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Sample records for capillary rogue waves

  1. Vector financial rogue waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhenya

    2011-11-01

    The coupled nonlinear volatility and option pricing model presented recently by Ivancevic is investigated, which generates a leverage effect, i.e., stock volatility is (negatively) correlated to stock returns, and can be regarded as a coupled nonlinear wave alternative of the Black-Scholes option pricing model. In this Letter, we analytically propose vector financial rogue waves of the coupled nonlinear volatility and option pricing model without an embedded w-learning. Moreover, we exhibit their dynamical behaviors for chosen different parameters. The vector financial rogue wave (rogon) solutions may be used to describe the possible physical mechanisms for the rogue wave phenomena and to further excite the possibility of relative researches and potential applications of vector rogue waves in the financial markets and other related fields.

  2. Optical rogue waves.

    PubMed

    Solli, D R; Ropers, C; Koonath, P; Jalali, B

    2007-12-13

    Recent observations show that the probability of encountering an extremely large rogue wave in the open ocean is much larger than expected from ordinary wave-amplitude statistics. Although considerable effort has been directed towards understanding the physics behind these mysterious and potentially destructive events, the complete picture remains uncertain. Furthermore, rogue waves have not yet been observed in other physical systems. Here, we introduce the concept of optical rogue waves, a counterpart of the infamous rare water waves. Using a new real-time detection technique, we study a system that exposes extremely steep, large waves as rare outcomes from an almost identically prepared initial population of waves. Specifically, we report the observation of rogue waves in an optical system, based on a microstructured optical fibre, near the threshold of soliton-fission supercontinuum generation--a noise-sensitive nonlinear process in which extremely broadband radiation is generated from a narrowband input. We model the generation of these rogue waves using the generalized nonlinear Schrödinger equation and demonstrate that they arise infrequently from initially smooth pulses owing to power transfer seeded by a small noise perturbation.

  3. Optical Dark Rogue Wave.

    PubMed

    Frisquet, Benoit; Kibler, Bertrand; Morin, Philippe; Baronio, Fabio; Conforti, Matteo; Millot, Guy; Wabnitz, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Photonics enables to develop simple lab experiments that mimic water rogue wave generation phenomena, as well as relativistic gravitational effects such as event horizons, gravitational lensing and Hawking radiation. The basis for analog gravity experiments is light propagation through an effective moving medium obtained via the nonlinear response of the material. So far, analogue gravity kinematics was reproduced in scalar optical wave propagation test models. Multimode and spatiotemporal nonlinear interactions exhibit a rich spectrum of excitations, which may substantially expand the range of rogue wave phenomena, and lead to novel space-time analogies, for example with multi-particle interactions. By injecting two colliding and modulated pumps with orthogonal states of polarization in a randomly birefringent telecommunication optical fiber, we provide the first experimental demonstration of an optical dark rogue wave. We also introduce the concept of multi-component analog gravity, whereby localized spatiotemporal horizons are associated with the dark rogue wave solution of the two-component nonlinear Schrödinger system. PMID:26864099

  4. Optical Dark Rogue Wave

    PubMed Central

    Frisquet, Benoit; Kibler, Bertrand; Morin, Philippe; Baronio, Fabio; Conforti, Matteo; Millot, Guy; Wabnitz, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Photonics enables to develop simple lab experiments that mimic water rogue wave generation phenomena, as well as relativistic gravitational effects such as event horizons, gravitational lensing and Hawking radiation. The basis for analog gravity experiments is light propagation through an effective moving medium obtained via the nonlinear response of the material. So far, analogue gravity kinematics was reproduced in scalar optical wave propagation test models. Multimode and spatiotemporal nonlinear interactions exhibit a rich spectrum of excitations, which may substantially expand the range of rogue wave phenomena, and lead to novel space-time analogies, for example with multi-particle interactions. By injecting two colliding and modulated pumps with orthogonal states of polarization in a randomly birefringent telecommunication optical fiber, we provide the first experimental demonstration of an optical dark rogue wave. We also introduce the concept of multi-component analog gravity, whereby localized spatiotemporal horizons are associated with the dark rogue wave solution of the two-component nonlinear Schrödinger system. PMID:26864099

  5. Optical Dark Rogue Wave.

    PubMed

    Frisquet, Benoit; Kibler, Bertrand; Morin, Philippe; Baronio, Fabio; Conforti, Matteo; Millot, Guy; Wabnitz, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Photonics enables to develop simple lab experiments that mimic water rogue wave generation phenomena, as well as relativistic gravitational effects such as event horizons, gravitational lensing and Hawking radiation. The basis for analog gravity experiments is light propagation through an effective moving medium obtained via the nonlinear response of the material. So far, analogue gravity kinematics was reproduced in scalar optical wave propagation test models. Multimode and spatiotemporal nonlinear interactions exhibit a rich spectrum of excitations, which may substantially expand the range of rogue wave phenomena, and lead to novel space-time analogies, for example with multi-particle interactions. By injecting two colliding and modulated pumps with orthogonal states of polarization in a randomly birefringent telecommunication optical fiber, we provide the first experimental demonstration of an optical dark rogue wave. We also introduce the concept of multi-component analog gravity, whereby localized spatiotemporal horizons are associated with the dark rogue wave solution of the two-component nonlinear Schrödinger system.

  6. Controllable parabolic-cylinder optical rogue wave.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Wei-Ping; Chen, Lang; Belić, Milivoj; Petrović, Nikola

    2014-10-01

    We demonstrate controllable parabolic-cylinder optical rogue waves in certain inhomogeneous media. An analytical rogue wave solution of the generalized nonlinear Schrödinger equation with spatially modulated coefficients and an external potential in the form of modulated quadratic potential is obtained by the similarity transformation. Numerical simulations are performed for comparison with the analytical solutions and to confirm the stability of the rogue wave solution obtained. These optical rogue waves are built by the products of parabolic-cylinder functions and the basic rogue wave solution of the standard nonlinear Schrödinger equation. Such rogue waves may appear in different forms, as the hump and paw profiles.

  7. Dark- and bright-rogue-wave solutions for media with long-wave-short-wave resonance.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shihua; Grelu, Philippe; Soto-Crespo, J M

    2014-01-01

    Exact explicit rogue-wave solutions of intricate structures are presented for the long-wave-short-wave resonance equation. These vector parametric solutions feature coupled dark- and bright-field counterparts of the Peregrine soliton. Numerical simulations show the robustness of dark and bright rogue waves in spite of the onset of modulational instability. Dark fields originate from the complex interplay between anomalous dispersion and the nonlinearity driven by the coupled long wave. This unusual mechanism, not available in scalar nonlinear wave equation models, can provide a route to the experimental realization of dark rogue waves in, for instance, negative index media or with capillary-gravity waves.

  8. Dark- and bright-rogue-wave solutions for media with long-wave-short-wave resonance.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shihua; Grelu, Philippe; Soto-Crespo, J M

    2014-01-01

    Exact explicit rogue-wave solutions of intricate structures are presented for the long-wave-short-wave resonance equation. These vector parametric solutions feature coupled dark- and bright-field counterparts of the Peregrine soliton. Numerical simulations show the robustness of dark and bright rogue waves in spite of the onset of modulational instability. Dark fields originate from the complex interplay between anomalous dispersion and the nonlinearity driven by the coupled long wave. This unusual mechanism, not available in scalar nonlinear wave equation models, can provide a route to the experimental realization of dark rogue waves in, for instance, negative index media or with capillary-gravity waves. PMID:24580164

  9. Rogue Waves and Modulational Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, V. E.; Dyachenko, A.

    2015-12-01

    The most plausible cause of rogue wave formation in a deep ocean is development of modulational instability of quasimonochromatic wave trains. An adequate model for study of this phenomenon is the Euler equation for potential flow of incompressible fluid with free surface in 2-D geometry. Numerical integration of these equations confirms completely the conjecture of rogue wave formation from modulational instability but the procedure is time consuming for determination of rogue wave appearance probability for a given shape of wave energy spectrum. This program can be realized in framework of simpler model using replacement of the exact interaction Hamiltonian by more compact Hamiltonian. There is a family of such models. The popular one is the Nonlinear Schrodinger equation (NLSE). This model is completely integrable and suitable for numerical simulation but we consider that it is oversimplified. It misses such important phenomenon as wave breaking. Recently, we elaborated much more reliable model that describes wave breaking but is as suitable as NLSE from the point of numerical modeling. This model allows to perform massive numerical experiments and study statistics of rogue wave formation in details.

  10. Evolution of rogue waves in dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Tolba, R. E. El-Bedwehy, N. A.; Moslem, W. M.; El-Labany, S. K.

    2015-04-15

    The evolution of rogue waves associated with the dynamics of positively charged dust grains that interact with streaming electrons and ions is investigated. Using a perturbation method, the basic set of fluid equations is reduced to a nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE). The rational solution of the NLSE is presented, which proposed as an effective tool for studying the rogue waves in Jupiter. It is found that the existence region of rogue waves depends on the dust-acoustic speed and the streaming densities of the ions and electrons. Furthermore, the supersonic rogue waves are much taller than the subsonic rogue waves by ∼25 times.

  11. Rogue waves in oceanic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedele, Francesco

    2008-08-01

    A stochastic model of wave groups is presented to explain the occurrence of exceptionally large waves, usually referred to as rogue waves. The model leads to the description of the non-Gaussian statistics of large waves in oceanic turbulence and to a new asymptotic distribution of their crest heights in a form that generalizes the Tayfun model. The new model explains the unusually large crests observed in flume experiments of narrow-band waves. However, comparisons with realistic oceanic measurements gathered in the North Sea during an intense storm indicate that the generalized model agrees with the original Tayfun distribution.

  12. Slow deterministic vector rogue waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeyev, S. V.; Kolpakov, S. A.; Mou, Ch.; Jacobsen, G.; Popov, S.; Kalashnikov, V.

    2016-03-01

    For an erbium-doped fiber laser mode-locked by carbon nanotubes, we demonstrate experimentally and theoretically a new type of the vector rogue waves emerging as a result of the chaotic evolution of the trajectories between two orthogonal states of polarization on the Poincare sphere. In terms of fluctuation induced phenomena, by tuning polarization controller for the pump wave and in-cavity polarization controller, we are able to control the Kramers time, i.e. the residence time of the trajectory in vicinity of each orthogonal state of polarization, and so can cause the rare events satisfying rogue wave criteria and having the form of transitions from the state with the long residence time to the state with a short residence time.

  13. Acoustic Remote Sensing of Rogue Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Wade; Kadri, Usama

    2016-04-01

    We propose an early warning system for approaching rogue waves using the remote sensing of acoustic-gravity waves (AGWs) - progressive sound waves that propagate at the speed of sound in the ocean. It is believed that AGWs are generated during the formation of rogue waves, carrying information on the rogue waves at near the speed of sound, i.e. much faster than the rogue wave. The capability of identifying those special sound waves would enable detecting rogue waves most efficiently. A lot of promising work has been reported on AGWs in the last few years, part of which in the context of remote sensing as an early detection of tsunami. However, to our knowledge none of the work addresses the problem of rogue waves directly. Although there remains some uncertainty as to the proper definition of a rogue wave, there is little doubt that they exist and no one can dispute the potential destructive power of rogue waves. An early warning system for such extreme waves would become a demanding safety technology. A closed form expression was developed for the pressure induced by an impulsive source at the free surface (the Green's function) from which the solution for more general sources can be developed. In particular, we used the model of the Draupner Wave of January 1st, 1995 as a source and calculated the induced AGW signature. In particular we studied the AGW signature associated with a special feature of this wave, and characteristic of rogue waves, of the absence of any local set-down beneath the main crest and the presence of a large local set-up.

  14. The destructive impact of the rogue waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamin, Roman

    2013-04-01

    In our talk rogue waves at the ocean will be considered. By means of numerical modeling dangerous impact of rogue waves on the ships and oil rigs is calculated. Cases when these waves can bring in accident are considered. Using statistics of emergence of waves (see [1]-[2]), it is possible to estimate risks in each case. These results can be used for safety of the ships and oil rigs from rogue waves. References [1] V.E. Zakharov, A.I. Dyachenko, R.V. Shamin. How probability for freak wave formation can be found // THE EUROPEAN PHYSICAL JOURNAL - SPECIAL TOPICS Volume 185, Number 1, 113-124, DOI: 10.1140/epjst/e2010-01242-y [2] V.E. Zakharov, R.V. Shamin. Statistics of rogue waves in computer experiments // JETP Letters, 2012, V. 96, Issue 1, pp 66-69.

  15. Nonlinear Talbot effect of rogue waves.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiqi; Belić, Milivoj R; Zheng, Huaibin; Chen, Haixia; Li, Changbiao; Song, Jianping; Zhang, Yanpeng

    2014-03-01

    Akhmediev and Kuznetsov-Ma breathers are rogue wave solutions of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE). Talbot effect (TE) is an image recurrence phenomenon in the diffraction of light waves. We report the nonlinear TE of rogue waves in a cubic medium. It is different from the linear TE, in that the wave propagates in a NL medium and is an eigenmode of NLSE. Periodic rogue waves impinging on a NL medium exhibit recurrent behavior, but only at the TE length and at the half-TE length with a π-phase shift; the fractional TE is absent. The NL TE is the result of the NL interference of the lobes of rogue wave breathers. This interaction is related to the transverse period and intensity of breathers, in that the bigger the period and the higher the intensity, the shorter the TE length.

  16. Rogue Waves in the Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waseda, Takuji

    2010-03-01

    Giant episodic ocean waves that suddenly soar like a wall of water out of an otherwise calm sea are not just a legend. Such waves—which in the past have been called “abnormal,” “exceptional,” “extreme,” and even “vicious killer” waves—are now commonly known as “rogue waves” or “freak waves.” These waves have sunk or severely damaged 22 supercarriers in the world and caused the loss of more than 500 lives in the past 40 years. The largest wave registered by reliable instruments reached 30 meters in height, and the largest wave recorded by visual observation reached about 34 meters, equivalent to the height of an eight-story building. Tales of seafarers from Christopher Columbus to the passengers of luxury cruise ships had long been undervalued by scientists, but in the past 10 or so years, those historical notes and modern testimonies have been scientifically dissected to reveal the nature of these monster waves.

  17. Book review: Rogue waves in the ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geist, Eric L.

    2011-01-01

    Review info: Rogue Waves in the Ocean. Advances in Geophysical and Environmental Mechanics and Mathematics. By Christian Kharif, Efim Pelinovsky and Alexey Slunyaev, 2009. ISBN: 978-3540884187, xiii, 216 pp.

  18. Dynamics of nonautonomous rogue waves in Bose-Einstein condensate

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Li-Chen

    2013-02-15

    We study rogue waves of Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) analytically in a time-dependent harmonic trap with a complex potential. Properties of the nonautonomous rogue waves are investigated analytically. It is reported that there are possibilities to 'catch' rogue waves through manipulating nonlinear interaction properly. The results provide many possibilities to manipulate rogue waves experimentally in a BEC system. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer One more generalized rogue wave solutions are presented. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Present one possible way to catch a rouge wave. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Properties of rogue waves are investigated analytically for the first time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Provide many possibilities to manipulate rogue waves in BEC.

  19. Optical rogue waves associated with the negative coherent coupling in an isotropic medium.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wen-Rong; Tian, Bo; Jiang, Yan; Zhen, Hui-Ling

    2015-02-01

    Optical rogue waves of the coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations with negative coherent coupling, which describe the propagation of orthogonally polarized optical waves in an isotropic medium, are reported. We construct and discuss a family of the vector rogue-wave solutions, including the bright rogue waves, four-petaled rogue waves, and dark rogue waves. A bright rogue wave without a valley can split up, giving birth to two bright rogue waves, and an eye-shaped rogue wave can split up, giving birth to two dark rogue waves.

  20. Early detection of rogue waves by the wavelet transforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayındır, Cihan

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the possible advantages of using the wavelet transform over the Fourier transform for the early detection of rogue waves. We show that the triangular wavelet spectra of the rogue waves can be detected at early stages of the development of rogue waves in a chaotic wave field. Compared to the Fourier spectra, the wavelet spectra are capable of detecting not only the emergence of a rogue wave but also its possible spatial (or temporal) location. Due to this fact, wavelet transform is also capable of predicting the characteristic distances between successive rogue waves. Therefore multiple simultaneous breaking of the successive rogue waves on ships or on the offshore structures can be predicted and avoided by smart designs and operations.

  1. A coupled "AB" system: Rogue waves and modulation instabilities.

    PubMed

    Wu, C F; Grimshaw, R H J; Chow, K W; Chan, H N

    2015-10-01

    Rogue waves are unexpectedly large and localized displacements from an equilibrium position or an otherwise calm background. For the nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) model widely used in fluid mechanics and optics, these waves can occur only when dispersion and nonlinearity are of the same sign, a regime of modulation instability. For coupled NLS equations, rogue waves will arise even if dispersion and nonlinearity are of opposite signs in each component as new regimes of modulation instability will appear in the coupled system. The same phenomenon will be demonstrated here for a coupled "AB" system, a wave-current interaction model describing baroclinic instability processes in geophysical flows. Indeed, the onset of modulation instability correlates precisely with the existence criterion for rogue waves for this system. Transitions from "elevation" rogue waves to "depression" rogue waves are elucidated analytically. The dispersion relation as a polynomial of the fourth order may possess double pairs of complex roots, leading to multiple configurations of rogue waves for a given set of input parameters. For special parameter regimes, the dispersion relation reduces to a cubic polynomial, allowing the existence criterion for rogue waves to be computed explicitly. Numerical tests correlating modulation instability and evolution of rogue waves were conducted.

  2. A coupled "AB" system: Rogue waves and modulation instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C. F.; Grimshaw, R. H. J.; Chow, K. W.; Chan, H. N.

    2015-10-01

    Rogue waves are unexpectedly large and localized displacements from an equilibrium position or an otherwise calm background. For the nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) model widely used in fluid mechanics and optics, these waves can occur only when dispersion and nonlinearity are of the same sign, a regime of modulation instability. For coupled NLS equations, rogue waves will arise even if dispersion and nonlinearity are of opposite signs in each component as new regimes of modulation instability will appear in the coupled system. The same phenomenon will be demonstrated here for a coupled "AB" system, a wave-current interaction model describing baroclinic instability processes in geophysical flows. Indeed, the onset of modulation instability correlates precisely with the existence criterion for rogue waves for this system. Transitions from "elevation" rogue waves to "depression" rogue waves are elucidated analytically. The dispersion relation as a polynomial of the fourth order may possess double pairs of complex roots, leading to multiple configurations of rogue waves for a given set of input parameters. For special parameter regimes, the dispersion relation reduces to a cubic polynomial, allowing the existence criterion for rogue waves to be computed explicitly. Numerical tests correlating modulation instability and evolution of rogue waves were conducted.

  3. Generation of rogue waves in a wave tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lechuga, A.

    2012-04-01

    Rogue waves have been reported as causing damages and ship accidents all over the oceans of the world. For this reason in the past decades theoretical studies have been carried out with the double aim of improving the knowledge of their main characteristics and of attempting to predict its sudden appearance. As an effort on this line we are trying to generate them in a water tank. The description of the procedure to do that is the objective of this presentation. After Akhmediev et al. (2011) we use a symmetric spectrum as input on the wave maker to produce waves with a rate(Maximun wave height/ significant wave height) of 2.33 and a kurtosis of 4.77, clearly between the limits of rogue waves. As it was pointed out by Janssen (2003), Onorato et al. (2006) and Kharif, Pelinovsky and Slunyaev (2009) modulation instability is enhanced when waves depart from Gaussian statistics (i.e. big kurtosis) and therefore both numbers enforce the criterion that we are generating genuine rogue waves. The same is confirmed by Shemer (2010) and Dudley et al.(2009) from a different perspective. If besides being symmetrical the spectrum is triangular, following Akhmediev(2011),the generated waves are even more conspicuously rogue waves.

  4. Rogue wave spectra of the Kundu-Eckhaus equation.

    PubMed

    Bayındır, Cihan

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we analyze the rogue wave spectra of the Kundu-Eckhaus equation (KEE). We compare our findings with their nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE) analogs and show that the spectra of the individual rogue waves significantly differ from their NLSE analogs. A remarkable difference is the one-sided development of the triangular spectrum before the rogue wave becomes evident in time. Also we show that increasing the skewness of the rogue wave results in increased asymmetry in the triangular Fourier spectra. Additionally, the triangular spectra of the rogue waves of the KEE begin to develop at earlier stages of their development compared to their NLSE analogs, especially for larger skew angles. This feature may be used to enhance the early warning times of the rogue waves. However, we show that in a chaotic wave field with many spectral components the triangular spectra remain as the main attribute as a universal feature of the typical wave fields produced through modulation instability and characteristic features of the KEE's analytical rogue wave spectra may be suppressed in a realistic chaotic wave field. PMID:27415263

  5. Integrable turbulence and formation of rogue waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agafontsev, D. S.; Zakharov, V. E.

    2015-08-01

    In the framework of the focusing nonlinear Schrödinger equation we study numerically the nonlinear stage of the modulation instability (MI) of the condensate. The development of the MI leads to the formation of ‘integrable turbulence’ (Zakharov 2009 Stud. Appl. Math. 122 219-34). We study the time evolution of its major characteristics averaged across realizations of initial data—the condensate solution seeded by small random noise with fixed statistical properties. We observe that the system asymptotically approaches to the stationary integrable turbulence, however this is a long process. During this process momenta, as well as kinetic and potential energies, oscillate around their asymptotic values. The amplitudes of these oscillations decay with time t as t-3/2, the phases contain the nonlinear phase shift that decays as t-1/2, and the frequency of the oscillations is equal to the double maximum growth rate of the MI. The evolution of wave-action spectrum is also oscillatory, and characterized by formation of the power-law region ˜|k|-α in the small vicinity of the zeroth harmonic k = 0 with exponent α close to 2/3. The corresponding modes form ‘quasi-condensate’, that acquires very significant wave action and macroscopic potential energy. The probability density function of wave amplitudes asymptotically approaches the Rayleigh distribution in an oscillatory way. Nevertheless, in the beginning of the nonlinear stage the MI slightly increases the occurrence of rogue waves. This takes place at the moments of potential energy modulus minima, where the PDF acquires ‘fat tales’ and the probability of rogue waves occurrence is by about two times larger than in the asymptotic stationary state. Presented facts need a theoretical explanation.

  6. Rogue waves in the ocean - review and progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelinovsky, Efim; Kharif, Christian; Slunyaev, Alexey

    2010-05-01

    Rogue waves in the ocean and physical mechanisms of their appearance are discussed. Theyse waves are among waves naturally observed by people on the sea surface that represent inseparable feature of the Ocean. Rogue waves appear from nowhere, cause danger and disappear at once. They may occur at the surface of a relatively calm sea, reach not very high amplitudes, but be fatal for ships and crew due to their unexpectedness and abnormal features. The billows appear suddenly exceeding the surrounding waves twice and more, and obtained many names: abnormal, exceptional, extreme, giant, huge, sudden, episodic, freak, monster, rogue, vicious, killer, mad- or rabid-dog waves; cape rollers, holes in the sea, walls of water, three sisters… Freak monsters, though living for seconds, were able to arouse superstitious fear of the crew, cause damage, death of heedless sailors or the whole ship. All these epithets are full of human fear and feebleness. The serious studies of the phenomenon started about 20-30 years ago and have been intensified during the recent decade. The research is being conducted in different fields: in physics (search of physical mechanisms and adequate models of wave enhancement and statistics), in geoscience (determining the regions and weather conditions when rogue waves are most probable), and in ocean and coastal engineering (estimations of the wave loads on fixed and drifting floating structures). Thus, scientists and engineers specializing in different subject areas are involved in the solution of the problem. The state-of-art of the rogue wave study is summarized in our book [Kharif, Ch., Pelinovsky, E., and Slunyaev, A. Rogue Waves in the Ocean. Springer, 2009] and presented in given review. Firstly, we start with a brief introduction to the problem of freak waves aiming at formulating what is understood as rogue or freak waves, what consequences their existence imply in our life, why people are so worried about them. Then we discuss existing

  7. Caustics and Rogue Waves in an Optical Sea

    PubMed Central

    Mathis, Amaury; Froehly, Luc; Toenger, Shanti; Dias, Frédéric; Genty, Goëry; Dudley, John M.

    2015-01-01

    There are many examples in physics of systems showing rogue wave behaviour, the generation of high amplitude events at low probability. Although initially studied in oceanography, rogue waves have now been seen in many other domains, with particular recent interest in optics. Although most studies in optics have focussed on how nonlinearity can drive rogue wave emergence, purely linear effects have also been shown to induce extreme wave amplitudes. In this paper, we report a detailed experimental study of linear rogue waves in an optical system, using a spatial light modulator to impose random phase structure on a coherent optical field. After free space propagation, different random intensity patterns are generated, including partially-developed speckle, a broadband caustic network, and an intermediate pattern with characteristics of both speckle and caustic structures. Intensity peaks satisfying statistical criteria for rogue waves are seen especially in the case of the caustic network, and are associated with broader spatial spectra. In addition, the electric field statistics of the intermediate pattern shows properties of an “optical sea” with near-Gaussian statistics in elevation amplitude, and trough-to-crest statistics that are near-Rayleigh distributed but with an extended tail where a number of rogue wave events are observed. PMID:26245864

  8. Taming rogue waves in vector Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinayagam, P. S.; Radha, R.; Porsezian, K.

    2013-10-01

    Using gauge transformation method, we generate rogue waves for the two-component Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) governed by the symmetric coupled Gross-Pitaevskii (GP) equations and study their dynamics. We also suggest a mechanism to tame the rogue waves either by manipulating the scattering length through Feshbach resonance or the trapping frequency, a phenomenon not witnessed in the domain of BECs, and we believe that these results may have wider ramifications in the management of rogons.

  9. Rogue Waves in Near Gaussian Sea States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborne, Alfred R.

    2015-04-01

    The field of nonlinear waves often emphasizes the importance of small amplitude modulations in the nonlinear Schroedinger equation (NLS). The Akhmediev and Peregrine breather trains are examples which manifest themselves from the usual linear instability analyses of NLS. In reality, however, oceanic sea states generated by wind waves are very nearly Gaussian processes and so the modulus of the Hilbert transform envelope is approximately Rayleigh distributed (with of course the possibility of a large amplitude tail) and is therefore never a small amplitude modulation. How can we then reconcile our usual perceptions with this fact? What are indeed the solutions of the nonlinear Schroedinger equation non Gaussianity have on the actual types of solutions that are likely to occur in the real ocean? I discuss how finite gap theory for NLS allows us to answer these and many more questions about rogue sea states. I analyze data from various laboratory and oceanic experiments to illustrate the method. Finally, I discuss whether breather trains such as Akhmediev, Peregrine and Ma-Kuznetsov can actually occur in ocean wave data.

  10. Electrostatic rogue-waves in relativistically degenerate plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M.

    2014-10-15

    In this paper, we investigate the modulational instability and the possibility of electrostatic rogue-wave propagations in a completely degenerate plasma with arbitrary degree of degeneracy, i.e., relativistically degenerate plasma, ranging from solid density to the astrophysical compact stars. The hydrodynamic approach along with the perturbation method is used to reduce the governing equations to the nonlinear Schrödinger equation from which the modulational instability, the growth rate of envelope excitations and the occurrence of rogue as well as super-rogue waves in the plasma, is evaluated. It is observed that the modulational instability in a fully degenerate plasma can be quite sensitive to the plasma number-density and the wavenumber of envelop excitations. It is further revealed that the relativistically degeneracy plasmas (R{sub 0} > 1) are almost always modulationally unstable. It is found, however, that the highly energetic sharply localized electrostatic rogue as well as super-rogue waves can exist in the astrophysical compact objects like white dwarfs and neutron star crusts. The later may provide a link to understand many physical processes in such stars and it may lead us to the origin of the random-localized intense short gamma-ray bursts, which “appear from nowhere and disappear without a trace” quite similar to oceanic rogue structures.

  11. Real world ocean rogue waves explained without the modulational instability.

    PubMed

    Fedele, Francesco; Brennan, Joseph; Ponce de León, Sonia; Dudley, John; Dias, Frédéric

    2016-06-21

    Since the 1990s, the modulational instability has commonly been used to explain the occurrence of rogue waves that appear from nowhere in the open ocean. However, the importance of this instability in the context of ocean waves is not well established. This mechanism has been successfully studied in laboratory experiments and in mathematical studies, but there is no consensus on what actually takes place in the ocean. In this work, we question the oceanic relevance of this paradigm. In particular, we analyze several sets of field data in various European locations with various tools, and find that the main generation mechanism for rogue waves is the constructive interference of elementary waves enhanced by second-order bound nonlinearities and not the modulational instability. This implies that rogue waves are likely to be rare occurrences of weakly nonlinear random seas.

  12. Real world ocean rogue waves explained without the modulational instability.

    PubMed

    Fedele, Francesco; Brennan, Joseph; Ponce de León, Sonia; Dudley, John; Dias, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Since the 1990s, the modulational instability has commonly been used to explain the occurrence of rogue waves that appear from nowhere in the open ocean. However, the importance of this instability in the context of ocean waves is not well established. This mechanism has been successfully studied in laboratory experiments and in mathematical studies, but there is no consensus on what actually takes place in the ocean. In this work, we question the oceanic relevance of this paradigm. In particular, we analyze several sets of field data in various European locations with various tools, and find that the main generation mechanism for rogue waves is the constructive interference of elementary waves enhanced by second-order bound nonlinearities and not the modulational instability. This implies that rogue waves are likely to be rare occurrences of weakly nonlinear random seas. PMID:27323897

  13. Real world ocean rogue waves explained without the modulational instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedele, Francesco; Brennan, Joseph; Ponce de León, Sonia; Dudley, John; Dias, Frédéric

    2016-06-01

    Since the 1990s, the modulational instability has commonly been used to explain the occurrence of rogue waves that appear from nowhere in the open ocean. However, the importance of this instability in the context of ocean waves is not well established. This mechanism has been successfully studied in laboratory experiments and in mathematical studies, but there is no consensus on what actually takes place in the ocean. In this work, we question the oceanic relevance of this paradigm. In particular, we analyze several sets of field data in various European locations with various tools, and find that the main generation mechanism for rogue waves is the constructive interference of elementary waves enhanced by second-order bound nonlinearities and not the modulational instability. This implies that rogue waves are likely to be rare occurrences of weakly nonlinear random seas.

  14. Real world ocean rogue waves explained without the modulational instability

    PubMed Central

    Fedele, Francesco; Brennan, Joseph; Ponce de León, Sonia; Dudley, John; Dias, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Since the 1990s, the modulational instability has commonly been used to explain the occurrence of rogue waves that appear from nowhere in the open ocean. However, the importance of this instability in the context of ocean waves is not well established. This mechanism has been successfully studied in laboratory experiments and in mathematical studies, but there is no consensus on what actually takes place in the ocean. In this work, we question the oceanic relevance of this paradigm. In particular, we analyze several sets of field data in various European locations with various tools, and find that the main generation mechanism for rogue waves is the constructive interference of elementary waves enhanced by second-order bound nonlinearities and not the modulational instability. This implies that rogue waves are likely to be rare occurrences of weakly nonlinear random seas. PMID:27323897

  15. High-order rogue waves for the Hirota equation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Linjing; Wu, Zhiwei; Wang, Lihong; He, Jingsong

    2013-07-15

    The Hirota equation is better than the nonlinear Schrödinger equation when approximating deep ocean waves. In this paper, high-order rational solutions for the Hirota equation are constructed based on the parameterized Darboux transformation. Several types of this kind of solutions are classified by their structures. -- Highlights: •The determinant representation of the N-fold Darboux transformation of the Hirota equation. •Properties of the fundamental pattern of the higher order rogue wave. •Ring structure and triangular structure of the higher order rogue waves.

  16. On shallow water rogue wave formation in strongly inhomogeneous channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didenkulova, Ira; Pelinovsky, Efim

    2016-05-01

    Rogue wave formation in shallow water is often governed by dispersive focusing and wave-bottom interaction. In this study we try to combine these mechanisms by considering dispersive nonreflecting wave propagation in shallow strongly inhomogeneous channels. Nonreflecting wave propagation provides extreme wave amplification and the transfer of wave energy over large distances, while dispersive effects allow formation of a short-lived wave of extreme height (rogue wave). We found several types of water channels, where this mechanism can be realized, including (i) channels with a monotonically decreasing cross-section (normal dispersion), (ii) an inland basin described by a half of elliptic paraboloid (abnormal dispersion) and (iii) an underwater hill described by a half of hyperbolic paraboloid (normal dispersion). Conditions for variations of local frequency in the wave train providing optimal focusing of the wave train are also found.

  17. Shallow water rogue wave formation in inhomogeneous channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelinovsky, Efim; Didenkulova, Ira

    2016-04-01

    Rogue wave formation in shallow water is often governed by dispersive focusing and wave-bottom interaction. In this study we try to combine these mechanisms by considering dispersive nonreflecting wave propagation in shallow strongly inhomogeneous channels. Nonreflecting wave propagation provides extreme wave amplification and transfer of wave energy over large distances, while dispersive effects allow formation of short-lived wave of extreme height (rogue wave). We found several types of water channels, where this mechanism can be realized, including (i) channels with monotonically decreasing cross-section (normal dispersion), (ii) inland basin described by a half of elliptic paraboloid (abnormal dispersion) and (iii) underwater hill described by a half of hyperbolic paraboloid (normal dispersion). Conditions for variations of local frequency in the wave trail providing optimal focusing of the wave train are also found.

  18. Rogue waves and solitons on a cnoidal background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kedziora, D. J.; Ankiewicz, A.; Akhmediev, N.

    2014-01-01

    Solutions of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation, appearing as rogue waves on a spatially-periodic background envelope, are obtained using the Darboux transformation scheme. Several particular examples are illustrated numerically. These include soliton and breather solutions on a periodic background as well as higher-order structures. The results enrich our knowledge of possible analytic solutions that describe the appearance of rogue waves in a variety of situations. This work is prepared on the occasion of Prof. Helmut Brand's 60th birthday. He has made significant contributions to the science of solitons and his ideas have inspired our research into localised formations in various physical contexts.

  19. Observation of three dimensional optical rogue waves through obstacles

    SciTech Connect

    Leonetti, Marco; Conti, Claudio

    2015-06-22

    We observe three-dimensional rogue waves in the speckle distribution of a spatially modulated optical beam. Light is transmitted beyond a partially reflecting obstacle generating optical rogue waves at a controlled position in the shadow of the barrier. When the barrier transmits only 0.07% of the input laser power, we observe the mostly localized event. These results demonstrate that an optimum amount of spatial non-homogeneity maximizes the probability of a gigantic event while the technique we exploit enables to control light behind a fully reflective wall.

  20. Observation of three dimensional optical rogue waves through obstacles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonetti, Marco; Conti, Claudio

    2015-06-01

    We observe three-dimensional rogue waves in the speckle distribution of a spatially modulated optical beam. Light is transmitted beyond a partially reflecting obstacle generating optical rogue waves at a controlled position in the shadow of the barrier. When the barrier transmits only 0.07% of the input laser power, we observe the mostly localized event. These results demonstrate that an optimum amount of spatial non-homogeneity maximizes the probability of a gigantic event while the technique we exploit enables to control light behind a fully reflective wall.

  1. Experiments on Rogue Waves in Superfluid 4He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efimov, Viktor; McClintock, Peter; Ganshin, Andrei; Kolmakov, German; Mezhov-Deglin, Leonid

    2010-05-01

    We describe an experimental and theoretical study of nonlinear wave interactions in superfluid helium and report the observation of rogue waves. Rogue waves (or freak waves, or killer waves, or extreme waves) have long been recognized by sailors as a menace to shipping and are believed to have been responsible for the unexplained losses of vessels of all sizes, including e.g. 22 super-carriers between 1968 and 1994 [1, 2]. Rogue waves on the ocean are rare, and are much higher (and steeper) than all the other waves around them. They seem to appear from nowhere and subsequently to disappear without trace [3]. Following the famous 'New Year wave' measured by instruments on the Draupner North Sea oil rig at the beginning of 1995, the existence of oceanic rogue waves is no longer in doubt. There have been several suggestions about possible mechanisms for the creation of rogue waves. These include the combined effects of wind and currents, and the focusing effects associated with the profile of the ocean floor and nearby shorelines. Where rogue waves appear in deep water far from any shore, which they sometimes do, it seems likely that they must evolve through nonlinear interactions within the 'noisy background" of smaller wind-blown waves [4]. Rogue waves have been modeled theoretically, especially by exploiting the special properties of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation. They have been sought experimentally and/or studied in large wave tanks [5], optical systems [6, 7], and superfluid 4He [8]. Our experimental system consists of high intensity second sound (temperature-entropy) waves within a resonant cavity filled with superfluid 4He at 2.1 K. Under steady state conditions, with a constant oscillatory driving force at the resonant frequency, the second sound waves are turbulent and fluxes of energy flow towards both high and low frequencies. It is found that rogue waves appear under the nonequilibrium conditions that prevail shortly after the drive has been

  2. Solar wind implication on dust ion acoustic rogue waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelghany, A. M.; Abd El-Razek, H. N.; Moslem, W. M.; El-Labany, S. K.

    2016-06-01

    The relevance of the solar wind with the magnetosphere of Jupiter that contains positively charged dust grains is investigated. The perturbation/excitation caused by streaming ions and electron beams from the solar wind could form different nonlinear structures such as rogue waves, depending on the dominant role of the plasma parameters. Using the reductive perturbation method, the basic set of fluid equations is reduced to modified Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) and further modified (KdV) equation. Assuming that the frequency of the carrier wave is much smaller than the ion plasma frequency, these equations are transformed into nonlinear Schrödinger equations with appropriate coefficients. Rational solution of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation shows that rogue wave envelopes are supported by the present plasma model. It is found that the existence region of rogue waves depends on the dust-acoustic speed and the streaming temperatures for both the ions and electrons. The dependence of the maximum rogue wave envelope amplitude on the system parameters has been investigated.

  3. Coexisting rogue waves within the (2+1)-component long-wave-short-wave resonance.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shihua; Soto-Crespo, Jose M; Grelu, Philippe

    2014-09-01

    The coexistence of two different types of fundamental rogue waves is unveiled, based on the coupled equations describing the (2+1)-component long-wave-short-wave resonance. For a wide range of asymptotic background fields, each family of three rogue wave components can be triggered by using a slight deterministic alteration to the otherwise identical background field. The ability to trigger markedly different rogue wave profiles from similar initial conditions is confirmed by numerical simulations. This remarkable feature, which is absent in the scalar nonlinear Schrödinger equation, is attributed to the specific three-wave interaction process and may be universal for a variety of multicomponent wave dynamics spanning from oceanography to nonlinear optics. PMID:25314555

  4. Coexisting rogue waves within the (2+1)-component long-wave-short-wave resonance.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shihua; Soto-Crespo, Jose M; Grelu, Philippe

    2014-09-01

    The coexistence of two different types of fundamental rogue waves is unveiled, based on the coupled equations describing the (2+1)-component long-wave-short-wave resonance. For a wide range of asymptotic background fields, each family of three rogue wave components can be triggered by using a slight deterministic alteration to the otherwise identical background field. The ability to trigger markedly different rogue wave profiles from similar initial conditions is confirmed by numerical simulations. This remarkable feature, which is absent in the scalar nonlinear Schrödinger equation, is attributed to the specific three-wave interaction process and may be universal for a variety of multicomponent wave dynamics spanning from oceanography to nonlinear optics.

  5. Three-dimensional rogue waves in nonstationary parabolic potentials.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhenya; Konotop, V V; Akhmediev, N

    2010-09-01

    Using symmetry analysis we systematically present a higher-dimensional similarity transformation reducing the (3+1) -dimensional inhomogeneous nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation with variable coefficients and parabolic potential to the (1+1) -dimensional NLS equation with constant coefficients. This transformation allows us to relate certain class of localized exact solutions of the (3+1) -dimensional case to the variety of solutions of integrable NLS equation of the (1+1) -dimensional case. As an example, we illustrated our technique using two lowest-order rational solutions of the NLS equation as seeding functions to obtain rogue wavelike solutions localized in three dimensions that have complicated evolution in time including interactions between two time-dependent rogue wave solutions. The obtained three-dimensional rogue wavelike solutions may raise the possibility of relative experiments and potential applications in nonlinear optics and Bose-Einstein condensates.

  6. Emergent rogue wave structures and statistics in spontaneous modulation instability.

    PubMed

    Toenger, Shanti; Godin, Thomas; Billet, Cyril; Dias, Frédéric; Erkintalo, Miro; Genty, Goëry; Dudley, John M

    2015-01-01

    The nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE) is a seminal equation of nonlinear physics describing wave packet evolution in weakly-nonlinear dispersive media. The NLSE is especially important in understanding how high amplitude "rogue waves" emerge from noise through the process of modulation instability (MI) whereby a perturbation on an initial plane wave can evolve into strongly-localised "breather" or "soliton on finite background (SFB)" structures. Although there has been much study of such structures excited under controlled conditions, there remains the open question of how closely the analytic solutions of the NLSE actually model localised structures emerging in noise-seeded MI. We address this question here using numerical simulations to compare the properties of a large ensemble of emergent peaks in noise-seeded MI with the known analytic solutions of the NLSE. Our results show that both elementary breather and higher-order SFB structures are observed in chaotic MI, with the characteristics of the noise-induced peaks clustering closely around analytic NLSE predictions. A significant conclusion of our work is to suggest that the widely-held view that the Peregrine soliton forms a rogue wave prototype must be revisited. Rather, we confirm earlier suggestions that NLSE rogue waves are most appropriately identified as collisions between elementary SFB solutions.

  7. Circularly polarized few-cycle optical rogue waves: rotating reduced Maxwell-Bloch equations.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shuwei; Porsezian, K; He, Jingsong; Cheng, Yi

    2013-12-01

    The rotating reduced Maxwell-Bloch (RMB) equations, which describe the propagation of few-cycle optical pulses in a transparent media with two isotropic polarized electronic field components, are derived from a system of complete Maxwell-Bloch equations without using the slowly varying envelope approximations. Two hierarchies of the obtained rational solutions, including rogue waves, which are also called few-cycle optical rogue waves, of the rotating RMB equations are constructed explicitly through degenerate Darboux transformation. In addition to the above, the dynamical evolution of the first-, second-, and third-order few-cycle optical rogue waves are constructed with different patterns. For an electric field E in the three lower-order rogue waves, we find that rogue waves correspond to localized large amplitude oscillations of the polarized electric fields. Further a complementary relationship of two electric field components of rogue waves is discussed in terms of analytical formulas as well as numerical figures.

  8. Nonlinear time series analysis: towards an effective forecast of rogue waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinmeyer, Günter; Birkholz, Simon; Brée, Carsten; Demircan, Ayhan

    2016-03-01

    Rogue waves are extremely large waves that exceed any expectation based on long-term observation and Gaussian statistics. Ocean rogue waves exceed the significant wave height in the ocean by a factor 2. Similar phenomena have been observed in a multiplicity of optical systems. While the optical systems show a much higher frequency of rogue events than the ocean, it appears nevertheless questionable what conclusions can be drawn for the prediction of ocean rogue waves. Here we tackle the problem from a different perspective and analyze the predictability of rogue events in two optical systems as well as in the ocean using nonlinear time-series analysis. Our analysis is exclusively based on experimental data. The results appear rather surprising as the optical rogue wave scenario of fiber-based supercontinuum generation does not allow any prediction whereas real ocean rogue waves and a multifilament scenario do bear a considerable amount of determinism, which allows, at least in principle, the prediction of extreme events. It becomes further clear that there exist two fundamentally different types of rogue-wave supporting systems. One class of rogue waves is obviously seeded by quantum fluctuations whereas in the other class, linear random interference of waves seems to prevail.

  9. Emergent rogue wave structures and statistics in spontaneous modulation instability

    PubMed Central

    Toenger, Shanti; Godin, Thomas; Billet, Cyril; Dias, Frédéric; Erkintalo, Miro; Genty, Goëry; Dudley, John M.

    2015-01-01

    The nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE) is a seminal equation of nonlinear physics describing wave packet evolution in weakly-nonlinear dispersive media. The NLSE is especially important in understanding how high amplitude “rogue waves” emerge from noise through the process of modulation instability (MI) whereby a perturbation on an initial plane wave can evolve into strongly-localised “breather” or “soliton on finite background (SFB)” structures. Although there has been much study of such structures excited under controlled conditions, there remains the open question of how closely the analytic solutions of the NLSE actually model localised structures emerging in noise-seeded MI. We address this question here using numerical simulations to compare the properties of a large ensemble of emergent peaks in noise-seeded MI with the known analytic solutions of the NLSE. Our results show that both elementary breather and higher-order SFB structures are observed in chaotic MI, with the characteristics of the noise-induced peaks clustering closely around analytic NLSE predictions. A significant conclusion of our work is to suggest that the widely-held view that the Peregrine soliton forms a rogue wave prototype must be revisited. Rather, we confirm earlier suggestions that NLSE rogue waves are most appropriately identified as collisions between elementary SFB solutions. PMID:25993126

  10. High-order rogue waves in vector nonlinear Schrödinger equations.

    PubMed

    Ling, Liming; Guo, Boling; Zhao, Li-Chen

    2014-04-01

    We study the dynamics of high-order rogue waves (RWs) in two-component coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations. We find that four fundamental rogue waves can emerge from second-order vector RWs in the coupled system, in contrast to the high-order ones in single-component systems. The distribution shape can be quadrilateral, triangle, and line structures by varying the proper initial excitations given by the exact analytical solutions. The distribution pattern for vector RWs is more abundant than that for scalar rogue waves. Possibilities to observe these new patterns for rogue waves are discussed for a nonlinear fiber. PMID:24827185

  11. Roadmap on optical rogue waves and extreme events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmediev, Nail; Kibler, Bertrand; Baronio, Fabio; Belić, Milivoj; Zhong, Wei-Ping; Zhang, Yiqi; Chang, Wonkeun; Soto-Crespo, Jose M.; Vouzas, Peter; Grelu, Philippe; Lecaplain, Caroline; Hammani, K.; Rica, S.; Picozzi, A.; Tlidi, Mustapha; Panajotov, Krassimir; Mussot, Arnaud; Bendahmane, Abdelkrim; Szriftgiser, Pascal; Genty, Goery; Dudley, John; Kudlinski, Alexandre; Demircan, Ayhan; Morgner, Uwe; Amiraranashvili, Shalva; Bree, Carsten; Steinmeyer, Günter; Masoller, C.; Broderick, Neil G. R.; Runge, Antoine F. J.; Erkintalo, Miro; Residori, S.; Bortolozzo, U.; Arecchi, F. T.; Wabnitz, Stefan; Tiofack, C. G.; Coulibaly, S.; Taki, M.

    2016-06-01

    The pioneering paper ‘Optical rogue waves’ by Solli et al (2007 Nature 450 1054) started the new subfield in optics. This work launched a great deal of activity on this novel subject. As a result, the initial concept has expanded and has been enriched by new ideas. Various approaches have been suggested since then. A fresh look at the older results and new discoveries has been undertaken, stimulated by the concept of ‘optical rogue waves’. Presently, there may not by a unique view on how this new scientific term should be used and developed. There is nothing surprising when the opinion of the experts diverge in any new field of research. After all, rogue waves may appear for a multiplicity of reasons and not necessarily only in optical fibers and not only in the process of supercontinuum generation. We know by now that rogue waves may be generated by lasers, appear in wide aperture cavities, in plasmas and in a variety of other optical systems. Theorists, in turn, have suggested many other situations when rogue waves may be observed. The strict definition of a rogue wave is still an open question. For example, it has been suggested that it is defined as ‘an optical pulse whose amplitude or intensity is much higher than that of the surrounding pulses’. This definition (as suggested by a peer reviewer) is clear at the intuitive level and can be easily extended to the case of spatial beams although additional clarifications are still needed. An extended definition has been presented earlier by N Akhmediev and E Pelinovsky (2010 Eur. Phys. J. Spec. Top. 185 1-4). Discussions along these lines are always useful and all new approaches stimulate research and encourage discoveries of new phenomena. Despite the potentially existing disagreements, the scientific terms ‘optical rogue waves’ and ‘extreme events’ do exist. Therefore coordination of our efforts in either unifying the concept or in introducing alternative definitions must be continued. From

  12. Roadmap on optical rogue waves and extreme events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmediev, Nail; Kibler, Bertrand; Baronio, Fabio; Belić, Milivoj; Zhong, Wei-Ping; Zhang, Yiqi; Chang, Wonkeun; Soto-Crespo, Jose M.; Vouzas, Peter; Grelu, Philippe; Lecaplain, Caroline; Hammani, K.; Rica, S.; Picozzi, A.; Tlidi, Mustapha; Panajotov, Krassimir; Mussot, Arnaud; Bendahmane, Abdelkrim; Szriftgiser, Pascal; Genty, Goery; Dudley, John; Kudlinski, Alexandre; Demircan, Ayhan; Morgner, Uwe; Amiraranashvili, Shalva; Bree, Carsten; Steinmeyer, Günter; Masoller, C.; Broderick, Neil G. R.; Runge, Antoine F. J.; Erkintalo, Miro; Residori, S.; Bortolozzo, U.; Arecchi, F. T.; Wabnitz, Stefan; Tiofack, C. G.; Coulibaly, S.; Taki, M.

    2016-06-01

    The pioneering paper ‘Optical rogue waves’ by Solli et al (2007 Nature 450 1054) started the new subfield in optics. This work launched a great deal of activity on this novel subject. As a result, the initial concept has expanded and has been enriched by new ideas. Various approaches have been suggested since then. A fresh look at the older results and new discoveries has been undertaken, stimulated by the concept of ‘optical rogue waves’. Presently, there may not by a unique view on how this new scientific term should be used and developed. There is nothing surprising when the opinion of the experts diverge in any new field of research. After all, rogue waves may appear for a multiplicity of reasons and not necessarily only in optical fibers and not only in the process of supercontinuum generation. We know by now that rogue waves may be generated by lasers, appear in wide aperture cavities, in plasmas and in a variety of other optical systems. Theorists, in turn, have suggested many other situations when rogue waves may be observed. The strict definition of a rogue wave is still an open question. For example, it has been suggested that it is defined as ‘an optical pulse whose amplitude or intensity is much higher than that of the surrounding pulses’. This definition (as suggested by a peer reviewer) is clear at the intuitive level and can be easily extended to the case of spatial beams although additional clarifications are still needed. An extended definition has been presented earlier by N Akhmediev and E Pelinovsky (2010 Eur. Phys. J. Spec. Top. 185 1–4). Discussions along these lines are always useful and all new approaches stimulate research and encourage discoveries of new phenomena. Despite the potentially existing disagreements, the scientific terms ‘optical rogue waves’ and ‘extreme events’ do exist. Therefore coordination of our efforts in either unifying the concept or in introducing alternative definitions must be continued. From

  13. Self-similar rogue waves and nonlinear tunneling effects in inhomogeneous nonlinear fiber optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Zhu, Yu-Jie; Jiang, Dong-Yang

    2016-04-01

    Analytical first- and second-order rogue wave solutions of the inhomogeneous modified nonlinear Schrödinger equation are presented by using similarity transformation. Then, by the proper choices of the inhomogeneous coefficients and free parameters, the controllable behaviors of the optical rogue waves are graphically discussed in the nonlinear fiber optics context. It is found that the width of the rogue wave can be tuned by adjusting the parameter ? and the locations of the rogue waves are linearly controlled by the parameter ?. The intensities of the rogue waves are influenced by the inhomogeneous linear gain/loss coefficient ? and parameter ?. The dispersion management function ? has effects on the periods and trajectories of the rogue waves and can induce maintenance (or annihilation) along ? direction. Interestingly, the composite rogue waves are revealed, the location of which is manipulated through changing the dispersion management function ?. Additionally, the nonlinear tunneling of those rogue waves is investigated as they propagate through a dispersion barrier (or well) and nonlinear barrier (or well).

  14. Rogue waves of the Kundu-Eckhaus equation in a chaotic wave field.

    PubMed

    Bayindir, Cihan

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we study the properties of the chaotic wave fields generated in the frame of the Kundu-Eckhaus equation (KEE). Modulation instability results in a chaotic wave field which exhibits small-scale filaments with a free propagation constant, k. The average velocity of the filaments is approximately given by the average group velocity calculated from the dispersion relation for the plane-wave solution; however, direction of propagation is controlled by the β parameter, the constant in front of the Raman-effect term. We have also calculated the probabilities of the rogue wave occurrence for various values of propagation constant k and showed that the probability of rogue wave occurrence depends on k. Additionally, we have showed that the probability of rogue wave occurrence significantly depends on the quintic and the Raman-effect nonlinear terms of the KEE. Statistical comparisons between the KEE and the cubic nonlinear Schrödinger equation have also been presented.

  15. Dust-acoustic waves modulational instability and rogue waves in a polarized dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bouzit, Omar; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2015-10-15

    The polarization force-induced changes in the dust-acoustic waves (DAWs) modulational instability (MI) are examined. Using the reductive perturbation method, the nonlinear Schrödinger equation that governs the MI of the DAWs is obtained. It is found that the effect of the polarization term R is to narrow the wave number domain for the onset of instability. The amplitude of the wave envelope decreases as R increases, meaning that the polarization force effects render weaker the associated DA rogue waves. The latter may therefore completely damp in the vicinity of R ∼ 1, i.e., as the polarization force becomes close to the electrostatic one (the net force acting on the dust particles becomes vanishingly small). The DA rogue wave profile is very sensitive to any change in the restoring force acting on the dust particles. It turns out that the polarization effects may completely smear out the DA rogue waves.

  16. Rogue waves of the Kundu-Eckhaus equation in a chaotic wave field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayindir, Cihan

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we study the properties of the chaotic wave fields generated in the frame of the Kundu-Eckhaus equation (KEE). Modulation instability results in a chaotic wave field which exhibits small-scale filaments with a free propagation constant, k . The average velocity of the filaments is approximately given by the average group velocity calculated from the dispersion relation for the plane-wave solution; however, direction of propagation is controlled by the β parameter, the constant in front of the Raman-effect term. We have also calculated the probabilities of the rogue wave occurrence for various values of propagation constant k and showed that the probability of rogue wave occurrence depends on k . Additionally, we have showed that the probability of rogue wave occurrence significantly depends on the quintic and the Raman-effect nonlinear terms of the KEE. Statistical comparisons between the KEE and the cubic nonlinear Schrödinger equation have also been presented.

  17. Controlling formation and suppression of fiber-optical rogue waves.

    PubMed

    Brée, Carsten; Steinmeyer, Günter; Babushkin, Ihar; Morgner, Uwe; Demircan, Ayhan

    2016-08-01

    Fiber-optical rogue waves appear as rare but extreme events during optical supercontinuum generation in photonic crystal fibers. This process is typically initiated by the decay of a high-order fundamental soliton into fundamental solitons. Collisions between these solitons as well as with dispersive radiation affect the soliton trajectory in frequency and time upon further propagation. Launching an additional dispersive wave at carefully chosen delay and wavelength enables statistical manipulation of the soliton trajectory in such a way that the probability of rogue wave formation is either enhanced or reduced. To enable efficient control, parameters of the dispersive wave have to be chosen to allow trapping of dispersive radiation in the nonlinear index depression created by the soliton. Under certain conditions, direct manipulation of soliton properties is possible by the dispersive wave. In other more complex scenarios, control is possible via increasing or decreasing the number of intersoliton collisions. The control mechanism reaches a remarkable efficiency, enabling control of relatively large soliton energies. This scenario appears promising for highly dynamic all-optical control of supercontinua. PMID:27472607

  18. The physics of anomalous ('rogue') ocean waves.

    PubMed

    Adcock, Thomas A A; Taylor, Paul H

    2014-10-01

    There is much speculation that the largest and steepest waves may need to be modelled with different physics to the majority of the waves on the open ocean. This review examines the various physical mechanisms which may play an important role in the dynamics of extreme waves. We examine the evidence for these mechanisms in numerical and physical wavetanks, and look at the evidence that such mechanisms might also exist in the real ocean.

  19. Rational solitary wave and rogue wave solutions in coupled defocusing Hirota equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xin

    2016-06-01

    We derive and study a general rational solution of a coupled defocusing Hirota equation which can be used to describe evolution of light in a two-mode fiber with defocusing Kerr effect and some certain high-order effects. We find some new excitation patterns in the model, such as M-shaped soliton, W-shaped soliton, anti-eye-shaped rogue wave and four-petaled flower rogue wave. The results are compared with the solutions obtained in other coupled systems like vector nonlinear Schrödinger equation, coupled focusing Hirota and Sasa-Satsuma equations. We explain the new characters by modulational instability properties. This further indicates that rational solution does not necessarily correspond to rogue wave excitation dynamics and the quantitative relation between nonlinear excitations and modulational instability should exist.

  20. Rogue-pair and dark-bright-rogue waves of the coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations from inhomogeneous femtosecond optical fibers.

    PubMed

    Yomba, Emmanuel; Zakeri, Gholam-Ali

    2016-08-01

    The coupled inhomogeneous Schrödinger equations with a wide range of applications describing a field of pluses with the right and the left polarizations that take into account cross-phase modulations, stimulated Ramani scattering, and absorption effects are investigated. A combination of several different approaches is used in a novel way to obtain the explicit expressions for the rogue-pair and dark-bright-rogue waves. We study the dynamics of these structurally stable rogues and analyze the effects of a parameter that controls the region of stability that intrinsically connects the cross-phase modulation and other Kerr nonlinearity factors. The effects of the right and left polarizations on the shape of the rogue-pair and other solitary rogue waves are graphically analyzed. These rogue-pair waves are studied on periodic and non-periodic settings. We observe that rogue-pair wave from the right and left polarizations has a similar structure while the dark-bright-rogue waves have quite different intensity profiles. PMID:27586611

  1. Rogue-pair and dark-bright-rogue waves of the coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations from inhomogeneous femtosecond optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yomba, Emmanuel; Zakeri, Gholam-Ali

    2016-08-01

    The coupled inhomogeneous Schrödinger equations with a wide range of applications describing a field of pluses with the right and the left polarizations that take into account cross-phase modulations, stimulated Ramani scattering, and absorption effects are investigated. A combination of several different approaches is used in a novel way to obtain the explicit expressions for the rogue-pair and dark-bright-rogue waves. We study the dynamics of these structurally stable rogues and analyze the effects of a parameter that controls the region of stability that intrinsically connects the cross-phase modulation and other Kerr nonlinearity factors. The effects of the right and left polarizations on the shape of the rogue-pair and other solitary rogue waves are graphically analyzed. These rogue-pair waves are studied on periodic and non-periodic settings. We observe that rogue-pair wave from the right and left polarizations has a similar structure while the dark-bright-rogue waves have quite different intensity profiles.

  2. Localized modes of the Hirota equation: Nth order rogue wave and a separation of variable technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Gui; Qin, Zhenyun; Chow, Kwok Wing; Ee, Bernard K.

    2016-10-01

    The Hirota equation is a special extension of the intensively studied nonlinear Schrödinger equation, by incorporating third order dispersion and one form of the self-steepening effect. Higher order rogue waves of the Hirota equation can be calculated theoretically through a Darboux-dressing transformation by a separation of variable approach. A Taylor expansion is used and no derivative calculation is invoked. Furthermore, stability of these rogue waves is studied computationally. By tracing the evolution of an exact solution perturbed by random noise, it is found that second order rogue waves are generally less stable than first order ones.

  3. Soliton's eigenvalue based analysis on the generation mechanism of rogue wave phenomenon in optical fibers exhibiting weak third order dispersion.

    PubMed

    Weerasekara, Gihan; Tokunaga, Akihiro; Terauchi, Hiroki; Eberhard, Marc; Maruta, Akihiro

    2015-01-12

    One of the extraordinary aspects of nonlinear wave evolution which has been observed as the spontaneous occurrence of astonishing and statistically extraordinary amplitude wave is called rogue wave. We show that the eigenvalues of the associated equation of nonlinear Schrödinger equation are almost constant in the vicinity of rogue wave and we validate that optical rogue waves are formed by the collision between quasi-solitons in anomalous dispersion fiber exhibiting weak third order dispersion.

  4. Nonlinear dynamics of trapped waves on jet currents and rogue waves.

    PubMed

    Shrira, V I; Slunyaev, A V

    2014-04-01

    Nonlinear dynamics of surface gravity waves trapped by an opposing jet current is studied analytically and numerically. For wave fields narrow band in frequency but not necessarily with narrow angular distributions the developed asymptotic weakly nonlinear theory based on the modal approach of Shrira and Slunyaev [J. Fluid. Mech. 738, 65 (2014)] leads to the one-dimensional modified nonlinear Schrödinger equation of self-focusing type for a single mode. Its solutions such as envelope solitons and breathers are considered to be prototypes of rogue waves; these solutions, in contrast to waves in the absence of currents, are robust with respect to transverse perturbations, which suggests a potentially higher probability of rogue waves. Robustness of the long-lived analytical solutions describing modulated trapped waves and solitary wave groups is verified by direct numerical simulations of potential Euler equations. PMID:24827178

  5. Nonlinear dynamics of trapped waves on jet currents and rogue waves.

    PubMed

    Shrira, V I; Slunyaev, A V

    2014-04-01

    Nonlinear dynamics of surface gravity waves trapped by an opposing jet current is studied analytically and numerically. For wave fields narrow band in frequency but not necessarily with narrow angular distributions the developed asymptotic weakly nonlinear theory based on the modal approach of Shrira and Slunyaev [J. Fluid. Mech. 738, 65 (2014)] leads to the one-dimensional modified nonlinear Schrödinger equation of self-focusing type for a single mode. Its solutions such as envelope solitons and breathers are considered to be prototypes of rogue waves; these solutions, in contrast to waves in the absence of currents, are robust with respect to transverse perturbations, which suggests a potentially higher probability of rogue waves. Robustness of the long-lived analytical solutions describing modulated trapped waves and solitary wave groups is verified by direct numerical simulations of potential Euler equations.

  6. High-order rogue wave solutions for the coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Li-Chen; Guo, Boling; Ling, Liming

    2016-04-01

    We study on dynamics of high-order rogue wave in two-component coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations. Based on the generalized Darboux transformation and formal series method, we obtain the high-order rogue wave solution without the special limitation on the wave vectors. As an application, we exhibit the first, second-order rogue wave solutions and the superposition of them by computer plotting. We find the distribution patterns for vector rogue waves are much more abundant than the ones for scalar rogue waves, and also different from the ones obtained with the constrain conditions on background fields. The results further enrich and deepen our realization on rogue wave excitation dynamics in such diverse fields as Bose-Einstein condensates, nonlinear fibers, and superfluids.

  7. Biological multi-rogue waves in discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation with saturable nonlinearities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchinang Tchameu, J. D.; Togueu Motcheyo, A. B.; Tchawoua, C.

    2016-09-01

    The discrete multi-rogue waves (DMRW) as solution of the discrete nonlinear Schrödinger (DNLS) equation with saturable nonlinearities is studied numerically. These biological rogue waves represent the complex probability amplitude of finding an amide-I vibrational quantum at a site. We observe that the growth in the higher order saturable nonlinearity implies the formation of DMRW including an increase in the short-living DMRW and a decrease in amplitude of the long-living DMRW.

  8. Wave Turbulence in Superfluid {sup 4}He: Energy Cascades and Rogue Waves in the Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Efimov, V. B.; Ganshin, A. N.; McClintock, P. V. E.; Kolmakov, G. V.; Mezhov-Deglin, L. P.

    2008-11-13

    Recent work on second sound acoustic turbulence in superfluid {sup 4}He is reviewed. Observations of forward and inverse energy cascades are described. The onset of the inverse cascade occurs above a critical driving energy and it is accompanied by giant waves that constitute an acoustic analogue of the rogue waves that occasionally appear on the surface of the ocean. The theory of the phenomenon is outlined and shown to be in good agreement with the experiments.

  9. Ocean rogue waves and their phase space dynamics in the limit of a linear interference model

    PubMed Central

    Birkholz, Simon; Brée, Carsten; Veselić, Ivan; Demircan, Ayhan; Steinmeyer, Günter

    2016-01-01

    We reanalyse the probability for formation of extreme waves using the simple model of linear interference of a finite number of elementary waves with fixed amplitude and random phase fluctuations. Under these model assumptions no rogue waves appear when less than 10 elementary waves interfere with each other. Above this threshold rogue wave formation becomes increasingly likely, with appearance frequencies that may even exceed long-term observations by an order of magnitude. For estimation of the effective number of interfering waves, we suggest the Grassberger-Procaccia dimensional analysis of individual time series. For the ocean system, it is further shown that the resulting phase space dimension may vary, such that the threshold for rogue wave formation is not always reached. Time series analysis as well as the appearance of particular focusing wind conditions may enable an effective forecast of such rogue-wave prone situations. In particular, extracting the dimension from ocean time series allows much more specific estimation of the rogue wave probability. PMID:27731411

  10. Ion-acoustic super rogue waves in ultracold neutral plasmas with nonthermal electrons

    SciTech Connect

    El-Tantawy, S. A.; El-Bedwehy, N. A.; El-Labany, S. K.

    2013-07-15

    The ion-acoustic rogue waves in ultracold neutral plasmas consisting of ion fluid and nonthermal electrons are reported. A reductive perturbation method is used to obtain a nonlinear Schrödinger equation for describing the system and the modulation instability of the ion-acoustic wave is analyzed. The critical wave number k{sub c}, which indicates where the modulational instability sets in, has been determined. Moreover, the possible region for the ion-acoustic rogue waves to exist is defined precisely. The effects of the nonthermal parameter β and the ions effective temperature ratio σ{sub *} on the critical wave number k{sub c} are studied. It is found that there are two critical wave numbers in our plasma system. For low wave number, increasing β would lead to cringe k{sub c} until β approaches to its critical value β{sub c}, then further increase of β beyond β{sub c} would enhance the values of k{sub c}. For large wave numbers, the increase of β would lead to a decrease of k{sub c}. However, increasing σ{sub *} would lead to the reduction of k{sub c} for all values of the wave number. The dependence of the rogue waves profile on the plasma parameters is numerically examined. It is found that the rogue wave amplitudes have complex behavior with increasing β. Furthermore, the enhancement of σ{sub *} and the carrier wave number k reduces the rogue wave amplitude. It is noticed that near to the critical wave number, the rogue wave amplitude becomes high, but it shrinks whenever we stepped away from k{sub c}. The implications of our results in laboratory ultracold neutral plasma experiments are briefly discussed.

  11. High-order rogue waves of the coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations with negative coherent coupling in an isotropic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wen-Rong; Tian, Bo; Xie, Xi-Yang; Chai, Jun; Jiang, Yan

    2016-10-01

    High-order rogue waves of the coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations with negative coherent coupling, which describe the propagation of orthogonally polarized optical waves in an isotropic medium, are reported in this paper. Key point lies in the introduction of a limit process in the Darboux transformation, with which we obtain a family of the first- and second-order rational solutions for the purpose of modelling the rogue waves. We observe that the double-hump rogue wave in the course of evolution turns into the one-hump rogue wave, and that the dark rogue wave with four valleys in the course of evolution turns into the bright rogue wave. It is found that the second-order rogue wave can split up, giving birth to the multiple rogue waves.

  12. Ion acoustic kinetic Alfvén rogue waves in two temperature electrons superthermal plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Nimardeep; Saini, N. S.

    2016-10-01

    The propagation properties of ion acoustic kinetic Alfvén (IAKA) solitary and rogue waves have been investigated in two temperature electrons magnetized superthermal plasma in the presence of dust impurity. A nonlinear analysis is carried out to derive the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation using the reductive perturbation method (RPM) describing the evolution of solitary waves. The effect of various plasma parameters on the characteristics of the IAKA solitary waves is studied. The dynamics of ion acoustic kinetic Alfvén rogue waves (IAKARWs) are also studied by transforming the KdV equation into nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation. The characteristics of rogue wave profile under the influence of various plasma parameters (κc, μc, σ , θ) are examined numerically by using the data of Saturn's magnetosphere (Schippers et al. 2008; Sakai et al. 2013).

  13. Rogue wave variational modelling through the interaction of two solitary waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gidel, Floriane; Bokhove, Onno

    2016-04-01

    The extreme and unexpected characteristics of Rogue waves have made them legendary for centuries. It is only on the 1st of January 1995 that these mariners' tales started to raise scientist's curiosity, when such a wave was recorded in the North Sea; a sudden wall of water hit the Draupner offshore platform, more than twice higher than the other waves, providing evidence of the existence of rogue or freak waves. Since then, studies have shown that these surface gravity waves of high amplitude (at least twice the height of the other sea waves [Dyste et al., 2008]) appear in non-linear dispersive water motion [Drazin and Johnson, 1989], at any depth, and have caused a lot of damage in recent years [Nikolkina and Didenkulova, 2011 ]. So far, most of the studies have tried to determine their probability of occurrence, but no conclusion has been achieved yet, which means that we are currently unenable to predict or avoid these monster waves. An accurate mathematical and numerical water-wave model would enable simulation and observation of this external forcing on boats and offshore structures and hence reduce their threat. In this work, we aim to model rogue waves through a soliton splash generated by the interaction of two solitons coming from different channels at a specific angle. Kodama indeed showed that one way to produce extreme waves is through the intersection of two solitary waves, or one solitary wave and its oblique reflection on a vertical wall [Yeh, Li and Kodama, 2010 ]. While he modelled Mach reflection from Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (KP) theory, we aim to model rogue waves from the three-dimensional potential flow equations and/or their asymptotic equivalent described by Benney and Luke [Benney and Luke, 1964]. These theories have the advantage to allow wave propagation in several directions, which is not the case with KP equations. The initial solitary waves are generated by removing a sluice gate in each channel. The equations are derived through a

  14. Akhmediev breathers, Kuznetsov-Ma solitons and rogue waves in a dispersion varying optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wen-Rong; Tian, Bo; Sun, Ya; Chai, Jun; Jiang, Yan

    2016-03-01

    Dispersion varying fibres have applications in optical pulse compression techniques. We investigate Akhmediev breathers, Kuznetsov-Ma (KM) solitons and optical rogue waves in a dispersion varying optical fibre based on a variable-coefficient nonlinear Schrödinger equation. Analytical solutions in the forms of Akhmediev breathers, KM solitons and rogue waves up to the second order of that equation are obtained via the generalised Darboux transformation and integrable constraint. The properties of Akhmediev breathers, KM solitons and rogue waves in a dispersion varying optical fibre, e.g. dispersion decreasing fibre (DDF) or a periodically distributed system (PDS), are discussed: in a DDF we observe the compression behaviours of KM solitons and rogue waves on a monotonically increasing background. The amplitude of each peak of the KM soliton increases, while the width of each peak of the KM soliton gradually decreases along the propagation distance; in a PDS, the amplitude of each peak of the KM soliton varies periodically along the propagation distance on a periodic background. Different from the KM soliton, the Akhmediev breather and rogue waves repeat their behaviours along the propagation distance without the compression.

  15. Generation of acoustic rogue waves in dusty plasmas through three-dimensional particle focusing by distorted waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Ya-Yi; Tsai, Jun-Yi; I, Lin

    2016-06-01

    Rogue waves--rare uncertainly emerging localized events with large amplitudes--have been experimentally observed in many nonlinear wave phenomena, such as water waves, optical waves, second sound in superfluid He II (ref. ) and ion acoustic waves in plasmas. Past studies have mainly focused on one-dimensional (1D) wave behaviour through modulation instabilities, and to a lesser extent on higher-dimensional behaviour. The question whether rogue waves also exist in nonlinear 3D acoustic-type plasma waves, the kinetic origin of their formation and their correlation with surrounding 3D waveforms are unexplored fundamental issues. Here we report the direct experimental observation of dust acoustic rogue waves in dusty plasmas and construct a picture of 3D particle focusing by the surrounding tilted and ruptured wave crests, associated with the higher probability of low-amplitude holes for rogue-wave generation.

  16. On the rogue waves propagation in non-Maxwellian complex space plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    El-Tantawy, S. A. El-Awady, E. I.; Tribeche, M. E-mail: mtribeche@usthb.dz

    2015-11-15

    The implications of the non-Maxwellian electron distributions (nonthermal/or suprathermal/or nonextensive distributions) are examined on the dust-ion acoustic (DIA) rogue/freak waves in a dusty warm plasma. Using a reductive perturbation technique, the basic set of fluid equations is reduced to a nonlinear Schrödinger equation. The latter is used to study the nonlinear evolution of modulationally unstable DIA wavepackets and to describe the rogue waves (RWs) propagation. Rogue waves are large-amplitude short-lived wave groups, routinely observed in space plasmas. The possible region for the rogue waves to exist is defined precisely for typical parameters of space plasmas. It is shown that the RWs strengthen for decreasing plasma nonthermality and increasing superthermality. For nonextensive electrons, the RWs amplitude exhibits a bit more complex behavior, depending on the entropic index q. Moreover, our numerical results reveal that the RWs exist with all values of the ion-to-electron temperature ratio σ for nonthermal and superthermal distributions and there is no limitation for the freak waves to propagate in both two distributions in the present plasma system. But, for nonextensive electron distribution, the bright- and dark-type waves can propagate in this case, which means that there is a limitation for the existence of freak waves. Our systematic investigation should be useful in understanding the properties of DIA solitary waves that may occur in non-Maxwellian space plasmas.

  17. Decay of capillary wave turbulence.

    PubMed

    Deike, Luc; Berhanu, Michael; Falcon, Eric

    2012-06-01

    We report on the observation of freely decaying capillary wave turbulence on the surface of a fluid. The capillary wave turbulence spectrum decay is found to be self-similar in time with the same power law exponent as the one found in the stationary regime, in agreement with weak turbulence predictions. The amplitude of all Fourier modes are found to decrease exponentially with time at the same damping rate. The longest wavelengths involved in the system are shown to be damped by a viscous surface boundary layer. These long waves play the role of an energy source during the decay that sustains nonlinear interactions to keep capillary waves in a wave turbulent state.

  18. Multi-soliton, multi-breather and higher order rogue wave solutions to the complex short pulse equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Liming; Feng, Bao-Feng; Zhu, Zuonong

    2016-07-01

    In the present paper, we are concerned with the general analytic solutions to the complex short pulse (CSP) equation including soliton, breather and rogue wave solutions. With the aid of a generalized Darboux transformation, we construct the N-bright soliton solution in a compact determinant form, the N-breather solution including the Akhmediev breather and a general higher order rogue wave solution. The first and second order rogue wave solutions are given explicitly and analyzed. The asymptotic analysis is performed rigorously for both the N-soliton and the N-breather solutions. All three forms of the analytical solutions admit either smoothed-, cusped- or looped-type ones for the CSP equation depending on the parameters. It is noted that, due to the reciprocal (hodograph) transformation, the rogue wave solution to the CSP equation can be a smoothed, cusponed or a looped one, which is different from the rogue wave solution found so far.

  19. Amplification of matter rogue waves and breathers in quasi-two-dimensional Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manikandan, K.; Senthilvelan, M.; Kraenkel, R. A.

    2016-02-01

    We construct rogue wave and breather solutions of a quasi-two-dimensional Gross-Pitaevskii equation with a time-dependent interatomic interaction and external trap. We show that the trapping potential and an arbitrary functional parameter that present in the similarity transformation should satisfy a constraint for the considered equation to be integrable and yield the desired solutions. We consider two different forms of functional parameters and investigate how the density of the rogue wave and breather profiles vary with respect to these functional parameters. We also construct vector localized solutions of a two coupled quasi-two-dimensional Bose-Einstein condensate system. We then investigate how the vector localized density profiles modify in the constant density background with respect to the functional parameters. Our results may help to manipulate matter rogue waves experimentally in the two-dimensional Bose-Einstein condensate systems.

  20. Rogue waves for a system of coupled derivative nonlinear Schrödinger equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Hiu Ning; Malomed, Boris; Chow, Kwok Wing

    2015-11-01

    Previous works in the literature on water waves have demonstrated that the fourth-order evolution of gravity waves in deep water will be governed by a higher order nonlinear Schrödinger equation. In the presence of two wave trains, the system is described by a higher order coupled nonlinear Schrödinger system. Through a gauge transformation, these evolution equations are reduced to a coupled derivative nonlinear Schrödinger system. The goal here is to study rogue waves, unexpectedly large displacements from an equilibrium position, through the Hirota bilinear transformation theoretically. The connections between the onset of rogue waves and modulation instability are investigated. The range of cubic nonlinearity allowing rogue wave formation is elucidated. Under a finite group velocity mismatch between the two components, the existence regime for rogue waves is extended as compared to the case with a single wave train. The amplification ratio of the amplitude can be higher than that of the single component nonlinear Schrödinger equation. Partial financial support has been provided by the Research Grants Council through contracts HKU711713E and HKU17200815.

  1. Dust-acoustic solitary and rogue waves in a Thomas-Fermi degenerate dusty plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irfan, M.; Ali, S.; Mirza, Arshad M.

    2014-10-01

    The formation and propagation of dust-acoustic (DA) solitary and rogue waves are studied in a non-relativistic degenerate Thomas-Fermi thermal dusty plasma incorporating transverse velocity perturbation effects. The electrons and ions are described by the Thomas-Fermi density distributions, whereas the dust grains are taken as dynamic and classical. By using the reductive perturbation technique, the cylindrical Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (CKP) equation is derived, which is then transformed into a Korteweg-deVries (KdV) equation by using appropriate variable transformations. The latter admits a solitary wave solution. However, when the carrier waves frequency is much smaller than the dust plasma frequency, the DA waves evolve into the nonlinear modulation instability, generating modulated wave packets in the form of Rogue waves. For the study of DA-rogue waves, the KdV equation is transformed into a self-focusing nonlinear Schrödinger equation. The variation of dust temperature and the electron density affects the nonlinearity and dispersion coefficients which suppress the amplitudes of the DA solitary and rogue waves. The present results aim to describe the nonlinear electrostatic excitations in astrophysical degenerate dense plasma.

  2. Raman rogue waves in a partially mode-locked fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Runge, Antoine F J; Aguergaray, Claude; Broderick, Neil G R; Erkintalo, Miro

    2014-01-15

    We report on an experimental study of spectral fluctuations induced by intracavity Raman conversion in a passively partially mode-locked, all-normal dispersion fiber laser. Specifically, we use dispersive Fourier transformation to measure single-shot spectra of Raman-induced noise-like pulses, demonstrating that for low cavity gain values Raman emission is sporadic and follows rogue-wave-like probability distributions, while a saturated regime with Gaussian statistics is obtained for high pump powers. Our experiments further reveal intracavity rogue waves originating from cascaded Raman dynamics. PMID:24562136

  3. An adaptive filter for studying the life cycle of optical rogue waves.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chu; Rees, Eric J; Laurila, Toni; Jian, Shuisheng; Kaminski, Clemens F

    2010-12-01

    We present an adaptive numerical filter for analyzing fiber-length dependent properties of optical rogue waves, which are highly intense and extremely red-shifted solitons that arise during supercontinuum generation in photonic crystal fiber. We use this filter to study a data set of 1000 simulated supercontinuum pulses, produced from 5 ps pump pulses containing random noise. Optical rogue waves arise in different supercontinuum pulses at various positions along the fiber, and exhibit a lifecycle: their intensity peaks over a finite range of fiber length before declining slowly.

  4. Modelling rogue waves through exact dynamical lump soliton controlled by ocean currents.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Anjan; Mukherjee, Abhik; Naskar, Tapan

    2014-04-01

    Rogue waves are extraordinarily high and steep isolated waves, which appear suddenly in a calm sea and disappear equally fast. However, though the rogue waves are localized surface waves, their theoretical models and experimental observations are available mostly in one dimension, with the majority of them admitting only limited and fixed amplitude and modular inclination of the wave. We propose two dimensions, exactly solvable nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation derivable from the basic hydrodynamic equations and endowed with integrable structures. The proposed two-dimensional equation exhibits modulation instability and frequency correction induced by the nonlinear effect, with a directional preference, all of which can be determined through precise analytic result. The two-dimensional NLS equation allows also an exact lump soliton which can model a full-grown surface rogue wave with adjustable height and modular inclination. The lump soliton under the influence of an ocean current appears and disappears preceded by a hole state, with its dynamics controlled by the current term. These desirable properties make our exact model promising for describing ocean rogue waves.

  5. Modelling rogue waves through exact dynamical lump soliton controlled by ocean currents

    PubMed Central

    Kundu, Anjan; Mukherjee, Abhik; Naskar, Tapan

    2014-01-01

    Rogue waves are extraordinarily high and steep isolated waves, which appear suddenly in a calm sea and disappear equally fast. However, though the rogue waves are localized surface waves, their theoretical models and experimental observations are available mostly in one dimension, with the majority of them admitting only limited and fixed amplitude and modular inclination of the wave. We propose two dimensions, exactly solvable nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation derivable from the basic hydrodynamic equations and endowed with integrable structures. The proposed two-dimensional equation exhibits modulation instability and frequency correction induced by the nonlinear effect, with a directional preference, all of which can be determined through precise analytic result. The two-dimensional NLS equation allows also an exact lump soliton which can model a full-grown surface rogue wave with adjustable height and modular inclination. The lump soliton under the influence of an ocean current appears and disappears preceded by a hole state, with its dynamics controlled by the current term. These desirable properties make our exact model promising for describing ocean rogue waves. PMID:24711719

  6. Vector rogue waves and dark-bright boomeronic solitons in autonomous and nonautonomous settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mareeswaran, R. Babu; Charalampidis, E. G.; Kanna, T.; Kevrekidis, P. G.; Frantzeskakis, D. J.

    2014-10-01

    In this work we consider the dynamics of vector rogue waves and dark-bright solitons in two-component nonlinear Schrödinger equations with various physically motivated time-dependent nonlinearity coefficients, as well as spatiotemporally dependent potentials. A similarity transformation is utilized to convert the system into the integrable Manakov system and subsequently the vector rogue and dark-bright boomeronlike soliton solutions of the latter are converted back into ones of the original nonautonomous model. Using direct numerical simulations we find that, in most cases, the rogue wave formation is rapidly followed by a modulational instability that leads to the emergence of an expanding soliton train. Scenarios different than this generic phenomenology are also reported.

  7. Solitons and Rogue Waves for a Higher-Order Nonlinear Schrödinger-Maxwell-Bloch System in an Erbium-Doped Fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Chuan-Qi; Gao, Yi-Tian; Xue, Long; Yu, Xin

    2015-10-01

    Under investigation in this article is a higher-order nonlinear Schrödinger-Maxwell-Bloch (HNLS-MB) system for the optical pulse propagation in an erbium-doped fiber. Lax pair, Darboux transformation (DT), and generalised DT for the HNLS-MB system are constructed. Soliton solutions and rogue wave solutions are derived based on the DT and generalised DT, respectively. Properties of the solitons and rogue waves are graphically presented. The third-order dispersion parameter, fourth-order dispersion parameter, and frequency detuning all influence the characteristic lines and velocities of the solitons. The frequency detuning also affects the amplitudes of solitons. The separating function has no effect on the properties of the first-order rogue waves, except for the locations where the first-order rogue waves appear. The third-order dispersion parameter affects the propagation directions and shapes of the rogue waves. The frequency detuning influences the rogue-wave types of the module for the measure of polarization of resonant medium and the extant population inversion. The fourth-order dispersion parameter impacts the rogue-wave interaction range and also has an effect on the rogue-wave type of the extant population inversion. The value of separating function affects the spatial-temporal separation of constituting elementary rogue waves for the second-order and third-order rogue waves. The second-order and third-order rogue waves can exhibit the triangular and pentagon patterns under different choices of separating functions.

  8. Nonlinear random optical waves: Integrable turbulence, rogue waves and intermittency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randoux, Stéphane; Walczak, Pierre; Onorato, Miguel; Suret, Pierre

    2016-10-01

    We examine the general question of statistical changes experienced by ensembles of nonlinear random waves propagating in systems ruled by integrable equations. In our study that enters within the framework of integrable turbulence, we specifically focus on optical fiber systems accurately described by the integrable one-dimensional nonlinear Schrödinger equation. We consider random complex fields having a Gaussian statistics and an infinite extension at initial stage. We use numerical simulations with periodic boundary conditions and optical fiber experiments to investigate spectral and statistical changes experienced by nonlinear waves in focusing and in defocusing propagation regimes. As a result of nonlinear propagation, the power spectrum of the random wave broadens and takes exponential wings both in focusing and in defocusing regimes. Heavy-tailed deviations from Gaussian statistics are observed in focusing regime while low-tailed deviations from Gaussian statistics are observed in defocusing regime. After some transient evolution, the wave system is found to exhibit a statistically stationary state in which neither the probability density function of the wave field nor the spectrum changes with the evolution variable. Separating fluctuations of small scale from fluctuations of large scale both in focusing and defocusing regimes, we reveal the phenomenon of intermittency; i.e., small scales are characterized by large heavy-tailed deviations from Gaussian statistics, while the large ones are almost Gaussian.

  9. Influence of optical activity on rogue waves propagating in chiral optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temgoua, D. D. Estelle; Kofane, T. C.

    2016-06-01

    We derive the nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation in chiral optical fiber with right- and left-hand nonlinear polarization. We use the similarity transformation to reduce the generalized chiral NLS equation to the higher-order integrable Hirota equation. We present the first- and second-order rational solutions of the chiral NLS equation with variable and constant coefficients, based on the modified Darboux transformation method. For some specific set of parameters, the features of chiral optical rogue waves are analyzed from analytical results, showing the influence of optical activity on waves. We also generate the exact solutions of the two-component coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations, which describe optical activity effects on the propagation of rogue waves, and their properties in linear and nonlinear coupling cases are investigated. The condition of modulation instability of the background reveals the existence of vector rogue waves and the number of stable and unstable branches. Controllability of chiral optical rogue waves is examined by numerical simulations and may bring potential applications in optical fibers and in many other physical systems.

  10. Influence of optical activity on rogue waves propagating in chiral optical fibers.

    PubMed

    Temgoua, D D Estelle; Kofane, T C

    2016-06-01

    We derive the nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation in chiral optical fiber with right- and left-hand nonlinear polarization. We use the similarity transformation to reduce the generalized chiral NLS equation to the higher-order integrable Hirota equation. We present the first- and second-order rational solutions of the chiral NLS equation with variable and constant coefficients, based on the modified Darboux transformation method. For some specific set of parameters, the features of chiral optical rogue waves are analyzed from analytical results, showing the influence of optical activity on waves. We also generate the exact solutions of the two-component coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations, which describe optical activity effects on the propagation of rogue waves, and their properties in linear and nonlinear coupling cases are investigated. The condition of modulation instability of the background reveals the existence of vector rogue waves and the number of stable and unstable branches. Controllability of chiral optical rogue waves is examined by numerical simulations and may bring potential applications in optical fibers and in many other physical systems. PMID:27415269

  11. Kinetic Alfvén solitary and rogue waves in superthermal plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bains, A. S.; Li, Bo Xia, Li-Dong

    2014-03-15

    We investigate the small but finite amplitude solitary Kinetic Alfvén waves (KAWs) in low β plasmas with superthermal electrons modeled by a kappa-type distribution. A nonlinear Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation describing the evolution of KAWs is derived by using the standard reductive perturbation method. Examining the dependence of the nonlinear and dispersion coefficients of the KdV equation on the superthermal parameter κ, plasma β, and obliqueness of propagation, we show that these parameters may change substantially the shape and size of solitary KAW pulses. Only sub-Alfvénic, compressive solitons are supported. We then extend the study to examine kinetic Alfvén rogue waves by deriving a nonlinear Schrödinger equation from the KdV equation. Rational solutions that form rogue wave envelopes are obtained. We examine how the behavior of rogue waves depends on the plasma parameters in question, finding that the rogue envelopes are lowered with increasing electron superthermality whereas the opposite is true when the plasma β increases. The findings of this study may find applications to low β plasmas in astrophysical environments where particles are superthermally distributed.

  12. Rogue waves generation via nonlinear soliton collision in multiple-soliton state of a mode-locked fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Peng, Junsong; Tarasov, Nikita; Sugavanam, Srikanth; Churkin, Dmitry

    2016-09-19

    We report for the first time, rogue waves generation in a mode-locked fiber laser that worked in multiple-soliton state in which hundreds of solitons occupied the whole laser cavity. Using real-time spatio-temporal intensity dynamics measurements, it is unveiled that nonlinear soliton collision accounts for the formation of rogue waves in this laser state. The nature of interactions between solitons are also discussed. Our observation may suggest similar formation mechanisms of rogue waves in other systems. PMID:27661869

  13. Mechanical energy fluctuations in granular chains: the possibility of rogue fluctuations or waves.

    PubMed

    Han, Ding; Westley, Matthew; Sen, Surajit

    2014-09-01

    The existence of rogue or freak waves in the ocean has been known for some time. They have been reported in the context of optical lattices and the financial market. We ask whether such waves are generic to late time behavior in nonlinear systems. In that vein, we examine the dynamics of an alignment of spherical elastic beads held within fixed, rigid walls at zero precompression when they are subjected to sufficiently rich initial conditions. Here we define such waves generically as unusually large energy fluctuations that sustain for short periods of time. Our simulations suggest that such unusually large fluctuations ("hot spots") and occasional series of such fluctuations through space and time ("rogue fluctuations") are likely to exist in the late time dynamics of the granular chain system at zero dissipation. We show that while hot spots are common in late time evolution, rogue fluctuations are seen in purely nonlinear systems (i.e., no precompression) at late enough times. We next show that the number of such fluctuations grows exponentially with increasing nonlinearity whereas rogue fluctuations decrease superexponentially with increasing precompression. Dissipation-free granular alignment systems may be possible to realize as integrated circuits and hence our observations may potentially be testable in the laboratory.

  14. Mechanical energy fluctuations in granular chains: The possibility of rogue fluctuations or waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Ding; Westley, Matthew; Sen, Surajit

    2014-09-01

    The existence of rogue or freak waves in the ocean has been known for some time. They have been reported in the context of optical lattices and the financial market. We ask whether such waves are generic to late time behavior in nonlinear systems. In that vein, we examine the dynamics of an alignment of spherical elastic beads held within fixed, rigid walls at zero precompression when they are subjected to sufficiently rich initial conditions. Here we define such waves generically as unusually large energy fluctuations that sustain for short periods of time. Our simulations suggest that such unusually large fluctuations ("hot spots") and occasional series of such fluctuations through space and time ("rogue fluctuations") are likely to exist in the late time dynamics of the granular chain system at zero dissipation. We show that while hot spots are common in late time evolution, rogue fluctuations are seen in purely nonlinear systems (i.e., no precompression) at late enough times. We next show that the number of such fluctuations grows exponentially with increasing nonlinearity whereas rogue fluctuations decrease superexponentially with increasing precompression. Dissipation-free granular alignment systems may be possible to realize as integrated circuits and hence our observations may potentially be testable in the laboratory.

  15. Rogue waves for a coupled nonlinear Schrödinger system in a multi-mode fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui-Min; Tian, Bo; Wang, Deng-Shan; Sun, Wen-Rong; Xie, Xi-Yang; Liu, Lei

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we investigate the rogue waves for an integrable coupled nonlinear Schrödinger (CNLS) system with the self-phase modulation, cross-phase modulation and four-wave mixing term, which can describe the propagation of optical waves in a multi-mode fibre. We construct a generalized Darboux transformation (GDT) for the CNLS system and find a gauge transformation which converts the Lax pair into the constant-coefficient differential equations. Solving those equations, we can obtain the vector solutions of the Lax pair. Using the GDT, we derive an iterative formula for the nth-order rogue-wave solutions for the CNLS system. We derive the first- and second-order rogue-wave solutions for the CNLS system and analyse the profiles for the rogue waves with respect to the self-phase modulation term a, cross-phase modulation term c and four-wave mixing term b, respectively. The rogue waves become thinner with the increase in the value for the real part of b and that the effect of a or c on the rogue waves is the same as the one of the real part of b.

  16. Two-dimensional cylindrical ion-acoustic solitary and rogue waves in ultrarelativistic plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ata-ur-Rahman; Ali, S.; Moslem, W. M.; Mushtaq, A.

    2013-07-15

    The propagation of ion-acoustic (IA) solitary and rogue waves is investigated in a two-dimensional ultrarelativistic degenerate warm dense plasma. By using the reductive perturbation technique, the cylindrical Kadomtsev–Petviashvili (KP) equation is derived, which can be further transformed into a Korteweg–de Vries (KdV) equation. The latter admits a solitary wave solution. However, when the frequency of the carrier wave is much smaller than the ion plasma frequency, the KdV equation can be transferred to a nonlinear Schrödinger equation to study the nonlinear evolution of modulationally unstable modified IA wavepackets. The propagation characteristics of the IA solitary and rogue waves are strongly influenced by the variation of different plasma parameters in an ultrarelativistic degenerate dense plasma. The present results might be helpful to understand the nonlinear electrostatic excitations in astrophysical degenerate dense plasmas.

  17. Analytical solutions and rogue waves in (3+1)-dimensional nonlinear Schrödinger equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Zheng-Yi; Ma, Song-Hua

    2012-03-01

    Analytical solutions in terms of rational-like functions are presented for a (3+1)-dimensional nonlinear Schrödinger equation with time-varying coefficients and a harmonica potential using the similarity transformation and a direct ansatz. Several free functions of time t are involved to generate abundant wave structures. Three types of elementary functions are chosen to exhibit the corresponding nonlinear rogue wave propagations.

  18. Peregrine rogue wave dynamics in the continuous nonlinear Schrödinger system with parity-time symmetric Kerr nonlinearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Samit Kumar; Sarma, Amarendra K.

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we have studied the peregrine rogue wave dynamics, with a solitons on finite background (SFB) ansatz, in the recently proposed (Ablowitz and Musslimani, (2013) [31]) continuous nonlinear Schrödinger system with parity-time symmetric Kerr nonlinearity. We have found that the continuous nonlinear Schrödinger system with PT-symmetric nonlinearity also admits Peregrine soliton solution. Motivated by the fact that Peregrine solitons are regarded as prototypical solutions of rogue waves, we have studied Peregrine rogue wave dynamics in the c-PTNLSE model. Upon numerical computation, we observe the appearance of low-intense Kuznetsov-Ma (KM) soliton trains in the absence of transverse shift (unbroken PT-symmetry) and well-localized high-intense Peregrine rogue waves in the presence of transverse shift (broken PT-symmetry) in a definite parametric regime.

  19. Rogue waves: from nonlinear Schrödinger breather solutions to sea-keeping test.

    PubMed

    Onorato, Miguel; Proment, Davide; Clauss, Günther; Klein, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Under suitable assumptions, the nonlinear dynamics of surface gravity waves can be modeled by the one-dimensional nonlinear Schrödinger equation. Besides traveling wave solutions like solitons, this model admits also breather solutions that are now considered as prototypes of rogue waves in ocean. We propose a novel technique to study the interaction between waves and ships/structures during extreme ocean conditions using such breather solutions. In particular, we discuss a state of the art sea-keeping test in a 90-meter long wave tank by creating a Peregrine breather solution hitting a scaled chemical tanker and we discuss its potential devastating effects on the ship.

  20. N-order bright and dark rogue waves in a resonant erbium-doped fiber system.

    PubMed

    He, Jingsong; Xu, Shuwei; Porsezian, K; Porseizan, K

    2012-12-01

    The rogue waves in a resonant erbium-doped fiber system governed by a coupled system of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation and the Maxwell-Bloch equation (NLS-MB equations) are given explicitly by a Taylor series expansion about the breather solutions of the normalized slowly varying amplitude of the complex field envelope E, polarization p, and population inversion η. The n-order breather solutions of the three fields are constructed using a Darboux transformation (DT) by assuming periodic seed solutions. Moreover, the n-order rogue waves are given by determinant forms with n+3 free parameters. Furthermore, the possible connection between our rouge waves and the generation of supercontinuum generation is discussed. PMID:23368068

  1. Dissipative rogue waves induced by soliton explosions in an ultrafast fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Liu, Meng; Luo, Ai-Ping; Xu, Wen-Cheng; Luo, Zhi-Chao

    2016-09-01

    We reported on the observation of dissipative rogue waves (DRWs) induced by soliton explosions in an ultrafast fiber laser. It was found that the soliton explosions could be obtained in the fiber laser at a critical pump power level. During the process of the soliton explosion, the high-amplitude waves that fulfill the rogue wave criteria could be detected. The appearance of the DRWs was identified by characterizing the intensity statistics of the time-stretched soliton profile based on the dispersive Fourier-transform method. Our findings provide the first experimental demonstration that the DRWs could be observed in the soliton explosion regime and further enhance the understanding of the physical mechanism of optical RW generation. PMID:27607935

  2. Multi-rogue waves solutions: from the NLS to the KP-I equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubard, P.; Matveev, V. B.

    2013-12-01

    Our discovery of multi-rogue wave (MRW) solutions in 2010 completely changed the viewpoint on the links between the theory of rogue waves and integrable systems, and helped explain many phenomena which were never understood before. It is enough to mention the famous Three Sister waves observed in oceans, the creation of a regular approach to studying higher Peregrine breathers, and the new understanding of 2 + 1 dimensional rogue waves via the NLS-KP correspondence. This article continues the study of the MRW solutions of the NLS equation and their links with the KP-I equation started in a previous series of articles (Dubard et al 2010 Eur. Phys. J. 185 247-58, Dubard and Matveev 2011 Natural Hazards Earth Syst. Sci. 11 667-72, Matveev and Dubard 2010 Proc. Int. Conf. FNP-2010 (Novgorod, St Petersburg) pp 100-101, Dubard 2010 PhD Thesis). In particular, it contains a discussion of the large parametric asymptotics of these solutions, which has never been studied before.

  3. Integrative approach to the problem of the rogue waves appearance and elimination of their consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodin, Artem; Rodina, Natalia

    2016-04-01

    Every year marine natural disasters claim thousands of lives. Only rogue waves during the last 10 years caused the death of 125 and injury of 169 people. In addition to studying the physical mechanisms of generation of rogue waves is important to study the mechanisms of human behavior in such extreme situations. The impact as large-scale natural disasters, as well as less severe (in its consequences) disaster strikes must be assessed on the basis of the entire set of conditions, in whose framework the community of people appears to be, taking into account both the power of the elements, and the available resources at their disposal to restore an acceptable level of life, including social and psychological context. Here particular relevance acquire interdisciplinary researches. This interaction is extremely important not only for sociologists and psychologists, but also for the representatives of the natural sciences (physics, chemistry, mathematics) since the ultimate goal of all efforts is to minimize the harm produced by any element or negative influence of technological progress.This also work contains statistical analysis of the appearance of rogue waves on the wind wave background in the shallow bay, obtained during the experiment in the Baltic Sea.

  4. A comparison of the measured North Sea Andrea rogue wave with numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitner-Gregersen, E. M.; Fernandez, L.; Lefèvre, J. M.; Monbaliu, J.; Toffoli, A.

    2013-09-01

    A coupling of a spectral wave model with a nonlinear phase resolving model is used to reconstruct the evolution of wave statistics during a storm crossing the North Sea on 8-9 November 2007. During this storm a rogue wave (named the Andrea wave) was recorded at the Ekofisk field. The wave has characteristics comparable to the well-known New Year wave measured by Statoil at the Draupner platform the 1 January 1995. Hindcast data of the storm are here applied as input to calculate random realizations of sea surface and evolution of its statistical properties associated with this specific wave event by solving the Euler equations with a Higher Order Spectral Method (HOSM). The numerical results are compared with the Andrea wave profile as well as characteristics of the Andrea wave record measured by the down-looking lasers at the Ekofisk field.

  5. Breather turbulence versus soliton turbulence: Rogue waves, probability density functions, and spectral features.

    PubMed

    Akhmediev, N; Soto-Crespo, J M; Devine, N

    2016-08-01

    Turbulence in integrable systems exhibits a noticeable scientific advantage: it can be expressed in terms of the nonlinear modes of these systems. Whether the majority of the excitations in the system are breathers or solitons defines the properties of the turbulent state. In the two extreme cases we can call such states "breather turbulence" or "soliton turbulence." The number of rogue waves, the probability density functions of the chaotic wave fields, and their physical spectra are all specific for each of these two situations. Understanding these extreme cases also helps in studies of mixed turbulent states when the wave field contains both solitons and breathers, thus revealing intermediate characteristics. PMID:27627303

  6. Breather turbulence versus soliton turbulence: Rogue waves, probability density functions, and spectral features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmediev, N.; Soto-Crespo, J. M.; Devine, N.

    2016-08-01

    Turbulence in integrable systems exhibits a noticeable scientific advantage: it can be expressed in terms of the nonlinear modes of these systems. Whether the majority of the excitations in the system are breathers or solitons defines the properties of the turbulent state. In the two extreme cases we can call such states "breather turbulence" or "soliton turbulence." The number of rogue waves, the probability density functions of the chaotic wave fields, and their physical spectra are all specific for each of these two situations. Understanding these extreme cases also helps in studies of mixed turbulent states when the wave field contains both solitons and breathers, thus revealing intermediate characteristics.

  7. Characteristics of the breathers, rogue waves and solitary waves in a generalized (2+1)-dimensional Boussinesq equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiu-Bin; Tian, Shou-Fu; Qin, Chun-Yan; Zhang, Tian-Tian

    2016-07-01

    Under investigation in this work is a generalized (2+1)-dimensional Boussinesq equation, which can be used to describe the propagation of small-amplitude, long wave in shallow water. By virtue of Bell's polynomials, an effective way is presented to succinctly construct its bilinear form. Furthermore, based on the bilinear formalism and the extended homoclinic test method, the breather wave solution, rogue-wave solution and solitary-wave solution of the equation are well constructed. Our results can be used to enrich the dynamical behavior of the generalized (2+1)-dimensional nonlinear wave fields.

  8. Nonautonomous solitons, breathers and rogue waves for the Gross-Pitaevskii equation in the Bose-Einstein condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Chuan-Qi; Gao, Yi-Tian; Xue, Long; Wang, Qi-Min

    2016-07-01

    Under investigation in this paper is the Gross-Pitaevskii equation which describes the dynamics of the Bose-Einstein condensate. Lax pair, conservation laws and Darboux transformation (DT) are constructed. Nonautonomous solitons and breathers are derived based on the DT obtained. A kind of modulation instability process is generated. Nonautonomous rogue waves are obtained via the generalized DT. Influence of the nonlinearity, linear external potential, harmonic external potential, and spectral parameter on the propagation and interaction of the nonautonomous solitons, breathers and rogue waves is also discussed. Amplitude of the first-order nonautonomous soliton is proportional to the imaginary part of the spectral parameter and inversely proportional to the nonlinearity parameter. Linear external potential parameter affects the location of the first-order nonautonomous soliton. Head-on interaction, overtaking interaction and bound-state-like nonautonomous solitons can be formed based on the signs of the real parts of the spectral parameters. Quasi-periodic behaviors are exhibited for the nonautonomous breathers. If the harmonic external potential parameter is negative, quasi-period decreases along the positive time axis, with an increase in the amplitude and a compression in the width. Quasi-period decreases with the increase of the nonlinearity parameter. The second-order nonautonomous rogue wave can split into three first-order ones. Nonlinearity parameter has an effect on the amplitude of the rogue wave. Linear external potential parameter influences the location of the rogue wave, while harmonic external potential parameter affects the curved direction of the background.

  9. Ion-acoustic solitons, double layers and rogue waves in plasma having superthermal electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh Saini, Nareshpal

    2016-07-01

    Most of the space and astrophysical plasmas contain different type of charged particles with non-Maxwellian velocity distributions (e.g., nonthermal, superthermal, Tsallis ). These distributions are commonly found in the auroral region of the Earth's magnetosphere, planetary magnetosphere, solar and stellar coronas, solar wind, etc. The observations from various satellite missions have confirmed the presence of superthermal particles in space and astrophysical environments. Over the last many years, there have been a much interest in studying the different kind of properties of the electrostatic nonlinear excitations (solitons, double layers, rogue waves etc.) in a multi-component plasmas in the presence of superthermal particles. It has been analyzed that superthermal distributions are more appropriate than Maxwellian distribution for the modeling of space data. It is interesting to study the dynamics of various kinds of solitary waves, Double layers, Shocks etc. in varieties of plasma systems containing different kind of species obeying Lorentzian (kappa-type)/Tsallis distribution. In this talk, I have focused on the study of large amplitude IA solitary structures (bipolar solitary structures, double layers etc.), modulational instability and rogue waves in multicomponent plasmas. The Sagdeev potential method has been employed to setup an energy balance equation, from which we have studied the characteristics of large amplitude solitary waves under the influence of superthermality of charged particles and other plasma parameters. The critical Mach number has been determined, above which solitary structures are observed and its variation with superthermality of electrons and other parameters has also been discussed. Double layers have also been discussed. Multiple scale reductive perturbation method has been employed to derive NLS equation. From the different kind of solutions of this equation, amplitude modulation of envelope solitons and rogue waves have been

  10. On the extension of solutions of the real to complex KdV equation and a mechanism for the construction of rogue waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Gawad, H. I.; Tantawy, M.; Abo Elkhair, R. E.

    2016-07-01

    Rogue waves are more precisely defined as waves whose height is more than twice the significant wave height. This remarkable height was measured (by Draupner in 1995). Thus, the need for constructing a mechanism for the rogue waves is of great utility. This motivated us to suggest a mechanism, in this work, that rogue waves may be constructed via nonlinear interactions of solitons and periodic waves. This suggestion is consolidated here, in an example, by studying the behavior of solutions of the complex (KdV). This is done here by the extending the solutions of its real version.

  11. Compressional Alfvénic rogue and solitary waves in magnetohydrodynamic plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Panwar, Anuraj; Rizvi, H.; Ryu, C. M.

    2013-08-15

    Generation of compressional Alfvénic rogue and solitary waves in magnetohydrodynamic plasmas is investigated. Dispersive effect caused by non-ideal electron inertia currents perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field can balance the nonlinear steepening of waves leading to the formation of a soliton. The reductive perturbation method is used to obtain a Korteweg–de Vries (KdV) equation describing the evolution of the solitary wave. The height of a soliton is proportional to the soliton speed “U” and inversely proportional to plasma “β” (ratio of plasma thermal pressure to pressure of the confining magnetic field) and the width of soliton is proportional to the electron inertial length. KdV equation is used to study the nonlinear evolution of modulationally unstable compressional Alfvénic wavepackets via the nonlinear Schrödinger equation. The characteristics of rogue wave influenced by plasma “β” and the electron inertial length are described.

  12. Optical rogue-wave-like extreme value fluctuations in fiber Raman amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Hammani, Kamal; Finot, Christophe; Dudley, John M; Millot, Guy

    2008-10-13

    We report experimental observation and characterization of rogue wave-like extreme value statistics arising from pump-signal noise transfer in a fiber Raman amplifier. Specifically, by exploiting Raman amplification with an incoherent pump, the amplified signal is shown to develop a series of temporal intensity spikes whose peak power follows a power-law probability distribution. The results are interpreted using a numerical model of the Raman gain process using coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations, and the numerical model predicts results in good agreement with experiment.

  13. Rogue waves lead to the instability in GaN semiconductors

    PubMed Central

    Yahia, M. E.; Tolba, R. E.; El-Bedwehy, N. A.; El-Labany, S. K.; Moslem, W. M.

    2015-01-01

    A new approach to understand the electron/hole interfaced plasma in GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs). A quantum hydrodynamic model is constructed to include electrons/holes degenerate pressure, Bohm potential, and the exchange/correlation effect and then reduced to the nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE). Numerical analysis of the latter predicts the rough (in)stability domains, which allow for the rogue waves to occur. Our results might give physical solution rather than the engineering one to the intrinsic problems in these high frequency/power transistors. PMID:26206731

  14. Controllable Discrete Rogue Wave Solutions of the Ablowitz—Ladik Equation in Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Xiao-Yong

    2016-07-01

    With the aid of symbolic computation Maple, the discrete Ablowitz—Ladik equation is studied via an algebra method, some new rational solutions with four arbitrary parameters are constructed. By analyzing related parameters, the discrete rogue wave solutions with alterable positions and amplitude for the focusing Ablowitz—Ladik equations are derived. Some properties are discussed by graphical analysis, which might be helpful for understanding physical phenomena in optics. Supported by the Beijing Natural Science Foundation under Grant No. 1153004, and China Postdoctoral Science Foundation under Grant No. 2015M570161 and the Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 61471406

  15. Dust kinetic Alfvén solitary and rogue waves in a superthermal dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Saini, N. S. Singh, Manpreet; Bains, A. S.

    2015-11-15

    Dust kinetic Alfvén solitary waves (DKASWs) have been examined in a low-β dusty plasma comprising of negatively charged dust grains, superthermal electrons, and ions. A nonlinear Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation has been derived using the reductive perturbation method. The combined effects of superthermality of charged particles (via κ), plasma β, obliqueness of propagation (θ), and dust concentration (via f) on the shape and size of the DKASWs have been examined. Only negative potential (rarefactive) structures are observed. Further, characteristics of dust kinetic Alfvén rogue waves (DKARWs), by deriving the non-linear Schrödinger equation (NLSE) from the KdV equation, are studied. Rational solutions of NLSE show that rogue wave envelopes are supported by this plasma model. It is observed that the influence of various plasma parameters (superthermality, plasma β, obliqueness, and dust concentration) on the characteristics of the DKARWs is very significant. This fundamental study may be helpful in understanding the formation of coherent nonlinear structures in space and astrophysical plasma environments where superthermal particles are present.

  16. Oscillon dynamics and rogue wave generation in Faraday surface ripples.

    PubMed

    Xia, H; Maimbourg, T; Punzmann, H; Shats, M

    2012-09-14

    We report new experimental results which suggest that the generation of extreme wave events in the Faraday surface ripples is related to the increase in the horizontal mobility of oscillating solitons (oscillons). The analysis of the oscillon trajectories in a horizontal plane shows that at higher vertical acceleration, oscillons move chaotically, merge and form enclosed areas on the water surface. The probability of the formation of such craters, which precede large wave events, increases with the increase in horizontal mobility. PMID:23005636

  17. Modulational instability, nonautonomous breathers and rogue waves for a variable-coefficient derivative nonlinear Schrödinger equation in the inhomogeneous plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lei Li, Min; Qi, Feng-Hua; Xu, Tao

    2015-03-15

    Under investigation in this paper is a variable-coefficient derivative nonlinear Schrödinger (vc-DNLS) equation modeling the nonlinear Alfvén waves in the inhomogeneous plasmas. The modulation instability is examined for this inhomogeneous nonlinear model. The nonautonomous breather and rogue wave solutions of the vc-DNLS equation are obtained via the modified Darboux transformation. It is found that the velocity and amplitude of the breather can be controlled by the inhomogeneous magnetic field and nonuniform density. Such novel phenomena as breather amplification and nonlinear Talbot effect-like property are demonstrated with the proper choices of the inhomogeneous parameters. Furthermore, dynamics of the fundamental rogue wave, periodical rogue wave, and composite rogue wave are graphically discussed. The trajectories and amplitudes of the rogue waves can be manipulated by the inhomogeneous magnetic field and nonuniform density. In addition, the nonlinear tunneling of the rogue waves and breathers is studied. As an application, a sample model is treated with our results, and the graphical illustrations exhibit the compressing, expanding, and fluctuating phenomena of the Alfvén rogue waves.

  18. Nonlinear waves in capillary electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Ghosal, Sandip; Chen, Zhen

    2011-01-01

    Electrophoretic separation of a mixture of chemical species is a fundamental technique of great usefulness in biology, health care and forensics. In capillary electrophoresis the sample migrates in a microcapillary in the presence of a background electrolyte. When the ionic concentration of the sample is sufficiently high, the signal is known to exhibit features reminiscent of nonlinear waves including sharp concentration ‘shocks’. In this paper we consider a simplified model consisting of a single sample ion and a background electrolyte consisting of a single co-ion and a counterion in the absence of any processes that might change the ionization states of the constituents. If the ionic diffusivities are assumed to be the same for all constituents the concentration of sample ion is shown to obey a one dimensional advection diffusion equation with a concentration dependent advection velocity. If the analyte concentration is sufficiently low in a suitable non-dimensional sense, Burgers’ equation is recovered, and thus, the time dependent problem is exactly solvable with arbitrary initial conditions. In the case of small diffusivity either a leading edge or trailing edge shock is formed depending on the electrophoretic mobility of the sample ion relative to the background ions. Analytical formulas are presented for the shape, width and migration velocity of the sample peak and it is shown that axial dispersion at long times may be characterized by an effective diffusivity that is exactly calculated. These results are consistent with known observations from physical and numerical simulation experiments. PMID:20238181

  19. Theoretical and experimental evidence of non-symmetric doubly localized rogue waves

    PubMed Central

    He, Jingsong; Guo, Lijuan; Zhang, Yongshuai; Chabchoub, Amin

    2014-01-01

    We present determinant expressions for vector rogue wave (RW) solutions of the Manakov system, a two-component coupled nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation. As a special case, we generate a family of exact and non-symmetric RW solutions of the NLS equation up to third order, localized in both space and time. The derived non-symmetric doubly localized second-order solution is generated experimentally in a water wave flume for deep-water conditions. Experimental results, confirming the characteristic non-symmetric pattern of the solution, are in very good agreement with theory as well as with numerical simulations, based on the modified NLS equation, known to model accurately the dynamics of weakly nonlinear wave packets in deep water. PMID:25383023

  20. Transversally periodic solitary gravity-capillary waves.

    PubMed

    Milewski, Paul A; Wang, Zhan

    2014-01-01

    When both gravity and surface tension effects are present, surface solitary water waves are known to exist in both two- and three-dimensional infinitely deep fluids. We describe here solutions bridging these two cases: travelling waves which are localized in the propagation direction and periodic in the transverse direction. These transversally periodic gravity-capillary solitary waves are found to be of either elevation or depression type, tend to plane waves below a critical transverse period and tend to solitary lumps as the transverse period tends to infinity. The waves are found numerically in a Hamiltonian system for water waves simplified by a cubic truncation of the Dirichlet-to-Neumann operator. This approximation has been proved to be very accurate for both two- and three-dimensional computations of fully localized gravity-capillary solitary waves. The stability properties of these waves are then investigated via the time evolution of perturbed wave profiles. PMID:24399922

  1. Transversally periodic solitary gravity-capillary waves.

    PubMed

    Milewski, Paul A; Wang, Zhan

    2014-01-01

    When both gravity and surface tension effects are present, surface solitary water waves are known to exist in both two- and three-dimensional infinitely deep fluids. We describe here solutions bridging these two cases: travelling waves which are localized in the propagation direction and periodic in the transverse direction. These transversally periodic gravity-capillary solitary waves are found to be of either elevation or depression type, tend to plane waves below a critical transverse period and tend to solitary lumps as the transverse period tends to infinity. The waves are found numerically in a Hamiltonian system for water waves simplified by a cubic truncation of the Dirichlet-to-Neumann operator. This approximation has been proved to be very accurate for both two- and three-dimensional computations of fully localized gravity-capillary solitary waves. The stability properties of these waves are then investigated via the time evolution of perturbed wave profiles.

  2. Simulation of the effect of rogue ryanodine receptors on a calcium wave in ventricular myocytes with heart failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Luyao; Xia, Ling; Ye, Xuesong; Cheng, Heping

    2010-06-01

    Calcium homeostasis is considered to be one of the most important factors for the contraction and relaxation of the heart muscle. However, under some pathological conditions, such as heart failure (HF), calcium homeostasis is disordered, and spontaneous waves may occur. In this study, we developed a mathematical model of formation and propagation of a calcium wave based upon a governing system of diffusion-reaction equations presented by Izu et al (2001 Biophys. J. 80 103-20) and integrated non-clustered or 'rogue' ryanodine receptors (rogue RyRs) into a two-dimensional (2D) model of ventricular myocytes isolated from failing hearts in which sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ pools are partially unloaded. The model was then used to simulate the effect of rogue RyRs on initiation and propagation of the calcium wave in ventricular myocytes with HF. Our simulation results show that rogue RyRs can amplify the diastolic SR Ca2+ leak in the form of Ca2+ quarks, increase the probability of occurrence of spontaneous Ca2+ waves even with smaller SR Ca2+ stores, accelerate Ca2+ wave propagation, and hence lead to delayed afterdepolarizations (DADs) and cardiac arrhythmia in the diseased heart. This investigation suggests that incorporating rogue RyRs in the Ca2+ wave model under HF conditions provides a new view of Ca2+ dynamics that could not be mimicked by adjusting traditional parameters involved in Ca2+ release units and other ion channels, and contributes to understanding the underlying mechanism of HF.

  3. Rogue waves in a two-component Manakov system with variable coefficients and an external potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Wei-Ping; Belić, Milivoj; Malomed, Boris A.

    2015-11-01

    We construct rogue waves (RWs) in a coupled two-mode system with the self-focusing nonlinearity of the Manakov type (equal SPM and XPM coefficients), spatially modulated coefficients, and a specially designed external potential. The system may be realized in nonlinear optics and Bose-Einstein condensates. By means of a similarity transformation, we establish a connection between solutions of the coupled Manakov system with spatially variable coefficients and the basic Manakov model with constant coefficients. Exact solutions in the form of two-component Peregrine and dromion waves are obtained. The RW dynamics is analyzed for different choices of parameters in the underlying parameter space. Different classes of RW solutions are categorized by means of a naturally introduced control parameter which takes integer values.

  4. Modulation instability and dissipative rogue waves in ion-beam plasma: Roles of ionization, recombination, and electron attachment

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Shimin Mei, Liquan

    2014-11-15

    The amplitude modulation of ion-acoustic waves is investigated in an unmagnetized plasma containing positive ions, negative ions, and electrons obeying a kappa-type distribution that is penetrated by a positive ion beam. By considering dissipative mechanisms, including ionization, negative-positive ion recombination, and electron attachment, we introduce a comprehensive model for the plasma with the effects of sources and sinks. Via reductive perturbation theory, the modified nonlinear Schrödinger equation with a dissipative term is derived to govern the dynamics of the modulated waves. The effect of the plasma parameters on the modulation instability criterion for the modified nonlinear Schrödinger equation is numerically investigated in detail. Within the unstable region, first- and second-order dissipative ion-acoustic rogue waves are present. The effect of the plasma parameters on the characteristics of the dissipative rogue waves is also discussed.

  5. The role of PR in the formation of psychological readiness for a rogue wave events.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaykovskaya, N.; Rodin, A.

    2012-04-01

    In recent years the study of psychological foundations of human behavior when dealing with rogue waves has received increasing attention. However, this problem is only in the interest of a narrow circle of specialists, while the task is to explain the rules of behavior when dealing with the phenomenon to anyone who can get into this situation. This problem can only be solved by media and PR-specialists working in this field. PR- specialists are required to convey to people the need of correct action stereotype for assault element, because, as it is known, a fact only becomes a fact when it is written about in a newspaper or is made a story about in a summary of radio or TV news. This publication is devoted to the developing of forms and methods of PR-specialists activity in this area.

  6. Nonlinear gravity-capillary water waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Lei

    1997-11-01

    Two-dimensional gravity-capillary water waves are analyzed using a fully-nonlinear Cauchy-integral method with spectral accuracy. Standing waves are generated in experiments by vertical oscillation and measured by a non-intrusive optical system along with a wave probe. Nonlinear resonance of standing waves with non-wetting contact line effects are discussed in detail. Amplitude- dependent wave frequency and damping in a glass rectangular tank suggest a new contact-line model. A new type of sideband resonance due to modulated forcing is discovered and explained by weakly-nonlinear analysis. This analytical solution is verified by our numerical simulations and physical experiments. New standing waveforms with dimpled or sharp crests are observed in experiments and computations. These new waveforms have strong symmetry breaking in time as a result of nonlinear harmonic interaction. With increasing wave steepness, steep standing waves experience period- tripling with three distinct forms: sharp crest, dimpled or flat crest, and round crest. Significant breaking occurs in the sharp-crest mode and the dimpled-crest mode. Using a complex-demodulation technique, I find that these breaking waves are related to the same 1:2 internal resonance (harmonic interaction) that causes the new steep waveforms. Novel approaches are used to estimate the (breaking and non-breaking) wave dissipation in steep and breaking standing waves. The breaking events (spray, air entrainment, and plunging) approximately double the wave dissipation. Weak capillarity significantly affects the limiting wave height and the form of standing waves, as demonstrated by both computations and small-scale Faraday-wave experiments. Capillary ripple generation on traveling waves is shown to be significant even at moderate wave steepness. The ubiquitous horizontal asymmetry of traveling waves is shown to be critical to capillary ripple generation. Two new asymmetric modes are identified and are shown to have an

  7. Rogue wave train generation in a metamaterial induced by cubic-quintic nonlinearities and second-order dispersion.

    PubMed

    Essama, Bedel Giscard Onana; Atangana, Jacques; Frederick, Biya Motto; Mokhtari, Bouchra; Eddeqaqi, Noureddine Cherkaoui; Kofane, Timoleon Crepin

    2014-09-01

    We investigate the behavior of the electromagnetic wave that propagates in a metamaterial for negative index regime. Second-order dispersion and cubic-quintic nonlinearities are taken into account. The behavior obtained for negative index regime is compared to that observed for absorption regime. The collective coordinates technique is used to characterize the light pulse intensity profile at some frequency ranges. Five frequency ranges have been pointed out. The perfect combination of second-order dispersion and cubic nonlinearity leads to a robust soliton at each frequency range for negative index regime. The soliton peak power progressively decreases for absorption regime. Further, this peak power also decreases with frequency. We show that absorption regime can induce rogue wave trains generation at a specific frequency range. However, this rogue wave trains generation is maintained when the quintic nonlinearity comes into play for negative index regime and amplified for absorption regime at a specific frequency range. It clearly appears that rogue wave behavior strongly depends on the frequency and the regime considered. Furthermore, the stability conditions of the electromagnetic wave have also been discussed at frequency ranges considered for both negative index and absorption regimes.

  8. Inverse scattering transform analysis of rogue waves using local periodization procedure

    PubMed Central

    Randoux, Stéphane; Suret, Pierre; El, Gennady

    2016-01-01

    The nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE) stands out as the dispersive nonlinear partial differential equation that plays a prominent role in the modeling and understanding of the wave phenomena relevant to many fields of nonlinear physics. The question of random input problems in the one-dimensional and integrable NLSE enters within the framework of integrable turbulence, and the specific question of the formation of rogue waves (RWs) has been recently extensively studied in this context. The determination of exact analytic solutions of the focusing 1D-NLSE prototyping RW events of statistical relevance is now considered as the problem of central importance. Here we address this question from the perspective of the inverse scattering transform (IST) method that relies on the integrable nature of the wave equation. We develop a conceptually new approach to the RW classification in which appropriate, locally coherent structures are specifically isolated from a globally incoherent wave train to be subsequently analyzed by implementing a numerical IST procedure relying on a spatial periodization of the object under consideration. Using this approach we extend the existing classifications of the prototypes of RWs from standard breathers and their collisions to more general nonlinear modes characterized by their nonlinear spectra. PMID:27385164

  9. Inverse scattering transform analysis of rogue waves using local periodization procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randoux, Stéphane; Suret, Pierre; El, Gennady

    2016-07-01

    The nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE) stands out as the dispersive nonlinear partial differential equation that plays a prominent role in the modeling and understanding of the wave phenomena relevant to many fields of nonlinear physics. The question of random input problems in the one-dimensional and integrable NLSE enters within the framework of integrable turbulence, and the specific question of the formation of rogue waves (RWs) has been recently extensively studied in this context. The determination of exact analytic solutions of the focusing 1D-NLSE prototyping RW events of statistical relevance is now considered as the problem of central importance. Here we address this question from the perspective of the inverse scattering transform (IST) method that relies on the integrable nature of the wave equation. We develop a conceptually new approach to the RW classification in which appropriate, locally coherent structures are specifically isolated from a globally incoherent wave train to be subsequently analyzed by implementing a numerical IST procedure relying on a spatial periodization of the object under consideration. Using this approach we extend the existing classifications of the prototypes of RWs from standard breathers and their collisions to more general nonlinear modes characterized by their nonlinear spectra.

  10. Weak-light rogue waves, breathers, and their active control in a cold atomic gas via electromagnetically induced transparency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Junyang; Hang, Chao; Huang, Guoxiang

    2016-06-01

    We propose a scheme to demonstrate the existence of optical Peregrine rogue waves and Akhmediev and Kuznetsov-Ma breathers and realize their active control via electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). The system we suggest is a cold, Λ -type three-level atomic gas interacting with a probe and a control laser fields and working under EIT condition. We show that, based on EIT with an incoherent optical pumping, which can be used to cancel optical absorption, (1+1)-dimensional optical Peregrine rogue waves, Akhmediev breathers, and Kuznetsov-Ma breathers can be generated with very low light power. In addition, we demonstrate that the Akhmediev and Kuznetsov-Ma breathers in (2+1)-dimensions obtained can be actively manipulated by using an external magnetic field. As a result, these breathers can display trajectory deflections and bypass obstacles during propagation.

  11. Rogue waves in electronegative space plasmas: The link between the family of the KdV equations and the nonlinear Schrödinger equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Tantawy, S. A.

    2016-05-01

    We examine the likelihood of the ion-acoustic rogue waves propagation in a non-Maxwellian electronegative plasma in the framework of the family of the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equations (KdV/modified KdV/Extended KdV equation). For this purpose, we use the reductive perturbation technique to carry out this study. It is known that the family of the KdV equations have solutions of distinct structures such as solitons, shocks, kinks, cnoidal waves, etc. However, the dynamics of the nonlinear rogue waves is governed by the nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE). Thus, the family of the KdV equations is transformed to their corresponding NLSE developing a weakly nonlinear wave packets. We show the possible region for the existence of the rogue waves and define it precisely for typical parameters of space plasmas. We investigate numerically the effects of relevant physical parameters, namely, the negative ion relative concentration, the nonthermal parameter, and the mass ratio on the propagation of the rogue waves profile. The present study should be helpful in understanding the salient features of the nonlinear structures such as, ion-acoustic solitary waves, shock waves, and rogue waves in space and in laboratory plasma where two distinct groups of ions, i.e. positive and negative ions, and non-Maxwellian (nonthermal) electrons are present.

  12. Generalized perturbation (n, M)-fold Darboux transformations and multi-rogue-wave structures for the modified self-steepening nonlinear Schrödinger equation.

    PubMed

    Wen, Xiao-Yong; Yang, Yunqing; Yan, Zhenya

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, a simple and constructive method is presented to find the generalized perturbation (n,M)-fold Darboux transformations (DTs) of the modified nonlinear Schrödinger (MNLS) equation in terms of fractional forms of determinants. In particular, we apply the generalized perturbation (1,N-1)-fold DTs to find its explicit multi-rogue-wave solutions. The wave structures of these rogue-wave solutions of the MNLS equation are discussed in detail for different parameters, which display abundant interesting wave structures, including the triangle and pentagon, etc., and may be useful to study the physical mechanism of multirogue waves in optics. The dynamical behaviors of these multi-rogue-wave solutions are illustrated using numerical simulations. The same Darboux matrix can also be used to investigate the Gerjikov-Ivanov equation such that its multi-rogue-wave solutions and their wave structures are also found. The method can also be extended to find multi-rogue-wave solutions of other nonlinear integrable equations. PMID:26274257

  13. Modulational instability and higher-order rogue waves with parameters modulation in a coupled integrable AB system via the generalized Darboux transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Xiao-Yong; Yan, Zhenya

    2015-12-01

    We study higher-order rogue wave (RW) solutions of the coupled integrable dispersive AB system (also called Pedlosky system), which describes the evolution of wave-packets in a marginally stable or unstable baroclinic shear flow in geophysical fluids. We propose its continuous-wave (CW) solutions and existent conditions for their modulation instability to form the rogue waves. A new generalized N-fold Darboux transformation (DT) is proposed in terms of the Taylor series expansion for the spectral parameter in the Darboux matrix and its limit procedure and applied to the CW solutions to generate multi-rogue wave solutions of the coupled AB system, which satisfy the general compatibility condition. The dynamical behaviors of these higher-order rogue wave solutions demonstrate both strong and weak interactions by modulating parameters, in which some weak interactions can generate the abundant triangle, pentagon structures, etc. Particularly, the trajectories of motion of peaks and depressions of profiles of the first-order RWs are explicitly analyzed. The generalized DT method used in this paper can be extended to other nonlinear integrable systems. These results may be useful for understanding the corresponding rogue-wave phenomena in fluid mechanics and related fields.

  14. Modulational instability and higher-order rogue waves with parameters modulation in a coupled integrable AB system via the generalized Darboux transformation.

    PubMed

    Wen, Xiao-Yong; Yan, Zhenya

    2015-12-01

    We study higher-order rogue wave (RW) solutions of the coupled integrable dispersive AB system (also called Pedlosky system), which describes the evolution of wave-packets in a marginally stable or unstable baroclinic shear flow in geophysical fluids. We propose its continuous-wave (CW) solutions and existent conditions for their modulation instability to form the rogue waves. A new generalized N-fold Darboux transformation (DT) is proposed in terms of the Taylor series expansion for the spectral parameter in the Darboux matrix and its limit procedure and applied to the CW solutions to generate multi-rogue wave solutions of the coupled AB system, which satisfy the general compatibility condition. The dynamical behaviors of these higher-order rogue wave solutions demonstrate both strong and weak interactions by modulating parameters, in which some weak interactions can generate the abundant triangle, pentagon structures, etc. Particularly, the trajectories of motion of peaks and depressions of profiles of the first-order RWs are explicitly analyzed. The generalized DT method used in this paper can be extended to other nonlinear integrable systems. These results may be useful for understanding the corresponding rogue-wave phenomena in fluid mechanics and related fields. PMID:26723154

  15. Nonlinear ion-acoustic structures in a nonextensive electron–positron–ion–dust plasma: Modulational instability and rogue waves

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Shimin; Mei, Liquan; Sun, Anbang

    2013-05-15

    The nonlinear propagation of planar and nonplanar (cylindrical and spherical) ion-acoustic waves in an unmagnetized electron–positron–ion–dust plasma with two-electron temperature distributions is investigated in the context of the nonextensive statistics. Using the reductive perturbation method, a modified nonlinear Schrödinger equation is derived for the potential wave amplitude. The effects of plasma parameters on the modulational instability of ion-acoustic waves are discussed in detail for planar as well as for cylindrical and spherical geometries. In addition, for the planar case, we analyze how the plasma parameters influence the nonlinear structures of the first- and second-order ion-acoustic rogue waves within the modulational instability region. The present results may be helpful in providing a good fit between the theoretical analysis and real applications in future spatial observations and laboratory plasma experiments. -- Highlights: ► Modulational instability of ion-acoustic waves in a new plasma model is discussed. ► Tsallis’s statistics is considered in the model. ► The second-order ion-acoustic rogue wave is studied for the first time.

  16. Three-dimensional dust-ion-acoustic rogue waves in a magnetized dusty pair-ion plasma with nonthermal nonextensive electrons and opposite polarity dust grains

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Shimin Mei, Liquan

    2014-08-15

    Dust-ion-acoustic (DIA) rogue waves are investigated in a three-dimensional magnetized plasma containing nonthermal electrons featuring Tsallis distribution, both positive and negative ions, and immobile dust grains having both positive and negative charges. Via the reductive perturbation method, a (3 + 1)-dimensional nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation is derived to govern the dynamics of the DIA wave packets. The modulation instability of DIA waves described by the (3 + 1)-dimensional NLS equation is investigated. By means of the similarity transformation and symbolic computation, both the first- and second-order rogue wave solutions of the (3 + 1)-dimensional NLS equation are constructed in terms of rational functions. Moreover, the dynamics properties and the effects of plasma parameters on the nonlinear structures of rogue waves are discussed in detail. The results could be useful for understanding the physical mechanism of rogue waves in laboratory experiments where pair-ion plasmas with electrons and dust grains can be found.

  17. Investigation of resonances in gravity-capillary wave turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubourg, Quentin; Mordant, Nicolas

    2016-06-01

    We report experimental results on nonlinear wave coupling in surface wave turbulence on water at scales close to the crossover between surface gravity waves and capillary waves. We study three-wave correlations either in the frequency domain or in the wave-vector domain. We observe that in a weakly nonlinear regime, the dominant nonlinear interactions correspond to waves that are collinear or close to collinear. Although the resonant coupling of pure gravity waves is supposed to involve four waves, at the capillary crossover we observe a nonlocal coupling between a gravity wave and two capillary waves. Furthermore, nonlinear spectral spreading permits three-gravity wave coupling. These observations raise the question of the relevance of these processes in the oceanographic context and in particular the range of frequencies of gravity waves that may be impacted.

  18. Solitons, breathers and rogue waves for a higher-order nonlinear Schrödinger-Maxwell-Bloch system in an erbium-doped fiber system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qi-Min; Gao, Yi-Tian; Su, Chuan-Qi; Zuo, Da-Wei

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, a higher-order nonlinear Schrödinger-Maxwell-Bloch system with quintic terms is investigated, which describes the propagation of ultrashort optical pulses, up to the attosecond duration, in an erbium-doped fiber. Multi-soliton, breather and rogue-wave solutions are derived by virtue of the Darboux transformation and the limiting procedure. Features and interaction patterns of the solitons, breathers and rogue waves are discussed. (i) The solitonic amplitudes, widths and velocities are exhibited, and solitonic amplitudes and widths are proved to have nothing to do with the higher-order terms. (ii) The higher-order terms and frequency detuning affect the growth rate of periodic modulation and skewing angle for the breathers, except for the range of the frequency of modulation. (iii) The quintic terms and frequency detuning have the effects on the temporal duration for the rogue waves. (iv) Breathers are classified into two types, according to the range of the modulation instability. (v) Interaction between the two solitons is elastic. When the two solitons interact with each other, the periodic structure occurs, which is affected by the higher-order terms and frequency detuning. (vi) Interaction between the two Akhmediev-like breathers or two Kuznetsov-Ma-like solitons shows the different patterns with different ratios of the relative modulation frequencies, while the interaction area induced by the two breathers looks like a higher-order rogue wave.

  19. The Hagen-Poiseuille, Plane Couette and Poiseuille Flows Linear Instability and Rogue Waves Excitation Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chefranov, Sergey; Chefranov, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Linear hydrodynamic stability theory for the Hagen-Poiseuille (HP) flow yields a conclusion of infinitely large threshold Reynolds number, Re, value. This contradiction to the observation data is bypassed using assumption of the HP flow instability having hard type and possible for sufficiently high-amplitude disturbances. HP flow disturbance evolution is considered by nonlinear hydrodynamic stability theory. Similar is the case of the plane Couette (PC) flow. For the plane Poiseuille (PP) flow, linear theory just quantitatively does not agree with experimental data defining the threshold Reynolds number Re= 5772 ( S. A. Orszag, 1971), more than five-fold exceeding however the value observed, Re=1080 (S. J. Davies, C. M. White, 1928). In the present work, we show that the linear stability theory conclusions for the HP and PC on stability for any Reynolds number and evidently too high threshold Reynolds number estimate for the PP flow are related with the traditional use of the disturbance representation assuming the possibility of separation of the longitudinal (along the flow direction) variable from the other spatial variables. We show that if to refuse from this traditional form, conclusions on the linear instability for the HP and PC flows may be obtained for finite Reynolds numbers (for the HP flow, for Re>704, and for the PC flow, for Re>139). Also, we fit the linear stability theory conclusion on the PP flow to the experimental data by getting an estimate of the minimal threshold Reynolds number as Re=1040. We also get agreement of the minimal threshold Reynolds number estimate for PC with the experimental data of S. Bottin, et.al., 1997, where the laminar PC flow stability threshold is Re = 150. Rogue waves excitation mechanism in oppositely directed currents due to the PC flow linear instability is discussed. Results of the new linear hydrodynamic stability theory for the HP, PP, and PC flows are published in the following papers: 1. S.G. Chefranov, A

  20. Rogue waves, rational solitons, and modulational instability in an integrable fifth-order nonlinear Schrödinger equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yunqing; Yan, Zhenya; Malomed, Boris A.

    2015-10-01

    We analytically study rogue-wave (RW) solutions and rational solitons of an integrable fifth-order nonlinear Schrödinger (FONLS) equation with three free parameters. It includes, as particular cases, the usual NLS, Hirota, and Lakshmanan-Porsezian-Daniel equations. We present continuous-wave (CW) solutions and conditions for their modulation instability in the framework of this model. Applying the Darboux transformation to the CW input, novel first- and second-order RW solutions of the FONLS equation are analytically found. In particular, trajectories of motion of peaks and depressions of profiles of the first- and second-order RWs are produced by means of analytical and numerical methods. The solutions also include newly found rational and W-shaped one- and two-soliton modes. The results predict the corresponding dynamical phenomena in extended models of nonlinear fiber optics and other physically relevant integrable systems.

  1. Dam break problem for the focusing nonlinear Schrödinger equation and the generation of rogue waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El, G. A.; Khamis, E. G.; Tovbis, A.

    2016-09-01

    We propose a novel, analytically tractable, scenario of the rogue wave formation in the framework of the small-dispersion focusing nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation with the initial condition in the form of a rectangular barrier (a ‘box’). We use the Whitham modulation theory combined with the nonlinear steepest descent for the semi-classical inverse scattering transform, to describe the evolution and interaction of two counter-propagating nonlinear wave trains—the dispersive dam break flows—generated in the NLS box problem. We show that the interaction dynamics results in the emergence of modulated large-amplitude quasi-periodic breather lattices whose amplitude profiles are closely approximated by the Akhmediev and Peregrine breathers within certain space-time domain. Our semi-classical analytical results are shown to be in excellent agreement with the results of direct numerical simulations of the small-dispersion focusing NLS equation.

  2. Akhmediev breathers, Ma solitons, and general breathers from rogue waves: a case study in the Manakov system.

    PubMed

    Vishnu Priya, N; Senthilvelan, M; Lakshmanan, M

    2013-08-01

    We present explicit forms of general breather (GB), Akhmediev breather (AB), Ma soliton (MS), and rogue wave (RW) solutions of the two-component nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation, namely Manakov equation. We derive these solutions through two different routes. In the forward route, we first construct a suitable periodic envelope soliton solution to this model from which we derive GB, AB, MS, and RW solutions. We then consider the RW solution as the starting point and derive AB, MS, and GB in the reverse direction. The second approach has not been illustrated so far for the two component NLS equation. Our results show that the above rational solutions of the Manakov system can be derived from the standard scalar nonlinear Schrödinger equation with a modified nonlinearity parameter. Through this two-way approach we establish a broader understanding of these rational solutions, which will be of interest in a variety of situations. PMID:24032912

  3. Numerical simulation of the resonantly excited capillary-gravity waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanazaki, Hideshi; Hirata, Motonori; Okino, Shinya

    2015-11-01

    Capillary gravity waves excited by an obstacle are investigated by a direct numerical simulation. In the flow without capillary effects, it is well known that large-amplitude upstream advancing solitary waves are generated periodically under the resonant condition, i.e., when the phase velocity of the long surface waves and the mean flow velocity agrees. With capillary effects, solutions of the Euler equations show the generation of very short waves further upstream of the solitary waves and also in the depression region downstream of the obstacle. The overall characteristics of these waves agree with the solutions of the forced fifth-order KdV equation, while the weakly nonlinear theory generally overestimates the wavelength of the short waves.

  4. The role of capillary waves in two-fluid atomization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Shirley C.; Luu, Patrick; Childs, Paul; Teshome, Asseged; Tsai, Chen S.

    1997-10-01

    A mechanistic study of two-fluid atomization has been carried out using a new spray technique called ultrasound-modulated two-fluid (UMTF) atomization. This technique is based on resonance between the liquid capillary waves generated by ultrasound and those generated by high-velocity air. Specifically, capillary waves are established on the surface of a liquid jet as it issues from a coaxial two-fluid atomizer, the nozzle tip of which vibrates at the same frequency as the ultrasound while the frequency of the capillary waves is only half of the ultrasound frequency. As these capillary waves travel downstream in the direction of air flow, their amplitude is further amplified by the air flowing around them. Atomization occurs when the wave amplitude becomes too great to maintain wave stability; the resulting drop sizes are proportional to the wavelength of the resonant capillary waves which is determined by the harmonic frequency of the ultrasound in accordance with the Kelvin equation. Theoretical calculations of the amplitude growth rate are based on two models of temporal instability of wind-generated capillary waves: Taylor's dispersion relation and Jeffreys' one-parameter (sheltering factor) model. Good agreements between the theoretical predictions by these models and the experimental results of how drop-size and size distributions are influenced by air velocity and surface tension led to the conclusion that Taylor-mode breakup of capillary waves plays a very important role in two-fluid atomization. Furthermore, all peak drop diameters can be accounted for by the harmonic frequencies of the ultrasound. Hence, it is further concluded that secondary atomization is negligible in co-flow two-fluid atomization of a water jet at air velocities up to 170 m/s and air-to-water mass ratio up to 5.6. In addition, uniform drops with diameters predetermined by the ultrasound frequency can be accomplished by adjusting the air velocity.

  5. Rogue wave solutions for the higher-order nonlinear Schrödinger equation with variable coefficients by generalized Darboux transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hai-Qiang; Chen, Jian

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we study a higher-order variable coefficient nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation, which plays an important role in the control of the ultrashort optical pulse propagation in nonlinear optical systems. Then, we construct a generalized Darboux transformation (GDT) for the higher-order variable coefficient NLS equation. The Nth order rogue wave solution is obtained by the iterative rule and it can be expressed by the determinant form. As application, we calculate rogue waves (RWs) from first- to fourth-order in accordance with different kinds of parameters. In particular, the dynamical properties and spatial-temporal structures of RWs are discussed and compared with Hirota equation through some figures.

  6. Direct numerical simulations of gravity-capillary wave turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deike, Luc; Fuster, Daniel; Berhanu, Michael; Falcon, Eric

    2012-11-01

    Direct numerical simulation of the full two phase Navier-Stokes equations, including surface tension are performed, using the code Gerris (Popinet, 2009), in order to investigate gravity-capillary wave turbulence. Wave turbulence concerns the study of the statistical and dynamical properties of a set of nonlinear interacting waves (Zakharov, 1992). Waves at the air-water interface, initially at rest, are excited at low wave-numbers and a stationary wave turbulence state is obtained after a time long enough (typically 30 periods of the wave forcing period). The space-time wave height power spectrum is calculated for both capillary and gravity waves regimes. The observed dispersion relation is in agreement with the theoretical one for linear gravity-capillary wave. The wave height power spectrum in the wave-number-space or in the frequency-space exhibit a power law and will be discussed with respects of weak turbulence theory (Zakharov, 2012). Finally the scaling of the spectrum with the injected power will be compared with theoretical and experimental works.

  7. Nonlocal resonances in weak turbulence of gravity-capillary waves.

    PubMed

    Aubourg, Quentin; Mordant, Nicolas

    2015-04-10

    We report a laboratory investigation of weak turbulence of water surface waves in the gravity-capillary crossover. By using time-space-resolved profilometry and a bicoherence analysis, we observe that the nonlinear processes involve three-wave resonant interactions. By studying the solutions of the resonance conditions, we show that the nonlinear interaction is dominantly one dimensional and involves collinear wave vectors. Furthermore, taking into account the spectral widening due to weak nonlinearity explains why nonlocal interactions are possible between a gravity wave and high-frequency capillary ones. We observe also that nonlinear three-wave coupling is possible among gravity waves, and we raise the question of the relevance of this mechanism for oceanic waves. PMID:25910127

  8. A Simple Theory of Capillary-Gravity Wave Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glazman, Roman E.

    1995-01-01

    Employing a recently proposed 'multi-wave interaction' theory, inertial spectra of capillary gravity waves are derived. This case is characterized by a rather high degree of nonlinearity and a complicated dispersion law. The absence of scale invariance makes this and some other problems of wave turbulence (e.g., nonlinear inertia gravity waves) intractable by small-perturbation techniques, even in the weak-turbulence limit. The analytical solution obtained in the present work for an arbitrary degree of nonlinearity is shown to be in reasonable agreement with experimental data. The theory explains the dependence of the wave spectrum on wind input and describes the accelerated roll-off of the spectral density function in the narrow sub-range separating scale-invariant regimes of purely gravity and capillary waves, while the appropriate (long- and short-wave) limits yield power laws corresponding to the Zakharov-Filonenko and Phillips spectra.

  9. Nonlocal resonances in weak turbulence of gravity-capillary waves.

    PubMed

    Aubourg, Quentin; Mordant, Nicolas

    2015-04-10

    We report a laboratory investigation of weak turbulence of water surface waves in the gravity-capillary crossover. By using time-space-resolved profilometry and a bicoherence analysis, we observe that the nonlinear processes involve three-wave resonant interactions. By studying the solutions of the resonance conditions, we show that the nonlinear interaction is dominantly one dimensional and involves collinear wave vectors. Furthermore, taking into account the spectral widening due to weak nonlinearity explains why nonlocal interactions are possible between a gravity wave and high-frequency capillary ones. We observe also that nonlinear three-wave coupling is possible among gravity waves, and we raise the question of the relevance of this mechanism for oceanic waves.

  10. Nonlinear structures of the Korteweg-de Vries and modified Korteweg-de Vries equations in non-Maxwellian electron-positron-ion plasma: Solitons collision and rogue waves

    SciTech Connect

    El-Tantawy, S. A.; Moslem, W. M.

    2014-05-15

    Solitons (small-amplitude long-lived waves) collision and rogue waves (large-amplitude short-lived waves) in non-Maxwellian electron-positron-ion plasma have been investigated. For the solitons collision, the extended Poincaré-Lighthill-Kuo perturbation method is used to derive the coupled Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equations with the quadratic nonlinearities and their corresponding phase shifts. The calculations reveal that both positive and negative polarity solitons can propagate in the present model. At critical value of plasma parameters, the coefficients of the quadratic nonlinearities disappear. Therefore, the coupled modified KdV (mKdV) equations with cubic nonlinearities and their corresponding phase shifts have been derived. The effects of the electron-to-positron temperature ratio, the ion-to-electron temperature ratio, the positron-to-ion concentration, and the nonextensive parameter on the colliding solitons profiles and their corresponding phase shifts are examined. Moreover, generation of ion-acoustic rogue waves from small-amplitude initial perturbations in plasmas is studied in the framework of the mKdV equation. The properties of the ion-acoustic rogue waves are examined within a nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE) that has been derived from the mKdV equation. The dependence of the rogue wave profile on the relevant physical parameters has been investigated. Furthermore, it is found that the NLSE that has been derived from the KdV equation cannot support the propagation of rogue waves.

  11. A Simple Theory of Capillary-Gravity Wave Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glazman, Roman E.

    1993-01-01

    Employing a recently proposed 'multi-wave interaction' theory [JFM, 243, 623-625], spectra of capillary-gravity waves are derived. This case is characterized by a rather high degree of nonlinearity and a complicated dispersion law. The resultant absence of scale invariance makes this and some other problems of wave turbulence (e.g., nonlinear Rossby waves) intractable by small-perturbation techniques, even in the weak turbulence limit. The analytical solution obtained in the present work is shown to be in good agreement with experimental data. Its low- and high-frequency limits yield power-laws characterizing spectra of purely gravity and capillary waves, respectively. In the limits of weak and strong linearity, these reduce of the Zakharov-Filonenko and Phillips spectra, respectively.

  12. A coupling modulation model of capillary waves from gravity waves: Theoretical analysis and experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Pengzhen; Wang, Xiaoqing; Liu, Li; Chong, Jinsong

    2016-06-01

    According to Bragg theory, capillary waves are the predominant scatterers of high-frequency band (such as Ka-band) microwave radiation from the surface of the ocean. Therefore, understanding the modulation mechanism of capillary waves is an important foundation for interpreting high-frequency microwave remote sensing images of the surface of the sea. In our experiments, we discovered that modulations of capillary waves are significantly larger than the values predicted by the classical theory. Further, analysis shows that the difference in restoring force results in an inflection point while the phase velocity changes from gravity waves region to capillary waves region, and this results in the capillary waves being able to resonate with gravity waves when the phase velocity of the gravity waves is equal to the group velocity of the capillary waves. Consequently, we propose a coupling modulation model in which the current modulates the capillary wave indirectly by modulating the resonant gravity waves, and the modulation of the former is approximated by that of the latter. This model very effectively explains the results discovered in our experiments. Further, based on Bragg scattering theory and this coupling modulation model, we simulate the modulation of normalized radar cross section (NRCS) of typical internal waves and show that the high-frequency bands are superior to the low-frequency bands because of their greater modulation of NRCS and better radiometric resolution. This result provides new support for choice of radar band for observation of wave-current modulation oceanic phenomena such as internal waves, fronts, and shears.

  13. Single-shot observation of optical rogue waves in integrable turbulence using time microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Suret, Pierre; Koussaifi, Rebecca El; Tikan, Alexey; Evain, Clément; Randoux, Stéphane; Szwaj, Christophe; Bielawski, Serge

    2016-01-01

    Optical fibres are favourable tabletop laboratories to investigate both coherent and incoherent nonlinear waves. In particular, exact solutions of the one-dimensional nonlinear Schrödinger equation such as fundamental solitons or solitons on finite background can be generated by launching periodic, specifically designed coherent waves in optical fibres. It is an open fundamental question to know whether these coherent structures can emerge from the nonlinear propagation of random waves. However the typical sub-picosecond timescale prevented—up to now—time-resolved observations of the awaited dynamics. Here, we report temporal ‘snapshots' of random light using a specially designed ‘time-microscope'. Ultrafast structures having peak powers much larger than the average optical power are generated from the propagation of partially coherent waves in optical fibre and are recorded with 250 femtoseconds resolution. Our experiment demonstrates the central role played by ‘breather-like' structures such as the Peregrine soliton in the emergence of heavy-tailed statistics in integrable turbulence. PMID:27713416

  14. Single-shot observation of optical rogue waves in integrable turbulence using time microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suret, Pierre; Koussaifi, Rebecca El; Tikan, Alexey; Evain, Clément; Randoux, Stéphane; Szwaj, Christophe; Bielawski, Serge

    2016-10-01

    Optical fibres are favourable tabletop laboratories to investigate both coherent and incoherent nonlinear waves. In particular, exact solutions of the one-dimensional nonlinear Schrödinger equation such as fundamental solitons or solitons on finite background can be generated by launching periodic, specifically designed coherent waves in optical fibres. It is an open fundamental question to know whether these coherent structures can emerge from the nonlinear propagation of random waves. However the typical sub-picosecond timescale prevented--up to now--time-resolved observations of the awaited dynamics. Here, we report temporal `snapshots' of random light using a specially designed `time-microscope'. Ultrafast structures having peak powers much larger than the average optical power are generated from the propagation of partially coherent waves in optical fibre and are recorded with 250 femtoseconds resolution. Our experiment demonstrates the central role played by `breather-like' structures such as the Peregrine soliton in the emergence of heavy-tailed statistics in integrable turbulence.

  15. Spatiotemporal measurement of surfactant distribution on gravity-capillary waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strickland, Stephen; Shearer, Michael; Daniels, Karen

    2015-11-01

    Materials adsorbed to the surface of a fluid - for instance, crude oil, biogenic slicks, or industrial/medical surfactants - will move in response to surface waves. Due to the difficulty of non-invasive measurement of the spatial distribution of a molecular monolayer, little is known about the dynamics that couple the surface waves and the evolving density field. We report measurements of the spatiotemporal dynamics of the density field of an insoluble surfactant driven by gravity-capillary waves in a shallow cylindrical container. Standing Faraday waves and traveling waves generated by the meniscus are superimposed to create a non-trivial surfactant density field. We measure both the height field of the surface using moire-imaging and the density field of the surfactant via the fluorescence of NBD-tagged phosphatidylcholine. Through phase-averaging stroboscopically-acquired images of the density field, we determine that the surfactant accumulates on the leading edge of the traveling meniscus waves and in the troughs of the standing Faraday waves. We fit the spatiotemporal variations in the two fields and report measurements of the wavenumbers as well as a temporal phase shift between the two fields. These measurements suggest that longitudinal waves contribute to the dynamics. Funded by NSF grant DMS-0968258.

  16. Capillary-wave description of rapid directional solidification.

    PubMed

    Korzhenevskii, Alexander L; Bausch, Richard; Schmitz, Rudi

    2012-02-01

    A recently introduced capillary-wave description of binary-alloy solidification is generalized to include the procedure of directional solidification. For a class of model systems a universal dispersion relation of the unstable eigenmodes of a planar steady-state solidification front is derived, which readjusts previously known stability considerations. We moreover establish a differential equation for oscillatory motions of a planar interface that offers a limit-cycle scenario for the formation of solute bands and, taking into account the Mullins-Sekerka instability, of banded structures.

  17. Numerical time-step restrictions as a result of capillary waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denner, Fabian; van Wachem, Berend G. M.

    2015-03-01

    The propagation of capillary waves on material interfaces between two fluids imposes a strict constraint on the numerical time-step applied to solve the equations governing this problem and is directly associated with the stability of interfacial flow simulations. The explicit implementation of surface tension is the generally accepted reason for the restrictions on the temporal resolution caused by capillary waves. In this article, a fully-coupled numerical framework with an implicit treatment of surface tension is proposed and applied, demonstrating that the capillary time-step constraint is in fact a constraint imposed by the temporal sampling of capillary waves, irrespective of the type of implementation. The presented results show that the capillary time-step constraint can be exceeded by several orders of magnitude, with the explicit as well as the implicit treatment of surface tension, if capillary waves are absent. Furthermore, a revised capillary time-step constraint is derived by studying the temporal resolution of capillary waves based on numerical stability and signal processing theory, including the Doppler shift caused by an underlying fluid motion. The revised capillary time-step constraint assures a robust, aliasing-free result, as demonstrated by representative numerical experiments, and is in the static case less restrictive than previously proposed time-step limits associated with capillary waves.

  18. Experimental study of three-wave interactions among capillary-gravity surface waves.

    PubMed

    Haudin, Florence; Cazaubiel, Annette; Deike, Luc; Jamin, Timothée; Falcon, Eric; Berhanu, Michael

    2016-04-01

    In propagating wave systems, three- or four-wave resonant interactions constitute a classical nonlinear mechanism exchanging energy between the different scales. Here we investigate three-wave interactions for gravity-capillary surface waves in a closed laboratory tank. We generate two crossing wave trains and we study their interaction. Using two optical methods, a local one (laser doppler vibrometry) and a spatiotemporal one (diffusive light photography), a third wave of smaller amplitude is detected, verifying the three-wave resonance conditions in frequency and in wave number. Furthermore, by focusing on the stationary regime and by taking into account viscous dissipation, we directly estimate the growth rate of the resonant mode. The latter is then compared to the predictions of the weakly nonlinear triadic resonance interaction theory. The obtained results confirm qualitatively and extend previous experimental results obtained only for collinear wave trains. Finally, we discuss the relevance of three-wave interaction mechanisms in recent experiments studying gravity-capillary turbulence. PMID:27176393

  19. Experimental study of three-wave interactions among capillary-gravity surface waves.

    PubMed

    Haudin, Florence; Cazaubiel, Annette; Deike, Luc; Jamin, Timothée; Falcon, Eric; Berhanu, Michael

    2016-04-01

    In propagating wave systems, three- or four-wave resonant interactions constitute a classical nonlinear mechanism exchanging energy between the different scales. Here we investigate three-wave interactions for gravity-capillary surface waves in a closed laboratory tank. We generate two crossing wave trains and we study their interaction. Using two optical methods, a local one (laser doppler vibrometry) and a spatiotemporal one (diffusive light photography), a third wave of smaller amplitude is detected, verifying the three-wave resonance conditions in frequency and in wave number. Furthermore, by focusing on the stationary regime and by taking into account viscous dissipation, we directly estimate the growth rate of the resonant mode. The latter is then compared to the predictions of the weakly nonlinear triadic resonance interaction theory. The obtained results confirm qualitatively and extend previous experimental results obtained only for collinear wave trains. Finally, we discuss the relevance of three-wave interaction mechanisms in recent experiments studying gravity-capillary turbulence.

  20. Wave drag due to generation of capillary-gravity surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burghelea, Teodor; Steinberg, Victor

    2002-11-01

    The onset of the wave resistance via the generation of capillary-gravity waves by a small object moving with a velocity V is investigated experimentally. Due to the existence of a minimum phase velocity Vc for surface waves, the problem is similar to the generation of rotons in superfluid helium near their minimum. In both cases, waves or rotons are produced at V>Vc due to Cherenkov radiation. We find that the transition to the wave drag state is continuous: in the vicinity of the bifurcation the wave resistance force is proportional to (V-Vc) for various fluids. This observation contradicts the theory of Raphaël and de Gennes. We also find that the reduced wave drag force for different fluids and different ball size may be scaled in such a way that all the data collapse on a single curve. The capillary-gravity wave pattern and the shape of the wave-generating region are investigated both experimentally and theoretically. Good agreement between the theory and the experimental data is found in this case.

  1. Going rogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Philip

    2015-07-01

    Once thought to be the stuff of exaggeration by seafaring folk, we now know that giant “rogue” waves that soar to heights of up to 30 m really do occur at sea. But scientists can't yet agree on why they happen, as Philip Ball reports.

  2. Capillary wave dynamics of thin liquid polymer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Fan-Yen; Steffen, Werner

    2014-09-01

    The dynamics of thin, liquid polybutadiene films on solid substrates at temperatures far above the glass transition temperature Tg was studied by Resonance Enhanced Dynamic Light Scattering. The capillary wave dynamics is the stronger suppressed by the substrate the thinner the film. We find a molecular weight independent film-thickness below which the dynamics change dramatically—the viscosity increases by orders of magnitude. This change is not related to 3Rg as postulated in theory and claimed in some experimental findings but rather to a fixed distance from the solid interface. Part of our observations we attribute to a, compared to bulk polymer, less mobile viscoelastic layer adjacent to the substrate, and part to a more mobile layer at the liquid-gas interface. Thus, the overall behavior of the dynamics can be explained by a "three layer" model, the third layer having bulk behavior in between the above two layers.

  3. Capillary wave dynamics of thin liquid polymer films.

    PubMed

    Lin, Fan-Yen; Steffen, Werner

    2014-09-14

    The dynamics of thin, liquid polybutadiene films on solid substrates at temperatures far above the glass transition temperature T(g) was studied by Resonance Enhanced Dynamic Light Scattering. The capillary wave dynamics is the stronger suppressed by the substrate the thinner the film. We find a molecular weight independent film-thickness below which the dynamics change dramatically--the viscosity increases by orders of magnitude. This change is not related to 3R(g) as postulated in theory and claimed in some experimental findings but rather to a fixed distance from the solid interface. Part of our observations we attribute to a, compared to bulk polymer, less mobile viscoelastic layer adjacent to the substrate, and part to a more mobile layer at the liquid-gas interface. Thus, the overall behavior of the dynamics can be explained by a "three layer" model, the third layer having bulk behavior in between the above two layers. PMID:25217947

  4. Laser probe for measuring 2-D wave slope spectra of ocean capillary waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palm, C. S.; Anderson, R. C.; Reece, A. M.

    1977-01-01

    A laser-optical instrument for use in determining the two-dimensional wave-slope spectrum of ocean capillary waves is described. The instrument measures up to a 35-deg tip angle of the surface normal by measuring the position of a refracted laser beam directed vertically upward through a water surface. A telescope, a continuous two-dimensional Schottky barrier photodiode, and a pair of analog dividers render the signals independent of water height and insensitive to laser-beam intensity fluctuations. Calibration is performed entirely in the laboratory before field use. Sample records and wave-slope spectra are shown for one-dimensional wave-tank tests and for two-dimensional ocean tests. These are presented along with comparison spectra for calm and choppy water conditions. A mechanical wave follower was used to adjust the instrument position in the presence of large ocean swell and tides.

  5. Laser probe for measuring 2-D wave slope spectra of ocean capillary waves.

    PubMed

    Palm, C S; Anderson, R C; Reece, A M

    1977-04-01

    A laser-optical instrument for use in determining the 2-D wave slope spectrum of ocean capillary waves is described. The instrument measures up to a 35 degrees tip angle of the surface normal by measuring the position of a refracted laser beam directed vertically upward through a water surface. A telescope, a continuous 2-D Schottky barrier photodiode, and a pair of analog dividers render the signals independent of water height and insensitive to laser beam intensity fluctuations. Calibration is performed entirely in the laboratory before field use. Sample records and wave slope spectra are shown for 1-D wave tank tests and for 2-D ocean tests. These are presented along with comparison spectra for calm and choppy water conditions. A mechanical wave follower was used to adjust the instrument position in the presence of large ocean swell and tides. PMID:20168638

  6. Direct numerical investigation of turbulence of capillary waves.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yulin; Yue, Dick K P

    2014-08-29

    We consider the inertial range spectrum of capillary wave turbulence. Under the assumptions of weak turbulence, the theoretical surface elevation spectrum scales with wave number k as Iη∼k(α), where α=α0=-19/4, energy (density) flux P as P(1/2). The proportional factor C, known as the Kolmogorov constant, has a theoretical value of C=C0=9.85 (we show that this value holds only after a formulation in the original derivation is corrected). The k(-19/4) scaling has been extensively, but not conclusively, tested; the P(1/2) scaling has been investigated experimentally, but until recently remains controversial, while direct confirmation of the value of C0 remains elusive. We conduct a direct numerical investigation implementing the primitive Euler equations. For sufficiently high nonlinearity, the theoretical k^{-19/4} and P(1/2) scalings as well as value of C0 are well recovered by our numerical results. For a given number of numerical modes N, as nonlinearity decreases, the long-time spectra deviate from theoretical predictions with respect to scaling with P, with calculated values of α<α0 and C>C0, all due to finite box effect. PMID:25215986

  7. Diffusing light photography of solitons and capillary-wave turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, W.; Budak, R.; Putterman, S. )

    1994-11-01

    The attenuation of light propagating through a slab of water (containing a dilute concentration of polyballs) is approximately proportional to its thickness. Application of this insight to the local elevation of a fluid surface has enabled us to use photography to determine the instantaneous global topography of the surface of a fluid in motion. Use of diffusing light enables us to obtain images that are free of the caustics which plague shadowgraphs. Applications include breather solitons and wave turbulence which results from the nonlinear interaction of a broadband spectrum of high amplitude surface ripples. Measurements indicate that as the amplitude of excitation of the surface of water is increased the wave number of the capillary motion displays a transition to a broadband spectrum. The temporal response of a single pixel yields the power spectrum of the surface height as a function of frequency [ital f].'' The numerous harmonics which can be seen at low amplitude merge at high amplitude into a broadband spectrum which goes as 1/[ital f][sup 3]. This technique should permit the measurement of turbulent parameters which go beyond the purported range of current theories. [Work supported by US DOE Division of Engineering and Geophysics and NASA Microgravity.

  8. Frequency dispersion of small-amplitude capillary waves in viscous fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denner, Fabian

    2016-08-01

    This work presents a detailed study of the dispersion of capillary waves with small amplitude in viscous fluids using an analytically derived solution to the initial value problem of a small-amplitude capillary wave as well as direct numerical simulation. A rational parametrization for the dispersion of capillary waves in the underdamped regime is proposed, including predictions for the wave number of critical damping based on a harmonic-oscillator model. The scaling resulting from this parametrization leads to a self-similar solution of the frequency dispersion of capillary waves that covers the entire underdamped regime, which allows an accurate evaluation of the frequency at a given wave number, irrespective of the fluid properties. This similarity also reveals characteristic features of capillary waves, for instance that critical damping occurs when the characteristic time scales of dispersive and dissipative mechanisms are balanced. In addition, the presented results suggest that the widely adopted hydrodynamic theory for damped capillary waves does not accurately predict the dispersion when viscous damping is significant, and an alternative definition of the damping rate, which provides consistent accuracy in the underdamped regime, is presented.

  9. Frequency dispersion of small-amplitude capillary waves in viscous fluids.

    PubMed

    Denner, Fabian

    2016-08-01

    This work presents a detailed study of the dispersion of capillary waves with small amplitude in viscous fluids using an analytically derived solution to the initial value problem of a small-amplitude capillary wave as well as direct numerical simulation. A rational parametrization for the dispersion of capillary waves in the underdamped regime is proposed, including predictions for the wave number of critical damping based on a harmonic-oscillator model. The scaling resulting from this parametrization leads to a self-similar solution of the frequency dispersion of capillary waves that covers the entire underdamped regime, which allows an accurate evaluation of the frequency at a given wave number, irrespective of the fluid properties. This similarity also reveals characteristic features of capillary waves, for instance that critical damping occurs when the characteristic time scales of dispersive and dissipative mechanisms are balanced. In addition, the presented results suggest that the widely adopted hydrodynamic theory for damped capillary waves does not accurately predict the dispersion when viscous damping is significant, and an alternative definition of the damping rate, which provides consistent accuracy in the underdamped regime, is presented. PMID:27627395

  10. Capillary waves in an inhomogeneous three-layer liquid with a free surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiryaeva, S. O.; Grigor'ev, A. I.; Zav'yalov, D. A.

    2016-06-01

    In the domain of capillary waves, a bicubic dispersion relation is derived and analyzed for surface and internal capillary-gravitational waves in a three-layer liquid with a free surface. It is shown that the ratio of the internal wave amplitudes to the surface wave amplitudes is fairly large if the trivial condition of a "homogeneous liquid" is discarded. The amplitude ratio between the internal waves themselves (generated at different interfaces) may be both greater and smaller than unity depending on the physical parameters of the system. Specifically, it strongly depends on the densities of the layers and their thicknesses.

  11. Capillary and acceleration wave breakup of liquid jets in axial-flow airstreams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingebo, R. D.

    1981-01-01

    Empirical correlations of reciprocal mean drop diameter with airstream momentum were derived from capillary and acceleration wave breakup of liquid jets atomized by cross stream injection into axial flow airstreams. A scanning radiometer was used to obtain data over an airstream momentum range of 3.7 to 25.7 g/sq cm sec. Transition from capillary to acceleration wave breakup was obtained at a critical Weber-Reynolds number of 1,000,000.

  12. On the physical mechanism of front-back asymmetry of nonlinear gravity-capillary waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dosaev, Alexander; Troitskaya, Yulia; Shrira, Victor

    2016-04-01

    In nature wind waves of all scales are asymmetric both with respect to the horizontal and vertical axes. The front-back (or fore-aft asymmetry), i.e. the asymmetry with respect to the vertical axis, manifests itself in steeper front slopes. Although it can be important for remote sensing of sea surface and wave field interaction with wind, especially for the waves of gravity-capillary range, at present the understanding of physical mechanisms causing the gravity-capillary waves asymmetry and its dependence on parameters is very poor; there has been no study dedicated to this problem. Here we address this gap. The decimetre-range water waves in many respects essentially differ from the waves of other ranges: wind forcing is stronger, steep waves develop a characteristic pattern of capillary ripples on their forward slopes. These 'parasitic capillaries', generated by a narrow pressure distribution associated with an underlying longer wave' crest, remain quasi-stationary with regard to the longer wave. The train of capillaries is localised on the front slope and decays towards the trough. We investigate the nature of the asymmetry of such waves by extensive numerical simulations of the Euler equations employing the method of conformal mapping for two-dimensional potential flow and taking into account wave generation by wind and dissipation due to molecular viscosity. We examine the role of various factors contributing to the wave profile asymmetry: wind pumping, viscous stresses, the Reynolds stresses caused by ripples and found the latter to be by far the most important. It is the lop-sided ripple distribution which leads to noticeable fore-aft asymmetry of the mean wave profile. We also found how the asymmetry depends on wavelength, steepness, wind and viscosity, which enables us to parametrize these dependencies for applications in microwave remote sensing and wave generation.

  13. Capillary-gravity waves on a liquid film of arbitrary depth: analysis of the wave resistance.

    PubMed

    Wędołowski, Karol; Napiórkowski, Marek

    2013-10-01

    We discuss the wave resistance in the case of an externally perturbed viscous liquid film of arbitrary thickness. Emphasis is placed on the dependence of the wave resistance on the film thickness H, the length scale b characterizing the external perturbation, and its velocity V. In particular, the effectiveness of the mechanisms of capillary-gravity waves and the viscous dissipation localized in the vicinity of the perturbation are compared and discussed as functions of H and V. We show that, in general, the wave resistance is a nonmonotonous function of H with a maximum whose amplitude and position depend on b and V. In the case of small H the wave resistance depends on a parameter S proportional V/H(3). We find three different regimes of this parameter in which the wave resistance behaves like S(r) with the exponent r equal to 1, 1/3, and -1. These results are also obtained independently within the thin liquid film approximation. This allows us to assess the range of validity of the thin liquid film approximation in various cases, in particular its dependence on the perturbation length scale b. PMID:24229283

  14. Capillary-gravity waves on a liquid film of arbitrary depth: analysis of the wave resistance.

    PubMed

    Wędołowski, Karol; Napiórkowski, Marek

    2013-10-01

    We discuss the wave resistance in the case of an externally perturbed viscous liquid film of arbitrary thickness. Emphasis is placed on the dependence of the wave resistance on the film thickness H, the length scale b characterizing the external perturbation, and its velocity V. In particular, the effectiveness of the mechanisms of capillary-gravity waves and the viscous dissipation localized in the vicinity of the perturbation are compared and discussed as functions of H and V. We show that, in general, the wave resistance is a nonmonotonous function of H with a maximum whose amplitude and position depend on b and V. In the case of small H the wave resistance depends on a parameter S proportional V/H(3). We find three different regimes of this parameter in which the wave resistance behaves like S(r) with the exponent r equal to 1, 1/3, and -1. These results are also obtained independently within the thin liquid film approximation. This allows us to assess the range of validity of the thin liquid film approximation in various cases, in particular its dependence on the perturbation length scale b.

  15. The vortical structure of capillary-gravity waves: An experimental investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Juan Jay

    1997-11-01

    An experimental investigation of near-surface flow beneath progressive capillary-gravity waves is presented. For capillary-gravity waves of lengths 50 mm to 100 mm with moderate steepnesses, significant capillary ripples are present. This phenomenon complicates the flow field, and highly non-linear mechanisms are present. Measuring precise experimental wave profiles is the first objective of the present thesis. A non-intrusive waveform detection technique is developed successfully. Due to the relatively small slopes of free-surface water waves, this method optically exaggerates the vertical scale of the wave profile to accurately measure the surface of the capillary ripples. Comparisons between experimental results and existing theories show good agreement for low steepness waves; however, the existing models do not satisfactorily explain the unsteady/modulated capillary ripple phenomena that appear on steeper capillary-gravity waves. Various aspects of these phenomena are presented and discussed. The second major achievement is the investigation of the velocity/vorticity field beneath capillary-gravity waves. A new technique, Sub-pattern particle image velocimetry, is developed to investigate the vortical characteristics of the extremely thin free-surface boundary layer. This modified particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique overcomes the difficulties in choosing optimal experimental parameters for conventional PIV methods, and successfully measures the fine-scale vortical structure of the capillary-gravity waves with parasitic capillary ripples present. The experimental data are compared to a direct numerical simulation of the Navier-Stokes equations, and they show reasonable agreement. This new Sub-pattern PIV technique is general and flexible and can be applied to other flow investigations that include fluid-fluid interfaces and thin shear (boundary) layers. For higher frequency capillary-gravity waves (8 Hz to 16 Hz), viscous drift phenomena are investigated

  16. An investigation of the modulation of capillary and short gravity waves in the open ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, D. D.; Shemdin, O. H.

    1980-01-01

    A preliminary investigation of the modulation of capillary and gravity waves by long ocean waves is described. A pressure transducer is used to obtain water surface displacements, and a high-response laser-optical system is used to detect short-wave slopes. Analytical techniques are developed to account for the orbital motion of long waves. The local mean squared wave slope is found to be maximum leeward of the long-wave crests. For the long waves studied here and for short waves from 1 cm to 1 m, the longer a short-wave component is, the more leeward its maximum tends to occur. Also, the shortest waves tend to modulate least. The modulation of short waves is found to be strong enough to be an important component of the synthetic aperture radar image formation mechanism for long ocean waves.

  17. Confining capillary waves to control aerosol droplet size from surface acoustic wave nebulisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarzadeh, Elijah; Reboud, Julien; Wilson, Rab; Cooper, Jonathan M.

    Aerosols play a significant role in targeted delivery of medication through inhalation of drugs in a droplet form to the lungs. Delivery and targeting efficiencies are mainly linked to the droplet size, leading to a high demand for devices that can produce aerosols with controlled sizes in the range of 1 to 5 μm. Here we focus on enabling the control of the droplet size of a liquid sample nebulised using surface acoustic wave (SAW) generated by interdigitated transducers on a piezoelectric substrate (lithium niobate). The formation of droplets was monitored through a high-speed camera (600,000 fps) and the sizes measured using laser diffraction (Spraytec, Malvern Ltd). Results show a wide droplet size distribution (between 0.8 and 400 μm), while visual observation (at fast frame rates) revealed that the large droplets (>100 μm) are ejected due to large capillary waves (80 to 300 μm) formed at the free surface of liquid due to leakage of acoustic radiation of the SAWs, as discussed in previous literature (Qi et al. Phys Fluids, 2008). To negate this effect, we show that a modulated structure, specifically with feature sizes, typically 200 μm, prevents formation of large capillary waves by reducing the degrees of freedom of the system, enabling us to obtain a mean droplet size within the optimum range for drug delivery (<10 μm). This work was supported by an EPSRC grant (EP/K027611/1) and an ERC Advanced Investigator Award (340117-Biophononics).

  18. Depinning-Induced Capillary Wave during the Sliding of a Droplet on a Textured Surface.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thanh-Vinh; Tsukagoshi, Takuya; Takahashi, Hidetoshi; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Shimoyama, Isao

    2016-09-20

    Surfaces covered with hydrophobic micro-/nanoscale textures can allow water droplets to slide easily because of low contact angle hysteresis. In contrast to the case of a droplet sliding on a smooth surface, when a droplet slides on a textured surface, it must recede from the textures at its rear edge and the resultant depinning events induce a capillary wave on the surface of the droplet. Although this depinning-induced capillary wave can be observed to some extent through high-speed imaging, important parameters of the wave, such as the wavelength and frequency, and the factors that determine these parameters are not fully understood. We report direct measurements of this depinning-induced capillary wave using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS)-based force sensors fabricated on a textured surface. Such sensor measurements reveal the frequency of the vibration occurring on the surface of the droplet, from which it is possible to calculate the wavelength of the capillary wave. We show that the frequency and wavelength of the depinning-induced capillary wave during the sliding of a water droplet on a micropillar array depend upon neither the size of the droplet nor its sliding velocity. However, the frequency (wavelength) decreases (increases) as the pitch of the micropillar array increases. We argue that the wavelength of the depinning-induced capillary wave is equal to the maximum length of the liquid bridges that develop at the micropillars before depinning. This hypothesis is confirmed by comparing the wavelengths obtained from the sensor measurements to the maximum liquid-bridge lengths calculated from observations using a high-speed camera. PMID:27603591

  19. Gas flow induced by ultrasonic cavitation bubble clouds and surface capillary wave.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Li, Tao; Kong, Ling Bing; Hng, Huey Hoon; Lee, Pooi See

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we report a gas flow phenomenon induced by ultrasonic water cavitation and capillary wave in a vibrating hollow tip and reflector system. The cavitation clouds generated a gas suction force and the capillary wave created tunnels through which the gas could go into the liquid. The gas flow rate was measured and compared under different conditions, including applied power, type of reflector, and tip-to-reflector distance. A model was proposed to explain the mechanisms of the gas flow and analyze the results in the experiments.

  20. Non local resonances in weak turbulence of gravity-capillary water waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mordant, Nicolas; Aubourg, Quentin

    2015-11-01

    We investigate experimentally the statistical properties of wave turbulence of surface waves on water. In the limit of weak non linearity an energy cascade in scale is predicted by the Weak Turbulence Theory. Energy transfers are predicted to occur among resonant waves. We use a Fourier Transform Profilometry technique that provides a 2D measurement of the water surface deformation that is resolved in time and scale. The principle is to project a pattern on the surface of water which diffuses light thanks to the addition of a Titanium oxyde powder. The pattern can then be inverted to provide the elevation of the water surface. Our wave tank is 70 cm long and we investigate waves that lie is the vicinity of the capillary-gravity crossover with frequencies between 1Hz and 100 Hz. We compute 3-wave correlations so that to study the non linear coupling and the energy transfers among resonant waves. We observe a 3-wave non linear coupling which is dominantly unidirectional and non local in scale: a low frequency gravity wave can be coupled to 2 high frequency capillary waves. We will also discuss the importance of approximate resonances in the wave coupling.

  1. 3D Solitons of Capillary-Gravity and Flexural-Gravity Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Reza

    2013-11-01

    In the context of nonlinear water wave theory an intriguing question has always been if fully-localized 3D wave structures, counterparts of 2D solitons, can exist. These structures are important because, if exist, they can transport mass, momentum and energy over long distances. For pure gravity waves this possibility is already ruled out, but- as we will discuss- few limiting cases of capillary-gravity and flexural-gravity wave equations admit such solutions in the form of dromions and lumps. Here we show that weakly nonlinear flexural-gravity wave packets, such as those propagating on the surface of ice-covered waters, admit three-dimensional fully localized solutions in the form of dromions. This study is motivated by observations of (relatively) large amplitude localized waves deep inside the ice-pack in polar waters. For capillary-gravity wave classical theory obtains dromions for shallow-water and strong surface tension (Bond number, Bo, greater than 1/3). Here we show that capillary-gravity dromions exist beyond this limit for a broad range of finite water depths as well as for sub-critical Bond numbers, i.e. for Bo < 1/3.

  2. Acoustic microfluidics: Capillary waves and vortex currents in a spherical fluid drop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev-Stepanov, P. V.; Rudenko, O. V.

    2016-07-01

    We calculate the radiation forces in a spherical drop lying on a solid substrate. The forces form as a result of the action of a capillary wave on a fluid as it propagates along the free spherical surface. We study the structure of acoustic currents excited by the radiation forces.

  3. Determination of the pulmonary capillary wedge position in patients with giant left atrial V waves.

    PubMed

    Moore, R A; Neary, M J; Gallagher, J D; Clark, D L

    1987-04-01

    Thirteen patients with giant left atrial V waves during preoperative cardiac catheterization were admitted into the study group. While awake and breathing spontaneously, simultaneous recordings of electrocardiographic leads II and V5, radial arterial traces, and pulmonary arterial or pulmonary capillary wedge traces were obtained. Measurements were made on four consecutive cardiac cycles in the unwedged and wedged positions for the following intervals: Q wave to the radial arterial upstroke (220 +/- 20 milliseconds) and peak (360 +/- 10 milliseconds), Q wave to the pulmonary arterial upstroke (170 +/- 20 milliseconds) and peak (350 +/- 20 milliseconds), Q wave to the V wave upstroke (280 +/- 20 milliseconds) and peak (570 +/- 20 milliseconds), and QT interval (420 +/- 20 milliseconds). These findings indicate that the radial arterial and pulmonary arterial upstrokes and peaks occur nearly simultaneously. Upon wedging, the V wave upstroke occurs significantly later in the cardiac cycle (P less than .05) compared with the pulmonary arterial upstroke, and the V wave peak occurs significantly later compared with both the pulmonary arterial and the radial arterial peak (P less than .05). A rapid, simple beat-to-beat method for differentiating pulmonary arterial from pulmonary capillary wedge positions in the presence of giant left atrial V waves is the superimposition of the pulmonary arterial trace on the radial arterial trace. When a wedge position is attained, there is an immediate rightward shift in the upstroke and peak of the pulmonary arterial pressure trace, which can be easily identified by observing the relationship between the pulmonary arterial and systemic arterial traces.

  4. Hamiltonian structure for rotational capillary waves in stratified flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Calin Iulian

    2016-07-01

    We show that the governing equations of two-dimensional water waves driven by surface tension propagating over two-layered stratified flows admit a Hamiltonian formulation. Moreover, the underlying flows that we consider here, have piecewise constant distribution of vorticity, the jump in vorticity being located along the interface separating the fluid of bigger density at the bottom from the lighter fluid adjacent to the free surface.

  5. Fifth-Order Approximations for Steep Gravity-Capillary Faraday Waves in Lagrangian Coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekerzh-Zenkovich, Sergey; Shingareva, Inna; Lizárraga-Celaya, Carlos

    2001-11-01

    Nonlinear gravity-capillary waves in water have been described usually in Eulearian coordinates (see M. Perlin & W. W. Schultz, Ann. Rev. Fluid Mech., Vol. 32, pp. 1-24, 2000). Less frequently, Lagrangian coordinates have been used by A. Miche (1944), Ya.I. Sekerzh-Zenkovich (1959), G.N. Mercer & A.J. Roberts (1992) and others for modeling free gravity waves. In the present study, Lagrangian coordinates are used for analytical description of 2D steep gravity and gravity-capillary Faraday waves of small forcing in a rectangular container. A formal asymptotic procedure of two-time scales (similar to Krylov-Bogolyubov averaging method) is developed to obtain (i) a power series expansions in wave amplitude for Lagrangian coordinates and (ii) the equations govering the wave amplitude and the slow phase as functions of the slow time-scale. With these equations, the fifth-order approximations have been derived for periodic waves excited in the subharmonic resonance conditions. The calculated wave parameters are found to be in good agreement with the known experimental data for standing waves of wave steepness up to 0.288. For the conditions of Schultz's et al. experiment (JFM, Vol.369, pp. 253-272, 1998) with a profile of the greatest wave steepness 0.425, the corresponding steepness is found to be 0.392. The highest predicted profile with these approximations has an unusual form: it is smooth and has infinite slope in two points in a small region of the wave crest.

  6. Sensitive detection of malachite green and crystal violet by nonlinear laser wave mixing and capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Eric J; Tong, William G

    2016-05-01

    An ultrasensitive label-free antibody-free detection method for malachite green and crystal violet is presented using nonlinear laser wave-mixing spectroscopy and capillary zone electrophoresis. Wave-mixing spectroscopy provides a sensitive absorption-based detection method for trace analytes. This is accomplished by forming dynamic gratings within a sample cell, which diffracts light to create a coherent laser-like signal beam with high optical efficiency and high signal-to-noise ratio. A cubic dependence on laser power and square dependence on analyte concentration make wave mixing sensitive enough to detect molecules in their native form without the use of fluorescent labels for signal enhancement. A 532 nm laser and a 635 nm laser were used for malachite green and crystal violet sample excitation. The use of two lasers of different wavelengths allows the method to simultaneously detect both analytes. Selectivity is obtained through the capillary zone electrophoresis separation, which results in characteristic migration times. Measurement in capillary zone electrophoresis resulted in a limit of detection of 6.9 × 10(-10)M (2.5 × 10(-19) mol) for crystal violet and 8.3 × 10(-11)M (3.0 × 10(-20) mol) for malachite green at S/N of 2.

  7. Sensitive detection of malachite green and crystal violet by nonlinear laser wave mixing and capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Eric J; Tong, William G

    2016-05-01

    An ultrasensitive label-free antibody-free detection method for malachite green and crystal violet is presented using nonlinear laser wave-mixing spectroscopy and capillary zone electrophoresis. Wave-mixing spectroscopy provides a sensitive absorption-based detection method for trace analytes. This is accomplished by forming dynamic gratings within a sample cell, which diffracts light to create a coherent laser-like signal beam with high optical efficiency and high signal-to-noise ratio. A cubic dependence on laser power and square dependence on analyte concentration make wave mixing sensitive enough to detect molecules in their native form without the use of fluorescent labels for signal enhancement. A 532 nm laser and a 635 nm laser were used for malachite green and crystal violet sample excitation. The use of two lasers of different wavelengths allows the method to simultaneously detect both analytes. Selectivity is obtained through the capillary zone electrophoresis separation, which results in characteristic migration times. Measurement in capillary zone electrophoresis resulted in a limit of detection of 6.9 × 10(-10)M (2.5 × 10(-19) mol) for crystal violet and 8.3 × 10(-11)M (3.0 × 10(-20) mol) for malachite green at S/N of 2. PMID:26998858

  8. Correlation dimension analysis and capillary wave turbulence in Dragon-Wash phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Huai-Wu; Li, Rui-Qu; Chen, Song-Ze; Li, Cun-Biao

    2008-02-01

    This paper describes the evolution of surface capillary waves of deep water excited by gradually increasing the lateral external force at a single frequency. The vertical velocities of the water surface are measured by using a Polytec Laser Vibrometer with a thin layer of aluminium powder scattering on the surface to reflect the laser beam. Nonlinear interaction processes result in a stationary Fourier spectrum of the vertical surface velocities (the same as the surface elevation), i.e. Iω ~ ω-3.5. The observed spectrum can be interpreted as a wave-turbulent Kolmogorov spectrum for the case of 'narrowband pumping' for a direct cascade of energy. Correlation dimension analysis of the whole development process reveals four distinct stages during the wave structure development and identifies the wave turbulence stage.

  9. Water Surface Currents, Short Gravity-Capillary Waves and Radar Backscatter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atakturk, Serhad S.; Katsaros, Kristina B.

    1993-01-01

    Despite their importance for air-sea interaction and microwave remote sensing of the ocean surface, intrinsic properties of short gravity-capillary waves are not well established. This is largely due to water surface currents and their effects on the direct measurements of wave parameters conducted at a fixed point. Frequencies of small scale waves propagating on a surface which itself is in motion, are subject to Doppler shifts. Hence, the high frequency tail of the wave spectra obtained from such temporal observations is smeared. Conversion of this smeared measured-frequency spectra to intrinsic-frequency (or wavenumber) spectra requires corrections for the Doppler shifts. Such attempts in the past have not been very successful in particular when field data were used. This becomes evident if the amplitude modulation of short waves by underlying long waves is considered. Microwave radar studies show that the amplitude of a short wave component attains its maximum value near the crests and its minimum in the troughs of the long waves. Doppler-shifted wave data yield similar results but much larger in modulation magnitude, as expected. In general, Doppler shift corrections reduce the modulation magnitude. Overcorrection may result in a negligible modulation or even in a strong modulation with the maximum amplitude in the wave troughs. The latter situation is clearly contradictory to our visual observations as well as the radar results and imply that the advection by currents is overestimated. In this study, a differential-advection approach is used in which small scale waves are advected by the currents evaluated not at the free surface, but at a depth proportional to their wavelengths. Applicability of this approach is verified by the excellent agreement in phase and magnitude of short-wave modulation between results based on radar and on wave-gauge measurements conducted on a lake.

  10. Spatiotemporal rogue events in optical multiple filamentation.

    PubMed

    Birkholz, Simon; Nibbering, Erik T J; Brée, Carsten; Skupin, Stefan; Demircan, Ayhan; Genty, Goëry; Steinmeyer, Günter

    2013-12-13

    The transient appearance of bright spots in the beam profile of optical filaments formed in xenon is experimentally investigated. Fluence profiles are recorded with high-speed optical cameras at the kilohertz repetition rate of the laser source. A statistical analysis reveals a thresholdlike appearance of heavy-tailed fluence distributions together with the transition from single to multiple filamentation. The multifilament scenario exhibits near-exponential probability density functions, with extreme events exceeding the significant wave height by more than a factor of 10. The extreme events are isolated in space and in time. The macroscopic origin of these experimentally observed heavy-tail statistics is shown to be local refractive index variations inside the nonlinear medium, induced by multiphoton absorption and subsequent plasma thermalization. Microscopically, mergers between filament strings appear to play a decisive role in the observed rogue wave statistics. PMID:24483663

  11. On the influence of the hysteretic behavior of the capillary pressure on the wave propagation in partially saturated soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albers, Bettina

    2016-06-01

    It is well known that the capillary pressure curve of partially saturated soils exhibits a hysteresis. For the same degree of saturation it has different values depending on the initial state of the soil, thus for drying of a wet soil or wetting of a dry soil. The influence of these different values of the capillary pressure on the propagation of sound waves is studied by use of a linear hyperbolic model. Even if the model does not contain a hysteresis operator, the effect of hysteresis in the capillary pressure curve is accounted for. In order to obtain the limits of phase speeds and attenuations for the two processes the correspondent values for main drying and main wetting are inserted into the model separately. This is done for two examples of soils, namely for Del Monte sand and for a silt loam both filled by an air-water mixture. The wave analysis reveals four waves: one transversal wave and three longitudinal waves. The waves which are driven by the immiscible pore fluids are influenced by the hysteresis in the capillary pressure curve while the waves which are mainly driven by the solid are not.

  12. Asymmetric Directional Multicast for Capillary Machine-to-Machine Using mmWave Communications.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Jung-Hyok; Kim, Eui-Jik

    2016-04-11

    The huge demand for high data rate machine-to-machine (M2M) services has led to the use of millimeter Wave (mmWave) band communications with support for a multi-Gbps data rate through the use of directional antennas. However, unnecessary sector switching in multicast transmissions with directional antennas results in a long delay, and consequently a low throughput. We propose asymmetric directional multicast (ADM) for capillary M2M to address this problem in mmWave communications. ADM provides asymmetric sectorization that is optimized for the irregular deployment pattern of mulicast group members. In ADM, an M2M gateway builds up asymmetric sectors with a beamwidth of a different size to cover all multicast group members with the minimum number of directional transmissions. The performance of ADM under various simulation environments is evaluated through a comparison with legacy mmWave multicast. The results of the simulation indicate that ADM achieves a better performance in terms of the transmission sectors, the transmission time, and the aggregate throughput when compared with the legacy multicast method.

  13. Asymmetric Directional Multicast for Capillary Machine-to-Machine Using mmWave Communications

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Jung-Hyok; Kim, Eui-Jik

    2016-01-01

    The huge demand for high data rate machine-to-machine (M2M) services has led to the use of millimeter Wave (mmWave) band communications with support for a multi-Gbps data rate through the use of directional antennas. However, unnecessary sector switching in multicast transmissions with directional antennas results in a long delay, and consequently a low throughput. We propose asymmetric directional multicast (ADM) for capillary M2M to address this problem in mmWave communications. ADM provides asymmetric sectorization that is optimized for the irregular deployment pattern of mulicast group members. In ADM, an M2M gateway builds up asymmetric sectors with a beamwidth of a different size to cover all multicast group members with the minimum number of directional transmissions. The performance of ADM under various simulation environments is evaluated through a comparison with legacy mmWave multicast. The results of the simulation indicate that ADM achieves a better performance in terms of the transmission sectors, the transmission time, and the aggregate throughput when compared with the legacy multicast method. PMID:27077859

  14. Asymmetric Directional Multicast for Capillary Machine-to-Machine Using mmWave Communications.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Jung-Hyok; Kim, Eui-Jik

    2016-01-01

    The huge demand for high data rate machine-to-machine (M2M) services has led to the use of millimeter Wave (mmWave) band communications with support for a multi-Gbps data rate through the use of directional antennas. However, unnecessary sector switching in multicast transmissions with directional antennas results in a long delay, and consequently a low throughput. We propose asymmetric directional multicast (ADM) for capillary M2M to address this problem in mmWave communications. ADM provides asymmetric sectorization that is optimized for the irregular deployment pattern of mulicast group members. In ADM, an M2M gateway builds up asymmetric sectors with a beamwidth of a different size to cover all multicast group members with the minimum number of directional transmissions. The performance of ADM under various simulation environments is evaluated through a comparison with legacy mmWave multicast. The results of the simulation indicate that ADM achieves a better performance in terms of the transmission sectors, the transmission time, and the aggregate throughput when compared with the legacy multicast method. PMID:27077859

  15. On the unsteady gravity-capillary wave pattern found behind a slow moving localized pressure distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masnadi, N.; Duncan, J. H.

    2013-11-01

    The non-linear response of a water surface to a slow-moving pressure distribution is studied experimentally using a vertically oriented carriage-mounted air-jet tube that is set to translate over the water surface in a long tank. The free surface deformation pattern is measured with a full-field refraction-based method that utilizes a vertically oriented digital movie camera (under the tank) and a random dot pattern (above the water surface). At towing speeds just below the minimum phase speed of gravity-capillary waves (cmin ~ 23 cm/s), an unsteady V-shaped pattern is formed behind the pressure source. Localized depressions are generated near the source and propagate in pairs along the two arms of the V-shaped pattern. These depressions are eventually shed from the tips of the pattern at a frequency of about 1 Hz. It is found that the shape and phase speeds of the first depressions shed in each run are quantitatively similar to the freely-propagating gravity-capillary lumps from potential flow calculations. In the experiments, the amplitudes of the depressions decrease by approximately 60 percent while travelling 12 wavelengths. The depressions shed later in each run behave in a less consistent manner, probably due to their interaction with neighboring depressions.

  16. The local structure factor near an interface; beyond extended capillary-wave models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parry, A. O.; Rascón, C.; Evans, R.

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the local structure factor S (zq) at a free liquid-gas interface in systems with short-ranged intermolecular forces and determine the corrections to the leading-order, capillary-wave-like, Goldstone mode divergence of S (zq) known to occur for parallel (i.e. measured along the interface) wavevectors q\\to 0 . We show from explicit solution of the inhomogeneous Ornstein-Zernike equation that for distances z far from the interface, where the profile decays exponentially, S (zq) splits unambiguously into bulk and interfacial contributions. On each side of the interface, the interfacial contributions can be characterised by distinct liquid and gas wavevector dependent surface tensions, {σ l}(q) and {σg}(q) , which are determined solely by the bulk two-body and three-body direct correlation functions. At high temperatures, the wavevector dependence simplifies and is determined almost entirely by the appropriate bulk structure factor, leading to positive rigidity coefficients. Our predictions are confirmed by explicit calculation of S (zq) within square-gradient theory and the Sullivan model. The results for the latter predict a striking temperature dependence for {σ l}(q) and {σg}(q) , and have implications for fluctuation effects. Our results account quantitatively for the findings of a recent very extensive simulation study by Höfling and Dietrich of the total structure factor in the interfacial region, in a system with a cut-off Lennard-Jones potential, in sharp contrast to extended capillary-wave models which failed completely to describe the simulation results.

  17. Roots and Rogues in German Child Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffield, Nigel

    2008-01-01

    This article is concerned with the proper characterization of subject omission at a particular stage in German child language. It focuses on post-verbal null subjects in finite clauses, here termed Rogues. It is argued that the statistically significant presence of Rogues, in conjunction with their distinct developmental profile, speaks against a…

  18. Damage Caused by the Rogue Trustee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Banion, Terry

    2009-01-01

    Fifty-nine community college presidents and chancellors in 16 states report on the damage caused by rogue trustees. While the damage to presidents, other trustees, and faculty and staff is alarming, the damage these trustees cause the college suggests that the rogue trustee may be the single most destructive force ever to plague an educational…

  19. Shock waves in capillary collapse of colloids: a model system for two-dimensional screened Newtonian gravity.

    PubMed

    Bleibel, J; Dietrich, S; Domínguez, A; Oettel, M

    2011-09-16

    Using Brownian dynamics simulations, density functional theory, and analytical perturbation theory we study the collapse of a patch of interfacially trapped, micrometer-sized colloidal particles, driven by long-ranged capillary attraction. This attraction is formally analogous to two-dimensional (2D) screened Newtonian gravity with the capillary length λ as the screening length. Whereas the limit λ→∞ corresponds to the global collapse of a self-gravitating fluid, for finite λ[over ^] we predict theoretically and observe in simulations a ringlike density peak at the outer rim of a disclike patch, moving as an inbound shock wave. Possible experimental realizations are discussed.

  20. Capillary wave Hamiltonian for the Landau-Ginzburg-Wilson density functional.

    PubMed

    Chacón, Enrique; Tarazona, Pedro

    2016-06-22

    We study the link between the density functional (DF) formalism and the capillary wave theory (CWT) for liquid surfaces, focused on the Landau-Ginzburg-Wilson (LGW) model, or square gradient DF expansion, with a symmetric double parabola free energy, which has been extensively used in theoretical studies of this problem. We show the equivalence between the non-local DF results of Parry and coworkers and the direct evaluation of the mean square fluctuations of the intrinsic surface, as is done in the intrinsic sampling method for computer simulations. The definition of effective wave-vector dependent surface tensions is reviewed and we obtain new proposals for the LGW model. The surface weight proposed by Blokhuis and the surface mode analysis proposed by Stecki provide consistent and optimal effective definitions for the extended CWT Hamiltonian associated to the DF model. A non-local, or coarse-grained, definition of the intrinsic surface provides the missing element to get the mesoscopic surface Hamiltonian from the molecular DF description, as had been proposed a long time ago by Dietrich and coworkers.

  1. Capillary wave Hamiltonian for the Landau-Ginzburg-Wilson density functional

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chacón, Enrique; Tarazona, Pedro

    2016-06-01

    We study the link between the density functional (DF) formalism and the capillary wave theory (CWT) for liquid surfaces, focused on the Landau-Ginzburg-Wilson (LGW) model, or square gradient DF expansion, with a symmetric double parabola free energy, which has been extensively used in theoretical studies of this problem. We show the equivalence between the non-local DF results of Parry and coworkers and the direct evaluation of the mean square fluctuations of the intrinsic surface, as is done in the intrinsic sampling method for computer simulations. The definition of effective wave-vector dependent surface tensions is reviewed and we obtain new proposals for the LGW model. The surface weight proposed by Blokhuis and the surface mode analysis proposed by Stecki provide consistent and optimal effective definitions for the extended CWT Hamiltonian associated to the DF model. A non-local, or coarse-grained, definition of the intrinsic surface provides the missing element to get the mesoscopic surface Hamiltonian from the molecular DF description, as had been proposed a long time ago by Dietrich and coworkers.

  2. Slow Modulations of Periodic Waves in Hamiltonian PDEs, with Application to Capillary Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benzoni-Gavage, S.; Noble, P.; Rodrigues, L. M.

    2014-08-01

    Since its elaboration by Whitham almost 50 years ago, modulation theory has been known to be closely related to the stability of periodic traveling waves. However, it is only recently that this relationship has been elucidated and that fully nonlinear results have been obtained. These only concern dissipative systems though: reaction-diffusion systems were first considered by Doelman et al. (Mem Am Math Soc 199(934):viii+105, 2009), and viscous systems of conservation laws have been addressed by Johnson et al. (Invent Math, 2013). Here, only nondissipative models are considered, and a most basic question is investigated, namely, the expected link between the hyperbolicity of modulated equations and the spectral stability of periodic traveling waves to sideband perturbations. This is done first in an abstract Hamiltonian framework, which encompasses a number of dispersive models, in particular the well-known (generalized) Korteweg-de Vries equation and the less known Euler-Korteweg system, in both Eulerian coordinates and Lagrangian coordinates. The latter is itself an abstract framework for several models arising in water wave theory, superfluidity, and quantum hydrodynamics. As regards its application to compressible capillary fluids, attention is paid here to untangle the interplay between traveling waves/modulation equations in Eulerian coordinates and those in Lagrangian coordinates. In the most general setting, it is proved that the hyperbolicity of modulated equations is indeed necessary for the spectral stability of periodic traveling waves. This extends earlier results by Serre (Commun Partial Differ Equ 30(1-3):259-282, 2005), Oh and Zumbrun (Arch Ration Mech Anal 166(2):99-166, 2003), and Johnson et al. (Phys D 239(23-24):2057-2065, 2010). In addition, reduced necessary conditions are obtained in the small-amplitude limit. Then numerical investigations are carried out for the modulated equations of the Euler-Korteweg system with two types of "pressure

  3. Surface viscoelastic properties of floating polyelectrolyte multilayers films: a capillary wave study.

    PubMed

    Safouane, M; Miller, R; Möhwald, H

    2005-12-01

    A capillary wave technique was used to study the viscoelastic properties of floating polyelectrolyte multilayers of (PSS/PAH)(n) at the air-water interface. Oppositely charged polyelectrolyte layers were adsorbed onto two different Langmuir monolayers, either the lipid dimethyldioctadecylammonium bromide (DODAB) or the block copolymer poly(styrene-b-sodium acrylate) (PS-b-PAA). The results allow to propose a schematic representation of the multilayers in three zones: Zone I as a precursor, representing the adhesion between the Langmuir monolayer and the bulk polyelectrolyte multilayer. Zone II forms a bulk or core zone of the multilayer. Zone III as an outer zone in direct contact with the aqueous phase. The results show an increase of the elasticity after the formation of four polyelectrolyte layers accompanied by an apparent negative viscosity. This behaviour was interpreted as a translation of elasticity dominance from zone I to zone II. The Young modulus of seven layers was in the same order of magnitude as observed for planar polyelectrolyte multilayer films.

  4. Strichartz estimates and local existence for the gravity-capillary waves with non-Lipschitz initial velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Poyferré, Thibault; Nguyen, Quang-Huy

    2016-07-01

    We consider the gravity-capillary waves in any dimension and in fluid domains with general bottoms. Using the paradifferential reduction established in [19], we prove Strichartz estimates for solutions to this problem, at a low regularity level such that initially, the velocity field can be non-Lipschitz up to the free surface. We then use those estimates to solve the Cauchy problem at this level of regularity.

  5. Contours of slope as a measure of gravity-capillary wind waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, C. S.; Zhang, X.

    2012-12-01

    Contours of both x and y components of water surface slopes can be generated optically. Two horizontal arrays of thin, linear lamps placed a few meters below the water surface are photographed from above. One array, consisting of a group of colored y-parallel lamps produces contours of x-slope. The value of each contour is recognized by its color. The other array, of x -parallel lamps produces contours of y-slope. When the two arrays are pulsed alternately and photographed by a fast camera, the full structure and evolution of the water surface shape can be monitored. In order to register capillaries down to one or two millimeter wavelengths the light pulses must be as short as 200 micro seconds to avoid smearing Adequate light intensity in such short pulses is generated by a row of high intensity light emitting diodes in each linear lamp. LEDs are advantageous because several different colored types are available. permitting many different contours to be generated. When each emitter has a narrow wavelength range, problems from light dispersion and differential color absorption in the water are avoided. In analyzing the photographs, correct identification of the color in the image of each contour is essential. Color sensing cameras have only the three color coordinates, red, green and blue. It is useful to identify each colored contour image by a unit vector in the 3-space of RGB for comparison with the array of expected values. This enables recognition of the most probable color and an estimate of probable error of the choice. If the probable error is large, the contour can then be discarded because of uncertainty of its value.. The conversion from a small number of contours to a continuous representation of the water surface shape is in theory perfect for a band limited spectrum of waves, but in practice inaccuracies, even at the pixel level, in the location of contours produce errors. The spacing of contours of slope is determined by the physical spacing between

  6. Understanding the influence of capillary waves on solvation at the liquid-vapor interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rane, Kaustubh; van der Vegt, Nico F. A.

    2016-03-01

    This work investigates the question if surface capillary waves (CWs) affect interfacial solvation thermodynamic properties that determine the propensity of small molecules toward the liquid-vapor interface. We focus on (1) the evaluation of these properties from molecular simulations in a practical manner and (2) understanding them from the perspective of theories in solvation thermodynamics, especially solvent reorganization effects. Concerning the former objective, we propose a computational method that exploits the relationship between an external field acting on the liquid-vapor interface and the magnitude of CWs. The system considered contains the solvent, an externally applied field (f) and the solute molecule fixed at a particular location. The magnitude of f is selected to induce changes in CWs. The difference between the solvation free energies computed in the presence and in the absence of f is then shown to quantify the contribution of CWs to interfacial solvation. We describe the implementation of this method in the canonical ensemble by using a Lennard-Jones solvent and a non-ionic solute. Results are shown for three types of solutes that differ in the nature of short-ranged repulsive (hard-core) interactions. Overall, we observe that CWs have a negligible or very small effect on the interfacial solvation free energy of a solute molecule fixed near the liquid-vapor interface for the above systems. We also explain how the effects of pinning or dampening of CWs caused by a fixed solute are effectively compensated and do not contribute to the solvation free energy.

  7. Disjoining pressure and the film-height-dependent surface tension of thin liquid films: new insight from capillary wave fluctuations.

    PubMed

    MacDowell, Luis G; Benet, Jorge; Katcho, Nebil A; Palanco, Jose M G

    2014-04-01

    In this paper we review simulation and experimental studies of thermal capillary wave fluctuations as an ideal means for probing the underlying disjoining pressure and surface tensions, and more generally, fine details of the Interfacial Hamiltonian Model. We discuss recent simulation results that reveal a film-height-dependent surface tension not accounted for in the classical Interfacial Hamiltonian Model. We show how this observation may be explained bottom-up from sound principles of statistical thermodynamics and discuss some of its implications. PMID:24351859

  8. The Effect Of Randomness On The Stability Of Capillary Gravity Waves In The Presence Of Air Flowing Over Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumder, D. P.; Dhar, A. K.

    2015-12-01

    A nonlinear spectral transport equation for the narrow band Gaussian random surface wave trains is derived from a fourth order nonlinear evolution equation, which is a good starting point for the study of nonlinear water waves. The effect of randomness on the stability of deep water capillary gravity waves in the presence of air flowing over water is investigated. The stability is then considered for an initial homogenous wave spectrum having a simple normal form to small oblique long wave length perturbations for a range of spectral widths. An expression for the growth rate of instability is obtained; in which a higher order contribution comes from the fourth order term in the evolution equation, which is responsible for wave induced mean flow. This higher order contribution produces a decrease in the growth rate. The growth rate of instability is found to decrease with the increase of spectral width and the instability disappears if the spectral width increases beyond a certain critical value, which is not influenced by the fourth order term in the evolution equation.

  9. Simultaneous Modeling of Waveforms Associated With Backscattered He-Ne Laser Light from a Fluid Filled Capillary Tube by Use of Geometrical Optics and Wave Theories

    SciTech Connect

    Tarigan, Hendra J.

    2008-09-01

    Backscattered He-Ne laser light from a side illuminated fluid-filled fused silica capillary tube generates a series of fringes when viewed in an imaging plane. The light intensity variation as a function of scattering angle constitutes a waveform, which contains hills and valleys. Geometrical Optics and Wave Theories, simultaneously, are employed to model the waveforms and quantify the index of refraction of fluid in the capillary tube.

  10. 78 FR 60375 - Rogue Valley Terminal Railroad Corporation-Corporate Family Transaction Exemption

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board Rogue Valley Terminal Railroad Corporation--Corporate Family Transaction Exemption Rogue Valley Terminal Railroad Corporation (Rogue Valley),\\1\\ a Class III rail carrier... White City Terminal & Utility Co. (WCTU) and was indirectly controlled by Berkshire Hathaway...

  11. Strategies for Dealing with Rogue Trustees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Banion, Terry

    2009-01-01

    In the two previous articles in this three-part series the author reported on the motivations and damage caused by rogue trustees. The articles are based on a study of 59 community college CEOs from 16 different states. In this final article the author addresses the strategies that presidents and their board chairs have used to curtail the…

  12. Mechanical Characterization of Ultralow Interfacial Tension Oil-in-Water Droplets by Thermal Capillary Wave Analysis in a Microfluidic Device.

    PubMed

    Bolognesi, Guido; Saito, Yuki; Tyler, Arwen I I; Ward, Andrew D; Bain, Colin D; Ces, Oscar

    2016-04-19

    Measurements of the ultralow interfacial tension and surfactant film bending rigidity for micron-sized heptane droplets in bis(2-ethylhexyl) sodium sulfosuccinate-NaCl aqueous solutions were performed in a microfluidic device through the analysis of thermally driven droplet interface fluctuations. The Fourier spectrum of the stochastic droplet interface displacement was measured through bright-field video microscopy and a contour analysis technique. The droplet interfacial tension, together with the surfactant film bending rigidity, was obtained by fitting the experimental results to the prediction of a capillary wave model. Compared to existing methods for ultralow interfacial tension measurements, this contactless, nondestructive, all-optical approach has several advantages, such as fast measurement, easy implementation, cost-effectiveness, reduced amount of liquids, and integration into lab-on-a-chip devices. PMID:26982629

  13. A dimension-breaking phenomenon in the theory of steady gravity-capillary water waves.

    PubMed

    Groves, M D; Haragus, M; Sun, S M

    2002-10-15

    The existence of a line solitary-wave solution to the water-wave problem with strong surface-tension effects was predicted on the basis of a model equation in the celebrated 1895 paper by D. J. Korteweg and G. de Vries and rigorously confirmed a century later by C. J. Amick and K. Kirchgässner in 1989. A model equation derived by B. B. Kadomtsev and V. I. Petviashvili in 1970 suggests that the Korteweg-de Vries line solitary wave belongs to a family of periodically modulated solitary waves which have a solitary-wave profile in the direction of motion and are periodic in the transverse direction. This prediction is rigorously confirmed for the full water-wave problem in the present paper. It is shown that the Korteweg-de Vries solitary wave undergoes a dimension-breaking bifurcation that generates a family of periodically modulated solitary waves. The term dimension-breaking phenomenon describes the spontaneous emergence of a spatially inhomogeneous solution of a partial differential equation from a solution which is homogeneous in one or more spatial dimensions.

  14. Capillarity and capillary waves in immiscible two-fluid channel flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yecko, Philip

    2005-11-01

    The configuration of two immiscible fluids undergoing sheared Couette-Poiseuille flow in a straight channel is analyzed as a linearized stability problem, both from the point of view of eigenvalues and energy growth resulting from the non-normality of the stability operator. Only mild density contrasts (0.75capillary modes in the energy growth of disturbances and the role of capillarity in the generic stability problem. It is found that when the capillary wavevector is normal to the flow plane, capillarity facilitates the exchange of energy between the mean and perturbed flows and can significantly affect the nature of growing disturbances. This is in stark contrast to the more subtle role of capillarity in general, where its primary effect is dissipative and appears as eigenvalue damping. In addition, calculations in the eigenvalue subcritical regime indicate the possibile existence of steady deformed interface solutions which may persist, in the nonlinear regime, as steady finite amplitude states.

  15. Foam on troubled water: Capillary induced finite-time arrest of sloshing waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viola, Francesco; Brun, P.-T.; Dollet, Benjamin; Gallaire, François

    2016-09-01

    Interfacial forces exceed gravitational forces on a scale small relative to the capillary length—two millimeters in the case of an air-water interface—and therefore dominate the physics of sub-millimetric systems. They are of paramount importance for various biological taxa and engineering processes where the motion of a liquid meniscus induces a viscous frictional force that exhibits a sublinear dependence in the meniscus velocity, i.e., a power law with an exponent smaller than one. Interested in the fundamental implications of this dependence, we use a liquid-foam sloshing system as a prototype to exacerbate the effect of sublinear friction on the macroscopic mechanics of multi-phase flows. In contrast to classical theory, we uncover the existence of a finite-time singularity in our system yielding the arrest of the fluid's oscillations. We propose a minimal theoretical framework to capture this effect, thereby amending the paradigmatic damped harmonic oscillator model. Our results suggest that, although often not considered at the macroscale, sublinear capillary forces govern the friction at liquid-solid and liquid-liquid interfaces.

  16. Capillary Hemangioma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Why do capillary hemangiomas on the eyelids cause vision problems? Capillary Hemangiomas of the eyelid can cause ... a capillary hemangioma in the eye socket cause vision problems? A capillary hemangioma in the eye socket ( ...

  17. A Bifurcation Theory for Three-Dimensional Oblique Travelling Gravity-Capillary Water Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groves, M. D.; Haragus, M.

    This article presents a rigorous existence theory for small-amplitude threedimensional travelling water waves. The hydrodynamic problem is formulated as an infinite-dimensional Hamiltonian system in which an arbitrary horizontal spatial direction is the timelike variable. Wave motions that are periodic in a second, different horizontal direction are detected using a centre-manifold reduction technique by which the problem is reduced to a locally equivalent Hamiltonian system with a finite number of degrees of freedom.

  18. On the response of a water surface to a surface pressure source moving at trans-critical gravity-capillary wave speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masnadi, Naeem; Cho, Yeunwoo; Duncan, James H.; Akylas, Triantaphyllos

    2015-11-01

    The non-linear response of a water free surface to a pressure source moving at speeds near the minimum speed of linear gravity-capillary waves (Cmin ~ 23 cm/s) is investigated with experiments and theory. In the experiments, waves are generated by a vertically oriented air-jet that moves at a constant speed over the water surface in a long tank. The 3-D surface shape behind the air-jet is measured using a cinematic refraction-based technique combined with an LIF technique. At towing speeds just below Cmin, an unsteady pattern is formed where localized depressions periodically appear in pairs and move away from the source along the arms of a downstream V-shaped pattern. This behavior is analogous to the periodic shedding of solitary waves upstream of a source moving at the maximum wave speed in shallow water. The gravity-capillary depressions are rapidly damped by viscosity and their speed-amplitude characteristics closely match those from inviscid calculations of gravity-capillary lumps. The shedding frequency of the lumps in the present experiments increases with both increasing towing speed and air-flow rate. Predictions of this behavior using a model equation that incorporates damping and a quadratic nonlinearity are in good agreement with the experiments. The partial support of the National Science Foundation under grant OCE0751853 is gratefully acknowledged.

  19. Direct Numerical Simulation of turbulent flows over superhydrophobic surfaces: capillary waves on gas-liquid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jongmin; García-Mayoral, Ricardo; Mani, Ali

    2015-11-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces under liquid flow can produce significant slip, and thus drag reduction, when they entrap gas bubbles within their roughness elements. Our work aims to explore the onset mechanism to the failure of drag reduction by superhydrophobic surfaces when they are exposed to turbulent boundary layers. We focus on the effect of finite surface tension to the dynamic response of deformable interfaces between overlying water flow and the gas pockets. To this end, we conduct direct numerical simulations of turbulent flows over superhydrophobic surfaces allowing deformable gas-liquid interface. DNS results show that spanwise-coherent, upstream-traveling waves develop on the gas-liquid interface as a result of its interactions with turbulence. We study the nature and scaling of the upstream-traveling waves through semi-analytical modeling. We will show that the traveling waves are well described by a Weber number based on the slip velocity at the interface. In higher Weber number, the stability of gas pocket decreases as the amplitude of interface deformation and the magnitude of pressure fluctuations are augmented. Supported by Office of Naval Research and the Kwanjeong Educational Scholarship Foundation.

  20. Capillary sample

    MedlinePlus

    ... using capillary blood sampling. Disadvantages to capillary blood sampling include: Only a limited amount of blood can be drawn using this method. The procedure has some risks (see below). Capillary ...

  1. Axisymmetric capillary waves on thin annular liquid sheets. II. Spatial development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehring, C.; Sirignano, W. A.

    2000-06-01

    The forced motion of semi-infinite axisymmetric thin inviscid annular liquid sheets, exiting from a nozzle or atomizer into a surrounding void under zero gravity but with constant gas-core pressure is analyzed by means of the reduced-dimension approach described in C. Mehring and W. A. Sirignano [Phys. Fluids 12, 1417 (2000)]. Linear analytical time-dependent ("limit-cycle") solutions to the pure boundary-value problem are presented as well as linear and nonlinear numerical (transient) solutions to the mixed boundary- and initial-value problem of initially undisturbed sheets harmonically forced at the orifice or nozzle exit. Group velocities for the six independent solutions to the linear boundary-value problem are used to determine the location of boundary conditions. Numerical simulations of the linear transient problem are employed to validate these predictions. Parameter studies on sheet breakup and collapse lengths as well as on breakup and collapse times are reported. The dependence on modulation frequency, modulated disturbance amplitude, Weber number, and annular radius is presented for various cases of the mixed problem, i.e., for linearly or nonlinearly stable and unstable, dilationally or sinusoidally forced sheets. Nonlinear effects often have significant effects on breakup times and lengths or on collapse times and lengths. Nonlinear wave forms can deviate substantially from linear predictions resulting in major impacts on the size of the rings and shells that will remain after breakup.

  2. Experimental validation of a combined electromagnetic and thermal model for a microwave drying of capillary porous materials inside a rectangular wave guide (effects of irradiation time, particle sizes and initial moisture content).

    PubMed

    Ratanadecho, P; Aoki, K; Akahori, M

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, the experimental validation of a combined electromagnetic and thermal model for a microwave drying of capillary porous materials inside a rectangular wave guide is presented. The effects of the irradiation time, particle sizes and the variation of initial moisture content on the microwave drying kinetics are clarified in detail, considering the interference between incident and reflected waves in the capillary porous materials. The established model has allowed us to determine the space-time evolution of electric field, temperature and moisture content within capillary porous materials during microwave drying process.

  3. Simulation of Arrhythmogenic Effect of Rogue RyRs in Failing Heart by Using a Coupled Model

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Luyao; Xia, Ling; Zhu, Xiuwei

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac cells with heart failure are usually characterized by impairment of Ca2+ handling with smaller SR Ca2+ store and high risk of triggered activities. In this study, we developed a coupled model by integrating the spatiotemporal Ca2+ reaction-diffusion system into the cellular electrophysiological model. With the coupled model, the subcellular Ca2+ dynamics and global cellular electrophysiology could be simultaneously traced. The proposed coupled model was then applied to study the effects of rogue RyRs on Ca2+ cycling and membrane potential in failing heart. The simulation results suggested that, in the presence of rogue RyRs, Ca2+ dynamics is unstable and Ca2+ waves are prone to be initiated spontaneously. These release events would elevate the membrane potential substantially which might induce delayed afterdepolarizations or triggered action potentials. Moreover, the variation of membrane potential depolarization is indicated to be dependent on the distribution density of rogue RyR channels. This study provides a new possible arrhythmogenic mechanism for heart failure from subcellular to cellular level. PMID:23056145

  4. Code and codeless ionospheric measurements with NASA's Rogue GPS Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, Jeff M.; Meehan, Tom K.; Young, Lawrence E.

    1989-01-01

    The NASA/JPL Rogue Receiver is an 8-satellite, non-multiplexed, highly digital global positioning system (GPS) receiver that can obtain dual frequency data either with or without knowledge of the P-code. In addition to its applications for high accuracy geodesy and orbit determination, the Rogue uses GPS satellite signals to measure the total electron content (TEC) of the ionosphere along the lines of sight from the receiver to the satellites. These measurements are used by JPL's Deep Space Network (DSN) for calibrating radiometric data. This paper will discuss Rogue TEC measurements, emphasizing the advantages of a receiver that can use the P-code, when available, but can also obtain reliable dual frequency data when the code is encrypted.

  5. Effectiveness of charged noncovalent polymer coatings against protein adsorption to silica surfaces studied by evanescent-wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy and capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Haselberg, Rob; van der Sneppen, Lineke; Ariese, Freek; Ubachs, Wim; Gooijer, Cees; de Jong, Gerhardus J; Somsen, Govert W

    2009-12-15

    Protein adsorption to silica surfaces is a notorious problem in analytical separations. Evanescent-wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy (EW-CRDS) and capillary electrophoresis (CE) were employed to investigate the capability of positively charged polymer coatings to minimize the adsorption of basic proteins. Adsorption of cytochrome c (cyt c) to silica coated with a single layer of polybrene (PB), or a triple layer of PB, dextran sulfate (DS), and PB, was studied and compared to bare silica. Direct analysis of silica surfaces by EW-CRDS revealed that both coatings effectively reduce irreversible protein adsorption. Significant adsorption was observed only for protein concentrations above 400 microM, whereas the PB-DS-PB coating was shown to be most effective and stable. CE analyses of cyt c were performed with and without the respective coatings applied to the fused-silica capillary wall. Monitoring of the electroosmotic flow and protein peak areas indicated a strong reduction of irreversible protein adsorption by the positively charged coatings. Determination of the electrophoretic mobility and peak width of cyt c revealed reversible protein adsorption to the PB coating. It is concluded that the combination of results from EW-CRDS and CE provides highly useful information on the adsorptive characteristics of bare and coated silica surfaces toward basic proteins.

  6. Manipulating localized matter waves in multicomponent Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manikandan, K.; Muruganandam, P.; Senthilvelan, M.; Lakshmanan, M.

    2016-03-01

    We analyze vector localized solutions of two-component Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) with variable nonlinearity parameters and external trap potentials through a similarity transformation technique which transforms the two coupled Gross-Pitaevskii equations into a pair of coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations with constant coefficients under a specific integrability condition. In this analysis we consider three different types of external trap potentials: a time-independent trap, a time-dependent monotonic trap, and a time-dependent periodic trap. We point out the existence of different interesting localized structures; namely, rogue waves, dark- and bright-soliton rogue waves, and rogue-wave breatherlike structures for the above three cases of trap potentials. We show how the vector localized density profiles in a constant background get deformed when we tune the strength of the trap parameter. Furthermore, we investigate the nature of the trajectories of the nonautonomous rogue waves. We also construct the dark-dark rogue wave solution for the repulsive-repulsive interaction of two-component BECs and analyze the associated characteristics for the three different kinds of traps. We then deduce single-, two-, and three-composite rogue waves for three-component BECs and discuss the correlated characteristics when we tune the strength of the trap parameter for different trap potentials.

  7. Manipulating localized matter waves in multicomponent Bose-Einstein condensates.

    PubMed

    Manikandan, K; Muruganandam, P; Senthilvelan, M; Lakshmanan, M

    2016-03-01

    We analyze vector localized solutions of two-component Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) with variable nonlinearity parameters and external trap potentials through a similarity transformation technique which transforms the two coupled Gross-Pitaevskii equations into a pair of coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations with constant coefficients under a specific integrability condition. In this analysis we consider three different types of external trap potentials: a time-independent trap, a time-dependent monotonic trap, and a time-dependent periodic trap. We point out the existence of different interesting localized structures; namely, rogue waves, dark- and bright-soliton rogue waves, and rogue-wave breatherlike structures for the above three cases of trap potentials. We show how the vector localized density profiles in a constant background get deformed when we tune the strength of the trap parameter. Furthermore, we investigate the nature of the trajectories of the nonautonomous rogue waves. We also construct the dark-dark rogue wave solution for the repulsive-repulsive interaction of two-component BECs and analyze the associated characteristics for the three different kinds of traps. We then deduce single-, two-, and three-composite rogue waves for three-component BECs and discuss the correlated characteristics when we tune the strength of the trap parameter for different trap potentials.

  8. Manipulating localized matter waves in multicomponent Bose-Einstein condensates.

    PubMed

    Manikandan, K; Muruganandam, P; Senthilvelan, M; Lakshmanan, M

    2016-03-01

    We analyze vector localized solutions of two-component Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) with variable nonlinearity parameters and external trap potentials through a similarity transformation technique which transforms the two coupled Gross-Pitaevskii equations into a pair of coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations with constant coefficients under a specific integrability condition. In this analysis we consider three different types of external trap potentials: a time-independent trap, a time-dependent monotonic trap, and a time-dependent periodic trap. We point out the existence of different interesting localized structures; namely, rogue waves, dark- and bright-soliton rogue waves, and rogue-wave breatherlike structures for the above three cases of trap potentials. We show how the vector localized density profiles in a constant background get deformed when we tune the strength of the trap parameter. Furthermore, we investigate the nature of the trajectories of the nonautonomous rogue waves. We also construct the dark-dark rogue wave solution for the repulsive-repulsive interaction of two-component BECs and analyze the associated characteristics for the three different kinds of traps. We then deduce single-, two-, and three-composite rogue waves for three-component BECs and discuss the correlated characteristics when we tune the strength of the trap parameter for different trap potentials. PMID:27078349

  9. Applications of capillary optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romaniuk, Ryszard

    2006-10-01

    The paper updates and summarizes contemporary applications of capillary optical fibers. Some of these applications are straight consequence of the classical capillary properties and capillary devices like: rheometry, electrophoresis, column chromatography (gas and liquid). Some new applications are tightly connected with co-propagation (or counter-propagation) of micro-mass together with optical wave - evanescent or of considerable intensity. In the first case, the optical wave is propagated in a narrow (more and more frequently single-mode) optical ring core adjacent to the capillary hole. The optical propagation is purely refractive. In the second case, the intensity maximum of optical wave is on the capillary long axis, i.e. in the center of the hole. The optical propagation is purely photonic, i.e. in a Bragg waveguide (one dimensional photonic band-gap). The capillary hole is filled with vacuum or with propagated matter (gas, liquid, single atoms, continuous particle arrangement). Optical capillaries, filamentary and embedded, are turning to a fundamental component of nano- and micro-MOEMS.

  10. Comparison of Thresholds for Pulmonary Capillary Hemorrhage Induced by Pulsed-wave and B-mode Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Douglas L.; Dou, Chunyan; Raghavendran, Krishnan

    2016-01-01

    Pulsed ultrasound was found to induce pulmonary capillary hemorrhage (PCH) in mice about 25 years ago but remains a poorly understood risk factor for pulmonary diagnostic ultrasound. In early research using laboratory fixed beam ultrasound, thresholds for PCH had frequency variation from 1–4 MHz similar to the Mechanical Index. In recent research, thresholds for B mode diagnostic ultrasound from 1.5–12 MHz had little dependence on frequency. To compare the diagnostic ultrasound method to laboratory pulsed exposure, thresholds for fixed beam ultrasound were determined using comparable methods at 1.5 and 7.5 MHz. PCH thresholds were lower for simple fixed-beam pulse modes than for B mode and in approximate agreement with early research. However, for comparable timing parameters, PCH thresholds had little dependence on ultrasonic frequency. These findings suggest that the MI may not be directly useful as a dosimetric parameter for safety guidance in pulmonary ultrasound. PMID:26819648

  11. Immiscible displacement of oil by water in consolidated porous media due to capillary imbibition under ultrasonic waves.

    PubMed

    Hamida, Tarek; Babadagli, Tayfun

    2007-09-01

    Numerous studies done in the last four decades have demonstrated that acoustic stimulation may enhance recovery in oil reservoirs. This technology is not only technically feasible, but also serves as an economical, environmentally friendly alternative to currently accepted enhanced oil recovery (EOR) method. It requires low capital expenditure, and yields almost immediate improvement without any additional EOR agents. Despite a vast body of empirical and theoretical support, this method lacks sufficient understanding to make meaningful and consistent engineering predictions. This is in part due to the complex nature of the physical processes involved, as well as due to a shortage of fundamental/experimental research. Much of what the authors believe is happening within acoustically stimulated porous media is speculative and theoretical. This paper focuses on the effects of ultrasound on the interfacial forces between immiscible fluids. Capillary (spontaneous) imbibition of an aqueous phase into oil (or air)-saturated Berea sandstone and Indiana limestone samples experiments were conducted. Solutions of water, brine (15,000 and 150,000 ppm NaCl), anionic surfactant (sodium dodecyl diphenyloxide disulfonate), nonionic surfactant (alcohol ethoxylate) and polymer (xanthan gum) were prepared as the aqueous phase. Both counter-current and co-current geometries were tested. Due to the intrinsically unforced, gentle nature of the process, and their strong dependence on wettability, interfacial tension, viscosity and density, such experiments provide valuable insight into some of the governing mechanisms behind ultrasonic stimulation.

  12. Localized waves in three-component coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Tao; Chen, Yong

    2016-09-01

    We study the generalized Darboux transformation to the three-component coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equation. First- and second-order localized waves are obtained by this technique. In first-order localized wave, we get the interactional solutions between first-order rogue wave and one-dark, one-bright soliton respectively. Meanwhile, the interactional solutions between one-breather and first-order rogue wave are also given. In second-order localized wave, one-dark-one-bright soliton together with second-order rogue wave is presented in the first component, and two-bright soliton together with second-order rogue wave are gained respectively in the other two components. Besides, we observe second-order rogue wave together with one-breather in three components. Moreover, by increasing the absolute values of two free parameters, the nonlinear waves merge with each other distinctly. These results further reveal the interesting dynamic structures of localized waves in the three-component coupled system. Project supported by the Global Change Research Program of China (Grant No. 2015CB953904), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11275072 and 11435005), the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20120076110024), the Network Information Physics Calculation of Basic Research Innovation Research Group of China (Grant No. 61321064), and Shanghai Collaborative Innovation Center of Trustworthy Software for Internet of Things, China (Grant No. ZF1213).

  13. Localized waves in three-component coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Tao; Chen, Yong

    2016-09-01

    We study the generalized Darboux transformation to the three-component coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equation. First- and second-order localized waves are obtained by this technique. In first-order localized wave, we get the interactional solutions between first-order rogue wave and one-dark, one-bright soliton respectively. Meanwhile, the interactional solutions between one-breather and first-order rogue wave are also given. In second-order localized wave, one-dark-one-bright soliton together with second-order rogue wave is presented in the first component, and two-bright soliton together with second-order rogue wave are gained respectively in the other two components. Besides, we observe second-order rogue wave together with one-breather in three components. Moreover, by increasing the absolute values of two free parameters, the nonlinear waves merge with each other distinctly. These results further reveal the interesting dynamic structures of localized waves in the three-component coupled system. Project supported by the Global Change Research Program of China (Grant No. 2015CB953904), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11275072 and 11435005), the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20120076110024), the Network Information Physics Calculation of Basic Research Innovation Research Group of China (Grant No. 61321064), and Shanghai Collaborative Innovation Center of Trustworthy Software for Internet of Things, China (Grant No. ZF1213).

  14. Capillary origami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Py, Charlotte; Doppler, Lionel; Bico, Jose; Roman, Benoit; Reverdy, Paul; Baroud, Charles

    2006-11-01

    The wet fur of a dog coming out of a pond assembles into bunches: this is the most common effect of capillary forces on elasticity structures (the hairs). From a practical point of view, the deformation of flexible elements by surface tension forces dramatically damages mechanical microsystems or lung airways, but also allows the self-organization of nanotube carpets into well defined clump patterns. But capillary forces may generate even more complex structures when flexible sheets are brought to contact with a liquid interface. Here we present experiments where surface tension folds up an elastic sheet around a deposited water droplet, and discuss the different possible shapes obtained. These self-folding origami may be used in microsy stems design as a convenient and robust way to fold two-dimensional planar patterns into 3-dimensional structures, since surface tension effects are enhanced at small scales.

  15. Signal-processing theory for the TurboRogue receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, J. B.

    1995-01-01

    Signal-processing theory for the TurboRogue receiver is presented. The signal form is traced from its formation at the GPS satellite, to the receiver antenna, and then through the various stages of the receiver, including extraction of phase and delay. The analysis treats the effects of ionosphere, troposphere, signal quantization, receiver components, and system noise, covering processing in both the 'code mode' when the P code is not encrypted and in the 'P-codeless mode' when the P code is encrypted. As a possible future improvement to the current analog front end, an example of a highly digital front end is analyzed.

  16. Capillary muscle

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Caroline; Mouterde, Timothée; Quéré, David; Clanet, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    The contraction of a muscle generates a force that decreases when increasing the contraction velocity. This “hyperbolic” force–velocity relationship has been known since the seminal work of A. V. Hill in 1938 [Hill AV (1938) Proc R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 126(843):136–195]. Hill’s heuristic equation is still used, and the sliding-filament theory for the sarcomere [Huxley H, Hanson J (1954) Nature 173(4412):973–976; Huxley AF, Niedergerke R (1954) Nature 173(4412):971–973] suggested how its different parameters can be related to the molecular origin of the force generator [Huxley AF (1957) Prog Biophys Biophys Chem 7:255–318; Deshcherevskiĭ VI (1968) Biofizika 13(5):928–935]. Here, we develop a capillary analog of the sarcomere obeying Hill’s equation and discuss its analogy with muscles. PMID:25944938

  17. Paramecium swimming in capillary tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana, Saikat; Um, Soong Ho; Jung, Sunghwan

    2012-04-01

    Swimming organisms in their natural habitat need to navigate through a wide range of geometries and chemical environments. Interaction with boundaries in such situations is ubiquitous and can significantly modify the swimming characteristics of the organism when compared to ideal laboratory conditions. We study the different patterns of ciliary locomotion in glass capillaries of varying diameter and characterize the effect of the solid boundaries on the velocities of the organism. Experimental observations show that Paramecium executes helical trajectories that slowly transition to straight lines as the diameter of the capillary tubes decreases. We predict the swimming velocity in capillaries by modeling the system as a confined cylinder propagating longitudinal metachronal waves that create a finite pressure gradient. Comparing with experiments, we find that such pressure gradient considerations are necessary for modeling finite sized ciliary organisms in restrictive geometries.

  18. The impact of positrons beam on the propagation of super freak waves in electron-positron-ion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali Shan, S.; El-Tantawy, S. A.

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we examine the nonlinear propagation of planar ion-acoustic freak waves in an unmagnetized plasma consisting of cold positive ions and superthermal electrons subjected to cold positrons beam. For this purpose, the reductive perturbation method is used to derive a nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE) for the evolution of electrostatic potential wave. We determine the domain of the plasma parameters where the rogue waves exist. The effect of the positron beam on the modulational instability of the ion-acoustic rogue waves is discussed. It is found that the region of the modulational stability is enhanced with the increase of positron beam speed and positron population. Second as positrons beam increases the nonlinearities of the plasma system, large amplitude ion acoustic rogue waves are pointed out. The present results will be helpful in providing a good fit between the theoretical analysis and real applications in future laboratory plasma experiments.

  19. Capillary pressure experiments under simulated reservoir conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kummerow, J.; Spangenberg, E.

    2012-04-01

    The contribution of residual trapping to a long-term storage of CO2 in saline aquifers mainly depends on the drainage capillary pressure of a reservoir and the hysteresis of the drainage and imbibition branches of the capillary pressure curve. However, the experimental database of capillary pressure measured at relevant pT conditions is still scarce. Here, we present an experimental set-up, which allows for the performance of capillary pressure experiments with a semi-permeable disk (porous plate) at simulated reservoir conditions. In the framework of the EU funded project CO2CARE, drainage and imbibition cycles are performed on Triassic sandstone samples. We use a temperature controlled oil pressure autoclave to apply a maximum confining pressure of 400 bar and a maximum working temperature of 150°C. The fluid displacement, and hence the sample saturation is controlled by a gear pump with a fine resolution of 0.01 ml. Additionally, the capillary pressure experiment is combined with measurements of elastic wave velocities as well as of the electrical resistivity. In this case, P and S wave velocities and the formation resistivity factor are determined as functions of the brine/ CO2 saturation. The experiment provides information about the efficiency of the capillary trapping of the sample and a calibration of the petrophysical properties on saturation.

  20. Botrytis species: relentless necrotrophic thugs or endophytes gone rogue?

    PubMed

    van Kan, Jan A L; Shaw, Michael W; Grant-Downton, Robert T

    2014-12-01

    Plant pathology has a long-standing tradition of classifying microbes as pathogens, endophytes or saprophytes. Lifestyles of pathogens are categorized as biotrophic, necrotrophic or hemibiotrophic. Botrytis species are considered by many to be archetypal examples of necrotrophic fungi, with B. cinerea being the most extensively studied species because of its broad host range and economic impact. In this review, we discuss recent work which illustrates that B. cinerea is capable of colonizing plants internally, presumably as an endophyte, without causing any disease or stress symptoms. The extent of the facultative endophytic behaviour of B. cinerea and its relevance in the ecology and disease epidemiology may be vastly underestimated. Moreover, we discuss the recent discovery of a novel Botrytis species, B. deweyae, which normally grows as an endophyte in ornamental daylilies (Hemerocallis), but displays facultative pathogenic behaviour, and is increasingly causing economic damage. We propose that the emergence of endophytes 'gone rogue' as novel diseases may be related to increased inbreeding of hybrid lines and reduced genetic diversity. These observations lead us to argue that the sometimes inflexible classification of pathogenic microbes by their lifestyles requires serious reconsideration. There is much more variety to the interactions of Botrytis with its hosts than the eye (or the plant pathologist) can see, and this may be true for other microbes interacting with plants. PMID:24754470

  1. Identification of rogue datasets in serial crystallography1

    PubMed Central

    Assmann, Greta; Brehm, Wolfgang; Diederichs, Kay

    2016-01-01

    Advances in beamline optics, detectors and X-ray sources allow new techniques of crystallographic data collection. In serial crystallography, a large number of partial datasets from crystals of small volume are measured. Merging of datasets from different crystals in order to enhance data completeness and accuracy is only valid if the crystals are isomorphous, i.e. sufficiently similar in cell parameters, unit-cell contents and molecular structure. Identification and exclusion of non-isomorphous datasets is therefore indispensable and must be done by means of suitable indicators. To identify rogue datasets, the influence of each dataset on CC1/2 [Karplus & Diederichs (2012 ▸). Science, 336, 1030–1033], the correlation coefficient between pairs of intensities averaged in two randomly assigned subsets of observations, is evaluated. The presented method employs a precise calculation of CC1/2 that avoids the random assignment, and instead of using an overall CC1/2, an average over resolution shells is employed to obtain sensible results. The selection procedure was verified by measuring the correlation of observed (merged) intensities and intensities calculated from a model. It is found that inclusion and merging of non-isomorphous datasets may bias the refined model towards those datasets, and measures to reduce this effect are suggested. PMID:27275144

  2. Multiple capillary biochemical analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Dovichi, Norman J.; Zhang, Jian Z.

    1995-01-01

    A multiple capillary analyzer allows detection of light from multiple capillaries with a reduced number of interfaces through which light must pass in detecting light emitted from a sample being analyzed, using a modified sheath flow cuvette. A linear or rectangular array of capillaries is introduced into a rectangular flow chamber. Sheath fluid draws individual sample streams through the cuvette. The capillaries are closely and evenly spaced and held by a transparent retainer in a fixed position in relation to an optical detection system. Collimated sample excitation radiation is applied simultaneously across the ends of the capillaries in the retainer. Light emitted from the excited sample is detected by the optical detection system. The retainer is provided by a transparent chamber having inward slanting end walls. The capillaries are wedged into the chamber. One sideways dimension of the chamber is equal to the diameter of the capillaries and one end to end dimension varies from, at the top of the chamber, slightly greater than the sum of the diameters of the capillaries to, at the bottom of the chamber, slightly smaller than the sum of the diameters of the capillaries. The optical system utilizes optic fibres to deliver light to individual photodetectors, one for each capillary tube. A filter or wavelength division demultiplexer may be used for isolating fluorescence at particular bands.

  3. Multiple capillary biochemical analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Dovichi, N.J.; Zhang, J.Z.

    1995-08-08

    A multiple capillary analyzer allows detection of light from multiple capillaries with a reduced number of interfaces through which light must pass in detecting light emitted from a sample being analyzed, using a modified sheath flow cuvette. A linear or rectangular array of capillaries is introduced into a rectangular flow chamber. Sheath fluid draws individual sample streams through the cuvette. The capillaries are closely and evenly spaced and held by a transparent retainer in a fixed position in relation to an optical detection system. Collimated sample excitation radiation is applied simultaneously across the ends of the capillaries in the retainer. Light emitted from the excited sample is detected by the optical detection system. The retainer is provided by a transparent chamber having inward slanting end walls. The capillaries are wedged into the chamber. One sideways dimension of the chamber is equal to the diameter of the capillaries and one end to end dimension varies from, at the top of the chamber, slightly greater than the sum of the diameters of the capillaries to, at the bottom of the chamber, slightly smaller than the sum of the diameters of the capillaries. The optical system utilizes optic fibers to deliver light to individual photodetectors, one for each capillary tube. A filter or wavelength division demultiplexer may be used for isolating fluorescence at particular bands. 21 figs.

  4. Mach-like capillary-gravity wakes.

    PubMed

    Moisy, Frédéric; Rabaud, Marc

    2014-08-01

    We determine experimentally the angle α of maximum wave amplitude in the far-field wake behind a vertical surface-piercing cylinder translated at constant velocity U for Bond numbers Bo(D)=D/λ(c) ranging between 0.1 and 4.2, where D is the cylinder diameter and λ(c) the capillary length. In all cases the wake angle is found to follow a Mach-like law at large velocity, α∼U(-1), but with different prefactors depending on the value of Bo(D). For small Bo(D) (large capillary effects), the wake angle approximately follows the law α≃c(g,min)/U, where c(g,min) is the minimum group velocity of capillary-gravity waves. For larger Bo(D) (weak capillary effects), we recover a law α∼√[gD]/U similar to that found for ship wakes at large velocity [Rabaud and Moisy, Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 214503 (2013)]. Using the general property of dispersive waves that the characteristic wavelength of the wave packet emitted by a disturbance is of order of the disturbance size, we propose a simple model that describes the transition between these two Mach-like regimes as the Bond number is varied. We show that the new capillary law α≃c(g,min)/U originates from the presence of a capillary cusp angle (distinct from the usual gravity cusp angle), along which the energy radiated by the disturbance accumulates for Bond numbers of order of unity. This model, complemented by numerical simulations of the surface elevation induced by a moving Gaussian pressure disturbance, is in qualitative agreement with experimental measurements.

  5. Mach-like capillary-gravity wakes.

    PubMed

    Moisy, Frédéric; Rabaud, Marc

    2014-08-01

    We determine experimentally the angle α of maximum wave amplitude in the far-field wake behind a vertical surface-piercing cylinder translated at constant velocity U for Bond numbers Bo(D)=D/λ(c) ranging between 0.1 and 4.2, where D is the cylinder diameter and λ(c) the capillary length. In all cases the wake angle is found to follow a Mach-like law at large velocity, α∼U(-1), but with different prefactors depending on the value of Bo(D). For small Bo(D) (large capillary effects), the wake angle approximately follows the law α≃c(g,min)/U, where c(g,min) is the minimum group velocity of capillary-gravity waves. For larger Bo(D) (weak capillary effects), we recover a law α∼√[gD]/U similar to that found for ship wakes at large velocity [Rabaud and Moisy, Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 214503 (2013)]. Using the general property of dispersive waves that the characteristic wavelength of the wave packet emitted by a disturbance is of order of the disturbance size, we propose a simple model that describes the transition between these two Mach-like regimes as the Bond number is varied. We show that the new capillary law α≃c(g,min)/U originates from the presence of a capillary cusp angle (distinct from the usual gravity cusp angle), along which the energy radiated by the disturbance accumulates for Bond numbers of order of unity. This model, complemented by numerical simulations of the surface elevation induced by a moving Gaussian pressure disturbance, is in qualitative agreement with experimental measurements. PMID:25215822

  6. NMD Against Rogue States-- Are We On the Right Track?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garwin, Richard L.

    2001-04-01

    The national missile defense (NMD) under development at present will deploy 100-200 interceptor missiles in Alaska and North Dakota and conduct hit-to-kill mid-course intercepts of strategic payloads-- biological warfare agents (BW) or nuclear warheads. Mid-course intercept is vulnerable to penetration aids-- hundreds of BW bomblets dispensed just after the ICBM reaches its full speed; and decoy balloons (aided by an enclosing balloon on the re-entry vehicle of a nuclear warhead). The NMD organization has not seriously considered countermeasures, which I believe are much easier to build than the ICBMs themselves. Only now is NMD beginning to structure a program to evaluate and determine the response to such countermeasures. Defense against North Korean ICBMs can be obtained by boost-phase intercept, while the ICBM rocket engines are still burning. I will discuss a proposal to conduct such intercepts from a joint U.S.- Russian base south of Vladivostok, and with some interceptors based on U.S. military cargo ships hundreds of km from North Korea. A similar system would counter ICBMs from Iraq, with a base in Southeast Turkey; but the much larger country, Iran, would need at least two bases-- perhaps one in the Caspian Sea and U.S. ships in the Gulf of Oman. Simple countermeasures and possible responses to them will be discussed, together with some problems and characteristics of boost-phase intercept systems. For a given level of kill-vehicle technology, space-based boost-phase interceptors are inferior to surface-based for the "rogue nation" potential ICBM threat, and weapons in space are likely to provoke a severe response that would endanger critical U.S. satellites.

  7. Rogue Community College Student Satisfaction Survey, Winter 2000. Management Report: Redwood and Riverside Campuses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wild, Nancy

    The Annual Student Satisfaction Survey at Oregon's Rogue Community College (RCC) allows the school to measure achievement in services, classes, and facilities. Three hundred and eleven students responded to this winter 2000 survey. Findings include: (1) seventeen percent of all respondents at the Redwood and Riverside campuses were very satisfied…

  8. Rogue Community College Student Satisfaction Survey, Winter 2001: Management Report. Redwood and Riverside Campuses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wild, Nancy

    This document is a 2001 report on student satisfaction at the Redwood and Riverside campuses of Rogue Community College (RCC) (Oregon). Surveys were used to help assess the community college's overall effectiveness and address the needs of students. A total of 269 (120 from Redwood and 149 from Riverside) student surveys were returned--most…

  9. Rogue Community College Student Satisfaction Survey, Winter 2000. Management Report: ABE/GED Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wild, Nancy

    The report discusses the winter 2000 student satisfaction survey at Rogue Community College (RCC) (Oregon). The annual survey is an important tool by which the college measures its achievement in the areas of services, classes, and facilities. The primary purpose of the study is to obtain feedback from attending students regarding the issues that…

  10. Reconstruction of arbitrary surface wave fields by refraction global method in a wave tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Heynert; Ludu, Andrei

    2015-11-01

    We use a new photographic procedure and design to construct reliable system for measurement and analysis of various surface water waves in a wave tank, including rogue and tsunami-like waves. The image of a grid placed at the bottom of the tank (3 feet maximum depth) is deformed by the surface waves and recorded on one or two cameras placed above the water. The measurement of the height and slope of the surface waves is determined by inverse refraction calculations plus the calibration information at four grouped points from capacitive level gauges. This research was supported by ERAU INTERNAL STUDENT RESEARCH AWARD.

  11. Intranasal lobular capillary haemangioma

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Dipak Ranjan; Bhandarkar, Ajay M; Shivamurthy, Archana; Joy, Jasmi

    2014-01-01

    Lobular capillary haemangioma (LCH) is a benign proliferation of capillaries with a characteristic lobular architecture on microscopy; it has an affinity for mucous membrane and skin of the head and neck. It is extremely rare in the nasal cavity. We present the case of a 45-year-old man who presented with epistaxis without any predisposing factors, which was diagnosed as lobular capillary haemangioma. PMID:25304675

  12. Altimeter Observations of Baroclinic Oceanic Inertia-Gravity Wave Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glazman, R. E.; Cheng, B.

    1996-01-01

    For a wide range of nonlinear wave processes - from capillary to planetary waves - theory predicts the existence of Kolmogorov-type spectral cascades of energy and other conserved quantities occuring via nonlinear resonant wave-wave interactions. So far, observations of wave turbulence (WT) have been limited to small-scale processes such as surface gravity and capillary-gravity waves.

  13. Capillary zone electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgenson, J.W.; Lukacs, K.D.

    1983-10-21

    Zone electrophoresis in capillaries is a technique complementary to electrophoresis in supporting media, and each approach has its own particular advantages. Efficient heat transfer from small-diameter capillaries permits use of unusually high voltages, resulting in both high resolution and rapid analysis. Capillaries also seem well suited for automation. Our present electromigration injection technique is relatively straightforward and should be simple to automate. Capillaries are reusable, which is an advantage over gels. On-line electronic detection permits good quantification, further enhancing possibilities for fully automatic operation. The greatest obstacle to further development and utilization of capillaries is the requirement of extremely sensitive detectors, and more types of detectors with higher sensitivity are greatly needed. A better understanding of capillary surface modification will also be important, both for improved capillary surface deactivation and for better control over electroosmotic flow. Capillaries should provide an ideal system in which to explore nonaqueous separation media. The prospects for nonaqueous media in electrophoresis are similar to those in electrochemistry, and capillaries should prove an excellent system in which to begin their study. 18 refs., 8 figs.

  14. Critical Velocities in Open Capillary Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreyer, Michael; Langbein, Dieter; Rath, Hans J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the proposed research program on open capillary flow and the preliminary work performed theoretically and in drop tower experiments. The work focuses on the fundamental physical understanding of the flow through capillary bound geometries, where the circumference of the cross section of the flow path contains free surfaces. Examples for such a flow configuration are capillary vanes in surface tension tanks, flow along edges and corners and flow through liquid bridges. The geometries may be classified by their cross section areas, wetted circumferences and the radii of curvature of the free surfaces. In the streaming float zone the flow path is bound by a free surface only. The ribbon vane is a model for vane types used in surface tension tanks, where a structure in proximity to the tank wall forms a capillary gap. A groove is used in heat pipes for the transportation of the condensed working fluid to the heat source and a wedge may occur in a spaceborne experiment where fluid has to be transported by the means of surface tension. The research objectives are the determination of the maximum volume flux, the observation of the free surfaces and the liquid flow inside the flow path as well as the evaluation of the limiting capillary wave speed. The restriction of the maximum volume flux is due to convective forces (flow velocity exceeding the capillary wave speed) and/or viscous forces, i.e. the viscous head loss along the flow path must be compensated by the capillary pressure due to the curved free surface. Exceeding the maximum volume flux leads to the choking of the flow path, thus the free surface collapses and.gas ingestion occurs at the outlet. The means are ground-based experimental work with plateau tanks and in a drop tower, a sounding rocket flight, and theoretical analysis with integral balances as well as full three dimensional CFD solutions for flow with free surfaces.

  15. An association, in adult Japanese, between the occurrence of rogue cells among cultured lymphocytes (JC virus activity) and the frequency of "simple" chromosomal damage among the lymphocytes of persons exhibiting these rogue cells.

    PubMed Central

    Neel, J V

    1998-01-01

    Data from a previous study of the cytogenetic effects, in cultured lymphocytes, of exposure to the atomic bomb in Hiroshima have been reanalyzed to determine the relationship between the occurrence of "rogue" cells in an individual and the frequency of "simple" chromosomal damage in the nonrogue cells of the same individual. Rogue cells are cells with complex chromosomal damage, currently believed to be a manifestation of the activity of a human polyoma virus termed "JC." Among a total of 1,835 persons examined, there were 45 exhibiting rogue cells. A total of 179,599 cells were scored for simple chromosomal damage. In both the exposed and the control populations, there was an absolute increase of approximately 1.5% in the frequency of simple chromosomal damage in the nonrogue cells of those exhibiting rogue cells, when compared with the frequencies observed in those not exhibiting rogue cells, which is a statistically significant difference. It is argued that this phenomenon, occurring not only in lymphocytes but possibly also in other cells/tissues, may play a contributory role in the origin of malignancies characterized by clonal chromosome abnormalities. Unexpectedly, among those exhibiting rogue cells, there was a disproportionately greater representation of persons who had received relatively high radiation exposures from the bomb. The reason for this is unclear, but it is tempting to relate the finding to some lingering effect of the exposure (or the circumstances surrounding the exposure) on immunocompetence. PMID:9683586

  16. Capillary instability of jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauhan, Anuj

    This thesis studies the capillary instability of a compound jet. A compound jet comprises an inner core of a primary fluid surrounded by an annulus of an immiscible secondary fluid. The compound jet is unstable due to capillarity. A compound jet finds applications in a variety of fields, such as, ink jet printing, particle sorting, extrusion, molding, particle production etc. In some of these applications such as molding, the disturbances that could cause the jet breakup start as periodic spatial disturbances of Fourier wave number k and grow in time. This is the temporal instability. In some other applications, such as, ink-jet printing, the disturbances initiate at the edge of the nozzle from which the jet issues out. These disturbances grow in space. This is the spatial instability. At small velocities, even if the initial disturbances are periodic in time, they grow exponentially in time. This is the absolute instability. We perform the temporal, spatial and the absolute stability analysis of an inviscid compound jet in a unified framework using the theory of transforms. Further, we solve the temporal instability problem for a viscous jet to understand the effect of viscosity on breakup dynamics. In the temporal analysis, we show that each interface of the compound jet contributes one mode to the instability. The modes contributed by the inner and outer interfaces grow for waves longer than the inner and the outer circumference of the undisturbed jet, respectively. The inner interface mode has a higher growth rate and hence dominates the breakup. The two interfaces grow exactly in phase in this mode and hence it is refereed to as the stretching mode. The other mode is the squeezing mode because the two interfaces grow exactly out of phase. The same two modes are also present in the spatial analysis. At high Weber numbers the predictions of the spatial theory reduce to those of the temporal theory because the waves simply convect with the jet velocity and there

  17. Capillary solitons on a levitated medium.

    PubMed

    Perrard, S; Deike, L; Duchêne, C; Pham, C-T

    2015-07-01

    A water cylinder deposited on a heated channel levitates on its own generated vapor film owing to the Leidenfrost effect. This experimental setup permits the study of the one-dimensional propagation of surface waves in a free-to-move liquid system. We report the observation of gravity-capillary waves under a dramatic reduction of gravity (up to a factor 30), leading to capillary waves at the centimeter scale. The generated nonlinear structures propagate without deformation and undergo mutual collisions and reflections at the boundaries of the domain. They are identified as Korteweg-de Vries solitons with negative amplitude and subsonic velocity. The typical width and amplitude-dependent velocities are in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions based on a generalized Korteweg-de Vries equation adapted to any substrate geometry. When multiple solitons are present, they interact and form a soliton turbulencelike spectrum.

  18. Capillary solitons on a levitated medium.

    PubMed

    Perrard, S; Deike, L; Duchêne, C; Pham, C-T

    2015-07-01

    A water cylinder deposited on a heated channel levitates on its own generated vapor film owing to the Leidenfrost effect. This experimental setup permits the study of the one-dimensional propagation of surface waves in a free-to-move liquid system. We report the observation of gravity-capillary waves under a dramatic reduction of gravity (up to a factor 30), leading to capillary waves at the centimeter scale. The generated nonlinear structures propagate without deformation and undergo mutual collisions and reflections at the boundaries of the domain. They are identified as Korteweg-de Vries solitons with negative amplitude and subsonic velocity. The typical width and amplitude-dependent velocities are in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions based on a generalized Korteweg-de Vries equation adapted to any substrate geometry. When multiple solitons are present, they interact and form a soliton turbulencelike spectrum. PMID:26274114

  19. Capillary solitons on a levitated medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrard, S.; Deike, L.; Duchêne, C.; Pham, C.-T.

    2015-07-01

    A water cylinder deposited on a heated channel levitates on its own generated vapor film owing to the Leidenfrost effect. This experimental setup permits the study of the one-dimensional propagation of surface waves in a free-to-move liquid system. We report the observation of gravity-capillary waves under a dramatic reduction of gravity (up to a factor 30), leading to capillary waves at the centimeter scale. The generated nonlinear structures propagate without deformation and undergo mutual collisions and reflections at the boundaries of the domain. They are identified as Korteweg-de Vries solitons with negative amplitude and subsonic velocity. The typical width and amplitude-dependent velocities are in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions based on a generalized Korteweg-de Vries equation adapted to any substrate geometry. When multiple solitons are present, they interact and form a soliton turbulencelike spectrum.

  20. Capillary micro-switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steen, Paul; Matalanis, Claude; Hirsa, Amir; Cox, Christhopher

    2002-11-01

    A capillary surface is a liquid/liquid or liquid/gas interface whose shape is determined by surface tension. Capillary surfaces occur when the capillary length is large compared to the container scale, as happens for typical liquids against gas on the sub-millimeter scale on Earth and on the meter scale in the micro-gravity environment of space vehicles. Manipulating capillary surfaces has emerged as a leading strategy for moving liquids on the micro-scale [1]. Practitioners have yet to take advantage of capillary instability in their design of devices, though. We illustrate how the response diagram of a single switch (bi-stable device) can be constructed from that of two capillary elements, how that of a system of switches (a pair) can be built from that of a single switch and finally how understanding the response of the system guides us to observations of new behavior in the laboratory. Experiments on capillary surfaces use either a soap-film analog (10 centimeter scale) or a liquid/gas (millimeter scale) apparatus. Progress is reported on the application of an array of micro-switches to make a controllable adhesion device, with the aim of effecting droplet transport. 1. Cho, Fan, Moon and Kim, "Towards digital microfluidic circuits: creating, transporting, cutting and merging liquid droplets by electrowetting-based actuation." Proc. 15th IEEE Int'l Conf. on MEMS, January 2002.

  1. Effect of rogue particles on the sub-surface damage of fused silica during grinding/polishing

    SciTech Connect

    Suratwala, T I; Steele, R; Feit, M D; Wong, L; Miller, P E; Menapace, J A; Davis, P J

    2007-05-02

    The distribution and characteristics of surface cracks (i.e., sub-surface damage or scratching) on fused silica formed during grinding/polishing resulting from the addition of rogue particles in the base slurry has been investigated. Fused silica samples (10 cm diameter x 1 cm thick) were: (1) ground by loose abrasive grinding (alumina particles 9-30 {micro}m) on a glass lap with the addition of larger alumina particles at various concentrations with mean sizes ranging from 15-30 {micro}m, or (2) polished (using 0.5 {micro}m cerium oxide slurry) on various laps (polyurethanes pads or pitch) with the addition of larger rogue particles (diamond (4-45 {micro}m), pitch, dust, or dried Ceria slurry agglomerates) at various concentrations. For the resulting ground samples, the crack distributions of the as-prepared surfaces were determined using a polished taper technique. The crack depth was observed to: (1) increase at small concentrations (>10{sup -4} fraction) of rogue particles; and (2) increase with rogue particle concentration to crack depths consistent with that observed when grinding with particles the size of the rogue particles alone. For the polished samples, which were subsequently etched in HF:NH{sub 4}F to expose the surface damage, the resulting scratch properties (type, number density, width, and length) were characterized. The number density of scratches increased exponentially with the size of the rogue diamond at a fixed rogue diamond concentration suggesting that larger particles are more likely to lead to scratching. The length of the scratch was found to increase with rogue particle size, increase with lap viscosity, and decrease with applied load. At high diamond concentrations, the type of scratch transitioned from brittle to ductile and the length of the scratches dramatically increased and extended to the edge of the optic. The observed trends can explained semi-quantitatively in terms of the time needed for a rogue particle to penetrate into a

  2. Multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, E.S.; Li, Q.; Lu, X.

    1998-04-21

    The invention provides a side-entry optical excitation geometry for use in a multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system. A charge-injection device is optically coupled to capillaries in the array such that the interior of a capillary is imaged onto only one pixel. In Sanger-type 4-label DNA sequencing reactions, nucleotide identification (``base calling``) is improved by using two long-pass filters to split fluorescence emission into two emission channels. A binary poly(ethyleneoxide) matrix is used in the electrophoretic separations. 19 figs.

  3. Multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, E.S.; Chang, H.T.; Fung, E.N.; Li, Q.; Lu, X.

    1996-12-10

    The invention provides a side-entry optical excitation geometry for use in a multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system. A charge-injection device is optically coupled to capillaries in the array such that the interior of a capillary is imaged onto only one pixel. In Sanger-type 4-label DNA sequencing reactions, nucleotide identification (``base calling``) is improved by using two long-pass filters to split fluorescence emission into two emission channels. A binary poly(ethyleneoxide) matrix is used in the electrophoretic separations. 19 figs.

  4. Multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edward S.; Li, Qingbo; Lu, Xiandan

    1998-04-21

    The invention provides a side-entry optical excitation geometry for use in a multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system. A charge-injection device is optically coupled to capillaries in the array such that the interior of a capillary is imaged onto only one pixel. In Sanger-type 4-label DNA sequencing reactions, nucleotide identification ("base calling") is improved by using two long-pass filters to split fluorescence emission into two emission channels. A binary poly(ethyleneoxide) matrix is used in the electrophoretic separations.

  5. Multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edward S.; Chang, Huan-Tsang; Fung, Eliza N.; Li, Qingbo; Lu, Xiandan

    1996-12-10

    The invention provides a side-entry optical excitation geometry for use in a multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system. A charge-injection device is optically coupled to capillaries in the array such that the interior of a capillary is imaged onto only one pixel. In Sanger-type 4-label DNA sequencing reactions, nucleotide identification ("base calling") is improved by using two long-pass filters to split fluorescence emission into two emission channels. A binary poly(ethyleneoxide) matrix is used in the electrophoretic separations.

  6. Nasal Lobular Capillary Hemangioma

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Prashant; Singla, Saurabh; Mane, Ranoji; Jagdeesh, K. S.

    2013-01-01

    Nasal lobular capillary hemangioma is a rare benign tumor of the paranasal sinuses. This lesion is believed to grow rapidly in size over time. The exact etiopathogenesis is still a dilemma. We discuss a case of nasal lobular capillary hemangioma presenting with a history of epistaxis. Contrast enhanced computed tomography of paranasal sinuses revealed an intensely enhancing soft-tissue mass in the left nasal cavity and left middle and inferior meati with no obvious bony remodeling or destruction. We present imaging and pathologic features of nasal lobular capillary hemangioma and differentiate it from other entities like nasal angiofibroma. PMID:24228209

  7. Overcoming the effects of rogue taxa: Evolutionary relationships of the bee flies

    PubMed Central

    Trautwein, Michelle D.; Wiegmann, Brian M.; Yeates, David K

    2011-01-01

    Bombyliidae (5000 sp.), or bee flies, are a lower brachyceran family of flower-visiting flies that, as larvae, act as parasitoids of other insects. The evolutionary relationships are known from a morphological analysis that yielded minimal support for higher-level groupings. We use the protein-coding gene CAD and 28S rDNA to determine phylogeny and to test the monophyly of existing subfamilies, the divisions Tomophtalmae, and ‘the sand chamber subfamilies’. Additionally, we demonstrate that consensus networks can be used to identify rogue taxa in a Bayesian framework. Pruning rogue taxa post-analysis from the final tree distribution results in increased posterior probabilities. We find 8 subfamilies to be monophyletic and the subfamilies Heterotropinae and Mythicomyiinae to be the earliest diverging lineages. The large subfamily Bombyliinae is found to be polyphyletic and our data does not provide evidence for the monophyly of Tomophthalmae or the ‘sand chamber subfamilies’. PMID:21686308

  8. Hybrid and Rogue Kinases Encoded in the Genomes of Model Eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Rakshambikai, Ramaswamy; Gnanavel, Mutharasu; Srinivasan, Narayanaswamy

    2014-01-01

    The highly modular nature of protein kinases generates diverse functional roles mediated by evolutionary events such as domain recombination, insertion and deletion of domains. Usually domain architecture of a kinase is related to the subfamily to which the kinase catalytic domain belongs. However outlier kinases with unusual domain architectures serve in the expansion of the functional space of the protein kinase family. For example, Src kinases are made-up of SH2 and SH3 domains in addition to the kinase catalytic domain. A kinase which lacks these two domains but retains sequence characteristics within the kinase catalytic domain is an outlier that is likely to have modes of regulation different from classical src kinases. This study defines two types of outlier kinases: hybrids and rogues depending on the nature of domain recombination. Hybrid kinases are those where the catalytic kinase domain belongs to a kinase subfamily but the domain architecture is typical of another kinase subfamily. Rogue kinases are those with kinase catalytic domain characteristic of a kinase subfamily but the domain architecture is typical of neither that subfamily nor any other kinase subfamily. This report provides a consolidated set of such hybrid and rogue kinases gleaned from six eukaryotic genomes–S.cerevisiae, D. melanogaster, C.elegans, M.musculus, T.rubripes and H.sapiens–and discusses their functions. The presence of such kinases necessitates a revisiting of the classification scheme of the protein kinase family using full length sequences apart from classical classification using solely the sequences of kinase catalytic domains. The study of these kinases provides a good insight in engineering signalling pathways for a desired output. Lastly, identification of hybrids and rogues in pathogenic protozoa such as P.falciparum sheds light on possible strategies in host-pathogen interactions. PMID:25255313

  9. Capillary rise of superspreaders.

    PubMed

    Radulovic, Jovana; Sefiane, Khellil; Shanahan, Martin E R

    2011-09-15

    Trisiloxane surfactants, known as 'superspreaders', are commonly employed in numerous applications where enhanced wetting is of the utmost importance. The underlying mechanisms of superspreader wetting have been a focus of scientific interest for ca. 2 decades, and a number of mechanisms have been proposed to explain the unique trisiloxane dynamics. We have studied trisiloxane behaviour in thin capillaries to get further insight into their interfacial activity. Additionally, our knowledge of the capillary rise of superspreaders is surprisingly limited, and the effect of this extraordinary group of surfactants on capillary phenomena has been largely overlooked. Diffusion was confirmed to be the limiting factor of trisiloxane behaviour. A tentative theoretical explanation for the phenomenon studied and an appropriate mathematical model are presented. It is concluded that the enhancement of wetting due to surfactant addition is also a function of geometry: the effect is clear for a sessile drop, but more complex and less beneficial in a capillary.

  10. Displaced capillary dies

    DOEpatents

    Kalejs, Juris P.; Chalmers, Bruce; Surek, Thomas

    1984-01-01

    An asymmetrical shaped capillary die made exclusively of graphite is used to grow silicon ribbon which is capable of being made into solar cells that are more efficient than cells produced from ribbon made using a symmetrically shaped die.

  11. Displaced capillary dies

    DOEpatents

    Kalejs, Juris P.; Chalmers, Bruce; Surek, Thomas

    1982-01-01

    An asymmetrical shaped capillary die made exclusively of graphite is used to grow silicon ribbon which is capable of being made into solar cells that are more efficient than cells produced from ribbon made using a symmetrically shaped die.

  12. Capillary Korteweg-de Vries solitons on a levitated cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Chi-Tuong; Perrard, Stephane; Duchene, Charles; Deike, Luc

    2014-11-01

    A water cylinder is deposited on a straight channel heated far above boiling temperature so that the water levitates above its own vapor owing to Leidenfrost effect. Our setup allows us to study the one-dimensional propagation of surface waves. We show that the dispersion relation of linear waves follows that of gravity-capillary waves under a dramatically reduced gravity (up to a factor 30), yielding an effective capillary length larger than one centimeter. Nonlinear capillary depression solitary waves propagate without deformation and undergo mutual collisions and reflections at the boundaries of the domain. Their typical width and their amplitude-dependent velocity are in very good agreement with theoretical predictions based on Korteweg-de Vries equation. Supported by ANR-11-BS04-001-01 (FREEFLOW project).

  13. Capillary discharge source

    DOEpatents

    Bender, III, Howard Albert

    2003-11-25

    Debris generation from an EUV electric discharge plasma source device can be significantly reduced or essentially eliminated by encasing the electrodes with dielectric or electrically insulating material so that the electrodes are shielded from the plasma, and additionally by providing a path for the radiation to exit wherein the electrodes are not exposed to the area where the radiation is collected. The device includes: (a) a body, which is made of an electrically insulating material, that defines a capillary bore that has a proximal end and a distal end and that defines at least one radiation exit; (b) a first electrode that defines a first channel that has a first inlet end that is connected to a source of gas and a first outlet end that is in communication with the capillary bore, wherein the first electrode is positioned at the distal end of the capillary bore; (c) a second electrode that defines a second channel that has a second inlet end that is in communication with the capillary bore and an outlet end, wherein the second electrode is positioned at the proximal end of the capillary bore; and (d) a source of electric potential that is connected across the first and second electrodes, wherein radiation generated within the capillary bore is emitted through the at least one radiation exit and wherein the first electrode and second electrode are shielded from the emitted radiation.

  14. Capillary saturation and desaturation.

    PubMed

    Hilfer, R; Armstrong, R T; Berg, S; Georgiadis, A; Ott, H

    2015-12-01

    Capillary desaturation experiments produce disconnected (trapped) ganglia of mesoscopic sizes intermediate between pore size and system size. Experimental evidence for interactions between these mesoscale clusters during desaturation is analyzed and discussed within the established microscopic and macroscopic laws of Newton, Young-Laplace, and Darcy. A theoretical expression for capillary number correlations is introduced that seems to have remained unnoticed. It expresses capillary desaturation curves in terms of stationary capillary pressures and relative permeabilities. The theoretical expression shows that the plateau saturation in capillary desaturation curves may in general differ from the residual nonwetting saturation defined through the saturation limit of the main hysteresis loop. Hysteresis effects as well as the difference between wetting and nonwetting fluids are introduced into the analysis of capillary desaturation experiments. The article examines experiments with different desaturation protocols and discusses the existence of a mesoscopic length scale intermediate between pore scale and sample scale. The theoretical expression is derived entirely within the existing traditional theory of two-phase flow in porous media and compared to a recent experiment. PMID:26764820

  15. Will Russian Scientists Go Rogue? A Survey on the Threat and the Impact of Western Assistance

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, D Y; Gerber, T P

    2004-12-27

    The collapse of the Soviet Union sparked fears throughout the world that rogue nations and terrorist organizations would gain access to weapons of mass destruction (WMD). One specific concern has been 'WMD brain drain.' Russians with knowledge about nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons could now depart to any country of their choice, including rogue nations seeking to produce WMD. Meanwhile, Russian science fell into a protracted crisis, with plummeting salaries, little funding for research, and few new recruits to science. These developments increased both the incentives and the opportunities for scientists to sell their knowledge to governments and terrorist organizations with hostile intentions toward the United States. Recognizing the threat of WMD brain drain from Russia, the United States, and other governments implemented a host of programs designed to reduce the risk. Despite, or perhaps partly because of, massive assistance from the West to prevent scientists with WMD knowledge from emigrating, the threat of Russian WMD brain drain has recently faded from view. Yet we have seen no evidence that these programs are effective and little systematic assessment of the current threat of WMD migration. Our data from an unprecedented survey of 602 Russian physicists, biologists, and chemists suggest that the threat of WMD brain drain from Russia should still be at the forefront of our attention. Roughly 20 percent of Russian physicists, biologists, and chemists say they would consider working in rogue nations such as North Korea, Iran, Syria, or Iraq (still considered a rogue state at the time of the survey). At the same time, the data reveal that U.S. and Western nonproliferation assistance programs work. They significantly reduce the likelihood that Russian scientists would consider working in these countries. Moreover, Russian grants do not reduce scientists' propensity to 'go rogue'. These survey findings have clear policy implications: the U.S. and its

  16. Gas-Filled Capillary Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhauer, L. C.; Kimura, W. D.

    2006-11-01

    We have developed a 1-D, quasi-steady-state numerical model for a gas-filled capillary discharge that is designed to aid in selecting the optimum capillary radius in order to guide a laser beam with the required intensity through the capillary. The model also includes the option for an external solenoid B-field around the capillary, which increases the depth of the parabolic density channel in the capillary, thereby allowing for propagation of smaller laser beam waists. The model has been used to select the parameters for gas-filled capillaries to be utilized during the Staged Electron Laser Acceleration — Laser Wakefield (STELLA-LW) experiment.

  17. Derivatization in Capillary Electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Marina, M Luisa; Castro-Puyana, María

    2016-01-01

    Capillary electrophoresis is a well-established separation technique in analytical research laboratories worldwide. Its interesting advantages make CE an efficient and potent alternative to other chromatographic techniques. However, it is also recognized that its main drawback is the relatively poor sensitivity when using optical detection. One way to overcome this limitation is to perform a derivatization reaction which is intended to provide the analyte more suitable analytical characteristics enabling a high sensitive detection. Based on the analytical step where the CE derivatization takes place, it can be classified as precapillary (before separation), in-capillary (during separation), or postcapillary (after separation). This chapter describes the application of four different derivatization protocols (in-capillary and precapillary modes) to carry out the achiral and chiral analysis of different compounds in food and biological samples with three different detection modes (UV, LIF, and MS). PMID:27645730

  18. Capillary stretching of fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duprat, C.; Protiere, S.

    2015-09-01

    We study the interaction of a finite volume of liquid with two parallel thin flexible fibers. A tension along the fibers is imposed and may be varied. We report two morphologies, i.e. two types of wet adhesion: a weak capillary adhesion, where a liquid drop bridges the fibers, and a strong elastocapillary adhesion where the liquid is spread between two collapsed fibers. We show that geometry, capillarity and stretching are the key parameters at play. We describe the collapse and detachment of the fibers as a function of two nondimensional parameters, arising from the geometry of the system and a balance between capillary and stretching energies. In addition, we show that the morphology, thus the capillary adhesion, can be controlled by changing the tension within the fibers.

  19. Capillary condenser/evaporator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valenzuela, Javier A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A heat transfer device is disclosed for transferring heat to or from a fluid that is undergoing a phase change. The heat transfer device includes a liquid-vapor manifold in fluid communication with a capillary structure thermally connected to a heat transfer interface, all of which are disposed in a housing to contain the vapor. The liquid-vapor manifold transports liquid in a first direction and conducts vapor in a second, opposite direction. The manifold provides a distributed supply of fluid (vapor or liquid) over the surface of the capillary structure. In one embodiment, the manifold has a fractal structure including one or more layers, each layer having one or more conduits for transporting liquid and one or more openings for conducting vapor. Adjacent layers have an increasing number of openings with decreasing area, and an increasing number of conduits with decreasing cross-sectional area, moving in a direction toward the capillary structure.

  20. Numerical simulation of unidirectional irregular nonlinear waves in the basin of intermediate depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slunyaev, Alexey; Sergeeva, Anna; Didenkulova, Ira

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we extend our study of intense irregular waves over infinitively deep water [1] to the situation of intermediate depth (in particular, conditions kph ≈ 2 and kph ≈ 1 are discussed, where kp is the peak wavenumber, and h is the water depth). We use a transition stage, when the nonlinearity is slowly enforcing during a few tens of wave periods, with the purpose to prepare 'natural' realizations of nonlinear waves in a quasi-stationary state. Then, the unidirectional waves are simulated by means of the High Order Spectral Method, what gives the complete data of wave evolution, and also the statistical data. Up to 100 realizations of wave trains were simulated for 20 minutes of physical time; each of the realization was about 10 km long and was characterized by the given JONSWAP spectrum. Small-scale artificial damping was introduced to eliminate the wave breaking effect. The simulation output data was collected providing sufficient resolution of the surface wave fields in time and space. The rogue wave events were identified on the basis of the wave data, and analyzed. One of the observations made in the case of infinitively deep water [1] was remarkably long lifetimes of the rogue events. This outcome was related to the formation of long-living wave groups due to two effects: absence of the transverse dimension (purely collinear waves), and nonlinear wave self-modulation. In the present study in one of the cases (i.e., kph ≈ 1 < 1.36) waves do not suffer from the Benjamin - Feir instability. Rather surprisingly, the lifetimes of the rogue waves do not show a clear dependence on the water depth. They seem to be somewhat shorter for the shallower water, but the difference is not definite. In general, the lifetime of rogue events may be up to 30-60 wave periods. The typical shape of the rogue waves was considered. Besides the crest-trough vertical asymmetry, which is natural for deep-water Stokes waves and becomes even more pronounced for intense

  1. Capillary action liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Bergström, Edmund T; Goodall, David M; Myers, Peter

    2009-06-01

    Capillary action LC (caLC) is introduced as a technique using capillary action as the driving force to perform LC in capillary columns packed with HPLC type microparticulate materials. A dry packing method with centrifugal force was developed to prepare capillary columns in parallel (10 columns per 3 min) to support their disposable use in caLC. Using a digital microscope for real-time imaging and recording separations of components in a dye mixture, caLC was found to have flow characteristics similar to TLC. Based on the investigation of microparticulate HPLC silica gels of different size (1.5-10 microm) and a typical TLC grade irregular medium, Merck 60G silica, the van Deemter curves suggested molecular diffusion as the major contribution to band broadening in caLC. With Waters Xbridge 2.6 microm silica, plate heights down to 8.8 microm were obtained, comparable to those achievable in HPLC. Assisted by an image-processing method, the visual caLC separation was converted to a classical chromatogram for further data analysis and such a facility confirmed the observation of highly efficient bands.

  2. Noise suppressing capillary separation system

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edward S.; Xue, Yongjun

    1996-07-30

    A noise-suppressing capillary separation system for detecting the real-time presence or concentration of an analyte in a sample is provided. The system contains a capillary separation means through which the analyte is moved, a coherent light source that generates a beam which is split into a reference beam and a sample beam that irradiate the capillary, and a detector for detecting the reference beam and the sample beam light that transmits through the capillary. The laser beam is of a wavelength effective to be absorbed by a chromophore in the capillary. The system includes a noise suppressing system to improve performance and accuracy without signal averaging or multiple scans.

  3. Rogue Waves, Remakes, and Resurrections: Allegorical Displacement and Screen Memory in "Poseidon"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Claire Sisco

    2008-01-01

    "Poseidon," the 2006 remake of the Vietnam-era disaster film "The Poseidon Adventure," functions rhetorically as a symptomatic response to the historical trauma(s) of 9/11, revising the narrative of its cinematic predecessor and producing a screen memory that marks the changed cultural and historical context that demanded its repetition in the…

  4. 75 FR 11511 - Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest; Mt. Ashland Ski Area Expansion, Jackson County, OR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-11

    ... Forest Service Rogue River-Siskiyou National Forest; Mt. Ashland Ski Area Expansion, Jackson County, OR...-03004-PA, to conditionally authorize expansion of the Mt. Ashland Ski Area. SUMMARY: In September 2004, the Forest Service issued a Record of Decision (ROD) for the Mt. Ashland Ski Area (MASA)...

  5. [Venoruton and capillary permeability].

    PubMed

    Cesarone, M R; Laurora, G; Gabini, M; Errichi, B M; Candiani, C; Belcaro, G

    1989-05-01

    A new system to evaluate capillary permeability, the vacuum suction chamber (VSC) device, was used to assess the effects of Venoruton in patients with venous hypertension. A temporary, superficial skin lesion (wheal) was produced with the VSC device by negative pressure (30 mmHg) applied for 10 minutes on the internal, perimalleolar region. Wheals disappear in less than 60 minutes in normals while in patients with venous hypertension the wheal is more persistent, requiring a significantly longer time to disappear. This new technique was used in association with laser-Doppler flowmetry to evaluate the efficacy of Venoruton (1000 mgs t.i.d.) administered for 2 weeks on venous hypertension. Results indicate a positive effect of Venoruton in reducing the abnormally increased capillary permeability in venous hypertension and are proportional to the changes observed in signs and symptoms after treatment.

  6. Movement and habitat use of green sturgeon Acipenser medirostris in the Rogue River, Oregon, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erickson, D.L.; North, J.A.; Hightower, J.E.; Weber, J.; Lauck, L.

    2002-01-01

    Green sturgeon (Acipenser medirostris) movement patterns and habitat use within the Rogue River, Oregon were evaluated using radio telemetry. Nineteen specimens ranging from 154 to 225 cm total length were caught by gill netting and tagged with radio transmitters during May-July 2000. One tagged green sturgeon was verified as a female near spawning condition. Individual green sturgeons spent more than 6 months in fresh water and traveled as far as river kilometer (rkm) 39.5. Green sturgeon preferred specific holding sites within the Rogue River during summer and autumn months. These sites were typically deep (> 5 m) low-gradient reaches or off-channel coves. Home ranges within holding sites were restricted. All tagged individuals emigrated from the system to the sea during the autumn and winter, when water temperatures dropped below 10??C and flows increased. This species is extremely vulnerable to habitat alterations and overfishing because it spawns in only a few North American rivers and individuals reside within extremely small areas for extended periods of time.

  7. Enantioseparations by capillary electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Fanali, S; Catarcini, P; Blaschke, G; Chankvetadze, B

    2001-09-01

    The review summarizes recent developments in enantioseparations by capillary electrochromatography (CEC). Selected fundamental aspects of CEC are discussed in order to stress those features which may allow the success of this technique in the competitive field of enantioseparations. In addition, the comparative characteristics of the different modes of chiral CEC and the stationary phases are presented. The effects of the characteristics of the stationary and liquid phases and operational conditions on the separation results are discussed. Finally, some future trends are briefly addressed.

  8. Automated Parallel Capillary Electrophoretic System

    DOEpatents

    Li, Qingbo; Kane, Thomas E.; Liu, Changsheng; Sonnenschein, Bernard; Sharer, Michael V.; Kernan, John R.

    2000-02-22

    An automated electrophoretic system is disclosed. The system employs a capillary cartridge having a plurality of capillary tubes. The cartridge has a first array of capillary ends projecting from one side of a plate. The first array of capillary ends are spaced apart in substantially the same manner as the wells of a microtitre tray of standard size. This allows one to simultaneously perform capillary electrophoresis on samples present in each of the wells of the tray. The system includes a stacked, dual carousel arrangement to eliminate cross-contamination resulting from reuse of the same buffer tray on consecutive executions from electrophoresis. The system also has a gel delivery module containing a gel syringe/a stepper motor or a high pressure chamber with a pump to quickly and uniformly deliver gel through the capillary tubes. The system further includes a multi-wavelength beam generator to generate a laser beam which produces a beam with a wide range of wavelengths. An off-line capillary reconditioner thoroughly cleans a capillary cartridge to enable simultaneous execution of electrophoresis with another capillary cartridge. The streamlined nature of the off-line capillary reconditioner offers the advantage of increased system throughput with a minimal increase in system cost.

  9. Pair-tunneling induced localized waves in a vector nonlinear Schrödinger equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Li-Chen; Ling, Liming; Yang, Zhan-Ying; Liu, Jie

    2015-06-01

    We investigate localized waves of coupled two-mode nonlinear Schrödinger equations with a pair-tunneling term representing strongly interacting particles can tunnel between the modes as a fragmented pair. Facilitated by Darboux transformation, we have derived exact solution of nonlinear vector waves such as bright solitons, Kuznetsov-Ma soliton, Akhmediev breathers and rogue waves and demonstrated their interesting temporal-spatial structures. A phase diagram that demarcates the parameter ranges of the nonlinear waves is obtained. Possibilities to observe these localized waves are discussed in a two species Bose-Einstein condensate.

  10. Do the freak waves exist in soliton gas?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shurgalina, Ekaterina; Pelinovsky, Efim

    2016-04-01

    The possibility of short-lived anomalous large waves (rogue waves) in soliton gas in the frameworks of integrable models like the Korteweg - de Vries - type equations is studied. It is shown that the dynamics of heteropolar soliton gas differs sufficiently from the dynamics of unipolar soliton fields. In particular, in the wave fields consisting of solitons with different polarities the freak wave appearance is possible. It is shown numerically in [Shurgalina and Pelinovsky, 2015]. Freak waves in the framework of the modified Korteweg-de Vries equation have been studied previously in the case of narrowband initial conditions [Grimshaw et al, 2005, 2010; Talipova, 2011]. In this case, the mechanism of freak wave generation was modulation instability of modulated quasi-sinusoidal wave packets. At the same time the modulation instability of modulated cnoidal waves was studied in the mathematical work [Driscoll & O'Neil, 1976]. Since a sequence of solitary waves can be a special case of cnoidal wave, the modulation instability can be a possible mechanism of freak wave appearance in a soliton gas. Thus, we expect that rogue wave phenomenon in soliton gas appears in nonlinear integrable models admitting an existence of modulation instability of periodic waves (like cnoidal waves). References: 1. Shurgalina E.G., Pelinovsky E.N. Dynamics of irregular wave ensembles in the coastal zone, Nizhny Novgorod State Technical University n.a. R.E. Alekseev. - Nizhny Novgorod, 2015, 179 pp. 2. Grimshaw R., Pelinovsky E., Talipova T., Sergeeva A. Rogue internal waves in the ocean: long wave model. European Physical Journal Special Topics, 2010, 185, 195 - 208. 3. Grimshaw R., Pelinovsky E., Talipova T., Ruderman M. Erdelyi R. Short-lived large-amplitude pulses in the nonlinear long-wave model described by the modified Korteweg-de Vries equation. Studied Applied Mathematics, 2005, 114 (2), 189. 4. Talipova T.G. Mechanisms of internal freak waves, Fundamental and Applied Hydrophysics

  11. Capillary reference half-cell

    DOEpatents

    Hall, Stephen H.

    1996-01-01

    The present invention is a reference half-cell electrode wherein intermingling of test fluid with reference fluid does not affect the performance of the reference half-cell over a long time. This intermingling reference half-cell may be used as a single or double junction submersible or surface reference electrode. The intermingling reference half-cell relies on a capillary tube having a first end open to reference fluid and a second end open to test fluid wherein the small diameter of the capillary tube limits free motion of fluid within the capillary to diffusion. The electrode is placed near the first end of the capillary in contact with the reference fluid. The method of operation of the present invention begins with filling the capillary tube with a reference solution. After closing the first end of the capillary, the capillary tube may be fully submerged or partially submerged with the second open end inserted into test fluid. Since the electrode is placed near the first end of the capillary, and since the test fluid may intermingle with the reference fluid through the second open end only by diffusion, this intermingling capillary reference half-cell provides a stable voltage potential for long time periods.

  12. Capillary reference half-cell

    DOEpatents

    Hall, S.H.

    1996-02-13

    The present invention is a reference half-cell electrode wherein intermingling of test fluid with reference fluid does not affect the performance of the reference half-cell over a long time. This intermingling reference half-cell may be used as a single or double junction submersible or surface reference electrode. The intermingling reference half-cell relies on a capillary tube having a first end open to reference fluid and a second end open to test fluid wherein the small diameter of the capillary tube limits free motion of fluid within the capillary to diffusion. The electrode is placed near the first end of the capillary in contact with the reference fluid. The method of operation of the present invention begins with filling the capillary tube with a reference solution. After closing the first end of the capillary, the capillary tube may be fully submerged or partially submerged with the second open end inserted into test fluid. Since the electrode is placed near the first end of the capillary, and since the test fluid may intermingle with the reference fluid through the second open end only by diffusion, this intermingling capillary reference half-cell provides a stable voltage potential for long time periods. 11 figs.

  13. Stability of Constrained Capillary Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostwick, J. B.; Steen, P. H.

    2015-01-01

    A capillary surface is an interface between two fluids whose shape is determined primarily by surface tension. Sessile drops, liquid bridges, rivulets, and liquid drops on fibers are all examples of capillary shapes influenced by contact with a solid. Capillary shapes can reconfigure spontaneously or exhibit natural oscillations, reflecting static or dynamic instabilities, respectively. Both instabilities are related, and a review of static stability precedes the dynamic case. The focus of the dynamic case here is the hydrodynamic stability of capillary surfaces subject to constraints of (a) volume conservation, (b) contact-line boundary conditions, and (c) the geometry of the supporting surface.

  14. Choked Flows in Open Capillary Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosendhal, U.

    2002-01-01

    In the present study the forced liquid flow through an open capillary channel is investigated experimentally under reduced gravity conditions (microgravity). The channel consists of two parallel plates and has two free liquid surfaces at the sides. Depending on the applied volume flux, the liquid pressure decreases in the flow direction due to flow losses. To achieve a stationary flow the difference between the liquid pressure and the ambient pressure has to be balanced by the capillary pressure of the free surface. Since the free surface can only withstand a certain difference pressure, the flow rate in the channel is limited. The maximum flow rate is achieved when the surfaces collapse at the end of the capillary channel. The aim of this investigation is to understand the mechanism of the flow rate limitation. Our thesis is, that the limitation occurs due to choking, which is known from compressible gas flows and open channel flow under normal gravity. The theory of choked flow predicts a limiting velocity corresponding to a characteristic signal velocity of the flow. Once that this critical velocity is reached the mass flow is maximal and cannot be increased further. For the open capillary channel flow we except a limiting velocity defined by the speed of longitudinal (capillary) waves. The investigations were performed in the Bremen drop tower and on board the sounding rocket TEXUS-37. For the prediction of the critical velocity an one-dimensional theoretical model taking into account the entrance pressure loss and the frictional pressure loss in the channel is developed. The experiment evaluation yields the critical velocity in the channel and the surface contour in good accuracy with the theoretical prediction. We show that the gained differential equation is of the same structure like the equations of similar compressible gas flows. The key parameter is the ratio of the liquid velocity and the characteristic wave speed which can be taken as a Weber number

  15. Alveolar Capillary Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Stankiewicz, Pawel; Steinhorn, Robin H.

    2011-01-01

    Alveolar capillary dysplasia with misalignment of the pulmonary veins (ACD/MPV) is a rare, fatal developmental lung disorder of neonates and infants. This review aims to address recent findings in the etiology and genetics of ACD/MPV and to raise awareness of this poorly known disease, which may also present as milder, unclassified forms. Successively discussed are what is known about the epidemiology, pathogenesis, pathophysiology, diagnostic indicators and approaches, genetic testing, treatment, and cases of delayed onset. The review concludes with suggestions for future directions to answer the many unknowns about this disorder. PMID:21471096

  16. Capillary suspensions: Particle networks formed through the capillary force

    PubMed Central

    Koos, Erin

    2014-01-01

    The addition of small amounts of a secondary fluid to a suspension can, through the attractive capillary force, lead to particle bridging and network formation. The capillary bridging phenomenon can be used to stabilize particle suspensions and precisely tune their rheological properties. This effect can even occur when the secondary fluid wets the particles less well than the bulk fluid. These materials, so-called capillary suspensions, have been the subject of recent research studying the mechanism for network formation, the properties of these suspensions, and how the material properties can be modified. Recent work in colloidal clusters is summarized and the relationship to capillary suspensions is discussed. Capillary suspensions can also be used as a pathway for new material design and some of these applications are highlighted. Results obtained to date are summarized and central questions that remain to be answered are proposed in this review. PMID:25729316

  17. Computationally Efficient Numerical Model for the Evolution of Directional Ocean Surface Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malej, M.; Choi, W.; Goullet, A.

    2011-12-01

    The main focus of this work has been the asymptotic and numerical modeling of weakly nonlinear ocean surface wave fields. In particular, a development of an efficient numerical model for the evolution of nonlinear ocean waves, including extreme waves known as Rogue/Freak waves, is of direct interest. Due to their elusive and destructive nature, the media often portrays Rogue waves as unimaginatively huge and unpredictable monsters of the sea. To address some of these concerns, derivations of reduced phase-resolving numerical models, based on the small wave steepness assumption, are presented and their corresponding numerical simulations via Fourier pseudo-spectral methods are discussed. The simulations are initialized with a well-known JONSWAP wave spectrum and different angular distributions are employed. Both deterministic and Monte-Carlo ensemble average simulations were carried out. Furthermore, this work concerns the development of a new computationally efficient numerical model for the short term prediction of evolving weakly nonlinear ocean surface waves. The derivations are originally based on the work of West et al. (1987) and since the waves in the ocean tend to travel primarily in one direction, the aforementioned new numerical model is derived with an additional assumption of a weak transverse dependence. In turn, comparisons of the ensemble averaged randomly initialized spectra, as well as deterministic surface-to-surface correlations are presented. The new model is shown to behave well in various directional wave fields and can potentially be a candidate for computationally efficient prediction and propagation of extreme ocean surface waves - Rogue/Freak waves.

  18. Tapered capillary optics

    DOEpatents

    Hirsch, Gregory

    1998-01-01

    A metal or glass wire is etched with great precision into a very narrowly tapering cone which has the shape of the desired final capillary-optics bore. By controlling the rate of removal of the wire from an etchant bath, a carefully controlled taper is produced. A sensor measures the diameter of the wire as it leaves the surface of the etchant. This signal is used for feedback control of the withdrawal speed. The etched wire undergoes a treatment to produce an extremely low surface-roughness. The etched and smoothed wire is coated with the material of choice for optimizing the reflectivity of the radiation being focused. This could be a vacuum evaporation, sputtering, CVD or aqueous chemical process. The coated wire is either electroplated, built up with electroless plating, or encapsulated in a polymer cylinder such as epoxy to increase the diameter of the wire for easier handling and greater robustness. During this process, the wire is vertically oriented and tensioned to assure that the wire is absolutely straight. The coated and electroformed wire is bonded to a flat, rigid substrate and is then periodically segmented by cutting or etching a series of narrow slits or grooves into the wire. The wire is vertically oriented and tensioned during the bonding process to assure that it is straight. The original wire material is then chemically etched away through the slits or otherwise withdrawn to leave the hollow internal bore of the final tapered-capillary optical element.

  19. Capillary Electrophoresis in Metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Maier, Tanja Verena; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Metabolomics is an analytical toolbox to describe (all) low-molecular-weight compounds in a biological system, as cells, tissues, urine, and feces, as well as in serum and plasma. To analyze such complex biological samples, high requirements on the analytical technique are needed due to the high variation in compound physico-chemistry (cholesterol derivatives, amino acids, fatty acids as SCFA, MCFA, or LCFA, or pathway-related metabolites belonging to each individual organism) and concentration dynamic range. All main separation techniques (LC-MS, GC-MS) are applied in routine to metabolomics hyphenated or not to mass spectrometry, and capillary electrophoresis is a powerful high-resolving technique but still underused in this field of complex samples. Metabolomics can be performed in the non-targeted way to gain an overview on metabolite profiles in biological samples. Targeted metabolomics is applied to analyze quantitatively pre-selected metabolites. This chapter reviews the use of capillary electrophoresis in the field of metabolomics and exemplifies solutions in metabolite profiling and analysis in urine and plasma. PMID:27645748

  20. A Survey of Light Pollution in the Rogue Valley, Southwest Oregon, By St. Mary’s School, Medford, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bensel, Holly; Arianna Ashby, Colin Cai, Thomas Cox, Genna Dorrell, Gabe FitzPatrick, Meaghan FitzPatrick, Jason Mars Liu, Mitchell Moczygemba, Kieran Rooney, Emry Timmons,; Ray You, students, (St. Mary's. School)

    2015-01-01

    Rural areas in Oregon, including the Rogue Valley, are renowned for beautiful dark skies. Electric light came to Medford, Oregon, the largest town in the Rogue Valley, in 1894. During the past 100 years the Rogue Valley grew from 2,500 individuals in 1895 to a population of 76,462 and a metropolitan area population of 208,545, in 2012. The increased population density resulted in increased light pollution. A light pollution chart using DMSP, Defense Meteorological Satellite Program, data was published in 2006, but did not show the spatial variation in detail. In the spring of 2014, the 9th grade physics students, astronomy students, and members of the Astronomy Club from St. Mary's School conducted the first detailed night sky survey. The purpose of the survey is to create a baseline of the variations in light pollution in the Rogue Valley.The project started with a talk by Steve Bosbach, former Texas IDA coordinator, on the topic of light pollution and how it affects our lives and the environment. Groups of students were given the tasks of measuring the night sky brightness in the Rogue Valley, doing a light audit in an area of their choice, and researching what light pollution is and its effects on the environment. From this they created a presentation for a final physics grade. The basis for this project, along with procedures can be found on the Globe at Night (www.globeatnight.org) website. The light audit and research portion were developed from the Dark Sky Rangers section (www.globeatnight.org/dsr/) of the website. In the fall of 2014, astronomy students and club members extended this study to the town of Ashland and the Sothern Oregon University campus, areas of the valley not surveyed in the Spring.This survey will increase awareness of light pollution in the Rogue Valley, as well as educate developers and city planners on the impact that light pollution has on the environment in Southern Oregon. It will help determine areas of concern and areas of dark

  1. Supercontinuum and rogue soliton generation by induced modulational instability in photonic crystal fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hua; Chen, Nengsong; Wang, Boyan; Tang, Pinghua; Zeng, Qilin

    2016-08-01

    We present an approach that enables active control of supercontinuum (SC) and rogue soliton (RS) generation through the modulation of a 500 fs input pulse by numerical simulations. The induced modulational instability contributes to the initial comb-like SC generation, which is fundamentally different from SC initiated by high-order soliton fission. The output spectrum shows great dependence on modulation frequencies and depths. It is interesting that we can manipulate the RS generation by adjusting the modulation parameters. And we also demonstrate the conditions which can be beneficial to RS generation: (i) very weak or large values of modulation depth; (ii) seeding in the vicinity of the peak of the modulational instability gain spectrum. Although RS degrades the smoothness of the SC, it is of great significance in the generation of tailored SC.

  2. Research of large-amplitude waves evolution in the framework of shallow water equations and their implication for people's safety in extreme situations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelinovsky, Efim; Chaikovskaia, Natalya; Rodin, Artem

    2015-04-01

    The paper presents the analysis of the formation and evolution of shock wave in shallow water with no restrictions on its amplitude in the framework of the nonlinear shallow water equations. It is shown that in the case of large-amplitude waves appears a new nonlinear effect of reflection from the shock front of incident wave. These results are important for the assessment of coastal flooding by tsunami waves and storm surges. Very often the largest number of victims was observed on the coastline where the wave moved breaking. Many people, instead of running away, were just looking at the movement of the "raging wall" and lost time. This fact highlights the importance of researching the problem of security and optimal behavior of people in situations with increased risk. Usually there is uncertainty about the exact time, when rogue waves will impact. This fact limits the ability of people to adjust their behavior psychologically to the stressful situations. It concerns specialists, who are busy both in the field of flying activity and marine service as well as adults, young people and children, who live on the coastal zone. The rogue wave research is very important and it demands cooperation of different scientists - mathematicians and physicists, as well as sociologists and psychologists, because the final goal of efforts of all scientists is minimization of the harm, brought by rogue waves to humanity.

  3. On Capillary Rise and Nucleation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prasad, R.

    2008-01-01

    A comparison of capillary rise and nucleation is presented. It is shown that both phenomena result from a balance between two competing energy factors: a volume energy and a surface energy. Such a comparison may help to introduce nucleation with a topic familiar to the students, capillary rise. (Contains 1 table and 3 figures.)

  4. Rogue Access Point Detection Using Innate Characteristics of the 802.11 MAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkataraman, Aravind; Beyah, Raheem

    Attacks on wireless networks can be classified into two categories: external wireless and internal wired. In external wireless attacks, an attacker uses a wireless device to target the access point (AP), other wireless nodes or the communications on the network. In internal wired attacks, an attacker or authorized insider inserts an unauthorized (or rogue) AP into the wired backbone for malicious activity or misfeasance. This paper addresses detecting the internal wired attack of inserting rogue APs (RAPs) in a network by monitoring on the wiredside for characteristics of wireless traffic. We focus on two 802.11 medium access control (MAC) layer features as a means of fingerprinting wireless traffic in a wired network. In particular, we study the effect of the Distributed Coordination Function (DCF) and rate adaptation specifications on wireless traffic by observing their influence on arrival delays. By focusing on fundamental traits of wireless communications, unlike existing techniques, we demonstrate that it is possible to extract wireless components from a flow without having to train our system with network-specific wired and wireless traces. Unlike some existing anomaly based detection schemes, our approach is generic as it does not assume that the wired network is inherently faster than the wireless network, is effective for networks that do not have sample wireless traffic, and is independent of network speed/type/protocol. We evaluate our approach using experiments and simulations. Using a Bayesian classifier we show that we can correctly identify wireless traffic on a wired link with 86-90% accuracy. This coupled with an appropriate switch port policy allows the identification of RAPs.

  5. Surface tension effects in wave breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deike, Luc; Melville, W. K.; Popinet, Stephane

    2014-11-01

    We present a numerical study of wave breaking by solving the full Navier-Stokes equations for two-phase air-water flows using the solver Gerris. We describe a parametric study of the influence of capillary effects on wave breaking using two-dimensional simulations. The onset of wave breaking as a function of the Bond number, Bo, and the initial wave steepness S is determined and a phase diagram in terms of (S,Bo) is presented that distinguishes between non-breaking gravity waves, parasitic capillaries on a gravity wave, spilling breakers and plunging breakers. The wave energy dissipation is computed for each wave regime and is found to be in good agreement with experimental results for breaking waves. Moreover, the enhanced dissipation just by parasitic capillaries is comparable to the dissipation due to breaking. Extending the simulations to three dimensions permits studies of the generation and statistics of bubbles and spray during breaking.

  6. Capillary optics for radiation focusing

    SciTech Connect

    Peurrung, A.J.; Reeder, P.L.; Bliss, M.; Craig, R.A.; Lepel, E.A.; Stromswold, D.C.; Stoffels, J.; Sunberg, D.S.; Tenny, H.

    1996-11-01

    Capillary lens technology may ultimately bring benefits to neutron and x-ray-based science like conventional lenses with visible light. Although the technology is not yet 10 years old, these lenses have already had a significant impact in engineering, science, and medicine. Capillary lenses are advantageous when it is desirable to increase the radiation flux at a location without regard to its angular divergence. PNNL has worked to improve the technology in several ways. A single, optimally tapered capillary was manufactured, which allows intensity gains of a factor of 270 for an initially parallel, incident x-ray beam. Feasibility of constructing neutron lenses using {sup 58}Ni (particularly effective at reflecting neutrons) has been explored. Three applications for capillary optics have been identified and studied: neutron telescope, Gandolphi x-ray diffractometry, and neutron radiotherapy. A brief guide is given for determining which potential applications are likely to be helped by capillary optics.

  7. Biomedical applications of capillary electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartsova, L. A.; Bessonova, E. A.

    2015-08-01

    The review deals with modern analytical approaches used in capillary electrophoresis for solving medical and biological problems: search for biomarkers of various diseases and rapid diagnosis based on characteristic profiles of biologically active compounds by capillary electrophoresis with mass spectrometric detection; monitoring of the residual drugs in biological fluids for evaluating the efficiency of drug therapy; testing of the enantiomeric purity of pharmaceutical products; the use of novel materials as components of stationary and pseudo-stationary phases in capillary electrophoresis and capillary electrochromatography to increase the selectivity of separation of components of complex matrices; and identification of various on-line preconcentration techniques to reduce the detection limits of biologically active analytes. A topical trend in capillary electrophoresis required in clinical practice, viz., the design of microfluidic systems, is discussed. The bibliography includes 173 references.

  8. Noise suppressing capillary separation system

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, E.S.; Xue, Y.

    1996-07-30

    A noise-suppressing capillary separation system for detecting the real-time presence or concentration of an analyte in a sample is provided. The system contains a capillary separation means through which the analyte is moved, a coherent light source that generates a beam which is split into a reference beam and a sample beam that irradiate the capillary, and a detector for detecting the reference beam and the sample beam light that transmits through the capillary. The laser beam is of a wavelength effective to be absorbed by a chromophore in the capillary. The system includes a noise suppressing system to improve performance and accuracy without signal averaging or multiple scans. 13 figs.

  9. Riccati parameterized self-similar waves in tapered graded-index waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyal, Amit; Gupta, Rama; Loomba, Shally; Kumar, C. N.

    2012-10-01

    We present a large family of self-similar waves by tailoring the tapering function, through Riccati parameter, in a tapered graded-index nonlinear waveguide amplifier. We show the existence of bright similaritons, self-similar Akhmediev breathers and self-similar rogue waves for generalized nonlinear Schrödinger equation with constant dispersion and nonlinearity, and a distributed gain. We illustrate the procedure to amplify the intensity of self-similar waves using isospectral Hamiltonian approach. This approach provides a handle to find analytically a wide class of tapering function and thus enabling one to control the self-similar wave structure and dynamical behavior.

  10. Steady Capillary Driven Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weislogel, Mark M.

    1996-01-01

    A steady capillary driven flow is developed for a liquid index in a circular tube which is partially coated with a surface modifier to produce a discontinuous wetting condition from one side of the tube to the other. The bulk flow is novel in that it is truly steady, and controlled solely by the physics associated with dynamic wetting. The influence of gravity on the flow is minimized through the use of small diameter tubes approximately O(1 mm) tested horizontally in a laboratory and larger tubes approximately O(10 mm) tested in the low gravity environment of a drop tower. Average steady velocities are predicted and compared against a large experimental data set which includes the effects of tube dimensions and fluid properties. The sensitivity of the velocity to surface cleanliness is dramatic and the advantages of experimentation in a microgravity environment are discussed.

  11. Benign sinonasal capillary haemangioma

    PubMed Central

    Stubbs, Darren; Poulios, Aristotelis; Khalil, Hisham

    2014-01-01

    Haemangiomas are benign fibrovascular tumours relatively that are common in the head and neck, where 60% of them occur Among the various categories of haemangiomas, lobular capillary haemangiomas (LCH) occur frequently on the skin, lips, buccal mucosa, tongue and gingiva. However, they are vanishingly rare in the paranasal sinuses. The imaging features of LCH are non-specific. The histological characteristics of LCH can also make diagnosis difficult as sometimes resemble highly vascular malignant tumours. This leads to the false preoperative diagnosis of suspected malignancy in many cases, which places the patient under unnecessary distress and anxiety. We present a case of LCH appearing as a suspicious nasal lesion of the lateral nasal wall with unilateral nasal obstruction, necrotic centre and epistaxis. The tumour was excised endoscopically in one operation including endoscopic medial maxillectomy. Further education about this lesion is deemed important as preoperative embolisation may be needed for a safe operation. PMID:25287393

  12. Capillaries for use in a multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, E.S.; Chang, H.T.; Fung, E.N.

    1997-12-09

    The invention provides a side-entry optical excitation geometry for use in a multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system. A charge-injection device is optically coupled to capillaries in the array such that the interior of a capillary is imaged onto only one pixel. In Sanger-type 4-label DNA sequencing reactions, nucleotide identification (``base calling``) is improved by using two long-pass filters to split fluorescence emission into two emission channels. A binary poly(ethyleneoxide) matrix is used in the electrophoretic separations. 19 figs.

  13. Capillaries for use in a multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edward S.; Chang, Huan-Tsang; Fung, Eliza N.

    1997-12-09

    The invention provides a side-entry optical excitation geometry for use in a multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system. A charge-injection device is optically coupled to capillaries in the array such that the interior of a capillary is imaged onto only one pixel. In Sanger-type 4-label DNA sequencing reactions, nucleotide identification ("base calling") is improved by using two long-pass filters to split fluorescence emission into two emission channels. A binary poly(ethyleneoxide) matrix is used in the electrophoretic separations.

  14. Capillary ratchet: Hydrodynamics of capillary feeding in shorebirds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Manu; Quere, David; Bush, John

    2008-03-01

    Bill morphologies are highly specialized to particular foraging strategies in birds, as is apparent from the large diversity of beak shapes observed in nature. Here we present an experimental and analytical study of capillary feeding in shorebirds. We highlight the critical role of contact angle hysteresis in capillary feeding. Our study provides a simple physical rationalization for the observation of multiple mandibular spreading cycles in feeding, necessary to overcome contact line resistance. We also find a unique geometrical optima in beak opening and closing angles for the most efficient drop transport. This capillary ratchet mechanism may also find applications in micro scale fluid transport, such as valveless pumping of fluid drops.

  15. Preliminary assessment of channel stability and bed-material transport in the Rogue River basin, southwestern Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, Krista L.; O'Connor, Jim E.; Keith, Mackenzie K.; Mangano, Joseph F.; Wallick, J. Rose

    2012-01-01

    This report summarizes a preliminary assessment of bed-material transport, vertical and lateral channel changes, and existing datasets for the Rogue River basin, which encompasses 13,390 square kilometers (km2) along the southwestern Oregon coast. This study, conducted to inform permitting decisions regarding instream gravel mining, revealed that: * The Rogue River in its lowermost 178.5 kilometers (km) alternates between confined and unconfined segments, and is predominately alluvial along its lowermost 44 km. The study area on the mainstem Rogue River can be divided into five reaches based on topography, hydrology, and tidal influence. The largely confined, active channel flows over bedrock and coarse bed material composed chiefly of boulders and cobbles in the Grants Pass (river kilometers [RKM] 178.5-152.8), Merlin (RKM 152.8-132.7), and Galice Reaches (RKM 132.7-43.9). Within these confined reaches, the channel contains few bars and has stable planforms except for locally wider segments such as the Brushy Chutes area in the Merlin Reach. Conversely, the active channel flows over predominately alluvial material and contains nearly continuous gravel bars in the Lobster Creek Reach (RKM 43.9-6.7). The channel in the Tidal Reach (RKM 6.7-0) is also alluvial, but tidally affected and unconfined until RKM 2. The Lobster Creek and Tidal Reaches contain some of the most extensive bar deposits within the Rogue River study area. * For the 56.6-km-long segment of the Applegate River included in this study, the river was divided into two reaches based on topography. In the Upper Applegate River Reach (RKM 56.6-41.6), the confined, active channel flows over alluvium and bedrock and has few bars. In the Lower Applegate River Reach (RKM 41.6-0), the active channel alternates between confined and unconfined segments, flows predominantly over alluvium, shifts laterally in unconfined sections, and contains more numerous and larger bars. * The 6.5-km segment of the lower

  16. Breather-to-soliton transitions, nonlinear wave interactions, and modulational instability in a higher-order generalized nonlinear Schrödinger equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Zhang, Jian-Hui; Wang, Zi-Qi; Liu, Chong; Li, Min; Qi, Feng-Hua; Guo, Rui

    2016-01-01

    We study the nonlinear waves on constant backgrounds of the higher-order generalized nonlinear Schrödinger (HGNLS) equation describing the propagation of ultrashort optical pulse in optical fibers. We derive the breather, rogue wave, and semirational solutions of the HGNLS equation. Our results show that these three types of solutions can be converted into the nonpulsating soliton solutions. In particular, we present the explicit conditions for the transitions between breathers and solitons with different structures. Further, we investigate the characteristics of the collisions between the soliton and breathers. Especially, based on the semirational solutions of the HGNLS equation, we display the novel interactions between the rogue waves and other nonlinear waves. In addition, we reveal the explicit relation between the transition and the distribution characteristics of the modulation instability growth rate.

  17. Instability of the capillary bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pare, Gounseti; Hoepffner, Jerome

    2014-11-01

    Capillary adhesion is a physical mechanism that maintains two bodies in contact by capillarity through a liquid ligament. The capillary bridge is an idealization of this capillary adhesion. In this study we first focus on the classical case of the stability of the capillary bridge. Secondly we study a slightly more complex configuration, imagining a flow in the capillary bridge as in the case of the dynamics of the neck of a liquid ligament, in its withdrawal under the effect of capillarity. Inspired by the experiments on soap films of Plateau, the configuration analyzed consists of an initially axisymmetric, mass of fluid held by surface tension forces between two parallel, coaxial, solid pipes of the same diameter. The results presented are obtained by numerical simulations using the free software, Gerris Flow Solver. We first focus on the capillary Venturi. In the static configuration the stability diagram of the capillary bridge obtained is in perfect agreement with the results of Lev A. Slobozhanin. In the dynamic case we develop a matlab code based on the one dimensional equations of Eggers and Dupont. The comparison of the bifurcation diagram obtained and the numerical simulations shows a good agreement.

  18. Wave-making by whirligig beetles (gyrinidae).

    PubMed

    Tucker, V A

    1969-11-14

    Swimming whirligig beetles (Dineutes carolinus) either make no waves at all or make conspicuous circular or vee-shaped patterns of capillary waves. The beetle's swimming speed can be determined from these wave patterns (or lack of them). Capillary waves precede the beetle for several body lengths, and their reflections may help the beetle avoid solid objects by echolocation. The gravity waves produced by a beetle are always longer than the beetle's hull length. Hence the waves do not interact with the hull to impose an upper limit on speed as they do with conventional ships. Although the beetles swim at high speeds, they apparently do not hydroplane. PMID:17815756

  19. Capillary flow solder wettability test

    SciTech Connect

    Vianco, P.T.; Rejent, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    A test procedure was developed to assess the capillary flow wettability of solders inside of a confined geometry. The test geometry was comprised of two parallel plates with a controlled gap of constant thickness (0.008 cm, 0.018 cm, 0.025 cm, and 0.038 cm). Capillary flow was assessed by: (1) the meniscus or capillary rise of the solder within the gap, (2) the extent of void formation in the gap, and (3) the time-dependence of the risen solder film. Tests were performed with the lead-free solders.

  20. Integrated multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edward S.; Tan, Hongdong

    2002-05-14

    The present invention provides an integrated multiplexed capillary electrophoresis system for the analysis of sample analytes. The system integrates and automates multiple components, such as chromatographic columns and separation capillaries, and further provides a detector for the detection of analytes eluting from the separation capillaries. The system employs multiplexed freeze/thaw valves to manage fluid flow and sample movement. The system is computer controlled and is capable of processing samples through reaction, purification, denaturation, pre-concentration, injection, separation and detection in parallel fashion. Methods employing the system of the invention are also provided.

  1. Analysis of Capillary Rise in Asymmetric Branch-Like Capillary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Caoxiong; Shen, Yinghao; Ge, Hongkui; Yang, Zhihui; Su, Shuai; Ren, Kai; Huang, Heyu

    2016-05-01

    Transport in porous media is common in nature, attracting many attentions for a long time. Tree-like network model is often used as a simplification for porous space, expressing the complexity of pore spaces instead of capillary bundle. To investigate spontaneous imbibition characteristics in this network, a dynamic asymmetric branch-like capillary model is used to represent basic network structure, using fractal method to represent tortuosity. This work investigates the influence of parameters on imbibition process in the branch-like capillary model. An analytical equation for the imbibition mass versus time is derived. Parameters from capillary structures to liquid properties are taken into account and analyzed based on the numerical solution of the equation. It is found that the imbibition process in asymmetric branch-like capillary model can be recognized by four sections and brunching tubes are positive for imbibition process. Concomitantly, meniscus arrest event is simulated and discussed. Moreover, the influence of parameters on imbibition process is discussed. These parameters can be classified as static and dynamic. Static parameters mainly change the capillary force, which are related to the ultimate imbibition mass or imbibition ability, while dynamic parameters mainly have influence on resistance of flowing fluid, which are related to the imbibition speed in the imbibition process.

  2. Experimental study of spatiotemporally localized surface gravity water waves.

    PubMed

    Chabchoub, A; Akhmediev, N; Hoffmann, N P

    2012-07-01

    We present experimental results on the study of spatiotemporally localized surface wave events on deep water that can be modeled using the Peregrine breather solution of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation. These are often considered as prototypes of oceanic rogue waves that can focus wave energy into a single wave packet. For small steepness values of the carrier gravity waves the Peregrine breathers are relatively wide, thus providing an excellent agreement between the theory and experimental results. For larger steepnesses the focusing leads to temporally and spatially shorter events. Nevertheless, agreement between measurements and the Peregrine breather theory remains reasonably good, with discrepancies of modulation gradients and spatiotemporal symmetries being tolerable. Lifetimes and travel distances of the spatiotemporally localized wave events determined from the experiment are in good agreement with the theory.

  3. A Survey of Light Pollution in the Rogue Valley, Southwest Oregon, by St. Mary's School, Medford, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bensel, Holly; Dorrell, Genna; Feng, James; Hicks, Sean; Mars Liu, Jason; Liu, Steven; Moczygemba, Mitchell; Sheng, Jason; Sternenburg, Leah; Than, Emi; Timmons, Emry; Wen, Jerry; Yaeger, Bella; You, Ruiyang

    2016-01-01

    The Rogue Valley in Southwest Oregon was known for its beautiful dark skies, but due to population growth the dark skies are vanishing. A light pollution chart using Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) data was published in 2006, but did not show the spatial variation in detail. In the spring of 2014, the 9th grade physics students, astronomy students, and members of the Astronomy Club from St. Mary's School conducted the first detailed night sky survey. The purpose of the survey is to create a baseline of the variations in light pollution in the Rogue Valley.The project continued into 2015, incorporating suggestions made at the 2014 AAS Conference to improve the study by including more light meter data and community outreach. Students used light meters, Loss of the Night app, and the Dark Sky meter app. Students researched light pollution and its effects on the environment, measured night sky brightness in the Rogue Valley, and completed a light audit in an area of their choice. They created a presentation for a final physics grade. The basis for this project, along with procedures can be found on the GaN, Globe at Night, (www.globeatnight.org) website. The light audit and research portion were developed from the Dark Sky Rangers section of the website (www.globeatnight.org/dsr/).The 2014 survey and public outreach increased awareness of light pollution in the Rogue Valley and around the state of Oregon. Examples include a local senior project to change lighting at a baseball stadium and a 4-H club in Northeast Oregon starting a GaN survey in their area. GaN shows growth in the amount of data collected in Oregon from 8 data points in 2006 to 193 in 2014. The Rogue Valley magnitude data from the spring of 2015 indicates a drop from an average magnitude of 4 to an average magnitude of 2. This is due to hazy skies from smoke drifting into the valley from a Siberian wildfire. Data collection during the summer and fall was hampered due to smoke from local

  4. DNA typing by capillary electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, N.

    1997-10-08

    Capillary electrophoresis is becoming more and more important in nucleic acid analysis including DNA sequencing, typing and disease gene measurements. This work summarized the background of DNA typing. The recent development of capillary electrophoresis was also discussed. The second part of the thesis showed the principle of DNA typing based on using the allelic ladder as the absolute standard ladder in capillary electrophoresis system. Future work will be focused on demonstrating DNA typing on multiplex loci and examples of disease diagnosis in the on-line format of PCR-CE. Also capillary array electrophoresis system should allow high throughput, fast speed DNA typing. Only the introduction and conclusions for this report are available here. A reprint was removed for separate processing.

  5. Liposome behavior in capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Roberts, M A; Locascio-Brown, L; Maccrehan, W A; Durst, R A

    1996-10-01

    The behavior of liposomes in capillary electrophoresis is studied for the purpose of developing a potential method for characterizing liposomes prepared for use in industrial and analytical applications. This study characterizes the electrophoretic behavior of liposomes under various conditions to provide information about electrophoretic mobility and liposome-capillary surface interactions. The results of this method are compared with the results obtained using traditional laser light-scattering methods to obtain size information about liposome preparations. Additionally, reactions of liposomes and the surfactant n-octyl-β-d-glucopyranoside are performed off-line in bulk solution experiments and on-line in the capillary. Automated delivery of lysis agents by multiple electrokinetic injections is demonstrated as a general method for inducing on-capillary reactions between liposomes and other reagents. Furthermore, some preliminary evidence on the use of liposomes as a hydrophobic partitioning medium for analytical separations is presented.

  6. Capillary Electrophoresis in Wine Science.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Christian; Bagala, Franck; Gougeon, Régis D; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Capillary electrophoresis appeared to be a powerful and reliable technique to analyze the diversity of wine compounds. Wine presents a great variety of natural chemicals coming from the grape berry extraction and the fermentation processes. The first and more abundant after water, ethanol has been quantified in wines via capillary electrophoresis. Other families like organic acids, neutral and acid sugars, polyphenols, amines, thiols, vitamins, and soluble proteins are electrophoretically separated from the complex matrix.Here, we will focus on the different methodologies that have been employed to conduct properly capillary electrophoresis in wine analysis.Two examples informing on wine chemistry obtained by capillary electrophoresis will be detailed. They concern polyphenol analysis and protein profiling. The first category is a well-developed quantitative approach important for the quality and the antioxidant properties conferred to wine. The second aspect involves more research aspects dealing with microbiota infections in the vineyard or in the grape as well as enological practices. PMID:27645750

  7. Surface Tension and Capillary Rise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walton, Alan J.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of the shortcomings of textbook explanations of surface tension, distinguishing between concepts of tension and capillary rise. The arguments require only a clear understanding of Newtonian mechanics, notably potential energy. (DF)

  8. Capillary electrophoresis electrospray ionization mass spectrometry interface

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Richard D.; Severs, Joanne C.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is an interface between a capillary electrophoresis separation capillary end and an electrospray ionization mass spectrometry emitter capillary end, for transporting an anolyte sample from a capillary electrophoresis separation capillary to a electrospray ionization mass spectrometry emitter capillary. The interface of the present invention has: (a) a charge transfer fitting enclosing both of the capillary electrophoresis capillary end and the electrospray ionization mass spectrometry emitter capillary end; (b) a reservoir containing an electrolyte surrounding the charge transfer fitting; and (c) an electrode immersed into the electrolyte, the electrode closing a capillary electrophoresis circuit and providing charge transfer across the charge transfer fitting while avoiding substantial bulk fluid transfer across the charge transfer fitting. Advantages of the present invention have been demonstrated as effective in providing high sensitivity and efficient analyses.

  9. Instability of nonplanar modulated dust acoustic wave packets in a strongly coupled nonthermal dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    El-Labany, S. K. Zedan, N. A.; El-Taibany, W. F. E-mail: eltaibany@du.edu.eg

    2015-07-15

    Cylindrical and spherical amplitude modulations of dust acoustic (DA) solitary wave envelopes in a strongly coupled dusty plasma containing nonthermal distributed ions are studied. Employing a reductive perturbation technique, a modified nonlinear Schrödinger equation including the geometrical effect is derived. The influences of nonthermal ions, polarization force, and the geometries on the modulational instability conditions are analyzed and the possible rogue wave structures are discussed in detail. It is found that the spherical DA waves are more structurally stable to perturbations than the cylindrical ones. Possible applications of these theoretical findings are briefly discussed.

  10. Waves and Water Beetles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Vance A.

    1971-01-01

    Capillary and gravity water waves are related to the position, wavelength, and velocity of an object in flowing water. Water patterns are presented for ships and the whirling beetle with an explanation of how the design affects the objects velocity and the observed water wavelengths. (DS)

  11. Sound Waves Levitate Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M. C.; Wang, T. G.

    1982-01-01

    System recently tested uses acoustic waves to levitate liquid drops, millimeter-sized glass microballoons, and other objects for coating by vapor deposition or capillary attraction. Cylindrical contactless coating/handling facility employs a cylindrical acoustic focusing radiator and a tapered reflector to generate a specially-shaped standing wave pattern. Article to be processed is captured by the acoustic force field under the reflector and moves as reflector is moved to different work stations.

  12. Curvature capillary migration of microspheres.

    PubMed

    Sharifi-Mood, Nima; Liu, Iris B; Stebe, Kathleen J

    2015-09-14

    We address the question: how does capillarity propel microspheres along curvature gradients? For a particle on a fluid interface, there are two conditions that can apply at the three phase contact line: either the contact line adopts an equilibrium contact angle, or it can be pinned by kinetic trapping, e.g. at chemical heterogeneities, asperities, or other pinning sites on the particle surface. We formulate the curvature capillary energy for both scenarios for particles smaller than the capillary length and far from any pinning boundaries. The scale and range of the distortion made by the particle are set by the particle radius; we use singular perturbation methods to find the distortions and to rigorously evaluate the associated capillary energies. For particles with equilibrium contact angles, contrary to the literature, we find that the capillary energy is negligible, with the first contribution bounded to fourth order in the product of the particle radius and the deviatoric curvature of the host interface. For pinned contact lines, we find curvature capillary energies that are finite, with a functional form investigated previously by us for disks and microcylinders on curved interfaces. In experiments, we show microspheres migrate along deterministic trajectories toward regions of maximum deviatoric curvature with curvature capillary energies ranging from 6 × 10(3)-5 × 10(4)kBT. These data agree with the curvature capillary energy for the case of pinned contact lines. The underlying physics of this migration is a coupling of the interface deviatoric curvature with the quadrupolar mode of nanometric disturbances in the interface owing to the particle's contact line undulations. This work is an example of the major implications of nanometric roughness and contact line pinning for colloidal dynamics.

  13. Numerical Considerations for Lagrangian Stochastic Dispersion Models: Eliminating Rogue Trajectories, and the Importance of Numerical Accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Brian N.

    2016-07-01

    When Lagrangian stochastic models for turbulent dispersion are applied to complex atmospheric flows, some type of ad hoc intervention is almost always necessary to eliminate unphysical behaviour in the numerical solution. Here we discuss numerical strategies for solving the non-linear Langevin-based particle velocity evolution equation that eliminate such unphysical behaviour in both Reynolds-averaged and large-eddy simulation applications. Extremely large or `rogue' particle velocities are caused when the numerical integration scheme becomes unstable. Such instabilities can be eliminated by using a sufficiently small integration timestep, or in cases where the required timestep is unrealistically small, an unconditionally stable implicit integration scheme can be used. When the generalized anisotropic turbulence model is used, it is critical that the input velocity covariance tensor be realizable, otherwise unphysical behaviour can become problematic regardless of the integration scheme or size of the timestep. A method is presented to ensure realizability, and thus eliminate such behaviour. It was also found that the numerical accuracy of the integration scheme determined the degree to which the second law of thermodynamics or `well-mixed condition' was satisfied. Perhaps more importantly, it also determined the degree to which modelled Eulerian particle velocity statistics matched the specified Eulerian distributions (which is the ultimate goal of the numerical solution). It is recommended that future models be verified by not only checking the well-mixed condition, but perhaps more importantly by checking that computed Eulerian statistics match the Eulerian statistics specified as inputs.

  14. Highly extended oceanic lithosphere: The basement and wallrocks for the Late Jurassic Rogue-Chetco oceanic arc, Oregon Klamath Mountains

    SciTech Connect

    Yule, J.D.; Saleeby, J.B.

    1993-04-01

    The superbly preserved, coeval Late Jurassic Rogue-Chetco oceanic arc and Josephine inter-arc basin exposed in the western Jurassic belt of the Oregon Klamath Mountains provide a unique opportunity to (1) directly observe the oceanic lithosphere upon which this oceanic arc was constructed, and (2) gain a better understanding of the pre-accretionary dynamic processes that shape oceanic arc and inter-arc basin lithosphere. Field relations exposed in the Roque, Illinois, and Chetco River areas show that (1) plutonic and volcanic rocks of the Rogue-Chetco arc both intruded and conformably overlapped fragmented composite blocks of oceanic crust and serpentinized, dike-filled depleted mantle rocks; and (2) arc growth occurred during regional oblique extension of the oceanic lithosphere resulting in the extreme fragmentation of oceanic crustal rocks and the local exposure of serpentinized mantle rocks on the sea floor. The Rogue-Chetco overlap sequence consists of rhythmically bedded volcanogenic turbidites, chert, argillite, and local deposits of polymict basal breccias. The clasts which comprise the distinctive basal breccias indicate derivation from a dominantly ophiolitic crust and serpentinized mantle source. Source materials for the basal breccias comprise the basement and wallrocks for the Roque-Chetco arc and consist of (1) rifted fragments of western Paleozoic and Triassic belt rocks (Yule and others, 1991) cut by heterogeneous mafic complexes inferred to represent early Josephine age rifting at approximately 165 Ma, (2) fault bounded blocks of massive gabbro, sheeted mafic dikes, pillow lava and breccia overlain by Callovian age chert, and (3) serpentinized depleted mantle peridotite cut by multiple generation of mafic and intermediate dikes. The basement rock types all share a pervasive brittle fragmentation and hydrothermal alteration history that is conspicuously absent in the arc volcanic and plutonic rocks.

  15. Revised Capillary Breakup Rheometer Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Louise; Schultz, William; Solomon, Michael

    2014-11-01

    Rather than integrate the one-dimensional equation of motion for a capillary breakup rheometer, we take the axial derivative of that equation. This avoids the determination of the axial force with all of its complications and correction factors. The resulting evolutionary equation that involves either two or four derivatives of the capillary radius as a function of the axial coordinate determines the ratio of elongational viscosity to surface tension coefficient. We examine several silicone and olive oils to show the accuracy of the method for Newtonian fluids. We will discuss our surface tension measurement techniques and briefly describe measurements of viscoelastic materials, including saliva.

  16. Conformation-sensitive capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Ashton, Emma Jane

    2011-01-01

    Conformation-sensitive capillary electrophoresis (CSCE) is a rapid, high-throughput screening method that can be applied to any region of a genome for detection of sequence variants. Slab gel-based conformation-sensitive gel electrophoresis was first described by Ganguly et al., and the transfer from slab gels to capillaries for higher throughput was reported by Rozycka et al. CSCE is based on the principle that DNA homoduplexes and heteroduplexes migrate at different rates during electrophoresis under mildly denaturing conditions. Fragments showing an altered peak morphology compared to the wild type are then sequenced to determine the precise nature of the sequence variant detected.

  17. Nonsteady Flow in Capillary Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, Ayako

    2000-03-01

    Surface phenomena in the field of electron devices and the problem of how long. It takes plants to absorb water during their growth in hydroponic cultivation is attraching the attention of riseachers. However, the related study of non-steady flow in capillary tubes has a number of issues that require investigation. In response to this situation, we made attempted to assess nonsteady fiow in capillary tubes, the liquid rise time and other issues, using a motion equation that takes factors including the friction force of the tube and the surface tension into consideration.

  18. Capillary interactions in Pickering emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzowski, J.; Tasinkevych, M.; Dietrich, S.

    2011-09-01

    The effective capillary interaction potentials for small colloidal particles trapped at the surface of liquid droplets are calculated analytically. Pair potentials between capillary monopoles and dipoles, corresponding to particles floating on a droplet with a fixed center of mass and subjected to external forces and torques, respectively, exhibit a repulsion at large angular separations and an attraction at smaller separations, with the latter resembling the typical behavior for flat interfaces. This change of character is not observed for quadrupoles, corresponding to free particles on a mechanically isolated droplet. The analytical results are compared with the numerical minimization of the surface free energy of the droplet in the presence of spherical or ellipsoidal particles.

  19. Nonlinear coherent structures of Alfvén wave in a collisional plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana, Sayanee; Ghosh, Samiran; Chakrabarti, Nikhil

    2016-07-01

    The Alfvén wave dynamics is investigated in the framework of two-fluid approach in a compressible collisional magnetized plasma. In the finite amplitude limit, the dynamics of the nonlinear Alfvén wave is found to be governed by a modified Korteweg-de Vries Burgers equation (mKdVB). In this mKdVB equation, the electron inertia is found to act as a source of dispersion, and the electron-ion collision serves as a dissipation. The collisional dissipation is eventually responsible for the Burgers term in mKdVB equation. In the long wavelength limit, this weakly nonlinear Alfvén wave is shown to be governed by a damped nonlinear Schrödinger equation. Furthermore, these nonlinear equations are analyzed by means of analytical calculation and numerical simulation to elucidate the various aspects of the phase-space dynamics of the nonlinear wave. Results reveal that nonlinear Alfvén wave exhibits the dissipation mediated shock, envelope, and breather like structures. Numerical simulations also predict the formation of dissipative Alfvénic rogue wave, giant breathers, and rogue wave holes. These results are discussed in the context of the space plasma.

  20. Multiplexed fluorescence detector system for capillary electrophoresis

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, E.S.; Taylor, J.A.

    1996-03-12

    A fluorescence detection system for capillary electrophoresis is provided wherein the detection system can simultaneously excite fluorescence and substantially simultaneously monitor separations in multiple capillaries. This multiplexing approach involves laser irradiation of a sample in a plurality of capillaries through optical fibers that are coupled individually with the capillaries. The array is imaged orthogonally through a microscope onto a charge-coupled device camera for signal analysis. 14 figs.

  1. Multiplexed fluorescence detector system for capillary electrophoresis

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edward S.; Taylor, John A.

    1994-06-28

    A fluorescence detection system for capillary electrophoresis is provided wherein the detection system can simultaneously excite fluorescence and substantially simultaneously monitor separations in multiple capillaries. This multiplexing approach involves laser irradiation of a sample in a plurality of capillaries through optical fibers that are coupled individually with the capillaries. The array is imaged orthogonally through a microscope onto a charge-coupled device camera for signal analysis.

  2. Multiplexed fluorescence detector system for capillary electrophoresis

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, E.S.; Taylor, J.A.

    1994-06-28

    A fluorescence detection system for capillary electrophoresis is provided wherein the detection system can simultaneously excite fluorescence and substantially simultaneously monitor separations in multiple capillaries. This multiplexing approach involves laser irradiation of a sample in a plurality of capillaries through optical fibers that are coupled individually with the capillaries. The array is imaged orthogonally through a microscope onto a charge-coupled device camera for signal analysis. 14 figures.

  3. Multiplexed fluorescence detector system for capillary electrophoresis

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edward S.; Taylor, John A.

    1996-03-12

    A fluorescence detection system for capillary electrophoresis is provided wherein the detection system can simultaneously excite fluorescence and substantially simultaneously monitor separations in multiple capillaries. This multiplexing approach involves laser irradiation of a sample in a plurality of capillaries through optical fibers that are coupled individually with the capillaries. The array is imaged orthogonally through a microscope onto a charge-coupled device camera for signal analysis.

  4. Capillary electrophoresis for drug analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lurie, Ira S.

    1999-02-01

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) is a high resolution separation technique which is amenable to a wide variety of solutes, including compounds which are thermally degradable, non-volatile and highly polar, and is therefore well suited for drug analysis. Techniques which have been used in our laboratory include electrokinetic chromatography (ECC), free zone electrophoresis (CZE) and capillary electrochromatography (CEC). ECC, which uses a charged run buffer additive which migrates counter to osmotic flow, is excellent for many applications, including, drug screening and analyses of heroin, cocaine and methamphetamine samples. ECC approaches include the use of micelles and charged cyclodextrins, which allow for the separation of complex mixtures. Simultaneous separation of acidic, neutral and basic solutes and the resolution of optical isomers and positional isomers are possible. CZE has been used for the analysis of small ions (cations and anions) in heroin exhibits. For the ECC and CZE experiments performed in our laboratory, uncoated capillaries were used. In contrast, CEC uses capillaries packed with high performance liquid chromatography stationary phases, and offers both high peak capacities and unique selectivities. Applications include the analysis of cannabinoids and drug screening. Although CE suffers from limited concentration sensitivity, it is still applicable to trace analysis of drug samples, especially when using injection techniques such as stacking, or detection schemes such as laser induced fluorescence and extended pathlength UV.

  5. Capillary Rise in a Wedge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piva, M.

    2009-01-01

    In introductory-level physics courses, the concept of surface tension is often illustrated using the example of capillary rise in thin tubes. In this paper the author describes experiments conducted using a planar geometry created with two small plates forming a thin wedge. The distribution of the fluid entering the wedge can be studied as a…

  6. Capillary blood viscosity in microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Cortinovis, A; Crippa, A; Cavalli, R; Corti, M; Cattaneo, L

    2006-01-01

    As known, at the arteriolar level there is the highest resistance to the flow due to the section and to the velocity with an average pressure fall of 50 mmHg (from 85 to 35 mmHg). This resistance is expressed in sec(-1) by the ratio W/2r. This ratio is very high with an average value of 332 sec(-1) and viscosity at this high shear-rate is negligible. At the capillary level the pressure fall is 11.5 mmHg but the vascular resistance W/2r is much lower, on average 32 sec(-1). We can say that if a resistance of 333 sec(-1) corresponds with a pressure fall of 50 mmHg, then a resistance of 32 sec(-1) should correspond with a pressure fall of 4.8 mmHg. The highest pressure fall is due to another kind of resistance which we can define as "Capillary Blood Viscosity" because it depends on the rheological and structural characteristics of the blood. Our instrument reproduces the structure of the capillary district in an experimental model and measures the General Blood Viscosity (GBV) and the Capillary Blood Viscosity (CBV) at the same shear-rate and in particular at the low shear-rate when in non-Newtonian fluids the highest increase in viscosity appears. Consequently, at the capillary, viscosity is dominant with respect to the other geometric and physical resistances. Moreover, the percentage ratio between the GBV and the CBV gives a physical measure of erythrocyte deformability. Knowing viscosity at shear-rate present in the circulatory system, we can obtain the size of RBCs aggregates in the different circulatory districts and their characteristics expressed like "aggregation bond". Changes in CBV are the only possibility in clinical practice to improve the circulatory flow in the capillary district because it is not sure that changes in the arteriolar section can improve the capillary flow or rather open arterio-venous anastomosis. Moreover, in the systemic circulation the aggregate size allows us to point out the phenomenon of cell adhesion because the presence of

  7. Gradient elution in capillary electrochromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Anex, D.; Rakestraw, D.J.; Yan, Chao; Dadoo, R.; Zare, R.N.

    1997-08-01

    In analogy to pressure-driven gradient techniques in high-performance liquid chromatography, a system has been developed for delivering electroosmotically-driven solvent gradients for capillary electrochromatography (CEC). Dynamic gradients with sub-mL/min flow rates are generated by merging two electroosmotic flows that are regulated by computer-controlled voltages. These flows are delivered by two fused-silica capillary arms attached to a T-connector, where they mix and then flow into a capillary column that has been electrokinetically packed with 3-mm reversed-phase particles. The inlet of one capillary arm is placed in a solution reservoir containing one mobile phase and the inlet of the other is placed in a second reservoir containing a second mobile phase. Two independent computer-controlled programmable high-voltage power supplies (0-50 kV)--one providing an increasing ramp and the other providing a decreasing ramp--are used to apply variable high-voltage potentials to the mobile phase reservoirs to regulate the electroosmotic flow in each arm. The ratio of the electroosmotic flow rates between the two arms is changed with time according to the computer-controlled voltages to deliver the required gradient profile to the separation column. Experiments were performed to confirm the composition of the mobile phase during a gradient run and to determine the change of the composition in response to the programmed voltage profile. To demonstrate the performance of electroosmotically-driven gradient elution in CEC, a mixture of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was separated in less than 90 minutes. This gradient technique is expected to be well-suited for generating not only solvent gradients in CEC, but also other types of gradients such as pH- and ionic-strength gradients in capillary electrokinetic separations and analyses.

  8. Non-contact acoustic trapping in circular cross-section glass capillaries: a numerical study.

    PubMed

    Gralinski, Ian; Alan, Tuncay; Neild, Adrian

    2012-11-01

    Ultrasonic particle manipulation has many applications in microfluidic systems. Such manipulation is achievable by establishing an ultrasonic standing wave in fluid filled micromachined chambers. In this work, the focus is on analyzing the trapping potential of water filled capillary tubes actuated ultrasonically. The curved walls necessitate the use of a finite element modeling approach. Multiple arrangements of the piezoelectric transducers were studied along with the effects of changing the capillary and piezoelectric transducer thicknesses. Additionally, different modes of driving the piezoelectric transducers were investigated. It was found that positioning four piezoelectric transducers equally spaced around the capillary tube provided the best force potential field for trapping polystyrene spheres in the center of the capillary. PMID:23145585

  9. Capillary filling dynamics of viscoelastic fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandopadhyay, Aditya; Ghosh, Uddipta; Chakraborty, Suman

    2014-05-01

    We consider the filling of a capillary by a viscoelastic fluid described by the Phan-Thien-Tanner (PTT) constitutive behavior. By considering both vertical capillary filling and horizontal capillary filling, we demarcate the role played by gravity and fluid rheology towards long-time oscillations in the capillary penetration depth. We also consider the isothermal filling of the capillary for a closed channel and thus bring out the fundamental differences in the nature of capillary filling for PTT and Newtonian fluids for closed channels in comparison to open channels. Through a scaling analysis, we highlight a distinct viscoelastic regime in the horizontal capillary filling which is in contrast to the Washburn scaling seen in the case of Newtonian fluids. Such an analysis with a very general constitutive behavior is therefore expected to shed light on many areas of microfluidics which focus on biofluids that are often well described by the PTT constitutive behavior.

  10. Gaussian variational ansatz in the problem of anomalous sea waves: Comparison with direct numerical simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Ruban, V. P.

    2015-05-15

    The nonlinear dynamics of an obliquely oriented wave packet on a sea surface is analyzed analytically and numerically for various initial parameters of the packet in relation to the problem of the so-called rogue waves. Within the Gaussian variational ansatz applied to the corresponding (1+2)-dimensional hyperbolic nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE), a simplified Lagrangian system of differential equations is derived that describes the evolution of the coefficients of the real and imaginary quadratic forms appearing in the Gaussian. This model provides a semi-quantitative description of the process of nonlinear spatiotemporal focusing, which is one of the most probable mechanisms of rogue wave formation in random wave fields. The system of equations is integrated in quadratures, which allows one to better understand the qualitative differences between linear and nonlinear focusing regimes of a wave packet. Predictions of the Gaussian model are compared with the results of direct numerical simulation of fully nonlinear long-crested waves.

  11. Giant waves in weakly crossing sea states

    SciTech Connect

    Ruban, V. P.

    2010-03-15

    The formation of rogue waves in sea states with two close spectral maxima near the wave vectors k{sub 0} {+-} {Delta}k/2 in the Fourier plane is studied through numerical simulations using a completely nonlinear model for long-crested surface waves [24]. Depending on the angle {theta} between the vectors k{sub 0} and {Delta}k, which specifies a typical orientation of the interference stripes in the physical plane, the emerging extreme waves have a different spatial structure. If {theta} {<=} arctan(1/{radical}2), then typical giant waves are relatively long fragments of essentially two-dimensional ridges separated by wide valleys and composed of alternating oblique crests and troughs. For nearly perpendicular vectors k{sub 0} and {Delta}k, the interference minima develop into coherent structures similar to the dark solitons of the defocusing nonlinear Schroedinger equation and a two-dimensional killer wave looks much like a one-dimensional giant wave bounded in the transverse direction by two such dark solitons.

  12. A rectangular capillary suction apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, D.J. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Hsu, Y.H. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1994-06-01

    Fluid flow and cake formation in a rectangular capillary suction apparatus (RCSA) are investigated experimentally and theoretically. Water, methanol, ethanol, and ethylene glycol are used to study the effects of liquid properties, and CaCO[sub 3], kaolin, and bentonite slurries are employed for studying the effects of cake formation on capillary suction-time (CST). A theory based on a diffusion-like approach is developed. The liquid saturation under the inner cell will approach a constant value when the wet front distance is large. A method based on this experimental finding for estimating the cake specific resistance is proposed. The agreement between experiments and calculations is close. The RCSA is superior to the cylindrical CSA when treating liquids with small diffusivities or slurries with high solid concentration and/or with high averaged specific resistance.

  13. Capillary electrophoresis in food authenticity.

    PubMed

    Kvasnicka, Frantisek

    2005-06-01

    Food authenticity is a term which simply refers to whether the food purchased by the consumer matches its description. False description can occur in many forms, from the undeclared addition of water or other cheaper materials, or the wrong declaration of the amount of a particular ingredient in the product, to making false statements about the source of ingredients i.e., their geographic, plant, or animal origin. The aim of this review is to summarize applications of capillary electrophoresis in food authentication.

  14. Capillary electrophoresis systems and methods

    SciTech Connect

    Dorairaj, Rathissh; Keynton, Robert S.; Roussel, Thomas J.; Crain, Mark M.; Jackson, Douglas J.; Walsh, Kevin M.; Naber, John F.; Baldwin, Richard P.; Franco, Danielle B.

    2011-08-02

    An embodiment of the invention is directed to a capillary electrophoresis apparatus comprising a plurality of separation micro-channels. A sample loading channel communicates with each of the plurality of separation channels. A driver circuit comprising a plurality of electrodes is configured to induce an electric field across each of the plurality of separation channels sufficient to cause analytes in the samples to migrate along each of the channels. The system further comprises a plurality of detectors configured to detect the analytes.

  15. Ionic Liquids in Capillary Electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Holzgrabe, Ulrike; Wahl, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Recently, a great interest was drawn toward ionic liquids (ILs) in analytical separation techniques. ILs possess many properties making them excellent additives in capillary electrophoresis (CE) background electrolytes (BGE). The most important property is the charge of the dissolved ions in BGE enabling the cations to interact with deprotonated silanol groups on the capillary surface and thereby modifying the electroosmotic flow (EOF). Ionic and/or proton donor-acceptor interactions between analyte and IL are possible interactions facilitating new kinds of separation mechanisms in CE. Further advantages of ILs are the high conductivity, the environmentally friendliness, and the good solubility for organic and inorganic compounds. The most commonly used ILs in capillary electrophoresis are dialkylimidazolium-based ILs, whereas for enantioseparation a lot of innovative chiral cations and anions were investigated.ILs are reported to be additives to a normal CE background electrolyte or the sole electrolyte in CE, nonaqueous CE (NACE), micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC), and in enantioseparation. An overview of applications and separation mechanisms reported in the literature is given here, in addition to the enantioseparation of pseudoephedrine using tetrabutylammonium chloride (TBAC) as IL additive to an ammonium formate buffer containing β-cyclodextrin (β-CD). PMID:27645735

  16. Capillary Electrophoresis - Optical Detection Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sepaniak, M. J.

    2001-08-06

    Molecular recognition systems are developed via molecular modeling and synthesis to enhance separation performance in capillary electrophoresis and optical detection methods for capillary electrophoresis. The underpinning theme of our work is the rational design and development of molecular recognition systems in chemical separations and analysis. There have been, however, some subtle and exciting shifts in our research paradigm during this period. Specifically, we have moved from mostly separations research to a good balance between separations and spectroscopic detection for separations. This shift is based on our perception that the pressing research challenges and needs in capillary electrophoresis and electrokinetic chromatography relate to the persistent detection and flow rate reproducibility limitations of these techniques (see page 1 of the accompanying Renewal Application for further discussion). In most of our work molecular recognition reagents are employed to provide selectivity and enhance performance. Also, an emerging trend is the use of these reagents with specially-prepared nano-scale materials. Although not part of our DOE BES-supported work, the modeling and synthesis of new receptors has indirectly supported the development of novel microcantilevers-based MEMS for the sensing of vapor and liquid phase analytes. This fortuitous overlap is briefly covered in this report. Several of the more significant publications that have resulted from our work are appended. To facilitate brevity we refer to these publications liberally in this progress report. Reference is also made to very recent work in the Background and Preliminary Studies Section of the Renewal Application.

  17. Treelike networks accelerating capillary flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shou, Dahua; Ye, Lin; Fan, Jintu

    2014-05-01

    Transport in treelike networks has received wide attention in natural systems, oil recovery, microelectronic cooling systems, and textiles. Existing studies are focused on transport behaviors under a constant potential difference (including pressure, temperature, and voltage) in a steady state [B. Yu and B. Li, Phys. Rev. E 73, 066302 (2006), 10.1103/PhysRevE.73.066302; J. Chen, B. Yu, P. Xu, and Y. Li, Phys. Rev. E 75, 056301 (2007), 10.1103/PhysRevE.75.056301]. However, dynamic (time-dependent) transport in such systems has rarely been concerned. In this work, we theoretically investigate the dynamics of capillary flow in treelike networks and design the distribution of radius and length of local branches for the fastest capillary flow. It is demonstrated that capillary flow in the optimized tree networks is faster than in traditional parallel tube nets under fixed constraints. As well, the flow time of the liquid is found to increase approximately linearly with penetration distance, which differs from Washburn's classic description that flow time increases as the square of penetration distance in a uniform tube.

  18. Capillary-driven automatic packaging.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yuzhe; Hong, Lingfei; Nie, Baoqing; Lam, Kit S; Pan, Tingrui

    2011-04-21

    Packaging continues to be one of the most challenging steps in micro-nanofabrication, as many emerging techniques (e.g., soft lithography) are incompatible with the standard high-precision alignment and bonding equipment. In this paper, we present a simple-to-operate, easy-to-adapt packaging strategy, referred to as Capillary-driven Automatic Packaging (CAP), to achieve automatic packaging process, including the desired features of spontaneous alignment and bonding, wide applicability to various materials, potential scalability, and direct incorporation in the layout. Specifically, self-alignment and self-engagement of the CAP process induced by the interfacial capillary interactions between a liquid capillary bridge and the top and bottom substrates have been experimentally characterized and theoretically analyzed with scalable implications. High-precision alignment (of less than 10 µm) and outstanding bonding performance (up to 300 kPa) has been reliably obtained. In addition, a 3D microfluidic network, aligned and bonded by the CAP technique, has been devised to demonstrate the applicability of this facile yet robust packaging technique for emerging microfluidic and bioengineering applications.

  19. Predictability of the appearance of anomalous waves at sufficiently small Benjamin-Feir indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruban, V. P.

    2016-05-01

    The numerical simulation of the nonlinear dynamics of random sea waves at sufficiently small Benjamin-Feir indices and its comparison with the linear dynamics (at the coincidence of spatial Fourier harmonics near a spectral peak at a certain time t p) indicate that the appearance of a rogue wave can be predicted in advance. If the linear approximation shows the presence of a sufficiently extensive and/or high group of waves in the near future after t p, an anomalous wave is almost necessarily formed in the nonlinear model. The interval of reliable forecasting covers several hundred wave periods, which can be quite sufficient in practice for, e.g., avoiding the meeting of a ship with a giant wave.

  20. Progression of Diabetic Capillary Occlusion: A Model

    PubMed Central

    Gens, John Scott; Glazier, James A.; Burns, Stephen A.; Gast, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    An explanatory computational model is developed of the contiguous areas of retinal capillary loss which play a large role in diabetic maculapathy and diabetic retinal neovascularization. Strictly random leukocyte mediated capillary occlusion cannot explain the occurrence of large contiguous areas of retinal ischemia. Therefore occlusion of an individual capillary must increase the probability of occlusion of surrounding capillaries. A retinal perifoveal vascular sector as well as a peripheral retinal capillary network and a deleted hexagonal capillary network are modelled using Compucell3D. The perifoveal modelling produces a pattern of spreading capillary loss with associated macular edema. In the peripheral network, spreading ischemia results from the progressive loss of the ladder capillaries which connect peripheral arterioles and venules. System blood flow was elevated in the macular model before a later reduction in flow in cases with progression of capillary occlusions. Simulations differing only in initial vascular network structures but with identical dynamics for oxygen, growth factors and vascular occlusions, replicate key clinical observations of ischemia and macular edema in the posterior pole and ischemia in the retinal periphery. The simulation results also seem consistent with quantitative data on macular blood flow and qualitative data on venous oxygenation. One computational model applied to distinct capillary networks in different retinal regions yielded results comparable to clinical observations in those regions. PMID:27300722

  1. Fluid Delivery System For Capillary Electrophoretic Applications.

    DOEpatents

    Li, Qingbo; Liu, Changsheng; Kane, Thomas E.; Kernan, John R.; Sonnenschein, Bernard; Sharer, Michael V.

    2002-04-23

    An automated electrophoretic system is disclosed. The system employs a capillary cartridge having a plurality of capillary tubes. The cartridge has a first array of capillary ends projecting from one side of a plate. The first array of capillary ends are spaced apart in substantially the same manner as the wells of a microtitre tray of standard size. This allows one to simultaneously perform capillary electrophoresis on samples present in each of the wells of the tray. The system includes a stacked, dual carrousel arrangement to eliminate cross-contamination resulting from reuse of the same buffer tray on consecutive executions from electrophoresis. The system also has a gel delivery module containing a gel syringe/a stepper motor or a high pressure chamber with a pump to quickly and uniformly deliver gel through the capillary tubes. The system further includes a multi-wavelength beam generator to generate a laser beam which produces a beam with a wide range of wavelengths. An off-line capillary reconditioner thoroughly cleans a capillary cartridge to enable simultaneous execution of electrophoresis with another capillary cartridge. The streamlined nature of the off-line capillary reconditioner offers the advantage of increased system throughput with a minimal increase in system cost.

  2. Quantifying the cleanliness of glass capillaries.

    PubMed

    Bowman, C L

    1998-01-01

    I used capillary rise methods to investigate the lumenal surface properties of quartz (fused silica, Amersil T-08), borosilicate (Corning 7800), and high-lead glass (Corning 0010) capillaries commonly used to make patch pipets. I calculated the capillary rise and contact angle for water and methanol from weight measurements. The capillary rise was compared with the theoretical maximum value calculated by assuming each fluid perfectly wetted the lumenal surface of the glass (i.e., zero contact angle, which reflects the absence of surface contamination). For borosilicate, high-lead, and quartz capillaries, the rise for water was substantially less than the theoretical maximum rise. Exposure of the borosilicate, lead, and quartz capillaries to several cleaning methods resulted in substantially better--but not perfect--agreement between the theoretical maximum rise and calculated capillary rise. By contrast, the capillary rise for methanol was almost identical in untreated and cleaned capillaries, but less than its theoretical maximum rise. The residual discrepancy between the observed and theoretical rise for water could not be improved on by trying a variety of cleaning procedures, but some cleaning methods were superior to others. The water solubility of the surface contaminants, deduced from the effectiveness of repeated rinsing, was different for each of the three types of capillaries examined: Corning 7800 > quartz > Corning 0010. A surface film was also detected in quatz tubing with an internal filament. I conclude that these borosilicate, quartz, and high-lead glass capillaries have a film on the lumenal surface, which can be removed using appropriate cleaning methods. The surface contaminants may be unique to each type of capillary and may also be hydrophobic. Two simple methods are presented to quantitate the cleanliness of glass capillary tubing commonly used to make pipets for studies of biological membranes. It is not known if the surface film is of

  3. Superposed nonlinear waves in coherently coupled Bose-Einstein condensates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babu Mareeswaran, R.; Kanna, T.

    2016-09-01

    We study the dynamics of superposed nonlinear waves in coherently coupled Gross-Pitaevskii (CCGP) equations with constant (autonomous system) and time varying (non-autonomous system) nonlinearity coefficients. By employing a linear transformation, the autonomous CCGP system is converted into two separate scalar nonlinear Schrödinger equations and we show that linear superposition of different nonlinear wave solutions of these scalar equations results into several kinds of nonlinear coherent structures namely, coexisting rogue wave-Ma breather, Akhmediev-Ma breathers, collision and bound states of Ma breathers and solitons. Next, the non-autonomous CCGP system is converted into an autonomous CCGP system with a similarity transformation. We show an interesting possibility of soliton compression and appearance of creeping solitons for kink-like and periodically modulated nonlinearity coefficient.

  4. Capillary Phenomena at Nanoscales: Electrowetting and Capillary Adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robbins, Mark

    2011-11-01

    Theories of capillary phenomena have traditionally been based on continuum approximations that break down as dimensions shrink to nanometer scales. Molecular simulations are used to test the limits of continuum theory in electrowetting on dielectric (EWOD) and capillary adhesion between solids. In EWOD, a fluid drop is separated from an electrode by a dielectric. Increasing the voltage V between drop and electrode, decreases the contact angle θ, allowing the droplet to be manipulated. Simulations of nanoscale drops show the same behavior as experiments on millimeter drops. The contact angle follows the continuum Young-Lippmann equation (YLE) at low voltages and then saturates. The saturation mechanism has been difficult to identify in experiments. Simulations show that charged molecules are pulled from the drop by large electrostatic forces near the contact line. Saturation can be delayed by increasing molecular binding, lowering temperature or increasing dielectric constant. A local force balance equation is derived that agrees with the YLE below saturation and remains valid after saturation. Simulations of capillary adhesion examined the force between a spherical tip of radius R and a flat substrate. The shape of the meniscus agrees remarkably well with continuum theory down to nanometer separations, as does the adhesive force from interfacial tension. However, the total force may deviate by factors of two or have the opposite sign. While the component of the pressure along the substrate agrees with the Laplace pressure from continuum theory, the out-of âplane component does not. There may also be significant force oscillations associated with layering near the solids. The elastic response of the solid has little affect on adhesive forces. This material is based upon work supported by National Science Foundation Grant No. CMS-0103408.

  5. Capillary pumped loop body heat exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, Theodore D. (Inventor); Wren, deceased, Paul (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A capillary pumped loop for transferring heat from one body part to another body part, the capillary pumped loop comprising a capillary evaporator for vaporizing a liquid refrigerant by absorbing heat from a warm body part, a condenser for turning a vaporized refrigerant into a liquid by transferring heat from the vaporized liquid to a cool body part, a first tube section connecting an output port of the capillary evaporator to an input of the condenser, and a second tube section connecting an output of the condenser to an input port of the capillary evaporator. A wick may be provided within the condenser. A pump may be provided between the second tube section and the input port of the capillary evaporator. Additionally, an esternal heat source or heat sink may be utilized.

  6. DNA Sequencing Using capillary Electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Barry Karger

    2011-05-09

    The overall goal of this program was to develop capillary electrophoresis as the tool to be used to sequence for the first time the Human Genome. Our program was part of the Human Genome Project. In this work, we were highly successful and the replaceable polymer we developed, linear polyacrylamide, was used by the DOE sequencing lab in California to sequence a significant portion of the human genome using the MegaBase multiple capillary array electrophoresis instrument. In this final report, we summarize our efforts and success. We began our work by separating by capillary electrophoresis double strand oligonucleotides using cross-linked polyacrylamide gels in fused silica capillaries. This work showed the potential of the methodology. However, preparation of such cross-linked gel capillaries was difficult with poor reproducibility, and even more important, the columns were not very stable. We improved stability by using non-cross linked linear polyacrylamide. Here, the entangled linear chains could move when osmotic pressure (e.g. sample injection) was imposed on the polymer matrix. This relaxation of the polymer dissipated the stress in the column. Our next advance was to use significantly lower concentrations of the linear polyacrylamide that the polymer could be automatically blown out after each run and replaced with fresh linear polymer solution. In this way, a new column was available for each analytical run. Finally, while testing many linear polymers, we selected linear polyacrylamide as the best matrix as it was the most hydrophilic polymer available. Under our DOE program, we demonstrated initially the success of the linear polyacrylamide to separate double strand DNA. We note that the method is used even today to assay purity of double stranded DNA fragments. Our focus, of course, was on the separation of single stranded DNA for sequencing purposes. In one paper, we demonstrated the success of our approach in sequencing up to 500 bases. Other

  7. Measurement of Liquid Viscosities in Tapered or Parabolic Capillaries.

    PubMed

    Ershov; Zorin; Starov

    1999-08-01

    The possibility of using tapered or parabolic capillaries for measurement of liquid viscosities is investigated both experimentally and theoretically. It is demonstrated that even small deviations in capillary radius from a constant value may substantially affect measurement results. Equations are derived which allow correct analysis of the measurement results in tapered or parabolic capillaries. The following cases are analyzed: a water imbibition into a tapered or parabolic capillary and displacement of one liquid by another immiscible liquid in tapered or parabolic capillaries. Two possibilities are considered: (a) the narrow end of the capillary as capillary inlet and (b) the wide end of the capillary as capillary inlet. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  8. Transmission of slow highly charged ions through glass capillaries: Role of the capillary shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, C. L.; Simon, M.; Ikeda, T.; Guillous, S.; Iskandar, W.; Méry, A.; Rangama, J.; Lebius, H.; Benyagoub, A.; Grygiel, C.; Müller, A.; Döbeli, M.; Tanis, J. A.; Cassimi, A.

    2013-11-01

    Comparison of the transmission of 27-keV Ar9+ ions through insulating funnel- and conical-shaped glass capillaries of outlet diameters of ˜22 μm is reported. Beam intensities of 1, 5, and 10 pA were injected into both capillaries. Transmission at the untilted angle of 0° was measured as well as at a tilt angle of ˜0.5° for the funnel capillary and a tilt angle of ˜1.1° for the conical capillary. For the funnel capillary, blocking of transmission was observed, whereas, the transmission was continuous for the conical capillary. These measurements suggest that conical-shaped capillaries have transport properties that are different than funnel-shaped capillaries for slow highly charged ions.

  9. Malpighi and the discovery of capillaries.

    PubMed

    Pearce, J M S

    2007-01-01

    Leonardo da Vinci clearly observed and described capillaries. Using the microscope, Marcello Malpighi examined the brain and major organs to demonstrate their finer anatomical features. This led to his discovery in 1661, of capillaries that proved fundamental to our understanding of the vascular system in the brain and cord. He hypothesized that capillaries were the connection between arteries and veins that allowed blood to flow back to the heart in the circulation of the blood, as first asserted by William Harvey.

  10. Analysis of Small Ions with Capillary Electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Aulakh, Jatinder Singh; Kaur, Ramandeep; Malik, Ashok Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Small inorganic ions are easily separated through capillary electrophoresis because they have a high charge-to-mass ratio and suffer little from some of the undesired phenomenon affecting higher molecular weight species like adsorption to the capillary wall, decomposition, and precipitation. This chapter is focused on the analysis of small ions other than metal ions using capillary electrophoresis. Methods are described for the determination of ions of nitrogen, phosphorus, sulfur, fluorine, chlorine, bromine, and iodine. PMID:27645739

  11. The liberal state and the rogue agency: FDA’s regulation of drugs for mood disorders, 1950s–1970s☆

    PubMed Central

    Shorter, Edward

    2013-01-01

    The theory of the liberal state does not generally contemplate the possibility that regulatory agencies will turn into “rogues,” regulating against the interests of their clients and, indeed, the public interest. In the years between circa 1955 and 1975 this seems to have happened to one of the prime regulatory agencies of the US federal government: the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Intent upon transforming itself from a traditional “cop” agency to a regulatory giant, the FDA campaigned systematically to bring down some safe and effective drugs. This article concentrates on hearings in the area of psychopharmacology regarding several antianxiety drugs, namely meprobamate (Miltown), chlordiazepoxide (Librium) and diazepam (Valium). In addition, from 1967 to 1973 this regulatory vengefulness occurred on a broad scale in the Drug Efficacy Study Implementation (DESI), an administrative exercise that removed from the market almost half of the psychopharmacopoeia. The article explores possible bureaucratic motives for these actions. PMID:18343498

  12. Transient studies of capillary-induced flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reagan, M. K.; Bowman, W. J.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents the numerical and experimental results of a study performed on the transient rise of fluid in a capillary tube. The capillary tube problem provides an excellent mechanism from which to launch an investigation into the transient flow of a fluid in a porous wick structure where capillary forces must balance both adverse gravitational effects and frictional losses. For the study, a capillary tube, initially charged with a small volume of water, was lowered into a pool of water. The behavior of the column of fluid during the transient that followed as more water entered the tube from the pool was both numerically and experimentally studied.

  13. Time reversal of water waves.

    PubMed

    Przadka, A; Feat, S; Petitjeans, P; Pagneux, V; Maurel, A; Fink, M

    2012-08-10

    We present time reversal experiments demonstrating refocusing of gravity-capillary waves in a water tank cavity. Owing to the reverberating effect of the cavity, only a few channels are sufficient to reconstruct the surface wave at the point source, even if the absorption is not negligible. Space-time-resolved measurements of the waves during the refocusing allow us to quantitatively demonstrate that the quality of the refocusing increases linearly with the number of reemitting channels. Numerical simulations corresponding to water waves at larger scales, with negligible damping, indicate the possibility of very high quality refocusing.

  14. Ocean dynamics studies. [of current-wave interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Both the theoretical and experimental investigations into current-wave interactions are discussed. The following three problems were studied: (1) the dispersive relation of a random gravity-capillary wave field; (2) the changes of the statistical properties of surface waves under the influence of currents; and (3) the interaction of capillary-gravity with the nonuniform currents. Wave current interaction was measured and the feasibility of using such measurements for remote sensing of surface currents was considered. A laser probe was developed to measure the surface statistics, and the possibility of using current-wave interaction as a means of current measurement was demonstrated.

  15. Enantiomer Separations by Capillary Electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Scriba, Gerhard K E; Harnisch, Henrik; Zhu, Qingfu

    2016-01-01

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) is a versatile and flexible technique for analytical enantioseparations. This is due to the large variety of chiral selectors as well as the different operation modes including electrokinetic chromatography, micellar electrokinetic chromatography, and microemulsion electrokinetic chromatography. The chiral selector, which is added to the background electrolyte, represents a pseudostationary phase with its own electrophoretic mobility allowing a variety of different separation protocols. The present chapter briefly addresses the basic fundamentals of CE enantioseparations as well as the most frequently applied chiral selectors and separation modes. The practical example illustrates the separation of the enantiomers of a positively charged analyte using native and charged cyclodextrin derivatives as chiral selectors. PMID:27645742

  16. Capillary pumped loop application guide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cullimore, Brent A.

    Capillary pumped loops (CPLs) have undergone extensive development since the late 1970's, and represent a maturing technology that is beginning to appear in spacecraft designs. Perhaps because most CPL literature is intended for CPL and heat pipe dedvelopers, or perhaps because of the myriad of component design and layout options available, many thermal control designers are either unfamiliar with the capabilities offered by CPLs, or are confused about their limitations. This survey paper is targeted toward thermal control designers who must decide when and where to use CPLs, or having chosen a CPL solution, must deal with system-level integration and test issues.

  17. Capillary surfaces in exotic containers

    SciTech Connect

    Concus, P. ); Finn, R. . Dept. of Mathematics)

    1991-07-01

    A survey is presented of results to date for capillary surfaces in exotic'' containers. These containers have the property that each one admits a continuum of distinct equilibrium free surfaces, all bounding with the container walls the same volume of fluid, making the same contact angle at the trip interface curve, and having identical mechanical energies. The containers can be so designed that they are themselves axially symmetric but that the fluid configurations of minimizing energy cannot be axially symmetric. 9 refs., 2 figs.

  18. Capillary rafts and their destabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Protiere, Suzie; Abkarian, Manouk; Aristoff, Jeffrey; Stone, Howard

    2010-11-01

    Small objects trapped at an interface are very common in Nature (insects walking on water, ant rafts, bubbles or pollen at the water-air interface, membranes...) and are found in many multiphase industrial processes. The study of such particle-laden interfaces is therefore of practical as well as fundamental importance. Here we report experiments on the self-assembly of spherical particles into capillary rafts at an oil-water interface and elucidate how such rafts sink. We characterize different types of sinking behavior and show that it is possible to obtain "armored droplets," whereby the sinking oil is encapsulated within a shell of particles.

  19. High pressure pulsed capillary viscometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. L.; Walowitt, J. A.; Pan, C. H. T.

    1972-01-01

    An analytical and test program was conducted in order to establish the feasibility of a multichamber pulsed-capillary viscometer. The initial design incorporated a piston, ram, and seals which produced measured pulses up to 30,000 psi in the closed chamber system. Pressure pulses from one to ten milliseconds were investigated in a system volume of 1 cuin. Four test fluids: a MIL-L-7808, a 5P4E polyphenyl ether, a MIL-L-23699A, and a synthetic hydrocarbon were examined in the test pressure assembly. The pressure-viscosity coefficient and viscosity delay time were determined for the MIL-L-7808 lubricant tested.

  20. Capillary electrophoresis in metallodrug development.

    PubMed

    Holtkamp, Hannah; Hartinger, Christian G

    2015-09-01

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) is a separation method based on differential migration of analytes in electric fields. The compatibility with purely aqueous separation media makes it a versatile tool in metallodrug research. Many metallodrugs undergo ligand exchange reactions that can easily be followed with this method and the information gained can even be improved by coupling the CE to advanced detectors, such as mass spectrometers. This gives the method high potential to facilitate the development of metallodrugs, especially when combined with innovative method development and experimental design. PMID:26547417

  1. Riccati parameterized self-similar waves in two-dimensional graded-index waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar De, Kanchan; Goyal, Amit; Raju, Thokala Soloman; Kumar, C. N.; Panigrahi, Prasanta K.

    2015-04-01

    An analytical method based on gauge-similarity transformation technique has been employed for mapping a (2+1)- dimensional variable coefficient coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations (vc-CNLSE) with dispersion, nonlinearity and gain to standard NLSE. Under certain functional relations we construct a large family of self-similar waves in the form of bright similaritons, Akhmediev breathers and rogue waves. We report the effect of dispersion on the intensity of the solitary waves. Further, we illustrate the procedure to amplify the intensity of self-similar waves using isospectral Hamiltonian approach. This approach provides an efficient mechanism to generate analytically a wide class of tapering profiles and widths by exploiting the Riccati parameter. Equivalently, it enables one to control efficiently the self-similar wave structures and hence their evolution.

  2. Experimental demonstration of wavelength domain rogue-free ONU based on wavelength-pairing for TDM/WDM optical access networks.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jie Hyun; Park, Heuk; Kang, Sae-Kyoung; Lee, Joon Ki; Chung, Hwan Seok

    2015-11-30

    In this study, we propose and experimentally demonstrate a wavelength domain rogue-free ONU based on wavelength-pairing of downstream and upstream signals for time/wavelength division-multiplexed optical access networks. The wavelength-pairing tunable filter is aligned to the upstream wavelength channel by aligning it to one of the downstream wavelength channels. Wavelength-pairing is implemented with a compact and cyclic Si-AWG integrated with a Ge-PD. The pairing filter covered four 100 GHz-spaced wavelength channels. The feasibility of the wavelength domain rogue-free operation is investigated by emulating malfunction of the misaligned laser. The wavelength-pairing tunable filter based on the Si-AWG blocks the upstream signal in the non-assigned wavelength channel before data collision with other ONUs.

  3. Evaluation of capillary reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cahill, J. E.; Halase, J. F.; South, W. K.; Stoffer, L. J.

    1985-01-01

    Anti-icing of the inlet of jet engines is generally performed with high pressure heated air that is directed forward from the compressor through a series of pipes to various manifolds located near the structures to be anti-iced. From these manifolds, the air is directed to all flowpath surfaces that may be susceptible to ice formation. There the anti-icing function may be performed by either heat conduction or film heating. Unfortunately, the prospect of utilizing lighweight, high strength composites for inlet structures of jet engines has been frustrated by the low transverse thermal conductivity of such materials. It was the objective of this program to develop an advanced materials and design concept for anti-icing composite structures. The concept that was evaluated used capillary glass tubes embedded on the surface of a composite structure with heated air ducted through the tubes. An analytical computer program was developed to predict the anti-icing performance of such tubes and a test program was conducted to demonstrate actual performance of this system. Test data and analytical code results were in excellent agreement. Both indicate feasibility of using capillary tubes for surface heating as a means for composite engine structures to combat ice accumulation.

  4. Cryogenic Capillary Screen Heat Entrapment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolshinskiy, L.G.; Hastings, L.J.; Stathman, G.

    2007-01-01

    Cryogenic liquid acquisition devices (LADs) for space-based propulsion interface directly with the feed system, which can be a significant heat leak source. Further, the accumulation of thermal energy within LAD channels can lead to the loss of sub-cooled propellant conditions and result in feed system cavitation during propellant outflow. Therefore, the fundamental question addressed by this program was: "To what degree is natural convection in a cryogenic liquid constrained by the capillary screen meshes envisioned for LADs.?"Testing was first conducted with water as the test fluid, followed by LN2 tests. In either case, the basic experimental approach was to heat the bottom of a cylindrical column of test fluid to establish stratification patterns measured by temperature sensors located above and below a horizontal screen barrier position. Experimentation was performed without barriers, with screens, and with a solid barrier. The two screen meshes tested were those typically used by LAD designers, "200x1400" and "325x2300", both with Twill Dutch Weave. Upon consideration of both the water and LN2 data it was concluded that heat transfer across the screen meshes was dependent upon barrier thermal conductivity and that the capillary screen meshes were impervious to natural convection currents.

  5. Nonaqueous Capillary Electrophoresis Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Klampfl, Christian W; Himmelsbach, Markus

    2016-01-01

    The term nonaqueous capillary electrophoresis (NACE) commonly refers to capillary electrophoresis with purely nonaqueous background electrolytes (BGE). Main advantages of NACE are the possibility to analyze substances with very low solubility in aqueous media as well as separation selectivity that can be quite different in organic solvents (compared to water)-a property that can be employed for manipulation of separation selectivities. Mass spectrometry (MS) has become more and more popular as a detector in CE a fact that applies also for NACE. In the present chapter, the development of NACE-MS since 2004 is reviewed. Relevant parameters like composition of BGE and its influence on separation and detection in NACE as well as sheath liquid for NACE-MS are discussed. Finally, an overview of the papers published in the field of NACE-MS between 2004 and 2014 is given. Applications are grouped according to the field (analysis of natural products, biomedical analysis, food analysis, analysis of industrial products, and fundamental investigations). PMID:27645734

  6. Capillary Rise in Porous Media.

    PubMed

    Lago, Marcelo; Araujo, Mariela

    2001-02-01

    Capillary rise experiments were performed in columns filled with glass beads and Berea sandstones, using visual methods to register the advance of the water front. For the glass bead filled columns, early time data are well fitted by the Washburn equation. However, in the experiments, the advancing front exceeded the predicted equilibrium height. For large times, an algebraic behavior of the velocity of the front is observed (T. Delker et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 76, 2902 (1996)). A model for studying the capillary pressure evolution in a regular assembly of spheres is proposed and developed. It is based on a quasi-static advance of the meniscus with a piston-like motion and allows us to estimate the hydraulic equilibrium height, with values very close to those obtained by fitting early time data to a Washburn equation. The change of regime is explained as a transition in the mechanism of advance of the meniscus. On the other hand, only the Washburn regime was observed for the sandstones. The front velocity was fitted to an algebraical form with an exponent close to 0.5, a value expected from the asymptotic limit of the Washburn equation. Copyright 2001 Academic Press. PMID:11161488

  7. Atomic Force Controlled Capillary Electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Aaron; Yeshua, Talia; Palchan, Mila; Lovsky, Yulia; Taha, Hesham

    2010-03-01

    Lithography based on scanning probe microscopic techniques has considerable potential for accurate & localized deposition of material on the nanometer scale. Controlled deposition of metallic features with high purity and spatial accuracy is of great interest for circuit edit applications in the semiconductor industry, for plasmonics & nanophotonics and for basic research in surface enhanced Raman scattering & nanobiophysics. Within the context of metal deposition we will review the development of fountain pen nanochemistry and its most recent emulation Atomic Force Controlled Capillary Electrophoresis (ACCE). Using this latter development we will demonstrate achievement of unprecedented control of nanoparticle deposition using a three-electrode geometry. Three electrodes are attached: one on the outside of a metal coated glass probe, one on the inside of a hollow probe in a solution containing Au nanoparticles in the capillary, and a third on the surface where the writing takes place. The three electrodes provide electrical pulses for accurate control of deposition and retraction of the liquid from the surface overcoming the lack of control seen in both dip pen lithography & fountain pen nanochemistry when the tip contacts the surface. With this development, we demonstrate depositing a single 1.3 nm Au nanoparticle onto surfaces such as semiconductors.

  8. The nonlinear Schrödinger equation and the propagation of weakly nonlinear waves in optical fibers and on the water surface

    SciTech Connect

    Chabchoub, A.; Kibler, B.; Finot, C.; Millot, G.; Onorato, M.; Dudley, J.M.; Babanin, A.V.

    2015-10-15

    The dynamics of waves in weakly nonlinear dispersive media can be described by the nonlinear Schrödinger equation (NLSE). An important feature of the equation is that it can be derived in a number of different physical contexts; therefore, analogies between different fields, such as for example fiber optics, water waves, plasma waves and Bose–Einstein condensates, can be established. Here, we investigate the similarities between wave propagation in optical Kerr media and water waves. In particular, we discuss the modulation instability (MI) in both media. In analogy to the water wave problem, we derive for Kerr-media the Benjamin–Feir index, i.e. a nondimensional parameter related to the probability of formation of rogue waves in incoherent wave trains.

  9. Sheathless interface for coupling capillary electrophoresis with mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chenchen; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D.

    2014-06-17

    A sheathless interface for coupling capillary electrophoresis (CE) with mass spectrometry is disclosed. The sheathless interface includes a separation capillary for performing CE separation and an emitter capillary for electrospray ionization. A portion of the emitter capillary is porous or, alternatively, is coated to form an electrically conductive surface. A section of the emitter capillary is disposed within the separation capillary, forming a joint. A metal tube, containing a conductive liquid, encloses the joint.

  10. Diffused waveguiding capillary tube with distributed feedback for a gas laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elachi, C. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    For use in a waveguide gas laser, a capillary tube of glass or ceramic has an inner surface defining a longitudinal capillary opening through which the laser gas flows. At least a portion of the inner surface is corrugated with corrugations or channels with a periodicity Lambda where Lambda = 1/2 Lambda, Lambda being the laser gas wavelength. The tube includes a diffused region extending outwardly from the opening. The diffused region of a depth d on the order of 1 Lambda to 3 Lambda acts as a waveguide for the waves, with the corrugations producing distributed feedback. The evanescent component of the waves traveling in the diffused region interact with the laser gas in the opening, gaining energy, and thereby amplifying the waves travelling in the diffused region, which exit the diffused region, surrounding the opening, as a beam of wavelength Lambda.

  11. Enzymophoresis of nucleic acids by tandem capillary enzyme reactor-capillary zone electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Nashabeh, W; el Rassi, Z

    1992-04-10

    Enzymophoresis with coupled heterogeneous capillary enzyme reactor-capillary zone electrophoresis was developed and evaluated in the area of nucleic acids. Ribonuclease T1, hexokinase and adenosine deaminase were successfully immobilized on the inner walls of short fused-silica capillaries through glutaraldehyde attachment. These open-tubular capillary enzyme reactors were quite stable for a prolonged period of use under operation conditions normally used in capillary zone electrophoresis. The capillary enzyme reactors coupled in series with capillary zone electrophoresis served as peak locator on the electropherogram, improved the system selectivity, and facilitated the quantitative determination of the analytes with good accuracy. Also, they allowed the on-line digestion and mapping of minute amounts of transfer ribonucleic acids, and the simultaneous synthesis and separation of nanogram quantities of oligonucleotides.

  12. Intracranial capillary hemangioma in an elderly patient

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Ai; Nakagawa, Ichiro; Matsuda, Ryosuke; Nishimura, Fumihiko; Motoyama, Yasushi; Park, Young-Su; Nakamura, Mitsutoshi; Nakase, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Background: Capillary hemangiomas are neoplasms involving skin and soft tissue in infants. These lesions rarely involved an intracranial space and reported age distribution ranges from infancy to middle age. We report an extremely rare case of rapidly rising intracranial capillary hemangioma in an elderly woman. Case Description: The 82-year-old woman presented with vomiting, reduced level of consciousness, and worsening mental state. Computed tomography showed a contrast-enhanced extra-axial lesion in the left frontal operculum, although no intracranial mass lesion was identifiable from magnetic resonance imaging taken 2 years earlier. Complete surgical excision was performed and histopathological examination diagnosed benign capillary hemangioma consisting of a variety of dilated capillary blood vessels lined by endothelial cells. Conclusion: This is the first description of rapid growth of an intracranial capillary hemangioma in an elderly woman. These lesions are exceedingly rare in the elderly population, but still show the capacity for rapid growth. Complete excision would prevent further recurrence. PMID:26664868

  13. Modeling capillary barriers in unsaturated fractured rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yu-Shu; Zhang, W.; Pan, Lehua; Hinds, Jennifer; Bodvarsson, G. S.

    2002-11-01

    This work presents a series of numerical modeling studies that investigate the hydrogeologic conditions required to form capillary barriers and the effect that capillary barriers have on fluid flow and tracer transport processes in the unsaturated fractured rock of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, a potential site for storing high-level radioactive waste. The modeling approach is based on a dual-continuum formulation of coupled multiphase fluid and tracer transport through fractured porous rock. The numerical modeling results showed that effective capillary barriers can develop where both matrix and fracture capillary gradients tend to move water upward. Under the current hydrogeologic conceptualization of Yucca Mountain, strong capillary barrier effects exist for diverting a significant amount of moisture flow through the relatively shallow Paintbrush nonwelded unit, with major faults observed at the site serving as major downward pathways for laterally diverted percolation fluxes. In addition, we used observed field liquid saturation and goechemical isotopic data to check model results and found consistent agreement.

  14. Copolymers For Capillary Gel Electrophoresis

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Changsheng; Li, Qingbo

    2005-08-09

    This invention relates to an electrophoresis separation medium having a gel matrix of at least one random, linear copolymer comprising a primary comonomer and at least one secondary comonomer, wherein the comonomers are randomly distributed along the copolymer chain. The primary comonomer is an acrylamide or an acrylamide derivative that provides the primary physical, chemical, and sieving properties of the gel matrix. The at least one secondary comonomer imparts an inherent physical, chemical, or sieving property to the copolymer chain. The primary and secondary comonomers are present in a ratio sufficient to induce desired properties that optimize electrophoresis performance. The invention also relates to a method of separating a mixture of biological molecules using this gel matrix, a method of preparing the novel electrophoresis separation medium, and a capillary tube filled with the electrophoresis separation medium.

  15. Stability limits of unsteady open capillary channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grah, Aleksander; Haake, Dennis; Rosendahl, Uwe; Klatte, J.?Rg; Dreyer, Michael E.

    This paper is concerned with steady and unsteady flow rate limitations in open capillary channels under low-gravity conditions. Capillary channels are widely used in Space technology for liquid transportation and positioning, e.g. in fuel tanks and life support systems. The channel observed in this work consists of two parallel plates bounded by free liquid surfaces along the open sides. The capillary forces of the free surfaces prevent leaking of the liquid and gas ingestion into the flow.In the case of steady stable flow the capillary pressure balances the differential pressure between the liquid and the surrounding constant-pressure gas phase. Increasing the flow rate in small steps causes a decrease of the liquid pressure. A maximum steady flow rate is achieved when the flow rate exceeds a certain limit leading to a collapse of the free surfaces due to the choking effect. In the case of unsteady flow additional dynamic effects take place due to flow rate transition and liquid acceleration. The maximum flow rate is smaller than in the case of steady flow. On the other hand, the choking effect does not necessarily cause surface collapse and stable temporarily choked flow is possible under certain circumstances.To determine the limiting volumetric flow rate and stable flow dynamic properties, a new stability theory for both steady and unsteady flow is introduced. Subcritical and supercritical (choked) flow regimes are defined. Stability criteria are formulated for each flow type. The steady (subcritical) criterion corresponds to the speed index defined by the limiting longitudinal small-amplitude wave speed, similar to the Mach number. The unsteady (supercritical) criterion for choked flow is defined by a new characteristic number, the dynamic index. It is based on pressure balances and reaches unity at the stability limit.The unsteady model based on the Bernoulli equation and the mass balance equation is solved numerically for perfectly wetting incompressible

  16. Dirt Cheap and Without Prescription: How Susceptible are Young US Consumers to Purchasing Drugs From Rogue Internet Pharmacies?

    PubMed Central

    Brookins-Fisher, Jodi; O´Boyle, Irene; Vibbert, Danielle; Erofeev, Dmitry; Fulton, Lawrence

    2010-01-01

    Background Websites of many rogue sellers of medications are accessible through links in email spam messages or via web search engines. This study examined how well students enrolled in a U.S. higher education institution could identify clearly unsafe pharmacies. Objective The aim is to estimate these health consumers´ vulnerability to fraud by illegitimate Internet pharmacies. Methods Two Internet pharmacy websites, created specifically for this study, displayed multiple untrustworthy features modeled after five actual Internet drug sellers which the authors considered to be potentially dangerous to consumers. The websites had none of the safe pharmacy signs and nearly all of the danger signs specified in the Food and Drug Administration´s (FDA´s) guide to consumers. Participants were told that a neighborhood pharmacy charged US$165 for a one-month supply of Beozine, a bogus drug to ensure no pre-existing knowledge. After checking its price at two Internet pharmacies—$37.99 in pharmacy A and $57.60 in pharmacy B—the respondents were asked to indicate if each seller was a good place to buy the drug. Responses came from 1,914 undergraduate students who completed an online eHealth literacy assessment in 2005-2008. Participation rate was 78%. Results In response to "On a scale from 0-10, how good is this pharmacy as a place for buying Beozine?" many respondents gave favorable ratings. Specifically, 50% of students who reviewed pharmacy A and 37% of students who reviewed pharmacy B chose a rating above the scale midpoint. When explaining a low drug cost, these raters related it to low operation costs, ad revenue, pressure to lower costs due to comparison shopping, and/or high sales volume. Those who said that pharmacy A or B was "a very bad place" for purchasing the drug (25%), as defined by a score of 1 or less, related low drug cost to lack of regulation, low drug quality, and/or customer information sales. About 16% of students thought that people should be

  17. Towards new applications using capillary waveguides

    PubMed Central

    Stasio, Nicolino; Shibukawa, Atsushi; Papadopoulos, Ioannis N.; Farahi, Salma; Simandoux, Olivier; Huignard, Jean-Pierre; Bossy, Emmanuel; Moser, Christophe; Psaltis, Demetri

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate the enhancement of the sensing capabilities of glass capillaries. We exploit their properties as optical and acoustic waveguides to transform them potentially into high resolution minimally invasive endoscopic devices. We show two possible applications of silica capillary waveguides demonstrating fluorescence and optical-resolution photoacoustic imaging using a single 330 μm-thick silica capillary. A nanosecond pulsed laser is focused and scanned in front of a capillary by digital phase conjugation through the silica annular ring of the capillary, used as an optical waveguide. We demonstrate optical-resolution photoacoustic images of a 30 μm-thick nylon thread using the water-filled core of the same capillary as an acoustic waveguide, resulting in a fully passive endoscopic device. Moreover, fluorescence images of 1.5 μm beads are obtained collecting the fluorescence signal through the optical waveguide. This kind of silica-capillary waveguide together with wavefront shaping techniques such as digital phase conjugation, paves the way to minimally invasive multi-modal endoscopy. PMID:26713182

  18. Hollow vortices, capillary water waves and double quadrature domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowdy, Darren G.; Roenby, Johan

    2014-06-01

    Two new classes of analytical solutions for hollow vortex equilibria are presented. One class involves a central hollow vortex, comprising a constant pressure region having non-zero circulation, surrounded by an n-polygonal array of point vortices with n\\geqslant 2. The solutions generalize the non-rotating polygonal point vortex configurations of Morikawa and Swenson (1971 Phys. Fluids 14 1058-73) to the case where the point vortex at the centre of the polygon is replaced by a hollow vortex. The results of Morikawa and Swenson would suggest that all equilibria for n\

  19. Capillary waves on an ɛ-dimensional interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forster, Dieter; Gabriunas, Aldona

    1981-05-01

    Calculations on the field-theoretic model of an interface, recently proposed by Wallace and Zia, are extended to three-loop order, in an expansion in ɛ=d-1, where d is the bulk dimension. Extended to d=2, we find a correlation-length exponent ν=1 near the critical point, in satisfying agreement with the two-dimensional Ising model. We also prove a Ward identity for the Gibbs free energy of the interface which allows a dramatic reduction of the calculational labor involved.

  20. Micromechanism linear actuator with capillary force sealing

    DOEpatents

    Sniegowski, Jeffry J.

    1997-01-01

    A class of micromachine linear actuators whose function is based on gas driven pistons in which capillary forces are used to seal the gas behind the piston. The capillary forces also increase the amount of force transmitted from the gas pressure to the piston. In a major subclass of such devices, the gas bubble is produced by thermal vaporization of a working fluid. Because of their dependence on capillary forces for sealing, such devices are only practical on the sub-mm size scale, but in that regime they produce very large force times distance (total work) values.

  1. "Getting the best sensitivity from on-capillary fluorescence detection in capillary electrophoresis" - A tutorial.

    PubMed

    Galievsky, Victor A; Stasheuski, Alexander S; Krylov, Sergey N

    2016-09-01

    Capillary electrophoresis with Laser-Induced Fluorescence (CE-LIF) detection is being applied to new analytical problems which challenge both the power of CE separation and the sensitivity of LIF detection. On-capillary LIF detection is much more practical than post-capillary detection in a sheath-flow cell. Therefore, commercial CE instruments utilize solely on-capillary CE-LIF detection with a Limit of Detection (LOD) in the nM range, while there are multiple applications of CE-LIF that require pM or lower LODs. This tutorial analyzes all aspects of on-capillary LIF detection in CE in an attempt to identify means for improving LOD of CE-LIF with on-capillary detection. We consider principles of signal enhancement and noise reduction, as well as relevant areas of fluorophore photochemistry and fluorescent microscopy. PMID:27543015

  2. Multistaged stokes injected Raman capillary waveguide amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Kurnit, Norman A.

    1980-01-01

    A multistaged Stokes injected Raman capillary waveguide amplifier for providing a high gain Stokes output signal. The amplifier uses a plurality of optically coupled capillary waveguide amplifiers and one or more regenerative amplifiers to increase Stokes gain to a level sufficient for power amplification. Power amplification is provided by a multifocused Raman gain cell or a large diameter capillary waveguide. An external source of CO.sub.2 laser radiation can be injected into each of the capillary waveguide amplifier stages to increase Raman gain. Devices for injecting external sources of CO.sub.2 radiation include: dichroic mirrors, prisms, gratings and Ge Brewster plates. Alternatively, the CO.sub.2 input radiation to the first stage can be coupled and amplified between successive stages.

  3. Capillary electrochromatography using fibers as stationary phases.

    PubMed

    Jinno, K; Watanabe, H; Saito, Y; Takeichi, T

    2001-10-01

    Fiber-packed capillary columns have been evaluated in chromatographic performance in capillary electrochromatography (CEC). The change of electroosmotic flow (EOF) velocity and selectivity using different kinds of fiber materials was examined. Although the EOF velocity among the different fiber packed columns was almost the same, retention of parabens was larger on the Kevlar-packed column than on the Zylon-packed one, and was larger on the as-span-type fiber-packed column than on the high-modulus-type packed one. Using 200 microm ID x 5 cm Kevlar packed column combined with a 100 microm ID x 20 cm precolumn capillary and a 530 microm ID x 45 cm postcolumn capillary, the separation of three parabens within 30 s was achieved. Other compounds were also separated in a few minutes by the fiber-packed CEC method.

  4. Capillary electrochromatography using fibers as stationary phases.

    PubMed

    Jinno, K; Watanabe, H; Saito, Y; Takeichi, T

    2001-10-01

    Fiber-packed capillary columns have been evaluated in chromatographic performance in capillary electrochromatography (CEC). The change of electroosmotic flow (EOF) velocity and selectivity using different kinds of fiber materials was examined. Although the EOF velocity among the different fiber packed columns was almost the same, retention of parabens was larger on the Kevlar-packed column than on the Zylon-packed one, and was larger on the as-span-type fiber-packed column than on the high-modulus-type packed one. Using 200 microm ID x 5 cm Kevlar packed column combined with a 100 microm ID x 20 cm precolumn capillary and a 530 microm ID x 45 cm postcolumn capillary, the separation of three parabens within 30 s was achieved. Other compounds were also separated in a few minutes by the fiber-packed CEC method. PMID:11669512

  5. CAPILLARY ELECTROPHORETIC BEHAVIOR OF SEVEN SULFONYLUREAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The electrophoretic behavior of bensulfuron Me, sulfometuron Me, nicosulfuron (Accent), chlorimuron Et, thifensulfuron Me (Harmony), metsulfuron Me, and chlorsulfuron was studied under capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) and micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) conditio...

  6. Capillary Flow Resistors: Local and Global Resistors.

    PubMed

    Berthier, Jean; Gosselin, David; Pham, Andrew; Delapierre, Guillaume; Belgacem, Naceur; Chaussy, Didier

    2016-01-26

    The use of capillary systems in space and biotechnology applications requires the regulation of the capillary flow velocity. It has been observed that constricted sections act as flow resistors. In this work, we also show that enlarged sections temporarily reduce the velocity of the flow. In this work, the theory of the dynamics of capillary flows passing through a constricted or an enlarged channel section is presented. It is demonstrated that the physics of a capillary flow in a channel with a constriction or an enlargement is different and that a constriction acts as a global flow resistor and an enlargement as a local flow resistor. The theoretical results are checked against experimental approaches. PMID:26704147

  7. Capillary Optics generate stronger X-rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    NASA scientist, in the Space Sciences lab at Marshall, works with capillary optics that generate more intense X-rays than conventional sources. This capability is useful in studying the structure of important proteins.

  8. Characterising Microstructured Materials Using a Capillary Rheometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, Christopher I.; See, Howard; Arabo, Emad Y. M.

    2008-07-01

    A parallel plate and capillary rheometer have been used to rheologically characterize an Australian hard wheat flour-water dough over an extensive range of shear rates (10-3-104 s-1). Torsional measurements showed that the shear viscosity of dough increased with strain to a maximum value then decreased, suggesting a breakdown of the dough structure. This was consistent with other published data on doughs. Capillary experiments revealed the shear thinning behavior of dough, which was described by a power-law model. The wall slip behavior of dough was examined, revealing a critical shear stress at which slip occurs for a 1 mm diameter capillary. The capillary data was best linked to the torsional data at low strain values (˜0.1) as expected given the nature of sampling in the two rheometers.

  9. ISS Update: Capillary Flow Experiments-2

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Kelly Humphries interviews Dr. Mark Weislogel, Principal Investigator for the Capillary Flow Experiments-2 (CFE), from the Portland State University in Oregon. The CFE i...

  10. RF Liquid Measurement Of Capillary Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poudyal, Bashudev; Mazzeo, Brian; Warnick, Karl

    2009-10-01

    Electromagnetic measurements of capillary tubes containing liquids can reveal solution properties for industrial, biological, and chemical processes. An analytical model was created for a perpendicular arrangement of SMA cables and a capillary tube. Numerical simulations in Ansoft High Frequency Structural Simulator were performed on the simple arrangement. The transmission parameters of the capillary tube were simulated between two lumped ports over a frequency range from 1 GHz to 20 GHz. Sensitivity of the transmission parameters to solution conditions were calculated for DI water and other variations of conductivity and permittivity. Experiments were performed on a capillary tube in a perpendicular arrangement using an HP 8720B Network Analyzer. The transmission parameters were measured and the resulting data was compared with the simulations. This measurement method can be adapted to different tube and solution conditions.

  11. Capillary Movement in Substrates in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bula, R. J.; Duffie, N. A.

    1996-01-01

    A more complete understanding of the dynamics of capillary flow through an unsaturated porous medium would be useful for a number of space and terrestrial applications. Knowledge of capillary migration of liquids in granular beds in microgravity would significantly enhance the development and understanding of how a matrix based nutrient delivery system for the growth of plants would function in a microgravity environment. Thus, such information is of interest from the theoretical as well as practical point of view.

  12. Thin film capillary process and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Conrad M.

    2003-11-18

    Method and system of forming microfluidic capillaries in a variety of substrate materials. A first layer of a material such as silicon dioxide is applied to a channel etched in substrate. A second, sacrificial layer of a material such as a polymer is deposited on the first layer. A third layer which may be of the same material as the first layer is placed on the second layer. The sacrificial layer is removed to form a smooth walled capillary in the substrate.

  13. Unusual intraosseous capillary hemangioma of the mandible

    PubMed Central

    Dereci, Omur; Acikalin, Mustafa Fuat; Ay, Sinan

    2015-01-01

    Intraosseous hemangioma is a benign vascular neoplasm, which is mostly seen in vertebrae, maxillofacial bones, and long bones. Intraosseous hemangioma is rarely seen on jaw bones compared to other skeletal bones and usually occurs in the cavernous form. Capillary intraosseous hemangioma of jaws is an uncommon form of intraosseous hemangioma and has not been thoroughly described so far. In this study, a case of capillary intraosseous hemangioma of the mandible was presented with relevant literature review. PMID:26430377

  14. Capillary fracture of soft gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostwick, Joshua B.; Daniels, Karen E.

    2013-10-01

    A liquid droplet resting on a soft gel substrate can deform that substrate to the point of material failure, whereby fractures develop on the gel surface that propagate outwards from the contact line in a starburst pattern. In this paper, we characterize (i) the initiation process, in which the number of arms in the starburst is controlled by the ratio of the surface tension contrast to the gel's elastic modulus, and (ii) the propagation dynamics showing that once fractures are initiated they propagate with a universal power law L∝t3/4. We develop a model for crack initiation by treating the gel as a linear elastic solid and computing the deformations within the substrate from the liquid-solid wetting forces. The elastic solution shows that both the location and the magnitude of the wetting forces are critical in providing a quantitative prediction for the number of fractures and, hence, an interpretation of the initiation of capillary fractures. This solution also reveals that the depth of the gel is an important factor in the fracture process, as it can help mitigate large surface tractions; this finding is confirmed with experiments. We then develop a model for crack propagation by considering the transport of an inviscid fluid into the fracture tip of an incompressible material and find that a simple energy-conservation argument can explain the observed material-independent power law. We compare predictions for both linear elastic and neo-Hookean solids, finding that the latter better explains the observed exponent.

  15. OCT methods for capillary velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Vivek J; Radhakrishnan, Harsha; Lo, Eng H; Mandeville, Emiri T; Jiang, James Y; Barry, Scott; Cable, Alex E

    2012-03-01

    TO DATE, TWO MAIN CATEGORIES OF OCT TECHNIQUES HAVE BEEN DESCRIBED FOR IMAGING HEMODYNAMICS: Doppler OCT and OCT angiography. Doppler OCT can measure axial velocity profiles and flow in arteries and veins, while OCT angiography can determine vascular morphology, tone, and presence or absence of red blood cell (RBC) perfusion. However, neither method can quantify RBC velocity in capillaries, where RBC flow is typically transverse to the probe beam and single-file. Here, we describe new methods that potentially address these limitations. Firstly, we describe a complex-valued OCT signal in terms of a static scattering component, dynamic scattering component, and noise. Secondly, we propose that the time scale of random fluctuations in the dynamic scattering component are related to red blood cell velocity. Analysis was performed along the slow axis of repeated B-scans to parallelize measurements. We correlate our purported velocity measurements against two-photon microscopy measurements of RBC velocity, and investigate changes during hypercapnia. Finally, we image the ischemic stroke penumbra during distal middle cerebral artery occlusion (dMCAO), where OCT velocimetry methods provide additional insight that is not afforded by either Doppler OCT or OCT angiography.

  16. Multiple capillary biochemical analyzer with barrier member

    DOEpatents

    Dovichi, Norman J.; Zhang, Jian Z.

    1996-01-01

    A multiple capillary biochemical analyzer for sequencing DNA and performing other analyses, in which a set of capillaries extends from wells in a microtiter plate into a cuvette. In the cuvette the capillaries are held on fixed closely spaced centers by passing through a sandwich construction having a pair of metal shims which squeeze between them a rubber gasket, forming a leak proof seal for an interior chamber in which the capillary ends are positioned. Sheath fluid enters the chamber and entrains filament sample streams from the capillaries. The filament sample streams, and sheath fluid, flow through aligned holes in a barrier member spaced close to the capillary ends, into a collection chamber having a lower glass window. The filament streams are illuminated above the barrier member by a laser, causing them to fluoresce. The fluorescence is viewed end-on by a CCD camera chip located below the glass window. The arrangement ensures an equal optical path length from all fluorescing spots to the CCD chip and also blocks scattered fluorescence illumination, providing more uniform results and an improved signal to noise ratio.

  17. Multiple capillary biochemical analyzer with barrier member

    DOEpatents

    Dovichi, N.J.; Zhang, J.Z.

    1996-10-22

    A multiple capillary biochemical analyzer is disclosed for sequencing DNA and performing other analyses, in which a set of capillaries extends from wells in a microtiter plate into a cuvette. In the cuvette the capillaries are held on fixed closely spaced centers by passing through a sandwich construction having a pair of metal shims which squeeze between them a rubber gasket, forming a leak proof seal for an interior chamber in which the capillary ends are positioned. Sheath fluid enters the chamber and entrains filament sample streams from the capillaries. The filament sample streams, and sheath fluid, flow through aligned holes in a barrier member spaced close to the capillary ends, into a collection chamber having a lower glass window. The filament streams are illuminated above the barrier member by a laser, causing them to fluoresce. The fluorescence is viewed end-on by a CCD camera chip located below the glass window. The arrangement ensures an equal optical path length from all fluorescing spots to the CCD chip and also blocks scattered fluorescence illumination, providing more uniform results and an improved signal-to-noise ratio. 12 figs.

  18. Cell adhesion during bullet motion in capillaries.

    PubMed

    Takeishi, Naoki; Imai, Yohsuke; Ishida, Shunichi; Omori, Toshihiro; Kamm, Roger D; Ishikawa, Takuji

    2016-08-01

    A numerical analysis is presented of cell adhesion in capillaries whose diameter is comparable to or smaller than that of the cell. In contrast to a large number of previous efforts on leukocyte and tumor cell rolling, much is still unknown about cell motion in capillaries. The solid and fluid mechanics of a cell in flow was coupled with a slip bond model of ligand-receptor interactions. When the size of a capillary was reduced, the cell always transitioned to "bullet-like" motion, with a consequent decrease in the velocity of the cell. A state diagram was obtained for various values of capillary diameter and receptor density. We found that bullet motion enables firm adhesion of a cell to the capillary wall even for a weak ligand-receptor binding. We also quantified effects of various parameters, including the dissociation rate constant, the spring constant, and the reactive compliance on the characteristics of cell motion. Our results suggest that even under the interaction between P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) and P-selectin, which is mainly responsible for leukocyte rolling, a cell is able to show firm adhesion in a small capillary. These findings may help in understanding such phenomena as leukocyte plugging and cancer metastasis.

  19. Cell adhesion during bullet motion in capillaries.

    PubMed

    Takeishi, Naoki; Imai, Yohsuke; Ishida, Shunichi; Omori, Toshihiro; Kamm, Roger D; Ishikawa, Takuji

    2016-08-01

    A numerical analysis is presented of cell adhesion in capillaries whose diameter is comparable to or smaller than that of the cell. In contrast to a large number of previous efforts on leukocyte and tumor cell rolling, much is still unknown about cell motion in capillaries. The solid and fluid mechanics of a cell in flow was coupled with a slip bond model of ligand-receptor interactions. When the size of a capillary was reduced, the cell always transitioned to "bullet-like" motion, with a consequent decrease in the velocity of the cell. A state diagram was obtained for various values of capillary diameter and receptor density. We found that bullet motion enables firm adhesion of a cell to the capillary wall even for a weak ligand-receptor binding. We also quantified effects of various parameters, including the dissociation rate constant, the spring constant, and the reactive compliance on the characteristics of cell motion. Our results suggest that even under the interaction between P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) and P-selectin, which is mainly responsible for leukocyte rolling, a cell is able to show firm adhesion in a small capillary. These findings may help in understanding such phenomena as leukocyte plugging and cancer metastasis. PMID:27261363

  20. Frequency and wavelength prediction of ultrasonic induced liquid surface waves.

    PubMed

    Mahravan, Ehsan; Naderan, Hamid; Damangir, Ebrahim

    2016-12-01

    A theoretical investigation of parametric excitation of liquid free surface by a high frequency sound wave is preformed, using potential flow theory. Pressure and velocity distributions, resembling the sound wave, are applied to the free surface of the liquid. It is found that for impinging wave two distinct capillary frequencies will be excited: One of them is the same as the frequency of the sound wave, and the other is equal to the natural frequency corresponding to a wavenumber equal to the horizontal wavenumber of the sound wave. When the wave propagates in vertical direction, mathematical formulation leads to an equation, which has resonance frequency equal to half of the excitation frequency. This can explain an important contradiction between the frequency and the wavelength of capillary waves in the two cases of normal and inclined interaction of the sound wave and the free surface of the liquid.

  1. Frequency and wavelength prediction of ultrasonic induced liquid surface waves.

    PubMed

    Mahravan, Ehsan; Naderan, Hamid; Damangir, Ebrahim

    2016-12-01

    A theoretical investigation of parametric excitation of liquid free surface by a high frequency sound wave is preformed, using potential flow theory. Pressure and velocity distributions, resembling the sound wave, are applied to the free surface of the liquid. It is found that for impinging wave two distinct capillary frequencies will be excited: One of them is the same as the frequency of the sound wave, and the other is equal to the natural frequency corresponding to a wavenumber equal to the horizontal wavenumber of the sound wave. When the wave propagates in vertical direction, mathematical formulation leads to an equation, which has resonance frequency equal to half of the excitation frequency. This can explain an important contradiction between the frequency and the wavelength of capillary waves in the two cases of normal and inclined interaction of the sound wave and the free surface of the liquid. PMID:27566141

  2. Capillary effect on water table fluctuations in unconfined aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Jun; Shen, Cheng-Ji; Xin, Pei; Song, Zhiyao; Li, Ling; Barry, D. A.; Jeng, D.-S.; Stagnitti, F.; Lockington, D. A.; Parlange, J.-Y.

    2013-05-01

    Parlange and Brutsaert (1987) derived a modified Boussinesq equation to account for the capillary effect on water table dynamics in unconfined aquifers. Barry et al. (1996) solved this equation subject to a periodic boundary condition. Their solution shows significant influence of capillarity on water table fluctuations, which evolve to finite-amplitude standing waves at the high frequency limit. Here we propose a new governing equation for the water table, which considers both horizontal and vertical flows in an unsaturated zone of finite thickness. An approximate analytical solution for periodic water table fluctuations based on the new equation was derived. In agreement with previous results, the analytical solution shows that the unsaturated zone's storage capacity permits water table fluctuations to propagate more readily than predicted by the Boussinesq equation. Furthermore, the new solution reveals a capping effect of the unsaturated zone on both the amplitude and phase of the water table fluctuations as well as the water table overheight. Due to the finite thickness of the unsaturated zone, the capillary effect on water table fluctuations is modified mainly with reduced amplitude damping and phase shift.

  3. Numerical simulation of surface waves instability on a homogeneous grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korotkevich, Alexander O.; Dyachenko, Alexander I.; Zakharov, Vladimir E.

    2016-05-01

    We performed full-scale numerical simulation of instability of weakly nonlinear waves on the surface of deep fluid. We show that the instability development leads to chaotization and formation of wave turbulence. Instability of both propagating and standing waves was studied. We separately studied pure capillary wave, that was unstable due to three-wave interactions and pure gravity waves, that were unstable due to four-wave interactions. The theoretical description of instabilities in all cases is included in the article. The numerical algorithm used in these and many other previous simulations performed by the authors is described in detail.

  4. Capillary fracture of soft gels.

    PubMed

    Bostwick, Joshua B; Daniels, Karen E

    2013-10-01

    A liquid droplet resting on a soft gel substrate can deform that substrate to the point of material failure, whereby fractures develop on the gel surface that propagate outwards from the contact line in a starburst pattern. In this paper, we characterize (i) the initiation process, in which the number of arms in the starburst is controlled by the ratio of the surface tension contrast to the gel's elastic modulus, and (ii) the propagation dynamics showing that once fractures are initiated they propagate with a universal power law L[proportional]t(3/4). We develop a model for crack initiation by treating the gel as a linear elastic solid and computing the deformations within the substrate from the liquid-solid wetting forces. The elastic solution shows that both the location and the magnitude of the wetting forces are critical in providing a quantitative prediction for the number of fractures and, hence, an interpretation of the initiation of capillary fractures. This solution also reveals that the depth of the gel is an important factor in the fracture process, as it can help mitigate large surface tractions; this finding is confirmed with experiments. We then develop a model for crack propagation by considering the transport of an inviscid fluid into the fracture tip of an incompressible material and find that a simple energy-conservation argument can explain the observed material-independent power law. We compare predictions for both linear elastic and neo-Hookean solids, finding that the latter better explains the observed exponent.

  5. Microfluidic flow counterbalanced capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Xia, Ling; Dutta, Debashis

    2013-04-01

    Flow counterbalanced capillary electrophoresis (FCCE) offers a powerful approach to realizing difficult charge based separations in compact microchip devices with application of relatively small electrical voltages. The need for dynamically controlling the pressure-gradient in the FCCE column however presents a significant challenge in implementing this technique on the microchip platform. In this article, we report the use of a simple on-chip pumping unit that allows precise introduction of a periodic pressure-driven backflow into a microfluidic separation channel enabling an FCCE analysis. The backflow in our device was produced by fabricating a shallow segment (0.5 μm deep) downstream of the analysis column (5 μm deep) and applying an electric field across it. A mismatch in the electroosmotic transport rate at the interface of this segment was shown to yield a pressure-gradient that could reverse the flow of the analyte bands without inverting the direction of the electric field. Although such a pressure-gradient also led to additional band broadening in the system, overall, the separation resolution of our device was observed to improve with an increasing number of back-and-forth sample passes through the analysis channel. For our current design, the corresponding improvement in the effective separation length was as much as 52% of the actual distance travelled by the chosen FITC-labeled amino acid samples. The reported device is well suited for further miniaturization of the FCCE method to the nanofluidic length scale which likely would improve its performance, and is easily integrable to other analytical procedures on the microchip platform for lab-on-a-chip applications. PMID:23420375

  6. Capillary fracture of soft gels.

    PubMed

    Bostwick, Joshua B; Daniels, Karen E

    2013-10-01

    A liquid droplet resting on a soft gel substrate can deform that substrate to the point of material failure, whereby fractures develop on the gel surface that propagate outwards from the contact line in a starburst pattern. In this paper, we characterize (i) the initiation process, in which the number of arms in the starburst is controlled by the ratio of the surface tension contrast to the gel's elastic modulus, and (ii) the propagation dynamics showing that once fractures are initiated they propagate with a universal power law L[proportional]t(3/4). We develop a model for crack initiation by treating the gel as a linear elastic solid and computing the deformations within the substrate from the liquid-solid wetting forces. The elastic solution shows that both the location and the magnitude of the wetting forces are critical in providing a quantitative prediction for the number of fractures and, hence, an interpretation of the initiation of capillary fractures. This solution also reveals that the depth of the gel is an important factor in the fracture process, as it can help mitigate large surface tractions; this finding is confirmed with experiments. We then develop a model for crack propagation by considering the transport of an inviscid fluid into the fracture tip of an incompressible material and find that a simple energy-conservation argument can explain the observed material-independent power law. We compare predictions for both linear elastic and neo-Hookean solids, finding that the latter better explains the observed exponent. PMID:24229192

  7. Capillary adhesion at the nanometer scale.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shengfeng; Robbins, Mark O

    2014-06-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used to study the capillary adhesion from a nonvolatile liquid meniscus between a spherical tip and a flat substrate. The atomic structure of the tip, the tip radius, the contact angles of the liquid on the two surfaces, and the volume of the liquid bridge are varied. The capillary force between the tip and substrate is calculated as a function of their separation h. The force agrees with continuum predictions based on macroscopic theory for h down to ∼5 to 10 nm. At smaller h, the force tends to be less attractive than predicted and has strong oscillations. This oscillatory component of the capillary force is completely missed in the macroscopic theory, which only includes contributions from the surface tension around the circumference of the meniscus and the pressure difference over the cross section of the meniscus. The oscillation is found to be due to molecular layering of the liquid confined in the narrow gap between the tip and substrate. This effect is most pronounced for large tip radii and/or smooth surfaces. The other two components considered by the macroscopic theory are also identified. The surface tension term, as well as the meniscus shape, is accurately described by the macroscopic theory for h down to ∼1 nm, but the capillary pressure term is always more positive than the corresponding continuum result. This shift in the capillary pressure reduces the average adhesion by a factor as large as 2 from its continuum value and is found to be due to an anisotropy in the pressure tensor. The component in the plane of the substrate is consistent with the capillary pressure predicted by the macroscopic theory (i.e., the Young-Laplace equation), but the normal pressure that determines the capillary force is always more positive than the continuum counterpart.

  8. Acoustophoretic particle motion in a square glass capillary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnkob, Rune; Marin, Alvaro; Rossi, Massimiliano; Kähler, Christian J.

    2014-11-01

    Acoustofluidics applications often use complex resonator geometries and complex acoustic actuation, which complicates the prediction of the acoustic resonances and the induced forces from the acoustic radiation and the acoustic streaming. Recently, it was shown that simultaneous actuation of two perpendicular half-wave resonances in a square channel can lead to acoustic streaming that will spiral small particles towards the pressure nodal center (Antfolk, Anal. Chem. 84, 2012). This we investigate in details experimentally by examining a square glass capillary with a 400- μm microchannel acoustically actuated around its 2-MHz half-wave transverse resonance. The acoustic actuation leads to the formation of a half-wave resonance in both the vertical and horizontal direction of the microchannel. Due to viscous and dissipative losses both resonances have finite widths, but are shifted in frequency due to asymmetric actuation and fabrication tolerances making the channel not perfectly square. We determine the resonance widths and shift by measuring the 3D3C trajectories of large particles whose motion is fully dominated by acoustic radiation forces, while the induced acoustic streaming is determined by measuring smaller particles weakly influenced by the acoustic radiation force. DFG KA 1808/16-1.

  9. Separation of Recombinant Therapeutic Proteins Using Capillary Gel Electrophoresis and Capillary Isoelectric Focusing.

    PubMed

    De Jong, Caitlyn A G; Risley, Jessica; Lee, Alexis K; Zhao, Shuai Sherry; Chen, David D Y

    2016-01-01

    Detailed step-by-step methods for protein separation techniques based on capillary electrophoresis (CE) are described in this chapter. Focus is placed on two techniques, capillary gel electrophoresis (CGE) and capillary isoelectric focusing (cIEF). CGE is essentially gel electrophoresis, performed in a capillary, where a hydrogel is used as a sieving matrix to separate proteins or peptides based on size. cIEF separates proteins or peptides based on their isoelectric point (pI), the pH at which the protein or peptide bears no charges. Detailed protocols and steps (including capillary preparation, sample preparation, CE separation conditions, and detection) for both CGE and cIEF presented so that readers can follow the described methods in their own labs. PMID:27473487

  10. On the optimal conditions for the focusing of giant sea waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruban, V. P.

    2015-02-01

    The dynamics of a wave packet on a two-dimensional sea surface, which is described by the nonlinear Schröbinger equation 2 iψ t + ψ xx - ψ yy + |ψ|2ψ = 0, has been analyzed within the Gaussian variational ansatz in application to the problem of the formation of rogue waves. The longitudinal ( X( t)) and transverse ( Y( t)) sizes of the packet are described by a system of differential equations: and , where the parameter N is proportional to the integral of motion ∫|ψ|2 dxdy. This system is interated in quadratures at an arbitrary N value, which makes it possible to understand the linear and nonlinear regimes of the focusing of a wavepacket and to formulate the optimal initial conditions under which the amplitude of the wave at the maximum is much larger than that in the linear case.

  11. Capillary liquid chromatography using laser-based and mass spectrometric detection. [Capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE); micellar electrokinetic capillary kchromatography (MECC)

    SciTech Connect

    Sepaniak, M.J.; Cook, K.D.

    1992-01-01

    In the years following the 1986 seminal paper (J. Chromatogr. Sci., 24, 347-352) describing modern capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE), the prominence of capillary electrokinetic separation techniques has grown. A related electrochromatographic technique is micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography (MECC). This report presents a brief synopsis of research efforts during the current 3-year period. In addition to a description of analytical separations-based research, results of efforts to develop and expand spectrometric detection for the techniques is reviewed. Laser fluorometric detection schemes have been successfully advanced. Mass spectrometric research was less fruitful, largely owing to personnel limitations. A regenerable fiber optic sensor was developed that can be used to remotely monitor chemical carcinogens, etc. (DLC)

  12. Capillary pressure in subjects with type 2 diabetes and hypertension and the effect of antihypertensive therapy.

    PubMed

    Fegan, P Gerard; Tooke, John E; Gooding, Kim M; Tullett, Jayne M; MacLeod, Kenneth M; Shore, Angela C

    2003-05-01

    Raised capillary pressure has been implicated in the formation of diabetic microangiopathy in type I diabetes, in which it is elevated in those with the earliest signs of diabetic kidney disease but remains normal in those without complications. In subjects with type 2 diabetes without complications, capillary pressure is normal, although alterations in the pressure waveforms suggested enhanced wave reflections. The nature of skin capillary pressure in subjects with type 2 diabetes and hypertension remains to be elucidated, as does the effect of blood pressure-lowering therapy on capillary pressure in these subjects. Three studies were performed in well-matched groups. First, capillary pressure was elevated in hypertensive subjects with type 2 diabetes compared with normotensive subjects with type 2 diabetes (20.2 [17.4 to 22.7] mm Hg versus 17.7 [16.1 to 18.9] mm Hg, respectively, P<0.03, Mann-Whitney U test). Second, no significant difference was detected between hypertensive subjects with type 2 diabetes and hypertensive subjects without type 2 diabetes (19.4 [15.8 to 21.3] mm Hg versus 17.2 [15.1 to 19.8] mm Hg, respectively, P=0.5, Mann-Whitney U test). Finally, patients with type 2 diabetes were recruited to a case-control study. Seven subjects received blood pressure-lowering therapy and 8 did not. Therapy reduced capillary pressure from 18.2 [15.8 to 20.1] mm Hg to 15.9 [15.4 to 17.0] mm Hg (P=0.024 ANOVA), in contrast to the lack of effect of time alone. Mean arterial pressure was reduced from 110 [102 to 115] mm Hg to 105 [101 to 111] mm Hg (P=0.006, ANOVA). These findings provide a plausible mechanism by which reducing arterial hypertension may reduce the risk of microangiopathy in type 2 diabetes. PMID:12695416

  13. Synthetic Capillaries to Control Microscopic Blood Flow

    PubMed Central

    Sarveswaran, K.; Kurz, V.; Dong, Z.; Tanaka, T.; Penny, S.; Timp, G.

    2016-01-01

    Capillaries pervade human physiology. The mean intercapillary distance is only about 100 μm in human tissue, which indicates the extent of nutrient diffusion. In engineered tissue the lack of capillaries, along with the associated perfusion, is problematic because it leads to hypoxic stress and necrosis. However, a capillary is not easy to engineer due to its complex cytoarchitecture. Here, it is shown that it is possible to create in vitro, in about 30 min, a tubular microenvironment with an elastic modulus and porosity consistent with human tissue that functionally mimicks a bona fide capillary using “live cell lithography”(LCL) to control the type and position of cells on a composite hydrogel scaffold. Furthermore, it is established that these constructs support the forces associated with blood flow, and produce nutrient gradients similar to those measured in vivo. With LCL, capillaries can be constructed with single cell precision—no other method for tissue engineering offers such precision. Since the time required for assembly scales with the number of cells, this method is likely to be adapted first to create minimal functional units of human tissue that constitute organs, consisting of a heterogeneous population of 100–1000 cells, organized hierarchically to express a predictable function. PMID:26905751

  14. Micro-injector for capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Sáiz, Jorge; Koenka, Israel Joel; García-Ruiz, Carmen; Müller, Beat; Chwalek, Thomas; Hauser, Peter C

    2015-08-01

    A novel micro-injector for capillary electrophoresis for the handling of samples with volumes down to as little as 300 nL was designed and built in our laboratory for analyses in which the available volume is a limitation. The sample is placed into a small cavity located directly in front of the separation capillary, and the injection is then carried out automatically by controlled pressurization of the chamber with compressed air. The system also allows automated flushing of the injection chamber as well as of the capillary. In a trial with a capillary electrophoresis system with contactless conductivity detector, employing a capillary of 25 μm diameter, the results showed good stability of migration times and peak areas. To illustrate the technique, the fast separation of five inorganic cations (Na(+) , K(+) , NH4 (+) , Ca(2+) , and Mg(2+) ) was set up. This could be achieved in less than 3 min, with good limits of detection (10 μM) and linear ranges (between about 10 and 1000 μM). The system was demonstrated for the determination of the inorganic cations in porewater samples of a lake sediment core.

  15. Passive Reactor Cooling Using Capillary Porous Wick

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Christopher G.; Lin, Thomas F.

    2006-07-01

    Long-term reliability of actively pumped cooling systems is a concern in space-based nuclear reactors. Capillary-driven passive cooling systems are being considered as an alternative to gravity-driven systems. The high surface tension of liquid lithium makes it attractive as the coolant in a capillary-driven cooling system. A system has been conceived in which the fuel rod of a reactor is surrounded by a concentric wick through which liquid lithium flows to provide cooling under normal and emergency operating conditions. Unheated wicking experiments at three pressures using four layered screen mesh wicks of different porosities and three relatively high surface tension fluids have been conducted to gain insight into capillary phenomena for such a capillary cooling system. All fluids tested demonstrated wicking ability in each of the wick structures for all pressures, and wicking ability for each fluid increased with decreasing wick pore size. An externally heated wicking experiment with liquid lithium as the wicking fluid was also conducted. In addition to wicking experiments, a heater rod is under development to simulate the fuel rod of a space based nuclear reactor by providing a heat flux of up to 110 kW/m{sup 2}. Testing of this heater rod has shown its ability to undergo repeated cycling from below 533 K to over 1255 K without failure. This heater rod will be integrated into lithium wicking experiments to provide more realistic simulation of the proposed capillary-driven space nuclear reactor cooling system. (authors)

  16. Restructuring and aging in a capillary suspension

    PubMed Central

    Koos, Erin; Kannowade, Wolfgang; Willenbacher, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    The rheological properties of capillary suspensions, suspensions with small amounts of an added immiscible fluid, are dramatically altered with the addition of the secondary fluid. We investigate a capillary suspension to determine how the network ages and restructures at rest and under applied external shear deformation. The present work uses calcium carbonate suspended in silicone oil (11 % solids) with added water as a model system. Aging of capillary suspensions and their response to applied oscillatory shear is distinctly different from particulate gels dominated by the van der Waals forces. The suspensions dominated by the capillary force are very sensitive to oscillatory flow, with the linear viscoelastic regime ending at a deformation of only 0.1% and demonstrating power-law aging behavior. This aging persists for long times at low deformations or for shorter times with a sudden decrease in the strength at higher deformations. This aging behavior suggests that the network is able to rearrange and even rupture. This same sensitivity is not demonstrated in shear flow where very high shear rates are required to rupture the agglomerates returning the apparent viscosity of capillary suspensions to the same viscosity as for the pure vdW suspension. A transitional region is also present at intermediate water contents wherein the material response depends very strongly on the type, strength, and duration of the external forcing. PMID:25729113

  17. Case report of lumbar intradural capillary hemangioma

    PubMed Central

    Unnithan, Ajaya Kumar Ayyappan; Joseph, T. P.; Gautam, Amol; Shymole, V.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Capillary hemangioma is a rare tumor in spinal intradural location. Despite the rarity, early recognition is important because of the risk of hemorrhage. This is a case report of a woman who had capillary hemangioma of cauda equina. Case Description: A 54 -year-old woman presented with a low backache, radiating to the left leg for 2 months. She had left extensor hallucis weakness, sensory impairment in left L5 dermatome, and mild tenderness in lower lumbar spine. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) LS spine showed L4/5 intradural tumor, completely occluding canal in myelogram, enhancing with contrast, s/o benign nerve sheath tumor. L4 laminectomy was done. Reddish tumor was seen originating from a single root. It was removed preserving the root. Postoperatively, she was relieved of symptoms. MRI showed no residue. Histopathology showed lobular proliferation of capillary-sized blood vessels and elongated spindle cells. Immunohistochemistry showed CD34 positivity in endothelial cell lining of blood vessel and smooth muscle actin positivity in blood vessel muscle cells. HPR-capillary hemangioma. Conclusion: Although rare, capillary hemangioma should be in the differential diagnosis of intradural tumors. It closely mimics nerve sheath tumor. PMID:27069745

  18. Synthetic Capillaries to Control Microscopic Blood Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarveswaran, K.; Kurz, V.; Dong, Z.; Tanaka, T.; Penny, S.; Timp, G.

    2016-02-01

    Capillaries pervade human physiology. The mean intercapillary distance is only about 100 μm in human tissue, which indicates the extent of nutrient diffusion. In engineered tissue the lack of capillaries, along with the associated perfusion, is problematic because it leads to hypoxic stress and necrosis. However, a capillary is not easy to engineer due to its complex cytoarchitecture. Here, it is shown that it is possible to create in vitro, in about 30 min, a tubular microenvironment with an elastic modulus and porosity consistent with human tissue that functionally mimicks a bona fide capillary using “live cell lithography”(LCL) to control the type and position of cells on a composite hydrogel scaffold. Furthermore, it is established that these constructs support the forces associated with blood flow, and produce nutrient gradients similar to those measured in vivo. With LCL, capillaries can be constructed with single cell precision—no other method for tissue engineering offers such precision. Since the time required for assembly scales with the number of cells, this method is likely to be adapted first to create minimal functional units of human tissue that constitute organs, consisting of a heterogeneous population of 100–1000 cells, organized hierarchically to express a predictable function.

  19. Capillary xray compressor: principle versus practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewe, Dale L.; Heald, Steve M.; Barg, Bill; Brown, Frederick C.; Kim, Kyungha H.; Stern, Edward A.

    1995-09-01

    Guiding x rays down the inside of tapered capillaries is a means to increase the flux density of x rays from synchrotron light sources without some of the disadvantages inherent in other techniques. We have demonstrated that a process based on techniques for fabrication of glass fibers may be used to produce tapered capillaries with inlet diameters on the order of 150 micrometers or more, and outlets on the order of 1 micrometer or less. We present a description of the capillary fabrication and results of tests of the performance of several capillaries, along with a comparison with calculations of performance. We also summarize refinements to the fabrication process that will provide additional improvements. The transmission of x rays from linear capillaries with inlet diameters of approximately 150 micrometers and outlet diameters of 1.3 - 1.4 micrometer is on the order of 2%, with corresponding intensity gains of up to 274. Initial results indicate that the capability exists for producing convex profiles necessary for optimal transmission. Calculated and measured transmission efficiencies are in fairly good agreement, leading to the expectation that efficiencies predicted by calculations to be attainable from optimal profiles are a realistic goal, given the ability to manufacture these profiles.

  20. Geologic features of dam sites in the Nehalem, Rogue, and Willamette River basins, Oregon, 1935-37

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Piper, A.M.

    1947-01-01

    The present report comprises brief descriptions of geologic features at 19 potential dam sites in the Nehalem, Rogue, and Willamette River basins in western Oregon. The topography of these site and of the corresponding reservoir site was mapped in 1934-36 under an allocation of funds, by the Public Works Administration for river-utilization surveys by the Conservation Branch of the United States Geological Survey. The field program in Oregon has been under the immediate charge of R. O. Helland. The 19 dam sites are distributed as follows: three on the Nehalem River, on the west or Pacific slope of the Oregon Coast range; four on Little Butte Creek and two on Evans Creek, tributaries of the Rogue River in the eastern part of the Klamath Mountains; four on the South and Middle Santiam Rivers, tributaries of the Willamette River from the west slope of the Cascade mountains; and six on tributaries of the Willamette River from the east slope of the Coast Range. Except in the Evans Creek basin, all the rocks in the districts that were studied are of comparatively late geological age. They include volcanic rocks, crystalline rocks of several types, marine and nonmarine sedimentary rocks, and recent stream deposits. The study of geologic features has sought to estimate the bearing power and water-tightness of the rocks at each dam site, also to place rather broad limits on the type of dam for which the respective sites seem best suited. It was not considered necessary to study the corresponding reservoir sites in detail for excessive leakage appears to be unlikely. Except at three of the four site in the Santiam River basin, no test pits have been dug nor exploratory holes drilled, so that geologic features have been interpreted wholly from natural outcrops and from highway and railroad cuts. Because these outcrops and cuts are few, many problems related to the construction and maintenance of dams can not be answered at the this time and all critical features of the sites

  1. Electromagnetic waves in optical fibres in a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorelik, V. S.; Burdanova, M. G.

    2016-03-01

    A new method is reported of recording the secondary radiation of luminescent substances based on the use of capillary fibres of great length. Theoretical analysis of the dispersion curves of electromagnetic radiation in capillary fibres doped with erbium ions Er3+ has been established. The Lorentz model is used for describing the dispersion properties of electromagnetic waves in a homogeneous medium doped with rare-earth ions. The dispersion dependencies of polariton and axion-polariton waves in erbium nitrate hydrate are determined on the basis of the model of the interaction between electromagnetic waves and the resonance electronic states of erbium ions in the absence and presence of a magnetic field.

  2. Surface wave patterns on acoustically levitated viscous liquid alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Z. Y.; Yan, N.; Geng, D. L.; Wei, B.

    2014-04-01

    We demonstrate two different kinds of surface wave patterns on viscous liquid alloys, which are melted and solidified under acoustic levitation condition. These patterns are consistent with the morphologies of standing capillary waves and ensembles of oscillons, respectively. The rapid solidification of two-dimensional liquid alloy surfaces may hold them down.

  3. Studies related to ocean dynamics. Task 3.2: Aircraft Field Test Program to investigate the ability of remote sensing methods to measure current/wind-wave interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, N. E.; Flood, W. A.; Brown, G. S.

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility of remote sensing of current flows in the ocean and the remote sensing of ocean currents by backscattering cross section techniques was studied. It was established that for capillary waves, small scale currents could be accurately measured through observation of wave kinematics. Drastic modifications of waves by changing currents were noted. The development of new methods for the measurement of capillary waves are discussed. Improvement methods to resolve data processing problems are suggested.

  4. Integrable turbulence generated from modulational instability of cnoidal waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agafontsev, D. S.; Zakharov, V. E.

    2016-11-01

    We study numerically the nonlinear stage of the modulational instability (MI) of cnoidal waves in the framework of the focusing one-dimensional nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation. Cnoidal waves are exact periodic solutions of the NLS equation which can be represented as the lattices of overlapping solitons. The MI of these lattices leads to the development of ‘integrable turbulence’ (Zakharov 2009 Stud. Appl. Math. 122 219–34). We study the major characteristics of turbulence for the dn-branch of cnoidal waves and demonstrate how these characteristics depend on the degree of ‘overlapping’ between the solitons within the cnoidal wave. Integrable turbulence, which develops from the MI of the dn-branch of cnoidal waves, asymptotically approaches its stationary state in an oscillatory way. During this process, kinetic and potential energies oscillate around their asymptotic values. The amplitudes of these oscillations decay with time as {{t}-α} , 1<α <1.5 , the phases contain nonlinear phase shift decaying as t ‑1/2, and the frequency of the oscillations is equal to the double maximal growth rate of the MI, s=2{γ\\max} . In the asymptotic stationary state, the ratio of potential to kinetic energy is equal to  ‑2. The asymptotic PDF of the wave intensity is close to the exponential distribution for cnoidal waves with strong overlapping, and is significantly non-exponential for cnoidal waves with weak overlapping of the solitons. In the latter case, the dynamics of the system reduces to two-soliton collisions, which occur at an exponentially small rate and provide an up to two-fold increase in amplitude compared with the original cnoidal wave. For all cnoidal waves of the dn-branch, the rogue waves at the time of their maximal elevation have a quasi-rational profile similar to that of the Peregrine solution.

  5. Novel absorption detection techniques for capillary electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Y.

    1994-07-27

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) has emerged as one of the most versatile separation methods. However, efficient separation is not sufficient unless coupled to adequate detection. The narrow inner diameter (I.D.) of the capillary column raises a big challenge to detection methods. For UV-vis absorption detection, the concentration sensitivity is only at the {mu}M level. Most commercial CE instruments are equipped with incoherent UV-vis lamps. Low-brightness, instability and inefficient coupling of the light source with the capillary limit the further improvement of UV-vis absorption detection in CE. The goals of this research have been to show the utility of laser-based absorption detection. The approaches involve: on-column double-beam laser absorption detection and its application to the detection of small ions and proteins, and absorption detection with the bubble-shaped flow cell.

  6. Capillary breakup of discontinuously rate thickening suspensions.

    PubMed

    Zimoch, Pawel J; McKinley, Gareth H; Hosoi, A E

    2013-07-19

    Using discontinuously rate thickening suspensions (DRTS) as a model system, we show that beads-on-a-string morphologies can arise as a result of external viscous drag acting during capillary-driven breakup of a non-Newtonian fluid. To minimize the perturbative effect of gravity, we developed a new experimental test platform in which the filament is supported in a horizontal position at the surface of an immiscible oil bath. We show that the evolution of thin DRTS filaments during the capillary thinning process is well described by a set of one-dimensional slender filament equations. The strongly rate-dependent rheology of the test fluid and the aspect ratio of the filament couple to control the thinning dynamics and lead to a simple criterion describing the localized arrest of the capillary thinning process and the subsequent formation of complex, high aspect ratio beads-on-a-string structures. PMID:23909338

  7. Waves in Radial Gravity Using Magnetic Fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohlsen, Daniel R.; Hart, John E.; Weidman, Patrick D.

    1996-01-01

    We are beginning laboratory experiments using magnetically active ferrofluids to study surface waves in novel geometries. Terrestrial gravity is eliminated from the dynamics, and the magnetic body force felt by ferrofluid in the presence of a magnetic field gradient is used to create a geopotential field which is a section of or an entire sphere or cylinder. New optical, electromagnetic and ultrasonic diagnostic techniques are under development to initially study capillary-gravity wave propagation and interaction in such geometries.

  8. Photosensitive diazotized poly(ethylene glycol) covalent capillary coatings for analysis of proteins by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Bing; Chen, Xin; Cong, Hailin; Shu, Xi; Peng, Qiaohong

    2016-09-01

    A new method for the fabrication of covalently cross-linked capillary coatings of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) is described using diazotized PEG (diazo-PEG) as a new photosensitive coating agent. The film of diazo-PEG depends on ionic bonding and was first prepared on the inner surface of capillary by self-assembly, and ionic bonding was converted into covalent bonding after reaction of ultraviolet light with diazo groups through unique photochemical reaction. The covalently bonded coating impedance adsorption of protein on the central surface of capillary and hence the four proteins ribonuclease A, cytochrome c, bovine serum albumin, and lysosome can be baseline separated by using capillary electrophoresis (CE). The covalently cross-linked diazo-PEG capillary column coatings not only improved the CE separation performance for proteins compared to non-covalently cross-linked coatings or bare capillary but also showed a remarkable chemical solidity and repeatability. Because photosensitive diazo-PEG took the place of the highly noxious and silane moisture-sensitive coating reagents in the fabrication of covalent coating, this technique shows the advantage of being environment-friendly and having a high efficiency for CE to make the covalently bonded capillaries. PMID:27475442

  9. Use of Plastic Capillaries for Macromolecular Crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, Rachel R.; Hong, Young-Soo; Ciszak, Ewa M.

    2003-01-01

    Methods of crystallization of biomolecules in plastic capillaries (Nalgene 870 PFA tubing) are presented. These crystallization methods used batch, free-interface liquid- liquid diffusion alone, or a combination with vapor diffusion. Results demonstrated growth of crystals of test proteins such as thaumatin and glucose isomerase, as well as protein studied in our laboratory such dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase. Once the solutions were loaded in capillaries, they were stored in the tubes in frozen state at cryogenic temperatures until the desired time of activation of crystallization experiments.

  10. Control of electroosmosis in coated quartz capillaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herren, Blair J.; Van Alstine, James; Snyder, Robert S.; Shafer, Steven G.; Harris, J. Milton

    1987-01-01

    The effectiveness of various coatings for controlling the electroosmotic fluid flow that hinders electrophoretic processes is studied using analytical particle microelectrophoresis. The mobilities of 2-micron diameter glass and polystyrene latex spheres (exhibiting both negative and zero effective surface charge) were measured in 2-mm diameter quartz capillaries filled with NaCl solutions within the 3.5-7.8 pH range. It is found that capillary inner surface coatings using 5000 molecular weight (or higher) poly(ethylene glycol): significantly reduced electroosmosis within the selected pH range, were stable for long time periods, and appeared to be more effective than dextran, methylcellulose, or silane coatings.

  11. A Rare Association of Trigeminal Autonomic Cephalgia: Pontine Capillary Telangiectasia

    PubMed Central

    Kurt, Erdal; Arslan, Sabina; Unal-Cevik, Isin; Karli Oguz, Kader; Tezer, F Irsel

    2015-01-01

    This report describes a case of pontine capillary telangiectasia in a 43-year-old woman with a clinical diagnosis of trigeminal autonomic cephalgia. The possible association with pontine capillary telangiectasia and trigeminal autonomic cephalgia is discussed. PMID:25963152

  12. Quantification and prediction of rare events in nonlinear waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapsis, Themistoklis; Cousins, Will; Mohamad, Mustafa

    2014-11-01

    The scope of this work is the quantification and prediction of rare events characterized by extreme intensity, in nonlinear dispersive models that simulate water waves. In particular we are interested for the understanding and the short-term prediction of rogue waves in the ocean and to this end, we consider 1-dimensional nonlinear models of the NLS type. To understand the energy transfers that occur during the development of an extreme event we perform a spatially localized analysis of the energy distribution along different wavenumbers by means of the Gabor transform. A stochastic analysis of the Gabor coefficients reveals i) the low-dimensionality of the intermittent structures, ii) the interplay between non-Gaussian statistical properties and nonlinear energy transfers between modes, as well as iii) the critical scales (or Gabor coefficients) where a critical energy can trigger the formation of an extreme event. The unstable character of these critical localized modes is analysed directly through the system equation and it is shown that it is defined as the result of the system nonlinearity and the wave dissipation (that mimics wave breaking). These unstable modes are randomly triggered through the dispersive ``heat bath'' of random waves that propagate in the nonlinear medium. Using these properties we formulate low-dimensional functionals of these Gabor coefficients that allow for the prediction of extreme event well before the strongly nonlinear interactions begin to occur. The prediction window is further enhanced by the combination of the developed scheme with traditional filtering schemes.

  13. Spectrometer capillary vessel and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Linehan, John C.; Yonker, Clement R.; Zemanian, Thomas S.; Franz, James A.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention is an arrangement of a glass capillary tube for use in spectroscopy. In particular, the invention is a capillary arranged in a manner permitting a plurality or multiplicity of passes of a sample material through a spectroscopic measurement zone. In a preferred embodiment, the multi-pass capillary is insertable within a standard NMR sample tube. The present invention further includes a method of making the multi-pass capillary tube and an apparatus for spinning the tube.

  14. Spectrometer capillary vessel and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Linehan, J.C.; Yonker, C.R.; Zemanian, T.S.; Franz, J.A.

    1995-11-21

    The present invention is an arrangement of a glass capillary tube for use in spectroscopy. In particular, the invention is a capillary arranged in a manner permitting a plurality or multiplicity of passes of a sample material through a spectroscopic measurement zone. In a preferred embodiment, the multi-pass capillary is insertable within a standard NMR sample tube. The present invention further includes a method of making the multi-pass capillary tube and an apparatus for spinning the tube. 13 figs.

  15. Characteristics of offshore extreme wind-waves detected by surface drifters with a low-cost GPS wave sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komatsu, Kosei

    Wind-generated waves have been recognized as one of the most important factors of the sea surface roughness which plays crucial roles in various air-sea interactions such as energy, mo-mentum, heat and gas exchanges. At the same time, wind waves with extreme wave heights representatively called as freak or rogue waves have been a matter of great concern for many people involved in shipping, fishing, constracting, surfing and other marine activities, because such extreme waves frequently affect on the marine activities and sometimes cause serious dis-asters. Nevertheless, investigations of actual conditions for the evolution of wind waves in the offshore region are less and sparse in contrast to dense monitoring networks in the coastal re-gions because of difficulty of offshore observation with high accuracy. Recently accurate in situ observation of offshore wind waves is getting possible at low cost owing to a wave height and di-rection sensor developed by Harigae et al. (2004) by installing a point-positioning GPS receiver on a surface drifting buoy. The point-positioning GPS sensor can extract three dimensional movements of the buoy excited by ocean waves with minimizing effects of GPS point-positioning errors through the use of a high-pass filter. Two drifting buoys equipped with the GPS-based wave sensor charged by solar cells were drifted in the western North Pacific and one of them continued to observe wind waves during 16 months from Sep. 2007. The RMSE of the GPS-based wave sensor was less than 10cm in significant wave height and about 1s in significant wave period in comparison with other sensors, i.e. accelerometers installed on drifting buoys of Japan Meteorological Agency, ultrasonic sensors placed at the Hiratsuka observation station of the University of Tokyo and altimeter of the JASON-1. The GPS-based wave buoys enabled us to detect freak waves defined as waves whose height is more than twice the significant wave height. The observation conducted by

  16. Laser illumination of multiple capillaries that form a waveguide

    DOEpatents

    Dhadwal, H.S.; Quesada, M.A.; Studier, F.W.

    1998-08-04

    A system and method are disclosed for efficient laser illumination of the interiors of multiple capillaries simultaneously, and collection of light emitted from them. Capillaries in a parallel array can form an optical waveguide wherein refraction at the cylindrical surfaces confines side-on illuminating light to the core of each successive capillary in the array. Methods are provided for determining conditions where capillaries will form a waveguide and for assessing and minimizing losses due to reflection. Light can be delivered to the arrayed capillaries through an integrated fiber optic transmitter or through a pair of such transmitters aligned coaxially at opposite sides of the array. Light emitted from materials within the capillaries can be carried to a detection system through optical fibers, each of which collects light from a single capillary, with little cross talk between the capillaries. The collection ends of the optical fibers can be in a parallel array with the same spacing as the capillary array, so that the collection fibers can all be aligned to the capillaries simultaneously. Applicability includes improving the efficiency of many analytical methods that use capillaries, including particularly high-throughput DNA sequencing and diagnostic methods based on capillary electrophoresis. 35 figs.

  17. Cyclodextrin-Functionalized Monolithic Capillary Columns: Preparation and Chiral Applications.

    PubMed

    Adly, Frady G; Antwi, Nana Yaa; Ghanem, Ashraf

    2016-02-01

    In this review, the recently reported approaches for the preparation of cyclodextrin-functionalized capillary monolithic columns are highlighted, with few applications in chiral separations using capillary liquid chromatography (CLC) and capillary electrochromatography (CEC). Chirality 28:97-109, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Laser illumination of multiple capillaries that form a waveguide

    DOEpatents

    Dhadwal, Harbans S.; Quesada, Mark A.; Studier, F. William

    1998-08-04

    A system and method are disclosed for efficient laser illumination of the interiors of multiple capillaries simultaneously, and collection of light emitted from them. Capillaries in a parallel array can form an optical waveguide wherein refraction at the cylindrical surfaces confines side-on illuminating light to the core of each successive capillary in the array. Methods are provided for determining conditions where capillaries will form a waveguide and for assessing and minimizing losses due to reflection. Light can be delivered to the arrayed capillaries through an integrated fiber optic transmitter or through a pair of such transmitters aligned coaxially at opposite sides of the array. Light emitted from materials within the capillaries can be carried to a detection system through optical fibers, each of which collects light from a single capillary, with little cross talk between the capillaries. The collection ends of the optical fibers can be in a parallel array with the same spacing as the capillary array, so that the collection fibers can all be aligned to the capillaries simultaneously. Applicability includes improving the efficiency of many analytical methods that use capillaries, including particularly high-throughput DNA sequencing and diagnostic methods based on capillary electrophoresis.

  19. Application of CHESS single-bounce capillaries at synchrotron beamlines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, R.; Szebenyi, T.; Pfeifer, M.; Woll, A.; Smilgies, D.-M.; Finkelstein, K.; Dale, D.; Wang, Y.; Vila-Comamala, J.; Gillilan, R.; Cook, M.; Bilderback, D. H.

    2014-03-01

    Single-bounce capillaries are achromatic X-ray focusing optics that can provide efficient and high demagnification focusing with large numerical apertures. Capillary fabrication at CHESS can be customized according to specific application requirements. Exemplary applications are reviewed in this paper, as well as recent progress on condensers for high-resolution transmission X-ray microscopy and small focal size capillaries.

  20. 21 CFR 864.6150 - Capillary blood collection tube.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Capillary blood collection tube. 864.6150 Section... blood collection tube. (a) Identification. A capillary blood collection tube is a plain or heparinized glass tube of very small diameter used to collect blood by capillary action. (b) Classification. Class...

  1. 21 CFR 864.6150 - Capillary blood collection tube.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Capillary blood collection tube. 864.6150 Section... blood collection tube. (a) Identification. A capillary blood collection tube is a plain or heparinized glass tube of very small diameter used to collect blood by capillary action. (b) Classification. Class...

  2. 21 CFR 864.6150 - Capillary blood collection tube.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Capillary blood collection tube. 864.6150 Section... blood collection tube. (a) Identification. A capillary blood collection tube is a plain or heparinized glass tube of very small diameter used to collect blood by capillary action. (b) Classification. Class...

  3. 21 CFR 864.6150 - Capillary blood collection tube.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Capillary blood collection tube. 864.6150 Section... blood collection tube. (a) Identification. A capillary blood collection tube is a plain or heparinized glass tube of very small diameter used to collect blood by capillary action. (b) Classification. Class...

  4. 21 CFR 864.6150 - Capillary blood collection tube.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Capillary blood collection tube. 864.6150 Section... blood collection tube. (a) Identification. A capillary blood collection tube is a plain or heparinized glass tube of very small diameter used to collect blood by capillary action. (b) Classification. Class...

  5. Macroscopic theory for capillary-pressure hysteresis.

    PubMed

    Athukorallage, Bhagya; Aulisa, Eugenio; Iyer, Ram; Zhang, Larry

    2015-03-01

    In this article, we present a theory of macroscopic contact angle hysteresis by considering the minimization of the Helmholtz free energy of a solid-liquid-gas system over a convex set, subject to a constant volume constraint. The liquid and solid surfaces in contact are assumed to adhere weakly to each other, causing the interfacial energy to be set-valued. A simple calculus of variations argument for the minimization of the Helmholtz energy leads to the Young-Laplace equation for the drop surface in contact with the gas and a variational inequality that yields contact angle hysteresis for advancing/receding flow. We also show that the Young-Laplace equation with a Dirichlet boundary condition together with the variational inequality yields a basic hysteresis operator that describes the relationship between capillary pressure and volume. We validate the theory using results from the experiment for a sessile macroscopic drop. Although the capillary effect is a complex phenomenon even for a droplet as various points along the contact line might be pinned, the capillary pressure and volume of the drop are scalar variables that encapsulate the global quasistatic energy information for the entire droplet. Studying the capillary pressure versus volume relationship greatly simplifies the understanding and modeling of the phenomenon just as scalar magnetic hysteresis graphs greatly aided the modeling of devices with magnetic materials.

  6. Interaction of light particles with capillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tőkési, K.; DuBois, R. D.

    2013-04-01

    The possible similarities and differences between the transmission of slow highly charged ions and light particles, like positrons and electrons, through a single cylindrical, tapered glass capillary with large aspect ratio are studied. We address the question whether the guiding-effect is observable for low intensity positron beams.

  7. Using Capillary Flows to Pattern Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyawahare, Saurabh; Craig, Kate; Scherer, Axel

    2006-03-01

    One can appreciate how capillary forces cause unexpected patterns and shapes by looking at a soap bubble. Pattern formation by surface tension is seen in ring patterns of coffee stains, fingering patterns in Hele-Shaw cells, ordering of two dimensional micro-sphere crystals, combing of DNA and skeleton formation in marine creatures called radiolarians. Though comman, problems involving the understanding and control of the self-assembly mechanism need to be resolved before using capillary forces as a practical lithographic tool. Here, we report capillary flows create line patterns in evaporating liquids between closely spaced parallel plates. The widths of these lines range from a few microns to a few nanometers. Deliberate patterning of such lines requires pinning of the contact line and the presence of foaming surfactants. The position and type of line can be controlled with artificial pinning points and varying solutes respectively, and large-scale photolithography can be used to guide and control the definition of nanostructures. We provide ``proof of principle'' demonstrations of this method's application by creating lines of colloidal quantum dots and micro-spheres. This represents the first step in using capillary phenomena to create controlled, self--assembling, one-dimensional wire-like structures

  8. Imbibition of ``Open Capillary'': Fundamentals and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tani, Marie; Kawano, Ryuji; Kamiya, Koki; Okumura, Ko

    2015-11-01

    Control or transportation of small amount of liquid is one of the most important issues in various contexts including medical sciences or pharmaceutical industries to fuel delivery. We studied imbibition of ``open capillary'' both experimentally and theoretically, and found simple scaling laws for both statics and dynamics of the imbibition, similarly as that of imbibition of capillary tubes. Furthermore, we revealed the existence of ``precursor film,'' which developed ahead of the imbibing front, and the dynamics of it is described well by another scaling law for capillary rise in a corner. Then, to show capabilities of open capillaries, we demonstrated two experiments by fabricating micro mixing devices to achieve (1) simultaneous multi-color change of the Bromothymol blue (BTB) solution and (2) expression of the green florescent protein (GFP). This research was partly supported by ImPACT Program of Council for Science, Technology and Innovation (Cabinet Office, Government of Japan). M. T. is supported by the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science Research Fellowships for Young Scientists.

  9. Macroscopic theory for capillary-pressure hysteresis.

    PubMed

    Athukorallage, Bhagya; Aulisa, Eugenio; Iyer, Ram; Zhang, Larry

    2015-03-01

    In this article, we present a theory of macroscopic contact angle hysteresis by considering the minimization of the Helmholtz free energy of a solid-liquid-gas system over a convex set, subject to a constant volume constraint. The liquid and solid surfaces in contact are assumed to adhere weakly to each other, causing the interfacial energy to be set-valued. A simple calculus of variations argument for the minimization of the Helmholtz energy leads to the Young-Laplace equation for the drop surface in contact with the gas and a variational inequality that yields contact angle hysteresis for advancing/receding flow. We also show that the Young-Laplace equation with a Dirichlet boundary condition together with the variational inequality yields a basic hysteresis operator that describes the relationship between capillary pressure and volume. We validate the theory using results from the experiment for a sessile macroscopic drop. Although the capillary effect is a complex phenomenon even for a droplet as various points along the contact line might be pinned, the capillary pressure and volume of the drop are scalar variables that encapsulate the global quasistatic energy information for the entire droplet. Studying the capillary pressure versus volume relationship greatly simplifies the understanding and modeling of the phenomenon just as scalar magnetic hysteresis graphs greatly aided the modeling of devices with magnetic materials. PMID:25646688

  10. Analytical biotechnology: Capillary electrophoresis and chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Horvath, C.; Nikelly, J.G.

    1990-01-01

    The papers describe the separation, characterization, and equipment required for the electrophoresis or chromatography of cyclic nucleotides, pharmaceuticals, therapeutic proteins, recombinant DNA products, pheromones, peptides, and other biological materials. One paper, On-column radioisotope detection for capillary electrophoresis, has been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  11. Numerical simulations of capillary barrier field tests

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, C.E.; Stormont, J.C.

    1997-12-31

    Numerical simulations of two capillary barrier systems tested in the field were conducted to determine if an unsaturated flow model could accurately represent the observed results. The field data was collected from two 7-m long, 1.2-m thick capillary barriers built on a 10% grade that were being tested to investigate their ability to laterally divert water downslope. One system had a homogeneous fine layer, while the fine soil of the second barrier was layered to increase its ability to laterally divert infiltrating moisture. The barriers were subjected first to constant infiltration while minimizing evaporative losses and then were exposed to ambient conditions. The continuous infiltration period of the field tests for the two barrier systems was modelled to determine the ability of an existing code to accurately represent capillary barrier behavior embodied in these two designs. Differences between the field test and the model data were found, but in general the simulations appeared to adequately reproduce the response of the test systems. Accounting for moisture retention hysteresis in the layered system will potentially lead to more accurate modelling results and is likely to be important when developing reasonable predictions of capillary barrier behavior.

  12. Recent advances of ionic liquids and polymeric ionic liquids in capillary electrophoresis and capillary electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Tang, Sheng; Liu, Shujuan; Guo, Yong; Liu, Xia; Jiang, Shengxiang

    2014-08-29

    Ionic liquids (ILs) and polymeric ionic liquids (PILs) with unique and fascinating properties have drawn considerable interest for their use in separation science, especially in chromatographic techniques. In this article, significant contributions of ILs and PILs in the improvement of capillary electrophoresis and capillary electrochromatography are described, and a specific overview of the most relevant examples of their applications in the last five years is also given. Accordingly, some general conclusions and future perspectives in these areas are discussed.

  13. Dynamics of a capillary invasion in a closed-end capillary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Hosub; Tripathi, Anubhav; Lee, Jinkee

    2014-11-01

    The position of fluid invasion in an open capillary increases as the square root of time and ceases when the capillary and hydrostatic forces are balanced, when viscous and inertia terms are negligible. Although this fluid invasion into open-end capillaries has been well described, detailed studies of fluid invasion in closed-end capillaries have not been explored thoroughly. Thus, we demonstrated, both theoretically and experimentally, a fluid invasion in closed-end capillaries, where the movement of the meniscus and the invasion velocity are accompanied by adiabatic gas compression inside the capillary. Theoretically, we found the fluid oscillations during invasion at short time scales by solving the one dimensional momentum balance. This oscillatory motion is evaluated in order to determine which physical forces dominate the different conditions, and is further described by a damped driven harmonic oscillator model. However, this oscillating motion is not observed in the experiments. This inconsistency is due to the following; first, a continuous decrease in the radius of the curvature caused by decreasing the invasion velocity and increasing pressure inside the close-ended capillary, and second, the shear stress increase in the short time scale by the plug like velocity profile within the entrance length. The viscous term of modified momentum equation can be written as K8/μl rc2dl/dt by using the multiplying factor K, which represents the increase of shear stress. The K is 7.3, 5.1 and 4.8 while capillary aspect ratio χc is 740, 1008 and 1244, respectively.

  14. Acoustic Measurement of Surface Wave Damping by a Meniscus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Guillaume; Pétrélis, François; Fauve, Stéphan

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the reflection of gravity-capillary surface waves by a plane vertical barrier. The size of the meniscus is found to strongly affect reflection: the energy of the reflected wave with a pinned contact line is around twice the one corresponding to a fully developed meniscus. To perform these measurements, a new experimental setup similar to an acousto-optic modulator is developed and offers a simple way to measure the amplitude, frequency and direction of propagation of surface waves.

  15. Method of making tapered capillary tips with constant inner diameters

    DOEpatents

    Kelly, Ryan T.; Page, Jason S.; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D.

    2009-02-17

    Methods of forming electrospray ionization emitter tips are disclosed herein. In one embodiment, an end portion of a capillary tube can be immersed into an etchant, wherein the etchant forms a concave meniscus on the outer surface of the capillary. Variable etching rates in the meniscus can cause an external taper to form. While etching the outer surface of the capillary wall, a fluid can be flowed through the interior of the capillary tube. Etching continues until the immersed portion of the capillary tube is completely etched away.

  16. The influence of artificial sealing on the capillary barrier's function.

    PubMed

    Trpkosová, Dagmar; Mls, Jirí

    2010-01-01

    Regulations for the sealing of landfill sites require two independent sealing components. To satisfy this requirement, the combined capillary barrier was developed using impermeable sheeting placed between the capillary layer and the capillary block of the traditional capillary barrier. In this study, a numerical model is introduced based on hydraulic characteristics obtained by means of measurements of samples of capillary barrier materials. To make a comparison possible, samples of a laboratory investigated barrier were measured. Two laboratory experiments with a simple and a combined capillary barrier were repeated using the developed numerical model and good agreement between computed and measured results was found. Subsequently, the model was used for investigating the effect of failure of the artificial sheeting on the capillary barrier's efficiency. The obtained results are presented and discussed. PMID:19853432

  17. Capillary leakage in travelers with dengue infection: implications for pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Meltzer, Eyal; Heyman, Zahava; Bin, Hanna; Schwartz, Eli

    2012-03-01

    Dengue hemorrhagic fever is characterized by the presence of a capillary leak syndrome. Its pathogenesis is presumed to differ from that of classical dengue fever (DF) and to be associated with secondary dengue infection. Returning travelers given a diagnosis of DF were evaluated for capillary leakage with abdominal sonography. Data were compared between travelers with primary/secondary infection defined by epidemiologic and serologic parameters. A total of 12 (34.3%) of 35 patients had sonographic signs of capillary leakage. Most (85%) patients with capillary leakage had classical DF. Capillary leak was diagnosed in 32% of primary dengue cases and in 40% of secondary dengue cases (P = 0.69). The two patients given a diagnosis of dengue hemorrhagic fever had primary infections. The high prevalence of capillary leakage among travelers, most of them with primary exposure to dengue, calls into question the importance of secondary infection in causing capillary leakage in dengue infection.

  18. Optical-resolution photoacoustic imaging through thick tissue with a thin capillary as a dual optical-in acoustic-out waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simandoux, Olivier; Stasio, Nicolino; Gateau, Jérome; Huignard, Jean-Pierre; Moser, Christophe; Psaltis, Demetri; Bossy, Emmanuel

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate the ability to guide high-frequency photoacoustic waves through thick tissue with a water-filled silica-capillary (150 μm inner diameter and 30 mm long). An optical-resolution photoacoustic image of a 30 μm diameter absorbing nylon thread was obtained by guiding the acoustic waves in the capillary through a 3 cm thick fat layer. The transmission loss through the capillary was about -20 dB, much lower than the -120 dB acoustic attenuation through the fat layer. The overwhelming acoustic attenuation of high-frequency acoustic waves by biological tissue can therefore be avoided by the use of a small footprint capillary acoustic waveguide for remote detection. We finally demonstrate that the capillary can be used as a dual optical-in acoustic-out waveguide, paving the way for the development of minimally invasive optical-resolution photoacoustic endoscopes free of any acoustic or optical elements at their imaging tip.

  19. Capillary Penetration into Inclined Circular Glass Tubes.

    PubMed

    Trabi, Christophe L; Ouali, F Fouzia; McHale, Glen; Javed, Haadi; Morris, Robert H; Newton, Michael I

    2016-02-01

    The spontaneous penetration of a wetting liquid into a vertical tube against the force of gravity and the imbibition of the same liquid into a horizontal tube (or channel) are both driven by capillary forces and described by the same fundamental equations. However, there have been few experimental studies of the transition from one orientation to the other. We report systematic measurements of capillary penetration of polydimethylsiloxane oils of viscosities 9.6, 19.2, and 48.0 mPa·s into glass capillary tubes. We first report the effect of tube radii R between 140 and 675 μm on the dynamics of spontaneous imbibition. We show that the data can be fitted using the exact numerical solution to the governing equations and that these are similar to fits using the analytical viscogravitational approximation. However, larger diameter tubes show a rate of penetration slower than expected using an equilibrium contact angle and the known value of liquid viscosity. To account for the slowness, an increase in viscosity by a factor (η/ρ)(scaling) is needed. We show full agreement with theory requires the ratio R/κ(-1) ∼ 0.1 or less, where κ(-1) is the capillary length. In addition, we propose an experimental method that enables the determination of the dynamic contact angle during imbibition, which gives values that agree with the literature values. We then report measurements of dynamic penetration into the tubes of R = 190 and 650 μm for a range of inclination angles to the horizontal, φ, from 5 to 90°. We show that capillary penetration can still be fitted using the viscogravitational solution, rather than the Bosanquet solution which describes imbibition without gravity, even for inclination angles as low as 10°. Moreover, at these low angles, the effect of the tube radius is found to diminish and this appears to relate to an effective capillary length, κ(-1)(φ) = (γ(LV)/ρg sin φ)(1/2). PMID:26738739

  20. [Functional morphology of endonasal blood capillaries].

    PubMed

    Grevers, G

    1989-01-01

    Harvey (1628) was the first to describe the blood circulatory system. 50 years later, the capillary system was discovered by Marcello Malpighi as a link between arteries and veins. Since then, the microvascular network has been examined abundantly by means of various morphological and physiological techniques. During the last decades the development of the technical equipment enabled us to receive detailed informations on the structural and ultrastructural aspects of the vasculature and--particularly--the capillary endothelium. New electron microscopic investigations on the behaviour of this special cell system. In the present study we combined our own morphological results on the endonasal microcirculatory system--using different morphological techniques--to interpret these anatomical finding under functional aspects.

  1. Separation of Peptides by Capillary Electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Scriba, Gerhard K E

    2016-01-01

    Peptides are an important class of analytes in chemistry, biochemistry, food chemistry, as well as medical and pharmaceutical sciences including biomarker analysis in peptidomics and proteomics. As a high-resolution technique, capillary electrophoresis (CE) is well suited for the analysis of polar compounds such as peptides. In addition, CE is orthogonal to high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) as both techniques are based on different physicochemical separation principles. For the successful development of peptide separations by CE, operational parameters including puffer pH, buffer concentration and buffer type, applied voltage, capillary dimensions, as well as background electrolyte additives such as detergents, ion-pairing reagents, cyclodextrins, (poly)amines, and soluble polymers have to be considered and optimized. PMID:27645745

  2. Immunogold-silver staining by capillary action.

    PubMed

    Kumar, R K; Braye, S G; Crouch, R L

    1989-12-01

    The authors have developed an improved method for immunogold-silver staining of paraffin sections. Using a manual capillary action staining system, they were able to simplify the technical aspects of the procedure, permitting rapid processing of large batches of slides with better reproducibility. Background staining was decreased by use of buffers containing a detergent. The use of a light-stable silver reagent permitted greater control of the enhancement stage. The method yielded a high degree of contrast with negligible nonspecific staining. Sensitivity was comparable to that obtained with conventional enzymatic immunostaining. However, the authors noted that trypsinization of sections was rendered unnecessary for those antigens for which such pretreatment was usually required, and the need for special fixatives could be eliminated. The method was also applicable to immunostaining of frozen sections. Immunogold-silver staining by capillary action deserves consideration as an alternative to existing immunohistochemical methods in diagnostic histopathology.

  3. Wetting kinetics in surface capillary grooves

    SciTech Connect

    Rye, R.R.; Yost, F.G.; Mann, J.A. Jr.

    1996-10-02

    For V-shaped surface grooves in copper, we have obtained the capillary driven flow kinetics for two liquids: unreactive 1-heptanol and eutectic Sn/Pb solder, which is known to react with copper. We show experimentally that the flow of both liquids in these grooves follows the classical Washburn kinetics, i.e., a Poiseuille flow process, modified to include a dynamic contact angle. Because no subsidiary processes are necessary to fit our data, we propose that in this geometry capillary driven solder flow is too rapid for reaction to provide an appreciable effect. Thus, to observe the effects of Sn/Cu reaction kinetics, the flow rate must be decreased, which the present experiments allow through redesign of the groove geometry and size. 16 refs., 4 figs.

  4. Geometry and wetting of capillary folding.

    PubMed

    Péraud, Jean-Philippe; Lauga, Eric

    2014-04-01

    Capillary forces are involved in a variety of natural phenomena, ranging from droplet breakup to the physics of clouds. The forces from surface tension can also be exploited in industrial applications provided the length scales involved are small enough. Recent experimental investigations showed how to take advantage of capillarity to fold planar structures into three-dimensional configurations by selectively melting polymeric hinges joining otherwise rigid shapes. In this paper we use theoretical calculations to quantify the role of geometry and fluid wetting on the final folded state. Considering folding in two and three dimensions, studying both hydrophilic and hydrophobic situations with possible contact-angle hysteresis, and addressing the shapes to be folded to be successively infinite, finite, curved, kinked, and elastic, we are able to derive an overview of the geometrical parameter space available for capillary folding.

  5. Penetration of surfactant solutions into hydrophobic capillaries.

    PubMed

    Bain, Colin D

    2005-08-21

    The initial rise velocity of surfactant solutions in hydrophobic capillaries is independent of time (F. Tiberg, B. Zhmud, K. Hallstensson and M. von Bahr, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2000, 2, 5189). By analogy with the hydrodynamics of an overflowing cylinder, we present a steady-state solution for capillary penetration in which the velocity is determined by the adsorption kinetics at the air-water interface. Good agreement between the model predictions and experimental data of Tiberg and coworkers is obtained for the non-ionic surfactant C10E6 under the assumption of diffusion-controlled adsorption. The longer chain homologue, C14E6, shows evidence of kinetic barriers to adsorption.

  6. Iohexol in serum determined by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Shihabi, Z K; Constantinescu, M S

    1992-10-01

    Iohexol, a nonionic compound used as a contrast medium for angiography and as a measure of the glomerular filtration rate, was quantified in serum by capillary electrophoresis. Comparable results were obtained for serum samples deproteinized with acetonitrile or analyzed directly after 50-fold dilution with borate buffer. Serum samples were electrophoresed for 2.6 min at 12 kV in a borate buffer with detection at 254 nm and with 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine as internal standard. Acetonitrile deproteinization gave a greater sensitivity than did sample dilution. Between-run CVs were between 4.7% and 6.7%, and within-run CVs were between 2.5 and 3.2%. Analytical recoveries were 95-105%. Results of the method compared well with those by high-performance liquid chromatography (slope 0.96, intercept 0.005 g/L). This method demonstrates the potential of capillary electrophoresis for rapid and simple quantification of small molecules.

  7. Capillary Study - Skylab Student Experiment ED-72

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    This chart describes the Skylab student experiment ED-72, Capillary Study, proposed by Roger G. Johnson of St. Paul, Mirnesota. Johnson theorized that capillary rise might continue to infinity in Skylab's zero-gravity environment. The behavior of fluids, particularly their flow properties in a low-gravity environment, had been important from the time that Robert H. Goddard launched his liquid-fueled rockets in the 1920's to the more sophisticated space systems of the day. It was necessary to design fluid-flow systems that would not only overcome the lack of gravity but also overcome, or take advantage of, the effect of surface tension. In March 1972, NASA and the National Science Teachers Association selected 25 experiment proposals for flight on Skylab. Science advisors from the Marshall Space Flight Center aided and assisted the students in developing the proposals for flight on Skylab.

  8. Capillary flow through heat-pipe wicks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eninger, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    Theoretical expressions are obtained for the capillary-pressure limit and permeability of a fibrous wick in terms of the porosity and fiber diameter. Hysteresis in capillary pressure is included through the introduction of an empirical hysteresis constant. A partial-saturation model based on the statistical distribution of local porosity requires an additional empirical constant, the standard deviation. The theory is compared to results of a beta-ray absorption experiment that measured the liquid content of a partially saturated wick and to results of permeability measurements on partially and fully saturated wicks. A simple wick-weighing experiment is described that yields values for the empirical hysteresis constant and the standard deviation. Theoretical results are used to design an optimum wick.

  9. Electrokinetic Flow and Dispersion in Capillary Electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosal, Sandip

    2006-01-01

    Electrophoretic separation of a mixture of chemical species is a fundamental technique of great usefulness in biology, health care, and forensics. In capillary electrophoresis (which has evolved from its predecessor, slab-gel electrophoresis), the sample migrates through a single microcapillary instead of through the network of pores in a gel. A fundamental design problem is to minimize dispersion in the separation direction. Molecular diffusion is inevitable and sets a theoretical limit on the best separation that can be achieved. But in practice, there are a number of effects arising out of the interplay between fluid flow, chemistry, thermal effects, and electric fields that result in enhanced dispersion. This paper reviews the subject of fluid flow in such capillary microchannels and examines the various causes of enhanced dispersion that limit the efficiency of separation.

  10. High-performance capillary electrophoresis of histones

    SciTech Connect

    Gurley, L.R.; London, J.E.; Valdez, J.G.

    1991-01-01

    A high performance capillary electrophoresis (HPCE) system has been developed for the fractionation of histones. This system involves electroinjection of the sample and electrophoresis in a 0.1M phosphate buffer at pH 2.5 in a 50 {mu}m {times} 35 cm coated capillary. Electrophoresis was accomplished in 9 minutes separating a whole histone preparation into its components in the following order of decreasing mobility; (MHP) H3, H1 (major variant), H1 (minor variant), (LHP) H3, (MHP) H2A (major variant), (LHP) H2A, H4, H2B, (MHP) H2A (minor variant) where MHP is the more hydrophobic component and LHP is the less hydrophobic component. This order of separation is very different from that found in acid-urea polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and in reversed-phase HPLC and, thus, brings the histone biochemist a new dimension for the qualitative analysis of histone samples. 27 refs., 8 figs.

  11. Capillary precipitin typing of Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Russell, H; Facklam, R R; Padula, J F; Cooksey, R

    1978-01-01

    The Neufeld test is presently the method of choice for typing Streptococcus pneumoniae. Although the test is reliable and relatively easy to perform, a simpler test, not requiring microscopic examination, would facilitate large-scale testing. A capillary precipitine test has been designed and tested for its usefulness in typing pneumococci. The type-specific carbohydrate antigens were obtained from broth culture supernatants. The antigens were reacted with type-specific antisera in glass capillary pipettes. Results from 82 reference antigens and 166 antigens from diagnostic pneumococcal strains showed that the reactions ere specific, and the results agreed with Neufeld test results. These results indicate that the precipitin test is as specific as the Neufeld test. The test is easy to perform, requires small amounts of antiserum, and can be completed in a short period of time. PMID:31369

  12. Metal Ions Analysis with Capillary Zone Electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Malik, Ashok Kumar; Aulakh, Jatinder Singh; Kaur, Varinder

    2016-01-01

    Capillary electrophoresis has recently attracted considerable attention as a promising analytical technique for metal ion separations. Significant advances that open new application areas for capillary electrophoresis in the analysis of metal species occurred based on various auxiliary separation principles. These are mainly due to complexation, ion pairing, solvation, and micellization interactions between metal analytes and electrolyte additives, which alter the separation selectivity in a broad range. Likewise, many separation studies for metal ions have been concentrated on the use of preelectrophoresis derivatization methodology. Approaches suitable for manipulation of selectivity for different metal species including metal cations, metal complexes, metal oxoanions, and organometallic compounds, are discussed, with special attention paid to the related electrophoretic system variables using illustrative examples. PMID:27645740

  13. Capillary Electrophoresis in Food and Foodomics.

    PubMed

    Ibáñez, Clara; Acunha, Tanize; Valdés, Alberto; García-Cañas, Virginia; Cifuentes, Alejandro; Simó, Carolina

    2016-01-01

    Quality and safety assessment as well as the evaluation of other nutritional and functional properties of foods imply the use of robust, efficient, sensitive, and cost-effective analytical methodologies. Among analytical technologies used in the fields of food analysis and foodomics, capillary electrophoresis (CE) has generated great interest for the analyses of a large number of compounds due to its high separation efficiency, extremely small sample and reagent requirements, and rapid analysis. The introductory section of this chapter provides an overview of the recent applications of capillary electrophoresis (CE) in food analysis and foodomics. Relevant reviews and research articles on these topics are tabulated including papers published in the period 2011-2014. In addition, to illustrate the great capabilities of CE in foodomics the chapter describes the main experimental points to be taken into consideration for a metabolomic study of the antiproliferative effect of carnosic acid (a natural diterpene found in rosemary) against HT-29 human colon cancer cells. PMID:27645749

  14. Capillary Leveling of Freestanding Liquid Nanofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilton, Mark; Couchman, Miles M. P.; Gerbelot, Cedric; Benzaquen, Michael; Fowler, Paul D.; Stone, Howard A.; Raphaël, Elie; Dalnoki-Veress, Kari; Salez, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    We report on the capillary-driven leveling of a topographical perturbation at the surface of a freestanding liquid nanofilm. The width of a stepped surface profile is found to evolve as the square root of time. The hydrodynamic model is in excellent agreement with the experimental data. In addition to exhibiting an analogy with diffusive processes, this novel system serves as a precise nanoprobe for the rheology of liquids at interfaces in a configuration that avoids substrate effects.

  15. Capillary-Effect Root-Environment System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Bruce D.

    1991-01-01

    Capillary-effect root-environment system (CERES) is experimental apparatus for growing plants in nutrient solutions. Solution circulated at slight tension in cavity filled with plastic screen and covered by porous plastic membrane. By adsorptive attraction, root draws solution through membrane. Conceived for use in microgravity of space, also finds terrestrial application in germinating seedlings, because it protects them from extremes of temperature, moisture, and soil pH and from overexposure to fertilizers and herbicides.

  16. Capillary zone electrophoresis-mass spectrometer interface

    DOEpatents

    D'Silva, Arthur

    1996-08-06

    A device for providing equal electrical potential between two loci unconnected by solid or liquid electrical conducts is provided. The device comprises a first electrical conducting terminal, a second electrical conducting terminal connected to the first terminal by a rigid dielectric structure, and an electrically conducting gas contacting the first and second terminals. This device is particularly suitable for application in the electrospray ionization interface between a capillary zone electrophoresis apparatus and a mass spectrometer.

  17. Capillary zone electrophoresis-mass spectrometer interface

    DOEpatents

    D`Silva, A.

    1996-08-06

    A device for providing equal electrical potential between two loci unconnected by solid or liquid electrical conductors is provided. The device comprises a first electrical conducting terminal, a second electrical conducting terminal connected to the first terminal by a rigid dielectric structure, and an electrically conducting gas contacting the first and second terminals. This device is particularly suitable for application in the electrospray ionization interface between a capillary zone electrophoresis apparatus and a mass spectrometer. 1 fig.

  18. [2012 annual review of capillary electrophoresis technology].

    PubMed

    Qu, Feng; Zhao, Xinying; Wang, Yong

    2012-12-01

    This paper reviews the capillary electrophoresis (CE) in 2012. Four international and three national conferences are included and the important reports are introduced briefly. Literatures searched from ISI Web of Science ranged in 2012.1.1 - 2012.12.1 are classified and introduced based on the biology and medicine applications as well as the use of detectors and the important analytical chemical journals.

  19. Severe reactions to Cuprophan capillary dialyzers.

    PubMed

    Popli, S; Ing, T S; Daugirdas, J T; Kheirbek, A O; Viol, G W; Vilbar, R M; Gandhi, V C

    1982-08-01

    Five severe reactions occurred in four maintenance hemodialysis patients 1 to 5 minutes after initiating dialysis with Cuprophan capillary dialyzers. All reactions were life-threatening and one resulted in death. Inadequate rinsing of the dialyzers was probably the cause of the reactions. The severe reactions were managed by immediate discontinuation of dialysis and the institution of supportive treatment. Antianaphylactic measures were also attempted, but their therapeutic effectiveness remains to be determined. PMID:7181733

  20. Water-surface elevations and channel characteristics for selected reaches of the Rogue River and Elk Creek, Jackson and Josephine Counties, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harris, D.D.

    1970-01-01

    The central Rogue River valley, because of its mild climate, fertile soil, scenic attractions, and sport-fishery resource, has great potential for future population growth and industrial development. As the population grows and the area develops, zoning becomes necessary to assure the most beneficial use of the land, especially of the flood plains. To establish land-use zones on the flood plains, the area subject to inundation and elevation of floods must be considered. Areas flooded during the December 1964 flood and the approximate limits of the 1861 flood in Jackson and Josephine Counties are shown in two interim reports (Corps of Engineers, 1965); however, there are no published flood-elevation profiles to use as a basis for establishing meaningful land-use-zone boundaries or for delineating inundated areas of other floods.