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Sample records for capsaicin induced trigeminal

  1. Increased vascular permeability in rat nasal mucosa induced by substance P and stimulation of capsaicin-sensitive trigeminal neurons.

    PubMed

    Lundblad, L; Saria, A; Lundberg, J M; Anggård, A

    1983-01-01

    Electrical stimulation of the maxillary branches of the trigeminal nerve induced an increase in vascular permeability to macromolecules and an interstitial edema in the nasal mucosa of the rat, as indicated by extravasation of Evans blue. In animals that had been treated neonatally with capsaicin, the effect of trigeminal nerve stimulation was abolished. Local application of capsaicin or substance P (SP) also induced a significant Evans blue extravasation in the nasal mucosa. In capsaicin-pretreated animals the effect of SP was still present, while the permeability increase induced by capsaicin was abolished. In conclusion, chemogenic irritation of the nasal mucosa by capsaicin induces edema probably via a local axon reflex inducing release of SP. Capsaicin-sensitive SP-containing afferents in the nasal mucosa may also be involved in the pathogenesis of nasal congestion seen in various types of rhinitis.

  2. Subcutaneous Botulinum toxin type A reduces capsaicin-induced trigeminal pain and vasomotor reactions in human skin.

    PubMed

    Gazerani, Parisa; Pedersen, Natalia Spicina; Staahl, Camilla; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2009-01-01

    The present human study aimed at investigating the effect of subcutaneous administration of Botulinum toxin type A (BoNT/A) on capsaicin-induced trigeminal pain, neurogenic inflammation and experimentally induced cutaneous pain modalities. Fourteen healthy males (26.3+/-2.6 years) were included in this double-blind and placebo-controlled trial. The subjects received subcutaneous BoNT/A (22.5U) and isotonic saline in the mirror sides of their forehead. Pain and neurogenic inflammation was induced by four intradermal injections of capsaicin (100mug/muL) (before, and days 1, 3 and 7 after treatments). The capsaicin-induced pain intensity, pain area, the area of secondary hyperalgesia, the area of visible flare and vasomotor reactions were recorded together with cutaneous heat, electrical and pressure pain thresholds. BoNT/A reduced the capsaicin-induced trigeminal pain intensity compared to saline (F=37.9, P<0.001). The perceived pain area was smaller for the BoNT/A-treated side compared to saline (F=7.8, P<0.05). BoNT/A reduced the capsaicin-induced secondary hyperalgesia (F=5.3, P<0.05) and flare area (F=10.3, P<0.01) compared to saline. BoNT/A reduced blood flow (F(1,26)=109.5, P<0.001) and skin temperature (F(1,26)=63.1, P<0.001) at the capsaicin injection sites compared to saline and its suppressive effect was maximal at days 3 and 7 (P<0.05, post hoc test). BoNT/A elevated cutaneous heat pain thresholds (F=17.1, P<0.001) compared to saline; however, no alteration was recorded for electrical or pressure pain thresholds (P>0.05). Findings from the present study suggest that BoNT/A appears to preferentially target Cfibers and probably TRPV1-receptors, block neurotransmitter release and subsequently reduce pain, neurogenic inflammation and cutaneous heat pain threshold.

  3. Glutamate and capsaicin effects on trigeminal nociception I: Activation and peripheral sensitization of deep craniofacial nociceptive afferents.

    PubMed

    Lam, David K; Sessle, Barry J; Hu, James W

    2009-01-28

    We have examined the effect of the peripheral application of glutamate and capsaicin to deep craniofacial tissues in influencing the activation and peripheral sensitization of deep craniofacial nociceptive afferents. The activity of single trigeminal nociceptive afferents with receptive fields in deep craniofacial tissues were recorded extracellularly in 55 halothane-anesthetized rats. The mechanical activation threshold (MAT) of each afferent was assessed before and after injection of 0.5 M glutamate (or vehicle) and 1% capsaicin (or vehicle) into the receptive field. A total of 68 afferents that could be activated by blunt noxious mechanical stimulation of the deep craniofacial tissues (23 masseter, 5 temporalis, 40 temporomandibular joint) were studied. When injected alone, glutamate and capsaicin activated and induced peripheral sensitization reflected as MAT reduction in many afferents. Following glutamate injection, capsaicin-evoked activity was greater than that evoked by capsaicin alone, whereas following capsaicin injection, glutamate-evoked responses were similar to glutamate alone. These findings indicate that peripheral application of glutamate or capsaicin may activate or induce peripheral sensitization in a subpopulation of trigeminal nociceptive afferents innervating deep craniofacial tissues, as reflected in changes in MAT and other afferent response properties. The data further suggest that peripheral glutamate and capsaicin receptor mechanisms may interact to modulate the activation and peripheral sensitization in some deep craniofacial nociceptive afferents.

  4. Effect of capsaicin on voltage-gated currents of trigeminal neurones in cell culture and slice preparations.

    PubMed

    Balla, Z; Szoke, E; Czéh, G; Szolcsányi, J

    2001-01-01

    Effects of capsaicin on voltage-gated currents were examined in vitro by whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from small neurones of rat trigeminal ganglia either in slice preparations or in different cell cultures. Cells were classified as sensitive to capsaicin if they responded with inward current and/or conductance change to the agent in nanomolar concentration. Capsaicin (150 to 330 nM) in sensitive cells reduced the mixed inward current evoked by depolarizing step or ramp commands in all preparations. In cultured cells, the inward current was depressed to 32.78 +/- 26.42% (n = 27) of the control. Both the tetrodotoxin-sensitive and -resistant inward currents were affected. The data support the concept that capsaicin besides acting on VR-1 receptors inhibits also some voltage gated channels. In 34 cultured cells, capsaicin increased the slope conductance to 170.5 +/- 68%. Percentage of capsaicin sensitive cells observed in nerve growth factor-treated cultured cell populations was higher (77.8%) than in the two other preparations (14.3 or 38.8%). It is concluded that 1) depression of the voltage-gated currents may play an important role in the functional desensitization of the sensory receptors and in the analgesic effect induced by the agent and 2) cell body of sensory neurones under native condition seems less sensitive to capsaicin then that of cells cultured in the presence of nerve growth factor.

  5. Capsaicin-responsive corneal afferents do not contain TRPV1 at their central terminals in trigeminal nucleus caudalis in rats.

    PubMed

    Hegarty, Deborah M; Hermes, Sam M; Largent-Milnes, Tally M; Aicher, Sue A

    2014-11-01

    We examined the substrates for ocular nociception in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. Capsaicin application to the ocular surface in awake rats evoked nocifensive responses and suppressed spontaneous grooming responses. Thus, peripheral capsaicin was able to activate the central pathways encoding ocular nociception. Our capsaicin stimulus evoked c-Fos expression in a select population of neurons within rostral trigeminal nucleus caudalis in anesthetized rats. These activated neurons also received direct contacts from corneal afferent fibers traced with cholera toxin B from the corneal surface. However, the central terminals of the corneal afferents that contacted capsaicin-activated trigeminal neurons did not contain TRPV1. To determine if TRPV1 expression had been altered by capsaicin stimulation, we examined TRPV1 content of corneal afferents in animals that did not receive capsaicin stimulation. These studies confirmed that while TRPV1 was present in 30% of CTb-labeled corneal afferent neurons within the trigeminal ganglion, TRPV1 was only detected in 2% of the central terminals of these corneal afferents within the trigeminal nucleus caudalis. Other TRP channels were also present in low proportions of central corneal afferent terminals in unstimulated animals (TRPM8, 2%; TRPA1, 10%). These findings indicate that a pathway from the cornea to rostral trigeminal nucleus caudalis is involved in corneal nociceptive transmission, but that central TRP channel expression is unrelated to the type of stimulus transduced by the peripheral nociceptive endings.

  6. Alternation of gene expression in trigeminal ganglion neurons following complete Freund's adjuvant or capsaicin injection into the rat face.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Masayo; Iwata, Koichi; Yasuda, Koichi; Inoue, Katsuhiro; Shinoda, Masamichi; Honda, Kuniya; Shibuta, Kazuo; Yasuda, Masashi; Kondo, Eiji

    2010-10-01

    The hyperexcitability of trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons following inflammation or C-fiber stimulation is known to be involved in a variety of changes in gene expression in TG neurons, resulting in pain abnormalities in orofacial regions. We analyzed nocifensive behavior following complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) or capsaicin injection into the maxillary whisker pad, and gene expression in the TG neurons using microarray analysis. The head-withdrawal latency to capsaicin injection or the head-withdrawal threshold to mechanical stimulation of the whisker pad skin in CFA-treated rats was significantly decreased compared to vehicle-treated rats. Many up-regulated and down-regulated genes in the TG neurons of each model were reported. Genes which have not been linked to peripheral inflammation or C-fiber activation were detected. Moreover, microarray chip containing a number of non-coding sequences was also up-regulated by C-fiber activation. These findings suggest that the diverse gene expressions in TG neurons are differentially involved in the inflammatory chronic pain and the acute pain induced by C-fiber activation, and the hyperexcitation of C-fibers are associated with the activation of certain non-coding RNAs.

  7. The effect of capsaicin on expression patterns of CGRP in trigeminal ganglion and trigeminal nucleus caudalis following experimental tooth movement in rats

    PubMed Central

    ZHOU, Yang; LONG, Hu; YE, Niansong; LIAO, Lina; YANG, Xin; JIAN, Fan; WANG, Yan; LAI, Wenli

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives The aim of this study was to explore the effect of capsaicin on expression patterns of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in the trigeminal ganglion (TG) and trigeminal subnucleus caudalis (Vc) following experimental tooth movement. Material and Methods Male Sprague-Dawley rats were used in this study and divided into small-dose capsaicin+force group, large-dose capsaicin+force group, saline+force group, and no force group. Closed coil springs were used to mimic orthodontic forces in all groups except for the no force group, in which springs were inactivated. Capsaicin and saline were injected into periodontal tissues. Rats were euthanized at 0 h, 12 h, 1 d, 3 d, 5 d, and 7 d following experimental tooth movement. Then, TG and Vc were obtained for immunohistochemical staining and western blotting against CGRP. Results Immunohistochemical results indicated that CGRP positive neurons were located in the TG, and CGRP immunoreactive fibers were distributed in the Vc. Immunohistochemical semiquantitative analysis and western blotting analysis demonstrated that CGRP expression levels both in TG and Vc were elevated at 12 h, 1 d, 3 d, 5 d, and 7 d in the saline + force group. However, both small-dose and large-dose capsaicin could decrease CGRP expression in TG and Vc at 1 d and 3 d following experimental tooth movement, as compared with the saline + force group. Conclusions These results suggest that capsaicin could regulate CGRP expression in TG and Vc following experimental tooth movement in rats. PMID:28076465

  8. Sweet taste and chorda tympani transection alter capsaicin-induced lingual pain perception in adult human subjects.

    PubMed

    Schöbel, N; Kyereme, J; Minovi, A; Dazert, S; Bartoshuk, L; Hatt, H

    2012-10-10

    Sweetness signals the nutritional value of food and may moreover be accompanied by a sensory suppression that leads to higher pain tolerance. This effect is well documented in infant rats and humans. However, it is still debated whether sensory suppression is also present in adult humans. Thus, we investigated the effects of sweet taste on the perception of the painful trigeminal stimulus capsaicin in two groups of healthy adult human subjects. A solution of 100 μM capsaicin was applied to the tip of the subject's tongues in order to stimulate trigeminal Aδ- and C-fiber nociceptors. When swallowed, 1M sucrose reduced the capsaicin-induced burning sensation by 29% (p ≤ 0.05) whereas a solution of similar taste intensity containing 1 μM quinine did not. Similarly, sucrose application to the frontal hemitongue suppressed the perception of the burning sensation induced by contralaterally applied capsaicin by 25% (p ≤ 0.01). We furthermore investigated the effects of documented unilateral transection of the chorda tympani nerve on capsaicin perception. In accordance with the ipsi-to-contralateral effect of sucrose on capsaicin perception in healthy subjects, hemiageusic subjects were more sensitive for capsaicin on the tongue contralateral to the taste nerve lesion (+38%; p ≤ 0.01). Taken together, these results argue I) for the existence of food intake-induced sensory suppression, if not analgesia, in adult humans and II) a centrally mediated suppression of trigeminal sensation by taste inputs that III) becomes disinhibited upon peripheral taste nerve lesion.

  9. The effects of Botulinum Toxin type A on capsaicin-evoked pain, flare, and secondary hyperalgesia in an experimental human model of trigeminal sensitization.

    PubMed

    Gazerani, Parisa; Staahl, Camilla; Drewes, Asbjøn M; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2006-06-01

    The trigeminovascular system is involved in migraine. Efficacy of Botulinum Toxin type A (BoNT-A) in migraine has been investigated in clinical studies but the mechanism of action remains unexplored. It is hypothesized that BoNT-A inhibits peripheral sensitization of nociceptive fibers and indirectly reduces central sensitization. We examined the effect of intramuscular injection of BoNT-A on an experimental human model of trigeminal sensitization induced by intradermal capsaicin injection to the forehead. BoNT-A (BOTOX) or saline was injected intramuscularly in precranial, neck and shoulder muscles to 32 healthy male volunteers in a double blind-randomized manner. Intradermally capsaicin-induced pain, flare and secondary hyperalgesia were obtained before and 1, 4 and 8 weeks after the above treatments. A significant suppressive effect of BoNT-A on pain, flare and hyperalgesia area was observed. The pain intensity area was significantly smaller in BoNT-A group (9.16+/-0.83 cm x s) compared to saline group (15.41+/-0.83cm x s) (P=0.011). The flare area was also reduced significantly in BoNT-A group (29.81+/-0.69 cm2) compared to saline group (39.71+/-0.69 cm2) (P<0.001). Similarly, the mean area of secondary hyperalgesia was significantly smaller in BoNT-A group (4.25+/-0.91 cm2) compared to saline group (7.03+/-0.91 cm2) (P=0.040). Post hoc analysis showed significant differences across the trials with a remarkable suppression effect of BoNT-A on capsaicin-induced sensory and vasomotor reactions as early as week1 (P<0.001). BoNT-A presented suppressive effects on the trigeminal/cervical nociceptive system activated by intradermal injection of capsaicin to the forehead. The effects are suggested to be caused by a local peripheral effect of BoNT-A on cutaneous nociceptors.

  10. Mechanistic Studies of Capsaicin-Induced Apnea in Rodents.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jun; Ding, Xiuqing; Greer, John J

    2017-02-01

    Inhalation of capsaicin-based sprays can cause central respiratory depression and lethal apneas. There are contradictory reports regarding the sites of capsaicin action. Furthermore, an understanding of the neurochemical mechanisms underlying capsaicin-induced apneas and the development of pharmacological interventions is lacking. The main objectives of this study were to perform a systematic study of the mechanisms of action of capsaicin-induced apneas and to provide insights relevant to pharmacological intervention. In vitro and in vivo rat and transient receptor potential vanilloid superfamily member 1 (TRPV1)-null mouse models were used to measure respiratory parameters and seizure-like activity in the presence of capsaicin and compounds that modulate glutamatergic neurotransmission. Administration of capsaicin to in vitro and in vivo rat and wild-type mouse models induced dose-dependent apneas and the production of seizure-like activity. No significant changes were observed in TRPV1-null mice or rat medullary slice preparations. The capsaicin-induced effects were inhibited by the TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine, amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate (AMPA) receptor antagonists CNQX, NBQX, perampanel, and riluzole, a drug that inhibits glutamate release and increases glutamate uptake. The capsaicin-induced effects on breathing and seizure-like activity were accentuated by positive allosteric modulators of the AMPA receptors, CX717 and cyclothiazide. To summarize, capsaicin-induced apneas and seizure-like behaviors are mediated via TRPV1 activation acting at lung afferents, spinal cord-ascending tracts, and medullary structures (including nucleus tractus solitarius). AMPA receptor-mediated conductances play an important role in capsaicin-induced apneas and seizure-like activity. A pharmaceutical strategy targeted at reducing AMPA receptor-mediated glutamatergic signaling may reduce capsaicin-induced deleterious effects.

  11. Olopatadine hydrochloride inhibits capsaicin-induced flare response in humans.

    PubMed

    Shindo, Masahisa; Yoshida, Yuichi; Yamamoto, Osamu

    2011-01-01

    Capsaicin, a vanilloid, has the potential for releasing substance P (SP) from sensory nerves. Topical application of capsaicin induces a flare response in the skin. However, it has not been clarified whether the release of SP is involved in the process of flare response or not. A potent antihistamine drug, olopatadine hydrochloride, is known to have inhibitory action against the release of SP. We examined the effects of olopatadine (at a dose of 5 mg) on skin reaction induced by topical application of capsaicin in 10 healthy subjects. The scores of capsaicin-induced flare responses after olopatadine administration were significantly lower at 30 min than at baseline. Our findings suggest that olopatadine hydrochloride could inhibit capsaicin-induced flare responses.

  12. Maresin 1 Inhibits TRPV1 in Temporomandibular Joint-Related Trigeminal Nociceptive Neurons and TMJ Inflammation-Induced Synaptic Plasticity in the Trigeminal Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chul-Kyu

    2015-01-01

    In the trigeminal system, disruption of acute resolution processing may lead to uncontrolled inflammation and chronic pain associated with the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Currently, there are no effective treatments for TMJ pain. Recently, it has been recognized that maresin 1, a newly identified macrophage-derived mediator of inflammation resolution, is a potent analgesic for somatic inflammatory pain without noticeable side effects in mice and a potent endogenous inhibitor of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) in the somatic system. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the analgesic actions of maresin 1 on TMJ pain are unclear in the trigeminal system. Here, by performing TMJ injection of a retrograde labeling tracer DiI (a fluorescent dye), I showed that maresin 1 potently inhibits capsaicin-induced TRPV1 currents and neuronal activity via Gαi-coupled G-protein coupled receptors in DiI-labeled trigeminal nociceptive neurons. Further, maresin 1 blocked TRPV1 agonist-evoked increases in spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic current frequency and abolished TMJ inflammation-induced synaptic plasticity in the trigeminal nucleus. These results demonstrate the potent actions of maresin 1 in regulating TRPV1 in the trigeminal system. Thus, maresin 1 may serve as a novel endogenous inhibitor for treating TMJ-inflammatory pain in the orofacial region. PMID:26617436

  13. Modulation of lipopolysaccharide-induced oxidative stress by capsaicin.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Salam, Omar M E; Abdel-Rahman, Rehab Fawzy; Sleem, Amany A; Farrag, Abdel Razik

    2012-08-01

    . Capsaicin exerted protective effects in the liver and lung against the LPS-induced tissue damage.

  14. Effects of the CGRP receptor antagonist BIBN4096BS on capsaicin-induced carotid haemodynamic changes in anaesthetised pigs

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Kapil; Arulmani, Udayasankar; Heiligers, Jan P C; Garrelds, Ingrid M; Willems, Edwin W; Doods, Henri; Villalón, Carlos M; Saxena, Pramod R

    2003-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), a potent vasodilator released from capsaicin-sensitive trigeminal sensory nerves, seems to be involved in the pathogenesis of migraine. Hence, CGRP receptor antagonists may serve as a novel treatment for migraine. This study was therefore designed to investigate the effects of BIBN4096BS (100, 300 and 1000 μg kg−1, i.v.), a potent and selective CGRP receptor antagonist, on capsaicin-induced carotid haemodynamic changes in anaesthetised pigs. Both vagosympathetic trunks were cut and phenylephrine was infused into the carotid artery (i.c.) to support carotid vascular tone. Infusions of capsaicin (0.3, 1, 3 and 10 μg kg−1 min−1, i.c.) did not alter the heart rate, but dose-dependently increased the mean arterial blood pressure. This moderate hypertensive effect was not modified by BIBN4096BS. Capsaicin infusion (10 μg kg−1 min−1, i.c.) increased total carotid, arteriovenous anastomotic and tissue blood flows and conductances as well as carotid pulsations, but decreased the difference between arterial and jugular venous oxygen saturations. These responses to capsaicin were dose-dependently blocked by BIBN4096BS. Capsaicin infusion (10 μg kg−1 min−1, i.c.) more than doubled the jugular venous plasma concentration of CGRP. This effect was not blocked, but rather increased, by BIBN4096BS. The above results show that BIBN4096BS behaves as a potent antagonist of capsaicin-induced carotid haemodynamic changes that are mediated via the release of CGRP. Therefore, this compound may prove effective in the treatment of migraine. PMID:12970078

  15. Overexpression of artemin in the tongue increases expression of TRPV1 and TRPA1 in trigeminal afferents and causes oral sensitivity to capsaicin and mustard oil.

    PubMed

    Elitt, Christopher M; Malin, Sacha A; Koerber, H Richard; Davis, Brian M; Albers, Kathryn M

    2008-09-16

    Artemin, a member of the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) family, supports a subpopulation of trigeminal sensory neurons through activation of the Ret/GFRalpha3 receptor tyrosine kinase complex. In a previous study we showed that artemin is increased in inflamed skin of wildtype mice and that transgenic overexpression of artemin in skin increases TRPV1 and TRPA1 expression in dorsal root ganglia neurons. In this study we examined how transgenic overexpression of artemin in tongue epithelium affects the anatomy, gene expression and calcium handling properties of trigeminal sensory afferents. At the RNA level, trigeminal ganglia of artemin overexpresser mice (ART-OEs) had an 81% increase in GFRalpha3, a 190% increase in TRPV1 and a 403% increase in TRPA1 compared to wildtype (WT) controls. Myelinated and unmyelinated fibers of the lingual nerve were increased in diameter, as was the density of GFRalpha3 and TRPV1-positive innervation to the dorsal anterior tongue and fungiform papilla. Retrograde labeling of trigeminal afferents by WGA injection into the tip of the tongue showed an increased percentage of GFRalpha3, TRPV1 and isolectin B4 afferents in ART-OE mice. ART-OE afferents had larger calcium transients in response to ligands of TRPV1 (capsaicin) and TRPA1 (mustard oil). Behavioral sensitivity was also exhibited by ART-OE mice to capsaicin and mustard oil, measured using a two-choice drinking test. These results suggest a potential role for artemin-responsive GFRalpha3/TRPV1/TRPA1 sensory afferents in mediating sensitivity associated with tissue injury, chemical sensitivity or disease states such as burning mouth syndrome.

  16. Capsaicin attenuates LPS-induced inflammatory cytokine production by upregulation of LXRα.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jing; Luo, Kang; Li, Yan; Chen, Quan; Tang, Dan; Wang, Deming; Xiao, Ji

    2015-09-01

    Here, we investigated the role of LXRα in capsaicin mediated anti-inflammatory effects. Results revealed that capsaicin inhibits LPS-induced IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α production in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Moreover, capsaicin increases LXRα expression through PPARγ pathway. Inhibition of LXRα activation by siRNA diminished the inhibitory action of capsaicin on LPS-induced IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α production. Additionally, LXRα siRNA abrogated the inhibitory action of capsaicin on p65 NF-κB protein expression. Thus, we propose that the anti-inflammatory effects of capsaicin are LXRα dependent, and LXRα may potentially link the capsaicin mediated PPARγ activation and NF-κB inhibition in LPS-induced inflammatory response.

  17. The role of trigeminal nucleus caudalis orexin 1 receptors in orofacial pain transmission and in orofacial pain-induced learning and memory impairment in rats.

    PubMed

    Kooshki, Razieh; Abbasnejad, Mehdi; Esmaeili-Mahani, Saeed; Raoof, Maryam

    2016-04-01

    It is widely accepted that the spinal trigeminal nuclear complex, especially the subnucleus caudalis (Vc), receives input from orofacial structures. The neuropeptides orexin-A and -B are expressed in multiple neuronal systems. Orexin signaling has been implicated in pain-modulating system as well as learning and memory processes. Orexin 1 receptor (OX1R) has been reported in trigeminal nucleus caudalis. However, its roles in trigeminal pain modulation have not been elucidated so far. This study was designed to investigate the role of Vc OX1R in the modulation of orofacial pain as well as pain-induced learning and memory deficits. Orofacial pain was induced by subcutaneous injection of capsaicin in the right upper lip of the rats. OX1R agonist (orexin-A) and antagonist (SB-334867-A) were microinjected into Vc prior capsaicin administration. After recording nociceptive times, learning and memory was investigated using Morris water maze (MWM) test. The results indicated that, orexin-A (150 pM/rat) significantly reduced the nociceptive times, while SB334867-A (80 nM/rat) exaggerated nociceptive behavior in response to capsaicin injection. In MWM test, capsaicin-treated rats showed a significant learning and memory impairment. Moreover, SB-334867-A (80 nM/rat) significantly exaggerated learning and memory impairment in capsaicin-treated rats. However, administration of orexin-A (100 pM/rat) prevented learning and memory deficits. Taken together, these results indicate that Vc OX1R was at least in part involved in orofacial pain transmission and orexin-A has also a beneficial inhibitory effect on orofacial pain-induced deficits in abilities of spatial learning and memory.

  18. 17Beta-estradiol mediates the sex difference in capsaicin-induced nociception in rats.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yu-Ching; Chen, Chao-Wei; Wang, Su-Yi; Wu, Fong-Sen

    2009-12-01

    We have previously shown that the male sex steroid testosterone inhibits slightly, but the female sex steroid 17beta-estradiol (E(2)) potentiates dramatically, the capsaicin receptor-mediated current in rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Here, we used pharmacological methods and the nociceptive behavioral test to determine whether there is a sex difference in capsaicin-induced acute pain in rats in vivo and what mechanism underlies this sex difference. Results revealed that intradermal injection of capsaicin induced a dose-dependent nocifensive response in males and females, with the dose required to produce a comparable level of nociception being approximately 3- to 4-fold higher in males than in females. In addition, females during the proestrus stage exhibited significantly greater capsaicin-induced nocifensive responses compared with the estrus stage. Moreover, the female's enhanced sensitivity to the capsaicin-induced nocifensive response was completely reversed by ovariectomy 6 weeks before capsaicin injection. It is noteworthy that intradermal coinjection of E(2) but not progesterone with capsaicin potentiated the capsaicin-induced nocifensive response in ovariectomized rats. Likewise, intradermal E(2) injection dose-dependently potentiated the capsaicin-induced nocifensive response in male rats. Furthermore, potentiation by E(2) of the capsaicin-induced nocifensive response in male rats was not significantly reduced by a selective protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor or by a selective protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, indicating that neither PKC nor PKA was involved in the effect of E(2). These data demonstrate that E(2) mediates the female's enhanced sensitivity to capsaicin-induced acute pain, consistent with potentiation by E(2) of the capsaicin receptor-mediated current in rat DRG neurons.

  19. Donitriptan, but not sumatriptan, inhibits capsaicin-induced canine external carotid vasodilatation via 5-HT1B rather than 5-HT1D receptors

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Islas, E; Gupta, S; Jiménez-Mena, L R; Lozano-Cuenca, J; Sánchez-López, A; Centurión, D; Mehrotra, S; MaassenVanDenBrink, A; Villalón, C M

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: It has been suggested that during a migraine attack capsaicin-sensitive trigeminal sensory nerves release calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), resulting in cranial vasodilatation and central nociception; hence, trigeminal inhibition may prevent this vasodilatation and abort migraine headache. This study investigated the effects of the agonists sumatriptan (5-HT1B/1D water-soluble), donitriptan (5-HT1B/1D lipid-soluble), PNU-142633 (5-HT1D water-soluble) and PNU-109291 (5-HT1D lipid-soluble) on vasodilator responses to capsaicin, α-CGRP and acetylcholine in dog external carotid artery. Experimental approach: 59 vagosympathectomized dogs were anaesthetized with sodium pentobarbitone. Blood pressure and heart rate were recorded with a pressure transducer, connected to a cannula inserted into a femoral artery. A precalibrated flow probe was placed around the common carotid artery, with ligation of the internal carotid and occipital branches, and connected to an ultrasonic flowmeter. The thyroid artery was cannulated for infusion of agonists. Key results: Intracarotid infusions of capsaicin, α-CGRP and acetylcholine dose-dependently increased blood flow through the carotid artery. These responses remained unaffected after intravenous (i.v.) infusions of sumatriptan, PNU-142633, PNU-109291 or physiological saline; in contrast, donitriptan significantly attenuated the vasodilator responses to capsaicin, but not those to α-CGRP or acetylcholine. Only sumatriptan and donitriptan dose-dependently decreased the carotid blood flow. Interestingly, i.v. administration of the antagonist, SB224289 (5-HT1B), but not of BRL15572 (5-HT1D), abolished the inhibition by donitriptan. Conclusions and implications: Our results suggest that the inhibition produced by donitriptan of capsaicin-induced external carotid vasodilatation is mainly mediated by 5-HT1B, rather than 5-HT1D, receptors, probably by a central mechanism. PMID:16880765

  20. TRPA1 contributes to capsaicin-induced facial cold hyperalgesia in rats.

    PubMed

    Honda, Kuniya; Shinoda, Masamichi; Furukawa, Akihiko; Kita, Kozue; Noma, Noboru; Iwata, Koichi

    2014-12-01

    Orofacial cold hyperalgesia is known to cause severe persistent pain in the face following trigeminal nerve injury or inflammation, and transient receptor potential (TRP) vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) and TRP ankylin 1 (TRPA1) are thought to be involved in cold hyperalgesia. However, how these two receptors are involved in cold hyperalgesia is not fully understood. To clarify the mechanisms underlying facial cold hyperalgesia, nocifensive behaviors to cold stimulation, the expression of TRPV1 and TRPA1 in trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons, and TG neuronal excitability to cold stimulation following facial capsaicin injection were examined in rats. The head-withdrawal reflex threshold (HWRT) to cold stimulation of the lateral facial skin was significantly decreased following facial capsaicin injection. This reduction of HWRT was significantly recovered following local injection of TRPV1 antagonist as well as TRPA1 antagonist. Approximately 30% of TG neurons innervating the lateral facial skin expressed both TRPV1 and TRPA1, and about 64% of TRPA1-positive neurons also expressed TRPV1. The TG neuronal excitability to noxious cold stimulation was significantly increased following facial capsaicin injection and this increase was recovered by pretreatment with TRPA1 antagonist. These findings suggest that TRPA1 sensitization via TRPV1 signaling in TG neurons is involved in cold hyperalgesia following facial skin capsaicin injection.

  1. Biomimetic proopiomelanocortin suppresses capsaicin-induced sensory irritation in humans

    PubMed Central

    Fatemi, Sayed Ali; Jafarian-Dehkordi, Abbas; Hajhashemi, Valiollah; Asilian-Mahabadi, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Sensitive skin is a frequently mentioned cosmetic complaint. Addition of a biomimetic of neuromediator has recently appeared as a promising new way to cure skin care product problems. This study was aimed to assess the inhibitory effect of a biomimetic lipopeptide derived from proopiomelanocortin (bPOMC) on capsaicin-induced sensory irritation in human volunteers and also to compare its protective effect with that of the well-known anti irritant strontium chloride. The effect of each test compound was studied on 28 selected healthy volunteers with sensitive skin in accordance with a double-blind vehicle-controlled protocol. From day 1 to day 13 each group was applied the test compound (bPOMC or strontium chloride) to one wing of the nose and the corresponding placebo (vehicle) to the other side twice daily. On days 0 and 14, acute skin irritation was induced by capsaicin solution and quantified using clinical stinging test assessments. Following the application of capsaicin solution, sensory irritation was evaluated using a 4-point numeric scale. The sensations perceived before and after treatment (on days 0 and 14) was calculated for the two zones (test materials and vehicle). Ultimately the percentage of variation between each sample and the placebo and also the inhibitory effect of bPOMC compared to that of strontium chloride were reported. Clinical results showed that after two weeks treatment, the levels of skin comfort reported in the group treated with bPOMC were significantly higher than those obtained in the placebo group and the inhibitory effect of bPOMC was about 47% higher than that of strontium chloride. The results of the present study support the hypothesis that biomimetic peptides may be effective on sensitive skin. PMID:28003842

  2. Capsaicin-induced activation of fine afferent fibres from rat skin in vitro.

    PubMed

    Seno, N; Dray, A

    1993-07-01

    A preparation of the hindpaw-skin together with the saphenous nerve from the adult rat was maintained in vitro. This was used to characterize the properties of sensory receptors with slowly conducting nerve fibres (C- and A delta) and to evaluate the effects of capsaicin and the capsaicin antagonist, capsazepine. Mechano-heat sensitive C-fibres were the most sensitive to capsaicin (threshold < 0.3 microM) applied to the receptive field. Other types of C-fibres were less sensitive (mechano-cold sensitive fibres threshold 1 microM) or insensitive (high- and low-threshold mechano-sensitive fibres). Mechano-heat and mechano-cold sensitive A delta-receptors were also activated by capsaicin but high- and low-threshold mechano-sensitive A delta-fibres were insensitive to capsaicin (maximum concentration 3 microM). The capsaicin-induced activation of mechano-heat sensitive C-fibres was concentration dependent with an EC50 = 350 nM. Responses to capsaicin, administered at submaximal concentrations were highly reproducible when administrations were separated by 30 min. Administrations at greater frequency reduced responsiveness to capsaicin. This was accompanied by a slowing of conduction velocity or production of a conduction blockade which was reversible after a few minutes. The activation of mechano-heat sensitive C-fibres by capsaicin could be prevented by capsazepine, indicating the involvement of specific capsaicin receptor-sites. These data show that fine afferents in the rat hindpaw-skin retain receptive properties when maintained in vitro. These fibres exhibit differential sensitivity to capsaicin; mechano-heat sensitive C-fibres being the most sensitive. The activation of this class of fibre was mediated via a specific capsaicin-receptor.

  3. The pepper's natural ingredient capsaicin induces autophagy blockage in prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Torres, Ágata; Bort, Alicia; Morell, Cecilia; Rodríguez-Henche, Nieves; Díaz-Laviada, Inés

    2016-01-01

    Capsaicin, the pungent ingredient of red hot chili peepers, has been shown to have anti-cancer activities in several cancer cells, including prostate cancer. Several molecular mechanisms have been proposed on its chemopreventive action, including ceramide accumulation, endoplasmic reticulum stress induction and NFκB inhibition. However, the precise mechanisms by which capsaicin exerts its anti-proliferative effect in prostate cancer cells remain questionable. Herein, we have tested the involvement of autophagy on the capsaicin mechanism of action on prostate cancer LNCaP and PC-3 cells. The results showed that capsaicin induced prostate cancer cell death in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, increased the levels of microtubule-associated protein light chain 3-II (LC3-II, a marker of autophagy) and the accumulation of the cargo protein p62 suggesting an autophagy blockage. Moreover, confocal microscopy revealed that capsaicin treatment increased lysosomes which co-localized with LC3 positive vesicles in a similar extent to that produced by the lysosomal protease inhibitors E64 and pepstatin pointing to an autophagolysosomes breakdown inhibition. Furthermore, we found that capsaicin triggered ROS generation in cells, while the levels of ROS decreased with N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC), a ROS scavenger. Co-treatment of cells with NAC and capsaicin abrogated the effects of capsaicin on autophagy and cell death. Normal prostate PNT2 and RWPE-1 cells were more resistant to capsaicin-induced cytotoxicity and did not accumulate p62 protein. Taken together, these results suggest that ROS-mediated capsaicin-induced autophagy blockage contributes to antiproliferation in prostate cancer cells, which provides new insights into the anticancer molecular mechanism of capsaicin. PMID:26625315

  4. Mechanisms underlying the augmentation of phenylbiguanide and capsaicin induced cardiorespiratory reflexes by Mesobuthus tamulus venom.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Abhaya; Akella, Aparna; Deshpande, Shripad B

    2012-10-01

    Phenylbiguanide (PBG) and capsaicin evoke cardiorespiratory reflexes utilizing two separate pathways. It is known that Indian Red Scorpion (Mesobuthus tumulus; MBT) venom augments PBG (5-HT(3)) responses but, the effect of MBT venom on capsaicin (TRPV1)-induced response is not known. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to ascertain whether MBT venom also augments the capsaicin-induced reflex responses involving mechanisms similar to PBG. Experiments were performed on anaesthetized adult rats. Blood pressure, respiratory excursions and ECG were recorded. At the end of each experiment pulmonary water content was determined. PBG (10 μg/kg) produced hypotension, bradycardia and apnoea-bradypnoea. Capsaicin (10 μg/kg) also produced hypotension, bradycardia and apnoea-bradypnoea. MBT venom (100 μg/kg) augmented PBG as well as capsaicin-induced responses and produced pulmonary oedema (increased pulmonary water content). Prostaglandin synthase inhibitor (indomethacin; 10 mg/kg) blocked the venom-induced augmentation of PBG and capsaicin reflexes. Kinin synthase inhibitor (aprotinin; 6000 KIU) and guanylate cyclase (GC) inhibitor (methylene blue; 5 mg/kg) blocked the venom-induced augmentation of PBG response but not the capsaicin response. However, pulmonary oedema was blocked by these antagonists. Phosphodiesterase V inhibitor (sildenafil; 100 μg/kg) augmented the PBG response but not the capsaicin response, though pulmonary oedema was seen in both the groups. The present results indicate that MBT venom also augments the capsaicin-induced responses. The augmentation of capsaicin response involves PGs and pulmonary oedema-independent mechanisms whereas, the augmentation of PBG response involves kinin mediated GC-cGMP pathway and pulmonary oedema-dependent mechanisms.

  5. Ocular inflammation induces trigeminal pain, peripheral and central neuroinflammatory mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Launay, Pierre-Serge; Reboussin, Elodie; Liang, Hong; Kessal, Karima; Godefroy, David; Rostene, William; Sahel, Jose-Alain; Baudouin, Christophe; Melik Parsadaniantz, Stéphane; Reaux Le Goazigo, Annabelle

    2016-04-01

    Ocular surface diseases are among the most frequent ocular pathologies, with prevalence ranging from 20% of the general population. In addition, ocular pain following corneal injury is frequently observed in clinic. The aim of the study was to characterize the peripheral and central neuroinflammatory process in the trigeminal pathways in response to cornea alteration induced by chronic topical instillations of 0.2% benzalkonium chloride (BAC) in male C57BL/6J mice. In vitro BAC induced neurotoxicity and increases neuronal (FOS, ATF3) and pro-inflammatory (IL-6) markers in primary mouse trigeminal ganglion culture. BAC-treated mice exhibited 7days after the treatment reduced aqueous tear production and increased inflammatory cell infiltration in the cornea. Hypertonic saline-evoked eye wipe behavior was enhanced in BAC-treated animals that exhibited increased FOS, ATF3 and Iba1 immunoreactivity in the trigeminal ganglion. Ocular inflammation is associated with a significant increase in IL-6 and TNF-α mRNA expression in the trigeminal ganglion. We reported a strong increase in FOS and Iba1 positive cells in particular in the sensory trigeminal complex at the ipsilateral interpolaris/caudalis (Vi/Vc) transition and Vc/upper cervical cord (Vc/C1) regions. In addition, activated microglial cells were tightly wrapped around activated FOS neurons in both regions and phosphorylated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase was markedly enhanced specifically in microglial cells during ocular inflammation. Similar data were obtained in the facial motor nucleus. These neuroanatomical data correlated with the increase in mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory (TNF-α, IL-6, CCL2) and neuronal (FOS and ATF3) markers. Interestingly, the suppression of corneal inflammation 10days following the end of BAC treatment resulted in a marked attenuation of peripheral and central changes observed in pathological conditions. This study provides the first demonstration that corneal inflammation

  6. Involvement of a capsaicin-sensitive TRPV1-independent mechanism in lipopolysaccharide-induced fever in chickens.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Motamed Elsayed; Shimizu, Yasutake; Shiina, Takahiko; Nikami, Hideki; Dosoky, Reem Mahmoud; Ahmed, Moustafa Mohamed; Takewaki, Tadashi

    2007-11-01

    It has been demonstrated that capsaicin blocks lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced fever in mammals. In this study, we investigated TRPV1 (transient receptor potential ion channel of vanilloid subtype-1)-independent action of capsaicin on LPS-induced fever in chickens. The chicken is a valuable model for this purpose because chicken TRPV1 has been shown to be insensitive to capsaicin and thus the effects of capsaicin can be attributed to TRPV1-independent mechanisms. Administration of capsaicin (10 mg/kg, iv) to conscious unrestrained chicks at 5 days of age caused a transient decrease in body temperature. This effect of capsaicin was not observed in chicks that had been pretreated twice with capsaicin, indicating that the capsaicin-sensitive pathway can be desensitized. LPS (2 mg/kg, ip) induced fever that lasted for about 2.5 h, but fever was not induced in chicks that had been pretreated with capsaicin for 2 days. The preventive effect of capsaicin on LPS-induced fever was not blocked by capsazepine, an antagonist for TRPV1, but the antagonist per se blocked the febrile response to LPS. These findings suggest that a capsaicin-sensitive TRPV1-independent mechanism may be involved in LPS-induced fever.

  7. Capsaicin-induced genotoxic stress does not promote apoptosis in A549 human lung and DU145 prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lewinska, Anna; Jarosz, Paulina; Czech, Joanna; Rzeszutek, Iwona; Bielak-Zmijewska, Anna; Grabowska, Wioleta; Wnuk, Maciej

    2015-02-01

    Capsaicin is the major pungent component of the hot chili peppers of the genus Capsicum, which are consumed worldwide as a food additive. More recently, the selective action of capsaicin against cancer cells has been reported. Capsaicin was found to induce apoptosis and inhibit proliferation of a wide range of cancer cells in vitro, whereas being inactive against normal cells. As data on capsaicin-induced genotoxicity are limited and the effects of capsaicin against human lung A549 and DU145 prostate cancer cells were not explored in detail, we were interested in determining whether capsaicin-associated genotoxicity may also provoke A549 and DU145 cell death. Capsaicin-induced decrease in metabolic activity and cell proliferation, and changes in the cell cycle were limited to high concentrations used (≥ 100 μM), whereas, at lower concentrations, capsaicin stimulated both DNA double strand breaks and micronuclei production. Capsaicin was unable to provoke apoptotic cell death when used up to 250 μM concentrations. Capsaicin induced oxidative stress, but was ineffective in provoking the dissipation of the mitochondrial inner transmembrane potential. A different magnitude of p53 binding protein 1 (53BP1) recruitment contributed to diverse capsaicin-induced genotoxic effects in DU145 and A549 cells. Capsaicin was also found to be a DNA hypermethylating agent in A549 cells. In summary, we have shown that genotoxic effects of capsaicin may contribute to limited susceptibility of DU145 and A549 cancer cells to apoptosis in vitro, which may question the usefulness of capsaicin-based anticancer therapy, at least in a case of lung and prostate cancer.

  8. Capsaicin-induced, capsazepine-insensitive relaxation of the guinea-pig ileum.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Seigo; Mori, Mayumi; Tsushima, Hiromi; Kunimatsu, Mitoshi

    2006-01-13

    The mechanisms underlying transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor type 1 (TRPV1)-independent relaxation elicited by capsaicin were studied by measuring isometric force and phosphorylation of 20-kDa regulatory light chain subunit of myosin (MLC(20)) in ileum longitudinal smooth muscles of guinea-pigs. In acetylcholine-stimulated tissues, capsaicin (1-100 microM) and resiniferatoxin (10 nM-1 microM) produced a concentration-dependent relaxation. The relaxant response was attenuated by 4-aminopyridine and high-KCl solution, but not by capsazepine, tetraethylammonium, Ba(2+), glibenclamide, charybdotoxin plus apamin nor antagonists of cannabinoid receptor type 1 and calcitonin-gene related peptide. A RhoA kinase inhibitor reduced the relaxant effect of capsaicin at 30 microM. Capsaicin and resiniferatoxin reduced acetylcholine- and caffeine-induced transient contractions in a Ca(2+)-free, EGTA solution. Capsaicin at 30 microM for 20 min did not alter basal levels of MLC(20) phosphorylation, but abolished an increase by acetylcholine in MLC(20) phosphorylation. It is suggested that the relaxant effect of capsaicin at concentrations used is not mediated by TRPV1, but by 4-aminopyridine-sensitive K(+) channels, and that capsaicin inhibits contractile mechanisms involving Ca(2+) release from intracellular storage sites. The relaxation could be explained by a decrease in phosphorylation of MLC(20).

  9. Effects of capsaicin on VGSCs in TRPV1-/- mice.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xuehong; Cao, Xuesong; Xie, Hong; Yang, Rong; Lei, Gang; Li, Fen; Li, Ai; Liu, Changjin; Liu, Lieju

    2007-08-13

    Two different mechanisms by which capsaicin blocks voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) were found by using knockout mice for the transient receptor potential V1 (TRPV1(-/-)). Similar with cultured rat trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons, the amplitude of tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R) sodium current was reduced 85% by 1 muM capsaicin in capsaicin sensitive neurons, while only 6% was blocked in capsaicin insensitive neurons of TRPV1(+/+) mice. The selective effect of low concentration capsaicin on VGSCs was reversed in TRPV1(-/-) mice, which suggested that this effect was dependent on TRPV1 receptor. The blockage effect of high concentration capsaicin on VGSCs in TRPV1(-/-) mice was the same as that in capsaicin insensitive neurons of rats and TRPV1(+/+) mice. It is noted that non-selective effect of capsaicin on VGSCs shares many similarities with local anesthetics. That is, firstly, both blockages are concentration-dependent and revisable. Secondly, being accompanied with the reduction of amplitude, voltage-dependent inactivation curve shifts to hyperpolarizing direction without a shift of activation curve. Thirdly, use-dependent blocks are induced at high stimulus frequency.

  10. Capsaicin Induces Degeneration of Cutaneous Autonomic Nerve Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, Christopher H; Wang, Ningshan; Freeman, Roy

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine the effects of topical application of capsaicin on cutaneous autonomic nerves. Methods Thirty-two healthy subjects underwent occlusive application of 0.1% capsaicin cream (or placebo) for 48 hours. Subjects were followed for 6 months with serial assessments of sudomotor, vasomotor, pilomotor and sensory function with simultaneous assessment of innervation through skin biopsies. Results There were reductions in sudomotor, vasomotor, pilomotor and sensory function in capsaicin- treated subjects (p<0.01 vs. placebo). Sensory function declined more rapidly than autonomic function; reaching a nadir by day 6 while autonomic function reached a nadir by day 16. There were reductions in sudomotor, vasomotor, pilomotor and sensory nerve fiber densities in capsaicin treated subjects (p<0.01 vs. placebo). Intra-epidermal nerve fiber density declined maximally by 6 days while autonomic nerve fiber densities reached maximal degeneration by day 16. Conversely, autonomic nerves generally regenerated more rapidly than sensory nerves, requiring 40–50 days to return to baseline levels while sensory fibers required 140–150 days to return to baseline. Interpretation Topical capsaicin leads to degeneration of sudomotor, vasomotor and pilomotor nerves accompanied by impairment of sudomotor, vasomotor and pilomotor function. These results suggest the susceptibility and/or pathophysiologic mechanisms of nerve damage may differ between autonomic and sensory nerve fibers treated with capsaicin and enhances the capsaicin model for the study of disease modifying agents. The data suggest caution should be taken when topical capsaicin is applied to skin surfaces at risk for ulceration, particularly in neuropathic conditions characterized by sensory and autonomic impairment. PMID:21061393

  11. Effect of capsaicin and cimetidine on the healing of acetic acid induced gastric ulceration in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Kang, J Y; Teng, C H; Chen, F C

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Capsaicin protects the gastric mucosa against experimental injury while capsaicin desensitisation reduces the rate of gastric ulcer healing. The effect of exogenous capsaicin on gastric ulcer healing has not to date been reported. AIM/METHOD: To investigate the effect of capsaicin, cimetidine, and in combination, given intragastrically in the healing of acetic acid induced chronic gastric ulcer in the rat. Treatment started immediately after ulcer induction. RESULTS: At the end of one week, capsaicin, cimetidine, and in combination increased ulcer healing but the effect of combined treatment was less than that of capsaicin alone. In an in vivo gastric chamber preparation, capsaicin increased, while cimetidine decreased, gastric mucosal blood flow measured by laser Doppler flowmetry. A dose response effect in reduction of gastric mucosal blood flow could be demonstrated for cimetidine. The gastric hyperaemic effect of capsaicin was blunted by prior administration of cimetidine. In contrast, capsaicin had no effect on gastric acid secretion and its addition to cimetidine did not affect the acid suppressant effect of the latter. CONCLUSIONS: Capsaicin promotes the healing of acetic acid induced gastric ulcer, probably by its gastric hyperaemic effect. Although cimetidine also promotes ulcer healing due to its inhibitory effect on acid secretion it may have an antagonistic effect on the gastric ulcer healing effect of capsaicin by virtue of inhibition of gastric hyperaemia. PMID:8984019

  12. Topical capsaicin application causes cold hypersensitivity in awake monkeys.

    PubMed

    Kamo, Hiroshi; Honda, Kuniya; Kitagawa, Junichi; Tsuboi, Yoshiyuki; Kondo, Masahiro; Taira, Masato; Yamashita, Akiko; Katsuyama, Narumi; Masuda, Yuji; Kato, Takafumi; Iwata, Koichi

    2008-06-01

    Recent animal studies have demonstrated that many trigeminal ganglion neurons co-express TRPV1 and TRPA1 receptors following peripheral inflammation. In the present study, we examined whether cold receptors were sensitized by capsaicin in awake monkeys. Two monkeys were trained to detect a change in cold stimulus temperature (30 degrees C to 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 or 2.0 degrees C) applied to the facial skin. A total of 589 trials were studied, and the number of escape and hold-through trials and detection latency were measured. The number of escape trials was increased after capsaicin treatment, whereas that of hold-through trials was decreased. Detection latency was significantly decreased after capsaicin treatment. The present findings suggest that topical application of capsaicin to the facial skin induces reversible hypersensitivity to a facial cold stimulus in behaving monkeys.

  13. Pharmacological characterisation of capsaicin-induced relaxations in human and porcine isolated arteries

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Saurabh; Lozano-Cuenca, Jair; Villalón, Carlos M.; de Vries, René; Garrelds, Ingrid M.; Avezaat, Cees J. J.; van Kats, Jorge P.; Saxena, Pramod R.

    2007-01-01

    Capsaicin, a pungent constituent from red chilli peppers, activates sensory nerve fibres via transient receptor potential vanilloid receptors type 1 (TRPV1) to release neuropeptides like calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and substance P. Capsaicin-sensitive nerves are widely distributed in human and porcine vasculature. In this study, we examined the mechanism of capsaicin-induced relaxations, with special emphasis on the role of CGRP, using various pharmacological tools. Segments of human and porcine proximal and distal coronary arteries, as well as cranial arteries, were mounted in organ baths. Concentration response curves to capsaicin were constructed in the absence or presence of the CGRP receptor antagonist olcegepant (BIBN4096BS, 1 μM), the neurokinin NK1 receptor antagonist L-733060 (0.5 μM), the voltage-sensitive calcium channel blocker ruthenium red (100 μM), the TRPV1 receptor antagonist capsazepine (5 μM), the nitric oxide synthetase inhibitor Nω-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester HCl (l-NAME; 100 μM), the gap junction blocker 18α-glycyrrhetinic acid (10 μM), as well as the RhoA kinase inhibitor Y-27632 (1 μM). Further, we also used the K+ channel inhibitors 4-aminopyridine (1 mM), charybdotoxin (0.5 μM) + apamin (0.1 μM) and iberiotoxin (0.5 μM) + apamin (0.1 μM). The role of the endothelium was assessed by endothelial denudation in distal coronary artery segments. In distal coronary artery segments, we also measured levels of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) after exposure to capsaicin, and in human segments, we also assessed the amount of CGRP released in the organ bath fluid after exposure to capsaicin. Capsaicin evoked concentration-dependent relaxant responses in precontracted arteries, but none of the above-mentioned inhibitors did affect these relaxations. There was no increase in the cAMP levels after exposure to capsaicin, unlike after (exogenously administered) α-CGRP. Interestingly, there were

  14. Apoptosis induced by capsaicin in prostate PC-3 cells involves ceramide accumulation, neutral sphingomyelinase, and JNK activation.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Ana Maria; Malagarie-Cazenave, Sophie; Olea, Nuria; Vara, Diana; Chiloeches, Antonio; Díaz-Laviada, Inés

    2007-11-01

    Numerous studies have recently focused on the anticarcinogenic, antimutagenic, or chemopreventive activities of the main pungent component of red pepper, capsaicin (N-vanillyl-8-methyl-1-nonenamide). We have previously shown that, in the androgen-independent prostate cancer PC-3 cells, capsaicin inhibits cell growth and induces apoptosis through reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation [Apoptosis 11 (2006) 89-99]. In the present study, we investigated the signaling pathways involved in the antiproliferative effect of capsaicin. Here, we report that capsaicin apoptotic effect was mediated by ceramide generation which occurred by sphingomyelin hydrolysis. Using siRNA, we demonstrated that N-SMase expression is required for the effect of capsaicin on prostate cell viability. We then investigated the role of MAP kinase cascades, extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38 MAPK, in the antiproliferative effect of capsaicin, and we confirmed that capsaicin could activate ERK and JNK but not p38 MAPK. Pharmacological inhibition of JNK kinase, as well as inhibition of ROS by the reducing agent N-acetylcysteine, prevented ceramide accumulation and capsaicin-induced cell death. However, inhibition of ceramide accumulation by the SMase inhibitor D609 did not modify JNK activation. These data reveal JNK as an upstream regulator of ceramide production. Capsaicin-promoted activation of ERK was prevented with all the inhibitors tested. We conclude that capsaicin induces apoptosis in PC-3 cells via ROS generation, JNK activation, ceramide accumulation, and second, ERK activation.

  15. Inhibiting ROS-STAT3-dependent autophagy enhanced capsaicin-induced apoptosis in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xun; Tan, Miduo; Xie, Zhiqin; Feng, Bin; Zhao, Zhijian; Yang, Kaiqing; Hu, Chen; Liao, Ni; Wang, Taoli; Chen, Dongliang; Xie, Feng; Tang, Caixi

    2016-07-01

    Capsaicin, which is the pungent ingredient of red hot chili peppers, has been reported to possess anticancer activity, including that against hepatocellular carcinoma. However, the precise molecular mechanisms by which capsaicin exerts its anticancer effects remain poorly understood. Herein, we have tested the involvement of autophagy in the capsaicin mechanism of action in human hepatocellular carcinoma. HepG2 cancer cells were treated with different doses of capsaicin (50, 100 and 200μmol/L) for 6, 12, and 24 h. Flow cytometry and Caspase-3 activity assay were performed to determine cell apoptosis. Immunofluorescence was performed to visualize LC3-positive puncta. Western blotting was used to detect the expression of the hallmarks of apoptosis and autophagy. Capsaicin can induce apoptosis in HepG2 cells. The expression levels of CL-PARP and Bcl-2 were significantly increased. In line with the apoptosis, capsaicin can trigger autophagy in HepG2 cells. Capsaicin increased LC3-II and beclin-1 expression and GFP-LC3-positive autophagosomes. Pharmacological or genetic inhibition of autophagy further sensitized HepG2 cells to capsaicin-induced apoptosis. Mechanistically, capsaicin upregulated the Stat3 activity which contributed to autophagy. Importantly, we found that capsaicin triggered reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in hepatoma cells and that the levels of ROS decreased with N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC), a ROS scavenger. Moreover, NAC abrogated the effects of capsaicin on Stat3-dependent autophagy. In this study, we demonstrated that capsaicin increased the phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (p-STAT3)-dependent autophagy through the generation of ROS signaling pathways in human hepatoma. Inhibiting autophagy could enhance capsaicin-induced apoptosis in human hepatocellular carcinoma.

  16. Capsaicin Induces “Brite” Phenotype in Differentiating 3T3-L1 Preadipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Baboota, Ritesh K.; Singh, Dhirendra P.; Sarma, Siddhartha M.; Kaur, Jaspreet; Sandhir, Rajat; Boparai, Ravneet K.; Kondepudi, Kanthi K.; Bishnoi, Mahendra

    2014-01-01

    Objective Targeting the energy storing white adipose tissue (WAT) by pharmacological and dietary means in order to promote its conversion to energy expending “brite” cell type holds promise as an anti-obesity approach. Present study was designed to investigate/revisit the effect of capsaicin on adipogenic differentiation with special reference to induction of “brite” phenotype during differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. Methods Multiple techniques such as Ca2+ influx assay, Oil Red-O staining, nutrigenomic analysis in preadipocytes and matured adipocytes have been employed to understand the effect of capsaicin at different doses. In addition to in-vitro experiments, in-vivo studies were carried out in high-fat diet (HFD) fed rats treated with resiniferatoxin (RTX) (a TRPV1 agonist) and in mice administered capsaicin. Results TRPV1 channels are expressed in preadipocytes but not in adipocytes. In preadipocytes, both capsaicin and RTX stimulate Ca2+ influx in dose-dependent manner. This stimulation may be prevented by capsazepine, a TRPV1 antagonist. At lower doses, capsaicin inhibits lipid accumulation and stimulates TRPV1 gene expression, while at higher doses it enhances accumulation of lipids and suppresses expression of its receptor. In doses of 0.1–100 µM, capsaicin promotes expression of major pro-adipogenic factor PPARγ and some of its downstream targets. In concentrations of 1 µM, capsaicin up-regulates anti-adipogenic genes. Low-dose capsaicin treatment of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes differentiating into adipocytes results in increased expression of brown fat cell marker genes. In white adipose of mice, capsaicin administration leads to increase in browning-specific genes. Global TRPV1 ablation (i.p. by RTX administration) leads to increase in locomotor activity with no change in body weight. Conclusion Our findings suggest the dual modulatory role of capsaicin in adipogenesis. Capsaicin inhibits adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 via TRPV1 activation and

  17. A comparison of hyperalgesia and neurogenic inflammation induced by melittin and capsaicin in humans.

    PubMed

    Sumikura, H; Andersen, O K; Drewes, A M; Arendt-Nielsen, L

    2003-02-13

    Melittin (a main compound of bee venom) and capsaicin were injected intradermally in healthy human volunteers: (1) to study secondary mechanical hyperalgesia (static hyperalgesia and dynamic hyperalgesia) around the injection site; and (2) to correlate the sensory changes to the neurogenic inflammation assessed by laser-doppler blood flowmetry. Melittin 50 microg and capsaicin 10 microg induced comparable spontaneous pain and increased blood flow (neurogenic inflammation). Intradermal injection of melittin induced regions of secondary mechanical hyperalgesia around the injection site, however, they were not as large as the hyperalgesia induced by capsaicin. This is the first report studying mechanical hyperalgesia induced by melittin in humans, and the results were in agreement with the previous observations in rats. Melittin seems to be a valuable model to study a possible contribution of neurogenic inflammation to hyperalgesia in humans.

  18. Ca(2+) and Calpain Mediate Capsaicin-induced Ablation of Axonal Terminals Expressing Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheng; Wang, Sen; Asgar, Jamila; Joseph, John; Ro, Jin Y; Wei, Feng; Campbell, James N; Chung, Man-Kyo

    2017-03-30

    Capsaicin is an ingredient in spicy peppers that produces burning pain by activating transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), a Ca2+-permeable ion channel in nociceptors. Capsaicin also has been used as an analgesic, and its topical administration is approved for the treatment of certain pain conditions. The mechanisms underlying capsaicin-induced analgesia likely involve reversible ablation of nociceptor terminals. However, the mechanisms underlying these effects are not well understood. To visualize TRPV1-lineage axons, a genetically engineered mouse model was used in which a fluorophore is expressed under TRPV1 promoter. Using a combination of these TRPV1-lineage reporter mice and primary afferent cultures, we monitored capsaicin-induced effects on afferent terminals in real time. We found that Ca2+ influx through TRPV1 is necessary for capsaicin-induced ablation of nociceptive terminals. Although capsaicin-induced mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake was TRPV1-dependent, dissipation of the mitochondrial membrane potential, inhibition of the mitochondrial transition permeability pore and scavengers of reactive oxygen species did not attenuate capsaicin-induced ablation. In contrast, MDL28170, an inhibitor of the Ca2+-dependent protease calpain diminished ablation. Furthermore, overexpression of calpastatin, an endogenous inhibitor of calpain, or knockdown of calpain2 also decreased the ablation. Quantitative assessment of TRPV1-lineage afferents in the epidermis of the hind paws of the reporter mice showed that EGTA and MDL28170 diminished capsaicin-induced ablation. Moreover, MDL28170 prevented capsaicin-induced thermal hypoalgesia. These results suggest that TRPV1/Ca2+/calpain-dependent signaling plays a dominant role in capsaicin-induced ablation of nociceptive terminals and further our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying effects of capsaicin on nociceptors.

  19. Dose-dependent protective effect of BPC 157 on capsaicin-induced rhinitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Kalogjera, L; Ries, M; Baudoin, T; Ferencic, Z; Trotic, R; Pegan, B

    1997-01-01

    Protection of BPC 157 on capsaicin-induced rhinitis was studied in Wistar rats for its effect on mastocyte infiltration, degranulation and inflammatory cell infiltration. Animals were pretreated with 10 microg/kg, 10 ng/kg or 2 ml saline i.p. and capsaicin (0.05 ml/nostril of 1750 nmol/l sol.) was applied intranasally. They were then euthanized at 1, 3 and 12 h after capsaicin provocation. Nasal mucosa was analyzed and scored for mastocyte infiltration, degranulation and inflammatory cell infiltration. BPC 157 pretreatment significantly prevented mastocyte infiltration at 1 h. Polymorphonuclear leukocyte infiltration was significantly reduced in rats pretreated with 10 microg/kg BPC 157. A dose-dependent effect of BPC 157 pretreatment was demonstrated only for polymorphonuclear leukocyte infiltration at 12 h.

  20. Vasosensory responses elicited by Indian red scorpion venom last longer than capsaicin-induced responses.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sanjeev K; Deshpande, Shripad B

    2008-11-01

    The present study was conducted to compare the time-related cardiorespiratory changes occurring after the injection of Mesobuthus tamulus (BT; 1 mg/kg) venom and capsaicin (1.2 ng/kg) in the peripheral end of femoral artery in urethane anaesthetised rats. Blood pressure (BP), electrocardiogram (for heart rate; HR) and respiratory movements were recorded for 60 min after venom/capsaicin intra-arterially. Minute ventilation (MV) was computed by using appropriate calibrations. After intraarterial injection of BT venom, there was immediate (within 2 sec) increase in respiratory rate (RR) and MV which reached to 40% within 30 sec, followed by a 40% decrease in RR without any change in MV. Further, there was sustained increase in RR (50%) and MV (65%) up to 60 min. The BP began to increase at 40 sec, peaking at 5 min (50%) and remained above the initial level up to 60 min. The bradycardiac response began after 5 min which peaked (50% of the initial) at 25 min and remained at that level up to 60 min. In capsaicin treated group, there was immediate hyperventilatory (increase in RR and MV) changes within 2 sec which returned to the initial level within 2 min and remained at that level up to 60 min. The capsaicin-induced hypotensive response began within 5 sec which returned to the initial level by 5 min and remained at that level throughout. Capsaicin did not produce any change in HR. These observations suggest that intraarterial injection of BT venom produces prolonged cardiorespiratory alterations as compared to the capsaicin-induced responses.

  1. Electroacupuncture suppresses capsaicin-induced secondary hyperalgesia through an endogenous spinal opioid mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee Young; Wang, Jigong; Lee, Inhyung; Kim, Hee Kee; Chung, Kyungsoon; Chung, Jin Mo

    2009-01-01

    Central sensitization, caused either by tissue inflammation or peripheral nerve injury, plays an important role in persistent pain. An animal model of capsaicin-induced pain has well-defined peripheral and central sensitization components, thus is useful for studying the analgesic effect on two separate components. The focus of this study is to examine the analgesic effects of electroacupuncture (EA) on capsaicin-induced secondary hyperalgesia, which represents central sensitization. Capsaicin (0.5%, 10 μl) was injected into the plantar side of the left hind paw, and foot withdrawal thresholds in response to von Frey stimuli (mechanical sensitivity) were determined for both primary and secondary hyperalgesia in rats. EA (2 Hz, 3 mA) was applied to various pairs of acupoints, GB30-GB34, BL40-BL60, GV2-GV6, LI3-LI6 and SI3-TE8, for 30 min under isofluraine anesthesia and then the effect of EA on mechanical sensitivity of paw was determined. EA applied to the ipsilateral SI3-TE8, but none the other acupoints, significantly reduced capsaicin-induced secondary hyperalgesia but not primary hyperalgesia. EA analgesic effect was inhibited by a systemic non-specific opioid receptor (OR) antagonist or an intrathecal μ- or δ-OR antagonist. EA analgesic effect was not affected by an intrathecal κ-OR antagonist or systemic adrenergic receptor antagonist. This study demonstrates that EA produces a stimulation point specific analgesic effect on capsaicin-induced secondary hyperalgesia (central sensitization), mediated by activating endogenous spinal μ and δ opioid receptors. PMID:19646817

  2. The capsaicin VR1 receptor mediates substance P release in toxin A-induced enteritis in rats.

    PubMed

    McVey, D C; Vigna, S R

    2001-09-01

    The mechanism by which Clostridium difficile toxin A causes substance P (SP) release and subsequent inflammation in the rat ileum is unknown. Pretreatment with the vanilloid receptor subtype 1 (VR1) antagonist, capsazepine, before toxin A administration significantly inhibited toxin A-induced SP release and intestinal inflammation. Intraluminal administration of the VR1 agonist capsaicin caused intestinal inflammation similar to the effects of toxin A. Pretreatment with capsazepine before capsaicin administration also significantly inhibited capsaicin-induced intestinal inflammation. These results suggest that intraluminal toxin A causes SP release from primary sensory neurons via stimulation of VR1 receptors resulting in intestinal inflammation.

  3. Capsaicin protects endothelial cells and macrophage against oxidized low-density lipoprotein-induced injury by direct antioxidant action.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kuo-Shuen; Chen, Pei-Ni; Hsieh, Yih-Shou; Lin, Chin-Yin; Lee, Yi-Hsun; Chu, Shu-Chen

    2015-02-25

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory vascular disease. It is characterized by endothelial dysfunction, lipid accumulation, leukocyte activation, and the production of inflammatory mediators and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Capsaicin, a biologically active compound of the red pepper and chili pepper, has several anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, and hypolipidemic biological effects. However, its protective effects on foam cell formation and endothelial injury induced by oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) remain unclear. In this study, we evaluated the anti-oxidative activity of capsaicin, and determined the mechanism by which capsaicin rescues human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) from oxLDL-mediated dysfunction. The anti-oxidative activity of capsaicin was defined by Apo B fragmentation and conjugated diene production of the copper-mediated oxidation of LDL. Capsaicin repressed ROS generation, as well as subsequent mitochondrial membrane potential collapse, cytochrome c expression, chromosome condensation, and caspase-3 activation induced by oxLDL in HUVECs. Capsaicin also protected foam cell formation in macrophage RAW 264.7 cells. Our results suggest that capsaicin may prevent oxLDL-induced cellular dysfunction and protect RAW 264.7 cells from LDL oxidation.

  4. Hydrogen sulfide determines HNO-induced stimulation of trigeminal afferents.

    PubMed

    Wild, Vanessa; Messlinger, Karl; Fischer, Michael J M

    2015-08-18

    Endogenous NO and hydrogen sulfide form HNO, which causes CGRP release via TRPA1 channel activation in sensory nerves. In the present study, stimulation of intact trigeminal afferent neuron preparations with NO donors, Na2S or both was analyzed by measuring CGRP release as an index of mass activation. Combined stimulation was able to activate all parts of the trigeminal system and acted synergistic compared to stimulation with both substances alone. To investigate the contribution of both substances, we varied their ratio and tracked intracellular calcium in isolated neurons. Our results demonstrate that hydrogen sulfide is the rate-limiting factor for HNO formation. CGRP has a key role in migraine pathophysiology and HNO formation at all sites of the trigeminal system should be considered for this novel means of activation.

  5. Anti pruritic effects of topical crotamiton, capsaicin, and a corticosteroid on pruritogen-induced scratching behavior.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Rika; Satoh, Takahiro; Takaoka, Ayumi; Saeki, Kazumi; Yokozeki, Hiroo

    2012-03-01

    Itch accompanies various skin diseases. As a number of mediators other than histamine can be involved in the itch sensation, H1 receptor antagonists are not necessarily effective in treating itch. External application of antipruritic drugs is occasionally used as an alternative therapy for pruritic skin conditions, such as pruritus on primary non-diseased, non-inflamed skin. Even so, the actual effects of these drugs on the itch sensation have yet to be studied in detail. To verify the antipruritic effects of crotamiton, capsaicin, and a corticosteroid on the itch sensation, we examined the inhibitory effects of these drugs on various pruritogen-induced scratching behaviors in mice. Topical application of 10% crotamiton moderately inhibited histamine-, serotonin-, and PAR-2 agonist-induced scratching behaviors. Topical capsaicin (0.025%) also exerted a moderate suppressive effect on histamine-, substance P-, and PAR-2 agonist-induced itch responses. Notably, topical corticosteroid (0.05% clobetasol propionate) remarkably inhibited the scratching behaviors induced by all of the pruritogenic agents tested. Therapeutic effects of capsaicin on substance P-induced pruritus did not seem to be mediated by desensitization of the TRPV1 (+) C fibers and/or by altered responsiveness of the mast cells. In addition, the antipruritic effects of crotamiton and corticosteroid appear to be, at least partly, associated with a TRPV1-independent pathway. This study examined the itch responses to pruritogens and demonstrated the mode of action of the externally applied antipruritic drugs.

  6. Increase in gastric secretion induced by 2-deoxy-D-glucose is impaired in capsaicin pretreated rats.

    PubMed Central

    Evangelista, S.; Santicioli, P.; Maggi, C. A.; Meli, A.

    1989-01-01

    Gastric acid secretion was determined following intravenous administration of 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG; 60 mg kg-1) or electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve in urethane-anaesthetized rats pretreated when newborn with either capsaicin or the vehicle. The secretory response to 2-DG was substantially reduced in the capsaicin pretreated rats, while that induced by electrical vagal stimulation (1 mA, 1 ms. 3 Hz) was unaffected. These results suggest that capsaicin-sensitive fibres are involved in the afferent branch of the reflex response activated by 2-DG to stimulate gastric acid secretion. PMID:2804552

  7. Effects of sensory denervation by neonatal capsaicin administration on experimental pancreatitis induced by dibutyltin dichloride.

    PubMed

    Ikeura, Tsukasa; Kataoka, Yosky; Wakabayashi, Taketoshi; Mori, Tetsuji; Takamori, Yasuharu; Takamido, Shoichiroh; Okazaki, Kazuichi; Yamada, Hisao

    2007-09-01

    Increase in the number of intrapancreatic sensory nerve fibers has been implicated in the generation of pain in chronic pancreatitis. Because some sensory neurotransmitters (e.g., substance P) are known to have proinflammatory effects, we hypothesized that denervation of intrapancreatic nerves might influence not only pain generation but also inflammation. Neonatal Lewis rats were injected with capsaicin (50 mg/kg or 0 mg/kg), a neurotoxin, to induce denervation of primary sensory neurons. When rats reached 170-190 g body weight, experimental pancreatitis was induced by a single administration of dibutyltin dichloride (7 mg/mg). The severity of pancreatitis was evaluated in both groups in the acute phase (at 3 and 7 days) and chronic phase (at 28 days). At day 7, the sensory denervation induced by neonatal capsaicin administration inhibited pancreatic inflammation on both histological (determination of interstitial edema, expansion of interlobular septa and intercellular spaces, and inflammatory cell infiltration) and biochemical (intrapancreatic myeloperoxidase activity) evaluation. Furthermore, at day 28, glandular atrophy, pseudotubular complexes, and rate of fibrosis were each significantly lower in the capsaicin-pretreated group than in the vehicle-pretreated group. Our findings provide in vivo evidence that primary sensory neurons play important roles in both acute pancreatitis and chronic pancreatic inflammation with fibrosis.

  8. Trigeminal star-like platinum complexes induce cancer cell senescence through quadruplex-mediated telomere dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiao-Hui; Mu, Ge; Zhong, Yi-Fang; Zhang, Tian-Peng; Cao, Qian; Ji, Liang-Nian; Zhao, Yong; Mao, Zong-Wan

    2016-12-01

    Two trigeminal star-like platinum complexes were synthesized to induce the formation of human telomere G-quadruplex (hTel G4) with extremely high selectivity and affinity. The induced hTel G4 activates strong telomeric DNA damage response (TDDR), resulting in telomere dysfunction and cell senescence.

  9. Orofacial neuropathic pain mouse model induced by Trigeminal Inflammatory Compression (TIC) of the infraorbital nerve

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Trigeminal neuropathic pain attacks can be excruciating for patients, even after being lightly touched. Although there are rodent trigeminal nerve research models to study orofacial pain, few models have been applied to studies in mice. A mouse trigeminal inflammatory compression (TIC) model is introduced here which successfully and reliably promotes vibrissal whisker pad hypersensitivity. Results The chronic orofacial neuropathic pain model is induced after surgical placement of chromic gut suture in the infraorbital nerve fissure in the maxillary bone. Slight compression and chemical effects of the chromic gut suture on the portion of the infraorbital nerve contacted cause mild nerve trauma. Nerve edema is observed in the contacting infraorbital nerve bundle as well as macrophage infiltration in the trigeminal ganglia. Centrally in the spinal trigeminal nucleus, increased immunoreactivity for an activated microglial marker is evident (OX42, postoperative day 70). Mechanical thresholds of the affected whisker pad are significantly decreased on day 3 after chromic gut suture placement, persisting at least 10 weeks. The mechanical allodynia is reversed by suppression of microglial activation. Cold allodynia was detected at 4 weeks. Conclusions A simple, effective, and reproducible chronic mouse model mimicking clinical orofacial neuropathic pain (Type 2) is induced by placing chromic gut suture between the infraorbital nerve and the maxillary bone. The method produces mild inflammatory compression with significant continuous mechanical allodynia persisting at least 10 weeks and cold allodynia measureable at 4 weeks. PMID:23270529

  10. Dependence of Nociceptive Detection Thresholds on Physiological Parameters and Capsaicin-Induced Neuroplasticity: A Computational Study

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Huan; Meijer, Hil G. E.; Doll, Robert J.; Buitenweg, Jan R.; van Gils, Stephan A.

    2016-01-01

    Physiological properties of peripheral and central nociceptive subsystems can be altered over time due to medical interventions. The effective change for the whole nociceptive system can be reflected in changes of psychophysical characteristics, e.g., detection thresholds. However, it is challenging to separate contributions of distinct altered mechanisms with measurements of thresholds only. Here, we aim to understand how these alterations affect Aδ-fiber-mediated nociceptive detection of electrocutaneous stimuli. First, with a neurophysiology-based model, we study the effects of single-model parameters on detection thresholds. Second, we derive an expression of model parameters determining the functional relationship between detection thresholds and the interpulse interval for double-pulse stimuli. Third, in a case study with topical capsaicin treatment, we translate neuroplasticity into plausible changes of model parameters. Model simulations qualitatively agree with changes in experimental detection thresholds. The simulations with individual forms of neuroplasticity confirm that nerve degeneration is the dominant mechanism for capsaicin-induced increases in detection thresholds. In addition, our study suggests that capsaicin-induced central plasticity may last at least 1 month. PMID:27252644

  11. Effects of capsaicin, dihydrocapsaicin, and curcumin on copper-induced oxidation of human serum lipids.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, Kiran D K; Kunde, Dale A; Ball, Madeleine J; Geraghty, Dominic P

    2006-08-23

    The oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is believed to be the initiating factor for the development and progression of atherosclerosis. The active ingredients of spices such as chili and turmeric (capsaicin and curcumin, respectively) have been shown to reduce the susceptibility of LDL to oxidation. One of the techniques used to study the oxidation of LDL is to isolate LDL and subject it to metal-induced (copper or iron) oxidation. However, whole serum may represent a closer situation to in vivo conditions than using isolated LDL. We investigated the effects of different concentrations (0.1-3 microM) of capsaicin, dihydrocapsaicin, and curcumin on copper-induced oxidation of serum lipoproteins. The lag time (before initiation of oxidation) and rate of oxidation (slope of propagation phase) were calculated. The lag time increased, and the rate of oxidation decreased with increasing concentrations of the tested antioxidants (p < 0.05). A 50% increase in lag time (from control) was observed at concentrations between 0.5 and 0.7 microM for capsaicin, dihydrocapsaicin, and curcumin. This study shows that oxidation of serum lipids is reduced by capsaicinoids and curcumin in a concentration-dependent manner.

  12. New insights into mechanisms of opioid inhibitory effects on capsaicin-induced TRPV1 activity during painful diabetic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Shaqura, Mohammed; Khalefa, Baled I; Shakibaei, Mehdi; Zöllner, Christian; Al-Khrasani, Mahmoud; Fürst, Susanna; Schäfer, Michael; Mousa, Shaaban A

    2014-10-01

    Painful diabetic neuropathy is a disease of the peripheral sensory neuron with impaired opioid responsiveness. Since μ-opioid receptor (MOR) activation can inhibit the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) activity in peripherally sensory neurons, this study investigated the mechanisms of impaired opioid inhibitory effects on capsaicin-induced TRPV1 activity in painful diabetic neuropathy. Intravenous injection of streptozotocin (STZ, 45 mg/kg) in Wistar rats led to a degeneration of insulin producing pancreatic β-cells, elevated blood glucose, and mechanical hypersensitivity (allodynia). In these animals, local morphine's inhibitory effects on capsaicin-induced nocifensive behavior as well as on capsaicin-induced TRPV1 current in dorsal root ganglion cells were significantly impaired. These changes were associated with a loss in MOR but not TRPV1 in peripheral sensory neurons. Intrathecal delivery of nerve growth factor in diabetic animals normalized sensory neuron MOR and subsequently rescued morphine's inhibitory effects on capsaicin-induced TRPV1 activity in vivo and in vitro. These findings identify a loss in functional MOR on sensory neurons as a contributing factor for the impaired opioid inhibitory effects on capsaicin-induced TRPV1 activity during advanced STZ-induced diabetes. Moreover, they support growing evidence of a distinct regulation of opioid responsiveness during various painful states of disease (e.g. arthritis, cancer, neuropathy) and may give novel therapeutic incentives.

  13. The role of trigeminal nucleus caudalis orexin 1 receptor in orofacial pain-induced anxiety in rat.

    PubMed

    Bahaaddini, Mehri; Khatamsaz, Saeed; Esmaeili-Mahani, Saeed; Abbasnejad, Mehdi; Raoof, Maryam

    2016-10-19

    The relationship between anxiety and pain has received special attention. Orexins (A and B) are hypothalamic neuropeptides that have diverse functions in the regulation of different physiological and behavioral responses. This study was designed to evaluate the role of orexin 1 receptors (OX1R) within trigeminal nucleus caudalis (TNC) in anxiety following the induction of orofacial pain. The subcutaneous injection of capsaicin (CAP) into the rat upper lip region produced pain responses. OX1R agonist (orexin A) and antagonist (SB-334867) were microinjected into the TNC before the administration of CAP. Anxiety behaviors were investigated using elevated plus maze (EPM) and open-field tests. The results showed that CAP injection significantly decreases the percentage of time spent in the open arms of the EPM and the time spent in the center of the open field. Surprisingly, orexin (50, 100, and 150 pM/rat) significantly exaggerated the CAP effects, whereas SB-334867 (20, 40 nM/rat) significantly inhibited the CAP-induced anxiety. The CAP-injected group showed a significant decrease in the percentage of entries to open arms in the EPM and the number of visits in the center area of the open field compared with the control group. Orexin significantly potentiated the mentioned effects of CAP, whereas SB-334867 (40, 80 nM/rat) exerted a significant inhibitory effect on CAP-induced anxiety. The overall results indicated that the TNC OX1Rs play an important role in orofacial pain-induced anxiety.

  14. Corneal edema induced by cold in trigeminal nerve palsy

    SciTech Connect

    Thorgaard, G.L.; Holland, E.J.; Krachmer, J.H.

    1987-05-15

    We examined a 34-year-old man who complained of decreased visual acuity in the right eye when exposed to cold environmental temperatures. Although examination at room temperature was unremarkable, he developed prominent unilateral corneal edema of the right eye when placed in a cold room at 4 C. Corneal thickness increased from 525 to 789 microns in the affected eye. Further examination disclosed a right-sided trigeminal nerve palsy. He was eventually found to have a 3 X 2-cm tentorial ridge meningioma on the right.

  15. Capsaicin sensitizes TRAIL-induced apoptosis through Sp1-mediated DR5 up-regulation: Involvement of Ca{sup 2+} influx

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, Dong-Oh; Kang, Chang-Hee; Kang, Sang-Hyuck; Choi, Yung-Hyun; Hyun, Jin-Won; Chang, Weon-Young; Kang, Hee-Kyoung; Koh, Young-Sang; Maeng, Young-Hee; Kim, Young-Ree; Kim, Gi-Young

    2012-02-15

    Although tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) induces apoptosis in various malignant cells, several cancers including human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) exhibit potent resistance to TRAIL-induced cell death. The aim of this study is to evaluate the anti-cancer potential of capsaicin in TRAIL-induced cancer cell death. As indicated by assays that measure phosphatidylserine exposure, mitochondrial activity and activation of caspases, capsaicin potentiated TRAIL-resistant cells to lead to cell death. In addition, we found that capsaicin induces the cell surface expression of TRAIL receptor DR5, but not DR4 through the activation Sp1 on its promoter region. Furthermore, we investigated that capsaicin-induced DR5 expression and apoptosis are inhibited by calcium chelator or inhibitors for calmodulin-dependent protein kinase. Taken together, our data suggest that capsaicin sensitizes TRAIL-mediated HCC cell apoptosis by DR5 up-regulation via calcium influx-dependent Sp1 activation. Highlights: ► Capsaicin sensitizes TRAIL-induced apoptosis through activation of caspases. ► Capsaicin induces expression of DR5 through Sp1 activation. ► Capsaicin activates calcium signaling pathway.

  16. Pattern of neuropathic pain induced by topical capsaicin application in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Lötsch, Jörn; Dimova, Violeta; Hermens, Hanneke; Zimmermann, Michael; Geisslinger, Gerd; Oertel, Bruno G; Ultsch, Alfred

    2015-03-01

    Human experimental pain models are widely used to study drug effects under controlled conditions, but they require further optimization to better reflect clinical pain conditions. To this end, we measured experimentally induced pain in 110 (46 men) healthy volunteers. The quantitative sensory testing (QST) battery (German Research Network on Neuropathic Pain) was applied on untreated ("control") and topical capsaicin-hypersensitized ("test") skin. Z-transformed QST-parameter values obtained at the test site were compared with corresponding values published from 1236 patients with neuropathic pain using Bayesian statistics. Subjects were clustered for the resemblance of their QST pattern to neuropathic pain. Although QST parameter values from the untreated site agreed with reference values, several QST parameters acquired at the test site treated with topical capsaicin deviated from normal. These deviations resembled in 0 to 7 parameters of the QST pattern observed in patients with neuropathic pain. Higher degrees (50%-60%) of resemblance to neuropathic QST pattern were obtained in 18% of the subjects. Inclusion in the respective clusters was predictable at a cross-validated accuracy of 86.9% by a classification and regression tree comprising 3 QST parameters (mechanical pain sensitivity, wind-up ratio, and z-transformed thermal sensory limen) from the control sites. Thus, we found that topical capsaicin partly induced the desired clinical pattern of neuropathic pain in a preselectable subgroup of healthy subjects to a degree that fuels expectations that experimental pain models can be optimized toward mimicking clinical pain. The subjects, therefore, qualify for enrollment in analgesic drug studies that use highly selected cohorts to enhance predictivity for clinical analgesia.

  17. Cancer-promoting effect of capsaicin on DMBA/TPA-induced skin tumorigenesis by modulating inflammation, Erk and p38 in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhaoguo; Zhu, Pingting; Tao, Yu; Shen, Cunsi; Wang, Siliang; Zhao, Lingang; Wu, Hongyan; Fan, Fangtian; Lin, Chao; Chen, Chen; Zhu, Zhijie; Wei, Zhonghong; Sun, Lihua; Liu, Yuping; Wang, Aiyun; Lu, Yin

    2015-07-01

    Epidemiologic and animal studies revealed that capsaicin (8-methyl-N-vanillyl-6-noneamide) can act as a carcinogen or cocarcinogen. However, the influence of consumption of capsaicin-containing foods or vegetables on skin cancer patients remains largely unknown. In the present study, we demonstrated that capsaicin has a cocarcinogenic effect on 9, 10-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)/12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced skin tumorigenesis. Our results showed that topical application of capsaicin on the dorsal skin of DMBA-initiated and TPA-promoted mice could significantly accelerate tumor formation and growth and induce more and larger skin tumors than the model group (DMBA + TPA). Moreover, capsaicin could promote TPA-induced skin hyperplasia and tumor proliferation. Mechanistic study found that inflammation-related factors cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) were highly elevated by pretreatment with capsaicin, suggesting an inflammation-dependent mechanism. Furthermore, mice that were administered capsaicin exhibited significant up-regulation of phosphorylation of nuclear factor kappaB (NF-κB), Erk and p38 but had no effect on JNK. Thus, our results indicated that inflammation, Erk and P38 collectively played a crucial role in cancer-promoting effect of capsaicin on carcinogen-induced skin cancer in mice.

  18. Analgesic effects of botulinum neurotoxin type A in a model of allyl isothiocyanate- and capsaicin-induced pain in mice.

    PubMed

    Luvisetto, Siro; Vacca, Valentina; Cianchetti, Carlo

    2015-02-01

    We evaluate analgesic effects of BoNT/A in relation to the two main transient receptor potentials (TRP), the vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) and the ankyrin 1 (TRPA1), having a role in migraine pain. BoNT/A (15 pg/mouse) was injected in the inner side of the medial part of hindlimb thigh of mice, where the superficial branch of femoral artery is located. We chosen this vascular structure because it is similar to other vascular structures, such as the temporal superficial artery, whose perivascular nociceptive fibres probably contributes to migraine pain. After an interval, ranging from 7 to 30 days, capsaicin (agonist of TRPV1) or allyl isothiocyanate (AITC; agonist of TRPA1) were injected in the same region previously treated with BoNT/A and nocifensive response to chemicals-induced pain was recorded. In absence of BoNT/A, capsaicin and AITC induced extensive nocifensive response, with a markedly different temporal profile: capsaicin induced maximal pain during the first 5 min, while AITC induced maximal pain at 15-30 min after injection. Pretreatment with BoNT/A markedly reduced both the capsaicin- and AITC-induced pain for at least 21 days. These data suggest a long lasting analgesic effect of BoNT/A exerted via prevention of responsiveness of TRPV1 and TRPA1 toward their respective agonists.

  19. Intraplantar injection of bergamot essential oil into the mouse hindpaw: effects on capsaicin-induced nociceptive behaviors.

    PubMed

    Sakurada, Tsukasa; Kuwahata, Hikari; Katsuyama, Soh; Komatsu, Takaaki; Morrone, Luigi Antonio; Corasaniti, Maria Tiziana; Bagetta, Giacinto; Sakurada, Shinobu

    2009-01-01

    Despite the increasing use of aromatherapy oils, there have not been many studies exploring the biological activities of bergamot (Citrus bergamia, Risso) essential oil (BEO). Recently, we have investigated the effects of BEO injected into the plantar surface of the hindpaw in the capsaicin test in mice. The intraplantar injection of capsaicin produced an intense and short-lived licking/biting response toward the injected hindpaw. The capsaicin-induced nociceptive response was reduced significantly by intraplantar injection of BEO. The essential oils of Clary Sage (Salvia sclarea), Thyme ct. linalool (linalool chemotype of Thymus vulgaris), Lavender Reydovan (Lavandula hybrida reydovan), and True Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia), had similar antinociceptive effects on the capsaicin-induced nociceptive response, while Orange Sweet (Citrus sinensis) essential oil was without effect. In contrast to a small number of pharmacological studies of BEO, there is ample evidence regarding isolated components of BEO which are also found in other essential oils. The most abundant compounds found in the volatile fraction are the monoterpene hydrocarbons, such as limonene, gamma-terpinene, beta-pinene, and oxygenated derivatives, linalool and linalyl acetate. Of these monoterpenes, the pharmacological activities of linalool have been examined. Following intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration in mice, linalool produces antinociceptive and antihyperalgesic effects in different animal models in addition to anti-inflammatory properties. Linalool also possesses anticonvulsant activity in experimental models of epilepsy. We address the importance of linalool or linalyl acetate in BEO-or the other essential oil-induced antinociception.

  20. The Role of Capsaicin-induced Acute Inactivation of C-fibers on Tactile Learning in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Rahmani, Mohammadreza; Rajabi, Soodeh; Allahtavakoli, Mohammad; Roohbakhsh, Ali; Sheibani, Vahid; Shamsizadeh, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Objective(s): In our previous study, we reported that capsaicin-induced unmyelinated C-fiber depletion can modulate excitatory and integrative circuits in the somatosensory cortex following experience-dependent plasticity. In this study, we investigated the involvement of the capsaicin-induced acute inactivation of c-fibers on tactile learning in rat. Materials and Methods: The delayed novel object recognition test was used to assess tactile learning. This procedure consisted of two phases. The first of these (T1) was a training phase during which the animals explored two similar objects. T2, the test phase, occurred 24 hr later, during which the animals explored one novel and one familiar object. In order to induce acute inactivation of the C-fiber pathway, 25–30 μl of a 10% capsaicin was injected subcutaneously into the rat’s upper lip, 6 h prior to T1. Tactile learning was quantified using a discrimination ratio. Results: In T2, the discrimination ratio in capsaicin-treated animals (37.3±3.8%) was lower than that observed in vehicle-treated animals (54.4±5.1%, P<0.05). Conclusion: These findings indicate that the selective inactivation of a peripheral nociceptor subpopulation affects tactile learning. PMID:24298379

  1. Peripheral nerve lesion-induced uptake and transport of choleragenoid by capsaicin-sensitive c-fibre spinal ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Jancsó, G; Sántha, P; Gecse, Krisztina

    2002-01-01

    In the present experiments the effect of systemic capsaicin treatment on the retrograde labelling of sensory ganglion cells was studied following the injection of choleratoxin B subunit-horseradish peroxidase conjugate (CTX-HRP) into intact and chronically transected peripheral nerves. In the control rats CTX-HRP injected into intact sciatic nerves labelled medium and large neurons with a mean cross-sectional area of 1,041 +/- 39 gm2. However, after injection of the conjugate into chronically transected sciatic nerves of the control rats, many small cells were also labelled, shifting the mean cross-sectional area of the labelled cells to 632 +/- 118 microm2. Capsaicin pretreatment per se induced a moderate but significant decrease in the mean cross-sectional area of the labelled neurons (879 +/- 79 microm2). More importantly, systemic pretreatment with capsaicin prevented the peripheral nerve lesion-induced labelling of small cells. Thus, the mean cross-sectional areas of labelled neurons relating to the intact and transected sciatic nerves, respectively, did not differ significantly. These findings provide direct evidence for a phenotypic switch of capsaicin-sensitive nociceptive neurons after peripheral nerve injury, and suggest that lesion-induced morphological changes in the spinal cord may be related to specific alterations in the chemistry of C-fibre afferent neurons rather than to a sprouting response of A-fibre afferents.

  2. Botulinum toxin A does not alter capsaicin-induced pain perception in human skin.

    PubMed

    Schulte-Mattler, Wilhelm J; Opatz, Oliver; Blersch, Wendelin; May, Arne; Bigalke, Hans; Wohlfahrt, Kai

    2007-09-15

    A genuine peripheral antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effect of Botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT/A) has been proposed but could not be demonstrated in humans so far. Therefore, 100 mouse units of Botulinum toxin A (Dysport) and placebo were injected in a double blind paradigm in defined skin areas of 50 subjects. At baseline and after 4 and 8 weeks allodynia was induced in the skin areas with capsaicin ointment. Heat and cold pain threshold temperatures were measured with quantitative sensory testing, and threshold intensities upon electrical stimulation with a pain specific surface electrode were determined. No BoNT/A related differences in pain perception were found at any quality. There is neither a direct peripheral antinociceptive effect nor a significant effect against neurogenic inflammation of BoNT/A in humans.

  3. The potentiating effect of calcitonin gene-related peptide on transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 activity and the electrophysiological responses of rat trigeminal neurons to nociceptive stimuli.

    PubMed

    Chatchaisak, Duangthip; Connor, Mark; Srikiatkhachorn, Anan; Chetsawang, Banthit

    2017-02-15

    Growing evidence suggests that calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) participates in trigeminal nociceptive responses. However, the role of CGRP in sensitization or desensitization of nociceptive transduction remains poorly understood. In this study, we sought to further investigate the CGRP-induced up-regulation of transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) and the responses of trigeminal neurons to nociceptive stimuli. Rat trigeminal ganglion (TG) organ cultures and isolated trigeminal neurons were incubated with CGRP. An increase in TRPV1 levels was observed in CGRP-incubated TG organ cultures. CGRP potentiated capsaicin-induced increase in phosphorylated CaMKII levels in the TG organ cultures. The incubation of the trigeminal neurons with CGRP significantly increased the inward currents in response to capsaicin challenge, and this effect was inhibited by co-incubation with the CGRP receptor antagonist, BIBN4068BS or the inhibitor of protein kinase A, H-89. These findings reveal that CGRP acting on trigeminal neurons may play a significant role in facilitating cellular events that contribute to the peripheral sensitization of the TG in nociceptive transmission.

  4. Capsaicin-induced Ca(2+) signaling is enhanced via upregulated TRPV1 channels in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells from patients with idiopathic PAH.

    PubMed

    Song, Shanshan; Ayon, Ramon J; Yamamura, Aya; Yamamura, Hisao; Dash, Swetaleena; Babicheva, Aleksandra; Tang, Haiyang; Sun, Xutong; Cordery, Arlette G; Khalpey, Zain; Black, Stephen M; Desai, Ankit A; Rischard, Franz; McDermott, Kimberly M; Garcia, Joe G N; Makino, Ayako; Yuan, Jason X-J

    2017-03-01

    Capsaicin is an active component of chili pepper and a pain relief drug. Capsaicin can activate transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channels to increase cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]cyt). A rise in [Ca(2+)]cyt in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) is an important stimulus for pulmonary vasoconstriction and vascular remodeling. In this study, we observed that a capsaicin-induced increase in [Ca(2+)]cyt was significantly enhanced in PASMCs from patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) compared with normal PASMCs from healthy donors. In addition, the protein expression level of TRPV1 in IPAH PASMCs was greater than in normal PASMCs. Increasing the temperature from 23 to 43°C, or decreasing the extracellular pH value from 7.4 to 5.9 enhanced capsaicin-induced increases in [Ca(2+)]cyt; the acidity (pH 5.9)- and heat (43°C)-mediated enhancement of capsaicin-induced [Ca(2+)]cyt increases were greater in IPAH PASMCs than in normal PASMCs. Decreasing the extracellular osmotic pressure from 310 to 200 mOsmol/l also increased [Ca(2+)]cyt, and the hypo-osmolarity-induced rise in [Ca(2+)]cyt was greater in IPAH PASMCs than in healthy PASMCs. Inhibition of TRPV1 (with 5'-IRTX or capsazepine) or knockdown of TRPV1 (with short hairpin RNA) attenuated capsaicin-, acidity-, and osmotic stretch-mediated [Ca(2+)]cyt increases in IPAH PASMCs. Capsaicin induced phosphorylation of CREB by raising [Ca(2+)]cyt, and capsaicin-induced CREB phosphorylation were significantly enhanced in IPAH PASMCs compared with normal PASMCs. Pharmacological inhibition and knockdown of TRPV1 attenuated IPAH PASMC proliferation. Taken together, the capsaicin-mediated [Ca(2+)]cyt increase due to upregulated TRPV1 may be a critical pathogenic mechanism that contributes to augmented Ca(2+) influx and excessive PASMC proliferation in patients with IPAH.

  5. [ROLE OF CAPSAICIN-SENSITIVE NERVES IN THE REGULATION OF DEHYDROEPIANDROSTERONE SULFATE BLOOD CONTENT UNDER NORMAL AND FRUCTOSE-INDUCED METABOLIC SYNDROME].

    PubMed

    Spiridonov, V K; Tolochko, Z S; Ovcjukova, M V; Kostina, N E; Obut, T A

    2015-08-01

    The effects of the stimulation of capsaicin-sensitive nerves (capsaicin, 1 mg/kg, s/c) and their eafferentation (capsaicin, 150 mg/kg, s/c) on the blood content of dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) was investigated in normal rats and rats with fructose-induced metabolic syndrome (12.5% fructose solution, 10 weeks). An increase in blood of tryglyceride, lipid peroxidation, glucose (fasting and after loading glucose, 2 mg/kg, i/p) was considered as symptoms of metabolic syndrome. It was shown that in normal rats drinking tap water the stimulation of capsaicin-sensitive nerves resulted in the increase of DHEAS content while their deafferentation reduced the concentration of this hormone in the blood. The fructose diet caused the decrease in content of DHEAS, triglyceridemia, lipid peroxidation, impaired tolerance glucose. In rats with the metabolic syndrome the stimulation capsaicin-sensitive nerves prevented the fructose-induced decrease of DHEAS content as well as decreased the symptoms of metabolic syndrome. In fructose fed rats the stimulation-induced effects were prevented by the deafferentation of capsaicin-sensitive nerves. It is suggested that capsaicin-sensitive nerves contribute both to the regulation of blood content of DHEAS under normal and fructose-induced metabolic syndrome.

  6. Capsaicin ameliorates stress-induced Alzheimer's disease-like pathological and cognitive impairments in rats.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xia; Jia, Lin-Wei; Li, Xiao-Hong; Cheng, Xiang-Shu; Xie, Jia-Zhao; Ma, Zhi-Wei; Xu, Wei-Jie; Liu, Yue; Yao, Yun; Du, Lai-Ling; Zhou, Xin-Wen

    2013-01-01

    Hyperphosphorylated tau aggregated into neurofibrillary tangles is a hallmark lesion of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and is linked to synaptic and cognitive impairments. In animal models, cold water stress (CWS) can cause cognitive disorder and tau hyperphosphorylation. Capsaicin (CAP), a specific TRPV1 agonist, is neuroprotective against stress-induced impairment, but the detailed mechanisms are still elusive. Here, we investigated whether CAP mitigates CWS-induced cognitive and AD-like pathological alterations in rats. The animals were administered CAP (10 mg/kg in 0.2 ml, 0.1% ethanol) or a control (0.2 ml normal saline, 0.1% ethanol) by intragastric infusion 1 h before CWS treatment. Our results showed that CAP significantly attenuated CWS-induced spatial memory impairment and suppression of PP-DG long-term potentiation; CAP abolished CWS-induced dendritic regression and enhanced several memory-associated proteins decreased by CWS, such as synapsin I and PSD93; CAP also prevented CWS-induced tau hyperphosphorylation by abolishing inhibition of protein phosphatase 2A. Taken together, this study demonstrated that activation of TRPV1 can mitigate CWS-induced AD-like neuropathological alterations and cognitive impairment and may be a promising target for therapeutic intervention in AD.

  7. Latent Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Infection Does Not Induce Apoptosis in Human Trigeminal Ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Lindemann, Anja; Sinicina, Inga; Strupp, Michael; Brandt, Thomas; Hüfner, Katharina

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) can establish lifelong latency in human trigeminal ganglia. Latently infected ganglia contain CD8+ T cells, which secrete granzyme B and are thus capable of inducing neuronal apoptosis. Using immunohistochemistry and single-cell reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR), higher frequency and transcript levels of caspase-3 were found in HSV-1-negative compared to HSV-1-positive ganglia and neurons, respectively. No terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay-positive neurons were detected. The infiltrating T cells do not induce apoptosis in latently infected neurons. PMID:25762734

  8. Changes in synaptic effectiveness of myelinated joint afferents during capsaicin-induced inflammation of the footpad in the anesthetized cat.

    PubMed

    Rudomin, P; Hernández, E

    2008-05-01

    The present series of experiments was designed to examine, in the anesthetized cat, the extent to which the synaptic efficacy of knee joint afferents is modified during the state of central sensitization produced by the injection of capsaicin into the hindlimb plantar cushion. We found that the intradermic injection of capsaicin increased the N2 and N3 components of the focal potentials produced by stimulation of intermediate and high threshold myelinated fibers in the posterior articular nerve (PAN), respectively. This facilitation lasted several hours, had about the same time course as the paw inflammation and was more evident for the N2 and N3 potentials recorded within the intermediate zone in the L6 than in the L7 spinal segments. The capsaicin-induced facilitation of the N2 focal potentials, which are assumed to be generated by activation of fibers signaling joint position, suggests that nociception may affect the processing of proprioceptive and somato-sensory information and, probably also, movement. In addition, the increased effectiveness of these afferents could activate, besides neurons in the intermediate region, neurons located in the more superficial layers of the dorsal horn. As a consequence, normal joint movements could produce pain representing a secondary hyperalgesia. The capsaicin-induced increased efficacy of the PAN afferents producing the N3 focal potentials, together with the reduced post-activation depression that follows high frequency autogenetic stimulation of these afferents, could further contribute to the pain sensation from non-inflamed joints during skin inflammation in humans. The persistence, after capsaicin, of the inhibitory effects produced by stimulation of cutaneous nerves innervating non-inflamed skin regions may account for the reported reduction of the articular pain sensations produced by trans-cutaneous stimulation.

  9. In vitro capsaicin-induced cytological changes and alteration in calcium distribution in giant serotonergic neurons of the snail Helix pomatia: a light- and electron-microscopic study.

    PubMed

    Hernádi, L; Erdélyi, L; Párducz, A; Szabadi, H; Such, G; Jancsó, G

    1995-12-01

    Morphological changes induced by capsaicin were studied in the serotonergic metacerebral giant neurons of the cerebral ganglia of Helix pomatia under in vitro conditions. Capsaicin at a concentration of 10(-4)M caused characteristic structural alterations in the giant serotonergic neurons but did not significantly influence serotonin immunoreactivity in the neurons. At the light-microscopic level, the most conspiciuous structural alterations were swelling of the cell bodies, which contained a swollen pale nucleus. Under the electron microscope, the nuclei, mitochondria and the cisternae of the endoplasmic reticulum were swollen in the capsaicin-affected metacerebral giant neurons. Electron-microscopic cytochemical techniques for calcium demonstration revealed electron-dense deposits in the swollen mitochondria and in the cisternae of the endoplasmic reticulum, suggesting an increased Ca2+ influx. The serotonergic metacerebral giant neurons could be labelled by cobalt (1mM) in the presence of capsaicin (10(-4)M) suggesting that capsaicin opens the cation chanels of the capsaicin-sensitive neuronal membrane. The morphological and cytochemical alterations induced by capsaicin in the serotonergic metacerebral giant neurons of Helix pomatia closely resemble those induced in sensory neurons of mammalian dorsal root ganglion.

  10. Intrathecal dihydroergotamine inhibits capsaicin-induced vasodilatation in the canine external carotid circulation via GR127935- and rauwolscine-sensitive receptors.

    PubMed

    Marichal-Cancino, Bruno A; González-Hernández, Abimael; Manrique-Maldonado, Guadalupe; Ruiz-Salinas, Inna I; Altamirano-Espinoza, Alain H; MaassenVanDenBrink, Antoinette; Villalón, Carlos M

    2012-10-05

    It has been suggested that during a migraine attack trigeminal nerves release calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), producing central nociception and vasodilatation of cranial arteries, including the extracranial branches of the external carotid artery. Since trigeminal inhibition may prevent this vasodilatation, the present study has investigated the effects of intrathecal dihydroergotamine on the external carotid vasodilatation to capsaicin, α-CGRP and acetylcholine. Anaesthetized vagosympathectomized dogs were prepared to measure blood pressure, heart rate and external carotid conductance. A catheter was inserted into the right common carotid artery for the continuous infusion of phenylephrine (to restore the carotid vascular tone), whereas the corresponding thyroid artery was cannulated for one-min intracarotid infusions of capsaicin, α-CGRP and acetylcholine (which dose-dependently increased the external carotid conductance). Another cannula was inserted intrathecally (C(1)-C(3)) for the administration of dihydroergotamine, the α(2)-adrenoceptor antagonist rauwolscine or the serotonin 5-HT(1B/1D) receptor antagonist GR127935 (N-[4-methoxy-3-(4-methyl-1-piperazinyl) phenyl]-2'-methyl-4'-(5-methyl-1,2,4-oxadiazol-3-yl)[1,1-biphenyl]-4-carboxamide hydrochloride monohydrate). Intrathecal dihydroergotamine (10, 31 and 100μg) inhibited the vasodilatation to capsaicin, but not that to α-CGRP or acetylcholine. This inhibition was: (i) unaffected by 10μg GR127935 or 100μg rauwolscine, but abolished by 31μg GR127935 or 310μg rauwolscine at 10μg dihydroergotamine; and (ii) abolished by the combination 10μg GR127935+100μg rauwolscine at 100μg dihydroergotamine. Thus, intrathecal (C(1)-C(3)) dihydroergotamine seems to inhibit the external carotid vasodilatation to capsaicin by spinal activation of serotonin 5-HT(1B/1D) (probably 5-HT(1B)) receptors and α(2) (probably α(2A/2C))-adrenoceptors.

  11. Capsaicin induces cytotoxicity in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor cells via mitochondrial action.

    PubMed

    Skrzypski, M; Sassek, M; Abdelmessih, S; Mergler, S; Grötzinger, C; Metzke, D; Wojciechowicz, T; Nowak, K W; Strowski, M Z

    2014-01-01

    Capsaicin (CAP), the pungent ingredient of chili peppers, inhibits growth of various solid cancers via TRPV1 as well as TRPV1-independent mechanisms. Recently, we showed that TRPV1 regulates intracellular calcium level and chromogranin A secretion in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (NET) cells. In the present study, we characterize the role of the TRPV1 agonist - CAP - in controlling proliferation and apoptosis of pancreatic BON and QGP-1 NET cells. We demonstrate that CAP reduces viability and proliferation, and stimulates apoptotic death of NET cells. CAP causes mitochondrial membrane potential loss, inhibits ATP synthesis and reduces mitochondrial Bcl-2 protein production. In addition, CAP increases cytochrome c and cleaved caspase 3 levels in cytoplasm. CAP reduces reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. The antioxidant N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) acts synergistically with CAP to reduce ROS generation, without affecting CAP-induced toxicity. TRPV1 protein reduction by 75% reduction fails to attenuate CAP-induced cytotoxicity. In summary, these results suggest that CAP induces cytotoxicity by disturbing mitochondrial potential, and inhibits ATP synthesis in NET cells. Stimulation of ROS generation by CAP appears to be a secondary effect, not related to CAP-induced cytotoxicity. These results justify further evaluation of CAP in modulating pancreatic NETs in vivo.

  12. Neurotransmitter-blocking agents influence antinociceptive effects of carbamazepine, baclofen, pentazocine and morphine on bradykinin-induced trigeminal pain.

    PubMed

    Foong, F W; Satoh, M

    1984-06-01

    The influence of naloxone (a narcotic antagonist), bicuculline (a GABA antagonist), phentolamine (an alpha-blocking agent), propranolol (a beta-adrenergic blocking agent), haloperidol (a dopaminergic blocking agent), methysergide (a serotonergic blocking agent) and atropine (a muscarinic blocking agent), on the antinociceptive effects induced by carbamazepine, baclofen, pentazocine and morphine, were investigated with a new antinociception test, using the trigeminal pain induced by application of bradykinin onto the tooth pulp of the rat. The antinociceptive effect of carbamazepine was significantly inhibited by bicuculline, phentolamine, propranolol and haloperidol but not by naloxone, methysergide and atropine. The effect of baclofen was significantly reduced by naloxone, bicuculline, propranolol and atropine but not by phentolamine, haloperidol and methysergide. The antinociceptive actions of pentazocine and morphine on trigeminal pain were significantly reduced by naloxone and phentolamine, and by naloxone alone, respectively. These results suggest the involvement of different neurotransmitters in the antinociceptive effects of the four analgesic drugs on trigeminal pain induced by bradykinin.

  13. Capsaicin for Rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Fokkens, Wytske; Hellings, Peter; Segboer, Christine

    2016-08-01

    Rhinitis is a multifactorial disease characterized by symptoms of sneezing, rhinorrhea, postnasal drip, and nasal congestion. Non-allergic rhinitis is characterized by rhinitis symptoms without systemic sensitization of infectious etiology. Based on endotypes, we can categorize non-allergic rhinitis into an inflammatory endotype with usually eosinophilic inflammation encompassing at least NARES and LAR and part of the drug induced rhinitis (e.g., aspirin intolerance) and a neurogenic endotype encompassing idiopathic rhinitis, gustatory rhinitis, and rhinitis of the elderly. Patients with idiopathic rhinitis have a higher baseline TRPV1 expression in the nasal mucosa than healthy controls. Capsaicin (8-methyl-N-vanillyl-6-nonenamide) is the active component of chili peppers, plants of the genus Capsicum. Capsaicin is unique among naturally occurring irritant compounds because the initial neuronal excitation evoked by it is followed by a long-lasting refractory period, during which the previously excited neurons are no longer responsive to a broad range of stimuli. Patients with idiopathic rhinitis benefit from intranasal treatment with capsaicin. Expression of TRPV1 is reduced in patients with idiopathic rhinitis after capsaicin treatment. Recently, in a Cochrane review, the effectiveness of capsaicin in the management of idiopathic rhinitis was evaluated and the authors concluded that given that many other options do not work well in non-allergic rhinitis, capsaicin is a reasonable option to try under physician supervision. Capsaicin has not been shown to be effective in allergic rhinitis nor in other forms of non-allergic rhinitis like the inflammatory endotypes or other neurogenic endotypes like rhinitis of the elderly or smoking induced rhinitis.

  14. Capsaicin pretreatment attenuates LPS-induced hypothermia through TRPV1-independent mechanisms in chicken.

    PubMed

    Nikami, Hideki; Mahmoud, Motamed Elsayed; Shimizu, Yasutake; Shiina, Takahiko; Hirayama, Haruko; Iwami, Momoe; Dosoky, Reem Mahmoud; Ahmed, Moustafa Mohamed; Takewaki, Tadashi

    2008-06-06

    It has been demonstrated that chicken TRPV1 (transient receptor potential vanilloid of subtype-1) is insensitive to capsaicin (CAP), and therefore, a chicken model is suitable to analyze the CAP-sensitive TRPV1-independent pathway. We elucidated here the possible involvement of the pathway in hypothermia induced by bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS) in chickens. Chicks were pretreated with CAP (10 mg/kg, iv) at 1, 2 and 3 days of age to desensitize them towards the CAP-sensitive pathway. An intravenous injection of LPS in 4-day-old chicks caused progressive hypothermia, ending with collapse and 78% mortality within 12 h after injection. The CAP pretreatment rescued the LPS-induced endotoxin shock and hypothermia in chicks. LPS-induced iNOS expression as well as NO production in liver and lung was suppressed by CAP pretreatment. CAP pretreatment also attenuated hypothermia due to exposure of chicks to cold ambient temperature. These findings suggest that a CAP-sensitive TRPV1-independent pathway may be involved in pathophysiological hypothermic reactions through the mediation of NO in chickens.

  15. Effects of intra-fourth ventricle injection of crocin on capsaicin-induced orofacial pain in rats

    PubMed Central

    Tamaddonfard, Esmaeal; Tamaddonfard, Sina; Pourbaba, Salar

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Crocin, a constituent of saffron and yellow gardenia, possesses anti-nociceptive effects. In the present study, we investigated the effects of intra-fourth ventricle injection of crocin in a rat model of orofacial pain. The contribution of opioid system was assessed using intra-fourth ventricle injection of naloxone, an opioid receptor antagonist. Materials and Methods: A guide cannula was implanted into the fourth ventricle of brain in anesthetized rats. Orofacial pain was induced by subcutaneous (s.c.) injection of capsaicin (1.5 µg/20 µl) into the right vibrissa pad. The time spent face rubbing/grooming was recorded for a period of 20 min. Locomotor activity was measured using an open-field test. Results: Intra-fourth ventricle injection of crocin (10 and 40 µg/rat) and morphine (10 and 40 µg/rat) and their co-administration (2.5 and 10 µg/rat of each) suppressed capsaicin-induced orofacial pain. The analgesic effect induced by 10 µg/rat of morphine, but not crocin (10 µg/rat), was prevented by 20 µg/rat of naloxone pretreatment. The above-mentioned chemical compounds did not affect locomotor activity. Conclusion: The results of this study showed that the injection of crocin into the cerebral fourth ventricle attenuates capsaicin-induced orofacial pain in rats. The anti-nociceptive effect of crocin was not attributed to the central opioid receptors. PMID:26468465

  16. Pharmacological evidence that spinal α(2C)- and, to a lesser extent, α(2A)-adrenoceptors inhibit capsaicin-induced vasodilatation in the canine external carotid circulation.

    PubMed

    Villalón, Carlos M; Galicia-Carreón, Jorge; González-Hernández, Abimael; Marichal-Cancino, Bruno A; Manrique-Maldonado, Guadalupe; Centurión, David

    2012-05-15

    During a migraine attack capsaicin-sensitive trigeminal sensory nerves release calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), producing cranial vasodilatation and central nociception; hence, trigeminal inhibition may prevent this vasodilatation and abort migraine headache. This study investigated the role of spinal α₂-adrenoceptors and their subtypes (i.e. α(2A), α(2B) and/or α(2C)-adrenoceptors) in the inhibition of the canine external carotid vasodilator responses to capsaicin. Anaesthetized vagosympathectomized dogs were prepared to measure arterial blood pressure, heart rate and external carotid conductance. The thyroid artery was cannulated for one-min intracarotid infusions of capsaicin, α-CGRP and acetylcholine. A cannula was inserted intrathecally for spinal (C₁-C₃) administration of 2-amino-6-ethyl-4,5,7,8-tetrahydro-6H-oxazolo-[5,4-d]-azepin-dihydrochloride (B-HT 933; a selective α₂-adrenoceptor agonist) and/or the α₂-adrenoceptor antagonists rauwolscine (α(2A/2B/2C)), 2-[(4,5-dihydro-1H-imidazol-2-yl)methyl]-2,3-dihydro-1-methyl-1H-isoindole maleate (BRL44408; α(2A)), imiloxan (α(2B)) or acridin-9-yl-[4-(4-methylpiperazin-1-yl)-phenyl]amine (JP-1302; α(2C)). Infusions of capsaicin, α-CGRP and acetylcholine dose-dependently increased the external carotid conductance. Intrathecal B-HT 933 (1000 and 3100 μg) inhibited the vasodilator responses to capsaicin, but not those to α-CGRP or acetylcholine. This inhibition, abolished by rauwolscine (310 μg), was: (i) unaffected by 3,100 μg imiloxan; (ii) partially blocked by 310 μg of BRL44408 or 100 μg of JP-1302; and (iii) abolished by 1,000 μg of BRL44408 or 310 μg of JP-1302. Thus, intrathecal B-HT 933 inhibited the external carotid vasodilator responses to capsaicin. This response, mediated by spinal α₂-adrenoceptors unrelated to the α(2B)-adrenoceptor subtype, resembles the pharmacological profile of α(2C)-adrenoceptors and, to a lesser extent, α(2A)-adrenoceptors.

  17. Capsaicin-sensitive sensory neurons are involved in bicarbonate secretion induced by lansoprazole, a proton pump inhibitor, in rats.

    PubMed

    Inada, I; Satoh, H

    1996-04-01

    Lansoprazole, a proton pump inhibitor, exerts prominent antiulcer activity via both antisecretory and mucosal protective actions. Although the antisecretory action has been explained by inactivation of (H+, K+)-ATPase in parietal cells, the mode of mucosal protective action remains to be elucidated. In the present study, the effect of lansoprazole on duodenal bicarbonate secretion was studied in anesthetized rats to clarify the mode of the mucosal protective action. Lansoprazole (0.1 mM) applied topically to the duodenum significantly (P < 0.01) increased bicarbonate secretion by 0.36 +/- 0.11 microeq/15 min (21 +/- 5%) compared with the value in the vehicle control. Topical administration of capsaicin (10 mg/ml) in the duodenum and intravenous infusion of vasoactive intestinal peptide (10 micrograms/kg/hr) increased bicarbonate secretion. Five-minute perfusion of the duodenal loop with 100 mM HCl increased bicarbonate secretion. Administration of lansoprazole (0.3 and 1 mg/kg, intravenously) 60 min before luminal acidification enhanced the acid-induced bicarbonate secretion dose-dependently and significantly (P < 0.01). In the capsaicin-pretreated rats, the effects of lansoprazole on basal and acid-induced bicarbonate secretion were significantly (P < 0.05) decreased compared with that of control group. These results indicate that lansoprazole increases basal and acid-induced bicarbonate secretion in the duodenum in rats and that capsaicin-sensitive sensory neurons may be involved in the mode of action for these effects.

  18. Reduction of pentylenetetrazole-induced seizure activity in awake rats by seizure-triggered trigeminal nerve stimulation.

    PubMed

    Fanselow, E E; Reid, A P; Nicolelis, M A

    2000-11-01

    Stimulation of the vagus nerve has become an effective method for desynchronizing the highly coherent neural activity typically associated with epileptic seizures. This technique has been used in several animal models of seizures as well as in humans suffering from epilepsy. However, application of this technique has been limited to unilateral stimulation of the vagus nerve, typically delivered according to a fixed duty cycle, independently of whether ongoing seizure activity is present. Here, we report that stimulation of another cranial nerve, the trigeminal nerve, can also cause cortical and thalamic desynchronization, resulting in a reduction of seizure activity in awake rats. Furthermore, we demonstrate that providing this stimulation only when seizure activity begins results in more effective and safer seizure reduction per second of stimulation than with previous methods. Seizure activity induced by intraperitoneal injection of pentylenetetrazole was recorded from microwire electrodes in the thalamus and cortex of awake rats while the infraorbital branch of the trigeminal nerve was stimulated via a chronically implanted nerve cuff electrode. Continuous unilateral stimulation of the trigeminal nerve reduced electrographic seizure activity by up to 78%, and bilateral trigeminal stimulation was even more effective. Using a device that automatically detects seizure activity in real time on the basis of multichannel field potential signals, we demonstrated that seizure-triggered stimulation was more effective than the stimulation protocol involving a fixed duty cycle, in terms of the percent seizure reduction per second of stimulation. In contrast to vagus nerve stimulation studies, no substantial cardiovascular side effects were observed by unilateral or bilateral stimulation of the trigeminal nerve. These findings suggest that trigeminal nerve stimulation is safe in awake rats and should be evaluated as a therapy for human seizures. Furthermore, the results

  19. Thermal conditions influence changes in body temperature induced by intragastric administration of capsaicin in mice.

    PubMed

    Mori, Noriyuki; Urata, Tomomi; Fukuwatari, Tsutomu

    2016-08-01

    Capsaicin has been reported to have unique thermoregulatory actions. However, changes in core temperature after the administration of capsaicin are a controversial point. Therefore, we investigated the effects of environmental thermal conditions on changes in body temperature caused by capsaicin in mice. We showed that intragastric administration of 10 and 15 mg/kg capsaicin increased tail temperature and decreased colonic temperatures in the core temperature (CT)-constant and CT-decreasing conditions. In the CT-increasing condition, 15 mg/kg capsaicin increased tail temperature and decreased colonic temperature. However, 10 mg/kg capsaicin increased colonic temperature. Furthermore, the amount of increase in tail temperature was greater in the CT-decreasing condition and lower in the CT-increasing condition, compared with that of the CT-constant condition. These findings suggest that the changes in core temperature were affected by the environmental thermal conditions and that preliminary thermoregulation state might be more important than the constancy of temperature to evaluate the effects of heat diffusion and thermogensis.

  20. A randomized placebo controlled trial to evaluate the effects of butamirate and dextromethorphan on capsaicin induced cough in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Faruqi, Shoaib; Wright, Caroline; Thompson, Rachel; Morice, Alyn H

    2014-01-01

    Aims The examination of cough reflex sensitivity through inhalational challenge can be utilized to demonstrate pharmacological end points. Here we compare the effect of butamirate, dextromethorphan and placebo on capsaicin-induced cough in healthy volunteers. Methods In this randomized, placebo-controlled, six way crossover study the effect of dextromethrophan 30 mg, four doses of butamirate and placebo was evaluated on incremental capsaicin challenges performed at baseline and 2, 4, 6, 8, 12 and 24 h following dosing. The primary end point was the area under the curve (AUC(0,12h)) of log10 C5 from pre-dose to 12 h after dosing. Plasma butamirate metabolites were analyzed to evaluate pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic relationships. Results Thirty-four subjects (13 males, median age 25 years) completed the study. Cough sensitivity decreased from baseline in all arms of the study. Dextromethorphan was superior to placebo (P = 0.01) but butamirate failed to show significant activity with maximum attenuation at the 45 mg dose. There was no apparent relationship between pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters for butamirate. Conclusions We have demonstrated for the first time that dextromethorphan attenuates capsaicin challenge confirming its broad activity on the cough reflex. The lack of efficacy of butamirate could be due to formulation issues at higher doses. PMID:24995954

  1. Low-dose endotoxin potentiates capsaicin-induced pain in man: evidence for a pain neuroimmune connection.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Mark R; Buijs, Mara; Tuke, Jonathan; Kwok, Yuen Hei; Gentgall, Melanie; Williams, Desmond; Rolan, Paul

    2013-05-01

    Despite the wealth of evidence in animals that immune activation has a key role in the development and maintenance of chronic pain, evidence to support this in humans is scant. We have sought such evidence by examining the effect of a subtle immunological stimulus, low dose intravenous endotoxin, on the allodynia, hyperalgesia, flare and pain produced by intradermal capsaicin in healthy volunteers. Here we provide evidence of immune priming of this neuropathic-like pain response in humans. Specifically, in 12 healthy volunteers, activation of Toll-Like Receptor 4 by endotoxin (0.4ng/kg IV) caused significant 5.1-fold increase in the 90-min integral of areas of capsaicin-induced allodynia (95% CI 1.3-9.1), 2.2-fold increase in flare (95% CI 1.9-2.6) and 1.8-fold increase in hyperalgesia (95% CI 1.1-2.5) following 50μg intradermal capsaicin injected into the forearm 3.5h after endotoxin. These data demonstrate clinically a significant role for the neuroimmune pain connection in modifying pain, thus providing evidence that immune priming may produce pain enhancement in humans and hence offer a novel range of pharmacological targets for anti-allodynics and/or analgesics. Additionally, the simplicity of the model makes it suitable as a test-bed for novel immune-targeted pain therapeutics.

  2. Signal transduction for inhibition of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 induction by capsaicin and related analogs in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ching-Wen; Lee, Sho Tone; Wu, Wen Tung; Fu, Wen-Mei; Ho, Feng-Ming; Lin, Wan Wan

    2003-11-01

    1. Although capsaicin analogs might be a potential strategy to manipulate inflammation, the mechanism is still unclear. In this study, the effects and action mechanisms of vanilloid analogs on iNOS and COX-2 expression were investigated in RAW264.7 macrophages. 2. Capsaicin and resiniferatoxin (RTX) can inhibit LPS- and IFN-gamma-mediated NO production, and iNOS protein and mRNA expression with similar IC50 values of around 10 microm. 3. Capsaicin also transcriptionally inhibited LPS- and PMA-induced COX-2 expression and PGE2 production. However, this effect exhibited a higher potency (IC50: 0.2 microm), and RTX failed to elicit such responses at 10 microm. 4. Interestingly, we found that capsazepine, a competitive TRPV1 antagonist, did not prevent the inhibition elicited by capsaicin or RTX. Nevertheless, it mimicked vanilloids in inhibiting iNOS/NO and COX-2/PGE2 induction with an IC50 value of 3 microm. RT-PCR and immunoblotting analysis excluded the expression of TRPV1 in RAW264.7 macrophages. 5. The DNA binding assay demonstrated the abilities of vanilloids to inhibit LPS-elicited NF-kappaB and AP-1 activation and IFN-gamma-elicited STAT1 activation. The reporter assay of AP-1 activity also supported this action. 6. The kinase assay indicated that ERK, JNK, and IKK activation by LPS were inhibited by vanilloids. 7. In conclusion, vanilloids can modulate the expression of inflammatory iNOS and COX-2 genes in macrophages through interference with upstream signalling events of LPS and IFN-gamma. These findings provide new insights into the potential benefits of the active ingredient in hot chilli peppers in inflammatory conditions.

  3. Drug-Induced Hypersensitivity Syndrome Caused by Carbamazepine Used for the Treatment of Trigeminal Neuralgia

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Yuko; Shirafuji, Yoshinori; Hamada, Toshihisa; Masui, Masanori; Obata, Kyoichi; Yao, Mayumi; Kishimoto, Koji; Sasaki, Akira

    2016-01-01

    An 88-year-old man was diagnosed with trigeminal neuralgia, and treatment of carbamazepine 200 mg/day was initiated. About 6 weeks later, the patient developed a skin rash accompanied by fever. He was admitted to hospital and diagnosed with drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS) caused by carbamazepine. Oral carbamazepine treatment was stopped, but blood tests showed acute liver and acute renal failure. Drug-induced lymphocyte stimulation test (DLST) for carbamazepine, human herpes virus-6 (HHV-6) IgG, and CMV-HRP were negative. Oral prednisolone therapy was begun 18 days later. The titer of HHV-6 IgG antibodies was then detected (640 times). Following treatment, liver and renal function improved and the erythema disappeared. PMID:27885344

  4. Sensitization of Primary Afferent Nociceptors Induced by Intradermal Capsaicin Involves the Peripheral Release of Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide Driven by Dorsal Root Reflexes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dingge; Ren, Yong; Xu, Xijin; Zou, Xiaoju; Fang, Li; Lin, Qing

    2008-01-01

    Neuropeptides released from axons of primary afferent nociceptive neurons are the key elements for the incidence of neurogenic inflammation and their release is associated with dorsal root reflexes (DRRs). However, whether the release is due to the triggering of DRRs and plays a role in inflammation-induced pain still remain to be determined. The present study assessed the role of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in sensitization of primary afferent nociceptors induced by activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) following intradermal injection of capsaicin and determined if this release is due to activation of primary afferent neurons antidromically by triggering of DRRs. Under dorsal root intact conditions, primary afferent nociceptive fibers recorded in anesthetized rats could be sensitized by capsaicin injection, as shown by an increase in afferent responses and lowering of the response threshold to mechanical stimuli. After DRRs were removed by dorsal rhizotomy, the capsaicin-evoked sensitization was significantly reduced. In dorsal root intact rats, peripheral pretreatment with a CGRP receptor antagonist could dose-dependently reduce the capsaicin-induced sensitization. Peripheral post-treatment with CGRP could dose-dependently restore the capsaicin-induced sensitization under dorsal rhizotomized conditions. Capsaicin injection evoked increases in numbers of single and double labeled TRPV1 and CGRP neurons in ipsilateral dorsal root ganglia (DRG). After dorsal rhizotomy, these evoked expressions were significantly inhibited. Perspective These data indicate that the DRR-mediated neurogenic inflammation enhances sensitization of primary afferent nociceptors induced by capsaicin injection. The underlying mechanism involves antidromic activation of DRG neurons via up-regulation of TRPV1 receptors whereby CGRP is released peripherally. PMID:18701354

  5. Identifying the integrated neural networks involved in capsaicin-induced pain using fMRI in awake TRPV1 knockout and wild-type rats

    PubMed Central

    Yee, Jason R.; Kenkel, William; Caccaviello, John C.; Gamber, Kevin; Simmons, Phil; Nedelman, Mark; Kulkarni, Praveen; Ferris, Craig F.

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we used functional MRI in awake rats to investigate the pain response that accompanies intradermal injection of capsaicin into the hindpaw. To this end, we used BOLD imaging together with a 3D segmented, annotated rat atlas and computational analysis to identify the integrated neural circuits involved in capsaicin-induced pain. The specificity of the pain response to capsaicin was tested in a transgenic model that contains a biallelic deletion of the gene encoding for the transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1). Capsaicin is an exogenous ligand for the TRPV1 receptor, and in wild-type rats, activated the putative pain neural circuit. In addition, capsaicin-treated wild-type rats exhibited activation in brain regions comprising the Papez circuit and habenular system, systems that play important roles in the integration of emotional information, and learning and memory of aversive information, respectively. As expected, capsaicin administration to TRPV1-KO rats failed to elicit the robust BOLD activation pattern observed in wild-type controls. However, the intradermal injection of formalin elicited a significant activation of the putative pain pathway as represented by such areas as the anterior cingulate, somatosensory cortex, parabrachial nucleus, and periaqueductal gray. Notably, comparison of neural responses to capsaicin in wild-type vs. knock-out rats uncovered evidence that capsaicin may function in an antinociceptive capacity independent of TRPV1 signaling. Our data suggest that neuroimaging of pain in awake, conscious animals has the potential to inform the neurobiological basis of full and integrated perceptions of pain. PMID:25745388

  6. Transient cold pain has no effect on cutaneous vasodilatation induced by capsaicin: a randomized-control-crossover study in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Pud, Dorit; Andersen, Ole Kaeseler; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Yarnitsky, David

    2006-05-01

    Cooling the skin induces sympathetically driven vasoconstriction, along with some vasoparalytic dilatation at lowermost temperatures. Neurogenic inflammation, on the other hand, entails vasodilatation. In the present study, we examined the dynamic vasomotor balance of capsaicin-induced vasodilatation within the area of the induced neurogenic inflammation, with and without superimposed cooling. In a randomized-control-crossover fashion, a sample of 14 healthy volunteers participated in three experiments: (1) exposure to each 0 degrees C cold pain stimulus and a neutral 30 degrees C stimulus (control) for 30 s to the volar forearms by contact thermal thermode (1.6x1.6 cm(2)), (2) injection of 50 microg intradermal capsaicin without cooling and (3) injection of capsaicin followed by application of 0 degrees C cold pain stimulation for 30 s within the area of the secondary hyperalgesia. Repetitive vascular measurements over skin area of 4.0x4.0 cm(2) of blood flux (BF) were acquired before and during the 5 min after stimulation. A marked increase in BF (i.e. vasodilatation) at the location of the cold stimulus in comparison to control (30 degrees C) (F=11.97, p=0.004) within the first 3 min was demonstrated. Two-way repeated-measures ANOVA indicated no interaction between the experimental conditions (capsaicin with or without cold) and time (F=0.934, p=0.454). The cold pain stimulation was found to be insignificant in its influence on BF evoked by capsaicin (F=0.018, p=0.894). The results of our study indicate that (1) transient cooling causes significant vasodilatation, (2) intradermal injection of capsaicin is dominant in inducing vasodilatation, and (3) the cold-pain-evoked vasodilatation has no modulative effect on the capsaicin-evoked cutaneous vasodilatation.

  7. Functional depletion of capsaicin-sensitive primary afferent fibers attenuates rat pain-related behaviors and paw edema induced by the venom of scorpion Buthus martensi Karch.

    PubMed

    Bai, Zhan-Tao; Liu, Tong; Pang, Xue-Yan; Jiang, Feng; Cheng, Ming; Ji, Yong-Hua

    2008-10-01

    The role of capsaicin-sensitive primary afferent fibers in rat pain-related behaviors and paw edema induced by scorpion Buthus martensi Karch (BmK) venom was investigated in this study. It was found that functional depletion of capsaicin-sensitive primary afferent fibers with a single systemic injection of resiniferatoxin (RTX) dramatically decreased spontaneous nociceptive behaviors, prevented the development of primary mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia as well as mirror-image mechanical hyperalgesia. RTX treatment significantly attenuated BmK venom-induced c-Fos expression in all laminaes of bilateral L4-L5 lumbar spinal cord, especially in superficial laminaes. Moreover, RTX treatment markedly reduced the early paw edema induced by BmK venom. Thus, the results indicate that capsaicin-sensitive primary afferent fibers play a critical role in various pain-related behaviors and paw edema induced by BmK venom in rats.

  8. Sigma-1 receptors are essential for capsaicin-induced mechanical hypersensitivity: studies with selective sigma-1 ligands and sigma-1 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Entrena, José Manuel; Cobos, Enrique José; Nieto, Francisco Rafael; Cendán, Cruz Miguel; Gris, Georgia; Del Pozo, Esperanza; Zamanillo, Daniel; Baeyens, José Manuel

    2009-06-01

    We evaluated the role of sigma(1) receptors on capsaicin-induced mechanical hypersensitivity and on nociceptive pain induced by punctate mechanical stimuli, using wild-type and sigma(1) receptor knockout (sigma(1)-KO) mice and selective sigma(1) receptor-acting drugs. Mutation in sigma(1)-KO mice was confirmed by PCR analysis of genomic DNA and, at the protein level, by [(3)H](+)-pentazocine binding assays. Both wild-type and sigma(1)-KO mice not treated with capsaicin showed similar responses to different intensities of mechanical stimuli (0.05-8 g force), ranging from innocuous to noxious, applied to the hind paw. This indicates that sigma(1) gene inactivation does not modify the perception of punctate mechanical stimuli. The intraplantar (i.pl.) administration of capsaicin induced dose-dependent mechanical allodynia in wild-type mice (markedly reducing both the threshold force necessary to induce paw withdrawal and the latency to paw withdrawal induced by a given force). In contrast, capsaicin was completely unable to induce mechanical hypersensitivity in sigma(1)-KO mice. The high-affinity and selective sigma(1) antagonists BD-1063, BD-1047 and NE-100, administered subcutaneously (s.c.), dose-dependently inhibited mechanical allodynia induced by capsaicin (1 microg,i.pl.), yielding ED(50) (mg/kg) values of 15.80+/-0.93, 29.31+/-1.65 and 40.74+/-7.20, respectively. The effects of the sigma(1) antagonists were reversed by the sigma(1) agonist PRE-084 (32 mg/kg, s.c.). None of the drugs tested modified the responses induced by a painful mechanical punctate stimulus (4 g force) in nonsensitized animals. These results suggest that sigma(1) receptors are essential for capsaicin-induced mechanical hypersensitivity, but are not involved in mechanical nociceptive pain.

  9. Eugenol and carvacrol excite first- and second-order trigeminal neurons and enhance their heat-evoked responses.

    PubMed

    Klein, A H; Joe, C L; Davoodi, A; Takechi, K; Carstens, M I; Carstens, E

    2014-06-20

    Eugenol and carvacrol from clove and oregano, respectively, are agonists of the warmth-sensitive transient receptor potential channel TRPV3 and the irritant-sensitive transient receptor potential ankyrin (TRPA)-1. Eugenol and carvacrol induce oral irritation that rapidly desensitizes, accompanied by brief enhancement of innocuous warmth and heat pain in humans. We presently investigated if eugenol and carvacrol activate nociceptive primary afferent and higher order trigeminal neurons and enhance their heat-evoked responses, using calcium imaging of cultured trigeminal ganglion (TG) and dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, and in vivo single-unit recordings in trigeminal subnucleus caudalis (Vc) of rats. Eugenol and carvacrol activated 20-30% of TG and 7-20% of DRG cells, the majority of which additionally responded to menthol, mustard oil and/or capsaicin. TG cell responses to innocuous (39°) and noxious (42 °C) heating were enhanced by eugenol and carvacrol. We identified dorsomedial Vc neurons responsive to noxious heating of the tongue in pentobarbital-anesthetized rats. Eugenol and carvacrol dose-dependently elicited desensitizing responses in 55% and 73% of heat-sensitive units, respectively. Responses to noxious heat were briefly enhanced by eugenol and carvacrol. Many eugenol- and carvacrol-responsive units also responded to menthol, cinnamaldehyde and capsaicin. These data support a peripheral site for eugenol and carvacrol to enhance warmth- and noxious heat-evoked responses of trigeminal neurons, and are consistent with the observation that these agonists briefly enhance warmth and heat pain on the human tongue.

  10. Eugenol and carvacrol excite first- and second-order trigeminal neurons and enhance their heat-evoked responses

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Amanda H.; Joe, Christopher L.; Davoodi, Auva; Takechi, Kenichi; Carstens, Mirela Iodi; Carstens, E

    2014-01-01

    Eugenol and carvacrol from clove and oregano, respectively, are agonists of the warmth-sensitive transient receptor potential channel TRPV3 and the irritant-sensitive TRPA1. Eugenol and carvacrol induce oral irritation that rapidly desensitizes, accompanied by brief enhancement of innocuous warmth and heat pain in humans. We presently investigated if eugenol and carvacrol activate nociceptive primary afferent and higher-order trigeminal neurons and enhance their heat-evoked responses, using calcium imaging of cultured trigeminal ganglion (TG) and dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, and in vivo single-unit recordings in trigeminal subnucleus caudalis (Vc) of rats. Eugenol and carvacrol activated 20-30% of TG and 7-20% of DRG cells, the majority of which additionally responded to menthol, mustard oil and/or capsaicin. TG cell responses to innocuous (39°) and noxious (42°C) heating were enhanced by eugenol and carvacrol. We identified dorsomedial Vc neurons responsive to noxious heating of the tongue in pentobarbital-anesthetized rats. Eugenol and carvacrol dose-dependently elicited desensitizing responses in 55% and 73% of heat-sensitive units, respectively. Responses to noxious heat were briefly enhanced by eugenol and carvacrol. Many eugenol- and carvacrol-responsive units also responded to menthol, cinnamaldehyde and capsaicin. These data support a peripheral site for eugenol and carvacrol to enhance warmth- and noxious heat-evoked responses of trigeminal neurons, and are consistent with the observation that these agonists briefly enhance warmth and heat pain on the human tongue. PMID:24759772

  11. Lack of effect of central nervous system-active doses of nabilone on capsaicin-induced pain and hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Kalliomäki, Jarkko; Philipp, Andrew; Baxendale, Jane; Annas, Peter; Karlsten, Rolf; Segerdahl, Märta

    2012-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of nabilone on capsaicin-induced pain and hyperalgesia, as well as on biomarkers of cannabinoid central nervous system (CNS) effects. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study was conducted in 30 healthy male volunteers receiving single doses of nabilone (1, 2 or 3 mg). Pain intensity after intradermal capsaicin injections in the forearm was assessed by continuous visual analogue scale (0-100 mm). Capsaicin cream was applied to the calf to induce hyperalgesia. Primary hyperalgesia was assessed by measuring heat pain thresholds, whereas secondary hyperalgesia was assessed by measuring the area where light tactile stimulation was felt to be painful. Pain and hyperalgesia were measured at baseline and 2-3.5 h after dosing. The CNS effects were assessed at baseline and up to 24 h after dosing using visual analogue mood scales for feeling 'stimulated', 'anxious', 'sedated' and 'down'. Plasma samples for pharmacokinetic analysis were obtained up to 24 h after drug administration. Nabilone did not significantly attenuate either ongoing pain or primary or secondary hyperalgesia, whereas dose-dependent CNS effects were observed from 1.5 to 6 h after dosing, being maximal at 4-6 h. Plasma concentrations of nabilone and its metabolite carbinol were maximal 1-2 h after dosing. Adverse events (AE) were common on nabilone treatment. Four subjects withdrew due to pronounced CNS AE (anxiety, agitation, altered perception, impaired consciousness). Although nabilone had marked CNS effects, no analgesic or antihyperalgesic effects were observed.

  12. Moderate extracellular acidification inhibits capsaicin-induced cell death through regulating calcium mobilization, NF-{kappa}B translocation and ROS production in synoviocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Fen; Yang, Shuang; Zhao, Dan; Zhu, Shuyan; Wang, Yuxiang; Li, Junying

    2012-07-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Moderate extracellular acidification regulates intracellular Ca{sup 2+} mobilization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Moderate acidification activates NF-{kappa}B nuclear translocation in synoviocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Moderate acidification depresses the ROS production induced by capsaicin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Moderate acidification inhibits capsaicin-caused synoviocyte death. -- Abstract: We previously show the expression of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) in primary synoviocytes from collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) rats. Capsaicin and lowered extracellular pH from 7.4 to 5.5 induce cell death through TRPV1-mediated Ca{sup 2+} entry and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. However, under the pathological condition in rheumatoid arthritis, the synovial fluid is acidified to a moderate level (about pH 6.8). In the present study, we examined the effects of pH 6.8 on the TRPV1-mediated cell death. Our finding is different or even opposite from what was observed at pH 5.5. We found that the moderate extracellular acidification (from pH 7.4 to 6.8) inhibited the capsaicin-induced Ca{sup 2+} entry through attenuating the activity of TRPV1. In the mean time, it triggered a phospholipse C (PLC)-related Ca{sup 2+} release from intracellular stores. The nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B was found at pH 6.8, and this also depends on PLC activation. Moreover, the capsaicin-evoked massive ROS production and cell death were depressed at pH 6.8, both of which are dependent on the activation of PLC and NF-{kappa}B. Taken together, these results suggested that the moderate extracellular acidification inhibited the capsaicin-induced synoviocyte death through regulating Ca{sup 2+} mobilization, activating NF-{kappa}B nuclear translocation and depressing ROS production.

  13. Phα1β toxin prevents capsaicin-induced nociceptive behavior and mechanical hypersensitivity without acting on TRPV1 channels.

    PubMed

    Castro-Junior, Celio J; Milano, Julie; Souza, Alessandra H; Silva, Juliana F; Rigo, Flávia K; Dalmolin, Geruza; Cordeiro, Marta N; Richardson, Michael; Barros, Alexandre G A; Gomez, Renato S; Silva, Marco A R; Kushmerick, Christopher; Ferreira, Juliano; Gomez, Marcus V

    2013-08-01

    Phα1β toxin is a peptide purified from the venom of the armed spider Phoneutria nigriventer, with markedly antinociceptive action in models of acute and persistent pain in rats. Similarly to ziconotide, its analgesic action is related to inhibition of high voltage activated calcium channels with more selectivity for N-type. In this study we evaluated the effect of Phα1β when injected peripherally or intrathecally in a rat model of spontaneous pain induced by capsaicin. We also investigated the effect of Phα1β on Ca²⁺ transients in cultured dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons and HEK293 cells expressing the TRPV1 receptor. Intraplantar or intrathecal administered Phα1β reduced both nocifensive behavior and mechanical hypersensitivity induced by capsaicin similarly to that observed with SB366791, a specific TRPV1 antagonist. Peripheral nifedipine and mibefradil did also decrease nociceptive behavior induced by intraplantar capsaicin. In contrast, ω-conotoxin MVIIA (a selective N-type Ca²⁺ channel blocker) was effective only when administered intrathecally. Phα1β, MVIIA and SB366791 inhibited, with similar potency, the capsaicin-induced Ca²⁺ transients in DRG neurons. The simultaneous administration of Phα1β and SB366791 inhibited the capsaicin-induced Ca²⁺ transients that were additive suggesting that they act through different targets. Moreover, Phα1β did not inhibit capsaicin-activated currents in patch-clamp recordings of HEK293 cells that expressed TRPV1 receptors. Our results show that Phα1β may be effective as a therapeutic strategy for pain and this effect is not related to the inhibition of TRPV1 receptors.

  14. Gingerol Reverses the Cancer-Promoting Effect of Capsaicin by Increased TRPV1 Level in a Urethane-Induced Lung Carcinogenic Model.

    PubMed

    Geng, Shengnan; Zheng, Yaqiu; Meng, Mingjing; Guo, Zhenzhen; Cao, Ning; Ma, Xiaofang; Du, Zhenhua; Li, Jiahuan; Duan, Yongjian; Du, Gangjun

    Both gingerol and capsaicin are agonists of TRPV1, which can negatively control tumor progression. This study observed the long-term effects of oral administration of 6-gingerol alone or in combination with capsaicin for 20 weeks in a urethane-induced lung carcinogenic model. We showed that lung carcinoma incidence and multiplicity were 70% and 21.2 ± 3.6, respectively, in the control versus 100% and 35.6 ± 5.2 in the capsaicin group (P < 0.01) and 50% and 10.8 ± 3.1 in the 6-gingerol group (P < 0.01). The combination of 6-gingerol and capsaicin reversed the cancer-promoting effect of capsaicin (carcinoma incidence of 100% versus 20% and multiplicity of 35.6 ± 5.2 versus 4.7 ± 2.3; P < 0.001). The cancer-promoting effect of capsaicin was due to increased epidermal growth-factor receptor (EGFR) level by decreased transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1 (TRPV1) level (P < 0.01) . The capsaicin-decreased EGFR level subsequently reduced levels of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and cyclin D1 that favored enhanced lung epithelial proliferation and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) during lung carcinogenesis (P < 0.01). In contrast, 6-gingerol promoted TRPV1 level and drastically decreased the levels of EGFR, NF-κB, and cyclin D1 that favored reduced lung epithelial proliferation and EMT (P < 0.01). This study provides valuable information for the long-term consumption of chili-pepper-rich diets to decrease the risk of cancer development.

  15. Roles of TRPV1 and neuropeptidergic receptors in dorsal root reflex-mediated neurogenic inflammation induced by intradermal injection of capsaicin

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Qing; Li, Dingge; Xu, Xijin; Zou, Xiaoju; Fang, Li

    2007-01-01

    Background Acute cutaneous neurogenic inflammation initiated by activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) receptors following intradermal injection of capsaicin is mediated mainly by dorsal root reflexes (DRRs). Inflammatory neuropeptides are suggested to be released from primary afferent nociceptors participating in inflammation. However, no direct evidence demonstrates that the release of inflammatory substances is due to the triggering of DRRs and how activation of TRPV1 receptors initiates neurogenic inflammation via triggering DRRs. Results Here we used pharmacological manipulations to analyze the roles of TRPV1 and neuropeptidergic receptors in the DRR-mediated neurogenic inflammation induced by intradermal injection of capsaicin. The degree of cutaneous inflammation in the hindpaw that followed capsaicin injection was assessed by measurements of local blood flow (vasodilation) and paw-thickness (edema) of the foot skin in anesthetized rats. Local injection of capsaicin, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) or substance P (SP) resulted in cutaneous vasodilation and edema. Removal of DRRs by either spinal dorsal rhizotomy or intrathecal administration of the GABAA receptor antagonist, bicuculline, reduced dramatically the capsaicin-induced vasodilation and edema. In contrast, CGRP- or SP-induced inflammation was not significantly affected after DRR removal. Dose-response analysis of the antagonistic effect of the TRPV1 receptor antagonist, capsazepine administered peripherally, shows that the capsaicin-evoked inflammation was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner, and nearly completely abolished by capsazepine at doses between 30–150 μg. In contrast, pretreatment of the periphery with different doses of CGRP8–37 (a CGRP receptor antagonist) or spantide I (a neurokinin 1 receptor antagonist) only reduced the inflammation. If both CGRP and NK1 receptors were blocked by co-administration of CGRP8–37 and spantide I, a stronger

  16. Role of capsaicin-sensitive afferents and sensory neuropeptides in endotoxin-induced airway inflammation and consequent bronchial hyperreactivity in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Elekes, Krisztián; Helyes, Zsuzsanna; Németh, József; Sándor, Katalin; Pozsgai, Gábor; Kereskai, László; Börzsei, Rita; Pintér, Erika; Szabó, Arpád; Szolcsányi, János

    2007-06-07

    Substance P (SP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) released from capsaicin-sensitive afferents induce neurogenic inflammation via NK(1), NK(2) and CGRP1 receptor activation. This study examines the role of capsaicin-sensitive fibres and sensory neuropeptides in endotoxin-induced airway inflammation and consequent bronchial hyperreactivity with functional, morphological and biochemical techniques in mice. Carbachol-induced bronchoconstriction was measured with whole body plethysmography 24 h after intranasal lipopolysaccharide administration. SP and CGRP were determined with radioimmunoassay, myeloperoxidase activity with spectrophotometry, interleukin-1beta with ELISA and histopathological changes with semiquantitative scoring from lung samples. Treatments with resiniferatoxin for selective destruction of capsaicin-sensitive afferents, NK(1) antagonist SR 140333, NK(2) antagonist SR 48968, their combination, or CGRP1 receptor antagonist CGRP(8-37) were performed. Lipopolysaccharide significantly increased lung SP and CGRP concentrations, which was prevented by resiniferatoxin pretreatment. Resiniferatoxin-desensitization markedly enhanced inflammation, but decreased bronchoconstriction. CGRP(8-37) or combination of SR 140333 and SR 48968 diminished neutrophil accumulation, MPO levels and IL-1beta production, airway hyperresponsiveness was inhibited only by SR 48968. This is the first evidence that capsaicin-sensitive afferents exert a protective role in endotoxin-induced airway inflammation, but contribute to increased bronchoconstriction. Activation of CGRP1 receptors or NK(1)+NK(2) receptors participate in granulocyte accumulation, but NK(2) receptors play predominant role in enhanced airway resistance.

  17. Trigeminal neuralgia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 117. Zakrzewska JM, Chen HI, Lee JYK. Trigeminal and glossopharyngeal neuralgia. In: McMohan ... A.M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the ...

  18. Neonatal sensory nerve injury-induced synaptic plasticity in the trigeminal principal sensory nucleus.

    PubMed

    Lo, Fu-Sun; Erzurumlu, Reha S

    2016-01-01

    Sensory deprivation studies in neonatal mammals, such as monocular eye closure, whisker trimming, and chemical blockade of the olfactory epithelium have revealed the importance of sensory inputs in brain wiring during distinct critical periods. But very few studies have paid attention to the effects of neonatal peripheral sensory nerve damage on synaptic wiring of the central nervous system (CNS) circuits. Peripheral somatosensory nerves differ from other special sensory afferents in that they are more prone to crush or severance because of their locations in the body. Unlike the visual and auditory afferents, these nerves show regenerative capabilities after damage. Uniquely, damage to a somatosensory peripheral nerve does not only block activity incoming from the sensory receptors but also mediates injury-induced neuro- and glial chemical signals to the brain through the uninjured central axons of the primary sensory neurons. These chemical signals can have both far more and longer lasting effects than sensory blockade alone. Here we review studies which focus on the consequences of neonatal peripheral sensory nerve damage in the principal sensory nucleus of the brainstem trigeminal complex.

  19. Development of anti-migraine therapeutics using the capsaicin-induced dermal blood flow model.

    PubMed

    Buntinx, Linde; Vermeersch, Steve; de Hoon, Jan

    2015-11-01

    The efficacy of calcitonin gene-related peptide (receptor) (CGRP-(R)) blocking therapeutics in the treatment of acute migraine headache provided proof-of-concept for the involvement of CGRP in the pathophysiology of this disorder. One of the major hurdles for the development of any class of drugs, including CGRP blocking therapeutics, is the early clinical development process during which toxic and inefficacious compounds need to be eliminated as early as possible in order to focus on the most promising molecules. At this stage, human models providing proof of target engagement, combined with safety and tolerability studies, are extremely valuable in focusing on those therapeutics that have the highest engagement from the lowest exposure. They guide the go/no-go decision making, establish confidence in the candidate molecule by de-risking toxicity and safety issues and thereby speed up the early clinical development. In this review the focus is on the so called 'capsaicin model' as a typical example of a target engagement biomarker used as a human model for the development of CGRP blocking therapeutics. By applying capsaicin onto the skin, TRPV1 channels are activated and a CGRP-mediated increase in dermal blood flow can be quantified with laser Doppler perfusion imaging. Effective CGRP blocking therapeutics in turn, display blockade of this response. The translation of this biomarker model from animals to humans is discussed as well as the limitations of the assay in predicting the efficacy of anti-migraine drugs.

  20. Trigeminal Inflammatory Compression (TIC) Injury Induces Chronic Facial Pain and Susceptibility to Anxiety-Related Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Danielle N.; Kniffin, Tracey C.; Zhang, Liping; Danaher, Robert J.; Miller, Craig S.; Bocanegra, Jose L.; Carlson, Charles R.; Westlund, Karin N.

    2015-01-01

    Our laboratory previously developed a novel neuropathic and inflammatory facial pain model for mice referred to as the Trigeminal Inflammatory Compression (TIC) model. Rather than inducing whole nerve ischemia and neuronal loss, this injury induces only slight peripheral nerve demyelination triggering long-term mechanical allodynia and cold hypersensitivity on the ipsilateral whisker pad. The aim of the present study is to further characterize the phenotype of the TIC injury model using specific behavioral assays (i.e. light-dark box, open field exploratory activity, and elevated plus maze) to explore pain- and anxiety-like behaviors associated with this model. Our findings determined that the TIC injury produces hypersensitivity 100% of the time after surgery that persists at least 21 weeks post injury (until the animals are euthanized). Three receptive field sensitivity pattern variations in mice with TIC injury are specified. Animals with TIC injury begin displaying anxiety-like behavior in the light-dark box preference and open field exploratory tests at week 8 post injury as compared to sham and naïve animals. Panic anxiety-like behavior was shown in the elevated plus maze in mice with TIC injury if the test was preceded with acoustic startle. Thus, in addition to mechanical and cold hypersensitivity, the present study identified significant anxiety-like behaviors in mice with TIC injury which resembling the clinical symptomatology and psychosocial impairments of patients with chronic facial pain. Overall, the TIC injury model’s chronicity, reproducibility, and reliability in producing pain- and anxiety-like behaviors demonstrate its usefulness as a chronic neuropathic facial pain model. PMID:25818051

  1. Trigeminal Inflammatory Compression (TIC) injury induces chronic facial pain and susceptibility to anxiety-related behaviors.

    PubMed

    Lyons, D N; Kniffin, T C; Zhang, L P; Danaher, R J; Miller, C S; Bocanegra, J L; Carlson, C R; Westlund, K N

    2015-06-04

    Our laboratory previously developed a novel neuropathic and inflammatory facial pain model for mice referred to as the Trigeminal Inflammatory Compression (TIC) model. Rather than inducing whole nerve ischemia and neuronal loss, this injury induces only slight peripheral nerve demyelination triggering long-term mechanical allodynia and cold hypersensitivity on the ipsilateral whisker pad. The aim of the present study is to further characterize the phenotype of the TIC injury model using specific behavioral assays (i.e. light-dark box, open field exploratory activity, and elevated plus maze) to explore pain- and anxiety-like behaviors associated with this model. Our findings determined that the TIC injury produces hypersensitivity 100% of the time after surgery that persists at least 21 weeks post injury (until the animals are euthanized). Three receptive field sensitivity pattern variations in mice with TIC injury are specified. Animals with TIC injury begin displaying anxiety-like behavior in the light-dark box preference and open field exploratory tests at week eight post injury as compared to sham and naïve animals. Panic anxiety-like behavior was shown in the elevated plus maze in mice with TIC injury if the test was preceded with acoustic startle. Thus, in addition to mechanical and cold hypersensitivity, the present study identified significant anxiety-like behaviors in mice with TIC injury resembling the clinical symptomatology and psychosocial impairments of patients with chronic facial pain. Overall, the TIC injury model's chronicity, reproducibility, and reliability in producing pain- and anxiety-like behaviors demonstrate its usefulness as a chronic neuropathic facial pain model.

  2. Body temperature dependency in baclofen-induced gastric acid secretion in rats relation to capsaicin-sensitive afferent neurons.

    PubMed

    Kato, S; Araki, H; Kawauchi, S; Takeuchi, K

    2001-03-16

    Body temperature dependency in gastric functional responses to baclofen, a GABA(B) agonist, such as acid secretion, mucosal blood flow (GMBF) and motor activity, was examined in urethane-anesthetized rats under normal (37+/-1 degrees C) and hypothermic (31+/-1 degrees C) conditions. A rat stomach was mounted in an ex-vivo chamber, perfused with saline, and the acid secretion was measured using a pH-stat method, simultaneously with GMBF by a laser Doppler flowmeter. Gastric motility was measured using a miniature balloon as intraluminal pressure recordings. Intravenous administration of baclofen significantly increased acid secretion at the doses > 0.3 mg/kg under hypothermic conditions, yet it caused a significant stimulation only at doses > 10 mg/kg under normothermic conditions. The increases in gastric motility and GMBF were similarly induced by baclofen, irrespective of whether the animals were subjected to normothermic or hypothermic conditions. These functional responses to baclofen under hypothermic conditions were totally attenuated by either bilateral vagotomy or atropine (3 mg/kg, s.c.). Baclofen at a lower dose (1 mg/kg i.v.) significantly increased the acid secretion even under normothermic conditions when the animals were subjected to chemical deafferenation of capsaicin-sensitive neurons or pretreatment with intracisternal injection of CGRP8-37 (30 ng/rat). These results suggest that 1) gastric effects of baclofen are dependent on body temperature in stimulating acid secretion but not GMBF or motor activity, 2) the acid stimulatory action of baclofen is enhanced under hypothermic conditions, and 3) the suppression of baclofen-induced acid response under normothermic conditions may be related to capsaicin-sensitive afferent neuronal activity, probably mediated by central release

  3. Integrating TRPV1 Receptor Function with Capsaicin Psychophysics

    PubMed Central

    Smutzer, Gregory; Devassy, Roni K.

    2016-01-01

    Capsaicin is a naturally occurring vanilloid that causes a hot, pungent sensation in the human oral cavity. This trigeminal stimulus activates TRPV1 receptors and stimulates an influx of cations into sensory cells. TRPV1 receptors function as homotetramers that also respond to heat, proinflammatory substances, lipoxygenase products, resiniferatoxin, endocannabinoids, protons, and peptide toxins. Kinase-mediated phosphorylation of TRPV1 leads to increased sensitivity to both chemical and thermal stimuli. In contrast, desensitization occurs via a calcium-dependent mechanism that results in receptor dephosphorylation. Human psychophysical studies have shown that capsaicin is detected at nanomole amounts and causes desensitization in the oral cavity. Psychophysical studies further indicate that desensitization can be temporarily reversed in the oral cavity if stimulation with capsaicin is resumed at short interstimulus intervals. Pretreatment of lingual epithelium with capsaicin modulates the perception of several primary taste qualities. Also, sweet taste stimuli may decrease the intensity of capsaicin perception in the oral cavity. In addition, capsaicin perception and hedonic responses may be modified by diet. Psychophysical studies with capsaicin are consistent with recent findings that have identified TRPV1 channel modulation by phosphorylation and interactions with membrane inositol phospholipids. Future studies will further clarify the importance of capsaicin and its receptor in human health and nutrition. PMID:26884754

  4. Integrating TRPV1 Receptor Function with Capsaicin Psychophysics.

    PubMed

    Smutzer, Gregory; Devassy, Roni K

    2016-01-01

    Capsaicin is a naturally occurring vanilloid that causes a hot, pungent sensation in the human oral cavity. This trigeminal stimulus activates TRPV1 receptors and stimulates an influx of cations into sensory cells. TRPV1 receptors function as homotetramers that also respond to heat, proinflammatory substances, lipoxygenase products, resiniferatoxin, endocannabinoids, protons, and peptide toxins. Kinase-mediated phosphorylation of TRPV1 leads to increased sensitivity to both chemical and thermal stimuli. In contrast, desensitization occurs via a calcium-dependent mechanism that results in receptor dephosphorylation. Human psychophysical studies have shown that capsaicin is detected at nanomole amounts and causes desensitization in the oral cavity. Psychophysical studies further indicate that desensitization can be temporarily reversed in the oral cavity if stimulation with capsaicin is resumed at short interstimulus intervals. Pretreatment of lingual epithelium with capsaicin modulates the perception of several primary taste qualities. Also, sweet taste stimuli may decrease the intensity of capsaicin perception in the oral cavity. In addition, capsaicin perception and hedonic responses may be modified by diet. Psychophysical studies with capsaicin are consistent with recent findings that have identified TRPV1 channel modulation by phosphorylation and interactions with membrane inositol phospholipids. Future studies will further clarify the importance of capsaicin and its receptor in human health and nutrition.

  5. Attenuation of capsaicin-induced acute and visceral nociceptive pain by alpha- and beta-amyrin, a triterpene mixture isolated from Protium heptaphyllum resin in mice.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Francisco A; Costa, Charllynton L S; Chaves, Mariana H; Almeida, Fernanda R C; Cavalcante, Italo J M; Lima, Alana F; Lima, Roberto C P; Silva, Regilane M; Campos, Adriana Rolim; Santos, Flavia A; Rao, Vietla S N

    2005-10-21

    The triterpene mixture, alpha- and beta-amyrin, isolated from Protium heptaphyllum resin was evaluated on capsaicin-evoked nociception in mice. Orally administered alpha- and beta-amyrin (3 to 100 mg/kg) significantly suppressed the nociceptive behaviors--evoked by either subplantar (1.6 microg) or intracolonic (149 microg) application of capsaicin. The antinociception produced by alpha- and beta-amyrin against subplantar capsaicin-induced paw-licking behavior was neither potentiated nor attenuated by ruthenium red (1.5 mg/kg, s.c.), a non-specific antagonist of vanilloid receptor (TRPV1), but was greatly abolished in animals pretreated with naloxone (2 mg/kg, s.c.), suggesting an opioid mechanism. However, participation of alpha2-adrenoceptor involvement was unlikely since yohimbine (2 mg/kg, i.p.) pretreatment failed to block the antinociceptive effect of alpha- and beta-amyrin in the experimental model of visceral nociception evoked by intracolonic capsaicin. The triterpene mixture (3 to 30 mg/kg, p.o.) neither altered significantly the pentobarbital sleeping time, nor impaired the ambulation or motor coordination in open-field and rota-rod tests, respectively, indicating the absence of sedative or motor abnormality that could account for its antinociception. Nevertheless, alpha- and beta-amyrin could significantly block the capsaicin (10 mg/kg, s.c.)-induced hyperthermic response but not the initial hypothermia. These results suggest that the triterpene mixture, alpha- and beta-amyrin has an analgesia inducing effect, possibly involving vanilloid receptor (TRPV1) and an opioid mechanism.

  6. Capsaicin Reduces Blood Glucose by Increasing Insulin Levels and Glycogen Content Better than Capsiate in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shiqi; Ma, Xiaohan; Zhang, Lei; Sun, Hui; Liu, Xiong

    2017-03-22

    Chili peppers exhibit antiobesity, anticancer, antidiabetic, and pain- and itch-relieving effects on animals and humans; these effects are due to capsaicin, which is the main pungent and biologically active component of pepper. Capsiate, a nonpungent capsaicin analogue, is similar to capsaicin in terms of structure and biological activity. In this study, we investigated whether capsaicin and capsiate exhibit the same hypoglycemic effects on rats with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Experimental rats were categorized into four groups: control, model, capsaicin, and capsiate groups. The two treatment groups were treated orally with 6 mg/kg bw capsaicin and capsiate daily for 28 days. Treatment with capsaicin and capsiate increased body weight, increased glycogen content, and inhibited intestinal absorption of sugar in T1D rats. Particularly, insulin levels were increased from 14.9 ± 0.76 mIU/L (model group) to 22.4 ± 1.39 mIU/L (capsaicin group), but the capsiate group (16.7 ± 0.79 mIU/L) was increased by only 12.2%. Analysis of the related genes suggested that the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) receptor was activated by capsaicin. Liver X receptor and pancreatic duodenum homeobox 1 controlled the glycometabolism balance by regulating the expression levels of glucose kinase, glucose transport protein 2 (GLUT2), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, and glucose-6-phosphatase, leading to reduced blood glucose levels in T1D rats. Meanwhile, the hypoglycemic effect was enhanced by the down-regulated expression of sodium glucose cotransporter 1, GLUT2, and GLUT5 in the intestine. The results showed that the spicy characteristics of capsaicin might be the root of its ability to decrease blood glucose.

  7. Mastication induces long-term increases in blood perfusion of the trigeminal principal nucleus.

    PubMed

    Viggiano, A; Manara, R; Conforti, R; Paccone, A; Secondulfo, C; Lorusso, L; Sbordone, L; Di Salle, F; Monda, M; Tedeschi, G; Esposito, F

    2015-12-17

    Understanding mechanisms for vessel tone regulation within the trigeminal nuclei is of great interest because some headache syndromes are due to dysregulation of such mechanisms. Previous experiments on animal models suggest that mastication may alter neuron metabolism and blood supply in these nuclei. To investigate this hypothesis in humans, arterial spin-labeling magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to measure blood perfusion within the principal trigeminal nucleus (Vp) and in the dorsolateral-midbrain (DM, including the mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus) in healthy volunteers, before and immediately after a mastication exercise consisting of chewing a gum on one side of the mouth for 1 h at 1 bite/s. The side preference for masticating was evaluated with a chewing test and the volume of the masseter muscle was measured on T1-weighted MRI scans. The results demonstrated that the mastication exercise caused a perfusion increase within the Vp, but not in the DM. This change was correlated to the preference score for the side where the exercise took place. Moreover, the basal Vp perfusion was correlated to the masseter volume. These results indicate that the local vascular tone of the trigeminal nuclei can be constitutively altered by the chewing practice and by strong or sustained chewing.

  8. Corn gluten hydrolysate and capsaicin have complimentary actions on body weight reduction and lipid-related genes in diet-induced obese rats.

    PubMed

    Mun, Joo-Mi; Ok, Hyang Mok; Kwon, Oran

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that a combination of corn gluten hydrolysate (CGH) and capsaicin may have an additive or synergistic effect on body weight reduction. For 13 weeks, male Sprague-Dawley rats were provided a diet to induce obesity. Afterward, the rats were randomly divided into 5 dietary groups: the normal control (n = 5), the high-fat control (n = 8), the high-fat diet (HFD) containing 35% CGH (n = 7), the HFD containing 0.02% capsaicin (HF-P) (n = 8), and the HFD containing both CGH and capsaicin (HF-CP) (n = 7) for an additional 4 weeks. Administration of CGH plus capsaicin, along with a HFD, led to significant decreases in body weight, fat mass, lipids in the liver, and plasma leptin as well as increases in plasma adiponectin. The pattern of gene expression was different in each target organ. In the liver, up-regulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α, carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1α, and acyl-coenzyme A oxidase was found in the HF-CP group. In contrast, down-regulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ was found in both the HFD containing 35% CGH and HF-CP groups. In skeletal muscle, up-regulation of insulin receptor and uncoupling protein 3 was found in the HF-P group only, whereas up-regulation of the glucose transporter 4 gene was observed in both the HF-CP and HF-P groups. In adipose tissue, up-regulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ and hormone-sensitive lipase was only found in the HF-CP group. In summary, this study suggests that CGH and capsaicin perform complementary actions on food intake, lipid metabolism, and insulin sensitivity by a coordinated control of energy metabolism in the liver, adipose tissue, and skeletal muscle, thus exerting an additive effect on body weight reduction.

  9. Arachidonic acid release and prostaglandin F(2alpha) formation induced by anandamide and capsaicin in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Someya, Akiyoshi; Horie, Syunji; Murayama, Toshihiko

    2002-08-23

    Anandamide, an endogenous agonist of cannabinoid receptors, activates various signal transduction pathways. Anandamide also activates vanilloid VR(1) receptor, which was a nonselective cation channel with high Ca(2+) permeability and had sensitivity to capsaicin, a pungent principle in hot pepper. The effects of anandamide and capsaicin on arachidonic acid metabolism in neuronal cells have not been well established. We examined the effects of anandamide and capsaicin on arachidonic acid release in rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells. Both agents stimulated [3H]arachidonic acid release in a concentration-dependent manner from the prelabeled PC12 cells even in the absence of extracellular CaCl(2). The effect of anandamide was neither mimicked by an agonist nor inhibited by an antagonist for cannabinoid receptors. The effects of anandamide and capsaicin were inhibited by phospholipase A(2) inhibitors, but not by an antagonist for vanilloid VR(1) receptor. In PC12 cells preincubated with anandamide or capsaicin, [3H]arachidonic acid release was marked and both agents were no more effective. Co-addition of anandamide or capsaicin synergistically enhanced [3H]arachidonic acid release by mastoparan in the absence of CaCl(2). Anandamide stimulated prostaglandin F(2alpha) formation. These findings suggest that anandamide and capsaicin stimulated arachidonic acid metabolism in cannabinoid receptors- and vanilloid VR(1) receptor-independent manner in PC12 cells. The possible mechanisms are also discussed.

  10. Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms of Trigeminal Chemosensation

    PubMed Central

    Gerhold, Kristin A.; Bautista, Diana M.

    2010-01-01

    Three sensory systems, olfaction, taste, and somatosensation, are dedicated to the detection of chemicals in the environment. Trigeminal somatosensory neurons enable us to detect a wide range of environmental stimuli, including pressure, temperature, and chemical irritants, within the oral and nasal mucosa. Natural plant-derived irritants have served as powerful pharmacological tools for identifying receptors underlying somatosensation. This is illustrated by the use of capsaicin, menthol, and wasabi to identify the heat-sensitive ion channel TRPV1, the cold-sensitive ion channel TRPM8, and the irritant receptor TRPA1, respectively. In addition to TRP channels, members of the two-pore potassium channel family have also been implicated in trigeminal chemosensation. KCNK18 was recently identified as a target for hydroxy-α-sanshool, the tingling and numbing compound produced in Schezuan peppers and other members of the Xanthoxylum genus. The role of these channels in trigeminal thermosensation and pain will be discussed. PMID:19686135

  11. Inhibition of FAAH reduces nitroglycerin-induced migraine-like pain and trigeminal neuronal hyperactivity in mice.

    PubMed

    Nozaki, Chihiro; Markert, Astrid; Zimmer, Andreas

    2015-08-01

    There is evidence to suggest that a dysregulation of endocannabinoid signaling may contribute to the etiology and pathophysiology of migraine. Thus, patients suffering from chronic migraine or medication overuse headache showed alterations in the activity of the arachidonoylethanolamide (AEA) degrading enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and a specific AEA membrane transporter, alongside with changes in AEA levels. The precise role of different endocannabinoid system components is, however, not clear. We have therefore investigated mice with a genetic deletion of the two main cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2, or the main endocannabinoid degrading enzymes, FAAH and monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL), which degrades 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), in a nitroglycerine-induced animal model of migraine. We found that nitroglycerin-induced mechanical allodynia and neuronal activation of the trigeminal nucleus were completely abolished in FAAH-deficient mice. To validate these results, we used two structurally different FAAH inhibitors, URB597 and PF3945. Both inhibitors also dose-dependently blocked nitroglycerin-induced hyperalgesia and the activation of trigeminal neurons. The effects of the genetic deletion of pharmacological blockade of FAAH are mediated by CB1 receptors, because they were completely disrupted with the CB1 antagonist rimonabant. These results identify FAAH as a target for migraine pharmacotherapy.

  12. Involvement of capsaicin-sensitive afferents and the Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 Receptor in xylene-induced nocifensive behaviour and inflammation in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Sándor, Katalin; Helyes, Zsuzsanna; Elekes, Krisztián; Szolcsányi, János

    2009-02-27

    The inflammatory actions of xylene, an aromatic irritant and sensitizing agent, were described to be predominantly neurogenic in the rat, but the mechanism and the role of the Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) capsaicin receptor localized on a subpopulation of sensory nerves has not been elucidated. This paper characterizes the involvement of capsaicin-sensitive afferents and the TRPV1 receptor in nociceptive and acute inflammatory effects of xylene in the mouse. Topical application of xylene on the paw induced a short, intensive nocifensive behaviour characterized by paw liftings and shakings, which was more intensive in Balb/c than in C57Bl/6 mice. Genetic deletion of the TRPV1 receptor as well as destroying capsaicin-sensitive nerve terminals with resiniferatoxin (RTX) pretreatment markedly reduced, but did not abolish nocifensive behaviours. In respect to the xylene-induced plasma protein extravasation detected by Evans blue leakage, significant difference was neither observed between the Balb/c and C57Bl/6 strains, nor the ear and the dorsal paw skin. These inflammatory responses were diminished in the RTX pretreated group, but not in the TRPV1 gene-deleted one. Injection of the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine 15min prior to xylene smearing significantly reduced plasma protein extravasation at both sites. These results demonstrate that xylene-induced acute nocifensive behaviour is mediated by capsaicin-sensitive afferents via TRPV1 receptor activation in mice. Neurogenic inflammatory components play an important role in xylene-induced plasma protein extravasation, but independently of the TRPV1 ion channel. Reactive oxygen or carbonyl species participate in this process presumably via stimulation of the TRPA1 channel.

  13. Testosterone is essential for alpha(2)-adrenoceptor-induced antinociception in the trigeminal region of the male rat.

    PubMed

    Nag, Subodh; Mokha, Sukhbir S

    2009-12-18

    Activation of the alpha(2)-adrenoceptor has been shown to produce antinociception. We have previously shown that the antinociceptive effect of clonidine, an alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonist, is sex-specific and is abolished by exogenous estrogen in ovariectomized rats or high level of endogenous estrogen in proestrous females. Here, we investigated whether testosterone mediates the antinociceptive effect of clonidine in the trigeminal region of the male rat. Clonidine (7 microg/5 microl) was injected intracisternally through a PE-10 cannula implanted dorsal to the trigeminal region in orchidectomized (GDX) male Sprague-Dawley rats. In separate groups, testosterone propionate (250 microg/100 microl; GDX+T) or beta-estradiol benzoate (100 microg/100 microl; GDX+E) were injected subcutaneously 24 and 48 h respectively prior to the N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA)--or heat-evoked nociceptive test. NMDA-induced number of scratches or duration of scratching behavior did not change significantly in control groups with or without hormonal replacement. Clonidine significantly reduced both measures only in the GDX+T group but not in GDX or GDX+E group. Clonidine also significantly increased head withdrawal latency (HWL) in the GDX+T group, but not in GDX or GDX+E group. The antinociceptive effect of clonidine was reversed by yohimbine, an alpha(2)-adrenoceptor antagonist, in GDX+T group. We conclude that testosterone is required for the expression of antinociception produced by selective activation of the alpha(2)-adrenoceptor in the trigeminal region of the male rat. These findings further our understanding of sex-related differences in the modulation of nociception and may provide insight into development and administration of analgesic agents in young vs. aging men.

  14. Tris-hydroxymethyl-aminomethane enhances capsaicin-induced intracellular Ca(2+) influx through transient receptor potential V1 (TRPV1) channels.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Satoshi; Sudo, Yuka; Miyano, Kanako; Nishimura, Hitomi; Matoba, Motohiro; Shiraishi, Seiji; Konno, Hiroki; Uezono, Yasuhito

    2016-02-01

    Non-selective transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) cation channels are activated by various insults, including exposure to heat, acidity, and the compound capsaicin, resulting in sensations of pain in the skin, visceral organs, and oral cavity. Recently, TRPV1 activation was also demonstrated in response to basic pH elicited by ammonia and intracellular alkalization. Tris-hydroxymethyl aminomethane (THAM) is widely used as an alkalizing agent; however, the effects of THAM on TRPV1 channels have not been defined. In this study, we characterized the effects of THAM-induced TRPV1 channel activation in baby hamster kidney cells expressing human TRPV1 (hTRPV1) and the Ca(2+)-sensitive fluorescent sensor GCaMP2 by real-time confocal microscopy. Notably, both capsaicin (1 μM) and pH 6.5 buffer elicited steep increases in the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i), while treatment with THAM (pH 8.5) alone had no effect. However, treatment with THAM (pH 8.5) following capsaicin application elicited a profound, long-lasting increase in [Ca(2+)]i that was completely inhibited by the TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine. Taken together, these results suggest that hTRPV1 pre-activation is required to provoke enhanced, THAM-induced [Ca(2+)]i increases, which could be a mechanism underlying pain induced by basic pH.

  15. Beneficial effect of a novel pentadecapeptide BPC 157 on gastric lesions induced by restraint stress, ethanol, indomethacin, and capsaicin neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Sikirić, P; Seiwerth, S; Grabarević, Z; Rucman, R; Petek, M; Jagić, V; Turković, B; Rotkvić, I; Mise, S; Zoricić, I; Gjurasin, M; Konjevoda, P; Separović, J; Ljubanović, D; Artuković, B; Bratulić, M; Tisljar, M; Jurina, L; Buljat, G; Miklić, P; Marović, A

    1996-08-01

    Very recently, the integrity of capsaicin somatosensory neurons and their protection were suggested to be related to the activity in nociception of a newly discovered 15-amino acid peptide, BPC 157, shown to have strong beneficial effect on intestinal and liver lesions. Therefore, from this viewpoint, we have studied the gastroprotective effect of the pentadecapeptide BPC 157, on gastric lesions produced in rats by 96% ethanol, restraint stress, and indomethacin. The possible involvement of sensory neurons in the salutary actions of BPC 157 (10 micrograms/kg, 10 ng/kg intraperitoneally) was studied with capsaicin, which has differential effects on sensory neurons: a high dose in adult (125 mg/kg subcutaneously, 3 months old) or administration (50 mg/kg subcutaneously) to neonatal animals (age of the 7 days) destroys sensory fibers, whereas a low dose (500 micrograms/kg intraperitoneally) activates neurotransmitter release and protective effects on the mucosa. In the absence of capsaicin, BPC 157 protected gastric mucosa against ethanol, restraint, and indomethacin application. In the presence of neurotoxic doses of capsaicin, the negative influence of capsaicin on restraint, ethanol, or indomethacin lesions consistently affected salutary activity of BPC 157. However, BPC 157 protection was still evident in the capsaicin-treated rats (either treated as adults or as newborns) in all of these assays. Interestingly, after neonatal capsaicin treatment, a complete abolition of BPC gastroprotection was noted if BPC 157 was applied as a single nanogram-regimen, but the mucosal protection was fully reversed when the same dose was used daily. In line with the excitatory dose of capsaicin the beneficial effectiveness of BPC 157 appears to be increased as well. Taken together, these data provide evidence for complex synergistic interaction between the beneficial effectiveness of BPC 157 and peptidergic sensory afferent neuron activity.

  16. Suppression of tumor necrosis factor-α-induced nuclear factor κB activation and aromatase activity by capsaicin and its analog capsazepine.

    PubMed

    Luqman, Suaib; Meena, Abha; Marler, Laura E; Kondratyuk, Tamara P; Pezzuto, John M

    2011-11-01

    Target-specific drugs, including natural products, offer promise for the amelioration of cancer and other human ailments. Capsaicin, the pungent ingredient present in chilies (Capsicum annuum L.), and capsazepine, a synthetic analog of capsaicin (collectively referred to as vanilloids), are known to possess a variety of pharmacological and physiological properties. In our continuous effort to discover and characterize cancer chemopreventive agents from natural products, we investigated the effect of vanilloids on nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB) activation using stably transfected 293/NFκB-Luc human embryonic kidney cells induced by treatment with tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) and on aromatase activity. Capsaicin and capsazepine blocked TNFα-induced NFκB activation in a dose-dependent manner with 50% inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) values of 0.68 and 4.2 μM, respectively. No significant cytotoxicity was observed at the highest concentrations tested (53.1 μM for capsazepine and 65.5 μM for capsaicin). In addition, these vanilloids inhibited aromatase activity with IC(50) values of 13.6 and 8.8 μM, respectively. Computer-aided molecular docking studies showed docking scores indicative of good binding affinity of vanilloids with aromatase and NFκB. The highly conserved residues for capsaicin and capsazepine binding with NFκB p50 were Ser299 and Ile278 (H-bond 2.81Å) and with NFκB p100 were Ser6, Arg82, Val86, Arg90 (H-bond 2.89Å), Gly4, and Ser2 (H-bond 2.81Å). The amino acids Trp224, Arg435, and Val373 (H-bond 2.80Å) were found to be important for the binding of capsaicin and capsazepine with aromatase. Based on these findings, aromatase and NFκB are suggested as valid targets for these compounds; additional investigation of chemopreventive or chemotherapeutic potential is required.

  17. Botulinum toxin type A selectivity for certain types of pain is associated with capsaicin-sensitive neurons.

    PubMed

    Matak, Ivica; Rossetto, Ornella; Lacković, Zdravko

    2014-08-01

    Unlike most classical analgesics, botulinum toxin type A (BoNT/A) does not alter acute nociceptive thresholds, and shows selectivity primarily for allodynic and hyperalgesic responses in certain pain conditions. We hypothesized that this phenomenon might be explained by characterizing the sensory neurons targeted by BoNT/A in the central nervous system after its axonal transport. BoNT/A's central antinociceptive activity following its application into the rat whisker pad was examined in trigeminal nucleus caudalis (TNC) and higher-level nociceptive brain areas using BoNT/A-cleaved synaptosomal-associated protein 25 (SNAP-25) and c-Fos immunohistochemistry. Occurrence of cleaved SNAP-25 in TNC was examined after nonselective ganglion ablation with formalin or selective denervation of capsaicin-sensitive (vanilloid receptor-1 or TRPV1-expressing) neurons, and in relation to different cellular and neuronal markers. Regional c-Fos activation and effect of TRPV1-expressing afferent denervation on toxin's antinociceptive action were studied in formalin-induced orofacial pain. BoNT/A-cleaved SNAP-25 was observed in TNC, but not in higher-level nociceptive nuclei. Cleaved SNAP-25 in TNC disappeared after formalin-induced trigeminal ganglion ablation or capsaicin-induced sensory denervation. Occurrence of cleaved SNAP-25 in TNC and BoNT/A antinociceptive activity in formalin-induced orofacial pain were prevented by denervation with capsaicin. Cleaved SNAP-25 localization demonstrated toxin's presynaptic activity in TRPV1-expressing neurons. BoNT/A reduced the c-Fos activation in TNC, locus coeruleus, and periaqueductal gray. Present experiments suggest that BoNT/A alters the nociceptive transmission at the central synapse of primary afferents. Targeting of TRPV1-expressing neurons might be associated with observed selectivity of BoNT/A action only in certain types of pain.

  18. Evaluation of the analgesic efficacy and psychoactive effects of AZD1940, a novel peripherally acting cannabinoid agonist, in human capsaicin-induced pain and hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Kalliomäki, Jarkko; Annas, Peter; Huizar, Karin; Clarke, Cyril; Zettergren, Annika; Karlsten, Rolf; Segerdahl, Märta

    2013-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of AZD1940, a novel peripherally acting cannabinoid CB(1) /CB(2) receptor agonist, on capsaicin-induced pain and hyperalgesia, as well as on biomarkers of cannabinoid central nervous system (CNS) effects. The present study was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, four-sequence, two-period, cross-over study in 44 male healthy volunteers aged 20-45 years. The effects of two single oral doses of AZD1940 (400 and 800 μg) were compared with placebo. Pain intensity after intradermal capsaicin injections in the forearm was assessed on a continuous visual analogue scale (VAS; 0-100 mm). Primary and secondary hyperalgesia induced by application of capsaicin cream on the calf were assessed by measuring heat pain thresholds and the area of mechanical allodynia, respectively. The CNS effects were assessed at baseline and up to 24 h after dosing using a visual analogue mood scales (VAMS) for feeling 'stimulated', 'high', 'anxious', 'sedated' or 'down'. AZD1940 did not significantly attenuate ongoing pain or primary or secondary hyperalgesia compared with placebo. Mild CNS effects for AZD1940were observed on the VAMS for 'high' and 'sedated'. Dose-dependent mild-to-moderate CNS-related and gastrointestinal adverse events were reported following treatment with AZD1940. No evidence of analgesic efficacy was found for a peripherally acting CB(1)/CB(2) receptor agonist in the human capsaicin pain model. The emergence of mild dose-dependent CNS effects suggests that the dose range predicted from preclinical data had been attained.

  19. Trigeminal neuralgia

    PubMed Central

    Cruccu, Giorgio; Finnerup, Nanna B.; Jensen, Troels S.; Scholz, Joachim; Sindou, Marc; Svensson, Peter; Zakrzewska, Joanna M.; Nurmikko, Turo

    2016-01-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is an exemplary condition of neuropathic facial pain. However, formally classifying TN as neuropathic pain based on the grading system of the International Association for the Study of Pain is complicated by the requirement of objective signs confirming an underlying lesion or disease of the somatosensory system. The latest version of the International Classification of Headache Disorders created similar difficulties by abandoning the term symptomatic TN for manifestations caused by major neurologic disease, such as tumors or multiple sclerosis. These diagnostic challenges hinder the triage of TN patients for therapy and clinical trials, and hamper the design of treatment guidelines. In response to these shortcomings, we have developed a classification of TN that aligns with the nosology of other neurologic disorders and neuropathic pain. We propose 3 diagnostic categories. Classical TN requires demonstration of morphologic changes in the trigeminal nerve root from vascular compression. Secondary TN is due to an identifiable underlying neurologic disease. TN of unknown etiology is labeled idiopathic. Diagnostic certainty is graded possible when pain paroxysms occur in the distribution of the trigeminal nerve branches. Triggered paroxysms permit the designation of clinically established TN and probable neuropathic pain. Imaging and neurophysiologic tests that establish the etiology of classical or secondary TN determine definite neuropathic pain. PMID:27306631

  20. Capsaicin and dihydrocapsaicin induce apoptosis in human glioma cells via ROS and Ca2+-mediated mitochondrial pathway

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Le; Xiang, Guang-Hong; Tang, Tao; Tang, Yan; Zhao, Ling-Yun; Liu, Dong; Zhang, You-Ren; Tang, Jin-Tian; Zhou, Shen; Wu, Da-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Human glioma is the most common type of primary brain tumor and one of the most invasive and aggressive tumors, which, even with treatments including surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, often relapses and exhibits resistance to conventional treatment methods. Developing novel strategies to control human glioma is, therefore, an important research focus. The present study investigated the mechanism of apoptosis induction in U251 human glioma cells by capsaicin (Cap) and dihydrocapsaicin (DHC), the major pungent ingredients of red chili pepper, using the Cell Counting Kit-8 assay, transmission electron microscopy analysis, flow cytometry analysis, laser scanning confocal microscope analysis and immunohistochemical staining. Treatment of U251 glioma cells with Cap and DHC resulted in a dose- and time-dependent inhibition of cell viability and induction of apoptosis, whereas few effects were observed on the viability of L929 normal murine fibroblast cells. The apoptosis-inducing effects of Cap and DHC in U251 cells were associated with the generation of reactive oxygen species, increased Ca2+ concentrations, mitochondrial depolarization, release of cytochrome c into the cytosol and activation of caspase-9 and −3. These effects were further confirmed by observations of the anti-tumor effects of Cap and DHC in vivo in a U251 cell murine tumor xenograft model. These results demonstrate that Cap and DHC are effective inhibitors of in vitro and in vivo survival of human glioma cells, and provide the rationale for further clinical investigation of Cap and DHC as treatments for human glioma. PMID:27748914

  1. NMDA-induced burst discharge in guinea pig trigeminal motoneurons in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y I; Chandler, S H

    1995-07-01

    1. The responses of guinea pig trigeminal motoneurons (TMNs) to N-methyl-D,L-aspartate (NMA) were studied using brain stem slice preparations and whole cell patch-clamp (n = 89) or conventional microelectrode (n = 22) recording techniques. The primary goals of this study were to determine whether N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activation would produce spontaneous bursting activity in TMNs and, if so, the underlying mechanisms responsible for the generation of these bursts. 2. Bath-applied NMA (100-300 microM, n = 80) in standard perfusion medium elicited depolarization, increase in apparent input resistance (Rinp), and rhythmic burst discharges (1-90 s in duration) from TMNs. These effects were blocked by the NMDA receptor antagonist DL-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (AP5, 30 microM, n = 6), but not by the non-NMDA receptor antagonist 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX, 5-10 microM, n = 10). Furthermore, the burst-inducing effect of NMA was not mimicked by the non-NMDA receptor agonists kainate (KA, 5-10 microM, n = 6) and (+/-)-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA, 5-10 microM, n = 5). 3. In tetrodotoxin (TTX) treatment conditions (n = 13), NMA elicited depolarization, an increase in apparent Rinp, and rhythmic membrane potential oscillations without action potential bursts (i.e., plateau potentials), suggesting that the effects of NMA observed in the TTX-free condition resulted from activation of postsynaptic NMDA receptors. 4. Graded depolarization of neurons (n = 20) by intracellular direct current injection generally led to a graded increase in frequency and duration of the NMA-induced bursts and plateau potentials until these rhythmic events eventually became transformed into continuous spike discharge and maintained depolarization, respectively. Removal of Mg2+ from the perfusion medium (n = 11) also turned the bursts and plateau potentials into continuous spike discharge and maintained depolarization, respectively

  2. Experimental colitis in rats induces de novo synthesis of cytokines at distant intestinal sites: role of capsaicin-sensitive primary afferent fibers.

    PubMed

    Mourad, Fadi H; Hamdi, Tamim; Barada, Kassem A; Saadé, Nayef E

    2016-06-01

    Increased levels of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines were observed in various segments of histologically-intact small intestine in animal models of acute and chronic colitis. Whether these cytokines are produced locally or spread from the inflamed colon is not known. In addition, the role of gut innervation in this upregulation is not fully understood. To examine whether cytokines are produced de novo in the small intestine in two rat models of colitis; and to investigate the role of capsaicin-sensitive primary afferents in the synthesis of these inflammatory cytokines. Colitis was induced by rectal instillation of iodoacetamide (IA) or trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid (TNBS) in adult Sprague-Dawley rats. Using reverse transcriptase (RT) and real-time PCR, TNF-α, and IL-10 mRNA expression was measured in mucosal scrapings of the duodenum, jejunum, ileum and colon at different time intervals after induction of colitis. Capsaicin-sensitive primary afferents (CSPA) were ablated using subcutaneous injections of capsaicin at time 0, 8 and 32 h, and the experiment was repeated at specific time intervals to detect any effect on cytokines expression. TNF-α mRNA expression increased by 3-40 times in the different intestinal segments (p<0.05 to p<0.001), 48h after IA-induced colitis. CSPA ablation completely inhibited this upregulation in the small intestine, but not in the colon. Similar results were obtained in TNBS-induced colitis at 24 h. Intestinal IL-10 mRNA expression significantly decreased at 12 h and then increased by 6-43 times (p<0.05 to p<0.001) 48h after IA administration. This increase was abolished in rats subjected to CSPA ablation except in the colon, where IL-10 further increased by twice (p<0.05). In the TNBS group, there was 4-12- and 4-7-fold increases in small intestinal IL-10 mRNA expression at 1 and 21 days after colitis induction, respectively (both p<0.01). This increase was not observed in rats pretreated with capsaicin. Capsaicin-treated and

  3. Quantitative characterization of capsaicin-induced TRPV1 ion channel activation in HEK293 cells by impedance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Weyer, Maxi; Jahnke, Heinz-Georg; Krinke, Dana; Zitzmann, Franziska D; Hill, Kerstin; Schaefer, Michael; Robitzki, Andrea A

    2016-11-01

    The analysis of receptor activity, especially in its native cellular environment, has always been of great interest to evaluate its intrinsic but also downstream biological activity. An important group of cellular receptors are ion channels. Since they are involved in a broad range of crucial cell functions, they represent important therapeutic targets. Thus, novel analytical techniques for the quantitative monitoring and screening of biological receptor activity are of great interest. In this context, we developed an impedance spectroscopy-based label-free and non-invasive monitoring system that enabled us to analyze the activation of the transient receptor potential channel Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) in detail. TRPV1 channel activation by capsaicin resulted in a reproducible impedance decrease. Moreover, concentration response curves with an EC50 value of 0.9 μM could be determined. Control experiments with non TRPV1 channel expressing HEK cells as well as experiments with the TRPV1 channel blocker ruthenium red validated the specificity of the observed impedance decrease. More strikingly, through correlative studies with a cytoskeleton restructuring inhibitor mixture and equivalent circuit analysis of the acquired impedance spectra, we could quantitatively discriminate between the direct TRPV1 channel activation and downstream-induced biological effects. In summary, we developed a quantitative impedimetric monitoring system for the analysis of TRPV1 channel activity as well as downstream-induced biological activity in living cells. It has the capabilities to identify novel ion channel activators as well as inhibitors for the TRPV1 channel but could also easily be applied to other ion channel-based receptors.

  4. Activation of the cAMP transduction cascade contributes to the mechanical hyperalgesia and allodynia induced by intradermal injection of capsaicin.

    PubMed

    Sluka, K A

    1997-11-01

    1. The spinal role of the cAMP transduction cascade in nociceptive processing was investigated in awake behaving rats (male, Sprague-Dawley) by activating or inhibiting this pathway spinally. Microdialysis fibres were implanted into the dorsal horn to infuse drugs directly to the spinal cord. 2. Animals, without peripheral tissue injury, were tested for responses to repeated applications (10 trials) of von Frey filaments and threshold to mechanical stimulation before and after infusion of 8-bromo-cAMP. In this group of animals treated spinally with 8-br-cAMP (1-10 mM) a dose-dependent hyperalgesia and allodynia were produced. This was manifested as an increased number of responses to 10 trials of von Frey filaments (10, 50, 150, 250 mN) and a decrease in mechanical threshold. 3. A second series of experiments studied the manipulation of the cAMP pathway spinally in a model of tissue injury induced by intradermal injection of capsaicin. Animals were either pre- or post-treated spinally with the adenylate cyclase inhibitor, tetrahydrofuryl adenine (THFA) or the protein kinase A inhibitor, myrosilated protein kinase (14-22) amide (PKI). Injection of capsaicin resulted in an increased number of responses to repeated applications of von Frey filaments and a decrease in threshold to mechanical stimuli outside the site of injection, secondary mechanical hyperalgesia and allodynia. 4. Pre-treatment with either THFA (1 mM) or PKI (5 mM) had no effect on the capsaicin-evoked secondary hyperalgesia and allodynia. 5. In contrast, post-treatment spinally with THFA (0.01-1 mM) or PKI (0.05-50 mM) dose-dependently reduced the mechanical hyperalgesia and allodynia produced by capsaicin injection. Furthermore, the mechanical hyperalgesia and allodynia blocked by the adenylate cyclase inhibitor, THFA (1 mM), was reversed by infusion of 8-bromo-cAMP (0.01-10 mM) in a dose-dependent manner. 6. Thus, this study demonstrates that activation of the cAMP transduction cascade at the spinal

  5. Capsaicin synergizes with camptothecin to induce increased apoptosis in human small cell lung cancers via the calpain pathway.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Jamie R; Perry, Haley E; Brown, Kathleen C; Gao, Ying; Lin, Ju; Stevenson, Cathyrn D; Hurley, John D; Nolan, Nicholas A; Akers, Austin T; Chen, Yi Charlie; Denning, Krista L; Brown, Linda G; Dasgupta, Piyali

    2017-04-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is characterized by excellent initial response to chemotherapy and radiation therapy with a majority of the patients showing tumor shrinkage and even remission. However, the challenge with SCLC therapy is that patients inevitably relapse and subsequently do not respond to the first line treatment. Recent clinical studies have investigated the possibility of camptothecin-based combination therapy as first line treatment for SCLC patients. Conventionally, camptothecin is used for recurrent SCLC and has poor survival outcomes. Therefore, drugs which can improve the therapeutic index of camptothecin should be valuable for SCLC therapy. Extensive evidence shows that nutritional compounds like capsaicin (the spicy compound of chili peppers) can improve the anti-cancer activity of chemotherapeutic drugs in both cell lines and animal models. Statistical analysis shows that capsaicin synergizes with camptothecin to enhance apoptosis of human SCLC cells. The synergistic activity of camptothecin and capsaicin is observed in both classical and variant SCLC cell lines and, in vivo, in human SCLC tumors xenotransplanted on chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) models. The synergistic activity of capsaicin and camptothecin are mediated by elevation of intracellular calcium and the calpain pathway. Our data foster hope for novel nutrition based combination therapies in SCLC.

  6. Inflammation enhanced brain-derived neurotrophic factor-induced suppression of the voltage-gated potassium currents in small-diameter trigeminal ganglion neurons projecting to the trigeminal nucleus interpolaris/caudalis transition zone.

    PubMed

    Takeda, M; Takahashi, M; Matsumoto, S

    2014-03-07

    We recently indicated that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) enhances the excitability of small-diameter trigeminal ganglion (TRG) neurons projecting onto the trigeminal nucleus interpolaris/caudalis (Vi/Vc) transition zone via a paracrine mechanism following masetter muscle (MM) inflammation. The present study investigated whether modulation of voltage-gated potassium (K) channels by BDNF contributes to this hyperexcitability effect. To induce inflammation we injected complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) into the MM. The escape threshold from mechanical stimulation applied to skin above the inflamed MM was significantly lower than in naïve rats. TRG neurons innervating the site of inflammation were subsequently identified by fluorogold (FG) labeling, and microbeads (MB) were used to label neurons projecting specifically to the Vi/Vc region. BDNF significantly decreased the total, transient (IA), and sustained (IK) currents in FG-/MB-labeled small-diameter TRG neurons under voltage-clamp conditions in naïve and inflamed rats. The magnitude of inhibition of IA and IK currents by BDNF in FG-/MB-labeled TRG neurons was significantly greater in inflamed rats than in naïve rats, and BDNF inhibited IA to a significantly greater extent than IK. Furthermore, co-administration of K252a, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, abolished the suppression of IA and IK currents by BDNF. These results suggested that the inhibitory effects of BDNF on IA and IK currents in small-diameter TRG neurons projecting onto the Vi/Vc potentiate neuronal excitability, and in turn, contribute to MM inflammatory hyperalgesia. These findings support the development of voltage-gated K(+) channel openers and tyrosine kinase inhibitors as potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of trigeminal inflammatory hyperalgesia.

  7. Perineural capsaicin induces the uptake and transganglionic transport of choleratoxin B subunit by nociceptive C-fiber primary afferent neurons.

    PubMed

    Oszlács, O; Jancsó, G; Kis, G; Dux, M; Sántha, P

    2015-12-17

    The distribution of spinal primary afferent terminals labeled transganglionically with the choleratoxin B subunit (CTB) or its conjugates changes profoundly after perineural treatment with capsaicin. Injection of CTB conjugated with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) into an intact nerve labels somatotopically related areas in the ipsilateral dorsal horn with the exceptions of the marginal zone and the substantia gelatinosa, whereas injection of this tracer into a capsaicin-pretreated nerve also results in massive labeling of these most superficial layers of the dorsal horn. The present study was initiated to clarify the role of C-fiber primary afferent neurons in this phenomenon. In L5 dorsal root ganglia, analysis of the size frequency distribution of neurons labeled after injection of CTB-HRP into the ipsilateral sciatic nerve treated previously with capsaicin or resiniferatoxin revealed a significant increase in the proportion of small neurons. In the spinal dorsal horn, capsaicin or resiniferatoxin pretreatment resulted in intense CTB-HRP labeling of the marginal zone and the substantia gelatinosa. Electron microscopic histochemistry disclosed a dramatic, ∼10-fold increase in the proportion of CTB-HRP-labeled unmyelinated dorsal root axons following perineural capsaicin or resiniferatoxin. The present results indicate that CTB-HRP labeling of C-fiber dorsal root ganglion neurons and their central terminals after perineural treatment with vanilloid compounds may be explained by their phenotypic switch rather than a sprouting response of thick myelinated spinal afferents which, in an intact nerve, can be labeled selectively with CTB-HRP. The findings also suggest a role for GM1 ganglioside in the modulation of nociceptor function and pain.

  8. Radiofrequency trigeminal rhizolysis for the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia secondary to brainstem infarction. Report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Foroohar, M; Herman, M; Heller, S; Levy, R M

    1997-01-15

    Although percutaneous radiofrequency trigeminal rhizolysis (RFL) has been used to treat idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia thought secondary to multiple sclerosis, the use of RFL for trigeminal neuralgia caused by brainstem infarction has not been advocated. The authors report two patients with trigeminal neuralgia following pontine infarction in whom aggressive medical management failed, but who were successfully treated with RFL. Pain relief has persisted for the 3- and 6-year duration of follow-up examinations. Descending trigeminal reticular fibers may be affected by brainstem infarction and result in trigeminal neuralgia; thus, treatment by rhizotomy may be effective in decreasing the peripheral afferent input into the spinal trigeminal nucleus thus decreasing the pain. These two cases demonstrate the utility of RFL in the relief of ischemia-induced trigeminal neuralgia and lead the authors to suggest that its use be broadened to include this indication.

  9. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS)-Induced Trigeminal Autonomic Cephalalgia

    PubMed Central

    DURMAZ, Onur; ATEŞ, Mehmet Alpay; ŞENOL, Mehmet Güney

    2015-01-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is an effective and novel treatment method that has been approved for the treatment of refractory depression by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The most common side effects of rTMS are a transient headache that usually responds to simple analgesics, local discomfort in the stimulation area, dizziness, ipsilateral lacrimation and, very rarely, generalized seizure. TMS is also regarded as a beneficial tool for investigating mechanisms underlying headache. Although rTMS has considerable benefits in terms of headache, there is the potential for rare side effects. In this report, we present the case of a patient with no history of autonomic headache who underwent a course of rTMS for refractory unipolar depression caused by an inadequate response to pharmacotherapy. After his fourth rTMS session, the patient developed sudden headaches with characteristics of trigeminal autonomic cephalalgia on the stimulated side, representing a noteworthy example of the potential side effects of rTMS. PMID:28360729

  10. GABAB receptors in the NTS mediate the inhibitory effect of trigeminal nociceptive inputs on parasympathetic reflex vasodilation in the rat masseter muscle.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Hisayoshi; Izumi, Hiroshi

    2012-03-15

    The present study was designed to examine whether trigeminal nociceptive inputs are involved in the modulation of parasympathetic reflex vasodilation in the jaw muscles. This was accomplished by investigating the effects of noxious stimulation to the orofacial area with capsaicin, and by microinjecting GABA(A) and GABA(B) receptor agonists or antagonists into the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), on masseter hemodynamics in urethane-anesthetized rats. Electrical stimulation of the central cut end of the cervical vagus nerve (cVN) in sympathectomized animals bilaterally increased blood flow in the masseter muscle (MBF). Increases in MBF evoked by cVN stimulation were markedly reduced following injection of capsaicin into the anterior tongue in the distribution of the lingual nerve or lower lip, but not when injected into the skin of the dorsum of the foot. Intravenous administration of either phentolamine or propranolol had no effect on the inhibitory effects of capsaicin injection on the increases of MBF evoked by cVN stimulation, which were largely abolished by microinjecting the GABA(B) receptor agonist baclofen into the NTS. Microinjection of the GABA(B) receptor antagonist CGP-35348 into the NTS markedly attenuated the capsaicin-induced inhibition of MBF increase evoked by cVN stimulation, while microinjection of the GABA(A) receptor antagonist bicuculline did not. Our results indicate that trigeminal nociceptive inputs inhibit vagal-parasympathetic reflex vasodilation in the masseter muscle and suggest that the activation of GABA(B) rather than GABA(A) receptors underlies the observed inhibition in the NTS.

  11. The blink reflex and the corneal reflex are followed by cortical activity resembling the nociceptive potentials induced by trigeminal laser stimulation in man.

    PubMed

    de Tommaso, M; Libro, G; Guido, M; Sciruicchio, V; Puca, F

    2001-09-07

    Laser stimulation of the supraorbital regions evokes brain potentials (LEPs) related to trigeminal nociception. The aim of this study was to record the R2 component of the blink reflex and the corneal reflex in 20 normal subjects, comparing the scalp activity following these reflexes with the nociceptive potentials evoked by CO2 laser stimulation of supraorbital regions. Cortical and muscular reflexes evoked by stimulation of the first trigeminal branch were recorded simultaneously. The R2 component of the blink reflex and the corneal reflex were followed by two cortical peaks, which resembled morphologically N-P waves of LEPs. The two peaks demonstrated a difference in latency of approximately 40 ms, which is consistent with activation time of nociception. This finding suggests that these reflexes are induced by activation of small pain-related fibers.

  12. Increases in PKC gamma expression in trigeminal spinal nucleus is associated with orofacial thermal hyperalgesia in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hong-Ying; Xu, Fei; Li, Yue; Zeng, Zhao-Bin; Zhang, Ran; Xu, Hui-Jun; Qian, Nian-Song; Zhang, Yi-Guan

    2015-01-01

    Painful diabetic polyneuropathy (PDN) at the early phrase of diabetes frequently exhibits increased responsiveness to nociception. In diabetic patients and animal models, alterations in the transmission of orofacial sensory information have been demonstrated in trigeminal system. Herein, we examined the changes of protein kinase Cγ subunit (PKCγ) in trigeminal spinal nucleus (Sp5C) and observed the development of orofacial thermal sensitivity in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced type 1 diabetic mice. With hyperglycemia and body weight loss, STZ mice exhibited orofacial thermal hyperalgesia, along with increased PKCγ expression in Sp5C. Insulin treatment at the early stage of diabetes could alleviate the orofacial thermal hyperalgesia and impaired increased PKCγ in Sp5C in diabetic mice. In summary, our results demonstrate that PKCγ might be involved in orofacial thermal hyperalgesia of diabetes, and early insulin treatment might be effective way to treat orofacial PDN.

  13. The pungent substances piperine, capsaicin, 6-gingerol and polygodial inhibit the human two-pore domain potassium channels TASK-1, TASK-3 and TRESK

    PubMed Central

    Beltrán, Leopoldo R.; Dawid, Corinna; Beltrán, Madeline; Gisselmann, Guenter; Degenhardt, Katharina; Mathie, Klaus; Hofmann, Thomas; Hatt, Hanns

    2013-01-01

    For a long time, the focus of trigeminal chemoperception has rested almost exclusively on TRP channels. However, two-pore domain (K2P) potassium channels have recently been identified as targets for substances associated with typical trigeminal sensations, such as numbing and tingling. In addition, they have been shown to be modulated by several TRP agonists. We investigated whether the pungent substances piperine, capsaicin, 6-gingerol and polygodial have an effect on human K2P channels. For this purpose, we evaluated the effects of these pungent substances on both wild-type and mutant K2P channels by means of two-electrode voltage-clamp experiments using Xenopus laevis oocytes. All four pungent substances were found to inhibit the basal activity of TASK-1 (K2P 3.1), TASK-3 (K2P 9.1), and TRESK (K2P 18.1) channels. This inhibitory effect was dose-dependent and, with the exception of polygodial on TASK-1, fully reversible. However, only piperine exhibited an IC50 similar to its reported EC50 on TRP channels. Finally, we observed for TASK-3 that mutating H98 to E markedly decreased the inhibition induced by piperine, capsaicin, and 6-gingerol, but not by polygodial. Our data contribute to the relatively sparse knowledge concerning the pharmacology of K2P channels and also raise the question of whether K2P channels could be involved in the pungency perception of piperine. PMID:24302912

  14. The pungent substances piperine, capsaicin, 6-gingerol and polygodial inhibit the human two-pore domain potassium channels TASK-1, TASK-3 and TRESK.

    PubMed

    Beltrán, Leopoldo R; Dawid, Corinna; Beltrán, Madeline; Gisselmann, Guenter; Degenhardt, Katharina; Mathie, Klaus; Hofmann, Thomas; Hatt, Hanns

    2013-01-01

    For a long time, the focus of trigeminal chemoperception has rested almost exclusively on TRP channels. However, two-pore domain (K2P) potassium channels have recently been identified as targets for substances associated with typical trigeminal sensations, such as numbing and tingling. In addition, they have been shown to be modulated by several TRP agonists. We investigated whether the pungent substances piperine, capsaicin, 6-gingerol and polygodial have an effect on human K2P channels. For this purpose, we evaluated the effects of these pungent substances on both wild-type and mutant K2P channels by means of two-electrode voltage-clamp experiments using Xenopus laevis oocytes. All four pungent substances were found to inhibit the basal activity of TASK-1 (K2P 3.1), TASK-3 (K2P 9.1), and TRESK (K2P 18.1) channels. This inhibitory effect was dose-dependent and, with the exception of polygodial on TASK-1, fully reversible. However, only piperine exhibited an IC50 similar to its reported EC50 on TRP channels. Finally, we observed for TASK-3 that mutating H98 to E markedly decreased the inhibition induced by piperine, capsaicin, and 6-gingerol, but not by polygodial. Our data contribute to the relatively sparse knowledge concerning the pharmacology of K2P channels and also raise the question of whether K2P channels could be involved in the pungency perception of piperine.

  15. Toll-like receptor 4 signaling in neurons of trigeminal ganglion contributes to nociception induced by acute pulpitis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jia-Ji; Du, Yi; Cai, Wen-Ke; Kuang, Rong; Chang, Ting; Zhang, Zhuo; Yang, Yong-Xiang; Sun, Chao; Li, Zhu-Yi; Kuang, Fang

    2015-01-01

    Pain caused by acute pulpitis (AP) is a common symptom in clinical settings. However, its underlying mechanisms have largely remained unknown. Using AP model, we demonstrated that dental injury caused severe pulp inflammation with up-regulated serum IL-1β. Assessment from head-withdrawal reflex thresholds (HWTs) and open-field test demonstrated nociceptive response at 1 day post injury. A consistent up-regulation of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in the trigeminal ganglion (TG) ipsilateral to the injured pulp was found; and downstream signaling components of TLR4, including MyD88, TRIF and NF-κB, and cytokines such as TNF-α and IL-1β, were also increased. Retrograde labeling indicated that most TLR4 positve neuron in the TG innnervated the pulp and TLR4 immunoreactivity was mainly in the medium and small neurons. Double labeling showed that the TLR4 expressing neurons in the ipsilateral TG were TRPV1 and CGRP positive, but IB4 negative. Furthermore, blocking TLR4 by eritoran (TLR4 antagonist) in TGs of the AP model significantly down-regulated MyD88, TRIF, NF-κB, TNF-α and IL-1β production and behavior of nociceptive response. Our findings suggest that TLR4 signaling in TG cells, particularly the peptidergic TRPV1 neurons, plays a key role in AP-induced nociception, and indicate that TLR4 signaling could be a potential therapeutic target for orofacial pain. PMID:26224622

  16. Capsaicin partially mimics heat in mouse fibroblast cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Naotoshi; Katakura, Masanori; Matsuzaki, Kentaro; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Yachie, Akihiro; Shido, Osamu

    2017-03-01

    Capsaicin activates transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), a cation channel in the transient receptor potential family, resulting in the transient entry of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) and a warm sensation. However, the effects of capsaicin on cells have not fully elucidated in fibroblasts. In this study, we investigated whether capsaicin could induce signal transduction in mouse fibroblast cells and compared the effect with that of heat-induced signal transduction. The activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) ERK and p38 MAPK, expression levels of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) and HSP90, actin assembly, and cell proliferation were analyzed in NIH3T3 mouse fibroblast cells. A 15-min stimulation with capsaicin (∼100 μM) phosphorylated ERK and p38 MAPK and induced actin assembly. A 2-day stimulation with capsaicin increased the level of HSP70, but not HSP90, and the 2-day stimulation with capsaicin (∼100 μM) did not affect cell proliferation. A 15-min exposure to moderate heat (39.5 °C) phosphorylated both ERK and p38 MAPK and induced actin assembly to similar degrees as stimulation with capsaicin. A 2-day exposure to moderate heat increased the levels of both HSP70 and HSP90 and prevented cell proliferation. However, the 2-day stimulation with capsaicin (100 μM) failed to prevent heat shock-induced cell death. Thus, our results suggest that the effects of capsaicin on fibroblast cells partially differ from those of heat. Notably, the 2-day stimulation with capsaicin was not sufficient to develop heat tolerance in fibroblast cells.

  17. Sex differences in the contribution of ATP-sensitive K+ channels in trigeminal ganglia under an acute muscle pain condition

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Katelyn; Saloman, Jami L.; Zhang, Youping; Ro, Jin Y.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we examined whether functional subunits of the ATP-dependent K+ channel (KATP) are expressed in trigeminal ganglia (TG), which contains sensory neurons that innervate oral and facial structures. We also investigated whether direct activation of the KATP effectively attenuates mechanical hypersensitivity in the context of an acute orofacial muscle pain condition. The KATP expression in TG and behavioral studies were conducted in age matched male and female Sprague Dawley rats. RT-PCR experiments showed that the mRNAs for the inwardly rectifying pore-forming subunits, Kir6.1 and Kir6.2, as well as the regulatory sulphonylurea subunits, SUR1 and SUR2, were reliably detected in TG. Subsequent western blot analysis confirmed that proteins for all 4 subunits are expressed in TG, and showed that Kir6.2 is expressed at a significantly higher level in male TG compared to that of female rats. This observation was confirmed by the immunohistochemical demonstration of higher percentages of Kir6 positive masseter afferents in female rats. Masseteric injection of capsaicin evokes a time dependent increase in masseter sensitivity to noxious mechanical stimulation. A specific KATP agonist, pinacidil, dose-dependently attenuated the capsaicin-induced mechanical hypersensitivity in male rats. The dose of pinacidil (20µg) that completely blocked the capsaicin responses in male rats was ineffective in female rats regardless of their estrus phases. Only at the highest dose (300µg) we used, pinacidil was partially effective in female rats. Similarly, another KATP agonist, diazoxide which targets different KATP subunits also showed sex specific responses in attenuating capsaicin-induced masseter hypersensitivity. These data suggested that sex differences in functional KATP expression in TG may underlie sex specific responses to KATP agonists. The present study provided novel information on sex differences in KATP expression in TG and its contribution under an orofacial

  18. Capsaicin binds to prohibitin 2 and displaces it from the mitochondria to the nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Kuramori, Chikanori; Azuma, Motoki; Kume, Kanako; Kaneko, Yuki; Inoue, Atsushi; Yamaguchi, Yuki; Kabe, Yasuaki; Hosoya, Takamitsu; Kizaki, Masahiro; Suematsu, Makoto; Handa, Hiroshi

    2009-02-06

    Capsaicin is widely used as a food additive and as an analgesic agent. Besides its well-known role in nociception, which is mediated by vanilloid receptor 1 specifically expressed in dorsal root ganglion neurons, capsaicin has also been considered as a potential anticancer agent, as it inhibits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in various types of cancer cells. Here we identified a new molecular target of capsaicin from human myeloid leukemia cells. We show that capsaicin binds to prohibitin (PHB) 2, which is normally localized to the inner mitochondrial membrane, and induces its translocation to the nucleus. PHB2 is implicated in the maintenance of mitochondrial morphology and the control of apoptosis. We also provide evidence suggesting that capsaicin causes apoptosis directly through the mitochondria and that PHB2 contributes to capsaicin-induced apoptosis at multiple levels. This work will serve as an important foundation for further understanding of anticancer activity of capsaicin.

  19. Transcutaneous trigeminal nerve stimulation induces a long-term depression-like plasticity of the human blink reflex.

    PubMed

    Pilurzi, Giovanna; Mercante, Beniamina; Ginatempo, Francesca; Follesa, Paolo; Tolu, Eusebio; Deriu, Franca

    2016-02-01

    The beneficial effects of trigeminal nerve stimulation (TNS) on several neurological disorders are increasingly acknowledged. Hypothesized mechanisms include the modulation of excitability in networks involved by the disease, and its main site of action has been recently reported at brain stem level. Aim of this work was to test whether acute TNS modulates brain stem plasticity using the blink reflex (BR) as a model. The BR was recorded from 20 healthy volunteers before and after 20 min of cyclic transcutaneous TNS delivered bilaterally to the infraorbital nerve. Eleven subjects underwent sham-TNS administration and were compared to the real-TNS group. In 12 subjects, effects of unilateral TNS were tested. The areas of the R1 and R2 components of the BR were recorded before and after 0 (T0), 15 (T15), 30 (T30), and 45 (T45) min from TNS. In three subjects, T60 and T90 time points were also evaluated. Ipsi- and contralateral R2 areas were significantly suppressed after bilateral real-TNS at T15 (p = 0.013), T30 (p = 0.002), and T45 (p = 0.001), while R1 response appeared unaffected. The TNS-induced inhibitory effect on R2 responses lasted up to 60 min. Real- and sham-TNS protocols produced significantly different effects (p = 0.005), with sham-TNS being ineffective at any time point tested. Bilateral TNS was more effective (p = 0.009) than unilateral TNS. Acute TNS induced a bilateral long-lasting inhibition of the R2 component of the BR, which resembles a long-term depression-like effect, providing evidence of brain stem plasticity produced by transcutaneous TNS. These findings add new insight into mechanisms of TNS neuromodulation and into physiopathology of those neurological disorders where clinical benefits of TNS are recognized.

  20. Direct action of capsaicin in brown adipogenesis and activation of brown adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Kida, Ryosuke; Yoshida, Hirofumi; Murakami, Masaru; Shirai, Mitsuyuki; Hashimoto, Osamu; Kawada, Teruo; Matsui, Tohru; Funaba, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    The ingestion of capsaicin, the principle pungent component of red and chili peppers, induces thermogenesis, in part, through the activation of brown adipocytes expressing genes related to mitochondrial biogenesis and uncoupling such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (Ppar) γ coactivator-1α (Pgc-1α) and uncoupling protein 1 (Ucp1). Capsaicin has been suggested to induce the activation of brown adipocytes, which is mediated by the stimulation of sympathetic nerves. However, capsaicin may directly affect the differentiation of brown preadipocytes, brown adipocyte function, or both, through its significant absorption. We herein demonstrated that Trpv1, a capsaicin receptor, is expressed in brown adipose tissue, and that its expression level is increased during the differentiation of HB2 brown preadipocytes. Furthermore, capsaicin induced calcium influx in brown preadipocytes. A treatment with capsaicin in the early stage of brown adipogenesis did not affect lipid accumulation or the expression levels of Fabp4 (a gene expressed in mature adipocytes), Pparγ2 (a master regulator of adipogenesis) or brown adipocyte-selective genes. In contrast, a treatment with capsaicin in the late stage of brown adipogenesis slightly increased the expression levels of Fabp4, Pparγ2 and Pgc-1α. Although capsaicin did not affect the basal expression level of Ucp1, Ucp1 induction by forskolin was partially inhibited by capsaicin, irrespective of the dose of capsaicin. The results of the present study suggest the direct effects of capsaicin on brown adipocytes or in the late stage of brown adipogenesis.

  1. Capsaicin, Nociception and Pain.

    PubMed

    Frias, Bárbara; Merighi, Adalberto

    2016-06-18

    Capsaicin, the pungent ingredient of the hot chili pepper, is known to act on the transient receptor potential cation channel vanilloid subfamily member 1 (TRPV1). TRPV1 is involved in somatic and visceral peripheral inflammation, in the modulation of nociceptive inputs to spinal cord and brain stem centers, as well as the integration of diverse painful stimuli. In this review, we first describe the chemical and pharmacological properties of capsaicin and its derivatives in relation to their analgesic properties. We then consider the biochemical and functional characteristics of TRPV1, focusing on its distribution and biological effects within the somatosensory and viscerosensory nociceptive systems. Finally, we discuss the use of capsaicin as an agonist of TRPV1 to model acute inflammation in slices and other ex vivo preparations.

  2. Perception of trigeminal mixtures.

    PubMed

    Filiou, Renée-Pier; Lepore, Franco; Bryant, Bruce; Lundström, Johan N; Frasnelli, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    The trigeminal system is a chemical sense allowing for the perception of chemosensory information in our environment. However, contrary to smell and taste, we lack a thorough understanding of the trigeminal processing of mixtures. We, therefore, investigated trigeminal perception using mixtures of 3 relatively receptor-specific agonists together with one control odor in different proportions to determine basic perceptual dimensions of trigeminal perception. We found that 4 main dimensions were linked to trigeminal perception: sensations of intensity, warmth, coldness, and pain. We subsequently investigated perception of binary mixtures of trigeminal stimuli by means of these 4 perceptual dimensions using different concentrations of a cooling stimulus (eucalyptol) mixed with a stimulus that evokes warmth perception (cinnamaldehyde). To determine if sensory interactions are mainly of central or peripheral origin, we presented stimuli in a physical "mixture" or as a "combination" presented separately to individual nostrils. Results showed that mixtures generally yielded higher ratings than combinations on the trigeminal dimensions "intensity," "warm," and "painful," whereas combinations yielded higher ratings than mixtures on the trigeminal dimension "cold." These results suggest dimension-specific interactions in the perception of trigeminal mixtures, which may be explained by particular interactions that may take place on peripheral or central levels.

  3. Capsaicin- and mustard oil-induced extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase phosphorylation in sensory neurons in vivo: effects of neurokinins 1 and 2 receptor antagonists and of a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Donnerer, Josef; Liebmann, Ingrid; Schuligoi, Rufina

    2009-01-01

    Stimulation of primary sensory neurons with capsaicin or mustard oil leads to phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2 (p-ERK1/2) via activation of transient receptor potential V1 (TRPV1) or TRPA1, respectively. p-ERK1/2 was determined by Western immunoblotting in the dorsal root ganglia and in the sciatic nerve of rats following either systemic or perineural capsaicin treatment, or mustard oil application to the hind paw skin. To investigate the possible involvement of neurokinin 1 (NK(1)) and NK(2) receptors as well as of nitric oxide, the selective antagonists, SR140333 for NK(1) and SR48968 for NK(2), and the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), were employed. The increase of p-ERK1/2 after systemic capsaicin treatment was markedly attenuated by SR140333, while only the increase in the dorsal root ganglia was impaired by SR48968; in contrast, inhibition of nitric oxide synthase had no effect. Perineural capsaicin induced an increase in p-ERK1/2 in the ipsilateral sciatic nerve and in the dorsal root ganglia. This effect was not influenced by SR140333 or L-NAME. We found for the first time that mustard oil application to the hind paw skin caused an increase in p-ERK1/2 in the sciatic nerve and in the dorsal root ganglia and only the phosphorylation in the latter was attenuated by SR140333 while L-NAME showed no effect. From the present results, it may be assumed that capsaicin- or mustard oil-induced p-ERK1/2 in sensory neurons is not solely directly linked to TRPV1 or TRPA1 channels, but under certain conditions NK(1)- and NK(2)-mediated mechanisms are involved.

  4. Capsaicin Inhibits Dimethylnitrosamine-Induced Hepatic Fibrosis by Inhibiting the TGF-β1/Smad Pathway via Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Gamma Activation.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae Ho; Jin, Sun Woo; Choi, Chul Yung; Kim, Hyung Gyun; Lee, Gi Ho; Kim, Yong An; Chung, Young Chul; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2017-01-18

    Capsaicin (CPS) exerts many pharmacological effects, but any possible influence on liver fibrosis remains unclear. Therefore, we evaluated the inhibitory effects of CPS on dimethylnitrosamine (DMN) and TGF-β1-induced liver fibrosis in rats and hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). CPS inhibited DMN-induced hepatotoxicity, NF-κB activation, and collagen accumulation. CPS also suppressed the DMN-induced increases in α-SMA, collagen type I, MMP-2, and TNF-α. In addition, CPS inhibited DMN-induced TGF-β1 expression (from 2.3 ± 0.1 to 1.0 ± 0.1) and Smad2/3 phosphorylation (from 1.5 ± 0.1 to 1.1 ± 0.1 and from 1.6 ± 0.1 to 1.1 ± 0.1, respectively) by activating Smad7 expression (from 0.1 ± 0.0 to 0.9 ± 0.1) via PPAR-γ induction (from 0.2 ± 0.0 to 0.8 ± 0.0) (p < 0.05). Furthermore, in HSCs, CPS inhibited the TGF-β1-induced increases in α-SMA and collagen type I expression, via PPAR-γ activation. These results indicate that CPS can ameliorate hepatic fibrosis by inhibiting the TGF-β1/Smad pathway via PPAR-γ activation.

  5. Effects of curcumin and capsaicin irradiated with visible light on murine oral mucosa.

    PubMed

    Okada, Norihisa; Muraoka, Eitoku; Fujisawa, Seiichiro; Machino, Mamoru

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the histopathological effects of curcumin and capsaicin, with or without visible light (VL) irradiation for 5 min, on the oral mucous membrane in mice. Capsaicin-treated, but not curcumin-treated, buccal epithelium exhibited slight tissue damage; VL irradiation caused excessive tissue damage, particularly when combined with the former treatment. The TdT-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end-labeling (TUNEL) method demonstrated that both capsaicin and curcumin induced apoptosis, with the apoptotic effect of capsaicin appearing at an early stage of application. VL irradiation increased the number of apoptotic cells, particularly those upon in the capsaicin-treated area. Capsaicin and curcumin acted as photosensitizers exposure to VL, in the presence of oxygen. Curcumin and capsaicin with VL irradiation could thus be used for photodynamic therapy in the clinical setting, especially in precancerous oral diseases.

  6. Trigeminal trophic syndrome: report of 3 cases affecting the scalp.

    PubMed

    Bolaji, Ranti S; Burrall, Barbara A; Eisen, Daniel B

    2013-12-01

    Trigeminal trophic syndrome (TTS) is a rare condition that results from a prior injury to the sensory distribution of the trigeminal nerve. Patients typically respond to the altered sensation with self-mutilation, most often of the nasal ala. We describe 3 patients with TTS who presented with self-induced ulcerations primarily involving the scalp. Two patients developed delusions of parasitosis (DOP) based on the resulting symptoms of TTS, which is a unique association. Trigeminal trophic syndrome may occur at extranasal sites and in any branch of the trigeminal nerve. The condition should be considered when ulcers are encountered in this nerve distribution. Symptoms such as formication may mimic DOP. Trigeminal trophic syndrome may be differentiated from DOP by the restriction of symptoms and ulcerations to the distribution of the trigeminal nerve.

  7. Capsaicin: Current Understanding of Its Mechanisms and Therapy of Pain and Other Pre-Clinical and Clinical Uses.

    PubMed

    Fattori, Victor; Hohmann, Miriam S N; Rossaneis, Ana C; Pinho-Ribeiro, Felipe A; Verri, Waldiceu A

    2016-06-28

    In this review, we discuss the importance of capsaicin to the current understanding of neuronal modulation of pain and explore the mechanisms of capsaicin-induced pain. We will focus on the analgesic effects of capsaicin and its clinical applicability in treating pain. Furthermore, we will draw attention to the rationale for other clinical therapeutic uses and implications of capsaicin in diseases such as obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular conditions, cancer, airway diseases, itch, gastric, and urological disorders.

  8. RPF101, a new capsaicin-like analogue, disrupts the microtubule network accompanied by arrest in the G2/M phase, inducing apoptosis and mitotic catastrophe in the MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sá-Júnior, Paulo Luiz de; Pasqualoto, Kerly Fernanda Mesquita; Ferreira, Adilson Kleber; Tavares, Maurício Temotheo; Damião, Mariana Celestina Frojuello Costa Bernstorff; Azevedo, Ricardo Alexandre de; Câmara, Diana Aparecida Dias; Pereira, Alexandre; Madeiro de Souza, Dener; Parise Filho, Roberto

    2013-02-01

    Breast cancer is the world's leading cause of death among women. This situation imposes an urgent development of more selective and less toxic agents. The use of natural molecular fingerprints as sources for new bioactive chemical entities has proven to be a quite promising and efficient method. Capsaicin, which is the primary pungent compound in red peppers, was reported to selectively inhibit the growth of a variety tumor cell lines. Here, we report for the first time a novel synthetic capsaicin-like analogue, RPF101, which presents a high antitumor activity on MCF-7 cell line, inducing arrest of the cell cycle at the G2/M phase through a disruption of the microtubule network. Furthermore, it causes cellular morphologic changes characteristic of apoptosis and a decrease of Δψm. Molecular modeling studies corroborated the biological findings and suggested that RPF101, besides being a more reactive molecule towards its target, may also present a better pharmacokinetic profile than capsaicin. All these findings support the fact that RPF101 is a promising anticancer agent. -- Highlights: ► We report for the first time that RPF101 possesses anticancer properties. ► RPF101 induces apoptosis of human breast cancer cells. ► RPF 101 decreases mitochondrial potential and induces DNA fragmentation.

  9. Electrical stimulation to the trigeminal proprioceptive fibres that innervate the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle induces involuntary reflex contraction of the frontalis muscles.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Kiyoshi; Osada, Yoshiro; Ban, Ryokuya

    2013-02-01

    The levator and frontalis muscles lack interior muscle spindles, despite consisting of slow-twitch fibres that involuntarily sustain eyelid-opening and eyebrow-raising against gravity. To compensate for this anatomical defect, this study hypothetically proposes that initial voluntary contraction of the levator fast-twitch muscle fibres stretches the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle and evokes proprioception, which continuously induces reflex contraction of slow-twitch fibres of the levator and frontalis muscles. This study sought to determine whether unilateral transcutaneous electrical stimulation to the trigeminal proprioceptive fibres that innervate the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle could induce electromyographic responses in the frontalis muscles, with monitoring responses in the orbicularis oculi muscles. The study population included 27 normal subjects and 23 subjects with aponeurotic blepharoptosis, who displayed persistently raised eyebrows on primary gaze and light eyelid closure. The stimulation induced a short-latency response in the ipsilateral frontalis muscle of all subjects and long-latency responses in the bilateral frontalis muscles of normal subjects. However, it did not induce long-latency responses in the bilateral frontalis muscles of subjects with aponeurotic blepharoptosis. The orbicularis oculi muscles showed R1 and/or R2 responses. The stimulation might reach not only the proprioceptive fibres, but also other sensory fibres related to the blink or corneal reflex. The experimental system can provoke a monosynaptic short-latency response in the ipsilateral frontalis muscle, probably through the mesencephalic trigeminal proprioceptive neuron and the frontalis motor neuron, and polysynaptic long-latency responses in the bilateral frontalis muscles through an unknown pathway. The latter neural circuit appeared to be engaged by the circumstances of aponeurotic blepharoptosis.

  10. Intracranial Trigeminal Schwannoma

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Intracranial trigeminal schwannomas are rare tumors. Patients usually present with symptoms of trigeminal nerve dysfunction, the most common symptom being facial pain. MRI is the imaging modality of choice and is usually diagnostic in the appropriate clinical setting. The thin T2-weighted CISS 3D axial sequence is important for proper assessment of the cisternal segment of the nerve. They are usually hypointense on T1, hyperintense on T2 with avid enhancement post gadolinium. CT scan is supplementary to MRI, particularly for tumors located in the skull base. Imaging plays a role in diagnosis and surgical planning. In this pictorial essay, we retrospectively reviewed imaging findings in nine patients with pathologically proven trigeminal schwannoma. Familiarity with the imaging findings of intracranial trigeminal schwannoma may help to diagnose this entity. PMID:25924170

  11. The effects of juvenile capsaicin desensitization in rats: behavioral impairments.

    PubMed

    Petrovszki, Zita; Adam, Gábor; Kekesi, Gabriella; Tuboly, Gábor; Morvay, Zita; Nagy, Endre; Benedek, György; Horvath, Gyöngyi

    2014-02-10

    Capsaicin desensitization leads to behavioral changes, some of which are related to schizophrenia, but investigations into these effects have been scarce. The goal of this study was to characterize the consequences of juvenile capsaicin desensitization on different functions: acute and inflammation-induced thermal and mechanical sensitivity, urinary bladder capacity and thermoregulation, and also on the potentially schizophrenia-related impairments in sensory-motor gating, motor activity and cognitive functioning. Male Wistar rats desensitized with increasing doses of subcutaneous capsaicin after weaning were investigated. Heat and mechanical pain sensitivity did not change significantly; however, morphine produced a prolonged decrease in the nociceptive response to inflammation in desensitized animals. Ultrasound examination of the bladder revealed enhanced bladder volume in treated animals. Capsaicin-treated animals had higher body temperature at 22 °C in both dark and light periods, and they also showed prolonged hyperthermia in new environmental circumstances. Warm environment induced a profound impairment of thermoregulation in desensitized animals. The treated animals also showed higher levels of activity during the active phase and at both cool and warm temperatures. The amplitude of the responses to auditory stimuli and prepulse inhibition did not differ between the two groups, but the desensitized animals showed learning impairments in the novel object recognition test. These results suggest that juvenile capsaicin desensitization leads to sustained changes in several functions that may be related to schizophrenia. We propose that capsaicin desensitization, together with other interventions, may lead to an improved chronic animal model of schizophrenia.

  12. Evidence for a role of capsaicin-sensitive sensory nerves in the lung oedema induced by Tityus serrulatus venom in rats.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Marcus V M; Souza, Danielle G; de A Castro, Maria Salete; Cunha-Melo, José R; Teixeira, Mauro M

    2002-03-01

    In the most severe cases of human envenoming by Tityus serrulatus, pulmonary oedema is a frequent finding and can be the cause of death. We have previously demonstrated a role for neuropeptides acting on tachykinin NK(1) receptors in the development of lung oedema following i.v. injection of T. serrulatus venom (TsV) in experimental animals. The present work was designed to investigate whether capsaicin-sensitive primary afferent neurons were a potential source of NK(1)-acting neuropeptides. To this end, sensory nerves were depleted of neuropeptides by neonatal treatment of rats with capsaicin. The effectiveness of this strategy at depleting sensory nerves was demonstrated by the inhibition of the neuropeptide-dependent response to intraplantar injection of formalin. Pulmonary oedema, as assessed by the levels of extravasation of Evans blue dye in the bronchoalveolar lavage and in the left lung, was markedly inhibited in capsaicin-treated animals. In contrast, capsaicin treatment failed to alter the increase in arterial blood pressure or the lethality following i.v. injection of TsV. Our results demonstrate an important role for capsaicin-sensitive sensory nerves in the cascade of events leading to lung injury following the i.v. administration of TsV.

  13. Nano-encapsulation of capsaicin on lipid vesicle and evaluation of their hepatocellular protective effect.

    PubMed

    Giri, Tapan Kumar; Mukherjee, Payel; Barman, Tapan Kumar; Maity, Subhasis

    2016-07-01

    The intention of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of nanocapsulated food constituent capsaicin in protection of liver oxidative stress. We had prepared phospholipid vesicle (nanoliposome) by formation of thin lipid film followed by hydration when the mean vesicle diameter was found to be 277.7nm. Protection from sodium fluoride (NaF) induced oxidative stress by capsaicin loaded nanoliposomal formulation were tested in rats where a single dose of capsaicin in free and nanoliposome forms were administered after two hour of exposure to NaF. Membrane in hepatic cells were damaged by NaF and it was evaluated by estimating reactive oxygen species (ROS), lipid peroxidation, and catalase activity when it was observed that free capsaicin produced mild protection whereas liposomal capsaicin exerted a significant result. This can be suggested that liposome encapsulating capsaicin acts as a promising therapeutic agent in reducing liver oxidative stress produced by different stress factors.

  14. Gene therapy for trigeminal pain in mice

    PubMed Central

    Tzabazis, Alexander Z.; Klukinov, Michael; Feliciano, David P.; Wilson, Steven P.; Yeomans, David C.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the efficacy of a single direct injection of viral vector encoding for encephalin to induce a widespread expression of the transgene and potential analgesic effect in trigeminal behavioral pain models in mice. After direct injection of HSV-1 based vectors encoding for human preproenkephalin (SHPE) or the lacZ reporter gene (SHZ.1, control virus) into the trigeminal ganglia in mice, we performed an orofacial formalin test and assessed the cumulative nociceptive behavior at different time points after injection of the viral vectors. We observed an analgesic effect on nociceptive behavior that lasted up to 8 weeks after a single injection of SHPE into the trigeminal ganglia. Control virus injected animals showed nociceptive behavior similar to naïve mice. The analgesic effect of SHPE injection was reversed/attenuated by subcutaneous naloxone injections, a μ-opioid receptor antagonist. SHPE injected mice also showed normalization in withdrawal latencies upon thermal noxious stimulation of inflamed ears after subdermal complete Freund’s adjuvans injection indicating widespread expression of the transgene. Quantitative immunohistochemistry of trigeminal ganglia showed expression of human preproenkephalin after SHPE injection. Direct injection of viral vectors proved to be useful for exploring the distinct pathophysiology of the trigeminal system and could also be an interesting addition to the pain therapists’ armamentarium. PMID:24572785

  15. Cold and L-menthol-induced sensitization in healthy volunteers--a cold hypersensitivity analogue to the heat/capsaicin model.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Hjalte H; Poulsen, Jeppe N; Uchida, Yugo; Nikbakht, Anahita; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Gazerani, Parisa

    2015-05-01

    Topical high-concentration L-menthol is the only established human experimental pain model to study mechanisms underlying cold hyperalgesia. We aimed at investigating the combinatorial effect of cold stimuli and topical L-menthol on cold pain and secondary mechanical hyperalgesia. Analogue to the heat-capsaicin model on skin sensitization, we proposed that cold/menthol enhances or prolong L-menthol-evoked sensitization. Topical 40% L-menthol or vehicle was applied (20 minutes) on the volar forearms of 20 healthy females and males (age, 28.7 ± 0.6 years). Cold stimulation of 5°C for 5 minutes was then applied to the treated area 3 times with 40-minute intervals. Cold detection threshold and pain, mechanical hyperalgesia (pinprick), static and dynamic mechanical allodynia (von Frey and brush), skin blood flow (laser speckle), and temperature (thermocamera) were assessed. Cold detection threshold and cold pain threshold (CPT) increased after L-menthol and remained high after the cold rekindling cycles (P < 0.001). L-menthol evoked secondary hyperalgesia to pinprick (P < 0.001) particularly in females (P < 0.05) and also induced secondary allodynia to von Frey and brush (P < 0.001). Application of cold stimuli kept these areas enlarged with a higher response in females to brush after the third cold cycle (P < 0.05). Skin blood flow increased after L-menthol (P < 0.001) and stayed stable after cold cycles. Repeated application of cold on skin treated by L-menthol facilitated and prolonged L-menthol-induced cold pain and hyperalgesia. This model may prove beneficial for testing analgesic compounds when a sufficient duration of time is needed to see drug effects on CPT or mechanical hypersensitivity.

  16. 5-HT7 Receptors Are Not Involved in Neuropeptide Release in Primary Cultured Rat Trigeminal Ganglion Neurons.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaojuan; Hu, Rong; Liang, Jianbo; Li, Ze; Sun, Weiwen; Pan, Xiaoping

    2016-06-01

    Migraine is a common but complex neurological disorder. Its precise mechanisms are not fully understood. Increasing indirect evidence indicates that 5-HT7 receptors may be involved; however, their role remains unknown. Our previous in vivo study showed that selective blockade of 5-HT7 receptors caused decreased serum levels of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in the external jugular vein following electrical stimulation of the trigeminal ganglion (TG) in an animal model of migraine. In the present study, we used an in vitro model of cultured TG cells to further investigate whether 5-HT7 receptors are directly responsible for the release of CGRP and substance P from TG neurons. We stimulated rat primary cultured TG neurons with capsaicin or potassium chloride (KCl) to mimic neurogenic inflammation, resulting in release of CGRP and substance P. 5-HT7 receptors were abundantly expressed in TG neurons. Greater than 93 % of 5-HT7 receptor-positive neurons co-expressed CGRP and 56 % co-expressed substance P. Both the capsaicin- and KCl-induced release of CGRP and substance P were unaffected by pretreatment of cultured TG cells with the selective 5-HT7 receptor agonist AS19 and antagonist SB269970. This study demonstrates for the first time that 5-HT7 receptors are abundantly co-expressed with CGRP and substance P in rat primary TG neurons and suggests that they are not responsible for the release of CGRP and substance P from cultured TG neurons evoked by capsaicin or KCl.

  17. Uncommon Cause of Trigeminal Neuralgia: Tentorial Ossification over Trigeminal Notch

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Sun Woo; Han, Kyung Ream; Kim, Seung Ho; Jeong, Won Ho; Kim, Eun Jin; Choi, Jin Wook; Kim, Chan

    2015-01-01

    Ossification of the tentorium cerebelli over the trigeminal notch is rare, but it may cause compression of the trigeminal nerve, leading to trigeminal neuralgia (TN). We were unable to find any previously reported cases with radiological evaluation, although we did find one case with surgically proven ossification of the tentorium cerebelli. Here, we present a case of TN caused by tentorial ossification over the trigeminal notch depicted on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT). PMID:26380124

  18. [Pharmacotherapy of trigeminal neuralgia].

    PubMed

    Ramirez, H; Martinez, C; Oliva, J; Montini, C

    1989-12-01

    The efficacy of drug treatment on 119 patients with trigeminal neuralgia is reported in the present paper. Among them, 112 were idiopathic trigeminal neuralgias while only 7 cases were secondary trigeminal neuralgias. All patients were treated with drugs at different stages of the evolution of the neuralgia. Carbamazepine was used on all patients. 12.6% was treated with imipramine (tricyclic antidepressive drug), 4 patients received amphetamines due to psychiatric emergencies, 4 patients were treated with phenytoin before this study and three patients received baclofen during short periods of follow-up. Drug therapy was the only treatment method in 51 patients. In 43 patients it was combined with peripheral surgical treatments including injections of alcohol and neurectomies. 16.8% of the patients were treated with drugs and acupuncture; the results of this experience will be reported in a future paper. Only 4.2% (5 patients) underwent neurosurgical treatment: one ponto cerebellar angle tumour, one electrocoagulation of the gasserian ganglion through the stereotaxic method and three cases of microvascular decompression of the trigeminal root. Clinical, pharmacological and neurophysiological aspects of trigeminal neuralgia pharmacotherapy are discussed.

  19. H2S-induced HCO3- secretion in the rat stomach--involvement of nitric oxide, prostaglandins, and capsaicin-sensitive sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Koji; Ise, Fumitaka; Takahashi, Kento; Aihara, Eitaro; Hayashi, Shusaku

    2015-04-30

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is known to be an important gaseous mediator that affects various functions under physiological and pathological conditions. We examined the effects of NaHS, a H2S donor, on HCO3(-) secretion in rat stomachs and investigated the mechanism involved in this response. Under urethane anesthesia, rat stomachs were mounted on an ex vivo chamber and perfused with saline. Acid secretion had been inhibited by omeprazole. The secretion of HCO3(-) was measured at pH 7.0 using a pH-stat method and by the addition of 10 mM HCl. NaHS (0.5-10 mM) was perfused in the stomach for 5 min. Indomethacin or L-NAME was administered s.c. before NaHS treatment, while glibenclamide (a KATP channel blocker), ONO-8711 (an EP1 antagonist), or propargylglycine (a cystathionine γ-lyase inhibitor) was given i.p. before. The mucosal perfusion of NaHS dose-dependently increased the secretion of HCO3(-), and this effect was significantly attenuated by indomethacin, L-NAME, and sensory deafferentation, but not by glibenclamide or ONO-8711. The luminal output of nitric oxide, but not the mucosal production of prostaglandin E2, was increased by the perfusion of NaHS. Mucosal acidification stimulated HCO3(-) secretion, and this response was inhibited by sensory deafferentation, indomethacin, L-NAME, and ONO-8711, but not by propargylglycine. These results suggested that H2S increased HCO3(-) secretion in the stomach, and this effect was mediated by capsaicin-sensitive afferent neurons and dependent on nitric oxide and prostaglandins, but not ATP-sensitive K(+) channels. Further study is needed to define the role of endogenous H2S in the mechanism underlying acid-induced gastric HCO3(-) secretion.

  20. Melittin selectively activates capsaicin-sensitive primary afferent fibers.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hong Kee; Kim, Jin Hyuk

    2004-08-06

    Whole bee venom (WBV)-induced pain model has been reported to be very useful for the study of pain. However, the major constituent responsible for the production of pain by WBV is not apparent. Intraplantar injection of WBV and melittin dramatically reduced mechanical threshold, and increased flinchings and paw thickness. In behavioral experiments, capsaicin pretreatment almost completely prevented WBV- and melittin-induced reduction of mechanical threshold and flinchings. Intraplantar injection of melittin increased discharge rate of dorsal horn neurons only with C fiber input from peripheral receptive field, which was completely blocked by topical application of capsaicin to sciatic nerve. These results suggest that both melittin and WBV induce nociceptive responses by selective activation of capsaicin-sensitive afferent fibers.

  1. Botulinum toxin type A reduces capsaicin-evoked pain and neurogenic vasodilatation in human skin.

    PubMed

    Tugnoli, Valeria; Capone, Jay Guido; Eleopra, Roberto; Quatrale, Rocco; Sensi, Mariachiara; Gastaldo, Ernesto; Tola, Maria Rosaria; Geppetti, Pierangelo

    2007-07-01

    The effect of Botulinum Toxin type A (BoNT/A) on pain and neurogenic vasodilatation induced by application to the human skin of thermal stimuli and capsaicin was evaluated in a double blind study. A capsaicin cream (0.5 ml of a 0.075%) was applied to the skin of both forearms of eighteen subjects randomly pretreated with either BoNT/A (Botox) or 0.9% saline (NS). Capsaicin was applied to a skin area either inside (protocol A) or adjacent to the BoNT/A treated area (protocol B). Pre-treatment with BoNT/A did not affect thermal-specific and thermal-pain thresholds (by quantitative sensory testing). However, capsaicin-induced pain sensation (by a visual analogue scale), flare area (by acetate sheet) and changes in cutaneous blood flow (CBF, by laser Doppler flowmetry) were reduced when capsaicin was administered inside (protocol A) the BoNT/A treated area. In Protocol B, capsaicin-induced pain was unchanged, and capsaicin-induced flare/increase in CBF were reduced only in the area treated with BoNT/A, but not in the BoNT/A untreated area. Results indicate that (i) BoNT/A reduces capsaicin-induced pain and neurogenic vasodilatation without affecting the transmission of thermal and thermal-pain modalities; (ii) reduction in capsaicin-induced pain occurs only if capsaicin is administered into the BoNT/A pretreated area; (iii) reduction in neurogenic vasodilatation by BoNT/A does not contribute to its analgesic action. BoNT/A could be tested for the treatment of conditions characterised by neurogenic inflammation and inflammatory pain.

  2. Methylmercury chloride-induced and antagonist-reverted succinic dehydrogenase changes in the brain and trigeminal ganglia of the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Unnikumar, K.R.; Sood, P.P.

    1987-06-01

    The effect of methylmercury chloride (MMC) toxicity and its antagonism by chelating agents (N-acetyl-DL-homocysteine thiolactone and 2,3-dimercaptosuccininc acid) on succinic dehydrogenase (SDH) activity of fore-, and mid-, and hindbrain and trigeminal ganglia of rats is reported in this study. A dose of 10 mg MMC/kg body weight was injected subcutaneously for 2.7, and 15 days. The chelating agents were also injected subcutaneously in two separate groups of MMC-treated animals except in group 3. In the latter case MMC was injected in two groups of rats for 7 days, and thereafter antagonists were administered daily (40 mg/kg) for 1 week. The result shows inhibition of the enzyme with MMC in all groups and its restoration by N-acetyl-DL-homocysteine thiolactone; 2,3-dimercaptosuccininc acid, however, further reduced the enzyme level. The significance of inhibition of the enzyme in relation to tissue respiration and ATP production is discussed and the capacities of antagonists in the restoration of the SDH level are also analyzed.

  3. The mesencephalic trigeminal sensory nucleus is involved in acquisition of active exploratory behavior induced by changing from a diet of exclusively milk formula to food pellets in mice.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Toshiaki; Furuoka, Hidefumi; Kitamura, Nobuo; Muroi, Yoshikage; Nishimura, Masakazu

    2006-09-21

    Post-weaning mice fed exclusively milk display low-frequency exploratory behavior [Ishii, T., Itou, T., and Nishimura, M. (2005) Life Sci. 78, 174-179] compared to mice fed a food pellet diet. This low-frequency exploratory behavior switched to high-frequency exploration after a switch from exclusively milk formula to a food pellet diet. Acquisition of the high-frequency exploratory behavior was irreversible. Recently, we demonstrated that the mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus (Me5) is involved in the control of feeding and exploratory behavior in mice without modulating the emotional state [Ishii, T., Furuoka, H., Itou, T., Kitamura, N., and Nishimura, M. (2005) Brain Res. 1048, 80-86]. We therefore investigated whether the Me5 is involved in acquisition of high-frequency exploratory behavior induced by the switch in diet from an exclusively milk formula to food pellets. Mouse feeding and exploratory behaviors were analyzed using a food search compulsion apparatus, which was designed to distinguish between the two behaviors under standard living conditions. Immunohistochemical analysis of immediate early genes indicated that the Me5, which receives signals from oral proprioceptors, is transiently activated after the diet change. The change from low-frequency to high-frequency exploratory behavior was prevented in milk-fed mice by bilateral lesion of the Me5. These results suggest that the Me5 is activated by signals associated with mastication-induced proprioception and contributes to the acquisition of active exploratory behavior.

  4. Effect of capsaicin on thermoregulation: an update with new aspects

    PubMed Central

    Szolcsányi, János

    2015-01-01

    Capsaicin, a selective activator of the chemo- and heat-sensitive transient receptor potential (TRP) V1 cation channel, has characteristic feature of causing long-term functional and structural impairment of neural elements supplied by TRPV1/capsaicin receptor. In mammals, systemic application of capsaicin induces complex heat-loss response characteristic for each species and avoidance of warm environment. Capsaicin activates cutaneous warm receptors and polymodal nociceptors but has no effect on cold receptors or mechanoreceptors. In this review, thermoregulatory features of capsaicin-pretreated rodents and TRPV1-mediated neural elements with innocuous heat sensitivity are summarized. Recent data support a novel hypothesis for the role of visceral warmth sensors in monitoring core body temperature. Furthermore, strong evidence suggests that central presynaptic nerve terminals of TRPV1-expressing cutaneous, thoracic and abdominal visceral receptors are activated by innocuous warmth stimuli and capsaicin. These responses are absent in TRPV1 knockout mice. Thermoregulatory disturbance induced by systemic capsaicin pretreatment lasts for months and is characterized by a normal body temperature at cool environment up to a total dose of 150 mg/kg s.c. Upward differential shift of set points for activation vasodilation, other heat-loss effectors and thermopreference develops. Avoidance of warm ambient temperature (35°C, 40°C) is severely impaired but thermopreference at cool ambient temperatures (Tas) are not altered. TRPV1 knockout or knockdown and genetically altered TRPV1, TRPV2 and TRPM8 knockout mice have normal core temperature in thermoneutral or cool environments, but the combined mutant mice have impaired regulation in warm or cold (4°C) environments. Several lines of evidence support that in the preoptic area warmth sensitive neurons are activated and desensitized by capsaicin, but morphological evidence for it is controversial. It is suggested that these

  5. Capsaicin protects mouse neuromuscular junctions from the neuroparalytic effects of botulinum neurotoxin a.

    PubMed

    Thyagarajan, Baskaran; Krivitskaya, Natalia; Potian, Joseph G; Hognason, Kormakur; Garcia, Carmen C; McArdle, Joseph J

    2009-11-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A), the most toxic, naturally occurring protein, cleaves synapse-associated protein of 25 kDa and inhibits acetylcholine release from motor nerve endings (MNEs). This leads to paralysis of skeletal muscles. Our study demonstrates that capsaicin protects mouse neuromuscular junctions from the neuroparalytic effects of BoNT/A. Bilateral injection of BoNT/A near the innervation of the Extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle of adult Swiss-Webster mice inhibited the toe spread reflex (TSR). However, when capsaicin was coinjected bilaterally, or injected 4 or 8 h before injecting BoNT/A, the TSR remained normal. In animals that were pretreated with capsazepine, capsaicin failed to protect against the neuroparalytic effects of BoNT/A. In vivo analyses demonstrated that capsaicin protected muscle functions and electromygraphic activity from the incapacitating effects of BoNT/A. The twitch response to nerve stimulation was greater for EDL preparations isolated from mice injected with capsaicin before BoNT/A. Capsaicin pretreatment also prevented the inhibitory effects of BoNT/A on end-plate currents. Furthermore, pretreatment of Neuro 2a cells with capsaicin significantly preserved labeling of synaptic vesicles by FM 1-43. This protective effect of capsaicin was observed only in the presence of extracellular Ca(2+) and was inhibited by capsazepine. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that MNEs express transient receptor potential protein of the vanilloid subfamily, TRPV1, the capsaicin receptor. Capsaicin pretreatment, in vitro, reduced nerve stimulation or KCl-induced uptake of BoNT/A into motor nerve endings and cholinergic Neuro 2a cells. These data demonstrate that capsaicin interacts with TRPV1 receptors on MNEs to reduce BoNT/A uptake via a Ca(2+)-dependent mechanism.

  6. Corticofugal projections induce long-lasting effects on somatosensory responses in the trigeminal complex of the rat

    PubMed Central

    Malmierca, Eduardo; Chaves-Coira, Irene; Rodrigo-Angulo, Margarita; Nuñez, Angel

    2014-01-01

    The sensory information flow at subcortical relay stations is controlled by the action of topographic connections from the neocortex. To determinate the functional properties of the somatosensory corticofugal projections to the principal (Pr5) and caudal spinal (Sp5C) trigeminal nuclei, we performed unitary recordings in anesthetized rats. To examine the effect of these cortical projections we used tactile stimulation of the whisker and electrical stimulation of somatosensory cortices. Corticofugal anatomical projections to Pr5 and Sp5C nuclei were detected by using retrograde fluorescent tracers. Neurons projecting exclusively to Pr5 were located in the cingulate cortex while neurons projecting to both Sp5C and Pr5 nuclei were located in the somatosensory and insular cortices (>75% of neurons). Physiological results indicated that primary somatosensory cortex produced a short-lasting facilitating or inhibiting effects (<5 min) of tactile responses in Pr5 nucleus through activation of NMDA glutamatergic or GABAA receptors since effects were blocked by iontophoretically application of APV and bicuculline, respectively. In contrast, stimulation of secondary somatosensory cortex did not affect most of the Pr5 neurons; however both cortices inhibited the nociceptive responses in the Sp5C nucleus through activation of glycinergic or GABAA receptors because effects were blocked by iontophoretically application of strychnine and bicuculline, respectively. These and anatomical results demonstrated that the somatosensory cortices projects to Pr5 nucleus to modulate tactile responses by excitatory and inhibitory actions, while projections to the Sp5C nucleus control nociceptive sensory transmission by only inhibitory effects. Thus, somatosensory cortices may modulate innocuous and noxious inputs simultaneously, contributing to the perception of specifically tactile or painful sensations. PMID:24904321

  7. Use of Capsaicin to Treat Pain: Mechanistic and Therapeutic Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Man-Kyo; Campbell, James N.

    2016-01-01

    Capsaicin is the pungent ingredient of chili peppers and is approved as a topical treatment of neuropathic pain. The analgesia lasts for several months after a single treatment. Capsaicin selectively activates TRPV1, a Ca2+-permeable cationic ion channel that is enriched in the terminals of certain nociceptors. Activation is followed by a prolonged decreased response to noxious stimuli. Interest also exists in the use of injectable capsaicin as a treatment for focal pain conditions, such as arthritis and other musculoskeletal conditions. Recently injection of capsaicin showed therapeutic efficacy in patients with Morton’s neuroma, a painful foot condition associated with compression of one of the digital nerves. The relief of pain was associated with no change in tactile sensibility. Though injection evokes short term pain, the brief systemic exposure and potential to establish long term analgesia without other sensory changes creates an attractive clinical profile. Short-term and long-term effects arise from both functional and structural changes in nociceptive terminals. In this review, we discuss how local administration of capsaicin may induce ablation of nociceptive terminals and the clinical implications. PMID:27809268

  8. Use of Capsaicin to Treat Pain: Mechanistic and Therapeutic Considerations.

    PubMed

    Chung, Man-Kyo; Campbell, James N

    2016-11-01

    Capsaicin is the pungent ingredient of chili peppers and is approved as a topical treatment of neuropathic pain. The analgesia lasts for several months after a single treatment. Capsaicin selectively activates TRPV1, a Ca(2+)-permeable cationic ion channel that is enriched in the terminals of certain nociceptors. Activation is followed by a prolonged decreased response to noxious stimuli. Interest also exists in the use of injectable capsaicin as a treatment for focal pain conditions, such as arthritis and other musculoskeletal conditions. Recently injection of capsaicin showed therapeutic efficacy in patients with Morton's neuroma, a painful foot condition associated with compression of one of the digital nerves. The relief of pain was associated with no change in tactile sensibility. Though injection evokes short term pain, the brief systemic exposure and potential to establish long term analgesia without other sensory changes creates an attractive clinical profile. Short-term and long-term effects arise from both functional and structural changes in nociceptive terminals. In this review, we discuss how local administration of capsaicin may induce ablation of nociceptive terminals and the clinical implications.

  9. Comparative effect of Phoneutria nigriventer spider venom and capsaicin on the rat paw oedema.

    PubMed

    Costa, S K; Esquisatto, L C; Camargo, E; Gambero, A; Brain, S D; De Nucci, G; Antunes, E

    2001-08-17

    Capsaicin, the pungent component of hot peppers, and the venom of the spider Phoneutria nigriventer are able to activate sensory nerves resulting in cutaneous neurogenic plasma extravasation. This study was undertaken to compare the ability of these substances to evoke oedema in the rat hind-paw and mechanisms underlying this effect. Subplantar injection of either Phoneutria nigriventer venom (PNV; 1-100 microg/paw) or capsaicin (10-200 microg/paw) caused a significant paw oedema that was potentiated by CGRP (10 pmol/paw). In rats treated neonatally with capsaicin to deplete neuropeptides, the paw oedema induced by either PNV (100 microg/paw) or capsaicin (100 microg/paw) was partially reduced (P<0.05). The tachykinin NK1 receptor antagonist SR140333 (0.2 micromol/kg; i.v.) prevented the paw oedema induced by the tachykinin NK1 receptor agonist GR73632 (30 pmol/paw) and partially reduced paw oedema induced by PNV or capsaicin. Treatment of rats with compound 48/80 (5 mg/kg; s.c. 3 days) or with both H1 receptor antagonist (mepyramine; 1 nmol/paw) and 5-HT receptor antagonist (methysergide; 1 nmol/paw) significantly inhibited PNV- or capsaicin-induced paw oedema. The combined treatment with mepyramine and methysergide and SR140333 further reduced PNV- and capsaicin-induced paw oedema. The bradykinin B2 receptor antagonist Hoe 140 affected neither PNV- nor capsaicin-induced responses. Our results suggest that PNV and capsaicin each induce paw oedema that is partially mediated by activation of sensory fibers culminating in the release of substance P as well as by activation of mast cells which in turn release amines such as histamine and 5-HT.

  10. Capsaicin and arterial hypertensive crisis.

    PubMed

    Patanè, Salvatore; Marte, Filippo; La Rosa, Felice Carmelo; La Rocca, Roberto

    2010-10-08

    Chili peppers are rich in capsaicin. The potent vasodilator calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is stored in a population of C-fiber afferents that are sensitive to capsaicin. CGRP and peptides released from cardiac C fibers have a beneficial effect in myocardial ischemia and reperfusion. It has been reported that capsaicin pretreatment can deplete cardiac C-fiber peptide stores. Furthermore, it has also been reported that capsaicin-treated pigs have significantly increased mean arterial blood pressure compared with controls, and that the decrease in CGRP synthesis and release contributes to the elevated blood pressure. A case has also been reported of an arterial hypertensive crisis in a patient with a large ingestion of peppers and chili peppers the day before. We present a case of an arterial hypertensive crisis in a 19-year-old Italian man with an abundant ingestion of peppers and of chili peppers the preceding day. This case describes an unusual pattern of arterial hypertensive crisis due to capsaicin.

  11. Biotechnological enhancement of capsaicin biosynthesis in cell suspension cultures of Naga King Chili (Capsicum chinense Jacq.).

    PubMed

    Kehie, Mechuselie; Kumaria, Suman; Tandon, Pramod

    2016-01-01

    Cell suspension cultures were initiated from hypocotyl derived callus to induce capsaicin biosynthesis in suspension cultures of Naga King Chili (Capsicum chinense Jacq.). Efficient capsaicin production with high growth index (GI) was obtained by exposing cells to salicylic acid (SA) and calcium channel modulators in suspension cultures. The time course of capsaicin formation is related to the cell growth profile in a batch culture. Cells cultivated in the standard medium (SM) initially showed low level of capsaicin yield during active growth. When the cells approached stationary phase, cell growth and cell viability decreased whereas capsaicin production increased continuously. In the fed-batch cultures, the highest capsaicin yield (567.4 ± 8.1 μgg(1) fresh weight) (f.wt) was obtained by feeding the cells with 1 mM SA. However, SA feeding during cultivation repressed the cell growth. Enhanced cell growth (3.1 ± 0.1 GI/culture) and capsaicin yield (534 ± 7.8 μgg(-1)f.wt) were obtained when the cells were fed with calcium ionophore A23187 (0.5 mM) on day 25 as compared to the control. Addition of the calcium channel blocker verapamil hydrochloride (100 mM) inhibited cell growth and capsaicin production in Naga King Chili suspension cell cultures.

  12. Capsaicin regulates the NF-κB pathway in salivary gland inflammation.

    PubMed

    Shin, Y-H; Namkoong, E; Choi, S; Bae, J-S; Jin, M; Hwang, S-M; Arote, R; Choi, S-Y; Park, K

    2013-06-01

    Salivary gland epithelial cells (SGEC) release several cytokines that play important roles in the inflammatory process. In this study, we examined whether capsaicin can modulate cytokine release in SGEC. After cells were stimulated with polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid [poly(I:C)] or lipopolysaccharide (LPS), mRNA transcript and protein levels were detected by reverse-transcriptase-polymerase chain-reaction (RT-PCR), real-time PCR, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). These findings demonstrated that the increases in TNFα and IL-6 mRNA transcripts were highest at 3 hrs and 1 hr after incubation with poly(I:C) and LPS, respectively. Pre-treatment of the cells with 10 μµ capsaicin, however, significantly inhibited mRNA transcripts and its protein levels. The simultaneous application of 10 μµ capsazepine with capsaicin did not block the inhibitory effect of capsaicin. Furthermore, the inhibitory effect of capsaicin was also shown in primary cultured cells from TRPV1(-/-) mice. We found that both poly(I:C) and LPS induced IκB-α degradation and phosphorylation, which resulted in NF-κB activation, and capsaicin inhibited this NF-κB pathway. These results demonstrate that SGEC release pro-inflammatory cytokines mediated by TLR, and capsaicin inhibits this process through the NF-κB pathway. This study suggests that capsaicin could potentially alleviate inflammation in salivary glands.

  13. TRPA1-mediated responses in trigeminal sensory neurons: interaction between TRPA1 and TRPV1.

    PubMed

    Salas, Margaux M; Hargreaves, Kenneth M; Akopian, Armen N

    2009-04-01

    The transient receptor potential (TRP)A1 channel is involved in the transduction of inflammation-induced noxious stimuli from the periphery. Previous studies have characterized the properties of TRPA1 in heterologous expression systems. However, there is little information on the properties of TRPA1-mediated currents in sensory neurons. A capsaicin-sensitive subset of rat and mouse trigeminal ganglion sensory neurons was activated with TRPA1-specific agonists, mustard oil and the cannabinoid WIN55,212. Mustard oil- and WIN55,212-gated currents exhibited marked variability in their kinetics of activation and acute desensitization. TRPA1-mediated responses in neurons also possess a characteristic voltage dependency with profound outward rectification that is influenced by extracellular Ca(2+) and the type and concentration of TRPA1-specific agonists. Examination of TRPA1-mediated responses in TRPA1-containing cells indicated that the features of neuronal TRPA1 are not duplicated in cells expressing only TRPA1 and, instead, can be restored only when TRPA1 and TRPV1 channels are coexpressed. In summary, our results suggest that TRPA1-mediated responses in sensory neurons have distinct characteristics that can be accounted for by the coexpression of the TRPV1 and TRPA1 channels.

  14. Trigeminal autonomic cephalgias

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Summary points 1. Trigeminal autonomic cephalgias (TACs) are headaches/facial pains classified together based on:a suspected common pathophysiology involving the trigeminovascular system, the trigeminoparasympathetic reflex and centres controlling circadian rhythms;a similar clinical presentation of trigeminal pain, and autonomic activation. 2. There is much overlap in the diagnostic features of individual TACs. 3. In contrast, treatment response is relatively specific and aids in establishing a definitive diagnosis. 4. TACs are often presentations of underlying pathology; all patients should be imaged. 5. The aim of the article is to provide the reader with a broad introduction to, and an overview of, TACs. The reading list is extensive for the interested reader. PMID:26516482

  15. The effect of spider toxin PhTx3-4, ω-conotoxins MVIIA and MVIIC on glutamate uptake and on capsaicin-induced glutamate release and [Ca2+]i in spinal cord synaptosomes.

    PubMed

    Gonçaves, Jomara M; Ferreira, Juliano; Prado, Marco Antonio M; Cordeiro, Marta N; Richardson, Michael; Pinheiro, Ana Cristina do Nascimento; Silva, Marco A Romano; Junior, Celio José de Castro; Souza, Alessandra H; Gomez, Marcus Vinicius

    2011-03-01

    In spinal cord synaptosomes, the spider toxin PhTx3-4 inhibited capsaicin-stimulated release of glutamate in both calcium-dependent and -independent manners. In contrast, the conus toxins, ω-conotoxin MVIIA and xconotoxin MVIIC, only inhibited calcium-dependent glutamate release. PhTx3-4, but not ω-conotoxin MVIIA or xconotoxin MVIIC, is able to inhibit the uptake of glutamate by synaptosomes, and this inhibition in turn leads to a decrease in the Ca(2+)-independent release of glutamate. No other polypeptide toxin so far described has this effect. PhTx3-4 and ω-conotoxins MVIIC and MVIIA are blockers of voltage-dependent calcium channels, and they significantly inhibited the capsaicin-induced rise of intracellular calcium [Ca(2+)](i) in spinal cord synaptosomes, which likely reflects calcium entry through voltage-gated calcium channels. The inhibition of the calcium-independent glutamate release by PhTx3-4 suggests a potential use of the toxin to block abnormal glutamate release in pathological conditions such as pain.

  16. Gamma Knife® radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Yen, Chun-Po; Schlesinger, David; Sheehan, Jason P

    2011-11-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia is characterized by a temporary paroxysmal lancinating facial pain in the trigeminal nerve distribution. The prevalence is four to five per 100,000. Local pressure on nerve fibers from vascular loops results in painful afferent discharge from an injured segment of the fifth cranial nerve. Microvascular decompression addresses the underlying pathophysiology of the disease, making this treatment the gold standard for medically refractory trigeminal neuralgia. In patients who cannot tolerate a surgical procedure, those in whom a vascular etiology cannot be identified, or those unwilling to undergo an open surgery, stereotactic radiosurgery is an appropriate alternative. The majority of patients with typical facial pain will achieve relief following radiosurgical treatment. Long-term follow-up for recurrence as well as for radiation-induced complications is required in all patients undergoing stereotactic radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia.

  17. Capsaicin exhibits anti-inflammatory property by inhibiting IkB-a degradation in LPS-stimulated peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chu-Sook; Kawada, Teruo; Kim, Byung-Sam; Han, In-Seob; Choe, Suck-Young; Kurata, Tadao; Yu, Rina

    2003-03-01

    Capsaicin, a major ingredient of hot pepper, was considered to exhibit an anti-inflammatory property. In order to clarify the signalling mechanism underlying the anti-inflammatory action of capsaicin, we investigated the effect of capsaicin on the production of inflammatory molecules in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated murine peritoneal macrophages. The level of PGE2 was measured by EIA. The expression levels of COX-2, iNOS, IkB-a, and vanilloid receptor-1 (VR-1) were determined at the protein and mRNA levels. Significant inhibition of the production of LPS-induced PGE2 by capsaicin was observed in a dose-dependent manner. Capsaicin did not affect the COX-2 expression at either the protein or mRNA level, but inhibited the enzyme activity of COX-2 and the expression of the iNOS protein. Capsaicin completely blocked LPS-induced disappearance of IkB-a and therefore inactivated NF-kB. The inhibitory action of capsaicin on PGE2 production was not abolished by capsazepine, a specific antagonist to VR-1. A high expression level of the VR-1 like protein (VRL-1) was observed in peritoneal macrophages, while the expression of VR-1 was not detected. These findings suggest that the anti-inflammatory action of capsaicin may occur through a novel mechanism, not by a VR-1 receptor-mediated one. Both capsaicin and capsazepine may be a promising drug candidates for ameliorating inflammatory diseases and cancer.

  18. A critical re-evaluation of the specificity of action of perivagal capsaicin

    PubMed Central

    Browning, K N; Babic, T; Holmes, G M; Swartz, E; Travagli, R A

    2013-01-01

    Perivagal application of capsaicin (1% solution) is considered to cause a selective degeneration of vagal afferent C fibres and has been used extensively to examine the site of action of many gastrointestinal (GI) neuropeptides. The actions of both capsaicin and GI neuropeptides may not be restricted to vagal afferent fibres, however, as other non-sensory neurones have displayed sensitivity to capsaicin and brainstem microinjections of these neuropeptides induce GI effects similar to those obtained upon systemic application. The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that perivagal capsaicin induces degeneration of vagal efferents controlling GI functions. Experiments were conducted 7–14 days after 30 min unilateral perivagal application of 0.1–1% capsaicin. Immunohistochemical analyses demonstrated that, as following vagotomy, capsaicin induced dendritic degeneration, decreased choline acetyltransferase but increased nitric oxide synthase immunoreactivity in rat dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMV) neurones. Electrophysiological recordings showed a decreased DMV input resistance and excitability due, in part, to the expression of a large conductance calcium-dependent potassium current and the opening of a transient outward potassium window current at resting potential. Furthermore, the number of DMV neurones excited by thyrotrophin-releasing hormone and the gastric motility response to DMV microinjections of TRH were decreased significantly. Our data indicate that perivagal application of capsaicin induced DMV neuronal degeneration and decreased vagal motor responses. Treatment with perivagal capsaicin cannot therefore be considered selective for vagal afferent C fibres and, consequently, care is needed when using perivagal capsaicin to assess the mechanism of action of GI neuropeptides. PMID:23297311

  19. A critical re-evaluation of the specificity of action of perivagal capsaicin.

    PubMed

    Browning, K N; Babic, T; Holmes, G M; Swartz, E; Travagli, R A

    2013-03-15

    Perivagal application of capsaicin (1% solution) is considered to cause a selective degeneration of vagal afferent C fibres and has been used extensively to examine the site of action of many gastrointestinal (GI) neuropeptides. The actions of both capsaicin and GI neuropeptides may not be restricted to vagal afferent fibres, however, as other non-sensory neurones have displayed sensitivity to capsaicin and brainstem microinjections of these neuropeptides induce GI effects similar to those obtained upon systemic application. The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that perivagal capsaicin induces degeneration of vagal efferents controlling GI functions. Experiments were conducted 7-14 days after 30 min unilateral perivagal application of 0.1-1% capsaicin. Immunohistochemical analyses demonstrated that, as following vagotomy, capsaicin induced dendritic degeneration, decreased choline acetyltransferase but increased nitric oxide synthase immunoreactivity in rat dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMV) neurones. Electrophysiological recordings showed a decreased DMV input resistance and excitability due, in part, to the expression of a large conductance calcium-dependent potassium current and the opening of a transient outward potassium window current at resting potential. Furthermore, the number of DMV neurones excited by thyrotrophin-releasing hormone and the gastric motility response to DMV microinjections of TRH were decreased significantly. Our data indicate that perivagal application of capsaicin induced DMV neuronal degeneration and decreased vagal motor responses. Treatment with perivagal capsaicin cannot therefore be considered selective for vagal afferent C fibres and, consequently, care is needed when using perivagal capsaicin to assess the mechanism of action of GI neuropeptides.

  20. Anticancer Properties of Capsaicin Against Human Cancer.

    PubMed

    Clark, Ruth; Lee, Seong-Ho

    2016-03-01

    There is persuasive epidemiological and experimental evidence that dietary phytochemicals have anticancer activity. Capsaicin is a bioactive phytochemical abundant in red and chili peppers. While the preponderance of the data strongly indicates significant anticancer benefits of capsaicin, more information to highlight molecular mechanisms of its action is required to improve our knowledge to be able to propose a potential therapeutic strategy for use of capsaicin against cancer. Capsaicin has been shown to alter the expression of several genes involved in cancer cell survival, growth arrest, angiogenesis and metastasis. Recently, many research groups, including ours, found that capsaicin targets multiple signaling pathways, oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes in various types of cancer models. In this review article, we highlight multiple molecular targets responsible for the anticancer mechanism of capsaicin. In addition, we deal with the benefits of combinational use of capsaicin with other dietary or chemotherapeutic compounds, focusing on synergistic anticancer activities.

  1. Refined distribution of myelinated trigeminal proprioceptive nerve fibres in Mueller's muscle as the mechanoreceptors to induce involuntary reflexive contraction of the levator and frontalis muscles.

    PubMed

    Yuzuriha, Shunsuke; Matsuo, Kiyoshi; Hirasawa, Chihiro; Moriizumi, Tetsuji

    2009-11-01

    Stretching of mechanoreceptors in Mueller's muscle induces reflexive contraction of not only the levator muscle but also the frontalis muscle as two different eyelid-opening muscles. Previously, we reported that fine neural myelinated structures, acting as mechanoreceptors, were found in the proximal Mueller's muscle. Since there is a risk of misunderstanding that the middle and distal Mueller's muscle does not contain mechanoreceptors and can be invalidated or resected, the accurate distribution of myelinated trigeminal proprioceptive nerve fibres as mechanoreceptors in Mueller's muscle was refined horizontally in this study. We explored 10 whole Mueller's muscles between the levator muscle and the tarsus of the upper eyelids obtained from five Japanese cadavers. The specimens were serially sliced along the horizontal plane and stained with HE, S-100 protein to determine the presence of Schwann cells, and smooth muscle actin antibody to determine the presence of Mueller's smooth muscle fibres. Although all myelinated nerve fibres in the intermuscular connective tissues among the sympathetically innervated Mueller's multi-unit smooth muscle fibres may not correspond to the proprioceptive nerve fibres, the nerve bundles consisting of multiple myelinated nerve fibres were well distributed in the proximal Mueller's muscle, and single myelinated nerve fibres were well distributed in the middle and distal Mueller's muscle. We believe that the mechanoreceptors in Mueller's muscle consist of myelinated proprioceptive nerve fibres with nerve endings possibly attached to collagen fibres in the intermuscular connective tissues present among Mueller's smooth muscle fibres. As the myelinated nerve fibres innervate the middle and distal Mueller's muscle to a greater extent than those in the proximal Mueller's muscle, the former may be more important as mechanoreceptors than the latter and should not be invalidated or excised during surgery for treatment of blepharoptosis to

  2. Capsaicin-Sensitive Sensory Nerves Mediate the Cellular and Microvascular Effects of H2S via TRPA1 Receptor Activation and Neuropeptide Release.

    PubMed

    Hajna, Zsófia; Sághy, Éva; Payrits, Maja; Aubdool, Aisah A; Szőke, Éva; Pozsgai, Gábor; Bátai, István Z; Nagy, Lívia; Filotás, Dániel; Helyes, Zsuzsanna; Brain, Susan D; Pintér, Erika

    2016-10-01

    It is supposed that TRPA1 receptor can be activated by hydrogen sulphide (H2S). Here, we have investigated the role of TRPA1 receptor in H2S-induced [Ca(2+)]i increase in trigeminal ganglia (TRG) neurons, and the involvement of capsaicin-sensitive sensory nerves in H2S-evoked cutaneous vasodilatation. [Ca(2+)]i was measured with ratiometric technique on TRG neurons of TRPA1(+/+) and TRPA1(-/-) mice after NaHS, Na2S, allylisothiocyanate (AITC) or KCl treatment. Microcirculatory changes in the ear were detected by laser Doppler imaging in response to topical NaHS, AITC, NaOH, NaSO3 or NaCl. Mice were either treated with resiniferatoxin (RTX), or CGRP antagonist BIBN4096, or NK1 receptor antagonist CP99994, or K(+) ATP channel blocker glibenclamide. Alpha-CGRP(-/-) and NK1 (-/-) mice were also investigated. NaHS and Na2S increased [Ca(2+)]i in TRG neurons derived from TRPA(+/+) but not from TRPA1(-/-) mice. NaHS increased cutaneous blood flow, while NaOH, NaSO3 and NaCl did not cause significant changes. NaHS-induced vasodilatation was reduced in RTX-treated animals, as well as by pre-treatment with BIBN4096 or CP99994 alone or in combination. NaHS-induced vasodilatation was significantly smaller in alpha-CGRP(-/-) or NK1 (-/-) mice compared to wild-types. H2S activates capsaicin-sensitive sensory nerves through TRPA1 receptors and the resultant vasodilatation is mediated by the release of vasoactive sensory neuropeptides CGRP and substance P.

  3. Novel therapeutics in the field of capsaicin and pain.

    PubMed

    Evangelista, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Capsaicin, a pharmacologically active agent found in chili peppers, causes burning and itching sensation due to binding at the transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV-1) receptor, a polymodal receptor critical to the sensing of a variety of stimuli (e.g., noxious heat, bidirectional pH), and subsequent activation of polymodal C and A-δ nociceptive fibers. Acutely, TRPV-1 activation with peripheral capsaicin produces pronociceptive effects, which extends to the development of hyperalgesia and allodynia. However, capsaicin has been reported to display antinociceptive properties as well, largely through TRPV-1-dependent mechanisms. Local application of high concentration of capsaicin is used for neuropathic pain and repeated stimulation of TRPV-1 induced an improvement of epigastric pain in irritable bowel syndrome and dyspepsia patients by desensitization of nociceptive pathways. New TRPV-1 agonists are currently under preclinical study and TRPV-1 antagonists are in early clinical development as analgesics. The TRPV-1 pathway might be a novel target for therapeutics in pain sensitivity.

  4. Hypothalamic thermosensitivity in capsaicin-desensitized rats.

    PubMed Central

    Cormarèche-Leydier, M; Shimada, S G; Stitt, J T

    1985-01-01

    In rats, we tested the hypothesis that capsaicin desensitization reduces hypothalamic warm thermosensitivity. We locally heated and cooled the hypothalamus using water-perfused thermodes while observing thermoregulatory variables. In untreated rats, a small dose of capsaicin had profound effects on thermoregulation. However, desensitizing rats to capsaicin had no effect on hypothalamic thermosensitivity for metabolic rate or changes in body temperature due to displacements of hypothalamic temperature. Contrary to current opinion, we conclude that capsaicin desensitization does not alter hypothalamic thermosensitivity to warm or cold. PMID:4020699

  5. Quantum dot nanoprobe-based high-content monitoring of notch pathway inhibition of breast cancer stem cell by capsaicin.

    PubMed

    Shim, Yumi; Song, Joon Myong

    2015-12-01

    Breast cancer is the major cause of cancer death for women worldwide. Breast cancer patients are treated with chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Although chemotherapy and radiotherapy are applied, some cancer cells still survive. These cells, called cancer stem cell (CSC), exhibit special capabilities, such as drug and radio resistance. The remaining CSC can trigger cancer recurrence. Thus, it is critical to find an effective way to target CSC. Capsaicin has been reported to affect anticancer activity in many cancers. It also has been shown that capsaicin induces apoptosis in the MCF-7 breast cancer cell line. In this study, we demonstrate that capsaicin causes dose-dependent growth disruption in breast CSC and inhibits translocation of notch intracellular membrane domain (NICD) into the nucleus. MCF-7 cells were treated with capsaicin at various concentrations (5 μM, 10 μM, and 20 μM) for 24 h. After capsaicin treatment, it was found that the number of breast CSC (%) decreased as the treatment concentration of capsaicin increased. This result was also confirmed with FACS. NICD translocation to the nucleus and apoptotic cell death of breast CSC were concurrently observed at the single breast CSC level using highly sensitive quantum dot (Qdot)-antibody nanoprobes. The control breast CSCs without the capsaicin treatment were able to translocate NICD into the nucleus. On the other hand, translocation of NICD into the nucleus was not observed in capsaicin-treated cells. In addition, apoptotic cell death was caused when the breast CSC were treated with capsaicin at more than 10 μM. Although many studies have shown that capsaicin produces anticancer activity in cancer cell lines, the present result is the first report to demonstrate that capsaicin is capable of causing breast CSC apoptotic cell death via inhibiting its notch signaling pathway.

  6. No relevant modulation of TRPV1-mediated trigeminal pain by intranasal carbon dioxide in healthy humans

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Nasal insufflation of CO2 has been shown to exert antinociceptive respectively antihyperalgesic effects in animal pain models using topical capsaicin with activation of TRPV1-receptor positive nociceptive neurons. Clinical benefit from CO2 inhalation in patients with craniofacial pain caused by a putative activation of TRPV1 receptor positive trigeminal neurons has also been reported. These effects are probably mediated via an activation of TRPV1 receptor - positive neurons in the nasal mucosa with subsequent central inhibitory effects (such as conditioned pain modulation). In this study, we aimed to examine the effects of intranasal CO2 on a human model of craniofacial pain elicited by nasal application of capsaicin. Methods In a first experiment, 48 healthy volunteers without previous craniofacial pain received intranasal capsaicin to provoke trigeminal pain elicited by activation of TRVP1 positive nociceptive neurons. Then, CO2 or air was insufflated alternatingly into the nasal cavity at a flow rate of 1 l/min for 60 sec each. In the subsequent experiment, all participants were randomized into 2 groups of 24 each and received either continuous nasal insufflation of CO2 or placebo for 18:40 min after nociceptive stimulation with intranasal capsaicin. In both experiments, pain was rated on a numerical rating scale every 60 sec. Results Contrary to previous animal studies, the effects of CO2 on experimental trigeminal pain were only marginal. In the first experiment, CO2 reduced pain ratings only minimally by 5.3% compared to air if given alternatingly with significant results for the main factor GROUP (F1,47 = 4.438; p = 0.041) and the interaction term TIME*GROUP (F2.6,121.2 = 3.3; p = 0.029) in the repeated-measures ANOVA. However, these effects were abrogated after continuous insufflation of CO2 or placebo with no significant changes for the main factors or the interaction term. Conclusions Although mild modulatory effects of low

  7. Trigeminal neuralgia - diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Maarbjerg, Stine; Di Stefano, Giulia; Bendtsen, Lars; Cruccu, Giorgio

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is characterized by touch-evoked unilateral brief shock-like paroxysmal pain in one or more divisions of the trigeminal nerve. In addition to the paroxysmal pain, some patients also have continuous pain. TN is divided into classical TN (CTN) and secondary TN (STN). Etiology and pathophysiology Demyelination of primary sensory trigeminal afferents in the root entry zone is the predominant pathophysiological mechanism. Most likely, demyelination paves the way for generation of ectopic impulses and ephaptic crosstalk. In a significant proportion of the patients, the demyelination is caused by a neurovascular conflict with morphological changes such as compression of the trigeminal root. However, there are also other unknown etiological factors, as only half of the CTN patients have morphological changes. STN is caused by multiple sclerosis or a space-occupying lesion affecting the trigeminal nerve. Differential diagnosis and treatment Important differential diagnoses include trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias, posttraumatic or postherpetic pain and other facial pains. First line treatment is prophylactic medication with sodium channel blockers, and second line treatment is neurosurgical intervention. Future perspectives Future studies should focus on genetics, unexplored etiological factors, sensory function, the neurosurgical outcome and complications, combination and neuromodulation treatment as well as development of new drugs with better tolerability.

  8. Cell bodies of the trigeminal proprioceptive neurons that transmit reflex contraction of the levator muscle are located in the mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus in rats.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Kenya; Matsuo, Kiyoshi; Yuzuriha, Shunsuke; Kawagishi, Kyutaro; Moriizumi, Tetsuji

    2012-12-01

    Since the levator and frontalis muscles lack interior muscle spindles despite being antigravity mixed muscles to involuntarily sustain eyelid opening and eyebrow lifting, this study has proposed a hypothetical mechanism to compensate for this anatomical defect. The voluntary contraction of fast-twitch fibres of the levator muscle stretches the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle to evoke proprioception, which continuously induces reflex contraction of slow-twitch fibres of the levator and frontalis muscles. This study confirmed the presence of cell bodies of the trigeminal proprioceptive neurons that transmit reflex contraction of the levator and frontalis muscles. After confirming that severing the trigeminal proprioceptive fibres that innervate the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle induced ipsilateral eyelid ptosis, Fluorogold was applied as a tracer to the proximal stump of the trigeminal proprioceptive nerve in rats. Fluorogold labelled the cell bodies of the trigeminal proprioceptive neurons, not in any regions of the rat brain including the trigeminal ganglion, but in the ipsilateral mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus neighbouring the locus ceruleus. Some Fluorogold particles accumulated in the area of the locus ceruleus. The trigeminal proprioceptive neurons could be considered centrally displaced ganglion cells to transmit afferent signal from the mechanoreceptors in Müller's muscle to the mesencephalon, where they may be able to make excitatory synaptic connections with both the oculomotor neurons and the frontalis muscle motoneurons for the involuntary coordination of the eyelid and eyebrow activities, and potentially to the locus ceruleus.

  9. Capsaicin inhibits the adipogenic differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells by regulating cell proliferation, apoptosis, oxidative and nitrosative stress.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Muhammed; Jang, Mi; Park, Mina; Gobianand, Kuppannan; You, Seungkwon; Yeon, Sung-Heom; Park, Sungkwon; Kim, Min Ji; Lee, Hyun-Jeong

    2015-07-01

    Obesity is a global health problem that requires the utmost attention. Apart from other factors the trans-differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into adipocytes is an added detrimental factor causing the intensification of obesity. The main objective of this present study is to analyse whether capsaicin is capable of inhibiting the differentiation of BMSCs to adipocytes. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) were obtained and exposed to different concentrations of capsaicin for a period of 6 days following 2 days of adipogenic induction. The capsaicin exposed cells were collected at three different time points (2, 4 and 6 days) and subjected to various analyses. BMSCs after exposure to capsaicin showed dose and time dependent reduction in cell viability and proliferation. Interestingly, capsaicin induced cell cycle arrest at G0-G1 and increased apoptosis by increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) production. Capsaicin significantly inhibited the early adipogenic differentiation, lipogenesis and maturation of adipocytes with concomitant repression of PPARγ, C/EBPα, FABP4 and SCD-1. Taken together, the results of the present study have clearly emphasized that capsaicin potentially inhibits the adipogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells via many different pathways (anti-proliferative, apoptotic and cell cycle arrest) through the stimulation of ROS and RNS production. Thus, capsaicin not only suppresses the maturation of pre-adipocytes into adipocytes but also inhibits the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells into adipocytes.

  10. Role of capsaicin sensitive nerves in epidermal growth factor effects on gastric mucosal injury and blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Kang, J; Teng, C; Chen, F; Wee, A

    1998-01-01

    Background—Epidermal growth factor (EGF) and capsaicin protect against experimental gastric mucosal injury. Capsaicin exerts its gastroprotective effect by stimulating afferent neurones leading to release of calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) which causes gastric hyperaemia. EGF also causes gastric hyperaemia but whether it acts via capsaicin sensitive neurones is unknown. 
Aims—To assess the influence of: (1) capsaicin desensitisation on EGF effects on gastric mucosal injury and gastric mucosal blood flow; and (2) close arterial infusion of hCGRP8-37, a CGRP antagonist, on EGF effects on gastric mucosal blood flow. 
Methods—The absolute ethanol induced gastric mucosal injury model in the rat was used. Gastric mucosal damage was assessed by planimetry and light microscopy. Gastric mucosal blood flow was measured by laser Doppler flowmetry in a gastric chamber preparation. 
Results—Capsaicin desensitisation abolished the gastroprotective and gastric hyperaemic effects of EGF. Close arterial infusion of hCGRP8-37 antagonised the hyperaemic effect of both capsaicin and EGF. 
Conclusion—Results show that EGF may exert its gastroprotective and gastric hyperaemic effects via capsaicin sensitive afferent neurones. 

 Keywords: capsaicin; epidermal growth factor; gastric mucosal injury; gastric mucosal blood flow; calcitonin gene related peptide antagonist; rat PMID:9577339

  11. Pain in trigeminal neuralgia: neurophysiology and measurement: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Kumar, S; Rastogi, S; Kumar, S; Mahendra, P; Bansal, M; Chandra, L

    2013-01-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is defined as sudden, usually unilateral, severe, brief, stabbing recurrent episodes of pain within the distribution of one or more branches of the trigeminal nerve. It is the most frequent cranial neuralgia, the incidence being 1 per 1,000,00 persons per year. Pain attacks start abruptly and last several seconds but may persist 1 to 2 minutes. The attacks are initiated by non painful physical stimulation of specific areas (trigger points or zones) that are located ipsilateral to the pain. After each episode, there is usually a refractive period during which stimulation of the trigger zone will not induce the pain. According to the European Federation of Neurological Societies (EFNS) guidelines on neuropathic pain assessment and the American Academy of Neurology (AAN)-EFNS guidelines on TN management the neurophysiological recording of trigeminal reflexes represents the most useful and reliable test for the neurophysiological diagnosis of trigeminal pains. The present article discusses different techniques for investigation of the trigeminal system by which an accurate topographical diagnosis and profile of sensory fiber pathology can be determined. With the aid of neurophysiological recordings and quantitative sensory testing, it is possible to approach a mechanism-based classification of orofacial pain.

  12. Pain in trigeminal neuralgia: neurophysiology and measurement: a comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, S; Rastogi, S; Kumar, S; Mahendra, P; Bansal, M; Chandra, L

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is defined as sudden, usually unilateral, severe, brief, stabbing recurrent episodes of pain within the distribution of one or more branches of the trigeminal nerve. It is the most frequent cranial neuralgia, the incidence being 1 per 1,000,00 persons per year. Pain attacks start abruptly and last several seconds but may persist 1 to 2 minutes. The attacks are initiated by non painful physical stimulation of specific areas (trigger points or zones) that are located ipsilateral to the pain. After each episode, there is usually a refractive period during which stimulation of the trigger zone will not induce the pain. According to the European Federation of Neurological Societies (EFNS) guidelines on neuropathic pain assessment and the American Academy of Neurology (AAN)-EFNS guidelines on TN management the neurophysiological recording of trigeminal reflexes represents the most useful and reliable test for the neurophysiological diagnosis of trigeminal pains. The present article discusses different techniques for investigation of the trigeminal system by which an accurate topographical diagnosis and profile of sensory fiber pathology can be determined. With the aid of neurophysiological recordings and quantitative sensory testing, it is possible to approach a mechanism-based classification of orofacial pain. PMID:24701256

  13. Alleviation of Microglial Activation Induced by p38 MAPK/MK2/PGE2 Axis by Capsaicin: Potential Involvement of other than TRPV1 Mechanism/s.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Harsharan S; Roelofs, Nora; Muñoz, Eduardo; Fiebich, Bernd L

    2017-12-01

    Exaggerated inflammatory responses in microglia represent one of the major risk factors for various central nervous system's (CNS) associated pathologies. Release of excessive inflammatory mediators such as prostaglandins and cytokines are the hallmark of hyper-activated microglia. Here we have investigated the hitherto unknown effects of capsaicin (cap) - a transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) agonist- in murine primary microglia, organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHSCs) and human primary monocytes. Results demonstrate that cap (0.1-25 µM) significantly (p < 0.05) inhibited the release of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), 8-iso-PGF2α, and differentially regulated the levels of cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6 & IL-1β). Pharmacological blockade (via capsazepine & SB366791) and genetic deficiency of TRPV1 (TRPV1(-/-)) did not prevent cap-mediated suppression of PGE2 in activated microglia and OHSCs. Inhibition of PGE2 was partially dependent on the reduced levels of PGE2 synthesising enzymes, COX-2 and mPGES-1. To evaluate potential molecular targets, we discovered that cap significantly suppressed the activation of p38 MAPK and MAPKAPK2 (MK2). Altogether, we demonstrate that cap alleviates excessive inflammatory events by targeting the PGE2 pathway in in vitro and ex vivo immune cell models. These findings have broad relevance in understanding and paving new avenues for ongoing TRPV1 based drug therapies in neuroinflammatory-associated diseases.

  14. Mechanisms and clinical uses of capsaicin.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Surinder Kumar; Vij, Amarjit Singh; Sharma, Mohit

    2013-11-15

    Capsaicin is the active ingredient of chili peppers and gives them the characteristic pungent flavor. Understanding the actions of capsaicin led to the discovery of its receptor, transient receptor potential vanilloid subfamily member 1 (TRPV1). This receptor is found on key sensory afferents, and so the use of capsaicin to selectively activate pain afferents has been studied in animal and human models for various indications. Capsaicin is unique among naturally occurring irritant compounds because the initial neuronal excitation evoked by it is followed by a long-lasting refractory period, during which the previously excited neurons are no longer responsive to a broad range of stimuli. This process known as defunctionalisation has been exploited for therapeutic use of capsaicin in various painful conditions. We reviewed different studies on mechanisms of action of capsaicin and its utility in different clinical conditions. A beneficial role of capsaicin has been reported in obesity, cardiovascular and gastrointestinal conditions, various cancers, neurogenic bladder, and dermatologic conditions. Various theories have been put forth to explain these effects. Interestingly many of these pharmacological actions are TRPV1 independent. This review is aimed at providing an overview of these mechanisms and to also present literature which contradicts the proposed beneficial effects of capsaicin. Most of the literature comes from animal studies and since many of these mechanisms are poorly understood, more investigation is required in human subjects.

  15. Effects of intrathecal capsaicin on autonomic and behavioral heat loss responses in the rat.

    PubMed

    Dib, B

    1987-09-01

    Capsaicin and Tween 80 were injected into the lumbar subarachnoid space of rats via a chronic cannula, and the thermoregulatory effects compared. The rats were placed in a climatic chamber at an ambient temperature (Ta) of 20 and 30 degrees C. In the first series of experiments the rats had no access to the fan lever. Intrathecal (IT) capsaicin injection produced a fall in rectal temperature, with a rise in cutaneous temperatures due to vasodilation. On the contrary, IT or the intraperitoneal (IP) Tween 80 injection route had no effect on body temperature. In addition capsaicin-administered IP induced a fall in spinal cord temperature (Tsp). In the second series of experiments the rats had access to a lever activating a fan that drew cool outside air into the climatic chamber. After IT capsaicin injection, the rats increased bar-pressing behavior for fresh air. This was significant at both Ta 20 and 30 degrees C. The results tend to support the hypothesis of capsaicin action somewhere on the thermal afferent pathways. Furthermore, it is possible that the action of capsaicin on thermoregulatory behavior is mediated by the release of substance P from primary afferent terminals.

  16. Historical characterization of trigeminal neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Eboli, Paula; Stone, James L; Aydin, Sabri; Slavin, Konstantin V

    2009-06-01

    TRIGEMINAL NEURALGIA IS a well known clinical entity characterized by agonizing, paroxysmal, and lancinating facial pain, often triggered by movements of the mouth or eating. Historical reviews of facial pain have attempted to describe this severe pain over the past 2.5 millennia. The ancient Greek physicians Hippocrates, Aretaeus, and Galen, described kephalalgias, but their accounts were vague and did not clearly correspond with what we now term trigeminal neuralgia. The first adequate description of trigeminal neuralgia was given in 1671, followed by a fuller description by physician John Locke in 1677. André described the convulsive-like condition in 1756, and named it tic douloureux; in 1773, Fothergill described it as "a painful affection of the face;" and in 1779, John Hunter more clearly characterized the entity as a form of "nervous disorder" with reference to pain of the teeth, gums, or tongue where the disease "does not reside." One hundred fifty years later, the neurological surgeon Walter Dandy equated neurovascular compression of the trigeminal nerve with trigeminal neuralgia.

  17. Capsaicin inhibits the production of tumor necrosis factor alpha by LPS-stimulated murine macrophages, RAW 264.7: a PPARgamma ligand-like action as a novel mechanism.

    PubMed

    Park, Jun-Young; Kawada, Teruo; Han, In-Seob; Kim, Byung-Sam; Goto, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Fushiki, Tohru; Kurata, Tadao; Yu, Rina

    2004-08-13

    Capsaicin, a major ingredient of hot pepper, is considered to exhibit anti-inflammatory properties. Our previous study demonstrated that capsaicin inhibited the production of pro-inflammatory mediators through NF-kappaB inactivation in LPS-stimulated macrophages. In order to further clarify the mechanism underlying the anti-inflammatory action of capsaicin, we investigated whether capsaicin alters PPARgamma activity, which regulates the production of the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNFalpha. Capsaicin significantly inhibited the production of TNFalpha by macrophages in a dose-dependent manner. Simultaneous exposure of the cells to capsaicin and PPARgamma agonist troglitazone or RXR agonist LG100268 resulted in stronger inhibition of TNFalpha production compared to the cells treated with either capsaicin, troglitazone, or LG100268 alone. Luciferase reporter assay revealed that capsaicin induced GAL4/PPARgamma chimera and full length PPARgamma (PPRE) transactivations in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, a specific PPARgamma antagonist T0070907 abrogated the inhibitory action of capsaicin on LPS-induced TNFalpha production by RAW 264.7 cells, indicating that capsaicin acts like a ligand for PPARgamma. Our data demonstrate for the first time that the anti-inflammatory action of capsaicin may be mediated by PPARgamma activation in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells.

  18. Effect of persistent monoarthritis of the temporomandibular joint region on acute mustard oil-induced excitation of trigeminal subnucleus caudalis neurons in male and female rats.

    PubMed

    Bereiter, David A; Okamoto, Keiichiro; Bereiter, Dominique F

    2005-09-01

    The effect of persistent inflammation of the temporomandibular (TMJ) region on Fos-like immunoreactivity (Fos-LI) evoked by acute noxious stimulation of the same or opposite TMJ was assessed in male and cycling female rats. Two weeks after inflammation of the TMJ by complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA, 25 microg) the selective small fiber excitant, mustard oil (MO, 20%), was injected into the arthritic or opposite TMJ under barbiturate anesthesia. MO stimulation of the arthritic TMJ increased Fos-LI ipsilateral, but not contralateral, to MO compared to naïve subjects in superficial laminae at the trigeminal subnucleus caudalis/upper cervical cord (Vc/C2) junction independent of sex hormone status. Unexpectedly, MO stimulation of the opposite TMJ in arthritic rats also produced a greater Fos-LI response ipsilateral to MO than naïve animals. Fos-LI produced in the dorsal paratrigeminal region (dPa5) and Vc/C2 junction after MO stimulation of the normal TMJ was significantly greater in proestrous than diestrous females or male monoarthritic rats. In contrast to naïve animals, Fos-LI was produced in deep laminae at the Vc/C2 junction ipsilateral to MO in CFA-treated animals independent of the site of prior CFA inflammation or sex hormone status. These results indicated that persistent monoarthritis of the TMJ region enhanced the excitability of trigeminal brainstem neurons to subsequent TMJ injury that occurred bilaterally in multiple regions of the lower trigeminal brainstem complex and depended on sex hormone status.

  19. Inhibitory control of nociceptive responses of trigeminal spinal nucleus cells by somatosensory corticofugal projection in rat.

    PubMed

    Malmierca, E; Martin, Y B; Nuñez, A

    2012-09-27

    The caudal division of the trigeminal spinal nucleus (Sp5C) is an important brainstem relay station of orofacial pain transmission. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of cortical electrical stimulation on nociceptive responses in Sp5C neurons. Extracellular recordings were performed in the Sp5C nucleus by tungsten microelectrodes in urethane-anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats. Nociceptive stimulation was produced by application of capsaicin cream on the whisker pad or by constriction of the infraorbital nerve. Capsaicin application evoked a long-lasting increase in the spontaneous firing rate from 1.4±0.2 to 3.4±0.6 spikes/s. Non-noxious tactile responses from stimuli delivered to the receptive field (RF) center decreased 5 min. after capsaicin application (from 2.3±0.1 to 1.6±0.1 spikes/stimulus) while responses from the whisker located at the RF periphery increased (from 1.3±0.2 to 2.0±0.1 spikes/stimulus under capsaicin). Electrical train stimulation of the primary (S1) or secondary (S2) somatosensory cortical areas reduced the increase in the firing rate evoked by capsaicin. Also, S1, but not S2, cortical stimulation reduced the increase in non-noxious tactile responses from the RF periphery. Inhibitory cortical effects were mediated by the activation of GABAergic and glycinergic neurons because they were blocked by bicuculline or strychnine. The S1 and S2 cortical stimulation also inhibited Sp5C neurons in animals with constriction of the infraorbital nerve. Consequently, the corticofugal projection from S1 and S2 cortical areas modulates nociceptive responses of Sp5C neurons and may control the transmission of nociceptive sensory stimulus.

  20. Diabetic rats show reduced cardiac-somatic reflex evoked by intrapericardial capsaicin.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Hua; Qin, Chao; Du, Jian-Qing; Xu, Yan; Sun, Na; Tang, Jing-Shi; Li, Qiang; Foreman, Robert D

    2011-01-25

    Painless myocardial infarction is a serious complication of diabetes. The present study examined whether cardiac nociception was altered in the streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat model by assessing intrapericardial capsaicin-evoked electromyography (EMG) responses in the spinotrapezius muscle. Somatic sensitivities to mechanical and thermal stimulation of the skin were also determined. Intrapericardial administration of capsaicin evoked a concentration-dependent EMG response, which was reproducible with repeated administration. However, the capsaicin-induced EMG responses were different in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats and controls. Intrapericardial capsaicin produced fewer EMG responses, which were delayed and reduced in streptozotocin-treated rats compared to controls. Pretreatment with capsazepine, a TRPV1 antagonist, significantly decreased capsaicin-evoked EMG activity in both streptozotocin-treated and control rats. In addition, streptozotocin-treated rats showed a decreased paw withdrawal threshold in response to mechanical stimulation but no change in response to radiant heat stimulation. These results suggest that streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats develop somatic mechanical hypersensitivity (allodynia), but reduced cardiac nociception. Decreased TRPV1 function may contribute to the reduction of cardiac nociception in the diabetic rat.

  1. Dissecting the role of TRPV1 in detecting multiple trigeminal irritants in three behavioral assays for sensory irritation

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, CJ

    2013-01-01

    Polymodal neurons of the trigeminal nerve innervate the nasal cavity, nasopharynx, oral cavity and cornea. Trigeminal nociceptive fibers express a diverse collection of receptors and are stimulated by a wide variety of chemicals. However, the mechanism of stimulation is known only for relatively few of these compounds. Capsaicin, for example, activates transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channels. In the present study, wildtype (C57Bl/6J) and TRPV1 knockout mice were tested in three behavioral assays for irritation to determine if TRPV1 is necessary to detect trigeminal irritants in addition to capsaicin. In one assay mice were presented with a chemical via a cotton swab and their response scored on a 5 level scale. In another assay, a modified two bottle preference test, which avoids the confound of mixing irritants with the animal’s drinking water, was used to assess aversion. In the final assay, an air dilution olfactometer was used to administer volatile compounds to mice restrained in a double-chambered plethysmograph where respiratory reflexes were monitored. TRPV1 knockouts showed deficiencies in the detection of benzaldehyde, cyclohexanone and eugenol in at least one assay. However, cyclohexanone was the only substance tested that appears to act solely through TRPV1. PMID:24358880

  2. Neonatal capsaicin treatment in rats affects TRPV1-related noxious heat sensation and circadian body temperature rhythm.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Keun-Yeong; Seong, Jinsil

    2014-06-15

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is a cation channel that serves as a polymodal detector of noxious stimuli such as capsaicin. Therefore, capsaicin treatment has been used to investigate the physiological function of TRPV1. Here, we report physiological changes induced by treating neonatal rats with capsaicin. Capsaicin (50mg/kg) (cap-treated) or vehicle (vehicle-treated) was systemically administered to newborn SD rat pups within 48 h after birth. TRPV1 expression, intake volume of capsaicin water, and noxious heat sensation were measured 6 weeks after capsaicin treatment. Circadian body temperature and locomotion were recorded by biotelemetry. Expression of Per1, Per2, Bmal1 and Hsf1 (clock genes) was also investigated. Neonatal capsaicin treatment not only decreased TRPV1 expression but also induced desensitization to noxious heat stimuli. Circadian body temperature of cap-treated rats increased significantly compared with that of vehicle-treated rats. Additionally, the amplitude of the circadian body temperature was reversed in cap-treated rats. Expression of the hypothalamic Hsf1 and liver Per2 clock genes followed a similar trend. Therefore, we suggest that these findings will be useful in studying various physiological mechanisms related to TRPV1.

  3. Repeat Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Trigeminal Neuralgia

    SciTech Connect

    Aubuchon, Adam C.; Chan, Michael D.; Lovato, James F.; Balamucki, Christopher J.; Ellis, Thomas L.; Tatter, Stephen B.; McMullen, Kevin P.; Munley, Michael T.; Deguzman, Allan F.; Ekstrand, Kenneth E.; Bourland, J. Daniel; Shaw, Edward G.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Repeat gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery (GKRS) for recurrent or persistent trigeminal neuralgia induces an additional response but at the expense of an increased incidence of facial numbness. The present series summarized the results of a repeat treatment series at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, including a multivariate analysis of the data to identify the prognostic factors for treatment success and toxicity. Methods and Materials: Between January 1999 and December 2007, 37 patients underwent a second GKRS application because of treatment failure after a first GKRS treatment. The mean initial dose in the series was 87.3 Gy (range, 80-90). The mean retreatment dose was 84.4 Gy (range, 60-90). The dosimetric variables recorded included the dorsal root entry zone dose, pons surface dose, and dose to the distal nerve. Results: Of the 37 patients, 81% achieved a >50% pain relief response to repeat GKRS, and 57% experienced some form of trigeminal dysfunction after repeat GKRS. Two patients (5%) experienced clinically significant toxicity: one with bothersome numbness and one with corneal dryness requiring tarsorraphy. A dorsal root entry zone dose at repeat treatment of >26.6 Gy predicted for treatment success (61% vs. 32%, p = .0716). A cumulative dorsal root entry zone dose of >84.3 Gy (72% vs. 44%, p = .091) and a cumulative pons surface dose of >108.5 Gy (78% vs. 44%, p = .018) predicted for post-GKRS numbness. The presence of any post-GKRS numbness predicted for a >50% decrease in pain intensity (100% vs. 60%, p = .0015). Conclusion: Repeat GKRS is a viable treatment option for recurrent trigeminal neuralgia, although the patient assumes a greater risk of nerve dysfunction to achieve maximal pain relief.

  4. Activation of Oral Trigeminal Neurons by Fatty Acids is Dependent upon Intracellular Calcium

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tian; Shah, Bhavik P.; Hansen, Dane R.; Park-York, MieJung; Gilbertson, Timothy A.

    2012-01-01

    The chemoreception of dietary fat in the oral cavity has largely been attributed to activation of the somatosensory system that conveys the textural properties of fat. However, the ability of fatty acids, which are believed to represent the proximate stimulus for fat taste, to stimulate rat trigeminal neurons has remained unexplored. Here, we found that several free fatty acids are capable of activating trigeminal neurons with different kinetics. Further, a polyunsaturated fatty acid, linoleic acid (LA), activates trigeminal neurons by increasing intracellular calcium concentration and generating depolarizing receptor potentials. Ion substitution and pharmacological approaches reveal that intracellular calcium store depletion is crucial for LA-induced signaling in a subset of trigeminal neurons. Using pseudorabies virus (PrV) as a live cell tracer, we identified a subset of lingual nerve-innervated trigeminal neurons that respond to different subsets of fatty acids. Quantitative real-time PCR of several transient receptor potential (TRP) channel markers in individual neurons validated that PrV labeled a subset but not the entire population of lingual-innervated trigeminal neurons. We further confirmed that the LA-induced intracellular calcium rise is exclusively coming from the release of calcium stores from the endoplasmic reticulum in this subset of lingual nerve-innervated trigeminal neurons. PMID:22644615

  5. [Oxidative modification of rat blood proteins after destruction capsaicin-sensitive nerve and change of nitric oxide level].

    PubMed

    Tolochko, Z S; Spiridonov, V K

    2010-01-01

    Content of blood protein carbonyl derivates in rats are determined to assess oxidative modification of protein after destruction of capsaicin-sensitive nerve and change of nitric oxide (NO) level. Deafferentation of these nerves produces increase of the protein carbonyl derivates content. The increase of NO by L-arginine does not affect protein oxidative destruction produced by ablation of capsaicin-sensitive nerve. Selective inhibitor of neuronal synthase NO (n-NOS) 7-nitroindazole (7-NI) results in similar effect. L-NAME increased oxidative destruction of proteins. These results demonstrate that deafferentation of capsaicin-sensitive nerve induces oxidative destruction of proteins. NO has party to mediating oxidative modification of proteins.

  6. Evidence for the role of lipid rafts and sphingomyelin in Ca2+-gating of Transient Receptor Potential channels in trigeminal sensory neurons and peripheral nerve terminals.

    PubMed

    Sághy, Éva; Szőke, Éva; Payrits, Maja; Helyes, Zsuzsanna; Börzsei, Rita; Erostyák, János; Jánosi, Tibor Zoltán; Sétáló, György; Szolcsányi, János

    2015-10-01

    Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) cation channels, such as TRP Vanilloid 1 and TRP Ankyrin repeat domain 1 (TRPV1 and TRPA1) are nocisensors playing important role to signal pain. Two "melastatin" TRP receptors, like TRPM8 and TRPM3 are also expressed in a subgroup of primary sensory neurons. These channels serve as thermosensors with unique thermal sensitivity ranges and are activated also by several exogenous and endogenous chemical ligands inducing conformational changes from various allosteric ("multisteric") sites. We analysed the role of plasma membrane microdomains of lipid rafts on isolated trigeminal (TRG) neurons and TRPV1-expressing CHO cell line by measuring agonist-induced Ca2+ transients with ratiometric technique. Stimulation-evoked calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) release from sensory nerve endings of the isolated rat trachea by radioimmunoassay was also measured. Lipid rafts were disrupted by cleaving sphingomyelin (SM) with sphingomyelinase (SMase), cholesterol depletion with methyl β-cyclodextrin (MCD) and ganglioside breakdown with myriocin. It has been revealed that intracellular Ca2+ increase responses evoked by the TRPV1 agonist capsaicin, the TRPA1 agonsits allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) and formaldehyde as well as the TRPM8 activator icilin were inhibited after SMase, MCD and myriocin incubation but the response to the TRPM3 agonist pregnenolon sulphate was not altered. Extracellular SMase treatment did not influence the thapsigargin-evoked Ca2+-release from intracellular stores. Besides the cell bodies, SMase also inhibited capsaicin- or AITC-evoked CGRP release from peripheral sensory nerve terminals, this provides the first evidence for the importance of lipid raft integrity in TRPV1 and TRPA1 gating on capsaicin-sensitive nerve terminals. SM metabolites, ceramide and sphingosine, did not influence TRPA1 and TRPV1 activation on TRG neurons, TRPV1-expressing CHO cell line, and nerve terminals. We suggest, that the hydrophobic

  7. The role of capsaicin in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Katherine; Shea, Sofia M; Patterson, James W

    2014-01-01

    Neurogenic pain and pruritus are the common chief complaints at dermatology office visits. Unfortunately, they are also notoriously difficult conditions to treat. Topical capsaicin used as a single therapy or as an adjuvant offers a low-risk option for patients who do not achieve control on other therapies. This chapter presents the evidence behind topical capsaicin use in dermatologic conditions characterized by neurogenic pain or pruritus, including postherpetic neuralgia, notalgia paresthetica, brachioradial pruritus, lichen simplex chronicus, prurigo nodularis, pruritus ani, pruritus of hemodialysis, aquagenic pruritus, apocrine chromhidrosis, lipodermatosclerosis, alopecia areata, and psoriasis. It presents the most common capsaicin formulations, dosages, and durations of treatment for each condition. Additionally, the chapter addresses various adverse effects and limitations in the use of topical capsaicin in dermatology.

  8. Chemical and pharmacological aspects of capsaicin.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Escogido, Maria de Lourdes; Gonzalez-Mondragon, Edith G; Vazquez-Tzompantzi, Erika

    2011-01-28

    Capsaicin is a unique alkaloid found primarily in the fruit of the Capsicum genus and is what provides its spicy flavor. Generally extracted directly from fruit, high demand has driven the use of established methods to increase production through extraction and characterization. Over time these methods have improved, usually be applying existing techniques in conjunction. An increasingly wide range of potential applications has increased interest in capsaicin. Especially compelling are the promising results of medical studies showing possible beneficial effects in many diseases. Capsaicin's pungency has limited its use in clinical trials to support its biological activity. Characterization and extraction/ synthesis of non-pungent analogues is in progress. A review is made of capsaicin research focusing mainly on its production, synthesis, characterization and pharmacology, including some of its main potential clinical uses in humans.

  9. Effects of perineural capsaicin treatment of the abdominal vagus on endotoxin fever and on a non-febrile thermoregulatory event.

    PubMed

    Pétervári, Erika; Garami, András; Pákai, Eszter; Székely, Miklós

    2005-01-01

    Following perineural capsaicin pretreatment of the main trunks of the abdominal vagus of rats, the first and the second phases of the polyphasic febrile response to intravenous lipopolysaccharide were unaltered, while the third phase of fever course (peak at 5 h) was attenuated. In rats desensitized by intraperitoneal (i.p.) capsaicin (i.e. abdominal non-systemic desensitization), mainly the first but not the later fever phases were reduced. The postprandial hyperthermia to intragastric injection of BaSO4 suspension was attenuated by either i.p. or perineural capsaicin treatment. It is concluded that, in contrast to the accepted model of postprandial hyperthermia, which is mediated by capsaicin-sensitive fibers of the abdominal vagus, in the early phase of polyphasic fever the vagal afferent nerves appear to play no role. The influence of i.p. capsaicin-desensitization on this initiating fever phase is independent of the vagus, and a capsaicin-induced alteration of endotoxin action in the liver, prior to vagal nerve endings, is more likely. The late febrile phase is probably influenced by efferent vagal fibers, which might be damaged more easily by perineural than i.p. capsaicin treatment.

  10. Dietary Capsaicin Protects Cardiometabolic Organs from Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Sun, Fang; Xiong, Shiqiang; Zhu, Zhiming

    2016-04-25

    Chili peppers have a long history of use for flavoring, coloring, and preserving food, as well as for medical purposes. The increased use of chili peppers in food is very popular worldwide. Capsaicin is the major pungent bioactivator in chili peppers. The beneficial effects of capsaicin on cardiovascular function and metabolic regulation have been validated in experimental and population studies. The receptor for capsaicin is called the transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1). TRPV1 is ubiquitously distributed in the brain, sensory nerves, dorsal root ganglia, bladder, gut, and blood vessels. Activation of TRPV1 leads to increased intracellular calcium signaling and, subsequently, various physiological effects. TRPV1 is well known for its prominent roles in inflammation, oxidation stress, and pain sensation. Recently, TRPV1 was found to play critical roles in cardiovascular function and metabolic homeostasis. Experimental studies demonstrated that activation of TRPV1 by capsaicin could ameliorate obesity, diabetes, and hypertension. Additionally, TRPV1 activation preserved the function of cardiometabolic organs. Furthermore, population studies also confirmed the beneficial effects of capsaicin on human health. The habitual consumption of spicy foods was inversely associated with both total and certain causes of specific mortality after adjustment for other known or potential risk factors. The enjoyment of spicy flavors in food was associated with a lower prevalence of obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases. These results suggest that capsaicin and TRPV1 may be potential targets for the management of cardiometabolic vascular diseases and their related target organs dysfunction.

  11. Dietary Capsaicin Protects Cardiometabolic Organs from Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Fang; Xiong, Shiqiang; Zhu, Zhiming

    2016-01-01

    Chili peppers have a long history of use for flavoring, coloring, and preserving food, as well as for medical purposes. The increased use of chili peppers in food is very popular worldwide. Capsaicin is the major pungent bioactivator in chili peppers. The beneficial effects of capsaicin on cardiovascular function and metabolic regulation have been validated in experimental and population studies. The receptor for capsaicin is called the transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1). TRPV1 is ubiquitously distributed in the brain, sensory nerves, dorsal root ganglia, bladder, gut, and blood vessels. Activation of TRPV1 leads to increased intracellular calcium signaling and, subsequently, various physiological effects. TRPV1 is well known for its prominent roles in inflammation, oxidation stress, and pain sensation. Recently, TRPV1 was found to play critical roles in cardiovascular function and metabolic homeostasis. Experimental studies demonstrated that activation of TRPV1 by capsaicin could ameliorate obesity, diabetes, and hypertension. Additionally, TRPV1 activation preserved the function of cardiometabolic organs. Furthermore, population studies also confirmed the beneficial effects of capsaicin on human health. The habitual consumption of spicy foods was inversely associated with both total and certain causes of specific mortality after adjustment for other known or potential risk factors. The enjoyment of spicy flavors in food was associated with a lower prevalence of obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases. These results suggest that capsaicin and TRPV1 may be potential targets for the management of cardiometabolic vascular diseases and their related target organs dysfunction. PMID:27120617

  12. Capsaicin-stimulated release of substance P from cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons: involvement of two distinct mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Purkiss, J; Welch, M; Doward, S; Foster, K

    2000-06-01

    Capsaicin, the pungent component of "hot" chili peppers, selectively activates a distinct population of primary sensory neurons responsive to noxious stimuli. Many of these fibres express neuropeptides including the tachykinin, substance P. Using cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons, we found that capsaicin (10 microM) stimulated a 2-fold increase in release of substance P in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+). Elevated potassium (75 mM) was unable to induce release under these conditions. The introduction of Ca(2+) enhanced capsaicin-induced release and brought about a robust response to potassium. Preincubation of cells with botulinum neurotoxin A (100 nM) completely blocked potassium-induced release but the capsaicin response, in the absence of Ca(2+), was unaffected. However, toxin treatment dramatically reduced capsaicin-stimulated release in the presence of Ca(2+). It is concluded that capsaicin induces release of substance P from dorsal root ganglion neurons via two mechanisms, one requiring extracellular Ca(2+) and the intact synaptosomal-associated protein 25 kDa (SNAP-25), and the other independent of extracellular Ca(2+) and not involving SNAP-25.

  13. Post-operative pain behavior in rats is reduced after single high-concentration capsaicin application.

    PubMed

    Pospisilova, Eva; Palecek, Jiri

    2006-12-05

    Surgical procedures associated with tissue injury are often followed by increased sensitivity to innocuous and noxious stimuli in the vicinity of the surgical wound. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 receptor (TRPV1) containing nociceptors in this process, by their functional inactivation using a high-concentration intradermal injection of capsaicin in a rat plantar incision model. Paw withdrawal responses to mechanical stimuli (von Frey filaments 10-367mN) and to radiant heat applied on plantar skin were tested in animals treated with capsaicin or the vehicle 6 days and 24h before or 2h after the incision was made. In the vehicle-treated animals, mechanical and thermal sensitivity increased significantly 1-96h following the incision. Capsaicin applied 24h before the surgery was most effective and significantly diminished the development of post-incisional mechanical allodynia and hyperalgesia. Thermal hypoalgesia was present in the incised paw after the capsaicin treatment. Capsaicin application 6 days before the incision induced thermal hypoalgesia before the incision but did not prevent completely the thermal hyperalgesia after the incision, while there was also a reduction of mechanical hypersensitivity. Application of the capsaicin injection after the incision showed its first effect at 2h after the injection and at 24h the effect was comparable with the 6 days pretreatment. Our results show an important role of TRPV1-containing nociceptors in the development of post-surgical hypersensitivity and suggest that local, high-concentration capsaicin treatment could be used to reduce it.

  14. Spontaneous trigeminal allodynia in rats: a model of primary headache.

    PubMed

    Oshinsky, Michael L; Sanghvi, Menka M; Maxwell, Christina R; Gonzalez, Dorian; Spangenberg, Rebecca J; Cooper, Marnie; Silberstein, Stephen D

    2012-10-01

    Animal models are essential for studying the pathophysiology of headache disorders and as a screening tool for new therapies. Most animal models modify a normal animal in an attempt to mimic migraine symptoms. They require manipulation to activate the trigeminal nerve or dural nociceptors. At best, they are models of secondary headache. No existing model can address the fundamental question: How is a primary headache spontaneously initiated? In the process of obtaining baseline periorbital von Frey thresholds in a wild-type Sprague-Dawley rat, we discovered a rat with spontaneous episodic trigeminal allodynia (manifested by episodically changing periorbital pain threshold). Subsequent mating showed that the trait is inherited. Animals with spontaneous trigeminal allodynia allow us to study the pathophysiology of primary recurrent headache disorders. To validate this as a model for migraine, we tested the effects of clinically proven acute and preventive migraine treatments on spontaneous changes in rat periorbital sensitivity. Sumatriptan, ketorolac, and dihydroergotamine temporarily reversed the low periorbital pain thresholds. Thirty days of chronic valproic acid treatment prevented spontaneous changes in trigeminal allodynia. After discontinuation, the rats returned to their baseline of spontaneous episodic threshold changes. We also tested the effects of known chemical human migraine triggers. On days when the rats did not have allodynia and showed normal periorbital von Frey thresholds, glycerol trinitrate and calcitonin gene related peptide induced significant decreases in the periorbital pain threshold. This model can be used as a predictive model for drug development and for studies of putative biomarkers for headache diagnosis and treatment.

  15. Roles of capsaicin-sensitive primary afferents in differential rat models of inflammatory pain: a systematic comparative study in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui-Sheng; He, Xiang; Wang, Yang; Wen, Wei-Wei; You, Hao-Jun; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2007-03-01

    To characterize the role of capsaicin-sensitive primary afferents in inflammatory pain, the effects of subcutaneous (s.c.) injection of 0.15% capsaicin on different chemical irritants-induced pathological nociception including persistent spontaneous nociception, primary thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia, and inflammatory response were systematically investigated in unanesthetized conscious rats. Four different animal models of inflammatory pain: the bee venom (BV) test, the formalin test, the carrageenan model, and the complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) model, were employed and compared. Local pre-treatment with capsaicin produced a significant inhibition on the s.c. BV and formalin induced long-lasting persistent spontaneous nociception. However, this capsaicin-induced inhibitory effect on spontaneous nociception in the BV test was only found within the late phase (tonic nociception; 11-60 min), but not the early phase (acute nociception; 0-10 min). A complete preventing effect of capsaicin on the decreased thermal paw withdrawal latency was found in the BV, carrageenan, and CFA models. Nevertheless, pre-treatment with capsaicin only produced complete blocking effects on the decreased mechanical paw withdrawal threshold in the BV and carrageenan models, but not in the CFA model. For inflammatory response, a significant inhibition of the BV-elicited paw swelling was found following capsaicin treatment. In marked contrast, capsaicin did not produce any effects on the paw inflammation during exposure to carrageenan, CFA, and formalin. These data suggest that capsaicin-sensitive primary afferents may play differential roles in the induction and development of pathological nociception in differential inflammatory pain models. In contrast to other chemical irritants, BV-induced long-term spontaneous nociception, facilitated nociceptive behavior, and inflammation are modulated by peripheral capsaicin-sensitive afferents.

  16. Trigeminal trophic syndrome with histopathologic correlation.

    PubMed

    Dolohanty, Lindsey B; Richardson, Steven J; Herrmann, David N; Markman, John; Mercurio, Mary Gail

    2015-03-01

    We present the case of a 49-year-old woman with trigeminal trophic syndrome (TTS), also known as trophic trigeminal neuralgia, trigeminal neurotrophic ulceration, and/or trigeminal neuropathy with nasal ulceration. Our case represents an uncommon report of intractable itching and chronic pain associated with TTS. Emphasis was placed on skin biopsy histology, which revealed no neuronal innervation of the affected scalp despite reports of intractable itching and chronic pain. Trigeminal trophic syndrome of the V1 branch of the trigeminal nerve secondary to herpes zoster (HZ) with correlated histology is described. This article provides a discussion of TTS and correlated histology as well as a brief discussion of intractable itching and postherpetic neuralgia.

  17. [Trigeminal neuralgia secondary to petrous endostosis].

    PubMed

    Mata-Gómez, Jacinto; Royano-Sánchez, Manuel; Bejarano-Parra, Macarena; Gilete-Tejero, Ignacio; Rico-Cotelo, María; Ortega-Martínez, Marta

    2017-03-10

    Arterial neurovascular compression is hypothesised to be the main cause of primary trigeminal neuralgia. Although it is the most common cause, other pathologies, such as tumours in the cerebellopontine angle, can cause trigeminal pain. We report a case of a 44-year-old female patient with right trigeminal neuralgia without satisfactory response to medical treatment. Cerebral MRI showed no structural injuries. During microvascular decompression of the trigeminal nerve, endostosis of the internal aspect of the petrous bone was found to compress the trigeminal nerve. The pain disappeared completely in the early postsurgical period, after the complete drilling of the endostosis and microvascular decompression. The patient remains asymptomatic one year later. Endostosis of the petrous bone is a rare cause of trigeminal neuralgia. A proper review of preoperative studies would enable the definitive surgical approach to be optimised.

  18. Capsaicin affects brain function in a model of hepatic encephalopathy associated with fulminant hepatic failure in mice

    PubMed Central

    Avraham, Y; Grigoriadis, NC; Magen, I; Poutahidis, T; Vorobiav, L; Zolotarev, O; Ilan, Y; Mechoulam, R; Berry, EM

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Hepatic encephalopathy is a neuropsychiatric syndrome caused by liver failure. In view of the effects of cannabinoids in a thioacetamide-induced model of hepatic encephalopathy and liver disease and the beneficial effect of capsaicin (a TRPV1 agonist) in liver disease, we assumed that capsaicin may also affect hepatic encephalopathy. Experimental approach: Fulminant hepatic failure was induced in mice by thioacetamide and 24 h later, the animals were injected with one of the following compound(s): 2-arachidonoylglycerol (CB1, CB2 and TRPV1 receptor agonist); HU308 (CB2 receptor agonist), SR141716A (CB1 receptor antagonist); SR141716A+2-arachidonoylglycerol; SR144528 (CB2 receptor antagonist); capsaicin; and capsazepine (TRPV1 receptor agonist and antagonist respectively). Their neurological effects were evaluated on the basis of activity in the open field, cognitive function in an eight-arm maze and a neurological severity score. The mice were killed 3 or 14 days after thioacetamide administration. 2-arachidonoylglycerol and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) levels were determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection, respectively. Results: Capsaicin had a neuroprotective effect in this animal model as shown by the neurological score, activity and cognitive function. The effect of capsaicin was blocked by capsazepine. Thioacetamide induced astrogliosis in the hippocampus and the cerebellum and raised brain 5-hydroxytryptamine levels, which were decreased by capsaicin, SR141716A and HU-308. Thioacetamide lowered brain 2-arachidonoylglycerol levels, an effect reversed by capsaicin. Conclusions: Capsaicin improved both liver and brain dysfunction caused by thioacetamide, suggesting that both the endocannabinoid and the vanilloid systems play important roles in hepatic encephalopathy. Modulation of these systems may have therapeutic value. PMID:19764982

  19. Capsaicin pretreatment prevents disruption of the blood-aqueous barrier in the rabbit eye

    SciTech Connect

    Bynke, G.

    1983-06-01

    Capsaicin, the irritating agent of red pepper, produces ocular inflammation through a neurogenic mechanism. The present study is concerned with the long-term effects of capsaicin pretreatment on the capacity of the eye to respond to different inflammatory stimuli. Following retrobulbar injection of capsaicin to rabbits the aqueous flare response induced by subsequent infrared irradiation (IR) of the iris, subcutaneously administered alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) and exogenously administered prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) was reduced greatly. In the case of IR and alpha-MSH the reduced responsiveness was manifest for several weeks after capsaicin pretreatment, involving first the capsaicin-treated eye, but later also the contralateral control eye. After 2-3 months the aqueous flare response was normal in both eyes. In the case of PGE2 the responsiveness was reduced for a shorter time; after 3 weeks the response was normal in both eyes. The results indicate that all three stimuli tested are at least partly dependent upon an intact sensory innervation to disrupt the blood-aqueous barrier, but that the mechanism of action of PGE2 is different from that of IR and alpha-MSH.

  20. A novel form of capsaicin-modified amygdala LTD mediated by TRPM1.

    PubMed

    Gebhardt, Christine; von Bohlen Und Halbach, Oliver; Hadler, Michael D; Harteneck, Christian; Albrecht, Doris

    2016-12-01

    Recently we have shown that capsaicin attenuates the strength of LTP in the lateral amygdala (LA) and demonstrated that this effect is mediated by the transient receptor potential (TRP) channel TRPV1. Here we further show that capsaicin, which is thought to act primarily through TRPV1, modifies long term depression (LTD) in the LA. Yet the application of various TRPV1 antagonists does not reverse this effect and it remains in TRPV1-deficient mice. In addition, voltage gated calcium channels, nitric oxide and CB1 receptors are not involved. Using pharmacology and TRPM1(-/-) mice, our electrophysiological data indicate that capsaicin-induced activation of TRPM1 channels contribute to the induction of LA-LTD. Whereas LA-LTD in general depends on the acitvation of NMDA receptors- and group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR), the modifying effect of capsaicin on LA-LTD via TRPM1 appears to be specifically mediated by group I mGluRs and in interaction with another member of the TRP family, TRPC5. Additionally, intact GABAergic transmission is required for the capsaicin-effect to take place. This is the first documentation that beside their function in the retina TRPM1 proteins are expressed in the brain and have a functional relevance in modifying synaptic plasticity.

  1. Alterations in capsaicin-evoked electrolyte transport during the evolution of guinea pig TNBS ileitis.

    PubMed

    Miceli, Paula; Morris, Gerald P; MacNaughton, Wallace K; Vanner, Stephen

    2002-06-01

    The efferent secretomotor activity of capsaicin-sensitive nerves was monitored during the evolution of 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced ileitis in the guinea pig by recording changes in short-circuit current (DeltaI(sc)) in response to capsaicin, substance P (SP), and carbachol. Submucosal-mucosal preparations mounted in standard Ussing chambers were studied at time 0, at 8 h, and 1, 3, 5, 7, 14, and 30 days following the intraluminal instillation of TNBS or saline. Maximal DeltaI(sc) responses to capsaicin were dramatically attenuated (54%) by 24 h. By day 7, SP- and TTX-insensitive carbachol-stimulated DeltaI(sc) were also significantly reduced. Similar attenuation in capsaicin and carbachol responses was observed in jejunal tissue 20 cm proximal to the inflamed site at day 7. These studies demonstrate that efferent secretomotor function of capsaicin-sensitive nerves is maintained early in TNBS ileitis but significantly reduced by 24 h. By day 7, defects in enterocyte secretory function at inflamed and noninflamed sites also occurred, an effect that may be mediated by circulating cytokines.

  2. The non-peptide neurokinin-1 antagonist, RPR 100893, decreases c-fos expression in trigeminal nucleus caudalis following noxious chemical meningeal stimulation.

    PubMed

    Cutrer, F M; Moussaoui, S; Garret, C; Moskowitz, M A

    1995-02-01

    The effect of RPR 100893, a selective and specific neurokinin-1 antagonist, or its enantiomer RPR 103253 was examined on c-fos antigen expression in brain stem and upper cervical cord 2 h after intracisternal capsaicin injection (30.5 micrograms/ml) in pentobarbital-anesthetized Hartley guinea-pigs. Positive cells were counted at three levels corresponding to obex, -2.25 mm and -6.75 mm in 18 sections (50 microns). Immunoreactivity was strongly expressed within laminae I and IIo of trigeminal nucleus caudalis, area postrema and the leptomeninges. Moderate labeling was present in the nucleus of the solitary tract and the medullary lateral reticular nucleus, whereas few positive cells were found in the ventral portion of the medullary reticular nucleus and Rexed laminae III-V and X. The distribution of labeled cells was consistent with previously reported results following subarachnoid placement of the noxious agents, blood or carrageenin. Pretreatment with RPR 100893 (1, 10 and 100 micrograms/kg, i.v.) but not its enantiomer (100 micrograms/kg, i.v.) 30 min prior to capsaicin injection significantly reduced the number of positive cells in the trigeminal nucleus caudalis (P < 0.01) in a dose-dependent manner, but not within area postrema or nucleus of the solitary tract. These results indicate that (i) the instillation of capsaicin into the subarachnoid space is an effective stimulus for the induction of c-fos antigen within trigeminal nucleus caudalis, presumably through activation of trigeminovascular afferents, and (ii) the neurokinin-1 antagonist RPR 100893 reduces the number of positive cells selectively within this nucleus. The findings are significant because drugs which alleviate vascular headaches decrease the number of c-fos-positive cells within trigeminal nucleus caudalis following noxious meningeal stimulation. Hence, strategies aimed at blocking the neurokinin-1 receptor may be useful for treating migraine and cluster headache.

  3. [Effects of capsaicin on oxidative modification of blood plasma proteins and arterial blood pressure in fructose-fed rats].

    PubMed

    Tolochko, Z S; Spiridonov, V K

    2012-01-01

    The influence of the activation of capsaicin-sensitive nerves with capsaicin on the oxidative modification of blood plasma proteins and arterial blood pressure was studied in Wistar rats fed with 12.5% fructose in drinking water for 10 weeks. The obtained results indicate that fructose feeding induces an increase in the arterial blood pressure and the content of plasma blood protein carbonyl derivates. At the same time, in hypertensive rats, the stimulation of sensory nerves by capsaicin (1 mg/kg, i.p.) decreases the content of oxidized proteins in the plasma and normalizes the arterial blood pressure. It is suggested that capsaicin-sensitive nerves are involved in the regulation of oxidative destruction of proteins as well as in blood pressure control under metabolic disturbances produced by prolonged fructose feeding.

  4. Morphine Increases Acetylcholine Release in the Trigeminal Nuclear Complex

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zhenghong; Bowman, Heather R.; Baghdoyan, Helen A.; Lydic, Ralph

    2008-01-01

    Study Objectives: The trigeminal nuclear complex (V) contains cholinergic neurons and includes the principal sensory trigeminal nucleus (PSTN) which receives sensory input from the face and jaw, and the trigeminal motor nucleus (MoV) which innervates the muscles of mastication. Pain associated with pathologies of V is often managed with opioids but no studies have characterized the effect of opioids on acetylcholine (ACh) release in PSTN and MoV. Opioids can increase or decrease ACh release in brainstem nuclei. Therefore, the present experiments tested the 2-tailed hypothesis that microdialysis delivery of opioids to the PSTN and MoV significantly alters ACh release. Design: Using a within-subjects design and isoflurane-anesthetized Wistar rats (n = 53), ACh release in PSTN during microdialysis with Ringer's solution (control) was compared to ACh release during dialysis delivery of the sodium channel blocker tetrodotoxin, muscarinic agonist bethanechol, opioid agonist morphine, mu opioid agonist DAMGO, antagonists for mu (naloxone) and kappa (nor-binaltorphimine; nor-BNI) opioid receptors, and GABAA antagonist bicuculline. Measurements and Results: Tetrodotoxin decreased ACh, confirming action potential-dependent ACh release. Bethanechol and morphine caused a concentration-dependent increase in PSTN ACh release. The morphine-induced increase in ACh release was blocked by nor-BNI but not by naloxone. Bicuculline delivered to the PSTN also increased ACh release. ACh release in the MoV was increased by morphine, and this increase was not blocked by naloxone or nor-BNI. Conclusions: These data comprise the first direct measures of ACh release in PSTN and MoV and suggest synaptic disinhibition as one possible mechanism by which morphine increases ACh release in the trigeminal nuclei. Citation: Zhu Z; Bowman HR; Baghdoyan HA; Lydic R. Morphine increases acetylcholine release in the trigeminal nuclear complex. SLEEP 2008;31(12):1629–1637. PMID:19090318

  5. Controlled thermocoagulation in trigeminal neuralgia.

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, B; Thomas, D G

    1986-01-01

    Results of 280 radiofrequency lesions on 229 patients with trigeminal neuralgia are presented with three months to eight years (average 3.8 years) follow up. The patients were aged from 18-91 years. There was a high overall success rate of 94%. The complication rate has been low, with sensory paraesthesiae the commonest (15%) and cranial nerve palsies very rare (2.4%) compared to other reported series. PMID:3746327

  6. Multimodality Management of Trigeminal Schwannomas.

    PubMed

    Niranjan, Ajay; Barnett, Samuel; Anand, Vijay; Agazzi, Siviero

    2016-08-01

    Patients presenting with trigeminal schwannomas require multimodality management by a skull base surgical team that can offer expertise in both transcranial and transnasal approaches as well as radiosurgical and microsurgical strategies. Improvement in neurologic symptoms, preservation of cranial nerve function, and control of mass effect are the primary goals of management for trigeminal schwannomas. Complete surgical resection is the treatment of choice but may not be possible in all cases. Radiosurgery is an option as primary management for small- to moderate-sized tumors and can be used for postoperative residuals or recurrences. Planned surgical resection followed by SRS for residual tumor is an effective option for larger trigeminal schwannomas. The endoscopic resection is an excellent approach for patients with an extradural tumor or tumors isolated to the Meckel cave. A detailed analysis of a tumor and its surroundings based on high-quality imaging can help better estimate the expected outcome from each treatment. An expert skull base team should be able to provide precise counseling for each patient's situation for selecting the best option.

  7. Rehabilitation of the trigeminal nerve

    PubMed Central

    Iro, Heinrich; Bumm, Klaus; Waldfahrer, Frank

    2005-01-01

    When it comes to restoring impaired neural function by means of surgical reconstruction, sensory nerves have always been in the role of the neglected child when compared with motor nerves. Especially in the head and neck area, with its either sensory, motor or mixed cranial nerves, an impaired sensory function can cause severe medical conditions. When performing surgery in the head and neck area, sustaining neural function must not only be highest priority for motor but also for sensory nerves. In cases with obvious neural damage to sensory nerves, an immediate neural repair, if necessary with neural interposition grafts, is desirable. Also in cases with traumatic trigeminal damage, an immediate neural repair ought to be considered, especially since reconstructive measures at a later time mostly require for interposition grafts. In terms of the trigeminal neuralgia, commonly thought to arise from neurovascular brainstem compression, a pharmaceutical treatment is considered as the state of the art in terms of conservative therapy. A neurovascular decompression of the trigeminal root can be an alternative in some cases when surgical treatment is sought after. Besides the above mentioned therapeutic options, alternative treatments are available. PMID:22073060

  8. The Brain Mechanisms Underlying the Perception of Pungent Taste of Capsaicin and the Subsequent Autonomic Responses

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Shinpei; Sato, Hajime; Sasaki, Akihiro T.; Tanabe, Hiroki C.; Yoshida, Yumiko; Saito, Mitsuru; Toyoda, Hiroki; Sadato, Norihiro; Kang, Youngnam

    2016-01-01

    In a human fMRI study, it has been demonstrated that tasting and ingesting capsaicin activate the ventral part of the middle and posterior short gyri (M/PSG) of the insula which is known as the primary gustatory area, suggesting that capsaicin is recognized as a taste. Tasting and digesting spicy foods containing capsaicin induce various physiological responses such as perspiration from face, salivation, and facilitation of cardiovascular activity, which are thought to be caused through viscero-visceral autonomic reflexes. However, this does not necessarily exclude the possibility of the involvement of higher-order sensory-motor integration between the M/PSG and anterior short gyrus (ASG) known as the autonomic region of the insula. To reveal a possible functional coordination between the M/PSG and ASG, we here addressed whether capsaicin increases neural activity in the ASG as well as the M/PSG using fMRI and a custom-made taste delivery system. Twenty subjects participated in this study, and three tastant solutions: capsaicin, NaCl, and artificial saliva (AS) were used. Group analyses with the regions activated by capsaicin revealed significant activations in the bilateral ASG and M/PSG. The fMRI blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signals in response to capsaicin stimulation were significantly higher in ASG than in M/PSG regardless of the side. Concomitantly, capsaicin increased the fingertip temperature significantly. Although there was no significant correlation between the fingertip temperatures and BOLD signals in the ASG or M/PSG when the contrast [Capsaicin–AS] or [Capsaicin–NaCl] was computed, a significant correlation was found in the bilateral ASG when the contrast [2 × Capsaicin–NaCl–AS] was computed. In contrast, there was a significant correlation in the hypothalamus regardless of the contrasts. Furthermore, there was a significant correlation between M/PSG and ASG. These results indicate that capsaicin increases neural activity in the

  9. TRPV1 activation and induction of nociceptive response by a non-pungent capsaicin-like compound, capsiate.

    PubMed

    Iida, T; Moriyama, T; Kobata, K; Morita, A; Murayama, N; Hashizume, S; Fushiki, T; Yazawa, S; Watanabe, T; Tominaga, M

    2003-06-01

    Capsiate is a capsaicin-like ingredient of a non-pungent cultivar of red pepper, CH-19 sweet. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying the non-pungency of capsiate, we investigated whether capsiate activates the cloned capsaicin receptor, TRPV1 (VR1). In patch-clamp experiments, capsiate was found to activate TRPV1 expressed transiently in HEK293 cells with a similar potency as capsaicin. Capsiate induced nociceptive responses in mice when injected subcutaneously into their hindpaws with a similar dose dependency as capsaicin. These data indicate that the non-pungent capsiate is an agonist for TRPV1 and could excite peripheral nociceptors. In contrast to this, capsiate did not induce any significant responses when applied to the skin surface, eye or oral cavity of mice, suggesting that capsiate requires direct access to nerve endings to exhibit its effects. Capsiate was proved to have high lipophilicity and to be easily broken down in normal aqueous conditions, leading to less accessibility to nociceptors. Another highly lipophilic capsaicin analogue, olvanil, was similar to capsiate in that it did not produce irritant responses when applied to the skin surface, although it could activate TRPV1. Taken together, high lipophilicity and instability might be critical determinants for pungency and so help in understanding the effects of capsaicin-related compounds.

  10. Double peak sensory responses: effects of capsaicin.

    PubMed

    Aprile, I; Tonali, P; Stalberg, E; Di Stasio, E; Caliandro, P; Foschini, M; Vergili, G; Padua, L

    2007-10-01

    The aim of this study is to verify whether degeneration of skin receptors or intradermal nerve endings by topical application of capsaicin modifies the double peak response obtained by submaximal anodal stimulation. Five healthy volunteers topically applied capsaicin to the finger-tip of digit III (on the distal phalanx) four times daily for 4-5 weeks. Before and after local capsaicin applications, we studied the following electrophysiological findings: compound sensory action potential (CSAP), double peak response, sensory threshold and double peak stimulus intensity. Local capsaicin application causes disappearance or decrease of the second component of the double peak, which gradually increases after the suspension of capsaicin. Conversely, no significant differences were observed for CSAP, sensory threshold and double peak stimulus intensity. This study suggests that the second component of the double peak may be a diagnostic tool suitable to show an impairment of the extreme segments of sensory nerve fibres in distal sensory axonopathy in the early stages of damage, when receptors or skin nerve endings are impaired but undetectable by standard nerve conduction studies.

  11. Inhibitory effect of capsaicin on B16-F10 melanoma cell migration via the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt/Rac1 signal pathway

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Dong-Hoon; Kim, Ok-Hee; Jun, Hye-Seung

    2008-01-01

    Capsaicin (trans-8-methyl-N-vanillyl-6-nonenamide), the major pungent ingredient of red pepper, has been reported to possess anti-carcinogenic and anti-mutagenic activities. In this study, the anti-migration activity of capsaicin on highly metastatic B16-F10 melanoma cells was investigated. Capsaicin significantly inhibited the migration of melanoma cells without showing obvious cellular cytotoxicity at low doses. This effect correlated with the down-regulation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K) and its downstream target, Akt. Although B16-F10 cell migration was increased by the PI3-K activator through the activation of Akt, these PI3-K activator-induced phenomena were attenuated by capsaicin. Moreover, capsaicin was found to significantly inhibit Rac1 activity in a pull-down assay. These results demonstrate that capsaicin inhibits the migration of B16-F10 cells through the inhibition of the PI3-K/Akt/Rac1 signal pathway. The present investigation suggests that capsaicin targets PI3-K/Akt/Rac1-mediated cellular events in B16-F10 melanoma cells. Consequently, capsaicin administration should be considered an effective approach for the suppression of invasion and metastasis in malignant melanoma chemotherapy. PMID:18985006

  12. Transient Receptor Potential Channels Encode Volatile Chemicals Sensed by Rat Trigeminal Ganglion Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Schöbel, Nicole; Beltrán, Leopoldo; Wetzel, Christian Horst; Hatt, Hanns

    2013-01-01

    Primary sensory afferents of the dorsal root and trigeminal ganglia constantly transmit sensory information depicting the individual’s physical and chemical environment to higher brain regions. Beyond the typical trigeminal stimuli (e.g. irritants), environmental stimuli comprise a plethora of volatile chemicals with olfactory components (odorants). In spite of a complete loss of their sense of smell, anosmic patients may retain the ability to roughly discriminate between different volatile compounds. While the detailed mechanisms remain elusive, sensory structures belonging to the trigeminal system seem to be responsible for this phenomenon. In order to gain a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying the activation of the trigeminal system by volatile chemicals, we investigated odorant-induced membrane potential changes in cultured rat trigeminal neurons induced by the odorants vanillin, heliotropyl acetone, helional, and geraniol. We observed the dose-dependent depolarization of trigeminal neurons upon application of these substances occurring in a stimulus-specific manner and could show that distinct neuronal populations respond to different odorants. Using specific antagonists, we found evidence that TRPA1, TRPM8, and/or TRPV1 contribute to the activation. In order to further test this hypothesis, we used recombinantly expressed rat and human variants of these channels to investigate whether they are indeed activated by the odorants tested. We additionally found that the odorants dose-dependently inhibit two-pore potassium channels TASK1 and TASK3 heterologously expressed In Xenopus laevis oocytes. We suggest that the capability of various odorants to activate different TRP channels and to inhibit potassium channels causes neuronal depolarization and activation of distinct subpopulations of trigeminal sensory neurons, forming the basis for a specific representation of volatile chemicals in the trigeminal ganglia. PMID:24205061

  13. Transient receptor potential channels encode volatile chemicals sensed by rat trigeminal ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Lübbert, Matthias; Kyereme, Jessica; Schöbel, Nicole; Beltrán, Leopoldo; Wetzel, Christian Horst; Hatt, Hanns

    2013-01-01

    Primary sensory afferents of the dorsal root and trigeminal ganglia constantly transmit sensory information depicting the individual's physical and chemical environment to higher brain regions. Beyond the typical trigeminal stimuli (e.g. irritants), environmental stimuli comprise a plethora of volatile chemicals with olfactory components (odorants). In spite of a complete loss of their sense of smell, anosmic patients may retain the ability to roughly discriminate between different volatile compounds. While the detailed mechanisms remain elusive, sensory structures belonging to the trigeminal system seem to be responsible for this phenomenon. In order to gain a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying the activation of the trigeminal system by volatile chemicals, we investigated odorant-induced membrane potential changes in cultured rat trigeminal neurons induced by the odorants vanillin, heliotropyl acetone, helional, and geraniol. We observed the dose-dependent depolarization of trigeminal neurons upon application of these substances occurring in a stimulus-specific manner and could show that distinct neuronal populations respond to different odorants. Using specific antagonists, we found evidence that TRPA1, TRPM8, and/or TRPV1 contribute to the activation. In order to further test this hypothesis, we used recombinantly expressed rat and human variants of these channels to investigate whether they are indeed activated by the odorants tested. We additionally found that the odorants dose-dependently inhibit two-pore potassium channels TASK1 and TASK3 heterologously expressed In Xenopus laevis oocytes. We suggest that the capability of various odorants to activate different TRP channels and to inhibit potassium channels causes neuronal depolarization and activation of distinct subpopulations of trigeminal sensory neurons, forming the basis for a specific representation of volatile chemicals in the trigeminal ganglia.

  14. Inflammation and hyperalgesia in rats neonatally treated with capsaicin: effects on two classes of nociceptive neurons in the superficial dorsal horn.

    PubMed

    Ren, K; Williams, G M; Ruda, M A; Dubner, R

    1994-11-01

    To address the mechanisms of hyperalgesia and dorsal horn plasticity following peripheral tissue inflammation, the effects of adjuvant-induced inflammation of the rat hindpaw on behavioral nociception and nociceptive neuronal activity in the superficial dorsal horn were examined in neonatally capsaicin-treated rats 6-8 weeks of age. Capsaicin treatment resulted in an 82% loss of unmyelinated fibers in L5 dorsal roots, a dramatic reduction of substance P-like immunoreactivity in the spinal cord, and a significant decrease in the percentage of dorsal horn nociceptive neurons that responded to C-fiber stimulation and noxious heating of the skin. The thermal nociceptive threshold was significantly increased in capsaicin-treated rats, but behavioral hyperalgesia to thermal stimuli still developed in response to inflammation. Following inflammation, there was a significant decrease in mechanical threshold and an increase in response duration to mechanical stimuli in both vehicle- and capsaicin-treated rats, suggesting that a state of mechanical hyperalgesia was also induced. The capsaicin treatment appears to have differential effects on nociceptive specific (NS) and wide-dynamic-range (WDR) neurons in inflamed rats. Expansion of the receptive fields of nociceptive neurons, a measure of the effect of inflammation-induced CNS plasticity, was less extensive for NS than for WDR neurons in capsaicin-treated rats. Compared to vehicle-treated rats, a smaller population of NS neurons, but a similar percentage of WDR neurons, had background activity in inflamed capsaicin-treated rats. C-fiber strength electrical stimulation of the sciatic nerve produced expansion of the receptive fields in a greater portion of NS neurons (53%, P < 0.05) in capsaicin- than in vehicle-treated rats (32%). There was no difference in stimulation-induced expansion of the receptive fields for WDR neurons between vehicle- or capsaicin-treated rats. An N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist, MK-801

  15. Adaptation to capsaicin within and across days.

    PubMed

    McBurney, D H; Balaban, C D; Christopher, D E; Harvey, C

    1997-02-01

    Subjects judged the time-course of the burn caused by 100 ppm capsaicin applied to the tongue on Day 1 and Day 5. On Days 2-4, they tasted hard candy containing capsaicin. Most subjects did not show adaptation within Day 1, but either plateaued after about 16 min or rose monotonically for the entire 34 min. Intensity was less on Day 5 and levelled off or declined for most subjects. Data were fit to a mathematical model of adaptation. Adaptation across days was accounted for by changes in the gains of the three processes.

  16. Neuronal plasticity of trigeminal ganglia in mice following nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Lynds, Randi; Lyu, Chuang; Lyu, Gong-Wei; Shi, Xie-Qi; Rosén, Annika; Mustafa, Kamal; Shi, Tie-Jun Sten

    2017-01-01

    Background Nerve injury may induce neuropathic pain. In studying the mechanisms of orofacial neuropathic pain, attention has been paid to the plastic changes that occur in the trigeminal ganglia (TGs) and nucleus in response to an injury of the trigeminal nerve branches. Previous studies have explored the impact of sciatic nerve injury on dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) and it has shown dramatic changes in the expression of multiple biomarkers. In large, the changes in biomarker expression in TGs after trigeminal nerve injury are similar to that in DRGs after sciatic nerve injury. However, important differences exist. Therefore, there is a need to study the plasticity of biomarkers in TGs after nerve injury in the context of the development of neuropathic pain-like behaviors. Aim The aim of this study was to investigate the plasticity of biomarkers associated with chronic persistent pain in TGs after trigeminal nerve injury. Materials and methods To mimic the chronic nature of the disorder, we used an intraoral procedure to access the infraorbital nerve (ION) and induced a nerve injury in mice. Immunohistochemistry and quantification were used for revealing the expression level of each biomarker in TGs after nerve injury. Results Two weeks after partial ION injury, immunohistochemistry results showed strongly upregulated expressions of activating transcription factor 3 and neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the ipsilateral TGs. Microglial cells were also activated after nerve injury. In regard to positive neuronal profile counting, however, no significant difference in expression was observed in galanin, substance P, calcitonin gene-related peptide, neuronal nitric oxide synthase, phosphorylated AKT, or P2X3 in ipsilateral TGs when compared to contralateral TGs. Conclusion In this study, the expression and regulation of biomarkers in TGs have been observed in response to trigeminal nerve injury. Our results suggest that NPY and Iba1 might play crucial roles in the pathogenesis of

  17. Depletion of substance P, neurokinin A and calcitonin gene-related peptide from the contralateral and ipsilateral caudal trigeminal nucleus following unilateral electrical stimulation of the trigeminal ganglion; a possible neurophysiological and neuroanatomical link to generalized head pain.

    PubMed

    Samsam, M; Coveñas, R; Csillik, B; Ahangari, R; Yajeya, J; Riquelme, R; Narváez, J A; Tramu, G

    2001-03-01

    Primary trigeminal neurons of the trigeminal ganglion (TG) innervate major parts of the face and head, including the dura. Electrical stimulation of the TG at specific parameters, can activate its nociceptive neurons and may serve as an experimental pain model. Markowitz [J. Neurosci. 7 (1987) 4129] reported that electrical stimulation of the trigeminal ganglion (TG) causes extravasation of plasma proteins from venules of the trigeminally innervated domain possibly due to the release of vasoactive substances. Neurogenic inflammation (vasodilatation, plasma protein extravasation, release of vasoactive peptides) in dura may serve as one of the possible pathomechanisms underlying vascular head pain [Moskowitz, Ann. Neurol. 16 (1984) 157]. We performed a unilateral electrical stimulation (7.5 Hz, 5 ms, 0.8-1.4 mA for 5 min) of the TG in rat, to induce a neurogenic inflammation in the peripheral trigeminal domain including the dura, looking for calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP), substance P (SP) and neurokinin A (NKA) immunoreactivity (IR) in the caudal trigeminal nucleus (CTN) into which massive central trigeminal processes terminate. Here, we show patchy depletion(s) of CGRP-, SP- and NKA-IRs in the contralateral CTN of the rat in addition to their ipsilateral depletion. Such depletion is due to the release of these neuropeptides in the CTN leading to the activation of bilateral trigeminal nociceptive pathway. These data afford the possibility that under specific frequencies (which may roughly correlate to the intensity of the painful stimulus) and/or specific intensities (may correlate to specific areas of the peripheral trigeminal domain) of stimulation, activation of one side of the TG may activate bilateral trigeminal nociceptive pathway leading to the perception of an ill localized/generalized pain or headache rather than a unilateral one.

  18. [The effect of destruction of rat capsaicin-sensitive nerves on blood pressure in rats with metabolic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Spiridonov, V K; Tolochko, Z S; Kostina, N E

    2013-09-01

    The effect of destruction of capsaicin-sensitive nerve (capsaicin 150 mg/kg, s/c) on blood pre- ssure was investigated in rats with metabolic syndrome induced by fructose (12.5% in drinking water for 10 weeks). The blood plasma concentrations of glucose, triglyceride (TG) and products of lipid perioxidation were defined in these rats. The systolic blood pressure was measured by non-invasive method using the Coda system (Coda, Kent Scientific, USA). The fructose diet caused impaired tolerance glucose, arterial hypertension, increased the contents of TG and products of lipid peroxidation. In capsaicin--pretreated rats (deafferentiation of capsaicin-sensitive nerve) the fructose intake did not evoke impairment tolerance glucose, the increase of systolic blood pressure and the plasma content of triglyceride. The increase of lipid perioxidation in fructose fed rats was not prevented by capsaicin pretreatment. The authors suggest that capsaicin-sensitive nerves contribute to the development of insulin resistance and arterial hypertension in the metabolic syndrome.

  19. TRPV4 is necessary for trigeminal irritant pain and functions as a cellular formalin receptor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong; Kanju, Patrick; Fang, Quan; Lee, Suk Hee; Parekh, Puja K; Lee, Whasil; Moore, Carlene; Brenner, Daniel; Gereau, Robert W; Wang, Fan; Liedtke, Wolfgang

    2014-12-01

    Detection of external irritants by head nociceptor neurons has deep evolutionary roots. Irritant-induced aversive behavior is a popular pain model in laboratory animals. It is used widely in the formalin model, where formaldehyde is injected into the rodent paw, eliciting quantifiable nocifensive behavior that has a direct, tissue-injury-evoked phase, and a subsequent tonic phase caused by neural maladaptation. The formalin model has elucidated many antipain compounds and pain-modulating signaling pathways. We have adopted this model to trigeminally innervated territories in mice. In addition, we examined the involvement of TRPV4 channels in formalin-evoked trigeminal pain behavior because TRPV4 is abundantly expressed in trigeminal ganglion (TG) sensory neurons, and because we have recently defined TRPV4's role in response to airborne irritants and in a model for temporomandibular joint pain. We found TRPV4 to be important for trigeminal nocifensive behavior evoked by formalin whisker pad injections. This conclusion is supported by studies with Trpv4(-/-) mice and TRPV4-specific antagonists. Our results imply TRPV4 in MEK-ERK activation in TG sensory neurons. Furthermore, cellular studies in primary TG neurons and in heterologous TRPV4-expressing cells suggest that TRPV4 can be activated directly by formalin to gate Ca(2+). Using TRPA1-blocker and Trpa1(-/-) mice, we found that both TRP channels co-contribute to the formalin trigeminal pain response. These results imply TRPV4 as an important signaling molecule in irritation-evoked trigeminal pain. TRPV4-antagonistic therapies can therefore be envisioned as novel analgesics, possibly for specific targeting of trigeminal pain disorders, such as migraine, headaches, temporomandibular joint, facial, and dental pain, and irritation of trigeminally innervated surface epithelia.

  20. Microsurgical anatomy of the trigeminal nerve.

    PubMed

    Joo, Wonil; Yoshioka, Fumitaka; Funaki, Takeshi; Mizokami, Koji; Rhoton, Albert L

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study is to review surgical anatomy of the trigeminal nerve. We also demonstrate some pictures involving the trigeminal nerve and its surrounding connective and neurovascular structures. Ten adult cadaveric heads were studied, using a magnification ranging from 3× to 40×, after perfusion of the arteries and veins with colored latex. The trigeminal nerve is the largest and most complex of the cranial nerves. It serves as a major conduit of sensory input from the face and provides motor innervation to the muscles of mastication. Because of its size and complexity, it is essential to have thorough knowledge of the nerve before diagnoses and treatment of the pathologic processes in the orofacial, temporomandibular, infratemporal, and pterygopalatine areas. The trigeminal nerve is encountered with imaging or surgery of the skull base surgery. Thus, a comprehensive knowledge of the anatomy of the trigeminal nerve is crucial for performing the surgical procedures without significant complication.

  1. Eyelid Opening with Trigeminal Proprioceptive Activation Regulates a Brainstem Arousal Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Matsuo, Kiyoshi; Ban, Ryokuya; Hama, Yuki; Yuzuriha, Shunsuke

    2015-01-01

    Eyelid opening stretches mechanoreceptors in the supratarsal Müller muscle to activate the proprioceptive fiber supplied by the trigeminal mesencephalic nucleus. This proprioception induces reflex contractions of the slow-twitch fibers in the levator palpebrae superioris and frontalis muscles to sustain eyelid and eyebrow positions against gravity. The cell bodies of the trigeminal proprioceptive neurons in the mesencephalon potentially make gap-junctional connections with the locus coeruleus neurons. The locus coeruleus is implicated in arousal and autonomic function. Due to the relationship between arousal, ventromedial prefrontal cortex, and skin conductance, we assessed whether upgaze with trigeminal proprioceptive evocation activates sympathetically innervated sweat glands and the ventromedial prefrontal cortex. Specifically, we examined whether 60° upgaze induces palmar sweating and hemodynamic changes in the prefrontal cortex in 16 subjects. Sweating was monitored using a thumb-mounted perspiration meter, and prefrontal cortex activity was measured with 45-channel, functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) and 2-channel NIRS at Fp1 and Fp2. In 16 subjects, palmar sweating was induced by upgaze and decreased in response to downgaze. Upgaze activated the ventromedial prefrontal cortex with an accumulation of integrated concentration changes in deoxyhemoglobin, oxyhemoglobin, and total hemoglobin levels in 12 subjects. Upgaze phasically and degree-dependently increased deoxyhemoglobin level at Fp1 and Fp2, whereas downgaze phasically decreased it in 16 subjects. Unilateral anesthetization of mechanoreceptors in the supratarsal Müller muscle used to significantly reduce trigeminal proprioceptive evocation ipsilaterally impaired the increased deoxyhemoglobin level by 60° upgaze at Fp1 or Fp2 in 6 subjects. We concluded that upgaze with strong trigeminal proprioceptive evocation was sufficient to phasically activate sympathetically innervated sweat glands

  2. Neuronal NTPDase3 Mediates Extracellular ATP Degradation in Trigeminal Nociceptive Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Lihua; Trinh, Thu; Ren, Yanfang; Dirksen, Robert T.; Liu, Xiuxin

    2016-01-01

    ATP induces pain via activation of purinergic receptors in nociceptive sensory nerves. ATP signaling is terminated by ATP hydrolysis mediated by cell surface-localized ecto-nucleotidases. Using enzymatic histochemical staining, we show that ecto-ATPase activity is present in mouse trigeminal nerves. Using immunofluorescence staining, we found that ecto-NTPDase3 is expressed in trigeminal nociceptive neurons and their projections to the brainstem. In addition, ecto-ATPase activity and ecto-NTPDase3 are also detected in the nociceptive outermost layer of the trigeminal subnucleus caudalis. Furthermore, we demonstrate that incubation with anti-NTPDase3 serum reduces extracellular ATP degradation in the nociceptive lamina of both the trigeminal subnucleus caudalis and the spinal cord dorsal horn. These results are consistent with neuronal NTPDase3 activity modulating pain signal transduction and transmission by affecting extracellular ATP hydrolysis within the trigeminal nociceptive pathway. Thus, disruption of trigeminal neuronal NTPDase3 expression and localization to presynaptic terminals during chronic inflammation, local constriction and injury may contribute to the pathogenesis of orofacial neuropathic pain. PMID:27706204

  3. The Effect of Capsaicin on Salivary Gland Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Shin, Yong-Hwan; Kim, Jin Man; Park, Kyungpyo

    2016-06-25

    Capsaicin (trans-8-methyl-N-vanilyl-6-nonenamide) is a unique alkaloid isolated from hot chili peppers of the capsicum family. Capsaicin is an agonist of transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1), which is expressed in nociceptive sensory neurons and a range of secretory epithelia, including salivary glands. Capsaicin has analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties in sensory neurons. Recently, increasing evidence has indicated that capsaicin also affects saliva secretion and inflammation in salivary glands. Applying capsaicin increases salivary secretion in human and animal models. Capsaicin appears to increase salivation mainly by modulating the paracellular pathway in salivary glands. Capsaicin activates TRPV1, which modulates the permeability of tight junctions (TJ) by regulating the expression and function of putative intercellular adhesion molecules in an ERK (extracelluar signal-regulated kinase) -dependent manner. Capsaicin also improved dysfunction in transplanted salivary glands. Aside from the secretory effects of capsaicin, it has anti-inflammatory effects in salivary glands. The anti-inflammatory effect of capsaicin is, however, not mediated by TRPV1, but by inhibition of the NF-κB pathway. In conclusion, capsaicin might be a potential drug for alleviating dry mouth symptoms and inflammation of salivary glands.

  4. Topical ethosomal capsaicin attenuates edema and nociception in arthritic rats.

    PubMed

    Kumar Sarwa, Khomendra; Rudrapal, Mithun; Mazumder, Bhaskar

    2015-12-01

    In this study, topical ethosomal formulation of capsaicin was prepared and evaluated for bio-efficacy in arthritic rats. Physical and biological characterizations of prepared capsaicin-loaded nano vesicular systems were also carried out. Ethosomal capsaicin showed significant reduction of rat paw edema along with promising antinociceptive action. The topical antiarthritic efficacy of prepared formulation of capsaicin was found more than that of Thermagel, a marketed gel of capsaicin. From toxicological study, no predictable signs of toxicity such as skin irritation (of experimental rats) were observed. Based on this finding, ethosomal capsaicin could be proposed as an effective as well as a safe topical delivery system for the long-term treatment of arthritis and associated inflammo-musculoskeletal disorders. Such exciting result would eventually enlighten the analgesic and anti-inflammatory potential of capsaicin for topical remedy.

  5. Simulated microgravity [bed rest] has little influence on taste, odor or trigeminal sensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vickers, Z. M.; Rice, B. L.; Rose, M. S.; Lane, H. W.

    2001-01-01

    Anecdotal evidence suggests that astronauts' perceptions of foods in space flight may differ from their perceptions of the same foods on Earth. Fluid shifts toward the head experienced in space may alter the astronauts' sensitivity to odors and tastes, producing altered perceptions. Our objective was to determine whether head-down bed rest, which produces similar fluid shifts, would produce changes in sensitivity to taste, odor or trigeminal sensations. Six subjects were rested three times prior to bed rest, three times during bed rest and two times after bed rest to determine their threshold sensitivity to the odors isoamylbutyrate and menthone, the tastants sucrose, sodium chloride, citric acid, quinine and monosodium glutamate, and to capsaicin. Thresholds were measured using a modified staircase procedure. Self-reported congestion was also recorded at each test time. Thresholds for monosodium glutamate where slightly higher during bed rest. None of the other thresholds were altered by bed rest.

  6. CAPSAICIN-SENSITIVE SENSORY NERVE FIBERS CONTRIBUTE TO THE GENERATION AND MAINTENANCE OF SKELETAL FRACTURE PAIN

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez-Andrade, Juan Miguel; Bloom, Aaron P.; Mantyh, William G.; Koewler, Nathan J.; Freeman, Katie T.; Delong, David; Ghilardi, Joseph R.; Kuskowski, Michael A.; Mantyh, Patrick W.

    2009-01-01

    Although skeletal pain can have a marked impact on a patient’s functional status and quality of life, relatively little is known about the specific populations of peripheral nerve fibers that drive non-malignant bone pain. In the present report, neonatal male Sprague Dawley rats were treated with capsaicin or vehicle and femoral fracture was produced when the animals were young adults (15–16 weeks old). Capsaicin treatment, but not vehicle, resulted in a significant (>70%) depletion in the density of calcitonin-gene related peptide positive (CGRP+) sensory nerve fibers, but not 200 kD neurofilament H positive (NF200+) sensory nerve fibers in the periosteum. The periosteum is a thin, cellular and fibrous tissue that tightly adheres to the outer surface of all but the articulated surface of bone and appears to play a pivotal role in driving fracture pain. In animals treated with capsaicin, but not vehicle, there was a 50% reduction in the severity, but no change in the time course, of fracture-induced skeletal pain related behaviors as measured by spontaneous flinching, guarding and weight bearing. These results suggest that both capsaicin-sensitive (primarily CGRP+ C-fibers) and capsaicin-insensitive (primarily NF200+ A-delta fibers) sensory nerve fibers participate in driving skeletal fracture pain. Skeletal pain can be a significant impediment to functional recovery following trauma-induced fracture, osteoporosis-induced fracture and orthopedic surgery procedures such as knee and hip replacement. Understanding the specific populations of sensory nerve fibers that need to be targeted to inhibit the generation and maintenance of skeletal pain may allow the development of more specific mechanism-based therapies that can effectively attenuate acute and chronic skeletal pain. PMID:19486928

  7. Capsaicin augments synaptic transmission in the rat medial preoptic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Urban; Sundgren-Andersson, Anna K; Johansson, Staffan; Krupp, Johannes J

    2005-05-10

    The medial preoptic nucleus (MPN) is the major nucleus of the preoptic area (POA), a hypothalamic area involved in the regulation of body-temperature. Injection of capsaicin into this area causes hypothermia in vivo. Capsaicin also causes glutamate release from hypothalamic slices. However, no data are available on the effect of capsaicin on synaptic transmission within the MPN. Here, we have studied the effect of exogenously applied capsaicin on spontaneous synaptic activity in hypothalamic slices of the rat. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were made from visually identified neurons located in the MPN. In a subset of the studied neurons, capsaicin enhanced the frequency of spontaneous glutamatergic EPSCs. Remarkably, capsaicin also increased the frequency of GABAergic IPSCs, an effect that was sensitive to removal of extracellular calcium, but insensitive to tetrodotoxin. This suggests an action of capsaicin at presynaptic GABAergic terminals. In contrast to capsaicin, the TRPV4 agonist 4alpha-PDD did not affect GABAergic IPSCs. Our results show that capsaicin directly affects synaptic transmission in the MPN, likely through actions at presynaptic terminals as well as on projecting neurons. Our data add to the growing evidence that capsaicin receptors are not only expressed in primary afferent neurons, but also contribute to synaptic processing in some CNS regions.

  8. [Update on the management of trigeminal neuralgia].

    PubMed

    Alcántara Montero, A; Sánchez Carnerero, C I

    2016-01-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia is one of the most severe facial pain syndromes. The annual incidence varies between 4-13% and has a significant effect on patient quality of life. The initial treatment of trigeminal neuralgia is pharmacological, and although other drugs have demonstrated efficacy, albeit in more limited form, carbamazepine is the only drug with sufficient level of evidence. When medical treatment fails, surgery should be considered and can opt for open surgery or minimally invasive percutaneous techniques. This paper reviews the medical and surgical therapeutic options for the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia, based on current available evidence.

  9. Spontaneous Trigeminal Allodynia in Rats: A Model of Primary Headache

    PubMed Central

    Oshinsky, Michael L.; Sanghvi, Menka M.; Maxwell, Christina R.; Gonzalez, Dorian; Spangenberg, Rebecca J.; Cooper, Marnie; Silberstein, Stephen D.

    2014-01-01

    Animal models are essential for studying the pathophysiology of headache disorders and as a screening tool for new therapies. Most animal models modify a normal animal in an attempt to mimic migraine symptoms. They require manipulation to activate the trigeminal nerve or dural nociceptors. At best, they are models of secondary headache. No existing model can address the fundamental question: How is a primary headache spontaneously initiated? In the process of obtaining baseline periorbital von Frey thresholds in a wild-type Sprague-Dawley rat, we discovered a rat with spontaneous episodic trigeminal allodynia (manifested by episodically changing periorbital pain threshold). Subsequent mating showed that the trait is inherited. Animals with spontaneous trigeminal allodynia allow us to study the pathophysiology of primary recurrent headache disorders. To validate this as a model for migraine, we tested the effects of clinically proven acute and preventive migraine treatments on spontaneous changes in rat periorbital sensitivity. Sumatriptan, ketorolac, and dihydroergotamine temporarily reversed the low periorbital pain thresholds. Thirty days of chronic valproic acid treatment prevented spontaneous changes in trigeminal allodynia. After discontinuation, the rats returned to their baseline of spontaneous episodic threshold changes. We also tested the effects of known chemical human migraine triggers. On days when the rats did not have allodynia and showed normal periorbital von Frey thresholds, glycerol trinitrate and calcitonin gene related peptide induced significant decreases in the periorbital pain threshold. This model can be used as a predictive model for drug development and for studies of putative biomarkers for headache diagnosis and treatment. PMID:22963523

  10. Nocifensive Behaviors in Mice with Radiation-Induced Oral Mucositis.

    PubMed

    Nolan, Michael W; Long, C Tyler; Marcus, Karen L; Sarmadi, Shayan; Roback, Donald M; Fukuyama, Tomoki; Baeumer, Wolfgang; Lascelles, B Duncan X

    2017-02-10

    Oral mucositis can result in significant dysphagia, and is the most common dose-limiting acute toxicity in head and neck cancer patients receiving chemoradiotherapy. There is a critical need to determine the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie radiotherapy-associated discomfort in patients with mucositis. The objective was to induce oral mucositis in mice, using a clinical linear accelerator, and to quantify resultant discomfort, and characterize peripheral sensitization. A clinical linear accelerator was used to deliver ionizing radiation to the oral cavity of mice. Mucositis severity scoring, and various behavioral assays were performed to quantify bouts of orofacial wiping and scratching, bite force, gnawing behavior and burrowing activity. Calcium imaging was performed on neurons of the trigeminal ganglia. Glossitis was induced with a single fraction of at least 27 Gy. Body weight decreased and subsequently returned to baseline, in concert with development and resolution of mucositis, which was worst at day 10 and 11 postirradiation, however was resolved within another 10 days. Neither bite force, nor gnawing behavior were measurably affected. However, burrowing activity was decreased, and both facial wiping and scratching were increased while mice had visible mucositis lesions. Sensory nerves of irradiated mice were more responsive to histamine, tumor necrosis factor alpha and capsaicin. Radiation-induced glossitis is associated with hyper-reactivity of sensory neurons in the trigeminal ganglia of mice, and is accompanied by several behaviors indicative of both itch and pain. These data validate an appropriate model for cancer treatment related discomfort in humans.

  11. The Effects of Pregabalin and the Glial Attenuator Minocycline on the Response to Intradermal Capsaicin in Patients with Unilateral Sciatica

    PubMed Central

    Sumracki, Nicole M.; Hutchinson, Mark R.; Gentgall, Melanie; Briggs, Nancy; Williams, Desmond B.; Rolan, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Background Patients with unilateral sciatica have heightened responses to intradermal capsaicin compared to pain-free volunteers. No studies have investigated whether this pain model can screen for novel anti-neuropathic agents in patients with pre-existing neuropathic pain syndromes. Aim This study compared the effects of pregabalin (300 mg) and the tetracycline antibiotic and glial attenuator minocycline (400 mg) on capsaicin-induced spontaneous pain, flare, allodynia and hyperalgesia in patients with unilateral sciatica on both their affected and unaffected leg. Methods/Results Eighteen patients with unilateral sciatica completed this randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, three-way cross-over study. Participants received a 10 µg dose of capsaicin into the middle section of their calf on both their affected and unaffected leg, separated by an interval of 75 min. Capsaicin-induced spontaneous pain, flare, allodynia and hyperalgesia were recorded pre-injection and at 5, 20, 40, 60 and 90 min post-injection. Minocycline tended to reduce pre-capsaicin injection values of hyperalgesia in the affected leg by 28% (95% CI 0% to 56%). The area under the effect time curves for capsaicin-induced spontaneous pain, flare, allodynia and hyperalgesia were not affected by either treatment compared to placebo. Significant limb differences were observed for flare (AUC) (−38% in affected leg, 95% CI for difference −19% to −52%). Both hand dominance and sex were significant covariates of response to capsaicin. Conclusions It cannot be concluded that minocycline is unsuitable for further evaluation as an anti-neuropathic pain drug as pregabalin, our positive control, failed to reduce capsaicin-induced neuropathic pain. However, the anti-hyperalgesic effect of minocycline observed pre-capsaicin injection is promising pilot information to support ongoing research into glial-mediated treatments for neuropathic pain. The differences in flare response between limbs may

  12. TRIGEMINAL UPTAKE AND CLEARANCE OF INHALED MANGANESECHLORIDE IN RATS AND MICE

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, J; Bench, G; Myers, O; Tinner, B; Staines, W; Barr, E; Divine, K K; Barrington, W; Karlsson, J

    2003-12-09

    Inhaled manganese (Mn) can enter the olfactory bulbs via the olfactory epithelium, and can then be further transported trans-synaptically to deeper brain structures. In addition to olfactory neurons, the nasal cavity is innervated by the maxillary division of the trigeminal nerve that projects to the spinal trigeminal nucleus. Direct uptake and transport of inhaled metal particles in the trigeminal system has not been investigated previously. We studied the uptake, deposition, and clearance of soluble Mn in the trigeminal system following nose-only inhalation of environmentally relevant concentrations. Rats and mice were exposed for 10 days (6 hours/day, 5 days/week) to air or MnCl2 aerosols containing 2.3 {+-} 1.3mg Mn/m{sup 3} with mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) of 3.1 {+-} 1.4 {micro}m for rats and 2.0 {+-} 0.09 mg Mn/m{sup 3} MnCl{sup 2} with MMAD of 1.98 {+-} 0.12 {micro}m for mice. Mn concentrations in the trigeminal ganglia and spinal trigeminal nucleus were measured 2 hours (0 day), 7, 14, or 30 days post-exposure using Proton Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE). Manganese-exposed rats and mice showed statistically elevated levels of Mn in trigeminal ganglia 0, 7 and 14 days after the 10 day exposure period when compared to control animals. The Mn concentration gradually decreased over time with a clearance rate (t{sub 1/2}) of 7-8 days. Rats and mice were similar in both average accumulated Mn levels in trigeminal ganglia and in rates of clearance. We also found a small but significant elevation of Mn in the spinal trigeminal nucleus of mice 7 days post-exposure and in rats 0 and 7 days post-exposure. Our data demonstrate that the trigeminal nerve can serve as a pathway for entry of inhaled Mn to the brain in rodents following nose-only exposure and raise the question of whether entry of toxicants via this pathway may contribute to development of neurodegenerative diseases.

  13. The sensory response to capsaicin during repeated topical exposures: differential effects on sensations of itching and pungency.

    PubMed

    Green, B G; Shaffer, G S

    1993-06-01

    Changes in sensory irritation were measured during repeated topical exposures to capsaicin over 2 days. The perceived intensities of itching and pungent sensations, predominantly burning and stinging/pricking, were assessed every 60 sec during 5 applications of capsaicin at inter-stimulus intervals (ISI) of 90 min (Exp. 1) or 15 min (Exp. 2) and in follow-up tests 24 h later. Psychophysical measurements were obtained with a hand-held dynamometer in conjunction with the method of magnitude production. When the ISI was 90 min, itching and pungency were both significantly reduced (i.e., desensitization occurred) by the fifth exposure; however, the reduction occurred more rapidly and dramatically for itching. After 24 h, desensitization remained significant only for itching. When the ISI was 15 min, the sensations on day 1 first intensified in a manner consistent with sensitization, then declined in a manner consistent with desensitization; compared to pungency, itch exhibited less sensitization and more desensitization. On day 2, overall intensity was less for both categories of sensation, primarily because of a reduction in sensitization. Marked individual differences were observed in the overall sensitivity to capsaicin, the time course of sensation, the susceptibility to capsaicin-induced itch, and the rate and duration of sensitization and desensitization. The results are discussed in terms of current hypotheses about the sensory mechanisms that underlie chemically induced itch and the use of capsaicin as a topical analgesic and antipruritic.

  14. Central effect of histamine in a rat model of acute trigeminal pain.

    PubMed

    Tamaddonfard, Esmaeal; Khalilzadeh, Emad; Hamzeh-Gooshchi, Nasrin; Seiednejhad-Yamchi, Sona

    2008-01-01

    In conscious rats implanted with an intracerebroventricular (icv) cannula, effect of icv injections of histamine, chlorpheniramine (H(1)-receptor antagonist) and ranitidine (H(2)-receptor blocker) was investigated in a rat model of acute trigeminal pain. Acute trigeminal pain was induced by putting a drop of 5 M NaCl solution on the corneal surface of the eye and the numbers of eye wipes were counted during the first 30 s. Histamine (20, 40 microg) and chlorpheniramine (80 microg) significantly decreased the numbers of eye wipes. Ranitidine alone had no effect. Pretreatment with chlorpheniramine did not change the histamine-induced analgesia, whereas the histamine effect on pain was inhibited with ranitidine pretreatment. These results indicate that the brain histamine, through central H(2) receptors, may be involved in the modulation of the acute trigeminal pain in rats.

  15. Chemosensory properties of the trigeminal system.

    PubMed

    Viana, Félix

    2011-01-19

    The capacity of cutaneous, including trigeminal endings, to detect chemicals is known as chemesthesis or cutaneous chemosensation. This sensory function involves the activation of nociceptor and thermoreceptor endings and has a protective or defensive function, as many of these substances are irritants or poisonous. However, humans have also developed a liking for the distinct sharpness or pungency of many foods, beverages, and spices following activation of the same sensory afferents. Our understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of chemosensation in the trigeminal system has experienced enormous progress in the past decade, following the cloning and functional characterization of several ion channels activated by physical and chemical stimuli. This brief review attempts to summarize our current knowledge in this field, including a functional description of various sensory channels, especially TRP channels, involved in trigeminal chemosensitivy. Finally, some of these new findings are discussed in the context of the pathophysiology of trigeminal chemosensation, including pain, pruritus, migraine, cough, airway inflammation, and ophthalmic diseases.

  16. Effective Management of Trigeminal Neuralgia by Neurostimulation

    PubMed Central

    Abd-Elsayed, Alaa A.; Grandhi, Ravi; Sachdeva, Harsh

    2015-01-01

    Background Treatment of trigeminal neuralgia can be challenging for many physicians; patients who do not respond to conventional treatments and traditional surgical approaches often continue to suffer with pain. The peripheral nerve stimulator (PNS) has been used to treat many chronic pain conditions, but few reports exist about its use to treat trigeminal neuralgia. Case Report We present the case of a patient with trigeminal neuralgia resistant to conventional techniques of pain management. Conservative pain management was attempted but was ineffective. As a result, a PNS was placed with minimally invasive surgery. Pain scores were recorded before and after the procedure, and the patient reported complete resolution of her pain. Conclusion PNS implantation can be a safe and effective method to treat trigeminal neuralgia. More research is needed to define its mechanism of action. PMID:26130986

  17. Atypical Trigeminal Neuralgia Secondary to Meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Niwant, Premeshwar; Motwani, Mukta; Naik, Sushil

    2015-01-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia is a disorder of the fifth cranial nerve that causes episodes of intense, stabbing, electric shock-like pain that lasts from few seconds to few minutes in the areas of the face where the branches of the nerve are distributed. More than one nerve branch can be affected by the disorder. We report an unusual case of trigeminal neuralgia affecting right side of face presenting atypical features of neuralgia and not responding to the usual course of treatment. The magnetic resonance imaging study of brain revealed a large extra-axial mass involving right cerebellopontine angle region causing moderate pressure effect on trigeminal nerve and brain stem. The aim of this case report is to show a tumor of cerebellopontine angle, presenting clinically as atypical trigeminal neuralgia. PMID:26664753

  18. Bioavailability of capsaicin and its implications for drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Rollyson, William D.; Stover, Cody A.; Brown, Kathleen C.; Perry, Haley E.; Stevenson, Cathryn D.; McNees, Christopher A.; Ball, John G.; Valentovic, Monica A.; Dasgupta, Piyali

    2014-01-01

    The dietary compound capsaicin is responsible for the “hot and spicy” taste of chili peppers and pepper extracts. It is a valuable pharmacological agent with several therapeutic applications in controlling pain and inflammation. Emerging studies show that it displays potent anti-tumor activity in several human cancers. On a more basic research level, capsaicin has been used as a ligand to activate several types of ion-channel receptors. The pharmacological activity of capsaicin-like compounds is dependent on several factors like the dose, the route of administration and most importantly on its concentration at target tissues. The present review describes the current knowledge involving the metabolism and bioavailability of capsaicinoids in rodents and humans. Novel drug delivery strategies used to improve the bioavailability and therapeutic index of capsaicin are discussed in detail. The generation of novel capsaicin-mimetics and improved drug delivery methods will foster the hope of innovative applications of capsaicin in human disease. PMID:25307998

  19. Trigemino-cardiac reflex during microvascular trigeminal decompression in cases of trigeminal neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Schaller, Bernhard

    2005-01-01

    The trigemino-cardiac reflex (TCR) is a well-recognized phenomenon consisting of bradycardia, arterial hypotension, apnea, and gastric hypermotility during ocular surgery or other manipulations in and around the orbit. Thus far, it could bee shown that central stimulation of the trigeminal nerve during transsphenoidal surgery and surgery for tumors in the cerebellopontine angle can lead to TCR. In cases of microvascular trigeminal decompression for trigeminal neuralgia, no data of the possible occurrence of TCR are available. TCR was defined as a drop in mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) and the heart rate (HR) of more than 20% to the baseline values before the stimulus and coinciding with the manipulation of the trigeminal nerve. Electronic anesthetic recorded perioperative HR and MABP values were reviewed retrospectively in 28 patients who received microvascular trigeminal decompression in cases of trigeminal neuralgia and were divided into two subgroups on the basis of occurrence of TCR during surgery. Of the 28 patients, 5 (18%) showed evidence of TCR during manipulation at the trigeminal radix by separation from microvascular structures. Their HR fell 46% and their MABP 57% during operative procedures near the trigeminal nerve as compared with levels immediately before the stimulus. After cessation of manipulation, HR and MABP returned (spontaneously) to levels before the stimulus. Risk factors of TCR were compared with results from the literature. In conclusion, the present results give evidence of TCR during manipulation of the central part of the trigeminal nerve during microvascular trigeminal decompression in cases of trigeminal neuralgia under a standardized anesthetic protocol.

  20. Treatment of notalgia paresthetica with capsaicin.

    PubMed

    Leibsohn, E

    1992-05-01

    Twenty-four patients with notalgia paresthetica were treated with topical capsaicin (Zostrix) in a concentration of 0.025 percent for four months. In approximately 70 percent of the patients who remained in the study, relief of pruritus was achieved up to the 90 percent level. In the majority of these patients pruritus returned when use of the medication was stopped. The history, causes, and prevalence of the condition are reviewed. This treatment is the first described that is relatively effective.

  1. Role of calcitonin gene-related peptide in the sensitization of dorsal horn neurons to mechanical stimulation after intradermal injection of capsaicin.

    PubMed

    Sun, Rui-Qing; Lawand, Nada B; Lin, Qing; Willis, William D

    2004-07-01

    This study was designed to assess the role of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and its receptor in the sensitization of dorsal horn neurons induced by intradermal injection of capsaicin in rats. Extracellular recordings were made from wide dynamic range (WDR) dorsal horn neurons with receptive fields on the hindpaw in the lumbar enlargement of anesthetized rats. The background activity and responses to brushing, pressing, and pinching the skin were assessed. A postsuperfusion or a presuperfusion of CGRP(8-37) paradigm was followed. When tested 30 min after capsaicin injection, there was an increase in background activity and responses to brush, press, and pinch applied to the receptive field. Superfusion of CGRP(8-37) into the spinal cord at 45 min after capsaicin injection significantly reversed the increased background activity and responses to brush, press, and pinch applied to the receptive field. On the other hand, spinal superfusion of CGRP(8-37) prior to capsaicin injection prevented the increased background activity and responses to brush, press, and pinch of WDR neurons that occurred following capsaicin injection in control experiments. A sensitization of spinal dorsal horn neurons could also be induced by superfusion of the spinal cord with CGRP. The effect could be blocked by CGRP(8-37) dose-dependently. Collectively, these results suggest that CGRP and its receptors are involved in the spinal cord central sensitization induced by intradermal injection of capsaicin.

  2. Altered thermal grill response and paradoxical heat sensations after topical capsaicin application.

    PubMed

    Schaldemose, Ellen L; Horjales-Araujo, Emilia; Svensson, Peter; Finnerup, Nanna B

    2015-06-01

    The thermal grill illusion, where interlaced warm and cold bars cause an unusual burning sensation, and paradoxical heat sensations (PHS), where cold is perceived as warm when alternating warm and cold, are examples of a complex integration of thermal sensations. Here, we investigated the effect of sensitization of heat-sensitive neurons on cold and warm integration. We examined thermal thresholds, PHS, and warm, cold, and pain sensations to alternating cold (10°C) and warm (40°C) bars (the thermal grill [TG]) in the primary area (application site) after topical application with capsaicin and vehicle control (ethanol) on the volar forearms in randomized order in 80 healthy participants. As expected, capsaicin induced heat allodynia and hyperalgesia and decreased cold and cold pain sensation. In addition, we found that after capsaicin application, the TG caused less pain and burning than the 40°C bars alone in contrast to the control side where the TG caused more pain and burning, consistent with the thermal grill illusion. In both situations, the pain intensity during the TG correlated inversely with both cold and warm pain thresholds but not with detection thresholds. Paradoxical heat sensation was only seen in 3 participants after control application but in 19 participants after capsaicin. Those with PHS after capsaicin application had higher detection thresholds to both cold and warm than those without PHS, but there was no difference in thermal pain threshold. These results suggest that a complex cross talk among several cold and warm sensitive pathways shapes thermal perception.

  3. Gamma knife radiosurgery to the trigeminal ganglion for treatment of trigeminal neuralgia secondary to vertebrobasilar ectasia

    PubMed Central

    Somaza, Salvador; Hurtado, Wendy; Montilla, Eglee; Ghaleb, Jose

    2014-01-01

    Background: We report the result obtained using Gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery on the trigeminal ganglion (TG) in a patient with trigeminal neuralgia (TN) secondary to vertebrobasilar ectasia (VBE). Case Description: Retrospective review of medical records corresponding to one patient with VBE-related trigeminal pain treated with radiosurgery. Because of the impossibility of visualization of the entry zone or the path of trigeminal nerve through the pontine cistern, we proceeded with stereotactic radiosurgery directed to the TG. The maximum radiation dose was 86 Gy with a 8-mm and a 4-mm collimator. The follow-up period was 24 months. The pain disappeared in 15 days, passing from Barrow Neurological Institute (BNI) grade V to BNI grade IIIa in 4 months and then to grade I. The patient did not experience noticeable subjective facial numbness. Conclusions: This experience showed that Gamma knife radiosurgery was effective in the management of VBE-related trigeminal pain, using the TG as radiosurgical target. PMID:25593782

  4. Antagonistic and Synergistic Activation of Cardiovascular Vagal and Sympathetic Motor Outflows in Trigeminal Reflexes

    PubMed Central

    Buchholz, Bruno; Kelly, Jazmín; Bernatene, Eduardo A.; Méndez Diodati, Nahuel; Gelpi, Ricardo J.

    2017-01-01

    The trigeminal nerve and heart are strongly related through somato-autonomic nervous reflexes that induce rapid changes in cardiovascular function. Several trigeminal reflexes have been described, but the diving and trigeminocardiac reflexes are the most studied. The heart is a target organ dually innervated by the sympathetic and parasympathetic systems. Thus, how cardiac function is regulated during the trigeminal reflexes is the result of the combination of an increased parasympathetic response and increased, decreased, or unaltered sympathetic activity. Various hemodynamic changes occur as a consequence of these alterations in autonomic tone. Often in the oxygen-conserving physiological reflexes such as the diving reflex, sympathetic/parasympathetic co-activation reduces the heart rate and either maintains or increases blood pressure. Conversely, in the trigeminocardiac reflex, bradycardia and hypotension due to parasympathetic activation and sympathetic inactivation tend to be observed. These sudden cardiac innervation disturbances may promote the generation of arrhythmias or myocardial ischemia during surgeries in the trigeminal territory. However, the function and mechanisms involved in the trigeminal reflexes remain to be fully elucidated. The current review provides a brief update and analysis of the features of these reflexes, with special focus on how the autonomic nervous system interacts with cardiovascular function. PMID:28270794

  5. Characterization of capsaicin synthase and identification of its gene (csy1) for pungency factor capsaicin in pepper (Capsicum sp.).

    PubMed

    Prasad, B C Narasimha; Kumar, Vinod; Gururaj, H B; Parimalan, R; Giridhar, P; Ravishankar, G A

    2006-09-05

    Capsaicin is a unique alkaloid of the plant kingdom restricted to the genus Capsicum. Capsaicin is the pungency factor, a bioactive molecule of food and of medicinal importance. Capsaicin is useful as a counterirritant, antiarthritic, analgesic, antioxidant, and anticancer agent. Capsaicin biosynthesis involves condensation of vanillylamine and 8-methyl nonenoic acid, brought about by capsaicin synthase (CS). We found that CS activity correlated with genotype-specific capsaicin levels. We purified and characterized CS ( approximately 35 kDa). Immunolocalization studies confirmed that CS is specifically localized to the placental tissues of Capsicum fruits. Western blot analysis revealed concomitant enhancement of CS levels and capsaicin accumulation during fruit development. We determined the N-terminal amino acid sequence of purified CS, cloned the CS gene (csy1) and sequenced full-length cDNA (981 bp). The deduced amino acid sequence of CS from full-length cDNA was 38 kDa. Functionality of csy1 through heterologous expression in recombinant Escherichia coli was also demonstrated. Here we report the gene responsible for capsaicin biosynthesis, which is unique to Capsicum spp. With this information on the CS gene, speculation on the gene for pungency is unequivocally resolved. Our findings have implications in the regulation of capsaicin levels in Capsicum genotypes.

  6. Reciprocal effects of capsaicin and menthol on thermosensation through regulated activities of TRPV1 and TRPM8.

    PubMed

    Takaishi, Masayuki; Uchida, Kunitoshi; Suzuki, Yoshiro; Matsui, Hiroshi; Shimada, Tadashi; Fujita, Fumitaka; Tominaga, Makoto

    2016-03-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is activated by elevated temperature (>42 °C), and it has been reported that cold temperature decreases capsaicin-induced TRPV1 activity. In contrast, transient receptor potential melastatin 8 (TRPM8) is activated by low temperatures and menthol, and heat stimulation suppresses menthol-evoked TRPM8 currents. These findings suggest that the effects of specific agents on TRPV1 and TRPM8 channels are intricately interrelated. We examined the effects of menthol on human (h)TRPV1 and of capsaicin on hTRPM8. hTRPV1 currents activated by heat and capsaicin were inhibited by menthol, whereas hTRPM8 currents activated by cold and menthol were similarly inhibited by capsaicin. An in vivo sensory irritation test showed that menthol conferred an analgesic effect on the sensory irritation evoked by a capsaicin analogue. These results indicate that in our study the agonists of TRPV1 and TRPM8 interacted with both of these channels and suggest that the anti-nociceptive effects of menthol can be partially explained by this phenomenon.

  7. Capsaicin failed in suppressing cortical processing of CO2 laser pain in migraine patients.

    PubMed

    de Tommaso, Marina; Losito, Luciana; Difruscolo, Olimpia; Sardaro, Michele; Libro, Giuseppe; Guido, Marco; Lamberti, Paolo; Livrea, Paolo

    The aim of this study was to compare the properties of the nociceptive system in eight migraine without aura patients in the pain-free phase with 10 healthy controls, by evaluating the topography and the source of the CO2 laser-evoked potentials (LEPs) obtained by the right supraorbital skin, during and after capsaicin topical application. In healthy subjects the acute cutaneous pain induced by capsaicin reduced the amplitude of the vertex LEPs and induced a posterior shifting of the P2 wave dipolar source within the anterior cingulate cortex. These functional changes seemed significantly reduced in migraine patients, for a disturbed pattern of pain modulation at the cortical level, which may subtend the onset and persistence of migraine.

  8. Antimicrobial and Anti-Virulence Activity of Capsaicin Against Erythromycin-Resistant, Cell-Invasive Group A Streptococci.

    PubMed

    Marini, Emanuela; Magi, Gloria; Mingoia, Marina; Pugnaloni, Armanda; Facinelli, Bruna

    2015-01-01

    Capsaicin (8-methyl-N-vanillyl-6-nonenamide) is the active component of Capsicum plants (chili peppers), which are grown as food and for medicinal purposes since ancient times, and is responsible for the pungency of their fruit. Besides its multiple pharmacological and physiological properties (pain relief, cancer prevention, and beneficial cardiovascular, and gastrointestinal effects) capsaicin has recently attracted considerable attention because of its antimicrobial and anti-virulence activity. This is the first study of its in vitro antibacterial and anti-virulence activity against Streptococcus pyogenes (Group A streptococci, GAS), a major human pathogen. The test strains were previously characterized, erythromycin-susceptible (n = 5) and erythromycin-resistant (n = 27), cell-invasive pharyngeal isolates. The MICs of capsaicin were 64-128 μg/mL (the most common MIC was 128 μg/mL). The action of capsaicin was bactericidal, as suggested by MBC values that were equal or close to the MICs, and by early detection of dead cells in the live/dead assay. No capsaicin-resistant mutants were obtained in single-step resistance selection studies. Interestingly, growth in presence of sublethal capsaicin concentrations induced an increase in biofilm production (p ≤ 0.05) and in the number of bacteria adhering to A549 monolayers, and a reduction in cell-invasiveness and haemolytic activity (both p ≤ 0.05). Cell invasiveness fell so dramatically that a highly invasive strain became non-invasive. The dose-response relationship, characterized by opposite effects of low and high capsaicin doses, suggests a hormetic response. The present study documents that capsaicin has promising bactericidal activity against erythromycin-resistant, cell-invasive pharyngeal GAS isolates. The fact that sublethal concentrations inhibited cell invasion and reduced haemolytic activity, two important virulence traits of GAS, is also interesting, considering that cell

  9. In Vitro and Sensory Evaluation of Capsaicin-Loaded Nanoformulations

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Mathias; Kirsch, Benedikt; Hauser, Hannah; Schneider, Désirée; Seuß-Baum, Ingrid; Goycoolea, Francisco M.

    2015-01-01

    Capsaicin has known health beneficial and therapeutic properties. It is also able to enhance the permeability of drugs across epithelial tissues. Unfortunately, due to its pungency the oral administration of capsaicin is limited. To this end, we assessed the effect of nanoencapsulation of capsaicin, under the hypothesis that this would reduce its pungency. Core-shell nanocapsules with an oily core and stabilized with phospholipids were used. This system was used with or without chitosan coating. In this work, we investigated the in vitro release behavior of capsaicin-loaded formulations in different physiological media (including simulated saliva fluid). We also evaluated the influence of encapsulation of capsaicin on the cell viability of buccal cells (TR146). To study the changes in pungency after encapsulation we carried out a sensory analysis with a trained panel of 24 students. The in vitro release study showed that the systems discharged capsaicin slowly in a monotonic manner and that the chitosan coating had an effect on the release profile. The cytotoxic response of TR146 cells to capsaicin at a concentration of 500 μM, which was evident for the free compound, was reduced following its encapsulation. The sensory study revealed that a chitosan coating results in a lower threshold of perception of the formulation. The nanoencapsulation of capsaicin resulted in attenuation of the sensation of pungency significantly. However, the presence of a chitosan shell around the nanoformulations did not mask the pungency, when compared with uncoated systems. PMID:26492045

  10. In Vitro and Sensory Evaluation of Capsaicin-Loaded Nanoformulations.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Mathias; Kirsch, Benedikt; Hauser, Hannah; Schneider, Désirée; Seuß-Baum, Ingrid; Goycoolea, Francisco M

    2015-01-01

    Capsaicin has known health beneficial and therapeutic properties. It is also able to enhance the permeability of drugs across epithelial tissues. Unfortunately, due to its pungency the oral administration of capsaicin is limited. To this end, we assessed the effect of nanoencapsulation of capsaicin, under the hypothesis that this would reduce its pungency. Core-shell nanocapsules with an oily core and stabilized with phospholipids were used. This system was used with or without chitosan coating. In this work, we investigated the in vitro release behavior of capsaicin-loaded formulations in different physiological media (including simulated saliva fluid). We also evaluated the influence of encapsulation of capsaicin on the cell viability of buccal cells (TR146). To study the changes in pungency after encapsulation we carried out a sensory analysis with a trained panel of 24 students. The in vitro release study showed that the systems discharged capsaicin slowly in a monotonic manner and that the chitosan coating had an effect on the release profile. The cytotoxic response of TR146 cells to capsaicin at a concentration of 500 μM, which was evident for the free compound, was reduced following its encapsulation. The sensory study revealed that a chitosan coating results in a lower threshold of perception of the formulation. The nanoencapsulation of capsaicin resulted in attenuation of the sensation of pungency significantly. However, the presence of a chitosan shell around the nanoformulations did not mask the pungency, when compared with uncoated systems.

  11. Trigeminal Cardiac Reflex and Cerebral Blood Flow Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Lapi, Dominga; Scuri, Rossana; Colantuoni, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The stimulation of some facial regions is known to trigger the trigemino-cardiac reflex: the main stimulus is represented by the contact of the face with water. This phenomenon called diving reflex induces a set of reactions in the cardiovascular and respiratory systems occurring in all mammals, especially marine (whales, seals). During the immersion of the face in the water, the main responses are aimed at reducing the oxygen consumption of the organism. Accordingly reduction in heart rate, peripheral vasoconstriction, blood pooling in certain organs, especially the heart, and brain and an increase in blood pressure have been reported. Moreover, the speed and intensity of the reflex is inversely proportional to the temperature of the water: more cold the water, more reactions as described are strong. In the case of deep diving an additional effect, such as blood deviation, has been reported: the blood is sequestered within the lungs, to compensate for the increase in the external pressure, preventing them from collapsing. The trigeminal-cardiac reflex is not just confined to the diving reflex; recently it has been shown that a brief proprioceptive stimulation (10 min) by jaw extension in rats produces interesting effects both at systemic and cerebral levels, reducing the arterial blood pressure, and vasodilating the pial arterioles. The arteriolar dilation is associated with rhythmic diameter changes characterized by an increase in the endothelial activity. Fascinating the stimulation of trigeminal nerve is able to activate the nitric oxide release by vascular endothelial cells. Therefore, the aim of this review was to highlight the effects due to trigeminal cardiac reflex induced by a simple mandibular extension. Opposite effects, such as hypotension, and modulation of cerebral arteriolar tone, were observed, when these responses were compared to those elicited by the diving reflex. PMID:27812317

  12. [Aural Stimulation with Capsaicin Ointment Improved the Swallowing Function in Patients with Dysphagia: Evaluation by the SMRC Scale].

    PubMed

    Kondo, Eiji; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Ohnishi, Hiroki; Kawata, Ikuji; Takeda, Noriaki

    2015-11-01

    Cough and swallowing reflexes are important airway-protective mechanisms against aspiration. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, one of the side effects of which is cough, have been reported to reduce the incidence of aspiration pneumonia in hypertensive patients with stroke. ACE inhibitors have also been reported to improve the swallowing function in post-stroke patients. On the other hand, stimulation of the Arnold nerve, the auricular branch of the vagus, triggers the cough reflex (Arnold's ear-cough reflex). Capsaicin, an agonist of Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), has been shown to activate the peripheral sensory C-fibers. Stimulation of the sensory branches of the vagus in the laryngotracheal mucosa with capsaicin induces the cough reflex and has been reported to improve the swallowing function in patients with dysphagia. In our previous study, we showed that aural stimulation of the Arnold nerve with 0.025% capsaicin ointment improved the swallowing function, as evaluated by the endoscopic swallowing score, in 26 patients with dysphagia. In the present study, the video images of swallowing recorded in the previous study were re-evaluated using the SMRC scale by an independent otolaryngologist who was blinded to the information about the patients and the endoscopic swallowing score. The SMRC scale is used to evaluate four aspects of the swallowing function: 1) Sensory: the initiation of the swallowing reflex as assessed by the white-out timing; 2) Motion: the ability to hold blue-dyed water in the oral cavity and induce laryngeal elevation; 3) Reflex: glottal closure and the cough reflex induced by touching the epiglottis or arytenoid with the endoscope; 4) Clearance: pharyngeal clearance of the blue-dyed water after swallowing. Accordingly, we demonstrated that a single application of capsaicin ointment to the external auditory canal of patients with dysphagia significantly improved the R, but not the S, M or C scores, and this

  13. Capsaicin: From Plants to a Cancer-Suppressing Agent.

    PubMed

    Chapa-Oliver, Angela M; Mejía-Teniente, Laura

    2016-07-27

    Capsaicinoids are plant secondary metabolites, capsaicin being the principal responsible for the pungency of chili peppers. It is biosynthesized through two pathways involved in phenylpropanoid and fatty acid metabolism. Plant capsaicin concentration is mainly affected by genetic, environmental and crop management factors. However, its synthesis can be enhanced by the use of elicitors. Capsaicin is employed as food additive and in pharmaceutical applications. Additionally, it has been found that capsaicin can act as a cancer preventive agent and shows wide applications against various types of cancer. This review is an approach in contextualizing the use of controlled stress on the plant to increase the content of capsaicin, highlighting its synthesis and its potential use as anticancer agent.

  14. Understand spiciness: mechanism of TRPV1 channel activation by capsaicin.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Zheng, Jie

    2017-03-01

    Capsaicin in chili peppers bestows the sensation of spiciness. Since the discovery of its receptor, transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) ion channel, how capsaicin activates this channel has been under extensive investigation using a variety of experimental techniques including mutagenesis, patch-clamp recording, crystallography, cryo-electron microscopy, computational docking and molecular dynamic simulation. A framework of how capsaicin binds and activates TRPV1 has started to merge: capsaicin binds to a pocket formed by the channel's transmembrane segments, where it takes a "tail-up, head-down" configuration. Binding is mediated by both hydrogen bonds and van der Waals interactions. Upon binding, capsaicin stabilizes the open state of TRPV1 by "pull-and-contact" with the S4-S5 linker. Understanding the ligand-host interaction will greatly facilitate pharmaceutical efforts to develop novel analgesics targeting TRPV1.

  15. Effects of inhaled histamine, methacholine and capsaicin on sputum levels of alpha 2-macroglobulin

    PubMed Central

    Halldorsdottir, H.; Greiff, L.; Wollmer, P.; Andersson, M.; Svensson, C.; Alkner, U.; Persson, C. G.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Plasma exudation-derived proteins and peptides contribute significantly to inflammation in the airway mucosa in vivo. In the guinea pig trachea both histamine and the neurogenic stimulant capsaicin produce acute mucosal tissue distribution and luminal entry of bulk plasma, whereas cholinergic agonists fail to produce this effect. Of these agents, only histamine induces mucosal exudation of plasma in human nasal airways. The exudative effect of the above agents on human bronchi remains unknown. METHODS: The bronchial exudative responses to inhalation of histamine, methacholine, and capsaicin were examined in two groups of healthy volunteers. Sputum was induced on three occasions in each study group by inhalation of hypertonic saline (4.5%) given as an aerosol for 40 minutes using an ultrasonic nebuliser. The second and third occasions were preceded by histamine and capsaicin challenges in the first study group, and by histamine and methacholine challenges in the second study group. Histamine and methacholine were given in cumulative doses (total doses 3160 micrograms, respectively) or until a 20% reduction in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) was achieved. Cumulative doses of capsaicin were inhaled until coughing prevented the subjects from drawing a full breath. Sputum levels of alpha 2-macroglobulin (729 kDa) were measured as an index of mucosal exudation of bulk plasma. RESULTS: Histamine increased mean (SE) sputum levels of alpha 2-macroglobulin from 2.72 (1.01) micrograms/ml (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.49 to 4.94) to 18.38 (8.03) micrograms/ml (95% CI 0.49 to 36.27) in the first group, and from 1.66 (0.84) micrograms/ml (95% CI -0.18 to 3.49) to 9.43 (3.63) micrograms/ml (95% CI 1.59 to 17.27) in the second group. In contrast, capsaicin evoked no exudation (sputum levels of alpha 2- macroglobulin 1.21 (0.28) micrograms/ml (95% CI 0.59 to 1.83)) and methacholine produced a minor increase in sputum levels of alpha 2- macroglobulin (2

  16. In vivo pharmacology of SDZ 249-665, a novel, non-pungent capsaicin analogue.

    PubMed

    Urban, L; Campbell, E A; Panesar, M; Patel, S; Chaudhry, N; Kane, S; Buchheit, K; Sandells, B; James, I F

    2000-12-15

    Capsaicin and analogues are valuable analgesic agents when administered to mammals, including humans. However, their pungency and the effects on the cardiovascular and respiratory systems through their general activation of small calibre (nociceptive) primary afferents severely limit their use. Recently, structure activity analysis revealed that the initial pungent and general excitatory effects can be prevented by structural modifications in such a way that the analgesic activity is retained. In this paper we present SDZ 249-665, a capsaicin analogue which produced analgesia in the mouse and anti-hyperalgesic effects in the rat and guinea pig. SDZ 249-665 was administered p.o., s.c. and i.v. in models of nociceptive pain, such as tail flick latency in response to a noxious thermal stimulus and acetic acid-induced writhing in mice, and in models of inflammatory mechanical hyperalgesia induced by turpentine or carrageenan in the rat and guinea pig, respectively. SDZ 249-665 was effective in the tail flick and the writhing assays and produced significant anti-hyperalgesic effects in the inflammatory models. The efficacy of SDZ 245-665 was similar to that of capsaicin, however, it was significantly more potent. SDZ 249-665 did not produce any irritancy in a nose wipe assay in guinea pigs or an eye irritancy assay in rats, while capsaicin was clearly irritant in both cases. Furthermore, unlike capsaicin, SDZ 249-665 did not produce unwanted side effects such as bronchoconstriction and blood pressure changes in the analgesic/anti-hyperalgesic dose range. Thus, a clear analgesic therapeutic window exists for SDZ 249-665. In summary, SDZ 249-665 is a potent orally active, analgesic/anti-hyperalgesic agent in mouse, rat and guinea pig. It lacks the excitatory effects associated with capsaicin and other close analogues, and therefore provides a clear therapeutic window for use in painful conditions. In addition to this favourable profile, no sign of tolerance was detected

  17. Minocycline inhibits the enhancement of antidromic primary afferent stimulation-evoked vasodilation following intradermal capsaicin injection.

    PubMed

    Gong, Kerui; Yue, Yue; Zou, Xiaoju; Li, Dingge; Lin, Qing

    2010-09-27

    Neurogenic inflammation is induced by inflammatory mediators released in peripheral tissue from primary afferent nociceptors. Our previous studies suggest that neurogenic inflammation induced by intradermal injection of capsaicin results from the enhancement of dorsal root reflexes (DRRs), which involve antidromic activation of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Numerous studies have reported the important role of glial modulation in pain. However, it remains unclear whether glial cells participate in the process of neurogenic inflammation-induced pain. Here we tested the role of DRG satellite glial cells (SGCs) in this process in anesthetized rats by administration of a glial inhibitor, minocycline. Electrical stimuli (ES, frequency 10 Hz; duration 1 ms; strength 3 mA) were applied to the cut distal ends of the L4-5 dorsal roots. The stimuli evoked antidromic action potentials designed to mimic DRRs. Local cutaneous blood flow in the hindpaw was measured using a Doppler flow meter. Antidromic ES for 10 min evoked a significant vasodilation that could be inhibited dose-dependently by local administration of the calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor antagonist, CGRP8-37. Pretreatment with capsaicin intradermally injected into the hindpaw 2h before the ES enhanced greatly the vasodilation evoked by antidromic ES, and this enhancement could be reversed by minocycline pretreatment. Our findings support the view that neurogenic inflammation following capsaicin injection involves antidromic activation of DRG neurons via the generation of DRRs. Inhibition of neurogenic inflammation by minocycline is suggested to be associated with its inhibitory effect on SGCs that are possibly activated following capsaicin injection.

  18. Bovine herpesvirus 1 regulatory proteins are detected in trigeminal ganglionic neurons during the early stages of stress-induced escape from latency.

    PubMed

    Kook, Insun; Doster, Alan; Jones, Clinton

    2015-10-01

    Bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV-1) establishes latency in sensory neurons. The synthetic corticosteroid dexamethasone consistently induces reactivation from latency. Within 90 min after latently infected calves are treated with dexamethasone, two BHV-1 regulatory proteins, BHV-1-infected cell protein 0 (bICP0) and viral protein 16 (VP16), are expressed in the same neuron. In this study, we demonstrate that VP16 and bICP0 can be detected at 22 and 33 min after dexamethasone (DEX) treatment of latently infected calves. However, we were unable to discern whether VP16 or bICP0 was expressed at early times after reactivation. VP16+ neurons consistently express the glucocorticoid receptor suggesting corticosteroid-mediated activation of its receptor rapidly stimulates reactivation from latency.

  19. Trigeminal neuralgia treatment dosimetry of the Cyberknife

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Anthony; Lo, Anthony T.; Dieterich, Sonja; Soltys, Scott G.; Gibbs, Iris C.; Chang, Steve G.; Adler, John R.

    2012-04-01

    There are 2 Cyberknife units at Stanford University. The robot of 1 Cyberknife is positioned on the patient's right, whereas the second is on the patient's left. The present study examines whether there is any difference in dosimetry when we are treating patients with trigeminal neuralgia when the target is on the right side or the left side of the patient. In addition, we also study whether Monte Carlo dose calculation has any effect on the dosimetry. We concluded that the clinical and dosimetric outcomes of CyberKnife treatment for trigeminal neuralgia are independent of the robot position. Monte Carlo calculation algorithm may be useful in deriving the dose necessary for trigeminal neuralgia treatments.

  20. Prostaglandin E(2) inhibits calcium current in two sub-populations of acutely isolated mouse trigeminal sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Borgland, Stephanie L; Connor, Mark; Ryan, Renae M; Ball, Helen J; Christie, MacDonald J

    2002-03-01

    Prostaglandins are important mediators of pain and inflammation. We have examined the effects of prostanoids on voltage-activated calcium currents (I(Ca)) in acutely isolated mouse trigeminal sensory neurons, using standard whole cell voltage clamp techniques. Trigeminal neurons were divided into two populations based on the presence (Type 2) or absence (Type 1) of low voltage-activated T-type I(Ca). The absence of T-type I(Ca) is highly correlated with sensitivity to mu-opioid agonists and the VR1 agonist capsaicin. In both populations of cells, high voltage-activated I(Ca) was inhibited by PGE(2) with an EC(50) of about 35 nM, to a maximum of 30 %. T-type I(Ca) was not inhibited by PGE(2). Pertussis toxin pre-treatment abolished the effects of PGE(2) in Type 2 cells, but not in Type 1 cells, whereas treatment with cholera toxin prevented the effects of PGE(2) in Type 1 cells, but not in Type 2 cells. Inhibition of I(Ca) by PGE(2) was associated with slowing of current activation and could be relieved with a large positive pre-pulse, consistent with inhibition of I(Ca) by G protein betagamma subunits. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction of mRNA from trigeminal ganglia indicated that all four EP prostanoid receptors were present. However, in both Type 1 and Type 2 cells the effects of PGE(2) were only mimicked by the selective EP(3) receptor agonist ONO-AE-248, and not by selective agonists for EP(1) (ONO-DI-004), EP(2) (ONO-AE1-259) and EP(4) (ONO-AE1-329) receptors. These data indicate that two populations of neurons in trigeminal ganglia differing in their calcium channel expression, sensitivity to mu-opioids and capsaicin also have divergent mechanisms of PGE(2)-mediated inhibition of calcium channels, with Gi/Go type G proteins involved in one population, and Gs type G proteins in the other.

  1. Elevated Fractalkine (CX3CL1) Levels in the Trigeminal Ganglion Mechanically Sensitize Temporalis Muscle Nociceptors.

    PubMed

    Cairns, Brian E; O'Brien, Melissa; Dong, Xu-Dong; Gazerani, Parisa

    2016-05-21

    It has been proposed that after nerve injury or tissue inflammation, fractalkine (CX3CL1) released from dorsal root ganglion neurons acts on satellite glial cells (SGCs) through CX3C receptor 1 (CX3CR1) to induce neuroplastic changes. The existence and importance of fractalkine/CX3CR1 signaling in the trigeminal ganglia has not yet been clarified. This study investigated (1) whether trigeminal ganglion neurons that innervate temporalis muscle and their associated SGCs contain fractalkine and/or express CX3CR1, (2) if intraganglionic injection of fractalkine increases the mechanical sensitivity of temporalis muscle afferent fibers, (3) whether complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced inflammation of the temporalis muscle alters the expression of fractalkine or its receptor in the trigeminal ganglion, and (4) if intraganglionic administration of CX3CR1 antibodies alters afferent mechanical sensitivity. Immunohistochemistry and in vivo electrophysiological recordings in male and female rats were used to address these questions. It was found that ∼50 % of temporalis ganglion neurons and ∼25 % of their associated SGCs express CX3CR1, while only neurons expressed fractalkine. Temporalis muscle inflammation increased the expression of fractalkine, but only in male rats. Intraganglionic injection of fractalkine (25 g/ml; 3 μl) induced prolonged afferent mechanical sensitization. Intraganglionic injection of CX3CR1 antibody increased afferent mechanical threshold, but this effect was greater in controls than in rats with CFA-induced muscle inflammation. These findings raise the possibility that basal fractalkine signalling within the trigeminal ganglion plays an important role in mechanical sensitivity of masticatory muscle sensory afferent fibers and that inhibition of CX3CR1 signaling within the trigeminal ganglia may induce analgesia through a peripheral mechanism.

  2. An exploration of the estrogen receptor transcription activity of capsaicin analogues via an integrated approach based on in silico prediction and in vitro assays.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Ma, Duo; Lin, Yuan; Fu, Jianjie; Zhang, Aiqian

    2014-06-16

    Capsaicin has been considered as an alternative template of dichlorodiphenyl trichloroethane (DDT) in antifouling paint. However, information regarding the estrogenic activity of capsaicin analogues is rather limited in comparison to that of DDT analogues and their metabolites. We here explore the ER transcription activity of selected capsaicin analogues via an integrated approach based on in silico prediction and in vitro assays. Molecular simulation and the agonist/antagonist differential-docking screening identified 6-iodonordihydrocapsaicin (6-I-CPS) as a weak ERα agonist, while anti-estrogenicity was expected for N-arachidonoyldopamine, capsazepine, dihydrocapsaicin, trichostatin A, and capsaicin. On the contrary, the large volume of analogues, such as phorbol 12-phenylacetate 13-acetate 20-homovanillate and phorbol 12,13-dinonanoate 20-homovanillate, cannot fit well with the ER cavity. The result of MVLN assay was in accord with the in silico prediction. 6-I-CPS was demonstrated to induce luciferase gene expression, while the other analogues of relatively small molecular volume reduced luciferase gene expression in MVLN cells, both in the absence and presence of estradiol. This finding suggested that the ER transcription activity of capsaicin analogues is generated at least partly through the ERα-mediated pathway. Moreover, receptor polymorphism analysis indicated that capsaicin analogues may exhibit diverse species selectivity for human beings and marine species.

  3. Direct reticular projections of trigeminal sensory fibers immunoreactive to CGRP: potential monosynaptic somatoautonomic projections

    PubMed Central

    Panneton, W. Michael; Gan, Qi

    2014-01-01

    Few trigeminal sensory fibers project centrally beyond the trigeminal sensory complex, with only projections of fibers carried in its sensory anterior ethmoidal (AEN) and intraoral nerves described. Fibers of the AEN project into the brainstem reticular formation where immunoreactivity against substance P and CGRP are found. We investigated whether the source of these peptides could be from trigeminal ganglion neurons by performing unilateral rhizotomies of the trigeminal root and looking for absence of label. After an 8–14 days survival, substance P immunoreactivity in the trigeminal sensory complex was diminished, but we could not conclude that the sole source of this peptide in the lateral parabrachial area and lateral reticular formation arises from primary afferent fibers. Immunoreactivity to CGRP after rhizotomy however was greatly diminished in the trigeminal sensory complex, confirming the observations of others. Moreover, CGRP immunoreactivity was nearly eliminated in fibers in the lateral parabrachial area, the caudal ventrolateral medulla, both the peri-ambiguus and ventral parts of the rostral ventrolateral medulla, in the external formation of the nucleus ambiguus, and diminished in the caudal pressor area. The nearly complete elimination of CGRP in the lateral reticular formation after rhizotomy suggests this peptide is carried in primary afferent fibers. Moreover, the arborization of CGRP immunoreactive fibers in these areas mimics that of direct projections from the AEN. Since electrical stimulation of the AEN induces cardiorespiratory adjustments including an apnea, peripheral vasoconstriction, and bradycardia similar to those seen in the mammalian diving response, we suggest these perturbations of autonomic behavior are enhanced by direct somatic primary afferent projections to these reticular neurons. We believe this to be first description of potential direct somatoautonomic projections to brainstem neurons regulating autonomic activity. PMID

  4. Effects of a TRPV1 agonist capsaicin on respiratory rhythm generation in brainstem-spinal cord preparation from newborn rats.

    PubMed

    Tani, Mariho; Kotani, Sayumi; Hayakawa, Chikara; Lin, Shih-Tien; Irie, Saki; Ikeda, Keiko; Kawakami, Kiyoshi; Onimaru, Hiroshi

    2017-02-01

    The heat-sensitive transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channels are expressed in the peripheral and central nervous systems. However, there is no report on how the activation of TRPV1 causes the modulation of neuronal activity in the medullary respiratory center. We examined effects of capsaicin, a specific agonist of TRPV1 channels, on respiratory rhythm generation in brainstem-spinal cord preparation from newborn rats. Capsaicin induced a biphasic response in the respiratory rhythm (a transient decrease followed by an increase in the C4 rate). The second-phase excitatory effect (but not the initial inhibitory effect) in the biphasic response was partly blocked by capsazepine or AMG9810 (TRPV1 antagonists). Capsaicin caused strong desensitization. After its washout, the strength of C4 burst inspiratory activity was augmented once per four to five respiratory cycles. The preinspiratory and inspiratory neurons showed tonic firings due to membrane depolarization during the initial inhibitory phase. In the presence of TTX, capsaicin increased the fluctuation of the membrane potential of the CO2-sensitive preinspiratory neurons in the parafacial respiratory group (pFRG), accompanied by slight depolarization. The C4 inspiratory activity did not stop, even 60-90 min after the application of 50/100 μM capsaicin. Voltage-sensitive dye imaging demonstrated that the spatiotemporal pattern of the respiratory rhythm generating networks after application of capsaicin (50 μM, 70-90 min) was highly similar to the control. A histochemical analysis using TRPV1 channel protein antibodies and mRNA demonstrated that the TRPV1 channel-positive cells were widely distributed in the reticular formation of the medulla, including the pFRG. Our results showed that the application of capsaicin in the medulla has various influences on the respiratory center: transient inhibitory and subsequent excitatory effects on the respiratory rhythm and periodical augmentation of the

  5. Topical capsaicin for pain management: therapeutic potential and mechanisms of action of the new high-concentration capsaicin 8% patch

    PubMed Central

    Anand, P.; Bley, K.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Topical capsaicin formulations are used for pain management. Safety and modest efficacy of low-concentration capsaicin formulations, which require repeated daily self-administration, are supported by meta-analyses of numerous studies. A high-concentration capsaicin 8% patch (Qutenza™) was recently approved in the EU and USA. A single 60-min application in patients with neuropathic pain produced effective pain relief for up to 12 weeks. Advantages of the high-concentration capsaicin patch include longer duration of effect, patient compliance, and low risk for systemic effects or drug–drug interactions. The mechanism of action of topical capsaicin has been ascribed to depletion of substance P. However, experimental and clinical studies show that depletion of substance P from nociceptors is only a correlate of capsaicin treatment and has little, if any, causative role in pain relief. Rather, topical capsaicin acts in the skin to attenuate cutaneous hypersensitivity and reduce pain by a process best described as ‘defunctionalization’ of nociceptor fibres. Defunctionalization is due to a number of effects that include temporary loss of membrane potential, inability to transport neurotrophic factors leading to altered phenotype, and reversible retraction of epidermal and dermal nerve fibre terminals. Peripheral neuropathic hypersensitivity is mediated by diverse mechanisms, including altered expression of the capsaicin receptor TRPV1 or other key ion channels in affected or intact adjacent peripheral nociceptive nerve fibres, aberrant re-innervation, and collateral sprouting, all of which are defunctionalized by topical capsaicin. Evidence suggests that the utility of topical capsaicin may extend beyond painful peripheral neuropathies. PMID:21852280

  6. Sustained increase of Ca+2 oscillations after chronic TRPV1 receptor activation with capsaicin in cultured spinal neurons.

    PubMed

    Larrucea, Carlos; Castro, Patricio; Sepulveda, Fernando J; Wandersleben, Gretchen; Roa, Jorge; Aguayo, Luis G

    2008-07-07

    Hyperalgesia and allodynia occur as a consequence of peripheral and central sensitization that follows sustained nociceptive activation. The cellular alterations associated to this state of nociceptive network hyperexcitability represent a form of neuronal plasticity, but they are not well understood because of its complexity in situ. In this study, after treating primary spinal neuron cultures with capsaicin (0.5-1 microM) for 48 h fluorimetric recordings were performed. The activation of TRPV1 receptors with capsaicin (0.5-1.0 microM) increased the frequency of calcium transients (0.03+/-0.002 Hz vs. 0.05+/-0.006 Hz, P<0.05), mediated by AMPAergic transmission, as well as the percent of neurons with activity (37+/-3% vs. 65+/-4%, P<0.05). The effect of capsaicin was long lasting and the neurons were found to be hyperfunctional and with increased levels of phosphorylated CREB (cAMP responsive element binding) even after 72 h of treatment with capsaicin (32+/-5% vs. 52+/-5%). The effect of capsaicin was blocked by capsazepine (1 microM), TTX (100 nM) and KN-62 (1 microM), but not by K252a (200 nM) or PD98059 (50 microM) indicating the involvement of TRPV1. The results suggest the participation of Ca2+, CaMKII and CREB on the prolonged enhancement of excitability following chronic exposure to capsaicin. Thus, it is likely that chronic TRPV1 activation is capable of inducing prolonged increases in neurotransmission mediated by glutamatergic receptors.

  7. Intradermal capsaicin inhibits lumbar dorsal horn neuronal responses to colorectal distention.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Motohiro; Al-Chaer, Elie D

    2003-05-23

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of cutaneous inflammation on the responses of viscerosomatic convergent dorsal horn neurons to graded colorectal distension (CRD) and cutaneous mechanical stimulation. Responses of single viscerosomatic neurons in the lumbar dorsal horn of the rat spinal cord to CRD and to cutaneous stimuli were recorded before and 50 min after cutaneous inflammation induced by intradermal injection of capsaicin in the receptive field (RF) or in the ipsilateral and contralateral forepaw. Capsaicin injection in the RF induced an increase in the spontaneous activity of dorsal horn neurons, an expansion in the size of their RF and facilitated their responses to cutaneous stimuli. An injection placed in the center of the RF attenuated the responses to noxious CRD. Capsaicin injection in the forepaw caused a significant decrease in the responses to CRD but not to cutaneous stimuli. These results indicate that the inhibitory effects, evoked by cutaneous inflammation, can modulate the responses of dorsal horn neurons to CRD, independent of its effect on the responses to cutaneous mechanical stimuli.

  8. Non-Invasive Mapping of Human Trigeminal Brainstem Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Jaymin; Knudsen, Jamie; Anderson, Julie; Becerra, Lino; Borsook, David

    2008-01-01

    The human trigeminal system mediates facial pain and somatosensory processing. The anatomic location of neuronal substrates and axonal pathways of the trigeminal system have previously been characterized with conventional in vitro methods. The present investigation implemented diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and probabilistic tractography to first segment the peripheral trigeminal circuitry; trigeminal nerve branches (ophthalmic, maxillary and mandibular nerves), ganglion and nerve root. Subsequent segmentations involved the spinal trigeminal and trigeminal thalamic tracts, which respectively convey information to spinal trigeminal nuclei and ventral thalamic regions. This latter procedure also identified (1) spinal thalamic (anterolateral) system pathways (propagating pain and temperature information from the body); (2) trigeminal lemniscus (touch and face position) and 3) medial lemniscus (touch and limb position). The anatomic location of the identified pain and somatosensory pathways compared well with previous functional findings in human trigeminal system as well as the tract position in human histological cross-sections. Probabilistic tractography may be a useful method to further comprehend the functional and structural properties of trigeminal and other related systems. Application of DTI to map pain and somatosensory pathways in conjunction with a characterization of function properties of pain and somatosensory processing would further define the systematic changes that occur in trigeminal pathology. PMID:18956455

  9. [Malignant lymphoma in a perineural spreading along trigeminal nerve, which developed as trigeminal neuralgia].

    PubMed

    Mano, Tomoo; Matsuo, Koji; Kobayashi, Yosuke; Kobayashi, Yasushi; Ozawa, Hiroaki; Arakawa, Toshinao

    2014-01-01

    A rare cause of trigeminal neuralgia is malignant lymphoma which spread along the trigeminal nerve. We report a 79-year-old male presented with 4-month history of neuralgic pain in right cheek. He was diagnosed as classical trigeminal neuralgia. It had improved through medication of carbamazepine. Four months later, the dull pain unlike neuralgia complicated on the right cheeks, it was ineffective with the medication. Furthermore, diplopia and facial palsy as the other cranial nerve symptoms appeared. Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed contrast-enhanced mass lesion extend both external pterygoid muscle and brainstem through the swelling trigeminal nerve. The patient was pathological diagnosed of diffuse large B cell lymphoma by biopsy. Malignant lymphoma should be considered in the different diagnosis of cases with a minimal single cranial nerve symptom.

  10. Capsaicin desensitization and recovery on the human tongue.

    PubMed

    Karrer, T; Bartoshuk, L

    1991-04-01

    The desensitization resulting from application of 10 or 100 ppm capsaicin was investigated, using daily testing of a capsaicin series (1-1000 ppm, in log steps). The series showed a significant decrement in perceived burn following desensitization with either concentration. Perceived burn of 100 and 1000 ppm did not recover from 100 ppm desensitization in six days, and perceived burn of 1-1000 ppm did not recover from 100 ppm desensitization in six days. When single capsaicin concentrations, rather than the series, were tested at one, two, four, or six days after desensitization, 10 ppm recovered from 10 ppm desensitization in one or two days, and 100 ppm recovered from 100 ppm desensitization between two and four days. This suggests that daily testing with the capsaicin series delayed recovery from desensitization. Nontasters of 6-n-propylthiouracil rated capsaicin burn lower than did tasters. The application method of rolling capsaicin onto the tongue with a swab was found to transiently inhibit burn. Implications for ingesting capsaicin products are discussed.

  11. Structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging Can Identify Trigeminal System Abnormalities in Classical Trigeminal Neuralgia

    PubMed Central

    DeSouza, Danielle D.; Hodaie, Mojgan; Davis, Karen D.

    2016-01-01

    Classical trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is a chronic pain disorder that has been described as one of the most severe pains one can suffer. The most prevalent theory of TN etiology is that the trigeminal nerve is compressed at the root entry zone (REZ) by blood vessels. However, there is significant evidence showing a lack of neurovascular compression (NVC) for many cases of classical TN. Furthermore, a considerable number of patients who are asymptomatic have MR evidence of NVC. Since there is no validated animal model that reproduces the clinical features of TN, our understanding of TN pathology mainly comes from biopsy studies that have limitations. Sophisticated structural MRI techniques including diffusion tensor imaging provide new opportunities to assess the trigeminal nerves and CNS to provide insight into TN etiology and pathogenesis. Specifically, studies have used high-resolution structural MRI methods to visualize patterns of trigeminal nerve-vessel relationships and to detect subtle pathological features at the trigeminal REZ. Structural MRI has also identified CNS abnormalities in cortical and subcortical gray matter and white matter and demonstrated that effective neurosurgical treatment for TN is associated with a reversal of specific nerve and brain abnormalities. In conclusion, this review highlights the advanced structural neuroimaging methods that are valuable tools to assess the trigeminal system in TN and may inform our current understanding of TN pathology. These methods may in the future have clinical utility for the development of neuroimaging-based biomarkers of TN. PMID:27807409

  12. Trigeminal Neuralgia due to Vertebrobasilar Dolichoectasia

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Wuilker Knoner; Guasti, André Accioly; da Silva, Benjamin Franklin; Guasti, José Antonio

    2012-01-01

    We presented a case of drug-resistant trigeminal neuralgia attributed to vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia, a rare condition characterized by enlargement, tortuosity, or elongation of intracranial arteries. Dolichoectatic vessels can cause dysfunction of cranial nerves through direct vascular compression. The relationships of vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia with the particularities of neurovascular conflict and images findings are discussed. PMID:22937350

  13. Trigeminal nerve: Anatomic correlation with MR imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, D.L.; Pech, P.; Pojunas, K.W.; Kilgore, D.P.; Williams, A.L.; Haughton, V.M.

    1986-06-01

    Through correlation with cryomicrotic sections, the appearance of the trigeminal nerve and its branches on magnetic resonance images is described in healthy individuals and in patients with tumors involving this nerve. Coronal images are best for defining the different parts of the nerve and for making a side-to-side comparison. Sagittal images are useful to demonstrate tumors involving the Gasserian ganglion.

  14. Capsaicin stimulates the non-store-operated Ca{sup 2+} entry but inhibits the store-operated Ca{sup 2+} entry in neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.-P. . E-mail: w1994@vghtc.gov.tw; Tseng, C.-S.; Sun, S.-P.; Chen, Y.-S.; Tsai, C.-R.; Hsu, M.-F.

    2005-12-01

    Rat neutrophils express the mRNA encoding for transient receptor potential (TRP) V1. However, capsaicin-stimulated [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} elevation occurred only at high concentrations ({>=}100 {mu}M). This response was substantially decreased in a Ca{sup 2+}-free medium. Vanilloids displayed similar patterns of Ca{sup 2+} response with the rank order of potency as follows: scutigeral>resiniferatoxin>capsazepine>capsaicin=olvanil>isovelleral. Arachidonyl dopamine (AAD), an endogenous ligand for TRPV1, failed to desensitize the subsequent capsaicin challenge. Capsaicin-induced Ca{sup 2+} response was not affected by 8-bromo-cyclic ADP-ribose (8-Br-cADPR), the ryanodine receptor blocker, but was slightly attenuated by 1-[6-[17{beta}-3-methoxyestra-1,3,5(10)-trien-17-yl]amino]hexyl]-1H-pyrrole-2,= 5-dione (U-73122), the inhibitor of phospholipase C-coupled processes, 1-[{beta}-[3-(4-methoxyphenyl)propoxy]-4-methoxyphenethyl]-1H-imidazole (SKF-96365), the blocker of receptor-gated and store-operated Ca{sup 2+} (SOC) channels, 2-aminoethyldiphenyl borate (2-APB), the blocker of D-myo-inositol 1,4,5-trisphospahte (IP{sub 3}) receptor and Ca{sup 2+} influx, and by ruthenium red, a blocker of TRPV channels, and enhanced by the Ca{sup 2+} channels blocker, cis-N-(2-phenylcyclopentyl)azacyclotridec-1-en-2-amine (MDL-12330A) and Na{sup +}-deprivation. In addition, capsaicin had no effect on the plasma membrane Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase activity or the production of nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) or on the total thiols content. Capsaicin ({>=}100 {mu}M) inhibited the cyclopiazonic acid (CPA)-induced store-operated Ca{sup 2+} entry (SOCE). In the absence of external Ca{sup 2+}, the robust Ca{sup 2+} entry after subsequent addition of Ca{sup 2+} was decreased by capsaicin in CPA-activated cells. Capsaicin alone increased the actin cytoskeleton, and also increased the actin filament content in cell activation with CPA. These results indicate that capsaicin

  15. Microstructural abnormalities of the trigeminal nerve by diffusion-tensor imaging in trigeminal neuralgia without neurovascular compression

    PubMed Central

    Sunil, Kumar; Ashish, Awasthi; Jayantee, Kalita; Usha Kant, Misra

    2015-01-01

    Microstructural changes of the trigeminal nerve in trigeminal neuralgia due to neurovascular compression have been reported by using diffusion tensor imaging. Other aetiologies such as primary demyelinating lesions, brain stem infarction and nerve root infiltration by tumour affecting the trigeminal pathway may also present as trigeminal neuralgia. The aim of this study was to evaluate the microstructural tissue abnormalities in the trigeminal nerve in symptomatic trigeminal neuralgia not related to neurovascular compression using diffusion tensor imaging. Mean values of the quantitative diffusion parameters of trigeminal nerve, fractional anisotropy and apparent diffusion coefficient, were measured in a group of four symptomatic trigeminal neuralgia patients without neurovascular compression who showed focal non-enhancing T2-hyperintense lesions in the pontine trigeminal pathway. These diffusion parameters were compared between the affected and unaffected sides in the same patient and with four age-matched healthy controls. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging revealed hyperintense lesions in the dorsolateral part of the pons along the central trigeminal pathway on T2-fluid-attenuated inversion recovery sequences. The mean fractional anisotropy value on the affected side was significantly decreased (P = 0.001) compared to the unaffected side and healthy controls. Similarly, the mean apparent diffusion coefficient value was significantly higher (P = 0.001) on the affected side compared to the unaffected side and healthy controls. The cause of trigeminal neuralgia in our patients was abnormal pontine lesions affecting the central trigeminal pathway. The diffusion tensor imaging results suggest that microstructural tissue abnormalities of the trigeminal nerve also exist even in non-neurovascular compression-related trigeminal neuralgia. PMID:26678753

  16. Cannabinoid receptor-independent actions of the aminoalkylindole WIN 55,212-2 on trigeminal sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Price, Theodore J; Patwardhan, Amol; Akopian, Armen N; Hargreaves, Kenneth M; Flores, Christopher M

    2004-01-01

    The prototypical aminoalkylindole cannabinoid WIN 55,212-2 (WIN-2) has been shown to produce antihyperalgesia through a peripheral mechanism of action. However, it is not known whether WIN-2 exerts this action directly via cannabinoid receptors located on primary afferents or if other, perhaps indirect or noncannabinoid, mechanisms are involved. To address this question, we have examined the specific actions of WIN-2 on trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons in vitro by quantifying its ability to modulate the evoked secretion of the proinflammatory neuropeptide CGRP as well as the inflammatory mediator-induced generation of cAMP. WIN-2 evoked CGRP release from TG neurons in vitro (EC50=26 μM) in a concentration- and calcium-dependent manner, which was mimicked by the cannabinoid receptor-inactive enantiomer WIN 55,212-3 (WIN-3). Moreover, WIN-2-evoked CGRP release was attenuated by the nonselective cation channel blocker ruthenium red but not by the vanilloid receptor type 1 (TRPV1) antagonist capsazepine, suggesting that, unlike certain endogenous and synthetic cannabinoids, WIN-2 is not a TRPV1 agonist but rather acts at an as yet unidentified cation channel. The inhibitory effects of WIN-2 on TG neurons were also examined. WIN-2 neither inhibited capsaicin-evoked CGRP release nor did it inhibit forskolin-, isoproteranol- or prostaglandin E2-stimulated cAMP accumulation. On the other hand, WIN-2 significantly inhibited (EC50=1.7 μM) 50 mM K+-evoked CGRP release by approximately 70%. WIN-2 inhibition of 50 mM K+-evoked CGRP release was not reversed by antagonists of cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor, but was mimicked in magnitude and potency (EC50=2.7 μM) by its cannabinoid-inactive enantiomer WIN-3. These findings indicate that WIN-2 exerts both excitatory and inhibitory effects on TG neurons, neither of which appear to be mediated by CB1, CB2 or TRPV1 receptors, but by a novel calcium-dependent mechanism. The ramifications of these results are discussed in relation

  17. Role of COX-2 in cough reflex sensitivity to inhaled capsaicin in patients with sinobronchial syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Sinobronchial syndrome is a cause of chronic productive cough. Inflammatory mediators are involved in the pathophysiology of chronic productive cough. Accumulating evidences indicate that cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, one of the inducible isoforms of COX, is a key element in the pathophysiological process of a number of inflammatory disorders. However, little is known about the role of COX-2 in chronic productive cough in patients with sinobronchial syndrome known as neutrophilic bronchial inflammation. Methods The effect of etodolac, a potent COX-2 inhibitor, on cough response to inhaled capsaicin was examined in 15 patients with sinobronchial syndrome in a randomized, placebo-controlled cross-over study. Capsaicin cough threshold, defined as the lowest concentration of capsaicin eliciting five or more coughs, was measured as an index of airway cough reflex sensitivity. Results The cough threshold was significantly (p < 0.03) increased after two-week treatment with etodolac (200 mg twice a day orally) compared with placebo [37.5 (GSEM 1.3) vs. 27.2 (GSEM 1.3) μM]. Conclusions These findings indicate that COX-2 may be a possible modulator augmenting airway cough reflex sensitivity in patients with sinobronchial syndrome. PMID:20696045

  18. Dissociation and trafficking of rat GABAB receptor heterodimer upon chronic capsaicin stimulation.

    PubMed

    Laffray, Sophie; Tan, Kelly; Dulluc, Josette; Bouali-Benazzouz, Rabia; Calver, Andrew R; Nagy, Frédéric; Landry, Marc

    2007-03-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid type B receptors (GABAB) are G-protein-coupled receptors that mediate GABAergic inhibition in the brain. Their functional expression is dependent upon the formation of heterodimers between GABAB1 and GABAB2 subunits, a process that occurs within the endoplasmic reticulum. However, the mechanisms that regulate GABAB receptor oligomerization at the plasma membrane remain largely unknown. We first characterized the functional cytoarchitecture of an organotypic co-culture model of rat dorsal root ganglia and spinal cord. Subsequently, we studied the interactions between GABAB subunits after chronic stimulation of sensory fibres with capsaicin. Surface labelling of recombinant proteins showed a decrease in subunit co-localization and GABAB2 labelling, after capsaicin treatment. In these conditions, fluorescence lifetime imaging measurements further demonstrated a loss of interactions between green fluorescent protein-GABAB1b and t-dimer discosoma sp red fluorescent protein-GABAB2 subunits. Finally, we established that the GABAB receptor undergoes clathrin-dependent internalization and rapid recycling to the plasma membrane following activation with baclofen, a GABAB agonist. However, in cultures chronically stimulated with capsaicin, the agonist-induced endocytosis was decreased, reflecting changes in the dimeric state of the receptor. Taken together, our results indicate that the chronic stimulation of sensory fibres can dissociate the GABAB heterodimer and alters its responsiveness to the endogenous ligand. Chronic stimulation thus modulates receptor oligomerization, providing additional levels of control of signalling.

  19. Intranasal trigeminal sensitivity: measurements before and after nasal surgery.

    PubMed

    Scheibe, M; Schulze, S; Mueller, C A; Schuster, B; Hummel, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Nasal surgeries constitute an extensive manipulation of the nasal mucosa and therefore of structures related to trigeminal and olfactory sensitivity. While olfactory changes due to nasal surgery are relatively well investigated, there are only very few studies regarding trigeminal sensitivity. Aim of the present study was to investigate sensory changes after nasal surgery with special regard to the trigeminal sensitivity. In 38 patients prior to and around 12 weeks after nasal surgery the following psychophysical measures were performed: odor identification, odor discrimination, phenyl ethyl alcohol odor threshold, sensitivity to trigeminal stimuli, trigeminal detection thresholds and trigeminal pain thresholds. These results were compared to those of a control group (43 healthy volunteers). Psychophysical olfactory and trigeminal testing showed no major changes in patients after surgery compared to the control group. Independent from the time of measurement higher trigeminal detection thresholds were found in patients compared to healthy subjects, meaning that trigeminal thresholds were already increased before surgery. The present study revealed a decreased trigeminal sensitivity in patients already before surgery. It may be hypothesized that patients also exhibit a decreased sensitivity for nasal airflow, which may also contribute to the patients' impression of impaired nasal breathing.

  20. Topical capsaicin for pain in osteoarthritis: A literature review.

    PubMed

    Guedes, Vânia; Castro, João Paulo; Brito, Iva

    2016-08-26

    Osteoarthritis is the most common joint disorder worldwide. The predominant symptom, pain, is usually treated with acetaminophen or oral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, although they are associated with a significant risk of side effects. Topical capsaicin may represent an effective and safe alternative. The aim of this review is to examine the evidence for the efficacy and safety profile of topical capsaicin in the management of pain caused by osteoarthritis. Databases were searched for articles published between 2004 and 2016, in Portuguese, English or Spanish, using the search terms "capsaicin" and "osteoarthritis". When compared to placebo, it was found that topical capsaicin has a good safety profile and efficacy in reducing osteoarthritis pain of the hand, knee, hip or shoulder. However, the studies have significant limitations, the most important the difficulty of blinding. It is attributed to this review the strength of recommendation B.

  1. Study of interferon-β antiviral activity against Herpes simplex virus type 1 in neuron-enriched trigeminal ganglia cultures.

    PubMed

    Low-Calle, Ana Maria; Prada-Arismendy, Jeanette; Castellanos, Jaime E

    2014-02-13

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) causes a lytic infection in epithelial cells before being captured and moved via retrograde axonal transport to the nuclei of the sensory neurons of the trigeminal ganglion or dorsal root, where it establishes a latent infection. HSV-1 infection induces an antiviral response through the production of Beta Interferon (IFN-β) in infected trigeminal ganglia. The aim of this work was to characterize the response induced by IFN-β in neuron-enriched trigeminal ganglia primary cultures infected with HSV-1. An antiviral effect of IFN-β in these cultures was observed, including reduced viral production and increased cell survival. In contrast, viral infection significantly decreased both double stranded RNA dependent protein kinase (Pkr) transcription and Jak-1 and Stat-1 phosphorylation, suggesting a possible HSV-1 immune evasion mechanism in trigeminal cells. Additionally, HSV-1 infection upregulated Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling-3 (Socs3) mRNA; upregulation of socs3 was inhibited in IFN-β treated cultures. HSV-1 infection increased the number of Socs3 positive cells and modified the intracellular distribution of Socs3 protein, in infected cells. This neuron-enriched trigeminal ganglia culture model could be used to elucidate the HSV-1 viral cycle in sensory neurons and to study cellular antiviral responses and possible viral evasion mechanisms that underlie the choice between viral replication and latency.

  2. Primary afferent plasticity following deafferentation of the trigeminal brainstem nuclei in the adult rat.

    PubMed

    De Riu, Pier Luigi; Russo, Antonella; Pellitteri, Rosalia; Stanzani, Stefania; Tringali, Giovanni; Roccazzello, Anna Maria; De Riu, Giacomo; Marongiu, Patrizia; Mameli, Ombretta

    2008-09-01

    Alpha-tyrosinated tubulin is a cytoskeletal protein that is involved in axonal growth and is considered a marker of neuronal plasticity in adult mammals. In adult rats, unilateral ablation of the left facial sensorimotor cortical areas induces degeneration of corticotrigeminal projections and marked denervation of the contralateral sensory trigeminal nuclei. Western blotting and real-time-PCR of homogenates of the contralateral trigeminal ganglion (TG) revealed consistent overexpression of growth proteins 15 days after left decortication in comparison with the ipsilateral side. Immunohistochemical analyses indicated marked overexpression of alpha-tyrosinated tubulin in the cells of the ganglion on the right side. Cytoskeletal changes were primarily observed in the small ganglionic neurons. Application of HRP-CT, WGA-HRP, and HRP to infraorbital nerves on both sides 15 days after left decortication showed a significant degree of terminal sprouting and neosynaptogenesis from right primary afferents at the level of the right caudalis and interpolaris trigeminal subnuclei. These observations suggest that the adaptive response of TG neurons to central deafferentation, leading to overcrowding and rearrangement of the trigeminal primary afferent terminals on V spinal subnuclei neurons, could represent the anatomical basis for distortion of facial modalities, perceived as allodynia and hyperalgesia, despite nerve integrity.

  3. Effect of an acute intraluminal administration of capsaicin on oesophageal motor pattern in GORD patients with ineffective oesophageal motility.

    PubMed

    Grossi, L; Cappello, G; Marzio, L

    2006-08-01

    Ineffective oesophageal motility (IOM) is a functional disorder affecting about 50% of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) patients. This disease in a severe form limits the clearing ability of the oesophagus and is considered one of the predictive factors for poorer GORD resolution. Capsaicin, the active compound of red pepper, exerts a prokinetic effect on oesophageal motility in healthy subjects by increasing the amplitude of body waves, even if no evidence exists on its possible role in situations of reduced motility. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of an acute administration of capsaicin on the oesophageal motor pattern in a group of GORD patients affected by severe IOM. Twelve GORD patients with severe IOM received an intra-oesophageal administration of 2 mL of a red pepper-olive oil mixture and 2 mL of olive oil alone serving as a control during a stationary manometry. The motor patterns of the oesophageal body and lower oesophageal sphincter (LOS) were analysed at baseline and after the infusion of the two stimuli. The administration of capsaicin induced a significant improvement in oesophageal body contractility when compared with baseline. The velocity of propagation of waves and the LOS basal tone remained unchanged. The motor pattern was unaltered by the administration of olive oil alone. An acute administration of capsaicin seems to improve the motor performance of the oesophageal body in patients with ineffective motility. Whether this could represent the basis for further therapeutic approaches of GORD patients needs further study.

  4. Differential roles of spinal cholera toxin- and pertussis toxin-sensitive G proteins in nociceptive responses caused by formalin, capsaicin, and substance P in mice.

    PubMed

    Chung, K M; Lee, K C; Choi, S S; Suh, H W

    2001-03-15

    The aim of the present study is to characterize the roles of spinal cholera toxin (CTX)- and pertussis toxin (PTX)-sensitive G proteins in the regulation of various nociceptive responses. The effects of intrathecal (i.t.) pretreatments with CTX and PTX on the formalin (subcutaneous)-, capsaicin (i.t.)-, and substance P (SP; i.t.)-induced nociceptive behaviours were examined in mice. Pretreatment with CTX (i.t.; 24 h before) significantly and dose-dependently (0.05-0.5 microg) suppressed both the first and second phases of the formalin-induced nociceptive behaviour. On the other hand, pretreatment with PTX (i.t., 6 days before) at the same doses (0.05-N0.5 microg) did not affect the formalin-induced response. Capsaicin (i.t., 0.5 microg)- and SP (i.t., 0.7 microg)-induced nociceptive behaviours were attenuated by the pretreatment with CTX. In addition, SP-induced nociceptive response was also attenuated by the pretreatment with PTX. However, the capsaicin-induced nociceptive response was not influenced by PTX pretreatment. These findings suggest that, at the spinal cord level, CTX-sensitive G-proteins are involved in the formalin-, capsaicin-, and SP-induced nociceptive behavioural responses, whereas PTX-sensitive G proteins are involved in SP-induced nociceptive response.

  5. Assessment of the biological similarity of three capsaicin analogs (Capsinoids) found in non-pungent chili pepper (CH-19 Sweet) fruits.

    PubMed

    Sasahara, Ikuko; Furuhata, Yasufumi; Iwasaki, Yusaku; Inoue, Naohiko; Sato, Hitoshi; Watanabe, Tatsuo; Takahashi, Michio

    2010-01-01

    CH-19 Sweet is a newly found chili pepper breed bearing much less pungent fruits. Because CH-19 Sweet fruits were found to contain three analogs (capsinoids) of capsaicin, a major component of pungency of hot peppers (the analogs are capsiate or CST, dihydrocapsiate or DCT, and nordihydrocapsiate or NDCT), we assessed in this study the bio-potencies of these three capsinoids by comparing them with capsaicin. The three capsinoids bound to transient potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) receptors expressed in cultured cells and activated Ca(2+) influx in a concentration-dependent manner with similar magnitudes. In contrast to capsaicin, capsinoids at the same concentration induced virtually no nociceptive responses when applied to the eyes or the oral cavities of mice. Intravenous administration of capsaicin or 20-fold increased doses of each capsinoid to rats induced significant increases in plasma catecholamine levels. Orally administered, each capsinoid enhanced oxygen consumption in mice. Based on the present results, capsaicin and these three capsinoids should have similar bio-potency, though capsinoids do not generate pungency or sensory irritation.

  6. The Effects of Dietary Iron and Capsaicin on Hemoglobin, Blood Glucose, Insulin Tolerance, Cholesterol, and Triglycerides, in Healthy and Diabetic Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Villalpando-Hernández, Salvador; Ríos-Silva, Mónica; Díaz-Reval, María I.; Cruzblanca, Humberto; Mancilla, Evelyn

    2016-01-01

    Objective Our aim was to assess the effects of dietary iron, and the compound capsaicin, on hemoglobin as well as metabolic indicators including blood glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides, insulin, and glucose tolerance. Materials and Methods Our animal model was the Wistar rat, fed a chow diet, with or without experimentally induced diabetes. Diabetic males were fed control, low, or high-iron diets, the latter, with or without capsaicin. Healthy rats were fed identical diets, but without the capsaicin supplement. We then measured the parameters listed above, using the Student t-test and ANOVA, to compare groups. Results Healthy rats fed a low-iron diet exhibited significantly reduced total cholesterol and triglyceride levels, compared with rats fed a control diet. Significantly reduced blood lipid was also provoked by low dietary iron in diabetic rats, compared with those fed a control diet. Insulin, and glucose tolerance was only improved in healthy rats fed the low-iron diet. Significant increases in total cholesterol were found in diabetic rats fed a high-iron diet, compared with healthy rats fed the same diet, although no statistical differences were found for triglycerides. Hemoglobin levels, which were not statistically different in diabetic versus healthy rats fed the high-iron diet, fell when capsaicin was added. Capsaicin also provoked a fall in the level of cholesterol and triglycerides in diabetic animals, versus diabetics fed with the high iron diet alone. In conclusion, low levels of dietary iron reduced levels of serum triglycerides, hemoglobin, and cholesterol, and significantly improved insulin, and glucose tolerance in healthy rats. In contrast, a high-iron diet increased cholesterol significantly, with no significant changes to triglyceride concentrations. The addition of capsaicin to the high-iron diet (for diabetic rats) further reduced levels of hemoglobin, cholesterol, and triglycerides. These results suggest that capsaicin, may be suitable

  7. Trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias. Part 2: Paroxysmal hemicrania.

    PubMed

    Klasser, Gary D; Balasubramaniam, Ramesh

    2007-11-01

    Paroxysmal hemicrania (PH) is characterized by severe, strictly unilateral pain attacks lasting 2 to 30 minutes localized to orbital, supraorbital, and temporal areas accompanied by ipsilateral autonomic features. It represents 1 of 3 primary headaches classified as trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias. Although PH is rare, patients may present to dental offices seeking relief for their pain. It is important for oral health care providers to recognize PH and render an accurate diagnosis. This will avoid the pitfall of implementing unnecessary and inappropriate traditional dental treatments in hopes of alleviating this neurovascular pain. This is part 2 of a review on trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias and focuses on PH. Aspects of PH including epidemiology, genetics, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, classification and variants, diagnosis, medical management, and dental considerations are discussed.

  8. Late results of bulbar trigeminal tractotomy

    PubMed Central

    Moffie, D.

    1971-01-01

    Re-examination of eight patients in whom bulbar trigeminal tractotomy had been performed 13 to 15 years previously showed that four had no complaints, and the other four had only very slight complaints about pain. In two patients a Spiller-Frazier operation had been performed after tractotomy, in two patients exairesis of the infraorbital or supraorbital nerve had been done. As bulbar trigeminal tractotomy is a major operation and the risk of recurrence is substantial, the indications for this type of operation have to remain very restricted. Theories to explain the recovery of sensation are discussed. It is possible that regeneration of transected fibres is responsible for the loss of analgesia. Images PMID:5571314

  9. Rare cause of trigeminal neuralgia: Meckel's cave meningocele.

    PubMed

    Alobaid, Abdullah; Schaeffer, Todd; Virojanapa, Justin; Dehdashti, Amir R

    2015-07-01

    The most common etiology of classic trigeminal neuralgia is vascular compression. However, other causes must be excluded. It is very unlikely that a meningocele presents with symptomatic trigeminal neuralgia. We present a rare case of a patient presenting with left trigeminal neuralgia. Thin-slice CT and MRI showed a transclival Meckel's cave meningocele. The patient underwent endoscopic repair of the meningocele, which resulted in complete resolution of her symptoms. Meckel's cave meningocele or encephalocele should be considered among the differential diagnoses of trigeminal neuralgia. Meningocele repair should be suggested as the first treatment option in this rare situation.

  10. Transcriptome analysis of trigeminal ganglia following masseter muscle inflammation in rats

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jennifer; Asgar, Jamila; Ro, Jin Y.

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic pain in masticatory muscles is a major medical problem. Although mechanisms underlying persistent pain in masticatory muscles are not fully understood, sensitization of nociceptive primary afferents following muscle inflammation or injury contributes to muscle hyperalgesia. It is well known that craniofacial muscle injury or inflammation induces regulation of multiple genes in trigeminal ganglia, which is associated with muscle hyperalgesia. However, overall transcriptional profiles within trigeminal ganglia following masseter inflammation have not yet been determined. In the present study, we performed RNA sequencing assay in rat trigeminal ganglia to identify transcriptome profiles of genes relevant to hyperalgesia following inflammation of the rat masseter muscle. Results Masseter inflammation differentially regulated >3500 genes in trigeminal ganglia. Predominant biological pathways were predicted to be related with activation of resident non-neuronal cells within trigeminal ganglia or recruitment of immune cells. To focus our analysis on the genes more relevant to nociceptors, we selected genes implicated in pain mechanisms, genes enriched in small- to medium-sized sensory neurons, and genes enriched in TRPV1-lineage nociceptors. Among the 2320 candidate genes, 622 genes showed differential expression following masseter inflammation. When the analysis was limited to these candidate genes, pathways related with G protein-coupled signaling and synaptic plasticity were predicted to be enriched. Inspection of individual gene expression changes confirmed the transcriptional changes of multiple nociceptor genes associated with masseter hyperalgesia (e.g., Trpv1, Trpa1, P2rx3, Tac1, and Bdnf) and also suggested a number of novel probable contributors (e.g., Piezo2, Tmem100, and Hdac9). Conclusion These findings should further advance our understanding of peripheral mechanisms involved in persistent craniofacial muscle pain conditions and provide a

  11. TOOTH PULP INFLAMMATION INCREASES BDNF EXPRESSION IN RODENT TRIGEMINAL GANGLION NEURONS

    PubMed Central

    Tarsa, Leila; Bałkowiec-Iskra, Ewa; Kratochvil, F. James; Jenkins, Victoria K.; McLean, Anne; Brown, Alexandra; Smith, Julie Ann; Baumgartner, J. Craig; Balkowiec, Agnieszka

    2010-01-01

    Nociceptive pathways with first-order neurons located in the trigeminal ganglion (TG) provide sensory innervation to the head, and are responsible for a number of common chronic pain conditions, including migraines, temporomandibular disorders and trigeminal neuralgias. Many of those conditions are associated with inflammation. Yet, the mechanisms of chronic inflammatory pain remain poorly understood. Our previous studies show that the neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is expressed by adult rat TG neurons, and released from cultured newborn rat TG neurons by electrical stimulation and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), a well-established mediator of trigeminal inflammatory pain. These data suggest that BDNF plays a role in activity-dependent plasticity at first-order trigeminal synapses, including functional changes that take place in trigeminal nociceptive pathways during chronic inflammation. The present study was designed to determine the effects of peripheral inflammation, using tooth pulp inflammation as a model, on regulation of BDNF expression in TG neurons of juvenile rats and mice. Cavities were prepared in right-side maxillary first and second molars of 4-week-old animals, and left open to oral microflora. BDNF expression in right TG was compared with contralateral TG of the same animal, and with right TG of sham-operated controls, 7 and 28 days after cavity preparation. Our ELISA data indicate that exposing the tooth pulp for 28 days, with confirmed inflammation, leads to a significant upregulation of BDNF in the TG ipsilateral to the affected teeth. Double-immunohistochemistry with antibodies against BDNF combined with one of nociceptor markers, CGRP or TRPV1, revealed that BDNF is significantly upregulated in TRPV1-immunoreactive (IR) neurons in both rats and mice, and CGRP-IR neurons in mice, but not rats. Overall, the inflammation-induced upregulation of BDNF is stronger in mice compared to rats. Thus, mouse TG provides a

  12. Non-pungent long chain capsaicin-analogs arvanil and olvanil display better anti-invasive activity than capsaicin in human small cell lung cancers.

    PubMed

    Hurley, John D; Akers, Austin T; Friedman, Jamie R; Nolan, Nicholas A; Brown, Kathleen C; Dasgupta, Piyali

    2017-01-02

    The nutritional compound capsaicin inhibits the invasion of many types of human cancers. The clinical development of capsaicin as an anti-cancer drug is limited due to its unfavorable side effects like burning sensation, stomach cramps, gut pain and nausea. This study compared the anti-invasive activity of capsaicin to non-pungent long chain capsaicin analogs, namely arvanil and olvanil, in human small cell lung cancer cells. Boyden chamber invasion assays revealed that arvanil and olvanil displayed improved anti-invasive activity relative to capsaicin in human SCLC cells. The results of the Boyden chamber assay were confirmed by the spherical invasion assay, and similar results were obtained. The anti-invasive activity of arvanil, olvanil and capsaicin were independent of TRPV and CB1 receptors. Furthermore, the anti-invasive activity of arvanil, olvanil and capsaicin was mediated by the AMPK pathway. Depletion of AMPK levels by siRNA methodology abrogated the anti-invasive activity of arvanil, olvanil and capsaicin. The non-pungent capsaicin analogs arvanil and olvanil display improved anti-invasive activity relative to capsaicin in human SCLC cells. These agents may represent the second generation of capsaicin-like compounds which are more potent than the parent molecule and have a better side effect profile.

  13. The differential expression of low-threshold K+ currents generates distinct firing patterns in different subtypes of adult mouse trigeminal ganglion neurones.

    PubMed

    Catacuzzeno, Luigi; Fioretti, Bernard; Pietrobon, Daniela; Franciolini, Fabio

    2008-11-01

    In adult mouse trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurones we identified three neuronal subpopulations, defined in terms of their firing response to protracted depolarizations, namely MF neurones, characterized by a multiple tonic firing; DMF neurones, characterized by a delay before the beginning of repetitive firing; and SS neurones, characterized by a strongly adapting response. The three subpopulations also differed in several other properties important for defining their functional role in vivo, namely soma size, action potential (AP) shape and capsaicin sensitivity. MF neurones had small soma, markedly long AP and mostly responded to capsaicin, properties typical of a subgroup of C-type nociceptors. SS neurones had large soma, short AP duration and were mostly capsaicin insensitive, suggesting that most of them have functions other than nociception. DMF neurones were all capsaicin insensitive, had a small soma size and intermediate AP duration, making them functionally distinct from both MF and SS neurones. We investigated the ionic basis underlying the delay to the generation of the first AP of DMF neurones, and the strong adaptation of SS neurones. We found that the expression of a fast-inactivating, 4-AP- and CP-339,818-sensitive K+ current (I(A)) in DMF neurones plays a critical role in the generation of the delay, whereas a DTX-sensitive K+ current (I(DTX)) selectively expressed in SS neurones appeared to be determinant for their strong firing adaptation. A minimal theoretical model of TG neuronal excitability confirmed that I(A) and I(DTX) have properties congruent with their suggested role.

  14. Can pontine trigeminal T2-hyperintensity suggest herpetic etiology of trigeminal neuralgia?

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Carmela; Ugga, Lorenzo; Mazio, Federica; Capone, Elisa; D’Arco, Felice; Mankad, Kshitij; Caranci, Ferdinando; Marano, Enrico; Brunetti, Arturo

    2016-01-01

    Background Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is usually classified into two different categories: idiopathic and secondary. We have investigated the frequency of brainstem pontine lesions in patients with idiopathic TN without multiple sclerosis (MS) or stroke, and their association with herpes zoster (HZ) infection. Methods Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies of 28 patients with TN were retrospectively reviewed. Results We found seven patients with clinical suspicion of HZ infection and pontine T2 hyperintense lesions, associated with nerve atrophy in one case. Fifteen patients had a neurovascular conflict (NVC) without brainstem involvement, two of them associated with trigeminal atrophy, while four patients had only volumetric reduction of the nerve. In all patients MRI findings were ipsilateral to the side of TN. Conclusions Pontine T2 hyperintensities could be considered as a MRI sign of TN in patients without NVCs. This “trigeminal pontine sign” (TPS) is frequently found in association with herpetic infections. PMID:27942467

  15. Addition of capsaicin and exchange of carbohydrate with protein counteract energy intake restriction effects on fullness and energy expenditure.

    PubMed

    Smeets, Astrid J; Janssens, Pilou L H R; Westerterp-Plantenga, Margriet S

    2013-04-01

    Energy intake restriction causes a yo-yo effect by decreasing energy expenditure (EE) and decreasing fullness. We investigated the 24-h effect of protein and capsaicin, singly or combined, on fullness and EE during 20% energy intake restriction. The 24 participants (12 male, 12 female; BMI, 25.2 ± 0.4 kg/m(2); age, 27 ± 4 y; body fat, 25.6 ± 5.7%; 3-factor eating questionnaire, F1: 6 ± 2, F2: 4 ± 2, F3: 3 ± 2) underwent eight 36-h sessions in a respiration chamber. The study had a randomized crossover design with 8 randomly sequenced conditions. The participants were fed 100 or 80% of their daily energy requirements. There were 2 control (C) conditions: 100%C and 80%C; 2 conditions with capsaicin (Caps): 100%Caps and 80%Caps; 2 conditions with elevated protein (P): 100%P and 80%P; and 2 conditions with a mixture of protein and capsaicin (PCaps): 100%PCaps and 80%PCaps. Appetite profile, EE, and substrate oxidation were monitored. Compared with 100%C, the 80%C group had expected negative energy-balance effects with respect to total EE, diet-induced thermogenesis, and fullness, whereas the 80%Caps diet counteracted these effects, and the 80%P and 80%PCaps diets exceeded these effects (P < 0.01). In energy balance and negative energy balance, fat balance was more negative in the 80%Caps, P, and PCaps groups than in the 80%C group (P < 0.05) and respiratory quotient values were lower. A negative protein balance was prevented with the 80%P and 80%PCaps diets compared with the 80%C diet. Our results suggest that protein and capsaicin, consumed singly or mixed, counteracted the energy intake restriction effects on fullness and EE. During energy restriction, protein and capsaicin promoted a negative fat balance and protein treatments also prevented a negative protein balance.

  16. The effects of desensitization of capsaicin-sensitive afferent neurons on the microcirculation in the stomach in rats depend on the blood glucocorticoid hormone level.

    PubMed

    Podvigina, T T; Bobryshev, P Yu; Bagaeva, T R; Mal'tsev, N A; Levkovich, Yu I; Filaretova, L P

    2009-07-01

    The effects of densensitization of capsaicin-sensitive afferent neurons on the microcirculation in the stomach were studied before and after administration of indomethacin at an ulcerogenic dose in adrenalectomized rats receiving and not receiving replacement therapy with corticosterone and in sham-operated animals. Measures of the microcirculation consisted of blood flow rates in microvessels in the submucous layer of the stomach and the diameter and permeability of microvessels in the mucosa. Desensitization of capsaicin-sensitive afferent neurons was performed by administration of capsaicin at a dose of 100 mg/kg for two weeks and adrenalectomy one week before the experiment. Blood flow rates in microvessels and microvessel diameters were assessed in non-anesthetized rats by direct video recording methods using a special optical system with a contact dark-field epiobjective. Administration of indomethacin at an ulcerogenic dose led to decreases in blood flow rate in microvessels in the submucous layer, dilation of superficial microvessels in the mucosa of the stomach, and an increase in their permeability. Desensitization of capsaicin-sensitive neurons potentiated indomethacin-induced impairments to the microcirculation in the submucous layer and the mucosa of the stomach. These effects of densensitization were significantly enhanced in conditions of glucocorticoid hormone deficiency. Thus, glucocorticoid hormones have favorable effects on the gastric microcirculation in rats with desensitization of capsaicin-sensitive afferent neurons.

  17. N-palmitoyl-vanillamide (palvanil) is a non-pungent analogue of capsaicin with stronger desensitizing capability against the TRPV1 receptor and anti-hyperalgesic activity.

    PubMed

    De Petrocellis, Luciano; Guida, Francesca; Moriello, Aniello Schiano; De Chiaro, Maria; Piscitelli, Fabiana; de Novellis, Vito; Maione, Sabatino; Di Marzo, Vincenzo

    2011-04-01

    N-acyl-vanillamide (NAVAM) analogues of the natural pungent principle of capsicum, capsaicin, were developed several years ago as potential non-pungent analgesic compounds. N-oleoyl-vanillamide (olvanil) and N-arachidonoy-vanillamide (arvanil), in particular, were described in several publications and patents to behave as potent anti-hyperalgesic compounds in experimental models of chronic and inflammatory pain, and to activate both "capsaicin receptors", i.e. the transient receptor potential of vanilloid type-1 (TRPV1) channel, and, either directly or indirectly, cannabinoid receptors of type-1. Here we report the biochemical and pharmacological characterization of a so far neglected NAVAM, N-palmitoyl-vanillamide (palvanil), and propose its possible use instead of capsaicin, as a possible topical analgesic. Palvanil exhibited a kinetics of activation of human recombinant TRPV1-mediated intracellular calcium elevation significantly slower than that of capsaicin (t(1/2)=21s and 8s, respectively at 1μM). Slow kinetics of TRPV1 agonists were previously found to be associated with stronger potencies as TRPV1 desensitizing agents, which in turn are usually associated with lower pungency and stronger anti-hyperalgesic activity. Accordingly, palvanil desensitized the human recombinant TRPV1 to the effect of capsaicin (10nM) with significantly higher potency than capsaicin (IC(50)=0.8nM and 3.8nM, respectively), this effect reaching its maximum more rapidly (50 and 250min, respectively). Palvanil was also more potent than capsaicin at desensitizing the stimulatory effect of TRPV1 by low pH together with anandamide, which mimics conditions occurring during inflammation. In the eye-wiping assay carried out in mice, palvanil was not pungent and instead caused a strong and long-lasting inhibition of capsaicin-induced eye-wiping. Finally, intraplantar palvanil inhibited the second phase of the nociceptive response to formalin in mice. In conclusion, palvanil appears to be a

  18. Capsaicin inhalation in man and the effects of sodium cromoglycate.

    PubMed Central

    Collier, J. G.; Fuller, R. W.

    1984-01-01

    The inhalation of capsaicin for 1 min, delivered as an aerosol by nebulising solutions of capsaicin at concentrations of 2-65 mumol 1(-1), caused dose-dependent coughing in normal volunteers and subjects with mild asthma. Capsaicin did not cause a feeling of breathlessness, and had no effect on forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) measured at the 1st, 5th and 9th min after the challenge was completed. Coughing started within seconds of applying the face mask, continued throughout the minute of capsaicin inhalation, and stopped within seconds of the mask being removed. In any one subject the number of coughs was reproducible when repeated on the same day or after an interval of several days. Experiments using local anaesthesia applied to the buccal mucosa or larynx indicated that the cough was caused by the stimulation of capsaicin-sensitive nerve terminals situated in the larynx. Cough response was not altered by the prior inhalation of sodium cromoglycate. PMID:6423016

  19. Effects of intracerebroventricular capsaicin on thermoregulatory behavior in the rat.

    PubMed

    Dib, B

    1982-01-01

    To clarify the action of capsaicin on the thermoregulatory system of rat, behavioral and autonomic responses were studied following intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection. Rats were chronically implanted with a lateral cerebral ventricular guide cannula. After the recovery period they were placed in a climatic chamber at ambient temperature (Ta) of 20, 30 or 35 degrees C. In the first series of experiments, they had access to a lever which activated a fan that drew cool outside air into the chamber. After ICV capsaicin (23 micrograms), the rats increased bar-pressing behavior for fresh air at Ta ranging from 20 degrees C to 35 degrees C. In the second series of experiment, the rats had no access to fanning. ICV capsaicin produced a fall in rectal and hypothalamic temperature (Thy) and an increased in cutaneous temperature. These changes depended on Ta. At a Ta of 30 degrees C Thy fell slightly (mean of 0.2 +/- 0.16 degrees C). At a Ta of 20 degrees C Thy fell to a mean of 1 degree C +/- 0.17 degrees C. The conclusion drawn is ICV capsaicin activated behavioral as well as autonomic thermoregulatory heat-loss responses. The effect of capsaicin resembles the effect of local heating of the hypothalamus. However, since hypothalamic temperature decreased the drug may have lowered the thermal set point, or excited directly hypothalamic warm-sensitive neurons.

  20. Sensory effects of capsaicin congeners. Part II: Importance of chemical structure and pungency in desensitizing activity of capsaicin-type compounds.

    PubMed

    Szolcsányi, J; Jancsó-Gábor, A

    1976-01-01

    The characteristic insensitivity of sensory nerve endings to chemically induced pain brought about by capsaicin could be reproduced on the rat's eye by pungent vanillylamides, homovanilloyl-alkylamides and piperine, while homovanilloyl-cycloalkylamides, -azacycloalkylamides, - alkylesters, -alkyl-homovanillylamides, undecenoyl-3-aminopropranololand zingerone were practically ineffective in this respect. Desensitizing potency was not parallel with the stimulating effect of the compounds, e.g. the strongly pungent homovanilloyl-octylester failed to desensitize the receptors, while the less pungent homovanilloyl-dodecylamide proved to be a more potent desensitizing agent than capsaicin itself. It is concluded that the inverse position of the acylamide linkage does not modify, while its replacement by an esteric group completely abolishes the desensitizing activity. In contrast to the stimulating effect, in desensitizing action the presence of an alkyl chain is essential and its optimal length corresponds to 10-12 C atoms. On the basis of these results the possible molecular interactions at the site of action are discussed.

  1. Capsaicin-sensitive sensory nerves exert complex regulatory functions in the serum-transfer mouse model of autoimmune arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Borbély, Éva; Botz, Bálint; Bölcskei, Kata; Kenyér, Tibor; Kereskai, László; Kiss, Tamás; Szolcsányi, János; Pintér, Erika; Csepregi, Janka Zsófia; Mócsai, Attila; Helyes, Zsuzsanna

    2015-01-01

    Objective The K/BxN serum-transfer arthritis is a widely-used translational mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis, in which the immunological components have thoroughly been investigated. In contrast, little is known about the role of sensory neural factors and the complexity of neuro–immune interactions. Therefore, we analyzed the involvement of capsaicin-sensitive peptidergic sensory nerves in autoantibody-induced arthritis with integrative methodology. Methods Arthritogenic K/BxN or control serum was injected to non-pretreated mice or resiniferatoxin (RTX)-pretreated animals where capsaicin-sensitive nerves were inactivated. Edema, touch sensitivity, noxious heat threshold, joint function, body weight and clinical arthritis severity scores were determined repeatedly throughout two weeks. Micro-CT and in vivo optical imaging to determine matrix-metalloproteinase (MMP) and neutrophil-derived myeloperoxidase (MPO) activities, semiquantitative histopathological scoring and radioimmunoassay to measure somatostatin in the joint homogenates were also performed. Results In RTX-pretreated mice, the autoantibody-induced joint swelling, arthritis severity score, MMP and MPO activities, as well as histopathological alterations were significantly greater compared to non-pretreated animals. Self-control quantification of the bone mass revealed decreased values in intact female mice, but significantly greater arthritis-induced pathological bone formation after RTX-pretreatment. In contrast, mechanical hyperalgesia from day 10 was smaller after inactivating capsaicin-sensitive afferents. Although thermal hyperalgesia did not develop, noxious heat threshold was significantly higher following RTX pretreatment. Somatostatin-like immunoreactivity elevated in the tibiotarsal joints in non-pretreated, which was significantly less in RTX-pretreated mice. Conclusions Although capsaicin-sensitive sensory nerves mediate mechanical hyperalgesia in the later phase of autoantibody-induced

  2. Human herpesvirus 1 meningoencephalitis after trigeminal neuralgia surgery.

    PubMed

    Prim, Núria; Benito, Natividad; Montes, Guillermo; Pomar, Virginia; Molet, Joan; Rabella, Núria

    2013-07-01

    We report a case of human herpesvirus 1 (HHV-1) meningoencephalitis in a patient who underwent trigeminal neuralgia surgery. Although this surgery has been reported to increase the risk of mucocutaneous HHV-1 recurrence, to our knowledge, an association between trigeminal surgery and HHV-1 encephalitis has not been previously described.

  3. Meckel's cave epidermoid with trigeminal neuralgia: CT findings.

    PubMed

    Kapila, A; Steinbaum, S; Chakeres, D W

    1984-12-01

    An epidermoid tumor of Meckel's cave was found in a middle-aged woman with trigeminal neuralgia. On CT the lesion had negative attenuation numbers of fat and extended from an expanded Meckel's cave through the porous trigeminus into the ambient and cerebellopontine angle cisterns. Surgical excision provided relief of the patient's trigeminal neuralgia.

  4. Hot Chili Peppers: Extraction, Cleanup, and Measurement of Capsaicin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jiping; Mabury, Scott A.; Sagebiel, John C.

    2000-12-01

    Capsaicin, the pungent ingredient of the red pepper or Capsicum annuum, is widely used in food preparation. The purpose of this experiment was to acquaint students with the active ingredients of hot chili pepper (capsaicin and dihydrocapsaicin), the extraction, cleanup, and analysis of these chemicals, as a fun and informative analytical exercise. Fresh peppers were prepared and extracted with acetonitrile, removing plant co-extractives by addition to a C-18 solid-phase extraction cartridge. Elution of the capsaicinoids was accomplished with a methanol-acetic acid solution. Analysis was completed by reverse-phase HPLC with diode-array or variable wavelength detection and calibration with external standards. Levels of capsaicin and dihydrocapsaicin were typically found to correlate with literature values for a specific hot pepper variety. Students particularly enjoyed relating concentrations of capsaicinoids to their perceived valuation of "hotness".

  5. Localization of TRPV1 and contractile effect of capsaicin in mouse large intestine: high abundance and sensitivity in rectum and distal colon.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Kenjiro; Kurosawa, Emi; Terui, Hiroyuki; Hosoya, Takuji; Tashima, Kimihito; Murayama, Toshihiko; Priestley, John V; Horie, Syunji

    2009-08-01

    We investigated immunohistochemical differences in the distribution of TRPV1 channels and the contractile effects of capsaicin on smooth muscle in the mouse rectum and distal, transverse, and proximal colon. In the immunohistochemical study, TRPV1 immunoreactivity was found in the mucosa, submucosal, and muscle layers and myenteric plexus. Large numbers of TRPV1-immunoreactive axons were observed in the rectum and distal colon. In contrast, TRPV1-positive axons were sparsely distributed in the transverse and proximal colon. The density of TRPV1-immunoreactive axons in the rectum and distal colon was much higher than those in the transverse and proximal colon. Axons double labeled with TRPV1 and protein gene product (PGP) 9.5 were detected in the myenteric plexus, but PGP 9.5-immunoreactive cell bodies did not colocalize with TRPV1. In motor function studies, capsaicin induced a fast transient contraction, followed by a large long-lasting contraction in the rectum and distal colon, whereas in the transverse and proximal colon only the transient contraction was observed. The capsaicin-induced transient contraction from the proximal colon to the rectum was moderately inhibited by an NK1 or NK2 receptor antagonist. The capsaicin-induced long-lasting contraction in the rectum and distal colon was markedly inhibited by an NK2 antagonist, but not by an NK1 antagonist. The present results suggest that TRPV1 channels located on the rectum and distal colon play a major role in the motor function in the large intestine.

  6. Role of voltage-gated cation channels and axon reflexes in the release of sensory neuropeptides by capsaicin from isolated rat trachea.

    PubMed

    Németh, József; Helyes, Zsuzsanna; Oroszi, Gábor; Jakab, Balázs; Pintér, Erika; Szilvássy, Zoltán; Szolcsányi, János

    2003-01-05

    In order to reveal the role of axon reflexes and sensory receptors in sensory neuropeptide release in response to capsaicin, liberation of substance P, calcitonin gene-related peptide and somatostatin from isolated rat tracheae was investigated in the presence of voltage-sensitive Na(+) and Ca(2+) channel blocking agents. Neuropeptide release induced by capsaicin (10 nM) remained unchanged in the presence of 25 mM lidocaine, 1 microM tetrodotoxin or the N-type Ca(2+) channel inhibitor, omega-conotoxin GVIA (100-300 nM). Peptide release by 100 pulses of 2 Hz field stimulation was prevented by lidocaine or tetrodotoxin. Omega-agatoxin TK (250 nM) significantly inhibited and Cd(2+) (200 microM) prevented capsaicin-induced neuropeptide release. These results suggest that chemical stimulation-induced neuropeptide release does not involve activation of fast Na(+) channels or N- and P-type voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels, but contribution of Q-type Ca(2+) channels is possible. Sensory neuropeptides are released by capsaicin from sensory receptors without axon reflexes.

  7. A proinflammatory chemokine, CCL3, sensitizes the heat- and capsaicin-gated ion channel TRPV1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ning; Inan, Saadet; Inan, Sadeet; Cowan, Alan; Sun, Ronghua; Wang, Ji Ming; Rogers, Thomas J; Caterina, Michael; Oppenheim, Joost J

    2005-03-22

    Pain, a critical component of host defense, is one hallmark of the inflammatory response. We therefore hypothesized that pain might be exacerbated by proinflammatory chemokines. To test this hypothesis, CCR1 was cotransfected into human embryonic kidney (HEK)293 cells together with transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), a cation channel required for certain types of thermal hyperalgesia. In these cells, capsaicin and anandamide induced Ca(2+) influx mediated by TRPV1. When CCR1:TRPV1/HEK293 cells were pretreated with CCL3, the sensitivity of TRPV1, as indicated by the Ca(2+) influx, was increased approximately 3-fold. RT-PCR analysis showed that a spectrum of chemokine and cytokine receptors is expressed in rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Immunohistochemical staining of DRG showed that CCR1 is coexpressed with TRPV1 in >85% of small-diameter neurons. CCR1 on DRG neurons was functional, as demonstrated by CCL3-induced Ca(2+) ion influx and PKC activation. Pretreatment with CCL3 enhanced the response of DRG neurons to capsaicin or anandamide. This sensitization was inhibited by pertussis toxin, U73122, or chelerythrine chloride, inhibitors of Gi-protein, phospholipase C, and protein kinase C, respectively. Intraplantar injection of mice with CCL3 decreased their hot-plate response latency. That a proinflammatory chemokine, by interacting with its receptor on small-diameter neurons, sensitizes TRPV1 reveals a previously undescribed mechanism of receptor cross-sensitization that may contribute to hyperalgesia during inflammation.

  8. Hemicrania continua. Unquestionably a trigeminal autonomic cephalalgia.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Maurice B

    2013-05-01

    Hemicrania continua (HC) is a well-known primary headache. The present version of the International Classification of Headache Disorders lists HC in the "other primary headaches" group. However, evidence has emerged demonstrating that HC is a phenotype that belongs to the trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias together with cluster headache, paroxysmal hemicrania (PH), and short-lasting, unilateral neuralgiform headache attacks with conjunctival injection and tearing. This is supported by a common general clinical picture - paroxysmal, fluctuating, unilateral, side-locked headaches located to the ocular, frontal, and/or temporal regions, accompanied by ipsilateral autonomic dysfunctions including for example, tearing and conjunctival injection. Apart from the remarkable clinical similarities, the absolute and incomparable effect of indomethacin in HC parallels the effect of this drug in PH, suggesting a shared core pathogenesis. Finally, neuroimage findings demonstrate a posterior hypothalamic activation in HC similarly to cluster headache, PH, and short-lasting, unilateral neuralgiform headache attacks with conjunctival injection and tearing. Taken together, data indicate that HC is certainly a type of trigeminal autonomic cephalalgia that should no longer be placed in a group of miscellaneous primary headache disorders.

  9. The usual treatment of trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias.

    PubMed

    Pareja, Juan A; Álvarez, Mónica

    2013-10-01

    Trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias include cluster headache, paroxysmal hemicrania, and short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache attacks with conjunctival injection, tearing, and rhinorrhea (SUNCT). Conventional pharmacological therapy can be successful in the majority of trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias patients. Most cluster headache attacks respond to 100% oxygen inhalation, or 6 mg subcutaneous sumatriptan. Nasal spray of sumatriptan (20 mg) or zolmitriptan (5 mg) are recommended as second choice. The bouts can be brought under control by a short course of corticosteroids (oral prednisone: 60-100 mg/day, or intravenous methylprednisolone: 250-500 mg/day, for 5 days, followed by tapering off the dosage), or by long-term prophylaxis with verapamil (at least 240 mg/day). Alternative long-term preventive medications include lithium carbonate (800-1600 mg/day), methylergonovine (0.4-1.2 mg/day), and topiramate (100-200 mg/day). As a rule, paroxysmal hemicrania responds to preventive treatment with indomethacin (75-150 mg/day). A short course of intravenous lidocaine (1-4 mg/kg/hour) can reduce the flow of attacks during exacerbations of SUNCT. Lamotrigine (100-300 mg/day) is the preventive drug of choice for SUNCT. Gabapentin (800-2700 mg/day), topiramate (50-300 mg/day), and carbamazepine (200-1600 mg/day) may be of help.

  10. Giant Trigeminal Schwannoma Presenting with Obstructive Hydrocephalus

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Gutierrez, Juan Carlos; Elder, Benjamin D; Olivi, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Trigeminal schwannomas represent between 0.07% and 0.36% of all intracranial tumors and 0.8% to 8% of intracranial schwannomas. Selection of the appropriate management strategy requires an understanding of the tumor’s natural history and treatment outcomes. This report describes the case of a 36-year-old male who presented with a three-month history of progressive headaches, dizziness, loss of balance, decreased sleep, and cognitive decline. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a large enhancing lesion centered around the left Meckel’s cave and extending into both the middle and the posterior fossa with obstructive hydrocephalus secondary to compression of the fourth ventricle. Resection of the posterior fossa component of the tumor was performed in order to relieve the mass effect upon the brainstem without attempting a radical removal of the middle fossa component and a potential risk of further cognitive impairment. The pathological exam confirmed the diagnosis of a trigeminal schwannoma. The residual tumor showed progressive spontaneous volumetric shrinkage after a subtotal surgical resection. This case shows the value of a planned conservative surgery in complex schwannomas and highlights the challenges in interpreting the treatment responses in these benign tumors, whether approached surgically or with stereotactic radiation techniques. PMID:26719829

  11. SCN2B in the Rat Trigeminal Ganglion and Trigeminal Sensory Nuclei.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Yusuke; Sato, Tadasu; Yajima, Takehiro; Fujita, Masatoshi; Hashimoto, Naoya; Shoji, Noriaki; Sasano, Takashi; Ichikawa, Hiroyuki

    2016-11-01

    The beta-2 subunit of the mammalian brain voltage-gated sodium channel (SCN2B) was examined in the rat trigeminal ganglion (TG) and trigeminal sensory nuclei. In the TG, 42.6 % of sensory neurons were immunoreactive (IR) for SCN2B. These neurons had various cell body sizes. In facial skins and oral mucosae, corpuscular nerve endings contained SCN2B-immunoreactivity. SCN2B-IR nerve fibers formed nerve plexuses beneath taste buds in the tongue and incisive papilla. However, SCN2B-IR free nerve endings were rare in cutaneous and mucosal epithelia. Tooth pulps, muscle spindles and major salivary glands were also innervated by SCN2B-IR nerve fibers. A double immunofluorescence method revealed that about 40 % of SCN2B-IR neurons exhibited calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-immunoreactivity. However, distributions of SCN2B- and CGRP-IR nerve fibers were mostly different in facial, oral and cranial structures. By retrograde tracing method, 60.4 and 85.3 % of TG neurons innervating the facial skin and tooth pulp, respectively, showed SCN2B-immunoreactivity. CGRP-immunoreactivity was co-localized by about 40 % of SCN2B-IR cutaneous and tooth pulp TG neurons. In trigeminal sensory nuclei of the brainstem, SCN2B-IR neuronal cell bodies were common in deep laminae of the subnucleus caudalis, and the subnuclei interpolaris and oralis. In the mesencephalic trigeminal tract nucleus, primary sensory neurons also exhibited SCN2B-immunoreactivity. In other regions of trigeminal sensory nuclei, SCN2B-IR cells were very infrequent. SCN2B-IR neuropil was detected in deep laminae of the subnucleus caudalis as well as in the subnuclei interpolaris, oralis and principalis. These findings suggest that SCN2B is expressed by various types of sensory neurons in the TG. There appears to be SCN2B-containing pathway in the TG and trigeminal sensory nuclei.

  12. Chordin and noggin expression in the adult rat trigeminal nuclei.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Yutaro; Mikawa, Sumiko; Masumoto, Kazuma; Katou, Fuminori; Sato, Kohji

    2016-12-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMP) exert its biological functions by interacting with membrane bound receptors. However, functions of BMPs are also regulated in the extracellular space by secreted antagonistic regulators, such as chordin and noggin. Although the deep involvement of BMP signaling in the development and functions of the trigeminal nuclei has been postulated, little information is available for its expression in the trigeminal nuclei. We, thus, investigated chordin and noggin expression in the adult rat trigeminal nuclei using immunohistochemistry. Chordin and noggin were intensely expressed throughout the trigeminal nuclei. In addition, interesting differences are observed between chordin expression and noggin expression. For example, chordin prefers dendritic expression than noggin, suggesting that chordin is involved in the regulation of dendritic morphology and synaptic homeostasis. Furthermore, chordin and noggin were differentially expressed in the neuropil of the trigeminal nuclei. Since BMP signaling is known to play a pivotal role to make precise neural network, theses differences might be important to keep precise interneuronal connections by regulating local BMP signaling intensity in each region. Interestingly, we also detected chordin and noggin expression in axons of the trigeminal nerves. These data indicate that chordin and noggin play pivotal roles also in the adult trigeminal system.

  13. Characterization of midline medulla role in the trigeminal depressor response.

    PubMed

    Clement, M E; McCall, R B

    1989-05-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to determine the role of the midline medulla in mediating the trigeminal depressor response. Previously we found that lesions of the midline medulla abolished the decrease in blood pressure resulting from electrical stimulation of the spinal trigeminal complex. Electrical stimulation (5 Hz) of the spinal trigeminal tract elicited a decrease in arterial blood pressure that was associated with an inhibition of sympathetic nerve activity recorded from the inferior cardiac nerve of anesthetized cats. The effect of single shocks applied to the trigeminal complex on sympathetic activity was determined using computer-averaging techniques. Single shock stimulation consistently elicited an excitation of sympathetic activity that was followed by an inhibition of sympathetic nerve discharge. The gamma-aminobutyric acid antagonist picrotoxin blocked the depressor response elicited by electrical stimulation of the midline medulla but not by stimulation of the spinal trigeminal complex. Extracellular recordings of the discharges of midline medullary neurons were made to determine the effects of trigeminal stimulation on sympathoinhibitory, sympathoexcitatory, and serotonin neurons. Sympathoinhibitory and sympathoexcitatory neurons were identified by the relationship between unitary discharges and sympathetic nerve activity and by their response to baroreceptor reflex activation. Serotonin (5-HT) neurons were identified using criteria previously developed in our laboratory. These included 1) a slow regular discharge rate, 2) sensitivity to the inhibitory action of the 5-HT1A agonist 8-OH 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin, 3) failure to respond to baroreceptor reflex activation, and 4) the discharges of the 5-HT neurons were not related to sympathetic activity. Stimulation of the spinal trigeminal complex typically inhibited the discharges of sympathoinhibitory neurons. In contrast, stimulation of the trigeminal complex

  14. Natural Capsaicin in Capsicum chinense: Concentration vs. Origin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Capsaicin [N-vanillyl-8-methyl-6-(E) noneamide] is the most pungent of the group of compounds known as capsaicinoids in chili peppers. A survey was conducted to screen fruits of 307 hot pepper accessions of Capsicum chinense selected from the USDA germplasm collection for their major capsaicinoids c...

  15. [Capsaicin and lidocaine usage in functional disorders of urinary bladder].

    PubMed

    Juszczak, Kajetan; Thor, Piotr J

    2011-01-01

    Most of the drugs in the treatment of functional disorders of the urinary bladder has a peripheral effect. Their work consists mainly in reducing detrusor contractility of the bladder, or effects on the afferent innervation. Anticholinergics are the first drugs of choice. An alternative pharmacological treatment is to eliminate the overactivity by acting on the bladder afferent innervation, while not inhibiting its contractility. One option is to modulate the pharmacological activity of sensory mechanisms governing the functioning of the bladder via the vanilloid receptor (TRPV1) and ancyrin (TRPA1). Intravesical treatment with capsaicin or lidocaine only partially reduces bladder sensation. Furthermore, clinical use of lidocaine in the treatment of overactive bladder (OAB) is reduced to intravesical supply before capsaicin instillation to reduce the symptoms associated with initial phase of C-fibres sensitization. This paper presents the current state of knowledge regarding the use of capsaicin and lidocaine in functional disorders of the urinary bladder, as well as discusses the impact of these substances on afferent C-fibres and the activity of the urinary bladder. Based on previous studies intravesical capsaicin and lidocaine therapy is one of the alternative treatment options in selected patients with functional disorders of the urinary bladder (in particular OAB) in addition to standard anticholinergics therapy or the newer generation of therapies using botulinum toxin.

  16. Vanilloid (capsaicin) receptors influence inflammatory sensitivity in response to particulate matter.

    PubMed

    Veronesi, B; Oortgiesen, M; Roy, J; Carter, J D; Simon, S A; Gavett, S H

    2000-11-15

    . Finally, semiquantitative RT-PCR showed a higher expression of VR1 receptor mRNA in DRG and spinal cord taken from neonatal BALB/c mice relative to B6 mice. Taken together, these data suggest that capsaicin and acid-sensitive irritant receptors, located on somatosensory cell bodies and their nerve fiber terminals, subserve PM-induced airway inflammation and are quantitatively different in responsive and nonresponsive mouse strains.

  17. Trigeminal neuralgia secondary to basilar impression: A case report

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida Holanda, Maurus Marques; Pereira Neto, Normando Guedes; de Moura Peixoto, Gustavo; Pinheiro Santos, Rayan Haquim

    2015-01-01

    We report a rare case of trigeminal neuralgia. A 23-year-old woman with a history of 1 year of typical trigeminal neuralgia manifested the characteristics of basilar impression. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated basilar impression, deformity of the posterior fossa with asymmetry of petrous bone, and compression of medulla oblongata in the topography of the odontoid apophysis. The operation was performed through a suboccipital craniectomy. The neuralgia disappeared after surgery and remains completely resolved until today. This is the second reported case of trigeminal neuralgia in a patient with basilar impression in Brazil. PMID:25972713

  18. Trigeminal neuralgia secondary to basilar impression: A case report.

    PubMed

    de Almeida Holanda, Maurus Marques; Pereira Neto, Normando Guedes; de Moura Peixoto, Gustavo; Pinheiro Santos, Rayan Haquim

    2015-01-01

    We report a rare case of trigeminal neuralgia. A 23-year-old woman with a history of 1 year of typical trigeminal neuralgia manifested the characteristics of basilar impression. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated basilar impression, deformity of the posterior fossa with asymmetry of petrous bone, and compression of medulla oblongata in the topography of the odontoid apophysis. The operation was performed through a suboccipital craniectomy. The neuralgia disappeared after surgery and remains completely resolved until today. This is the second reported case of trigeminal neuralgia in a patient with basilar impression in Brazil.

  19. Role of the trigeminal nerve in regrowth of hypoglossal motoneurons after hypoglossal-facial anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Mameli, Ombretta; Pellitteri, Rosalia; Russo, Antonella; Stanzani, Stefania; Caria, Marcello Alessandro; De Riu, Pier Luigi

    2006-12-01

    Conclusion. Functional recovery of facial muscles following hypoglossal-facial anastomosis (HFA) may be dependent not only on sensory information, relayed via the trigeminal nuclei to the hypoglossal nucleus, but also on extratrigeminal fibers, originating from the hypoglossal nucleus that travel in the infraorbital nerve (ION). This fact helps to explain the ability of hypoglossal neurons, after HFA, to induce contractions of muscles originally innervated from other nervous structures. Objective. The aim of the study was to better understand the role of the trigeminal nerve in reinnervation of facial muscles by hypoglossal motoneurons following HFA. Materials and methods. Central afferences of the ION were analyzed in rats by labeling the exposed nerve with horseradish peroxidase (HRP), whereas central organization of the efferent projections to the vibrissal area was analyzed by labeling the whisker pad muscles of the rat with a 5% solution of 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (Dil) in N,N-dimethylformamide. Results. The results show that extratrigeminal fibers, originating in the hypoglossal nucleus, travel along the ION. Retrograde tracing applied to ION or injected into the whisker pad showed labeled neurons in the Pr5 nucleus and all Sp5 trigeminal subnuclei. Small labeled neurons (10-15 microm diameter; 10-12 neurons per section), were also found in the hypoglossal nucleus.

  20. In vivo and in vitro evaluation for nutraceutical purposes of capsaicin, capsanthin, lutein and four pepper varieties.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Bedmar, Zahira; Alonso-Moraga, Angeles

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the nutraceutic potential of different Capsicum sp, capsaicin, capsanthin and lutein and provide data in order to clarify the conflicting results obtained for capsaicin by different authors. To achieve these objectives, in vivo (geno/antigenotoxicity and lifespan assays in the animal model Drosophila) and in vitro (cytotoxicity and DNA-fragmentation assays in HL60 promyelocytic cell line) assays were carried out. Results showed that i) none of the tested substances were genotoxic except green hot pepper and capsaicin at the highest tested concentration (5 mg/mL and 11.5 μM respectively), ii) all tested substances except green hot pepper are antimutagenic against H2O2-induced damage, iii) only red sweet pepper significantly extend the lifespan and healthspan of D. melanogaster at 1.25 and 2.5 mg/mL, iv) all pepper varieties induce dose-depended cytotoxic effect in HL60 cells with different IC50, and v) all pepper varieties and capsaicin exerted proapoptotic effect on HL60 cells.

  1. Eugenol inhibits the GABAA current in trigeminal ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Hoon; Moon, Jee Youn; Jung, Sung Jun; Kang, Jin Gu; Choi, Seung Pyo; Jang, Jun Ho

    2015-01-01

    Eugenol has sedative, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and analgesic effects, but also serves as an irritant through the regulation of a different set of ion channels. Activation of gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors on sensory neurons leads to the stabilization of neuronal excitability but contributes to formalin-induced inflammatory pain. In this study, we examined the effect of eugenol on the GABA-induced current in rat trigeminal ganglia (TG) neurons and in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells expressing the GABAA receptor α1β2γ2 subtype using the whole-cell patch clamp technique. RT-PCR and Western blot analysis were used to confirm the expression of GABAA receptor γ2 subunit mRNA and protein in the TG and hippocampus. Eugenol decreased the amplitude ratio of the GABA-induced current to 27.5 ± 3.2% (p < 0.05) in TG neurons, which recovered after a 3-min washout. In HEK 293 cells expressing the α1β2γ2 subtype, eugenol inhibited GABA-induced currents in a dose-dependent manner. Application of eugenol also decreased the GABA response in the presence of a G-protein blocker. Eugenol pretreatment with different concentrations of GABA resulted in similar inhibition of the GABA-induced current in a non-competitive manner. In conclusion, eugenol inhibits the GABA-induced current in TG neurons and HEK 293 cells expressing the GABAA receptor in a reversible, dose-dependent, and non-competitive manner, but not via the G-protein pathway. We suggest that the GABAA receptor could be a molecular target for eugenol in the modulation of nociceptive information.

  2. Capsaicin and evodiamine ingestion does not augment energy expenditure and fat oxidation at rest or after moderately-intense exercise.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Neil A; Spillane, Mike; La Bounty, Paul; Grandjean, Peter W; Leutholtz, Brian; Willoughby, Darryn S

    2013-12-01

    Capsaicin and evodiamine are 2 thermogenic agents recognized for their ability to stimulate the sympathetic nervous system. We hypothesized that both capsaicin and evodiamine would be effective at increasing thermogenesis and lipid oxidation during rest and exercise. In a randomized, cross-over design, 11 men ingested 500 mg of cayenne pepper (1.25 mg capsaicin), 500 mg evodiamine, or placebo at rest following 30 minutes of energy expenditure assessment using open-circuit spirometry. Energy expenditure was assessed again prior to commencing approximately 30 minutes of treadmill exercise at 65% peak oxygen consumption. Energy expenditure was assessed for another 30 minutes of the post-exercise period. Heart rate, blood pressure, core temperature, and venous blood samples were obtained 30 minutes before supplement ingestion, 1 hour after supplement ingestion, immediately post-exercise, and 45 minutes post-exercise. Serum markers of lipid oxidation (glycerol, free fatty acids, glucose, epinephrine, and norepinephrine) were determined spectrophotometrically with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Two-way analyses of variance with repeated measures were performed for each dependent variable (P ≤ .05) with Supplement and Test as main effects. Statistical analyses revealed significant main effects for Test for hemodynamics, energy expenditure, serum catecholamines, and markers of fat oxidation immediately post-exercise (P < .05). No significant interactions between Supplement and Test were noted for any criterion variable (P > .05). These results suggest that acute ingestion of 500 mg of cayenne (1.25 mg capsaicin) or evodiamine is not effective at inducing thermogenesis and increasing fat oxidation at rest or during exercise in men.

  3. Prostaglandin E2 potentiates a TTX-resistant sodium current in rat capsaicin-sensitive vagal pulmonary sensory neurones.

    PubMed

    Kwong, Kevin; Lee, Lu-Yuan

    2005-04-15

    Capsaicin-sensitive vagal pulmonary neurones (pulmonary C neurones) play an important role in regulating airway function. During airway inflammation, the level of prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) increases in the lungs and airways. PGE(2) has been shown to sensitize isolated pulmonary C neurones. The somatosensory correlate of the pulmonary C neurone, the small-diameter nociceptive neurone of the dorsal root ganglion, contains a high percentage of tetrodotoxin-resistant sodium currents (TTX-R I(Na)). Therefore, this study was carried out to determine whether these channel currents are involved in the PGE(2)-induced sensitization of pulmonary C neurones. We used the perforated patch-clamp technique to study the effects of PGE(2) on the TTX-R I(Na) in acutely cultured capsaicin-sensitive pulmonary neurones that were identified by retrograde labelling with a fluorescent tracer, DiI. We found that the pulmonary neurones sensitive to capsaicin had a higher percentage of TTX-R I(Na) than that of capsaicin-insensitive pulmonary neurones. PGE(2) exposure increased the evoked TTX-R I(Na) when experiments were performed at both room temperature and at 37 degrees C. Furthermore, stimulation of the adenylyl cyclase/protein kinase A pathway with either forskolin or Sp-5,6-DCl-cBiMPS potentiated the TTX-R I(Na) in a manner similar to that of PGE(2). We conclude that these modulatory effects of PGE(2) on TTX-R I(Na) play an important role in the sensitization of pulmonary C neurones.

  4. Update on neuropathic pain treatment for trigeminal neuralgia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Quliti, Khalid W.

    2015-01-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia is a syndrome of unilateral, paroxysmal, stabbing facial pain, originating from the trigeminal nerve. Careful history of typical symptoms is crucial for diagnosis. Most cases are caused by vascular compression of the trigeminal root adjacent to the pons leading to focal demyelination and ephaptic axonal transmission. Brain imaging is required to exclude secondary causes. Many medical and surgical treatments are available. Most patients respond well to pharmacotherapy; carbamazepine and oxcarbazepine are first line therapy, while lamotrigine and baclofen are considered second line treatments. Other drugs such as topiramate, levetiracetam, gabapentin, pregabalin, and botulinum toxin-A are alternative treatments. Surgical options are available if medications are no longer effective or tolerated. Microvascular decompression, gamma knife radiosurgery, and percutaneous rhizotomies are most promising surgical alternatives. This paper reviews the medical and surgical therapeutic options for the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia, based on available evidence and guidelines. PMID:25864062

  5. Hemimasticatory spasm treated with microvascular decompression of the trigeminal nerve.

    PubMed

    Chon, Kyu-Hyon; Lee, Jong-Myong; Koh, Eun-Jeong; Choi, Ha-Young

    2012-09-01

    Hemimasticatory spasm is a very rare disorder of the trigeminal nerve characterized by paroxysmal involuntary contraction of the jaw-closing muscles. The mechanisms leading to hemimasticatory spasm are still unclear. Recently, injection of botulinum toxin has become the treatment of choice due to its excellent results. We report a case of a successful treatment of hemimasticatory spasm via microvascular decompression of the motor branch of the trigeminal nerve.

  6. [Teflon granuloma after microvascular decompression of the trigeminal nerve root in a patient with recurrent trigeminal neuralgia].

    PubMed

    Rzaev, D A; Kulikova, E V; Moysak, G I; Voronina, E I; Ageeva, T A

    2016-01-01

    The use of a Teflon implant for Jannetta surgery in patients with trigeminal neuralgia is complicated in rare cases by the development of a Teflon granuloma and can cause recurrent facial pain. The article presents a clinical case of a Teflon granuloma developed after microvascular decompression of the trigeminal nerve root, describes the surgical findings and histological picture, and analyzes the literature, causes of granuloma development, and recommendations for treatment of these patients.

  7. IL-1beta in the trigeminal subnucleus caudalis contributes to extra-territorial allodynia/hyperalgesia following a trigeminal nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kouji; Watanabe, Mineo; Suekawa, Yohei; Ito, Goshi; Inubushi, Toshihiro; Hirose, Naoto; Murasaki, Kyoko; Hiyama, Shinji; Uchida, Takashi; Tanne, Kazuo

    2011-05-01

    It has been reported that the whisker pad (WP) area, which is innervated by the second branch of the trigeminal nerve, shows allodynia/hyperalgesia following transection of the mental nerve (MN: the third branch of the trigeminal nerve). However, the mechanisms of this extra-territorial pain induction still remain unclear. Glia and cytokines are known to facilitate perception of noxious input, raising a possibility that these non-neuronal elements are involved in the induction and spread of allodynia/hyperalgesia at non-injured skin territory. One day after MN transection, tactile allodynia/hyperalgesia developed on the ipsilateral WP area, which is in the non-injured skin territory. The tactile allodynia/hyperalgesia lasted for more than 56 days. In response to MN transection, astrocytes and microglia appeared to be in an activated state, and interleukin (IL)-1beta was up-regulated in astrocytes in the trigeminal subnucleus caudalis (Vc). Allodynia/hyperalgesia at WP area induced by MN transection was attenuated dose-dependently by IL-1 receptor antagonist IL-1ra (i.t., 0.05, 0.5, and 5 pg/rat). Fos-like immunoreactive (Fos-Li) neurons were observed in the Vc after non-noxious mechanical stimulation of the WP area in the rats with MN transection. Administration of IL-1ra also attenuated the number of Fos-Li neurons dose-dependently. Administration of a noncompetitive antagonist of NMDA receptors MK-801 (i.t., 5 μg/rat) reversed allodynia/hyperalgesia. IL-1 receptor type I (IL-1RI) was localized in Fos- and phospho NR1-immunoreactive neurons. These results suggest that IL-1beta in the Vc plays an important role in the development of extra-territorial tactile allodynia/hyperalgesia after MN transection.

  8. Transganglionic transport of choleragenoid by capsaicin-sensitive C-fibre afferents to the substantia gelatinosa of the spinal dorsal horn after peripheral nerve section.

    PubMed

    Sántha, P; Jancsó, G

    2003-01-01

    Choleratoxin B subunit-binding thick myelinated, A-fibre and unmyelinated, capsaicin-sensitive nociceptive C-fibre primary afferent fibres terminate in a strict topographic and somatotopic manner in the spinal cord dorsal horn. Injection of choleratoxin B subunit-horseradish peroxidase conjugate into injured but not intact peripheral nerves produced transganglionic labelling of primary afferents not only in the deeper layers (Rexed's laminae III-IV), but also in the substantia gelatinosa (Rexed's laminae II) of the spinal dorsal horn. This was interpreted in terms of a sprouting response of the Abeta-myelinated afferents and suggested a contribution to the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain [Nature 355 (1992) 75; J Comp Neurol 360 (1995) 121]. By utilising the selective neurotoxic effect of capsaicin, we examined the role of C-fibre sensory ganglion neurons in the mechanism of this phenomenon. Elimination of these particular, capsaicin-sensitive C-fibre afferents by prior intrathecal or systemic capsaicin treatment inhibited transganglionic labelling by the choleratoxin B subunit-horseradish peroxidase conjugate of the substantia gelatinosa evoked by chronic sciatic nerve section. More importantly, prior perineural capsaicin treatment of the transected nerve proximal to the anticipated site of injection of choleragenoid 12 hours later prevented the labelling of the substantia gelatinosa, but not that of the deeper layers. Electron microscopic examination of the dorsal roots revealed no significant difference in the proportion of labelled myelinated fibres relating to the intact (54.4+/-5.5%) and the transected (62.4+/-5.4%) sciatic nerves. In contrast, the proportion of labelled unmyelinated dorsal root axons relating to the transected, but not the intact nerves showed a significant, six-fold increase after sciatic nerve transection (intact: 4.9+/-1.3%; transected: 35+/-6.7%). These observations indicate that peripheral nerve lesion-induced transganglionic labelling

  9. Over-expression of TRESK K(+) channels reduces the excitability of trigeminal ganglion nociceptors.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhaohua; Cao, Yu-Qing

    2014-01-01

    TWIK-related spinal cord K(+) (TRESK) channel is abundantly expressed in trigeminal ganglion (TG) and dorsal root ganglion neurons and is one of the major background K(+) channels in primary afferent neurons. Mutations in TRESK channels are associated with familial and sporadic migraine. In rats, both chronic nerve injury and inflammation alter the expression level of TRESK mRNA. Functional studies indicate that reduction of endogenous TRESK channel activity results in hyper-excitation of primary afferent neurons, suggesting that TRESK is a potential target for the development of new analgesics. However, whether and how enhancing TRESK channel activity would decrease the excitability of primary afferent neurons has not been directly tested. Here, we over-expressed TRESK subunits in cultured mouse TG neurons by lipofectamine-mediated transfection and investigated how this altered the membrane properties and the excitability of the small-diameter TG population. To account for the heterogeneity of neurons, we further divided small TG neurons into two groups, based on their ability to bind to fluorescently-labeled isolectin B (IB4). The transfected TG neurons showed a 2-fold increase in the level of TRESK proteins. This was accompanied by a significant increase in the fraction of lamotrigine-sensitive persistent K(+) currents as well as the size of total background K(+) currents. Consequently, both IB4-positive and IB4-negative TG neurons over-expressing TRESK subunits exhibited a lower input resistance and a 2-fold increase in the current threshold for action potential initiation. IB4-negative TG neurons over-expressing TRESK subunits also showed a significant reduction of the spike frequency in response to supra-threshold stimuli. Importantly, an increase in TRESK channel activity effectively inhibited capsaicin-evoked spikes in TG neurons. Taken together, our results suggest that potent and specific TRESK channel openers likely would reduce the excitability of

  10. Cuneus and fusiform cortices thickness is reduced in trigeminal neuralgia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic pain disorders are presumed to induce changes in brain grey and white matters. Few studies have focused CNS alterations in trigeminal neuralgia (TN). Methods The aim of this study was to explore changes in white matter microstructure in TN subjects using diffusion tensor images (DTI) with tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS); and cortical thickness changes with surface based morphometry. Twenty-four patients with classical TN (37-67 y-o) and 24 healthy controls, matched for age and sex, were included in the study. Results Comparing patients with controls, no diffusivity abnormalities of brain white matter were detected. However, a significant reduction in cortical thickness was observed at the left cuneus and left fusiform cortex in the patients group. The thickness of the fusiform cortex correlated negatively with the carbamazepine dose (p = 0.023). Conclusions Since the cuneus and the fusiform gyrus have been related to the multisensory integration area and cognitive processing, as well as the retrieval of shock perception conveyed by Aδ fibers, our results support the role of these areas in TN pathogenesis. Whether such changes occurs as an epiphenomenon secondary to daily stimulation or represent a structural predisposition to TN in the light of peripheral vascular compression is a matter of future studies. PMID:24661349

  11. Spermatogonial stem cell sensitivity to capsaicin: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Mizrak, Sefika C; Gadella, Bart M; Erdost, Hatice; Ozer, Aytekin; van Pelt, Ana MM; van Dissel-Emiliani, Federica MF

    2008-01-01

    Background Conflicting reports have been published on the sensitivity of spermatogenesis to capsaicin (CAP), the pungent ingredient of hot chili peppers. Here, the effect of CAP on germ cell survival was investigated by using two testis germ cell lines as a model. As CAP is a potent agonist of the transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor 1 (TRPV1) and no information was available of its expression in germ cells, we also studied the presence of TRPV1 in the cultured cells and in germ cells in situ. Methods The rat spermatogonial stem cell lines Gc-5spg and Gc-6spg were used to study the effects of different concentrations of CAP during 24 and 48 h. The response to CAP was first monitored by phase-contrast microscopy. As germ cells appear to undergo apoptosis in the presence of CAP, the activation of caspase 3 was studied using an anti activated caspase 3 antibody or by quantifying the amount of cells with DNA fragmentation using flow cytometry. Immunolocalization was done with an anti-TRPV1 antibody either with the use of confocal microscopy to follow live cell labeling (germ cells) or on Bouin fixed paraffin embedded testicular tissues. The expression of TRPV1 by the cell lines and germ cells was confirmed by Western blots. Results Initial morphological observations indicated that CAP at concentrations ranging from 150 uM to 250 uM and after 24 and 48 h of exposure, had deleterious apoptotic-like effects on both cell lines: A large population of the CAP treated cell cultures showed signs of DNA fragmentation and caspase 3 activation. Quantification of the effect demonstrated a significant effect of CAP with doses of 150 uM in the Gc-5spg cell line and 200 uM in the Gc-6spg cell line, after 24 h of exposure. The effect was dose and time dependent in both cell lines. TRPV1, the receptor for CAP, was found to be expressed by the spermatogonial stem cells in vitro and also by premeiotic germ cells in situ. Conclusion CAP adversely affects spermatogonial survival

  12. Environmental risk assessment on capsaicin used as active substance for antifouling system on ships.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianbing; Shi, Ting; Yang, Xiaoling; Han, Wenya; Zhou, Yunrui

    2014-06-01

    Biodegradation experiments were carried out with capsaicin to evaluate its degradability. The results show that capsaicin was readily biodegradable under aerobic conditions. The values of Kow and the calculated bioconcentration factor indicate that capsaicin have a low potential for bioconcentration. The fish acute toxicity tests conducted with Brachydanio rerio show LC50 for capsaicin was 5.98 mg L(-1). The tests of alga growth inhibition conducted with Selenastrum capricornutum suggest EC50 for capsaicin was 114 mg L(-1). The calculated PNEC (Predicted No Effect Concentration) was 4.9×10(-4) mg L(-1). The average PEC (Predicted Environmental Concentration) for OECD-EU commercial harbor and marina were 3.99×10(-6) and 2.49×10(-5) mg L(-1), respectively. These indicate that the PEC was much less than the PNEC for capsaicin. The low Kp value of capsaicin suggests the data about the risk of capsaicin to sediment organisms can be waived. According to the results from the analysis of the degradation, bioaccumulation, toxicity and accumulation in sediment, it can be concluded that capsaicin used as active substance for antifouling system on ships poses relatively low risk to marine environment.

  13. Influence of topical capsaicin on facial sensitivity in response to experimental pain.

    PubMed

    Lee, Y-S; Kho, H-S; Kim, Y-K; Chung, S-C

    2007-01-01

    Capsaicin, the pungent component of the red pepper, has been used as an analgesic in a variety of pain conditions, but sensory impairment after long-term treatment has been concerned. This study investigated the influence of topical capsaicin on various types of sensations including pain in the facial areas innervated by the mental nerve, and also evaluated whether the measurement of cutaneous current perception threshold (CPT) is reliable for the quantification of sensory change following capsaicin application. Twenty healthy subjects were given topical capsaicin cream (0.075%), which was applied to the mental area unilaterally, four times daily for 2 weeks. Burning sensation after capsaicin application gradually decreased with repeated applications. Repeated topical capsaicin resulted in reduced sensation to mechanical, heat and cold pain without changing non-painful tactile sensation. It also resulted in increased CPTs at 5 Hz and 250 Hz stimuli but no change in the CPTs at 2000 Hz from the first evaluation after capsaicin treatment and throughout the treatment period. This study demonstrated that topical capsaicin treatment for the management of chronic localized pain can be safely applied to the face without affecting non-painful normal sensations, and that CPT testing is a clinically useful tool for the quantification of sensory changes following capsaicin application.

  14. Some like it hot: The emerging role of spicy food (capsaicin) in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yaxiong; Huang, Xin; Wu, Haijing; Zhao, Ming; Lu, Qianjin; Israeli, Eitan; Dahan, Shani; Blank, Miri; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2016-05-01

    Autoimmune diseases refer to a spectrum of diseases characterized by an active immune response against the host, which frequently involves increased autoantibody production. The pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases is multifactorial and the exploitation of novel effective treatment is urgent. Capsaicin is a nutritional factor, the active component of chili peppers, which is responsible for the pungent component of chili pepper. As a stimuli, capsaicin selectively activate transient receptor potential vanilloid subfamily 1(TRPV1) and exert various biological effects. This review discusses the effect of capsaicin through its receptor on the development and modulation of autoimmune diseases, which may shed light upon potential therapies in capsaicin-targeted approaches.

  15. Percutaneous trigeminal ganglion radiofrequency thermocoagulation alleviates anxiety and depression disorders in patients with classic trigeminal neuralgia

    PubMed Central

    Tang, YuanZhang; Ma, Ling; Li, Na; Guo, Yuna; Yang, Liqiang; Wu, Baishan; Yue, Jianning; Wang, Qi; Liu, Jingjie; Ni, Jia-xiang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is a neurological condition that presents as excruciating facial pain. Depression and anxiety are commonly associated with TN; however, anxiety and depression disorders in patients with TN and the effects of the various therapeutic strategies for TN on these disorders are not well studied. To evaluate depression and anxiety in patients with trigeminal neuralgia (TN), identify factors that predict their occurrence and study the effect of the percutaneous trigeminal ganglion radiofrequency thermocoagulation (PRT) procedure for alleviating pain on depression and anxiety. Patients with classic TN, who received PRT treatment, were consecutively recruited between October 2014 and October 2015. Severity of pain was determined using the visual analogue scale (VAS) score. Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI) and Beck anxiety Inventory (BAI) were used to evaluate depression and anxiety disorders pre- and post-PRT. Medical, demographic, and psychosocial backgrounds were also assessed as predictive factors. A BDI score of ≥14 represented depression and BAI score of ≥45 represented anxiety. VAS, BDI, and BAI scores were collected at the time of admission and on the day of discharge. Of the 167 patients who participated in the study, 121 (72.5%) had depression and 34 (20.4%) suffered anxiety. Pre-PRT procedure, female sex, age >50 years, ineffective treatment, and high pain intensity (VAS ≥7) predicted the development of depression and anxiety. Post-PRT procedure, all patients who experienced pain relief also reported amelioration of depression and anxiety. A considerable percentage of patients with TN developed depression and anxiety. Patients who were female, older than 50 years, or suffered from failure treatment and severe pain (VAS>7), were at higher risk of depression and anxiety development. Complete alleviation of pain by using surgical PRT could immediately attenuate depressive and anxiety disorders associated with TN. PMID

  16. Dosimetric analysis of trigeminal nerve, brain stem doses in CyberKnife radiosurgery of trigeminal neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Sudahar, H; Kurup, P G G; Murali, V; Velmurugan, J

    2012-07-01

    CyberKnife radiosurgery treatment of Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is performed as a non-invasive image guided procedure. The prescription dose for TN is very high. The brainstem is the adjacent critical organ at risk (OAR) which is prone to receive the very high target dose of TN. The present study is to analyze the dose distribution inside the tiny trigeminal nerve target and also to analyze the dose fall off in the brain stem. Seven TN cases treated between November 2010 and January 2012 were taken for this study retrospectively. The treatment plans were analyzed for target dose conformity, homogeneity and dose coverage. In the brainstem the volume doses D(1%), D(2%) were taken for analyzing the higher doses in the brain stem. The dose fall off was analyzed in terms of D(5%) and D(10%). The mean value of maximum dose within the trigeminal nerve target was 73.5±2.1Gy (P=0.0007) and the minimum dose was 50.0±4.1Gy (P=0.1315). The mean conformity index was 2.19 and the probable reason could be the smallest CyberKnife collimator of 5mm used in the treatment plan. The mean D(1%), of the brainstem was 10.5± 2.1Gy (P=0.5316) and the mean value of the maximum point dose within the brainstem was 35.6±3.8Gy. This shows the degree of dose fall off within the brainstem. Though the results of the present study are showing superior sparing of brain stem and reasonable of target coverage, it is necessary to execute the treatment plan with greater accuracy in CyberKnife as the immobilization is noninvasive and frameless.

  17. Capsaicin: a potent inhibitor of carbonic anhydrase isoenzymes.

    PubMed

    Arabaci, Betul; Gulcin, Ilhami; Alwasel, Saleh

    2014-07-10

    Carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) is a zinc containing metalloenzyme that catalyzes the rapid and reversible conversion of carbon dioxide (CO2) and water (H2O) into a proton (H+) and bicarbonate (HCO3-) ion. On the other hand, capsaicin is the main component in hot chili peppers and is used extensively used in spices, food additives and drugs; it is responsible for their spicy flavor and pungent taste. There are sixteen known CA isoforms in humans. Human CA isoenzymes I, and II (hCA I and hCA II) are ubiquitous cytosolic isoforms. In this study, the inhibition properties of capsaicin against the slow cytosolic isoform hCA I, and the ubiquitous and dominant rapid cytosolic isozymes hCA II were studied. Both CA isozymes were inhibited by capsaicin in the micromolar range. This naturally bioactive compound has a Ki of 696.15 µM against hCA I, and of 208.37 µM against hCA II.

  18. Sensitization of capsaicin and icilin responses in oxaliplatin treated adult rat DRG neurons

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Oxaliplatin chemotherapy induced neuropathy is a dose related cumulative toxicity that manifests as tingling, numbness, and chronic pain, compromising the quality of life and leading to discontinued chemotherapy. Patients report marked hypersensitivity to cold stimuli at early stages of treatment, when sensory testing reveals cold and heat hyperalgesia. This study examined the morphological and functional effects of oxaliplatin treatment in cultured adult rat DRG neurons. Results 48 hour exposure to oxaliplatin resulted in dose related reduction in neurite length, density, and number of neurons compared to vehicle treated controls, using Gap43 immunostaining. Neurons treated acutely with 20 μg/ml oxaliplatin showed significantly higher signal intensity for cyclic AMP immunofluorescence (160.5 ± 13 a.u., n = 3, P < 0.05), compared to controls (120.3 ± 4 a.u.). Calcium imaging showed significantly enhanced capsaicin (TRPV1 agonist), responses after acute 20 μg/ml oxaliplatin treatment where the second of paired capsaicin responses increased from 80.7 ± 0.6% without oxaliplatin, to 171.26 ± 29% with oxaliplatin, (n = 6 paired t test, P < 0.05); this was reduced to 81.42 ± 8.1% (P < 0.05), by pretretreatment with the cannabinoid CB2 receptor agonist GW 833972. Chronic oxaliplatin treatment also resulted in dose related increases in capsaicin responses. Similarly, second responses to icilin (TRPA1/TRPM8 agonist), were enhanced after acute (143.85 ± 7%, P = 0.004, unpaired t test, n = 3), and chronic (119.7 ± 11.8%, P < 0.05, n = 3) oxaliplatin treatment, compared to control (85.3 ± 1.7%). Responses to the selective TRPM8 agonist WS-12 were not affected. Conclusions Oxaliplatin treatment induces TRP sensitization mediated by increased intracellular cAMP, which may cause neuronal damage. These effects may be mitigated by co-treatment with adenylyl cyclase inhibitors, like CB2 agonists, to alleviate the neurotoxic effects of oxaliplatin. PMID:21106058

  19. RPF151, a novel capsaicin-like analogue: in vitro studies and in vivo preclinical antitumor evaluation in a breast cancer model.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Adilson Kleber; Tavares, Maurício Temotheo; Pasqualoto, Kerly Fernanda Mesquita; de Azevedo, Ricardo Alexandre; Teixeira, Sarah Fernandes; Ferreira-Junior, Wilson Alves; Bertin, Ariane Matiello; de-Sá-Junior, Paulo Luiz; Barbuto, José Alexandre Marzagão; Figueiredo, Carlos Rogério; Cury, Yara; Damião, Mariana Celestina Frojuello Costa Bernstorff; Parise-Filho, Roberto

    2015-09-01

    Capsaicin, the primary pungent component of the chili pepper, has antitumor activity. Herein, we describe the activity of RPF151, an alkyl sulfonamide analogue of capsaicin, against MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. RPF151 was synthetized, and molecular modeling was used to compare capsaicin and RPF151. Cytotoxicity of RPF151 on MDA-MB-231 was also evaluated by the 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Cell cycle analysis, by flow cytometry, and Western blot analysis of cycle-related proteins were used to evaluate the antiproliferative mechanisms. Apoptosis was evaluated by phosphatidyl-serine externalization, cleavage of Ac-YVAD-AMC, and Bcl-2 expression. The production of reactive oxygen species was evaluated by flow cytometry. RPF151 in vivo antitumor effects were investigated in murine MDA-MB-231 model. This study shows that RPF151 downregulated p21 and cyclins A, D1, and D3, leading to S-phase arrest and apoptosis. Although RPF151 has induced the activation of TRPV-1 and TRAIL-R1/DR4 and TRAIL-2/DR5 on the surface of MDA-MB-231 cells, its in vivo antitumor activity was TRPV-1-independent, thus suggesting that RPF151 should not have the same pungency-based limitation of capsaicin. In silico analysis corroborated the biological findings, showing that RPF151 has physicochemical improvements over capsaicin. Overall, the activity of RPF151 against MDA-MB-231 and its lower pungency suggest that it may have a relevant role in cancer therapy.

  20. Acute peripheral facial palsy: is there a trigeminal nerve involvement?

    PubMed

    Uluduz, Derya; Kiziltan, Meral E; Akalin, Mehmet Ali

    2010-07-26

    The aim of this study was to investigate trigeminal nerve involvement in patients with peripheral facial palsy. In total, 25 patients with facial nerve palsy and 19 controls were tested by electrophysiological methods regarding their facial and trigeminal nerve functions within 1 month after disease onset. The presence of an abnormal blink reflex was determined in patients with peripheral facial palsy by comparing paralytic and non-paralytic sides (12.3+/-1.1 and 10.8+/-1.3, respectively; p=0.001). However, the average masseter inhibitory reflex difference between the paretic and non-paralytic sides of patients compared with the corresponding side-to-side comparison for controls was not statistically significant. The masseter inhibitory reflex response was abnormal in some cases. These findings suggest that the masseter inhibitory reflex, a trigemino-trigeminal reflex, was normal in most of our patients with peripheral facial palsy, but may be abnormal in individual cases. Our study showed that subclinical disorders affecting the trigeminal pathways occur in individual patients with idiopathic facial palsy, while the majority of patients have no trigeminal nerve involvement.

  1. Classification issues related to neuropathic trigeminal pain.

    PubMed

    Zakrzewska, Joanna M

    2004-01-01

    The goal of a classification system of medical conditions is to facilitate accurate communication, to ensure that each condition is described uniformly and universally and that all data banks for the storage and retrieval of research and clinical data related to the conditions are consistent. Classification entails deciding which kinds of diagnostic entities should be recognized and how to order them in a meaningful way. Currently there are 3 major pain classification systems of relevance to orofacial pain: The International Association for the Study of Pain classification system, the International Headache Society classification system, and the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD). All use different methodologies, and only the RDC/TMD take into account social and psychologic factors in the classification of conditions. Classification systems need to be reliable, valid, comprehensive, generalizable, and flexible, and they need to be tested using consensus views of experts as well as the available literature. There is an urgent need for a robust classification system for neuropathic trigeminal pain.

  2. Capsaicin and dihydrocapsaicin determination in chili pepper genotypes using ultra-fast liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Usman, Magaji G; Rafii, Mohd Y; Ismail, Mohd R; Malek, Md Abdul; Latif, Mohammad Abdul

    2014-05-21

    Research was carried out to estimate the levels of capsaicin and dihydrocapsaicin that may be found in some heat tolerant chili pepper genotypes and to determine the degree of pungency as well as percentage capsaicin content of each of the analyzed peppers. A sensitive, precise, and specific ultra fast liquid chromatographic (UFLC) system was used for the separation, identification and quantitation of the capsaicinoids and the extraction solvent was acetonitrile. The method validation parameters, including linearity, precision, accuracy and recovery, yielded good results. Thus, the limit of detection was 0.045 µg/kg and 0.151 µg/kg for capsaicin and dihydrocapsaicin, respectively, whereas the limit of quantitation was 0.11 µg/kg and 0.368 µg/kg for capsaicin and dihydrocapsaicin. The calibration graph was linear from 0.05 to 0.50 µg/g for UFLC analysis. The inter- and intra-day precisions (relative standard deviation) were <5.0% for capsaicin and <9.9% for dihydrocapsaicin while the average recoveries obtained were quantitative (89.4%-90.1% for capsaicin, 92.4%-95.2% for dihydrocapsaicin), indicating good accuracy of the UFLC method. AVPP0705, AVPP0506, AVPP0104, AVPP0002, C05573 and AVPP0805 showed the highest concentration of capsaicin (12,776, 5,828, 4,393, 4,760, 3,764 and 4,120 µg/kg) and the highest pungency level, whereas AVPP9703, AVPP0512, AVPP0307, AVPP0803 and AVPP0102 recorded no detection of capsaicin and hence were non-pungent. All chili peppers studied except AVPP9703, AVPP0512, AVPP0307, AVPP0803 and AVPP0102 could serve as potential sources of capsaicin. On the other hand, only genotypes AVPP0506, AVPP0104, AVPP0002, C05573 and AVPP0805 gave a % capsaicin content that falls within the pungency limit that could make them recommendable as potential sources of capsaicin for the pharmaceutical industry.

  3. [Transformation of trigeminal nerve tumor into malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST)].

    PubMed

    Nenashev, E A; Cherekaev, V A; Kadasheva, A B; Kozlov, A V; Rotin, D L; Stepanian, M A

    2012-01-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) is a rare entity with only 18 cases of trigeminal nerve MPNST described by now and only one report of malignant transformation of trigeminal nerve tumor into MPNST published up to date. One more case of malignant transformation of trigeminal nerve (1st division) tumor into MPNST is demonstrated.

  4. 5-HT7 receptor activation inhibits mechanical hypersensitivity secondary to capsaicin sensitization in mice.

    PubMed

    Brenchat, Alex; Romero, Luz; García, Mónica; Pujol, Marta; Burgueño, Javier; Torrens, Antoni; Hamon, Michel; Baeyens, José Manuel; Buschmann, Helmut; Zamanillo, Daniel; Vela, José Miguel

    2009-02-01

    This work aimed to evaluate the potential role of the 5-HT(7) receptor in nociception secondary to a sensitizing stimulus in mice. For this purpose, the effects of relevant ligands (5-HT(7) receptor agonists: AS-19, MSD-5a, E-55888; 5-HT(7) receptor antagonists: SB-258719, SB-269970; 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist: F-13640; 5-HT(1A) receptor antagonist: WAY-100635) were assessed on capsaicin-induced mechanical hypersensitivity, a pain behavior involving hypersensitivity of dorsal horn neurons (central sensitization). For the 5-HT(7) receptor agonists used, binding profile and intrinsic efficacy to stimulate cAMP formation in HEK-293F cells expressing the human 5-HT(7) receptor were also evaluated. AS-19 and E-55888 were selective for 5-HT(7) receptors. E-55888 was a full agonist whereas AS-19 and MSD-5a behaved as partial agonists, with maximal effects corresponding to 77% and 61%, respectively, of the cAMP response evoked by the full agonist 5-HT. Our in vivo results revealed that systemic administration of 5-HT(7) receptor agonists exerted a clear-cut dose-dependent antinociceptive effect that was prevented by 5-HT(7) receptor antagonists, but not by the 5-HT(1A) receptor antagonist. The order of efficacy (E-55888>AS-19>MSD-5a) matched their in vitro efficacy as 5-HT(7) receptor agonists. Contrary to agonists, a dose-dependent promotion of mechanical hypersensitivity was observed after administration of 5-HT(7) receptor antagonists, substantiating the involvement of the 5-HT(7) receptor in the control of capsaicin-induced mechanical hypersensitivity. These findings suggest that serotonin exerts an inhibitory role in the control of nociception through activation of 5-HT(7) receptors, and point to a new potential therapeutic use of 5-HT(7) receptor agonists in the field of analgesia.

  5. Substantial role of locus coeruleus-noradrenergic activation and capsaicin-insensitive primary afferent fibers in bee venom's anti-inflammatory effect.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Young Bae; Yoon, Seo Yeon; Kim, Hyun Woo; Roh, Dae Hyun; Kang, Seuk Yun; Ryu, Yeon Hee; Choi, Sun Mi; Han, Ho Jae; Lee, Hye Jung; Kim, Kee Won; Beitz, Alvin J; Lee, Jang Hern

    2006-06-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate significant interactions between the immune and nervous systems. Our recent study reveals that 'bee venom (BV) induced anti-inflammatory effect' (BVAI) was produced by sympathetic preganglionic neuronal activation and subsequent adrenomedullary catecholamine release in a zymosan-induced inflammation model. However, the specific peripheral input and the supraspinal neuronal systems that are involved in this BVAI remain to be defined. Here we show that subcutaneous BV injection into left hind limb significantly reduces zymosan-induced leukocyte migration and that this effect is completely inhibited by denervation of the left sciatic nerve. This BVAI was not affected by the destruction of capsaicin-sensitive primary afferent fibers using either neonatal capsaicin or resiniferatoxin (RTX) pretreatment. BV injection into the left hind limb significantly increased Fos expression in the contralateral locus coeruleus (LC) in non-inflamed mice. In zymosan-inflamed mice, BV injection produced a further increase in LC Fos expression as compared with non-inflamed mice. This BV-induced Fos increase in the LC was not affected by RTX pretreatment. Pharmacological blockage of central noradrenergic activity by either central chemical sympathectomy (i.c.v. 6-hydroxydopamine) or alpha2 adrenoceptor antagonism (i.c.v. idazoxan) completely blocked BVAI. Taken together, these results suggest that BVAI is mediated by peripheral activation of capsaicin-insensitive primary afferent fibers and subsequent central noradrenergic activation including the LC.

  6. Acupuncture for episodic cluster headache: a trigeminal approach.

    PubMed

    Hayhoe, Simon

    2015-09-10

    Following evidence that acupuncture is clinically feasible and cost-effective in the treatment of headache, the UK National Institute for Health and Care Excellence recommends acupuncture as prophylactic treatment for migraine and tension headache. There has thus been expectation that other forms of headache should benefit also. Unfortunately, acupuncture has not generally been successful for cluster headache. This may be due to acupuncturists approaching the problem as one of severe migraine. In fact, cluster headache is classed as a trigeminal autonomic cephalgia. In this case report, episodic cluster headache is treated in the same way as has been shown effective for trigeminal neuralgia. Acupuncture is applied to the contralateral side at points appropriate for stimulating branches of the trigeminal nerve. Thus, ST2 is used for the infraorbital nerve, BL2 and Yuyao for the supratrochlear and supraorbital nerves, and Taiyang for the temporal branch of the zygomatic nerve.

  7. Evidence for a novel bursting mechanism in rodent trigeminal neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Del Negro, C A; Hsiao, C F; Chandler, S H; Garfinkel, A

    1998-01-01

    We investigated bursting behavior in rodent trigeminal neurons. The essential mechanisms operating in the biological systems were determined based on testable predictions of mathematical models. Bursting activity in trigeminal motoneurons is consistent with a traditional mechanism employing a region of negative slope resistance in the steady-state current-voltage relationship (Smith, T. G. 1975. Nature. 253:450-452). However, the bursting dynamics of trigeminal interneurons is inconsistent with the traditional mechanisms, and is far more effectively explained by a new model of bursting that exploits the unique stability properties associated with spike threshold (Baer, S. M., T. Erneux, and J. Rinzel. 1989. SIAM J. Appl. Math. 49:55-71). PMID:9649377

  8. Capsicum and capsaicin--a review: case report of the use of hot peppers in child abuse.

    PubMed

    Tominack, R L; Spyker, D A

    1987-01-01

    Capsaicin, the active principle of hot peppers of the genus Capsicum, exhibits broad bioactivity. It targets neuronal structures which contain substance P, clinically seen as gastrointestinal and dermatologic irritation, bronchospasm and fibrinolysis. As a research tool, capsaicin profoundly alters neurologic anatomy and function. We review the toxicity of capsaicin and comment briefly on the use of hot peppers in child abuse.

  9. Unravelling the Mystery of Capsaicin: A Tool to Understand and Treat Pain

    PubMed Central

    Brock, Christina; Olesen, Anne Estrup; Andresen, Trine; Nilsson, Matias; Dickenson, Anthony H.

    2012-01-01

    A large number of pharmacological studies have used capsaicin as a tool to activate many physiological systems, with an emphasis on pain research but also including functions such as the cardiovascular system, the respiratory system, and the urinary tract. Understanding the actions of capsaicin led to the discovery its receptor, transient receptor potential (TRP) vanilloid subfamily member 1 (TRPV1), part of the superfamily of TRP receptors, sensing external events. This receptor is found on key fine sensory afferents, and so the use of capsaicin to selectively activate pain afferents has been exploited in animal studies, human psychophysics, and imaging studies. Its effects depend on the dose and route of administration and may include sensitization, desensitization, withdrawal of afferent nerve terminals, or even overt death of afferent fibers. The ability of capsaicin to generate central hypersensitivity has been valuable in understanding the consequences and mechanisms behind enhanced central processing of pain. In addition, capsaicin has been used as a therapeutic agent when applied topically, and antagonists of the TRPV1 receptor have been developed. Overall, the numerous uses for capsaicin are clear; hence, the rationale of this review is to bring together and discuss the different types of studies that exploit these actions to shed light upon capsaicin working both as a tool to understand pain but also as a treatment for chronic pain. This review will discuss the various actions of capsaicin and how it lends itself to these different purposes. PMID:23023032

  10. Administration of ciprofloxacin and capsaicin in rats to achieve higher maximal serum concentrations.

    PubMed

    Sumano-López, Héctor; Gutiérrez-Olvera, Lilia; Aguilera-Jiménez, Rita; Gutiérrez-Olvera, Carlos; Jiménez-Gómez, Francisco

    2007-01-01

    To test if capsaicin could improve the bioavailability of ciprofloxacin (1-cyclopropyl-6-fluoro-1,4-dihydro-4-oxo-7-(1-piperazinyl)-3-quinolinecarboxylic acid, CAS 85721-33-1, Bay q 3939) in rats, 0.01, 0.1, 0.5 and 1% capsaicin ((E)-N-[(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)methyl]-8-methyl-6-nonenamide, trans-8-methyl-N-vanillyl-6-nonenamide, CAS 404-86-4) dissolved in ethanol and mixed with 20 mg/kg of ciprofloxacin were orally administered to groups of 10 rats each. Control groups were dosed with capsaicin-free, ethanol-containing or ethanol-free ciprofloxacin. Reference intravenous pharmacokinetics of ciprofloxacin was also established. The results revealed that capsaicin increased ciprofloxacin bioavailability by approximately 70% in groups receiving preparations containing capsaicin at a rate of 0.01, 0.1 and 0.5%. Higher concentrations failed to further increase bioavailability. However, capsaicin appears to have little or no impact on the rate of absorption or clearance of ciprofloxacin. Considering that 0.01% or 0.1% capsaicin are unlikely to upset the gastrointestinal tract, it may be worth attempting to study if a similar effect occurs in man, and to evaluate if the addition of capsaicin can be used as a method to increase the area under the curve/minimum inhibitory concentration rate, a key variable to improve clinical efficacy of ciprofloxacin.

  11. In vitro percutaneous penetration of topically applied capsaicin in relation to in vivo sensation responses.

    PubMed

    Magnusson, B M; Koskinen, L D

    2000-02-15

    Capsaicin, the primary pungent element in several spices, elicits a variety of physiological effects which are due to neurogenic responses. The aim of the study was to explore the in vivo sensation responses of capsaicin and to compare the results with the in vitro percutaneous absorption of the substance. The overall objectives were to determining an in vitro-in vivo correlation for capsaicin. Capsaicin was applied in a chamber on the volar forearm of twelve volunteers and in a flow-through diffusion chamber on excised human epidermal membranes. Topical administration of capsaicin produced a complex cutaneous sensation that changed in intensity and quality as a function of time and was characterized by sting, prick, burn and pain. Percutaneous steady-state penetrations of capsaicin with a receptor fluid consisting either of 4% bovine serum albumin in phosphate buffered saline or 50% ethanol in water were 28.2+/-2.7 and 29.6+/-2.9 microg/cm(2) per h, respectively. The corresponding cumulative penetrated amounts of capsaicin after 30 min were 14. 7+/-1.7 and 19.2+/-2.1 microg/cm(2), respectively. The present investigation indicates that there is a good correlation between in vivo physiological responses and in vitro percutaneous penetration of topically applied capsaicin.

  12. Characterization of cardiovascular reflexes evoked by airway stimulation with allylisothiocyanate, capsaicin, and ATP in Sprague-Dawley rats

    PubMed Central

    Hooper, J. S.; Hadley, S. H.; Morris, K. F.; Breslin, J. W.; Dean, J. B.

    2015-01-01

    Acute inhalation of airborne pollutants alters cardiovascular function and evidence suggests that pollutant-induced activation of airway sensory nerves via the gating of ion channels is critical to these systemic responses. Here, we have investigated the effect of capsaicin [transient receptor potential (TRP) vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) agonist], AITC [TRP ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) agonist], and ATP (P2X2/3 agonist) on bronchopulmonary sensory activity and cardiovascular responses of conscious Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Single fiber recordings show that allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) and capsaicin selectively activate C fibers, whereas subpopulations of both A and C fibers are activated by stimulation of P2X2/3 receptors. Inhalation of the agonists by conscious rats caused significant bradycardia, atrioventricular (AV) block, and prolonged PR intervals, although ATP-induced responses were lesser than those evoked by AITC or capsaicin. Responses to AITC were inhibited by the TRP channel blocker ruthenium red and the muscarinic antagonist atropine. AITC inhalation also caused a biphasic blood pressure response: a brief hypertensive phase followed by a hypotensive phase. Atropine accentuated the hypertensive phase, while preventing the hypotension. AITC-evoked bradycardia was not abolished by terazosin, the α1-adrenoceptor inhibitor, which prevented the hypertensive response. Anesthetics had profound effects on AITC-evoked bradycardia and AV block, which was abolished by urethane, ketamine, and isoflurane. Nevertheless, AITC inhalation caused bradycardia and AV block in paralyzed and ventilated rats following precollicular decerebration. In conclusion, we provide evidence that activation of ion channels expressed on nociceptive airway sensory nerves causes significant cardiovascular effects in conscious SD rats via reflex modulation of the autonomic nervous system. PMID:26718787

  13. Trigeminal projections to thalamus and subthalamus in the hedgehog tenrec.

    PubMed

    Künzle, H

    1998-09-01

    The objective of the present study was the identification and characterization of the trigemino-diencephalic target areas in the Madagascan lesser hedgehog tenrec in order to get a more comprehensive view on the mammalian somatosensory thalamus, its evolution and representation in different species. Such an analysis has been considered important because in lower mammals the head and face are relatively well represented, but their ascending trigeminal projections have scarcely been analysed. Following injections of different tracer substances into the rostral and caudal portions of the trigeminal nuclear complex the most prominent area of termination was found in the medial ventroposterior nucleus. These projections were patchy and scarcely overlapped the region previously shown to receive spinal and dorsal column nuclear afferents. On the basis of the laterality and the intensity of the projections, two subdivisions were distinguished, the principal portion and the accessory portion receiving a dense contralateral and a weak bilateral input, respectively. They were considered equivalents to the magnocellular and parvocellular subdivisions of the medial ventroposterior nucleus in more differentiated mammals. In the latter species, however, the overlap between trigeminal and parabrachial fibres appears less extensive than in the tenrec. In addition, a weak bilateral projection was shown from the caudal trigeminal nucleus to the caudal and dorsal subdivision of the nucleus submedius. There was little, if any evidence for a trigeminal projection to the intralaminar nuclei and we failed to identify a correlate to the posterior nuclear complex of higher mammals. On the other hand, there was a distinct contralateral projection to the ventral portion of the zona incerta. This projection was of similar strength as the projection to the medial ventroposterior nucleus; it supports the notion that the zona incerta may play a crucial role in relaying trigeminal information.

  14. [A case of combined glossopharyngeal and trigeminal neuralgia].

    PubMed

    Katoh, Masahito; Aida, Toshimitsu; Moriwaki, Takuya; Yoshino, Masami; Aoki, Takeshi; Abumiya, Takeo; Imamura, Hiroyuki; Ogata, Akihiko

    2012-06-01

    It is well-known that idiopathic neuralgias of the trigeminal and glossopharyngeal nerves are caused by vascular compression at the root entry zone of the cranial nerves. Because they are functional diseases, initial treatment is medical, especially with carbamazepine. However, if medical therapy fails to adequately manage the pain, microvascular decompression (MVD) is prescribed. Glossopharyngeal neuralgia is rare, and combined trigeminal and glossopharyngeal neuralgia is an extremely rare disorder. A 70-year-old woman presented herself to Hokkaido Neurosurgical Memorial Hospital because of paroxysms of lancinating pain in her left pharynx and another lancinating pain in her left cheek. Carbamazepine, which was prescribed at another hospital, favorably relieved the pain; however, drug eruption compelled her to discontinue the medication. The multi-volume method revealed that a root entry zone of the left glossopharyngeal nerve was compressed by the left posterior inferior cerebellar artery, and the left trigeminal artery was compressed by the left superior cerebellar artery. MVD for both nerves was performed employing a left lateral suboccipital craniotomy. She experienced complete relief of pain immediately after MVD. Combined trigeminal and glossopharyngeal neuralgia is extremely rare, but some groups noted a relatively high incidence of concurrent trigeminal neuralgia in patients with glossopharyngeal neuralgia up until the 1970's. Glossopharyngeal neuralgia includes pain near the gonion; therefore, there is an overlap of symptoms between glossopharyngeal and trigeminal neuralgias. By virtue of recent progress in imaging technology, minute preoperative evaluations of microvascular compression are possible. Until the 1970's, there might have been some misunderstanding regarding the overlap of symptoms because of lack of the concept of microvascular compression as a cause of neuralgia and rudimentary imaging technology. Minute evaluations of both symptoms and

  15. A potent and selective calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonist, MK-8825, inhibits responses to nociceptive trigeminal activation: Role of CGRP in orofacial pain.

    PubMed

    Romero-Reyes, Marcela; Pardi, Vanessa; Akerman, Simon

    2015-09-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) are orofacial pains within the trigeminal distribution, which involve the masticatory musculature, the temporomandibular joint or both. Their pathophysiology remains unclear, as inflammatory mediators are thought to be involved, and clinically TMD presents pain and sometimes limitation of function, but often appears without gross indications of local inflammation, such as visible edema, redness and increase in temperature. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) has been implicated in other pain disorders with trigeminal distribution, such as migraine, of which TMD shares a significant co-morbidity. CGRP causes activation and sensitization of trigeminal primary afferent neurons, independent of any inflammatory mechanisms, and thus may also be involved in TMD. Here we used a small molecule, selective CGRP receptor antagonist, MK-8825, to dissect the role of CGRP in inducing spontaneous nociceptive facial grooming behaviors, neuronal activation in the trigeminal nucleus, and systemic release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, in a mouse model of acute orofacial masseteric muscle pain that we have developed, as a surrogate of acute TMD. We show that CFA masseteric injection causes significant spontaneous orofacial pain behaviors, neuronal activation in the trigeminal nucleus, and release of interleukin-6 (IL-6). In mice pre-treated with MK-8825 there is a significant reduction in these spontaneous orofacial pain behaviors. Also, at 2 and 24h after CFA injection the level of Fos immunoreactivity in the trigeminal nucleus, used as a marker of neuronal activation, was much lower on both ipsilateral and contralateral sides after pre-treatment with MK-8825. There was no effect of MK-8825 on the release of IL-6. These data suggest that CGRP may be involved in TMD pathophysiology, but not via inflammatory mechanisms, at least in the acute stage. Furthermore, CGRP receptor antagonists may have therapeutic efficacy in the treatment of TMD, as they

  16. Calcium Channel α2δ1 Proteins Mediate Trigeminal Neuropathic Pain States Associated with Aberrant Excitatory Synaptogenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kang-Wu; Yu, Yanhui Peter; Zhou, Chunyi; Kim, Doo-Sik; Lin, Bin; Sharp, Kelli; Steward, Oswald; Luo, Z. David

    2014-01-01

    To investigate a potential mechanism underlying trigeminal nerve injury-induced orofacial hypersensitivity, we used a rat model of chronic constriction injury to the infraorbital nerve (CCI-ION) to study whether CCI-ION caused calcium channel α2δ1 (Cavα2δ1) protein dysregulation in trigeminal ganglia and associated spinal subnucleus caudalis and C1/C2 cervical dorsal spinal cord (Vc/C2). Furthermore, we studied whether this neuroplasticity contributed to spinal neuron sensitization and neuropathic pain states. CCI-ION caused orofacial hypersensitivity that correlated with Cavα2δ1 up-regulation in trigeminal ganglion neurons and Vc/C2. Blocking Cavα2δ1 with gabapentin, a ligand for the Cavα2δ1 proteins, or Cavα2δ1 antisense oligodeoxynucleotides led to a reversal of orofacial hypersensitivity, supporting an important role of Cavα2δ1 in orofacial pain processing. Importantly, increased Cavα2δ1 in Vc/C2 superficial dorsal horn was associated with increased excitatory synaptogenesis and increased frequency, but not the amplitude, of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents in dorsal horn neurons that could be blocked by gabapentin. Thus, CCI-ION-induced Cavα2δ1 up-regulation may contribute to orofacial neuropathic pain states through abnormal excitatory synapse formation and enhanced presynaptic excitatory neurotransmitter release in Vc/C2. PMID:24459143

  17. The anatomy of vascular compression in trigeminal neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Krystin L; Vilensky, Joel A

    2014-01-01

    The etiological basis of trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is unknown but vascular (arterial and venous) compression of the trigeminal nerve roots has emerged as the likely cause in most cases. Here we examine the evidence for the "brain sagging/arterial elongation hypothesis" with reference to the cerebral arteries and veins believed to cause the compression. Most often implicated are the superior cerebellar artery, the anterior and posterior inferior cerebellar arteries, and the superior petrosal vein including several of its tributaries. The reviewed data suggest that the theoretical support for a vascular compressive etiology of TN is weak, albeit the surgical outcome data are relatively convincing.

  18. Trigeminal hypoplasia due to vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia: A new entity

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Abhishek; Gupta, Prakhar; Haroon, Mohammad; Shah, Gaurav; Gupta, Gagan; Khalid, Mohd.

    2015-01-01

    The term “vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia” refers to anomalous dilatation of the intracranial arteries associated with elongation or tortuosity of the affected vessels. The etiology of the disease is unknown and is usually detected incidentally. The predominant clinical manifestations arise due to the mass effect of the dilated vessels and may include cranial nerve compression, extrinsic aqueductal compression, motor and sensory disturbances. Trigeminal hypoplasia is a very uncommon condition, usually described in association with Goldenhar-Gorlin syndrome and has not yet been attributed to vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia. The current case report highlights this rare association of trigeminal nerve hypoplasia and vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia, leading to hemifacial and corneal anesthesia. PMID:26167222

  19. Exposure to Allergen Causes Changes in NTS Neural Activities after Intratracheal Capsaicin Application, in Endocannabinoid Levels and in the Glia Morphology of NTS

    PubMed Central

    Spaziano, Giuseppe; Petrosino, Stefania; Matteis, Maria; Palazzo, Enza; Sullo, Nikol; de Novellis, Vito; Rossi, Francesco; Maione, Sabatino; D'Agostino, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Allergen exposure may induce changes in the brainstem secondary neurons, with neural sensitization of the nucleus solitary tract (NTS), which in turn can be considered one of the causes of the airway hyperresponsiveness, a characteristic feature of asthma. We evaluated neurofunctional, morphological, and biochemical changes in the NTS of naive or sensitized rats. To evaluate the cell firing activity of NTS, in vivo electrophysiological experiments were performed before and after capsaicin challenge in sensitized or naive rats. Immunohistochemical studies, endocannabinoid, and palmitoylethanolamide quantification in the NTS were also performed. This study provides evidence that allergen sensitization in the NTS induced: (1) increase in the neural firing response to intratracheal capsaicin application, (2) increase of endocannabinoid anandamide and palmitoylethanolamide, a reduction of 2-arachidonoylglycerol levels in the NTS, (3) glial cell activation, and (4) prevention by a Group III metabotropic glutamate receptor activation of neural firing response to intratracheal application of capsaicin in both naïve and sensitized rats. Therefore, normalization of ovalbumin-induced NTS neural sensitization could open up the prospect of new treatments based on the recovery of specific brain nuclei function and for extensive studies on acute or long-term efficacy of selective mGlu ligand, in models of bronchial hyperreactivity. PMID:25866824

  20. Capsaicin in hot chili pepper: carcinogen, co-carcinogen or anticarcinogen?

    PubMed

    Surh, Y J; Lee, S S

    1996-03-01

    Capsaicin (trans-8-methyl-N-vanillyl-6-nonenamide) is a major pungent ingredient of the Capsicum fruits such as hot green and red peppers. Besides its use as a food additive in various spicy cuisines, capsaicin is currently utilized for therapeutic purposes to treat various peripheral painful conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and diabetic neuropathy. Considering consumption of capsaicin as a food additive and its current medicinal application in humans, correct evaluation and precise assessment of any harmful effects of this compound are essential from the public health standpoint. Numerous investigations have been conducted to determine the potential mutagenic and carcinogenic activity of capsaicin and chili pepper, but results are discordant. This review briefly examines findings in the literature of studies testing mutagenicity and tumorigenicity of capsaicin and presents a possible mechanistic basis for the dual effects exerted by the compound.

  1. Glutamate dysregulation in the trigeminal ganglion: a novel mechanism for peripheral sensitization of the craniofacial region.

    PubMed

    Laursen, J C; Cairns, B E; Dong, X D; Kumar, U; Somvanshi, R K; Arendt-Nielsen, L; Gazerani, P

    2014-01-03

    In the trigeminal ganglion (TG), satellite glial cells (SGCs) form a functional unit with neurons. It has been proposed that SGCs participate in regulating extracellular glutamate levels and that dysfunction of this SGC capacity can impact nociceptive transmission in craniofacial pain conditions. This study investigated whether SGCs release glutamate and whether elevation of TG glutamate concentration alters response properties of trigeminal afferent fibers. Immunohistochemistry was used to assess glutamate content and the expression of excitatory amino acid transporter (EAAT)1 and EAAT2 in TG sections. SGCs contained glutamate and expressed EAAT1 and EAAT2. Potassium chloride (10 mM) was used to evoke glutamate release from cultured rat SGCs treated with the EAAT1/2 inhibitor (3S)-3-[[3-[[4-(trifluoromethyl)ben zoyl]amino]phenyl]methoxy]-L-aspartic acid (TFB-TBOA) or control. Treatment with TFB-TBOA (1 and 10 μM) significantly reduced the glutamate concentration from 10.6 ± 1.1 to 5.8 ± 1.4 μM and 3.0 ± 0.8 μM, respectively (p<0.05). Electrophysiology experiments were conducted in anaesthetized rats to determine the effect of intraganglionic injections of glutamate on the response properties of ganglion neurons that innervated either the temporalis or masseter muscle. Intraganglionic injection of glutamate (500 mM, 3 μl) evoked afferent discharge and significantly reduced muscle afferent mechanical threshold. Glutamate-evoked discharge was attenuated bythe N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist 2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate (APV) and increased by TFB-TBOA, whereas mechanical sensitization was only sensitive to APV. Antidromic invasion of muscle afferent fibers by electrical stimulation of the caudal brainstem (10 Hz) or local anesthesia of the brainstem with lidocaine did not alter glutamate-induced mechanical sensitization. These findings provide a novel mechanism whereby dysfunctional trigeminal SGCs could contribute to cranial muscle tenderness in

  2. Antinociceptive Effects of Transcytosed Botulinum Neurotoxin Type A on Trigeminal Nociception in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hye-Jin; Lee, Geun-Woo; Kim, Min-Ji; Yang, Kui-Ye; Kim, Seong-Taek; Bae, Yong-Cheol

    2015-01-01

    We examined the effects of peripherally or centrally administered botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT-A) on orofacial inflammatory pain to evaluate the antinociceptive effect of BoNT-A and its underlying mechanisms. The experiments were carried out on male Sprague-Dawley rats. Subcutaneous (3 U/kg) or intracisternal (0.3 or 1 U/kg) administration of BoNT-A significantly inhibited the formalin-induced nociceptive response in the second phase. Both subcutaneous (1 or 3 U/kg) and intracisternal (0.3 or 1 U/kg) injection of BoNT-A increased the latency of head withdrawal response in the complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-treated rats. Intracisternal administration of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) evoked nociceptive behavior via the activation of trigeminal neurons, which was attenuated by the subcutaneous or intracisternal injection of BoNT-A. Intracisternal injection of NMDA up-regulated c-Fos expression in the trigeminal neurons of the medullary dorsal horn. Subcutaneous (3 U/kg) or intracisternal (1 U/kg) administration of BoNT-A significantly reduced the number of c-Fos immunoreactive neurons in the NMDA-treated rats. These results suggest that the central antinociceptive effects the peripherally or centrally administered BoNT-A are mediated by transcytosed BoNT-A or direct inhibition of trigeminal neurons. Our data suggest that central targets of BoNT-A might provide a new therapeutic tool for the treatment of orofacial chronic pain conditions. PMID:26170739

  3. Oxaliplatin enhances gap junction-mediated coupling in cell cultures of mouse trigeminal ganglia.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Jeppe Nørgaard; Warwick, Rebekah; Duroux, Meg; Hanani, Menachem; Gazerani, Parisa

    2015-08-01

    Communications between satellite glial cells and neighboring neurons within sensory ganglia may contribute to neuropathic and inflammatory pain. To elucidate the role of satellite glial cells in chemotherapy-induced pain, we examined the effects of oxaliplatin on the gap junction-mediated coupling between these cells. We also examined whether the gap junction blocker, carbenoxolone, can reverse the coupling. Primary cultures of mice trigeminal ganglia, 24-48h after cell isolation, were used. Satellite glial cells were injected with Lucifer yellow in the presence or absence of oxaliplatin (60 μM). In addition, the effect of carbenoxolone (100 μM) on coupling, and the expression of connexin 43 proteins were evaluated. Dye coupling between adjacent satellite glial cells was significantly increased (2.3-fold, P<0.05) following a 2h incubation with oxaliplatin. Adding carbenoxolone to the oxaliplatin-treated cultures reversed oxaliplatin-evoked coupling to baseline (P<0.05). Immunostaining showed no difference between expression of connexin 43 in control and oxaliplatin-treated cultures. Our findings indicated that oxaliplatin-increased gap junction-mediated coupling between satellite glial cells in primary cultures of mouse trigeminal ganglia, and carbenoxolone reversed this effect. Hence, it is proposed that increased gap junction-mediated coupling was seen between satellite glial cells in TG. This observation together with our previous data obtained from a behavioral study suggests that this phenomenon might contribute to chemotherapy-induced nociception following oxaliplatin treatment.

  4. Novel CT-guided biopsy of isolated perineural spread of adenoid cystic carcinoma along the trigeminal nerve masquerading as chronic trigeminal neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Yong, Xian Zhang Eric; Dillon, Jonathan; Smith, Paul; Salinas-La Rosa, Cesar; Jhamb, Ashu

    2017-02-01

    The differential diagnoses for chronic peripheral neuropathy are broad and diagnosing a cause can be challenging. We present a case of isolated perineural spread of adenoid cystic carcinoma to the trigeminal nerve involving skull base foramina and Meckel's cave in the setting of chronic trigeminal neuropathy and no known prior malignancy. Computed tomography-guided core (CT) needle biopsy was needed to arrive at a diagnosis and a novel approach was required to obtain tissue from the trigeminal nerve lesion at foramen ovale.

  5. Influence of capsaicin infusion on secondary peristalsis in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Chih-Hsun; Lei, Wei-Yi; Hung, Jui-Sheng; Liu, Tso-Tsai; Chen, Chien-Lin; Pace, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine whether capsaicin infusion could influence heartburn perception and secondary peristalsis in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). METHODS Secondary peristalsis was performed with slow and rapid mid-esophageal injections of air in 10 patients with GERD. In a first protocol, saline and capsaicin-containing red pepper sauce infusions were randomly performed, whereas 2 consecutive sessions of capsaicin-containing red pepper sauce infusions were performed in a second protocol. Tested solutions including 5 mL of red pepper sauce diluted with 15 mL of saline and 20 mL of 0.9% saline were infused into the mid-esophagus via the manometric catheter at a rate of 10 mL/min with a randomized and double-blind fashion. During each study protocol, perception of heartburn, threshold volumes and peristaltic parameters for secondary peristalsis were analyzed and compared between different stimuli. RESULTS Infusion of capsaicin significantly increased heartburn perception in patients with GERD (P < 0.001), whereas repeated capsaicin infusion significantly reduced heartburn perception (P = 0.003). Acute capsaicin infusion decreased threshold volume of secondary peristalsis (P = 0.001) and increased its frequency (P = 0.01) during rapid air injection. The prevalence of GERD patients with successive secondary peristalsis during slow air injection significantly increased after capsaicin infusion (P = 0.001). Repeated capsaicin infusion increased threshold volume of secondary peristalsis (P = 0.002) and reduced the frequency of secondary peristalsis (P = 0.02) during rapid air injection. CONCLUSION Acute esophageal exposure to capsaicin enhances heartburn sensation and promotes secondary peristalsis in gastroesophageal reflux disease, but repetitive capsaicin infusion reverses these effects. PMID:28018112

  6. Differential effects of NGF and NT-3 on embryonic trigeminal axon growth patterns.

    PubMed

    Ulupinar, E; Jacquin, M F; Erzurumlu, R S

    2000-09-18

    We examined the effects of neurotrophins nerve growth factor (NGF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) on trigeminal axon growth patterns. Embryonic (E13-15) wholemount explants of the rat trigeminal pathway including the whisker pads, trigeminal ganglia, and brainstem were cultured in serum-free medium (SFM) or SFM supplemented with NGF or NT-3 for 3 days. Trigeminal axon growth patterns were analyzed with the use of lipophilic tracer DiI. In wholemount cultures grown in SFM, trigeminal axon projections, growth patterns, and differentiation of peripheral and central targets are similar to in vivo conditions. We show that in the presence of NGF, central trigeminal axons leave the tract and grow into the surrounding brainstem regions in the elongation phase without any branching. On the other hand, NT-3 promotes precocious development of short axon collaterals endowed with focal arbors along the sides of the central trigeminal tract. These neurotrophins also affect trigeminal axon growth within the whisker pad. Additionally, we cultured dissociated trigeminal ganglion cells in the presence of NGF, NT-3, or NGF+NT-3. The number of trigeminal ganglion cells, their size distribution under each condition were charted, and axon growth was analyzed following immunohistochemical labeling with TrkA and parvalbumin antibodies. In these cultures too, NGF led to axon elongation and NT-3 to axon arborization. Our in vitro analyses suggest that aside from their survival promoting effects, NGF and NT-3 can differentially influence axon growth patterns of embryonic trigeminal neurons.

  7. Sodium-calcium exchangers in rat trigeminal ganglion neurons

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Noxious stimulation and nerve injury induce an increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) via various receptors or ionic channels. While an increase in [Ca2+]i excites neurons, [Ca2+]i overload elicits cytotoxicity, resulting in cell death. Intracellular Ca2+ is essential for many signal transduction mechanisms, and its level is precisely regulated by the Ca2+ extrusion system in the plasma membrane, which includes the Na+-Ca2+ exchanger (NCX). It has been demonstrated that Ca2+-ATPase is the primary mechanism for removing [Ca2+]i following excitatory activity in trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons; however, the role of NCXs in this process has yet to be clarified. The goal of this study was to examine the expression/localization of NCXs in TG neurons and to evaluate their functional properties. Results NCX isoforms (NCX1, NCX2, and NCX3) were expressed in primary cultured rat TG neurons. All the NCX isoforms were also expressed in A-, peptidergic C-, and non-peptidergic C-neurons, and located not only in the somata, dendrites, axons and perinuclear region, but also in axons innervating the dental pulp. Reverse NCX activity was clearly observed in TG neurons. The inactivation kinetics of voltage-dependent Na+ channels were prolonged by NCX inhibitors when [Ca2+]i in TG neurons was elevated beyond physiological levels. Conclusions Our results suggest that NCXs in TG neurons play an important role in regulating Ca2+-homeostasis and somatosensory information processing by functionally coupling with voltage-dependent Na+ channels. PMID:23628073

  8. Activation of TRPV1 mediates calcitonin gene-related peptide release, which excites trigeminal sensory neurons and is attenuated by a retargeted botulinum toxin with anti-nociceptive potential.

    PubMed

    Meng, Jianghui; Ovsepian, Saak V; Wang, Jiafu; Pickering, Mark; Sasse, Astrid; Aoki, K Roger; Lawrence, Gary W; Dolly, J Oliver

    2009-04-15

    Excessive release of inflammatory/pain mediators from peripheral sensory afferents renders nerve endings hyper-responsive, causing central sensitization and chronic pain. Herein, the basal release of proinflammatory calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) was shown to increase the excitability of trigeminal sensory neurons in brainstem slices via CGRP1 receptors because the effect was negated by an antagonist, CGRP8-37. This excitatory action could be prevented by cleaving synaptosomal-associated protein of M(r) 25,000 (SNAP-25) with botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) type A, a potent inhibitor of exocytosis. Strikingly, BoNT/A proved unable to abolish the CGRP1 receptor-mediated effect of capsaicin, a nociceptive TRPV1 stimulant, or its elevation of CGRP release from trigeminal ganglionic neurons (TGNs) in culture. Although the latter was also not susceptible to BoNT/E, apparently attributable to a paucity of its acceptors (glycosylated synaptic vesicle protein 2 A/B), this was overcome by using a recombinant chimera (EA) of BoNT/A and BoNT/E. It bound effectively to the C isoform of SV2 abundantly expressed in TGNs and cleaved SNAP-25, indicating that its /A binding domain (H(C)) mediated uptake of the active /E protease. The efficacy of /EA is attributable to removal of 26 C-terminal residues from SNAP-25, precluding formation of SDS-resistant SNARE complexes. In contrast, exocytosis could be evoked after deleting nine of the SNAP-25 residues with /A but only on prolonged elevation of [Ca(2+)](i) with capsaicin. This successful targeting of /EA to nociceptive neurons and inhibition of CGRP release in vitro and in situ highlight its potential as a new therapy for sensory dysmodulation and chronic pain.

  9. Aqueous two-phase extraction combined with chromatography: new strategies for preparative separation and purification of capsaicin from capsicum oleoresin.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Pei-Pei; Lu, Yan-Min; Tan, Cong-Ping; Liang, Yan; Cui, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Capsaicin was preparatively separated and purified from capsicum oleoresin with a new method combined with aqueous two-phase extraction (ATPE) and chromatography. Screening experiments of ATPE systems containing salts and hydrophilic alcohols showed that potassium carbonate/ethanol system was the most suitable system for capsaicin recovery among the systems considered. Response surface methodology was used to determine an optimized aqueous two-phase system for the extraction of capsaicin from capsaicin oleoresin. In a 20 % (w/w) ethanol/22.3 % (w/w) potassium carbonate system, 85.4 % of the capsaicin was recovered in the top ethanol-rich phase while most oil and capsanthin ester were removed in the interphase. The capsaicinoid extract was then subjected to two chromatographic steps using D101 macroporous resin and inexpensive SKP-10-4300 reverse-phase resin first applied for the purification of capsaicin. After simple optimization of loading/elution conditions for D101 macroporous resin chromatography and SKP-10-4300 reverse-phase resin chromatography, the purities of capsaicin were improved from 7 to 85 %. In the two chromatography processes, the recoveries of capsaicin were 93 and 80 % respectively; the productivities of capsaicin were 1.86 and 4.2 (g capsaicin/L resin) per day respectively. It is worth mentioning that a by-product of capsaicin production was also obtained with a high purity (90 %).

  10. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy versus cyclic voltammetry for the electroanalytical sensing of capsaicin utilising screen printed carbon nanotube electrodes.

    PubMed

    Randviir, Edward P; Metters, Jonathan P; Stainton, John; Banks, Craig E

    2013-05-21

    Screen printed carbon nanotube electrodes (SPEs) are explored as electroanalytical sensing platforms for the detection of capsaicin in both synthetic capsaicin solutions and capsaicin extracted from chillies and chilli sauces utilising both cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). It is found that the technique which is most applicable to the electroanalytical detection of capsaicin depends upon the analyte concentration: for the case of low capsaicin concentrations, CV is a more appropriate method as capsaicin exhibits characteristic voltammetric waves of peak heights relevant to the capsaicin concentration; but for the case of high capsaicin concentrations where the voltammetric waves merge and migrate out of the potential window, EIS is shown to be a more appropriate technique, owing to the observed linear increases in R(ct) with increasing concentration. Furthermore, we explore different types of screen printed carbon nanotube electrodes, namely single- and multi- walled carbon nanotubes, finding that they are technique-specific: for the case of low capsaicin concentrations, single-walled carbon nanotube SPEs are preferable (SW-SPE); yet for the case of EIS at high capsaicin concentrations, multi-walled carbon nanotube SPEs (MW-SPE) are preferred, based upon analytical responses. The analytical performance of CV and EIS is applied to the sensing of capsaicin in grown chillies and chilli sauces and is critically compared to 'gold standard' HPLC analysis.

  11. Trigeminal branch stimulation for the treatment of intractable craniofacial pain.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Jason A; Mejia Munne, Juan C; Winfree, Christopher J

    2015-07-01

    OBJECT Trigeminal branch stimulation has been used in the treatment of craniofacial pain syndromes. The risks and benefits of such an approach have not been clearly delineated in large studies, however. The authors report their experience in treating craniofacial pain with trigeminal branch stimulation and share the lessons they have learned after 93 consecutive electrode placements. METHODS A retrospective review of all patients who underwent trigeminal branch electrode placement by the senior author (C.J.W.) for the treatment of craniofacial pain was performed. RESULTS Thirty-five patients underwent implantation of a total of 93 trial and permanent electrodes between 2006 and 2013. Fifteen patients who experienced improved pain control after trial stimulation underwent implantation of permanent stimulators and were followed for an average of 15 months. At last follow-up 73% of patients had improvement in pain control, whereas only 27% of patients had no pain improvement. No serious complications were seen during the course of this study. CONCLUSIONS Trigeminal branch stimulation is a safe and effective treatment for a subset of patients with intractable craniofacial pain.

  12. The Influence of Trigeminal Stimulation on Children's Judgements of Odor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engen, Trygg; Moskowitz, Linda

    Children's preference for odors, some of which presumably had marked trigeminal (noxious) effects, was assessed with the use of the method of pair comparison. Although the children, from 4 to 7 years old, were able to discriminate between the intensities of the odors, they were neither attracted nor repelled by them as much as the adults. In other…

  13. Pain. Part 2a: Trigeminal Anatomy Related to Pain.

    PubMed

    Renton, Tara; Egbuniwe, Obi

    2015-04-01

    In order to understand the underlying principles of orofacial pain it is important to understand the corresponding anatomy and mechanisms. Paper 1 of this series explains the central nervous and peripheral nervous systems relating to pain. The trigeminal nerve is the 'great protector' of the most important region of our body. It is the largest sensory nerve of the body and over half of the sensory cortex is responsive to any stimulation within this system. This nerve is the main sensory system of the branchial arches and underpins the protection of the brain, sight, smell, airway, hearing and taste, underpinning our very existence. The brain reaction to pain within the trigeminal system has a significant and larger reaction to the threat of, and actual, pain compared with other sensory nerves. We are physiologically wired to run when threatened with pain in the trigeminal region and it is a 'miracle' that patients volunteer to sit in a dental chair and undergo dental treatment. Clinical Relevance: This paper aims to provide the dental and medical teams with a review of the trigeminal anatomy of pain and the principles of pain assessment.

  14. Clinical Characteristics of Patients with Trigeminal Neuralgia Referred to Neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Siqueira, Silvia RDT; Teixeira, Manoel J; Siqueira, José TT

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the clinical characteristics of patients with trigeminal neuralgia referred to surgery in a center of reference. Methods We evaluated the general characteristics of 395 patients with trigeminal neuralgia referred to neurosurgery as treatment. They corresponded to 2 samples of 1984 and 2004. The EDOF-HC protocol (Orofacial Pain Questionnaire) and the medical profile were used. Results In the first study (1984), with 290 patients, the higher prevalence was: women (57.3%), white (95.5%), with mean age of 62.5. The most affected trigeminal branches were the maxillary and/or mandibular branches (65.5%), and the right side was the most affected (57.6%). From the second study (2004), with 105 patients, 57.1% were women, 75.2% white, with a mean age of 60.8. The maxillary and/or mandibular branches (79.0%) and the right side (69.5%) were the most affected. Both samples had neurological abnormalities and systemic diseases (mainly cardiovascular). Conclusions General characteristics of these patients were similar to other samples of trigeminal neuralgia. Neurological findings were also present in patients with no previous surgical treatment for TN. Hypertension and cardiac diseases were also frequent and make the monitoring of the patients during crises necessary. PMID:19756195

  15. Chronic dysphagia and trigeminal anesthesia after trichloroethylene exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, W.H.; Partyka, E.K.

    1981-12-01

    A patient is described who inhaled trichloroethylene fumes while working in a closed underground pit. At the time of exposure he developed dysphagia, dysarthria and dyspnea. Assessment of his condition 11 years after the incident indicated major damage of cranial nerves, particularly the trigeminal, chronic involvement of the bulbar cranial nerves, and resultant esophageal and pharnygeal motility impairment. (JMT)

  16. [Computed tomography in the diagnosis of intracranial trigeminal neuroma].

    PubMed

    Xiao, J; Wang, D; Deng, K

    1993-12-01

    CT scans of 12 cases of intracranial trigeminal neuroma were presented. Three of the neuromas were located in petrous apex-middle cranial fossa, two in posterior cranial fossa, and 7 in both the middle and posterior cranial fossae. The tumors appeared hypo- and isodense on the plain CT scan. After contrast infusion, all tumors were well circumscribed with marked enhancement, which was homogeneous, inhomogeneous or circular. None of the trigeminal neuroma had surrounding brain edema. Of 12 cases, 10 showed change of cranial bones, which included dilatation of Meckle's cave and destructions of petrous apex, clivus and the bottom of middle cranial fossa. The tumor in one case extended to paranasopharyngeal space from the bottom of middle cranial fossa, Various features of trigeminal neuroma on CT were reviewed. Also presented were the author's experiences in differentiating intracranial trigeminal neuroma from meningiom, from pituitary adenoma spreading to parasella and glioma adjacent to cranial bottom in middle cranial fossa, and from acoustic neuroma, meningioma, cholesteatoma in cerebellopontine angle.

  17. The capsaicin receptor TRPV1 is a crucial mediator of the noxious effects of mustard oil.

    PubMed

    Everaerts, Wouter; Gees, Maarten; Alpizar, Yeranddy A; Farre, Ricard; Leten, Cindy; Apetrei, Aurelia; Dewachter, Ilse; van Leuven, Fred; Vennekens, Rudi; De Ridder, Dirk; Nilius, Bernd; Voets, Thomas; Talavera, Karel

    2011-02-22

    Mustard oil (MO) is a plant-derived irritant that has been extensively used in experimental models to induce pain and inflammation. The noxious effects of MO are currently ascribed to specific activation of the cation channel TRPA1 in nociceptive neurons. In contrast to this view, we show here that the capsaicin receptor TRPV1 has a surprisingly large contribution to aversive and pain responses and visceral irritation induced by MO. Furthermore, we found that this can be explained by previously unknown properties of this compound. First, MO has a bimodal effect on TRPA1, producing current inhibition at millimolar concentrations. Second, it directly and stably activates mouse and human recombinant TRPV1, as well as TRPV1 channels in mouse sensory neurons. Finally, physiological temperatures enhance MO-induced TRPV1 stimulation. Our results refute the dogma that TRPA1 is the sole nocisensor for MO and motivate a revision of the putative roles of these channels in models of MO-induced pain and inflammation. We propose that TRPV1 has a generalized role in the detection of irritant botanical defensive traits and in the coevolution of multiple mammalian and plant species.

  18. Enhanced itch elicited by capsaicin in a chronic itch model

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Guang; Yang, Niuniu; Li, Fengxian; Chen, Meijuan; Guo, Changxiong J; Wang, Changming; Hu, Danyou; Yang, Yan; Zhu, Chan; Wang, Zhongli; Shi, Hao; Gegen, Tana; Tang, Ming; He, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Chronic itch (pruritus) is an important clinical problem. However, the underlying molecular basis has yet to be understood. The Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 channel is a heat-sensitive cation channel expressed in primary sensory neurons and involved in both thermosensation and pain, but its role in chronic itch remains elusive. Here, we for the first time revealed an increased innervation density of Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1-expressing sensory fibers in the skin afflicted with chronic itch. Further analysis indicated that this phenomenon is due to an expansion of Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1-expressing sensory neurons under chronic itch conditions. As a functional correlates of this neuronal expansion, we observed an enhanced neuronal responsiveness to capsaicin under the dry skin conditions. Importantly, the neuronal hypersensitivity to capsaicin results in itch, rather than pain sensation, suggesting that the up-regulated Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 underlies the pain-to-itch switch under chronic itchy conditions. The study shows that there are different mechanisms of chronic pain and itching, and Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 plays an important role in chronic itch. PMID:27118771

  19. Enhanced itch elicited by capsaicin in a chronic itch model.

    PubMed

    Yu, Guang; Yang, Niuniu; Li, Fengxian; Chen, Meijuan; Guo, Changxiong J; Wang, Changming; Hu, Danyou; Yang, Yan; Zhu, Chan; Wang, Zhongli; Shi, Hao; Gegen, Tana; Tang, Ming; He, Qian; Liu, Qin; Tang, Zongxiang

    2016-01-01

    Chronic itch (pruritus) is an important clinical problem. However, the underlying molecular basis has yet to be understood. The Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 channel is a heat-sensitive cation channel expressed in primary sensory neurons and involved in both thermosensation and pain, but its role in chronic itch remains elusive. Here, we for the first time revealed an increased innervation density of Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1-expressing sensory fibers in the skin afflicted with chronic itch. Further analysis indicated that this phenomenon is due to an expansion of Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1-expressing sensory neurons under chronic itch conditions. As a functional correlates of this neuronal expansion, we observed an enhanced neuronal responsiveness to capsaicin under the dry skin conditions. Importantly, the neuronal hypersensitivity to capsaicin results in itch, rather than pain sensation, suggesting that the up-regulated Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 underlies the pain-to-itch switch under chronic itchy conditions. The study shows that there are different mechanisms of chronic pain and itching, and Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 plays an important role in chronic itch.

  20. Using Diffusion Tensor Imaging to Evaluate Microstructural Changes and Outcomes after Radiofrequency Rhizotomy of Trigeminal Nerves in Patients with Trigeminal Neuralgia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shu-Tian; Yang, Jen-Tsung; Yeh, Mei-Yu; Weng, Hsu-Huei; Chen, Chih-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia is characterized by facial pain that may be sudden, intense, and recurrent. Our aim was to investigate microstructural tissue changes of the trigeminal nerve in patients with trigeminal neuralgia resulting from neurovascular compression by diffusion tensor imaging, and to test the predictive value of diffusion tensor imaging for determining outcomes after radiofrequency rhizotomy. Forty-three patients with trigeminal neuralgia were recruited, and diffusion tensor imaging was performed before radiofrequency rhizotomy. By selecting the cisternal segment of the trigeminal nerve manually, we measured the volume of trigeminal nerve, fractional anisotropy, apparent diffusion coefficient, axial diffusivity, and radial diffusivity. The apparent diffusion coefficient and mean value of fractional anisotropy, axial diffusivity, and radial diffusivity were compared between the affected and normal side in the same patient, and were correlated with pre-rhizotomy and post-rhizotomy visual analogue scale pain scores. The results showed the affected side had significantly decreased fractional anisotropy, increased apparent diffusion coefficient and radial diffusivity, and no significant change of axial diffusivity. The volume of the trigeminal nerve on affected side was also significantly smaller. There was a trend of fractional anisotropy reduction and visual analogue scale pain score reduction (P = 0.072). The results suggest that demyelination without axonal injury, and decreased size of the trigeminal nerve, are the microstructural abnormalities of the trigeminal nerve in patients with trigeminal neuralgia caused by neurovascular compression. The application of diffusion tensor imaging in understanding the pathophysiology of trigeminal neuralgia, and predicting the treatment effect has potential and warrants further study. PMID:27997548

  1. Metabolic detoxification of capsaicin by UDP-glycosyltransferase in three Helicoverpa species.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Seung-Joon; Badenes-Pérez, Francisco R; Reichelt, Michael; Svatoš, Aleš; Schneider, Bernd; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Heckel, David G

    2011-10-01

    Capsaicin β-glucoside was isolated from the feces of Helicoverpa armigera, Helicoverpa assulta, and Helicoverpa zea that fed on capsaicin-supplemented artificial diet. The chemical structure was identified by NMR spectroscopic analysis as well as by enzymatic hydrolysis. The excretion rates of the glucoside were different among the three species; those in the two generalists, H. armigera and H. zea, were higher than in a specialist, H. assulta. UDP-glycosyltransferases (UGT) enzyme activities measured from the whole larval homogenate of the three species with capsaicin and UDP-glucose as substrates were also higher in the two generalists. Compared among five different larval tissues (labial glands, testes from male larvae, midgut, the Malpighian tubules (MT), and fat body) from the three species, the formation of the capsaicin glucoside by one or more UGT is high in the fat body of all the three species as expected, as well as in H. assulta MT. Optimization of the enzyme assay method is also described in detail. Although the lower excretion rate of the unaltered capsaicin in H. assulta indicates higher metabolic capacity toward capsacin than in the other two generalists, the glucosylation per se seems to be insufficient to explain the decrease in capsaicin in the specialist, suggesting that H. assulta might have another important mechanism to deal with capsaicin more specifically.

  2. Tachykinin-independent activity of capsaicin on in-vitro lamb detrusor.

    PubMed

    Tucci, Paolo; Evandri, Maria Grazia; Bolle, Paola

    2002-08-01

    The capsicum alkaloid capsaicin is an afferent fibre exciter. In the vesical bladder, capsaicin acts by releasing peptides stored in afferent fibres. The aim of this work was to verify the activity of capsaicin on in-vitro lamb urinary bladder and to ascertain whether this alkaloid evokes peptide release. Capsaicin relaxed about 80% of the lamb detrusor muscle preparations tested and contracted about 20%. Whereas neurokinin A and substance P antagonists, administered alone or together, left the contractile responses to capsaicin unchanged, atropine and tetrodotoxin totally inhibited contraction. Ruthenium red and indometacin abolished contractions and relaxation. The substance P and neurokinin A antagonists and the NO-synthesis inhibitor N omega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) left relaxation unchanged; conversely, the calcitonin gene-related peptide antagonist alpha h-CGRP (8-37) abolished this response. These results suggest that capsaicin relaxes lamb detrusor muscle not through tachykinins but by releasing CGRP from afferent fibres. Our observation that indometacin blocks the capsaicin response in in-vitro lamb urinary bladder also suggests a role of prostanoids.

  3. Interaction of capsaicin with calf thymus DNA: A multi-spectroscopic and molecular modelling study.

    PubMed

    Qais, Faizan Abul; Abdullah, K M; Alam, Md Maroof; Naseem, Imrana; Ahmad, Iqbal

    2017-04-01

    Studying the mode of interaction between small molecules and DNA has received much attention in recent years, as many drugs have been reported to directly interact with DNA thereby regulating the expression of many genes. Capsaicin is a capsaiciniods family phytocompound having many therapeutic applications including diabetic neuropathy, rheumatoid arthritis, prevention of DNA strand breaks and chromosomal aberrations. In this study, we have investigated the interaction of capsaicin with calf thymus DNA using a number of biophysical techniques to get an insight and better understanding of the interaction mechanism. Analysis of UV-vis absorbance spectra and fluorescence spectra indicates the formation of complex between capsaicin and Ct-DNA. Thermodynamic parameters ΔG, ΔH, and ΔS measurements were taken at different temperatures indicated that hydrogen bonding and van der Waal's forces played major role in the binding process. Additional experiments such as iodide quenching, CD spectroscopy suggested that capsaicin possibly binds to the minor groove of the Ct-DNA. These observations were further confirmed by DNA melting studies, viscosity measurements. Molecular docking provided detailed computational interaction of capsaicin with Ct-DNA which proved that capsaicin binds to Ct-DNA at minor groove. Computational molecular docking also revealed the exact sites and groups to which capsaicin interacted.

  4. Voltage-activated sodium current is inhibited by capsaicin in rat atrial myocytes.

    PubMed

    Milesi, V; Rebolledo, A; Alvis, A G; Raingo, J; Grassi de Gende, A O

    2001-04-13

    The effects of capsaicin, the active principle of hot pepper genus Capsicum, were studied on voltage-activated, tetrodotoxin-sensitive Na+ currents in isolated rat atrial cells using the patch clamp technique in the whole-cell configuration. 0.4 and 4 microM of capsaicin produced a significant tonic block on voltage-activated Na+ current (I(Na)) evoked by a depolarizing step to -40 mV from a holding potential of -100 mV (49 +/- 7% n = 11, P < 0.05 and 72 +/- 13% n = 4, P < 0.05 respectively). We didn't observe any use-dependent block of capsaicin in our experimental conditions. Capsaicin slowed the time decay of inactivation of I(Na), and increased the time constant of the recovery of inactivation. Capsaicin and tetrodotoxin (TTX) depressed contractility of isolated electrically driven left rat atria, being the depression of maximal velocity of force development (dF/dt(max)) with respect to control values of 19 +/- 3% at 1 microM of capsaicin and 22 +/- 2% at 1 microM of TTX. These results show an inhibitory effect of capsaicin on I(Na) in isolated atrial cells that may modify the electrical and contractile function of the rat heart.

  5. Chitosan encapsulation modulates the effect of capsaicin on the tight junctions of MDCK cells

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, M.; Pereira, S.; Pohl, L.; Ketelhut, S.; Kemper, B.; Gorzelanny, C.; Galla, H. -J.; Moerschbacher, B. M.; Goycoolea, F. M.

    2015-01-01

    Capsaicin has known pharmacological effects including the ability to reversibly open cellular tight junctions, among others. The aim of this study was to develop a strategy to enhance the paracellular transport of a substance with low permeability (FITC-dextran) across an epithelial cell monolayer via reversible opening of cellular tight junctions using a nanosystem comprised by capsaicin and of chitosan. We compared the biophysical properties of free capsaicin and capsaicin-loaded chitosan nanocapsules, including their cytotoxicity towards epithelial MDCK-C7 cells and their effect on the integrity of tight junctions, membrane permeability and cellular uptake. The cytotoxic response of MDCK-C7 cells to capsaicin at a concentration of 500 μM, which was evident for the free compound, is not observable following its encapsulation. The interaction between nanocapsules and the tight junctions of MDCK-C7 cells was investigated by impedance spectroscopy, digital holographic microscopy and structured illumination fluorescence microscopy. The nanocapsules modulated the interaction between capsaicin and tight junctions as shown by the different time profile of trans-epithelial electrical resistance and the enhanced permeability of monolayers incubated with FITC-dextran. Structured illumination fluorescence microscopy showed that the nanocapsules were internalized by MDCK-C7 cells. The capsaicin-loaded nanocapsules could be further developed as drug nanocarriers with enhanced epithelial permeability. PMID:25970096

  6. RNA Sequencing of Trigeminal Ganglia in Rattus Norvegicus after Glyceryl Trinitrate Infusion with Relevance to Migraine

    PubMed Central

    Hougaard Pedersen, Sara; Maretty, Lasse; Ramachandran, Roshni; Sibbesen, Jonas Andreas; Yakimov, Victor; Elgaard-Christensen, Rikke; Hansen, Thomas Folkmann; Krogh, Anders; Olesen, Jes; Jansen-Olesen, Inger

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Infusion of glyceryl trinitrate (GTN), a donor of nitric oxide, induces immediate headache in humans that in migraineurs is followed by a delayed migraine attack. In order to achieve increased knowledge of mechanisms activated during GTN-infusion this present study aims to investigate transcriptional responses to GTN-infusion in the rat trigeminal ganglia. Methods Rats were infused with GTN or vehicle and trigeminal ganglia were isolated either 30 or 90 minutes post infusion. RNA sequencing was used to investigate transcriptomic changes in response to the treatment. Furthermore, we developed a novel method for Gene Set Analysis Of Variance (GSANOVA) to identify gene sets associated with transcriptional changes across time. Results 15 genes displayed significant changes in transcription levels in response to GTN-infusion. Ten of these genes showed either sustained up- or down-regulation in the 90-minute period after infusion. The GSANOVA analysis demonstrate enrichment of pathways pointing towards an increase in immune response, signal transduction, and neuroplasticity in response to GTN-infusion. Future functional in-depth studies of these mechanisms are expected to increase our understanding of migraine pathogenesis. PMID:27213950

  7. Relationship between electrophysiological signature and defined sensory modality of trigeminal ganglion neurons in vivo.

    PubMed

    Boada, M Danilo

    2013-02-01

    The trigeminal ganglia (TG) innervate a heterogeneous set of highly sensitive and exposed tissues. Weak, innocuous stimuli can evoke pain as a normal response in some areas such as the cornea. This observation implies, however, the capability of low-threshold mechanoreceptors, inducing pain in the normal condition. To clarify this matter, the present study correlates the electrical signature (both fiber conduction velocity and somatic electrical properties) with receptor field, mechanical threshold, and temperature responsiveness of sensory afferents innervating tissues with dissimilar sensitivity (skin vs. cornea) in the trigeminal domain. Intracellular recordings were obtained in vivo from 148 neurons of the left TG of 62 mice. In 111 of these neurons, the peripheral receptor field was successfully localized: 96 of them innervated the hairy skin, while the remaining 15 innervated the cornea. The electrical signature was defined and peripheral responses correlated with tissue target. No high threshold neurons were found in the cornea. Moreover, the electrical signature of corneal afferents resembles nociceptive neurons in the skin. TG skin afferents showed similar membrane electrical signature and sensory modality as skin afferents from dorsal root ganglion, although TG afferents exhibited a shorter duration of afterhyperpolarization then those previously described in dorsal root ganglion. These data suggest than new or different ways to classify and study TG sensory neurons may be required.

  8. Increased susceptibility of gastric mucosa to ulcerogenic stimulation in diabetic rats–role of capsaicin-sensitive sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Tashima, Kimihito; Korolkiewicz, Roman; Kubomi, Masafumi; Takeuchi, Koji

    1998-01-01

    We examined the gastric mucosal blood flow (GMBF) and ulcerogenic responses following barrier disruption induced by sodium taurocholate (TC) in diabetic rats and investigated the role of capsaicin-sensitive sensory neurons in these responses.Animals were injected streptozotocin (STZ: 70 mg kg−1, i.p.) and used after 5, 10 and 15 weeks of diabetes with blood glucose levels of >350 mg dl−1. The stomach was mounted on an ex-vivo chamber under urethane anaesthesia and exposed to 20 mM TC plus 50 mM HCl for 30 min in the presence of omeprazole. Gastric transmucosal potential difference (PD), GMBF, and luminal acid loss (H+ back-diffusion) were measured before and after exposure to 20 mM TC, and the mucosa was examined for lesions 90 min after TC treatment.Mucosal application of TC caused PD reduction in all groups; the degree of PD reduction was similar between normal and diabetic rats, although basal PD values were lower in diabetic rats. In normal rats, TC treatment caused luminal acid loss, followed by an increase of GMBF, resulting in minimal damage in the mucosa.The increased GMBF responses associated with H+ back-diffusion were mitigated in STZ-treated rats, depending on the duration of diabetes, and severe haemorrhagic lesions occurred in the stomach after 10 weeks of diabetes.Intragastric application of capsaicin increased GMBF in normal rats, but such responses were mitigated in STZ diabetic rats. The amount of CGRP released in the isolated stomach in response to capsaicin was significantly lower in diabetic rats when compared to controls.The deleterious influences on GMBF and mucosal ulcerogenic responses in STZ-diabetic rats were partially but significantly antagonized by daily insulin (4 units rat−1) treatment.These results suggest that the gastric mucosa of diabetic rats is more vulnerable to acid injury following barrier disruption, and this change is insulin-sensitive and may be partly accounted for by the impairment of GMBF

  9. Controlled noxious chemical stimulation: responses of rat trigeminal brainstem neurones to CO2 pulses applied to the nasal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Anton, F; Peppel, P; Euchner, I; Handwerker, H O

    1991-02-25

    The nasal mucosa of halothane-anesthetized rats was stimulated with defined CO2 pulses. Recordings were performed from single trigeminal brainstem neurons to characterize their responses to this controlled chemical irritation. All cells examined with this stimulus displayed graded discharges to increasing concentrations of CO2. Enhanced responses were obtained in a group of neurons when the duration of the interstimulus interval was increased. The application of chemical irritants, notably mustard oil or acetic acid induced vigorous ongoing discharges in all cells tested. The CO2 stimulation method described here thus provides an ideal model for the quantitative physiological and pharmacological examination of chemically induced nociception.

  10. Trigeminal trophic syndrome from stroke: an under-recognized central neuropathic itch syndrome.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Ashley R; Oaklander, Anne L; Johnson, Annette; Yosipovitch, Gil

    2012-04-01

    Trigeminal trophic syndrome (TTS) is the historic name for neuropathic self-induced facial ulceration from abnormal sensory symptoms leading to uncontrolled scratching. Anatomic co-localization of sensory loss (numbness) plus neuropathic itch and pain permits painless scratching. If the itch is severe, some patients will scratch to the point of causing self-injury. Patients may be unaware or may conceal the fact that their lesions are self-induced and thus the diagnosis presents a clinical challenge. Many cases remain undiagnosed, leading to unnecessary and ineffective tests, procedures, and prescribing. We document a patient with a central cause of TTS - multiple cerebral vascular accidents - and summarize the presentation, pathogenesis, and treatment options.

  11. Over-Expression of TRESK K+ Channels Reduces the Excitability of Trigeminal Ganglion Nociceptors

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhaohua; Cao, Yu-Qing

    2014-01-01

    TWIK-related spinal cord K+ (TRESK) channel is abundantly expressed in trigeminal ganglion (TG) and dorsal root ganglion neurons and is one of the major background K+ channels in primary afferent neurons. Mutations in TRESK channels are associated with familial and sporadic migraine. In rats, both chronic nerve injury and inflammation alter the expression level of TRESK mRNA. Functional studies indicate that reduction of endogenous TRESK channel activity results in hyper-excitation of primary afferent neurons, suggesting that TRESK is a potential target for the development of new analgesics. However, whether and how enhancing TRESK channel activity would decrease the excitability of primary afferent neurons has not been directly tested. Here, we over-expressed TRESK subunits in cultured mouse TG neurons by lipofectamine-mediated transfection and investigated how this altered the membrane properties and the excitability of the small-diameter TG population. To account for the heterogeneity of neurons, we further divided small TG neurons into two groups, based on their ability to bind to fluorescently-labeled isolectin B (IB4). The transfected TG neurons showed a 2-fold increase in the level of TRESK proteins. This was accompanied by a significant increase in the fraction of lamotrigine-sensitive persistent K+ currents as well as the size of total background K+ currents. Consequently, both IB4-positive and IB4-negative TG neurons over-expressing TRESK subunits exhibited a lower input resistance and a 2-fold increase in the current threshold for action potential initiation. IB4-negative TG neurons over-expressing TRESK subunits also showed a significant reduction of the spike frequency in response to supra-threshold stimuli. Importantly, an increase in TRESK channel activity effectively inhibited capsaicin-evoked spikes in TG neurons. Taken together, our results suggest that potent and specific TRESK channel openers likely would reduce the excitability of primary

  12. Decision-making in classic trigeminal neuralgia concurrent with a pontine cavernous malformation: Causal or coincidental association?

    PubMed

    Parise, Maud; Acioly, Marcus André; Vincent, Maurice; Gasparetto, Emerson Leandro

    2015-01-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia is classically associated with neurovascular compression of the trigeminal nerve, at the root entry zone (REZ). However, patients are occasionally affected by intra-axial involvement of trigeminal sensory fibers caused by demyelinating diseases, strokes and, rarely, pontine cavernous malformations. We discuss the management strategies and decision-making process in a 55-year-old patient, affected by trigeminal neuralgia with 2 potential causative mechanisms: a neurovascular conflict at the trigeminal REZ and an ipsilateral cavernous malformation at the pontine nucleus of the trigeminal nerve.

  13. Capsaicin receptor: TRPV1 a promiscuous TRP channel.

    PubMed

    Pingle, S C; Matta, J A; Ahern, G P

    2007-01-01

    TRPV1, the archetypal member of the vanilloid TRP family, was initially identified as the receptor for capsaicin, the pungent ingredient in hot chili peppers. The receptor has a diverse tissue distribution, with high expression in sensory neurons. TRPV1 is a nonselective cation channel with significant permeability to calcium, protons, and large polyvalent cations. It is the most polymodal TRP channel, being activated by numerous stimuli, including heat, voltage, vanilloids, lipids, and protons/cations. TRPV1 acts as a molecular integrator of physical and chemical stimuli in peripheral nociceptor terminals and plays a critical role in thermal inflammatory hyperalgesia. In addition, TRPV1 may regulate a variety of physiological functions in different organ systems. Various second messenger systems regulate TRPV1 activity, predominantly by serine-threonine phosphorylation. In this review, we provide a concise summary of the information currently available about this channel.

  14. Enhanced Chemosensory Sensitivity in Idiopathic Rhinitis Patients and its Reversal by Nasal Capsaicin Treatment.

    PubMed

    Van Gerven, L; Alpizar, Y A; Steelant, B; Callebaut, I; Kortekaas Krohn, I; Wouters, M; Vermeulen, F; Boeckxstaens, G; Talavera, K; Hellings, P W

    2017-04-04

    We show electrophysiological evidence for an increased chemical sensitivity in idiopathic rhinitis patients compared to healthy controls. This abnormality is decreased after capsaicin treatment, along with a reduction of symptoms.

  15. Capsaicin, arterial hypertensive crisis and acute myocardial infarction associated with high levels of thyroid stimulating hormone.

    PubMed

    Patanè, Salvatore; Marte, Filippo; Di Bella, Gianluca; Cerrito, Marco; Coglitore, Sebastiano

    2009-05-01

    Chili peppers are rich in capsaicin. The potent vasodilator calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is stored in a population of C-fiber afferents that are sensitive to capsaicin. CGRP and peptides released from cardiac C fibers have a beneficial effect in myocardial ischemia and reperfusion. It has been reported that capsaicin pretreatment deplete cardiac C-fiber peptide stores. Furthermore, it has also been reported that capsaicin-treated pigs significantly increase mean arterial blood pressure compared with controls and that the decrease in CGRP synthesis and release contributes to the elevated blood pressure. It has also been reported that sub-clinical hypothyroidism is associated with a significant risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). We present a case of arterial hypertensive crisis and acute myocardial infarction in a 59-year-old Italian man with high levels of thyroid stimulating hormone and with an abundant ingestion of peppers and of chili peppers which occurred the day before.

  16. Sigma-1 Receptor Agonism Promotes Mechanical Allodynia After Priming the Nociceptive System with Capsaicin.

    PubMed

    Entrena, J M; Sánchez-Fernández, C; Nieto, F R; González-Cano, R; Yeste, S; Cobos, E J; Baeyens, J M

    2016-11-25

    Sigma-1 receptor antagonists promote antinociception in several models of pain, but the effects of sigma-1 agonists on nociception (particularly when the nociceptive system is primed) are not so well characterized; therefore we evaluated the effects of sigma-1 agonists on pain under different experimental conditions. The systemic administration of the selective sigma-1 agonists (+)-pentazocine and PRE-084, as well as the nonselective sigma-1 agonist carbetapentane (used clinically as an antitussive drug), did not alter sensitivity to mechanical stimulation under baseline conditions. However, they greatly promoted secondary mechanical allodynia after priming the nociceptive system with capsaicin. These effects of sigma-1 agonists were consistent in terms potency with the affinities of these drugs for sigma-1 receptors, were reversed by sigma-1 antagonists, and were not observed in sigma-1 knockout mice, indicating that they are sigma-1-mediated. Repeated systemic treatment with PRE-084 induced proallodynic effects even 24 h after treatment completion, but only after the nociceptive system was primed. However, neither the presence of this drug in the organism nor changes in sigma-1 receptor expression in areas involved in pain processing explains its long-term effects, suggesting that sustained sigma-1 agonism induces plastic changes in the nociceptive system that promote nociception.

  17. Sigma-1 Receptor Agonism Promotes Mechanical Allodynia After Priming the Nociceptive System with Capsaicin

    PubMed Central

    Entrena, J. M.; Sánchez-Fernández, C.; Nieto, F. R.; González-Cano, R.; Yeste, S.; Cobos, E. J.; Baeyens, J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Sigma-1 receptor antagonists promote antinociception in several models of pain, but the effects of sigma-1 agonists on nociception (particularly when the nociceptive system is primed) are not so well characterized; therefore we evaluated the effects of sigma-1 agonists on pain under different experimental conditions. The systemic administration of the selective sigma-1 agonists (+)-pentazocine and PRE-084, as well as the nonselective sigma-1 agonist carbetapentane (used clinically as an antitussive drug), did not alter sensitivity to mechanical stimulation under baseline conditions. However, they greatly promoted secondary mechanical allodynia after priming the nociceptive system with capsaicin. These effects of sigma-1 agonists were consistent in terms potency with the affinities of these drugs for sigma-1 receptors, were reversed by sigma-1 antagonists, and were not observed in sigma-1 knockout mice, indicating that they are sigma-1-mediated. Repeated systemic treatment with PRE-084 induced proallodynic effects even 24 h after treatment completion, but only after the nociceptive system was primed. However, neither the presence of this drug in the organism nor changes in sigma-1 receptor expression in areas involved in pain processing explains its long-term effects, suggesting that sustained sigma-1 agonism induces plastic changes in the nociceptive system that promote nociception. PMID:27886264

  18. Final report on the safety assessment of capsicum annuum extract, capsicum annuum fruit extract, capsicum annuum resin, capsicum annuum fruit powder, capsicum frutescens fruit, capsicum frutescens fruit extract, capsicum frutescens resin, and capsaicin.

    PubMed

    2007-01-01

    , gasping, inability to breathe or speak, and, rarely, cyanosis, apnea, and respiratory arrest. A trade name mixture containing 1% to 5% Capsicum Frutescens Fruit Extract induced very slight erythema in 1 of 10 volunteers patch tested for 48 h. Capsicum Frutescens Fruit Extract at 0.025% in a repeated-insult patch test using 103 subjects resulted in no clinically meaningful irritation or allergic contact dermatitis. One epidemiological study indicated that chili pepper consumption may be a strong risk factor for gastric cancer in populations with high intakes of chili pepper; however, other studies did not find this association. Capsaicin functions as an external analgesic, a fragrance ingredient, and as a skin-conditioning agent--miscellaneous in cosmetic products, but is not in current use. Capsaicin is not generally recognized as safe and effective by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for fever blister and cold sore treatment, but is considered to be safe and effective as an external analgesic counterirritant. Ingested Capsaicin is rapidly absorbed from the stomach and small intestine in animal studies. Subcutaneous injection of Capsaicin in rats resulted in a rise in the blood concentration, reaching a maximum at 5 h; the highest tissue concentrations were in the kidney and lowest in the liver. In vitro percutaneous absorption of Capsaicin has been demonstrated in human, rat, mouse, rabbit, and pig skin. Enhancement of the skin permeation of naproxen (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agent) in the presence of Capsaicin has also been demonstrated. Pharmacological and physiological studies demonstrated that Capsaicin, which contains a vanillyl moiety, produces its sensory effects by activating a Ca2 +-permeable ion channel on sensory neurons. Capsaicin is a known activator of vanilloid receptor 1. Capsaicin-induced stimulation of prostaglandin biosynthesis has been shown using bull seminal vesicles and rheumatoid arthritis synoviocytes. Capsaicin inhibits protein

  19. Carbamazepine and folic acid in trigeminal neuralgia patients.

    PubMed Central

    al-Musaed, A A; Zakrzewska, J M; Bain, B J

    1992-01-01

    The effect of carbamazepine monotherapy on the red cell folate level of 133 patients with trigeminal neuralgia was evaluated. The patient group had a significantly lower mean value of red cell folate levels compared with 110 controls. No significant correlation was found between the red cell folate levels and the mean cell volume or haemoglobin values in either the carbamazepine or control group. In addition no significant correlation was found between the red cell folate levels and drug dosage. Administration of folic acid supplements raised the mean value of red cell folate significantly. Dietary folate intake was assessed in 43 trigeminal neuralgia patients and 33 matched control patients and there was no significant difference between the groups. Patients taking carbamazepine should be advised on a well-balanced diet rich in folate as opposed to being given a routine prescription of folic acid. PMID:1548649

  20. A Novel Pathophysiological Mechanism Contributing to Trigeminal Neuralgia

    PubMed Central

    Grasso, Giovanni; Landi, Alessandro; Alafaci, Concetta

    2016-01-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is a form of neuropathic pain that affects the fifth cranial nerve, the most widely distributed nerve in the head. Although TN has been associated with a variety of pathological conditions, neurovascular compression on the trigeminal nerve as it exits the brainstem is the most frequent reported cause. This compression causes progressive demyelination of the nerve and subsequent aberrant neural transmission. Although several studies have clarified some pathophysiological mechanisms underlying TN, the molecular basis remains vague. Very recently the substitution of methionine 136 by valine (MET126Val) in sodium channel Nav1.6 in a case study of typical TN has suggested a new possible mechanism for TN. The findings of this new mutation provide novel information that warrants further conclusive investigation. PMID:27533070

  1. Trigeminal herpes zoster: early recognition and treatment are crucial

    PubMed Central

    Lovell, Ben

    2015-01-01

    Reactivation of varicella zoster virus (VZV) is not uncommon in older patients, particularly in cases of chronic autoimmune disorders and in patients taking immunosuppressant drugs. We present a case of a 57-year-old woman presenting with severe herpes zoster infection, involving the maxillary and ophthalmic branches of the trigeminal nerve. Despite an initial delay in instigating crucial antiviral treatment, the patient achieved an excellent recovery, with only some mild scarring at 2 months postinfection. Trigeminal herpes zoster is a potentially devastating clinical occurrence, and is associated with severe long-term neurological sequelae, including encephalitis, vision loss and postherpetic neuralgia. Physicians must be aware of risk factors and treatment modalities. PMID:25795749

  2. Cerebellopontine angle primitive neuroectodermal tumor mimicking trigeminal schwannoma

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Saad Akhtar; Ujjan, Badar Uddin; Salim, Adnan; Shamim, Shahzad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNETs) comprise a group of aggressive, poorly differentiated embryonal tumors occurring in central nervous system as well as in peripheral locations. Primary cerebellopontine angle (CPA) PNET is an extremely rare entity. It is important to have knowledge of this pathology and to be able to differentiate it from other commonly occurring CPA tumors, such as vestibular and trigeminal schwannomas. This distinction is essential because of the difference in the overall treatment plan and prognosis. Case Description: This report describes a case of a young male presenting with diplopia and numbness of face; magnetic resonance imaging showed a CPA mass. With a provisional diagnosis of trigeminal schwannoma, the patient underwent surgery. Histopathology provided a diagnosis of PNET. Conclusion: We discuss the importance of recognizing this rare condition and how this entity differs from the commonly occurring tumors. PMID:26862446

  3. Effect of beam channel plugging on the outcome of gamma knife radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia

    SciTech Connect

    Massager, Nicolas . E-mail: nmassage@ulb.ac.be; Nissim, Ouzi; Murata, Noriko; Devriendt, Daniel; Desmedt, Francoise; Vanderlinden, Bruno; Regis, Jean; Levivier, Marc

    2006-07-15

    Purpose: We studied the influence of using plugs for brainstem protection during gamma knife radiosurgery (GKR) of trigeminal neuralgia (TN), with special emphasis on irradiation doses delivered to the trigeminal nerve, pain outcomes, and incidence of trigeminal dysfunction. Methods and Materials: A GKR procedure for TN using an anterior cisternal target and a maximum dose of 90 Gy was performed in 109 patients. For 49 patients, customized beam channel blocking (plugs) were used to reduce the dose delivered to the brainstem. We measured the mean and integrated radiation doses delivered to the trigeminal nerve and the clinical course of patients treated with and without plugs. Results: We found that blocking increases the length of trigeminal nerve exposed to high-dose radiation, resulting in a significantly higher mean dose to the trigeminal nerve. Significantly more of the patients with blocking achieved excellent pain outcomes (84% vs. 62%), but with higher incidences of moderate and bothersome trigeminal nerve dysfunction (37% mild/10% bothersome with plugs vs. 30% mild/2% bothersome without). Conclusions: The use of plugs to protect the brainstem during GKR treatment for TN increases the dose of irradiation delivered to the intracisternal trigeminal nerve root and is associated with an important increase in the incidence of trigeminal nerve dysfunction. Therefore, beam channel blocking should be avoided for 90 Gy-GKR of TN.

  4. Trigeminal nerve morphology in Alligator mississippiensis and its significance for crocodyliform facial sensation and evolution.

    PubMed

    George, Ian D; Holliday, Casey M

    2013-04-01

    Modern crocodylians possess a derived sense of face touch, in which numerous trigeminal nerve-innervated dome pressure receptors speckle the face and mandible and sense mechanical stimuli. However, the morphological features of this system are not well known, and it remains unclear how the trigeminal system changes during ontogeny and how it scales with other cranial structures. Finally, when this system evolved within crocodyliforms remains a mystery. Thus, new morphological insights into the trigeminal system of extant crocodylians may offer new paleontological tools to investigate this evolutionary transformation. A cross-sectional study integrating histological, morphometric, and 3D imaging analyses was conducted to identify patterns in cranial nervous and bony structures of Alligator mississippiensis. Nine individuals from a broad size range were CT-scanned followed by histomorphometric sampling of mandibular and maxillary nerve divisions of the trigeminal nerve. Endocast volume, trigeminal fossa volume, and maxillomandibular foramen size were compared with axon counts from proximal and distal regions of the trigeminal nerves to identify scaling properties of the structures. The trigeminal fossa has a significant positive correlation with skull length and endocast volume. We also found that axon density is greater in smaller alligators and total axon count has a significant negative correlation with skull size. Six additional extant and fossil crocodyliforms were included in a supplementary scaling analysis, which found that size was not an accurate predictor of trigeminal anatomy. This suggests that phylogeny or somatosensory adaptations may be responsible for the variation in trigeminal ganglion and nerve size in crocodyliforms.

  5. Age-dependent loss of cholinergic neurons in learning and memory-related brain regions and impaired learning in SAMP8 mice with trigeminal nerve damage.

    PubMed

    He, Yifan; Zhu, Jihong; Huang, Fang; Qin, Liu; Fan, Wenguo; He, Hongwen

    2014-11-15

    The tooth belongs to the trigeminal sensory pathway. Dental damage has been associated with impairments in the central nervous system that may be mediated by injury to the trigeminal nerve. In the present study, we investigated the effects of damage to the inferior alveolar nerve, an important peripheral nerve in the trigeminal sensory pathway, on learning and memory behaviors and structural changes in related brain regions, in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease. Inferior alveolar nerve transection or sham surgery was performed in middle-aged (4-month-old) or elderly (7-month-old) senescence-accelerated mouse prone 8 (SAMP8) mice. When the middle-aged mice reached 8 months (middle-aged group 1) or 11 months (middle-aged group 2), and the elderly group reached 11 months, step-down passive avoidance and Y-maze tests of learning and memory were performed, and the cholinergic system was examined in the hippocampus (Nissl staining and acetylcholinesterase histochemistry) and basal forebrain (choline acetyltransferase immunohistochemistry). In the elderly group, animals that underwent nerve transection had fewer pyramidal neurons in the hippocampal CA1 and CA3 regions, fewer cholinergic fibers in the CA1 and dentate gyrus, and fewer cholinergic neurons in the medial septal nucleus and vertical limb of the diagonal band, compared with sham-operated animals, as well as showing impairments in learning and memory. Conversely, no significant differences in histology or behavior were observed between middle-aged group 1 or group 2 transected mice and age-matched sham-operated mice. The present findings suggest that trigeminal nerve damage in old age, but not middle age, can induce degeneration of the septal-hippocampal cholinergic system and loss of hippocampal pyramidal neurons, and ultimately impair learning ability. Our results highlight the importance of active treatment of trigeminal nerve damage in elderly patients and those with Alzheimer's disease, and indicate that

  6. GABA-A RECEPTOR ACTIVITY IN THE NORADRENERGIC LOCUS COERULEUS DRIVES TRIGEMINAL NEUROPATHIC PAIN IN THE RAT; CONTRIBUTION OF NAα1 RECEPTORS IN THE MEDIAL PREFRONTAL CORTEX

    PubMed Central

    KAUSHAL, R.; TAYLOR, B. K.; JAMAL, A. B.; ZHANG, L.; MA, F.; DONAHUE, R.; WESTLUND, K. N.

    2017-01-01

    Trigeminal neuropathic pain is described as constant excruciating facial pain. The study goal was to investigate the role of nucleus locus coeruleus (LC) in a model of chronic orofacial neuropathic pain (CCI-ION). The study examines LC’s relationship to both the medullary dorsal horn receiving trigeminal nerve sensory innervation and the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). LC is a major source of CNS noradrenaline (NA) and a primary nucleus involved in pain modulation. Although descending inhibition of acute pain by LC is well established, contribution of the LC to facilitation of chronic neuropathic pain is also reported. In the present study, a rat orofacial pain model of trigeminal neuropathy was induced by chronic constrictive injury of the infraorbital nerve (CCI-ION). Orofacial neuropathic pain was indicated by development of whisker pad mechanical hypersensitivity. Hypersensitivity was alleviated by selective elimination of NA neurons, including LC (A6 cell group), with the neurotoxin anti-dopamine-β-hydroxylase saporin (anti-DβH-saporin) microinjected either intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) or into trigeminal spinal nucleus caudalis (spVc). The GABAA receptor antagonist, bicuculline, administered directly into LC (week 8) inhibited hypersensitivity. This indicates a valence shift in which increased GABAA signaling ongoing in LC after trigeminal nerve injury paradoxically produces excitatory facilitation of the chronic pain state. Microinjection of NAα1 receptor antagonist, benoxathian, into mPFC attenuated whisker pad hypersensitivity, while NAα2 receptor antagonist, idazoxan, was ineffective. Thus, GABAA-mediated activation of NA neurons during CCI-ION can facilitate hypersensitivity through NAα1 receptors in the mPFC. These data indicate LC is a chronic pain generator. Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of IBRO. PMID:27520081

  7. Trigeminal autonomic cephalgia caused by recurrent posterior scleritis.

    PubMed

    Alim-Marvasti, Ali; Ho, Jason; Weatherall, Mark; Patel, Maneesh; George, Sheena; Viegas, Stuart

    2016-12-01

    A 40-year-old woman presented with a side-locked headache with autonomic features, which then switched sides before reverting to the original side. The atypical features of side swapping, partial response to indometacin and abnormal optic disc appearances ultimately led to a diagnosis of recurrent posterior scleritis. We discuss the differential diagnosis of trigeminal autonomic cephalgias and its secondary causes, and provide practical pointers for its investigation and management.

  8. Patterns and Variations in Microvascular Decompression for Trigeminal Neuralgia

    PubMed Central

    TODA, Hiroki; GOTO, Masanori; IWASAKI, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Microvascular decompression (MVD) is a highly effective surgical treatment for trigeminal neuralgia (TN). Although there is little prospective clinical evidence, accumulated observational studies have demonstrated the benefits of MVD for refractory TN. In the current surgical practice of MVD for TN, there have been recognized patterns and variations in surgical anatomy and various decompression techniques. Here we provide a stepwise description of surgical procedures and relevant anatomical characteristics, as well as procedural options. PMID:25925756

  9. Differences in the chemesthetic subqualities of capsaicin, ibuprofen, and olive oil.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Samantha M; Hayes, John E

    2012-06-01

    Chemesthetic sensations elicited by ibuprofen, extra-virgin olive oil, and capsaicin were compared to quantify perceptual differences between known agonists of TRPA1 and TRPV1. Extra virgin olive oil contains a phenolic compound, oleocanthal, which is thought to share unique chemesthetic qualities with the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, ibuprofen. Pilot work suggested participants had difficulty distinguishing between multiple chemesthetic subqualities (e.g., burn, sting, itch, tickle, etc.) in a multiattribute rating task. Here, we assessed overall irritation via direct scaling, and a check all that apply task was used to collect information about chemesthetic subqualities over time. Replicated ratings were collected at discrete intervals using the generalized labeled magnitude scale to generate time-intensity curves; maximum intensity (Imax) and area under the curve were extracted for each participant. Intensity responses varied substantially across participants, and within a participant, the relationship was strongest between ibuprofen and olive oil. However, there were also positive, albeit weaker, correlations between capsaicin and ibuprofen and capsaicin and olive oil. The correlation found between olive oil and capsaicin may suggest the presence of unknown TRPV1 agonists in olive oil. This view was also supported by the qualitative data: capsaicin was described most often as burning and warm/hot, whereas ibuprofen was numbing and tickling. Olive oil shared characteristics with both capsaicin (warm/hot) and ibuprofen (tickle).

  10. Characterization of cubosomes as a targeted and sustained transdermal delivery system for capsaicin

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Xinsheng; Zhou, Yanfang; Han, Ke; Qin, Lingzhen; Dian, Linghui; Li, Ge; Pan, Xin; Wu, Chuanbin

    2015-01-01

    Phytantriol- and glycerol monooleate-based cubosomes were produced and characterized as a targeted and sustained transdermal delivery system for capsaicin. The cubosomes were prepared by emulsification and homogenization of phytantriol (F1), glycerol monooleate (F2), and poloxamer dispersions, characterized for morphology and particle size distribution by transmission electron microscope and photon correlation spectroscopy. Their Im3m crystallographic space group was confirmed by small-angle X-ray scattering. An in vitro release study showed that the cubosomes provided a sustained release system for capsaicin. An in vitro diffusion study conducted using Franz diffusion cells indicated that the skin retention of capsaicin from cubosomes in the stratum corneum was much higher (2.75±0.22 μg versus 4.32±0.13 μg, respectively) than that of capsaicin cream (0.72±0.13 μg). The stress testing showed that the cubosome formulations were stable under strong light and high temperature for up to 10 days. After multiapplications on mouse skin, the irritation of capsaicin cubosomes and cream was light with the least amount of side effects. Overall, the present study demonstrated that cubosomes may be a suitable skin-targeted and sustained delivery system for the transdermal administration of capsaicin. PMID:26345516

  11. Impaired basal thermal homeostasis in rats lacking capsaicin-sensitive peripheral small sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Hitoshi; Wang, Zuocheng; Wang, Youxue; Furuyama, Tatsuo; Kontani, Yasuhide; Sato, Yuzo; Mori, Nozomu

    2008-03-01

    We studied the effects of selective loss of capsaicin-sensitive primary sensory neurons on thermosensation and thermoregulation in rats. Neonatal capsaicin treatment in rats caused a remarkable decrease in the number of small-diameter neurons in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) compared with their number in the control rats. Gene expression analysis for various thermo-sensitive transient receptor potential (TRP) channels indicated marked reductions in the mRNA levels of TRPV1 (70%), TRPM8 (46%) and TRPA1 (64%), but not of TRPV2, in the DRG of capsaicin-treated rats compared with those in the control rats. In addition to the heat and cold insensitivity, capsaicin-treated rats showed lower rectal core temperature, higher skin temperature and decreased sensitivity to ambient temperature alteration under normal housing at room temperature, suggesting impaired thermosensation and change in thermoregulation in the rats. Uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) expression and the thermogenic ability in brown adipose tissues were attenuated in the capsaicin-treated rats. These results indicate a critical role of capsaicin-sensitive sensory neurons in both heat and cool sensation and hence in basal thermal homeostasis, which is balanced by heat release and production including UCP1 thermogenesis, following sensation of the ambient temperature.

  12. Evaluation of toxicity of capsaicin and zosteric acid and their potential application as antifoulants.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qingwei; Barrios, Carlos A; Cutright, Teresa; Zhang Newby, Bi-min

    2005-10-01

    The toxicity of two natural product antifoulants, capsaicin and zosteric acid, was evaluated using the Microtox assay and a static toxicity test. The EC50 values obtained from the Microtox assay for capsaicin and zosteric acid were 11.75 +/- 1.02 and 442 +/- 100 mg/L, respectively. The static toxicity test, conducted with freshwater organisms, yielded capsaicin EC50 values of 5.5 +/- 0.5 and 23 +/- 2.0 mg/L for P. putida and Lake Erie bacteria, respectively. Zosteric acid EC50 values were 167 +/- 3.9 and 375 +/- 10 mg/L for P. putida and Lake Erie bacteria, respectively. Tests with marine organisms resulted in capsaicin EC50 values of 6.9 +/- 0.2 and 15.6 +/- 0.4 mg/L for V. natriegens and V. parahaemolyticus, respectively; whereas zosteric acid EC50 values were 7.4 +/- 0.1 and 18 +/- 0.6 mg/L for V. natriegens and V. parahaemolyticus, respectively. These results indicate that zosteric acid is much less toxic than capsaicin and that both are substantially less toxic than the currently used antifoulants, such as TBT (EC50 < 0.01 ppb). Their effectiveness as natural antifoulants was demonstrated by preliminary attachments studies. As the aqueous antifoulant concentration increased, significant inhibition of bacteria attachment or prevention of biofilm formation was achieved. Hence, both capsaicin and zosteric acid could be attractive alternatives as new antifouling compounds.

  13. Determination of capsaicin and dihydrocapsaicin in Capsicum fruit samples using high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Al Othman, Zeid Abdullah; Ahmed, Yacine Badjah Hadj; Habila, Mohamed Abdelaty; Ghafar, Ayman Abdel

    2011-10-24

    The aim of the present study was to determine the content of capsaicin and dihydrocapsaicin in Capsicum samples collected from city markets in Riyadh (Saudi Arabia), calculate their pungency in Scoville heat units (SHU) and evaluate the average daily intake of capsaicin for the population of Riyadh. The investigated samples consisted of hot chillies, red chillies, green chillies, green peppers, red peppers and yellow peppers. Extraction of capsaicinoids was done using ethanol as solvent, while high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used for separation, identification and quantitation of the components. The limit of detection (LOD) of the method was 0.09 and 0.10 µg/g for capsaicin and dihydrocapsaicin, respectively, while the limit of quantification (LOQ) was 0.30 and 0.36 µg/g for capsaicin and dihydrocapsaicin, respectively. Hot chillies showed the highest concentration of capsaicin (4249.0 ± 190.3 µg/g) and the highest pungency level (67984.60 SHU), whereas green peppers had the lowest detected concentration (1.0 ± 0.9 µg/g); green peppers, red peppers and yellow peppers were non pungent. The mean consumption of peppers for Riyadh city population was determined to be 15.5 g/person/day while the daily capsaicin intake was 7.584 mg/person/day.

  14. Distinct mechanosensitive properties of capsaicin-sensitive and -insensitive sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Drew, Liam J; Wood, John N; Cesare, Paolo

    2002-06-15

    Mechanical stimulation of the somata of cultured neonatal rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons evoked inward cationic currents that displayed distinct properties between different subsets of cells. The presumptive nociceptor population, defined by capsaicin sensitivity, showed higher thresholds for the induction of an inward current and lower peak currents than other mechanosensitive neurons. A subset of capsaicin-sensitive IB4-positive sensory neurons was refractory to mechanical stimulation. All mechanically activated currents were blocked by gadolinium (IC50 approximately 8 microm) and ruthenium red (IC50 approximately 3 microm). Disruption of the actin cytoskeleton by acute application of 10 microm cytochalasin B inhibited currents much more effectively in capsaicin-insensitive (61%) than capsaicin-sensitive neurons (20%). Extracellular calcium also attenuated mechanosensitive currents and to a greater degree in capsaicin-insensitive neurons than capsaicin-sensitive neurons. These data demonstrate that the somata of different types of cultured sensory neurons have distinct mechanosensitive phenotypes that retain properties associated with nerve terminal mechanosensors in vivo.

  15. The capsaicin cough reflex in eczema patients with respiratory symptoms elicited by perfume.

    PubMed

    Elberling, Jesper; Dirksen, Asger; Johansen, Jeanne Duus; Mosbech, Holger

    2006-03-01

    Respiratory symptoms elicited by perfume are common in the population but have unclear pathophysiology. Increased capsaicin cough responsiveness has been associated with the symptoms, but it is unknown whether the site of the symptoms in the airways influences this association. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between the site of airway symptoms elicited by perfume and cough responsiveness to bronchial challenge with capsaicin. 21 eczema patients with respiratory symptoms elicited by perfume were compared with 21 healthy volunteers in a sex- and age-matched case control study. The participants completed a symptom questionnaire and underwent a bronchial challenge with capsaicin. Lower, but not upper, respiratory symptoms elicited by perfume were associated with increased capsaicin cough responsiveness. Having severe symptoms to perfume (n=11) did not relate to the site of the symptoms in the airways and was not associated with increased capsaicin cough responsiveness. In conclusion, respiratory symptoms elicited by perfume may reflect local hyperreactivity related to defensive reflexes in the airways, and measurements of the capsaicin cough reflex are relevant when patients with lower respiratory symptoms related to environmental perfume exposures are investigated.

  16. Trigeminal neuralgia and chiropractic care: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Rodine, Robert J; Aker, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The following case describes a 68 year-old woman with a 7½ year history of worsening head and neck pain diagnosed as trigeminal neuralgia following surgical resection of a brain tumor. After years of unsuccessful management with medication and physical therapies, a therapeutic trial of chiropractic was carried out. Chiropractic care included ultrasound, manual therapies (manipulation and mobilization), soft tissue therapies, and home stretching exercises. After an initial treatment period followed by 18 months of supportive care the patient reported satisfactory improvement. It became evident that there were at least three sources of her symptoms: mechanical and/or degenerative neck pain, temporomandibular joint syndrome, and trigeminal neuralgia. While never completely pain-free, the patient continued to report that her pains reduced to minimal at times. At the most recent follow-up, the pain had not returned to pre-treatment intractable levels. This case study demonstrates the importance of diagnosing and treating multiple sources of pain and the positive role chiropractic care can have in the management of patients with these clinical conditions. The potential for convergence of sensory input from the upper three cervical segments and the trigeminal nerve via the trigeminocervical nucleus is discussed. PMID:20808617

  17. Influences of smoking and caffeine consumption on trigeminal pain processing

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Many human and animal studies have shown the influence of nicotine and caffeine on pain perception and processing. This study aims to investigate whether smoking or caffeine consumption influences trigeminal pain processing. Methods Sixty healthy subjects were investigated using simultaneous recordings of the nociceptive blink reflex (nBR) and pain related evoked potentials (PREP) following nociceptive electrical stimulation on both sides of the forehead (V1). Thirty subjects were investigated before and after smoking a cigarette, as well as before and after taking a tablet of 400 mg caffeine. Results After smoking PREP showed decreased N2 and P2 latencies indicating central facilitation at supraspinal (thalamic or cortical) level. PREP amplitudes were not changed. NBR showed a decreased area under the curve (AUC) indicating central inhibition at brainstem level. After caffeine intake no significant changes were observed comparing nBR and PREP results before consumption. Conclusions Smoking influences trigeminal pain processing on supraspinal and brainstem level. In the investigated setting, caffeine consumption does not significantly alter trigeminal pain processing. This observation might help in the further understanding of the pathophysiology of pain disorders that are associated with excessive smoking habits such as cluster headache. Previous smoking has to be taken into account when performing electrophysiological studies to avoid bias of study results. PMID:24928141

  18. The magnetic retina: light-dependent and trigeminal magnetoreception in migratory birds.

    PubMed

    Mouritsen, Henrik; Hore, P J

    2012-04-01

    Recent advances have brought much new insight into the physiological mechanisms and required characteristics of the sensory molecules that enable birds to use magnetic fields for orientation. European robins almost certainly have two magnetodetection senses, one associated with the ophthalmic branch of the trigeminal nerve, and one based on light-dependent radical-pair processes in both eyes. The first brain areas processing magnetic information from each of these two senses have been identified. It has been experimentally verified that Earth-strength magnetic fields can affect photo-induced chemical reactions and that these reactions can respond to magnetic field direction. Diagnostic behavioural experiments have provided clues to identify putative magnetoreceptive molecules in the retina. We discuss the implications of these and other recent findings and outline crucial open questions with an emphasis on the light-dependent mechanism.

  19. Trigeminal neurons detect cellphone radiation: Thermal or nonthermal is not the question.

    PubMed

    Marino, Andrew A; Kim, Paul Y; Frilot Ii, Clifton

    2017-01-01

    Cellphone electromagnetic radiation produces temperature alterations in facial skin. We hypothesized that the radiation-induced heat was transduced by warmth-sensing trigeminal neurons, as evidenced by changes in cognitive processing of the afferent signals. Ten human volunteers were exposed on the right side of the face to 1 GHz radiation in the absence of acoustic, tactile, and low-frequency electromagnetic stimuli produced by cellphones. Cognitive processing manifested in the electroencephalogram (EEG) was quantitated by analysis of brain recurrence (a nonlinear technique). The theoretical temperature sensitivity of warmth-sensing neurons was estimated by comparing changes in membrane voltage expected as a result of heat transduction with membrane-voltage variance caused by thermal noise. Each participant underwent sixty 12-s trials. The recurrence variable r ("percent recurrence") was computed second by second for the ∆ band of EEGs from two bilaterally symmetric derivations (decussated and nondecussated). Percent recurrence during radiation exposure (first 4 s of each trial) was reduced in the decussated afferent signal compared with the control (last four seconds of each trial); mean difference, r = 1.1 ± 0.5%, p < 0.005. Mean relative ∆ power did not differ between the exposed and control intervals, as expected. Trigeminal neurons were capable of detecting temperature changes far below skin temperature increases caused by cellphone radiation. Simulated cellphone radiation affected brain electrical activity associated with nonlinear cognitive processing of radiation-induced thermal afferent signals. Radiation standards for cellphones based on a thermal/nonthermal binary distinction do not prevent neurophysiological consequences of cellphone radiation.

  20. Evaluation of Trigeminal Sensitivity to Ammonia in Asthmatics and Healthy Human Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Petrova, Maja; Diamond, Jeanmarie; Schuster, Benno; Dalton, Pamela

    2009-01-01

    Background Asthmatics often report the triggering or exacerbation of respiratory symptoms following exposure to airborne irritants, which in some cases may result from stimulation of irritant receptors in the upper airways inducing reflexive broncho-constriction. Ammonia (NH3) is a common constituent of commercially available household products, and in high concentration has the potential to elicit sensory irritation in the eyes and upper respiratory tract of humans. The goal of the present study was to evaluate the irritation potential of ammonia in asthmatics and healthy volunteers and to determine whether differences in nasal or ocular irritant sensitivity to ammonia between these two groups could account for the exacerbation of symptoms reported by asthmatics following exposure to an irritant. Methods 25 healthy and 15 mild/moderate persistent asthmatic volunteers, with reported sensitivity to household cleaning products, were evaluated for their sensitivity to the ocular and nasal irritancy of NH3. Lung function was evaluated at baseline and multiple time points following exposure. Results Irritation thresholds did not differ between asthmatics and healthy controls, nor did ratings of odor intensity, annoyance and irritancy following exposure to NH3 concentrations at and above the irritant threshold for longer periods of time (30 sec).Importantly, no changes in lung function occurred following exposure to NH3 for any individuals in either group. Conclusion Despite heightened symptom reports to environmental irritants among asthmatics, the ocular and nasal trigeminal system of mild-moderate asthmatics does not appear to be more sensitive or more reactive than that of non-asthmatics, nor does short duration exposure to ammonia at irritant levels induce changes in lung function. At least in brief exposures, the basis for some asthmatics to experience adverse responses to volatile compounds in everyday life may arise from factors other than trigeminally

  1. Corticofugal projection patterns of whisker sensorimotor cortex to the sensory trigeminal nuclei.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jared B; Watson, Glenn D R; Alloway, Kevin D; Schwarz, Cornelius; Chakrabarti, Shubhodeep

    2015-01-01

    The primary (S1) and secondary (S2) somatosensory cortices project to several trigeminal sensory nuclei. One putative function of these corticofugal projections is the gating of sensory transmission through the trigeminal principal nucleus (Pr5), and some have proposed that S1 and S2 project differentially to the spinal trigeminal subnuclei, which have inhibitory circuits that could inhibit or disinhibit the output projections of Pr5. Very little, however, is known about the origin of sensorimotor corticofugal projections and their patterns of termination in the various trigeminal nuclei. We addressed this issue by injecting anterograde tracers in S1, S2 and primary motor (M1) cortices, and quantitatively characterizing the distribution of labeled terminals within the entire rostro-caudal chain of trigeminal sub-nuclei. We confirmed our anterograde tracing results by injecting retrograde tracers at various rostro-caudal levels within the trigeminal sensory nuclei to determine the position of retrogradely labeled cortical cells with respect to S1 barrel cortex. Our results demonstrate that S1 and S2 projections terminate in largely overlapping regions but show some significant differences. Whereas S1 projection terminals tend to cluster within the principal trigeminal (Pr5), caudal spinal trigeminal interpolaris (Sp5ic), and the dorsal spinal trigeminal caudalis (Sp5c), S2 projection terminals are distributed in a continuum across all trigeminal nuclei. Contrary to the view that sensory gating could be mediated by differential activation of inhibitory interconnections between the spinal trigeminal subnuclei, we observed that projections from S1 and S2 are largely overlapping in these subnuclei despite the differences noted earlier.

  2. Typical and atypical neurovascular relations of the trigeminal nerve in the cerebellopontine angle: an anatomical study.

    PubMed

    Rusu, M C; Ivaşcu, R V; Cergan, R; Păduraru, D; Podoleanu, L

    2009-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to anatomically evaluate in adults the neurovascular trigeminal relations in the cere