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Sample records for cape grim tasmania

  1. Organic nitrogen in rain and aerosol at Cape Grim, Tasmania, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mace, Kimberly A.; Duce, Robert A.; Tindale, Neil W.

    2003-06-01

    During the Southern Hemispheric spring of 2000 (during the months of November and early December), rain, bulk and size-separated aerosol samples were collected at the Cape Grim Baseline Air Pollution Station located on the island of Tasmania, Australia and analyzed for total organic nitrogen (N), urea, and dissolved free amino acids. Rain and bulk aerosol samples contained organic N at concentrations representing, on average, between 19 and 25% of total N. Urea was not detected in the six rain samples analyzed. However, urea represented ˜24% of the organic N contained in nonbaseline aerosol samples, and ˜2% of the organic N contained within baseline samples. Trajectory analysis combined with meteorological data indicated that high concentrations of urea within aerosols were mainly due to Tasmanian sources, likely animal emissions, although the application of urea fertilizers cannot be dismissed as a source. In nonbaseline samples the highest concentrations of urea were associated with the coarse mode aerosol (>1 μm), although urea was also found in the fine mode aerosol (<1 μm), potentially indicating gas-to-particle conversion of urea. Aerosol samples collected in marine air masses contained urea within an intermediate fraction centered at ˜1 μm suggesting the sea surface microlayer as a source. Dissolved free amino acids contributed ˜53% of the organic N in rain, but were not a significant proportion of the total organic N fraction in either nonbaseline or baseline aerosol samples. Due to their presence in rain, amino acids likely exist in aerosols as unhydrolyzed proteins. In cascade impactor samples highly influenced by marine sources, profiles for amino N were inversely related to urea N, possibly indicating live species and the sea surface microlayer as a source for organic N.

  2. Biomass burning emissions of trace gases and particles in marine air at Cape Grim, Tasmania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, S. J.; Keywood, M. D.; Galbally, I. E.; Gras, J. L.; Cainey, J. M.; Cope, M. E.; Krummel, P. B.; Fraser, P. J.; Steele, L. P.; Bentley, S. T.; Meyer, C. P.; Ristovski, Z.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2015-12-01

    Biomass burning (BB) plumes were measured at the Cape Grim Baseline Air Pollution Station during the 2006 Precursors to Particles campaign, when emissions from a fire on nearby Robbins Island impacted the station. Measurements made included non-methane organic compounds (NMOCs) (PTR-MS), particle number size distribution, condensation nuclei (CN) > 3 nm, black carbon (BC) concentration, cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) number, ozone (O3), methane (CH4), carbon monoxide (CO), hydrogen (H2), carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrous oxide (N2O), halocarbons and meteorology. During the first plume strike event (BB1), a 4 h enhancement of CO (max ~ 2100 ppb), BC (~ 1400 ng m-3) and particles > 3 nm (~ 13 000 cm-3) with dominant particle mode of 120 nm were observed overnight. A wind direction change lead to a dramatic reduction in BB tracers and a drop in the dominant particle mode to 50 nm. The dominant mode increased in size to 80 nm over 5 h in calm sunny conditions, accompanied by an increase in ozone. Due to an enhancement in BC but not CO during particle growth, the presence of BB emissions during this period could not be confirmed. The ability of particles > 80 nm (CN80) to act as CCN at 0.5 % supersaturation was investigated. The ΔCCN / ΔCN80 ratio was lowest during the fresh BB plume (56 ± 8 %), higher during the particle growth period (77 ± 4 %) and higher still (104 ± 3 %) in background marine air. Particle size distributions indicate that changes to particle chemical composition, rather than particle size, are driving these changes. Hourly average CCN during both BB events were between 2000 and 5000 CCN cm-3, which were enhanced above typical background levels by a factor of 6-34, highlighting the dramatic impact BB plumes can have on CCN number in clean marine regions. During the 29 h of the second plume strike event (BB2) CO, BC and a range of NMOCs including acetonitrile and hydrogen cyanide (HCN) were clearly enhanced and some enhancements in O3 were observed

  3. Biomass burning emissions of trace gases and particles in marine air at Cape Grim, Tasmania, 41° S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, S. J.; Keywood, M. D.; Galbally, I. E.; Gras, J. L.; Cainey, J. M.; Cope, M. E.; Krummel, P. B.; Fraser, P. J.; Steele, L. P.; Bentley, S. T.; Meyer, C. P.; Ristovski, Z.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2015-07-01

    Biomass burning (BB) plumes were measured at the Cape Grim Baseline Air Pollution Station during the 2006 Precursors to Particles campaign, when emissions from a fire on nearby Robbins Island impacted the station. Measurements made included non methane organic compounds (NMOCs) (PTR-MS), particle number size distribution, condensation nuclei (CN) > 3 nm, black carbon (BC) concentration, cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) number, ozone (O3), methane (CH4), carbon monixide (CO), hydrogen (H2), carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrous oxide (N2O), halocarbons and meteorology. During the first plume strike event (BB1), a four hour enhancement of CO (max ~ 2100 ppb), BC (~ 1400 ng m-3) and particles > 3 nm (~ 13 000 cm-3) with dominant particle mode of 120 nm were observed overnight. Dilution of the plume resulted in a drop in the dominant particle mode to 50 nm, and then growth to 80 nm over 5 h. This was accompanied by an increase in O3, suggesting that photochemical processing of air and condensation of low volatility oxidation products may be driving particle growth. The ability of particles > 80 nm (CN80) to act as CCN at 0.5 % supersaturation was investigated. The ΔCCN / ΔCN80 ratio was lowest during the fresh BB plume (56 %), higher during the particle growth event (77 %) and higher still (104 %) in background marine air. Particle size distributions indicate that changes to particle chemical composition, rather than particle size, are driving these changes. Hourly average CCN during both BB events were between 2000-5000 CCN cm-3, which were enhanced above typical background levels by a factor of 6-34, highlighting the dramatic impact BB plumes can have on CCN number in clean marine regions. During the 29 h of the second plume strike event (BB2) CO, BC and a range of NMOCs including acetonitrile and hydrogen cyanide (HCN) were clearly enhanced and some enhancements in O3 were observed (ΔO3 / ΔCO 0.001-0.074). A shortlived increase in NMOCs by a factor of 10 corresponded

  4. Quantifying Regional Greenhouse Gas Emissions of HFC-134a From Atmospheric Measurements at the Trinidad Head (California), Cape Grim (Tasmania) and Mace Head (Ireland) Remote AGAGE Sites.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, A. J.; Weiss, R. F.; Mühle, J.; Fraser, P. J.; Krummel, P. B.; O'Doherty, S.; Simmonds, P. G.

    2008-12-01

    Atmospheric measurement-based "top-down" approaches to emissions estimation provide a method of validating reported inventory-based "bottom-up" emissions assessments. At the AGAGE (Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment) measurement stations at Trinidad Head (THD) on the Northern California coast (41°N, 124°W), Cape Grim (CGM) on the northwestern tip of Tasmania (41°S, 145°E), and Mace Head (MHD) on the western coast of Ireland (53°N, 10°W), Medusa GC/MS and GC/ECD/FID instrumentation measure a wide range of trace gases in ambient air at high temporal resolution and high precision. Here, the western US, northwestern European and southern Australian emissions of the greenhouse gas (GHG) HFC-134a are estimated using the HFC-134a measurements, an atmospheric dispersion model (NAME), and an inversion methodology. NAME (Numerical Atmospheric dispersion Modelling Environment) is a Lagrangian atmospheric dispersion model that uses 3D meteorology from the UK Met Office numerical weather prediction model. Mid-latitude Northern and Southern Hemisphere baseline concentrations of HFC-134a are determined using NAME and statistical post- processing of the observations, and this baseline is used to generate a time series of "polluted" (above baseline) observations. In this application NAME is run backwards in time for ten days for each 3-hour interval in 1995-2008 for MHD, 2003-2008 for CGM and 2005-2008 for THD releasing thousands of model particles at each observing site. A map is then produced estimating all of the surface (0-100m) contributions within ten days of travel arriving at each site during each interval. The resulting matrix describes the dilution in concentration that occurs from a unit release from each grid as it travels to the measurement site. Iterative inversion modeling is then carried out to generate an emission estimate that provides the best statistical match between the modeled time series and the observations. Uncertainty in the emission

  5. Seismic stratigraphy or Cape Sorell Basin, Tasmania

    SciTech Connect

    Bellow, T.L.

    1990-05-01

    Because large new exploration areas have become scarce, the Cape Sorell basin has become an increasingly attractive frontier area. Cape Sorell basin, located along the western passive continental margin of Tasmania formed as a result of the breakup of eastern Gondwanaland 95{plus minus}5 Ma. An extensional fault system trending west-northwest with dip-slip movement down to the south-southwest forms the northern boundary and a second fault system trending north-northwest with oblique slip down to the south-southwest creates the basin. Second order extensional faults within the basin have created wrench-type flower structures, which are potential migration pathways for hydrocarbons. Nine distinct depositional sequences identified within the Cape Sorell basin record the evolution of this passive continental margin. Late Cretaceous-early Paleocene sequences were deposited as the rifting ceased and clastic progradation over the rift terrain began. Relative lowering of sea level occurred during the Paleocene, resulting in extensive channeling of the Late Cretaceous-early Paleocene sequences. A subsequent rise in relative sea level resulted in canyon-fill deposition during the early Paleocene to early Eocene. During the Eocene, sedimentation sufficiently increased to produce a downlapping sediment progradation characterized by deltaic depositional environment. Although interrupted several times by changes in relative sea level and shifting sediment sources, deltaic deposition continued until the late Oligocene. As the rate of clastic sedimentation slowed, carbonate shelf deposition began and has typified the basin since late the Oligocene.

  6. Characterisation of J(O1D) at Cape Grim 2000-2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, S. R.

    2015-07-01

    Estimates of the rate of production of excited oxygen atoms due to the photolysis of ozone (J(O1D)) have been derived from radiation measurements carried out at Cape Grim, Tasmania (40.6° S, 144.7° E). The individual measurements have a total uncertainty of 16 % (1σ). These estimates agree well with model estimates of clear-sky photolysis rates. Observations spanning 2000-2005 have been used to quantify the impact of season, clouds and ozone column amount. The annual cycle of J(O1D) has been investigated via monthly means. These means show an interannual variation (monthly standard deviation) of 9 %, but in midsummer and midwinter this reduces to 3-5 %. Variations in solar zenith angle and total column ozone explain 86 % of the observed variability in the measured photolysis rates. The impact of total column ozone, expressed as a radiation amplification factor (RAF), is found to be ~ 1.53, in agreement with model estimates. This ozone dependence explains 20 % of the variation observed at medium solar zenith angles (30-50°). The impact of clouds results in a median reduction of 30 % in J(O1D) for the same solar zenith angle range. Including estimates of cloudiness derived from long-wave radiation measurements resulted in a statistically significant fit to observations, but the quality of the fit did not increase significantly as measured by the adjusted R2.

  7. Aerosol Optical Depth at Cape Grim 1986 - 2014: What does it tell us?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Stephen

    2015-04-01

    The Cape Grim Baseline Air Pollution Station is located near the northwest tip of Tasmania (Australia), a site chosen to permit measurement of the atmospheric environment over the southern oceans. Atmospheric measurements began in the late 1970s, and observations of Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) using automated sunphotometers began in 1986. Since then, measurements have continued with a range of different instruments operating at a varying number of wavelengths. The site is challenging for these measurements as it is exposed to a sea-salt laden atmosphere, which presents both instrumental issues (corrosion) and measurement complications (salt fouling of the windows) in addition to the high frequency of cloud. The dataset has been processed to produce a record of half-hourly AOD for the period 1986 - 2014 and investigated for internal consistency. In general the AOD is small (around 0.05 at 500nm). The impact of the Mount Pinatubo eruption in 1991 can be clearly observed, along with a persistent annual cycle. This has been further analyzed fitting to all wavelengths measured to derive an averaged optical depth (at 500 nm) and some preliminary aerosol size distribution information.

  8. Long term fine aerosols at the Cape Grim global baseline station: 1998 to 2016

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, Jagoda; Cohen, David D.; Stelcer, Eduard; Atanacio, Armand J.

    2017-10-01

    When air masses were arriving from the baseline sector, the maximum concentration of aged sea salt was 1.3 μg/m3, compared to overall maximum of 4.9 μg/m3. For secondary sulfates and nitrates the maximum concentrations were 2.5 and 7.5 μg/m3 from the baseline sector and overall, respectively. While measurements at Cape Grim can be affected from long range transport from mainland Australia and some local Tasmanian sources, the average concentrations of anthropogenic sources are still considerably lower than those measured at more populated areas. For example, at Lucas Heights (located south-west of the Sydney central business district, with little local sources) the average concentrations of secondary sulfates/nitrates and aged sea air were 1.4 and 1.0 μg/m3, respectively; compared to average concentrations of 0.8 and 0.6 μg/m3, at Cape Grim. The average concentrations of smoke were compatible at the two sites. The impact of primary aerosols from vehicle exhaust at Cape Grim was limited and no corresponding fingerprint was resolved.

  9. Measurements of HCFC-142b and HCFC-141b in the Cape Grim air Archive: 1978-1993

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oram, D. E.; Reeves, C. E.; Penkett, S. A.; Fraser, P. J.

    Stored air samples collected at Cape Grim, Tasmania since 1978, have been analyzed by GC-MS to investigate the change in the tropospheric concentration of HCFC-142b and HCFC-141b over the past 15 years. Between April 1978 and September 1993 the concentration of HCFC-142b rose from 0.20±0.02 pptv to 3.0±0.3 pptv, with the majority of this increase occurring from 1989 onwards. By mid-1993 the rate of increase had reached 0.9±0.1 pptv/yr. From 1982 to 1991 the average concentration of HCFC-141b was 0.08±0.01 pptv. A very sharp increase in concentration began in 1992 however, such that it reached 0.46±0.05 pptv by September 1993. Using a 2-D model of atmospheric chemistry, constrained by these observations, global emissions of these two compounds have been calculated and found to differ from other estimates. This is partly due to the background concentration levels which existed prior to the start of the other estimated emissions.

  10. Observation of sea-salt fraction in sub-100 nm diameter particles at Cape Grim

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cravigan, Luke T.; Ristovski, Zoran; Modini, Robin L.; Keywood, Melita D.; Gras, John L.

    2015-03-01

    Volatility-hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer measurements were used to infer the composition of sub-100 nm diameter Southern Ocean marine aerosols at Cape Grim in November and December 2007. This study focuses on a short-lived high sea spray aerosol (SSA) event on 7-8 December with two externally mixed modes in the Hygroscopic Growth Factor (HGF) distributions (90% relative humidity (RH)), one at HGF > 2 and another at HGF~1.5. The particles with HGF > 2 displayed a deliquescent transition at 73-75% RH and were nonvolatile up to 280°C, which identified them as SSA particles with a large inorganic sea-salt fraction. SSA HGFs were 3-13% below those for pure sea-salt particles, indicating an organic volume fraction (OVF) of up to 11-46%. Observed high inorganic fractions in sub-100 nm SSA is contrary to similar, earlier studies. HGFs increased with decreasing particle diameter over the range 16-97 nm, suggesting a decreased OVF, again contrary to earlier studies. SSA comprised up to 69% of the sub-100 nm particle number, corresponding to concentrations of 110-290 cm-3. Air mass back trajectories indicate that SSA particles were produced 1500 km, 20-40 h upwind of Cape Grim. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray spectrometry measurements of sub-100 nm aerosols collected from the same location, and at the same time, displayed a distinct lack of sea salt. Results herein highlight the potential for biases in TEM analysis of the chemical composition of marine aerosols.

  11. No evidence for change of the atmospheric helium isotope composition since 1978 from re-analysis of the Cape Grim Air Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mabry, Jennifer C.; Lan, Tefang; Boucher, Christine; Burnard, Peter G.; Brennwald, Matthias S.; Langenfelds, Ray; Marty, Bernard

    2015-10-01

    The helium isotope composition of air might have changed since the industrial revolution due to the release of 4He-rich crustal helium during exploitation of fossil fuels. Thereby, variation of the atmospheric helium isotope ratio (3He/4He) has been proposed as a possible new atmospheric tracer of industrial activity. However, the magnitude of such change is debated, with possible values ranging from 0 to about 2 ‰ /yr (Sano et al., 1989; Hoffman and Nier, 1993; Pierson-Wickmann et al., 2001; Brennwald et al., 2013; Lupton and Evans, 2013). A new analytical facility for high precision (2‰, 2σ) analysis of the 3He/4He ratio of air has been developed at CRPG Nancy (France) capable of investigating permil level variations. Previously, Brennwald et al. (2013) analyzed a selection of air samples archived since 1978 at Cape Grim, Tasmania, by the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO). They reported a mean temporal decrease of the 3He/4He ratio of 0.23-0.30‰/yr. Re-analysis of aliquots of the same samples using the new high-precision instrument showed no significant temporal decrease of the 3He/4He ratio (0.0095 ± 0.033‰ /yr, 2σ) in the time interval 1978-2011. These new data constrain the mean He content of globally produced natural gas to about 0.034% or less, which is about 3× lower than commonly quoted.

  12. Correlating the Late Mesoproterozoic Unkar Group, Grand Canyon, Arizona with the upper Rocky Cape Group, western Tasmania: A sedimentary record of a southwest Laurentia-East Antarctica connection in Rodinia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulder, Jacob; Karlstrom, Karl; Halpin, Jacqueline; Meffre, Sebastien; Gehrels, George; Pecha, Mark

    2017-04-01

    A major challenge facing paleogeographic reconstructions of the Late Mesoproterozoic supercontinent Rodinia is identifying the extension of the Grenville orogen in continents formerly adjacent to western Laurentia (Proterozoic North America). Many paleogeographic reconstructions of Rodinia link exposures of the Grenville orogen in southern Laurentia to Late Mesoproterozoic orogens in central Australia or in the Transantarctic Mountains of East Antarctica. The Grenville Orogeny in southern Laurentia was accompanied by regionally extensive sedimentation in the interior of the continent, represented by a series of Late Mesoproterozoic basins throughout southwest Laurentia. The Late Mesoproterozoic basin system of southwest Laurentia is truncated by the Neoproterozoic rifted margin of western Laurentia produced during the breakup of Rodinia. Remnants of this basin system could be exposed on continents formerly adjacent to western Laurentia and may therefore be an important 'piercing point' for refining paleogeographic reconstructions of Rodinia. In this contribution, we identify a possible fragment of the Late Mesoproterozoic basin system of southwest Laurentia represented by the upper Rocky Cape Group of western Tasmania, Australia. We test the correlation between Late Mesoproterozoic strata in southwest Laurentia and western Tasmania through new field observations and detrital zircon U-Pb-Hf isotopic data from exposures of the Unkar Group (Grand Canyon, Arizona) and the upper Rocky Cape Group. The stratigraphy of the Unkar Group and upper Rocky Cape Group are remarkably similar with both successions comprising a lower subdivision of stromatolitic dolomite and siltstone overlain by quartz arenite with soft-sediment deformation features. Detrital zircons age distributions from the Unkar and upper Rocky Cape Groups are both characterized by large age peaks at 1600—1800 Ma, prominent 1450 Ma peaks, abundant 1400—1300 Ma ages, and youngest peaks at ca. 1220 Ma. The

  13. GRIM: General Relativistic Implicit Magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Mani; Foucart, Francois; Gammie, Charles F.

    2017-02-01

    GRIM (General Relativistic Implicit Magnetohydrodynamics) evolves a covariant extended magnetohydrodynamics model derived by treating non-ideal effects as a perturbation of ideal magnetohydrodynamics. Non-ideal effects are modeled through heat conduction along magnetic field lines and a difference between the pressure parallel and perpendicular to the field lines. The model relies on an effective collisionality in the disc from wave-particle scattering and velocity-space (mirror and firehose) instabilities. GRIM, which runs on CPUs as well as on GPUs, combines time evolution and primitive variable inversion needed for conservative schemes into a single step using only the residuals of the governing equations as inputs. This enables the code to be physics agnostic as well as flexible regarding time-stepping schemes.

  14. Eddies off Tasmania

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This true-color satellite image shows a large phytoplankton bloom, several hundred square kilometers in size, in the Indian Ocean off the west coast of Tasmania. In this scene, the rich concentration of microscopic marine plants gives the water a lighter, more turquoise appearance which helps to highlight the current patterns there. Notice the eddies, or vortices in the water, that can be seen in several places. It is possible that these eddies were formed by converging ocean currents flowing around Tasmania, or by fresh river runoff from the island, or both. Often, eddies in the sea serve as a means for stirring the water, thus providing nutrients that help support phytoplankton blooms, which in turn provide nutrition for other organisms. Effectively, these eddies help feed the sea (click to read an article on this topic). This image was acquired November 7, 2000, by the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) flying aboard the Orbview-2 satellite. Tasmania is located off Australia's southeastern coast. Image courtesy SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE

  15. Eddies off Tasmania

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This true-color satellite image shows a large phytoplankton bloom, several hundred square kilometers in size, in the Indian Ocean off the west coast of Tasmania. In this scene, the rich concentration of microscopic marine plants gives the water a lighter, more turquoise appearance which helps to highlight the current patterns there. Notice the eddies, or vortices in the water, that can be seen in several places. It is possible that these eddies were formed by converging ocean currents flowing around Tasmania, or by fresh river runoff from the island, or both. Often, eddies in the sea serve as a means for stirring the water, thus providing nutrients that help support phytoplankton blooms, which in turn provide nutrition for other organisms. Effectively, these eddies help feed the sea (click to read an article on this topic). This image was acquired November 7, 2000, by the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) flying aboard the Orbview-2 satellite. Tasmania is located off Australia's southeastern coast. Image courtesy SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE

  16. Tasmania in Nuna: Witness to a ~1.4 Ga East Antarctica-Laurentia Connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halpin, J. A.; Mulder, J. A.; Daczko, N. R.

    2015-12-01

    Most recent reconstructions of the supercontinent Nuna juxtapose the North Australian craton, Mawson continent (South Australia-East Antarctica), and Laurentia between 1.6 Ga and 1.3 Ga, but differ in their relative positioning. Tasmania (SE Australia) has not been considered in previous Nuna reconstructions. Prior to late Neoproterozoic rifting, this crustal fragment was likely part of the eastern margin of East Antarctica. The significance of Tasmania's position within Nuna has recently been highlighted with the discovery that the majority of a >10-km-thick marine shelfal package exposed in northwest Tasmania (Rocky Cape Group) was deposited between 1.45 and 1.30 Ga. The detrital zircon signatures of these strata are distinct from other Mesoproterozoic basins in Australia, and instead closely resemble time-equivalent upper parts of the Belt-Purcell Basin of Laurentia, suggesting correlations within Nuna. We investigate the provenance of the Rocky Cape Group quartzites by comparing new detrital zircon U-Pb-Hf isotopic data to an extensive compilation of zircon data from Australia, East Antarctica, and Laurentia. Our analysis demonstrates that the Rocky Cape Group is unlikely to have been sourced from any geological terrane exposed in present-day Australia. Instead, zircon isotopic signatures from basement terranes in Laurentia and East Antarctica show striking similarities to the Rocky Cape Group detrital signature. Paleocurrent data indicate a northwest-southeast-trending paleoshoreline
and suggest that the majority of sediment was sourced from Paleoproterozoic crust in SW Laurentia, which was to the southeast (present-day coordinates) of Tasmania. These new data support a SWEAT-like (southwest United States-East Antarctica) configuration for Nuna. We suggest that rifting propagated southward from ca. 1.4 Ga, leaving a thinned continental connection between East Antarctica and southwest Laurentia onto which the lower-middle RCG was deposited prior to 1.3 Ga.

  17. Soil Security Assessment of Tasmania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, Damien; Kidd, Darren; McBratney, Alex

    2017-04-01

    The concept of soil security aligns well with the aspirational and marketing policies of the Tasmanian Government, where increased agricultural expansion through new irrigation schemes and multiple-use State managed production forests co-exists beside pristine World Heritage conservation land, a major drawcard of the economically important tourism industry . Regarding the Sustainable Development Gaols (SDG's) this could be seen as a exemplar of the emerging tool for quantification of spatial soil security to effectively protect our soil resource in terms of food (SDG 2.4, 3.9) and water security (SDG 6.4, 6.6), biodiversity maintenance and safeguarding fragile ecosystems (SDG 15.3, 15.9). The recent development and application of Digital Soil Mapping and Assessment capacities in Tasmania to stimulate agricultural production and better target appropriate soil resources has formed the foundational systems that can enable the first efforts in quantifying and mapping Tasmanian Soil Security, in particular the five Soil Security dimensions (Capability, Condition, Capital, Codification and Connectivity). However, to provide a measure of overall soil security, it was necessary to separately assess the State's three major soil uses; Agriculture, Conservation and Forestry. These products will provide an indication of where different activities are sustainable or at risk, where more soil data is needed, and provide a tool to better plan for a State requiring optimal food and fibre production, without depleting its natural soil resources and impacting on the fragile ecosystems supporting environmental benefits and the tourism industry.

  18. grim: A Flexible, Conservative Scheme for Relativistic Fluid Theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Mani; Foucart, Francois; Gammie, Charles F.

    2017-03-01

    Hot, diffuse, relativistic plasmas such as sub-Eddington black-hole accretion flows are expected to be collisionless, yet are commonly modeled as a fluid using ideal general relativistic magnetohydrodynamics (GRMHD). Dissipative effects such as heat conduction and viscosity can be important in a collisionless plasma and will potentially alter the dynamics and radiative properties of the flow from that in ideal fluid models; we refer to models that include these processes as Extended GRMHD. Here we describe a new conservative code, grim, that enables all of the above and additional physics to be efficiently incorporated. grim combines time evolution and primitive variable inversion needed for conservative schemes into a single step using an algorithm that only requires the residuals of the governing equations as inputs. This algorithm enables the code to be physics agnostic as well as flexibility regarding time-stepping schemes. grim runs on CPUs, as well as on GPUs, using the same code. We formulate a performance model and use it to show that our implementation runs optimally on both architectures. grim correctly captures classical GRMHD test problems as well as a new suite of linear and nonlinear test problems with anisotropic conduction and viscosity in special and general relativity. As tests and example applications, we resolve the shock substructure due to the presence of dissipation, and report on relativistic versions of the magneto-thermal instability and heat flux driven buoyancy instability, which arise due to anisotropic heat conduction, and of the firehose instability, which occurs due to anisotropic pressure (i.e., viscosity). Finally, we show an example integration of an accretion flow around a Kerr black hole, using Extended GRMHD.

  19. Cape Barren English. Linguistic Communications: Working Papers of the Linguistic Society of Australia, No. 13.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton, Peter

    Cape Barren English is clearly the most aberrant dialect of English spoken in Australia. Descended from English sealers, whalers and ex-convicts and their Aboriginal wives, the inhabitants of Cape Barren Island, Tasmania, have lived in relative isolation for the last 150 years or more. Their dialect is not a creolized pidgin; it has a number of…

  20. Francisella tularensis Subspecies holarctica, Tasmania, Australia, 2011

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Justin; McGregor, Alistair; Cooley, Louise; Ng, Jimmy; Brown, Mitchell; Ong, Chong Wei; Darcy, Catharine

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of ulceroglandular tularemia that developed in a woman after she was bitten by a ringtail possum (Pseudocheirus peregrinus) in a forest in Tasmania, Australia. Francisella tularensis subspecies holarctica was identified. This case indicates the emergence of F. tularensis type B in the Southern Hemisphere. PMID:22931809

  1. Cape Cod

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  Cape Cod, Massachusetts     View Larger ... Pilgrims landed, is located on the west side of Cape Cod Bay, shown in this Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) ... Terra orbit 1708. South of the distinctively-shaped Cape Cod are Nantucket Island and Martha's Vineyard. Further west is Block Island, ...

  2. Cape Cod

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  Winter in Cape Cod     View Larger Image Cape Cod extends over 50 miles into the Atlantic Ocean. Its rugged coastline, ... February 18, 2001 - Snow and thin clouds over Cape Cod. project:  MISR category:  gallery ...

  3. Scorched earth strategy: Grim Reaper saves the plant.

    PubMed

    Wrzaczek, Michael; Brosché, Mikael; Kangasjärvi, Jaakko

    2009-07-01

    Programmed cell death is a common feature of developmental processes and responses to environmental cues in many multicellular organisms. Examples of programmed cell death in plants are leaf abscission in autumn and the hypersensitive response during pathogen attack. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in the regulation of various types of cell death. However, the precise mechanics of the involvement of ROS in the processes leading to initiation of cell death and subsequent containment are currently unknown. We recently showed the involvement of an Arabidopsis protein GRIM REAPER in the regulation of ROS-induced cell death under stress conditions. Our results indicated that the presence of a truncated protein primes plants for cell death in the presence of ROS leading to ozone sensitivity and increased resistance to hemibiotrophic pathogens.

  4. GRIM-19 mutations fail to inhibit v-Src-induced oncogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kalakonda, S; Nallar, S C; Lindner, D J; Sun, P; Lorenz, R R; Lamarre, E; Reddy, S P; Kalvakolanu, D V

    2014-06-12

    The non-receptor tyrosine kinase Src is a major player in multiple physiological responses including growth, survival and differentiation. Overexpression and/or oncogenic mutation in the Src gene have been documented in human tumors. The v-Src protein is an oncogenic mutant of Src, which promotes cell survival, migration, invasion and division. GRIM-19 is an antioncogene isolated using a genome-wide knockdown screen. Genes associated with Retinoid-IFN-induced Mortality (GRIM)-19 binds to transcription factor STAT3 and ablates its pro-oncogenic effects while v-Src activates STAT3 to promote its oncogenic effects. However, we found that GRIM-19 inhibits the pro-oncogenic effects of v-Src independently of STAT3. Here, we report the identification of functionally inactivating GRIM-19 mutations in a set of head and neck cancer patients. While wild-type GRIM-19 strongly ablated v-Src-induced cell migration, cytoskeletal remodeling and tumor metastasis, the tumor-derived mutants (L(71)P, L(91)P and A(95)T) did not. These mutants were also incapable of inhibiting the drug resistance of v-Src-transformed cells. v-Src downregulated the expression of Pag1, a lipid raft-associated inhibitor of Src, which was restored by wild-type GRIM-19. The tumor-derived mutant GRIM-19 proteins failed to upregulate Pag1. These studies show a novel mechanism that deregulates Src activity in cancer cells.

  5. Mitochondrial GRIM-19 as a potential therapeutic target for STAT3-dependent carcinogenesis of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiaodong; Bao, Liming; Huang, Daochao; Song, Lihua; Li, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant STAT3 activation occurs in most human gastric cancers (GCs) and contributes to the malignant progression of GC, but mechanism(s) underlying aberrant STAT3 remain largely unknown. Here we demonstrated that the gene associated with retinoid interferon-induced mortality 19 (GRIM-19) was severely depressed or lost in GC and chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG) tissues and its loss contributed to GC tumorigenesis partly by activating STAT3 signaling. In primary human GC tissues, GRIM-19 was frequently depressed or lost and this loss correlated with advanced clinical stage, lymph node metastasis, H. pylori infection and poor overall survival of GC patients. In CAG tissues, GRIM-19 was progressively decreased along with its malignant transformation. Functionally, we indentified an oncogenic role of GRIM-19 loss in promoting GC tumorigenesis. Ectopic GRIM-19 expression suppressed GC tumor formation in vitro and in vivo by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Moreover, we revealed that GRIM-19 inhibited STAT3 transcriptional activation and its downstream targets by reducing STAT3 nuclear distribution. Conversely, knockdown of GRIM-19 induced aberrant STAT3 activation and accelerated GC cell growth in vitro and in vivo, and this could be partly attenuated by the blockage of STAT3 activation. In addition, we observed subcellular redistributions of GRIM-19 characterized by peri-nuclear aggregates, non-mitochondria cytoplasmic distribution and nuclear invasion, which should be responsible for reduced STAT3 nuclear distribution. Our studies suggest that mitochondrial GRIM-19 could not only serve as an valuable prognostic biomarker for GC development, but also as a potential therapeutic target for STAT3-dependent carcinogenesis of GC. PMID:27167343

  6. Late cainozoic glaciation in western tasmania, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colhoun, Eric A.; Fitzsimons, Sean J.

    Four major Quaternary glaciations, with associated interglaciations and interstadials, have been identified in Tasmania, for which some chronological cotrol is given by radiocarbon and amino-acid assays, pollen analysis and relative weathering characteristics. The glaciations are known as the Margaret, Henty, Moore and Linda. The Margaret Glaciations has two clear stadial intervals (Isotope Stages 4 and 2), separated by the Tullabardine Interstadial dated at ca. 50-25 ka BP. An interglaciation corresponding to Isotope Stage 5 (Pieman Interglaciation) is characterised by sediments containing a pollen assemblage of a temperate rain forest. Weathered glacial deposits lying beneath the Pieman sediments are inferred to be those of the Penultimate Glaciation; three stadial moraines are identified. A preceding interglaciation (Langdon) contains wood that yielded an amino-acid ratio equivalent to the age of marine Isotope Stage 7. The following Moore Glaciation had three stadial intervals, two of which are separated by a clear interstadial (Baxter) with organic sediments that have amino-acid 'ages' equivalent to Isotope Stage 10; the non-glacial sediments have a DRM of normal polarity and are inferred to be of Mid-Quaternary age. The oldest interglaciation (Regency) is identified from organic-rich sediments (pollen assemblage of a temperate rain forest) overlying intensely weathered glacial deposits that have a DRM with reversed polarity (i.e. > 730 ka). The Linda Glaciation is the most extensive of all in Tasmania; although dating is uncertain, it has been assigned tentatively to the Early Quaternary.

  7. Cape Verde.

    PubMed

    1986-10-01

    This summary background paper for the Cape Verde Islands, by the U.S. State Department, includes geography, people, history, government, politics, economy and foreign relations. Cape Verde, located 650 km west of Senegal, has 10 volcanic islands inhabited by 339,000 people of combined African and Portuguese descent. The annual growth rate is 1.4%, although numbers of Cape Verdeans emigrate or work abroad. Per capita income is about $350; resources include volcanic rock, fish, salt, ship repair and light industry, subsistence and tropical agricultural products, although there has been a drought since 1968. Cape Verde has been independent since 1975. There is one political party, and a constitutional government. The country is nonaligned, and is on good terms with many other nations, accepting foreign aid from several sources. A significant proportion of the GNP derives from Cape Verde nationals working abroad.

  8. Modelling the shelf circulation off eastern Tasmania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, Eric C. J.; Herzfeld, Mike; Holbrook, Neil J.

    2016-11-01

    The marine waters across Tasmanian's eastern continental shelf are biologically productive and home to economically important fisheries and aquaculture industries. However, the marine climate there is poorly understood. We use a high-resolution (∼2 km in the horizontal), three-dimensional ocean model for eastern Tasmania (ETAS) to examine the simulated mean state and seasonal cycle of temperature, salinity and three-dimensional flow field, and the evaluation of daily model outputs against in situ and remote observations for the 1993-2014 period. We also use the model to examine the roles of river input and tidal forcing. The model is evaluated against remotely-sensed sea surface temperature and in-situ observations of sea level and subsurface temperature, salinity, and currents. The mean state demonstrates the influence of two well-known boundary currents (the East Australian Current, EAC, and the Zeehan Current, ZC) as well as the effects of local freshwater input from river runoff. The EAC is dominant in summer and the ZC in winter; the influence of the EAC also increases northwards and in the offshore direction. In addition, the model indicates the presence of a semi-permanent subsurface (50-100 m depth) northward flow trapped near the coast. Cool freshwater runoff from the Derwent and Huon Rivers directly impacts the temperature and salinity in their estuaries but has little influence further across the shelf. Tidal forcing impacts the mean state through tide-river interactions which flush Frederick Henry Bay and Norfolk Bay with freshwater. Tidal forcing also impacts the variability of temperature all along the coastline, most likely due to changes in the turbulent mixing near to the coast. The ETAS model output data are available as a high-resolution representation of the mean state, seasonal variations, and interannual variability of Tasmania's eastern continental shelf marine climate.

  9. Implementation of Total Asset Management at the University of Tasmania.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Matt

    2002-01-01

    Describes the implementation of total asset management (TAM) at the University of Tasmania to better link physical resources management with the university's strategic planning. Discusses TAM's principles, objectives, and future direction. (EV)

  10. Characterizing the semidiurnal internal tide off Tasmania using glider data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boettger, Daniel; Robertson, Robin; Rainville, Luc

    2015-05-01

    The spatial structure of the semidiurnal internal tide in the vicinity of Tasmania is characterized using temperature and salinity data from Seaglider and Slocum glider deployments. Wavelet analysis of isopycnal displacements measured by the gliders was used to isolate the semidiurnal internal tide, with a solid signal observed both to the east and to the south of Tasmania. The signal south of Tasmania was attributed to local forcing, while that to the east of Tasmania was found to have propagated from the south east to the north west—a result which supports previous studies indicating the presence of an internal tidal beam originating over the Macquarie Ridge, south of New Zealand. Displacement amplitudes were observed to be amplified in the vicinity of the continental slope, with the incoming tidal beam shown to be both reflected and scattered on the continental slope and shelf, and energy transferred to higher modes.

  11. Implementation of Total Asset Management at the University of Tasmania.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Matt

    2002-01-01

    Describes the implementation of total asset management (TAM) at the University of Tasmania to better link physical resources management with the university's strategic planning. Discusses TAM's principles, objectives, and future direction. (EV)

  12. Suit - Cape

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1962-02-05

    S62-00249 (1962) --- View of astronaut John H. Glenn Jr. being fitted with gloves for his spacesuit during preflight training activities at Cape Canaveral, Florida. Glenn is assisted by suit technician Joe Schmitt. Photo credit: NASA

  13. 3-D Teleseismic Tomography of the Crust and Upper Mantle Beneath Northern Tasmania, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawlinson, N.; Kennett, B. L.; Reading, A. M.

    2004-12-01

    The TIGGER project is a multi-faceted seismic study of Tasmania and southern Victoria (SE Australia) undertaken by the Australian National University in 2001/2002. As part of this project, an array of 72 short period and broadband seismic recorders with a nominal spacing of 15 km was deployed across northern Tasmania for a period of five months. To date, nearly 6,000 relative arrival times from 100 earthquakes have been picked using a newly developed and robust adaptive stacking technique. The azimuthal coverage of teleseisms is generally good, with many events to the north and east (e.g.~Indonesia, Papua New Guinea, New Zealand, Fiji), although fewer from the south and west(e.g.~South Sandwich Islands, mid- Indian ridge). A new iterative non-linear tomographic inversion procedure based on the fast marching method (FMM), a grid based eikonal solver, and a subspace inversion scheme, is used to map traveltime residual patterns as P-wave velocity anomalies from an ak135 reference model. The 3-D model volume beneath the array is parameterized using cubic B-spline functions in spherical coordinates; a total of nearly 10,000 vertices at approximately 15 km grid spacing is used to describe the TIGGER model. Preliminary tomographic results from the TIGGER experiment show significant lateral variations in P-wave velocity structure within the Tasmanian lithosphere. Geological inferences made from these early results include: (1) Within the crust, the first-order E-W velocity variations strongly support the idea that eastern Tasmania is underlain by dense rocks with an oceanic crustal affinity, contrasting with the continentally derived lower crustal rocks of western Tasmania; (2) the Tamar Fracture System, often defined as a lithospheric scale discontinuity, probably does not exist; (3) the elevated crustal velocities beneath the Rocky Cape Group and Arthur Lineament, compared to the Tyennan Element and Mt. Read Volcanics to the east, also support a mafic

  14. Structural analysis of a functional DIAP1 fragment bound to grim and hid peptides.

    PubMed

    Wu, J W; Cocina, A E; Chai, J; Hay, B A; Shi, Y

    2001-07-01

    The inhibitor of apoptosis protein DIAP1 suppresses apoptosis in Drosophila, with the second BIR domain (BIR2) playing an important role. Three proteins, Hid, Grim, and Reaper, promote apoptosis, in part by binding to DIAP1 through their conserved N-terminal sequences. The crystal structures of DIAP1-BIR2 by itself and in complex with the N-terminal peptides from Hid and Grim reveal that these peptides bind a surface groove on DIAP1, with the first four amino acids mimicking the binding of the Smac tetrapeptide to XIAP. The next 3 residues also contribute to binding through hydrophobic interactions. Interestingly, peptide binding induces the formation of an additional alpha helix in DIAP1. Our study reveals the structural conservation and diversity necessary for the binding of IAPs by the Drosophila Hid/Grim/Reaper and the mammalian Smac proteins.

  15. Sidereal variations deep underground in Tasmania

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humble, J. E.; Fenton, A. G.; Fenton, K. B.

    1985-01-01

    Data from the deep underground vertically directed muon telescopes at Poatina, Tasmania, have been used since 1972 for a number of investigations, including the daily intensity variations, atmospheric influences, and checking for possible effects due to the interplanetary magnetic field. These telescopes have a total sensitive area of only 3 square meters, with the result that the counting rate is low (about 1680 events per hour) and the statistical errors on the results are rather large. Consequently, it was decided several years ago to construct larger detectors for this station. The first of these telescopes has been in operation for two complete years, and the results from it are presented. Results from the new, more stable equipment at Poatina appear to confirm the existence of a first harmonic in the daily variations in sidereal time reported earlier, and are consistent with small or non-existent first harmonics in solar and anti-sidereal time. All the second harmonics appear to be small, if not zero at these energies.

  16. Cape Verde

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    This Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity Pancam 'super resolution' mosaic of the approximately 6 m (20 foot) high cliff face of the Cape Verde promontory was taken by the rover from inside Victoria Crater, during the rover's descent into Duck Bay. Super-resolution is an imaging technique which utilizes information from multiple pictures of the same target in order to generate an image with a higher resolution than any of the individual images. Cape Verde is a geologically rich outcrop and is teaching scientists about how rocks at Victoria crater were modified since they were deposited long ago. This image complements super resolution mosaics obtained at Cape St. Mary and Cape St. Vincent and is consistent with the hypothesis that Victoria crater is located in the middle of what used to be an ancient sand dune field. Many rover team scientists are hoping to be able to eventually drive the rover closer to these layered rocks in the hopes of measuring their chemistry and mineralogy.

    This is a Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity Panoramic Camera image mosaic acquired on sols 1342 and 1356 (November 2 and 17, 2007), and was constructed from a mathematical combination of 64 different blue filter (480 nm) images.

  17. Cape Verde.

    PubMed

    1989-11-01

    The Republic of Cape Verde has an area of 1,5557 square miles, a population of 364,207, and a growth rate of 2.02%/year. Rugged volcanic islands comprise the terrain and the climate is dry and temperate. The ethnic groups consist of Creole, a mix of African and Portuguese, African, and European. The religions are Roman Catholic and Protestant, and the languages are Portuguese and Crioulo. The infant mortality rate is 11/100 and life expectancy is 61 years. The government consists of a republic with a president, a council of ministers, and a national assembly. The gross national product is $193.5 million with a 6.8% growth rate. They have natural resources of salt, pozzolana, and limestone; agricultural products are bananas, corn, beans, sugarcane, coffee, fruits, vegetables, and livestock. The main industries are fishing, salt, construction, building, materials ship repair, clothing, shoes, furniture, metal products and beverages. In 1462 Portuguese settled in Cape Verde, in 1951 the colony became a province, and in 1975 Cape Verde became an independent republic. The government is neutral and seeks cooperative relations from many states. The US has had a long and cordial relation with Cape Verde, and assists in economic and social development.

  18. Cape Verde

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    This Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity Pancam 'super resolution' mosaic of the approximately 6 m (20 foot) high cliff face of the Cape Verde promontory was taken by the rover from inside Victoria Crater, during the rover's descent into Duck Bay. Super-resolution is an imaging technique which utilizes information from multiple pictures of the same target in order to generate an image with a higher resolution than any of the individual images. Cape Verde is a geologically rich outcrop and is teaching scientists about how rocks at Victoria crater were modified since they were deposited long ago. This image complements super resolution mosaics obtained at Cape St. Mary and Cape St. Vincent and is consistent with the hypothesis that Victoria crater is located in the middle of what used to be an ancient sand dune field. Many rover team scientists are hoping to be able to eventually drive the rover closer to these layered rocks in the hopes of measuring their chemistry and mineralogy.

    This is a Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity Panoramic Camera image mosaic acquired on sols 1342 and 1356 (November 2 and 17, 2007), and was constructed from a mathematical combination of 64 different blue filter (480 nm) images.

  19. Marginal selenium status in northern Tasmania.

    PubMed

    Beckett, Jeffrey M; Ball, Madeleine J

    2011-09-01

    Se plays many important roles in humans. Marginal Se status has been associated with adverse health effects including an increased risk of chronic disease such as cancer. There are few Australian data, but the population of Tasmania, Australia, is potentially at risk of marginal Se status. A cross-sectional study of 498 men and women aged 25-84 years was undertaken to assess the Se status of the northern Tasmanian population. Se status was assessed using dietary estimates and measures of serum Se and glutathione peroxidase (GPx). Mean Se intakes were 77·4 (sd 31·3) and 65·1 (sd 23·7) μg/d for men and women, respectively; 27 % of the subjects consumed less than the Australian/New Zealand estimated average requirement. Mean serum Se concentration was 89·1 (sd 15·1) μg/l; 83 % of the study subjects had serum Se concentrations below 100 μg/l and 60 % had serum Se concentration below 90 μg/l, suggesting that Se status in many subjects was inadequate for maximal GPx activity. This was supported by the positive association between serum Se and serum GPx (P < 0·001), indicating that enzyme activity was limited by Se concentrations. The lowest mean serum Se concentrations were observed in the oldest age ranges; however, the prevalence of marginal Se status was similar across age ranges and did not appear to be influenced by sex or socio-economic status. The prevalence of marginal Se status was high in all sex and age subgroups, suggesting that the northern Tasmanian population could benefit from increasing Se intakes.

  20. An outbreak of norovirus linked to oysters in Tasmania.

    PubMed

    Lodo, Kerryn L; Veitch, Mark G K; Green, Michelle L

    2014-03-31

    Norovirus is the most commonly reported virus in shellfish related gastroenteritis outbreaks. In March 2013 an investigation was conducted following the receipt of reports of gastroenteritis after the consumption of oysters at private functions in Tasmania. Cases were ascertained through general practitioners, emergency departments, media releases and self-reporting. Of the 306 cases identified in Tasmania, ten faecal specimens were collected for laboratory testing and eight were positive for norovirus (GII.g). The most common symptoms were vomiting (87%), diarrhoea (85%), myalgia (82%) and fever (56%). The implicated oysters were traced to a single lease from which they were harvested and distributed locally and interstate. Nationally 525 cases were identified from Tasmania (306), Victoria (209), New South Wales (8) and Queensland (2). This report highlights the consequences of norovirus outbreaks in shellfish, even with rapid identification, trace back and removal of the implicated product from the market.

  1. 7 CFR 319.56-20 - Apples and pears from Australia (including Tasmania) and New Zealand.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Apples and pears from Australia (including Tasmania... Fruits and Vegetables § 319.56-20 Apples and pears from Australia (including Tasmania) and New Zealand. Apples and pears from Australia (including Tasmania) and New Zealand may be imported only in accordance...

  2. 7 CFR 319.56-20 - Apples and pears from Australia (including Tasmania) and New Zealand.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Apples and pears from Australia (including Tasmania... Fruits and Vegetables § 319.56-20 Apples and pears from Australia (including Tasmania) and New Zealand. Apples and pears from Australia (including Tasmania) and New Zealand may be imported only in accordance...

  3. 7 CFR 319.56-20 - Apples and pears from Australia (including Tasmania) and New Zealand.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Apples and pears from Australia (including Tasmania... Fruits and Vegetables § 319.56-20 Apples and pears from Australia (including Tasmania) and New Zealand. Apples and pears from Australia (including Tasmania) and New Zealand may be imported only in accordance...

  4. 7 CFR 319.56-20 - Apples and pears from Australia (including Tasmania) and New Zealand.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Apples and pears from Australia (including Tasmania... Fruits and Vegetables § 319.56-20 Apples and pears from Australia (including Tasmania) and New Zealand. Apples and pears from Australia (including Tasmania) and New Zealand may be imported only in accordance...

  5. 7 CFR 319.56-20 - Apples and pears from Australia (including Tasmania) and New Zealand.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Apples and pears from Australia (including Tasmania... Fruits and Vegetables § 319.56-20 Apples and pears from Australia (including Tasmania) and New Zealand. Apples and pears from Australia (including Tasmania) and New Zealand may be imported only in accordance...

  6. CAPE for CaPE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Joni

    1993-01-01

    In an effort to improve short-term forecasting for the Kennedy Space Center region, Holle et al. (1992) investigated the effects of low level wind regimes on the distribution of cloud-to-ground lightning in central Florida. With a study period of 455 days, Holle et al. (1992) found 'southwest flow contributed 66 percent of the total network flashes while also occurring on the most days (142).' Relationships among mesoscale thermodynamic variables and precipitation and/or lightning have been addressed in previous studies in Canada and the Tennessee valley. Zawadzki et al. (1981) found 'soundings, surface pressure, temperature and humidity obtained from a standard observation network were correlated with rain rates given by raingages and radar.' Buechler et al. (1990) found 'a fair relationship between CAPE (convective available potential energy) and daily cloud-to-ground activity' with a correlation coefficient of r = 0.68. The present research will investigate the relationships among rainfall, cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning, CAPE, and low level wind flow using data collected during the CaPE (Convection and Precipitation/Electrification Experiment) field program. The CaPE field program was conducted in east central Florida from July 8, 1991 to August 18, 1991.

  7. Man and megafauna in Tasmania: closing the gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillespie, Richard; Camens, Aaron B.; Worthy, Trevor H.; Rawlence, Nicolas J.; Reid, Craig; Bertuch, Fiona; Levchenko, Vladimir; Cooper, Alan

    2012-03-01

    Recent discussion on the late Pleistocene extinction of the Australian megafauna has revolved around interpretation of several key fossil sites in Tasmania. It has been suggested that humans did not arrive in Tasmania until after the megafauna became extinct, or did not hunt now extinct megafauna, and therefore that humans cannot be implicated in the extinctions. Radiocarbon results from these sites indicate that the youngest extinct megafauna are close to charcoal ages from the oldest archaeological deposits, although difficulties have arisen in establishing chronologies because most relevant sites have ages near the limit for radiocarbon analysis. We report a series of new radiocarbon ages, δ13C, δ15N and C:N ratios on collagen and dentine fractions from skeletal remains in the Mount Cripps karst area and the Mowbray Swamp, both in northwestern Tasmania, and discuss the reliability of ages from these and other sites. We also report the discovery of an articulated Simosthenurus occidentalis skeleton at Mt Cripps, that represents only the second directly-dated extinct megafaunal taxon with a reliable age <50 ka cal BP from Tasmania. Our results suggest that C:N ratios measured on collagen or dentine are not an infallible guide to radiocarbon age reliability. We confirm previous reports of a temporal overlap between the megafaunal and archaeological records in Tasmania, but the presence of archaeological evidence and megafauna with the same age at the same site has not yet been demonstrated. At least two megafaunal taxa—the now-extinct Protemnodon anak and a giant Pleistocene form of the extant Macropus giganteus—were still present in Tasmania after 43 ka, when human crossing of the Bassian landbridge from mainland Australia first became sustainable.

  8. Debris flow hazard mapping, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazengarb, Colin; Rigby, Ted; Stevenson, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Our mapping on the many dolerite capped mountains in Tasmania indicates that debris flows are a significant geomorphic process operating there. Hobart, the largest city in the State, lies at the foot of one of these mountains and our work is focussed on identifying areas that are susceptible to these events and estimating hazard in the valley systems where residential developments have been established. Geomorphic mapping with the benefit of recent LiDAR and GIS enabled stereo-imagery has allowed us to add to and refine a landslide inventory in our study area. In addition, a dominant geomorphic model has been recognised involving headward gully retreat in colluvial materials associated with rainstorms explains why many past events have occurred and where they may occur in future. In this paper we will review the landslide inventory including a large event (~200 000m3) in 1872 that affected a lightly populated area but since heavily urbanised. From this inventory we have attempted volume-mobility relationships, magnitude-frequency curves and likelihood estimates. The estimation of volume has been challenging to determine given that the area of depletion for each debris flow feature is typically difficult to distinguish from the total affected area. However, where LiDAR data exists, this uncertainty is substantially reduced and we develop width-length relationships (area of depletion) and area-volume relationships to estimate volume for the whole dataset exceeding 300 features. The volume-mobility relationship determined is comparable to international studies and in the absence of reliable eye-witness accounts, suggests that most of the features can be explained as single event debris flows, without requiring more complex mechanisms (such as those that form temporary debris dams that subsequently fail) as proposed by others previously. Likelihood estimates have also been challenging to derive given that almost all of the events have not been witnessed, some are

  9. Integrating Farm Production and Natural Resource Management in Tasmania, Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotching, W. E.; Sherriff, L.; Kilpatrick, S.

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on the social learning from a project aimed to increase the knowledge and capacity of a group of farmers in Tasmania, Australia, to reduce the impacts of intensive agriculture on soil health and waterways, and to optimise the efficient use of on-farm inputs. The plan-do-check-review cycle adopted in this project required the…

  10. Business Action Learning Tasmania (BALT)--An Account of Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cother, Genevieve; Cother, Robert F.

    2017-01-01

    Business Action Learning Tasmania's (BALT) mission is self-reliant industry development, with diverse companies co-operating to improve their profitability, develop their people and grow the local economy. This is achieved through collaborative action learning, with companies working together on projects of vital importance and sharing the…

  11. Integrating Farm Production and Natural Resource Management in Tasmania, Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotching, W. E.; Sherriff, L.; Kilpatrick, S.

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on the social learning from a project aimed to increase the knowledge and capacity of a group of farmers in Tasmania, Australia, to reduce the impacts of intensive agriculture on soil health and waterways, and to optimise the efficient use of on-farm inputs. The plan-do-check-review cycle adopted in this project required the…

  12. Acid-Sulfate-Weathering Activity in Shergottite Sites on Mars Recorded in Grim Glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, M. N.; Nyquist, L. E.; Ross, K.; Sutton, S. R.; Schwandt, C. S.

    2011-01-01

    Based on mass spectrometric studies of sulfur species in Shergotty and EET79001, [1] and [2] showed that sulfates and sulfides occur in different proportions in shergottites. Sulfur speciation studies in gas-rich impact-melt (GRIM) glasses in EET79001 by the XANES method [3] showed that S K-XANES spectra in GRIM glasses from Lith A indicate that S is associated with Ca and Al presumably as sulfides/sulfates whereas the XANES spectra of amorphous sulfide globules in GRIM glasses from Lith B indicate that S is associated with Fe as FeS. In these amorphous iron sulfide globules, [4] found no Ni using FE-SEM and suggested that the globules resulting from immiscible sulfide melt may not be related to the igneous iron sulfides having approximately 1-3% Ni. Furthermore, in the amorphous iron sulfides from 507 GRIM glass, [5] determined delta(sup 34)S values ranging from +3.5%o to -3.1%o using Nano-SIMS. These values plot between the delta(sup 34)S value of +5.25%o determined in the sulfate fraction in Shergotty [6] at one extreme and the value of -1.7%o obtained for igneous sulfides in EET79001 and Shergotty [7] at the other. These results suggest that the amorphous Fe-S globules likely originated by shock reduction of secondary iron sulfate phases occurring in the regolith precursor materials during impact [7]. Sulfates in the regolith materials near the basaltic shergottite sites on Mars owe their origin to surficial acid-sulfate interactions. We examine the nature of these reactions by studying the composition of the end products in altered regolith materials. For the parent material composition, we use that of the host shergottite material in which the impact glasses are situated.

  13. Global/Regional Integrated Model System (GRIMs): Double Fourier Series (DFS) Dynamical Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, M.; Hong, S.

    2013-12-01

    A multi-scale atmospheric/oceanic model system with unified physics, the Global/Regional Integrated Model system (GRIMs) has been created for use in numerical weather prediction, seasonal simulations, and climate research projects, from global to regional scales. It includes not only the model code, but also the test cases and scripts. The model system is developed and practiced by taking advantage of both operational and research applications. We outlines the history of GRIMs, its current applications, and plans for future development, providing a summary useful to present and future users. In addition to the traditional spherical harmonics (SPH) dynamical core, a new spectral method with a double Fourier series (DFS) is available in the GRIMs (Table 1). The new DFS dynamical core with full physics is evaluated against the SPH dynamical core in terms of short-range forecast capability for a heavy rainfall event and seasonal simulation framework. Comparison of the two dynamical cores demonstrates that the new DFS dynamical core exhibits performance comparable to the SPH in terms of simulated climatology accuracy and the forecast of a heavy rainfall event. Most importantly, the DFS algorithm guarantees improved computational efficiency in the cluster computer as the model resolution increases, which is consistent with theoretical values computed from the dry primitive equation model framework of Cheong (Fig. 1). The current study shows that, at higher resolutions, the DFS approach can be a competitive dynamical core because the DFS algorithm provides the advantages of both the spectral method for high numerical accuracy and the grid-point method for high performance computing in the aspect of computational cost. GRIMs dynamical cores

  14. Enhanced control of end-group composition in poly(3-hexylthiophene)s prepared by GRIM

    SciTech Connect

    Kochemba, William Michael; Kilbey, II, S Michael; Pickel, Deanna L

    2012-01-01

    The ability to prepare well-defined semiconducting polymers is essential for understanding the link between structure and function in organic photovoltaic devices. A general method for enhanced control of the degree of functionality of end-functionalized poly(3-hexylthiophene)s (P3HT) prepared by Grignard Metathesis (GRIM) polymerization has been developed. In the absence of additives, the degree of functionality of end-functional P3HTs prepared by quenching of the GRIM polymerization with a Grignard reagent is dependent on the Grignard reagent utilized. In this study, additives such as styrene and 1-pentene are shown to alter the end-group composition of tolyl-functionalized P3HTs as determined by MALDI-TOF MS. In particular, when quenching the GRIM polymerization with tolylmagnesium bromide a modest decrease in the difunctional product is observed, and the yield of the monofunctional product increases significantly. Temperature and lithium chloride (LiCl) addition also play impactful roles. Monofunctional P3HT is found to be the major product (65%) when the functionalization is done in the presence of LiCl and styrene at 0oC, whereas in the absence of additives the monofunctional product is present at only 20%.

  15. Sudden infant deaths and seasonality in Tasmania, 1970-1976.

    PubMed

    McGlashan, N D; Grice, A C

    1983-01-01

    Analyses of monthly minimum temperatures and daily minimum temperatures show that significantly more Sudden Infant Deaths and 'pneumonitis' deaths occur in colder conditions in southern Tasmania. Low minimum monthly and low minimum daily temperatures 'explain' part of the observed winter seasonal peak of deaths. However, a sharp change of temperature over 24 hours, either upwards or downwards, is associated with fewer deaths than occurred when little or no change of temperature had been experienced. Utilising the additional data of the Tasmania-wide series it is shown that the winter seasonal effect is especially evident in infants over 3 months of age compared with those aged only 0-3 months, in whom seasonal variation did not occur.

  16. Occupational health-related experiences in rural Tasmania.

    PubMed

    Newman, Barbara; Berens, Heidi

    2010-07-01

    This descriptive, explorative study sought to identify the occupational-related health experiences of community nurses in their workday within rural North West Tasmania. Tasmania is one of eight states and territories that form Australia. The findings indicate the majority of community nurses consider their health average or better, although 30% reported being overweight; 5% reported smoking; 60% reported feeling tense, anxious or depressed sometimes during the week. In the 12 months prior to survey 48% of participants had experienced a work-related injury or illness. At least two thirds of participants spent an average of 1.5 hours teaching nursing students and 2 hours teaching medical students, per week. Hazards (needlestick injury, items obstructing passageways, debris within homes), dogs and use of mobile telephones were regularly associated with weekly work incidents. Interestingly, more time was spent in a day on documentation than with clients or professional development.

  17. Laser scan of the Grimming Mts. (Austria) with the latest LiDAR VZ-4000 equipment: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Harald; Hatzenbichler, Georg; Amon, Philipp; Fallah, Mohammad; Tari, Gabor; Grasemann, Bernhard

    2013-04-01

    As part of a cooperation project between OMV, RIEGL and the University of Vienna the new LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) VZ-4000 laser scanner was tested at the Grimming Mts. of the Eastern Alps in Austria. The prominent Grimming Mts. lies in the eastern part of the Dachstein Massif at the southern margin of the Northern Calcareous Alps. The Grimming, with a peak of 2,351 m above sea level, is one of the highest isolated mountains in Europe. Because of its spectacular topography, the Grimming has been used as an important surface reference mark since 1822. From a structural geology standpoint, the Grimming forms a huge antiform made up of dominantly well-bedded Triassic Dachstein Limestone. Because of the relatively well exposed bedrock surfaces above the tree-line and the fairly complex internal structure, the Grimming Mts. provides an ideal target for testing new high resolution laser scan techniques and devices. The maximum distance from the scanning positions on the nearby valley floor to the mountain face was about 4,500 m and the generated point cloud has an average resolution of 25 points per square meter. The purpose of this work was to test the latest version of the high resolution LiDAR laser equipment in a setting which falls beyond the capabilities of most existing LiDAR devices. The results of the pilot study include high-resolution spatial data on bedding planes, fault planes and the thickness variations of individual beds within the Dachstein Limestone. For the first time, the data obtained can be directly used to generate the proper 3D geometry of folds and faults observed on the Grimming Mts. This leads to a modern understanding of this prominent Alpine anticline in terms of structural geology.

  18. Oxidation States of Grim Glasses in EET79001 Based on Vanadium Valence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, S. R.; Rao, M. N.; Nyquist, L. E.

    2010-01-01

    Gas-rich impact-melt (GRIM) glasses in SNC meteorites are very rich in Martian atmospheric noble gases and sulfur suggesting a possible occurrence of regolith-derived secondary mineral assemblages in these samples. Previously, we have studied two GRIM glasses, 506 and 507, from EET79001 Lith A and Lith B, respectively, for elemental abundances and spatial distribution of sulfur using EMPA (WDS) and FE-SEM (EDS) techniques and for sulfur-speciation using K-edge XANES techniques. These elemental and FE-SEM micro-graph data at several locations in the GRIM glasses from Shergotty (DBS), Zagami 994 and EET79001, Lith B showed that FeO and SO3 are positively correlated (SO3 represents a mixture of sulfide and sulfate). FE-SEM (EDS) study revealed that the sulfur-rich pockets in these glasses contain numerous micron-sized iron-sulfide (Fe-S) globules sequestered throughout the volume. However, in some areas (though less frequently), we detected significant Fe-S-O signals suggesting the occurrence of iron sulfate. These GRIM glasses were studied by K-edge microXANES techniques for sulfur speciation in association with iron in sulfur-rich areas. In both samples, we found the sulfur speciation dominated by sulfide with minor oxidized sulfur mixed in with various proportions. The abundance of oxidized sulfur was greater in 506 than in 507. Based on these results, we hypothesize that sulfur initially existed as sulfate in the glass precursor materials and, on shock-impact melting of the precursor materials producing these glasses, the oxidized sulfur was reduced to predominately sulfide. In order to further test this hypothesis, we have used microXANES to measure the valence states of vanadium in GRIM glasses from Lith A and Lith B to complement and compare with previous analogous measurements on Lith C (note: 506 and 507 contain the largest amounts of martian atmospheric gases but the gas-contents in Lith C measured by are unknown). Vanadium is ideal for addressing this re

  19. The Teaching of English in Tasmania: Building Links between Senior Secondary and Tertiary Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Lisa; Clarke, Robert; Crane, Ralph; Gaby, Rosemary; Milthorpe, Naomi; Stark, Hannah

    2016-01-01

    This article tells the story of two projects initiated by the University of Tasmania's English program, which were designed to investigate and improve the pathway from pre-tertiary to tertiary English studies in the state: the First Year English Survey (2012-2014) and the Teaching of English in Tasmania Community of Practice (TETCoP). The authors…

  20. The Teaching of English in Tasmania: Building Links between Senior Secondary and Tertiary Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Lisa; Clarke, Robert; Crane, Ralph; Gaby, Rosemary; Milthorpe, Naomi; Stark, Hannah

    2016-01-01

    This article tells the story of two projects initiated by the University of Tasmania's English program, which were designed to investigate and improve the pathway from pre-tertiary to tertiary English studies in the state: the First Year English Survey (2012-2014) and the Teaching of English in Tasmania Community of Practice (TETCoP). The authors…

  1. Update on patterns of mandibular fracture in Tasmania, Australia.

    PubMed

    Verma, Shreya; Chambers, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Mandibular fractures often present to hospital, so if we understand trends in patterns of fractures and their demographics it may help us to deliver a better service, and prevent these injuries. Here, we compare current data on mandibular fractures in Tasmania with data from 15 years ago, and with current world trends. Patients who presented to the Royal Hobart Hospital with fractured mandibles were audited, and the data analysed and compared with those from a previous study. About 37 fractured mandibles presented to hospital each year. Most patients were men aged 20-30 years old. Ninety-seven of the 159 fractures (61%) were secondary to assault, 27 (17%) were the result of sport, and 24 (15%) followed falls. Road crashes contributed only 5% of mandibular fractures. Sixty-six patients (60%) were intoxicated at the time of injury. The angle of the mandible was the most common site of fracture and open reduction and internal fixation was the treatment of choice. There have been important changes in mandibular fracture patterns in Tasmania in the last 15 years. There was a rise in alcohol-related interpersonal violence, and men were most commonly involved. There was also a decrease in mandibular fractures caused by road crashes, which suggests an improvement in road safety.

  2. Goitre studies in Tasmania. 16 Years' prophylaxis with iodide.

    PubMed

    Clements, F W; Gibson, H B; Howeler-Coy, J F

    1968-01-01

    The results of 16 years' prophylaxis against endemic goiter among children in Tasmania are given. A survey carried out in 1949 showed a relatively high prevalence of endemic goiter among children in most parts of the island, and in 1950, distribution of tablets containing 10 mg of potassium iodide to all school children was commenced. This distribution was gradually stopped during 1966 as legislation made it possible to add potassium iodate to all bread baked on the island. Periodic surveys showed that the prevalence of endemic goiter has fallen significantly but has not vanished entirely. Seasonal fluctuations in the prevalence found in some regions of the island decreased at the same time. Histopathological studies on goitrous tissue and iodine estimations on body fluids confirmed that the goiter in Tasmania is typical of endemic goiter, which is usually attributed to iodine deficiency. The effect of the treatment of established goiters in adolescent girls with thyroxine is described, as are results of the studies of the ability to taste phenylthiocarbamide, a property which may be genetically linked to a predisposition to goiter. (author's) (summary in ENG).

  3. GRIM REAPER peptide binds to receptor kinase PRK5 to trigger cell death in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Wrzaczek, Michael; Vainonen, Julia P; Stael, Simon; Tsiatsiani, Liana; Help-Rinta-Rahko, Hanna; Gauthier, Adrien; Kaufholdt, David; Bollhöner, Benjamin; Lamminmäki, Airi; Staes, An; Gevaert, Kris; Tuominen, Hannele; Van Breusegem, Frank; Helariutta, Ykä; Kangasjärvi, Jaakko

    2015-01-01

    Recognition of extracellular peptides by plasma membrane-localized receptor proteins is commonly used in signal transduction. In plants, very little is known about how extracellular peptides are processed and activated in order to allow recognition by receptors. Here, we show that induction of cell death in planta by a secreted plant protein GRIM REAPER (GRI) is dependent on the activity of the type II metacaspase METACASPASE-9. GRI is cleaved by METACASPASE-9 in vitro resulting in the release of an 11 amino acid peptide. This peptide bound in vivo to the extracellular domain of the plasma membrane-localized, atypical leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase POLLEN-SPECIFIC RECEPTOR-LIKE KINASE 5 (PRK5) and was sufficient to induce oxidative stress/ROS-dependent cell death. This shows a signaling pathway in plants from processing and activation of an extracellular protein to recognition by its receptor. PMID:25398910

  4. GRIM REAPER peptide binds to receptor kinase PRK5 to trigger cell death in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wrzaczek, Michael; Vainonen, Julia P; Stael, Simon; Tsiatsiani, Liana; Help-Rinta-Rahko, Hanna; Gauthier, Adrien; Kaufholdt, David; Bollhöner, Benjamin; Lamminmäki, Airi; Staes, An; Gevaert, Kris; Tuominen, Hannele; Van Breusegem, Frank; Helariutta, Ykä; Kangasjärvi, Jaakko

    2015-01-02

    Recognition of extracellular peptides by plasma membrane-localized receptor proteins is commonly used in signal transduction. In plants, very little is known about how extracellular peptides are processed and activated in order to allow recognition by receptors. Here, we show that induction of cell death in planta by a secreted plant protein GRIM REAPER (GRI) is dependent on the activity of the type II metacaspase METACASPASE-9. GRI is cleaved by METACASPASE-9 in vitro resulting in the release of an 11 amino acid peptide. This peptide bound in vivo to the extracellular domain of the plasma membrane-localized, atypical leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase POLLEN-SPECIFIC RECEPTOR-LIKE KINASE 5 (PRK5) and was sufficient to induce oxidative stress/ROS-dependent cell death. This shows a signaling pathway in plants from processing and activation of an extracellular protein to recognition by its receptor.

  5. Accident rates amongst regular bicycle riders in Tasmania, Australia.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Andrew J; Si, Lei; Gordon, Jared M; Saul, Tim; Curry, Beverley A; Otahal, Petr; Hitchens, Peta L

    2014-11-01

    To characterise the demographics, cycling habits and accident rates of adult cyclists in Tasmania. Volunteers ≥18 years of age who had cycled at least once/week over the previous month provided information on demographics; cycling experience; bicycles owned; hours/km/trips cycled per week; cycling purpose; protective equipment used; and major (required third-party medical treatment or resulted ≥1 day off work) or minor (interfered with individuals' regular daily activities and/or caused financial costs) accidents while cycling. Over 8-months, 136 cyclists (70.6% male) completed the telephone survey. Mean (standard deviation) age was 45.4 (12.1) years with 17.1 (11.4) years of cycling experience. In the week prior to interview, cyclists averaged 6.6 trips/week (totalling 105.7km or 5.0h). The most common reason for cycling was commuting/transport (34% of trips), followed by training/health/fitness (28%). The incidence of major and minor cycling accidents was 1.6 (95% CI 1.1-2.0) and 3.7 (2.3-5.0) per 100,000km, respectively. Male sex was associated with a significantly lower minor accident risk (incidence rate ratio=0.34, p=0.01). Mountain biking was associated with a significantly higher risk of minor accident compared with road or racing, touring, and city or commuting biking (p<0.05). Physical activity of regular cyclists' exceeds the level recommended for maintenance of health and wellbeing; cyclists also contributed substantially to the local economy. Accident rates are higher in this sample than previously reported in Tasmania and internationally. Mountain biking was associated with higher risks of both major and minor accidents compared to road/racing bike riding. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Cape of Good Hope

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    article title:  Aerosol retrieval over Cape of Good Hope   ... Da image in the southern part of South Africa - the aerosol retrieval picks it up, and also the slightly clearer area in the middle. Also, ... MISR Science Teams Aug 23, 2000 - Aerosol retrieval over Cape of Good Hope. project:  MISR ...

  7. Cape of Good Hope

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-08-24

    article title:  Aerosol retrieval over Cape of Good Hope (Enlargement)     ... (MISR) image is an enlargement of the  aerosol retrieval over Cape of Good Hope, August 23, 2000 , showing a more detailed ... energy, so MISR's contribution is not only the aerosol retrieval necessary to do the correction, but the multi-angular integration. ...

  8. Palaeoclimatic conditions during Neoproterozoic: case study from Iran & Australia (Tasmania)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adabi, Mohammad Hossein; Khatibi Mehr, Mina

    2010-05-01

    Petrographic, elemental and isotopic composition of Neoproterozoic least- altered dolomites at Renison mine (Western Australia) and Gachin (Zagros, Iran sections have been studied to determine the climatic conditions during Neoproterozoic. The Neoproterozoic Era was a time of repeated continental glaciations, including one of the Earth's most severs refrigerations (Kaufman etal., 1993). Three major phases of glaciations (Sturtian glacial, ~715 Ma, Marinoan glacial, ~630 Ma and Gaskiers glaciation ~580 Ma) were widespread during Neoproterozoic (Hoffman etal., 2004; Knoll etal., 2004; Calver etal., 2004). In this period, extensive low latitude ice sheets and glacio-marine deposits were reported (Kasting, 1992; Williams, 1993). Thus, the Neoproterozoic world has the most extensive glaciation in the earth's history and truly icehouse climate (Hambrey, 1992). Widespread glaciogenic deposits of Neoproterozoic age occurs in a belt of sedimentary basins across central Australia (Brookfield, 1994) and also in Tasmania (Claver etal., 2004, Kendall etal., 2007). The association of dolomite with tillites, and particularly the presence of glacial erratics in these sediments, indicates cold water conditions throughout most of the Neoproterozoic time. In western Tasmania thick diamictite units and the presence of dropstones in laminated dolosiltite have been reported by (Calver, 1995; Calver etal., 2004). The carbon isotope chemostratigraphy gives an age range of between 570-800 Ma for the Renison carbonates (Adabi, 1997). These ages range corresponds to Gaskiers and Sturtian glacial respectively. The calculated palaeotemperature of seawater during the Neoproterozoic, considering δw=-6‰ (Tucker, 1986), and least-altered dolomites δ18O values of -1±1‰ indicates that the seawater temperatures was around 12°±4°C (Land equation) in Tasmania. Petrographycally, dolomicrites in Gachin (Zagros) section in Iran are interpereted as least-altered dolomites, as original

  9. The import of the transcription factor STAT3 into mitochondria depends on GRIM-19, a component of the electron transport chain.

    PubMed

    Tammineni, Prasad; Anugula, Chandrashekhar; Mohammed, Fareed; Anjaneyulu, Murari; Larner, Andrew C; Sepuri, Naresh Babu Venkata

    2013-02-15

    The signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), a nuclear transcription factor, is also present in mitochondria and regulates cellular respiration in a transcriptional-independent manner. The mechanism of STAT3 import into mitochondria remains obscure. In this report we show that mitochondrial-localized STAT3 resides in the inner mitochondrial membrane. In vitro import studies show that the gene associated with retinoid interferon induced cell mortality 19 (GRIM-19), a complex I subunit that acts as a chaperone to recruit STAT3 into mitochondria. In addition, GRIM-19 enhances the integration of STAT3 into complex I. A S727A mutation in STAT3 reduces its import and assembly even in the presence of GRIM-19. Together, our studies unveil a novel chaperone function for GRIM-19 in the recruitment of STAT3 into mitochondria.

  10. All-polymer photovoltaic devices of poly(3-(4-n-octyl)-phenylthiophene) from Grignard Metathesis (GRIM) polymerization.

    PubMed

    Holcombe, Thomas W; Woo, Claire H; Kavulak, David F J; Thompson, Barry C; Fréchet, Jean M J

    2009-10-14

    The synthesis of poly[3-(4-n-octyl)-phenylthiophene] (POPT) from Grignard Metathesis (GRIM) is reported. GRIM POPT is found to have favorable electronic, optical, and processing properties for organic photovoltaics (OPVs). Space-charge limited current and field effect transistor measurements for POPT yielded hole mobilities of 1 x 10(-4) cm(2)/(V s) and 0.05 cm(2)/(V s), respectively. Spincasting GRIM POPT from chlorobenzene yields a thin film with a 1.8 eV band gap, and PC(61)BM:POPT bulk heterojection devices provide a peak performance of 3.1%. Additionally, an efficiency of 2.0% is achieved in an all-polymer, bilayer OPV using poly[2-methoxy-5-(2'-ethylhexyloxy)-1,4-(1-cyanovinylene)phenylene] (CNPPV) as an acceptor. This state-of-the-art all-polymer device is analyzed in comparison to the analogous poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT)/CNPPV device. Counter to expectations based on more favorable energy level alignment, greater active layer light absorption, and similar hole mobility, P3HT/CNPPV devices perform less well than POPT/CNPPV devices with a peak efficiency of 0.93%.

  11. Updates in the Global/Regional Integrated Model system (GRIMs)-Double Fourier Series (DFS) Dynamical Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, M. S.; Park, H.; Park, S. H.; Hong, S. Y.

    2014-12-01

    The Global/Regional Integrated Model system (GRIMs)-double Fourier series (DFS) spectral dynamical core has been developed to overcome the limitation of traditional spectral model using spherical harmonics in terms of computational cost at very high resolution. Recently, the GRIMs-DFS dynamical core was updated in two respects: (1) better scalability on high-performance computing platform; and (2) reduction of numerical time-stepping error. To improve the parallel efficiency, the archived wave domain was designed not to be sliced in the meridional direction, but to be decomposed in the horizontal and vertical directions. Although the computational cost slightly increased due to the requirement of temporary work array, the revised DFS dynamical core yielded higher scalability in terms of the wall-clock-time than the original one. In addition, its efficiency gain became greater with the increase of horizontal resolution when the number of processors is increased. The Robert-Asselin-Williams (RAW) time filter has been proposed as a simple improvement to the widely used Robert-Asselin filter, in order to reduce time-stepping errors in semi-implicit leapfrog integration. This new approach was implemented into the GRIMs-DFS dynamical core and its impact was quantitatively evaluated on medium-range forecast and seasonal ensemble prediction frameworks. Preliminary results showed that the RAW time-filter properly reduced spurious light rainfalls that might be produced from unphysical computational mode generated by leap-frog time stepping. Further details will be presented in the conference.

  12. Atmospheric deposition of fluoride in the lower Tamar Valley, Tasmania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Low, P. S.; Bloom, H.

    Soluble fluoride (F -), measured using an ion-selective electrode, was monitored during 1982-1983 in monthly bulk (wet and dry) atmospheric deposition samples collected at 17 locations in the lower Tamar Valley, Tasmania, where an aluminium (Al) smelter is located. Glass samplers (funnel-bottle type) were used, with duplications by plastic samplers at five locations later. The spatial and temporal variations in F - deposition in relation to wind flow and rainfall are discussed, and its impact on the environment is highlighted. The mean deposition rates of F -, as measured from September 1982 to August 1983, ranged from about 90 μg m -2 day -1 at the intended 'background' location to 12,568 μg m -2day -1 at a location about 1 km east-southeast from the smelter. The depositional fluxes of F - and insoluble Al (another elemental tracer of the smelter) are significantly correlated ( P < 0.001). They were much higher within 3 km of the smelter, where vegetation damage by fluoride contamination was most evident. However, air emissions from the smelter could travel at least 10 km up the valley. Wet deposition was the predominant removal process for F - during autumn and winter, while dry deposition appeared to be more significant in summer. The plastic samplers collected about 8 and 17% more F - and Al, respectively, but with higher standard deviations. Thus the variations observed could be largely due to sampling fluctuations.

  13. Ambient wood smoke exposure and respiratory symptoms in Tasmania, Australia.

    PubMed

    Bennett, C M; Dharmage, S C; Matheson, M; Gras, J L; Markos, J; Mészáros, D; Hopper, J; Walters, E H; Abramson, M J

    2010-12-15

    Wood smoke exposure has been associated with adverse respiratory health outcomes, with much of the current research focused on wood smoke from domestic heating and cooking. This study examined the association between respiratory symptoms and outdoor wood smoke in Launceston, Tasmania, where ~30% of homes use wood burners for domestic heating. This ecological study examined data from participants of the 2004 Tasmanian Longitudinal Health Study postal survey and compared the prevalence of respiratory symptoms in Launceston (n=601) with that in Hobart (n=1071), a larger Tasmanian city with much less wood smoke. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to investigate the associations of interest while adjusting for gender, atopy, history of allergic disease and current smoking status. There were no significant differences in symptom prevalence between Launceston and Hobart. Two subgroup analyses, which examined participants with pre-existing chronic respiratory disease, and those who reported actively using a wood burner in their home, also did not find significant differences. Any impact of wood smoke on non-specific respiratory symptoms might have been overshadowed by other important determinants of respiratory health, such as vehicle exhaust and tobacco smoking, or were too small to have been detected. However, the lack of detectable differences in symptom prevalence might also reflect the success of regulatory action by local governments to reduce wood smoke emissions in Launceston. The results of other epidemiological studies support an association between ambient wood smoke exposure and adverse respiratory health. Further investigations of wood smoke exposure in Australian settings are needed to investigate the lack of significant associations found in this study, especially studies of indoor air quality and health impacts in children and elderly populations.

  14. Review of the management of childhood asthma in Tasmania.

    PubMed

    Bereznicki, Bonnie J; Norton, Lucy C; Beggs, Sean A; Gee, Peter; Bereznicki, Luke R E

    2013-08-01

    To review the supply of medications to children with asthma and parent-reported management of childhood asthma in Tasmania and highlight evidence-practice gaps for future interventions. Participating pharmacies ran a software application that extracted data from dispensing records and helped to identify children with asthma. Parents of identified children were mailed a survey evaluating components of asthma management. Dispensing and survey data were analysed. A total of 939 children from 23 pharmacies were identified by the software and deemed eligible for inclusion. Surveys were received from 353 (37.6%) parents. In the past year, short-acting beta-2 agonists were supplied to 56.1% of the cohort, preventers to 76.5% (inhaled corticosteroids 52.3%; leukotriene receptor antagonists 31.3%; inhaled cromones 0.6%), long-acting beta-2 agonists (LABAs) to 25.7% and oral corticosteroids to 21.5%. Approximately half of the children receiving inhaled corticosteroids were concurrently receiving a LABA. Among children with indicators of inadequately controlled asthma, up to 73.7% of their parents reported that their asthma was adequately controlled, up to 38.2% did not possess an Asthma Action Plan, up to 36.8% were not regularly using a spacer and up to 22.8% had not received a preventer. These results indicate gaps in childhood asthma management, in particular, undersupply of preventers in high-risk patient groups, high supply of LABAs and insufficient spacer and asthma action plan usage. These areas should be targeted for interventions to improve childhood asthma management. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2013 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  15. The history of early low frequency radio astronomy in Australia. 2: Tasmania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Martin; Orchiston, Wayne; Slee, Bruce; Wielebinski, Richard

    2015-03-01

    Significant contributions to low frequency radio astronomy were made in the Australian state of Tasmania after the arrival of Grote Reber in 1954. Initially, Reber teamed with Graeme Ellis, who was then working with the Ionospheric Prediction Service, and they carried out observations as low as 0.52 MHz during the 1955 period of exceptionally low sunspot activity. In the early 1960s, Reber established a 2.085 MHz array in the southern central region of the State and used this to make the first map of the southern sky at this frequency. In addition, in the 1960s the University of Tasmania constructed several low frequency arrays near Hobart, including a 609m × 609m array designed for operation between about 2 MHz and 20 MHz. In this paper we present an overview of the history of low frequency radio astronomy in Tasmania.

  16. Panorama from 'Cape Verde'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity captured this vista of 'Victoria Crater' from the viewpoint of 'Cape Verde,' one of the promontories that are part of the scalloped rim of the crater. Opportunity drove onto Cape Verde shortly after arriving at the rim of Victoria in September 2006. The view combines hundreds of exposures taken by the rover's panoramic camera (Pancam). The camera began taking the component images during Opportunity's 970th Martian day, or sol, on Mars (Oct. 16, 2006). Work on the panorama continued through the solar conjunction period, when Mars was nearly behind the sun from Earth's perspective and communications were minimized. Acquisition of images for this panorama was completed on Opportunity's 991st sol (Nov. 7, 2006).

    The top of Cape Verde is in the immediate foreground at the center of the image. To the left and right are two of the more gradually sloped bays that alternate with the cliff-faced capes or promontories around the rim of the crater. 'Duck Bay,' where Opportunity first reached the rim, is to the right. Beyond Duck Bay counterclockwise around the rim, the next promontory is 'Cabo Frio,' about 150 meters (500 feet) from the rover. On the left side of the panorama is 'Cape St. Mary,' the next promontory clockwise from Cape Verde and about 40 meters (130 feet) from the rover. The vantage point atop Cape Verde offered a good view of the rock layers in the cliff face of Cape St. Mary, which is about 15 meters or 50 feet tall. By about two weeks after the Pancam finished collecting the images for this panorama, Opportunity had driven to Cape St. Mary and was photographing Cape Verde's rock layers.

    The far side of the crater lies about 800 meters (half a mile) away, toward the southeast.

    This approximately true-color view combines images taken through three of the Pancam's filters, admitting light with wavelengths centered at 750 nanometers (near infrared), 530 nanometers (green) and 430 nanometers (violet).

  17. Translating global climate model projections into usable information for water managers and industry: A case study from Tasmania, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, J.; Ling, F.; Graham, B.; Grose, M.; Corney, S.; Holz, G.; White, C.; Gaynor, S.; Bindoff, N.

    2010-09-01

    Translating meteorological projections from global climate models (GCMs) into useful information for water managers and industry involves addressing a combination of technical and communication challenges. The Climate Futures for Tasmania project has projected water yield in Tasmania, Australia to 2100. This paper describes how the Climate Futures for Tasmania project successfully translated climate projections into useable information for water managers and industry. From its inception, the Climate Futures for Tasmania project has maintained a dialogue with the two major water managers in the Tasmania: the Department of Primary Industry, Parks, Water and Environment (DPIPWE), the government body with statutory responsibility for water management in Tasmania, and Hydro Tasmania, Australia's largest hydropower generator. Frequent discussions with these two organisations directed the technical research into future water yields. Tasmania is a difficult region for climate change-hydrology studies. Tasmania's complex rainfall patterns are not replicated by GCMs, and hence GCMs produce information that is too general to be useful to Tasmanian water managers. To overcome this problem, GCM projections were downscaled to a finer spatial resolution. Downscaling greatly improved the spatial correlation of modelled rainfall with observations, and accordingly the usefulness of the projections to water managers. The downscaled climate projections were fed into hydrological models to produce projections of streamflow. The hydrological modelling involved two steps: 1. Runoff modelling - calculating statewide, gridded natural runoff at a resolution of 0.05 degrees 2. River system modelling - aggregating the gridded natural runoff to 65 Tasmanian river basins and then accounting for human activities in rivers including dams, irrigation and hydropower generation. Splitting the hydrological modelling into these two steps allows the effects of climate and human activity to be

  18. The first Cordyla Meigen species (Diptera, Mycetophilidae) from continental Australia and Tasmania

    PubMed Central

    Kurina, Olavi; Oliveira, Sarah Siqueira

    2013-01-01

    Abstract A new species of Mycetophilidae, Cordyla australica sp. n., is described from continental Australia and Tasmania, representing the first Cordyla record in the region. A detailed description of its morphology with illustrations of male and female terminalia and a map of the collecting localities are provided. According to the structure of male terminalia, Cordyla australica sp. n. belongs to the Cordyla murina species-group that has 13 species worldwide. Within the group Cordyla australica sp. n. resembles Cordyla murina but has a unique outline of the hypoproct and medial branch of the gonostylus. The observed distributional pattern is restricted to the rainforest of eastern Australia and Tasmania. PMID:24194654

  19. Beneath Bass Strait: Linking Tasmania and Mainland Australia using Ambient Seismic Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilia, S.; Rawlinson, N.; Direen, N. G.; Reading, A. M.

    2012-12-01

    One of the most hotly debated topics in Australian geology pertains to the tectonic relationship between Tasmania and mainland Australia. Studies that attempt to link Victoria and Tasmania have been wide ranging and have undergone considerable change through time, leading to a variety of plausible tectonic models. One of the main difficulties in reconciling mainland Australian and Tasmanian tectonics is the lack of Precambrian exposure in the Lachlan Orogen (Victoria), which contrast with the West Tasmania Terrane that exhibits numerous outcrops of Proterozoic rocks, apparently excluding any tectonic affinity between them. Furthermore, the West Tasmania Terrane differs significantly from the East Tasmania Terrane in that the latter does not contain any evidence of Precambrian rocks and no evidence of a Proterozoic continental basement has been reported, either in outcrop nor inferred from geophysical surveys. Perhaps most significantly, the presence of Bass Strait and the Mesozoic and Cainozoic sedimentary and volcanic sequences that mask the older terranes, makes the link between Tasmania and southeast mainland Australia even harder to decipher. This has significantly impeded the ability of conventional surface mapping to unravel the tectonic history of this area, which remains one of the great challenges of Australian Earth sciences. The focus of this study is ambient seismic noise data from 24 broadband stations, which span northern Tasmania, several islands in Bass Strait (King Island, Deal Island and Flinders Island) and southern Victoria, thus allowing a dense coverage of surface wave paths that can be exploited to image the 3-D structure of the crust joining Tasmania and Victoria in high detail. To produce the highest quality Green's functions, careful processing of the data has been performed, after which Group and Phase velocity dispersion measurements have been carried out using a frequency-time analysis method on the symmetric component (average of the

  20. The geology of Darwin Crater, western Tasmania, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Kieren T.; Haines, Peter W.

    2007-08-01

    Darwin glass is a siliceous impact glass found in a 400 km 2 strewn field near Mt Darwin, western Tasmania, Australia. It has been dated by Ar-Ar methods at 816 ± 7 ka. A 1.2 km diameter circular depression, named Darwin Crater (42°18.39'S, 145°39.41'E), is the assumed source crater for the glass. Darwin Crater is situated in a remote rain forested valley developed within Siluro-Devonian quartzite and slate (Eldon Group). Earlier geophysical investigations demonstrated that the structure is an almost circular bowl-shaped sediment-filled basin. This paper provides the first detailed description of the geology of Darwin Crater. The centre of the crater has been penetrated by two drill cores, the deeper to a maximum depth of ˜ 230 m. The drill cores intersected fine-grained lacustrine sediments (˜ 60 m thick) overlying poorly sorted coarser crater-fill deposits. The pre-lacustrine crater-fill stratigraphy comprises an uppermost polymict breccia (˜ 40 m thick) of angular quartz and country rock, which contains very rare (≪ 1%) fresh glass fragments (Crater-fill Facies A). Beneath the polymict breccia facies, the drill core intersected monomict sandy breccias of angular quartz (Crater-fill Facies B), and a complicated package of deformed slate clasts (Crater-fill Facies C). Quartz grains in the crater-fill samples contain abundant irregular fractures. In some of the most deformed quartz grains, sub-planar fractures define zones of alternating extinction that superficially resemble twinning. Kinked micas are also present. While the deformation observed in clasts of the crater-fill facies is far greater than in rocks cropping out around the crater, no diagnostic shock indicators, such as planar deformation features (PDF's) in quartz, were observed. If the crater is of impact origin, as seems likely due to the close association with Darwin glass, this is another example of a simple crater where diagnostic shock indicators appear to be absent, preventing

  1. A Miocene basanite peperitic dyke at Stanley, northwestern Tasmania, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Yoshihiko; McPhie, Jocelyn

    1996-11-01

    A Miocene basanite dyke at Stanley, northwestern Tasmania, Australia, displays well preserved peperite texture. The dyke is 2 m wide and has intruded basaltic breccia ("host sediment"). One contact of the dyke is fluidally shaped, and amoeboid apophyses 10-25 cm long extend into the host sediment, whereas the other contact is characterized by blocky peperite texture comprising tabular to wedge-shaped clasts up to 30 cm across separated by host sediment. The clasts have internal spherical fractures and some show splinter texture. Vesicles are common in the clasts, and those intersected by clast margins have been filled with sediment. The interior of the dyke comprises close-packed blocky peperite consisting of tabular, wedge-shaped and polyhedral clasts tens of centimetres across separated by host sediment. These clasts show well developed jigsaw-fit texture. The textures and structures in the basanite dyke are inferred to have formed in two stages: an earlier, hotter, apophysis-forming stage and a later, cooler, angular clast-forming stage, both of which occurred during the intrusion of magma into wet, poorly consolidated sediment in a shallow marine environment. During the apophysis-forming stage, the magma had relatively low viscosity and progressively displaced wet sediment. The wet sediment around the dyke was partly fluidized by vaporization of pore water. The angular clast-forming stage reflects a change in the rheological behaviour of the magma from ductile to brittle, most likely in response to decreasing temperature. The chilled parts of the dyke were subject to stress arising from cooling contraction and also from continued, pulsatory movement of hotter, still ductile magma in the interior of the dyke, resulting in brittle fragmentation. Brittle fragmentation was accompanied by movement of host sediment into the newly created open spaces, forming blocky peperite. Spherical fractures, splinter texture and sediment-filled vesicles formed during the angular

  2. ASTRONAUT SHEPARD, ALAN - CAPE

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1961-05-05

    S61-01927 (5 May 1961) --- Mercury-Redstone 3 (MR-3), the United States' first manned spaceflight, is launched from Cape Canaveral on a suborbital mission. Astronaut Alan B. Shepard Jr. was the pilot of the Mercury spacecraft, designated "Freedom 7". The spacecraft attained a maximum speed of 5,180 miles per hour (mph), reached an altitude of 116 1/2 statute miles, and landed 302 statute miles downrange from Cape Canaveral, Florida. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  3. The National Broadband Network and the Challenges of Creating Connectivity in Education: The Case of Tasmania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stack, Sue; Watson, Jane; Abbott-Chapman, Joan

    2013-01-01

    Tasmania, one of the first locations to have communities connected to the national broadband network (NBN), provided the context within which to ask significant questions about the implications of the NBN for all levels and sectors of education. This paper reports findings from a research project that developed innovative methodology to explore…

  4. What's working, what's not: The monitoring and reporting system for Tasmania's national parks and reserves

    Treesearch

    Glenys Jones

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the Australian State of Tasmania's management effectiveness Monitoring and Reporting System for national parks and reserves. This jurisdictional performance measurement system is designed to provide all interested parties with reliable factual information and measured evidence about reserve management achievements, progress and challenges. Key...

  5. Modeling vegetation mosaics in sub-alpine Tasmania under various fire regimes

    Treesearch

    Gabriel I. Yospin; Samuel W. Wood; Andres Holz; David M. J. S. Bowman; Robert E. Keane; Cathy Whitlock

    2015-01-01

    Western Tasmania, Australia contains some of the highest levels of biological endemism of any temperate region in the world, including vegetation types that are conservation priorities: fire-sensitive rainforest dominated by endemic conifer species in the genus Athrotaxis; and firetolerant buttongrass moorlands. Current management focuses on fire suppression,...

  6. Looking at Curriculum Change in Tasmania: Will Essential Learnings Promote Successful Reform?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watt, Michael G.

    2006-01-01

    The release of the Labor government's policy statement, "Learning Together," in December 2000 initiated a long-term systemic reform strategy, which included the first attempt in Tasmania to formulate a new curriculum, the "Essential Learnings Framework." The purpose of this paper is to trace the historical pattern of change in…

  7. Site-specific risk factors of white mould epidemics in bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) in Tasmania

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In Tasmania, Australia, if more than 5% of bean pods are found to be affected by white mould (caused by Sclerotinia sclerotiorum) entire crops can be rejected by contracting processors. This strict quality standard is one of the main reasons for prophylactic application of fungicides over flowering...

  8. FMR1 alleles in Tasmania: a screening study of the special educational needs population.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, R J; Holden, J J A; Zhang, C; Curlis, Y; Slater, H R; Burgess, T; Kirkby, K C; Carmichael, A; Heading, K D; Loesch, D Z

    2005-01-01

    The distribution of fragile X mental retardation-1 (FMR1) allele categories, classified by the number of CGG repeats, in the population of Tasmania was investigated in 1253 males with special educational needs (SEN). The frequencies of these FMR1 categories were compared with those seen in controls as represented by 578 consecutive male births. The initial screening was based on polymerase chain reaction analysis of dried blood spots. Inconclusive results were verified by Southern analysis of a venous blood sample. The frequencies of common FMR1 alleles in both samples, and of grey zone alleles in the controls, were similar to those in other Caucasian populations. Consistent with earlier reports, we found some (although insignificant) increase of grey zone alleles in SEN subjects compared with controls. The frequencies of predisposing flanking haplotypes among grey zone males FMR1 alleles were similar to those seen in other Caucasian SEN samples. Contrary to expectation, given the normal frequency of grey zone alleles, no premutation (PM) or full mutation (FM) allele was detected in either sample, with only 15 fragile X families diagnosed through routine clinical admissions registered in Tasmania up to 2002. An explanation of this discrepancy could be that the C19th founders of Tasmania carried few PM or FM alleles. The eight to ten generations since white settlement of Tasmania has been insufficient time for susceptible grey zone alleles to evolve into the larger expansions.

  9. The Cape Fear Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conrath, Richard C.

    In spring 1992, Cape Fear Community College (CFCC) completed its long-range strategic plan. The consultant who helped guide the institution through the process presented the plan to the Board of Trustees with 60 recommendations for implementation. The Chairman of the Board established task forces to study the recommendations for each major…

  10. Comprehensive picture of rural women's needs in maternity care in Tasmania, Australia.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Ha; Le, Quynh

    2013-08-01

    This study investigates (i) rural women's needs in maternity care in Tasmania; (ii) the current rural maternity services in Tasmania; and (iii) the gap between women's needs and the services provided. Mixed methods study was adopted. A questionnaire explored women's views on rural maternity services from antenatal to postnatal care and also invited comments from the participants. Interviews were conducted to provide comprehensive insights into their needs in maternity care. Six rural communities in Tasmania, Australia. Women who have had childbirth experiences in rural areas in Tasmania. Two hundred ten women completed the questionnaire with a response rate of 35%. There were over 150 written comments from the survey. Twenty-two follow-up interviews were conducted. This paper reports the written comments from the survey and interviews. Five main themes emerged from the data, namely (i) access needs, (ii) safety needs, (iii) needs for rural birthing services, (iv) support needs and (v) needs for quality services. This study has revealed a comprehensive picture of rural women's needs in maternity care throughout their pregnancy to the early postnatal period. There is a major lack of maternity services in rural areas of Tasmania. The lack of rural maternity services shifts cost and risk from the health care system to rural women and their families. Women want to have greater access to maternity services in their local community and be ensured safety for themselves and their babies. Moreover, they need more support from the health care system and they desire quality services. © 2013 The Authors. Australian Journal of Rural Health © National Rural Health Alliance Inc.

  11. The spatial and temporal variation of the distribution and prevalence of Atlantic salmon reovirus (TSRV) infection in Tasmania, Australia.

    PubMed

    Carlile, G; East, I J; McColl, K A; Ellard, K; Browning, G F; Crane, M St J

    2014-09-01

    Atlantic salmon reovirus (TSRV) has been consistently isolated from Atlantic salmon in Tasmania, since first identification in 1990 under the Tasmanian Salmonid Health Surveillance Program (TSHSP). The distribution and prevalence of TSRV was identified using TSHSP data. A data set of 730 fish submissions tested over a period of 15 years was reviewed and analysed to describe the spatial and temporal variation of TSRV in Tasmanian salmonid aquaculture production units. The virus was present throughout Tasmania with the highest reported prevalence of the virus in the south-east region of Tasmania. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. 76 FR 27970 - Safety Zone; Cape Charles Fireworks, Cape Charles Harbor, Cape Charles, VA.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-13

    ... in Cape Charles, VA in support of the Fourth of July Fireworks event. This action is necessary to... notice. Basis and Purpose On July 3, 2011 the Town of Cape Charles will sponsor a fireworks display on... established in the vicinity of Cape Charles, VA from 9 p.m. to 10 p.m. on July 3, 2011, with a rain date of...

  13. Cape Baleia, Caravelas, Brazil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Cape Baleia (17.5N, 39.0W), on the north central coast of Brazil illustrates a good example of multiple coastal sand spits. Over a several thousand year time period, shifting regimes of wave and current patterns have piled up sand onto a series of beach ridges and tidal lagoons. Offshore, several prominent reefs and sandbanks can be seen paralleling the coast. The largest is the Recife da Pedra Grande (Big Rocks Reef).

  14. Cape Agulhas, South Africa

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-10-13

    The southernmost tip of Africa is marked by the Cape Agulhas lighthouse. The warm Atlantic Agulhas current meets the cold water Indian Ocean Benguela current, creating treacherous seas that have claimed many ships over the last 450 years. The image covers an area of 22.5 by 41.1 kilometers, was acquired September 27, 2006, and is located at 34.8 degrees south, 20 degrees east. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21014

  15. Vals Cape, New Guinea

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1994-09-30

    STS068-261-062 (30 September-11 October 1994) --- Vals Cape (left) is the prominent point of the island of New Guinea (Indonesia's Irian Jaya) that juts southwest into the Arafura Sea, pointing towards Australia. The part of New Guinea in this northwest-looking view is entirely low-lying swampland with very low population density. The Digul River, snaking across the middle of the view, drains the high mountain chain, which runs along the spine of the island.

  16. Salmonella Mississippi infections in Tasmania: the role of native Australian animals and untreated drinking water.

    PubMed

    Ashbolt, R; Kirk, M D

    2006-12-01

    Salmonella Mississippi infections are very common in Australia's island state - Tasmania - with an annual rate of 17 cases/100000 population. A case-control study conducted during 2001-2002 found single variable associations with indirect exposure to many native animal species, untreated drinking water, travelling within the state, hand-mouth behaviours and contact with pet faeces. No associations were detected with farm animal or pet species or with any food. Indirect contact with native birds, untreated drinking water and travel within the state remained significant predictors of infection in the final model with population attributable fractions of 0.57 and 0.54 for native animals and untreated drinking water respectively. In Tasmania, Australian wildlife species are the likely reservoir for S. Mississippi, contaminating land and water environments. To decrease infection rates requires treatment of water supplies, particularly private rainwater collection systems and advising people to wash their hands after being outdoors and prior to eating.

  17. Organochlorine pesticide residues in animals of Tasmania, Australia-1975-77.

    PubMed

    Bloom, H; Taylor, W; Bloom, W R; Ayling, G M

    1979-12-01

    Animals taken in Tasmania including duck (Anas superciliosa), eel (Anguilla australis), English perch (Perca fluviatilis), white-faced heron (Ardea pacifica), brown trout (Salmo trutta), European starling (Strunus vulgaris), cat (Felis cattus), cormorant (Phalacrocorax sp.), mutton bird (Puffinus tenuirostris), Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii), rainbow trout (Salmo gairdnerii), Tasmanian raven (Corvus mellori), tench (Tinca tinca), and quail (Coturnix sp.) were sampled for p,p'-DDE, pp,p'-TDE, p,p'-DDT, lindane, dieldrin, and hexachlorobenzene. Pesticide residue levels exceeded 0.1 ppm in at least one animal from each area and in the majority of animals sampled from all areas. Pesticide sources could not be determined, partly because migratory species such as ducks, mutton birds, cormorants, and eels may have ingested pesticides outside of Tasmania.

  18. Environmental drivers of Ross River virus in southeastern Tasmania, Australia: towards strengthening public health interventions.

    PubMed

    Werner, A K; Goater, S; Carver, S; Robertson, G; Allen, G R; Weinstein, P

    2012-02-01

    In Australia, Ross River virus (RRV) is predominantly identified and managed through passive health surveillance. Here, the proactive use of environmental datasets to improve community-scale public health interventions in southeastern Tasmania is explored. Known environmental drivers (temperature, rainfall, tide) of the RRV vector Aedes camptorhynchus are analysed against cumulative case records for five adjacent local government areas (LGAs) from 1993 to 2009. Allowing for a 0- to 3-month lag period, temperature was the most significant driver of RRV cases at 1-month lag, contributing to a 23·2% increase in cases above the long-term case average. The potential for RRV to become an emerging public health issue in Tasmania due to projected climate changes is discussed. Moreover, practical outputs from this research are proposed including the development of an early warning system for local councils to implement preventative measures, such as public outreach and mosquito spray programmes.

  19. Mating structure, isonymy and social class in late nineteenth century Tasmania.

    PubMed

    Lafranchi, M; Mitchell, R J; Kosten, M

    1988-01-01

    This study analysed all marriages (N = 4258) registered in the island State of Tasmania during the period 1896-1899 for mating structure, using marital isonymy. We found that irrespective of the geographic size of the subdivisions the random component (Fr) values were similar. This is because there was a high proportion of unique names despite the large population size. Fn values were sensitive to geographic distance only with respect to the 'unrealistically' larger units of analysis. Isonymy is valid over very large distances in Tasmania. Inbreeding values in the study were typical of other mainstream populations, but the nonrandom component was unusually high. Farmer marriages were the major contributors to the high Fn values. One particular region, the Midlands, displayed both a high F (0.0081) and Fn (0.0074) component. The explanation of these values lies in the effects of a rigid socio-economic structure established during colonization.

  20. Urinary Escherichia coli antimicrobial susceptibility profiles and their relationship with community antibiotic use in Tasmania, Australia.

    PubMed

    Meumann, Ella M; Mitchell, Brett G; McGregor, Alistair; McBryde, Emma; Cooley, Louise

    2015-10-01

    This study assessed urinary Escherichia coli antibiotic susceptibility patterns in Tasmania, Australia, and examined their association with community antibiotic use. The susceptibility profiles of all urinary E. coli isolates collected in Tasmania between January 2010 and December 2012 were included. The amount of Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS)-subsidised use of amoxicillin, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (AMC), cefalexin, norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin and trimethoprim was retrieved (at the Tasmanian population level) and the number of defined daily doses per 1000 population per day in Tasmania for these antibiotics was calculated for each month during the study period. Antimicrobial susceptibility data were assessed for changes over time in the 3-year study period. Antimicrobial use and susceptibility data were assessed for seasonal differences and lag in resistance following antibiotic use. Excluding duplicates, 28145 E. coli isolates were included. Resistance levels were low; 35% of isolates were non-susceptible to amoxicillin, 14% were non-susceptible to trimethoprim and <5% were non-susceptible to AMC, cefalexin, gentamicin and norfloxacin. Amoxicillin use increased by 35% during winter/spring compared with summer/autumn, and AMC use increased by 21%. No seasonal variation in quinolone use or resistance was detected. The low levels of antimicrobial resistance identified may relate to Tasmania's isolated geographical location. Significant seasonal variation in amoxicillin and AMC use is likely to be due to increased use of these antibiotics for treatment of respiratory tract infections in winter. Quinolone use is restricted by the PBS in Australia, which is the likely explanation for the low levels of quinolone use and resistance identified. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  1. Evidence for early postglacial warming in Mount Field National Park, Tasmania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rees, Andrew B. H.; Cwynar, Les C.

    2010-02-01

    Situated between the Western Pacific Warm Pool to the north and Antarctica to the south, Tasmania is an ideal location to study both postglacial and Holocene paleoclimates. Few well-dated, quantitative temperature reconstructions exist for the region so that important questions about the occurrence and magnitude of events, such as the Antarctic Cold Reversal and Younger Dryas, in Tasmania remain unanswered. Here, we provide chironomid-based reconstructions of temperature of the warmest quarter (TWARM) for two small subalpine lakes, Eagle and Platypus Tarns, Mount Field National Park. Shortly after deglaciation, TWARM reached modern values by approximately 15 000 cal a BP and remained high until 13 000 cal a BP after which temperatures began to cool steadily, reaching a minimum by 11 100-10 000 cal a BP. These results are consistent with sea surface temperature (SST) reconstructions from south of Tasmania but are in stark contrast to temperature inferences drawn from vegetation reconstructions based on pollen data that indicate cool initial temperatures followed by a broad warm period between 11 600-6800 cal a BP (10 000-6000 14C a BP). The chironomid record broadly matches the summer insolation curve whereas the vegetation record and associated climate inferences mirror winter insolation. The Antarctic Cold Reversal and Younger Dryas cold events are not evident in the chironomid-inferred temperatures, but the Antarctic Cold Reversal is evident in the loss-on-ignition curves.

  2. Problems with provision: barriers to drinking water quality and public health in rural Tasmania, Australia.

    PubMed

    Whelan, Jessica J; Willis, Karen

    2007-01-01

    Access to safe drinking water is essential to human life and wellbeing, and is a key public health issue. However, many communities in rural and regional parts of Australia are unable to access drinking water that meets national standards for protecting human health. The aim of this research was to identify the key issues in and barriers to the provision and management of safe drinking water in rural Tasmania, Australia. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with key local government employees and public health officials responsible for management of drinking water in rural Tasmania. Participants were asked about their core public health duties, regulatory responsibilities, perceptions and management of risk, as well as the key barriers that may be affecting the provision of safe drinking water. This research highlights the effect of rural locality on management and safety of fresh water in protecting public health. The key issues contributing to problems with drinking water provision and quality identified by participants included: poor and inadequate water supply infrastructure; lack of resources and staffing; inadequate catchment monitoring; and the effect of competing land uses, such as forestry, on water supply quality. This research raises issues of inequity in the provision of safe drinking water in rural communities. It highlights not only the increasing need for greater funding by state and commonwealth government for basic services such as drinking water, but also the importance of an holistic and integrated approach to managing drinking water resources in rural Tasmania.

  3. Glenn at the Cape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    Astronaut John H. Glenn Jr. in his silver Mercury spacesuit during pre- flight training activities at Cape Canaveral. On February 20, 1962 Glenn lifted off into space aboard his Mercury Atlas (MA-6) rocket and became the first American to orbit the Earth. After orbiting the Earth 3 times, Friendship 7 landed in the Atlantic Ocean 4 hours, 55 minutes and 23 seconds later, just East of Grand Turk Island in the Bahamas. Glenn and his capsule were recovered by the Navy Destroyer Noa, 21 minutes after splashdown.

  4. 33 CFR 80.525 - Cape Lookout, NC to Cape Fear, NC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Cape Lookout, NC to Cape Fear, NC... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Fifth District § 80.525 Cape Lookout, NC to Cape Fear... southeast side of the Inlet. (g) Except as provided elsewhere in this section from Cape Lookout to Cape...

  5. 33 CFR 80.525 - Cape Lookout, NC to Cape Fear, NC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Cape Lookout, NC to Cape Fear, NC... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Fifth District § 80.525 Cape Lookout, NC to Cape Fear...) Except as provided elsewhere in this section from Cape Lookout to Cape Fear, lines drawn parallel...

  6. 33 CFR 80.525 - Cape Lookout, NC to Cape Fear, NC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Cape Lookout, NC to Cape Fear, NC... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Fifth District § 80.525 Cape Lookout, NC to Cape Fear...) Except as provided elsewhere in this section from Cape Lookout to Cape Fear, lines drawn parallel...

  7. 33 CFR 80.525 - Cape Lookout, NC to Cape Fear, NC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Cape Lookout, NC to Cape Fear, NC... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Fifth District § 80.525 Cape Lookout, NC to Cape Fear... southeast side of the Inlet. (g) Except as provided elsewhere in this section from Cape Lookout to Cape...

  8. 33 CFR 80.525 - Cape Lookout, NC to Cape Fear, NC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cape Lookout, NC to Cape Fear, NC... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Fifth District § 80.525 Cape Lookout, NC to Cape Fear... southeast side of the Inlet. (g) Except as provided elsewhere in this section from Cape Lookout to Cape...

  9. 77 FR 29929 - Safety Zone; Town of Cape Charles Fireworks, Cape Charles Harbor, Cape Charles, VA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-21

    ... Harbor in Cape Charles, VA in support of the Fourth of July Fireworks event. This action is intended to... rule, when finalized, will be effective on July 4th and 5th, 2012. Public Participation and Request for.... Basis and Purpose On July 4, 2012 the Town of Cape Charles will sponsor a fireworks display on the...

  10. Treating melancholia at home: theoretical wisdom and grim reality in the career of E.C. Seguin.

    PubMed

    Goetz, Christopher G; Harter, Donald H

    2013-04-30

    E.C. Seguin was one of the early, influential 19th-century neurologists who participated in the development of neurology as a specialty in the United States. Born in France, but raised from early childhood in the United States, Seguin published widely, developed a high-profile New York City practice, and was named Clinical Professor of Diseases of the Mind and Nervous System at the College of Physicians and Surgeons (New York) in 1874. Typical of the era, he studied neurologic disorders, but also several conditions that today would be considered in the realm of psychiatry. One of his seminal papers was titled "The treatment of mild cases of melancholia at home" (1876). Contrary to the widespread practice of isolating patients in either rest homes or asylums, Seguin introduced and formalized treatment of depression within the household. Against this academic backdrop, Seguin returned home on October 31, 1882, to discover that his own wife, afflicted with long-standing depression and treated at home, had committed suicide after murdering their 3 children. The grim dichotomy between the confidently written paper and the reality of the treatment failure is a neurologic lesson in humility regarding diseases and their unpredictable outcomes.

  11. Putting Partnership at the Centre of Teachers' Professional Learning in Rural and Regional Contexts: Evidence from Case Study Projects in Tasmania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stack, Sue; Beswick, Kim; Brown, Natalie; Bound, Helen; Kenny, John; Abbott-Chapman, Joan

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a professional learning (PL) model that emerged from the authors' involvement with PL processes in several rural and remote schools in the state of Tasmania. As is the case for rural areas generally, young people in rural areas of Tasmania have lower retention rates to Year 12 and lower participation rates in higher education…

  12. Southern Westerly Winds submit to the ENSO regime: A multiproxy paleohydrology record from Lake Dobson, Tasmania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rees, Andrew B. H.; Cwynar, Les C.; Fletcher, Michael-Shawn

    2015-10-01

    The El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and Southern Westerly Winds (SWW) profoundly influence synoptic-scale climate in the Southern Hemisphere. Although many studies have invoked either phenomenon to explain trends in proxy data, few have demonstrated the transition from a climate dominated by SWW flow to one controlled by El Niño activity, which is postulated to have occurred after 5 cal ka BP in the mid-latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere. Tasmania, southeast Australia, is ideally situated to detect changes in both of these climatic controls. Currently, El Niño and La Niña events result in drier and wetter conditions island-wide, respectively, with the greatest impact in the north. Further, Tasmania houses north-south trending mountain ranges near its western coast. As a result, areas west of the mountains exhibit a positive correlation between SWW flow and precipitation, while eastern regions possess either no or a negative relationship. Here, we present data from chironomid remains, charcoal, and geochemical proxies to investigate the paleohydrological history of Lake Dobson, a site located in Mount Field National Park, Tasmania. The proxies revealed three broad periods: (1) an early Holocene (11.5-8.3 cal kyr BP) characterised by generally high rainfall, the occurrence of irregular fires, and elevated charcoal influx at 11.4 and 10.2 cal ka BP - conditions compatible with attenuated SWW flow over the site; (2) an ambiguous mid-Holocene (8.3-5 cal kyr BP) that marks the transition from a SWW- to ENSO-dominated climate; and (3) a relatively dry and stable late Holocene (5 cal kyr BP to present) that is consistent with the onset of a climate controlled by ENSO activity (i.e., characterised by a more mean El Niño climate state). The proxy record of Lake Dobson highlights the teleconnections between the equatorial Pacific and southern Australasia.

  13. Late-surviving megafauna in Tasmania, Australia, implicate human involvement in their extinction.

    PubMed

    Turney, Chris S M; Flannery, Timothy F; Roberts, Richard G; Reid, Craig; Fifield, L Keith; Higham, Tom F G; Jacobs, Zenobia; Kemp, Noel; Colhoun, Eric A; Kalin, Robert M; Ogle, Neil

    2008-08-26

    Establishing the cause of past extinctions is critical if we are to understand better what might trigger future occurrences and how to prevent them. The mechanisms of continental late Pleistocene megafaunal extinction, however, are still fiercely contested. Potential factors contributing to their demise include climatic change, human impact, or some combination. On the Australian mainland, 90% of the megafauna became extinct by approximately 46 thousand years (ka) ago, soon after the first archaeological evidence for human colonization of the continent. Yet, on the neighboring island of Tasmania (which was connected to the mainland when sea levels were lower), megafaunal extinction appears to have taken place before the initial human arrival between 43 and 40 ka, which would seem to exonerate people as a contributing factor in the extirpation of the island megafauna. Age estimates for the last megafauna, however, are poorly constrained. Here, we show, by direct dating of fossil remains and their associated sediments, that some Tasmanian megafauna survived until at least 41 ka (i.e., after their extinction on the Australian mainland) and thus overlapped with humans. Furthermore, a vegetation record for Tasmania spanning the last 130 ka shows that no significant regional climatic or environmental change occurred between 43 and 37 ka, when a land bridge existed between Tasmania and the mainland. Our results are consistent with a model of human-induced extinction for the Tasmanian megafauna, most probably driven by hunting, and they reaffirm the value of islands adjacent to continental landmasses as tests of competing hypotheses for late Quaternary megafaunal extinctions.

  14. A new species of Alwisia (Myxomycetes) from New South Wales and Tasmania.

    PubMed

    Leontyev, Dmitry V; Stephenson, Steven L; Schnittler, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Based on a morphological investigation of a series of specimens collected in New South Wales and Tasmania and a phylogeny constructed with partial 18S ribosomal RNA gene sequences, we describe a new species Alwisia lloydiae; the fourth species within the recently revalidated genus Alwisia. This new species is characterized by short ovate sporothecae with mostly free stalks, morphologically resembling the recently described A. morula. However, the new species possesses a tubular capillitium that suggests an affinity with A. bombarda. The capillitium of the new species is ornamented with globular warts, and this feature separates it from all other members of the genus. © 2014 by The Mycological Society of America.

  15. Immigration and slow-growth economies: the experience of South Australia and Tasmania.

    PubMed

    Beer, A

    1998-01-01

    "This paper examines national immigration processes and demographic change in South Australia and Tasmania over the last four decades. Particular attention is paid to the inter-censal period 1986-1991.... The paper investigates the impact of the historic make-up of immigrant flows on settlement patterns, and examines the impact on policies intended to increase immigrant settlement in these states. It argues that the policies being pursued by state and federal governments are unlikely to add to the numbers settling in these states, because they pay too little attention to migration processes, and especially the attraction of others from the source country." excerpt

  16. Three year retrospective analysis of computer-assisted emergency dental triage in Tasmania, Australia.

    PubMed

    Ponnusamy, A; Monty, R; Alam, N; Kruger, E; Tennant, M

    2013-01-01

    Tasmania is Australia's smallest state measuring approximately 68,000 km2 and separated (by approximately 240 km of ocean) from the mainland of Australia, at the south-east corner of the continent. The total resident population of Tasmania is approximately 500,000 people with the greatest population density in the capital city, Hobart. Adult dental care is subsidised for socioeconomically disadvantaged people and are provided through the State government dental clinics. Emergency demand for adult dental care is rationed through a triage system (mainly by telephone contact with trained receptionists), applied across the State based on universal clinically agreed criteria. The aim of this study was to analyse the outcomes of this triage system in delivering effective public emergency dental care services in Tasmania. The study population consisted of all patients who approached the dental services in Tasmania for emergency care over a period of 3 years. The data were collected from all four major fixed public dental clinics for the calendar years 2009, 2010 and 2011. A total of 56,298 triage events were analysed over the 3 years (2009-2011) of the study. The proportion of each triage outcome category (ie speed to needing to be seen) was stable. Regarding month-to-month variation, December had the lowest overall number of events (n=3921) and August had the greatest (n=5237). There was a tendency mid-year (winter in the southern hemisphere) for triage events to be above the baseline, while in summer (December to February) there were fewer events. Most triage events occurred on the first day of the working week (Monday), and the least occurred on Fridays. Over half the events were driven from two patient symptom sets: (1) pain that woke patients at night; and (2) pain that required analgesics. In order to deal with the current workforce shortage and funding constraints in the public health sector, the peri-operative workforce such as receptionists can be utilized in

  17. Recurring outbreaks of Salmonella typhimurium phage type 135 associated with the consumption of products containing raw egg in Tasmania.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Nicola; Coleman, David; Shaw, Kathleen

    2008-12-01

    Large egg-associated outbreaks of Salmonella Typhimurium 135 (STm135) that were associated with inadequate food safety practices but also linked to a common poultry farm occurred in Tasmania in 2005. A series of public health interventions were implemented to prevent further occurrences but 2 more egg-associated outbreaks in Tasmania in March 2007 and January 2008 led to a further 66 cases of STm135. This report describes these outbreaks and their links to the common source associated with the outbreaks in 2005.

  18. Opportunity View Leaving Cape York

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-06-07

    NASA Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to acquire this view looking toward the southwest. The scene includes tilted rocks at the edge of a bench surrounding Cape York, with Burns formation rocks exposed in Botany Bay.

  19. Network-derived inhomogeneity in monthly rainfall analyses over western Tasmania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fawcett, Robert; Trewin, Blair; Barnes-Keoghan, Ian

    2010-08-01

    Monthly rainfall in the wetter western half of Tasmania was relatively poorly observed in the early to middle parts of the 20th century, and this causes a marked inhomogeneity in the operational gridded monthly rainfall analyses generated by the Australian Bureau of Meteorology up until the end of 2009. These monthly rainfall analyses were generated for the period 1900 to 2009 in two forms; a national analysis at 0.25° latitude-longitude resolution, and a southeastern Australia regional analysis at 0.1° resolution. For any given month, they used all the monthly data from the standard Bureau rainfall gauge network available in the Australian Data Archive for Meteorology. Since this network has changed markedly since Federation (1901), there is obvious scope for network-derived inhomogeneities in the analyses. In this study, we show that the topography-resolving techniques of the new Australian Water Availability Project analyses, adopted as the official operational analyses from the start of 2010, substantially diminish those inhomogeneities, while using largely the same observation network. One result is an improved characterisation of recent rainfall declines across Tasmania. The new analyses are available at two resolutions, 0.25° and 0.05°.

  20. Seed ferns survived the end-Cretaceous mass extinction in Tasmania.

    PubMed

    McLoughlin, Stephen; Carpenter, Raymond J; Jordan, Gregory J; Hill, Robert S

    2008-04-01

    Seed ferns, dominant elements of the vegetation in many parts of the world from the Triassic to Cretaceous, were considered to have disappeared at the end of the Cretaceous together with several other groups that had occupied key positions in terrestrial and marine ecosystems such as dinosaurs, plesiosaurs, and ammonoids. Seed-fern demise is generally correlated with competition from diversifying flowering plants through the Cretaceous and the global environmental crisis related to the Chicxulub impact event in the paleotropics at the end of the period. New fossils from Tasmania show that one seed-fern lineage survived into the Cenozoic by at least 13 million years. These fossils are described here as a new species, Komlopteris cenozoicus. Komlopteris is a genus of seed ferns attributed to Corystospermaceae and until now was not known from sediments younger than the Early Cretaceous. Discovery of this "Lazarus taxon," together with the presence of a range of other relictual fossil and extant organisms in Tasmania, other southern Gondwanan provinces, and some regions of northern North America and Asia, underscores high-latitude regions as biodiversity refugia during global environmental crises and highlights their importance as sources of postextinction radiations.

  1. Sedimentology of the cold-climate, coal-bearing, Lower Permian ``Lower Freshwater Sequence'' of Tasmania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martini, I. P.; Banks, M. R.

    1989-08-01

    The Lower Permian "Lower Freshwater Sequence" of Tasmania consists of fluvial and coastal sediments deposited in a cold-climate setting adjacent to ice-ridden, shallow seas. The sequence represents a regressive pulse during the filling of a marine basin, possibly a fjord, up to 150 km wide and more than 270 km long, occupied by glaciers in the late Carboniferous. The climatic conditions during the early Permian in Tasmania are revealed by (1) well-developed continental scree breccias, (2) the flora ( Glossopteris-Gangamopteris assemblage), (3) rarity of fossils in tidal deposits, (4) the structure of the trace fossil population (intense bioturbation in offshore muds), (5) the foramol nature of the fauna of the marine beds below and above the Lower Freshwater Sequence, a fauna dominated by brachiopods and bryozoa and containing Eurydesma, and (6) features of the sediments themselves, such as "lonestones" in muddy offshore marine deposits, and oxygen isotopes of associated marine carbonates. Although the sedimentation in the Lower Freshwater Sequence is qualitatively analogous to that of the Quaternary of Canada, the fluvial and coastal sediments do not show evidence of ice rafting nor of frozen ground. Lack of such evidence suggests a cold-temperate rather than a subpolar setting.

  2. Impacts after four years of experimental trampling on alpine/sub-alpine environments in western Tasmania.

    PubMed

    Whinam, Jennie; Chilcott, Nicole M

    2003-04-01

    Experimental trials were undertaken over four years to assess the impact of recreational trampling in undisturbed alpine and sub-alpine vegetation communities in the Western Arthur Range, western Tasmania. Data on 'pad' formation due to human trampling were collected using vegetation cover assessments, biomass estimates and detailed cross-sectional surface profiles. In sub-alpine buttongrass and alpine herbfield, prolonged and sustained damage may occur after 100 passes by walkers. The environmental threshold of the flat alpine herbfield site was breached after 200 passes. Plant morphology was one determinant of resistance and resilience, with upright woody shrubs and tall tussock graminoids most vulnerable to sustained trampling damage. Cushions are susceptible to trampling impacts at 500 passes. Loss of vegetation cover peaks 6-12 months after trampling. Our results show that pads formed with as few as 30-100 passes per annum and tracks form at between 100 and 500 passes per annum. Two years after the cessation of trampling, there is some small recovery in vegetation cover after 30 and 100 passes per annum applied for three years, but no evidence of recovery at the 500 pass treatments. The low trampling threshold and slow recovery rates in western Tasmania suggest that concentrating walkers on a minimal number of sites may be the best management option for these untracked alpine and sub-alpine environments.

  3. Relationship between northwestern Tasmania and East Gondwanaland in the Late Cambrian/Early Ordovician: Paleomagnetic evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z. X.; Baillie, P. W.; Powell, C. M.

    1997-02-01

    The 71 samples from 11 sites in the lower Upper Cambrian turbiditic red siltstone and mudstone of northwestern Tasmania have revealed a high-temperature component which passes a fold test, indicating an age older than Late Devonian. The mean direction of D = 58.3°, I=11.1°, α95 = 10.4°, k = 20.2, is interpreted as of primary or early diagenetic origin, and gives a paleomagnetic pole position at (19.4°S, 28.9°E) with DP = 5.3°, DM = 10.5°. This pole position falls on the Late Cambrian to Early Ordovician part of the East Gondwanaland apparent polar wander path, indicating that if northwestern Tasmania were separated from East Gondwanaland during the Neoproterozoic breakup of the supercontinent Rodinia, it had been accreted to East Gondwanaland by at least the Early Ordovician. Two over-print poles, one at (50.4°S, 177.4°E) with DP = 6.5°, DM = 6.9°, and the other at (62.0°S, 102.6°E) with DP = 9.9°, DM = 11.3°, suggest that there could have been more than one overprinting event in the region during the breakup between Australia and Antarctica in the late Mesozoic and early Tertiary.

  4. Women's access needs in maternity care in rural Tasmania, Australia: a mixed methods study.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Ha; Le, Quynh; Terry, Daniel

    2014-03-01

    This study investigates (i) maternity care access issues in rural Tasmania, (ii) rural women's challenges in accessing maternity services and (iii) rural women's access needs in maternity services. A mixed-method approach using a survey and semi-structured interviews was conducted. The survey explored women's views of rural maternity services from antenatal to postnatal care, while interviews reinforced the survey results and provided insights into the access issues and needs of women in maternity care. The survey was completed by n=210 women, with a response rate of 35%, with n=22 follow-up interviews being conducted. The survey indicated the majority of rural women believed antenatal education and check-ups and postnatal check-ups should be provided locally. The majority of women surveyed also believed in the importance of having a maternity unit in the local hospital, which was further iterated and clarified within the interviews. Three main themes emerged from the interview data, namely (i) lack of access to maternity services, (ii) difficulties in accessing maternity services, and (iii) rural women's access needs. The study suggested that women's access needs are not fully met in some rural areas of Tasmania. Rural women face many challenges when accessing maternity services, including financial burden and risk of labouring en route. The study supports the claim that the closure of rural maternity units shifts cost and risk from the health care system to rural women and their families. Copyright © 2013 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Late Pleistocene and Holocene paleolimnology of two mountain lakes in western Tasmania.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Platt, Bradbury J.

    1986-01-01

    The analysis of diatoms from two lake-sediment cores from southwestern Tasmania that span the Pleistocene-Holocene boundary provides insight about paleolimnological and paleoclimatic change in this region. Both Lake Vera and Eagle Tarn have lacustrine records that begin about 12 000 yr ago. Both lakes have had similar limnological histories. Each appears to have been larger and more alkaline 12 000 yr ago and both became shallower through time. Fossil diatom assemblages about 11 000 yr old indicate shallow- water environments that fluctuated in pH, and between dilute and possibly slightly saline hydrochemical conditions. Beginning 11 500 yr ago, limnological conditions of shallow, dilute water of neutral pH prevailed, indicating reduction of moisture stress. A subsequent transition to diatom assemblages indicative of acidic conditions about 10 000 yr ago parallels the establishment of rain-forest vegetation and essentially modern climatic conditions with excess precipitation over evaporation. Changes at these separate and distinctive sites suggests a regional paleoclimatic cause rather than local environmental effects. Latest Pleistocene climates were apparently more continental and drier than Holocene climates in southwestern Tasmania.-from Author

  6. Mechanisms of arsenic attenuation in acid mine drainage from Mount Bischoff, western Tasmania.

    PubMed

    Gault, Andrew G; Cooke, David R; Townsend, Ashley T; Charnock, John M; Polya, David A

    2005-06-01

    There is a dearth of research concerning the geochemistry of arsenic in acid mine drainage (AMD) in western Tasmania. To help address this, the controls on the mobility and fate of arsenic in AMD and its associated sediment at the Mount Bischoff mine site in western Tasmania were investigated. AMD issuing from the adit mouth contained dissolved arsenic and iron concentrations of 2.5 and 800 mg L(-1), respectively. The aqueous concentration of both arsenic and iron decreased markedly over a 150-m stretch from the adit mouth due to precipitation of hydrous ferric oxides (HFO) and jarosite, both of which are effective scavengers of arsenic. Microwave-assisted digestion of the sediment collected at the adit mouth revealed that the arsenic concentration exceeded 1%. Sequential extraction of this sediment showed that the bulk of arsenic was associated with amorphous and crystalline hydrous oxides of Al and/or Fe. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis indicated that the solid phase arsenic exists as As(V). EXAFS data were consistent with arsenate tetrahedra substituting for sulphate in jarosite and with corner-sharing complexes adsorbed on ferric oxyhydroxide octahedra. Erosional transport of AMD sediment downstream to higher pH waters may increase the mobility (and hence bioavailablity) of arsenic through dissolution of As-rich jarosite.

  7. Where does biodiversity go from here? A grim business-as-usual forecast and a hopeful portfolio of partial solutions

    PubMed Central

    Ehrlich, Paul R.; Pringle, Robert M.

    2008-01-01

    The threats to the future of biodiversity are many and well known. They include habitat conversion, environmental toxification, climate change, and direct exploitation of wildlife, among others. Moreover, the projected addition of 2.6 billion people by mid-century will almost certainly have a greater environmental impact than that of the last 2.6 billion. Collectively, these trends portend a grim future for biodiversity under a business-as-usual scenario. These threats and their interactions are formidable, but we review seven strategies that, if implemented soundly and scaled up dramatically, would preserve a substantial portion of global biodiversity. These are actions to stabilize the human population and reduce its material consumption, the deployment of endowment funds and other strategies to ensure the efficacy and permanence of conservation areas, steps to make human-dominated landscapes hospitable to biodiversity, measures to account for the economic costs of habitat degradation, the ecological reclamation of degraded lands and repatriation of extirpated species, the education and empowerment of people in the rural tropics, and the fundamental transformation of human attitudes about nature. Like the carbon “stabilization wedges” outlined by Pacala and Socolow [Pacala S, Socolow R (2004) Stabilization wedges: Solving the climate problem for the next 50 years with current technologies. Science 305:968–972] (1), the science and technologies needed to effect this vision already exist. The remaining challenges are largely social, political, and economic. Although academic conservation biology still has an important role to play in developing technical tools and knowledge, success at this juncture hinges more on a massive mobilization of effort to do things that have traditionally been outside the scope of the discipline. PMID:18695214

  8. Inferring the distribution and demography of an invasive species from sighting data: the red fox incursion into Tasmania.

    PubMed

    Caley, Peter; Ramsey, David S L; Barry, Simon C

    2015-01-01

    A recent study has inferred that the red fox (Vulpes vulpes) is now widespread in Tasmania as of 2010, based on the extraction of fox DNA from predator scats. Heuristically, this inference appears at first glance to be at odds with the lack of recent confirmed discoveries of either road-killed foxes--the last of which occurred in 2006, or hunter killed foxes--the most recent in 2001. This paper demonstrates a method to codify this heuristic analysis and produce inferences consistent with assumptions and data. It does this by formalising the analysis in a transparent and repeatable manner to make inference on the past, present and future distribution of an invasive species. It utilizes Approximate Bayesian Computation to make inferences. Importantly, the method is able to inform management of invasive species within realistic time frames, and can be applied widely. We illustrate the technique using the Tasmanian fox data. Based on the pattern of carcass discoveries of foxes in Tasmania, we infer that the population of foxes in Tasmania is most likely extinct, or restricted in distribution and demographically weak as of 2013. It is possible, though unlikely, that that population is widespread and/or demographically robust. This inference is largely at odds with the inference from the predator scat survey data. Our results suggest the chances of successfully eradicating the introduced red fox population in Tasmania may be significantly higher than previously thought.

  9. Inferring the Distribution and Demography of an Invasive Species from Sighting Data: The Red Fox Incursion into Tasmania

    PubMed Central

    Caley, Peter; Ramsey, David S. L.; Barry, Simon C.

    2015-01-01

    A recent study has inferred that the red fox (Vulpes vulpes) is now widespread in Tasmania as of 2010, based on the extraction of fox DNA from predator scats. Heuristically, this inference appears at first glance to be at odds with the lack of recent confirmed discoveries of either road-killed foxes—the last of which occurred in 2006, or hunter killed foxes—the most recent in 2001. This paper demonstrates a method to codify this heuristic analysis and produce inferences consistent with assumptions and data. It does this by formalising the analysis in a transparent and repeatable manner to make inference on the past, present and future distribution of an invasive species. It utilizes Approximate Bayesian Computation to make inferences. Importantly, the method is able to inform management of invasive species within realistic time frames, and can be applied widely. We illustrate the technique using the Tasmanian fox data. Based on the pattern of carcass discoveries of foxes in Tasmania, we infer that the population of foxes in Tasmania is most likely extinct, or restricted in distribution and demographically weak as of 2013. It is possible, though unlikely, that that population is widespread and/or demographically robust. This inference is largely at odds with the inference from the predator scat survey data. Our results suggest the chances of successfully eradicating the introduced red fox population in Tasmania may be significantly higher than previously thought. PMID:25602618

  10. Investigation of genetic structure between deep and shallow populations of the southern Rock Lobster, Jasus edwardsii in Tasmania, Australia.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Erin M J; Green, Bridget S; Murphy, Nicholas P; Strugnell, Jan M

    2013-01-01

    The southern rock lobster, Jasus edwardsii, shows clear phenotypic differences between shallow water (red coloured) and deeper water (pale coloured) individuals. Translocations of individuals from deeper water to shallower waters are currently being trialled as a management strategy to facilitate a phenotypic change from lower value pale colouration, common in deeper waters, to the higher value red colouration found in shallow waters. Although panmixia across the J. edwardsii range has been long assumed, it is critical to assess the genetic variability of the species to ensure that the level of population connectivity is appropriately understood and translocations do not have unintended consequences. Eight microsatellite loci were used to investigate genetic differentiation between six sites (three shallow, three deep) across southern Tasmania, Australia, and one from New Zealand. Based on analyses the assumption of panmixia was rejected, revealing small levels of genetic differentiation across southern Tasmania, significant levels of differentiation between Tasmania and New Zealand, and high levels of asymmetric gene flow in an easterly direction from Tasmania into New Zealand. These results suggest that translocation among Tasmanian populations are not likely to be problematic, however, a re-consideration of panmictic stock structure for this species is necessary.

  11. Investigation of Genetic Structure between Deep and Shallow Populations of the Southern Rock Lobster, Jasus edwardsii in Tasmania, Australia

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Erin M. J.; Green, Bridget S.; Murphy, Nicholas P.; Strugnell, Jan M.

    2013-01-01

    The southern rock lobster, Jasus edwardsii, shows clear phenotypic differences between shallow water (red coloured) and deeper water (pale coloured) individuals. Translocations of individuals from deeper water to shallower waters are currently being trialled as a management strategy to facilitate a phenotypic change from lower value pale colouration, common in deeper waters, to the higher value red colouration found in shallow waters. Although panmixia across the J. edwardsii range has been long assumed, it is critical to assess the genetic variability of the species to ensure that the level of population connectivity is appropriately understood and translocations do not have unintended consequences. Eight microsatellite loci were used to investigate genetic differentiation between six sites (three shallow, three deep) across southern Tasmania, Australia, and one from New Zealand. Based on analyses the assumption of panmixia was rejected, revealing small levels of genetic differentiation across southern Tasmania, significant levels of differentiation between Tasmania and New Zealand, and high levels of asymmetric gene flow in an easterly direction from Tasmania into New Zealand. These results suggest that translocation among Tasmanian populations are not likely to be problematic, however, a re-consideration of panmictic stock structure for this species is necessary. PMID:24250747

  12. Clearfell controversies and alternative timber harvest designs: how acceptability perceptions vary between Tasmania and the U.S. Pacific Northwest.

    PubMed

    Ribe, Robert G; Ford, Rebecca M; Williams, Kathryn J H

    2013-01-15

    Perceptions of the acceptability of alternative "variable retention" timber harvests, that keep trees standing in harvested areas, were compared between regions beset by major forestry conflicts. Data from similar studies of similar harvest systems were compared between Oregon and Tasmania. These comparisons were related to attitudes and to differences in ecosystems, silvicultural prescriptions, forestry outcomes, aesthetics, and social-political context. Findings showed that perceptions measured in one region cannot be assumed valid in another. Substantial regional differences arose not from general sociological differences but from differences in local forestry outcomes. These largely arose from different regeneration requirements of commercial tree species and consequent differences in the design of otherwise analogous harvests. Comparisons of perceptions by people with similar attitudes yielded substantial regional differences. Those prioritizing ecological conservation were mainly influenced by habitat outcomes, and consequently preferred harvests with aggregated tree retention patterns in Tasmania but not in Oregon. People sympathetic to timber industry interests in both regions showed little association between forestry outcomes and acceptability and favoured more intensive harvests. Tasmanian harvest advocates perceived harvests that keep more standing trees as less acceptable than those in Oregon. This may be due to sampling differences or to greater risk perceptions towards new harvest designs in Tasmania. Tasmanians generally disliked clearfelling more than Oregonians, likely due to different political narratives framing these perceptions or to higher aesthetic impacts in Tasmania due to burning. Dispersed retention was perceived as more acceptable in Oregon than in Tasmania, likely because Oregon had much higher post-harvest tree densities. Regional differences in wildfire-risk and logger-safety were not strongly associated with different acceptability

  13. GhMCS1, the Cotton Orthologue of Human GRIM-19, Is a Subunit of Mitochondrial Complex I and Associated with Cotton Fibre Growth

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Chun-Juan; Wu, Ai-Min; Du, Shao-Jun; Tang, Kai; Wang, Yun; Liu, Jin-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    GRIM-19 (Gene associated with Retinoid-Interferon-induced Mortality 19) is a subunit of mitochondrial respiratory complex I in mammalian systems, and it has been demonstrated to be a multifunctional protein involved in the cell cycle, cell motility and innate immunity. However, little is known about the molecular functions of its homologues in plants. Here, we characterised GhMCS1, an orthologue of human GRIM-19 from cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.), and found that it was essential for maintaining complex integrity and mitochondrial function in cotton. GhMCS1 was detected in various cotton tissues, with high levels expressed in developing fibres and flowers and lower levels in leaves, roots and ovules. In fibres at different developmental stages, GhMCS1 expression peaked at 5–15 days post anthesis (dpa) and then decreased at 20 dpa and diminished at 25 dpa. By Western blot analysis, GhMCS1 was observed to be localised to the mitochondria of cotton leaves and to colocalise with complex I. In Arabidopsis, GhMCS1 overexpression enhanced the assembly of complex I and thus respiratory activity, whereas the GhMCS1 homologue (At1g04630) knockdown mutants showed significantly decreased respiratory activities. Furthermore, the mutants presented with some phenotypic changes, such as smaller whole-plant architecture, poorly developed seeds and fewer trichomes. More importantly, in the cotton fibres, both the GhMCS1 transcript and protein levels were correlated with respiratory activity and fibre developmental phase. Our results suggest that GhMCS1, a functional ortholog of the human GRIM-19, is an essential subunit of mitochondrial complex I and is involved in cotton fibre development. The present data may deepen our knowledge on the potential roles of mitochondria in fibre morphogenesis. PMID:27632161

  14. View of 'Cape St. Mary' from 'Cape Verde' (Altered Contrast)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    As part of its investigation of 'Victoria Crater,' NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity examined a promontory called 'Cape St. Mary' from the from the vantage point of 'Cape Verde,' the next promontory counterclockwise around the crater's deeply scalloped rim. This view of Cape St. Mary combines several exposures taken by the rover's panoramic camera into an approximately true-color mosaic with contrast adjusted to improve the visibility of details in shaded areas.

    The upper portion of the crater wall contains a jumble of material tossed outward by the impact that excavated the crater. This vertical cross-section through the blanket of ejected material surrounding the crater was exposed by erosion that expanded the crater outward from its original diameter, according to scientists' interpretation of the observations. Below the jumbled material in the upper part of the wall are layers that survive relatively intact from before the crater-causing impact. Near the base of the Cape St. Mary cliff are layers with a pattern called 'crossbedding,' intersecting with each other at angles, rather than parallel to each other. Large-scale crossbedding can result from material being deposited as wind-blown dunes.

    The images combined into this mosaic were taken during the 970th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity's Mars-surface mission (Oct. 16, 2006). The panoramic camera took them through the camera's 750-nanometer, 530-nanometer and 430-nanometer filters.

  15. Twins eye study in Tasmania (TEST): rationale and methodology to recruit and examine twins.

    PubMed

    Mackey, David A; Mackinnon, Jane R; Brown, Shayne A; Kearns, Lisa S; Ruddle, Jonathan B; Sanfilippo, Paul G; Sun, Cong; Hammond, Christopher J; Young, Terri L; Martin, Nicholas G; Hewitt, Alex W

    2009-10-01

    Visual impairment is a leading cause of morbidity and poor quality of life in our community. Unravelling the mechanisms underpinning important blinding diseases could allow preventative or curative steps to be implemented. Twin siblings provide a unique opportunity in biology to discover genes associated with numerous eye diseases and ocular biometry. Twins are particularly useful for quantitative trait analysis through genome-wide association and linkage studies. Although many studies involving twins rely on twin registries, we present our approach to the Twins Eye Study in Tasmania to provide insight into possible recruitment strategies, expected participation rates and potential examination strategies that can be considered by other researchers for similar studies. Five separate avenues for cohort recruitment were adopted: (1) piggy-backing existing studies where twins had been recruited, (2) utilizing the national twin registry, (3) word-of-mouth and local media publicity, (4) directly approaching schools, and finally (5) collaborating with other research groups studying twins.

  16. Controls on salt mobility and storage in the weathered dolerites of north-east Tasmania, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweeney, Margaret; Moore, Leah

    2014-05-01

    Changes in land use and vegetation due to agriculture, forestry practices and urbanisation can mobilise naturally occurring salts in the landscape and accelerate the expression of land and water salinisation, potentially threatening built and natural assets. Some salts are released during rock weathering or are derived from marine sediments or wind-blown dust, but in Tasmania most originate from salt dissolved in rainfall that is concentrated during evaporation. The volume of salts deposited over north-east Tasmania from precipitation exceeds 70kg/ha/year. The dominant lithology of the salt affected regions in Tasmania is dolerite which breaks down to form secondary minerals including: smectite and kaolinite clays and Fe-bearing sesquioxides. The weathering of Tasmanian dolerites, sampled from fresh corestones, weathering rinds and sequentially through the soil horizon, has been examined petrographically and geochemically. The EC1:5 increases with weathering to a maximum 4.9 dS/m and decreases in the pedogenic zone. This confirms field observations that deeply weathered dolerite can serve as a significant store for salt in the landscape. The water associated with dolerite weathering is typically a bicarbonate fluid. The pH1:5 decreases as the samples weather and increases in the pedogenic zone. Clay content increases with distance from corestones (sandy clay loam to heavy clay), and this is also reflected in the density (2.6-1.3 gm/cm3) and loss on ignition (1.3-13.3 wt%). The patterns for Na are complicated as it is enriched through NaCl accession and removed during the weathering of plagioclase. The net enrichment of Cl (up to 5239 ppm) implies decoupling of Cl from Na during weathering. Potassium, Ca and Sr are mobilised from the profile as plagioclase weathers, and silica is progressively lost from the profile with the weathering of silicate phases. Iron is initially mobilised with the weathering of pyroxene and mafic accessory minerals, but is rapidly fixed in

  17. Twins Eye Study in Tasmania (TEST): Rationale and Methodology to Recruit and Examine Twins

    PubMed Central

    Mackey, David A; MacKinnon, Jane R; Brown, Shayne A; Kearns, Lisa S; Ruddle, Jonathan B; Sanfilippo, Paul G; Sun, Cong; Hammond, Christopher J; Young, Terri L; Martin, Nicholas G; Hewitt, Alex W

    2013-01-01

    Visual impairment is a leading cause for morbidity and poor quality of life in our community. Unravelling the mechanisms underpinning important blinding diseases could allow for preventative or curative steps to be implemented. Twin siblings provide a unique opportunity in biology to discover genes associated with numerous eye diseases and ocular biometry. Twins are particularly useful for quantitative trait analysis through genome-wide association and linkage studies. Although many studies involving twins rely on twin registries, we present our approach to the Twins Eye Study in Tasmania to provide insight into possible recruitment strategies, expected participation rates and potential examination strategies that can be considered by other researchers for similar studies. Five separate avenues for cohort recruitment were adopted: 1) piggy-backing existing studies where twins had been recruited; 2); utilising the national twin registry; 3) word of mouth and local media publicity; 4) directly approaching schools; and finally 5) collaborating with other research groups studying twins. PMID:19803772

  18. Leptospirosis in Tasmanian Devils ( Sarcophilus harrisii ) in Tasmania, 2008-12.

    PubMed

    Wynwood, Sarah J; Burns, Mary-Anne; Graham, Glenn C; Weier, Steven L; McKay, David B; Peck, Sarah; Craig, Scott B

    2016-07-01

    In 2014, we performed a diagnostic study of leptospirosis in Tasmanian devil ( Sarcophilus harrisii ) samples collected between 2008 and 2012 from wild and captive animals. Tasmanian devil populations have been declining because of a facial tumor disease since the 1990s, with ongoing investigations examining potential causative agents. Identifying other causative pathogens that may contribute additively to their decline is important to preserve current and future populations. We tested 81 Tasmanian devil serum samples and two tissue samples using PCR, microscopic agglutination test (MAT), and microsphere immunoassay (MIA). We found evidence of leptospirosis in Tasmanian devil populations across a wide geographic range of Tasmania. Antibodies to serovars in the serogroup Javanica, which are not considered endemic to Australia, were identified in 10 Tasmanian devils using MAT. We also identified serovar Celledoni serologically using the immunoglobulin G MIA and detected Leptospira in one sample using PCR.

  19. Today's Grim Jobs Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fogg, Neeta P.; Harrington, Paul E.

    2010-01-01

    June 2009 is seen by many as the end of the Great Recession. Strong growth in GDP following massive monetary and fiscal responses to the collapse in housing and financial markets meant that the economy was on the mend. Yet a year later, 1.1 million "fewer" people are working, and the unemployment rate is stuck at 9.5%. Worse still, more than one…

  20. Today's Grim Jobs Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fogg, Neeta P.; Harrington, Paul E.

    2010-01-01

    June 2009 is seen by many as the end of the Great Recession. Strong growth in GDP following massive monetary and fiscal responses to the collapse in housing and financial markets meant that the economy was on the mend. Yet a year later, 1.1 million "fewer" people are working, and the unemployment rate is stuck at 9.5%. Worse still, more than one…

  1. Acute photosensitisation and mortality in a herd of dairy cattle in Tasmania.

    PubMed

    Golder, H M; Moss, N; Rogers, G; Jackson, B; Gannon, N; Wong, Ptw; Lean, I J

    2017-01-01

    A herd of Holstein, Jersey, or Holstein-Jersey cross lactating cattle of mixed ages presented with a sudden drop in milk yield in 94/678 cows on 3 October 2014 (Day 0). The herd was located in Gretna in the Derwent Valley (Tasmania, Australia) and had been grazing dryland pasture. On Day 0 the cows variably showed recumbency, peracute photosensitisation, inflamed coronary bands, conjunctival erythema, periauricular oedema, distress indicated by kicking at the flank, bruxism, discomfort, weight shifting, vocalisation indicating pain and depression. Blood samples collected on Day 4 from five clinically affected cows showed high activities of aspartate aminotransferase, glutamate dehydrogenase and gamma-glutamyl transferase. Morbidity, based on the number of treated cases within 72 hours of clinical onset, was estimated at 165/678 cows (24.3%). Mortality over the first 30 days was 19/678 cows (2.8%). Necropsies of two cows on Day 4 showed marked distension of the gall bladder and extensive icterus. Necropsies of another two cows on Day 5 showed enlarged livers with severe damage and oedema of the distal abomasum. Severe ulcerative abomasal gastritis was present in both cows. Hepatic histopathology was consistent with chronic cholangiohepatitis. Fifty-five different mycotoxins were detected from a barley grass (Hordeum murinum) sample from the presumably contaminated pasture. Concentrations of B-trichothecenes, fumonisins, and zearalenone metabolites from this sample were remarkably high. The leaf smut, Jamesdicksonia dactylidis, that has not been previously reported in Tasmania, was identified from the sample of barley grass, but it is not known whether the smut can produce toxins. Probably an undescribed peracute mycotoxicosis associated with the ingestion of contaminated dryland pasture. A definitive diagnosis could not be reached in this case of acute photosensitisation and mortality in dairy cattle grazing possibly contaminated dryland pasture. The findings

  2. Trends of atmospheric methane in the Southern Hemisphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fraser, P. J.; Khalil, M. A. K.; Rasmussen, R. A.; Crawford, A. J.

    1981-01-01

    Atmospheric observations spanning the past three years show that methane increased at 1.2 (plus or minus 0.3)% per year at Cape Grim in Tasmania (41 deg S). This rate of increase can be compared to the 1.9 (plus or minus 0.4)% per year observed at Cape Meares in Oregon (45 deg N) over the past two years. Over the corresponding period the concentration at Cape Grim increased by 1.4 (plus or minus 0.4)% per year. The Southern Hemisphere data also suggest seasonal variations with minimum concentrations in March and maximum in September. These results are based on 26 large-volume stable air samples collected cryogenically in stainless steel flasks and 75 smaller-volume air samples collected in glass flasks, all analyzed by a gas chromatograph using a flame ionization detector.

  3. 33 CFR 165.530 - Safety Zone: Cape Fear and Northeast Cape Fear Rivers, NC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Safety Zone: Cape Fear and Northeast Cape Fear Rivers, NC. 165.530 Section 165.530 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 165.530 Safety Zone: Cape Fear and Northeast Cape Fear Rivers, NC. (a) Location. The following area...

  4. 33 CFR 165.530 - Safety Zone: Cape Fear and Northeast Cape Fear Rivers, NC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Safety Zone: Cape Fear and Northeast Cape Fear Rivers, NC. 165.530 Section 165.530 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 165.530 Safety Zone: Cape Fear and Northeast Cape Fear Rivers, NC. (a) Location. The following area...

  5. 33 CFR 165.530 - Safety Zone: Cape Fear and Northeast Cape Fear Rivers, NC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Safety Zone: Cape Fear and Northeast Cape Fear Rivers, NC. 165.530 Section 165.530 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 165.530 Safety Zone: Cape Fear and Northeast Cape Fear Rivers, NC. (a) Location. The following area...

  6. 33 CFR 165.530 - Safety Zone: Cape Fear and Northeast Cape Fear Rivers, NC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Safety Zone: Cape Fear and Northeast Cape Fear Rivers, NC. 165.530 Section 165.530 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 165.530 Safety Zone: Cape Fear and Northeast Cape Fear Rivers, NC. (a) Location. The following area...

  7. 33 CFR 165.530 - Safety Zone: Cape Fear and Northeast Cape Fear Rivers, NC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Safety Zone: Cape Fear and Northeast Cape Fear Rivers, NC. 165.530 Section 165.530 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 165.530 Safety Zone: Cape Fear and Northeast Cape Fear Rivers, NC. (a) Location. The following area...

  8. 46 CFR 7.140 - Cape Blanco, OR to Cape Flattery, WA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cape Blanco, OR to Cape Flattery, WA. 7.140 Section 7.140 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC BOUNDARY LINES Pacific Coast § 7.140 Cape Blanco, OR to Cape Flattery, WA. (a) A line drawn from the seaward...

  9. 77 FR 9699 - Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission; Cape Cod National Seashore, South Wellfleet, MA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-17

    ... National Park Service Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission; Cape Cod National Seashore, South... Stat. 770, 5 U.S.C. App 1, Section 10) of a meeting of the Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission. DATES: The meeting of the Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission will be held on March...

  10. 76 FR 8768 - Cape Cod National Seashore, South Wellfleet, MA; Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-15

    ... National Park Service Cape Cod National Seashore, South Wellfleet, MA; Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory... Stat. 770, 5 U.S.C. App 1, Section 10) of a meeting of the Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission. DATES: The meeting of the Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission will be held on March...

  11. 76 FR 44606 - Cape Cod National Seashore; South Wellfleet, MA; Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-26

    ... National Park Service Cape Cod National Seashore; South Wellfleet, MA; Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory.... 770, 5 U.S.C. App 1, Section 10) of a meeting of the Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission. DATES: The meeting of the Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission will be held on September...

  12. 76 FR 66082 - Cape Cod National Seashore, South Wellfleet, MA; Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-25

    ... National Park Service Cape Cod National Seashore, South Wellfleet, MA; Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory... Stat. 770, 5 U.S.C. App 1, Section 10) of a meeting of the Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission. DATES: The meeting of the Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission will be held on...

  13. 76 FR 81965 - Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission; Cape Cod National Seashore, South Wellfleet, MA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-29

    ... National Park Service Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission; Cape Cod National Seashore, South... Stat. 770, 5 U.S.C. App 1, Section 10) of a meeting of the Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission. DATES: The meeting of the Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission will be held on...

  14. 75 FR 34479 - Cape Cod National Seashore; South Wellfleet, MA; Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-17

    ... National Park Service Cape Cod National Seashore; South Wellfleet, MA; Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory... Stat. 770, 5 U.S.C. App 1, Section 10) of a meeting of the Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission. DATES: The meeting of the Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission will be held on July...

  15. 75 FR 5622 - Cape Cod National Seashore, South Wellfleet, MA; Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-03

    ... Cape Cod National Seashore, South Wellfleet, MA; Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission AGENCY.... App 1, Section 10) of a meeting of the Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission. DATES: The meeting of the Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission will be held on March 22, 2010 at 1...

  16. 75 FR 77900 - Cape Cod National Seashore, South Wellfleet, MA; Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-14

    ... National Park Service Cape Cod National Seashore, South Wellfleet, MA; Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory... Stat. 770, 5 U.S.C. App 1, Section 10) of a meeting of the Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission. DATES: The meeting of the Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission will be held on...

  17. 75 FR 63854 - Cape Cod National Seashore, South Wellfleet, MA; Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-18

    ... National Park Service Cape Cod National Seashore, South Wellfleet, MA; Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory... Stat. 770, 5 U.S.C. App 1, Section 10) of a meeting of the Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission. DATES: The meeting of the Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission will be held on...

  18. 75 FR 20380 - Cape Cod National Seashore; South Wellfleet, Massachusetts; Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-19

    ... National Park Service Cape Cod National Seashore; South Wellfleet, Massachusetts; Cape Cod National... (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770, 5 U.S.C. App 1, Section 10) of a meeting of the Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission. DATES: The meeting of the Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission...

  19. NASA Spots an "Eye" of Smoke and Phytoplankton near Cape Barren Island

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-28

    NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over Australia's Cape Barren Island and captured an image of phytoplankton and smoke from fires that resembled an eye and eyebrow. The Tasmanian Fire Service reported that a vegetation fire near Thunder and Lightning Bay, Cape Barren Island started on December 4 and was still blazing on December 8. Cape Barren Island is one of a trail of islands in the Bass Strait of the South Pacific Ocean, between southeastern Australia and Tasmania. This natural-color satellite image from Dec. 7 was collected by the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument that flies aboard NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite. The red dots in the image represent heat signatures from the fires as detected by VIIRS. A light grey stream of smoke was blowing to the southeast in what could be seen as the "eyebrow" to the "eye" or swirl of blue and green phytoplankton below it. Phytoplankton are tiny microscopic plant-like organisms that form the base of the marine food chain. Like land plants, phytoplankton contain chlorophyll which is used in photosynthesis to turn sunlight into chemical energy. The chlorophyll gives the phytoplankton their green color, which is visible from space when large numbers of the organism group together. NASA image courtesy MODIS Rapid Response Team #nasagoddard #earth #smoke #Phytoplankton #science b>NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  20. 46 CFR 7.155 - Cape Spencer, AK to Cape St. Elias, AK.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cape Spencer, AK to Cape St. Elias, AK. 7.155 Section 7... LINES Alaska § 7.155 Cape Spencer, AK to Cape St. Elias, AK. (a) A line drawn from the westernmost... from Ocean Cape Light to latitude 59°31.9′ N. longitude 139°57.1′ W. (Yakutat Bay Entrance Lighted...

  1. 46 CFR 7.155 - Cape Spencer, AK to Cape St. Elias, AK.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cape Spencer, AK to Cape St. Elias, AK. 7.155 Section 7... LINES Alaska § 7.155 Cape Spencer, AK to Cape St. Elias, AK. (a) A line drawn from the westernmost... from Ocean Cape Light to latitude 59°31.9′ N. longitude 139°57.1′ W. (Yakutat Bay Entrance Lighted...

  2. 46 CFR 7.155 - Cape Spencer, AK to Cape St. Elias, AK.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cape Spencer, AK to Cape St. Elias, AK. 7.155 Section 7... LINES Alaska § 7.155 Cape Spencer, AK to Cape St. Elias, AK. (a) A line drawn from the westernmost... from Ocean Cape Light to latitude 59°31.9′ N. longitude 139°57.1′ W. (Yakutat Bay Entrance Lighted...

  3. 46 CFR 7.155 - Cape Spencer, AK to Cape St. Elias, AK.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cape Spencer, AK to Cape St. Elias, AK. 7.155 Section 7... LINES Alaska § 7.155 Cape Spencer, AK to Cape St. Elias, AK. (a) A line drawn from the westernmost... from Ocean Cape Light to latitude 59°31.9′ N. longitude 139°57.1′ W. (Yakutat Bay Entrance Lighted...

  4. 46 CFR 7.155 - Cape Spencer, AK to Cape St. Elias, AK.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cape Spencer, AK to Cape St. Elias, AK. 7.155 Section 7... LINES Alaska § 7.155 Cape Spencer, AK to Cape St. Elias, AK. (a) A line drawn from the westernmost... from Ocean Cape Light to latitude 59°31.9′ N. longitude 139°57.1′ W. (Yakutat Bay Entrance Lighted...

  5. The Southern Annular Mode determines interannual and centennial-scale fire activity in temperate southwest Tasmania, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariani, Michela; Fletcher, Michael-Shawn

    2016-02-01

    Southern Annular Mode (SAM) is the primary mode of atmospheric variability in the Southern Hemisphere. While it is well established that the current anthropogenic-driven trend in SAM is responsible for decreased rainfall in southern Australia, its role in driving fire regimes in this region has not been explored. We examined the connection between fire activity and SAM in southwest Tasmania, which lies in the latitudinal band of strongest correlation between SAM and rainfall in the Southern Hemisphere. We reveal that fire activity during a fire season is significantly correlated with the phase of SAM in the preceding year using superposed epoch analysis. We then synthesized new 14 charcoal records from southwest Tasmania spanning the last 1000 years, revealing a tight coupling between fire activity and SAM at centennial timescales, observing a multicentury increase in fire activity over the last 500 years and a spike in fire activity in the 21st century in response to natural and anthropogenic SAM trends.

  6. William Russ Pugh's remarkable life: natural scientist, innovative anaesthetist and founding member of the Royal Society of Tasmania.

    PubMed

    Paull, J D

    2011-07-01

    While well known in anaesthetic circles for being the first to provide ether anaesthesia for a surgical procedure in June 1847 in Launceston, Tasmania, William Russ Pugh's achievements in the field of natural history are less well known. He personally assisted Count Peter de Strzelecki in the chemical analysis of Australian coal and mineral samples and provided the laboratory space and equipment. His analytic skills were utilised by coroners in cases of poisoning. He was consulted about a ship's cargo which threatened to spontaneously combust in Launceston's port. He was a founding member of the Tasmanian Society and subsequently of the Royal Society of Tasmania. He made many presentations on geology, zoology, botany, mineralogy and meteorology to meetings of both Societies. These scientific interests may have provided the knowledge and motivation which encouraged Pugh to proceed so confidently with the introduction of ether anaesthesia.

  7. Serological prevalence study of exposure of cats and dogs in Launceston, Tasmania, Australia to spotted fever group rickettsiae.

    PubMed

    Izzard, L; Cox, E; Stenos, J; Waterston, M; Fenwick, S; Graves, S

    2010-01-01

    A sero-epidemiological study of cats and dogs in the Launceston area of Tasmania, Australia was undertaken to determine the prevalence of antibodies to spotted fever group (SFG) rickettsiae. Results showed that 59% of cats and 57% of dogs were positive for antibodies, but there was no correlation between the animal's health and seropositivity at the time of testing, suggesting that rickettsial exposure is unrelated to ill-health in these two species of domestic animals.

  8. The Tsunami Risk of South-East Tasmania, Australia - the impact of the Puysegur Trench on greater Hobart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Andreas; Daniell, James; Mazengarb, Colin; Rigby, Edward; Wenzel, Friedemann

    2016-04-01

    The coastline of South-East Tasmania in Australia has seen various tsunami events over the last couple of centuries, many of them with an ambiguous offspring. None of these tsunamis have caused a significant loss so far. Due to the absence of locally tsunami-triggering earthquake sources, the area of greater Hobart can be considered fairly safe at least in comparison to more exposed regions like New Zealand or Chile. Nevertheless, the Puysegur trench, about 1500 km East of Tasmania is considered to be capable of triggering earthquakes beyond magnitude 8.5. These events are rare yet possible and therefore a detailed study of the likely impact patterns of such earthquake scenarios has been undertaken. The seismic source characteristics of the Puysegur trench have been reviewed in detail to provide a selection of possible rupture scenarios, considering partial and full rupture of the trench. In addition, these results have been compared to those of other authors. The propagation and inundation patterns of the scenarios are compared to previous studies and the impact of varying seismic slip distribution has been investigated. Inundation is calculated using high-resolution elevation models for various locations in and around Hobart. Furthermore, inundation and average flow velocity data is used to compute the full range of socio-economic losses associated with the event set. This study provides a detailed tsunami risk assessment of South East Tasmania and indicates the hazard and risk variability with respect to varying slip distribution of the earthquake source.

  9. A Cape for Staying Connected

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Jay P.

    2005-01-01

    Some think a good superintendent these days shares a lot in common with a superhero. Larry Hill is one superintendent who really does don a cape. It is a flowing black one, complemented by a sparkly white bow tie and red top hat. And better yet, he wears it on his job as the top administrator of the North Iowa Community Schools in Buffalo Center,…

  10. A Cape for Staying Connected

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Jay P.

    2005-01-01

    Some think a good superintendent these days shares a lot in common with a superhero. Larry Hill is one superintendent who really does don a cape. It is a flowing black one, complemented by a sparkly white bow tie and red top hat. And better yet, he wears it on his job as the top administrator of the North Iowa Community Schools in Buffalo Center,…

  11. MISR Looks at Cape Cod

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Each year in late November the United States observes the Thanksgiving holiday, commemorating the harvest festival celebrated by the Plymouth colonists and the Native Americans who helped them survive the devastating winter of 1620. Plymouth, Massachusetts, where the Mayflower Pilgrims landed, is located on the west side of Cape Cod Bay, shown in this MISR vertical-viewing (nadir) camera image. This nearly cloud-free picture was acquired on April 13, 2000 during Terra orbit 1708.

    South of the distinctively-shaped Cape Cod are Nantucket Island and Martha's Vineyard. Further west is Block Island, south of Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island. Montauk Point on the eastern tip of Long Island, New York, is visible at the lower left. On the mainland, Providence and Boston appear as gray patches. Jutting out from the Massachusetts coastline, northeast of Boston, is Cape Ann, location of the city of Gloucester, which was settled soon after the Pilgrim's arrival in Plymouth. Gloucester is the oldest fishing port in the eastern United States.

    MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington, DC. The Terra satellite is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

  12. 76 FR 38302 - Safety Zone; Cape Charles Fireworks, Cape Charles Harbor, Cape Charles, VA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-30

    ... of the Fourth of July Fireworks event. This action is necessary to provide for the safety of life on.... DATES: This rule is effective from 9 p.m. until 10 p.m. on July 3, 2011, with a rain date of July 4... Purpose On July 03, 2011 the Town of Cape Charles will sponsor a fireworks display on the shoreline of the...

  13. Late Quaternary extraglacial cold-climate deposits in low and mid-altitude Tasmania and their climatic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, P. D.; Eberhard, R.; Slee, A.; Moss, P.; Price, D. M.; Donaldson, P.; Doyle, R.; Martins, J.

    2012-12-01

    Many Tasmanian deposits previously described as 'periglacial' have been described in more detail, re-interpreted and dated. We suggest that 'periglacial' has little meaning when applied locally and the term 'relict cold-climate deposits' is more appropriate. In this paper we examine the origin and age of relict cold-climate slope deposits, fan alluvium and aeolian sediments in Tasmania, and infer the conditions under which they accumulated. Fan alluvium dating from the penultimate Glacial (OIS 6) and capped by a prominent palaeosol deduced to date to the Last Interglacial (OIS 5e) is present at Woodstock, south of Hobart. Many fan deposits formed before 40 ka or in a period c. 30-23 ka; only a few deposits date to the Last Glacial Maximum in Tasmania, which is defined as spanning the period 23.5-17.5 ka. Slope deposits indicate widespread instability down to present-day sea level throughout the Last Glacial, probably as a result of freeze-thaw in a sparsely vegetated landscape. Layered fine gravel and coarse sand colluvial deposits resembling grèzes litées, produced both by dry deposition and by the action of water, are locally common where jointed siltstone bedrock outcrops. These deposits occur from altitudes of 500 m to near sea level and also in caves and must have formed under sparse vegetation cover, probably by freeze-thaw in extremely dry conditions. They have been radiocarbon dated from 35 to 17.5 cal. ka. Relict dunes and sandsheets are widespread at the margin of the Bassian Plain that once provided a land bridge between Tasmania and the mainland. They are also found in western Tasmania and in areas of inland southern Tasmania that now support wet eucalypt forest and rainforest and receive mean annual rainfall > 1500 mm. In the south they have been dated > 87.5-19 ka and attest to a long period of semi-arid climate in an area extending well to the west and south of the present semiarid zone. We deduce that during most of the Last Glacial anticyclones

  14. Preliminary investigations of toxicity in the Georges Bay catchment, Tasmania, Australia.

    PubMed

    Bleaney, Alison; Hickey, Christopher W; Stewart, Michael; Scammell, Marcus; Senjen, Rye

    2015-01-02

    North-eastern Tasmania, Australia has been an area of major production for Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas) for over 25 years. Since the mid-1990s, increased oyster mortality has been observed. The purpose of the present study was to identify the agent causing aquatic toxicity and to investigate whether there is a chemical and/or toxicological link between river foam and monoculture timber plantation forests of exotic eucalypts (Eucalyptus nitens) present in the catchment area. Foam samples from the George River catchment demonstrated high toxicity to a freshwater cladoceran and larvae of a marine blue mussel species. After filtration to remove most particulates, foam samples also demonstrated a marked reduction in toxicity to blue mussels, which suggested that the toxicity is particle associated. Foam and leaf extracts of E. nitens were then fractionated using HPLC and size exclusion chromatography and the resulting fractions were screened for cladoceran and blue mussel toxicity. Toxicity was detected in fractions common to both the foam and the leaf extracts. This study suggests that there may be a chemical and toxicological relationship between foam and E. nitens leaf components.

  15. Preliminary investigations of toxicity in the Georges Bay catchment, Tasmania, Australia

    PubMed Central

    Bleaney, Alison; Hickey, Christopher W.; Stewart, Michael; Scammell, Marcus; Senjen, Rye

    2015-01-01

    North-eastern Tasmania, Australia has been an area of major production for Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas) for over 25 years. Since the mid-1990s, increased oyster mortality has been observed. The purpose of the present study was to identify the agent causing aquatic toxicity and to investigate whether there is a chemical and/or toxicological link between river foam and monoculture timber plantation forests of exotic eucalypts (Eucalyptus nitens) present in the catchment area. Foam samples from the George River catchment demonstrated high toxicity to a freshwater cladoceran and larvae of a marine blue mussel species. After filtration to remove most particulates, foam samples also demonstrated a marked reduction in toxicity to blue mussels, which suggested that the toxicity is particle associated. Foam and leaf extracts of E. nitens were then fractionated using HPLC and size exclusion chromatography and the resulting fractions were screened for cladoceran and blue mussel toxicity. Toxicity was detected in fractions common to both the foam and the leaf extracts. This study suggests that there may be a chemical and toxicological relationship between foam and E. nitens leaf components. PMID:25745193

  16. Holocene Vegetation and Paleoclimatic and Paleomagnetic History from Lake Johnston, Tasmania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anker, Sharon A.; Colhoun, Eric A.; Barton, Charles E.; Peterson, Mike; Barbetti, Mike

    2001-09-01

    Lake Johnston cirque contains some of the best subalpine rainforest in Tasmania. Pollen from the sediments shows Lagarostrobos franklinii, which presently reaches 1040 m, may be a glacial relict. Nothofagus cunninghamii-Nothofagus gunnii subalpine rainforest developed between 9000 and 6000 14C yr B.P., with a maximum at 8700 14C yr B.P. After 6000 14C yr B.P. Nothofagus gunnii became more important, and from 3600 14C yr B.P. sclerophyll and heath components increased. Partial burning of the catchment occurred periodically. Early Holocene climate was warmer and wetter than late Holocene climate. The vegetation and climate changes are similar to those recorded from western South Island New Zealand and Chile. Radiocarbon dates give a sedimentation rate of 0.43 mm/yr. Cores are correlated by magnetic susceptibility. Magnetic ages are assigned by matching with the 14C-dated secular variation master curve for southeastern Australia. Magnetic ages are consistent with the 14C chronology when the former are adjusted by 350 years.

  17. Modern estuarine siliceous spiculites, Tasmania, Australia: A non-polar link to Phanerozoic spiculitic cherts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, C. M.; James, N. P.; Kyser, T. K.; Barrett, N.; Hirst, A. J.

    2008-02-01

    Biosiliceous sedimentary rocks are well known from the geologicrecord and many are correctly interpreted to have formed indeep-water or cold-water environments. Shallow non-polar spiculitesare also known from the rock record, yet no modern analog hasbeen documented for such environments. Bathurst Harbour, anestuarine system in southwest Tasmania, provides this much-neededmodern analog. In this system a sharp halocline separates tannin-richlow-salinity surface waters from clear marine bottom waters.Tannins supply few nutrients and substantially reduce lightpenetration to bottom environments, resulting in a thinned photiczone and the mixing of deeper-water sub-photic biotas of softcorals, bryozoans, and sponges with other organisms more typicalof this temperate shallow-water environment. The well-definedhalocline allows a typically marine biota, including echinoderms,to live in bottom waters of this estuarine setting. The bioclasticfactory, producing both carbonate and siliceous particles, existsin marine subphotic bottom waters of incised channel and shallowrocky environments along the shoreline. Extensive organic-richsoft sediments in protected embayments generate few bioclasts,but contain allochthonous sponge spicules transported from theadjacent bioclastic factory. Trapping of organic material withinthe estuarine system lowers sediment pH and promotes dissolutionof carbonate biofragments, resulting in preferential preservationof siliceous sponge spicules. This situation implies that manybiosiliceous neritic deposits in the rock record may be theresult of similar preferential preservation.

  18. Geochemical differences between tropical (Ordovician) and subpolar (Permian) carbonates, Tasmania, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasada Rao, C.

    1981-05-01

    The Ordovician Gordon Limestone in Tasmania is a low-paleolatitude (10°N) peritidal carbonate with a tropical chlorozoan assemblage (calcareous green algae and corals), diverse nonskeletal grains, extensive early diagenetic dolomites, and some evaporites. It is characterized by small Mn, moderate Na, and large Sr concentrations as in Holocene tropical aragonitic carbonates. The range of Sr/Na (2.6 to 4.6) in the Gordon Limestone is related to aragonitic original mineralogy, dolomitization, and evaporite formation and to channel, prograding tidal flat, and stratigraphic reef environments. The Upper Permian Berriedale Limestone is a sequence of inter-bedded limestones and calcareous shales deposited at a paleolatitude near 80° S during the Gondwanan ice age. The shallow-marine limestone beds formed during the lowering of sea level in colder periods. As sea level rose in warmer periods, a shower of dropstones preceded shale deposition. The Berriedale Limestone contains a cold-water foramol fauna (bryozoans, brachiopods, and pelecypods), intraclasts, and abundant orthochems. Low Mg, equal amounts of Sr and Na (Sr/Na = 1.0), and large Mn concentrations in this limestone indicate original low-Mg calcite precipitation from sea water at a temperature <3 °C.

  19. Characteristics of, and insurance payments for, injuries to cyclists in Tasmania, 1990-2010.

    PubMed

    Hitchens, P L; Palmer, A J

    2012-11-01

    To describe the characteristics and costs of injuries to cyclists resulting in a 3rd party insurance claim in Tasmania. Data on injuries to cyclists were obtained from the Motor Accident Insurance Board (MAIB) for the period 1990-2010. Frequency and insurance costs of injuries to cyclists were compared to injuries incurred by other road users. Descriptive analyses of cycling injuries and insurance costs by year, age and sex of claimant, and type and location of injury are presented. Annual costs of insurance claims by cyclists averaged AUD 3.9 million. There was a significant decrease in the frequency of claims made by all road users combined over the study period, but not for cyclists. Cycling injuries made up 2.0% of claims but accounted for 3.4% of the total costs and were among the road user groups with the highest mean costs per claim. Fractures (20.7%) were the most common cycling injury. Brain injuries led to the highest mean claim costs (AUD 1,559,032), and accounted for 66.8% of claim costs made by cyclists. Mean costs per claim for cycling injuries are high compared to those made by most other road users. The costs of these injuries impose a substantial burden on insurance payers. The high costs and severity of claims by cyclists compared to other road users demonstrates the high vulnerability of cyclists, and lends support to increasing separation of cyclists from motor vehicles. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Dating the Late Cenozoic glacial sequence, Pieman River basin, western Tasmania, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augustinus, Paul C.

    1999-10-01

    The Pieman River basin, western Tasmania, displays one of the most complete Middle to Early Pleistocene glacial sequences from a Southern Hemisphere mid-latitude site. Most of the glacial deposits exceed the 14C limit, although mapping of the depositional units using morphostratigraphic, post-depositional weathering criteria and magnetostratigraphy, shows that the sediments of the Boco and Bobadil glaciation were deposited during the Brunhes normal chron (<783 kyr), whilst the reversed polarity of Bulgobac Glaciation deposits indicates deposition prior to 783 kyr. A maximum age of latest Pliocene for the Bulgobac Glaciation is suggested by magneto- and palynostratigraphy of underlying organic-rich silts. Refinement in dating the Middle Pleistocene glacial deposits has been achieved using U/Th methods on ferricretes and peat developed within and upon the sediment bodies whereby the deposits of the Boco and Bobadil glaciation are shown to be broadly correlative with Oxygen Isotope Stages 6 and 8, respectively. An older mid-Pleistocene glacial event (Animal Creek Glaciation) has also been recognised and dated to >275 kyr. Late Last (Margaret) Glaciation advances in the Pieman basin are much more restricted in extent and display evidence for multiple stillstand-readvance phases during the decay of the system, with most of the ice having disappeared by ˜14 kyr BP.

  1. Domoic Acid Poisoning as a Possible Cause of Seasonal Cetacean Mass Stranding Events in Tasmania, Australia.

    PubMed

    Bengtson Nash, S M; Baddock, M C; Takahashi, E; Dawson, A; Cropp, R

    2017-01-01

    The periodic trend to cetacean mass stranding events in the Australian island state of Tasmania remains unexplained. This article introduces the hypothesis that domoic acid poisoning may be a causative agent in these events. The hypothesis arises from the previously evidenced role of aeolian dust as a vector of iron input to the Southern Ocean; the role of iron enrichment in Pseudo-nitzschia bloom proliferation and domoic acid production; and importantly, the characteristic toxicosis of domoic acid poisoning in mammalian subjects leading to spatial navigation deficits. As a pre-requisite for quantitative evaluation, the plausibility of this hypothesis was considered through correlation analyses between historical monthly stranding event numbers, mean monthly chlorophyll concentration and average monthly atmospheric dust loading. Correlation of these variables, which under the domoic acid stranding scenario would be linked, revealed strong agreement (r = 0.80-0.87). We therefore advocate implementation of strategic quantitative investigation of the role of domoic acid in Tasmanian cetacean mass stranding events.

  2. The petrology of high pressure xenoliths and associated Cenozoic basalts from Northeastern Tasmania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasir, S. J.; Everard, J. L.; McClenaghan, M. P.; Bombardieri, D.; Worthing, M. A.

    2010-07-01

    Abundant mantle xenoliths are found in widespread undersaturated Cenozoic basaltic rocks in Northeastern Tasmania and comprise lavas, dykes, plugs and diatremes. The basanites and nephelinites, include primitive magmas (11-14 wt.% MgO) with OIB-like geochemical features. Trace element and Pb- and Sr-Nd isotope data suggest that they were generated by mixing of melts derived from low degree (< 5%) melting of both garnet- (˜ 90%) and spinel lherzolite (˜ 10%) facies mantle sources with HIMU and EMII characteristics. The associated xenolith suite consists mainly of spinel lherzolite and rare spinel pyroxenite with predominantly granoblastic textures. Calculated oxygen fugacities indicate equilibration of the xenoliths at 0.81 to 2.65 log units below the fayalite-magnetite-quartz (FMQ) buffer. Mantle xenolith equilibration temperatures range from 890-1050 ± 50 °C at weakly constrained pressures between 0.8 and 11.5 GPa. A hot xenolith's geotherm is indicated and attributed to tectonothermal events associated with the break-up of Gondwanaland and/or the opening of the Tasman Sea.

  3. Distribution of Neoparamoeba sp. in sediments around marine finfish farming sites in Tasmania.

    PubMed

    Crosbie, P B B; Macleod, C; Forbes, S; Nowak, B F

    2005-11-09

    Marine sediment samples collected from various sites at 2 Atlantic salmon farms in Tasmania were analysed for the presence of Neoparamoeba sp., an amoeba associated with amoebic gill disease (AGD) in farmed Atlantic salmon. Environmental variables of the sediment layer at each site, including redox potential and sulphide concentration, were measured and the general biological condition assessed by video observation. Sediments and environmental data were collected on 4 occasions at each site over a 12 mo period. Neoparamoeba sp. was detected in populations of amoebae recovered by culture from all sites and in 50% of all sediment samples taken. There was evidence of a seasonal influence on the presence of the amoeba, but this was different at each farm. No Neoparamoeba sp. was recovered from any sites at Farm 1 during the winter of 2002 whereas at Farm 2 this was the case for the summer of 2003. There appeared to be no relationship between the presence of Neoparamoeba sp., salmon farming activities and environmental parameters.

  4. The dREAM/Myb-MuvB complex and Grim are key regulators of the programmed death of neural precursor cells at the Drosophila posterior wing margin.

    PubMed

    Rovani, Margritte K; Brachmann, Carrie Baker; Ramsay, Gary; Katzen, Alisa L

    2012-12-01

    Successful development of a multicellular organism depends on the finely tuned orchestration of cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis from embryogenesis through adulthood. The MYB-gene family encodes sequence-specific DNA-binding transcription factors that have been implicated in the regulation of both normal and neoplastic growth. The Drosophila Myb protein, DMyb (and vertebrate B-Myb protein), has been shown to be part of the dREAM/MMB complex, a large multi-subunit complex, which in addition to four Myb-interacting proteins including Mip130, contains repressive E2F and pRB proteins. This complex has been implicated in the regulation of DNA replication within the context of chorion gene amplification and transcriptional regulation of a wide array of genes. Detailed phenotypic analysis of mutations in the Drosophila myb gene, Dm myb, has revealed a previously undiscovered function for the dREAM/MMB complex in regulating programmed cell death (PCD). In cooperation with the pro-apoptotic protein Grim and dREAM/MMB, DMyb promotes the PCD of specified sensory organ precursor daughter cells in at least two different settings in the peripheral nervous system: the pIIIb precursor of the neuron and sheath cells in the posterior wing margin and the glial cell in the thoracic microchaete lineage. Unlike previously analyzed settings, in which the main role of DMyb has been to antagonize the activities of other dREAM/MMB complex members, it appears to be the critical effector in promoting PCD. The finding that Dm myb and grim are both involved in regulating PCD in two distinct settings suggests that these two genes may often work together to mediate PCD. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. 46 CFR 7.55 - Cape Henry, VA to Cape Fear, NC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cape Henry, VA to Cape Fear, NC. 7.55 Section 7.55 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC BOUNDARY LINES Atlantic Coast § 7.55 Cape Henry, VA to Cape Fear, NC. (a) A line drawn from Rudee Inlet Jetty Light “2”...

  6. 46 CFR 7.55 - Cape Henry, VA to Cape Fear, NC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cape Henry, VA to Cape Fear, NC. 7.55 Section 7.55 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC BOUNDARY LINES Atlantic Coast § 7.55 Cape Henry, VA to Cape Fear, NC. (a) A line drawn from Rudee Inlet Jetty Light “2”...

  7. 46 CFR 7.55 - Cape Henry, VA to Cape Fear, NC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cape Henry, VA to Cape Fear, NC. 7.55 Section 7.55 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC BOUNDARY LINES Atlantic Coast § 7.55 Cape Henry, VA to Cape Fear, NC. (a) A line drawn from Rudee Inlet Jetty Light “2”...

  8. 46 CFR 7.55 - Cape Henry, VA to Cape Fear, NC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cape Henry, VA to Cape Fear, NC. 7.55 Section 7.55 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC BOUNDARY LINES Atlantic Coast § 7.55 Cape Henry, VA to Cape Fear, NC. (a) A line drawn from Rudee Inlet Jetty Light “2”...

  9. 46 CFR 7.55 - Cape Henry, VA to Cape Fear, NC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cape Henry, VA to Cape Fear, NC. 7.55 Section 7.55 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC BOUNDARY LINES Atlantic Coast § 7.55 Cape Henry, VA to Cape Fear, NC. (a) A line drawn from Rudee Inlet Jetty Light “2”...

  10. 33 CFR 80.515 - Cape Henry, VA to Cape Hatteras, NC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cape Henry, VA to Cape Hatteras, NC. 80.515 Section 80.515 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Fifth District § 80.515 Cape Henry, VA to...

  11. 33 CFR 80.515 - Cape Henry, VA to Cape Hatteras, NC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Cape Henry, VA to Cape Hatteras, NC. 80.515 Section 80.515 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Fifth District § 80.515 Cape Henry, VA to...

  12. 33 CFR 80.515 - Cape Henry, VA to Cape Hatteras, NC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Cape Henry, VA to Cape Hatteras, NC. 80.515 Section 80.515 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Fifth District § 80.515 Cape Henry, VA to...

  13. 33 CFR 80.515 - Cape Henry, VA to Cape Hatteras, NC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Cape Henry, VA to Cape Hatteras, NC. 80.515 Section 80.515 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Fifth District § 80.515 Cape Henry, VA to...

  14. 33 CFR 80.515 - Cape Henry, VA to Cape Hatteras, NC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Cape Henry, VA to Cape Hatteras, NC. 80.515 Section 80.515 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Fifth District § 80.515 Cape Henry, VA to...

  15. Prospects for biological control of Cape-ivy with the Cape-ivy fly and the cape-ivy moth

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cape-ivy (Delairea odorata, Asteraceae), native to coastal floodplains and mountain riparian zones in eastern South Africa, is an invasive vine in coastal riparian, woodland and scrub habitats in California and southern Oregon. Cape-ivy smothers native vegetation and may impair water flow in coastal...

  16. Tasmante cruise: Swath-mapping and underway geophysics south and west of Tasmania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Exon, N. F.; Royer, J.-Y.; Hill, P. J.

    1996-06-01

    The 1994 Tasmante swath-mapping and reflection seismic cruise covered 200 000 km2 of sea floor south and west of Tasmania. The survey provided a wealth of morphological, structural and sedimentological information, in an area of critical importance in reconstructing the break-up of East Gondwana. The west Tasmanian margin consists of a non-depositional continental shelf less than 50 km wide and a sedimented continental slope about 100 km wide. The adjacent 20 km of abyssal plain to the west is heavily sedimented, and beyond that is lightly sedimented Eocene oceanic crust formed as Australia and Antarctica separated. The swath data revealed systems of 100 m-deep downslope canyons and large lower-slope fault-blocks, striking 320° and dipping landward. These continental blocks lie adjacent to the continent ocean boundary (COB) and are up to 2500 m high and have 15° 20° scarps. The South Tasman Rise (STR) is bounded to the west by the Tasman Fracture Zone extending south to Antarctica. Adjacent to the STR, the fracture zone is represented by a scarp up to 2000 m high with slopes of 15 20°. The scarp consists of continental faultblocks dipping landward. Beyond the scarp to the west is a string of sheared parallel highs, and beyond that is lightly sedimented Oligocene oceanic crust 4200 4600 m deep with distinct E-W spreading fabric. The eastern margin of the bathymetric STR trends about 320° and is structurally controlled. The depression between it and the continental East Tasman Plateau (ETP) is heavily sedimented; its western part is underlain by thinned continental crust and its central part by oceanic crust of Late Cretaceous to Early Tertiary age. The southern margin of the STR is formed by N-S transform faults and south-dipping normal faults. The STR is cut into two major terrains by a N-S fracture zone at 146°15'E. The western terrain is characterised by rotated basement blocks and intervening basins mostly trending 270° 290°. The eastern terrain is

  17. Trends in anecdotal fox sightings in Tasmania accounted for by psychological factors.

    PubMed

    Marks, Clive A; Clark, Malcolm; Obendorf, David; Hall, Graham P; Soares, Inês; Pereira, Filipe

    2017-04-06

    There has been little evaluation of anecdotal sightings as a means to confirm new incursions of invasive species. This paper explores the potential for equivocal information communicated by the media to account for patterns of anecdotal reports. In 2001, it was widely reported that red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) had been deliberately released in the island state of Tasmania (Australia), although this claim was later revealed to be baseless. Regardless, by 2013 a total of 3153 anecdotal fox sightings had been reported by members of the public, which implied their distribution was wide. For each month in 2001-2003, we defined a monthly media index (MMI) of fox-related media coverage, an index of their relative seasonal abundance (abundance), and a factor denoting claims of fox evidence (claimed evidence) regardless of its evidentiary quality. We fitted a generalized linear model with Poisson error for monthly totals of anecdotal sightings with factors of year and claimed evidence and covariates of MMI, abundance, and hours of darkness. The collective effect of psychological factors (MMI, claimed evidence, and year) relative to biophysical factors (photoperiod and abundance) was highly significant (χ(2) = 122.1, df = 6, p < 0.0001), whereas anticipated changes in abundance had no significant influence on reported sightings (p = 0.15). An annual index of fox media from 2001 to 2010 was strongly associated with the yearly tally of anecdotal sightings (p = 0.018). The odds ratio of sightings ranked as reliable by the fox eradication program in any year decreased exponentially at a rate of 0.00643 as the total number of sightings increased (p < 0.0001) and was indicative of an observer-expectancy bias. Our results suggest anecdotal sightings are highly susceptible to cognitive biases and when used to qualify and quantify species presence can contribute to flawed risk assessments. © 2017 Society for Conservation Biology.

  18. The osteology of the basal archosauromorph Tasmaniosaurus triassicus from the Lower Triassic of Tasmania, Australia.

    PubMed

    Ezcurra, Martín D

    2014-01-01

    Proterosuchidae are the most taxonomically diverse archosauromorph reptiles sampled in the immediate aftermath of the Permo-Triassic mass extinction and represent the earliest radiation of Archosauriformes (archosaurs and closely related species). Proterosuchids are potentially represented by approximately 15 nominal species collected from South Africa, China, Russia, Australia and India, but the taxonomic content of the group is currently in a state of flux because of the poor anatomic and systematic information available for several of its putative members. Here, the putative proterosuchid Tasmaniosaurus triassicus from the Lower Triassic of Hobart, Tasmania (Australia), is redescribed. The holotype and currently only known specimen includes cranial and postcranial remains and the revision of this material sheds new light on the anatomy of the animal, including new data on the cranial endocast. Several bones are re-identified or reinterpreted, contrasting with the descriptions of previous authors. The new information provided here shows that Tasmaniosaurus closely resembles the South African proterosuchid Proterosuchus, but it differed in the presence of, for example, a slightly downturned premaxilla, a shorter anterior process of maxilla, and a diamond-shaped anterior end of interclavicle. Previous claims for the presence of gut contents in the holotype of Tasmaniosaurus are considered ambiguous. The description of the cranial endocast of Tasmaniosaurus provides for the first time information about the anatomy of this region in proterosuchids. The cranial endocast preserves possibly part of the vomero-nasal ( = Jacobson's) system laterally to the olfactory bulbs. Previous claims of the absence of the vomero-nasal organs in archosaurs, which is suggested by the extant phylogenetic bracket, are questioned because its absence in both clades of extant archosaurs seems to be directly related with the independent acquisition of a non-ground living mode of life.

  19. Effect of birth parameters on retinal vascular caliber: the Twins Eye Study in Tasmania.

    PubMed

    Sun, Cong; Ponsonby, Anne-Louise; Wong, Tien Y; Brown, Shayne A; Kearns, Lisa S; Cochrane, Jenny; MacKinnon, Jane R; Ruddle, Jonathan B; Hewitt, Alex W; Liew, Gerald; Dwyer, Terence; Scurrah, Katrina; Mackey, David A

    2009-03-01

    Recent studies reported an association between smaller birth size and narrower retinal vascular caliber, but it remains unclear whether this association is attributed to confounding by shared environment or genetic factors. At a mean age of 9.3 years, 266 twins (49 monozygotic and 84 dizygotic pairs) in the Twins Eye Study in Tasmania underwent an ophthalmic examination including retinal photography. Retinal vascular caliber was measured using a validated protocol. The majority of these twins were also in the Tasmanian Infant Health Study, which prospectively collected data on birth parameters and antenatal maternal factors. We conducted the main analysis using linear mixed models, accounting for birth set clustering. Both the within-pair (-9.73; 95% CI: -14.68 to -4.77 microm per 5-cm decrease in birth length) and between-pair associations (-7.15; 95% CI: -11.54 to -3.01) with retinal arteriolar caliber were significant and of similar magnitude (difference in effect, P=0.61), after adjusting for age, sex, maternal smoking, mean arterial blood pressure, and other confounders. These associations remained within dizygotic and monozygotic pairs. Analyses of head circumference and retinal arteriolar caliber were similar to those of birth length (within-pair regression coefficient: -2.41; 95% CI: -5.09 to 0.28; between-pair regression coefficient: -2.60; 95% CI: -5.00 to -0.19). For birth weight, only a between-pair association was evident (-7.28; 95% CI: -13.07 to -1.48). This study demonstrates a consistent association between smaller birth size and narrower retinal arterioles in twins. The independent effect of shorter birth length on retinal arteriolar caliber supports a role for twin-specific supply line factors affecting fetal growth on vascular structure.

  20. Habitat characteristics predicting distribution and abundance patterns of scallops in D'Entrecasteaux Channel, Tasmania.

    PubMed

    Mendo, Tania; Lyle, Jeremy M; Moltschaniwskyj, Natalie A; Tracey, Sean R; Semmens, Jayson M

    2014-01-01

    Habitat characteristics greatly influence the patterns of distribution and abundance in scallops, providing structure for the settlement of spat and influencing predation risk and rates of survival. Establishing scallop-habitat relationships is relevant to understanding the ecological processes that regulate scallop populations and to managing critical habitats. This information is particularly relevant for the D'Entrecasteaux Channel, south-eastern Tasmania (147.335 W, 43.220 S), a region that has supported significant but highly variable scallop production over many years, including protracted periods of stock collapse. Three species of scallops are present in the region; the commercial scallop Pecten fumatus, the queen scallop Equichlamys bifrons, and the doughboy scallop Mimachlamys asperrima. We used dive surveys and Generalized Additive Modelling to examine the relationship between the distribution and abundance patterns of each species and associated habitat characteristics. The aggregated distribution of each species could be predicted as a function of sediment type and species-specific habitat structural components. While P. fumatus was strongly associated with finer sediments and E. bifrons with coarse grain sediments, M. asperrima had a less selective association, possibly related to its ability to attach on a wide range of substrates. Other habitat characteristics explaining P. fumatus abundance were depth, Asterias amurensis abundance, shell and macroalgae cover. Equichlamys bifrons was strongly associated with macroalgae and seagrass cover, whereas M. asperrima abundance was greatly explained by sponge cover. The models define a set of relationships from which plausible hypotheses can be developed. We propose that these relationships are mediated by predation pressure as well as the specific behavioural characteristics of each species. The findings also highlight the specific habitat characteristics that are relevant for spatial management and habitat

  1. Habitat Characteristics Predicting Distribution and Abundance Patterns of Scallops in D’Entrecasteaux Channel, Tasmania

    PubMed Central

    Mendo, Tania; Lyle, Jeremy M.; Moltschaniwskyj, Natalie A.; Tracey, Sean R.; Semmens, Jayson M.

    2014-01-01

    Habitat characteristics greatly influence the patterns of distribution and abundance in scallops, providing structure for the settlement of spat and influencing predation risk and rates of survival. Establishing scallop-habitat relationships is relevant to understanding the ecological processes that regulate scallop populations and to managing critical habitats. This information is particularly relevant for the D’Entrecasteaux Channel, south-eastern Tasmania (147.335 W, 43.220 S), a region that has supported significant but highly variable scallop production over many years, including protracted periods of stock collapse. Three species of scallops are present in the region; the commercial scallop Pecten fumatus, the queen scallop Equichlamys bifrons, and the doughboy scallop Mimachlamys asperrima. We used dive surveys and Generalized Additive Modelling to examine the relationship between the distribution and abundance patterns of each species and associated habitat characteristics. The aggregated distribution of each species could be predicted as a function of sediment type and species-specific habitat structural components. While P. fumatus was strongly associated with finer sediments and E. bifrons with coarse grain sediments, M. asperrima had a less selective association, possibly related to its ability to attach on a wide range of substrates. Other habitat characteristics explaining P. fumatus abundance were depth, Asterias amurensis abundance, shell and macroalgae cover. Equichlamys bifrons was strongly associated with macroalgae and seagrass cover, whereas M. asperrima abundance was greatly explained by sponge cover. The models define a set of relationships from which plausible hypotheses can be developed. We propose that these relationships are mediated by predation pressure as well as the specific behavioural characteristics of each species. The findings also highlight the specific habitat characteristics that are relevant for spatial management and

  2. Hydrocarbon biomarkers, thermal maturity, and depositional setting of tasmanite oil shales from Tasmania, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revill, A. T.; Volkman, J. K.; O'Leary, T.; Summons, R. E.; Boreham, C. J.; Banks, M. R.; Denwer, K.

    1994-09-01

    This study represents the first geological and organic geochemical investigation of samples of tasmanite oil shale representing different thermal maturities from three separate locations in Tasmania, Australia. The most abundant aliphatic hydrocarbon in the immature oil shale from Latrobe is a C 19 tricyclic alkane, whereas in the more mature samples from Oonah and Douglas River low molecular weight n- alkanes dominate the extractable hydrocarbon distribution. The aromatic hydrocarbons are predominantly derivatives of tricyclic compounds, with 1,2,8-trimethylphenanthrene increasing in relative abundance with increasing maturity. Geological and geochemical evidence suggests that the sediments were deposited in a marine environment of high latitude with associated cold waters and seasonal seaice. It is proposed that the organism contributing the bulk of the kerogen, Tasmanites, occupied an environmental niche similar to that of modern sea-ice diatoms and that bloom conditions coupled with physical isolation from atmospheric CO 2 led to the distinctive "isotopically heavy" δ 13C values (-13.5‰ to -11.7‰) for the kerogen. δ 13C data from modern sea-ice diatoms (-7‰) supports this hypothesis. Isotopic analysis of n- alkanes in the bitumen (-13.5 to -31‰) suggest a multiple source from bacteria and algae. On the other hand, the n- alkanes generated from closed-system pyrolysis of the kerogen (-15‰) are mainly derived from the preserved Tasmanites biopolymer algaenan. The tricyclic compounds (mean -8‰) both in the bitumen and pyrolysate, have a common precursor. They are consistently enriched in 13C compared with the kerogen and probably have a different source from the n- alkanes. The identification of a location where the maturity of the tasmanite oil shale approaches the "oil window" raises the possibility that it may be a viable petroleum source rock.

  3. The Osteology of the Basal Archosauromorph Tasmaniosaurus triassicus from the Lower Triassic of Tasmania, Australia

    PubMed Central

    Ezcurra, Martín D.

    2014-01-01

    Proterosuchidae are the most taxonomically diverse archosauromorph reptiles sampled in the immediate aftermath of the Permo-Triassic mass extinction and represent the earliest radiation of Archosauriformes (archosaurs and closely related species). Proterosuchids are potentially represented by approximately 15 nominal species collected from South Africa, China, Russia, Australia and India, but the taxonomic content of the group is currently in a state of flux because of the poor anatomic and systematic information available for several of its putative members. Here, the putative proterosuchid Tasmaniosaurus triassicus from the Lower Triassic of Hobart, Tasmania (Australia), is redescribed. The holotype and currently only known specimen includes cranial and postcranial remains and the revision of this material sheds new light on the anatomy of the animal, including new data on the cranial endocast. Several bones are re-identified or reinterpreted, contrasting with the descriptions of previous authors. The new information provided here shows that Tasmaniosaurus closely resembles the South African proterosuchid Proterosuchus, but it differed in the presence of, for example, a slightly downturned premaxilla, a shorter anterior process of maxilla, and a diamond-shaped anterior end of interclavicle. Previous claims for the presence of gut contents in the holotype of Tasmaniosaurus are considered ambiguous. The description of the cranial endocast of Tasmaniosaurus provides for the first time information about the anatomy of this region in proterosuchids. The cranial endocast preserves possibly part of the vomero-nasal ( = Jacobson’s) system laterally to the olfactory bulbs. Previous claims of the absence of the vomero-nasal organs in archosaurs, which is suggested by the extant phylogenetic bracket, are questioned because its absence in both clades of extant archosaurs seems to be directly related with the independent acquisition of a non-ground living mode of life

  4. Sedges in the mist: A new species of Lepidosperma (Cyperaceae, Schoeneae) from the mountains of Tasmania.

    PubMed

    Plunkett, George T; Wilson, Karen L; Bruhl, Jeremy J

    2013-01-01

    The status of a putative new species of Lepidosperma from the mountains of south-western Tasmania, Australia, was investigated. Phenetic analysis (Flexible UPGMA Agglomerative Hierarchical Fusion and semi-strong hybrid multidimensional scaling) was conducted on a database derived from morphological and anatomical characters scored from herbarium material, culm anatomy slides and scanning electron micrographs of fruit. The results of the analysis support the recognition of a new species, here described as Lepidosperma monticola G.T.Plunkett & J.J.Bruhl. The distribution, habitat and conservation status are discussed.

  5. Sedges in the mist: A new species of Lepidosperma (Cyperaceae, Schoeneae) from the mountains of Tasmania

    PubMed Central

    Plunkett, George T.; Wilson, Karen L.; Bruhl, Jeremy J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The status of a putative new species of Lepidosperma from the mountains of south-western Tasmania, Australia, was investigated. Phenetic analysis (Flexible UPGMA Agglomerative Hierarchical Fusion and semi-strong hybrid multidimensional scaling) was conducted on a database derived from morphological and anatomical characters scored from herbarium material, culm anatomy slides and scanning electron micrographs of fruit. The results of the analysis support the recognition of a new species, here described as Lepidosperma monticola G.T.Plunkett & J.J.Bruhl. The distribution, habitat and conservation status are discussed. PMID:24399891

  6. Estimating annual generation rates of total P and total N for different land uses in Tasmania, Australia.

    PubMed

    Broad, S T; Corkrey, R

    2011-06-01

    Water quality issues have become increasingly important to Australian catchment stakeholders. As extensive nutrient sampling and modelling expertise are often absent or unattainable, simple unit-area models like Catchment Management Support System (CMSS) remain an attractive option for informing water quality management decisions. The selection of nutrient generation rates for use in CMSS is often an arbitrary assignment based on limited literature sources or expert opinion. Using a Bayesian model to estimate nutrient generation rates for the region of Tasmania, Australia, improved the rigor of CMSS modelling and in the process highlighted that dairy pastures were the most significant contributor of total phosphorus and total nitrogen loads to Tasmanian rivers.

  7. 76 FR 22719 - Cape Wind Energy Project

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-22

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement Cape Wind Energy Project AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement (BOEMRE), Interior. ACTION: Notice of the... Construction and Operations Plan (COP) for the Cape Wind Energy Project located on the Outer Continental...

  8. CAPE-OPEN WITH .NET TRAINING COURSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    On March 7, 2007 in Heidelberg, Germany, the CAPE-OPEN Laboratories Network (CO-LaN) is offering a one-day training seminar on implementing CAPE-OPEN compliant process modeling components (PMCs) using .NET-based development tools. This seminar will be geared to component develope...

  9. CAPE-OPEN WITH .NET TRAINING COURSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    On March 7, 2007 in Heidelberg, Germany, the CAPE-OPEN Laboratories Network (CO-LaN) is offering a one-day training seminar on implementing CAPE-OPEN compliant process modeling components (PMCs) using .NET-based development tools. This seminar will be geared to component develope...

  10. Cape Verdeans in America: Our Story.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almeida, Raymond Anthony, Ed.

    Immigration and acculturation of Cape Verdeans in the United States from the mid-19th century to the present are discussed. Emphasis is on the period prior to 1922, at which time the United States Congress enacted new laws restricting the immigration of people of color. The Cape Verde islands are located in the Atlantic off the coast of West…

  11. Cape Verdeans in America: Our Story.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almeida, Raymond Anthony, Ed.

    Immigration and acculturation of Cape Verdeans in the United States from the mid-19th century to the present are discussed. Emphasis is on the period prior to 1922, at which time the United States Congress enacted new laws restricting the immigration of people of color. The Cape Verde islands are located in the Atlantic off the coast of West…

  12. Cape Verde in False Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    A promontory nicknamed 'Cape Verde' can be seen jutting out from the walls of Victoria Crater in this false-color picture taken by the panoramic camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. The rover took this picture on martian day, or sol, 1329 (Oct. 20, 2007), more than a month after it began descending down the crater walls -- and just 9 sols shy of its second Martian birthday on sol 1338 (Oct. 29, 2007). Opportunity landed on the Red Planet on Jan. 25, 2004. That's nearly four years ago on Earth, but only two on Mars because Mars takes longer to travel around the sun than Earth. One Martian year equals 687 Earth days.

    This view was taken using three panoramic-camera filters, admitting light with wavelengths centered at 750 nanometers (near infrared), 530 nanometers (green) and 430 nanometers (violet).

  13. Cape Verde in False Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    A promontory nicknamed 'Cape Verde' can be seen jutting out from the walls of Victoria Crater in this false-color picture taken by the panoramic camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. The rover took this picture on martian day, or sol, 1329 (Oct. 20, 2007), more than a month after it began descending down the crater walls -- and just 9 sols shy of its second Martian birthday on sol 1338 (Oct. 29, 2007). Opportunity landed on the Red Planet on Jan. 25, 2004. That's nearly four years ago on Earth, but only two on Mars because Mars takes longer to travel around the sun than Earth. One Martian year equals 687 Earth days.

    This view was taken using three panoramic-camera filters, admitting light with wavelengths centered at 750 nanometers (near infrared), 530 nanometers (green) and 430 nanometers (violet).

  14. Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Solid Rocket ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Solid Rocket Booster Disassembly & Refurbishment Complex, Thrust Vector Control Deservicing Facility, Hangar Road, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  15. The history of early low frequency radio astronomy in Australia. 5: Reber and the Kempton field station in Tasmania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Martin; Orchiston, Wayne; Wielebinski, Richard; Slee, Bruce

    2015-11-01

    After initially making low frequency observations with Graeme Ellis near Hobart, Tasmania, in 1955, Grote Reber returned to Tasmania to carry out further observations in 1956-1957 near Kempton, to the north of Hobart. He chose to investigate at 520 kHz, and used four dipoles, each about 670m long, about 300m apart and approximately 100m above a valley floor. Reber deduced that there was a celestial component which appeared to have a maximum, with an intensity he stated to be 4 × 10-20 Jy/sr, around right ascension 22 hours, declination -6°. By 1960, he had re-interpreted the results and concluded that the maximum emission actually came from a declination of about +42°, in the constellation of Cygnus. However, two decades later, he expressed doubt that he had actually observed cosmic emissions at all. In 1957, Reber briefly also made observations from Kempton at 143 kHz. One of us (MG) has visited the Kempton site on several occasions in recent years and has located artefacts that have remained relatively undisturbed for nearly 60 years.

  16. Composition of soil testate amoebae communities: their structure and modifications in the temperate rain forests of New Zealand and Tasmania.

    PubMed

    Bamforth, Stuart S

    2015-01-01

    A study of the temperate rain forests of New Zealand and Tasmania showed that their soil testate amoebae communities are composed of five groups of taxa: (1) seven taxa characteristic of wet acidic soils and Sphagnum peatlands (i.e., Amphitemidae, Apodera, Alcodera, Certesella, Cyphoderia, Placocista); (2) a group of 16 species of predatory Nebelids and Heleopera spp., characteristic of Sphagnum and rainforests; (3) a group of 17 species of litter and soil Euglypha, excluding the smallest ones; (4) a diverse population of other morphotypes common in other biomes; and (5) a population of small euryoecious taxa - Cryptodifflugia and Pseudodifflugia spp., Euglypha rotunda, E. laevis, Corythion and Trinema spp. This fifth group, with other r-selected protists (e.g., colpodid ciliates) appears in all habitats. Soil testate communities of other rainforests are composed of the same five groups and are distinguished by the first three assemblages. The fourth and fifth groups, often supplemented with a few Euglypha species, comprise the soil testate amoebae of other biomes. Nebelids and Heleopera, incorporating prey idiosomes into their shells, add an additional link to the role of Euglyphids in the silica cycle. Three Gondwanan Nebelid genera, Apodera, Alcodera, and Certesella were frequently observed, and the discovery of Alcodera cockayni in Tasmania extends its recorded distribution in the Southern Hemisphere.

  17. Multi-elemental concentrations in the tissues of the oceanic squid Todarodes filippovae from Tasmania and the southern Indian Ocean.

    PubMed

    Kojadinovic, Jessica; Jackson, Christine H; Cherel, Yves; Jackson, George D; Bustamante, Paco

    2011-07-01

    This study investigates 14 elements (Ag, As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Se, V and Zn) in the tissues of the oceanic ommastrephid squid Todarodes filippovae from waters surrounding Île Amsterdam (southern Indian Ocean) and Tasmania (Australia). As for other cephalopod species, the digestive gland and branchial hearts showed the highest concentrations of many elements (Ag, Cd, Se, V and Zn, and Cr and Ni, respectively) highlighting their role in bioaccumulation and detoxification processes. With the exception of As and Hg, the muscles showed relatively low trace element concentrations. Squid size was positively correlated to Ag, As, Cd, Hg and Zn concentrations in Tasmanian squid and negatively correlated to all but Hg and Zn concentrations in Île Amsterdam squid. Furthermore, no differences in elemental concentrations were noted between sexes. There were, however, some differences between mated and non-mated females from Tasmania. Comparing elemental concentrations in squid from both islands, higher concentrations of Cd, Co, Cr, Ni, Pb and V in squid sampled in Île Amsterdam reflect different exposure conditions. When considering T. filippovae as a dietary resource for humans it should be noted that, given their Hg content, squids from Île Amsterdam are not recommended for consumption on a regular basis. Moreover, regardless of the squid's origin, digestive glands should be avoided as Cd and Hg concentrations were above the European Union authorized limits in these organs.

  18. First genetic analysis of Cryptosporidium from humans from Tasmania, and identification of a new genotype from a traveller to Bali.

    PubMed

    Koehler, Anson V; Whipp, Margaret; Hogg, Geoff; Haydon, Shane R; Stevens, Melita A; Jex, Aaron R; Gasser, Robin B

    2014-09-01

    Little is known about the molecular composition of Cryptosporidium species from humans living in the insular state of Tasmania, Australia. In the present study, we genetically characterized 82 samples of Cryptosporidium from humans following conventional coproscopic testing in a routine, diagnostic laboratory. Using a PCR-coupled single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) technique, targeting portions of the small subunit rRNA (SSU), and 60 kDa glycoprotein (gp60) loci, we identified two species of Cryptosporidium, including C. hominis (subgenotypes IbA10G2, IdA16, IeA12G3T3, and IfA19G1) and C. parvum (IIaA16G1R1 and IIaA18G3), and a new operational taxonomic unit (OTU) that genetically closely resembled C. wrairi. This OTU was further characterized using markers in the actin, Cryptosporidium oocyst wall protein (COWP), and 70 kDa heat shock protein (hsp70) genes. This study provides the first characterization of species and genotypes of Cryptosporidium from Tasmania, and presents clear genetic evidence, using five independent genetic loci, for a new genotype or species of Cryptosporidium in a Tasmanian person with a recent history of travelling to Bali, Indonesia. It would be interesting to undertake detailed molecular-based studies of Cryptosporidium in Indonesia and neighbouring countries, in conjunction with morphological and experimental investigations of new genotypes.

  19. Having a baby in the new land: a qualitative exploration of the experiences of Asian migrants in rural Tasmania, Australia.

    PubMed

    Hoang, H T; Le, Q; Kilpatrick, S

    2009-01-01

    Australia is a land of cultural diversity. Cultural differences in maternity care may result in conflict between migrants and healthcare providers, especially when migrants have minimal English language knowledge. The aim of the study was to investigate Asian migrant women's child-birth experiences in a rural Australian context. The study consisted of semi-structured interviews conducted with 10 Asian migrant women living in rural Tasmania to explore their childbirth experiences and the barriers they faced in accessing maternal care in the new land. The data were analysed using grounded theory and three main categories were identified: 'migrants with traditional practices in the new land', 'support and postnatal experiences' and 'barriers to accessing maternal care'. The findings revealed that Asian migrants in Tasmania faced language and cultural barriers when dealing with the new healthcare system. Because some Asian migrants retain traditional views and practices for maternity care, confusion and conflicting expectations may occur. Family and community play an important role in supporting migrant women through their maternity care. Providing interpreting services, social support for migrant women and improving the cross-cultural training for healthcare providers were recommended to improve available maternal care services.

  20. Exploration of testing practices and population characteristics support an increase in chlamydia positivity in Tasmania between 2001 and 2010.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Nicola; Coleman, David; Shaw, Kelly; O'Sullivan, Maree; Vally, Hassan; Venn, Alison

    2016-08-01

    The proportion of positive chlamydia tests in young people in Tasmania increased significantly between 2001 and 2010. While female positivity rates increased steadily, male positivity rose steeply to 2005 then stabilised. Crude positivity rates can be influenced by a variety of factors making interpretation difficult. Unique Tasmanian datasets were used to explore whether symptom status, reason for testing or sexual exposure could explain the observed positivity trends. Population-level chlamydia positivity rates in Tasmania over a 10-year period were compared with surveillance data collected on people aged 15 to 29 years notified with chlamydia. The proportion of asymptomatic chlamydia cases increased, with the largest increase in males aged 15 to 19 years (28%). Opportunistic testing of cases increased (greatest in males, range 17-32%). Sexual exposure remained consistent. After allowing for any changes in sexual exposure, symptom status and reason for testing, an increase in chlamydia positivity occurred over the 10 years. Healthcare providers have increased chlamydia testing in high-risk groups. Monitoring chlamydia testing patterns and positivity rates at a population level is a step forward in surveillance practices. Targeted surveys provide valuable information to supplement routine surveillance data. © 2016 Public Health Association of Australia.

  1. On regional dynamical downscaling for the assessment and projection of temperature and precipitation extremes across Tasmania, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Christopher J.; McInnes, Kathleen L.; Cechet, Robert P.; Corney, Stuart P.; Grose, Michael R.; Holz, Gregory K.; Katzfey, Jack J.; Bindoff, Nathaniel L.

    2013-12-01

    The ability of an ensemble of six GCMs, downscaled to a 0.1° lat/lon grid using the Conformal Cubic Atmospheric Model over Tasmania, Australia, to simulate observed extreme temperature and precipitation climatologies and statewide trends is assessed for 1961-2009 using a suite of extreme indices. The downscaled simulations have high skill in reproducing extreme temperatures, with the majority of models reproducing the statewide averaged sign and magnitude of recent observed trends of increasing warm days and warm nights and decreasing frost days. The warm spell duration index is however underestimated, while variance is generally overrepresented in the extreme temperature range across most regions. The simulations show a lower level of skill in modelling the amplitude of the extreme precipitation indices such as very wet days, but simulate the observed spatial patterns and variability. In general, simulations of dry extreme precipitation indices are underestimated in dryer areas and wet extremes indices are underestimated in wetter areas. Using two SRES emissions scenarios, the simulations indicate a significant increase in warm nights compared to a slightly more moderate increase in warm days, and an increase in maximum 1- and 5- day precipitation intensities interspersed with longer consecutive dry spells across Tasmania during the twenty-first century.

  2. Liquefaction along Late Pleistocene to early Holocene Faults as Revealed by Lidar in Northwest Tasmania, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, J.; Gardner, T.

    2016-12-01

    In northwest Tasmania well-preserved mid-Holocene beach ridges with maximum radiocarbon ages of 5.25 ka occur along the coast; inland are a parallel set of lower relief beach ridges of probable MIS 5e age. The latter are cut by northeast-striking faults clearly visible on LIDAR images, with a maximum vertical displacement (evident as difference in topographic elevation) of 3 m. Also distinct on the LIDAR images are large sand boils along the fault lines; they are up to 5 m in diameter and 2-3 m high and mostly occur on the hanging wall close to the fault traces. Without LIDAR it would have been almost impossible to distinguish either the fault scarps or the sand boils. Excavations through the sand boils show that they are massive, with no internal structure, suggesting that they formed in a single event. They are composed of well-sorted, very fine white sand, identical to the sand in the underlying beach ridges. The sand boils overlie a peaty paleosol; this formed in the tea-tree swamp that formerly covered the area, and has been offset along the faults. Radiocarbon dating of the buried organic-rich paleosol gave ages of 14.8-7.2 ka, suggesting that the faulting is latest Pleistocene to early Holocene in age; it occurred prior to deposition of the mid-Holocene beach ridges, which are not offset. The beach ridge sediments are up to 7 m thick and contain an iron-cemented hard pan 1-3 m below the surface. The water table is very shallow and close to the ground surface, so the sands of the beach ridges are mostly saturated. During faulting these sands experienced extensive liquefaction. The resulting sand boils rose to a substantial height of 2-3 m, probably possibly reflecting the elevation of the potentiometric surface within the confined part of the beach ridge sediments below the iron-cemented hard pan. Motion on the faults was predominantly dip slip (shown by an absence of horizontal offset) and probably reverse, which is consistent with the present-day northwest

  3. Carbon export production in the subantarctic zone and polar front zone south of Tasmania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquet, S. H. M.; Lam, P. J.; Trull, T.; Dehairs, F.

    2011-11-01

    We studied the water column distribution of total 234Th in subantarctic (SAZ) and polar front (PFZ) zone systems south of Tasmania during mid-austral summer 2007. The objective was to assess whether the observed zonal differences in biomass in this sector translated into variability of the carbon export and sequestration potential, and to identify possible causes inducing this variability. This study is part of a broader investigation focusing on macro- and micronutrient availability controlling ecosystem functioning in this area. Surface deficits in 234Th activities were observed at every station. 234Th export fluxes calculated from the 234Th activity deficits assuming steady state conditions showed higher 234Th export fluxes in the western than eastern SAZ, both of which were higher than those in the PFZ. 234Th fluxes sampled by free-drifting IRS and PPS-3 sediment traps at 150 and 170 m during short-term deployments (˜ 6 days) at the three process stations were significantly lower than those obtained by the 234Th-deficit method. Possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed. Carbon export fluxes were calculated based on the total 234Th fluxes ( 234Th deficit method) and the C:Th ratio for the >54 μm particle size fraction from the appropriate export depth. The >54 μm C:Th ratio was significantly lower in the eastern SAZ than the western SAZ or PFZ, resulting in carbon export fluxes that were lowest in the eastern SAZ. Overall, export fluxes range from 3.6±1.5 to 13.2±3.1 mmol C m -2 d -1. Carbon export fluxes are compared with gross primary production, new production and mesopelagic remineralization fluxes obtained by others during the same cruise. Contrary to expectations, we found higher export production in the PFZ and the western SAZ where biomass and dissolved Fe were lower than in the eastern SAZ. Significant differences in community structure of both primary producers and consumers likely contributed to this difference between the three regions

  4. Geochemistry of Darwin glass and target rocks from Darwin crater, Tasmania, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Kieren T.

    2008-03-01

    Darwin glass formed about 800,000 years ago in western Tasmania, Australia. Target rocks at Darwin crater are quartzites and slates (Siluro-Devonian, Eldon Group). Analyses show 2 groups of glass, Average group 1 is composed of: SiO2 (85%), Al2O3 (7.3%), TiO2 (0.05%), FeO (2.2%), MgO (0.9%), and K2O (1.8%). Group 2 has lower average SiO2 (81.1%) and higher average Al2O3 (8.2%). Group 2 is enriched in FeO (+1.5%), MgO (+1.3%) and Ni, Co, and Cr. Average Ni (416 ppm), Co (31 ppm), and Cr (162 ppm) in group 2 are beyond the range of sedimentary rocks. Glass and target rocks have concordant REE patterns (La/Lu = 5.9-10; Eu/Eu* = 0.55-0.65) and overlapping trace element abundances. 87Sr/86Sr ratios for the glasses (0.80778-0.81605) fall in the range (0.76481-1.1212) defined by the rock samples. ɛ-Nd results range from -13.57 to -15.86. Nd model ages range from 1.2-1.9 Ga (CHUR) and the glasses (1.2-1.5 Ga) fall within the range defined by the target samples. The 87Sr/86Sr versus 87Rb/86Sr regression age (411 ± 42 Ma) and initial ratio (0.725 ± 0.016), and the initial 43Nd/144Nd ratio (0.51153 ± 000011) and regression age (451 ± 140 Ma) indicate that the glasses have an inherited isotopic signal from the target rocks at Darwin crater. Mixing models using target rock compositions successfully model the glass for all elementsexcept FeO, MgO, Ni, Co, and Cr in group 2. Mixing models using terrestrial ultramafic rocks fail to match the glass compositions and these enrichments may be related to the projectile.

  5. Building a local medical workforce in Tasmania: where are international fee-paying medical graduates likely to work?

    PubMed

    Cheek, Colleen; Hays, Richard; Allen, Penny; Walker, Gary; Shires, Lizzi

    2017-01-01

    Much of regional Australia continues to face challenges in recruitment and retention of medical practitioners, despite the apparently successful rural medical education initiatives funded by the Commonwealth Government. International fee-paying (IFP) medical students are a significant component of Australian medical education, contributing additional income and more diverse learning environments for universities. Their contribution to the Australian medical workforce is harder to determine. After obtaining registration, IFP graduates may apply to remain in Australia as skilled migrants. Since 1999 there has been a 325% increase in the number of international medical students in Australia, with approximately 73% of IFP graduates remaining in Australia for at least some postgraduate training. Recognising the potential contribution of IFP students to the Tasmanian medical workforce, the authors sought better understanding of the career intentions and work locations of IFP graduates from the medical program in Tasmania, Australia, through two studies. Firstly, a quantitative study was conducted of the locations of all IFP graduates from the Tasmanian medical program, and then a qualitative study exploring graduating students' intentions and factors that contribute to their decisions about work location choices. This was a cohort study of IFP students who graduated from the University of Tasmania School of Medicine over the period 2000-2015. Work locations for 2016 were mapped to a Modified Monash rurality classification. Semi-structured interviews were held with 15 final year IFP medical students, exploring career intentions and location preferences. There were 261 IFP graduates, 54.4% male. The most common country of origin was Malaysia (55.2%). In 2016, 189 (72.4 %) were working in Australia, 42 (16.1%) in Tasmania and 126 (66.7%) in areas categorised as Modified Monash 1. Recent graduates in postgraduate year 1/2 (71.3%) were more likely to be working in Tasmania

  6. Cape Photographic Durchmusterung, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Cape Photographic Durchmusterung (CPD Gill and Kapteyn 1895-1900) is a photographic survey of southern stars in the declination range -18 to -90 degrees. This volume covers the declination range -18 through -37 degrees. Positions are given for the 1875 equinox. The summary of the positional uncertainties quoted in the third volume of the published catalog gives +/- 0.28 sec (R.A.) +/- 0.044 arcmin (Dec.) for zones -18 to -57 degrees. The probable error of a photographic magnitude as determined by combining results for different magnitudes and weighting proportionately according to the numbers of stars in each class of magnitude is given as +/- 0.055 mag. From an analysis of the taint magnitude limits on the plates discussed in the third volume introduction, the catalog as a whole can be considered complete to photographic magnitude 9.2 but it is stated that it will be found practically complete in or near the Milky Way, to magnitude 9.5.

  7. Tasmania's Child and Family Centres: A Place-Based Early Childhood Services Model for Families and Children from Pregnancy to Age Five

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Catherine L.; Jose, Kim; van de Lageweg, Wietse I.; Christensen, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Tasmania's child and family centres (Centres) provide a single entry point to early childhood services (ECS) for children and families living in amongst the most disadvantaged communities in Australia. This study investigated the impact of Centres on parents' use and experiences of ECS using a mixed methods approach. The results showed that Centre…

  8. Astronaut John Glenn - Blood Draw - Training - Cape

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1961-07-05

    S61-02579 (1961) --- Astronaut nurse Delores B. O'Hara, R.N., in the Aeromedical Laboratory at Cape Canaveral, Florida, takes a blood sample from Mercury astronaut John H. Glenn Jr. Photo credit: NASA

  9. Approach to Cape Tribulation Summit Stereo

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-01-08

    NASA Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity recorded this view of the summit of Cape Tribulation, on the western rim of Endeavour Crater on the day before the rover drove to the top. You need 3D glasses to view this image.

  10. ASTRONAUT ALAN SHEPARD - FREEDOM "7" - LIFTOFF - CAPE

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1961-05-05

    S61-02409 (5 May 1961) --- Launching of the Mercury-Redstone 3 (MR-3) rocket from Cape Canaveral on astronaut Alan B. Shepard?s suborbital mission. Photo credit: NASA or National Aeronautics and Space Administration

  11. The cape triage score: a new triage system South Africa. Proposal from the cape triage group

    PubMed Central

    Gottschalk, S B; Wood, D; DeVries, S; Wallis, L A; Bruijns, S

    2006-01-01

    The Cape Triage Group (CTG) convened with the intention of producing a triage system for the Western Cape, and eventually South Africa. The group includes in-hospital and prehospital staff from varied backgrounds. The CTG triage protocol is termed the Cape Triage Score (CTG), and has been developed by a multi-disciplinary panel, through best available evidence and expert opinion. The CTS has been validated in several studies, and was launched across the Western Cape on 1 January 2006. The CTG would value feedback from readers of this journal, as part of the ongoing monitoring and evaluation process. PMID:16439753

  12. 3. View from former light tower to Cape Elizabeth Light ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. View from former light tower to Cape Elizabeth Light Tower, view northeast, southwest side of Cape Elizabeth Tower - Cape Elizabeth Light Station, Near Two Lights State Park at end of Two Lights Road, off State Highway 77, Cape Elizabeth, Cumberland County, ME

  13. Cape Photographic Durchmusterung, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Cape Photographic Durchmusterung (CPD, Gill and Kapteyn 1895-1900) is a Photographic survey of southern stars in the declination range -18 to -90 degrees. This volume covers the declination range -53 through -89 degrees. Positions are given for 1875 equinox. The summary of the positional uncertainties quoted in the third volume of the published catalog gives +/- 0.28 sec (R.A.), +/- 0.044 arcmin (Dec.) for zones - 18 to -57 degrees, + 0.157 sec + 0.0764/cos(delta) sec (R.A.), +/- 0.056 arcmin (Dec.) for zones -58 to -85 degrees, +0.157 sec + 0.0353/cos (delta) sec (R.A.), + 0.0127 arcmin (Dec.) for the polar plate where, as explained in the introduction to the third volume, many positions were derived from rectangular coordinates (these are positions reported to 0.1 SCC (R.A.) and 0.001 arcmin (Dec.) in the -86 to -89 degree zones in the catalog). The probable error of a photographic magnitude, as determined by combining results for different magnitudes and weighting proportionately according to the numbers of stars in each class of magnitude, is given as +0.055 mag. From an analysis of the faint magnitude limits on the plates discussed in the third volume introduction, the catalog as a whole can be considered complete to photographic magnitude 9.2, but it is stated that it will be found practically complete, in or near the Milky Way, to magnitude 9.5.

  14. Cape Photographic Durchmusterung, volume 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Cape Photographic Durchmusterung (CPD, Gill and Kapleyn 1895-1900) is a photographic survey of southern stars in the declination range -18 to -90 degrees. This volume covers the declination range -53 through -89 degrees. Positions are given for the 1875 equinox. The summary of the positional uncertainties quoted in the third volume of the published catalog gives +/- 0.28 sec (R.A.), + 0.044 arcmin (Dec.) for zones -18 to -57 degrees, + 0.157 sec + 0.0764/cos(delta) sec (R.A.), +/- 0.056 arcmin (Dec.) for zones -58 to -85 degrees, +0.157 sec + 0.0353/cos(delta) sec (R.A.), +/- 0.0127 arcmin (Dec.) for the polar plate where, as explained in the introduction to the third volume, many positions were derived from rectangular coordinates (these are positions reported to 0.1 sec (R.A.) and 0.001 arcmin (Dec.) in the -86 to -89 degree zones in the catalog). The probable error of a photographic magnitude, as determined by combining results for different magnitudes and weighting proportionately according to the numbers of stars in each class of magnitude, is given as +0.055 mag. From an analysis of the faint magnitude limits on the plates discussed in the third volume introduction, the catalog as a whole can be considered complete to photographic magnitude 9.2, but it is stated that it will be found practically complete, in or near the Milky Way, to magnitude 9.5.

  15. Tectonic implications of Late Proterozoic-Early Palaeozoic igneous rock associations in western Tasmania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, Anthony J.; Berry, Ron F.

    1992-11-01

    In contrast to the mainland Lachlan Fold Belt, Late Proterozoic basement(?) and Cambrian rocks are exposed over large areas of western Tasmania. They offer the possibility of solving the paradox regarding the continental versus oceanic nature of the basement beneath southern Australia, and better understanding the Late Proterozoic and Cambrian tectonic history of this southern part of the Lachlan Fold Belt. Around 600 Ma, attenuation and eventual rifting of Proterozoic continental crust resulted in formation of a thinned passive continental margin transected by small rift basins in which rift tholeiites transitional to MORB accumulated. Eastward-directed intra-oceanic subduction commenced to the east of the passive margin at some time before the Middle Cambrian, forming an oceanic arc with boninites and low-Ti magnesian quartz tholeiites in the forearc region. Continued subduction of intervening oceanic crust between the arc and the passive margin resulted in an arc-continent collision within the Middle Cambrian. One or more extensive sheets of forearc crust, dominated by low-Ti basalts and boninites and their cumulate complements, were overthrust onto thinned continental crust. Continued compression at the suture initiated what was probably a short-lived episode of westward-directed subduction beneath the newly-emplaced allochthon and passive margin basement, and generated medium- to high-K andesites and more felsic rocks of the Central Volcanic Complex of the Mount Read Volcanics. Rebound backthrusting along the eastern side of the Central Volcanic Complex of the Mount Read Volcanics belt exhumed underthrust Proterozoic crystalline crust which now forms the Tyennan region, and a foreland basin half-graben, the Dundas Trough, formed along the western edge of this basement inlier. The upper Mount Read Volcanics are mainly post-collisional high-K to shoshonitic basalts and andesites generated by delayed partial melting of subduction-modified, underthrust passive

  16. Measurements of Atmospheric Methane and 13C/12C of Atmospheric Methane from Flask Air Samples (1999)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Quay, Paul; Stutsman, Johnny

    1999-01-01

    This database offers precise measurements of atmospheric methane and 13C/12C in atmospheric methane from flask air samples collected at eight sites worldwide and aboard NOAA cruises in the Pacific Ocean. The eight sites include Olympic Peninsula, Washington; Cape Grim, Tasmania; Fraserdale, Ontario; Marshall Islands; Baring Head, New Zealand; Mauna Loa, Hawaii; Point Barrow, Alaska; and American Samoa. The measurements span the period 1988 to mid-1996. These data are useful for global methane budget analyses and for determining the atmospheric isotopic composition of methane. All isotopic measurements have been corrected for standard drift.

  17. 33 CFR 334.595 - Atlantic Ocean off Cape Canaveral; 45th Space Wing, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, FL...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean off Cape Canaveral; 45th Space Wing, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, FL; restricted area. 334.595 Section 334.595... AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.595 Atlantic Ocean off Cape Canaveral; 45th Space Wing, Cape...

  18. 33 CFR 334.595 - Atlantic Ocean off Cape Canaveral; 45th Space Wing, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, FL...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean off Cape Canaveral; 45th Space Wing, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, FL; restricted area. 334.595 Section 334.595... AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.595 Atlantic Ocean off Cape Canaveral; 45th Space Wing, Cape...

  19. 33 CFR 334.595 - Atlantic Ocean off Cape Canaveral; 45th Space Wing, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, FL...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean off Cape Canaveral; 45th Space Wing, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, FL; restricted area. 334.595 Section 334.595... AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.595 Atlantic Ocean off Cape Canaveral; 45th Space Wing, Cape...

  20. 33 CFR 334.595 - Atlantic Ocean off Cape Canaveral; 45th Space Wing, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, FL...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean off Cape Canaveral; 45th Space Wing, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, FL; restricted area. 334.595 Section 334.595... AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.595 Atlantic Ocean off Cape Canaveral; 45th Space Wing, Cape...

  1. 33 CFR 334.595 - Atlantic Ocean off Cape Canaveral; 45th Space Wing, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, FL...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean off Cape Canaveral; 45th Space Wing, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, FL; restricted area. 334.595 Section 334.595... AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.595 Atlantic Ocean off Cape Canaveral; 45th Space Wing, Cape...

  2. 75 FR 54770 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Cape Fear River and Northeast Cape Fear River, in Wilmington, NC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-09

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Cape Fear River and Northeast Cape Fear River, in Wilmington, NC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of temporary deviation from...: The Cape Fear River Memorial Bridge, across Cape Fear River, mile 26.8, and the Isabel S....

  3. Panorama from 'Cape Verde' (False Color)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity captured this vista of 'Victoria Crater' from the viewpoint of 'Cape Verde,' one of the promontories that are part of the scalloped rim of the crater. Opportunity drove onto Cape Verde shortly after arriving at the rim of Victoria in September 2006. The view combines hundreds of exposures taken by the rover's panoramic camera (Pancam). The camera began taking the component images during Opportunity's 970th Martian day, or sol, on Mars (Oct. 16, 2006). Work on the panorama continued through the solar conjunction period, when Mars was nearly behind the sun from Earth's perspective and communications were minimized. Acquisition of images for this panorama was completed on Opportunity's 991st sol (Nov. 7, 2006).

    The top of Cape Verde is in the immediate foreground at the center of the image. To the left and right are two of the more gradually sloped bays that alternate with the cliff-faced capes or promontories around the rim of the crater. 'Duck Bay,' where Opportunity first reached the rim, is to the right. Beyond Duck Bay counterclockwise around the rim, the next promontory is 'Cabo Frio,' about 150 meters (500 feet) from the rover. On the left side of the panorama is 'Cape St. Mary,' the next promontory clockwise from Cape Verde and about 40 meters (130 feet) from the rover. The vantage point atop Cape Verde offered a good view of the rock layers in the cliff face of Cape St. Mary, which is about 15 meters or 50 feet tall. By about two weeks after the Pancam finished collecting the images for this panorama, Opportunity had driven to Cape St. Mary and was photographing Cape Verde's rock layers.

    The far side of the crater lies about 800 meters (half a mile) away, toward the southeast.

    This view combines images taken through three of the Pancam's filters, admitting light with wavelengths centered at 750 nanometers (near infrared), 530 nanometers (green) and 430 nanometers (violet). It is presented in false

  4. 'Cape capture': Geologic data and modeling results suggest the holocene loss of a Carolina Cape

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thieler, E.R.; Ashton, A.D.

    2011-01-01

    For more than a century, the origin and evolution of the set of cuspate forelands known as the Carolina Capes-Hatteras, Lookout, Fear, and Romain-off the eastern coast of the United States have been discussed and debated. The consensus conceptual model is not only that these capes existed through much or all of the Holocene transgression, but also that their number has not changed. Here we describe bathymetric, lithologic, seismic, and chronologic data that suggest another cape may have existed between Capes Hatteras and Lookout during the early to middle Holocene. This cape likely formed at the distal end of the Neuse-Tar-Pamlico fiuvial system during the early Holocene transgression, when this portion of the shelf was fiooded ca. 9 cal (calibrated) kyr B.P., and was probably abandoned by ca. 4 cal kyr B.P., when the shoreline attained its present general configuration. Previously proposed mechanisms for cape formation suggest that the large-scale, rhythmic pattern of the Carolina Capes arose from a hydrodynamic template or the preexisting geologic framework. Numerical modeling, however, suggests that the number and spacing of capes can be dynamic, and that a coast can self-organize in response to a high-angle-wave instability in shoreline shape. In shoreline evolution model simulations, smaller cuspate forelands are subsumed by larger neighbors over millennial time scales through a process of 'cape capture.' The suggested former cape in Raleigh Bay represents the first interpreted geological evidence of dynamic abandonment suggested by the self-organization hypothesis. Cape capture may be a widespread process in coastal environments with large-scale rhythmic shoreline features; its preservation in the sedimentary record will vary according to geologic setting, physical processes, and sea-level history. ?? 2011 Geological Society of America.

  5. Tasmania's Reproductive Health (Access to Terminations) Act 2013: An analysis of conscientious objection to abortion and the "obligation to refer".

    PubMed

    Sifris, Ronli

    2015-06-01

    This article focuses on Tasmania's Reproductive Health (Access to Terminations) Act 2013, which decriminalises abortion in that State. The article first provides an overview of the Tasmanian legislation, comparing it with Victoria's Abortion Law Reform Act 2008. It then provides a more in-depth analysis of a doctor's right to "conscientious objection" and the requirement in both Acts of an "obligation to refer". The article concludes that ultimately, as a democratic society, it is important that both a woman's right to terminate a pregnancy and a doctor's right to freedom of conscience is respected. Where these rights conflict, as is the case when a doctor with a conscientious objection to abortion is confronted with a patient who seeks information about abortion, they must be balanced. The Victorian and Tasmanian Acts represent a considered and reasonable approach to balancing the rights at issue.

  6. Colloquium paper: where does biodiversity go from here? A grim business-as-usual forecast and a hopeful portfolio of partial solutions.

    PubMed

    Ehrlich, Paul R; Pringle, Robert M

    2008-08-12

    The threats to the future of biodiversity are many and well known. They include habitat conversion, environmental toxification, climate change, and direct exploitation of wildlife, among others. Moreover, the projected addition of 2.6 billion people by mid-century will almost certainly have a greater environmental impact than that of the last 2.6 billion. Collectively, these trends portend a grim future for biodiversity under a business-as-usual scenario. These threats and their interactions are formidable, but we review seven strategies that, if implemented soundly and scaled up dramatically, would preserve a substantial portion of global biodiversity. These are actions to stabilize the human population and reduce its material consumption, the deployment of endowment funds and other strategies to ensure the efficacy and permanence of conservation areas, steps to make human-dominated landscapes hospitable to biodiversity, measures to account for the economic costs of habitat degradation, the ecological reclamation of degraded lands and repatriation of extirpated species, the education and empowerment of people in the rural tropics, and the fundamental transformation of human attitudes about nature. Like the carbon "stabilization wedges" outlined by Pacala and Socolow [Pacala S, Socolow R (2004) Stabilization wedges: Solving the climate problem for the next 50 years with current technologies. Science 305:968-972] (1), the science and technologies needed to effect this vision already exist. The remaining challenges are largely social, political, and economic. Although academic conservation biology still has an important role to play in developing technical tools and knowledge, success at this juncture hinges more on a massive mobilization of effort to do things that have traditionally been outside the scope of the discipline.

  7. An analysis of the readability characteristics of oral health information literature available to the public in Tasmania, Australia.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Tony; Hoang, Ha; Furlan, Ashlea

    2016-03-17

    The effectiveness of print-based health promotion materials is dependent on their readability. This study aimed to assess the characteristics of print-based oral health information literature publically available in Tasmania, Australia. Oral health education brochures were collected from 11 dental clinics across Tasmania and assessed for structure and format, content and readability. Reading level was calculated using three widely-used measures: Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level (FKGL), Flesch Reading Ease, and Simple Measure of Gobbledygook (SMOG) reading grade level. The FKGL of the 67 brochures sampled ranged from grade 3 to 13. The grade level for government health department brochures (n = 14) ranged from grade 4 to 11 (5.6 ± 1.8). Reading levels for materials produced by commercial sources (n = 22) ranged from 3 to 13 (8.3 ± 2.1), those from professional associations (n = 22) ranged from grade 7 to 11 (8.9 ± 0.9) and brochures produced by other sources (n = 9) ranged from 5 to 10 (7.6 ± 1.5). The SMOG test was positively correlated with the FKGL (rs = 0.92, p < 0.001) though consistently rated materials 2-3 grades higher. The reading level required to comprehend brochures published by government sources were, on average, lower than those from commercial, professional and other sources. Government materials were also more likely to contain fewer words and professional jargon terms than brochures from the other sources. A range of oral health information brochures were publically available for patients in both public and private dental clinics. However, their readability characteristics differed. Many brochures required a reading skill level higher than that suited to a large proportion of the Tasmanian population. Readability and other characteristics of oral health education materials should be assessed to ensure their suitability for use with patients, especially those suspected of having low literacy skills.

  8. Rural placements in Tasmania: do experiential placements and background influence undergraduate health science student's attitudes toward rural practice?

    PubMed

    Dalton, Lisa M; Routley, Georgina K; Peek, Karla J

    2008-01-01

    Each year growing numbers of undergraduate health science students, from a variety of disciplines, participate in a University of Tasmania Department of Rural Health supported rural placement program in Tasmania. This study aimed to investigate the influence rural placement and rural background had on students' intentions to live and work in a rural or remote location after graduation. Between January 2005 and December 2006, 336 students participated in the placement program. Students were requested to complete a survey at the completion of their placement. A response rate of 239 was achieved (71%). The survey measured students' stated rural career intentions and rural background status according to location of primary and secondary school attendance. A demographic analysis of respondents was undertaken and results cross tabulated according to the rural, remote and metropolitan area (RRMA) classification system. Statistical analyses, including paired t-tests and a Wilcoxon signed rank test, were conducted to compare reported mean intention to practise rurally both prior to and after placement. The results from this survey show that rural placements in the undergraduate health science programs have a predominantly positive influence on students' intention to work in a rural community post-graduation. While these findings were significant for the disciplines of nursing, medicine and allied health, the results were not significant for pharmacy students. Students' average intention to practise rurally significantly increased after the placement for students from RRMA classifications 1 and 3-5. The value of rural placements as a method for increasing health science students' intentionality to take up rural practice as a positive and viable career option is considerable.

  9. Geologic history of Cape Cod, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1976-01-01

    Cape Cod, a sandy peninsula built mostly during the Ice Age, juts into the Atlantic Ocean like a crooked arm. Because of its exposed location, Cape Cod was visited by many early explorers. Although clear-cut evidence is lacking, the Vikings may have sighted this land about 1,000 years ago. It was visited by Samuel de Champlain in 1605, and his detailed descriptions and charts have helped present-day scientists to determine the rate of growth of Nauset Beach marsh and Nauset spit. Bartholomew Gosnold, a lesser known explorer, settled for a short time on the Elizabeth Islands to the southwest and gave Cape Cod its name in 1602. The Pilgrims first landed in America on the tip of Lower Cape Cod after they were turned back from their more southerly destination by shoals between Cape Cod and Nantucket Island. On Cape Cod they found potable water and food and had their first fight with the natives. The Pilgrims, however, decided that this land was too isolated, too exposed, and too sandy to support them, and they sailed across Cape Cod Bay to establish Plymouth. These features remain today. Small villages are separated by large areas of forest, dune, beach, and marsh. This unspoiled natural beauty makes Cape Cod one of the most favored vacation areas for the people living in the thickly settled Northeastern States. Cape Cod is of particular interest to geologists because it was formed by glaciers very recently in terms of geologic time. During the Great Ice Age, (the Pleistocene Epoch which began 2 to 3 million years ago), glaciers advanced from the north into the temperate regions of the Earth. Glacial ice covered the land at least four times. Each advance was accompanied by a worldwide lowering of sea level because the source of the ice was water from the seas. When the glaciers melted, the climate and sea level were probably much like they are today. In fact, some scientists believe that the Earth is presently between glacial episodes and that ice once again will

  10. CAPE: Automatically Predicting Changes in Group Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sliva, Amy; Subrahmanian, V. S.; Martinez, Vanina; Simari, Gerardo

    There is now intense interest in the problem of forecasting what a group will do in the future. Past work [1, 2, 3] has built complex models of a group’s behavior and used this to predict what the group might do in the future. However, almost all past work assumes that the group will not change its past behavior. Whether the group is a group of investors, or a political party, or a terror group, there is much interest in when and how the group will change its behavior. In this paper, we develop an architecture and algorithms called CAPE to forecast the conditions under which a group will change its behavior. We have tested CAPE on social science data about the behaviors of seven terrorist groups and show that CAPE is highly accurate in its predictions—at least in this limited setting.

  11. Cape Canaveral, Kennedy Space Center, Florida

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1973-06-22

    SL2-106-1194 (22 June 1973) --- This overhead view of the central eastern shore of Florida shows the Cape Canaveral and Kennedy Space Center (28.5N, 80.5W), where all of the NASA manned space missions originate. Sprinkled along the jutting cape are a number of KSC launch pads from the earlier Mercury, Gemini Apollo and Skylab series of spaceflights. Merritt Island, just south of Kennedy Space Center, is where the spacecraft liftoff tracking station is located. Photo credit: NASA

  12. Cape Canaveral and Kennedy Space Center, Florida

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1989-05-08

    STS030-76-042 (4-8 May 1989) --- For two decades, astronauts have been photographing their launching area from space, but in terms of sharpness and clarity, NASA photo experts feel, few rival this STS-30 vertical scene over the Cape Canaveral area. Sprinkled along the jutting cape feature are a number of launching pads of Kennedy Space Center, and nearby is seen the Shuttle landing facility. Titusville can be seen just above center on the north; Cocoa, Cocoa Beach and Merritt Island are south, near bottom of the frame. St. Johns, Banana and Indian Rivers are easily traced as well.

  13. Cape Cod, Buzzard's Bay, Massachusetts, USA

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1990-03-04

    STS036-151-225 (2 March 1990) --- Surrounded by waters of the Atlantic Ocean, Cape Cod Bay and Nantucket Sound, the jutting Cape Cod feature caught the attention of the astronaut crewmembers aboard the Earth-orbiting Space Shuttle Atlantis, 126 nautical miles above Earth. Parts of Martha's Vineyard and Nantucket are in bottom left corner. Plymouth Bay is in upper left corner. Center point coordinates are 42 degrees north latitude and 70 degrees west longitude. A large format Linhof camera (4" x 5" film) was used to expose the frame.

  14. CAPE-2 Cubesat - ELaNa IV

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-07-25

    CAPE-2: Cajun Advanced Picosatellite Experiment – ELaNa IV CAPE-2 was developed by students from the University of Louisiana Lafayette to engage, inspire and educate K-12 students to encourage them to pursue STEM careers. The secondary focus is the technology demonstration of deployed solar panels to support the following payloads: text to speech, voice repeater, tweeting, email, file transfer and data collection from buoys. Launched by NASA’s CubeSat Launch Initiative on the ELaNa IV mission as an auxiliary payload aboard the U.S. Air Force-led Operationally Responsive Space (ORS-3) Mission on November 19, 2013.

  15. Convict bastards, common-law unions, and shotgun weddings: premarital conceptions and ex-nuptial births in nineteenth-century Tasmania.

    PubMed

    Kippen, Rebecca; Gunn, Peter A

    2011-01-01

    This article uses reconstituted family data from birth, death, and marriage registers to measure ex-nuptial fertility and premarital pregnancies in nineteenth-century Tasmania. It also examines the extent to which convict origins of European society on the island caused a departure from English norms of family formation behavior, during a period when men greatly outnumbered women. Illegitimacy was high during the convict period. From the mid-1850s, after the convict system collapsed, levels of ex-nupital births were relatively constant until the end of the century, as indicated both by the illegitimacy rate and by the proportion of marriages associated with prenuptial births. By the end of the nineteenth-century, rates of illegitimacy and prenuptial conceptions in Tasmania were well within the range of those of contemporary English-speaking populations.

  16. Temporal trends in thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and thyroid peroxidase antibody (ATPO) testing across two phases of iodine fortification in Tasmania (1995-2013).

    PubMed

    Hong, A; Stokes, B; Otahal, P; Owens, D; Burgess, J R

    2017-10-01

    Tasmania is an island state of the Australian Commonwealth with a well-documented history of mild iodine deficiency. Between 2001 and 2009, Tasmania experienced two incremental phases of iodine fortification. To examine trends in thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and thyroid peroxidase antibody (ATPO) testing and their relationship to different phases of iodine nutrition in the Tasmanian population between 1995 and 2013. Retrospective longitudinal study. The major primary care and largest public hospital pathology providers in Tasmania submitted data for all TSH and ATPO tests performed between 1995 and 2013. Data linkage methodology was used to determine trends in TSH and ATPO testing. A total of 1.66 million TSH assessments, involving 389,910 individual patients, were performed in Tasmania between 1995 and 2013. There was approximately a fourfold increase in the overall rate of TSH testing during this period with the rate of incident TSH assessment remaining relatively stable over the study period. The incidence of overt suppression and elevation of TSH (TSH≤0.1 mIU/L and ≥10 mIU/L) declined 62.3% and 59.7%, respectively, with a trend for increased incidence of borderline TSH elevation ≥4.0 mIU/L. The incidence of thyroid autoimmunity as determined by the proportion of abnormal ATPO results remained stable, with the absolute number of positive test results increasing during the study period. Iodine supplementation of this mildly iodine-deficient population was not associated with an obvious increase in incidence of overt thyroid dysfunction or autoimmunity. Whilst the volume of TSH testing increased over the study period, the increase was driven by patients undergoing follow-up TSH assessments. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. The history of early low frequency radio astronomy in Australia. 8: Grote Reber and the 'Square Kilometre Array' near Bothwell, Tasmania, in the 1960s and 1970s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Martin; Orchiston, Wayne; Wielebinski, Richard

    2017-08-01

    In the 1960s, Grote Reber (1911‒2002) established and used an antenna array near Bothwell in Tasmania. Working independently, he produced a radio map of the southern sky at a frequency of 2.085 MHz (a wavelength of 144 metres). Encouraged by this success, he modified the array in the 1970s to work at 1.155 MHz, but this second endeavour failed to produce any usable results.

  18. AIDS. Grim news for Asia.

    PubMed

    1992-12-04

    While Asia was the last region to be exposed to the global spread of HIV and AIDS, the incidence of HIV infection there is increasing fastest. The Asian Development Bank predicts mortality from AIDS will cause some town and village populations to begin declining by the year 2000. With an estimated 1 million people infected in India, and 400,000 in Thailand, these 2 countries are particularly exposed to the risk of epidemic HIV spread. In 5 years, more people may be affected by AIDS in India than anywhere else in the world. Concern over a growing presence of HIV is also merited for the Philippines, Indonesia, China, and the drug trade's Golden Triangle. The Second International Conference on AIDS in Asia and the Pacific in November 1992 stressed that AIDS no longer affects only homosexual and IV drug using populations. 50% of new infections worldwide in the first half of 1992 were among women, 65% of Thailand's AIDS cases are among heterosexuals, and 3-5% of Thailand's long-haul truck drivers have tested positive for HIV infection. HIV and AIDS robs economies and societies of their best workers. The immediate costs of caring for AIDS patients will pale next to the far greater losses to be realized in private sector economic productivity. Asia's more developed economies will probably be able to survive the epidemic, but small, poor countries like Laos will wilt. Prompt action must be taken to overcome public and religious ignorance and objections to promoting and using condoms throughout the region. For the first time, Beijing has organized an AIDS awareness conference for male homosexuals. Further, Singapore has implemented compulsory testing for lower-income foreign workers. Pakistan has even solicited educational assistance and support from Islamic religious leaders; similar action is being considered in Bangladesh.

  19. GEO-CAPE Aerosol Working Group Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian; Jethva, Hiren; Joiner, Joanna; Lyapustin, Alexei; Mattoo, Shana; Torres, Omar; Vasilkov, Alexander; Kondragunta, Shobha; Ciren, Pubu; Remer, Lorraine; Wang, Jun

    2013-01-01

    GEO-CAPE will measure a suite of short-lived species that are relevant to both air quality and climate. The document was presented at the 2013 AEROCENTER Annual Meeting held at the GSFC Visitors Center, May 31, 2013. The Organizers of the meeting are posting the talks to the public Aerocentr website, after the meeting.

  20. GEMINI-TITAN-IV - SUITED (CLOSEUP) - CAPE

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1965-05-31

    S65-19528 (1 June 1965) --- Astronauts Edward H. White II (left), Gemini-Titan 4 pilot; and James A. McDivitt, command pilot. EDITOR?S NOTE: Astronaut White died in the Apollo 1/Saturn 204 fire at Cape Kennedy on Jan. 27, 1967.

  1. Biogeography in a continental island: population structure of the relict endemic centipede Craterostigmus tasmanianus (Chilopoda, Craterostigmomorpha) in Tasmania using 16S rRNA and COI.

    PubMed

    Vélez, Sebastián; Mesibov, Robert; Giribet, Gonzalo

    2012-01-01

    We used 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) sequence data to investigate the population structure in the centipede Craterostigmus tasmanianus Pocock, 1902 (Chilopoda: Craterostigmomorpha: Craterostigmidae) and to look for possible barriers to gene flow on the island of Tasmania, where C. tasmanianus is a widespread endemic. We first confirmed a molecular diagnostic character in 28S rRNA separating Tasmanian Craterostigmus from its sister species Craterostigmus crabilli (Edgecombe and Giribet 2008) in New Zealand and found no shared polymorphism in this marker for the 2 species. In Tasmania, analysis of molecular variance analysis showed little variation at the 16S rRNA and COI loci within populations (6% and 13%, respectively), but substantial variation (56% and 48%, respectively) among populations divided geographically into groups. We found no clear evidence of isolation by distance using a Mantel test. Bayesian clustering and gene network analysis both group the C. tasmanianus populations in patterns which are broadly concordant with previously known biogeographical divisions within Tasmania, but we did not find that genetic distance varied in a simple way across cluster boundaries. The coarse-scale geographical sampling on which this study was based should be followed in the future by sampling at a finer spatial scale and to investigate genetic structure within clusters and across cluster boundaries.

  2. Interhemispheric differences in seasonal cycles of tropospheric ozone in the marine boundary layer: Observation-model comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derwent, Richard G.; Parrish, David D.; Galbally, Ian E.; Stevenson, David S.; Doherty, Ruth M.; Young, Paul J.; Shallcross, Dudley E.

    2016-09-01

    Marine boundary layer ozone seasonal cycles have been quantified by fitting the sum of two sine curves through monthly detrended observations taken at three stations: Mace Head, Ireland, and Trinidad Head, California, in the Northern Hemisphere and Cape Grim, Tasmania, in the Southern Hemisphere. The parameters defining the sine curve fits at these stations have been compared with those from a global Lagrangian chemistry-transport model and from 14 Atmospheric Chemistry Coupled Climate Model Intercomparison Project chemistry-climate models. Most models substantially overestimated the long-term average ozone levels at Trinidad Head, while they performed much better for Mace Head and Cape Grim. This led to an underestimation of the observed (North Atlantic inflow-North Pacific inflow) difference. The models generally underpredicted the magnitude of the fundamental term of the fitted seasonal cycle, most strongly at Cape Grim. The models more accurately reproduced the observed second harmonic terms compared to the fundamental terms at all stations. Significant correlations have been identified between the errors in the different models' estimates of the seasonal cycle parameters; these correlations may yield further insights into the causes of the model-measurement discrepancies.

  3. BOTTOM LEVEL OF ALTITUDE CHAMBER L, FACING SOUTHWEST Cape ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BOTTOM LEVEL OF ALTITUDE CHAMBER L, FACING SOUTHWEST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  4. 44. CAPE COD AIR STATION PAVE PAWS FACILITY BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    44. CAPE COD AIR STATION PAVE PAWS FACILITY - BUILDING ELEVATION WITH BUILDING METAL SIDING BEING APPLIED ON "B" FACE. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  5. VIEW OF WEST ELEVATION, FACING EAST Cape Canaveral Air ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF WEST ELEVATION, FACING EAST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 34, Operations Support Building, Freedom Road, Southwest of Launch Stand CX-34, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  6. VIEW OF NORTH ELEVATION, FACING SOUTH Cape Canaveral Air ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF NORTH ELEVATION, FACING SOUTH - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 34, Operations Support Building, Freedom Road, Southwest of Launch Stand CX-34, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  7. DETAIL OF ELECTRICAL PANEL, ROOM 112, FACING EAST Cape ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF ELECTRICAL PANEL, ROOM 112, FACING EAST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 34, Operations Support Building, Freedom Road, Southwest of Launch Stand CX-34, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  8. VIEW OF ROOM 112, FACING NORTHEAST Cape Canaveral Air ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF ROOM 112, FACING NORTHEAST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 34, Operations Support Building, Freedom Road, Southwest of Launch Stand CX-34, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  9. VIEW OF SOUTH AND EAST ELEVATIONS, FACING NORTHWEST Cape ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF SOUTH AND EAST ELEVATIONS, FACING NORTHWEST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 34, Operations Support Building, Freedom Road, Southwest of Launch Stand CX-34, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  10. DETAIL OF ELECTRICAL CART, WEST SHED AREA Cape Canaveral ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF ELECTRICAL CART, WEST SHED AREA - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 34, Operations Support Building, Freedom Road, Southwest of Launch Stand CX-34, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  11. EXTERIOR OF LOCKER ROOM PROJECTION, FACING SOUTHEAST Cape Canaveral ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    EXTERIOR OF LOCKER ROOM PROJECTION, FACING SOUTHEAST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 34, Operations Support Building, Freedom Road, Southwest of Launch Stand CX-34, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  12. EXTERIOR DOOR DETAIL, CORRIDOR 137, FACING EAST Cape Canaveral ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    EXTERIOR DOOR DETAIL, CORRIDOR 137, FACING EAST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 34, Operations Support Building, Freedom Road, Southwest of Launch Stand CX-34, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  13. VIEW OF NORTH AND EAST ELEVATIONS, FACING SOUTHWEST Cape ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF NORTH AND EAST ELEVATIONS, FACING SOUTHWEST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 34, Operations Support Building, Freedom Road, Southwest of Launch Stand CX-34, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  14. VIEW OF SOUTH AND WEST ELEVATIONS, FACING NORTHEAST Cape ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF SOUTH AND WEST ELEVATIONS, FACING NORTHEAST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 34, Operations Support Building, Freedom Road, Southwest of Launch Stand CX-34, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  15. DETAIL OF WEST ELEVATION, FACING SOUTHEAST Cape Canaveral Air ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF WEST ELEVATION, FACING SOUTHEAST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 34, Operations Support Building, Freedom Road, Southwest of Launch Stand CX-34, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  16. DETAIL OF WEST ELEVATION ROOF OVERHANG Cape Canaveral Air ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF WEST ELEVATION ROOF OVERHANG - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 34, Operations Support Building, Freedom Road, Southwest of Launch Stand CX-34, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  17. DETAIL OF WEST STORAGE AREA, FACING NORTHEAST Cape Canaveral ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF WEST STORAGE AREA, FACING NORTHEAST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 34, Operations Support Building, Freedom Road, Southwest of Launch Stand CX-34, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  18. VIEW OF ROOM 136, FACING SOUTHWEST Cape Canaveral Air ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF ROOM 136, FACING SOUTHWEST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 34, Operations Support Building, Freedom Road, Southwest of Launch Stand CX-34, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  19. VIEW OF EAST ELEVATION, FACING WEST Cape Canaveral Air ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF EAST ELEVATION, FACING WEST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 34, Operations Support Building, Freedom Road, Southwest of Launch Stand CX-34, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  20. VIEW OF NORTH AND WEST ELEVATIONS, FACING SOUTHEAST Cape ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF NORTH AND WEST ELEVATIONS, FACING SOUTHEAST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 34, Operations Support Building, Freedom Road, Southwest of Launch Stand CX-34, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  1. VIEW OF SOUTH ELEVATION, FACING NORTH Cape Canaveral Air ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF SOUTH ELEVATION, FACING NORTH - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 34, Operations Support Building, Freedom Road, Southwest of Launch Stand CX-34, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  2. DETAIL OF ELECTRICAL PANEL, CORRIDOR 137 Cape Canaveral Air ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF ELECTRICAL PANEL, CORRIDOR 137 - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 34, Operations Support Building, Freedom Road, Southwest of Launch Stand CX-34, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  3. DETAIL VIEW OF COMPUTER PANELS, ROOM 8A Cape Canaveral ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF COMPUTER PANELS, ROOM 8A - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Mobile Launcher Platforms, Launcher Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  4. Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, The Solid ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, The Solid Rocket Booster Assembly and Refurbishment Facility Manufacturing Building, Southeast corner of Schwartz Road and Contractors Road, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  5. MLP SUPPORT PEDESTAL 4 AT PARKING SITE Cape Canaveral ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MLP SUPPORT PEDESTAL 4 AT PARKING SITE - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Mobile Launcher Platforms, Launcher Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  6. MLP SUPPORT PEDESTAL 2 AT PARKING SITE Cape Canaveral ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MLP SUPPORT PEDESTAL 2 AT PARKING SITE - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Mobile Launcher Platforms, Launcher Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  7. MLP SUPPORT PEDESTAL 1 AT PARKING SITE Cape Canaveral ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    MLP SUPPORT PEDESTAL 1 AT PARKING SITE - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Mobile Launcher Platforms, Launcher Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  8. DETAIL VIEW OF THE PORT TSM ACCESS DOOR Cape ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF THE PORT TSM ACCESS DOOR - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Mobile Launcher Platforms, Launcher Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  9. 33 CFR 80.745 - Cape Sable, FL to Cape Romano, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... East Cape to Little Shark River Light 1; thence to westernmost extremity of Shark Point; thence... surrounding the Ten Thousand Islands and the bays, creeks, inlets, and rivers between Chatham Bend and...

  10. 33 CFR 80.745 - Cape Sable, FL to Cape Romano, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... East Cape to Little Shark River Light 1; thence to westernmost extremity of Shark Point; thence... surrounding the Ten Thousand Islands and the bays, creeks, inlets, and rivers between Chatham Bend and...

  11. 33 CFR 80.745 - Cape Sable, FL to Cape Romano, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... East Cape to Little Shark River Light 1; thence to westernmost extremity of Shark Point; thence... surrounding the Ten Thousand Islands and the bays, creeks, inlets, and rivers between Chatham Bend and...

  12. 33 CFR 80.745 - Cape Sable, FL to Cape Romano, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... East Cape to Little Shark River Light 1; thence to westernmost extremity of Shark Point; thence... parallel to the general trend of the shoreline. (e) A line formed by the centerline of Highway 92 Bridge...

  13. Structural and Geomorphic Controls on Dryland Salinity and Regolith Distribution in the Critical Zone, North-east Tasmania, Australia.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweeney, M. E.; Moore, C. L.

    2015-12-01

    Salinity occurs in the drier and flatter Australian landscapes because there is insufficient rain to flush salts from critical zone. Changes in land use due to agriculture and urbanisation can accelerate salinity effects, leading to soil and water degradation and threatening infrastructure and ecosystems. The dominant lithology in the salt affected regions of North-east Tasmania is dolerite. The geochemistry of dolerite regolith has been examined in order to understand the association between salinity and weathered dolerite. The electrical conductivity of 1:5 soil-waters is higher in the more weathered material (maximum 4.9 dS/m). This confirms field observations that highly weathered dolerite can serve as a significant store for salt in the landscape. However, the clay content and salinity varies, depending on the local geomorphic context. Dolerite weathering on well-drained slopes has favoured the formation of 1:1 kaolinite clays, and sometimes bauxite formation. Kaolinite-bearing regolith can store salt via matrix diffusion processes. However, there are fault-bounded pockets of colluvium and highly-weathered in situmaterial, where the supply of cations has not been diminished and 2:1 montmorillonite clays dominate. These regions have the capacity to store large volumes of salts. The geomorphology also affects the volume of rain and flux of salt from windblown dust and oceanic aerosols. The chemistry of rainwater from an array of bulk deposition collectors was studied from Spring 2013 to Winter 2014. The average salt flux was 79± 10 kg/ha/yr in the study region, ranging from 170± 12 kg/ha/yr in the north to 42 ± 6 kg/ha/yr inland. To assist in understanding why salt is found in certain parts of the landscape but not in others, it is essential to model how water moves through the critical zone and geological structures. By exploring the complex interactions of geomorphology and other biophysical parameters the study area has been divided into Hydrogeological

  14. The dispersion and detection patterns of mtDNA-assigned red fox Vulpes vulpes scats in Tasmania are anomalous.

    PubMed

    Marks, Clive A; Obendorf, David; Pereira, Filipe; Edwards, Ivo; Hall, Graham P

    2014-08-01

    Models used for resource allocation in eradication programmes must be based on replicated data of known quality and have proven predictive accuracy, or they may provide a false indication of species presence and/or distribution. In the absence of data corroborating the presence of extant foxes Vulpes vulpes in Tasmania, a habitat-specific model based upon mtDNA data (Sarre et al. 2012. Journal Applied Ecology, 50, 459-468) implied that foxes were widespread. Overall, 61 of 9940 (0·6%) surveyed scats were assigned as mtDNA fox positive by the fox eradication programme (FEP). We investigated the spatiotemporal distribution of the 61 mtDNA-assigned fox scats and modelled the probability of replicating scat detection in independent surveys using detection dogs based upon empirically derived probabilities of scat detection success obtained by the FEP using imported fox scats. In a prior mainland study, fox genotypes were recurrently detected in a consecutive four-day pool of scats. In Tasmania, only three contemporaneously collected scat pairs of unknown genotype were detected by the FEP within an area corresponding to a conservatively large mainland fox home range (639 ha) in a decade. Nearest neighbour pairs were widely spaced (mean = 7·0 km; circular area = 153 km(2)) and generated after a mean of 281 days. The majority of assigned mtDNA positive scats were found in urban and peri-urban environments corresponding to small mainland fox home ranges (30-45 ha) that imply higher scat density and more certain replication. Using the lowest empirically determined scat detection success for dogs, the failure to replicate fox scat detection on 34 of 36 occasions in a large (639 ha) home range is highly improbable (P = 0·00001) and suggestive of Type I error. Synthesis and applications. Type I error, which may have various sources, should be considered when scat mtDNA data are few, accumulated over many years, uncorroborated by observations of extant specimens

  15. The dispersion and detection patterns of mtDNA-assigned red fox Vulpes vulpes scats in Tasmania are anomalous

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Clive A; Obendorf, David; Pereira, Filipe; Edwards, Ivo; Hall, Graham P

    2014-01-01

    Models used for resource allocation in eradication programmes must be based on replicated data of known quality and have proven predictive accuracy, or they may provide a false indication of species presence and/or distribution. In the absence of data corroborating the presence of extant foxes Vulpes vulpes in Tasmania, a habitat-specific model based upon mtDNA data (Sarre et al. 2012. Journal Applied Ecology, 50, 459–468) implied that foxes were widespread. Overall, 61 of 9940 (0·6%) surveyed scats were assigned as mtDNA fox positive by the fox eradication programme (FEP). We investigated the spatiotemporal distribution of the 61 mtDNA-assigned fox scats and modelled the probability of replicating scat detection in independent surveys using detection dogs based upon empirically derived probabilities of scat detection success obtained by the FEP using imported fox scats. In a prior mainland study, fox genotypes were recurrently detected in a consecutive four-day pool of scats. In Tasmania, only three contemporaneously collected scat pairs of unknown genotype were detected by the FEP within an area corresponding to a conservatively large mainland fox home range (639 ha) in a decade. Nearest neighbour pairs were widely spaced (mean = 7·0 km; circular area = 153 km2) and generated after a mean of 281 days. The majority of assigned mtDNA positive scats were found in urban and peri-urban environments corresponding to small mainland fox home ranges (30–45 ha) that imply higher scat density and more certain replication. Using the lowest empirically determined scat detection success for dogs, the failure to replicate fox scat detection on 34 of 36 occasions in a large (639 ha) home range is highly improbable (P = 0·00001) and suggestive of Type I error. Synthesis and applications. Type I error, which may have various sources, should be considered when scat mtDNA data are few, accumulated over many years, uncorroborated by observations of extant

  16. Porcess-industry CAPE-OPEN software standard overview

    SciTech Connect

    Zitney, S.

    2009-01-01

    CAPE-OPEN (CAPE is short for Computer Aided Process Engineering) is a standard for writing computer software interfaces. It is mainly applied in process engineering where it enables a standardized communication between process simulators (e.g. Aspen Plus) and products developed by ourselves. The advantage of CAPE-OPEN is that these products are applicable to more than just one process simulator; they are aimed at all process simulators that are CAPE-OPEN compliant.

  17. Cape Hatteras, North Carolina area as seen from Apollo 9

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1969-03-12

    AS09-20-3128 (3-13 March 1969) --- Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, area as photographed from the Apollo 9 spacecraft during its Earth-orbital mission. Cape Lookout is near bottom of picture. Cape Hatteras juts the farthest out into the Atlantic. Largest inland body of water is Pamlico Sound; and to the north of it is Albemarle Sound.

  18. 33 CFR 117.822 - Cape Fear River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Cape Fear River. 117.822 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements North Carolina § 117.822 Cape Fear River. The draw of the Cape Fear Memorial Bridge, mile 26.8, at Wilmington need not open for the passage of vessels...

  19. 33 CFR 117.822 - Cape Fear River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Cape Fear River. 117.822 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements North Carolina § 117.822 Cape Fear River. The draw of the Cape Fear Memorial Bridge, mile 26.8, at Wilmington need not open for the passage of vessels...

  20. 33 CFR 117.822 - Cape Fear River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Cape Fear River. 117.822 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements North Carolina § 117.822 Cape Fear River. The draw of the Cape Fear Memorial Bridge, mile 26.8, at Wilmington need not open for the passage of vessels...

  1. 33 CFR 117.823 - Cape Fear River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cape Fear River. 117.823 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements North Carolina § 117.823 Cape Fear River. The draw of the Cape Fear Memorial Bridge, mile 26.8, at Wilmington need not open for the passage of vessel from...

  2. 33 CFR 117.823 - Cape Fear River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Cape Fear River. 117.823 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements North Carolina § 117.823 Cape Fear River. The draw of the Cape Fear Memorial Bridge, mile 26.8, at Wilmington need not open for the passage of vessels...

  3. Photocopy of drawing. OPERATIONS SUPPORT BUILDING. NASA, Cape Canaveral Air ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of drawing. OPERATIONS SUPPORT BUILDING. NASA, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida. Drawing 86K01547, Maurice H. Connell & Associates, February, 1961. OPERATIONS SUPPORT BUILDING FLOOR PLAN AND SCHEDULES. Sheet 4 of 34 - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 34, Operations Support Building, Freedom Road, Southwest of Launch Stand CX-34, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  4. Photocopy of drawing. OPERATIONS SUPPORT BUILDING. NASA, Cape Canaveral Air ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of drawing. OPERATIONS SUPPORT BUILDING. NASA, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida. Drawing 86K01547, Maurice H. Connell & Associates, February, 1961. OPERATIONS SUPPORT BUILDING ROOF PLAN, REFLECTED CEILING PLAN, AND DETAILS. Sheet 7 of 34 - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 34, Operations Support Building, Freedom Road, Southwest of Launch Stand CX-34, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  5. Photocopy of drawing. OPERATIONS SUPPORT BUILDING. NASA, Cape Canaveral Air ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of drawing. OPERATIONS SUPPORT BUILDING. NASA, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida. Drawing 86K01547, Maurice H. Connell & Associates, February, 1961. OPERATIONS SUPPORT BUILDING ELEVATIONS AND SECTION. Sheet 5 of 34 - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 34, Operations Support Building, Freedom Road, Southwest of Launch Stand CX-34, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  6. Photocopy of drawing. OPERATIONS SUPPORT BUILDING. NASA, Cape Canaveral Air ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of drawing. OPERATIONS SUPPORT BUILDING. NASA, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida. Drawing 86K01547, Maurice H. Connell & Associates, February, 1961. OPERATIONS SUPPORT BUILDING SITE PLAN. Sheet 2 of 34 - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 34, Operations Support Building, Freedom Road, Southwest of Launch Stand CX-34, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  7. 33 CFR 165.540 - Regulated Navigation Area; Cape Fear River, Northeast Cape Fear River, Wilmington, North Carolina.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Fear River, Northeast Cape Fear River, Wilmington, North Carolina. 165.540 Section 165.540 Navigation... Limited Access Areas Fifth Coast Guard District § 165.540 Regulated Navigation Area; Cape Fear River, Northeast Cape Fear River, Wilmington, North Carolina. (a) Description of the Regulated Navigation Area (RNA...

  8. 33 CFR 165.540 - Regulated Navigation Area; Cape Fear River, Northeast Cape Fear River, Wilmington, North Carolina.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Fear River, Northeast Cape Fear River, Wilmington, North Carolina. 165.540 Section 165.540 Navigation... Limited Access Areas Fifth Coast Guard District § 165.540 Regulated Navigation Area; Cape Fear River, Northeast Cape Fear River, Wilmington, North Carolina. (a) Description of the Regulated Navigation Area (RNA...

  9. 33 CFR 165.540 - Regulated Navigation Area; Cape Fear River, Northeast Cape Fear River, Wilmington, North Carolina.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Fear River, Northeast Cape Fear River, Wilmington, North Carolina. 165.540 Section 165.540 Navigation... Limited Access Areas Fifth Coast Guard District § 165.540 Regulated Navigation Area; Cape Fear River, Northeast Cape Fear River, Wilmington, North Carolina. (a) Description of the Regulated Navigation Area (RNA...

  10. Space Radar Image of Cape Cod, Massachusetts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This spaceborne radar image shows the famous 'hook' of Cape Cod, Massachusetts. The Cape, which juts out into the Atlantic Ocean about 100 kilometers (62 miles) southeast of Boston, actually consists of sandy debris left behind by the great continental ice sheets when they last retreated from southern New England about 20,000 years ago. Today's landscape consists of sandy forests, fields of scrub oak and other bushes and grasses, salt marshes, freshwater ponds, as well as the famous beaches and sand dunes. In this image, thickly forested areas appear green, marshes are dark blue, ponds and sandy areas are black, and developed areas are mostly pink. The dark L-shape in the lower center is the airport runways in Hyannis, the Cape's largest town. The dark X-shape left of the center is Otis Air Force Base. The Cape Cod Canal, above and left of center, connects Buzzards Bay on the left with Cape Cod Bay on the right. The northern tip of the island of Martha's Vineyard is seen in the lower left. The tip of the Cape, in the upper right, includes the community of Provincetown, which appears pink, and the protected National Seashore areas of sand dunes that parallel the Atlantic coast east of Provincetown. Scientists are using radar images like this one to study delicate coastal environments and the effects of human activities on the ecosystem and landscape. This image was acquired by Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) onboard the space shuttle Endeavour on April 15, 1994. The image is 81.7 kilometers by 43.1 kilometers (50.7 miles by 26.7 miles) and is centered at 41.8 degrees north latitude, 70.3 degrees west longitude. North is toward the upper right. The colors are assigned to different radar frequencies and polarizations of the radar as follows: red is L-band, horizontally transmitted and received; green is C-band, horizontally transmitted, vertically received; and blue is C-band, horizontally transmitted and received. SIR

  11. Born to roam? Surveying cat owners in Tasmania, Australia, to identify the drivers and barriers to cat containment.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Lynette J; Hine, Donald W; Bengsen, Andrew J

    2015-12-01

    Free-roaming domestic cats, Felis catus, are a major public nuisance in neighbourhoods across the world, and have been linked to biodiversity loss and a host of community health problems. Owners who let their cats roam, also place their cats at risk of serious injury. One management strategy that is gaining considerable support involves encouraging cat owners to contain their pets within their property. Contemporary behaviour change models highlight the importance of identifying drivers and barriers that encourage and discourage target behaviours such as cat containment. Results from a random dial phone survey of 356 cat owners in northern Tasmania identified four distinct cat containment profiles: owners who contained their cat all the time, owners who only contained their cat at night, owners who sporadically contained their cat with no set routine, and owners who made no attempt to contain their pet. Our results indicated that cat-owners' decisions to contain or not contain their cats were guided by a range of factors including owners' beliefs about their ability to implement an effective containment strategy and their views about the physical and psychological needs of their cats. The results are discussed in terms of improving the behavioural effectiveness of cat containment interventions by selecting appropriate behavioural change tools for the identified drivers and barriers, and developing targeted engagement strategies and messaging. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Testing quantitative pollen dispersal models in animal-pollinated vegetation mosaics: An example from temperate Tasmania, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariani, M.; Connor, S. E.; Theuerkauf, M.; Kuneš, P.; Fletcher, M.-S.

    2016-12-01

    Reconstructing past vegetation abundance and land-cover changes through time has important implications in land management and climate modelling. To date palaeovegetation reconstructions in Australia have been limited to qualitative or semi-quantitative inferences from pollen data. Testing pollen dispersal models constitutes a crucial step in developing quantitative past vegetation and land cover reconstructions. Thus far, the application of quantitative pollen dispersal models has been restricted to regions dominated by wind-pollinated plants (e.g. Europe) and their performance in a landscape dominated by animal-pollinated plant taxa is still unexplored. Here we test, for the first time in Australia, two well-known pollen dispersal models to assess their performance in the wind- and animal-pollinated vegetation mosaics of western Tasmania. We focus on a mix of wind- (6 taxa) and animal- (7 taxa) pollinated species that comprise the most common pollen types and key representatives of the dominant vegetation formations. Pollen Productivity Estimates and Relevant Source Area of Pollen obtained using Lagrangian Stochastic turbulent simulations appear to be more realistic when compared to the results from the widely used Gaussian Plume Model.

  13. Re-assessment of the mid to late Quaternary glacial and environmental history of the Boco Plain, western Tasmania.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augustinus, Paul; Fink, David; Fletcher, Michael-Shawn; Thomas, Ian

    2017-03-01

    The glacial geomorphology and drill core-based stratigraphy of the Boco Plain, western Tasmania, reveal a complex sequence of Quaternary glacial and non-glacial episodes. The upper part of the southern Boco Plain stratigraphy was previously dated by 14C and U-series on interbedded organics of MIS 1 to MIS 5 affinity. U-series dating of ferricretes associated with glacial diamictons from Boco Plain cores suggested that there were glacial advances broadly correlative with MIS 6, 8 and ≥10. However, terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide (10Be and 26Al) exposure ages for the moraine sequence preserved on the wider Boco Plain area indicate that moraines previously attributed to MIS 6 and 8 advances were deposited during MIS 10 or earlier cold stages. There is no evidence for MIS 2, 4 or 6 affinity glacial advances onto the Boco Plain with ice of this age restricted to the West Coast Range. New palynological records from the Boco Plain core 6690 confirmed the late Quaternary ages of the upper part of the sequence, whilst extinct palynomorphs indicate a pre-Quaternary age for the glacial diamictons at the base of core Boco 4 and 10. Consequently, the mid-Pleistocene glacial sequence preserved in the Boco Plain is significantly older than previously envisaged, with the post MIS 10 to 12 geomorphology of the plain dominated by fluvial deltaic, swamp peat and lacustrine environments.

  14. Identification of the sources of metal (lead) contamination in drinking waters in north-eastern Tasmania using lead isotopic compositions.

    PubMed

    Harvey, P J; Handley, H K; Taylor, M P

    2015-08-01

    This study utilises a range of scientific approaches, including lead isotopic compositions, to differentiate unknown sources of ongoing lead contamination of a drinking water supply in north-eastern Tasmania, Australia. Drinking water lead concentrations are elevated above the Australian Drinking Water Guideline (10 μg/L), reaching 540 μg/L in the supply network. Water lead isotopic compositions from the town of Pioneer ((208)Pb/(207)Pb 2.406, (206)Pb/(207)Pb 1.144 to (208)Pb/(207)Pb 2.360, (206)Pb/(207)Pb 1.094) and Ringarooma ((208)Pb/(207)Pb 2.398, (206)Pb/(207)Pb 1.117) are markedly different from the local bedrock ((208)Pb/(207)Pb 2.496, (206)Pb/(207)Pb 1.237). The data show that the lead in the local waters is sourced from a combination of dilapidated drinking water infrastructure, including lead jointed pipelines, end-of-life polyvinyl chloride pipes and household plumbing. Drinking water is being inadvertently contaminated by aging infrastructure, and it is an issue that warrants investigation to limit the burden of disease from lead exposure.

  15. Seasonal occurrence and population structure of the broadnose sevengill shark Notorynchus cepedianus in coastal habitats of south-east Tasmania.

    PubMed

    Barnett, A; Stevens, J D; Frusher, S D; Semmens, J M

    2010-11-01

    Research longline sampling was conducted seasonally from December 2006 to February 2009 to investigate the occurrence and population structure of the broadnose sevengill shark Notorynchus cepedianus in coastal areas of south-east Tasmania. Notorynchus cepedianus showed a consistent temporal trend in seasonal occurrence in Norfolk Bay characterized by high abundances in summer to near absence in winter. This pattern was less pronounced in the Derwent Estuary, where fish were still caught during winter. The absence of smaller total length (L(T) ) classes (<80 cm) from the catches suggests that N. cepedianus are not using these coastal habitats as nursery areas. Of the 457 individuals tagged, 68 (15%) were recaptured. Time at liberty ranged from 6 days to almost 4 years and all but one of the recaptures were caught in its original tagging location, suggesting site fidelity. The large number of N. cepedianus in these coastal systems over summer indicates that these areas are important habitats for this species and that N. cepedianus may have a significant influence on community dynamics through both direct and indirect predator-prey interactions.

  16. Prochristianella mattisi sp. n. (Trypanorhyncha: Eutetrarhynchidae) from the wedgenose skate, Dipturus whitleyi (Rajiformes: Rajidae), from Tasmania (Australia).

    PubMed

    Schaeffner, Bjoern C; Beveridge, Ian

    2013-07-01

    A new species of Prochristianella Dollfus, 1946 is described from the spiral intestine of the wedgenose skate, Dipturus whitleyi (Iredale) (Rajiformes: Rajidae), off the north-western coast of Tasmania (Australia). Prochristianella mattisi sp. n. is characterised by an acraspedote scolex, two oval bothria, elongate, bent bulbs, a retractor muscle inserting at the base of each bulb and the presence of gland-cells within the bulbs and prebulbar organs. The tentacular armature is typical heteroacanthous, heteromorphous, with a characteristic basal oncotaxy and a metabasal armature with hooks first increasing and then decreasing in size along each principle row. It can be differentiated from other species of Prochristianella by a combination of morphological characters, such as the metabasal tentacular armature with eight hooks per principle row, a unique basal armature without enlarged hooks on the basal swelling and genital pores slightly posterior to the mid-line of the segment. The description of P. mattisi sp. n. increases the number of known species within Prochristianella to 20, eight of which occur in Australian waters. A key for the identification to species within Prochristianella is provided.

  17. Response of sea surface fugacity of CO2 to the SAM shift south of Tasmania: Regional differences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Liang; Gao, Libao; Cai, Wei-Jun; Yu, Weidong; Wei, Meng

    2015-05-01

    Using observational data collected south of Tasmania during 14 austral summer cruises during 1993-2011, we examined the response of sea surface fugacity of carbon dioxide (fCO2) to the Southern Annular Mode (SAM) shift, which occurred around 2000. In the southern part of the Southern Ocean (SO) or the Polar Zone (PZ) and the Polar Frontal Zone (PFZ), fCO2 increased faster at the sea surface than in the atmosphere before the SAM shift, but not after the shift. In the northern part of the SO or the Subantarctic Zone (SAZ), however, surface fCO2 increased faster than atmospheric fCO2 both before and after the shift. The SAM shift had an important influence on the surface fCO2 trend in the PZ and PFZ but not in the SAZ, which we attribute to differences in regional oceanographic processes (upwelling versus nonupwelling). The SAM shift may have reversed the negative trend of SO CO2 uptake.

  18. Cubesat Application for Planetary Entry Missions (CAPE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esper, Jaime; Baumann, Jean-Pierre; Herdrich, Georg

    2013-01-01

    The Cubesat Application for Planetary Entry Missions (CAPE) concept describes a high-performing Cubesat system which includes a propulsion module and miniaturized technologies capable of surviving atmospheric entry heating, while reliably transmitting scientific and engineering data. The Micro Return Capsule 2 (MIRKA2) is CAPE’s first planetary entry probe flight prototype. Within this context, this paper summarizes CAPE’s configuration and typical operational scenario. It also summarizes MIRKA2’s design and basic aerodynamic characteristics, and discusses potential challenges drawn from the experience of missions such as Stardust and MUSES-C. CAPE not only opens the door to new planetary mission capabilities, it also offers relatively low-cost opportunities especially suitable to university participation.

  19. Analysis of the Cape Cod tracer data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ezzedine, Souheil; Rubin, Yoram

    1997-01-01

    An analysis of the Cape Cod test was performed using several first- and higher-order theoretical models. We compare conditional and unconditional solutions of the transport equation and employ them for analysis of the experimental data. We consider spatial moments, mass breakthrough curves, and the distribution of the solute mass in space. The concentration measurements were also analyzed using theoretical models for the expected value and variance of concentration. The theoretical models we employed are based on the spatial correlation structure of the conductivity field, without any fitting of parameters to the tracer data, and hence we can test the predictive power of the theories tested. The effects of recharge on macrodispersion are investigated, and it is shown that recharge provides a reasonable explanation for the enhanced lateral spread of the Cape Cod plume. The compendium of the experimental results presented here is useful for testing of theoretical and numerical models.

  20. Hepatitis E virus: Western Cape, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Madden, Richie G; Wallace, Sebastian; Sonderup, Mark; Korsman, Stephen; Chivese, Tawanda; Gavine, Bronwyn; Edem, Aniefiok; Govender, Roxy; English, Nathan; Kaiyamo, Christy; Lutchman, Odelia; van der Eijk, Annemiek A; Pas, Suzan D; Webb, Glynn W; Palmer, Joanne; Goddard, Elizabeth; Wasserman, Sean; Dalton, Harry R; Spearman, C Wendy

    2016-01-01

    AIM To conduct a prospective assessment of anti-hepatitis E virus (HEV) IgG seroprevalence in the Western Cape Province of South Africa in conjunction with evaluating risk factors for exposure. METHODS Consenting participants attending clinics and wards of Groote Schuur, Red Cross Children’s Hospital and their affiliated teaching hospitals in Cape Town, South Africa, were sampled. Healthy adults attending blood donor clinics were also recruited. Patients with known liver disease were excluded and all major ethnic/race groups were included to broadly represent local demographics. Relevant demographic data was captured at the time of sampling using an interviewer-administered confidential questionnaire. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) status was self-disclosed. HEV IgG testing was performed using the Wantai® assay. RESULTS HEV is endemic in the region with a seroprevalence of 27.9% (n = 324/1161) 95%CI: 25.3%-30.5% (21.9% when age-adjusted) with no significant differences between ethnic groups or HIV status. Seroprevalence in children is low but rapidly increases in early adulthood. With univariate analysis, age ≥ 30 years old, pork and bacon/ham consumption suggested risk. In the multivariate analysis, the highest risk factor for HEV IgG seropositivity (OR = 7.679, 95%CI: 5.38-10.96, P < 0.001) was being 30 years or older followed by pork consumption (OR = 2.052, 95%CI: 1.39-3.03, P < 0.001). A recent clinical case demonstrates that HEV genotype 3 may be currently circulating in the Western Cape. CONCLUSION Hepatitis E seroprevalence was considerably higher than previously thought suggesting that hepatitis E warrants consideration in any patient presenting with an unexplained hepatitis in the Western Cape, irrespective of travel history, age or ethnicity. PMID:27956810

  1. Hepatitis E virus: Western Cape, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Madden, Richie G; Wallace, Sebastian; Sonderup, Mark; Korsman, Stephen; Chivese, Tawanda; Gavine, Bronwyn; Edem, Aniefiok; Govender, Roxy; English, Nathan; Kaiyamo, Christy; Lutchman, Odelia; van der Eijk, Annemiek A; Pas, Suzan D; Webb, Glynn W; Palmer, Joanne; Goddard, Elizabeth; Wasserman, Sean; Dalton, Harry R; Spearman, C Wendy

    2016-11-28

    To conduct a prospective assessment of anti-hepatitis E virus (HEV) IgG seroprevalence in the Western Cape Province of South Africa in conjunction with evaluating risk factors for exposure. Consenting participants attending clinics and wards of Groote Schuur, Red Cross Children's Hospital and their affiliated teaching hospitals in Cape Town, South Africa, were sampled. Healthy adults attending blood donor clinics were also recruited. Patients with known liver disease were excluded and all major ethnic/race groups were included to broadly represent local demographics. Relevant demographic data was captured at the time of sampling using an interviewer-administered confidential questionnaire. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) status was self-disclosed. HEV IgG testing was performed using the Wantai(®) assay. HEV is endemic in the region with a seroprevalence of 27.9% (n = 324/1161) 95%CI: 25.3%-30.5% (21.9% when age-adjusted) with no significant differences between ethnic groups or HIV status. Seroprevalence in children is low but rapidly increases in early adulthood. With univariate analysis, age ≥ 30 years old, pork and bacon/ham consumption suggested risk. In the multivariate analysis, the highest risk factor for HEV IgG seropositivity (OR = 7.679, 95%CI: 5.38-10.96, P < 0.001) was being 30 years or older followed by pork consumption (OR = 2.052, 95%CI: 1.39-3.03, P < 0.001). A recent clinical case demonstrates that HEV genotype 3 may be currently circulating in the Western Cape. Hepatitis E seroprevalence was considerably higher than previously thought suggesting that hepatitis E warrants consideration in any patient presenting with an unexplained hepatitis in the Western Cape, irrespective of travel history, age or ethnicity.

  2. The Cape Observatory: all Categories of Heritage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glass, Ian S.

    2012-09-01

    In this presentation I will give an outline of the various types of heritage related to the Royal Observatory, Cape of Good Hope, established in 1820 and now the headquarters campus of the South African Astronomical Observatory, located quite close to downtown Cape Town. In terms of tangible, fixed heritage, the campus itself, the domes and the various other buildings are obviously relevant. This category includes the Classical Revival Main Building of 1828 and the McClean dome of 1895 by the leading colonial architect Herbert Baker as well as many other buildings and even the graves of two directors. Tangible movable items include, in principle, the telescopes, the accessory instruments and many pieces of apparatus that have been preserved. In addition, extensive collections of antique paintings, drawings, furniture and books add to the site's cultural significance. Many of the Observatory's archives are still kept locally. The intangible heritage of the Observatory consists for example of its history, its major discoveries, its interaction with the City, its central role in the history of science in South Africa and its appeal as a living cultural institution. Especially notable were the observations by Henderson (ca 1831) leading to the distance of a Cen and the early sky survey known as the Cape Photographic Durchmusterung.

  3. Nonmethane hydrocarbons in Southern Ocean boundary layer air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Alastair C.; Carpenter, Lucy J.; Pilling, Michael J.

    2001-03-01

    Measurements at the remote marine boundary layer station of Cape Grim, Northwest Tasmania, allow study of the unperturbed background atmosphere. Here we present a continuous data series of nonmethane hydrocarbons (NMHCs), measured in situ and with high sensitivity during the Second Southern Ocean Photochemistry Experiment (SOAPEX 2) during austral summer 1999. Air masses arriving at Cape Grim originate from the Australian continent, Tasmania, and Southern Ocean and Antarctic regions. In Southern Ocean marine boundary layer (MBL) air, C2 and C3 alkanes show a highly uniform abundance (ethane 142±11.9 parts per trillion by volume (pptv), propane 8.9±1.7 pptv) at around 4 times lower concentrations than encountered in unpolluted Northern Hemisphere MBL air. The presence of shorter-lived NMHCs in marine air indicates sources of both C4-C6 alkanes and several alkenes in the Southern Ocean. The alkane isomer distributions and abundances are in broad agreement with literature sea-air flux rates. In dynamically stable maritime air, midday maxima in ethene, propene, and isoprene concentrations of a few pptv indicate photochemically driven sources very near to the sea surface. Despite their high reactivity, the impact of these oceanic alkenes on local OH concentrations in remote MBL air is not significant. However, the abundance of isoprene in marine air may significantly elevate formaldehyde above that generated by methane oxidation.

  4. Sexual health literacy of the student population of the University of Tasmania: results of the RUSSL Study.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Steve; Clifford, Christine; Ross, Kaz; Sefton, Neil; Owen, Louise; Blizzard, Leigh; Turner, Richard

    2015-06-01

    Background Evidence suggests a varied level of sexual health literacy (SHL) among university student populations, so we evaluated the SHL among students at the University of Tasmania. Students were invited to complete an anonymous online questionnaire during August/September 2013. SHL was assessed using the ARCSHS National Survey of Australian Secondary Students & Sexual Health (ARC) and the Sexual Health Questionnaire (SHS). Predictors of literacy scores were evaluated by linear regression. The study recruited 1786 participants (8.2% of 2013 student population), of similar composition to the general university population. Female sex, older age, sexual education, and sexual experience were significant predictors of SHL. As hypothesised, students in medical/nursing disciplines had the highest SHL. Less expected were the significant differences by birthplace and religious affiliation, many of which persisted on adjustment for confounders. Compared with Australian/New Zealander students, overseas-born students had significantly lower ARC (-3.6%, P<0.001) & SHS (-4.2%, P<0.001); this was driven by Malaysian, Indian, and Chinese students. Compared with agnostic/atheist-identifying students, those of Buddhist (ARC: -5.4%, P=0.014; SHS: -6.7%, P=0.002), Hindu (ARC: -8.8%, P=0.098; SHS: -12.2%, P=0.027), Muslim (ARC: -16.5%, P<0.001; SHS: -13.4%, P=0.001) and Protestant (ARC: -2.3%, P=0.023; SHS: -4.4%, P<0.001) identifications had markedly lower SHL. This study, one of the first among university students in Australia, found a varied SHL by sex, age, sexual education and sexual experience, as well as by birthplace and religious affiliation. These findings have applications in orientation and education programs at Australian universities.

  5. Late-glacial and Holocene record of vegetation and climate from Cynthia Bay, Lake St Clair, Tasmania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopf, F. V. L.; Colhoun, E. A.; Barton, C. E.

    2000-10-01

    A Late-glacial-Holocene pollen record was obtained from a 3.96 m sediment core taken from Lake St Clair, central Tasmania. Modern vegetation and pollen analyses formed the basis for interpretation of the vegetation and climate history. Following deglaciation and before ca. 18450 yr BP Podocarpus lawrencei coniferous heath and Astelia-Plantago wet alpine herbfield became established at Lake St Clair. A distinct Poaceae-Plantago peak occurs between 18450 and 11210 yr BP and a mean annual temperature depression from ca. 6.2°C to 3°C below present is inferred for this period. The marked reduction in Podocarpus and strong increase of Poaceae suggests reduced precipitation levels during the period of widespread deglaciation (ca. 18.5-11 kyr BP). The local Late Pleistocene-Holocene non-forest to forest biostratigraphical boundary is dated at 11.2 kyr BP. It is characterised by expansion of the subalpine taxa Athrotaxis/Diselma with Nothofagus gunnii, and by the establishment of Nothofagus cunninghamii with Eucalyptus spp. A Phyllocladus bulge prior to the expansion of Nothofagus cunninghamii, reported at other Tasmanian sites, is not present at Lake St Clair. Nothofagus cunninghamii cool temperate rainforest peaked at 7800 yr BP, probably under wetter climatic conditions than present. The maximum development of rainforest in the early-middle Holocene may indicate that the temperature was slightly warmer than present, but the evidence is not definitive. The expansion of Eucalyptus spp. and Poaceae after 6000 yr BP may be partly a disclimax effect as a result of Aboriginal burning, but appears also to reflect reduced precipitation. The changes in vegetation and inferred climate can be explained by major changes in synoptic patterns of southern Australia and the adjacent southwest Pacific.

  6. High severity fires, positive fire feedbacks and alternative stable states in Athrotaxis rainforest ecosystems in western Tasmania.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holz, A.; Wood, S.; Fletcher, M. S.; Ward, C.; Hopf, F.; Veblen, T. T.; Bowman, D. M. J. S.

    2016-12-01

    Recurrent landscape fires present a powerful selective force on plant regeneration strategies that form a continuum between vegetative resprouters and obligate seeders. In the latter case, reduction of the interval between fires, combined with factors that affect plant traits and regeneration dynamics can drive plant population to local extinction. Here we use Athrotaxis selaginoides, a relict fire-sensitive Gondwanan tree species that occurs in western Tasmania, as model system to investigate the putative impacts of climate change and variability and human management of fire. We integrate landscape ecology (island-wide scale), with field survey and dendrochronology (stand-scale) and sedimentary records (watershed and landscape-scales) to garner a better understanding of the timing and impact of landscape fire on the vegetation dynamics of Athrotaxis at multiple scales. Across the species range sedimentary charcoal and pollen concentrations indicate that the recovery time since the last fire has consistently lengthened over the last 10,000 yrs. Stand-scale tree-age and fire-scar reconstructions suggest that populations of the Athrotxis have survive very infrequent landscape fires over the last 4-6 centuries, but that fire severity has increased following European colonization causing population collapse of Athrotaxis and an associate shift in stand structure and composition that favor resprouter species over obligate seeders. Overall our findings suggest that the resistance to fires and postfire recovery of populations of A. selaginoides have gradually declined throughout the Holocene and rapidly declined after Europeans altered fire regimes, a trend that matches the fate other Gondwanan conifers in temperate rainforests elsewhere in the southern Hemisphere.

  7. An analysis of the breakdown of paper products (toilet paper, tissues and tampons) in natural environments, Tasmania, Australia.

    PubMed

    Bridle, Kerry L; Kirkpatrick, J B

    2005-01-01

    An examination of the relative breakdown rates of unused toilet paper, facial tissues and tampons was undertaken in nine different environments typical of Tasmanian natural areas. Bags of the paper products (toilet paper, facial tissues, tampons) were buried for periods of 6, 12 and 24 months at depths of 5 and 15 cm. A nutrient solution simulating human body wastes was added to half of the samples, to test the hypothesis that the addition of nutrients would enhance the breakdown of paper products buried in the soil. Mean annual rainfall was the most important measured variable determining mean breakdown in the nutrient addition treatment between sites, with high rainfall sites (mean annual rainfall of greater than 650 mm) recording less decayed products than the drier sites (mean annual rainfall of 500-650 mm). Temperature and soil organic content were important influences on the breakdown of the unfertilised products. Toilet paper and tissues decayed more readily than tampons. Nutrient addition enhanced decay for all products across all sites. Depth of burial was not important in determining the degree to which products decayed. In alpine environments, burial under rocks at the surface did not increase the speed of decay of any product. The Western Alpine site, typical of alpine sites in the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area, showed very little decay over the two-year period, even for nutrient enhanced products. Management prescriptions should be amended to dissuade people from depositing human toilet waste in the extreme (montane to alpine) environments in western Tasmania. Tampons should continue to be carried out as currently prescribed.

  8. The Effect of Local Topographic Unevenness on Contourite Paleo-Deposition Around Marine Capes: A Novel "Geostrophic Cascade" in Cape Suvero and Cape Cilento (Tyrrhenian Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salusti, E.; Chiocci, F. L.; Martorelli, E.; Falcini, F.

    2014-12-01

    Despite the fact that two neighboring headlands in the Italian Southern Tyrrhenian Sea, Cape Cilento and Cape Suvero, have rather similar morphology and contouring flows, their contourite drifts were recognized, respectively, upstream the Cape Cilento tip and downstream Cape Suvero tip. Such an intriguing difference is discussed in terms of paleo-sedimentary processes induced by the interaction between large scale marine current turbulence and seafloor morphology around a cape (Martorelli et al., 2010). However Martorelli's et al. model for contourite location - which allows only an upstream contourite location for this kind of capes - fails in trying to explain such a difference. We thus focus on the local effect of a topographic depression, viz. a landslide scar off Cape Suvero, on flows contouring a cape. By applying the classical conservation of marine water potential vorticity we find a steady cyclonic circulation over the scar, that generates a "geostrophic cascade" that affects contourite deposition and stability. All this intuitively reminds the current dynamics around the Galileo's Red Spot in Jupiter's atmosphere. We thus show that the application of the potential vorticity conservation can provide a novel theoretical tool for investigating sedimentary structures and their evolution.

  9. The Roles of Climate Change and El Niño in the Record Low Rainfall in October 2015 in Tasmania, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karoly, David; Black, Mitchell; Grose, Michael; King, Andrew

    2017-04-01

    The island state of Tasmania, in southeast Australia, received record low average rainfall of 21 mm in October 2015, 17% of the 1961-90 normal. This had major impacts across the state, affecting agriculture and hydroelectric power generation and preconditioning the landscape for major bushfires the following summer. Rainfall in Tasmania is normally high throughout the year, with variations in Austral spring associated with mean sea level pressure (MSLP) and circulation variations due to El Niño, the Indian Ocean dipole (IOD), and the southern annular mode (SAM). Spring rainfall is declining and projected to decrease further in Tasmania We have investigated the roles of anthropogenic climate change, the 2015/16 El Niño, and internal atmospheric variability on this record low October rainfall using observational data, regional climate simulations driven by specified sea surface temperatures (SSTs) from the weather@home Australia and New Zealand (w@h ANZ) project, and coupled climate model simulations from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5. Anthropogenic climate change and the strong El Niño in 2015 very likely increased the chances of breaking the previous record low rainfall in 1965. In terms of contributions to the magnitude of this rainfall deficit, internal atmospheric variability as indicated by the Pacific-South American MSLP pattern was likely the main contributor, with El Niño next and a smaller but significant contribution from anthropogenic climate change. In this case, it was the MSLP and circulation changes associated with anthropogenic climate change in the Southern Hemisphere middle and high latitudes and not the thermodynamic effects of anthropogenic climate change that contributed to this event. Karoly, D. J., M.T. Black, M.R. Grose and A. D. King (2016) The roles of climate change and El Niño in the record low rainfall in October 2015 in Tasmania, Australia [in "Explaining Extremes of 2015 from a Climate Perspective"]. Bull. Am

  10. The history of low frequency radio astronomy in Australia. 7: Philip Hamilton, Raymond Haynes and the University of Tasmania's Penna Field Station near Hobart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Martin; Orchiston, Wayne; Wielebinski, Richard

    2017-04-01

    Following initial experiments near Hobart by Graeme Ellis, Grote Reber and Gordon Newstead from 1955 to 1957, the University of Tasmania established several sites for the study of low frequency radio astronomy, beginning in 1961. This paper describes the antenna array that was constructed at Penna, to the east northeast of Hobart. Between 1962 and 1967 it was used to produce maps of the southern sky at the frequencies of 4.7 and 10.02 MHz and contributed to an overall study of the low frequency emission from the Galaxy. Because of the proximity of the array to the town of Sorell, it was also referred to the 'Sorell Radio Telescope'.

  11. LIFTOFF - MERCURY-REDSTONE (MR)-2 - CAPE

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1961-01-31

    S63-22731 (31 Jan. 1961) --- The launch of the Mercury-Redstone 2 (MR-2) suborbital mission from Cape Canaveral, Florida, on Jan. 31, 1961. Onboard the spacecraft was ?Ham?, a 37-pound chimpanzee. Despite an over-acceleration factor, the flight was considered to be successful. Following recovery Ham appeared to be in good physiological condition, but sometime later when he was shown the Mercury spacecraft it was visually apparent that he had no further interest in cooperating with the spaceflight program. Photo credit: NASA

  12. Geothermal community heating for Cape Charles, Virginia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leffel, C. S., Jr.

    1981-10-01

    An economic feasibility study for a geothermal community heating system was made for the residential heat load of Cape Charles, Virginia using a computer program. The effects of inflation, interest rates, wellhead temperatures, and the addition of reinjection wells are investigated. It is concluded that the utilization of geothermal energy would be feasible if well flows of 500 gal/minute could be obtained and if reinjection of the geothermal fluids were not required. A comparison of the geothermal assisted community system with a coal fired system shows that the coal fired system may be the most attractive alternative to the heating of homes with individual oil fired furnaces.

  13. 75 FR 48990 - Cape Cod National Seashore; South Wellfleet, MA; Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... hereby given in accordance with the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86 Stat. 770, 5 U.S.C. App 1, Section 10) of a meeting of the Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission. DATES: The...

  14. 33 CFR 80.745 - Cape Sable, FL to Cape Romano, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    .... (a) A line drawn following the general trend of the mainland, highwater shoreline from Cape Sable at... following the general trend of the mainland, highwater shoreline crossing the entrances of Harney River... parallel to the general trend of the shoreline. (e) A line formed by the centerline of Highway 92 Bridge at...

  15. Cape Hatteras Lighthouse, Project CAPE Teaching Module, Publication 3-4a.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temple, Bonnie K.

    Twelve interdisciplinary lessons with supplementary materials for grades three and four comprise this teaching guide about the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse. An introduction explains how the lighthouse is threatened by erosion, alternatives for saving it, the need for the lighthouse, and its history. Each lesson includes subject area, skills, lesson…

  16. Cape of Storms or Cape of Good Hope? Educational Technology in a Changing Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Czerniewicz, Laura

    2004-01-01

    This article locates and describes the work of the Multimedia Education Group (MEG) at the University of Cape Town (UCT). This work is contextualised by three national and international challenges, these being (1) the need to increase access to new technologies and overcome the digital divide, (2) the need to respond to a new communication order,…

  17. Cape of Storms or Cape of Good Hope? Educational Technology in a Changing Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Czerniewicz, Laura

    2004-01-01

    This article locates and describes the work of the Multimedia Education Group (MEG) at the University of Cape Town (UCT). This work is contextualised by three national and international challenges, these being (1) the need to increase access to new technologies and overcome the digital divide, (2) the need to respond to a new communication order,…

  18. Cape Hatteras Lighthouse, Project CAPE Teaching Module, Publication 3-4a.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Temple, Bonnie K.

    Twelve interdisciplinary lessons with supplementary materials for grades three and four comprise this teaching guide about the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse. An introduction explains how the lighthouse is threatened by erosion, alternatives for saving it, the need for the lighthouse, and its history. Each lesson includes subject area, skills, lesson…

  19. The transport of atmospheric sulfur over Cape Town

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenner, Samantha L.; Abiodun, Babatunde J.

    2013-11-01

    Cape Town, renowned for its natural beauty, is troubled by an unpleasant brown haze pollution, in which atmospheric sulfur plays a major role. This study investigates whether Cape Town is a net producer or recipient of anthropogenic sulfur pollution. In the study, two atmospheric chemistry-transport models (RegCM and WRF) are used to simulate atmospheric flow and chemistry transport over South Africa for two years (2001 and 2002). Both models reproduce the observed seasonal variability in the atmospheric flow and SO2 concentration over Cape Town. The models simulations agree on the seasonal pattern of SO2 over South Africa but disagree on that of SO4. The simulations show that ambient sulfur in Cape Town may be linked with pollutant emissions from the Mpumalanga Highveld, South Africa's most industrialized region. While part of atmospheric SO2 from the Highveld is transported at 700 hPa level toward the Indian Ocean (confirming previous studies), part is transported at low level from the Highveld toward Cape Town. In April, a band of high concentration SO2 extends between the Highveld and Cape Town, following the south coast. Extreme sulfur pollution events in Cape Town are associated with weak flow convergence or stagnant conditions over the city, both of which encourage the accumulation of pollution. However the study suggests that atmospheric sulfur is being advected from Mpumalanga Highveld to Cape Town and this may contribute to atmospheric pollution problems in Cape Town.

  20. Cape Fear: an outdoor hillslope laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauro, Flavia; Petroselli, Andrea; Fiori, Aldo; Romano, Nunzio; Rulli, Maria Cristina; Porfiri, Maurizio; Palladino, Mario; Grimaldi, Salvatore

    2016-04-01

    Hydrological processes occurring at the hillslope scale highly influence the response of natural catchments. However, modelling hillslope dynamics is often extremely challenging, and conceptualizations may be inadequate to simulate such complex processes. Towards this aim, field experiments on natural and artificial catchments have proved highly beneficial. In this work, we present Cape Fear, an ad hoc designed experimental plot whereby traditional and new measurement systems are integrated for improved comprehension of hillslope processes. This outdoor hillslope laboratory hosts diverse sensing apparatuses, spanning from a system of rainfall simulators, a v-notch weir for input and output fluxes analysis, sophisticated instrumentation for continuous measurements of surface and subsurface water and soil transport, to innovative image-based setups to remotely sense surface waters. We demonstrate the potential of such a versatile and thoroughly instrumented outdoor laboratory through a proof-of-concept experiment conducted during a natural rainfall event. The response of the plot to the storm is reconstructed based on continuous monitoring of input and output fluxes. Further, an innovative tracer-based approach involving the use of fluorescent particles is utilized to remotely investigate the onset of overland flow from captured images. Insight from experimental observations is utilized to identify the physical phenomena governing the response of the hillslope to the precipitation event. Cape Fear is a powerful resource for the hydrological community and this small scale experimental observatory is expected to provide diverse and innovative observations to advance current knowledge on hydrological processes at the hillslope scale.

  1. Infrared Correlation Radiometer for GEO-CAPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neil, D. O.; Boldt, J.; Edwards, D. P.; Yee, J.

    2009-12-01

    We present our plans as part of NASA’s Instrument Incubator Program to characterize the performance of a 2.3 μm infrared correlation radiometer (IRCR) prototype subsystem for an instrument designed specifically to measure carbon monoxide (CO) from geostationary orbit. The Earth Science and Applications Decadal Survey mission GEO-CAPE specifies infrared correlation radiometry to measure CO in two spectral regions. CO measurements at 2.3 μm are uniformly sensitive throughout the troposphere, and 4.7 μm measurements are most sensitive to the free troposphere. In combination, the measurements yield information of this Criteria Pollutant near Earth's surface. The success of NASA’s Shuttle-based Measurement of Air Pollution from Satellites (MAPS) and Terra/MOPITT infrared gas correlation radiometers for CO measurements at 4.7 μm shifts the technology focus toward improving existing 2.3 μm CO measurement capability. GEO-CAPE uses this robust IRCR measurement technique at GEO, nearly 50 times farther away than the Terra/MOPITT orbit, to determine hourly changes in CO across a continental domain. We have structured the IRCR project around an analytical performance model to enable rapid evaluation of design specifics once the mission is defined. We present the architecture of the performance model, and the design of the simulator hardware and test plan which will populate the performance model.

  2. Cosmogenic 10Be and 26Al exposure ages of glaciations in the Frankland Range, southwest Tasmania reveal a limited MIS-2 ice advance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiernan, Kevin; Fink, David; McConnell, Anne

    2017-02-01

    New mapping of the glacial geomorphology coupled with 10Be and 26Al exposure age dating of moraines on the flanks of the Frankland Range in south west Tasmania indicate that glacier extent during MIS-2 was far smaller than during earlier glaciations with the ice cover being confined to only the uppermost cirques of the range. Moraines further down the range flanks, ∼50-150 m lower in altitude than the MIS-2 dated advance, indicate that glaciers were only slightly larger during earlier glaciations and, depending on the interpretation of their exposure ages, may range from MIS 7 to MIS 12. These older moraines are nested inside the maximum ice limits of an even more ancient and extensive glaciation, defined by degraded valley floor moraines and coalescing glacio-fluvial fans that remain undated but appear no younger than MIS 12. Patterns of glacial erosion and moraine deposition on the Frankland Range suggest that the more recent glaciations were increasingly influenced by the erosional morphology initiated by earlier glaciers. Microclimatic differences resulting from this earlier glacial topography were particularly influential determinants of glaciation during MIS 2. These results are consistent with emerging evidence from studies of other ranges in southwest Tasmania.

  3. Exposure dating and glacial reconstruction at Mt. Field, Tasmania, Australia, identifies MIS 3 and MIS 2 glacial advances and climatic variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackintosh, A. N.; Barrows, T. T.; Colhoun, E. A.; Fifield, L. K.

    2006-05-01

    Tasmania is important for understanding Quaternary climatic change because it is one of only three areas that experienced extensive mid-latitude Southern Hemisphere glaciation and it lies in a dominantly oceanic environment at a great distance from Northern Hemisphere ice sheet feedbacks. We applied exposure dating using 36Cl to an extensive sequence of moraines from the last glacial at Mt. Field, Tasmania. Glaciers advanced at 41-44 ka during Marine oxygen Isotope Stage (MIS) 3 and at 18 ka during MIS 2. Both advances occurred in response to an ELA lowering greater than 1100 m below the present-day mean summer freezing level, and a possible temperature reduction of 7-8°C. Deglaciation was rapid and complete by ca. 16 ka. The overall story emerging from studies of former Tasmanian glaciers is that the MIS 2 glaciation was of limited extent and that some glaciers were more extensive during earlier parts of the last glacial cycle. Copyright

  4. Patterns of plant speciation in the Cape floristic region.

    PubMed

    van der Niet, Timotheüs; Johnson, Steven D

    2009-04-01

    Plant species have accumulated in the Cape region of southern Africa to a much greater degree than in areas of equivalent size in the rest of the subcontinent. Although this could be a consequence simply of lower extinction rates in the Cape, most researchers have invoked high rates of ecological speciation, driven by unique aspects of the Cape environment, as the primary explanation for this richness. To assess these ideas, we analyzed the frequencies of ecological shifts among 188 sister species pairs obtained from molecular phylogenies of eight Cape clades. Ecological shifts were evident in 80% of sister species pairs, with general habitat, pollinator, and fire-survival strategy shifts being especially frequent. Contrary to an established idea that shifts in soil type are frequently associated with speciation of Cape taxa, these shifts were relatively rare, occurring in just 17% of species pairs. More cases of sister species divergence are accompanied solely by floral than by vegetative diversification, suggesting an important role for pollinator-driven speciation. In an analysis of two large orchid genera that have radiated in both the Cape and the rest of southern Africa, the frequency of ecological shifts (general habitat, soil type, altitude and flowering time), did not differ between sister species pairs in the Cape region and those outside it. Despite suggestions that Cape plants tend to have small range sizes and show fine-scale patterns of speciation, range size did not differ significantly between species in the Cape and those outside it. We conclude that ecological speciation is likely to have been important for radiation of the Cape flora, but there is no evidence as yet for special "Cape" patterns of ecological speciation.

  5. Transport of atmospheric NOx and HNO3 over Cape Town

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abiodun, B. J.; Ojumu, A. M.; Jenner, S.; Ojumu, T. V.

    2013-05-01

    Cape Town, the most popular tourist city in Africa, usually experiences air pollution with unpleasant odour in winter. Previous studies have associated the pollution with local emission of pollutants within the city. The present study examines the transport of atmospheric pollutants (NOx and HNO3) over South Africa and shows how the transport of pollutants from the Mpumalanga Highveld may contribute to the pollution in Cape Town. The study analysed observation data (2001-2008) from Cape Town air quality network and simulation data (2001-2004) from regional climate model (RegCM4) over southern Africa. The simulation accounts for the influence of complex topography, atmospheric condition, and atmospheric chemistry on emission and transport of pollutants over southern Africa. Flux budget analysis was used to examine whether Cape Town is a source or sink for NOx and HNO3 during the extreme pollution events. The results show that extreme pollution events over Cape Town are associated with the low-level (surface-850 hPa) transport of NOx from the Mpumalanga Highveld to Cape Town, and with a tongue of high concentration of HNO3 that extends from the Mpumalanga Highveld to Cape Town along the south coast of South Africa. The prevailing atmospheric conditions during the extreme pollution events feature an upper-level (700 hPa) anticyclonic flow over South Africa and a low-level col over Cape Town. The anticyclonic flow induces a strong subsidence motion, which prevents vertical mixing of the pollutants and caps high concentration of pollutants close to the surface as they are transported from the Mpumalanga Highveld toward Cape Town, while the col accumulates the pollutants over the city. This study shows that Cape Town can be a sink for the NOx and HNO3 during extreme pollution events and suggests that the accumulation of pollutants transported from other areas (e.g. Mpumalanga Highveld) may contribute substantially to the air pollution in Cape Town.

  6. Historical lead isotope record of a sediment core from the Derwent River (Tasmania, Australia): a multiple source environment.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Ashley T; Seen, Andrew J

    2012-05-01

    A 105 cm sediment core from the Derwent River (Tasmania, Australia) was collected in 2004 and was characterised considering both physical (loss on ignition at 550 °C and grain size) and chemical (Fe, Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb concentrations, Pb isotope ratios and (210)Pb dating) properties. The core was analysed to (i) investigate the historical profiles of some important elements associated with the Risdon zinc refinery adjacent to the Derwent River, (ii) determine Pb isotopic signatures of sediment samples, and (iii) assess the veracity of Pb isotope ratios as indicators of contaminant Pb input. Extractable metal concentrations were (all values as mgkg(-1), non-normalised for grain size) Fe: 20,000-35,000, Zn: 42-4500, Pb: 5-1090, Cu: 13-141, and Cd: 1-31; with a close correlation between Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb. Metal enrichment factors (normalised to Al) were Pb: 0.9-144, Zn: 0.8-93, Cd: 0.8-30, Cu: 0.8-8.9 and Fe: 0.9-1.3, confirming anthropogenic contributions of Cu, Zn, Pb and Cd to the sediments. The onset of metal contamination above background levels occurred at a depth between 43 and 49 cm, with maximum concentrations noted near 20 cm for Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb. Lead isotope ratios were determined in sediments using sector field ICP-MS, and were found to be 36.5-38.8, 16.5-18.7 and 1.07-1.20 for (208)Pb/(204)Pb, (206)Pb/(204)Pb and (206)Pb/(207)Pb ratios, respectively. Major Australian ores processed at the refinery over the previous ~90 years include those from Broken Hill, Rosebery, Mt Isa, Elura, Hellyer and Century deposits. Anthropogenic impact by Pb with Broken Hill type isotopic ratio was initially evident in the core at 43-49 cm. The introduction of Rosebery and Elura ores to the refinery was also clearly noted. Pb isotope ratios further highlight that the Derwent River has been exposed to a greater impact by anthropogenic Pb in comparison to other major Tasmanian rivers, namely the Huon and Tamar.

  7. The Cape Town Statement on Geoethics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Capua, Giuseppe; Peppoloni, Silvia; Bobrowsky, Peter

    2017-04-01

    The interest of geoscientists in (geo)ethical aspects of geoscience knowledge, education, research and practice is rising and today geoethics has a significant visibility. This prominence is the result of hard work done in the last 4 years by the IAPG - International Association for Promoting Geoethics (http://www.geoethics.org), a not-for-profit, multidisciplinary, scientific network (with more than 1350 members in 107 countries) established for widening the discussion and creating awareness about problems of ethics applied to the geosciences. IAPG has produced a strong conceptual substratum on which to base the future development of geoethics, by clarifying the meaning of the word Geoethics, formalizing its definition, and identifying a framework of reference values on which the geoscience community can base more effective codes of conduct. IAPG members have published numerous books and articles in peer reviewed international journals, and organized scientific sessions to bring geoethics at the most important geoscience conferences. Geoethical issues have been included in the European project ENVRI-Plus, dedicated to the environmental and solid Earth research infrastructures. Moreover, the most prestigious geoscience organizations around the world now recognize geoethics as an important issue that warrants attention. This success was confirmed by the high quality of contents and the large participation of scientists in the 6 technical sessions and single panel session on geoethics organized by IAPG at the 35th IGC - International Geological Congress, held in 2016 in Cape Town (South Africa), with the cooperative work of different geoscience organizations (IUGS-TGGP - Task Group on Global Geoscience Professionalism; GSL - Geological Society of London; EFG - European Federation of Geologists; EGS - EuroGeoSurveys; AGI - American Geosciences Institute; AGU - American Geophysical Union, and AAWG - African Association of Women in Geosciences). IAPG considers the 35th

  8. EPA Approves Massachusetts Plan to Protect Cape Cod Waters

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA has formally approved an updated plan from the Commonwealth of MA that creates a robust framework for Cape Cod communities to reduce nitrogen levels that are currently harming ecological health of ponds, bays and other surface waters on the Cape.

  9. Cape of Good Hope: Teacher Description and Project Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moyo, Kimya

    1998-01-01

    Presents detailed information about the Cape of Good Hope project in which pairs of students designed capes and cloaks out of the garbage bags for a fashion show. Also describes student objectives, unit goals, group activities, products required, and the final show and presentation. (ASK)

  10. 33 CFR 117.829 - Northeast Cape Fear River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Northeast Cape Fear River. 117... Fear River. (a) The draw of the Isabel S. Holmes Bridge, at mile 1.0, at Wilmington, North Carolina... at the Navassa Railroad Bridge mile 34.0 across the Cape Fear River. (2) The draw shall be left in...

  11. 33 CFR 117.829 - Northeast Cape Fear River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Northeast Cape Fear River. 117... Fear River. (a) The draw of the Isabel S. Holmes Bridge, at mile 1.0, at Wilmington, North Carolina... at the Navassa Railroad Bridge mile 34.0 across the Cape Fear River. (2) The draw shall be left in...

  12. 45. CAPE COD AIR STATION PAVE PAWS FACILITY BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    45. CAPE COD AIR STATION PAVE PAWS FACILITY - BUILDING ELEVATION VIEW WITH BUILDING METAL SIDING BEING APPLIED ON "A" FACE (LEFT) AND "B" FACE (RIGHT). NOTE THAT NORTH IS GENERALLY TO RIGHT OF VIEW. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  13. 43. CAPE COD AIR STATION PAVE PAWS FACILITY WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    43. CAPE COD AIR STATION PAVE PAWS FACILITY - WITH BUILDING METAL SIDING BEING APPLIED ON "C" FACE (RIGHT) AND "B" FACE BEING PREPARED FOR INSTALLATION. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  14. 46. CAPE COD AIR STATION PAVE PAWS FACILITY BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    46. CAPE COD AIR STATION PAVE PAWS FACILITY - BUILDING ELEVATION VIEW WITH ALL METAL SIDING INSTALLED AND WITH EMITTER/ANTENNA ARRAY SYSTEM NEARING OCMPLETION ON "B" FACE (RIGHT). VIEW ALSO SHOWS TRAVELING "CLEANING" SYSTEM ON "B" FACE - NOW REMOVED. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  15. 42. CAPE COD AIR STATION PAVE PAWS FACILITY SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    42. CAPE COD AIR STATION PAVE PAWS FACILITY - SHOWING BUILDING "RED IRON" STEEL STRUCTURE AT 46T DAY OF STEEL CONSTRUCTION. "BUILDING TOPPED OFF, 7 JULY, 1974. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  16. 47. CAPE COD AIR STATION PAVE PAWS FACILITY AERIAL VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    47. CAPE COD AIR STATION PAVE PAWS FACILITY AERIAL VIEW OF "A" FACE (LEFT) WITH CLEANING SYSTEM INSTALLED (NOW REMOVED) AND "B" FACE (RIGHT) WITH CONSTRUCTION CRANE IN USE. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  17. The "Cape Times"'s Portrayal of School Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Wet, Corene

    2016-01-01

    This study explores the "Cape Times"'s portrayal of school violence in the Western Cape (WC), South Africa, reporting on findings from a qualitative content analysis of 41 news articles retrieved from the SA Media database. The findings shed light on the victims and their victimisation, the perpetrators, as well as the context of the…

  18. EPA Cape Cod 208 Plan 2015 Update Approval Letter

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA approval letter re: certification by the Governor of MA that the Cape Cod WQM Plan Update is consistent with CWA section 208(b)(3) & accepted the Commonwealth’s reaffirmation of the existing designations of Cape Cod Towns as waste management agencies.

  19. 33 CFR 117.589 - Cape Cod Canal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Cape Cod Canal. 117.589 Section 117.589 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Massachusetts § 117.589 Cape Cod Canal. The draw...

  20. 33 CFR 117.589 - Cape Cod Canal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Cape Cod Canal. 117.589 Section 117.589 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Massachusetts § 117.589 Cape Cod Canal. The draw...

  1. 33 CFR 117.589 - Cape Cod Canal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Cape Cod Canal. 117.589 Section 117.589 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Massachusetts § 117.589 Cape Cod Canal. The draw...

  2. 33 CFR 117.589 - Cape Cod Canal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Cape Cod Canal. 117.589 Section 117.589 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Massachusetts § 117.589 Cape Cod Canal. The draw...

  3. 17. CAPE COD AIR STATION PAVE PAWS FACILITY AERIAL VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. CAPE COD AIR STATION PAVE PAWS FACILITY AERIAL VIEW WITH PROJECT NEARING COMPLETION. VIEW SHOWS "A" FACE (LEFT) AND "B" FACE OF RADAR ARRAY SYSTEM. NOTE THAT NORTH IS GENERALLY TO RIGHT OF VIEW. - Cape Cod Air Station, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  4. Cape Verdeans in America: Our Story. A Teachers Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almeida, Raymond A.; And Others

    Teaching strategies are suggested to help high school social studies teachers develop and implement a study of Cape Verdean American history. Intended as a guide to accompany "Cape Verdeans in America," (SO 011 060), the teacher's manual offers three categories of teaching methods: (1) ideas to help students read and understand the book,…

  5. Layers of 'Cape Verde' in 'Victoria Crater'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    This view of Victoria crater is looking north from 'Duck Bay' towards the dramatic promontory called 'Cape Verde.' The dramatic cliff of layered rocks is about 50 meters (about 165 feet) away from the rover and is about 6 meters (about 20 feet) tall. The taller promontory beyond that is about 100 meters (about 325 feet) away, and the vista beyond that extends away for more than 400 meters (about 1300 feet) into the distance. This is an approximately true color rendering of images taken by the panoramic camera (Pancam) on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity during the rover's 952nd sol, or Martian day, (Sept. 28, 2006) using the camera's 750-nanometer, 530-nanometer and 430-nanometer filters.

  6. Leptospira interrogans in Rodents from Cape Verde.

    PubMed

    Plata-Luis, Josué; Foronda, Pilar; Martín-Alonso, Aaron; Feliu, Carlos; Alves, Joana; Gil, Horacio; Valladares, Basilio

    2016-11-01

    Leptospirosis is an important worldwide zoonotic disease that can infect both animals and humans. In most cases, leptospirosis is a nonspecific self-limiting illness, but some patients can develop a severe form with a high mortality. This study was carried out in Santiago Island, Cape Verde, in 2012-2013. A total of 62 wild rodents (Rattus rattus and Mus domesticus) were analyzed. The lipL32 gene, present only in pathogenic Leptospira spp., was amplified by PCR, and 16 samples were positive (25.8%). In both rodent species, Leptospira interrogans was identified. The results show the presence of pathogenic Leptospira in the three localities analyzed in Santiago. The presence of L. interrogans demonstrates a serious health risk for the population, since this species has been associated with the most severe form of leptospirosis, the Weil's disease in humans, a severe infection with jaundice, renal failure, and hemorrhage.

  7. Peritoneal Dialysis in Cape Town, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Okpechi, Ikechi G.; Rayner, Brian L.; Swanepoel, Charles R.

    2012-01-01

    ♦ Background: Chronic kidney disease is a major public health problem in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), which encompasses 70% of the least-developed countries in the world. Most people in SSA have no access to any form of renal replacement therapy (RRT). Given its ease of performance and patient independence, peritoneal dialysis (PD) should be an ideal form of RRT in SSA, but several complex and interdependent factors make PD a difficult option in SSA. The present review describes the practice of PD in SSA, with emphasis on Cape Town, South Africa. ♦ Methods and Results: After a review of the recent PubMed literature on RRT in SSA and an appraisal of nephrology practice in South Africa, factors that make the provision of RRT (especially PD) a challenge in SSA include the low number of qualified health care workers, socio-demographic issues (poor housing, electricity, and water supplies), and the cost of PD fluids in the region. Although South Africa has the largest PD population in all of SSA, the growth of PD in South Africa is specifically impeded by the system of RRT rationing, which favors HD; the methods of funding for dialysis and for remuneration of doctors in private practice; and many other socio-economic factors. The peritonitis rate remains relatively high, and it is a significant contributor to morbidity in PD patients in Cape Town. ♦ Conclusions: In many parts of SSA, PD could be the main dialysis modality. However, African governments must start taking responsibility for their people by providing adequate funds for renal replacement programs. Attempts to produce PD fluids locally and to train and educate health care workers will greatly improve the use of PD as a RRT option in SSA. PMID:22641735

  8. 76 FR 4725 - Apria Healthcare Customer Service Department; Fourteen Locations in Missouri Cameron, Cape...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-26

    ... Missouri Cameron, Cape Girardeau, Columbia, Farmington, Fenton, Joplin, Lee's Summit, Pleasant Valley... Healthcare, Customer Service Department, Thirteen Locations in Missouri: Cameron, Cape Girardeau, Columbia...,676J); Cameron, Cape Girardeau, Columbia, Farmington, Fenton, Joplin, Lee's Summit, Pleasant Valley...

  9. Species diversity of Fergusonina Malloch gall flies (Diptera: Fergusoninidae) forming leaf bud galls on snow gum (Eucalyptus pauciflora Sieb. ex Spreng. complex), with a description of a new species from Tasmania

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A new species of Fergusonina (Diptera: Fergusoninidae) fly is described from terminal leaf bud galls (TLBGs) from the Eucalyptus pauciflora Sieb. ex Spreng. (snow gum) species complex. Fergusonina tasmaniensis Nelson sp.n. is the first species from the genus Fergusonina to be described from Tasmania...

  10. The atmospheric lifetime experiment. III - Lifetime methodology and application to three years of CFCL3 data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunnold, D. M.; Alyea, F. N.; Cardelino, C. A.; Prinn, R. G.; Rasmussen, R. A.; Crawford, A. J.; Simmonds, P. G.; Fraser, P. J.; Rosen, R. D.

    1983-01-01

    Observations of the chlorofluorocarbon CFCl3 obtained several times daily over the period July 1978 to June 1981 at Adrigole, Ireland; Ragged Point, Barbados; Point Matatula, American Samoa; and Cape Grim, Tasmania are reported. In addition, observations at Cape Meares, Oregon are given for the period January 1980 to June 1981. On January 1, 1980, the average mixing ratio of CFCl3 in the lower troposphere is esimated to have been 168 pptv, and this is calculated to have been increasing 5.7 percent annually. Assuming that the only destruction of CFCl3 occurs in the stratosphere, the lifetime, on January 1, 1980, estimated by a trend technique is 83 + 73, or -27 years; the lifetime estimated from the global inventory of CFCl3 is to + 89 or -25 years. The maximum likelihood current lifetime estimate obtained by combining the estimates from both analysis techniques is 78 years.

  11. 75 FR 33999 - Safety Zone; Fourth of July Fireworks Event, Cape Charles City Harbor, Cape Charles, VA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-16

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Fourth of July Fireworks Event, Cape... Harbor in Cape Charles, VA, in support of the Fourth of July Fireworks event. This action is intended to....1. 0 2. Add Sec. 165.T05-0477 to read as follows: Sec. 165.T05-0477 Safety Zone; Fourth of July...

  12. Cape capture’: Geologic data and modeling results suggest the Holocene loss of a Carolina Cape

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thieler, E. Robert; Ashton, Andrew D.

    2011-01-01

    For more than a century, the origin and evolution of the set of cuspate forelands known as the Carolina Capes—Hatteras, Lookout, Fear, and Romain—off the eastern coast of the United States have been discussed and debated. The consensus conceptual model is not only that these capes existed through much or all of the Holocene transgression, but also that their number has not changed. Here we describe bathymetric, lithologic, seismic, and chronologic data that suggest another cape may have existed between Capes Hatteras and Lookout during the early to middle Holocene. This cape likely formed at the distal end of the Neuse-Tar-Pamlico fluvial system during the early Holocene transgression, when this portion of the shelf was flooded ca. 9 cal (calibrated) kyr B.P., and was probably abandoned by ca. 4 cal kyr B.P., when the shoreline attained its present general configuration. Previously proposed mechanisms for cape formation suggest that the large-scale, rhythmic pattern of the Carolina Capes arose from a hydrodynamic template or the preexisting geologic framework. Numerical modeling, however, suggests that the number and spacing of capes can be dynamic, and that a coast can self-organize in response to a high-angle-wave instability in shoreline shape. In shoreline evolution model simulations, smaller cuspate forelands are subsumed by larger neighbors over millennial time scales through a process of ‘cape capture.’ The suggested former cape in Raleigh Bay represents the first interpreted geological evidence of dynamic abandonment suggested by the self-organization hypothesis. Cape capture may be a widespread process in coastal environments with large-scale rhythmic shoreline features; its preservation in the sedimentary record will vary according to geologic setting, physical processes, and sea-level history.

  13. Tropospheric ozone and its regional transport over Cape Town

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nzotungicimpaye, Claude-Michel; Abiodun, Babatunde J.; Steyn, Douw G.

    2014-04-01

    As part of efforts to understand the sources of air pollution in Cape Town, this study investigates the local variation of tropospheric ozone (O3) and identifies possible advection paths of O3 pollution from a remote source to Cape Town. Measurements of O3 and wind from three sites in the Cape Town area were analyzed to study the local variations of O3. At each site, the diurnal variation of O3 is found to be mainly driven by photochemical production while the seasonal variation of O3 is mostly driven by wind conditions. The highest concentration of O3 is observed at the remote site (Cape Point) while lowest O3 concentration is observed at the sub-urban site (Goodwood), where there are chemical sinks of O3 such as NOx. Atmospheric pollution over southern Africa was simulated to study the regional transport of O3. The simulations show that extreme O3 levels in Cape Town can be caused by air pollution transported from the industrial Highveld of South Africa, in the lower troposphere. Such extreme O3 pollution events over Cape Town are simulated to occur in January (14%), March (44%), April (28%) and September (14%). Lagrangian trajectories suggest four paths by which air parcels can be transported from the industrial Highveld to Cape Town: a north-easterly path which is the most frequent route, a tropical deviation route, a deviation along the south coastline and an oceanic deviation path which is the less frequent route. The major advection paths associated with poor air quality in Cape Town are the north-easterly route and the path along the south coastline of the country. Hence the study suggests that emissions in the industrial Highveld may contribute to O3 concentration in the Cape Town area.

  14. Report: Maximizing recycling participation to reduce waste to landfill: a study of small to medium-sized enterprises in Hobart, Tasmania, Australia.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Sam; Kriwoken, Lorne K

    2010-05-01

    Small to medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in Hobart, Tasmania, Australia face many barriers to recycling participation. This study first investigated the volumes and types of waste produced by SMEs. Significant barriers were then identified and key motivators to recycle examined. Using the Australia New Zealand Standard of Industrial Classification, stratified sampling of SMEs (n = 436) was undertaken. Inadequate storage space, paucity of readily available information on recycling services and the lack of staff allocated to sort and recycle were identified as major barriers. Cardboard, paper and plastic waste were produced in large volumes with only a small percentage being recycled and these were identified as target areas for local government. Recommendations include the appointment of a dedicated recycling officer to maximize recycling participation for the reduction of waste to landfill and to undertake further research on minimizing recycling costs.

  15. Noble gases in anhydrous mantle xenoliths from Tasmania in comparison with other localities from eastern Australia: Implications for the tectonic evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czuppon, György; Matsumoto, Takuya; Matsuda, Jun-ichi; Everard, John; Sutherland, Lin

    2010-11-01

    Ultramafic xenoliths from Tasmanian basalts were analysed for elemental and isotopic compositions of noble gases, for greater understanding of the evolution of the underlying subcontinental lithosphere. The noble gas isotopic compositions indicate contributions of radiogenic and MORB-like components to the xenoliths. The MORB-like component is characterized by 3He/ 4He ratios between 7 and 9 Ra while the radiogenic component shows lower 3He/ 4He ratios than those in MORB (8.75 ± 2.14 Ra, Graham, 2002). The identified radiogenic component in xenoliths from Tasmania may stem from subduction events, during which the mantle wedge and subcontinental lithospheric mantle were metasomatised by U- and Th-rich fluids. As subduction processes have played important role in the evolution of Eastern Australia during the Paleozoic, the radiogenic component is probably associated with this event. Incorporation of MORB-like noble gases in the subcontinental lithospheric mantle beneath Tasmania is likely related to extensional rifting and associated opening of the Tasman Sea in the Late Mesozoic and Cenozoic. The identified noble gas components of the xenoliths are consistent with the geochemical character of the host basalt based on the radiogenic isotope and trace element systematics. This agreement and the petrographic observations (e.g. fluid inclusion trails connected with the reaction rim of the minerals close to the host basalt, spongy texture) indicate that fluids (noble gases, CO 2) most likely propagated from the host basalts to the xenoliths forming fluid inclusions. The observed noble gas isotopic heterogeneity in mantle-derived xenoliths from Tasmanian to North Queensland reflects isotopic heterogeneity at regional scale in the subcontinental lithospheric mantle beneath eastern Australia.

  16. EAARL topography: Cape Cod National Seashore

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brock, John C.; Wright, C. Wayne; Patterson, Matt; Nayegandhi, Amar; Travers, Laurinda J.

    2007-01-01

    This Web site contains 90 Lidar-derived bare earth topography maps and GIS files for the Cape Cod National Seashore. These Lidar-derived topography maps were produced as a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC) St. Petersburg, Florida, the National Park Service (NPS), Northeast Coastal and Barrier Network, Inventory and Monitoring Program, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Wallops Flight Facility. One objective of this research is to create techniques to survey coral reefs and barrier islands for the purposes of geomorphic change studies, habitat mapping, ecological monitoring, change detection, and event assessment. As part of this project, data from an innovative instrument under development at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, the NASA Experimental Airborne Advanced Research Lidar (EAARL) are being used. This sensor has the potential to make significant contributions in this realm for measuring subaerial and submarine topography wthin cross-environment surveys. High spectral resolution, water-column correction, and low costs were found to be key factors in providing accurate and affordable imagery to coastal resource managers.

  17. Opportunity's Second Martian Birthday at Cape Verde

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    A promontory nicknamed 'Cape Verde' can be seen jutting out from the walls of Victoria Crater in this approximate true-color picture taken by the panoramic camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. The rover took this picture on martian day, or sol, 1329 (Oct. 20, 2007), more than a month after it began descending down the crater walls -- and just 9 sols shy of its second Martian birthday on sol 1338 (Oct. 29, 2007). Opportunity landed on the Red Planet on Jan. 25, 2004. That's nearly four years ago on Earth, but only two on Mars because Mars takes longer to travel around the sun than Earth. One Martian year equals 687 Earth days.

    The overall soft quality of the image, and the 'haze' seen in the lower right portion, are the result of scattered light from dust on the front sapphire window of the rover's camera.

    This view was taken using three panoramic-camera filters, admitting light with wavelengths centered at 750 nanometers (near infrared), 530 nanometers (green) and 430 nanometers (violet).

  18. Opportunity's Second Martian Birthday at Cape Verde

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    A promontory nicknamed 'Cape Verde' can be seen jutting out from the walls of Victoria Crater in this approximate true-color picture taken by the panoramic camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. The rover took this picture on martian day, or sol, 1329 (Oct. 20, 2007), more than a month after it began descending down the crater walls -- and just 9 sols shy of its second Martian birthday on sol 1338 (Oct. 29, 2007). Opportunity landed on the Red Planet on Jan. 25, 2004. That's nearly four years ago on Earth, but only two on Mars because Mars takes longer to travel around the sun than Earth. One Martian year equals 687 Earth days.

    The overall soft quality of the image, and the 'haze' seen in the lower right portion, are the result of scattered light from dust on the front sapphire window of the rover's camera.

    This view was taken using three panoramic-camera filters, admitting light with wavelengths centered at 750 nanometers (near infrared), 530 nanometers (green) and 430 nanometers (violet).

  19. Layers of Cape Verde in Victoria Crater Stereo

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-10-06

    This anaglyph from from NASA Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity is of Victoria crater, looking north from Duck Bay towards the dramatic promontory called Cape Verde. 3D glasses are necessary to view this image.

  20. Botany Bay and Cape York with Vertical Exaggeration

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-12-07

    This graphic combines a perspective view from NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter of the Botany Bay and Cape York areas of the rim of Endeavour Crater on Mars, and an inset with mapping-spectrometer data.

  1. Western Edge of Cape York, with Bright Vein

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-12-07

    NASA Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity recorded this view of the western edge of Cape York, a segment of the rim of Endeavour Crater. A bright vein, informally named Homestake, is visible on the right side of the image.

  2. Unusual megafaunal assemblages on the continental slope off Cape Hatteras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecker, Barbara

    Megafaunal assemblages were studied in August-September 1992 using a towed camera sled along seven cross-isobath transects on the continental slope off Cape Hatteras. A total of 20,722 megafaunal organisms were observed on 10,918 m 2 of the sea floor between the depths of 157 and 1 924 m. These data were compared with data previously collected off Cape Hatteras in 1985 and at other locations along the eastern U.S. coast between 1981 and 1987. Megafaunal populations on the upper and lower slopes off Cape Hatteras were fouond to be similar, in terms of density and species composition, to those observed at the other locations. In contrast, megafaunal abundances were found to be elevated (0.88 and 2.65 individuals per m 2 during 1985 and 1992, respectively) on the middle slope off Cape Hatteras when compared to most other slope locations (<0.5individuals per m 2). These elevated abundances mainly reflect dense populations of three demersal fish, two eel pouts ( Lysenchelys verrilli and Lycodes atlanticus) and the witch flounder Glyptocephalus cynoglossus, and a large anemone ( Actinauge verrilli). These four species dominated the megafauna off Cape Hatteras, whereas they represented only a minor component of megafaunal populations found at other slope locations. Additionally, numerous tubes of the foraminiferan Bathysiphon filiformis were observed off Cape Hatteras, but not elsewhere. The high density of demersal fish found off Cape Hatteras appears to be related to the high densities of infaunal prey reported from this area. The high densities of A. verrilli and B. fuliformis may be related to the same factors responsible for the high infaunal densities, namely enhanced nutrient inputs in the form of fine particles. Extreme patchiness also was observed in the distributions of the middle slope taxa off Cape Hatteras. This patchiness may reflect the habitat heterogeneity of this exceptionally rugged slope and the sedentary nature of the organisms inhabiting it.

  3. Strategies GeoCape Intelligent Observation Studies @ GSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cappelaere, Pat; Frye, Stu; Moe, Karen; Mandl, Dan; LeMoigne, Jacqueline; Flatley, Tom; Geist, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    This presentation provides information a summary of the tradeoff studies conducted for GeoCape by the GSFC team in terms of how to optimize GeoCape observation efficiency. Tradeoffs include total ground scheduling with simple priorities, ground scheduling with cloud forecast, ground scheduling with sub-area forecast, onboard scheduling with onboard cloud detection and smart onboard scheduling and onboard image processing. The tradeoffs considered optimzing cost, downlink bandwidth and total number of images acquired.

  4. John Herschel and the Cape flora, 1834 - 1839.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rourke, J. P.

    John Herschel's interest in botany was stimulated by his contact with the species-rich Cape flora while resident in Cape Town, 1834 - 1838. The comparative study of his extensive living collection of bulbous plants, mainly of the Iridaceae, Liliaceae, Amarayllidaceae and Orchidaceae led him to consider some basic aspects of the origin of species and of taxonomic theory, in letters to colleagues in Europe.

  5. 78 FR 9587 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Cape Fear River, Wilmington, NC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-11

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Cape Fear River, Wilmington, NC... Cape Fear River Memorial Bridge, across the Cape Fear River, mile 26.8, at Wilmington, NC. The... second Sunday of November every year. The Cape Fear River Memorial Bridge, at mile 26.8, at...

  6. 77 FR 51699 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Cape Fear River, Wilmington, NC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-27

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Cape Fear River, Wilmington, NC... operation of the Cape Fear River Memorial Bridge, at mile 26.8, over Cape Fear River, at Wilmington, NC. The... a.m. on the first or second Sunday of November every year. The Cape Fear River Memorial Bridge,...

  7. A Cretaceous origin for fire adaptations in the Cape flora.

    PubMed

    He, Tianhua; Lamont, Byron B; Manning, John

    2016-10-05

    Fire has had a profound effect on the evolution of worldwide biotas. The Cape Floristic Region is one of the world's most species-rich regions, yet it is highly prone to recurrent fires and fire-adapted species contribute strongly to the overall flora. It is hypothesized that the current fire regimes in the Cape could be as old as 6-8 million years (My), while indirect evidence indicates that the onset of fire could have reached 18 million years ago (Ma). Here, we trace the origin of fire-dependent traits in two monocot families that are significant elements in the fire-prone Cape flora. Our analysis shows that fire-stimulated flowering originated in the Cape Haemodoraceae 81 Ma, while fire-stimulated germination arose in the African Restionaceae at least 70 Ma, implying that wildfires have been a significant force in the evolution of the Cape flora at least 60 My earlier than previous estimates. Our results provide strong evidence for the presence of fire adaptations in the Cape from the Cretaceous, leading to the extraordinary persistence of a fire-adapted flora in this biodiversity hotspot, and giving support to the hypothesis that Cretaceous fire was a global phenomenon that shaped the evolution of terrestrial floras.

  8. A Cretaceous origin for fire adaptations in the Cape flora

    PubMed Central

    He, Tianhua; Lamont, Byron B.; Manning, John

    2016-01-01

    Fire has had a profound effect on the evolution of worldwide biotas. The Cape Floristic Region is one of the world’s most species-rich regions, yet it is highly prone to recurrent fires and fire-adapted species contribute strongly to the overall flora. It is hypothesized that the current fire regimes in the Cape could be as old as 6–8 million years (My), while indirect evidence indicates that the onset of fire could have reached 18 million years ago (Ma). Here, we trace the origin of fire-dependent traits in two monocot families that are significant elements in the fire-prone Cape flora. Our analysis shows that fire-stimulated flowering originated in the Cape Haemodoraceae 81 Ma, while fire-stimulated germination arose in the African Restionaceae at least 70 Ma, implying that wildfires have been a significant force in the evolution of the Cape flora at least 60 My earlier than previous estimates. Our results provide strong evidence for the presence of fire adaptations in the Cape from the Cretaceous, leading to the extraordinary persistence of a fire-adapted flora in this biodiversity hotspot, and giving support to the hypothesis that Cretaceous fire was a global phenomenon that shaped the evolution of terrestrial floras. PMID:27703273

  9. Lagrangian circulation study near Cape Henry, Virginia. [Chesapeake Bay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    A study of the circulation near Cape Henry, Virginia, was made using surface and seabed drifters and radar tracked surface buoys coupled to subsurface drag plates. Drifter releases were conducted on a line normal to the beach just south of Cape Henry. Surface drifter recoveries were few; wind effects were strongly noted. Seabed drifter recoveries all exhibited onshore motion into Chesapeake Bay. Strong winds also affected seabed recoveries, tending to move them farther before recovery. Buoy trajectories in the vicinity of Cape Henry appeared to be of an irrotational nature, showing a clockwise rotary tide motion. Nearest the cape, the buoy motion elongated to almost parallel depth contours around the cape. Buoy motion under the action of strong winds showed that currents to at least the depth of the drag plates substantially are altered from those of low wind conditions near the Bay mouth. Only partial evidence could be found to support the presence of a clockwise nontidal eddy at Virginia Beach, south of Cape Henry.

  10. Cape Province, South Africa as seen from STS-58

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1993-10-30

    STS058-77-083 (18 Oct-1 Nov 1993) --- In this scene of the south coast of Africa, Cape Agulhas, the southernmost point on the continent, appears as the leftmost cape. Viewed with the Earth's limb top left, clouds at bottom, the view direction is west and north top right. The Cape of Good Hope, with Cape Town nearby, is the thin spike beyond. The great bay in the foreground is Algoa Bay with the city of Port Elizabeth. This was the first time European voyagers are known to have rounded the Cape of Good Hope in their quest to reach India by sea. The entire fold mountain belt of southern Africa is visible: these mountains appear as green (forested) wavy structures stretching west form the foreground, to the Cape of Good Hope, and then northwards some distance. One theory about their origin is that the Falkland Plateau, now an undersea extension of South America, was jostled up against Africa more than 150 million years ago, in times before the Atlantic Ocean existed, before Africa and South America drifted apart from one another. The jostling caused the evolution of the fold mountain belt.

  11. Shoreline Movements. Report 1. Cape Henry, Virginia, to Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, 1849-1980.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-07-01

    w I-- - * C4- 65 ±cc { z;\\> omI 0I 41 N" c - . L fA - - 2C - I 6t)a C a rt I t I i , I I kirjie - ir 1) LLI dI IY occI Irr t’ IIo Ii I i III I t tiit...of the lonig i it tr’vtili iig reach lt whi ich shore I ire pos it Iin dat. were uiiava i I ah 1t. Shorel Iire change rates at Vi rginiia Beach...APE HENP A TO CAPE HATTERAS N1K MAP NO LCCAAiT -~ Cn, H-r, 4 Ncrth Bav 46 Klolts Isln 47 BaiL, NV 48 Barm NE 49 Baro SE 50 Pco ,01s Point 51 Kittv H ,l

  12. Rayleigh wave group tomography in southeast Australia and Tasmania from cross-correlation of the ambient noise wavefield recorded with WOMBAT, a rolling array experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arroucau, P.; Rawlinson, N.; Sambridge, M.; Reading, A. M.

    2009-12-01

    Ambient noise cross-correlation is now a well established and powerful tool for studying the structure of the crust and upper mantle. In the past decade, it has given rise to a new class of seismic tomography which has been successfully applied at different scales and in various regions of the world. In this work, we exploit the ambient noise data from WOMBAT, an extensive program of temporary seismic array deployments in southeast Australia and Tasmania. With an interstation distance of a few tens of kilometers, and a cumulative total of approximately 500 sites occupied over the past decade, this dataset provides a unique opportunity to help address fundamental questions regarding the structure and tectonic evolution of the Lachlan and Delamarian orogens, which underpin the southern half of Palaeozoic eastern Australia. We computed the cross-correlation of the vertical component of the ambient noise for all simultaneously recording station pairs. Rayleigh wave group traveltimes were determined from the obtained cross-correlograms in a two-stage approach. In the first stage, preliminary dispersion curves for periods ranging from 1 to 20 s were constructed and averaged in order to build a phase-matched filter which was subsequently applied to the seismograms prior to a second round of traveltime picking. Theoretical studies have shown that the negative time derivative of the average noise correlation function provides an estimate of the Green's function of the intervening medium. Yet some studies have been successfully carried out using the correlation function without differentiation, assuming that results would not be significantly affected when dealing with group velocity only. In this work, traveltimes were picked on both and an average value was calculated for each period and station pair after some consistency check. Time picking uncertainties were assigned by determining the half-width of the time interval during which the amplitude of the envelope was 50% of

  13. A mass shooting at Port Arthur, Tasmania, Australia: a study of its impact on early pregnancy losses using a conception time-based methodology.

    PubMed

    Dean, R G; Dean, J; Heller, G Z; Leader, L R

    2015-11-01

    Does an acute calamity in a community cause early miscarriage and is this association the same for male and female fetuses? Estimated losses of 29.5% of first trimester pregnancies in the affected region could be associated with an acute calamity, with no statistically significant difference in estimated losses by fetal sex. There are very few studies on the impact of a calamity on early pregnancy loss and its differential effects on male and female fetuses. A decline in the human sex ratio at birth associated with the events of 9/11 in New York has been documented. This is a retrospective descriptive study of birth register data in Tasmania, Australia, from 1991 to 1997, covering the period in which the calamity occurred. The register contains data on all pregnancies that proceeded to >20 weeks gestation. The conception date was calculated by subtracting gestational age from birth date. We estimated that 40 318 pregnancies were conceived in the period 1991-1996 inclusive. These were aggregated to 4-weekly blocks classified by region and sex. The acute calamity was at Port Arthur, Tasmania, Australia. On 28 April 1996, a gunman opened fire on visitors and staff in a tourist cafe. A very stressful 20 h period, ended with 35 people dead and 22 injured. A negative binomial regression model was used to assess the association between this calamity and pregnancy loss. This loss is evidenced by a shortfall in the registration of pregnancies that were in their first trimester at the time of the calamity. We estimated a shortfall of 29.5% or 229 registered pregnancies among those in the first trimester at the time of the calamity (P < 0.001), in the region surrounding the calamity site. There was no sex effect in this shortfall (P = 0.911). There was no corresponding shortfall in other parts of Tasmania (P = 0.349). The study is descriptive and cannot produce causal inferences. These first trimester miscarriages are estimated statistically and it is understood that

  14. Coastal upwelling at Cape Frio: Its structure and weakening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jury, Mark R.

    2017-01-01

    Cape Frio at the Angola-Namibia border, is the northern-most coastal upwelling cell of the Benguela Current ( 17S, 11E) and is sensitive to climate variability. This study provides new insights using daily high resolution satellite and ocean-atmosphere reanalysis datasets in the period 1985-2015. The annual cycle of SST follows two months behind the net heat balance and wind stress curl, reaching a minimum in July-September. Ranking the daily SST record, two intense multi-day upwelling events stand out. The more recent case of 26-29 August 2005 is studied, given the greater density and sophistication of satellite data. A coastal wind jet >10 m s-1 develops next to Cape Frio, with sharp edges imposed by a thermal inversion and the mountainous cape. The cold plume < 14C west of Cape Frio is co-located with cyclonic wind stress curl and downward heat fluxes. Leeward of Cape Frio, a wind shadow and poleward currents contribute to phytoplankton blooms. Daily time series 1985-2015 reveal warming SST +.035C/yr and diminishing winds -0.025 m s-1/yr. The trend toward cyclonic winds over Angola and the northern Benguela Current reflects a poleward and offshore shift of the main axis of southeasterly winds.

  15. Cape Canaveral, Florida as seen from STS-66 Atlantis

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1994-11-14

    This nadir photograph of the Cape Canaveral area on Florida's eastern coast was taken by the STS-66 crew in November, 1994. The Space Shuttle Vehicle Assembly area and the runways used by the returning Shuttles can be seen near the center of this photograph as part of the John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Launch Pads A and B as well as many other launch pads and a runway can be seen on Cape Canaveral. Cape Canaveral is located to the east of KSC. South of the launch area is Port Canaveral and Cocoa Beach on the Atlantic coast with the towns of Cocoa, Merrit Island and Titusville situated along the Intercoastal Waterway.

  16. Fall migration of woodcock at Cape May, New Jersey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krohn, W.B.; Fieffenberger, J.C.; Ferrigno, F.

    1977-01-01

    From 1968 to 1973, 2,337 American woodcock (Philohela minor) were banded during late fall on the Cape May Peninsula of southern New Jersey. Direct recovery rates averaged 3.6 percent for hatching-year birds and 1.7 percent for adults. Distribution of recoveries indicated that Cape May migrants wintered on the coastal plain of Virginia and North Carolina. Indirect recoveries showed that Peninsula woodcock originated from as far north as New England and eastern Canada. The percentage of woodcock seen which were caught by night-lighting averaged 2.5 times greater from a truck than on foot. Age-sex structure of ban dings was similar each year with the overall composition as follows: immaturemales, 57 percent; immature females, 28 percent; adult males, 10 percent; and adult females, 5 percent. Compared to the continental population, there was an unusually high proportion of immature woodcock at Cape May during late fall.

  17. "Cape Town, South Africa taken from Atlantis during STS-106"

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-09-19

    STS106-713-057 (19 September 2000) --- One of the STS-106 crew members on board the Space Shuttle Atlantis used a handheld 70mm camera to photograph this image of Cape Town and the Karroo Ranges in South Africa. Cape Town occupies the north end of the Cape of Good Hope peninsula and extends to the shore of False Bay. The city is home to about 2.7 million people. Tourism and viticulture contribute importantly to the local economy, and the city is a service center for government and industry -- particularly mining. The great folded mountain ranges of South Africa were formed during the assembly of the ancient super continent of Gondwana. Broad N-trending folds of the Cedarburg range, South Africa formed first, according to geologists, about 230 million years ago, and the W-trending Karroo ranges formed a little later.

  18. Wind-driven surface circulation in the Cape Blanc region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellanos, P.; Pelegrí, J. L.; Benazzouz, A.

    2013-06-01

    We analyze the short-term transition, on time scales of the order of days and weeks, of the surface fields in the coastal transition zone off Northwest Africa, between 15°N and 25°N, during winter and spring 2005 and 2006. This is a complex region characterized by the baroclinic coastal jet north of Cape Blanc, along-shore convergence and water export at the Cape Blanc giant filament, and substantial mesoscale variability between Capes Verde and Blanc. We use the anomalies of the wind impulse and two different coastal upwelling indexes, evaluated off 17°N, 20°N and 23°N, in order to assess the importance of wind forcing in this short-term variability. We also employ daily and weekly surface maps of wind, temperature, surface height and currents to investigate which are the mechanisms that lead to the relatively fast changes in the flow patterns. The coastal baroclinic jet and the Cape Blanc giant filament are ubiquitous features, the two being intrinsically related through the intensity of upwelling off Cape Blanc. Therefore, the strength of both features responds, to a large extent, to the fluctuations of the northeasterly winds; their intensity is greater in spring than winter but during both seasons they experience relatively fast oscillations related to the intermittency of the wind field. The mesoscalar features are visible in the entire domain, with time scales typically of the order of two weeks, but become prominent in the southern region during spring, apparently related to an intense northward coastal jet south of Cape Blanc.

  19. Hydrologic overlay maps of the Cape Canaveral Quadrangle, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frazee, James M.; Laughlin, Charles P.

    1979-01-01

    Brevard County is an area of some 1,300 square miles located on the east coast of central Florida.  The Cape Canaveral quadrangle, in central Brevard, includes part of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, John F. Kennedy Space Center (NASA), and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station.  The eastern part of the quadrangle is occupied by the Atlantic Ocean and the western part by estuarine waters of the Banana River.  Topography is characterized by numerous elongate sand dumes, with altitudes up to 10 feet or greater, which roughly parallel the estuary and ocean.

  20. Strategic Analysis for the MER Cape Verde Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaines, Daniel; Belluta, Paolo; Herman, Jennifer; Hwang, Pauline; Mukai, Ryan; Porter, Dan; Jones, Byron; Wood, Eric; Grotzinger, John; Edgar, Lauren; hide

    2009-01-01

    The Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity has recently completed a two year campaign studying Victoria Crater. The campaign culminated in a close approach of Cape Verde in order to acquire high resolution imagery of the exposed stratigraphy in the cliff face. The close approach to Cape Verde provided significant challenges for every subsystem of the rover as the rover needed to traverse difficult, uncharacterised terrain and approach a cliff face with the potential of blocking out solar energy and communications with Earth. In this paper we describe the strategic analyses performed by the science and engineering teams so that we could successfully achieve the science objectives while keeping the rover safe.

  1. Strategic analysis for the MER Cape Verde approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gaines, D.; Belluta, P.; Herman, J.; Hwang, P.; Mukai, R.; Porter, D.; Jones, B.; Wood, E.; Grotzinger, J.; Edgar, L.; Hayes, A.; Hare, T.; Squyres, S.

    2009-01-01

    The Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity has recently completed a two year campaign studying Victoria Crater. The campaign culminated in a close approach of Cape Verde in order to acquire high resolution imagery of the exposed stratigraphy in the cliff face. The close approach to Cape Verde provided significant challenges for every subsystem of the rover as the rover needed to traverse difficult, uncharacterised terrain and approach a cliff face with the potential of blocking out solar energy and communications with Earth. In this paper we describe the strategic analyses performed by the science and engineering teams so that we could successfully achieve the science objectives while keeping the rover safe. ??2009 IEEE.

  2. Strategic Analysis for the MER Cape Verde Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaines, Daniel; Belluta, Paolo; Herman, Jennifer; Hwang, Pauline; Mukai, Ryan; Porter, Dan; Jones, Byron; Wood, Eric; Grotzinger, John; Edgar, Lauren; Hayes, Alex; Hare, Trent; Squyres, Steve

    2009-01-01

    The Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity has recently completed a two year campaign studying Victoria Crater. The campaign culminated in a close approach of Cape Verde in order to acquire high resolution imagery of the exposed stratigraphy in the cliff face. The close approach to Cape Verde provided significant challenges for every subsystem of the rover as the rover needed to traverse difficult, uncharacterised terrain and approach a cliff face with the potential of blocking out solar energy and communications with Earth. In this paper we describe the strategic analyses performed by the science and engineering teams so that we could successfully achieve the science objectives while keeping the rover safe.

  3. The perceptions of undergraduate student nurses of high-fidelity simulation-based learning: a case report from the University of Tasmania.

    PubMed

    Reilly, Amanda; Spratt, Christine

    2007-08-01

    This paper reports a qualitatively informed curriculum research project in the three-year Bachelor of Nursing (BN) at the School of Nursing and Midwifery (SNM) at the University of Tasmania. The project investigated the perceptions of second year undergraduate nurses and their academic teachers of their experiences of high-fidelity simulation using the Laerdal Vital Sim Nursing Kelly and Nursing Anne technology(2) as part of their preparation for clinical practice. An associated curriculum benchmarking audit was also undertaken. A voluntary purposeful sample of students enrolled in a clinically-based practise unit(3) participated in the research, along with a small cohort of academic teachers. The results indicated that undergraduate nursing students value the opportunity to practice nursing activities in a safe environment prior to clinical placement. Students believed that simulation is an innovative strategy that promotes active learning and has great potential for developing clinical competence and increasing confidence prior to practise. The academic staff reported a similar belief about the potential of high-fidelity simulation in a case-based curriculum. The associated curriculum benchmarking audit provided evidence to support further integration of high-fidelity simulation in the undergraduate nursing program.

  4. Millennia-long tree-ring records from Tasmania and New Zealand: a basis for modelling climate variability and forcing, past, present and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Edward R.; Buckley, Brendan M.; Palmer, Jonathan G.; Fenwick, Pavla; Peterson, Michael J.; Boswijk, Gretel; Fowler, Anthony

    2006-10-01

    Progress in the development of millennia-long tree-ring chronologies from Australia and New Zealand is reviewed from the perspective of modelling long-term climate variability there. Three tree species have proved successful in this regard: Huon pine (Lagarostrobos franklinii) from Tasmania, silver pine (L. colensoi) from the South Island of New Zealand, and kauri (Agathis australis) from the North Island of New Zealand. Each of these species is very long-lived and produces abundant quantities of well-preserved wood for extending their tree-ring chronologies back several millennia into the past. The growth patterns on these chronologies strongly correlate with both local and regional warm-season temperature changes over significant areas of the Southern Hemisphere (especially Huon and silver pine) and to ENSO variability emanating from the equatorial Pacific region (especially kauri). In addition, there is evidence for significant, band-limited, multi-decadal and centennial timescale variability in the warm-season temperature reconstruction based on Huon pine tree rings that may be related to slowly varying changes in ocean circulation dynamics in the southern Indian Ocean. This suggests the possibility of long-term climate predictability there. Copyright

  5. The language of science and preferential thinking styles: A comparison between hindi speaking students (in India) and english speaking students (in Tasmania)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, P. P.; Chipman, H. H.; Pachaury, A. C.

    A study of science textbooks and students' responses indicates that many key concepts are treated at different levels of meaning. As a consequence of these observations we have attempted to examine what we have termed students' preferential thinking style. To do this, the level of meaning that students preferred when thinking about each of 16 key concept definitions associated with the theme, the nature of matter, was measured for each concept. The same concept definitions had already been studied in respect to students' ability to recognize them. Each of the 16 concept terms was formulated at the three levels of meaning defined by us as: membership, partial association, and generalization. The resulting test of preferential thinking style was administered to representative samples of Hindi-speaking high school students in India (826) and English-speaking high school students in Tasmania (1635). Some marked changes in the relative development of preferential thinking styles for the two groups were observed which raises questions associated with the importance of this notion as an outcome of science teaching.

  6. Fe-isotope fractionation in magmatic-hydrothermal mineral deposits: A case study from the Renison Sn-W deposit, Tasmania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wawryk, Christine M.; Foden, John D.

    2015-02-01

    We present 50 new iron isotopic analyses of source granite and mineral separates from the Renison tin deposit in western Tasmania. The aim of the study is to characterise the composition of minerals within a tin deposit associated with a reduced, S-type magma. We have analysed bulk samples of granite, and separates of pyrrhotite, pyrite, arsenopyrite, magnetite, chalcopyrite and siderite by multi-collector inductively coupled mass spectrometry. The isotopic compositions of mineral separates are consistent with theoretical predictions of equilibrium fractionation based on Mössbauer spectroscopy and other parametric calculations. Mineral-mineral pairs yield temperatures of formation that are in agreement with prior detailed fluid inclusion studies, but are spatially inconsistent with declining fluid temperatures with distance from the causative intrusion, limiting the use of Fe isotopes as a potential geothermometer, at least in this case. Comparison of our data with published data from other deposits clearly demonstrates that pyrite, magnetite and chalcopyrite from the hottest ore fluids (>300-400 °C) at Renison are isotopically heavier than minerals sampled from a deposit formed at similar temperatures, but associated with a more oxidised and less differentiated intrusion.

  7. Vanguard Satellite SLV-2 Being Examined at Cape Canaveral

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1958-01-01

    Vanguard satellite SLV-2 is being checked out at Cape Canaveral, Florida. The Solar X-ray radiation satellite was launched June 26, 1958. The second stage of the launch vehicle ended prematurely due to low chamber pressure and terminated the mission. The launch was part of the U.S. International Geophysical Year program under the direction of the Office of Naval Research.

  8. A generalization of CAPE into potential-energy convertibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, Jun-Ichi; Chaboureau, Jean-Pierre; Guichard, Françoise

    2005-04-01

    The concept of the potential-energy convertibility (PEC) is proposed as a generalization of convective available potential energy (CAPE). It is defined as a vertical integral of buoyancy weighted by a non-dimensional normalized vertical momentum. This is a measure of convertibility of potential energy into kinetic energy in the sense that the actual conversion rate is recovered when PEC evaluated by the convective-scale local buoyancy and vertical momentum, as available from cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations, is multiplied by the normalization factor for the vertical momentum. It reduces to CAPE, when the standard parcel-lifted buoyancy and a unit value for the normalized vertical momentum are used. It is equivalent to Arakawas-Schubert's cloud work function, when the buoyancy and the vertical momentum profile for an entraining plume are used. PEC evaluated from locally defined buoyancy and vertical momentum in CRM simulations correlates better with the convective precipitation than CAPE. The evaluation of PEC within a convective parametrization may be possible with an appropriate definition of the effective entrainment rate, for example, which is expected to improve CAPE-based convective parametrizations.

  9. Learners' Experiences of Learning Support in Selected Western Cape Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bojuwoye, Olaniyi; Moletsane, Mokgadi; Stofile, Sindiswa; Moolla, Nadeen; Sylvester, Fredrick

    2014-01-01

    The study explored Western Cape primary and secondary school learners' experiences regarding the provision and utilization of support services for improving learning. A qualitative interpretive approach was adopted and data gathered through focus group interviews involving 90 learners. Results revealed that learners received and utilized various…

  10. Delineation of groundwater recharge areas, western Cape Cod, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Masterson, John P.; Walter, Donald A.

    2000-01-01

    For additional information on the hydrology and geology of western Cape Cod, the reader is referred to the following reports: LeBlanc and others (1986), Barlow and Hess (1993), Masterson and others (1997a), Masterson and others (1997b), Masterson and others (1998), Ogden Environmental and Energy Services, Inc. (1998) and Jacobs Engineering Group, Inc. (1999).

  11. 33 CFR 117.829 - Northeast Cape Fear River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Northeast Cape Fear River. 117... Fear River. (a) The draw of the Isabel S. Holmes Bridge, at mile 1.0, at Wilmington, North Carolina... Fear River. (2) The draw shall be left in the open position to vessels and will only be closed for the...

  12. 33 CFR 117.829 - Northeast Cape Fear River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Northeast Cape Fear River. 117... Fear River. (a) The draw of the Isabel S. Holmes Bridge, at mile 1.0, at Wilmington, North Carolina... Fear River. (2) The draw shall be left in the open position to vessels and will only be closed for the...

  13. Eddy Processes of the Western Adriatic Current Near Cape Gargano

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    Marine Science, Venezia, Italy 3 University of Durham, Durham, U.K. 4 NATO Undersea Research Centre, La Spezia, Italy 5 C.N.R.-Institute of Marine...Science, La Spezia, Italy 6 Institute of Oceanography and Fisheries, Split, Croatia Abstract Eddy processes of the Western Adriatic Current near Cape

  14. Cape Canaveral, Florida 2010 Single-beam Bathymetry Data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, David M.; Plant, Nathaniel G.; Hansen, Mark E.; Doran, Kara S.; DeWitt, Nancy T.; Schreppel, Heather A.

    2015-01-01

    Single-beam bathymetric surveys were conducted on July 27-29, 2010 along 37 cross-shore transects offshore from Cape Canaveral, Fla. The transects were spaced 500 m apart in the alongshore direction and each was approximately 5 km long in the cross-shore.

  15. Prefabricated solution to modular construction in Cape Verde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, Nuno; Amado, Miguel; Pinho, Fernando

    2017-02-01

    Nowadays, the lack of adequate housing in Cape Verde is a growing problem. The migration of the population living in the countryside to the major cities generates an increase of the diameter of the cities. With the lack of economic power, the migrating families tend to occupy the land with houses which don't present proper conditions to living. Praia is the capital of Cape Verde and so on the biggest city of the country. This fact leads Praia to being the city with major economic power and job offer in all country. Consequently, Praia has developed the biggest slum of the Cape Verde and it is urgent to approach this problem in order to create solutions that reveal capacity to start solving it. Cape Verde's unique dry subtropical climate turns indispensable a careful resolution of the housing, in order to ensure the comfort of the occupants. The modular construction is a solution with potential to approach this problem with a fast and economic response. In order to answer the situation, this article introduces a modular solution in order to reach the needing of thermal comfort to the specific case of Praia.

  16. Evolution of the species-rich Cape flora.

    PubMed Central

    Linder, H P; Hardy, C R

    2004-01-01

    The Cape Floristic Region ('fynbos biome') has very high levels of plant species diversity and endemism. Much of this diversity is concentrated in a relatively small number of clades centered in the region (Cape clades), and these form a vegetation called 'fynbos'. The general explanation for the origin of this diversity is that much of it evolved in the Pliocene and Late Miocene in response to progressive aridification. We present a phylogenetic analysis of an almost complete species sample of the largest clade of Restionaceae, the third largest Cape clade. This indicates that the radiation of the Restionaceae started between 20 and 42 Myr ago, and since then there were no, or at most gradual, changes in the speciation rate in this clade. For seven other clades, the estimated starting dates for their radiation ranges from 7 to 20 Myr ago. Combining the radiation patterns for these clades shows that ca. 15% of the modern species evolved during the Pleistocene, and almost 40% since the beginning of the Pliocene. We suggest that these clades might have radiated in response to the fynbos vegetation increasing its extent in the Cape as a result of climatic change. PMID:15519977

  17. Experimental Dune Restoration and Stabilization, Nauset Beach, Cape Cod, Massachusetts.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-01

    AREA ......... .................. 9 1. Geography and Geomorphology ........ ................ 9 2. Climate ........... .......................... ... 11...By 1969, the south spit was approximately 853 meters long, and the inlet was migrating northward. 2. Climate . The Cape’s proximity with the marine...environment produces a moderate climate . Precipitation occurs more than 90 days per year, averages about 100 centimeters, and is evenly distributed

  18. Sediment transport on Cape Sable, Everglades National Park, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zucker, Mark; Boudreau, Carrie

    2010-01-01

    The Cape Sable peninsula is located on the southwestern tip of the Florida peninsula within Everglades National Park (ENP). Lake Ingraham, the largest lake within Cape Sable, is now connected to the Gulf of Mexico and western Florida Bay by canals built in the early 1920's. Some of these canals breached a natural marl ridge located to the north of Lake Ingraham. These connections altered the landscape of this area allowing for the transport of sediments to and from Lake Ingraham. Saline intrusion into the formerly fresh interior marsh has impacted the local ecology. Earthen dams installed in the 1950's and 1960's in canals that breached the marl ridge have repeatedly failed. Sheet pile dams installed in the early 1990's subsequently failed resulting in the continued alteration of Lake Ingraham and the interior marsh. The Cape Sable Canals Dam Restoration Project, funded by ENP, proposes to restore the two failed dams in Lake Ingraham. The objective of this study was to collect discharge and water quality data over a series of tidal cycles and flow conditions to establish discharge and sediment surrogate relations prior to initiating the Cape Sable Canals Dam Restoration Project. A dry season synoptic sampling event was performed on April 27-30, 2009.

  19. The Politics of an Emancipatory Literacy in Cape Verde.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macedo, Donaldo P.

    1983-01-01

    Examines the literacy program in Cape Verde against theories of cultural production and reproduction. Argues that the use of Portuguese rather than the Capeverdean dialect reproduces a colonial, elitist mentality, and that functional literacy in Portuguese fails to provide Capeverdeans with opportunities for critical reflection and social…

  20. EAARL Coastal Topography–Cape Cod National Seashore, Massachusetts, 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kranenburg, Christine; Hardy, Matthew; Nagle, David B.

    2017-01-01

    These datasets, prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center in collaboration with the National Park Service, provide lidar-derived first-surface and bare-earth topography for Cape Cod National Seashore, Massachusetts. Elevation measurements were acquired by the Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL) during October 2002.

  1. Five Cape Cod Communities Receiving EPA Technical Assistance to Address Nitrogen Pollution

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Fieldwork is beginning this week in the Cape Cod communities of Barnstable, Dennis, Falmouth, Mashpee and Orleans on a project that may help reduce harmful levels of nitrogen and other nutrients from flowing into Cape Cod waters.

  2. DETAIL OF ELECTRICAL ON/OFF SWITCH, FACING EAST Cape Canaveral ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF ELECTRICAL ON/OFF SWITCH, FACING EAST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 34, Operations Support Building, Freedom Road, Southwest of Launch Stand CX-34, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  3. A/C MECHANICAL ROOM, FACING NORTHWEST Cape Canaveral Air Force ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    A/C MECHANICAL ROOM, FACING NORTHWEST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 34, Operations Support Building, Freedom Road, Southwest of Launch Stand CX-34, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  4. 33 CFR 165.515 - Safety Zone: Cape Fear River, Wilmington, North Carolina.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the Battleship USS NORTH CAROLINA, across the Cape Fear River to the north end of the Coast Guard... (Chandler's Wharf), back across the Cape Fear River to Eagle Island, and then up along the west bank of the...

  5. The oxidative capacity of the troposphere: coupling of field measurements of OH and a global chemistry transport model.

    PubMed

    Bloss, William J; Evans, Mathew J; Lee, James D; Sommariva, Roberto; Heard, Dwayne E; Pilling, Michael J

    2005-01-01

    A combination of in situ, ground-based observations of marine boundary layer OH concentrations performed by laser-induced fluorescence at Mace Head, Ireland and Cape Grim, Tasmania, and a global chemistry-transport model (GEOS-CHEM) are used to obtain an estimate of the mean concentration of OH in the global troposphere. The model OH field is constrained to the geographically sparse, observed OH concentration averaged over the duration of the measurement campaigns to remove diurnal and synoptic variability. The mean northern and southern hemispheric OH concentrations obtained are 0.91 x 10(6) cm(-3) and 1.03 x 10(6) cm(-3) respectively, consistent with values determined from methyl chloroform observations. The observational OH dataset is heavily biased towards mid-latitude summer and autumn observations in the northern hemisphere, while the global oxidising capacity is dominated by the tropics which is observed extremely sparsely; the implications of these geographical distributions are discussed.

  6. Cape Town, South Africa, Anaglyph, Landsat Image over SRTM Elevation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Cape Town and the Cape of Good Hope, South Africa, appear on the left (west) of this anaglyph view generated from a Landsat satellite image and elevation data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). The city center is located between Table Bay (upper left) and Table Mountain (just to the south), a 1,086-meter (3,563-foot) tall sandstone and granite natural landmark.

    Cape Town enjoys a Mediterranean climate but must deal with the limited water supply characteristic of that climate. Until the 1890s the city relied upon streams and springs along the base of Table Mountain, then built a small reservoir atop Table Mountain to capture and store rainfall there (visible in this anaglyph when viewed at full resolution). Now the needs of a much larger population are met in part by much larger reservoirs such as seen well inland (upper right) at the Theewaterskloof Dam.

    False Bay is the large bay to the southeast (lower right) of Cape Town, just around the Cape of Good Hope. It is one of the largest bays along the entire South African coast, but nearby Cape Town has its harbor at Table Bay. False Bay got its name because mariners approaching Cape Town from the east would see the prominent bay and falsely assume it to be the entrance to Cape Town harbor. Similarly, people often mistake the Cape of Good Hope as the southernmost point of Africa. But the southernmost point is actually Cape Agulhas, located just to the southeast (lower right) of this scene.

    This anaglyph was created by draping a Landsat visible light image over an SRTM elevation model, and then generating two differing perspectives, one for each eye. When viewed through special glasses, the anaglyph is a vertically exaggerated view of the Earth's surface in its full three dimensions. Anaglyph glasses cover the left eye with a red filter and cover the right eye with a blue filter.

    Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard

  7. Cape Town, South Africa, Anaglyph, Landsat Image over SRTM Elevation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Cape Town and the Cape of Good Hope, South Africa, appear on the left (west) of this anaglyph view generated from a Landsat satellite image and elevation data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). The city center is located between Table Bay (upper left) and Table Mountain (just to the south), a 1,086-meter (3,563-foot) tall sandstone and granite natural landmark.

    Cape Town enjoys a Mediterranean climate but must deal with the limited water supply characteristic of that climate. Until the 1890s the city relied upon streams and springs along the base of Table Mountain, then built a small reservoir atop Table Mountain to capture and store rainfall there (visible in this anaglyph when viewed at full resolution). Now the needs of a much larger population are met in part by much larger reservoirs such as seen well inland (upper right) at the Theewaterskloof Dam.

    False Bay is the large bay to the southeast (lower right) of Cape Town, just around the Cape of Good Hope. It is one of the largest bays along the entire South African coast, but nearby Cape Town has its harbor at Table Bay. False Bay got its name because mariners approaching Cape Town from the east would see the prominent bay and falsely assume it to be the entrance to Cape Town harbor. Similarly, people often mistake the Cape of Good Hope as the southernmost point of Africa. But the southernmost point is actually Cape Agulhas, located just to the southeast (lower right) of this scene.

    This anaglyph was created by draping a Landsat visible light image over an SRTM elevation model, and then generating two differing perspectives, one for each eye. When viewed through special glasses, the anaglyph is a vertically exaggerated view of the Earth's surface in its full three dimensions. Anaglyph glasses cover the left eye with a red filter and cover the right eye with a blue filter.

    Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard

  8. IN and CCN Measurements on RV Polarstern and Cape Verde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welti, André; Herenz, Paul; Henning, Silvia; Stratmann, Frank

    2016-04-01

    Two field campaigns, one situated on RV Polarstern (Oct. - Dec. 2015) and one on the Cape Verde islands (Jan. - Feb. 2016) measuring ice nuclei (IN) and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations as a function of supersaturation and temperature are presented. The Polarstern cruise from Bremerhaven to Cape Town yields a cross section of IN and CCN concentrations from 54°N to 35°S and passes the Cape Verde Islands at 15°N. Measurements were conducted using the commercial CCNC and SPIN instruments from DMT. During both campaigns, a comprehensive set of aerosol characterization data including size distribution, optical properties and chemical information were measured in parallel. The ship based measurements provide a measure of variability in IN/CCN concentration with geographic position. As an example a clear influence on IN and CCN number concentration of the Saharan desert dust outflow between the Canary Islands and Cape Verde or the continental aerosol from Europe and South Africa was observed. The measurements on Cape Verde provide information on the temporal variability at a fixed position varying between clean marine and dust influenced conditions. Both datasets are related to auxiliary data of aerosol size distribution and chemical composition. The datasets are used to distinguish the influence of local sources and background concentration of IN/CCN. By combining of the geographically fix measurements with the geographical cross section, typical ranges of IN and CCN concentration are derived. The datasets will be part of the BACCHUS database thereby providing valuable input for future climate modeling activities.

  9. 46 CFR 7.60 - Cape Fear, NC to Sullivans Island, SC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cape Fear, NC to Sullivans Island, SC. 7.60 Section 7.60... Atlantic Coast § 7.60 Cape Fear, NC to Sullivans Island, SC. (a) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity to Cape Fear to latitude 33°49.5′ N. longitude 78°03.7′ W. (Cape Fear River Entrance Lighted...

  10. 46 CFR 7.60 - Cape Fear, NC to Sullivans Island, SC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cape Fear, NC to Sullivans Island, SC. 7.60 Section 7.60... Atlantic Coast § 7.60 Cape Fear, NC to Sullivans Island, SC. (a) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity to Cape Fear to latitude 33°49.5′ N. longitude 78°03.7′ W. (Cape Fear River Entrance Lighted...

  11. 46 CFR 7.60 - Cape Fear, NC to Sullivans Island, SC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cape Fear, NC to Sullivans Island, SC. 7.60 Section 7.60... Atlantic Coast § 7.60 Cape Fear, NC to Sullivans Island, SC. (a) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity to Cape Fear to latitude 33°49.5′ N. longitude 78°03.7′ W. (Cape Fear River Entrance Lighted...

  12. 46 CFR 7.60 - Cape Fear, NC to Sullivans Island, SC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cape Fear, NC to Sullivans Island, SC. 7.60 Section 7.60... Atlantic Coast § 7.60 Cape Fear, NC to Sullivans Island, SC. (a) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity to Cape Fear to latitude 33°49.5′ N. longitude 78°03.7′ W. (Cape Fear River Entrance Lighted...

  13. 46 CFR 7.60 - Cape Fear, NC to Sullivans Island, SC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cape Fear, NC to Sullivans Island, SC. 7.60 Section 7.60... Atlantic Coast § 7.60 Cape Fear, NC to Sullivans Island, SC. (a) A line drawn from the southernmost extremity to Cape Fear to latitude 33°49.5′ N. longitude 78°03.7′ W. (Cape Fear River Entrance Lighted...

  14. UK physics council sees grim future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brumfiel, Geoff

    2009-11-01

    Britain's high-energy physicists and astronomers are bracing themselves for budget cuts. The Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC), which funds the United Kingdom's astronomy, particle- and nuclear-physics communities, is short by roughly £40 million (US$66 million) in its annual £450-million cash budget.

  15. Grim Job Talks Are a Buzz Kill

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapiro, Dan

    2012-01-01

    This article takes a look at five mistakes that candidates should avoid making during their research presentations. These mistakes are the following: (1) they didn't do any research on the norms of the campus culture; (2) they presented a single, well-thought-out project that had no future; (3) they didn't use the opportunity to demonstrate their…

  16. Grim Job Talks Are a Buzz Kill

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapiro, Dan

    2012-01-01

    This article takes a look at five mistakes that candidates should avoid making during their research presentations. These mistakes are the following: (1) they didn't do any research on the norms of the campus culture; (2) they presented a single, well-thought-out project that had no future; (3) they didn't use the opportunity to demonstrate their…

  17. Cape Verde and Its People: A Short History, Part I [And] Folk Tales of the Cape Verdean People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almeida, Raymond A.; Nyhan, Patricia

    Two booklets provide an overview of the history and folklore of Cape Verde, a group of islands lying 370 miles off the west coast of Africa. One booklet describes the history of the islands which were probably settled initially by Africans from the west coast of Africa. By the 15th century the islands were colonized by Portuguese and other…

  18. Neotectonic morphotructures in the junction zone of the Cape Verde Rise and Cape Verde Abyssal Plain, Central Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skolotnev, S. G.; Kolodyazhny, S. Yu.; Tsukanov, N. V.; Chamov, N. P.; Sokolov, S. Yu.

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic profiling carried out with an Edgetech 3300 prophilograph in the junction zone of the Cape Verde Rise, Cape Verde Abyssal Plain, and Grimaldi and Bathymetrists seamounts in the Central Atlantic during Cruise 23 of the R/V Akademik Nikolaj Strakhov allowed us to obtain new data on neotectonic deformations in the ocean and to propose their interpretation. It has been established that neotectonic movements occurred in the discrete manner: blocks of undeformed rocks alternate with linear zones of intense deformation spatially related to paleotransform fracture zones, where anticlines, horsts, diapir-like morphostructures, and grabens were formed. The Cape Verde Ridge is a large horst. Its sedimentary cover is disturbed by thrust (?), reverse, and normal faults, steeply dipping fracture zones, and folds. Three stages of tectonic movements—Oligocene-early Miocene, pre-Quaternary, and Holocene—are recognized. The tectonic deformations occurred largely under near-meridional compression. Extension setting was characteristic of the Cape Verde Ridge and the Carter Rise in the Holocene.

  19. 33 CFR 165.515 - Safety Zone: Cape Fear River, Wilmington, North Carolina.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Safety Zone: Cape Fear River... § 165.515 Safety Zone: Cape Fear River, Wilmington, North Carolina. (a) Location. The following area is a safety zone: (1) The waters of the Cape Fear River bounded by a line connecting the...

  20. 33 CFR 167.250 - In the approaches to the Cape Fear River: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false In the approaches to the Cape Fear River: General. 167.250 Section 167.250 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Cape Fear River: General. The traffic separation scheme (TSS) in the approaches to the Cape Fear...

  1. 33 CFR 80.530 - Cape Fear, NC to Little River Inlet, NC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Cape Fear, NC to Little River... SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Fifth District § 80.530 Cape Fear, NC to... latitude 33°52.4′ N. longitude 78°00.1′ W. across the Cape Fear River Entrance to Oak Island Light....

  2. 77 FR 5186 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Northeast Cape Fear River, Wilmington, NC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-02

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Northeast Cape Fear River, Wilmington... operation of the Isabel S. Holmes Bridge across the Northeast Cape Fear River, mile 1.0, at Wilmington, NC... marine radio on channel 13 VHF. The Isabel S. Holmes Bridge across the Northeast Cape Fear River, mile...

  3. 33 CFR 165.515 - Safety Zone: Cape Fear River, Wilmington, North Carolina.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Safety Zone: Cape Fear River... § 165.515 Safety Zone: Cape Fear River, Wilmington, North Carolina. (a) Location. The following area is a safety zone: (1) The waters of the Cape Fear River bounded by a line connecting the...

  4. 33 CFR 165.515 - Safety Zone: Cape Fear River, Wilmington, North Carolina.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Safety Zone: Cape Fear River... § 165.515 Safety Zone: Cape Fear River, Wilmington, North Carolina. (a) Location. The following area is a safety zone: (1) The waters of the Cape Fear River bounded by a line connecting the...

  5. 33 CFR 167.250 - In the approaches to the Cape Fear River: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false In the approaches to the Cape Fear River: General. 167.250 Section 167.250 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Cape Fear River: General. The traffic separation scheme (TSS) in the approaches to the Cape Fear...

  6. 33 CFR 80.530 - Cape Fear, NC to Little River Inlet, NC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Cape Fear, NC to Little River... SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Fifth District § 80.530 Cape Fear, NC to... latitude 33°52.4′ N. longitude 78°00.1′ W. across the Cape Fear River Entrance to Oak Island Light....

  7. 77 FR 1406 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Northeast Cape Fear River, Wilmington, NC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-10

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Northeast Cape Fear River... operation of the Isabel S. Holmes Bridge, mile 1.0, across the Northeast Cape Fear River, at Wilmington, NC... Northeast Cape Fear River. The drawbridge will be able to open in the event of an emergency. The Coast...

  8. 33 CFR 80.530 - Cape Fear, NC to Little River Inlet, NC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cape Fear, NC to Little River... SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Fifth District § 80.530 Cape Fear, NC to... latitude 33°52.4′ N. longitude 78°00.1′ W. across the Cape Fear River Entrance to Oak Island Light....

  9. 33 CFR 80.530 - Cape Fear, NC to Little River Inlet, NC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Cape Fear, NC to Little River... SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Fifth District § 80.530 Cape Fear, NC to... latitude 33°52.4′ N., longitude 78°00.1′ W., across the Cape Fear River Entrance to Oak Island Light....

  10. 33 CFR 165.515 - Safety Zone: Cape Fear River, Wilmington, North Carolina.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Safety Zone: Cape Fear River... § 165.515 Safety Zone: Cape Fear River, Wilmington, North Carolina. (a) Location. The following area is a safety zone: (1) The waters of the Cape Fear River bounded by a line connecting the...

  11. 33 CFR 167.250 - In the approaches to the Cape Fear River: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false In the approaches to the Cape Fear River: General. 167.250 Section 167.250 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Cape Fear River: General. The traffic separation scheme (TSS) in the approaches to the Cape Fear...

  12. 33 CFR 167.250 - In the approaches to the Cape Fear River: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false In the approaches to the Cape Fear River: General. 167.250 Section 167.250 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Cape Fear River: General. The traffic separation scheme (TSS) in the approaches to the Cape Fear...

  13. 33 CFR 80.530 - Cape Fear, NC to Little River Inlet, NC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Cape Fear, NC to Little River... SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Fifth District § 80.530 Cape Fear, NC to... latitude 33°52.4′ N., longitude 78°00.1′ W., across the Cape Fear River Entrance to Oak Island Light....

  14. 75 FR 10500 - Environmental Assessment Prepared for Proposed Cape Wind Energy Project in Nantucket Sound, MA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-08

    ... Minerals Management Service Environmental Assessment Prepared for Proposed Cape Wind Energy Project in... review and comment of an EA and Draft FONNSI prepared by MMS for the Cape Wind Energy Project proposed... Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) for the Cape Wind Energy Project. The FEIS assessed the...

  15. 78 FR 66763 - Notice of December 2, 2013, Meeting for Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-06

    ... National Park Service Notice of December 2, 2013, Meeting for Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory... the date of the 291st Meeting of the Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission. DATES: The public meeting of the Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission will be held on Monday, December 2, 2013,...

  16. 77 FR 59970 - Notice of November 14, 2012, Meeting for Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-01

    ... National Park Service Notice of November 14, 2012, Meeting for Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory... the date of the Two Hundred Eighty- Sixth Meeting of the Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission. DATES: The public meeting of the Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission will be held...

  17. 78 FR 23783 - Notice of May 13, 2013, Meeting for Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-22

    ... National Park Service Notice of May 13, 2013, Meeting for Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission... of the Two Hundred Eighty- Ninth Meeting of the Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission. DATES: The public meeting of the Cape Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission will be held on Monday,...

  18. Nho Lobo: Folk Tales of the Cape Verdean People. Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nyhan, Patricia; Almeida, Raymond A.

    The teacher's guide presents two Cape Verdean folktales, background information, discussion questions, and activity suggestions for grades 4-6. The objective is to teach students about Cape Verde and its culture through folklore. The guide contains five sections. Section I offers a description of Cape Verdean folklore, describes five ways folklore…

  19. Cape Verdeans in the United States (Continuing a Story of Struggle, Creativity and Persistence).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houston, Laura Pires

    This article focuses on the history of the Cape Verde Islands, the nature of Cape Verdean immigration to the United States, and the ethnic experience of Cape Verdeans in the U.S. The colonization of the Atlantic archipelago by the Portuguese as part of their expanding slave trade is described and the Islands' economic, ecologic, racial and…

  20. Cytoprotective Effect of Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester (CAPE) and Catechol Ring-Fluorinated CAPE Derivatives Against Menadione-Induced Oxidative Stress in Human Endothelial Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-31

    chlorogenic acid , and rosmari- nic acid did not display any cytoprotective effect in this assay at 15 lM (data not shown). Within the same pas- sage of HUVEC...Cytoprotective effect of caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) and catechol ring-fluorinated CAPE derivatives against menadione-induced oxidative...accepted 13 March 2006 Available online 31 March 2006 Abstract—Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE), a natural polyphenolic compound with many

  1. Dusk Lighting of Layered Textures in 'Cape Verde'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Full-shade lighting in the late Martian afternoon helps make details visible in this view of the layered cliff face of the 'Cape Verde' promontory making up part of the rim of Victoria Crater in the Meridiani Planum region of equatorial Mars.

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its panoramic camera (Pancam) to shoot the dozens of individual images that have been combined into this mosaic. Opportunity was inside Victoria Crater and near the base of the cliff when it took these images on the 1,579th and 1,580th Martian days, or sols, of the mission (July 2 and 3, 2008).

    Photographing the promontory from this position in Victoria Crater presented challenges for the rover team. The geometry was such that Cape Verde was between the rover and the sun, which could cause a range of negative effects, from glinting off Pancam's dusty lenses to shadowing on the cliff face. The team's solution was to take the images for this mosaic just after the sun disappeared behind the crater rim, at about 5:30 p.m. local solar time. The atmosphere was still lit, but no direct sunlight was illuminating the wall of Cape Verde.

    The result is a high-resolution view of Cape Verde in relatively uniform diffuse sky lighting across the scene.

    Pancam used a clear filter for taking the images for this mosaic. Capturing images in low-light situations was one of the main motivations for including the clear filter among the camera's assortment of filters available for use.

    The face of Cape Verde is about 6 meters (20 feet) tall. Victoria Crater, at about 800 meters (one-half mile) wide, is the largest and deepest crater that Opportunity has visited. It sits more than 5 kilometers (almost 4 miles) away from Opportunity's Eagle Crater landing site. Researchers sent Opportunity into Victoria Crater to study the rock layers exposed inside. The textures seen in the rock layers of Cape Verde suggest that the exposed layers were originally deposited by wind.

  2. Gambling Participation and Problem Gambling Severity in a Stratified Random Survey: Findings from the Second Social and Economic Impact Study of Gambling in Tasmania.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Darren R; Dowling, Nicki A; Jackson, Alun C; Thomas, Shane A

    2015-12-01

    Demographic characteristics associated with gambling participation and problem gambling severity were investigated in a stratified random survey in Tasmania, Australia. Computer-assisted telephone interviews were conducted in March 2011 resulting in a representative sample of 4,303 Tasmanian residents aged 18 years or older. Overall, 64.8% of Tasmanian adults reported participating in some form of gambling in the previous 12 months. The most common forms of gambling were lotteries (46.5%), keno (24.3%), instant scratch tickets (24.3%), and electronic gaming machines (20.5%). Gambling severity rates were estimated at non-gambling (34.8%), non-problem gambling (57.4%), low risk gambling (5.3%), moderate risk (1.8%), and problem gambling (.7%). Compared to Tasmanian gamblers as a whole significantly higher annual participation rates were reported by couples with no children, those in full time paid employment, and people who did not complete secondary school. Compared to Tasmanian gamblers as a whole significantly higher gambling frequencies were reported by males, people aged 65 or older, and people who were on pensions or were unable to work. Compared to Tasmanian gamblers as a whole significantly higher gambling expenditure was reported by males. The highest average expenditure was for horse and greyhound racing ($AUD 1,556), double the next highest gambling activity electronic gaming machines ($AUD 767). Compared to Tasmanian gamblers as a whole problem gamblers were significantly younger, in paid employment, reported lower incomes, and were born in Australia. Although gambling participation rates appear to be falling, problem gambling severity rates remain stable. These changes appear to reflect a maturing gambling market and the need for population specific harm minimisation strategies.

  3. Strong depth-related zonation of megabenthos on a rocky continental margin (∼700-4000 m) off southern Tasmania, Australia.

    PubMed

    Thresher, Ronald; Althaus, Franziska; Adkins, Jess; Gowlett-Holmes, Karen; Alderslade, Phil; Dowdney, Jo; Cho, Walter; Gagnon, Alex; Staples, David; McEnnulty, Felicity; Williams, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Assemblages of megabenthos are structured in seven depth-related zones between ∼700 and 4000 m on the rocky and topographically complex continental margin south of Tasmania, southeastern Australia. These patterns emerge from analysis of imagery and specimen collections taken from a suite of surveys using photographic and in situ sampling by epibenthic sleds, towed video cameras, an autonomous underwater vehicle and a remotely operated vehicle (ROV). Seamount peaks in shallow zones had relatively low biomass and low diversity assemblages, which may be in part natural and in part due to effects of bottom trawl fishing. Species richness was highest at intermediate depths (1000-1300 m) as a result of an extensive coral reef community based on the bioherm-forming scleractinian Solenosmilia variabilis. However, megabenthos abundance peaked in a deeper, low diversity assemblage at 2000-2500 m. The S. variabilis reef and the deep biomass zone were separated by an extensive dead, sub-fossil S. variabilis reef and a relatively low biomass stratum on volcanic rock roughly coincident with the oxygen minimum layer. Below 2400 m, megabenthos was increasingly sparse, though punctuated by occasional small pockets of relatively high diversity and biomass. Nonetheless, megabenthic organisms were observed in the vast majority of photographs on all seabed habitats and to the maximum depths observed--a sandy plain below 3950 m. Taxonomic studies in progress suggest that the observed depth zonation is based in part on changing species mixes with depth, but also an underlying commonality to much of the seamount and rocky substrate biota across all depths. Although the mechanisms supporting the extraordinarily high biomass in 2000-2500 m depths remains obscure, plausible explanations include equatorwards lateral transport of polar production and/or a response to depth-stratified oxygen availability.

  4. Changes in biomass burning mark the onset of an ENSO-influenced climate regime at 42°S in southwest Tasmania, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Michael-Shawn; Benson, Alexa; Heijnis, Hendrik; Gadd, Patricia S.; Cwynar, Les C.; Rees, Andrew B. H.

    2015-08-01

    We use macroscopic charcoal and sediment geochemistry analysis of two proximal upper montane lakes located at 42°S in southwest Tasmania, Australia, to test the role of the southern hemisphere westerly winds (SWW) and the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) in governing the climate of this sector of the southern mid-to high-latitudes. Inter-annual climate anomalies in the study area are driven by changes in both ENSO and the Southern Annular Mode (SAM - an index that describes seasonal to decadal shifts in the SWW), making it an ideal location to test assumptions about the varying influence of the SWW and ENSO, two important components of the global climate system, through time. We find multi-millennial scale trends in fire activity that are remarkably consistent with trends in hydroclimate reconstructed at the same latitude in southern South America, providing empirical support for the notion of zonally symmetric changes in the SWW governing the climate at this latitude in the Southern Hemisphere between 12 and 5 cal ka BP. A transition from multi-millennial scale to sub-millennial scale trends in fire activity occurs after ca 5 cal ka BP in concert with the onset of high frequency and amplitude ENSO variability in the tropical Pacific Ocean region. We conclude that the onset of sub-millennial scale trends in ENSO drove changes in fire activity in our study region over the last ca 5 cal ka. Geochemical data reveals divergent local impacts at the two study sites in response to these major climate transitions that are related to local topography and geography.

  5. Strong Depth-Related Zonation of Megabenthos on a Rocky Continental Margin (∼700–4000 m) off Southern Tasmania, Australia

    PubMed Central

    Thresher, Ronald; Althaus, Franziska; Adkins, Jess; Gowlett-Holmes, Karen; Alderslade, Phil; Dowdney, Jo; Cho, Walter; Gagnon, Alex; Staples, David; McEnnulty, Felicity; Williams, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Assemblages of megabenthos are structured in seven depth-related zones between ∼700 and 4000 m on the rocky and topographically complex continental margin south of Tasmania, southeastern Australia. These patterns emerge from analysis of imagery and specimen collections taken from a suite of surveys using photographic and in situ sampling by epibenthic sleds, towed video cameras, an autonomous underwater vehicle and a remotely operated vehicle (ROV). Seamount peaks in shallow zones had relatively low biomass and low diversity assemblages, which may be in part natural and in part due to effects of bottom trawl fishing. Species richness was highest at intermediate depths (1000–1300 m) as a result of an extensive coral reef community based on the bioherm-forming scleractinian Solenosmilia variabilis. However, megabenthos abundance peaked in a deeper, low diversity assemblage at 2000–2500 m. The S. variabilis reef and the deep biomass zone were separated by an extensive dead, sub-fossil S. variabilis reef and a relatively low biomass stratum on volcanic rock roughly coincident with the oxygen minimum layer. Below 2400 m, megabenthos was increasingly sparse, though punctuated by occasional small pockets of relatively high diversity and biomass. Nonetheless, megabenthic organisms were observed in the vast majority of photographs on all seabed habitats and to the maximum depths observed - a sandy plain below 3950 m. Taxonomic studies in progress suggest that the observed depth zonation is based in part on changing species mixes with depth, but also an underlying commonality to much of the seamount and rocky substrate biota across all depths. Although the mechanisms supporting the extraordinarily high biomass in 2000–2500 m depths remains obscure, plausible explanations include equatorwards lateral transport of polar production and/or a response to depth-stratified oxygen availability. PMID:24465758

  6. Monitoring St. Lawrence Island and Cape Thompson seabird populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatch, Scott A.; Piatt, John F.; Fadely, Brian S.; Roberts, Bay D.

    1990-01-01

    About 1.8 million seabirds of 12 species breed on St. Lawrence Island (Figure 1) - one of the largest aggregations of breeding seabirds in the subarctic Pacific. Colonies of least and crested auklets alone, totaling 1.5 million birds, contain a substantial proportion (perhaps 20%) of these species’ world populations. Large seabird colonies occur also at Cape Thompson (Figure 2), where thick-billed and common murres (ea. 360,000) and black-legged kittiwakes (ea. 26,000) are the numerically dominant species. Although critical nesting and foraging habitats of Cape Thompson and St, Lawrence Island seabirds have so far remained mostly free from disturbance or alteration, there is a possibility of adverse effects on either or both components of the birds’ environment from the exploration, production, or transport of oil and gas in the region.

  7. Hepatic capillariasis in a Cape ground squirrel (Xerus inaurus).

    PubMed

    Erlwanger, K H; De Witt, B A; Fick, L G; Hetem, R S; Meyer, L C R; Mitchell, D; Wilson, W A; Mitchell, B

    2009-12-01

    We report, for the first time, an incidental finding of Calodium hepaticum infestation in a sub-adult female Cape ground squirrel (Xerus inaurus). Post mortem examination of the squirrel revealed severe haemoperitoneum, splenomegaly and hepatomegaly with miliary white spots distributed diffusely throughout the hepatic parenchyma. Histologically the portal tracts in the liver showed granulomatous inflammation with fibrosis and numerous giant cells. Occasional adult worms were identified and there were multiple C. hepaticum eggs distributed diffusely throughout the portal tracts and the parenchyma. The spleen also contained C. hepaticum eggs. The genus Rattus is the primary host and reservoir of C. hepaticum, but C. hepaticum infections have been reported previously in other Sciuridae. Based on our findings, people should be cautious of the zoonotic potential of C. hepaticum, when they come into contact with the Cape ground squirrel.

  8. The Magnetic Observatory Buildings at the Royal Observatory, Cape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glass, I. S.

    2015-10-01

    During the 1830s there arose a strong international movement, promoted by Carl Friedrich Gauss and Alexander von Humboldt, to characterise the earth's magnetic field. By 1839 the Royal Society in London, driven by Edward Sabine, had organised a "Magnetic Crusade" - the establishment of a series of magnetic and meteorological observatories around the British Empire, including New Zealand, Australia, St Helena and the Cape. This article outlines the history of the latter installation, its buildings and what became of them.

  9. Current Boundries and Sun Glint, Cape Hatteras, NC, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    In this view of Cape Hatteras, NC (35.0N, 75.5W) the barrier islands appear off the coast in sunglint. Sun light reflected from the water's surface makes patterns that indicate the surface condition. Smooth water has a high reflectance and is seen as a bright area. Rough water on the other hand, disperses the light and appears dark. Ocean currents in this region are very dynamic because of the Gulf Stream interacting with ocean currents.

  10. Revised prediction (estimation) of Cape Kennedy, Florida, wind speed profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guttman, N. B.; Crutcher, H. L.

    1975-01-01

    The prediction of the wind profile maximum speed at Cape Kennedy, Florida, is made for any selected calendar data. The prediction is based on a normal probability distribution model with 15 years of smoothed input data and is static in the sense that no dynamic principles of persistence or synoptic features are considered. Comparison with similar predictions based on 6 years of data shows the same general pattern, but the variability decreased with the increase of sample size.

  11. Use of the CAPE Pm test with disabled patients.

    PubMed

    McPherson, F M; Gamsu, C V; Cockram, L L; Cooke, D

    1986-05-01

    The problem of estimating a patient's CAS total score on CAPE when the Pm (maze) test cannot be administered because of sensory or physical--rather than cognitive--disability is considered. Analysis of the scores of 250 elderly subjects who attempted all three CAS tests suggests that 'proration' of total CAS scores from I/O and MA scores, while preferable to alternative methods, results in error in a significant proportion of cases and should be used only with caution.

  12. Preliminary Results of Recent Deep Drilling on Cape Cod, Massachusetts.

    PubMed

    Koteff, C; Cotton, J E

    1962-07-06

    In 1961 a 1000-foot drill hole near Harwich on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, penetrated 435 feet of Pleistocene deposits above 50 to 60 feet of crystalline limestone and phyllitic schist, and more than 500 feet of phyllitic schist with abundant quartz veins. Similar rock is known in the Pennsylvanian and Precambrian (?) sections of Massachusetts and Rhode Island. Material of Eocene age was found in earlier drilling near Provincetown, but none was identified from this hole.

  13. Reconnaissance Study for Cape Vincent Harbor, New York.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-04-01

    breakwater is of the timber-crib type, with a concrete superstruc- ture. Illustration No. 1(c), page 4, presents a clear and detailed descrip- tion of a...typical cross section of the breakwater. This includes both the timber crib and the concrete superstructure. The timber crib consists of hemlock blocks...while the superstructure contains concrete blocks as well as filling stone. Illustration 1 (a): Portion q Cape Vincent Villa geA Ferry Route to Wolfe I

  14. Heterotrophic euglenids from marine sediments of cape tribulation, tropical australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Je Lee, Won

    2006-06-01

    This paper presents new data on free-living heterotrophic euglenids (Euglenozoa, Protista) that occurred in the marine sediments at Cape Tribulation, Queensland, Australia. Twenty-nine species from 9 genera are described with uninterpreted records based on light microscopy, including one new taxon: Notosolenus capetribulationi n. sp. There was little evidence for endemism because the majority of heterotrophic euglenid species encountered here have been reported or were found from other habitats.

  15. Cape Cod Easterly Shore Beach Erosion Study. Volume 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-04-01

    fcur different series of glacial deposits have been recognized on the outer Cape from Orleans northward. They are differentiated on the basis of...the combined erigean sprinq tide results in an even greater tidal range. When the moon’s orbit is oil or close to the equator (that is, when the...industry. For this reason, the towns feel strongly that differential pricing for beach use (resident/nonresident) is appropriate and necessary. The rise in

  16. Submarine Hydrogeological Data from Cape Cod National Seashore

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cross, VeeAnn A.; Bratton, John F.; Crusius, John; Colman, John A.; McCobb, Timothy D.

    2008-01-01

    In order to test hypotheses about ground water flow under and into estuaries and the Atlantic Ocean, geophysical surveys, geophysical probing, submarine ground-water sampling, and sediment coring were conducted by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists at Cape Cod National Seashore (CCNS) in Massachusetts from 2004 through 2006. This USGS Open-File Report presents the data collected as a result of these field efforts.

  17. APOLLO/SATURN (A/S) 201 - LAUNCH - CAPE

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1966-02-26

    A/S 201 was launched from the Kennedy Space Center Launch Complex 34 at 11:12 a.m., 02/26/1966. The instrumented Apollo Command and Service Module, and, a spacecraft Lunar Excursion Module Adapter, was successfully launched on the unmanned suborbital mission by the Saturn 1B to check spacecraft launch vehicle mechanical compatibility and to test the spacecraft heat shield in a high-velocity re-entry mode. CAPE KENNEDY, FL

  18. 9. Photocopy of photograph of tower under construction at Cape ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Photocopy of photograph of tower under construction at Cape Henlopen, Delaware, May 1924 (original photograph in National Archives and Records Service, Still Pictures in Branch, RG 26, 26-LG-19-14-B), photographer unknown, May 23, 1924. - Mispillion Lighthouse, Beacon Tower, South bank of Mispillion River at it confluence with Delaware River at northeast end of County Road 203, 7 miles east of Milford, Milford, Sussex County, DE

  19. 10. Photocopy of photograph of tower as constructed at Cape ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Photocopy of photograph of tower as constructed at Cape Henlopen, Delaware, September 1926 (original photograph in National Archives and Records Service, Still Pictures Branch, RG 26, 26-LG-22-A), photographer G.W. Hitchens, September 10, 1926. "New Tower. Camera Station West 100 ft." - Mispillion Lighthouse, Beacon Tower, South bank of Mispillion River at it confluence with Delaware River at northeast end of County Road 203, 7 miles east of Milford, Milford, Sussex County, DE

  20. Search for "Lost" Variables in Carina. I. The Cape Variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morel, M.; di Scala, G.

    We present precise positions and finder charts for probable candidates for thirteen variables found on Cape Observatory plates, part of sixty new variables near η Carinae originally published by Worssell in 1919. BVRI datasets are presented for eight of the stars (BE, BF, BG, BH, BM, BN, BW, and BY Car), showing that most of these stars are essentially constant. BK Car may be identical with NSV 4957.

  1. Glycosidically bound flavor compounds of cape gooseberry (Physalis peruviana L.).

    PubMed

    Mayorga, H; Knapp, H; Winterhalter, P; Duque, C

    2001-04-01

    The bound volatile fraction of cape gooseberry (Physalis peruviana L.) fruit harvested in Colombia has been examined by HRGC and HRGC-MS after enzymatic hydrolysis using a nonselective pectinase (Rohapect D5L). Forty bound volatiles could be identified, with 21 of them being reported for the first time in cape gooseberry. After preparative isolation of the glycosidic precursors on XAD-2 resin, purification by multilayer coil countercurrent chromatography and HPLC of the peracetylated glycosides were carried out. Structure elucidation by NMR, ESI-MS/MS, and optical rotation enabled the identification of (1S,2S)-1-phenylpropane-1,2-diol 2-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (1) and p-menth-4(8)-ene-1,2-diol 1-O-alpha-L-arabinopyranosyl-(1-6)-beta-D-glucopyranoside (2). Both glycosides have been identified for the first time in nature. They could be considered as immediate precursors of 1-phenylpropane-1,2-diol and p-menth-4(8)-ene-1,2-diol, typical volatiles found in the fruit of cape gooseberry.

  2. From Cape Town to Cambridge: Orthopaedic trauma in contrasting environments.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, John E; Khanduja, Vikas

    2016-05-18

    To compare the trauma experience gained by a trainee at a United Kingdom major trauma centre and a secondary level hospital in South Africa. A profile of inpatient trauma cases during a five-week period in Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge and Somerset Hospital, Cape Town was created. This was achieved by recording various parameters for each patient admitted including age, gender, injury, mechanism of injury and postal/area code. This, together with details of the departments themselves, allows a comparison of the amount and variety of orthopaedic trauma cases experienced by an individual trainee in each setting. The trauma profiles differed significantly. Patients in Cape Town were younger and more likely to be male. In the young, injury in Cape Town was more likely to occur due to assault or being struck by a vehicle, whilst patients in Cambridge were more likely to be injured whilst in a vehicle or in high energy falls. In older patients, trauma at both centres was almost exclusively due to mechanical falls. In a given age group, injuries at the two centres were similar, however the majority of patients admitted to Addenbrooke's were elderly, resulting in less variation in the overall injury profile. The trauma profile of a major trauma centre in the United Kingdom is less varied than that of a South African secondary centre, with significantly fewer cases per surgeon. This suggests a more varied training experience in the developing world with a greater caseload.

  3. Cape Adare - A sentinel for change in Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, G. S.; Cary, C.; Cummings, V.; Hawes, I.; Hong, S. G.; Coleman, M.

    2015-12-01

    Cape Adare stretches some 40km beyond the Antarctic Continent across the Continental Shelf. It is flanked to the east by the northern Ross Sea and to the West by Robertson Bay. The following characteristics make it an ideal monitoring and observation point to understand the impact of warm ocean and climate propogating into Antarctica from the Southern Ocean: 1) Robertson Bay is some 500m deep and has the potential to record deep water inflow which is predicted as climate warms and is also indicated as the biggest risk for melting Antarctic ice shelves. 2) Cape Adare also lies between the Antarctic continental high pressure and the Southern Ocean low pressure 3) Ridley Beach at the tip of the Peninsula is home to Antarctica's largest Adelie Penguin Colony In November 2015 we will conduct a pilot survey of the marine and terrestrial ecology and physical setting, with a view to determining what opportunities exist for a long term monitoring system. Cape Adare and the Ridley Beach Penguin Colony also offers the advantage of being on the edge of the proposed Ross Sea marine protected area and may represent an opportunity to monitor the associated ecosystem.

  4. LANDSAT application of remote sensing to shoreline-form analysis. [Cape Hatteras, Cape Lookout, and Assateague Island

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolan, R.; Hayden, B.; Heywood, J. (Principal Investigator)

    1978-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Using Assateague Island, Cape Hatteras, and Cape Lookout, significantly high correlations were found for most of the six barrier island sections that were examined. Relationships were not consistent from island to island. It was concluded that coastal vulnerability to storm damage can not be assessed based on coastal orientation alone. When orientation data were combined with erosion data for individual barrier islands, the relationship could be used as a basis for barrier island classification. A method was developed to obtain large amounts of historical data on surface coastal process from aerial photography, which was called the orthogonal grid address system. Data on shoreline change and overwash penetration gathered on over 400 km of the mid-Atlantic coast, are being used by various federal and state agencies for planning purposes.

  5. Tuberculosis in Cape Town: an age-structured transmission model

    PubMed Central

    Blaser, Nello; Zahnd, Cindy; Hermans, Sabine; Salazar-Vizcaya, Luisa; Estill, Janne; Morrow, Carl; Egger, Matthias; Keiser, Olivia; Wood, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) is the leading cause of death in South Africa. The burden of disease varies by age, with peaks in TB notification rates in the HIV-negative population at ages 0-5, 20-24 and 45-49 years. There is little variation between age groups in the rates in the HIV-positive population. The drivers of this age pattern remain unknown. Methods We developed an age-structured simulation model of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) transmission in Cape Town, South Africa. We considered five states of TB progression: susceptible, infected (latent TB), active TB, treated TB and treatment default. Latently infected individuals could be re-infected; a previous Mtb infection slowed progression to active disease. We further considered three states of HIV progression: HIV negative, HIV positive, on antiretroviral therapy. To parameterize the model, we analysed treatment outcomes from the Cape Town electronic TB register, social mixing patterns from a Cape Town community and literature estimates for other parameters. To investigate the main drivers behind the age patterns, we conducted sensitivity analyses on all parameters related to the age structure. Results The model replicated the age patterns in HIV-negative TB notification rates of Cape Town in 2009. Simulated TB notification rate in HIV-negative patients was 1,000/100,000 person-years (pyrs) in children aged < 5 years and decreased to 51/100,000 in children 5-15 years. The peak in early adulthood occurred at 25-29 years (463/100,000 pyrs). After a subsequent decline, simulated TB notification rates gradually increased from the age of 30 years. Sensitivity analyses showed that the dip after the early adult peak was due to the protective effect of latent TB and that retreatment TB was mainly responsible for the rise in TB notification rates from the age of 30 years. Conclusion The protective effect of a first latent infection on subsequent infections and the faster progression in previously treated patients

  6. Tuberculosis in Cape Town: An age-structured transmission model.

    PubMed

    Blaser, Nello; Zahnd, Cindy; Hermans, Sabine; Salazar-Vizcaya, Luisa; Estill, Janne; Morrow, Carl; Egger, Matthias; Keiser, Olivia; Wood, Robin

    2016-03-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is the leading cause of death in South Africa. The burden of disease varies by age, with peaks in TB notification rates in the HIV-negative population at ages 0-5, 20-24, and 45-49 years. There is little variation between age groups in the rates in the HIV-positive population. The drivers of this age pattern remain unknown. We developed an age-structured simulation model of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) transmission in Cape Town, South Africa. We considered five states of TB progression: susceptible, infected (latent TB), active TB, treated TB, and treatment default. Latently infected individuals could be re-infected; a previous Mtb infection slowed progression to active disease. We further considered three states of HIV progression: HIV negative, HIV positive, on antiretroviral therapy. To parameterize the model, we analysed treatment outcomes from the Cape Town electronic TB register, social mixing patterns from a Cape Town community and used literature estimates for other parameters. To investigate the main drivers behind the age patterns, we conducted sensitivity analyses on all parameters related to the age structure. The model replicated the age patterns in HIV-negative TB notification rates of Cape Town in 2009. Simulated TB notification rate in HIV-negative patients was 1000/100,000 person-years (pyrs) in children aged <5 years and decreased to 51/100,000 in children 5-15 years. The peak in early adulthood occurred at 25-29 years (463/100,000 pyrs). After a subsequent decline, simulated TB notification rates gradually increased from the age of 30 years. Sensitivity analyses showed that the dip after the early adult peak was due to the protective effect of latent TB and that retreatment TB was mainly responsible for the rise in TB notification rates from the age of 30 years. The protective effect of a first latent infection on subsequent infections and the faster progression in previously treated patients are the key determinants of the

  7. Population size, breeding biology and on-land threats of Cape Verde petrel (Pterodroma feae) in Fogo Island, Cape Verde

    PubMed Central

    Zango, Laura; Calabuig, Pascual; Stefan, Laura M.; González-Solís, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    Cape Verde petrel (Pterodroma feae) is currently considered near threatened, but little is known about its population size, breeding biology and on land threats, jeopardizing its management and conservation. To improve this situation, we captured, marked and recaptured (CMR) birds using mist-nets over 10 years; measured and sexed them; monitored up to 14 burrows, deployed GPS devices on breeders and analyzed activity data of geolocators retrieved from breeders in Fogo (Cape Verde). We set cat traps over the colony and investigated their domestic/feral origin by marking domestic cats from a nearby village with transponders, by deploying GPS devices on domestic cats and by performing stable isotope analyses of fur of the trapped and domestic cats. The population of Fogo was estimated to be 293 birds, including immatures (95% CI: 233–254, CMR modelling). Based on geolocator activity data and nest monitoring we determined the breeding phenology of this species and we found biometric differences between sexes. While monitoring breeding performance, we verified a still ongoing cat predation and human harvesting. Overall, data gathered from trapped cats without transponder, cats GPS trips and the distinct isotopic values between domestic and trapped cats suggest cats visiting the colony are of feral origin. GPS tracks from breeders showed birds left and returned to the colony using the sector NE of the islands, where high level of public lights should be avoided specially during the fledging period. Main threats for the Cape Verde petrel in the remaining breeding islands are currently unknown but likely to be similar to Fogo, calling for an urgent assessment of population trends and the control of main threats in all Cape Verde Islands and uplisting its conservation status. PMID:28369105

  8. Population size, breeding biology and on-land threats of Cape Verde petrel (Pterodroma feae) in Fogo Island, Cape Verde.

    PubMed

    Militão, Teresa; Dinis, Herculano Andrade; Zango, Laura; Calabuig, Pascual; Stefan, Laura M; González-Solís, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    Cape Verde petrel (Pterodroma feae) is currently considered near threatened, but little is known about its population size, breeding biology and on land threats, jeopardizing its management and conservation. To improve this situation, we captured, marked and recaptured (CMR) birds using mist-nets over 10 years; measured and sexed them; monitored up to 14 burrows, deployed GPS devices on breeders and analyzed activity data of geolocators retrieved from breeders in Fogo (Cape Verde). We set cat traps over the colony and investigated their domestic/feral origin by marking domestic cats from a nearby village with transponders, by deploying GPS devices on domestic cats and by performing stable isotope analyses of fur of the trapped and domestic cats. The population of Fogo was estimated to be 293 birds, including immatures (95% CI: 233-254, CMR modelling). Based on geolocator activity data and nest monitoring we determined the breeding phenology of this species and we found biometric differences between sexes. While monitoring breeding performance, we verified a still ongoing cat predation and human harvesting. Overall, data gathered from trapped cats without transponder, cats GPS trips and the distinct isotopic values between domestic and trapped cats suggest cats visiting the colony are of feral origin. GPS tracks from breeders showed birds left and returned to the colony using the sector NE of the islands, where high level of public lights should be avoided specially during the fledging period. Main threats for the Cape Verde petrel in the remaining breeding islands are currently unknown but likely to be similar to Fogo, calling for an urgent assessment of population trends and the control of main threats in all Cape Verde Islands and uplisting its conservation status.

  9. CAPE Analogs Induce Growth Arrest and Apoptosis in Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Beauregard, Annie-Pier; Harquail, Jason; Lassalle-Claux, Grégoire; Belbraouet, Mehdi; Jean-Francois, Jacques; Touaibia, Mohamed; Robichaud, Gilles A

    2015-07-10

    Breast cancer is the second leading cause of death amongst women worldwide. As a result, many have turned their attention to new alternative approaches to treat this disease. Caffeic acid phenylethyl ester (CAPE), a well-known active compound from bee propolis, has been previously identified as a strong antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antiviral and anticancer molecule. In fact, CAPE is well documented as inducing cell death by inhibiting NFκB and by inducing pro-apoptotic pathways (i.e., p53). With the objective of developing stronger anticancer compounds, we studied 18 recently described CAPE derivatives for their ability to induce apoptosis in breast cancer cell lines. Five of the said compounds, including CAPE, were selected and subsequently characterised for their anticancer mechanism of action. We validated that CAPE is a potent inducer of caspase-dependent apoptosis. Interestingly, some newly synthesized CAPE derivatives also showed greater cell death activity than the lead CAPE structure. Similarly to CAPE, analog compounds elicited p53 activation. Interestingly, one compound in particular, analog 10, induced apoptosis in a p53-mutated cell line. These results suggest that our new CAPE analog compounds may display the capacity to induce breast cancer apoptosis in a p53-dependent and/or independent manner. These CAPE analogs could thus provide new therapeutic approaches for patients with varying genotypic signatures (such as p53 mutations) in a more specific and targeted fashion.

  10. Diel variation of chlorophyll- a fluorescence, phytoplankton pigments and productivity in the Sub-Antarctic and Polar Front Zones south of Tasmania, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doblin, Martina A.; Petrou, Katherina L.; Shelly, Kirsten; Westwood, Karen; van den Enden, Rick; Wright, Simon; Griffiths, Brian; Ralph, Peter J.

    2011-11-01

    Marine primary production is a fundamental measure of the ocean's capacity to convert carbon dioxide to particulate organic carbon for the marine foodweb, and as such is an essential variable used in ecosystem and biogeochemical models to assess trophic dynamics and carbon cycling. The Sub-Antarctic Zone (SAZ) is a major sink for atmospheric carbon and exhibits large gradients in ocean conditions on both temporal and spatial scales. In this dynamic system, an understanding of small-scale temporal changes is critical for modelling primary production at larger scales. Thus, we investigated diel effects on maximum quantum yield of PSII ( FV/ FM), photosynthetic pigment pools and primary productivity in the western (Diel 1) and eastern SAZ region (Diel 3) south of Tasmania, Australia, and compared this to a station at the polar front (Diel 2). Phytoplankton in the eastern SAZ had the greatest diel response, with cells showing decreased FV/ FM and increased biosynthesis and transformation of xanthophyll and other photoprotective pigments during the day, but only in the surface waters (0 and 10 m). Diel responses diminished by 30 m. Cells in the western SAZ had similar responses across the depths sampled, increasing their FV/ FM during the night and increasing their xanthophyll pigment content during the day. Phytoplankton at the polar front (Diel 2) showed intermediate diel-related variations in photophysiology, with xanthophyll conversion and increases in photoprotective pigments during the day but constant FV/ FM. These diel changes at all sampling stations had little impact on carbon fixation rates, although cells sampled from the deep chlorophyll maximum at the polar front had significantly lower maximum carbon fixation and minimum saturating irradiance ( Ek) compared to the other depths and stations. Considering the oceanographic context, cells at Diel 1 and 2 received less light and were more deeply mixed than cells at Diel 3, causing a dampening of the diel

  11. Make vitamin D while the sun shines, take supplements when it doesn't: a longitudinal, observational study of older adults in Tasmania, Australia.

    PubMed

    Pittaway, Jane K; Ahuja, Kiran D K; Beckett, Jeffrey M; Bird, Marie-Louise; Robertson, Iain K; Ball, Madeleine J

    2013-01-01

    Low vitamin D status has been associated with a number of chronic conditions, particularly in older adults. The aim of this study was to identify how best to maintain optimum vitamin D status throughout the year in this high-risk population. The main objectives of the study were to assess seasonal vitamin D status; identify the main determinants of vitamin D status; determine if taking part in the study led to alterations in participant behaviour and vitamin D status. A longitudinal design across four consecutive seasons observed ninety-one 60-85 year old community-dwelling adults in Tasmania (41π S) over 13 consecutive months, with a follow-up assessment at next winter's end. Associations between solar UVB exposure, sun protection behaviours, dietary and supplemental vitamin D with serum 25(OH)D concentrations were assessed. Variation in serum 25(OH)D demonstrated an identical pattern to solar UVB, lagging 8-10 weeks. Serum 25(OH)D was positively associated with summer UVB (mean 15.9 nmol/L; 95%CI 11.8-19.9 nmol/L, p<0.001) and vitamin D supplementation (100-600 IU/day: 95%CI 10.2 nmol/L; 0.8-19.6 nmol/L; p = 0.03; 800 IU/day: 21.0 nmol/L; 95%CI 8.1-34.0 nmol/L; p = 0.001). Seasonal variation in serum 25(OH)D was greatly diminished in supplement users. The most common alteration in participant behaviour after the study was ingesting vitamin D supplements. Post-study vitamin D supplementation ℘800 IU/day was seven times more likely than during the study resulting in mean difference in serum 25(OH)D between supplement and non-supplement users of 30.1 nmol/L (95%CI 19.4-40.8 nmol/L; p<0.001). The main limitation was homogeneity of participant ethnicity. Solar exposure in summer and ingestion of vitamin D supplements in other seasons are the most effective ways of achieving and maintaining year-round vitamin D sufficiency in older adults in the Southern hemisphere. Vitamin D supplementation has greatest effect on vitamin D status if ingested during and

  12. Assimilation Studies Off Cape Sao Vicente (southern Portugal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitorino, J.; Monteiro, M.

    In April 2001 the Portuguese Navy conducted a naval exercise (Swordfish 2001) in the area off Cape Sao Vicente, in the southwest tip of Portugal. The operational environ- mental assessment (OEA) component of this exercise, conducted by Instituto Hidro- grafico, intended to provide forecasts of the oceanographic conditions to the naval forces. A program of observations, which included CTD casts to maximum depth of 2500m and AXBTs casts to maximum depth 1000m, was conducted in the area be- tween 35zN and 39zN and from 7zW to 12.5zW. Forecasts of the oceanographic con- ditions were produced using the Harvard Ocean Prediction System (HOPS) with as- similation of the hydrographic data. The period covered by the exercise was character- ized by predominant southerly winds, forcing upwelling conditions along the western Portuguese coast. These conditions promote the development of a large cold upwelling filament that extended a few hundreds of kilometers southwards Cape Sao Vicente. In this communication we present several results obtained for the period between 18 to 28 April 2001, marked by an event of two days of inversion of the upwelling favor- able. The numerical runs were obtained using two nested domains, one covering the global area of observations and the second one covering the shelf and slope area off Cape Sao Vicente. Double-sigma coordinates were used in both domains, with a total of 20 sigma levels. The surface forcing used the wind fields generated by ALADIN- Portugal, a limited area model (12.7-km grid resolution) nested on a global model (ARPEGE).

  13. Toward better assessment of tornado potential in typhoons: Significance of considering entrainment effects for CAPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sueki, Kenta; Niino, Hiroshi

    2016-12-01

    The characteristics of typhoons that spawned tornadoes (tornadic typhoons: TTs) in Japan from 1991 to 2013 were investigated by composite analysis using the Japanese 55 year Reanalysis and compared with those of typhoons that did not spawn tornadoes (nontornadic typhoons: NTs). We found that convective available potential energy (CAPE), which considers the effects of entrainment (entraining CAPE: E-CAPE), and storm-relative environmental helicity (SREH) are significantly large in the northeast quadrant of TTs where tornadoes frequently occur and that E-CAPE and SREH in that quadrant for TTs are larger than those for NTs. On the other hand, ordinary CAPE without entrainment does not account for the spatial distribution of tornado occurrences nor does it distinguish TTs from NTs. E-CAPE is sensitive to humidity in the midtroposphere; thus, it is effective for detecting a conditionally unstable layer up to about 550 hPa, which is distinctive of TTs.

  14. Fifty years of porphyria at the University of Cape Town.

    PubMed

    Meissner, Peter N; Corrigall, Anne V; Hift, Richard J

    2012-03-02

    The porphyrias are a group of disorders resulting from defective haem biosynthesis. One form, variegate porphyria, is common in South Africa as a result of a founder effect. Over the past 50 years, the University of Cape Town Faculty of Health Sciences has built and maintained an international reputation for excellence in the field of porphyria. The porphyria group is respected for its research and for its accumulated experience in the management of these disorders. Equally important has been the comprehensive and holistic care offered to patients with porphyria, and to their families.

  15. Ophiolitic association of Cape Fiolent area, southwestern Crimea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Promyslova, M. Yu.; Demina, L. I.; Bychkov, A. Yu.; Gushchin, A. I.; Koronovsky, N. V.; Tsarev, V. V.

    2016-01-01

    An ophiolitic association consisting of serpentinized ultramafic rocks and serpentinite, layered mafic-ultramafic complex, gabbro and gabbrodolerite, fragments of parallel dike complex, pillow lava, black bedded chert, and jasper has been identified for the first time by authors in the Cape Fiolent area. The chemistry of pillow lavas and dolerites, including REE patterns and a wide set of other microelements, indicates suprasubduction nature of the ophiolites and their belonging to a backarc basin that has reached the stage of spreading in its evolution.

  16. Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) lifted off from Cape Canaveral

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-28

    KSC-2015-1363 (02/11/2015) --- The SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket carrying NOAA’s Deep Space Climate Observatory spacecraft, or DSCOVR, lifts off from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida at 6:03 p.m. EST. DSCOVR is a partnership between NOAA, NASA and the U.S. Air Force, and will maintain the nation's real-time solar wind monitoring capabilities. To learn more about DSCOVR, visit www.nesdis.noaa.gov/DSCOVR. Photo credit: NASA/Tony Gray and Tim Powers

  17. Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) lifted off from Cape Canaveral

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-28

    Open Image KSC-2015-1368.KSC-2015-1368 (02/11/2015) --- The SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket carrying NOAA’s Deep Space Climate Observatory spacecraft, or DSCOVR, lifts off from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. Liftoff occurred at 6:03 p.m. EST. DSCOVR is a partnership between NOAA, NASA and the U.S. Air Force, and will maintain the nation's real-time solar wind monitoring capabilities. To learn more about DSCOVR, visit www.nesdis.noaa.gov/DSCOVR. Photo credit: NASA/Tony Gray and Tim Powers

  18. Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) lifted off from Cape Canaveral

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-28

    KSC-2015-1342 (02/11/2015) --- Backdropped by a bright blue sky, the SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket carrying NOAA’s Deep Space Climate Observatory spacecraft, or DSCOVR, soars away from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. Liftoff occurred at 6:03 p.m. EST. DSCOVR is a partnership between NOAA, NASA and the U.S. Air Force, and will maintain the nation's real-time solar wind monitoring capabilities. To learn more about DSCOVR, visit www.nesdis.noaa.gov/DSCOVR. Photo credit: NASA/Ben Smegelsky..

  19. Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) lifted off from Cape Canaveral

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-28

    KSC-2015-1341 (02/11/2015) --- The SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket carrying NOAA’s Deep Space Climate Observatory spacecraft, or DSCOVR, lifts off from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. Liftoff occurred at 6:03 p.m. EST. DSCOVR is a partnership between NOAA, NASA and the U.S. Air Force, and will maintain the nation's real-time solar wind monitoring capabilities. To learn more about DSCOVR, visit www.nesdis.noaa.gov/DSCOVR. Photo credit: NASA/Ben Smegelsky

  20. Reproductive biology of the male Cape porcupine, Hystrix africaeaustralis.

    PubMed

    van Aarde, R J; Skinner, J D

    1986-03-01

    The reproductive tract of the male Cape porcupine is morphologically and histologically similar to that of New World hystricomorph rodents. Males are reproductively active throughout the year and attained sexual maturity (complete spermatogenesis) at an age of 8-18 months. Testes weight, epididymides weight and seminiferous tubule diameter attained asymptotic values at the age of 23-30 months. A tendency towards seasonality in the activity of accessory glands, preceded and accompanied by an increase in circulating plasma testosterone values, may be considered as a factor enforcing seasonal breeding in females. Testosterone concentrations in pubertal males were significantly higher than those recorded in sexually mature males.