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Sample records for capn3 enhance mutation

  1. CAPN3 mutations in patients with idiopathic eosinophilic myositis.

    PubMed

    Krahn, Martin; Lopez de Munain, Adolfo; Streichenberger, Nathalie; Bernard, Rafaëlle; Pécheux, Christophe; Testard, Hervé; Pena-Segura, José L; Yoldi, Eugenia; Cabello, Ana; Romero, Norma B; Poza, Juan J; Bouillot-Eimer, Sandrine; Ferrer, Xavier; Goicoechea, Maria; Garcia-Bragado, Federico; Leturcq, France; Urtizberea, J Andoni; Lévy, Nicolas

    2006-06-01

    Eosinophilic myositis (EM) constitutes a rare pathological entity characterized by eosinophilic infiltration of skeletal muscles, usually associated with parasite infections, systemic disorders, or the intake of drugs or L-tryptophan. The exclusion of such causes defines the spectrum of idiopathic EM. Based on a protein analysis performed in one affected patient, we identified the gene encoding calpain-3, CAPN3, as a candidate for a subset of idiopathic EM. We screened CAPN3 for mutations using DHPLC and direct sequencing in six unrelated patients, recruited for EM diagnosed after histological examination of muscle biopsy samples, without any identified causative factor. We identified CAPN3 mutations in the six unrelated patients originally diagnosed with idiopathic EM. Mutations in CAPN3 can cause EM. Thus, a subset of idiopathic EM is genetically determined, with an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. Patients presented with a triad that appears to be indicative of CAPN3 mutations: (1) EM in the first decade, (2) elevated serum creatine phosphokinase levels (isolated or with little corresponding weakness), and (3) inconstant peripheral hypereosinophilia. However, that EM represents a distinct phenotype associated to CAPN3 mutations or, rather, an early histopathological picture of LGMD2A must be further evaluated. Our findings should be of interest toward further investigating the role of calpain-3 in skeletal muscle. Furthermore, patients with idiopathic EM should undergo calpain-3 protein analysis and be considered for subsequent molecular analysis of the CAPN3 gene.

  2. cDNA analyses of CAPN3 enhance mutation detection and reveal a low prevalence of LGMD2A patients in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Duno, Morten; Sveen, Marie-Louise; Schwartz, Marianne; Vissing, John

    2008-08-01

    Calpainopathy or limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A (LGMD2A) is generally recognized as the most prevalent form of recessive LGMD and is caused by mutations in the CAPN3 gene. Out of a cohort of 119 patients fulfilling clinical criteria for LGMD2, referred to our neuromuscular clinic, 46 were suspected to have LGMD2A, based on western blot results. Four of these patients were shown to have LGMD2I upon molecular analysis, whereas 16 of the remaining 42 patients harbored mutations in CAPN3 by both direct genomic sequencing and cDNA analyses. In 10 patients, we identified both mutant alleles. In three other, only one heterozygous mutation could be identified on the genomic level; however, CAPN3 cDNA analyses demonstrated homozygosity for the mutant allele, indicating the presence of an unidentified allele that somehow compromise correct CAPN3 RNA processing. In the three remaining patients, only a single heterozygous mutation could be identified both at the genomic level and on full-length CAPN3 cDNA. All three patients exhibited a highly abnormal western blot for calpain-3 and clinical characteristics of LGMD2A. Only three of the genetically confirmed LGMD2A patients were of Danish origin, indicating a five- to sixfold lower prevalence in Denmark compared to other European countries. A total of 16 different CAPN3 mutations were identified, of which 5 were novel. The present study demonstrates the value of cDNA analysis for CAPN3 in LGMD2A patients and indicates that calpainopathy is an uncommon cause of LGMD in the Denmark.

  3. Clinical and Pathological Heterogeneity of Korean Patients with CAPN3 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyung Jun; Jang, Hoon; Lee, Jung Hwan; Shin, Ha Young; Cho, Sung-Rae; Park, Kee Duk; Bang, Duhee; Lee, Min Goo; Kim, Seung Min

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study was designed to investigate the characteristics of Korean patients with calpainopathy. Materials and Methods Thirteen patients from ten unrelated families were diagnosed with calpainopathy via direct or targeted sequencing of the CAPN3 gene. Clinical, mutational, and pathological spectra were then analyzed. Results Nine different mutations, including four novel mutations (NM_000070: c.1524+1G>T, c.1789_1790inA, c.2184+1G>T, and c.2384C>T) were identified. The median age at symptom onset was 22 (interquartile range: 15-28). Common clinical findings were joint contracture in nine patients, winged scapula in four, and lordosis in one. However, we also found highly variable clinical features including early onset joint contractures, asymptomatic hyperCKemia, and heterogeneous clinical severity in three members of the same family. Four of nine muscle specimens revealed lobulated fibers, but three showed normal skeletal muscle histology. Conclusion We identified four novel CAPN3 mutations and demonstrated clinical and pathological heterogeneity in Korean patients with calpainopathy. PMID:26632398

  4. Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2a with mutation in CAPN3: the first report in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chien-Hua; Liang, Wen-Chen; Minami, Narihiro; Nishino, Ichizo; Jong, Yuh-Jyh

    2015-02-01

    The autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A (LGMD2A) is caused by mutations in the calpain 3 (CAPN3) gene, and it is characterized by selective atrophy and weakness of proximal limb and girdle muscles. We report a 33-year-old woman with initial presentations of exercise intolerance and running difficulty at age 15 years. At presentation, waddling gait, positive Gowers' sign, and marked muscle atrophy in pelvic and leg muscles were noted. Muscle computed tomography (CT) imaging demonstrated symmetric involvement of the posterior thigh muscles with relative sparing of vastus lateralis, sartorius, and gracilis. Muscle biopsy revealed a dystrophic change and many lobulated fibers on NADH-tetrazolium reductase staining. Genetic analysis of the CAPN3 gene identified a novel homozygous mutation of c2047_2050 del4, p.Lys683fs mutation, confirming the first LGMD2A patient in Taiwan.

  5. Novel Homozygous Missense Mutation in CAPN3 Gene Detected in a Saudi Arabian Family With Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy Type 2A.

    PubMed

    Al-Harbi, Talal M; Abdulmanaʼ, Sameeh O; Dridi, Walid

    2016-12-01

    More than 300 mutations were identified in Calpainopathy (CAPN3) gene in limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A (LGMD2A) patients. LGMD2A type is also known as Calpainopathy, which is characterized by selective atrophy and weakness of proximal limb muscles. We report a Saudi Arabian family with weakness in limb-girdle distribution: waddling gait, positive Gowers' sign, and marked muscle atrophy in the shoulder and pelvic girdle muscles. We sequenced all exonic and intronic regions of the CAPN3 gene and identified c.1699 G>A variant as a novel variant not previously described in other patients. In silico predictions indicate that this is probably a disease-causing mutation. Here, for the first time, we report this c.1699 G>A new variant in the CAPN3 gene that can be considered as a robust genetics factor causing LGMD2A disease.

  6. High incidence of 550delA mutation of CAPN3 in LGMD2 patients from Russia.

    PubMed

    Pogoda, T V; Krakhmaleva, I N; Lipatova, N A; Shakhovskaya, N I; Shishkin, S S; Limborska, S A

    2000-03-01

    Autosomal recessive limb gird muscular dystrophy (LGMD2) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of diseases that are characterized by progressive atrophy and weakness of the proximal limb muscles. At least eight genetic loci leading to LGMD2 are recognized. The proportion of particular gene involved in producing different forms of LGMD2 shows a marked geographical variation. We studied 19 LGMD2 patients from Russia (15 families) and found calpain 3 (CAPN3) gene mutations in most of the patients studied. Sequence analysis of the fourth exons revealed two sibs - heterozygous compound for a 15-bp deletion (nt598-612) and 550 adenine deletion, and two sibs homozygous for a 550delA. We developed assay based on allele specific amplification (ASA) for rapid screening of the 550delA. The ASA assay of the LGMD2 patients under study showed that 7 patients from 6 families were homozygous for 550delA and 7 patients from 4 families were heterozygous for 550delA. A linkage analysis employing four microsatellites flanking the LGMD2A locus was performed. We found complete haplotype identity in most cases what favors the possibility of a common founder. Heterozygous carriers of 550delA were found in general population. The crude estimate of the mutation frequency is 1/150. Hum Mutat 15:295, 2000.

  7. Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy in the Agarwals: Utility of founder mutations in CAPN3 gene

    PubMed Central

    Khadilkar, Satish V.; Chaudhari, Chetan R.; Dastur, Rashna S.; Gaitonde, Pradnya S.; Yadav, Jayendra G.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Diagnostic evaluation of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A (LGMD2A) involves specialized studies on muscle biopsy and mutation analysis. Mutation screening is the gold standard for diagnosis but is difficult as the gene is large and multiple mutations are known. This study evaluates the utility of two known founder mutations as a first-line diagnostic test for LGMD2A in the Agarwals. Materials and Methods: The Agarwals with limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) phenotype were analyzed for two founder alleles (intron 18/exon 19 c.2051-1G>T and exon 22 c.2338G>C). Asymptomatic first-degree relatives of patients with genetically confirmed mutations and desirous of counseling were screened for founder mutations. Results: Founder alleles were detected in 26 out of 29 subjects with LGMD phenotype (89%). The most common genotype observed was homozygous for exon 22 c.2338 G>C mutation followed by compound heterozygosity. Single founder allele was identified in two. Single allele was detected in two of the five asymptomatic relatives. Conclusion: Eighty-nine percent of the Agarwals having LGMD phenotype have LGMD2A resulting from founder mutations. Founder allele analysis can be utilized as the initial noninvasive diagnostic step for index cases, carrier detection, and counseling. PMID:27011640

  8. A unique case of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A carrying novel compound heterozygous mutations in the human CAPN3 gene.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, E; Tsuchiya, A; Minami, N; Nishino, I; Pappolla, M A; Shoji, M; Abe, K

    2007-07-01

    A unique sib pair afflicted by limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A (LGMD2A) is described showing a slowly progressive autosomal recessive type of muscular dystrophy with onset in the third and fourth decades. The patients had early asymmetric muscle involvement characterized by prominent biceps brachii atrophy with sparing of the knee extensors. Additional findings included elevation of serum creatine kinase level, myopathic EMG changes and dystrophic type of pathology on muscle biopsy. Asymmetrical wasting of muscles in the extremities exhibited uniform and highly selective CT imaging patterns. RNA and DNA analyses confirmed novel compound heterozygous mutations (R147X/L212F) in the human CAPN3 gene.

  9. An eccentric calpain, CAPN3/p94/calpain-3.

    PubMed

    Ono, Yasuko; Ojima, Koichi; Shinkai-Ouchi, Fumiko; Hata, Shoji; Sorimachi, Hiroyuki

    2016-03-01

    Calpains are Ca(2+)-regulated proteolytic enzymes that are involved in a variety of biological phenomena. Calpains process substrates by limited proteolysis to modulate various protein functions in the cell, and are thus called "modulator proteases." CAPN3, previously called p94 or calpain-3, has unique features that are not found in any of the other 14 human calpains, or even in other proteases. For instance, CAPN3 undergoes extremely rapid and exhaustive autodegradation. CAPN3 is also the first (and so far, the only) intracellular enzyme found to depend on Na(+) for its activation. CAPN3 has both proteolytic and non-proteolytic functions. It has the interesting distinction of being the only protease, other than a few virus proteases, with the ability to regain protease function after its autolytic dissociation; this occurs through a process known as intermolecular complementation (iMOC). Gene mutations causing CAPN3 defects are responsible for limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A (LGMD2A). Unusual characteristics of CAPN3 have fascinated researchers, but have also hampered conventional biochemical analysis. In this review, we describe significant findings about CAPN3 from its discovery to the present, and suggest promising avenues for future CAPN3 research.

  10. Entire CAPN3 gene deletion in a patient with limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A.

    PubMed

    Jaka, Oihane; Azpitarte, Margarita; Paisán-Ruiz, Coro; Zulaika, Miren; Casas-Fraile, Leire; Sanz, Raúl; Trevisiol, Nathalie; Levy, Nicolas; Bartoli, Marc; Krahn, Martin; López de Munain, Adolfo; Sáenz, Amets

    2014-09-01

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A (LGMD2A) due to mutations in the CAPN3 gene is one of the most common of autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophies. We describe a patient who had a typical LGMD2A phenotype and posterior compartment involvement on MRI. Different genetic analyses were performed, including microarray analysis. There was an apparently homozygous mutation in exon 24, c.2465G>T, p.(*822Leuext62*), and a lack of correlation in the disease segregation analyses. This suggested the presence of a genomic rearrangement. In fact, a heterozygous deletion of the entire CAPN3 gene was found. This novel deletion comprised the terminal region of the GANC gene and the entire CAPN3 gene. This finding points out the need to reconsider and adapt our current strategy of molecular diagnosis in order to detect these types of genomic rearrangements that escape standard mutation screening procedures.

  11. The N- and C-terminal autolytic fragments of CAPN3/p94/calpain-3 restore proteolytic activity by intermolecular complementation

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Yasuko; Shindo, Mayumi; Doi, Naoko; Kitamura, Fujiko; Gregorio, Carol C.

    2014-01-01

    CAPN3/p94/calpain-3, a calpain protease family member predominantly expressed in skeletal muscle, possesses unusually rapid and exhaustive autolytic activity. Mutations in the human CAPN3 gene impairing its protease functions cause limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A (LGMD2A); yet, the connection between CAPN3’s autolytic activity and the enzyme’s function in vivo remain unclear. Here, we demonstrated that CAPN3 protease activity was reconstituted by intermolecular complementation (iMOC) between its two autolytic fragments. Furthermore, the activity of full-length CAPN3 active-site mutants was surprisingly rescued through iMOC with autolytic fragments containing WT amino acid sequences. These results provide evidence that WT CAPN3 can be formed by the iMOC of two different complementary CAPN3 mutants. The finding of iMOC-mediated restoration of calpain activity indicates a novel mechanism for the genotype–phenotype links in LGMD2A. PMID:25512505

  12. A heterozygous 21-bp deletion in CAPN3 causes dominantly inherited limb girdle muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Vissing, John; Barresi, Rita; Witting, Nanna; Van Ghelue, Marijke; Gammelgaard, Lise; Bindoff, Laurence A; Straub, Volker; Lochmüller, Hanns; Hudson, Judith; Wahl, Christoph M; Arnardottir, Snjolaug; Dahlbom, Kathe; Jonsrud, Christoffer; Duno, Morten

    2016-08-01

    Limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A is the most common limb girdle muscular dystrophy form worldwide. Although strict recessive inheritance is assumed, patients carrying a single mutation in the calpain 3 gene (CAPN3) are reported. Such findings are commonly attributed to incomplete mutation screening. In this investigation, we report 37 individuals (age range: 21-85 years, 21 females and 16 males) from 10 families in whom only one mutation in CAPN3 could be identified; a 21-bp, in-frame deletion (c.643_663del21). This mutation co-segregated with evidence of muscle disease and autosomal dominant transmission in several generations. Evidence of muscle disease was indicated by muscle pain, muscle weakness and wasting, significant fat replacement of muscles on imaging, myopathic changes on muscle biopsy and loss of calpain 3 protein on western blotting. Thirty-one of 34 patients had elevated creatine kinase or myoglobin. Muscle weakness was generally milder than observed in limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A, but affected the same muscle groups (proximal leg, lumbar paraspinal and medial gastrocnemius muscles). In some cases, the weakness was severely disabling. The 21-bp deletion did not affect mRNA maturation. Calpain 3 expression in muscle, assessed by western blot, was below 15% of normal levels in the nine mutation carriers in whom this could be tested. Haplotype analysis in four families from three different countries suggests that the 21-bp deletion is a founder mutation. This study provides strong evidence that heterozygosity for the c.643_663del21 deletion in CAPN3 results in a dominantly inherited muscle disease. The normal expression of mutated mRNA and the severe loss of calpain 3 on western blotting, suggest a dominant negative effect with a loss-of-function mechanism affecting the calpain 3 homodimer. This renders patients deficient in calpain 3 as in limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A, albeit in a milder form in most cases. Based on findings

  13. Limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A (CAPN3): mapping using allelic association.

    PubMed

    Lonjou, C; Collins, A; Beckmann, J; Allamand, V; Morton, N

    1998-01-01

    Recently a graphical study of linkage disequilibrium around the CAPN3 locus failed to refine the 1.3-Mb interval suggested by haplotype sharing. On the contrary, the Malecot model as implemented in the ALLASS program maps CAPN3 within 3 kb of its true location (23 kb from the locus midpoint), overcoming identified problems with small samples, interrelated sibships, and short duration.

  14. Characterization of the expression profile of calpain-3 (CAPN3) gene in chicken.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zeng-Rong; Zhu, Qing; Yao, Yong-Gang; Jiang, Xiao-Song; Du, Hua-Rui; Liu, Yi-Ping

    2012-04-01

    Calpain-3 is a skeletal muscle-specific protease and participates in the regulation of myogenesis. In this study, we quantified the expression of calpain-3 (CAPN3) mRNA in a Chinese local chicken breed (Sichuan Mountainous Black-boned chicken [MB]), to discern the tissue and ontogenic expression pattern. Meanwhile, we compared the CAPN3 mRNA expression pattern in MB chicken at 10 weeks with a commercial meat type chicken line (S01) of the same age to identify the unique expression pattern under different genetic background. A real time quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR) assay was developed for an accurate measurement of its expression in various tissues from chickens at different ages (0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 weeks). Expression of the CAPN3 mRNA was detected in the selected tissues, regardless of age. The breast muscle and leg muscle tissues had a significantly higher expression than the other tissues from the same individual (P < 0.01). Overall, the CAPN3 mRNA level exhibited a "rise-decline" developmental change in detected tissues except for brain. The S01 chicken had a higher expression of the CAPN3 mRNA in detected tissues than the MB chicken at 10 weeks. The present expression data of chicken CAPN3 gene may provide some information to shed light on the tissue and ontogenic expression pattern during chicken development.

  15. In vitro correction of a pseudoexon-generating deep intronic mutation in LGMD2A by antisense oligonucleotides and modified small nuclear RNAs.

    PubMed

    Blázquez, Lorea; Aiastui, Ana; Goicoechea, Maria; Martins de Araujo, Mafalda; Avril, Aurélie; Beley, Cyriaque; García, Luis; Valcárcel, Juan; Fortes, Puri; López de Munain, Adolfo

    2013-10-01

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A (LGMD2A) is the most frequent autosomal recessive muscular dystrophy. It is caused by mutations in the calpain-3 (CAPN3) gene. The majority of the mutations described to date are located in the coding sequence of the gene. However, it is estimated that 25% of the mutations are present at exon-intron boundaries and modify the pre-mRNA splicing of the CAPN3 transcript. We have previously described the first deep intronic mutation in the CAPN3 gene: c.1782+1072G>C mutation. This mutation causes the pseudoexonization of an intronic sequence of the CAPN3 gene in the mature mRNA. In the present work, we show that the point mutation generates the inclusion of the pseudoexon in the mRNA using a minigene assay. In search of a treatment that restores normal splicing, splicing modulation was induced by RNA-based strategies, which included antisense oligonucleotides and modified small-nuclear RNAs. The best effect was observed with antisense sequences, which induced pseudoexon skipping in both HeLa cells cotransfected with mutant minigene and in fibroblasts from patients. Finally, transfection of antisense sequences and siRNA downregulation of serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 1 (SRSF1) indicate that binding of this factor to splicing enhancer sequences is involved in pseudoexon activation.

  16. Report of limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2a in 6 Iranian patients, one with a novel deletion in CAPN3 gene.

    PubMed

    Fadaee, Mahsa; Kariminejad, Ariana; Fattahi, Zohreh; Nafissi, Shahriar; Godarzi, Hamed Reza; Beheshtian, Maryam; Vazehan, Raheleh; Akbari, Mohammad Reza; Kahrizi, Kimia; Najmabadi, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Calpain3 is a calcium-dependent intracellular protease involved in an autosomal recessive form of muscular dystrophy known as limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A. Many pathogenic mutations have been identified in calpain3, encoded by the CAPN3 gene, which leads to weakness of the pelvic and shoulder girdle muscles. In the present study, whole exome sequencing was performed on six unrelated Iranian families who presented with progressive muscle weakness, with a strong suspicion of Calpainopathies. Genetic analysis of CAPN3 gene revealed five causative variants which had not been reported in the Iranian population before including a novel 6 bp deletion (c.795_800delCATTGA) and four previously reported mutations (c.1939G > T, c.2243G > A, c.2257delGinsAA, and c.2380 + 2T > G). Our findings indicate that exome sequencing can be a very effective and affordable method to diagnose heterogeneous muscular dystrophies, especially in consanguineous populations such as Iran.

  17. Integrative variants, haplotypes and diplotypes of the CAPN3 and FRMD5 genes and several environmental exposures associate with serum lipid variables

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Tao; Yin, Rui-Xing; Pan, Ling; Yang, Shuo; Miao, Liu; Huang, Feng

    2017-01-01

    To determine whether the integrative variants, haplotypes and diplotypes of the calpain 3 (CAPN3) and the FERM domain containing 5 genes (FRMD5) and several environmental exposures are associated with an implication in lipid homeostasis, which are associated with cardiovascular risk. Genotyping of the CAPN3 rs4344713 and FRMD5 rs524908 was performed by Sanger sequencing in 1,640 subjects (Jing, 819 and Han, 821). Multivariate analyses of covariance models that adjusted by age, gender, body mass index (BMI), blood pressure and lifestyle (smoking and drinking), were constructed using variants, haplotypes and diplotypes of the CAPN3 rs4344713 and FRMD5 rs524908 as predictors and changes in lipid variables. Significant associations with low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and apolipoprotein (Apo) B were found. Linkage disequilibrium with each other showed the haplotype-phenotype associations with triglyceride and ApoA1. This study also suggested pleiotropic associations of the CAPN3-FRMD5 diplotypes with lipid variables. As potential confounders, diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and BMI were significantly associated with lipid variables. We conclude that integrative variants, haplotypes and diplotypes of the CAPN3 rs4344713 and FRMD5 rs524908, as well as DBP and BMI are associated with serum lipid variables in the Jing and Han populations. PMID:28332615

  18. Pathogenity of some limb girdle muscular dystrophy mutations can result from reduced anchorage to myofibrils and altered stability of calpain 3

    PubMed Central

    Ermolova, Natalia; Kudryashova, Elena; DiFranco, Marino; Vergara, Julio; Kramerova, Irina; Spencer, Melissa J.

    2011-01-01

    Calpain 3 (CAPN3) is a muscle-specific, calcium-dependent proteinase that is mutated in Limb Girdle Muscle Dystrophy type 2A. Most pathogenic missense mutations in LGMD2A affect CAPN3's proteolytic activity; however, two mutations, D705G and R448H, retain activity but nevertheless cause muscular dystrophy. Previously, we showed that D705G and R448H mutations reduce CAPN3s ability to bind to titin in vitro. In this investigation, we tested the consequence of loss of titin binding in vivo and examined whether this loss can be an underlying pathogenic mechanism in LGMD2A. To address this question, we created transgenic mice that express R448H or D705G in muscles, on wild-type (WT) CAPN3 or knock-out background. Both mutants were readily expressed in insect cells, but when D705G was expressed in skeletal muscle, it was not stable enough to study. Moreover, the D705G mutation had a dominant negative effect on endogenous CAPN3 when expressed on a WT background. The R448H protein was stably expressed in muscles; however, it was more rapidly degraded in muscle extracts compared with WT CAPN3. Increased degradation of R448H was due to non-cysteine, cellular proteases acting on the autolytic sites of CAPN3, rather than autolysis. Fractionation experiments revealed a significant decrease of R448H from the myofibrillar fraction, likely due to the mutant's inability to bind titin. Our data suggest that R448H and D705G mutations affect both CAPN3s anchorage to titin and its stability. These studies reveal a novel mechanism by which mutations that spare enzymatic activity can still lead to calpainopathy. PMID:21624972

  19. Enhanced tumorigenicity by mitochondrial DNA mild mutations.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Bermúdez, Alberto; Vallejo, Carmen G; Vicente-Blanco, Ramiro J; Gallardo, María Esther; Fernández-Moreno, Miguel Ángel; Quintanilla, Miguel; Garesse, Rafael

    2015-05-30

    To understand how mitochondria are involved in malignant transformation we have generated a collection of transmitochondrial cybrid cell lines on the same nuclear background (143B) but with mutant mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variants with different degrees of pathogenicity. These include the severe mutation in the tRNALys gene, m.8363G>A, and the three milder yet prevalent Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) mutations in the MT-ND1 (m.3460G>A), MT-ND4 (m.11778G>A) and MT-ND6 (m.14484T>C) mitochondrial genes. We found that 143B ρ0 cells devoid of mtDNA and cybrids harboring wild type mtDNA or that causing severe mitochondrial dysfunction do not produce tumors when injected in nude mice. By contrast cybrids containing mild mutant mtDNAs exhibit different tumorigenic capacities, depending on OXPHOS dysfunction.The differences in tumorigenicity correlate with an enhanced resistance to apoptosis and high levels of NOX expression. However, the final capacity of the different cybrid cell lines to generate tumors is most likely a consequence of a complex array of pro-oncogenic and anti-oncogenic factors associated with mitochondrial dysfunction.Our results demonstrate the essential role of mtDNA in tumorigenesis and explain the numerous and varied mtDNA mutations found in human tumors, most of which give rise to mild mitochondrial dysfunction.

  20. Enhanced tumorigenicity by mitochondrial DNA mild mutations

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Bermúdez, Alberto; Vallejo, Carmen G.; Vicente-Blanco, Ramiro J.; Gallardo, María Esther; Fernández-Moreno, Miguel Ángel; Quintanilla, Miguel; Garesse, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    To understand how mitochondria are involved in malignant transformation we have generated a collection of transmitochondrial cybrid cell lines on the same nuclear background (143B) but with mutant mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variants with different degrees of pathogenicity. These include the severe mutation in the tRNALys gene, m.8363G>A, and the three milder yet prevalent Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) mutations in the MT-ND1 (m.3460G>A), MT-ND4 (m.11778G>A) and MT-ND6 (m.14484T>C) mitochondrial genes. We found that 143B ρ0 cells devoid of mtDNA and cybrids harboring wild type mtDNA or that causing severe mitochondrial dysfunction do not produce tumors when injected in nude mice. By contrast cybrids containing mild mutant mtDNAs exhibit different tumorigenic capacities, depending on OXPHOS dysfunction. The differences in tumorigenicity correlate with an enhanced resistance to apoptosis and high levels of NOX expression. However, the final capacity of the different cybrid cell lines to generate tumors is most likely a consequence of a complex array of pro-oncogenic and anti-oncogenic factors associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. Our results demonstrate the essential role of mtDNA in tumorigenesis and explain the numerous and varied mtDNA mutations found in human tumors, most of which give rise to mild mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:25909222

  1. Autolytic activation of calpain 3 proteinase is facilitated by calmodulin protein.

    PubMed

    Ermolova, Natalia; Kramerova, Irina; Spencer, Melissa J

    2015-01-09

    Calpains are broadly distributed, calcium-dependent enzymes that induce limited proteolysis in a wide range of substrates. Mutations in the gene encoding the muscle-specific family member calpain 3 (CAPN3) underlie limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2A. We have shown previously that CAPN3 knockout muscles exhibit attenuated calcium release, reduced calmodulin kinase (CaMKII) signaling, and impaired muscle adaptation to exercise. However, neither the precise role of CAPN3 in these processes nor the mechanisms of CAPN3 activation in vivo have been fully elucidated. In this study, we identify calmodulin (CaM), a known transducer of the calcium signal, as the first positive regulator of CAPN3 autolytic activity. CaM was shown to bind CAPN3 at two sites located in the C2L domain. Biochemical studies using muscle extracts from transgenic mice overexpressing CAPN3 or its inactive mutant revealed that CaM binding enhanced CAPN3 autolytic activation. Furthermore, CaM facilitated CAPN3-mediated cleavage of its in vivo substrate titin in tissue extracts. Therefore, these studies reveal a novel interaction between CAPN3 and CaM and identify CaM as the first positive regulator of CAPN3 activity.

  2. Autolytic Activation of Calpain 3 Proteinase Is Facilitated by Calmodulin Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Ermolova, Natalia; Kramerova, Irina; Spencer, Melissa J.

    2015-01-01

    Calpains are broadly distributed, calcium-dependent enzymes that induce limited proteolysis in a wide range of substrates. Mutations in the gene encoding the muscle-specific family member calpain 3 (CAPN3) underlie limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2A. We have shown previously that CAPN3 knockout muscles exhibit attenuated calcium release, reduced calmodulin kinase (CaMKII) signaling, and impaired muscle adaptation to exercise. However, neither the precise role of CAPN3 in these processes nor the mechanisms of CAPN3 activation in vivo have been fully elucidated. In this study, we identify calmodulin (CaM), a known transducer of the calcium signal, as the first positive regulator of CAPN3 autolytic activity. CaM was shown to bind CAPN3 at two sites located in the C2L domain. Biochemical studies using muscle extracts from transgenic mice overexpressing CAPN3 or its inactive mutant revealed that CaM binding enhanced CAPN3 autolytic activation. Furthermore, CaM facilitated CAPN3-mediated cleavage of its in vivo substrate titin in tissue extracts. Therefore, these studies reveal a novel interaction between CAPN3 and CaM and identify CaM as the first positive regulator of CAPN3 activity. PMID:25389288

  3. Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy Type 2A Resulting From c.C479G and c.G1818A Mutations in the Calpain-3 Gene.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Edwardo; Pardo, Sherly; Mas Rodríguez, Manuel F; Vélez, John

    2015-12-01

    Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy type 2A (LGMD2A) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by progressive weakness of proximal muscles. Here, we describe a patient with clinical features consistent with LGMD2A who harbors 2 rare changes in the CAPN3 gene sequence of unknown clinical significance. Mechanisms by which these 2 mutations could affect the protein are discussed. The c.C479G mutation seems to affect the proteolytic domain of calpain-3. Whereas the novel mutation c.G1818A seems to affect mRNA translation of the protein region involved in titin binding. We strongly believe that these genomic variants in CAPN3 are indeed deleterious and thus are currently misclassified. Since LGMD2 is considered a disorder of autosomal recessive inheritance, further population studies involving the molecular characterization of symptomatic patients must be performed as well as in vitro studies to ascertain the functional effects of these specific variants.

  4. Epidemiological and Molecular Characterization of a Mexican Population Isolate with High Prevalence of Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy Type 2A Due to a Novel Calpain-3 Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Pantoja-Melendez, Carlos A.; Miranda-Duarte, Antonio; Roque-Ramirez, Bladimir; Zenteno, Juan C.

    2017-01-01

    Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy type 2 (LGMD2) is a group of autosomally recessive inherited disorders defined by weakness and wasting of the shoulder and pelvic girdle muscles. In the past, several population isolates with high incidence of LGMD2 arising from founder mutation effects have been identified. The aim of this work is to describe the results of clinical, epidemiologic, and molecular studies performed in a Mexican village segregating numerous cases of LGMD2. A population census was conducted in the village to identify all LGMD affected patients. Molecular analysis included genome wide homozygosity mapping using a 250K SNP Affymetrix microarray followed by PCR amplification and direct nucleotide sequencing of the candidate gene. In addition, DNA from 401 randomly selected unaffected villagers was analyzed to establish the carrier frequency of the LGMD2 causal mutation. A total of 32 LGMD2 patients were identified in the village, rendering a disease prevalence of 4.3 (CI: 2.9–5.9) cases per 1,000 habitants (1 in 232). Genome wide homozygosity mapping revealed that affected individuals shared a 6.6 Mb region of homozygosity at chromosome 15q15. The identified homozygous interval contained CAPN3, the gene responsible for LGMD2 type A (LGMD2A). Direct sequencing of this gene revealed homozygosity for a novel c.348C>A mutation (p.Ala116Asp) in DNA from all 20 affected subjects available for genetic screening, except one which was heterozygous for the mutation. In such patient, a heterozygous c.2362AG>TCATCT deletion/insertion was recognized as the second CAPN3 mutation. Western blot and autocatalytic activity analyses in protein lysates from skeletal muscle biopsy obtained from a p.Ala116Asp homozygous patient suggested that this particular mutation increased the autocatalytic activity of CAPN3. Thirty eigth heterozygotes of the p.Ala116Asp mutation were identified among 401 genotyped unaffected villagers, yielding a population carrier frequency of 1 in 11

  5. Epidemiological and Molecular Characterization of a Mexican Population Isolate with High Prevalence of Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy Type 2A Due to a Novel Calpain-3 Mutation.

    PubMed

    Pantoja-Melendez, Carlos A; Miranda-Duarte, Antonio; Roque-Ramirez, Bladimir; Zenteno, Juan C

    2017-01-01

    Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy type 2 (LGMD2) is a group of autosomally recessive inherited disorders defined by weakness and wasting of the shoulder and pelvic girdle muscles. In the past, several population isolates with high incidence of LGMD2 arising from founder mutation effects have been identified. The aim of this work is to describe the results of clinical, epidemiologic, and molecular studies performed in a Mexican village segregating numerous cases of LGMD2. A population census was conducted in the village to identify all LGMD affected patients. Molecular analysis included genome wide homozygosity mapping using a 250K SNP Affymetrix microarray followed by PCR amplification and direct nucleotide sequencing of the candidate gene. In addition, DNA from 401 randomly selected unaffected villagers was analyzed to establish the carrier frequency of the LGMD2 causal mutation. A total of 32 LGMD2 patients were identified in the village, rendering a disease prevalence of 4.3 (CI: 2.9-5.9) cases per 1,000 habitants (1 in 232). Genome wide homozygosity mapping revealed that affected individuals shared a 6.6 Mb region of homozygosity at chromosome 15q15. The identified homozygous interval contained CAPN3, the gene responsible for LGMD2 type A (LGMD2A). Direct sequencing of this gene revealed homozygosity for a novel c.348C>A mutation (p.Ala116Asp) in DNA from all 20 affected subjects available for genetic screening, except one which was heterozygous for the mutation. In such patient, a heterozygous c.2362AG>TCATCT deletion/insertion was recognized as the second CAPN3 mutation. Western blot and autocatalytic activity analyses in protein lysates from skeletal muscle biopsy obtained from a p.Ala116Asp homozygous patient suggested that this particular mutation increased the autocatalytic activity of CAPN3. Thirty eigth heterozygotes of the p.Ala116Asp mutation were identified among 401 genotyped unaffected villagers, yielding a population carrier frequency of 1 in 11

  6. An Enhanced Differential Evolution Algorithm Based on Multiple Mutation Strategies.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Wan-li; Meng, Xue-lei; An, Mei-qing; Li, Yin-zhen; Gao, Ming-xia

    2015-01-01

    Differential evolution algorithm is a simple yet efficient metaheuristic for global optimization over continuous spaces. However, there is a shortcoming of premature convergence in standard DE, especially in DE/best/1/bin. In order to take advantage of direction guidance information of the best individual of DE/best/1/bin and avoid getting into local trap, based on multiple mutation strategies, an enhanced differential evolution algorithm, named EDE, is proposed in this paper. In the EDE algorithm, an initialization technique, opposition-based learning initialization for improving the initial solution quality, and a new combined mutation strategy composed of DE/current/1/bin together with DE/pbest/bin/1 for the sake of accelerating standard DE and preventing DE from clustering around the global best individual, as well as a perturbation scheme for further avoiding premature convergence, are integrated. In addition, we also introduce two linear time-varying functions, which are used to decide which solution search equation is chosen at the phases of mutation and perturbation, respectively. Experimental results tested on twenty-five benchmark functions show that EDE is far better than the standard DE. In further comparisons, EDE is compared with other five state-of-the-art approaches and related results show that EDE is still superior to or at least equal to these methods on most of benchmark functions.

  7. An Enhanced Differential Evolution Algorithm Based on Multiple Mutation Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Wan-li; Meng, Xue-lei; An, Mei-qing; Li, Yin-zhen; Gao, Ming-xia

    2015-01-01

    Differential evolution algorithm is a simple yet efficient metaheuristic for global optimization over continuous spaces. However, there is a shortcoming of premature convergence in standard DE, especially in DE/best/1/bin. In order to take advantage of direction guidance information of the best individual of DE/best/1/bin and avoid getting into local trap, based on multiple mutation strategies, an enhanced differential evolution algorithm, named EDE, is proposed in this paper. In the EDE algorithm, an initialization technique, opposition-based learning initialization for improving the initial solution quality, and a new combined mutation strategy composed of DE/current/1/bin together with DE/pbest/bin/1 for the sake of accelerating standard DE and preventing DE from clustering around the global best individual, as well as a perturbation scheme for further avoiding premature convergence, are integrated. In addition, we also introduce two linear time-varying functions, which are used to decide which solution search equation is chosen at the phases of mutation and perturbation, respectively. Experimental results tested on twenty-five benchmark functions show that EDE is far better than the standard DE. In further comparisons, EDE is compared with other five state-of-the-art approaches and related results show that EDE is still superior to or at least equal to these methods on most of benchmark functions. PMID:26609304

  8. Anaerobically Grown Escherichia coli Has an Enhanced Mutation Rate and Distinct Mutational Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Shewaramani, Sonal; Finn, Thomas J.; Kassen, Rees; Rainey, Paul B.

    2017-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a major cause of mutation but little is known about how growth in the absence of oxygen impacts the rate and spectrum of mutations. We employed long-term mutation accumulation experiments to directly measure the rates and spectra of spontaneous mutation events in Escherichia coli populations propagated under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. To detect mutations, whole genome sequencing was coupled with methods of analysis sufficient to identify a broad range of mutational classes, including structural variants (SVs) generated by movement of repetitive elements. The anaerobically grown populations displayed a mutation rate nearly twice that of the aerobic populations, showed distinct asymmetric mutational strand biases, and greater insertion element activity. Consistent with mutation rate and spectra observations, genes for transposition and recombination repair associated with SVs were up-regulated during anaerobic growth. Together, these results define differences in mutational spectra affecting the evolution of facultative anaerobes. PMID:28103245

  9. Influence of a Small Fraction of Individuals with Enhanced Mutations on a Population Genetic Pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cebrat, S.; Stauffer, D.

    It has been observed that a higher mutation load could be introduced into the genomes of children conceived by assisted reproduction technology (fertilization in-vitro). This generates two effects — slightly higher mutational pressure on the whole genetic pool of population and inhomogeneity of mutation distributions in the genetic pool. Computer simulations of the Penna ageing model suggest that already a small fraction of births with enhanced number of new mutations can negatively influence the whole population.

  10. Enhanced hydrogen production of Enterobacter aerogenes mutated by nuclear irradiation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jun; Liu, Min; Song, Wenlu; Ding, Lingkan; Liu, Jianzhong; Zhang, Li; Cen, Kefa

    2017-03-01

    Nuclear irradiation was used for the first time to generate efficient mutants of hydrogen-producing bacteria Enterobacter aerogenes, which were screened with larger colour circles of more fermentative acid by-products. E. aerogenes cells were mutated by nuclear irradiation of (60)Co γ-rays. The screened E. aerogenes ZJU1 mutant with larger colour circles enhanced the hydrogenase activity from 89.8 of the wild strain to 157.4mLH2/(gDWh). The hereditary stability of the E. aerogenes ZJU1 mutant was certified after over ten generations of cultivation. The hydrogen yield of 301mLH2/gglucose with the mutant was higher by 81.8% than that of 166mL/gglucose with the wild strain. The peak hydrogen production rate of 27.2mL/(L·h) with the mutant was higher by 40.9% compared with that of 19.3mL/(L·h) with the wild strain. The mutant produced more acetate and butyrate but less ethanol compared with the wild strain during hydrogen fermentation.

  11. Enhancing human spermine synthase activity by engineered mutations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhe; Zheng, Yueli; Petukh, Margo; Pegg, Anthony; Ikeguchi, Yoshihiko; Alexov, Emil

    2013-01-01

    Spermine synthase (SMS) is an enzyme which function is to convert spermidine into spermine. It was shown that gene defects resulting in amino acid changes of the wild type SMS cause Snyder-Robinson syndrome, which is a mild-to-moderate mental disability associated with osteoporosis, facial asymmetry, thin habitus, hypotonia, and a nonspecific movement disorder. These disease-causing missense mutations were demonstrated, both in silico and in vitro, to affect the wild type function of SMS by either destabilizing the SMS dimer/monomer or directly affecting the hydrogen bond network of the active site of SMS. In contrast to these studies, here we report an artificial engineering of a more efficient SMS variant by transferring sequence information from another organism. It is confirmed experimentally that the variant, bearing four amino acid substitutions, is catalytically more active than the wild type. The increased functionality is attributed to enhanced monomer stability, lowering the pKa of proton donor catalytic residue, optimized spatial distribution of the electrostatic potential around the SMS with respect to substrates, and increase of the frequency of mechanical vibration of the clefts presumed to be the gates toward the active sites. The study demonstrates that wild type SMS is not particularly evolutionarily optimized with respect to the reaction spermidine → spermine. Having in mind that currently there are no variations (non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism, nsSNP) detected in healthy individuals, it can be speculated that the human SMS function is precisely tuned toward its wild type and any deviation is unwanted and disease-causing.

  12. Enhanced Tumor Formation in Mice Heterozygous for Blm Mutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heppner Goss, Kathleen; Risinger, Mary A.; Kordich, Jennifer J.; Sanz, Maureen M.; Straughen, Joel E.; Slovek, Lisa E.; Capobianco, Anthony J.; German, James; Boivin, Gregory P.; Groden, Joanna

    2002-09-01

    Persons with the autosomal recessive disorder Bloom syndrome are predisposed to cancers of many types due to loss-of-function mutations in the BLM gene, which encodes a recQ-like helicase. Here we show that mice heterozygous for a targeted null mutation of Blm, the murine homolog of BLM, develop lymphoma earlier than wild-type littermates in response to challenge with murine leukemia virus and develop twice the number of intestinal tumors when crossed with mice carrying a mutation in the Apctumor suppressor. These observations indicate that Blm is a modifier of tumor formation in the mouse and that Blm haploinsufficiency is associated with tumor predisposition, a finding with important implications for cancer risk in humans.

  13. Recessive mutations in a distal PTF1A enhancer cause isolated pancreatic agenesis.

    PubMed

    Weedon, Michael N; Cebola, Ines; Patch, Ann-Marie; Flanagan, Sarah E; De Franco, Elisa; Caswell, Richard; Rodríguez-Seguí, Santiago A; Shaw-Smith, Charles; Cho, Candy H-H; Allen, Hana Lango; Houghton, Jayne Al; Roth, Christian L; Chen, Rongrong; Hussain, Khalid; Marsh, Phil; Vallier, Ludovic; Murray, Anna; Ellard, Sian; Ferrer, Jorge; Hattersley, Andrew T

    2014-01-01

    The contribution of cis-regulatory mutations to human disease remains poorly understood. Whole-genome sequencing can identify all noncoding variants, yet the discrimination of causal regulatory mutations represents a formidable challenge. We used epigenomic annotation in human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived pancreatic progenitor cells to guide the interpretation of whole-genome sequences from individuals with isolated pancreatic agenesis. This analysis uncovered six different recessive mutations in a previously uncharacterized ~400-bp sequence located 25 kb downstream of PTF1A (encoding pancreas-specific transcription factor 1a) in ten families with pancreatic agenesis. We show that this region acts as a developmental enhancer of PTF1A and that the mutations abolish enhancer activity. These mutations are the most common cause of isolated pancreatic agenesis. Integrating genome sequencing and epigenomic annotation in a disease-relevant cell type can thus uncover new noncoding elements underlying human development and disease.

  14. An enhanced MITOMAP with a global mtDNA mutational phylogeny

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Pesini, Eduardo; Lott, Marie T.; Procaccio, Vincent; Poole, Jason C.; Brandon, Marty C.; Mishmar, Dan; Yi, Christina; Kreuziger, James; Baldi, Pierre; Wallace, Douglas C.

    2007-01-01

    The MITOMAP () data system for the human mitochondrial genome has been greatly enhanced by the addition of a navigable mutational mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) phylogenetic tree of ∼3000 mtDNA coding region sequences plus expanded pathogenic mutation tables and a nuclear-mtDNA pseudogene (NUMT) data base. The phylogeny reconstructs the entire mutational history of the human mtDNA, thus defining the mtDNA haplogroups and differentiating ancient from recent mtDNA mutations. Pathogenic mutations are classified by both genotype and phenotype, and the NUMT sequences permits detection of spurious inclusion of pseudogene variants during mutation analysis. These additions position MITOMAP for the implementation of our automated mtDNA sequence analysis system, Mitomaster. PMID:17178747

  15. Mutation analysis of NR2E3 and NRL genes in Enhanced S Cone Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wright, Alan F; Reddick, Adam C; Schwartz, Sharon B; Ferguson, Julie S; Aleman, Tomas S; Kellner, Ulrich; Jurklies, Bernhard; Schuster, Andreas; Zrenner, Eberhart; Wissinger, Bernd; Lennon, Alan; Shu, Xinhua; Cideciyan, Artur V; Stone, Edwin M; Jacobson, Samuel G; Swaroop, Anand

    2004-11-01

    Ten new and seventeen previously reported Enhanced S Cone Syndrome (ESCS) subjects were used to search for genetic heterogeneity. All subjects were diagnosed with ESCS on the basis of clinical, psychophysical and/or electroretinography testing using published criteria. Mutation analysis was performed on the NR2E3 nuclear receptor gene by single strand conformation analysis and direct sequencing, which revealed either homozygous (N=13) or compound heterozygous (N=11) mutations in 24 subjects (89%), heterozygous mutations in 2 subjects (7%) and no mutations in 1 subject (4%). Fifteen different mutations were identified, including six not previously reported. The subject (Patient A) with no detected NR2E3 mutation had features not usually associated with ESCS, in particular moderate rod photoreceptor function in peripheral retina and an abnormally thick retinal nerve fibre layer. Mutation analysis of the NRL, CRX, NR1D1 and THRB genes in this individual revealed a heterozygous one base-pair insertion in exon 2 of the NRL gene, which results in a predicted truncation of the NRL protein. Loss-of-function NRL alleles have not been described previously in humans, but since the same mutation was present in unaffected family members, it raises the possibility that the abnormal ESCS phenotype in Patient A may result from a digenic mechanism, with a heterozygous NRL mutation and a mutation in another unknown gene. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Enhanced Ratio of Signals Enables Digital Mutation Scanning for Rare Allele Detection

    PubMed Central

    Castellanos-Rizaldos, Elena; Paweletz, Cloud; Song, Chen; Oxnard, Geoffrey R.; Mamon, Harvey; Jänne, Pasi A.; Makrigiorgos, G. Mike

    2016-01-01

    The use of droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) for low-level DNA mutation detection in cancer, prenatal diagnosis, and infectious diseases is growing rapidly. However, although ddPCR has been implemented successfully for detection of rare mutations at pre-determined positions, no ddPCR adaptation for mutation scanning exists. Yet, frequently, clinically relevant mutations reside on multiple sequence positions in tumor suppressor genes or complex hotspot mutations in oncogenes. Here, we describe a combination of coamplification at lower denaturation temperature PCR (COLD-PCR) with ddPCR that enables digital mutation scanning within approximately 50-bp sections of a target amplicon. Two FAM/HEX-labeled hydrolysis probes matching the wild-type sequence are used during ddPCR. The ratio of FAM/HEX-positive droplets is constant when wild-type amplicons are amplified but deviates when mutations anywhere under the FAM or HEX probes are present. To enhance the change in FAM/HEX ratio, we employed COLD-PCR cycling conditions that enrich mutation-containing amplicons anywhere on the sequence. We validated COLD-ddPCR on multiple mutations in TP53 and in EGFR using serial mutation dilutions and cell-free circulating DNA samples, and demonstrate detection down to approximately 0.2% to 1.2% mutation abundance. COLD-ddPCR enables a simple, rapid, and robust two-fluorophore detection method for the identification of multiple mutations during ddPCR and potentially can identify unknown DNA variants present in the target sequence. PMID:25772705

  17. Variable Phenotype of Diabetes Mellitus in Siblings with a Homozygous PTF1A Enhancer Mutation.

    PubMed

    Gonc, E Nazlı; Ozon, Alev; Alikasifoglu, Ayfer; Haliloğlu, Mithat; Ellard, Sian; Shaw-Smith, Charles; Kandemir, Nurgun

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal diabetes is a rare form of diabetes, characterized by onset in the first 6 months of life. A number of cases are due to pancreas agenesis. Recently, PTF1A enhancer mutations have been shown to cause neonatal diabetes associated with pancreatic agenesis. Herein, we report the clinical features of two siblings with PTF1A enhancer mutations, one of whom had neonatal diabetes, whereas the elder sister had a milder form of the disease with onset of diabetes at 9 years of age. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Antibiotic treatment enhances the genome-wide mutation rate of target cells.

    PubMed

    Long, Hongan; Miller, Samuel F; Strauss, Chloe; Zhao, Chaoxian; Cheng, Lei; Ye, Zhiqiang; Griffin, Katherine; Te, Ronald; Lee, Heewook; Chen, Chi-Chun; Lynch, Michael

    2016-05-03

    Although it is well known that microbial populations can respond adaptively to challenges from antibiotics, empirical difficulties in distinguishing the roles of de novo mutation and natural selection have left several issues unresolved. Here, we explore the mutational properties of Escherichia coli exposed to long-term sublethal levels of the antibiotic norfloxacin, using a mutation accumulation design combined with whole-genome sequencing of replicate lines. The genome-wide mutation rate significantly increases with norfloxacin concentration. This response is associated with enhanced expression of error-prone DNA polymerases and may also involve indirect effects of norfloxacin on DNA mismatch and oxidative-damage repair. Moreover, we find that acquisition of antibiotic resistance can be enhanced solely by accelerated mutagenesis, i.e., without direct involvement of selection. Our results suggest that antibiotics may generally enhance the mutation rates of target cells, thereby accelerating the rate of adaptation not only to the antibiotic itself but to additional challenges faced by invasive pathogens.

  19. Antibiotic treatment enhances the genome-wide mutation rate of target cells

    PubMed Central

    Long, Hongan; Miller, Samuel F.; Strauss, Chloe; Zhao, Chaoxian; Cheng, Lei; Ye, Zhiqiang; Griffin, Katherine; Te, Ronald; Lee, Heewook; Chen, Chi-Chun; Lynch, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Although it is well known that microbial populations can respond adaptively to challenges from antibiotics, empirical difficulties in distinguishing the roles of de novo mutation and natural selection have left several issues unresolved. Here, we explore the mutational properties of Escherichia coli exposed to long-term sublethal levels of the antibiotic norfloxacin, using a mutation accumulation design combined with whole-genome sequencing of replicate lines. The genome-wide mutation rate significantly increases with norfloxacin concentration. This response is associated with enhanced expression of error-prone DNA polymerases and may also involve indirect effects of norfloxacin on DNA mismatch and oxidative-damage repair. Moreover, we find that acquisition of antibiotic resistance can be enhanced solely by accelerated mutagenesis, i.e., without direct involvement of selection. Our results suggest that antibiotics may generally enhance the mutation rates of target cells, thereby accelerating the rate of adaptation not only to the antibiotic itself but to additional challenges faced by invasive pathogens. PMID:27091991

  20. Enhancement of the safety of live influenza vaccine by attenuating mutations from cold-adapted hemagglutinin

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Yoon Jae; Jang, Yo Han; Kim, Paul; Lee, Yun Ha; Lee, Young Jae; Byun, Young Ho; Lee, Kwang-Hee; Kim, Kyusik; Seong, Baik Lin

    2016-04-15

    In our previous study, X-31ca-based H5N1 LAIVs, in particular, became more virulent in mice than the X-31ca MDV, possibly by the introduction of the surface antigens of highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza virus, implying that additional attenuation is needed in this cases to increase the safety level of the vaccine. In this report we suggest an approach to further increase the safety of LAIV through additional cold-adapted mutations in the hemagglutinin. The cold-adaptation of X-31 virus resulted in four amino acid mutations in the HA. We generated a panel of 7:1 reassortant viruses each carrying the hemagglutinins with individual single amino acid mutations. We examined their phenotypes and found a major attenuating mutation, N81K. This attenuation marker conferred additional temperature-sensitive and attenuation phenotype to the LAIV. Our data indicate that the cold-adapted mutation in the HA confers additional attenuation to the LAIV strain, without compromising its productivity and immune response. - Highlights: • Cold-adaptation process induced four amino acid mutations in the HA of X-31 virus. • The four mutations in the HA also contributed to attenuation of the X-31ca virus • N81K mutation was the most significant marker for the attenuation of X-31ca virus. • Introduction of N81K mutation into H3N2 LAIV further attenuated the vaccine. • This approach provides a useful guideline for enhancing the safety of the LAIVs.

  1. Late gadolinium enhanced cardiovascular magnetic resonance of lamin A/C gene mutation related dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to identify early features of lamin A/C gene mutation related dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) with cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR). We characterise myocardial and functional findings in carriers of lamin A/C mutation to facilitate the recognition of these patients using this method. We also investigated the connection between myocardial fibrosis and conduction abnormalities. Methods Seventeen lamin A/C mutation carriers underwent CMR. Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) and cine images were performed to evaluate myocardial fibrosis, regional wall motion, longitudinal myocardial function, global function and volumetry of both ventricles. The location, pattern and extent of enhancement in the left ventricle (LV) myocardium were visually estimated. Results Patients had LV myocardial fibrosis in 88% of cases. Segmental wall motion abnormalities correlated strongly with the degree of enhancement. Myocardial enhancement was associated with conduction abnormalities. Sixty-nine percent of our asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic patients showed mild ventricular dilatation, systolic failure or both in global ventricular analysis. Decreased longitudinal systolic LV function was observed in 53% of patients. Conclusions Cardiac conduction abnormalities, mildly dilated LV and depressed systolic dysfunction are common in DCM caused by a lamin A/C gene mutation. However, other cardiac diseases may produce similar symptoms. CMR is an accurate tool to determine the typical cardiac involvement in lamin A/C cardiomyopathy and may help to initiate early treatment in this malignant familiar form of DCM. PMID:21689390

  2. Toward PCR-free mutation detection based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culha, Mustafa; Karatas, Omer F.; Aydin, Omer; Kahraman, Mehmet; Keseroğlu, Kemal; Sayin, Ismail; Bayrak, Omer F.

    2009-02-01

    The development of an assay for the detection of gene mutations has been attempted based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). Using multiplexing property and high sensitivity of SERS technique, the detection of all mutation possibilities on one given spot is achievable. To test the feasibility of approach, SNPs and other types of mutations such as insertion and deletion are investigated. The PCR amplified and isolated genomic DNA without PCR amplification is immobilized on poly-L/D-lysine coated glass surface after denaturing with heating. The SERS probes are prepared by simultaneous attachment of oligonucleotides complementary to the target mutation regions and Raman active dyes to 13 nm gold nanoparticles (GNPs). After the hybridization of SERS probes on the poly-L/D-lysine surfaces, it was stained with silver colloidal nanoparticles for further enhancement of Raman scattering. In the second approach, Raman active dyes are chemically attached on gold nanoparticles and a thin layer of silver film is deposited on top of it to prepare core-shell nanoparticles. The complementary oligonucleotides to the target regions of the gene are chemically attached to silver surfaces of the nanoparticles. The promising results indicate that it is possible to detect certain mutation types without PCR amplification using the approach.

  3. Enhanced thermostability of keratinase by computational design and empirical mutation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Baihong; Zhang, Juan; Fang, Zhen; Gu, Lei; Liao, Xiangru; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2013-07-01

    Keratinases are proteolytic enzymes capable of degrading insoluble keratins. The importance of these enzymes is being increasingly recognized in fields as diverse as animal feed production, textile processing, detergent formulation, leather manufacture, and medicine. To enhance the thermostability of Bacillus licheniformis BBE11-1 keratinase, the PoPMuSiC algorithm was applied to predict the folding free energy change (ΔΔG) of amino acid substitutions. Use of the algorithm in combination with molecular modification of homologous subtilisin allowed the introduction of four amino acid substitutions (N122Y, N217S, A193P, N160C) into the enzyme by site-directed mutagenesis, and the mutant genes were expressed in Bacillus subtilis WB600. The quadruple mutant displayed synergistic or additive effects with an 8.6-fold increase in the t 1/2 value at 60 °C. The N122Y substitution also led to an approximately 5.6-fold increase in catalytic efficiency compared to that of the wild-type keratinase. These results provide further insight into the thermostability of keratinase and suggest further potential industrial applications.

  4. SCN10A Mutation in a Patient with Erythromelalgia Enhances C-Fiber Activity Dependent Slowing.

    PubMed

    Kist, Andreas M; Sagafos, Dagrun; Rush, Anthony M; Neacsu, Cristian; Eberhardt, Esther; Schmidt, Roland; Lunden, Lars Kristian; Ørstavik, Kristin; Kaluza, Luisa; Meents, Jannis; Zhang, Zhiping; Carr, Thomas Hedley; Salter, Hugh; Malinowsky, David; Wollberg, Patrik; Krupp, Johannes; Kleggetveit, Inge Petter; Schmelz, Martin; Jørum, Ellen; Lampert, Angelika; Namer, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Gain-of-function mutations in the tetrodotoxin (TTX) sensitive voltage-gated sodium channel (Nav) Nav1.7 have been identified as a key mechanism underlying chronic pain in inherited erythromelalgia. Mutations in TTX resistant channels, such as Nav1.8 or Nav1.9, were recently connected with inherited chronic pain syndromes. Here, we investigated the effects of the p.M650K mutation in Nav1.8 in a 53 year old patient with erythromelalgia by microneurography and patch-clamp techniques. Recordings of the patient's peripheral nerve fibers showed increased activity dependent slowing (ADS) in CMi and less spontaneous firing compared to a control group of erythromelalgia patients without Nav mutations. To evaluate the impact of the p.M650K mutation on neuronal firing and channel gating, we performed current and voltage-clamp recordings on transfected sensory neurons (DRGs) and neuroblastoma cells. The p.M650K mutation shifted steady-state fast inactivation of Nav1.8 to more hyperpolarized potentials and did not significantly alter any other tested gating behaviors. The AP half-width was significantly broader and the stimulated action potential firing rate was reduced for M650K transfected DRGs compared to WT. We discuss the potential link between enhanced steady state fast inactivation, broader action potential width and the potential physiological consequences.

  5. SCN10A Mutation in a Patient with Erythromelalgia Enhances C-Fiber Activity Dependent Slowing

    PubMed Central

    Neacsu, Cristian; Eberhardt, Esther; Schmidt, Roland; Lunden, Lars Kristian; Ørstavik, Kristin; Kaluza, Luisa; Meents, Jannis; Zhang, Zhiping; Carr, Thomas Hedley; Salter, Hugh; Malinowsky, David; Wollberg, Patrik; Krupp, Johannes; Kleggetveit, Inge Petter; Schmelz, Martin; Jørum, Ellen; Namer, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Gain-of-function mutations in the tetrodotoxin (TTX) sensitive voltage-gated sodium channel (Nav) Nav1.7 have been identified as a key mechanism underlying chronic pain in inherited erythromelalgia. Mutations in TTX resistant channels, such as Nav1.8 or Nav1.9, were recently connected with inherited chronic pain syndromes. Here, we investigated the effects of the p.M650K mutation in Nav1.8 in a 53 year old patient with erythromelalgia by microneurography and patch-clamp techniques. Recordings of the patient’s peripheral nerve fibers showed increased activity dependent slowing (ADS) in CMi and less spontaneous firing compared to a control group of erythromelalgia patients without Nav mutations. To evaluate the impact of the p.M650K mutation on neuronal firing and channel gating, we performed current and voltage-clamp recordings on transfected sensory neurons (DRGs) and neuroblastoma cells. The p.M650K mutation shifted steady-state fast inactivation of Nav1.8 to more hyperpolarized potentials and did not significantly alter any other tested gating behaviors. The AP half-width was significantly broader and the stimulated action potential firing rate was reduced for M650K transfected DRGs compared to WT. We discuss the potential link between enhanced steady state fast inactivation, broader action potential width and the potential physiological consequences. PMID:27598514

  6. Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A resulting from homozygous G2338C transversion mutation in the calpain-3 gene.

    PubMed

    Peddareddygari, Leema Reddy; Surgan, Victoria; Grewal, Raji P

    2010-12-01

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy represents a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of myopathies. Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy Type 2A, which is transmitted in an autosomal-recessive pattern, is caused by mutations in the calpain-3 (CAPN3) gene. A number of mutations have been reported in patients from throughout the world but not in the Asian-Indian population. We describe a genotype/phenotype analysis of an Asian-Indian patient with a history, neurologic examination, and investigations consistent with muscular dystrophy. Genetic analysis of this patient showed a homozygous G2338C transversion resulting in an amino acid change from aspartic acid 780 histidine in the CAPN3 gene confirming Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy Type 2A. Subsequent testing of the patient's family revealed that his parents and sister were heterozygous unaffected carriers. The G2338C transversion was detected as a compound heterozygous mutation in one patient in Germany. We report a homozygous case and expand the clinical spectrum of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy Type 2A to include Asian-Indians.

  7. DNA-Mutation Inventory to Refine and Enhance Cancer Treatment (DIRECT): a catalog of clinically relevant cancer mutations to enable genome-directed anticancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Paul; Chen, Heidi; Andrews, Jenny; Naser, Riyad; Pao, William; Horn, Leora

    2013-04-01

    Tumor gene mutation status is becoming increasingly important in the treatment of patients with cancer. A comprehensive catalog of tumor gene-response outcomes from individual patients is needed, especially for actionable mutations and rare variants. We created a proof-of-principle database [DNA-mutation Inventory to Refine and Enhance Cancer Treatment (DIRECT)], starting with lung cancer-associated EGF receptor (EGFR) mutations, to provide a resource for clinicians to prioritize treatment decisions based on a patient's tumor mutations at the point of care. A systematic search of literature published between June 2005 and May 2011 was conducted through PubMed to identify patient-level, mutation-drug response in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with EGFR mutant tumors. Minimum inclusion criteria included patient's EGFR mutation, corresponding treatment, and an associated radiographic outcome. A total of 1,021 patients with 1,070 separate EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy responses from 116 different publications were included. About 188 unique EGFR mutations occurring in 207 different combinations were identified: 149 different mutation combinations were associated with disease control and 42 were associated with disease progression. Four secondary mutations, in 16 different combinations, were associated with acquired resistance. As tumor sequencing becomes more common in oncology, this comprehensive electronic catalog can enable genome-directed anticancer therapy. DIRECT will eventually encompass all tumor mutations associated with clinical outcomes on targeted therapies. Users can make specific queries at http://www.mycancergenome.org/about/direct to obtain clinically relevant data associated with various mutations. ©2013 AACR.

  8. Genetic Correlations Greatly Increase Mutational Robustness and Can Both Reduce and Enhance Evolvability

    PubMed Central

    Greenbury, Sam F.; Schaper, Steffen; Ahnert, Sebastian E.; Louis, Ard A.

    2016-01-01

    Mutational neighbourhoods in genotype-phenotype (GP) maps are widely believed to be more likely to share characteristics than expected from random chance. Such genetic correlations should strongly influence evolutionary dynamics. We explore and quantify these intuitions by comparing three GP maps—a model for RNA secondary structure, the HP model for protein tertiary structure, and the Polyomino model for protein quaternary structure—to a simple random null model that maintains the number of genotypes mapping to each phenotype, but assigns genotypes randomly. The mutational neighbourhood of a genotype in these GP maps is much more likely to contain genotypes mapping to the same phenotype than in the random null model. Such neutral correlations can be quantified by the robustness to mutations, which can be many orders of magnitude larger than that of the null model, and crucially, above the critical threshold for the formation of large neutral networks of mutationally connected genotypes which enhance the capacity for the exploration of phenotypic novelty. Thus neutral correlations increase evolvability. We also study non-neutral correlations: Compared to the null model, i) If a particular (non-neutral) phenotype is found once in the 1-mutation neighbourhood of a genotype, then the chance of finding that phenotype multiple times in this neighbourhood is larger than expected; ii) If two genotypes are connected by a single neutral mutation, then their respective non-neutral 1-mutation neighbourhoods are more likely to be similar; iii) If a genotype maps to a folding or self-assembling phenotype, then its non-neutral neighbours are less likely to be a potentially deleterious non-folding or non-assembling phenotype. Non-neutral correlations of type i) and ii) reduce the rate at which new phenotypes can be found by neutral exploration, and so may diminish evolvability, while non-neutral correlations of type iii) may instead facilitate evolutionary exploration and so

  9. The H50Q mutation enhances α-synuclein aggregation, secretion, and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Khalaf, Ossama; Fauvet, Bruno; Oueslati, Abid; Dikiy, Igor; Mahul-Mellier, Anne-Laure; Ruggeri, Francesco Simone; Mbefo, Martial K; Vercruysse, Filip; Dietler, Giovanni; Lee, Seung-Jae; Eliezer, David; Lashuel, Hilal A

    2014-08-08

    Over the last two decades, the identification of missense mutations in the α-synuclein (α-Syn) gene SNCA in families with inherited Parkinson disease (PD) has reinforced the central role of α-Syn in PD pathogenesis. Recently, a new missense mutation (H50Q) in α-Syn was described in patients with a familial form of PD and dementia. Here we investigated the effects of this novel mutation on the biophysical properties of α-Syn and the consequences for its cellular function. We found that the H50Q mutation affected neither the structure of free or membrane-bound α-Syn monomer, its interaction with metals, nor its capacity to be phosphorylated in vitro. However, compared with the wild-type (WT) protein, the H50Q mutation accelerated α-Syn fibrillization in vitro. In cell-based models, H50Q mutation did not affect α-Syn subcellular localization or its ability to be phosphorylated by PLK2 and GRK6. Interestingly, H50Q increased α-Syn secretion from SHSY5Y cells into culture medium and induced more mitochondrial fragmentation in hippocampal neurons. Although the transient overexpression of WT or H50Q did not induce toxicity, both species induced significant cell death when added to the culture medium of hippocampal neurons. Strikingly, H50Q exhibited more toxicity, suggesting that the H50Q-related enhancement of α-Syn aggregation and secretion may play a role in the extracellular toxicity of this mutant. Together, our results provide novel insight into the mechanism by which this newly described PD-associated mutation may contribute to the pathogenesis of PD and related disorders.

  10. Natural mutations lead to enhanced proteasomal degradation of human Ncb5or, a novel flavoheme reductase.

    PubMed

    Kálmán, Fanni S; Lizák, Beáta; Nagy, Szilvia K; Mészáros, Tamás; Zámbó, Veronika; Mandl, József; Csala, Miklós; Kereszturi, Eva

    2013-07-01

    NADH cytochrome b5 oxidoreductase (Ncb5or) protects β-cells against oxidative stress and lipotoxicity. The predominant phenotype of lean Ncb5or-null mouse is insulin-dependent diabetes due to β-cell death. This suggests the putative role of NCB5OR polymorphism in human diabetes. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the effect of natural missense mutations on the expression of human NCB5OR. Protein and mRNA levels of five non-synonymous coding variants were analyzed in transfected HEK293 and HepG2 cells. Although the mRNA levels were only slightly affected by the mutations, the amount of Ncb5or protein was largely reduced upon two Glu to Gly replacements in the third exon (p.E87G, p.E93G). These two mutations remarkably and synergistically shortened the half-life of Ncb5or and their effect could be attenuated by proteasome inhibitors. Our results strongly indicate that p.E87G, p.E93G mutations lead to enhanced proteasomal degradation due to manifest conformational alterations in the b5 domain. These data provide first evidence for natural mutations in NCB5OR gene resulting in decreased protein levels and hence having potential implications in human pathology. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Current models for starch synthesis and the sugary enhancer1 (se1) mutation in Zea mays.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Jennifer A; Juvik, John A

    2004-06-01

    Among the desirable quality traits essential for commercial production of fresh or processed sweet corn, kernel sugar content is universally important. In sweet corn genotypes the primary kernel sugar is sucrose, which is elevated at the expense of starch, particularly amylopectin. Sweet corn mutations have been traditionally divided into two classes. Generally speaking, class one mutations affect cytosolic reactions early in the process of starch synthesis, before starch is synthesized, and class two mutations affect reactions within the amyloplast directly involving starch granule assembly. Two widely used but previously unclassified mutations are sugary1 (su1) and sugary enhancer1 (se1). The se1 gene is a recessive modifier of su1; therefore, both genes require mutual discussion. This review provides current information about the su1 and se1 maize endosperm mutations and describes evidence further supporting previous suggestions that they fit criteria for categorization as class two mutants [Science 151 (1966) 341]. Information on the genetics and phenotype of se1 will be summarized and the hypothesized role of the se1 gene product discussed within the context of current models for starch synthesis in Zea mays L.

  12. Validation of a mobile phone-assisted microarray decoding platform for signal-enhanced mutation detection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guanbin; Li, Caixia; Lu, Yuan; Hu, Hua; Xiang, Guangxin; Liang, Zhiqing; Liao, Pu; Dai, Pu; Xing, Wanli; Cheng, Jing

    2011-08-15

    We have established a mobile phone-assisted microarray decoding platform for signal-enhanced mutation detection. A large amount of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) was obtained by combining symmetric PCR and magnetic isolation, and ssDNA prepared with magnetic bead as label was further allowed to hybridize against the tag-array for decoding purpose. High sensitivity and specificity was achieved with the detection of genomic DNA. When simultaneously genotyping nine common mutations associated with hereditary hearing loss, the detection limit of 1 ng genomic DNA was achieved. Significantly, a mobile phone was also used to record and decode the genotyping results through a custom-designed imaging adaptor and a dedicated mobile phone software. A total of 51 buccal swabs from patients probably with deafness-related mutations were collected and analyzed. The genotyping results were all confirmed by fluorescence-based laser confocal scanning and direct DNA sequencing. This mobile phone-assisted decoding platform provides an effective but economic mutation detection alternative for the future quicker and sensitive detection of virtually any mutation-related diseases in developing and underdeveloped countries.

  13. Enhanced slow inactivation by V445M: a sodium channel mutation associated with myotonia.

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, M P; Cannon, S C

    1999-01-01

    Over 20 different missense mutations in the alpha subunit of the adult skeletal muscle Na channel have been identified in families with either myotonia (muscle stiffness) or periodic paralysis, or both. The V445M mutation was recently found in a family with myotonia but no weakness. This mutation in transmembrane segment IS6 is novel because no other disease-associated mutations are in domain I. Na currents were recorded from V445M and wild-type channels transiently expressed in human embryonic kidney cells. In common with other myotonic mutants studied to date, fast gating behavior was altered by V445M in a manner predicted to increase excitability: an impairment of fast inactivation increased the persistent Na current at 10 ms and activation had a hyperpolarized shift (4 mV). In contrast, slow inactivation was enhanced by V445M due to both a slower recovery (10 mV left shift in beta(V)) and an accelerated entry rate (1.6-fold). Our results provide additional evidence that IS6 is crucial for slow inactivation and show that enhanced slow inactivation cannot prevent myotonia, whereas previous studies have shown that disrupted slow inactivation predisposes to episodic paralysis. PMID:9929487

  14. Novel MYH11 and ACTA2 mutations reveal a role for enhanced TGFβ signaling in FTAAD

    PubMed Central

    Renard, Marjolijn; Callewaert, Bert; Baetens, Machteld; Campens, Laurence; MacDermot, Kay; Fryns, Jean-Pierre; Bonduelle, Maryse; Dietz, Hal; Gaspar, Isabel Mendes; Cavaco, Diogo; Stattin, Eva-Lena; Schrander-Stumpel, Constance; Coucke, Paul; Loeys, Bart; De Paepe, Anne; De Backer, Julie

    2011-01-01

    Background Thoracic aortic aneurysm / dissection (TAAD) is a common phenotype that may occur as an isolated manifestation or within the constellation of a defined syndrome. In contrast to syndromic TAAD, the elucidation of the genetic basis of isolated TAAD has only recently started. To date, defects have been found in genes encoding extracellular matrix proteins (fibrillin-1, FBN1; collagen type III alpha 1, COL3A1), proteins involved in transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) signaling (TGFβ receptor 1 and 2, TGFBR1/2; and SMAD3) or proteins that build up the contractile apparatus of aortic smooth muscle cells (myosin heavy chain 11, MYH11; smooth muscle actin alpha 2, ACTA2; and MYLK). Methods and results In 110 non-syndromic TAAD patients that previously tested negative for FBN1 or TGFBR1/2 mutations, we identified 7 ACTA2 mutations in a cohort of 43 familial TAAD patients, including 2 premature truncating mutations. Sequencing of MYH11 revealed an in frame splice-site alteration in one out of two probands with TAA(D) associated with PDA but none in the series of 22 probands from the cohort of 110 patients with non-syndromic TAAD. Interestingly, immunohistochemical staining of aortic biopsies of a patient and a family member with MYH11 and patients with ACTA2 missense mutations showed upregulation of the TGFβ signaling pathway. Conclusions MYH11 mutations are rare and typically identified in patients with TAAD associated with PDA. ACTA2 mutations were identified in 16% of a cohort presenting familial TAAD. Different molecular defects in TAAD may account for a different pathogenic mechanism of enhanced TGFβ signaling. PMID:21937134

  15. Mutations That Enhance the Ciprofloxacin Resistance of Escherichia coli with qnrA1

    PubMed Central

    Vinué, Laura; Corcoran, Marian A.; Hooper, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Plasmid-mediated qnr genes provide only a modest decrease in quinolone susceptibility but facilitate the selection of higher-level resistance. In Escherichia coli strain J53 without qnr, ciprofloxacin resistance often involves mutations in the GyrA subunit of DNA gyrase. Mutations in gyrA were absent, however, when 43 mutants with decreased ciprofloxacin susceptibility were selected from J53(pMG252) with qnrA1. Instead, in 13 mutants, individual and whole-genome sequencing identified mutations in marR and soxR associated with increased expression of marA and soxS and, through them, increased expression of the AcrAB pump, which effluxes quinolones. Nine mutants had increased expression of the MdtE efflux pump, and six demonstrated increased expression of the ydhE pump gene. Many efflux mutants also had increased resistance to novobiocin, another pump substrate, but other mutants were novobiocin hypersusceptible. Mutations in rfaD and rfaE in the pathway for inner core lipopolysaccharide (LPS) biosynthesis were identified in five such strains. Many of the pump and LPS mutants had decreased expression of OmpF, the major porin channel for ciprofloxacin entry. Three mutants had increased expression of qnrA that persisted when pMG252 from these strains was outcrossed. gyrA mutations were also rare when mutants with decreased ciprofloxacin susceptibility were selected from E. coli J53 with aac(6′)-Ib-cr or qepA. We suggest that multiple genes conferring low-level resistance contribute to enhanced ciprofloxacin resistance selected from an E. coli strain carrying qnrA1, aac(6′)-Ib-cr, or qepA because these determinants decrease the effective ciprofloxacin concentration and allow more common but lower-resistance mutations than those in gyrA to predominate. PMID:26711751

  16. Mutations That Enhance the Ciprofloxacin Resistance of Escherichia coli with qnrA1.

    PubMed

    Vinué, Laura; Corcoran, Marian A; Hooper, David C; Jacoby, George A

    2015-12-28

    Plasmid-mediated qnr genes provide only a modest decrease in quinolone susceptibility but facilitate the selection of higher-level resistance. In Escherichia coli strain J53 without qnr, ciprofloxacin resistance often involves mutations in the GyrA subunit of DNA gyrase. Mutations in gyrA were absent, however, when 43 mutants with decreased ciprofloxacin susceptibility were selected from J53(pMG252) with qnrA1. Instead, in 13 mutants, individual and whole-genome sequencing identified mutations in marR and soxR associated with increased expression of marA and soxS and, through them, increased expression of the AcrAB pump, which effluxes quinolones. Nine mutants had increased expression of the MdtE efflux pump, and six demonstrated increased expression of the ydhE pump gene. Many efflux mutants also had increased resistance to novobiocin, another pump substrate, but other mutants were novobiocin hypersusceptible. Mutations in rfaD and rfaE in the pathway for inner core lipopolysaccharide (LPS) biosynthesis were identified in five such strains. Many of the pump and LPS mutants had decreased expression of OmpF, the major porin channel for ciprofloxacin entry. Three mutants had increased expression of qnrA that persisted when pMG252 from these strains was outcrossed. gyrA mutations were also rare when mutants with decreased ciprofloxacin susceptibility were selected from E. coli J53 with aac(6')-Ib-cr or qepA. We suggest that multiple genes conferring low-level resistance contribute to enhanced ciprofloxacin resistance selected from an E. coli strain carrying qnrA1, aac(6')-Ib-cr, or qepA because these determinants decrease the effective ciprofloxacin concentration and allow more common but lower-resistance mutations than those in gyrA to predominate.

  17. A 168 bp derivative of Suppressor-mutator/Enhancer is responsible for the maize o2-23 mutation.

    PubMed

    Aukerman, M J; Schmidt, R J

    1993-01-01

    From a directed transposon tagging of the maize Opaque-2 gene (O2), we have isolated a stable mutant o2 allele, o2-23. Cloning and molecular analysis of the allele revealed a 168 nucleotide insertion in the third exon of o2. The sequence of this small insertion indicated identity with the 5' and 3' ends of the 8.3 kb Suppressor-mutator/Enhancer (Spm/En) transposable element. This represents the smallest deletion derivative of Spm (dSpm) thus far characterized in maize. Genetic crosses of plants homozygous for o2-23 with plants homozygous for both an o2 null allele (o2-R) and an autonomous Spm produce stable opaque seed having no apparent sectors of vitreous endosperm. DNA fragments of the size expected if the dSpm were to excise were not detectable by Southern analysis, suggesting that this element is unable to transpose. Northern analysis detected an o2-23 mRNA that was much more abundant in o2-23 seeds lacking Spm than in o2-23 seeds containing Spm, consistent with the idea that Spm transacting functions can suppress the accumulation of the o2-23 transcript.

  18. A transforming mutation enhances the activity of the c-Kit soluble tyrosine kinase domain.

    PubMed Central

    Lam, L P; Chow, R Y; Berger, S A

    1999-01-01

    An activating mutation (DY814) located in the catalytic domain of the c-Kit receptor has been found in mastocytomas from human, mouse and rat. We evaluated the enzymic properties of purified wild-type (WT) and DY814 tyrosine kinase domains expressed in Pichia pastoris. A linker encoding the Flag epitope was fused to c-Kit cDNA species, enabling affinity purification of the proteins with anti-Flag antibodies. Yeast lysates expressing DY814 contained multiple tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins, whereas WT lysates had no detectable tyrosine phosphorylation. Purification of the WT and mutant kinases in the presence of vanadate demonstrated that both enzymes undergo autophosphorylation. Kinetic analyses of WT and DY814 kinases indicated that at 20 nM enzyme concentration the mutation increases the specific activity 10-fold and decreases the apparent Km for ATP 9-fold. WT activity displayed a hyperbolic dependence on enzyme concentration, consistent with a requirement for dimerization or aggregation for activity. This activity was also enhanced by anti-Flag antibodies. In contrast, the dependence of DY814 activity on enzyme concentration was primarily linear and only marginally enhanced by anti-Flag antibodies. Gel-filtration analysis showed that the WT kinase migrated as a monomer, whereas the DY814 mutant migrated as a dimer. These results indicate that this point mutation promotes dimerization of the c-Kit kinase, potentially contributing to its transforming potential in mast cells. PMID:9931308

  19. Disruption of Autoregulatory Feedback by a Mutation in a Remote, Ultraconserved PAX6 Enhancer Causes Aniridia

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Shipra; Bengani, Hemant; Fish, Margaret; Brown, Alison; Divizia, Maria Teresa; de Marco, Riccardo; Damante, Guiseppe; Grainger, Robert; van Heyningen, Veronica; Kleinjan, Dirk A.

    2013-01-01

    The strictly regulated expression of most pleiotropic developmental control genes is critically dependent on the activity of long-range cis-regulatory elements. This was revealed by the identification of individuals with a genetic condition lacking coding-region mutations in the gene commonly associated with the disease but having a variety of nearby chromosomal abnormalities, collectively described as cis-ruption disease cases. The congenital eye malformation aniridia is caused by haploinsufficiency of the developmental regulator PAX6. We discovered a de novo point mutation in an ultraconserved cis-element located 150 kb downstream from PAX6 in an affected individual with intact coding region and chromosomal locus. The element SIMO acts as a strong enhancer in developing ocular structures. The mutation disrupts an autoregulatory PAX6 binding site, causing loss of enhancer activity, resulting in defective maintenance of PAX6 expression. These findings reveal a distinct regulatory mechanism for genetic disease by disruption of an autoregulatory feedback loop critical for maintenance of gene expression through development. PMID:24290376

  20. Migraine Mutations Impair Hippocampal Learning Despite Enhanced Long-Term Potentiation

    PubMed Central

    Dilekoz, Ergin; Houben, Thijs; Eikermann-Haerter, Katharina; Balkaya, Mustafa; Lenselink, A. Mariette; Whalen, Michael J.; Spijker, Sabine; Ferrari, Michel D.; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    To explain cognitive and memory difficulties observed in some familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) patients, we examined hippocampal neurotransmission and plasticity in knock-in mice expressing the FHM type 1 (FHM1) R192Q gain-of function mutation in the CACNA1A gene that encodes the α1A subunit of neuronal CaV2.1 channels. We determined stimulus intensity–response curves for anterior commissure-evoked hippocampal CA1 field potentials in strata pyramidale and radiatum and assessed neuroplasticity by inducing long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) in anesthetized mice in vivo. We also studied learning and memory using contextual fear-conditioning, Morris water maze, and novel object recognition tests. Hippocampal field potentials were significantly enhanced in R192Q mice compared with wild-type controls. Stimulus intensity–response curves were shifted to the left and displayed larger maxima in the mutants. LTP was augmented by twofold in R192Q mice, whereas LTD was unchanged compared with wild-type mice. R192Q mice showed significant spatial memory deficits in contextual fear-conditioning and Morris water maze tests compared with wild-type controls. Novel object recognition was not impaired in R192Q mice; however, mice carrying the more severe S218L CACNA1A mutation showed marked deficits in this test, suggesting a genotype–phenotype relationship. Thus, whereas FHM1 gain-of-function mutations enhance hippocampal excitatory transmission and LTP, learning and memory are paradoxically impaired, providing a possible explanation for cognitive changes detected in FHM. Data suggest that abnormally enhanced plasticity can be as detrimental to efficient learning as reduced plasticity and highlight how genetically enhanced neuronal excitability may impact cognitive function. PMID:25716839

  1. The callipyge mutation enhances bidirectional long-range DLK1-GTL2 intergenic transcription in cis

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Haruko; Caiment, Florian; Smit, Maria; Hiard, Samuel; Tordoir, Xavier; Cockett, Noelle; Georges, Michel; Charlier, Carole

    2006-01-01

    The callipyge mutation (CLPG) is an A to G transition that affects a muscle-specific long-range control element located in the middle of the 90-kb DLK1-GTL2 intergenic (IG) region. It causes ectopic expression of a 327-kb cluster of imprinted genes in skeletal muscle, resulting in the callipyge muscular hypertrophy and its non-Mendelian inheritance pattern known as polar overdominance. We herein demonstrate that the CLPG mutation alters the muscular epigenotype of the DLK1-GTL2 IG region in cis, including hypomethylation, acquisition of novel DNase-I hypersentivite sites, and, most strikingly, strongly enhanced bidirectional, long-range IG transcription. The callipyge phenotype thus emerges as a unique model to study the functional significance of IG transcription, which recently has proven to be a widespread, yet elusive, feature of the mammalian genome. PMID:16690740

  2. Locked Nucleic Acid Probes (LNA) for Enhanced Detection of Low-Level, Clinically Significant Mutations.

    PubMed

    Nafa, Khedoudja; Hameed, Meera; Arcila, Marie E

    2016-01-01

    The detection of clinically significant somatic mutations present at low level in a tissue sample represents a challenge in any laboratory. While several high sensitivity methods are described, the incorporation of these new techniques in a clinical lab may be difficult if the technology is not readily available or requires major changes in the workflow of the laboratory. Techniques that are robust and easily adapted to existing laboratory protocols are highly advantageous. In this chapter we describe the use of locked nucleic acid (LNA) probes to modify existing polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based protocols which can then be sequenced by Sanger sequencing. LNA probes are used to enhance the sensitivity of Sanger sequencing to mutation frequencies below 1 %. The method is robust and is easily incorporated for assessment of any sample with low tumor content or low mutant allele burden.

  3. Enhanced detection of TP53 mutations using a GC-clamp in denaturing high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Greiner, Timothy C

    2007-03-01

    Although denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) is a highly effective technique for screening for TP53 mutations, the use of denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) is a growing methodology. This report describes a comparison between DHPLC and DGGE in the detection of TP53 mutations in hematopoietic cell lines and lymphomas. In addition, the improved effectiveness of guanine cytosine (GC)-clamped DHPLC for TP53 screening is detailed. Thirty DNA samples with known TP53 mutations in the hotspot region of codons 5-8, previously identified by DGGE, were analyzed by DHPLC. We found 100% concordance in mutation detection by DHPLC with DGGE. Similar to the improved efficacy observed in DGGE, the addition of 40 nucleotide GC-clamps composed of guanine and cytosine bases at one end of the product enhanced the detection of a mutation pattern by DHPLC. DHPLC of GC-clamped products is a viable and faster alternative method for screening TP53 mutations.

  4. Cornelia de Lange individuals with new and recurrent SMC1A mutations enhance delineation of mutation repertoire and phenotypic spectrum.

    PubMed

    Gervasini, Cristina; Russo, Silvia; Cereda, Anna; Parenti, Ilaria; Masciadri, Maura; Azzollini, Jacopo; Melis, Daniela; Aravena, Teresa; Doray, Bérénice; Ferrarini, Alessandra; Garavelli, Livia; Selicorni, Angelo; Larizza, Lidia

    2013-11-01

    We report on the clinical and molecular characterization of eight patients, one male and seven females, with clinical diagnosis of Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS), who were found to carry distinct mutations of the SMC1A gene. Five of the eight mutations are novel, with two involving amino acid residues previously described as altered in a different way. The other three have been reported each in a single case. Comparison of pairs of individuals with the same mutation indicates only partial overlap of their clinical phenotypes. The following novel missense mutations, all affecting highly conserved amino acid residues, were found: p.R398G in the N-terminal coiled-coil domain, p.V651M in the C-terminal coiled-coil/hinge junction, p.R693G in the C-terminal coiled-coil, and p.N1166T and p.L1189F in the C-terminal ABC cassette. The latter is localized in the H-loop, and represents the first mutation involving a functional motif of SMC1A protein. The effect of the mutations on SMC1A protein function has been predicted using four bioinformatic tools. All mutations except p.V651M were scored as pathogenic by three or four of the tools. p.V651M was found in the only male individual of our cohort, who presented with the most severe phenotype. This raises the issue of gender effect when addressing mutation-phenotype correlation for genes such as SMC1A, which incompletely escapes X-inactivation. Our clinical and molecular findings expand the total number of characterized SMC1A-mutated patients (from 44 to 52) and the restricted repertoire of SMC1A mutations (from 29 to 34), contributing to the molecular and clinical signature of SMC1A-based CdLS. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Mutations in ash1 and trx enhance P-element-dependent silencing in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    McCracken, Allen; Locke, John

    2016-08-01

    In Drosophila melanogaster, the mini-w(+) transgene in Pci is normally expressed throughout the adult eye; however, when other P or KP elements are present, a variegated-eye phenotype results, indicating random w(+) silencing during development called P-element-dependent silencing (PDS). Mutant Su(var)205 and Su(var)3-7 alleles act as haplo-suppressors/triplo-enhancers of this variegated phenotype, indicating that these heterochromatic modifiers act dose dependently in PDS. Previously, we recovered a spontaneous mutation of P{lacW}ci(Dplac) called P{lacW}ci(DplacE1) (E1) that variegated in the absence of P elements, presumably due to the insertion of an adjacent gypsy element. From a screen for genetic modifiers of E1 variegation, we describe here the isolation of five mutations in ash1 and three in trx that enhance the E1 variegated phenotype in a dose-dependent and cumulative manner. These mutant alleles enhance PDS at E1, and in E1/P{lacW}ci(Dplac), but suppress position effect variegation (PEV) at In(1)w(m)(4). This opposite action is consistent with a model where ASH1 and TRX mark transcriptionally active chromatin domains. If ASH1 or TRX function is lost or reduced, heterochromatin can spread into these domains creating a sink that diverts heterochromatic proteins from other variegating locations, which then may express a suppressed phenotype.

  6. Estimation and enhancement of real-time software reliability through mutation analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geist, Robert; Offutt, A. J.; Harris, Frederick C., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    A simulation-based technique for obtaining numerical estimates of the reliability of N-version, real-time software is presented. An extended stochastic Petri net is employed to represent the synchronization structure of N versions of the software, where dependencies among versions are modeled through correlated sampling of module execution times. Test results utilizing specifications for NASA's planetary lander control software indicate that mutation-based testing could hold greater potential for enhancing reliability than the desirable but perhaps unachievable goal of independence among N versions.

  7. Estimation and enhancement of real-time software reliability through mutation analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geist, Robert; Offutt, A. J.; Harris, Frederick C., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    A simulation-based technique for obtaining numerical estimates of the reliability of N-version, real-time software is presented. An extended stochastic Petri net is employed to represent the synchronization structure of N versions of the software, where dependencies among versions are modeled through correlated sampling of module execution times. Test results utilizing specifications for NASA's planetary lander control software indicate that mutation-based testing could hold greater potential for enhancing reliability than the desirable but perhaps unachievable goal of independence among N versions.

  8. Enhanced cellulase production of the Trichoderma viride mutated by microwave and ultraviolet.

    PubMed

    Li, Xing-hua; Yang, Hua-jun; Roy, Bhaskar; Park, Enoch Y; Jiang, Li-jun; Wang, Dan; Miao, Yun-gen

    2010-03-31

    Cellulase-producing fungi Trichoderma viride were cultured and fermented on the solid-state wheat bran fermentation medium. The characteristics of its carboxymethyl cellulase (CMCase) in the condition of this solid-state fermentation were evaluated, and the optimum culture time, optimum pH and optimum temperature for CMCase activity of T. viride fermented in this solid state were 60h, 5.0 and 50 degrees C, respectively. Carboxymethyl cellulose sodium (CMC-Na) and Congo red were used to screen the strains that had stronger ability to produce enzymes. After the compound mutagenesis by microwave and ultraviolet, seven mutant strains (M-B1-M-B7) were selected and their CMCase activities were assayed. Five of them (M-B1, M-B2, M-B3, M-B5 and M-B7) had significantly stronger ability to produce enzymes than the normal wild type, and they were also very stable for a long period up to 9 generations to produce cellulase. Molecular studies showed that there were some base mutations in endoglucanase I (EG I) genes of mutants M-B1, M-B2, M-B3 and M-B5, but no change in M-B7, suggesting that some amino mutations in EG I proteins caused by base mutations could lead to enhanced cellulase production.

  9. A single mutation in Securin induces chromosomal instability and enhances cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Mora-Santos, Mar; Castilla, Carolina; Herrero-Ruiz, Joaquín; Giráldez, Servando; Limón-Mortés, M Cristina; Sáez, Carmen; Japón, Miguel Á; Tortolero, Maria; Romero, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Pituitary tumour transforming gene (pttg1) encodes Securin, a protein involved in the inhibition of sister chromatid separation binding to Separase until the onset of anaphase. Separase is a cysteine-protease that degrades cohesin to segregate the sister chromatids to opposite poles of the cell. The amount of Securin is strongly regulated because it should allow Separase activation when it is degraded by the anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome, should arrest the cell cycle after DNA damage, when it is degraded through SKP1-CUL1-βTrCP ubiquitin ligase, and its overexpression induces tumour formation and correlates with metastasis in multiple tumours. Securin is a phosphoprotein that contains 32 potentially phosphorylatable residues. We mutated and analysed most of them, and found a single mutant, hSecT60A, that showed enhanced oncogenic properties. Our fluorescence activated cell sorting analysis, fluorescence in situ hybridisation assays, tumour cell migration and invasion experiments and gene expression by microarrays analysis clearly involved hSecT60A in chromosomal instability and cell invasion. These results show, for the first time, that a single mutation in pttg1 is sufficient to trigger the oncogenic properties of Securin. The finding of this point mutation in patients might be used as an effective strategy for early detection of cancer. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Connection Subdomain Mutations in HIV-1 Subtype-C Treatment-Experienced Patients Enhance NRTI and NNRTI Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Delviks-Frankenberry, Krista A.; Lengruber, Renan B.; Santos, Andre F.; Silveira, Jussara M.; Soares, Marcelo A.; Kearney, Mary F.; Maldarelli, Frank; Pathak, Vinay K.

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the connection subdomain (CN) and RNase H domain (RH) of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) from subtype B-infected patients enhance nucleoside and nonnucleoside RT inhibitor (NRTI and NNRTI) resistance by affecting the balance between polymerization and RNase H activity. To determine whether CN mutations in subtype C influence drug sensitivity, single genome sequencing was performed on Brazilian subtype C-infected patients failing RTI therapy. CN mutations identified were similar to subtype B, including A376S, A400T, Q334D, G335D, N348I, and A371V, and increased AZT resistance in the presence of thymidine analog mutations. CN mutations also enhanced NNRTI resistance in the presence of classical NNRTI mutations: etravirine resistance was enhanced 6- to 11-fold in the presence of L100I/K103N/Y181C. These results indicate that selection of CN mutations in treatment-experienced patients also occurs in subtype-C-infected patients and are likely to provide valuable information in predicting clinical RTI resistance. PMID:23068886

  11. An Oncogenic Super-Enhancer Formed Through Somatic Mutation of a Noncoding Intergenic Element

    PubMed Central

    Mansour, Marc R.; Abraham, Brian J; Anders, Lars; Berezovskaya, Alla; Gutierrez, Alejandro; Durbin, Adam D; Etchin, Julia; Lawton, Lee; Sallan, Stephen E.; Silverman, Lewis B.; Loh, Mignon L.; Hunger, Stephen P.; Sanda, Takaomi; Young, Richard A.; Look, A. Thomas

    2016-01-01

    In certain human cancers, the expression of critical oncogenes is driven from large regulatory elements, called super-enhancers, which recruit much of the cell’s transcriptional apparatus and are defined by extensive acetylation of histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27ac). In a subset of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cases, we found that heterozygous somatic mutations are acquired that introduce binding motifs for the MYB transcription factor in a precise noncoding site, which creates a super-enhancer upstream of the TAL1 oncogene. MYB binds to this new site and recruits it’s H3K27 acetylase binding partner CBP, as well as core components of a major leukemogenic transcriptional complex that contains RUNX1, GATA-3, and TAL1 itself. Additionally, most endogenous super-enhancers found in T-ALL cells are occupied by MYB and CBP, suggesting a general role for MYB in super-enhancer initiation. Thus, this study identifies a genetic mechanism responsible for the generation of oncogenic super-enhancers in malignant cells. PMID:25394790

  12. Synthetic aminoglycosides efficiently suppress cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator nonsense mutations and are enhanced by ivacaftor.

    PubMed

    Xue, Xiaojiao; Mutyam, Venkateshwar; Tang, Liping; Biswas, Silpak; Du, Ming; Jackson, Laura A; Dai, Yanying; Belakhov, Valery; Shalev, Moran; Chen, Fuquan; Schacht, Jochen; J Bridges, Robert; Baasov, Timor; Hong, Jeong; Bedwell, David M; Rowe, Steven M

    2014-04-01

    New drugs are needed to enhance premature termination codon (PTC) suppression to treat the underlying cause of cystic fibrosis (CF) and other diseases caused by nonsense mutations. We tested new synthetic aminoglycoside derivatives expressly developed for PTC suppression in a series of complementary CF models. Using a dual-luciferase reporter system containing the four most prevalent CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) nonsense mutations (G542X, R553X, R1162X, and W1282X) within their local sequence contexts (the three codons on either side of the PTC), we found that NB124 promoted the most readthrough of G542X, R1162X, and W1282X PTCs. NB124 also restored full-length CFTR expression and chloride transport in Fischer rat thyroid cells stably transduced with a CFTR-G542XcDNA transgene, and was superior to gentamicin and other aminoglycosides tested. NB124 restored CFTR function to roughly 7% of wild-type activity in primary human bronchial epithelial (HBE) CF cells (G542X/delF508), a highly relevant preclinical model with endogenous CFTR expression. Efficacy was further enhanced by addition of the CFTR potentiator, ivacaftor (VX-770), to airway cells expressing CFTR PTCs. NB124 treatment rescued CFTR function in a CF mouse model expressing a human CFTR-G542X transgene; efficacy was superior to gentamicin and exhibited favorable pharmacokinetic properties, suggesting that in vitro results translated to clinical benefit in vivo. NB124 was also less cytotoxic than gentamicin in a tissue-based model for ototoxicity. These results provide evidence that NB124 and other synthetic aminoglycosides provide a 10-fold improvement in therapeutic index over gentamicin and other first-generation aminoglycosides, providing a promising treatment for a wide array of CFTR nonsense mutations.

  13. Minimum Variance Distortionless Response Beamformer with Enhanced Nulling Level Control via Dynamic Mutated Artificial Immune System

    PubMed Central

    Kiong, Tiong Sieh; Salem, S. Balasem; Paw, Johnny Koh Siaw; Sankar, K. Prajindra

    2014-01-01

    In smart antenna applications, the adaptive beamforming technique is used to cancel interfering signals (placing nulls) and produce or steer a strong beam toward the target signal according to the calculated weight vectors. Minimum variance distortionless response (MVDR) beamforming is capable of determining the weight vectors for beam steering; however, its nulling level on the interference sources remains unsatisfactory. Beamforming can be considered as an optimization problem, such that optimal weight vector should be obtained through computation. Hence, in this paper, a new dynamic mutated artificial immune system (DM-AIS) is proposed to enhance MVDR beamforming for controlling the null steering of interference and increase the signal to interference noise ratio (SINR) for wanted signals. PMID:25003136

  14. Knockout mutations of insulin-like peptide genes enhance sexual receptivity in Drosophila virgin females.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kazuki; Sakai, Takaomi

    2016-01-01

    In the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster, females take the initiative to mate successfully because they decide whether to mate or not. However, little is known about the molecular and neuronal mechanisms regulating sexual receptivity in virgin females. Genetic tools available in Drosophila are useful for identifying molecules and neural circuits involved in the regulation of sexual receptivity. We previously demonstrated that insulin-producing cells (IPCs) in the female brain are critical to the regulation of female sexual receptivity. Ablation and inactivation of IPCs enhance female sexual receptivity, suggesting that neurosecretion from IPCs inhibits female sexual receptivity. IPCs produce and release insulin-like peptides (Ilps) that modulate various biological processes such as metabolism, growth, lifespan and behaviors. Here, we report a novel role of the Ilps in sexual behavior in Drosophila virgin females. Compared with wild-type females, females with knockout mutations of Ilps showed a high mating success rate toward wild-type males, whereas wild-type males courted wild-type and Ilp-knockout females to the same extent. Wild-type receptive females retard their movement during male courtship and this reduced female mobility allows males to copulate. Thus, it was anticipated that knockout mutations of Ilps would reduce general locomotion. However, the locomotor activity in Ilp-knockout females was significantly higher than that in wild-type females. Thus, our findings indicate that the high mating success rate in Ilp-knockout females is caused by their enhanced sexual receptivity, but not by improvement of their sex appeal or by general sluggishness.

  15. Enhancing the soluble expression of an amylase in Escherichia coli by the mutations related to its domain interactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peili; Qin, Weitong; Xu, Jiangtao; Yan, Yaru; Tian, Jian; Wu, Ningfeng; Yao, Bin

    2016-04-01

    The sequence and structure of the target protein exert a marked effect on its soluble expression in Escherichia coli. The effects of the mutation of an amylase isolated from Bacillus licheniformis (BLA) on its soluble expression in E. coli were investigated. A random mutation library of BLA was constructed to screen for mutations that resulted in enhanced soluble expression in E. coli. Two interesting mutations (A390I and D401V) were identified, which are located at the interaction surface between the A and C domains of BLA. The A390I mutation enhanced soluble BLA expression by 2.0-fold compared to wild type, while D401V decreased soluble expression 160-fold. Structural analysis revealed that A390 and D401 residues could affect the interaction between the A and C domains of BLA. Therefore, soluble expression of the target protein in E. coli could be affected by introduction of a mutation in the protein sequence.

  16. Molecular Diagnosis of Hereditary Fructose Intolerance: Founder Mutation in a Community from India.

    PubMed

    Bijarnia-Mahay, Sunita; Movva, Sireesha; Gupta, Neerja; Sharma, Deepak; Puri, Ratna D; Kotecha, Udhaya; Saxena, Renu; Kabra, Madhulika; Mohan, Neelam; Verma, Ishwar C

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) is a difficult-to-confirm diagnosis, requiring either invasive liver biopsy-enzyme assay or potentially hazardous fructose challenge test or expensive molecular genetic analysis. Therefore, worldwide there has been a trend towards finding "common mutations" in distinct ethnic groups to simplify the process of diagnosis. The nonspecific presentation of the disease often leads to diagnostic confusion with other metabolic liver disorders such as glycogenoses, galactosemia, and tyrosinemia. This leads to much delay in diagnosis with consequent harm to the patient.We report mutations in the ALDOB gene, from eleven Indian patients, seven of whom belong to the Agarwal community. Six patients from the Agarwal community and two non-Agarwal patients harbored one novel mutation, c.324+1G>A (five homozygous and one heterozygous), in the ALDOB gene. Haplotyping performed in families confirmed a founder effect. The community has been known to harbor founder mutations in other genes such as the MLC1, PANK2, and CAPN3 genes, thus providing another evidence for a founder effect in the community in case of HFI. This may pave the path for a simpler and quicker test at least for this community in India. In addition to the founder mutation, we report four other novel mutations, c.112+1delG, c.380-1G>A, c.677G>A, and c.689delA, and a previously reported mutation, c.1013C>T, in the cohort from India.

  17. The H29D Mutation Does Not Enhance Cytosolic Ca2+ Activation of the Cardiac Ryanodine Receptor.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zhichao; Guo, Wenting; Yuen, Siobhan M Wong King; Wang, Ruiwu; Zhang, Lin; Van Petegem, Filip; Chen, S R Wayne

    2015-01-01

    The N-terminal domain of the cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR2) harbors a large number of naturally occurring mutations that are associated with stress-induced ventricular tachyarrhythmia and sudden death. Nearly all these disease-associated N-terminal mutations are located at domain interfaces or buried within domains. Mutations at these locations would alter domain-domain interactions or the stability/folding of domains. Recently, a novel RyR2 mutation H29D associated with ventricular arrhythmia at rest was found to enhance the activation of single RyR2 channels by diastolic levels of cytosolic Ca2+. Unlike other N-terminal disease-associated mutations, the H29D mutation is located on the surface of the N-terminal domain. It is unclear how this surface-exposed H29D mutation that does not appear to interact with other parts of the RyR2 structure could alter the intrinsic properties of the channel. Here we carried out detailed functional characterization of the RyR2-H29D mutant at the molecular and cellular levels. We found that the H29D mutation has no effect on the basal level or the Ca2+ dependent activation of [3H]ryanodine binding to RyR2, the cytosolic Ca2+ activation of single RyR2 channels, or the cytosolic Ca2+- or caffeine-induced Ca2+ release in HEK293 cells. In addition, the H29D mutation does not alter the propensity for spontaneous Ca2+ release or the thresholds for Ca2+ release activation or termination. Furthermore, the H29D mutation does not have significant impact on the thermal stability of the N-terminal region (residues 1-547) of RyR2. Collectively, our data show that the H29D mutation exerts little or no effect on the function of RyR2 or on the folding stability of the N-terminal region. Thus, our results provide no evidence that the H29D mutation enhances the cytosolic Ca2+ activation of RyR2.

  18. The H29D Mutation Does Not Enhance Cytosolic Ca2+ Activation of the Cardiac Ryanodine Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Zhichao; Guo, Wenting; Yuen, Siobhan M. Wong King; Wang, Ruiwu; Zhang, Lin; Van Petegem, Filip; Chen, S. R. Wayne

    2015-01-01

    The N-terminal domain of the cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR2) harbors a large number of naturally occurring mutations that are associated with stress-induced ventricular tachyarrhythmia and sudden death. Nearly all these disease-associated N-terminal mutations are located at domain interfaces or buried within domains. Mutations at these locations would alter domain-domain interactions or the stability/folding of domains. Recently, a novel RyR2 mutation H29D associated with ventricular arrhythmia at rest was found to enhance the activation of single RyR2 channels by diastolic levels of cytosolic Ca2+. Unlike other N-terminal disease-associated mutations, the H29D mutation is located on the surface of the N-terminal domain. It is unclear how this surface-exposed H29D mutation that does not appear to interact with other parts of the RyR2 structure could alter the intrinsic properties of the channel. Here we carried out detailed functional characterization of the RyR2-H29D mutant at the molecular and cellular levels. We found that the H29D mutation has no effect on the basal level or the Ca2+ dependent activation of [3H]ryanodine binding to RyR2, the cytosolic Ca2+ activation of single RyR2 channels, or the cytosolic Ca2+- or caffeine-induced Ca2+ release in HEK293 cells. In addition, the H29D mutation does not alter the propensity for spontaneous Ca2+ release or the thresholds for Ca2+ release activation or termination. Furthermore, the H29D mutation does not have significant impact on the thermal stability of the N-terminal region (residues 1–547) of RyR2. Collectively, our data show that the H29D mutation exerts little or no effect on the function of RyR2 or on the folding stability of the N-terminal region. Thus, our results provide no evidence that the H29D mutation enhances the cytosolic Ca2+ activation of RyR2. PMID:26405799

  19. Notch1 Mutation Leads to Valvular Calcification Through Enhanced Myofibroblast Mechanotransduction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Joseph; Ryzhova, Larisa M; Sewell-Loftin, M K; Brown, Christopher B; Huppert, Stacey S; Baldwin, H Scott; Merryman, W David

    2015-07-01

    Calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) is a significant cardiovascular disorder, and controversy exists as to whether it is primarily a dystrophic or osteogenic process in vivo. In this study, we sought to clarify the mechanism of CAVD by assessing a genetic mutation, Notch1 heterozygosity, which leads to CAVD with 100% penetrance in humans. Murine immortalized Notch1(+/-) aortic valve interstitial cells (AVICs) were isolated and expanded in vitro. Molecular signaling of wild-type and Notch1(+/-) AVICs were compared to identify changes in pathways that have been linked to CAVD-transforming growth factor-β1/bone morphogenetic protein, mitogen-activated protein kinase, and phosphoinositide 3-kinase/protein kinase B-and assessed for calcification potential. Additionally, AVIC mechanobiology was studied in a physiologically relevant, dynamic mechanical environment (10% cyclic strain) to investigate differences in responses between the cell types. We found that Notch1(+/-) AVICs resembled a myofibroblast-like phenotype expressing higher amounts of cadherin-11, a known mediator of dystrophic calcification, and decreased Runx2, a known osteogenic marker. We determined that cadherin-11 expression is regulated by Akt activity, and inhibition of Akt phosphorylation significantly reduced cadherin-11 expression. Moreover, in the presence of cyclic strain, Notch1(+/-) AVICs exhibited significantly upregulated phosphorylation of Akt at Ser473 and smooth muscle α-actin expression, indicative of a fully activated myofibroblast. Finally, these Notch1-mediated alterations led to enhanced dystrophic calcific nodule formation. This study presents novel insights in our understanding of Notch1-mediated CAVD by demonstrating that the mutation leads to AVICs that are fully activated myofibroblasts, resulting in dystrophic, but not osteogenic, calcification. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. The sensitivity of exome sequencing in identifying pathogenic mutations for LGMD in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Hemakumar M.; Cho, Kyung-Ah; Lek, Monkol; Estrella, Elicia; Valkanas, Elise; Jones, Michael D.; Mitsuhashi, Satomi; Darras, Basil T.; Amato, Anthony A.; Lidov, Hart G.W.; Brownstein, Catherine A.; Margulies, David M.; Yu, Timothy W.; Salih, Mustafa A.; Kunkel, Louis M.; MacArthur, Daniel G.; Kang, Peter B.

    2016-01-01

    The current study characterizes a cohort of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) in the United States using whole exome sequencing. Fifty-five families affected by LGMD were recruited using an institutionally-approved protocol. Exome sequencing was performed on probands and selected parental samples. Pathogenic mutations and co-segregation patterns were confirmed by Sanger sequencing. Twenty-two families (40%) had novel and previously reported pathogenic mutations, primarily in LGMD genes, but also in genes for Duchenne muscular dystrophy, facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy, congenital myopathy, myofibrillar myopathy, inclusion body myopathy, and Pompe disease. One family was diagnosed via clinical testing. Dominant mutations were identified in COL6A1, COL6A3, FLNC, LMNA, RYR1, SMCHD1, and VCP, recessive mutations in ANO5, CAPN3, GAA, LAMA2, SGCA, and SGCG, and X-linked mutations in DMD. A previously reported variant in DMD was confirmed to be benign. Exome sequencing is a powerful diagnostic tool for LGMD. Despite careful phenotypic screening, pathogenic mutations were found in other muscle disease genes, largely accounting for the increased sensitivity of exome sequencing. Our experience suggests that broad sequencing panels are useful for these analyses due to the phenotypic overlap of many neuromuscular conditions. The confirmation of a benign DMD variant illustrates the potential of exome sequencing to help determine pathogenicity. PMID:27708273

  1. Loss-of-function mutations of Dynamin 2 promote T-ALL by enhancing IL-7 signalling.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, C S; Brown, F C; Collett, M; Saw, J; Chiu, S K; Sonderegger, S E; Lucas, S E; Alserihi, R; Chau, N; Toribio, M L; McCormack, M P; Chircop, M; Robinson, P J; Jane, S M; Curtis, D J

    2016-10-01

    Mutations in the DYNAMIN2 (DNM2) gene are frequently detected in human acute T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL), although the mechanisms linking these mutations to disease pathogenesis remain unknown. Using an ENU-based forward genetic screen for mice with erythroid phenotypes, we identified a heterozygous mouse line carrying a mutation in the GTPase domain of Dnm2 (Dnm2(V265G)) that induced a microcytic anemia. In vitro assays using the V265G mutant demonstrated loss of GTPase activity and impaired endocytosis that was comparable to other DNM2 mutants identified in human T-ALL. To determine the effects of DNM2 mutations in T-ALL, we bred the Dnm2(V265G) mice with the Lmo2 transgenic mouse model of T-ALL. Heterozygous Dnm2 mutants lacking the Lmo2 transgene displayed normal T-cell development, and did not develop T-ALL. In contrast, compound heterozygotes displayed an accelerated onset of T-ALL compared with mice carrying the Lmo2 oncogene alone. The leukemias from these mice exhibited a more immature immunophenotype and an expansion in leukemic stem cell numbers. Mechanistically, the Dnm2 mutation impaired clathrin-mediated endocytosis of the interleukin (IL)-7 receptor resulting in increased receptor density on the surface of leukemic stem cells. These findings suggest that DNM2 mutations cooperate with T-cell oncogenes by enhancing IL-7 signalling.

  2. Oncogenic Activity of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Kinase Mutant Alleles Is Enhanced by the T790M Drug Resistance Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Godin-Heymann, Nadia; Bryant, Ianthe; Rivera, Miguel N.; Ulkus, Lindsey; Bell, Daphne W.; Riese, David J.; Settleman, Jeffrey; Haber, Daniel A.

    2010-01-01

    Activating mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) characterize a subset of non–small cell lung cancers (NSCLC) with extraordinary sensitivity to targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI). A single secondary EGFR mutation, T790M, arising in cis with the primary activating mutation, confers acquired resistance to these drugs. However, the T790M mutation is also detected in the absence of drug selection, suggesting that it may provide a growth advantage. We show here that although T790M alone has only a modest effect on EGFR function, when combined with the characteristic activating mutations L858R or del746–750, it results in a dramatic enhancement of EGFR activity. The double mutants show potent ligand-independent receptor autophosphorylation associated with altered cellular phenotypes, soft agar colony formation, and tumorigenesis in nude mice. The significant gain-of-function properties of these double mutants may explain their initial presence before drug selection and their rapid selection as the single drug resistance mutation during therapy with gefitinib/erlotinib, and suggests that they may contribute to the adverse clinical course of TKI-resistant NSCLC. PMID:17671201

  3. Loss-of-Function Mutations in ABCA1 and Enhanced β-Cell Secretory Capacity in Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Goeser, Eugen S.; Fuller, Carissa; Lord, Christine; Bowler, Anne M.; Doliba, Nicolai M.; Hegele, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations affecting the cholesterol transporter ATP-binding cassette transporter subfamily A member 1 (ABCA1) impair cellular cholesterol efflux and are associated with reduced HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) levels. ABCA1 may also be important in regulating β-cell cholesterol homeostasis and insulin secretion. We sought to determine whether loss-of-function ABCA1 mutations affect β-cell secretory capacity in humans by performing glucose-potentiated arginine tests in three subjects homozygous for ABCA1 mutations (age 25 ± 11 years), eight heterozygous subjects (28 ± 7 years), and eight normal control subjects pair-matched to the heterozygous carriers. To account for any effect of low HDL-C on insulin secretion, we studied nine subjects with isolated low HDL-C with no ABCA1 mutations (age 26 ± 6 years) and nine pair-matched control subjects. Homozygotes for ABCA1 mutations exhibited enhanced oral glucose tolerance and dramatically increased β-cell secretory capacity that was also greater in ABCA1 heterozygous subjects than in control subjects, with no differences in insulin sensitivity. Isolated low HDL-C subjects also demonstrated an increase in β-cell secretory capacity but in contrast to those with ABCA1 mutations, exhibited impaired insulin sensitivity, supporting β-cell compensation for increased insulin demand. These data indicate that loss-of-function mutations in ABCA1 in young adults may be associated with enhanced β-cell secretory capacity and normal insulin sensitivity and support the importance of cellular cholesterol homeostasis in regulating β-cell insulin secretion. PMID:25125487

  4. Adaptive mutations resulting in enhanced polymerase activity contribute to high virulence of influenza A virus in mice.

    PubMed

    Rolling, Thierry; Koerner, Iris; Zimmermann, Petra; Holz, Kristian; Haller, Otto; Staeheli, Peter; Kochs, Georg

    2009-07-01

    High virulence of influenza virus A/Puerto Rico/8/34 in mice carrying the Mx1 resistance gene was recently shown to be determined by the viral surface proteins and the viral polymerase. Here, we demonstrated high-level polymerase activity in mammalian host cells but not avian host cells and investigated which mutations in the polymerase subunits PB1, PB2, and PA are critical for increased polymerase activity and high virus virulence. Mutational analyses demonstrated that an isoleucine-to-valine change at position 504 in PB2 was the most critical and strongly enhanced the activity of the reconstituted polymerase complex. An isoleucine-to-leucine change at position 550 in PA further contributed to increased polymerase activity and high virulence, whereas all other mutations in PB1, PB2, and PA were irrelevant. To determine whether this pattern of acquired mutations represents a preferred viral strategy to gain virulence, two independent new virus adaptation experiments were performed. Surprisingly, the conservative I504V change in PB2 evolved again and was the only mutation present in an aggressive virus variant selected during the first adaptation experiment. In contrast, the virulent virus selected in the second adaptation experiment had a lysine-to-arginine change at position 208 in PB1 and a glutamate-to-glycine change at position 349 in PA. These results demonstrate that a variety of minor amino acid changes in the viral polymerase can contribute to enhanced virulence of influenza A virus. Interestingly, all virulence-enhancing mutations that we identified in this study resulted in substantially increased viral polymerase activity.

  5. Adaptive Mutations Resulting in Enhanced Polymerase Activity Contribute to High Virulence of Influenza A Virus in Mice▿

    PubMed Central

    Rolling, Thierry; Koerner, Iris; Zimmermann, Petra; Holz, Kristian; Haller, Otto; Staeheli, Peter; Kochs, Georg

    2009-01-01

    High virulence of influenza virus A/Puerto Rico/8/34 in mice carrying the Mx1 resistance gene was recently shown to be determined by the viral surface proteins and the viral polymerase. Here, we demonstrated high-level polymerase activity in mammalian host cells but not avian host cells and investigated which mutations in the polymerase subunits PB1, PB2, and PA are critical for increased polymerase activity and high virus virulence. Mutational analyses demonstrated that an isoleucine-to-valine change at position 504 in PB2 was the most critical and strongly enhanced the activity of the reconstituted polymerase complex. An isoleucine-to-leucine change at position 550 in PA further contributed to increased polymerase activity and high virulence, whereas all other mutations in PB1, PB2, and PA were irrelevant. To determine whether this pattern of acquired mutations represents a preferred viral strategy to gain virulence, two independent new virus adaptation experiments were performed. Surprisingly, the conservative I504V change in PB2 evolved again and was the only mutation present in an aggressive virus variant selected during the first adaptation experiment. In contrast, the virulent virus selected in the second adaptation experiment had a lysine-to-arginine change at position 208 in PB1 and a glutamate-to-glycine change at position 349 in PA. These results demonstrate that a variety of minor amino acid changes in the viral polymerase can contribute to enhanced virulence of influenza A virus. Interestingly, all virulence-enhancing mutations that we identified in this study resulted in substantially increased viral polymerase activity. PMID:19403683

  6. Genetic enhancement of cognition in a kindred with cone–rod dystrophy due to RIMS1 mutation

    PubMed Central

    Sisodiya, Sanjay M; Thompson, Pamela J; Need, Anna; Harris, Sarah E; Weale, Michael E; Wilkie, Susan E; Michaelides, Michel; Free, Samantha L; Walley, Nicole; Gumbs, Curtis; Gerrelli, Dianne; Ruddle, Piers; Whalley, Lawrence J; Starr, John M; Hunt, David M; Goldstein, David B; Deary, Ian J; Moore, Anthony T

    2007-01-01

    Background The genetic basis of variation in human cognitive abilities is poorly understood. RIMS1 encodes a synapse active‐zone protein with important roles in the maintenance of normal synaptic function: mice lacking this protein have greatly reduced learning ability and memory function. Objective An established paradigm examining the structural and functional effects of mutations in genes expressed in the eye and the brain was used to study a kindred with an inherited retinal dystrophy due to RIMS1 mutation. Materials and methods Neuropsychological tests and high‐resolution MRI brain scanning were undertaken in the kindred. In a population cohort, neuropsychological scores were associated with common variation in RIMS1. Additionally, RIMS1 was sequenced in top‐scoring individuals. Evolution of RIMS1 was assessed, and its expression in developing human brain was studied. Results Affected individuals showed significantly enhanced cognitive abilities across a range of domains. Analysis suggests that factors other than RIMS1 mutation were unlikely to explain enhanced cognition. No association with common variation and verbal IQ was found in the population cohort, and no other mutations in RIMS1 were detected in the highest scoring individuals from this cohort. RIMS1 protein is expressed in developing human brain, but RIMS1 does not seem to have been subjected to accelerated evolution in man. Conclusions A possible role for RIMS1 in the enhancement of cognitive function at least in this kindred is suggested. Although further work is clearly required to explore these findings before a role for RIMS1 in human cognition can be formally accepted, the findings suggest that genetic mutation may enhance human cognition in some cases. PMID:17237123

  7. A familial ATP13A2 mutation enhances alpha-synuclein aggregation and promotes cell death.

    PubMed

    Lopes da Fonseca, Tomás; Pinho, Raquel; Outeiro, Tiago F

    2016-07-15

    Aberrant protein-protein interactions are a common pathological hallmark among neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease (PD). Thus far, mutations in more than 20 genes have been associated with PD. These genes encode for proteins involved in distinct intracellular pathways, complicating our understanding of the precise molecular mechanisms underlying the disease. Recent reports suggested that the endolysosomal protein ATP13A2 can determine the fate of alpha-synuclein (α-Syn), although no consensus has yet been reached on the mechanisms underlying this effect. Here, we describe, for the first time, the deleterious effect arising from the interaction between the ATP13A2 familial mutant Dup22 with α-Syn. We show that this ATP13A2 mutant can enhance α-Syn oligomerization and aggregation in cell culture. Additionally, we report the accumulation of both proteins in abnormal endoplasmic reticulum membranous structures and the activation of the protein kinase RNA-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase pathway. Ultimately, our data bring new insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying the interplay of these two proteins, opening novel perspectives for therapeutic intervention.

  8. Enhancement of Phenol Biodegradation by Pseudochrobactrum sp. through Ultraviolet-Induced Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Zhen; Yu, Chenyang; Xin, Lingling

    2015-01-01

    The phenol-degrading efficiency of Pseudochrobactrum sp. was enhanced by ultraviolet (UV) irradiation. First, a bacterial strain, Pseudochrobactrum sp. XF1, was isolated from the activated sludge in a coking plant. It was subjected to mutation by UV radiation for 120 s and a mutant strain with higher phenol-degrading efficiency, Pseudochrobactrum sp. XF1-UV, was selected. The mutant strain XF1-UV was capable of degrading 1800 mg/L phenol completely within 48 h and had higher tolerance to hydrogen ion concentration and temperature variation than the wild type. Haldane’s kinetic model was used to fit the exponential growth data and the following kinetic parameters were obtained: μmax = 0.092 h−1, Ks = 22.517 mg/L, and Ki = 1126.725 mg/L for XF1, whereas μmax = 0.110 h−1, Ks = 23.934 mg/L, and Ki = 1579.134 mg/L for XF1-UV. Both XF1 and XF1-UV degraded phenol through the ortho-pathway; but the phenol hydroxylase activity of XF1-UV1 was higher than that of XF1, therefore, the mutant strain biodegraded phenol faster. Taken together, our results suggest that Pseudochrobactrum sp. XF1-UV could be a promising candidate for bioremediation of phenol-containing wastewaters. PMID:25837630

  9. A common haplotype associated with the Basque 2362AG --> TCATCT mutation in the muscular calpain-3 gene.

    PubMed

    Cobo, Ana María; Sáenz, Ametz; Poza, Juan José; Urtasun, Miguel; Indakoetxea, Begoña; Urtizberea, Jon Andoni; López de Munain, Adolfo; Calafell, Francesc

    2004-10-01

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A (LGMD2A) is caused by any of over 150 mutations in the calpain-3 (CAPN3) gene. Of those, 2362AG --> TCATCT is particularly prevalent in Basque patients, and this mutation was hypothesized to have arisen in the Basque Country. To explore the natural history of this mutation, we genotyped 65 Basque and non-Basque patients with LGMD2A who carry the 2362AG --> TCATCT mutation for four microsatellites within or flanking the gene. A particular haplotype was found in three-fourths of the patients and was assumed to be ancestral. From the average number of recombinations and mutations accumulated from this ancestral haplotype, the age of the 2362AG ----> TCATCT mutation was estimated to be 50 generations (i.e., 1,250 years), which is more recent than the Paleolithic Basque heritage. The subsequent spread of the 2362AG --> TCATCT mutation can be related to gene flow out of the Basque Country, even across a cultural border.

  10. Transforming function of proto-ras genes depends on heterologous promoters and is enhanced by specific point mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, A K; Cichutek, K; Duesberg, P H

    1991-01-01

    Based on transfection into cells in culture or natural transduction into retroviruses, proto-ras genes seem to derive transforming function either from heterologous promoters or from point mutations. Here we ask how such different events could achieve the same results. To identify homologous regulatory elements, about 3 kilobases of rat DNA upstream of the first untranslated proto-Ha-ras exon was sequenced. Surprisingly, the sequence shares at -1858 a homology of 148 nucleotides with Harvey (Ha) sarcoma virus, 5' of viral ras, signaling possibly a second untranslated proto-Ha-ras exon. In addition the sequence contains a perfect repeat of 25 CA dinucleotides at -2655. A retroviral promoter, even from upstream of the poly(CA), conferred transforming function on proto-Ha-ras and increased transcription greater than 100-fold compared with that of unrearranged proto-ras. Point mutations were not necessary for transforming function of rat and human proto-Ha-ras genes with retroviral promoters but did enhance it greater than 10-fold. A unifying hypothesis proposes that proto-ras genes depend on high expression from heterologous promoters or enhancers for transforming function, which is modulated by ras point mutations. The hypothesis makes two testable predictions. (i) Unrearranged proto-ras genes with point mutations, which occur in some cancers, have no transforming function. Indeed, tumors with mutated proto-ras genes, even those that also lack hypothetical tumor-suppressor genes, are indistinguishable from counterparts with normal proto-ras genes. (ii) Proto-ras genes in transfected cells derive transforming function from heterologous promoters or enhancers acquired via illegitimate recombination from vector DNAs and particularly from viral helper genes that must be cotransfected for transformation of primary cells. Indeed, expression of exogenous proto-ras genes in cells transformed by transfection is as high as for viral ras genes and is much higher than in the

  11. Mutation of praR in Rhizobium leguminosarum enhances root biofilms, improving nodulation competitiveness by increased expression of attachment proteins

    PubMed Central

    Frederix, Marijke; Edwards, Anne; Swiderska, Anna; Stanger, Andrew; Karunakaran, Ramakrishnan; Williams, Alan; Abbruscato, Pamela; Sanchez-Contreras, Maria; Poole, Philip S; Downie, J Allan

    2014-01-01

    In Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae, quorum-sensing is regulated by CinR, which induces the cinIS operon. CinI synthesizes an AHL, whereas CinS inactivates PraR, a repressor. Mutation of praR enhanced biofilms in vitro. We developed a light (lux)-dependent assay of rhizobial attachment to roots and demonstrated that mutation of praR increased biofilms on pea roots. The praR mutant out-competed wild-type for infection of pea nodules in mixed inoculations. Analysis of gene expression by microarrays and promoter fusions revealed that PraR represses its own transcription and mutation of praR increased expression of several genes including those encoding secreted proteins (the adhesins RapA2, RapB and RapC, two cadherins and the glycanase PlyB), the polysaccharide regulator RosR, and another protein similar to PraR. PraR bound to the promoters of several of these genes indicating direct repression. Mutations in rapA2, rapB, rapC, plyB, the cadherins or rosR did not affect the enhanced root attachment or nodule competitiveness of the praR mutant. However combinations of mutations in rapA, rapB and rapC abolished the enhanced attachment and nodule competitiveness. We conclude that relief of PraR-mediated repression determines a lifestyle switch allowing the expression of genes that are important for biofilm formation on roots and the subsequent initiation of infection of legume roots. PMID:24942546

  12. Mutation of praR in Rhizobium leguminosarum enhances root biofilms, improving nodulation competitiveness by increased expression of attachment proteins.

    PubMed

    Frederix, Marijke; Edwards, Anne; Swiderska, Anna; Stanger, Andrew; Karunakaran, Ramakrishnan; Williams, Alan; Abbruscato, Pamela; Sanchez-Contreras, Maria; Poole, Philip S; Downie, J Allan

    2014-08-01

    In Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae, quorum-sensing is regulated by CinR, which induces the cinIS operon. CinI synthesizes an AHL, whereas CinS inactivates PraR, a repressor. Mutation of praR enhanced biofilms in vitro. We developed a light (lux)-dependent assay of rhizobial attachment to roots and demonstrated that mutation of praR increased biofilms on pea roots. The praR mutant out-competed wild-type for infection of pea nodules in mixed inoculations. Analysis of gene expression by microarrays and promoter fusions revealed that PraR represses its own transcription and mutation of praR increased expression of several genes including those encoding secreted proteins (the adhesins RapA2, RapB and RapC, two cadherins and the glycanase PlyB), the polysaccharide regulator RosR, and another protein similar to PraR. PraR bound to the promoters of several of these genes indicating direct repression. Mutations in rapA2, rapB, rapC, plyB, the cadherins or rosR did not affect the enhanced root attachment or nodule competitiveness of the praR mutant. However combinations of mutations in rapA, rapB and rapC abolished the enhanced attachment and nodule competitiveness. We conclude that relief of PraR-mediated repression determines a lifestyle switch allowing the expression of genes that are important for biofilm formation on roots and the subsequent initiation of infection of legume roots. © 2014 The Authors. Molecular Microbiology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Automated DNA mutation detection using universal conditions direct sequencing: application to ten muscular dystrophy genes

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background One of the most common and efficient methods for detecting mutations in genes is PCR amplification followed by direct sequencing. Until recently, the process of designing PCR assays has been to focus on individual assay parameters rather than concentrating on matching conditions for a set of assays. Primers for each individual assay were selected based on location and sequence concerns. The two primer sequences were then iteratively adjusted to make the individual assays work properly. This generally resulted in groups of assays with different annealing temperatures that required the use of multiple thermal cyclers or multiple passes in a single thermal cycler making diagnostic testing time-consuming, laborious and expensive. These factors have severely hampered diagnostic testing services, leaving many families without an answer for the exact cause of a familial genetic disease. A search of GeneTests for sequencing analysis of the entire coding sequence for genes that are known to cause muscular dystrophies returns only a small list of laboratories that perform comprehensive gene panels. The hypothesis for the study was that a complete set of universal assays can be designed to amplify and sequence any gene or family of genes using computer aided design tools. If true, this would allow automation and optimization of the mutation detection process resulting in reduced cost and increased throughput. Results An automated process has been developed for the detection of deletions, duplications/insertions and point mutations in any gene or family of genes and has been applied to ten genes known to bear mutations that cause muscular dystrophy: DMD; CAV3; CAPN3; FKRP; TRIM32; LMNA; SGCA; SGCB; SGCG; SGCD. Using this process, mutations have been found in five DMD patients and four LGMD patients (one in the FKRP gene, one in the CAV3 gene, and two likely causative heterozygous pairs of variations in the CAPN3 gene of two other patients). Methods and assay

  14. ESR1 mutations affect anti-proliferative responses to tamoxifen through enhanced cross-talk with IGF signaling.

    PubMed

    Gelsomino, Luca; Gu, Guowei; Rechoum, Yassine; Beyer, Amanda R; Pejerrey, Sasha M; Tsimelzon, Anna; Wang, Tao; Huffman, Kenneth; Ludlow, Andrew; Andò, Sebastiano; Fuqua, Suzanne A W

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to address the role of ESR1 hormone-binding mutations in breast cancer. Soft agar anchorage-independent growth assay, Western blot, ERE reporter transactivation assay, proximity ligation assay (PLA), coimmunoprecipitation assay, silencing assay, digital droplet PCR (ddPCR), Kaplan-Meier analysis, and statistical analysis. It is now generally accepted that estrogen receptor (ESR1) mutations occur frequently in metastatic breast cancers; however, we do not yet know how to best treat these patients. We have modeled the three most frequent hormone-binding ESR1 (HBD-ESR1) mutations (Y537N, Y537S, and D538G) using stable lentiviral transduction in human breast cancer cell lines. Effects on growth were examined in response to hormonal and targeted agents, and mutation-specific changes were studied using microarray and Western blot analysis. We determined that the HBD-ESR1 mutations alter anti-proliferative effects to tamoxifen (Tam), due to cell-intrinsic changes in activation of the insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF1R) signaling pathway and levels of PIK3R1/PIK3R3. The selective estrogen receptor degrader, fulvestrant, significantly reduced the anchorage-independent growth of ESR1 mutant-expressing cells, while combination treatments with the mTOR inhibitor everolimus, or an inhibitor blocking IGF1R, and the insulin receptor significantly enhanced anti-proliferative responses. Using digital drop (dd) PCR, we identified mutations at high frequencies ranging from 12 % for Y537N, 5 % for Y537S, and 2 % for D538G in archived primary breast tumors from women treated with adjuvant mono-tamoxifen therapy. The HBD-ESR1 mutations were not associated with recurrence-free or overall survival in response in this patient cohort and suggest that knowledge of other cell-intrinsic factors in combination with ESR1 mutation status will be needed determine anti-proliferative responses to Tam.

  15. MUTATIONS IN THE E2 GLYCOPROTEIN AND THE 3' UNTRANSLATED REGION ENHANCE CHIKUNGUNYA VIRUS VIRULENCE IN MICE.

    PubMed

    Hawman, David W; Carpentier, Kathryn S; Fox, Julie M; May, Nicholas A; Sanders, Wes; Montgomery, Stephanie A; Moorman, Nathaniel J; Diamond, Michael S; Morrison, Thomas E

    2017-07-26

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-transmitted alphavirus that causes debilitating musculoskeletal pain and inflammation and can persist for months to years after acute infection. Although studies in humans and experimentally-infected animals suggest that CHIKV infection persists in musculoskeletal tissues, the mechanisms for this remain poorly understood. To evaluate this further, we isolated CHIKV from the serum of persistently infected Rag1(-/-) mice at day 28. When inoculated into naïve WT mice, this persistently circulating CHIKV strain displayed a capacity for earlier dissemination and greater pathogenicity compared with the parental virus. Sequence analysis revealed a nonsynonymous mutation in the E2 glycoprotein (E2 K200R) and a deletion within the 3' untranslated region (3' -UTR). Introduction of these changes into the parental virus conferred enhanced virulence in mice although a primary tropism for musculoskeletal tissues was maintained. The E2 K200R mutation was largely responsible for enhanced viral dissemination and pathogenicity, although these effects were augmented by the 3' -UTR deletion. Finally, studies in Irf3/Irf7(-/-) and Ifnar1(-/-) mice suggest that the E2 K200R mutation enhances viral dissemination from the site of inoculation independently of IRF3, IRF7, and IFNAR1 mediated responses. As our findings reveal viral determinants of CHIKV dissemination and pathogenicity, their further study should help to elucidate host-virus interactions that determine acute and chronic CHIKV infection.IMPORTANCE CHIKV is a globally-spreading, mosquito-transmitted virus that causes debilitating acute and chronic musculoskeletal disease in humans. The viral genetic determinants that dictate acute and chronic disease severity are not understood. To improve our understanding of CHIKV pathogenesis, we evaluated a CHIKV strain isolated from the serum of chronically-infected immunocompromised mice. Sequence analysis of this persistent CHIKV strain identified

  16. Enhancement of the safety of live influenza vaccine by attenuating mutations from cold-adapted hemagglutinin.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yoon Jae; Jang, Yo Han; Kim, Paul; Lee, Yun Ha; Lee, Young Jae; Byun, Young Ho; Lee, Kwang-Hee; Kim, Kyusik; Seong, Baik Lin

    2016-04-01

    In our previous study, X-31ca-based H5N1 LAIVs, in particular, became more virulent in mice than the X-31ca MDV, possibly by the introduction of the surface antigens of highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza virus, implying that additional attenuation is needed in this cases to increase the safety level of the vaccine. In this report we suggest an approach to further increase the safety of LAIV through additional cold-adapted mutations in the hemagglutinin. The cold-adaptation of X-31 virus resulted in four amino acid mutations in the HA. We generated a panel of 7:1 reassortant viruses each carrying the hemagglutinins with individual single amino acid mutations. We examined their phenotypes and found a major attenuating mutation, N81K. This attenuation marker conferred additional temperature-sensitive and attenuation phenotype to the LAIV. Our data indicate that the cold-adapted mutation in the HA confers additional attenuation to the LAIV strain, without compromising its productivity and immune response. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A somatic-mutational process recurrently duplicates germline susceptibility loci and tissue-specific super-enhancers in breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Glodzik, Dominik; Morganella, Sandro; Davies, Helen; Simpson, Peter T; Li, Yilong; Zou, Xueqing; Diez-Perez, Javier; Staaf, Johan; Alexandrov, Ludmil B; Smid, Marcel; Brinkman, Arie B; Rye, Inga Hansine; Russnes, Hege; Raine, Keiran; Purdie, Colin A; Lakhani, Sunil R; Thompson, Alastair M; Birney, Ewan; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G; van de Vijver, Marc J; Martens, John W M; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Richardson, Andrea L; Kong, Gu; Viari, Alain; Easton, Douglas; Evan, Gerard; Campbell, Peter J; Stratton, Michael R; Nik-Zainal, Serena

    2017-03-01

    Somatic rearrangements contribute to the mutagenized landscape of cancer genomes. Here, we systematically interrogated rearrangements in 560 breast cancers by using a piecewise constant fitting approach. We identified 33 hotspots of large (>100 kb) tandem duplications, a mutational signature associated with homologous-recombination-repair deficiency. Notably, these tandem-duplication hotspots were enriched in breast cancer germline susceptibility loci (odds ratio (OR) = 4.28) and breast-specific 'super-enhancer' regulatory elements (OR = 3.54). These hotspots may be sites of selective susceptibility to double-strand-break damage due to high transcriptional activity or, through incrementally increasing copy number, may be sites of secondary selective pressure. The transcriptomic consequences ranged from strong individual oncogene effects to weak but quantifiable multigene expression effects. We thus present a somatic-rearrangement mutational process affecting coding sequences and noncoding regulatory elements and contributing a continuum of driver consequences, from modest to strong effects, thereby supporting a polygenic model of cancer development.

  18. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Mutation Enhances Expression of Cadherin-5 in Lung Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Hung, Ming-Szu; Chen, I-Chuan; Lung, Jr-Hau; Lin, Paul-Yann; Li, Ya-Chin; Tsai, Ying-Huang

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation has been shown to play a critical role in tumor angiogenesis. In this study, we investigate the correlation between EGFR mutations and cadherin-5 (CDH5), which is an angiogenic factor, in lung cancer cells. Increased expression CDH5 is observed in lung cancer cells with EGFR mutations. Stable lung cancer cell lines expressing mutant (exon 19 deletion E746-A750, and exon 21 missense mutation L858R) and wild type EGFR genes are established. A significantly higher expression of CDH5 is observed in exon 19 deletion stable lung cancer cells and mouse xenografts. Further studies show that expression of CDH5 is decreased after the inhibition of EGFR and downstream Akt pathways in lung cancer cells with EGFR mutation. In addition, mutant EGFR genes potentiates angiogenesis in lung cancer cells, which is inhibited by CDH5 siRNA, and potentiates migration and invasion in lung cancer cells. Our study shows that mutant EGFR genes are associated with overexpression of CDH5 through increased phosphorylation of EGFR and downstream Akt pathways. Our result may provide an insight into the association of mutant EGFR and CDH5 expression in lung cancer and aid further development of target therapy for NSCLC in the future.

  19. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Mutation Enhances Expression of Cadherin-5 in Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Ming-Szu; Chen, I-Chuan; Lung, Jr-Hau; Lin, Paul-Yann; Li, Ya-Chin; Tsai, Ying-Huang

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation has been shown to play a critical role in tumor angiogenesis. In this study, we investigate the correlation between EGFR mutations and cadherin-5 (CDH5), which is an angiogenic factor, in lung cancer cells. Increased expression CDH5 is observed in lung cancer cells with EGFR mutations. Stable lung cancer cell lines expressing mutant (exon 19 deletion E746-A750, and exon 21 missense mutation L858R) and wild type EGFR genes are established. A significantly higher expression of CDH5 is observed in exon 19 deletion stable lung cancer cells and mouse xenografts. Further studies show that expression of CDH5 is decreased after the inhibition of EGFR and downstream Akt pathways in lung cancer cells with EGFR mutation. In addition, mutant EGFR genes potentiates angiogenesis in lung cancer cells, which is inhibited by CDH5 siRNA, and potentiates migration and invasion in lung cancer cells. Our study shows that mutant EGFR genes are associated with overexpression of CDH5 through increased phosphorylation of EGFR and downstream Akt pathways. Our result may provide an insight into the association of mutant EGFR and CDH5 expression in lung cancer and aid further development of target therapy for NSCLC in the future. PMID:27362942

  20. Mutations in a delta9-Stearoyl-ACP-Desaturase Gene Are Associated with Enhanced Stearic Acid Levels in Soybean Seeds

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, P.; Shanklin, J.; Burton, J. W.; Upchurch, R. G.; Whittle, E.; Dewey, R. E.

    2008-11-01

    Stearic acid (18:0) is typically a minor component of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] oil, accounting for only 2 to 4% of the total fatty acid content. Increasing stearic acid levels of soybean oil would lead to enhanced oxidative stability, potentially reducing the need for hydrogenation, a process leading to the formation of undesirable trans fatty acids. Although mutagenesis strategies have been successful in developing soybean germplasm with elevated 18:0 levels in the seed oil, the specific gene mutations responsible for this phenotype were not known. We report a newly identified soybean gene, designated SACPD-C, that encodes a unique isoform of {Delta}{sup 9}-stearoyl-ACP-desaturase, the enzyme responsible for converting stearic acid to oleic acid (18:1). High levels of SACPD-C transcript were only detected in developing seed tissue, suggesting that the encoded desaturase functions to enhance oleic acid biosynthetic capacity as the immature seed is actively engaged in triacylglycerol production and storage. The participation of SACPD-C in storage triacylglycerol synthesis is further supported by the observation of mutations in this gene in two independent sources of elevated 18:0 soybean germplasm, A6 (30% 18:0) and FAM94-41 (9% 18:0). A molecular marker diagnostic for the FAM94-41 SACPD-C gene mutation strictly associates with the elevated 18:0 phenotype in a segregating population, and could thus serve as a useful tool in the development of cultivars with oils possessing enhanced oxidative stability.

  1. Point mutations in the Moloney murine leukemia virus enhancer identify a lymphoid-specific viral core motif and 1,3-phorbol myristate acetate-inducible element.

    PubMed Central

    Speck, N A; Renjifo, B; Hopkins, N

    1990-01-01

    The transcriptional enhancer of the Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV) is organized as a 75-base-pair repeat, and in each copy of the repeat there are multiple binding sites for nuclear factors. We have introduced point mutations into each of the known nuclear factor-binding sites in the MoMLV enhancer, in both copies of the direct repeat, and have analyzed the transcriptional activity conferred by the mutated enhancers by transient-expression assays in both hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cell lines. Mutation of individual binding sites in the MoMLV enhancer has moderate effects (less than 2-fold to 20-fold) on transcription in six independent cell lines. Several mutations decreased transcription from the MoMLV enhancer ubiquitously (the leukemia virus factor b site and the glucocorticoid response element), whereas others affected transcription specifically in lymphoid cell lines (core motif) or, more significantly, in fibroblasts (nuclear factor 1 site). The transcriptional activity of the MoMLV enhancer can be induced 8- to 10-fold by 1,3-phorbol myristate acetate in Jurkat T cells. Mutations in any of three adjacent binding sites (leukemia virus factor b and c sites and the core motif) within a 28-base-pair region in the center of the direct repeat sequence of the MoMLV enhancer completely attenuate the response to 1,3-phorbol myristate acetate. Images PMID:2104942

  2. Loss of immune escape mutations during persistent HCV infection in pregnancy enhances replication of vertically transmitted viruses.

    PubMed

    Honegger, Jonathan R; Kim, Seungtaek; Price, Aryn A; Kohout, Jennifer A; McKnight, Kevin L; Prasad, Mona R; Lemon, Stanley M; Grakoui, Arash; Walker, Christopher M

    2013-11-01

    Globally, about 1% of pregnant women are persistently infected with the hepatitis C virus (HCV). Mother-to-child transmission of HCV occurs in 3-5% of pregnancies and accounts for most new childhood infections. HCV-specific CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) are vital in the clearance of acute HCV infections, but in the 60-80% of infections that persist, these cells become functionally exhausted or select for mutant viruses that escape T cell recognition. Increased HCV replication during pregnancy suggests that maternofetal immune tolerance mechanisms may further impair HCV-specific CTLs, limiting their selective pressure on persistent viruses. To assess this possibility, we characterized circulating viral quasispecies during and after consecutive pregnancies in two women. This revealed a loss of some escape mutations in HLA class I epitopes during pregnancy that was associated with emergence of more fit viruses. CTL selective pressure was reimposed after childbirth, at which point escape mutations in these epitopes again predominated in the quasispecies and viral load dropped sharply. Importantly, the viruses transmitted perinatally were those with enhanced fitness due to reversion of escape mutations. Our findings indicate that the immunoregulatory changes of pregnancy reduce CTL selective pressure on HCV class I epitopes, thereby facilitating vertical transmission of viruses with optimized replicative fitness.

  3. Mutation of proline-1003 to glycine in the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor enhances responsiveness to EGF.

    PubMed Central

    Schuh, S M; Newberry, E P; Dalton, M A; Pike, L J

    1994-01-01

    We have shown previously that the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor is phosphorylated at Ser-1002 and that this phosphorylation is associated with desensitization of the EGF receptor. Ser-1002 is followed immediately by Pro-1003, a residue that may promote the adoption of a specific conformation at this site or severe as a recognition element for the interaction of the EGF receptor with other proteins. To examine these possibilities, we have mutated Pro-1003 of the EGF receptor to a Gly residue and have analyzed the effect of this mutation on EGF-stimulated signaling. Cells expressing the P1003G EGF receptors exhibited higher EGF-stimulated autophosphorylation and synthetic peptide phosphorylation compared to cells expressing wild-type EGF receptors. In addition, the ability of EGF to stimulate PI 3-kinase activity and mitogen-activated protein kinase activity was enhanced in cells expressing the P1003G EGF receptor. Cells expressing P1003G receptors also demonstrated an increased ability to form colonies in soft agar in response to EGF. These results indicate that mutation of Pro-1003 leads to a potentiation of the biological effects of EGF. The findings are consistent with the hypothesis that Pro-1003 plays a role in a form of regulation that normally suppresses EGF receptor function. Images PMID:7812043

  4. Sequential Adaptive Mutations Enhance Efficient Vector Switching by Chikungunya Virus and Its Epidemic Emergence

    PubMed Central

    Tsetsarkin, Konstantin A.; Weaver, Scott C.

    2011-01-01

    The adaptation of Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) to a new vector, the Aedes albopictus mosquito, is a major factor contributing to its ongoing re-emergence in a series of large-scale epidemics of arthritic disease in many parts of the world since 2004. Although the initial step of CHIKV adaptation to A. albopictus was determined to involve an A226V amino acid substitution in the E1 envelope glycoprotein that first arose in 2005, little attention has been paid to subsequent CHIKV evolution after this adaptive mutation was convergently selected in several geographic locations. To determine whether selection of second-step adaptive mutations in CHIKV or other arthropod-borne viruses occurs in nature, we tested the effect of an additional envelope glycoprotein amino acid change identified in Kerala, India in 2009. This substitution, E2-L210Q, caused a significant increase in the ability of CHIKV to develop a disseminated infection in A. albopictus, but had no effect on CHIKV fitness in the alternative mosquito vector, A. aegypti, or in vertebrate cell lines. Using infectious viruses or virus-like replicon particles expressing the E2-210Q and E2-210L residues, we determined that E2-L210Q acts primarily at the level of infection of A. albopictus midgut epithelial cells. In addition, we observed that the initial adaptive substitution, E1-A226V, had a significantly stronger effect on CHIKV fitness in A. albopictus than E2-L210Q, thus explaining the observed time differences required for selective sweeps of these mutations in nature. These results indicate that the continuous CHIKV circulation in an A. albopictus-human cycle since 2005 has resulted in the selection of an additional, second-step mutation that may facilitate even more efficient virus circulation and persistence in endemic areas, further increasing the risk of more severe and expanded CHIK epidemics. PMID:22174678

  5. Computationally optimized deimmunization libraries yield highly mutated enzymes with low immunogenicity and enhanced activity.

    PubMed

    Salvat, Regina S; Verma, Deeptak; Parker, Andrew S; Kirsch, Jack R; Brooks, Seth A; Bailey-Kellogg, Chris; Griswold, Karl E

    2017-06-27

    Therapeutic proteins of wide-ranging function hold great promise for treating disease, but immune surveillance of these macromolecules can drive an antidrug immune response that compromises efficacy and even undermines safety. To eliminate widespread T-cell epitopes in any biotherapeutic and thereby mitigate this key source of detrimental immune recognition, we developed a Pareto optimal deimmunization library design algorithm that optimizes protein libraries to account for the simultaneous effects of combinations of mutations on both molecular function and epitope content. Active variants identified by high-throughput screening are thus inherently likely to be deimmunized. Functional screening of an optimized 10-site library (1,536 variants) of P99 β-lactamase (P99βL), a component of ADEPT cancer therapies, revealed that the population possessed high overall fitness, and comprehensive analysis of peptide-MHC II immunoreactivity showed the population possessed lower average immunogenic potential than the wild-type enzyme. Although similar functional screening of an optimized 30-site library (2.15 × 10(9) variants) revealed reduced population-wide fitness, numerous individual variants were found to have activity and stability better than the wild type despite bearing 13 or more deimmunizing mutations per enzyme. The immunogenic potential of one highly active and stable 14-mutation variant was assessed further using ex vivo cellular immunoassays, and the variant was found to silence T-cell activation in seven of the eight blood donors who responded strongly to wild-type P99βL. In summary, our multiobjective library-design process readily identified large and mutually compatible sets of epitope-deleting mutations and produced highly active but aggressively deimmunized constructs in only one round of library screening.

  6. Nav1.7 mutations associated with paroxysmal extreme pain disorder, but not erythromelalgia, enhance Navβ4 peptide-mediated resurgent sodium currents

    PubMed Central

    Theile, Jonathan W; Jarecki, Brian W; Piekarz, Andrew D; Cummins, Theodore R

    2011-01-01

    Inherited erythromelalgia (IEM) and paroxysmal extreme pain disorder (PEPD) are inherited pain syndromes predominantly caused by missense mutations in the peripheral neuronal voltage-gated sodium channel (Nav) isoform Nav1.7. While both IEM and PEPD mutations increase neuronal excitability, IEM mutations primarily enhance activation and PEPD mutations impair inactivation. In addition, one PEPD mutation, Nav1.7-I1461T, has been shown to increase resurgent sodium currents in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Because resurgent currents have been implicated in increased neuronal excitability, we asked whether (1) additional PEPD mutations located within the putative inactivation gate and docking sites and (2) IEM mutations might also increase these unusual currents. Resurgent currents are generated following open-channel block at positive potentials by an endogenous blocking particle and subsequent expulsion of this blocker upon repolarization to moderately negative potentials. Here we used a mimetic of the putative blocking particle, the Navβ4 peptide, to determine if enhanced resurgent currents are induced by three distinct PEPD mutations and two IEM mutations in stably transfected HEK293 cells. We demonstrate that (1) Nav1.7-mediated resurgent currents are observed in HEK293 cells with the Navβ4 peptide in the recording pipette, (2) while the PEPD mutants M1627K, T1464I and V1299F exhibit enhanced resurgent current amplitudes compared to wild-type, the IEM mutants I848T and L858H do not, and (3) there is a strong correlation between the decay time constant of open-channel fast inactivation and resurgent current amplitude. These data suggest that resurgent currents may play a role in the neuronal hyperexcitability associated with PEPD, but not IEM, mutations. PMID:21115638

  7. Phosphomimetic mutations enhance oligomerization of phospholemman and modulate its interaction with the Na/K-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Song, Qiujing; Pallikkuth, Sandeep; Bossuyt, Julie; Bers, Donald M; Robia, Seth L

    2011-03-18

    Na/K-ATPase (NKA) activity is dynamically regulated by an inhibitory interaction with a small transmembrane protein, phospholemman (PLM). Inhibition is relieved upon PLM phosphorylation. Phosphorylation may alter how PLM interacts with NKA and/or itself, but details of these interactions are unknown. To address this, we quantified FRET between PLM and its regulatory target NKA in live cells. Phosphorylation of PLM was mimicked by mutation S63E (PKC site), S68E (PKA/PKC site), or S63E/S68E. The dependence of FRET on protein expression in live cells yielded information about the structure and binding affinity of the PLM-NKA regulatory complex. PLM phosphomimetic mutations altered the quaternary structure of the regulatory complex and reduced the apparent affinity of the PLM-NKA interaction. The latter effect was likely due to increased oligomerization of PLM phosphomimetic mutants, as suggested by PLM-PLM FRET measurements. Distance constraints obtained by FRET suggest that phosphomimetic mutations slightly alter the oligomer quaternary conformation. Photon-counting histogram measurements revealed that the major PLM oligomeric species is a tetramer. We conclude that phosphorylation of PLM increases its oligomerization into tetramers, decreases its binding to NKA, and alters the structures of both the tetramer and NKA regulatory complex.

  8. Epidermal growth factor receptor mutation enhances expression of vascular endothelial growth factor in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Hung, Ming-Szu; Chen, I-Chuan; Lin, Paul-Yann; Lung, Jr-Hau; Li, Ya-Chin; Lin, Yu-Ching; Yang, Cheng-Ta; Tsai, Ying-Huang

    2016-12-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation has been demonstrated to have a critical role in tumor angiogenesis. In the present study, the correlation between EGFR mutations and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was investigated in lung cancer cell lines and non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tumor tissues. VEGF levels were significantly increased in culture medium of lung cancer cells and NSCLC tissues with EGFR mutations (H1650 vs. A549, P=0.0399; H1975 vs. A549, P<0.0001). Stable lung cancer cell lines expressing mutant (exon 19 deletion, E746-A750; exon 21 missense mutation, L858R) and wild-type EGFR genes were established. Significantly increased expression of VEGF and stronger inhibitory effects of gefitinib to VEGF expression were observed in exon 19 deletion stable lung cancer cells (exon 19 deletion vs. wild-type EGFR, P=0.0005). The results of the present study may provide an insight into the association of mutant EGFR and VEGF expression in lung cancer, and may assist with further development of targeted therapy for NSCLC in the future.

  9. Phosphomimetic Mutations Enhance Oligomerization of Phospholemman and Modulate Its Interaction with the Na/K-ATPase*

    PubMed Central

    Song, Qiujing; Pallikkuth, Sandeep; Bossuyt, Julie; Bers, Donald M.; Robia, Seth L.

    2011-01-01

    Na/K-ATPase (NKA) activity is dynamically regulated by an inhibitory interaction with a small transmembrane protein, phospholemman (PLM). Inhibition is relieved upon PLM phosphorylation. Phosphorylation may alter how PLM interacts with NKA and/or itself, but details of these interactions are unknown. To address this, we quantified FRET between PLM and its regulatory target NKA in live cells. Phosphorylation of PLM was mimicked by mutation S63E (PKC site), S68E (PKA/PKC site), or S63E/S68E. The dependence of FRET on protein expression in live cells yielded information about the structure and binding affinity of the PLM-NKA regulatory complex. PLM phosphomimetic mutations altered the quaternary structure of the regulatory complex and reduced the apparent affinity of the PLM-NKA interaction. The latter effect was likely due to increased oligomerization of PLM phosphomimetic mutants, as suggested by PLM-PLM FRET measurements. Distance constraints obtained by FRET suggest that phosphomimetic mutations slightly alter the oligomer quaternary conformation. Photon-counting histogram measurements revealed that the major PLM oligomeric species is a tetramer. We conclude that phosphorylation of PLM increases its oligomerization into tetramers, decreases its binding to NKA, and alters the structures of both the tetramer and NKA regulatory complex. PMID:21220422

  10. Mutation of a Single Envelope N-Linked Glycosylation Site Enhances the Pathogenicity of Bovine Leukemia Virus

    PubMed Central

    Bouzar, Amel Baya; Jacques, Jean-Rock; Cosse, Jean-Philippe; Gillet, Nicolas; Callebaut, Isabelle; Reichert, Michal

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Viruses have coevolved with their host to ensure efficient replication and transmission without inducing excessive pathogenicity that would indirectly impair their persistence. This is exemplified by the bovine leukemia virus (BLV) system in which lymphoproliferative disorders develop in ruminants after latency periods of several years. In principle, the equilibrium reached between the virus and its host could be disrupted by emergence of more pathogenic strains. Intriguingly but fortunately, such a hyperpathogenic BLV strain was never observed in the field or designed in vitro. In this study, we sought to understand the role of envelope N-linked glycosylation with the hypothesis that this posttranslational modification could either favor BLV infection by allowing viral entry or allow immune escape by using glycans as a shield. Using reverse genetics of an infectious molecular provirus, we identified a N-linked envelope glycosylation site (N230) that limits viral replication and pathogenicity. Indeed, mutation N230E unexpectedly leads to enhanced fusogenicity and protein stability. IMPORTANCE Infection by retroviruses requires the interaction of the viral envelope protein (SU) with a membrane-associated receptor allowing fusion and release of the viral genomic RNA into the cell. We show that N-linked glycosylation of the bovine leukemia virus (BLV) SU protein is, as expected, essential for cell infection in vitro. Consistently, mutation of all glycosylation sites of a BLV provirus destroys infectivity in vivo. However, single mutations do not significantly modify replication in vivo. Instead, a particular mutation at SU codon 230 increases replication and accelerates pathogenesis. This unexpected observation has important consequences in terms of disease control and managing. PMID:26085161

  11. Human Erythroid 5-Aminolevulinate Synthase Mutations Associated with X-Linked Protoporphyria Disrupt Conformational Equilibrium and Enhance Product Release†

    PubMed Central

    Fratz, Erica J.; Clayton, Jerome; Hunter, Gregory A.; Ducamp, Sarah; Breydo, Leonid; Uversky, Vladimir N.; Deybach, Jean-Charles; Gouya, Laurent; Puy, Hervé; Ferreira, Gloria C.

    2015-01-01

    Regulation of 5-aminolevulinate synthase (ALAS) is at the origin of balanced heme production in mammals. Mutations in the C-terminal region of human erythroid-specific ALAS (hALAS2) are associated with X-linked protoporphyria (XLPP), a disease characterized by extreme photosensitivity, with elevated blood concentrations of free protoporphyrin IX and zinc protoporphyrin. To investigate the molecular basis for this disease, recombinant hALAS2 and variants of the enzyme harboring the gain-of-function XLPP mutations were constructed, purified, and analyzed kinetically, spectroscopically and thermodynamically. Enhanced activities of the XLPP variants resulted from accelerations in the rate at which the product 5-aminolevulinate (ALA) was released from the enzyme. Circular dichroism spectroscopy revealed that the XLPP mutations altered the microenvironment of the pyridoxal 5’-phosphate cofactor, which underwent further and specific alterations upon succinyl-CoA binding. Transient kinetic analyses of the variant-catalyzed reactions and protein fluorescence quenching upon ALA binding to the XLPP variants demonstrated that the protein conformational transition step associated with product release was predominantly affected. Of relevance, XLPP could also be modeled in cell culture. We propose that 1) the XLPP mutations destabilize the succinyl-CoA-induced hALAS2 closed conformation and thus accelerate ALA release, 2) the extended C-terminus of wild-type mammalian ALAS2 provides a regulatory role that allows for allosteric modulation of activity, thereby controlling the rate of erythroid heme biosynthesis, and 3) this control is disrupted in XLPP, resulting in porphyrin accumulation. PMID:26300302

  12. Apoptotic Activity of MeCP2 Is Enhanced by C-Terminal Truncating Mutations.

    PubMed

    Williams, Alison A; Mehler, Vera J; Mueller, Christina; Vonhoff, Fernando; White, Robin; Duch, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    Methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) is a widely abundant, multifunctional protein most highly expressed in post-mitotic neurons. Mutations causing Rett syndrome and related neurodevelopmental disorders have been identified along the entire MECP2 locus, but symptoms vary depending on mutation type and location. C-terminal mutations are prevalent, but little is known about the function of the MeCP2 C-terminus. We employ the genetic efficiency of Drosophila to provide evidence that expression of p.Arg294* (more commonly identified as R294X), a human MECP2 E2 mutant allele causing truncation of the C-terminal domains, promotes apoptosis of identified neurons in vivo. We confirm this novel finding in HEK293T cells and then use Drosophila to map the region critical for neuronal apoptosis to a small sequence at the end of the C-terminal domain. In vitro studies in mammalian systems previously indicated a role of the MeCP2 E2 isoform in apoptosis, which is facilitated by phosphorylation at serine 80 (S80) and decreased by interactions with the forkhead protein FoxG1. We confirm the roles of S80 phosphorylation and forkhead domain transcription factors in affecting MeCP2-induced apoptosis in Drosophila in vivo, thus indicating mechanistic conservation between flies and mammalian cells. Our findings are consistent with a model in which C- and N-terminal interactions are required for healthy function of MeCP2.

  13. Gene correction of a duchenne muscular dystrophy mutation by meganuclease-enhanced exon knock-in.

    PubMed

    Popplewell, Linda; Koo, Taeyoung; Leclerc, Xavier; Duclert, Aymeric; Mamchaoui, Kamel; Gouble, Agnés; Mouly, Vincent; Voit, Thomas; Pâques, Frédéric; Cédrone, Frédéric; Isman, Olga; Yáñez-Muñoz, Rafael J; Dickson, George

    2013-07-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a severe inherited, muscle-wasting disorder caused by mutations in the DMD gene. Gene therapy development for DMD has concentrated on vector-based DMD minigene transfer, cell-based gene therapy using genetically modified adult muscle stem cells or healthy wild-type donor cells, and antisense oligonucleotide-induced exon-skipping therapy to restore the reading frame of the mutated DMD gene. This study is an investigation into DMD gene targeting-mediated correction of deletions in human patient myoblasts using a target-specific meganuclease (MN) and a homologous recombination repair matrix. The MN was designed to cleave within DMD intron 44, upstream of a deletion hotspot, and integration-competent lentiviral vectors expressing the nuclease (LVcMN) were generated. MN western blotting and deep gene sequencing for LVcMN-induced non-homologous end-joining InDels (microdeletions or microinsertions) confirmed efficient MN expression and activity in transduced DMD myoblasts. A homologous repair matrix carrying exons 45-52 (RM45-52) was designed and packaged into integration-deficient lentiviral vectors (IDLVs; LVdRM45-52). After cotransduction of DMD myoblasts harboring a deletion of exons 45 to 52 with LVcMN and LVdRM45-52 vectors, targeted knock-in of the RM45-52 region in the correct location in DMD intron 44, and expression of full-length, correctly spliced wild-type dystrophin mRNA containing exons 45-52 were observed. This work demonstrates that genome surgery on human DMD gene mutations can be achieved by MN-induced locus-specific genome cleavage and homologous recombination knock-in of deleted exons. The feasibility of human DMD gene repair in patient myoblasts has exciting therapeutic potential.

  14. Apoptotic Activity of MeCP2 Is Enhanced by C-Terminal Truncating Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Mehler, Vera J.; Mueller, Christina; Vonhoff, Fernando; White, Robin; Duch, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    Methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) is a widely abundant, multifunctional protein most highly expressed in post-mitotic neurons. Mutations causing Rett syndrome and related neurodevelopmental disorders have been identified along the entire MECP2 locus, but symptoms vary depending on mutation type and location. C-terminal mutations are prevalent, but little is known about the function of the MeCP2 C-terminus. We employ the genetic efficiency of Drosophila to provide evidence that expression of p.Arg294* (more commonly identified as R294X), a human MECP2 E2 mutant allele causing truncation of the C-terminal domains, promotes apoptosis of identified neurons in vivo. We confirm this novel finding in HEK293T cells and then use Drosophila to map the region critical for neuronal apoptosis to a small sequence at the end of the C-terminal domain. In vitro studies in mammalian systems previously indicated a role of the MeCP2 E2 isoform in apoptosis, which is facilitated by phosphorylation at serine 80 (S80) and decreased by interactions with the forkhead protein FoxG1. We confirm the roles of S80 phosphorylation and forkhead domain transcription factors in affecting MeCP2-induced apoptosis in Drosophila in vivo, thus indicating mechanistic conservation between flies and mammalian cells. Our findings are consistent with a model in which C- and N-terminal interactions are required for healthy function of MeCP2. PMID:27442528

  15. Surprising behavioral and neurochemical enhancements in mice with combined mutations linked to Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Hennis, Meghan R.; Marvin, Marian A.; Taylor, Charles M.; Goldberg, Matthew S.

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder behind Alzheimer's disease. There are currently no therapies proven to halt or slow the progressive neuronal cell loss in PD. A better understanding of the molecular and cellular causes of PD is needed to develop disease-modifying therapies. PD is an age-dependent disease that causes the progressive death of dopamine-producing neurons in the brain. Loss of substantia nigra dopaminergic neurons results in locomotor symptoms such as slowness of movement, tremor, rigidity and postural instability. Abnormalities in other neurotransmitters, such as serotonin, may also be involved in both the motor and non-motor symptoms of PD. Most cases of PD are sporadic but many families show a Mendelian pattern of inherited parkinsonism and causative mutations have been identified in genes such as Parkin, DJ-1, PINK1, alpha-synuclein and Leucine Rich Repeat Kinase 2 (LRRK2). Although the definitive causes of idiopathic PD remain uncertain, the activity of the antioxidant enzyme glutathione peroxidase 1 (Gpx1) is reduced in PD brains and has been shown to be a key determinant of vulnerability to dopaminergic neuron loss in PD animal models. Furthermore, Gpx1 activity decreases with age in human substantia nigra but not rodent substantia nigra. Therefore, we crossed mice deficient for both Parkin and DJ-1 with mice deficient for Gpx1 to test the hypothesis that loss-of-function mutations in Parkin and DJ-1 cause PD by increasing vulnerability to Gpx1 deficiency. Surprisingly, mice lacking Parkin, DJ-1 and Gpx1 have increased striatal dopamine levels in the absence of nigral cell loss compared to wild-type, Gpx1−/−, and Parkin−/−DJ-1−/− mutant mice. Additionally, Parkin−/−DJ-1−/− mice exhibit improved rotarod performance and have increased serotonin in the striatum and hippocampus. Stereological analysis indicated that the increased serotonin levels were not due to increased serotonergic

  16. Selected prfA* mutations in recombinant attenuated Listeria monocytogenes strains augment expression of foreign immunogens and enhance vaccine-elicited humoral and cellular immune responses.

    PubMed

    Yan, Lin; Qiu, Jin; Chen, Jianbo; Ryan-Payseur, Bridgett; Huang, Dan; Wang, Yunqi; Rong, Lijun; Melton-Witt, Jody A; Freitag, Nancy E; Chen, Zheng W

    2008-08-01

    While recombinant Listeria monocytogenes strains can be explored as vaccine candidates, it is important to develop attenuated but highly immunogenic L. monocytogenes vaccine vectors. Here, prfA* mutations selected on the basis of upregulated expression of L. monocytogenes PrfA-dependent genes and proteins were assessed to determine their abilities to augment expression of foreign immunogens in recombinant L. monocytogenes vectors and therefore enhance vaccine-elicited immune responses (a prfA* mutation is a mutation that results in constitutive overexpression of PrfA and PrfA-dependent virulence genes; the asterisk distinguishes the mutation from inactivation or stop mutations). A total of 63 recombinant L. monocytogenes vaccine vectors expressing seven individual viral or bacterial immunogens each in nine different L. monocytogenes strains carrying wild-type prfA or having prfA* mutations were constructed and investigated. Mutations selected on the basis of increased PrfA activation in recombinant L. monocytogenes prfA* vaccine vectors augmented expression of seven individual protein immunogens remarkably. Consistently, prime and boost vaccination studies with mice indicated that the prfA(G155S) mutation in recombinant L. monocytogenes DeltaactA prfA* strains enhanced vaccine-elicited cellular immune responses. Surprisingly, the prfA(G155S) mutation was found to enhance vaccine-elicited humoral immune responses as well. The highly immunogenic recombinant L. monocytogenes DeltaactA prfA* vaccine strains were as attenuated as the recombinant parent L. monocytogenes DeltaactA vaccine vector. Thus, recombinant attenuated L. monocytogenes DeltaactA prfA* vaccine vectors potentially are better antimicrobial and anticancer vaccines.

  17. An Insertion Mutation That Distorts Antibody Binding Site Architecture Enhances Function of a Human Antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Krause, Jens C.; Ekiert, Damian C.; Tumpey, Terrence M.; Smith, Patricia B.; Wilson, Ian A.; Crowe, Jr., James E.

    2011-09-02

    The structural and functional significance of somatic insertions and deletions in antibody chains is unclear. Here, we demonstrate that a naturally occurring three-amino-acid insertion within the influenza virus-specific human monoclonal antibody 2D1 heavy-chain variable region reconfigures the antibody-combining site and contributes to its high potency against the 1918 and 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza viruses. The insertion arose through a series of events, including a somatic point mutation in a predicted hot-spot motif, introduction of a new hot-spot motif, a molecular duplication due to polymerase slippage, a deletion due to misalignment, and additional somatic point mutations. Atomic resolution structures of the wild-type antibody and a variant in which the insertion was removed revealed that the three-amino-acid insertion near the base of heavy-chain complementarity-determining region (CDR) H2 resulted in a bulge in that loop. This enlarged CDR H2 loop impinges on adjacent regions, causing distortion of the CDR H1 architecture and its displacement away from the antigen-combining site. Removal of the insertion restores the canonical structure of CDR H1 and CDR H2, but binding, neutralization activity, and in vivo activity were reduced markedly because of steric conflict of CDR H1 with the hemagglutinin antigen.

  18. Rhbdf2 mutations increase its protein stability and drive EGFR hyperactivation through enhanced secretion of amphiregulin

    PubMed Central

    Hosur, Vishnu; Johnson, Kenneth R.; Burzenski, Lisa M.; Stearns, Timothy M.; Maser, Richard S.; Shultz, Leonard D.

    2014-01-01

    The rhomboid 5 homolog 2 (Rhbdf2) gene encodes an inactive rhomboid (iRhom) protease, iRhom2, one of a family of enzymes containing a long cytosolic N terminus and a dormant peptidase domain of unknown function. iRhom2 has been implicated in epithelial regeneration and cancer growth through constitutive activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling. However, little is known about the physiological substrates for iRhom2 or the molecular mechanisms underlying these functions. We show that iRhom2 is a short-lived protein whose stability can be increased by select mutations in the N-terminal domain. In turn, these stable variants function to augment the secretion of EGF family ligands, including amphiregulin, independent of metalloprotease a disintegrin and metalloproteinase 17 (ADAM17) activity. In vivo, N-terminal iRhom2 mutations induce accelerated wound healing as well as accelerated tumorigenesis, but they do not drive spontaneous tumor development. This work underscores the physiological prominence of iRhom2 in controlling EGFR signaling events involved in wound healing and neoplastic growth, and yields insight into the function of key iRhom2 domains. PMID:24825892

  19. Mutations in adenine-binding pockets enhance catalytic properties of NAD(P)H-dependent enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Cahn, J.K.B.; Baumschlager, A.; Brinkmann-Chen, S.; Arnold, F.H.

    2016-01-01

    NAD(P)H-dependent enzymes are ubiquitous in metabolism and cellular processes and are also of great interest for pharmaceutical and industrial applications. Here, we present a structure-guided enzyme engineering strategy for improving catalytic properties of NAD(P)H-dependent enzymes toward native or native-like reactions using mutations to the enzyme's adenine-binding pocket, distal to the site of catalysis. Screening single-site saturation mutagenesis libraries identified mutations that increased catalytic efficiency up to 10-fold in 7 out of 10 enzymes. The enzymes improved in this study represent three different cofactor-binding folds (Rossmann, DHQS-like, and FAD/NAD binding) and utilize both NADH and NADPH. Structural and biochemical analyses show that the improved activities are accompanied by minimal changes in other properties (cooperativity, thermostability, pH optimum, uncoupling), and initial tests on two enzymes (ScADH6 and EcFucO) show improved functionality in Escherichia coli. PMID:26512129

  20. Rhbdf2 mutations increase its protein stability and drive EGFR hyperactivation through enhanced secretion of amphiregulin.

    PubMed

    Hosur, Vishnu; Johnson, Kenneth R; Burzenski, Lisa M; Stearns, Timothy M; Maser, Richard S; Shultz, Leonard D

    2014-05-27

    The rhomboid 5 homolog 2 (Rhbdf2) gene encodes an inactive rhomboid (iRhom) protease, iRhom2, one of a family of enzymes containing a long cytosolic N terminus and a dormant peptidase domain of unknown function. iRhom2 has been implicated in epithelial regeneration and cancer growth through constitutive activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling. However, little is known about the physiological substrates for iRhom2 or the molecular mechanisms underlying these functions. We show that iRhom2 is a short-lived protein whose stability can be increased by select mutations in the N-terminal domain. In turn, these stable variants function to augment the secretion of EGF family ligands, including amphiregulin, independent of metalloprotease a disintegrin and metalloproteinase 17 (ADAM17) activity. In vivo, N-terminal iRhom2 mutations induce accelerated wound healing as well as accelerated tumorigenesis, but they do not drive spontaneous tumor development. This work underscores the physiological prominence of iRhom2 in controlling EGFR signaling events involved in wound healing and neoplastic growth, and yields insight into the function of key iRhom2 domains.

  1. Trimer Enhancement Mutation Effects on HIV-1 Matrix Protein Binding Activities

    PubMed Central

    Alfadhli, Ayna; Mack, Andrew; Ritchie, Christopher; Cylinder, Isabel; Harper, Logan; Tedbury, Philip R.; Freed, Eric O.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The HIV-1 matrix (MA) protein is the amino-terminal domain of the HIV-1 precursor Gag (Pr55Gag) protein. MA binds to membranes and RNAs, helps transport Pr55Gag proteins to virus assembly sites at the plasma membranes of infected cells, and facilitates the incorporation of HIV-1 envelope (Env) proteins into virions by virtue of an interaction with the Env protein cytoplasmic tails (CTs). MA has been shown to crystallize as a trimer and to organize on membranes in hexamer lattices. MA mutations that localize to residues near the ends of trimer spokes have been observed to impair Env protein assembly into virus particles, and several of these are suppressed by the 62QR mutation at the hubs of trimer interfaces. We have examined the binding activities of wild-type (WT) MA and 62QR MA variants and found that the 62QR mutation stabilized MA trimers but did not alter the way MA proteins organized on membranes. Relative to WT MA, the 62QR protein showed small effects on membrane and RNA binding. However, 62QR proteins bound significantly better to Env CTs than their WT counterparts, and CT binding efficiencies correlated with trimerization efficiencies. Our data suggest a model in which multivalent binding of trimeric HIV-1 Env proteins to MA trimers contributes to the process of Env virion incorporation. IMPORTANCE The HIV-1 Env proteins assemble as trimers, and incorporation of the proteins into virus particles requires an interaction of Env CT domains with the MA domains of the viral precursor Gag proteins. Despite this knowledge, little is known about the mechanisms by which MA facilitates the virion incorporation of Env proteins. To help elucidate this process, we examined the binding activities of an MA mutant that stabilizes MA trimers. We found that the mutant proteins organized similarly to WT proteins on membranes, and that mutant and WT proteins revealed only slight differences in their binding to RNAs or lipids. However, the mutant proteins showed

  2. Enhanced group II intron retrohoming in magnesium-deficient Escherichia coli via selection of mutations in the ribozyme core

    PubMed Central

    Truong, David M.; Sidote, David J.; Russell, Rick; Lambowitz, Alan M.

    2013-01-01

    Mobile group II introns are bacterial retrotransposons thought to be evolutionary ancestors of spliceosomal introns and retroelements in eukaryotes. They consist of a catalytically active intron RNA (“ribozyme”) and an intron-encoded reverse transcriptase, which function together to promote RNA splicing and intron mobility via reverse splicing of the intron RNA into new DNA sites (“retrohoming”). Although group II introns are active in bacteria, their natural hosts, they function inefficiently in eukaryotes, where lower free Mg2+ concentrations decrease their ribozyme activity and constitute a natural barrier to group II intron proliferation within nuclear genomes. Here, we show that retrohoming of the Ll.LtrB group II intron is strongly inhibited in an Escherichia coli mutant lacking the Mg2+ transporter MgtA, and we use this system to select mutations in catalytic core domain V (DV) that partially rescue retrohoming at low Mg2+ concentrations. We thus identified mutations in the distal stem of DV that increase retrohoming efficiency in the MgtA mutant up to 22-fold. Biochemical assays of splicing and reverse splicing indicate that the mutations increase the fraction of intron RNA that folds into an active conformation at low Mg2+ concentrations, and terbium-cleavage assays suggest that this increase is due to enhanced Mg2+ binding to the distal stem of DV. Our findings indicate that DV is involved in a critical Mg2+-dependent RNA folding step in group II introns and demonstrate the feasibility of selecting intron variants that function more efficiently at low Mg2+ concentrations, with implications for evolution and potential applications in gene targeting. PMID:24043808

  3. Mutations to the piRNA pathway component aubergine enhance meiotic drive of segregation distorter in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Gell, Selena L; Reenan, Robert A

    2013-03-01

    Diploid sexual reproduction involves segregation of allelic pairs, ensuring equal representation of genotypes in the gamete pool. Some genes, however, are able to "cheat" the system by promoting their own transmission. The Segregation distorter (Sd) locus in Drosophila melanogaster males is one of the best-studied examples of this type of phenomenon. In this system the presence of Sd on one copy of chromosome 2 results in dysfunction of the non-Sd-bearing (Sd(+)) sperm and almost exclusive transmission of Sd to the next generation. The mechanism by which Sd wreaks such selective havoc has remained elusive. However, its effect requires a target locus on chromosome 2 known as Responder (Rsp). The Rsp locus comprises repeated copies of a satellite DNA sequence and Rsp copy number correlates with sensitivity to Sd. Under distorting conditions during spermatogenesis, nuclei with chromosomes containing greater than several hundred Rsp repeats fail to condense chromatin and are eliminated. Recently, Rsp sequences were found as small RNAs in association with Argonaute family proteins Aubergine (Aub) and Argonaute3 (AGO3). These proteins are involved in a germline-specific RNAi mechanism known as the Piwi-interacting RNA (piRNA) pathway, which specifically suppresses transposon activation in the germline. Here, we evaluate the role of piRNAs in segregation distortion by testing the effects of mutations to piRNA pathway components on distortion. Further, we specifically targeted mutations to the aub locus of a Segregation Distorter (SD) chromosome, using ends-out homologous recombination. The data herein demonstrate that mutations to piRNA pathway components act as enhancers of SD.

  4. Enhancement of the enzymatic activity of Escherichia coli acetyl esterase by a double mutation obtained by random mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Ryuichi; Hirano, Nobutaka; Kanaya, Shigenori; Haruki, Mitsuru

    2012-01-01

    A double mutant of Escherichia coli acetyl esterase (EcAE) with enhanced enzymatic activity was obtained by random mutagenesis using error-prone PCR and screening for enzymatic activity by observing halo formation on a tributyrin plate. The mutant contained Leu97Phe (L97F) and Leu209Phe (L209F) mutations. Single mutants L97F and L209F were also constructed and analyzed for kinetic parameters, as well as double mutant L97F/L209F. Kinetic analysis using p-nitrophenyl butyrate as substrate indicated that the k(cat) values of L97F and L97F/L209F were larger than that of the wild-type enzyme, by 8.3-fold and 12-fold respectively, whereas no significant change was observed in the k(cat) value of L209F. The K(m) values of L209F and L97F/L209F were smaller than that of the wild-type enzyme, by 2.9-fold and 2.4-fold respectively, whereas no significant change was observed in the K(m) value of L97F. These results indicate that a combination of an increase in k(cat) values due to the L97F mutation and a decrease in K(m) value due to the L209F mutation renders the k(cat)/K(m) value of the double mutant enzyme 29-fold higher than that of the wild-type enzyme.

  5. Structural and dynamic changes associated with beneficial engineered single-amino-acid deletion mutations in enhanced green fluorescent protein

    SciTech Connect

    Arpino, James A. J.; Rizkallah, Pierre J.; Jones, D. Dafydd

    2014-08-01

    The beneficial engineered single-amino-acid deletion variants EGFP{sup D190Δ} and EGFP{sup A227Δ} have been studied. Single-amino-acid deletions are a common part of the natural evolutionary landscape but are rarely sampled during protein engineering owing to limited and prejudiced molecular understanding of mutations that shorten the protein backbone. Single-amino-acid deletion variants of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) have been identified by directed evolution with the beneficial effect of imparting increased cellular fluorescence. Biophysical characterization revealed that increased functional protein production and not changes to the fluorescence parameters was the mechanism that was likely to be responsible. The structure EGFP{sup D190Δ} containing a deletion within a loop revealed propagated changes only after the deleted residue. The structure of EGFP{sup A227Δ} revealed that a ‘flipping’ mechanism was used to adjust for residue deletion at the end of a β-strand, with amino acids C-terminal to the deletion site repositioning to take the place of the deleted amino acid. In both variants new networks of short-range and long-range interactions are generated while maintaining the integrity of the hydrophobic core. Both deletion variants also displayed significant local and long-range changes in dynamics, as evident by changes in B factors compared with EGFP. Rather than being detrimental, deletion mutations can introduce beneficial structural effects through altering core protein properties, folding and dynamics, as well as function.

  6. Suppression and enhancement of the Aspergillus nidulans medusa mutation by altered dosage of the bristle and stunted genes.

    PubMed

    Busby, T M; Miller, K Y; Miller, B L

    1996-05-01

    Asexual reproduction in Aspergillus nidulans is characterized by the orderly differentiation of multicellular reproductive structures (conidiophores) and chains of uninucleate conidia (spores). Mutations in the developmental modifier medusa (medA) result in aberrant conidiophores with branching chains of reiterated reproductive cells (metulae), delayed conidial differentiation and frequent reinitiation of secondary conidiophores. We show that incorrect morphology is in part a consequence of modified bristle (brlA) and abacus (abaA) expression, key regulators of the core genetic pathway directing conidial differentiation. First, correct temporal expression of both brlA transcripts (brlA alpha and brlA beta) requires MedAp. Second, MedAp functions as a coactivator required for normal levels of abaA expression. Finally, we show that wild-type morphology results from a finely tuned balance in the expression of brlA, medA and the developmental modifier stunted (stuA). One extra copy of brlA suppresses medA mutations and restores normal abaA mRNA abundance. In contrast, an extra copy of stuA in a medA- strain results in an enhanced medusoid phenotype with extensive metulae proliferation and nearly complete absence of conidia. abaA and brlA alpha transcription are completely repressed in these strains. In general, low stuA:brlA ratios promoted conidiation while high ratios caused proliferation of unicellular sterigmata and inhibited conidiation.

  7. Suppression and Enhancement of the Aspergillus Nidulans Medusa Mutation by Altered Dosage of the Bristle and Stunted Genes

    PubMed Central

    Busby, T. M.; Miller, K. Y.; Miller, B. L.

    1996-01-01

    Asexual reproduction in Aspergillus nidulans is characterized by the orderly differentiation of multicellular reproductive structures (conidiophores) and chains of uninucleate conidia (spores). Mutations in the developmental modifier medusa (medA) result in aberrant conidiophores with branching chains of reiterated reproductive cells (metulae), delayed conidial differentiation and frequent reinitiation of secondary conidiophores. We show that incorrect morphology is in part a consequence of modified bristle (brlA) and abacus (abaA) expression, key regulators of the core genetic pathway directing conidial differentiation. First, correct temporal expression of both brlA transcripts (brlAα and brlAβ) requires MedAp. Second, MedAp functions as a coactivator required for normal levels of abaA expression. Finally, we show that wild-type morphology results from a finely tuned balance in the expression of brlA, medA and the developmental modifier stunted (stuA). One extra copy of brlA suppresses medA mutations and restores normal abaA mRNA abundance. In contrast, an extra copy of stuA in a medA(-) strain results in an enhanced medusoid phenotype with extensive metulae proliferation and nearly complete absence of conidia. abaA and brlAα transcription are completely repressed in these strains. In general, low stuA:brlA ratios promoted conidiation while high ratios caused proliferation of unicellular sterigmata and inhibited conidiation. PMID:8722771

  8. Mutations that affect phosphorylation of the adenovirus DNA-binding protein alter its ability to enhance its own synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Morin, N; Delsert, C; Klessig, D F

    1989-01-01

    The multifunctional adenovirus single-strand DNA-binding protein (DBP) is highly phosphorylated. Its phosphorylation sites are located in the amino-terminal domain of the protein, and its DNA- and RNA-binding activity resides in the carboxy-terminal half of the polypeptide. We have substituted cysteine or alanine for up to 10 of these potential phosphorylation sites by using oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis. Alteration of one or a few of these sites had little effect on the viability of virus containing the mutated DBP. However, when eight or more sites were altered, viral growth decreased significantly. This suggests that the overall phosphorylation state of the protein was more important than whether any particular site was modified. The reduction in growth correlated with both depressed DNA replication and expression of late genes. This reduction was probably the result of lower DBP accumulation in mutant-infected cells. Interestingly, although the stability of the mutated DBP was not affected, DBP synthesis and the level of its mRNA were depressed 5- to 10-fold for the underphosphorylated protein. These results suggest that DBP enhances its own expression and imply that phosphorylation of the DBP may be important for this function. Similarities to several eucaryotic transcriptional activators, which are composed of negatively charged activating domains and separate binding domains, are discussed. Images PMID:2585602

  9. A somatic-mutational process recurrently duplicates germline susceptibility loci and tissue-specific super-enhancers in breast cancers

    DOE PAGES

    Glodzik, Dominik; Morganella, Sandro; Davies, Helen; ...

    2017-01-23

    Somatic rearrangements contribute to the mutagenized landscape of cancer genomes. Here, we systematically interrogated rearrangements in 560 breast cancers by using a piecewise constant fitting approach. We identified 33 hotspots of large (>100 kb) tandem duplications, a mutational signature associated with homologous-recombination-repair deficiency. Notably, these tandem-duplication hotspots were enriched in breast cancer germline susceptibility loci (odds ratio (OR) = 4.28) and breast-specific 'super-enhancer' regulatory elements (OR = 3.54). These hotspots may be sites of selective susceptibility to double-strand-break damage due to high transcriptional activity or, through incrementally increasing copy number, may be sites of secondary selective pressure. Furthermore, the transcriptomicmore » consequences ranged from strong individual oncogene effects to weak but quantifiable multigene expression effects. We thus present a somatic-rearrangement mutational process affecting coding sequences and noncoding regulatory elements and contributing a continuum of driver consequences, from modest to strong effects, thereby supporting a polygenic model of cancer development.« less

  10. Direct functional consequences of ZRS enhancer mutation combine with secondary long range SHH signalling effects to cause preaxial polydactyly.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Edward J; Neely, David M; Dunn, Ian C; Davey, Megan G

    2014-08-15

    Sonic hedgehog (SHH) plays a central role in patterning numerous embryonic tissues including, classically, the developing limb bud where it controls digit number and identity. This study utilises the polydactylous Silkie (Slk) chicken breed, which carries a mutation in the long range limb-specific regulatory element of SHH, the ZRS. Using allele specific SHH expression analysis combined with quantitative protein analysis, we measure allele specific changes in SHH mRNA and concentration of SHH protein over time. This confirms that the Slk ZRS enhancer mutation causes increased SHH expression in the posterior leg mesenchyme. Secondary consequences of this increased SHH signalling include increased FGF pathway signalling and growth as predicted by the SHH/GREM1/FGF feedback loop and the Growth/Morphogen models. Manipulation of Hedgehog, FGF signalling and growth demonstrate that anterior-ectopic expression of SHH and induction of preaxial polydactyly is induced secondary to increased SHH signalling and Hedgehog-dependent growth directed from the posterior limb. We predict that increased long range SHH signalling acts in combination with changes in activation of SHH transcription from the Slk ZRS allele. Through analysis of the temporal dynamics of anterior SHH induction we predict a gene regulatory network which may contribute to activation of anterior SHH expression from the Slk ZRS.

  11. Exon 10 skipping in ACAT1 caused by a novel c.949G>A mutation located at an exonic splice enhancer site.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Hiroki; Sasai, Hideo; Nakama, Mina; Aoyama, Yuka; Abdelkreem, Elsayed; Ohnishi, Hidenori; Konstantopoulou, Vassiliki; Sass, Jörn Oliver; Fukao, Toshiyuki

    2016-11-01

    Beta-ketothiolase deficiency, also known as mitochondrial acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase (T2) deficiency, is an autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in the acetyl‑CoA acetyltransferase 1 (ACAT1) gene. A German T2‑deficient patient that developed a severe ketoacidotic episode at the age of 11 months, was revealed to be a compound heterozygote of a previously reported null mutation, c.472A>G (p.N158D) and a novel mutation, c.949G>A (p.D317N), in ACAT1. The c.949G>A mutation was suspected to cause aberrant splicing as it is located within an exonic splicing enhancer sequence (c. 947CTGACGC) that is a potential binding site for serine/arginine‑rich splicing factor 1. A mutation in this sequence, c.951C>T, results in exon 10 skipping. A minigene construct was synthesized that included exon 9‑truncated intron 9‑exon 10‑truncated intron 10‑exon 11, and the splicing of this minigene revealed that the c.949G>A mutant construct caused exon 10 skipping in a proportion of the transcripts. Furthermore, additional substitution of G for C at the first nucleotide of exon 10 (c.941G>C) abolished the effect of the c.949G>A mutation. Transient expression analysis of the c.949G>A mutant cDNA revealed no residual T2 activity in the mutated D317N enzyme. Therefore, c.949G>A (D317N) is a pathogenic missense mutation, and diminishes the effect of an exonic splicing enhancer and causes exon 10 skipping. The present study demonstrates that a missense mutation, or even a synonymous substitution, may disrupt enzyme function by interference with splicing.

  12. Enhanced ε-poly-L-lysine production by inducing double antibiotic-resistant mutations in Streptomyces albulus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liang; Chen, Xusheng; Wu, Guangyao; Li, Shu; Zeng, Xin; Ren, Xidong; Tang, Lei; Mao, Zhonggui

    2017-02-01

    ε-Poly-L-lysine (ε-PL), as a food additive, has been widely used in many countries. However, its production still needs to be improved. We successfully enhanced ε-PL production of Streptomyces albulus FEEL-1 by introducing mutations related to antibiotics, such as streptomycin, gentamicin, and rifampin. Single- and double-resistant mutants (S-88 and SG-31) were finally screened with the improved ε-PL productions of 2.81 and 3.83 g/L, 1.75- to 2.39-fold compared with that of initial strain FEEL-1. Then, the performances of mutants S-88 and SG-31 were compared with the parent strain FEEL-1 in a 5-L bioreactor under the optimal condition for ε-PL production. After 174-h fed-batch fermentation, the ε-PL production and productivity of hyper-strain SG-31 reached the maximum of 59.50 g/L and 8.21 g/L/day, respectively, which was 138 and 105% higher than that of FEEL-1. Analysis of streptomycin-resistant mutants demonstrated that a point mutation occurred in rpsL gene (encoding the ribosomal protein S12). These single and double mutants displayed remarkable increases of the activities and transcriptional levels of key enzymes in ε-PL biosynthesis pathway, which may be responsible for the enhanced mycelia viability, respiratory activity, and ε-PL productions of SG-31. These results showed that the new breeding method, called ribosome engineering, could be a novel and effective breeding strategy for the evolution of ε-PL-producing strains.

  13. Characterization of enhancer elements and their mutations in the long terminal repeat of feline endogenous RD-114 proviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, A K; Roy-Burman, P

    1989-01-01

    To locate the enhancer regions of the feline endogenous RD-114 long terminal repeat (LTR), we examined expression of the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene driven by various segments of the U3 region from two different proviral loci (CRL3 and CR1). Transient expression assays demonstrated that the primary signal sequence for transcription enhancement was located within the 63-base-pair (bp) element of the CRL3 DNA occurring between positions -184 and -121 from the CAP site (+1), whereas the similar region of CR1 was almost inactive. This element from both CRL3 and CR1 contained a single 30-bp sequence (direct repeat [DR]-B2) found in duplicate tandem copies in the LTR of the infectious RD-114 provirus. Two 9-bp inverted repeats marked the DR-B unit of the active element, and a prominent base deletion in one of these repeats in CR1 DNA appeared to be related to loss of enhancer activity. Another segment of CRL3 (-296 to -184), also displaying enhancer function, contained tandem repeated sequences (DR-A1 and DR-A2). The Dr-A2 unit, which lacked the 5' 20-bp sequence of the 47-pb DR-A1, could not function as an enhancer by itself, but it contributed to enhancer effects in cooperation with either the DR-A1 or DR-B2 region. The CR1 LTR contained a single DR-A1 sequence with extensive mutations, and the region (-313 to -181) containing this DR-A1 unit was nonfunctional, similar to the DR-B2 region of CR1. Site-directed mutagenesis analysis of another enhancer element, an octamer motif occurring between CAAT and TATA boxes of all RD-114 LTRs sequenced, revealed that this element was necessary for full enhancer function of the U3 region but with a variable effect, depending on the cell types in which chloramphenicol acetyltransferase expression was determined. Images PMID:2778873

  14. A Key Evolutionary Mutation Enhances DNA Binding of the FOXP2 Forkhead Domain.

    PubMed

    Morris, Gavin; Fanucchi, Sylvia

    2016-04-05

    Forkhead box (FOX) transcription factors share a conserved forkhead DNA binding domain (FHD) and are key role players in the development of many eukaryotic species. Their involvement in various congenital disorders and cancers makes them clinically relevant targets for novel therapeutic strategies. Among them, the FOXP subfamily of multidomain transcriptional repressors is unique in its ability to form DNA binding homo and heterodimers. The truncated FOXP2 FHD, in the absence of the leucine zipper, exists in equilibrium between monomeric and domain-swapped dimeric states in vitro. As a consequence, determining the DNA binding properties of the FOXP2 FHD becomes inherently difficult. In this work, two FOXP2 FHD hinge loop mutants have been generated to successfully prevent both the formation (A539P) and the dissociation (F541C) of the homodimers. This allows for the separation of the two species for downstream DNA binding studies. Comparison of DNA binding of the different species using electrophoretic mobility shift assay, fluorescence anisotropy and isothermal titration calorimetry indicates that the wild-type FOXP2 FHD binds DNA as a monomer. However, comparison of the DNA-binding energetics of the monomer and wild-type FHD, reveals that there is a difference in the mechanism of binding between the two species. We conclude that the naturally occurring reverse mutation (P539A) seen in the FOXP subfamily increases DNA binding affinity and may increase the potential for nonspecific binding compared to other FOX family members.

  15. Chemokine-enhanced chemotaxis of lymphangioleiomyomatosis cells with mutations in the tumor suppressor TSC2 gene.

    PubMed

    Pacheco-Rodriguez, Gustavo; Kumaki, Fumiyuki; Steagall, Wendy K; Zhang, Yi; Ikeda, Yoshihiko; Lin, Jing-Ping; Billings, Eric M; Moss, Joel

    2009-02-01

    Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is characterized by cystic lung destruction caused by LAM cells (smooth-muscle-like cells) that have mutations in the tumor suppressor genes tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) 1 or 2 and have the capacity to metastasize. Since chemokines and their receptors function in chemotaxis of metastatic cells, we hypothesized that LAM cells may be recruited by chemokine(s) in the lung. Quantification of 25 chemokines in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from LAM patients and healthy volunteers revealed that concentrations of CCL2, CXCL1, and CXCL5 were significantly higher in samples from LAM patients than those from healthy volunteers. In vitro, CCL2 or MCP-1 induced selective migration of cells, showing loss of heterozygosity of TSC2 from a heterogeneous population of cells grown from explanted LAM lungs. Additionally, the frequencies of single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the CCL2 gene promoter region differed significantly in LAM patients and healthy volunteers (p = 0.018), and one polymorphism was associated significantly more frequently with the decline of lung function. The presence (i.e., potential functionality) of chemokine receptors was evaluated using immunohistochemistry in lung sections from 30 LAM patients. Expression of chemokines and these receptors varied among LAM patients and differed from that seen in some cancers (e.g., breast cancer and melanoma cells). These observations are consistent with the notion that chemokines such as CCL2 may serve to determine mobility and specify the site of metastasis of the LAM cell.

  16. Caspase-8 mutations in head and neck cancer confer resistance to death receptor-mediated apoptosis and enhance migration, invasion, and tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Li, Changyou; Egloff, Ann Marie; Sen, Malabika; Grandis, Jennifer R; Johnson, Daniel E

    2014-10-01

    Little is known regarding molecular markers in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) that predict responsiveness to different therapeutic regimens or predict HNSCC progression. Mutations in procaspase-8 occur in 9% of HNSCC primary tumors, but the functional consequences of these mutations are poorly understood. In this study, we examined the impact of four, representative, HNSCC-associated procaspase-8 mutations on activation of the extrinsic apoptosis pathway, as well as cellular migration and invasion, and in vivo tumor growth. All four mutant proteins acted to potently inhibit activation of apoptosis following treatment with TRAIL or agonistic anti-Fas. In contrast to wild-type procaspase-8, the mutant proteins were not recruited to FADD following treatment with TRAIL or anti-Fas, but may be constitutively bound by FADD. Three of the four procaspase-8 mutants promoted enhanced cellular migration and invasion through matrigel, relative to that seen with the wild-type procaspase-8 protein. Procaspase-8 mutation also stimulated the growth of HNSCC xenograft tumors. These findings indicate that HNSCC-associated procaspase-8 mutations inhibit activation of the extrinsic apoptosis pathway and are likely to represent markers for resistance to therapeutic regimens incorporating death receptor activators. Moreover, procaspase-8 mutations may serve as markers of HNSCC tumor progression, as exemplified by enhanced migration, invasion, and tumor growth. Copyright © 2014 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Prognostic effects of TERT promoter mutations are enhanced by coexistence with BRAF or RAS mutations and strengthen the risk prediction by the ATA or TNM staging system in differentiated thyroid cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Song, Young Shin; Lim, Jung Ah; Choi, Hoonsung; Won, Jae-Kyung; Moon, Jae Hoon; Cho, Sun Wook; Lee, Kyu Eun; Park, Young Joo; Yi, Ka Hee; Park, Do Joon; Seo, Jeong-Sun

    2016-05-01

    Recent reports suggest that mutations in the promoter of the gene encoding telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) affect thyroid cancer outcomes. In all, 551 patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) enrolled in this study. The median follow-up duration was 4.8 years (interquartile range, 3.4-10.6 years). TERT promoter mutations were detected in 25 DTCs (4.5%): 2.8% in neither BRAF-mutated nor RAS-mutated tumors, 4.8% in BRAF-mutated tumors, and 11.3% in RAS-mutated tumors. Moreover, they were frequently observed in American Thyroid Association (ATA) high-risk and TNM stage III/IV groups (9.1% and 12.9%, respectively). The coexistence of BRAF or RAS with TERT promoter mutations increased aggressive clinicopathologic features, recurrence (hazard ratio [HR] for BRAF, 4.64; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.42-15.18; HR for RAS, 5.36; 95% CI, 1.20-24.02), and mortality (HR for BRAF, 15.13; 95% CI, 1.55-148.23; HR for RAS, 14.75; 95% CI, 1.30-167.00), even after adjustments for the age at diagnosis and sex, although the significance was lost after additional adjustments for pathologic characteristics. Furthermore, TERT promoter mutations significantly increased the risk of both recurrence and mortality in the ATA high-risk (HR for recurrence, 5.79; 95% CI, 2.07-16.18; HR for mortality, 16.16; 95% CI, 2.10-124.15) and TNM stage III/IV groups (HR for recurrence, 3.60; 95% CI, 1.19-10.85; HR for mortality, 9.06; 95% CI, 2.09-39.26). The coexistence of BRAF or RAS mutations enhanced the prognostic effects of TERT promoter mutations. Furthermore, TERT promoter mutations strengthened the predictions of mortality and recurrence by the ATA and TNM staging systems, particularly for high-risk patients with DTC. Cancer 2016;122:1370-1379. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  18. A single-point mutation enhances dual functionality of a scorpion toxin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xueli; Gao, Bin; Zhu, Shunyi

    2016-01-01

    Scorpion venom represents a tremendous, hitherto partially explored peptide library that has been proven to be useful not only for understanding ion channels but also for drug design. MeuTXKα3 is a functionally unknown scorpion toxin-like peptide. Here we describe new transcripts of this gene arising from alternative polyadenylation and its biological function as well as a mutant with a single-point substitution at site 30. Native-like MeuTXKα3 and its mutant were produced in Escherichia coli and their toxic function against Drosophila Shaker K(+) channel and its mammalian counterparts (rKv1.1-rKv1.3) were assayed by two-electrode voltage clamp technique. The results show that MeuTXKα3 is a weak toxin with a wide-spectrum of activity on both Drosophila and mammalian K(+) channels. The substitution of a proline at site 30 by an asparagine, an evolutionarily conserved functional residue in the scorpion α-KTx family, led to an increased activity on rKv1.2 and rKv1.3 but a decreased activity on the Shaker channel without changing the potency on rKv1.1, suggesting a key role of this site in species selectivity of scorpion toxins. MeuTXKα3 was also active on a variety of bacteria with lethal concentrations ranging from 4.66 to 52.01μM and the mutant even had stronger activity on some of these bacterial species. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on a bi-functional short-chain peptide in the lesser Asian scorpion venom. Further extensive mutations of MeuTXKα3 at site 30 could help improve its K(+) channel-blocking and antibacterial functions.

  19. Oncogenic mutations mimic and enhance dynamic events in the natural activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase p110α (PIK3CA)

    PubMed Central

    Burke, John E.; Perisic, Olga; Masson, Glenn R.; Vadas, Oscar; Williams, Roger L.

    2012-01-01

    The p110α catalytic subunit (PIK3CA) is one of the most frequently mutated genes in cancer. We have examined the activation of the wild-type p110α/p85α and a spectrum of oncogenic mutants using hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS). We find that for the wild-type enzyme, the natural transition from an inactive cytosolic conformation to an activated form on membranes entails four distinct events. Analysis of oncogenic mutations shows that all up-regulate the enzyme by enhancing one or more of these dynamic events. We provide the first insight into the activation mechanism by mutations in the linker between the adapter-binding domain (ABD) and the Ras-binding domain (RBD) (G106V and G118D). These mutations, which are common in endometrial cancers, enhance two of the natural activation events: movement of the ABD and ABD–RBD linker relative to the rest of the catalytic subunit and breaking the C2–iSH2 interface on binding membranes. C2 domain mutants (N345K and C420R) also mimic these events, even in the absence of membranes. A third event is breaking the nSH2–helical domain contact caused by phosphotyrosine-containing peptides binding to the enzyme, which is mimicked by a helical domain mutation (E545K). Interaction of the C lobe of the kinase domain with membranes is the fourth activation event, and is potentiated by kinase domain mutations (e.g., H1047R). All mutations increased lipid binding and basal activity, even mutants distant from the membrane surface. Our results elucidate a unifying mechanism in which diverse PIK3CA mutations stimulate lipid kinase activity by facilitating allosteric motions required for catalysis on membranes. PMID:22949682

  20. Mutations of the TATA-binding protein confer enhanced tolerance to hyperosmotic stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kim, Na-Rae; Yang, Jungwoo; Kwon, Hyeji; An, Jieun; Choi, Wonja; Kim, Wankee

    2013-09-01

    Previously, it was shown that overexpression of either of two SPT15 mutant alleles, SPT15-M2 and SPT15-M3, which encode mutant TATA-binding proteins, confer enhanced ethanol tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this study, we demonstrated that strains overexpressing SPT15-M2 or SPT15-M3 were tolerant to hyperosmotic stress caused by high concentrations of glucose, salt, and sorbitol. The enhanced tolerance to high glucose concentrations in particular improved ethanol production from very high gravity (VHG) ethanol fermentations. The strains displayed constitutive and sustained activation of Hog1, a central kinase in the high osmolarity glycerol (HOG) signal transduction pathway of S. cerevisiae. However, the cell growth defect known to be caused by constitutive and sustained activation of Hog1 was not observed. We also found that reactive oxygen species (ROS) were accumulated to a less extent upon exposure to high glucose concentration in our osmotolerant strains. We identified six new genes (GPH1, HSP12, AIM17, SSA4, USV1, and IGD1), the individual deletion of which renders cells sensitive to 50 % glucose. In spite of the presence of multiple copies of stress response element in their promoters, it was apparent that those genes were not controlled at the transcriptional level by the HOG pathway under the high glucose conditions. Combined with previously published results, overexpression of SPT15-M2 or SPT15-M3 clearly provides a basis for improved tolerance to ethanol and osmotic stress, which enables construction of strains of any genetic background that need enhanced tolerance to high concentrations of ethanol and glucose, promoting the feasibility for VHG ethanol fermentation.

  1. A Natural Mutation in Helix 5 of the Ligand Binding Domain of Glucocorticoid Receptor Enhances Receptor-Ligand Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Reyer, Henry; Ponsuksili, Siriluck; Kanitz, Ellen; Pöhland, Ralf; Wimmers, Klaus; Murani, Eduard

    2016-01-01

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is a central player in the neuroendocrine stress response; it mediates feedback regulation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and physiological actions of glucocorticoids in the periphery. Despite intensive investigations of GR in the context of receptor-ligand interaction, only recently the first naturally occurring gain-of-function substitution, Ala610Val, of the ligand binding domain was identified in mammals. We showed that this mutation underlies a major quantitative trait locus for HPA axis activity in pigs, reducing cortisol production by about 40–50 percent. To unravel the molecular mechanisms behind this gain of function, receptor-ligand interactions were evaluated in silico, in vitro and in vivo. In accordance with previously observed phenotypic effects, the mutant Val610 GR showed significantly increased activation in response to glucocorticoid and non-glucocorticoid steroids, and, as revealed by GR-binding studies in vitro and in pituitary glands, enhanced ligand binding. Concordantly, the protein structure prediction depicted reduced binding distances between the receptor and ligand, and altered interactions in the ligand binding pocket. Consequently, the Ala610Val substitution opens up new structural information for the design of potent GR ligands and to examine effects of the enhanced GR responsiveness to glucocorticoids on the entire organism. PMID:27736993

  2. Mutagenic Effects of Ribavirin on Hepatitis E Virus—Viral Extinction versus Selection of Fitness-Enhancing Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Todt, Daniel; Walter, Stephanie; Brown, Richard J. P.; Steinmann, Eike

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV), an important agent of viral hepatitis worldwide, can cause severe courses of infection in pregnant women and immunosuppressed patients. To date, HEV infections can only be treated with ribavirin (RBV). Major drawbacks of this therapy are that RBV is not approved for administration to pregnant women and that the virus can acquire mutations, which render the intra-host population less sensitive or even resistant to RBV. One of the proposed modes of action of RBV is a direct mutagenic effect on viral genomes, inducing mismatches and subsequent nucleotide substitutions. These transition events can drive the already error-prone viral replication beyond an error threshold, causing viral population extinction. In contrast, the expanded heterogeneous viral population can facilitate selection of mutant viruses with enhanced replication fitness. Emergence of these mutant viruses can lead to therapeutic failure. Consequently, the onset of RBV treatment in chronically HEV-infected individuals can result in two divergent outcomes: viral extinction versus selection of fitness-enhanced viruses. Following an overview of RNA viruses treated with RBV in clinics and a summary of the different antiviral modes of action of this drug, we focus on the mutagenic effect of RBV on HEV intrahost populations, and how HEV is able to overcome lethal mutagenesis. PMID:27754363

  3. Mutagenic Effects of Ribavirin on Hepatitis E Virus-Viral Extinction versus Selection of Fitness-Enhancing Mutations.

    PubMed

    Todt, Daniel; Walter, Stephanie; Brown, Richard J P; Steinmann, Eike

    2016-10-13

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV), an important agent of viral hepatitis worldwide, can cause severe courses of infection in pregnant women and immunosuppressed patients. To date, HEV infections can only be treated with ribavirin (RBV). Major drawbacks of this therapy are that RBV is not approved for administration to pregnant women and that the virus can acquire mutations, which render the intra-host population less sensitive or even resistant to RBV. One of the proposed modes of action of RBV is a direct mutagenic effect on viral genomes, inducing mismatches and subsequent nucleotide substitutions. These transition events can drive the already error-prone viral replication beyond an error threshold, causing viral population extinction. In contrast, the expanded heterogeneous viral population can facilitate selection of mutant viruses with enhanced replication fitness. Emergence of these mutant viruses can lead to therapeutic failure. Consequently, the onset of RBV treatment in chronically HEV-infected individuals can result in two divergent outcomes: viral extinction versus selection of fitness-enhanced viruses. Following an overview of RNA viruses treated with RBV in clinics and a summary of the different antiviral modes of action of this drug, we focus on the mutagenic effect of RBV on HEV intrahost populations, and how HEV is able to overcome lethal mutagenesis.

  4. A point mutation in the RNA-binding domain of human parainfluenza virus type 2 nucleoprotein elicits an abnormally enhanced polymerase activity.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Yusuke; Ohta, Keisuke; Kolakofsky, Daniel; Nishio, Machiko

    2017-02-08

    The genome RNA of human parainfluenza virus type 2 (hPIV2) that acts as template for the polymerase complex is entirely encapsidated by the nucleoprotein (NP). Recently, the crystal structure of NP of PIV5, a virus closely related to hPIV2, was resolved in association with RNA. Ten amino acids that contact the bound RNA-binding were identified, and are strictly conserved between PIV5 and hPIV2 NP. Mutation of hPIV2 NP Q202 (that contacts a base rather than the RNA backbone) to some amino acids resulted in an over thirty-fold increase of polymerase activity as evidenced by a minireplicon assay, even though RNA-binding affinity was unaltered. Using various modified minireplicons, we found that enhanced reporter gene expression could be accounted for by increased minigenome replication, whereas mRNA synthesis itself was not affected by Q202 mutation. Moreover, the enhanced activities were still observed in minigenomes partially lacking the leader sequence and which were not of hexamer genome length. Unexpectedly, recombinant hPIV2 possessing the NP Q202A mutation could not be recovered from cDNA.IMPORTANCE We examined the importance of amino acids in the putative RNA-binding domain of hPIV2 NP for polymerase activity using minireplicons. Abnormally enhanced genome replication was observed by the substitution in NP Q202 position to various amino acids. Surprisingly, this mutation enabled polymerase to use minigenomes partially lacking the leader sequence and not of hexamer genome length. This mutation does not affect fundamental properties of NP, e.g., recognition of gene junctional and editing signals. However, the strongly enhanced polymerase activity may not be viable for infectious life-cycle. This report highlights the potential of the polymerase complex with point mutations in NP, and helps our detailed understanding of the molecular basis of gene expression.

  5. Erythrocytic Iron Deficiency Enhances Susceptibility to Plasmodium chabaudi Infection in Mice Carrying a Missense Mutation in Transferrin Receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Lelliott, Patrick M; McMorran, Brendan J; Foote, Simon J; Burgio, Gaetan

    2015-11-01

    The treatment of iron deficiency in areas of high malaria transmission is complicated by evidence which suggests that iron deficiency anemia protects against malaria, while iron supplementation increases malaria risk. Iron deficiency anemia results in an array of pathologies, including reduced systemic iron bioavailability and abnormal erythrocyte physiology; however, the mechanisms by which these pathologies influence malaria infection are not well defined. In the present study, the response to malaria infection was examined in a mutant mouse line, Tfrc(MRI24910), identified during an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) screen. This line carries a missense mutation in the gene for transferrin receptor 1 (TFR1). Heterozygous mice exhibited reduced erythrocyte volume and density, a phenotype consistent with dietary iron deficiency anemia. However, unlike the case in dietary deficiency, the erythrocyte half-life, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, and intraerythrocytic ferritin content were unchanged. Systemic iron bioavailability was also unchanged, indicating that this mutation results in erythrocytic iron deficiency without significantly altering overall iron homeostasis. When infected with the rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium chabaudi adami, mice displayed increased parasitemia and succumbed to infection more quickly than their wild-type littermates. Transfusion of fluorescently labeled erythrocytes into malaria parasite-infected mice demonstrated an erythrocyte-autonomous enhanced survival of parasites within mutant erythrocytes. Together, these results indicate that TFR1 deficiency alters erythrocyte physiology in a way that is similar to dietary iron deficiency anemia, albeit to a lesser degree, and that this promotes intraerythrocytic parasite survival and an increased susceptibility to malaria in mice. These findings may have implications for the management of iron deficiency in the context of malaria. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology

  6. Reovirus Variants with Mutations in Genome Segments S1 and L2 Exhibit Enhanced Virion Infectivity and Superior Oncolysis

    PubMed Central

    Gujar, Shashi A.; Ahn, Dae-Gyun; Mohamed, Adil

    2012-01-01

    Reovirus preferentially replicates in transformed cells and is being explored as a cancer therapy. Immunological and physical barriers to virotherapy inspired a quest for reovirus variants with enhanced oncolytic potency. Using a classical genetics approach, we isolated two reovirus variants (T3v1 and T3v2) with superior replication relative to wild-type reovirus serotype 3 Dearing (T3wt) on various human and mouse tumorigenic cell lines. Unique mutations in reovirus λ2 vertex protein and σ1 cell attachment protein were associated with the large plaque-forming phenotype of T3v1 and T3v2, respectively. Both T3v1 and T3v2 exhibited higher infectivity (i.e., a higher PFU-to-particle ratio) than T3wt. A detailed analysis of virus replication revealed that virus cell binding and uncoating were equivalent for variant and wild-type reoviruses. However, T3v1 and T3v2 were significantly more efficient than T3wt in initiating productive infection. Thus, when cells were infected with equivalent input virus particles, T3v1 and T3v2 produced significantly higher levels of early viral RNAs relative to T3wt. Subsequent steps of virus replication (viral RNA and protein synthesis, virus assembly, and cell death) were equivalent for all three viruses. In a syngeneic mouse model of melanoma, both T3v1 and T3v2 prolonged mouse survival compared to wild-type reovirus. Our studies reveal that oncolytic potency of reovirus can be improved through distinct mutations that increase the infectivity of reovirus particles. PMID:22532697

  7. Erythrocytic Iron Deficiency Enhances Susceptibility to Plasmodium chabaudi Infection in Mice Carrying a Missense Mutation in Transferrin Receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Lelliott, Patrick M.; McMorran, Brendan J.; Foote, Simon J.

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of iron deficiency in areas of high malaria transmission is complicated by evidence which suggests that iron deficiency anemia protects against malaria, while iron supplementation increases malaria risk. Iron deficiency anemia results in an array of pathologies, including reduced systemic iron bioavailability and abnormal erythrocyte physiology; however, the mechanisms by which these pathologies influence malaria infection are not well defined. In the present study, the response to malaria infection was examined in a mutant mouse line, TfrcMRI24910, identified during an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) screen. This line carries a missense mutation in the gene for transferrin receptor 1 (TFR1). Heterozygous mice exhibited reduced erythrocyte volume and density, a phenotype consistent with dietary iron deficiency anemia. However, unlike the case in dietary deficiency, the erythrocyte half-life, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, and intraerythrocytic ferritin content were unchanged. Systemic iron bioavailability was also unchanged, indicating that this mutation results in erythrocytic iron deficiency without significantly altering overall iron homeostasis. When infected with the rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium chabaudi adami, mice displayed increased parasitemia and succumbed to infection more quickly than their wild-type littermates. Transfusion of fluorescently labeled erythrocytes into malaria parasite-infected mice demonstrated an erythrocyte-autonomous enhanced survival of parasites within mutant erythrocytes. Together, these results indicate that TFR1 deficiency alters erythrocyte physiology in a way that is similar to dietary iron deficiency anemia, albeit to a lesser degree, and that this promotes intraerythrocytic parasite survival and an increased susceptibility to malaria in mice. These findings may have implications for the management of iron deficiency in the context of malaria. PMID:26303393

  8. Specific mutations in the enhancer II/core promoter/precore regions of hepatitis B virus subgenotype C2 in Korean patients with hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ja Kyung; Chang, Hye Young; Lee, Jung Min; Baatarkhuu, Oidov; Yoon, Young Joon; Park, Jun Yong; Kim, Do Young; Han, Kwang-Hyub; Chon, Chae Yoon; Ahn, Sang Hoon

    2009-06-01

    Recently, hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotypes and mutations have been reported to be related to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). This cross-sectional case-control study examined the relationship between HCC and mutations in the enhancer II/core promoter and precore regions of HBV by comparing 135 Korean HCC patients infected with HBV genotype C2 (HBV/C2; HCC group) with 135 age-, sex-, and hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) status-matched patients without HCC (non- HCC group). Age and sex were also matched between HBeAg-positive and -negative patients. The prevalence of T1653, A1689, V1753, T1762/A1764, T1846, A1850, C1858, and A1896 mutations was evaluated in this population. The prevalence of the T1653 mutation in the box alpha region, the T1689 [corrected] mutation in between the box alpha and beta regions, and the T1762/A1764 mutations in the basal core promoter region was significantly higher in the HCC group compared to the non-HCC group (8.9% vs. 2.2%, P = 0.017; 19.3% vs. 4.4%, P < 0.001; and 60.7% vs. 22.2%; P < 0.001). Among HBeAg-negative patients, the frequency of the T1653 mutation was higher in the HCC group. Regardless of HBeAg status, the prevalence of the T1689, [corrected] and T1762/A1764 mutations was higher in the HCC group than in the non-HCC group. However, no association was observed between mutations in the precore region and HCC. Upon multivariate analysis, the presence of the T1653, T1689, [corrected] and T1762/A1764 mutations was an independent predictive factor for HCC. The addition of the T1653 or T1689 [corrected] mutation to T1762/A1764 increased the risk of HCC. In conclusion, the T1653, T1689, [corrected] and/or T1762/A1764 mutations were associated with the development of HCC in Korean patients infected with HBV/C2.

  9. Adaptive mutations of neuraminidase stalk truncation and deglycosylation confer enhanced pathogenicity of influenza A viruses.

    PubMed

    Park, Sehee; Il Kim, Jin; Lee, Ilseob; Bae, Joon-Yong; Yoo, Kirim; Nam, Misun; Kim, Juwon; Sook Park, Mee; Song, Ki-Joon; Song, Jin-Won; Kee, Sun-Ho; Park, Man-Seong

    2017-09-07

    It has been noticed that neuraminidase (NA) stalk truncation has arisen from evolutionary adaptation of avian influenza A viruses (IAVs) from wild aquatic birds to domestic poultry. We identified this molecular alteration after the adaptation of a 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus (pH1N1) in BALB/c mice. The mouse-adapted pH1N1 lost its eight consecutive amino acids including one potential N-linked glycosite from the NA stalk region. To explore the relationship of NA stalk truncation or deglycosylation with viral pathogenicity changes, we generated NA stalk mutant viruses on the pH1N1 backbone by reverse genetics. Intriguingly, either NA stalk truncation or deglycosylation changed pH1N1 into a lethal virus to mice by resulting in extensive pathologic transformation in the mouse lungs and systemic infection affecting beyond the respiratory organs in mice. The increased pathogenicity of these NA stalk mutants was also reproduced in ferrets. In further investigation using a human-infecting H7N9 avian IAV strain, NA stalk truncation or deglycosylation enhanced the replication property and pathogenicity of H7N9 NA stalk mutant viruses in the same mouse model. Taken together, our results suggest that NA stalk truncation or deglycosylation can be the pathogenic determinants of seasonal influenza viruses associated with the evolutionary adaptation of IAVs.

  10. Patient derived mutation W257G of PPP2R1A enhances cancer cell migration through SRC-JNK-c-Jun pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Ae Lee; Han, Sora; Lee, Sunyi; Su Park, Jeong; Lu, Yiling; Yu, Shuangxing; Li, Jane; Chun, Kyung-Hee; Mills, Gordon B.; Yang, Young

    2016-01-01

    Mutation of PPP2R1A has been observed at high frequency in endometrial serous carcinomas but at low frequency in ovarian clear cell carcinoma. However, the biological role of mutation of PPP2R1A in ovarian and endometrial cancer progression remains unclear. In this study, we found that PPP2R1A expression is elevated in high-grade primary tumor patients with papillary serous tumors of the ovary. To determine whether increased levels or mutation of PPP2R1A might contribute to cancer progression, the effects of overexpression or mutation of PPP2R1A on cell proliferation, migration, and PP2A phosphatase activity were investigated using ovarian and endometrial cancer cell lines. Among the mutations, PPP2R1A-W257G enhanced cell migration in vitro through activating SRC-JNK-c-Jun pathway. Overexpression of wild type (WT) PPP2R1A increased its binding ability with B56 regulatory subunits, whereas PPP2R1A-mutations lost the ability to bind to most B56 subunits except B56δ. Total PP2A activity and PPP2R1A-associated PP2Ac activity were significantly increased in cells overexpressing PPP2R1A-WT. In addition, overexpression of PPP2R1A-WT increased cell proliferation in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. PMID:27272709

  11. Homozygosity for a Recessive Loss-of-Function Mutation of the NRL Gene Is Associated With a Variant of Enhanced S-Cone Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Newman, Hadas; Blumen, Sergiu C; Braverman, Itzhak; Hanna, Rana; Tiosano, Beatrice; Perlman, Ido; Ben-Yosef, Tamar

    2016-10-01

    To investigate the genetic basis for severe visual complaints by Bukharan Jewish patients with oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD). Polymerase chain reaction amplification and direct sequencing were used to test for NRL, PABPN1, and NR2E3 mutations. Complete ophthalmic examination included best-corrected visual acuity, biomicroscopic examination, optical coherence tomography, and fundus autofluorescence. Detailed electroretinography (ERG) testing was conducted including expanded International Society for Clinical Electrophysiology of Vision protocol for light-adapted and dark-adapted conditions, measurements of S-cone function, and ON-OFF light-adapted ERG. The index patients were homozygotes for both a dominant mutation of the PABPN1 gene, (GCN)13, and a recessive mutation of the NRL gene, p.R31X, on chromosome 14q11.1, leading to early-onset OPMD accompanied by night blindness and reduced visual acuity. No mutations were found in the NR2E3 gene. Both patients were of Bukharan Jewish origin, but from unrelated families. Electroretinography responses of both patients were dominated by short-wavelength-sensitive mechanisms, with no detectable rod function, similar to the ERG responses of individuals with enhanced S-cone syndrome (ESCS) due to NR2E3 mutations. Heterozygotes for the PABPN1 and NRL mutations demonstrated normal fundi and ERG responses. Homozygosity for the recessive NRL mutation described here appears to be associated with a distinct retinal phenotype, demonstrating ERG characteristics similar to those of ESCS patients. This report expands the spectrum of NRL recessive mutations, as well as the genetic spectrum of ESCS, and indicates a new syndrome of OPMD with an ESCS-like phenotype.

  12. Evidence that the oxygen enhancement ratio for pink somatic mutations in Tradescantia stamen hairs may approach unity at very low x-ray doses

    SciTech Connect

    Underbrink, A.G.; Woch, B.

    1980-11-01

    Experimental evidence was found that the oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) for pink somatic mutations in the stamen hairs of Tradescantia clone 02 appears to reach unity at X-ray doses of 2 to 3 rad. There is also a small segment on the dose-response curves from about 3 to 10 rad where the OER appears to be dose-dependent. At higher doses the aerated and hypoxic curves are parallel, and the OER is 3.2 up to doses where the mutation frequency reaches a plateau.

  13. Enhanced excitation-coupled calcium entry in myotubes expressing malignant hyperthermia mutation R163C is attenuated by dantrolene.

    PubMed

    Cherednichenko, Gennady; Ward, Chris W; Feng, Wei; Cabrales, Elaine; Michaelson, Luke; Samso, Montserrat; López, José R; Allen, Paul D; Pessah, Isaac N

    2008-04-01

    Dantrolene is the drug of choice for the treatment of malignant hyperthermia (MH) and is also useful for treatment of spasticity or muscle spasms associated with several clinical conditions. The current study examines the mechanisms of dantrolene's action on skeletal muscle and shows that one of dantrolene's mechanisms of action is to block excitation-coupled calcium entry (ECCE) in both adult mouse flexor digitorum brevis fibers and primary myotubes. A second important new finding is that myotubes isolated from mice heterozygous and homozygous for the ryanodine receptor type 1 R163C MH susceptibility mutation show significantly enhanced ECCE rates that could be restored to those measured in wild-type cells after exposure to clinical concentrations of dantrolene. We propose that this gain of ECCE function is an important etiological component of MH susceptibility and possibly contributes to the fulminant MH episode. The inhibitory potency of dantrolene on ECCE found in wild-type and MH-susceptible muscle is consistent with the drug's clinical potency for reversing the MH syndrome and is incomplete as predicted by its efficacy as a muscle relaxant.

  14. Enhanced Excitation-Coupled Calcium Entry in Myotubes Expressing Malignant Hyperthermia Mutation R163C Is Attenuated by Dantrolene

    PubMed Central

    Cherednichenko, Gennady; Ward, Chris W.; Feng, Wei; Cabrales, Elaine; Michaelson, Luke; Samso, Montserrat; López, José R.; Allen, Paul D.; Pessah, Isaac N.

    2009-01-01

    Dantrolene is the drug of choice for the treatment of malignant hyperthermia (MH) and is also useful for treatment of spasticity or muscle spasms associated with several clinical conditions. The current study examines the mechanisms of dantrolene's action on skeletal muscle and shows that one of dantrolene's mechanisms of action is to block excitation-coupled calcium entry (ECCE) in both adult mouse flexor digitorum brevis fibers and primary myotubes. A second important new finding is that myotubes isolated from mice heterozygous and homozygous for the ryanodine receptor type 1 R163C MH susceptibility mutation show significantly enhanced ECCE rates that could be restored to those measured in wild-type cells after exposure to clinical concentrations of dantrolene. We propose that this gain of ECCE function is an important etiological component of MH susceptibility and possibly contributes to the fulminant MH episode. The inhibitory potency of dantrolene on ECCE found in wild-type and MH-susceptible muscle is consistent with the drug's clinical potency for reversing the MH syndrome and is incomplete as predicted by its efficacy as a muscle relaxant. PMID:18171728

  15. Mutations during the Adaptation of H9N2 Avian Influenza Virus to the Respiratory Epithelium of Pigs Enhance Sialic Acid Binding Activity and Virulence in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, W.; Punyadarsaniya, D.; Lambertz, R. L. O.; Lee, D. C. C.; Liang, C. H.; Höper, D.; Leist, S. R.; Hernández-Cáceres, A.; Stech, J.; Beer, M.; Wu, C. Y.; Wong, C. H.; Schughart, K.

    2017-01-01

    by passaging the virus three times in differentiated porcine respiratory epithelial cells. Among the four mutations detected, the two HA mutations were analyzed by generating recombinant viruses. Depending on the infection system used, the mutations differed in their phenotypic expression, e.g., sialic acid binding activity, replication kinetics, plaque size, and pathogenicity in inbred mice. However, none of the mutations affected the ciliary activity which serves as a virulence marker. Thus, early adaptive mutation enhances the replication kinetics, but more mutations are required for IAV of the H9N2 subtype to become virulent. PMID:28148793

  16. Deletion mutation of sodium channel Na(V)1.7 in inherited erythromelalgia: enhanced slow inactivation modulates dorsal root ganglion neuron hyperexcitability.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiaoyang; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D; Tyrrell, Lynda; Te Morsche, Rene H; Drenth, Joost P H; Waxman, Stephen G

    2011-07-01

    Gain-of-function missense mutations of voltage-gated sodium channel Na(V)1.7 have been linked to the painful disorder inherited erythromelalgia. These mutations hyperpolarize activation, slow deactivation and enhance currents evoked by slow ramp stimuli (ramp currents). A correlation has recently been suggested between the age of onset of inherited erythromelalgia and the extent of hyperpolarizing shifts in mutant Na(V)1.7 channel activation; mutations causing large activation shifts have been linked to early age of onset inherited erythromelalgia, while mutations causing small activation shifts have been linked to age of onset within the second decade of life. Here, we report a family with inherited erythromelalgia with an in-frame deletion of a single residue--leucine 955 (Del-L955) in DII/S6. The proband did not show symptoms until the age of 15 years, and her affected mother only experienced mild symptoms during adolescence, which disappeared at the age of 38 years. Del-L955 shows no effect on Na(V)1.7 current density and fast inactivation, but causes an approximately -24 mV shift in activation, together with increases in amplitude of persistent currents and ramp currents. The mutation also produces an approximately -40 mV shift in slow inactivation, which reduces channel availability. Comparison of the effects of the Del-L955 mutation on dorsal root ganglion neuron hyperexcitability with those produced by another inherited erythromelalgia mutation (L858F) that does not enhance slow inactivation suggests that a delayed age of onset and milder symptoms in association with a large shift of channel activation, enhanced persistent and enhanced ramp currents may be related to the approximately -40 mV shift in slow inactivation for Del-L955, the largest shift thus far demonstrated in mutant Na(V)1.7 channels. Our results suggest that despite the pivotal role of activation shift in inherited erythromelalgia development, slow inactivation may regulate clinical

  17. The mthA Mutation Conferring Low-Level Resistance to Streptomycin Enhances Antibiotic Production in Bacillus subtilis by Increasing the S-Adenosylmethionine Pool Size

    PubMed Central

    Tojo, Shigeo; Kim, Ji-Yun; Tanaka, Yukinori; Inaoka, Takashi; Hiraga, Yoshikazu

    2014-01-01

    Certain Strr mutations that confer low-level streptomycin resistance result in the overproduction of antibiotics by Bacillus subtilis. Using comparative genome-sequencing analysis, we successfully identified this novel mutation in B. subtilis as being located in the mthA gene, which encodes S-adenosylhomocysteine/methylthioadenosine nucleosidase, an enzyme involved in the S-adenosylmethionine (SAM)-recycling pathways. Transformation experiments showed that this mthA mutation was responsible for the acquisition of low-level streptomycin resistance and overproduction of bacilysin. The mthA mutant had an elevated level of intracellular SAM, apparently acquired by arresting SAM-recycling pathways. This increase in the SAM level was directly responsible for bacilysin overproduction, as confirmed by forced expression of the metK gene encoding SAM synthetase. The mthA mutation fully exerted its effect on antibiotic overproduction in the genetic background of rel+ but not the rel mutant, as demonstrated using an mthA relA double mutant. Strikingly, the mthA mutation activated, at the transcription level, even the dormant ability to produce another antibiotic, neotrehalosadiamine, at concentrations of 150 to 200 μg/ml, an antibiotic not produced (<1 μg/ml) by the wild-type strain. These findings establish the significance of SAM in initiating bacterial secondary metabolism. They also suggest a feasible methodology to enhance or activate antibiotic production, by introducing either the rsmG mutation to Streptomyces or the mthA mutation to eubacteria, since many eubacteria have mthA homologues. PMID:24509311

  18. Mutations within enhancer II and BCP regions of hepatitis B virus in relation to advanced liver diseases in patients infected with subgenotype B3 in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Heriyanto, Didik Setyo; Yano, Yoshihiko; Utsumi, Takako; Anggorowati, Nungki; Rinonce, Hanggoro Tri; Lusida, Maria Inge; Soetjipto; Triwikatmani, Catharina; Ratnasari, Neneng; Maduseno, Sutanto; Purnama, Putut Bayu; Nurdjanah, Siti; Hayashi, Yoshitake

    2012-01-01

    Studies on the characteristics of mutations within the hepatitis B virus (HBV) genome, their roles in the pathogenesis of advanced liver diseases, and the involvement of host properties of HBV-infected individuals have not been conducted in subgenotype B3-infected populations. For addressing this issue, 40 cases with HBV surface antigen (HBsAg)-positive advanced liver diseases, including advanced liver cancer and cirrhosis (male 31, female 9, age 54.4 ± 11.6-year-old), were collected and compared with 109 cases with chronic hepatitis B (male 71, female 38, age 38.0 ± 13.4-year-old). Mutations in enhancer II (Enh II) and basal core promoter (BCP)/precore regions were analyzed by PCR-direct sequencing method. HBV viral load was examined by real-time PCR. For all examined regions, the prevalence of mutation was significantly higher in cases with advanced liver diseases. Multivariate analysis showed that, in patients older than 45 years, C1638T and T1753V mutations constituted independent risk factors for the advancement of liver diseases. The presence of C1638T and T1753V mutations may serve as predictive markers for the progression of liver diseases in Indonesia and other countries, where subgenotype B3 infection is prevalent.

  19. Structural analysis of disease-related TDP-43 D169G mutation: linking enhanced stability and caspase cleavage efficiency to protein accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Chien-Hao; Grauffel, Cédric; Wu, Lien-Szu; Kuo, Pan-Hsien; Doudeva, Lyudmila G.; Lim, Carmay; Shen, Che-Kun James; Yuan, Hanna S.

    2016-01-01

    The RNA-binding protein TDP-43 forms intracellular inclusions in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). While TDP-43 mutations have been identified in ALS patients, how these mutations are linked to ALS remains unclear. Here we examined the biophysical properties of six ALS-linked TDP-43 mutants and found that one of the mutants, D169G, had higher thermal stability than wild-type TDP-43 and that it was cleaved by caspase 3 more efficiently, producing increased levels of the C-terminal 35 kD fragments (TDP-35) in vitro and in neuroblastoma cells. The crystal structure of the TDP-43 RRM1 domain containing the D169G mutation in complex with DNA along with molecular dynamics simulations reveal that the D169G mutation induces a local conformational change in a β turn and increases the hydrophobic interactions in the RRM1 core, thus enhancing the thermal stability of the RRM1 domain. Our results provide the first crystal structure of TDP-43 containing a disease-linked D169G mutation and a disease-related mechanism showing that D169G mutant is more susceptible to proteolytic cleavage by caspase 3 into the pathogenic C-terminal 35-kD fragments due to its increased stability in the RRM1 domain. Modulation of TDP-43 stability and caspase cleavage efficiency could present an avenue for prevention and treatment of TDP-43-linked neurodegeneration. PMID:26883171

  20. Mutations in ACTRT1 and its enhancer RNA elements lead to aberrant activation of Hedgehog signaling in inherited and sporadic basal cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Bal, Elodie; Park, Hyun-Sook; Belaid-Choucair, Zakia; Kayserili, Hülya; Naville, Magali; Madrange, Marine; Chiticariu, Elena; Hadj-Rabia, Smail; Cagnard, Nicolas; Kuonen, Francois; Bachmann, Daniel; Huber, Marcel; Le Gall, Cindy; Côté, Francine; Hanein, Sylvain; Rosti, Rasim Özgür; Aslanger, Ayca Dilruba; Waisfisz, Quinten; Bodemer, Christine; Hermine, Olivier; Morice-Picard, Fanny; Labeille, Bruno; Caux, Frédéric; Mazereeuw-Hautier, Juliette; Philip, Nicole; Levy, Nicolas; Taieb, Alain; Avril, Marie-Françoise; Headon, Denis J; Gyapay, Gabor; Magnaldo, Thierry; Fraitag, Sylvie; Crollius, Hugues Roest; Vabres, Pierre; Hohl, Daniel; Munnich, Arnold; Smahi, Asma

    2017-09-04

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC), the most common human cancer, results from aberrant activation of the Hedgehog signaling pathway. Although most cases of BCC are sporadic, some forms are inherited, such as Bazex-Dupré-Christol syndrome (BDCS)-a cancer-prone genodermatosis with an X-linked, dominant inheritance pattern. We have identified mutations in the ACTRT1 gene, which encodes actin-related protein T1 (ARP-T1), in two of the six families with BDCS that were examined in this study. High-throughput sequencing in the four remaining families identified germline mutations in noncoding sequences surrounding ACTRT1. These mutations were located in transcribed sequences encoding enhancer RNAs (eRNAs) and were shown to impair enhancer activity and ACTRT1 expression. ARP-T1 was found to directly bind to the GLI1 promoter, thus inhibiting GLI1 expression, and loss of ARP-T1 led to activation of the Hedgehog pathway in individuals with BDCS. Moreover, exogenous expression of ACTRT1 reduced the in vitro and in vivo proliferation rates of cell lines with aberrant activation of the Hedgehog signaling pathway. In summary, our study identifies a disease mechanism in BCC involving mutations in regulatory noncoding elements and uncovers the tumor-suppressor properties of ACTRT1.

  1. CREBBP knockdown enhances RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK signaling in Ras pathway mutated acute lymphoblastic leukemia but does not modulate chemotherapeutic response.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Zach A; Nicholson, Lindsay; Zeppetzauer, Martin; Matheson, Elizabeth; Sinclair, Paul; Harrison, Christine J; Irving, Julie A E

    2017-04-01

    Relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia is the most common cause of cancer-related mortality in young people and new therapeutic strategies are needed to improve outcome. Recent studies have shown that heterozygous inactivating mutations in the histone acetyl transferase, CREBBP, are particularly frequent in relapsed childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia and associated with a hyperdiploid karyotype and KRAS mutations. To study the functional impact of CREBBP haploinsufficiency in acute lymphoblastic leukemia, RNA interference was used to knock down expression of CREBBP in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines and various primagraft acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells. We demonstrate that attenuation of CREBBP results in reduced acetylation of histone 3 lysine 18, but has no significant impact on cAMP-dependent target gene expression. Impaired induction of glucocorticoid receptor targets was only seen in 1 of 4 CREBBP knockdown models, and there was no significant difference in glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis, sensitivity to other acute lymphoblastic leukemia chemotherapeutics or histone deacetylase inhibitors. Importantly, we show that CREBBP directly acetylates KRAS and that CREBBP knockdown enhances signaling of the RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK pathway in Ras pathway mutated acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells, which are still sensitive to MEK inhibitors. Thus, CREBBP mutations might assist in enhancing oncogenic RAS signaling in acute lymphoblastic leukemia but do not alter response to MEK inhibitors. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  2. A Point Mutation in the Hair Cell Nicotinic Cholinergic Receptor Prolongs Cochlear Inhibition and Enhances Noise Protection

    PubMed Central

    Taranda, Julian; Maison, Stéphane F; Ballestero, Jimena A; Katz, Eleonora; Savino, Jessica; Vetter, Douglas E; Boulter, Jim; Liberman, M. Charles; Fuchs, Paul A; Elgoyhen, A. Belén

    2009-01-01

    The transduction of sound in the auditory periphery, the cochlea, is inhibited by efferent cholinergic neurons projecting from the brainstem and synapsing directly on mechanosensory hair cells. One fundamental question in auditory neuroscience is what role(s) this feedback plays in our ability to hear. In the present study, we have engineered a genetically modified mouse model in which the magnitude and duration of efferent cholinergic effects are increased, and we assess the consequences of this manipulation on cochlear function. We generated the Chrna9L9′T line of knockin mice with a threonine for leucine change (L9′T) at position 9′ of the second transmembrane domain of the α9 nicotinic cholinergic subunit, rendering α9-containing receptors that were hypersensitive to acetylcholine and had slower desensitization kinetics. The Chrna9L9′T allele produced a 3-fold prolongation of efferent synaptic currents in vitro. In vivo, Chrna9L9′T mice had baseline elevation of cochlear thresholds and efferent-mediated inhibition of cochlear responses was dramatically enhanced and lengthened: both effects were reversed by strychnine blockade of the α9α10 hair cell nicotinic receptor. Importantly, relative to their wild-type littermates, Chrna9L9′T/L9′T mice showed less permanent hearing loss following exposure to intense noise. Thus, a point mutation designed to alter α9α10 receptor gating has provided an animal model in which not only is efferent inhibition more powerful, but also one in which sound-induced hearing loss can be restrained, indicating the ability of efferent feedback to ameliorate sound trauma. PMID:19166271

  3. Diversity of LTR-retrotransposons and Enhancer/Suppressor Mutator-like transposons in cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz).

    PubMed

    Gbadegesin, Michael A; Wills, Matthew A; Beeching, John R

    2008-10-01

    Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz), though a major world crop with enormous potential, is very under studied. Little is known about its genome structure and organisation. Transposable elements have a key role in the evolution of genome structure, and can be used as important tools in applied genetics. This paper sets out to survey the diversity of members of three major classes of transposable element within the cassava genome and in relation to similar elements in other plants. Members of two classes of LTR-retrotransposons, Ty1/copia-like and Ty3/gypsy-like, and of Enhancer/Suppressor Mutator (En/Spm)-like transposons were isolated and characterised. Analyses revealed 59 families of Ty1/copia, 26 families of Ty3/gypsy retrotransposons, and 40 families of En/Spm in the cassava genome. In the comparative analyses, the predicted amino acid sequences for these transposon classes were compared with those of related elements from other plant species. These revealed that there were multiple lineages of Ty1/copia-like retrotransposons in the genome of cassava and suggested that vertical and horizontal transmission as the source of cassava Mecops may not be mutually exclusive. For the Ty3/gypsy elements network, two groups of cassava Megyps were evident including the Arabidopsis Athila lineage. However, cassava En/Spm-like elements (Meens) constituted a single group within a network of plant En/Spm-like elements. Hybridisation analysis supported the presence of transposons in the genome of cassava in medium (Ty3/gypsy and En/Spm) to high (Ty1/copia) copy numbers. Thus the cassava genome was shown to contain diverse members of three major classes of transposable element; however, the different classes exhibited contrasting evolutionary histories.

  4. Somatic mutations in arachidonic acid metabolism pathway genes enhance oral cancer post-treatment disease-free survival.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Nidhan K; Das, Subrata; Maitra, Arindam; Sarin, Rajiv; Majumder, Partha P

    2014-12-17

    The arachidonic acid metabolism (AAM) pathway promotes tumour progression. Chemical inhibitors of AAM pathway prolong post-treatment survival of cancer patients. Here we test whether non-synonymous somatic mutations in genes of this pathway, acting as natural inhibitors, increase post-treatment survival. We identify loss-of-function somatic mutations in 15 (18%) of 84 treatment-naïve oral cancer patients by whole-exome sequencing, which we map to genes of AAM pathway. Patients (n = 53) who survived ≥ 12 months after surgery without recurrence have significantly (P = 0.007) higher proportion (26% versus 3%) of mutations than those who did not (n = 31). Patients with mutations have a significantly (P = 0.003) longer median disease-free survival (24 months) than those without (13 months). Compared with the presence of a mutation, absence of any mutation increases the hazard ratio for death (11.3) significantly (P = 0.018). The inferences are strengthened when we pool our data with The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) data. In patients with AAM pathway mutations, some downstream pathways, such as the PI3K-Akt pathway, are downregulated.

  5. Mutation of a conserved residue enhances the sensitivity of analogue-sensitised kinases to generate a novel approach to the study of mitosis in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Tay, Ye-Dee; Patel, Avinash; Kaemena, Daniel F; Hagan, Iain M

    2013-11-01

    The chemical genetic strategy in which mutational enlargement of the ATP-binding site sensitises of a protein kinase to bulky ATP analogues has proved to be an elegant tool for the generation of conditional analogue-sensitive kinase alleles in a variety of model organisms. Here, we describe a novel substitution mutation in the kinase domain that can enhance the sensitivity of analogue-sensitive kinases. Substitution of a methionine residue to phenylalanine in the +2 position after HRDLKxxN motif of the subdomain VIb within the kinase domain markedly increased the sensitivities of the analogue-sensitive kinases to ATP analogues in three out of five S. pombe kinases (i.e. Plo1, Orb5 and Wee1) that harbor this conserved methionine residue. Kinome alignment established that a methionine residue is found at this site in 5-9% of kinases in key model organisms, suggesting that a broader application of this structural modification may enhance ATP analogue sensitivity of analogue-sensitive kinases in future studies. We also show that the enhanced sensitivity of the wee1.as8 allele in a cdc25.22 background can be exploited to generate highly synchronised mitotic and S phase progression at 36°C. Proof-of-principle experiments show how this novel synchronisation technique will prove of great use in the interrogation of the mitotic or S-phase functions through temperature sensitivity mutation of molecules of interest in fission yeast.

  6. TET2 mutations affect non-CpG island DNA methylation at enhancers and transcription factor binding sites in chronic myelomonocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Yamazaki, Jumpei; Jelinek, Jaroslav; Lu, Yue; Cesaroni, Matteo; Madzo, Jozef; Neumann, Frank; He, Rong; Taby, Rodolphe; Vasanthakumar, Aparna; Macrae, Trisha; Ostler, Kelly R.; Kantarjian, Hagop M.; Liang, Shoudan; Estecio, Marcos R.; Godley, Lucy A.; Issa, Jean-Pierre J.

    2015-01-01

    TET2 enzymatically converts 5-methylcytosine to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine as well as other covalently-modified cytosines and its mutations are common in myeloid leukemia. However, the exact mechanism and the extent to which TET2 mutations affect DNA methylation remain in question. Here we report on DNA methylomes in TET2 wild type (TET2-WT) and mutant (TET2-MT) cases of chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML). We analyzed 85,134 CpG sites (28,114 sites in CpG islands (CGIs) and 57,020 in non-CpG islands (NCGIs)). TET2 mutations do not explain genome-wide differences in DNA methylation in CMML, and we found few and inconsistent differences at CGIs between TET2-WT and TET2-MT cases. By contrast, we identified 409 (0.71%) TET2-specific differentially methylated CpGs (tet2-DMCs) in NCGIs, 86% of which were hypermethylated in TET2-MT cases, suggesting a strikingly different biology of the effects of TET2 mutations at CGIs and NCGIs. DNA methylation of tet2-DMCs at promoters and non-promoters repressed gene expression. Tet2-DMCs showed significant enrichment at hematopoietic-specific enhancers marked by H3K4me1, and at binding sites for the transcription factor p300. Tet2-DMCs showed significantly lower 5-hydroxymethylcytosine in TET2-MT cases. We conclude that leukemia-associated TET2 mutations affect DNA methylation at NCGI regions containing hematopoietic-specific enhancers and transcription factor binding sites. PMID:25972343

  7. Mutations in Nonessential eIF3k and eIF3l Genes Confer Lifespan Extension and Enhanced Resistance to ER Stress in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Kirthi C.; Droste, Rita; Kim, Dennis H.

    2016-01-01

    The translation initiation factor eIF3 is a multi-subunit protein complex that coordinates the assembly of the 43S pre-initiation complex in eukaryotes. Prior studies have demonstrated that not all subunits of eIF3 are essential for the initiation of translation, suggesting that some subunits may serve regulatory roles. Here, we show that loss-of-function mutations in the genes encoding the conserved eIF3k and eIF3l subunits of the translation initiation complex eIF3 result in a 40% extension in lifespan and enhanced resistance to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in Caenorhabditis elegans. In contrast to previously described mutations in genes encoding translation initiation components that confer lifespan extension in C. elegans, loss-of-function mutations in eif-3.K or eif-3.L are viable, and mutants show normal rates of growth and development, and have wild-type levels of bulk protein synthesis. Lifespan extension resulting from EIF-3.K or EIF-3.L deficiency is suppressed by a mutation in the Forkhead family transcription factor DAF-16. Mutations in eif-3.K or eif-3.L also confer enhanced resistance to ER stress, independent of IRE-1-XBP-1, ATF-6, and PEK-1, and independent of DAF-16. Our data suggest a pivotal functional role for conserved eIF3k and eIF3l accessory subunits of eIF3 in the regulation of cellular and organismal responses to ER stress and aging. PMID:27690135

  8. Characterization of disease-associated mutations affecting an exonic splicing enhancer and two cryptic splice sites in exon 13 of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene.

    PubMed

    Aznarez, Isabel; Chan, Elayne M; Zielenski, Julian; Blencowe, Benjamin J; Tsui, Lap-Chee

    2003-08-15

    Sequences in exons can play an important role in constitutive and regulated pre-mRNA splicing. Since exonic splicing regulatory sequences are generally poorly conserved and their mechanism of action is not well understood, the consequence of exonic mutations on splicing can only be determined empirically. In this study, we have investigated the consequence of two cystic fibrosis (CF) disease-causing mutations, E656X and 2108delA, on the function of a putative exonic splicing enhancer (ESE) in exon 13 of the CFTR gene. We have also determined whether five other CF mutations D648V, D651N, G654S, E664X and T665S located near this putative ESE could lead to aberrant splicing of exon 13. Using minigene constructs, we have demonstrated that the E656X and 2108delA mutations could indeed cause aberrant splicing in a predicted manner, supporting a role for the putative ESE sequence in pre-mRNA splicing. In addition, we have shown that D648V, E664X and T665S mutations could cause aberrant splicing of exon 13 by improving the polypyrimidine tracts of two cryptic 3' splice sites. We also provide evidence that the relative levels of two splicing factors, hTra2alpha and SF2/ASF, could alter the effect on splicing of some of the exon 13 disease mutations. Taken together, our results suggest that the severity of CF disease could be modulated by changes in the fidelity of CFTR pre-mRNA splicing.

  9. The VP1 S154D mutation of type Asia1 foot-and-mouth disease virus enhances viral replication and pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Lian, Kaiqi; Yang, Fan; Zhu, Zixiang; Cao, Weijun; Jin, Ye; Liu, Huanan; Li, Dan; Zhang, Keshan; Guo, Jianhong; Liu, Xiangtao; Zheng, Haixue

    2016-04-01

    One of the proteins encoded by the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV), the VP1 protein, a capsid protein, plays an important role in integrin receptor attachment and humoral immunity-mediated host responses. The integrin receptor recognition motif and an important antigenic epitope exist within the G-H loop, which is comprised of amino acids 134-160 of the VP1 protein. FMDV strain, Asia1/HN/CHA/06, isolated from a pig, was passaged four times in suckling mice and sequenced. Sequencing analyses showed that there was a mutation of the integrin receptor recognition motif Arg-Gly-Asp/Arg-Asp-Asp (RGD/RDD, VP1 143-145) and a VP1 154 serine/Asp (VP1 S154D) mutation in the G-H loop of the VP1 protein. The influence of the RGD/RDD mutation on Asia1 FMDV disease phenotype has been previously studied. In this study, to determine the influence of the VP1 S154D mutation on FMDV Asia1 replication and pathogenicity, two recombinant FMDVs with different residues only at the VP1 154 site were rescued by reverse genetics techniques and their infectious potential in host cells and pathogenicity in pigs were compared. Our data indicates that the VP1 S154D mutation increases the replication level of FMDV Asia1/HN/CHA/06 in BHK-21, IB-RS-2, and PK-15 cells and enhances pathogenicity in pigs. Through the transient transfection-infection assay to compare integrin receptor usage of two recombinant viruses, the result shows that the VP1 S154D mutation markedly increases the ability of type Asia1 FMDV to use the integrin receptors αυβ6 and αυβ8 from pig. This study identifies a key research target for illuminating the role of residues located at G-H loop in FMDV pathogenicity.

  10. Egg-adaptive mutations in H3N2v vaccine virus enhance egg-based production without loss of antigenicity or immunogenicity.

    PubMed

    Barman, Subrata; Franks, John; Turner, Jasmine C; Yoon, Sun-Woo; Webster, Robert G; Webby, Richard J

    2015-06-22

    The recently detected zoonotic H3N2 variant influenza A (H3N2v) viruses have caused 343 documented cases of human infection linked to contact with swine. An effective vaccine is needed for these viruses, which may acquire transmissibility among humans. However, viruses isolated from human cases do not replicate well in embryonated chicken eggs, posing an obstacle to egg-based vaccine production. To address this issue, we sought to identify egg-adaptive mutations in surface proteins that increase the yield of candidate vaccine viruses (CVVs) in eggs while preserving their immunizing effectiveness. After serial passage of a representative H3N2v isolate (A/Indiana/08/2011), we identified several egg-adaptive combinations of HA mutations and assessed the egg-based replication, antigenicity, and immunogenicity of A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (H1N1, PR8)-based 6+2 reverse genetics CVVs carrying these mutations. Here we demonstrate that the respective combined HA substitutions G1861V+N2461K, N1651K+G1861V, T1281N+N1651K+R762G, and T1281N+N1651K+I102M, all identified after egg passage, enhanced the replication of the CVVs in eggs without substantially affecting their antigenicity or immunogenicity. The mutations were stable, and the mutant viruses acquired no additional substitutions during six subsequent egg passages. We found two crucial mutations, G186V, which was previously defined, and N246K, which in combination improved virus yield in eggs without significantly impacting antigenicity or immunogenicity. This combination of egg-adaptive mutations appears to most effectively generate high egg-based yields of influenza A/Indiana/08/2011-like CVVs.

  11. Phosphomimetic mutation of the N-terminal lid of MDM2 enhances the polyubiquitination of p53 through stimulation of E2-ubiquitin thioester hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Jennifer A; Worrall, Erin G; Lin, Yao; Landre, Vivien; Pettersson, Susanne; Blackburn, Elizabeth; Walkinshaw, Malcolm; Muller, Petr; Vojtesek, Borek; Ball, Kathryn; Hupp, Ted R

    2015-04-24

    Mouse double minute 2 (MDM2) has a phosphorylation site within a lid motif at Ser17 whose phosphomimetic mutation to Asp17 stimulates MDM2-mediated polyubiquitination of p53. MDM2 lid deletion, but not Asp17 mutation, induced a blue shift in the λ(max) of intrinsic fluorescence derived from residues in the central domain including Trp235, Trp303, Trp323, and Trp329. This indicates that the Asp17 mutation does not alter the conformation of MDM2 surrounding the tryptophan residues. In addition, Phe235 mutation enhanced MDM2 binding to p53 but did not stimulate its ubiquitination function, thus uncoupling increases in p53 binding from its E3 ubiquitin ligase function. However, the Asp17 mutation in MDM2 stimulated its discharge of the UBCH5a-ubiquitin thioester adduct (UBCH5a is a ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2D 1 UBC4/5 homolog yeast). This stimulation of ubiquitin discharge from E2 was independent of the p53 substrate. There are now four known effects of the Asp17 mutation on MDM2: (i) it alters the conformation of the isolated N-terminus as defined by NMR; (ii) it induces increased thermostability of the isolated N-terminal domain; (iii) it stimulates the allosteric interaction of MDM2 with the DNA-binding domain of p53; and (iv) it stimulates a novel protein-protein interaction with the E2-ubiquitin complex in the absence of substrate p53 that, in turn, increases hydrolysis of the E2-ubiquitin thioester bond. These data also suggest a new strategy to disrupt MDM2 function by targeting the E2-ubiquitin discharge reaction.

  12. Replacement and deletion mutations in the catalytic domain and belt region of Aspergillus awamori glucoamylase to enhance thermostability.

    PubMed

    Liu, H L; Doleyres, Y; Coutinho, P M; Ford, C; Reilly, P J

    2000-09-01

    Three single-residue mutations, Asp71-->Asn, Gln409-->Pro and Gly447-->Ser, two long-to-short loop replacement mutations, Gly23-Ala24-Asp25-Gly26-Ala27-Trp28- Val29-Ser30-->Asn-Pro-Pro (23-30 replacement) and Asp297-Ser298-Glu299-Ala300-Val301-->Ala-G ly-Ala (297-301 replacement) and one deletion mutation removing Glu439, Thr440 and Ser441 (Delta439-441), all based on amino acid sequence alignments, were made to improve Aspergillus awamori glucoamylase thermostability. The first and second single-residue mutations were designed to introduce a potential N:-glycosylation site and to restrict backbone bond rotation, respectively, and therefore to decrease entropy during protein unfolding. The third single-residue mutation was made to decrease flexibility and increase O:-glycosylation in the already highly O:-glycosylated belt region that extends around the globular catalytic domain. The 23-30 replacement mutation was designed to eliminate a very thermolabile extended loop on the catalytic domain surface and to bring the remainder of this region closer to the rest of the catalytic domain, therefore preventing it from unfolding. The 297-301 replacement mutant GA was made to understand the function of the random coil region between alpha-helices 9 and 10. Delta439-441 was constructed to decrease belt flexibility. All six mutations increased glucoamylase thermostability without significantly changing enzyme kinetic properties, with the 23-30 replacement mutation increasing the activation free energy for thermoinactivation by about 4 kJ/mol, which leads to a 4 degrees C increase in operating temperature at constant thermostability.

  13. Breast MRI fibroglandular volume and parenchymal enhancement in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers before and immediately after risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy.

    PubMed

    DeLeo, Michael J; Domchek, Susan M; Kontos, Despina; Conant, Emily; Chen, Jinbo; Weinstein, Susan

    2015-03-01

    OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this article is to assess the difference in fibroglandular volume and background parenchymal enhancement in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers on contrast-enhanced breast MRI (CE-MRI) performed before and immediately after risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy (RRSO). MATERIALS AND METHODS. We retrospectively compared fibroglandular volume and background parenchymal enhancement in 55 female BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers before and after RRSO using standard BI-RADS categories and a paired Wilcoxon and Mann-Whitney U test. A two-sample Wilcoxon test was performed to compare fibroglandular volume and background parenchymal enhancement in women with and without subsequent breast cancer diagnosis on follow-up. RESULTS. The median time to post-RRSO CE-MRI was 8 months (range, 1-40 months). There was no difference in fibroglandular volume before and after RRSO (p = 0.65). The mean background parenchymal enhancement was 2.5 (range, 1-4) before and 1.5 (range, 1-4) after RRSO (overall range, -2.5 to 1.5; p = 0.0001). Breast cancer was detected in nine women at a median time of 4.8 years (range, 1.8-13.3 years) after RRSO. For women who received a diagnosis of breast cancer after RRSO compared with those who did not, mean background parenchymal enhancement before RRSO was 3 (range, 2-4) versus 2.5 (range, 1-4; p = 0.001), and mean background parenchymal enhancement after RRSO was 2.5 (range, 1.5-4) versus 1.5 (range 2-4; p = 0.0018). There was no difference in fibroglandular volume before and after RRSO. CONCLUSION. In BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, we observed a significant reduction in background parenchymal enhancement on the first CE-MRI after RRSO and no significant change in fibroglandular volume. Higher background parenchymal enhancement before and after RRSO was observed in women who subsequently received a diagnosis of breast cancer. This suggests that background parenchymal enhancement, rather than fibro-glandular volume, may be a

  14. Sea-urchin-like Au nanocluster with surface-enhanced raman scattering in detecting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation status of malignant pleural effusion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Guo, Ting; Lu, Qiang; Yan, Xiaolong; Zhong, Daixing; Zhang, Zhipei; Ni, Yunfeng; Han, Yong; Cui, Daxiang; Li, Xiaofei; Huang, Lijun

    2015-01-14

    Somatic mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene are common in patients with lung adenocarcinomas and are associated with sensitivity to the small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). For 10%-50% of the patients who experienced malignant pleural effusion (MPE), pathological diagnosis might rely exclusively on finding lung cancer cells in the MPE. Current methods based on polymerase chain reaction were utilized to test EGFR mutation status of MPE samples, but the accuracy of the test data was very low, resulting in many patients losing the chance of TKIs treatment. Herein, we synthesized the sea-urchin-like Au nanocluster (AuNC) with an average diameter of 92.4 nm, composed of 15-nm nanopricks. By introducing abundant sharp nanopricks, the enhancement factor of AuNC reached at 1.97 × 10(7). After capped with crystal violet (CV), polyethylene glycol, and EGFR mutation specific antibody, the AuNC-EGFR had excellent surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) activity and EGFR mutation targeted recognition capability in lung cancer cells. Characteristic SERS signal at 1617 cm(-1) of CV was linear correlation with the number of H1650 cells, demonstrating the minimum detection limit as 25 cells in a 1-mL suspension. The gold mass in single H1650 cells exposed to AuNC-E746_750 for 2 h ranged from 208.6 pg to 231.4 pg, which approximately corresponded to 56-62 AuNCs per cell. Furthermore, SERS was preclinically utilized to test EGFR mutation status in MPE samples from 35 patients with lung adenocarcinoma. Principal component analysis (PCA) and the support vector machine (SVM) algorithm were constructed for EGFR mutation diagnostic analysis, yielding an overall accuracy of 90.7%. SERS measurement based on sea-urchin-like AuNC was an efficient method for EGFR mutation detection in MPE, and it might show great potential in applications such as predicting gene typing of clinical lung cancer in the near future.

  15. Enhancing the Predictive Power of Mutations in the C-Terminus of the KCNQ1-Encoded Kv7.1 Voltage-Gated Potassium Channel

    PubMed Central

    Kapplinger, Jamie D.; Tseng, Andrew S.; Salisbury, Benjamin A.; Tester, David J.; Callis, Thomas E.; Alders, Marielle; Wilde, Arthur A.M.; Ackerman, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the overrepresentation of Kv7.1 mutations among patients with a robust diagnosis of LQTS, a background rate of innocuous Kv7.1 missense variants observed in healthy controls creates ambiguity in the interpretation of LQTS genetic test results. A recent study showed the probability of pathogenicity for rare missense mutations depends in part on the topological location of the variant in Kv7.1’s various structure-function domains. Since the Kv7.1 C-terminus accounts for nearly 50% of the overall protein and nearly 50% of the overall background rate of rare variants falls within the C-terminus, further enhancement in mutation calling may provide guidance in distinguishing pathogenic LQT1-causing mutations from non-disease causing rare variants in Kv7.1’s C-terminus. Therefore, we have used conservation analysis and a large case/control study to generate topology-based estimative predictive values to aid in interpretation; identifying three regions of high conservation within the Kv7.1 C-terminus which have a high probability of LQT1 pathogenicity. PMID:25854863

  16. Enhancer mutations of Akv murine leukemia virus inhibit the induction of mature B-cell lymphomas and shift disease specificity towards the more differentiated plasma cell stage

    SciTech Connect

    Sorensen, Karina Dalsgaard; Kunder, Sandra; Quintanilla-Martinez, Leticia; Sorensen, Jonna; Schmidt, Joerg; Pedersen, Finn Skou . E-mail: fsp@mb.au.dk

    2007-05-25

    This study investigates the role of the proviral transcriptional enhancer for B-lymphoma induction by exogenous Akv murine leukemia virus. Infection of newborn inbred NMRI mice with Akv induced 35% plasma cell proliferations (PCPs) (consistent with plasmacytoma), 33% diffuse large B-cell lymphomas, 25% follicular B-cell lymphomas and few splenic marginal zone and small B-cell lymphomas. Deleting one copy of the 99-bp proviral enhancer sequence still allowed induction of multiple B-cell tumor types, although PCPs dominated (77%). Additional mutation of binding sites for the glucocorticoid receptor, Ets, Runx, or basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors in the proviral U3 region, however, shifted disease induction to almost exclusively PCPs, but had no major influence on tumor latency periods. Southern analysis of immunoglobulin rearrangements and ecotropic provirus integration patterns showed that many of the tumors/cell proliferations induced by each virus were polyclonal. Our results indicate that enhancer mutations weaken the ability of Akv to induce mature B-cell lymphomas prior to the plasma cell stage, whereas development of plasma cell proliferations is less dependent of viral enhancer strength.

  17. D27E mutation of VTC1 impairs the interaction with CSN5B and enhances ascorbic acid biosynthesis and seedling growth in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Li, Shenghui; Wang, Juan; Yu, Yanwen; Wang, Fengru; Dong, Jingao; Huang, Rongfeng

    2016-11-01

    Our previous investigation revealed that GDP-Man pyrophosphorylase (VTC1), a vital ascorbic acid (AsA) biosynthesis enzyme, could be degraded through interaction with the photomorphogenic factor COP9 signalosome subunit 5B (CSN5B) in the darkness, demonstrating the posttranscriptional regulation of light signal in AsA production. Here, we further report that a point mutation in D27E of VTC1 disables the interaction with CSN5B, resulting in enhancement of AsA biosynthesis and seedling growth in Arabidopsis thaliana. To identify the interaction sites with CSN5B, we first predicted the key amino acids in VTC1 via bioinformatics analysis. And then we biochemically and genetically demonstrated that the 27th Asp was the amino acid that influenced the interaction of VTC1 with CSN5B in plants. Moreover, transgenic lines overexpressing the site-specific mutagenesis from D27 (Asp) into E27 (Glu) in VTC1 showed enhanced AsA accumulation and reduced H2O2 content in Arabidopsis seedlings, compared with the lines overexpressing the mutation from D27 into N27 (Asn) in VTC1. In addition, this regulation of VTC1 D27E mutation promoted seedling growth. Together, our data reveal that the 27th amino acid of VTC1 confers a key regulation in the interaction with CSN5B and AsA biosynthesis, as well as in Arabidopsis seedling growth.

  18. Enhancement of malate-production and increase in sensitivity to dimethyl succinate by mutation of the VID24 gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Negoro, Hiroaki; Kotaka, Atsushi; Matsumura, Kengo; Tsutsumi, Hiroko; Hata, Yoji

    2016-06-01

    Malate in sake (a Japanese alcoholic beverage) is an important component for taste that is produced by yeasts during alcoholic fermentation. To date, many researchers have developed methods for breeding high-malate-producing yeasts; however, genes responsible for the high-acidity phenotype are not known. We determined the mutated gene involved in high malate production in yeast, isolated as a sensitive mutant to dimethyl succinate. In the comparative whole genome analysis between high-malate-producing strain and its parent strain, one of the non-synonymous substitutions was identified in the VID24 gene. The mutation of VID24 resulted in enhancement of malate-productivity and sensitivity to dimethyl succinate. The mutation appeared to lead to a deficiency in Vid24p function. Furthermore, disruption of cytoplasmic malate dehydrogenase (Mdh2p) gene in the VID24 mutant inhibited the high-malate-producing phenotype. Vid24p is known as a component of the multisubunit ubiquitin ligase and participates in the degradation of gluconeogenic enzymes such as Mdh2p. We suggest that the enhancement of malate-productivity results from an accumulation of Mdh2p due to the loss of Vid24p function. These findings propose a novel mechanism for the regulation of organic acid production in yeast cells by the component of ubiquitin ligase, Vid24p. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Senescence: novel insight into DLX3 mutations leading to enhanced bone formation in Tricho-Dento-Osseous syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Na; Han, Dong; Liu, Haochen; Li, Yue; Wong, Sing-Wai; Cao, Zhengyi; Xu, Jian; Zhang, Xiaowei; Cai, Tao; Wang, Yixiang; Feng, Hailan

    2016-01-01

    The homeodomain transcription factor distal-less homeobox 3 gene (DLX3) is required for hair, tooth and skeletal development. DLX3 mutations have been found to be responsible for Tricho-Dento-Osseous (TDO) syndrome, characterized by kinky hair, thin-pitted enamel and increased bone density. Here we show that the DLX3 mutation (c.533 A>G; Q178R) attenuates osteogenic potential and senescence of bone mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) isolated from a TDO patient, providing a molecular explanation for abnormal increased bone density. Both DLX3 mutations (c.533 A>G and c.571_574delGGGG) delayed cellular senescence when they were introduced into pre-osteoblastic cells MC3T3-E1. Furthermore, the attenuated skeletal aging and bone loss in DLX3 (Q178R) transgenic mice not only reconfirmed that DLX3 mutation (Q178R) delayed cellular senescence, but also prevented aging-mediated bone loss. Taken together, these results indicate that DLX3 mutations act as a loss of function in senescence. The delayed senescence of BMSCs leads to increased bone formation by compensating decreased osteogenic potentials with more generations and extended functional lifespan. Our findings in the rare human genetic disease unravel a novel mechanism of DLX3 involving the senescence regulation of bone formation. PMID:27924851

  20. Mutations in CG8878, a Novel Putative Protein Kinase, Enhance P Element Dependent Silencing (PDS) and Position Effect Variegation (PEV) in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    McCracken, Allen; Locke, John

    2014-01-01

    Genes in multicellular organisms are expressed as part of a developmental program that is largely dependent on self-perpetuating higher-order chromatin states. The mechanism of establishing and maintaining these epigenetic events is well studied in Drosophila. The first known example of an epigenetic effect was that of (PEV) in Drosophila, which has been shown to be due to gene silencing via heterochromatin formation. We are investigating a process similar to Position Effect Variegation (PEV) using a mini-w transgene, called Pci, inserted in the upstream regulatory region of ci. The mini-white+ transgene in Pci is expressed throughout the adult eye; however, when other P or KP elements are present, a variegated eye phenotype results indicating random w+ silencing during development. This P element dependent silencing (PDS) can be modified by the haplo-suppressors/triplo-enhancers, Su(var)205 and Su(var)3–7, indicating that these heterochromatic modifiers also act dose dependently in PDS. Here we use a spontaneous derivative mutation of Pci called PciE1 (E1) that variegates like PDS in the absence of P elements, presumably due to an adjacent gypsy element insertion, to screen for second-site modifier mutations that enhance variable silencing of white+ in E1. We isolated 7 mutations in CG8878, an essential gene, that enhance the E1 variegated phenotype. CG8878, a previously uncharacterized gene, potentially encodes a serine/threonine kinase whose closest Drosophila paralogue, ballchen (nhk-1), phosphorylates histones. These mutant alleles enhance both PDS at E1 and Position Effect Variegation (PEV) at wm4, indicating a previously unknown common silencing mechanism between the two. PMID:24614804

  1. Mutations in the testis-specific enhancer of SOX9 in the SRY independent sex-determining mechanism in the genus Tokudaia.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Ryutaro; Murata, Chie; Kuroki, Yoko; Kuroiwa, Asato

    2014-01-01

    SRY (sex-determining region Y) is widely conserved in eutherian mammals as a sex-determining gene located on the Y chromosome. SRY proteins bind to the testis-specific enhancer of SOX9 (TES) with SF1 to upregulate SOX9 expression in undifferentiated gonads of XY embryos of humans and mice. The core region within TES, named TESCO, is an important enhancer for mammalian sex determination. We show that TESCO of the genus Tokudaia lost enhancer activity caused by mutations in its SRY and SF1 binding sites. Two species of Tokudaia do not have the Y chromosome or SRY, and one species has multiple SRYs located on the neo-Y chromosome consisting of the Y fused with an autosome. The sequence of Tokudaia TESCO exhibited more than 83% identity with mouse TESCO, however, nucleotide substitution(s) were found in two out of three SRY binding sites and in five out of six SF1 binding sites. TESCO of all species showed low enhancer activity in cells co-transfected with SRY and SF1, and SOX9 and SF1 in reporter gene assays. Mutated TESCO, in which nucleotide substitutions found in SRY and SF1 binding sites were replaced with mouse sequence, recovered the activity. Furthermore, SRYs of the SRY-positive species could not activate the mutated TESCO or mouse TESCO, suggesting that SRYs lost function as a sex-determining gene any more. Our results indicate that the SRY dependent sex-determining mechanism was lost in a common ancestor of the genus Tokudaia caused by nucleotide substitutions in SRY and SF1 binding sites after emergence of a new sex-determining gene. We present the first evidence for an intermediate stage of the switchover from SRY to a new sex-determining gene in the evolution of mammalian sex-determining mechanism.

  2. Enhanced thermostability of methyl parathion hydrolase from Ochrobactrum sp. M231 by rational engineering of a glycine to proline mutation.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jian; Wang, Ping; Gao, Shan; Chu, Xiaoyu; Wu, Ningfeng; Fan, Yunliu

    2010-12-01

    Protein thermostability can be increased by some glycine to proline mutations in a target protein. However, not all glycine to proline mutations can improve protein thermostability, and this method is suitable only at carefully selected mutation sites that can accommodate structural stabilization. In this study, homology modeling and molecular dynamics simulations were used to select appropriate glycine to proline mutations to improve protein thermostability, and the effect of the selected mutations was proved by the experiments. The structure of methyl parathion hydrolase (MPH) from Ochrobactrum sp. M231 (Ochr-MPH) was constructed by homology modeling, and molecular dynamics simulations were performed on the modeled structure. A profile of the root mean square fluctuations of Ochr-MPH was calculated at the nanosecond timescale, and an eight-amino acid loop region (residues 186-193) was identified as having high conformational fluctuation. The two glycines nearest to this region were selected as mutation targets that might affect protein flexibility in the vicinity. The structures and conformational fluctuations of two single mutants (G194P and G198P) and one double mutant (G194P/G198P) were modeled and analyzed using molecular dynamics simulations. The results predicted that the mutant G194P had the decreased conformational fluctuation in the loop region and might increase the thermostability of Ochr-MPH. The thermostability and kinetic behavior of the wild-type and three mutant enzymes were measured. The results were consistent with the computational predictions, and the mutant G194P was found to have higher thermostability than the wild-type enzyme.

  3. Enhanced but hypofunctional osteoclastogenesis in an autosomal dominant osteopetrosis type II case carrying a c.1856C>T mutation in CLCN7

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiang; Zhang, Kun; Hock, Janet; Wang, Chunyu; Yu, Xijie

    2016-01-01

    Type II autosomal dominant osteopetrosis (ADO2), which is the most common form of osteopetrosis, is caused by heterozygous mutations in the chloride channel 7 (CLCN7) gene. The osteopetrosis of ADO2 has been attributed to hypofunctional osteoclasts. The mechanism underlying the abnormality in osteoclast function remains largely unknown. This study was designed to investigate gene mutations and osteoclast function in a case that was clinically diagnosed as ADO2. Genomic DNA was extracted from blood samples of this patient, and the 25 exons of CLCN7 were amplified. Peripheral blood from the ADO2 subject and a healthy age- and sex-matched control was used to evaluate osteoclastogenesis, osteoclast morphology, and bone resorption. Analysis of DNA from the patient showed a germline heterozygous missense mutation, c.1856C>T (p.P619L), in exon 20 of CLCN7. A similar homozygous mutation at this site was previously reported in a patient with autosomal recessive osteopetrosis. When cultured, the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from the ADO2 patient spontaneously differentiated into mature osteoclasts in vitro. The ADO2 patient’s PBMCs formed enhanced, but heterogeneous, osteoclasts in both the presence and absence of macrophage-colony stimulating factor, and nuclear factor-ĸB ligand. Bone resorption was reduced in the ADO2 patient’s osteoclasts, which exhibited aberrant morphology and abnormal distribution of integrin avβ3. Gene analysis found increased c-fos expression and reduced RhoA and integrin beta 3 expression in ADO2 cells. In conclusion, our data suggest that enhanced, heterogeneous osteoclast induction may be an intrinsic characteristic of ADO2. PMID:27990310

  4. Reduction of trophic support enhances apoptosis in PC12 cells expressing Alzheimer's APP mutation and sensitizes cells to staurosporine-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Leutz, Steffen; Steiner, Barbara; Marques, Celio A; Haass, Christian; Müller, Walter E; Eckert, Anne

    2002-06-01

    Mutations in the amyloid precursor protein (APP) gene are known as causative factors in the pathogenesis of early-onset familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD). In this study, the influence of the Swedish double-mutation form of APP (APPsw; KM670/671NL) on apoptosis regulation in PC12 cells was investigated. APPsw-transfected PC12 cells were compared with wild-type APP (APPwt)-expressing and vector-transfected PC12 cells with regard to their susceptibility to cell death induced by the reduction of trophic support or by additional treatment with staurosporine. Expression of APPsw markedly enhanced the level of apoptotic PC12 cells induced by serum reduction. A similar hypersensitivity of APPsw-expressing PC12 cells could be detected after differentiation with nerve growth factor under serum-reduced conditions. Likewise, the expression of APPsw rendered PC12 cells more vulnerable to staurosporine but only under serum-reduced conditions. This APPsw-effect disappeared in high serum-containing medium. Thus, expression of APPsw seems to enhance cellular sensitivity not in general but after the reduction of trophic factors probably by causing oxidative stress. This, in turn, may sensitize cells to secondary apoptotic stimuli. Moreover, the mutation-specific increase in vulnerability to cell death was only seen at the stage of apoptotic nuclei, but not using methods measuring cell death by determining metabolic activity or membrane integrity. Therefore, the expression of APPsw seems to affect specifically apoptotic cell death rather than overall cell death in vitro. Our study further emphasizes the pathogenic role of mutant APP and may provide new insights in the mechanisms underlying the massive neurodegeneration in brain from patients bearing the APPsw mutation.

  5. Impact of the F508del mutation on ovine CFTR, a Cl− channel with enhanced conductance and ATP-dependent gating

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Zhiwei; Palmai-Pallag, Timea; Khuituan, Pissared; Mutolo, Michael J; Boinot, Clément; Liu, Beihui; Scott-Ward, Toby S; Callebaut, Isabelle; Harris, Ann; Sheppard, David N

    2015-01-01

    Cross-species comparative studies are a powerful approach to understanding the epithelial Cl− channel cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), which is defective in the genetic disease cystic fibrosis (CF). Here, we investigate the single-channel behaviour of ovine CFTR and the impact of the most common CF mutation, F508del-CFTR, using excised inside-out membrane patches from transiently transfected CHO cells. Like human CFTR, ovine CFTR formed a weakly inwardly rectifying Cl− channel regulated by PKA-dependent phosphorylation, inhibited by the open-channel blocker glibenclamide. However, for three reasons, ovine CFTR was noticeably more active than human CFTR. First, single-channel conductance was increased. Second, open probability was augmented because the frequency and duration of channel openings were increased. Third, with enhanced affinity and efficacy, ATP more strongly stimulated ovine CFTR channel gating. Consistent with these data, the CFTR modulator phloxine B failed to potentiate ovine CFTR Cl− currents. Similar to its impact on human CFTR, the F508del mutation caused a temperature-sensitive folding defect, which disrupted ovine CFTR protein processing and reduced membrane stability. However, the F508del mutation had reduced impact on ovine CFTR channel gating in contrast to its marked effects on human CFTR. We conclude that ovine CFTR forms a regulated Cl− channel with enhanced conductance and ATP-dependent channel gating. This phylogenetic analysis of CFTR structure and function demonstrates that subtle changes in structure have pronounced effects on channel function and the consequences of the CF mutation F508del. Key points Malfunction of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a gated pathway for chloride movement, causes the common life-shortening genetic disease cystic fibrosis (CF). Towards the development of a sheep model of CF, we have investigated the function of sheep CFTR. We found that

  6. Enhanced fixation and preservation of a newly arisen duplicate gene by masking deleterious loss-of-function mutations.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kentaro M; Takahasi, K Ryo; Takano-Shimizu, Toshiyuki

    2009-08-01

    Segmental duplications are enriched within many eukaryote genomes, and their potential consequence is gene duplication. While previous theoretical studies of gene duplication have mainly focused on the gene silencing process after fixation, the process leading to fixation is even more important for segmental duplications, because the majority of duplications would be lost before reaching a significant frequency in a population. Here, by a series of computer simulations, we show that purifying selection against loss-of-function mutations increases the fixation probability of a new duplicate gene, especially when the gene is haplo-insufficient. Theoretically, the probability of simultaneous preservation of both duplicate genes becomes twice the loss-of-function mutation rate (u(c)) when the population size (N), the degree of dominance of mutations (h) and the recombination rate between the duplicate genes (c) are all sufficiently large (Nu(c)>1, h>0.1 and c>u(c)). The preservation probability declines rapidly with h and becomes 0 when h=0 (haplo-sufficiency). We infer that masking deleterious loss-of-function mutations give duplicate genes an immediate selective advantage and, together with effects of increased gene dosage, would predominantly determine the fates of the duplicate genes in the early phase of their evolution.

  7. Enhancement of lipid peroxidation and its amelioration by vitamin E in a subject with mutations in the SBP2 gene.

    PubMed

    Saito, Yoshiro; Shichiri, Mototada; Hamajima, Takashi; Ishida, Noriko; Mita, Yuichiro; Nakao, Shohei; Hagihara, Yoshihisa; Yoshida, Yasukazu; Takahashi, Kazuhiko; Niki, Etsuo; Noguchi, Noriko

    2015-11-01

    Selenocysteine (Sec) insertion sequence-binding protein 2 (SBP2) is essential for the biosynthesis of Sec-containing proteins, termed selenoproteins. Subjects with mutations in the SBP2 gene have decreased levels of several selenoproteins, resulting in a complex phenotype. Selenoproteins play a significant role in antioxidative defense, and deficiencies in these proteins can lead to increased oxidative stress. However, lipid peroxidation and the effects of antioxidants in subjects with SBP2 gene mutations have not been studied. In the present study, we evaluated the lipid peroxidation products in the blood of a subject (the proband) with mutations in the SBP2 gene. We found that the proband had higher levels of free radical-mediated lipid peroxidation products, such as 7β-hydroxycholesterol, than the control subjects. Treatment of the proband with vitamin E (α-tocopherol acetate, 100 mg/day), a lipid-soluble antioxidant, for 2 years reduced lipid peroxidation product levels to those of control subjects. Withdrawal of vitamin E treatment for 7 months resulted in an increase in lipid peroxidation products. Collectively, these results clearly indicate that free radical-mediated oxidative stress is increased in the subject with SBP2 gene mutations and that vitamin E treatment effectively inhibits the generation of lipid peroxidation products.

  8. Transcription factor 4 and myocyte enhancer factor 2C mutations are not common causes of Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Armani, Roksana; Archer, Hayley; Clarke, Angus; Vasudevan, Pradeep; Zweier, Christiane; Ho, Gladys; Williamson, Sarah; Cloosterman, Desiree; Yang, Nan; Christodoulou, John

    2012-04-01

    The systematic screening of Rett syndrome (RTT) patients for pathogenetic sequence variations has focused on three genes that have been associated with RTT or related clinical phenotypes, namely MECP2, CDKL5, and FOXG1. More recently, it has been suggested that phenotypes associated with TCF4 and MEF2C mutations may represent a form of RTT. Here we report on the screening of the TCF4 and MEF2C genes in a cohort of 81 classical, atypical, and incomplete atypical RTT patients harboring no known mutations in MECP2, CDKL5, and FOXG1 genes. No pathogenetic sequence variations were identified in the MEF2C gene in our cohort. However, a frameshift mutation in TCF4 was identified in a patient with a clinical diagnosis of "variant" RTT, in whom the clinical evolution later raised the possibility of Pitt-Hopkins syndrome. Although our results suggest that these genes are not commonly associated with RTT, we note the clinical similarity between RTT and Pitt-Hopkins syndrome, and suggest that RTT patients with no mutation identified in MECP2 be considered for molecular screening of the TCF4 gene.

  9. Mutation screening of patients with Leber Congenital Amaurosis or the enhanced S-Cone Syndrome reveals a lack of sequence variations in the NRL gene.

    PubMed

    Acar, Ceren; Mears, Alan J; Yashar, Beverly M; Maheshwary, Anjali S; Andreasson, Sten; Baldi, Alfonso; Sieving, Paul A; Iannaccone, Alessandro; Musarella, Maria A; Jacobson, Samuel G; Swaroop, Anand

    2003-01-24

    To determine if mutations in the retinal transcription factor gene NRL are associated with retinopathies other than autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP). Genomic DNA was isolated from blood samples obtained from 50 patients with Leber Congenital Amaurosis (LCA), 17 patients with the Enhanced S-Cone Syndrome (ESCS), and a patient with an atypical retinal degeneration that causes photoreceptor rosettes with blue cone opsin. The 5' upstream region (putative promoter), untranslated exon 1, coding exons 2 and 3, and exon-intron boundaries of the NRL gene were analyzed by direct sequencing of the PCR-amplified products. Complete sequencing of the NRL gene in DNA samples from this cohort of patients revealed only one nucleotide change. The C->G transversion at nucleotide 711 of NRL exon 3 was detected in one LCA patient; however, this change did not alter the amino acid (L237L). No potential disease causing mutation was identified in the NRL gene in patients with LCA, ESCS, or the atypical retinal degeneration. Together with previous studies, our results demonstrate that mutations in the NRL gene are not a major cause of retinopathy. To date, only missense changes have been reported in adRP patients, and sequence variations are rare. It is possible that the loss of NRL function in humans is associated with a more complex clinical phenotype due to its expression in pineal gland in addition to rod photoreceptors.

  10. Amino acid mutations in the env gp90 protein that modify N-linked glycosylation of the Chinese EIAV vaccine strain enhance resistance to neutralizing antibodies.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiue; Zhang, Ping; Yu, Wei; Xiang, Wenhua; Li, Xiaodong

    2016-12-01

    The Chinese EIAV vaccine is an attenuated live virus vaccine obtained by serial passage of a virulent horse isolate (EIAVL) in donkeys (EIAVD) and, subsequently, in donkey cells in vitro. In this study, we compare the env gene of the original horse virulent virus (EIAVL) with attenuated strains serially passaged in donkey MDM (EIAVDLV) and donkey dermal cells (EIAVFDDV). Genetic comparisons among parental and attenuated strains found that vaccine strains contained amino acid substitutions/deletions in gp90 that resulted in a loss of three potential N-linked glycosylation sites, designated g5, g9, and g10. To investigate the biological significance of these changes, reverse-mutated viruses were constructed in the backbone of the EIAVFDDV infectious molecular clone (pLGFD3). The resulting virus stocks were characterized for replication efficiency in donkey dermal cells and donkey MDM, and were tested for sensitivity to neutralization using sera from two ponies experimentally infected with EIAVFDDV. Results clearly show that these mutations generated by site-directed mutagenesis resulted in cloned viruses with enhanced resistance to serum neutralizing antibodies that were also able to recognize parental viruses. This study indicates that these mutations played an important role in the attenuation of the EIAV vaccine strains.

  11. Enhancement of the production of L-glutaminase, an anticancer enzyme, from Aeromonas veronii by adaptive and induced mutation techniques.

    PubMed

    Jesuraj, S Aravinth Vijay; Sarker, Md Moklesur Rahman; Ming, Long Chiau; Praya, S Marylin Jeya; Ravikumar, M; Wui, Wong Tin

    2017-01-01

    Microbial anti-cancer enzymes have been proven to be effective and economical agents for cancer treatment. Aeromonas veronii has been identified as a microorganism with the potential to produce L-glutaminase, an anticancer agent effective against acute lymphocytic leukaemia. In this study, a selective medium of Aeromonas veronii was used to culture the microorganism. Strain improvement was done by adaptive and induced mutational techniques. A selective minimal agar media was incorporated for the growth of the strain which further supports adaptive mutation. Strains were also UV-irradiated and successively treated with N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine to find a resilient strain capable of producing L-glutaminase efficiently. The Plackett-Burman design and central composite designs were used to screen and optimize additional carbon and nitrogen sources. Adaptive mutation resulted in promising yield improvements compared to native strain (P<0.001). The mean yield of 30 treated colonies from the induced mutation was significantly increased compared to the non-induced strain (P< 0.001). The economically feasible statistical designs were found to reinforce each other in order to maximize the yield of the enzyme. The interactions of nutrient factors were understood from the 3D response surface plots. The model was found to be a perfect fit in terms of maximizing enzyme yield, with the productivity improving at every stage to a fourfold output of enzyme (591.11 ±7.97 IU/mL) compared to the native strain (135±3.51 IU/mL).

  12. Enhancement of the production of L-glutaminase, an anticancer enzyme, from Aeromonas veronii by adaptive and induced mutation techniques

    PubMed Central

    Jesuraj, S. Aravinth Vijay; Sarker, Md. Moklesur Rahman; Ming, Long Chiau; Praya, S. Marylin Jeya; Ravikumar, M.; Wui, Wong Tin

    2017-01-01

    Microbial anti-cancer enzymes have been proven to be effective and economical agents for cancer treatment. Aeromonas veronii has been identified as a microorganism with the potential to produce L-glutaminase, an anticancer agent effective against acute lymphocytic leukaemia. In this study, a selective medium of Aeromonas veronii was used to culture the microorganism. Strain improvement was done by adaptive and induced mutational techniques. A selective minimal agar media was incorporated for the growth of the strain which further supports adaptive mutation. Strains were also UV-irradiated and successively treated with N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine to find a resilient strain capable of producing L-glutaminase efficiently. The Plackett-Burman design and central composite designs were used to screen and optimize additional carbon and nitrogen sources. Adaptive mutation resulted in promising yield improvements compared to native strain (P<0.001). The mean yield of 30 treated colonies from the induced mutation was significantly increased compared to the non-induced strain (P< 0.001). The economically feasible statistical designs were found to reinforce each other in order to maximize the yield of the enzyme. The interactions of nutrient factors were understood from the 3D response surface plots. The model was found to be a perfect fit in terms of maximizing enzyme yield, with the productivity improving at every stage to a fourfold output of enzyme (591.11 ±7.97 IU/mL) compared to the native strain (135±3.51 IU/mL). PMID:28813436

  13. Familial Alzheimer’s mutations within APPTM increase Aβ42 production by enhancing accessibility of ɛ-cleavage site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wen; Gamache, Eric; Rosenman, David J.; Xie, Jian; Lopez, Maria M.; Li, Yue-Ming; Wang, Chunyu

    2014-01-01

    The high Aβ42/Aβ40 production ratio is a hallmark of familial Alzheimer’s disease, which can be caused by mutations in the amyloid precursor protein (APP). The C-terminus of Aβ is generated by γ-secretase cleavage within the transmembrane domain of APP (APPTM), a process that is primed by an initial ɛ-cleavage at either T48 or L49, resulting in subsequent production of Aβ42 or Aβ40, respectively. Here we solve the dimer structures of wild-type APPTM (AAPTM WT) and mutant APPTM (FAD mutants V44M) with solution NMR. The right-handed APPTM helical dimer is mediated by GXXXA motif. From the NMR structural and dynamic data, we show that the V44M and V44A mutations can selectively expose the T48 site by weakening helical hydrogen bonds and increasing hydrogen-deuterium exchange rate (kex). We propose a structural model in which FAD mutations (V44M and V44A) can open the T48 site γ-secretase for the initial ɛ-cleavage, and consequently shift cleavage preference towards Aβ42.

  14. Comparative genomic analysis identified a mutation related to enhanced heterologous protein production in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus oryzae.

    PubMed

    Jin, Feng-Jie; Katayama, Takuya; Maruyama, Jun-Ichi; Kitamoto, Katsuhiko

    2016-11-01

    Genomic mapping of mutations using next-generation sequencing technologies has facilitated the identification of genes contributing to fundamental biological processes, including human diseases. However, few studies have used this approach to identify mutations contributing to heterologous protein production in industrial strains of filamentous fungi, such as Aspergillus oryzae. In a screening of A. oryzae strains that hyper-produce human lysozyme (HLY), we previously isolated an AUT1 mutant that showed higher production of various heterologous proteins; however, the underlying factors contributing to the increased heterologous protein production remained unclear. Here, using a comparative genomic approach performed with whole-genome sequences, we attempted to identify the genes responsible for the high-level production of heterologous proteins in the AUT1 mutant. The comparative sequence analysis led to the detection of a gene (AO090120000003), designated autA, which was predicted to encode an unknown cytoplasmic protein containing an alpha/beta-hydrolase fold domain. Mutation or deletion of autA was associated with higher production levels of HLY. Specifically, the HLY yields of the autA mutant and deletion strains were twofold higher than that of the control strain during the early stages of cultivation. Taken together, these results indicate that combining classical mutagenesis approaches with comparative genomic analysis facilitates the identification of novel genes involved in heterologous protein production in filamentous fungi.

  15. Novel point mutations and mutational complexes in the enhancer II, core promoter and precore regions of hepatitis B virus genotype D1 associated with hepatocellular carcinoma in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Khan, Anis; Al Balwi, Mohammed A; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Hajeer, Ali; Sanai, Faisal M; Al Abdulkarim, Ibrahim; Al Ayyar, Latifah; Badri, Motasim; Saudi, Dib; Tamimi, Waleed; Mizokami, Masashi; Al Knawy, Bandar

    2013-12-15

    In this study, a cohort of 182 patients [55 hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and 127 non-HCC] infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV) in Saudi Arabia was investigated to study the relationship between sequence variation in the enhancer II (EnhII), basal core promoter (BCP) and precore regions of HBV genotype D (HBV/D) and the risk of HCC. HBV genotypes were determined by sequencing analysis and/or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Variations in the EnhII, BCP and precore regions were compared between 107 non-HCC and 45 HCC patients infected with HBV/D, followed by age-matched analysis of 40 cases versus equal number of controls. Age and male gender were significantly associated with HCC (p = 0.0001 and p = 0.03, respectively). Serological markers such as aspartate aminotransferase, albumin and anti-HBe were significantly associated with HCC (p = 0.0001 for all), whereas HBeAg positivity was associated with non-HCC (p = 0.0001). The most prevalent HBV genotype was HBV/D (94%), followed by HBV/E (4%), HBV/A (1.6%) and HBV/C (0.5%). For HBV/D1, genomic mutations associated with HCC were T1673/G1679, G1727, C1741, C1761, A1757/T1764/G1766, T1773, T1773/G1775 and C1909. Age- and gender-adjusted stepwise logistic regression analysis indicated that mutations G1727 [odds ratio (OR) = 18.3; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 2.8-118.4; p = 0.002], A1757/T1764/G1766 (OR = 4.7; 95% CI = 1.3-17.2; p = 0.01) and T1773 (OR = 14.06; 95% CI = 2.3-84.8; p = 0.004) are independent predictors of HCC development. These results implicate novel individual and combination patterns of mutations in the X/precore region of HBV/D1 as predictors of HCC. Risk stratification based on these mutation complexes would be useful in determining high-risk patients and improving diagnostic and treatment strategies for HBV/D1.

  16. In Vivo Analysis of Retroviral Enhancer Mutations in Hematopoietic Cells: SP1/EGR1 and ETS/GATA Motifs Contribute to Long Terminal Repeat Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Wahlers, Anke; Zipfel, Peter F.; Schwieger, Maike; Ostertag, Wolfram; Baum, Christopher

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this work was to identify, in the context of chromosomally integrated DNA, the contribution of defined transcription factor binding motifs to the function of a complex retrovirus enhancer in hematopoietic cells in vivo. Repopulating murine hematopoietic cells were transduced with equal gene dosages of replication-incompetent retrovirus vectors encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein. Enhancer sequences were derived from mouse spleen focus-forming virus. Destruction of GC-rich sites representing overlapping targets for SP1 or EGR1 uniformly attenuated gene expression (∼25 to 70% of wild-type levels) in all hematopoietic lineages, as shown by multicolor flow cytometry of peripheral blood and bone marrow cells at various time points posttransplantation. In contrast, a point mutation within a dual ETS/GATA motif that abolished transactivation by ETS factors but not by GATA-1 slightly increased activity in erythroid cells and significantly attenuated enhancer function in T lymphocytes. This study shows that controlled gene transfer in transplantable hematopoietic cells allows a functional analysis of distinct cis elements within a complex retrovirus enhancer, as required for the characterization and engineering of various cellular and viral regulatory sequences in basic research and gene therapy. PMID:11739695

  17. The tyrosine kinase receptor Tyro3 enhances lifespan and neuropeptide Y (Npy) neuron survival in the mouse anorexia (anx) mutation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dennis Y; Yu, Joanna; Mui, Ryan K; Niibori, Rieko; Taufique, Hamza Bin; Aslam, Rukhsana; Semple, John W; Cordes, Sabine P

    2017-05-01

    Severe appetite and weight loss define the eating disorder anorexia nervosa, and can also accompany the progression of some neurodegenerative disorders such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Although acute loss of hypothalamic neurons that produce appetite-stimulating neuropeptide Y (Npy) and agouti-related peptide (Agrp) in adult mice or in mice homozygous for the anorexia (anx) mutation causes aphagia, our understanding of the factors that help maintain appetite regulatory circuitry is limited. Here we identify a mutation (C19T) that converts an arginine to a tryptophan (R7W) in the TYRO3 protein tyrosine kinase 3 (Tyro3) gene, which resides within the anx critical interval, as contributing to the severity of anx phenotypes. Our observation that, like Tyro3(-/-) mice, anx/anx mice exhibit abnormal secondary platelet aggregation suggested that the C19T Tyro3 variant might have functional consequences. Tyro3 is expressed in the hypothalamus and other brain regions affected by the anx mutation, and its mRNA localization appeared abnormal in anx/anx brains by postnatal day 19 (P19). The presence of wild-type Tyro3 transgenes, but not an R7W-Tyro3 transgene, doubled the weight and lifespans of anx/anx mice and near-normal numbers of hypothalamic Npy-expressing neurons were present in Tyro3-transgenic anx/anx mice at P19. Although no differences in R7W-Tyro3 signal sequence function or protein localization were discernible in vitro, distribution of R7W-Tyro3 protein differed from that of Tyro3 protein in the cerebellum of transgenic wild-type mice. Thus, R7W-Tyro3 protein localization deficits are only detectable in vivo Further analyses revealed that the C19T Tyro3 mutation is present in a few other mouse strains, and hence is not the causative anx mutation, but rather an anx modifier. Our work shows that Tyro3 has prosurvival roles in the appetite regulatory circuitry and could also provide useful insights towards the development of interventions targeting

  18. The tyrosine kinase receptor Tyro3 enhances lifespan and neuropeptide Y (Npy) neuron survival in the mouse anorexia (anx) mutation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dennis Y.; Yu, Joanna; Mui, Ryan K.; Niibori, Rieko; Taufique, Hamza Bin; Aslam, Rukhsana; Semple, John W.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Severe appetite and weight loss define the eating disorder anorexia nervosa, and can also accompany the progression of some neurodegenerative disorders such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Although acute loss of hypothalamic neurons that produce appetite-stimulating neuropeptide Y (Npy) and agouti-related peptide (Agrp) in adult mice or in mice homozygous for the anorexia (anx) mutation causes aphagia, our understanding of the factors that help maintain appetite regulatory circuitry is limited. Here we identify a mutation (C19T) that converts an arginine to a tryptophan (R7W) in the TYRO3 protein tyrosine kinase 3 (Tyro3) gene, which resides within the anx critical interval, as contributing to the severity of anx phenotypes. Our observation that, like Tyro3−/− mice, anx/anx mice exhibit abnormal secondary platelet aggregation suggested that the C19T Tyro3 variant might have functional consequences. Tyro3 is expressed in the hypothalamus and other brain regions affected by the anx mutation, and its mRNA localization appeared abnormal in anx/anx brains by postnatal day 19 (P19). The presence of wild-type Tyro3 transgenes, but not an R7W-Tyro3 transgene, doubled the weight and lifespans of anx/anx mice and near-normal numbers of hypothalamic Npy-expressing neurons were present in Tyro3-transgenic anx/anx mice at P19. Although no differences in R7W-Tyro3 signal sequence function or protein localization were discernible in vitro, distribution of R7W-Tyro3 protein differed from that of Tyro3 protein in the cerebellum of transgenic wild-type mice. Thus, R7W-Tyro3 protein localization deficits are only detectable in vivo. Further analyses revealed that the C19T Tyro3 mutation is present in a few other mouse strains, and hence is not the causative anx mutation, but rather an anx modifier. Our work shows that Tyro3 has prosurvival roles in the appetite regulatory circuitry and could also provide useful insights towards the development of interventions

  19. Replication of Subgenomic Hepatitis A Virus RNAs Expressing Firefly Luciferase Is Enhanced by Mutations Associated with Adaptation of Virus to Growth in Cultured Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yi, MinKyung; Lemon, Stanley M.

    2002-01-01

    Replication of hepatitis A virus (HAV) in cultured cells is inefficient and difficult to study due to its protracted and generally noncytopathic cycle. To gain a better understanding of the mechanisms involved, we constructed a subgenomic HAV replicon by replacing most of the P1 capsid-coding sequence from an infectious cDNA copy of the cell culture-adapted HM175/18f virus genome with sequence encoding firefly luciferase. Replication of this RNA in transfected Huh-7 cells (derived from a human hepatocellular carcinoma) led to increased expression of luciferase relative to that in cells transfected with similar RNA transcripts containing a lethal premature termination mutation in 3Dpol (RNA polymerase). However, replication could not be confirmed in either FrhK4 cells or BSC-1 cells, cells that are typically used for propagation of HAV. Replication was substantially slower than that observed with replicons derived from other picornaviruses, as the basal luciferase activity produced by translation of input RNA did not begin to increase until 24 to 48 h after transfection. Replication of the RNA was reversibly inhibited by guanidine. The inclusion of VP4 sequence downstream of the viral internal ribosomal entry site had no effect on the basal level of luciferase or subsequent increases in luciferase related to its amplification. Thus, in this system this sequence does not contribute to viral translation or replication, as suggested previously. Amplification of the replicon RNA was profoundly enhanced by the inclusion of P2 (but not 5′ noncoding sequence or P3) segment mutations associated with adaptation of wild-type virus to growth in cell culture. These results provide a simple reporter system for monitoring the translation and replication of HAV RNA and show that critical mutations that enhance the growth of virus in cultured cells do so by promoting replication of viral RNA in the absence of encapsidation, packaging, and cellular export of the viral genome. PMID

  20. Combined inhibition of IGFR enhances the effects of gefitinib in H1650: a lung cancer cell line with EGFR mutation and primary resistance to EGFR-TK inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yun Jung; Rho, Jin Kyung; Jeon, Byung-suk; Choi, Su Jin; Park, Su Cheol; Lee, Seung Sook; Kim, Hye-Ryoun; Kim, Cheol Hyeon; Lee, Jae Cheol

    2010-07-01

    H1650 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells display primary resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs) although they have a deletion mutation on exon 19 of the EGFR gene. We investigated the effect of inhibition of both insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGFR) and EGFR signaling considering that IGFR signaling pathway has been implicated in the development and progression with therapeutic resistance of various cancers including lung cancer. Three human NSCLC cell lines with an EGFR mutation of PC-9, HCC827 and H1650 were used for experiment. Cell viability and proliferative activity were assessed by MTT and three-dimensional culture assay. Combination index was obtained by CalcuSyn software. The change of EGFR- and IGFR-related signals was evaluated by western blots. H1650 cells were 1,000 times more resistant to gefitinib and erlotinib than HCC827 and PC-9 cells possessing the same EGFR mutation. Phosphatase and tensin homolog loss and sustained phosphorylation of Akt in spite of treatment with gefitinib were evident only in H1650 cells. Interestingly, IGFR phosphorylation was decreased by gefitinib in HCC827 and PC-9 cells while being maintained in H1650 cells. Combined treatment with the IGFR inhibitors alpha-IR3 and AG1024 enhanced gefitinib-induced growth inhibition and apoptosis, and down-regulated phosphorylation of Akt, EGFR and IGFR. Combined inhibition of IGFR signaling enhances the growth inhibitory and apoptosis-inducing effects of gefitinib, suggesting that this approach could be useful to overcome the primary resistance to EGFR-TKIs in lung cancer.

  1. Directed evolution and structural analysis of NADPH-dependent Acetoacetyl Coenzyme A (Acetoacetyl-CoA) reductase from Ralstonia eutropha reveals two mutations responsible for enhanced kinetics.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Ken'ichiro; Tanaka, Yoshikazu; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi; Motohashi, Ren; Ikeda, Koji; Tobitani, Kota; Yao, Min; Tanaka, Isao; Taguchi, Seiichi

    2013-10-01

    NADPH-dependent acetoacetyl-coenzyme A (acetoacetyl-CoA) reductase (PhaB) is a key enzyme in the synthesis of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) [P(3HB)], along with β-ketothiolase (PhaA) and polyhydroxyalkanoate synthase (PhaC). In this study, PhaB from Ralstonia eutropha was engineered by means of directed evolution consisting of an error-prone PCR-mediated mutagenesis and a P(3HB) accumulation-based in vivo screening system using Escherichia coli. From approximately 20,000 mutants, we obtained two mutant candidates bearing Gln47Leu (Q47L) and Thr173Ser (T173S) substitutions. The mutants exhibited kcat values that were 2.4-fold and 3.5-fold higher than that of the wild-type enzyme, respectively. In fact, the PhaB mutants did exhibit enhanced activity and P(3HB) accumulation when expressed in recombinant Corynebacterium glutamicum. Comparative three-dimensional structural analysis of wild-type PhaB and highly active PhaB mutants revealed that the beneficial mutations affected the flexibility around the active site, which in turn played an important role in substrate recognition. Furthermore, both the kinetic analysis and crystal structure data supported the conclusion that PhaB forms a ternary complex with NADPH and acetoacetyl-CoA. These results suggest that the mutations affected the interaction with substrates, resulting in the acquirement of enhanced activity.

  2. Bisphosphonates enhance EGFR-TKIs efficacy in advanced NSCLC patients with EGFR activating mutation: A retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Xiao-Hong; Yao, Wen-Xiu; Xu, Yong; Liu, Xiao-Ke; Zhu, Wen-Jiang; Wang, Yan; Zhou, Jin; Lu, You; Wang, Yong-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Background Bisphosphonates have exhibited anti-tumor activity in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We aimed to evaluate whether the combination of bisphosphonates with tyrosine kinase inhibitors of EGFR (EGFR-TKIs) could obtain a synergistic effect on advanced NSCLC patients with EGFR mutations. Methods Between January 2008 and October 2013, 114 advanced EGFR mutations NSCLC patients who received EGFR-TKIs as first-line therapy were recruited from two cancer centers. Patients were separated into EGFR-TKIs alone or EGFR-TKIs plus bisphosphonates (combination) group. Median progression free survival (mPFS), median overall survival (mOS) distributions and survival curves were analyzed. Results Among the 114 patients, 62 had bone metastases (19 patients treated with EGFR-TKIs, 43 patients treated with EGFR-TKIs + bisphosphonates). Median PFS and OS were significantly improved in combination group compared with EGFR-TKIs group (mPFS: 15.0 vs 7.3 months, P = 0.0017; mOS: 25.2 vs 10.4 months, P = 0.0015) in patients with bone metastases. Among the 71 patients (19 patients with bone metastases) treated with EGFR-TKIs alone, patients with bone metastases had poor survival prognosis (mPFS:7.3 vs 12.1 months, P = 0.0434; mOS:10.4 vs 22.0 months, P = 0.0036). The survival of patients with bone metastases who received EGFR-TKIs plus bisphosphonates therapy was non-inferior to patients without bone metastases treated with EGFR-TKIs alone (mPFS: 15.0 vs 12.1 months, p = 0.1871; mOS: 25.2 vs 22.0 months, p = 0.9798). Conclusions Concomitant use of bisphosphonates and EGFR-TKIs improves therapeutic efficacy and brings survival benefits to NSCLC patients with EGFR mutation and bone metastases. PMID:26624882

  3. Nav1.7-A1632G Mutation from a Family with Inherited Erythromelalgia: Enhanced Firing of Dorsal Root Ganglia Neurons Evoked by Thermal Stimuli.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Huang, Jianying; Mis, Malgorzata A; Estacion, Mark; Macala, Lawrence; Shah, Palak; Schulman, Betsy R; Horton, Daniel B; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D; Waxman, Stephen G

    2016-07-13

    Voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.7 is a central player in human pain. Mutations in Nav1.7 produce several pain syndromes, including inherited erythromelalgia (IEM), a disorder in which gain-of-function mutations render dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons hyperexcitable. Although patients with IEM suffer from episodes of intense burning pain triggered by warmth, the effects of increased temperature on DRG neurons expressing mutant Nav1.7 channels have not been well documented. Here, using structural modeling, voltage-clamp, current-clamp, and multielectrode array recordings, we have studied a newly identified Nav1.7 mutation, Ala1632Gly, from a multigeneration family with IEM. Structural modeling suggests that Ala1632 is a molecular hinge and that the Ala1632Gly mutation may affect channel gating. Voltage-clamp recordings revealed that the Nav1.7-A1632G mutation hyperpolarizes activation and depolarizes fast-inactivation, both gain-of-function attributes at the channel level. Whole-cell current-clamp recordings demonstrated increased spontaneous firing, lower current threshold, and enhanced evoked firing in rat DRG neurons expressing Nav1.7-A1632G mutant channels. Multielectrode array recordings further revealed that intact rat DRG neurons expressing Nav1.7-A1632G mutant channels are more active than those expressing Nav1.7 WT channels. We also showed that physiologically relevant thermal stimuli markedly increase the mean firing frequencies and the number of active rat DRG neurons expressing Nav1.7-A1632G mutant channels, whereas the same thermal stimuli only increase these parameters slightly in rat DRG neurons expressing Nav1.7 WT channels. The response of DRG neurons expressing Nav1.7-A1632G mutant channels upon increase in temperature suggests a cellular basis for warmth-triggered pain in IEM. Inherited erythromelalgia (IEM), a severe pain syndrome characterized by episodes of intense burning pain triggered by warmth, is caused by mutations in sodium channel Nav

  4. Missense mutation in exon 11 (Codon 378) of the presenilin-1 gene in a French family with early-onset Alzheimer's disease and transmission study by mismatch enhanced allele specific amplification. Mutations in brief no. 141. Online. besancon@rockefeller1.univ.lyon1.fr.

    PubMed

    Besançon, R; Lorenzi, A; Cruts, M; Radawiec, S; Sturtz, F; Broussolle, E; Chazot, G; van Broeckhoven, C; Chamba, G; Vandenberghe, A

    1998-01-01

    Mutations in the presenilin-1 (PS1) gene account for the majority of familial early-onset Alzheimer's disease (EOAD) cases. We screened the coding part of the PS1 gene for the present of mutations in a French family with EOAD, using single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis. Patients in the pedigree showed a missense mutation in exon 11 of the PS1 gene involving a transition of G to A, altering glycine to glutamate at codon 378. The cosegregation of the mutation with EOAD in the family was studied by allele specific amplification, enhanced by the introduction of a mismatch at the penultimate position near the 3' primer end. The mutation has not been described before and is located within the third large cytoplasmic loop and may lead to the appearance of a short additional a-helix.

  5. Enhancement of the Chaperone Activity of Alkyl Hydroperoxide Reductase C from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 Resulting from a Point-Specific Mutation Confers Heat Tolerance in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Taek; Lee, Seung Sik; Mondal, Suvendu; Tripathi, Bhumi Nath; Kim, Siu; Lee, Keun Woo; Hong, Sung Hyun; Bai, Hyoung-Woo; Cho, Jae-Young; Chung, Byung Yeoup

    2016-01-01

    Alkyl hydroperoxide reductase subunit C from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 (PaAhpC) is a member of the 2-Cys peroxiredoxin family. Here, we examined the peroxidase and molecular chaperone functions of PaAhpC using a site-directed mutagenesis approach by substitution of Ser and Thr residues with Cys at positions 78 and 105 located between two catalytic cysteines. Substitution of Ser with Cys at position 78 enhanced the chaperone activity of the mutant (S78C-PaAhpC) by approximately 9-fold compared with that of the wild-type protein (WT-PaAhpC). This increased activity may have been associated with the proportionate increase in the high-molecular-weight (HMW) fraction and enhanced hydrophobicity of S78C-PaAhpC. Homology modeling revealed that mutation of Ser78 to Cys78 resulted in a more compact decameric structure than that observed in WT-PaAhpC and decreased the atomic distance between the two neighboring sulfur atoms of Cys78 in the dimer-dimer interface of S78C-PaAhpC, which could be responsible for the enhanced hydrophobic interaction at the dimer-dimer interface. Furthermore, complementation assays showed that S78C-PaAhpC exhibited greatly improved the heat tolerance, resulting in enhanced survival under thermal stress. Thus, addition of Cys at position 78 in PaAhpC modulated the functional shifting of this protein from a peroxidase to a chaperone. PMID:27457208

  6. Changes in membrane fatty acid composition through proton-induced fabF mutation enhancing 1-butanol tolerance in E. coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Haeyoung; Kim, Sun Hong; Han, Sang Soo; Kim, Myung Hee; Lee, Keun Chul

    2012-07-01

    While a rational approach based on genomic data has become the preferred method for microbial strain development, radiation-induced random mutagenesis is still a robust method for organisms such as plants whose genome or target gene information is unavailable. We previously reported on a combined approach that consists of proton irradiation and a long-term experimental evolution to enhance 1-butanol tolerance of the E. coli C strain so that it can be used as a basal strain for the production of 1-butanol, a potential biofuel along with ethanol. Genome sequencing of one randomly chosen clone (PKH5000) from the endpoint population revealed eleven mutations occurring in the coding regions, and we found that a mutation (F74C) in fabF gene encoding β-ketoacyl-ACP synthases II is associated with a twofold increase in the major unsaturated fatty acid, cis-vaccenic acid. The increase of cis-vaccenic acid by wild-type FabF, which is more active at low temperatures or in the presence of organic compounds, is considered to be a protective mechanism against cold stress. A structural analysis of the FabF protein suggests that the F74C mutation may affect the enzyme activity through a change in flexibility around the catalytic site. The expression of a plasmid that harbors mutant fabF gene in the fabF knockout strain enhanced growth in a medium containing butanol with a concomitant elevation of the cis-vaccenic acid level. Among the eight available Keio knockout strains for genes that have amino acid substitution in the PKH5000 strain, the fabF mutant showed the slowest growth in the presence of 0.7% butanol. We propose that fabF, as probably the gene most responsible for butanol tolerance in wild-type form, contributes further when converted into a F74C missense mutation, which is beneficial as it increases the level of cis-vaccenic acid.

  7. AUTO-MUTE 2.0: A Portable Framework with Enhanced Capabilities for Predicting Protein Functional Consequences upon Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Masso, Majid; Vaisman, Iosif I.

    2014-01-01

    The AUTO-MUTE 2.0 stand-alone software package includes a collection of programs for predicting functional changes to proteins upon single residue substitutions, developed by combining structure-based features with trained statistical learning models. Three of the predictors evaluate changes to protein stability upon mutation, each complementing a distinct experimental approach. Two additional classifiers are available, one for predicting activity changes due to residue replacements and the other for determining the disease potential of mutations associated with nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) in human proteins. These five command-line driven tools, as well as all the supporting programs, complement those that run our AUTO-MUTE web-based server. Nevertheless, all the codes have been rewritten and substantially altered for the new portable software, and they incorporate several new features based on user feedback. Included among these upgrades is the ability to perform three highly requested tasks: to run “big data” batch jobs; to generate predictions using modified protein data bank (PDB) structures, and unpublished personal models prepared using standard PDB file formatting; and to utilize NMR structure files that contain multiple models. PMID:25197272

  8. Rapid Discovery of De Novo Deleterious Mutations in Cattle Enhances the Value of Livestock as Model Species.

    PubMed

    Bourneuf, E; Otz, P; Pausch, H; Jagannathan, V; Michot, P; Grohs, C; Piton, G; Ammermüller, S; Deloche, M-C; Fritz, S; Leclerc, H; Péchoux, C; Boukadiri, A; Hozé, C; Saintilan, R; Créchet, F; Mosca, M; Segelke, D; Guillaume, F; Bouet, S; Baur, A; Vasilescu, A; Genestout, L; Thomas, A; Allais-Bonnet, A; Rocha, D; Colle, M-A; Klopp, C; Esquerré, D; Wurmser, C; Flisikowski, K; Schwarzenbacher, H; Burgstaller, J; Brügmann, M; Dietschi, E; Rudolph, N; Freick, M; Barbey, S; Fayolle, G; Danchin-Burge, C; Schibler, L; Bed'Hom, B; Hayes, B J; Daetwyler, H D; Fries, R; Boichard, D; Pin, D; Drögemüller, C; Capitan, A

    2017-09-13

    In humans, the clinical and molecular characterization of sporadic syndromes is often hindered by the small number of patients and the difficulty in developing animal models for severe dominant conditions. Here we show that the availability of large data sets of whole-genome sequences, high-density SNP chip genotypes and extensive recording of phenotype offers an unprecedented opportunity to quickly dissect the genetic architecture of severe dominant conditions in livestock. We report on the identification of seven dominant de novo mutations in CHD7, COL1A1, COL2A1, COPA, and MITF and exploit the structure of cattle populations to describe their clinical consequences and map modifier loci. Moreover, we demonstrate that the emergence of recessive genetic defects can be monitored by detecting de novo deleterious mutations in the genome of bulls used for artificial insemination. These results demonstrate the attractiveness of cattle as a model species in the post genomic era, particularly to confirm the genetic aetiology of isolated clinical case reports in humans.

  9. AUTO-MUTE 2.0: A Portable Framework with Enhanced Capabilities for Predicting Protein Functional Consequences upon Mutation.

    PubMed

    Masso, Majid; Vaisman, Iosif I

    2014-01-01

    The AUTO-MUTE 2.0 stand-alone software package includes a collection of programs for predicting functional changes to proteins upon single residue substitutions, developed by combining structure-based features with trained statistical learning models. Three of the predictors evaluate changes to protein stability upon mutation, each complementing a distinct experimental approach. Two additional classifiers are available, one for predicting activity changes due to residue replacements and the other for determining the disease potential of mutations associated with nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) in human proteins. These five command-line driven tools, as well as all the supporting programs, complement those that run our AUTO-MUTE web-based server. Nevertheless, all the codes have been rewritten and substantially altered for the new portable software, and they incorporate several new features based on user feedback. Included among these upgrades is the ability to perform three highly requested tasks: to run "big data" batch jobs; to generate predictions using modified protein data bank (PDB) structures, and unpublished personal models prepared using standard PDB file formatting; and to utilize NMR structure files that contain multiple models.

  10. Calpain 3 Expression Pattern during Gastrocnemius Muscle Atrophy and Regeneration Following Sciatic Nerve Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ronghua; Yan, Yingying; Yao, Jian; Liu, Yan; Zhao, Jianmei; Liu, Mei

    2015-01-01

    Calpain 3 (CAPN3), also known as p94, is a skeletal muscle-specific member of the calpain family that is involved in muscular dystrophy; however, the roles of CAPN3 in muscular atrophy and regeneration are yet to be understood. In the present study, we attempted to explain the effect of CAPN3 in muscle atrophy by evaluating CAPN3 expression in rat gastrocnemius muscle following reversible sciatic nerve injury. After nerve injury, the wet weight ratio and cross sectional area (CSA) of gastrocnemius muscle were decreased gradually from 1–14 days and then recovery from 14–28 days. The active form of CAPN3 (~62 kDa) protein decreased slightly on day 3 and then increased from day 7 to 14 before a decrease from day 14 to 28. The result of linear correlation analysis showed that expression of the active CAPN3 protein level was negatively correlated with muscle wet weight ratio. CAPN3 knockdown by short interfering RNA (siRNA) injection improved muscle recovery on days 7 and 14 after injury as compared to that observed with control siRNA treatment. Depletion of CAPN3 gene expression could promote myoblast differentiation in L6 cells. Based on these findings, we conclude that the expression pattern of the active CAPN3 protein is linked to muscle atrophy and regeneration following denervation: its upregulation during early stages may promote satellite cell renewal by inhibiting differentiation, whereas in later stages, CAPN3 expression may be downregulated to stimulate myogenic differentiation and enhance recovery. These results provide a novel mechanistic insight into the role of CAPN3 protein in muscle regeneration after peripheral nerve injury. PMID:26569227

  11. Propofol inhibits hERG K(+) channels and enhances the inhibition effects on its mutations in HEK293 cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Sheng-Na; Jing, Ying; Yang, Lin-Lin; Zhang, Zhao; Zhang, Li-Rong

    2016-11-15

    QT interval prolongation, a potential risk for arrhythmias, may result from gene polymorphisms relevant to cardiomyocyte repolarization. Another noted cause of QT interval prolongation is the administration of chemical compounds such as anesthetics, which may affect a specific type of cardiac K(+) channel encoded by the human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG). hERG K(+) current was recorded using whole-cell patch clamp in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells expressing wild type (WT) or mutated hERG channels. Expression of hERG K(+) channel proteins was evaluated using western blot and confirmed by fluorescent staining and imaging. Computational modeling was adopted to identify the possible binding site(s) of propofol with hERG K(+) channels. Propofol had a significant inhibitory effect on WT hERG K(+) currents in a concentration-dependent manner, with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 60.9±6.4μM. Mutations in drug-binding sites (Y652A or F656C) of the hERG channel were found to attenuate hERG current blockage by propofol. However, propofol did not inhibit the trafficking of hERG protein to the cell membrane. Meanwhile, for the three selective hERG K(+) channel mutant heterozygotes WT/Q738X-hERG, WT/A422T-hERG, and WT/H562P-hERG, the IC50 of propofol was calculated as 14.2±2.8μM, 3.3±1.2μM, and 5.9±1.9μM, respectively, which were much lower than that for the wild type. These findings indicate that propofol may potentially increase QT interval prolongation risk in patients via direct inhibition of the hERG K(+) channel, especially in those with other concurrent triggering factors such as hERG gene mutations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Enhanced striatal dopamine transmission and motor performance with LRRK2 overexpression in mice is eliminated by familial Parkinson's disease mutation G2019S.

    PubMed

    Li, Xianting; Patel, Jyoti C; Wang, Jing; Avshalumov, Marat V; Nicholson, Charles; Buxbaum, Joseph D; Elder, Gregory A; Rice, Margaret E; Yue, Zhenyu

    2010-02-03

    PARK8/LRRK2 (leucine-rich repeat kinase 2) was recently identified as a causative gene for autosomal dominant Parkinson's disease (PD), with LRRK2 mutation G2019S linked to the most frequent familial form of PD. Emerging in vitro evidence indicates that aberrant enzymatic activity of LRRK2 protein carrying this mutation can cause neurotoxicity. However, the physiological and pathophysiological functions of LRRK2 in vivo remain elusive. Here we characterize two bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) transgenic mouse strains overexpressing LRRK2 wild-type (Wt) or mutant G2019S. Transgenic LRRK2-Wt mice had elevated striatal dopamine (DA) release with unaltered DA uptake or tissue content. Consistent with this result, LRRK2-Wt mice were hyperactive and showed enhanced performance in motor function tests. These results suggest a role for LRRK2 in striatal DA transmission and the consequent motor function. In contrast, LRRK2-G2019S mice showed an age-dependent decrease in striatal DA content, as well as decreased striatal DA release and uptake. Despite increased brain kinase activity, LRRK2-G2019S overexpression was not associated with loss of DAergic neurons in substantia nigra or degeneration of nigrostriatal terminals at 12 months. Our results thus reveal a pivotal role for LRRK2 in regulating striatal DA transmission and consequent control of motor function. The PD-associated mutation G2019S may exert pathogenic effects by impairing these functions of LRRK2. Our LRRK2 BAC transgenic mice, therefore, could provide a useful model for understanding early PD pathological events.

  13. Mutation design of a thermophilic Rubisco based on three-dimensional structure enhances its activity at ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Fujihashi, Masahiro; Nishitani, Yuichi; Kiriyama, Tomohiro; Aono, Riku; Sato, Takaaki; Takai, Tomoyuki; Tagashira, Kenta; Fukuda, Wakao; Atomi, Haruyuki; Imanaka, Tadayuki; Miki, Kunio

    2016-10-01

    Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) plays a central role in carbon dioxide fixation on our planet. Rubisco from a hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis (Tk-Rubisco) shows approximately twenty times the activity of spinach Rubisco at high temperature, but only one-eighth the activity at ambient temperature. We have tried to improve the activity of Tk-Rubisco at ambient temperature, and have successfully constructed several mutants which showed higher activities than the wild-type enzyme both in vitro and in vivo. Here, we designed new Tk-Rubisco mutants based on its three-dimensional structure and a sequence comparison of thermophilic and mesophilic plant Rubiscos. Four mutations were introduced to generate new mutants based on this strategy, and one of the four mutants, T289D, showed significantly improved activity compared to that of the wild-type enzyme. The crystal structure of the Tk-Rubisco T289D mutant suggested that the increase in activity was due to mechanisms distinct from those involved in the improvement in activity of Tk-Rubisco SP8, a mutant protein previously reported to show the highest activity at ambient temperature. Combining the mutations of T289D and SP8 successfully generated a mutant protein (SP8-T289D) with the highest activity to date both in vitro and in vivo. The improvement was particularly pronounced for the in vivo activity of SP8-T289D when introduced into the mesophilic, photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris, which resulted in a strain with nearly two-fold higher specific growth rates compared to that of a strain harboring the wild-type enzyme at ambient temperature. Proteins 2016; 84:1339-1346. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Mutations in VP2 and VP1 capsid proteins increase infectivity and mouse lethality of enterovirus 71 by virus binding and RNA accumulation enhancement.

    PubMed

    Huang, Sheng-Wen; Wang, Ya-Fang; Yu, Chun-Keung; Su, Ih-Jen; Wang, Jen-Ren

    2012-01-05

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a major cause of hand-foot-and-mouth disease. EV71 infection occasionally associates with severe neurological sequelae such as brainstem encephalitis or poliovirus-like paralysis. We demonstrated that mouse-adapted strain increases infectivity, resulting in higher cytotoxicity of neuron cells and mortality to neonatal mice than a non-adapted strain. Results pointed to EV71 capsid region determining viral infectivity and mouse lethality. Mutant virus with lysine to methionine substitution at VP2(149) (VP2(149M)) or glutamine to glutamic acid substitution at VP1(145) (VP1(145E)) showed greater viral titers and apoptosis. Synergistic effect of VP2(149M) and VP1(145E) double mutations enhanced viral binding and RNA accumulation in infected Neuro-2a cells. The dual substitution mutants markedly reduced value of 50% lethal dose in neonatal mice infection, indicating they raised mouse lethality in vivo. In sum, VP2(149M) and VP1(145E) mutations cooperatively promote viral binding and RNA accumulation of EV71, contributing to viral infectivity in vitro and mouse lethality in vivo.

  15. Nav1.7 mutations associated with paroxysmal extreme pain disorder, but not erythromelalgia, enhance Navbeta4 peptide-mediated resurgent sodium currents.

    PubMed

    Theile, Jonathan W; Jarecki, Brian W; Piekarz, Andrew D; Cummins, Theodore R

    2011-02-01

    Abnormal pain sensitivity associated with inherited and acquired pain disorders occurs through increased excitability of peripheral sensory neurons in part due to changes in the properties of voltage-gated sodium channels (Navs). Resurgent sodium currents (I(NaR)) are atypical currents believed to be associated with increased excitability of neurons and may have implications in pain. Mutations in Nav1.7 (peripheral Nav isoform) associated with two genetic pain disorders, inherited erythromelalgia (IEM) and paroxysmal extreme pain disorder (PEPD), enhance Nav1.7 function via distinct mechanisms. We show that changes in Nav1.7 function due to mutations associated with PEPD, but not IEM, are important in I(NaR) generation, suggesting that I(NaR) may play a role in pain associated with PEPD. This knowledge provides us with a better understanding of the mechanism of I(NaR) generation and may lead to the development of specialized treatment for pain disorders associated with I(NaR).

  16. Enhanced thermal stability and mismatch discrimination of mutation-carrying DNA duplexes and their kinetic and thermodynamic properties in microchannel laminar flow.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Maria Portia B; Yamashita, Kenichi; Miyazaki, Masaya; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Maeda, Hideaki

    2009-07-01

    This article reports the enhancement of thermal stability involving normal duplex and mutation-carrying DNA duplexes in microchannel laminar flow. The application of an in-house temperature-controllable microchannel-type flow cell is demonstrated for improved discrimination of mismatch base pairs such as A-G and T-G that are difficult to distinguish due to the rather small thermal destabilizations. Enhancement in thermal stability is reflected by an increased thermal melting temperature achieved in microchannel laminar flow as compared with batch reactions. To examine the kinetics and thermodynamics of duplex-coil equilibrium of DNA oligomers, denaturation-renaturation hysteresis curves were measured. The influence of microchannel laminar flow on DNA base mismatch analysis was described from the kinetic and thermodynamic perspectives. An increasing trend was observed for association rate constant as flow rate increased. In contrast, an apparent decrease in dissociation rate constant was observed with increasing flow rate. The magnitudes of the activation energies of dissociation were nearly constant for both the batch and microchannel laminar flow systems at all flow rates. In contrast, the magnitudes of activation energies of association decreased as flow rate increased. These results clearly show how microchannel laminar flow induces change in reaction rate by effecting change in activation energy. We anticipate, therefore, that this approach based on microchannel laminar flow system holds great promise for improved mismatch discrimination in DNA analyses, particularly on single-base-pair mismatch, by pronouncedly enhancing thermal stability.

  17. Variable in vivo embryoprotective role for ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated against constitutive and phenytoin-enhanced oxidative stress in atm knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Bhuller, Yadvinder; Jeng, Winnie; Wells, Peter G

    2006-09-01

    Knockout mice lacking the ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated (Atm) protein exhibit impaired detection and repair of DNA damage and increased embryopathies from ionizing radiation in vivo, and vehicle or phenytoin in embryo culture. Here we determined if Atm-deficient mice are more susceptible in vivo to phenytoin embryopathies. Wild-type (+/+) or heterozygous (+/-) Atm knockout dams were mated with +/- males, pregnant dams were treated with phenytoin (65 mg/kg ip) or its vehicle, and resorptions and fetuses were genotyped and characterized. This strain proved resistant to phenytoin-initiated cleft palates but not to other spontaneous and phenytoin-enhanced embryopathies. With vehicle-treated +/- dams, fetal body weight was lower in homozygous Atm-null (-/-) fetuses compared to +/- and +/+ littermates (p < 0.05). Phenytoin enhanced this Atm-dependent embryopathic pattern (p < 0.05). It also enhanced DNA oxidation in -/- Atm-deficient embryos compared to its +/- Atm-deficient (p < 0.001) and +/+ Atm-normal (p < 0.001), phenytoin-exposed littermates and to its -/- vehicle controls (p < 0.01). Postpartum lethality was greater in both +/- and -/- Atm-deficient fetuses compared to +/+ littermates, independent of treatment (0.05 < p < 0.1). By maternal genotype, +/- Atm-deficient dams had fewer implantations than +/+ dams, independent of treatment, and phenytoin decreased litter size (p < 0.05). Conversely, phenytoin-exposed +/+ fetuses were more likely than -/- littermates to die in utero (p < 0.05), and in +/+ dams fetal resorptions and postpartum lethality were variably higher and enhanced by phenytoin (p < 0.05). Despite variable actions in vivo, the embryoprotective effects of Atm suggest a role for reactive oxygen species and oxidative DNA damage in some spontaneous and phenytoin-enhanced embryopathies.

  18. Powdery Mildew Resistance Conferred by Loss of the ENHANCED DISEASE RESISTANCE1 Protein Kinase Is Suppressed by a Missense Mutation in KEEP ON GOING, a Regulator of Abscisic Acid Signaling1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Wawrzynska, Anna; Christiansen, Katy M.; Lan, Yinan; Rodibaugh, Natalie L.; Innes, Roger W.

    2008-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) ENHANCED DISEASE RESISTANCE1 (EDR1) gene confer enhanced resistance to infection by powdery mildew (Golovinomyces cichoracearum). EDR1 encodes a protein kinase, but its substrates and the pathways regulated by EDR1 are unknown. To identify components of the EDR1 signal transduction pathway(s), we conducted a forward genetic screen for mutations that suppressed edr1-mediated disease resistance. Genetic mapping and cloning of one of these suppressor mutations revealed a recessive missense mutation in the KEEP ON GOING gene (KEG; At5g13530), which we designated keg-4. KEG encodes a multidomain protein that includes a RING E3 ligase domain, a kinase domain, ankyrin repeats, and HERC2-like repeats. The KEG protein has previously been shown to have ubiquitin ligase activity and to negatively regulate protein levels of the transcription factor ABCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE5. KEG mRNA levels were found to be 3-fold higher in edr1 mutant plants compared to wild type. Loss-of-function mutations in KEG are seedling lethal and are hypersensitive to glucose and abscisic acid (ABA). The keg-4 mutation, in contrast, conferred resistance to 6% glucose and suppressed edr1-mediated hypersensitivity to ABA, suggesting that the keg-4 mutation suppresses ABA signaling by altering KEG function. Several ABA-responsive genes were found to be further up-regulated in the edr1 mutant following ABA treatment, and this up-regulation was suppressed by the keg-4 mutation. We conclude that edr1-mediated resistance to powdery mildew is mediated, in part, by enhanced ABA signaling. PMID:18815384

  19. Powdery mildew resistance conferred by loss of the ENHANCED DISEASE RESISTANCE1 protein kinase is suppressed by a missense mutation in KEEP ON GOING, a regulator of abscisic acid signaling.

    PubMed

    Wawrzynska, Anna; Christiansen, Katy M; Lan, Yinan; Rodibaugh, Natalie L; Innes, Roger W

    2008-11-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) ENHANCED DISEASE RESISTANCE1 (EDR1) gene confer enhanced resistance to infection by powdery mildew (Golovinomyces cichoracearum). EDR1 encodes a protein kinase, but its substrates and the pathways regulated by EDR1 are unknown. To identify components of the EDR1 signal transduction pathway(s), we conducted a forward genetic screen for mutations that suppressed edr1-mediated disease resistance. Genetic mapping and cloning of one of these suppressor mutations revealed a recessive missense mutation in the KEEP ON GOING gene (KEG; At5g13530), which we designated keg-4. KEG encodes a multidomain protein that includes a RING E3 ligase domain, a kinase domain, ankyrin repeats, and HERC2-like repeats. The KEG protein has previously been shown to have ubiquitin ligase activity and to negatively regulate protein levels of the transcription factor ABCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE5. KEG mRNA levels were found to be 3-fold higher in edr1 mutant plants compared to wild type. Loss-of-function mutations in KEG are seedling lethal and are hypersensitive to glucose and abscisic acid (ABA). The keg-4 mutation, in contrast, conferred resistance to 6% glucose and suppressed edr1-mediated hypersensitivity to ABA, suggesting that the keg-4 mutation suppresses ABA signaling by altering KEG function. Several ABA-responsive genes were found to be further up-regulated in the edr1 mutant following ABA treatment, and this up-regulation was suppressed by the keg-4 mutation. We conclude that edr1-mediated resistance to powdery mildew is mediated, in part, by enhanced ABA signaling.

  20. mdm Muscular Dystrophy: Interactions with Calpain 3 and a Novel Functional Role for Titin’s N2A Domain

    PubMed Central

    Huebsch, Kimberly A.; Kudryashova, Elena; Wooley, Christine M.; Sher, Roger B.; Seburn, Kevin L.; Spencer, Melissa J.; Cox, Gregory A.

    2005-01-01

    Human tibial muscular dystrophy (TMD) and limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2J (LGMD2J) are caused by mutations in the giant sarcomeric protein titin (TTN) adjacent to a binding site for the muscle-specific protease calpain 3 (CAPN3). Muscular dystrophy with myositis (mdm) is a recessive mouse mutation with severe and progressive muscular degeneration caused by a deletion in the N2A domain of titin (TTN-N2AΔ83), disrupting a putative binding site for CAPN3. To determine whether the muscular dystrophy in mutant mdm mice is caused by misregulation of CAPN3 activity, genetic crosses with CAPN3 overexpressing transgenic (C3Tg) and CAPN3 knockout (C3KO) mice were generated. Here we report that overexpression of CAPN3 exacerbates the mdm disease, leading to a shorter lifespan and more severe muscular dystrophy. However, in a direct genetic test of CAPN3’s role as a mediator of mdm pathology, C3KO;mdm double mutant mice showed no change in the progression or severity of disease indicating that aberrant CAPN3 activity is not a primary mechanism in this disease. To determine whether we could detect a functional deficit in titin in a non-disease state, we examined the treadmill locomotion of heterozygous +/mdm mice and detected a significant increase in stride time with a concomitant increase in stance time. Interestingly, these altered gait parameters were completely corrected by CAPN3 overexpression in transgenic C3Tg;+/mdm mice, supporting a CAPN3-dependent role for the N2A domain of TTN in the dynamics of muscle contraction. PMID:16115818

  1. Elimination of the Yeast Rad6 Ubiquitin Conjugase Enhances Base-Pair Transitions and G.c -> T.a Transversions as Well as Transposition of the Ty Element: Implications for the Control of Spontaneous Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Kang, X.; Yadao, F.; Gietz, R. D.; Kunz, B. A.

    1992-01-01

    The RAD6 gene of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes an enzyme that conjugates ubiquitin to other proteins. Defects in RAD6 confer a mutator phenotype due, in part, to an increased rate of transposition of the yeast Ty element. To further delineate the role of protein ubiquitination in the control of spontaneous mutagenesis in yeast, we have characterized 202 mutations that arose spontaneously in the SUP4-o gene carried on a centromere vector in a RAD6 deletion strain. The resulting mutational spectrum was compared to that for 354 spontaneous SUP4-o mutations isolated in the isogenic wild-type parent. This comparison revealed that the rad6 mutator enhanced the rate of single base-pair substitution, as well as Ty insertion, but did not affect the rates of the other mutational classes detected. Relative to the wild-type parent, Ty inserted at considerably more SUP4-o positions in the rad6 strain with a significantly smaller fraction detected at a transposition hotspot. These findings suggest that, in addition to the rate of transposition, protein ubiquitination might influence the target site specificity of Ty insertion. The increase in the substitution rate accounted for approximately 90% of the rad6 mutator effect but only the two transitions and the G.C -> T.A transversion were enhanced. Analysis of the distribution of these events within SUP4-o suggested that the site specificity of the substitutions was influenced by DNA sequence context. Transformation of heteroduplex plasmid DNAs into the two strains demonstrated that the rad6 mutator did not reduce the efficiency of correcting mismatches that could give rise to the transitions or transversion nor did it bias restoration of the mismatches to the incorrect base-pairs. These results are discussed in relation to possible mechanisms that might link ubiquitination of proteins to spontaneous mutation rates. PMID:1311695

  2. IDH1 R132H Mutation Enhances Cell Migration by Activating AKT-mTOR Signaling Pathway, but Sensitizes Cells to 5-FU Treatment as NADPH and GSH Are Reduced

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Jiangdong; Huang, Keting; Wu, Mindan; Xia, Chunlin

    2017-01-01

    Aim of study Mutations of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1 and IDH2) gene were recently discovered in vast majority of World Health Organization (WHO) grade II/III gliomas. This study is to understand the effects of IDH1 R132H mutation in gliomagenesis and to develop new strategies to treat glioma with IDH1 R132H mutation. Materials and methods Over expression of IDH1 R132H in U87MG cells was done by transfecting cells with IDH1 R132H plasmid. MTT assay, scratch repair assay and western blot were performed to study effects of IDH1 R132H mutation on cell proliferation, migration, regulating AKT-mTOR signaling pathway and cell death respectively. NADP+/NADPH and GSH quantification assays were performed to evaluate effects of IDH1 R132H mutation on the production of antioxidant NADPH and GSH. Results We found that over expression of IDH1 R132H mutation decreased cell proliferation consistent with previous reports; however, it increased cell migration and enhanced AKT-mTOR signaling pathway activation. Mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) 1 also change the function of the enzymes and cause them to produce 2-hydroxyglutarate and not produce NADPH. We tested the level of NADPH and GSH and demonstrated that IDH1 R132H mutant stable cells had significantly low NADPH and GSH level compared to control or IDH1 wild type stable cells. The reduced antioxidants (NADPH and GSH) sensitized U87MG cells with IDH R132H mutant to 5-FU treatment. Conclusion Our study highlights the important role of IHD1 R132H mutant in up- regulating AKT-mTOR signaling pathway and enhancing cell migration. Furthermore, we demonstrate that IDH1 R132H mutation affects cellular redox status and sensitizes gliomas cells with IDH1 R132H mutation to 5FU treatment. PMID:28052098

  3. The G2019S LRRK2 mutation increases myeloid cell chemotactic responses and enhances LRRK2 binding to actin-regulatory proteins.

    PubMed

    Moehle, Mark S; Daher, João Paulo Lima; Hull, Travis D; Boddu, Ravindra; Abdelmotilib, Hisham A; Mobley, James; Kannarkat, George T; Tansey, Malú G; West, Andrew B

    2015-08-01

    The Leucine rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) gene is genetically and biochemically linked to several diseases that involve innate immunity. LRRK2 protein is highly expressed in phagocytic cells of the innate immune system, most notably in myeloid cells capable of mounting potent pro-inflammatory responses. Knockdown of LRRK2 protein in these cells reduces pro-inflammatory responses. However, the effect of LRRK2 pathogenic mutations that cause Parkinson's disease on myeloid cell function is not clear but could provide insight into LRRK2-linked disease. Here, we find that rats expressing G2019S LRRK2 have exaggerated pro-inflammatory responses and subsequent neurodegeneration after lipopolysaccharide injections in the substantia nigra, with a marked increase in the recruitment of CD68 myeloid cells to the site of injection. While G2019S LRRK2 expression did not affect immunological homeostasis, myeloid cells expressing G2019S LRRK2 show enhanced chemotaxis both in vitro in two-chamber assays and in vivo in response to thioglycollate injections in the peritoneum. The G2019S mutation enhanced the association between LRRK2 and actin-regulatory proteins that control chemotaxis. The interaction between G2019S LRRK2 and actin-regulatory proteins can be blocked by LRRK2 kinase inhibitors, although we did not find evidence that LRRK2 phosphorylated these interacting proteins. These results suggest that the primary mechanism of G2019S LRRK2 with respect to myeloid cell function in disease may be related to exaggerated chemotactic responses. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Modified bean seed protein phaseolin did not accumulate stably in transgenic tobacco seeds after methionine enhancement mutations

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The major seed storage protein phaseolin of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is deficient in methionine, an essential amino acid for human and animal health. To improve the nutritional quality of common bean, we designed methionine enhancement of phaseolin based on the three dimensional structure...

  5. Enhanced immunogenicity of CTL antigens through mutation of the CD8 binding MHC class I invariant region.

    PubMed

    Wooldridge, Linda; Lissina, Anna; Vernazza, Jonathan; Gostick, Emma; Laugel, Bruno; Hutchinson, Sarah L; Mirza, Fareed; Dunbar, P Rod; Boulter, Jonathan M; Glick, Meir; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; van den Berg, Hugo A; Price, David A; Sewell, Andrew K

    2007-05-01

    CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) are key determinants of immunity to intracellular pathogens and neoplastic cells. Recognition of specific antigens in the form of peptide-MHC class I complexes (pMHCI) presented on the target cell surface is mediated by T cell receptor (TCR) engagement. The CD8 coreceptor binds to invariant domains of pMHCI and facilitates antigen recognition. Here, we investigate the biological effects of a Q115E substitution in the alpha2 domain of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A*0201 that enhances CD8 binding by approximately 50% without altering TCR/pMHCI interactions. Soluble and cell surface-expressed forms of Q115E HLA-A*0201 exhibit enhanced recognition by CTL without loss of specificity. These CD8-enhanced antigens induce greater CD3 zeta chain phosphorylation in cognate CTL leading to substantial increases in cytokine production, proliferation and priming of naive T cells. This effect provides a fundamental new mechanism with which to enhance cellular immunity to specific T cell antigens.

  6. A mutation in MRH2 kinesin enhances the root hair tip growth defect caused by constitutively activated ROP2 small GTPase in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guohua; Gao, Peng; Zhang, Hua; Huang, Shanjin; Zheng, Zhi-Liang

    2007-10-24

    Root hair tip growth provides a unique model system for the study of plant cell polarity. Transgenic plants expressing constitutively active (CA) forms of ROP (Rho-of-plants) GTPases have been shown to cause the disruption of root hair polarity likely as a result of the alteration of actin filaments (AF) and microtubules (MT) organization. Towards understanding the mechanism by which ROP controls the cytoskeletal organization during root hair tip growth, we have screened for CA-rop2 suppressors or enhancers using CA1-1, a transgenic line that expresses CA-rop2 and shows only mild disruption of tip growth. Here, we report the characterization of a CA-rop2 enhancer (cae1-1 CA1-1) that exhibits bulbous root hairs. The cae1-1 mutation on its own caused a waving and branching root hair phenotype. CAE1 encodes the root hair growth-related, ARM domain-containing kinesin-like protein MRH2 (and thus cae1-1 was renamed to mrh2-3). Cortical MT displayed fragmentation and random orientation in mrh2 root hairs. Consistently, the MT-stabilizing drug taxol could partially rescue the wavy root hair phenotype of mrh2-3, and the MT-depolymerizing drug Oryzalin slightly enhanced the root hair tip growth defect in CA1-1. Interestingly, the addition of the actin-depolymerizing drug Latrunculin B further enhanced the Oryzalin effect. This indicates that the cross-talk of MT and AF organization is important for the mrh2-3 CA1-1 phenotype. Although we did not observe an apparent effect of the MRH2 mutation in AF organization, we found that mrh2-3 root hair growth was more sensitive to Latrunculin B. Moreover, an ARM domain-containing MRH2 fragment could bind to the polymerized actin in vitro. Therefore, our genetic analyses, together with cell biological and pharmacological evidence, suggest that the plant-specific kinesin-related protein MRH2 is an important component that controls MT organization and is likely involved in the ROP2 GTPase-controlled coordination of AF and MT during

  7. Enhanced cytotoxicity of PARP inhibition in mantle cell lymphoma harbouring mutations in both ATM and p53

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Chris T; Kubota, Eiji; Hamill, Jeffrey D; Klimowicz, Alexander; Ye, Ruiqiong; Muzik, Huong; Dean, Michelle; Tu, LiRen; Gilley, David; Magliocco, Anthony M; McKay, Bruce C; Bebb, D Gwyn; Lees-Miller, Susan P

    2012-01-01

    Poly-ADP ribose polymerase (PARP) inhibitors have shown promise in the treatment of human malignancies characterized by deficiencies in the DNA damage repair proteins BRCA1 and BRCA2 and preclinical studies have demonstrated the potential effectiveness of PARP inhibitors in targeting ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM)-deficient tumours. Here, we show that mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) cells deficient in both ATM and p53 are more sensitive to the PARP inhibitor olaparib than cells lacking ATM function alone. In ATM-deficient MCL cells, olaparib induced DNA-PK-dependent phosphorylation and stabilization of p53 as well as expression of p53-responsive cell cycle checkpoint regulators, and inhibition of DNA-PK reduced the toxicity of olaparib in ATM-deficient MCL cells. Thus, both DNA-PK and p53 regulate the response of ATM-deficient MCL cells to olaparib. In addition, small molecule inhibition of both ATM and PARP was cytotoxic in normal human fibroblasts with disruption of p53, implying that the combination of ATM and PARP inhibitors may have utility in targeting p53-deficient malignancies. PMID:22416035

  8. Toward a theory of multilevel evolution: long-term information integration shapes the mutational landscape and enhances evolvability.

    PubMed

    Hogeweg, Paulien

    2012-01-01

    Most of evolutionary theory has abstracted away from how information is coded in the genome and how this information is transformed into traits on which selection takes place. While in the earliest stages of biological evolution, in the RNA world, the mapping from the genotype into function was largely predefined by the physical-chemical properties of the evolving entities (RNA replicators, e.g. from sequence to folded structure and catalytic sites), in present-day organisms, the mapping itself is the result of evolution. I will review results of several in silico evolutionary studies which examine the consequences of evolving the genetic coding, and the ways this information is transformed, while adapting to prevailing environments. Such multilevel evolution leads to long-term information integration. Through genome, network, and dynamical structuring, the occurrence and/or effect of random mutations becomes nonrandom, and facilitates rapid adaptation. This is what does happen in the in silico experiments. Is it also what did happen in biological evolution? I will discuss some data that suggest that it did. In any case, these results provide us with novel search images to tackle the wealth of biological data.

  9. Enhanced disease resistance caused by BRI1 mutation is conserved between Brachypodium distachyon and barley (Hordeum vulgare).

    PubMed

    Goddard, R; Peraldi, A; Ridout, C; Nicholson, P

    2014-10-01

    This study investigated the impact of brassinosteroid (BR)-insensitive 1 (BRI1) mutation, the main receptor of BR in both Brachypodium distachyon and barley, on disease resistance against a range of fungal pathogens of cereals exhibiting different trophic lifestyles. Results presented here show that i) disruption of BRI1 has pleiotropic effects on disease resistance in addition to affecting plant development. BR signaling functions antagonistically with mechanisms of disease resistance that are effective against a broad range of cereal pathogens. ii) Disruption of BRI1 results in increased disease resistance against necrotrophic and hemibiotrophic pathogens that exhibit only a marginal asymptomatic phase but has no effect on biotrophic pathogens or those with a prolonged asymptomatic phase, and iii) disruption of BRI1 has a similar effect on disease resistance in B. distachyon and barley, indicating that defense mechanisms are conserved between these species. This work presents the first evidence for conservation of disease resistance mechanisms between the model species B. distachyon and the cereal crop barley and validates B. distachyon for undertaking model-to-crop translation studies of disease resistance.

  10. Reversal of clavulanate resistance conferred by a Ser-244 mutant of TEM-1 beta-lactamase as a result of a second mutation (Arg to Ser at position 164) that enhances activity against ceftazidime.

    PubMed Central

    Imtiaz, U; Manavathu, E K; Mobashery, S; Lerner, S A

    1994-01-01

    The mutation of Arg-244 to Ser (Arg-244-->Ser mutation) in the TEM-1 beta-lactamase has been shown to produce resistance to inactivation by clavulanate in the mutant enzyme and resistance to ampicillin plus clavulanate in a strain of Escherichia coli producing this enzyme. The Arg-164-->Ser mutation in the TEM-1 beta-lactamase (TEM-12 enzyme) is known to enhance the activity of the enzyme against ceftazidime, resulting in resistance to the drug in a strain producing the mutant enzyme (D. A. Weber, C. C. Sanders, J. S. Bakken, and J. P. Quinn, J. Infect. Dis. 162:460-465, 1990). The doubly mutated derivative of the TEM-1 enzyme (Ser-164/Ser-244) retains the characteristics of the Ser-164 mutant enzyme, i.e., enhanced activity against ceftazidime and sensitivity to inactivation by clavulanate. It also confers the same phenotype as the Ser-164 mutant enzyme, i.e., resistance to ceftazidime and ampicillin, with reversal of this resistance in the presence of clavulanate. Thus, the Arg-164-->Ser mutation in the TEM-1 beta-lactamase suppresses the effect of the Arg-244-->Ser mutation which, by itself, reduces the sensitivity of the enzyme to inactivation by clavulanate. PMID:8067751

  11. A desmoplakin point mutation with enhanced keratin association ameliorates pemphigus vulgaris autoantibody-mediated loss of cell cohesion.

    PubMed

    Dehner, Carina; Rötzer, Vera; Waschke, Jens; Spindler, Volker

    2014-09-01

    Desmoplakin (DP) serves to anchor intermediate filaments in desmosomal complexes. Recent data suggest that a specific DP point mutation (S2849G) exhibits increased keratin filament association and fosters Ca(2+) insensitivity of desmosomes in keratinocytes, presumably by rendering DP inaccessible for protein kinase C (PKC) phosphorylation. Previously, we have reported that depletion of the desmosomal adhesion molecule desmoglein (Dsg)3 induced by autoantibodies from patients with the blistering skin disease pemphigus vulgaris (PV) IgG is reduced in maturated desmosomes and dependent on PKC signaling. We investigated the role of DP-S2849G for loss of cell cohesion mediated by PV-IgG. In cell dissociation assays, expression of green fluorescent protein-tagged DP-S2849G (DP-S2849G-GFP) increased cell cohesion in two different human keratinocyte cell lines and ameliorated loss of cell adhesion induced by pemphigus autoantibodies. Depletion of Dsg3 was inhibited by DP-S2849G-GFP in the cytoskeletal (Triton X-100 insoluble) fraction, and keratin filament retraction, a hallmark of PV, was efficiently blocked similar to treatment with the PKC inhibitor Bim-X. We found that DP is phosphorylated after incubation with PV-IgG in a PKC-dependent manner and that DP-S2849G-GFP expression prevents DP phosphorylation and increases association of PKC-α with PKC scaffold receptor for activated C-kinase 1. Taken together, our data indicate that DP phosphorylation at S2849 represents an important mechanism in pemphigus pathogenesis, which, by reversing Ca(2+) insensitivity, promotes Dsg3 depletion. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. OsCESA9 conserved-site mutation leads to largely enhanced plant lodging resistance and biomass enzymatic saccharification by reducing cellulose DP and crystallinity in rice

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Fengcheng; Xie, Guosheng; Huang, Jiangfeng; ...

    2017-03-15

    Genetic modification of plant cell walls has been posed to reduce lignocellulose recalcitrance for enhancing biomass saccharification. Several dozen CESA mutants have been reported since cellulose synthase (CESA) gene was first identified, but almost all mutants exhibit the defective phenotypes in plant growth and development. Here, the rice (Oryza sativa) Osfc16 mutant with substitutions (W481C, P482S) at P-CR conserved site in CESA9 shows a slightly affected plant growth and higher biomass yield by 25%–41% compared with wild type (Nipponbare, a japonica variety). Chemical and ultrastructural analyses indicate that Osfc16 has a significantly reduced cellulose crystallinity (CrI) and thinner secondary cellmore » walls compared with wild type. CESA co-IP detection, together with implementations of a proteasome inhibitor (MG132) and two distinct cellulose inhibitors (Calcofluor, CGA), shows that CESA9 mutation could affect integrity of CESA4/7/9 complexes, which may lead to rapid CESA proteasome degradation for low-DP cellulose biosynthesis. These may reduce cellulose CrI, which improves plant lodging resistance, a major and integrated agronomic trait on plant growth and grain production, and enhances biomass enzymatic saccharification by up to 2.3-fold and ethanol productivity by 34%–42%. Our study has for the first time reported a direct modification for the low-DP cellulose production that has broad applications in biomass industries.« less

  13. A mutation in the GTP hydrolysis site of Arabidopsis dynamin-related protein 1E confers enhanced cell death in response to powdery mildew infection.

    PubMed

    Tang, Dingzhong; Ade, Jules; Frye, Catherine A; Innes, Roger W

    2006-07-01

    We screened for mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana that displayed enhanced disease resistance to the powdery mildew pathogen Erysiphe cichoracearum and identified the edr3 mutant, which formed large gray lesions upon infection with E. cichoracearum and supported very little sporulation. The edr3-mediated disease resistance and cell death phenotypes were dependent on salicylic acid signaling, but independent of ethylene and jasmonic acid signaling. In addition, edr3 plants displayed enhanced susceptibility to the necrotrophic fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea, but showed normal responses to virulent and avirulent strains of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato. The EDR3 gene was isolated by positional cloning and found to encode Arabidopsis dynamin-related protein 1E (DRP1E). The edr3 mutation caused an amino acid substitution in the GTPase domain of DRP1E (proline 77 to leucine) that is predicted to block GTP hydrolysis, but not GTP binding. A T-DNA insertion allele in DRP1E did not cause powdery mildew-induced lesions, suggesting that this phenotype is caused by DRP1E being locked in the GTP-bound state, rather than by a loss of DRP1E activity. Analysis of DRP1E-green fluorescent protein fusion proteins revealed that DRP1E is at least partially localized to mitochondria. These observations suggest a mechanistic link between salicylic acid signaling, mitochondria and programmed cell death in plants.

  14. Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated kinase-mediated upregulation of NKG2D ligands on leukemia cells by resveratrol results in enhanced natural killer cell susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Luis Espinoza, J; Takami, Akiyoshi; Trung, Ly Q; Nakao, Shinji

    2013-06-01

    The powerful activating receptor NKG2D is expressed by natural killer (NK) cells and promotes cytotoxic lysis of cancer cells expressing NKG2D ligands (NKG2D-Ls). We report the effective induction of NKG2D-Ls, achieved with the naturally occurring polyphenol resveratrol, in a broad range of leukemia cells. In this study, resveratrol upregulated the NKG2D-Ls MHC class I chain-related proteins MICA and MICB, and UL16-binding proteins ULBP1, ULBP2, and ULBP3 in most of the leukemia cells analyzed. Ligand upregulation induced by resveratrol was impaired by pharmacological and genetic disruption of ataxia-telangiectasia mutated kinase, the main regulator of NKG2D-L expression. Leukemia cells treated with resveratrol were more susceptible to killing by NK cells than untreated cells, and the enhanced cytotoxicity of NK cells was blocked by treatment of NK cells with anti-NKG2D mAbs. Interestingly, resveratrol consistently upregulated the NKG2D receptor expression and enhanced NKG2D-mediated functions in resting NK cells obtained from healthy individuals. Therefore, resveratrol has attractive immunotherapeutic potential.

  15. Hairpin DNA-assisted silicon/silver-based surface-enhanced Raman scattering sensing platform for ultrahighly sensitive and specific discrimination of deafness mutations in a real system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Jiang, Xiangxu; Wang, Xing; Wei, Xinpan; Zhu, Ying; Sun, Bin; Su, Yuanyuan; He, Sudan; He, Yao

    2014-08-05

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is well-recognized as a powerful analytical tool for ultrahighly sensitive detection of analytes. In this article, we present a kind of silicon-based SERS sensing platform made of a hairpin DNA-modified silver nanoparticles decorated silicon wafer (AgNPs@Si). In particular, the AgNPs@Si with a high enhancement factor (EF) value of ~4.5 × 10(7) is first achieved under optimum reaction conditions (i.e., pH = 12, reaction time = 20 min) based on systematic investigation. Such resultant AgNPs@Si is then employed for construction of a silicon-based SERS sensing platform through surface modification of hairpin DNA, which is superbly suitable for highly reproducible, multiplexed, and ultrasensitive DNA detection. A detection limit of 1 fM is readily achieved in a very reproducible manner along with high specificity. Most significantly, for the first time, we demonstrate that the silicon-based SERS platform is highly efficacious for discriminating deafness-causing mutations in a real system at the femtomolar level (500 fM), which is about 3-4 orders of magnitude lower than that (~5 nM) ever reported by conventional detection methods. Our results raise the exciting potential of practical SERS applications in biology and biomedicine.

  16. Mutation of neutralizing/antibody-dependent enhancing epitope on spike protein and 7b gene of feline infectious peritonitis virus: influences of viral replication in monocytes/macrophages and virulence in cats.

    PubMed

    Takano, Tomomi; Tomiyama, Yoshika; Katoh, Yasuichiroh; Nakamura, Michiyo; Satoh, Ryoichi; Hohdatsu, Tsutomu

    2011-03-01

    We previously prepared neutralizing monoclonal antibody (MAb)-resistant (mar) mutant viruses using a laboratory strain feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV) 79-1146 (Kida et al., 1999). Mar mutant viruses are mutated several amino acids of the neutralizing epitope of Spike protein, compared with the parent strain, FIPV 79-1146. We clarified that MAb used to prepare mar mutant viruses also lost its activity to enhance homologous mar mutant viruses, strongly suggesting that neutralizing and antibody-dependent enhancing epitopes are present in the same region in the strain FIPV 79-1146. We also discovered that amino acid mutation in the neutralizing epitope reduced viral replication in monocytes/macrophages. We also demonstrated that the mutation or deletion of two nucleotides in 7b gene abrogate the virulence of strain FIPV 79-1146.

  17. I223R Mutation in Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 Neuraminidase Confers Reduced Susceptibility to Oseltamivir and Zanamivir and Enhanced Resistance with H275Y

    PubMed Central

    Abou-Jaoudé, Georges; Scemla, Anne; Ribaud, Patricia; Mercier-Delarue, Séverine; Caro, Valérie; Enouf, Vincent; Simon, François; Molina, Jean-Michel; van der Werf, Sylvie

    2012-01-01

    Background Resistance of pandemic A(H1N1)2009 (H1N1pdm09) virus to neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs) has remained limited. A new mutation I223R in the neuraminidase (NA) of H1N1pdm09 virus has been reported along with H275Y in immunocompromised patients. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of I223R on oseltamivir and zanamivir susceptibility. Methods The NA enzymatic characteristics and susceptibility to NAIs of viruses harbouring the mutations I223R and H275Y alone or in combination were analyzed on viruses produced by reverse genetics and on clinical isolates collected from an immunocompromised patient with sustained influenza H1N1pdm09 virus shedding and treated by oseltamivir (days 0–15) and zanamivir (days 15–25 and 70–80). Results Compared with the wild type, the NA of recombinant viruses and clinical isolates with H275Y or I223R mutations had about two-fold reduced affinity for the substrate. The H275Y and I223R isolates showed decreased susceptibility to oseltamivir (246-fold) and oseltamivir and zanamivir (8.9- and 4.9-fold), respectively. Reverse genetics assays confirmed these results and further showed that the double mutation H275Y and I223R conferred enhanced levels of resistance to oseltamivir and zanamivir (6195- and 15.2-fold). In the patient, six days after initiation of oseltamivir therapy, the mutation H275Y conferring oseltamivir resistance and the I223R mutation were detected in the NA. Mutations were detected concomitantly from day 6–69 but molecular cloning did not show any variant harbouring both mutations. Despite cessation of NAI treatment, the mutation I223R persisted along with additional mutations in the NA and the hemagglutinin. Conclusions Reduced susceptibility to both oseltamivir and zanamivir was conferred by the I223R mutation which potentiated resistance to both NAIs when associated with the H275Y mutation in the NA. Concomitant emergence of the I223R and H275Y mutations under oseltamivir treatment underlines

  18. MiR-26a enhances the radiosensitivity of glioblastoma multiforme cells through targeting of ataxia–telangiectasia mutated

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Pin; Lan, Jin; Ge, Jianwei; Nie, Quanmin; Guo, Liemei; Qiu, Yongming; Mao, Qing

    2014-01-15

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is notoriously resistant to radiation, and consequently, new radiosensitizers are urgently needed. MicroRNAs are a class of endogenous gene modulators with emerging roles in DNA repair. We found that overexpression of miR-26a can enhance radiosensitivity and reduce the DNA repair ability of U87 cells. However, knockdown miR-26a in U87 cells could act the converse manner. Mechanistically, this effect is mediated by direct targeting of miR-26a to the 3′UTR of ATM, which leads to reduced ATM levels and consequent inhibition of the homologous recombination repair pathway. These results suggest that miR-26a may act as a new radiosensitizer of GBM. - Highlights: ●miR-26a directly target ATM in GBM cells. ●miR-26a enhances the radiosensitivity of GBM cells. ●miR-26a could reduce the DNA repair capacity of GBM cells.

  19. Mutations in chicory FEH genes are statistically associated with enhanced resistance to post-harvest inulin depolymerization.

    PubMed

    Dauchot, Nicolas; Raulier, Pierre; Maudoux, Olivier; Notté, Christine; Bertin, Pierre; Draye, Xavier; Van Cutsem, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Nucleotidic polymorphisms were identified in fructan exohydrolases genes which are statistically associated with enhanced susceptibility to post-harvest inulin depolymerization. Industrial chicory (Cichorium intybus L.) root is the main commercial source of inulin, a linear fructose polymer used as dietary fiber. Post-harvest, inulin is depolymerized into fructose which drastically increases processing cost. To identify genetic variations associated with enhanced susceptibility to post-harvest inulin depolymerization and related free sugars content increase, we used a candidate-gene approach focused on inulin and sucrose synthesis and degradation genes, all members of the family 32 of glycoside hydrolases (GH32). Polymorphism in these genes was first investigated by carrying out EcoTILLING on two groups of chicory breeding lines exhibiting contrasted response to post-harvest inulin depolymerization. This allowed the identification of polymorphisms significantly associated with depolymerization in three fructan exohydrolase genes (FEH). This association was confirmed on a wider panel of 116 unrelated families in which the FEH polymorphism explained 35 % of the post-harvest variance for inulin content, 36 % of variance for sucrose content, 18 % for inulin degree of polymerization, 23 % for free fructose content and 22 % for free glucose content. These polymorphisms were associated with significant post-harvest changes of inulin content, inulin chain length and free sugars content.

  20. A Restrictive Cardiomyopathy Mutation in an Invariant Proline at the Myosin Head/Rod Junction Enhances Head Flexibility and Function, Yielding Muscle Defects in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Achal, Madhulika; Trujillo, Adriana S; Melkani, Girish C; Farman, Gerrie P; Ocorr, Karen; Viswanathan, Meera C; Kaushik, Gaurav; Newhard, Christopher S; Glasheen, Bernadette M; Melkani, Anju; Suggs, Jennifer A; Moore, Jeffrey R; Swank, Douglas M; Bodmer, Rolf; Cammarato, Anthony; Bernstein, Sanford I

    2016-06-05

    An "invariant proline" separates the myosin S1 head from its S2 tail and is proposed to be critical for orienting S1 during its interaction with actin, a process that leads to muscle contraction. Mutation of the invariant proline to leucine (P838L) caused dominant restrictive cardiomyopathy in a pediatric patient (Karam et al., Congenit. Heart Dis. 3:138-43, 2008). Here, we use Drosophila melanogaster to model this mutation and dissect its effects on the biochemical and biophysical properties of myosin, as well as on the structure and physiology of skeletal and cardiac muscles. P838L mutant myosin isolated from indirect flight muscles of transgenic Drosophila showed elevated ATPase and actin sliding velocity in vitro. Furthermore, the mutant heads exhibited increased rotational flexibility, and there was an increase in the average angle between the two heads. Indirect flight muscle myofibril assembly was minimally affected in mutant homozygotes, and isolated fibers displayed normal mechanical properties. However, myofibrils degraded during aging, correlating with reduced flight abilities. In contrast, hearts from homozygotes and heterozygotes showed normal morphology, myofibrillar arrays, and contractile parameters. When P838L was placed in trans to Mhc(5), an allele known to cause cardiac restriction in flies, it did not yield the constricted phenotype. Overall, our studies suggest that increased rotational flexibility of myosin S1 enhances myosin ATPase and actin sliding. Moreover, instability of P838L myofibrils leads to decreased function during aging of Drosophila skeletal muscle, but not cardiac muscle, despite the strong evolutionary conservation of the P838 residue. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Increased polyamine biosynthesis enhances stress tolerance by preventing the accumulation of reactive oxygen species: T-DNA mutational analysis of Oryza sativa lysine decarboxylase-like protein 1.

    PubMed

    Jang, Su Jin; Wi, Soo Jin; Choi, Yoo Jin; An, Gynheung; Park, Ky Young

    2012-09-01

    A highly oxidative stress-tolerant japonica rice line was isolated by T-DNA insertion mutation followed by screening in the presence of 50 mM H(2)O(2). The T-DNA insertion was mapped to locus Os09g0547500, the gene product of which was annotated as lysine decarboxylase-like protein (GenBank accession No. AK062595). We termed this gene OsLDC-like 1, for Oryza sativa lysine decarboxylase-like 1. The insertion site was in the second exon and resulted in a 27 amino acid N-terminal deletion. Despite this defect in OsLDC-like 1, the mutant line exhibited enhanced accumulation of the polyamines (PAs) putrescine, spermidine, and spermine under conditions of oxidative stress. The generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the mutant line was assessed by qRT-PCR analysis of NADPH oxidase (RbohD and RbohF), and by DCFH-DA staining. Cellular levels of ROS in osldc-like 1 leaves were significantly lower than those in the wild-type (WT) rice after exposure to oxidative, high salt and acid stresses. Exogenously-applied PAs such as spermidine and spermine significantly inhibited the stress-induced accumulation of ROS and cell damage in WT leaves. Additionally, the activities of ROS-detoxifying enzymes were increased in the homozygous mutant line in the presence or absence of H(2)O(2). Thus, mutation of OsLDC-like 1 conferred an oxidative stress-tolerant phenotype. These results suggest that increased cellular PA levels have a physiological role in preventing stress-induced ROS and ethylene accumulation and the resultant cell damage.

  2. CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha (CEBPA) polymorphisms and mutations in healthy individuals and in patients with peripheral artery disease, ischaemic heart disease and hyperlipidaemia.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, O; Kostecka, A; Provazníková, D; Krásná, B; Kotlín, R; Stanková, M; Kobylka, P; Dostálová, G; Zeman, M; Chochola, M

    2010-01-01

    The CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein alpha, encoded by the intronless CEBPA gene, is a transcription factor that induces expression of genes involved in differentiation of granulocytes, monocytes, adipocytes and hepatocytes. Both mono- and bi-allelic CEBPA mutations were detected in acute myeloid leukaemia and myelodysplastic syndrome. In this study we also identified CEBPA mutations in healthy individuals and in patients with peripheral artery disease, ischaemic heart disease and hyperlipidaemia. We found 16 various deletions with the presence of two direct repeats in CEBPA by analysis of 431 individuals. Three most frequent repeats included in these deletions in CEBPA gene are CGCGAG (493- 498_865-870), GG (486-487_885-886), and GCCAAGCAGC (508-517_907-916), all according to GenBank Accession No. NM_004364.2. In one case we identified that a father with ischaemic heart disease and his healthy son had two identical deletions (493_864del and 508_906del, both according to GenBank Accession No. NM_004364.2) in CEBPA. The occurrence of deletions between two repetitive sequences may be caused by recombination events in the repair process. A double-stranded cut in DNA may initiate these recombination events in adjacent DNA sequences. Four types of polymorphisms in the CEBPA gene were also detected in the screened individuals. Polymorphism in CEBPA gene 690 G>T according to GenBank Accession No. NM_004364.2 is the most frequent type in our analysis. Statistical analysis did not find significant differences in the frequency of polymorphisms in CEBPA in patients and in healthy individuals with the exception of P4 polymorphism (580_585dup according to GenBank Accesion No. NM_004364.2). P4 polymorphism was significantly increased in ischaemic heart disease patients.

  3. Mutations Derived from the Thermophilic Polyhydroxyalkanoate Synthase PhaC Enhance the Thermostability and Activity of PhaC from Cupriavidus necator H16

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wen-Ming; Lai, Yung-Wei; Chang, Rey-Chang

    2012-01-01

    The thermophile Cupriavidus sp. strain S-6 accumulated polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) from glucose at 50°C. A 9.0-kbp EcoRI fragment cloned from the genomic DNA of Cupriavidus sp. S-6 enabled Escherichia coli XL1-Blue to synthesize PHB at 45°C. Nucleotide sequence analysis showed a pha locus in the clone. The thermophilic polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthase (PhaCCsp) shared 81% identity with mesophilic PhaC of Cupriavidus necator H16. The diversity between these two strains was found dominantly on their N and C termini, while the middle regions were highly homologous (92% identity). We constructed four chimeras of mesophilic and thermophilic phaC genes to explore the mutations related to its thermostability. Among the chimeras, only PhaCH16β, which was PhaCH16 bearing 30 point mutations derived from the middle region of PhaCCsp, accumulated a high content of PHB (65% [dry weight]) at 45°C. The chimera phaCH16β and two parental PHA synthase genes were overexpressed in E. coli BLR(DE3) cells and purified. At 30°C, the specific activity of the chimera PhaCH16β (172 ± 17.8 U/mg) was 3.45-fold higher than that of the parental enzyme PhaCH16 (50 ± 5.2 U/mg). At 45°C, the half-life of the chimera PhaCH16β (11.2 h) was 127-fold longer than that of PhaCH16 (5.3 min). Furthermore, the chimera PhaCH16β accumulated 1.55-fold (59% [dry weight]) more PHA content than the parental enzyme PhaCH16 (38% [dry weight]) at 37°C. This study reveals a limited number of point mutations which enhance not only thermostability but also PhaCH16 activity. The highly thermostable and active PHA synthase will provide advantages for its promising applications to in vitro PHA synthesis and recombinant E. coli PHA fermentation. PMID:22408158

  4. Mutations derived from the thermophilic polyhydroxyalkanoate synthase PhaC enhance the thermostability and activity of PhaC from Cupriavidus necator H16.

    PubMed

    Sheu, Der-Shyan; Chen, Wen-Ming; Lai, Yung-Wei; Chang, Rey-Chang

    2012-05-01

    The thermophile Cupriavidus sp. strain S-6 accumulated polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) from glucose at 50°C. A 9.0-kbp EcoRI fragment cloned from the genomic DNA of Cupriavidus sp. S-6 enabled Escherichia coli XL1-Blue to synthesize PHB at 45°C. Nucleotide sequence analysis showed a pha locus in the clone. The thermophilic polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthase (PhaC(Csp)) shared 81% identity with mesophilic PhaC of Cupriavidus necator H16. The diversity between these two strains was found dominantly on their N and C termini, while the middle regions were highly homologous (92% identity). We constructed four chimeras of mesophilic and thermophilic phaC genes to explore the mutations related to its thermostability. Among the chimeras, only PhaC(H16β), which was PhaC(H16) bearing 30 point mutations derived from the middle region of PhaC(Csp), accumulated a high content of PHB (65% [dry weight]) at 45°C. The chimera phaC(H16)(β) and two parental PHA synthase genes were overexpressed in E. coli BLR(DE3) cells and purified. At 30°C, the specific activity of the chimera PhaC(H16β) (172 ± 17.8 U/mg) was 3.45-fold higher than that of the parental enzyme PhaC(H16) (50 ± 5.2 U/mg). At 45°C, the half-life of the chimera PhaC(H16β) (11.2 h) was 127-fold longer than that of PhaC(H16) (5.3 min). Furthermore, the chimera PhaC(H16β) accumulated 1.55-fold (59% [dry weight]) more PHA content than the parental enzyme PhaC(H16) (38% [dry weight]) at 37°C. This study reveals a limited number of point mutations which enhance not only thermostability but also PhaC(H16) activity. The highly thermostable and active PHA synthase will provide advantages for its promising applications to in vitro PHA synthesis and recombinant E. coli PHA fermentation.

  5. Disruption of the splicing enhancer sequence within exon 27 of the dystrophin gene by a nonsense mutation induces partial skipping of the exon and is responsible for Becker muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Shiga, N; Takeshima, Y; Sakamoto, H; Inoue, K; Yokota, Y; Yokoyama, M; Matsuo, M

    1997-01-01

    The mechanism of exon skipping induced by nonsense mutations has not been well elucidated. We now report results of in vitro splicing studies which disclosed that a particular example of exon skipping is due to disruption of a splicing enhancer sequence located within the exon. A nonsense mutation (E1211X) due to a G to T transversion at the 28th nucleotide of exon 27 (G3839T) was identified in the dystrophin gene of a Japanese Becker muscular dystrophy case. Partial skipping of the exon resulted in the production of truncated dystrophin mRNA, although the consensus sequences for splicing at both ends of exon 27 were unaltered. To determine how E1211X induced exon 27 skipping, the splicing enhancer activity of purine-rich region within exon 27 was examined in an in vitro splicing system using chimeric doublesex gene pre-mRNA. The mutant sequence containing G3839T abolished splicing enhancer activity of the wild-type purine-rich sequence for the upstream intron in this chimeric pre-mRNA. An artificial polypurine oligonucleotide mimicking the purine-rich sequence of exon 27 also showed enhancer activity that was suppressed by the introduction of a T nucleotide. Furthermore, the splicing enhancer activity was more markedly inhibited when a nonsense codon was created by the inserted T residue. This is the first evidence that partial skipping of an exon harboring a nonsense mutation is due to disruption of a splicing enhancer sequence. PMID:9410897

  6. Mutations of Asp540 and the domain-connecting residues synergistically enhance Pyrococcus furiosus DNA ligase activity.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Maiko; Ishino, Sonoko; Ishino, Yoshizumi; Nishida, Hirokazu

    2014-01-21

    The structure of Pyrococcus furiosus DNA ligase (PfuLig), which architecturally resembles human DNA ligase I (hLigI), revealed that the C-terminal helix stabilizes the closed conformation through several ionic interactions between two domains (adenylylation domain (AdD) and C-terminal OB-fold domain (OBD)). This helix is oriented differently in DNA-bound hLigI, suggesting that the disruption of its interactions with AdD facilitates DNA binding. Previously, we demonstrated that the replacement of Asp540 with arginine improves the ligation activity. Here we report that the combination of the Asp540-replacement and the elimination of ionic residues in the helix, forming interactions with AdD, effectively enhanced the activity.

  7. An Arabidopsis soil-salinity-tolerance mutation confers ethylene-mediated enhancement of sodium/potassium homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Caifu; Belfield, Eric J; Cao, Yi; Smith, J Andrew C; Harberd, Nicholas P

    2013-09-01

    High soil Na concentrations damage plants by increasing cellular Na accumulation and K loss. Excess soil Na stimulates ethylene-induced soil-salinity tolerance, the mechanism of which we here define via characterization of an Arabidopsis thaliana mutant displaying transpiration-dependent soil-salinity tolerance. This phenotype is conferred by a loss-of-function allele of ethylene overproducer1 (ETO1; mutant alleles of which cause increased production of ethylene). We show that lack of ETO1 function confers soil-salinity tolerance through improved shoot Na/K homeostasis, effected via the ethylene resistant1-constitutive triple response1 ethylene signaling pathway. Under transpiring conditions, lack of ETO1 function reduces root Na influx and both stelar and xylem sap Na concentrations, thereby restricting root-to-shoot delivery of Na. These effects are associated with increased accumulation of respiratory burst oxidase homolog F (RBOHF)-dependent reactive oxygen species in the root stele. Additionally, lack of ETO1 function leads to significant enhancement of tissue K status by an RBOHF-independent mechanism associated with elevated high-affinity K(+) TRANSPORTER5 transcript levels. We conclude that ethylene promotes soil-salinity tolerance via improved Na/K homeostasis mediated by RBOHF-dependent regulation of Na accumulation and RBOHF-independent regulation of K accumulation.

  8. Impaired cell envelope resulting from arcA mutation largely accounts for enhanced sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide in Shewanella oneidensis

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Fen; Mao, Yinting; Dong, Yangyang; Ju, Lili; Wu, Genfu; Gao, Haichun

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is one of the major challenges that Shewanella encounter routinely because they thrive in redox-stratified environments prone to reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, letting alone that ROS can be generated endogenously. As respiration is the predominant process for endogenous ROS, regulators mediating respiration have been demonstrated and/or implicated to play a role in oxidative stress response. In our efforts to unveil the involvement of global regulators for respiration in the oxidative stress response, we found that loss of the Arc system increases S. oneidensis sensitivity to H2O2 whereas neither Fnr nor Crp has a significant role. A comparison of transcriptomic profiles of the wild-type and its isogenic arcA mutant revealed that the OxyR regulon is independent of the Arc system. We then provided evidence that the enhanced H2O2 sensitivity of the arcA mutant is due to an increased H2O2 uptake rate, a result of a cell envelope defect. Although one of three proteases of the ArcA regulon when in excess is partially accountable for the envelope defect, the major contributors remain elusive. Overall, our data indicate that the Arc system influences the bacterial cell envelope biosynthesis, a physiological aspect that has not been associated with the regulator before. PMID:25975178

  9. An Arabidopsis Soil-Salinity–Tolerance Mutation Confers Ethylene-Mediated Enhancement of Sodium/Potassium Homeostasis[W

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Caifu; Belfield, Eric J.; Cao, Yi; Smith, J. Andrew C.; Harberd, Nicholas P.

    2013-01-01

    High soil Na concentrations damage plants by increasing cellular Na accumulation and K loss. Excess soil Na stimulates ethylene-induced soil-salinity tolerance, the mechanism of which we here define via characterization of an Arabidopsis thaliana mutant displaying transpiration-dependent soil-salinity tolerance. This phenotype is conferred by a loss-of-function allele of ETHYLENE OVERPRODUCER1 (ETO1; mutant alleles of which cause increased production of ethylene). We show that lack of ETO1 function confers soil-salinity tolerance through improved shoot Na/K homeostasis, effected via the ETHYLENE RESISTANT1–CONSTITUTIVE TRIPLE RESPONSE1 ethylene signaling pathway. Under transpiring conditions, lack of ETO1 function reduces root Na influx and both stelar and xylem sap Na concentrations, thereby restricting root-to-shoot delivery of Na. These effects are associated with increased accumulation of RESPIRATORY BURST OXIDASE HOMOLOG F (RBOHF)–dependent reactive oxygen species in the root stele. Additionally, lack of ETO1 function leads to significant enhancement of tissue K status by an RBOHF-independent mechanism associated with elevated HIGH-AFFINITY K+ TRANSPORTER5 transcript levels. We conclude that ethylene promotes soil-salinity tolerance via improved Na/K homeostasis mediated by RBOHF-dependent regulation of Na accumulation and RBOHF-independent regulation of K accumulation. PMID:24064768

  10. The von Hippel-Lindau Chuvash mutation in mice causes carotid-body hyperplasia and enhanced ventilatory sensitivity to hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Slingo, Mary E; Turner, Philip J; Christian, Helen C; Buckler, Keith J; Robbins, Peter A

    2014-04-01

    The hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) family of transcription factors coordinates diverse cellular and systemic responses to hypoxia. Chuvash polycythemia (CP) is an autosomal recessive disorder in humans in which there is impaired oxygen-dependent degradation of HIF, resulting in long-term systemic elevation of HIF levels at normal oxygen tensions. CP patients demonstrate the characteristic features of ventilatory acclimatization to hypoxia, namely, an elevated baseline ventilation and enhanced acute hypoxic ventilatory response (AHVR). We investigated the ventilatory and carotid-body phenotype of a mouse model of CP, using whole-body plethysmography, immunohistochemistry, and electron microscopy. In keeping with studies in humans, CP mice had elevated ventilation in euoxia and a significantly exaggerated AHVR when exposed to 10% oxygen, with or without the addition of 3% carbon dioxide. Carotid-body immunohistochemistry demonstrated marked hyperplasia of the oxygen-sensing type I cells, and the cells themselves appeared enlarged with more prominent nuclei. This hypertrophy was confirmed by electron microscopy, which also revealed that the type I cells contained an increased number of mitochondria, enlarged dense-cored vesicles, and markedly expanded rough endoplasmic reticulum. The morphological and ultrastructural changes seen in the CP mouse carotid body are strikingly similar to those observed in animals exposed to chronic hypoxia. Our study demonstrates that the HIF pathway plays a major role, not only in regulating both euoxic ventilatory control and the sensitivity of the response to hypoxia, but also in determining the morphology of the carotid body.

  11. The von Hippel-Lindau Chuvash mutation in mice causes carotid-body hyperplasia and enhanced ventilatory sensitivity to hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Slingo, Mary E.; Turner, Philip J.; Christian, Helen C.; Buckler, Keith J.

    2013-01-01

    The hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) family of transcription factors coordinates diverse cellular and systemic responses to hypoxia. Chuvash polycythemia (CP) is an autosomal recessive disorder in humans in which there is impaired oxygen-dependent degradation of HIF, resulting in long-term systemic elevation of HIF levels at normal oxygen tensions. CP patients demonstrate the characteristic features of ventilatory acclimatization to hypoxia, namely, an elevated baseline ventilation and enhanced acute hypoxic ventilatory response (AHVR). We investigated the ventilatory and carotid-body phenotype of a mouse model of CP, using whole-body plethysmography, immunohistochemistry, and electron microscopy. In keeping with studies in humans, CP mice had elevated ventilation in euoxia and a significantly exaggerated AHVR when exposed to 10% oxygen, with or without the addition of 3% carbon dioxide. Carotid-body immunohistochemistry demonstrated marked hyperplasia of the oxygen-sensing type I cells, and the cells themselves appeared enlarged with more prominent nuclei. This hypertrophy was confirmed by electron microscopy, which also revealed that the type I cells contained an increased number of mitochondria, enlarged dense-cored vesicles, and markedly expanded rough endoplasmic reticulum. The morphological and ultrastructural changes seen in the CP mouse carotid body are strikingly similar to those observed in animals exposed to chronic hypoxia. Our study demonstrates that the HIF pathway plays a major role, not only in regulating both euoxic ventilatory control and the sensitivity of the response to hypoxia, but also in determining the morphology of the carotid body. PMID:24030664

  12. Aucklandia lappa DC. extract enhances gefitinib efficacy in gefitinib-resistance secondary epidermal growth factor receptor mutations.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guan; Tong, Yanli; He, Qidi; Wang, Jie; Chen, Zuanguang

    2017-07-12

    Aucklandia lappa DC. is a widely used medicinal plant in China, India and Pakistan for a long time. Previously, a number of different pharmacological experiments in vitro and in vivo have convincingly demonstrated the abilities of it to exhibit anticancer activities. Reynoutria japonica Houtt. has also been widely used as traditional Chinese medicinal plant. Previous studies have demonstrated that it is bioactive to exhibit anticancer activities. This study aims to investigate whether the extracts of Aucklandia lappa DC. and Reynoutria japonica Houtt. are capable of treating drug-resistant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), providing support for novel usage beyond traditional uses. Extracts combined with gefitinib have been tested taking the vulval development of transgenic C. elegans (jgIs25) as an effective and simple in vivo model system, evaluating their efficacy against acquired NSCLC. Synchronous larval 1 (L1) larvae were treated with extracts plus gefitinib and cultured to obtain mainly L4 larvae. The multivulva (Muv) phenotype was recorded at the adult stage. Our data showed that Aucklandia lappa DC. extract could significantly enhance the efficacy of gefitinib, suppressing the Muv phenotype of jgIs25. Meanwhile, it could also down-regulate the mRNA and protein expression of EGFR in jgIs25. Collectively, our results verified that the capability of Aucklandia lappa DC. to inhibit Muv phenotype may be based on the EGFR signaling pathway inhibition. We demonstrated that the co-administration of Aucklandia lappa DC. with gefitinib may provide an effective strategy for the therapy of EGFR inhibitor resistant NSCLCs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Single point mutations in the helicase domain of the NS3 protein enhance dengue virus replicative capacity in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells and circumvent the type I interferon response.

    PubMed

    Silveira, G F; Strottmann, D M; de Borba, L; Mansur, D S; Zanchin, N I T; Bordignon, J; dos Santos, C N Duarte

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is the most prevalent arboviral disease worldwide. The outcome of the infection is determined by the interplay of viral and host factors. In the present study, we evaluated the cellular response of human monocyte-derived DCs (mdDCs) infected with recombinant dengue virus type 1 (DV1) strains carrying a single point mutation in the NS3hel protein (L435S or L480S). Both mutated viruses infect and replicate more efficiently and produce more viral progeny in infected mdDCs compared with the parental, non-mutated virus (vBACDV1). Additionally, global gene expression analysis using cDNA microarrays revealed that the mutated DVs induce the up-regulation of the interferon (IFN) signalling and pattern recognition receptor (PRR) canonical pathways in mdDCs. Pronounced production of type I IFN were detected specifically in mdDCs infected with DV1-NS3hel-mutated virus compared with mdDCs infected with the parental virus. In addition, we showed that the type I IFN produced by mdDCs is able to reduce DV1 infection rates, suggesting that cytokine function is effective but not sufficient to mediate viral clearance of DV1-NS3hel-mutated strains. Our results demonstrate that single point mutations in subdomain 2 have important implications for adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) activity of DV1-NS3hel. Although a direct functional connection between the increased ATPase activity and viral replication still requires further studies, these mutations speed up viral RNA replication and are sufficient to enhance viral replicative capacity in human primary cell infection and circumvent type I IFN activity. This information may have particular relevance for attenuated vaccine protocols designed for DV.

  14. The mild phenotype in severe hemophilia A with Arg1781His mutation is associated with enhanced binding affinity of factor VIII for factor X.

    PubMed

    Yada, Koji; Nogami, Keiji; Wakabayashi, Hironao; Fay, Philip J; Shima, Midori

    2013-06-01

    The clinical severity in some patients with haemophilia A appears to be unrelated to the levels of factor (F)VIII activity (FVIII:C), but mechanisms are poorly understood. We have investigated a patient with a FVIII gene mutation at Arg1781 to His (R1781H) presenting with a mild phenotype despite FVIII:C of 0.9 IU/dl. Rotational thromboelastometry using the patient's whole blood demonstrated that the clot time and clot firmness were comparable to those usually observed at FVIII:C 5-10 IU/dl. Thrombin and FXa assays using plasma samples also showed that the peak levels of thrombin formation and the initial rate of FXa generation were comparable to those observed at FVIII:C 5-10 IU/dl. The results suggested a significantly greater haemostatic potential in this individual than in those with severe phenotype. The addition of incremental amounts of FX to control plasma with FVIII:C 0.9 IU/dl in clot waveform analyses suggested that the enhanced functional tenase assembly might have been related to changes in association between FVIII and FX. To further investigate this mechanism, we prepared a stably expressed, recombinant, B-domainless FVIII R1781H mutant. Thrombin generation assays using mixtures of control plasma and FVIII revealed that the coagulation function observed with the R1781H mutant (0.9 IU/dl) was comparable to that seen with wild-type FVIII:C at ~5 IU/dl. In addition, the R1781H mutant demonstrated an ~1.9-fold decrease in Km for FX compared to wild type. These results indicated that relatively enhanced binding affinity of FVIII R1781H for FX appeared to moderate the severity of the haemophilia A phenotype.

  15. OsCESA9 conserved-site mutation leads to largely enhanced plant lodging resistance and biomass enzymatic saccharification by reducing cellulose DP and crystallinity in rice.

    PubMed

    Li, Fengcheng; Xie, Guosheng; Huang, Jiangfeng; Zhang, Ran; Li, Yu; Zhang, Miaomiao; Wang, Yanting; Li, Ao; Li, Xukai; Xia, Tao; Qu, Chengcheng; Hu, Fan; Ragauskas, Arthur J; Peng, Liangcai

    2017-09-01

    Genetic modification of plant cell walls has been posed to reduce lignocellulose recalcitrance for enhancing biomass saccharification. Since cellulose synthase (CESA) gene was first identified, several dozen CESA mutants have been reported, but almost all mutants exhibit the defective phenotypes in plant growth and development. In this study, the rice (Oryza sativa) Osfc16 mutant with substitutions (W481C, P482S) at P-CR conserved site in CESA9 shows a slightly affected plant growth and higher biomass yield by 25%-41% compared with wild type (Nipponbare, a japonica variety). Chemical and ultrastructural analyses indicate that Osfc16 has a significantly reduced cellulose crystallinity (CrI) and thinner secondary cell walls compared with wild type. CESA co-IP detection, together with implementations of a proteasome inhibitor (MG132) and two distinct cellulose inhibitors (Calcofluor, CGA), shows that CESA9 mutation could affect integrity of CESA4/7/9 complexes, which may lead to rapid CESA proteasome degradation for low-DP cellulose biosynthesis. These may reduce cellulose CrI, which improves plant lodging resistance, a major and integrated agronomic trait on plant growth and grain production, and enhances biomass enzymatic saccharification by up to 2.3-fold and ethanol productivity by 34%-42%. This study has for the first time reported a direct modification for the low-DP cellulose production that has broad applications in biomass industries. © 2017 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Enhanced amyloidogenic processing of the beta-amyloid precursor protein in gene-targeted mice bearing the Swedish familial Alzheimer's disease mutations and a "humanized" Abeta sequence.

    PubMed

    Reaume, A G; Howland, D S; Trusko, S P; Savage, M J; Lang, D M; Greenberg, B D; Siman, R; Scott, R W

    1996-09-20

    The processing of the beta-amyloid precursor protein (APP) in vivo has been characterized in a novel animal model that recapitulates, in part, the APP genotype of a familial form of Alzheimer's disease (AD). A gene-targeting strategy was used to introduce the Swedish familial AD mutations and convert mouse Abeta to the human sequence. The mutant APP is expressed at normal levels in brain, and cleavage at the mutant beta-secretase site is both accurate and enhanced. Furthermore, human Abeta production is significantly increased to levels 9-fold greater than those in normal human brain while nonamyloidogenic processing is depressed. The results on Abeta production extend similar findings obtained in cell culture to the brain of an animal and substantiate Abeta as a etiological factor in Swedish familial AD. These animals provide several distinguishing features over others created by conventional transgenic methodologies. The spatial and temporal expression patterns of human Abeta are expected to be faithfully reproduced because the gene encoding the mutant APP remains in its normal chromosomal context. Thus, the neuropathological consequences of human Abeta overproduction can be evaluated longitudinally in the absence of potential mitigating effects of APP overexpression or presence of the mouse Abeta peptide.

  17. Expression of a mutated SPT15 gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae enhances both cell growth and ethanol production in microaerobic batch, fed-batch, and simultaneous saccharification and fermentations.

    PubMed

    Seong, Yeong-Je; Park, Haeseong; Yang, Jungwoo; Kim, Soo-Jung; Choi, Wonja; Kim, Kyoung Heon; Park, Yong-Cheol

    2017-05-01

    The SPT15 gene encodes a Saccharomyces cerevisiae TATA-binding protein, which is able to globally control the transcription levels of various metabolic and regulatory genes. In this study, a SPT15 gene mutant (S42N, S78R, S163P, and I212N) was expressed in S. cerevisiae BY4741 (BSPT15-M3), of which effects on fermentative yeast properties were evaluated in a series of culture types. By applying different nitrogen sources and air supply conditions in batch culture, organic nitrogen sources and microaerobic condition were decided to be more favorable for both cell growth and ethanol production of the BSPT15-M3 strain than the control S. cerevisiae BY4741 strain expressing the SPT15 gene (BSPT15wt). Microaerobic fed-batch cultures of BSPT15-M3 with glucose shock in the presence of high ethanol content resulted in a 9.5-13.4% higher glucose consumption rate and ethanol productivity than those for the BSPT15wt strain. In addition, BSPT15-M3 showed 4.5 and 3.9% increases in ethanol productivity from cassava hydrolysates and corn starch in simultaneous saccharification and fermentation processes, respectively. It was concluded that overexpression of the mutated SPT15 gene would be a potent strategy to develop robust S. cerevisiae strains with enhanced cell growth and ethanol production abilities.

  18. Detection of BRAF mutation in the cytocentrifugation supernatant fluid from fine-needle aspiration of thyroid lesions may enhance the diagnostic yield

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Ashley E.; Lim, Khin Sandar; Corpus, George; Hustek, Martha T.; Tran, Tien Anh N.; Chang, Chung-Che

    2017-01-01

    Objective: BRAF mutations using cellular DNA from fine-needle aspiration (FNA) specimens are commonly used to support the diagnosis of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). The goal of this study was to preliminarily evaluate the diagnostic utility of detecting BRAF mutations in the routinely discarded FNA specimen supernatant fluid. Materials and Methods: Seventy-eight FNAs of thyroid lesions were evaluated for BRAF mutations using both cellular and supernatant DNA. BRAF mutation data were correlated with cytology and surgical pathology. Results: Of the 78 samples evaluated, 68 (87%) had amplifiable DNA in the supernatant with 2 (3%) positive for BRAF mutations. These two samples showed no mutations in the cellular counterpart. Among the 11 samples showing morphologic findings (FNA/surgical pathology) suspicious/diagnostic of PTC, 6 (55%) samples (one supernatant and five cellulars) were positive for BRAF mutations. This suggests that testing supernatant DNA in FNA specimens may increase the diagnostic yield by 1/11 (9%) in this setting. Conclusions: The vast majority of routinely discarded FNA supernatants contain amplifiable DNA. In addition, profiling the mutations of BRAF and other genes using supernatant DNA may provide valuable diagnostic information to assist the diagnosis of PTC in patients with clinical/morphologic findings suspicious for malignancies and cellular DNA showing no mutations. PMID:28331529

  19. Cone deactivation kinetics and GRK1/GRK7 expression in enhanced S cone syndrome caused by mutations in NR2E3.

    PubMed

    Cideciyan, Artur V; Jacobson, Samuel G; Gupta, Nisha; Osawa, Shoji; Locke, Kristin G; Weiss, Ellen R; Wright, Alan F; Birch, David G; Milam, Ann H

    2003-03-01

    To determine the relationship between cone deactivation kinetics in patients with the enhanced S cone syndrome (ESCS) caused by mutations in NR2E3 and the immunoreactivity to G-protein-coupled receptor kinase 1 (GRK1) and GRK7. Electroretinogram (ERG) photoresponses were used to investigate activation kinetics of cones with a model of cone phototransduction. Deactivation kinetics of cones after bright flashes was quantified with a paired-flash ERG paradigm. Immunocytochemistry was performed with antibodies against cone opsins and kinases GRK1 and GRK7 in postmortem normal and ESCS retinal tissue. Activation kinetics of long/middle-wavelength-sensitive (L/M) cone-mediated responses in patients with ESCS were similar to those of normal L/M cones. Activation kinetics of ESCS short-wavelength-sensitive (S) cones, when compared with normal L/M cone responses evoked by the same stimulus, were slower by an amount consistent with the expected differences in spectral sensitivities. After bright flashes chosen to evoke identical activation kinetics, ESCS S cones deactivated much more slowly than ESCS or normal L/M cones. Normal human retina revealed strongly labeled cone outer segments with anti-GRK1 and anti-GRK7. In an ESCS retina, outer segments positive for L/M opsin were strongly labeled with anti-GRK1, whereas outer segments positive for S opsin showed no detectable GRK1 reactivity. GRK7 labeling was absent in all photoreceptors of the ESCS retina. The cone-dominant human retina resulting from NR2E3 mutations affords greater understanding of the physiological roles of GRK1 and GRK7 in human cone photoreceptors. Normal deactivation kinetics in human L/M cones can occur without GRK7 when GRK1 is present in ESCS, but does not occur when GRK7 is present but GRK1 is deficient in Oguchi disease. Lack of both GRK1 and GRK7 in S cones of patients with ESCS results in a more pronounced abnormality in deactivation kinetics and suggests the existence of partial compensation by

  20. Stimulus-evoked release of neuropeptides is enhanced in sensory neurons from mice with a heterozygous mutation of the Nf1 gene.

    PubMed

    Hingtgen, C M; Roy, S L; Clapp, D W

    2006-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type I is a common autosomal dominant disease characterized by formation of multiple benign and malignant tumors. People with this disorder also experience chronic pain, which can be disabling. Neurofibrinomin, the protein product of the NF1 gene (neurofibromin gene (human)), is a guanosine triphosphate activating protein for p21(ras). Loss of NF1 results in an increase in activity of the p21(ras) transduction cascade. Because of the growing evidence suggesting involvement of downstream components of the p21(ras) transduction cascade in the sensitization of nociceptive sensory neurons, we examined the stimulus-evoked release of the neuropeptides, substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide, from primary sensory neurons of mice with a mutation of the Nf1 gene (neurofibromin gene (mouse)) (Nf1+/-). Measuring immunoreactive substance P and immunoreactive calcitonin gene-related peptide by radioimmunoassay, we demonstrated that capsaicin-stimulated release of neuropeptides is three to five-fold higher in spinal cord slices from Nf1+/- mice than from wildtype mouse tissue. In addition, the potassium and capsaicin-stimulated release of immunoreactive calcitonin gene-related peptide from cultures of sensory neurons isolated from Nf1+/- mice was more than double that from cultures of wildtype neurons. Treatment of wildtype sensory neurons with nerve growth factor for 5-7 days mimicked the enhanced stimulus-evoked release observed from the Nf1+/- neurons. When nerve growth factor was removed 48 h before conducting release experiments, nerve growth factor-induced augmentation of immunoreactive calcitonin gene-related peptide release from Nf1+/- neurons was more pronounced than in Nf1+/- sensory neurons that were treated with nerve growth factor continuously for 5-7 days. Thus, sensory neurons from mice with a heterozygous mutation of the Nf1 gene that is analogous to the human disease neurofibromatosis type I, exhibit increased sensitivity to chemical

  1. CBL linker region and RING finger mutations lead to enhanced granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) signaling via elevated levels of JAK2 and LYN.

    PubMed

    Javadi, Mojib; Richmond, Terri D; Huang, Kai; Barber, Dwayne L

    2013-07-05

    Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML) is characterized by hypersensitivity to granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). SHP2, NF-1, KRAS, and NRAS are mutated in JMML patients, leading to aberrant regulation of RAS signaling. A subset of JMML patients harbor CBL mutations associated with 11q acquired uniparental disomy. Many of these mutations are in the linker region and the RING finger of CBL, leading to a loss of E3 ligase activity. We investigated the mechanism by which CBL-Y371H, a linker region mutant, and CBL-C384R, a RING finger mutant, lead to enhanced GM-CSF signaling. Expression of CBL mutants in the TF-1 cell line resulted in enhanced survival in the absence of GM-CSF. Cells expressing CBL mutations displayed increased phosphorylation of GM-CSF receptor βc subunit in response to stimulation, although expression of total GM-CSFR βc was lower. This suggested enhanced kinase activity downstream of GM-CSFR. JAK2 and LYN kinase expression is elevated in CBL-Y371H and CBL-C384R mutant cells, resulting in enhanced phosphorylation of CBL and S6 in response to GM-CSF stimulation. Incubation with the JAK2 inhibitor, TG101348, abolished the increased phosphorylation of GM-CSFR βc in cells expressing CBL mutants, whereas treatment with the SRC kinase inhibitor dasatinib resulted in equalization of GM-CSFR βc phosphorylation signal between wild type CBL and CBL mutant samples. Dasatinib treatment inhibited the elevated phosphorylation of CBL-Y371H and CBL-C384R mutants. Our study indicates that CBL linker and RING finger mutants lead to enhanced GM-CSF signaling due to elevated kinase expression, which can be blocked using small molecule inhibitors targeting specific downstream pathways.

  2. CBL Linker Region and RING Finger Mutations Lead to Enhanced Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-stimulating Factor (GM-CSF) Signaling via Elevated Levels of JAK2 and LYN*

    PubMed Central

    Javadi, Mojib; Richmond, Terri D.; Huang, Kai; Barber, Dwayne L.

    2013-01-01

    Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML) is characterized by hypersensitivity to granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). SHP2, NF-1, KRAS, and NRAS are mutated in JMML patients, leading to aberrant regulation of RAS signaling. A subset of JMML patients harbor CBL mutations associated with 11q acquired uniparental disomy. Many of these mutations are in the linker region and the RING finger of CBL, leading to a loss of E3 ligase activity. We investigated the mechanism by which CBL-Y371H, a linker region mutant, and CBL-C384R, a RING finger mutant, lead to enhanced GM-CSF signaling. Expression of CBL mutants in the TF-1 cell line resulted in enhanced survival in the absence of GM-CSF. Cells expressing CBL mutations displayed increased phosphorylation of GM-CSF receptor βc subunit in response to stimulation, although expression of total GM-CSFR βc was lower. This suggested enhanced kinase activity downstream of GM-CSFR. JAK2 and LYN kinase expression is elevated in CBL-Y371H and CBL-C384R mutant cells, resulting in enhanced phosphorylation of CBL and S6 in response to GM-CSF stimulation. Incubation with the JAK2 inhibitor, TG101348, abolished the increased phosphorylation of GM-CSFR βc in cells expressing CBL mutants, whereas treatment with the SRC kinase inhibitor dasatinib resulted in equalization of GM-CSFR βc phosphorylation signal between wild type CBL and CBL mutant samples. Dasatinib treatment inhibited the elevated phosphorylation of CBL-Y371H and CBL-C384R mutants. Our study indicates that CBL linker and RING finger mutants lead to enhanced GM-CSF signaling due to elevated kinase expression, which can be blocked using small molecule inhibitors targeting specific downstream pathways. PMID:23696637

  3. Oncogene Mutation Survey in MPNST Cell Lines Enhances the Dominant Role of Hyperactive Ras in NF1 Associated Pro-Survival and Malignancy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Daochun; Tainsky, Michael A; Haddad, Ramsi

    2012-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) are a type of soft tissue sarcoma that can be associated with germline mutations in Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) or may occur sporadically. Although the etiology of MPNST is poorly understood, it is clear that a loss of function of the NF1 gene, encoding a Ras-GAP, is an important factor in the tumorigenesis of the inherited form of MPNST. Tumor latency in NF1 patients suggests that additional mutational events are probably required for malignancy. In order to define oncogene mutations associated with 5 MPNST cell lines, we assayed the 238 most frequent mutations in 19 commonly activated oncogenes using mass spectroscopy-based analysis. All 238 mutation sites in the assayed oncogenes were determined to harbor only wild-type sequences. These data suggest that hyperactive Ras resulting from the loss function of neurofibromin may be sufficient to set up the direction of malignant transformation of Schwann cells to MPNST.

  4. Dual targeting of PI3K and MEK enhances the radiation response of K-RAS mutated non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Toulany, Mahmoud; Iida, Mari; Keinath, Simone; Iyi, Firdevs F.; Mueck, Katharina; Fehrenbacher, Birgit; Mansour, Wael Y.; Schaller, Martin; Wheeler, Deric L.; Rodemann, H. Peter

    2016-01-01

    Despite the significant contribution of radiotherapy to non-small lung cancer (NSCLC), radioresistance still occurs. One of the major radioresistance mechanisms is the hyperactivation of the PI3K/Akt pathway in which Akt facilitates the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) through the stimulation of DNA-PKcs. We investigated if targeting PI3K would be a potential approach for enhancing the radiosensitivity of K-RAS mutated (K-RASmut) NSCLC cell lines A549 and H460. Short-term (1-2 h) pre-treatment of cells with the PI3K inhibitor PI-103 (1 μM) inhibited Akt/DNA-PKcs activity, blocked DSBs repair and induced radiosensitivity, while long-term (24 h) pre-treatment did not. Lack of an effect after 24 h of PI-103 pre-treatment was due to reactivation of K-Ras/MEK/ERK-dependent Akt. However, long-term treatment with the combination of PI-103 and MEK inhibitor PD98059 completely blocked reactivation of Akt and impaired DSBs repair through non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) leading to radiosensitization. The effect of PI3K inhibition on Akt signaling was also tested in A549 mouse xenografts. P-Akt and P-DNA-PKcs were inhibited 30 min post-irradiation in xenografts, which were pretreated by PI-103 30 min before irradiation. However, Akt was reactivated 30 min post-irradiation in tumors, which were pre-treated for 3 h with PI-103 before irradiation. After a 24 h pretreatment with PI-103, a significant reactivation of Akt was achieved 24 h after irradiation. Thus, due to MEK/ERK-dependent reactivation of Akt, targeting PI3K alone is not a suitable approach for radiosensitizing K-RASmut NSCLC cells, indicating that dual targeting of PI3K and MEK is an efficient approach to improve radiotherapy outcome. PMID:27248324

  5. Disruption of thioredoxin metabolism enhances the toxicity of transforming growth factor β-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) inhibition in KRAS-mutated colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Hrabe, Jennifer E.; O’Leary, Brianne R.; Fath, Melissa A.; Rodman, Samuel N.; Button, Anna M.; Domann, Frederick E.; Spitz, Douglas R.; Mezhir, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Transforming growth factor β-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) is critical for survival of many KRAS mutated colorectal cancer cells, and TAK1 inhibition with 5Z-7-oxozeaenol has been associated with oxidative stress leading to tumor cell killing. When SW 620 and HCT 116 human colon cancer cells were treated with 5 µM 5Z-7-oxozeaenol, cell viability, growth, and clonogenic survival were significantly decreased. Consistent with TAK1 inhibition being causally related to thiol-mediated oxidative stress, 10 mM N-acetylcysteine (NAC) partially reversed the growth inhibitory effects of 5Z-7-oxozeaenol. In addition, 5Z-7-oxozeaenol also increased steady-state levels of H2DCFDA oxidation as well as increased levels of total glutathione (GSH) and glutathione disulfide (GSSG). Interestingly, depletion of GSH using buthionine sulfoximine did not significantly potentiate 5Z-7-oxozeaenol toxicity in either cell line. In contrast, pre-treatment of cells with auranofin (Au) to inhibit thioredoxin reductase activity significantly increased levels of oxidized thioredoxin as well as sensitized cells to 5Z-7-oxozeaenol-induced growth inhibition and clonogenic cell killing. These results were confirmed in SW 620 murine xenografts, where treatment with 5Z-7-oxozeaenol or with Au plus 5Z-7-oxozeaenol significantly inhibited growth, with Au plus 5Z-7-oxozeaenol trending toward greater growth inhibition compared to 5Z-7-oxozeaenol alone. These results support the hypothesis that thiol-mediated oxidative stress is causally related to TAK1-induced colon cancer cell killing. In addition, these results support the hypothesis that thioredoxin metabolism is a critical target for enhancing colon cancer cell killing via TAK1 inhibition and could represent an effective therapeutic strategy in patients with these highly resistant tumors. PMID:26114584

  6. Non-proteolytic functions of calpain-3 in sarcoplasmic reticulum in skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Ojima, Koichi; Ono, Yasuko; Ottenheijm, Coen; Hata, Shoji; Suzuki, Hidenori; Granzier, Henk; Sorimachi, Hiroyuki

    2011-04-01

    Mutations in CAPN3/Capn3, which codes for skeletal muscle-specific calpain-3/p94 protease, are responsible for limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A. Using "knock-in" (referred to as Capn3(CS/CS)) mice, in which the endogenous calpain-3 is replaced with a mutant calpain-3:C129S, which is a proteolytically inactive but structurally intact calpain-3, we demonstrated in our previous studies that loss of calpain-3 protease activity causes muscular dystrophy [Ojima, K. et al. (2010) J. Clin. Invest. 120, 2672-2683]. However, compared to Capn3-null (Capn3(-/-)) mice, Capn3(CS/CS) mice showed less severe dystrophic symptoms. This suggests that calpain-3 also has a non-proteolytic function. This study aimed to elucidate the non-proteolytic functions of calpain-3 through comparison of Capn3(CS/CS) mice with Capn3(-/-) mice. We found that calpain-3 is a component of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), and that calpain-3 interacts with, but does not proteolyze, typical SR components such as ryanodine receptor and calsequestrin. Furthermore, Capn3(CS/CS) mice showed that the nonenzymatic role of calpain-3 is required for proper Ca(2+) efflux from the SR to cytosol during muscle contraction. These results indicate that calpain-3 functions as a nonenzymatic element for the Ca(2+) efflux machinery in the SR, rather than as a protease. Thus, defects in the nonenzymatic function of calpain-3 must also be involved in the pathogenesis of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A.

  7. Two novel epistatic mutations (E1:K211E and E2:V264A) in structural proteins of Chikungunya virus enhance fitness in Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Ankita; Sharma, Ajay Kumar; Sukumaran, D; Parida, Manmohan; Dash, Paban Kumar

    2016-10-01

    Expansion of CHIKV outbreaks with appearance of novel mutations are reported from many parts of the world. Two novel mutations viz. E1:K211E and E2:V264A in background of E1:226A are recently identified from Aedes aegypti dominated areas of India. In this study, the role of these mutations in modulation of infectivity, dissemination and transmission by two different Aedes species was studied. Mutations were sequentially constructed in CHIKV genome and female Ae. aegypti and Aedes albopictus mosquitoes were orally infected with eight different CHIKV mutants. Double mutant virus containing E1:K211E and E2:V264A mutations in background of E1:226A revealed remarkably higher fitness for Ae. aegypti, as indicated by significant increase in virus infectivity (13 fold), dissemination (15 fold) and transmission (62 fold) compared to parental E1:226A virus. These results indicate that adaptive mutations in CHIKV are leading to efficient CHIKV circulation in Ae. aegypti endemic areas, contributing and sustaining the major CHIKV outbreaks. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. GENERAL ENHANCEMENT OF MUTAGENIC POTENCY OF VARIOUS MUTAGENS DUE TO DELETED GENES IN THE ΔuvrB STRAINS TA 98 AND TA 100 OF SALMONELLA COMPARED WITH STRAINS CONTAINING ONLY A POINT MUTATION IN uvrB

    EPA Science Inventory

    The two most common strains used in Ames mutagenicity assays, TA98 and TA 100, contain a �uvrB mutation designed to enhance the mutagenicity of compounds, presumably due to the loss of the nucleotide excision repair system. We showed previously that the �uvrB mutations in these s...

  9. GENERAL ENHANCEMENT OF MUTAGENIC POTENCY OF VARIOUS MUTAGENS DUE TO DELETED GENES IN THE ΔuvrB STRAINS TA 98 AND TA 100 OF SALMONELLA COMPARED WITH STRAINS CONTAINING ONLY A POINT MUTATION IN uvrB

    EPA Science Inventory

    The two most common strains used in Ames mutagenicity assays, TA98 and TA 100, contain a �uvrB mutation designed to enhance the mutagenicity of compounds, presumably due to the loss of the nucleotide excision repair system. We showed previously that the �uvrB mutations in these s...

  10. MicroRNA-223 Enhances Radiation Sensitivity of U87MG Cells In Vitro and In Vivo by Targeting Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Liping; Zhu, Ji; Zaorsky, Nicholas G.; Deng, Yun; Wu, Xingzhong; Liu, Yong; Liu, Fangqi; Cai, Guoxiang; Gu, Weilie; Shen, Lijun; Zhang, Zhen

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein is important in the DNA damage response because it repairs radiation-induced damage in cancers. We examined the effect of microRNA-223 (miR-223), a regulator of ATM expression, on radiation sensitivity of cancer cells. Methods and Materials: Human embryonic kidney 293 T (293T) cells were infected with pLL3.7-miR-223 plasmid to generate the pLL3.7-miR-223 and -empty virus (EV) lentivirus (miR-223 and EV). A dual luciferase assay in which the reporter contained wild-type 3′ untranslated region (UTR) of ATM was performed. U87MG cells were infected with miR-223 or EV to establish the overexpressed stable cell lines (U87-223 or U87-EV, respectively). Cells were irradiated in vitro, and dose enhancement ratios at 2 Gy (DER{sub 2}) were calculated. Hind legs of BALB/c athymic mice were injected with U87-223 or U87-EV cells; after 2 weeks, half of the tumors were irradiated. Tumor volumes were tracked for a total of 5 weeks. Results: The dual luciferase reporter assay showed a significant reduction in luciferase activity of 293T cells cotransfected with miR-223 and the ATM 3′UTR compared to that in EV control. Overexpression of miR-223 in U87MG cells showed that ATM expression was significantly downregulated in the U87-223 cells compared to that in U87-EV (ATM/β-actin mRNA 1.0 vs 1.5, P<.05). U87-223 cells were hypersensitive to radiation compared to U87-EV cells in vitro (DER{sub 2} = 1.32, P<.01). Mice injected with miR-223-expressing tumors had almost the same tumors after 3 weeks (1.5 cm{sup 3} vs 1.7 cm{sup 3}). However, irradiation significantly decreased tumor size in miR-223-expressing tumors compared to those in controls (0.033 cm{sup 3} vs 0.829 cm{sup 3}). Conclusions: miR-223 overexpression downregulates ATM expression and sensitizes U87 cells to radiation in vitro and in vivo. MicroRNA-223 may be a novel cancer-targeting therapy, although its cancer- and patient-specific roles are

  11. Combinations of Affinity-Enhancing Mutations in a T Cell Receptor Reveal Highly Nonadditive Effects within and between CDRs and Chains

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Brian G.; Haidar, Jaafar N.; Yu, Yong; Weng, Zhiping

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the energetic and structural response to multiple mutations in a protein-protein interface is a key aspect of rational protein design. Here we investigate the cooperativity of combinations of point mutations of a T cell receptor (TCR) that binds in vivo to the HLA-A2 MHC and a viral peptide. The mutations were obtained from two sources: a structure-based design study on the TCR α chain (9 mutations) and an in vitro selection study on the TCR β chain (4 mutations). In addition to combining the highest affinity variants from each chain, we tested other combinations of mutations within and among the chains, for a total of 23 TCR mutants that we measured for binding kinetics to the peptide/MHC. A wide range of binding affinities was observed, from 2-fold to 1000-fold binding improvement over wild-type, with significant nonadditive effects observed within and between TCR chains. This included an amino acid dependent cooperative interaction between CDR1 and CDR3 residues that are separated by over 9 Å in the wild-type complex. When analyzing the kinetics of the mutations, we found that the association rates were primarily responsible for the cooperativity, while the dissociation rates were responsible for the anticooperativity (less-than-additive energetics). Based on structural modeling of anticooperative mutants we determined that side chain clash between proximal mutants likely led to nonadditive binding energies. These results highlight the complex nature of TCR association and binding and will be informative in future design efforts that combine multiple mutant residues. PMID:20681514

  12. Mutation of the highly conserved Ser-40 of the HIV-1 p6 gag protein to Phe causes the formation of a hydrophobic patch, enhances membrane association, and polyubiquitination of Gag.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Friedrich; Setz, Christian; Friedrich, Melanie; Rauch, Pia; Solbak, Sara Marie; Frøystein, Nils Age; Henklein, Petra; Votteler, Jörg; Fossen, Torgils; Schubert, Ulrich

    2014-10-02

    The HIV-1 p6 Gag protein contains two late assembly (l-) domains that recruit proteins of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) pathway to mediate membrane fission between the nascent virion and the cell membrane. It was recently demonstrated that mutation of the highly conserved Ser-40 to Phe (S40F) disturbs CA-SP1 processing, virus morphogenesis, and infectivity. It also causes the formation of filopodia-like structures, while virus release remains unaffected. Here, we show that the mutation S40F, but not the conservative mutation to Asp (S40D) or Asn (S40N), augments membrane association, K48-linked polyubiquitination, entry into the 26S proteasome, and, consequently, enhances MHC-I antigen presentation of Gag derived epitopes. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structure analyses revealed that the newly introduced Phe-40, together with Tyr-36, causes the formation of a hydrophobic patch at the C-terminal α-helix of p6, providing a molecular rationale for the enhanced membrane association of Gag observed in vitro and in HIV-1 expressing cells. The extended exposure of the S40F mutant to unidentified membrane-resident ubiquitin E3-ligases might trigger the polyubiquitination of Gag. The cumulative data support a previous model of a so far undefined property of p6, which, in addition to MA, acts as membrane targeting domain of Gag.

  13. Mutation of the Highly Conserved Ser-40 of the HIV-1 p6 Gag Protein to Phe Causes the Formation of a Hydrophobic Patch, Enhances Membrane Association, and Polyubiquitination of Gag

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Friedrich; Setz, Christian; Friedrich, Melanie; Rauch, Pia; Solbak, Sara Marie; Frøystein, Nils Åge; Henklein, Petra; Votteler, Jörg; Fossen, Torgils; Schubert, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    The HIV-1 p6 Gag protein contains two late assembly (l-) domains that recruit proteins of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) pathway to mediate membrane fission between the nascent virion and the cell membrane. It was recently demonstrated that mutation of the highly conserved Ser-40 to Phe (S40F) disturbs CA-SP1 processing, virus morphogenesis, and infectivity. It also causes the formation of filopodia-like structures, while virus release remains unaffected. Here, we show that the mutation S40F, but not the conservative mutation to Asp (S40D) or Asn (S40N), augments membrane association, K48-linked polyubiquitination, entry into the 26S proteasome, and, consequently, enhances MHC-I antigen presentation of Gag derived epitopes. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structure analyses revealed that the newly introduced Phe-40, together with Tyr-36, causes the formation of a hydrophobic patch at the C-terminal α-helix of p6, providing a molecular rationale for the enhanced membrane association of Gag observed in vitro and in HIV-1 expressing cells. The extended exposure of the S40F mutant to unidentified membrane-resident ubiquitin E3-ligases might trigger the polyubiquitination of Gag. The cumulative data support a previous model of a so far undefined property of p6, which, in addition to MA, acts as membrane targeting domain of Gag. PMID:25279819

  14. Mutations in the feline immunodeficiency virus envelope glycoprotein confer resistance to a dominant-negative fragment of Tsg101 by enhancing infectivity and cell-to-cell virus transmission.

    PubMed

    Luttge, Benjamin G; Panchal, Prashant; Puri, Vinita; Checkley, Mary Ann; Freed, Eric O

    2014-04-01

    The Pro-Ser-Ala-Pro (PSAP) motif in the p2 domain of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) Gag is required for efficient virus release, virus replication, and Gag binding to the ubiquitin-E2-variant (UEV) domain of Tsg101. As a result of this direct interaction, expression of an N-terminal fragment of Tsg101 containing the UEV domain (referred to as TSG-5') inhibits FIV release. In these respects, the FIV p2(Gag) PSAP motif is analogous to the PTAP motif of HIV-1 p6(Gag). To evaluate the feasibility of a late domain-targeted inhibition of virus replication, we created an enriched Crandell-Rees feline kidney (CRFK) cell line (T5'(hi)) that stably expresses high levels of TSG-5'. Here we show that mutations in either the V3 loop or the second heptad repeat (HR2) domain of the FIV envelope glycoprotein (Env) rescue FIV replication in T5'(hi) cells without increasing FIV release efficiency. TSG-5'-resistance mutations in Env enhance virion infectivity and the cell-cell spread of FIV when diffusion is limited using a semi-solid growth medium. These findings show that mutations in functional domains of Env confer TSG-5'-resistance, which we propose enhances specific infectivity and the cell-cell transmission of virus to counteract inefficient virus release. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Viral Membrane Proteins-Channels for Cellular Networking. © 2013.

  15. Isothermal detection of multiple point mutations by a surface plasmon resonance biosensor with Au nanoparticles enhanced surface-anchored rolling circle amplification.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Yang; Deng, Kun; Xia, Han; Yao, Chunyan; Chen, Qinghai; Zhang, Liqun; Liu, Zhiyong; Fu, Weiling

    2013-11-15

    In this study, we developed a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) DNA biosensor method using surface-anchored rolling circle amplification (RCA) and Au nanoparticles modified probes (AuNPs) to isothermally detect multiple point mutations associated with drug-resistance in multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium Tuberculosis (MDRTB). A set of probes contains an allele-specific padlock probe (PLP), a capture probe and an AuNPs. The linear PLPs, circularized by ligation upon the recognition of the point mutation on DNA targets, hybridize to the capture probes via the specific tag/anti-tag recognition. Upon recognition each point mutation is identified by locating into the corresponding channel on the chip. Then the immobilized primer (capture probe)-template (circular PLP) complex are amplified isothermally as RCA and further amplified by AuNPs. The RCA products immobilized on the chip surface cause great SPR angle changes consequently. The 5 pM synthetic oligonucleotides and 8.2 pg uL(-1) of genomic DNA from clinical samples can be detected by the method. The positive mutation detection is achieved with a wild-type to mutant ratio of 5000:1. The method was demonstrated by targeting five clinically meaningful mutations in MDRTB. Thirty clinical samples were identified and they were in good agreement with the results from sequencing. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Familial hemiplegic migraine CaV2.1 channel mutation R192Q enhances ATP-gated P2X3 receptor activity of mouse sensory ganglion neurons mediating trigeminal pain

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The R192Q mutation of the CACNA1A gene, encoding for the α1 subunit of voltage-gated P/Q Ca2+ channels (Cav2.1), is associated with familial hemiplegic migraine-1. We investigated whether this gain-of-function mutation changed the structure and function of trigeminal neuron P2X3 receptors that are thought to be important contributors to migraine pain. Results Using in vitro trigeminal sensory neurons of a mouse genetic model knockin for the CACNA1A R192Q mutation, we performed patch clamp recording and intracellular Ca2+ imaging that showed how these knockin ganglion neurons generated P2X3 receptor-mediated responses significantly larger than wt neurons. These enhanced effects were reversed by the Cav2.1 blocker ω-agatoxin. We, thus, explored intracellular signalling dependent on kinases and phosphatases to understand the molecular regulation of P2X3 receptors of knockin neurons. In such cells we observed strong activation of CaMKII reversed by ω-agatoxin treatment. The CaMKII inhibitor KN-93 blocked CaMKII phosphorylation and the hyperesponsive P2X3 phenotype. Although no significant difference in membrane expression of knockin receptors was found, serine phosphorylation of knockin P2X3 receptors was constitutively decreased and restored by KN-93. No change in threonine or tyrosine phosphorylation was detected. Finally, pharmacological inhibitors of the phosphatase calcineurin normalized the enhanced P2X3 receptor responses of knockin neurons and increased their serine phosphorylation. Conclusions The present results suggest that the CACNA1A mutation conferred a novel molecular phenotype to P2X3 receptors of trigeminal ganglion neurons via CaMKII-dependent activation of calcineurin that selectively impaired the serine phosphorylation state of such receptors, thus potentiating their effects in transducing trigeminal nociception. PMID:20735819

  17. Enhanced in planta Fitness through Adaptive Mutations in EfpR, a Dual Regulator of Virulence and Metabolic Functions in the Plant Pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum

    PubMed Central

    Rengel, David; Barlet, Xavier; Gouzy, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    Experimental evolution of the plant pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum, where bacteria were maintained on plant lineages for more than 300 generations, revealed that several independent single mutations in the efpR gene from populations propagated on beans were associated with fitness gain on bean. In the present work, novel allelic efpR variants were isolated from populations propagated on other plant species, thus suggesting that mutations in efpR were not solely associated to a fitness gain on bean, but also on additional hosts. A transcriptomic profiling and phenotypic characterization of the efpR deleted mutant showed that EfpR acts as a global catabolic repressor, directly or indirectly down-regulating the expression of multiple metabolic pathways. EfpR also controls virulence traits such as exopolysaccharide production, swimming and twitching motilities and deletion of efpR leads to reduced virulence on tomato plants after soil drenching inoculation. We studied the impact of the single mutations that occurred in efpR during experimental evolution and found that these allelic mutants displayed phenotypic characteristics similar to the deletion mutant, although not behaving as complete loss-of-function mutants. These adaptive mutations therefore strongly affected the function of efpR, leading to an expanded metabolic versatility that should benefit to the evolved clones. Altogether, these results indicated that EfpR is a novel central player of the R. solanacearum virulence regulatory network. Independent mutations therefore appeared during experimental evolution in the evolved clones, on a crucial node of this network, to favor adaptation to host vascular tissues through regulatory and metabolic rewiring. PMID:27911943

  18. Skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor mutations associated with malignant hyperthermia showed enhanced intensity and sensitivity to triggering drugs when expressed in human embryonic kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Sato, Keisaku; Roesl, Cornelia; Pollock, Neil; Stowell, Kathryn M

    2013-07-01

    Mutations within the gene encoding the skeletal muscle calcium channel ryanodine receptor can result in malignant hyperthermia. Although it is important to characterize the functional effects of candidate mutations to establish a genetic test for diagnosis, ex vivo methods are limited because of the low incidence of the disorder and sample unavailability. More than 250 candidate mutations have been identified, but only a few mutations have been functionally characterized. The human skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor complementary DNA was cloned with or without a disease-related variant. Wild-type and mutant calcium channel proteins were transiently expressed in human embryonic kidney-293 cells expressing the large T-antigen of simian virus 40, and functional analysis was carried out using calcium imaging with fura-2 AM. Six human malignant hyperthermia-related mutants such as R44C, R163C, R401C, R533C, R533H, and H4833Y were analyzed. Cells were stimulated with a specific ryanodine receptor agonist 4-chloro-m-cresol, and intracellular calcium mobility was analyzed to determine the functional aspects of mutant channels. Mutant proteins that contained a variant linked to malignant hyperthermia showed higher sensitivity to the agonist. Compared with the wild type (EC50=453.2 µM, n=18), all six mutants showed a lower EC50 (21.2-170.4 µM, n=12-23), indicating susceptibility against triggering agents. These six mutations cause functional abnormality of the calcium channel, leading to higher sensitivity to a specific agonist, and therefore could be considered potentially causative of malignant hyperthermia reactions.

  19. Enhanced in planta Fitness through Adaptive Mutations in EfpR, a Dual Regulator of Virulence and Metabolic Functions in the Plant Pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum.

    PubMed

    Perrier, Anthony; Peyraud, Rémi; Rengel, David; Barlet, Xavier; Lucasson, Emmanuel; Gouzy, Jérôme; Peeters, Nemo; Genin, Stéphane; Guidot, Alice

    2016-12-01

    Experimental evolution of the plant pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum, where bacteria were maintained on plant lineages for more than 300 generations, revealed that several independent single mutations in the efpR gene from populations propagated on beans were associated with fitness gain on bean. In the present work, novel allelic efpR variants were isolated from populations propagated on other plant species, thus suggesting that mutations in efpR were not solely associated to a fitness gain on bean, but also on additional hosts. A transcriptomic profiling and phenotypic characterization of the efpR deleted mutant showed that EfpR acts as a global catabolic repressor, directly or indirectly down-regulating the expression of multiple metabolic pathways. EfpR also controls virulence traits such as exopolysaccharide production, swimming and twitching motilities and deletion of efpR leads to reduced virulence on tomato plants after soil drenching inoculation. We studied the impact of the single mutations that occurred in efpR during experimental evolution and found that these allelic mutants displayed phenotypic characteristics similar to the deletion mutant, although not behaving as complete loss-of-function mutants. These adaptive mutations therefore strongly affected the function of efpR, leading to an expanded metabolic versatility that should benefit to the evolved clones. Altogether, these results indicated that EfpR is a novel central player of the R. solanacearum virulence regulatory network. Independent mutations therefore appeared during experimental evolution in the evolved clones, on a crucial node of this network, to favor adaptation to host vascular tissues through regulatory and metabolic rewiring.

  20. Mutations that alter the equilibrium between open and closed conformations of Escherichia coli maltose-binding protein impede its ability to enhance the solubility of passenger proteins.

    PubMed

    Nallamsetty, Sreedevi; Waugh, David S

    2007-12-21

    Certain highly soluble proteins, such as Escherichia coli maltose-binding protein (MBP), have the ability to enhance the solubility of their fusion partners, making them attractive vehicles for the production of recombinant proteins, yet the mechanism of solubility enhancement remains poorly understood. Here, we report that the solubility-enhancing properties of MBP are dramatically affected by amino acid substitutions that alter the equilibrium between its "open" and "closed" conformations. Our findings indicate that the solubility-enhancing activity of MBP is mediated by its open conformation and point to a likely role for the ligand-binding cleft in the mechanism of solubility enhancement.

  1. Mutations that alter the equilibrium between open and closed conformations of Escherichia coli maltose-binding protein impede its ability to enhance the solubility of passenger proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Nallamsetty, Sreedevi; Waugh, David S.

    2007-12-21

    Certain highly soluble proteins, such as Escherichia coli maltose-binding protein (MBP), have the ability to enhance the solubility of their fusion partners, making them attractive vehicles for the production of recombinant proteins, yet the mechanism of solubility enhancement remains poorly understood. Here, we report that the solubility-enhancing properties of MBP are dramatically affected by amino acid substitutions that alter the equilibrium between its 'open' and 'closed' conformations. Our findings indicate that the solubility-enhancing activity of MBP is mediated by its open conformation and point to a likely role for the ligand-binding cleft in the mechanism of solubility enhancement.

  2. Cell proliferation in liver of Mmh/Ogg1-deficient mice enhances mutation frequency because of the presence of 8-hydroxyguanine in DNA.

    PubMed

    Arai, Tsuyoshi; Kelly, Vincent P; Komoro, Kimiyo; Minowa, Osamu; Noda, Tetsuo; Nishimura, Susumu

    2003-07-15

    The Mmh/Ogg1 gene product maintains the integrity of the genome by removing the damaged base 8-hydroxyguanine (8-OH-G), one of the major DNA lesions generated by reactive oxygen species. Using Ogg1-deficient mice, we sought to establish if cells having high amounts of 8-OH-G have the ability to proliferate and whether the mutation frequency increases after proliferation in vivo. When KBrO(3), a known renal carcinogen, at a dose of 2 grams/liter was administered to Ogg1 mutant mice for 12 weeks, the amount of 8-OH-G in liver DNA from treated Ogg1(-/-) mice increased 26.1 times that of treated Ogg1(+/+) mice. The accumulated 8-OH-G did not decrease 4 weeks after cessation of KBrO(3) treatment. Partial hepatectomy was performed on Ogg1(+/-) and Ogg1(-/-) mice after being treated with KBrO(3) for 12 weeks. The remnant liver from Ogg1(-/-) mice treated with KBrO(3) regenerated to the same extent as nontreated Ogg1(+/-) mice. In addition, 8-OH-G was not repaired during cell proliferation by partial hepatectomy, indicating that there is no replication coupled repair of preexisting 8-OH-G. The mutation frequency after the regeneration of liver from treated Ogg1(-/-) mice showed a 3.5-fold increase compared with before regeneration. This represents a mutation frequency 6.2 times that of normal levels. The proliferation of cells having accumulated amounts of 8-OH-G caused mainly GC-->TA transversions. These results showed that inactivation of the Ogg1 gene leads to a higher risk of cancer because cells with accumulated 8-OH-G still retain the ability to proliferate, leading to an increase in the mutation frequency.

  3. Point Mutations in FimH Adhesin of Crohn's Disease-Associated Adherent-Invasive Escherichia coli Enhance Intestinal Inflammatory Response

    PubMed Central

    Dreux, Nicolas; Denizot, Jérémy; Martinez-Medina, Margarita; Mellmann, Alexander; Billig, Maria; Kisiela, Dagmara; Chattopadhyay, Sujay; Sokurenko, Evgeni; Neut, Christel; Gower-Rousseau, Corinne; Colombel, Jean-Frédéric; Bonnet, Richard; Darfeuille-Michaud, Arlette; Barnich, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Adherent-invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC) are abnormally predominant on Crohn's disease (CD) ileal mucosa. AIEC reference strain LF82 adheres to ileal enterocytes via the common type 1 pili adhesin FimH and recognizes CEACAM6 receptors abnormally expressed on CD ileal epithelial cells. The fimH genes of 45 AIEC and 47 non-AIEC strains were sequenced. The phylogenetic tree based on fimH DNA sequences indicated that AIEC strains predominantly express FimH with amino acid mutations of a recent evolutionary origin - a typical signature of pathoadaptive changes of bacterial pathogens. Point mutations in FimH, some of a unique AIEC-associated nature, confer AIEC bacteria a significantly higher ability to adhere to CEACAM-expressing T84 intestinal epithelial cells. Moreover, in the LF82 strain, the replacement of fimHLF82 (expressing FimH with an AIEC-associated mutation) with fimHK12 (expressing FimH of commensal E. coli K12) decreased the ability of bacteria to persist and to induce severe colitis and gut inflammation in infected CEABAC10 transgenic mice expressing human CEACAM receptors. Our results highlight a mechanism of AIEC virulence evolution that involves selection of amino acid mutations in the common bacterial traits, such as FimH protein, and leads to the development of chronic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in a genetically susceptible host. The analysis of fimH SNPs may be a useful method to predict the potential virulence of E. coli isolated from IBD patients for diagnostic or epidemiological studies and to identify new strategies for therapeutic intervention to block the interaction between AIEC and gut mucosa in the early stages of IBD. PMID:23358328

  4. [Heterozygosity for Mutations Affecting Coat Pigmentation in the American Mink (Neovison vison) Enhances Structural Stability of Adrenal Cortex under Stress Conditions].

    PubMed

    Trapezov, O V; Luzenko, N D; Trapezova, L I

    2016-04-01

    The results of the study of the effects of heterozygosity for mutations affecting coat pigmentation on the response to the environmental stress caused by extreme feeding conditions are provided. The animals with the following genotypes were taken into the study: homozygotes standard (+/+), hedlund white (h/h), and aleutian (a/a) and heterozygotes hedlund white (h/+) and aleutian (a/+). The animals homozygous for the aleutian mutation (a/a) showed a statistically lower growth rate than the animals of other genotypes both in the ontrol and in the experiment (p < 0.05). Under the control conditions, the animals homozygous forboth the wild type standard allele (+/+) and the mutant hedlund white (h/h) and aleutian (a/a) alleles showed the evident tendency for the zona fasciculata and zona reticularis of the adrenal cortex broadening compared to the experimental conditions. At the same time, in the animals heterozygous for the hedlund white (h/+) and the aleutian (a/+) mutations, a clear tendency for increasing size of the zona fasciculata and zona reticularis under the experimental conditions was observed. In the heterozygous animals, although we observed single destructive changes in the adrenal cortex under stress conditions, they were much less profound than in the homozygous ones. This may be related to the broader range of morphological adaptation in the heterozygotes, which gives them the possibility of more significant enlargement of the secreting zone to provide for its adequate functioning.

  5. An engineered tale-transcription factor rescues transcription of factor VII impaired by promoter mutations and enhances its endogenous expression in hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Barbon, Elena; Pignani, Silvia; Branchini, Alessio; Bernardi, Francesco; Pinotti, Mirko; Bovolenta, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    Tailored approaches to restore defective transcription responsible for severe diseases have been poorly explored. We tested transcription activator-like effectors fused to an activation domain (TALE-TFs) in a coagulation factor VII (FVII) deficiency model. In this model, the deficiency is caused by the −94C > G or −61T > G mutation, which abrogate the binding of Sp1 or HNF-4 transcription factors. Reporter assays in hepatoma HepG2 cells naturally expressing FVII identified a single TALE-TF (TF4) that, by targeting the region between mutations, specifically trans-activated both the variant (>100-fold) and wild-type (20–40-fold) F7 promoters. Importantly, in the genomic context of transfected HepG2 and transduced primary hepatocytes, TF4 increased F7 mRNA and protein levels (2- to 3-fold) without detectable off-target effects, even for the homologous F10 gene. The ectopic F7 expression in renal HEK293 cells was modestly affected by TF4 or by TALE-TF combinations. These results provide experimental evidence for TALE-TFs as gene-specific tools useful to counteract disease-causing promoter mutations. PMID:27341548

  6. Non-RVD mutations that enhance the dynamics of the TAL repeat array along the superhelical axis improve TALEN genome editing efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Tochio, Naoya; Umehara, Kohei; Uewaki, Jun-ichi; Flechsig, Holger; Kondo, Masaharu; Dewa, Takehisa; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Saitoh, Takashi; Togashi, Yuichi; Tate, Shin-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effector (TALE) nuclease (TALEN) is widely used as a tool in genome editing. The DNA binding part of TALEN consists of a tandem array of TAL-repeats that form a right-handed superhelix. Each TAL-repeat recognises a specific base by the repeat variable diresidue (RVD) at positions 12 and 13. TALEN comprising the TAL-repeats with periodic mutations to residues at positions 4 and 32 (non-RVD sites) in each repeat (VT-TALE) exhibits increased efficacy in genome editing compared with a counterpart without the mutations (CT-TALE). The molecular basis for the elevated efficacy is unknown. In this report, comparison of the physicochemical properties between CT- and VT-TALEs revealed that VT-TALE has a larger amplitude motion along the superhelical axis (superhelical motion) compared with CT-TALE. The greater superhelical motion in VT-TALE enabled more TAL-repeats to engage in the target sequence recognition compared with CT-TALE. The extended sequence recognition by the TAL-repeats improves site specificity with limiting the spatial distribution of FokI domains to facilitate their dimerization at the desired site. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed that the non-RVD mutations alter inter-repeat hydrogen bonding to amplify the superhelical motion of VT-TALE. The TALEN activity is associated with the inter-repeat hydrogen bonding among the TAL repeats. PMID:27883072

  7. Integrin alphavbeta3 enhances β-catenin signaling in acute myeloid leukemia harboring Fms-like tyrosine kinase-3 internal tandem duplication mutations: implications for microenvironment influence on sorafenib sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Hai; Zeng, Dongfeng; Shen, Zhaohua; Liao, Jun; Wang, Xiaoguo; Liu, Yao; Zhang, Xi; Kong, Peiyan

    2016-01-01

    Binding of leukemia cells to the bone marrow extracellular matrix (ECM) through integrins might influence drug response and the survival of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, the functions of integrin in AML are needed to be clarified. Data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) were retrieved and integrin β3 (ITGB3) expression and prognostic significance for AML were analyzed. Integrin alphavbeta3 (αvβ3) in sorafenib sensitivity and signaling pathway of FLT3-ITD AML cells was evaluated in vitro. The level of ITGB3 expression was positively correlated with risk stratification and prognosis of AML patients, especially in cytogenetic-normal patients with Fms-like tyrosine kinase-3 internal tandem duplication (FLT3-ITD) mutation. Integrin αvβ3 decreased sorafenib sensitivity when co-culture of MV4-11 cells and bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs), and it is crucial for osteopontin (OPN) induced sorafenib insensitivity in FLT3-ITD mutated AML cells. Mechanically, αvβ3 enhance β-catenin activation through phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/Glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta (GSK3β) pathway. Moreover, genetic inhibition of β-catenin by shRNA could increase sorafenib sensitivity in MV4-11 cells. Taken together, our study revealed a novel mechanism in microenvironment influence on sorafenib sensitivity in AML with FLT3-ITD mutation that was caused by activating integrin αvβ3/PI3K/Akt/GSK3β/β-catenin pathway. Integrin αvβ3/β-catenin could be considered as a new therapeutic target for AML especially for FLT3-ITD mutated AML. PMID:27248172

  8. Mutations on the N-terminal edge of the DELSEED loop in either the α or β subunit of the mitochondrial F1-ATPase enhance ATP hydrolysis in the absence of the central γ rotor.

    PubMed

    La, Thuy; Clark-Walker, George Desmond; Wang, Xiaowen; Wilkens, Stephan; Chen, Xin Jie

    2013-11-01

    F(1)-ATPase is a rotary molecular machine with a subunit stoichiometry of α(3)β(3)γ(1)δ(1)ε(1). It has a robust ATP-hydrolyzing activity due to effective cooperativity between the three catalytic sites. It is believed that the central γ rotor dictates the sequential conformational changes to the catalytic sites in the α(3)β(3) core to achieve cooperativity. However, recent studies of the thermophilic Bacillus PS3 F(1)-ATPase have suggested that the α(3)β(3) core can intrinsically undergo unidirectional cooperative catalysis (T. Uchihashi et al., Science 333:755-758, 2011). The mechanism of this γ-independent ATP-hydrolyzing mode is unclear. Here, a unique genetic screen allowed us to identify specific mutations in the α and β subunits that stimulate ATP hydrolysis by the mitochondrial F(1)-ATPase in the absence of γ. We found that the F446I mutation in the α subunit and G419D mutation in the β subunit suppress cell death by the loss of mitochondrial DNA (ρ(o)) in a Kluyveromyces lactis mutant lacking γ. In organello ATPase assays showed that the mutant but not the wild-type γ-less F(1) complexes retained 21.7 to 44.6% of the native F(1)-ATPase activity. The γ-less F(1) subcomplex was assembled but was structurally and functionally labile in vitro. Phe446 in the α subunit and Gly419 in the β subunit are located on the N-terminal edge of the DELSEED loops in both subunits. Mutations in these two sites likely enhance the transmission of catalytically required conformational changes to an adjacent α or β subunit, thereby allowing robust ATP hydrolysis and cell survival under ρ(o) conditions. This work may help our understanding of the structural elements required for ATP hydrolysis by the α(3)β(3) subcomplex.

  9. Depletion of pro-oncogenic RUNX2 enhances gemcitabine (GEM) sensitivity of p53-mutated pancreatic cancer Panc-1 cells through the induction of pro-apoptotic TAp63

    PubMed Central

    Ozaki, Toshinori; Nakamura, Mizuyo; Ogata, Takehiro; Sang, Meijie; Yoda, Hiroyuki; Hiraoka, Kiriko; Sang, Meixiang; Shimozato, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we have described that siRNA-mediated silencing of runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) improves anti-cancer drug gemcitabine (GEM) sensitivity of p53-deficient human pancreatic cancer AsPC-1 cells through the augmentation of p53 family TAp63-dependent cell death pathway. In this manuscript, we have extended our study to p53-mutated human pancreatic cancer Panc-1 cells. According to our present results, knockdown of mutant p53 alone had a marginal effect on GEM-mediated cell death of Panc-1 cells. We then sought to deplete RUNX2 using siRNA in Panc-1 cells and examined its effect on GEM sensitivity. Under our experimental conditions, RUNX2 knockdown caused a significant enhancement of GEM sensitivity of Panc-1 cells. Notably, GEM-mediated induction of TAp63 but not of TAp73 was further stimulated in RUNX2-depleted Panc-1 cells, indicating that, like AsPC-1 cells, TAp63 might play a pivotal role in the regulation of GEM sensitivity of Panc-1 cells. Consistent with this notion, forced expression of TAp63α in Panc-1 cells promoted cell cycle arrest and/or cell death, and massively increased luciferase activities driven by TAp63-target gene promoters such as p21WAF1 and NOXA. In addition, immunoprecipitation experiments indicated that RUNX2 forms a complex with TAp63 in Panc-1 cells. Taken together, our current observations strongly suggest that depletion of RUNX2 enhances the cytotoxic effect of GEM on p53-mutated Panc-1 cells through the stimulation of TAp63-dependent cell death pathway even in the presence of a large amount of pro-oncogenic mutant p53, and might provide an attractive strategy to treat pancreatic cancer patients with p53 mutations. PMID:27713122

  10. Depletion of pro-oncogenic RUNX2 enhances gemcitabine (GEM) sensitivity of p53-mutated pancreatic cancer Panc-1 cells through the induction of pro-apoptotic TAp63.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Toshinori; Nakamura, Mizuyo; Ogata, Takehiro; Sang, Meijie; Yoda, Hiroyuki; Hiraoka, Kiriko; Sang, Meixiang; Shimozato, Osamu

    2016-11-01

    Recently, we have described that siRNA-mediated silencing of runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) improves anti-cancer drug gemcitabine (GEM) sensitivity of p53-deficient human pancreatic cancer AsPC-1 cells through the augmentation of p53 family TAp63-dependent cell death pathway. In this manuscript, we have extended our study to p53-mutated human pancreatic cancer Panc-1 cells. According to our present results, knockdown of mutant p53 alone had a marginal effect on GEM-mediated cell death of Panc-1 cells. We then sought to deplete RUNX2 using siRNA in Panc-1 cells and examined its effect on GEM sensitivity. Under our experimental conditions, RUNX2 knockdown caused a significant enhancement of GEM sensitivity of Panc-1 cells. Notably, GEM-mediated induction of TAp63 but not of TAp73 was further stimulated in RUNX2-depleted Panc-1 cells, indicating that, like AsPC-1 cells, TAp63 might play a pivotal role in the regulation of GEM sensitivity of Panc-1 cells. Consistent with this notion, forced expression of TAp63α in Panc-1 cells promoted cell cycle arrest and/or cell death, and massively increased luciferase activities driven by TAp63-target gene promoters such as p21WAF1 and NOXA. In addition, immunoprecipitation experiments indicated that RUNX2 forms a complex with TAp63 in Panc-1 cells. Taken together, our current observations strongly suggest that depletion of RUNX2 enhances the cytotoxic effect of GEM on p53-mutated Panc-1 cells through the stimulation of TAp63-dependent cell death pathway even in the presence of a large amount of pro-oncogenic mutant p53, and might provide an attractive strategy to treat pancreatic cancer patients with p53 mutations.

  11. Poly-l-aspartic Acid Enhances and Prolongs Gentamicin-mediated Suppression of the CFTR-G542X Mutation in a Cystic Fibrosis Mouse Model*

    PubMed Central

    Du, Ming; Keeling, Kim M.; Fan, Liming; Liu, Xiaoli; Bedwell, David M.

    2009-01-01

    Aminoglycosides such as gentamicin have the ability to suppress translation termination at premature stop mutations, leading to a partial restoration of protein expression and function. This observation led to studies showing that this approach may provide a viable treatment for patients with genetic diseases such as cystic fibrosis that are caused by premature stop mutations. Although aminoglycoside treatment is sometimes associated with harmful side effects, several studies have shown that the co-administration of polyanions such as poly-l-aspartic acid (PAA) can both reduce toxicity and increase the intracellular aminoglycoside concentration. In the current study we examined how the co-administration of gentamicin with PAA influenced the readthrough of premature stop codons in cultured cells and a cystic fibrosis mouse model. Using a dual luciferase readthrough reporter system in cultured cells, we found that the co-administration of gentamicin with PAA increased readthrough 20–40% relative to cells treated with the same concentration of gentamicin alone. Using a Cftr-/- hCFTR-G542X mouse model, we found that PAA also increased the in vivo nonsense suppression induced by gentamicin. Following the withdrawal of gentamicin, PAA significantly prolonged the time interval during which readthrough could be detected, as shown by short circuit current measurements and immunofluorescence. Because the use of gentamicin to suppress disease-causing nonsense mutations will require their long term administration, the ability of PAA to reduce toxicity and increase both the level and duration of readthrough has important implications for this promising therapeutic approach. PMID:19136563

  12. A Green Tea Catechin Normalizes the Enhanced Ca2+ Sensitivity of Myofilaments Regulated by a Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Associated Mutation in Human Cardiac Troponin I (K206I)

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Chad M.; Karam, Chehade N.; Wolska, Beata M.; Kobayashi, Tomoyoshi; de Tombe, Pieter P.; Arteaga, Grace M.; Bos, J. Martijn; Ackerman, Michael J.; Solaro, R. John

    2015-01-01

    Background Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common inherited cardiovascular disease characterized by thickening of ventricular walls and decreased left ventricular chamber volume. The majority of HCM-associated mutations are found in genes encoding sarcomere proteins. Herein, we set out to functionally characterize a novel HCM-associated mutation (K206I-TNNI3), and elucidate the mechanism of dysfunction at the level of myofilament proteins. Methods and Results The male index case was diagnosed with HCM after an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest which was followed by comprehensive clinical evaluation, transthoracic echocardiography, and clinical genetic testing. To determine molecular mechanism(s) of the mutant human cardiac troponin I (K206I), we tested the Ca2+ dependence of thin filament-activated myosin-S1-ATPase activity in a reconstituted, regulated, actomyosin system comparing wildtype human troponin complex, 50% mix of K206I/wildtype, or 100% K206I. We also exchanged native troponin detergent extracted fibers with reconstituted troponin containing either wildtype or a 65% mix of K206I/wildtype, and measured force generation. The Ca2+ sensitivity of the myofilaments containing the K206I variant was significantly increased, and when treated with 20 μM EGCG (green tea) was restored back to wildtype levels in ATPase and force measurements. The K206I mutation impairs the ability of the troponin I to inhibit ATPase activity in the absence of Ca-hcTnC (calcium-bound-human cardiac troponin C). The ability of Ca-hcTnC to neutralize the inhibition of K206I was greater than with wildtype TnI. Conclusions Compromised interactions of K206I with actin and hcTnC may lead to impaired relaxation and HCM. PMID:26553696

  13. Gene-environment interaction in the onset of eczema in infancy: filaggrin loss-of-function mutations enhanced by neonatal cat exposure.

    PubMed

    Bisgaard, Hans; Simpson, Angela; Palmer, Colin N A; Bønnelykke, Klaus; McLean, Irwin; Mukhopadhyay, Somnath; Pipper, Christian B; Halkjaer, Liselotte B; Lipworth, Brian; Hankinson, Jenny; Woodcock, Ashley; Custovic, Adnan

    2008-06-24

    Loss-of-function variants in the gene encoding filaggrin (FLG) are major determinants of eczema. We hypothesized that weakening of the physical barrier in FLG-deficient individuals may potentiate the effect of environmental exposures. Therefore, we investigated whether there is an interaction between FLG loss-of-function mutations with environmental exposures (pets and dust mites) in relation to the development of eczema. We used data obtained in early life in a high-risk birth cohort in Denmark and replicated the findings in an unselected birth cohort in the United Kingdom. Primary outcome was age of onset of eczema; environmental exposures included pet ownership and mite and pet allergen levels. In Copenhagen (n = 379), FLG mutation increased the risk of eczema during the first year of life (hazard ratio [HR] 2.26, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.27-4.00, p = 0.005), with a further increase in risk related to cat exposure at birth amongst children with FLG mutation (HR 11.11, 95% CI 3.79-32.60, p < 0.0001); dog exposure was moderately protective (HR 0.49, 95% CI 0.24-1.01, p = 0.05), but not related to FLG genotype. In Manchester (n = 503) an independent and significant association of the development of eczema by age 12 mo with FLG genotype was confirmed (HR 1.95, 95% CI 1.13-3.36, p = 0.02). In addition, the risk increased because of the interaction of cat ownership at birth and FLG genotype (HR 3.82, 95% CI 1.35-10.81, p = 0.01), with no significant effect of the interaction with dog ownership (HR 0.59, 95% CI 0.16-2.20, p = 0.43). Mite-allergen had no effects in either cohort. The observed effects were independent of sensitisation. We have demonstrated a significant interaction between FLG loss-of-function main mutations (501x and 2282del4) and cat ownership at birth on the development of early-life eczema in two independent birth cohorts. Our data suggest that cat but not dog ownership substantially increases the risk of eczema within the first year of life in

  14. NF-kappaB-dependent expression of the antiapoptotic factor c-FLIP is regulated by calpain 3, the protein involved in limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A.

    PubMed

    Benayoun, Béatrice; Baghdiguian, Stephen; Lajmanovich, Alicia; Bartoli, Marc; Daniele, Nathalie; Gicquel, Evelyne; Bourg, Nathalie; Raynaud, Fabrice; Pasquier, Marie-Anne; Suel, Laurence; Lochmuller, Hanns; Lefranc, Gérard; Richard, Isabelle

    2008-05-01

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A (LGMD2A) is a recessive genetic disorder caused by mutations in the cysteine protease calpain 3 (CAPN3) that leads to selective muscle wasting. We previously showed that CAPN3 deficiency is associated with a profound perturbation of the NF-kappaB/IkappaB alpha survival pathway. In this study, the consequences of altered NF-kappaB/IkappaB alpha pathway were investigated using biological materials from LGMD2A patients. We first show that the antiapoptotic factor cellular-FLICE inhibitory protein (c-FLIP), which is dependent on the NF-kappaB pathway in normal muscle cells, is down-regulated in LGMD2A biopsies. In muscle cells isolated from LGMD2A patients, NF-kappaB is readily activated on cytokine induction as shown by an increase in its DNA binding activity. However, we observed discrepant transcriptional responses depending on the NF-kappaB target genes. IkappaB alpha is expressed following NF-kappaB activation independent of the CAPN3 status, whereas expression of c-FLIP is obtained only when CAPN3 is present. These data lead us to postulate that CAPN3 intervenes in the regulation of the expression of NF-kappaB-dependent survival genes to prevent apoptosis in skeletal muscle. Deregulations in the NF-kappaB pathway could be part of the mechanism responsible for the muscle wasting resulting from CAPN3 deficiency.

  15. Genetic and Molecular Analysis of Suppressors of Ras Mutations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-10-01

    mutation and enhance the Vulvaless phenotype of mutations in lin-45 raf, sur-8 or mpk-1. Double mutant analysis suggests that sur-6 PP2A-B acts...Multivulva phenotype of an activated ras mutation and enhance the Vulvaless phenotype of mutations in lin-45 raf, sur-8 or mpk-1. Double mutant...dosage analysis indicated that the sur-8(kul67) mutation is a recessive , strong loss-of-function mutation. The deficiency mDf4 failed to complement sur

  16. Enhanced resistance to fluoroquinolones in laboratory-grown mutants & clinical isolates of Shigella due to synergism between efflux pump expression & mutations in quinolone resistance determining region.

    PubMed

    Taneja, Neelam; Mishra, Arti; Kumar, Ajay; Verma, Garima; Sharma, Meera

    2015-01-01

    There is a worldwide emergence of fluoroquinolone resistance in Shigella species. To understand the molecular mechanisms associated with fluoroquinolone resistance, naturally occurring fluoroquinolone-resistant strains and laboratory-induced spontaneous mutants of Shigella spp. were used and the relative contributions of acrAB-tolC efflux pumps, gyrase and topoisomerase target gene mutations towards fluoroquinolone resistance were determined. Eight Shigella flexneri and six S. dysenteriae clinical isolates were studied. Three consecutive mutants resistant to ciprofloxacin for S. flexneri SFM1 (≥ 0.25 µg/ml), SFM2 (≥ 4 µg/ml) and SFM3 (≥ 32 µg/ml) were selected in 15 steps from susceptible isolates by serial exposure to increasing concentrations of nalidixic acid and ciprofloxacin. Similarly, two mutants for S. dysenteriae SDM1 (≥ 0.25 µg/ml) and SDM2 (≥ 4 µg/ml) were selected in eight steps. After PCR amplification sequence analyses of gyrase and topoisomerase target genes were performed. Expression of efflux genes acrA, acrB, acrR and tolC was measured using real-time PCR. Mutations were observed in gyrA Ser [83]→Leu, Asp [87]→Asn/Gly, Val [196]→Ala and in parC Phe [93]→Val, Ser [80]→Ile, Asp [101]→Glu and Asp [110]→Glu. Overall, acrA and acrB overexpression was associated with fluoroquinolone resistance ( p0 <0.05); while tolC and acrR expression levels did not. Fluoroquinolone resistance in Shigella spp. is the end product of either a single or a combination of mutations in QRDRs and/ or efflux activity. Novel polymorphisms were observed at Val [196]→Ala in gyrA in clinical isolates and Phe [93]→Val, Asp [101]→Glu, Asp [110]→Glu and in parC in majority of laboratory-grown mutants.

  17. Dynamically-driven enhancement of the catalytic machinery of the SARS 3C-like protease by the S284-T285-I286/A mutations on the extra domain.

    PubMed

    Lim, Liangzhong; Shi, Jiahai; Mu, Yuguang; Song, Jianxing

    2014-01-01

    Previously we revealed that the extra domain of SARS 3CLpro mediated the catalysis via different mechanisms. While the R298A mutation completely abolished the dimerization, thus resulting in the inactive catalytic machinery, N214A inactivated the enzyme by altering its dynamics without significantly perturbing its structure. Here we studied another mutant with S284-T285-I286 replaced by Ala (STI/A) with a 3.6-fold activity increase and slightly enhanced dimerization. We determined its crystal structure, which still adopts the dimeric structure almost identical to that of the wild-type (WT), except for slightly tighter packing between two extra-domains. We then conducted 100-ns molecular dynamics (MD) simulations for both STI/A and WT, the longest reported so far for 3CLpro. In the simulations, two STI/A extra domains become further tightly packed, leading to a significant volume reduction of the nano-channel formed by residues from both catalytic and extra domains. The enhanced packing appears to slightly increase the dynamic stability of the N-finger and the first helix residues, which subsequently triggers the redistribution of dynamics over residues directly contacting them. This ultimately enhances the dynamical stability of the residues constituting the catalytic dyad and substrate-binding pockets. Further correlation analysis reveals that a global network of the correlated motions exists in the protease, whose components include all residues identified so far to be critical for the dimerization and catalysis. Most strikingly, the N214A mutation globally decouples this network while the STI/A mutation alters the correlation pattern. Together with previous results, the present study establishes that besides the classic structural allostery, the dynamic allostery also operates in the SARS 3CLpro, which is surprisingly able to relay the perturbations on the extra domain onto the catalytic machinery to manifest opposite catalytic effects. Our results thus imply a

  18. An Enhanced Polymerase Chain Reaction Assay to Detect Pre- and Full Mutation Alleles of the Fragile X Mental Retardation 1 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Saluto, Alessandro; Brussino, Alessandro; Tassone, Flora; Arduino, Carlo; Cagnoli, Claudia; Pappi, Patrizia; Hagerman, Paul; Migone, Nicola; Brusco, Alfredo

    2005-01-01

    Several diagnostic strategies have been applied to the detection of FMR1 gene repeat expansions in fragile X syndrome. Here, we report a novel polymerase chain reaction-based strategy using the Expand Long Template PCR System (Roche Diagnostics, Mannheim, Germany) and the osmolyte betaine. Repeat expansions up to ∼330 CGGs in males and up to at least ∼160 CGGs in carrier women could be easily visualized on ethidium bromide agarose gels. We also demonstrated that fluorescence analysis of polymerase chain reaction products was a reliable tool to verify the presence of premutation and full mutation alleles both in males and in females. This technique, primarily designed to detect premutation alleles, can be used as a routine first screen for expanded FMR1 alleles. PMID:16258159

  19. Enhanced fast-inactivated state stability of cardiac sodium channels by a novel voltage sensor SCN5A mutation, R1632C, as a cause of atypical Brugada syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Tadashi; Kaneko, Yoshiaki; Saito, Akihiro; Ota, Masaki; Iijima, Takafumi; Kurabayashi, Masahiko

    2015-11-01

    Mutations in SCN5A, which encodes the cardiac voltage-gated sodium channels, can be associated with multiple electrophysiological phenotypes. A novel SCN5A R1632C mutation, located in the domain IV-segment 4 voltage sensor, was identified in a young male patient who had a syncopal episode during exercise and presented with atrial tachycardia, sinus node dysfunction, and Brugada syndrome. We sought to elucidate the functional consequences of the R1632C mutation. The wild-type (WT) or R1632C SCN5A mutation was coexpressed with β1 subunit in tsA201 cells, and whole-cell sodium currents (INa) were recorded using patch-clamp methods. INa density, measured at -20 mV from a holding potential of -120 mV, for R1632C was significantly lower than that for WT (R1632C: -433 ± 52 pA/pF, n = 14; WT: -672 ± 90 pA/pF, n = 15; P < .05); however, no significant changes were observed in the steady-state activation and fast inactivation rate. The steady-state inactivation curve for R1632C was remarkably shifted to hyperpolarizing potentials compared with that for WT (R1632C: V1/2 = -110.7 ± 0.8 mV, n = 16; WT: V1/2 = -85.9 ± 2.5 mV, n = 17; P < .01). The steady-state fast inactivation curve for R1632C was also shifted to the same degree. Recovery from fast inactivation after a 20-ms depolarizing pulse for R1632C was remarkably delayed compared with that for WT (R1632C: τ = 246.7 ± 14.3 ms, n = 8; WT: τ = 3.7 ± 0.3 ms, n = 8; P < .01). Repetitive depolarizing pulses at various cycle lengths greatly attenuated INa for R1632C than that for WT. R1632C showed a loss of function of INa by an enhanced fast-inactivated state stability because of a pronounced impairment of recovery from fast inactivation, which may explain the phenotypic manifestation observed in our patient. Copyright © 2015 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Mutagenesis of 8-oxoguanine adjacent to an abasic site in simian kidney cells: tandem mutations and enhancement of G-->T transversions.

    PubMed

    Kalam, M Abul; Basu, Ashis K

    2005-08-01

    Clustered DNA damages are well-established characteristics of ionizing radiation. As a model clustered lesion in the same strand of DNA, we have evaluated the mutagenic potential of 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) adjacent to a uracil in simian kidney cells using a phagemid vector. The uracil residue would be excised by the enzyme uracil DNA glycosylase in vivo generating an abasic site (AP site). A solitary uracil in either GUGTC or GTGUC sequence context provided >60% progeny containing GTGTC indicating that dAMP incorporation opposite the AP site or uracil occurred, but a >30% population showed replacement of U by A, C, or G, which suggests that dTMP, dGMP, or dCMP incorporation also occurred, respectively, opposite the AP site. While the preference for targeted base substitutions at the GUG site was T > C > A > G, the same at the GUC site was T > A > C > G. We conclude that base incorporation opposite an AP site is sequence-dependent. For 8-oxoG, as compared to 23-24% G-->T mutants from a single 8-oxoG in a TG(8-oxo)T sequence context, the tandem lesions UG(8-oxo)T and TG(8-oxo)U generated approximately 60 and >85% progeny, respectively, that did not contain the TGT sequence. A significant fraction of tandem mutations were detected when uracil was adjacent to 8-oxoG. What we found most interesting is that the total targeted G(8-oxo)-->T transversions that included both single and tandem mutations at the TG(8-oxo)U site was nearly 60% relative to about 30% at the UG(8-oxo)T site. A higher mutational frequency at the TG(8-oxo)U sequence may arise from a change in DNA polymerase that is more error prone. Thermal melting experiments showed that the Tm for the 8-oxoG:C pair in the TG(8-oxo)(AP*) sequence in a 12-mer was lower than the same in a (AP*)G(8-oxo)T 12-mer with deltadeltaG 0.8 kcal/mol (where AP* represents tetrahydrofuran, the model abasic site). When the 8-oxoG:C pair in each sequence was compared with a 8-oxoG:A pair, the former was found to be more stable than

  1. Mutation and the environment

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelsohn, M.L. ); Albertini, R.J. )

    1990-01-01

    This book is covered under the following topics: Somatic Mutation: Animal Model; Somatic Mutation: Human; Heritable Mutation: Animal Model; Heritable Mutation: Approaches to Human Induction Rates; Heritable Mutation: Human Risk; Epidemiology: Population Studies on Genotoxicity; and Epidemiology: Workplace Studies of Genotoxicity.

  2. Anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies enhance sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents in BRCA1-mutated and PTEN-wild-type triple-negative breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    El Guerrab, Abderrahim; Bamdad, Mahchid; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Penault-Llorca, Frédérique; Aubel, Corinne

    2017-05-01

    Increased epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is recognized as a promising therapeutic target, specifically through the use of selective EGFR inhibitors combined with chemotherapies. TNBC is characterized by genetic instability that leads to increased sensitivity to cytotoxic agents. We analyzed the effect of anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies (mAbs; cetuximab and panitumumab) in combination with chemotherapeutic agents (docetaxel, cisplatin, and epirubicin) on EGFR-expressing TNBC cell lines that have different mutation statuses for one oncogene (KRAS) and two tumor suppressor genes (PTEN and BRCA1). Both mAbs failed to improve the cytotoxic effect of chemotherapies in the KRAS mutant cell line (MDA-MB-231) and PTEN-null cell lines (HCC-1937 and MDA-MB-468). In contrast, mAbs combined with DNA-damaging agents (cisplatin or epirubicin) had a synergistic effect in the BRCA1-mutant cell line SUM-1315 (wild-type KRAS and PTEN). The reintroduction of wild-type BRCA1 into SUM-1315 cells abolished this synergism. The improved effect of combination therapy was associated with cell cycle arrest at G1 phase and inhibition of the phosphorylation of EGFR and ERK1/2 proteins. These results suggest that patients with BRCA1-associated TNBC without genetic alterations in the PTEN and KRAS genes may have improved therapeutic responses to anti-EGFR mAbs combined with DNA-damaging agents. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. The effect of silibinin in enhancing toxicity of temozolomide and etoposide in p53 and PTEN-mutated resistant glioma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Elhag, Rashid; Mazzio, Elizabeth A; Soliman, Karam F A

    2015-03-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is an intractable brain tumor, associated with poor prognosis and low survival rate. Combination therapy such as surgery, radiotherapy and temozolomide is considered standard in overcoming this aggressive cancer, despite poor prognosis. There is a need to identify potential agents, which may augment the chemotherapeutic effects of standard drugs such as temozolomide. In this project, we evaluated the effects of silibinin, a natural plant component of milk thistle seeds, to potentiate toxic effects of chemotherapy drugs such as temozolomide, etoposide and irinotecan on LN229, U87 and A172 (P53 and phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) -tumor suppressor-mutated) glioma cell lines. Data from this work suggest that silibinin was effective in potentiating the cytotoxic efficacy of temozolomide in LN229, U87 and A172 cells. While silibinin reduced survivin protein expression only in LN229 cells, its ability to potentiate cytotoxicity of chemo therapy drugs occurred irrespective of survivin protein levels. The data also demonstrated that silibinin potentiated the effect of etoposide and but not irinotecan in LN229 cells. Future research will be required to evaluate the in vivo efficacy of silibinin to delineate its mechanism of action and its ability to cross the blood-brain barrier.

  4. Mutations in the Hyperosmotic Stress-Responsive Mitochondrial BASIC AMINO ACID CARRIER2 Enhance Proline Accumulation in Arabidopsis1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Toka, Iman; Planchais, Séverine; Cabassa, Cécile; Justin, Anne-Marie; De Vos, Delphine; Richard, Luc; Savouré, Arnould; Carol, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial carrier family proteins are diverse in their substrate specificity, organellar location, and gene expression. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), 58 genes encode these six-transmembrane-domain proteins. We investigated the biological role of the basic amino acid carrier Basic Amino Acid Carrier2 (BAC2) from Arabidopsis that is structurally and functionally similar to ARG11, a yeast ornithine and arginine carrier, and to Arabidopsis BAC1. By studying the expression of BAC2 and the consequences of its mutation in Arabidopsis, we showed that BAC2 is a genuine mitochondrial protein and that Arabidopsis requires expression of the BAC2 gene in order to use arginine. The BAC2 gene is induced by hyperosmotic stress (with either 0.2 m NaCl or 0.4 m mannitol) and dark-induced senescence. The BAC2 promoter contains numerous stress-related cis-regulatory elements, and the transcriptional activity of BAC2:β-glucuronidase is up-regulated by stress and senescence. Under hyperosmotic stress, bac2 mutants express the P5CS1 proline biosynthetic gene more strongly than the wild type, and this correlates with a greater accumulation of Pro. Our data suggest that BAC2 is a hyperosmotic stress-inducible transporter of basic amino acids that contributes to proline accumulation in response to hyperosmotic stress in Arabidopsis. PMID:20172963

  5. Mutation of the Streptococcus gordonii Thiol-Disulfide Oxidoreductase SdbA Leads to Enhanced Biofilm Formation Mediated by the CiaRH Two-Component Signaling System

    PubMed Central

    Davey, Lauren; Halperin, Scott A.; Lee, Song F.

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus gordonii is a commensal inhabitant of human oral biofilms. Previously, we identified an enzyme called SdbA that played an important role in biofilm formation by S. gordonii. SdbA is thiol-disulfide oxidoreductase that catalyzes disulfide bonds in secreted proteins. Surprisingly, inactivation of SdbA results in enhanced biofilm formation. In this study we investigated the basis for biofilm formation by the ΔsdbA mutant. The results revealed that biofilm formation was mediated by the interaction between the CiaRH and ComDE two-component signalling systems. Although it did not affect biofilm formation by the S. gordonii parent strain, CiaRH was upregulated in the ΔsdbA mutant and it was essential for the enhanced biofilm phenotype. The biofilm phenotype was reversed by inactivation of CiaRH or by the addition of competence stimulating peptide, the production of which is blocked by CiaRH activity. Competition assays showed that the enhanced biofilm phenotype also corresponded to increased oral colonization in mice. Thus, the interaction between SdbA, CiaRH and ComDE affects biofilm formation both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27846284

  6. Mutation rates and mutational loads in man

    SciTech Connect

    Cavalli-Sforza, L.L.

    1984-01-01

    The following areas of research are discussed: (1) the study of human mutation rates; (2) geography of human genes and its relevance to mutation; (3) sociocultural studies correlated with population genetics; (4) consanguineous marriages; and (5) surnames. (ACR)

  7. Mutation of rpoS enhances Pseudomonas sp. KL28 growth at higher concentrations of m-cresol and changes its surface-related phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Yun, Ji In; Cho, Kyoung Mi; Kim, Jin-Kyoo; Lee, Soo O; Cho, Kyungyun; Lee, Kyoung

    2007-04-01

    A Tn5 transposon mutant was isolated of the alkylphenol degrader Pseudomonas sp. KL28 that showed increased growth at higher levels of m-cresol on solid and in liquid cultures. The transposon was inserted at the 5'-terminus of rpoS, which encodes a stationary-phase sigma factor. When grown on agar plates, the rpoS mutant developed prominent wrinkles, especially at lower temperatures, and spread faster on soft agar. In addition, the rpoS mutant had enhanced biofilm-forming ability that was not due to self-produced diffusible signals.

  8. Selective FLT3 inhibitor FI-700 neutralizes Mcl-1 and enhances p53-mediated apoptosis in AML cells with activating mutations of FLT3 through Mcl-1/Noxa axis.

    PubMed

    Kojima, K; Konopleva, M; Tsao, T; Andreeff, M; Ishida, H; Shiotsu, Y; Jin, L; Tabe, Y; Nakakuma, H

    2010-01-01

    Treatment using Fms-like tyrosine kinase-3 (FLT3) inhibitors is a promising approach to overcome the dismal prognosis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with activating FLT3 mutations. Current trials are combining FLT3 inhibitors with p53-activating conventional chemotherapy. The mechanisms of cytotoxicity of FLT3 inhibitors are poorly understood. We investigated the interaction of FLT3 and p53 pathways after their simultaneous blockade using the selective FLT3 inhibitor FI-700 and the MDM2 inhibitor Nutlin-3 in AML. We found that FI-700 immediately reduced antiapoptotic Mcl-1 levels and enhanced Nutlin-induced p53-mediated mitochondrial apoptosis in FLT3/internal tandem duplication cells through the Mcl-1/Noxa axis. FI-700 induced proteasome-mediated degradation of Mcl-1, resulting in the reduced ability of Mcl-1 to sequester proapoptotic Bim. Nutlin-3 induced Noxa, which displaced Bim from Mcl-1. The FI-700/Nutlin-3 combination profoundly activated Bax and induced apoptosis. Our findings suggest that FI-700 actively enhances p53 signaling toward mitochondrial apoptosis and that a combination strategy aimed at inhibiting FLT3 and activating p53 signaling could potentially be effective in AML.

  9. SOS mutator DNA polymerase IV functions in adaptive mutation and not adaptive amplification.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, G J; Lee, P L; Lombardo, M J; Hastings, P J; Rosenberg, S M

    2001-03-01

    Adaptive point mutation and amplification are induced responses to environmental stress, promoting genetic changes that can enhance survival. A specialized adaptive mutation mechanism has been documented in one Escherichia coli assay, but its enzymatic basis remained unclear. We report that the SOS-inducible, error-prone DNA polymerase (pol) IV, encoded by dinB, is required for adaptive point mutation in the E. coli lac operon. A nonpolar dinB mutation reduces adaptive mutation frequencies by 85% but does not affect adaptive amplification, growth-dependent mutation, or survival after oxidative or UV damage. We show that pol IV, together with the major replicase, pol III, can account for all adaptive point mutations at lac. The results identify a role for pol IV in inducible genetic change.

  10. Mutations in monoamine oxidase (MAO) genes in mice lead to hypersensitivity to serotonin-enhancing drugs: implications for drug side effects in humans

    PubMed Central

    Fox, MA; Panessiti, MG; Moya, PR; Tolliver, TJ; Chen, K; Shih, JC; Murphy, DL

    2012-01-01

    A possible side effect of serotonin-enhancing drugs is the serotonin syndrome, which can be lethal. Here we examined possible hypersensitivity to two such drugs, the serotonin precursor 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan (5-HTP) and the atypical opioid tramadol, in mice lacking the genes for both monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) and MAOB. MAOA/B-knockout (KO) mice displayed baseline serotonin syndrome behaviors, and these behavioral responses were highly exaggerated following 5-HTP or tramadol versus baseline and wild-type (WT) littermates. Compared with MAOA/B-WT mice, baseline tissue serotonin levels were increased ~2.6–3.9-fold in MAOA/B-KO mice. Following 5-HTP, serotonin levels were further increased ~4.5–6.2-fold in MAOA/B-KO mice. These exaggerated responses are in line with the exaggerated responses following serotonin-enhancing drugs that we previously observed in mice lacking the serotonin transporter (SERT). These findings provide a second genetic mouse model suggestive of possible human vulnerability to the serotonin syndrome in individuals with lesser-expressing MAO or SERT polymorphisms that confer serotonergic system changes. PMID:22964922

  11. Ataxia-Telangiectasia, Mutated (ATM)/Nuclear Factor κ light chain enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB) signaling controls basal and DNA damage-induced transglutaminase 2 expression.

    PubMed

    Ai, Lingbao; Skehan, Ryan R; Saydi, John; Lin, Tong; Brown, Kevin D

    2012-05-25

    Transglutaminase 2 (TG2) is a ubiquitously expressed enzyme that cross-links proteins and its overexpression, linked to a drug resistant phenotype, is commonly observed in cancer cells. Further, up-regulation of TG2 expression occurs during response to various forms of cell stress; however, the molecular mechanisms that drive inducible expression of the TG2 gene (TGM2) require elucidation. Here we show that genotoxic stress induces TG2 expression through the Ataxia-Telangiectasia, Mutated (ATM)/Nuclear Factor κ light chain enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB) signaling pathway. We further document that NFκB is both necessary and sufficient to drive constitutive TG2 expression in cultured cell lines. Additionally, shRNA-mediated knockdown or pharmacological inhibition of the ATM kinase results in reduced constitutive TG2 expression and NFκB transcriptional activity. We document that the NFκB subunit p65 (RelA) interacts with two independent consensus NFκB binding sites within the TGM2 promoter, that mutation of either site or pharmacological inhibition of NFκB reduces TGM2 promoter activity, and genotoxic stress drives heightened association of p65 with the TGM2 promoter. Finally, we observed that knockdown of either p65 or ATM in MDA-MB-468 breast cancer cells expressing recombinant TG2 partially reduces resistance to doxorubicin, indicating that the drug resistance linked to overexpression of TG2 functions, in part, through p65 and ATM. This work establishes a novel ATM-dependent signaling loop where TG2 and NFκB activate each other resulting in sustained activation of NFκB and acquisition of a drug-resistant phenotype.

  12. Protein engineering of Bacillus thuringiensis δ-endotoxin: Mutations at domain II of CryIAb enhance receptor affinity and toxicity toward gypsy moth larvae

    PubMed Central

    Rajamohan, Francis; Alzate, Oscar; Cotrill, Jeffrey A.; Curtiss, April; Dean, Donald H.

    1996-01-01

    Substitutions or deletions of domain II loop residues of Bacillus thuringiensis δ-endotoxin CryIAb were constructed using site-directed mutagenesis techniques to investigate their functional roles in receptor binding and toxicity toward gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar). Substitution of loop 2 residue N372 with Ala or Gly (N372A, N372G) increased the toxicity against gypsy moth larvae 8-fold and enhanced binding affinity to gypsy moth midgut brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV) ≈4-fold. Deletion of N372 (D3), however, substantially reduced toxicity (>21 times) as well as binding affinity, suggesting that residue N372 is involved in receptor binding. Interestingly, a triple mutant, DF-1 (N372A, A282G and L283S), has a 36-fold increase in toxicity to gypsy moth neonates compared with wild-type toxin. The enhanced activity of DF-1 was correlated with higher binding affinity (18-fold) and binding site concentrations. Dissociation binding assays suggested that the off-rate of the BBMV-bound mutant toxins was similar to that of the wild type. However, DF-1 toxin bound 4 times more than the wild-type and N372A toxins, and it was directly correlated with binding affinity and potency. Protein blots of gypsy moth BBMV probed with labeled N372A, DF-1, and CryIAb toxins recognized a common 210-kDa protein, indicating that the increased activity of the mutants was not caused by binding to additional receptor(s). The improved binding affinity of N372A and DF-1 suggest that a shorter side chain at these loops may fit the toxin more efficiently to the binding pockets. These results offer an excellent model system for engineering δ-endotoxins with higher potency and wider spectra of target pests by improving receptor binding interactions. PMID:8962052

  13. Site-directed mutagenesis of the T4 endonuclease V gene: Mutations which enhance enzyme specific activity at low salt concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, R.S.; Augustine, M.L. )

    1989-01-01

    Previous structure/function analyses of the DNA repair enzyme, T4 endonuclease V, have suggested that the extreme carboxyl portion of the enzyme is associated with pyrimidine dimer-specific binding. Within the final 11 amino acids there are 5 aromatic, 2 basic, and no acidic residues and it has been proposed that these residues stack with and electrostatically interact with the kinked DNA at the site of a pyrimidine dimer. The role of the tyrosine residue at position 129 has been investigated by oligonucleotide site-directed mutagenesis in which the codon for Tyr-129 has been altered to reflect conservative changes of Trp and Phe and more dramatic changes of Ser, a stop codon, deletion of the codon or introduction of a frameshift. Both changes to the aromatic amino acids resulted in proteins which accumulated well in E. coli and not only significantly enhanced the UV survival of repair-deficient cells but also complemented a defective denV gene within UV-irradiated T4 phage. Partially purified preparations of the Tyr-129----Trp and Tyr-129----Phe mutants were assayed for their ability to processively incise UV-irradiated plasmid DNA (a nicking reaction carried out at low 25 mM salt concentrations). The mutant enzymes Tyr-129----Phe and Tyr-129----Trp displayed a 1000% and 500% enhanced specific nicking activity, respectively. These reactions were also shown to be completely processive. Assays performed at higher (100 mM) salt concentrations reduced the specific activities of the mutant enzymes approximately to that of wild type for the Tyr-129----Phe mutant and to 20% that of wild type for the Tyr-129----Trp mutant.

  14. Enhancement of α5-Containing Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid TypeAReceptors by the Nonimmobilizer 1,2-Dichlorohexafluorocyclobutane (F6) is Abolished by the β3(N265M) Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Burkat, Paul M.; Lor, Chong; Perouansky, Misha; Pearce, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Modulation of γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptors (GABAARs) by general anesthetics may contribute to their ability to produce amnesia. Receptors containing α5 subunits, which mediate tonic and slow synaptic inhibition, are co-localized with β3 and γ2 subunits in dendritic layers of the hippocampus and are sensitive to low (amnestic) concentrations of anesthetics. Since α5 and β3 subunits influence performance in hippocampus-dependent learning tasks in the presence and absence of general anesthetics, and the experimental inhaled drug 1,2-dichlorohexafluorocyclobutane (F6) impairs hippocampus-dependent learning, we hypothesized that F6 would modulate receptors that incorporate α5 and β3 subunits. We hypothesized further that the β3(N265M) mutation, which controls receptor modulation by general anesthetics, would similarly influence modulation by F6. Methods Using whole-cell electrophysiological recording techniques, we tested the effects of F6 at concentrations ranging from 4 μM to 16 μM on receptors expressed in human embryonic kidney293 cells. We measured drug modulation of wild type α5β3 and α5β3γ2L GABAARs, and receptors harboring the β3(N265M) mutation. We also tested the effects of F6 on α1β2γ2L receptors, which were reported previously to be insensitive to this drug when expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Results F6 enhanced the responses of wild type α5β3γ2L but not α1β2γ2L receptors to low concentrations of GABA in a concentration-dependent manner. Receptors that incorporated the mutant β3(N265M) subunit were insensitive to F6. When applied together with a high concentration of GABA, F6 blocked currents through α5β3 but not α5β3γ2L receptors. F6 did not alter deactivation of α5β3γ2L receptors after brief, high concentration pulses of GABA. Conclusions The nonimmobilizer F6 modulates GABAARs in a manner that depends on subunit composition and on mode of receptor activation by GABA, supporting a possible role for α5

  15. Enhancement of α5-containing γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptors by the nonimmobilizer 1,2-dichlorohexafluorocyclobutane (F6) is abolished by the β3(N265M) mutation.

    PubMed

    Burkat, Paul M; Lor, Chong; Perouansky, Misha; Pearce, Robert A

    2014-12-01

    Modulation of γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptors (GABAARs) by general anesthetics may contribute to their ability to produce amnesia. Receptors containing α5 subunits, which mediate tonic and slow synaptic inhibition, are co-localized with β3 and γ2 subunits in dendritic layers of the hippocampus and are sensitive to low (amnestic) concentrations of anesthetics. Because α5 and β3 subunits influence performance in hippocampus-dependent learning tasks in the presence and absence of general anesthetics, and the experimental inhaled drug 1,2-dichlorohexafluorocyclobutane (F6) impairs hippocampus-dependent learning, we hypothesized that F6 would modulate receptors that incorporate α5 and β3 subunits. We hypothesized further that the β3(N265M) mutation, which controls receptor modulation by general anesthetics, would similarly influence modulation by F6. Using whole-cell electrophysiologic recording techniques, we tested the effects of F6 at concentrations ranging from 4 to 16 μM on receptors expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells. We measured drug modulation of wild-type α5β3 and α5β3γ2L GABAARs and receptors harboring the β3(N265M) mutation. We also tested the effects of F6 on α1β2γ2L receptors, which were reported previously to be insensitive to this drug when expressed in Xenopus oocytes. F6 enhanced the responses of wild-type α5β3γ2L but not α1β2γ2L receptors to low concentrations of GABA in a concentration-dependent manner. Receptors that incorporated the mutant β3(N265M) subunit were insensitive to F6. When applied together with a high concentration of GABA, F6 blocked currents through α5β3 but not α5β3γ2L receptors. F6 did not alter deactivation of α5β3γ2L receptors after brief high- concentration pulses of GABA. The nonimmobilizer F6 modulates GABAARs in a manner that depends on subunit composition and mode of receptor activation by GABA, supporting a possible role for α5-containing receptors in suppression of learning

  16. A Point Mutation in the Exon Junction Complex Factor Y14 Disrupts Its Function in mRNA Cap Binding and Translation Enhancement.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Tzu-Wei; Lee, Kuo-Ming; Lou, Yuan-Chao; Lu, Chia-Chen; Tarn, Woan-Yuh

    2016-04-15

    Eukaryotic mRNA biogenesis involves a series of interconnected steps mediated by RNA-binding proteins. The exon junction complex core protein Y14 is required for nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) and promotes translation. Moreover, Y14 binds the cap structure of mRNAs and inhibits the activity of the decapping enzyme Dcp2. In this report, we show that an evolutionarily conserved tryptophan residue (Trp-73) of Y14 is critical for its binding to the mRNA cap structure. A Trp-73 mutant (W73V) bound weakly to mRNAs and failed to protect them from degradation. However, this mutant could still interact with the NMD and mRNA degradation factors and retained partial NMD activity. In addition, we found that the W73V mutant could not interact with translation initiation factors. Overexpression of W73V suppressed reporter mRNA translation in vitro and in vivo and reduced the level of a set of nascent proteins. These results reveal a residue of Y14 that confers cap-binding activity and is essential for Y14-mediated enhancement of translation. Finally, we demonstrated that Y14 may selectively and differentially modulate protein biosynthesis. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. A Point Mutation in the Exon Junction Complex Factor Y14 Disrupts Its Function in mRNA Cap Binding and Translation Enhancement*

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Tzu-Wei; Lee, Kuo-Ming; Lou, Yuan-Chao; Lu, Chia-Chen; Tarn, Woan-Yuh

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic mRNA biogenesis involves a series of interconnected steps mediated by RNA-binding proteins. The exon junction complex core protein Y14 is required for nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) and promotes translation. Moreover, Y14 binds the cap structure of mRNAs and inhibits the activity of the decapping enzyme Dcp2. In this report, we show that an evolutionarily conserved tryptophan residue (Trp-73) of Y14 is critical for its binding to the mRNA cap structure. A Trp-73 mutant (W73V) bound weakly to mRNAs and failed to protect them from degradation. However, this mutant could still interact with the NMD and mRNA degradation factors and retained partial NMD activity. In addition, we found that the W73V mutant could not interact with translation initiation factors. Overexpression of W73V suppressed reporter mRNA translation in vitro and in vivo and reduced the level of a set of nascent proteins. These results reveal a residue of Y14 that confers cap-binding activity and is essential for Y14-mediated enhancement of translation. Finally, we demonstrated that Y14 may selectively and differentially modulate protein biosynthesis. PMID:26887951

  18. Single mutations of ketoreductase ChKRED20 enhance the bioreductive production of (1S)-2-chloro-1-(3, 4-difluorophenyl) ethanol.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Feng-Jiao; Liu, Yan; Pei, Xiao-Qiong; Guo, Chao; Wu, Zhong-Liu

    2017-03-01

    (1S)-2-chloro-1-(3, 4-difluorophenyl) ethanol ((S)-CFPL) is an intermediate for the drug ticagrelor, and is manufactured via chemical approaches. To develop a biocatalytic solution to (S)-CFPL, an inventory of ketoreductases from Chryseobacterium sp. CA49 were rescreened, and ChKRED20 was found to catalyze the reduction of the ketone precursor with excellent stereoselectivity (>99 % ee). After screening an error-prone PCR library of the wild-type ChKRED20, two mutants, each bearing a single amino acid substitution of H145L or L205M, were identified with significantly increased activity. Then, the two critical positions were each randomized by constructing saturation mutagenesis libraries, which delivered several mutants with further enhanced activity. Among them, the mutant L205A was the best performer with a specific activity of 178 μmol/min/mg, ten times of that of the wild-type. Its k cat/K m increased by 15 times and half-life at 50 °C increased by 70 %. The mutant catalyzed the complete conversion of 150 and 200 g/l substrate within 6 and 20 h, respectively, to yield enantiopure (S)-CFPL with an isolated yield of 95 %.

  19. Enhanced alkaline cellulases production by the thermohalophilic Aspergillus terreus AUMC 10138 mutated by physical and chemical mutagens using corn stover as substrate

    PubMed Central

    Isaac, George Saad; Abu-Tahon, Medhat Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A thermohalophilic fungus, Aspergillus terreus AUMC 10138, isolated from the Wadi El-Natrun soda lakes in northern Egypt was exposed successively to gamma and UV-radiation (physical mutagens) and ethyl methan-sulfonate (EMS; chemical mutagen) to enhance alkaline cellulase production under solid state fermentation (SSF) conditions. The effects of different carbon sources, initial moisture, incubation temperature, initial pH, incubation period, inoculum levels and different concentrations of NaCl on production of alkaline filter paper activity (FPase), carboxymethyl cellulase (CMCase) and β-glucosidase by the wild-type and mutant strains of A. terreus were evaluated under SSF. The optimum conditions for maximum production of FPase, CMCase and β-glucosidase were found to be the corn stover: moisture ratio of 1:3(w/v), temperature 45 °C, pH range, 9.0–11.0, and fermentation for 4, 4 and 7 day, respectively. Inoculum levels of 30% for β-glucosidase and 40% for FPase, CMCase gave the higher cellulase production by the wild-type and mutant strains, respectively. Higher production of all three enzymes was obtained at a 5% NaCl. Under the optimized conditions, the mutant strain A. terreus M-17 produced FPase (729 U/g), CMCase (1,783 U/g), and β-glucosidase (342 U/g), which is, 1.85, 1.97 and 2.31-fold higher than the wild-type strain. Our results confirmed that mutant strain M-17 could be a promising alkaline cellulase enzyme producer employing lignocellulosics especially corn stover. PMID:26691490

  20. Adaptive Mutations Enhance Assembly and Cell-to-Cell Transmission of a High-Titer Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 5a Core-NS2 JFH1-Based Recombinant

    PubMed Central

    Mathiesen, Christian K.; Prentoe, Jannick; Meredith, Luke W.; Jensen, Tanja B.; Krarup, Henrik; McKeating, Jane A.; Gottwein, Judith M.

    2015-01-01

    care burden, affecting more than 150 million people worldwide. These individuals are at high risk of developing severe end-stage liver diseases. No vaccine exists. While it is possible to produce HCV particles resembling isolates of all HCV genotypes in human hepatoma cells (HCVcc), production efficacy varies. Thus, for several important studies, including vaccine development, in vitro systems enabling high-titer production of diverse HCV strains would be advantageous. Our study offers important functional data on how cell culture-adaptive mutations identified in genotype 5a JFH1-based HCVcc permit high-titer culture by affecting HCV genesis through increasing virus assembly and HCV fitness by enhancing the virus specific infectivity and cell-to-cell transmission ability, without influencing the biophysical particle properties. High-titer HCVcc like the one described in this study may be pivotal in future vaccine-related studies where large quantities of infectious HCV particles are necessary. PMID:25995244

  1. Adaptive Mutations Enhance Assembly and Cell-to-Cell Transmission of a High-Titer Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 5a Core-NS2 JFH1-Based Recombinant.

    PubMed

    Mathiesen, Christian K; Prentoe, Jannick; Meredith, Luke W; Jensen, Tanja B; Krarup, Henrik; McKeating, Jane A; Gottwein, Judith M; Bukh, Jens

    2015-08-01

    more than 150 million people worldwide. These individuals are at high risk of developing severe end-stage liver diseases. No vaccine exists. While it is possible to produce HCV particles resembling isolates of all HCV genotypes in human hepatoma cells (HCVcc), production efficacy varies. Thus, for several important studies, including vaccine development, in vitro systems enabling high-titer production of diverse HCV strains would be advantageous. Our study offers important functional data on how cell culture-adaptive mutations identified in genotype 5a JFH1-based HCVcc permit high-titer culture by affecting HCV genesis through increasing virus assembly and HCV fitness by enhancing the virus specific infectivity and cell-to-cell transmission ability, without influencing the biophysical particle properties. High-titer HCVcc like the one described in this study may be pivotal in future vaccine-related studies where large quantities of infectious HCV particles are necessary. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  2. Impaired calcium calmodulin kinase signaling and muscle adaptation response in the absence of calpain 3.

    PubMed

    Kramerova, I; Kudryashova, E; Ermolova, N; Saenz, A; Jaka, O; López de Munain, A; Spencer, M J

    2012-07-15

    Mutations in the non-lysosomal, cysteine protease calpain 3 (CAPN3) result in the disease limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A (LGMD2A). CAPN3 is localized to several subcellular compartments, including triads, where it plays a structural, rather than a proteolytic, role. In the absence of CAPN3, several triad components are reduced, including the major Ca(2+) release channel, ryanodine receptor (RyR). Furthermore, Ca(2+) release upon excitation is impaired in the absence of CAPN3. In the present study, we show that Ca-calmodulin protein kinase II (CaMKII) signaling is compromised in CAPN3 knockout (C3KO) mice. The CaMK pathway has been previously implicated in promoting the slow skeletal muscle phenotype. As expected, the decrease in CaMKII signaling that was observed in the absence of CAPN3 is associated with a reduction in the slow versus fast muscle fiber phenotype. We show that muscles of WT mice subjected to exercise training activate the CaMKII signaling pathway and increase expression of the slow form of myosin; however, muscles of C3KO mice do not exhibit these adaptive changes to exercise. These data strongly suggest that skeletal muscle's adaptive response to functional demand is compromised in the absence of CAPN3. In agreement with our mouse studies, RyR levels were also decreased in biopsies from LGMD2A patients. Moreover, we observed a preferential pathological involvement of slow fibers in LGMD2A biopsies. Thus, impaired CaMKII signaling and, as a result, a weakened muscle adaptation response identify a novel mechanism that may underlie LGMD2A and suggest a pharmacological target that should be explored for therapy.

  3. Pro32Pro33 Mutations in the Integrin β3 PSI Domain Result in αIIbβ3 Priming and Enhanced Adhesion: Reversal of the Hypercoagulability Phenotype by the Src Inhibitor SKI-606

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, Kendra H.; Jessen, Tammy; Crawford, Emily L.; Chung, Chang Y.; Sutcliffe, James S.

    2014-01-01

    The plasma-membrane integrin αIIbβ3 (CD41/CD61, GPIIbIIIa) is a major functional receptor in platelets during clotting. A common isoform of integrin β3, Leu33Pro is associated with enhanced platelet function and increased risk for coronary thrombosis and stroke, although these findings remain controversial. To better understand the molecular mechanisms by which this sequence variation modifies platelet function, we produced transgenic knockin mice expressing a Pro32Pro33 integrin β3. Consistent with reports utilizing human platelets, we found significantly reduced bleeding and clotting times, as well as increased in vivo thrombosis, in Pro32Pro33 homozygous mice. These alterations paralleled increases in platelet attachment and spreading onto fibrinogen resulting from enhanced integrin αIIbβ3 function. Activation with protease-activated receptor 4– activating peptide, the main thrombin signaling receptor in mice, showed no significant difference in activation of Pro32Pro33 mice as compared with controls, suggesting that inside-out signaling remains intact. However, under unstimulated conditions, the Pro32Pro33 mutation led to elevated Src phosphorylation, facilitated by increased talin interactions with the β3 cytoplasmic domain, indicating that the αIIbβ3 intracellular domains are primed for activation while the ligand-binding domain remains unchanged. Acute dosing of animals with a Src inhibitor was sufficient to rescue the clotting phenotype in knockin mice to wild-type levels. Together, our data establish that the Pro32Pro33 structural alteration modifies the function of integrin αIIbβ3, priming the integrin for outside-in signaling, ultimately leading to hypercoagulability. Furthermore, our data may support a novel approach to antiplatelet therapy by Src inhibition where hemostasis is maintained while reducing risk for cardiovascular disease. PMID:24695082

  4. Pro32Pro33 mutations in the integrin β3 PSI domain result in αIIbβ3 priming and enhanced adhesion: reversal of the hypercoagulability phenotype by the Src inhibitor SKI-606.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Kendra H; Jessen, Tammy; Crawford, Emily L; Chung, Chang Y; Sutcliffe, James S; Carneiro, Ana M

    2014-06-01

    The plasma-membrane integrin αIIbβ3 (CD41/CD61, GPIIbIIIa) is a major functional receptor in platelets during clotting. A common isoform of integrin β3, Leu33Pro is associated with enhanced platelet function and increased risk for coronary thrombosis and stroke, although these findings remain controversial. To better understand the molecular mechanisms by which this sequence variation modifies platelet function, we produced transgenic knockin mice expressing a Pro32Pro33 integrin β3. Consistent with reports utilizing human platelets, we found significantly reduced bleeding and clotting times, as well as increased in vivo thrombosis, in Pro32Pro33 homozygous mice. These alterations paralleled increases in platelet attachment and spreading onto fibrinogen resulting from enhanced integrin αIIbβ3 function. Activation with protease-activated receptor 4- activating peptide, the main thrombin signaling receptor in mice, showed no significant difference in activation of Pro32Pro33 mice as compared with controls, suggesting that inside-out signaling remains intact. However, under unstimulated conditions, the Pro32Pro33 mutation led to elevated Src phosphorylation, facilitated by increased talin interactions with the β3 cytoplasmic domain, indicating that the αIIbβ3 intracellular domains are primed for activation while the ligand-binding domain remains unchanged. Acute dosing of animals with a Src inhibitor was sufficient to rescue the clotting phenotype in knockin mice to wild-type levels. Together, our data establish that the Pro32Pro33 structural alteration modifies the function of integrin αIIbβ3, priming the integrin for outside-in signaling, ultimately leading to hypercoagulability. Furthermore, our data may support a novel approach to antiplatelet therapy by Src inhibition where hemostasis is maintained while reducing risk for cardiovascular disease.

  5. The Clustered, Regularly Interspaced, Short Palindromic Repeats-associated Endonuclease 9 (CRISPR/Cas9)-created MDM2 T309G Mutation Enhances Vitreous-induced Expression of MDM2 and Proliferation and Survival of Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Yajian; Ma, Gaoen; Huang, Xionggao; D'Amore, Patricia A.; Zhang, Feng; Lei, Hetian

    2016-01-01

    The G309 allele of SNPs in the mouse double minute (MDM2) promoter locus is associated with a higher risk of cancer and proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR), but whether SNP G309 contributes to the pathogenesis of PVR is to date unknown. The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated endonuclease (Cas) 9 from Streptococcus pyogenes (SpCas9) can be harnessed to manipulate a single or multiple nucleotides in mammalian cells. Here we delivered SpCas9 and guide RNAs using dual adeno-associated virus-derived vectors to target the MDM2 genomic locus together with a homologous repair template for creating the mutation of MDM2 T309G in human primary retinal pigment epithelial (hPRPE) cells whose genotype is MDM2 T309T. The next-generation sequencing results indicated that there was 42.51% MDM2 G309 in the edited hPRPE cells using adeno-associated viral CRISPR/Cas9. Our data showed that vitreous induced an increase in MDM2 and subsequent attenuation of p53 expression in MDM2 T309G hPRPE cells. Furthermore, our experimental results demonstrated that MDM2 T309G in hPRPE cells enhanced vitreous-induced cell proliferation and survival, suggesting that this SNP contributes to the pathogenesis of PVR. PMID:27246850

  6. A New Subtype of Multiple Synostoses Syndrome Is Caused by a Mutation in GDF6 That Decreases Its Sensitivity to Noggin and Enhances Its Potency as a BMP Signal

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian; Yu, Tingting; Wang, Zhigang; Ohte, Satoshi; Yao, Ru-en; Zheng, Zhaojing; Geng, Juan; Cai, Haiqing; Ge, Yihua; Li, Yuchan; Xu, Yunlan; Zhang, Qinghua; Gusella, James F; Fu, Qihua; Pregizer, Steven; Rosen, Vicki; Shen, Yiping

    2017-01-01

    Growth and differentiation factors (GDFs) are secreted signaling molecules within the BMP family that have critical roles in joint morphogenesis during skeletal development in mice and humans. Using genetic data obtained from a six-generation Chinese family, we identified a missense variant in GDF6 (NP_001001557.1; p.Y444N) that fully segregates with a novel autosomal dominant synostoses (SYNS) phenotype, which we designate as SYNS4. Affected individuals display bilateral wrist and ankle deformities at birth and progressive conductive deafness after age 40 years. We find that the Y444N variant affects a highly conserved residue of GDF6 in a region critical for binding of GDF6 to its receptor(s) and to the BMP antagonist NOG, and show that this mutant GDF6 is a more potent stimulator of the canonical BMP signaling pathway compared with wild-type GDF6. Further, we determine that the enhanced BMP activity exhibited by mutant GDF6 is attributable to resistance to NOG-mediated antagonism. Collectively, our findings indicate that increased BMP signaling owing to a GDF6 gain-of-function mutation is responsible for loss of joint formation and profound functional impairment in patients with SYNS4. More broadly, our study highlights the delicate balance of BMP signaling required for proper joint morphogenesis and reinforces the critical role of BMP signaling in skeletal development. PMID:26643732

  7. The Clustered, Regularly Interspaced, Short Palindromic Repeats-associated Endonuclease 9 (CRISPR/Cas9)-created MDM2 T309G Mutation Enhances Vitreous-induced Expression of MDM2 and Proliferation and Survival of Cells.

    PubMed

    Duan, Yajian; Ma, Gaoen; Huang, Xionggao; D'Amore, Patricia A; Zhang, Feng; Lei, Hetian

    2016-07-29

    The G309 allele of SNPs in the mouse double minute (MDM2) promoter locus is associated with a higher risk of cancer and proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR), but whether SNP G309 contributes to the pathogenesis of PVR is to date unknown. The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated endonuclease (Cas) 9 from Streptococcus pyogenes (SpCas9) can be harnessed to manipulate a single or multiple nucleotides in mammalian cells. Here we delivered SpCas9 and guide RNAs using dual adeno-associated virus-derived vectors to target the MDM2 genomic locus together with a homologous repair template for creating the mutation of MDM2 T309G in human primary retinal pigment epithelial (hPRPE) cells whose genotype is MDM2 T309T. The next-generation sequencing results indicated that there was 42.51% MDM2 G309 in the edited hPRPE cells using adeno-associated viral CRISPR/Cas9. Our data showed that vitreous induced an increase in MDM2 and subsequent attenuation of p53 expression in MDM2 T309G hPRPE cells. Furthermore, our experimental results demonstrated that MDM2 T309G in hPRPE cells enhanced vitreous-induced cell proliferation and survival, suggesting that this SNP contributes to the pathogenesis of PVR. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. MutationAligner: a resource of recurrent mutation hotspots in protein domains in cancer.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, Nicholas Paul; Reznik, Ed; Gao, Jianjiong; Sumer, Selcuk Onur; Schultz, Nikolaus; Sander, Chris; Miller, Martin L

    2016-01-04

    The MutationAligner web resource, available at http://www.mutationaligner.org, enables discovery and exploration of somatic mutation hotspots identified in protein domains in currently (mid-2015) more than 5000 cancer patient samples across 22 different tumor types. Using multiple sequence alignments of protein domains in the human genome, we extend the principle of recurrence analysis by aggregating mutations in homologous positions across sets of paralogous genes. Protein domain analysis enhances the statistical power to detect cancer-relevant mutations and links mutations to the specific biological functions encoded in domains. We illustrate how the MutationAligner database and interactive web tool can be used to explore, visualize and analyze mutation hotspots in protein domains across genes and tumor types. We believe that MutationAligner will be an important resource for the cancer research community by providing detailed clues for the functional importance of particular mutations, as well as for the design of functional genomics experiments and for decision support in precision medicine. MutationAligner is slated to be periodically updated to incorporate additional analyses and new data from cancer genomics projects. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  9. Cancer-specific high-throughput annotation of somatic mutations: computational prediction of driver missense mutations.

    PubMed

    Carter, Hannah; Chen, Sining; Isik, Leyla; Tyekucheva, Svitlana; Velculescu, Victor E; Kinzler, Kenneth W; Vogelstein, Bert; Karchin, Rachel

    2009-08-15

    Large-scale sequencing of cancer genomes has uncovered thousands of DNA alterations, but the functional relevance of the majority of these mutations to tumorigenesis is unknown. We have developed a computational method, called Cancer-specific High-throughput Annotation of Somatic Mutations (CHASM), to identify and prioritize those missense mutations most likely to generate functional changes that enhance tumor cell proliferation. The method has high sensitivity and specificity when discriminating between known driver missense mutations and randomly generated missense mutations (area under receiver operating characteristic curve, >0.91; area under Precision-Recall curve, >0.79). CHASM substantially outperformed previously described missense mutation function prediction methods at discriminating known oncogenic mutations in P53 and the tyrosine kinase epidermal growth factor receptor. We applied the method to 607 missense mutations found in a recent glioblastoma multiforme sequencing study. Based on a model that assumed the glioblastoma multiforme mutations are a mixture of drivers and passengers, we estimate that 8% of these mutations are drivers, causally contributing to tumorigenesis.

  10. MutationAligner: a resource of recurrent mutation hotspots in protein domains in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gauthier, Nicholas Paul; Reznik, Ed; Gao, Jianjiong; Sumer, Selcuk Onur; Schultz, Nikolaus; Sander, Chris; Miller, Martin L.

    2016-01-01

    The MutationAligner web resource, available at http://www.mutationaligner.org, enables discovery and exploration of somatic mutation hotspots identified in protein domains in currently (mid-2015) more than 5000 cancer patient samples across 22 different tumor types. Using multiple sequence alignments of protein domains in the human genome, we extend the principle of recurrence analysis by aggregating mutations in homologous positions across sets of paralogous genes. Protein domain analysis enhances the statistical power to detect cancer-relevant mutations and links mutations to the specific biological functions encoded in domains. We illustrate how the MutationAligner database and interactive web tool can be used to explore, visualize and analyze mutation hotspots in protein domains across genes and tumor types. We believe that MutationAligner will be an important resource for the cancer research community by providing detailed clues for the functional importance of particular mutations, as well as for the design of functional genomics experiments and for decision support in precision medicine. MutationAligner is slated to be periodically updated to incorporate additional analyses and new data from cancer genomics projects. PMID:26590264

  11. [Pathogenic mutation or polymorphism? (How to find criteria)].

    PubMed

    Kochański, Andrzej

    2006-01-01

    The classification of amino-acid substitutions into pathogenic mutations and harmless polymorphisms should be revised. In the recent years it was shown that some amino-acid substitutions considered as pathogenic mutations were polymorphisms. Similarly, some 'harmless' polymorphisms have been shown to be pathogenic mutations. Functional analysis considered as a good method to estimate the pathogenic nature of mutations is also limited. The selection of DNA samples for the control group is also difficult. Due to the molecular mechanism mediated by recently discovered exonic splicing enhancers and silencers (ESE and ESS) it is hard to predict a pathogenic effect of some mutations. In addition, the phenotype variability observed between unrelated patients harboring the same mutation may reflect the effects of modifying genes as well as the lack of association between mutation and "its" phenotype. The aim of this study is to describe the problem of the pathogenic effect of mutations.

  12. Mechanisms of viral mutation.

    PubMed

    Sanjuán, Rafael; Domingo-Calap, Pilar

    2016-12-01

    The remarkable capacity of some viruses to adapt to new hosts and environments is highly dependent on their ability to generate de novo diversity in a short period of time. Rates of spontaneous mutation vary amply among viruses. RNA viruses mutate faster than DNA viruses, single-stranded viruses mutate faster than double-strand virus, and genome size appears to correlate negatively with mutation rate. Viral mutation rates are modulated at different levels, including polymerase fidelity, sequence context, template secondary structure, cellular microenvironment, replication mechanisms, proofreading, and access to post-replicative repair. Additionally, massive numbers of mutations can be introduced by some virus-encoded diversity-generating elements, as well as by host-encoded cytidine/adenine deaminases. Our current knowledge of viral mutation rates indicates that viral genetic diversity is determined by multiple virus- and host-dependent processes, and that viral mutation rates can evolve in response to specific selective pressures.

  13. CF Mutation Panel

    MedlinePlus

    ... AACC products and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities CF Gene Mutations Testing Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Cystic Fibrosis Genotyping; CF DNA Analysis; CF Gene Mutation Panel; ...

  14. Patterns of Somatic Mutations in Immunoglobulin Variable Genes

    PubMed Central

    Golding, G. Brian; Gearhart, Patricia J.; Glickman, Barry W.

    1987-01-01

    The mechanism responsible for somatic mutation in the variable genes of antibodies is unknown and may differ from previously described mechanisms that produce mutation in DNA. We have analyzed 421 somatic mutations from the rearranged immunoglobulin variable genes of mice to determine (1) if the nucleotide substitutions differ from those generated during meiosis and (2) if the presence of nearby direct and inverted repeated sequences could template mutations around the variable gene. The results reveal a difference in the pattern of substitutions obtained from somatic mutations vs. meiotic mutations. An increased frequency of T:A to C:G transitions and a decreased frequency of mutations involving a G in the somatic mutants compared to the meiotic mutants is indicated. This suggests that the mutational processes responsible for somatic mutation in antibody genes differs from that responsible for mutation during meiosis. An analysis of the local DNA sequences revealed many direct repeats and palindromic sequences that were capable of templating some of the known mutations. Although additional factors may be involved in targeting mutations to the variable gene, mistemplating by nearby repeats may provide a mechanism for the enhancement of somatic mutation. PMID:3557109

  15. UV Signature Mutations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Sequencing complete tumor genomes and exomes has sparked the cancer field's interest in mutation signatures for identifying the tumor's carcinogen. This review and meta-analysis discusses signatures and their proper use. We first distinguish between a mutagen's canonical mutations – deviations from a random distribution of base changes to create a pattern typical of that mutagen – and the subset of signature mutations, which are unique to that mutagen and permit inference backward from mutations to mutagen. To verify UV signature mutations, we assembled literature datasets on cells exposed to UVC, UVB, UVA, or solar simulator light (SSL) and tested canonical UV mutation features as criteria for clustering datasets. A confirmed UV signature was: ≥60% of mutations are C→T at a dipyrimidine site, with ≥5% CC→TT. Other canonical features such as a bias for mutations on the non-transcribed strand or at the 3' pyrimidine had limited application. The most robust classifier combined these features with criteria for the rarity of non-UV canonical mutations. In addition, several signatures proposed for specific UV wavelengths were limited to specific genes or species; non-signature mutations induced by UV may cause melanoma BRAF mutations; and the mutagen for sunlight-related skin neoplasms may vary between continents. PMID:25354245

  16. Evidence for modifier genes that enhance the effect of the Pax-3 mutation, splotch-delayed (Sp{sup d}), on facial morphology: A model for studying the causes of variation of Waardenburg syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, R.W.; Morell, R.; Friedman, T.B.

    1994-09-01

    Waardenburg syndrome type I (WS1) is caused by autosomal dominant mutations of the gene coding for the PAX3 transcription factor. These mutations have variable penetrance and expressivity within and between families where they cause hypopigmentation, deafness and facially dysmorphic features. It has been suspected that changes of penetrance and expressivity in WS1 mutations are caused by familial variation in other loci which interact with or modify the expression of the PAX3 locus. Splotch mutations (Sp, Sp{sup d}, etc.) are the mouse homologs of WS1 mutations. Mutations in Pax-3 were first used to predict the map position and function of WS1 mutations. We now present morphometric evidence for alleles of modifier genes, originating from Mus spretus and segregating in an F{sub 1} backcross with Mus musculus, that modify the effects of Sp{sup d} on the structure of mouse facial bones. Variation caused by these mouse genes are precisely homologous to the familial variation we see in dystopia canthorum, the principal diagnostic feature of Waardenburg syndrome type I. The mouse modifier genes of Pax-3 identified by this analysis are now being mapped as a first step towards positional cloning human PAX3 modifier genes.

  17. Mutations in the mutY gene of Escherichia coli enhance the frequency of targeted G:C-->T:a transversions induced by a single 8-oxoguanine residue in single-stranded DNA.

    PubMed

    Moriya, M; Grollman, A P

    1993-05-01

    Oxidative damage to guanine in DNA results in the formation of 8-oxoguanine, which has been shown to induce G-->T transversions targeted to this site. The mutagenicity of this lesion was studied in several mutator strains of Escherichia coli, using single-stranded DNA containing a single 8-oxoguanine residue. The frequencies of targeted G-->T transversions increased markedly in mutY strains, while this mutagenic event was not affected in mutM or mutS strains. Introduction of a mutM mutation into a mutY strain caused a somewhat higher frequency of G-->T transversions than that in the mutY strain and the effect of a mutS mutation was marginal. We conclude that the mutY gene plays a crucial role in preventing targeted G-->T mutations derived from misreplication of the 8-oxoguanine-containing template DNA.

  18. Effective Temperature of Mutations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derényi, Imre; Szöllősi, Gergely J.

    2015-02-01

    Biological macromolecules experience two seemingly very different types of noise acting on different time scales: (i) point mutations corresponding to changes in molecular sequence and (ii) thermal fluctuations. Examining the secondary structures of a large number of microRNA precursor sequences and model lattice proteins, we show that the effects of single point mutations are statistically indistinguishable from those of an increase in temperature by a few tens of kelvins. The existence of such an effective mutational temperature establishes a quantitative connection between robustness to genetic (mutational) and environmental (thermal) perturbations.

  19. Integrative analysis of mutational and transcriptional profiles reveals driver mutations of metastatic breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji-Hyun; Zhao, Xing-Ming; Yoon, Ina; Lee, Jin Young; Kwon, Nam Hoon; Wang, Yin-Ying; Lee, Kyung-Min; Lee, Min-Joo; Kim, Jisun; Moon, Hyeong-Gon; In, Yongho; Hao, Jin-Kao; Park, Kyung-Mii; Noh, Dong-Young; Han, Wonshik; Kim, Sunghoon

    2016-01-01

    Despite the explosion in the numbers of cancer genomic studies, metastasis is still the major cause of cancer mortality. In breast cancer, approximately one-fifth of metastatic patients survive 5 years. Therefore, detecting the patients at a high risk of developing distant metastasis at first diagnosis is critical for effective treatment strategy. We hereby present a novel systems biology approach to identify driver mutations escalating the risk of metastasis based on both exome and RNA sequencing of our collected 78 normal-paired breast cancers. Unlike driver mutations occurring commonly in cancers as reported in the literature, the mutations detected here are relatively rare mutations occurring in less than half metastatic samples. By supposing that the driver mutations should affect the metastasis gene signatures, we develop a novel computational pipeline to identify the driver mutations that affect transcription factors regulating metastasis gene signatures. We identify driver mutations in ADPGK, NUP93, PCGF6, PKP2 and SLC22A5, which are verified to enhance cancer cell migration and prompt metastasis with in vitro experiments. The discovered somatic mutations may be helpful for identifying patients who are likely to develop distant metastasis.

  20. Integrative analysis of mutational and transcriptional profiles reveals driver mutations of metastatic breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji-Hyun; Zhao, Xing-Ming; Yoon, Ina; Lee, Jin Young; Kwon, Nam Hoon; Wang, Yin-Ying; Lee, Kyung-Min; Lee, Min-Joo; Kim, Jisun; Moon, Hyeong-Gon; In, Yongho; Hao, Jin-Kao; Park, Kyung-Mii; Noh, Dong-Young; Han, Wonshik; Kim, Sunghoon

    2016-01-01

    Despite the explosion in the numbers of cancer genomic studies, metastasis is still the major cause of cancer mortality. In breast cancer, approximately one-fifth of metastatic patients survive 5 years. Therefore, detecting the patients at a high risk of developing distant metastasis at first diagnosis is critical for effective treatment strategy. We hereby present a novel systems biology approach to identify driver mutations escalating the risk of metastasis based on both exome and RNA sequencing of our collected 78 normal-paired breast cancers. Unlike driver mutations occurring commonly in cancers as reported in the literature, the mutations detected here are relatively rare mutations occurring in less than half metastatic samples. By supposing that the driver mutations should affect the metastasis gene signatures, we develop a novel computational pipeline to identify the driver mutations that affect transcription factors regulating metastasis gene signatures. We identify driver mutations in ADPGK, NUP93, PCGF6, PKP2 and SLC22A5, which are verified to enhance cancer cell migration and prompt metastasis with in vitro experiments. The discovered somatic mutations may be helpful for identifying patients who are likely to develop distant metastasis. PMID:27625789

  1. From Gene Mutation to Protein Characterization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moffet, David A.

    2009-01-01

    A seven-week "gene to protein" laboratory sequence is described for an undergraduate biochemistry laboratory course. Student pairs were given the task of introducing a point mutation of their choosing into the well studied protein, enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). After conducting literature searches, each student group chose the…

  2. From Gene Mutation to Protein Characterization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moffet, David A.

    2009-01-01

    A seven-week "gene to protein" laboratory sequence is described for an undergraduate biochemistry laboratory course. Student pairs were given the task of introducing a point mutation of their choosing into the well studied protein, enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). After conducting literature searches, each student group chose the…

  3. Gestational mutations in radiation carcinogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meza, R.; Luebeck, G.; Moolgavkar, S.

    Mutations in critical genes during gestation could increase substantially the risk of cancer. We examine the consequences of such mutations using the Luebeck-Moolgavkar model for colorectal cancer and the Lea-Coulson modification of the Luria-Delbruck model for the accumulation of mutations during gestation. When gestational mutation rates are high, such mutations make a significant contribution to cancer risk even for adult tumors. Furthermore, gestational mutations ocurring at distinct times during emryonic developmemt lead to substantially different numbers of mutated cells at birth, with early mutations leading to a large number (jackpots) of mutated cells at birth and mutation occurring late leading to only a few mutated cells. Thus gestational mutations could confer considerable heterogeneity of the risk of cancer. If the fetus is exposed to an environmental mutagen, such as ionizing radiation, the gestational mutation rate would be expected to increase. We examine the consequences of such exposures during gestation on the subsequent development of cancer.

  4. The effect of ataxia-telangiectasia mutated kinase-dependent hyperphosphorylation of checkpoint kinase-2 on oligodeoxynucleotide 7909 containing CpG motifs-enhanced sensitivity to X-rays in human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoqun; Liu, Xiangdong; Qiao, Tiankui; Chen, Wei; Yuan, Sujuan

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of the study reported here was to further investigate the potential effect of ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase-dependent hyperphosphorylation of checkpoint kinase-2 (Chk2) on radiosensitivity enhanced by oligodeoxynucleotide 7909 containing CpG motifs (CpG ODN7909) in human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells. Methods In vitro A549 cells were randomly separated into control, CpG, X-ray, CpG+ X-ray, ATM kinase-small interfering RNA (siRNA)+CpG+X-ray (ATM-siRNA), and Chk2-siRNA+CpG+X-ray (Chk2-siRNA) groups. siRNAs were adopted to silence the ATM and Chk2 genes. Expression and phosphorylation of ATM kinase and Chk2 were detected by Western blot assay. Cell colonies were observed under inverted phase-contrast microscopy. Cellular survival curves were fitted using a multi-target single-hitting model. Cell cycle and apoptosis were analyzed by flow cytometry. Results Expression of ATM kinase and Chk2 was similar among the control, CpG, X-ray, and CpG+X-ray groups. Phosphorylated ATM kinase and Chk2 were significantly increased in the CpG+X-ray group compared with in the X-ray group (t=6.00, P<0.01 and t=3.13, P<0.05, respectively), though these were hardly detected in the control and CpG groups. However, expression of ATM kinase and Chk2 was clearly downregulated in the ATM-siRNA and Chk2-siRNA groups, respectively. Similarly, their phosphorylation levels were also significantly decreased in the ATM-siRNA group (t=14.35, P<0.01 and t=8.46, P<0.01, respectively) and a significant decrease in phosphorylated Chk2 was observed in the Chk2-siRNA group (t=7.28, P<0.01) when compared with the CpG+X-ray group. Further, the number of A549 cells at Gap 2/mitotic phase and the apoptosis rate were clearly increased in the CpG+X-ray group compared with in the other groups (all P<0.05). The multi-target single-hitting model showed that the sensitization enhancement ratio calculated by mean death dose was 1.39 in CpG+X-ray group (vs 1.04 and 1.03 in the ATM

  5. Stabilizing mutations and calcium-dependent stability of subtilisin.

    PubMed

    Alexander, P A; Ruan, B; Strausberg, S L; Bryan, P N

    2001-09-04

    Stability is a property of subtilisin which has proven particularly amenable to enhancement via random mutagenesis and screening, yet the effects of most stabilizing mutations are not understood in structural and energetic detail. This paper seeks to explain the longstanding observation that stabilizing mutations are usually calcium-dependent in their stabilizing effect, irrespective of their proximity to the calcium binding sites. Stabilizing mutations in subtilisin fall into one of three classes. The largest class of mutations stabilize only in the presence of excess calcium. A smaller number of mutations stabilize independently of [calcium], and a few mutations stabilize only in the presence of chelating agents, such as EDTA. This study compares the effects of mutations from each class when introduced into subtilisin BPN' and two calcium-free versions of subtilisin. The calcium-dependent effects of mutations can be explained by considering subtilisin to be in conformational equilibrium between two structurally similar but energetically distinct states: N and N*. The equilibrium from the N* to the N state can be altered either by calcium binding to site A or by mutation. Mutations which stabilize only in the presence of calcium stabilize the N state relative to N*. Mutations which stabilize only in the presence of chelants stabilize the N* state relative to N. As a byproduct of this analysis, we have developed a hyperstable variant of subtilisin whose inactivation at high temperature in the presence of EDTA is 10(5) times slower than wild-type subtilisin.

  6. Mutation and premating isolation.

    PubMed

    Woodruff, R C; Thompson, J N

    2002-11-01

    While premating isolation might be traceable to different genetic mechanisms in different species, evidence supports the idea that as few as one or two genes may often be sufficient to initiate isolation. Thus, new mutation can theoretically play a key role in the process. But it has long been thought that a new isolation mutation would fail, because there would be no other individuals for the isolation-mutation-carrier to mate with. We now realize that premeiotic mutations are very common and will yield a cluster of progeny carrying the same new mutant allele. In this paper, we discuss the evidence for genetically simple premating isolation barriers and the role that clusters of an isolation mutation may play in initiating allopatric, and even sympatric, species divisions.

  7. Mutation and premating isolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodruff, R. C.; Thompson, J. N. Jr

    2002-01-01

    While premating isolation might be traceable to different genetic mechanisms in different species, evidence supports the idea that as few as one or two genes may often be sufficient to initiate isolation. Thus, new mutation can theoretically play a key role in the process. But it has long been thought that a new isolation mutation would fail, because there would be no other individuals for the isolation-mutation-carrier to mate with. We now realize that premeiotic mutations are very common and will yield a cluster of progeny carrying the same new mutant allele. In this paper, we discuss the evidence for genetically simple premating isolation barriers and the role that clusters of an isolation mutation may play in initiating allopatric, and even sympatric, species divisions.

  8. Mutation and premating isolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodruff, R. C.; Thompson, J. N. Jr

    2002-01-01

    While premating isolation might be traceable to different genetic mechanisms in different species, evidence supports the idea that as few as one or two genes may often be sufficient to initiate isolation. Thus, new mutation can theoretically play a key role in the process. But it has long been thought that a new isolation mutation would fail, because there would be no other individuals for the isolation-mutation-carrier to mate with. We now realize that premeiotic mutations are very common and will yield a cluster of progeny carrying the same new mutant allele. In this paper, we discuss the evidence for genetically simple premating isolation barriers and the role that clusters of an isolation mutation may play in initiating allopatric, and even sympatric, species divisions.

  9. Mutational spectrum of adult T-ALL

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Martin; Vosberg, Sebastian; Schlee, Cornelia; Heesch, Sandra; Schwartz, Stefan; Gökbuget, Nicola; Hoelzer, Dieter; Graf, Alexander; Krebs, Stefan; Bartram, Isabelle; Blum, Helmut; Brüggemann, Monika; Hecht, Jochen; Bohlander, Stefan K.

    2015-01-01

    Novel target discovery is warranted to improve treatment in adult T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) patients. We provide a comprehensive study on mutations to enhance the understanding of therapeutic targets and studied 81 adult T-ALL patients. NOTCH1 exhibitedthe highest mutation rate (53%). Mutation frequencies of FBXW7 (10%), WT1 (10%), JAK3 (12%), PHF6 (11%), and BCL11B (10%) were in line with previous reports. We identified recurrent alterations in transcription factors DNM2, and RELN, the WNT pathway associated cadherin FAT1, and in epigenetic regulators (MLL2, EZH2). Interestingly, we discovered novel recurrent mutations in the DNA repair complex member HERC1, in NOTCH2, and in the splicing factor ZRSR2. A frequently affected pathway was the JAK/STAT pathway (18%) and a significant proportion of T-ALL patients harboured mutations in epigenetic regulators (33%), both predominantly found in the unfavourable subgroup of early T-ALL. Importantly, adult T-ALL patients not only showed a highly heterogeneous mutational spectrum, but also variable subclonal allele frequencies implicated in therapy resistance and evolution of relapse. In conclusion, we provide novel insights in genetic alterations of signalling pathways (e.g. druggable by γ-secretase inhibitors, JAK inhibitors or EZH2 inhibitors), present in over 80% of all adult T-ALL patients, that could guide novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:25595890

  10. Splice-shifting oligonucleotide (SSO) mediated blocking of an exonic splicing enhancer (ESE) created by the prevalent c.903+469T>C MTRR mutation corrects splicing and restores enzyme activity in patient cells.

    PubMed

    Palhais, Bruno; Præstegaard, Veronica S; Sabaratnam, Rugivan; Doktor, Thomas Koed; Lutz, Seraina; Burda, Patricie; Suormala, Terttu; Baumgartner, Matthias; Fowler, Brian; Bruun, Gitte Hoffmann; Andersen, Henriette Skovgaard; Kožich, Viktor; Andresen, Brage Storstein

    2015-05-19

    The prevalent c.903+469T>C mutation in MTRR causes the cblE type of homocystinuria by strengthening an SRSF1 binding site in an ESE leading to activation of a pseudoexon. We hypothesized that other splicing regulatory elements (SREs) are also critical for MTRR pseudoexon inclusion. We demonstrate that the MTRR pseudoexon is on the verge of being recognized and is therefore vulnerable to several point mutations that disrupt a fine-tuned balance between the different SREs. Normally, pseudoexon inclusion is suppressed by a hnRNP A1 binding exonic splicing silencer (ESS). When the c.903+469T>C mutation is present two ESEs abrogate the activity of the ESS and promote pseudoexon inclusion. Blocking the 3'splice site or the ESEs by SSOs is effective in restoring normal splicing of minigenes and endogenous MTRR transcripts in patient cells. By employing an SSO complementary to both ESEs, we were able to rescue MTRR enzymatic activity in patient cells to approximately 50% of that in controls. We show that several point mutations, individually, can activate a pseudoexon, illustrating that this mechanism can occur more frequently than previously expected. Moreover, we demonstrate that SSO blocking of critical ESEs is a promising strategy to treat the increasing number of activated pseudoexons. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  11. Splice-shifting oligonucleotide (SSO) mediated blocking of an exonic splicing enhancer (ESE) created by the prevalent c.903+469T>C MTRR mutation corrects splicing and restores enzyme activity in patient cells

    PubMed Central

    Palhais, Bruno; Præstegaard, Veronica S.; Sabaratnam, Rugivan; Doktor, Thomas Koed; Lutz, Seraina; Burda, Patricie; Suormala, Terttu; Baumgartner, Matthias; Fowler, Brian; Bruun, Gitte Hoffmann; Andersen, Henriette Skovgaard; Kožich, Viktor; Andresen, Brage Storstein

    2015-01-01

    The prevalent c.903+469T>C mutation in MTRR causes the cblE type of homocystinuria by strengthening an SRSF1 binding site in an ESE leading to activation of a pseudoexon. We hypothesized that other splicing regulatory elements (SREs) are also critical for MTRR pseudoexon inclusion. We demonstrate that the MTRR pseudoexon is on the verge of being recognized and is therefore vulnerable to several point mutations that disrupt a fine-tuned balance between the different SREs. Normally, pseudoexon inclusion is suppressed by a hnRNP A1 binding exonic splicing silencer (ESS). When the c.903+469T>C mutation is present two ESEs abrogate the activity of the ESS and promote pseudoexon inclusion. Blocking the 3′splice site or the ESEs by SSOs is effective in restoring normal splicing of minigenes and endogenous MTRR transcripts in patient cells. By employing an SSO complementary to both ESEs, we were able to rescue MTRR enzymatic activity in patient cells to approximately 50% of that in controls. We show that several point mutations, individually, can activate a pseudoexon, illustrating that this mechanism can occur more frequently than previously expected. Moreover, we demonstrate that SSO blocking of critical ESEs is a promising strategy to treat the increasing number of activated pseudoexons. PMID:25878036

  12. Whole Genome Sequencing of Newly Established Pancreatic Cancer Lines Identifies Novel Somatic Mutation (c.2587G>A) in Axon Guidance Receptor Plexin A1 as Enhancer of Proliferation and Invasion.

    PubMed

    Sorber, Rebecca; Teper, Yaroslav; Abisoye-Ogunniyan, Abisola; Waterfall, Joshua J; Davis, Sean; Killian, J Keith; Pineda, Marbin; Ray, Satyajit; McCord, Matt R; Pflicke, Holger; Burkett, Sandra Sczerba; Meltzer, Paul S; Rudloff, Udo

    2016-01-01

    The genetic profile of human pancreatic cancers harbors considerable heterogeneity, which suggests a possible explanation for the pronounced inefficacy of single therapies in this disease. This observation has led to a belief that custom therapies based on individual tumor profiles are necessary to more effectively treat pancreatic cancer. It has recently been discovered that axon guidance genes are affected by somatic structural variants in up to 25% of human pancreatic cancers. Thus far, however, some of these mutations have only been correlated to survival probability and no function has been assigned to these observed axon guidance gene mutations in pancreatic cancer. In this study we established three novel pancreatic cancer cell lines and performed whole genome sequencing to discover novel mutations in axon guidance genes that may contribute to the cancer phenotype of these cells. We discovered, among other novel somatic variants in axon guidance pathway genes, a novel mutation in the PLXNA1 receptor (c.2587G>A) in newly established cell line SB.06 that mediates oncogenic cues of increased invasion and proliferation in SB.06 cells and increased invasion in 293T cells upon stimulation with the receptor's natural ligand semaphorin 3A compared to wild type PLXNA1 cells. Mutant PLXNA1 signaling was associated with increased Rho-GTPase and p42/p44 MAPK signaling activity and cytoskeletal expansion, but not changes in E-cadherin, vimentin, or metalloproteinase 9 expression levels. Pharmacologic inhibition of the Rho-GTPase family member CDC42 selectively abrogated PLXNA1 c.2587G>A-mediated increased invasion. These findings provide in-vitro confirmation that somatic mutations in axon guidance genes can provide oncogenic gain-of-function signals and may contribute to pancreatic cancer progression.

  13. Whole Genome Sequencing of Newly Established Pancreatic Cancer Lines Identifies Novel Somatic Mutation (c.2587G>A) in Axon Guidance Receptor Plexin A1 as Enhancer of Proliferation and Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Abisoye-Ogunniyan, Abisola; Waterfall, Joshua J.; Davis, Sean; Killian, J. Keith; Pineda, Marbin; Ray, Satyajit; McCord, Matt R.; Pflicke, Holger; Burkett, Sandra Sczerba; Meltzer, Paul S.; Rudloff, Udo

    2016-01-01

    The genetic profile of human pancreatic cancers harbors considerable heterogeneity, which suggests a possible explanation for the pronounced inefficacy of single therapies in this disease. This observation has led to a belief that custom therapies based on individual tumor profiles are necessary to more effectively treat pancreatic cancer. It has recently been discovered that axon guidance genes are affected by somatic structural variants in up to 25% of human pancreatic cancers. Thus far, however, some of these mutations have only been correlated to survival probability and no function has been assigned to these observed axon guidance gene mutations in pancreatic cancer. In this study we established three novel pancreatic cancer cell lines and performed whole genome sequencing to discover novel mutations in axon guidance genes that may contribute to the cancer phenotype of these cells. We discovered, among other novel somatic variants in axon guidance pathway genes, a novel mutation in the PLXNA1 receptor (c.2587G>A) in newly established cell line SB.06 that mediates oncogenic cues of increased invasion and proliferation in SB.06 cells and increased invasion in 293T cells upon stimulation with the receptor’s natural ligand semaphorin 3A compared to wild type PLXNA1 cells. Mutant PLXNA1 signaling was associated with increased Rho-GTPase and p42/p44 MAPK signaling activity and cytoskeletal expansion, but not changes in E-cadherin, vimentin, or metalloproteinase 9 expression levels. Pharmacologic inhibition of the Rho-GTPase family member CDC42 selectively abrogated PLXNA1 c.2587G>A-mediated increased invasion. These findings provide in-vitro confirmation that somatic mutations in axon guidance genes can provide oncogenic gain-of-function signals and may contribute to pancreatic cancer progression. PMID:26962861

  14. Mutations during the adaptation of H9N2 avian influenza virus to the respiratory epithelium of pigs enhance the sialic acid binding activity and the virulence in mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, W; Punyadarsaniya, D; Lambertz, R L O; Lee, D C C; Liang, C H; Höper, D; Leist, S R; Hernández-Cáceres, A; Stech, J; Beer, M; Wu, C Y; Wong, C H; Schughart, K; Meng, F; Herrler, G

    2017-02-01

    The natural reservoir for influenza viruses is waterfowl from where they succeeded to cross the barrier to different mammalian species. We analyzed the adaptation of avian influenza viruses to a mammalian host by passaging an H9N2 strain three times in differentiated swine airway epithelial cells. Using precision-cut slices from the porcine lung to passage the parental virus, isolates from each of the three passages (P1-P3) were characterized by assessing growth curves and ciliostatic effects. The only difference noted was an increased growth kinetics of the P3 virus. Sequence analysis revealed four mutations: one each in the PB2 and NS1, and two in the HA protein. The HA mutations, A190V and T212I, were characterized by generating recombinant viruses containing either one or both amino acid exchanges. Whereas the parental virus recognized α2,3-linked sialic acids preferentially, the HA190 mutant bound to a broad spectrum of glycans with α2,6/8/9-linked sialic acids. The HA212 mutant alone differed only slightly from the parental virus; however, the combination of both mutations (HA190+HA212) increased the binding affinity to those glycans recognized by the HA190 mutant. Remarkably, only the HA double mutant showed a significantly increased pathogenicity in mice. By contrast, none of those mutations affected the ciliary activity of the epithelial cells which is characteristic for virulent swine influenza viruses. Taken together, our results indicate that shifts in the HA receptor affinity are just an early adaptation step of avian H9N2 strains; further mutational changes may be required to become virulent for pigs.

  15. Frequency of TERT promoter mutations in human cancers.

    PubMed

    Vinagre, João; Almeida, Ana; Pópulo, Helena; Batista, Rui; Lyra, Joana; Pinto, Vasco; Coelho, Ricardo; Celestino, Ricardo; Prazeres, Hugo; Lima, Luis; Melo, Miguel; da Rocha, Adriana Gaspar; Preto, Ana; Castro, Patrícia; Castro, Ligia; Pardal, Fernando; Lopes, José Manuel; Santos, Lúcio Lara; Reis, Rui Manuel; Cameselle-Teijeiro, José; Sobrinho-Simões, Manuel; Lima, Jorge; Máximo, Valdemar; Soares, Paula

    2013-01-01

    Reactivation of telomerase has been implicated in human tumorigenesis, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here we report the presence of recurrent somatic mutations in the TERT promoter in cancers of the central nervous system (43%), bladder (59%), thyroid (follicular cell-derived, 10%) and skin (melanoma, 29%). In thyroid cancers, the presence of TERT promoter mutations (when occurring together with BRAF mutations) is significantly associated with higher TERT mRNA expression, and in glioblastoma we find a trend for increased telomerase expression in cases harbouring TERT promoter mutations. Both in thyroid cancers and glioblastoma, TERT promoter mutations are significantly associated with older age of the patients. Our results show that TERT promoter mutations are relatively frequent in specific types of human cancers, where they lead to enhanced expression of telomerase.

  16. Homeochaos: dynamics stability of a symbiotic network with population dynamics and evolving mutation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Kunihiko; Ikegami, Takashi

    1992-06-01

    Evolution of mutation rates is studied, in a population model with mutation of species coded by bit sequences and mutation rates. Even without interaction among species, the mutation rate is initially enhanced to search for fitted species and then is lowered towards zero. This enhancement opens a possibility of automatic simulated annealing. With the interaction among species (hosts versus parasites), high mutation rates are sustained. The rates go up with the interaction strength abruptly if the fitness landscape is rugged. A large cluster of species, connected by mutation, is formed by a sustained high mutation rate. With the formation of this symbiotic network resolved is the paradox of mutation rates; paradox on the stability of a rule to change itself. Population dynamics of each species shows high-dimensional chaos with small positive Lyapunov exponents. Stability of our symbiotic network is dynamically sustained through this weak high-dimensional chaos, termed “homeochaos”.

  17. AIP mutations and gigantism.

    PubMed

    Rostomyan, Liliya; Potorac, Iulia; Beckers, Pablo; Daly, Adrian F; Beckers, Albert

    2017-06-01

    AIP mutations are rare in sporadic acromegaly but they are seen at a higher frequency among certain specific populations of pituitary adenoma patients (pituitary gigantism cases, familial isolated pituitary adenoma (FIPA) kindreds, and patients with macroadenomas who are diagnosed ≤30 years). AIP mutations are most prevalent in patients with pituitary gigantism (29% of this group were found to have mutations in AIP gene). These data support targeted genetic screening for AIP mutations/deletions in these groups of pituitary adenoma patients. Earlier diagnosis of AIP-related acromegaly-gigantism cases enables timely clinical evaluation and treatment, thereby improving outcomes in terms of excessive linear growth and acromegaly comorbidities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Mutator Activity of Petite Strains of SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE

    PubMed Central

    Flury, Fred; von Borstel, R. C.; Williamson, D. H.

    1976-01-01

    Petite strains in Saccharomyces exhibit enhanced spontaneous mutation rates of nuclear genes regardless of whether they are cytoplasmically or nuclearly inherited, or whether or not the cytoplasmic petite strains have mitochondrial DNA. In petite strains, the mutation rate for the nonsense allele lys1-1 is enhanced by a factor of 3-6 and for the missense allele his1-7 by a factor of 2 as compared with their grande counterparts. The reversion of a third allele, the putative frameshift mutation, hom3-10 , is not enhanced in a petite background. The results indicate that the spontaneous mutation rate of an organism can be altered by indirect intracellular influences. PMID:786779

  19. Mutator activity of petite strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Flury, F; von Borstel, R C; Williamson, D H

    1976-08-01

    Petite strains in Saccharomyces exhibit enhanced spontaneous mutation rates of nuclear genes regardless of whether they are cytoplasmically or nuclearly inherited, or whether or not the cytoplasmic petite strains have mitochondrial DNA. In petite strains, the mutation rate for the nonsense allele lys1-1 is enhanced by a factor of 3-6 and for the missense allele his1-7 by a factor of 2 as compared with their grande counterparts. The reversion of a third allele, the putative frameshift mutation, hom3-10, is not enhanced in a petite background. The results indicate that the spontaneous mutation rate of an organism can be altered by indirect intracellular influences.

  20. ATM mutations for surgeons.

    PubMed

    Mansfield, Sara A; Pilarski, Robert; Agnese, Doreen M

    2016-12-17

    The ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene encodes a protein kinase involved in DNA repair. Heterozygotic carriers are at an increased risk of developing breast cancer. As the use of genetic testing increases, identification of at-risk patients will also increase. The aim of this study is to review two cases of heterozygous ATM mutation carriers and review the literature to clarify the cancer risks and suggested management for breast surgeons who will be intimately involved in the care of these patients.

  1. Comparing Mutational Variabilities

    PubMed Central

    Houle, D.; Morikawa, B.; Lynch, M.

    1996-01-01

    We have reviewed the available data on V(M), the amount of genetic variation in phenotypic traits produced each generation by mutation. We use these data to make several qualitative tests of the mutation-selection balance hypothesis for the maintenance of genetic variance (MSB). To compare V(M) values, we use three dimensionless quantities: mutational heritability, V(M)/V(E); the mutational coefficient of variation, CV(M); and the ratio of the standing genetic variance to V(M), V(G)/V(M). Since genetic coefficients of variation for life history traits are larger than those for morphological traits, we predict that under MSB, life history traits should also have larger CV(M). This is confirmed; life history traits have a median CV(M) value more than six times higher than that for morphological traits. V(G)/V(M) approximates the persistence time of mutations under MSB in an infinite population. In order for MSB to hold, V(G)/V(M) must be small, substantially less than 1000, and life history traits should have smaller values than morphological traits. V(G)/V(M) averages about 50 generations for life history traits and 100 generations for morphological traits. These observations are all consistent with the predictions of a mutation-selection balance model. PMID:8807316

  2. Viral fitness: relation to drug resistance mutations and mechanisms involved: nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor mutations.

    PubMed

    Weber, Jan; Henry, Kenneth R; Arts, Eric J; Quiñones-Mateu, Miguel E

    2007-03-01

    Nucleoside and nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors constitute the backbone of highly active antiretroviral therapy in the treatment of HIV-1 infection. One of the major obstacles in achieving the long-term efficacy of anti-HIV-1 therapy is the development of resistance. The advent of resistance mutations is usually accompanied by a change in viral replicative fitness. This review focuses on the most common nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-associated mutations and their effects on HIV-1 replicative fitness. Recent studies have explained the two main mechanisms of resistance to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and their role in HIV-1 replicative fitness. The first involves mutations directly interfering with binding or incorporation and seems to impact replicative fitness more adversely than the second mechanism, which involves enhanced excision of the newly incorporated analogue. Further studies have helped explain the antagonistic effects between amino acid substitutions, K65R, L74V, M184V, and thymidine analogue mutations, showing how viral replicative fitness influences the evolution of thymidine analogue resistance pathways. Nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor resistance mutations impact HIV-1 replicative fitness to a lesser extent than protease resistance mutations. The monitoring of viral replicative fitness may help in the management of HIV-1 infection in highly antiretroviral-experienced individuals.

  3. [Introduction of mutations in insulin molecule: positive and negative mutations].

    PubMed

    Ksenofontova, O I

    2014-01-01

    Introduction of mutations in an insulin molecule is one of the important approaches to drug development for treatment of diabetes mellitus. Generally, usage of mutations is aimed at activation of insulin and insulin receptor interaction. Such mutations can be considered as positive. Mutations that reduce the binding efficacy are negative. There are neutral mutations as well. This article considers both natural mutations that are typical for various members of the insulin superfamily and artificial ones which are introduced to improve the insulin pharmacological characteristics. Data presented here can be useful in developing new effective insulin analogues for treatment of diabetes mellitus.

  4. Mutations in Lettuce Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Mou, Beiquan

    2011-01-01

    Lettuce is a major vegetable in western countries. Mutations generated genetic variations and played an important role in the domestication of the crop. Many traits derived from natural and induced mutations, such as dwarfing, early flowering, male sterility, and chlorophyll deficiency, are useful in physiological and genetic studies. Mutants were also used to develop new lettuce products including miniature and herbicide-tolerant cultivars. Mutant analysis was critical in lettuce genomic studies including identification and cloning of disease-resistance genes. Mutagenesis combined with genomic technology may provide powerful tools for the discovery of novel gene alleles. In addition to radiation and chemical mutagens, unconventional approaches such as tissue or protoplast culture, transposable elements, and space flights have been utilized to generate mutants in lettuce. Since mutation breeding is considered nontransgenic, it is more acceptable to consumers and will be explored more in the future for lettuce improvement. PMID:22287955

  5. ALS2 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Susanne A.; Carr, Lucinda; Deuschl, Guenther; Hopfner, Franziska; Stamelou, Maria; Wood, Nicholas W.; Bhatia, Kailash P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the genetic etiology in 2 consanguineous families who presented a novel phenotype of autosomal recessive juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis associated with generalized dystonia. Methods: A combination of homozygosity mapping and whole-exome sequencing in the first family and Sanger sequencing of candidate genes in the second family were used. Results: Both families were found to have homozygous loss-of-function mutations in the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 2 (juvenile) (ALS2) gene. Conclusions: We report generalized dystonia and cerebellar signs in association with ALS2-related disease. We suggest that the ALS2 gene should be screened for mutations in patients who present with a similar phenotype. PMID:24562058

  6. A mutation in the E2 subunit of the mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex in Arabidopsis reduces plant organ size and enhances the accumulation of amino acids and intermediate products of the TCA cycle.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hailan; Du, Xiaoqiu; Zhang, Fengxia; Zhang, Fang; Hu, Yong; Liu, Shichang; Jiang, Xiangning; Wang, Guodong; Liu, Dong

    2012-08-01

    The mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (mtPDC) plays a pivotal role in controlling the entry of carbon into the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle for energy production. This multi-enzyme complex consists of three components: E1, E2, and E3. In Arabidopsis, there are three genes, mtE2-1, mtE2-2, and mtE2-3, which encode the putative mtPDC E2 subunit but how each of them contributes to the total mtPDC activity remains unknown. In this work, we characterized an Arabidopsis mutant, m132, that has abnormal small organs. Molecular cloning indicated that the phenotype of m132 is caused by a mutation in the mtE2-1 gene, which results in a truncation of 109 amino acids at the C-terminus of the encoded protein. In m132, mtPDC activity is only 30% of the WT and ATP production is severely impaired. The mutation in the mtE2-1 gene also leads to the over-accumulation of most intermediate products of the TCA cycle and of all the amino acids for protein synthesis. Our results suggest that, among the three mtE2 genes, mtE2-1 is a major contributor to the function of Arabidopsis mtPDC and that the functional disruption of mtE2-1 profoundly affects plant growth and development, as well as its metabolism.

  7. Germ-line origins of mutation in families with hemophilia B: the sex ratio varies with the type of mutation.

    PubMed Central

    Ketterling, R P; Vielhaber, E; Bottema, C D; Schaid, D J; Cohen, M P; Sexauer, C L; Sommer, S S

    1993-01-01

    Previous epidemiological and biochemical studies have generated conflicting estimates of the sex ratio of mutation. Direct genomic sequencing in combination with haplotype analysis extends previous analyses by allowing the precise mutation to be determined in a given family. From analysis of the factor IX gene of 260 consecutive families with hemophilia B, we report the germ-line origin of mutation in 25 families. When combined with 14 origins of mutation reported by others and with 4 origins previously reported by us, a total of 25 occur in the female germ line, and 18 occur in the male germ line. The excess of germ-line origins in females does not imply an overall excess mutation rate per base pair in the female germ line. Bayesian analysis of the data indicates that the sex ratio varies with the type of mutation. The aggregate of single-base substitutions shows a male predominance of germ-line mutations (P < .002). The maximum-likelihood estimate of the male predominance is 3.5-fold. Of the single-base substitutions, transitions at the dinucleotide CpG show the largest male predominance (11-fold). In contrast to single-base substitutions, deletions display a sex ratio of unity. Analysis of the parental age at transmission of a new mutation suggests that germ-line mutations are associated with a small increase in parental age in females but little, if any, increase in males. Although direct genomic sequencing offers a general method for defining the origin of mutation in specific families, accurate estimates of the sex ratios of different mutational classes require large sample sizes and careful correction for multiple biases of ascertainment. The biases in the present data result in an underestimate of the enhancement of mutation in males. PMID:8434583

  8. Germ-line origins of mutation in families with hemophilia B: The sex ratio varies with the type of mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Ketterling, R.P.; Vielhaber, E.; Bottema, C.D.K.; Schaid, D.J.; Sommer, S.S. ); Cohen, M.P. ); Sexauer, C.L. )

    1993-01-01

    Previous epidemiological and biochemical studies have generated conflicting estimates of the sex ratio of mutation. Direct genomic sequencing in combination with haplotype analysis extends previous analyses by allowing the precise mutation to be determined in a given family. From analysis of the factor IX gene of 260 consecutive families with hemophilia B, the authors report the germ-line origin of mutation in 25 families. When combined with 14 origins of mutation reported by others and with 4 origins previously reported by them, a total of 25 occur in the female germ line, and 18 occur in the male germ line. The excess of germ-line origins in females does not imply an overall excess mutation rate per base pair in the female germ line. Bayesian analysis of the data indicates that the sex ratio varies with the type of mutation. The aggregate of single-base substitutions shows a male predominance of germ-line mutations (P < .002). The maximum-likelihood estimate of the male predominance is 3.5-fold. Of the single-base substitutions, deletions display a sex ratio of unity. Analysis of the parental age at transmission of a new mutation suggests that germ-line mutations are associated with a small increase in parental age in females but little, if any, increase in males. Although direct genomic sequencing offers a general method for defining the origin of mutation in specific families, accurate estimates of the sex ratios of different mutational classes require large sample sizes and careful correction for multiple biases of ascertainment. The biases in the present data result in an underestimate of the enhancement of mutation in males. 62 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  9. Mutation directional selection sheds light on prion pathogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Liang; Ji, Hong-Fang

    2011-07-01

    Highlights: {yields} Most pathogenic mutations possess strong directional selection, i.e., enhancing hydrophobicity or decreasing negative and increasing positive charge. {yields} Mutation-induced changes may strengthen the interactions between PrP and facilitating factors. {yields} The findings also have significant implications for exploring potential regions involved in the conformational transition from PrP{sup C} to PrP{sup Sc}. -- Abstract: As mutations in the PRNP gene account for human hereditary prion diseases (PrDs), it is crucial to elucidating how these mutations affect the central pathogenic conformational transition of normal cellular prion protein (PrP{sup C}) to abnormal scrapie isoform (PrP{sup Sc}). Many studies proposed that these pathogenic mutations may make PrP more susceptible to conformational change through altering its structure stability. By evaluating the most recent observations regarding pathogenic mutations, it was found that the pathogenic mutations do not exert a uniform effect on the thermodynamic stability of the human PrP's structure. Through analyzing the reported PrDs-related mutations, we found that 25 out of 27 mutations possess strong directional selection, i.e., enhancing hydrophobicity or decreasing negative and increasing positive charge. Based on the triggering role reported by previous studies of facilitating factors in PrP{sup C} conversion, e.g., lipid and polyanion, we proposed that the mutation-induced changes may strengthen the interaction between PrP and facilitating factors, which will accelerate PrP conversion and cause PrDs.

  10. Msx1 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Y.; Kong, H.; Mues, G.; D’Souza, R.

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the transcription factors PAX9 and MSX1 cause selective tooth agenesis in humans. In tooth bud mesenchyme of mice, both proteins are required for the expression of Bmp4, which is the key signaling factor for progression to the next step of tooth development. We have previously shown that Pax9 can transactivate a 2.4-kb Bmp4 promoter construct, and that most tooth-agenesis-causing PAX9 mutations impair DNA binding and Bmp4 promoter activation. We also found that Msx1 by itself represses transcription from this proximal Bmp4 promoter, and that, in combination with Pax9, it acts as a potentiator of Pax9-induced Bmp4 transactivation. This synergism of Msx1 with Pax9 is significant, because it is currently the only documented mechanism for Msx1-mediated activation of Bmp4. In this study, we investigated whether the 5 known tooth-agenesis-causing MSX1 missense mutations disrupt this Pax9-potentiation effect, or if they lead to deficiencies in protein stability, protein-protein interactions, nuclear translocation, and DNA-binding. We found that none of the studied molecular mechanisms yielded a satisfactory explanation for the pathogenic effects of the Msx1 mutations, calling for an entirely different approach to the investigation of this step of odontogenesis on the molecular level. PMID:21297014

  11. Mutations in galactosemia

    SciTech Connect

    Reichardt, J.K.V.

    1995-10-01

    This Letter raises four issues concerning two papers on galactosemia published in the March 1995 of the Journal. First, table 2 in the paper by Elsas et al. incorrectly attributes seven galactose-l-phosphate uridyl transferase (GALT) mutations (S135L, L195P, K285N, N314D, R333W, R333G, and K334R). The table also fails to mention that others have reported the same two findings attributed to {open_quotes}Leslie et al.; Elsas et al. and in press{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}Leslie et al.; Elsas et al.{close_quotes} The first finding on the prevalence of the Q188R galactosemia mutation in the G/G Caucasian population has also been described by Ng et al., and the second finding on the correlation of the N314D GALT mutation with the Duarte variant was reported by Lin et al. Second, Elsas et al. suggest that the E203K and N314D mutations may {open_quotes}produce intra-allelic complementation when in cis{close_quotes}. This speculation is supported by the activity data of individual III-2 but is inconsistent with the activities of three other individuals I-1, II-1, and III-1 of the same pedigree. The GALT activity measured in these three individuals suggests a dominant negative effect of E203K in E203K-N314D chromosomes, since they all have less than normal activity. Thus, the preponderance of the data in this paper is at odds with the authors speculation. It is worth recalling that Lin et al. also identified four N314D GALT mutations on 95 galactosemic chromosomes examined. A similar situation also appears to be the case in proband III-1 (with genotype E203K-N314D/IVSC) in the Elsas et al. paper. 9 refs.

  12. Induction of delayed mutations by benzene and ethylene dibromide in drosophila

    SciTech Connect

    Kale, P.; Kale, R.

    1995-08-01

    Two carcinogens, ethylene dibromide and benzene, were used to induce delayed (germinal mosaic) sex-linked recessive lethal mutations in spermatozoa and spermatids of adult Drosophila males. Significant numbers of delayed mutations (in F{sub 3}) were scored in absence of conventional (in F{sub 2}) mutations. A large proportion of nonlethal F{sub 2} cultures carried delayed mutations, so much so that, in some cultures, all F{sub 2} females were carriers of mutations. The mechanism through which single strand damage to treated X chromosomes can result in such delayed lethals is discussed. These observations indicate that the delayed mutation test should be used for testing the mutagenicity of environmental compounds, especially carcinogens, which tested negative in the conventional sex-linked recessive lethal mutation test. The data will support the relationship between mutagenesis and carcinogenesis and, also will further enhance the sensitivity of the Drosophila mutation assay. 12 refs., 4 tabs.

  13. The Site-Directed A184S Mutation in the HTH Domain of the Global Regulator IrrE Enhances Deinococcus radiodurans R1 Tolerance to UV Radiation and MMC Shock.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chen; Zhou, Zhengfu; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Zhen; Song, Yuan; Lu, Wei; Lin, Min; Chen, Ming

    2015-12-28

    IrrE is a highly conserved global regulator in the Deinococcus genus and contributes to survival from high doses of UV radiation, ionizing radiation, and desiccation. Drad-IrrE and Dgob-IrrE from Deinococcus radiodurans and Deinococcus gobiensis I-0 each share 66% sequence identity. However, Dgob-IrrE showed a stronger protection phenotype against UV radiation than Drad- IrrE in the D. radiodurans irrE-deletion mutant (ΔirrE), which may be due to amino acid residues differences around the DNA-binding HTH domain. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to generate a Drad-IrrE A184S single mutant, which has been characterized and compared with the ΔirrE mutant complemented strain with Drad-irrE, designated ΔirrE-E. The effects of the A184S mutation following UV radiation and mitomycin C (MMC) shock were determined. The A184S mutant displayed significantly increased resistance to UV radiation and MMC shock. The corresponding A184 site in Dgob-IrrE was inversely mutated, generating the S131A mutant, which exhibited a loss of resistance against UV radiation, MMC shock, and desiccation. qPCR analysis revealed that critical genes in the DNA repair system, such as recA, pprA, uvrA, and ddrB, were remarkably induced after UV radiation and MMC shock in the ΔirrE-IE and A184S mutants. These data suggested that A184S improves the ability against UV radiation and MMC shock, providing new insights into the modification of IrrE. We speculated that the serine residue may determine the efficiency of DNA binding, leading to the increased expression of IrrE-dependent genes important for protection against DNA damage.

  14. Depletion of runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) enhances SAHA sensitivity of p53-mutated pancreatic cancer cells through the regulation of mutant p53 and TAp63

    PubMed Central

    Ogata, Takehiro; Nakamura, Mizuyo; Sang, Meijie; Yoda, Hiroyuki; Hiraoka, Kiriko; Yin, Danjing; Sang, Mexiang; Shimozato, Osamu

    2017-01-01

    Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) represents one of the new class of anti-cancer drugs. However, multiple lines of clinical evidence indicate that SAHA might be sometimes ineffective on certain solid tumors including pancreatic cancer. In this study, we have found for the first time that RUNX2/mutant p53/TAp63-regulatory axis has a pivotal role in the determination of SAHA sensitivity of p53-mutated pancreatic cancer MiaPaCa-2 cells. According to our present results, MiaPaCa-2 cells responded poorly to SAHA. Forced depletion of mutant p53 stimulated SAHA-mediated cell death of MiaPaCa-2 cells, which was accomapanied by a further accumulation of γH2AX and cleaved PARP. Under these experimental conditions, pro-oncogenic RUNX2 was strongly down-regulated in mutant p53-depleted MiaPaCa-2 cells. Surprisingly, RUNX2 silencing augmented SAHA-dependent cell death of MiaPaCa-2 cells and caused a significant reduction of mutant p53. Consistent with these observations, overexpression of RUNX2 in MiaPaCa-2 cells restored SAHA-mediated decrease in cell viability and increased the amount of mutant p53. Thus, it is suggestive that there exists a positive auto-regulatory loop between RUNX2 and mutant p53, which might amplify their pro-oncogenic signals. Intriguingly, knockdown of mutant p53 or RUNX2 potentiated SAHA-induced up-regulation of TAp63. Indeed, SAHA-stimulated cell death of MiaPaCa-2 cells was partially attenuated by p63 depletion. Collectively, our present observations strongly suggest that RUNX2/mutant p53/TAp63-regulatory axis is one of the key determinants of SAHA sensitivity of p53-mutated pancreatic cancer cells. PMID:28671946

  15. Depletion of runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) enhances SAHA sensitivity of p53-mutated pancreatic cancer cells through the regulation of mutant p53 and TAp63.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Takehiro; Nakamura, Mizuyo; Sang, Meijie; Yoda, Hiroyuki; Hiraoka, Kiriko; Yin, Danjing; Sang, Mexiang; Shimozato, Osamu; Ozaki, Toshinori

    2017-01-01

    Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) represents one of the new class of anti-cancer drugs. However, multiple lines of clinical evidence indicate that SAHA might be sometimes ineffective on certain solid tumors including pancreatic cancer. In this study, we have found for the first time that RUNX2/mutant p53/TAp63-regulatory axis has a pivotal role in the determination of SAHA sensitivity of p53-mutated pancreatic cancer MiaPaCa-2 cells. According to our present results, MiaPaCa-2 cells responded poorly to SAHA. Forced depletion of mutant p53 stimulated SAHA-mediated cell death of MiaPaCa-2 cells, which was accomapanied by a further accumulation of γH2AX and cleaved PARP. Under these experimental conditions, pro-oncogenic RUNX2 was strongly down-regulated in mutant p53-depleted MiaPaCa-2 cells. Surprisingly, RUNX2 silencing augmented SAHA-dependent cell death of MiaPaCa-2 cells and caused a significant reduction of mutant p53. Consistent with these observations, overexpression of RUNX2 in MiaPaCa-2 cells restored SAHA-mediated decrease in cell viability and increased the amount of mutant p53. Thus, it is suggestive that there exists a positive auto-regulatory loop between RUNX2 and mutant p53, which might amplify their pro-oncogenic signals. Intriguingly, knockdown of mutant p53 or RUNX2 potentiated SAHA-induced up-regulation of TAp63. Indeed, SAHA-stimulated cell death of MiaPaCa-2 cells was partially attenuated by p63 depletion. Collectively, our present observations strongly suggest that RUNX2/mutant p53/TAp63-regulatory axis is one of the key determinants of SAHA sensitivity of p53-mutated pancreatic cancer cells.

  16. Differential evolution with ranking-based mutation operators.

    PubMed

    Gong, Wenyin; Cai, Zhihua

    2013-12-01

    Differential evolution (DE) has been proven to be one of the most powerful global numerical optimization algorithms in the evolutionary algorithm family. The core operator of DE is the differential mutation operator. Generally, the parents in the mutation operator are randomly chosen from the current population. In nature, good species always contain good information, and hence, they have more chance to be utilized to guide other species. Inspired by this phenomenon, in this paper, we propose the ranking-based mutation operators for the DE algorithm, where some of the parents in the mutation operators are proportionally selected according to their rankings in the current population. The higher ranking a parent obtains, the more opportunity it will be selected. In order to evaluate the influence of our proposed ranking-based mutation operators on DE, our approach is compared with the jDE algorithm, which is a highly competitive DE variant with self-adaptive parameters, with different mutation operators. In addition, the proposed ranking-based mutation operators are also integrated into other advanced DE variants to verify the effect on them. Experimental results indicate that our proposed ranking-based mutation operators are able to enhance the performance of the original DE algorithm and the advanced DE algorithms.

  17. Low pesticide rates may hasten the evolution of resistance by increasing mutation frequencies.

    PubMed

    Gressel, Jonathan

    2011-03-01

    At very low pesticide rates, a certain low proportion of pests may receive a sublethal dose, are highly stressed by the pesticide and yet survive. Stress is a general enhancer of mutation rates. Thus, the survivors are likely to have more than normal mutations, which might include mutations leading to pesticide resistance, both for multifactorial (polygenic, gene amplification, sequential allelic mutations) and for major gene resistance. Management strategies should consider how to eliminate the subpopulation of pests with the high mutation rates, but the best strategy is probably to avoid too low application rates of pesticides from the outset.

  18. cis-Regulatory Mutations Are a Genetic Cause of Human Limb Malformations

    PubMed Central

    VanderMeer, Julia E.; Ahituv, Nadav

    2011-01-01

    The underlying mutations that cause human limb malformations are often difficult to determine, particularly for limb malformations that occur as isolated traits. Evidence from a variety of studies shows that cis-regulatory mutations, specifically in enhancers, can lead to some of these isolated limb malformations. Here, we provide a review of human limb malformations that have been shown to be caused by enhancer mutations and propose that cis-regulatory mutations will continue to be identified as the cause of additional human malformations as our understanding of regulatory sequences improves. PMID:21509892

  19. Synonymous mutations frequently act as driver mutations in human cancers.

    PubMed

    Supek, Fran; Miñana, Belén; Valcárcel, Juan; Gabaldón, Toni; Lehner, Ben

    2014-03-13

    Synonymous mutations change the sequence of a gene without directly altering the sequence of the encoded protein. Here, we present evidence that these "silent" mutations frequently contribute to human cancer. Selection on synonymous mutations in oncogenes is cancer-type specific, and although the functional consequences of cancer-associated synonymous mutations may be diverse, they recurrently alter exonic motifs that regulate splicing and are associated with changes in oncogene splicing in tumors. The p53 tumor suppressor (TP53) also has recurrent synonymous mutations, but, in contrast to those in oncogenes, these are adjacent to splice sites and inactivate them. We estimate that between one in two and one in five silent mutations in oncogenes have been selected, equating to ~6%- 8% of all selected single-nucleotide changes in these genes. In addition, our analyses suggest that dosage-sensitive oncogenes have selected mutations in their 3' UTRs.

  20. Bioenergetics of mitochondrial diseases associated with mtDNA mutations.

    PubMed

    Lenaz, Giorgio; Baracca, Alessandra; Carelli, Valerio; D'Aurelio, Marilena; Sgarbi, Gianluca; Solaini, Giancarlo

    2004-07-23

    This mini-review summarizes our present view of the biochemical alterations associated with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) point mutations. Mitochondrial cytopathies caused by mutations of mtDNA are well-known genetic and clinical entities, but the biochemical pathogenic mechanisms are often obscure. Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is due to three main mutations in genes for complex I subunits. Even if the catalytic activity of complex I is maintained except in cells carrying the 3460/ND1 mutation, in all cases there is a change in sensitivity to complex I inhibitors and an impairment of mitochondrial respiration, eliciting the possibility of generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by the complex. Neurogenic muscle weakness, Ataxia and Retinitis Pigmentosa (NARP), is due to a mutation in the ATPase-6 gene. In NARP patients ATP synthesis is strongly depressed to an extent proportional to the mutation load; nevertheless, ATP hydrolysis and ATP-driven proton translocation are not affected. It is suggested that the NARP mutation affects the ability of the enzyme to couple proton transport to ATP synthesis. A point mutation in subunit III of cytochrome c oxidase is accompanied by a syndrome resembling MELAS: however, no major biochemical defect is found, if we except an enhanced production of ROS. The mechanism of such enhancement is at present unknown. In this review, we draw attention to a few examples in which the overproduction of ROS might represent a common step in the induction of clinical phenotypes and/or in the progression of several human pathologies associated with mtDNA point mutations.

  1. Subunit-selective mutational analysis and tissue culture evaluations of the interactions of the E138K and M184I mutations in HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hong-Tao; Oliveira, Maureen; Quashie, Peter K; McCallum, Matthew; Han, Yingshan; Quan, Yudong; Brenner, Bluma G; Wainberg, Mark A

    2012-08-01

    The emergence of HIV-1 drug resistance remains a major obstacle in antiviral therapy. M184I/V and E138K are signature mutations of clinical relevance in HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) for the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) lamivudine (3TC) and emtricitabine (FTC) and the second-generation (new) nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) rilpivirine (RPV), respectively, and the E138K mutation has also been shown to be selected by etravirine in cell culture. The E138K mutation was recently shown to compensate for the low enzyme processivity and viral fitness associated with the M184I/V mutations through enhanced deoxynucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) usage, while the M184I/V mutations compensated for defects in polymerization rates associated with the E138K mutations under conditions of high dNTP concentrations. The M184I mutation was also shown to enhance resistance to RPV and ETR when present together with the E138K mutation. These mutual compensatory effects might also enhance transmission rates of viruses containing these two mutations. Therefore, we performed tissue culture studies to investigate the evolutionary dynamics of these viruses. Through experiments in which E138K-containing viruses were selected with 3TC-FTC and in which M184I/V viruses were selected with ETR, we demonstrated that ETR was able to select for the E138K mutation in viruses containing the M184I/V mutations and that the M184I/V mutations consistently emerged when E138K viruses were selected with 3TC-FTC. We also performed biochemical subunit-selective mutational analyses to investigate the impact of the E138K mutation on RT function and interactions with the M184I mutation. We now show that the E138K mutation decreased rates of polymerization, impaired RNase H activity, and conferred ETR resistance through the p51 subunit of RT, while an enhancement of dNTP usage as a result of the simultaneous presence of both mutations E138K and M184I occurred via both

  2. OXPHOS mutations and neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Koopman, Werner J H; Distelmaier, Felix; Smeitink, Jan AM; Willems, Peter HGM

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) sustains organelle function and plays a central role in cellular energy metabolism. The OXPHOS system consists of 5 multisubunit complexes (CI–CV) that are built up of 92 different structural proteins encoded by the nuclear (nDNA) and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Biogenesis of a functional OXPHOS system further requires the assistance of nDNA-encoded OXPHOS assembly factors, of which 35 are currently identified. In humans, mutations in both structural and assembly genes and in genes involved in mtDNA maintenance, replication, transcription, and translation induce ‘primary' OXPHOS disorders that are associated with neurodegenerative diseases including Leigh syndrome (LS), which is probably the most classical OXPHOS disease during early childhood. Here, we present the current insights regarding function, biogenesis, regulation, and supramolecular architecture of the OXPHOS system, as well as its genetic origin. Next, we provide an inventory of OXPHOS structural and assembly genes which, when mutated, induce human neurodegenerative disorders. Finally, we discuss the consequences of mutations in OXPHOS structural and assembly genes at the single cell level and how this information has advanced our understanding of the role of OXPHOS dysfunction in neurodegeneration. PMID:23149385

  3. Mutator and MULE Transposons.

    PubMed

    Lisch, Damon

    2015-04-01

    The Mutator system of transposable elements (TEs) is a highly mutagenic family of transposons in maize. Because they transpose at high rates and target genic regions, these transposons can rapidly generate large numbers of new mutants, which has made the Mutator system a favored tool for both forward and reverse mutagenesis in maize. Low copy number versions of this system have also proved to be excellent models for understanding the regulation and behavior of Class II transposons in plants. Notably, the availability of a naturally occurring locus that can heritably silence autonomous Mutator elements has provided insights into the means by which otherwise active transposons are recognized and silenced. This chapter will provide a review of the biology, regulation, evolution and uses of this remarkable transposon system, with an emphasis on recent developments in our understanding of the ways in which this TE system is recognized and epigenetically silenced as well as recent evidence that Mu-like elements (MULEs) have had a significant impact on the evolution of plant genomes.

  4. Mutation Rates among RNA Viruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, John W.; Holland, John J.

    1999-11-01

    The rate of spontaneous mutation is a key parameter in modeling the genetic structure and evolution of populations. The impact of the accumulated load of mutations and the consequences of increasing the mutation rate are important in assessing the genetic health of populations. Mutation frequencies are among the more directly measurable population parameters, although the information needed to convert them into mutation rates is often lacking. A previous analysis of mutation rates in RNA viruses (specifically in riboviruses rather than retroviruses) was constrained by the quality and quantity of available measurements and by the lack of a specific theoretical framework for converting mutation frequencies into mutation rates in this group of organisms. Here, we describe a simple relation between ribovirus mutation frequencies and mutation rates, apply it to the best (albeit far from satisfactory) available data, and observe a central value for the mutation rate per genome per replication of μ g≈ 0.76. (The rate per round of cell infection is twice this value or about 1.5.) This value is so large, and ribovirus genomes are so informationally dense, that even a modest increase extinguishes the population.

  5. Septin Mutations in Human Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Angelis, Dimitrios; Spiliotis, Elias T.

    2016-01-01

    Septins are GTP-binding proteins that are evolutionarily and structurally related to the RAS oncogenes. Septin expression levels are altered in many cancers and new advances point to how abnormal septin expression may contribute to the progression of cancer. In contrast to the RAS GTPases, which are frequently mutated and actively promote tumorigenesis, little is known about the occurrence and role of septin mutations in human cancers. Here, we review septin missense mutations that are currently in the Catalog of Somatic Mutations in Cancer (COSMIC) database. The majority of septin mutations occur in tumors of the large intestine, skin, endometrium and stomach. Over 25% of the annotated mutations in SEPT2, SEPT4, and SEPT9 belong to large intestine tumors. From all septins, SEPT9 and SEPT14 exhibit the highest mutation frequencies in skin, stomach and large intestine cancers. While septin mutations occur with frequencies lower than 3%, recurring mutations in several invariant and highly conserved amino acids are found across different septin paralogs and tumor types. Interestingly, a significant number of these mutations occur in the GTP-binding pocket and septin dimerization interfaces. Future studies may determine how these somatic mutations affect septin structure and function, whether they contribute to the progression of specific cancers and if they could serve as tumor-specific biomarkers. PMID:27882315

  6. Estimation of spontaneous mutation rates.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Loki; Berry, Charles C; Gasche, Christoph

    2003-09-01

    Spontaneous or randomly occurring mutations play a key role in cancer progression. Estimation of the mutation rate of cancer cells can provide useful information about the disease. To ascertain these mutation rates, we need mathematical models that describe the distribution of mutant cells. In this investigation, we develop a discrete time stochastic model for a mutational birth process. We assume that mutations occur concurrently with mitosis so that when a nonmutant parent cell splits into two progeny, one of these daughter cells could carry a mutation. We propose an estimator for the mutation rate and investigate its statistical properties via theory and simulations. A salient feature of this estimator is the ease with which it can be computed. The methods developed herein are applied to a human colorectal cancer cell line and compared to existing continuous time models.

  7. Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA mutations in Chinese patients: 16 novel mutations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Weimin; Wang, Yun; Meng, Yan; Su, Liang; Shi, Huiping; Huang, Shangzhi

    2010-08-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA; Morquio A syndrome) is a lysosomal storage disease caused by deficiency of N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfatase (GALNS) and transmitted as an autosomal recessive trait. This is the first systematic mutation screen in Chinese MPS IVA patients. Mutation detections in 24 unrelated Chinese MPS IVA patients were performed by PCR and direct sequencing of exons or the mRNA of GALNS. A total of 42 mutant alleles were identified, belonging to 27 different mutations. Out of the 27 mutations, 16 were novel, including 2 splicing mutations (c.567-1G>T and c.634-1G>A), 2 nonsense mutations (p.W325X and p.Q422X) and 12 missense mutations (p.T88I, p.H142R, p.P163H, p.G168L, p.H236D, p.N289S, p.T312A, p.G316V, p.A324E, p.L366P, p.Q422K and p.F452L). p.G340D was found to be a common mutation in the Chinese MPS IVA patients, accounting for 16.7% of the total number of mutant alleles. The results show that the mutations in Chinese MPS IVA patients are also family specific but have a different mutation spectrum as compared to those of other populations.

  8. Calreticulin Mutations in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Lavi, Noa

    2014-01-01

    With the discovery of the JAK2V617F mutation in patients with Philadelphia chromosome-negative (Ph−) myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) in 2005, major advances have been made in the diagnosis of MPNs, in understanding of their pathogenesis involving the JAK/STAT pathway, and finally in the development of novel therapies targeting this pathway. Nevertheless, it remains unknown which mutations exist in approximately one-third of patients with non-mutated JAK2 or MPL essential thrombocythemia (ET) and primary myelofibrosis (PMF). At the end of 2013, two studies identified recurrent mutations in the gene encoding calreticulin (CALR) using whole-exome sequencing. These mutations were revealed in the majority of ET and PMF patients with non-mutated JAK2 or MPL but not in polycythemia vera patients. Somatic 52-bp deletions (type 1 mutations) and recurrent 5-bp insertions (type 2 mutations) in exon 9 of the CALR gene (the last exon encoding the C-terminal amino acids of the protein calreticulin) were detected and found always to generate frameshift mutations. All detected mutant calreticulin proteins shared a novel amino acid sequence at the C-terminal. Mutations in CALR are acquired early in the clonal history of the disease, and they cause activation of JAK/STAT signaling. The CALR mutations are the second most frequent mutations in Ph− MPN patients after the JAK2V617F mutation, and their detection has significantly improved the diagnostic approach for ET and PMF. The characteristics of the CALR mutations as well as their diagnostic, clinical, and pathogenesis implications are discussed in this review. PMID:25386351

  9. Rapamycin drives selection against a pathogenic heteroplasmic mitochondrial DNA mutation.

    PubMed

    Dai, Ying; Zheng, Kangni; Clark, Joanne; Swerdlow, Russell H; Pulst, Stefan M; Sutton, James P; Shinobu, Leslie A; Simon, David K

    2014-02-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations cause a variety of mitochondrial disorders for which effective treatments are lacking. Emerging data indicate that selective mitochondrial degradation through autophagy (mitophagy) plays a critical role in mitochondrial quality control. Inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase activity can activate mitophagy. To test the hypothesis that enhancing mitophagy would drive selection against dysfunctional mitochondria harboring higher levels of mutations, thereby decreasing mutation levels over time, we examined the impact of rapamycin on mutation levels in a human cytoplasmic hybrid (cybrid) cell line expressing a heteroplasmic mtDNA G11778A mutation, the most common cause of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy. Inhibition of mTORC1/S6 kinase signaling by rapamycin induced colocalization of mitochondria with autophagosomes, and resulted in a striking progressive decrease in levels of the G11778A mutation and partial restoration of ATP levels. Rapamycin-induced upregulation of mitophagy was confirmed by electron microscopic evidence of increased autophagic vacuoles containing mitochondria-like organelles. The decreased mutational burden was not due to rapamycin-induced cell death or mtDNA depletion, as there was no significant difference in cytotoxicity/apoptosis or mtDNA copy number between rapamycin and vehicle-treated cells. These data demonstrate the potential for pharmacological inhibition of mTOR kinase activity to activate mitophagy as a strategy to drive selection against a heteroplasmic mtDNA G11778A mutation and raise the exciting possibility that rapamycin may have therapeutic potential for the treatment of mitochondrial disorders associated with heteroplasmic mtDNA mutations, although further studies are needed to determine if a similar strategy will be effective for other mutations and other cell types.

  10. Mutations induced by heavy charged particles.

    PubMed

    Yatagai, Fumio

    2004-12-01

    The relative biological-effectiveness of radiation is increased when cells or tissue are exposed to densely ionizing (high-LET) radiation. A large number of studies focus on the following aspects of the biological effects of high-LET radiation: (i) basic understanding of radiation damage and repair; (ii) developing radiotherapy protocols for accelerated charged particles; and (iii) estimation of human risks from exposure to high-LET heavy charged particles. The increased lethal effectiveness (cell inactivation) of high-LET radiation contributes to new methods for using radiation therapy, but it is also necessary to study the enhanced mutagenic effect of high LET radiation, because higher frequencies of mutation can be expected to provide higher rates of carcinogenicity with human exposure. It is important to note that both measures of biological effectiveness (lethality and mutagenicity) depend on the quality of radiation, the dose, dose-rate effects, and the biological endpoints studied. This paper is intended to provide a review of current research on the mutagenic effects of high-LET radiation, and is organized into three sections. First, are descriptions of the induced mutations studied with various detection systems (section 1) because the detectable mutations induced by ionizing radiation, including heavy-ions, depend largely on the detection system used. Second is a discussion of the biological significance of the dependence of induced mutations on LET (section 2). This is related to the molecular nature of radiation lesions and to the repair mechanisms used to help cells recover from such damage. Finally, applications of mutation detection systems for studies in space (section 3) are described, in which the carcinogenic effects of space environmental radiation are considered.

  11. Association between BRCA Mutation Status, Pathological Findings, and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Features in Patients with Breast Cancer at Risk for the Mutation.

    PubMed

    Noh, Jae Myoung; Han, Boo-Kyung; Choi, Doo Ho; Rhee, Sun Jung; Cho, Eun Yoon; Huh, Seung Jae; Park, Won; Park, Hyojung; Nam, Seok Jin; Lee, Jeong Eon; Kil, Won-Ho

    2013-09-01

    We investigated the relationship between BRCA mutations, pathological findings, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features in patients with breast cancer at risk for the mutation. Genetic testing for BRCA mutations was performed in 275 breast cancer patients with at least one risk factor for the mutation. Using the breast imaging reporting and data system MR lexicon, morphological and kinetic features were reviewed on MRI scans of 230 tumors in 209 patients. The relationship between BRCA mutations, pathologic findings, and MRI data was examined, and disease recurrence was estimated. BRCA mutations were detected in 48 patients (23.0%), of which 21 (10.0%) were in BRCA1, and 25 (12.0%) in BRCA2. Additionally, two patients (1.0%) had mutations in both genes. Cancers in patients with BRCA1 mutations more frequently showed a higher nuclear grade (p=0.0041), and triple-negative (TN) phenotype (p<0.0001). On MRI scans, the cancers were seen as mass-type in 182 out of 230 lesions (79.1%), and nonmass type in 48 cases (20.9%). Among the features indentified by MRI, rim enhancement was significantly associated with molecular subtypes based on immunohistochemistry (p<0.0001), and nuclear grade (p=0.0387) in multiple logistic regression analysis. Rim enhancement on MRI, along with advanced pathologic N stage, was associated with increased disease recurrence (p=0.0023) based on multivariate analysis. However, the proportion of mass and nonmass tumors, and the distribution of morphological shape, margin, internal enhancement, and kinetic features assessed by MRI were not different according to BRCA mutation status. BRCA1 mutations were associated with aggressive pathological characteristics, and the TN phenotype. Rim enhancement was frequently seen on MRI scans of high-grade cancers and in the TN phenotype. And it was a significant predictor of disease recurrence. However, a direct association with BRCA mutations was not observed.

  12. Medulloblastoma exome sequencing uncovers subtype-specific somatic mutations.

    PubMed

    Pugh, Trevor J; Weeraratne, Shyamal Dilhan; Archer, Tenley C; Pomeranz Krummel, Daniel A; Auclair, Daniel; Bochicchio, James; Carneiro, Mauricio O; Carter, Scott L; Cibulskis, Kristian; Erlich, Rachel L; Greulich, Heidi; Lawrence, Michael S; Lennon, Niall J; McKenna, Aaron; Meldrim, James; Ramos, Alex H; Ross, Michael G; Russ, Carsten; Shefler, Erica; Sivachenko, Andrey; Sogoloff, Brian; Stojanov, Petar; Tamayo, Pablo; Mesirov, Jill P; Amani, Vladimir; Teider, Natalia; Sengupta, Soma; Francois, Jessica Pierre; Northcott, Paul A; Taylor, Michael D; Yu, Furong; Crabtree, Gerald R; Kautzman, Amanda G; Gabriel, Stacey B; Getz, Gad; Jäger, Natalie; Jones, David T W; Lichter, Peter; Pfister, Stefan M; Roberts, Thomas M; Meyerson, Matthew; Pomeroy, Scott L; Cho, Yoon-Jae

    2012-08-02

    Medulloblastomas are the most common malignant brain tumours in children. Identifying and understanding the genetic events that drive these tumours is critical for the development of more effective diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic strategies. Recently, our group and others described distinct molecular subtypes of medulloblastoma on the basis of transcriptional and copy number profiles. Here we use whole-exome hybrid capture and deep sequencing to identify somatic mutations across the coding regions of 92 primary medulloblastoma/normal pairs. Overall, medulloblastomas have low mutation rates consistent with other paediatric tumours, with a median of 0.35 non-silent mutations per megabase. We identified twelve genes mutated at statistically significant frequencies, including previously known mutated genes in medulloblastoma such as CTNNB1, PTCH1, MLL2, SMARCA4 and TP53. Recurrent somatic mutations were newly identified in an RNA helicase gene, DDX3X, often concurrent with CTNNB1 mutations, and in the nuclear co-repressor (N-CoR) complex genes GPS2, BCOR and LDB1. We show that mutant DDX3X potentiates transactivation of a TCF promoter and enhances cell viability in combination with mutant, but not wild-type, β-catenin. Together, our study reveals the alteration of WNT, hedgehog, histone methyltransferase and now N-CoR pathways across medulloblastomas and within specific subtypes of this disease, and nominates the RNA helicase DDX3X as a component of pathogenic β-catenin signalling in medulloblastoma.

  13. Long QT syndrome mutation detection by SNaPshot technique.

    PubMed

    Edelmann, Jeanett; Schumann, Stefanie; Nastainczyk, Marina; Husser-Bollmann, Daniela; Lessig, Rüdiger

    2012-11-01

    Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a cardiac disorder with an abnormality of cardiac rhythm associated with sudden death especially in younger, apparently healthy individuals. If there is no clear cause of death detectable during comprehensive coroner's inquest (autopsy-negative cases), you have to consider LQTS and other heritable arrhythmia syndromes. A molecular genetic screening regarding mutations in associated genes can help to ensure the cause of death and to protect affected family members. Genetic testing of LQTS, currently performed mainly by sequencing, is still very expensive and time consuming. With this study we present a rapid and reasonable method for the simultaneously screening of some of the most common mutations associated with LQTS, focused on the KCNQ1 and KCNH2 genes. With the method of SNaPshot minisequencing, a total of 58 mutations were analyzed in four multiplex assays which were successfully established and optimized. The comparison with samples previously analyzed by direct sequencing showed concordance. Furthermore, autopsy-negative cases were tested but no mutations could be observed in any of the specimen. The presented method is well suitable for LQTS mutation screening. An enhancement to further mutations and population-based investigations regarding mutation frequencies should be the aim of prospective studies.

  14. Amino acid composition of proteins reduces deleterious impact of mutations

    PubMed Central

    Hormoz, Sahand

    2013-01-01

    The evolutionary origin of amino acid occurrence frequencies in proteins (composition) is not yet fully understood. We suggest that protein composition works alongside the genetic code to minimize impact of mutations on protein structure. First, we propose a novel method for estimating thermodynamic stability of proteins whose sequence is constrained to a fixed composition. Second, we quantify the average deleterious impact of substituting one amino acid with another. Natural proteome compositions are special in at least two ways: 1) Natural compositions do not generate more stable proteins than the average random composition, however, they result in proteins that are less susceptible to damage from mutations. 2) Natural proteome compositions that result in more stable proteins (i.e. those of thermophiles) are also tuned to have a higher tolerance for mutations. This is consistent with the observation that environmental factors selecting for more stable proteins also enhance the deleterious impact of mutations. PMID:24108121

  15. Determining optimal treatment strategy for diffuse glioma: the emerging role of IDH mutations.

    PubMed

    Juratli, Tareq A; Cahill, Daniel P; McCutcheon, Ian E

    2015-06-01

    The isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1 and IDH2) genes mutate frequently in gliomas, and it has become increasingly apparent that IDH mutation status accounts for much of the prognostic information previously rendered by histological grading. Most glioblastomas (90-95%) are IDH wild-type and most lower-grade diffuse gliomas (80%) are IDH-mutant. We examine here how IDH mutation status interacts with treatments known to influence survival (surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy) in patients with gliomas, and the impact of the IDH mutations on patients' survival after such treatments. IDH mutations is associated with more complete surgical resection of enhancing disease, and with a better response to RT. In addition, there is increasing clinical evidence that, in certain contexts, IDH mutations predict chemotherapeutic sensitivity. Mutations in IDH and other genes are beginning to drive decisions on therapy for diffuse gliomas and will likely allow tailoring of treatment by molecular profile in the future.

  16. SETBP1 mutations drive leukemic transformation in ASXL1-mutated MDS.

    PubMed

    Inoue, D; Kitaura, J; Matsui, H; Hou, H-A; Chou, W-C; Nagamachi, A; Kawabata, K C; Togami, K; Nagase, R; Horikawa, S; Saika, M; Micol, J-B; Hayashi, Y; Harada, Y; Harada, H; Inaba, T; Tien, H-F; Abdel-Wahab, O; Kitamura, T

    2015-04-01

    Mutations in ASXL1 are frequent in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and are associated with adverse survival, yet the molecular pathogenesis of ASXL1 mutations (ASXL1-MT) is not fully understood. Recently, it has been found that deletion of Asxl1 or expression of C-terminal-truncating ASXL1-MTs inhibit myeloid differentiation and induce MDS-like disease in mice. Here, we find that SET-binding protein 1 (SETBP1) mutations (SETBP1-MT) are enriched among ASXL1-mutated MDS patients and associated with increased incidence of leukemic transformation, as well as shorter survival, suggesting that SETBP1-MT play a critical role in leukemic transformation of MDS. We identify that SETBP1-MT inhibit ubiquitination and subsequent degradation of SETBP1, resulting in increased expression. Expression of SETBP1-MT, in turn, inhibited protein phosphatase 2A activity, leading to Akt activation and enhanced expression of posterior Hoxa genes in ASXL1-mutant cells. Biologically, SETBP1-MT augmented ASXL1-MT-induced differentiation block, inhibited apoptosis and enhanced myeloid colony output. SETBP1-MT collaborated with ASXL1-MT in inducing acute myeloid leukemia in vivo. The combination of ASXL1-MT and SETBP1-MT activated a stem cell signature and repressed the tumor growth factor-β signaling pathway, in contrast to the ASXL1-MT-induced MDS model. These data reveal that SETBP1-MT are critical drivers of ASXL1-mutated MDS and identify several deregulated pathways as potential therapeutic targets in high-risk MDS.

  17. MECP2 mutations in males

    PubMed Central

    Villard, Laurent

    2007-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RS; MIM 312750) is a severe neurological disorder affecting exclusively females. Its prevalence is about 1 in 10 000 female births, and it is a prominent cause of profound mental handicap in women. RS is caused by mutations in the X‐linked methyl CpG‐binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene. These mutations were initially thought to be lethal in males. However, MECP2 mutations are now frequently identified in mentally retarded male patients. The frequency of disease‐causing MECP2 mutations in this population is between 1.3% and 1.7%. Surprisingly, MECP2 mutations in males are responsible for a wide spectrum of neurological disorders, ranging from mild mental retardation to severe neonatal encephalopathy. The aim of this review is to describe the nature of the MECP2 mutations identified in male patients to date and their associated phenotypes. PMID:17351020

  18. The incidence of PAX6 mutation in patients with simple aniridia: an evaluation of mutation detection in 12 cases.

    PubMed Central

    Axton, R; Hanson, I; Danes, S; Sellar, G; van Heyningen, V; Prosser, J

    1997-01-01

    Twelve aniridia patients, five with a family history and seven presumed to be sporadic, were exhaustively screened in order to test what proportion of people with aniridia, uncomplicated by associated anomalies, carry mutations in the human PAX6 gene. Mutations were detected in 90% of the cases. Three mutation detection techniques were used to determine if one method was superior for this gene. The protein truncation test (PTT) was used on RT-PCR products, SSCP on genomic PCR amplifications, and chemical cleavage of mismatch on both RT-PCR and genomic amplifications. For RT-PCR products, only the translated portion of the gene was screened. On genomic products exons 1 to 13 (including 740 bp of the 3' untranslated sequence and all intron/exon boundaries) were screened, as was a neuroretina specific enhancer in intron 4. Ten of the possible 12 mutations in the five familial cases and five of the sporadic patients were found, all of which conformed to a functional outcome of haploinsufficiency. Five were splice site mutations (one in the donor site of intron 4, two in the donor site of intron 6, one in each of the acceptor sites of introns 8 and 9) and five were nonsense mutations in exons 8, 9, 10, 11, and 12. SSCP analysis of individually amplified exons, with which nine of the 10 mutations were seen, was the most useful detection method for PAX6. Images PMID:9138149

  19. Glucocorticoid Steroid and Alendronate Treatment Alleviates Dystrophic Phenotype with Enhanced Functional Glycosylation of α-Dystroglycan in Mouse Model of Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy with FKRPP448L Mutation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bo; Shah, Sapana N; Lu, Peijuan; Richardson, Stephanie M; Bollinger, Lauren E; Blaeser, Anthony; Madden, Kyle L; Sun, Yubo; Luckie, Taylor M; Cox, Michael D; Sparks, Susan; Harper, Amy D; Lu, Qi Long

    2016-06-01

    Fukutin-related protein-muscular dystrophy is characterized by defects in glycosylation of α-dystroglycan with variable clinical phenotypes, most commonly as limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2I. There is no effective therapy available. Glucocorticoid steroids have become the standard treatment for Duchenne and other muscular dystrophies with serious adverse effects, including excessive weight gain, immune suppression, and bone loss. Bisphosphonates have been used to treat Duchenne muscular dystrophy for prevention of osteoporosis. Herein, we evaluated prednisolone and alendronate for their therapeutic potential in the FKRPP448L-mutant mouse representing moderate limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2I. Mice were treated with prednisolone, alendronate, and both in combination for up to 6 months. Prednisolone improved muscle pathology with significant reduction in muscle degeneration, but had no effect on serum creatine kinase levels and muscle strength. Alendronate treatment did not ameliorate muscle degeneration, but demonstrated a limited enhancement on muscle function test. Combined treatment of prednisolone and alendronate provided best improvement in muscle pathology with normalized fiber size distribution and significantly reduced serum creatine kinase levels, but had limited effect on muscle force generation. The use of alendronate significantly mitigated the bone loss. Prednisolone alone and in combination with alendronate enhance functionally glycosylated α-dystroglycan. These results, for the first time, demonstrate the efficacy and feasibility of this alliance treatment of the two drugs for fukutin-related protein-muscular dystrophy. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Exploring Missense Mutations in Tyrosine Kinases Implicated with Neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Sami, Neha; Kumar, Vijay; Islam, Asimul; Ali, Sher; Ahmad, Faizan; Hassan, Imtaiyaz

    2017-09-01

    Protein kinases are one of the largest families of evolutionarily related proteins and the third most common protein class of human genome. All the protein kinases share the same structural organization. They are made up of an extracellular domain, transmembrane domain and an intra cellular kinase domain. Missense mutations in these kinases have been studied extensively and correlated with various neurological disorders. Individual mutations in the kinase domain affect the functions of protein. The enhanced or reduced expression of protein leads to hyperactivation or inactivation of the signalling pathways, resulting in neurodegeneration. Here, we present extensive analyses of missense mutations in the tyrosine kinase focussing on the neurodegenerative diseases encompassing structure function relationship. This is envisaged to enhance our understanding about the neurodegeneration and possible therapeutic measures.

  1. Mutations in the deubiquitinase gene USP8 cause Cushing's disease.

    PubMed

    Reincke, Martin; Sbiera, Silviu; Hayakawa, Akira; Theodoropoulou, Marily; Osswald, Andrea; Beuschlein, Felix; Meitinger, Thomas; Mizuno-Yamasaki, Emi; Kawaguchi, Kohei; Saeki, Yasushi; Tanaka, Keiji; Wieland, Thomas; Graf, Elisabeth; Saeger, Wolfgang; Ronchi, Cristina L; Allolio, Bruno; Buchfelder, Michael; Strom, Tim M; Fassnacht, Martin; Komada, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    Cushing's disease is caused by corticotroph adenomas of the pituitary. To explore the molecular mechanisms of endocrine autonomy in these tumors, we performed exome sequencing of 10 corticotroph adenomas. We found somatic mutations in the USP8 deubiquitinase gene in 4 of 10 adenomas. The mutations clustered in the 14-3-3 protein binding motif and enhanced the proteolytic cleavage and catalytic activity of USP8. Cleavage of USP8 led to increased deubiqutination of the EGF receptor, impairing its downregulation and sustaining EGF signaling. USP8 mutants enhanced promoter activity of the gene encoding proopiomelanocortin. In summary, our data show that dominant mutations in USP8 cause Cushing's disease via activation of EGF receptor signaling.

  2. Recurrent gene mutations in CLL.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Trillos, Alejandra; Quesada, Víctor; Villamor, Neus; Puente, Xose S; López-Otín, Carlos; Campo, Elías

    2013-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing of whole genomes and exomes in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) has provided the first comprehensive view of somatic mutations in this disease. Subsequent studies have characterized the oncogenic pathways and clinical implications of a number of these mutations. The global number of somatic mutations per case is lower than those described in solid tumors but is in agreement with previous estimates of less than one mutation per megabase in hematological neoplasms. The number and pattern of somatic mutations differ in tumors with unmutated and mutated IGHV, extending at the genomic level the clinical differences observed in these two CLL subtypes. One of the striking conclusions of these studies has been the marked genetic heterogeneity of the disease, with a relatively large number of genes recurrently mutated at low frequency and only a few genes mutated in up to 10-15 % of the patients. The mutated genes tend to cluster in different pathways that include NOTCH1 signaling, RNA splicing and processing machinery, innate inflammatory response, Wnt signaling, and DNA damage and cell cycle control, among others. These results highlight the molecular heterogeneity of CLL and may provide new biomarkers and potential therapeutic targets for the diagnosis and management of the disease.

  3. BRAF Mutations in Canine Cancers.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Hiroyuki; Kennedy, Katherine; Shapiro, Susan G; Breen, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Activating mutations of the BRAF gene lead to constitutive activation of the MAPK pathway. Although many human cancers carry the mutated BRAF gene, this mutation has not yet been characterized in canine cancers. As human and canine cancers share molecular abnormalities, we hypothesized that BRAF gene mutations also exist in canine cancers. To test this hypothesis, we sequenced the exon 15 of BRAF, mutation hot spot of the gene, in 667 canine primary tumors and 38 control tissues. Sequencing analysis revealed that a single nucleotide T to A transversion at nucleotide 1349 occurred in 64 primary tumors (9.6%), with particularly high frequency in prostatic carcinoma (20/25, 80%) and urothelial carcinoma (30/45, 67%). This mutation results in the amino acid substitution of glutamic acid for valine at codon 450 (V450E) of canine BRAF, corresponding to the most common BRAF mutation in human cancer, V600E. The evolutional conservation of the BRAF V600E mutation highlights the importance of MAPK pathway activation in neoplasia and may offer opportunity for molecular diagnostics and targeted therapeutics for dogs bearing BRAF-mutated cancers.

  4. REEP1 Mutation Spectrum and Genotype/Phenotype Correlation in Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia Type 31

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beetz, Christian; Schule, Rebecca; Deconinck, Tine; Tran-Viet, Khanh-Nhat; Zhu, Hui; Kremer, Berry P. H.; Frints, Suzanna G. M.; van Zelst-Stams, Wendy A. G.; Byrne, Paula; Otto, Susanne; Nygren, Anders O. H.; Baets, Jonathan; Smets, Katrien; Ceulemans, Berten; Dan, Bernard; Nagan, Narasimhan; Kassubek, Jan; Klimpe, Sven; Klopstock, Thomas; Stolze, Henning; Smeets, Hubert J. M.; Schrander-Stumpel, Constance T. R. M.; Hutchinson, Michael; van de Warrenburg, Bart P.; Braastad, Corey; Deufel, Thomas; Pericak-Vance, Margaret; Schols, Ludger; de Jonghe, Peter; Zuchner, Stephan

    2008-01-01

    Mutations in the receptor expression enhancing protein 1 (REEP1) have recently been reported to cause autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) type SPG31. In a large collaborative effort, we screened a sample of 535 unrelated HSP patients for "REEP1" mutations and copy number variations. We identified 13 novel and 2 known "REEP1"…

  5. REEP1 Mutation Spectrum and Genotype/Phenotype Correlation in Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia Type 31

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beetz, Christian; Schule, Rebecca; Deconinck, Tine; Tran-Viet, Khanh-Nhat; Zhu, Hui; Kremer, Berry P. H.; Frints, Suzanna G. M.; van Zelst-Stams, Wendy A. G.; Byrne, Paula; Otto, Susanne; Nygren, Anders O. H.; Baets, Jonathan; Smets, Katrien; Ceulemans, Berten; Dan, Bernard; Nagan, Narasimhan; Kassubek, Jan; Klimpe, Sven; Klopstock, Thomas; Stolze, Henning; Smeets, Hubert J. M.; Schrander-Stumpel, Constance T. R. M.; Hutchinson, Michael; van de Warrenburg, Bart P.; Braastad, Corey; Deufel, Thomas; Pericak-Vance, Margaret; Schols, Ludger; de Jonghe, Peter; Zuchner, Stephan

    2008-01-01

    Mutations in the receptor expression enhancing protein 1 (REEP1) have recently been reported to cause autosomal dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) type SPG31. In a large collaborative effort, we screened a sample of 535 unrelated HSP patients for "REEP1" mutations and copy number variations. We identified 13 novel and 2 known "REEP1"…

  6. Calpain 3 deficiency affects SERCA expression and function in the skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Toral-Ojeda, Ivan; Aldanondo, Garazi; Lasa-Elgarresta, Jaione; Lasa-Fernández, Haizpea; Fernández-Torrón, Roberto; López de Munain, Adolfo; Vallejo-Illarramendi, Ainara

    2016-04-08

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A (LGMD2A) is a form of muscular dystrophy caused by mutations in calpain 3 (CAPN3). Several studies have implicated Ca2+ dysregulation as an underlying event in several muscular dystrophies, including LGMD2A. In this study we used mouse and human myotube cultures, and muscle biopsies in order to determine whether dysfunction of sarco/endoplasmatic Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA) is involved in the pathology of this disease. In CAPN3-deficient myotubes, we found decreased levels of SERCA 1 and 2 proteins, while mRNA levels remained comparable with control myotubes. Also, we found a significant reduction in SERCA function that resulted in impairment of Ca2+ homeostasis, and elevated basal intracellular [Ca2+] in human myotubes. Furthermore, small Ankyrin 1 (sAnk1), a SERCA1-binding protein that is involved in sarcoplasmic reticulum integrity, was also diminished in CAPN3-deficient fibres. Interestingly, SERCA2 protein was patently reduced in muscles from LGMD2A patients, while it was normally expressed in other forms of muscular dystrophy. Thus, analysis of SERCA2 expression may prove useful for diagnostic purposes as a potential indicator of CAPN3 deficiency in muscle biopsies. Altogether, our results indicate that CAPN3 deficiency leads to degradation of SERCA proteins and Ca2+ dysregulation in the skeletal muscle. While further studies are needed in order to elucidate the specific contribution of SERCA towards muscle degeneration in LGMD2A, this study constitutes a reasonable foundation for the development of therapeutic approaches targeting SERCA1, SERCA2 or sAnk1.

  7. Cis-regulatory mutations in human disease

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Cis-acting regulatory sequences are required for the proper temporal and spatial control of gene expression. Variation in gene expression is highly heritable and a significant determinant of human disease susceptibility. The diversity of human genetic diseases attributed, in whole or in part, to mutations in non-coding regulatory sequences is on the rise. Improvements in genome-wide methods of associating genetic variation with human disease and predicting DNA with cis-regulatory potential are two of the major reasons for these recent advances. This review will highlight select examples from the literature that have successfully integrated genetic and genomic approaches to uncover the molecular basis by which cis-regulatory mutations alter gene expression and contribute to human disease. The fine mapping of disease-causing variants has led to the discovery of novel cis-acting regulatory elements that, in some instances, are located as far away as 1.5 Mb from the target gene. In other cases, the prior knowledge of the regulatory landscape surrounding the gene of interest aided in the selection of enhancers for mutation screening. The success of these studies should provide a framework for following up on the large number of genome-wide association studies that have identified common variants in non-coding regions of the genome that associate with increased risk of human diseases including, diabetes, autism, Crohn's, colorectal cancer, and asthma, to name a few. PMID:19641089

  8. Cis-regulatory mutations in human disease.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Douglas J

    2009-07-01

    Cis-acting regulatory sequences are required for the proper temporal and spatial control of gene expression. Variation in gene expression is highly heritable and a significant determinant of human disease susceptibility. The diversity of human genetic diseases attributed, in whole or in part, to mutations in non-coding regulatory sequences is on the rise. Improvements in genome-wide methods of associating genetic variation with human disease and predicting DNA with cis-regulatory potential are two of the major reasons for these recent advances. This review will highlight select examples from the literature that have successfully integrated genetic and genomic approaches to uncover the molecular basis by which cis-regulatory mutations alter gene expression and contribute to human disease. The fine mapping of disease-causing variants has led to the discovery of novel cis-acting regulatory elements that, in some instances, are located as far away as 1.5 Mb from the target gene. In other cases, the prior knowledge of the regulatory landscape surrounding the gene of interest aided in the selection of enhancers for mutation screening. The success of these studies should provide a framework for following up on the large number of genome-wide association studies that have identified common variants in non-coding regions of the genome that associate with increased risk of human diseases including, diabetes, autism, Crohn's, colorectal cancer, and asthma, to name a few.

  9. Exposing synonymous mutations.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Ryan C; Simhadri, Vijaya L; Iandoli, Matthew; Sauna, Zuben E; Kimchi-Sarfaty, Chava

    2014-07-01

    Synonymous codon changes, which do not alter protein sequence, were previously thought to have no functional consequence. Although this concept has been overturned in recent years, there is no unique mechanism by which these changes exert biological effects. A large repertoire of both experimental and bioinformatic methods has been developed to understand the effects of synonymous variants. Results from this body of work have provided global insights into how biological systems exploit the degeneracy of the genetic code to control gene expression, protein folding efficiency, and the coordinated expression of functionally related gene families. Although it is now clear that synonymous variants are important in a variety of contexts, from human disease to the safety and efficacy of therapeutic proteins, there is no clear consensus on the approaches to identify and validate these changes. Here, we review the diverse methods to understand the effects of synonymous mutations.

  10. Spontaneous mutations in Streptococcus pyogenes isolates from streptococcal toxic shock syndrome patients play roles in virulence

    PubMed Central

    Ikebe, Tadayoshi; Matsumura, Takayuki; Nihonmatsu, Hisako; Ohya, Hitomi; Okuno, Rumi; Mitsui, Chieko; Kawahara, Ryuji; Kameyama, Mitsuhiro; Sasaki, Mari; Shimada, Naomi; Ato, Manabu; Ohnishi, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (group A Streptococcus; GAS) is a widespread human pathogen and causes streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS). STSS isolates have been previously shown to have high frequency mutations in the csrS/csrR (covS/covR) and/or rgg (ropB) genes, which are negative regulators of virulence. However, these mutations were found at somewhat low frequencies in emm1-genotyped isolates, the most prevalent STSS genotype. In this study, we sought to detect causal mutations of enhanced virulence in emm1 isolates lacking mutation(s) in the csrS/csrR and rgg genes. Three mutations associated with elevated virulence were found in the sic (a virulence gene) promoter, the csrR promoter, and the rocA gene (a csrR positive regulator). In vivo contribution of the sic promoter and rocA mutations to pathogenicity and lethality was confirmed in a GAS mouse model. Frequency of the sic promoter mutation was significantly higher in STSS emm1 isolates than in non-invasive STSS isolates; the rocA gene mutation frequency was not significantly different among STSS and non-STSS isolates. STSS emm1 isolates possessed a high frequency mutation in the sic promoter. Thus, this mutation may play a role in the dynamics of virulence and STSS pathogenesis. PMID:27349341

  11. Identification of spontaneous mutations within the long-range limb-specific Sonic Hedgehog enhancer (ZRS) that alter Sonic Hedgehog expression in the chicken limb mutants oligozeugodactly and Silkie Breed

    PubMed Central

    Maas, Sarah A.; Suzuki, Takayuki; Fallon, John F.

    2011-01-01

    The evolutionarily conserved, non-coding ~800 base-pair zone of polarizing activity (ZPA) regulatory sequence (ZRS) controls Shh expression in the posterior limb. We report that the chicken mutant oligozeugodactly (ozd), which lacks limb Shh expression, has a large deletion within the ZRS. Furthermore, the preaxial polydactylous, Silkie Breed chicken, which develops ectopic anterior limb Shh expression, has a single base-pair change within the ZRS. Using an in vivo reporter assay to examine enhancer function in the chick limb, we demonstrate that the wild-type ZRS drives β-galactosidase reporter expression in the ZPA of both wild-type and ozd limbs. The Silkie ZRS drives β-galactosidase in both posterior and anterior Shh domains in wild-type limb buds. These results support the hypothesis that the ZRS integrates positive and negative prepatterned regulatory inputs in the chicken model system and demonstrate the utility of the chicken limb as an efficient genetic system for gene regulatory studies. PMID:21509895

  12. PTCH mutations: distribution and analyses.

    PubMed

    Lindström, Erika; Shimokawa, Takashi; Toftgård, Rune; Zaphiropoulos, Peter G

    2006-03-01

    Mutations in the PTCH (PTCH1) gene are the underlying cause of nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS), and are also found in many different sporadic tumors in which PTCH is thought to act as a tumor suppressor gene. To investigate the distribution pattern of these mutations in tumors and NBCCS, we analyzed 284 mutations and 48 SNPs located in the PTCH gene that were compiled from our PTCH mutation database. We found that the PTCH mutations were mainly clustered into the predicted two large extracellular loops and the large intracellular loop. The SNPs appeared to be clustered around the sterol sensing domain and the second half of the protein. The NBCCS cases and each class of tumor analyzed revealed a different distribution of the mutations in the various PTCH domains. Moreover, the types of mutations were also unique for the different groups. Finally, the PTCH gene harbors mutational hot spot residues and regions, including a slippage-sensitive sequence in the N-terminus.

  13. Identification of High-Impact cis-Regulatory Mutations Using Transcription Factor Specific Random Forest Models

    PubMed Central

    Svetlichnyy, Dmitry; Imrichova, Hana; Fiers, Mark; Kalender Atak, Zeynep; Aerts, Stein

    2015-01-01

    Cancer genomes contain vast amounts of somatic mutations, many of which are passenger mutations not involved in oncogenesis. Whereas driver mutations in protein-coding genes can be distinguished from passenger mutations based on their recurrence, non-coding mutations are usually not recurrent at the same position. Therefore, it is still unclear how to identify cis-regulatory driver mutations, particularly when chromatin data from the same patient is not available, thus relying only on sequence and expression information. Here we use machine-learning methods to predict functional regulatory regions using sequence information alone, and compare the predicted activity of the mutated region with the reference sequence. This way we define the Predicted Regulatory Impact of a Mutation in an Enhancer (PRIME). We find that the recently identified driver mutation in the TAL1 enhancer has a high PRIME score, representing a “gain-of-target” for MYB, whereas the highly recurrent TERT promoter mutation has a surprisingly low PRIME score. We trained Random Forest models for 45 cancer-related transcription factors, and used these to score variations in the HeLa genome and somatic mutations across more than five hundred cancer genomes. Each model predicts only a small fraction of non-coding mutations with a potential impact on the function of the encompassing regulatory region. Nevertheless, as these few candidate driver mutations are often linked to gains in chromatin activity and gene expression, they may contribute to the oncogenic program by altering the expression levels of specific oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. PMID:26562774

  14. ENAM Mutations with Incomplete Penetrance

    PubMed Central

    Seymen, F.; Lee, K.-E.; Koruyucu, M.; Gencay, K.; Bayram, M.; Tuna, E.B.; Lee, Z.H.; Kim, J.-W.

    2014-01-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is a genetic disease affecting tooth enamel formation. AI can be an isolated entity or a phenotype of syndromes. To date, more than 10 genes have been associated with various forms of AI. We have identified 2 unrelated Turkish families with hypoplastic AI and performed mutational analysis. Whole-exome sequencing identified 2 novel heterozygous nonsense mutations in the ENAM gene (c.454G>T p.Glu152* in family 1, c.358C>T p.Gln120* in family 2) in the probands. Affected individuals were heterozygous for the mutation in each family. Segregation analysis within each family revealed individuals with incomplete penetrance or extremely mild enamel phenotype, in spite of having the same mutation with the other affected individuals. We believe that these findings will broaden our understanding of the clinical phenotype of AI caused by ENAM mutations. PMID:25143514

  15. Mutations in WNT1 Cause Different Forms of Bone Fragility

    PubMed Central

    Keupp, Katharina; Beleggia, Filippo; Kayserili, Hülya; Barnes, Aileen M.; Steiner, Magdalena; Semler, Oliver; Fischer, Björn; Yigit, Gökhan; Janda, Claudia Y.; Becker, Jutta; Breer, Stefan; Altunoglu, Umut; Grünhagen, Johannes; Krawitz, Peter; Hecht, Jochen; Schinke, Thorsten; Makareeva, Elena; Lausch, Ekkehart; Cankaya, Tufan; Caparrós-Martín, José A.; Lapunzina, Pablo; Temtamy, Samia; Aglan, Mona; Zabel, Bernhard; Eysel, Peer; Koerber, Friederike; Leikin, Sergey; Garcia, K. Christopher; Netzer, Christian; Schönau, Eckhard; Ruiz-Perez, Victor L.; Mundlos, Stefan; Amling, Michael; Kornak, Uwe; Marini, Joan; Wollnik, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    We report that hypofunctional alleles of WNT1 cause autosomal-recessive osteogenesis imperfecta, a congenital disorder characterized by reduced bone mass and recurrent fractures. In consanguineous families, we identified five homozygous mutations in WNT1: one frameshift mutation, two missense mutations, one splice-site mutation, and one nonsense mutation. In addition, in a family affected by dominantly inherited early-onset osteoporosis, a heterozygous WNT1 missense mutation was identified in affected individuals. Initial functional analysis revealed that altered WNT1 proteins fail to activate canonical LRP5-mediated WNT-regulated β-catenin signaling. Furthermore, osteoblasts cultured in vitro showed enhanced Wnt1 expression with advancing differentiation, indicating a role of WNT1 in osteoblast function and bone development. Our finding that homozygous and heterozygous variants in WNT1 predispose to low-bone-mass phenotypes might advance the development of more effective therapeutic strategies for congenital forms of bone fragility, as well as for common forms of age-related osteoporosis. PMID:23499309

  16. Drosophila chem mutations disrupt epithelial polarity in Drosophila embryos

    PubMed Central

    Zamudio-Arroyo, José M.

    2016-01-01

    Drosophila embryogenesis has proven to be an extremely powerful system for developmental gene discovery and characterization. We isolated five new EMS-induced alleles that do not complement the l(3R)5G83 lethal line isolated in the Nüsslein-Volhard and Wieschaus screens. We have named this locus chem. Lethality of the new alleles as homozygous zygotic mutants is not completely penetrant, and they have an extended phenocritical period. Like the original allele, a fraction of mutant embryos die with cuticular defects, notably head involution and dorsal closure defects. Embryonic defects are much more extreme in germline clones, where the majority of mutant embryos die during embryogenesis and do not form cuticle, implying a strong chem maternal contribution. chem mutations genetically interact with mutations in cytoskeletal genes (arm) and with mutations in the epithelial polarity genes coracle, crumbs, and yurt. chem mutants dorsal open defects are similar to those present in yurt mutants, and, likewise, they have epithelial polarity defects. chem1 and chem3 mutations suppress yurt3, and chem3 mutants suppress crumbs1 mutations. In contrast, chem1 and coracle2 mutations enhance each other. Compared to controls, in chem mutants in embryonic lateral epithelia Crumbs expression is mislocalized and reduced, Coracle is increased and mislocalized basally at embryonic stages 13–14, then reduced at stage 16. Arm expression has a similar pattern but levels are reduced. PMID:27920954

  17. A genotypic mutation system measuring mutations in restriction recognition sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Felley-Bosco, E; Pourzand, C; Zijlstra, J; Amstad, P; Cerutti, P

    1991-01-01

    The RFLP/PCR approach (restriction fragment length polymorphism/polymerase chain reaction) to genotypic mutation analysis described here measures mutations in restriction recognition sequences. Wild-type DNA is restricted before the resistant, mutated sequences are amplified by PCR and cloned. We tested the capacity of this experimental design to isolate a few copies of a mutated sequence of the human c-Ha-ras1 gene from a large excess of wild-type DNA. For this purpose we constructed a 272 bp fragment with 2 mutations in the PvuII recognition sequence 1727-1732 and studied the rescue by RFLP/PCR of a few copies of this 'PvuII mutant standard'. Following amplification with Taq-polymerase and cloning into lambda gt10, plaques containing wild-type sequence, PvuII mutant standard or Taq-polymerase induced bp changes were quantitated by hybridization with specific oligonucleotide probes. Our results indicate that 10 PvuII mutant standard copies can be rescued from 10(8) to 10(9) wild-type sequences. Taq polymerase errors originating from unrestricted, residual wild-type DNA were sequence dependent and consisted mostly of transversions originating at G.C bp. In contrast to a doubly mutated 'standard' the capacity to rescue single bp mutations by RFLP/PCR is limited by Taq-polymerase errors. Therefore, we assessed the capacity of our protocol to isolate a G to T transversion mutation at base pair 1698 of the MspI-site 1695-1698 of the c-Ha-ras1 gene from excess wild-type ras1 DNA. We found that 100 copies of the mutated ras1 fragment could be readily rescued from 10(8) copies of wild-type DNA. Images PMID:1676153

  18. MEK inhibitors block growth of lung tumours with mutations in ataxia–telangiectasia mutated

    PubMed Central

    Smida, Michal; Fece de la Cruz, Ferran; Kerzendorfer, Claudia; Uras, Iris Z.; Mair, Barbara; Mazouzi, Abdelghani; Suchankova, Tereza; Konopka, Tomasz; Katz, Amanda M.; Paz, Keren; Nagy-Bojarszky, Katalin; Muellner, Markus K.; Bago-Horvath, Zsuzsanna; Haura, Eric B.; Loizou, Joanna I.; Nijman, Sebastian M. B.

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths, and effective treatments are urgently needed. Loss-of-function mutations in the DNA damage response kinase ATM are common in lung adenocarcinoma but directly targeting these with drugs remains challenging. Here we report that ATM loss-of-function is synthetic lethal with drugs inhibiting the central growth factor kinases MEK1/2, including the FDA-approved drug trametinib. Lung cancer cells resistant to MEK inhibition become highly sensitive upon loss of ATM both in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistically, ATM mediates crosstalk between the prosurvival MEK/ERK and AKT/mTOR pathways. ATM loss also enhances the sensitivity of KRAS- or BRAF-mutant lung cancer cells to MEK inhibition. Thus, ATM mutational status in lung cancer is a mechanistic biomarker for MEK inhibitor response, which may improve patient stratification and extend the applicability of these drugs beyond RAS and BRAF mutant tumours. PMID:27922010

  19. TERT promoter mutations contribute to IDH mutations in predicting differential responses to adjuvant therapies in WHO grade II and III diffuse gliomas.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhen-Yu; Chan, Aden Ka-Yin; Ding, Xiao-Jie; Qin, Zhi-Yong; Hong, Christopher S; Chen, Ling-Chao; Zhang, Xin; Zhao, Fang-Ping; Wang, Yin; Wang, Yang; Zhou, Liang-Fu; Zhuang, Zhengping; Ng, Ho-Keung; Yan, Hai; Yao, Yu; Mao, Ying

    2015-09-22

    IDH mutations frequently occur in WHO grade II and III diffuse gliomas and have favorable prognosis compared to wild-type tumors. However, whether IDH mutations in WHO grade II and II diffuse gliomas predict enhanced sensitivity to adjuvant radiation (RT) or chemotherapy (CHT) is still being debated. Recent studies have identified recurrent mutations in the promoter region of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) in gliomas. We previously demonstrated that TERT promoter mutations may be promising biomarkers in glioma survival prognostication when combined with IDH mutations. This study analyzed IDH and TERT promoter mutations in 295 WHO grade II and III diffuse gliomas treated with or without adjuvant therapies to explore their impact on the sensitivity of tumors to genotoxic therapies. IDH mutations were found in 216 (73.2%) patients and TERT promoter mutations were found in 112 (38%) patients. In multivariate analysis, IDH mutations (p < 0.001) were independent prognostic factors for PFS and OS in patients receiving genotoxic therapies while TERT promoter mutations were not. In univariate analysis, IDH and TERT promoter mutations were not significant prognostic factors in patients who did not receive genotoxic therapies. Adjuvant RT and CHT were factors independently impacting PFS (RT p = 0.001, CHT p = 0.026) in IDH mutated WHO grade II and III diffuse gliomas but not in IDH wild-type group. Univariate and multivariate analyses demonstrated TERT promoter mutations further stratified IDH wild-type WHO grade II and III diffuse gliomas into two subgroups with different responses to genotoxic therapies. Adjuvant RT and CHT were significant parameters influencing PFS in the IDH wt/TERT mut subgroup (RT p = 0.015, CHT p = 0.015) but not in the IDH wt/TERT wt subgroup. Our data demonstrated that IDH mutated WHO grade II and III diffuse gliomas had better PFS and OS than their IDH wild-type counterparts when genotoxic therapies were administered after surgery

  20. TERT promoter mutations contribute to IDH mutations in predicting differential responses to adjuvant therapies in WHO grade II and III diffuse gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xiao-Jie; Qin, Zhi-Yong; Hong, Christopher S.; Chen, Ling-Chao; Zhang, Xin; Zhao, Fang-Ping; Wang, Yin; Wang, Yang; Zhou, Liang-Fu; Zhuang, Zhengping; Ng, Ho-Keung; Yan, Hai; Yao, Yu; Mao, Ying

    2015-01-01

    IDH mutations frequently occur in WHO grade II and III diffuse gliomas and have favorable prognosis compared to wild-type tumors. However, whether IDH mutations in WHO grade II and II diffuse gliomas predict enhanced sensitivity to adjuvant radiation (RT) or chemotherapy (CHT) is still being debated. Recent studies have identified recurrent mutations in the promoter region of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) in gliomas. We previously demonstrated that TERT promoter mutations may be promising biomarkers in glioma survival prognostication when combined with IDH mutations. This study analyzed IDH and TERT promoter mutations in 295 WHO grade II and III diffuse gliomas treated with or without adjuvant therapies to explore their impact on the sensitivity of tumors to genotoxic therapies. IDH mutations were found in 216 (73.2%) patients and TERT promoter mutations were found in 112 (38%) patients. In multivariate analysis, IDH mutations (p < 0.001) were independent prognostic factors for PFS and OS in patients receiving genotoxic therapies while TERT promoter mutations were not. In univariate analysis, IDH and TERT promoter mutations were not significant prognostic factors in patients who did not receive genotoxic therapies. Adjuvant RT and CHT were factors independently impacting PFS (RT p = 0.001, CHT p = 0.026) in IDH mutated WHO grade II and III diffuse gliomas but not in IDH wild-type group. Univariate and multivariate analyses demonstrated TERT promoter mutations further stratified IDH wild-type WHO grade II and III diffuse gliomas into two subgroups with different responses to genotoxic therapies. Adjuvant RT and CHT were significant parameters influencing PFS in the IDH wt/TERT mut subgroup (RT p = 0.015, CHT p = 0.015) but not in the IDH wt/TERT wt subgroup. Our data demonstrated that IDH mutated WHO grade II and III diffuse gliomas had better PFS and OS than their IDH wild-type counterparts when genotoxic therapies were administered after surgery

  1. Functional impact of HIV coreceptor-binding site mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Biscone, Mark J.; Miamidian, John L.; Muchiri, John M.; Baik, Sarah S.W.; Lee, Fang-Hua; Doms, Robert W. . E-mail: doms@mail.med.upenn.edu; Reeves, Jacqueline D. . E-mail: jreeves@MonogramBio.com

    2006-07-20

    The bridging sheet region of the gp120 subunit of the HIV-1 Env protein interacts with the major virus coreceptors, CCR5 and CXCR4. We examined the impact of mutations in and adjacent to the bridging sheet region of an X4 tropic HIV-1 on membrane fusion and entry inhibitor susceptibility. When the V3-loop of this Env was changed so that CCR5 was used, the effects of these same mutations on CCR5 use were assayed as well. We found that coreceptor-binding site mutations had greater effects on CXCR4-mediated fusion and infection than when CCR5 was used as a coreceptor, perhaps related to differences in coreceptor affinity. The mutations also reduced use of the alternative coreceptors CCR3 and CCR8 to varying degrees, indicating that the bridging sheet region is important for the efficient utilization of both major and minor HIV coreceptors. As seen before with a primary R5 virus strain, bridging sheet mutations increased susceptibility to the CCR5 inhibitor TAK-779, which correlated with CCR5 binding efficiency. Bridging sheet mutations also conferred increased susceptibility to the CXCR4 ligand AMD-3100 in the context of the X4 tropic Env. However, these mutations had little effect on the rate of membrane fusion and little effect on susceptibility to enfuvirtide, a membrane fusion inhibitor whose activity is dependent in part on the rate of Env-mediated membrane fusion. Thus, mutations that reduce coreceptor binding and enhance susceptibility to coreceptor inhibitors can affect fusion and enfuvirtide susceptibility in an Env context-dependent manner.

  2. Physical origins of remarkable thermostabilization by an octuple mutation for the adenosine A2a receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajiwara, Yuta; Ogino, Takahiro; Yasuda, Satoshi; Takamuku, Yuuki; Murata, Takeshi; Kinoshita, Masahiro

    2016-07-01

    It was experimentally showed that the thermal stability of a membrane protein, the adenosine A2a receptor, was remarkably enhanced by an octuple mutation. Here we theoretically prove that the energy decrease arising from the formation of protein intramolecular hydrogen bonds and the solvent-entropy gain upon protein folding are made substantially larger by the mutation, leading to the remarkable enhancement. The solvent is formed by hydrocarbon groups constituting nonpolar chains of the lipid bilayer within a membrane. The mutation modifies geometric characteristics of the structure so that the solvent crowding can be reduced to a larger extent when the protein folds.

  3. Search for novel candidate mutations for metronidazole resistance in Helicobacter pylori using next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Binh, Tran Thanh; Suzuki, Rumiko; Trang, Tran Thi Huyen; Kwon, Dong Hyeon; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2015-04-01

    Metronidazole resistance is a key factor associated with Helicobacter pylori treatment failure. Although this resistance is mainly associated with mutations in the rdxA and frxA genes, the question of whether metronidazole resistance is caused by the inactivation of frxA alone is still debated. Furthermore, it is unclear whether there are other mutations involved in addition to the two genes that are associated with resistance. A metronidazole-resistant strain was cultured from the metronidazole-susceptible H. pylori strain 26695-1 by exposure to low concentrations of metronidazole. The genome sequences of both susceptible and resistant H. pylori strains were determined by Illumina next-generation sequencing, from which putative candidate resistance mutations were identified. Natural transformation was used to introduce PCR products containing candidate mutations into the susceptible parent strain 26695-1, and the metronidazole MIC was determined for each strain. Mutations in frxA (hp0642), rdxA (hp0954), and rpsU (hp0562) were confirmed by the Sanger method. The mutated sequence in rdxA was successfully transformed into strain 26695-1, and the transformants showed resistance to metronidazole. The transformants containing a single mutation in rdxA showed a low MIC (16 mg/liter), while those containing mutations in both rdxA and frxA showed a higher MIC (48 mg/liter). No transformants containing a single mutation in frxA or rpsU were obtained. Next-generation sequencing was used to identify mutations related to drug resistance. We confirmed that the mutations in rdxA are mainly associated with metronidazole resistance, and mutations in frxA are able to enhance H. pylori resistance only in the presence of rdxA mutations. Moreover, mutations in rpsU may play a role in metronidazole resistance. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Search for Novel Candidate Mutations for Metronidazole Resistance in Helicobacter pylori Using Next-Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Binh, Tran Thanh; Suzuki, Rumiko; Trang, Tran Thi Huyen; Kwon, Dong Hyeon

    2015-01-01

    Metronidazole resistance is a key factor associated with Helicobacter pylori treatment failure. Although this resistance is mainly associated with mutations in the rdxA and frxA genes, the question of whether metronidazole resistance is caused by the inactivation of frxA alone is still debated. Furthermore, it is unclear whether there are other mutations involved in addition to the two genes that are associated with resistance. A metronidazole-resistant strain was cultured from the metronidazole-susceptible H. pylori strain 26695-1 by exposure to low concentrations of metronidazole. The genome sequences of both susceptible and resistant H. pylori strains were determined by Illumina next-generation sequencing, from which putative candidate resistance mutations were identified. Natural transformation was used to introduce PCR products containing candidate mutations into the susceptible parent strain 26695-1, and the metronidazole MIC was determined for each strain. Mutations in frxA (hp0642), rdxA (hp0954), and rpsU (hp0562) were confirmed by the Sanger method. The mutated sequence in rdxA was successfully transformed into strain 26695-1, and the transformants showed resistance to metronidazole. The transformants containing a single mutation in rdxA showed a low MIC (16 mg/liter), while those containing mutations in both rdxA and frxA showed a higher MIC (48 mg/liter). No transformants containing a single mutation in frxA or rpsU were obtained. Next-generation sequencing was used to identify mutations related to drug resistance. We confirmed that the mutations in rdxA are mainly associated with metronidazole resistance, and mutations in frxA are able to enhance H. pylori resistance only in the presence of rdxA mutations. Moreover, mutations in rpsU may play a role in metronidazole resistance. PMID:25645832

  5. A multiple phenotype predator-prey model with mutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abernethy, Gavin M.; Mullan, Rory; Glass, David H.; McCartney, Mark

    2017-01-01

    An existing multiple phenotype predator-prey model is expanded to include mutation amongst the predator phenotypes. Two unimodal maps are used for the underlying dynamics of the prey. A predation strategy is also defined which differs for each of the predators in the model. Results show that the introduction of predator mutation enhances predator survival both in terms of the number of phenotypes and total population for a range of values of the predation rate. In general, the dominant predator phenotype is the one which is most focused on the prey phenotype with the largest population.

  6. TERT promoter mutations lead to high transcriptional activity under hypoxia and temozolomide treatment and predict poor prognosis in gliomas.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; Han, Sheng; Meng, Lingxuan; Li, Zhonghua; Zhang, Xue; Wu, Anhua

    2014-01-01

    This study explored the effects of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter mutations on transcriptional activity of the TERT gene under hypoxic and temozolomide (TMZ) treatment conditions, and investigated the status and prognostic value of these mutations in gliomas. The effect of TERT promoter mutations on the transcriptional activity of the TERT gene under hypoxic and TMZ treatment conditions was investigated in glioma cells using the luciferase assay. TERT promoter mutations were detected in 101 glioma samples (grades I-IV) and 49 other brain tumors by sequencing. TERT mRNA expression in gliomas was examined by real-time PCR. Hazard ratios from survival analysis of glioma patients were determined relative to the presence of TERT promoter mutations. Mutations in the TERT promoter enhanced gene transcription even under hypoxic and TMZ treatment conditions, inducing upregulation of TERT mRNA expression. Mutations were detected in gliomas, but not in meningiomas, pituitary adenomas, cavernomas, intracranial metastases, normal brain tissues, or peripheral blood of glioma patients. Patients with TERT promoter mutations had lower survival rates, even after adjusting for other known or potential risk factors, and the incidence of mutation was correlated with patient age. TERT promoter mutations were specific to gliomas. TERT promoter mutations maintained its ability of inducing high transcriptional activity even under hypoxic and TMZ treatment conditions, and the presence of mutations was associated with poor prognosis in glioma patients. These findings demonstrate that TERT promoter mutations are novel prognostic markers for gliomas that can inform prospective therapeutic strategies.

  7. Ribosomal mutations promote the evolution of antibiotic resistance in a multidrug environment.

    PubMed

    Gomez, James E; Kaufmann-Malaga, Benjamin B; Wivagg, Carl N; Kim, Peter B; Silvis, Melanie R; Renedo, Nikolai; Ioerger, Thomas R; Ahmad, Rushdy; Livny, Jonathan; Fishbein, Skye; Sacchettini, James C; Carr, Steven A; Hung, Deborah T

    2017-02-21

    Antibiotic resistance arising via chromosomal mutations is typically specific to a particular antibiotic or class of antibiotics. We have identified mutations in genes encoding ribosomal components in Mycobacterium smegmatis that confer resistance to several structurally and mechanistically unrelated classes of antibiotics and enhance survival following heat shock and membrane stress. These mutations affect ribosome assembly and cause large-scale transcriptomic and proteomic changes, including the downregulation of the catalase KatG, an activating enzyme required for isoniazid sensitivity, and upregulation of WhiB7, a transcription factor involved in innate antibiotic resistance. Importantly, while these ribosomal mutations have a fitness cost in antibiotic-free medium, in a multidrug environment they promote the evolution of high-level, target-based resistance. Further, suppressor mutations can then be easily acquired to restore wild-type growth. Thus, ribosomal mutations can serve as stepping-stones in an evolutionary path leading to the emergence of high-level, multidrug resistance.

  8. Clusters of mutations from transient hypermutability.

    PubMed

    Drake, John W; Bebenek, Anna; Kissling, Grace E; Peddada, Shyamal

    2005-09-06

    Collections of mutants usually contain more mutants bearing multiple mutations than expected from the mutant frequency and a random distribution of mutations. This excess is seen in a variety of organisms and also after DNA synthesis in vitro. The excess is unlikely to originate in mutator mutants but rather from transient hypermutability resulting from a perturbation of one of the many transactions that maintain genetic fidelity. The multiple mutations are sometimes clustered and sometimes randomly distributed. We model some spectra as populations comprising a majority with a low mutation frequency and a minority with a high mutation frequency. In the case of mutants produced in vitro by a bacteriophage RB69 mutator DNA polymerase, mutants with two mutations are in approximately 10-fold excess and mutants with three mutations are in even greater excess. However, phenotypically undetectable mutations seen only as hitchhikers with detectable mutations are approximately 5-fold more frequent than mutants bearing detectable mutations, indicating that they arose in a subpopulation with a higher mutation frequency. Excess multiple mutations may contribute critically to carcinogenesis and to adaptive mutation, including the adaptations of pathogens as they move from host to host. In the case of the rapidly mutating riboviruses, the viral population appears to be composed of a majority with a mutation frequency substantially lower than the average and a minority with a huge mutational load.

  9. Mutation breeding by ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zengliang; Deng, Jianguo; He, Jianjun; Huo, Yuping; Wu, Yuejin; Wang, Xuedong; Lui, Guifu

    1991-07-01

    Ion implantation as a new mutagenic method has been used in the rice breeding program since 1986, and for mutation breeding of other crops later. It has been shown, in principle and in practice, that this method has many outstanding advantages: lower damage rate; higher mutation rate and wider mutational spectrum. Many new lines of rice with higher yield rate; broader disease resistance; shorter growing period but higher quality have been bred from ion beam induced mutants. Some of these lines have been utilized for the intersubspecies hybridization. Several new lines of cotton, wheat and other crops are now in breeding. Some biophysical effects of ion implantation for crop seeds have been studied.

  10. Mutational profiling reveals PIK3CA mutations in gallbladder carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The genetics of advanced biliary tract cancers (BTC), which encompass intra- and extra-hepatic cholangiocarcinomas as well as gallbladder carcinomas, are heterogeneous and remain to be fully defined. Methods To better characterize mutations in established known oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes we tested a mass spectrometric based platform to interrogate common cancer associated mutations across a panel of 77 formalin fixed paraffin embedded archived BTC cases. Results Mutations among three genes, KRAS, NRAS and PIK3CA were confirmed in this cohort. Activating mutations in PIK3CA were identified exclusively in GBC (4/32, 12.5%). KRAS mutations were identified in 3 (13%) intra-hepatic cholangiocarcinomas and 1 (33%) perihillar cholangiocarcinoma but were not identified in gallbladder carcinomas and extra-hepatic cholangiocarcinoma. Conclusions The presence of activating mutations in PIK3CA specifically in GBC has clinical implications in both the diagnosis of this cancer type, as well as the potential utility of targeted therapies such as PI3 kinase inhibitors. PMID:21303542

  11. HER2 missense mutations have distinct effects on oncogenic signaling and migration.

    PubMed

    Zabransky, Daniel J; Yankaskas, Christopher L; Cochran, Rory L; Wong, Hong Yuen; Croessmann, Sarah; Chu, David; Kavuri, Shyam M; Red Brewer, Monica; Rosen, D Marc; Dalton, W Brian; Cimino-Mathews, Ashley; Cravero, Karen; Button, Berry; Kyker-Snowman, Kelly; Cidado, Justin; Erlanger, Bracha; Parsons, Heather A; Manto, Kristen M; Bose, Ron; Lauring, Josh; Arteaga, Carlos L; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos; Park, Ben Ho

    2015-11-10

    Recurrent human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) missense mutations have been reported in human cancers. These mutations occur primarily in the absence of HER2 gene amplification such that most HER2-mutant tumors are classified as "negative" by FISH or immunohistochemistry assays. It remains unclear whether nonamplified HER2 missense mutations are oncogenic and whether they are targets for HER2-directed therapies that are currently approved for the treatment of HER2 gene-amplified breast cancers. Here we functionally characterize HER2 kinase and extracellular domain mutations through gene editing of the endogenous loci in HER2 nonamplified human breast epithelial cells. In in vitro and in vivo assays, the majority of HER2 missense mutations do not impart detectable oncogenic changes. However, the HER2 V777L mutation increased biochemical pathway activation and, in the context of a PIK3CA mutation, enhanced migratory features in vitro. However, the V777L mutation did not alter in vivo tumorigenicity or sensitivity to HER2-directed therapies in proliferation assays. Our results suggest the oncogenicity and potential targeting of HER2 missense mutations should be considered in the context of cooperating genetic alterations and provide previously unidentified insights into functional analysis of HER2 mutations and strategies to target them.

  12. HER2 missense mutations have distinct effects on oncogenic signaling and migration

    PubMed Central

    Zabransky, Daniel J.; Yankaskas, Christopher L.; Cochran, Rory L.; Wong, Hong Yuen; Croessmann, Sarah; Chu, David; Kavuri, Shyam M.; Red Brewer, Monica; Rosen, D. Marc; Dalton, W. Brian; Cimino-Mathews, Ashley; Cravero, Karen; Button, Berry; Kyker-Snowman, Kelly; Cidado, Justin; Erlanger, Bracha; Parsons, Heather A.; Manto, Kristen M.; Bose, Ron; Lauring, Josh; Arteaga, Carlos L.; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos; Park, Ben Ho

    2015-01-01

    Recurrent human epidermal growth facto