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Sample records for caprine arthritis encephalitis

  1. Isolation of caprine arthritis encephalitis virus from goats in Mexico.

    PubMed Central

    Daltabuit Test, M; de la Concha-Bermejillo, A; Espinosa, L E; Loza Rubio, E; Aguilar Setién, A

    1999-01-01

    A lentivirus was isolated from 2 goats in Mexico that were seropositive to caprine arthritis encephalitis virus (CAEV) by the agar gel immunodiffusion (AGID) test. The lentivirus was identified as CAEV by the observation of giant multinucleated cells (syncytia) in goat synovial membrane (GSM) monolayers co-cultivated with blood mononuclear (BMN) cells from the seropositive goats, and by amplifying a DNA segment of the CAEV gag gene using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique. Subsequently, cell supernatants from the GSM cells co-cultivated with BMN cells were used to infect 2 CAEV-seronegative goats. These goats seroconverted to CAEV as determined by the AGID test, and CAEV was re-isolated from these goats. One of the goats developed polyarthritis 8 mo after inoculation. Previous serological surveys indicate that infection with CAEV is prevalent among goats in Mexico. To our knowledge this is the first report of CAEV isolation in Mexico. Because of globalization of markets and increased trading among nations, the rapid identification and reporting of diseases such as CAEV are important to prevent the dissemination of these diseases. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. PMID:10480464

  2. Preferential immune response to virion surface glycoproteins by caprine arthritis-encephalitis virus-infected goats.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, G C; Barbet, A F; Klevjer-Anderson, P; McGuire, T C

    1983-01-01

    Six months after inoculation with caprine arthritis-encephalitis virus, the serum and synovial fluid of virus-infected goats had antibodies to [35S]methionine-labeled viral proteins with apparent molecular weights of 125,000, 90,000, 28,000, and 15,000. The 125,000-, 90,000-, and 15,000-molecular-weight methionine-labeled proteins were identified as virion surface glycoproteins by lactoperoxidase iodination and galactose oxidase-boro[3H]hydride reduction labeling techniques. Radioimmunoassay antibody titers to purified p28, the most abundant viral structural protein, averaged 1:182 in synovial fluid and 1:67 in serum 6 months after inoculation. High dilutions of serum and synovial fluid reacted with gp90 and gp125 electroblotted onto nitrocellulose paper from polyacrylamide gels. Anti-gp90 activity was detected at dilutions with an immunoglobulin G content of 0.02 to 11 micrograms, whereas antibody to p28, when detectable on Western blots, was present in samples with an immunoglobulin G content of 0.1 to 2 mg, representing 100- to 1,000-fold-greater titers of antibody to the surface glycoprotein. Synovial fluids often contained more anti-gp90 antibody than did sera. Immunoprecipitation of lactoperoxidase-iodinated virus confirmed the presence of high antibody titers to the two virion surface glycoproteins. Because antiviral gp90 and gp125 antibody is abundant in the synovial fluid of infected goats, it probably contributes to the high immunoglobulin G1 concentrations seen at this site 6 months after caprine arthritis-encephalitis virus infection. Images PMID:6307878

  3. First results on small ruminant brucellosis and tuberculosis and caprine arthritis-encephalitis in El Salvador.

    PubMed

    Linderot de Cardona, Kristina; De Gracia Scanapieco, Abelardo; Braun, Peggy G

    2016-06-01

    This paper reports a first-time study performed in El Salvador on the presence or absence of antibodies to three important animal diseases in small ruminants. The work was conducted in the west and central departments of the country, selecting 42 and 43 cantons with an existing sheep and goat population, respectively. Serum samples were collected from 396 sheep and 335 goats and tested for seropositivity to Brucella (B.) spp. The specimens from goats were also tested for antibodies to caprine arthritis-encephalitis (CAE) virus. Four (1 %) sheep and none of the goats were seropositive by Rose Bengal test. All animals were negative by indirect ELISA (iELISA) for B. abortus. All animals were negative by iELISA for CAE. A total of 383 sheep and 330 goats underwent the single intradermal cervical tuberculin (SICT) test for tuberculosis. Seventy (18 %) sheep and 43 (13 %) goats reacted to the SICT test. Those reactors were subjected to the single intradermal comparative cervical tuberculin (SICCT) test, and one (0.3 %) goat was deemed to be a positive reactor. No mycobacteria were diagnosed in concluding analyses, and further studies are considered necessary to determine the prevalence of the investigated diseases. Additionally, it is recommended that small ruminants should be included in the national eradication program on bovine brucellosis and tuberculosis to prevent potential reservoirs.

  4. Development and Field Testing of a Real-Time PCR Assay for Caprine Arthritis-Encephalitis-Virus (CAEV)

    PubMed Central

    Brajon, Giovanni; Mandas, Daniela; Liciardi, Manuele; Taccori, Flavia; Meloni, Mauro; Corrias, Franco; Montaldo, Caterina; Coghe, Ferdinando; Casciari, Cristina; Giammarioli, Monica; Orrù, Germano

    2011-01-01

    Caprine arthritis/encephalitis (CAE) of goats and occasionally sheep are persistent virus infections caused by a lentivirus (CAEV). This viral infection results in arthritis in adult animals and encephalitis in kids. Prognosis for the encephalitic form is normally poor, with substantial economic loss for the farm. In this context an early/fast laboratory diagnosis for CAEV infection could be useful for effective prophylactic action. In this work we performed a quantitative real time PCR designed on the CAEV env gene to detect/quantify in goat/sheep samples, viral RNA or proviral DNA forms of CAEV. This procedure was validated in 15 sheep, experimentally infected with CAEV or with a highly correlated lentivirus (visna maedi, MVV); in addition, a total of 37 clinical goat specimens recruited in CAEV positive herds were analyzed and compared using serological analysis (Elisa and AGID). All samples infected with MVV resulted negative. In sheep experimentally infected with CAEV, proviral DNA was detectable 15 days post infection, whereas the serological methods revealed an indicative positivity after 40-60 days.This method showed a sensitivity of 102 env fragments/PCR) with a linear dynamic range of quantitation from 103 to 107 env fragments/PCR; the R2 correlation coefficient was 0.98. All subjects with a clinical diagnosis for Caprine Arthritis-Encephalitis (CAE) resulted CAEV DNA positive. PMID:22888382

  5. High prevalence of caprine arthritis encephalitis virus (CAEV) in Taiwan revealed by large-scale serological survey

    PubMed Central

    YANG, Wei-Cheng; CHEN, Hui-Yu; WANG, Chi-Young; PAN, Hung-Yu; WU, Cheng-Wei; HSU, Yun-Hsiu; SU, Jui-Chuan; CHAN, Kun-Wei

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a large-scale serological survey of caprine arthritis encephalitis virus (CAEV) infection was conducted between March 2011 and October 2012. 3,437 goat blood or milk samples were collected from 65 goat farms throughout Taiwan. A commercial ELISA kit was used to detect antibodies against CAEV. The overall seropositive rate was 61.7% (2,120/3,437) in goats and in 98.5% (64/65) of goat farms. These results provide the first large-scale serological evidence for the presence of CAEV infection, indicating that the disease is widespread in Taiwan. PMID:27916786

  6. Fatal Caprine arthritis encephalitis virus-like infection in 4 Rocky Mountain goats (Oreamnos americanus).

    PubMed

    Patton, Kristin M; Bildfell, Robert J; Anderson, Mark L; Cebra, Christopher K; Valentine, Beth A

    2012-03-01

    Over a 3.5-year period, 4 Rocky Mountain goats (Oreamnos americanus), housed at a single facility, developed clinical disease attributed to infection by Caprine arthritis encephalitis virus (CAEV). Ages ranged from 1 to 10 years. Three of the goats, a 1-year-old female, a 2-year-old male, and a 5-year-old male, had been fed raw domestic goat milk from a single source that was later found to have CAEV on the premises. The fourth animal, a 10-year-old male, had not ingested domestic goat milk but had been housed with the other 3 Rocky Mountain goats. All 4 animals had clinical signs of pneumonia prior to death. At necropsy, findings in lungs included marked diffuse interstitial pneumonia characterized histologically by severe lymphoplasmacytic infiltrates with massive alveolar proteinosis, interstitial fibrosis, and type II pneumocyte hyperplasia. One animal also developed left-sided hemiparesis, and locally extensive lymphoplasmacytic myeloencephalitis was present in the cranial cervical spinal cord. Two animals had joint effusions, as well as severe lymphoplasmacytic and ulcerative synovitis. Immunohistochemical staining of fixed sections of lung tissue from all 4 goats, as well as spinal cord in 1 affected animal, and synovium from 2 affected animals were positive for CAEV antigen. Serology testing for anti-CAEV antibodies was positive in the 2 goats tested. The cases suggest that Rocky Mountain goats are susceptible to naturally occurring CAEV infection, that CAEV from domestic goats can be transmitted to this species through infected milk and by horizontal transmission, and that viral infection can result in clinically severe multisystemic disease.

  7. Large-scale serological survey of caprine arthritis-encephalitis virus (CAEV) in Korean black goats (Capra hircus aegagrus).

    PubMed

    Oem, Jae-Ku; Chung, Joon-Yee; Byun, Jae-Won; Kim, Ha-Young; Kwak, Dongmi; Jung, Byeong Yeal

    2012-12-01

    A national serological survey of caprine arthritis-encephalitis virus (CAEV) infection was conducted using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and an agar gel immunodiffusion (AGID) test. A total of 658 black goats of various breeds were sampled from 59 farms in three regions of Korea. The CAEV-positive goats were predominantly detected in the Southern region (n=17) as compared with the Northern (n=1) and Central regions (n=0) (χ(2)=6.26, P=0.044). Among 658 goats tested, 18 were positive in both ELISA and AGID, indicating a CAEV prevalence of 2.73% (95% confidence interval: 1.74-4.28). These results indicate that CAEV is present in Korean black goats.

  8. Development of TaqMan-based qPCR method for detection of caprine arthritis-encephalitis virus (CAEV) infection.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Zhou, Fengjuan; Li, Xia; Wang, Jianhua; Zhao, Xiangping; Huang, Jinhai

    2013-10-01

    A specific and sensitive two-step TaqMan real-time PCR has been developed for rapid diagnosis of caprine arthritis-encephalitis virus (CAEV) infection by using a set of specific primers and a TaqMan probe targeting a highly conserved region within the gene encoding the viral capsid protein (CA). The assay successfully detected CAEV proviral DNA in total DNA extracts originating from cell culture, whole blood samples and isolated PBMCs, with a lower detection limit of 10(2) copies and a linear dynamic range of 10(5) to 10(10) copies/ml. There was no cross-reaction with other animal viruses (e.g., goat pox virus, bovine leukemia virus, bovine mucosal disease virus, swine influenza virus and Nipah virus). When applied in parallel with serological AGID and conventional PCR for detection of CAEV in field samples, this assay exhibited a higher sensitivity than these traditional methods, and 7.8 % of the 308 specimens collected in the Shanxi and Tianjin regions of China from 1993 to 2011 were found to be positive. Thus, the TaqMan qPCR assay provides a fast, specific and sensitive means for detecting CAEV proviral DNA in goat specimens and should be useful for large-scale detection in eradication programs and epidemiological studies.

  9. Distribution of caprine arthritis encephalitis virus provirus, RNA, and antigen in the reproductive tract of one naturally and seven experimentally infected bucks.

    PubMed

    Turchetti, Andréia P; Paniago, Juliana J; da Costa, Luciana F; da Cruz, Juliano C M; Braz, Gissandra F; Gouveia, Aurora M G; Paixão, Tatiane A; Santos, Renato L; Heinemann, Marcos B

    2013-11-01

    Caprine arthritis encephalitis is a worldwide, multisystemic disease caused by a small ruminant lentivirus. Although the main route of transmission is oral, detection of proviral DNA of the caprine arthritis encephalitis virus (CAEV) in caprine semen has been previously described. However, the presence of viral antigens in the male reproductive tract has apparently never been reported. The objective was to study lesions in the buck reproductive system and to detect, in these tissues, the presence of proviral DNA, viral RNA and CAEV antigens. Tissues from eight CAEV-infected bucks (one naturally and seven experimentally infected) were analyzed by histopathology, nested polymerase chain reaction, reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, and immunohistochemistry. Interstitial pneumonia, synovitis, and lesions in the male reproductive tract were detected in some of the bucks. Proviral DNA was detected in the lungs and joints as well as in the reproductive systems of all animals, whereas viral RNA was detected only in the genital tract of the naturally infected buck. Viral antigens were immunostained in most of the organs of the male reproductive tract. This report was apparently the first to clearly demonstrate CAEV antigen expression in the male reproductive tract, which indicates the possibility of venereal transmission of CAEV.

  10. Evaluation of a caprine arthritis-encephalitis virus/maedi-visna virus indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in the serological diagnosis of ovine progressive pneumonia virus in U.S. sheep

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Serological diagnostic testing of sheep and goats using enzyme immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) is the most common method of determining small ruminant lentivirus (SRLV) infection. A caprine arthritis-encephalitis virus (CAEV)/maedi-visna virus (MVV) indirect (i) ELISA, which utilizes MVV EV1 capsid a...

  11. Development of a recombinase polymerase amplification lateral flow dipstick (RPA-LFD) for the field diagnosis of caprine arthritis-encephalitis virus (CAEV) infection.

    PubMed

    Tu, Po-An; Shiu, Jia-Shian; Lee, Shu-Hwae; Pang, Victor Fei; Wang, De-Chi; Wang, Pei-Hwa

    2017-05-01

    Caprine arthritis-encephalitis (CAE) in goats is a complex disease syndrome caused by a lentivirus. This persistent viral infection results in arthritis in adult goats and encephalitis in lambs. The prognosis for the encephalitic form is normally poor, and this form of the disease has caused substantial economic losses for goat farmers. Hence, a more efficient detection platform based on recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) and a lateral flow dipstick (LFD) was developed in the present study for detecting the proviral DNA of caprine arthritis-encephalitis virus (CAEV). Under the optimal incubation conditions, specifically, 30min at 37°C for RPA followed by 5min at room temperature for LFD, the assay was found to be sensitive to a lower limit of 80pg of total DNA and 10 copies of plasmid DNA. Furthermore, there was no cross-reaction with other tested viruses, including goat pox virus and bovine leukemia virus. Given its simplicity and portability, this RPA-LFD protocol can serve as an alternative tool to ELISA for the primary screening of CAEV, one that is suitable for both laboratory and field application. When the RPA-LFD was applied in parallel with serological ELISA for the detection of CAEV in field samples, the RPA-LFD assay exhibited a higher sensitivity than the traditional method, and 82% of the 200 samples collected in Taiwan were found to be positive. To our knowledge, this is the first report providing evidence to support the use of an RPA-LFD assay as a specific and sensitive platform for detecting CAEV proviral DNA in goats in a faster manner, one that is also applicable for on-site utilization at farms and that should be useful in both eradication programs and epidemiological studies.

  12. First isolation and nucleotide comparison of the gag gene of the caprine arthritis encephalitis virus circulating in naturally infected goats from Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Panei, Carlos Javier; Gos, Maria Laura; Valera, Alejandro Rafael; Galosi, Cecilia Monica; Echeverria, Maria Gabriela

    2017-01-01

    Caprine arthritis encephalitis virus (CAEV) has been reported in different countries worldwide, based on serological and molecular detection. In Argentina, the prevalence of CAEV infections is increasing, with goats showing symptoms associated mostly with cachexia and arthritis. Although in Argentina the virus has been detected by serology, it has never been isolated or characterized. Thus, the objectives of this work were to isolate and analyze the nucleotide sequences of the gag gene of Argentine CAEV strains and compare them with those of other SRLVs previously reported. Nucleotide sequence comparison showed homology with CAEV-Co, the CAEV prototype. Phylogenetic analyses showed that the Argentine strains clustered with genotype B, subtype B1. Because the molecular characterization of the gag region is suitable for phylogenetic studies and may be applied to monitor the control of SRLV, molecularly characterizing the Argentine CAEV strains may help develop a proper plan of eradication of CAEV infections. PMID:28331831

  13. Is caprine arthritis encephalitis virus (CAEV) transmitted vertically to early embryo development stages (morulae or blastocyst) via in vitro infected frozen semen?

    PubMed

    Al Ahmad, M Z Ali; Chebloune, Y; Chatagnon, G; Pellerin, J L; Fieni, F

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine, in vivo, whether in vitro infected cryopreserved caprine sperm is capable of transmitting caprine arthritis-encephalitis virus (CAEV) vertically to early embryo development stages via artificial insemination with in vitro infected semen. Sperm was collected from CAEV-free bucks by electroejaculation. Half of each ejaculate was inoculated with CAEV-pBSCA at a viral concentration of 10(4) TCID(50)/mL. The second half of each ejaculate was used as a negative control. The semen was then frozen. On Day 13 of superovulation treatment, 14 CAEV-free does were inseminated directly into the uterus under endoscopic control with thawed infected semen. Six CAEV-free does, used as a negative control, were inseminated intrauterine with thawed CAEV-free sperm, and eight CAEV-free does were mated with naturally infected bucks. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to detect CAEV proviral-DNA in the embryos at the D7 stage, in the embryo washing media, and in the uterine secretions of recipient does. At Day 7, all the harvested embryos were PCR-negative for CAEV proviral-DNA; however, CAEV proviral-DNA was detected in 8/14 uterine smears, and 9/14 flushing media taken from does inseminated with infected sperm, and in 1/8 uterine swabs taken from the does mated with infected bucks. The results of this study confirm that (i) artificial insemination with infected semen or mating with infected bucks may result in the transmission of CAEV to the does genital tack seven days after insemination, and (ii) irrespective of the medical status of the semen or the recipient doe, it is possible to obtain CAEV-free early embryos usable for embryo transfer.

  14. Activation/proliferation and apoptosis of bystander goat lymphocytes induced by a macrophage-tropic chimeric caprine arthritis encephalitis virus expressing SIV Nef

    SciTech Connect

    Bouzar, Baya Amel; Rea, Angela; Hoc-Villet, Stephanie; Garnier, Celine; Guiguen, Francois; Jin Yuhuai; Narayan, Opendra; Chebloune, Yahia . E-mail: ychebloune@kumc.edu

    2007-08-01

    Caprine arthritis encephalitis virus (CAEV) is the natural lentivirus of goats, well known for its tropism for macrophages and its inability to cause infection in lymphocytes. The viral genome lacks nef, tat, vpu and vpx coding sequences. To test the hypothesis that when nef is expressed by the viral genome, the virus became toxic for lymphocytes during replication in macrophages, we inserted the SIVsmm PBj14 nef coding sequences into the genome of CAEV thereby generating CAEV-nef. This recombinant virus is not infectious for lymphocytes but is fully replication competent in goat macrophages in which it constitutively expresses the SIV Nef. We found that goat lymphocytes cocultured with CAEV-nef-infected macrophages became activated, showing increased expression of the interleukin-2 receptor (IL-2R). Activation correlated with increased proliferation of the cells. Interestingly, a dual effect in terms of apoptosis regulation was observed in exposed goat lymphocytes. Nef was found first to induce a protection of lymphocytes from apoptosis during the first few days following exposure to infected macrophages, but later it induced increased apoptosis in the activated lymphocytes. This new recombinant virus provides a model to study the functions of Nef in the context of infection of macrophages, but in absence of infection of T lymphocytes and brings new insights into the biological effects of Nef on lymphocytes.

  15. A serological study on Brucella abortus, caprine arthritis-encephalitis virus and Leptospira in dairy goats in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Lilenbaum, Walter; de Souza, Guilherme Nunes; Ristow, Paula; Moreira, Madelayne Cortez; Fráguas, Suzana; Cardoso, Verônica da Silva; Oelemann, Walter Martin Roland

    2007-03-01

    In spite of the large number of goats found in several developing tropical countries, milk production remains unsatisfactory. The occurrence of infectious diseases, such as leptospirosis, brucellosis and caprine arthritis-encephalitis (CAE) may in part be responsible for sub-optimal production. In this study, 1000 serum samples were tested for leptospirosis, 953 for brucellosis and 562 for CAE. All tested flocks presented at least one seroreactive animal for leptospirosis and for CAE. Reactivity to leptospirosis was 11.1%, and serovar hardjo was the most frequently found. Anti-B. abortus agglutinins were found in 0.5% of the samples presented and 14.1% were seroreactive to CAE. Leptospirosis was considered to represent the major infectious problem in the studied goat flocks. The occurrence of infectious diseases in the tested flocks may represent an important factor contributing to the decreased productivity of the animals. These findings may be similar to those observed in other developing countries and require further study to define the relationship between seropositivity and reduced production.

  16. Immunogenicity of a lentiviral-based DNA vaccine driven by the 5'LTR of the naturally attenuated caprine arthritis encephalitis virus (CAEV) in mice and macaques.

    PubMed

    Arrode-Brusés, Géraldine; Hegde, Ramakrishna; Jin, Yuhuai; Liu, Zhengian; Narayan, Opendra; Chebloune, Yahia

    2012-04-19

    Increasing the safety and the efficacy of existing HIV vaccines is one of the strategies that could help to promote the development of a vaccine for human use. We developed a HIV DNA vaccine (Δ4-SHIVKU2) that has been shown to induce potent polyfunctional HIV-specific T cell responses following a single dose immunization of mice and macaques. Δ4-SHIVKU2 also induced protection when immunized macaques were challenged with homologous pathogenic viruses. In the present study, our aim was to examine whether a chimeric HIV DNA vaccine (CAL-Δ4-SHIVKU2) whose genome is driven by the LTR of the goat lentivirus, caprine arthritis encephalitis (CAEV) expresses efficiently the vaccine antigens and induces potent immune responses in animal models for HIV vaccine. Data of radioimmunoprecipitation assays clearly show that this chimeric genome drives efficient expression of all HIV antigens in the construct. In addition, evaluation of the p24 Gag protein in the supernatant of HEK-293-T cells transfected in parallel with Δ4-SHIVKU2 and CAL-Δ4-SHIVKU2 showed no difference suggesting that these two LTRs are inducing equally the expression of the viral genes. Immunization of mice and macaques using our single dose immunization regimen resulted in induction of similar IFN-γ ELISPOT responses in Δ4-SHIVKU2- and CAL-Δ4-SHIVKU2-treated mice. Similar profiles of T cell responses were also detected both in mice and macaques when multiparametric flow cytometry analyses were performed. Since CAEV LTR is not dependent of Tat to drive viral gene expression and is not functional for integration with HIV integrase, this new vector increases the safety and efficacy of our vaccine vectors and vaccination strategy.

  17. Mutations increasing exposure of a receptor binding site epitope in the soluble and oligomeric forms of the caprine arthritis-encephalitis lentivirus envelope glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Hoetzel, Isidro . E-mail: ihotzel@gene.com; Cheevers, William P.

    2005-09-01

    The caprine arthritis-encephalitis (CAEV) and ovine maedi-visna (MVV) viruses are resistant to antibody neutralization, a feature shared with all other lentiviruses. Whether the CAEV gp135 receptor binding site(s) (RBS) in the functional surface envelope glycoprotein (Env) is protected from antibody binding, allowing the virus to resist neutralization, is not known. Two CAEV gp135 regions were identified by extrapolating a gp135 structural model that could affect binding of antibodies to the RBS: the V1 region and a short sequence analogous in position to the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp120 loop B postulated to be located between two major domains of CAEV gp135. Mutation of isoleucine-166 to alanine in the putative loop B of gp135 increased the affinity of soluble gp135 for the CAEV receptor(s) and goat monoclonal antibody (Mab) F7-299 which recognizes an epitope overlapping the gp135 RBS. The I166A mutation also stabilized or exposed the F7-299 epitope in anionic detergent buffers, indicating that the I166A mutation induces conformational changes and stabilizes the RBS of soluble gp135 and enhances Mab F7-299 binding. In contrast, the affinity of a V1 deletion mutant of gp135 for the receptor and Mab F7-299 and its structural stability did not differ from that of the wild-type gp135. However, both the I166A mutation and the V1 deletion of gp135 increased cell-to-cell fusion activity and binding of Mab F7-299 to the oligomeric Env. Therefore, the CAEV gp135 RBS is protected from antibody binding by mechanisms both dependent and independent of Env oligomerization which are disrupted by the V1 deletion and the I166A mutation, respectively. In addition, we found a correlation between side-chain {beta}-branching at amino acid position 166 and binding of Mab F7-299 to oligomeric Env and cell-to-cell fusion, suggesting local secondary structure constraints in the region around isoleucine-166 as one determinant of gp135 RBS exposure and antibody binding.

  18. The validation of housekeeping genes as a reference in quantitative Real Time PCR analysis: application in the milk somatic cells and frozen whole blood of goats infected with caprine arthritis encephalitis virus.

    PubMed

    Jarczak, Justyna; Kaba, Jarosław; Bagnicka, Emilia

    2014-10-10

    The validation of housekeeping genes (HKGs) for normalization of RNA expression in Real-Time PCR is crucial to obtain the most reliable results. There is limited information on reference genes used in the study of gene expression in milk somatic cells and the frozen whole blood of goats. Thus, the aim of this study was to propose the most stable housekeeping genes that can be used as a reference in Real-Time PCR analysis of milk somatic cells and whole blood of goats infected with caprine arthritis encephalitis virus (CAEV). Animals were divided into two groups: non-infected (N=13) and infected with CAEV (N=13). Biological material (milk somatic cells and whole blood) was collected 4 times during the lactation period (7, 30, 100 and 240days post-partum). The expression levels of candidate reference genes were analyzed using geNorm and NormFinder software. The stability of candidates for reference gene expression was analyzed for CAEV-free (control) and CAEV-infected groups, and also for both groups together (combined group). The stability of expression of β-actin (ACTB), glyceraldehyde-3P-dehydrogenase (GAPDH), cyclophilin A (PPIA), RNA18S1, ubiquilin (UBQLN1) and ribosomal protein large subunit P0 (RPLP0) was determined in milk somatic cells, while ACTB, PPIA, RPLP0, succinate dehydrogenase complex subunit A (SDHA), zeta polypeptide (YWHAZ), battenin (CLN3), eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3K (EIF3K) and TATA box-binding protein (TBP) were measured in frozen whole blood of goats. PPIA and RPLP0 were considered as the most suitable internal controls as they were stably expressed in milk somatic cells regardless of disease status, according to NormFinder software. Furthermore, geNorm results indicated the expression of PPIA/RPLP0 genes as the best combination under these experimental conditions. The results of frozen whole blood analysis using NormFinder software revealed that the most stable reference gene in control, CAEV-infected and combined groups is

  19. Encephalitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... encephalitis virus Echovirus Japanese encephalitis, which occurs in Asia West Nile virus After the virus enters the ... are traveling to places such as parts of Asia, where Japanese encephalitis is found. Vaccinate animals to ...

  20. Expression of cytokine mRNA in lentivirus-induced arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Lechner, F.; Vogt, H. R.; Seow, H. F.; Bertoni, G.; Cheevers, W. P.; von Bodungen, U.; Zurbriggen, A.; Peterhans, E.

    1997-01-01

    Infection of goats with the lentivirus caprine arthritis encephalitis virus (CAEV) leads to persistent infection and development of chronic arthritis. We analyzed the expression of cytokines and viral RNA in the joints of goats at early time points after experimental infection with CAEV and in those of animals suffering from chronic arthritis as a result of natural infection. In situ hybridization experiments showed that the pattern of cytokine expression in caprine arthritis was similar to that found in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), with a few cells expressing the lymphocyte-derived cytokines interferon (IFN)-gamma and interleukin (IL)-2 and rather more cells expressing monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha. IFN-gamma mRNA expression in experimentally infected joints peaked at day 12 and was mostly detected in areas containing viral RNA. At later time points, no IFN-gamma- or virus-expressing cells were found in inflamed joints but both were again detected in goats with severe arthritis. Interestingly, at the clinical stage of arthritis reflecting the chronic stage of infection, the inflammatory lesion was found to be immunologically compartmentalized. Humoral immune responses and cell-mediated immune responses appeared to concurrently occur in distinct areas of the synovial membrane. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9327739

  1. Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... two bones meet, such as your elbow or knee. Over time, a swollen joint can become severely damaged. Some kinds of arthritis can also cause problems in your organs, such as your eyes or skin. Types of arthritis include Osteoarthritis is the most common type of arthritis. It's ...

  2. Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... joints Infection, most often by bacteria or virus Crystals such as uric acid or calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate ... common types of inflammatory arthritis include: Ankylosing ... calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease Juvenile rheumatoid ...

  3. Small ruminant lentivirus-induced arthritis: clinicopathologic findings in sheep infected by a highly replicative SRLV B2 genotype.

    PubMed

    Pérez, M; Biescas, E; Reina, R; Glaria, I; Marín, B; Marquina, A; Salazar, E; Álvarez, N; de Andrés, D; Fantova, E; Badiola, J J; Amorena, B; Luján, L

    2015-01-01

    We describe the clinicopathologic features of an arthritis outbreak in sheep induced by small ruminant lentivirus (SRLV), linked to the presence of a new SRLV isolate phylogenetically assigned to caprine arthritis encephalitis virus-like subgroup B2. Thirteen SRLV seropositive Rasa Aragonesa adult ewes were selected from 5 SRLV highly infected flocks (mean seroprevalence, 90.7%) for presenting uni- or bilateral chronic arthritis in the carpal joint. A complete study was performed, including symptomatology, histopathology, immunocytochemistry, immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization, and microbiology. The carpus was the joint almost exclusively affected, with 10 sheep (76%) showing a moderate increase in carpal joint size (diameter range, 18-20 cm; normal range, 15-16 cm) without signs of locomotion problems and with 3 ewes (23%) showing severe inflammation with marked increase in diameter (21-24 cm), pain at palpation, and abnormal standing position. Grossly, chronic proliferative arthritis was observed in affected joints characterized by an increased thickness of the synovial capsule and synovial membrane proliferation. Microscopically, synovial membrane inflammation and proliferation and hyperplasia of synoviocytes were observed. More positive cases of SLRV infection were detected by immunocytochemistry of articular fluid than of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization also detected positive cells in the subsynovial connective tissue, lung, mediastinal lymph node, mammary gland, and mammary lymph node. All animals were negative for the presence of Mycoplasma or other bacteria in the articular space. The present outbreak likely represents an adaptation of a caprine virus to sheep. Our results underline the importance of the arthritis induced by SRLV in sheep, a clinical form that might be underestimated.

  4. St. Louis Encephalitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fact Sheet Other diseases transmitted by mosquitoes Chikungunya virus Dengue Eastern Equine Encephalitis Japanese Encephalitis Malaria La Crosse Encephalitis Western Equine Encephalitis West Nile virus Yellow Fever Saint Louis Encephalitis Frequently Asked Questions ...

  5. Dengue encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Borawake, Kapil; Prayag, Parikshit; Wagh, Atul; Dole, Swati

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of dengue fever with features of encephalitis. The diagnosis of dengue was confirmed by the serum antibodies to dengue and the presence of a dengue antigen in the cerebrospinal fluid. This patient had characteristic magnetic resonance imaging brain findings, mainly involving the bilateral thalami, with hemorrhage. Dengue is not primarily a neurotropic virus and encephalopathy is a common finding in Dengue. Hence various other etiological possibilities were considered before concluding this as a case of Dengue encephalitis. This case explains the importance of considering the diagnosis of dengue encephalitis in appropriate situations. PMID:22013316

  6. Encephalitis awareness.

    PubMed

    Easton, Ava

    2017-03-01

    Last week we marked the 4th World Encephalitis Day, a global campaign with two primary aims. The first is to acknowledge the experiences of survivors of this devastating neurological condition and their family members, while the second is to raise much-needed awareness among the public.

  7. Encephalitis (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... West Nile encephalitis, St. Louis encephalitis, and Western Equine encephalitis. Over the last several years in the ... to prevent further swelling of the brain. Because antibiotics aren't effective against viruses, they aren't ...

  8. Gene Knockdown of Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus E2 Glycoprotein Using DNA-Directed RNA Interference

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    e _s~u~m mary - Introduction: Alphaviruses are a large family of RNA viruses that can cause acute infection resulting in arthritis and encephalitis...One of the important alphaviruses is the Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus. This virus has been linked to a number of outbreaks in both North and... replication of VEE virus in vitro. Bhogal, H.S., McLaws, L.J., and Jager, S.J. 2006. Gene Knockdown of Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus E2

  9. Autoimmune Encephalitis in Children

    PubMed Central

    Armangue, Thaís; Petit-Pedrol, Mar; Dalmau, Josep

    2013-01-01

    The causes of encephalitis are numerous, and extensive investigations for infectious agents and other etiologies are often negative. The discovery that many of these encephalitis are immune mediated has changed the approach to the diagnosis and treatment of these disorders. Moreover, the broad spectrum of symptoms including, psychosis, catatonia, alterations of behavior and memory, seizures, abnormal movements, and autonomic dysregulation usually requires a multidisciplinary treatment approach. This review focuses in several forms of encephalitis that occur in children, and for which an autoimmune etiology has been demonstrated (eg, anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis) or is strongly suspected (eg, Rasmussen encephalitis, limbic encephalitis, opsoclonus-myoclonus). The authors also review several disorders that may be immune mediated, such as the rapid onset obesity with hypothalamic dysfunction, hypoventilation and autonomic dysregulation (ROHHAD) syndrome and some encephalopathies with fever and status epilepticus. Recognition of novel immune-mediated encephalitis is important because some of these disorders are highly responsive to immunotherapy. PMID:22935553

  10. Managing patients with encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Matata, Claire; Easton, Ava; Michael, Benedict; Evans, Becky; Ward, Deborah; Solomon, Tom; Kneen, Rachel

    2015-11-11

    This article provides an overview of encephalitis and addresses its diagnosis, some of the common presenting signs and symptoms, and the different aspects of nursing care required for these patients. In particular, it addresses how to explain encephalitis to the patient's relatives, the rehabilitation needs of these patients, and important aspects of discharge planning. Tests that are necessary for diagnosis in patients with suspected encephalitis and the importance of these are explained.

  11. Arthritis - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - arthritis ... The following organizations provide more information on arthritis : American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons -- orthoinfo.aaos.org/menus/arthritis.cfm Arthritis Foundation -- www.arthritis.org Centers for Disease Control and Prevention -- www. ...

  12. Rheumatoid Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Education Visitor Information RePORT NIH Fact Sheets Home > Rheumatoid Arthritis Small Text Medium Text Large Text Rheumatoid Arthritis Rheumatoid arthritis is an inflammatory disease affecting about ...

  13. Eastern Equine Encephalitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Image of Culiseta melanura mosquito, photo taken by Jason Williams, reproduced by permission from the Virginia Mosquito Control Association. Eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV) is ...

  14. Encephalitis (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Encephalitis can be a very rare complication of Lyme disease transmitted by ticks or of rabies spread by ... MORE ON THIS TOPIC West Nile Virus Chickenpox Lyme Disease Fever and Taking Your Child's Temperature What's West ...

  15. Auto-immune encephalitis as differential diagnosis of infectious encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Armangue, Thaís; Leypoldt, Frank; Dalmau, Josep

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review To describe the main types of autoimmune encephalitis with special emphasis on those associated with antibodies against neuronal cell surface or synaptic proteins, and the differential diagnosis with infectious encephalitis. Recent findings There is a continuous expansion of the number of cell surface or synaptic proteins that are targets of autoimmunity. The most recently identified include the mGluR5, DPPX, and the GABAAR. In these and previously known autoimmune encephalitis (NMDAR, AMPAR, GABABR, LGI1, CASPR2), the prodromal symptoms or types of presentations often suggest a viral encephalitis. We review here clues that help in the differential diagnosis with infectious encephalitis. Moreover, recent investigations indicate that viral encephalitis (e.g., herpes simplex) can trigger synaptic autoimmunity. In all these disorders immunotherapy is usually effective. Summary Autoimmune encephalitis comprises an expanding group of potentially treatable disorders that should be included in the differential diagnosis of any type of encephalitis. PMID:24792345

  16. Tick-borne encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Gritsun, T S; Lashkevich, V A; Gould, E A

    2003-01-01

    Tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) is one of the most dangerous human infections occurring in Europe and many parts of Asia. The etiological agent Tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV), is a member of the virus genus Flavivirus, of the family Flaviviridae. TBEV is believed to cause at least 11,000 human cases of encephalitis in Russia and about 3000 cases in the rest of Europe annually. Related viruses within the same group, Louping ill virus (LIV), Langat virus (LGTV) and Powassan virus (POWV), also cause human encephalitis but rarely on an epidemic scale. Three other viruses within the same group, Omsk hemorrhagic fever virus (OHFV), Kyasanur Forest disease virus (KFDV) and Alkhurma virus (ALKV), are closely related to the TBEV complex viruses and tend to cause fatal hemorrhagic fevers rather than encephalitis. This review describes the clinical manifestations associated with TBEV infections, the main molecular-biological properties of these viruses, and the different factors that define the incidence and severity of disease. The role of ticks and their local hosts in the emergence of new virus variants with different pathogenic characteristics is also discussed. This review also contains a brief history of vaccination against TBE including trials with live attenuated vaccine and modern tendencies in developing of vaccine virus strains.

  17. Autoimmune encephalitis update

    PubMed Central

    Dalmau, Josep; Rosenfeld, Myrna R.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer-associated immune-mediated disorders of the central nervous system are a heterogeneous group. These disorders include the classic paraneoplastic neurologic disorders and the more recently described autoimmune encephalitis associated with antibodies to neuronal cell-surface or synaptic receptors that occur with and without a cancer association. Autoimmune encephalitis is increasingly recognized as the cause of a variety of neuropsychiatric syndromes that can be severe and prolonged. In contrast to the classic paraneoplastic disorders that are poorly responsive to tumor treatment and immunotherapy, autoimmune encephalitis often responds to these treatments, and patients can have full or marked recoveries. As early treatment speeds recovery, reduces disability, and decreases relapses that can occur in about 20% of cases, it is important that the immune pathogenesis of these disorders is recognized. PMID:24637228

  18. California encephalitis in Alabama.

    PubMed

    Mancao, M Y; Law, I M; Roberson-Trammell, K

    1996-10-01

    Arthropod-borne virus (arbovirus) infections in humans are primarily central nervous system infections, but other clinical manifestations include febrile illness and fever with hemorrhagic diathesis. In the genus Bunyavirus there are several viruses that cause disease in humans, especially in North America; these include LaCrosse, Jamestown Canyon, trivittatus, and snowshoe hare viruses. The disease seen mainly in children is California encephalitis (usually of the LaCrosse subtype); this infection is widespread in the United States but is most prevalent in the upper Midwest, especially in rural areas. We present the first reported case of California encephalitis in rural Alabama; the patient was a 7-year-old boy who came to us with fever and seizures in the summer of 1994. This report stresses the importance of including California encephalitis in the differential diagnosis when children have fever and altered sensorium after exposure to mosquitoes during summer months.

  19. Rheumatoid Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a form of arthritis that causes pain, swelling, stiffness and loss of function in ... wrist and fingers. More women than men get rheumatoid arthritis. It often starts in middle age and is ...

  20. [Hashimoto encephalitis and depression].

    PubMed

    Veltman, E M; Rhebergen, D; van Exel, E; Stek, M L

    2015-01-01

    Hashimoto encephalitis (he) is an auto-immune disease, with 40-50% of patients developing psychopathology. This could require targeted treatment. HE and prednison could both cloud the identification of a concurrent depressive disorder. We saw a 78-year-old woman with he and a severe depression, and treated her succesfully with ect.

  1. Psoriatic arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, L.H.; Espinoza, L.R.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 11 chapters. Some of the titles are: The history and epidemiologic definition of psoriatic arthritis as a distinct entity; Psoriatic arthritis: Further epidemiologic and genetic considerations; The radiologic features of psoriatic arthritis; and Laboratory findings and pathology of psoriatic arthritis.

  2. [Herpetic encephalitis: a clinical case].

    PubMed

    Dryhant, L P; Sereda, V H; Kushpiĭ, O V; Tkachenko, V V; Kravchuk, N A; Inhula, N I; Sizina, A V; Sachko, Iu Iu; Andrusenko, A S; Tytenko, Iu I; Babirad, A M

    2012-01-01

    An example of diagnostics and treatment of patient is in-process made with herpetic encephalitis. It is well-proven in researches, that a herpetic encephalitis is 11.5% among sharp encephalitises. Morbidity is sporadic, some researchers specify on an increase its spring. An infection can be passed tiny and pin a way. Seasonal vibrations are not incident to the herpetic encephalitis. Two peaks of morbidity are on 5-30 years and age more senior 50 years. More than in 95% cases the virus of simple herpes of type serves as an exciter of herpetic encephalitis 1. A characteristic triad of herpetic encephalitis is the sharp feverish beginning, development of cramps of dzheksonovskogo type and violation of consciousness, developing usually after a brief respirator infection. Sometimes sudden development of cramps and loss of consciousness is preceded a fever. Example of such development of disease is made an in our work.

  3. Overview: Japanese encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Misra, Usha Kant; Kalita, Jayantee

    2010-06-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) is one of the most important endemic encephalitis in the world especially in Eastern and Southeastern Asia. JE affects over 50,000 patients and results in 15,000 deaths annually. JE virus is a single stranded positive sense RNA virus belonging to family flaviviridae. JE virus is transmitted through a zoonotic cycle between mosquitoes, pigs and water birds. Humans are accidentally infected and are a dead end host because of low level and transient viremia. In the northern region, large epidemics occur during summers whereas in the southern region JE tends to be endemic: cases occur throughout the year with a peak in the rainy season. Occurrence of JE is more closely related to temperature than to humidity. JE is regarded as a disease of children in the endemic areas but in the newly invaded areas, it affects both the adults and children because of the absence of protective antibodies. For every patient of JE, there are large numbers of subclinical cases (25-1000). Symptomatic JEV infection manifests with nonspecific febrile illness, aseptic meningitis or encephalitis. Encephalitis manifests with altered sensorium, seizures and focal neurological deficit. Acute flaccid paralysis may occur due to anterior horn cell involvement. A wide variety of movement disorders especially transient Parkinsonian features and dystonia (limb, axial, orofacial) are reported in 20-60% patients. JE mainly affects thalamus, corpus striatum, brainstem and spinal cord as revealed by MRI and on autopsy studies. Coinfection of JE and cysticercosis occurs because of the important role of pigs in the life cycle of both JEV and cysticercosis. Laboratory diagnosis of JE is by IgM capture ELISA, which has high sensitivity and specificity. In the absence of specific antiviral therapy, JE is managed by symptomatic and supportive therapies and preventive measures. Purified formalin inactivated mouse brain derived vaccine and live attenuated vaccine (SA 14-14-2) are

  4. Psoriatic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... psoriasis are also at risk for psoriatic arthritis. Identification of genes that increase the risk of psoriatic arthritis will help scientists unlock the secrets of this troubling disease, and identify targets for more specific and effective therapy. Biologic therapies. ...

  5. Gonococcal arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... is inflammation of a joint due to a gonorrhea infection. Causes Gonococcal arthritis is an infection of a joint. It occurs in people who have gonorrhea caused by the bacteria Neisseria gonorrhoeae . Gonococcal arthritis ...

  6. Autoimmune NMDA receptor encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Lazar-Molnar, Eszter; Tebo, Anne E

    2015-01-01

    Anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (anti-NMDAR) encephalitis is a treatable autoimmune disease of the central nervous system (CNS) with prominent neurologic and psychiatric features at disease onset. The disease is associated with the production of autoantibodies to NMDAR, a protein involved in memory function and synaptic plasticity. Affected patients develop a multistage progressive illness with symptoms ranging from memory deficits, seizures and psychosis, to potentially lethal catatonia, and autonomic and breathing instability. The outcome can be much improved with accurate diagnosis and early treatment using adequate immunosuppressive therapy. However, since the neurological and psychiatric symptoms as well as the clinical examination results can be non-specific, the disease is probably under-recognized. Reliable and accurate clinical testing for the identification of NMDAR autoantibodies is crucial for diagnosis, timely treatment selection, and monitoring. Recently, a cell-based indirect immunofluorescent antibody test for the detection of IgG antibodies to NMDAR has become available for diagnostic use. This review highlights the progress and challenges of laboratory testing in the evaluation and management anti-NMDAR encephalitis, and perspectives for the future.

  7. Rheumatoid Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... men. About two to three times as many women as men have the disease. Living with Rheumatoid Arthritis Video length: 2 min 54 sec Click to watch this video Learn more about how rheumatoid arthritis occurs. Effects Vary Rheumatoid arthritis affects people differently. Some people ...

  8. Morphological changes of post-isolation of caprine pancreatic islet.

    PubMed

    Hani, Homayoun; Allaudin, Zeenathul Nazariah; Tengku Ibrahim, Tengku Azmi; Mohd-Lila, Mohd-Azmi; Sarsaifi, Kazhal; Camalxaman, Siti Nazrina; Othman, Abas Mazni

    2015-02-01

    Pancreatic islet transplantation is commonly used to treat diabetes. Cell isolation and purification methods can affect the structure and function of the isolated islet cells. Thus, the development of cell isolation techniques that preserve the structure and function of pancreatic islet cells is essential for enabling successful transplantation procedures. The impact of purification procedures on cell function can be assessed by performing ultrastructure and in vivo studies. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of caprine islets purification procedure on islet cell ultrastructure and functional integrity prior to and post-isolation/purification. The islets were isolated from caprine pancreas by using an optimized collagenase XI-S concentration, and the cells were subsequently purified using Euro-Ficoll density gradient. In vitro viability of islets was determined by fluorescein diacetate and propidium iodide staining. Static incubation was used to assess functionality and insulin production by islet cells in culture media when exposed to various levels of glucose. Pancreatic tissues were examined by using light microscopy, fluorescence microscopy, scanning, and transmission electron microscopy. In vivo viability and functionality of caprine islets were assessed by evaluating the transplanted islets in diabetic mice. Insulin assay of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion test showed that the insulin levels increased with increasing concentration of glucose. Thus, purified islets stimulated with high glucose concentration (25 mM) secreted higher levels of insulin (0.542 ± 0.346 μg/L) than the insulin levels (0.361 ± 0.219, 0.303 ± 0.234 μg/L) secreted by exposure to low glucose concentrations (1.67 mM). Furthermore, insulin levels of recipient mice were significantly higher (p < 0.001) than those prior to xenotransplantation. In addition, following islets transplantation, there was significant enhancement in blood glucose

  9. Reading Recovery Following Herpes Encephalitis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, C. D.; Peters, Phyllis

    1979-01-01

    The article presents the medical, psychological, and reading diagnoses of a 24-year-old man with herpes encephalitis, an acute neurological disease. Test results are reported and the client's response to learning disability remedial techniques are reviewed. (SBH)

  10. Japanese Encephalitis: Frequently Asked Questions

    MedlinePlus

    ... by a virus spread by infected mosquitoes in Asia and the western Pacific. JE virus is one ... Where does Japanese encephalitis occur? JE occurs in Asia and parts of the western Pacific. It usually ...

  11. Japanese viral encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Tiroumourougane, S; Raghava, P; Srinivasan, S

    2002-01-01

    One of the leading causes of acute encephalopathy in children in the tropics is Japanese encephalitis (JE). Transmitted by the culex mosquito, this neurotropic virus predominately affects the thalamus, anterior horns of the spinal cord, cerebral cortex, and cerebellum. It mainly affects children <15 years and is mostly asymptomatic. The occasional symptomatic child typically presents with a neurological syndrome characterised by altered sensorium, seizures, and features of intracranial hypertension. Aetiological diagnosis is based on virus isolation or demonstration of virus specific antigen or antibodies in the cerebrospinal fluid/blood. Though no antiviral drug is available against JE, effective supportive management can improve the outcome. Control of JE involves efficient vector control and appropriate use of vaccines. PMID:11930023

  12. Polyamine profile in ovine and caprine colostrum and milk.

    PubMed

    Galitsopoulou, Augustina; Michaelidou, Alexandra-Maria; Menexes, George; Alichanidis, Efstathios

    2015-04-15

    The objective of this study was to monitor the post-partum variation of polyamine content, in ovine and caprine milk, from indigenous Greek breeds. Twenty samples of ewe and 20 samples of goat colostrum and milk were collected at the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th and 15th day post-partum. Putrescine, spermidine and spermine were measured as dansylated derivatives by high-performance liquid chromatography. Putrescine was the least concentrated of these substances in both milk types. Spermidine was the prevailing polyamine in caprine samples, reaching levels up to 4.41 μmol/l on the 3rd day post-partum. In ovine milk, the profile of the mean concentrations showed greater levels of spermine than spermidine, except for the 5th day post-partum. These data suggest that goat colostrum and ewe milk (15th day) could be considered as good natural sources for these bioactive growth factors, and may become useful raw materials for designing tailored dairy products for specific population groups.

  13. Dynamics of the enzymatic antioxidants during experimental caprine coccidiosis.

    PubMed

    Rakhshandehroo, E; Razavi, S M; Nazifi, S; Farzaneh, M; Mobarraei, N

    2013-04-01

    Caprine coccidiosis, caused by coccidian parasites from genus Eimeria, is considered as one of the most common and significant diseases in goats worldwide. The aim of this experiment was to investigate the responses of the enzymatic antioxidant systems during experimental coccidiosis. For this purpose, 20 newborn kids were selected. Ten were infected with sporulated oocysts of the most pathogenic species of Eimeria, and the remainder served as the control. Blood samples were taken at 0 (before inoculation), 3, 7, 14, 21, 28, and 35 days post-infection (dpi), and antioxidant-oxidant-related parameters were measured. Our data showed that the activities of the main erythrocyte antioxidant enzymes revealed significant declines at 7 dpi. These decreases were more evident at 14 to 21 dpi and then gradually enhanced to the normal values until 35 dpi; however, total antioxidant capacity revealed a remarkable decrease at 7 dpi and remained on the same level toward the end of the study. By contrast, serum levels of malondialdehyde (a biomarker of lipid peroxidation) and total homocysteine significantly increased at 21 and 14, 21, and 28 dpi, respectively. These observations suggest that caprine coccidiosis can impair the major antioxidant systems leading to remarkable oxidative damages during the infection. Furthermore, oxidative injuries could have a considerable linkage to the pathogenesis of Eimeria parasites.

  14. What Is Reactive Arthritis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Arthritis PDF Version Size: 69 KB November 2014 What is Reactive Arthritis? Fast Facts: An Easy-to- ... Information About Reactive Arthritis and Other Related Conditions What Causes Reactive Arthritis? Sometimes, reactive arthritis is set ...

  15. Role of PRNP S127 allele in experimental goat infection with classical caprine scrapie

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Classical scrapie is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy that affects domestic goats and sheep. Experimental inoculation studies in sheep confirmed that classical caprine scrapie can readily transmit to sheep. Therefore, even if current scrapie eradication measures are successful in sheep, goa...

  16. Bacterial expression and preliminary crystallographic studies of a 149-residue fragment of human Caprin-1

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yuhong; Zhu, Jiang; Huang, Xiaolan; Du, Zhihua

    2015-01-01

    Caprin-1 is an RNA-binding protein which plays critical roles in several important biological processes, including cellular proliferation, the interferon-mediated antiviral innate immune response, the maintenance of synaptic plasticity and the formation of RNA stress granules. Caprin-1 has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several human diseases, including osteo­sarcoma, breast cancer, viral infections, hearing loss and neurodegenerative disorders. Despite the emerging biological and physiopathological significance of Caprin-1, no structural information is available for this protein. Moreover, Caprin-1 does not have sequence similarity to any other protein with a known structure. It is therefore expected that structural studies will play a particularly crucial role in revealing the functional mechanisms of Caprin-1. Here, a protein fragment of human Caprin-1 consisting of residues 112–260 was expressed, purified and crystallized. Native and Se-SAD data sets were collected to resolutions to 2.05 and 2.65 Å, respectively, in different space groups. PMID:25760709

  17. Lipid oxidation in algae oil-in-water emulsions stabilized by bovine and caprine caseins.

    PubMed

    Mora-Gutierrez, Adela; Attaie, Rahmat; Farrell, Harold M

    2010-04-28

    Caseins (alpha(s1)-, alpha(s2)-, and beta-casein) are phosphoproteins that are capable of binding transition metals and scavenging free radicals; this property makes them good candidates to be used as natural antioxidants in oil-in-water emulsions. Caprine casein exhibits variability in alpha(s1)-casein content generated by genetic polymorphism. This variability in composition could lead to altered antioxidant properties. Thus, the ability of two caprine caseins differing in alpha(s1)-casein content to inhibit lipid oxidation in algae oil-in-water emulsions at 5% oil was investigated and compared to bovine caseinate. All caseins inhibited the formation of lipid oxidation at pH 7.0 as determined by lipid hydroperoxides and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS). However, caprine caseins were in general more effective inhibitors of lipid oxidation than the bovine caseins, which may be attributed to their altered casein amino acid content and/or metal binding capabilities. The combination of the carotenoids with bovine and caprine caseins was highly effective at repressing oxidation leading to the speculation that the caseins may inhibit the loss of the carotenoids and/or react with and enhance the carotenoid activity; again some differences between bovine and caprine caseins were observed with caprine caseins being slightly more effective in the presence of carotenoids.

  18. An assessment of caprine tuberculosis prevalence in Lubumbashi slaughterhouse, Democratic Republic of Congo.

    PubMed

    Luboya, Luboya Wa; Malangu, Mposhy; Kaleka, Mwenyi; Ngulu, Nsasi; Nkokele, Bimwala; Maryabo, Kazembe; Pourrut, Xavier; Vincent, Tom; Gonzalez, Jean-Paul

    2017-04-01

    Caprine tuberculosis is a major health problem for goats and a major zoonosis of veterinary public health interest. In order to prepare a response to and control of caprine tuberculosis, to evaluate the potential risks to public health, and to assess the prevalence of the disease in Katanga province, Democratic Republic of Congo, 656 goats that were slaughtered at the Kabasele abattoir of Mzee Laurent-Desire Kabila Market in Lubumbashi were subjected to rigorous veterinary inspection during June to August 2012. All goat specimens came from the Kasumbalesa, Kasenga, and Kipushi areas of Katanga province. Consequently, suspected organs presenting signs of tuberculosis were collected and examined using Ziehl-Neelsen stains for diagnosis. Through this investigative inspection in the province, we found an overall prevalence of caprine tuberculosis of 1.68%. Although females showed higher prevalence of caprine tuberculosis (1.07%) compared to males (0.61%), and adults showed higher prevalence (1.22%) than juveniles (0.45%), these comparisons were not statically significant. However, lung and intestine infection by tuberculosis showed significantly higher prevalence of positive cases (1.21 and 0.46%, respectively) (p < 0.05). Goats from Kasumbalesa had the highest prevalence of caprine tuberculosis (1.22%) compared to goats from Kipushi (0.31%) and Kasenga (0.18%). These findings show the risk of caprine tuberculosis in the province for the first time, and we therefore recommend the implementation of strict animal biosecurity and tuberculosis controlling protocols.

  19. The effect of heat treatment and skimming on precipitate formation in caprine and bovine milks.

    PubMed

    Miloradovic, Zorana N; Kljajevic, Nemanja V; Jovanovic, Snezana T; Vucic, Tanja R; Macej, Ognjen D

    2015-02-01

    Caprine and bovine milks have a similar overall gross composition, but vary considerably in the ratios of their casein components. These differences in colloidal casein micelles could affect directly or indirectly the heat stability of caprine and bovine milks at their natural pH. In the present work, the differences in colloidal stability of caprine and bovine milk have been studied by analysing the effect of heat treatment and skimming on precipitation of proteins. Raw and heated milk samples (70 °C/5 min, 80°C/5 min and 90°C/5 min) were centrifuged at 600, 2000, and 4500  g . The amount of precipitate formed after skimming was measured and the protein composition of both precipitates and supernatants analysed using the SDS-PAGE (sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis) and densitometry. In caprine milk, the heat treatment prior to skimming had a statistically significant effect on protein precipitation. Centrifugal force had a statistically significant effect on amount of precipitate for both milks, but the amount was 2 to 4 times higher for caprine milk. When defatting the milk for electrophoresis, a centrifugal force of 600  g appeared to be the most appropriate, in order to avoid protein loss and a possible error in the interpretation of results. Results of this study could also serve as the basis for further investigations on adjusting the skimming conditions for caprine milk in industrial dairy processing environment.

  20. Septic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... septic arthritis. Knees are most commonly affected, but septic arthritis also can affect hips, shoulders and other joints. The infection can quickly and severely damage the cartilage and bone within the joint, so prompt treatment is crucial. Treatment involves draining the joint with ...

  1. The analytic hierarchy process in decisionmaking for caprine health programmes.

    PubMed

    Maino, M; Pérez, P; Oviedo, P; Sotomayor, G; Abalos, P

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to apply the analytic hierarchy process (AHP) to assist decision-making when planning animal health programmes, by assigning priorities to issues of concern to producers in Chile's main goat production region. This process allows a multi-criteria approach to problems, by analysing and ranking them in a hierarchical structure. Industry experts have highlighted the following animal health and disease control criteria: acceptance by breeders of disease control measures; impact of specific diseases on regional animal trade; the cost and efficacy of control measures; a decrease in flock production; and the impact of caprine diseases on human public health. Using these criteria in the AHP, the study found that the most important impacts were on human public health and on the animal trade. The disease priorities were tuberculosis, brucellosis and echinococcosis/hydatidosis, due mainlyto their zoonotic impact. The analytic hierarchy process proved useful when several criteria were involved in public health issues.

  2. Visual influences on primate encephalization.

    PubMed

    Kirk, E Christopher

    2006-07-01

    Primates differ from most other mammals in having relatively large brains. As a result, numerous comparative studies have attempted to identify the selective variables influencing primate encephalization. However, none have examined the effect of the total amount of visual input on relative brain size. According to Jerison's principle of proper mass, functional areas of the brain devoted primarily to processing visual information should exhibit increases in size when the amount of visual input to those areas increases. As a result, the total amount of visual input to the brain could exert a large influence on encephalization because visual areas comprise a large proportion of total brain mass in primates. The goal of this analysis is to test the expectation of a direct relationship between visual input and encephalization using optic foramen size and optic nerve size as proxies for total visual input. Data were collected for a large comparative sample of primates and carnivorans, and three primary analyses were undertaken. First, the relationship between relative proxies for visual input and relative endocranial volume were examined using partial correlations and phylogenetic comparative methods. Second, to examine the generality of the results derived for extant primates, a parallel series of partial correlation and comparative analyses were undertaken using data for carnivorans. Third, data for various Eocene and Oligocene primates were compared with those for living primates in order to determine whether the fossil taxa demonstrate a similar relationship between relative brain size and visual input. All three analyses confirm the expectations of proper mass and favor the conclusion that the amount of visual input has been a major influence on the evolution of relative brain size in both primates and carnivorans. Furthermore, this study suggests that differences in visual input may partly explain (1) the high encephalization of primates relative to the primitive

  3. Diagnosis and treatment of viral encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhuri, A; Kennedy, P

    2002-01-01

    Acute encephalitis constitutes a medical emergency. In most cases, the presence of focal neurological signs and focal seizures will distinguish encephalitis from encephalopathy. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis is a non-infective inflammatory encephalitis that may require to be treated with steroids. Acute infective encephalitis is usually viral. Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) is the commonest sporadic acute viral encephalitis in the Western world. Magnetic resonance imaging of brain is the investigation of choice in HSE and the diagnosis may be confirmed by the polymerase chain reaction test for the virus in the cerebrospinal fluid. In this article, we review the diagnosis, investigations, and management of acute encephalitis. With few exceptions (for example, aciclovir for HSE), no specific therapy is available for most forms of viral encephalitis. Mortality and morbidity may be high and long term sequelae are known among survivors. The emergence of unusual forms of zoonotic encephalitis has posed an important public health problem. Vaccination and vector control measures are useful preventive strategies in certain arboviral and zoonotic encephalitis. However, we need better antiviral therapy to meet the challenge of acute viral encephalitis more effectively. PMID:12415078

  4. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Is Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis the same as Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis? Yes, Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) is a new ... of chronic inflammatory diseases that affect children. Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis (JRA) is the older term that was used ...

  5. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... damage. Psoriatic arthritis is when a person has psoriasis and arthritis together. Enthesitis-related arthritis usually affects ... person's symptoms, find out if others in the family have had arthritis, and do a complete physical ...

  6. Calcium pyrophosphate arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease that can cause attacks of arthritis. Like gout, crystals form in the joints. But in this ... CPPD arthritis can be confused with: Gouty arthritis (gout) Osteoarthritis Rheumatoid arthritis Exams and Tests Most arthritic ...

  7. Effect of aging on the rheology of full fat and low fat Cheddar-like caprine cheese

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The rheological properties of aging full fat (FF) and low fat (LF) caprine milk cheeses were characterized to determine the changes in the cheese matrix during storage. Six batches of high moisture, Cheddar-like cheese were manufactured from whole or skim caprine milk and were aged at 4 deg C for u...

  8. Juvenile Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... of providers usually treats JA. Medicines and physical therapy can help maintain movement and reduce swelling and pain. They may also help prevent and treat complications. NIH: National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases

  9. Rheumatoid Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... also cause side effects, such as easy bruising, bone thinning, cataracts and diabetes. Antirheumatic (say: "anti-roo-mat-ick") medicines can help fight RA. If these medicines are started early ... arthritis, osteoarthritis, RA, rheumatic disease, rheumatoid nodules, ...

  10. Infectious Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... something that has bacteria on it. To diagnose infectious arthritis, your health care provider may do tests of your blood, urine, and joint fluid. Treatment includes medicines and sometimes surgery.

  11. Thumb Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... arthritis can cause severe pain, swelling, and decreased strength and range of motion, making it difficult to ... tenderness at the base of your thumb Decreased strength when pinching or grasping objects Decreased range of ...

  12. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... is Happening to the Joints? Rheumatoid Arthritis: Gaining Control – Working with your Rheumatologist Rheumatoid Arthritis: Additional Conditions ... Arthritis Nutrition & Rheumatoid Arthritis Arthritis and Health-related Quality of Life Rehabilitation Management for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients ...

  13. Viral arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Michael; Marks, Jonathan L

    2016-01-01

    Acute-onset arthritis is a common clinical problem facing both the general clinician and the rheumatologist. A viral aetiology is though to be responsible for approximately 1% of all cases of acute arthritis with a wide range of causal agents recognised. The epidemiology of acute viral arthritis continues to evolve, with some aetiologies, such as rubella, becoming less common due to vaccination, while some vector-borne viruses have become more widespread. A travel history therefore forms an important part of the assessment of patients presenting with an acute arthritis. Worldwide, parvovirus B19, hepatitis B and C, HIV and the alphaviruses are among the most important causes of virally mediated arthritis. Targeted serological testing may be of value in establishing a diagnosis, and clinicians must also be aware that low-titre autoantibodies, such as rheumatoid factor and antinuclear antibody, can occur in the context of acute viral arthritis. A careful consideration of epidemiological, clinical and serological features is therefore required to guide clinicians in making diagnostic and treatment decisions. While most virally mediated arthritides are self-limiting some warrant the initiation of specific antiviral therapy. PMID:27037381

  14. Chlamydia pecorum: fetal and placental lesions in sporadic caprine abortion.

    PubMed

    Giannitti, Federico; Anderson, Mark; Miller, Myrna; Rowe, Joan; Sverlow, Karen; Vasquez, Marce; Cantón, Germán

    2016-03-01

    Chlamydial abortion in small ruminants is usually associated with Chlamydia abortus infection. Although Chlamydia pecorum has been detected in aborted ruminants and epidemiological data suggests that C. pecorum is abortigenic in these species, published descriptions of lesions in fetuses are lacking. This work describes fetoplacental lesions in a caprine abortion with C. pecorum infection, and further supports the abortigenic role of C. pecorum in ruminants. A 16-month-old Boer goat aborted twin fetuses at ~130 days of gestation. Both fetuses (A and B) and the placenta of fetus A were submitted for postmortem examination and diagnostic workup. At autopsy, the fetuses had moderate anasarca, intermuscular edema in the hindquarters (A), and brachygnathia and palatoschisis (B). In the placenta, the cotyledons were covered by yellow fibrinosuppurative exudate that extended into the adjacent intercotyledonary areas. Histologically, there was severe suppurative and necrotizing placentitis with vasculitis (arteriolitis) and thrombosis, multifocal lymphohistiocytic and neutrophilic hepatitis (A), and fibrinosuppurative enteritis in both fetuses. Chlamydia antigen was detected in the placenta by the direct fluorescent antibody test and in fetal intestines by immunohistochemistry. Nested polymerase chain reaction of DNA extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections of placenta and intestine amplified 400 bp of the Chlamydia 16S rRNA gene that was sequenced and found to be 99% identical to C. pecorum by BLAST analysis. Other known abortigenic infectious agents were ruled out by specific testing. It is concluded that C. pecorum infection is associated with fetoplacental lesions and sporadic abortion in goats.

  15. Caprine (goat) collagen: a potential biomaterial for skin tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Indranil; Mishra, Debasish; Das, Tamal; Maiti, Swatilekha; Maiti, Tapas K

    2012-01-01

    Collagens presently used in tissue engineering are primarily of bovine or porcine origin. However, a risk of a spongiform encephalopathy epidemic has limited the use of collagen from these sources. Keeping the aforementioned perspective in mind, we explored the possibility of using domestic goat available in the subcontinent as a potential source of collagen for tissue-engineering application. This article delineates the isolation, physico-chemical characterization, biocompatibility study and wound healing application of acid soluble caprine (goat) tendon collagen (GTC). Physico-chemical characterization of 1% acetic acid extracted GTC was done by SDS-PAGE, amino-acid composition analysis, FT-IR and CD spectroscopy. Results revealed that GTC was comprised of type-I collagen. Biocompatibility study showed that GTC augmented cell adhesion, cell cycle progression and proliferation. Immuno-cytochemical analysis in conjugation with traction force microscopy further confirmed a superior focal adhesion complex mediated cell-substrate interaction in GTC. Finally, in vivo study in mice model revealed that GTC has low immunogenicity and it augments healing process significantly. Throughout the study, calf skin collagen (CSC) was used as standard for comparative evaluation. In conclusion, it can be said that GTC may find its application as biomaterial in skin tissue engineering.

  16. MicroRNA-Mediated Myostatin Silencing in Caprine Fetal Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Bushuai; Zhang, Yanli; Yan, Yibo; Wang, Ziyu; Ying, Shijia; Huang, Mingrui; Wang, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Myostatin functions as a negative regulator of skeletal muscle growth by suppressing proliferation and differentiation of myoblasts. Dysfunction of the myostatin gene, either due to natural mutation or genetic manipulations such as knockout or knockdown, has been reported to increase muscle mass in mammalian species. RNA interference (RNAi) mediated by microRNAs (miRNAs) is a promising method for gene knockdown studies. In the present study, transient and stable silencing of the myostatin gene in caprine fetal fibroblasts (CFF) was evaluated using the two most effective constructs selected from four different miRNA expression constructs screened in 293FT cells. Using these two miRNA constructs, we achieved up to 84% silencing of myostatin mRNA in transiently transfected CFF cells and up to 31% silencing in stably transfected CFF cells. Moreover, off-target effects due to induction of interferon (IFN) response genes, such as interferon beta (IFN-β) and 2′-5′-oligoadenylate synthetase 2 (OAS2), were markedly fewer in stably transfected CFF cells than in transiently transfected cells. Stable expression of anti-myostatin miRNA with minimal induction of interferon shows great promise for increasing muscle mass in transgenic goats. PMID:25244645

  17. Recent advances in Japanese encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Anirban; Dutta, Kallol

    2017-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis is a flaviviral disease that is endemic to the South, Southeast Asia, and Asia Oceania regions. Given that about 60% of the world’s population (about 7.4 billion) resides in this region (about 4.4 billion), this disease poses a significant threat to global health. Active vaccination campaigns conducted in endemic countries have led to a decrease in the number of reported cases over the years. In this article, we strive to briefly highlight recent advances in understanding the role of microRNAs in disease pathology, focus on providing brief summaries of recent clinical trials in the field of Japanese encephalitis therapeutics, and review the current prophylactic strategies. PMID:28357054

  18. [Autoimmune encephalitis as a cause of psychosis].

    PubMed

    Suokas, Kimmo; Kampman, Olli

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies directed to the surface structures of nerve cells may cause autoimmune encephalitis. It may cause limbic encephalitis requiring intensive care, or symptoms are restricted to psychosis. This disease may be impossible to distinguish clinically from a functional psychotic illness. Some of the cases are paraneoplastic, i.e. associated with a diagnosed or latent malignant neoplasia, most commonly ovarian teratoma. The first line treatment for autoimmune encephalitis is an immunomodulatory combination therapy with immunoglobulin and methylprednisolone. We recommend screening of the most common NMDAR and VGKC antibodies related to autoimmune encephalitis from patients having developed a new psychosis.

  19. Rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Scott, David L; Wolfe, Frederick; Huizinga, Tom W J

    2010-09-25

    Rheumatoid arthritis is characterised by persistent synovitis, systemic inflammation, and autoantibodies (particularly to rheumatoid factor and citrullinated peptide). 50% of the risk for development of rheumatoid arthritis is attributable to genetic factors. Smoking is the main environmental risk. In industrialised countries, rheumatoid arthritis affects 0·5-1·0% of adults, with 5-50 per 100 000 new cases annually. The disorder is most typical in women and elderly people. Uncontrolled active rheumatoid arthritis causes joint damage, disability, decreased quality of life, and cardiovascular and other comorbidities. Disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), the key therapeutic agents, reduce synovitis and systemic inflammation and improve function. The leading DMARD is methotrexate, which can be combined with other drugs of this type. Biological agents are used when arthritis is uncontrolled or toxic effects arise with DMARDs. Tumour necrosis factor inhibitors were the first biological agents, followed by abatacept, rituximab, and tocilizumab. Infections and high costs restrict prescription of biological agents. Long-term remission induced by intensive, short-term treatment selected by biomarker profiles is the ultimate goal.

  20. [Anti-NMDA-receptor encephalitis].

    PubMed

    Engen, Kristine; Agartz, Ingrid

    2016-06-01

    BACKGROUND In 2007 a clinical disease caused by autoantibodies directed against the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor was described for the first time. Anti-NMDA-receptor encephalitis is a subacute, autoimmune neurological disorder with psychiatric manifestations. The disease is a form of limbic encephalitis and is often paraneoplastic. The condition is also treatable. In this review article we examine the development of the disease, clinical practice, diagnostics and treatment.MATERIAL AND METHOD The article is based on references retrieved from searches in PubMed, and a discretionary selection of articles from the authors' own literature archive.RESULTS The disease most frequently affects young women. It may initially be perceived as a psychiatric condition, as it usually presents in the form of delusions, hallucinations or mania. The diagnosis should be suspected in patients who later develop neurological symptoms such as various movement disorders, epileptic seizures and autonomic instability. Examination of serum or cerebrospinal fluid for NMDA receptor antibodies should be included in the assessment of patients with suspected encephalitis. MRI, EEG and assessment for tumours are important tools in diagnosing the condition and any underlying malignancy.INTERPRETATION If treatment is initiated early, the prognosis is good. Altogether 75 % of patients will fully recover or experience significant improvement. Apart from surgical resection of a possible tumour, the treatment consists of immunotherapy. Because of good possibilities for treatment, it is important that clinicians, particularly those in acute psychiatry, are aware of and alert to this condition.

  1. Anti-NMDA encephalitis: an uncommon, autoimmune mediated form of encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Azizyan, Avetis; Albrektson, Joshua R; Maya, Marcel M; Pressman, Barry D; Moser, Franklin

    2014-08-01

    We report an interesting case of a 19 year old female with findings on MRI suggestive of viral encephalitis. An extensive workup was negative for infectious causes and she was subsequently diagnosed with anti-NMDA encephalitis. Anti-NMDA encephalitis is a highly lethal but treatable form of autoimmune encephalitis that has recently been characterized. It is frequently found in young women and associated with an underlying teratoma. Although rare, this diagnosis should be considered in young females for whom a rapid onset of encephalitis cannot be explained by more common causes.

  2. Eastern Equine Encephalitis Treated With Intravenous Immunoglobulins

    PubMed Central

    Mukerji, Shibani S.; Lam, Alice D.

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 68-year-old man from southeastern Massachusetts presenting with encephalitis due to eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) virus. Despite the high morbidity and mortality rate of EEE, the patient made a near complete recovery in the setting of receiving early intravenous immunoglobulins. PMID:26740855

  3. Eastern Equine Encephalitis Treated With Intravenous Immunoglobulins.

    PubMed

    Mukerji, Shibani S; Lam, Alice D; Wilson, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 68-year-old man from southeastern Massachusetts presenting with encephalitis due to eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) virus. Despite the high morbidity and mortality rate of EEE, the patient made a near complete recovery in the setting of receiving early intravenous immunoglobulins.

  4. Transmission of caprine herpesvirus 2 in domestic goats.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Keller, Janice; Knowles, Donald P; Taus, Naomi S; Oaks, J Lindsay; Crawford, Timothy B

    2005-04-25

    Caprine herpesvirus 2 (CpHV-2) is a recently recognized gammaherpesvirus that is endemic in domestic goats and has been observed to cause clinical malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) in certain species of deer. In this study, transmission of CpHV-2 in goats was examined. A total of 30 kids born to a CpHV-2 positive goat herd were selected and divided into two groups: group 1 (n=16) remained in the positive herd; group 2 (n=14) was separated from the herd at 1 week of age after obtaining colostrum. Peripheral blood samples from each kid were examined regularly by competitive ELISA for MCF viral antibody and by PCR for CpHV-2 DNA. Fifteen out of 16 goats (94%) that remained with the positive herd seroconverted and became PCR-positive for CpHV-2 by 10 months of age. In contrast, all kids (100%) that were separated from the positive herd at 1 week of age remained negative until termination of the experiment at 1 year of age. Additional transmission experiments revealed that all CpHV-2-free adult goats were susceptible to CpHV-2 or ovine herpesvirus 2 (OvHV-2) infection. The data indicate that the transmission pattern of CpHV-2 in goats is similar to the pattern of OvHV-2 in sheep and that CpHV-2-free goats can be established by early separation of kids from positive herds, which has significant implications for MCF control programs.

  5. Copper: a biphasic regulator of caprine sperm forward progression.

    PubMed

    Roy, Debarun; Dey, Souvik; Majumder, Gopal Chandra; Bhattacharyya, Debdas

    2014-02-01

    Copper is essential for spermatogenesis and its presence has been demonstrated in male and female reproductive fluids in several mammalian species. However, little is known about the physiological significance of this trace element in the regulation of forward progression of mammalian sperm cells which is essential for sperm fertility potential in vivo. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the physiological role of the bivalent copper ion (Cu(2+)) on mammalian sperm forward motility using a chemically-defined medium and caprine cauda epididymal sperm model. Sperm forward motility was significantly enhanced by Cu(2+) in a dose-dependent manner; maximal activation (approx 20%) was noted at the 5 µM level of the metal. Above 10 µM Cu(2+) sperm motility decreased, showing that Cu(2+) exerts a biphasic regulation on sperm motility. These findings have been confirmed using a spectrophotometric motility assay, an objective method of motility analysis. At lower concentrations (up to 5 µM), copper enhanced sperm membrane lipid peroxidation as well as the level of intra-sperm cyclic adenosine mono phosphate (c-AMP), but at a higher level it caused marked inhibition of both of the biochemical parameters. The observed correlation of Cu(2+)-dependent biphasic modulation of sperm membrane lipid peroxidation and intrasperm c-AMP with sperm forward motility is consistent with the view that Cu(2+) regulation of sperm motility is mediated by membrane lipid peroxidation, which in turn modulates the level of intra-sperm c-AMP, a well-known activator of sperm motility.

  6. Fungal arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... A.D.A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Fungal Infections Infectious Arthritis Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by URAC, also known as the American Accreditation HealthCare ... for online health information and services. Learn more about A.D. ...

  7. Grammatical Arthritis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bush, Don

    1994-01-01

    Discusses grammatical arthritis (an internal buildup of rules that hinders writing flexibility); four new "rules" (concerning "data is,""none are,""hopefully," and the restrictive "which"); attitudes toward English grammar; how to be a helpful editor; and where to learn about grammar. (SR)

  8. Lipid oxidation in algae oil-in-water emulsions stabilized by bovine and caprine caseins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Caseins (alpha S1-, alpha S2-, and beta-casein) are phosphoproteins that are capable of binding transition metals and scavenging free radicals, these properties make them good candidates to be used as natural antioxidants in oil-in-water emulsions. Caprine casein exhibits variability in aS1-casein c...

  9. Screening of fluoroquinolone residues in caprine milk using a 5-kg luminescence photometer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A terbium-sensitized luminescence (TSL) method was developed to screen presence of residues of four fluoroquinolones (FQ) registered in caprine milk in the European Union: enrofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, flumequine, and danofloxacin. After extraction in McIlvaine buffer and SPE cleanup, TSL was measure...

  10. The effect of helminth infection on the microbial composition and structure of the caprine abomasal microbiome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Haemonchus contortus is arguably the most important helminth parasite for small ruminants. Here we characterized the impact of helminth infection on the caprine abomasal microbiome. Fourteen parasite naive goats were exposed to 5,000 H. contortus L3 larvae for 50 days. Six age-matched goats served a...

  11. Determination of the molecular defect of caprine N-acetylglucosamine 6-sulfatase deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Leipprandt, J.R.; Jones, M.Z.; Cavanagh, K.T.

    1994-09-01

    Caprine N-acetylglucosamine 6-sulfatase (G6S) deficiency is the only animal analog of Sanfilippo syndrome (type D). The goat with this mucopolysaccharidousis disorder (MPS III D) demonstrated delayed motor development and growth retardation but reached sexual maturity before dying suddenly at 19 mo. Histochemical and biochemical analysis of the liver showed glycosaminoglycan storage and there was GM{sub 3} ganglioside accumulation in the brain. Towards further development of this animal model for treatment strategies, we have cloned the caprine G6S gene, determined the nature of the gene defect in caprine MPS III D and compared the goat sequence to the human sequence. The human and caprine sequences show an overall sequence similarity of about 90% in the coding region. The 5{prime}-coding region is very GC-rich in both the human and caprine G6S. One striking difference between the human and caprine genes is the presence of a GCC repeat in the goat resulting in insertion of 6 prolines and a leucine in the signal peptide. This proline-rich stretch was confirmed by amplifying and sequencing the same cDNA segment from other goats. Additionally, this region was examined in bovine cDNA and found to contain 4 prolines and 2 leucines. The mRNA for G6S consists of two species of approximately 4.0 and 4.2 kb with a coding region of 1.6 kb. For mutation analysis a series of primers was designed to cover the entire G6S coding region. Amplicons from RT-PCR on normal and affected goat total RNA were produced and sequenced. A single base substitution, T for C, was found in the 5{prime} region of the coding sequence of the affected animals that creates a stop codon. This mutation introduces an Alu I restriction site. PCR primers designed to amplify a short segment of genomic DNA encompassing the mutation have been used to identify putative carriers and develop a caprine Sanfilippo III D carrier colony.

  12. Arthritis of the Wrist

    MedlinePlus

    ... is caused by just two types: osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. Osteoarthritis Osteoarthritis (OA) is a progressive condition that ... other, it results in pain, stiffness, and weakness. Rheumatoid Arthritis Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic disease that ...

  13. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) KidsHealth > For Teens > Juvenile Idiopathic ... can affect people under age 17. What Is Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis? Arthritis doesn't affect young people ...

  14. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... rule out other conditions or infections, such as Lyme disease , that may cause similar symptoms or occur along ... ESR) Bones, Muscles, and Joints Evaluate Your Child's Lyme Disease Risk Word! Arthritis Arthritis Lupus Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis ( ...

  15. What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Arthritis PDF Version Size: 57 KB Audio Version Time: 10:20 Size: 9.7 MB November 2014 What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis? Fast Facts: An Easy-to-Read Series of Publications for the Public Rheumatoid arthritis is ...

  16. Forms of Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... stiffness, inflammation, swelling and, sometimes, destruction of joints. Gout — a form of arthritis that occurs when uric ... the joints. Some 2.1 million Americans have gout. Lupus — a form of arthritis, like rheumatoid arthritis, ...

  17. Rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Smolen, Josef S; Aletaha, Daniel; McInnes, Iain B

    2016-10-22

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory joint disease, which can cause cartilage and bone damage as well as disability. Early diagnosis is key to optimal therapeutic success, particularly in patients with well-characterised risk factors for poor outcomes such as high disease activity, presence of autoantibodies, and early joint damage. Treatment algorithms involve measuring disease activity with composite indices, applying a treatment-to-target strategy, and use of conventional, biological, and newz non-biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs. After the treatment target of stringent remission (or at least low disease activity) is maintained, dose reduction should be attempted. Although the prospects for most patients are now favourable, many still do not respond to current therapies. Accordingly, new therapies are urgently required. In this Seminar, we describe current insights into genetics and aetiology, pathophysiology, epidemiology, assessment, therapeutic agents, and treatment strategies together with unmet needs of patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

  18. Viral encephalitis: current treatments and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Domingues, Renan Barros

    2012-12-01

    Several viruses may cause central nervous system infections that lead to a broad range of clinical manifestations. The course of the viral encephalitis can be acute, sub acute, or chronic. Some viruses have the ability to enter into the brain and cause direct injury, while others activate inflammatory cells that attack the central nervous system (CNS) secondarily. Some types of viral encephalitis occur in previously healthy individuals, while others affect immunocompromised patients. The epidemiology of viral encephalitis has undergone changes in recent years. Factors such as evolving lifestyles and ecological changes have had a considerable impact on the epidemiology of some types of viral encephalitis. The result is a change in the etiology spectrum of viral encephalitis, with new types of encephalitis arising or returning from time to time. Many scientific achievements in neuroimaging, molecular diagnosis, antiviral therapy, immunomodulatory treatments, and neurointensive care have allowed more precise and earlier diagnoses and more efficient treatments, resulting in improved outcomes. Despite these advances, there is still considerable morbidity and mortality related to these disorders. This aim of this article is to review the current knowledge of the current drugs used in the management of the most important viral encephalitis, focusing on the mechanisms of action, efficacy, and side effects of the drugs. In addition, future perspectives in this area will be addressed. Despite the technological advances, much effort has yet to be undertaken to reduce the impact of these potentially devastating diseases.

  19. Case Definitions, Diagnostic Algorithms, and Priorities in Encephalitis: Consensus Statement of the International Encephalitis Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesan, A.; Tunkel, A. R.; Bloch, K. C.; Lauring, A. S.; Sejvar, J.; Bitnun, A.; Stahl, J-P.; Mailles, A.; Drebot, M.; Rupprecht, C. E.; Yoder, J.; Cope, J. R.; Wilson, M. R.; Whitley, R. J.; Sullivan, J.; Granerod, J.; Jones, C.; Eastwood, K.; Ward, K. N.; Durrheim, D. N.; Solbrig, M. V.; Guo-Dong, L.; Glaser, C. A.; Sheriff, Heather; Brown, David; Farnon, Eileen; Messenger, Sharon; Paterson, Beverley; Soldatos, Ariane; Roy, Sharon; Visvesvara, Govinda; Beach, Michael; Nasci, Roger; Pertowski, Carol; Schmid, Scott; Rascoe, Lisa; Montgomery, Joel; Tong, Suxiang; Breiman, Robert; Franka, Richard; Keuhnert, Matt; Angulo, Fred; Cherry, James

    2013-01-01

    Background.Encephalitis continues to result in substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide. Advances in diagnosis and management have been limited, in part, by a lack of consensus on case definitions, standardized diagnostic approaches, and priorities for research. Methods.In March 2012, the International Encephalitis Consortium, a committee begun in 2010 with members worldwide, held a meeting in Atlanta to discuss recent advances in encephalitis and to set priorities for future study. Results.We present a consensus document that proposes a standardized case definition and diagnostic guidelines for evaluation of adults and children with suspected encephalitis. In addition, areas of research priority, including host genetics and selected emerging infections, are discussed. Conclusions.We anticipate that this document, representing a synthesis of our discussions and supported by literature, will serve as a practical aid to clinicians evaluating patients with suspected encephalitis and will identify key areas and approaches to advance our knowledge of encephalitis. PMID:23861361

  20. Virus meningo-encephalitis in Slovenia

    PubMed Central

    Vesenjak-Zmijanac, J.; Bedjanič, M.; Rus, S.; Kmet, J.

    1955-01-01

    An organism was isolated from the blood of a patient clinically diagnosed as suffering from virus meningo-encephalitis; the organism causes illness and death in white mice. The antigen prepared from the brains of mice infected with this organism fixes complement with sera from typical cases of virus meningo-encephalitis. From its biological and serological characteristics, the isolated organism appears to belong to the group of neurotropic viruses and to be the causative agent of virus meningo-encephalitis in Slovenia. PMID:14378996

  1. CD4+ T cells provide protection against acute lethal encephalitis caused by Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus.

    PubMed

    Yun, Nadezhda E; Peng, Bi-Hung; Bertke, Andrea S; Borisevich, Viktoriya; Smith, Jennifer K; Smith, Jeanon N; Poussard, Allison L; Salazar, Milagros; Judy, Barbara M; Zacks, Michele A; Estes, D Mark; Paessler, Slobodan

    2009-06-19

    Studying the mechanisms of host survival resulting from viral encephalitis is critical to the development of vaccines. Here we have shown in several independent studies that high dose treatment with neutralizing antibody prior to intranasal infection with Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus had an antiviral effect in the visceral organs and prolonged survival time of infected mice, even in the absence of alphabeta T cells. Nevertheless, antibody treatment did not prevent the development of lethal encephalitis. On the contrary, the adoptive transfer of primed CD4(+) T cells was necessary to prevent lethal encephalitis in mice lacking alphabeta T cell receptor.

  2. Psychiatric aspects of herpes simplex encephalitis, tick-borne encephalitis and herpes zoster encephalitis among immunocompetent patients.

    PubMed

    Więdłocha, Magdalena; Marcinowicz, Piotr; Stańczykiewicz, Bartłomiej

    2015-01-01

    The psychopathological symptoms occurring in the course of diseases associated with infections are often initially isolated and non-characteristic, and may cause diagnostic difficulties. Moreover, such disorders tend to be less responsive to psychiatric management. Among possible causes such as trauma, neoplasm and vascular changes, inflammatory changes of the brain as a result of a viral infection should also be considered. There were 452 registered cases of viral encephalitis in Poland in 2010, and although not very prevalent they remain a severe and life-threatening condition. What is more, the frequently occurring neurological and psychiatric complications of viral encephalitis often result in permanent disabilities, causing a significant decrease in the quality of life. This article presents the three types of encephalitis that are most prevalent among immunocompetent patients in Poland, i.e. herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE), tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) and herpes zoster encephalitis (HZE). The psychopathology of the acute phase of the infection, the residual symptoms, features apparent in imaging studies and some neuropathological aspects are also presented. The paper also focuses on psychiatric aspects of the diagnostics and treatment of the described conditions. The clinical pictures of these infections are quite specific, although they cover a wide range of symptoms, and these characteristic features are described. The aim of this review is also to show the significance of thorough diagnostics and a multidisciplinary approach to patients with viral CNS infections.

  3. Anti-NMDA Receptor Encephalitis During Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Mathis, Stéphane; Pin, Jean-Christophe; Pierre, Fabrice; Ciron, Jonathan; Iljicsov, Anna; Lamy, Matthias; Neau, Jean-Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (anti-MMDAR) encephalitis is an immune-mediated encephalitis mainly affecting young women. We describe the case of a 21-year-old woman who developed a classical form of anti-NMDAR encephalitis during the 10th week of gestation. The patient had been treated with methylpredinsolone and intravenous immunoglobulins. Birth history of the child was normal, with normal APGAR score. The clinical symptoms of the patient have improved after a few months. This rare occurrence during pregnancy (only 9 other cases described) presents an opportunity to highlight the importance of making the earliest possible diagnosis of this treatable and potentially reversible encephalitis, and to educate gynecologists, psychiatrists, anesthetists, and neurologists on this potential cause of psychiatric and neurological manifestations during pregnancy. PMID:26131809

  4. Emergency Neurologic Life Support: Meningitis and Encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Gaieski, David F; Nathan, Barnett R; O'Brien, Nicole F

    2015-12-01

    Bacterial meningitis and viral encephalitis, particularly herpes simplex encephalitis, are severe neurological infections that, if not treated promptly and effectively, lead to poor neurological outcome or death. Because treatment is more effective if given early, the topic of meningitis and encephalitis was chosen as an Emergency Neurological Life Support protocol. This protocol provides a practical approach to recognition and urgent treatment of bacterial meningitis and encephalitis. Appropriate imaging, spinal fluid analysis, and early empiric treatment is discussed. Though uncommon in its full form, the typical clinical triad of headache, fever, and neck stiffness should alert the clinical practitioner to the possibility of a central nervous system infection. Early attention to the airway and maintaining normotension is crucial in treatment of these patients, as is rapid treatment with anti-infectives and, in some cases, corticosteroids.

  5. The Laboratory Diagnosis of Autoimmune Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Kun; Lee, Soon-Tae

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune encephalitis is a group of encephalitis syndromes that cause altered mentality, memory decline, or seizures in association with the presence of serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) autoantibodies (auto-Abs). An early diagnosis enables early treatments. The detection of auto-Abs is a confirmatory diagnosis. Tissue-based assay, cell-based immunoassay, and immunoblotting are used to detect various autoantibodies. The CSF test for the presence of antibodies is important because it is more sensitive and reflects disease activity in many autoimmune encephalitis, although antibody tests can be negative even in the presence of autoimmune encephalitis. EEG is often abnormal, but nonspecific. A unilateral or bilateral medial temporal T2 high signal is a common finding in MRI. Fludeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography is sometimes useful for diagnosis in patients with normal MRI. PMID:28101474

  6. Cysticercal encephalitis with cortical blindness.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Rajniti; Thakur, Neha; Mohanty, C; Singh, M K; Mishra, O P; Singh, Utpal Kant

    2010-10-21

    The authors report a 6-year-old boy, who had presented with low-grade fever, altered sensorium, headache and seizure for 5 days. On examination, he had features of raised intracranial pressure with left VI cranial-nerve palsy and bilateral extensor plantar response. CT scan showed multiple calcifications in cerebral cortex. MRI cranium showed multiple cysts involving whole of the brain. He was diagnosed as having cysticercal encephalitis, based on immunological and imaging study. He was managed with 20% mannitol, phenytoin and albendazole, and regained consciousness 7 days later, but had residual neurological deficit as left-lower-limb monoparesis and visual acuity of just projection of rays (PR+) and perception of light (PL+).

  7. [Saint Louis encephalitis: case report].

    PubMed

    Carballo, Carolina; Cabana, Magdalena; Ledezma, Francisca; Pascual, Carolina; Cazes, Claudia; Mistchenko, Alicia; López, Eduardo

    2016-08-01

    Saint Louis encephalitis is transmitted by Culex mosquitoes. In Argentina sporadic cases are registered. Symptomatic illness is unusual in children. We present a case of meningoencephalitis caused by an uncommon viral infection. The clinical signs and symptoms are unusual for pediatric patients and the bilateral thalamic compromise showed on magnetic resonance has not been described previously. An 8-year-old girl consulted due to fever, behavior disorders and ataxia. Clonus and neck stiffness were detected at physical exam. Cerebrospinal fluid revealed mononuclear leukocytosis; bilateral ischemic compromise was observed in thalamus by magnetic resonance. Saint Louis virus was confirmed by serology: serum and cerebrospinal fluid IgM were positive during the acute phase of the disease and serum IgG was positive four weeks later. Most of the signs and symptoms of the disease were resolved, however mild behavior disorders were observed as acute sequelae up to 45 days after hospital discharge.

  8. Encephalitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... are transmitted by mosquitoes or other blood-sucking insects. Mosquito-borne viruses can cause infections that include ... Ganciclovir (Cytovene) Foscarnet (Foscavir) Some viruses, such as insect-borne viruses, don't respond to these treatments. ...

  9. Encephalitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Viruses and other germs that are transmitted by insects, like West Nile virus (transmitted through a mosquito ... are only transmitted through the bite of infected insects; it's not possible to catch them from other ...

  10. Encephalitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... a mosquito bite) and the germs that cause Lyme disease and Rocky Mountain spotted fever (transmitted through tick ... West Nile Virus Meningitis Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever Lyme Disease Contact Us Print Resources Send to a friend ...

  11. The Anatomy of Caprine Female Urethra and Characteristics of Muscle and Bone Marrow Derived Caprine Cells for Autologous Cell Therapy Testing.

    PubMed

    Burdzinska, Anna; Dybowski, Bartosz; Zarychta-Wisniewska, Weronika; Kulesza, Agnieszka; Zagozdzon, Radoslaw; Gajewski, Zdzislaw; Paczek, Leszek

    2017-03-01

    Cell therapy is emerging as an alternative treatment of stress urinary incontinence. However, many aspects of the procedure require further optimization. A large animal model is needed to reliably test cell delivery methods. In this study, we aim to determine suitability of the goat as an experimental animal for testing intraurethral autologous cell transplantation in terms of urethral anatomy and cell culture parameters. The experiments were performed in 12 mature/aged female goats. Isolated caprine muscle derived cells (MDC) were myogenic in vitro and mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) population was able to differentiate into adipo-, osteo- and chondrogenic lineages. The median yield of cells after 3 weeks of culture amounted 47 × 10(6) for MDC and 37 × 10(6) for MSC. Urethral pressure profile measurements revealed the mean functional urethral length of 3.75 ± 0.7 cm. The mean maximal urethral closure pressure amounted 63.5 ± 5.9 cmH2 O and the mean functional area was 123.3 ± 19.4 cm*cmH2 O. The omega- shaped striated urethral sphincter was well developed in the middle and distal third of the urethra and its mean thickness on cross section was 2.3 mm. In the proximal part of the urethra only loosely arranged smooth muscle fibers were identified. To conclude, presented data demonstrate that caprine MDC and MSC can be expanded in vitro in a repeatable manner even when mature or aged animals are cell donors. Results suggest that female caprine urethra has similar parameters to those reported in human and therefore the goat can be an appropriate experimental animal for testing intraurethral cell transplantation. Anat Rec, 00:000-000, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Anat Rec, 300:577-588, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Encephalitis and AMPA receptor antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Höftberger, Romana; van Sonderen, Agnes; Leypoldt, Frank; Houghton, David; Geschwind, Michael; Gelfand, Jeffrey; Paredes, Mercedes; Sabater, Lidia; Saiz, Albert; Titulaer, Maarten J.; Graus, Francesc

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We report the clinical features, comorbidities, and outcome of 22 newly identified patients with antibodies to the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor (AMPAR). Methods: This was a retrospective review of patients diagnosed between May 2009 and March 2014. Immunologic techniques have been reported previously. Results: Patients' median age was 62 years (range 23–81; 14 female). Four syndromes were identified: 12 (55%) patients presented with distinctive limbic encephalitis (LE), 8 (36%) with limbic dysfunction along with multifocal/diffuse encephalopathy, one with LE preceded by motor deficits, and one with psychosis with bipolar features. Fourteen patients (64%) had a tumor demonstrated pathologically (5 lung, 4 thymoma, 2 breast, 2 ovarian teratoma) or radiologically (1 lung). Additional antibodies occurred in 7 patients (3 onconeuronal, 1 tumor-related, 2 cell surface, and 1 tumor-related and cell surface), all with neurologic symptoms or tumor reflecting the concurrent autoimmunity. Treatment and outcome were available from 21 patients (median follow-up 72 weeks, range 5–266): 5 had good response to immunotherapy and tumor therapy, 10 partial response, and 6 did not improve. Eventually 5 patients died; all had a tumor or additional paraneoplastic symptoms related to onconeuronal antibodies. Coexistence of onconeuronal antibodies predicted a poor outcome (p = 0.009). Conclusion: Anti-AMPAR encephalitis usually manifests as LE, can present with other symptoms or psychosis, and is paraneoplastic in 64% of cases. Complete and impressive neurologic improvement can occur, but most patients have partial recovery. Screening for a tumor and onconeuronal antibodies is important because their detection influences outcome. PMID:25979696

  13. Herpes encephalitis preceded by ipsilateral vestibular neuronitis.

    PubMed

    Philpot, Stephen J; Archer, John S

    2005-11-01

    A 74-year-old woman developed vertigo and jerk nystagmus to the left with normal cerebral imaging. Three days later she developed fever, altered mental state and left medial temporal lobe hypodensity, confirmed on lumbar puncture to be due to herpes simplex type 1 encephalitis. We propose that the patient had vestibular neuronitis caused by HSV-1 that progressed to ipsilateral temporal lobe encephalitis.

  14. Gonococcal arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cucurull, E; Espinoza, L R

    1998-05-01

    Disseminated gonococcal infection is the most common systemic complication of acute gonorrhea and occurs in 0.5% to 3.0% of patients with untreated mucosal infection. It is also the most common cause of septic arthritis in patients less than 30 years of age. Fortunately, the incidence of gonorrhea is decreasing dramatically in the United States and Western Europe, although it is still high in developing countries. Increasing resistance to antibiotics requires continuous surveillance of antimicrobial susceptibilities to determine the efficacy of current therapeutic measures.

  15. Comparison of the principal proteins in bovine, caprine, buffalo, equine and camel milk.

    PubMed

    Hinz, Katharina; O'Connor, Paula M; Huppertz, Thom; Ross, R Paul; Kelly, Alan L

    2012-05-01

    Proteomic analysis of bovine, caprine, buffalo, equine and camel milk highlighted significant interspecies differences. Camel milk was found to be devoid of β-lactoglobulin, whereas β-lactoglobulin was the major whey protein in bovine, buffalo, caprine, and equine milk. Five different isoforms of κ-casein were found in camel milk, analogous to the micro-heterogeneity observed for bovine κ-casein. Several spots observed in 2D-electrophoretograms of milk of all species could tentatively be identified as polypeptides arising from the enzymatic hydrolysis of caseins. The understanding gained from the proteomic comparison of these milks may be of relevance both in terms of identifying sources of hypoallergenic alternatives to bovine milk and detection of adulteration of milk samples and products.

  16. Relevance of Neuroinflammation and Encephalitis in Autism

    PubMed Central

    Kern, Janet K.; Geier, David A.; Sykes, Lisa K.; Geier, Mark R.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, many studies indicate that children with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) diagnosis have brain pathology suggestive of ongoing neuroinflammation or encephalitis in different regions of their brains. Evidence of neuroinflammation or encephalitis in ASD includes: microglial and astrocytic activation, a unique and elevated proinflammatory profile of cytokines, and aberrant expression of nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells. A conservative estimate based on the research suggests that at least 69% of individuals with an ASD diagnosis have microglial activation or neuroinflammation. Encephalitis, which is defined as inflammation of the brain, is medical diagnosis code G04.90 in the International Classification of Disease, 10th revision; however, children with an ASD diagnosis are not generally assessed for a possible medical diagnosis of encephalitis. This is unfortunate because if a child with ASD has neuroinflammation, then treating the underlying brain inflammation could lead to improved outcomes. The purpose of this review of the literature is to examine the evidence of neuroinflammation/encephalitis in those with an ASD diagnosis and to address how a medical diagnosis of encephalitis, when appropriate, could benefit these children by driving more immediate and targeted treatments. PMID:26834565

  17. Anti-NMDA Receptor Encephalitis and Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hsiuying

    2017-01-01

    Anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate (Anti-NMDA) receptor encephalitis is an acute autoimmune neurological disorder. The cause of this disease is often unknown, and previous studies revealed that it might be caused by a virus, vaccine or tumor. It occurs more often in females than in males. Several cases were reported to be related to vaccination such as the H1N1 vaccine and tetanus/diphtheria/pertussis and polio vaccines. In this study, we reported an anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis case that may be caused by Japanese encephalitis vaccination. To investigate the association between anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis and vaccination, we analyzed the phylogenetic relationship of the microRNAs, which significantly regulate these vaccine viruses or bacteria, and the phylogenetic relationship of these viruses and bacteria. This reveals that anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis may be caused by Japanese encephalitis vaccination, as well as H1N1 vaccination or tetanus/diphtheria/pertussis and polio vaccinations, from the phylogenetic viewpoint. PMID:28106787

  18. Anti-NMDA Receptor Encephalitis and Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hsiuying

    2017-01-18

    Anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate (Anti-NMDA) receptor encephalitis is an acute autoimmune neurological disorder. The cause of this disease is often unknown, and previous studies revealed that it might be caused by a virus, vaccine or tumor. It occurs more often in females than in males. Several cases were reported to be related to vaccination such as the H1N1 vaccine and tetanus/diphtheria/pertussis and polio vaccines. In this study, we reported an anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis case that may be caused by Japanese encephalitis vaccination. To investigate the association between anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis and vaccination, we analyzed the phylogenetic relationship of the microRNAs, which significantly regulate these vaccine viruses or bacteria, and the phylogenetic relationship of these viruses and bacteria. This reveals that anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis may be caused by Japanese encephalitis vaccination, as well as H1N1 vaccination or tetanus/diphtheria/pertussis and polio vaccinations, from the phylogenetic viewpoint.

  19. Expanding possibilities for intervention against small ruminant lentiviruses through genetic marker-assisted selective breeding

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Small ruminant lentiviruses include members that infect sheep (ovine lentivirus [OvLV]; also known as ovine progressive pneumonia virus/maedi-visna virus) and goats (caprine arthritis encephalitis virus [CAEV]). Breed differences in seroprevalence and proviral concentration of OvLV had suggested a s...

  20. Anti-NMDA Receptor Encephalitis in a Pregnant Woman.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jiyoung; Park, Seung Ha; Jung, Yu Ri; Park, Soon Won; Jung, Dae Soo

    2015-06-01

    Anti N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor encephalitis is one of the most common types of autoimmune synaptic encephalitis. Anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis commonly occurs in young women with ovarian teratoma. It has variable clinical manifestations and treatment responses. Sometimes it is misdiagnosed as a psychiatric disorder or viral encephalitis. To the best of our knowledge, anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis is a rare condition in pregnant women. We report a case of anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis in a pregnant woman who presented with abnormal behavior, epileptic seizure, and hypoventilation.

  1. Caprine herpesvirus 1 (CpHV-1) vaginal infection of goats: clinical efficacy of fig latex.

    PubMed

    Camero, Michele; Marinaro, Mariarosaria; Losurdo, Michele; Larocca, Vittorio; Bodnar, Livia; Patruno, Giovanni; Buonavoglia, Canio; Tempesta, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The latex of Ficus carica Linn. (Moraceae) has been shown to interfere with the replication of caprine herpesvirus (CpHV)-1 in vitro. The present study was undertaken to determine the efficacy of vaginal administration of fig latex in goats experimentally infected with CpHV-1. The fig latex reduced the clinical signs of the herpetic disease although it slightly influenced the titres of CpHV-1 shed. Thus, the fig latex maintained a partial efficacy in vivo.

  2. A primitive caprine from the Upper Vallesian of La Roma 2 (Alfambra, Teruel, Aragon, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcalá, Luis; Morales, Jorge

    1997-06-01

    We describe a new caprine form from the Upper Vallesian of La Roma 2 (Teruel Basin, Aragon). Aragoral mudejar Gen.n., sp.n. is close to the primitive forms of the Hippotraginae-Caprinae group. It differs from Norbertia hellenica by its more primitive dentition, the greater separation between the bases of the horn cores, the decreased thickness of the frontal bone and the relatively smaller size of the horn cores.

  3. Pediatric Herpes Simplex Virus Encephalitis Complicated by N-Methyl-D-aspartate Receptor Antibody Encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Bamford, Alasdair; Crowe, Belinda H A; Hacohen, Yael; Lin, Jean-Pierre; Clarke, Antonia; Tudor-Williams, Gareth; Sancho-Shimizu, Vanessa; Vincent, Angela; Lim, Ming; Pullaperuma, Sunil P

    2015-06-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antibodies (NMDAR-Abs) can contribute to neurological relapse after herpes simplex virus encephalitis (HSE). We describe a child with NMDAR-Ab encephalitis after HSE, which was recognized and treated early. We discuss the case in the context of existing reports, and we propose a modified immunotherapy strategy to minimize risk of viral reactivation.

  4. Comparison of vitrification and conventional freezing for cryopreservation of caprine embryos.

    PubMed

    Araújo-Lemos, Paula F B; Freitas Neto, Leopoldo M; Moura, Marcelo T; Melo, Janaína V; Lima, Paulo F; Oliveira, Marcos A L

    2015-08-01

    The experiment aimed to compare conventional freezing and different vitrification protocols for cryopreservation of caprine embryos at morphological, ultrastructural, and functional levels. Caprine embryos produced in vivo were allocated randomly to three groups: (1) conventional freezing with ethylene glycol (EG); (2) dimethyl sulfoxide + EG (DMSO/EG) vitrification; and (3) dimethylformamide + EG (DMF/EG) vitrification. All groups were scored for cell viability (propidium iodide staining and ultrastructural levels) and re-expansion rate after thawing or warming. Embryos subjected to DMSO/EG vitrification showed higher cell viability (73.33%), compared with DMF/EG vitrification and conventional freezing group embryos (40.00 and 66.66%, respectively). The ultrastructural study revealed that vitrified embryos had greater preservation of cellular structure than embryos from conventional freezing with EG. DMSO/EG vitrification resulted in higher rates of re-expansion in vitro (47.36%) than DMF/EG vitrification (31.58%), and conventional freezing (25.00%). In conclusion, caprine embryos produced in vivo are better cryopreserved after vitrification than conventional freezing, therefore we conclude that DMSO/EG vitrification is the most effective protocol for cryopreservation.

  5. Cross-linking of bovine and caprine caseins by microbial transglutaminase and their use as microencapsulating agents for n-3 fatty acids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine and caprine caseins were cross-linked with microbial transglutaminase (mTG). The mTG-cross-linked bovine or caprine casein dispersion, mixed with 14.5% maltodextrin (DE = 40), was used to prepare emulsions with 10.5% algae oil. Oxidative stability of emulsions was evaluated by peroxide valu...

  6. Encephalization of Australian and New Guinean marsupials.

    PubMed

    Ashwell, K W S

    2008-01-01

    Encephalization of Australian marsupials was analyzed using the endocranial volume (ECV) of 52 species of Dasyuromorphia and Notoryctemorphia, 14 species of Peramelemorphia and 116 species of Diprotodontia from Australia and New Guinea and compared with 16 species of Ameridelphian marsupials and 3 species of native and recently introduced Australian eutherian carnivores (dingo, feral cat and feral fox). Linear regression analysis of the relationship between ECV and body weight for marsupials revealed that allometric parameters for these groups are different from those previously derived for samples of (mainly eutherian) mammals, with higher slopes for Dasyuromorphia and Diprotodontia and lower slopes for Ameridelphians and Peramelemorphia. Absolute ECV for small Australian and New Guinea marsupial carnivores (Antechinus and Sminthopsis) were found to be comparable to eutherians of similar body weight, but large marsupial carnivores such as the Tasmanian devil and thylacine had substantially smaller ECVs than eutherian carnivores of similar body weight. Similarly, members of some superfamilies within Diprotodontia (Burramyoidea, Petauroidea, Tarsipedoidea) had ECVs comparable to prosimians, whereas bandicoots, bilbies and many macropods were found to be poorly encephalized. When both encephalization quotient (EQ) and residuals from regression analysis were used to compare relative ECV of extinct/threatened species with common species there were no significant differences for any of the orders of Australian marsupials, suggesting that encephalization is not a major factor in the current extinction crisis for Australian marsupials. Similarly there were no consistent differences in relative ECV between marsupials from New Guinea and associated islands compared to Australia or between arid and non-arid Australian regions for any of the marsupial orders. The results indicate that marsupials are not uniformly poorly encephalized and that small marsupial carnivores and

  7. PSYCHOTIC DISORDERS GENERATED BY AUTOIMMUNE ENCEPHALITIS (CLINICAL CASE).

    PubMed

    Craciun, Georgiana; Cucoş, Liliana; Ungureanu, Elena; Pendefunda, L; Petrariu, F D; Nechita, Petronela

    2015-01-01

    Encephalitis is a brain inflammation, which could involve also the meninges. The etiology of encephalitis could be: viral, bacterial, fungal or autoimmune. Anti-NMDAR encephalitis is an immune disorder, easy to diagnose and is a treatable condition. Most patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis develop a multistage illness that progresses from psychosis, memory deficits, seizures, to catatonic state and breathing instability. We present a case report of a 20-year old woman, who presented: amnesia, visual hallucination, illusions, seizures after that occurred following autoimmune encephalitis. The exact incidence of anti-NMDAR encephalitis is unknown, but it seems to be more frequent than any other known paraneoplastic encephalitis. The present case is important considering that autoimmune encephalitis is a rare frequency disorder in Romania, with patients presenting resounding psychiatric and neurological manifestations.

  8. Menstrual arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    McDonagh, J E; Singh, M M; Griffiths, I D

    1993-01-01

    The menstrual cycle is characterised by variations in the absolute and relative concentrations of the hormones of the hypothalamic pituitary ovarian axis, which in turn affect cell function and cytokine and heat shock protein production. Menstruation involves the shedding of the secretory endometrium, which is part of the mucosal associated lymphoid tissue and hence is rich in immunologically competent cells such as CD8 T cells and macrophages. The case is reported here of a patient presenting with a recurrent but transient symmetrical inflammatory polyarthritis which only occurred at menstruation with no residual damage. The disease was suppressed by danazol. Endometrial degradation products are suggested as the trigger of this 'menstrual arthritis'. PMID:8427519

  9. Susceptibility of Peruvian Mosquitoes to Eastern Equine Encephalitis virus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-01

    VECTOR/PATHOGEN/HOST INTERACTION, TRANSMISSION Susceptibility of Peruvian Mosquitoes to Eastern Equine Encephalitis Virus M. J. TURELL,1 M. L...the Amazon Basin, near Iquitos, Peru, and used in experimental studies to evaluate their susceptibility to strains of eastern equine encephalitis virus...enzootic vector of EEEV in this region. KEY WORDS Peru, eastern equine encephalitis virus, transmission, mosquito Eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV

  10. Encephalitis and GABAB receptor antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Höftberger, Romana; Titulaer, Maarten J.; Sabater, Lidia; Dome, Balazs; Rózsás, Anita; Hegedus, Balazs; Hoda, Mir Alireza; Laszlo, Viktoria; Ankersmit, Hendrik Jan; Harms, Lutz; Boyero, Sabas; de Felipe, Alicia; Saiz, Albert; Dalmau, Josep

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To report the clinical features of 20 newly diagnosed patients with GABAB receptor (GABABR) antibodies and determine the frequency of associated tumors and concurrent neuronal autoantibodies. Methods: Clinical data were retrospectively obtained and evaluated. Serum and CSF samples were examined for additional antibodies using methods previously reported. Results: Seventeen patients presented with seizures, memory loss, and confusion, compatible with limbic encephalitis (LE), one patient presented with ataxia, one patient presented with status epilepticus, and one patient presented with opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome (OMS). Nineteen (95%) patients eventually developed LE during the course of the disease. Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) was identified in 10 (50%) patients, all with LE. Treatment and outcome was available from 19 patients: 15 showed complete (n = 7) or partial (n = 8) neurologic improvement after steroids, IV immunoglobulins, or plasma exchange and oncologic treatment when indicated; 1 patient died of tumor progression shortly after the first cycle of immunotherapy, and 3 were not treated. Five patients with SCLC had additional onconeuronal antibodies (Ri, amphiphysin, or SOX1), and 2 without tumor had GAD65 and NMDAR antibodies, respectively. GABABR antibodies were not detected in serum of 116 patients with SCLC without neurologic symptoms. Conclusion: Our study confirms GABABR as an autoantigen of paraneoplastic and nonparaneoplastic LE and expands the phenotype of GABABR antibodies to ataxia, OMS, and status epilepticus. The long-term prognosis is dictated by the presence of a tumor. Recognition of syndromes associated with GABABR antibodies is important because they usually respond to treatment. PMID:24068784

  11. Comparison of proteins specified by Murray Valley encephalitis, West Nile, Japanese encephalitis and St. Louis encephalitis viruses.

    PubMed

    Wright, P J; Warr, H M

    1986-10-01

    The relationships among proteins specified by Murray Valley encephalitis (MVE), West Nile (WN), Japanese encephalitis (JE) and St. Louis encephalitis (SLE) viruses were examined by peptide mapping. [3H]methionine-labelled tryptic peptides of viral proteins were separated by reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and the separation profiles for a given protein specified by the different viruses were compared. Analyses of the non-structural protein NV5 (P98 or NS5) suggested that WN and SLE were the most closely related pair of viruses, and that JE was the virus most distant from the other three. Analyses of the structural proteins C and E failed to show the close relationship between WN and SLE indicated by the NV5 results, but did suggest that NV5 was the most conserved and E the least conserved of the three proteins.

  12. The Diagnosis and Treatment of Autoimmune Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune encephalitis causes subacute deficits of memory and cognition, often followed by suppressed level of consciousness or coma. A careful history and examination may show early clues to particular autoimmune causes, such as neuromyotonia, hyperekplexia, psychosis, dystonia, or the presence of particular tumors. Ancillary testing with MRI and EEG may be helpful for excluding other causes, managing seizures, and, rarely, for identifying characteristic findings. Appropriate autoantibody testing can confirm specific diagnoses, although this is often done in parallel with exclusion of infectious and other causes. Autoimmune encephalitis may be divided into several groups of diseases: those with pathogenic antibodies to cell surface proteins, those with antibodies to intracellular synaptic proteins, T-cell diseases associated with antibodies to intracellular antigens, and those associated with other autoimmune disorders. Many forms of autoimmune encephalitis are paraneoplastic, and each of these conveys a distinct risk profile for various tumors. Tumor screening and, if necessary, treatment is essential to proper management. Most forms of autoimmune encephalitis respond to immune therapies, although powerful immune suppression for weeks or months may be needed in difficult cases. Autoimmune encephalitis may relapse, so follow-up care is important. PMID:26754777

  13. Dietary quality and encephalization in platyrrhine primates

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Kari L.; Kay, Richard F.

    2012-01-01

    The high energetic costs of building and maintaining large brains are thought to constrain encephalization. The ‘expensive-tissue hypothesis’ (ETH) proposes that primates (especially humans) overcame this constraint through reduction of another metabolically expensive tissue, the gastrointestinal tract. Small guts characterize animals specializing on easily digestible diets. Thus, the hypothesis may be tested via the relationship between brain size and diet quality. Platyrrhine primates present an interesting test case, as they are more variably encephalized than other extant primate clades (excluding Hominoidea). We find a high degree of phylogenetic signal in the data for diet quality, endocranial volume and body size. Controlling for phylogenetic effects, we find no significant correlation between relative diet quality and relative endocranial volume. Thus, diet quality fails to account for differences in platyrrhine encephalization. One taxon, in particular, Brachyteles, violates predictions made by ETH in having a large brain and low-quality diet. Dietary reconstructions of stem platyrrhines further indicate that a relatively high-quality diet was probably in place prior to increases in encephalization. Therefore, it is unlikely that a shift in diet quality was a primary constraint release for encephalization in platyrrhines and, by extrapolation, humans. PMID:21831898

  14. Rheumatoid arthritis (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease in which the body's immune system attacks itself. The pattern of joints ... other joints and is worse in the morning. Rheumatoid arthritis is also a systemic disease, involving other body ...

  15. Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... joints. This form of JIA may turn into rheumatoid arthritis. It may involve five or more large and ... no known prevention for JIA. Alternative Names Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA); Juvenile chronic polyarthritis; Still disease; Juvenile spondyloarthritis ...

  16. Arthritis in America

    MedlinePlus

    ... Arthritis makes it harder to manage heart disease, diabetes or obesity. About half of adults with heart disease (49%) ... adults with arthritis who also have heart disease, diabetes or obesity, have some limitation of their normal activities because ...

  17. A Practical Approach to Meningitis and Encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Richie, Megan B; Josephson, S Andrew

    2015-12-01

    Meningitis is an inflammatory syndrome involving the meninges that classically manifests with headache and nuchal rigidity and is diagnosed by cerebrospinal fluid examination. In contrast, encephalitis refers to inflammation of the brain parenchyma itself and often results in focal neurologic deficits or seizures. In this article, the authors review the differential diagnosis of meningitis and encephalitis, with an emphasis on infectious etiologies. The recommended practical clinical approach focuses on early high-yield diagnostic testing and empiric antimicrobial administration, given the high morbidity associated with these diseases and the time-sensitive nature of treatment initiation. If the initial workup does not yield a diagnosis, further etiology-specific testing based upon risk factors and clinical characteristics should be pursued. Effective treatment is available for many causes of meningitis and encephalitis, and when possible should address both the primary disease process as well as potential complications.

  18. Tick-borne encephalitis in the USSR*

    PubMed Central

    Graščenkov, N. I.

    1964-01-01

    The author gives the history of the study of tick-borne encephalitis in the USSR, following it up with a description of the etiological and epidemiological aspects and of the pathology, symptomology, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of the disease. He stresses that other ticks as well as the main vectors of the virus, Ixodes, transmit the disease, in particular Dermacentor and Haemaphysalis. A detailed account of tick-borne encephalitis in the USSR may be of value in the study of the rather similar forms of the disease now being encountered more and more frequently in countries of South-East Asia as well as of northern and eastern Europe. PMID:14153408

  19. Tick-borne encephalitis in children.

    PubMed

    Rostasy, Kevin

    2012-06-01

    This review is a summary of the most important clinical findings and implications of tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) in children. It is based on a Pubmed search with the terms "tick-borne encephalitis", "children", "infection", "meningitis", "meningoencephalitis", and "outcome". TBE in children shares several features with their adult counterpart but has overall a better prognosis. Nevertheless, TBE is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality in a small group of children and seems to cause cognitive dysfunctions, which needs to be studied in further detail.

  20. Hemiplegia: an initial manifestation of Japanese encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Nalini, A; Arunodaya, G R; Taly, A B; Swamy, H S; Vasudev, M K

    2003-09-01

    A 7-year-old boy from an area endemic to Japanese encephalitis (JE) manifested with acute febrile illness, left hemiplegia and preserved consciousness during the prodromal phase of illness. The child developed features of encephalitis 48 hours after the onset of hemiplegia. IgM MAC ELISA for JE virus revealed high titers in the serum and cerebrospinal fluid suggestive of JE. MRI of the brain showed asymmetrical bilateral thalamic hyperintense lesions on T2 weighted image, considered diagnostic of JE. Hemiplegia during the prodromal phase or as an initial symptom of JE is rather unusual.

  1. Herpes simplex encephalitis: some interesting presentations.

    PubMed

    Jha, S; Jose, M; Kumar, V

    2003-09-01

    Herpes Simplex Encephalitis (HSE) is the most common cause of fatal viral encephalitis. A high index of suspicion is mandatory for early diagnosis and successful therapy to restrict morbidity and mortality. We report 4 patients of HSE, with interesting presentations, viz. brainstem involvement in an immunosuppressed patient, Kluver-Bucy Syndrome-a consequence of untreated HSE, HSE in the postpartum period mistaken as cortical venous thrombosis, and response to inadequate treatment. They demonstrate the wide spectrum of clinical features, pitfalls in diagnosis, and a variable response to therapy in HSE.

  2. Different digestion of caprine whey proteins by human and porcine gastrointestinal enzymes.

    PubMed

    Eriksen, Ellen K; Holm, Halvor; Jensen, Einar; Aaboe, Ragnhild; Devold, Tove G; Jacobsen, Morten; Vegarud, Gerd E

    2010-08-01

    The objective of the present study was twofold: first to compare the degradation patterns of caprine whey proteins digested with either human digestive juices (gastric or duodenal) or commercial porcine enzymes (pepsin or pancreatic enzymes) and second to observe the effect of gastric pH on digestion. An in vitro two-step assay was performed at 37 degrees C to simulate digestion in the stomach (pH 2, 4 or 6) and the duodenum (pH 8). The whey proteins were degraded more efficiently by porcine pepsin than by human gastric juice at all pH values. Irrespective of the enzyme source, gastric digestion at pH 2 followed by duodenal digestion resulted in the most efficient degradation. Lactoferrin, serum albumin and the Ig heavy chains were highly degraded with less than 6 % remaining after digestion. About 15, 56 and 50 % Ig light chains, beta-lactoglobulin (beta-LG) and alpha-lactalbumin remained intact, respectively, when digested with porcine enzymes compared with 25, 74 and 81 % with human digestive juices. For comparison, purified bovine beta-LG was digested and the peptide profiles obtained were compared with those of the caprine beta-LG in the digested whey. The bovine beta-LG seemed to be more extensively cleaved than the caprine beta-LG in the whey. Commercial enzymes appear to digest whey proteins more efficiently compared with human digestive juices when used at similar enzyme activities. This could lead to conflicting results when comparing human in vivo protein digestion with digestion using purified enzymes of non-human species. Consequently the use of human digestive juices might be preferred.

  3. Gonococcal and nongonococcal arthritis.

    PubMed

    García-De La Torre, Ignacio; Nava-Zavala, Arnulfo

    2009-02-01

    Acute bacterial arthritis usually is caused by gonococcal or nongonococcal infection of the joints. Nongonococcal and gonococcal arthritis are the most potentially dangerous and destructive forms of acute arthritis. These bacterial infections of the joints are usually curable with treatment, but morbidity and mortality are still significant in patients who have underlying rheumatoid arthritis, patients who have prosthetic joints, elderly patients, and patients who have severe and multiple comorbidities. This article reviews the risk factors, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of nongonococcal and gonococcal arthritis.

  4. In vitro modulation of caprine monocyte immune functions by ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Lecchi, Cristina; Invernizzi, Guido; Agazzi, Alessandro; Ferroni, Mariella; Pisani, Laura Francesca; Savoini, Giovanni; Ceciliani, Fabrizio

    2011-09-01

    The in vitro effects of the ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) eicosapentanoic acid (EPA) and docosahexanoic acid (DHA) on phagocytosis and the extracellular respiratory burst in caprine monocytes were assessed. Blood monocytes incubated with increasing concentrations of EPA or DHA (25-200 μM) demonstrated increased phagocytosis compared to unexposed monocytes. Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was not markedly affected in the presence of EPA and DHA, except at 200 μM, at which concentrations monocyte viability was also reduced.

  5. [Gonococcus-associated arthritis].

    PubMed

    Bodmer, K

    1989-04-01

    The various forms of arthritis associated with a gonococcus infection are pathogenetically and clinically differentiated. Whereas an infectious systemic process with different clinical symptoms is said to be underlying the arthritis-dermatitis syndrome as well as the septic GO-arthritis, the third form is para-infectious reactive arthritis. It is often difficult to diagnose an infectious GO-arthritis, as direct evidence of the virus found in joint and blood is rarely positive, so that the diagnosis can be affirmed or negated on the basis of clinical facts of the reaction of arthritis after an appropriate antibiotic therapy. Differential diagnostic considerations may help to find the correct diagnosis in view of an acute urethritis arthritis.

  6. Novel variant of tickborne encephalitis virus, Russia.

    PubMed

    Ternovoi, Vladimir A; Protopopova, Elena V; Chausov, Eugene V; Novikov, Dmitry V; Leonova, Galina N; Netesov, Sergey V; Loktev, Valery B

    2007-10-01

    We isolated a novel strain of tickborne encephalitis virus (TBEV), Glubinnoe/2004, from a patient with a fatal case in Russia. We sequenced the strain, whose landmark features included 57 amino acid substitutions and 5 modified cleavage sites. Phylogenetically, Glubinnoe/2004 is a novel variant that belongs to the Eastern type of TBEV.

  7. Anorexia nervosa with herpes simplex encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    George, G. C. W.

    1981-01-01

    Studies of patients suffering from anorexia nervosa appear to show an increased immunity to certain infections, as well as immunological deficiencies. This is the report of a patient with anorexia nervosa who developed herpes simplex encephalitis, a condition associated with lowered immunological defence mechanisms. PMID:7301681

  8. Migrating Birds and Tickborne Encephalitis Virus

    PubMed Central

    Lundkvist, Åke; Falk, Kerstin I.; Garpmo, Ulf; Bergström, Sven; Lindegren, Gunnel; Sjöstedt, Anders; Mejlon, Hans; Fransson, Thord; Haemig, Paul D.; Olsen, Björn

    2007-01-01

    During spring and autumn 2001, we screened 13,260 migrating birds at Ottenby Bird Observatory, Sweden, and found 3.4% were infested with ticks. Four birds, each a different passerine species, carried tickborne encephalitis virus (TBEV)–infected ticks (Ixodes ricinus). Migrating birds may play a role in the geographic dispersal of TBEV-infected ticks. PMID:17953095

  9. Paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis: clinico-pathological correlations.

    PubMed Central

    Bakheit, A M; Kennedy, P G; Behan, P O

    1990-01-01

    Three new cases of limbic encephalitis in association with malignancy are reported. The literature on this condition is reviewed and the clinical, laboratory and histopathological features of cases proven at necropsy are correlated. The possible pathogenic mechanism of this disorder is discussed. PMID:1963440

  10. Can Herpes Simplex Virus Encephalitis Cause Aphasia?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naude, H.; Pretorius, E.

    2003-01-01

    Aphasia implies the loss or impairment of language caused by brain damage. The key to understanding the nature of aphasic symptoms is the neuro-anatomical site of brain damage, and not the causative agent. However, because "Herpes simplex" virus (HSV) encephalitis infection usually affects the frontal and temporal lobes, subcortical…

  11. Butter making from caprine creams: effect of washing treatment on phospholipids and milk fat globule membrane proteins distribution.

    PubMed

    Lamothe, Sophie; Robitaille, Gilles; St-Gelais, Daniel; Britten, Michel

    2008-11-01

    A washing treatment was applied to caprine cream before churning in order to improve phospholipids and MFGM protein purification from buttermilk and butter serum. Cream obtained from a first separation was diluted with water and separated a second time using pilot plant equipment. Regular and washed creams were churned to produce buttermilk and butter, from which butter serum was extracted. The washing treatment allowed a significant decrease of the casein content. As a result, the phospholipids-to-protein ratios in washed buttermilk and butter serum were markedly increased by 2.1 and 1.7-folds respectively, which represents an advantage for the production of phospholipids concentrates. However, when compared with bovine cream, lower phospholipids-to-protein ratios were observed when the washing treatment was applied to caprine cream. A higher concentration of MFGM protein and a lower retention of phospholipids during washing treatment are responsible for the lower phospholipids-to-protein ratios in buttermilk and butter serum obtained from caprine cream. The phospholipids distribution in the butter making process was similar to the one obtained from bovine regular and washed cream. Phospholipids were preferentially concentrated in the butter serum rather than the buttermilk fraction. This simple approach permitted the production of caprine and bovine butter sera extracts containing up to 180 and 240 g phospholipids/kg sera, respectively, on a dry basis.

  12. The Fetal Cleft palate: V. Elucidation of the Mechanism of Palatal Clefting in the Congenital Caprine Model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maternal ingestion of Nicotiana glauca from gestation days 32 through 41 results in a high incidence of cleft palate in Spanish goats. This caprine cleft palate model was used to evaluate the temporal sequence of palatal shelf fusion throughout the period of cleft induction with the poisonous plant...

  13. Dynamic Patterns of Systemic Innate Immunity and Inflammatory Associated Factors in Experimental Caprine Coccidiosis

    PubMed Central

    Tadayon, Shabnam; Razavi, Seyed Mostafa; Nazifi, Saeed

    2016-01-01

    The present study was designed to assess the dynamic patterns of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-4, IL-6, acute phase protein (α1-acid-glycoprotein, AGP), and an inflammation associated factor (adenosine deaminase; ADA) following experimental caprine coccidiosis. Ten kids aging from 2 to 4 months were infected orally with 5×104 sporulated oocysts and 10 animals served as controls. Blood samples were collected in both groups before infection and at days 3, 7, 14, 21, 28, and 35 post-infection (PI), and the levels of above-mentioned factors were measured. IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-4, IL-6, AGP, and ADA activities were significantly higher in infected animals from day 7 PI (P<0.05). In conclusion, the circulatory levels of most systemic inflammatory markers, including pro-inflammatory cytokines (IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-4, IL-6), AGP, and ADA increased significantly starting from day 3 to day 7 PI in caprine coccidiosis. PMID:28095656

  14. Measurement of caprine plasma beta-mannosidase with a p-nitrophenyl substrate.

    PubMed

    Cavanagh, K; Dunstan, R W; Jones, M Z

    1983-04-01

    Experimental conditions for measuring caprine plasma beta-D-mannosidase activity are described with p-nitrophenyl-beta-D-mannopyranoside as a substrate. The plasma enzyme was stable for 3 months at -20 C or 1 week at 4 C. The optimal pH for activity was 5.0 in citrate-phosphate or acetate buffer. Enzyme activity was linear with time up to 24 hours at 37 C, but incubation of plasma at 56 C for 5 minutes resulted in loss of all activity. The apparent Michaelis-Menten constant (Km) for the plasma enzyme was 10.0 mM. Plasma beta-mannosidase from clinically normal and beta-mannosidosis carrier goats did not differ with respect to pH optimum, heat stability, or Km. The coefficient of variation for the assay, determined by assaying a plasma pool over a 3-month period, was 10.7% (mean: 115 nmole of p-nitrophenol formed/hour/ml of plasma). The assay described can be used to evaluate plasma beta-mannosidase measurements as a test for detecting carriers of caprine beta-mannosidosis, a newly described lysosomal storage disease.

  15. Genetics Home Reference: rheumatoid arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions rheumatoid arthritis rheumatoid arthritis Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Rheumatoid arthritis is a disease that causes chronic abnormal inflammation, ...

  16. Arthritis of the hand - Rheumatoid

    MedlinePlus

    ... Guide Journal of Hand Surgery (JHS) Home Anatomy Rheumatoid Arthritis Email to a friend * required fields From * To * ... tendons causes pressure on the nearby nerve. How Rheumatoid Arthritis is Diagnosed The diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis is ...

  17. Infectious arthritis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Mateo Soria, L; Miquel Nolla Solé, J; Rozadilla Sacanell, A; Valverde García, J; Roig Escofet, D

    1992-01-01

    Eleven cases of infectious arthritis occurring in patients with rheumatoid arthritis are reported. Staphylococcus aureus was the causative organism in eight patients. Streptococcus anginosus and Streptococcus agalactiae in one patient each, and Mycobacterium tuberculosis in two patients. The mean duration of symptoms before diagnosis was 16 days in patients with pyogenic arthritis. The diagnosis of joint infection caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis was especially delayed (57 days). Four patients died; they were found to have a longer time to diagnosis and two of them had multiple joint infection. Although Staphylococcus aureus is the microorganism most often affecting patients with rheumatoid arthritis, infection caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis must also be considered in such patients. PMID:1575593

  18. How undifferentiated arthritis evolves into chronic arthritis.

    PubMed

    van der Woude, D; Toes, R E M; Scherer, H U

    2014-08-01

    Undifferentiated arthritis (UA) is a frequently occurring clinical presentation with a variable outcome. While some forms of UA will spontaneously remit, other forms will progress to chronic arthritis; an outcome that would preferably be prevented. Which immunological factors are normally at the basis of resolution of inflammation, and what, on the other hand, causes inflammation to persist? This review provides an overview of the immunological mechanisms involved in these two scenarios, including specific examples of how these mechanisms apply, or can be influenced in rheumatic diseases. Furthermore, what do we know about risk factors for chronic arthritis, such as the development of autoantibodies? The recent years have provided many insights concerning risk factors for autoantibody-positive versus autoantibody-negative rheumatoid arthritis, which are discussed along with a possible pathophysiological model incorporating autoantibodies into the larger process of disease development. Finally, the evolution of the autoantibody response over time is described.

  19. Infections and arthritis.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Ashish Jacob; Ravindran, Vinod

    2014-12-01

    Bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites can all cause arthritis of either acute or chronic nature, which can be divided into infective/septic, reactive, or inflammatory. Considerable advances have occurred in diagnostic techniques in the recent decades resulting in better treatment outcomes in patients with infective arthritis. Detection of emerging arthritogenic viruses has changed the epidemiology of infection-related arthritis. The role of viruses in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory arthritides such as rheumatoid arthritis is increasingly being recognized. We discuss the various causative agents of infective arthritis and emphasize on the approach to each type of arthritis, highlighting the diagnostic tests, along with their statistical accuracy. Various investigations including newer methods such as nucleic acid amplification using polymerase chain reaction are discussed along with the pitfalls in interpreting the tests.

  20. When is arthritis reactive?

    PubMed Central

    Hamdulay, S S; Glynne, S J; Keat, A

    2006-01-01

    Reactive arthritis is an important cause of lower limb oligoarthritis, mainly in young adults. It is one of the spondyloarthropathy family; it is distinguishable from other forms of inflammatory arthritis by virtue of the distribution of affected sites and the high prevalence of characteristic extra‐articular lesions. Many terms have been used to refer to this and related forms of arthritis leading to some confusion. Reactive arthritis is precipitated by an infection at a distant site and genetic susceptibility is marked by possession of the HLA‐B27 gene, although the mechanism remains uncertain. Diagnosis is a two stage process and requires demonstration of a temporal link with a recognised “trigger” infection. The identification and management of “sexually acquired” and “enteric” forms of reactive arthritis are considered. Putative links with HIV infection are also discussed. The clinical features, approach to investigation, diagnosis, and management of reactive arthritis are reviewed. PMID:16822921

  1. Mumps encephalitis with akinesia and mutism.

    PubMed

    Suga, Kenichi; Goji, Aya; Shono, Miki; Matsuura, Sato; Inoue, Miki; Toda, Eiko; Miyazaki, Tatsushi; Kawahito, Masami; Mori, Kazuhiro

    2015-08-01

    Measles-rubella-mumps vaccination is routine in many countries, but the mumps vaccine remains voluntary and is not covered by insurance in Japan. A 5-year-old Japanese boy who had not received the mumps vaccine was affected by mumps parotitis. Several days later, he presented with various neurological abnormalities, including akinesia, mutism, dysphagia, and uncontrolled respiratory disorder. Mumps encephalitis was diagnosed. Despite steroid pulse and immunoglobulin treatment, the disease progressed. Magnetic resonance imaging showed necrotic changes in bilateral basal ganglia, midbrain, and hypothalamus. At 1 year follow up, he was bedridden and required enteral feeding through a gastric fistula and tracheostomy. Mumps vaccination should be made routine as soon as possible in Japan, because mumps encephalitis carries the risk of severe sequelae.

  2. Sarcocystis neurona encephalitis in a dog.

    PubMed

    Cooley, A J; Barr, B; Rejmanek, D

    2007-11-01

    A 1.5-year-old male Feist dog was presented to a veterinarian for reluctance to stand on the hind legs. Treatment included dexamethasone and resulted in a favorable initial response, but posterior paresis returned and progressed to recumbency, hyperesthesia, and attempts to bite the owner. The dog was euthanized. The brain was negative for rabies by fluorescent antibody analysis. Multiple foci of encephalitis were found in the cerebrum and particularly in the cerebellum. Protozoa morphologically consistent with Sarcocystis sp. were identified at sites of intense inflammation and malacia. Additionally, multiple schizonts were identified in areas without inflammation. Immunohistochemistry using both polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies specific for Sarcocystis neurona was strongly positive. No reaction to polyclonal antisera for Toxoplasma gondii or Neospora caninum was found. Polymerase chain reaction confirmed that the protozoa were S. neurona. Additional aberrant hosts for S. neurona other than horses have been identified, but S. neurona encephalitis has not been documented previously in the dog.

  3. Acute encephalitis as initial presentation of primary HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Nzwalo, Hipólito; Añón, Rosário Pazos; Àguas, Maria João

    2012-07-03

    Acute encephalitis is a life-threatening condition. A wide variety of infectious agents are implicated and in many patients no cause is found. HIV acute seroconversion illness can rarely present as acute encephalitis. Although most experts agree in starting antiretroviral treatment in severe acute HIV infection, the evidence of the benefits are still lacking. The authors report a case of severe acute encephalitis as a primary presentation of HIV infection in which introduction of highly active antiretroviral treatment resulted in clinical recovery. This case highlights the need to consider HIV infection in the differential diagnosis of treatable viral encephalitis.

  4. Frequent rhabdomyolysis in anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jung-Ah; Lee, Soon-Tae; Kim, Tae-Joon; Moon, Jangsup; Sunwoo, Jun-Sang; Byun, Jung-Ick; Jung, Keun-Hwa; Jung, Ki-Young; Chu, Kon; Lee, Sang Kun

    2016-09-15

    The aim of this study was to analyze the clinical presentation and provocation factors of rhabdomyolysis in anti-NMDAR encephalitis. Among the 16 patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis in our institutional cohort, nine patients had elevated CK enzyme levels and clinical evidence of rhabdomyolysis. Rhabdomyolysis was more frequent after immunotherapy. The use of dopamine receptor blocker (DRB) increased the risk of rhabdomyolysis. None of the patients without rhabdomyolysis received DRBs. Rhabdomyolysis is a frequent complication in anti-NMDAR encephalitis and more common after immunotherapy and the use of DRBs increases the risk. Therefore, DRBs should be administered carefully in patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis.

  5. Multiple Paths to Encephalization and Technical Civilizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartzman, David; Middendorf, George

    2011-12-01

    We propose consideration of at least two possible evolutionary paths for the emergence of intelligent life with the potential for technical civilization. The first is the path via encephalization of homeothermic animals; the second is the path to swarm intelligence of so-called superorganisms, in particular the social insects. The path to each appears to be facilitated by environmental change: homeothermic animals by decreased climatic temperature and for swarm intelligence by increased oxygen levels.

  6. Sarcocystis calchasi encephalitis in a rock pigeon.

    PubMed

    Ushio, Nanako; Watanabe, Ken-ichi; Chambers, James K; Shibato, Tokuhiro; Nakayama, Hiroyuki; Uchida, Kazuyuki

    2015-11-01

    A rock pigeon (Columba livia) caught in Akihabara, Tokyo, showed neurological symptoms, such as head tilt and circling. Pathological examinations revealed abundant Sarcocystic cysts in the skeletal muscle and myocardium with mild myositis, and numerous schizonts and sarcocysts with severe multifocal granulomatous T-lymphocytic infiltration in the central nervous system. A Sarcocystis calchasi-specific gene was detected in the muscle and brain. This case indicates S. calchasi was distributed in Japan and caused severe encephalitis to rock pigeons.

  7. Autoimmune encephalitis in psychiatric institutions: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Bost, Chloe; Pascual, Olivier; Honnorat, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune encephalitis is a rare and newly described group of diseases involving autoantibodies directed against synaptic and neuronal cell surface antigens. It comprises a wide range of neuropsychiatric symptoms. Sensitive and specific diagnostic tests such as cell-based assay are primordial for the detection of neuronal cell surface antibodies in patients’ cerebrospinal fluid or serum and determine the treatment and follow-up of the patients. As neurological symptoms are fairly well described in the literature, this review focuses on the nature of psychiatric symptoms occurring at the onset or during the course of the diseases. In order to help the diagnosis, the main neurological symptoms of the most representative synaptic and neuronal cell surface autoantibodies were detailed. Finally, the exploration of these autoantibodies for almost a decade allowed us to present an overview of autoimmune encephalitis incidence in psychiatric disease and the general guidelines for the management of psychiatric manifestations. For the majority of autoimmune encephalitis, the prognosis depends on the rapidity of the detection, identification, and the management of the disease. Because the presence of pronounced psychiatric symptoms drives patients to psychiatric institutions and can hinder the diagnosis, the aim of this work is to provide clues to help earlier detection by physicians and thus provide better medical care to patients. PMID:27822050

  8. Living with Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... someone might fall or be injured in a car accident. Then, years after the individual’s knee has apparently healed, he might get arthritis in his knee joint. Rheumatoid arthritis happens when the body’s own defense system doesn’t work properly. It affects joints and bones (often of ...

  9. Fatal transmission of contagious caprine pleuropneumonia to an Arabian oryx (Oryx leucoryx).

    PubMed

    Chaber, A L; Lignereux, L; Al Qassimi, M; Saegerman, C; Manso-Silván, L; Dupuy, V; Thiaucourt, F

    2014-09-17

    Contagious caprine pleuropneumonia (CCPP) is an infectious respiratory disease mainly affecting domestic goats. As CCPP has never been documented in grazing antelopes (subfamily hippotraginae), they were not considered susceptible. Mycoplasma capricolum subspecies capripneumoniae (Mccp) was isolated from pleural liquid collected during the necropsy of a severely emaciated Arabian oryx with mild nasal discharge. The Mccp isolate was then genotyped using a multilocus sequence scheme; the sequence type was identical to the Mccp strain previously identified in a sand gazelle from a nearby enclosure. This case shows for the first time that members of the hippotraginae subfamily, here the Arabian oryx, can be affected by CCPP. In addition, genotyping shows that the oryx was most probably infected, at a distance, by sand gazelles.

  10. Evaluating the virulence of a Brucella melitensis hemagglutinin gene in the caprine model.

    PubMed

    Perry, Quinesha L; Hagius, Sue D; Walker, Joel V; Elzer, Philip H

    2010-10-01

    With the completion of the genomic sequence of Brucella melitensis 16M, a putative hemagglutinin gene was identified which is present in 16M and absent in Brucella abortus. The possibility of this hemagglutinin being a potential virulence factor was evaluated via gene replacement in B. melitensis yielding 16MΔE and expression in trans in B. abortus 2308-QAE. Utilizing the caprine brucellosis model, colonization and pathogenesis studies were performed to evaluate these strains. B. melitensis 16M hemagglutinin gene expression in trans in 2308-QAE revealed a significant (p≤0.05) increase in colonization and abortion rates when compared to B. abortus 2308, mimicking B. melitensis 16M virulence in pregnant goats. The B. melitensis disruption mutant's colonization and abortion rates demonstrated no attenuation in colonization but displayed a 28% reduction in abortions when compared to parental B. melitensis 16M.

  11. In vitro inhibition of caprine herpesvirus 1 by acyclovir and mizoribine.

    PubMed

    Elia, G; Camero, M; Decaro, N; Lovero, A; Martella, V; Tempesta, M; Buonavoglia, C; Crescenzo, G

    2015-04-01

    Caprine herpesvirus 1 (CpHV-1) infection in goats induces genital vesicular-ulcerative lesions that strictly resemble the lesions induced by herpesvirus 2 in the human host. The immunosuppressive drug Mizoribine (MIZ) was found to increase the antiviral activity of Acyclovir (ACV) against herpesvirus infections, raising interesting perspectives on new combined therapeutic strategies. In this study the anti-CpHV-1 activity in vitro of ACV alone or in combination with MIZ was characterized. When applied alone at non-toxic concentrations, ACV had a slight effect on CpHV-1 replication while in combination with MIZ a dose-dependent inhibition of the virus yield was observed with an IC50 of ACV of 28.5 µM. These findings suggest that combined therapy of ACV and MIZ is potentially exploitable in the treatment of genital infection by herpesviruses.

  12. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitory activity of peptides derived from caprine kefir.

    PubMed

    Quirós, A; Hernández-Ledesma, B; Ramos, M; Amigo, L; Recio, I

    2005-10-01

    In this study, a potent angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory activity was found in a commercial kefir made from caprine milk. The low molecular mass peptides released from caseins during fermentation were mainly responsible for this activity. Sixteen peptides were identified by HPLC-tandem mass spectrometry. Two of these peptides, with sequences PYVRYL and LVYPFTGPIPN, showed potent ACE-inhibitory properties. The impact of gastrointestinal digestion on ACE-inhibitory activity of kefir peptides was also evaluated. Some of these peptides were resistant to the incubation with pepsin followed by hydrolysis with Corolase PP. The ACE-inhibitory activity after simulated digestion was similar to or slightly lower than unhydrolyzed peptides, except for peptide beta-casein f(47-52) (DKIHPF), which exhibited an activity 8 times greater after hydrolysis.

  13. Enhancement of the antiviral activity against caprine herpesvirus type 1 of Acyclovir in association with Mizoribine.

    PubMed

    Camero, Michele; Buonavoglia, Domenico; Lucente, Maria Stella; Losurdo, Michele; Crescenzo, Giuseppe; Trerotoli, Paolo; Casalino, Elisabetta; Martella, Vito; Elia, Gabriella; Tempesta, Maria

    2017-02-16

    Caprine herpesvirus 1 (CpHV-1) infection in goats is responsible for genital lesions resembling the lesions induced by herpesvirus 2 in humans (HHV-2). The immunosuppressive drug Mizoribine (MIZ) is able to increase the antiviral activity of Acyclovir (ACV) against herpesvirus infections, raising interesting perspectives on new combined therapeutic strategies. In this study the anti-CpHV-1 activity in vitro of ACV alone or in combination with MIZ was evaluated. ACV (100μg/ml) displayed an antiviral effect on CpHV-1 replication. This inhibitory effect was higher when ACV (100μg/ml) was used in association with MIZ (20μg/ml). Other combinations of ACV and MIZ in various concentrations were not as effective as ACV 100μg/ml/MIZ 20μg/ml. These findings suggest that the association of ACV and MIZ is potentially useful for treatment of genital infection by herpesviruses.

  14. In Vitro Fermentation of caprine milk oligosaccharides by bifidobacteria isolated from breast-fed infants

    PubMed Central

    Thum, Caroline; Roy, Nicole C; McNabb, Warren C; Otter, Don E; Cookson, Adrian L

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the catabolism and fermentation of caprine milk oligosaccharides (CMO) by selected bifidobacteria isolated from 4 breast-fed infants. Seventeen bifidobacterial isolates consisting of 3 different species (Bifidobacterium breve, Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum and Bifidobacterium bifidum) were investigated. A CMO-enriched fraction (CMOF) (50% oligosaccharides, 10% galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS), 20% lactose, 10% glucose and 10% galactose) from caprine cheese whey was added to a growth medium as a sole source of fermentable carbohydrate. The inclusion of the CMOF was associated with increased bifidobacterial growth for all strains compared to glucose, lactose, GOS, inulin, oligofructose, 3'-sialyl-lactose and 6'-sialyl-lactose. Only one B. bifidum strain (AGR2166) was able to utilize the sialyl-CMO, 3'-sialyl-lactose and 6'-sialyl-lactose, as carbohydrate sources. The inclusion of CMOF increased the production of acetic and lactic acid (P < 0.001) after 36 h of anaerobic fermentation at 37°C, when compared to other fermentable substrates. Two B. bifidum strains (AGR2166 and AGR2168) utilised CMO, contained in the CMOF, to a greater extent than B. breve or B. longum subsp longum isolates, and this increased CMO utilization was associated with enhanced sialidase activity. CMOF stimulated bifidobacterial growth when compared to other tested fermentable carbohydrates and also increased the consumption of mono- and disaccharides, such as galactose and lactose present in the CMOF. These findings indicate that the dietary consumption of CMO may stimulate the growth and metabolism of intestinal Bifidobacteria spp. including B. bifidum typically found in the large intestine of breast-fed infants. PMID:26587678

  15. Molecular dating of caprines using ancient DNA sequences of Myotragus balearicus, an extinct endemic Balearic mammal

    PubMed Central

    Lalueza-Fox, Carles; Castresana, Jose; Sampietro, Lourdes; Marquès-Bonet, Tomàs; Alcover, Josep Antoni; Bertranpetit, Jaume

    2005-01-01

    Background Myotragus balearicus was an endemic bovid from the Balearic Islands (Western Mediterranean) that became extinct around 6,000-4,000 years ago. The Myotragus evolutionary lineage became isolated in the islands most probably at the end of the Messinian crisis, when the desiccation of the Mediterranean ended, in a geological date established at 5.35 Mya. Thus, the sequences of Myotragus could be very valuable for calibrating the mammalian mitochondrial DNA clock and, in particular, the tree of the Caprinae subfamily, to which Myotragus belongs. Results We have retrieved the complete mitochondrial cytochrome b gene (1,143 base pairs), plus fragments of the mitochondrial 12S gene and the nuclear 28S rDNA multi-copy gene from a well preserved Myotragus subfossil bone. The best resolved phylogenetic trees, obtained with the cytochrome b gene, placed Myotragus in a position basal to the Ovis group. Using the calibration provided by the isolation of Balearic Islands, we calculated that the initial radiation of caprines can be dated at 6.2 ± 0.4 Mya. In addition, alpine and southern chamois, considered until recently the same species, split around 1.6 ± 0.3 Mya, indicating that the two chamois species have been separated much longer than previously thought. Conclusion Since there are almost no extant endemic mammals in Mediterranean islands, the sequence of the extinct Balearic endemic Myotragus has been crucial for allowing us to use the Messinian crisis calibration point for dating the caprines phylogenetic tree. PMID:16332256

  16. Detection of Helicobacter pylori in bovine, buffalo, camel, ovine, and caprine milk in Iran.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Ebrahim; Kheirabadi, Elahe Kazemi

    2012-05-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection in humans is one of the most common infections worldwide. However, the origin and transmission of this bacterium has not been clearly explained. One of the suggested theories is transmission via raw milk from animals to human beings. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence rate of H. pylori in bulk milk samples from dairy bovine, buffalo, camel, ovine, and caprine herds in Iran. In the present study, 447 bulk milk samples from 230 dairy bovine, buffalo, camel, ovine, and caprine herds were collected in four provinces and tested for H. pylori by cultural method and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the detection of the ureC (glmM) gene. The animals whose milk samples collected for this study were clinically healthy. Using the cultural method, three of 447 milk samples (0.67%), including two sheep (2.2%) and one buffalo (1.6%) milk samples, were found to be contaminated with H. pylori. H. pylori ureC gene was detected in 56 (12.5%) of milk samples, including 19 cow (14.1%), 11 sheep (12.2%), nine goat (8.7%), two camel (3.6%), and 15 buffalo (23.4%) milk samples. Using PCR method, there were significant differences (p<0.05) in the level of contamination with H. pylori between milk samples collected from different species. The present study is the first report of the isolation of H. pylori from raw sheep and buffalo milk in Iran and the first demonstration of H. pylori DNA in camel and buffalo milk.

  17. Occurrence of Neospora caninum and Toxoplasma gondii infections in ovine and caprine abortions.

    PubMed

    Moreno, B; Collantes-Fernández, E; Villa, A; Navarro, A; Regidor-Cerrillo, J; Ortega-Mora, L M

    2012-06-08

    Neospora caninum and Toxoplasma gondii are closely related cyst-forming apicomplexan parasites identified as important causes of reproductive failure in cattle and small ruminants, respectively. Protozoan abortion in small ruminants is traditionally associated with T. gondii, but the importance of N. caninum remains uncertain. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of N. caninum and T. gondii infections in abortion cases in small ruminants submitted for diagnosis. For this purpose, 74 ovine and 26 caprine aborted foetuses were recovered from different areas in Spain. Foetal histopathology was used to detect the presence of protozoal-associated lesions in brain. The presence of N. caninum and T. gondii was confirmed by PCR. Protozoal infection was detected in 17 out of 100 (17%) foetuses examined by at least one of the diagnostic techniques used. Lesions suggestive of protozoal infection were observed in 10.8% (8/74) and 15.4% (4/26) of the ovine and caprine abortions respectively. N. caninum and T. gondii infection was detected by PCR in 6.8% (5/74) and 5.4% (4/74) of sheep foetuses, respectively, of which five showed protozoal-associated lesions. N. caninum DNA was detected in 11.5% (3/26) of goat foetuses, of which two showed protozoal-associated lesions, whereas T. gondii DNA was detected in one goat foetus with no lesions. The simultaneous presence of N. caninum and T. gondii DNA was detected in one sheep foetus with severe lesions. This study demonstrates that N. caninum plays a significant role in abortion in small ruminants in the studied population. In addition, our results highlight the importance of differentiating between protozoa whenever characteristic lesions are observed.

  18. Encephalitis-Associated Human Metapneumovirus Pneumonia in Adult, Australia.

    PubMed

    Fok, Anthony; Mateevici, Cristina; Lin, Belinda; Chandra, Ronil V; Chong, Victor H T

    2015-11-01

    Human metapneumovirus pneumonia, most commonly found in children, was diagnosed in an adult with encephalitis. This case suggests that testing for human metapneumovirus RNA in nasopharyngeal aspirate and cerebrospinal fluid samples should be considered in adults with encephalitis who have a preceding respiratory infection.

  19. Cardiac sympathetic dysfunction in anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Byun, Jung-Ick; Lee, Soon-Tae; Moon, Jangsup; Jung, Keun-Hwa; Shin, Jung-Won; Sunwoo, Jun-Sang; Lim, Jung-Ah; Shin, Yong-Won; Kim, Tae-Joon; Lee, Keon-Joo; Park, Kyung-Il; Jung, Ki-Young; Lee, Sang Kun; Chu, Kon

    2015-12-01

    Patients with anti-NMDA receptor (anti-NMDAR) encephalitis frequently suffer from autonomic dysfunctions, which can cause substantial morbidity. This study assessed cardiac autonomic functions in patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis using heart rate variability (HRV) analysis. This was a retrospective single-center case-control study. Eleven patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis and 15 age- and sex-matched controls were included in this study. To ensure that autonomic dysfunction does not occur in any encephalitis, we additionally analyzed HRV of 9 patients with herpes encephalitis (HSE) and compared with that of NMDAR encephalitis patients and controls. Five minute resting stationary electrocardiogram was collected from each subject, and HRV was analyzed. Total power and low frequency (LF) power were lower in anti-NMDAR encephalitis patients than those in controls (p=0.005, 0.001 respectively), indicating cardiac autonomic dysfunction especially in sympathetic system. Patients with HSE showed no significant difference in HRV parameters compared with that of controls. Cardiac autonomic dysfunction was associated with 3 month functional outcome in anti-NMDAR encephalitis patients.

  20. Genotype III Saint Louis Encephalitis Virus Outbreak, Argentina, 2005

    PubMed Central

    Ré, Viviana; Almirón, Walter R.; Farías, Adrián; Vázquez, Ana; Sanchez-Seco, María Paz; Aguilar, Javier; Spinsanti, Lorena; Konigheim, Brenda; Visintin, Andrés; García, Jorge; Morales, Maria Alejandra; Tenorio, Antonio; Contigiani, Marta

    2006-01-01

    Twenty-six years after it was last detected, Saint Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV) genotype III reemerged in 2005 in Córdoba, Argentina, where it caused an outbreak. Two genotype III SLEV strains were isolated from Culex quinquefasciatus. A 71.43% prevalence for neutralizing antibodies was found in domestic fowl in the homestead of a patient with encephalitis. PMID:17283629

  1. A case of late herpes simplex encephalitis relapse.

    PubMed

    Rigamonti, Andrea; Lauria, Giuseppe; Mantero, Vittorio; Salmaggi, Andrea

    2013-09-01

    Late relapse of herpes simplex encephalitis, defined as recurrence more than 3 months after the first initial encephalitic episode, is a rare condition. We describe the case of an adult patient who presented a relapse of herpes simplex encephalitis 8 years after the first episode occurred at the age of 57 years and review the literature of this topic.

  2. Hyperleukocytosis in a premature infant with intrauterine herpes simplex encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Underwood, M A; Wartell, A E; Borghese, R A

    2012-06-01

    Herpes encephalitis is a rare but devastating infection in premature infants. We report a 29 week gestation infant with severe intrauterine cutaneous and central nervous system herpes accompanied by hyperleukocytosis. Leukemoid reactions are not uncommon in this population, but the association of herpes encephalitis and a leukemoid reaction or hyperleukocytosis has not been reported previously.

  3. Resistance of ovine, caprine and bovine endothelial cells to Clostridium perfringens type D epsilon toxin in vitro.

    PubMed

    Uzal, F A; Rolfe, B E; Smith, N J; Thomas, A C; Kelly, W R

    1999-08-01

    Ovine, caprine and bovine endothelial cells were grown in vitro and challenged with Clostridium perfringens type D epsilon toxin to compare their susceptibility to this toxin. Madin Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells, which are known to be susceptible to epsilon toxin, were used as a positive control. No morphological alterations were observed in any of the endothelial cell cultures tested, even after challenging with doses as high as 1200 MLD50/ml of epsilon toxin. MDCK cells showed contour rounding and nuclear condensation as early as 30 min after exposure to 100 MLD50/ml of epsilon toxin and after 60 min of exposure to 12.5 MLD50/ml of the same toxin. All the MDCK cells were dead after 3 h of exposure to all concentrations of epsilon toxin. The results indicate that ovine, caprine and bovine endothelial cells are not morphologically responsive to the action of epsilon toxin in vitro.

  4. In vitro evaluation of the fermentation properties and potential prebiotic activity of caprine cheese whey oligosaccharides in batch culture systems.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Diana L; Costabile, Adele; Wilbey, R Andrew; Grandison, Alistair S; Duarte, Luis C; Roseiro, Luisa B

    2012-01-01

    The prebiotic effect of oligosaccharides recovered and purified from caprine whey, was evaluated by in vitro fermentation under anaerobic conditions using batch cultures at 37°C with human faeces. Effects on key gut bacterial groups were monitored over 24 h by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), which was used to determine a quantitative prebiotic index score. Production of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) as fermentation end products was analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Growth of Bifidobacterium spp was significantly higher (P ≥ 0.05) with the purified oligosaccharides compared to the negative control. Lactic and propionic acids were the main SCFAs produced. Antimicrobial activity of the oligosaccharides was also tested, revealing no inhibition though a decrease in Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli growth. These findings indicate that naturally extracted oligosaccharides from caprine whey could be used as new and valuable source of prebiotics.

  5. A clinical approach to diagnosis of autoimmune encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Graus, Francesc; Titulaer, Maarten J; Balu, Ramani; Benseler, Susanne; Bien, Christian G; Cellucci, Tania; Cortese, Irene; Dale, Russell C; Gelfand, Jeffrey M; Geschwind, Michael; Glaser, Carol A; Honnorat, Jerome; Höftberger, Romana; Iizuka, Takahiro; Irani, Sarosh R; Lancaster, Eric; Leypoldt, Frank; Prüss, Harald; Rae-Grant, Alexander; Reindl, Markus; Rosenfeld, Myrna R; Rostásy, Kevin; Saiz, Albert; Venkatesan, Arun; Vincent, Angela; Wandinger, Klaus-Peter; Waters, Patrick; Dalmau, Josep

    2016-04-01

    Encephalitis is a severe inflammatory disorder of the brain with many possible causes and a complex differential diagnosis. Advances in autoimmune encephalitis research in the past 10 years have led to the identification of new syndromes and biomarkers that have transformed the diagnostic approach to these disorders. However, existing criteria for autoimmune encephalitis are too reliant on antibody testing and response to immunotherapy, which might delay the diagnosis. We reviewed the literature and gathered the experience of a team of experts with the aims of developing a practical, syndrome-based diagnostic approach to autoimmune encephalitis and providing guidelines to navigate through the differential diagnosis. Because autoantibody test results and response to therapy are not available at disease onset, we based the initial diagnostic approach on neurological assessment and conventional tests that are accessible to most clinicians. Through logical differential diagnosis, levels of evidence for autoimmune encephalitis (possible, probable, or definite) are achieved, which can lead to prompt immunotherapy.

  6. A clinical approach to diagnosis of autoimmune encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Graus, Francesc; Titulaer, Maarten J; Balu, Ramani; Benseler, Susanne; Bien, Christian G; Cellucci, Tania; Cortese, Irene; Dale, Russell C; Gelfand, Jeffrey M; Geschwind, Michael; Glaser, Carol A; Honnorat, Jerome; Höftberger, Romana; Iizuka, Takahiro; Irani, Sarosh R; Lancaster, Eric; Leypoldt, Frank; Prüss, Harald; Rae-Grant, Alexander; Reindl, Markus; Rosenfeld, Myrna R; Rostásy, Kevin; Saiz, Albert; Venkatesan, Arun; Vincent, Angela; Wandinger, Klaus-Peter; Waters, Patrick; Dalmau, Josep

    2016-01-01

    Encephalitis is a severe inflammatory disorder of the brain with many possible causes and a complex differential diagnosis. Advances in autoimmune encephalitis research in the past 10 years have led to the identification of new syndromes and biomarkers that have transformed the diagnostic approach to these disorders. However, existing criteria for autoimmune encephalitis are too reliant on antibody testing and response to immunotherapy, which might delay the diagnosis. We reviewed the literature and gathered the experience of a team of experts with the aims of developing a practical, syndrome-based diagnostic approach to autoimmune encephalitis and providing guidelines to navigate through the differential diagnosis. Because autoantibody test results and response to therapy are not available at disease onset, we based the initial diagnostic approach on neurological assessment and conventional tests that are accessible to most clinicians. Through logical differential diagnosis, levels of evidence for autoimmune encephalitis (possible, probable, or definite) are achieved, which can lead to prompt immunotherapy. PMID:26906964

  7. Encephalitis Surveillance through the Emerging Infections Program, 1997–2010

    PubMed Central

    Glaser, Carol A.

    2015-01-01

    Encephalitis is a devastating illness that commonly causes neurologic disability and has a case fatality rate >5% in the United States. An etiologic agent is identified in <50% of cases, making diagnosis challenging. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Emerging Infections Program (EIP) Encephalitis Project established syndromic surveillance for encephalitis in New York, California, and Tennessee, with the primary goal of increased identification of causative agents and secondary goals of improvements in treatment and outcome. The project represents the largest cohort of patients with encephalitis studied to date and has influenced case definition and diagnostic evaluation of this condition. Results of this project have provided insight into well-established causal pathogens and identified newer causes of infectious and autoimmune encephalitis. The recognition of a possible relationship between enterovirus D68 and acute flaccid paralysis with myelitis underscores the need for ongoing vigilance for emerging causes of neurologic disease. PMID:26295485

  8. Anti-NMDAR encephalitis misdiagnosed as Hashimoto's encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Mirabelli-Badenier, M; Biancheri, R; Morana, G; Fornarino, S; Siri, L; Celle, M E; Veneselli, E; Vincent, A; Gaggero, R; Mancardi, M M

    2014-01-01

    Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis is a well-defined autoimmune disorder. Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE) is a still controversial entity, lacking definite diagnostic criteria. We described a 14-year-old-girl presenting with a clinical picture consistent with the diagnosis of anti-NMDAR encephalitis, confirmed by NMDAR antibody testing. Four years earlier, she had presented a similar episode of acute encephalopathy diagnosed as HE. Anti-NMDAR encephalitis and HE share similar clinical features so that the differential diagnosis can be difficult if specific antibodies are not tested. The correct diagnosis of anti-NMDAR encephalitis is crucial to plan the appropriate management and follow-up, namely in term of oncological screening, since it can be paraneoplastic in origin. We suggest to re-evaluate the clinical history of all subjects with previous HE diagnosis in order to evaluate the possible diagnosis of anti-NMDAR encephalitis and plan the appropriate management of these patients.

  9. Simulated-physiological loading conditions preserve biological and mechanical properties of caprine lumbar intervertebral discs in ex vivo culture.

    PubMed

    Paul, Cornelis P L; Zuiderbaan, Hendrik A; Zandieh Doulabi, Behrouz; van der Veen, Albert J; van de Ven, Peter M; Smit, Theo H; Helder, Marco N; van Royen, Barend J; Mullender, Margriet G

    2012-01-01

    Low-back pain (LBP) is a common medical complaint and associated with high societal costs. Degeneration of the intervertebral disc (IVD) is assumed to be an important causal factor of LBP. IVDs are continuously mechanically loaded and both positive and negative effects have been attributed to different loading conditions.In order to study mechanical loading effects, degeneration-associated processes and/or potential regenerative therapies in IVDs, it is imperative to maintain the IVDs' structural integrity. While in vivo models provide comprehensive insight in IVD biology, an accompanying organ culture model can focus on a single factor, such as loading and may serve as a prescreening model to reduce life animal testing. In the current study we examined the feasibility of organ culture of caprine lumbar discs, with the hypothesis that a simulated-physiological load will optimally preserve IVD properties.Lumbar caprine IVDs (n = 175) were cultured in a bioreactor up to 21 days either without load, low dynamic load (LDL), or with simulated-physiological load (SPL). IVD stiffness was calculated from measurements of IVD loading and displacement. IVD nucleus, inner- and outer annulus were assessed for cell viability, cell density and gene expression. The extracellular matrix (ECM) was analyzed for water, glycosaminoglycan and total collagen content.IVD biomechanical properties did not change significantly with loading conditions. With SPL, cell viability, cell density and gene expression were preserved up to 21 days. Both unloaded and LDL resulted in decreased cell viability, cell density and significant changes in gene expression, yet no differences in ECM content were observed in any group.In conclusion, simulated-physiological loading preserved the native properties of caprine IVDs during a 21-day culture period. The characterization of caprine IVD response to culture in the LDCS under SPL conditions paves the way for controlled analysis of degeneration- and

  10. Effects of reducing fat content on the proteolytic and rheological properties of Cheddar-like caprine milk cheese

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High-moisture Cheddar-like cheeses made from caprine milk containing 3.6, 2.0, 1.0, and 0.1-0.5% fat were manufactured and their proteolytic and rheological properties compared after 1, 3, and 6 mo of aging at 4 deg C. The full-fat (FF), reduced fat (RF), low-fat (LF), and non-fat (NF) cheeses conta...

  11. Insights into pediatric herpes simplex encephalitis from a cohort of 21 children from the California Encephalitis Project, 1998-2011.

    PubMed

    To, Tu M; Soldatos, Ariane; Sheriff, Heather; Schmid, D Scott; Espinosa, Natasha; Cosentino, Giorgio; Preas, Christopher P; Glaser, Carol A

    2014-12-01

    Twenty-one children with confirmed herpes simplex encephalitis were identified in the California Encephalitis Project.Noteworthy features included 6 (29%) patients with an initial negative herpes simplex virus cerebrospinal fluid polymerase chain reaction test and 13 (62%) patients with extratemporal lobe involvement identified by neuroimaging [corrected]. Eleven cases were <4 years of age, but all 4 fatal cases occurred in adolescents.

  12. Effect of Co-transfection of Anti-myostatin shRNA Constructs in Caprine Fetal Fibroblast Cells.

    PubMed

    Hati Boruah, Jyoti Lakshmi; Ranjan, Rakesh; Gogoi, Hamen; Pandey, Saurabh Kumar; Kumar, Dharmendra; Phukan, Amlan Jyoti; Bori, Joygeswar; Sarkhel, Bikash Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Knockdown of myostatin gene (MSTN), transforming growth factor-β superfamily, and a negative regulator of the skeletal muscle growth, by RNA interference (RNAi), has been reported to increase muscle mass in mammals. The current study was aimed to cotransfect two anti-MSTN short hairpin RNA (shRNA) constructs in caprine fetal fibroblast cells for transient silencing of MSTN gene. In the present investigation, approximately 89% MSTN silencing was achieved in transiently transfected caprine fetal fibroblast cells by cotransfection of two best out of four anti-MSTN shRNA constructs. Simultaneously, we also monitored the induction of IFN responsive genes (IFN), pro-apoptotic gene (caspase3) and anti-apoptotic gene (MCL-1) due to cotransfection of different anti-MSTN shRNA constructs. We observed induction of 0.66-19.12, 1.04-4.14, 0.50-3.43, and 0.42-1.98 for folds IFN-β, OAS1, caspase3, and MCL-1 genes, respectively (p < 0.05). This RNAi based cotransfection method could provide an alternative strategy of gene knockout and develop stable caprine fetal fibroblast cells. Furthermore, these stable cells can be used as a cell donor for the development of transgenic cloned embryos by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) technique.

  13. Quantification of minerals and trace elements in raw caprine milk using flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry and flame photometry.

    PubMed

    Singh, Mahavir; Yadav, Poonam; Garg, V K; Sharma, Anshu; Singh, Balvinder; Sharma, Himanshu

    2015-08-01

    This study reports minerals and trace elements quantification in raw caprine milk of Beetal breed, reared in Northern India and their feed, fodder & water using flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry and flame photometry. The mineral and trace elements' concentration in the milk was in the order: K > Ca > Na > Fe > Zn > Cu. The results showed that minerals concentration in caprine milk was lesser than reference values. But trace elements concentration (Fe and Zn) was higher than reference values. Multivariate statistical techniques, viz., Pearsons' correlation, Cluster analysis (CA) and Principal component analysis (PCA) were applied to analyze the interdependences within studied variables in caprine milk. Significantly positive correlations were observed between Fe - Zn, Zn - K, Ca - Na and Ca - pH. The results of correlation matrix were further supported by Cluster analysis and Principal component analysis as primary cluster pairs were found for Ca - pH, Ca - Na and Fe - Zn in the raw milk. No correlation was found between mineral & trace elements content of the milk and feed.

  14. “Of Sheep and Men”: Earliest Direct Evidence of Caprine Domestication in Southern Africa at Leopard Cave (Erongo, Namibia)

    PubMed Central

    Pleurdeau, David; Imalwa, Emma; Détroit, Florent; Lesur, Joséphine; Veldman, Anzel; Bahain, Jean-Jacques; Marais, Eugène

    2012-01-01

    The origins of herding practices in southern Africa remain controversial. The first appearance of domesticated caprines in the subcontinent is thought to be c. 2000 years BP; however, the origin of this cultural development is still widely debated. Recent genetic analyses support the long-standing hypothesis of herder migration from the north, while other researchers have argued for a cultural diffusion hypothesis where the spread of herding practices took place without necessarily implicating simultaneous and large population movements. Here we document the Later Stone Age (LSA) site of Leopard Cave (Erongo, Namibia), which contains confirmed caprine remains, from which we infer that domesticates were present in the southern African region as early as the end of the first millennium BC. These remains predate the first evidence of domesticates previously recorded for the subcontinent. This discovery sheds new light on the emergence of herding practices in southern Africa, and also on the possible southward routes used by caprines along the western Atlantic coast. PMID:22808138

  15. Caprine Endometrial Mesenchymal Stromal Stem Cell: Multilineage Potential, Characterization, and Growth Kinetics in Breeding and Anestrous Stages

    PubMed Central

    Zarezadeh, Younes; Dianatpour, Mehdi; Zare, Shahrokh

    2017-01-01

    The endometrial layer of the uterus contains a population of cells with similar characteristics of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). In the present study, caprine endometrial mesenchymal stromal stem cells (En-MSCs) characters and differentiation potential to chondrogenic, osteogenic, and adipogenic cell lines as well as their growth kinetics in breeding and anestrous stages were evaluated. En-MSCs were enzymatically isolated from endometrial layer of the uterus of adult goats and were cultured and subcultured until passage 4. The growth kinetics and population doubling time (PDT) of caprine En-MSCs in breeding and anestrous stages were determined. En-MSCs in passage 4 were used for the karyotyping and differentiation into chondrocytes, osteocytes, and adipocytes. The PDT in anestrus phase was 40.6 h and in cyclic goats was 53 h. En-MSCs were fibroblast-like in all passages. The number of chromosomes was normal (2n = 60) with no chromosomal instability. Chondrogenic, osteogenic, and adipogenic differentiation of En-MSCs was confirmed by staining with Alcian blue, Alizarin red, and Oil Red O, respectively. Caprine En-MSCs demonstrated to be an alternative source of MSCs for cell therapy purposes in regenerative medicine. PMID:28357151

  16. Targeting essential Eimeria ninakohlyakimovae sporozoite ligands for caprine host endothelial cell invasion with a phage display peptide library.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, A; Pérez, D; Muñoz, M C; Molina, J M; Taubert, A; Jacobs-Lorena, M; Vega-Rodríguez, J; López, A M; Hermosilla, C

    2015-11-01

    Eimeria ninakohlyakimovae is an important coccidian parasite of goats which causes severe diarrhoea in young animals. Specific molecules that mediate E. ninakohlyakimovae host interactions and molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis are still unknown. Although strong circumstantial evidence indicates that E. ninakohlyakimovae sporozoite interactions with caprine endothelial host cells (ECs) are specific, hardly any information is available about the interacting molecules that confer host cell specificity. In this study, we describe a novel method to identify surface proteins of caprine umbilical vein endothelial cells (CUVEC) using a phage display library. After several panning rounds, we identified a number of peptides that specifically bind to the surface of CUVEC. Importantly, caprine endothelial cell peptide 2 (PCEC2) and PCEC5 selectively reduced the infection rate by E. ninakohlyakimovae sporozoites. These preliminary data give new insight for the molecular identification of ligands involved in the interaction between E. ninakohlyakimovae sporozoites and host ECs. Further studies using this phage approach might be useful to identify new potential target molecules for the development of anti-coccidial drugs or even new vaccine strategies.

  17. ANTIGENIC VARIANTS OF EASTERN EQUINE ENCEPHALITIS VIRUS

    PubMed Central

    Casals, Jordi

    1964-01-01

    A study by hemagglutination-inhibition test showed that 19 strains of eastern equine encephalitis virus grouped themselves in two main types, which have been designated North American and South American. The former consists of ten strains from the eastern half of the United States, from Massachusetts to Florida; Jamaica, the Dominican Republic, and, subject to confirmation, Thailand. The South American type comprises nine strains from Panama, Trinidad, British Guiana, Brazil, and Argentina. The strains were isolated from different natural hosts over a period of 30 years. PMID:14151098

  18. Septic arthritis after ureteroneocystostomy.

    PubMed

    Allen, W R

    1979-04-01

    Acute infectious arthritis is an uncommon disease that is most commonly caused by Neisseria gonorrhoeae or gram-positive cocci. Gram-negative bacteria are an infrequent and highly virulent cause of septic arthritis and most commonly enter the circulation through the urinary tract, as in this case after ureteroneocystostomy. The resulting arthritis carries a mortality of 25% and a morbidity of 80%. Early recognition and treatment with appropriate antibiotics and mechanical drainage is imperative. Needle drainage of the affected joint has been shown superior to open surgical drainage.

  19. Psoriasis and arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cats, A

    1990-10-01

    The exact association between psoriasis and arthritis remains an enigma. Some investigators consider that the two disorders constitute a disease entity, psoriatic arthritis, while others support the thesis that psoriasis and arthritis are common diseases and occur simultaneously by chance. The author upholds the latter view as viable. To underscore his viewpoint he presents a comprehensive overview of the controversial opinions through an historical perspective as well as reporting on his epidemiologic and clinical findings from large population studies in the Netherlands. Therapeutic regimens for the management of both skin and joint problems are presented.

  20. Global emergence of Alphaviruses that cause arthritis in humans.

    PubMed

    Lwande, Olivia Wesula; Obanda, Vincent; Bucht, Göran; Mosomtai, Gladys; Otieno, Viola; Ahlm, Clas; Evander, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses) may cause severe emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases, which pose a significant threat to human and animal health in the world today. These infectious diseases range from mild febrile illnesses, arthritis, and encephalitis to haemorrhagic fevers. It is postulated that certain environmental factors, vector competence, and host susceptibility have a major impact on the ecology of arboviral diseases. Presently, there is a great interest in the emergence of Alphaviruses because these viruses, including Chikungunya virus, O'nyong'nyong virus, Sindbis virus, Ross River virus, and Mayaro virus, have caused outbreaks in Africa, Asia, Australia, Europe, and America. Some of these viruses are more common in the tropics, whereas others are also found in temperate regions, but the actual factors driving Alphavirus emergence and re-emergence remain unresolved. Furthermore, little is known about the transmission dynamics, pathophysiology, genetic diversity, and evolution of circulating viral strains. In addition, the clinical presentation of Alphaviruses may be similar to other diseases such as dengue, malaria, and typhoid, hence leading to misdiagnosis. However, the typical presence of arthritis may distinguish between Alphaviruses and other differential diagnoses. The absence of validated diagnostic kits for Alphaviruses makes even routine surveillance less feasible. For that purpose, this review describes the occurrence, genetic diversity, clinical characteristics, and the mechanisms involving Alphaviruses causing arthritis in humans. This information may serve as a basis for better awareness and detection of Alphavirus-caused diseases during outbreaks and in establishing appropriate prevention and control measures.

  1. Global emergence of Alphaviruses that cause arthritis in humans

    PubMed Central

    Lwande, Olivia Wesula; Obanda, Vincent; Bucht, Göran; Mosomtai, Gladys; Otieno, Viola; Ahlm, Clas; Evander, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses) may cause severe emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases, which pose a significant threat to human and animal health in the world today. These infectious diseases range from mild febrile illnesses, arthritis, and encephalitis to haemorrhagic fevers. It is postulated that certain environmental factors, vector competence, and host susceptibility have a major impact on the ecology of arboviral diseases. Presently, there is a great interest in the emergence of Alphaviruses because these viruses, including Chikungunya virus, O'nyong'nyong virus, Sindbis virus, Ross River virus, and Mayaro virus, have caused outbreaks in Africa, Asia, Australia, Europe, and America. Some of these viruses are more common in the tropics, whereas others are also found in temperate regions, but the actual factors driving Alphavirus emergence and re-emergence remain unresolved. Furthermore, little is known about the transmission dynamics, pathophysiology, genetic diversity, and evolution of circulating viral strains. In addition, the clinical presentation of Alphaviruses may be similar to other diseases such as dengue, malaria, and typhoid, hence leading to misdiagnosis. However, the typical presence of arthritis may distinguish between Alphaviruses and other differential diagnoses. The absence of validated diagnostic kits for Alphaviruses makes even routine surveillance less feasible. For that purpose, this review describes the occurrence, genetic diversity, clinical characteristics, and the mechanisms involving Alphaviruses causing arthritis in humans. This information may serve as a basis for better awareness and detection of Alphavirus-caused diseases during outbreaks and in establishing appropriate prevention and control measures. PMID:26689654

  2. MP Joint Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... arthritis. The x-ray shows narrowing of the space between the bones, which is a sign that cartilage has been lost. Your doctor may also order blood tests or imaging studies to confirm the diagnosis. Treatment There are many ...

  3. Arthritis in hip (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Cartilage normally protects the joint, allowing for smooth movement. Cartilage also absorbs shock when pressure is placed on ... like when walking. Arthritis involves the breakdown of cartilage. Without the usual amount of cartilage, the bones ...

  4. Juvenile chronic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Southwood, T R; Woo, P

    1995-05-01

    The nomenclature and classification criteria for arthritis in children should be dealt with initially as separate issues, although they are undoubtedly intertwined. The classification criteria should aim to delineate homogeneous patient populations, yet should be flexible enough to incorporate advances in disease knowledge. It should be recognized that arriving at an international consensus for classification criteria will merely provide a set of operational definitions to facilitate research, and not a set of diagnostic criteria. Indeed the only point to obtaining consensus is to begin a process of systematic ongoing review of the criteria. The labels attached to any of these diseases should facilitate accurate communication. In view of the heterogeneous nature of childhood arthritis, consideration should be given to using a broad umbrella term such as juvenile or childhood arthritis only for communicating with the lay public. Medical nomenclature should be formulated to reflect accurately homogeneous subgroups of arthritis, and should not artificially proscribe a relationship between paediatric and adult disease.

  5. Arthritis and the Feet

    MedlinePlus

    ... for months, or years, then abate, sometimes permanently. Gout (gouty arthritis) : Gout is a condition caused by a buildup of ... sauces, shellfish, and brandy is popularly associated with gout, there are other protein compounds in foods such ...

  6. Neuronal Surface Antibody-Mediated Autoimmune Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Linnoila, Jenny J.; Rosenfeld, Myrna R.; Dalmau, Josep

    2016-01-01

    In the past few years, many autoimmune encephalitides have been identified, with specific clinical syndromes and associated antibodies against neuronal surface antigens. There is compelling evidence that many of these antibodies are pathogenic and most of these encephalitides are highly responsive to immunotherapies. The clinical spectra of some of these antibody-mediated syndromes, especially those reported in only a few patients, are evolving. Others, such as anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor encephalitis, are well characterized. Diagnosis involves recognizing the specific syndromes and identifying the antibody in a patient’s cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and/or serum. These syndromes are associated with variable abnormalities in CSF, magnetic resonance imaging, and electroencephalography. Treatment is often multidisciplinary and should be focused upon neutralizing the effects of antibodies and eliminating their source. Overlapping disorders have been noted, with some patients having more than one neurologic autoimmune disease. In other patients, viral infections such as herpes simplex virus encephalitis trigger robust antineuronal autoimmune responses. PMID:25369441

  7. Autoimmune Schizophrenia? Psychiatric Manifestations of Hashimoto's Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Maryam; Adetutu, Ebun; Thakur, Richa; Gottlich, Caleb; DeBacker, Danielle L; Marks, Lianne

    2016-01-01

    Hashimoto’s encephalitis (HE), also known as steroid-responsive encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroiditis (SREAT), can be a debilitating manifestation of an autoimmune reaction against the thyroid that is often under-diagnosed primarily due to a lack of definitive diagnostic criteria. This is a case of a 52-year-old woman who has been diagnosed with HE after presenting with recurrent and severe psychosis in conjunction with paranoia and a thyroidopathy. Her symptoms are chronic, having first been documented as presenting 15 years prior and showing progressive exacerbation in both frequency and severity. The patient’s paranoia often manifested as delusions involving family members or close friends and consequently introduced an opportunity for harm to herself and others. She showed great conviction with self-diagnoses that were proven incorrect, resulting in occasional non-compliance. Between episodes, the patient did not show evidence of symptoms. This patient struggled with several incorrect diagnoses and treatments for several years before the correct diagnosis of HE was made and displayed extreme improvement upon corticosteroid administration. This case illustrates the importance of increasing awareness of HE as well as including HE in a differential diagnosis when any patient presents with psychosis and concurrent thyroidopathy. Hashimoto’s encephalitis follows putative characteristics of autoimmune diseases, exhibiting a higher incidence in women as compared to men, presenting with increased titers of autoantibodies, and showing dramatic amelioration when treated with corticosteroids. PMID:27672526

  8. Balint's syndrome in subacute HIV encephalitis.

    PubMed Central

    Schnider, A; Landis, T; Regard, M

    1991-01-01

    A 45 year old patient with AIDS is described in whom Balint's syndrome developed over several days without other higher cognitive defects. Radiological findings were typical of subacute HIV encephalitis involving mainly the white matter of the occipital lobes with extension into the parietal and temporal lobe on the left side and into the temporal lobe on the right side. While the patient could usually recognise only one single component within her visual field, her performance in reading much improved if she was allowed to observe the examiner writing. This finding is attributed to well preserved movement perception in our patient, which may have helped her in directing her visual attention. The preservation of movement perception despite damage to the lateral temporo-occipital area may be due to the distinct pathology of subacute HIV encephalitis, which leaves the cortex and adjacent subcortical white matter virtually intact and therefore allows information transfer between primary visual areas in the occipital lobe and movement specific areas in the lateral temporo-occipital area through U-fibres. Images PMID:1955902

  9. Autoimmune Schizophrenia? Psychiatric Manifestations of Hashimoto's Encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Haider, Ali S; Alam, Maryam; Adetutu, Ebun; Thakur, Richa; Gottlich, Caleb; DeBacker, Danielle L; Marks, Lianne

    2016-07-05

    Hashimoto's encephalitis (HE), also known as steroid-responsive encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroiditis (SREAT), can be a debilitating manifestation of an autoimmune reaction against the thyroid that is often under-diagnosed primarily due to a lack of definitive diagnostic criteria. This is a case of a 52-year-old woman who has been diagnosed with HE after presenting with recurrent and severe psychosis in conjunction with paranoia and a thyroidopathy. Her symptoms are chronic, having first been documented as presenting 15 years prior and showing progressive exacerbation in both frequency and severity. The patient's paranoia often manifested as delusions involving family members or close friends and consequently introduced an opportunity for harm to herself and others. She showed great conviction with self-diagnoses that were proven incorrect, resulting in occasional non-compliance. Between episodes, the patient did not show evidence of symptoms. This patient struggled with several incorrect diagnoses and treatments for several years before the correct diagnosis of HE was made and displayed extreme improvement upon corticosteroid administration. This case illustrates the importance of increasing awareness of HE as well as including HE in a differential diagnosis when any patient presents with psychosis and concurrent thyroidopathy. Hashimoto's encephalitis follows putative characteristics of autoimmune diseases, exhibiting a higher incidence in women as compared to men, presenting with increased titers of autoantibodies, and showing dramatic amelioration when treated with corticosteroids.

  10. [Viral encephalitis. Experiences with 53 patients in Middle Hessia].

    PubMed

    Büttner, T; Dorndorf, W

    1988-10-01

    Clinical symptoms, course of disease, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and cranial CT of 53 patients suffering from acute or subacute encephalitis were evaluated retrospectively. The virus could be identified in 21 (39%) patients. Nine of them had herpes simplex virus-encephalitis. 16 patients, eight with herpes simplex virus-encephalitis, died due to the disease. Complete restitution could be observed in 73% of survivors. Disturbance of consciousness and severe focal neurological deficit worsened prognosis towards letality and functional recovery. Most patients had initially elevated number of cellular elements and/or pathological protein concentration in CSF. CSF protein profile showed disturbance of blood-CSF-barrier function in a great number of patients during the first week of the disease whereas autochthonous production of immunoglobulin G was observed predominantly during the second and third week. Elevated concentration of CSF-lactate was seen in herpes simplex virus-encephalitis and in letal cases. 28 (53%) patients had pathological CT-findings. Generalized brain edema, focal hypodensities, focal and cortical contrast enhancement and hemorrhagic imbibation were observed. With one exception patients with herpes simplex virus-encephalitis had hypodense lesions in the temporal lobe. Besides this CT-findings did not allow conclusions regarding the etiology of encephalitis. Prognosis of encephalitis caused by other than herpes simplex virus was worse in case of pathological CT.

  11. [Human Herpesvirus-6 Encephalitis in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation].

    PubMed

    Ogata, Masao

    2015-07-01

    The reactivation of human herpesvirus-6B (HHV-6B) is common after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT), and it is sporadically associated with the development of HHV-6 encephalitis. HHV-6 encephalitis typically develops around 2-6 weeks after allo-HCT, and it is characterized by short-term memory loss. Magnetic resonance imaging typically shows bilateral signal abnormalities in the limbic system. The incidence of HHV-6 encephalitis is reportedly 0-11.6% after bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cell transplantation and 4.9-21.4% after cord blood transplantation. The mortality of HHV-6 encephalitis is high, and survivors are often left with serious sequelae. Antiviral therapy using foscarnet or ganciclovir is recommended for the treatment of HHV-6 encephalitis, but the efficacy of the currently available treatment is insufficient once HHV-6 encephalitis has developed. The elucidation of the pathogenesis of HHV-6 encephalitis and the establishment of preventative therapy are needed to overcome this disease.

  12. Rehabilitation in psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Lubrano, Ennio; Spadaro, Antonio; Parsons, Wendy J; Atteno, Mariangela; Ferrara, Nicola

    2009-08-01

    This article summarizes the state of the art of rehabilitation in psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Very little evidence was available to assess the efficacy of rehabilitation. Some data were borrowed from studies on ankylosing spondylitis. Covering certain aspects of the disease by the standard measure of functioning was difficult. However, rehabilitation was considered by the GRAPPA Group (Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis), as part of treatment of axial PsA.

  13. Osteoporosis and psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Del Puente, Antonio; Esposito, Antonella; Parisi, Anna; Atteno, Mariangela; Montalbano, Simona; Vitiello, Maria; Esposito, Carmela; Bertolini, Nicoletta; Foglia, Francesca; Costa, Luisa; Scarpa, Raffaele

    2012-07-01

    Osteoporosis (OP) is a skeletal disorder characterized by compromised bone strength that predisposes to an increased risk of fracture. The prevalence of OP in the general population is very high as established in several studies, and OP represents one of the possible aspects of bone involvement in arthritis. In psoriatic arthritis this involvement is particularly complex because it affects not only mechanisms of bone loss but also of bone formation. We will discuss these aspects and the available epidemiological data.

  14. [Arthritis and infections].

    PubMed

    Cimaz, R; Meregalli, E; Biggioggero, M; Casadei, A; Careddu, P

    2005-08-01

    Arthritis caused by infectious agents can be secondary to direct invasion of the joint space or to immune mechanisms (subsequent to or concomitant to an infection). Septic arthritis refers to a situation when bacteria can be cultured in synovial fluid. Arthritis can complicate for example meningococcemia or infection by Neisseria gonorrhoeae or Haemophilus influenzae. Reactive (postinfectious) arthritides are an important diagnostic category within a pediatric rheumatology practice. Yersinia and, less frequently, Salmonella, play an important role in postdiarrheal disorders. The arthritis that can ensue is usually oligoarticular and occurs 1-2 weeks after the enteric infection. Reiter's syndrome, rare in the pediatric age, is characterized by the triad urethritis-conjunctivitis-arthritis. Postviral arthritides can occur after a variety of viral infections, including Parvovirus B19, rubella, and others (e.g. hepatitis B, Epstein-Barr virus, chickenpox, mumps). Especially in patients with acute arthritis, the presence of preceding infections should always be investigated. Although the majority of postinfectious arthritides are self-limiting in nature and do not require specific treatment, conditions such as Lyme borreliosis and rheumatic fever can be associated with significant morbidity, and sometimes can be even lethal.

  15. Behaviour disturbances during recovery from herpes simplex encephalitis.

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood, R; Bhalla, A; Gordon, A; Roberts, J

    1983-01-01

    Bizarre behaviour disturbances in four patients occurring during incomplete recovery from herpes simplex encephalitis are described. Some aspects of their behaviour were similar to that originally described by Klüver and Bucy in monkeys following bilateral temporal lobectomy. Previous reports of behavioural disturbances in man after herpes simplex encephalitis are reviewed and attention drawn to the aggressive and disruptive behaviour that is often seen. With the reduced mortality in herpes simplex encephalitis in recent years it is possible that behaviour disturbances such as those described here will be seen more frequently. Images PMID:6619889

  16. Development of a Genetically Engineered Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus Vaccine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-04-15

    antibody neutralization titers of sera from the TC-5A immunized horses ranged from 64 to > 128; however, the sera did not neutralize the equine virulent VEE...human adenovirus 5 DNA. Virology 52:456-467. Groot, H. 1972. The health and economic impact of Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE). p. 7-16. In... equine encephalitis (VEE). p. 7-16. In Venezuelan Encephalitis, Sci. Pub. 243, Pan American Health Organization, Washington, D.C. Hunt, A.R., Johnson, A.J

  17. Toxoplasmic Encephalitis with Untreated Hairy Cell Leukemia Variant

    PubMed Central

    Ikebe, Taichi; Sasaki, Hitohiro; Takata, Hiroyuki; Miyazaki, Yasuhiko; Ohtsuka, Eiichi; Saburi, Yoshio; Ogata, Masao; Shirao, Kuniaki

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasmic encephalitis is a rare infectious complication in patients with hematological malignancy except for allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). We herein report a case of possible toxoplasmic encephalitis with untreated hairy cell leukemia variant. Magnetic resonance imaging showed multiple nodules with surrounding edema in the entire cerebrum. A polymerase chain reaction analysis for Toxoplasma gondii was negative. Her signs and symptoms fully recovered by empirical therapy with sulfadiazine and pyrimethamine. Toxoplasmic encephalitis may occur in patients who undergo non-allogeneic HSCT for hematological malignancies, even in those who have not been treated. PMID:27803415

  18. Identification and Profiling of microRNAs and Their Target Genes from Developing Caprine Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Xingtang; Zhao, Yulong; Chen, Xiaohui; Sun, Jiajie; Zhou, Yang; Wang, Jianjin; Wang, Yongan; Lan, Xianyong; Chen, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Goat is an important agricultural animal for meat production. Functional studies have demonstrated that microRNAs (miRNAs) regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level and play an important role in various biological processes. Although studies on miRNAs expression profiles have been performed in various animals, relatively limited information about goat muscle miRNAs has been reported. To investigate the miRNAs involved in regulating different periods of skeletal muscle development, we herein performed a comprehensive research for expression profiles of caprine miRNAs during two developmental stages of skeletal muscles: fetal stage and six month-old stage. As a result, 15,627,457 and 15,593,721 clean reads were obtained from the fetal goat library (FC) and the six month old goat library (SMC), respectively. 464 known miRNAs and 83 novel miRNA candidates were identified. Furthermore, by comparing the miRNA profile, 336 differentially expressed miRNAs were identified and then the potential targets of the differentially expressed miRNAs were predicted. To understand the regulatory network of miRNAs during muscle development, the mRNA expression profiles for the two development stages were characterized and 7322 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified. Then the potential targets of miRNAs were compared to the DEGs, the intersection of the two gene sets were screened out and called differentially expressed targets (DE-targets), which were involved in 231 pathways. Ten of the 231 pathways that have smallest P-value were shown as network figures. Based on the analysis of pathways and networks, we found that miR-424-5p and miR-29a might have important regulatory effect on muscle development, which needed to be further studied. This study provided the first global view of the miRNAs in caprine muscle tissues. Our results help elucidation of complex regulatory networks between miRNAs and mRNAs and for the study of muscle development. PMID

  19. Reactive arthritis mimicking inflammatory bowel disease arthritis: a challenging diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Trabulo, D; Mangualde, J; Cremers, I; Oliveira, A P

    2014-01-01

    Reactive arthritis comprises a subgroup of infection-associated arthritis which occurs after genitourinary or gastrointestinal tract infection in genetically susceptible hosts. Studies have proposed Salmonella, Shigella or Yersinia infection as the microorganisms responsible for the post-dysenteric form. The human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B27 is a well recognised best-known predisposing factor. We report a case of HLA-B27-associated reactive arthritis after Salmonella goldcoast enteritis, mimicking inflammatory bowel disease arthritis.

  20. Severe Encephalitis in Cynomolgus Macaques Exposed to Aerosolized Eastern Equine Encephalitis Virus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-08-01

    the illness. The onset of illness was dose dependent, but once a febrile response was observed, macaques were moribund within 36 h. Simultaneously, a...high mortality caused by a group of arboviruses found in the eastern half of North America and por- tions of Central and South America [1]. EEE viruses...encepha- litis (VEE) and western equine encephalitis (WEE) viruses, EEE viruses are mosquito transmitted and circulate through a natural reservoir

  1. Listeria monocytogenes encephalitis mimicking Herpes Simplex virus encephalitis: the differential diagnostic importance of cerebrospinal fluid lactic acid levels.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Burke A; Fatehpuria, Ritu; Eisenstein, Lawrence E

    2007-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a common cause of bacterial meningitis in elderly patients and in those with impaired cellular immunity. The most common central nervous system infection caused by L. monocytogenes is acute bacterial meningitis; meningoencephalitis is uncommon and encephalitis is rare. Early diagnosis of L. monocytogenes meningitis is difficult because only 50% of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Gram stains are negative. L. monocytogenes is one of the few central nervous system pathogens associated with red blood cells in the CSF. When L. monocytogenes presents as encephalitis with red blood cells in the CSF, the clinical presentation mimics most closely herpes simplex virus (HSV)-1 encephalitis. Because the therapies for L. monocytogenes and HSV-1 are different, early diagnostic differentiation is clinically important. The CSF lactic acid is the best way to rapidly differentiate between these two entities; the CSF lactic acid level is elevated in L. monocytogenes but is not elevated in HSV-1 encephalitis. The case presented is an elderly man with chronic lymphocytic leukemia who presented with encephalitis. Advanced age and chronic lymphocytic leukemia predispose him to a wide variety of pathogens, but the rapidity and severity of his clinical presentation made L. monocytogenes and HSV-1 encephalitis the most likely diagnostic possibilities. The CSF Gram stain was negative, but the elevated CSF lactic acid levels with encephalitis and red blood cells in the CSF indicated L. monocytogenes as the most likely pathogen. We present a case of L. monocytogenes encephalitis mimicking HSV-1 encephalitis. While receiving ampicillin therapy, the patient remained unresponsive for more than 1 week and then suddenly regained consciousness and recovered without neurologic sequelae.

  2. Noncytopathic Replication of Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus and Eastern Equine Encephalitis Virus Replicons in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Petrakova, Olga; Volkova, Eugenia; Gorchakov, Rodion; Paessler, Slobodan; Kinney, Richard M.; Frolov, Ilya

    2005-01-01

    Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE) and eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) viruses are important, naturally emerging zoonotic viruses. They are significant human and equine pathogens which still pose a serious public health threat. Both VEE and EEE cause chronic infection in mosquitoes and persistent or chronic infection in mosquito-derived cell lines. In contrast, vertebrate hosts infected with either virus develop an acute infection with high-titer viremia and encephalitis, followed by host death or virus clearance by the immune system. Accordingly, EEE and VEE infection in vertebrate cell lines is highly cytopathic. To further understand the pathogenesis of alphaviruses on molecular and cellular levels, we designed EEE- and VEE-based replicons and investigated their replication and their ability to generate cytopathic effect (CPE) and to interfere with other viral infections. VEE and EEE replicons appeared to be less cytopathic than Sindbis virus-based constructs that we designed in our previous research and readily established persistent replication in BHK-21 cells. VEE replicons required additional mutations in the 5′ untranslated region and nsP2 or nsP3 genes to further reduce cytopathicity and to become capable of persisting in cells with no defects in alpha/beta interferon production or signaling. The results indicated that alphaviruses strongly differ in virus-host cell interactions, and the ability to cause CPE in tissue culture does not necessarily correlate with pathogenesis and strongly depends on the sequence of viral nonstructural proteins. PMID:15919912

  3. Noncytopathic replication of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus and eastern equine encephalitis virus replicons in Mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Petrakova, Olga; Volkova, Eugenia; Gorchakov, Rodion; Paessler, Slobodan; Kinney, Richard M; Frolov, Ilya

    2005-06-01

    Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE) and eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) viruses are important, naturally emerging zoonotic viruses. They are significant human and equine pathogens which still pose a serious public health threat. Both VEE and EEE cause chronic infection in mosquitoes and persistent or chronic infection in mosquito-derived cell lines. In contrast, vertebrate hosts infected with either virus develop an acute infection with high-titer viremia and encephalitis, followed by host death or virus clearance by the immune system. Accordingly, EEE and VEE infection in vertebrate cell lines is highly cytopathic. To further understand the pathogenesis of alphaviruses on molecular and cellular levels, we designed EEE- and VEE-based replicons and investigated their replication and their ability to generate cytopathic effect (CPE) and to interfere with other viral infections. VEE and EEE replicons appeared to be less cytopathic than Sindbis virus-based constructs that we designed in our previous research and readily established persistent replication in BHK-21 cells. VEE replicons required additional mutations in the 5' untranslated region and nsP2 or nsP3 genes to further reduce cytopathicity and to become capable of persisting in cells with no defects in alpha/beta interferon production or signaling. The results indicated that alphaviruses strongly differ in virus-host cell interactions, and the ability to cause CPE in tissue culture does not necessarily correlate with pathogenesis and strongly depends on the sequence of viral nonstructural proteins.

  4. [Two pediatric cases of anti-NMDA receptor antibody encephalitis].

    PubMed

    Ben Azoun, M; Tatencloux, S; Deiva, K; Blanc, P

    2014-11-01

    Although less frequent than viral encephalitis, anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis is a frequent form of acute pediatric encephalitis. After a prodromal phase of flu-like symptoms, psychiatric symptoms predominate - agitation, anxiety, hallucinations - and can make correct diagnosis more difficult. Also noted are abnormal dyskinesia and dystonia-like movements, partial seizures, difficulties talking or memorizing, and autonomic manifestations. The presentation of two cases of anti-NMDAR encephalitis illustrates the symptoms of this disease. Although the CSF abnormalities are not highly specific of this disease, and MRI most often normal, EEG shows more specific signs. These observations enable us to discuss different treatment options and understand the progression of this disease.

  5. Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus, Southern Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Estrada-Franco, José G.; Navarro-Lopez, Roberto; Freier, Jerome E.; Cordova, Dionicio; Clements, Tamara; Moncayo, Abelardo; Kang, Wenli; Gomez-Hernandez, Carlos; Rodriguez-Dominguez, Gabriela; Ludwig, George V.

    2004-01-01

    Equine epizootics of Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE) occurred in the southern Mexican states of Chiapas in 1993 and Oaxaca in 1996. To assess the impact of continuing circulation of VEE virus (VEEV) on human and animal populations, serologic and viral isolation studies were conducted in 2000 to 2001 in Chiapas State. Human serosurveys and risk analyses indicated that long-term endemic transmission of VEEV occurred among villages with seroprevalence levels of 18% to 75% and that medical personnel had a high risk for VEEV exposure. Seroprevalence in wild animals suggested cotton rats as possible reservoir hosts in the region. Virus isolations from sentinel animals and genetic characterizations of these strains indicated continuing circulation of a subtype IE genotype, which was isolated from equines during the recent VEE outbreaks. These data indicate long-term enzootic and endemic VEEV circulation in the region and continued risk for disease in equines and humans. PMID:15663847

  6. Isolation of caprine herpesvirus 1 from a major outbreak of infectious pustular vulvovaginitis in goats.

    PubMed

    Piper, K L; Fitzgerald, C J; Ficorilli, N; Studdert, M J

    2008-04-01

    We describe an outbreak of infectious pustular vulvovaginitis caused by Caprine herpesvirus 1 (CpHV1) in a group of approximately 200, 8 month old virgin does that were imported to Victoria from New Zealand. CpHV1 was isolated in cell cultures from vaginal swabs from three of three affected does but not from two bucks that had been with the does. The identity of the virus as a herpesvirus was confirmed by negative stain electron microscopy. Restriction endonuclease DNA fingerprint analysis showed that the DNA fingerprints were similar, but not identical, to previously described CpHV1 isolates made in New Zealand, New South Wales, and in other parts of the world. Acute and convalescent phase sera from selected does supported the diagnosis of CpHV1 infection. It is most likely that the disease was initiated by reactivation of latent virus in at least one of four bucks that served the does, since each was positive for CpHV neutralising antibody when first tested. This is the first report of CpHV infectious pustular vulvovaginitis in goats in Victoria and to our knowledge appears to be one of the largest outbreaks recorded anywhere.

  7. In vitro antiviral activity of Ficus carica latex against caprine herpesvirus-1.

    PubMed

    Camero, Michele; Marinaro, Mariarosaria; Lovero, Angela; Elia, Gabriella; Losurdo, Michele; Buonavoglia, Canio; Tempesta, Maria

    2014-01-01

    The latex of Ficus carica Linn. (Moraceae) has been shown to possess antiviral properties against some human viruses. To determine the ability of F. carica latex (F-latex) to interfere with the infection of caprine herpesvirus-1 (CpHV-1) in vitro, F-latex was resuspended in culture media containing 1% ethanol and was tested for potential antiviral effects against CpHV-1. Titration of CpHV-1 in the presence or in the absence of F-latex was performed on monolayers of Madin Darby Bovine Kidney (MDBK) cells. Simultaneous addition of F-latex and CpHV-1 to monolayers of MDBK cells resulted in a significant reduction of CpHV-1 titres 3 days post-infection and this effect was comparable to that induced by acyclovir. The study suggests that the F-latex is able to interfere with the replication of CpHV-1 in vitro on MDBK cells and future studies will determine the mechanisms responsible for the observed antiviral activity.

  8. In vitro assessment of the antimicrobial susceptibility of caprine isolates of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. capri.

    PubMed

    Paterna, A; Tatay-Dualde, J; Amores, J; Prats-van der Ham, M; Sánchez, A; de la Fe, C; Contreras, A; Corrales, J C; Gómez-Martín, Á

    2016-08-01

    The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum mycoplasmacidal concentration (MMC) of 17 antimicrobials against 41 Spanish caprine isolates of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. capri (Mmc) obtained from different specimens (milk, external auricular canal and semen) were determined using a liquid microdilution method. For half of the isolates, the MIC was also estimated for seven of the antimicrobials using an epsilometric test (ET), in order to compare both methods and assess the validity of ET. Mutations in genes gyrA, gyrB, parC and parE conferring fluoroquinolone resistance, which have been recently described in Mmc, were investigated using PCR. The anatomical origin of the isolate had no effect on its antimicrobial susceptibility. Moxifloxacin and doxycycline had the lowest MIC values. The rest of the fluoroquinolones studied (except norfloxacin), together with tylosin and clindamycin, also had low MIC values, although the MMC obtained for clindamycin was higher than for the other antimicrobials. For all the aminoglycosides, spiramycin and erythromycin, a notable level of resistance was observed. The ET was in close agreement with broth microdilution at low MICs, but not at intermediate or high MICs. The analysis of the genomic sequences revealed the presence of an amino acid substitution in codon 83 of the gene gyrA, which has not been described previously in Mmc.

  9. Complementary tools for the control and eradication of caprine and ovine brucellosis in the European Union.

    PubMed

    Crespo León, F; Sáez Llorente, J L; Reviriego Gordejo, F J; Rodríguez Ferri, E F; Durán Ferrer, M

    2012-12-01

    Caprine and ovine brucellosis is one of the most serious and complex animal health problems faced by Veterinary Services in countries where the disease is endemic. Various geographical factors and the nature of the disease itself influence its epidemiology, encouraging widespread distribution and, at the same time, impeding the ability of animal health programmes to prevent, control and eradicate it. Although strategies against brucellosis have traditionally been based on two specific tools (namely, vaccination of the at-risk population and testing and slaughter of animals which are suspected of or test positive for the disease), other complementary tools of a technical or administrative nature should also be considered. Experience in the European Union has shown that these tools are necessary to guarantee sustainable progress and success against this disease. However, these complementary tools have not always received sufficient attention during the strategic planning and subsequent implementation of animal health programmes, with consequent reductions in efficiency. The aim of this article is to review these complementary tools, in order to facilitate their adoption and use by official Veterinary Services, according to the resources available.

  10. Serological Analysis of Tuberculosis in Goats by Use of the Enferplex Caprine TB Multiplex Test.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Amanda; Whelan, Clare; Clarke, John B; Hayton, Alastair; Watt, Neil J; Harkiss, Gordon D

    2017-02-01

    Tuberculosis in goats is usually diagnosed clinically, at postmortem, or by a positive skin test. However, none of these approaches detects all infected animals. Serology offers an additional tool to identify infected animals missed by current tests. We describe the use of the Enferplex Caprine TB serology test to aid the management of a large dairy goat herd undergoing a tuberculosis breakdown. Initial skin and serology testing showed that IgG antibodies were present in both serum and milk from 100% of skin test-positive animals and in serum and milk from 77.8 and 95.4% of skin test-negative animals, respectively. A good correlation was observed between serum and milk antibody levels. The herd had been vaccinated against Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, but no direct serological cross-reactions were found. Subsequent skin testing revealed 13.7% positive animals, 64.9% of which were antibody positive, while 42.1% of skin test-negative animals were seropositive. Antibody responses remained high 1 month later (57.1% positive), and the herd was slaughtered. Postmortem analysis of 20 skin test-negative goats revealed visible lesions in 6 animals, all of which had antibodies to six Mycobacterium bovis antigens. The results provide indirect evidence that serology testing with serum or milk could be a useful tool in the diagnosis and management of tuberculosis in goats.

  11. Comparison of phenotypic and genotypic profiles among caprine and ovine Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae strains.

    PubMed

    Maksimović, Z; De la Fe, C; Amores, J; Gómez-Martín, Á; Rifatbegović, M

    2017-02-18

    Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae (Movp) is considered to be one of the most important mycoplasmas causing respiratory disease in small ruminants. Most epidemiologic and characterisation studies have been conducted on strains collected from sheep. Information on the presence and characteristics of Movp in healthy and pneumonic goats is limited. Phenotypic or genotypic differences between sheep and goat isolates have never been studied. The objective of our study was to characterise and compare the similarities and differences between caprine and ovine Movp strains isolated from affected and asymptomatic animals in order to elucidate phenotypic and genotypic variability. Four different techniques were used on a set of 23 Movp isolates. These included SDS-PAGE, Western blotting, random amplified polymorphic DNA and the heat shock protein 70 gene sequence-based method. A high degree of phenotypic and genotypic heterogeneity among Movp strains was demonstrated in this study. Our results demonstrated differences between goat and sheep strains, revealing not only a link between strains and host ruminant species, but by geographical origin as well. However, the finding of immunodominant antigens of molecular masses 36, 38, 40 and 70 kDa (±3 kDa) in Movp isolates from sheep and goats foretells their potential use in the development of serological diagnostic tests and vaccines.

  12. Contagious caprine pleuropneumonia outbreak in captive wild ungulates at Al Wabra Wildlife Preservation, State of Qatar.

    PubMed

    Arif, Abdi; Schulz, Julia; Thiaucourt, François; Taha, Abid; Hammer, Sven

    2007-03-01

    Contagious caprine pleuropneumonia (CCPP) caused by Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae is a highly contagious and serious respiratory disease of domestic goats, characterized by coughing, severe respiratory distress, and high mortality rates. The lesions at necropsy are mainly a fibrinous pleuropneumonia with increased straw-colored pleural fluid. An outbreak of CCPP in wild goat (Capra aegagrus), Nubian ibex (Capra ibex nubiana), Laristan mouflon (Ovis orientalis laristanica), and gerenuk (Litocranius walleri) occurred at Al Wabra Wildlife Preservation in the State of Qatar. The disease was suspected because of the clinical symptoms and the necropsy findings and was confirmed by the isolation and identification of the causative organism. This new finding indicates that CCPP should be considered a potential threat to wildlife and the conservation of endangered ruminant species, especially in the Middle East, where it is enzootic because of its presence in chronic carriers. Susceptible imported animals should be quarantined and vaccinated. The preferred samples for diagnosis are the pleural fluid, which contains high numbers of Mycoplasma, and sections of hepatized lung, preferably at the interface of normal and diseased tissues. Samples must be shipped to diagnostic laboratories rapidly, and appropriate cool conditions must be maintained during shipping.

  13. Virulence factors genes of Staphylococcus spp. isolated from caprine subclinical mastitis.

    PubMed

    Salaberry, Sandra Renata Sampaio; Saidenberg, André Becker Simões; Zuniga, Eveline; Melville, Priscilla Anne; Santos, Franklin Gerônimo Bispo; Guimarães, Ednaldo Carvalho; Gregori, Fábio; Benites, Nilson Roberti

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate genes involved in adhesion expression, biofilm formation, and enterotoxin production in isolates of Staphylococcus spp. from goats with subclinical mastitis and associate these results with the staphylococcal species. One hundred and twenty-four isolates were identified and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed to detect the following genes: cna, ebpS, eno, fib, fnbA, fnbB, bap, sea, seb, sec, sed and see. The most commonly Staphylococcus species included S. epidermidis, S. lugdunensis, S. chromogenes, S. capitis ss capitis and S. intermedius. With the exception of fnbB, the genes were detected in different frequencies of occurrence in 86.3% of the Staphylococcus spp. isolates. Eno (73.2%) and bap (94.8%) were more frequently detected in coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS); ebpS (76%), fib (90.9%) and fnbA (87%) were the most frequent genes in coagulase-positive staphylococci (CPS). Regarding enterotoxins, genes sed (28.2%) and see (24.2%) had a higher frequency of occurrence; sec gene was more frequently detected in CPS (58.8%). There was no association between the presence of the genes and the Staphylococcus species. Different virulence factors genes can be detected in caprine subclinical mastitis caused by CNS and CPS. The knowledge of the occurrence of these virulence factors is important for the development of effective control and prevention measures of subclinical mastitis caused by CNS and CPS in goats.

  14. The effect of helminth infection on the microbial composition and structure of the caprine abomasal microbiome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Robert W.; Li, Weizhong; Sun, Jiajie; Yu, Peng; Baldwin, Ransom L.; Urban, Joseph F.

    2016-02-01

    Haemonchus contortus is arguably the most injurious helminth parasite for small ruminants. We characterized the impact of H. contortus infection on the caprine abomasal microbiome. Fourteen parasite naive goats were inoculated with 5,000 H. contortus infective larvae and followed for 50 days. Six age-matched naïve goats served as uninfected controls. Reduced bodyweight gain and a significant increase in the abosamal pH was observed in infected goats compared to uninfected controls. Infection also increased the bacterial load while reducing the abundance of the Archaea in the abomasum but did not appear to affect microbial diversity. Nevertheless, the infection altered the abundance of approximately 19% of the 432 species-level operational taxonomic units (OTU) detected per sample. A total of 30 taxa displayed a significantly different abundance between control and infected goats. Furthermore, the infection resulted in a distinct difference in the microbiome structure. As many as 8 KEGG pathways were predicted to be significantly affected by infection. In addition, H. contortus-induced changes in butyrate producing bacteria could regulate mucosal inflammation and tissue repair. Our results provided insight into physiological consequences of helminth infection in small ruminants and could facilitate the development of novel control strategies to improve animal and human health.

  15. The effect of helminth infection on the microbial composition and structure of the caprine abomasal microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Li, Robert W.; Li, Weizhong; Sun, Jiajie; Yu, Peng; Baldwin, Ransom L.; Urban, Joseph F.

    2016-01-01

    Haemonchus contortus is arguably the most injurious helminth parasite for small ruminants. We characterized the impact of H. contortus infection on the caprine abomasal microbiome. Fourteen parasite naive goats were inoculated with 5,000 H. contortus infective larvae and followed for 50 days. Six age-matched naïve goats served as uninfected controls. Reduced bodyweight gain and a significant increase in the abosamal pH was observed in infected goats compared to uninfected controls. Infection also increased the bacterial load while reducing the abundance of the Archaea in the abomasum but did not appear to affect microbial diversity. Nevertheless, the infection altered the abundance of approximately 19% of the 432 species-level operational taxonomic units (OTU) detected per sample. A total of 30 taxa displayed a significantly different abundance between control and infected goats. Furthermore, the infection resulted in a distinct difference in the microbiome structure. As many as 8 KEGG pathways were predicted to be significantly affected by infection. In addition, H. contortus-induced changes in butyrate producing bacteria could regulate mucosal inflammation and tissue repair. Our results provided insight into physiological consequences of helminth infection in small ruminants and could facilitate the development of novel control strategies to improve animal and human health. PMID:26853110

  16. Paleogenomics in a Temperate Environment: Shotgun Sequencing from an Extinct Mediterranean Caprine

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez, Oscar; Gigli, Elena; Bover, Pere; Alcover, Josep Antoni; Bertranpetit, Jaume; Castresana, Jose; Lalueza-Fox, Carles

    2009-01-01

    Background Numerous endemic mammals, including dwarf elephants, goats, hippos and deers, evolved in isolation in the Mediterranean islands during the Pliocene and Pleistocene. Most of them subsequently became extinct during the Holocene. Recently developed high-throughput sequencing technologies could provide a unique tool for retrieving genomic data from these extinct species, making it possible to study their evolutionary history and the genetic bases underlying their particular, sometimes unique, adaptations. Methodology/Principals Findings A DNA extraction of a ∼6,000 year-old bone sample from an extinct caprine (Myotragus balearicus) from the Balearic Islands in the Western Mediterranean, has been subjected to shotgun sequencing with the GS FLX 454 platform. Only 0.27% of the resulting sequences, identified from alignments with the cow genome and comprising 15,832 nucleotides, with an average length of 60 nucleotides, proved to be endogenous. Conclusions A phylogenetic tree generated with Myotragus sequences and those from other artiodactyls displays an identical topology to that generated from mitochondrial DNA data. Despite being in an unfavourable thermal environment, which explains the low yield of endogenous sequences, our study demonstrates that it is possible to obtain genomic data from extinct species from temperate regions. PMID:19461892

  17. Prenatal caprine milk oligosaccharide consumption affects the development of mice offspring

    PubMed Central

    McNabb, Warren C.; Young, Wayne; Cookson, Adrian L.; Roy, Nicole C.

    2016-01-01

    1 Scope The composition of the gastrointestinal (GIT) microbiota, particularly in early life, influences the development of metabolic diseases later in life. The maternal microbiota is the main source of bacteria colonising the infant GIT and can be modified by dietary prebiotics. Our objective was to determine the effects of prenatal consumption of prebiotic caprine milk oligosaccharides (CMO) on the large intestine of female mice, milk composition, and offspring's development. 2 Methods and results C57BL/6 mice were fed either a control diet, CMO diet, or galacto‐oligosaccharide diet from mating to weaning. From weaning, some pups nursed by CMO, GOS, and control‐dams were fed the control diet for 30 days. CMO or GOS‐fed dams had increased colon length and milk protein concentration compared to control‐fed dams. At weaning, pups from CMO‐fed dams had increased body weight and colon length and increased proportions of colonic Bifidobacterium spp compared to the pups from control‐fed dams. Thirty days after weaning, pups from CMO‐fed dams had increased visceral fat weight compared to pups from control‐fed dams. 3 Conclusion Consumption of CMO by the dams during gestation and lactation improved the development of the pups, and the relative abundance of bifidobacteria and butyric acid in the colon, at weaning. PMID:27067267

  18. Interaction between melatonin and follicle-stimulating hormone promotes in vitro development of caprine preantral follicles.

    PubMed

    Rocha, R M P; Lima, L F; Alves, A M C V; Celestino, J J H; Matos, M H T; Lima-Verde, I B; Bernuci, M P; Lopes, C A P; Báo, S N; Campello, C C; Rodrigues, A P R; Figueiredo, J R

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of melatonin and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) on the in vitro culture of goat preantral follicles. Ovarian fragments were cultured for 7 d in α-minimum essential medium (α-MEM(+)) containing melatonin (100, 250, 500, or 1,000 pM), FSH (50 ng/mL), or a combination of the 2 hormones and further analyzed by histology and transmission electron and fluorescent microscopy. The results showed that after 7 d of culture, tissues cultured in α-MEM(+) alone or supplemented with FSH alone, melatonin (500 and 1,000 pM), or the combination of FSH and melatonin (1,000 pM) maintained percentages of normal preantral follicles similar to the fresh control. In contrast to the noncultured tissues, the percentage of developing follicles was increased under all culture conditions after 7 d (P < 0.05). The addition of 1,000 pM melatonin associated with FSH to the culture medium increased follicular and oocyte diameters compared with α-MEM(+) alone after 7 d of culture (P < 0.05). Ultrastructural and fluorescent analyses confirmed the integrity of follicles cultured with 1,000 pM of melatonin plus FSH for 7 d. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that the interaction between melatonin and FSH maintains ultrastructural integrity and stimulates further growth of cultured caprine preantral follicles.

  19. Genetic variation of St. Louis encephalitis virus.

    PubMed

    May, Fiona J; Li, Li; Zhang, Shuliu; Guzman, Hilda; Beasley, David W C; Tesh, Robert B; Higgs, Stephen; Raj, Pushker; Bueno, Rudy; Randle, Yvonne; Chandler, Laura; Barrett, Alan D T

    2008-08-01

    St. Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV) has been regularly isolated throughout the Americas since 1933. Previous phylogenetic studies involving 62 isolates have defined seven major lineages (I-VII), further divided into 14 clades. In this study, 28 strains isolated in Texas in 1991 and 2001-2003, and three older, previously unsequenced strains from Jamaica and California were sequenced over the envelope protein gene. The inclusion of these new sequences, and others published since 2001, has allowed better delineation of the previously published SLEV lineages, in particular the clades of lineage II. Phylogenetic analysis of 106 isolates identified 13 clades. All 1991 and 2001-2003 isolates from Nueces, Jefferson and Harris Counties (Texas Gulf Coast) group in clade IIB with other isolates from these counties isolated during the 1980s and 1990s. This lack of evidence for introduction of novel strains into the Texas Gulf Coast over a long period of time is consistent with overwintering of SLEV in this region. Two El Paso isolates, both from 2002, group in clade VA with recent Californian isolates from 1998-2001 and some South American strains with a broad temporal range. Overall, these data are consistent with multiple introductions of SLEV from South America into North America, and provide support for the hypothesis that in most situations, SLEV circulates within a locality, with occasional incursions from other areas. Finally, SLEV has much lower nucleotide (10.1 %) and amino acid variation (2.8 %) than other members of the Japanese encephalitis virus complex (maximum variation 24.6 % nucleotide and 11.8 % amino acid).

  20. Prospects for cannabinoid therapies in viral encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Solbrig, Marylou V; Fan, Yijun; Hazelton, Paul

    2013-11-06

    Cannabinoids are promising therapies to support neurogenesis and decelerate disease progression in neuroinflammatory and degenerative disorders. Whether neuroprotective effects of cannabinoids are sustainable during persistent viral infection of the CNS is not known. Using a rodent model of chronic viral encephalitis based on Borna Disease (BD) virus, in which 1 week treatment with the general cannabinoid WIN 55,212-2 has been shown to be neuroprotective (Solbrig et al., 2010), we examine longer term (2 week treatment) effects of a general (CB1 and CB2) cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN55,212-2 (1mg/kg ip twice per day) or a specific (CB2) cannabinoid receptor agonist HU-308 (5mg/kg ip once daily) on histopathology, measures of frontostriatal neurogenesis and gliogenesis, and viral load. We find that WIN and HU-308 differ in their ability to protect new BrdU(+) cells. The selective CB2 agonist HU increases BrdU(+) cells in prefrontal cortex (PFC), significantly increases BrdU(+) cells in striatum, differentially regulates polydendrocytes vs. microglia/macrophages, and reduces immune activation at a time WIN-treated rats appear tolerant to the anti-inflammatory effect of their cannabinoid treatment. WIN and HU had little direct viral effect in PFC and striatum, yet reduced viral signal in hippocampus. Thus, HU-308 action on CB2 receptors, receptors known to be renewed during microglia proliferation and action, is a nontolerizing mechanism of controlling CNS inflammation during viral encephalitis by reducing microglia activation, as well as partially limiting viral infection, and uses a nonpsychotropic cannabinoid agonist.

  1. Cachexia in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Walsmith, Joseph; Roubenoff, Ronenn

    2002-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a debilitating, chronic, systemic, autoimmune disease of unknown etiology that causes destruction of joint cartilage and bone. It generally occurs between the fourth and sixth decades of life, and affects two to three times more women than men. It is characterized by joint stiffness, pain, and swelling, and is accompanied by a loss of body cell mass. This loss of cell mass, known as rheumatoid cachexia, predominates in skeletal muscle, but also occurs in the viscera and immune system. Thus, rheumatoid cachexia leads to muscle weakness and a loss of functional capacity, and is believed to accelerate morbidity and mortality in rheumatoid arthritis. Currently there is no established mechanism for rheumatoid cachexia, but it is accompanied by elevated resting energy expenditure, accelerated whole-body protein catabolism, and excess production of the inflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1beta. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha is probably the central mediator of muscle wasting in rheumatoid arthritis, and is known to act synergistically with interleukin-1beta to promote cachexia. In general, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1beta are thought to alter the balance between protein degradation and protein synthesis in rheumatoid arthritis to cause muscle wasting. The precise mechanism by which they do this is not known. Reduced peripheral insulin action and low habitual physical activity are important consequences of rheumatoid arthritis, and have also been implicated as mediators of rheumatoid cachexia. Insulin inhibits muscle protein degradation. Consequently, reduced peripheral insulin action in rheumatoid arthritis is thought to be permissive to cytokine-driven muscle loss. The cause of reduced peripheral insulin action in rheumatoid arthritis is not known, but tumor necrosis factor-alpha has been shown to interfere with insulin receptor signaling and is probably an important contributor. Low habitual physical

  2. Fifteen minute consultation: Managing neonatal and childhood herpes encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Le Doare, K; Menson, Esse; Patel, Deepak; Lim, Ming; Lyall, Hermione; Herberg, Jethro

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) is the most common single cause of viral encephalitis in infants and children. Treated or untreated, it can be associated with considerable morbidity and mortality, and its presentation is usually insidious and non-specific. Prompt and careful investigation is important in order to establish the diagnosis so that treatment can be optimised. We address some common questions arising when diagnosing and treating presumed HSE throughout childhood. PMID:25112286

  3. Development of a Genetically Engineered Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus Vaccine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-20

    immunization, the horses will be returned to the large animal biocontainment facility to be challenged with equine virulent VEE virus. The animals will be...AD £IT FiLE C p DEVELOPMENT OF A GENETICALLY ENGINEERED VENEZUELAN EQUINE ENCEPHALITIS VIRUS VACCINE ANNUAL REPORT to DENNIS W. TRENT 0DECEMBER 20...Engineered Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus Vaccine 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Dennis W. Trent 13a. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME COVERED 14. DATE OF REPORT

  4. Acute septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Shirtliff, Mark E; Mader, Jon T

    2002-10-01

    Acute septic arthritis may develop as a result of hematogenous seeding, direct introduction, or extension from a contiguous focus of infection. The pathogenesis of acute septic arthritis is multifactorial and depends on the interaction of the host immune response and the adherence factors, toxins, and immunoavoidance strategies of the invading pathogen. Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Staphylococcus aureus are used in discussing the host-pathogen interaction in the pathogenesis of acute septic arthritis. While diagnosis rests on isolation of the bacterial species from synovial fluid samples, patient history, clinical presentation, laboratory findings, and imaging studies are also important. Acute nongonococcal septic arthritis is a medical emergency that can lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Therefore, prompt recognition, rapid and aggressive antimicrobial therapy, and surgical treatment are critical to ensuring a good prognosis. Even with prompt diagnosis and treatment, high mortality and morbidity rates still occur. In contrast, gonococcal arthritis is often successfully treated with antimicrobial therapy alone and demonstrates a very low rate of complications and an excellent prognosis for full return of normal joint function. In the case of prosthetic joint infections, the hardware must be eventually removed by a two-stage revision in order to cure the infection.

  5. [Acute encephalitis. Neuropsychiatric manifestations as expression of influenza virus infection].

    PubMed

    Moreno-Flagge, Noris; Bayard, Vicente; Quirós, Evelia; Alonso, Tomás

    2009-01-01

    The aim is to review the encephalitis in infants and adolescents as well as its etiology, clinical manifestation, epidemiology, physiopathology, diagnostic methods and treatment, and the neuropsyquiatric signs appearing an influenza epidemy. Encephalitis is an inflammation of the central nervous system (CNS) which involves the brain. The clinical manifestations usually are: headache, fever and confusional stage. It could also be manifested as seizures, personality changes, or psiqyiatric symptoms. The clinical manifestations are related to the virus and the cell type affected in the brain. A meningitis or encephalopathy need to be ruled out. It could be present as an epidemic or isolated form, beeing this the most frequent form. It could be produced by a great variety of infections agents including virus, bacterias, fungal and parasitic. Viral causes are herpesvirus, arbovirus, rabies and enterovirus. Bacterias such as Borrelia burgdorferi, Rickettsia and Mycoplasma neumoniae. Some fungal causes are: Coccidioides immitis and Histoplasma capsulatum. More than 100 agents are related to encephalitis. The diagnosis of encephalitis is a challenge for the clinician and its infectious etiology is clear in only 40 to 70% of all cases. The diagnosis of encephalitis can be established with absolute certainty only by the microscopic examination of brain tissue. Epidemiology is related to age of the patients, geographic area, season, weather or the host immune system. Early intervention can reduce the mortality rate and sequels. We describe four patients with encephalitis and neuropsychiatric symptoms during an influenza epidemic.

  6. Cortical hypometabolism demonstrated by PET in relapsing NMDA receptor encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Sekhar C; Gill, Deepak; Webster, Richard; Howman-Giles, Robert; Dale, Russell C

    2010-09-01

    N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor encephalitis is a newly defined type of autoimmune encephalitis. Two girls (age 3 years, case 1, and 7 years, case 2) with relapsing NMDA receptor encephalitis each had the classic clinical features of encephalopathy, movement disorders, psychiatric symptoms, seizures, insomnia, and mild autonomic dysfunction. Both patients had persistent neuropsychiatric disability, despite immune therapies. Positron emission tomography (PET) scans were performed during clinical relapse at 6 weeks (case 1) and 5 months (case 2). In both cases, the scans demonstrated reduced fluorodeoxyglucose metabolism in the cerebral cortex, with the temporal regions being most affected. PET imaging was more sensitive than magnetic resonance imaging in these patients. In contrast, the one previous report of acute NMDA receptor encephalitis indicated cortical hypermetabolism. Thus, NMDA receptor encephalitis may be associated with variable PET findings, possibly dependent upon the timing of the study, or other factors. Future studies should investigate whether cortical hypometabolism is associated with a relapsing course, and whether it is predictive of a poorer outcome in NMDA receptor encephalitis.

  7. [Two cases of anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kazue; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Matsuoka, Tadasu; Kido, Mikio; Uehara, Takashi; Suzuki, Michio

    2011-01-01

    Anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis, reported by Dalmau et al., is a paraneoplastic encephalitis frequently associated with ovarian teratoma. After the manifestation of schizophrenia-like psychotic symptoms in the initial stage, serious neurological symptoms such as convulsions and central hypoventilation develop. We report two cases of 17-year-old girls with anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis who exhibited different clinical courses. Case 1 showed a typical course of anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis associated with sustained consciousness disturbance requiring long-term artificial respiration. Case 2 underwent surgery for an ovarian teratoma in the early stages of the disorder, did not show convulsions or central hypoventilation, and recovered without any sequelae. Early resection of the ovarian teratoma and the immune suppression therapy may have contributed to the rapid recovery and favorable outcome in case 2. Psychiatrists are the first to see a majority of patients with anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis because of psychiatric symptoms and behavioral changes observed in the initial stage. For successful treatment, psychiatrists need to cooperate with neurologists and gynecologists early in the course of this disorder. Psychiatrists' knowledge of the symptoms and clinical course of this form of encephalitis is essential for early detection and adequate treatment, which may be life-saving and contribute to good functional outcomes.

  8. [Arthritis and clinical history].

    PubMed

    Silva, Lígia; Sampaio, Luzia; Pinto, José; Ventura, Francisco S

    2011-01-01

    In front of a patient with arthritis, clinical good-sense tells that the most probable diagnosis are the most prevalent ones. Nevertheless, we have to exclude a multiplicity of other aetiologies, less frequent, but with highest implications in the therapeutic conduct. Infections by Brucella and by Borrelia are rare causes of chronic arthritis, yet are diagnosis to consider, even when the clinical manifestations aren't the most typical, as there still exist endemic areas in Portugal. Here we report two clinical cases about patients with arthritis for more than one year, subject to ineffective exams ant treatments. Only the clinical history could put on evidence clinical-epidemiological data, suggestive of Brucellosis and Lyme Disease, namely the professional contact with infected animals, and the history of probable erythema migrans, that pointed toward the correct diagnosis. So, with directed therapeutic, there was complete resolution of the inflammatory symptoms.

  9. Arthritis in Roman Britain.

    PubMed Central

    Thould, A K; Thould, B T

    1983-01-01

    The pattern of arthritis in Roman Britain was investigated by examining the skeletons of 416 adults from the Roman cemetery at Poundbury Camp near Dorchester, Dorset. The mean height of the people was not much less than that of the current British population, and the prevalence of right handedness was similar to our own. There was a high prevalence of osteoarthritis for such a relatively young community, with particularly severe changes in the vertebral column. The pattern of joints affected by osteoarthritis was different from that seen now, but the prevalence of vertebral ankylosing hyperostosis was much the same. Rheumatoid arthritis was seen as often as the expected rat would indicate, given that the population died young, but it was rare. Other forms of arthritis, including gout and ankylosing spondylitis, were not seen. Images FIG 1 FIG 2 FIG 3 FIG 4 PMID:6418269

  10. Neonatal septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Dan, M

    1983-11-01

    To assess and correlate the microbiology of neonatal septic arthritis with the clinical presentation, we reviewed the records of nine infants with neonatal septic arthritis (NSA) diagnosed at Edmonton hospitals between 1964 and 1981, and evaluated 92 other cases reported in the English literature since 1960. Our analysis revealed that the microbiology of NSA seemed to be dependent on whether it was hospital or community acquired. In the hospital-acquired cases, staphylococci were the predominant isolates (62%), followed by Candida species (17%) and gram-negative enteric bacilli (15%). Community-acquired arthritis was caused most often by streptococci (52%), followed by staphylococci (26%) and gonococci (17%). Since 1970, the relative infrequency of staphylococcal (5%) in favor of streptococcal (75%) isolates in community-acquired NSA is even more pronounced.

  11. Dermatoglyphics in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ravindranath, Roopa; Shubha, R; Nagesh, H V; Johnson, Job; Rajangam, Sayee

    2003-10-01

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis have been referred to Division of Human Genetics for counselling. Qualitative dermatoglyphics comprising of finger print pattern, interdigital pattern, hypothenar pattern and palmar crease were studied on 26 female and 11 male rheumatoid arthritis patients. Comparison between patient male and control male; and patient female and control female has been done. 'Chi' square test was performed. In male patients, with hands together, arches were increased, loops/ whorls were decreased. Partial Simian crease was significantly increased. In the right hand, patterns were increased in the 3rd interdigital area. On the other hand, in female patients there was a significant increase in whorls and decrease in loops on the first finger on both the hands, increase in arches on the 3rd finger; both arches and whorls on the 4th finger of left hand. Present study has emphasized that dermatoglyphics could be applied as a diagnostic tool to patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

  12. In vitro production of a caprine embryo from a preantral follicle cultured in media supplemented with growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Magalhães, D M; Duarte, A B G; Araújo, V R; Brito, I R; Soares, T G; Lima, I M T; Lopes, C A P; Campello, C C; Rodrigues, A P R; Figueiredo, J R

    2011-01-01

    The objective was to evaluate the effects of growth hormone (GH) on the survival, growth, maturation, and fertilization of oocytes derived from caprine preantral ovarian follicles cultured in vitro. Preantral follicles were isolated from the cortex of caprine ovaries and individually cultured for 18 d in the absence (control) or presence of bovine GH at concentrations of 10 or 50 ng/mL (GH10 and GH50, respectively). Follicle development was evaluated on the basis of survival, antral cavity formation, diameter increase, and the presence of healthy cumulus-oocyte complexes and mature oocytes. After culture, oocytes were subjected to in vitro maturation (IVM) and in vitro fertilization (IVF). The rate of antrum formation after Day 6 of culture was higher in both GH10 and GH50 than in the control (81.0, 92.7, and 47.6%, respectively, P < 0.05). Percentages of grown oocytes that were acceptable for IVM were also higher (P < 0.05) in GH-treated groups than in the control (54.8, 48.8, and 11.9% for GH10, GH50, and Control). A higher percentage of oocytes in the GH50 treatment underwent meiotic resumption (50.0%), produced mature oocytes, and enabled production of an embryo after IVF than in the control group (0.0%; P < 0.05). In conclusion, GH promoted in vitro growth and maturation of goat preantral follicle oocytes and enabled production of an embryo. Furthermore, this study was apparently the first to produce a caprine embryo by in vitro fertilization of oocytes derived from preantral follicles grown in vitro.

  13. What Is Juvenile Arthritis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the possible causes of juvenile arthritis. They are studying genetic and environmental factors that they think are involved. They are also trying to improve current treatments and find new medicines that will work better with fewer side effects. Research supported by ...

  14. Dapsone in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Chang, D J; Lamothe, M; Stevens, R M; Sigal, L H

    1996-06-01

    Dapsone, a synthetic sulfone with chemical similarities to sulfapyridine, has been used for a number of years to treat leprosy and dermatitis herpetiformis. Recently, a number of prospective, randomized, double-blind trials have shown their success in the management of rheumatoid arthritis, with dapsone being superior to placebo and comparable to chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine. Its mode of anti-inflammatory actions in rheumatoid arthritis is not clearly understood, but modulation of neutrophil activity or inhibition of neutrophil inflammatory product formation or release appear to play a role. The major limiting side effect is hemolytic anemia, which may be mitigated through careful patient selection, conservative drug dosing, close monitoring, and possibly, concurrent administration of antioxidants or cytochrome P450 inhibitors. Methemoglobinemia is another common finding among patients receiving dapsone therapy, but rarely does it result in prominent symptoms other than transient pallor. Less common adverse events to dapsone include the idiosyncratic reactions of leukopenia and agranulocytosis, cutaneous eruptions, peripheral neuropathy, psychosis, toxic hepatitis, cholestatic jaundice, nephrotic syndrome, renal papillary necrosis, severe hypoalbuminemia without proteinuria, an infectious mononucleosis-like syndrome, and minor neurological and gastrointestinal complaints. In this report, two patients with advanced rheumatoid arthritis, who were safely and effectively treated with dapsone after failure with other second-line agents, are described and the literature is reviewed. We suggest that dapsone is an effective second-line agent in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

  15. Neonatal septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Halder, D; Seng, Q B; Malik, A S; Choo, K E

    1996-09-01

    Neonatal septic arthritis has always been considered as separate from its counterpart in older children. The condition is uncommon but serious. Affected neonates usually survive, but with permanent skeletal deformities. Ten cases of neonatal septic arthritis were diagnosed between January 1989 and December 1993 in the neonatal intensive care units of two referral hospitals in the state of Kelantan, Malaysia. All except one neonate was born prematurely. The mean age of presentation was 15.6 days. Joint swelling (10/10), increased warmth (7/10) and erythema of the overlying skin (7/10) were the common presenting signs. Vague constitutional symptoms preceded the definitive signs of septic arthritis in all cases. The total white cell counts were raised with shift to the left. The knee (60%) was not commonly affected, followed by the hip (13%) and ankle (13%). Three neonates had multiple joint involvement. Coexistence of arthritis with osteomyelitis was observed in seven neonates. The commonest organism isolated was methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (9/10). Needle aspiration was performed in nine neonates and one had incision with drainage. Follow up data was available for five neonates and two of these had skeletal morbidity. Early diagnosis by frequent examination of the joints, prompt treatment and control of nosocomial infection are important for management.

  16. Arthritis of the Hand

    MedlinePlus

    ... If arthritis is due to damaged ligaments, the support structures of the joint may be unstable or “loose.” ... dominant hand is affected • Your personal goals, home support structure, and ability to understand the treatment and comply ...

  17. Oxidative Stress and Cell Apoptosis in Caprine Liver Induced by Molybdenum and Cadmium in Combination.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Zhang, Caiying; Zhuang, Yu; Gu, Xiaolong; Xiao, Qingyang; Guo, Xiaoquan; Hu, Guoliang; Cao, Huabin

    2016-09-01

    To investigate the effects of co-exposure to molybdenum (Mo) and cadmium (Cd) on oxidative stress and cell apoptosis in caprine livers, 36 Boer goats were randomly divided into four groups with nine goats in each group. Three groups were randomly assigned with one of three oral treatments of CdCl2 (0.5 mg Cd kg(-1)·BW) and [(NH4)6Mo7O24·4H2O] (15 mg Mo kg(-1)·BW, 30 mg Mo kg(-1)·BW, 45 mg Mo kg(-1)·BW), while the control group received deionized water. Liver tissues on days 0, 25, and 50 were subjected to determine antioxidant activity indexes and the messenger RNA (mRNA) expression levels of ceruloplasmin (CP), cysteinyl aspartate-specific proteinase-3 (caspase-3), second mitochondria-derived activator of caspases (Smac), and cytochrome-C (Cyt-C) genes. The results showed that significant reductions were observed in total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC) and total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD) activities (P < 0.05), while activities or contents of malondialdehyde (MDA), nitric oxide (NO), and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) were increased (P < 0.05). The mRNA expression levels of CP, caspase-3, Smac, and Cyt-C genes were upregulated (P < 0.05). In addition, histopathological lesions showed different degrees of vacuolar degeneration and edematous and mitochondrial swelling. The results suggest that co-exposure to Mo and Cd could induce oxidative stress and cell apoptosis possibly associated with mitochondrial intrinsic pathway in goat liver and show possible synergistic effects between the two elements.

  18. Varying Dietary Levels of Molybdenum Inducing Cell Apoptosis of Spleen Under Cadmium Stress in Caprine.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Qingyang; Zhang, Caiying; Gu, Xiaolong; Zhuang, Yu; Luo, Junrong; Liu, Ping; Guo, Xiaoquan; Hu, Guoliang; Cao, Huabin

    2016-07-01

    The present experiment aims at evaluating chronic toxic effects of the combination of cadmium (Cd) and molybdenum (Mo) according to residual element contents, apoptosis gene expression, and ultrastructure and histopathology changes of caprine spleen. In total, 36 Boer goats were randomly divided into four groups with the equal number in each group. The control group was orally administered with deionized water while the experimental groups I, II, and III were administered with the equal quantity of CdCl2 (1 mg kg(-1) BW) and (NH4)6·Mo7O24·4H2O including 15, 30, and 45 mg·Mo kg(-1) BW, respectively. Three individuals from each group were treated with euthanasia on days 0, 25, and 50. The data showed that the content of splenic residual Mo and Cd increased (P < 0.05) in the experimental groups on days 25 and 50, while no significant difference was observed in the content of Cu. The apoptosis-related gene expression levels including Bcl-2, Bax, Caspase-3, Smac, and ceruloplasmin (CP) were also determined. Results showed that significant reductions were observed in Bcl-2 and CP expressions (P < 0.01), while Caspase-3 gene was up-regulated (P < 0.05). However, no significant difference was observed in Smac and Bax expressions. Furthermore, on day 50, spleen tissues were presented to observe ultrastructural changes in lesions by means of transmission electron microscopy, with fragmentized nucleus, vesiculation of cytoplasm, mitochondria hyperplasia, and increasing lysosomes included. In addition, histopathology results corroborated the toxicity by showing cell hemorrhage, thickening central arteries, and enhanced capsule thickness. To sum up, our study revealed that the combination of Cd and Mo could induce remarkable damage to the spleen of goats by promoting cell apoptosis in the mitochondrial pathway and affecting the deposition of Mo and Cd.

  19. Effects of volatile fatty acids on propionate metabolism and gluconeogenesis in caprine hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Aiello, R.J.; Armentano, L.E.

    1987-12-01

    Isolated caprine hepatocytes were incubated with fatty acids of various chain lengths. Short-chain fatty acids effects on rates of gluconeogenesis and oxidation from (2-/sup 14/C) propionate were determined. Additions of glucose (2.5 mM) had no effect on hepatic (2-/sup 14/C)-propionate metabolism in the presence and absence of amino acids. A complete mixture of amino acids increased label incorporation from (2-/sup 14/C) propionate into (/sup 14/C) glucose by 22%. Butyrate inhibited (2-/sup 14/C) propionate metabolism and increased the apparent Michaelis constant for (2-/sup 14/C) propionate incorporation into (/sup 14/C) glucose from 2.4 +/- 1.5 to 5.6 +/- .9 mM. Butyrate's effects on propionate were similar in the presence and absence of L-carnitine (1 mM). Isobutyrate, 2-methylbutyrate, and valerate (1.25 mM) had no effect on (/sup 14/C) glucose production but decreased /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ production to 57, 61, and 54% of the control (2-/sup 14/C) propionate (1.25 mM). This inhibition on /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ was not competitive. Isovalerate had no effect on either (2-/sup 14/C) propionate incorporation into glucose of CO/sub 2/. An increase in ratio of (/sup 14/C) glucose to /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ from (2-/sup 14/C)-propionate demonstrated that short-chain fatty acids other than butyrate do not inhibit gluconeogenesis from propionate. In addition, fatty acids that generate a net synthesis of intracellular oxaloacetate may partition propionate carbons toward gluconeogenic rather than oxidative pathways in goat hepatocytes.

  20. Identification of Brucella melitensis 16M genes required for bacterial survival in the caprine host.

    PubMed

    Zygmunt, Michel S; Hagius, Sue D; Walker, Joel V; Elzer, Philip H

    2006-01-01

    Brucella species are gram-negative bacteria which belong to alpha-Proteobacteria family. These organisms are zoonotic pathogens that induce abortion and sterility in domestic mammals and chronic infections in humans known as Malta fever. The virulence of Brucella is dependent upon its ability to enter and colonize the cells in which it multiplies. The genetic basis of this aspect is poorly understood. Signature-tagged mutagenesis (STM) was used to identify potential Brucella virulence factors. PCR amplification has been used in place of DNA hybridization to identify the STM-generated attenuated mutants. A library of 288 Brucella melitensis 16M tagged mini-Tn5 Km2 mutants, in 24 pools, was screened for its ability to colonize spleen, lymph nodes and liver of goats at three weeks post-i.v. infection. This comparative screening identified 7 mutants (approximately 5%) which were not recovered from the output pool in goats. Some genes were known virulence genes involved in biosynthesis of LPS (lpsA gene) or in intracellular survival (the virB operon). Other mutants included ones which had a disrupted gene homologous to flgF, a gene coding for the basal-body rod of the flagellar apparatus, and another with a disruption in a gene homologous to ppk which is involved in the biosynthesis of inorganic polyphosphate (PolyP) from ATP. Other genes identified encoded factors involved in DNA metabolism and oxidoreduction metabolism. Using STM and the caprine host for screening, potential virulence determinants in B. melitensis have been identified.

  1. G3BP–Caprin1–USP10 complexes mediate stress granule condensation and associate with 40S subunits

    PubMed Central

    Panas, Marc D.; Achorn, Christopher A.; Lyons, Shawn; Tisdale, Sarah; Hickman, Tyler; Thomas, Marshall; Lieberman, Judy; McInerney, Gerald M.; Ivanov, Pavel; Anderson, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian stress granules (SGs) contain stalled translation preinitiation complexes that are assembled into discrete granules by specific RNA-binding proteins such as G3BP. We now show that cells lacking both G3BP1 and G3BP2 cannot form SGs in response to eukaryotic initiation factor 2α phosphorylation or eIF4A inhibition, but are still SG-competent when challenged with severe heat or osmotic stress. Rescue experiments using G3BP1 mutants show that phosphomimetic G3BP1-S149E fails to rescue SG formation, whereas G3BP1-F33W, a mutant unable to bind G3BP partner proteins Caprin1 or USP10, rescues SG formation. Caprin1/USP10 binding to G3BP is mutually exclusive: Caprin binding promotes, but USP10 binding inhibits, SG formation. G3BP interacts with 40S ribosomal subunits through its RGG motif, which is also required for G3BP-mediated SG formation. We propose that G3BP mediates the condensation of SGs by shifting between two different states that are controlled by the phosphorylation of S149 and by binding to Caprin1 or USP10. PMID:27022092

  2. Anti-NMDA Receptor antibody encephalitis with concomitant detection of Varicella zoster virus.

    PubMed

    Solís, Natalia; Salazar, Lucrecia; Hasbun, Rodrigo

    2016-10-01

    The typical presentation of anti-NMDA (N-Methyl-d-Aspartate) receptor encephalitis involves young women with psychiatric, neurologic and autonomic symptoms; it is often associated with mature ovarian teratomas. NMDA receptor encephalitis has been described following Herpes simplex virus (HSV) encephalitis. This case describes a classic presentation of anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis with the concomitant presence of Varicella zoster virus in the cerebrospinal fluid.

  3. Primary viraemia responses of herons to experimental infection with Murray Valley encephalitis, Kunjin and Japanese encephalitis viruses.

    PubMed

    Boyle, D B; Dickerman, R W; Marshall, I D

    1983-12-01

    Rufous night herons, Pacific herons, little egrets and intermediate egrets were experimentally infected with Murray Valley encephalitis, Kunjin or Japanese encephalitis viruses. Viraemias of at least one day's duration were detected in all birds except two intermediate egrets inoculated with a very low dose of Kunjin virus and one rufous night heron inoculated with Japanese encephalitis virus. there was usually a viraemia of 3 to 5 days' duration commencing on the first or second day and continuing until day 5 or 6 and rarely until day 7. Maximum titres tended to be higher in young birds, up to 2-5 months of age (10(4)-10(5) mouse LD50/ml), than in older birds more than 8 months of age (10(3)-10(4) mouse LD50/ml). Significant differences in maximum viraemia titres were not observed in the different species or between Murray Valley encephalitis and Kunjin viruses. Japanese encephalitis viraemias were significantly lower, but this was probably due to the high mouse brain passage level of the strain used. The onset of viraemia was earlier in intermediate egrets than in rufous night herons inoculated with similar doses of Murray Valley encephalitis virus, but no difference in the susceptibility to infection was observed. With Kunjin virus there was a significant difference in the susceptibility of intermediate egrets and rufous night herons, with rufous night herons being more susceptible to infection with low doses of virus. This difference in threshold of infection, if it extends to other species with both Kunjin and Murray Valley encephalitis viruses, may, in part, be an explanation for the greater incidence of natural infections observed in rufous night herons compared with other species and orders of water birds.

  4. A possible case of caprine-associated malignant catarrhal fever in a domestic water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) in Switzerland

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) is a fatal herpesvirus infection, affecting various wild and domestic ruminants all over the world. Water buffaloes were reported to be particularly susceptible for the ovine herpesvirus-2 (OvHV-2) causing the sheep-associated form of MCF (SA-MCF). This report describes the first case of possibly caprine-associated malignant catarrhal fever symptoms in a domestic water buffalo in Switzerland. Case presentation The buffalo cow presented with persistent fever, dyspnoea, nasal bleeding and haematuria. Despite symptomatic therapy, the buffalo died and was submitted to post mortem examination. Major findings were an abomasal ulceration, a mild haemorrhagic cystitis and multifocal haemorrhages on the epicardium and on serosal and mucosal surfaces. Eyes and oral cavity were not affected. Histopathology revealed a mild to moderate lymphohistiocytic vasculitis limited to the brain and the urinary bladder. Although these findings are typical for MCF, OvHV-2 DNA was not detected in peripheral blood lymphocytes or in paraffin-embedded brain, using an OvHV-2 specific real time PCR. With the aid of a panherpesvirus PCR, a caprine herpesvirus-2 (CpHV-2) sequence could be amplified from both samples. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first report of malignant catarrhal fever in the subfamily Bovinae, where the presence of CpHV-2 could be demonstrated. The etiological context has yet to be evaluated. PMID:22132808

  5. Geographic dynamics of viral encephalitis in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Henrich, Timothy J; Hutchaleelaha, Sombat; Jiwariyavej, Vitaya; Barbazan, Philippe; Nitatpattana, Narong; Yoksan, Sutee; Gonzalez, Jean-Paul

    2003-06-01

    Viral encephalitis (VE) continues to be a major disease in Asia, causing serious illness which may result in death or have neurological sequelae. This study involves an ecological analysis of the climatic, geographic and seasonal patterns of clinically reported VE in Thailand from 1993 to 1998 to investigate regional and seasonal differences in disease incidence. Three thousand eight hundred and twenty nine cases of VE were clinically diagnosed nationwide during the study period by the Thai Ministry of Public Health. Spearman rank correlations of temporal, spatial and geographic variables with disease incidence were performed. The monthly incidence of VE correlated significantly with seasonal changes in temperature, relative humidity and rainfall in the north-northeast region of Thailand (P < 0.001), whereas incidence in the south-central region correlated only with relative humidity (P = 0.003). Spatial analysis revealed a positive correlation of disease with elevation (P < 0.001), and negative correlations with rice-field cover (P < 0.001), agricultural land-use (P < 0.001) and temperature (P = 0.004) in the north-northeast region. No significant spatial correlation was identified in the south-central region. The spatial distribution of VE suggests that etiologic variations may be responsible, in part, for the geographic patterns of disease. Active etiologic surveillance is necessary in a variety of geographic settings in order to provide physicians with information necessary for disease prevention and clinical management.

  6. The impact of climate on Japanese encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Hsu, S M; Yen, A M F; Chen, T H H

    2008-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the change of seasonal pattern of Japanese encephalitis (JE) cases in the post-vaccination period and to elucidate whether the lagged climate variables (precipitation and temperature) were associated with occurrence of JE after adjustment for seasonal pattern, time trend, geographic areas, pig density, vaccination coverage rate for humans, and time dependence of time-series numbers of JE cases. A total of 287 confirmed JE cases between 1991 and 2005 were collected, together with monthly data on socio-ecological archival data including climate, pig density and vaccination. A time-series generalized autoregressive Poisson regression model was used to achieve the objectives. The rate of JE increased from 1998 onwards. The seasonal pattern on occurrence of JE cases clustered between May and August during the period from 1991 to 2005 in Taiwan. In each geographic area, monitoring temperature and precipitation, two possible proxy variables for mosquito density, in conjunction with seasonal factors and pig density is of assistance in forecasting JE epidemics.

  7. THE PATHOGENESIS OF HERPES VIRUS ENCEPHALITIS

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Richard T.

    1964-01-01

    The pathogenesis of herpes simplex virus encephalitis and myelitis was studied in suckling mice using routine titration procedures and fluorescent antibody staining for the identification of infected cells. After intracerebral inoculation virus was shown to disperse rapidly in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), multiply in meninges and ependyma, and then invade the underlying parenchyma infecting both neurons and glia. Following extraneural inoculation virus gained access to the central nervous system (CNS) by both hematogenous and neural pathways. After intraperitoneal and intranasal inoculation virus was found to multiply in viscera and produce viremia; foci of CNS infection then developed around small cerebral vessels. After subcutaneous and intranasal inoculation neural spread of virus was demonstrated along corresponding peripheral and cranial nerves. This spread resulted from the centripetal infection of endoneural cells (Schwann cells and fibroblasts). Antigen was not found in axons even after infection of the corresponding ganglion cell perikaryon. Subsequent spread within the CNS was unrelated to neural tracts, and there was no evidence of axonal spread of virus in the host-virus system studied. These findings are discussed in relation to previous and current theories of the viral "blood-brain barrier" and neural pathways of infection. PMID:14164487

  8. Tick-borne encephalitis in eastern France.

    PubMed

    Hansmann, Yves; Pierre Gut, Jean; Remy, Veronique; Martinot, Martin; Allard Witz, Marie; Christmann, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Each y a few cases of TBE infection are described in Alsace, France which lies at the occidental limit of the endemic zone of tick-borne encephalitis (TBE). Hence we carried out a retrospective epidemiological and clinical study of TBE infection in Alsace. Data were collected from serological results sent to the Institut de Virologie (Université Louis Pasteur) in Strasbourg. All samples positive for specific IgM against TBE were retained. The physician in charge of each patient was asked to provide clinical, epidemiological and biological data and with his agreement the medical file was referred to us. Since 1968, 64 cases of TBE infection, occurring between April and November, had been described. In 56% of cases, flu-like symptoms preceded neurological symptoms. Most patients had meningitis (54%) or meningoencephalitis (34%). There was no death due to TBE. Two areas were more highly endemic for the disease: the Guebwiller valley in low mountain country and the Neuhof forest, near Strasbourg in the plain of Alsace. In the last 2 y of the study, a third zone seemed to emerge, in the Munster valley. This epidemiological survey revealed the existence in Alsace of 2 endemic zones of TBE with a third zone possibly emerging in the last few y. The survey must be continued to follow the evolution of the disease.

  9. Henipavirus Encephalitis: Recent Developments and Advances.

    PubMed

    Ong, Kien Chai; Wong, Kum Thong

    2015-09-01

    The genus Henipavirus within the family Paramyxoviridae includes the Hendra virus (HeV) and Nipah virus (NiV) which were discovered in the 1990s in Australia and Malaysia, respectively, after emerging to cause severe and often fatal outbreaks in humans and animals. While HeV is confined to Australia, more recent NiV outbreaks have been reported in Bangladesh, India and the Philippines. The clinical manifestations of both henipaviruses in humans appear similar, with a predominance of an acute encephalitic syndrome. Likewise, the pathological features are similar and characterized by disseminated, multi-organ vasculopathy comprising endothelial infection/ulceration, vasculitis, vasculitis-induced thrombosis/occlusion, parenchymal ischemia/microinfarction, and parenchymal cell infection in the central nervous system (CNS), lung, kidney and other major organs. This unique dual pathogenetic mechanism of vasculitis-induced microinfarction and neuronal infection causes severe tissue damage in the CNS. Both viruses can also cause relapsing encephalitis months and years after the acute infection. Many animal models studied to date have largely confirmed the pathology of henipavirus infection, and provided the means to test new therapeutic agents and vaccines. As the bat is the natural host of henipaviruses and has worldwide distribution, spillover events into human populations are expected to occur in the future.

  10. Eastern equine encephalitis: a classical case.

    PubMed

    Baig, Basarat; Mehta, Tapan; Khalid, Nauman; Chhabra, Lovely

    2014-10-01

    We present the case of a 40-year-old man with rapidly deteriorating acute meningoencephalitis, finally diagnosed as eastern equine encephalitis (EEE). The course and timing in this patient are quite characteristic. EEE is an arthropod borneviral illness in which the mosquito serves as the vector. It is amongst the most severe of the arbovirus encephalitides and has a high mortality and morbidity. In nonfatal cases, residual neurological deficits are often severe and permanent. North American lineage of EEE is mainly found in the northeast especially along the coastal areas. EEE is primarily found in horses and other domestic mammals that remain outdoors nocturnally. In humans, symptoms range from nonspecific constitutional features to catastrophic neurological sequelae including death. Hyponatremia and increased cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) white blood cell count are independent predictors of poor outcomes. Diagnosis is suggestive by demonstrating IgM antibody in blood or CSF samples and can be confirmed by other serologic assay including immunohistochemistry and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Measures recommended by the Center for Disease Control (CDC) for prevention include using repellents, protective clothing, screens, and eradication of mosquito breeding areas. EEE remains without cure and prevention is the best medicine.

  11. [Anti-NMDA-receptor encephalitis. An interdisciplinary clinical picture].

    PubMed

    Prüss, H; Dalmau, J; Arolt, V; Wandinger, K-P

    2010-04-01

    Anti-NMDA-receptor encephalitis is a severe and considerably underdiagnosed form of encephalitis with characteristic clinical features including psychiatric symptoms, decreased levels of consciousness, hypoventilation, epileptic seizures, autonomic dysfunction and dyskinesias. Most patients are primarily seen by psychiatrists, often on the assumption of a drug-induced psychosis. Anti-NMDA-receptor encephalitis had initially been described in young women with ovarian teratoma, but is also common in women without tumour, in men and in children. The diagnosis is based on the characteristic clinical picture, supporting findings of brain MRI, electroencephalogram and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and the presence of highly specific autoantibodies directed against the NR1 subunit of NMDA-type glutamate receptors in the serum or CSF. In particular, anti-NMDA-receptor encephalitis must be excluded in patients with 'encephalitis of unknown cause'. In principle, the prognosis is favourable and recovery from symptoms can be expected even after prolonged intensive care treatment and mechanical ventilation. However, improvement correlates with prompt identification of the disorder, early immunotherapy and - in the case of a malignancy - with complete tumour removal. Patient care requires an interdisciplinary approach including neurologists, psychiatrists, paediatricians, oncologists and gynaecologists.

  12. Rheumatoid Arthritis: Can It Affect the Lungs?

    MedlinePlus

    Rheumatoid arthritis: Can it affect the lungs? Can rheumatoid arthritis affect your lungs? Answers from April Chang-Miller, M.D. Although rheumatoid arthritis primarily affects joints, it sometimes causes lung disease ...

  13. Rheumatoid Arthritis: Can It Affect the Eyes?

    MedlinePlus

    Rheumatoid arthritis: Can it affect the eyes? Can rheumatoid arthritis affect the eyes? Answers from April Chang-Miller, M.D. Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease that primarily affects ...

  14. Fatal Infection with Murray Valley Encephalitis Virus Imported from Australia to Canada, 2011

    PubMed Central

    Niven, Daniel J.; Afra, Kevin; Iftinca, Mircea; Tellier, Raymond; Fonseca, Kevin; Kramer, Andreas; Safronetz, David; Holloway, Kimberly; Drebot, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Murray Valley encephalitis virus (MVEV), a flavivirus belonging to the Japanese encephalitis serogroup, can cause severe clinical manifestations in humans. We report a fatal case of MVEV infection in a young woman who returned from Australia to Canada. The differential diagnosis for travel-associated encephalitis should include MVEV, particularly during outbreak years. PMID:28098530

  15. Pathogenetic difference between collagen arthritis and adjuvant arthritis

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    Daily treatment with cyclosporin at a dose of 25 mg/kg for 14 d gave complete suppression of the development of collagen arthritis and adjuvant arthritis in Sprague-Dawley rats during an observation period of 45 d. To study whether the immunologic unresponsiveness produced by cyclosporin is antigen specific, we rechallenged the cyclosporin- protected rats with either type II collagen or complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) after discontinuation of cyclosporin treatment. Type II collagen-immunized, cyclosporin-protected rats did not develop arthritis in response to reimmunization with type II collagen, but, they did develop arthritis in response to a subsequent injection of CFA. Similarly, CFA-injected, cyclosporin-protected rats showed a suppressed arthritogenic reaction in response to reinjection of CFA, whereas their response to a subsequent immunization with type II collagen was unaffected. On the other hand, the rats that were treated with cyclosporin without any prior antigenic challenge could develop arthritis in response to a subsequent injection of CFA or type II collagen after cessation of cyclosporin treatment. These results indicate that specific immunologic unresponsiveness can be induced by cyclosporin in the two experimental models of polyarthritis, collagen arthritis and adjuvant arthritis, and that there is no cross-reactivity between type II collagen and the mycobacterial cell wall components. The results further indicate that immunity to type II collagen plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of collagen arthritis but that its pathogenetic role in adjuvant arthritis is insignificant. PMID:6201583

  16. [Two cases of herpes encephalitis with normal cerebrospinal fluid findings].

    PubMed

    Avkan Oğuz, Vildan; Yapar, Nur; Sezak, Nurbanu; Alp Cavuş, Sema; Kuruüzüm, Ziya; Sayiner, Arzu; Ada, Emel; Cakir, Nedim; Yüce, Ayşe

    2006-01-01

    In this report, characteristics of two cases of Herpes simplex virus (HSV) encephalitis with normal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) findings at the time of admission have been discussed and the current literature has been reviewed. The diagnosis of the cases (one was 23 years old male, and the other was 75 years old female patient) was made on the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings concordant with HSV encephalitis, together with HSV-1 DNA positivity by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Both of the patients were treated with acyclovir (3 x 750 mg/day) lasting for 15 days and 21 days, respectively. The first male patient recovered with mild neurological defects, whereas the second female patient died because of nosocomial pneumonia and septicemia. In conclusion, even the CSF findings are normal, in cases considered to be HSV encephalitis, MRI should be the first radiological diagnostic step and the diagnosis should be confirmed by the detection of HSV DNA in CSF by PCR.

  17. Primary amoebic meningo-encephalitis due to Naegleria fowleri.

    PubMed

    Jain, Ragini; Tilak, Vijai

    2011-07-01

    Primary amoebic meningo-encephalitis is a fulminant, often rapidly fatal infection affecting individuals with a recent history of swimming in warm fresh water. A fatal case of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis due to Naegleria fowleri in a 35 years old male suffering from human immunodeficiency virus with pulmonary tuberculosis infection is reported. Naegleria fowleri was diagnosed by wet mount examination of cerebrospinal fluid and the diagnosis was confirmed by culture of the cerebrospinal fluid on non-nutrient agar layered with Escherichia coli. The patient was treated with amphotericin B and antituberculous treatment but the outcome was fatal. Primary amoebic meningo-encephalitis should be suspected in every case of pyogenic meningo-encephalitis in which no bacteria or fungus is found on cerebrospinal fluid examination.

  18. West Nile virus encephalitis with myositis and orchitis.

    PubMed

    Smith, Roger D; Konoplev, Sergiej; DeCourten-Myers, Gabrielle; Brown, Thomas

    2004-02-01

    This report documents the hospital course and autopsy findings of a 43-year-old man with a renal allograft who died of West Nile virus (WNV) encephalitis. Central nervous system (CNS) findings were those of severe necrotizing and hemorrhagic encephalitis affecting gray matter regions limited to the diencepahlon, rhombencephalon, spinal cord, and limbic system. The bilateral process exhibited preferential involvement of motor neurons. Brain imaging obtained 6 days before death demonstrated an unusual pattern of involvement corresponding with the autopsy findings, confirming that imaging may be a specific diagnostic guide in WNV encephalitis. Extra-CNS findings include myositis with T-lymphocyte infiltration of nerve fibers, suggesting that the virus may reach the CNS via peripheral nerves. Orchitis with dense T-lymphocyte infiltration and syncytial cell formation thought to be due to WNV were also noted.

  19. Diagnosis of Jamestown Canyon encephalitis by polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Huang, C; Campbell, W; Grady, L; Kirouac, I; LaForce, F M

    1999-06-01

    In recent years, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has been under study as a potential technique to improve the accuracy of diagnosis of suspected central nervous system viral infections. We describe a case of severe encephalitis in a previously healthy 20-year-old woman from New York who presented with headache, fever, and photophobia. Her illness was characterized by progressive worsening of her neurological status, leading to confusion, delirium, and status epilepticus. The diagnosis of Jamestown Canyon encephalitis was established by positive reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR and nucleic acid sequencing of the band from both cerebrospinal fluid and brain tissue. The nucleotide sequence and the deduced amino acid sequence of the Jamestown Canyon virus from this patient were very similar to Jamestown Canyon virus isolates from mosquito pools in New York. This report suggests that RT-PCR assays could be important tools in the diagnostic workup of cases of encephalitis.

  20. Epstein-Barr Virus Encephalitis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    HASHEMIAN, Somayh; ASHRAFZADEH, Farah; AKHONDIAN, Javad; BEIRAGHI TOOSI, Mehran

    2015-01-01

    Many neurologic manifestations of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection have been documented, including encephalitis, aseptic meningitis, transverse myelitis, and Guillain-Barre syndrome. These manifestations can occur alone or coincidentally with the clinical picture of infectious mononucleosis. EBV encephalitis is rare and is indicated as a wide range of clinical manifestations. We report a 10-year-old girl presented with fever, gait disturbance, and bizarre behavior for one week. The results of the physical examination were unremarkable. The diagnosis of EBV encephalitis was made by changes in titers of EBV specific antibodies and MRI findings. A cranial MRI demonstrated abnormal high signal intensities in the basal ganglia and the striatal body, especially in the putamen and caudate nucleus. EBV infection should be considered when lesions are localized to the basal ganglia. PMID:25767548

  1. Neuroleptic intolerance in patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Lejuste, Florian; Thomas, Laure; Picard, Géraldine; Desestret, Virginie; Ducray, François; Rogemond, Veronique; Psimaras, Dimitri; Antoine, Jean-Christophe; Delattre, Jean-Yves; Groc, Laurent; Leboyer, Marion

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To precisely describe the initial psychiatric presentation of patients with anti-NMDA receptor (NMDAR) antibodies encephalitis (anti-NMDAR encephalitis) to identify potential clues enhancing its early diagnosis. Methods: We retrospectively studied the French Reference Centre medical records of every adult patient with anti-NMDAR encephalitis to specify the patients' initial psychiatric symptoms leading to hospitalization in a psychiatric department and the reasons underlying the diagnosis of anti-NMDAR encephalitis. Results: The medical records of 111 adult patients were reviewed. Psychiatric features were the initial presentation in 65 patients (59%). Among them, several psychiatric manifestations were observed, including visual and auditory hallucinations (n = 26, 40%), depression (n = 15, 23%), mania (n = 5, 8%), acute schizoaffective episode (n = 15, 23%), and eating disorder or addiction (n = 4; 6%). Forty-five patients (40% of total cohort) were first hospitalized in a psychiatric institution (91% women), with a median duration of stay of 9 days (range 0.25–239 days). Among them, 24 patients (53%) had associated discreet neurologic signs at the first evaluation, while 17 additional patients (38%) developed neurologic signs within a few days. Twenty-one patients (47%) were transferred to a medical unit for a suspicion of antipsychotic intolerance characterized by high temperature, muscle rigidity, mutism or coma, and biological results suggesting rhabdomyolysis. Conclusions: Several psychiatric presentations were observed in patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis, although none was specific; however, patients, mostly women, also had discreet neurologic signs that should be carefully assessed as well as signs of antipsychotic intolerance that should raise suspicion for anti-NMDAR encephalitis. PMID:27606355

  2. Roseolovirus-associated encephalitis in immunocompetent and immunocompromised individuals.

    PubMed

    Ongrádi, Joseph; Ablashi, Dharam V; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi; Stercz, Balázs; Ogata, Masao

    2017-02-01

    The roseoloviruses, human herpesvirus (HHV)-6A, HHV-6B, and HHV-7, can cause severe encephalitis or encephalopathy. In immunocompetent children, primary HHV-6B infection is occasionally accompanied by diverse clinical forms of encephalitis. Roseolovirus coinfections with heterologous viruses and delayed primary HHV-7 infection in immunocompetent adults result in very severe neurological and generalized symptoms. Recovery from neurological sequelae is slow and sometimes incomplete. In immunocompromised patients with underlying hematological malignancies and transplantation, frequent single or simultaneous reactivation of roseoloviruses elicit severe, lethal organ dysfunctions, including damages in the limbic system, brain stem, and hippocampus. Most cases have been due to HHV-6B with HHV-6A accounting for 2-3%. The most severe manifestation of HHV-6B reactivation is post-transplantation limbic encephalitis. Seizures, cognitive problems, and abnormal EEG are common. Major risk factors for HHV-6B-associated encephalitis include unrelated cord blood cell transplantation and repeated hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Rare genetic disorders, male gender, certain HLA constellation, and immune tolerance to replicating HHV-6 in persons carrying chromosomally integrated HHV-6 might also predispose an individual to roseolovirus-associated brain damage. At this time, little is known about the risk factors for HHV-7-associated encephalitis. Intrathecal glial cell destruction due to virus replication, overexpression of proinflammatory cytokines, and viral mimicry of chemokines all contribute to brain dysfunction. High virus load in the cerebrospinal fluid, hippocampal astrogliosis, and viral protein expression in HHV-6B-associated cases and multiple microscopic neuronal degeneration in HHV-7-associated cases are typical laboratory findings. Early empirical therapy with ganciclovir or foscarnet might save the life of a patient with roseolovirus-associated encephalitis.

  3. Herpes simplex virus type 1 encephalitis in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chrétien, F; Bélec, L; Hilton, D A; Flament-Saillour, M; Guillon, F; Wingertsmann, L; Baudrimont, M; de Truchis, P; Keohane, C; Vital, C; Love, S; Gray, F

    1996-10-01

    Herpes simplex (HSV) infection of the central nervous system is uncommon in AIDS and usually has an atypical topography. This review is centred around the case of a 49-year-old homosexual patient with AIDS who died from diffuse encephalopathy. Neuropathological examination revealed necrotic and haemorrhagic changes involving both temporal lobes, insulae and cingulate gyri. Cowdry type A intranuclear inclusion bodies were abundant but inflammation was minimal. Electron microscopy confirmed characteristic herpes virus particles. Immunocyto-chemistry was positive for HSV type 1 and 2. In situ hybridization and PCR, however, were positive for HSV type 1 but excluded HSV type 2. There was associated cytomegalovirus ventriculitis but clearly separated from HSV encephalitis. There were no histological features of HIV encephalitis and HIV could not be demonstrated by immunocytochemistry or by PCR to demonstrate proviral DNA. Apoptotic neurons were numerous in areas with a severe macrophage reaction. Only two pathological cases with characteristic limbic distribution and necrotic haemorrhagic histologic have been reported previously. The rarity of these reports suggests that in advanced AIDS, the immune reaction causing a typical necrotizing encephalitis cannot be mounted. Distinction between HSV type 1 and 2 infection may be difficult by immunocytochemistry and usually requires in situ hybridization, tissue culture or PCR. In AIDS patients, HSV-1 has been identified as responsible for encephalitis whereas HSV-2 has been more responsible for myelitis. Associated productive HIV infection of the CNS was found in none of the cases. In contrast, cytomegalovirus encephalitis was found in nine of 11 cases of AIDS-associated HSV encephalitis.

  4. Oxidation in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hitchon, Carol A; El-Gabalawy, Hani S

    2004-01-01

    Oxygen metabolism has an important role in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced in the course of cellular oxidative phosphorylation, and by activated phagocytic cells during oxidative bursts, exceed the physiological buffering capacity and result in oxidative stress. The excessive production of ROS can damage protein, lipids, nucleic acids, and matrix components. They also serve as important intracellular signaling molecules that amplify the synovial inflammatory–proliferative response. Repetitive cycles of hypoxia and reoxygenation associated with changes in synovial perfusion are postulated to activate hypoxia-inducible factor-1α and nuclear factor-κB, two key transcription factors that are regulated by changes in cellular oxygenation and cytokine stimulation, and that in turn orchestrate the expression of a spectrum of genes critical to the persistence of synovitis. An understanding of the complex interactions involved in these pathways might allow the development of novel therapeutic strategies for rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:15535839

  5. Epidemiology of Japanese encephalitis: past, present, and future prospects

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huanyu; Liang, Guodong

    2015-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) is one of severe viral encephalitis that affects individuals in Asia, western Pacific countries, and northern Australia. Although 67,900 JE cases have been estimated among 24 JE epidemic countries annually, only 10,426 have been reported in 2011. With the establishment of JE surveillance and vaccine use in some countries, the JE incidence rate has decreased; however, serious outbreaks still occur. Understanding JE epidemics and identifying the circulating JE virus genotypes will improve JE prevention and control. This review summarizes the current epidemiology data in these countries. PMID:25848290

  6. Luxury perfusion phenomenon in acute herpes simplex virus encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, M; Uesugi, M; Igeta, Y; Kondo, S; Sun, X; Hirai, S

    1995-02-01

    In a patient with acute herpes simplex virus (HSV) encephalitis, positron emission tomography (PET) demonstrated increased cerebral blood flow in the affected temporal lobe accompanied by reduction in the cerebral oxygen extraction fraction and the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen, i.e., luxury perfusion. Follow-up PET studies showed reduction in cerebral perfusion until it was more closely coupled with oxygen metabolism after the resolution of the acute inflammation. These findings support previous single photon emission computed tomographic data and provide a pathophysiological background for the occurrence of hyperperfusion in HSV encephalitis. This is an interesting example of the luxury perfusion phenomenon occurring in a disease other than cerebral ischemia.

  7. Anterior opercular syndrome induced by Epstein-Barr virus encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Matsushima, Takashi; Nishioka, Kenya; Tanaka, Ryota; Yokoyama, Kazumasa; Hattori, Nobutaka

    2016-01-01

    We report a 19-year-old female presenting with fever, drooling, anarthria, and voluntary facial movement disruption, characteristic of anterior opercular syndrome (AOS). Serological examination revealed Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection following acute encephalitis with severe ataxia. A single-photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) examination indicated hypoperfusion in the left perisylvian region, bilateral thalamus, occipital lobe, and cerebellum. This is the first report of AOS related to EBV encephalitis. SPECT was a useful method for detecting the damaged region of the operculum. In addition, AOS is a clinically distinct entity that may help us understand the mechanisms of language circuits within the operculum.

  8. Management of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Carette, Simon

    1984-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a common disease, for which every physician should have a sound approach. This paper details the global management of the disease. Guidelines are given for educating the patient and assessing the level of disease activity. Common questions about the indications and uses of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, local corticosteroid injections, slow-acting agents, immunosuppressive drugs and steroids are discussed. PMID:21278947

  9. [Sarcopenia in rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Krajewska-Włodarczyk, Magdalena

    The clinical picture of rheumatoid arthritis covers the condition of chronic inflammation connected to the increased concentration of inflammatory mediators, reduced physical activity, immobilization caused by pain, stiffness and joint destruction as well as accompanying hormonal and metabolic disorders. It all may lead to extra-articular complications, also to the loss of muscle mass with the weakness of muscle strength, adding to the disability and significantly lowering the patients' quality of life. Sarcopenia is an advanced form of muscle mass loss which constitutes an independent and vital threat for dexterity. Attempts are made to define and classify sarcopenia basing on the measurements of muscle mass where the examinations are conducted by the method of computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, absorptiometry of two X-ray beams of various energies, electric bioimpedance and anthropometric methods. The data gained in few studies conducted in order to estimate the reduction of muscle mass in patients with rheumatoid arthritis confirm the significant increase of sarcopenia occurence in this group. Procedure with rheumatoid arthritis covers primarily treatment of the inflammatory process with traditional and biological medicaments that modify the course of illness. Such treatment seems to diminish the risk of equal sarcopenia occurrence. The effectiveness of using anabolic medicaments and high protein diet has not been proved. Currently, regular physical activity including aerobic exercise and exercises with load is considered a good method of muscle mass loss prevention and a procedure in case of confirmed muscle mass loss.

  10. Herpes simplex encephalitis and subsequent cytomegalovirus encephalitis after chemoradiotherapy for central nervous system lymphoma: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hiroshi I; Hangaishi, Akira; Hosoya, Noriko; Watanabe, Takuro; Kanda, Yoshinobu; Motokura, Toru; Chiba, Shigeru; Kurokawa, Mineo

    2008-06-01

    Neurological complications during the treatment of hematological malignancies have a wide range of causes. Treatment-related leukoencephalopathy has been recognized as a major complication of combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy for central nervous system (CNS) lymphoma, and can complicate the diagnosis of CNS infection. Herein, we present a patient with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma who developed herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) and subsequent cytomegalovirus encephalitis after chemoradiotherapy for CNS relapse. Although cerebrospinal fluid examination (CSF) showed no significant pleocytosis, brain magnetic resonance imaging and polymerase chain reaction analysis of the CSF were useful in the diagnosis. With a review of the literature on the association between HSE and radiotherapy for CNS malignancies, our case suggests that an awareness of viral encephalitis is important in the differential diagnosis of acute neurologic disturbance during chemoradiotherapy for CNS lymphoma.

  11. Anethole improves the in vitro development of isolated caprine secondary follicles.

    PubMed

    Sá, N A R; Araújo, V R; Correia, H H V; Ferreira, A C A; Guerreiro, D D; Sampaio, A M; Escobar, E; Santos, F W; Moura, A A; Lôbo, C H; Ceccatto, V M; Campello, C C; Rodrigues, A P R; Leal-Cardoso, J H; Figueiredo, J R

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of three concentrations of anethole (30, 300, and 2000 μg/mL) on survival, antrum formation, follicular diameter, and oocyte maturation in the caprine species. The study also evaluated the effects of anethole on transcripts of ICAM-1, CAV-1, TIMP-2, and PAI-1 genes and levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in isolated goat preantral ovarian follicles before and after in vitro culture for 18 days. Preantral follicles were isolated from goat ovaries and individually cultured in alpha minimum essential medium modified (α-MEM(+)), defined as the control treatment, α-MEM(+) supplemented with ascorbic acid at a concentration of 100 μg/mL (AA), or α-MEM(+) supplemented with three different concentrations of anethole (30, 300, 2000 μg/mL) for a period of 18 days. Treatments were named as α-MEM(+), AA, AN30, AN300, and AN2000, respectively. After culture, the follicles were opened, the cumulus oocytes complex (COCs) were removed and matured in vitro. The walls of the follicles were used for the quantitation of mRNA by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Finally, the medium collected at the end of culture was used for the measurements of ROS. After 18 days of culture, the AA treatment showed the percentage of intact follicles and follicular diameter significantly higher compared with the other treatments. However, daily growth rate, antrum formation, and also oocyte diameter were similar among the treatments. In addition, compared with AA, the rate of oocytes for in vitro maturation (diameter ≥ 110 μm) and the meiosis resumption rate were significantly higher in the treatments AN30 and AN2000, respectively. When assessing gene related to remodeling of the basement membrane, significant differences in mRNA levels for ICAM-1, CAV-1, TIMP-2, and PAI-1 were observed in comparison with Day 0, i.e., in the noncultured control. In addition, the ROS from Day 12, all treatments with the addition

  12. Mouse Models of Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Caplazi, P; Baca, M; Barck, K; Carano, R A D; DeVoss, J; Lee, W P; Bolon, B; Diehl, L

    2015-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic debilitating autoimmune disorder characterized by synovitis that leads to cartilage and bone erosion by invading fibrovascular tissue. Mouse models of RA recapitulate many features of the human disease. Despite the availability of medicines that are highly effective in many patient populations, autoimmune diseases (including RA) remain an area of active biomedical research, and consequently mouse models of RA are still extensively used for mechanistic studies and validation of therapeutic targets. This review aims to integrate morphologic features with model biology and cover the key characteristics of the most commonly used induced and spontaneous mouse models of RA. Induced models emphasized in this review include collagen-induced arthritis and antibody-induced arthritis. Collagen-induced arthritis is an example of an active immunization strategy, whereas antibody- induced arthritis models, such as collagen antibody-induced arthritis and K/BxN antibody transfer arthritis, represent examples of passive immunization strategies. The coverage of spontaneous models in this review is focused on the TNFΔ (ARE) mouse, in which arthritis results from overexpression of TNF-α, a master proinflammatory cytokine that drives disease in many patients.

  13. Axial disease in psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Gladman, Dafna D

    2007-12-01

    The definition of axial disease in psoriatic arthritis has varied from isolated unilateral grade 2 sacroiliitis to criteria similar to those used for ankylosing spondylitis. Depending on the definition used, the prevalence of axial disease varies from 25% to 70% of patients with psoriatic arthritis. This article reviews the prevalence, clinical and radiologic features, pathogenesis, prognosis, and treatment of psoriatic spondylitis.

  14. Subchondral pseudocysts in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Rennell, C; Mainzer, F; Multz, C V; Genant, H K

    1977-12-01

    Subchondral cyst formation (geode) is a not uncommon manifestation of rheumatoid arthritis which may at times impede correct radiologic interpretation. Four patients with rheumatoid arthritis who demonstrated striking subarticular cystic erosive disease are described. These cases emphasize the nature and appearance of this interesting finding.

  15. Kartagener syndrome and rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Rébora, Martin Esteban; Cuneo, Julia Ana; Marcos, Josefina; Marcos, Juan Carlos

    2006-02-01

    We report the case of a 38-year-old female patient, affected with Kartagener syndrome (primary ciliary dyskinesia), who developed seropositive and erosive rheumatoid arthritis. According to our review, there are only 6 cases reported so far with this association without a definite etiopathogenic linkage recognized in common. Chronic infections resulting from the ciliary dysfunction might be a trigger for rheumatoid arthritis.

  16. Citrullinated Chemokines in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    with other inflam- matory rheumatic diseases, including gout (n 4), pseudogout (n 2), psoriatic arthritis (n 1), spondyloarthritis (n 3...Expression and function of CXCL16 in a novel model of gout . Arthritis Rheum 2010;62:2536–44. 23. Koch AE, Burrows JC, Marder R, Domer PH, Leibovich SJ

  17. Fulminant encephalitis associated with a vaccine strain of rubella virus.

    PubMed

    Gualberto, Felipe Augusto Souza; de Oliveira, Maria Isabel; Alves, Venancio A F; Kanamura, Cristina T; Rosemberg, Sérgio; Sato, Helena Keico; Arantes, Benedito A F; Curti, Suely Pires; Figueiredo, Cristina Adelaide

    2013-12-01

    Involvement of the central nervous system is common in measles, but rare in rubella. However, rubella virus (RV) can cause a variety of central nervous system syndromes, including meningitis, encephalitis, Guillain-Barré syndrome and sub acute sclerosing panencephalitis. We report the occurrence of one fatal case of the encephalitis associated with measles-rubella (MR) vaccine during an immunization campaign in São Paulo, Brazil. A 31 year-old-man, previously in good health, was admitted at emergency room, with confusion, agitation, inability to stand and hold his head up. Ten days prior to admission, he was vaccinated with combined MR vaccine (Serum Institute of India) and three days later he developed 'flu-like' illness with fever, myalgia and headache. Results of clinical and laboratory exams were consistent with a pattern of viral encephalitis. During hospitalization, his condition deteriorated rapidly with tetraplegia and progression to coma. On the 3rd day of hospitalization he died. Histopathology confirmed encephalitis and immunohistochemistry was positive for RV on brain tissue. RV was also detected by qPCR and virus isolation in cerebrospinal fluid, brain and other clinical samples. The sequence obtained from the isolated virus was identical to that of the RA 27/3 vaccine strain.

  18. Scrub Typhus Leading to Acute Encephalitis Syndrome, Assam, India

    PubMed Central

    Bora, Trishna; Laskar, Basanta; Khan, Abdul M.; Dutta, Prafulla

    2017-01-01

    To determine the contribution of Orientia tsutsugamushi, the agent of scrub typhus, as a cause of acute encephalitis syndrome (AES) in Assam, India, we conducted a retrospective study of hospital patients with symptoms of AES during 2013–2015. Our findings suggest that O. tsutsugamushi infection leads to AES and the resulting illness and death. PMID:27875108

  19. Neuropsychiatric Sequelae of Acute Epidemic Encephalitis in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebaugh, Franklin G.

    2007-01-01

    In reviewing the enormous number of articles on all phases of acute epidemic encephalitis one cannot help being impressed by the lack of attention paid to children who have suffered from this disease. This is especially true of the important neuropsychiatric sequelae. During the past few months, seventeen patients have been referred to the…

  20. Current approaches to the treatment of paraneoplastic encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Grisold, Wolfgang; Giometto, Bruno; Vitaliani, Roberta; Oberndorfer, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes (PNSs) cover a wide range of diseases and involve both the central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral nervous system. Paraneoplastic encephalitis comprises several diseases such as paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (PCD), limbic encephalitis (LE), paraneoplastic encephalomyelitis (PEM), brainstem encephalitis, opsomyoclonus syndrome, in addition to other even less frequently occurring entities. LE was the first historically identified CNS PNS, and similarities between other temporal lobe diseases such as herpes encephalitis have been elucidated. In the past few decades several autoantibodies have been described in association with LE. These encompass the classical ‘onconeuronal’ antibodies (abs) such as Hu, Yo, Ri and others, and now additionally abs towards either ion channels or surface antigens. The clinical core findings in LE are various mental changes such as amnesia or confusion, often associated with seizures. Careful characterization of psychiatric manifestations and/or associated neurological signs can help to characterize the syndrome and type of ab. The treatment options in LE depend on the aetiology. In LE caused by onconeuronal abs, the treatment options are poor. In two types of abs associated with LE, abs against ion channels and surface antigens (e.g. NMDA), immunomodulatory treatments seem effective, making these types of LE treatable conditions. However, LE can also occur without being associated with cancer, in which case only immunomodulation is required. Despite effective treatments, some patients’ residual deficits remain, and recurrences have also been described. PMID:21765874

  1. Reemergence of St. Louis Encephalitis Virus, California, 2015

    PubMed Central

    White, Gregory S.; Symmes, Kelly; Sun, Pu; Fang, Ying; Garcia, Sandra; Steiner, Cody; Smith, Kirk; Reisen, William K.

    2016-01-01

    St. Louis encephalitis virus infection was detected in summer 2015 in southern California after an 11-year absence, concomitant with an Arizona outbreak. Sequence comparisons showed close identity of California and Arizona isolates with 2005 Argentine isolates, suggesting introduction from South America and underscoring the value of continued arbovirus surveillance. PMID:27869600

  2. The microbiome and psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Eppinga, Hester; Konstantinov, Sergey R; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P; Thio, H Bing

    2014-03-01

    Psoriatic arthritis is a chronic inflammatory joint disease, seen in combination with the chronic inflammatory skin disease psoriasis and belonging to the family of spondylarthritides (SpA). A link is recognized between psoriatic arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Environmental factors seem to induce inflammatory disease in individuals with underlying genetic susceptibility. The microbiome is a subject of increasing interest in the etiology of these inflammatory immune-mediated diseases. The intestinal microbiome is able to affect extra-intestinal distant sites, including the joints, through immunomodulation. At this point, evidence regarding a relationship between the microbiome and psoriatic arthritis is scarce. However, we hypothesize that common immune-mediated inflammatory pathways seen in the "skin-joint-gut axis" in psoriatic arthritis are induced or at least mediated by the microbiome. Th17 has a crucial function in this mechanism. Further establishment of this connection may lead to novel therapeutic approaches for psoriatic arthritis.

  3. Effects of EPA and DHA on lipid droplet accumulation and mRNA abundance of PAT proteins in caprine monocytes.

    PubMed

    Lecchi, Cristina; Invernizzi, Guido; Agazzi, Alessandro; Modina, Silvia; Sartorelli, Paola; Savoini, Giovanni; Ceciliani, Fabrizio

    2013-04-01

    The present study investigated the in vitro effects on caprine monocytes of two ω-3 PUFAs, namely eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) on lipid droplet formation, an emerging process of fundamental importance in innate immunity regulation. The mRNA abundance of PAT protein family (PLIN1, PLIN2 and PLIN3), involved in the formation and trafficking of the droplets, was also assessed. The effects of EPA and DHA on monocyte apoptosis were studied as well. The number of lipid droplets per cell was found to be dependent on both type and concentration of fatty acid. ω-3 PUFAs upregulated PLIN3 and PLIN2 gene expression, as well as apoptosis rate. The present findings suggest that PUFA might modify innate immune functions of goat monocytes by interfering with the formation of lipid droplets and by upregulating proteins belonging to PAT protein family.

  4. Structural characteristic, pH and thermal stabilities of apo and holo forms of caprine and bovine lactoferrins.

    PubMed

    Sreedhara, Ashoka; Flengsrud, Ragnar; Langsrud, Thor; Kaul, Purnima; Prakash, Vishweshwaraiah; Vegarud, Gerd Elisabeth

    2010-12-01

    Apo and holo forms of lactoferrin (LF) from caprine and bovine species have been characterized and compared with regard to the structural stability determined by thermal denaturation temperature values (T (m)), at pH 2.0-8.0. The bovine lactoferrin (bLF) showed highest thermal stability with a T (m) of 90 ± 1°C at pH 7.0 whereas caprine lactoferrin (cLF) showed a lower T (m) value 68 ± 1°C. The holo form was much more stable than the apo form for the bLF as compared to cLF. When pH was gradually reduced to 3.0, the T (m) values of both holo bLF and holo cLF were reduced showing T (m) values of 49 ± 1 and 40 ± 1°C, respectively. Both apo and holo forms of cLF and bLF were found to be most stable at pH 7.0. A significant loss in the iron content of both holo and apo forms of the cLF and bLF was observed when pH was decreased from 7.0 to 2.0. At the same time a gradual unfolding of the apo and holo forms of both cLF and bLF was shown by maximum exposure of hydrophobic regions at pH 3.0. This was supported with a loss in α-helix structure together with an increase in the content of unordered (aperiodic) structure, while β structure seemed unchanged at all pH values. Since LF is used today as fortifier in many products, like infant formulas and exerts many biological functions in human, the structural changes, iron binding and release affected by pH and thermal denaturation temperature are important factors to be clarified for more than the bovine species.

  5. A new African fossil caprin and a combined molecular and morphological Bayesian phylogenetic analysis of caprini (Mammalia: Bovidae).

    PubMed

    Bibi, F; Vrba, E; Fack, F

    2012-09-01

    Given that most species that have ever existed on Earth are extinct, no evolutionary history can ever be complete without the inclusion of fossil taxa. Bovids (antelopes and relatives) are one of the most diverse clades of large mammals alive today, with over a hundred living species and hundreds of documented fossil species. With the advent of molecular phylogenetics, major advances have been made in the phylogeny of this clade; however, there has been little attempt to integrate the fossil record into the developing phylogenetic picture. We here describe a new large fossil caprin species from ca. 1.9-Ma deposits from the Middle Awash, Ethiopia. To place the new species phylogenetically, we perform a Bayesian analysis of a combined molecular (cytochrome b) and morphological (osteological) character supermatrix. We include all living species of Caprini, the new fossil species, a fossil takin from the Pliocene of Ethiopia (Budorcas churcheri), and the insular subfossil Myotragus balearicus. The combined analysis demonstrates successful incorporation of both living and fossil species within a single phylogeny based on both molecular and morphological evidence. Analysis of the combined supermatrix produces superior resolution than with either the molecular or morphological data sets considered alone. Parsimony and Bayesian analyses of the data set are also compared and shown to produce similar results. The combined phylogenetic analysis indicates that the new fossil species is nested within Capra, making it one of the earliest representatives of this clade, with implications for molecular clock calibration. Geographical optimization indicates no less than four independent dispersals into Africa by caprins since the Pliocene.

  6. Interaction between estradiol and follicle-stimulating hormone promotes in vitro survival and development of caprine preantral follicles.

    PubMed

    Lima-Verde, I B; Matos, M H T; Saraiva, M V A; Bruno, J B; Tenório, S B; Martins, F S; Rossetto, R; Cunha, L D; Name, K P O; Báo, S N; Campello, C C; Figueiredo, J R

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of estradiol and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) on survival and growth of caprine preantral follicles. Pieces of ovarian tissue were cultured for 1 or 7 days in minimum essential medium (MEM) containing estradiol (1, 5, 10, 20 or 40 pg/ml), FSH (50 ng/ml), or a combination of the two hormones. Cultured and noncultured control ovarian tissues were processed for histological and ultrastructural studies. The results showed that after 7 days of culture, the treatments that yielded the highest percentage of normal follicles relative to MEM alone were those that combined FSH with estradiol at 1, 5 or 20 pg/ml. The addition of FSH to 1-day cultures containing 1 pg/ml estradiol or to 7-day cultures with 1 or 5 pg/ml estradiol increased the percentage of normal follicles compared to estradiol alone at the same concentrations. After 7 days of culture, all treatments generated higher percentages of developing follicles as compared to control and MEM alone. The addition of either FSH or 10 pg/ml of estradiol to the culture media or estradiol (1, 5, 10 or 20 pg/ml) and FSH in combination significantly increased follicular diameter as compared with MEM alone following 7 days of culture. Ultrastructural studies confirmed follicular integrity after 7 days of culture in the presence of 1 pg/ml estradiol plus FSH. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that the interaction between estradiol and FSH maintains ultrastructural integrity and stimulates activation and further growth of cultured caprine preantral follicles.

  7. Tissue-engineered cartilaginous constructs for the treatment of caprine cartilage defects, including distribution of laminin and type IV collagen.

    PubMed

    Jeng, Lily; Hsu, Hu-Ping; Spector, Myron

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was the immunohistochemical evaluation of (1) cartilage tissue-engineered constructs; and (2) the tissue filling cartilage defects in a goat model into which the constructs were implanted, particularly for the presence of the basement membrane molecules, laminin and type IV collagen. Basement membrane molecules are localized to the pericellular matrix in normal adult articular cartilage, but have not been examined in tissue-engineered constructs cultured in vitro or in tissue filling cartilage defects into which the constructs were implanted. Cartilaginous constructs were engineered in vitro using caprine chondrocyte-seeded type II collagen scaffolds. Autologous constructs were implanted into 4-mm-diameter defects created to the tidemark in the trochlear groove in the knee joints of skeletally mature goats. Eight weeks after implantation, the animals were sacrificed. Constructs underwent immunohistochemical and histomorphometric evaluation. Widespread staining for the two basement membrane molecules was observed throughout the extracellular matrix of in vitro and in vivo samples in a distribution unlike that previously reported for cartilage. At sacrifice, 70% of the defect site was filled with reparative tissue, which consisted largely of fibrous tissue and some fibrocartilage, with over 70% of the reparative tissue bonded to the adjacent host tissue. A novel finding of this study was the observation of laminin and type IV collagen in in vitro engineered cartilaginous constructs and in vivo cartilage repair samples from defects into which the constructs were implanted, as well as in normal caprine articular cartilage. Future work is needed to elucidate the role of basement membrane molecules during cartilage repair and regeneration.

  8. Fungal arthritis and osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Kohli, Rakhi; Hadley, Susan

    2005-12-01

    Fungal arthritis and osteomyelitis are uncommon diseases and generally present in an indolent fashion. The incidence of fungal bone and joint dis-ease is increasing with an increase in the prevalence of factors predisposing to invasive fungal disease, such as the use of central venous catheters, broad spectrum antibiotics, immunosuppression, and abdominal surgery. Definitive diagnosis relies on bone or synovial culture or biopsy. Successful management has traditionally consisted of amphotericin B in combination with surgical debridement. Given the rarity of this disease, treatment is not well defined, but reports of success with the use of azole antifungal agents, including itraconazole, fluconazole, voriconazole, and posaconazole, are promising.

  9. Classification of degenerative arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, N. S.; Cruess, R. L.

    1977-01-01

    It is suggested that the former division of degenerative arthritis into idiopathic types and those secondary to some disease process is no longer valid. Recent studies have indicated that abnormal concentrations of force on cartilage lead to the development of this disease. A classification is presented that is based on the assumption that the process is initiated by abnormal concentrations of force on normal cartilage matrix, normal concentrations of force on abnormal cartilage matrix or normal concentrations of force on normal cartilage matrix that is supported by bone of abnormal consistency. PMID:907947

  10. Hydrolysis of bovine and caprine milk fat globules by lipoprotein lipase. Effects of heparin and skim milk on lipase distribution and on lipolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sundheim, G.; Bengtsson-Olivecrona, G.

    1987-12-01

    Heparin can dissociate lipoprotein lipase from casein micelles, and addition of heparin enhances lipolysis in bovine but not in caprine milk. Heparin shortened the lag-time for binding of lipoprotein lipase to milk fat globules and for lipolysis. Heparin counteracted the inhibitory effects of skim milk on binding of lipase and on lipolysis. Heparin stimulated lipolysis in all bovine milk samples when added before cooling and in spontaneously lipolytic milk samples also when added after cooling. Heparin enhanced lipolysis of isolated milk fat globules. Hence, its effect is not solely due to dissociation of lipoprotein lipase from the casein micelles. Cooling of goat milk caused more marked changes in the distribution of lipase than cooling of bovine milk; the fraction of added /sup 125/I-labeled lipase that bound to cream increased from about 8 to 60%. In addition, caprine skim milk caused less inhibition of lipolysis than bovine skim milk. These observations provide an explanation for the high degree of cold storage lipolysis in goat milk. Heparin had only small effects on the distribution of lipoprotein lipase in caprine milk, which explains why heparin has so little effect on lipolysis in caprine milk. The distribution of /sup 35/S-labeled heparin in bovine milk was studied. In warm milk less than 10% bound to the cream fraction, but when milk was cooled, binding of heparin to cream increased to 45%. These results suggest that there exists in the skim fraction a relatively small amount of a heparin-binding protein, which on cooling of milk adsorbs to the milk fat, or suggests that cooling induces a conformational change in a membrane protein such that its affinity for heparin increases.

  11. CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE PATHOLOGY OF EXPERIMENTAL VIRUS ENCEPHALITIS

    PubMed Central

    Flexner, Simon; Amoss, Harold L.

    1925-01-01

    In this paper is given an account of an inoculable virus disease produced in the rabbit with cerebrospinal fluid taken from a case of vascular and neural syphilis. The study which yielded the results presented was undertaken in the course of an investigation into the etiology of epidemic or lethargic encephalitis. Twenty-seven samples of cerebrospinal fluid, derived from cases of epidemic encephalitis, were tested by us upon rabbits without positive result. The one successful instance in which an inoculable disease was produced arose from the injection of one of three specimens of the cerebrospinal fluid taken from the case of syphilis. Following this success, two subsequent injections of the fluid, taken from the same patient, were made unsuccessfully. Although certain American and European investigators have reported securing a virus from the cerebrospinal fluid of cases of epidemic encephalitis, we have consistently failed in our endeavors to confirm their results. However, we believe that the finding of the J. B. virus may serve to clarify the obscurity and confusion now enveloping the so called virus of encephalitis. It had previously been shown that no biological differences could be detected between the herpes and the encephalitis strains of virus. The former, as is well known, is readily secured by inoculating rabbits with the contents of herpes vesicles, while the latter has, at best, been obtained with great difficulty. The J. B. virus agrees biologically with the herpes and encephalitis strains of virus. It is our opinion that the J. B. virus is merely a herpes virus which has gained access to the cerebrospinal fluid and, at the time of inoculation of the rabbits, was present in a concentration sufficing to induce virus encephalitis. The fact, if fact it is proved to be, that the herpes virus may find its way into the cerebrospinal fluid opens to question all the supposed instances of successful implantation of a virus of epidemic encephalitis upon the

  12. Fragile X mental retardation protein interacts with the RNA-binding protein Caprin1 in neuronal RiboNucleoProtein complexes [corrected].

    PubMed

    El Fatimy, Rachid; Tremblay, Sandra; Dury, Alain Y; Solomon, Samuel; De Koninck, Paul; Schrader, John W; Khandjian, Edouard W

    2012-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome is caused by the absence of the Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein (FMRP), an RNA-binding protein. FMRP is associated with messenger RiboNucleoParticles (mRNPs) present in polyribosomes and its absence in neurons leads to alteration in synaptic plasticity as a result of translation regulation defects. The molecular mechanisms by which FMRP plays a role in translation regulation remain elusive. Using immunoprecipitation approaches with monoclonal Ab7G1-1 and a new generation of chicken antibodies, we identified Caprin1 as a novel FMRP-cellular partner. In vivo and in vitro evidence show that Caprin1 interacts with FMRP at the level of the translation machinery as well as in trafficking neuronal granules. As an RNA-binding protein, Caprin1 has in common with FMRP at least two RNA targets that have been identified as CaMKIIα and Map1b mRNAs. In view of the new concept that FMRP species bind to RNA regardless of known structural motifs, we propose that protein interactors might modulate FMRP functions.

  13. Caprine PrP variants harboring Asp-146, His-154 and Gln-211 alleles display reduced convertibility upon interaction with pathogenic murine prion protein in scrapie infected cells.

    PubMed

    Kanata, Eirini; Arsenakis, Minas; Sklaviadis, Theodoros

    2016-09-02

    Scrapie, the prion disease of sheep and goats, is a devastating malady of small ruminants. Due to its infectious nature, epidemic outbreaks may occur in flocks/herds consisting of highly susceptible animals. Field studies identified scrapie-protective caprine PrP variants, harboring specific single amino acid changes (Met-142, Arg-143, Asp-146, Ser-146, His-154, Gln-211 and Lys-222). Their effects are under further evaluation, and aim to determine the most protective allele. We assessed some of these variants (Asp-146, His-154, Gln-211 and Lys-222), after their exogenous expression as murine-caprine chimeras in a scrapie- infected murine cell line. We report that exogenously expressed PrPs undergo conformational conversion upon interaction with the endogenous pathological murine prion protein (PrP(SC)), which results in the detection of goat-specific and partially PK-resistant moieties. These moieties display a PK-resistance pattern distinct from the one detected in natural goat scrapie cases. Within this cellular model, distinct conformational conversion potentials were assigned to the tested variants. Molecules carrying the Asp-146, His-154 and Gln-211 alleles showed significantly lower conversion levels compared to wild type, confirming their protective effects against scrapie. Although we utilized a heterologous conversion system, this is to our knowledge, the first study of caprine PrP variants in a cellular context of scrapie, that confirms the protective effects of some of the studied alleles.

  14. Septic Arthritis of Native Joints.

    PubMed

    Ross, John J

    2017-03-30

    Septic arthritis is a rheumatologic emergency that may lead to disability or death. Prompt evacuation of the joint, either by arthrocentesis at the bedside, open or arthroscopic drainage in the operating room, or imaging-guided drainage in the radiology suite, is mandatory. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has become a major cause of septic arthritis in the United States. MRSA joint infection seems to be associated with worse outcomes. Antibiotic courses of 3 to 4 weeks in duration are usually adequate for uncomplicated bacterial arthritis. Treatment duration should be extended to 6 weeks if there is imaging evidence of accompanying osteomyelitis.

  15. Anti-NMDA Receptor Encephalitis in the Polar Bear (Ursus maritimus) Knut.

    PubMed

    Prüss, H; Leubner, J; Wenke, N K; Czirják, G Á; Szentiks, C A; Greenwood, A D

    2015-08-27

    Knut the polar bear of the Berlin Zoological Garden drowned in 2011 following seizures and was diagnosed as having suffered encephalitis of unknown etiology after exhaustive pathogen screening. Using the diagnostic criteria applied to human patients, we demonstrate that Knut's encephalitis is almost identical to anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis which is a severe autoimmune disease representing the most common non-infectious encephalitis in humans. High concentrations of antibodies specific against the NR1 subunit of the NMDA receptor were detected in Knut's cerebrospinal fluid. Histological examination demonstrated very similar patterns of plasma cell infiltration and minimal neuronal loss in affected brain areas. We conclude that Knut suffered anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis making his the first reported non-human case of this treatable disease. The results suggest that anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis may be a disease of broad relevance to mammals that until now has remained undiagnosed.

  16. Anti-NMDA Receptor Encephalitis in the Polar Bear (Ursus maritimus) Knut

    PubMed Central

    Prüss, H.; Leubner, J.; Wenke, N. K.; Czirják, G. Á.; Szentiks, C. A.; Greenwood, A. D.

    2015-01-01

    Knut the polar bear of the Berlin Zoological Garden drowned in 2011 following seizures and was diagnosed as having suffered encephalitis of unknown etiology after exhaustive pathogen screening. Using the diagnostic criteria applied to human patients, we demonstrate that Knut’s encephalitis is almost identical to anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis which is a severe autoimmune disease representing the most common non-infectious encephalitis in humans. High concentrations of antibodies specific against the NR1 subunit of the NMDA receptor were detected in Knut’s cerebrospinal fluid. Histological examination demonstrated very similar patterns of plasma cell infiltration and minimal neuronal loss in affected brain areas. We conclude that Knut suffered anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis making his the first reported non-human case of this treatable disease. The results suggest that anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis may be a disease of broad relevance to mammals that until now has remained undiagnosed. PMID:26313569

  17. Cognitive inferences in fossil apes (Primates, Hominoidea): does encephalization reflect intelligence?

    PubMed

    Alba, David M

    2010-01-01

    Paleobiological inferences on general cognitive abilities (intelligence) in fossil hominoids strongly rely on relative brain size or encephalization, computed by means of allometric residuals, quotients or constants. Th is has been criticized on the basis that it presumably fails to reflect the higher intelligence of great apes, and absolute brain size has been favored instead. Many problems of encephalization metrics stem from the decrease of allometric slopes towards lower taxonomic level, thus making it difficult to determine at what level encephalization metrics have biological meaning. Here, the hypothesis that encephalization can be used as a good neuroanatomical proxy for intelligence is tested at two different taxonomic levels. A significant correlation is found between intelligence and encephalization only at a lower taxonomic level, i.e. on the basis of a low allometric slope, irrespective of whether species data or independent contrasts are employed. This indicates that higher-level slopes, resulting from encephalization grade shifts between subgroups (including hylobatids vs. great apes), do not reflect functional equivalence, whereas lower-level metrics can be employed as a paleobiological proxy for intelligence. Thus, in accordance to intelligence rankings, lower-level metrics indicate that great apes are more encephalized than both monkeys and hylobatids. Regarding fossil taxa, encephalization increased during hominin evolution (particularly in Homo), but during the Miocene a significant shift towards higher encephalization (and inferred enhanced cognitive abilities) must have been also involved in the emergence of the great-ape-and-human clade (Hominidae). This is confirmed by the modern great-ape-like degree of encephalization displayed by the fossil great ape Hispanopithecus, which contrasts with the rather hylobatid-like degree of the stem hominoid Proconsul. The similarly low encephalization of Oreopithecus might result from secondary reduction

  18. Molecular Strategy for the Construction of a Genetically Engineered Vaccine for Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-29

    AD-A236 920 MOLECULAR STRATEGY FOR THE CONSTRUCTION OF A GENETICALLY ENGINEERED VACCINE FOR VENEZUELAN EQUINE ENCEPHALITIS VIRUS FINAL REPORT ROBERT...89-C-9089 engineered vaccine for Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus 62787A 3M162787A871 AD Robert Edward Johnston WUDA318408 Nancy Lee Davis...multiple mutants were more attenuated than those containing a single attenuating Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEE) full-length clones; In vitro

  19. Handout on Health: Rheumatoid Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... or changes in certain hormones, may promote the development of rheumatoid arthritis in a genetically susceptible person who has been exposed to a triggering agent from the environment. Even though all the answers are not known, ...

  20. Stay active and exercise - arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... your overall health and sense of well-being. Exercise keeps your muscles strong and increases your range ... Water exercises may be the best exercise for your arthritis. Swimming laps, water aerobics, or even just walking in ...

  1. Glucocorticoid use in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Harris, E D

    1983-09-01

    Although the early hopes and enthusiasm held for glucocorticoids in rheumatoid arthritis therapy have been greatly modified, there is still a secondary therapeutic role for these drugs, one which has been refined by clinical experience.

  2. Toxoplasmic encephalitis associated with meningitis in a heart transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Baliu, C; Sanclemente, G; Cardona, M; Castel, M A; Perez-Villa, F; Moreno, A; Cervera, C

    2014-08-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an opportunistic pathogen that causes neurologic and extraneurologic manifestations in immunosuppressed patients. Encephalitis and intracranial mass lesions are easily recognized as typical manifestations of toxoplasmosis. However, meningitis caused by T. gondii is a rare condition with very few cases described in the literature. We present the case of a heart transplant recipient who developed toxoplasmic encephalitis associated with meningitis. After an extensive review of the medical literature, we found only 1 case of meningitis in solid organ transplant recipients and <25 cases in immunosuppressed patients, such as patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus or those with Hodgkin's disease. In this report, we consider toxoplasmosis in the differential diagnosis of meningitis in immunocompromised individuals.

  3. Gerstmann's syndrome following an acute herpes simplex encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Ilchevsky, S; Boev, I; Kazakova, T

    1998-01-01

    The authors present a rare clinical case of a woman who developed Gerstmann's syndrome following an acute Herpes simplex viral encephalitis. Clinical observation and laboratory evaluation were performed during the acute phase of the disease. After that the follow-up continued for one-year period. The localization of the pathologic process was determined by computerized tomography, conducted periodically. The characteristics of the clinical picture are interpreted in the context of the contemporary concepts of the topical diagnosis of Gerstmann's syndrome. The possibility of a sudden onset of acute Herpes simplex viral encephalitis without a preceding febrile-intoxication syndrome is worth noting. Conclusions are drawn stressing the need of an early etiologic treatment and the importance of the rehabilitation activities during the convalescence period.

  4. [Autoimmune encephalitis induced by antibodies against GABA-A receptor].

    PubMed

    González R, Pablo; Hudson A, Lorena; Basáez M, Esteban; Miranda C, Marcelo

    2016-11-01

    Among autoimmune encephalitides, a prevalent group are those associated with antibodies against the N-Methyl-D-aspartate receptor, which present with behavior abnormalities, psychosis, seizures and abnormal movements. A new variant, mediated by antibodies against the GABA-A receptor, was recen-tly described. We report a 66-years-old female with this form of encephalitis whose main manifestation was the presence of severe seizures leading to status epilepticus. The patient had a good response to immunomodulatory therapy with intravenous methylprednisolone, azathioprine and anticonvulsants. The laboratory tests initially detected anti-thyroid peroxidase antibodies which lead to the misdiagnosis of Hashimoto Encephalitis, which was ruled out after the detection of antibodies against GABA-A receptor. No malignancy was detected.

  5. Management of granulomatous amebic encephalitis: Laboratory diagnosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Parija, Subhash Chandra; Dinoop, KP; Venugopal, Hrudya

    2015-01-01

    Granulomatous amebic encephalitis is a life-threatening central nervous system (CNS) infection caused by the free-living amoebae Acanthamoeba spp., Balamuthia mandrillaris and Sappinia pedata. The disease has a subacute to chronic onset affecting commonly the immunocompromised population with high mortality rate. The diagnosis of this disease entity requires high suspicion with appropriate sample collection and testing by the laboratory experts. Radiological investigations are nonspecific and commonly confused with CNS tuberculosis, neurocysticercosis, disseminated encephalomyelitis, viral encephalitis etc., delaying the accurate diagnosis of these cases. Early diagnosis plays a crucial role in the survival of these cases since appropriate management can be initiated. No single drug is effective; hence multiple antibiotics targeting various proteins or receptors are required for successful treatment. A combination of surgical and medical interventions involving multiple specialty experts is required to prevent death and morbidity in survivors. PMID:25709949

  6. Encephalization quotients and life-history traits in the Sirenia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Shea, T.J.; Reep, R.L.

    1990-01-01

    Relative brain size in the Sirenia is unusually small. Encephalization quotients are 0.27 for Florida manatees (Trichechus manatus) and 0.38 for dugongs (Dugong dugon). Estimates for Steller's sea cow (Hydrodamalis gigas) range from 0.12 to 0.19. These values are among the lowest known for Recent mammals, and seemingly have changed little since the Eocene. A body plan specialized for the aquatic environment does not account for low encephalization quotients; values are substantially less than predicted based on cetacean or pinniped allometry. Life-history, ecological, and behavioral traits of the Sirenia are typical of relatively large-brained species. Low quality food and a low metabolic rate, however, are characteristic of the Sirenia and other small-brained mammals. Acting through prolonged postnatal growth, selection also likely favored large body size in the Sirenia without a correlated increase in brain size.

  7. Control of Japanese encephalitis in Asia: the time is now

    PubMed Central

    Hills, Susan; Martin, Rebecca; Marfin, Anthony; Fischer, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) virus is the most common vaccine-preventable cause of encephalitis in Asia. Recent progress in the development and availability of improved JE vaccines has revitalized the prospects for JE control. There now are a number of safe and effective vaccines, two WHO prequalified vaccines available for pediatric use, at least one vaccine considered affordable for use in lower income countries, and a GAVI Alliance commitment to provide financial support to eligible countries for campaigns for children aged 9 months through 14 years. While challenges remain, this tremendous progress means there is a better opportunity than at any time in the past to prevent the substantial morbidity and mortality from this disease. PMID:24927959

  8. Efficacies of treatments for anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hsiuying

    2016-01-01

    Treatments for anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor encephalitis include immunotherapy with steroids, intravenous immunoglobulin, plasma exchange, or plasmapheresis as first-line treatments, immunotherapy with rituximab or cyclophosphamide as second-line treatments, and tumor removal. In this systematic review, we evaluated previous studies and examined the association between certain microRNAs and anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis to investigate the performance of different treatment combinations. The efficacies of different combinations of treatments classified into the following four categories were compared: (I) intravenous immunoglobulin administration, (II) plasmapheresis or plasma exchange, (III) treatment with rituximab or cyclophosphamide and (IV) tumor removal. Statistical analyses showed that treatment combinations including at least two of these categories resulted in higher efficacy rates than treatment with a single form of therapy. These findings suggest that if a patient is not recovering, converting to other therapies is more likely to result in early recovery than continuing on the original therapy.

  9. Molecular mechanisms of neuroinflammation and injury during acute viral encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Shives, Katherine D; Tyler, Kenneth L; Beckham, J David

    2017-03-11

    Viral infections in the central nervous system are a major cause of encephalitis. West Nile virus (WNV) and Herpes simplex virus (HSV) are the most common causes of viral encephalitis in the United States. We review the role of neuroinflammation in the pathogenesis of WNV and HSV infections in the central nervous system (CNS). We discuss the role of the innate and cell-mediated immune responses in peripheral control of viral infection, viral invasion of the CNS, and in inflammatory-mediated neuronal injury. By understanding the role of specific inflammatory responses to viral infections in the CNS, targeted therapeutic approaches can be developed to maximize control of acute viral infection while minimizing neuronal injury in the CNS.

  10. Post Tick-Borne Encephalitis Virus Vaccination Narcolepsy with Cataplexy

    PubMed Central

    Hidalgo, Hildegard; Kallweit, Ulf; Mathis, Johannes; Bassetti, Claudio L.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Narcolepsy with cataplexy (NC) is a chronic neurological disorder thought to result from an altered immune response based on a genetic predisposition coupled with environmental factors. Pandemrix vaccination has been reported to increase the risk of narcolepsy. We aimed at identifying other vaccines associated with the onset of narcolepsy. Methods: Case series and retrospective database study. Results: We identified four cases of NC following a tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) vaccination with FSME Immun. Additional four cases could be detected in the database of the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut, Federal Institute for Vaccines and Biomedicines in Germany. Conclusions: Our findings implicate TBE vaccination as a potential additional environmental factor for the development of NC and add additional evidence for an immunological mechanism in the pathogenesis of the disease. Citation: Hidalgo H, Kallweit U, Mathis J, Bassetti CL. Post tick-borne encephalitis virus vaccination narcolepsy with cataplexy. SLEEP 2016;39(10):1811–1814. PMID:27397572

  11. Fatal West Nile virus encephalitis in a renal transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Cushing, Melissa M; Brat, Daniel J; Mosunjac, Mario I; Hennigar, Randolph A; Jernigan, Daniel B; Lanciotti, Robert; Petersen, Lyle R; Goldsmith, Cynthia; Rollin, Pierre E; Shieh, Wun-Ju; Guarner, Jeannette; Zaki, Sherif R

    2004-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV), a mosquito-transmitted single-stranded RNA flavivirus, causes human disease of variable severity. We report clinical and pathologic findings of fatal encephalitis from the transmission of WNV from an organ donor to a kidney transplant recipient. The patient developed a febrile illness 18 days after transplantation, which progressed to encephalitis. Postmortem examination demonstrated extensive viral encephalopathic changes. Immunohistochemical studies highlighted WNV antigens within neurons, especially in the cerebellum and brainstem. Flavivirus virions were detected ultrastructurally within the cerebellum, and WNV was isolated from the brain and the brainstem. Thus, this case demonstrates the first death in the first solid organ transplant-associated transmission of WNV. Immunosuppression of the transplant recipient might have been responsible for the fulminant viral effects. The pathologic diagnosis helped guide subsequent epidemiologic and laboratory studies.

  12. Diagnostic Pathways as Social and Participatory Practices: The Case of Herpes Simplex Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Jessie; Kierans, Ciara; Defres, Sylviane; Easton, Ava; Kneen, Rachel; Solomon, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) encephalitis is a potentially devastating disease, with significant rates of mortality and co-morbidities. Although the prognosis for people with HSV encephalitis can be improved by prompt treatment with aciclovir, there are often delays involved in the diagnosis and treatment of the disease. In response, National Clinical Guidelines have been produced for the UK which make recommendations for improving the management of suspected viral encephalitis. However, little is currently known about the everyday experiences and processes involved in the diagnosis and care of HSV encephalitis. The reported study aimed to provide an account of the diagnosis and treatment of HSV encephalitis from the perspective of people who had been affected by the condition. Thirty narrative interviews were conducted with people who had been diagnosed with HSV encephalitis and their significant others. The narrative accounts reveal problems with gaining access to a diagnosis of encephalitis and shortfalls in care for the condition once in hospital. In response, individuals and their families work hard to obtain medical recognition for the problem and shape the processes of acute care. As a consequence, we argue that the diagnosis and management of HSV encephalitis needs to be considered as a participatory process, which is co-produced by health professionals, patients, and their families. The paper concludes by making recommendations for developing the current management guidelines by formalising the critical role of patients and their significant others in the identification, and treatment of, HSV encephalitis. PMID:26960197

  13. Antecedent anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis in two patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Baheerathan, A; Brownlee, W J; Chard, D T; Shields, K; Gregory, R; Trip, S A

    2017-02-01

    Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis is an autoimmune disorder characterised by psychiatric symptoms, movement disorder and seizures often evolving into a severe encephalopathy. An overlap has recently been recognised between anti-NMDAR encephalitis and inflammatory demyelinating disorders, particularly neuromyelitis optical spectrum disorder (NMOSD). In this case report, we describe two patients with an initial presentation consistent with anti-NMDAR encephalitis who have subsequently developed relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS) and discuss the literature pertaining to potential overlap between NMDAR encephalitis and inflammatory demyelinating disorders.

  14. Unusual Clinical Presentation and Role of Decompressive Craniectomy in Herpes Simplex Encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Singhi, Pratibha; Saini, Arushi Gahlot; Sahu, Jitendra Kumar; Kumar, Nuthan; Vyas, Sameer; Vasishta, Rakesh Kumar; Aggarwal, Ashish

    2015-08-01

    Decompressive craniectomy in pediatric central nervous infections with refractory intracranial hypertension is less commonly practiced. We describe improved outcome of decompressive craniectomy in a 7-year-old boy with severe herpes simplex encephalitis and medically refractory intracranial hypertension, along with a brief review of the literature. Timely recognition of refractory intracranial hypertension and surgical decompression in children with herpes simplex encephalitis can be life-saving. Additionally, strokelike atypical presentations are being increasingly recognized in children with herpes simplex encephalitis and should not take one away from the underlying herpes simplex encephalitis.

  15. Canine rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Heuser, W

    1980-11-01

    A miniature poodle was presented with a history of a chronic, insidious hind limb lameness. As part of the clinical approach to the case, a serum electrophoresis was done which revealed a polyclonal hypergammaglobulinemia. Analysis of stife and carpal joint fluid revealed an elevated white cell count, that consisted of about 75% neutrophils and 25% monocytes. The joint fluid was sterile on bacteriological culture. Radiographs of the carpal joints indicated some narrowing of joint spaces and subchondral lucencies. Rheumatoid factor was identified on serological testing. Histopathology of carpal joint biopsies indicated a nonsuppurative synovitis. These findings are consistent with a diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis. The dog was treated with prednisone on a long term basis. Response to treatment has been good.

  16. Comorbidity in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Turesson, Carl

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory condition, which is associated with an increased risk of comorbidity from other diseases. RA disease severity is a major predictor of development of cardiovascular disease, serious infections and malignant lymphoma. This reflects the role of chronic inflammation in the underlying pathology. Recent surveys indicate that although clinical outcomes have improved in patients with RA, mainly owing to access to more efficient pharmacotherapy, comorbidity remains a major issue in many patients. Register-based observational studies are useful sources of information on the impact of comorbidity and the efficacy and safety of antirheumatic treatment in patients with coexisting diseases. As a part of strategies to improve further the management of patients with RA, multidisciplinary collaboration for prevention and early detection of comorbidities is of major importance.

  17. Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Young, Melodie; Bergman, Martin Jan

    2017-01-01

    Psoriasis is a dynamic systemic disease that can have a profound affect on a patient’s self-esteem. Fortunately, numerous therapeutic advances have been made over the last 10 years. In order to help patients manage their disease, healthcare providers should be aware of the modifiable risk factors that may exacerbate psoriasis. Additionally, exploring the impact the disease has on a patient and how it may change over their lifespan will help ensure appropriate therapies are used. Patients are unique so one medication will not fit all of our patients’ needs. In this paper, the authors look at available treatment options for psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Educating psoriasis patients, in addition to collaborating with patients and other healthcare providers, may help initiate therapies that will result in patients living their lives to the fullest. PMID:28360971

  18. Psoriatic Arthritis: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Peter; Ryan, Caitriona; Menter, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis is a debilitating condition, which affects approximately one-quarter of psoriasis patients. Recent findings have furthered our understanding of the complex pathophysiology of PsA. There have been major advances in the identification of genes associated with joint involvement but not with cutaneous disease alone. The elucidation of key immunologic pathways has allowed the development of novel targeted therapies that are in the research pipeline. Currently, good screening tests and biomarkers to diagnose early PsA and to guide therapy are limited. In this paper, we present recent findings with regard to the immunopathogenesis and genetics of PsA, biomarkers, and screening tools and review the targeted therapies currently in clinical trials. PMID:23209897

  19. Physiotherapy in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kavuncu, Vural; Evcik, Deniz

    2004-05-17

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic and painful clinical condition that leads to progressive joint damage, disability, deterioration in quality of life, and shortened life expectancy. Even mild inflammation may result in irreversible damage and permanent disability. The clinical course according to symptoms may be either intermittent or progressive in patients with RA. In most patients, the clinical course is progressive, and structural damage develops in the first 2 years. The aim of RA management is to achieve pain relief and prevent joint damage and functional loss. Physiotherapy and rehabilitation applications significantly augment medical therapy by improving the management of RA and reducing handicaps in daily living for patients with RA. In this review, the application of physiotherapy modalities is examined, including the use of cold/heat applications, electrical stimulation, and hydrotherapy. Rehabilitation treatment techniques for patients with RA such as joint protection strategies, massage, exercise, and patient education are also presented.

  20. Electroconvulsive therapy and/or plasmapheresis in autoimmune encephalitis?

    PubMed Central

    Gough, Jessica L; Coebergh, Jan; Chandra, Brunda; Nilforooshan, Ramin

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune encephalitis is a poorly understood condition that can present with a combination of neurological and psychiatric symptoms, either of which may predominate. There are many autoantibodies associated with a variety of clinical syndromes - anti-N-Methyl-D-Aspartate receptor (NMDAR) is the commonest. Currently, the most widely used therapy is prompt plasmapheresis and steroid treatment (and tumour resection if indicated), followed by second line immunosuppression if this fails. Given the growing awareness of autoimmune encephalitis as an entity, it is increasingly important that we consider it as a potential diagnosis in order to provide timely, effective treatment. We discuss several previously published case reports and one new case. These reports examined the effects of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) on patients with autoimmune encephalitis, particularly those in whom psychiatric symptoms are especially debilitating and refractory to standard treatment. We also discuss factors predicting good outcome and possible mechanisms by which ECT may be effective. Numerous cases, such as those presented by Wingfield, Tsutsui, Florance, Sansing, Braakman and Matsumoto, demonstrate effective use of ECT in anti-NMDAR encephalitis patients with severe psychiatric symptoms such as catatonia, psychosis, narcolepsy and stupor who had failed to respond to standard treatments alone. We also present a new case of a 71-year-old female who presented to a psychiatric unit initially with depression, which escalated to catatonia, delusions, nihilism and auditory hallucinations. After anti-NMDAR antibodies were isolated, she was treated by the neurology team with plasmapheresis and steroids, with a partial response. She received multiple sessions of ECT and her psychiatric symptoms completely resolved and she returned to her premorbid state. For this reason, we suggest that ECT should be considered, particularly in those patients who are non-responders to standard therapies. PMID

  1. MRI findings in eastern equine encephalitis: the "parenthesis" sign.

    PubMed

    Nickerson, Joshua P; Kannabiran, Suma; Burbank, Heather N

    2016-01-01

    Two patients with eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) presented to a tertiary referral center. Both subjects' brain magnetic resonance imaging showed T2/FLAIR (fluid-attenuated inversion recovery) hyperintensities including linear areas of hyperintensity in the external and internal capsules with sparing of the lentiform nuclei. Single case reports of imaging findings in EEE exist with nonspecific patterns of abnormality. We propose that this "( ) parentheses sign" on T2 or FLAIR imaging may distinguish EEE from other processes.

  2. Relapsing herpes simplex encephalitis resulting in Kluver-Bucy syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ku, Bon D; Yoon, Sung Sang

    2011-01-01

    Relapsing herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) rarely occurs after acyclovir treatment. We treated a patient with relapsing HSE of the contralateral temporal lobe, resulting in Klüver-Bucy syndrome, after a full-dose acyclovir treatment. This case suggests that physicians should consider sudden behavioral and emotional changes after HSE treatment as a possible indication of relapsing HSE, as well as possible temporal lobe epilepsy, and the need to administer longer acyclovir treatment for select patients.

  3. Cyst rupture as a pathogenic mechanism of toxoplasmic encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Frenkel, J K; Escajadillo, A

    1987-05-01

    Seemingly intact cysts and sequential stages of disintegrating cysts of Toxoplasma were identified immunohistologically within developing microglial nodules in a Panamanian night monkey (Aotus lemurinus). This monkey had been successfully immunized and challenged 5 months earlier. This supports the hypothesis that glial nodules unassociated with Toxoplasma tachyzoites may represent the tombstone of a Toxoplasma cyst. Disintegration of cysts may give rise to clinical encephalitis in the presence of apparently adequate immunity.

  4. Susceptibility of two turtle species to eastern equine encephalitis virus.

    PubMed

    Smith, A L; Anderson, C R

    1980-10-01

    Two species of turtle collected in southern New England were inoculated subcutaneously with eastern equine encephalitis virus. The spotted turtles (Clemmys guttata) developed viremia and neutralizing antibody after exposure to 3 logs or more of virus. Viremia was not detected in the eastern painted turtles (Chrysemys picta), and neutralizing antibody was detected in only 1 of 15 inoculated C. picta; however, since pre-inoculation serum was not obtained from this animal, the possibility of natural infection cannot be eliminated.

  5. Transcranial direct current stimulation in adolescent and adult Rasmussen's encephalitis.

    PubMed

    San-Juan, Daniel; Calcáneo, Juan de Dios Del Castillo; González-Aragón, Maricarmen Fernández; Bermúdez Maldonado, Luis; Avellán, Alvaro Moreno; Argumosa, Edgar Valentín Gómez; Fregni, Felipe

    2011-01-01

    Rasmussen's encephalitis is a rare, progressive inflammatory disease that typically affects one cerebral hemisphere and causes intractable partial-onset seizures. Currently, the only effective therapy is hemispherectomy; however, this procedure is associated with irreversible neurological deficits. Novel therapeutic approaches to this condition are therefore necessary. One possible option that has not yet been extensively studied is electrical cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation (cTDCS). We describe the cases of two patients with atypical-onset Rasmussen's encephalitis who underwent cTDCS at 1- and 2-mA intensity for 60 minutes in four sessions (on days 0, 7, 30, and 60). No complications were recorded during their therapy. At follow-up evaluations 6 and 12 months later, one patient had a significant reduction in seizure frequency and one was seizure free. Additionally, both patients had improved levels of alertness and language. This is the first time that cTDCS has been applied in serial sessions to treat Rasmussen's encephalitis to avoid or delay surgical treatment.

  6. A New Model for Hendra Virus Encephalitis in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Dups, Johanna; Middleton, Deborah; Yamada, Manabu; Monaghan, Paul; Long, Fenella; Robinson, Rachel; Marsh, Glenn A.; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2012-01-01

    Hendra virus (HeV) infection in humans is characterized by an influenza like illness, which may progress to pneumonia or encephalitis and lead to death. The pathogenesis of HeV infection is poorly understood, and the lack of a mouse model has limited the opportunities for pathogenetic research. In this project we reassessed the role of mice as an animal model for HeV infection and found that mice are susceptible to HeV infection after intranasal exposure, with aged mice reliably developing encephalitic disease. We propose an anterograde route of neuroinvasion to the brain, possibly along olfactory nerves. This is supported by evidence for the development of encephalitis in the absence of viremia and the sequential distribution of viral antigen along pathways of olfaction in the brain of intranasally challenged animals. In our studies mice developed transient lower respiratory tract infection without progressing to viremia and systemic vasculitis that is common to other animal models. These studies report a new animal model of HeV encephalitis that will allow more detailed studies of the neuropathogenesis of HeV infection, particularly the mode of viral spread and possible sequestration within the central nervous system; investigation of mechanisms that moderate the development of viremia and systemic disease; and inform the development of improved treatment options for human patients. PMID:22808132

  7. Catatonic Syndrome in Anti-NMDA Receptor Encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Mythri, Starlin Vijay; Mathew, Vivek

    2016-01-01

    Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor encephalitis is a newly recognised autoimmune condition. With its typical clinical pattern, consistent association with the presence of auto antibodies and rapid improvement with immunotherapy, this condition is giving insights into the boundaries between psychiatry and other neurosciences, and is opening avenues for future research. In a young lady who presented with catatonia, we considered anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis, after ruling out other aetiologies. After a positive antibody test we treated her with immunotherapy. She showed gradual improvement in her psychotic and catatonic symptoms. Knowledge regarding the nature and function of NMDA receptors and pathophysiology of this particular encephalitis is important for psychiatric practice. The great opportunity for research in this area due to its association with psychotic disorders is evident but an appeal to temper the enthusiasm by considering the historical lessons learnt from Karl Jaspers' critique of General Paresis of Insane, is in place. Catatonic syndrome has to be conceptualised broadly and should be recognised with a separate nosological position.

  8. [Anti-NMDA Receptor Antibody-Related Encephalitis].

    PubMed

    Nagayama, Shigemi; Tanaka, Keiko

    2016-09-01

    Recently, the search for diagnostic antibody markers has drawn considerable attention in relation to autoimmune encephalitis. Among the antibody markers, the most frequently detected is the anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)antibody. Patients with this antibody develop characteristic clinical features. This disease tends to affect young women, and starts with psychiatric symptoms followed by seizures, involuntary movements, autonomic failure, and respiratory failure. Nearly half of these female patients have ovarian teratoma. Some of the patients with anti-NMDAR antibody show atypical clinical features. Approximately 4% show only psychiatric symptoms, which might lead to a diagnosis of malignant catatonia. Other reports describe patients experiencing refractory seizures to have the anti-NMDAR antibody. Some of the antibody-positive patients are associated with demyelinating disorders, and some develop anti-NMDAR encephalitis after recovery from herpes simplex encephalitis. It is important to test the anti-NMDAR antibody in these groups since immunotherapy ameliorates their symptoms. The anti-NMDAR antibody binds to the constitutional epitope at the extracellular domain of GluN1 and disrupts its function. Early introduction of immunotherapy together with tumor resection will results in improvement of neurological symptoms.

  9. Catatonic Syndrome in Anti-NMDA Receptor Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Mythri, Starlin Vijay; Mathew, Vivek

    2016-01-01

    Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor encephalitis is a newly recognised autoimmune condition. With its typical clinical pattern, consistent association with the presence of auto antibodies and rapid improvement with immunotherapy, this condition is giving insights into the boundaries between psychiatry and other neurosciences, and is opening avenues for future research. In a young lady who presented with catatonia, we considered anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis, after ruling out other aetiologies. After a positive antibody test we treated her with immunotherapy. She showed gradual improvement in her psychotic and catatonic symptoms. Knowledge regarding the nature and function of NMDA receptors and pathophysiology of this particular encephalitis is important for psychiatric practice. The great opportunity for research in this area due to its association with psychotic disorders is evident but an appeal to temper the enthusiasm by considering the historical lessons learnt from Karl Jaspers’ critique of General Paresis of Insane, is in place. Catatonic syndrome has to be conceptualised broadly and should be recognised with a separate nosological position. PMID:27114630

  10. Distinct Structural Features ofCaprin-1 Mediate Its Interaction with G3BP-1 and Its Induction of Phosphorylation of Eukaryotic Translation Initiation Factor 2α, Entry to Cytoplasmic Stress Granules, and Selective Interaction with a Subset of mRNAs▿

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Samuel; Xu, Yaoxian; Wang, Bin; David, Muriel D.; Schubert, Peter; Kennedy, Derek; Schrader, John W.

    2007-01-01

    Caprin-1 is a ubiquitously expressed, well-conserved cytoplasmic phosphoprotein that is needed for normal progression through the G1-S phase of the cell cycle and occurs in postsynaptic granules in dendrites of neurons. We demonstrate that Caprin-1 colocalizes with RasGAP SH3 domain binding protein-1 (G3BP-1) in cytoplasmic RNA granules associated with microtubules and concentrated in the leading and trailing edge of migrating cells. Caprin-1 exhibits a highly conserved motif, F(M/I/L)Q(D/E)Sx(I/L)D that binds to the NTF-2-like domain of G3BP-1. The carboxy-terminal region of Caprin-1 selectively bound mRNA for c-Myc or cyclin D2, this binding being diminished by mutation of the three RGG motifs and abolished by deletion of the RGG-rich region. Overexpression of Caprin-1 induced phosphorylation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α (eIF-2α) through a mechanism that depended on its ability to bind mRNA, resulting in global inhibition of protein synthesis. However, cells lacking Caprin-1 exhibited no changes in global rates of protein synthesis, suggesting that physiologically, the effects of Caprin-1 on translation were limited to restricted subsets of mRNAs. Overexpression of Caprin-1 induced the formation of cytoplasmic stress granules (SG). Its ability to bind RNA was required to induce SG formation but not necessarily its ability to enter SG. The ability of Caprin-1 or G3BP-1 to induce SG formation or enter them did not depend on their association with each other. The Caprin-1/G3BP-1 complex is likely to regulate the transport and translation of mRNAs of proteins involved with synaptic plasticity in neurons and cellular proliferation and migration in multiple cell types. PMID:17210633

  11. Silent Circulation of St. Louis Encephalitis Virus Prior to an Encephalitis Outbreak in Cordoba, Argentina (2005)

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, Luis Adrian; Albrieu Llinás, Guillermo; Vázquez, Ana; Tenorio, Antonio; Contigiani, Marta Silvia

    2012-01-01

    St. Louis encephalitis virus is a complex zoonoses. In 2005, 47 laboratory-confirmed and probable clinical cases of SLEV infection were reported in Córdoba, Argentina. Although the causes of 2005 outbreak remain unknown, they might be related not only to virological factors, but also to ecological and environmental conditions. We hypothesized that one of the factors for SLE reemergence in Córdoba, Argentina, was the introduction of a new SLEV genotype (SLEV genotype III), with no previous activity in the area. In order to evaluate this hypothesis we carried out a molecular characterization of SLEV detections from mosquitoes collected between 2001 and 2004 in Córdoba city. A total of 315 mosquito pools (11,002 individuals) including 12 mosquitoes species were analyzed. Overall, 20 pools (8 mosquitoes species) were positive for SLEV. During this study, genotypes II, V and VII were detected. No mosquito pool infected with genotype III was detected before the 2005 outbreak. Genotype V was found every year and in the 8 sampled sites. Genotypes II and VII showed limited temporal and spatial activities. We cannot dismiss the association of genotype II and V as etiological agents during the outbreak. However, the silent circulation of other SLEV strains in Córdoba city before the 2005 outbreak suggests that the introduction of genotype III was an important factor associated to this event. Not mutually exclusive, other factors such as changes in avian hosts and mosquitoes vectors communities, driven by climatic and environmental modifications, should also be taken into consideration in further studies. PMID:22303490

  12. Review: A review on classical and atypical scrapie in caprine: Prion protein gene polymorphisms and their role in the disease.

    PubMed

    Curcio, L; Sebastiani, C; Di Lorenzo, P; Lasagna, E; Biagetti, M

    2016-10-01

    Scrapie is a naturally occurring transmissible spongiform encephalopathy in sheep and goat. It has been known for ~250 years and is characterised by the accumulation of an abnormal isoform of a host-encoded prion protein that leads to progressive neurodegeneration and death. Scrapie is recognised in two forms, classical and atypical scrapie. The susceptibility to both types of scrapie is influenced by polymorphisms of the prion protein gene (PRNP). Sheep susceptibility or resistance to classical scrapie is strongly regulated by the polymorphisms at codons 136, 154 and 171 of the PRNP. The genetic role in atypical scrapie in sheep has been defined by polymorphisms at codons 141, 154 and 171, which are associated with different degrees of risk in the occurrence of the ovine disease. Progress has been achieved in the prevention of scrapie in sheep due to efficient genetic breeding programmes based on eradication and control of the disease. In Europe, the success of these programmes has been verified by applying eradication and genetic selection plans. In general terms, the ovine selection plans aim to eliminate and reduce the susceptible allele and to enrich the resistant allele ARR. During outbreaks all susceptible animals are slaughtered, only ARR/ARR resistant rams and sheep and semi-resistant females are preserved. In the occurrence of scrapie positive goats a complete cull of the flock (stamping out) is performed with great economic loss and severe risk of extinction for the endangered breeds. The ability to select scrapie-resistant animals allows to define new breeding strategies aimed to boost genetic progress while reducing costs during scrapie outbreaks. Allelic variants of PRNP can be protective for caprine scrapie, and the knowledge of their distribution in goats has become very important. Over the past few years, the integration of genetic information on goat populations could be used to make selection decisions, commonly referred to as genetic selection

  13. Sensitivity of the VecTest antigen assay for eastern equine encephalitis and western equine encephalitis viruses.

    PubMed

    Nasci, Roger S; Gottfried, Kristy L; Burkhalter, Kristen L; Ryan, Jeffrey R; Emmerich, Eva; Davé, Kirti

    2003-12-01

    VecTest assays for detecting eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEE) and western equine encephalitis virus (WEE) antigen in mosquito pools were evaluated to determine their sensitivity and specificity by using a range of EEE, WEE, St. Louis encephalitis virus (SLE), and West Nile virus (WN) dilutions as well as individual and pooled mosquitoes containing EEE or WEE. The EEE test produced reliable positive results with samples containing > or = 5.3 log10 plaque-forming units (PFU) of EEE/ml, and the WEE test produced reliable positive results with samples containing > or = 4.7 log10 PFU WEE/ml. Both assays detected the respective viral antigens in single virus-positive mosquitoes and in pools containing a single positive mosquito and 49 negative specimens. The SLE and WN assays also contained on the dipsticks accurately detected their respective viruses. No evidence was found of cross reaction or false positives in any of the tests. The VecTest assays were less sensitive than the EEE- and WEE-specific TaqMan reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and Vero cell plaque assay, but appear to be useful for detecting arboviruses in mosquito-based arbovirus surveillance programs.

  14. Understanding Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA): Treatment and Causes

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Understanding Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Treatment and Causes Past Issues / Summer 2014 Table of Contents How Is Rheumatoid Arthritis Treated? Doctors have many ways to treat this ...

  15. Gut Microbes Linked to Rheumatoid Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Matters November 25, 2013 Gut Microbes Linked to Rheumatoid Arthritis The presence of a specific type of gut bacteria correlates with rheumatoid arthritis in newly diagnosed, untreated people. The finding suggests ...

  16. Arthritis - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Arthritis URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/arthritis.html Other topics A-Z A B ...

  17. Miscellaneous conditions associated with arthritis in children.

    PubMed

    Cassidy, J T

    1986-10-01

    Miscellaneous conditions associated with arthritis in children are reviewed as distinct entities in the differential diagnosis of the many types of juvenile arthritis reviewed here and in other articles.

  18. Inflammatory arthritis in children with osteochondrodysplasias

    PubMed Central

    Scuccimarri, R.; Azouz, E; Duffy, K.; Fassier, F.; Duffy, C.

    2000-01-01

    Osteochondrodysplasias are a heterogeneous group of genetic skeletal dysplasias. Patients with these diseases commonly develop an early degenerative arthritis or osteoarthritis. Occasional observations of inflammatory arthritis have been made in this population but such observations are based on clinical grounds alone without confirmatory imaging studies. Four patients followed up in a paediatric rheumatology clinic with three different skeletal dysplasias, who had both clinical and radiological evidence of an inflammatory arthritis and coexistent degenerative arthritis, are described.

 PMID:11053062

  19. Pathogenesis and Prediction of Future Rheumatoid Arthritis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0408 TITLE: Pathogenesis and Prediction of Future Rheumatoid Arthritis ...5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Pathogenesis and Prediction of Future Rheumatoid Arthritis 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-13-1-0408 5c...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT It is now well established that there is a preclinical period of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) development that is

  20. 9 CFR 311.7 - Arthritis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Arthritis. 311.7 Section 311.7 Animals... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.7 Arthritis. (a) Carcasses affected with arthritis which is localized and not associated with systemic change may be passed for...

  1. 9 CFR 311.7 - Arthritis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Arthritis. 311.7 Section 311.7 Animals... CERTIFICATION DISPOSAL OF DISEASED OR OTHERWISE ADULTERATED CARCASSES AND PARTS § 311.7 Arthritis. (a) Carcasses affected with arthritis which is localized and not associated with systemic change may be passed for...

  2. Diagnosis of contagious caprine pleuropneumonia by detection and identification of Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae by PCR and restriction enzyme analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Bölske, G; Mattsson, J G; Bascuñana, C R; Bergström, K; Wesonga, H; Johansson, K E

    1996-01-01

    Contagious caprine pleuropneumonia (CCPP), one of the most serious and dramatic diseases of goats, is caused by Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae (M. capripneumoniae). This organism is very difficult to isolate and to correctly identify. In a previous report we described a method for the rapid detection and identification of M. capripneumoniae. This method is based on a PCR system by which a segment of the 16S rRNA gene from all mycoplasmas of the M. mycoides cluster can be amplified. The PCR product is then analyzed by restriction enzyme cleavage for the identification of M. capripneumoniae DNA. This system has now been further evaluated with respect to specificity and diagnostic efficacy for the identification and direct detection of the organism in clinical material. Identification by restriction enzyme analysis of amplified DNA from mycoplasmas of the M. mycoides cluster was verified for 55 strains, among which were 15 strains of M. capripneumoniae. The PCR was applied to clinical samples from the nose, ear, pharynx, pleural fluid, and lung tissue containing M. capripneumoniae or other mycoplasmas. As expected, mycoplasmas belonging to the M. mycoides cluster could be detected by the PCR. Restriction enzyme analysis of the PCR products could then be applied for the identification of M. capripneumoniae. Clinical samples and cultures containing M. capripneumoniae were dried on filter paper, to try an easier sample transport method, and were tested by PCR. M. capripneumoniae DNA could be detected in the dried specimens, but the sensitivity of the PCR test was reduced. PMID:8815084

  3. In vitro susceptibilities of caprine Mycoplasma agalactiae field isolates to six antimicrobial agents using the E test methodology.

    PubMed

    Filioussis, George; Petridou, Evanthia; Giadinis, Nektarios D; Kritas, Spyridon K

    2014-12-01

    The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of enrofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, spectinomycin, tetracycline, spiramycin and erythromycin against 30 caprine Greek isolates of Mycoplasma agalactiae were determined using E test methodology. The E test strips were placed on Eaton's agar medium without antimicrobials and phenol red. MICs were then read by determining where the growth inhibition zone intersected with the MIC scale on the strip. An MIC value of 8 µg/mL was considered as a guide to mycoplasma resistance. All isolates were sensitive to fluoroquinolones (MIC50, 0.19 g/mL; MIC90, 0.38 µg/mL; highest MIC, 0.5 µg/mL), spectinomycin (MIC50, 0.5 µg/mL; MIC90, 1 µg/mL; highest MIC, 1 µg/mL), and spiramycin (MIC50, 1 µg/mL; MIC90, 1.5 µg/mL; highest MIC, 2 µg/mL). Two strains exhibited resistance to tetracycline (MIC 32 µg/mL) but these were not found to carry any of the tet(M), tet(O), and tet(S) resistance genes. Finally all isolates expressed resistance to erythromycin (MIC50, 128 µg/mL; MIC90, >256 µg/mL).

  4. Caprine herpesvirus-2 in association with naturally occurring malignant catarrhal fever in captive sika deer (Cervus nippon).

    PubMed

    Keel, M Kevin; Patterson, J Gage; Noon, Ted H; Bradley, Gregory A; Collins, James K

    2003-03-01

    Three female sika deer from a single captive herd were submitted for postmortem examination over a 139-day period. The first 2 deer submitted were reported to have lost body mass for 20 days to 1 month before euthanasia. One of these deer had diarrhea, the other had a crusting dermatitis on the nasal planum and inner aspects of both pinnae. The third hind did not have any signs of disease before it was found seizuring and was immediately euthanatized. Microscopically, all 3 animals had a lymphocytic vasculitis typical of malignant catarrhal fever (MCF), with the most severe lesions in the brain. All 3 deer were polymerase chain reaction (PCR) positive for caprine herpesvirus 2 (CpHV-2) and were negative for ovine herpesvirus 2 (OHV-2). Two healthy goats that were housed adjacent to the deer were also PCR positive for CpHV-2 and PCR negative for OHV-2. The CpHV-2, PCR amplicons from the hinds, and the 2 healthy goats had an identical single base polymorphism. A male sika deer that was housed with the hinds and a fawn from 1 of the hinds remained asymptomatic and were PCR negative for CpHV-2. This represents the first report of mortality with MCF-like lesions in association with CpHV-2.

  5. Comprehensive behavioral analysis of RNG105 (Caprin1) heterozygous mice: Reduced social interaction and attenuated response to novelty

    PubMed Central

    Ohashi, Rie; Takao, Keizo; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi; Shiina, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    RNG105 (also known as Caprin1) is a major RNA-binding protein in neuronal RNA granules, and is responsible for mRNA transport to dendrites and neuronal network formation. A recent study reported that a heterozygous mutation in the Rng105 gene was found in an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) patient, but it remains unclear whether there is a causal relation between RNG105 deficiency and ASD. Here, we subjected Rng105+/− mice to a comprehensive behavioral test battery, and revealed the influence of RNG105 deficiency on mouse behavior. Rng105+/− mice exhibited a reduced sociality in a home cage and a weak preference for social novelty. Consistently, the Rng105+/− mice also showed a weak preference for novel objects and novel place patterns. Furthermore, although the Rng105+/− mice exhibited normal memory acquisition, they tended to have relative difficulty in reversal learning in the spatial reference tasks. These findings suggest that the RNG105 heterozygous knockout leads to a reduction in sociality, response to novelty and flexibility in learning, which are implicated in ASD-like behavior. PMID:26865403

  6. Comprehensive behavioral analysis of RNG105 (Caprin1) heterozygous mice: Reduced social interaction and attenuated response to novelty.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Rie; Takao, Keizo; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi; Shiina, Nobuyuki

    2016-02-11

    RNG105 (also known as Caprin1) is a major RNA-binding protein in neuronal RNA granules, and is responsible for mRNA transport to dendrites and neuronal network formation. A recent study reported that a heterozygous mutation in the Rng105 gene was found in an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) patient, but it remains unclear whether there is a causal relation between RNG105 deficiency and ASD. Here, we subjected Rng105(+/-) mice to a comprehensive behavioral test battery, and revealed the influence of RNG105 deficiency on mouse behavior. Rng105(+/-) mice exhibited a reduced sociality in a home cage and a weak preference for social novelty. Consistently, the Rng105(+/-) mice also showed a weak preference for novel objects and novel place patterns. Furthermore, although the Rng105(+/-) mice exhibited normal memory acquisition, they tended to have relative difficulty in reversal learning in the spatial reference tasks. These findings suggest that the RNG105 heterozygous knockout leads to a reduction in sociality, response to novelty and flexibility in learning, which are implicated in ASD-like behavior.

  7. Differential Diagnosis of Polyarticular Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Pujalte, George G A; Albano-Aluquin, Sheila A

    2015-07-01

    Polyarticular arthritis is commonly encountered in clinical settings and has multiple etiologies. The first step is to distinguish between true articular pain and nonarticular or periarticular conditions by recognizing clinical patterns through the history and physical examination. Once pain within a joint or joints is confirmed, the next step is to classify the pain as noninflammatory or inflammatory in origin. Noninflammatory arthritis, which is mostly related to osteoarthritis, has a variable onset and severity and does not have inflammatory features, such as warm or swollen joints. Osteoarthritis usually presents with less than one hour of morning stiffness and pain that is aggravated by activity and improves with rest. A review of systems is usually negative for rashes, oral ulcers, or other internal organ involvement. In contrast, inflammatory arthritis generally causes warm, swollen joints; prolonged morning stiffness; and positive findings on a review of systems. Once inflammatory arthritis is suspected, possible diagnoses are sorted by the pattern of joint involvement, which includes number and type of joints involved, symmetry, and onset. The suspicion for inflammatory arthritis should be confirmed by the appropriate serologic/tissue and/or imaging studies in the clinical setting or in consultation with a subspecialist.

  8. Rabies direct fluorescent antibody test does not inactivate rabies or eastern equine encephalitis viruses.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, Jodie A; Franke, Mary A; Davis, April D

    2016-08-01

    An examination using the routine rabies direct fluorescent antibody test was performed on rabies or Eastern equine encephalitis positive mammalian brain tissue to assess inactivation of the virus. Neither virus was inactivated with acetone fixation nor the routine test, thus laboratory employees should treat all samples as rabies and when appropriate Eastern equine encephalitis positive throughout the whole procedure.

  9. Catatonia in encephalitis and nonconvulsive seizures: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Sahaya, Kinshuk; Lardizabal, David

    2010-03-01

    A 20-year-old woman was admitted for psychosis. On further investigation, she was found to be have viral encephalitis and generalized nonconvulsive seizures. After the seizures were controlled, she remained in a prolonged catatonic state. Repeated intravenous benzodiazepine administration, improved her cognition dramatically. This case emphasizes that catatonia may occur after encephalitis and nonconvulsive seizures.

  10. Recurrent aseptic encephalitis in periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and adenopathy (PFAPA) syndrome.

    PubMed

    Frye, Richard E

    2006-05-01

    An 11-year-old boy with episodes of periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and adenitis (PFAPA) is reported. Two PFAPA episodes were associated with aseptic encephalitis and seizures. Recurrent acute aseptic encephalitis or seizures have never been reported during the febrile episodes of PFAPA. This possible association is discussed within the context of the etiology of PFAPA.

  11. Cytokines in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Vervoordeldonk, Margriet J B M; Tak, Paul P

    2002-06-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic disease characterized by synovial inflammation that leads to the destruction of cartilage and bone. In the last decade, there was a lot of successful research in the field of cytokine expression and regulation. It has become clear that pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, derived predominantely from cells of macrophage lineage, play a major role in the initiation and perpetuation of the chronic inflammatory process in the RA synovial membrane. Monokines are abundant in rheumatoid synovial tissue, whereas low amounts of lymphokines are found. The involvement of pro-inflammatory cytokines, particularly interleukin (IL)-1 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, in the pathogenesis of RA is well accepted. Recent data provide evidence that the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-18 plays a crucial role in the development and sustenance of inflammatory joint diseases. There also appears to be a compensatory anti-inflammatory response in RA synovial membrane. It has become clear in the last few years that T cell-derived cytokines expressed preferentially by Th1 cells contribute to joint destruction and inflammation in RA. However, products from Th2 cells may be protective.

  12. [Pathophysiology of rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Lequerré, Thierry; Richez, Christophe

    2012-10-01

    These last years were especially marked by the best understanding of the physiopathological mechanisms at the onset of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and in the processes of joint inflammation and joint destruction. RA is more and more considered as a syndrome with at least two clinical entities with different phenotype and profiles: seronegative RA and seropositive RA. In RA with ACPA, it is the process of immunization, that is the immunological reaction against citrullinated peptides, that leads to the disease. The peptide citrullination is directly favored by environmental factors such as tobacco, infection to Porphyromonas gingivalis and alcohol. The immunization supposes a genetic predisposition including approximately 22 genetic factors including the molecules of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and PTPN22. Finally, joint damage result at the same time from an excess of destruction (RANK/RANKL, TNFalpha) and from a defect of bone reparation by the way Wnt/Frizzled. It is thanks to the best understanding of RA physiopathology that leads to development of targeted treatments and specially processing for this disease.

  13. [Tocilizumab in rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Rueda Gotor, Javier; Blanco Alonso, Ricardo

    2011-03-01

    Tocilizumab (TCZ) is a humanized monoclonal antibody directed against the receptor for IL-6, approved for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in Japan, Europe and the US. Wide clinical development has shown the efficacy of TCZ in most of the possible situations of RA: RA without prior failure to MTX (AMBITION), RA unresponsive to MTX (SATORI, OPTION, LITHE) or any DMARD (TOWARD, ROSE) as well as RA refractory to anti-TNFa agents (RADIATE). In addition to its early onset, efficacy was constant and even increased as time passed (GROWTH95, GROWTH96). TCZ has shown great efficacy in correcting laboratory alterations in RA, both in acute phase reactants as well as anemia of inflammatory disease. Although in RA TCZ us initially indicated in combination with MTX, it has also shown its efficacy as monotherapy (AMBITION). TCZ is equally effective in the prevention of structural damage (SAMURAI, LITHE). In addition, it has shown to be a safe and well-tolerated drug, similar to other biologic therapies. All of these aspects make TCZ an adequate therapeutic alternative to be considered in any RA scenario.

  14. Molecular epidemiological study of enteroviruses associated with encephalitis in children from India.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Arvind; Shukla, Deepti; Kumar, Rashmi; Idris, Mohammad Z; Misra, Usha K; Dhole, Tapan N

    2012-11-01

    Enteroviruses have been reported in encephalitis cases. However, clinical and epidemiological characteristics of enteroviruses in encephalitis are not fully established. We prospectively investigated 204 children with encephalitis over a period of 2 years (2009 to 2010) for enterovirus. Enterovirus was detected in 45 specimens (22.1%); of these, 40 were typed by seminested reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) and sequencing of the VP1 gene. Molecular typing of enterovirus revealed the predominance of echovirus 21 associated with an epidemic during the rainy seasons of 2010 and the circulation of echovirus 1, coxsackievirus B1, enterovirus 75, enterovirus 76, coxsackievirus B5, and echovirus 19. The nucleotide divergence among echovirus 21 strains was 0 to 2% at the nucleotide level. This study suggests that enterovirus is an important cause of encephalitis in children from India. To our knowledge, this is the first report of echovirus 21 in encephalitis cases worldwide.

  15. Prevalence of Coxiella burnetii in bulk milk samples from dairy bovine, ovine, caprine, and camel herds in Iran as determined by polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Ebrahim; Ameri, Mehrdad; Karim, Guity; Doosti, Abbas

    2011-02-01

    Q fever is a widespread zoonosis caused by the obligate intracellular micro-organism Coxiella burnetii. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence rate of C. burnetii in bulk milk samples from dairy bovine, ovine, caprine, and camel herds in Isfahan province, Iran. In the present study, 567 bulk milk samples from 186 dairy bovine, ovine, caprine, and camel herds were tested for C. burnetii using a nested polymerase chain reaction assay. The animals whose milk samples collected for this study were clinically healthy. In total, 8 of 247 (3.2%) bovine milk samples were positive; the positive samples originated from 6 of 90 (6.7%) dairy herds. Eight of 140 (5.7%) ovine bulk milk samples from 42 sheep breeding farms and 5 of 110 (4.5%) caprine bulk milk samples from 32 goat breeding farms were positive for C. burnetii. One of 70 (1.4%) camel bulk milk samples from 22 camel breeding farms was also positive for C. burnetii. Although no extensive prevalence study was undertaken, the results of this study indicate that clinically healthy dairy animals are important sources of C. burnetii infection in Iran. To the authors' knowledge, this study is the first report of direct identification of C. burnetii using polymerase chain reaction in bulk milk samples from dairy ovine herds in Iran and the first report of direct identification of C. burnetii in bulk milk samples from dairy camel herds. Further intensive prevalence studies on Coxiella infection and on possible risks of dairy products will be needed to elucidate the epidemiology of Q fever in Iran.

  16. Detection of Toxoplasma gondii in raw caprine, ovine, buffalo, bovine, and camel milk using cell cultivation, cat bioassay, capture ELISA, and PCR methods in Iran.

    PubMed

    Dehkordi, Farhad Safarpoor; Borujeni, Mohammad Reza Haghighi; Rahimi, Ebrahim; Abdizadeh, Rahman

    2013-02-01

    This study was conducted to determine the presence of Toxoplasma gondii in animal milk samples in Iran. From a total of 395 dairy herds in three provinces of Iran, 66 bovine, 58 ovine, 54 caprine, 33 buffalo, and 30 camel herds were studied, and from these parts of Iran, 200 bovine, 185 ovine, 180 caprine, 164 buffalo, and 160 camel milk samples were collected from various seasons. Samples were tested for Toxoplasma gondii by cell line culture, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique. Only the results of cell line cultivation were confirmed by bioassay in cat. Results indicated that all herds were infected with Toxoplasma gondii. The culture method showed that 51 out of 889 milk samples (5.73%) were positive for Toxoplasma gondii, and all 51 positive culture results were positive with bioassay in cat. The Fars province had the highest prevalence of Toxoplasma gondii (6.84%). The ELISA test showed that 41 milk samples (4.61%) were positive for the presence of Toxoplasma gondii, while the PCR showed that 46 milk samples were positive for Toxoplasma gondii. The results showed higher sensitivity of PCR and higher specificity of ELISA. Caprine had the highest (10%) and camel had the lowest (3.12%) prevalence rate of parasite. The summer season had the highest (76.47%) but winter (3.92) had the lowest incidence of Toxoplasma gondii. This study is the first prevalence report of direct detection of Toxoplasma gondii in animal milk samples in Iran.

  17. Expression of follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) in goat ovarian follicles and the impact of sequential culture medium on in vitro development of caprine preantral follicles.

    PubMed

    Saraiva, M V A; Celestino, J J H; Araújo, V R; Chaves, R N; Almeida, A P; Lima-Verde, I B; Duarte, A B G; Silva, G M; Martins, F S; Bruno, J B; Matos, M H T; Campello, C C; Silva, J R V; Figueiredo, J R

    2011-08-01

    This study evaluated the expression of FSH receptors (FSHR) in the different stages of goat follicle development and investigated whether the addition of increasing concentrations of FSH throughout the culture period influences the survival, growth and antral formation of in vitro-cultured caprine preantral follicles. The expression of FSHR was analysed before and after culturing follicles using real-time RT-PCR. For the culture, preantral follicles (≥150 μm) were isolated from ovarian fragments and cultured for 18 days in α-MEM+ alone or associated with recombinant FSH (rFSH: 100 or 1000 ng/ml), or in α-MEM+ supplemented with increasing concentrations of FSH throughout culture periods as follows: (a) sequential medium 1: FSH 100 ng/ml (from day 0 to 6), FSH 500 ng/ml (from day 6 to 12) and FSH 1000 ng/ml (from day 12 to 18); and (b) sequential medium 2: FSH 500 ng/ml (from day 0 to 9) and 1000 ng/ml (from day 9 to 18). Follicle development was evaluated on the basis of antral cavity formation, follicular and oocyte growth, and cumulus-oocyte complex health. The expression of FSHR in isolated caprine follicles increased from the preantral to antral phase. Regarding the culture, after 18 days, sequential medium 1 promoted follicular survival, antrum formation and a reduction in oocyte extrusion. Both sequential media promoted a higher rate of meiotic resumption compared with the other treatments. In conclusion, the addition of increased concentrations of FSH (sequential medium) has a significant impact on the in vitro development of caprine preantral follicles.

  18. Improving recognition of psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Conaghan, Philip G; Coates, Laura C

    2009-12-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a common form of inflammatory arthritis but is underdiagnosed. Psoriasis affects over 1.5% of the UK population. Around 15% of these patients will be diagnosed with PsA, but up to 40% may have evidence of arthritis if reviewed thoroughly. PsA can be difficult to diagnose as patients present with a variety of different patterns of arthritis. Most patients with PsA have relatively mild skin psoriasis, but some have more significant disease. Only 10-20% develop arthritis before their skin disease. Many patients have mild skin psoriasis that they are unaware of, or have not had diagnosed. Joint involvement is far more variable in PsA, compared with rheumatoid arthritis, and patients may present with: monoarthritis; oligoarthritis; involvement of the distal interphalangeal joints; a rheumatoid arthritis-like picture with multiple joints involved including the small joints in the hand or axial disease producing symptoms similar to ankylosing spondylitis. Features such as dactylitis (uniform sausage-like swelling of the whole digit either finger or toe) and enthesitis (inflammation at the sites of muscle or tendon attachment to bone) may also help diagnose PsA. Skin disease is present in the majority of patients although not all. Hidden areas for psoriasis include: behind the ears; at the top of the natal cleft and around the umbilicus. Larger joints, particularly the knees, can develop very big effusions causing obvious swelling. Areas to test for enthesitis should include the Achilles tendon, plantar fascia, costochondral joints and the elbow. Patients with suspected PsA should be referred promptly to a rheumatologist for further assessment and treatment. Diagnosis of PsA can be made on clinical grounds but blood tests and radiographs are performed routinely to aid diagnosis. Initial therapy for PsA should include NSAIDs to ease pain and stiffness. Local injections of corticosteroids are recommended for peripheral arthritis (given IA) and

  19. Current Therapy of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kamin, Edward J.; Multz, Carter V.

    1969-01-01

    The well informed and well motivated patient with rheumatoid arthritis today has an excellent chance of avoiding serious disability and deformity. No available pharmacologic agent can permanently alter the course of the disease, and no pharmacologic agent can preclude the need for a balanced program emphasizing moderation, rest and constant attention to physical therapy. Early synovectomy is enjoying increasing popularity although the long-term benefits have yet to be established. The several drugs now undergoing trial hold little promise of materially altering the management of rheumatoid arthritis in the near future. The skills of physician, surgeon, and physiatrist must be brought to bear to provide optimal care. PMID:4883503

  20. Management of Arthritis and Rheumatism

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Duncan

    1970-01-01

    The principles of successful management of the patient with arthritis depend on adequate patient education and various medical and physical therapy measures to control pain and maintain function. In many instances psychiatric and orthopaedic consultations are invaluable. The treatment of arthritis at any age, however, must depend on a precise diagnosis. This may require examination of synovial fluid including polarizing microscopy, serological studies, arthrographic procedures and an awareness of factors which may influence the level of serum uric acid. The establishment of a diagnosis alone may be insufficient for proper evaluation and the physician may be assisted by physio, occupational therapy and medical social work assessments. Imagesp37-a PMID:20468462

  1. Brainstem and limbic encephalitis with paraneoplastic neuromyelitis optica.

    PubMed

    Moussawi, Khaled; Lin, David J; Matiello, Marcelo; Chew, Sheena; Morganstern, Daniel; Vaitkevicius, Henrikas

    2016-01-01

    The spectrum of disorders associated with anti-neuromyelitis optica (NMO) antibody is being extended to include infrequent instances associated with cancer. We describe a patient with brainstem and limbic encephalitis from NMO-immunoglobulin G in serum and cerebrospinal fluid in the context of newly diagnosed breast cancer. The neurological features markedly improved with excision of her breast cancer and immune suppressive therapy. This case further broadens the NMO spectrum disorders (NMOSD) by an association between NMOSD and cancer and raises the question of coincidental occurrence and the appropriate circumstances to search for a tumor in certain instances of NMO.

  2. Ethical Implications of the Mild Encephalitis Hypothesis of Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Riedmüller, Rita; Müller, Sabine

    2017-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a serious mental disease with a high mortality rate and severe social consequences. Due to insufficient knowledge about its etiopathogenesis, curative treatments are not available. One of the most promising new research concepts is the mild encephalitis hypothesis of schizophrenia, developed mainly by Karl Bechter and Norbert Müller. According to this hypothesis, a significant subgroup of schizophrenia patients suffer from a mild, but chronic, form of encephalitis with markedly different etiologies ranging from viral infections, traumas to autoimmune diseases. This inflammatory process is thought to occur in the beginning or during the course of the disease. In this article, we investigate the consequences of the mild encephalitis hypothesis of schizophrenia for the scientific community, and evaluate these consequences ethically. The mild encephalitis hypothesis implies that schizophrenia would no longer be considered an incurable psychiatric disorder. Instead, it would be considered a chronic, but treatable, neurological disease. This paradigm shift would doubtlessly have significant consequences: (1) major reforms would be necessary in the theoretical conceptualization of schizophrenia, which would challenge the psychiatric diagnostic systems, Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders version 5 and ICD-10. (2) Psychotic patients should be treated in interdisciplinary teams, optimally in neuropsychiatric units; additionally, specialists for endocrinology, diabetology, and cardiology should be consulted for the frequently occuring somatic comorbidities. (3) Current diagnostic procedures and (4) therapies would have to be modified significantly. (5) There might be repercussions for the pharmaceutical industry as well: first, because old drugs with expired patent protection could partly replace expensive drugs and, second, because there would be a demand for the development of new anti-inflammatory drugs. (6) Legal evaluation of

  3. Efficacy of eastern equine encephalitis immunization in whooping cranes.

    PubMed

    Olsen, G H; Turell, M J; Pagac, B B

    1997-04-01

    An epizootic of eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center (PWRC), Laurel, Maryland (USA), in 1989 provided an opportunity to determine if EEE immunization protected whooping cranes (Grus americana). Based on seroconversion of 31% of sympatric hatch-year sandhill cranes, Grus canadensis, and a previous 35% case fatality rate in whooping cranes, 17 (37%) of the 46 susceptible whooping cranes should have been exposed to virus and six should have died. As there were no deaths in these birds, the EEE vaccination program appeared to be efficacious in this whooping crane population.

  4. Herpes Simplex Encephalitis Complicated by Cerebral Hemorrhage during Acyclovir Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Yukinori; Hara, Yuuta

    2017-01-01

    Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) can be complicated by adverse events in the acute phase. We herein present the case of a 71-year-old woman with HSE complicated by cerebral hemorrhage. She presented with acute deterioration of consciousness and fever and was diagnosed with HSE based on the detection of herpes simplex virus-1 in the cerebrospinal fluid by a polymerase chain reaction. The cerebral hemorrhage developed during acyclovir therapy; however, its diagnosis was delayed for 2 days. After the conservative treatment of the cerebral hemorrhage, the patient made a near-complete recovery. Cerebral hemorrhage should be considered as an acute-phase complication of HSE. PMID:28090058

  5. Efficacy of eastern encephalitis immunization in whooping cranes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olsen, G.H.; Turell, M.J.; Pagac, B.B.

    1997-01-01

    An epizootic of eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center (PWRC), Laurel, Maryland (USA), in 1989 provided an opportunity to determine if EEE immunization protected whooping cranes (Grus americana). Based on seroconversion of 31 % of sympatric hatch-year sandhill cranes, Grus canadensis, and a previous 35% case fatality rate in whooping cranes, 17 (37%) of the 46 susceptible whooping cranes should have been exposed to virus and six should have died. As there were no deaths in these birds, the EEE vaccination program appeared to be efficacious in this whooping crane population.

  6. Extratemporal herpes encephalitis during natalizumab treatment: A case report.

    PubMed

    Haggiag, Shalom; Prosperini, Luca; Galgani, Simonetta; Pozzilli, Carlo; Pinnetti, Carmela

    2016-11-01

    Herpes simplex virus encephalitis (HSE) is a rare but often fatal disease if left untreated. MRI typically shows the characteristic findings of medial temporal lobe and insular involvement, while diagnosis in confirmed by CSF PCR. In immunocompromised state, HSE may have atypical clinical and radiological features. We report a MS patient under natalizumab treatment with HSE, who presented with MRI lesions exclusively in the right parietal lobe. The patient was timely started on acyclovir resulting in marked improvement. A high index of suspicion for HSE should be maintained when a patient presents with fever and extratemporal lesions, even more in immunocompromised subjects.

  7. Herpes Simplex Encephalitis Complicated by Cerebral Hemorrhage during Acyclovir Therapy.

    PubMed

    Harada, Yukinori; Hara, Yuuta

    2017-01-01

    Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) can be complicated by adverse events in the acute phase. We herein present the case of a 71-year-old woman with HSE complicated by cerebral hemorrhage. She presented with acute deterioration of consciousness and fever and was diagnosed with HSE based on the detection of herpes simplex virus-1 in the cerebrospinal fluid by a polymerase chain reaction. The cerebral hemorrhage developed during acyclovir therapy; however, its diagnosis was delayed for 2 days. After the conservative treatment of the cerebral hemorrhage, the patient made a near-complete recovery. Cerebral hemorrhage should be considered as an acute-phase complication of HSE.

  8. Perspectives of a scrapie resistance breeding scheme targeting Q211, S146 and K222 caprine PRNP alleles in Greek goats.

    PubMed

    Kanata, Eirini; Humphreys-Panagiotidis, Cynthia; Giadinis, Nektarios D; Papaioannou, Nikolaos; Arsenakis, Minas; Sklaviadis, Theodoros

    2014-04-09

    The present study investigates the potential use of the scrapie-protective Q211 S146 and K222 caprine PRNP alleles as targets for selective breeding in Greek goats. Genotyping data from a high number of healthy goats with special emphasis on bucks, revealed high frequencies of these alleles, while the estimated probabilities of disease occurrence in animals carrying these alleles were low, suggesting that they can be used for selection. Greek goats represent one of the largest populations in Europe. Thus, the considerations presented here are an example of the expected effect of such a scheme on scrapie occurrence and on stakeholders.

  9. [Pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Branimir Anić; Miroslav Mayer

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune systemic disease that primarily affects joints. Etiology and the pathogenesis of RA are complex, involving many types of cells, among others macrophages, T and B cells, fibro- blasts, chondrocytes and dendritic cells. Despite well documented role of many genes and epigenetic modifications in the development and evolution of the disease, in most RA patients there is no clear predisposing factor present. Environmental factors involved in RA pathogenesis are cigarette smoke, industrial pollutants like silica crystals, disturbances of intestinal, lung, and oral microbiota and some specific bacterial and viral infectious agents and their components. In the initial disease stage there are qualitative and quantitative disturbances ofpeptide citrulination as well as other protein modifications, followed by antigen presenting cell (APC) (macrophages and dendritic cells) and fibroblast like synoviocytes (FLS) activation. Some microbes foster this processes by APC and FLS direct and indirect activation. In the second stage APC's elicit specific humoral B cell re- sponse resulting in specific antibodies production and T cell autoreactivity. Inherited and acquired defects in T and B cell responses caused by repeated activation of innate immunity as well as loss of tolerance, elicit chronic autoimmune inflammation, primarily of synovial membranes, and development of cellular panus. Pathologic activation of the osteoclasts and release of the immune system effector molecules and the proteolytic enzymes damage the cartilage, bone and tendons composition and structure. Persistent inflammation through its complex mechanisms results in many systemic and extraarticular RA manifestations of almost all organ systems, resulting in severe complications and comorbidities such as rheumatoid lung, carditis, vasculitis, cahexia, anemia, accelerated atherosclerosis, myocardial and cerebrovascular vascular disease, lymphoma, osteoporosis, depression etc

  10. [Understanding rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Sibilia, Jean; Sordet, Christelle; Mrabet, Dalila; Wachsmann, Dominique

    2005-12-15

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a common and severe inflammatory rheumatic disease, for which the immune mechanisms are being decoded little by little. The pathogenic ncludes significant cellular actors of innate immunity (fibroblastic synoviocytes, macrophages, mastocytes...) and adaptive immunity (T and B lymphocytes). These actors interact through the production of and response to specific (cytokines, chemokines and auto-antibodies) and non-specific (prostaglandins, nitrous oxide [NO], complement, proteases) mediators. The chronology of this rheumatoid synovitis is becoming progressively clearer. Its initiation could be the consequence of a precocious activation of the innate immunity, induced by bacterial agents or debris (PAMP). The activation of the synoviocytes and the macrophages via specific receptors (PPR) unleashes an intense inflammatory reaction that triggers a cascade of events. The ongoing nature of this synovitis leads to the intra-articular recruitment of different cells of immunity. This cellular afflux amplifies the macrophagic and synoviocytic activation and proliferation. All of these interactive phenomena end in the production of large quantities of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNFa, IL1, IL6, IL15, IL17, IL18) but also other pathogenic mediators (auto-antibodies, complement, prostaglandins, nitrous oxide...). This synovitis persists, as it is no longer regulated by a sufficient production of physiological regulators (soluble receptors and inhibitors of cytokines). The consequence of this intense inflammation and synovial proliferation leads to osteo-articular destruction by the production of proteases and the activation of osteoclasts by the RANK/RANK-ligand pathway under the effect of cytokines (TNFa, IL5, IL1, IL6, IL17) and other mediators (prostaglandins) liberated by synoviocytes, macrophages and lymphocytes. The decryption of this puzzle has already created new therapeutic orientations. The identification of new targets is one of the major

  11. Treatment of arthritis, including rheumatoid arthritis, with radioactive isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Lieberman, E.; Bordoni, M.E.; Thornton, A.K.

    1988-06-21

    A radioactive composition is described for the treatment of arthritis comprising, in combination, a ferric hydroxide or aluminum hydroxide aggregate suspension having a particle size of 3 to 20 microns, wherein a radionuclide is entrapped, the radionuclide being /sup 166/Holmium.

  12. Surveillance for Western Equine Encephalitis, St. Louis Encephalitis, and West Nile Viruses Using Reverse Transcription Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Sarah S.; Ball, Cameron S.; Langevin, Stanley A.; Fang, Ying; Coffey, Lark L.; Meagher, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Collection of mosquitoes and testing for vector-borne viruses is a key surveillance activity that directly influences the vector control efforts of public health agencies, including determining when and where to apply insecticides. Vector control districts in California routinely monitor for three human pathogenic viruses including West Nile virus (WNV), Western equine encephalitis virus (WEEV), and St. Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV). Reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) offers highly sensitive and specific detection of these three viruses in a single multiplex reaction, but this technique requires costly, specialized equipment that is generally only available in centralized public health laboratories. We report the use of reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) to detect WNV, WEEV, and SLEV RNA extracted from pooled mosquito samples collected in California, including novel primer sets for specific detection of WEEV and SLEV, targeting the nonstructural protein 4 (nsP4) gene of WEEV and the 3’ untranslated region (3’-UTR) of SLEV. Our WEEV and SLEV RT-LAMP primers allowed detection of <0.1 PFU/reaction of their respective targets in <30 minutes, and exhibited high specificity without cross reactivity when tested against a panel of alphaviruses and flaviviruses. Furthermore, the SLEV primers do not cross-react with WNV, despite both viruses being closely related members of the Japanese encephalitis virus complex. The SLEV and WEEV primers can also be combined in a single RT-LAMP reaction, with discrimination between amplicons by melt curve analysis. Although RT-qPCR is approximately one order of magnitude more sensitive than RT-LAMP for all three targets, the RT-LAMP technique is less instrumentally intensive than RT-qPCR and provides a more cost-effective method of vector-borne virus surveillance. PMID:26807734

  13. Surveillance for Western equine encephalitis St. Louis encephalitis and West Nile viruses using reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Meagher, Robert J.; Ball, Cameron Scott; Langevin, Stanley A.; Fang, Ying; Wheeler, Sarah S.; Coffey, Lark L.

    2016-01-25

    In this study, collection of mosquitoes and testing for vector-borne viruses is a key surveillance activity that directly influences the vector control efforts of public health agencies, including determining when and where to apply insecticides. Vector control districts in California routinely monitor for three human pathogenic viruses including West Nile virus (WNV), Western equine encephalitis virus (WEEV), and St. Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV). Reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) offers highly sensitive and specific detection of these three viruses in a single multiplex reaction, but this technique requires costly, specialized equipment that is generally only available in centralized public health laboratories. We report the use of reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) to detect WNV, WEEV, and SLEV RNA extracted from pooled mosquito samples collected in California, including novel primer sets for specific detection of WEEV and SLEV, targeting the nonstructural protein 4 (nsP4) gene of WEEV and the 3’ untranslated region (3’-UTR) of SLEV. Our WEEV and SLEV RT-LAMP primers allowed detection of <0.1 PFU/reaction of their respective targets in <30 minutes, and exhibited high specificity without cross reactivity when tested against a panel of alphaviruses and flaviviruses. Furthermore, the SLEV primers do not cross-react with WNV, despite both viruses being closely related members of the Japanese encephalitis virus complex. The SLEV and WEEV primers can also be combined in a single RT-LAMP reaction, with discrimination between amplicons by melt curve analysis. Although RT-qPCR is approximately one order of magnitude more sensitive than RT-LAMP for all three targets, the RT-LAMP technique is less instrumentally intensive than RT-qPCR and provides a more cost-effective method of vector-borne virus surveillance.

  14. Surveillance for Western equine encephalitis St. Louis encephalitis and West Nile viruses using reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification

    DOE PAGES

    Meagher, Robert J.; Ball, Cameron Scott; Langevin, Stanley A.; ...

    2016-01-25

    In this study, collection of mosquitoes and testing for vector-borne viruses is a key surveillance activity that directly influences the vector control efforts of public health agencies, including determining when and where to apply insecticides. Vector control districts in California routinely monitor for three human pathogenic viruses including West Nile virus (WNV), Western equine encephalitis virus (WEEV), and St. Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV). Reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) offers highly sensitive and specific detection of these three viruses in a single multiplex reaction, but this technique requires costly, specialized equipment that is generally only available in centralized publicmore » health laboratories. We report the use of reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) to detect WNV, WEEV, and SLEV RNA extracted from pooled mosquito samples collected in California, including novel primer sets for specific detection of WEEV and SLEV, targeting the nonstructural protein 4 (nsP4) gene of WEEV and the 3’ untranslated region (3’-UTR) of SLEV. Our WEEV and SLEV RT-LAMP primers allowed detection of <0.1 PFU/reaction of their respective targets in <30 minutes, and exhibited high specificity without cross reactivity when tested against a panel of alphaviruses and flaviviruses. Furthermore, the SLEV primers do not cross-react with WNV, despite both viruses being closely related members of the Japanese encephalitis virus complex. The SLEV and WEEV primers can also be combined in a single RT-LAMP reaction, with discrimination between amplicons by melt curve analysis. Although RT-qPCR is approximately one order of magnitude more sensitive than RT-LAMP for all three targets, the RT-LAMP technique is less instrumentally intensive than RT-qPCR and provides a more cost-effective method of vector-borne virus surveillance.« less

  15. Surveillance for Western Equine Encephalitis, St. Louis Encephalitis, and West Nile Viruses Using Reverse Transcription Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Sarah S; Ball, Cameron S; Langevin, Stanley A; Fang, Ying; Coffey, Lark L; Meagher, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    Collection of mosquitoes and testing for vector-borne viruses is a key surveillance activity that directly influences the vector control efforts of public health agencies, including determining when and where to apply insecticides. Vector control districts in California routinely monitor for three human pathogenic viruses including West Nile virus (WNV), Western equine encephalitis virus (WEEV), and St. Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV). Reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) offers highly sensitive and specific detection of these three viruses in a single multiplex reaction, but this technique requires costly, specialized equipment that is generally only available in centralized public health laboratories. We report the use of reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) to detect WNV, WEEV, and SLEV RNA extracted from pooled mosquito samples collected in California, including novel primer sets for specific detection of WEEV and SLEV, targeting the nonstructural protein 4 (nsP4) gene of WEEV and the 3' untranslated region (3'-UTR) of SLEV. Our WEEV and SLEV RT-LAMP primers allowed detection of <0.1 PFU/reaction of their respective targets in <30 minutes, and exhibited high specificity without cross reactivity when tested against a panel of alphaviruses and flaviviruses. Furthermore, the SLEV primers do not cross-react with WNV, despite both viruses being closely related members of the Japanese encephalitis virus complex. The SLEV and WEEV primers can also be combined in a single RT-LAMP reaction, with discrimination between amplicons by melt curve analysis. Although RT-qPCR is approximately one order of magnitude more sensitive than RT-LAMP for all three targets, the RT-LAMP technique is less instrumentally intensive than RT-qPCR and provides a more cost-effective method of vector-borne virus surveillance.

  16. Citrullinated Chemokines in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    Public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions...searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing this collection of information. Send...inflammatory properties in RA pathogenesis. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Citrullination, chemokines, chemotaxis, rheumatoid arthritis, immunology 16. SECURITY

  17. Eupatilin ameliorates collagen induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Juryun; Kim, Youngkyun; Yi, Hyoju; Jung, Hyerin; Rim, Yeri Alice; Park, Narae; Jung, Seung Min; Park, Sung-Hwan; Ju, Ji Hyeon

    2015-03-01

    Eupatilin is the main active component of DA-9601, an extract from Artemisia. Recently, eupatilin was reported to have anti-inflammatory properties. We investigated the anti-arthritic effect of eupatilin in a murine arthritis model and human rheumatoid synoviocytes. DA-9601 was injected into collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) mice. Arthritis score was regularly evaluated. Mouse monocytes were differentiated into osteoclasts when eupatilin was added simultaneously. Osteoclasts were stained with tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase and then manually counted. Rheumatoid synoviocytes were stimulated with TNF-α and then treated with eupatilin, and the levels of IL-6 and IL-1β mRNA expression in synoviocytes were measured by RT-PCR. Intraperitoneal injection of DA-9601 reduced arthritis scores in CIA mice. TNF-α treatment of synoviocytes increased the expression of IL-6 and IL-1β mRNAs, which was inhibited by eupatilin. Eupatilin decreased the number of osteoclasts in a concentration dependent manner. These findings, showing that eupatilin and DA-9601 inhibited the expression of inflammatory cytokines and the differentiation of osteoclasts, suggest that eupatilin and DA-9601 is a candidate anti-inflammatory agent.

  18. The case for immunomodulatory approaches in treating HSV encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishna, Chandran; Openshaw, Harry; Cantin, Edouard M

    2013-01-01

    HSV encephalitis (HSE) is the most prevalent sporadic viral encephalitis. Although safe and effective antiviral therapies and greatly improved noninvasive diagnostic procedures have significantly improved outcomes, mortality (~20%) and debilitating neurological sequelae in survivors remain unacceptably high. An encouraging new development is that the focus is now shifting away from the virus exclusively, to include consideration of the host immune response to infection in the pathology underlying development of HSE. In this article, the authors discuss results from recent studies in experimental mouse models, as well as clinical reports that demonstrate a role for exaggerated host inflammatory responses in the brain in the development of HSE that is motivating researchers and clinicians to consider new therapeutic approaches for treating HSE. The authors also discuss results from a few studies that have shown that immunomodulatory drugs can be highly protective against HSE, which supports a role for deleterious host inflammatory responses in HSE. The impressive outcomes of some immunomodulatory approaches in mouse models of HSE emphasize the urgent need for clinical trials to rigorously evaluate combination antiviral and immunomodulatory therapy in comparison with standard antiviral therapy for treatment of HSE, and support for such an initiative is gaining momentum. PMID:23956785

  19. Neuropsychological and psychiatric profiles in acute encephalitis in adults.

    PubMed

    Pewter, Stephen M; Williams, W Huw; Haslam, Catherine; Kay, Janice M

    2007-01-01

    Acute encephalitis is an inflammation of brain tissue that can result from activity in the central nervous system (CNS) of a number of viruses. Although the neurological and psychiatric effects of encephalitis in the acute phase of the illness are well-known (Caroff, Mann, Gliatto, Sullivan, & Campbell, 2001), larger scale studies of the pattern of neuropsychological and psychiatric impairment following recovery from the acute inflammatory phase are less apparent. This paper reports the results of neuropsychological testing with a range of standardised cognitive measures in a case series of long-term post-acute participants. Psychiatric abnormality is examined using the SCL-90-R self-report scale of distress (Derogatis, 1983). We also examined the role of emerging insight in the aetiology of depression in this population. Two clusters of cognitive dysfunction were observed, one group of primarily herpes simplex cases showing a severe generalised deficit across a number of cognitive domains and a second cluster showing a variety of more isolated disorders of executive function. Abnormally high levels of distress were reported by participants, with depression, obsessive-compulsive symptoms, interpersonal sensitivity and phobic anxiety most significantly increased. Depression was found to be least severe in those with most accurate insight into their problems. Examining the correlations between cognitive and psychiatric test results demonstrates a relationship between depression and interpersonal anxiety and specific cognitive measures. Obsessive-compulsive behaviour and phobic anxiety, however, appear to exist independently of the assessed cognitive deficits.

  20. Crystal Structure of the Japanese Encephalitis Virus Envelope Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Luca, Vincent C.; AbiMansour, Jad; Nelson, Christopher A.; Fremont, Daved H.

    2012-03-13

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is the leading global cause of viral encephalitis. The JEV envelope protein (E) facilitates cellular attachment and membrane fusion and is the primary target of neutralizing antibodies. We have determined the 2.1-{angstrom} resolution crystal structure of the JEV E ectodomain refolded from bacterial inclusion bodies. The E protein possesses the three domains characteristic of flavivirus envelopes and epitope mapping of neutralizing antibodies onto the structure reveals determinants that correspond to the domain I lateral ridge, fusion loop, domain III lateral ridge, and domain I-II hinge. While monomeric in solution, JEV E assembles as an antiparallel dimer in the crystal lattice organized in a highly similar fashion as seen in cryo-electron microscopy models of mature flavivirus virions. The dimer interface, however, is remarkably small and lacks many of the domain II contacts observed in other flavivirus E homodimers. In addition, uniquely conserved histidines within the JEV serocomplex suggest that pH-mediated structural transitions may be aided by lateral interactions outside the dimer interface in the icosahedral virion. Our results suggest that variation in dimer structure and stability may significantly influence the assembly, receptor interaction, and uncoating of virions.

  1. IL-22 signaling contributes to West Nile encephalitis pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Penghua; Bai, Fengwei; Zenewicz, Lauren A; Dai, Jianfeng; Gate, David; Cheng, Gong; Yang, Long; Qian, Feng; Yuan, Xiaoling; Montgomery, Ruth R; Flavell, Richard A; Town, Terrence; Fikrig, Erol

    2012-01-01

    The Th17 cytokine, IL-22, regulates host immune responses to extracellular pathogens. Whether IL-22 plays a role in viral infection, however, is poorly understood. We report here that Il22(-/-) mice were more resistant to lethal West Nile virus (WNV) encephalitis, but had similar viral loads in the periphery compared to wild type (WT) mice. Viral loads, leukocyte infiltrates, proinflammatory cytokines and apoptotic cells in the central nervous system (CNS) of Il22(-/-) mice were also strikingly reduced. Further examination showed that Cxcr2, a chemokine receptor that plays a non-redundant role in mediating neutrophil migration, was significantly reduced in Il22(-/-) compared to WT leukocytes. Expression of Cxcr2 ligands, cxcl1 and cxcl5, was lower in Il22(-/-) brains than wild type mice. Correspondingly, neutrophil migration from the blood into the brain was attenuated following lethal WNV infection of Il22(-/-) mice. Our results suggest that IL-22 signaling exacerbates lethal WNV encephalitis likely by promoting WNV neuroinvasion.

  2. Neospora caninum as causative agent of bovine encephalitis in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Malaguti, Jane Mary Albinati; Cabral, Aline Diniz; Abdalla, Raisa Pereira; Salgueiro, Yolanda Oliveira; Galleti, Nara Thiers Cacciatori; Okuda, Liria Hiromi; Cunha, Elenice Maria Sequetin; Pituco, Edviges Maristela; Del Fava, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    For supporting the Brazilian bovine encephalitis surveillance program this study examined the differential diagnosis of Neospora caninum in central nervous system (CNS) by histological analysis (HE staining), immunohistochemistry (IHC), and nested-PCR using a set of primers from the Nc5 region of the genomic DNA and ITS1 region of the ribosomal DNA. A sample of 302 cattle presenting neurological syndrome and negative for rabies, aged 0 to 18 years, from herds in 10 Brazilian states was evaluated for N. caninum from January 2007 to April 2010. All specimens tested negative with IHC and nested-PCR using primers from the ITS1 region of ribosomal DNA, while two positive cases (0.66%) were found using primers from the Nc5 region of genomic DNA: a 20 month-old male and a 72 month-old female, both from São Paulo State. Only the male presented severe multifocal necrotizing encephalitis associated with mononuclear cell infiltration, a pathognomonic lesion caused by parasites of the family Sarcocystidae, and only this case was associated with N. caninum thus representing 0.33% positivity. Future studies should explore the association of IHC and nested-PCR with real-time PCR, a quantitative method that could be standardized for improving the detection of N. caninum in bovine CNS specimens.

  3. Disgust and fear recognition in paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Sprengelmeyer, Reiner; Atkinson, Anthony P; Sprengelmeyer, Anke; Mair-Walther, Johanna; Jacobi, Christian; Wildemann, Brigitte; Dittrich, Winand H; Hacke, Werner

    2010-05-01

    Paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis (PNLE) affects limbic portions of the brain associated with recognition of social signals of emotions. Yet it is not known whether this perceptual ability is impaired in individuals with PNLE. We therefore conducted a single case study to explore possible impairments in recognising facially, vocally and bodily expressed emotions, using standardised emotion recognition tests. Facial expression recognition was tested with two forced-choice emotion-labelling tasks using static faces with either prototypical or morphed blends of basic emotions. Recognition of vocally and bodily expressed emotions was also tested with forced-choice labelling tasks, one based on prosodic cues, the other on whole-body movement cues. We found a deficit in fear and disgust recognition from both face and voice, while recognition of bodily expressed emotions was unaffected. These findings are consistent with data from previous studies demonstrating critical roles for certain brain regions - particularly the amygdala and insular cortex - in processing facially and vocally displayed basic emotions, and furthermore, suggest that recognition of bodily expressed emotions may not depend on neural structures involved in facial and vocal emotion recognition. Impaired facial and vocal emotion recognition may form a further neuropsychological marker of limbic encephalitis, in addition to the already well-described mnestic deficits.

  4. Acute hemorrhagic encephalitis: An unusual presentation of dengue viral infection

    PubMed Central

    Nadarajah, Jeyaseelan; Madhusudhan, Kumble Seetharama; Yadav, Ajay Kumar; Gupta, Arun Kumar; Vikram, Naval Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Dengue is a common viral infection worldwide with presentation varying from clinically silent infection to dengue fever, dengue hemorrhagic fever, and severe fulminant dengue shock syndrome. Neurological manifestation usually results from multisystem dysfunction secondary to vascular leak. Presentation as hemorrhagic encephalitis is very rare. Here we present the case of a 13-year-old female admitted with generalized tonic clonic seizures. Plain computed tomography (CT) scan of head revealed hypodensities in bilateral deep gray matter nuclei and right posterior parietal lobe without any hemorrhage. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serology were positive for IgM and IgG antibodies to dengue viral antigen. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed multifocal T2 and fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) hyperintensities in bilateral cerebral parenchyma including basal ganglia. No hemorrhage was seen. She was managed with steroids. As her clinical condition deteriorated, after being stable for 2 days, repeat MRI was done which revealed development of hemorrhage within the lesions, and diagnosis of acute hemorrhagic encephalitis of dengue viral etiology was made. PMID:25709166

  5. Acute hemorrhagic encephalitis: An unusual presentation of dengue viral infection.

    PubMed

    Nadarajah, Jeyaseelan; Madhusudhan, Kumble Seetharama; Yadav, Ajay Kumar; Gupta, Arun Kumar; Vikram, Naval Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Dengue is a common viral infection worldwide with presentation varying from clinically silent infection to dengue fever, dengue hemorrhagic fever, and severe fulminant dengue shock syndrome. Neurological manifestation usually results from multisystem dysfunction secondary to vascular leak. Presentation as hemorrhagic encephalitis is very rare. Here we present the case of a 13-year-old female admitted with generalized tonic clonic seizures. Plain computed tomography (CT) scan of head revealed hypodensities in bilateral deep gray matter nuclei and right posterior parietal lobe without any hemorrhage. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serology were positive for IgM and IgG antibodies to dengue viral antigen. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed multifocal T2 and fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) hyperintensities in bilateral cerebral parenchyma including basal ganglia. No hemorrhage was seen. She was managed with steroids. As her clinical condition deteriorated, after being stable for 2 days, repeat MRI was done which revealed development of hemorrhage within the lesions, and diagnosis of acute hemorrhagic encephalitis of dengue viral etiology was made.

  6. Human-like antibodies neutralizing Western equine encephalitis virus

    PubMed Central

    Hülseweh, Birgit; Rülker, Torsten; Pelat, Thibaut; Langermann, Claudia; Frenzel, Andrè; Schirrmann, Thomas; Dübel, Stefan; Thullier, Philippe; Hust, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This study describes the development of the first neutralizing antibodies against Western equine encephalitis virus (WEEV), a member of the genus Alphavirus. WEEV is transmitted by mosquitoes and can spread to the human central nervous system, causing symptoms ranging from mild febrile reactions to life-threatening encephalitis. WEEV has been classified as a biological warfare agent by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. No anti-WEEV drugs are currently commercially available. Neutralizing antibodies are useful for the pre- and post-exposure treatment of WEEV infections. In this study, two immune antibody gene libraries were constructed from two macaques immunized with inactivated WEEV. Four antibodies were selected from these libraries and recloned as scFv-Fc, with a human Fc part. These antibodies bound WEEV specifically in ELISA with little or no cross-reaction with other alphaviruses. They were further analyzed by immunohistochemistry. All binders were suitable for the intracellular detection of WEEV particles. Neutralizing activity was determined in vitro. Three of the four antibodies were found to be neutralizing; about 1 ng/mL of the best antibody (ToR69–3A2) neutralized 50% of 5x104 TCID50/mL. Due to its human-like nature with a germinality index of 89% (VH) and 91% (VL), the ToR69–3A2 antibody is a promising candidate for future passive vaccine development. PMID:24518197

  7. Japanese encephalitis virus tropism in experimentally infected pigs.

    PubMed

    Ricklin, Meret E; Garcìa-Nicolàs, Obdulio; Brechbühl, Daniel; Python, Sylvie; Zumkehr, Beatrice; Posthaus, Horst; Oevermann, Anna; Summerfield, Artur

    2016-02-24

    Pigs are considered to be the main amplifying host for Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), and their infection can correlate with human cases of disease. Despite their importance in the ecology of the virus as it relates to human cases of encephalitis, the pathogenesis of JEV in pigs remains obscure. In the present study, the localization and kinetics of virus replication were investigated in various tissues after experimental intravenous infection of pigs. The data demonstrate a rapid and broad spreading of the virus to the central nervous system (CNS) and various other organs. A particular tropism of JEV in pigs not only to the CNS but also for secondary lymphoid tissue, in particular the tonsils with the overall highest viral loads, was observed. In this organ, even 11 days post infection, the latest time point of the experiment, no apparent decrease in viral RNA loads and live virus was found despite the presence of a neutralizing antibody response. This was also well beyond the clinical and viremic phase. These results are of significance for the pathogenesis of JEV, and call for further experimental studies focusing on the cellular source and duration of virus replication in pigs.

  8. HIV-2 encephalitis: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Wood, Brian R; Klein, Joshua P; Lyons, Jennifer L; Milner, Danny A; Phillips, Richard E; Schutten, Martin; Folkerth, Rebecca D; Ciarlini, Pedro; Henrich, Timothy J; Johnson, Jennifer A

    2012-07-01

    We report the case of a 59-year-old man who moved from Cape Verde to Massachusetts at the age of 29. He had multiple sexual contacts with female partners in Cape Verde and with West African women in Massachusetts, as well as multiple past indeterminate HIV-1 antibody tests. He presented to our facility with 2-3 months of inappropriate behaviors, memory impairment, weight loss, and night sweats, at which time he was found to have an abnormal enhancing lesion of the corpus collosum on brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Laboratory testing revealed a CD4 count of 63 cells/mm(3), positive HIV-2 Western blot, serum HIV-2 RNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of 1160 copies per milliliter and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) HIV-2 RNA PCR of 2730 copies per milliliter. Brain biopsy demonstrated syncytial giant cells centered around small blood vessels and accompanied by microglia, which correlated with prior pathologic descriptions of HIV-2 encephalitis and with well-described findings of HIV-1 encephalitis. Based on genotype resistance assay results, treatment guidelines, and prior studies validating success with lopinavir-ritonavir, he was treated with tenofovir-emtricitabine and lopinavir-ritonavir, which has led to virologic suppression along with steady neurologic and radiologic improvement, although he continues to have deficits.

  9. [Anti-NMDA encephalitis in psychiatry; malignant catatonia, atypical psychosis and ECT].

    PubMed

    Kanbayashi, Takashi; Tsutsui, Ko; Tanaka, Keiko; Omori, Yuki; Takaki, Manabu; Omokawa, Mayu; Mori, Akane; Kusanagi, Hiroaki; Nishino, Seiji; Shimizu, Tetsuo

    2014-01-01

    The symptoms of malignant (lethal) catatonia has been reported similar to initial symptoms of anti-NMDAR encephalitis. Subsequently, this autoimmune limbic encephalitis has been noticed in many psychiatrists. We have experienced several cases with malignant catatonia having anti-NMDAR antibody without clinical signs of encephalitis. Thereafter, we have also found anti-NMDAR antibody positive patients of young females with acute florid psychiatric symptoms without clinical signs of encephalitis. The features of these patients mirror-those of "Atypical psychosis" proposed by Mitsuda in Japan, a notion derived from "Cycloid psychosis" conceptualized by German psychiatrist, Leonhard. Both cycloid and atypical psychosis have coinciding features of acute onset, emotional disturbances, psychomotor disturbances, alternations of consciousness, high prevalence in women and oriented premorbid personality. Both malignant catatonia and atypical psychosis have been known to be effectively treated with modified electro convulsion therapy (m-ECT). Our 5 cases with anti-NMDAR antibody, m-ECT treatments were effective. Infectious encephalitis is contra indication of m-ECT, but this autoimmune encephalitis would be careful indication. Schizophrenia is a common, heterogeneous, and complex disorder with unknown etiology. There is established evidence of NMDAR hypofunction as a central component of the functional disconnectivity; this is one of the most accepted models for schizophrenia. Moreover, autoimmune mechanisms have been proposed to be involved, at least in subgroups of schizophrenia patients. Further research of anti-NMDAR antibody and encephalitis would be important clues for the investigation of schizophrenia, catatonia and atypical psychosis.

  10. First Description of Infection of Caprine Herpesvirus 1 (CpHV-1) in Goats in Mainland France

    PubMed Central

    Suavet, Florence; Champion, Jean-Luc; Bartolini, Luc; Bernou, Maryline; Alzieu, Jean-Pierre; Brugidou, Roland; Darnatigues, Séverine; Reynaud, Gaël; Perrin, Cécile; Adam, Gilbert; Thiéry, Richard; Duquesne, Véronique

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the epidemiological situation of the caprine herpesvirus 1 (CpHV-1) infection in nine districts in mainland France, mostly in the south, near Italy or Spain, where high seroprevalence has been observed. Two more central areas were also included in the study. The serosurvey was carried out in 9564 goats (275 herds) using bovine herpesvirus 1 (BoHV-1) glycoprotein B and E ELISAs. To confirm the presence of specific CpHV-1 antibodies, some of the samples were tested in neutralization assay. Results demonstrate, for the first time, CpHV-1 infection in goat herds on the French mainland. The analysis found cases of alphaherpesviruses infection in each district studied, with different levels of seroprevalence observed within each district (ranging from 0.2% to 31.56% at an individual level and from 9% to 46.2% for herd seroprevalence). Moreover, in the Alpes-Maritimes district, the seroprevalence seemed to be higher in older goats (79.45% of animals 6 years old or more) than in younger animals (40.99% of one-year-olds). This result suggests frequent virus re-excretion and circulation in herds. Results analysis also shows that the seroprevalence was higher when the herd size increased. In addition, the first French CpHV-1 strain was isolated from nasal swabs taken on an infected goat. The data reported herein demonstrate that CpHV-1 circulates in mainland France, which should henceforth be taken into consideration in cases of unexplained abortion in goats. PMID:26861403

  11. Caprine prion gene polymorphisms are associated with decreased incidence of classical scrapie in goat herds in the United Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The application of genetic breeding programmes to eradicate transmissible spongiform encephalopathies in goats is an important aim for reasons of animal welfare as well as human food safety and food security. Based on the positive impact of Prnp genetics on sheep scrapie in Europe in the past decade, we have established caprine Prnp gene variation in more than 1100 goats from the United Kingdom and studied the association of Prnp alleles with disease phenotypes in 150 scrapie-positive goats. This investigation confirms the association of the Met142 encoding Prnp allele with increased resistance to preclinical and clinical scrapie. It reveals a novel association of the Ser127 encoding allele with a reduced probability to develop clinical signs of scrapie in goats that are already positive for the accumulation of disease-specific prion protein in brain or periphery. A United Kingdom survey of Prnp genotypes in eight common breeds revealed eleven alleles in over thirty genotypes. The Met142 encoding allele had a high overall mean allele frequency of 22.6%, whereas the Ser127 encoding allele frequency was considerably lower with 6.4%. In contrast, a well known resistance associated allele encoding Lys222 was found to be rare (0.9%) in this survey. The analysis of Prnp genotypes in Mexican Criollas goats revealed nine alleles, including a novel Phe to Leu substitution in codon 201, confirming that high genetic variability of Prnp can be found in scrapie-free populations. Our study implies that it should be feasible to lower scrapie prevalence in goat herds in the United Kingdom by genetic selection. PMID:22040234

  12. Brucella suis vaccine strain S2-infected immortalized caprine endometrial epithelial cell lines induce non-apoptotic ER-stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiangguo; Lin, Pengfei; Yin, Yanlong; Zhou, Jinhua; Lei, Lanjie; Zhou, Xudong; Jin, Yaping; Wang, Aihua

    2015-05-01

    Brucella, which is regarded as an intracellular pathogen responsible for a zoonotic disease called brucellosis, survives and proliferates within several types of phagocytic and non-phagocytic cells. Brucella infects not only their preferred hosts but also other domestic and wild animal species, inducing abortion and infertility. Therefore, the interaction between uterine cells and Brucella is important for understanding the pathogenesis of this disease. In this study, we describe the Brucella suis vaccine strain S2 (B.suis.S2) infection and replication in the immortalized caprine endometrial epithelial cell line hTERT-EECs and the induced cellular and molecular response modulation in vitro. We found that B.suis S2 was able to infect and replicate to high titers and inhibit the proliferation of EECs and induce non-apoptotic pathways, as determined by B.suis.S2 detection using MTT and acridine orange/ethidium bromide (AO/EB) staining and flow cytometry. We explored the evidence of non-apoptotic pathways using real-time quantitative RT-PCR and by western blot analysis. Finally, we discovered the over-expression of GRP78, ATF4, ATF6, PERK, eIF2α, CHOP, and cytochrome c (Cyt-c) but not IRE1, xbp-1, and caspase-3 in B.suis.S2 (HK)-attacked and B.suis.S2-infected cells, suggesting that the molecular mechanism of ER stress sensor activation by B.suis.S2 is basically concomitant with that by B.suis.S2 (HK) and that ER stress, especially the PERK pathway, plays an important role in the process of B.suis.S2 infecting EEC, which may, in part, explain the role of the uterus in the pathogenesis of B.suis.S2.

  13. The presence of long spinal muscles increases stiffness and hysteresis of the caprine spine in-vitro.

    PubMed

    Valentin, S; Grösel, M; Licka, T

    2012-10-11

    Long muscle-tendon-units are known to contribute to spinal stiffness and hysteresis in-vivo, yet their contribution as a passive structure in-vitro is less well defined. Twelve full length caprine spines including the head, pelvis and all spinal muscles were tested during displacement in Flexion-Extension (FE) and coupled Lateral and Rotational (LR) motion in a material testing machine. Hysteresis and modified stiffness (modST), i.e. mean force divided by the total displacement, were calculated. This was repeated following removal of dorsal muscles (longissimus dorsi and gluteus) and ventral muscles (iliopsoas), in a random order. ModST and hysteresis in the different dissection stages were identified. Correlations between modST, hysteresis, body mass, spine length and longissimus muscle thickness were calculated. Removal of dorsal musculature reduced extension modST significantly by 23%, and flexion modST by 40%. Ventral muscle removal reduced extension modST by 1% and flexion modSt by 13%. Hysteresis was reduced by 27% after dorsal and 2% after ventral muscle removal in FE hysteresis. Out of 105 correlation coefficients, five values were significantly correlated (p<0.05, range r(2): 0.61-0.71) and 10 values were highly significantly correlated (p<0.01, range r(2): 0.75-0.97). Strongest correlations were between hysteresis and modST for the same movement direction and dissection state. The results of this study demonstrate that the presence of muscles stiffens the spine with dorsal muscles showing more effect. This supports the concept that muscle volume even in a non-contractile state provides a stabilising function to the spine.

  14. Elucidation of the involvement of p14, a sperm protein during maturation, capacitation and acrosome reaction of caprine spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Nandi, Pinki; Ghosh, Swatilekha; Jana, Kuladip; Sen, Parimal C

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian sperm capacitation is an essential prerequisite to fertilization. Although progress is being made in understanding the physiology and biochemistry of capacitation, little has been yet explored about the potential role(s) of individual sperm cell protein during this process. Therefore elucidation of the role of different sperm proteins in the process of capacitation might be of great importance to understand the process of fertilization. The present work describes the partial characterization of a 14-kDa protein (p14) detected in goat spermatozoa using an antibody directed against the purified protein. Confocal microscopic analysis reveals that the protein is present in both the intracellular and extracellular regions of the acrosomal and postacrosomal portion of caudal sperm head. Though subcellular localization shows that p14 is mainly cytosolic, however it is also seen to be present in peripheral plasma membrane and soluble part of acrosome. Immuno-localization experiment shows change in the distribution pattern of this protein upon induction of capacitation in sperm cells. Increased immunolabeling in the anterior head region of live spermatozoa is also observed when these cells are incubated under capacitating conditions, whereas most sperm cells challenged with the calcium ionophore A23187 to acrosome react, lose their labeling almost completely. Intracellular distribution of p14 also changes significantly during acrosome reaction. Interestingly, on the other hand the antibody raised against this 14-kDa sperm protein enhances the forward motility of caprine sperm cells. Rose-Bengal staining method shows that this anti-p14 antibody also decreases the number of acrosome reacted cells if incubated with capacitated sperm cells before induction of acrosome reaction. All these results taken together clearly indicate that p14 is intimately involved and plays a critical role in the acrosomal membrane fusion event.

  15. An international collaborative study to determine the prevalence of contagious caprine pleuropneumonia by monoclonal antibody-based cELISA

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Few serological tests are available for detecting antibodies against Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae, the causal agent of contagious caprine pleuropneumonia (CCPP). The complement fixation test, the test prescribed for international trade purposes, uses a crude antigen that cross-reacts with all the other mycoplasma species of the “mycoides cluster” frequently infecting goat herds. The lack of a more specific test has been a real obstacle to the evaluation of the prevalence and economic impact of CCPP worldwide. A new competitive ELISA kit for CCPP, based on a previous blocking ELISA, was formatted at CIRAD and used to evaluate the prevalence of CCPP in some regions of Kenya, Ethiopia, Mauritius, Tajikistan and Pakistan in an international collaborative study. Results The strict specificity of the test was confirmed in CCPP-free goat herds exposed to other mycoplasma species of the “mycoides cluster”. Prevalence studies were performed across the enzootic range of the disease in Africa and Asia. Seroprevalence was estimated at 14.6% in the Afar region of Ethiopia, whereas all the herds presented for CCPP vaccination in Kenya tested positive (individual seroprevalence varied from 6 to 90% within each herd). In Mauritius, where CCPP emerged in 2009, nine of 62 herds tested positive. In Central Asia, where the disease was confirmed only recently, no positive animals were detected in the Wakhan District of Afghanistan or across the border in neighboring areas of Tajikistan, whereas seroprevalence varied between 2.7% and 44.2% in the other districts investigated and in northern Pakistan. The test was also used to monitor seroconversion in vaccinated animals. Conclusions This newly formatted CCPP cELISA kit has retained the high specificity of the original kit. It can therefore be used to evaluate the prevalence of CCPP in countries or regions without vaccination programs. It could also be used to monitor the efficacy of vaccination

  16. Caprine prion gene polymorphisms are associated with decreased incidence of classical scrapie in goat herds in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Goldmann, Wilfred; Ryan, Kelly; Stewart, Paula; Parnham, David; Xicohtencatl, Rosa; Fernandez, Nora; Saunders, Ginny; Windl, Otto; González, Lorenzo; Bossers, Alex; Foster, James

    2011-10-31

    The application of genetic breeding programmes to eradicate transmissible spongiform encephalopathies in goats is an important aim for reasons of animal welfare as well as human food safety and food security. Based on the positive impact of Prnp genetics on sheep scrapie in Europe in the past decade, we have established caprine Prnp gene variation in more than 1100 goats from the United Kingdom and studied the association of Prnp alleles with disease phenotypes in 150 scrapie-positive goats. This investigation confirms the association of the Met142 encoding Prnp allele with increased resistance to preclinical and clinical scrapie. It reveals a novel association of the Ser127 encoding allele with a reduced probability to develop clinical signs of scrapie in goats that are already positive for the accumulation of disease-specific prion protein in brain or periphery. A United Kingdom survey of Prnp genotypes in eight common breeds revealed eleven alleles in over thirty genotypes. The Met142 encoding allele had a high overall mean allele frequency of 22.6%, whereas the Ser127 encoding allele frequency was considerably lower with 6.4%. In contrast, a well known resistance associated allele encoding Lys222 was found to be rare (0.9%) in this survey. The analysis of Prnp genotypes in Mexican Criollas goats revealed nine alleles, including a novel Phe to Leu substitution in codon 201, confirming that high genetic variability of Prnp can be found in scrapie-free populations. Our study implies that it should be feasible to lower scrapie prevalence in goat herds in the United Kingdom by genetic selection.

  17. Effect of a Semi-Purified Oligosaccharide-Enriched Fraction from Caprine Milk on Barrier Integrity and Mucin Production of Co-Culture Models of the Small and Large Intestinal Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, Alicia M.; Roy, Nicole C.; McNabb, Warren C.; Cookson, Adrian L.

    2016-01-01

    Caprine milk contains the highest amount of oligosaccharides among domestic animals, which are structurally similar to human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs). This suggests caprine milk oligosaccharides may offer similar protective and developmental effects to that of HMOs. However, to date, studies using oligosaccharides from caprine milk have been limited. Thus, this study aimed to examine the impact of a caprine milk oligosaccharide-enriched fraction (CMOF) on barrier function of epithelial cell co-cultures of absorptive enterocytes (Caco-2 cells) and mucus-secreting goblet cells (HT29-MTX cells), that more closely simulate the cell proportions found in the small (90:10) and large intestine (75:25). Treatment of epithelial co-cultures with 0.4, 1.0, 2.0 and 4.0 mg/mL of CMOF was shown to have no effect on metabolic activity but did enhance cell epithelial barrier integrity as measured by trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TEER), in a dose-dependent manner. The CMOF at the maximum concentration tested (4.0 mg/mL) enhanced TEER, mucin gene expression and mucin protein abundance of epithelial co-cultures, all of which are essential components of intestinal barrier function. PMID:27164134

  18. dFMRP and Caprin, translational regulators of synaptic plasticity, control the cell cycle at the Drosophila mid-blastula transition

    PubMed Central

    Papoulas, Ophelia; Monzo, Kathryn F.; Cantin, Greg T.; Ruse, Cristian; Yates, John R.; Ryu, Young Hee; Sisson, John C.

    2010-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms driving the conserved metazoan developmental shift referred to as the mid-blastula transition (MBT) remain mysterious. Typically, cleavage divisions give way to longer asynchronous cell cycles with the acquisition of a gap phase. In Drosophila, rapid synchronous nuclear divisions must pause at the MBT to allow the formation of a cellular blastoderm through a special form of cytokinesis termed cellularization. Drosophila Fragile X mental retardation protein (dFMRP; FMR1), a transcript-specific translational regulator, is required for cellularization. The role of FMRP has been most extensively studied in the nervous system because the loss of FMRP activity in neurons causes the misexpression of specific mRNAs required for synaptic plasticity, resulting in mental retardation and autism in humans. Here, we show that in the early embryo dFMRP associates specifically with Caprin, another transcript-specific translational regulator implicated in synaptic plasticity, and with eIF4G, a key regulator of translational initiation. dFMRP and Caprin collaborate to control the cell cycle at the MBT by directly mediating the normal repression of maternal Cyclin B mRNA and the activation of zygotic frühstart mRNA. These findings identify two new targets of dFMRP regulation and implicate conserved translational regulatory mechanisms in processes as diverse as learning, memory and early embryonic development. PMID:21068064

  19. In vitro growth and maturation of isolated caprine preantral follicles: Influence of insulin and FSH concentration, culture dish, coculture, and oocyte size on meiotic resumption.

    PubMed

    Silva, G M; Brito, I R; Sales, A D; Aguiar, F L N; Duarte, A B G; Araújo, V R; Vieira, L A; Magalhães-Padilha, D M; Lima, L F; Alves, B G; Silveira, L B R; Lo Turco, E G; Rodrigues, A P; Campello, C C; Wheeler, M B; Figueiredo, J R

    2017-03-01

    The aims of this study were: (1) to evaluate the effect of different insulin concentrations, alone or in combination with either a fixed FSH concentration or increasing FSH concentrations on the in vitro culture of isolated caprine preantral follicles and (2) to analyze the efficiency of two IVM media and maturation culture systems (with or without coculture with in vivo grown oocytes) on the meiosis resumption. Secondary follicles were cultured for 18 days in a basic medium supplemented with low- or high-insulin concentration alone or with a fixed FSH concentration or with increasing FSH concentrations. Oocytes grown in vivo or in vitro were matured alone or cocultured. The high-insulin concentration associated with fixed FSH treatment had higher meiotic resumption rate (P < 0.05) and was the only treatment capable of producing oocytes in metaphase II. The rates of germinal vesicle, germinal vesicle breakdown, metaphase I, metaphase II (MII), meiotic resumption, and oocyte diameter were similar between the maturation media. In conclusion, a basic medium supplemented with 10-μg/mL insulin and 100-μg/mL FSH throughout the culture period improved meiotic resumption rate and produced MII oocytes from caprine preantral follicles cultured in vitro. The MII rate was similar between in vivo and in vitro grown oocytes ≥110 μm.

  20. Modulation of the pro-inflammatory molecules E-selectin and TNF-α gene transcription in Eimeria ninakohlyakimovae-infected primary caprine host endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Pérez, D; Ruiz, A; Muñoz, M C; Molina, J M; Hermosilla, C; López, A M; Matos, L; Ortega, L; Martín, S; Taubert, A

    2015-10-01

    Eimeria ninakohlyakimovae is an important coccidian parasite of goats which causes severe hemorrhagic typhlocolitis in young animals, thereby leading to high economic losses in goat industry worldwide. The first merogony of E. ninakohlyakimovae occurs within host endothelial cells (ECs) of the lacteal capillaries of the villi of the distal ileum resulting in the formation of macromeronts (up to 170 μm) within 10-12 days post-infection (p.i.) and releasing >120,000 merozoites I. The E. ninakohlyakimovae-macromeront formation within highly immunoreactive host endothelial cells (ECs) should rely on several regulatory processes to fulfill this massive replication. Here host EC-parasite interactions were investigated to determine the extent of modulation carried out by E. ninakohlyakimovae in primary caprine umbilical vein endothelial cells (CUVEC) during the first merogony. Gene transcription of the adhesion molecule E-selectin and the cytokine TNF-α were significantly enhanced in the first hours and days p.i. in E. ninakohlyakimovae-infected CUVEC. The activation of CUVEC was also demonstrated by enhanced chemokine CCL2 and cytokine GM-CSF gene transcription, whereas no differences of the eNOS gene transcription were observed in E. ninakohlyakimovae-infected CUVEC when compared to un-infected controls. The data presented here suggest that infection of caprine host ECs by E. ninakohlyakimovae results in EC activation associated with enhanced gene transcription encoding for pro-inflammatory as well as immunomodulatory molecules, which might be important for the defense against this intracellular parasite.

  1. Anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor encephalitis: review of clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Helen; Byrne, Susan; Barrett, Elizabeth; Murphy, Kieran C.; Cotter, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor encephalitis is a form of encephalitis occurring primarily in women and associated with antibodies against NR1 or NR2 subunits of the NMDA receptor. As a potentially treatable differential for symptoms and signs seen in neurology and psychiatric clinics, clinicians practising across the lifespan should be aware of this form of encephalitis. Common clinical features include auditory and visual hallucinations, delusions, behavioural change (frequently with agitation), impaired consciousness, motor disturbance (ranging from dyskinesia to catatonia), seizures, and autonomic dysfunction. We present a review of the literature on the disorder, including its clinical presentation, differential diagnosis, epidemiology, treatment and prognosis. PMID:26191419

  2. Anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor encephalitis: review of clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Barry, Helen; Byrne, Susan; Barrett, Elizabeth; Murphy, Kieran C; Cotter, David R

    2015-02-01

    Anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor encephalitis is a form of encephalitis occurring primarily in women and associated with antibodies against NR1 or NR2 subunits of the NMDA receptor. As a potentially treatable differential for symptoms and signs seen in neurology and psychiatric clinics, clinicians practising across the lifespan should be aware of this form of encephalitis. Common clinical features include auditory and visual hallucinations, delusions, behavioural change (frequently with agitation), impaired consciousness, motor disturbance (ranging from dyskinesia to catatonia), seizures, and autonomic dysfunction. We present a review of the literature on the disorder, including its clinical presentation, differential diagnosis, epidemiology, treatment and prognosis.

  3. Naegleria fowleri-associated encephalitis in a cow from Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Morales, Juan A; Chaves, Aida J; Visvesvara, G S; Dubey, J P

    2006-06-30

    Species of Naegleria, Acanthamoeba, and Balamuthia are soil amoebae that can cause encephalitis in animals and humans. Of these, Naegleria fowleri is the cause of often fatal primary meningoencephalitis in humans. N. fowleri-associated encephalitis was diagnosed in a cow that was suspected to have rabies. Only formalin-fixed brain was available for diagnosis. There was severe meningoencephalitis involving all parts of the brain and numerous amoebic trophozoites were present in lesions. The amoebae reacted with N. fowleri-specific polyclonal antibodies in an indirect immunofluorescent antibody test. This is the first report of amoebic encephalitis in any host from Costa Rica.

  4. Unilateral predominance of abnormal movements: A characteristic feature of the pediatric anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis?

    PubMed

    Benjumea-Cuartas, Vanessa; Eisermann, Monika; Simonnet, Hina; Hully, Marie; Nabbout, Rima; Desguerre, Isabelle; Kaminska, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis is a treatable autoimmune disease characterized by cognitive, motor and psychiatric features that primarily affects young adults and children. We present a case of a 7-year-old boy with asymmetrical (mainly right hemibody) and abnormal polymorphic movements without concomitant scalpictal EEG changes but had background slowing predominating over the left hemisphere. This report illustrates previous descriptions of asymmetric presentation of abnormal movements in pediatric anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis and emphasizes the importance of video-EEG interpreted within the overall clinical context, to differentiate epileptic from non-epileptic abnormal movements in patients with autoimmune encephalitis.

  5. Anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis: a neurological disease in psychiatric disguise.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Bhawna; Handa, Rahul; Prakash, Swayam; Nagpal, Kadam; Gupta, Pankaj

    2014-02-01

    Anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis was first described in 2005 when psychiatric features, memory loss and altered consciousness were found in four women with ovarian teratoma. We report a case of anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis in a 16-year-old female who presented with psychiatric features followed by autonomic dysfunction and orofacial dyskinesias that showed drastic improvement to intravenous immunoglobulin. As many patients of anti-NMDAR encephalitis initially present with psychiatric features, it is important for psychiatrists to have high index of suspicion for this disease and thus avoid the delay in diagnosing this treatable condition which may be otherwise fatal.

  6. Anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis: an easily missed diagnosis in older patients.

    PubMed

    Rainey, Katie; Gholkar, Bethan; Cheesman, Mark

    2014-09-01

    Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor encephalitis is an important, treatable cause of encephalitis which remains under-recognised despite a growing body of the literature [1]. It is an immune-mediated syndrome which presents with a variety of neurological symptoms including headache, fever, personality change and seizures. Most case reports to date are of young adults, it is much less frequently reported in older adults. The syndrome has been associated with ovarian teratomas. The prognosis is good with early recognition and treatment, though may relapse. We present a case of NMDA encephalitis in an elderly patient who responded well to immunosuppressive therapy.

  7. Prolonged acyclovir treatment in a child with opercular syndrome related to herpes simplex encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Karli, Arzu; Şensoy, Gülnar; Tekin, Emine; Sofuoğlu, Ayşe I; Bilgici, Meltem C; Özyürek, Hamit

    HSV 1 encephalitis is the most common cause of sporadic and focal viral encephalitis. Opercular syndrome is characterized by swallowing and speech difficulties which are associated with deterioration of voluntary control of face, pharynx, tongue and chewing muscles. It can be developed in patients with Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE). Here, a twelve-year-old boy who was diagnosed with HSE and Opercular syndrome, is presented. The patient recovered without sequela as a result of 30 days of intravenous and 10 days of oral acyclovir treatment. It might be important as well, to personalize and elongate the treatment in terms of prognosis.

  8. BK Virus Encephalitis in HIV-Infected Patients: Case Report and Review

    PubMed Central

    Antoniolli, Luciana; Borges, Rafael

    2017-01-01

    Encephalitis and meningitis due to BKPyV are unusual and emerging condition. Only a few cases of BKPyV encephalitis have been reported in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients, with the majority of cases presenting with concurrent hemorrhagic cystitis and HIV-infected patients. The authors report two HIV-infected patients with the diagnosis of BKPyV encephalitis and discuss the main clinical, diagnostic, and therapeutic aspects of this infection in patients with AIDS. Physicians should be aware to recognize the main clinical features and diagnose BKPyV central nervous infection in the setting of AIDS. PMID:28326104

  9. What People with Rheumatoid Arthritis Need to Know about Osteoporosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Osteoporosis Osteoporosis and Other Conditions What People With Rheumatoid Arthritis Need to Know About Osteoporosis Publication available in: ... focus(); */ } //--> Print-Friendly Page April 2016 What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis? Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease, a disorder ...

  10. What Are Osteoporosis and Arthritis and How Are They Different?

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease. How Do People With Osteoporosis and Arthritis Cope? If you have osteoporosis or arthritis, exercise can ... People with arthritis need to learn ways to cope with joints that don't move well and ...

  11. Endomorphins in rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, and experimental arthritis.

    PubMed

    Jessop, David S; Fassold, Alexander; Wolff, Christine; Hofbauer, Rafael; Chover-Gonzalez, Antonio; Richards, Louise J; Straub, Rainer H

    2010-04-01

    The opioid tetrapeptides endomorphins (EM)-1 and EM-2 are widely expressed in central nervous system and immune tissues of rats and humans. Their analgesic properties are well characterized but they also have anti-inflammatory properties. EM-1 significantly attenuated the onset of hindpaw inflammation in adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats. Immunohistochemical staining demonstrated the presence of EMs in T cells, macrophages, and fibroblasts in synovial tissues from patients with osteo- or rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In an ex vivo superfusion system, EM-1 potently inhibited the release of proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 from synovial tissues from patients with osteo- or RA. These results demonstrate that EMs are endogenously synthesized within human immune cells and have the potential to act as potent therapeutic agents in the treatment of chronic inflammatory disease. We discuss the clinical potential for EM analogues chemically modified to resist proteolytic degradation and identify modified protease-resistant analogues with enhanced bioactivity.

  12. Psoriatic arthritis: Epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jung-Tai; Yeh, Horng-Ming; Liu, Shyun-Yeu; Chen, Kow-Tong

    2014-01-01

    Our understanding of psoriatic arthritis has evolved as new knowledge of the disease has emerged. However, the exact prevalence of psoriatic arthritis is unknown, and its pathogenesis has not been fully elucidated. Genetic, environmental, and immunologic factors have all been implicated in disease development. Early diagnosis and treatment have become primary objectives in clinical rheumatology. Psoriatic arthritis not only causes functional impairment, but also increases mortality risk of patients. The advent of new therapeutic agents capable of arresting the progression of joint damage is expected. However, early psoriatic arthritis assessment remains limited. The objectives of this article are to outline the epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment of psoriatic arthritis and to suggest a paradigm for identifying early psoriatic arthritis patients. PMID:25232529

  13. Polyarticular septic arthritis in an immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Clements, J; Dinneen, A; Heilpern, G

    2013-03-01

    Septic arthritis is an uncommon condition with an incidence of 2-3/100,000. It is clinically notable, however, as it is a rapidly destructive joint disease with significant associated morbidity and mortality. Polyarticular septic arthritis has an estimated incidence of 15% of all cases of infectious arthritis. We report a case of polyarticular septic arthritis with involvement of bilateral shoulders and wrist to highlight the importance of early diagnosis and treatment as well as the high mortality rates associated with this condition. Bilateral septic shoulder arthritis poses a challenge to treat, and its significance should not be underestimated as even with early surgical intervention and aggressive antibiotic and fluid resuscitation death is a sad but perhaps not uncommon outcome. It is therefore imperative that the diagnosis of polyarticular septic arthritis is kept prominent in the physician's mind when confronted with a patient with symptomatic polyarthralgia.

  14. TNF inhibition as therapy for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Wollheim, Frank A

    2002-07-01

    The introduction of TNF- alpha -inhibiting biologicals has been a major therapeutic breakthrough in rheumatoid arthritis therapy. Against a background of conventional disease-modifying antirheumatic drug experience, this review focuses on present experiences and possible future developments. TNF inhibition results in profound improvement in the majority of rheumatoid arthritis patients, but non-response and adverse effects need attention. Adalimumab is being filed for approval. Other monoclonal antibodies or receptor constructs are in late development. Small molecule inhibitors of TNF production or signalling are a hot topic. One emerging target is nuclear factor kappa B and selective inhibition has proved effective in animal models of arthritis. Synovial proliferation in rheumatoid arthritis is characterised by diminished apoptosis of fibroblasts, whereas bone marrow precursor cells undergo accelerated apoptosis in active rheumatoid arthritis. Both abnormalities are seemingly ameliorated by TNF inhibition. Anti-apoptotic strategies will soon go into development for control of unresponsive rheumatoid arthritis.

  15. HIV positive patient with HSV-2 encephalitis: case report.

    PubMed

    Pagliano, Pasquale; Ascione, Tiziana; Carleo, Maria Aurora; Boccia, Giovanni; De Caro, Francesco; Tortora, Fabio

    2016-09-01

    Incidence of brain infections in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) positive patients is reduced after the availability of current high active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Herpes Simplex Virus type 2 (HSV-2) is an infrequent cause of encephalitis in HIV patients despite it is frequently involved in sexual transmitted infections. Here, we report a case of HSV-2 encephalitis occurring in a patient without full suppression of HIV replication within the brain. A 38 year-old HIV infected man was admitted to our department because of recurrent generalized seizure and fever during the previous 24 hours. Eight months before our observation the patient was switched from a protease inhibitor based regimen to a rilpivirine-based regimen without any evidence of HIV-RNA replication in the plasma. When the patient was admitted in our hospital, he was febrile and moderately confused, no deficit of cranial nerves was reported, motility was conserved, but he was unable to walk. Laboratory examinations performed at admission demonstrated an increase of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) protein and cells with lymphocyte prevalence, and normal CSF glucose. HSV-2-DNA and HIV-RNA were present within CSF at admission. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance imaging of the brain revealed lesions of the medial part of both temporal lobes including hippocampus without any sign of bleeding. A 21-day course of acyclovir therapy was administered with consistent improvement of clinical findings and disappearance of HSV-2-DNA within CSF. After the episode, HAART was switched to a regimen with high CSF penetrability containing abacavir, lamivudine, darunavir and ritonavir. Twelve months after HSV-2 encephalitis neurologic evaluation was normal, but symptoms of depression were reported, HIV-RNA remained undetectable both in the plasma and CSF, and CD4+ lymphocytes were above 500/μL. No opportunistic infection was reported. Patients switched to regimen well tolerated such those containing rilpivirine, that have

  16. Acromioclavicular septic arthritis and sternoclavicular septic arthritis with contiguous pyomyositis.

    PubMed

    Corey, Sally A; Agger, William A; Saterbak, Andrew T

    2015-03-01

    Acromioclavicular (AC) and sternoclavicular (SC) septic arthritis with contiguous pyomyositis are rare, especially in immunocompetent individuals. We report a case of septic AC joint with pyomyositis of the deltoid and supraspinatus muscles and a separate case with septic SC joint with pyomysitis of the sternocleidomastoid muscle. Both patients had similar presentations of infections with Staphylococcus aureus and were successfully treated with surgical incision and drainage followed by prolonged antibiotic therapy.

  17. Septic arthritis in immunocompetent and immunosuppressed hosts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dingyuan Alvin; Tambyah, Paul Anantharajah

    2015-04-01

    Septic arthritis has long been considered an orthopedic emergency. Historically, Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Staphylococcus aureus have been the most common causes of septic arthritis worldwide but in the modern era of biological therapy and extensive use of prosthetic joint replacements, the spectrum of microbiological causes of septic arthritis has widened considerably. There are also new approaches to diagnosis but therapy remains a challenge, with a need for careful consideration of a combined medical and surgical approach in most cases.

  18. Galectin-3: A key player in arthritis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yong; Yéléhé-Okouma, Mélissa; Ea, Hang-Korng; Jouzeau, Jean-Yves; Reboul, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Arthritis is more and more considered as the leading reason for the disability in the world, particularly regarding its main entities, rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. The common feature of arthritis is inflammation, which is mainly supported by synovitis (synovial inflammation), although the immune system plays a primary role in rheumatoid arthritis and a secondary one in osteoarthritis. During the inflammatory phase of arthritis, many pro-inflammatory cytokines and mediators are secreted by infiltrating immune and resident joint cells, which are responsible for cartilage degradation and excessive bone remodeling. Amongst them, a β-galactoside-binding lectin, galectin-3, has been reported to be highly expressed and secreted by inflamed synovium of rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis patients. Furthermore, galectin-3 has been demonstrated to induce joint swelling and osteoarthritis-like lesions after intra-articular injection in laboratory animals. However, the mechanisms underlying its pathophysiological role in arthritis have not been fully elucidated. This review deals with the characterization of arthritis features and galectin-3 and summarizes our current knowledge of the contribution of galectin-3 to joint tissue lesions in arthritis.

  19. Diagnosis and treatment of Lyme arthritis.

    PubMed

    Arvikar, Sheila L; Steere, Allen C

    2015-06-01

    In the United States, Lyme arthritis is the most common feature of late-stage Borrelia burgdorferi infection, usually beginning months after the initial bite. In some, earlier phases are asymptomatic and arthritis is the presenting manifestation. Patients with Lyme arthritis have intermittent or persistent attacks of joint swelling and pain in 1 or a few large joints. Serologic testing is the mainstay of diagnosis. Synovial fluid polymerase chain reaction for B burgdorferi DNA is often positive before treatment, but is not a reliable marker of spirochetal eradication after therapy. This article reviews the clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and management of Lyme arthritis.

  20. Post-marketing surveillance of live-attenuated Japanese encephalitis vaccine safety in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yali; Dong, Duo; Cheng, Gang; Zuo, Shuyan; Liu, Dawei; Du, Xiaoxi

    2014-10-07

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) is the most severe form of viral encephalitis in Asia and no specific treatment is available. Vaccination provides an effective intervention to prevent JE. In this paper, surveillance data for adverse events following immunization (AEFI) related to SA-14-14-2 live-attenuated Japanese encephalitis vaccine (Chengdu Institute of Biological Products) was presented. This information has been routinely generated by the Chinese national surveillance system for the period 2009-2012. There were 6024 AEFI cases (estimated reported rate 96.55 per million doses). Most common symptoms of adverse events were fever, redness, induration and skin rash. There were 70 serious AEFI cases (1.12 per million doses), including 9 cases of meningoencephalitis and 4 cases of death. The post-marketing surveillance data add the evidence that the Chengdu institute live attenutated vaccine has a reasonable safety profile. The relationship between encephalitis and SA-14-14-2 vaccination should be further studied.

  1. Postpartum Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate Receptor Encephalitis: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Doden, Tadashi; Sekijima, Yoshiki; Ikeda, Junji; Ozawa, Kazuki; Ohashi, Nobuhiko; Kodaira, Minori; Hineno, Akiyo; Tachibana, Naoko; Ikeda, Shu-ichi

    2017-01-01

    We describe a 24-year-old woman with anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (anti-NMDAR) encephalitis that developed 3 weeks after normal delivery. She was treated with methylprednisolone, intravenous immunoglobulin, and plasmapheresis, in addition to teratoma excision. However, her recovery was slow, and dysmnesia and mental juvenility persisted even two years after onset. To date, five patients with postpartum anti-NMDAR encephalitis have been reported. All of those patients showed psychotic symptoms and were suspected of having postpartum psychosis in the early period of the encephalitis. Changes in hormonal factors, modification of immune tolerance, or retrograde infection of the ovary may be contributing factors for postpartum anti-NMDAR encephalitis. PMID:28154283

  2. Anti-N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor Encephalitis in HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Patarata, Eunice; Bernardino, Vera; Martins, Ana; Pereira, Rui; Loureiro, Conceição; Moraes-Fontes, Maria Francisca

    2016-01-01

    Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (anti-NMDAR) encephalitis is a rare condition characterized by emotional and behavioral disturbances, dyskinesias, and extrapyramidal signs. It occurs in young women of reproductive age and is classically described as a paraneoplastic phenomenon. We present a 36-year-old, HIV-positive female who was admitted to the hospital in an acute confusional state, with a stiff posture, periods of motor agitation, and myoclonic jerks of the hands. Her mental state progressively deteriorated. Without evidence of infection, the presence of anti-NMDAR antibodies both in serum and cerebrospinal fluid clinched the diagnosis of autoimmune encephalitis. No evidence of neoplastic disease was found, and the beneficial response to immunosuppressive therapy was exceptional. This is the first report of anti-NMDAR encephalitis in an HIV-infected individual, reminding us that autoimmune encephalitis should be included in the differential diagnosis of a young patient presenting in an acute confusional state. PMID:28101036

  3. Brain PET metabolic abnormalities in a case of varicella-zoster virus encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Coiffard, Benjamin; Guedj, Eric; Daumas, Aurélie; Leveque, Pierre; Villani, Patrick

    2014-09-01

    The role of brain 18F-FDG PET in the diagnostic evaluation of encephalitis has been recently suggested, especially in limbic encephalitis, but descriptions are mainly limited to small case reports. However, the evaluation of cerebral metabolism by 18F-FDG PET has never been described for varicella-zoster virus encephalitis. We report the first case of varicella-zoster virus encephalitis in which 18F-FDG PET revealed brain metabolic abnormalities. Brain metabolic PET imaging was analyzed by comparing the patient's brain 18F-FDG PET scans to that of 12 healthy subjects. Compared with healthy subjects, significant hypometabolism and hypermetabolism were found and evolved over time with treatment.

  4. Encephalitis caused by pathogens transmitted through organ transplants, United States, 2002-2013.

    PubMed

    Basavaraju, Sridhar V; Kuehnert, Matthew J; Zaki, Sherif R; Sejvar, James J

    2014-09-01

    The cause of encephalitis among solid organ transplant recipients may be multifactorial; the disease can result from infectious or noninfectious etiologies. During 2002-2013, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention investigated several encephalitis clusters among transplant recipients. Cases were caused by infections from transplant-transmitted pathogens: West Nile virus, rabies virus, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, and Balamuthia mandrillaris amebae. In many of the clusters, identification of the cause was complicated by delayed diagnosis due to the rarity of the disease, geographic distance separating transplant recipients, and lack of prompt recognition and reporting systems. Establishment of surveillance systems to detect illness among organ recipients, including communication among transplant center physicians, organ procurement organizations, and public health authorities, may enable the rapid discovery and investigation of infectious encephalitis clusters. These transplant-transmitted pathogen clusters highlight the need for greater awareness among clinicians, pathologists, and public health workers, of emerging infectious agents causing encephalitis among organ recipients.

  5. Multiple Paths to Encephalization and Technical Civilizations: Constraints Inferred from the Biosphere's Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartzman, D. W.; Middendorf, G.

    2010-04-01

    Two possible evolutionary paths should be considered for the emergence of intelligent life with the potential for technical civilization, encephalization in warm blooded animals, and swarm intelligence in superorganisms (e.g., termite colonies).

  6. [Clinical diagnosis and treatment of anti-NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) receptor encephalitis].

    PubMed

    Kamei, Satoshi

    2013-05-01

    Recent clinical management of anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis is reviewed. This illness is required the management of the neurological emergency. Typical symptoms of anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis develop in several stages that progresses from psychosis, memory deficits, seizures, and language disintegration into a state of unresponsiveness with catatonic features often associated with abnormal movements, and autonomic and respiratory instability. The diagnosis is depended on the detection of the NMDA receptor antibody in CSF or serum under the above characteristic symptoms of encephalitis. The disorder predominantly affects children and young adults, occurs with or without tumor association. The presence of a tumor (usually an ovarian teratoma) is dependent on age and sex, being more frequent in women older than 18 years. Anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis should be treated with tumor resection and immunotherapy (corticosteroids, intravenous immunoglobulin, or plasma exchange) responded faster to treatment and less frequently needed second-line immunotherapy (cyclophosphamide or rituximab, or both).

  7. A Sarcocystis neurona-like organism associated with encephalitis in a striped skunk (Mephitis mephitis).

    PubMed

    Dubey, J P; Hamir, A N; Niezgoda, M; Rupprecht, C E

    1996-02-01

    A Sarcocystis neurona-like organism was associated with granulomatous encephalitis in an ataxic male juvenile striped skunk (Mephitis mephitis) from Cape Cod, Massachusetts. Various stages of schizonts and merozoites of S. neurona were seen within some of the granulomata.

  8. Whooping crane titers to eastern equine encephalitis vaccinations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olsen, G.H.; Kolski, E.; Hatfield, J.S.; Docherty, D.E.; Chavez-Ramirez, Felipe

    2005-01-01

    In 1984 an epizootic of eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) virus killed 7 of 39 (18%) whooping cranes in captivity at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center in Laurel, Maryland, USA. Since that time whooping cranes have been vaccinated with a human EEE vaccine. This vaccine was unavailable for several years, necessitating use of an equine vaccine in the cranes. This study compared the antibody titers measured for three years using the human vaccine with those measured for two years using the equine form. Whooping cranes developed similarly elevated titers in one year using the human vaccine and both years using the equine vaccine. However, in two years where the human vaccine was used, the whooping cranes developed significantly lower titers compared to other years.

  9. Ecological studies on the mosquito vectors of Japanese encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, C. J.; Chen, P. S.

    1973-01-01

    These studies were conducted in China (Province of Taiwan) to assess the populations of known and potential mosquito vectors of Japanese encephalitis in a typical endemic area, and to evaluate a variety of sampling techniques, some of which were new. Culex annulus was found to be the predominant vector species in the study area during the epidemic season; C. tritaeniorhynchus was never abundant, and C. fuscocephalus was rare. C. annulus and C. tritaeniorhynchus were active throughout the year, although populations were at a low level during the cool season. The results show that attention must be given to C. annulus as a possible vector where it is present in JE foci. The collection of mosquitos during the early evening hours from buffalo bait tethered outdoors was found to be the most efficient and sensitive means of monitoring vector populations throughout the year. During the JE epidemic season remarkable results were obtained with a vacuum sweep-net. PMID:4367779

  10. New-onset refractory status epilepticus mimicking herpes virus encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Puoti, Gianfranco; Elefante, Andrea; Saracino, Dario; Capasso, Antonella; Cotrufo, Roberto; Anello, Clara Belluomo

    2013-01-01

    New-onset refractory status epilepticus (NORSE) is a recently defined clinical entity that describes patients who present with status epilepticus of unclear etiology that is highly refractory to therapy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of NORSE usually discloses no specific abnormalities except for an occasional mild T2/FLAIR hyperintense signal of the mesial temporal lobe. Here, we report a peculiar case of NORSE in which brain MRI showed massive alteration of both temporal lobes, with features strongly supporting the diagnosis of herpes virus encephalitis, but lacking any laboratory evidence of viral infection in the blood and cerebrospinal fluid. It showed also striking signal alterations in the thalamus, which got worse in the course of the disease. This report emphasizes the possibility that seizure activity alone plays a critical role in both determining the disease and whether it will be self-sustaining.

  11. Experimental infection of wading birds with eastern equine encephalitis virus.

    PubMed

    McLean, R G; Crans, W J; Caccamise, D F; McNelly, J; Kirk, L J; Mitchell, C J; Calisher, C H

    1995-10-01

    To study the susceptibility of wading birds to eastern equine encephalitis (EEE) virus and to determine their potential as reservoir or amplifying hosts, fledgling glossy ibises (Plegadis falcinellus) and snowy egrets (Egretta thula) were captured in New Jersey (USA) and shipped to Colorado (USA) where they were experimentally inoculated with EEE virus. All 16 snowy egrets and 14 (93%) of 15 of the glossy ibises inoculated became viremic with moderate titers, and all survivors developed neutralizing antibody. Six ibises and two egrets died during the first week after inoculation, and EEE virus was isolated from the tissues of three birds. Our experimental results support field evidence about the relative involvement of glossy ibises and snowy egrets in the epizootiology of EEE virus in New Jersey.

  12. Competency of reptiles and amphibians for eastern equine encephalitis virus.

    PubMed

    White, Gregory; Ottendorfer, Christy; Graham, Sean; Unnasch, Thomas R

    2011-09-01

    Eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV) is endemic throughout most of the eastern United States. Although it is transmitted year round in Florida, transmission elsewhere is seasonal. The mechanism that enables EEEV to overwinter in seasonal foci remains obscure. In previous field studies, early season EEEV activity was detected in mosquito species that feed primarily upon ectothermic hosts, suggesting that reptiles and amphibians might represent overwintering reservoir hosts for EEEV. To determine if this might be possible, two commonly fed upon amphibian and reptile species were evaluated as hosts for the North American subtype I strain of EEEV. Neither amphibian species was a competent host. However, circulating viremias were detected in both reptile species examined. Hibernating infected garter snakes remained viremic after exiting hibernation. These data suggest that snakes may represent an overwintering host for North American EEEV.

  13. Cysticercal encephalitis presenting with a "starry sky" appearance on neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Patil, Tushar B; Gulhane, Ragini V

    2015-01-01

    A lady in her early forties was brought to our hospital in an unconscious state with history of generalized tonic-clonic seizures for last 6 h. She had multiple episodes of seizures in last 4 months, but did not receive any treatment. Relatives also gave a history of fever, headache, and vomiting for last 1 week. Her seizures were controlled with intravenous lorazepam and valproate. Clinical examination revealed a delirious patient with bilateral papilledema, brisk deep tendon reflexes, and extensor plantars. She had aspirated and had bilateral coarse crepitations on chest auscultation. Computed tomography (CT) of brain showed multiple small hyperdense calcific lesions extending throughout both the cerebral hemispheres leading to a "starry sky" appearance, suggestive of cysticercal encephalitis. The patient succumbed to progressive aspiration pneumonitis on the 6(th) day after hospitalization.

  14. A Rare Case of Mediterranean Spotted Fever and Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Maria João; Matos Costa, João

    2016-01-01

    Mediterranean spotted fever is a tick-borne zoonotic disease caused by Rickettsia conorii. It is transmitted by the dog tick Rhipicephalus sanguineus. It usually presents as a benign self-limited disease characterized by a skin rash, high fever, and, sometimes, a characteristic ulcer at the tick bite site called tache noir. The course of this disease is usually benign, although severe manifestations have been previously described, mainly in adults. Neurological manifestations are very unusual. We present a case of Mediterranean spotted fever with encephalitis to highlight the importance of clinical suspicion, mainly in endemic areas, the potential severity of this disease, and the need of early initiation of therapy in order to prevent severe complications. PMID:28053795

  15. A Variegated Squirrel Bornavirus Associated with Fatal Human Encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Bernd; Tappe, Dennis; Höper, Dirk; Herden, Christiane; Boldt, Annemarie; Mawrin, Christian; Niederstraßer, Olaf; Müller, Tobias; Jenckel, Maria; van der Grinten, Elisabeth; Lutter, Christian; Abendroth, Björn; Teifke, Jens P; Cadar, Daniel; Schmidt-Chanasit, Jonas; Ulrich, Rainer G; Beer, Martin

    2015-07-09

    Between 2011 and 2013, three breeders of variegated squirrels (Sciurus variegatoides) had encephalitis with similar clinical signs and died 2 to 4 months after onset of the clinical symptoms. With the use of a metagenomic approach that incorporated next-generation sequencing and real-time reverse-transcriptase quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), the presence of a previously unknown bornavirus was detected in a contact squirrel and in brain samples from the three patients. Phylogenetic analyses showed that this virus, tentatively named variegated squirrel 1 bornavirus (VSBV-1), forms a lineage separate from that of the known bornavirus species. (Funded by the Federal Ministry of Food and Agriculture [Germany] and others.).

  16. Alexander the Great and West Nile Virus Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Marr, John S.

    2003-01-01

    Alexander the Great died in Babylon in 323 BC. His death at age 32 followed a 2-week febrile illness. Speculated causes of death have included poisoning, assassination, and a number of infectious diseases. One incident, mentioned by Plutarch but not considered by previous investigators, may shed light on the cause of Alexander’s death. The incident, which occurred as he entered Babylon, involved a flock of ravens exhibiting unusual behavior and subsequently dying at his feet. The inexplicable behavior of ravens is reminiscent of avian illness and death weeks before the first human cases of West Nile virus infection were identified in the United States. We posit that Alexander may have died of West Nile encephalitis. PMID:14725285

  17. Seasonal forecast of St. Louis encephalitis virus transmission, Florida.

    PubMed

    Shaman, Jeffrey; Day, Jonathan F; Stieglitz, Marc; Zebiak, Stephen; Cane, Mark

    2004-05-01

    Disease transmission forecasts can help minimize human and domestic animal health risks by indicating where disease control and prevention efforts should be focused. For disease systems in which weather-related variables affect pathogen proliferation, dispersal, or transmission, the potential for disease forecasting exists. We present a seasonal forecast of St. Louis encephalitis virus transmission in Indian River County, Florida. We derive an empiric relationship between modeled land surface wetness and levels of SLEV transmission in humans. We then use these data to forecast SLEV transmission with a seasonal lead. Forecast skill is demonstrated, and a real-time seasonal forecast of epidemic SLEV transmission is presented. This study demonstrates how weather and climate forecast skill-verification analyses may be applied to test the predictability of an empiric disease forecast model.

  18. Drought-induced amplification of Saint Louis encephalitis virus, Florida.

    PubMed

    Shaman, Jeffrey; Day, Jonathan F; Stieglitz, Marc

    2002-06-01

    We used a dynamic hydrology model to simulate water table depth (WTD) and quantify the relationship between Saint Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV) transmission and hydrologic conditions in Indian River County, Florida, from 1986 through 1991, a period with an SLEV epidemic. Virus transmission followed periods of modeled drought (specifically low WTDs 12 to 17 weeks before virus transmission, followed by a rising of the water table 1 to 2 weeks before virus transmission). Further evidence from collections of Culex nigripalpus (the major mosquito vector of SLEV in Florida) suggests that during extended spring droughts vector mosquitoes and nestling, juvenile, and adult wild birds congregate in selected refuges, facilitating epizootic amplification of SLEV. When the drought ends and habitat availability increases, the SLEV-infected Cx. nigripalpus and wild birds disperse, initiating an SLEV transmission cycle. These findings demonstrate a mechanism by which drought facilitates the amplification of SLEV and its subsequent transmission to humans.

  19. Herpes simplex virus encephalitis is a trigger of brain autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Armangue, Thaís; Leypoldt, Frank; Málaga, Ignacio; Raspall-Chaure, Miquel; Marti, Itxaso; Nichter, Charles; Pugh, John; Vicente-Rasoamalala, Monica; Lafuente-Hidalgo, Miguel; Macaya, Alfons; Ke, Michael; Titulaer, Maarten J; Höftberger, Romana; Sheriff, Heather; Glaser, Carol; Dalmau, Josep

    2014-02-01

    In 5 prospectively diagnosed patients with relapsing post-herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE), N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antibodies were identified. Antibody synthesis started 1 to 4 weeks after HSE, preceding the neurological relapse. Three of 5 patients improved postimmunotherapy, 1 spontaneously, and 1 has started to improve. Two additional patients with NMDAR antibodies, 9 with unknown neuronal surface antibodies, and 1 with NMDAR and unknown antibodies, were identified during retrospective assessment of 34 HSE patients; the frequency of autoantibodies increased over time (serum, p=0.004; cerebrospinal fluid, p=0.04). The 3 retrospectively identified NMDAR antibody-positive patients also had evidence of relapsing post-HSE. Overall, these findings indicate that HSE triggers NMDAR antibodies and potentially other brain autoimmunity.

  20. Pediatric herpes simplex virus encephalitis: a retrospective multicenter experience.

    PubMed

    Schleede, Lena; Bueter, Wolfgang; Baumgartner-Sigl, Sara; Opladen, Thomas; Weigt-Usinger, Katharina; Stephan, Susanne; Smitka, Martin; Leiz, Steffen; Kaiser, Olaf; Kraus, Verena; van Baalen, Andreas; Skopnik, Heino; Hartmann, Hans; Rostasy, Kevin; Lücke, Thomas; Schara, Ulrike; Häusler, Martin

    2013-03-01

    Knowledge on pediatric herpes simplex virus encephalitis is limited. Here we summarize 6 neonates and 32 children diagnosed by polymerase chain reaction (n = 37) or serological studies (n = 1), respectively. Diagnosis was difficult, as only 15 patients presented neurologic symptoms. Moreover, cerebrospinal fluid glucose, protein, and leukocytes were normal in 6 patients. Subsequently, all but 2 showed neurologic symptoms. Diffusion-weighted neuroimaging was the most sensitive early imaging method. Despite acyclovir treatment, 8 patients experienced early relapses, showing movement abnormalities, impaired vigilance, and seizures. Diffuse white matter changes, found in 3 of 5 relapse patients on neuroimaging, and a negative cerebrospinal fluid herpes simplex virus polymerase chain reaction suggested inflammatory processes. All relapse patients were again treated with acyclovir, and 3 responded to additional corticosteroid treatment. Whereas outcome after relapses was poor, overall outcome was good. No child died; 14 were asymptomatic at discharge, and neuroimaging remained normal in 7 of 30 patients studied.

  1. Metabolic syndrome in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cojocaru, Manole; Cojocaru, Inimioara Mihaela; Silosi, Isabela; Vrabie, Camelia Doina

    2012-06-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) generally affects people between the ages of 20 and 50. Patients with RA have a significantly higher prevalence of the metabolic syndrome (MS) compared to the general population. The increased cardiovascular risk (CVR) associated with RA places this disease among the most widely studied. The duration of RA was associated with MS, implicating the role of inflammation in MS development. The presence of MS correlates with increased subclinical atherosclerosis. A positive correlation between prevalence of MS and worsening of functional status was found in patients with RA. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis have an increased risk and a higher mortality from cardiovascular diseases (CVD), the rheumatologist should be aware of those MS risk factors and attempt to modify them. This review summarizes recent advances in the field of MS in RA.

  2. Fungal osteomyelitis and septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Bariteau, Jason T; Waryasz, Gregory R; McDonnell, Matthew; Fischer, Staci A; Hayda, Roman A; Born, Christopher T

    2014-06-01

    Management of fungal osteomyelitis and fungal septic arthritis is challenging, especially in the setting of immunodeficiency and conditions that require immunosuppression. Because fungal osteomyelitis and fungal septic arthritis are rare conditions, study of their pathophysiology and treatment has been limited. In the literature, evidence-based treatment is lacking and, historically, outcomes have been poor. The most common offending organisms are Candida and Aspergillus, which are widely distributed in humans and soil. However, some fungal pathogens, such as Histoplasma, Blastomyces, Coccidioides, Cryptococcus, and Sporothrix, have more focal areas of endemicity. Fungal bone and joint infections result from direct inoculation, contiguous infection spread, or hematogenous seeding of organisms. These infections may be difficult to diagnose and eradicate, especially in the setting of total joint arthroplasty. Although there is no clear consensus on treatment, guidelines are available for management of many of these pathogens.

  3. Two forms of reactive arthritis?

    PubMed Central

    Toivanen, P.; Toivanen, A.

    1999-01-01

    Inflammatory arthritides developing after a distant infection have so far been called reactive or postinfectious, quite often depending on the microbial trigger and/or HLA-B27 status of the patient. For clarity, it is proposed that they all should be called reactive arthritis, which, according to the trigger, occurs as an HLA-B27 associated or non-associated form. In addition to the causative agents and HLA-B27, these two categories are also distinguished by other characteristics. Most important, HLA-B27 associated arthritis may occur identical to the Reiter's syndrome with accompanying uretheritis and/or conjunctivitis, whereas in the B27 non-associated form this has not been clearly described. Likewise, only the B27 associated form belongs to the group of spondyloarthropathies.

 PMID:10577958

  4. Update in rheumatoid arthritis therapy.

    PubMed

    Kim-Howard, Xana R; Staudt, Leslie; James, Judith A

    2005-02-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease characterized by polyarticular symmetrical arthritis. Inflammatory mediators targeting joint structures produce joint inflammation with pain, functional loss, joint destruction and permanent deformity. Currently, no cure for RA exists but the increasing use of combination therapy and immunomodulatory agents has led to improved quality of life and long-term outlook for many of these patients. While traditionally employed therapies have provided limited disease suppression, advances in our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of RA have resulted in new therapies targeting very specific components of the inflammatory process. These new treatments have shown very promising results with improved efficacy and an overall decreased toxicity profile. This review provides an overview for practicing clinicians of the current immunosuppressive therapies in RA with an emphasis on newer biological agents regarding their mechanisms of action, efficacy, side effects and monitoring recommendations. Developing therapeutics will be briefly discussed.

  5. Ayurvedic medicine for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Basnyat, Shristi; Kolasinski, Sharon L

    2014-08-01

    Ayurvedic medicine is the traditional medicine of India, which originated over 5,000 years ago. Parts of this alternative medical system have become increasingly popular worldwide as patients seek approaches to medical care that they perceive as more holistic and less toxic than those offered by conventional Western medicine. Despite the advent of highly effective pharmacologic therapy, most individuals with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) continue to use alternative therapy at some point in the treatment of their disease. This report discusses some of the in-vitro data that suggest potential mechanisms through which Ayurvedic herbal medicines might have beneficial actions in rheumatoid arthritis, and the available clinical data evaluating the use of Ayurvedic medicine for RA.

  6. Microbial Infection and Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Song; Yu, Yangsheng; Yue, Yinshi; Zhang, Zhixin; Su, Kaihong

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a complex autoimmune disease affecting 1–2% of general worldwide population. The etiopathogenesis of RA involves the interplay of multiple genetic risk factors and environmental triggers. Microbial infections are believed to play an important role in the initiation and perpetuation of RA. Recent clinical studies have shown the association of microbial infections with RA. Accumulated studies using animal models have also found that microbial infections can induce and/or exaggerate the symptoms of experimental arthritis. In this review, we have identified the most common microbial infections associated with RA in the literature and summarized the current evidence supporting their pathogenic role in RA. We also discussed the potential mechanisms whereby infection may promote the development of RA, such as generation of neo-autoantigens, induction of loss of tolerance by molecular mimicry, and bystander activation of the immune system. PMID:25133066

  7. Nutritional considerations in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Touger-Decker, R

    1988-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic, systemic, inflammatory disorder of unknown etiology. The severity of the disease process adversely affects nutritional status. Articular changes, such as small joint deformities and temporomandibular joint syndrome, alter the ability to self-feed. The inflammatory process may increase metabolic rate. Ingestion, digestion, absorption, and excretion may be compromised by secondary manifestations of the disease. Comprehensive nutrition assessment incorporates evaluation of disease and treatment-specific factors, along with the usual assessment parameters. Abnormal values for certain assessment parameters do not necessarily reflect nutritional status. Treatment methods, including medications, may have an impact on nutritional status, assessment tools, and self-feeding. Nutrition management goals focus on identification and implementation of feeding strategies. Evaluation of the ability to feed oneself includes consideration of functional status, secondary manifestations, and medical treatment. Multiple feeding modalities may be required. Oral supplements, tube feedings, and parenteral nutrition may be employed to meet the nutrition needs of the individual with rheumatoid arthritis.

  8. Pathologically confirmed autoimmune encephalitis in suspected Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    PubMed Central

    Maat, Peter; de Beukelaar, Janet W.; Jansen, Casper; Schuur, Maaike; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; van Coevorden, Marleen H.; de Graaff, Esther; Titulaer, Maarten; Rozemuller, Annemieke J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the clinical features and presence in CSF of antineuronal antibodies in patients with pathologically proven autoimmune encephalitis derived from a cohort of patients with suspected Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). Methods: The Dutch Surveillance Centre for Prion Diseases performed 384 autopsies on patients with suspected CJD over a 14-year period (1998–2011). Clinical information was collected from treating physicians. Antineuronal antibodies were tested in CSF obtained postmortem by immunohistochemistry on fresh frozen rat brain sections, by Luminex assay for the presence of well-characterized onconeural antibodies, and by cell-based assays for antibodies against NMDAR, GABABR1/2, GABAAR GLUR1/2, LGI1, Caspr2, and DPPX. Results: In 203 patients, a diagnosis of definite CJD was made, while in 181 a variety of other conditions were diagnosed, mainly neurodegenerative. In 22 of these 181, the neuropathologist diagnosed autoimmune encephalitis. One patient was excluded because of lack of clinical information. Inflammatory infiltrates were predominantly perivascular and consisted mainly of T cells. The predominant locations were basal ganglia and thalamus (90%) and temporal lobes and hippocampus (81%). In 6 patients (29%), antineuronal antibodies were detected in postmortem CSF, directed against Hu, NMDAR, GABABR1/2, Caspr2, and an unidentified synaptic antigen in 2. The most frequent symptoms were dementia (90%), gait disturbance (86%), cerebellar signs (67%), and neuropsychiatric symptoms (67%). Immunopathologic and clinical findings did not differ between autoantibody-negative patients and patients with antineuronal antibodies. Conclusions: It is important to consider immune-mediated disorders in the differential diagnosis of rapidly progressive neurologic deficits. PMID:26601117

  9. West nile virus encephalitis induced opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Chad J; Said, Sarmad

    2014-04-22

    West Nile virus (WNV) is an arthropod borne neurotropic single stranded RNA flavivirus with <1% developing presenting with neurological disease. Immunocompromised and elderly patients are more prone to developing WNV meningitis or encephalitis. Definitive diagnosis of WNV meningoencephalitis is a combination of clinical suspicion and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) serology. Forty-eight year old Caucasian female presented with a sudden onset of altered mental status after being found unresponsive. She was confused with intermittent bouts of alertness/lethargy and unintelligible responses to questioning. Her medical problems included endometrial cancer that was in remission after undergoing a total abdominal hysterectomy with bilateral salpingectomy and postoperative chemotherapy with paclitaxel and carboplatin. Pertinent physical examination revealed muscle strength that was significantly decreased, nuchal rigidity and +2 pitting edema of both lower extremities. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of the brain were negative for any intracranial pathology. CSF analysis was consistent with aseptic meningitis with all CSF serology being negative except for positive WNV antibody. A few days after being admitted she developed involuntary random movements of her eyes and generalized jerking movements (myoclonus). This was determined to be opsoclonus myoclonus syndrome (OMS) induced by the WNV meningoencephalitis. She then received five consecutive days of plasmapheresis with a significant improvement in her neurological status. Opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome (OMS) is a rare neurological disorder associated with chaotic multidirectional eye movements, myoclonus and less frequently cerebellar ataxia. OMS affects as few as 1 in 10,000,000 people per year. The pathogenesis is not fully understood with the majority of cases of opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome being idiopathic. According to current medical literature there have only been two previous case reports of

  10. Treatment of limbic encephalitis with anti-glioma-inactivated 1 (LGI1) antibodies.

    PubMed

    Krastinova, E; Vigneron, M; Le Bras, P; Gasnault, J; Goujard, C

    2012-11-01

    We report a 72-year-old patient who developed acute limbic encephalitis initially considered of uncertain aetiology. Detailed information on clinical presentation, MRI appearance, antibody levels, cognitive impairment assessment, treatment and evolution of the patient is reported here. Since the early 2000s, many antibodies implied in central nervous system autoimmune disorders have been identified. Anti-glioma-inactivated 1 (LGI1) antibodies have been recently identified as associated with limbic encephalitis, as was the case in our patient.

  11. Emergence or improved detection of Japanese encephalitis virus in the Himalayan highlands?

    PubMed Central

    Baylis, Matthew; Barker, Christopher M.; Caminade, Cyril; Joshi, Bhoj R.; Pant, Ganesh R.; Rayamajhi, Ajit; Reisen, William K.; Impoinvil, Daniel E.

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) in the Himalayan highlands is of significant veterinary and public health concern and may be related to climate warming and anthropogenic landscape change, or simply improved surveillance. To investigate this phenomenon, a One Health approach focusing on the phylogeography of JEV, the distribution and abundance of the mosquito vectors, and seroprevalence in humans and animal reservoirs would be useful to understand the epidemiology of Japanese encephalitis in highland areas. PMID:26956778

  12. Regional Impact of Climate on Japanese Encephalitis in Areas Located near the Three Gorges Dam

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Deqiang; Luo, Chao; He, Yuanyuan; Liang, Guodong; Lu, Bo; Bisesi, Michael S.; Sun, Qinghua; Xu, Xinyi; Yang, Weizhong; Liu, Qiyong

    2014-01-01

    Background In this study, we aim to identify key climatic factors that are associated with the transmission of Japanese encephalitis virus in areas located near the Three Gorges Dam, between 1997 and 2008. Methods We identified three geographical regions of Chongqing, based on their distance from the Three Gorges Dam. Collectively, the three regions consisted of 12 districts from which study information was collected. Zero-Inflated Poisson Regression models were run to identify key climatic factors of the transmission of Japanese encephalitis virus for both the whole study area and for each individual region; linear regression models were conducted to examine the fluctuation of climatic variables over time during the construction of the Three Gorges Dam. Results Between 1997 and 2008, the incidence of Japanese encephalitis decreased throughout the entire city of Chongqing, with noticeable variations taking place in 2000, 2001 and 2006. The eastern region, which is closest to the Three Gorges Dam, suffered the highest incidence of Japanese encephalitis, while the western region experienced the lowest incidence. Linear regression models revealed that there were seasonal fluctuations of climatic variables during this period. Zero-Inflated Poisson Regression models indicated a significant positive association between temperature (with a lag of 1 and 3 months) and Japanese encephalitis incidence, and a significant negative association between rainfall (with a lag of 0 and 4 months) and Japanese encephalitis incidence. Conclusion The spatial and temporal trends of Japanese encephalitis incidence that occurred in the City of Chongqing were associated with temperature and rainfall. Seasonal fluctuations of climatic variables during this period were also observed. Additional studies that focus on long-term data collection are needed to validate the findings of this study and to further explore the effects of the Three Gorges Dam on Japanese encephalitis and other related

  13. Pathogenesis of Aerosolized Eastern Equine Encephalitis Virus Infection in Guinea Pigs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    infected animals and humans [1-3]. The related alphaviruses Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) and western equine encephalitis virus (WEEV) also...viruses [4] and experimental studies in animals have demonstrated that all three alphaviruses are infectious by the aerosol route and are considered a...associ- ated with EEEV infection are the most severe of any alphavirus , with an estimated mortality rate in humans of 30% for the North American strains

  14. The evolution of orbit orientation and encephalization in the Carnivora (Mammalia)

    PubMed Central

    Finarelli, John A; Goswami, Anjali

    2009-01-01

    Evolutionary change in encephalization within and across mammalian clades is well-studied, yet relatively few comparative analyses attempt to quantify the impact of evolutionary change in relative brain size on cranial morphology. Because of the proximity of the braincase to the orbits, and the inter-relationships among ecology, sensory systems and neuroanatomy, a relationship has been hypothesized between orbit orientation and encephalization for mammals. Here, we tested this hypothesis in 68 fossil and living species of the mammalian order Carnivora, comparing orbit orientation angles (convergence and frontation) to skull length and encephalization. No significant correlations were observed between skull length and orbit orientation when all taxa were analysed. Significant correlations were observed between encephalization and orbit orientation; however, these were restricted to the families Felidae and Canidae. Encephalization is positively correlated with frontation in both families and negatively correlated with convergence in canids. These results indicate that no universal relationship exists between encephalization and orbit orientation for Carnivora. Braincase expansion impacts orbit orientation in specific carnivoran clades, the nature of which is idiosyncratic to the clade itself. PMID:19438762

  15. The evolution of orbit orientation and encephalization in the Carnivora (Mammalia).

    PubMed

    Finarelli, John A; Goswami, Anjali

    2009-05-01

    Evolutionary change in encephalization within and across mammalian clades is well-studied, yet relatively few comparative analyses attempt to quantify the impact of evolutionary change in relative brain size on cranial morphology. Because of the proximity of the braincase to the orbits, and the inter-relationships among ecology, sensory systems and neuroanatomy, a relationship has been hypothesized between orbit orientation and encephalization for mammals. Here, we tested this hypothesis in 68 fossil and living species of the mammalian order Carnivora, comparing orbit orientation angles (convergence and frontation) to skull length and encephalization. No significant correlations were observed between skull length and orbit orientation when all taxa were analysed. Significant correlations were observed between encephalization and orbit orientation; however, these were restricted to the families Felidae and Canidae. Encephalization is positively correlated with frontation in both families and negatively correlated with convergence in canids. These results indicate that no universal relationship exists between encephalization and orbit orientation for Carnivora. Braincase expansion impacts orbit orientation in specific carnivoran clades, the nature of which is idiosyncratic to the clade itself.

  16. [Paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis with positive anti-RI antibodies and mediastinal seminoma].

    PubMed

    Launay, M; Bozzolo, E; Venissac, N; Delmont, E; Fredenrich, A; Thomas, P

    2008-01-01

    We report the case of a 49-year-old man who was admitted for progressive behaviorial disorders with frontal elements. There was no sensorial nor motor deficiency. Clinical examination revealed android obesity, cutaneous and mucous paleness, pubic and axillary depilation and gynecomastia. Encephalic MRI found a lesion of the left amygdalian region with high T2 intensity and low T1 intensity associated with gadolinium-enhancement. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis showed a lymphocytic meningitis. Panhypopituitarism was found on the endocrine investigations. Anti-RI antibodies were positive, leading to the diagnosis of paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis. The CT-scan showed a node of the lower part of the thymic area. Surgical resection revealed an ectopic mediastinal seminoma. The evolution consisted of paraneoplastic fever and crossed-syndrome with right hemiparesia and left common oculomotor nerve paralysis. Treatment was completed by two cycles of carboplatin, corticosteroids and substitutive opotherapy. Paraneoplastic fever disappeared, but behavioral disorders and palsy remain unchanged. The patient died two years later in a bedridden state. This case of paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis associated with positive anti-RI antibodies and mediastinal seminoma is exceptional and has not to our knowledge been described in the literature. Cancers usually associated with anti-RI antibody are breast and lung cancer. Paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis is not the classical clinical presentation, which usually is brainstem encephalitis. Hypothalamic involvement, uncommon in paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis is mainly associated with positive antineuronal anti-Ma2 antibodies. Finally, the gadolinium enhancement on encephalic MRI is unusual in paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis.

  17. Choreoathetosis after herpes simplex encephalitis with basal ganglia involvement on MRI.

    PubMed

    Kullnat, Megan Wills; Morse, Richard P

    2008-04-01

    Children with herpes simplex virus encephalitis have a relapse in approximately 25% of cases, which rarely may present as a movement disorder, most often choreoathetosis. The anatomic basis for herpes simplex virus encephalitis-associated movement disorders has been poorly understood, because neuroimaging, to date, has not been able to show the direct involvement of the areas of the brain that typically govern such movements. We present a patient with abnormal involuntary movements after herpes simplex virus encephalitis, with new lesions on MRI between the time of initial presentation and the development of choreoathetosis. To our knowledge, this is the first patient with a post-herpes simplex virus encephalitis movement disorder with neuroradiographic evidence of thalamic involvement correlating with the onset of abnormal involuntary movements. We describe this patient and review the literature on movement disorders and herpes simplex virus encephalitis. Current understanding of the pathophysiology of post-herpes simplex virus encephalitis movement disorders proposes 2 possible mechanisms that may be responsible: reinfection with the resumption of viral replication, or a postinfectious, immune-mediated process.

  18. A study on seroprevalence of caprine brucellosis under three livestock production systems in southern and central Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Asmare, Kassahun; Megersa, Bekele; Denbarga, Yifat; Abebe, Girma; Taye, Anley; Bekele, Jemere; Bekele, Tesfaye; Gelaye, Esayas; Zewdu, Endrias; Agonafir, Abebe; Ayelet, Gelagay; Skjerve, Eystein

    2013-02-01

    Caprine brucellosis in Ethiopia is less commonly reported with limited information on the disease status in the country. The objective of this study was therefore to highlight the status of goat brucellosis in three distinctly different livestock production systems of southern and central Ethiopia. A total 3,315 goats of different age and sex, living with other animals in variable flock size, were sampled from 448 flocks raised in sedentary, pastoral and agro-pastoral production systems. Goats were bled aseptically and sera were collected for serial testing using Rose Bengal Plate Test as screening test and subsequently complement fixation test as confirmatory test. Questionnaire and laboratory data were analysed for descriptive, univariable and multivariable logistic regression analysis both at individual and flock level (STATA 11). The study revealed an overall animal level seroprevalence of 1.9 % (95 % CI 1.5, 2.4). In sedentary production system, the observed seroprevalence was 0.6 % (95 % CI 0.2, 0.9) while 1.9 % (95 % CI 1.1, 2.7) and 7.6 % (95 % CI 5.1, 10.1) were the proportion of seroreactors for agro-pastoral and pastoral production systems, respectively. The observed prevalence difference between the three production systems was statistically significant (P < 0.05). At the flock level analysis, 11.2 % (95 % CI 8.2, 14.1) of the flocks sampled had at least one seropositive goat among themselves. Like individual level analysis, the highest prevalence of 32.5 % (95 % CI 21.9, 43.0) was recorded for pastoral production system, followed by agro-pastoral, 13.0 % (95 % CI 7.0, 19.0) and sedentary production system, 3.6 % (95% CI 1.3, 6.0). Accordingly, the odds of Brucella seropositivity were higher (OR = 12.8) in pastoral followed by agro-pastoral (OR = 4.0) in relation to sedentary production system. Large numbers of seroreactors were observed in adult age living in larger flocks with other livestock species. However, no difference was noted between male and

  19. Relapsing Anti-NMDAR Encephalitis after a gap of eight years in a girl from North-East India

    PubMed Central

    Kayal, Ashok Kumar; Das, Marami; Bhowmick, Suvorit; Synmon, Baiakmenlang

    2014-01-01

    It has been just 7 years since the discovery of anti-NMDAR encephalitis as distinct immune-mediated encephalitis and we have such cases being reported from our country. Herein, we describe a case of a 13-year-old girl who had relapsing encephalitis consisting of multiple types of difficult-to-control seizures, abnormal behavior, language disintegration, memory loss and abnormal movements eight years after the first clinical attack. In 2005, when she was 5 yearsold, anti-NMDAR encephalitis was not yet discovered and she was provisionally diagnosed as a case of viral encephalitis. During her second attack in 2013, antibodies against NMDAR were demonstrated by immunofluoresence in serum (1:10). This is the first report from our country of a case of relapsing anti-NMDAR encephalitis of such a long duration, successfully treated by immunotherapy. PMID:25221411

  20. Proportional mortality: A study of 152 goats submitted for necropsy from 13 goat herds in Quebec, with a special focus on caseous lymphadenitis

    PubMed Central

    Debien, Elaine; Hélie, Pierre; Buczinski, Sébastien; Lebœuf, Anne; Bélanger, Denise; Drolet, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the main causes of mortality, with a special focus on caseous lymphadenits as a cause of death or wasting in caprine herds from Quebec. Goats (n = 152) from 13 herds were submitted for necropsy; the cause of mortality, and the presence, location, and cause of abscesses (if present) were recorded. Proportional mortalities were distributed as: Clostridium perfringens type D enterotoxemia (17.1%), pneumonia (13.8%), paratuberculosis (10.5%), listeriosis (6.6%), pregnancy toxemia (5.3%), caprine arthritis-encephalitis (4.6%), and caseous lymphadenitis (3.9%). Caseous lymphadenitis was diagnosed in 24.3% of the submitted goats, but was not a major cause of wasting or mortality. Abscesses were localized internally in 54.1% of the cases. Paratuberculosis was diagnosed in 29 goats (16 as cause of death) and was considered a major cause of wasting and/or mortality. PMID:24155449

  1. Proportional mortality: A study of 152 goats submitted for necropsy from 13 goat herds in Quebec, with a special focus on caseous lymphadenitis.

    PubMed

    Debien, Elaine; Hélie, Pierre; Buczinski, Sébastien; Lebœuf, Anne; Bélanger, Denise; Drolet, Richard

    2013-06-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the main causes of mortality, with a special focus on caseous lymphadenits as a cause of death or wasting in caprine herds from Quebec. Goats (n = 152) from 13 herds were submitted for necropsy; the cause of mortality, and the presence, location, and cause of abscesses (if present) were recorded. Proportional mortalities were distributed as: Clostridium perfringens type D enterotoxemia (17.1%), pneumonia (13.8%), paratuberculosis (10.5%), listeriosis (6.6%), pregnancy toxemia (5.3%), caprine arthritis-encephalitis (4.6%), and caseous lymphadenitis (3.9%). Caseous lymphadenitis was diagnosed in 24.3% of the submitted goats, but was not a major cause of wasting or mortality. Abscesses were localized internally in 54.1% of the cases. Paratuberculosis was diagnosed in 29 goats (16 as cause of death) and was considered a major cause of wasting and/or mortality.

  2. The potential use of microcalorimetry in rapid differentiation between septic arthritis and other causes of arthritis.

    PubMed

    Yusuf, E; Hügle, T; Daikeler, T; Voide, C; Borens, O; Trampuz, A

    2015-03-01

    Current diagnostic methods in differentiating septic from non-septic arthritis are time-consuming (culture) or have limited sensitivity (Gram stain). Microcalorimetry is a novel method that can rapidly detect microorganisms by their heat production. We investigated the accuracy and time to detection of septic arthritis by using microcalorimetry. Patients older than 18 years of age with acute arthritis of native joints were prospectively included. Synovial fluid was aspirated and investigated by Gram stain, culture and microcalorimetry. The diagnosis of septic arthritis and non-septic arthritis were made by experienced rheumatologists or orthopaedic surgeons. Septic arthritis was diagnosed by considering the finding of acute arthritis together with findings such as positive Gram stain or positive culture of synovial fluid or positive blood culture. The sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing septic arthritis and the time to positivity of microcalorimetry were determined. Of 90 patients (mean age 64 years), nine had septic arthritis, of whom four (44 %) had positive Gram stain, six (67 %) positive synovial fluid culture and four (44 %) had positive blood culture. The sensitivity of microcalorimetry was 89 %, the specificity was 99 % and the mean detection time was 5.0 h (range, 2.2-8.0 h). Microcalorimetry is an accurate and rapid method for the diagnosis of septic arthritis. It has potential to be used in clinical practice in diagnosing septic arthritis.

  3. Report - Recurrent hip arthritis diagnosed as juvenile idiopathic arthritis: A case report.

    PubMed

    Chang, Tung-Ming; Yang, Kuender D; Yong, Su-Boon

    2016-05-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis is the most common rheumatic disease in childhood. It is a chronic inflammatory disease associated with arthritis of unknown etiology that begins before the age of 16 and persists for longer than 6 weeks. In this report, the case of a child who suffered recurrent alternative hip arthritis with bilateral hip arthritis is examined, in which he was finally diagnosed as suffering from Juvenile idiopathic arthritis. A 14-year-old boy of Taiwanese origin presented with a normal birth and developmental history. At the age of 10, right-side hip joint pain was experienced, which later migrated to the left side. On further inspection, synovium hypertrophy, cartilage erosion and hip turbid fluid accumulation were found and aseptic arthritis was presumed to be the primary cause. However, after re-examining both his clinical history and presentation, Juvenile idiopathic arthritis was the final diagnosis. Any child presenting with repeat joint swelling are at risk of Juvenile idiopathic arthritis. This is still to be the case if symptoms recede or heal and no initial diagnosis is made. Therefore, a better understanding of the risk of recurrent arthritis is needed. It cannot be emphasized strongly enough that Juvenile idiopathic arthritis should be suspected at all times when a child suffers from recurrent aseptic arthritis of the hip joint.

  4. Encephalitis lethargica and the influenza virus. II. The influenza pandemic of 1918/19 and encephalitis lethargica: epidemiology and symptoms*

    PubMed Central

    Foley, Paul Bernard

    2009-01-01

    This is the first of two papers which critically examine the relationship between the 1918/19 influenza pandemic and encephalitis lethargica (EL). The role of influenza in the etiology of EL was vigorously debated until 1924. It is notable, however, that the unitarian camp were largely reactive in their argumentation; while the influenza skeptics provided detail descriptions of EL and the features they argued to be unique or at least unusual, influenza supporters focused on sequentially refuting the evidence of their opponents. The impression which emerges from this debate is that the individual features identified by the skeptics were not absolutely pathognomic for EL, but, on the other hand, their combination in one disorder had not previously been described for any other disease. PMID:19707848

  5. Encephalitis lethargica and the influenza virus. III. The influenza pandemic of 1918/19 and encephalitis lethargica: neuropathology and discussion*

    PubMed Central

    Foley, Paul Bernard

    2009-01-01

    This is the second of two papers which critically examine the relationship between the 1918/19 influenza pandemic and encephalitis lethargica (EL). The role of influenza in the etiology of EL was vigorously debated until 1924. It is notable, however, that the unitarian camp were largely reactive in their argumentation; while the influenza skeptics provided detail descriptions of EL and the features they argued to be unique or at least unusual, influenza supporters focused on sequentially refuting the evidence of their opponents. The impression which emerges from this debate is that the individual features identified by the skeptics were not absolutely pathognomic for EL, but, on the other hand, their combination in one disorder had not previously been described for any other disease. PMID:19707847

  6. A new approach for studying prehistoric herd management in arid areas: intra-tooth isotopic analyses of archaeological caprine from IranUne nouvelle approche pour l'étude de la gestion préhistorique des troupeaux en zones arides: analyses isotopiques intra-dentaires de caprinés archéologiques d'Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocherens, Hervé; Mashkour, Marjan; Billiou, Daniel; Pellé, Eric; Mariotti, André

    2001-01-01

    Carbon and oxygen isotopic variations in archaeological tooth enamel from Iran have been used to investigate prehistoric herd management. Oxygen isotopic variations in domestic caprines are more important than in wild equids, indicating a seasonal consumption of 18O-depleted drinking water. Since the plants consumed at the same time were partly C 4, it is presumed that the access to this 18O-depleted water was controlled by humans, and that the water came from wells or underground canalisations. This methodology is expected to provide valuable information on herd management in the past in arid areas.

  7. Temporal and pontine involvement in a case of herpes simplex encephalitis, presenting as kluver bucy syndrome - a case report.

    PubMed

    Thirunavukarasu, Suresh

    2011-01-01

    Bilateral temporal and frontal lobe involvement is a common characteristic of herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE). Clinical sequelae of herpes simplex encephalitis may manifest sometimes as Kluver Bucy syndrome (KBS). In herpes simplex encephalitis, apart from frontal lobe, extra temporal involvement is rare and uncommon. We report a case of HSE manifesting clinically as KBS with a rare radiological finding of temporal and extratemporal involvement of pons.

  8. Septic Arthritis Caused by Noncapsulated Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    Le Quellec, Sandra; Gaillot, Olivier; Chotel, Franck; Freydière, Anne-Marie; Laurent, Frédéric; Vandenesch, François

    2013-01-01

    Since the introduction of type b Haemophilus influenzae vaccination, noncapsulated H. influenzae has become responsible for most cases of invasive H. influenzae diseases. In our two cases of septic arthritis, we isolated strains with β-lactamase-positive amoxicillin-clavulanate resistance (BLPACR). Thus, the increasing prevalence of BLPACR should be taken into account when empirical therapy is chosen for septic arthritis. PMID:23515545

  9. Opioid analgesics for rheumatoid arthritis pain.

    PubMed

    Whittle, Samuel L; Richards, Bethan L; Buchbinder, Rachelle

    2013-02-06

    CLINICAL QUESTION Do the benefits of opioid analgesics outweigh the risks in patients with persistent pain due to rheumatoid arthritis? BOTTOM LINE Weak opioids (such as codeine, dextropropoxyphene, and tramadol) may be effective in the short-term management of rheumatoid arthritis pain, but adverse effects are common and may outweigh the benefits; alternative analgesics should be considered first.

  10. Psychotic symptoms in anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor encephalitis: A case report and challenges.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Pawan; Sagar, Rajesh; Patra, Bichitrananda; Saini, Lokesh; Gulati, Sheffali; Chakrabarty, Biswaroop

    2016-08-01

    Anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor encephalitis, only recently first described, is an increasingly well-recognized inflammatory encephalitis that is seen in children and adults. An 11-year old girl admitted to the psychiatry ward with a presentation of acute psychosis was diagnosed with NMDA receptor encephalitis following neurology referral and was treated accordingly. This case highlights psychiatric manifestations in encephalitis and the need for the psychiatrist to have high index of suspicion when atypical symptoms (e.g., dyskinesia, seizure, fever etc.) present in acutely psychotic patients.

  11. Biomarkers for rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Verheul, M K; Fearon, U; Trouw, L A; Veale, D J

    2015-11-01

    Rheumatic diseases, such as rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis are systemic inflammatory conditions characterized by a chronic form of arthritis, often leading to irreversible joint damage. Early treatment for patients with rheumatic diseases is required to reduce or prevent joint injury. However, early diagnosis can be difficult and currently it is not possible to predict which individual patient will develop progressive erosive disease or who may benefit from a specific treatment according to their clinical features at presentation. Biomarkers are therefore required to enable earlier diagnosis and predict prognosis in both rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis. In this review we will examine the evidence and current status of established and experimental biomarkers in rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis for three important purposes; disease diagnosis, prognosis and prediction of response to therapy.

  12. Photoacoustic tomography to identify inflammatory arthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajian, Justin Rajesh; Girish, Gandikota; Wang, Xueding

    2012-09-01

    Identifying neovascularity (angiogenesis) as an early feature of inflammatory arthritis can help in early accurate diagnosis and treatment monitoring of this disease. Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is a hybrid imaging modality which relies on intrinsic differences in the optical absorption among the tissues being imaged. Since blood has highly absorbing chromophores including both oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin, PAT holds potential in identifying early angiogenesis associated with inflammatory joint diseases. PAT is used to identify changes in the development of inflammatory arthritis in a rat model. Imaging at two different wavelengths, 1064 nm and 532 nm, on rats revealed that there is a significant signal enhancement in the ankle joints of the arthritis affected rats when compared to the normal control group. Histology images obtained from both the normal and the arthritis affected rats correlated well with the PAT findings. Results support the fact that the emerging PAT could become a new tool for clinical management of inflammatory arthritis.

  13. Current concepts in the treatment of gouty arthritis.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zhen-hua; Waizy, Hazibullah

    2013-02-01

    Gouty arthritis is an extremely painful condition that causes functional impairment. Gouty arthritis has become increasingly complex because of multiple comorbidities, iatrogenic factors and hyperuricemia that is refractory to treatment. In this review, we present a general overview of gouty arthritis including its pathophysiology, clinical presentations, diagnosis, predisposing factors and prophylactic therapy for preventing gouty arthritis flares.

  14. Employing in vitro analysis to test the potency of methylglyoxal in inducing the formation of amyloid-like aggregates of caprine brain cystatin.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Waseem Feeroze; Bhat, Sheraz Ahmad; Khaki, Peerzada Shariq Shaheen; Bano, Bilqees

    2015-01-01

    Thiol protease inhibitors (cystatins) are implicated in various disease states from cancer to neurodegenerative conditions and immune responses. Cystatins have high amyloidogenic propensity and they are prone to form fibrillar aggregates leading to amyloidosis. Particularly challenging examples of such disorders occur in type 2 diabetes, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. The aim of the present study is to find an interaction between the compound methylglyoxal (MG) which is particularly elevated in type 2 diabetes with caprine brain cystatin (CBC). Results have shown that elevated concentration of MG forms amyloid aggregates of CBC. This was achieved by allowing slow growth in a solution containing moderate to high concentrations of MG. When analysed with microscopy, the protein aggregate present in the sample after incubation consisted of extended filaments with ordered structures. This fibrillar material possesses extensive β-sheet structure as revealed by far-UV CD and IR spectroscopy. Furthermore, the fibrils exhibit increased Thioflavin T fluorescence.

  15. Occurrence, virulence genes and antibiotic resistance of Escherichia coli O157 isolated from raw bovine, caprine and ovine milk in Greece.

    PubMed

    Solomakos, Nikolaos; Govaris, Alexandros; Angelidis, Apostolos S; Pournaras, Spyros; Burriel, Angeliki Rothi; Kritas, Spyridon K; Papageorgiou, Demetrios K

    2009-12-01

    The examination of 2005 raw bovine (n = 950), caprine (n = 460) and ovine (n = 595) bulk milk samples collected throughout several regions in Greece for the presence of Escherichia coli serogroup O157 resulted in the isolation of 29 strains (1.4%) of which 21 were isolated from bovine (2.2%), 3 from caprine (0.7%) and 5 from ovine (0.8%) milk. Out of the 29 E. coli O157 isolates, only 12 (41.4%) could be classified as Shiga-toxigenic based on immunoassay and PCR results. All 12 Shiga-toxigenic E. coli serogroup O157 isolates belonged to the E. coli O157:H7 serotype. All except one of the 12 Shiga-toxin positive isolates were stx(2)-positive, five of which were also stx(1)-positive. The remaining isolate was positive only for the stx(1) gene. All stx-positive isolates (whether positive for stx(1), stx(2) or stx(1) and stx(2)) were also PCR-positive for the eae and ehxA genes. The remaining 17 E. coli O157 isolates (58.6%) were negative for the presence of the H7 flagellar gene by PCR, tested negative for Shiga-toxin production both by immunoassay and PCR, and among these, only four and three strains were PCR-positive for the eae and ehxA genes, respectively. All 29 E. coli O157 isolates displayed resistance to a wide range of antimicrobials, with the stx-positive isolates being, on average, resistant to a higher number of antibiotics than those which were stx-negative.

  16. The characterization of the physicochemical and sensory properties of full-fat, reduced-fat and low-fat bovine, caprine, and ovine Greek yogurt (Labneh)

    PubMed Central

    Atamian, Samson; Olabi, Ammar; Kebbe Baghdadi, Omar; Toufeili, Imad

    2014-01-01

    Concentrated/Greek yogurt or Labneh is a semisolid food produced from yogurt by eliminating part of its water and water-soluble compounds. Today's world is geared toward the production of lower fat foods without compromising the texture and flavor of these products. The objective of this study was to characterize the physicochemical and sensory properties of bovine, caprine, and ovine Labneh with different fat levels. Bovine, caprine, and ovine milks were used to produce two batches of full-fat (∼10%), reduced-fat (∼5%), and low-fat (<1%) concentrated yogurt samples. Chemical analyses of fat, moisture, protein, ash, syneresis, acidity, pH, sodium, magnesium, and calcium contents were conducted. Instrumental texture analysis using the back extrusion method was applied. Quantitative descriptive sensory analysis was used to profile samples by 11 trained panelists and the acceptability of samples was assessed by 47 panelists. Type of milk significantly affected (P < 0.001) all chemical attributes except moisture and nitrogen-free extract, and fat level significantly impacted moisture, fat, protein, ash, acidity, and magnesium contents of Labneh. Type of milk significantly affected apparent modulus, hardness, hardness work done, and adhesive force, whereas fat level significantly affected hardness. Type of milk significantly affected the sensory attributes of syneresis, compactness, goaty odor and flavor, rate of flow, color, shininess, bitter flavor, denseness, melting rate, and spreadability, whereas fat level affected only color, denseness, and melting rate. Type of milk had a significant effect on overall acceptability and acceptability of flavor and texture. PMID:24804075

  17. Relative mRNA expression and immunolocalization for transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) and their effect on in vitro development of caprine preantral follicles.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, G Q; Bertoldo, M J; Brito, I R; Silva, C M G; Sales, A D; Castro, S V; Duffard, N; Locatelli, Y; Mermillod, P; Lobo, C H; Campello, C C; Rodrigues, A P R; Freitas, V J F; Figueiredo, J R

    2014-09-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the immunolocalization and messenger RNA (mRNA) expression for transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) and its receptors (TGF-βRI and RII), as well as mRNA expression for P450 aromatase and FSH receptor in caprine preantral follicles. The effects of TGF-β, FSH alone, or in association on the in vitro follicular development were also assessed. Immunohistochemical analyses showed the expression of TGF-β and its receptors in oocytes of all follicle stages and granulosa cells of primary and secondary follicles. mRNA for TGF-β receptors and for FSH receptor (FSHR) was present in preantral follicles as well as in oocytes and granulosa cells of antral follicles. Isolated secondary follicles were cultured in α-minimum essential medium (MEM) alone or supplemented with either FSH (100 ng/ml), TGF-β (10 ng/ml), or TGF-β + FSH for 18 d. TGF-β increased significantly oocyte diameter when compared to FSH alone and control. After 18 d of culture, all groups showed a significant reduction in P450 aromatase and FSHR mRNA levels in comparison to fresh control. In contrast, treatment with FSH significantly increased the mRNA expression for TGF-β in comparison to fresh control and other treatments. In conclusion, the findings showed that TGF-β and its receptors are present in caprine ovarian follicles. Furthermore, they showed a positive effect on oocyte growth in vitro.

  18. Caprine and ovine Greek dairy products: The official German method generates false-positive results due to κ-casein gene polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Tsartsianidou, V; Triantafillidou, D; Karaiskou, N; Tarantili, P; Triantafillidis, G; Georgakis, E; Triantafyllidis, A

    2017-03-16

    Caseins are widely used for species identification of dairy products. Isoelectric focusing (IEF) of para-κ-casein peptide is used as the official German method for the differentiation between caprine (isoform A) and ovine (isoform B) dairy products, based on their different isoelectric points. The discrimination between Greek goat and ewe dairy products using IEF has, however, been shown to be problematic because of the existence of the ewe isoform in milk from Greek indigenous dairy goats. This could be due to nucleotide polymorphisms within the goat κ-casein gene of Greek indigenous breeds, which alter the isoelectric point of the para-κ-casein peptide and lead to false positive results. Previous DNA analysis of the goat κ-casein gene has shown high levels of polymorphism; however, no such information is available for Greek indigenous dairy goats. Therefore, 87 indigenous dairy goats were sequenced at exon IV of κ-casein gene. In total, 9 polymorphic sites were detected. Three nonsynonymous point mutations were identified, which change the isoelectric point of the goat para-κ-casein peptide so that it appears identical to that of the ewe peptide. Ten composite genotypes were reconstructed and 6 of them included the problematic point mutations. For the verification of genetic results, IEF was carried out. Both goat and ewe patterns appeared in the problematic genotypes. The frequency of these genotypes could be characterized as moderate (0.23) to high (0.60) within Greek indigenous breeds. However, this is not an issue restricted to Greece, as such genotypes have been detected in various non-Greek goat breeds. In conclusion, IEF based on the official German method is certainly inappropriate for ovine and caprine discrimination concerning Greek dairy goat products, and consequently a new method should be established.

  19. Dynamic medium containing kit ligand and follicle-stimulating hormone promotes follicular survival, activation, and growth during long-term in vitro culture of caprine preantral follicles.

    PubMed

    Lima, I M T; Celestino, J J H; Faustino, L R; Magalhães-Padilha, D M; Rossetto, R; Brito, I R; Donato, M A M; Lopes, C A P; Campello, C C; Peixoto, C A; Figueiredo, J R; Rodrigues, A P R

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a dynamic medium containing kit ligand (KL) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) on the in vitro culture of caprine preantral follicles for 16 days. Ovarian fragments were cultured in α-MEM(+) containing or not containing KL (50 ng/ml) and/or FSH (50 ng/ml) added during the first (days 0-8) and/or second half (days 8-16) of the culture period. Noncultured (control) and cultured fragments were processed for histological and ultrastructural evaluation. After 1 day of culture, only the treatments performed with KL or FSH maintained a percentage of normal follicles similar to that of the control. After 16 days, all treatments using KL until day 8 (KL/KL, KL/FSH, and KL/FSH+KL) and only FSH during the entire culture period (FSH/FSH) showed higher rates of follicular survival compared to α-MEM(+) alone. After 1 and 8 days, the treatments initially cultured with KL increased the percentage of follicular activation in comparison to α-MEM(+) alone and other treatments. The highest follicular diameter after 16 days was observed in follicles cultured with KL until day 8 followed by FSH (KL/FSH). Furthermore, this treatment promoted, as early as after 1 day of culture, an increase in oocyte growth compared to α-MEM(+) alone. Ultrastructural analysis confirmed the integrity of follicles cultured in KL/FSH after 16 days. In conclusion, a dynamic medium containing KL and FSH maintained follicular integrity and promoted follicular activation and growth during the long-term in vitro culture of caprine preantral follicles.

  20. The characterization of the physicochemical and sensory properties of full-fat, reduced-fat and low-fat bovine, caprine, and ovine Greek yogurt (Labneh).

    PubMed

    Atamian, Samson; Olabi, Ammar; Kebbe Baghdadi, Omar; Toufeili, Imad

    2014-03-01

    Concentrated/Greek yogurt or Labneh is a semisolid food produced from yogurt by eliminating part of its water and water-soluble compounds. Today's world is geared toward the production of lower fat foods without compromising the texture and flavor of these products. The objective of this study was to characterize the physicochemical and sensory properties of bovine, caprine, and ovine Labneh with different fat levels. Bovine, caprine, and ovine milks were used to produce two batches of full-fat (∼10%), reduced-fat (∼5%), and low-fat (<1%) concentrated yogurt samples. Chemical analyses of fat, moisture, protein, ash, syneresis, acidity, pH, sodium, magnesium, and calcium contents were conducted. Instrumental texture analysis using the back extrusion method was applied. Quantitative descriptive sensory analysis was used to profile samples by 11 trained panelists and the acceptability of samples was assessed by 47 panelists. Type of milk significantly affected (P < 0.001) all chemical attributes except moisture and nitrogen-free extract, and fat level significantly impacted moisture, fat, protein, ash, acidity, and magnesium contents of Labneh. Type of milk significantly affected apparent modulus, hardness, hardness work done, and adhesive force, whereas fat level significantly affected hardness. Type of milk significantly affected the sensory attributes of syneresis, compactness, goaty odor and flavor, rate of flow, color, shininess, bitter flavor, denseness, melting rate, and spreadability, whereas fat level affected only color, denseness, and melting rate. Type of milk had a significant effect on overall acceptability and acceptability of flavor and texture.