch experiments, increasing in the stirred flow chamber due to convective flow. Calcined and ground mussel shells could be recycled removing Hg from water, with the presence of phosphates in solution improving efficacy.

  19. Thief process for the removal of mercury from flue gas

    DOEpatents

    Pennline, Henry W.; Granite, Evan J.; Freeman, Mark C.; Hargis, Richard A.; O'Dowd, William J.

    2003-02-18

    A system and method for removing mercury from the flue gas of a coal-fired power plant is described. Mercury removal is by adsorption onto a thermally activated sorbent produced in-situ at the power plant. To obtain the thermally activated sorbent, a lance (thief) is inserted into a location within the combustion zone of the combustion chamber and extracts a mixture of semi-combusted coal and gas. The semi-combusted coal has adsorptive properties suitable for the removal of elemental and oxidized mercury. The mixture of semi-combusted coal and gas is separated into a stream of gas and semi-combusted coal that has been converted to a stream of thermally activated sorbent. The separated stream of gas is recycled to the combustion chamber. The thermally activated sorbent is injected into the duct work of the power plant at a location downstream from the exit port of the combustion chamber. Mercury within the flue gas contacts and adsorbs onto the thermally activated sorbent. The sorbent-mercury combination is removed from the plant by a particulate collection system.

  20. Substorms on Mercury?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siscoe, G. L.; Ness, N. F.; Yeates, C. M.

    1974-01-01

    Qualitative similarities between some of the variations in the Mercury encounter data and variations in the corresponding regions of the earth's magnetosphere during substorms are pointed out. The Mariner 10 data on Mercury show a strong interaction between the solar wind and the plant similar to a scaled down version of that for the earth's magnetosphere. Some of the features observed in the night side Mercury magnetosphere suggest time dependent processes occurring there.

  1. Novel sandwich structure adsorptive membranes for removal of 4-nitrotoluene from water.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yuexin; Jia, Zhiqian

    2016-11-01

    Novel sandwich PES-SPES/PS-PDVB/PTFE adsorptive membranes were prepared by a filtration/immersion precipitation method and employed for the removal of 4-nitrotoluene from water. The static adsorption thermodynamics, kinetics, dynamic adsorption/desorption and membrane reusability were investigated. The results showed that the Freundlich model describes the adsorption isotherm satisfactorily. With increased PS-PDVB content, the maximum static adsorption capacity, partition coefficient, apparent adsorption rate constant, and dynamic adsorption capacity all significantly increased. The sandwich membranes showed much higher removal efficiency and adsorption capacity than those of mixed matrix membranes. With respect to dynamics adsorption/desorption, the sandwich membranes exhibited excellent reusability, with a removal efficiency greater than 95% even after five recycles. PMID:27322899

  2. Adsorption of anionic and cationic dyes by activated carbons, PVA hydrogels, and PVA/AC composite.

    PubMed

    Sandeman, Susan R; Gun'ko, Vladimir M; Bakalinska, Olga M; Howell, Carol A; Zheng, Yishan; Kartel, Mykola T; Phillips, Gary J; Mikhalovsky, Sergey V

    2011-06-15

    The textural and adsorption characteristics of a series of activated carbons (ACs), porous poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) gels, and PVA/AC composites were studied using scanning electron microscopy, mercury porosimetry, adsorption of nitrogen (at 77.4 K), cationic methylene blue (MB), anionic methyl orange (MO), and Congo red (CR) from the aqueous solutions. Dye-PVA-AC-water interactions were modeled using the semiempirical quantum chemical method PM6. The percentage of dye removed (C(rem)) by the ACs was close to 100% at an equilibrium concentration (C(eq)) of less than 0.1 mM but decreased with increasing dye concentration. This decrease was stronger at C(eq) of less than 1 mM, and C(rem) was less than 50% at a C(eq) of 10-20 mM. For PVA and the PVA/AC composite containing C-7, the C(rem) values were minimal (<75%). The free energy distribution functions (f(ΔG)) for dye adsorption include one to three peaks in the -ΔG range of 1-60 kJ/mol, depending on the dye concentration range used and the spatial, charge symmetry of the hydrated dye ions and the structural characteristics of the adsorbents. The f(ΔG) shape is most complex for MO with the most asymmetrical geometry and charge distribution and adsorbed at concentrations over a large C(eq) range. For symmetrical CR ions, adsorbed over a narrow C(eq) range, the f(ΔG) plot includes mainly one narrow peak. MB has a minimal molecular size at a planar geometry (especially important for effective adsorption in slit-shaped pores) which explains its greater adsorptive capacity over that of MO or CR. Dye adsorption was greatest for ACs with the largest surface area but as molecular size increases adsorption depends to a greater extent on the pore size distribution in addition to total and nanopore surface areas and pore volume.

  3. Adsorption of anionic and cationic dyes by activated carbons, PVA hydrogels, and PVA/AC composite.

    PubMed

    Sandeman, Susan R; Gun'ko, Vladimir M; Bakalinska, Olga M; Howell, Carol A; Zheng, Yishan; Kartel, Mykola T; Phillips, Gary J; Mikhalovsky, Sergey V

    2011-06-15

    The textural and adsorption characteristics of a series of activated carbons (ACs), porous poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) gels, and PVA/AC composites were studied using scanning electron microscopy, mercury porosimetry, adsorption of nitrogen (at 77.4 K), cationic methylene blue (MB), anionic methyl orange (MO), and Congo red (CR) from the aqueous solutions. Dye-PVA-AC-water interactions were modeled using the semiempirical quantum chemical method PM6. The percentage of dye removed (C(rem)) by the ACs was close to 100% at an equilibrium concentration (C(eq)) of less than 0.1 mM but decreased with increasing dye concentration. This decrease was stronger at C(eq) of less than 1 mM, and C(rem) was less than 50% at a C(eq) of 10-20 mM. For PVA and the PVA/AC composite containing C-7, the C(rem) values were minimal (<75%). The free energy distribution functions (f(ΔG)) for dye adsorption include one to three peaks in the -ΔG range of 1-60 kJ/mol, depending on the dye concentration range used and the spatial, charge symmetry of the hydrated dye ions and the structural characteristics of the adsorbents. The f(ΔG) shape is most complex for MO with the most asymmetrical geometry and charge distribution and adsorbed at concentrations over a large C(eq) range. For symmetrical CR ions, adsorbed over a narrow C(eq) range, the f(ΔG) plot includes mainly one narrow peak. MB has a minimal molecular size at a planar geometry (especially important for effective adsorption in slit-shaped pores) which explains its greater adsorptive capacity over that of MO or CR. Dye adsorption was greatest for ACs with the largest surface area but as molecular size increases adsorption depends to a greater extent on the pore size distribution in addition to total and nanopore surface areas and pore volume. PMID:21457992

  4. Adsorption of halogenated aliphatic contaminants by graphene nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yang; Apul, Onur Guven; Karanfil, Tanju

    2015-08-01

    In this study, adsorption of ten environmentally halogenated aliphatic synthetic organic compounds (SOCs) by a pristine graphene nanosheet (GNS) and a reduced graphene oxide (rGO) was examined, and their adsorption behaviors were compared with those of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) and a granular activated carbon (GAC). In addition, the impacts of background water components (i.e., natural organic matter (NOM), ionic strength (IS) and pH) on the SOC adsorption behavior were investigated. The results indicated HD3000 and SWCNT with higher microporous volumes exhibited higher adsorption capacities for the selected aliphatic SOCs than graphenes, demonstrating microporosity of carbonaceous adsorbents played an important role in the adsorption. Analysis of adsorption isotherms demonstrated that hydrophobic interactions were the dominant contributor to the adsorption of aliphatic SOCs by graphenes. However, π-π electron donor-acceptor and van der Waals interactions are likely the additional mechanisms contributing to the adsorption of aliphatic SOCs on graphenes. Among the three background solution components examined, NOM showed the most influential effect on adsorption of the selected aliphatic SOCs, while pH and ionic strength had a negligible effects. The NOM competition on aliphatic adsorption was less pronounced on graphenes than SWCNT. Overall, in terms of adsorption capacities, graphenes tested in this study did not exhibit a major advantage over SWCNT and GAC for the adsorption of aliphatic SOCs.

  5. COMPETITIVE ADSORPTION OF VOCS AND BOM: THE ROLE OF MOLECULAR OXYGEN

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, the presence of background organic matter (BOM) was seen to reduce the adsorptive capacity of carbon for chloroform, chlorobenzene, and dibromochloropropane. Adsorption of these compounds was further reduced under oxic conditions. This additional reduction in cap...

  6. Fluorocarbon Adsorption in Hierarchical Porous Frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Motkuri, Radha K.; Annapureddy, Harsha V.; Vijayakumar, M.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Martin, P F.; McGrail, B. Peter; Dang, Liem X.; Krishna, Rajamani; Thallapally, Praveen K.

    2014-07-09

    The adsorption behavior of a series of fluorocarbon derivatives was examined on a set of microporous metal organic framework (MOF) sorbents and another set of hierarchical mesoporous MOFs. The microporous M-DOBDC (M = Ni, Co) showed a saturation uptake capacity for R12 of over 4 mmol/g at a very low relative saturation pressure (P/Po) of 0.02. In contrast, the mesoporous MOF MIL-101 showed an exceptionally high uptake capacity reaching over 14 mmol/g at P/Po of 0.4. Adsorption affinity in terms of mass loading and isosteric heats of adsorption were found to generally correlate with the polarizability of the refrigerant with R12 > R22 > R13 > R14 > methane. These results suggest the possibility of exploiting MOFs for separation of azeotropic mixtures of fluorocarbons and use in eco-friendly fluorocarbon-based adsorption cooling and refrigeration applications.

  7. Peru Mercury Inventory 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brooks, William E.; Sandoval, Esteban; Yepez, Miguel A.; Howard, Howell

    2007-01-01

    In 2004, a specific need for data on mercury use in South America was indicated by the United Nations Environmental Programme-Chemicals (UNEP-Chemicals) at a workshop on regional mercury pollution that took place in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Mercury has long been mined and used in South America for artisanal gold mining and imported for chlor-alkali production, dental amalgam, and other uses. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) provides information on domestic and international mercury production, trade, prices, sources, and recycling in its annual Minerals Yearbook mercury chapter. Therefore, in response to UNEP-Chemicals, the USGS, in collaboration with the Economic Section of the U.S. Embassy, Lima, has herein compiled data on Peru's exports, imports, and byproduct production of mercury. Peru was selected for this inventory because it has a 2000-year history of mercury production and use, and continues today as an important source of mercury for the global market, as a byproduct from its gold mines. Peru is a regional distributor of imported mercury and user of mercury for artisanal gold mining and chlor-alkali production. Peruvian customs data showed that 22 metric tons (t) of byproduct mercury was exported to the United States in 2006. Transshipped mercury was exported to Brazil (1 t), Colombia (1 t), and Guyana (1 t). Mercury was imported from the United States (54 t), Spain (19 t), and Kyrgyzstan (8 t) in 2006 and was used for artisanal gold mining, chlor-alkali production, dental amalgam, or transshipment to other countries in the region. Site visits and interviews provided information on the use and disposition of mercury for artisanal gold mining and other uses. Peru also imports mercury-containing batteries, electronics and computers, fluorescent lamps, and thermometers. In 2006, Peru imported approximately 1,900 t of a wide variety of fluorescent lamps; however, the mercury contained in these lamps, a minimum of approximately 76 kilograms (kg), and in

  8. Phosphate adsorption on aluminum-coordinated functionalized macroporous–mesoporous silica: Surface structure and adsorption behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Weiya; Li, Dan; Zhu, Yi; Xu, Kai; Li, Jianqiang; Han, Boping; Zhang, Yuanming

    2013-12-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Al-coordinated functionalized macroporous–mesoporous silica for phosphate removal. • It had the maximum adsorption capacity of 23.59 mg P/g. • Over 95% of the final adsorption capacity reached in the first 1 min. - Abstract: In this study, Al(III)-coordinated diamino-functionalized macroporous–mesoporous silica was synthesized and characterized by X-ray diffraction, N{sub 2} adsorption–desorption, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Because of well-defined and interconnecting macroporous–mesoporous networks, the resulting adsorbent (MM-SBA) exhibited a significantly better phosphate adsorption performance and faster removal rate, as compared with the mesoporous adsorbent (M-SBA). Based on the Freundlich and Langmuir models, the phosphate adsorption capacity and the maximum adsorption capacity of MM-SBA were 7.99 mg P/g and 23.59 mg P/g, respectively. In the kinetic study of MM-SBA, over 95% of its final adsorption capacity reached in the first 1 min; whereas that of M-SBA was less than 79%.

  9. Kinetic and thermodynamic studies of sulforaphane adsorption on macroporous resin.

    PubMed

    Yuanfeng, Wu; Lei, Zhang; Jianwei, Mao; Shiwang, Liu; Jun, Huang; Yuru, You; Lehe, Mei

    2016-08-15

    The adsorption equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic of sulforaphane (SF) adsorption onto macroporous resin in aqueous phase were studied. The SP850 resin was screened as the appropriate resin for SF purification. From the equilibrium studies, the Redlich-Peterson model was found to be the best for description of the adsorption behavior of SF onto SP850 resin, followed by the Freundlich model and the Langmuir model. Batch equilibrium experiments demonstrated that, in the examined temperature range, the equilibrium adsorption capacity of SP850 resin decreased with increasing adsorption temperature. Thermodynamics studies indicated that the adsorption of SF was a physical, exothermic, and spontaneous process. The adsorption kinetics revealed that the pseudo-second-order kinetic model was suitable to characterize the kinetics of adsorption of SF onto SP850. Finally, the intra-particle diffusion model demonstrated that SF diffused quickly into macropores, and that diffusion slowed down in the meso- and micropores. PMID:27391585

  10. Adsorption of thorium from aqueous solutions by perlite.

    PubMed

    Talip, Z; Eral, M; Hiçsönmez, U

    2009-02-01

    The use of expanded perlite for the adsorption of thorium from aqueous solution by batch technique is presented. The effects of particle size, pH of the solution, initial thorium concentration, shaking time, V/m ratio and temperature were determined. It was found that the adsorption capacity increases by the increase in the pH of the suspensions. The rate of thorium adsorption on expanded perlite was observed to be fast in the first hour of the reaction time. Adsorption isotherms were expressed by Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption models and the adsorption experiments conducted at 30 +/- 1 degrees C showed that the adsorption isotherms correlated well with the Langmuir model. From the adsorption data, thermodynamic parameters such as DeltaG(o), DeltaH(o) and DeltaS(o) were calculated as a function of temperature.

  11. Competitive adsorption of heavy metals onto sesame straw biochar in aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-Hwan; Ok, Yong Sik; Kim, Seong-Heon; Cho, Ju-Sik; Heo, Jong-Soo; Delaune, Ronald D; Seo, Dong-Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Objective of this research was to evaluate adsorption of heavy metals in mono and multimetal forms onto sesame straw biochar (SSB). Competitive sorption of metals by SSB has never been reported previously. The maximum adsorption capacities (mgg(-1)) of metals by SSB were in the order of Pb (102)≫Cd (86)≫Cr (65)>Cu (55)≫Zn (34) in the monometal adsorption isotherm and Pb (88)≫Cu (40)≫Cr (21)>Zn (7)⩾Cd (5) in the multimetal adsorption isotherm. Based on data obtained from the distribution coefficients, Freundlich and Langmuir adsorption models, and three-dimensional simulation, multimetal adsorption behaviors differed from monometal adsorption due to competition. Especially, during multimetal adsorption, Cd was easily exchanged and substituted by other metals. Further competitive adsorption studies are necessary in order to accurately estimate the heavy metal adsorption capacity of biochar in natural environments.

  12. Polybenzoxazine: a powerful tool for removal of mercury salts from water.

    PubMed

    Taskin, Omer S; Kiskan, Baris; Aksu, Abdullah; Balkis, Nuray; Weber, Jens; Yagci, Yusuf

    2014-08-25

    A reusable macroporous polybenzoxazine resin with high specific surface area was prepared as sorbent material for the removal of mercury salts. For this purpose, allyl-functionalized bis-benzoxazine was cured in dimethyl sulfoxide by thermally activated ring-opening polymerization at 180 °C for 3 d followed by a freeze-drying process. The porous structure of the resin was confirmed by SEM analysis and N2 adsorption/desorption studies at 77.3 K. Among various metal ions, namely, Pb(II), Fe(II), Mn(II), Cu(II), Zn(II), and Cd(II), the porous polybenzoxazine resin exhibited a specific sorption behaviour towards Hg(II). Mainly chemisorption and to some extent adsorption mechanisms were proposed for the observed high loading capacity of the resin. As evidenced by FTIR spectral analysis, the chemisorption is attributed to the coordination system formed between free OH and tertiary amino groups in the polybenzoxazine structure and Hg(II) ions. It was also demonstrated that the porous polybenzoxazine can be regenerated simply by treatment with acids. The resin was recycled for up to seven cycles without any significant loss of activity, as proved by sorption and desorption experiments. PMID:25080127

  13. Clay honeycomb monoliths for water purification: Modulating methylene blue adsorption through controlled activation via natural coal templating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatica, José M.; Gómez, Diana M.; Harti, Sanae; Vidal, Hilario

    2013-07-01

    Texturally modified clay honeycomb monoliths were prepared for use as filters to remove pollutants from water solutions. An easy, economical, "green chemistry" activation route was employed during the preparation to enhance the adsorption capacity of the honeycombs. The method involves mixing the clay before its extrusion with a natural coal that is subsequently eliminated from the monolith by heating it under air at the lowest possible temperature (440 °C according to a thermogravimetric study). The size of the coal particles used as a template was intentionally modified by adjusting the milling process (dry or wet) and its duration (1-120 min) to modulate the porosity induced in the clay monoliths after their further burning. N2 physisorption, mercury porosimetry, granulometry and SEM were used to investigate the influence of the above preparative variables on the textural properties of the clay, significant effects being found in the macropore range. Methylene blue adsorption tests under dynamic conditions suggest that there is a correlation between pollutant removal and the macropore structure generated. FTIR spectroscopy indicates that the differences observed in cationic dye adsorption over the monoliths must be related to their different texture rather than to differences in the nature of their surface hydroxyl groups.

  14. Regenerable sorbents for mercury capture in simulated coal combustion flue gas.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Pérez, Jorge; López-Antón, M Antonia; Díaz-Somoano, Mercedes; García, Roberto; Martínez-Tarazona, M Rosa

    2013-09-15

    This work demonstrates that regenerable sorbents containing nano-particles of gold dispersed on an activated carbon are efficient and long-life materials for capturing mercury species from coal combustion flue gases. These sorbents can be used in such a way that the high investment entailed in their preparation will be compensated for by the recovery of all valuable materials. The characteristics of the support and dispersion of gold in the carbon surface influence the efficiency and lifetime of the sorbents. The main factor that determines the retention of mercury and the regeneration of the sorbent is the presence of reactive gases that enhance mercury retention capacity. The capture of mercury is a consequence of two mechanisms: (i) the retention of elemental mercury by amalgamation with gold and (ii) the retention of oxidized mercury on the activated carbon support. These sorbents were specifically designed for retaining the mercury remaining in gas phase after the desulfurization units in coal power plants.

  15. Experimental evaluation of sorbents for the capture of mercury in flue gases

    SciTech Connect

    Livengood, C.D.; Huang, H.S.; Wu, J.M.

    1994-06-01

    The results and conclusions to date from the Argonne research program on air toxics (mercury) control can be summarized as follows: (1) Mercury emissions from coal-fired combustors are generally in the range of 10--70 {mu}g/m{sup 3} and are highly variable. (2) Existing FGC technologies are only partially effective in controlling mercury emissions. (3) Lime hydrates, either regular or high-surface-area, are not effective in removing mercury. (4) Mercury removals are enhanced by the addition of activated carbon. (5) Mercury removals with activated carbon decrease with increasing temperature, larger particle size, and decreasing mercury concentration in the gas. (6) Chemical pretreatment (with sulfur or CaCl{sub 2}) can greatly increase the removal capacity of activated carbon.

  16. Mercury distribution in contaminated surface sediments from four estuaries, Khuzestan shore, north part of Persian Gulf.

    PubMed

    Sarasiab, Abdolah Raeisi; Hosseini, Mehdi; Mirsalari, Zohreh

    2014-11-01

    The distribution of mercury in surface sediment from four estuaries along the Khuzestan shore, north part of Persian Gulf, was measured. The concentration of mercury varied among sampling stations (p < 0.05). The concentrations of mercury in all estuaries were from 0.01 to 2.16 µg g(-1). Relatively high mercury concentrations were observed in sediments from Musa estuary. The percentage of mercury associated with different fractions in the sediment from all stations were in the order of residual (70.4 %) > organic matter (16.6 %) > easily and exchangeable (2.2 %) > acid reduction (0.8 %). I geo values calculated for mercury (1.5) showed higher values in Musa estuary than in the other stations. The bioavailability of mercury in sediments could be controlled by physicochemical factors such as pH, oxidation and reduction potential, organic carbon content and cation exchange capacity.

  17. Regenerable sorbents for mercury capture in simulated coal combustion flue gas.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Pérez, Jorge; López-Antón, M Antonia; Díaz-Somoano, Mercedes; García, Roberto; Martínez-Tarazona, M Rosa

    2013-09-15

    This work demonstrates that regenerable sorbents containing nano-particles of gold dispersed on an activated carbon are efficient and long-life materials for capturing mercury species from coal combustion flue gases. These sorbents can be used in such a way that the high investment entailed in their preparation will be compensated for by the recovery of all valuable materials. The characteristics of the support and dispersion of gold in the carbon surface influence the efficiency and lifetime of the sorbents. The main factor that determines the retention of mercury and the regeneration of the sorbent is the presence of reactive gases that enhance mercury retention capacity. The capture of mercury is a consequence of two mechanisms: (i) the retention of elemental mercury by amalgamation with gold and (ii) the retention of oxidized mercury on the activated carbon support. These sorbents were specifically designed for retaining the mercury remaining in gas phase after the desulfurization units in coal power plants. PMID:23876255

  18. Fly Ash and Mercury Oxidation/Chlorination Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sukh Sidhu; Patanjali Varanasi

    2008-12-31

    a diffusion tube as the source of Hg0(g). All experiments were conducted using 4% O2 in nitrogen mix as a reaction gas, and other reactants (HCl, H2O and SO2, NO2, Br2) were added as required. The fixed bed reactor was operated over a temperature range of 200 to 400 C. In each experiment, the reactor effluent was analyzed using the modified Ontario-Hydro method. After each experiment, fly ash particles were also analyzed for mercury. The results show that the ability of fly ash to adsorb and/or oxidize mercury is primarily dependent on its carbon, iron and calcium content. There can be either one or more than one key component at a particular temperature and flue gas condition. Surface area played a secondary role in effecting the mercury transformations when compared to the concentration of the key component in the fly ash. Amount of carbon and surface area played a key important role in the adsorption of mercury. Increased concentration of gases in the flue gas other than oxygen and nitrogen caused decreased the amount of mercury adsorbed on carbon surface. Mercury adsorption by iron oxide primarily depended on the crystalline structure of iron oxide. {alpha}-Iron oxide had no effect on mercury adsorption or oxidation under most of the flue gas conditions, but ?-iron oxide adsorbed mercury under most of the flue gas conditions. Bromine is a very good oxidizing agent for mercury. But in the presence of calcium oxide containing fly ashes, all the oxidized mercury would be reduced to elemental form. Among the catalysts, it was observed that presence of free lattice chlorine in the catalyst was very important for the oxidation of mercury. But instead of using the catalyst alone, using it along with carbon may better serve the purpose by providing the adsorption surface for mercury and also some extra surface area for the reaction to occur (especially for fly ashes with low surface area).

  19. Modeling Mercury in Proteins.

    PubMed

    Parks, J M; Smith, J C

    2016-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a naturally occurring element that is released into the biosphere both by natural processes and anthropogenic activities. Although its reduced, elemental form Hg(0) is relatively nontoxic, other forms such as Hg(2+) and, in particular, its methylated form, methylmercury, are toxic, with deleterious effects on both ecosystems and humans. Microorganisms play important roles in the transformation of mercury in the environment. Inorganic Hg(2+) can be methylated by certain bacteria and archaea to form methylmercury. Conversely, bacteria also demethylate methylmercury and reduce Hg(2+) to relatively inert Hg(0). Transformations and toxicity occur as a result of mercury interacting with various proteins. Clearly, then, understanding the toxic effects of mercury and its cycling in the environment requires characterization of these interactions. Computational approaches are ideally suited to studies of mercury in proteins because they can provide a detailed molecular picture and circumvent issues associated with toxicity. Here, we describe computational methods for investigating and characterizing how mercury binds to proteins, how inter- and intraprotein transfer of mercury is orchestrated in biological systems, and how chemical reactions in proteins transform the metal. We describe quantum chemical analyses of aqueous Hg(II), which reveal critical factors that determine ligand-binding propensities. We then provide a perspective on how we used chemical reasoning to discover how microorganisms methylate mercury. We also highlight our combined computational and experimental studies of the proteins and enzymes of the mer operon, a suite of genes that confer mercury resistance in many bacteria. Lastly, we place work on mercury in proteins in the context of what is needed for a comprehensive multiscale model of environmental mercury cycling.

  20. Modeling Mercury in Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Jeremy C; Parks, Jerry M

    2016-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a naturally occurring element that is released into the biosphere both by natural processes and anthropogenic activities. Although its reduced, elemental form Hg(0) is relatively non-toxic, other forms such as Hg2+ and, in particular, its methylated form, methylmercury, are toxic, with deleterious effects on both ecosystems and humans. Microorganisms play important roles in the transformation of mercury in the environment. Inorganic Hg2+ can be methylated by certain bacteria and archaea to form methylmercury. Conversely, bacteria also demethylate methylmercury and reduce Hg2+ to relatively inert Hg(0). Transformations and toxicity occur as a result of mercury interacting with various proteins. Clearly, then, understanding the toxic effects of mercury and its cycling in the environment requires characterization of these interactions. Computational approaches are ideally suited to studies of mercury in proteins because they can provide a detailed picture and circumvent issues associated with toxicity. Here we describe computational methods for investigating and characterizing how mercury binds to proteins, how inter- and intra-protein transfer of mercury is orchestrated in biological systems, and how chemical reactions in proteins transform the metal. We describe quantum chemical analyses of aqueous Hg(II), which reveal critical factors that determine ligand binding propensities. We then provide a perspective on how we used chemical reasoning to discover how microorganisms methylate mercury. We also highlight our combined computational and experimental studies of the proteins and enzymes of the mer operon, a suite of genes that confers mercury resistance in many bacteria. Lastly, we place work on mercury in proteins in the context of what is needed for a comprehensive multi-scale model of environmental mercury cycling.

  1. Modeling Mercury in Proteins.

    PubMed

    Parks, J M; Smith, J C

    2016-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a naturally occurring element that is released into the biosphere both by natural processes and anthropogenic activities. Although its reduced, elemental form Hg(0) is relatively nontoxic, other forms such as Hg(2+) and, in particular, its methylated form, methylmercury, are toxic, with deleterious effects on both ecosystems and humans. Microorganisms play important roles in the transformation of mercury in the environment. Inorganic Hg(2+) can be methylated by certain bacteria and archaea to form methylmercury. Conversely, bacteria also demethylate methylmercury and reduce Hg(2+) to relatively inert Hg(0). Transformations and toxicity occur as a result of mercury interacting with various proteins. Clearly, then, understanding the toxic effects of mercury and its cycling in the environment requires characterization of these interactions. Computational approaches are ideally suited to studies of mercury in proteins because they can provide a detailed molecular picture and circumvent issues associated with toxicity. Here, we describe computational methods for investigating and characterizing how mercury binds to proteins, how inter- and intraprotein transfer of mercury is orchestrated in biological systems, and how chemical reactions in proteins transform the metal. We describe quantum chemical analyses of aqueous Hg(II), which reveal critical factors that determine ligand-binding propensities. We then provide a perspective on how we used chemical reasoning to discover how microorganisms methylate mercury. We also highlight our combined computational and experimental studies of the proteins and enzymes of the mer operon, a suite of genes that confer mercury resistance in many bacteria. Lastly, we place work on mercury in proteins in the context of what is needed for a comprehensive multiscale model of environmental mercury cycling. PMID:27497164

  2. Mercury concentrations in estuarine sediments, Lavaca and Matagorda bays, Texas, 1992

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, David S.; Snyder, Grant L.; Taylor, R. Lynn

    1998-01-01

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Method 7471 (Cold Vapor Atomic Absorption) was an acceptable analytical method for determining the total mercury concentrations in the Lavaca-Matagorda Bays estuarine sediment samples. Measurement of additional trace metals would aid in the characterization of total mercury concentrations and in the identification of concentrator/collector relations that are principally responsible for the adsorption of mercurous compounds to particulates in the bottom sediments.

  3. [Fluoride adsorption form drinking water by granular lanthanum alginate].

    PubMed

    Huo, Ya-Kun; Ding, Wen-Ming; Huang, Xia

    2010-11-01

    Granular lanthanum alginate was prepared by dripping solved sodium alginate into lanthanum chloride solution. After washed and dried, sorbent with 1-1.5 mm diameter, 25% (mass fraction) La content was made and applied for fluoride removal from drinking test. Adsorption performance such as adsorption rate, adsorption isotherm, pH and disturbing ions effects were tested in batch adsorption. The changes of adsorbent surface and the solution composition before and after adsorption were also studied. Results showed that the adsorption rate was fast, fluoride concentration trend to stable after 2h reaction, and the adsorption rate fit for pseudo second order equation. The adsorption was significantly affected by pH and some disturbing ions, optimum pH = 4, phosphate and carbonate reduced adsorption. Adsorption isotherm fitted Langmuir equation well; the max adsorption capacity was 197.2 mg x g(-1). SEM photographs of sorbent before and after adsorption showed significantly different surface morphology; EDX composition analysis of sorbent surface and solution concentration changes before and after adsorption showed that ion exchange take placed between solution F- and sorbent surface Cl- and OH-.

  4. MESSENGER: Exploring Mercury's Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, James A.

    2008-01-01

    The MESSENGER mission to Mercury offers our first opportunity to explore this planet's miniature magnetosphere since Mariner 10's brief fly-bys in 1974-5. Mercury's magnetosphere is unique in many respects. The magnetosphere of Mercury is the smallest in the solar system with its magnetic field typically standing off the solar wind only - 1000 to 2000 km above the surface. For this reason there are no closed dri-fi paths for energetic particles and, hence, no radiation belts; the characteristic time scales for wave propagation and convective transport are short possibly coupling kinetic and fluid modes; magnetic reconnection at the dayside magnetopause may erode the subsolar magnetosphere allowing solar wind ions to directly impact the dayside regolith; inductive currents in Mercury's interior should act to modify the solar In addition, Mercury's magnetosphere is the only one with its defining magnetic flux tubes rooted in a planetary regolith as opposed to an atmosphere with a conductive ionosphere. This lack of an ionosphere is thought to be the underlying reason for the brevity of the very intense, but short lived, approx. 1-2 min, substorm-like energetic particle events observed by Mariner 10 in Mercury's magnetic tail. In this seminar, we review what we think we know about Mercury's magnetosphere and describe the MESSENGER science team's strategy for obtaining answers to the outstanding science questions surrounding the interaction of the solar wind with Mercury and its small, but dynamic magnetosphere.

  5. Dynamic duo captures mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Senior, C.; Adams, B.

    2006-02-15

    There is strong evidence that the combination of wet flue gas desulphurisation (FGD) scrubbers and selective catalytic reduction (SCR) can prove a viable and formidable combination for knocking out mercury. This article analyzes the capabilities and limitations of the SCR-FGD combination for mercury compliance, including applicability to different types of coal and issues with scrubber by-products. 3 figs.

  6. Mercury in the environment

    SciTech Connect

    Idaho National Laboratory - Mike Abbott

    2008-08-06

    Abbott works for Idaho National Laboratory as an environmental scientist. Using state-of-thescienceequipment, he continuously samples the air, looking for mercury. In turn, he'll analyzethis long-term data and try to figure out the mercury's point of or

  7. Mercury and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... made when mercury in the air gets into water. The mercury in the air comes from natural sources (such as volcanoes) and man-made sources (such as burning coal and other pollution). You can get methylmercury in your body by ...

  8. Mercury in the environment

    ScienceCinema

    Idaho National Laboratory - Mike Abbott

    2016-07-12

    Abbott works for Idaho National Laboratory as an environmental scientist. Using state-of-thescienceequipment, he continuously samples the air, looking for mercury. In turn, he'll analyzethis long-term data and try to figure out the mercury's point of or

  9. Mercury poisoning in wildlife

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heinz, G.H.; Fairbrother, Anne; Locke, Louis N.; Hoff, Gerald L.

    1996-01-01

    Mercury is an intriguing contaminant because it has complex chemical properties, a wide range of harmful effects, and an infinite persistence in the environment. Die-offs of wildlife due to mercury have occurred in many countries, especially before mercury seed dressings were banned. Today, most mercury problems are associated with aquatic environments. Methylmercury, the most toxic chemical form, attacks many organ systems, but damage to the central nervous system is most severe. Harmful wet-weight concentrations of mercury, as methylmercury, in the tissues of adult birds and mammals range from about 8-30 ppm in the brain, 20-60 ppm in liver, 20-60 ppm in kidney, and 15-30 ppm in muscle. Young animals may be more sensitive.

  10. Adsorption characteristics of siloxanes in landfill gas by the adsorption equilibrium test.

    PubMed

    Nam, Sangchul; Namkoong, Wan; Kang, Jeong-Hee; Park, Jin-Kyu; Lee, Namhoon

    2013-10-01

    Due to the increase in energy cost by constantly high oil prices and the obligation to reduce greenhouse effect gases, landfill gas is frequently used as an alternative energy source for producing heat and electricity. Most of landfill gas utility facilities, however, are experiencing problems controlling siloxanes from landfill gas as their catalytic oxidizers are becoming fouled by silicon dioxide dust. To evaluate adsorption characteristics of siloxanes, an adsorption equilibrium test was conducted and parameters in the Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms were analyzed. Coconut activated carbon (CA1), coal activated carbon (CA2), impregnated activated carbon (CA3), silicagel (NCA1), and activated alumina (NCA2) were used for the adsorption of the mixed siloxane which contained hexamethyldisiloxane (L2), octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4), and decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5). L2 had higher removal efficiency in noncarbon adsorbents compared to carbon adsorbents. The application of Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm demonstrated that coconut based CA1 and CA3 provided higher adsorption capacity on L2. And CA2 and NCA1 provided higher adsorption capacity on D4 and D5. Based on the experimental results, L2, D4, and D5 were converted by adsorption and desorption in noncarbon adsorbents. Adsorption affinity of siloxane is considered to be affect by the pore size distribution of the adsorbents and by the molecular size of each siloxane.

  11. Adsorption characteristics of siloxanes in landfill gas by the adsorption equilibrium test.

    PubMed

    Nam, Sangchul; Namkoong, Wan; Kang, Jeong-Hee; Park, Jin-Kyu; Lee, Namhoon

    2013-10-01

    Due to the increase in energy cost by constantly high oil prices and the obligation to reduce greenhouse effect gases, landfill gas is frequently used as an alternative energy source for producing heat and electricity. Most of landfill gas utility facilities, however, are experiencing problems controlling siloxanes from landfill gas as their catalytic oxidizers are becoming fouled by silicon dioxide dust. To evaluate adsorption characteristics of siloxanes, an adsorption equilibrium test was conducted and parameters in the Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms were analyzed. Coconut activated carbon (CA1), coal activated carbon (CA2), impregnated activated carbon (CA3), silicagel (NCA1), and activated alumina (NCA2) were used for the adsorption of the mixed siloxane which contained hexamethyldisiloxane (L2), octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4), and decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5). L2 had higher removal efficiency in noncarbon adsorbents compared to carbon adsorbents. The application of Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm demonstrated that coconut based CA1 and CA3 provided higher adsorption capacity on L2. And CA2 and NCA1 provided higher adsorption capacity on D4 and D5. Based on the experimental results, L2, D4, and D5 were converted by adsorption and desorption in noncarbon adsorbents. Adsorption affinity of siloxane is considered to be affect by the pore size distribution of the adsorbents and by the molecular size of each siloxane. PMID:23684695

  12. Getting Mercury out of Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1999

    This guide was prepared while working with many Massachusetts schools to remove items that contain mercury and to find suitable alternatives. It contains fact sheets on: mercury in science laboratories and classrooms, mercury in school buildings and maintenance areas, mercury in the medical office and in medical technology classrooms in vocational…

  13. Fibrous polymer-grafted chitosan/clay composite beads as a carrier for immobilization of papain and its usability for mercury elimination.

    PubMed

    Metin, Ayşegül Ülkü; Alver, Erol

    2016-07-01

    Papain, which is an industrially important enzyme, has been immobilized on fibrous polymer-modified composite beads, namely poly(methacrylic acid)-grafted chitosan/clay. Characterization studies have been done using FTIR and SEM analysis. Operating parameters such as pH and initial concentration of papain have been varied to obtain the finest papain immobilized polymer-modified composite beads. The immobilization capacity of composite beads has been determined as 34.47 ± 1.18 (n = 3) mg/g. The proteolytic activity of immobilized papain was operated using bovine serum albumin (BSA) and maximum velocity (V max) and Michaelis-Menten constant (Km) values of the free and immobilized enzymes were determined using Lineweaver-Burk and Eadie-Hofstee equations. Usability of papain immobilized polymer-modified composite beads as adsorbents for the elimination of mercury was investigated. The maximum removal capacity of PIPMC beads has been found to be 4.88 ± 0.21 mg Hg/g when the initial metal concentration and weight of polymer-modified composite beads were 50 mg/L and 0.04 g at pH 7, respectively. Mercury removal performance of the papain immobilized polymer-modified composite beads was investigated in conjunction with Cu (II), Zn (II) and Cd (II) ions. The mercury adsorption capacity of papain immobilized polymer-modified composite beads was a slight reduction from 1.15 to 0.89 mg/g in presence of multiple metal salts. PMID:27013506

  14. Fibrous polymer-grafted chitosan/clay composite beads as a carrier for immobilization of papain and its usability for mercury elimination.

    PubMed

    Metin, Ayşegül Ülkü; Alver, Erol

    2016-07-01

    Papain, which is an industrially important enzyme, has been immobilized on fibrous polymer-modified composite beads, namely poly(methacrylic acid)-grafted chitosan/clay. Characterization studies have been done using FTIR and SEM analysis. Operating parameters such as pH and initial concentration of papain have been varied to obtain the finest papain immobilized polymer-modified composite beads. The immobilization capacity of composite beads has been determined as 34.47 ± 1.18 (n = 3) mg/g. The proteolytic activity of immobilized papain was operated using bovine serum albumin (BSA) and maximum velocity (V max) and Michaelis-Menten constant (Km) values of the free and immobilized enzymes were determined using Lineweaver-Burk and Eadie-Hofstee equations. Usability of papain immobilized polymer-modified composite beads as adsorbents for the elimination of mercury was investigated. The maximum removal capacity of PIPMC beads has been found to be 4.88 ± 0.21 mg Hg/g when the initial metal concentration and weight of polymer-modified composite beads were 50 mg/L and 0.04 g at pH 7, respectively. Mercury removal performance of the papain immobilized polymer-modified composite beads was investigated in conjunction with Cu (II), Zn (II) and Cd (II) ions. The mercury adsorption capacity of papain immobilized polymer-modified composite beads was a slight reduction from 1.15 to 0.89 mg/g in presence of multiple metal salts.

  15. Formation of nanocolloidal metacinnabar in mercury-DOM-sulfide systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gerbig, Chase A.; Kim, Christopher S.; Stegemeier, John P.; Ryan, Joseph N.; Aiken, George R.

    2011-01-01

    Direct determination of mercury (Hg) speciation in sulfide-containing environments is confounded by low mercury concentrations and poor analytical sensitivity. Here we report the results of experiments designed to assess mercury speciation at environmentally relevant ratios of mercury to dissolved organic matter (DOM) (i.e., -1) by combining solid phase extraction using C18 resin with extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. Aqueous Hg(II) and a DOM isolate were equilibrated in the presence and absence of 100 μM total sulfide. In the absence of sulfide, mercury adsorption to the resin increased as the Hg:DOM ratio decreased and as the strength of Hg-DOM binding increased. EXAFS analysis indicated that in the absence of sulfide, mercury bonds with an average of 2.4 ± 0.2 sulfur atoms with a bond length typical of mercury-organic thiol ligands (2.35 Å). In the presence of sulfide, mercury showed greater affinity for the C18 resin, and its chromatographic behavior was independent of Hg:DOM ratio. EXAFS analysis showed mercury–sulfur bonds with a longer interatomic distance (2.51–2.53 Å) similar to the mercury–sulfur bond distance in metacinnabar (2.53 Å) regardless of the Hg:DOM ratio. For all samples containing sulfide, the sulfur coordination number was below the ideal four-coordinate structure of metacinnabar. At a low Hg:DOM ratio where strong binding DOM sites may control mercury speciation (1.9 nmol mg-1) mercury was coordinated by 2.3 ± 0.2 sulfur atoms, and the coordination number rose with increasing Hg:DOM ratio. The less-than-ideal coordination numbers indicate metacinnabar-like species on the nanometer scale, and the positive correlation between Hg:DOM ratio and sulfur coordination number suggests progressively increasing particle size or crystalline order with increasing abundance of mercury with respect to DOM. In DOM-containing sulfidic systems nanocolloidal metacinnabar-like species may form, and these species need to

  16. Development of mercury control technology for coal-fired systems

    SciTech Connect

    Livengood, D.C.; Huang, H.S.; Mendelsohn, M.H.; Wu, Jiann M.

    1995-08-01

    The emission of hazardous air pollutants (air toxics) from various industrial processes has emerged as a major environmental issue that was singled out for particular attention in the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. In particular, mercury emissions are the subject of several current EPA studies because of concerns over possible serious effects on human health. Some of those emissions originate in the combustion of coal, which contains trace amounts of mercury, and are likely to be the subject of control requirements in the relatively near future. Data collected by the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) at operating electric-power plants have shown that conventional flue-gas cleanup (FGC) technologies are not very effective in controlling emissions of mercury in general, and are particularly poor at controlling emissions of elemental mercury. This paper gives an overview of research being conducted at Argonne National Laboratory on improving the capture of mercury in flue gas through the use of dry sorbents and/or wet scrubbers. The results and conclusions to date from the Argonne research on dry sorbents can be summarized as follows: lime hydrates, either regular or high-surface-area, are not effective in removing elemental mercury; mercury removals are enhanced by the addition of activated carbon; mercury removals with activated carbon decrease with increasing temperature, larger particle size, and decreasing mercury concentration in the gas; chemical pretreatment (e.g., with sulfur or CaCl{sub 2}) can greatly increase the removal capacity of activated carbon; chemically treated mineral substrates have the potential to be developed into effective and economical mercury sorbents; sorbents treated with different chemicals respond in significantly different ways to changes in flue-gas temperature.

  17. Detoxification of mercury pollutant leached from spent fluorescent lamps using bacterial strains.

    PubMed

    Al-Ghouti, Mohammad A; Abuqaoud, Reem H; Abu-Dieyeh, Mohammed H

    2016-03-01

    The spent fluorescent lamps (SFLs) are being classified as a hazardous waste due to having mercury as one of its main components. Mercury is considered the second most toxic heavy metal (arsenic is the first) with harmful effects on animal nervous system as it causes different neurological disorders. In this research, the mercury from phosphor powder was leached, then bioremediated using bacterial strains isolated from Qatari environment. Leaching of mercury was carried out with nitric and hydrochloric acid solutions using two approaches: leaching at ambient conditions and microwave-assisted leaching. The results obtained from this research showed that microwave-assisted leaching method was significantly better in leaching mercury than the acid leaching where the mercury leaching efficiency reached 76.4%. For mercury bio-uptake, twenty bacterial strains (previously isolated and purified from petroleum oil contaminated soils) were sub-cultured on Luria Bertani (LB) plates with mercury chloride to check the bacterial tolerance to mercury. Seven of these twenty strains showed a degree of tolerance to mercury. The bio-uptake capacities of the promising strains were investigated using the mercury leached from the fluorescent lamps. Three of the strains (Enterobacter helveticus, Citrobacter amalonaticus, and Cronobacter muytjensii) showed bio-uptake efficiency ranged from 28.8% to 63.6%.

  18. Detoxification of mercury pollutant leached from spent fluorescent lamps using bacterial strains.

    PubMed

    Al-Ghouti, Mohammad A; Abuqaoud, Reem H; Abu-Dieyeh, Mohammed H

    2016-03-01

    The spent fluorescent lamps (SFLs) are being classified as a hazardous waste due to having mercury as one of its main components. Mercury is considered the second most toxic heavy metal (arsenic is the first) with harmful effects on animal nervous system as it causes different neurological disorders. In this research, the mercury from phosphor powder was leached, then bioremediated using bacterial strains isolated from Qatari environment. Leaching of mercury was carried out with nitric and hydrochloric acid solutions using two approaches: leaching at ambient conditions and microwave-assisted leaching. The results obtained from this research showed that microwave-assisted leaching method was significantly better in leaching mercury than the acid leaching where the mercury leaching efficiency reached 76.4%. For mercury bio-uptake, twenty bacterial strains (previously isolated and purified from petroleum oil contaminated soils) were sub-cultured on Luria Bertani (LB) plates with mercury chloride to check the bacterial tolerance to mercury. Seven of these twenty strains showed a degree of tolerance to mercury. The bio-uptake capacities of the promising strains were investigated using the mercury leached from the fluorescent lamps. Three of the strains (Enterobacter helveticus, Citrobacter amalonaticus, and Cronobacter muytjensii) showed bio-uptake efficiency ranged from 28.8% to 63.6%. PMID:26725036

  19. Assessing The Impact Of Mercury Contamination To Lake Balkyldak In Kazakhstan

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adjacent to Lake Balkyldak in Kazakhstan, there is a large wastewater holding pond from a former mercury cell chloralkali plant which contains high levels of mercury-contamination. The holding pond capacity is 74 million m3 with a water-surface area of 18 km2

  20. Interactions between mercury and dry FGD ash in simulated post combustion conditions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shaohua; Wang, Shuai; Gao, Jihui; Wu, Yanyan; Chen, Guoqing; Zhu, Yuwen

    2011-04-15

    Two different flue gas desulfurization (FGD) ash samples were exposed to a simulated flue gas stream containing elemental mercury vapor to evaluate the interactions and determine the effects of gas components, dry FGD ash samples, and temperature on adsorption and heterogeneous oxidation of mercury. Both samples were characterized for surface area, unburned carbon content, element content, and mineralogical composition. Mercury speciation downstream from the sample was determined using Ontario Hydro Method. Results showed that higher levels of mercury oxidation were associated with higher levels of mercury capture. The NO(2), HCl, and Cl(2) promoted mercury oxidation, while SO(2) and NO had inhibitory effects on mercury oxidation. Unburned carbon of dry FGD ash sample played an important role in mercury capture. Whether the surface area was caused by unburned carbon or by calcium-based sorbents might be more significant than the level of surface area. Extent of mercury oxidation and capture increased slightly and then decreased as the temperature rising due to the interaction of mass transfer and reaction rates control.

  1. Poultry manure as raw material for mercury adsorbents in gas applications

    SciTech Connect

    Klasson, K.T.; Lima, I.M.; Boihem, L.L.

    2009-09-30

    The quantity of poultry manure generated each year is large, and technologies that take advantage of the material should be explored. At the same time, increased emphasis on the reduction of mercury emissions from coal-fired electric power plants has resulted in environmental regulations that may, in the future, require application of activated carbons as mercury sorbents. The sorbents could be injected into the flue gas stream, where they could adsorb the mercury. The sorbents (now containing mercury) would be removed via filtration or other means from the flue gas. Our preliminary work has demonstrated that activated carbon made from poultry manure can adsorb mercury from air with good efficiency. In laboratory experiments, an activated carbon made from turkey cake manure removed the majority of elemental mercury from a hot air stream. Other activated carbons made from chicken and turkey litter manure were also efficient. In general, unwashed activated carbons made from poultry manure were more efficient in removing mercury than their acid-washed counterparts. The results suggest that the adsorption of mercury was mainly due to chemisorption on the surface of the carbon. Other potential uses for the activated carbons are the removal of mercury from air and natural gas.

  2. Interactions between mercury and dry FGD ash in simulated post combustion conditions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shaohua; Wang, Shuai; Gao, Jihui; Wu, Yanyan; Chen, Guoqing; Zhu, Yuwen

    2011-04-15

    Two different flue gas desulfurization (FGD) ash samples were exposed to a simulated flue gas stream containing elemental mercury vapor to evaluate the interactions and determine the effects of gas components, dry FGD ash samples, and temperature on adsorption and heterogeneous oxidation of mercury. Both samples were characterized for surface area, unburned carbon content, element content, and mineralogical composition. Mercury speciation downstream from the sample was determined using Ontario Hydro Method. Results showed that higher levels of mercury oxidation were associated with higher levels of mercury capture. The NO(2), HCl, and Cl(2) promoted mercury oxidation, while SO(2) and NO had inhibitory effects on mercury oxidation. Unburned carbon of dry FGD ash sample played an important role in mercury capture. Whether the surface area was caused by unburned carbon or by calcium-based sorbents might be more significant than the level of surface area. Extent of mercury oxidation and capture increased slightly and then decreased as the temperature rising due to the interaction of mass transfer and reaction rates control. PMID:21334138

  3. Removal of mercury from stack gases by activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Vidic, R.D.

    1995-10-01

    On combustion, the trace elements in the incinerator feed stream are partitioned between the bottom ash (slag) stream, and a flue gas stream containing suspended fly ash and vapors of volatile elements or compounds. A further partitioning of the flue gas stream takes place in the particulate emission control devices that efficiently remove larger fly ash particles but are less efficient for vapors and finer particles. Environmental control agencies, researchers, and general public have become increasingly concerned with the mobilization of trace elements to the environment from solid and hazardous waste incinerators. Mercury is the trace element of particular concern since, during combustion, most of the mercury present in the influent stream is transferred into the vapor phase due to its high volatility. There is a considerable evidence in the literature that currently used pollution abatement technologies (flue gas clean-up and particulate control devices) are not capable of controlling gas phase mercury emissions. Activated carbon adsorption is a unit process that offers great promise for achieving high quality air emissions with respect to mercury and other trace elements that might be present in gases emitted from solid and hazardous waste incinerators. This study is designed to evaluate the rate of vapor-phase mercury removal by virgin and sulfur impregnated activated carbons under various process conditions. The specific process conditions that will be evaluated for their effect on the rate and mechanism of mercury uptake include temperature, moisture content, oxygen partial pressure, and presence of other compounds and trace elements in the vapor-phase. Accurate description of the kinetics of mercury removal by activated carbon is an essential component in establishing design procedures that would ensure successful application of this efficient technology for mercury control.

  4. A comparison of three adsorption equations and sensitivity study of parameter uncertainty effects on adsorption refrigeration thermal performance estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yongling; Hu, Eric; Blazewicz, Antoni

    2012-02-01

    This paper presents isosteric-based adsorption equilibrium tests of three activated carbon samples with methanol as an adsorbate. Experimental data was fitted into Langmuir equation, Freundlich equation and Dubinin-Astakov (D-A) equation, respectively. The fitted adsorption equations were compared in terms of agreement with experimental data. Moreover, equation format's impacts on calculation of the coefficient of performance (COP) and refrigeration capacity of an adsorption refrigeration system was analyzed. In addition, the sensitivity of each parameter in each adsorption equation format to the estimation of cycle's COP and refrigeration capacity was investigated. It was found that the D-A equation is the best form for presenting the adsorptive property of a carbon-methanol working pair. The D-A equation is recommended for estimating thermal performance of an adsorption refrigeration system because simulation results obtained using the D-A equation are less sensitive to errors of experimentally determined D-A equation's parameters.

  5. Catalysts for oxidation of mercury in flue gas

    DOEpatents

    Granite, Evan J.; Pennline, Henry W.

    2010-08-17

    Two new classes of catalysts for the removal of heavy metal contaminants, especially mercury (Hg) from effluent gases. Both of these classes of catalysts are excellent absorbers of HCl and Cl.sub.2 present in effluent gases. This adsorption of oxidizing agents aids in the oxidation of heavy metal contaminants. The catalysts remove mercury by oxidizing the Hg into mercury (II) moieties. For one class of catalysts, the active component is selected from the group consisting of iridium (Ir) and iridum-platinum (Ir/Pt) alloys. The Ir and Ir/Pt alloy catalysts are especially corrosion resistant. For the other class of catalyst, the active component is partially combusted coal or "Thief" carbon impregnated with Cl.sub.2. Untreated Thief carbon catalyst can be self-activating in the presence of effluent gas streams. The Thief carbon catalyst is disposable by means of capture from the effluent gas stream in a particulate collection device (PCD).

  6. Mercury in the ecosystem

    SciTech Connect

    Mitra, S.

    1986-01-01

    This treatise on the environmental dispersion of mercury emphasizes the importance of ''mercury-consciousness'' in the present-day world, where rapidly expanding metallurgical, chemical, and other industrial developments are causing widespread contamination of the atmosphere, soil, and water by this metal and its toxic organic derivatives. Concepts concerning the mechanism of mercury dispersion and methyl-mercury formation in the physico-biological ecosystem are discussed in detail and a substantial body of data on the degree and nature of the mercury contamination of various plants, fish, and land animals by industrial and urban effluents is presented. Various analytical methods for the estimation of mercury in inorganic and organic samples are presented. These serve as a ready guide to the selection of the correct method for analyzing environmental samples. This book is reference work in mercury-related studies. It is written to influence industrial policies of governments in their formulation of control measures to avoid the recurrence of human tragedies such as the well-known Minamata case in Japan, and the lesser known cases in Iraq, Pakistan, and Guatamala.

  7. Mercury's Dynamic Magnetic Tail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, James A.

    2010-01-01

    The Mariner 10 and MESSENGER flybys of Mercury have revealed a magnetosphere that is likely the most responsive to upstream interplanetary conditions of any in the solar system. The source of the great dynamic variability observed during these brief passages is due to Mercury's proximity to the Sun and the inverse proportionality between reconnection rate and solar wind Alfven Mach number. However, this planet's lack of an ionosphere and its small physical dimensions also contribute to Mercury's very brief Dungey cycle, approx. 2 min, which governs the time scale for internal plasma circulation. Current observations and understanding of the structure and dynamics of Mercury's magnetotail are summarized and discussed. Special emphasis will be placed upon such questions as: 1) How much access does the solar wind have to this small magnetosphere as a function of upstream conditions? 2) What roles do heavy planetary ions play? 3) Do Earth-like substorms take place at Mercury? 4) How does Mercury's tail respond to extreme solar wind events such coronal mass ejections? Prospects for progress due to advances in the global magnetohydrodynamic and hybrid simulation modeling and the measurements to be taken by MESSENGER after it enters Mercury orbit on March 18, 2011 will be discussed.

  8. Mercury Metadata Toolset

    SciTech Connect

    2009-09-08

    Mercury is a federated metadata harvesting, search and retrieval tool based on both open source software and software developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. It was originally developed for NASA, and the Mercury development consortium now includes funding from NASA, USGS, and DOE. A major new version of Mercury (version 3.0) was developed during 2007 and released in early 2008. This Mercury 3.0 version provides orders of magnitude improvements in search speed, support for additional metadata formats, integration with Google Maps for spatial queries, facetted type search, support for RSS delivery of search results, and ready customization to meet the needs of the multiple projects which use Mercury. For the end users, Mercury provides a single portal to very quickly search for data and information contained in disparate data management systems. It collects metadata and key data from contributing project servers distributed around the world and builds a centralized index. The Mercury search interfaces then allow the users to perform simple, fielded, spatial, and temporal searches across these metadata sources. This centralized repository of metadata with distributed data sources provides extremely fast search results to the user, while allowing data providers to advertise the availability of their data and maintain complete control and ownership of that data.

  9. Mercury Metadata Toolset

    2009-09-08

    Mercury is a federated metadata harvesting, search and retrieval tool based on both open source software and software developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. It was originally developed for NASA, and the Mercury development consortium now includes funding from NASA, USGS, and DOE. A major new version of Mercury (version 3.0) was developed during 2007 and released in early 2008. This Mercury 3.0 version provides orders of magnitude improvements in search speed, support for additionalmore » metadata formats, integration with Google Maps for spatial queries, facetted type search, support for RSS delivery of search results, and ready customization to meet the needs of the multiple projects which use Mercury. For the end users, Mercury provides a single portal to very quickly search for data and information contained in disparate data management systems. It collects metadata and key data from contributing project servers distributed around the world and builds a centralized index. The Mercury search interfaces then allow the users to perform simple, fielded, spatial, and temporal searches across these metadata sources. This centralized repository of metadata with distributed data sources provides extremely fast search results to the user, while allowing data providers to advertise the availability of their data and maintain complete control and ownership of that data.« less

  10. New insight into the biological treatment by activated sludge: the role of adsorption process.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaochun; Li, Xinrun; Zhang, Qingrui; Peng, Qiuming; Zhang, Wen; Gao, Faming

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of adsorption on the biological treatment process of wastewater. In the absence of substrate in the water, activated sludge developed well in the first hour, indicating that the growth of microorganism was not directly related to substrate concentration and the dissolved organic matter in the water assays were performed, no organic matter was detected out, revealing that there was no desorption in the activated sludge adsorption process. Activated sludge batch growth experiments in the presence of different adsorption capacities indicated that specific growth rate increased as specific adsorption capacity increased. The experiment on the relationship of adsorption capacity and substrate concentration or sludge concentration was also carried out. Specific adsorption capacity increased as sludge load increased, presenting linear correlation. The experiment results showed that adsorption should be taken into account in the study of the biological treatment process of wastewater.

  11. Methylene blue adsorption from aqueous solution by activated carbon: effect of acidic and alkaline solution treatments.

    PubMed

    Ijagbemi, Christianah O; Chun, Ji I; Han, Da H; Cho, Hye Y; O, Se J; Kim, Dong S

    2010-01-01

    The removal of Methylene Blue (MB) from aqueous solution using activated carbon (AC) has been investigated. Adsorption experiments were conducted and the maximum adsorption capacity was determined. The effect of experimental parameters such as pH, dye concentration and temperature were studied on the adsorption process. Equilibrium data were mathematically modeled using the Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption models to describe the equilibrium isotherms at different dye concentrations and temperature. Parameters of best-fit model were calculated and discussed. To understand the mechanism of adsorption, kinetic models were employed to follow the adsorption processes; the pseudo-first-order best described the adsorption of MB onto AC. It was found that pH plays a major role in the adsorption process; adsorption capacity was influenced by the physical and surface chemical properties of carbon and the pH of the solution. 99.0% MB removal was achieved at equilibrium.

  12. Amination of activated carbon for enhancing phenol adsorption: Effect of nitrogen-containing functional groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Guo; Chen, Honglin; Qin, Hangdao; Feng, Yujun

    2014-02-01

    To study the contribution of different nitrogen-containing functional groups to enhancement of phenol adsorption, the aminated activated carbons (AC) were characterized by N2 adsorption/desorption, XPS, Boehm titration, and pH drift method and tested for adsorption behaviors of phenol. Adsorption isotherm fitting revealed that the Langmuir model was preferred for the aminated ACs. The adsorption capacity per unit surface area (qm/SSABET) was linearly correlated with the amount of pyridinic and pyrrolic N, which suggested that these two functional groups played a critical role in phenol adsorption. The enhancement of adsorption capacity was attributed to the strengthened π-π dispersion between phenol and basal plane of AC by pyridinic, pyrrolic N. The adsorption kinetics was found to follow the pseudo-second-order kinetic model, and intraparticle diffusion was one of the rate-controlling steps in the adsorption process.

  13. Equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic studies on the adsorption of phenol onto graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yanhui; Du, Qiuju; Liu, Tonghao; Sun, Jiankun; Jiao, Yuqin; Xia, Yanzhi; Xia, Linhua; Wang, Zonghua; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Kunlin; Zhu, Hongwei; Wu, Dehai

    2012-08-15

    Graphical abstract: The effect of temperature on phenol adsorbed by graphene shows that the equilibrium adsorption capacity of phenol increases with the increase in temperature from 285 to 333 K. Increasing adsorption capacities with temperature indicates that the adsorption of phenol is controlled by an endothermic reaction. Highlights: ► The graphene has high phenol adsorption capacity. ► The graphene has a high specific surface area of 305 m{sup 2}/g. ► The adsorption capacity is high at acidic pH range. ► The graphene has rapid phenol adsorption rate. ► Phenol adsorption is a spontaneous and endothermic process. -- Abstract: Graphene, a new member of carbon family, has been prepared, characterized and used as adsorbent to remove phenol from aqueous solution. The effect parameters including pH, dosage, contact time, and temperature on the adsorption properties of phenol onto graphene were investigated. The results showed that the maximum adsorption capacity can reach 28.26 mg/g at the conditions of initial phenol concentration of 50 mg/L, pH 6.3 and 285 K. Adsorption data were well described by both Freundlich and Langmuir models. The kinetic study illustrated that the adsorption of phenol onto graphene fit the pseudo second-order model. The thermodynamic parameters indicated that the adsorption of phenol onto graphene was endothermic and spontaneous.

  14. Inorganic: the other mercury.

    PubMed

    Risher, John F; De Rosa, Christopher T

    2007-11-01

    There is a broad array of mercury species to which humans may be exposed. While exposure to methylmercury through fish consumption is widely recognized, the public is less aware of the sources and potential toxicity of inorganic forms of mercury. Some oral and laboratory thermometers, barometers, small batteries, thermostats, gas pressure regulators, light switches, dental amalgam fillings, cosmetic products, medications, cultural/religious practices, and gold mining all represent potential sources of exposure to inorganic forms of mercury. The route of exposure, the extent of absorption, the pharmacokinetics, and the effects all vary with the specific form of mercury and the magnitude and duration of exposure. If exposure is suspected, a number of tissue analyses can be conducted to confirm exposure or to determine whether an exposure might reasonably be expected to be biologically significant. By contrast with determination of exposure to methylmercury, for which hair and blood are credible indicators, urine is the preferred biological medium for the determination of exposure to inorganic mercury, including elemental mercury, with blood normally being of value only if exposure is ongoing. Although treatments are available to help rid the body of mercury in cases of extreme exposure, prevention of exposure will make such treatments unnecessary. Knowing the sources of mercury and avoiding unnecessary exposure are the prudent ways of preventing mercury intoxication. When exposure occurs, it should be kept in mind that not all unwanted exposures will result in adverse health consequences. In all cases, elimination of the source of exposure should be the first priority of public health officials.

  15. Inorganic: the other mercury.

    PubMed

    Risher, John F; De Rosa, Christopher T

    2007-11-01

    There is a broad array of mercury species to which humans may be exposed. While exposure to methylmercury through fish consumption is widely recognized, the public is less aware of the sources and potential toxicity of inorganic forms of mercury. Some oral and laboratory thermometers, barometers, small batteries, thermostats, gas pressure regulators, light switches, dental amalgam fillings, cosmetic products, medications, cultural/religious practices, and gold mining all represent potential sources of exposure to inorganic forms of mercury. The route of exposure, the extent of absorption, the pharmacokinetics, and the effects all vary with the specific form of mercury and the magnitude and duration of exposure. If exposure is suspected, a number of tissue analyses can be conducted to confirm exposure or to determine whether an exposure might reasonably be expected to be biologically significant. By contrast with determination of exposure to methylmercury, for which hair and blood are credible indicators, urine is the preferred biological medium for the determination of exposure to inorganic mercury, including elemental mercury, with blood normally being of value only if exposure is ongoing. Although treatments are available to help rid the body of mercury in cases of extreme exposure, prevention of exposure will make such treatments unnecessary. Knowing the sources of mercury and avoiding unnecessary exposure are the prudent ways of preventing mercury intoxication. When exposure occurs, it should be kept in mind that not all unwanted exposures will result in adverse health consequences. In all cases, elimination of the source of exposure should be the first priority of public health officials. PMID:18044248

  16. Removal of mercury from powder river basin coal by low-temperature thermal treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Merriam, N.W.

    1993-07-01

    This report describes work conducted at Western Research Institute (WRI) to remove mercury from Powder River Basin (PRB) coal as part of the research performed under Task 2.1, Development and Optimization of a Process for the Production of a Premium Solid Fuel from Western US Coals, of the 1993 Annual Project Plan. In the tests minus 16 mesh PRB coal was fed to a bench-scale fluidized-bed reactor where it was heated by contact with carbon dioxide fluidizing gas. A side stream of the gas from the reactor was passed through traps containing activated carbon where mercury driven from the coal was collected. The feed coal (which contains about 0.062 milligrams of mercury/kilogram of coal), the fines elutriated from the reactor, the activated carbon, and the condensed water from the reactor were analyzed for mercury. The solid products were analyzed using cold vapor atomic adsorption spectroscopy (ASTM D3684) while the water was analyzed using US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Method 245.1 which is based upon reduction of mercury to elemental form followed by adsorption at a wave length of 253.7 nanometers. The results of these tests show that about 70 to 80 wt % of the mercury is removed from the coal when the temperature is raised from about 300{degree}F (149{degree}C) to about 550{degree}F (288{degree}C). The remaining 20 wt % of the mercury remains in the char at temperatures up to about 1100{degree}F (593{degree}C). About 0.5 wt % of the mercury in the feed coal is condensed with water recovered from the coal. Nearly all of the mercury driven from the coal remains in the gas stream. Fines elutriated from the reactor contain about the same concentration of mercury as the feed coal.

  17. Adsorption of catechol from aqueous solution by aminated hypercrosslinked polymers.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yue; Li, Xiao-Tao; Xu, Chao; Chen, Jin-Long; Li, Ai-Min; Zhang, Quan-Xing

    2005-01-01

    Adsorption of catechol from aqueous solution with the hypercrosslinked polymeric adsorbent NDA-100 and its derivatives AH-1, AH-2 and AH-3 aminated by dimethylamine, the commercial resin Amberlite XAD-4 and weakly basic anion exchanger resin D301 was compared. It was found that the aminated hypercrosslinked resins had the highest adsorption capacities among the tested polymers. The empirical Freundlich equation was successfully employed to describe the adsorption process. Specific surface area and micropore structure of the adsorbent, in company with tertiary amino groups on matrix affected the adsorption performance towards catechol. In addition, thermodynamic study was carried out to interpret the adsorption mechanism. Kinetic study testified that the tertiary amino groups on the polymer matrix could decrease the adsorption rate and increase the adsorption apparent activation energy.

  18. Global change and mercury

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krabbenhoft, David P.; Sunderland, Elsie M.

    2013-01-01

    More than 140 nations recently agreed to a legally binding treaty on reductions in human uses and releases of mercury that will be signed in October of this year. This follows the 2011 rule in the United States that for the first time regulates mercury emissions from electricity-generating utilities. Several decades of scientific research preceded these important regulations. However, the impacts of global change on environmental mercury concentrations and human exposures remain a major uncertainty affecting the potential effectiveness of regulatory activities.

  19. Adsorption coefficients for TNT on soil and clay minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, Rosángela; Pabón, Julissa; Pérez, Omarie; Muñoz, Miguel A.; Mina, Nairmen

    2007-04-01

    To understand the fate and transport mechanisms of TNT from buried landmines is it essential to determine the adsorption process of TNT on soil and clay minerals. In this research, soil samples from horizons Ap and A from Jobos Series at Isabela, Puerto Rico were studied. The clay fractions were separated from the other soil components by centrifugation. Using the hydrometer method the particle size distribution for the soil horizons was obtained. Physical and chemical characterization studies such as cation exchange capacity (CEC), surface area, percent of organic matter and pH were performed for the soil and clay samples. A complete mineralogical characterization of clay fractions using X-ray diffraction analysis reveals the presence of kaolinite, goethite, hematite, gibbsite and quartz. In order to obtain adsorption coefficients (K d values) for the TNT-soil and TNT-clay interactions high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used. The adsorption process for TNT-soil was described by the Langmuir model. A higher adsorption was observed in the Ap horizon. The Freundlich model described the adsorption process for TNT-clay interactions. The affinity and relative adsorption capacity of the clay for TNT were higher in the A horizon. These results suggest that adsorption by soil organic matter predominates over adsorption on clay minerals when significant soil organic matter content is present. It was found that, properties like cation exchange capacity and surface area are important factors in the adsorption of clayey soils.

  20. Defluoridation of drinking water using adsorption processes.

    PubMed

    Loganathan, Paripurnanda; Vigneswaran, Saravanamuthu; Kandasamy, Jaya; Naidu, Ravi

    2013-03-15

    Excessive intake of fluoride (F), mainly through drinking water, is a serious health hazard affecting humans worldwide. There are several methods used for the defluoridation of drinking water, of which adsorption processes are generally considered attractive because of their effectiveness, convenience, ease of operation, simplicity of design, and for economic and environmental reasons. In this paper, we present a comprehensive and a critical literature review on various adsorbents used for defluoridation, their relative effectiveness, mechanisms and thermodynamics of adsorption, and suggestions are made on choice of adsorbents for various circumstances. Effects of pH, temperature, kinetics and co-existing anions on F adsorption are also reviewed. Because the adsorption is very weak in extremely low or high pHs, depending on the adsorbent, acids or alkalis are used to desorb F and regenerate the adsorbents. However, adsorption capacity generally decreases with repeated use of the regenerated adsorbent. Future research needs to explore highly efficient, low cost adsorbents that can be easily regenerated for reuse over several cycles of operations without significant loss of adsorptive capacity and which have good hydraulic conductivity to prevent filter clogging during the fixed-bed treatment process.

  1. EFFECT OF GAC CHARACTERISTICS ON ADSORPTION OF ORGANIC POLLUTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The impact of the characteristics of granular activated carbon (GAC) on adsorption capacity and on the potential for polymerization of phenolic compounds on the surface of GAC in the presence of molecular oxygen is evaluated in this study. Adsorption isotherm data were collected...

  2. Mercury content in mushroom species in the Cordoba area

    SciTech Connect

    Zurera, G.; Rincon, F.; Arcos, F.; Pozo-Lora, R.

    1986-05-01

    Numerous investigations have established that fish is the food which shows the highest levels of mercury, thus being the most hazardous for humans. Recently much research has been carried out in several places of Europe on the high capacity of mushrooms to accumulate heavy metals. It has been noticed that the various species differ in their tendency to accumulate heavy metals. Two genera in which mercury accumulation was very marked are Agaricus and Lycoperdon. It is suggested that members of the genus Agaricus could be used as indicator organisms in the study of mercury pollution. The object of the present paper is to provide data on the levels of mercury contents in mushroom species collected in the Cordoba area (Spain).

  3. Recovery of mercury from mercury compounds via electrolytic methods

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Mark W.; George, William A.

    1989-01-01

    A process for electrolytically recovering mercury from mercury compounds is provided. In one embodiment, Hg is recovered from Hg.sub.2 Cl.sub.2 employing as the electrolyte solution a mixture of HCl and H.sub.2 O. In another embodiment, Hg is electrolytically recovered from HgO wherein the electrolyte solution is comprised of glacial acetic acid and H.sub.2 O. Also provided is an apparatus for producing isotopically enriched mercury compounds in a reactor and then transporting the dissolved compounds into an electrolytic cell where mercury ions are electrolytically reduced and elemental mercury recovered from the mercury compounds.

  4. Recovery of mercury from mercury compounds via electrolytic methods

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Mark W.; George, William A.

    1988-01-01

    A process for electrolytically recovering mercury from mercury compounds is provided. In one embodiment, Hg is recovered from Hg.sub.2 Cl.sub.2 employing as the electrolyte solution a mixture of HCl and H.sub.2 O. In another embodiment, Hg is electrolytically recovered from HgO wherein the electrolyte solution is comprised of glacial acetic acid and H.sub.2 O. Also provided is an apparatus for producing isotopically enriched mercury compounds in a reactor and then transporting the dissolved compounds into an electrolytic cell where mercury ions are electrolytically reduced and elemental mercury recovered from the mercury compounds.

  5. Recovery of mercury from mercury compounds via electrolytic methods

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, M.W.; George, W.A.

    1991-06-18

    A process for electrolytically recovering mercury from mercury compounds is provided. In one embodiment, Hg is recovered from Hg[sub 2]Cl[sub 2] employing as the electrolyte solution a mixture of HCl and H[sub 2]O. In another embodiment, Hg is electrolytically recovered from HgO wherein the electrolyte solution is comprised of glacial acetic acid and H[sub 2]O. Also provided is an apparatus for producing isotopically enriched mercury compounds in a reactor and then transporting the dissolved compounds into an electrolytic cell where mercury ions are electrolytically reduced and elemental mercury recovered from the mercury compounds. 3 figures.

  6. Recovery of mercury from mercury compounds via electrolytic methods

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, M.W.; George, W.A.

    1989-11-07

    A process for electrolytically recovering mercury from mercury compounds is provided. In one embodiment, Hg is recovered from Hg[sub 2]Cl[sub 2] employing as the electrolyte solution a mixture of HCl and H[sub 2]O. In another embodiment, Hg is electrolytically recovered from HgO wherein the electrolyte solution is comprised of glacial acetic acid and H[sub 2]O. Also provided is an apparatus for producing isotopically enriched mercury compounds in a reactor and then transporting the dissolved compounds into an electrolytic cell where mercury ions are electrolytically reduced and elemental mercury recovered from the mercury compounds. 3 figs.

  7. Recovery of mercury from mercury compounds via electrolytic methods

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Mark W.; George, William A.

    1991-01-01

    A process for electrolytically recovering mercury from mercury compounds is provided. In one embodiment, Hg is recovered from Hg.sub.2 Cl.sub.2 employing as the electrolyte solution a mixture of HCl and H.sub.2 O. In another embodiment, Hg is electrolytically recovered from HgO wherein the electrolyte solution is comprised of glacial acetic acid and H.sub.2 O. Also provided is an apparatus for producing isotopically enriched mercury compounds in a reactor and then transporting the dissolved compounds into an electrolytic cell where mercury ions are electrolytically reduced and elemental mercury recovered from the mercury compounds.

  8. Study of Adsorption of Copper Species onto Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Functionalized CNTs have improved adsorptive capacities over pristine CNTs. These can be used for sensors, membranes, filters and matrix composite enhancements made possible because of their nano-size.

  9. Effects of HCl and SO{sub 2} concentration on mercury removal by activated carbon sorbents in coal-derived flue gas

    SciTech Connect

    Ryota Ochiai; M. Azhar Uddin; Eiji Sasaoka; Shengji Wu

    2009-09-15

    The effect of the presence of HCl and SO{sub 2} in the simulated coal combustion flue gas on the Hg{sup 0} removal by a commercial activated carbon (coconut shell AC) was investigated in a laboratory-scale fixed-bed reactor in a temperature range of 80-200{sup o}C. The characteristics (thermal stability) of the mercury species formed on the sorbents under various adsorption conditions were investigated by the temperature-programmed decomposition desorption (TPDD) technique. It was found that the presence of HCl and SO{sub 2} in the flue gas affected the mercury removal efficiency of the sorbents as well as the characteristics of the mercury adsorption species. The mercury removal rate of AC increased with the HCl concentration in the flue gas. In the presence of HCl and the absence of SO{sub 2} during Hg{sup 0} adsorption by AC, a single Hg{sup 0} desorption peak at around 300{sup o}C was observed in the TPDD spectra and intensity of this peak increased with the HCl concentration during mercury adsorption. The peak at around 300{sup o}C may be derived from the decomposition and desorption of mercury chloride species. The presence of SO{sub 2} during mercury adsorption had an adverse effect on the mercury removal by AC in the presence of HCl. In the presence of both HCl and SO{sub 2} during Hg{sup 0} adsorption by AC, the major TPDD peak temperatures changed drastically depending upon the concentration of HCl and SO{sub 2} in flue gas during Hg{sup 0} adsorption. 16 refs., 7 figs.

  10. Mercury exposure and children's health.

    PubMed

    Bose-O'Reilly, Stephan; McCarty, Kathleen M; Steckling, Nadine; Lettmeier, Beate

    2010-09-01

    Acute or chronic mercury exposure can cause adverse effects during any period of development. Mercury is a highly toxic element; there is no known safe level of exposure. Ideally, neither children nor adults should have any mercury in their bodies because it provides no physiological benefit. Prenatal and postnatal mercury exposures occur frequently in many different ways. Pediatricians, nurses, and other health care providers should understand the scope of mercury exposures and health problems among children and be prepared to handle mercury exposures in medical practice. Prevention is the key to reducing mercury poisoning. Mercury exists in different chemical forms: elemental (or metallic), inorganic, and organic (methylmercury and ethyl mercury). Mercury exposure can cause acute and chronic intoxication at low levels of exposure. Mercury is neuro-, nephro-, and immunotoxic. The development of the child in utero and early in life is at particular risk. Mercury is ubiquitous and persistent. Mercury is a global pollutant, bio-accumulating, mainly through the aquatic food chain, resulting in a serious health hazard for children. This article provides an extensive review of mercury exposure and children's health.

  11. Mercury cycling in terrestrial watersheds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shanley, James B.; Bishop, Kevin; Banks, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    This chapter discusses mercury cycling in the terrestrial landscape, including inputs from the atmosphere, accumulation in soils and vegetation, outputs in streamflow and volatilization, and effects of land disturbance. Mercury mobility in the terrestrial landscape is strongly controlled by organic matter. About 90% of the atmospheric mercury input is retained in vegetation and organic matter in soils, causing a buildup of legacy mercury. Some mercury is volatilized back to the atmosphere, but most export of mercury from watersheds occurs by streamflow. Stream mercury export is episodic, in association with dissolved and particulate organic carbon, as stormflow and snowmelt flush organic-rich shallow soil horizons. The terrestrial landscape is thus a major source of mercury to downstream aquatic environments, where mercury is methylated and enters the aquatic food web. With ample organic matter and sulfur, methylmercury forms in uplands as well—in wetlands, riparian zones, and other anoxic sites. Watershed features (topography, land cover type, and soil drainage class) are often more important than atmospheric mercury deposition in controlling the amount of stream mercury and methylmercury export. While reductions in atmospheric mercury deposition may rapidly benefit lakes, the terrestrial landscape will respond only over decades, because of the large stock and slow turnover of legacy mercury. We conclude with a discussion of future scenarios and the challenge of managing terrestrial mercury.

  12. Field Demonstration of Enhanced Sorbent Injection for Mercury Control

    SciTech Connect

    Shin Kang; Robert Schrecengost

    2009-01-07

    Alstom Power Inc. has conducted a DOE/NETL-sponsored program (under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-04NT42306) to demonstrate Mer-Cure{trademark}, one of Alstom's mercury control technologies for coal-fired boilers. Mer-Cure{trademark} utilizes a small amount of Mer-Clean{trademark} sorbent that is injected into the flue gas stream for oxidation and adsorption of gaseous mercury. Mer-Clean{trademark} sorbents are carbon-based and prepared with chemical additives that promote oxidation and capture of mercury. Mer-Cure{trademark} is unique in that the sorbent is injected into an environment where the mercury capture kinetics is accelerated. This full-scale demonstration program was comprised of three seven-week long test campaigns at three host sites including PacifiCorp's 240-MW{sub e} Dave Johnston Unit No.3 burning a Powder River Basin (PRB) coal, Basin Electric's 220-MW{sub e} Leland Olds Unit No.1 burning a North Dakota lignite, and Reliant Energy's 170-MW{sub e} Portland Unit No.1 burning an Eastern bituminous coal. All three boilers are equipped with electrostatic precipitators. The goals for this Round 2 program, established by DOE/NETL under the original solicitation, were to reduce the uncontrolled mercury emissions by 50 to 70% at a cost 25 to 50% lower than the previous target of $60,000/lb mercury removed. The results for all three host sites indicated that Mer-Cure{trademark} technology could achieve mercury removal of 90%. The estimated mercury removal costs were 25-92% lower than the benchmark of $60,000/lb mercury removed. The estimated costs for control, at sorbent cost of $1.25 to $2.00/lb respectively, are as follows: (1) Dave Johnston Unit No.3--$2,650 to $4,328/lb Hg removed (92.8% less than $60k/lb); (2) Leland Olds Unit No.1--$8,680 to $13,860/lb Hg removed (76.7% less than $60k/lb); and (3) Portland Unit No.1--$28,540 to $45,065/lb Hg removed (24.9% less than $60k/lb). In summary, the results from demonstration testing at all three host

  13. Ecosystem conceptual model- Mercury

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alpers, Charles N.; Eagles-Smith, Collin A.; Foe, Chris; Klasing, Susan; Marvin-DiPasquale, Mark C.; Slotton, Darell G.; Windham-Myers, Lisamarie

    2008-01-01

    Mercury has been identified as an important contaminant in the Delta, based on elevated concentrations of methylmercury (a toxic, organic form that readily bioaccumulates) in fish and wildlife. There are health risks associated with human exposure to methylmercury by consumption of sport fish, particularly top predators such as bass species. Original mercury sources were upstream tributaries where historical mining of mercury in the Coast Ranges and gold in the Sierra Nevada and Klamath-Trinity Mountains caused contamination of water and sediment on a regional scale. Remediation of abandoned mine sites may reduce local sources in these watersheds, but much of the mercury contamination occurs in sediments stored in the riverbeds, floodplains, and the Bay- Delta, where scouring of Gold-Rush-era sediment represents an ongoing source.Conversion of inorganic mercury to toxic methylmercury occurs in anaerobic environments including some wetlands. Wetland restoration managers must be cognizant of potential effects on mercury cycling so that the problem is not exacerbated. Recent research suggests that wettingdrying cycles can contribute to mercury methylation. For example, high marshes (inundated only during the highest tides for several days per month) tend to have higher methylmercury concentrations in water, sediment, and biota compared with low marshes, which do not dry out completely during the tidal cycle. Seasonally inundated flood plains are another environment experiencing wetting and drying where methylmercury concentrations are typically elevated. Stream restoration efforts using gravel injection or other reworking of coarse sediment in most watersheds of the Central Valley involve tailings from historical gold mining that are likely to contain elevated mercury in associated fines. Habitat restoration projects, particularly those involving wetlands, may cause increases in methylmercury exposure in the watershed. This possibility should be evaluated.The DRERIP

  14. Mercury CEM Calibration

    SciTech Connect

    John F. Schabron; Joseph F. Rovani; Susan S. Sorini

    2007-03-31

    The Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR) which was published in the Federal Register on May 18, 2005, requires that calibration of mercury continuous emissions monitors (CEMs) be performed with NIST-traceable standards. Western Research Institute (WRI) is working closely with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to facilitate the development of the experimental criteria for a NIST traceability protocol for dynamic elemental mercury vapor generators. The traceability protocol will be written by EPA. Traceability will be based on the actual analysis of the output of each calibration unit at several concentration levels ranging from about 2-40 ug/m{sup 3}, and this analysis will be directly traceable to analyses by NIST using isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma/mass spectrometry (ID ICP/MS) through a chain of analyses linking the calibration unit in the power plant to the NIST ID ICP/MS. Prior to this project, NIST did not provide a recommended mercury vapor pressure equation or list mercury vapor pressure in its vapor pressure database. The NIST Physical and Chemical Properties Division in Boulder, Colorado was subcontracted under this project to study the issue in detail and to recommend a mercury vapor pressure equation that the vendors of mercury vapor pressure calibration units can use to calculate the elemental mercury vapor concentration in an equilibrium chamber at a particular temperature. As part of this study, a preliminary evaluation of calibration units from five vendors was made. The work was performed by NIST in Gaithersburg, MD and Joe Rovani from WRI who traveled to NIST as a Visiting Scientist.

  15. To Mercury dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkin, Yu. V.; Ferrandiz, J. M.

    Present significance of the study of rotation of Mercury considered as a core-mantle system arises from planned Mercury missions. New high accurate data on Mercury's structure and its physical fields are expected from BepiColombo mission (Anselmi et al., 2001). Investigation of resonant rotation of Mercury, begun by Colombo G. (1966), will play here main part. New approaches to the study of Mercury dynamics and the construction of analytical theory of its resonant rotation are suggested. Within these approaches Mercury is considered as a system of two non-spherical interacting bodies: a core and a mantle. The mantle of Mercury is considered as non-spherical, rigid (or elastic) layer. Inner shell is a liquid core, which occupies a large ellipsoidal cavity of Mercury. This Mercury system moves in the gravitational field of the Sun in resonant traslatory-rotary regime of the resonance 3:2. We take into account only the second harmonic of the force function of the Sun and Mercury. For the study of Mercury rotation we have been used specially designed canonical equations of motion in Andoyer and Poincare variables (Barkin, Ferrandiz, 2001), more convenient for the application of mentioned methods. Approximate observational and some theoretical evaluations of the two main coefficients of Mercury gravitational field J_2 and C22 are known. From observational data of Mariner-10 mission were obtained some first evaluations of these coefficients: J_2 =(8± 6)\\cdot 10-5(Esposito et al., 1977); J_2 =(6± 2)\\cdot 10-5and C22 =(1.0± 0.5)\\cdot 10-5(Anderson et al., 1987). Some theoretical evaluation of ratio of these coefficients has been obtained on the base of study of periodic motions of the system of two non-spherical gravitating bodies (Barkin, 1976). Corresponding values of coefficients consist: J_2 =8\\cdot 10-5and C22 =0.33\\cdot 10-5. We have no data about non-sphericity of inner core of Mercury. Planned missions to Mercury (BepiColombo and Messenger) promise to

  16. Method and apparatus for monitoring mercury emissions

    DOEpatents

    Durham, Michael D.; Schlager, Richard J.; Sappey, Andrew D.; Sagan, Francis J.; Marmaro, Roger W.; Wilson, Kevin G.

    1997-01-01

    A mercury monitoring device that continuously monitors the total mercury concentration in a gas. The device uses the same chamber for converting speciated mercury into elemental mercury and for measurement of the mercury in the chamber by radiation absorption techniques. The interior of the chamber is resistant to the absorption of speciated and elemental mercury at the operating temperature of the chamber.

  17. Method and apparatus for monitoring mercury emissions

    DOEpatents

    Durham, M.D.; Schlager, R.J.; Sappey, A.D.; Sagan, F.J.; Marmaro, R.W.; Wilson, K.G.

    1997-10-21

    A mercury monitoring device that continuously monitors the total mercury concentration in a gas. The device uses the same chamber for converting speciated mercury into elemental mercury and for measurement of the mercury in the chamber by radiation absorption techniques. The interior of the chamber is resistant to the absorption of speciated and elemental mercury at the operating temperature of the chamber. 15 figs.

  18. Characterization of biochars derived from agriculture wastes and their adsorptive removal of atrazine from aqueous solution: A comparative study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Na; Charrua, Alberto Bento; Weng, Chih-Huang; Yuan, Xiaoling; Ding, Feng

    2015-12-01

    The physicochemical properties of biochars produced from soybeans (SBB), corn stalks (CSB), rice stalks (RSB), poultry manure (PMB), cattle manure (CMB), and pig manure (PgMB) and their adsorption characteristics of atrazine were investigated. The adsorption capacity increased with the increase of temperature and initial atrazine concentration. More atrazine was removed from basic solutions than acidic solutions, due to the effects of adsorption and hydrolysis. The Freundlich isotherm adsorption parameters indicated that the adsorption capacity decreased in the order SBB>RSB>CMB>CSB>PMB>PgMB, which is associated to the pore volume of biochars. The total pore volume and biochar pH were concluded to play important roles in determining the adsorption capacity, and they may have contributed to physical adsorption mechanisms dominating the overall adsorption process (the low activation energy for all of the biochars). Modified Freundlich and intraparticle diffusion models were used to describe the kinetics of the adsorption process.

  19. Spatially Oscillating Activity and Microbial Succession of Mercury-Reducing Biofilms in a Technical-Scale Bioremediation System

    PubMed Central

    von Canstein, Harald; Li, Ying; Leonhäuser, Johannes; Haase, Elke; Felske, Andreas; Deckwer, Wolf-Dieter; Wagner-Döbler, Irene

    2002-01-01

    Mercury-contaminated chemical wastewater of a mercury cell chloralkali plant was cleaned on site by a technical-scale bioremediation system. Microbial mercury reduction of soluble Hg(II) to precipitating Hg(0) decreased the mercury load of the wastewater during its flow through the bioremediation system by up to 99%. The system consisted of a packed-bed bioreactor, where most of the wastewater's mercury load was retained, and an activated carbon filter, where residual mercury was removed from the bioreactor effluent by both physical adsorption and biological reduction. In response to the oscillation of the mercury concentration in the bioreactor inflow, the zone of maximum mercury reduction oscillated regularly between the lower and the upper bioreactor horizons or the carbon filter. At low mercury concentrations, maximum mercury reduction occurred near the inflow at the bottom of the bioreactor. At high concentrations, the zone of maximum activity moved to the upper horizons. The composition of the bioreactor and carbon filter biofilms was investigated by 16S-23S ribosomal DNA intergenic spacer polymorphism analysis. Analysis of spatial biofilm variation showed an increasing microbial diversity along a gradient of decreasing mercury concentrations. Temporal analysis of the bioreactor community revealed a stable abundance of two prevalent strains and a succession of several invading mercury-resistant strains which was driven by the selection pressure of high mercury concentrations. In the activated carbon filter, a lower selection pressure permitted a steady increase in diversity during 240 days of operation and the establishment of one mercury-sensitive invader. PMID:11916716

  20. Protein adsorption to multi-component glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Matthew Micah

    2003-07-01

    The adsorption of human serum albumin (HSA) to sodium silicate, soda lime silicate (SLS), and sodium aluminosilicate (SAS) glass microspheres was investigated using sodiumdodecylsulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) in conjunction with a colloidal silver stain for visualization. The 30 Na2O·70 SiO2 composition could not be evaluated due to an apparent chemical interference that occurred during silver staining. This inhibitory effect was attributed to the extensive corrosion that occurred during the protein elution and caused an elevation in the pH of the solution. The remaining glass compositions were sufficiently durable for further study. The HSA adsorption capacity of SLS glass microspheres containing 70 and 80 mol% SiO2 increased as CaO was substituted for Na2O. An abrupt decrease in the HSA adsorption capacity was observed for SLS glasses containing 60 mol% SiO2. A similar trend was observed for the SAS glass microspheres, although the SAS glasses adsorbed less HSA than the SLS glasses containing equivalent molar percentages of SiO2. The initial increase in HSA adsorption capacity for SLS and SAS glasses containing 70 and 80 MOM SiO2 was attributed to the introduction of positive charges into the glass surfaces via Ca2+ and Al3+ cations. The decrease in HSA adsorption capacity for SLS and SAS glasses containing 60 mol% SiO2 may be due to an enhanced affinity between the glasses and HSA, resulting in a "flattened" conformation that limits the total accessible area for adsorption.

  1. Subtask 2.7 -- Mercury capture on solid surfaces and aerosols. Semi-annual report, July 1--December 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, R.L.

    1997-08-01

    Determining the fly ash properties responsible for the capture of mercury in coal-fired power generation systems is key to understanding and controlling mercury emissions in these systems. Several capture mechanisms and interactions may be possible, such as condensation, chemical adsorption, physical adsorption, chemical bonding, and amalgamation. The chemical nature of the exposed surfaces and the amount of surface area are likely to affect the amount of mercury capture, so both of these parameters must be explored. Since much of the fly ash surface area is concentrated on submicron particles, the interaction of mercury with submicron particles needs to be evaluated. Another possible explanation of mercury capture on fly ash is the formation of amalgams with other metal species that may be present in the fly ash; if this is true, amalgamation may be a viable control technology. The project objectives are to relate mercury capture by fly ash to chemical and physical properties of the fly ash, determine mercury associations with submicron aerosols, evaluate mercury capture on metal sorbents, and relate experimental results to predictions based on state-of-the-art models. Results to date on these activities are described.

  2. GEOCHEMICAL FACTORS GOVERNING METHYL MERCURY PRODUCTION IN MERCURY CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bench scale experiments were conducted to improve our understanding of aquatic mercury transformation processes (biotic and abiotic), specifically those factors which govern the production of methyl mercury (MeHg) in sedimentary environments. The greatest cause for concern regar...

  3. Mercury pollution in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Hajeb, Parvaneh; Jinap, S; Ismail, Ahmad; Mahyudin, Nor Ainy

    2012-01-01

    Although several studies have been published on levels of mercury contamination of the environment, and of food and human tissues in Peninsular Malaysia, there is a serious dearth of research that has been performed in East Malaysia (Sabah and Sarawak). Industry is rapidly developing in East Malaysia, and, hence, there is a need for establishing baseline levels of mercury contamination in environmental media in that part of the country by performing monitoring studies. Residues of total mercury and inorganic in food samples have been determined in nearly all previous studies that have been conducted; however, few researchers have analyzed samples for the presence of methlymercury residues. Because methylmercury is the most toxic form of mercury, and because there is a growing public awareness of the risk posed by methylmercury exposure that is associated with fish and seafood consumption, further monitoring studies on methylmercury in food are also essential. From the results of previous studies, it is obvious that the economic development in Malaysia, in recent years, has affected the aquatic environment of the country. Primary areas of environmental concern are centered on the rivers of the west Peninsular Malaysian coast, and the coastal waters of the Straits of Malacca, wherein industrial activities are rapidly expanding. The sources of existing mercury input to both of these areas of Malaysia should be studied and identified. Considering the high levels of mercury that now exists in human tissues, efforts should be continued, and accelerated in the future, if possible, to monitor mercury contamination levels in the coastal states, and particularly along the west Peninsular Malaysian coast. Most studies that have been carried out on mercury residues in environmental samples are dated, having been conducted 20-30 years ago; therefore, the need to collect much more and more current data is urgent. Furthermore, establishing baseline levels of mercury exposure to

  4. Mercury pollution in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Hajeb, Parvaneh; Jinap, S; Ismail, Ahmad; Mahyudin, Nor Ainy

    2012-01-01

    Although several studies have been published on levels of mercury contamination of the environment, and of food and human tissues in Peninsular Malaysia, there is a serious dearth of research that has been performed in East Malaysia (Sabah and Sarawak). Industry is rapidly developing in East Malaysia, and, hence, there is a need for establishing baseline levels of mercury contamination in environmental media in that part of the country by performing monitoring studies. Residues of total mercury and inorganic in food samples have been determined in nearly all previous studies that have been conducted; however, few researchers have analyzed samples for the presence of methlymercury residues. Because methylmercury is the most toxic form of mercury, and because there is a growing public awareness of the risk posed by methylmercury exposure that is associated with fish and seafood consumption, further monitoring studies on methylmercury in food are also essential. From the results of previous studies, it is obvious that the economic development in Malaysia, in recent years, has affected the aquatic environment of the country. Primary areas of environmental concern are centered on the rivers of the west Peninsular Malaysian coast, and the coastal waters of the Straits of Malacca, wherein industrial activities are rapidly expanding. The sources of existing mercury input to both of these areas of Malaysia should be studied and identified. Considering the high levels of mercury that now exists in human tissues, efforts should be continued, and accelerated in the future, if possible, to monitor mercury contamination levels in the coastal states, and particularly along the west Peninsular Malaysian coast. Most studies that have been carried out on mercury residues in environmental samples are dated, having been conducted 20-30 years ago; therefore, the need to collect much more and more current data is urgent. Furthermore, establishing baseline levels of mercury exposure to

  5. Centrifugal Adsorption Cartridge System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R.; Tsao, Yow-Min D.; Lee, Wenshan

    2004-01-01

    The centrifugal adsorption cartridge system (CACS) is an apparatus that recovers one or more bioproduct(s) from a dilute aqueous solution or suspension flowing from a bioreactor. The CACS can be used both on Earth in unit gravity and in space in low gravity. The CACS can be connected downstream from the bioreactor; alternatively, it can be connected into a flow loop that includes the bioreactor so that the liquid can be recycled. A centrifugal adsorption cartridge in the CACS (see figure) includes two concentric cylinders with a spiral ramp between them. The volume between the inner and outer cylinders, and between the turns of the spiral ramp is packed with an adsorbent material. The inner cylinder is a sieve tube covered with a gas-permeable, hydrophobic membrane. During operation, the liquid effluent from the bioreactor is introduced at one end of the spiral ramp, which then constrains the liquid to flow along the spiral path through the adsorbent material. The spiral ramp also makes the flow more nearly uniform than it would otherwise be, and it minimizes any channeling other than that of the spiral flow itself. The adsorbent material is formulated to selectively capture the bioproduct(s) of interest. The bioproduct(s) can then be stored in bound form in the cartridge or else eluted from the cartridge. The centrifugal effect of the spiral flow is utilized to remove gas bubbles from the liquid. The centrifugal effect forces the bubbles radially inward, toward and through the membrane of the inner cylinder. The gas-permeable, hydrophobic membrane allows the bubbles to enter the inner cylinder while keeping the liquid out. The bubbles that thus enter the cylinder are vented to the atmosphere. The spacing between the ramps determines rate of flow along the spiral, and thereby affects the air-bubble-removal efficiency. The spacing between the ramps also determines the length of the fluid path through the cartridge adsorbent, and thus affects the bioproduct

  6. Mercury(II) and methyl mercury determinations in water and fish samples by using solid phase extraction and cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometry combination.

    PubMed

    Tuzen, Mustafa; Karaman, Isa; Citak, Demirhan; Soylak, Mustafa

    2009-07-01

    A method has been developed for mercury(II) and methyl mercury speciation on Staphylococcus aureus loaded Dowex Optipore V-493 micro-column in the presented work, by using cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometry. Selective and sequential elution with 0.1 molL(-1) HCl for methyl mercury and 2 molL(-1) HCl for mercury(II) were performed at the pH range of 2-6. Optimal analytical conditions including pH, amounts of biosorbent, sample volumes were investigated. The detection limits of the analytes were 2.5 ngL(-1) for Hg(II) and 1.7 ngL(-1) for methyl mercury. The capacity of biosorbent for mercury(II) and methyl mercury was 6.5 and 5.4 mgg(-1), respectively. The validation of the presented procedure is performed by the analysis of standard reference material. The speciation procedure established was successfully applied to the speciation of mercury(II) and methyl mercury in natural water and microwave digested fish samples.

  7. Heavy metal adsorption changes of EAF steel slag after phosphorus adsorption.

    PubMed

    Song, Guanling; Cao, Lijing; Chen, Xiao; Hou, Wenhua; Wang, Qunhui

    2012-01-01

    A kind of electric arc furnace (EAF) steel slag was phosphated, and its isothermal and dynamic adsorptions of copper, cadmium, and lead ions were measured to determine if heavy metal adsorption changes after phosphorus adsorption. The surface area increased greatly after the slag was phosphated. Isothermal adsorption experiments showed that the theoretical Q(max) of the EAF steel slag on Cu(2+), Cd(2+), and Pb(2+) improved 59, 50, and 89% respectively after it was phosphated. Dynamic adsorption results showed that the greatest adsorption capacities of unit volume of Cu(2+), Cd(2+), and Pb(2+) were 2.2, 1.8, and 1.8 times that of the column packed with original EAF steel slag when the column was packed with phosphate EAF steel slag at the same heavy metal ion concentration. The breakthrough time, the exhaustion time and elution efficiency of the column also increased when the column was packed with phosphated EAF steel slag compared with that packed with original EAF steel slag. Phosphorus adsorption could further improve the heavy metal ion adsorption of the EAF steel slag.

  8. Industrial water treatment, by adsorption, using organized mesoporous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koubaissy, Bachar; Toufaily, Joumana; Kafrouny, Lina; Joly, Guy; Magnoux, Patrick; Hamieh, Tayssir

    In this work, pure silica SBA-15 was synthesized by a sol-gel method and in-situ functionalized by a series of organosilane. These mesoporous materials are used to absorb polluants from wastewater. We studied the influence of functional groups on adsorption of phenol drifts. The carboxylic acid groups and substituted chlorine on phenol have been studied. There is a sharp increase of adsorption (more than double compared to phenol) which is very encouraging. Furthermore we note that the percentage of grafted ligands also plays an important role in adsorption. Finally, the adsorption capacity also depends on the nature and percentage of ligands present.

  9. Removal of carbonyl sulfide using activated carbon adsorption.

    PubMed

    Sattler, Melanie L; Rosenberk, Ranjith Samuel

    2006-02-01

    Wastewater treatment plant odors are caused by compounds such as hydrogen sulfide (H2S), methyl mercaptans, and carbonyl sulfide (COS). One of the most efficient odor control processes is activated carbon adsorption; however, very few studies have been conducted on COS adsorption. COS is not only an odor causing compound but is also listed in the Clean Air Act as a hazardous air pollutant. Objectives of this study were to determine the following: (1) the adsorption capacity of 3 different carbons for COS removal; (2) the impact of relative humidity (RH) on COS adsorption; (3) the extent of competitive adsorption of COS in the presence of H2S; and (4) whether ammonia injection would increase COS adsorption capacity. Vapor phase react (VPR; reactivated), BPL (bituminous coal-based), and Centaur (physically modified to enhance H2S adsorption) carbons manufactured by Calgon Carbon Corp. were tested in three laboratory-scale columns, 6 in. in depth and 1 in. in diameter. Inlet COS concentrations varied from 35 to 49 ppmv (86-120 mg/m3). RHs of 17%, 30%, 50%, and 90% were tested. For competitive adsorption studies, H2S was tested at 60 ppmv, with COS at 30 ppmv. COS, RH, H2S, and ammonia concentrations were measured using an International Sensor Technology Model IQ-350 solid state sensor, Cole-Parmer humidity stick, Interscan Corp. 1000 series portable analyzer, and Drager Accuro ammonia sensor, respectively. It was found that the adsorption capacity of Centaur carbon for COS was higher than the other two carbons, regardless of RH. As humidity increased, the percentage of decrease in adsorption capacity of Centaur carbon, however, was greater than the other two carbons. The carbon adsorption capacity for COS decreased in proportion to the percentage of H2S in the gas stream. More adsorption sites appear to be available to H2S, a smaller molecule. Ammonia, which has been found to increase H2S adsorption capacity, did not increase the capacity for COS.

  10. MESSENGER: Exploring Mercury's Magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, James A.; Krimigis, Stamatios M.; Acuna, Mario H.; Anderson, Brian J.; Baker, Daniel N.; Koehn, Patrick L.; Korth, Haje; Levi, Stefano; Mauk, Barry H.; Solomon, Sean C.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.

    2005-01-01

    The MESSENGER mission to Mercury offers our first opportunity to explore this planet s miniature magnetosphere since the brief flybys of Mariner 10. Mercury s magnetosphere is unique in many respects. The magnetosphere of Mercury is among the smallest in the solar system; its magnetic field typically stands off the solar wind only - 1000 to 2000 km above the surface. For this reason there are no closed drift paths for energetic particles and, hence, no radiation belts. The characteristic time scales for wave propagation and convective transport are short and kinetic and fluid modes may be coupled. Magnetic reconnection at the dayside magnetopause may erode the subsolar magnetosphere allowing solar wind ions to impact directly the regolith. Inductive currents in Mercury s interior may act to modify the solar wind interaction by resisting changes due to solar wind pressure variations. Indeed, observations of these induction effects may be an important source of information on the state of Mercury s interior. In addition, Mercury s magnetosphere is the only one with its defining magnetic flux tubes rooted in a planetary regolith as opposed to an atmosphere with a conductive ionospheric layer. This lack of an ionosphere is probably the underlying reason for the brevity of the very intense, but short-lived, - 1-2 min, substorm-like energetic particle events observed by Mariner 10 during its first traversal of Mercury s magnetic tail. Because of Mercury s proximity to the sun, 0.3 - 0.5 AU, this magnetosphere experiences the most extreme driving forces in the solar system. All of these factors are expected to produce complicated interactions involving the exchange and re-cycling of neutrals and ions between the solar wind, magnetosphere, and regolith. The electrodynamics of Mercury s magnetosphere are expected to be equally complex, with strong forcing by the solar wind, magnetic reconnection at the magnetopause and in the tail, and the pick-up of planetary ions all

  11. Assessing the Adsorption Properties of Shales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pini, R.

    2014-12-01

    Fine-grained rocks, such as shales, contain a significant amount of nanopores that can significantly contribute to their storage capacity through the mechanism of adsorption. The current ability to extract natural gas that is adsorbed in the rock's matrix is limited and current technology focuses primarily on the free gas in the fractures, thus leading to very low recovery efficiencies. Shales constitute also a great portion of so-called caprocks above potential CO2 sequestration sites; hereby, the adsorption process may limit the CO2 mobility within the cap-rock, thus minimizing leakage phenomena. Whether it is a reservoir or a caprock, understanding and quantifying the mechanisms of adsorption in these natural materials is key to improve the engineering design of subsurface operations. Results will be presented from a laboratory study that combines conventional techniques for the measurement of adsorption isotherms with novel methods that allows for the imaging of adsorption using x-rays. Various nanoporous materials are considered, thus including rocks, such as shales and coals, pure clay minerals and engineered adsorbents with well-defined nanopore structures, such as zeolites. Supercritical CO2 adsorption isotherms have been measured with a Rubotherm Magnetic Suspension balance by covering the pressure range 0.1-20~MPa. A medical x-ray CT scanner has been used to identify three-dimensional patterns of the adsorption properties of a packed-bed of adsorbent, thus enabling to assess the spatial variability of the adsorption isotherm. The data are analyzed by using thermodynamically rigorous measures of adsorption and a graphical method is applied for their interpretation. The density of the adsorbed phase is estimated and compared to data reported in the literature; the latter is key to disclose gas-reserves and/or potential storage capacity estimates. When evaluated against classic adsorbent materials, the adsorption mechanism in shales is further complicated by

  12. Mercury pollution from irrigation with treated sewage water (TSW).

    PubMed

    Pillay, A E; Yaghi, B; Williams, J R; Al-Kindy, S

    2007-06-01

    The lack of potable water in arid countries leads to the use of treated sewage water (TSW) for crop growth. Mercury accumulation (up to 500 ng/g) in agricultural soil originating from daily irrigation with TSW was found at two sites fed separately from a hospital sewage plant and an industrial plant. A control site irrigated with potable water ([Hg] <0.01 ng/ml) had much reduced levels in soil (<12 ng/g). Cold-vapour analysis of TSW revealed that Hg concentrations fluctuated widely, and were between 10-100 times higher than those of potable water. The TSW data originated from a total of 46 samples (1 L each), from both plants, collected over a 6-month period. The Hg levels varied from 0.1 to 1.0 ng/ml, which suggested that the possible source of the accumulation could be found in continuous irrigation with comparatively higher Hg levels. Remedial measures could be approached from the perspective of curbing this inconsistency to produce more consistent Hg concentrations below 0.5 ng/ml. It was found that the electrical conductivity of TSW is a useful indicator to rapidly monitor fluctuations in treatment. A novel development in the study was the potential capacity of the plastic TSW discharge-pipes to behave as crude 'chromatographic' columns for possible Hg adsorption. If this property of the pipes is developed further it could have a considerable mitigating effect on the Hg levels. Possible recommendations for remediation to limit the Hg levels and promote sustainable development are discussed.

  13. Determination of mercurous chloride and total mercury in mercury ores

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fahey, J.J.

    1937-01-01

    A method for the determination of mercurous chloride and total mercury on the same sample is described. The mercury minerals are volatilized in a glass tube and brought into intimate contact with granulated sodium carbonate. The chlorine is fixed as sodium chloride, determined with silver nitrate, and computed to mercurous chloride. The mercury is collected on a previously weighed gold coil and weighed.

  14. Enterovirus 71 adsorption on metal ion-composite chitosan beads.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ya-Ching; Lin, Shu-Ting; Chen, Cheng-Yi; Wu, Sheng-Chi

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we developed composite chitosan beads combining various metal ions, including Ni(2+), Cu(2+), Zn(2+), and Fe(2+), for direct adsorption of enterovirus 71 (EV71). The metal-ion species had significant effects on the adsorption capacity of beads. Among these metal ion-composite chitosan beads, Ni(2+)-chitosan beads exhibited the best adsorption capacity of EV71. Using a concentration of 0.01-M Ni(2+) was found to best provide for bead formation and EV71 adsorption. The adsorption of EV71 for Ni(2+)-chitosan beads at neutral or alkaline pH was favored. Under a competitive condition with albumin proteins, Ni(2+)-chitosan beads exhibited significant capacity of EV71 adsorption in culture media. The adsorption of EV71 on the Ni(2+)-chitosan beads was attributed to the strong binding between Ni(2+) ions chelated to the surface amino acid of EV71 capsids and Ni(2+) ions chelated on the chitosan materials. Moreover, the adsorbed EV71 retained its antigenicity and infectivity after desorption. The Ni(2+)-chitosan beads exhibit a promising application to EV71 adsorption and removal.

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF A CL-IMPREGNATED ACTIVATED CARBON FOR ENTRAINED-FLOW CAPTURE OF ELEMENTAL MERCURY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Efforts to discern the role of an activated carbon's surface functional groups on the adsorption of elemental mercury [Hg(0)] and mercuric chloride demonstrated that chlorine (Cl) impregnation of a virgin activated carbon using dilute solutions of hydrogen chloride leads to incre...

  16. Study of Methylene Blue adsorption on keratin nanofibrous membranes.

    PubMed

    Aluigi, A; Rombaldoni, F; Tonetti, C; Jannoke, L

    2014-03-15

    In this work, keratin nanofibrous membranes (mean diameter of about 220nm) were prepared by electrospinning and tested as adsorbents for Methylene Blue through batch adsorption tests. The adsorption capacity of the membranes was evaluated as a function of initial dye concentration, pH, adsorbent dosage, time and temperature. The adsorption capacity increased with increasing the initial dye concentration and pH, while it decreased with increasing the adsorbent dosage and temperature, indicating an exothermic process. The adsorption results indicated that the Langmuir isotherm fitted the experimental data better than the Freundlich and Temkin isotherm models. A mean free energy evaluated through the Dubinin-Radushkevich model of about 16kJmol(-1), indicated a chemisorption process which occurred by ion exchange. The kinetic data were found to fit the pseudo-second-order model better than the pseudo-first-order model. The obtained results suggest that keratin nanofibrous membranes could be promising candidates as dye adsorption filters.

  17. Use of statistical design of experiments to evaluate the sorption capacity of 7-amine-4-azaheptylsilica and 10-amine- 4-azadecylsilica for Cu(II), Pb(II), and Fe(III) adsorption.

    PubMed

    Passos, Camila G; Ribaski, Fernanda S; Simon, Nathália M; dos Santos, Araci A; Vaghetti, Júlio C P; Benvenutti, Edilson V; Lima, Eder Cláudio

    2006-10-15

    7-Amine-4-azaheptylsilica (AAH Si) and 10-amine-4-azadecylsilica (AAD Si) were prepared and used for removal of Cu(II), Pb(II), and Fe(III) from aqueous solutions. Full 2(3) factorial designs with two pseudo-central points were carried out in order to achieve the best conditions of the batch adsorption procedure for metallic ion uptake by the adsorbents. To continue the optimizations, central composite surface design was also employed. These two independent statistical designs of experiments lead to the following conditions: m=30.0 mg of adsorbent; pH 6.0 for Cu(II) and Pb(II), pH 4.0 for Fe(III); t of contact 180 min to guarantee equilibration at higher adsorbate concentration. After optimization of the conditions, isotherms of the metallic ions adsorbed on the AAH Si and AAD Si adsorbents were obtained, which were fitted to nonlinear Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models.

  18. Adsorption behavior of perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) on boehmite.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Liu, Chengshuai; Shih, Kaimin

    2012-11-01

    Understanding the interaction of perfluorochemicals, persistent pollutants with known human health effects, with mineral compounds in surface water and groundwater environments is essential to determining their fate and transport. Kinetic experiments showed that adsorption equilibrium can be achieved within 48 h and the boehmite (AlOOH) surface is receptive to perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) adsorption. The adsorption isotherms estimated the maximum adsorption capacities of PFOS and PFOA on boehmite as 0.877 μg m(-2) and 0.633 μg m(-2), respectively. Compared to the adsorption capacity on γ-alumina, the abundant hydroxyl groups on boehmite surfaces resulted in the 2-3 times higher adsorption of PFOS and PFOA. Increasing solution pH led to a moderate decrease in PFOS and PFOA adsorption, owing to an increase in ligand exchange reactions and the decrease of electrostatic interactions. The presence of NaCl and CaCl(2) in solution demonstrated negative effects for PFOS and PFOA adsorption on boehmite surfaces, with potential mechanisms being electrical double layer compression, competitive adsorption of chloride, and the Ca(2+) bridging effect between perfluorochemicals. PMID:22897837

  19. Advanced Utility Mercury-Sorbent Field-Testing Program

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald Landreth

    2007-12-31

    This report summarizes the work conducted from September 1, 2003 through December 31, 2007 on the project entitled Advanced Utility Mercury-Sorbent Field-Testing Program. The project covers the testing at the Detroit Edison St. Clair Plant and the Duke Power Cliffside and Buck Stations. The St. Clair Plant used a blend of subbituminous and bituminous coal and controlled the particulate emissions by means of a cold-side ESP. The Duke Power Stations used bituminous coals and controlled their particulate emissions by means of hot-side ESPs. The testing at the Detroit Edison St. Clair Plant demonstrated that mercury sorbents could be used to achieve high mercury removal rates with low injection rates at facilities that burn subbituminous coal. A mercury removal rate of 94% was achieved at an injection rate of 3 lb/MMacf over the thirty day long-term test. Prior to this test, it was believed that the mercury in flue gas of this type would be the most difficult to capture. This is not the case. The testing at the two Duke Power Stations proved that carbon- based mercury sorbents can be used to control the mercury emissions from boilers with hot-side ESPs. It was known that plain PACs did not have any mercury capacity at elevated temperatures but that brominated B-PAC did. The mercury removal rate varies with the operation but it appears that mercury removal rates equal to or greater than 50% are achievable in facilities equipped with hot-side ESPs. As part of the program, both sorbent injection equipment and sorbent production equipment was acquired and operated. This equipment performed very well during this program. In addition, mercury instruments were acquired for this program. These instruments worked well in the flue gas at the St. Clair Plant but not as well in the flue gas at the Duke Power Stations. It is believed that the difference in the amount of oxidized mercury, more at Duke Power, was the difference in instrument performance. Much of the equipment was

  20. Student Exposure to Mercury Vapors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Joyce

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the problem of mercury vapors caused by spills in high school and college laboratories. Describes a study which compared the mercury vapor levels of laboratories in both an older and a newer building. Concludes that the mercurial contamination of chemistry laboratories presents minimal risks to the students. (TW)

  1. ATMOSPHERIC MERCURY TRANSPORT AND DEPOSITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The current state of our scientific understanding the mercury cycle tells us that most of the mercury getting into fish comes from atmospheric deposition, but methylation of that mercury in aquatic systems is required for the concentrations in fish to reach harmful levels. We st...

  2. Reference Atmosphere for Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Killen, Rosemary M.

    2002-01-01

    We propose that Ar-40 measured in the lunar atmosphere and that in Mercury's atmosphere is due to current diffusion into connected pore space within the crust. Higher temperatures at Mercury, along with more rapid loss from the atmosphere will lead to a smaller column abundance of argon at Mercury than at the Moon, given the same crustal abundance of potassium. Because the noble gas abundance in the Hermean atmosphere represents current effusion, it is a direct measure of the crustal potassium abundance. Ar-40 in the atmospheres of the planets is a measure of potassium abundance in the interiors, since Ar-40 is a product of radiogenic decay of K-40 by electron capture with the subsequent emission of a 1.46 eV gamma-ray. Although the Ar-40 in the Earth's atmosphere is expected to have accumulated since the late bombardment, Ar-40 in the atmospheres of Mercury and the Moon is eroded quickly by photoionization and electron impact ionization. Thus, the argon content in the exospheres of the Moon and Mercury is representative of current effusion rather than accumulation over the lifetime of the planet.

  3. Adsorption of reovirus by minerals and soils.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, R S; Taylor, D H; Reddy, M M; Sturman, L S

    1982-01-01

    Adsorption of [35S]methionine-labeled reovirus by 30 dry soils, minerals, and finely ground rocks suspended in synthetic freshwater at pH 7 was investigated to determine the conditions necessary for optimum virus removal during land application of wastewaters. All of the minerals and soils studied were excellent adsorbents of reovirus, with greater than 99% of the virus adsorbed after 1 h at 4 degrees C. Thereafter, virus remaining in suspension was significantly inactivated, and within 24 h a three to five log10 reduction in titer occurred. The presence of divalent cations, i.e., Ca2+ and Mg2+, in synthetic freshwater enhanced removal, whereas soluble organic matter decreased the amount of virus adsorbed in secondary effluent. The amount of virus adsorbed by these substrates was inversely correlated with the amount of organic matter, capacity to adsorb cationic polyelectrolyte, and electrophoretic mobility. Adsorption increased with increasing available surface area, as suspended infectivity was reduced further by the more finely divided substrates. However, the organic content of the soils reduced the level of infectious virus adsorbed below that expected from surface area measurements alone. The inverse correlation between virus adsorption and substrate capacity for cationic polyelectrolyte indicates that the adsorption of infectious reovirus particles is predominately a charged colloidal particle-charged surface interaction. Thus, adsorption of polyelectrolyte may be useful in predicting the fate of viruses during land application of sewage effluents and sludges. PMID:7149717

  4. Sensing Mercury for Biomedical and Environmental Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Selid, Paul D.; Xu, Hanying; Collins, E. Michael; Face-Collins, Marla Striped; Zhao, Julia Xiaojun

    2009-01-01

    Mercury is a very toxic element that is widely spread in the atmosphere, lithosphere, and surface water. Concentrated mercury poses serious problems to human health, as bioaccumulation of mercury within the brain and kidneys ultimately leads to neurological diseases. To control mercury pollution and reduce mercury damage to human health, sensitive determination of mercury is important. This article summarizes some current sensors for the determination of both abiotic and biotic mercury. A wide array of sensors for monitoring mercury is described, including biosensors and chemical sensors, while piezoelectric and microcantilever sensors are also described. Additionally, newly developed nanomaterials offer great potential for fabricating novel mercury sensors. Some of the functional fluorescent nanosensors for the determination of mercury are covered. Afterwards, the in vivo determination of mercury and the characterization of different forms of mercury are discussed. Finally, the future direction for mercury detection is outlined, suggesting that nanomaterials may provide revolutionary tools in biomedical and environmental monitoring of mercury. PMID:22346707

  5. Comparative evaluation of adsorption kinetics of diclofenac and isoproturon by activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Torrellas, Silvia A; Rodriguez, Araceli R; Escudero, Gabriel O; Martín, José María G; Rodriguez, Juan G

    2015-01-01

    Adsorption mechanism of diclofenac and isoproturon onto activated carbon has been proposed using Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. Adsorption capacity and optimum adsorption isotherms were predicted by nonlinear regression method. Different kinetic equations, pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, intraparticle diffusion model and Bangham kinetic model, were applied to study the adsorption kinetics of emerging contaminants on activated carbon in two aqueous matrices. PMID:26301850

  6. Evaluation of the isosteric heat of adsorption at zero coverage for hydrogen on activated carbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dohnke, E.; Beckner, M.; Romanos, J.; Olsen, R.; Wexler, C.; Pfeifer, P.

    2011-03-01

    Activated carbons made from corn cob show promise as materials for high-capacity hydrogen storage. As part of our characterization of these materials, we are interested in learning how different production methods affect the adsorption energies. In this talk, we will show how hydrogen adsorption isotherms may be used to calculate these adsorption energies at zero coverage using Henry's law. We will additionally discuss differences between the binding energy and the isosteric heat of adsorption by applying this analysis at different temperatures.

  7. [Adsorption kinetics of reactive dyes on activated carbon fiber].

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Yue, Qin-Yan; Gao, Bao-Yu; Yang, Jing; Zheng, Yan

    2007-11-01

    The adsorption capability of activated carbon fiber (ACF) to four reactive dyes (reactive brilliant red K-2BP, reactive turquoise blue KN-G, reactive golden yellow K-3RP, reactive black KN-B) in aqueous solution was studied, and adsorption mechanism was focused on from kinetics point of view. The results show that the equilibrium adsorbing capacity (q(e)) of each dye increases with the addition of initial concentration or temperature. On the same condition, the order of q(e) is: reactive brilliant red > reactive golden yellow > reactive black > reactive turquoise blue. The adsorption processes follow a pseudo second-order kinetic rate equation, and the steric structure, size and polarity of dyes are important influence factors to initial adsorption rate. The adsorption activation energy of each dye is low (16.42, 3.56, 5.21, 26.38 kJ x mol(-1) respectively), which indicates that it belongs to physics adsorption.

  8. Tetraethylenepentamine embedded zeolite A for carbon dioxide adsorption.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Ki; Mo, Yong-Hwan; Lee, Jun; You, Hyo-Sang; Yi, Chang-Keun; Park, Young Cheol; Park, Sang-Eon

    2013-04-01

    Tetraethylenepentamine (TEPA) embedded zeolite A crystals were synthesized by using TEPA and the preformed zeolite A precursor under the microwave irradiation. The presence of TEPA in zeolite A crystal was confirmed by TG analysis and FTIR, Raman spectra. The CO2 adsorptive behavior of TEPA embedded zeolite A samples was investigated by CO2 isotherms measured at 25 degrees C comparing with zeolite A. The optimum CO2 sorption capacity was found in the case of 7.5% TEPA embedded zeolite A, which showed 3.75 mmol g(-1) where as the zeolite A showed less CO2 adsorption capacity of 2.88 mmol g(-1). The adsorption capacity of TEPA embedded Zeolite A was sustained up to 90% during 4 cycles of temperature swing adsorption (TSA) from 40 degrees C to 140 degrees C, indicating that the TEPA embedded Zeolite A was found to be useful as one of the application to solid amine adsorbent for CO2.

  9. Phytoremediation of mercury-contaminated soils by Jatropha curcas.

    PubMed

    Marrugo-Negrete, José; Durango-Hernández, José; Pinedo-Hernández, José; Olivero-Verbel, Jesús; Díez, Sergi

    2015-05-01

    Jatropha curcas plants species were tested to evaluate their phytoremediation capacity in soils contaminated by different levels of mercury. The experimental treatments consisted of four levels of mercury concentrations in the soil - T0, T1, T5, and T10 (0, 1, 5, and 10 μg Hg per g soil, respectively). The total mercury content absorbed by the different plant tissues (roots, stems and leaves) was determined during four months of exposure. The growth behavior, mercury accumulation, translocation (TF) and bioconcentration (BCF) factors were determined. The different tissues in J. curcas can be classified in order of decreasing accumulation Hg as follows: roots>leaves>stems. The highest cumulative absorption of the metal occurred between the second and third month of exposure. Maximum TF was detected during the second month and ranged from 0.79 to 1.04 for the different mercury concentrations. Values of BCF ranged from 0.21 to 1.43. Soils with T1 showed significantly higher BCF (1.43) followed by T10 (1.32) and T5 (0.91), all of them at the fourth month. On the other hand TFs were low (range 0.10-0.26) at the en of the experiment. The maximum reduction of biomass (16.3%) occurred for T10 (10 μg Hg g(-1)). In sum, J. curcas species showed high BCFs and low TFs, and their use could be a promising approach to remediating mercury-contaminated soils.

  10. Phytoremediation of mercury-contaminated soils by Jatropha curcas.

    PubMed

    Marrugo-Negrete, José; Durango-Hernández, José; Pinedo-Hernández, José; Olivero-Verbel, Jesús; Díez, Sergi

    2015-05-01

    Jatropha curcas plants species were tested to evaluate their phytoremediation capacity in soils contaminated by different levels of mercury. The experimental treatments consisted of four levels of mercury concentrations in the soil - T0, T1, T5, and T10 (0, 1, 5, and 10 μg Hg per g soil, respectively). The total mercury content absorbed by the different plant tissues (roots, stems and leaves) was determined during four months of exposure. The growth behavior, mercury accumulation, translocation (TF) and bioconcentration (BCF) factors were determined. The different tissues in J. curcas can be classified in order of decreasing accumulation Hg as follows: roots>leaves>stems. The highest cumulative absorption of the metal occurred between the second and third month of exposure. Maximum TF was detected during the second month and ranged from 0.79 to 1.04 for the different mercury concentrations. Values of BCF ranged from 0.21 to 1.43. Soils with T1 showed significantly higher BCF (1.43) followed by T10 (1.32) and T5 (0.91), all of them at the fourth month. On the other hand TFs were low (range 0.10-0.26) at the en of the experiment. The maximum reduction of biomass (16.3%) occurred for T10 (10 μg Hg g(-1)). In sum, J. curcas species showed high BCFs and low TFs, and their use could be a promising approach to remediating mercury-contaminated soils. PMID:25655698

  11. Accidental inhalation of mercury vapour: respiratory and toxicologic consequences.

    PubMed Central

    Lien, D. C.; Todoruk, D. N.; Rajani, H. R.; Cook, D. A.; Herbert, F. A.

    1983-01-01

    Four adults, including a pregnant woman, and three children were admitted to hospital following accidental exposure to mercury vapour produced by heating mercury-gold amalgam. Initial symptoms and signs included a paroxysmal cough, dyspnea, chest pain, tachypnea, nausea, vomiting, fever and leukocytosis. Pulmonary function testing performed on the second day after exposure revealed air-flow obstruction and minor restrictive defects in three patients. The diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide was reduced in two of these patients. The mean initial blood mercury level (+/- one standard deviation) for the seven patients was 30.8 +/- 1.5 micrograms/dl. A computer analysis showed mercury to behave as a two-compartment system, the compartments having half-lives of 2 and 8 days. The four adults received chelation therapy with D-penicillamine, which did not affect the urinary excretion of mercury. The pregnant woman's infant, born 26 days after exposure, had no detectable clinical abnormalities. The levels of mercury in the blood of the mother and infant at birth and 6 days later were comparable, indicating free transfer of the metal across the placenta. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 PMID:6883261

  12. MOLECULAR OXYGEN AND THE ADSORPTION OF PHENOLS - EFFECT OF FUNCTIONAL GROUPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study reveals that the presence of molecular oxygen (oxic conditions) has a significant impact on the exhibited adsorptive capacity of granular activated carbon (GAC) for several phenolic compounds. The increase in the GAC adsorptive capacity under oxic conditions results f...

  13. Modeling adsorption: Investigating adsorbate and adsorbent properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Charles Edwin

    1999-12-01

    Surface catalyzed reactions play a major role in current chemical production technology. Currently, 90% of all chemicals are produced by heterogeneously catalyzed reactions. Most of these catalyzed reactions involve adsorption, concentrating the substrate(s) (the adsorbate) on the surface of the solid (the adsorbent). Pore volumes, accessible surface areas, and the thermodynamics of adsorption are essential in the understanding of solid surface characteristics fundamental to catalyst and adsorbent screening and selection. Molecular properties such as molecular volumes and projected molecular areas are needed in order to convert moles adsorbed to surface volumes and areas. Generally, these molecular properties have been estimated from bulk properties, but many assumptions are required. As a result, different literature values are employed for these essential molecular properties. Calculated molar volumes and excluded molecular areas are determined and tabulated for a variety of molecules. Molecular dimensions of molecules are important in the understanding of molecular exclusion as well as size and shape selectivity, diffusion, and adsorbent selection. Molecular dimensions can also be used in the determination of the effective catalytic pore size of a catalyst. Adsorption isotherms, on zeolites, (crystalline mineral oxides) and amorphous solids, can be analyzed with the Multiple Equilibrium Analysis (MEA) description of adsorption. The MEA produces equilibrium constants (Ki), capacities (ni), and thermodynamic parameters (enthalpies, ΔHi, and entropies, ΔSi) of adsorption for each process. Pore volumes and accessible surface areas are calculated from the process capacities. Adsorption isotherms can also be predicted for existing and new adsorbate-adsorbent systems with the MEA. The results show that MEA has the potential of becoming a standard characterization method for microporous solids that will lead to an increased understanding of their behavior in gas

  14. Determination of binding capacity and adsorption enthalpy between Human Glutamate Receptor (GluR1) peptide fragments and kynurenic acid by surface plasmon resonance experiments. Part 2: Interaction of GluR1270-300 with KYNA.

    PubMed

    Csapó, E; Bogár, F; Juhász, Á; Sebők, D; Szolomájer, J; Tóth, G K; Majláth, Z; Vécsei, L; Dékány, I

    2015-09-01

    In the course of our previous work, the interactions of two peptide fragments (GluR1201-230 and GluR1231-259) of human glutamate receptor (GluR1201-300) polypeptide with kynurenic acid (KYNA) were investigated by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy. Besides quantitation of the interactions, the enthalpies of binding of KYNA on certain peptide fragment-modified gold surfaces were also reported. In the present work, a third peptide fragment (GluR1270-300) of the glutamate receptor was synthesized and its interaction with KYNA was investigated by an SPR technique. This 31-membered peptide was chemically bonded onto a gold-coated SPR chip via a cysteine residue. The peptide-functionalized biosensor chip was analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and theoretical calculations were performed on the structure and dimensions of the peptide on the gold surface. In order to determine the isosteric heat of adsorption of the binding of KYNA on the peptide-functionalized gold thin film, SPR experiments were carried out between +10°C and +40°C. The results on the GluR1270-300-KYNA system were compared with the previously published binding parameters of the interactions of GluR1201-230 and GluR1231-259 with KYNA. The binding abilities of KYNA with all three peptide fragments immobilized on the gold surface were estimated by a molecular docking procedure and the binding free energies of these AMPA receptor subunits with KYNA were determined.

  15. Microemulsion synthesis of hydroxyapatite nanomaterials and their adsorption behaviors for Cr3+ ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Y. L.; Wang, X. S.; Cui, H. H.; Mu, M. M.; Huang, F. Z.

    2016-05-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAP) nanoparticles with different morphologies, such as nanorods, nanospheres, and their mixtures were successfully synthesized by microemulsion method with soluble additive. Their adsorption capacity for Cr3+ ion was investigated. Most of the Cr3+ were absorbed by HAP within 60 min. The adsorption capacity of the HAP nanospheres was the best, and the maximum Cr3+ removal ratio was 96.4%, revealing that the metal ions adsorption by HAP is dependent on the morphology of its particles.

  16. The thief process for mercury removal from flue gas.

    PubMed

    Granite, Evan J; Freeman, Mark C; Hargis, Richard A; O'Dowd, William J; Pennline, Henry W

    2007-09-01

    The Thief Process is a cost-effective variation to activated carbon injection (ACI) for removal of mercury from flue gas. In this scheme, partially combusted coal from the furnace of a pulverized coal power generation plant is extracted by a lance and then re-injected into the ductwork downstream of the air preheater. Recent results on a 500-lb/h pilot-scale combustion facility show similar removals of mercury for both the Thief Process and ACI. The tests conducted to date at laboratory, bench, and pilot-scales demonstrate that the Thief sorbents exhibit capacities for mercury from flue gas streams that are comparable to those exhibited by commercially available activated carbons. A patent for the process was issued in February 2003. The Thief sorbents are cheaper than commercially-available activated carbons; exhibit excellent capacities for mercury; and the overall process holds great potential for reducing the cost of mercury removal from flue gas. The Thief Process was licensed to Mobotec USA, Inc. in May of 2005.

  17. The thief process for mercury removal from flue gas

    SciTech Connect

    Granite, E.J.; Freeman, M.C.; Hargis, R.A.; O'Dowd, W.J.; Pennline, H.W.

    2007-09-01

    The Thief Process is a cost-effective variation to activated carbon injection (ACI) for removal of mercury from flue gas. In this scheme, partially combusted coal from the furnace of a pulverized coal power generation plant is extracted by a lance and then re-injected into the ductwork downstream of the air preheater. Recent results on a 500-lb/h pilot-scale combustion facility show similar removals of mercury for both the Thief Process and ACI. The tests conducted to date at laboratory, bench, and pilot-scales demonstrate that the Thief sorbents exhibit capacities for mercury from flue gas streams that are comparable to those exhibited by commercially available activated carbons. A patent for the process was issued in February 2003. The Thief sorbents are cheaper than commercially-available activated carbons; exhibit excellent capacities for mercury; and the overall process holds great potential for reducing the cost of mercury removal from flue gas. The Thief Process was licensed to Mobotec USA, Inc. in May of 2005.

  18. Follow that mercury!

    SciTech Connect

    Linero, A.A.

    2008-07-01

    The article discusses one technology option for avoiding release of mercury captured by power plant pollution control equipment in order to render it usable in concrete. This is the use of selective catalytic reduction for NOx control and lime spray dryer absorbers (SDA) for SO{sub 2} control prior to particulate collection by fabric filters. In this scenario all mercury removed is trapped in the fabric filter baghouse. The US EPA did not establish mercury emission limits for existing cement plants in the latest regulation 40 CFR 63, Subpart LLL (December 2006) and was sued by the Portland Cement Association because of the Hg limits established for new kilns and by several states and environmental groups for the lack of limits on existing ones. A full version of this article is available on www.acaa-usa.org/AshatWork.htm. 2 figs.

  19. Mercury radar speckle dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holin, Igor V.

    2010-06-01

    Current data reveal that Mercury is a dynamic system with a core which has not yet solidified completely and is at least partially decoupled from the mantle. Radar speckle displacement experiments have demonstrated that the accuracy in spin-dynamics determination for Earth-like planets can approach 10 -5. The extended analysis of space-time correlation properties of radar echoes shows that the behavior of speckles does not prevent estimation of Mercury's instantaneous spin-vector components to accuracy of a few parts in 10 7. This limit can be reached with more powerful radar facilities and leads to constraining the interior in more detail from effects of spin dynamics, e.g., from observation of the core-mantle interplay through high precision monitoring of the 88-day spin-variation of Mercury's crust.

  20. Water displacement mercury pump

    DOEpatents

    Nielsen, M.G.

    1984-04-20

    A water displacement mercury pump has a fluid inlet conduit and diffuser, a valve, a pressure cannister, and a fluid outlet conduit. The valve has a valve head which seats in an opening in the cannister. The entire assembly is readily insertable into a process vessel which produces mercury as a product. As the mercury settles, it flows into the opening in the cannister displacing lighter material. When the valve is in a closed position, the pressure cannister is sealed except for the fluid inlet conduit and the fluid outlet conduit. Introduction of a lighter fluid into the cannister will act to displace a heavier fluid from the cannister via the fluid outlet conduit. The entire pump assembly penetrates only a top wall of the process vessel, and not the sides or the bottom wall of the process vessel. This insures a leak-proof environment and is especially suitable for processing of hazardous materials.

  1. Water displacement mercury pump

    DOEpatents

    Nielsen, Marshall G.

    1985-01-01

    A water displacement mercury pump has a fluid inlet conduit and diffuser, a valve, a pressure cannister, and a fluid outlet conduit. The valve has a valve head which seats in an opening in the cannister. The entire assembly is readily insertable into a process vessel which produces mercury as a product. As the mercury settles, it flows into the opening in the cannister displacing lighter material. When the valve is in a closed position, the pressure cannister is sealed except for the fluid inlet conduit and the fluid outlet conduit. Introduction of a lighter fluid into the cannister will act to displace a heavier fluid from the cannister via the fluid outlet conduit. The entire pump assembly penetrates only a top wall of the process vessel, and not the sides or the bottom wall of the process vessel. This insures a leak-proof environment and is especially suitable for processing of hazardous materials.

  2. Influence of the Sostanj coal-fired thermal power plant on mercury and methyl mercury concentrations in Lake Velenje, Slovenia

    PubMed

    Kotnik; Horvat; Mandic; Logar

    2000-10-01

    Lake Velenje is located in one of the most polluted regions in Slovenia, the Salek Valley. The major source of pollution in the valley is the coal-fired thermal power plant in Sostanj (STPP, capacity 775 MW). It has five separate units. All units have electrostatic precipitators for fly ash removal. Unit 4 also has installed a wet flue gas desulfurisation system (FGD system). Total mercury (THg) concentrations were measured in lignite, slag and ash samples from the STPP. In flue gas, different mercury species (THg, MeHg, Hg2+, Hg0) were determined separately for unit 4 and unit 5 which use different flue gas cleaning technology. Mercury and methyl mercury (MeHg) concentrations were also measured in lake water at different depths, in inflow water, outflow water, rain, snow and lake sediments in order to establish the influence of the power plant on the lake. Most mercury emitted from the power plant is in the elemental form. The ratio between oxidised and elemental Hg depends on the flue gas cleaning technology. Mass balance calculations have been performed for the STPP. The results show that the major sources of mercury in Lake Velenje are wet deposition and lake inflows. Total and MeHg concentrations in the water column are very low and can be compared to other non-contaminated freshwater lakes in the world.

  3. Biomass gasification chars for mercury capture from a simulated flue gas of coal combustion.

    PubMed

    Fuente-Cuesta, A; Diaz-Somoano, M; Lopez-Anton, M A; Cieplik, M; Fierro, J L G; Martínez-Tarazona, M R

    2012-05-15

    The combustion of coal can result in trace elements, such as mercury, being released from power stations with potentially harmful effects for both human health and the environment. Research is ongoing to develop cost-effective and efficient control technologies for mercury removal from coal-fired power plants, the largest source of anthropogenic mercury emissions. A number of activated carbon sorbents have been demonstrated to be effective for mercury retention in coal combustion power plants. However, more economic alternatives need to be developed. Raw biomass gasification chars could serve as low-cost sorbents for capturing mercury since they are sub-products generated during a thermal conversion process. The aim of this study was to evaluate different biomass gasification chars as mercury sorbents in a simulated coal combustion flue gas. The results were compared with those obtained using a commercial activated carbon. Chars from a mixture of paper and plastic waste showed the highest retention capacity. It was found that not only a high carbon content and a well developed microporosity but also a high chlorine content and a high aluminium content improved the mercury retention capacity of biomass gasification chars. No relationship could be inferred between the surface oxygen functional groups and mercury retention in the char samples evaluated. PMID:22325640

  4. Biomass gasification chars for mercury capture from a simulated flue gas of coal combustion.

    PubMed

    Fuente-Cuesta, A; Diaz-Somoano, M; Lopez-Anton, M A; Cieplik, M; Fierro, J L G; Martínez-Tarazona, M R

    2012-05-15

    The combustion of coal can result in trace elements, such as mercury, being released from power stations with potentially harmful effects for both human health and the environment. Research is ongoing to develop cost-effective and efficient control technologies for mercury removal from coal-fired power plants, the largest source of anthropogenic mercury emissions. A number of activated carbon sorbents have been demonstrated to be effective for mercury retention in coal combustion power plants. However, more economic alternatives need to be developed. Raw biomass gasification chars could serve as low-cost sorbents for capturing mercury since they are sub-products generated during a thermal conversion process. The aim of this study was to evaluate different biomass gasification chars as mercury sorbents in a simulated coal combustion flue gas. The results were compared with those obtained using a commercial activated carbon. Chars from a mixture of paper and plastic waste showed the highest retention capacity. It was found that not only a high carbon content and a well developed microporosity but also a high chlorine content and a high aluminium content improved the mercury retention capacity of biomass gasification chars. No relationship could be inferred between the surface oxygen functional groups and mercury retention in the char samples evaluated.

  5. Adsorption of herbicides using activated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Derbyshire, F.; Jagtoyan, M.; Lafferty, C.; Kimber, G.

    1996-10-01

    This work describes development of a series of novel activated carbon materials and their testing for possible water treatment applications by studying the adsorption of sodium pentachlorphenolate, PCP (a common herbicide/wood preservative). Although the application of activated carbons is an established technology for the treatment of public water supplies, there is a growing need for materials with higher selectivity and adsorptive capacities as well as high abrasion resistance. The materials that will be discussed include extruded wood-derived carbons with novel pore size distributions and high hardness, as well as activated carbon fiber composites. Comparisons will be made with commercial granular water treatment carbons.

  6. SO{sub 3} effect on mercury control

    SciTech Connect

    Jarvis, J.; Meserole, F.

    2008-01-15

    Utilities are counting on their flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubbers and selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems to control mercury as well as pollutants such as SO{sub 2} and NOx. As more stringent emission limits are phased in, utilities will likely need supplemental measures such as activated carbon injection (ACI) to further reduce emissions. However, SO{sub 3} could foul this strategy and potentially jeopardize the ability of some coal-fired power plants to meet future mercury emission limits. A growing consensus exists among emissions control engineers and researchers that the presence of SO{sub 3} in the flue gas from coal-fired boilers reduces the capacity of fly ash and/or activated carbon to adsorb gaseous mercury species. The impact of SO{sub 3}, which is actually a combination of SO{sub 3} and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} vapor, has been investigated on a fundamental level using approaches such as fixed-bed reactors and activated carbons. Pilot testing has provided mercury removal efficiency data on actual flue gas over a wide range of SO{sub 3} concentrations. If SO{sub 3} threatens the feasibility of low capital-cost approaches involving activated carbon, utilities will be forced to explore other more costly options. One example is the use of mercury catalytic oxidation to boost mercury removal efficiencies in wet scrubbers. However, catalytic oxidation of mercury using SCR catalysts may have unintended consequences. A better alternative may be to remove the SO{sub 3} so it does not interfere with the removal of mercury via the fly ash and/or activated carbon for example using sodium sorbents. The article outlines research projects on alternatives. 4 figs.

  7. Mercury's sodium exosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leblanc, F.; Johnson, R. E.

    2003-08-01

    Mercury's neutral sodium exosphere is simulated using a comprehensive 3D Monte Carlo model following sodium atoms ejected from Mercury's surface by thermal desorption, photon stimulated desorption, micro-meteoroid vaporization and solar wind sputtering. The evolution of the sodium surface density with respect to Mercury's rotation and its motion around the Sun is taken into account by considering enrichment processes due to surface trapping of neutrals and ions and depletion of the sodium available for ejection from the surfaces of grains. The change in the sodium exosphere is calculated during one Mercury year taking into account the variations in the solar radiation pressure, the photo-ionization frequency, the solar wind density, the photon and meteoroid flux intensities, and the surface temperature. Line-of-sight column densities at different phase angles, the supply rate of new sodium, average neutral and ion losses over a Mercury year, surface density distribution and the importance of the different processes of ejection are discussed in this paper. The sodium surface density distribution is found to become significantly nonuniform from day to night sides, from low to high latitudes and from morning to afternoon because of rapid depletion of sodium atoms in the surfaces of grains mainly driven by thermal depletion. The shape of the exosphere, as it would be seen from the Earth, changes drastically with respect to Mercury's heliocentric position. High latitude column density maxima are related to maxima in the sodium surface concentration at high latitudes in Mercury's surface and are not necessarily due to solar wind sputtering. The ratio between the sodium column density on the morning side of Mercury's exosphere and the sodium column density on the afternoon side is consistent with the conclusions of Sprague et al. (1997, Icarus 129, 506-527). The model, which has no fitting parameters, shows surprisingly good agreement with recent observations of Potter et