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Sample records for capsaicin receptor trpv1

  1. Integrating TRPV1 Receptor Function with Capsaicin Psychophysics

    PubMed Central

    Smutzer, Gregory; Devassy, Roni K.

    2016-01-01

    Capsaicin is a naturally occurring vanilloid that causes a hot, pungent sensation in the human oral cavity. This trigeminal stimulus activates TRPV1 receptors and stimulates an influx of cations into sensory cells. TRPV1 receptors function as homotetramers that also respond to heat, proinflammatory substances, lipoxygenase products, resiniferatoxin, endocannabinoids, protons, and peptide toxins. Kinase-mediated phosphorylation of TRPV1 leads to increased sensitivity to both chemical and thermal stimuli. In contrast, desensitization occurs via a calcium-dependent mechanism that results in receptor dephosphorylation. Human psychophysical studies have shown that capsaicin is detected at nanomole amounts and causes desensitization in the oral cavity. Psychophysical studies further indicate that desensitization can be temporarily reversed in the oral cavity if stimulation with capsaicin is resumed at short interstimulus intervals. Pretreatment of lingual epithelium with capsaicin modulates the perception of several primary taste qualities. Also, sweet taste stimuli may decrease the intensity of capsaicin perception in the oral cavity. In addition, capsaicin perception and hedonic responses may be modified by diet. Psychophysical studies with capsaicin are consistent with recent findings that have identified TRPV1 channel modulation by phosphorylation and interactions with membrane inositol phospholipids. Future studies will further clarify the importance of capsaicin and its receptor in human health and nutrition. PMID:26884754

  2. Integrating TRPV1 Receptor Function with Capsaicin Psychophysics.

    PubMed

    Smutzer, Gregory; Devassy, Roni K

    2016-01-01

    Capsaicin is a naturally occurring vanilloid that causes a hot, pungent sensation in the human oral cavity. This trigeminal stimulus activates TRPV1 receptors and stimulates an influx of cations into sensory cells. TRPV1 receptors function as homotetramers that also respond to heat, proinflammatory substances, lipoxygenase products, resiniferatoxin, endocannabinoids, protons, and peptide toxins. Kinase-mediated phosphorylation of TRPV1 leads to increased sensitivity to both chemical and thermal stimuli. In contrast, desensitization occurs via a calcium-dependent mechanism that results in receptor dephosphorylation. Human psychophysical studies have shown that capsaicin is detected at nanomole amounts and causes desensitization in the oral cavity. Psychophysical studies further indicate that desensitization can be temporarily reversed in the oral cavity if stimulation with capsaicin is resumed at short interstimulus intervals. Pretreatment of lingual epithelium with capsaicin modulates the perception of several primary taste qualities. Also, sweet taste stimuli may decrease the intensity of capsaicin perception in the oral cavity. In addition, capsaicin perception and hedonic responses may be modified by diet. Psychophysical studies with capsaicin are consistent with recent findings that have identified TRPV1 channel modulation by phosphorylation and interactions with membrane inositol phospholipids. Future studies will further clarify the importance of capsaicin and its receptor in human health and nutrition.

  3. Integrating TRPV1 Receptor Function with Capsaicin Psychophysics.

    PubMed

    Smutzer, Gregory; Devassy, Roni K

    2016-01-01

    Capsaicin is a naturally occurring vanilloid that causes a hot, pungent sensation in the human oral cavity. This trigeminal stimulus activates TRPV1 receptors and stimulates an influx of cations into sensory cells. TRPV1 receptors function as homotetramers that also respond to heat, proinflammatory substances, lipoxygenase products, resiniferatoxin, endocannabinoids, protons, and peptide toxins. Kinase-mediated phosphorylation of TRPV1 leads to increased sensitivity to both chemical and thermal stimuli. In contrast, desensitization occurs via a calcium-dependent mechanism that results in receptor dephosphorylation. Human psychophysical studies have shown that capsaicin is detected at nanomole amounts and causes desensitization in the oral cavity. Psychophysical studies further indicate that desensitization can be temporarily reversed in the oral cavity if stimulation with capsaicin is resumed at short interstimulus intervals. Pretreatment of lingual epithelium with capsaicin modulates the perception of several primary taste qualities. Also, sweet taste stimuli may decrease the intensity of capsaicin perception in the oral cavity. In addition, capsaicin perception and hedonic responses may be modified by diet. Psychophysical studies with capsaicin are consistent with recent findings that have identified TRPV1 channel modulation by phosphorylation and interactions with membrane inositol phospholipids. Future studies will further clarify the importance of capsaicin and its receptor in human health and nutrition. PMID:26884754

  4. The capsaicin receptor TRPV1 as a novel modulator of neural precursor cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Stock, Kristin; Garthe, Alexander; de Almeida Sassi, Felipe; Glass, Rainer; Wolf, Susanne A; Kettenmann, Helmut

    2014-12-01

    The capsaicin receptor (TRPV1, transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1) was first discovered in the peripheral nervous system as a detector of noxious chemical and thermal stimuli including the irritant chili pepper. Recently, there has been increasing evidence of TRPV1 expression in the central nervous system. Here, we show that TRPV1 is expressed in neural precursor cells (NPCs) during postnatal development, but not in the adult. However, expression of TRPV1 is induced in the adult in paradigms linked to an increase in neurogenesis, such as spatial learning in the Morris water maze or voluntary exercise. Loss of TRPV1 expression in knockout mice leads to an increase in NPC proliferation. Functional TRPV1 expression has been confirmed in cultured NPCs. Our results indicate that TRPV1 expression influences both postnatal and activity-induced neurogenesis in adulthood. PMID:25092424

  5. Selective blockade of the capsaicin receptor TRPV1 attenuates bone cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Ghilardi, Joseph R; Röhrich, Heidi; Lindsay, Theodore H; Sevcik, Molly A; Schwei, Matthew J; Kubota, Kazufumi; Halvorson, Kyle G; Poblete, Jeannie; Chaplan, Sandra R; Dubin, Adrienne E; Carruthers, Nicholas I; Swanson, Devin; Kuskowski, Michael; Flores, Christopher M; Julius, David; Mantyh, Patrick W

    2005-03-23

    Cancer colonization of bone leads to the activation of osteoclasts, thereby producing local tissue acidosis and bone resorption. This process may contribute to the generation of both ongoing and movement-evoked pain, resulting from the activation of sensory neurons that detect noxious stimuli (nociceptors). The capsaicin receptor TRPV1 (transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1) is a cation channel expressed by nociceptors that detects multiple pain-producing stimuli, including noxious heat and extracellular protons, raising the possibility that it is an important mediator of bone cancer pain via its capacity to detect osteoclast- and tumor-mediated tissue acidosis. Here, we show that TRPV1 is present on sensory neuron fibers that innervate the mouse femur and that, in an in vivo model of bone cancer pain, acute or chronic administration of a TRPV1 antagonist or disruption of the TRPV1 gene results in a significant attenuation of both ongoing and movement-evoked nocifensive behaviors. Administration of the antagonist had similar efficacy in reducing early, moderate, and severe pain-related responses, suggesting that TRPV1 may be a novel target for pharmacological treatment of chronic pain states associated with bone cancer metastasis.

  6. ThermoTRP Channels in Nociceptors: Taking a Lead from Capsaicin Receptor TRPV1

    PubMed Central

    Mandadi, Sravan; Roufogalis, Basil D.

    2008-01-01

    Nociceptors with peripheral and central projections express temperature sensitive transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels, also called thermoTRP’s. Chemosensitivity of thermoTRP’s to certain natural compounds eliciting pain or exhibiting thermal properties has proven to be a good tool in characterizing these receptors. Capsaicin, a pungent chemical in hot peppers, has assisted in the cloning of the first thermoTRP, TRPV1. This discovery initiated the search for other receptors encoding the response to a wide range of temperatures encountered by the body. Of these, TRPV1 and TRPV2 encode unique modalities of thermal pain when exposed to noxious heat. The ability of TRPA1 to encode noxious cold is presently being debated. The role of TRPV1 in peripheral inflammatory pain and central sensitization during chronic pain is well known. In addition to endogenous agonists, a wide variety of chemical agonists and antagonists have been discovered to activate and inhibit TRPV1. Efforts are underway to determine conditions under which agonist-mediated desensitization of TRPV1 or inhibition by antagonists can produce analgesia. Also, identification of specific second messenger molecules that regulate phosphorylation of TRPV1 has been the focus of intense research, to exploit a broader approach to pain treatment. The search for a role of TRPV2 in pain remains dormant due to the lack of suitable experimental models. However, progress into TRPA1’s role in pain has received much attention recently. Another thermoTRP, TRPM8, encoding for the cool sensation and also expressed in nociceptors, has recently been shown to reduce pain via a central mechanism, thus opening a novel strategy for achieving analgesia. The role of other thermoTRP’s (TRPV3 and TRPV4) encoding for detection of warm temperatures and expressed in nociceptors cannot be excluded. This review will discuss current knowledge on the role of nociceptor thermoTRPs in pain and therapy and describes the

  7. The effects of Sympathetic Outflow on Upregulation of Vanilloid Receptors TRPV1 in Primary Afferent Neurons Evoked by Intradermal Capsaicin

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xijin; Wang, Peng; Zou, Xiaoju; Li, Dingge; Fang, Li; Gong, Kerui; Lin, Qing

    2010-01-01

    The vanilloid receptor TRPV1 is a key nociceptive molecule located in primary afferent nociceptive neurons in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) for initiating neurogenic inflammation and pain. Our recent study demonstrates that up-regulation of TRPV1 receptors by intradermal injection of capsaicin is modulated by activation of the protein kinase C (PKC) cascade. Neurogenic inflammation and pain resulting from capsaicin injection are sympathetically dependent, responding to norepinephrine, adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP) and/or neuropeptide Y released from sympathetic efferents. In a rat model of acute neurogenic inflammatory pain produced by capsaicin injection, we used immunofluorescence and Western blots combined with pharmacology and surgical sympathectomies to analyze whether the capsaicin-evoked up-regulation of TRPV1 in DRG neurons is affected by sympathetic outflow by way of activating the PKC cascade. Sympathetic denervation reduced significantly the capsaicin-evoked expressions of TRPV1, calcitonin gene-related peptide and/or phosphorylated PKC and their co-expression. These reductions could be restored by exogenous pretreatment with an analog of ATP, α,β-methylene ATP. Inhibition of PKC with chelerythrine chloride prevented the ATP effect. Consistent results were obtained from experiments in which capsaicin-evoked changes in cutaneous inflammation (vasodilation and edema) were examined after sympathetic denervation, and the effects of the above pharmacological manipulations were evaluated. Our findings suggest that the capsaicin-evoked up-regulation of TRPV1 receptors in DRG neurons is modulated sympathetically by the action of ATP released from sympathetic efferents to activate the PKC cascade. Thus, this study proposes a potential new mechanism of sympathetic modulation of neurogenic inflammation. PMID:20036240

  8. Material basis for inhibition of dragon's blood on capsaicin-induced TRPV1 receptor currents in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Wei, Li-Si; Chen, Su; Huang, Xian-Ju; Yao, Jing; Liu, Xiang-Ming

    2013-02-28

    The effects of dragon's blood and its components cochinchinenin A, cochinchinenin B, loureirin B as well as various combinations of the three components on capsaicin-induced TRPV1 receptor currents were studied in acutely dissociated DRG neurons using both voltage and current whole-cell patch clamp technique. The results indicated that dragon's blood and its three components concentration-dependently reduce the peak amplitudes of capsaicin-induced TRPV1 receptor currents. There was no significant difference between the effects of dragon's blood and the combination wherein the three components were present in respective mass fractions in dragon's blood. The respective concentrations of the three components used alone were all higher than the total concentration of three components used in combination when the percentage inhibition of the peak amplitude was 50%. The proportion of three components was adjusted and the total concentration reduced, the resulting combination still inhibit the currents with a lower IC50 value, and inhibit capsaicin-induced membrane depolarization on current clamp. The combination of three components not only increase the capsaicin IC50 value, but also reduce the capsaicin maximal response. These result suggested that analgesic effect of dragon's blood may be partly explained on the basis of silencing pain signaling pathways caused by the inhibition of dragon's blood on capsaicin-induced TRPV1 receptor currents in DRG neurons and could be due to the synergistic effect of the three components. Antagonism of the capsaicin response by the combination of three components is not competitive. The analgesic effect of dragon's blood was also confirmed using animal models.

  9. Binding of Capsaicin to the TRPV1 Ion Channel.

    PubMed

    Darré, Leonardo; Domene, Carmen

    2015-12-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels constitute a notable family of cation channels involved in the ability of an organisms to detect noxious mechanical, thermal, and chemical stimuli that give rise to the perception of pain, taste, and changes in temperature. One of the most experimentally studied agonist of TRP channels is capsaicin, which is responsible for the burning sensation produced when chili pepper is in contact with organic tissues. Thus, understanding how this molecule interacts and regulates TRP channels is essential to high impact pharmacological applications, particularly those related to pain treatment. The recent publication of a three-dimensional structure of the vanilloid receptor 1 (TRPV1) in the absence and presence of capsaicin from single particle electron cryomicroscopy experiments provides the opportunity to explore these questions at the atomic level. In the present work, molecular docking and unbiased and biased molecular dynamics simulations were employed to generate a structural model of the capsaicin-channel complex. In addition, the standard free energy of binding was estimated using alchemical transformations coupled with conformational, translational, and orientational restraints on the ligand. Key binding modes consistent with previous experimental data are identified, and subtle but essential dynamical features of the binding site are characterized. These observations shed some light into how TRPV1 interacts with capsaicin, and may help to refine design parameters for new TRPV1 antagonists, and potentially guide further developments of TRP channel modulators. PMID:26502196

  10. Binding of Capsaicin to the TRPV1 Ion Channel.

    PubMed

    Darré, Leonardo; Domene, Carmen

    2015-12-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels constitute a notable family of cation channels involved in the ability of an organisms to detect noxious mechanical, thermal, and chemical stimuli that give rise to the perception of pain, taste, and changes in temperature. One of the most experimentally studied agonist of TRP channels is capsaicin, which is responsible for the burning sensation produced when chili pepper is in contact with organic tissues. Thus, understanding how this molecule interacts and regulates TRP channels is essential to high impact pharmacological applications, particularly those related to pain treatment. The recent publication of a three-dimensional structure of the vanilloid receptor 1 (TRPV1) in the absence and presence of capsaicin from single particle electron cryomicroscopy experiments provides the opportunity to explore these questions at the atomic level. In the present work, molecular docking and unbiased and biased molecular dynamics simulations were employed to generate a structural model of the capsaicin-channel complex. In addition, the standard free energy of binding was estimated using alchemical transformations coupled with conformational, translational, and orientational restraints on the ligand. Key binding modes consistent with previous experimental data are identified, and subtle but essential dynamical features of the binding site are characterized. These observations shed some light into how TRPV1 interacts with capsaicin, and may help to refine design parameters for new TRPV1 antagonists, and potentially guide further developments of TRP channel modulators.

  11. Capsaicin interaction with TRPV1 channels in a lipid bilayer: molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Sonya M; Newstead, Simon; Swartz, Kenton J; Sansom, Mark S P

    2015-03-24

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1) is a heat-sensitive ion channel also involved in pain sensation, and is the receptor for capsaicin, the active ingredient of hot chili peppers. The recent structures of TRPV1 revealed putative ligand density within the S1 to S4 voltage-sensor-like domain of the protein. However, questions remain regarding the dynamic role of the lipid bilayer in ligand binding to TRPV1. Molecular dynamics simulations were used to explore behavior of capsaicin in a 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl phosphatidylcholine bilayer and with the target S1-S4 transmembrane helices of TRPV1. Equilibrium simulations reveal a preferred interfacial localization for capsaicin. We also observed a capsaicin molecule flipping from the extracellular to the intracellular leaflet, and subsequently able to access the intracellular TRPV1 binding site. Calculation of the potential of mean force (i.e., free energy profile) of capsaicin along the bilayer normal confirms that it prefers an interfacial localization. The free energy profile indicates that there is a nontrivial but surmountable barrier to the flipping of capsaicin between opposing leaflets of the bilayer. Molecular dynamics of the S1-S4 transmembrane helices of the TRPV1 in a lipid bilayer confirm that Y511, known to be crucial to capsaicin binding, has a distribution along the bilayer normal similar to that of the aromatic group of capsaicin. Simulations were conducted of the TRPV1 S1-S4 transmembrane helices in the presence of capsaicin placed in the aqueous phase, in the lipid, or docked to the protein. No stable interaction between ligand and protein was seen for simulations initiated with capsaicin in the bilayer. However, interactions were seen between TRPV1 and capsaicin starting from the cytosolic aqueous phase, and capsaicin remained stable in the majority of simulations from the docked pose. We discuss the significance of capsaicin flipping from the extracellular to the intracellular

  12. Attenuation of natural killer cell functions by capsaicin through a direct and TRPV1-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hun Sik; Kwon, Hyung-Joon; Kim, Gye Eun; Cho, Mi-Hyang; Yoon, Seung-Yong; Davies, Alexander J; Oh, Seog Bae; Lee, Heuiran; Cho, Young Keol; Joo, Chul Hyun; Kwon, Seog Woon; Kim, Sun Chang; Kim, Yoo Kyum

    2014-07-01

    The assessment of the biological activity of capsaicin, the compound responsible for the spicy flavor of chili pepper, produced controversial results, showing either carcinogenicity or cancer prevention. The innate immune system plays a pivotal role in cancer pathology and prevention; yet, the effect of capsaicin on natural killer (NK) cells, which function in cancer surveillance, is unclear. This study found that capsaicin inhibited NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity and cytokine production (interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α). Capsaicin impaired the cytotoxicity of NK cells, thereby inhibiting lysis of standard target cells and gastric cancer cells by modulating calcium mobilization in NK cells. Capsaicin also induced apoptosis in gastric cancer cells, but that effect required higher concentrations and longer exposure times than those required to trigger NK cell dysfunction. Furthermore, capsaicin inhibited the cytotoxicity of isolated NK cells and of an NK cell line, suggesting a direct effect on NK cells. Antagonists of transient receptor potential vanilloid subfamily member 1 (TRPV1), a cognate capsaicin receptor, or deficiency in TRPV1 expression failed to prevent the defects induced by capsaicin in NK cells expressing functional TRPV1. Thus, the mechanism of action of capsaicin on NK cells is largely independent of TRPV1. Taken together, capsaicin may have chemotherapeutic potential but may impair NK cell function, which plays a central role in tumor surveillance. PMID:24743513

  13. Capsaicin Interaction with TRPV1 Channels in a Lipid Bilayer: Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Sonya M.; Newstead, Simon; Swartz, Kenton J.; Sansom, Mark S.P.

    2015-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1) is a heat-sensitive ion channel also involved in pain sensation, and is the receptor for capsaicin, the active ingredient of hot chili peppers. The recent structures of TRPV1 revealed putative ligand density within the S1 to S4 voltage-sensor-like domain of the protein. However, questions remain regarding the dynamic role of the lipid bilayer in ligand binding to TRPV1. Molecular dynamics simulations were used to explore behavior of capsaicin in a 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl phosphatidylcholine bilayer and with the target S1–S4 transmembrane helices of TRPV1. Equilibrium simulations reveal a preferred interfacial localization for capsaicin. We also observed a capsaicin molecule flipping from the extracellular to the intracellular leaflet, and subsequently able to access the intracellular TRPV1 binding site. Calculation of the potential of mean force (i.e., free energy profile) of capsaicin along the bilayer normal confirms that it prefers an interfacial localization. The free energy profile indicates that there is a nontrivial but surmountable barrier to the flipping of capsaicin between opposing leaflets of the bilayer. Molecular dynamics of the S1–S4 transmembrane helices of the TRPV1 in a lipid bilayer confirm that Y511, known to be crucial to capsaicin binding, has a distribution along the bilayer normal similar to that of the aromatic group of capsaicin. Simulations were conducted of the TRPV1 S1–S4 transmembrane helices in the presence of capsaicin placed in the aqueous phase, in the lipid, or docked to the protein. No stable interaction between ligand and protein was seen for simulations initiated with capsaicin in the bilayer. However, interactions were seen between TRPV1 and capsaicin starting from the cytosolic aqueous phase, and capsaicin remained stable in the majority of simulations from the docked pose. We discuss the significance of capsaicin flipping from the extracellular to the intracellular

  14. Capsaicin interaction with TRPV1 channels in a lipid bilayer: molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Sonya M; Newstead, Simon; Swartz, Kenton J; Sansom, Mark S P

    2015-03-24

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1) is a heat-sensitive ion channel also involved in pain sensation, and is the receptor for capsaicin, the active ingredient of hot chili peppers. The recent structures of TRPV1 revealed putative ligand density within the S1 to S4 voltage-sensor-like domain of the protein. However, questions remain regarding the dynamic role of the lipid bilayer in ligand binding to TRPV1. Molecular dynamics simulations were used to explore behavior of capsaicin in a 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl phosphatidylcholine bilayer and with the target S1-S4 transmembrane helices of TRPV1. Equilibrium simulations reveal a preferred interfacial localization for capsaicin. We also observed a capsaicin molecule flipping from the extracellular to the intracellular leaflet, and subsequently able to access the intracellular TRPV1 binding site. Calculation of the potential of mean force (i.e., free energy profile) of capsaicin along the bilayer normal confirms that it prefers an interfacial localization. The free energy profile indicates that there is a nontrivial but surmountable barrier to the flipping of capsaicin between opposing leaflets of the bilayer. Molecular dynamics of the S1-S4 transmembrane helices of the TRPV1 in a lipid bilayer confirm that Y511, known to be crucial to capsaicin binding, has a distribution along the bilayer normal similar to that of the aromatic group of capsaicin. Simulations were conducted of the TRPV1 S1-S4 transmembrane helices in the presence of capsaicin placed in the aqueous phase, in the lipid, or docked to the protein. No stable interaction between ligand and protein was seen for simulations initiated with capsaicin in the bilayer. However, interactions were seen between TRPV1 and capsaicin starting from the cytosolic aqueous phase, and capsaicin remained stable in the majority of simulations from the docked pose. We discuss the significance of capsaicin flipping from the extracellular to the intracellular

  15. Capsaicin-Induced Changes in LTP in the Lateral Amygdala Are Mediated by TRPV1

    PubMed Central

    Zschenderlein, Carsten; Gebhardt, Christine; von Bohlen und Halbach, Oliver; Kulisch, Christoph; Albrecht, Doris

    2011-01-01

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) channel is a well recognized polymodal signal detector that is activated by painful stimuli such as capsaicin. Here, we show that TRPV1 is expressed in the lateral nucleus of the amygdala (LA). Despite the fact that the central amygdala displays the highest neuronal density, the highest density of TRPV1 labeled neurons was found within the nuclei of the basolateral complex of the amygdala. Capsaicin specifically changed the magnitude of long-term potentiation (LTP) in the LA in brain slices of mice depending on the anesthetic (ether, isoflurane) used before euthanasia. After ether anesthesia, capsaicin had a suppressive effect on LA-LTP both in patch clamp and in extracellular recordings. The capsaicin-induced reduction of LTP was completely blocked by the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor L-NAME and was absent in neuronal NOS as well as in TRPV1 deficient mice. The specific antagonist of cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1), AM 251, was also able to reduce the inhibitory effect of capsaicin on LA-LTP, suggesting that stimulation of TRPV1 provokes the generation of anandamide in the brain which seems to inhibit NO synthesis. After isoflurane anesthesia before euthanasia capsaicin caused a TRPV1-mediated increase in the magnitude of LA-LTP. Therefore, our results also indicate that the appropriate choice of the anesthetics used is an important consideration when brain plasticity and the action of endovanilloids will be evaluated. In summary, our results demonstrate that TRPV1 may be involved in the amygdala control of learning mechanisms. PMID:21249195

  16. Understanding TRPV1 activation by ligands: Insights from the binding modes of capsaicin and resiniferatoxin

    PubMed Central

    Elokely, Khaled; Velisetty, Phanindra; Delemotte, Lucie; Palovcak, Eugene; Klein, Michael L.; Rohacs, Tibor; Carnevale, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    The transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1) or vanilloid receptor 1 is a nonselective cation channel that is involved in the detection and transduction of nociceptive stimuli. Inflammation and nerve damage result in the up-regulation of TRPV1 transcription, and, therefore, modulators of TRPV1 channels are potentially useful in the treatment of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. Understanding the binding modes of known ligands would significantly contribute to the success of TRPV1 modulator drug design programs. The recent cryo-electron microscopy structure of TRPV1 only provides a coarse characterization of the location of capsaicin (CAPS) and resiniferatoxin (RTX). Herein, we use the information contained in the experimental electron density maps to accurately determine the binding mode of CAPS and RTX and experimentally validate the computational results by mutagenesis. On the basis of these results, we perform a detailed analysis of TRPV1–ligand interactions, characterizing the protein ligand contacts and the role of individual water molecules. Importantly, our results provide a rational explanation and suggestion of TRPV1 ligand modifications that should improve binding affinity. PMID:26719417

  17. Understanding TRPV1 activation by ligands: Insights from the binding modes of capsaicin and resiniferatoxin.

    PubMed

    Elokely, Khaled; Velisetty, Phanindra; Delemotte, Lucie; Palovcak, Eugene; Klein, Michael L; Rohacs, Tibor; Carnevale, Vincenzo

    2016-01-12

    The transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1) or vanilloid receptor 1 is a nonselective cation channel that is involved in the detection and transduction of nociceptive stimuli. Inflammation and nerve damage result in the up-regulation of TRPV1 transcription, and, therefore, modulators of TRPV1 channels are potentially useful in the treatment of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. Understanding the binding modes of known ligands would significantly contribute to the success of TRPV1 modulator drug design programs. The recent cryo-electron microscopy structure of TRPV1 only provides a coarse characterization of the location of capsaicin (CAPS) and resiniferatoxin (RTX). Herein, we use the information contained in the experimental electron density maps to accurately determine the binding mode of CAPS and RTX and experimentally validate the computational results by mutagenesis. On the basis of these results, we perform a detailed analysis of TRPV1-ligand interactions, characterizing the protein ligand contacts and the role of individual water molecules. Importantly, our results provide a rational explanation and suggestion of TRPV1 ligand modifications that should improve binding affinity. PMID:26719417

  18. Understanding TRPV1 activation by ligands: Insights from the binding modes of capsaicin and resiniferatoxin.

    PubMed

    Elokely, Khaled; Velisetty, Phanindra; Delemotte, Lucie; Palovcak, Eugene; Klein, Michael L; Rohacs, Tibor; Carnevale, Vincenzo

    2016-01-12

    The transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1) or vanilloid receptor 1 is a nonselective cation channel that is involved in the detection and transduction of nociceptive stimuli. Inflammation and nerve damage result in the up-regulation of TRPV1 transcription, and, therefore, modulators of TRPV1 channels are potentially useful in the treatment of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. Understanding the binding modes of known ligands would significantly contribute to the success of TRPV1 modulator drug design programs. The recent cryo-electron microscopy structure of TRPV1 only provides a coarse characterization of the location of capsaicin (CAPS) and resiniferatoxin (RTX). Herein, we use the information contained in the experimental electron density maps to accurately determine the binding mode of CAPS and RTX and experimentally validate the computational results by mutagenesis. On the basis of these results, we perform a detailed analysis of TRPV1-ligand interactions, characterizing the protein ligand contacts and the role of individual water molecules. Importantly, our results provide a rational explanation and suggestion of TRPV1 ligand modifications that should improve binding affinity.

  19. Acetylsalicylic acid enhances tachyphylaxis of repetitive capsaicin responses in TRPV1-GFP expressing HEK293 cells.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Kristina; Binzen, Uta; Mörz, Handan; Bugert, Peter; Schedel, Angelika; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Greffrath, Wolfgang

    2014-03-20

    Since many years acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) is known for its antithrombotic, antiphlogistic and analgesic effects caused by irreversible acetylation of cyclooxygenase. ASA also inhibits capsaicin- and heat-induced responses in cultured dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons, suggesting TRPV1 (transient receptor potential channel of the vanilloid receptor family, subtype 1) to be an additional target of ASA. We now studied the effect of ASA on heterologously expressed rat TRPV1 using calcium microfluorimetry. Capsaicin dose-dependently increased intracellular calcium with an EC50 of 0.29 μM in rTRPV1 expressing HEK293 cells. During repetitive stimulation the second response to capsaicin was reduced (53.4 ± 8.3% compared to vehicle control; p<0.005; Student's unpaired t-test) by 1μM ASA, a concentration much below the one needed to inhibit cyclooxygenase (IC50 of 35 μM in thromboxane B2 production assay). In contrast, calcium transients induced by a single stimulus of 0.3 or 1 μM capsaicin were not significantly reduced by 0.3 or 1 μM ASA. These data suggest that ASA increases the tachyphylaxis of rTRPV1 channel activation. Mechanisms are unknown and may be direct by e.g. stabilization of the desensitized state or indirect via inhibition of intracellular signaling pathways e.g. of the mitogen-activated protein kinase family (MAPK/ERK).

  20. Effects of neonatal treatment with the TRPV1 agonist, capsaicin, on adult rat brain and behaviour.

    PubMed

    Newson, Penny N; van den Buuse, Maarten; Martin, Sally; Lynch-Frame, Ann; Chahl, Loris A

    2014-10-01

    Treatment of neonatal rats with the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channel agonist, capsaicin, produces life-long loss of sensory neurons expressing TRPV1 channels. Previously it was shown that rats treated on day 2 of life with capsaicin had behavioural hyperactivity in a novel environment at 5-7 weeks of age and brain changes reminiscent of those found in subjects with schizophrenia. The objective of the present study was to investigate brain and behavioural responses of adult rats treated as neonates with capsaicin. It was found that the brain changes found at 5-7 weeks in rats treated as neonates with capsaicin persisted into adulthood (12 weeks) but were less in older rats (16-18 weeks). Increased prepulse inhibition (PPI) of acoustic startle was found in these rats at 8 and 12 weeks of age rather than the deficit commonly found in animal models of schizophrenia. Subjects with schizophrenia also have reduced flare responses to niacin and methylnicotinate proposed to be mediated by prostaglandin D2 (PGD2). Flare responses are accompanied by cutaneous plasma extravasation. It was found that the cutaneous plasma extravasation responses to methylnicotinate and PGD2 were reduced in capsaicin-treated rats. In conclusion, several neuroanatomical changes observed in capsaicin-treated rats, as well as the reduced cutaneous plasma extravasation responses, indicate that the role of TRPV1 channels in schizophrenia is worthy of investigation.

  1. Capsaicin induces NKCC1 internalization and inhibits chloride secretion in colonic epithelial cells independently of TRPV1.

    PubMed

    Bouyer, Patrice G; Tang, Xu; Weber, Christopher R; Shen, Le; Turner, Jerrold R; Matthews, Jeffrey B

    2013-01-15

    Colonic chloride secretion is regulated via the neurohormonal and immune systems. Exogenous chemicals (e.g., butyrate, propionate) can affect chloride secretion. Capsaicin, the pungent ingredient of the chili peppers, exerts various effects on gastrointestinal function. Capsaicin is known to activate the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1), expressed in the mesenteric nervous system. Recent studies have also demonstrated its presence in epithelial cells but its role remains uncertain. Because capsaicin has been reported to inhibit colonic chloride secretion, we tested whether this effect of capsaicin could occur by direct action on epithelial cells. In mouse colon and model T84 human colonic epithelial cells, we found that capsaicin inhibited forskolin-dependent short-circuit current (FSK-I(sc)). Using PCR and Western blot, we demonstrated the presence of TRPV1 in colonic epithelial cells. In T84 cells, TRPV1 localized at the basolateral membrane and in vesicular compartments. In permeabilized monolayers, capsaicin activated apical chloride conductance, had no effect on basolateral potassium conductance, but induced NKCC1 internalization demonstrated by immunocytochemistry and basolateral surface biotinylation. AMG-9810, a potent inhibitor of TRPV1, did not prevent the inhibition of the FSK-I(sc) by capsaicin. Neither resiniferatoxin nor N-oleoyldopamine, two selective agonists of TRPV1, blocked the FSK-I(sc). Conversely capsaicin, resiniferatoxin, and N-oleoyldopamine raised intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)](i)) in T84 cells and AMG-9810 blocked the rise in [Ca(2+)](i) induced by capsaicin and resiniferatoxin suggesting the presence of a functional TRPV1 channel. We conclude that capsaicin inhibits chloride secretion in part by causing NKCC1 internalization, but by a mechanism that appears to be independent of TRPV1. PMID:23139219

  2. Biochemical pharmacology of the vanilloid receptor TRPV1. An update.

    PubMed

    Cortright, Daniel N; Szallasi, Arpad

    2004-05-01

    There is mounting evidence that the vanilloid (capsaicin) receptor; transient receptor potential channel, vanilloid subfamily member 1 (TRPV1), is subjected to multiple interacting levels of control. The first level is by reversible phosphorylation catalyzed by intrinsic kinases (e.g. protein kinase A and C) and phosphatases (e.g. calcineurin), which plays a pivotal role in receptor sensitization vs. tachyphylaxis. In addition, this mechanism links TRPV1 to intracellular signaling by various important endogenous as well as exogenous substances such as bradykinin, ethanol, nicotin and insulin. It is not clear, however, whether phosphorylation per se is sufficient to liberate TRPV1 under the inhibitory control of phosphatydylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate. The second level of control is by forming TRPV1 heteromers and their association with putative regulatory proteins. The next level of regulation is by subcellular compartmentalization. The membrane form of TRPV1 functions as a nonselective cation channel. On the endoplasmic reticulum, TRPV1 is present in two differentially regulated forms, one of which is inositol triphosphate-dependent whereas the other is not. These three TRPV1 compartments provide a versatile regulation of intracellular Ca(2+) levels. Last, there is a complex and poorly understood regulation of TRPV1 activity via control of gene expression. Factors that downregulate TRPV1 expression include vanilloid treatment and growth factor (notably, nerve growth factor) deprivation. By contrast, TRPV1 appears to be upregulated during inflammatory conditions. Interestingly, following experimental nerve injury and in animal models of diabetic neuropathy TRPV1 is present on neurons that do not normally express TRPV1. Combined, these findings imply an important role for aberrant TRPV1 expression in the development of neuropathic pain and hyperalgesia. In humans, disease-related changes in TRPV1 expression have already been described (e.g. inflammatory bowel disease

  3. Capsaicin enhances anti-proliferation efficacy of pirarubicin via activating TRPV1 and inhibiting PCNA nuclear translocation in 5637 cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Long; Chen, Jiaqi; Ma, Zhenkun; Liu, Wei; Yang, Fei; Yang, Zhao; Wang, Ke; Wang, Xinyang; He, Dalin; Li, Lei; Zeng, Jin

    2016-01-01

    The recurrence of bladder cancer after surgery with or without chemotherapy remains a major challenge in bladder cancer treatment. Previous studies have shown that transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) acts as a tumor suppressor through inducing apoptosis in bladder cancer cells. However, whether activation of TRPV1 has any synergistic effects with pirarubicin (THP), one of main drugs used in urinary bladder instillation chemotherapy to improve chemotherapeutic efficacy has remained elusive. The present study verified that TRPV1 was differentially expressed in bladder cancer cell lines. Furthermore, activation of TRPV1 by capsaicin was shown to induce growth inhibition of 5637 cells in which TRPV1 was highly expressed, while the growth of T24 cells, which express TRPV1 at low levels, was not affected. In addition, the present study demonstrated that activation of TRPV1 enhanced the anti‑proliferative effects of pirarubicin using an MTT assay and cell cycle analysis. Finally, immunofluorescent microscopy revealed that activation of TRPV1 prevented the translocation of proliferating cell nuclear antigen to the nucleus. This phenomenon was reversed by pre‑treatment with capsazepine, a specific TRPV1 antagonist. In conclusion, the present study confirmed the anti‑tumor activity of TRPV1 against bladder cancer. Activation of TRPV1 may be applied as a novel strategy to treat bladder cancer or enhance the therapeutic efficacy of traditional chemotherapeutic drugs.

  4. Neonatal capsaicin treatment in rats affects TRPV1-related noxious heat sensation and circadian body temperature rhythm.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Keun-Yeong; Seong, Jinsil

    2014-06-15

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is a cation channel that serves as a polymodal detector of noxious stimuli such as capsaicin. Therefore, capsaicin treatment has been used to investigate the physiological function of TRPV1. Here, we report physiological changes induced by treating neonatal rats with capsaicin. Capsaicin (50mg/kg) (cap-treated) or vehicle (vehicle-treated) was systemically administered to newborn SD rat pups within 48 h after birth. TRPV1 expression, intake volume of capsaicin water, and noxious heat sensation were measured 6 weeks after capsaicin treatment. Circadian body temperature and locomotion were recorded by biotelemetry. Expression of Per1, Per2, Bmal1 and Hsf1 (clock genes) was also investigated. Neonatal capsaicin treatment not only decreased TRPV1 expression but also induced desensitization to noxious heat stimuli. Circadian body temperature of cap-treated rats increased significantly compared with that of vehicle-treated rats. Additionally, the amplitude of the circadian body temperature was reversed in cap-treated rats. Expression of the hypothalamic Hsf1 and liver Per2 clock genes followed a similar trend. Therefore, we suggest that these findings will be useful in studying various physiological mechanisms related to TRPV1.

  5. Selective disruption of high sensitivity heat activation but not capsaicin activation of TRPV1 channels by pore turret mutations.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yuanyuan; Yang, Fan; Cao, Xu; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Wang, KeWei; Zheng, Jie

    2012-04-01

    The capsaicin receptor transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV)1 is a highly heat-sensitive ion channel. Although chemical activation and heat activation of TRPV1 elicit similar pungent, painful sensation, the molecular mechanism underlying synergistic activation remains mysterious. In particular, where the temperature sensor is located and whether heat and capsaicin share a common activation pathway are debated. To address these fundamental issues, we searched for channel mutations that selectively affected one form of activation. We found that deletion of the first 10 amino acids of the pore turret significantly reduced the heat response amplitude and shifted the heat activation threshold, whereas capsaicin activation remained unchanged. Removing larger portions of the turret disrupted channel function. Introducing an artificial sequence to replace the deleted region restored sensitive capsaicin activation in these nonfunctional channels. The heat activation, however, remained significantly impaired, with the current exhibiting diminishing heat sensitivity to a level indistinguishable from that of a voltage-gated potassium channel, Kv7.4. Our results demonstrate that heat and capsaicin activation of TRPV1 are structurally and mechanistically distinct processes, and the pore turret is an indispensible channel structure involved in the heat activation process but is not part of the capsaicin activation pathway. Synergistic effect of heat and capsaicin on TRPV1 activation may originate from convergence of the two pathways on a common activation gate.

  6. Structure-activity relationships of vanilloid receptor agonists for arteriolar TRPV1

    PubMed Central

    Czikora, Á; Lizanecz, E; Bakó, P; Rutkai, I; Ruzsnavszky, F; Magyar, J; Pórszász, R; Kark, T; Facskó, A; Papp, Z; Édes, I; Tóth, A

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) plays a role in the activation of sensory neurons by various painful stimuli and is a therapeutic target. However, functional TRPV1 that affect microvascular diameter are also expressed in peripheral arteries and we attempted to characterize this receptor. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Sensory TRPV1 activation was measured in rats by use of an eye wiping assay. Arteriolar TRPV1-mediated smooth muscle specific responses (arteriolar diameter, changes in intracellular Ca2+) were determined in isolated, pressurized skeletal muscle arterioles obtained from the rat and wild-type or TRPV1−/− mice and in canine isolated smooth muscle cells. The vascular pharmacology of the TRPV1 agonists (potency, efficacy, kinetics of action and receptor desensitization) was determined in rat isolated skeletal muscle arteries. KEY RESULTS Capsaicin evoked a constrictor response in isolated arteries similar to that mediated by noradrenaline, this was absent in arteries from TRPV1 knockout mice and competitively inhibited by TRPV1 antagonist AMG9810. Capsaicin increased intracellular Ca2+ in the arteriolar wall and in isolated smooth muscle cells. The TRPV1 agonists evoked similar vascular constrictions (MSK-195 and JYL-79) or were without effect (resiniferatoxin and JYL-273), although all increased the number of responses (sensory activation) in the eye wiping assay. Maximal doses of all agonists induced complete desensitization (tachyphylaxis) of arteriolar TRPV1 (with the exception of capsaicin). Responses to the partial agonist JYL-1511 suggested 10% TRPV1 activation is sufficient to evoke vascular tachyphylaxis without sensory activation. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Arteriolar TRPV1 have different pharmacological properties from those located on sensory neurons in the rat. PMID:21883148

  7. The effect of neurotrophic factors on morphology, TRPV1 expression and capsaicin responses of cultured human DRG sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Anand, U; Otto, W R; Casula, M A; Day, N C; Davis, J B; Bountra, C; Birch, R; Anand, P

    2006-05-15

    We have studied the effect of key neurotrophic factors (NTFs) on morphology, levels of the vanilloid receptor-1 (TRPV1) and responses to capsaicin in adult human sensory neurons in vitro. Avulsed dorsal root ganglia (DRG, n = 5) were cultured with or without a combination of nerve growth factor (NGF), glial cell (line)-derived growth factor (GDNF) and neurotrophin3 (NT3) for 5 days. In the absence of NTFs, the diameter of neurons ranged from 20 to 100 microm (mean 42 +/- 4 microm). Adding NTFs caused a significant increase in neuronal sizes, up to 120 microm (mean diameter 62 +/- 5 microm, P < 0.01, t-test), an overall 35% increase of TRPV1-positive neurons (P < 0.003), and notably of large TRPV1-positive neurons > 80 microm (P < 0.05). Responses to capsaicin were significantly enhanced with calcium ratiometry (P < 0.0001). Short duration (1h) exposure of dissociated sensory neurons to NTFs increased numbers of TRPV1-positive neurons, but not of TRPV3, Nav 1.8 and IK1 and the morphological size-distribution remained similar to intact post-mortem DRG neurons. NTFs thus increase size, elevate TRPV1 levels and enhance capsaicin responses in cultured human DRG neurons; these changes may relate to pathophysiology in disease states, and provide an in vitro model to study novel analgesics. PMID:16481104

  8. Presynaptic TRPV1 vanilloid receptor function is age- but not CB1 cannabinoid receptor-dependent in the rodent forebrain.

    PubMed

    Köles, László; Garção, Pedro; Zádori, Zoltán S; Ferreira, Samira G; Pinheiro, Bárbara S; da Silva-Santos, Carla S; Ledent, Catherine; Köfalvi, Attila

    2013-08-01

    Neocortical and striatal TRPV1 (vanilloid or capsaicin) receptors (TRPV1Rs) are excitatory ligand-gated ion channels, and are implicated in psychiatric disorders. However, the purported presynaptic neuromodulator role of TRPV1Rs in glutamatergic, serotonergic or dopaminergic terminals of the rodent forebrain remains little understood. With the help of patch-clamp electrophysiology and neurochemical approaches, we mapped the age-dependence of presynaptic TRPV1R function, and furthermore, we aimed at exploring whether the presence of CB1 cannabinoid receptors (CB1Rs) influences the function of the TRPV1Rs, as both receptor types share endogenous ligands. We found that the major factor which affects presynaptic TRPV1R function is age: by post-natal day 13, the amplitude of capsaicin-induced release of dopamine and glutamate is halved in the rat striatum, and two weeks later, capsaicin already loses its effect. However, TRPV1R receptor function is not enhanced by chemical or genetic ablation of the CB1Rs in dopaminergic, glutamatergic and serotonergic terminals of the mouse brain. Altogether, our data indicate a possible neurodevelopmental role for presynaptic TRPV1Rs in the rodent brain, but we found no cross-talk between TRPV1Rs and CB1Rs in the same nerve terminal.

  9. Presynaptic TRPV1 vanilloid receptor function is age- but not CB1 cannabinoid receptor-dependent in the rodent forebrain.

    PubMed

    Köles, László; Garção, Pedro; Zádori, Zoltán S; Ferreira, Samira G; Pinheiro, Bárbara S; da Silva-Santos, Carla S; Ledent, Catherine; Köfalvi, Attila

    2013-08-01

    Neocortical and striatal TRPV1 (vanilloid or capsaicin) receptors (TRPV1Rs) are excitatory ligand-gated ion channels, and are implicated in psychiatric disorders. However, the purported presynaptic neuromodulator role of TRPV1Rs in glutamatergic, serotonergic or dopaminergic terminals of the rodent forebrain remains little understood. With the help of patch-clamp electrophysiology and neurochemical approaches, we mapped the age-dependence of presynaptic TRPV1R function, and furthermore, we aimed at exploring whether the presence of CB1 cannabinoid receptors (CB1Rs) influences the function of the TRPV1Rs, as both receptor types share endogenous ligands. We found that the major factor which affects presynaptic TRPV1R function is age: by post-natal day 13, the amplitude of capsaicin-induced release of dopamine and glutamate is halved in the rat striatum, and two weeks later, capsaicin already loses its effect. However, TRPV1R receptor function is not enhanced by chemical or genetic ablation of the CB1Rs in dopaminergic, glutamatergic and serotonergic terminals of the mouse brain. Altogether, our data indicate a possible neurodevelopmental role for presynaptic TRPV1Rs in the rodent brain, but we found no cross-talk between TRPV1Rs and CB1Rs in the same nerve terminal. PMID:23831917

  10. Resiniferatoxin (RTX) Causes a Uniquely Protracted Musculoskeletal Hyperalgesia in Mice by Activation of TRPV1 Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Abdelhamid, Ramy E.; Kovács, Katalin J.; Honda, Christopher N.; Nunez, Myra G.; Larson, Alice A.

    2013-01-01

    Inactivation of TRPV1 receptors is one approach to analgesic drug development. However, TRPV1 receptors exert different effects on each modality of pain. Because muscle pain is clinically important, we compared the effect of TRPV1 ligands on musculoskeletal nociception to that on thermal and tactile nociception. Injected parenterally, capsaicin had no effect on von Frey fiber responses (tactile) but induced a transient hypothermia and hyperalgesia in both the tail flick (thermal) and grip force (musculoskeletal) assays, presumably by its agonistic action at TRPV1 sites. In contrast, RTX produced a chronic (>58 days) thermal antinociception, consistent with its reported ability to desensitize TRPV1 sites. In the same mice, RTX produced a transient hypothermia (7 h) and a protracted (28 day) musculoskeletal hyperalgesia in spite of a 35.5% reduction in TRPV1 receptor-immunoreactivity in muscle afferents. Once musculoskeletal hyperalgesia subsided, mice were tolerant to the hyperalgesic effects of either capsaicin or RTX while tolerance to hypothermia did not develop until after three injections. Musculoskeletal hyperalgesia was prevented but not reversed by SB-366791, a TRPV1 antagonist, indicating that TRPV1 receptors initiate but do not maintain hyperalgesia. Injected intrathecally, RTX produced only a brief musculoskeletal hyperalgesia (2 days) after which mice were tolerant to this effect. Perspective The effect of TRPV1 receptors varies depending on modality and tissue type such that RTX causes thermal antinociception, musculoskeletal hyperalgesia, and no effect on tactile nociception in healthy mice. Spinal TRPV1 receptors are a potential target for pain relief as they induce only a short musculoskeletal hyperalgesia followed by desensitization. PMID:24188863

  11. Retinoids activate the irritant receptor TRPV1 and produce sensory hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Yin, Shijin; Luo, Jialie; Qian, Aihua; Du, Junhui; Yang, Qing; Zhou, Shentai; Yu, Weihua; Du, Guangwei; Clark, Richard B; Walters, Edgar T; Carlton, Susan M; Hu, Hongzhen

    2013-09-01

    Retinoids are structurally related derivatives of vitamin A and are required for normal vision as well as cell proliferation and differentiation. Clinically, retinoids are effective in treating many skin disorders and cancers. Application of retinoids evokes substantial irritating side effects, including pain and inflammation; however, the precise mechanisms accounting for the sensory hypersensitivity are not understood. Here we show that both naturally occurring and synthetic retinoids activate recombinant or native transient receptor potential channel vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1), an irritant receptor for capsaicin, the pungent ingredient of chili peppers. In vivo, retinoids produced pain-related behaviors that were either eliminated or significantly reduced by genetic or pharmacological inhibition of TRPV1 function. These findings identify TRPV1 as an ionotropic receptor for retinoids and provide cellular and molecular insights into retinoid-evoked hypersensitivity. These findings also suggest that selective TRPV1 antagonists are potential therapeutic drugs for treating retinoid-induced sensory hypersensitivity. PMID:23925292

  12. Retinoids activate the irritant receptor TRPV1 and produce sensory hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Yin, Shijin; Luo, Jialie; Qian, Aihua; Du, Junhui; Yang, Qing; Zhou, Shentai; Yu, Weihua; Du, Guangwei; Clark, Richard B; Walters, Edgar T; Carlton, Susan M; Hu, Hongzhen

    2013-09-01

    Retinoids are structurally related derivatives of vitamin A and are required for normal vision as well as cell proliferation and differentiation. Clinically, retinoids are effective in treating many skin disorders and cancers. Application of retinoids evokes substantial irritating side effects, including pain and inflammation; however, the precise mechanisms accounting for the sensory hypersensitivity are not understood. Here we show that both naturally occurring and synthetic retinoids activate recombinant or native transient receptor potential channel vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1), an irritant receptor for capsaicin, the pungent ingredient of chili peppers. In vivo, retinoids produced pain-related behaviors that were either eliminated or significantly reduced by genetic or pharmacological inhibition of TRPV1 function. These findings identify TRPV1 as an ionotropic receptor for retinoids and provide cellular and molecular insights into retinoid-evoked hypersensitivity. These findings also suggest that selective TRPV1 antagonists are potential therapeutic drugs for treating retinoid-induced sensory hypersensitivity.

  13. Retinoids activate the irritant receptor TRPV1 and produce sensory hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Shijin; Luo, Jialie; Qian, Aihua; Du, Junhui; Yang, Qing; Zhou, Shentai; Yu, Weihua; Du, Guangwei; Clark, Richard B.; Walters, Edgar T.; Carlton, Susan M.; Hu, Hongzhen

    2013-01-01

    Retinoids are structurally related derivatives of vitamin A and are required for normal vision as well as cell proliferation and differentiation. Clinically, retinoids are effective in treating many skin disorders and cancers. Application of retinoids evokes substantial irritating side effects, including pain and inflammation; however, the precise mechanisms accounting for the sensory hypersensitivity are not understood. Here we show that both naturally occurring and synthetic retinoids activate recombinant or native transient receptor potential channel vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1), an irritant receptor for capsaicin, the pungent ingredient of chili peppers. In vivo, retinoids produced pain-related behaviors that were either eliminated or significantly reduced by genetic or pharmacological inhibition of TRPV1 function. These findings identify TRPV1 as an ionotropic receptor for retinoids and provide cellular and molecular insights into retinoid-evoked hypersensitivity. These findings also suggest that selective TRPV1 antagonists are potential therapeutic drugs for treating retinoid-induced sensory hypersensitivity. PMID:23925292

  14. Involvement of Transient Receptor Potential Cation Channel Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) in Myoblast Fusion.

    PubMed

    Kurosaka, Mitsutoshi; Ogura, Yuji; Funabashi, Toshiya; Akema, Tatsuo

    2016-10-01

    The mechanisms that underlie the complex process of muscle regeneration after injury remain unknown. Transient receptor potential cation channel vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is expressed in several cell types, including skeletal muscle, and is activated by high temperature and by certain molecules secreted during tissue inflammation. Severe inflammation and local temperature perturbations are induced during muscle regeneration, which suggests that TRPV1 might be activated and involved in the process. The aim of this study, was to clarify the role of TRPV1 in the myogenic potential of satellite cells responsible for muscle regeneration. We found that mRNA and protein levels of TRPV1 increased during regeneration after cardiotoxin (CTX)-induced muscle injury in mice. Using isolated mouse satellite cells (i.e., myoblasts), we observed that activation of TRPV1 by its agonist capsaicin (CAP) augmented myogenin protein levels. Whereas CAP did not alter myoblast proliferation, it facilitated myoblast fusion (evaluated using myonucleii number per myotube and fusion index). In contrast, suppression of TRPV1 by siRNA impaired myoblast fusion. Using mice, we also demonstrated that intramuscular injection of CAP facilitated muscle repair after CTX-induced muscle injury. Moreover, we showed that these roles of TRPV1 might be mediated by interleukin-4 and calcium signaling during myoblast fusion. Collectively, these results suggest that TRPV1 underlies normal myogenesis through promotion of myoblast fusion. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2275-2285, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26892397

  15. Involvement of Transient Receptor Potential Cation Channel Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) in Myoblast Fusion.

    PubMed

    Kurosaka, Mitsutoshi; Ogura, Yuji; Funabashi, Toshiya; Akema, Tatsuo

    2016-10-01

    The mechanisms that underlie the complex process of muscle regeneration after injury remain unknown. Transient receptor potential cation channel vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is expressed in several cell types, including skeletal muscle, and is activated by high temperature and by certain molecules secreted during tissue inflammation. Severe inflammation and local temperature perturbations are induced during muscle regeneration, which suggests that TRPV1 might be activated and involved in the process. The aim of this study, was to clarify the role of TRPV1 in the myogenic potential of satellite cells responsible for muscle regeneration. We found that mRNA and protein levels of TRPV1 increased during regeneration after cardiotoxin (CTX)-induced muscle injury in mice. Using isolated mouse satellite cells (i.e., myoblasts), we observed that activation of TRPV1 by its agonist capsaicin (CAP) augmented myogenin protein levels. Whereas CAP did not alter myoblast proliferation, it facilitated myoblast fusion (evaluated using myonucleii number per myotube and fusion index). In contrast, suppression of TRPV1 by siRNA impaired myoblast fusion. Using mice, we also demonstrated that intramuscular injection of CAP facilitated muscle repair after CTX-induced muscle injury. Moreover, we showed that these roles of TRPV1 might be mediated by interleukin-4 and calcium signaling during myoblast fusion. Collectively, these results suggest that TRPV1 underlies normal myogenesis through promotion of myoblast fusion. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2275-2285, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Structural determinants of the transient receptor potential 1 (TRPV1) channel activation by phospholipid analogs.

    PubMed

    Morales-Lázaro, Sara L; Serrano-Flores, Barbara; Llorente, Itzel; Hernández-García, Enrique; González-Ramírez, Ricardo; Banerjee, Souvik; Miller, Duane; Gududuru, Veeresh; Fells, James; Norman, Derek; Tigyi, Gabor; Escalante-Alcalde, Diana; Rosenbaum, Tamara

    2014-08-29

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) ion channel is a polymodal protein that responds to various stimuli, including capsaicin (the pungent compound found in chili peppers), extracellular acid, and basic intracellular pH, temperatures close to 42 °C, and several lipids. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), an endogenous lipid widely associated with neuropathic pain, is an agonist of the TRPV1 channel found in primary afferent nociceptors and is activated by other noxious stimuli. Agonists or antagonists of lipid and other chemical natures are known to possess specific structural requirements for producing functional effects on their targets. To better understand how LPA and other lipid analogs might interact and affect the function of TRPV1, we set out to determine the structural features of these lipids that result in the activation of TRPV1. By changing the acyl chain length, saturation, and headgroup of these LPA analogs, we established strict requirements for activation of TRPV1. Among the natural LPA analogs, we found that only LPA 18:1, alkylglycerophosphate 18:1, and cyclic phosphatidic acid 18:1, all with a monounsaturated C18 hydrocarbon chain activate TRPV1, whereas polyunsaturated and saturated analogs do not. Thus, TRPV1 shows a more restricted ligand specificity compared with LPA G-protein-coupled receptors. We synthesized fatty alcohol phosphates and thiophosphates and found that many of them with a single double bond in position Δ9, 10, or 11 and Δ9 cyclopropyl group can activate TRPV1 with efficacy similar to capsaicin. Finally, we developed a pharmacophore and proposed a mechanistic model for how these lipids could induce a conformational change that activates TRPV1. PMID:25035428

  17. Structural Determinants of the Transient Receptor Potential 1 (TRPV1) Channel Activation by Phospholipid Analogs*

    PubMed Central

    Morales-Lázaro, Sara L.; Serrano-Flores, Barbara; Llorente, Itzel; Hernández-García, Enrique; González-Ramírez, Ricardo; Banerjee, Souvik; Miller, Duane; Gududuru, Veeresh; Fells, James; Norman, Derek; Tigyi, Gabor; Escalante-Alcalde, Diana; Rosenbaum, Tamara

    2014-01-01

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) ion channel is a polymodal protein that responds to various stimuli, including capsaicin (the pungent compound found in chili peppers), extracellular acid, and basic intracellular pH, temperatures close to 42 °C, and several lipids. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), an endogenous lipid widely associated with neuropathic pain, is an agonist of the TRPV1 channel found in primary afferent nociceptors and is activated by other noxious stimuli. Agonists or antagonists of lipid and other chemical natures are known to possess specific structural requirements for producing functional effects on their targets. To better understand how LPA and other lipid analogs might interact and affect the function of TRPV1, we set out to determine the structural features of these lipids that result in the activation of TRPV1. By changing the acyl chain length, saturation, and headgroup of these LPA analogs, we established strict requirements for activation of TRPV1. Among the natural LPA analogs, we found that only LPA 18:1, alkylglycerophosphate 18:1, and cyclic phosphatidic acid 18:1, all with a monounsaturated C18 hydrocarbon chain activate TRPV1, whereas polyunsaturated and saturated analogs do not. Thus, TRPV1 shows a more restricted ligand specificity compared with LPA G-protein-coupled receptors. We synthesized fatty alcohol phosphates and thiophosphates and found that many of them with a single double bond in position Δ9, 10, or 11 and Δ9 cyclopropyl group can activate TRPV1 with efficacy similar to capsaicin. Finally, we developed a pharmacophore and proposed a mechanistic model for how these lipids could induce a conformational change that activates TRPV1. PMID:25035428

  18. Structural determinants of the transient receptor potential 1 (TRPV1) channel activation by phospholipid analogs.

    PubMed

    Morales-Lázaro, Sara L; Serrano-Flores, Barbara; Llorente, Itzel; Hernández-García, Enrique; González-Ramírez, Ricardo; Banerjee, Souvik; Miller, Duane; Gududuru, Veeresh; Fells, James; Norman, Derek; Tigyi, Gabor; Escalante-Alcalde, Diana; Rosenbaum, Tamara

    2014-08-29

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) ion channel is a polymodal protein that responds to various stimuli, including capsaicin (the pungent compound found in chili peppers), extracellular acid, and basic intracellular pH, temperatures close to 42 °C, and several lipids. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), an endogenous lipid widely associated with neuropathic pain, is an agonist of the TRPV1 channel found in primary afferent nociceptors and is activated by other noxious stimuli. Agonists or antagonists of lipid and other chemical natures are known to possess specific structural requirements for producing functional effects on their targets. To better understand how LPA and other lipid analogs might interact and affect the function of TRPV1, we set out to determine the structural features of these lipids that result in the activation of TRPV1. By changing the acyl chain length, saturation, and headgroup of these LPA analogs, we established strict requirements for activation of TRPV1. Among the natural LPA analogs, we found that only LPA 18:1, alkylglycerophosphate 18:1, and cyclic phosphatidic acid 18:1, all with a monounsaturated C18 hydrocarbon chain activate TRPV1, whereas polyunsaturated and saturated analogs do not. Thus, TRPV1 shows a more restricted ligand specificity compared with LPA G-protein-coupled receptors. We synthesized fatty alcohol phosphates and thiophosphates and found that many of them with a single double bond in position Δ9, 10, or 11 and Δ9 cyclopropyl group can activate TRPV1 with efficacy similar to capsaicin. Finally, we developed a pharmacophore and proposed a mechanistic model for how these lipids could induce a conformational change that activates TRPV1.

  19. Structural insights into transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) from homology modeling, flexible docking, and mutational studies

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin Hee; Lee, Yoonji; Ryu, HyungChul; Kang, Dong Wook; Lee, Jeewoo; Lazar, Jozsef; Pearce, Larry V.; Pavlyukovets, Vladimir A.; Blumberg, Peter M.; Choi, Sun

    2012-01-01

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1) is a non-selective cation channel composed of four monomers with six transmembrane helices (TM1-TM6). TRPV1 is found in the central and peripheral nervous system, and it is an important therapeutic target for pain relief. We describe here the construction of a tetrameric homology model of rTRPV1. We experimentally evaluated by mutational analysis the contribution of residues of rat TRPV1 (rTRPV1) contributing to ligand binding by the prototypical TRPV1 agonists capsaicin and resiniferatoxin. We then performed docking analysis using our homology model. The docking results with capsaicin and RTX showed that our homology model was reliable, affording good agreement with our mutation data. Additionally, the binding mode of a simplified RTX (sRTX) ligand as predicted by the modeling agreed well with those of capsaicin and RTX, accounting for the high binding affinity of the sRTX ligand for TRPV1. Through the homology modeling, docking and mutational studies, we obtained important insights into the ligand-receptor interactions at the molecular level which should prove of value in the design of novel TRPV1 ligands. PMID:21448716

  20. Inhibition of capsaicin-driven nasal hyper-reactivity by SB-705498, a TRPV1 antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Carlijn; Drunen, Cornelis Van; Denyer, Jane; Smart, Kevin; Segboer, Christine; Terreehorst, Ingrid; Newlands, Amy; Beerahee, Misba; Fokkens, Wytske; Tsitoura, Daphne C

    2014-01-01

    AIMS To assess the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of intranasal SB-705498, a selective TRPV1 antagonist. METHODS Two randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, clinical studies were performed: (i) an intranasal SB-705498 first time in human study to examine the safety and PK of five single escalating doses from 0.5 to 12 mg and of repeat dosing with 6 mg and 12 mg twice daily for 14 days and (ii) a PD efficacy study in subjects with non-allergic rhinitis (NAR) to evaluate the effect of 12 mg intranasal SB-705498 against nasal capsaicin challenge. RESULTS Single and repeat dosing with intranasal SB-705498 was safe and well tolerated. The overall frequency of adverse events was similar for SB-705498 and placebo and no dose-dependent increase was observed. Administration of SB-705498 resulted in less than dose proportional AUC(0,12 h) and Cmax, while repeat dosing from day 1 to day 14 led to its accumulation. SB-705498 receptor occupancy in nasal tissue was estimated to be high (>80%). Administration of 12 mg SB-705498 to patients with NAR induced a marked reduction in total symptom scores triggered by nasal capsaicin challenge. Inhibition of rhinorrhoea, nasal congestion and burning sensation was associated with 2-to 4-fold shift in capsaicin potency. CONCLUSIONS Intranasal SB-705498 has an appropriate safety and PK profile for development in humans and achieves clinically relevant attenuation of capsaicin-provoked rhinitis symptoms in patients with NAR. The potential impact intranasal SB-705498 may have in rhinitis treatment deserves further evaluation. PMID:23909699

  1. The pain receptor TRPV1 displays agonist-dependent activation stoichiometry.

    PubMed

    Hazan, Adina; Kumar, Rakesh; Matzner, Henry; Priel, Avi

    2015-07-21

    The receptor channel TRPV1 (Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1) is expressed by primary afferent sensory neurons of the pain pathway, where it functions as a sensor of noxious heat and various chemicals, including eicosanoids, capsaicin, protons and peptide toxins. Comprised of four identical subunits that organize into a non-selective cationic permeable channel, this receptor has a variety of binding sites responsible for detecting their respective agonists. Although its physiological role as a chemosensor has been described in detail, the stoichiometry of TRPV1 activation by its different ligands remains unknown. Here, we combined the use of concatemeric constructs harboring mutated binding sites with patch-clamp recordings in order to determine the stoichiometry for TRPV1 activation through the vanilloid binding site and the outer-pore domain by capsaicin and protons, respectively. We show that, while a single capsaicin-bound subunit was sufficient to achieve a maximal open-channel lifetime, all four proton-binding sites were required. Thus, our results demonstrate a distinct stoichiometry of TRPV1 activation through two of its different agonist-binding domains.

  2. Identifying the integrated neural networks involved in capsaicin-induced pain using fMRI in awake TRPV1 knockout and wild-type rats.

    PubMed

    Yee, Jason R; Kenkel, William; Caccaviello, John C; Gamber, Kevin; Simmons, Phil; Nedelman, Mark; Kulkarni, Praveen; Ferris, Craig F

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we used functional MRI in awake rats to investigate the pain response that accompanies intradermal injection of capsaicin into the hindpaw. To this end, we used BOLD imaging together with a 3D segmented, annotated rat atlas and computational analysis to identify the integrated neural circuits involved in capsaicin-induced pain. The specificity of the pain response to capsaicin was tested in a transgenic model that contains a biallelic deletion of the gene encoding for the transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1). Capsaicin is an exogenous ligand for the TRPV1 receptor, and in wild-type rats, activated the putative pain neural circuit. In addition, capsaicin-treated wild-type rats exhibited activation in brain regions comprising the Papez circuit and habenular system, systems that play important roles in the integration of emotional information, and learning and memory of aversive information, respectively. As expected, capsaicin administration to TRPV1-KO rats failed to elicit the robust BOLD activation pattern observed in wild-type controls. However, the intradermal injection of formalin elicited a significant activation of the putative pain pathway as represented by such areas as the anterior cingulate, somatosensory cortex, parabrachial nucleus, and periaqueductal gray. Notably, comparison of neural responses to capsaicin in wild-type vs. knock-out rats uncovered evidence that capsaicin may function in an antinociceptive capacity independent of TRPV1 signaling. Our data suggest that neuroimaging of pain in awake, conscious animals has the potential to inform the neurobiological basis of full and integrated perceptions of pain. PMID:25745388

  3. Identifying the integrated neural networks involved in capsaicin-induced pain using fMRI in awake TRPV1 knockout and wild-type rats

    PubMed Central

    Yee, Jason R.; Kenkel, William; Caccaviello, John C.; Gamber, Kevin; Simmons, Phil; Nedelman, Mark; Kulkarni, Praveen; Ferris, Craig F.

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we used functional MRI in awake rats to investigate the pain response that accompanies intradermal injection of capsaicin into the hindpaw. To this end, we used BOLD imaging together with a 3D segmented, annotated rat atlas and computational analysis to identify the integrated neural circuits involved in capsaicin-induced pain. The specificity of the pain response to capsaicin was tested in a transgenic model that contains a biallelic deletion of the gene encoding for the transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1). Capsaicin is an exogenous ligand for the TRPV1 receptor, and in wild-type rats, activated the putative pain neural circuit. In addition, capsaicin-treated wild-type rats exhibited activation in brain regions comprising the Papez circuit and habenular system, systems that play important roles in the integration of emotional information, and learning and memory of aversive information, respectively. As expected, capsaicin administration to TRPV1-KO rats failed to elicit the robust BOLD activation pattern observed in wild-type controls. However, the intradermal injection of formalin elicited a significant activation of the putative pain pathway as represented by such areas as the anterior cingulate, somatosensory cortex, parabrachial nucleus, and periaqueductal gray. Notably, comparison of neural responses to capsaicin in wild-type vs. knock-out rats uncovered evidence that capsaicin may function in an antinociceptive capacity independent of TRPV1 signaling. Our data suggest that neuroimaging of pain in awake, conscious animals has the potential to inform the neurobiological basis of full and integrated perceptions of pain. PMID:25745388

  4. The mechanism of μ-opioid receptor (MOR)-TRPV1 crosstalk in TRPV1 activation involves morphine anti-nociception, tolerance and dependence

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Yanju; Gao, Yebo; Yang, Liping; Kong, Xiangying; Yu, Jing; Hou, Wei; Hua, Baojin

    2015-01-01

    Initiated by the activation of various nociceptors, pain is a reaction to specific stimulus modalities. The μ-opioid receptor (MOR) agonists, including morphine, remain the most potent analgesics to treat patients with moderate to severe pain. However, the utility of MOR agonists is limited by the adverse effects associated with the use of these drugs, including analgesic tolerance and physical dependence. A strong connection has been suggested between the expression of the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) ion channel and the development of inflammatory hyperalgesia. TRPV1 is important for thermal nociception induction, and is mainly expressed on sensory neurons. Recent reports suggest that opioid or TRPV1 receptor agonist exposure has contrasting consequences for anti-nociception, tolerance and dependence. Chronic morphine exposure modulates TRPV1 activation and induces the anti-nociception effects of morphine. The regulation of many downstream targets of TRPV1 plays a critical role in this process, including calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and substance P (SP). Additional factors also include capsaicin treatment blocking the anti-nociception effects of morphine in rats, as well as opioid modulation of TRPV1 responses through the cAMP-dependent PKA pathway and MAPK signaling pathways. Here, we review new insights concerning the mechanism underlying MOR-TRPV1 crosstalk and signaling pathways and discuss the potential mechanisms of morphine-induced anti-nociception, tolerance and dependence associated with the TRPV1 signaling pathway and highlight how understanding these mechanisms might help find therapeutic targets for the treatment of morphine induced antinociception, tolerance and dependence. PMID:26176938

  5. Structural mechanism underlying capsaicin binding and activation of the TRPV1 ion channel.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Xiao, Xian; Cheng, Wei; Yang, Wei; Yu, Peilin; Song, Zhenzhen; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Zheng, Jie

    2015-07-01

    Capsaicin bestows spiciness by activating TRPV1 channel with exquisite potency and selectivity. Although a capsaicin-bound channel structure was previously resolved by cryo-EM at 4.2- to 4.5-Å resolution, capsaicin was registered as a small electron density, reflecting neither its chemical structure nor specific ligand-channel interactions--important details required for mechanistic understanding. We obtained the missing atomic-level details by iterative computation and confirmed them by systematic site-specific functional tests. We observed that the bound capsaicin takes a 'tail-up, head-down' configuration. The vanillyl and amide groups form specific interactions to anchor its bound position, while the aliphatic tail may sample a range of conformations, making it invisible in cryo-EM images. Capsaicin stabilizes TRPV1's open state by 'pull-and-contact' interactions between the vanillyl group and the S4-S5 linker. Our study provides a structural mechanism for the agonistic function of capsaicin and its analogs, and demonstrates an effective approach to obtain atomic-level information from cryo-EM structures.

  6. Expression and functionality of TRPV1 receptor in human MCF-7 and canine CF.41 cells.

    PubMed

    Vercelli, C; Barbero, R; Cuniberti, B; Odore, R; Re, G

    2015-06-01

    As canine mammary tumours (CMT) and human breast cancer share clinical and prognostic features, the former have been proposed as a model to study carcinogenesis and improved therapeutic treatment in human breast cancer. In recent years, it has been shown that transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is expressed in different neoplastic tissues and its activation has been associated with regulation of cancer growth and progression. The aim of the present research was to demonstrate the presence of TRPV1 in human and canine mammary cancer cells, MCF-7 and CF.41, respectively, and to study the role of TRPV1 in regulating cell proliferation. The images obtained by Western blot showed a signal at 100 kDa corresponding to the molecular weight of TRPV1 receptor. All tested TRPV1 agonists and antagonists caused a significant decrease (P < 0.05) of cell growth rate in MCF-7 cells. By contrast, in CF.41 cells capsaicin and capsazepine induced a significant increase (P < 0.05) in cell proliferation, whereas resiniferatoxin (RTX) and 5-iodo-resiniferatoxin (5-I-RTX) had no influence on CF.41 cell proliferation. Further studies are needed to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanism responsible for the different effects evoked by TRPV1 activation in MCF-7 and CF.41 cells. PMID:23510405

  7. Modulation of defensive behavior by Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid Type-1 (TRPV1) channels.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, D C; Moreira, F A; Terzian, A L; Fogaça, M V; Lisboa, S F; Wotjak, C T; Guimaraes, F S

    2014-10-01

    The Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid Type-1 (TRPV1) was first characterized in primary afferent fibers as a receptor for capsaicin (the pungent ingredient of chili peppers). Later on, this cation-permeable ion channel was also described in the central nervous system, where its main putative endogenous ligand is N-arachidonoyl ethanolamide (an endocannabinoid, also known as anandamide). Recent results employing genetic, pharmacological and histochemical techniques indicate that TRPV1 tonically modulate anxiety, fear and panic responses in brain regions related to defensive responses, such as the dorsal periaqueductal gray, the hippocampus and the medial prefrontal cortex. Genetic deletion or antagonism of this ion channel induces anxiolytic-like effects in several animal models. The main mechanism responsible for TRPV1-mediated effects on anxiety seems to involve facilitation of glutamatergic neurotransmission. In addition, there is evidence for interactions with other neurotransmitter systems, such as nitric oxide and endocannabinoids. PMID:24726577

  8. Modulation of defensive behavior by Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid Type-1 (TRPV1) channels.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, D C; Moreira, F A; Terzian, A L; Fogaça, M V; Lisboa, S F; Wotjak, C T; Guimaraes, F S

    2014-10-01

    The Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid Type-1 (TRPV1) was first characterized in primary afferent fibers as a receptor for capsaicin (the pungent ingredient of chili peppers). Later on, this cation-permeable ion channel was also described in the central nervous system, where its main putative endogenous ligand is N-arachidonoyl ethanolamide (an endocannabinoid, also known as anandamide). Recent results employing genetic, pharmacological and histochemical techniques indicate that TRPV1 tonically modulate anxiety, fear and panic responses in brain regions related to defensive responses, such as the dorsal periaqueductal gray, the hippocampus and the medial prefrontal cortex. Genetic deletion or antagonism of this ion channel induces anxiolytic-like effects in several animal models. The main mechanism responsible for TRPV1-mediated effects on anxiety seems to involve facilitation of glutamatergic neurotransmission. In addition, there is evidence for interactions with other neurotransmitter systems, such as nitric oxide and endocannabinoids.

  9. 20-Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) is a novel activator of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channel.

    PubMed

    Wen, Hairuo; Östman, Johan; Bubb, Kristen J; Panayiotou, Catherine; Priestley, John V; Baker, Mark D; Ahluwalia, Amrita

    2012-04-20

    TRPV1 is a member of the transient receptor potential ion channel family and is gated by capsaicin, the pungent component of chili pepper. It is expressed predominantly in small diameter peripheral nerve fibers and is activated by noxious temperatures >42 °C. 20-Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) is a cytochrome P-450 4A/4F-derived metabolite of the membrane phospholipid arachidonic acid. It is a powerful vasoconstrictor and has structural similarities with other TRPV1 agonists, e.g. the hydroperoxyeicosatetraenoic acid 12-HPETE, and we hypothesized that it may be an endogenous ligand for TRPV1 in sensory neurons innervating the vasculature. Here, we demonstrate that 20-HETE both activates and sensitizes mouse and human TRPV1, in a kinase-dependent manner, involving the residue Ser(502) in heterologously expressed hTRPV1, at physiologically relevant concentrations. PMID:22389490

  10. Binding Mode Prediction of Evodiamine within Vanilloid Receptor TRPV1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhanli; Sun, Lidan; Yu, Hui; Zhang, Yanhui; Gong, Wuzhuang; Jin, Hongwei; Zhang, Liangren; Liang, Huaping

    2012-01-01

    Accurate assessment of the potential binding mode of drugs is crucial to computer-aided drug design paradigms. It has been reported that evodiamine acts as an agonist of the vanilloid receptor Transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1). However, the precise interaction between evodiamine and TRPV1 was still not fully understood. In this perspective, the homology models of TRPV1 were generated using the crystal structure of the voltage-dependent shaker family K+ channel as a template. We then performed docking and molecular dynamics simulation to gain a better understanding of the probable binding modes of evodiamine within the TRPV1 binding pocket. There are no significant interspecies differences in evodiamine binding in rat, human and rabbit TRPV1 models. Pharmacophore modeling further provided confidence for the validity of the docking studies. This study is the first to shed light on the structural determinants required for the interaction between TRPV1 and evodiamine, and gives new suggestions for the rational design of novel TRPV1 ligands. PMID:22942745

  11. Deletion of vanilloid receptor (TRPV1) in mice alters behavioral effects of ethanol

    PubMed Central

    Blednov, Y.A.; Harris, R.A.

    2009-01-01

    The vanilloid receptor TRPV1 is activated by ethanol and this may be important for some of the central and peripheral actions of ethanol. To determine if this receptor has a role in ethanol-mediated behaviors, we studied null mutant mice in which the Trpv1 gene was deleted. Mice lacking this gene showed significantly higher preference for ethanol and consumed more ethanol in a two-bottle choice test as compared with wild type littermates. Null mutant mice showed shorter duration of loss of righting reflex induced by low doses of ethanol (3.2 and 3.4 g/kg) and faster recovery from motor incoordination induced by ethanol (2 g/kg). However, there were no differences between null mutant and wild type mice in severity of ethanol-induced acute withdrawal (4 g/kg) or conditioned taste aversion to ethanol (2.5 g/kg). Two behavioral phenotypes (decreased sensitivity to ethanol-induced sedation and faster recovery from ethanol-induced motor incoordination) seen in null mutant mice were reproduced in wild type mice by injection of a TRPV1 antagonist, capsazepine (10 mg/kg). These two ethanol behaviors were changed in the opposite direction after injection of capsaicin, a selective TRPV1 agonist, in wild type mice. The studies provide the first evidence that TRPV1 is important for specific behavioral actions of ethanol. PMID:19705551

  12. Gingerol Reverses the Cancer-Promoting Effect of Capsaicin by Increased TRPV1 Level in a Urethane-Induced Lung Carcinogenic Model.

    PubMed

    Geng, Shengnan; Zheng, Yaqiu; Meng, Mingjing; Guo, Zhenzhen; Cao, Ning; Ma, Xiaofang; Du, Zhenhua; Li, Jiahuan; Duan, Yongjian; Du, Gangjun

    2016-08-10

    Both gingerol and capsaicin are agonists of TRPV1, which can negatively control tumor progression. This study observed the long-term effects of oral administration of 6-gingerol alone or in combination with capsaicin for 20 weeks in a urethane-induced lung carcinogenic model. We showed that lung carcinoma incidence and multiplicity were 70% and 21.2 ± 3.6, respectively, in the control versus 100% and 35.6 ± 5.2 in the capsaicin group (P < 0.01) and 50% and 10.8 ± 3.1 in the 6-gingerol group (P < 0.01). The combination of 6-gingerol and capsaicin reversed the cancer-promoting effect of capsaicin (carcinoma incidence of 100% versus 20% and multiplicity of 35.6 ± 5.2 versus 4.7 ± 2.3; P < 0.001). The cancer-promoting effect of capsaicin was due to increased epidermal growth-factor receptor (EGFR) level by decreased transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1 (TRPV1) level (P < 0.01) . The capsaicin-decreased EGFR level subsequently reduced levels of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and cyclin D1 that favored enhanced lung epithelial proliferation and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) during lung carcinogenesis (P < 0.01). In contrast, 6-gingerol promoted TRPV1 level and drastically decreased the levels of EGFR, NF-κB, and cyclin D1 that favored reduced lung epithelial proliferation and EMT (P < 0.01). This study provides valuable information for the long-term consumption of chili-pepper-rich diets to decrease the risk of cancer development. PMID:27436516

  13. Targeting the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) assembly domain attenuates inflammation-induced hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Robyn; Chapman, Kevin; Iftinca, Mircea; Aboushousha, Reem; Varela, Diego; Altier, Christophe

    2014-06-13

    The transient receptor potential channel vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) is a non-selective cation channel expressed in sensory neurons of the dorsal root and trigeminal ganglia. TRPV1 is a polymodal channel activated by noxious heat, capsaicin, and protons. As a sensor for noxious stimuli, TRPV1 channel has been described as a key contributor to pain signaling. To form a functional channel, TRPV1 subunits must assemble into tetramers, and several studies have identified the TRPV1 C terminus as an essential element in subunit association. Here we combined biochemical assays with electrophysiology and imaging-based bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) in live cells to identify a short motif in the C-terminal tail of the TRPV1 subunit that governs channel assembly. Removing this region through early truncation or targeted deletion results in loss of subunit association and channel function. Importantly, we found that interfering with TRPV1 subunit association using a plasma membrane-tethered peptide attenuated mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity in two mouse models of inflammatory hyperalgesia. This represents a novel mechanism to disrupt TRPV1 subunit assembly and hence may offer a new analgesic tool for pain relief.

  14. Targeting the Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid Type 1 (TRPV1) Assembly Domain Attenuates Inflammation-induced Hypersensitivity*

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Robyn; Chapman, Kevin; Iftinca, Mircea; Aboushousha, Reem; Varela, Diego; Altier, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    The transient receptor potential channel vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) is a non-selective cation channel expressed in sensory neurons of the dorsal root and trigeminal ganglia. TRPV1 is a polymodal channel activated by noxious heat, capsaicin, and protons. As a sensor for noxious stimuli, TRPV1 channel has been described as a key contributor to pain signaling. To form a functional channel, TRPV1 subunits must assemble into tetramers, and several studies have identified the TRPV1 C terminus as an essential element in subunit association. Here we combined biochemical assays with electrophysiology and imaging-based bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) in live cells to identify a short motif in the C-terminal tail of the TRPV1 subunit that governs channel assembly. Removing this region through early truncation or targeted deletion results in loss of subunit association and channel function. Importantly, we found that interfering with TRPV1 subunit association using a plasma membrane-tethered peptide attenuated mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity in two mouse models of inflammatory hyperalgesia. This represents a novel mechanism to disrupt TRPV1 subunit assembly and hence may offer a new analgesic tool for pain relief. PMID:24808184

  15. Targeting the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) assembly domain attenuates inflammation-induced hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Robyn; Chapman, Kevin; Iftinca, Mircea; Aboushousha, Reem; Varela, Diego; Altier, Christophe

    2014-06-13

    The transient receptor potential channel vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) is a non-selective cation channel expressed in sensory neurons of the dorsal root and trigeminal ganglia. TRPV1 is a polymodal channel activated by noxious heat, capsaicin, and protons. As a sensor for noxious stimuli, TRPV1 channel has been described as a key contributor to pain signaling. To form a functional channel, TRPV1 subunits must assemble into tetramers, and several studies have identified the TRPV1 C terminus as an essential element in subunit association. Here we combined biochemical assays with electrophysiology and imaging-based bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) in live cells to identify a short motif in the C-terminal tail of the TRPV1 subunit that governs channel assembly. Removing this region through early truncation or targeted deletion results in loss of subunit association and channel function. Importantly, we found that interfering with TRPV1 subunit association using a plasma membrane-tethered peptide attenuated mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity in two mouse models of inflammatory hyperalgesia. This represents a novel mechanism to disrupt TRPV1 subunit assembly and hence may offer a new analgesic tool for pain relief. PMID:24808184

  16. Caged vanilloid ligands for activation of TRPV1 receptors by 1- and 2-photon excitation†

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jun; Gover, Tony D.; Muralidharan, Sukumaran; Auston, Darryl A.; Weinreich, Daniel; Kao, Joseph P. Y.

    2008-01-01

    Nociceptive neurons in the peripheral nervous system detect noxious stimuli and report the information to the central nervous system. Most nociceptive neurons express the vanilloid receptor, TRPV1, a non-selective cation channel gated by vanilloid ligands such as capsaicin, the pungent essence of chili peppers. Here, we report the synthesis and biological application of two caged vanilloids—biologically inert precursors that, when photolyzed, release bioactive vanilloid ligands. The two caged vanilloids, Nb-VNA and Nv-VNA, are photoreleased with quantum efficiency of 0.13 and 0.041, respectively. Under flash photolysis conditions, photorelease of Nb-VNA and Nv-VNA is 95% complete in ∼40 μs and ∼125 μs, respectively. Through 1-photon excitation with ultraviolet light (360 nm), or 2-photon excitation with red light (720 nm), the caged vanilloids can be photoreleased in situ to activate TRPV1 receptors on nociceptive neurons. The consequent increase in intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) can be visualized by laser-scanning confocal imaging of neurons loaded with the fluorescent Ca2+ indicator, fluo-3. Stimulation results from TRPV1 receptor activation, because the response is blocked by capsazepine, a selective TRPV1 antagonist. In Ca2+-free extracellular medium, photoreleased vanilloid can still elevate [Ca2+]i, which suggests that TRPV1 receptors also reside on endomembranes in neurons and can mediate Ca2+ release from intracellular stores. Notably, whole-cell voltage clamp measurements showed that flash photorelease of vanilloid can activate TRPV1 channels in < 4 msec at 22°C. In combination with 1- or 2-photon excitation, caged vanilloids are a powerful tool for probing morphologically distinct structures of nociceptive sensory neurons with high spatial and temporal precision. PMID:16605259

  17. Capsaicin Blocks the Hyperpolarization-Activated Inward Currents via TRPV1 in the Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Jiyeon

    2012-06-01

    Capsaicin, the pungent ingredient in hot pepper, activates nociceptors to produce pain and inflammation. However, prolonged exposures of capsaicin will cause desensitization to nociceptive stimuli. Hyperpolarization-activated cation currents (I(h)) contribute to the maintenance of the resting membrane potential and excitability of neurons. In the cultured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, we investigated mechanisms underlying capsaicin-mediated modulation of I(h) using patch clamp recordings. Capsaicin (1 µM) inhibited I(h) only in the capsaicin-sensitive neurons. The capsaicin-induced inhibition of I(h) was prevented by preexposing the TRPV1 antagonist, capsazepine (CPZ). Capsaicin-induced inhibition of I(h) was dose dependent (IC(50)= 0.68 µM) and partially abolished by intracellular BAPTA and cyclosporin A, specific calcineurin inhibitor. In summary, the inhibitory effects of capsaicin on I(h) are mediated by activation of TRPV1 and Ca(2+)-triggered cellular responses. Analgesic effects of capsaicin have been thought to be related to desensitization of nociceptive neurons due to depletion of pain-related substances. In addition, capsaicin-induced inhibition of I(h) is likely to be important in understanding the analgesic mechanism of capsaicin.

  18. Biological activity of a polypeptide modulator of TRPV1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Dyachenko, I A; Andreev, Ya A; Logashina, Yu A; Murashev, A N; Grishin, E V

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents data on the activity of a new APHC2 polypeptide modulator of TRPV1 receptors, which was isolated from the sea anemone Heteractis crispa. It has been shown that APHC2 has an analgesic activity, does not impair normal motor activity, and does not change body temperature of experimental animals, which has a great practical value for design of potent analgesics of a new generation. Further study of the characteristics of binding of the polypeptide to the TRPV1 receptor may show approaches to the development of other antagonists of this receptor that do not influence the body temperature. PMID:26725234

  19. Dorsolateral periaqueductal gray matter CB1 and TRPV1 receptors exert opposite modulation on expression of contextual fear conditioning.

    PubMed

    Uliana, D L; Hott, S C; Lisboa, S F; Resstel, L B M

    2016-04-01

    Cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) and Transient Potential Vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptors in the dorsolateral periaqueductal gray (dlPAG) matter are involved in the modulation of conditioned response. Both CB1 and TRPV1 receptors are related to glutamate release and nitric oxide (NO) synthesis. It was previously demonstrated that both NMDA glutamate receptors and NO are involved in the conditioned emotional response. Therefore, one aim of this work was to verify whether dlPAG CB1 and TRPV1 receptors modulate the expression of contextual conditioned emotional response. Moreover, we also investigated the involvement of NMDA receptors and the NO pathway in this response. Male Wistar rats with local dlPAG guide cannula were submitted to contextual fear conditioning. Following 24 h, a polyethylene catheter was implanted in the femoral artery for cardiovascular recordings. After an additional 24 h, drugs were administered in the dlPAG and freezing behavior and autonomic responses were recorded during chamber re-exposure. Both a CB1 antagonist (AM251) and a TRPV1 agonist (Capsaicin; CPS) increased the expression of a conditioned emotional response. This response was prevented by an NMDA antagonist, a preferential neuronal NO synthase inhibitor, an NO scavenger and a soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor (sGC). Furthermore, pretreatment with a TRPV1 antagonist also prevented the increased conditioned emotional response induced by AM251. Considering that GABA can counterbalance glutamate effects, we also investigated whether GABAA receptors were involved in the effect of a higher dose of AM251. Pretreatment with a GABAA receptor antagonist caused an increased conditioned emotional response by AM251. Our results support the possibility that dlPAG CB1 and TRPV1 receptors are involved in the expression of conditioned emotional response through the NMDA/NO/sGC pathway. Moreover, the opposite effects exerted by GABA and glutamate could produce different outcomes of drugs modulating eCBs.

  20. Capsaicin, nonivamide and trans-pellitorine decrease free fatty acid uptake without TRPV1 activation and increase acetyl-coenzyme A synthetase activity in Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Rohm, Barbara; Riedel, Annett; Ley, Jakob P; Widder, Sabine; Krammer, Gerhard E; Somoza, Veronika

    2015-01-01

    Red pepper and its major pungent component, capsaicin, have been associated with hypolipidemic effects in rats, although mechanistic studies on the effects of capsaicin and/or structurally related compounds on lipid metabolism are scarce. In this work, the effects of capsaicin and its structural analog nonivamide, the aliphatic alkamide trans-pellitorine and vanillin as the basic structural element of all vanilloids on the mechanisms of intestinal fatty acid uptake in differentiated intestinal Caco-2 cells were studied. Capsaicin and nonivamide were found to reduce fatty acid uptake, with IC₅₀ values of 0.49 μM and 1.08 μM, respectively. trans-Pellitorine was shown to reduce fatty acid uptake by 14.0±2.14% at 100 μM, whereas vanillin was not effective, indicating a pivotal role of the alkyl chain with the acid amide group in fatty acid uptake by Caco-2 cells. This effect was associated neither with the activation of the transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1) or the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) nor with effects on paracellular transport or glucose uptake. However, acetyl-coenzyme A synthetase activity increased (p<0.05) in the presence of 10 μM capsaicin, nonivamide or trans-pellitorine, pointing to an increased fatty acid biosynthesis that might counteract the decreased fatty acid uptake.

  1. TRPV1 activation improves exercise endurance and energy metabolism through PGC-1α upregulation in mice.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhidan; Ma, Liqun; Zhao, Zhigang; He, Hongbo; Yang, Dachun; Feng, Xiaoli; Ma, Shuangtao; Chen, Xiaoping; Zhu, Tianqi; Cao, Tingbing; Liu, Daoyan; Nilius, Bernd; Huang, Yu; Yan, Zhencheng; Zhu, Zhiming

    2012-03-01

    Impaired aerobic exercise capacity and skeletal muscle dysfunction are associated with cardiometabolic diseases. Acute administration of capsaicin enhances exercise endurance in rodents, but the long-term effect of dietary capsaicin is unknown. The capsaicin receptor, the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) cation channel has been detected in skeletal muscle, the role of which remains unclear. Here we report the function of TRPV1 in cultured C2C12 myocytes and the effect of TRPV1 activation by dietary capsaicin on energy metabolism and exercise endurance of skeletal muscles in mice. In vitro, capsaicin increased cytosolic free calcium and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) expression in C2C12 myotubes through activating TRPV1. In vivo, PGC-1α in skeletal muscle was upregulated by capsaicin-induced TRPV1 activation or genetic overexpression of TRPV1 in mice. TRPV1 activation increased the expression of genes involved in fatty acid oxidation and mitochondrial respiration, promoted mitochondrial biogenesis, increased oxidative fibers, enhanced exercise endurance and prevented high-fat diet-induced metabolic disorders. Importantly, these effects of capsaicin were absent in TRPV1-deficient mice. We conclude that TRPV1 activation by dietary capsaicin improves energy metabolism and exercise endurance by upregulating PGC-1α in skeletal muscles. The present results indicate a novel therapeutic strategy for managing metabolic diseases and improving exercise endurance.

  2. Capsaicin mimics mechanical load-induced intracellular signaling events: involvement of TRPV1-mediated calcium signaling in induction of skeletal muscle hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Ito, Naoki; Ruegg, Urs T; Kudo, Akira; Miyagoe-Suzuki, Yuko; Takeda, Shin'ichi

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical load-induced intracellular signaling events are important for subsequent skeletal muscle hypertrophy. We previously showed that load-induced activation of the cation channel TRPV1 caused an increase in intracellular calcium concentrations ([Ca ( 2+) ]i) and that this activated mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and promoted muscle hypertrophy. However, the link between mechanical load-induced intracellular signaling events, and the TRPV1-mediated increases in [Ca ( 2+) ]i are not fully understood. Here we show that administration of the TRPV1 agonist, capsaicin, induces phosphorylation of mTOR, p70S6K, S6, Erk1/2 and p38 MAPK, but not Akt, AMPK or GSK3β. Furthermore, the TRPV1-induced phosphorylation patterns resembled those induced by mechanical load. Our results continue to highlight the importance of TRPV1-mediated calcium signaling in load-induced intracellular signaling pathways.

  3. The role of endogenous molecules in modulating pain through transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1)

    PubMed Central

    Morales-Lázaro, Sara L; Simon, Sidney A; Rosenbaum, Tamara

    2013-01-01

    Pain is a physiological response to a noxious stimulus that decreases the quality of life of those sufferring from it. Research aimed at finding new therapeutic targets for the treatment of several maladies, including pain, has led to the discovery of numerous molecular regulators of ion channels in primary afferent nociceptive neurons. Among these receptors is TRPV1 (transient receptor potential vanilloid 1), a member of the TRP family of ion channels. TRPV1 is a calcium-permeable channel, which is activated or modulated by diverse exogenous noxious stimuli such as high temperatures, changes in pH, and irritant and pungent compounds, and by selected molecules released during tissue damage and inflammatory processes. During the last decade the number of endogenous regulators of TRPV1's activity has increased to include lipids that can negatively regulate TRPV1, as is the case for cholesterol and PIP2 (phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate) while, in contrast, other lipids produced in response to tissue injury and ischaemic processes are known to positively regulate TRPV1. Among the latter, lysophosphatidic acid activates TRPV1 while amines such as N-acyl-ethanolamines and N-acyl-dopamines can sensitize or directly activate TRPV1. It has also been found that nucleotides such as ATP act as mediators of chemically induced nociception and pain and gases, such as hydrogen sulphide and nitric oxide, lead to TRPV1 activation. Finally, the products of lipoxygenases and omega-3 fatty acids among other molecules, such as divalent cations, have also been shown to endogenously regulate TRPV1 activity. Here we provide a comprehensive review of endogenous small molecules that regulate the function of TRPV1. Acting through mechanisms that lead to sensitization and desensitization of TRPV1, these molecules regulate pathways involved in pain and nociception. Understanding how these compounds modify TRPV1 activity will allow us to comprehend how some pathologies are associated with

  4. The role of endogenous molecules in modulating pain through transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1).

    PubMed

    Morales-Lázaro, Sara L; Simon, Sidney A; Rosenbaum, Tamara

    2013-07-01

    Pain is a physiological response to a noxious stimulus that decreases the quality of life of those sufferring from it. Research aimed at finding new therapeutic targets for the treatment of several maladies, including pain, has led to the discovery of numerous molecular regulators of ion channels in primary afferent nociceptive neurons. Among these receptors is TRPV1 (transient receptor potential vanilloid 1), a member of the TRP family of ion channels. TRPV1 is a calcium-permeable channel, which is activated or modulated by diverse exogenous noxious stimuli such as high temperatures, changes in pH, and irritant and pungent compounds, and by selected molecules released during tissue damage and inflammatory processes. During the last decade the number of endogenous regulators of TRPV1's activity has increased to include lipids that can negatively regulate TRPV1, as is the case for cholesterol and PIP2 (phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate) while, in contrast, other lipids produced in response to tissue injury and ischaemic processes are known to positively regulate TRPV1. Among the latter, lysophosphatidic acid activates TRPV1 while amines such as N-acyl-ethanolamines and N-acyl-dopamines can sensitize or directly activate TRPV1. It has also been found that nucleotides such as ATP act as mediators of chemically induced nociception and pain and gases, such as hydrogen sulphide and nitric oxide, lead to TRPV1 activation. Finally, the products of lipoxygenases and omega-3 fatty acids among other molecules, such as divalent cations, have also been shown to endogenously regulate TRPV1 activity. Here we provide a comprehensive review of endogenous small molecules that regulate the function of TRPV1. Acting through mechanisms that lead to sensitization and desensitization of TRPV1, these molecules regulate pathways involved in pain and nociception. Understanding how these compounds modify TRPV1 activity will allow us to comprehend how some pathologies are associated with

  5. Detailed Analysis of the Binding Mode of Vanilloids to Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid Type I (TRPV1) by a Mutational and Computational Study.

    PubMed

    Ohbuchi, Katsuya; Mori, Yoshikazu; Ogawa, Kazuo; Warabi, Eiji; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Hirokawa, Takatsugu

    2016-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) is a non-selective cation channel and a multimodal sensor protein. Since the precise structure of TRPV1 was obtained by electron cryo-microscopy, the binding mode of representative agonists such as capsaicin and resiniferatoxin (RTX) has been extensively characterized; however, detailed information on the binding mode of other vanilloids remains lacking. In this study, mutational analysis of human TRPV1 was performed, and four agonists (capsaicin, RTX, [6]-shogaol and [6]-gingerol) were used to identify amino acid residues involved in ligand binding and/or modulation of proton sensitivity. The detailed binding mode of each ligand was then simulated by computational analysis. As a result, three amino acids (L518, F591 and L670) were newly identified as being involved in ligand binding and/or modulation of proton sensitivity. In addition, in silico docking simulation and a subsequent mutational study suggested that [6]-gingerol might bind to and activate TRPV1 in a unique manner. These results provide novel insights into the binding mode of various vanilloids to the channel and will be helpful in developing a TRPV1 modulator. PMID:27606946

  6. Detailed Analysis of the Binding Mode of Vanilloids to Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid Type I (TRPV1) by a Mutational and Computational Study

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Yoshikazu; Ogawa, Kazuo; Warabi, Eiji; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Hirokawa, Takatsugu

    2016-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) is a non-selective cation channel and a multimodal sensor protein. Since the precise structure of TRPV1 was obtained by electron cryo-microscopy, the binding mode of representative agonists such as capsaicin and resiniferatoxin (RTX) has been extensively characterized; however, detailed information on the binding mode of other vanilloids remains lacking. In this study, mutational analysis of human TRPV1 was performed, and four agonists (capsaicin, RTX, [6]-shogaol and [6]-gingerol) were used to identify amino acid residues involved in ligand binding and/or modulation of proton sensitivity. The detailed binding mode of each ligand was then simulated by computational analysis. As a result, three amino acids (L518, F591 and L670) were newly identified as being involved in ligand binding and/or modulation of proton sensitivity. In addition, in silico docking simulation and a subsequent mutational study suggested that [6]-gingerol might bind to and activate TRPV1 in a unique manner. These results provide novel insights into the binding mode of various vanilloids to the channel and will be helpful in developing a TRPV1 modulator. PMID:27606946

  7. Long-Term Activation of Group I Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors Increases Functional TRPV1-Expressing Neurons in Mouse Dorsal Root Ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Masuoka, Takayoshi; Kudo, Makiko; Yoshida, Junko; Ishibashi, Takaharu; Muramatsu, Ikunobu; Kato, Nobuo; Imaizumi, Noriko; Nishio, Matomo

    2016-01-01

    Damaged tissues release glutamate and other chemical mediators for several hours. These chemical mediators contribute to modulation of pruritus and pain. Herein, we investigated the effects of long-term activation of excitatory glutamate receptors on functional expression of transient receptor potential vaniloid type 1 (TRPV1) in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and then on thermal pain behavior. In order to detect the TRPV1-mediated responses in cultured DRG neurons, we monitored intracellular calcium responses to capsaicin, a TRPV1 agonist, with Fura-2. Long-term (4 h) treatment with glutamate receptor agonists (glutamate, quisqualate or DHPG) increased the proportion of neurons responding to capsaicin through activation of metabotropic glutamate receptor mGluR1, and only partially through the activation of mGluR5; engagement of these receptors was evident in neurons responding to allylisothiocyanate (AITC), a transient receptor potential ankyrin type 1 (TRPA1) agonist. Increase in the proportion was suppressed by phospholipase C (PLC), protein kinase C, mitogen/extracellular signal-regulated kinase, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase or transcription inhibitors. Whole-cell recording was performed to record TRPV1-mediated membrane current; TRPV1 current density significantly increased in the AITC-sensitive neurons after the quisqualate treatment. To elucidate the physiological significance of this phenomenon, a hot plate test was performed. Intraplantar injection of quisqualate or DHPG induced heat hyperalgesia that lasted for 4 h post injection. This chronic hyperalgesia was attenuated by treatment with either mGluR1 or mGluR5 antagonists. These results suggest that long-term activation of mGluR1/5 by peripherally released glutamate may increase the number of neurons expressing functional TRPV1 in DRG, which may be strongly associated with chronic hyperalgesia. PMID:27064319

  8. Involvement of afferent neurons in the pathogenesis of endotoxin-induced ileus in mice: role of CGRP and TRPV1 receptors.

    PubMed

    De Winter, Benedicte Y; Bredenoord, Albert J; Van Nassauw, Luc; De Man, Joris G; De Schepper, Heiko U; Timmermans, Jean-Pierre; Pelckmans, Paul A

    2009-08-01

    Activation of neuronal reflex pathways by inflammatory mediators is postulated as an important pathogenic mechanism in postoperative ileus. In this study, we investigated the involvement of afferent neurons and more specifically the role of the transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor type 1 (TRPV1) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in endotoxin-induced motility disturbances in mice. Mice were injected with either lipopolysaccharides (LPS) or saline (control) and pre-treated with hexamethonium (blocker of neuronal transmission), capsaicin (neurotoxin), CGRP 8-37 (CGRP antagonist) or BCTC (TRPV1 receptor antagonist). We measured gastric emptying and intestinal transit of Evans blue next to rectal temperature and a global sickness behaviour scale. In vehicle-treated mice, LPS significantly delayed gastric emptying, small intestinal transit and rectal temperature while the sickness behaviour scale was increased. Hexamethonium, capsaicin, CGRP8-37 and BCTC all reversed the endotoxin-induced delay in gastric emptying and significantly reduced the delay in intestinal transit without effect on the endotoxin-induced decrease in rectal temperature and increase in sickness behaviour scale. Our findings provide evidence for the involvement of afferent nerves in the pathogenesis of endotoxin-induced motility disturbances in mice mediated via CGRP and TRPV1 receptors. Blockade of CGRP and TRPV1 receptors may offer a novel strategy for the treatment of endotoxin-induced ileus.

  9. THE TRPV1 RECEPTOR: TARGET OF TOXICANTS AND THERAPEUTICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Understanding the structural and functional complexities of the TRPV1 is essential to the therapeutic modulation of inflammation and pain. Because of its central role in initiating inflammatory processes and integrating painful stimuli, there is an understandable interest...

  10. TRPV1 antagonists as potential antitussive agents.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Robbie L; Correll, Craig C; Jia, Yanlin; Anthes, John C

    2008-01-01

    Cough is an important defensive pulmonary reflex that removes irritants, fluids, or foreign materials from the airways. However, when cough is exceptionally intense or when it is chronic and/or nonproductive it may require pharmacologic suppression. For many patients, antitussive therapies consist of OTC products with inconsequential efficacies. On the other hand, the prescription antitussive market is dominated by older opioid drugs such as codeine. Unfortunately, "codeine-like" drugs suppress cough at equivalent doses that also often produce significant ancillary liabilities such as GI constipation, sedation, and respiratory depression. Thus, the discovery of a novel and effective antitussive drug with an improved side effect profile relative to codeine would fulfill an unmet clinical need in the treatment of cough. Afferent pulmonary nerves are endowed with a multitude of potential receptor targets, including TRPV1, that could act to attenuate cough. The evidence linking TRPV1 to cough is convincing. TRPV1 receptors are found on sensory respiratory nerves that are important in the generation of the cough reflex. Isolated pulmonary vagal afferent nerves are responsive to TRPV1 stimulation. In vivo, TRPV1 agonists such as capsaicin elicit cough when aerosolized and delivered to the lungs. Pertinent to the debate on the potential use of TRPV1 antagonist as antitussive agents are the observations that airway afferent nerves become hypersensitive in diseased and inflamed lungs. For example, the sensitivity of capsaicin-induced cough responses following upper respiratory tract infection and in airway inflammatory diseases such as asthma and COPD is increased relative to that of control responses. Indeed, we have demonstrated that TRPV1 antagonism can attenuate antigen-induced cough in the allergic guinea pig. However, it remains to be determined if the emerging pharmacologic profile of TRPV1 antagonists will translate into a novel human antitussive drug. Current

  11. Carboxyl-terminal domain of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 contains distinct segments differentially involved in capsaicin- and heat-induced desensitization.

    PubMed

    Joseph, John; Wang, Sen; Lee, Jongseok; Ro, Jin Y; Chung, Man-Kyo

    2013-12-13

    Multiple Ca(2+)-dependent processes are involved in capsaicin-induced desensitization of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), but desensitization of TRPV1 by heat occurs even in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+), although the mechanisms are unknown. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that capsaicin and heat desensitize TRPV1 through distinct mechanisms involving distinct structural segments of TRPV1. In HEK293 cells that heterologously express TRPV1, we found that heat-induced desensitization was not affected by the inclusion of intracellular ATP or alanine mutation of Lys(155), both of which attenuate capsaicin-induced desensitization, suggesting that heat-induced desensitization occurs through mechanisms distinct from capsaicin-induced desensitization. To determine protein domains involved in heat-induced desensitization, we generated chimeric proteins between TRPV1 and TRPV3, a heat-gated channel lacking heat-induced desensitization. We found that TRPV1 with the carboxyl-terminal domain (CTD) of TRPV3 retained heat activation but was impaired in heat-induced desensitization. Further experiments using chimeric or deletion mutants within TRPV1 CTD indicated that the distal half of CTD regulates the activation and desensitization of TRPV1 in modality-specific manners. Within the distal CTD, we identified two segments that distinctly regulated capsaicin- and heat-induced desensitization. The results suggest that the activation and desensitization of TRPV1 by capsaicin and heat can be modulated differentially and disproportionally through different regions of TRPV1 CTD. Identifying the domains involved in thermal regulation of TRPV1 may facilitate the development of novel anti-hyperalgesic approaches aimed at attenuating activation and enhancing desensitization of TRPV1 by thermal stimuli.

  12. Differences in the Control of Secondary Peristalsis in the Human Esophagus: Influence of the 5-HT4 Receptor versus the TRPV1 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Chih-Hsun; Lei, Wei-Yi; Hung, Jui-Sheng; Liu, Tso-Tsai; Orr, William C.; Fabio, Pace; Chen, Chien-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Objective Acute administration of 5-hydroxytryptamine4 (5-HT4) receptor agonist, mosapride or esophageal infusion of the transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor-1 (TRPV1) agonist capsaicin promotes secondary peristalsis. We aimed to investigate whether acute esophageal instillation of capsaicin-containing red pepper sauce or administration of mosapride has different effects on the physiological characteristics of secondary peristalsis. Methods Secondary peristalsis was induced with mid-esophageal air injections in 14 healthy subjects. We compared the effects on secondary peristalsis subsequent to capsaicin-containing red pepper sauce (pure capsaicin, 0.84 mg) or 40 mg oral mosapride. Results The threshold volume for generating secondary peristalsis during slow air distensions was significantly decreased with capsaicin infusion compared to mosapride (11.6 ± 1.0 vs. 14.1 ± 0.8 mL, P = 0.02). The threshold volume required to produce secondary peristalsis during rapid air distension was also significantly decreased with capsaicin infusion (4.6 ± 0.5 vs. 5.2 ± 0.6 mL, P = 0.02). Secondary peristalsis was noted more frequently in response to rapid air distension after capsaicin infusion than mosapride (80% [60–100%] vs. 65% [5–100%], P = 0.04). Infusion of capsaicin or mosapride administration didn’t change any parameters of primary or secondary peristalsis. Conclusions Esophageal infusion with capsaicin-containing red pepper sauce suspension does create greater mechanosensitivity as measured by secondary peristalsis than 5-HT4 receptor agonist mosapride. Capsaicin-sensitive afferents appear to be more involved in the sensory modulation of distension-induced secondary peristalsis. PMID:27438088

  13. Measurement of relative Ca²⁺ permeability during sustained activation of TRPV1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Samways, Damien S K; Tomkiewicz, Evan; Langevin, Olivia M; Bukhari, Maurish

    2016-02-01

    Some cation permeable ligand-gated ion channels, including the capsaicin-sensitive TRPV1, have been reported to exhibit a time-dependent increase in permeability to large inorganic cations during sustained activation, a phenomenon termed "pore dilation." TRPV1 conducts substantial Ca(2+) entry, and it has been suggested that this channel undergoes a time-dependent change in Ca(2+) permeability relative to Na(+) (P Ca/P Na) that parallels pore dilation. However, our experiments employing whole cell patch clamp photometry and single channel recordings to directly measure relative Ca(2+) current in TRPV1 expressing HEK293 cells show that relative Ca(2+) influx remains constant for the duration of capsaicin-evoked channel activation. Further, we present evidence from patch clamp photometry experiments suggesting that sustained activation of Ca(2+) permeable ion channels in the voltage-clamp configuration leads to rapid saturation of the pipette Ca(2+) chelator, and that subsequent observed shifts in the current reversal potentials in the presence of extracellular Ca(2+) are likely due to intracellular accumulation of this ion and a movement of the Ca(2+) equilibrium potential (E Ca) towards zero. Finally, using an adapted reversal potential-based protocol in which cells are only exposed to Ca(2+) after sustained capsaicin exposure in the absence of added extracellular Ca(2+), we demonstrate that the calculated P Ca/P Na is unaffected by duration of TRPV1 activation. In conclusion, we find no evidence in support of a time-dependent change in P Ca/P Na for TRPV1. Our data further urges caution in estimating relative Ca(2+) permeability using reversal potentials, as there is a limited time window in which the cytosolic Ca(2+) chelator included in the patch pipette can prevent localised elevations in cytosolic free Ca(2+) and thus allow for an accurate estimate of this important channel permeability parameter.

  14. Effect of Maillard Reacted Peptides on Human Salt Taste and the Amiloride-Insensitive Salt Taste Receptor (TRPV1t)

    PubMed Central

    Katsumata, Tadayoshi; Nakakuki, Hiroko; Tokunaga, Chikara; Fujii, Noboru; Egi, Makoto; Phan, Tam-Hao T.; Mummalaneni, Shobha; DeSimone, John A.

    2008-01-01

    Maillard reacted peptides (MRPs) were synthesized by conjugating a peptide fraction (1000–5000 Da) purified from soy protein hydrolyzate with galacturonic acid, glucosamine, xylose, fructose, or glucose. The effect of MRPs was investigated on human salt taste and on the chorda tympani (CT) taste nerve responses to NaCl in Sprague–Dawley rats, wild-type, and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) knockout mice. MRPs produced a biphasic effect on human salt taste perception and on the CT responses in rats and wild-type mice in the presence of NaCl + benzamil (Bz, a blocker of epithelial Na+ channels), enhancing the NaCl response at low concentrations and suppressing it at high concentrations. The effectiveness of MRPs as salt taste enhancers varied with the conjugated sugar moiety: galacturonic acid = glucosamine > xylose > fructose > glucose. The concentrations at which MRPs enhanced human salt taste were significantly lower than the concentrations of MRPs that produced increase in the NaCl CT response. Elevated temperature, resiniferatoxin, capsaicin, and ethanol produced additive effects on the NaCl CT responses in the presence of MRPs. Elevated temperature and ethanol also enhanced human salt taste perception. N-(3-methoxyphenyl)-4-chlorocinnamid (a blocker of TRPV1t) inhibited the Bz-insensitive NaCl CT responses in the absence and presence of MRPs. TRPV1 knockout mice demonstrated no Bz-insensitive NaCl CT response in the absence or presence of MRPs. The results suggest that MRPs modulate human salt taste and the NaCl + Bz CT responses by interacting with TRPV1t. PMID:18603652

  15. Artificial sweeteners and salts producing a metallic taste sensation activate TRPV1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Riera, Céline E; Vogel, Horst; Simon, Sidney A; le Coutre, Johannes

    2007-08-01

    Throughout the world many people use artificial sweeteners (AS) for the purpose of reducing caloric intake. The most prominently used of these molecules include saccharin, aspartame (Nutrasweet), acesulfame-K, and cyclamate. Despite the caloric advantage they provide, one key concern in their use is their aversive aftertaste that has been characterized on a sensory level as bitter and/or metallic. Recently, it has been shown that the activation of particular T2R bitter taste receptors is partially involved with the bitter aftertaste sensation of saccharin and acesulfame-K. To more fully understand the biology behind these phenomena we have addressed the question of whether AS could stimulate transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) receptors, as these receptors are activated by a large range of structurally different chemicals. Moreover, TRPV1 receptors and/or their variants are found in taste receptor cells and in nerve terminals throughout the oral cavity. Hence, TRPV1 activation could be involved in the AS aftertaste or even contribute to the poorly understood metallic taste sensation. Using Ca(2+) imaging on TRPV1 receptors heterologously expressed in the human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells and on dissociated primary sensory neurons, we find that in both systems, AS activate TRPV1 receptors, and, moreover, they sensitize these channels to acid and heat. We also found that TRPV1 receptors are activated by CuSO(4), ZnSO(4), and FeSO(4), three salts known to produce a metallic taste sensation. In summary, our results identify a novel group of compounds that activate TRPV1 and, consequently, provide a molecular mechanism that may account for off tastes of sweeteners and metallic tasting salts.

  16. Spatial Distribution of the Cannabinoid Type 1 and Capsaicin Receptors May Contribute to the Complexity of Their Crosstalk

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jie; Varga, Angelika; Selvarajah, Srikumaran; Jenes, Agnes; Dienes, Beatrix; Sousa-Valente, Joao; Kulik, Akos; Veress, Gabor; Brain, Susan D.; Baker, David; Urban, Laszlo; Mackie, Ken; Nagy, Istvan

    2016-01-01

    The cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor and the capsaicin receptor (TRPV1) exhibit co-expression and complex, but largely unknown, functional interactions in a sub-population of primary sensory neurons (PSN). We report that PSN co-expressing CB1 receptor and TRPV1 form two distinct sub-populations based on their pharmacological properties, which could be due to the distribution pattern of the two receptors. Pharmacologically, neurons respond either only to capsaicin (COR neurons) or to both capsaicin and the endogenous TRPV1 and CB1 receptor ligand anandamide (ACR neurons). Blocking or deleting the CB1 receptor only reduces both anandamide- and capsaicin-evoked responses in ACR neurons. Deleting the CB1 receptor also reduces the proportion of ACR neurons without any effect on the overall number of capsaicin-responding cells. Regarding the distribution pattern of the two receptors, neurons express CB1 and TRPV1 receptors either isolated in low densities or in close proximity with medium/high densities. We suggest that spatial distribution of the CB1 receptor and TRPV1 contributes to the complexity of their functional interaction. PMID:27653550

  17. Streptozotocin-Induced Early Thermal Hyperalgesia is independent of Glycemic State of Rats: Role of Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1(TRPV1) and Inflammatory mediators

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Streptozotocin (STZ) is used as a common tool to induce diabetes and to study diabetes-induced complications including diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). Previously, we have reported that STZ induces a direct effect on neurons through expression and function of the Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channel in sensory neurons resulting in thermal hyperalgesia, even in non-diabetic STZ-treated mice. In the present study, we investigated the role of expression and function of TRPV1 in the central sensory nerve terminals in the spinal cord in STZ-induced hyperalgesia in rats. Results We found that a proportion of STZ-treated rats were normoglycemic but still exhibited thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia. Immunohistochemical data show that STZ treatment, irrespective of glycemic state of the animal, caused microglial activation and increased expression of TRPV1 in spinal dorsal horn. Further, there was a significant increase in the levels of pro-inflammatory mediators (IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α) in spinal cord tissue, irrespective of the glycemic state. Capsaicin-stimulated release of calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) was significantly higher in the spinal cord of STZ-treated animals. Intrathecal administration of resiniferatoxin (RTX), a potent TRPV1 agonist, significantly attenuated STZ-induced thermal hyperalgesia, but not mechanical allodynia. RTX treatment also prevented the increase in TRPV1-mediated neuropeptide release in the spinal cord tissue. Conclusions From these results, it is concluded that TRPV1 is an integral component of initiating and maintaining inflammatory thermal hyperalgesia, which can be alleviated by intrathecal administration of RTX. Further, the results suggest that enhanced expression and inflammation-induced sensitization of TRPV1 at the spinal cord may play a role in central sensitization in STZ-induced neuropathy. PMID:21794120

  18. Involvement of central TRPV1 receptors in pentylenetetrazole and amygdala-induced kindling in male rats.

    PubMed

    Shirazi, Mohsen; Izadi, Mahin; Amin, Masoud; Rezvani, Mohammad Ebrahim; Roohbakhsh, Ali; Shamsizadeh, Ali

    2014-08-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is a non-selective cation channel that is involved in modulation of diverse physiological processes. The role of this receptor in epilepsy has not been studied well. Therefore, we investigated the role of central TRPV1 receptors on the development of pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) and amygdala-induced kindling in rats. Male Wistar rats received subconvulsive dose of PTZ intraperitoneally, every other day. TRPV1 receptor agonist, OLDA and its antagonist, AMG-9810 were injected intracerebroventricularly 30 min prior to PTZ administration. In electrical kindling, stimulating and recording electrodes were implanted in the right amygdala of male rats. After kindling, the effect of TRPV1 receptor agonist or antagonist on afterdischarge duration (ADD), latency to the onset of bilateral forelimb clonuses (S4L) and duration of loss of equilibrium (stage 5 seizures, S5D) were measured. The results demonstrated that, OLDA at the doses of 0.01, 0.1 and 1 μg/rat, significantly accelerated the incidence of all seizure stages, increased S5D and decreased S4L in the PTZ model of kindling. Also, in amygdala kindling, S5D and ADD were significantly reduced following the administration of AMG-9810. In contrast, OLDA significantly aggravated the indices of seizure in both models of epileptic seizure. This study demonstrated that central TRPV1 receptors may be involved in the development of electrical and PTZ-induced kindling.

  19. Molecular Cloning and Functional Characterization of Xenopus tropicalis Frog Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 Reveal Its Functional Evolution for Heat, Acid, and Capsaicin Sensitivities in Terrestrial Vertebrates*

    PubMed Central

    Ohkita, Masashi; Saito, Shigeru; Imagawa, Toshiaki; Takahashi, Kenji; Tominaga, Makoto; Ohta, Toshio

    2012-01-01

    The functional difference of thermosensitive transient receptor potential (TRP) channels in the evolutionary context has attracted attention, but thus far little information is available on the TRP vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) function of amphibians, which diverged earliest from terrestrial vertebrate lineages. In this study we cloned Xenopus tropicalis frog TRPV1 (xtTRPV1), and functional characterization was performed using HeLa cells heterologously expressing xtTRPV1 (xtTRPV1-HeLa) and dorsal root ganglion neurons isolated from X. tropicalis (xtDRG neurons) by measuring changes in the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i). The channel activity was also observed in xtTRPV1-expressing Xenopus oocytes. Furthermore, we tested capsaicin- and heat-induced nocifensive behaviors of the frog X. tropicalis in vivo. At the amino acid level, xtTRPV1 displays ∼60% sequence identity to other terrestrial vertebrate TRPV1 orthologues. Capsaicin induced [Ca2+]i increases in xtTRPV1-HeLa and xtDRG neurons and evoked nocifensive behavior in X. tropicalis. However, its sensitivity was extremely low compared with mammalian orthologues. Low extracellular pH and heat activated xtTRPV1-HeLa and xtDRG neurons. Heat also evoked nocifensive behavior. In oocytes expressing xtTRPV1, inward currents were elicited by heat and low extracellular pH. Mutagenesis analysis revealed that two amino acids (tyrosine 523 and alanine 561) were responsible for the low sensitivity to capsaicin. Taken together, our results indicate that xtTRPV1 functions as a polymodal receptor similar to its mammalian orthologues. The present study demonstrates that TRPV1 functions as a heat- and acid-sensitive channel in the ancestor of terrestrial vertebrates. Because it is possible to examine vanilloid and heat sensitivities in vitro and in vivo, X. tropicalis could be the ideal experimental lower vertebrate animal for the study of TRPV1 function. PMID:22130664

  20. The stress protein heat shock cognate 70 (Hsc70) inhibits the Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) channel

    PubMed Central

    Iftinca, Mircea; Flynn, Robyn; Basso, Lilian; Melo, Helvira; Aboushousha, Reem; Taylor, Lauren

    2016-01-01

    Background Specialized cellular defense mechanisms prevent damage from chemical, biological, and physical hazards. The heat shock proteins have been recognized as key chaperones that maintain cell survival against a variety of exogenous and endogenous stress signals including noxious temperature. However, the role of heat shock proteins in nociception remains poorly understood. We carried out an expression analysis of the constitutively expressed 70 kDa heat-shock cognate protein, a member of the stress-induced HSP70 family in lumbar dorsal root ganglia from a mouse model of Complete Freund’s Adjuvant-induced chronic inflammatory pain. We used immunolabeling of dorsal root ganglion neurons, behavioral analysis and patch clamp electrophysiology in both dorsal root ganglion neurons and HEK cells transfected with Hsc70 and Transient Receptor Potential Channels to examine their functional interaction in heat shock stress condition. Results We report an increase in protein levels of Hsc70 in mouse dorsal root ganglia, 3 days post Complete Freund’s Adjuvant injection in the hind paw. Immunostaining of Hsc70 was observed in most of the dorsal root ganglion neurons, including the small size nociceptors immunoreactive to the TRPV1 channel. Standard whole-cell patch-clamp technique was used to record Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid type 1 current after exposure to heat shock. We found that capsaicin-evoked currents are inhibited by heat shock in dorsal root ganglion neurons and transfected HEK cells expressing Hsc70 and TRPV1. Blocking Hsc70 with matrine or spergualin compounds prevented heat shock-induced inhibition of the channel. We also found that, in contrast to TRPV1, both the cold sensor channels TRPA1 and TRPM8 were unresponsive to heat shock stress. Finally, we show that inhibition of TRPV1 depends on the ATPase activity of Hsc70 and involves the rho-associated protein kinase. Conclusions Our work identified Hsc70 and its ATPase activity as a central

  1. Discovery of small molecule antagonists of TRPV1.

    PubMed

    Rami, Harshad K; Thompson, Mervyn; Wyman, Paul; Jerman, Jeffrey C; Egerton, Julie; Brough, Stephen; Stevens, Alexander J; Randall, Andrew D; Smart, Darren; Gunthorpe, Martin J; Davis, John B

    2004-07-16

    Small molecule antagonists of the vanilloid receptor 1 (TRPV1, also known as VR1) are disclosed. Ureas such as 5 (SB-452533) were used to explore the structure activity relationship with several potent analogues identified. Pharmacological studies using electrophysiological and FLIPR Ca(2+) based assays showed compound 5 was an antagonist versus capsaicin, noxious heat and acid mediated activation of TRPV1. Study of a quaternary salt of 5 supports a mode of action in which compounds from this series cause inhibition via an extracellularly accessible binding site on the TRPV1 receptor. PMID:15203132

  2. Polymorphisms in gene encoding TRPV1-receptor involved in pain perception are unrelated to chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The major clinical feature in chronic pancreatitis is pain, but the genetic basis of pancreatic pain in chronic pancreatitis is poorly understood. The transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor 1 (TRPV1) gene has been associated with pain perception, and genetic variations in TRPV1 may modify the presence and phenotype of chronic pancreatitis. The aim of our study was to investigate the genetic variation of TRPV1 in Dutch patients with chronic pancreatitis and healthy controls. Methods We genotyped 4 SNPs (rs222749, rs222747, rs224534 and rs8065080) in 228 chronic pancreatitis-patients and 207 healthy controls by PCR, followed by restriction-fragment-length-polymorphism analysis and DNA sequencing. We generated 27 diplotypes and compared prevalence between patients and controls. Results There was no significant difference in allele frequency of the 4 TRPV1 gene SNPs in patients with chronic pancreatitis and healthy controls. Distribution of diplotypes was not statistically significantly different between patients and controls. Conclusion TRPV1 diplotypes are not associated with chronic pancreatitis. PMID:20034385

  3. CB(2) and TRPV(1) receptors oppositely modulate in vitro human osteoblast activity.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Francesca; Bellini, Giulia; Tortora, Chiara; Bernardo, Maria Ester; Luongo, Livio; Conforti, Antonella; Starc, Nadia; Manzo, Iolanda; Nobili, Bruno; Locatelli, Franco; Maione, Sabatino

    2015-09-01

    In the current study, we have investigated the effect of CB2 and TRPV1 receptor ligands on in vitro osteoblasts from bone marrow of human healthy donors. A pivotal role for the endocannabinoid/endovanilloid system in bone metabolism has been highlighted. We have demonstrated a functional cross-talk between CB2 and TRPV1 in human osteoclasts, suggesting these receptors as new pharmacological target for the treatment of bone resorption disease as osteoporosis. Moreover, we have shown the presence of these receptors on human mesenchimal stem cells, hMSCs. Osteoblasts are mononucleated cells originated from hMSCs by the essential transcription factor runt-related transcription factor 2 and involved in bone formation via the synthesis and release of macrophage colony-stimulating factor, receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand and osteoprotegerin. For the first time, we show that CB2 and TRPV1 receptors are both expressed on human osteoblasts together with enzymes synthesizing and degrading endocannabinoids/endovanilloids, and oppositely modulate human osteoblast activity in culture in a way that the CB2 receptor stimulation improves the osteogenesis whereas TRPV1 receptor stimulation inhibits it.

  4. Expression of TRPV1 in rabbits and consuming hot pepper affects its body weight.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qi; Wang, Yanli; Yu, Ying; Li, Yafeng; Zhao, Sihai; Chen, Yulong; Waqar, Ahmed Bilal; Fan, Jianglin; Liu, Enqi

    2012-07-01

    The capsaicin receptor, known as transient receptor potential vanilloid subfamily member 1 (TRPV1), is an important membrane receptor that has been implicated in obesity, diabetes, metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular diseases. The rabbit model is considered excellent for studying cardiovascular and metabolic diseases, however, the tissue expression of TRPV1 and physiological functions of its ligand capsaicin on diet-induced obesity have not been fully defined in this model. In the current study, we investigated the tissue expression of TRPV1 in normal rabbits using real-time RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. Rabbit TRPV1 mRNA was highly expressed in a variety of organs, including the kidneys, adrenal gland, spleen and brain. A phylogenetic analysis showed that the amino acid sequence of rabbit TRPV1 was closer to human TRPV1 than rodent TRPV1. To examine the effect of capsaicin (a pungent compound in hot pepper) on body weight, rabbits were fed with either a high fat diet (as control) or high fat diet containing 1% hot pepper. We found that the body weight of the hot pepper-fed rabbits was significantly lower than the control group. We conclude that the intake of capsaicin can prevent diet-induced obesity and rabbit model is useful for the study of TRPV1 function in cardiovascular and metabolic diseases.

  5. TRPV1 Activation in Primary Cortical Neurons Induces Calcium-Dependent Programmed Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Song, Juhyun; Lee, Jun Hong; Lee, Sung Ho; Park, Kyung Ah; Lee, Won Taek; Lee, Jong Eun

    2013-03-01

    Transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily V, member 1 (TRPV1, also known as vanilloid receptor 1) is a receptor that detects capsaicin, a pungent component of chili peppers, and noxious heat. Although its function in the primary nociceptor as a pain receptor is well established, whether TRPV1 is expressed in the brain is still under debate. In this study, the responses of primary cortical neurons were investigated. Here, we report that 1) capsaicin induces caspase-3-dependent programmed cell death, which coincides with increased production of nitric oxide and peroxynitrite ; that 2) the prolonged capsaicin treatment induces a steady increase in the degree of capase-3 activation, which is prevented by the removal of capsaicin; 3) and that blocking calcium entry and calcium-mediated signaling prevents capsaicin-induced cell death. These results indicate that cortical neurons express TRPV1 whose prolonged activation causes cell death. PMID:23585723

  6. Regulation of the Putative TRPV1t Salt Taste Receptor by Phosphatidylinositol 4, 5-Bisphosphate

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Tam-Hao T.; Ren, ZuoJun; Mummalaneni, Shobha; Melone, Pamela; Mahavadi, Sunila; Murthy, Karnam S.; DeSimone, John A.

    2010-01-01

    Regulation of the putative amiloride and benzamil (Bz)-insensitive TRPV1t salt taste receptor by phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) was studied by monitoring chorda tympani (CT) taste nerve responses to 0.1 M NaCl solutions containing Bz (5 × 10−6 M; a specific ENaC blocker) and resiniferatoxin (RTX; 0–10 × 10−6 M; a specific TRPV1 agonist) in Sprague-Dawley rats and in wildtype (WT) and TRPV1 knockout (KO) mice. In rats and WT mice, RTX elicited a biphasic effect on the NaCl + Bz CT response, increasing the CT response between 0.25 × 10−6 and 1 × 10−6 M. At concentrations >1 × 10−6 M, RTX inhibited the CT response. An increase in PIP2 by topical lingual application of U73122 (a phospholipase C blocker) or diC8-PIP2 (a short chain synthetic PIP2) inhibited the control NaCl + Bz CT response and decreased its sensitivity to RTX. A decrease in PIP2 by topical lingual application of phenylarsine oxide (a phosphoinositide 4 kinase blocker) enhanced the control NaCl + Bz CT response, increased its sensitivity to RTX stimulation, and inhibited the desensitization of the CT response at RTX concentrations >1 × 10−6 M. The ENaC-dependent NaCl CT responses were not altered by changes in PIP2. An increase in PIP2 enhanced CT responses to sweet (0.3 M sucrose) and bitter (0.01 M quinine) stimuli. RTX produced the same increase in the Bz-insensitive Na+response when present in salt solutions containing 0.1 M NaCl + Bz, 0.1 M monosodium glutamate + Bz, 0.1 M NaCl + Bz + 0.005 M SC45647, or 0.1 M NaCl + Bz + 0.01 M quinine. No effect of RTX was observed on CT responses in WT mice and rats in the presence of the TRPV1 blocker N-(3-methoxyphenyl)-4-chlorocinnamide (1 × 10−6 M) or in TRPV1 KO mice. We conclude that PIP2 is a common intracellular effector for sweet, bitter, umami, and TRPV1t-dependent salt taste, although in the last case, PIP2 seems to directly regulate the taste receptor protein itself, i.e., the TRPV1 ion channel or its taste

  7. TRPV1: A Target for Rational Drug Design

    PubMed Central

    Carnevale, Vincenzo; Rohacs, Tibor

    2016-01-01

    Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is a non-selective, Ca2+ permeable cation channel activated by noxious heat, and chemical ligands, such as capsaicin and resiniferatoxin (RTX). Many compounds have been developed that either activate or inhibit TRPV1, but none of them are in routine clinical practice. This review will discuss the rationale for antagonists and agonists of TRPV1 for pain relief and other conditions, and strategies to develop new, better drugs to target this ion channel, using the newly available high-resolution structures. PMID:27563913

  8. TRPV1: A Target for Rational Drug Design.

    PubMed

    Carnevale, Vincenzo; Rohacs, Tibor

    2016-01-01

    Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is a non-selective, Ca(2+) permeable cation channel activated by noxious heat, and chemical ligands, such as capsaicin and resiniferatoxin (RTX). Many compounds have been developed that either activate or inhibit TRPV1, but none of them are in routine clinical practice. This review will discuss the rationale for antagonists and agonists of TRPV1 for pain relief and other conditions, and strategies to develop new, better drugs to target this ion channel, using the newly available high-resolution structures. PMID:27563913

  9. The biophysical and molecular basis of TRPV1 proton gating

    PubMed Central

    Aneiros, Eduardo; Cao, Lishuang; Papakosta, Marianthi; Stevens, Edward B; Phillips, Stephen; Grimm, Christian

    2011-01-01

    The capsaicin receptor TRPV1, a member of the transient receptor potential family of non-selective cation channels is a polymodal nociceptor. Noxious thermal stimuli, protons, and the alkaloid irritant capsaicin open the channel. The mechanisms of heat and capsaicin activation have been linked to voltage-dependent gating in TRPV1. However, until now it was unclear whether proton activation or potentiation or both are linked to a similar voltage-dependent mechanism and which molecular determinants underlie the proton gating. Using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique, we show that protons activate and potentiate TRPV1 by shifting the voltage dependence of the activation curves towards more physiological membrane potentials. We further identified a key residue within the pore region of TRPV1, F660, to be critical for voltage-dependent proton activation and potentiation. We conclude that proton activation and potentiation of TRPV1 are both voltage dependent and that amino acid 660 is essential for proton-mediated gating of TRPV1. PMID:21285946

  10. Capsaicin induces apoptosis in human small cell lung cancer via the TRPV6 receptor and the calpain pathway.

    PubMed

    Lau, Jamie K; Brown, Kathleen C; Dom, Aaron M; Witte, Theodore R; Thornhill, Brent A; Crabtree, Clayton M; Perry, Haley E; Brown, J Michael; Ball, John G; Creel, Rebecca G; Damron, C Luke; Rollyson, William D; Stevenson, Cathryn D; Hardman, W Elaine; Valentovic, Monica A; Carpenter, A Betts; Dasgupta, Piyali

    2014-08-01

    Capsaicin, the pungent ingredient of chili peppers, displays potent anti-neoplastic activity in a wide array of human cancer cells. The present manuscript examines the signaling pathways underlying the apoptotic activity of capsaicin in human small cell lung cancer (SCLC) in vitro and in vivo. Studies in neuronal cells show that capsaicin exerts its biological activity via the transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) superfamily of cation-channel receptors. The TRPV family is comprised of six members (TRPV1-6). Capsaicin is a known agonist of the TRPV1 receptor. We observed that capsaicin-induced apoptosis in human SCLC cells was mediated via the TRPV receptor family; however it was independent of TRPV1. Surprisingly, the apoptotic activity of capsaicin required the TRPV6 receptor. Depletion of TRPV6 receptor by siRNA methodology abolished the apoptotic activity of capsaicin in SCLC cells. Immunostaining and ELISA showed that TRPV6 receptor was robustly expressed on human SCLC tissues (from patients) and SCLC cell lines but almost absent in normal lung tissues. This correlates with our results that capsaicin induced very little apoptosis in normal lung epithelial cells. The pro-apoptotic activity of capsaicin was mediated by the intracellular calcium and calpain pathway. The treatment of human SCLC cells with capsaicin increased the activity of calpain 1 and 2 by threefold relative to untreated SCLC cells. Such calpain activation, in response to capsaicin, was downstream of the TRPV6 receptor. Taken together, our data provide insights into the mechanism underlying the apoptotic activity of capsaicin in human SCLCs. PMID:24878626

  11. Capsaicin induces apoptosis in human small cell lung cancer via the TRPV6 receptor and the calpain pathway.

    PubMed

    Lau, Jamie K; Brown, Kathleen C; Dom, Aaron M; Witte, Theodore R; Thornhill, Brent A; Crabtree, Clayton M; Perry, Haley E; Brown, J Michael; Ball, John G; Creel, Rebecca G; Damron, C Luke; Rollyson, William D; Stevenson, Cathryn D; Hardman, W Elaine; Valentovic, Monica A; Carpenter, A Betts; Dasgupta, Piyali

    2014-08-01

    Capsaicin, the pungent ingredient of chili peppers, displays potent anti-neoplastic activity in a wide array of human cancer cells. The present manuscript examines the signaling pathways underlying the apoptotic activity of capsaicin in human small cell lung cancer (SCLC) in vitro and in vivo. Studies in neuronal cells show that capsaicin exerts its biological activity via the transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) superfamily of cation-channel receptors. The TRPV family is comprised of six members (TRPV1-6). Capsaicin is a known agonist of the TRPV1 receptor. We observed that capsaicin-induced apoptosis in human SCLC cells was mediated via the TRPV receptor family; however it was independent of TRPV1. Surprisingly, the apoptotic activity of capsaicin required the TRPV6 receptor. Depletion of TRPV6 receptor by siRNA methodology abolished the apoptotic activity of capsaicin in SCLC cells. Immunostaining and ELISA showed that TRPV6 receptor was robustly expressed on human SCLC tissues (from patients) and SCLC cell lines but almost absent in normal lung tissues. This correlates with our results that capsaicin induced very little apoptosis in normal lung epithelial cells. The pro-apoptotic activity of capsaicin was mediated by the intracellular calcium and calpain pathway. The treatment of human SCLC cells with capsaicin increased the activity of calpain 1 and 2 by threefold relative to untreated SCLC cells. Such calpain activation, in response to capsaicin, was downstream of the TRPV6 receptor. Taken together, our data provide insights into the mechanism underlying the apoptotic activity of capsaicin in human SCLCs.

  12. Capsaicin Induces Apoptosis in Human Small Cell Lung Cancer via the TRPV6 Receptor and the Calpain Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Jamie K.; Brown, Kathleen C.; Dom, Aaron M.; Witte, Theodore R.; Thornhill, Brent A.; Crabtree, Clayton M.; Perry, Haley E.; Brown, J. Michael; Ball, John G.; Creel, Rebecca G.; Damron, C. Luke; Rollyson, William D.; Stevenson, Cathryn D.; Hardman, W. Elaine; Valentovic, Monica A.; Carpenter, A. Betts; Dasgupta, Piyali

    2014-01-01

    Capsaicin, the pungent ingredient of chili peppers, displays potent anti-neoplastic activity in a wide array of human cancer cells. The present manuscript examines the signaling pathways underlying the apoptotic activity of capsaicin in human small cell lung cancer (SCLC) in vitro and in vivo. Studies in neuronal cells show that capsaicin exerts its biological activity via the transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) superfamily of cation-channel receptors. The TRPV family is comprised of six members (TRPV1-6). Capsaicin is an agonist of the TRPV1 receptor. We observed that capsaicin-induced apoptosis in human SCLC cells was mediated via the TRPV receptor family; however it was independent of TRPV1. Surprisingly, the apoptotic activity of capsaicin required the TRPV6 receptor. Depletion of TRPV6 receptor by siRNA methodology abolished the apoptotic activity of capsaicin in SCLC cells. Immunostaining and ELISA showed that TRPV6 receptor was robustly expressed on human SCLC tissues (from patients) and SCLC cell lines but almost absent in normal lung tissues. This correlates with our results that capsaicin induced very little apoptosis in normal lung epithelial cells. The proapoptotic activity of was mediated by the intracellular calcium and calpain pathway. The treatment of human SCLC cells with capsaicin induced increased the activity of calpain 1 and 2 by three-fold relative to untreated SCLC cells. Such calpain activation, in response to capsaicin, was downstream of the TRPV6 receptor. Taken together, our data provide insights into the mechanism underlying the apoptotic activity of capsaicin in human SCLCs. PMID:24878626

  13. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 activation by dietary capsaicin promotes urinary sodium excretion by inhibiting epithelial sodium channel α subunit-mediated sodium reabsorption.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Wang, Fei; Wei, Xing; Liang, Yi; Cui, Yuanting; Gao, Feng; Zhong, Jian; Pu, Yunfei; Zhao, Yu; Yan, Zhencheng; Arendshorst, William J; Nilius, Bernd; Chen, Jing; Liu, Daoyan; Zhu, Zhiming

    2014-08-01

    High salt (HS) intake contributes to the development of hypertension. Epithelial sodium channels play crucial roles in regulating renal sodium reabsorption and blood pressure. The renal transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) cation channel can be activated by its agonist capsaicin. However, it is unknown whether dietary factors can act on urinary sodium excretion and renal epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) function. Here, we report that TRPV1 activation by dietary capsaicin increased urinary sodium excretion through reducing sodium reabsorption in wild-type (WT) mice on a HS diet but not in TRPV1(-/-) mice. The effect of capsaicin on urinary sodium excretion was involved in inhibiting αENaC and its related with-no-lysine kinase 1/serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible protein kinase 1 pathway in renal cortical collecting ducts of WT mice. Dietary capsaicin further reduced the increased αENaC activity in WT mice attributed to the HS diet. In contrast, this capsaicin effect was absent in TRPV1(-/-) mice. Immunoprecipitation study indicated αENaC specifically coexpressed and functionally interact with TRPV1 in renal cortical collecting ducts of WT mice. Additionally, ENaC activity and expression were suppressed by capsaicin-mediated TRPV1 activation in cultured M1-cortical collecting duct cells. Long-term dietary capsaicin prevented the development of high blood pressure in WT mice on a HS diet. It concludes that TRPV1 activation in the cortical collecting ducts by capsaicin increases urinary sodium excretion and avoids HS diet-induced hypertension through antagonizing αENaC-mediated urinary sodium reabsorption. Dietary capsaicin may represent a promising lifestyle intervention in populations exposed to a high dietary salt intake.

  14. GABAA receptor modulation by piperine and a non-TRPV1 activating derivative☆

    PubMed Central

    Khom, Sophia; Strommer, Barbara; Schöffmann, Angela; Hintersteiner, Juliane; Baburin, Igor; Erker, Thomas; Schwarz, Thomas; Schwarzer, Christoph; Zaugg, Janine; Hamburger, Matthias; Hering, Steffen

    2013-01-01

    The action of piperine (the pungent component of pepper) and its derivative SCT-66 ((2E,4E)-5-(1,3-benzodioxol-5-yl))-N,N-diisobutyl-2,4-pentadienamide) on different gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) type A (GABAA) receptors, transient-receptor-potential-vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) receptors and behavioural effects were investigated. GABAA receptor subtypes and TRPV1 receptors were expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Modulation of GABA-induced chloride currents (IGABA) by piperine and SCT-66 and activation of TRPV1 was studied using the two-microelectrode-voltage-clamp technique and fast perfusion. Their effects on explorative behaviour, thermoregulation and seizure threshold were analysed in mice. Piperine acted with similar potency on all GABAA receptor subtypes (EC50 range: 42.8 ± 7.6 μM (α2β2)–59.6 ± 12.3 μM (α3β2)). IGABA modulation by piperine did not require the presence of a γ2S-subunit, suggesting a binding site involving only α and β subunits. IGABA activation was slightly more efficacious on receptors formed from β2/3 subunits (maximal IGABA stimulation through α1β3 receptors: 332 ± 64% and α1β2: 271 ± 36% vs. α1β1: 171 ± 22%, p < 0.05) and α3-subunits (α3β2: 375 ± 51% vs. α5β2:136 ± 22%, p < 0.05). Replacing the piperidine ring by a N,N-diisobutyl residue (SCT-66) prevents interactions with TRPV1 and simultaneously increases the potency and efficiency of GABAA receptor modulation. SCT-66 displayed greater efficacy on GABAA receptors than piperine, with different subunit-dependence. Both compounds induced anxiolytic, anticonvulsant effects and reduced locomotor activity; however, SCT-66 induced stronger anxiolysis without decreasing body temperature and without the proconvulsive effects of TRPV1 activation and thus may serve as a scaffold for the development of novel GABAA receptor modulators. PMID:23623790

  15. Fibronectin Stimulates TRPV1 Translocation in Primary Sensory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Jeske, Nathaniel A.; Patwardhan, Amol M.; Henry, Michael A.; Milam, Stephen B.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules are highly variable in their composition and receptor recognition. Their ubiquitous expression profile has been linked to roles in cell growth, differentiation, and survival. Recent work has identified certain ECM molecules that serve as dynamic signal modulators, versus the more-recognized role of chronic modulation of signal transduction. In this study, we investigated the role that fibronectin plays in the dynamic modulation of TRPV1 translocation to the plasma membrane in trigeminal ganglia (TG) sensory neurons. Confocal immunofluorescence analyses identify co-expression of the TRPV1 receptor with integrin subunits that bind fibronectin. TG neurons cultured upon or treated with fibronectin experienced a leftward shift in the EC50 of capsaicin-stimulated neuropeptide release. This fibronectin-induced increase in TRPV1 sensitivity to activation is coupled by an increase in plasma membrane expression of TRPV1, as well as an increase in tyrosine phosphorylation of TRPV1 in TG neurons. Furthermore, TG neurons cultured on fibronectin demonstrated an increase in capsaicin-mediated Ca+2 accumulation relative to neurons cultured on poly-D-lysine. Data presented from these studies indicate that fibronectin stimulates tyrosine-phosphorylation-dependent translocation of the TRPV1 receptor to the plasma membrane, identifying fibronectin as a critical component of the ECM capable of sensory neuron sensitization. PMID:19012739

  16. Dietary Capsaicin Protects Cardiometabolic Organs from Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Sun, Fang; Xiong, Shiqiang; Zhu, Zhiming

    2016-01-01

    Chili peppers have a long history of use for flavoring, coloring, and preserving food, as well as for medical purposes. The increased use of chili peppers in food is very popular worldwide. Capsaicin is the major pungent bioactivator in chili peppers. The beneficial effects of capsaicin on cardiovascular function and metabolic regulation have been validated in experimental and population studies. The receptor for capsaicin is called the transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1). TRPV1 is ubiquitously distributed in the brain, sensory nerves, dorsal root ganglia, bladder, gut, and blood vessels. Activation of TRPV1 leads to increased intracellular calcium signaling and, subsequently, various physiological effects. TRPV1 is well known for its prominent roles in inflammation, oxidation stress, and pain sensation. Recently, TRPV1 was found to play critical roles in cardiovascular function and metabolic homeostasis. Experimental studies demonstrated that activation of TRPV1 by capsaicin could ameliorate obesity, diabetes, and hypertension. Additionally, TRPV1 activation preserved the function of cardiometabolic organs. Furthermore, population studies also confirmed the beneficial effects of capsaicin on human health. The habitual consumption of spicy foods was inversely associated with both total and certain causes of specific mortality after adjustment for other known or potential risk factors. The enjoyment of spicy flavors in food was associated with a lower prevalence of obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases. These results suggest that capsaicin and TRPV1 may be potential targets for the management of cardiometabolic vascular diseases and their related target organs dysfunction.

  17. Dietary Capsaicin Protects Cardiometabolic Organs from Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Fang; Xiong, Shiqiang; Zhu, Zhiming

    2016-01-01

    Chili peppers have a long history of use for flavoring, coloring, and preserving food, as well as for medical purposes. The increased use of chili peppers in food is very popular worldwide. Capsaicin is the major pungent bioactivator in chili peppers. The beneficial effects of capsaicin on cardiovascular function and metabolic regulation have been validated in experimental and population studies. The receptor for capsaicin is called the transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1). TRPV1 is ubiquitously distributed in the brain, sensory nerves, dorsal root ganglia, bladder, gut, and blood vessels. Activation of TRPV1 leads to increased intracellular calcium signaling and, subsequently, various physiological effects. TRPV1 is well known for its prominent roles in inflammation, oxidation stress, and pain sensation. Recently, TRPV1 was found to play critical roles in cardiovascular function and metabolic homeostasis. Experimental studies demonstrated that activation of TRPV1 by capsaicin could ameliorate obesity, diabetes, and hypertension. Additionally, TRPV1 activation preserved the function of cardiometabolic organs. Furthermore, population studies also confirmed the beneficial effects of capsaicin on human health. The habitual consumption of spicy foods was inversely associated with both total and certain causes of specific mortality after adjustment for other known or potential risk factors. The enjoyment of spicy flavors in food was associated with a lower prevalence of obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases. These results suggest that capsaicin and TRPV1 may be potential targets for the management of cardiometabolic vascular diseases and their related target organs dysfunction. PMID:27120617

  18. Dietary Capsaicin Protects Cardiometabolic Organs from Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Sun, Fang; Xiong, Shiqiang; Zhu, Zhiming

    2016-01-01

    Chili peppers have a long history of use for flavoring, coloring, and preserving food, as well as for medical purposes. The increased use of chili peppers in food is very popular worldwide. Capsaicin is the major pungent bioactivator in chili peppers. The beneficial effects of capsaicin on cardiovascular function and metabolic regulation have been validated in experimental and population studies. The receptor for capsaicin is called the transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1). TRPV1 is ubiquitously distributed in the brain, sensory nerves, dorsal root ganglia, bladder, gut, and blood vessels. Activation of TRPV1 leads to increased intracellular calcium signaling and, subsequently, various physiological effects. TRPV1 is well known for its prominent roles in inflammation, oxidation stress, and pain sensation. Recently, TRPV1 was found to play critical roles in cardiovascular function and metabolic homeostasis. Experimental studies demonstrated that activation of TRPV1 by capsaicin could ameliorate obesity, diabetes, and hypertension. Additionally, TRPV1 activation preserved the function of cardiometabolic organs. Furthermore, population studies also confirmed the beneficial effects of capsaicin on human health. The habitual consumption of spicy foods was inversely associated with both total and certain causes of specific mortality after adjustment for other known or potential risk factors. The enjoyment of spicy flavors in food was associated with a lower prevalence of obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases. These results suggest that capsaicin and TRPV1 may be potential targets for the management of cardiometabolic vascular diseases and their related target organs dysfunction. PMID:27120617

  19. Capsaicin, Nociception and Pain.

    PubMed

    Frias, Bárbara; Merighi, Adalberto

    2016-01-01

    Capsaicin, the pungent ingredient of the hot chili pepper, is known to act on the transient receptor potential cation channel vanilloid subfamily member 1 (TRPV1). TRPV1 is involved in somatic and visceral peripheral inflammation, in the modulation of nociceptive inputs to spinal cord and brain stem centers, as well as the integration of diverse painful stimuli. In this review, we first describe the chemical and pharmacological properties of capsaicin and its derivatives in relation to their analgesic properties. We then consider the biochemical and functional characteristics of TRPV1, focusing on its distribution and biological effects within the somatosensory and viscerosensory nociceptive systems. Finally, we discuss the use of capsaicin as an agonist of TRPV1 to model acute inflammation in slices and other ex vivo preparations. PMID:27322240

  20. Capsaicin, Nociception and Pain.

    PubMed

    Frias, Bárbara; Merighi, Adalberto

    2016-01-01

    Capsaicin, the pungent ingredient of the hot chili pepper, is known to act on the transient receptor potential cation channel vanilloid subfamily member 1 (TRPV1). TRPV1 is involved in somatic and visceral peripheral inflammation, in the modulation of nociceptive inputs to spinal cord and brain stem centers, as well as the integration of diverse painful stimuli. In this review, we first describe the chemical and pharmacological properties of capsaicin and its derivatives in relation to their analgesic properties. We then consider the biochemical and functional characteristics of TRPV1, focusing on its distribution and biological effects within the somatosensory and viscerosensory nociceptive systems. Finally, we discuss the use of capsaicin as an agonist of TRPV1 to model acute inflammation in slices and other ex vivo preparations.

  1. Hypersensitivity Induced by Activation of Spinal Cord PAR2 Receptors Is Partially Mediated by TRPV1 Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Mrozkova, Petra; Spicarova, Diana; Palecek, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    Protease-activated receptors 2 (PAR2) and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) receptors in the peripheral nerve endings are implicated in the development of increased sensitivity to mechanical and thermal stimuli, especially during inflammatory states. Both PAR2 and TRPV1 receptors are co-expressed in nociceptive dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons on their peripheral endings and also on presynaptic endings in the spinal cord dorsal horn. However, the modulation of nociceptive synaptic transmission in the superficial dorsal horn after activation of PAR2 and their functional coupling with TRPV1 is not clear. To investigate the role of spinal PAR2 activation on nociceptive modulation, intrathecal drug application was used in behavioural experiments and patch-clamp recordings of spontaneous, miniature and dorsal root stimulation-evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs, mEPSCs, eEPSCs) were performed on superficial dorsal horn neurons in acute rat spinal cord slices. Intrathecal application of PAR2 activating peptide SLIGKV-NH2 induced thermal hyperalgesia, which was prevented by pretreatment with TRPV1 antagonist SB 366791 and was reduced by protein kinases inhibitor staurosporine. Patch-clamp experiments revealed robust decrease of mEPSC frequency (62.8 ± 4.9%), increase of sEPSC frequency (127.0 ± 5.9%) and eEPSC amplitude (126.9 ± 12.0%) in dorsal horn neurons after acute SLIGKV-NH2 application. All these EPSC changes, induced by PAR2 activation, were prevented by SB 366791 and staurosporine pretreatment. Our results demonstrate an important role of spinal PAR2 receptors in modulation of nociceptive transmission in the spinal cord dorsal horn at least partially mediated by activation of presynaptic TRPV1 receptors. The functional coupling between the PAR2 and TRPV1 receptors on the central branches of DRG neurons may be important especially during different pathological states when it may enhance pain perception. PMID:27755539

  2. Involvement of perivascular nerves and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) in vascular responses to histamine in rat mesenteric resistance arteries.

    PubMed

    Jin, Honghua; Sun, Pengyuan; Takatori, Shingo; Koyama, Toshihiro; Zamami, Yoshito; Tangsucharit, Panot; Kitamura, Yoshihisa; Kawasaki, Hiromu

    2012-04-01

    A previous report showed that histamine in denuded mesenteric vascular beds produced a triphasic response; an initial small histamine H(2) receptor-mediated vasodilation, a transient histamine H(1) receptor-mediated vasoconstriction, and finally a long-lasting vasodilation. We further investigated the vascular effect of histamine in mesenteric preparations without an endothelium to clarify the possible involvement of perivascular nerves. Male Wistar rat mesenteric vascular beds without an endothelium were perfused with Krebs solution containing methoxamine to produce active tone and lafutidine to block histamine H(2) receptor-mediated vasodilation. Histamine (1-100μM) was perfused for 1min and perfusion pressure was measured with a pressure transducer. Histamine caused a biphasic vascular response; initial vasoconstriction followed vasodilation. Tetrodotoxin (a neurotoxin, 1μM) and procaine (a local anesthetic, 100μM) significantly inhibited the vasoconstriction and vasodilation. Ruthenium red (a transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) antagonist, 1μM) also significantly inhibited both phases of the response. Pretreatment with capsaicin (a depletor of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-containing nerves, 5μM) significantly inhibited the vasodilation without affecting the initial vasoconstriction. Both indomethacin (a cyclooxygenase inhibitor, 0.5μM) and seratrodast (a thromboxane A(2) receptor antagonist, 0.1μM) abolished the histamine-induced vasoconstriction and subsequent vasodilation. These results suggest that histamine-induced vasoconstriction and long-lasting vasodilation are mediated by activation of TRPV1 on capsaicin-sensitive and capsaicin-insensitive nerves. They also suggest that perivascular nerves and prostanoids, probably thromboxane A(2), are responsible for the vascular response to histamine.

  3. Phosphoinositide regulation of TRPV1 revisited

    PubMed Central

    Rohacs, Tibor

    2015-01-01

    The heat- and capsaicin-sensitive Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 ion channel (TRPV1) is regulated by plasma membrane phosphoinositides. The effects of these lipids on this channel have been controversial. Recent articles re-ignited the debate and also offered resolution to place some of the data in a coherent picture. This review summarizes the literature on this topic and provides a detailed and critical discussion on the experimental evidence for the various effects of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphayte [PI(4,5)P2 or PIP2] on TRPV1. We conclude that PI(4,5)P2 and potentially its precursor PI(4)P are positive cofactors for TRPV1, acting via direct interaction with the channel, and their depletion by Ca2+-induced activation of phospholipase Cδ isoforms (PLCδ) limits channel activity during capsaicin-induced desensitization. Other negatively charged lipids at higher concentrations can also support channel activity, which may explain some controversies in the literature. PI(4,5)P2 also partially inhibits channel activity in some experimental settings, and relief from this inhibition upon PLCβ activation may contribute to sensitization. The negative effect of PI(4,5)P2 is more controversial and its mechanism is less well understood. Other TRP channels from the TRPV and TRPC families may also undergo similar dual regulation by phosphoinositides, thus the complexity of TRPV1 regulation is not unique to this channel. PMID:25754030

  4. Neuronal TRPV1 activation regulates alveolar bone resorption by suppressing osteoclastogenesis via CGRP.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Naoki; Matsuda, Yumi; Sato, Keisuke; de Jong, Petrus R; Bertin, Samuel; Tabeta, Koichi; Yamazaki, Kazuhisa

    2016-01-01

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channel is abundantly expressed in peripheral sensory neurons where it acts as an important polymodal cellular sensor for heat, acidic pH, capsaicin, and other noxious stimuli. The oral cavity is densely innervated by afferent sensory neurons and is a highly specialized organ that protects against infections as well as physical, chemical, and thermal stresses in its capacity as the first part of the digestive system. While the function of TRPV1 in sensory neurons has been intensively studied in other organs, its physiological role in periodontal tissues is unclear. In this study we found that Trpv1(-/-) mice developed severe bone loss in an experimental model of periodontitis. Chemical ablation of TRPV1-expressing sensory neurons recapitulated the phenotype of Trpv1(-/-) mice, suggesting a functional link between neuronal TRPV1 signaling and periodontal bone loss. TRPV1 activation in gingival nerves induced production of the neuropeptide, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), and CGRP treatment inhibited osteoclastogenesis in vitro. Oral administration of the TRPV1 agonist, capsaicin, suppressed ligature-induced bone loss in mice with fewer tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive cells in alveolar bone. These results suggest that neuronal TRPV1 signaling in periodontal tissue is crucial for the regulation of osteoclastogenesis via the neuropeptide CGRP. PMID:27388773

  5. Neuronal TRPV1 activation regulates alveolar bone resorption by suppressing osteoclastogenesis via CGRP

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Naoki; Matsuda, Yumi; Sato, Keisuke; de Jong, Petrus R.; Bertin, Samuel; Tabeta, Koichi; Yamazaki, Kazuhisa

    2016-01-01

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channel is abundantly expressed in peripheral sensory neurons where it acts as an important polymodal cellular sensor for heat, acidic pH, capsaicin, and other noxious stimuli. The oral cavity is densely innervated by afferent sensory neurons and is a highly specialized organ that protects against infections as well as physical, chemical, and thermal stresses in its capacity as the first part of the digestive system. While the function of TRPV1 in sensory neurons has been intensively studied in other organs, its physiological role in periodontal tissues is unclear. In this study we found that Trpv1−/− mice developed severe bone loss in an experimental model of periodontitis. Chemical ablation of TRPV1-expressing sensory neurons recapitulated the phenotype of Trpv1−/− mice, suggesting a functional link between neuronal TRPV1 signaling and periodontal bone loss. TRPV1 activation in gingival nerves induced production of the neuropeptide, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), and CGRP treatment inhibited osteoclastogenesis in vitro. Oral administration of the TRPV1 agonist, capsaicin, suppressed ligature-induced bone loss in mice with fewer tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive cells in alveolar bone. These results suggest that neuronal TRPV1 signaling in periodontal tissue is crucial for the regulation of osteoclastogenesis via the neuropeptide CGRP. PMID:27388773

  6. POTENTIATION OF PULMONARY REFLEX RESPONSE TO CAPSAICIN 24 HOURS FOLLOWING WHOLE-BODY ACROLEIN EXPOSURE IS MEDIATED BY TRPV1

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pulmonary C-fibers are stimulated by irritant air pollutants producing apnea, bronchospasm, and decrease in HR. C-fiber chemoreflex activation is mediated by TRPV1 and release of substance P. While acrolein has been shown to stimulate C-fibers, the persistence of acrolein effect...

  7. Estrogen-dependent up-regulation of TRPA1 and TRPV1 receptor proteins in the rat endometrium.

    PubMed

    Pohóczky, Krisztina; Kun, József; Szalontai, Bálint; Szőke, Éva; Sághy, Éva; Payrits, Maja; Kajtár, Béla; Kovács, Krisztina; Környei, József László; Garai, János; Garami, András; Perkecz, Anikó; Czeglédi, Levente; Helyes, Zsuzsanna

    2016-02-01

    Transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) and vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) receptors expressed predominantly in sensory nerves are activated by inflammatory stimuli and mediate inflammation and pain. Although they have been shown in the human endometrium, their regulation and function are unknown. Therefore, we investigated their estrogen- and progesterone-dependent alterations in the rat endometrium in comparison with the estrogen-regulated inflammatory cytokine macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF). Four-week-old (sexually immature) and four-month-old (sexually mature) female rats were treated with the non-selective estrogen receptor (ER) agonist diethylstilboestrol (DES), progesterone and their combination, or ovariectomized. RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry were performed to determine mRNA and protein expression levels respectively. Channel function was investigated with ratiometric [Ca(2+)]i measurement in cultured primary rat endometrial cells. Both TRP receptors and MIF were detected in the endometrium at mRNA and protein levels, and their localizations were similar. Immunostaining was observed in the immature epithelium, while stromal, glandular and epithelial positivity were observed in adults. Functionally active TRP receptor proteins were shown in endometrial cells by activation-induced calcium influx. In adults, Trpa1 and Trpv1 mRNA levels were significantly up-regulated after DES treatment. TRPA1 increased after every treatment, but TRPV1 remained unchanged following the combined treatment and ovariectomy. In immature rats, DES treatment resulted in increased mRNA expression of both channels and elevated TRPV1 immunopositivity. MIF expression changed in parallel with TRPA1/TRPV1 in most cases. DES up-regulated Trpa1, Trpv1 and Mif mRNA levels in endometrial cell cultures, but 17β-oestradiol having ERα-selective potency increased only the expression of Trpv1. We provide the first evidence for TRPA1/TRPV1 expression and their estrogen-induced up

  8. "Hotheaded": the role OF TRPV1 in brain functions.

    PubMed

    Martins, D; Tavares, I; Morgado, C

    2014-10-01

    The TRPV1 (vanilloid 1) channel is best known for its role in sensory transmission in the nociceptive neurons of the peripheral nervous system. Although first studied in the dorsal root ganglia as the receptor for capsaicin, TRPV1 has been recently recognized to have a broader distribution in the central nervous system, where it is likely to constitute an atypical neurotransmission system involved in several functions through modulation of both neuronal and glial activities. The endovanilloid-activated brain TRPV1 channels seem to be involved in somatosensory, motor and visceral functions. Recent studies suggested that TRPV1 channels also account for more complex functions, as addiction, anxiety, mood and cognition/learning. However, more studies are needed before the relevance of TRPV1 in brain activity can be clearly stated. This review highlights the increasing importance of TRPV1 as a regulator of brain function and discusses possible bases for the future development of new therapeutic approaches that by targeting brain TRPV1 receptors might be used for the treatment of several neurological disorders.

  9. TRPV1 stimulation triggers apoptotic cell death of rat cortical neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Shirakawa, Hisashi; Yamaoka, Tomoko; Sanpei, Kazuaki; Sasaoka, Hirotoshi; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Kaneko, Shuji

    2008-12-26

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) functions as a polymodal nociceptor and is activated by several vanilloids, including capsaicin, protons and heat. Although TRPV1 channels are widely distributed in the brain, their roles remain unclear. Here, we investigated the roles of TRPV1 in cytotoxic processes using TRPV1-expressing cultured rat cortical neurons. Capsaicin induced severe neuronal death with apoptotic features, which was completely inhibited by the TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine and was dependent on extracellular Ca{sup 2+} influx. Interestingly, nifedipine, a specific L-type Ca{sup 2+} channel blocker, attenuated capsaicin cytotoxicity, even when applied 2-4 h after the capsaicin. ERK inhibitor PD98059 and several antioxidants, but not the JNK and p38 inhibitors, attenuated capsaicin cytotoxicity. Together, these data indicate that TRPV1 activation triggers apoptotic cell death of rat cortical cultures via L-type Ca{sup 2+} channel opening, Ca{sup 2+} influx, ERK phosphorylation, and reactive oxygen species production.

  10. TRPV1: A Potential Drug Target for Treating Various Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Brito, Rafael; Sheth, Sandeep; Mukherjea, Debashree; Rybak, Leonard P.; Ramkumar, Vickram

    2014-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is an ion channel present on sensory neurons which is activated by heat, protons, capsaicin and a variety of endogenous lipids termed endovanilloids. As such, TRPV1 serves as a multimodal sensor of noxious stimuli which could trigger counteractive measures to avoid pain and injury. Activation of TRPV1 has been linked to chronic inflammatory pain conditions and peripheral neuropathy, as observed in diabetes. Expression of TRPV1 is also observed in non-neuronal sites such as the epithelium of bladder and lungs and in hair cells of the cochlea. At these sites, activation of TRPV1 has been implicated in the pathophysiology of diseases such as cystitis, asthma and hearing loss. Therefore, drugs which could modulate TRPV1 channel activity could be useful for the treatment of conditions ranging from chronic pain to hearing loss. This review describes the roles of TRPV1 in the normal physiology and pathophysiology of selected organs of the body and highlights how drugs targeting this channel could be important clinically. PMID:24861977

  11. The chimeric approach reveals that differences in the TRPV1 pore domain determine species-specific sensitivity to block of heat activation.

    PubMed

    Papakosta, Marianthi; Dalle, Carine; Haythornthwaite, Alison; Cao, Lishuang; Stevens, Edward B; Burgess, Gillian; Russell, Rachel; Cox, Peter J; Phillips, Stephen C; Grimm, Christian

    2011-11-11

    The capsaicin-, heat-, and proton-activated ion channel TRPV1, a member of the transient receptor potential cation channel family is a polymodal nociceptor. For almost a decade, TRPV1 has been explored by the pharmaceutical industry as a potential target for example for pain conditions. Antagonists which block TRPV1 activation by capsaicin, heat, and protons were developed by a number of pharmaceutical companies. The unexpected finding of hyperthermia as an on-target side effect in clinical studies using polymodal TRPV1 antagonists has prompted companies to search for ways to circumvent hyperthermia, for example by the development of modality-selective antagonists. The significant lack of consistency of the pharmacology of many TRPV1 antagonists across different species has been a further obstacle. JYL-1421 for example was shown to block capsaicin and heat responses in human and monkey TRPV1 while it was largely ineffective in blocking heat responses in rat TRPV1. These findings suggested structural dissimilarities between different TRPV1 species relevant for small compound antagonism for example of heat activation. Using a chimeric approach (human and rat TRPV1) in combination with a novel FLIPR-based heat activation assay and patch-clamp electrophysiology we have identified the pore region as being strongly linked to the observed species differences. We demonstrate that by exchanging the pore domains JYL-1421, which is modality-selective in rat can be made modality-selective in human TRPV1 and vice-versa.

  12. The Chimeric Approach Reveals That Differences in the TRPV1 Pore Domain Determine Species-specific Sensitivity to Block of Heat Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Papakosta, Marianthi; Dalle, Carine; Haythornthwaite, Alison; Cao, Lishuang; Stevens, Edward B.; Burgess, Gillian; Russell, Rachel; Cox, Peter J.; Phillips, Stephen C.; Grimm, Christian

    2011-01-01

    The capsaicin-, heat-, and proton-activated ion channel TRPV1, a member of the transient receptor potential cation channel family is a polymodal nociceptor. For almost a decade, TRPV1 has been explored by the pharmaceutical industry as a potential target for example for pain conditions. Antagonists which block TRPV1 activation by capsaicin, heat, and protons were developed by a number of pharmaceutical companies. The unexpected finding of hyperthermia as an on-target side effect in clinical studies using polymodal TRPV1 antagonists has prompted companies to search for ways to circumvent hyperthermia, for example by the development of modality-selective antagonists. The significant lack of consistency of the pharmacology of many TRPV1 antagonists across different species has been a further obstacle. JYL-1421 for example was shown to block capsaicin and heat responses in human and monkey TRPV1 while it was largely ineffective in blocking heat responses in rat TRPV1. These findings suggested structural dissimilarities between different TRPV1 species relevant for small compound antagonism for example of heat activation. Using a chimeric approach (human and rat TRPV1) in combination with a novel FLIPR-based heat activation assay and patch-clamp electrophysiology we have identified the pore region as being strongly linked to the observed species differences. We demonstrate that by exchanging the pore domains JYL-1421, which is modality-selective in rat can be made modality-selective in human TRPV1 and vice-versa. PMID:21911503

  13. Transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) is a mediator of lung toxicity for coal fly ash particulate material.

    PubMed

    Deering-Rice, Cassandra E; Johansen, Mark E; Roberts, Jessica K; Thomas, Karen C; Romero, Erin G; Lee, Jeewoo; Yost, Garold S; Veranth, John M; Reilly, Christopher A

    2012-03-01

    Environmental particulate matter (PM) pollutants adversely affect human health, but the molecular basis is poorly understood. The ion channel transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) has been implicated as a sensor for environmental PM and a mediator of adverse events in the respiratory tract. The objectives of this study were to determine whether TRPV1 can distinguish chemically and physically unique PM that represents important sources of air pollution; to elucidate the molecular basis of TRPV1 activation by PM; and to ascertain the contributions of TRPV1 to human lung cell and mouse lung tissue responses exposed to an insoluble PM agonist, coal fly ash (CFA1). The major findings of this study are that TRPV1 is activated by some, but not all of the prototype PM materials evaluated, with rank-ordered responses of CFA1 > diesel exhaust PM > crystalline silica; TRP melastatin-8 is also robustly activated by CFA1, whereas other TRP channels expressed by airway sensory neurons and lung epithelial cells that may also be activated by CFA1, including TRPs ankyrin 1 (A1), canonical 4α (C4α), M2, V2, V3, and V4, were either slightly (TRPA1) or not activated by CFA1; activation of TRPV1 by CFA1 occurs via cell surface interactions between the solid components of CFA1 and specific amino acid residues of TRPV1 that are localized in the putative pore-loop region; and activation of TRPV1 by CFA1 is not exclusive in mouse lungs but represents a pathway by which CFA1 affects the expression of selected genes in lung epithelial cells and airway tissue.

  14. Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) Is a Mediator of Lung Toxicity for Coal Fly Ash Particulate Material

    PubMed Central

    Deering-Rice, Cassandra E.; Johansen, Mark E.; Roberts, Jessica K.; Thomas, Karen C.; Romero, Erin G.; Lee, Jeewoo; Yost, Garold S.; Veranth, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Environmental particulate matter (PM) pollutants adversely affect human health, but the molecular basis is poorly understood. The ion channel transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) has been implicated as a sensor for environmental PM and a mediator of adverse events in the respiratory tract. The objectives of this study were to determine whether TRPV1 can distinguish chemically and physically unique PM that represents important sources of air pollution; to elucidate the molecular basis of TRPV1 activation by PM; and to ascertain the contributions of TRPV1 to human lung cell and mouse lung tissue responses exposed to an insoluble PM agonist, coal fly ash (CFA1). The major findings of this study are that TRPV1 is activated by some, but not all of the prototype PM materials evaluated, with rank-ordered responses of CFA1 > diesel exhaust PM > crystalline silica; TRP melastatin-8 is also robustly activated by CFA1, whereas other TRP channels expressed by airway sensory neurons and lung epithelial cells that may also be activated by CFA1, including TRPs ankyrin 1 (A1), canonical 4α (C4α), M2, V2, V3, and V4, were either slightly (TRPA1) or not activated by CFA1; activation of TRPV1 by CFA1 occurs via cell surface interactions between the solid components of CFA1 and specific amino acid residues of TRPV1 that are localized in the putative pore-loop region; and activation of TRPV1 by CFA1 is not exclusive in mouse lungs but represents a pathway by which CFA1 affects the expression of selected genes in lung epithelial cells and airway tissue. PMID:22155782

  15. [Upregulation of P2X3 receptors in dorsal root ganglion of TRPV1 knockout female mice].

    PubMed

    Fang, Xiao; Shi, Xiao-Han; Huang, Li-Bin; Rong, Wei-Fang; Ma, Bei

    2014-08-25

    The study was aimed to investigate the changes in mechanical pain threshold in the condition of chronic inflammatory pain after transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) gene was knockout. Hind-paw intraplantar injection of complete freund's adjuvant (CFA, 20 μL) produced peripheral inflammation in wild-type and TRPV1 knockout female mice. The mechanical pain thresholds were measured during the 8 days after injection and pre-injection by using Von-Frey hair. Nine days after injection, mice were killed and the differences of expression of c-Fos and P2X3 receptor in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and spinal cord dorsal horn were examined by Western blotting between the two groups. Compared with that in wild-type mice, the mechanical pain threshold was increased significantly in TRPV1 knockout mice (P < 0.05); 3 days after CFA injection, the baseline mechanical pain threshold in the TRPV1 knockout mice group was significantly higher than that in the wild-type mice group (P < 0.05); The result of Western blotting showed that the expression of c-Fos protein both in DRG and spinal cord dorsal horn of TRPV1 knockout mice group was decreased significantly compared with that in wild-type mice group (P < 0.01, P < 0.05), while the expression of P2X3 receptor in DRG of TRPV1 knockout mice group was increased significantly compared with that in wild-type mice group (P < 0.05). Our findings indicate that TRPV1 may influence the peripheral mechanical pain threshold by mediating the expression of c-Fos protein both in DRG and spinal cord dorsal horn and changing the expression of P2X3 receptor in DRG.

  16. A novel human volunteer pain model using contact heat evoked potentials (CHEP) following topical skin application of transient receptor potential agonists capsaicin, menthol and cinnamaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Roberts, K; Shenoy, R; Anand, P

    2011-07-01

    The discovery of transient receptor potential (TRP) receptors has advanced understanding of temperature sensation, and pre-clinical studies have identified TRP as major novel analgesic targets in inflammatory and neuropathic pain states. We systematically investigated the sensory effects and interactions of TRP agonists capsaicin (TRPV1), menthol (TRPM8) and cinnamaldehyde (TRPA1) applied topically to the skin in 14 healthy human participants. Capsaicin lowered heat pain thresholds while warm detection thresholds were unchanged, suggesting an effect purely on nociceptor nerve fibres. The amplitude of contact heat-evoked potentials (CHEP) and evoked pain ratings were negatively correlated after capsaicin, whereas CHEP had been correlated positively without capsaicin in a previous volunteer study. Menthol caused cold hypersensitivity and cinnamaldehyde caused heat hypersensitivity, but neither had an effect on evoked potentials. The CHEP after application of capsaicin show features observed in some patients with painful neuropathy, and could provide a model for development of novel analgesics, particularly TRPV1 antagonists.

  17. Role of TRPV1 Channels in Ischemia/Reperfusion-Induced Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lan; Markó, Lajos; Kaßmann, Mario; Zhu, Ye; Wu, Kaiyin; Gollasch, Maik

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) -positive sensory nerves are widely distributed in the kidney, suggesting that TRPV1-mediated action may participate in the regulation of renal function under pathophysiological conditions. Stimulation of TRPV1 channels protects against ischemia/reperfusion (I/R)-induced acute kidney injury (AKI). However, it is unknown whether inhibition of these channels is detrimental in AKI or not. We tested the role of TRPV1 channels in I/R-induced AKI by modulating these channels with capsaicin (TRPV1 agonist), capsazepine (TRPV1 antagonist) and using Trpv1−/− mice. Methods and Results Anesthetized C57BL/6 mice were subjected to 25 min of renal ischemia and 24 hrs of reperfusion. Mice were pretreated with capsaicin (0.3 mg/kg body weight) or capsazepine (50 mg/kg body weight). Capsaicin ameliorated the outcome of AKI, as measured by serum creatinine levels, tubular damage,neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) abundance and Ly-6B.2 positive polymorphonuclear inflammatory cells in injured kidneys. Neither capsazepine nor deficiency of TRPV1 did deteriorate renal function or histology after AKI. Measurements of endovanilloids in kidney tissue indicate that 20-hydroxyeicosatetraeonic acid (20-HETE) or epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) are unlikely involved in the beneficial effects of capsaicin on I/R-induced AKI. Conclusions Activation of TRPV1 channels ameliorates I/R-induced AKI, but inhibition of these channels does not affect the outcome of AKI. Our results may have clinical implications for long-term safety of renal denervation to treat resistant hypertension in man, with respect to the function of primary sensory nerves in the response of the kidney to ischemic stimuli. PMID:25330307

  18. Additive antiemetic efficacy of low-doses of the cannabinoid CB(1/2) receptor agonist Δ(9)-THC with ultralow-doses of the vanilloid TRPV1 receptor agonist resiniferatoxin in the least shrew (Cryptotis parva).

    PubMed

    Darmani, Nissar A; Chebolu, Seetha; Zhong, Weixia; Trinh, Chung; McClanahan, Bryan; Brar, Rajivinder S

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that cannabinoid CB1/2 and vanilloid TRPV1 agonists (delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC) and resiniferatoxin (RTX), respectively) can attenuate the emetic effects of chemotherapeutic agents such as cisplatin. In this study we used the least shrew to demonstrate whether combinations of varying doses of Δ(9)-THC with resiniferatoxin can produce additive antiemetic efficacy against cisplatin-induced vomiting. RTX by itself caused vomiting in a bell-shaped dose-dependent manner with maximal vomiting at 18 μg/kg when administered subcutaneously (s.c.) but not intraperitoneally (i.p.). Δ(9)-THC up to 10 mg/kg provides only 80% protection of least shrews from cisplatin-induced emesis with an ID50 of 0.3-1.8 mg/kg. Combinations of 1 or 5 μg/kg RTX with varying doses of Δ(9)-THC completely suppressed both the frequency and the percentage of shrews vomiting with ID50 dose values 5-50 times lower than Δ(9)-THC doses tested alone against cisplatin. A less potent TRPV1 agonist, capsaicin, by itself did not cause emesis (i.p. or s.c.), but it did significantly reduce vomiting induced by cisplatin given after 30 min but not at 2 h. The TRPV1-receptor antagonist, ruthenium red, attenuated cisplatin-induced emesis at 5mg/kg; however, another TRPV1-receptor antagonist, capsazepine, did not. In summary, we present evidence that combination of CB1/2 and TRPV1 agonists have the capacity to completely abolish cisplatin-induced emesis at doses that are ineffective when used individually.

  19. Anticonvulsant effects of N-arachidonoyl-serotonin, a dual fatty acid amide hydrolase enzyme and transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1 (TRPV1) channel blocker, on experimental seizures: the roles of cannabinoid CB1 receptors and TRPV1 channels.

    PubMed

    Vilela, Luciano R; Medeiros, Daniel C; de Oliveira, Antonio Carlos P; Moraes, Marcio F; Moreira, Fabricio A

    2014-10-01

    Selective blockade of anandamide hydrolysis, through the inhibition of the FAAH enzyme, has anticonvulsant effects, which are mediated by CB1 receptors. Anandamide, however, also activates TRPV1 channels, generally with an opposite outcome on neuronal modulation. Thus, we suggested that the dual FAAH and TRPV1 blockade with N-arachidonoyl-serotonin (AA-5-HT) would be efficacious in inhibiting pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizures in mice. We also investigated the contribution of CB1 activation and TRPV1 blockade to the overt effect of AA-5-HT. In the first experiment, injection of AA-5-HT (0.3-3.0 mg/kg) delayed the onset and reduced the duration of PTZ (60 mg)-induced seizures in mice. These effects were reversed by pre-treatment with the CB1 antagonist, AM251 (1.0-3.0 mg/kg). Finally, we observed that administration of the selective TRPV1 antagonist, SB366791 (0.1-1 mg/kg), did not entirely mimic AA-5-HT effects. In conclusion, AA-5-HT alleviates seizures in mice, an effect inhibited by CB1 antagonism, but not completely mimicked by TRPV1 blockage, indicating that the overall effect of AA-5-HT seems to depend mainly on CB1 receptors. This may represent a new strategy for the development of drugs against seizures, epilepsies and related syndromes.

  20. Transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1 (TRPV-1) channels contribute to cutaneous thermal hyperaemia in humans.

    PubMed

    Wong, Brett J; Fieger, Sarah M

    2010-11-01

    The initial, rapid increase in skin blood flow in response to direct application of heat is thought to be mediated by an axon reflex, which is dependent on intact cutaneous sensory nerves. We tested the hypothesis that inhibition of transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV-1) channels, which are putative channels located on sensory nerves, would attenuate the skin blood flow response to local heating in humans. Ten subjects were equipped with four microdialysis fibres which were randomly assigned one of four treatments: (1) vehicle control (90% propylene glycol + 10% lactated Ringer solution); (2) 20 mm capsazepine to inhibit TRPV-1 channels; (3) 10 mm l-NAME to inhibit NO synthase; and (4) combined 20 mm capsazepine + 10 mm l-NAME. Following baseline measurements, the temperature of skin heaters was increased from 33°C to 42°C at a rate of 1.0°C every 10 s and local temperature was held at 42°C for 20-30 min until a stable plateau in skin blood flow was achieved. An index of skin blood flow was measured directly over each microdialysis site via laser-Doppler flowmetry (LDF). Beat-by-beat blood pressure was measured via photoplethysmography and verified via automated brachial auscultation. At the end of the local heating protocol, temperature of the heaters was increased to 43°C and 28 mm nitroprusside was infused to achieve maximal vasodilatation. Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) was calculated as LDF/mean arterial pressure and normalized to maximal values (%CVCmax). Initial peak in capsazepine (44 ± 4%CVCmax), l-NAME (56 ± 4%CVCmax) and capsazepine + l-NAME (32 ± 6%CVCmax) sites was significantly attenuated compared to control (87 ± 5%CVCmax; P < 0.001 for all conditions). The plateau phase of thermal hyperaemia was significantly attenuated in capsazepine (73 ± 6%CVCmax), l-NAME (47 ± 5%CVCmax) and capsazepine + l-NAME (31 ± 7%CVCmax) sites compared to control (92 ± 5%CVCmax; P < 0.001 for all conditions). These data suggest TRPV-1

  1. Evodiamine suppresses capsaicin-induced thermal hyperalgesia through activation and subsequent desensitization of the transient receptor potential V1 channels.

    PubMed

    Iwaoka, Emiko; Wang, Shenglan; Matsuyoshi, Nobuyuki; Kogure, Yoko; Aoki, Shunji; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Noguchi, Koichi; Dai, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Evodiae fructus (EF), a fruit of Evodia rutaecarpa Bentham, has long been used as an analgesic drug in traditional Chinese and Japanese medicine. However, the underlying molecular mechanism of its pharmacological action is unclear. Here, using calcium imaging, whole-cell patch-clamp recording, and behavioral analysis, we investigated the pharmacological action of EF and its principal compound, evodiamine, on the transient receptor potential (TRP) V1 channels. Dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and TRPV1- or TRPA1-transfected human embryonic kidney-derived (HEK) 293 cells were used for calcium imaging or whole-cell patch-clamp recording. Twenty male adult Sprague-Dawley rats were used for the capsaicin-induced thermal hyperalgesia behavioral analyses. We found that evodiamine induced significant increases in intracellular calcium and robust inward currents in a subpopulation of isolated rat DRG neurons, most of which were also sensitive to capsaicin. The effect of evodiamine was completely blocked by capsazepine, a competitive antagonist of TRPV1. Evodiamine induced significant inward currents in TRPV1-, but not TRPA1-transfected HEK293 cells. Pretreatment with evodiamine reduced capsaicin-induced currents significantly. Furthermore, the in vivo pre-treatment of evodiamine suppressed thermal hyperalgesia induced by intraplantar injection of capsaicin in rats. These results identify that the analgesic effect of EF and evodiamine may be due to the activation and subsequent desensitization of TRPV1 in sensory neurons.

  2. Regulation of the temperature-dependent activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) by phospholipids in planar lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaohui; Zakharian, Eleonora

    2015-02-20

    TRPV1 (transient receptor potential vanilloid 1) proteins are heat-activated nonselective cation channels. TRPV1 channels are polymodal in their function and exhibit multifaceted regulation with various molecular compounds. In this regard, phosphoinositides, particularly phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate and phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate, are important channel regulators. However, their effects on TRPV1 channel activity have not been conclusively determined. To characterize temperature-induced activation of TRPV1 in the presence of different phospholipids, we purified the TRPV1 protein from HEK-293 cells and incorporated it into planar lipid bilayers. In the presence of 2.5 μm phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate, TRPV1 channels demonstrated rapid activation at 33-39 °C and achieved full channel opening at 42 °C. At this temperature range, TRPV1 heat activation exhibited steep temperature dependence (temperature coefficient (Q10) of 18), and the channel openings were accompanied by large changes in entropy and enthalpy, suggesting a substantial conformation change. At a similar temperature range, another phosphoinositide, phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate, also potentiated heat activation of TRPV1, but with much lower efficiency. Negatively charged phosphatidylglycerol could also induce heat activation of TRPV1 channels, although with a small-conductance state. Our data demonstrate that phospholipids, specifically phosphoinositides, are important regulators of TRPV1 and are required for heat-induced channel activity.

  3. Hyaluronan modulates TRPV1 channel opening, reducing peripheral nociceptor activity and pain.

    PubMed

    Caires, Rebeca; Luis, Enoch; Taberner, Francisco J; Fernandez-Ballester, Gregorio; Ferrer-Montiel, Antonio; Balazs, Endre A; Gomis, Ana; Belmonte, Carlos; de la Peña, Elvira

    2015-01-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) is present in the extracellular matrix of all body tissues, including synovial fluid in joints, in which it behaves as a filter that buffers transmission of mechanical forces to nociceptor nerve endings thereby reducing pain. Using recombinant systems, mouse-cultured dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons and in vivo experiments, we found that HA also modulates polymodal transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1) channels. HA diminishes heat, pH and capsaicin (CAP) responses, thus reducing the opening probability of the channel by stabilizing its closed state. Accordingly, in DRG neurons, HA decreases TRPV1-mediated impulse firing and channel sensitization by bradykinin. Moreover, subcutaneous HA injection in mice reduces heat and capsaicin nocifensive responses, whereas the intra-articular injection of HA in rats decreases capsaicin joint nociceptor fibres discharge. Collectively, these results indicate that extracellular HA reduces the excitability of the ubiquitous TRPV1 channel, thereby lowering impulse activity in the peripheral nociceptor endings underlying pain.

  4. Comparison of the effects of pelargonic acid vanillylamide and capsaicin on human vanilloid receptors.

    PubMed

    Weiser, Thomas; Roufogalis, Basil; Chrubasik, Sigrun

    2013-07-01

    Pelargonic acid vanillylamide is like capsaicin a natural capsaicinoid from chili peppers and commonly used in food additives to create a hot sensation, even in self-defense pepper sprays and as an alternative to capsaicin in medical products for topical treatment of pain. Although the chemical structures of both compounds are similar, preclinical data suggest that capsaicin is the more potent compound. We therefore performed voltage-clamp recordings using cells transfected with the human vanilloid receptor TRPV1 in order to assess the responses of pelargonic acid vanillylamide and capsaicin at the receptor level. We provide evidence that at the molecular target TRPV1, the concentration-response curves, kinetics of current activation, as well as inhibition by the competitive antagonist capsazepine were not significantly different between the two capsaicinoids. We suggest that the different effects of the two capsaicinoids observed in previous studies may rather be due to different physicochemical or pharmacokinetic properties than to different pharmacological profiles at the receptor level. PMID:22961689

  5. Comparison of the effects of pelargonic acid vanillylamide and capsaicin on human vanilloid receptors.

    PubMed

    Weiser, Thomas; Roufogalis, Basil; Chrubasik, Sigrun

    2013-07-01

    Pelargonic acid vanillylamide is like capsaicin a natural capsaicinoid from chili peppers and commonly used in food additives to create a hot sensation, even in self-defense pepper sprays and as an alternative to capsaicin in medical products for topical treatment of pain. Although the chemical structures of both compounds are similar, preclinical data suggest that capsaicin is the more potent compound. We therefore performed voltage-clamp recordings using cells transfected with the human vanilloid receptor TRPV1 in order to assess the responses of pelargonic acid vanillylamide and capsaicin at the receptor level. We provide evidence that at the molecular target TRPV1, the concentration-response curves, kinetics of current activation, as well as inhibition by the competitive antagonist capsazepine were not significantly different between the two capsaicinoids. We suggest that the different effects of the two capsaicinoids observed in previous studies may rather be due to different physicochemical or pharmacokinetic properties than to different pharmacological profiles at the receptor level.

  6. Antinociceptive activity of transient receptor potential channel TRPV1, TRPA1, and TRPM8 antagonists in neurogenic and neuropathic pain models in mice*

    PubMed Central

    Sałat, Kinga; Filipek, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research was to assess the antinociceptive activity of the transient receptor potential (TRP) channel TRPV1, TRPM8, and TRPA1 antagonists in neurogenic, tonic, and neuropathic pain models in mice. For this purpose, TRP channel antagonists were administered into the dorsal surface of a hind paw 15 min before capsaicin, allyl isothiocyanate (AITC), or formalin. Their antiallodynic and antihyperalgesic efficacies after intraperitoneal administration were also assessed in a paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain model. Motor coordination of paclitaxel-treated mice that received these TRP channel antagonists was investigated using the rotarod test. TRPV1 antagonists, capsazepine and SB-366791, attenuated capsaicin-induced nociceptive reaction in a concentration-dependent manner. At 8 μg/20 μl, this effect was 51% (P<0.001) for capsazepine and 37% (P<0.05) for SB-366791. A TRPA1 antagonist, A-967079, reduced pain reaction by 48% (P<0.05) in the AITC test and by 54% (P<0.001) in the early phase of the formalin test. The test compounds had no influence on the late phase of the formalin test. In paclitaxel-treated mice, they did not attenuate heat hyperalgesia but N-(3-aminopropyl)-2-{[(3-methylphenyl)methyl]oxy}-N-(2-thienylmethyl) benzamide hydrochloride salt (AMTB), a TRPM8 antagonist, reduced cold hyperalgesia and tactile allodynia by 31% (P<0.05) and 51% (P<0.01), respectively. HC-030031, a TRPA1 channel antagonist, attenuated tactile allodynia in the von Frey test (62%; P<0.001). In conclusion, distinct members of TRP channel family are involved in different pain models in mice. Antagonists of TRP channels attenuate nocifensive responses of neurogenic, tonic, and neuropathic pain, but their efficacies strongly depend on the pain model used. PMID:25743118

  7. TRPV1 channels are involved in niacin-induced cutaneous vasodilation in mice.

    PubMed

    Clifton, Heather L; Inceoglu, Bora; Ma, Linlin; Zheng, Jie; Schaefer, Saul

    2015-02-01

    Niacin is effective in treating dyslipidemias but causes cutaneous vasodilation or flushing, a side effect that limits its clinical use. Blocking prostaglandins in humans reduces but does not consistently eliminate flushing, indicating additional mechanisms may contribute to flushing. The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channel, when activated, causes cutaneous vasodilation and undergoes tachyphylaxis similar to that seen with niacin. Using a murine model, early phase niacin-induced flushing was examined and TRPV1 channel involvement demonstrated using pharmacologic blockade, desensitization, and genetic knockouts (TRPV1 KO). The TRPV1 antagonist AMG9810 reduced the magnitude of the initial and secondary peaks and the rapidity of the vasodilatory response (slope). TRPV1 desensitization by chronic capsaicin reduced the initial peak and slope. TRPV1 KO mice had a lower initial peak, secondary peak, and slope compared with wild-type mice. Chronic niacin reduced the initial peak, secondary peak, and slope in wild-type mice but had no effect in knockout mice. Furthermore, chronic niacin diminished the response to capsaicin in wild-type mice. Overall, these data demonstrate an important role for TRPV1 channels in niacin-induced flushing, both in the acute response and with chronic administration. That niacin-induced flushing is a complex cascade of events, which should inform pharmacological intervention against this side effect.

  8. The TRPV1 channel in rodents is a major target for antinociceptive effect of the probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri DSM 17938.

    PubMed

    Perez-Burgos, Azucena; Wang, Lu; McVey Neufeld, Karen-Anne; Mao, Yu-Kang; Ahmadzai, Mustafa; Janssen, Luke J; Stanisz, Andrew M; Bienenstock, John; Kunze, Wolfgang A

    2015-09-01

    Certain probiotic bacteria have been shown to reduce distension-dependent gut pain, but the mechanisms involved remain obscure. Live luminal Lactobacillus reuteri (DSM 17938) and its conditioned medium dose dependently reduced jejunal spinal nerve firing evoked by distension or capsaicin, and 80% of this response was blocked by a specific TRPV1 channel antagonist or in TRPV1 knockout mice. The specificity of DSM action on TRPV1 was further confirmed by its inhibition of capsaicin-induced intracellular calcium increases in dorsal root ganglion neurons. Another lactobacillus with ability to reduce gut pain did not modify this response. Prior feeding of rats with DSM inhibited the bradycardia induced by painful gastric distension. These results offer a system for the screening of new and improved candidate bacteria that may be useful as novel therapeutic adjuncts in gut pain. Certain bacteria exert visceral antinociceptive activity, but the mechanisms involved are not determined. Lactobacillus reuteri DSM 17938 was examined since it may be antinociceptive in children. Since transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channel activity may mediate nociceptive signals, we hypothesized that TRPV1 current is inhibited by DSM. We tested this by examining the effect of DSM on the firing frequency of spinal nerve fibres in murine jejunal mesenteric nerve bundles following serosal application of capsaicin. We also measured the effects of DSM on capsaicin-evoked increase in intracellular Ca(2+) or ionic current in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Furthermore, we tested the in vivo antinociceptive effects of oral DSM on gastric distension in rats. Live DSM reduced the response of capsaicin- and distension-evoked firing of spinal nerve action potentials (238 ± 27.5% vs. 129 ± 17%). DSM also reduced the capsaicin-evoked TRPV1 ionic current in DRG neuronal primary culture from 83 ± 11% to 41 ± 8% of the initial response to capsaicin only. Another lactobacillus

  9. The TRPV1 channel in rodents is a major target for antinociceptive effect of the probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri DSM 17938.

    PubMed

    Perez-Burgos, Azucena; Wang, Lu; McVey Neufeld, Karen-Anne; Mao, Yu-Kang; Ahmadzai, Mustafa; Janssen, Luke J; Stanisz, Andrew M; Bienenstock, John; Kunze, Wolfgang A

    2015-09-01

    Certain probiotic bacteria have been shown to reduce distension-dependent gut pain, but the mechanisms involved remain obscure. Live luminal Lactobacillus reuteri (DSM 17938) and its conditioned medium dose dependently reduced jejunal spinal nerve firing evoked by distension or capsaicin, and 80% of this response was blocked by a specific TRPV1 channel antagonist or in TRPV1 knockout mice. The specificity of DSM action on TRPV1 was further confirmed by its inhibition of capsaicin-induced intracellular calcium increases in dorsal root ganglion neurons. Another lactobacillus with ability to reduce gut pain did not modify this response. Prior feeding of rats with DSM inhibited the bradycardia induced by painful gastric distension. These results offer a system for the screening of new and improved candidate bacteria that may be useful as novel therapeutic adjuncts in gut pain. Certain bacteria exert visceral antinociceptive activity, but the mechanisms involved are not determined. Lactobacillus reuteri DSM 17938 was examined since it may be antinociceptive in children. Since transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channel activity may mediate nociceptive signals, we hypothesized that TRPV1 current is inhibited by DSM. We tested this by examining the effect of DSM on the firing frequency of spinal nerve fibres in murine jejunal mesenteric nerve bundles following serosal application of capsaicin. We also measured the effects of DSM on capsaicin-evoked increase in intracellular Ca(2+) or ionic current in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Furthermore, we tested the in vivo antinociceptive effects of oral DSM on gastric distension in rats. Live DSM reduced the response of capsaicin- and distension-evoked firing of spinal nerve action potentials (238 ± 27.5% vs. 129 ± 17%). DSM also reduced the capsaicin-evoked TRPV1 ionic current in DRG neuronal primary culture from 83 ± 11% to 41 ± 8% of the initial response to capsaicin only. Another lactobacillus

  10. Sulphur-containing compounds of durian activate the thermogenesis-inducing receptors TRPA1 and TRPV1.

    PubMed

    Terada, Yuko; Hosono, Takashi; Seki, Taiichiro; Ariga, Toyohiko; Ito, Sohei; Narukawa, Masataka; Watanabe, Tatsuo

    2014-08-15

    Durian (Durio zibethinus Murr.) is classified as a body-warming food in Indian herbalism, and its hyperthermic effect is empirically known in Southeast Asia. To investigate the mechanism underlying this effect, we focused on the thermogenesis-inducing receptors, TRPA1 and TRPV1. Durian contains sulphides similar to the TRPA1 and TRPV1 agonists of garlic. Accordingly, we hypothesized that the thermogenic effect of durian is driven by sulphide-induced TRP channel activation. To investigate our hypothesis, we measured the TRPA1 and TRPV1 activity of the sulphur-containing components of durian and quantified their content in durian pulp. These sulphur-containing components had a stronger effect on TRPA1 than TRPV1. Furthermore, sulphide content in the durian pulp was sufficient to evoke TRP channel activation and the main agonist was diethyl disulphide. From these results, we consider that the body-warming effect of durian is elicited by TRPA1 activation with its sulphides, as can be seen in spices.

  11. Depressive behavior in the forced swim test can be induced by TRPV1 receptor activity and is dependent on NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Abdelhamid, Ramy E; Kovács, Katalin J; Nunez, Myra G; Larson, Alice A

    2014-01-01

    Blocking, desensitizing, or knocking out transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptors decreases immobility in the forced swim test, a measure of depressive behavior. We questioned whether enhancing TRPV1 activity promotes immobility in a fashion that is prevented by antidepressants. To test this we activated heat-sensitive TRPV1 receptors in mice by water that is warmer than body temperature (41 °C) or a low dose of resiniferatoxin (RTX). Water at 41 °C elicited less immobility than cooler water (26 °C), indicating that thermoregulatory sites do not contribute to immobility. Although a desensitizing regimen of RTX (3-5 injections of 0.1 mg/kg s.c.) decreased immobility during swims at 26 °C, it did not during swims at 41 °C. In contrast, low dose of RTX (0.02 mg/kg s.c.) enhanced immobility, but only during swims at 41 °C. Thus, activation of TRPV1 receptors, endogenously or exogenously, enhances immobility and these sites are activated by cold rather than warmth. Two distinct types of antidepressants, amitriptyline (10mg/kg i.p.) and ketamine (50 mg/kg i.p.), each inhibited the increase in immobility induced by the low dose of RTX, verifying its mediation by TRPV1 sites. When desensitization was limited to central populations using intrathecal injections of RTX (0.25 μg/kg i.t.), immobility was attenuated at both temperatures and the increase in immobility produced by the low dose of RTX was inhibited. This demonstrates a role for central TRPV1 receptors in depressive behavior, activated by conditions (cold stress) distinct from those that activate TRPV1 receptors along thermosensory afferents (heat). PMID:24200896

  12. Depressive behavior in the forced swim test can be induced by TRPV1 receptor activity and is dependent on NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Abdelhamid, Ramy E; Kovács, Katalin J; Nunez, Myra G; Larson, Alice A

    2014-01-01

    Blocking, desensitizing, or knocking out transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptors decreases immobility in the forced swim test, a measure of depressive behavior. We questioned whether enhancing TRPV1 activity promotes immobility in a fashion that is prevented by antidepressants. To test this we activated heat-sensitive TRPV1 receptors in mice by water that is warmer than body temperature (41 °C) or a low dose of resiniferatoxin (RTX). Water at 41 °C elicited less immobility than cooler water (26 °C), indicating that thermoregulatory sites do not contribute to immobility. Although a desensitizing regimen of RTX (3-5 injections of 0.1 mg/kg s.c.) decreased immobility during swims at 26 °C, it did not during swims at 41 °C. In contrast, low dose of RTX (0.02 mg/kg s.c.) enhanced immobility, but only during swims at 41 °C. Thus, activation of TRPV1 receptors, endogenously or exogenously, enhances immobility and these sites are activated by cold rather than warmth. Two distinct types of antidepressants, amitriptyline (10mg/kg i.p.) and ketamine (50 mg/kg i.p.), each inhibited the increase in immobility induced by the low dose of RTX, verifying its mediation by TRPV1 sites. When desensitization was limited to central populations using intrathecal injections of RTX (0.25 μg/kg i.t.), immobility was attenuated at both temperatures and the increase in immobility produced by the low dose of RTX was inhibited. This demonstrates a role for central TRPV1 receptors in depressive behavior, activated by conditions (cold stress) distinct from those that activate TRPV1 receptors along thermosensory afferents (heat).

  13. Possible role for TRPV1 in neomycin-induced inhibition of visceral hypersensitivity in rat.

    PubMed

    van den Wijngaard, R M; Welting, O; Bulmer, D C; Wouters, M M; Lee, K; de Jonge, W J; Boeckxstaens, G E

    2009-08-01

    Transient receptor ion channel 1 (TRPV1) is a nociceptor involved in visceral hypersensitivity. Aminoglycosides like neomycin are not only potent antibiotics but in vitro data suggest that neomycin also acts as a TRPV1-antagonist and alleviates somatic pain responses. To what extent neomycin reduces visceral hypersensitivity remains unknown. Therefore, we aimed to investigate whether neomycin can inhibit in vivo TRPV1-dependent hypersensitivity responses in two rat models of visceral pain. In the first model rats were pretreated with intraperitoneal (i.p.) capsazepine, the selective TRPV1 antagonist SB-705498, neomycin or vehicle alone and 30 min later instilled with intracolonic TRPV1-activating capsaicin. Likewise, rats were pretreated with 10 days oral neomycin and then subjected to intracolonic capsaicin. The visceromotor response (VMR) to distension was measured before and after capsaicin application. In addition, the VMR to distension was measured in adult maternal separated rats before and after acute stress. Before the 2nd distension protocol these rats were treated with i.p. neomycin, amoxycillin or vehicle alone. Our results showed that capsaicin administration induced an enhanced VMR to distension that was prevented by i.p. capsazepine, SB-705498 and neomycin. Oral neomycin treatment changed bacterial faecal content but could not inhibit capsaicin induced visceral hypersensitivity. In maternal separated rats acute stress induced an enhanced response to distension that was reversed by i.p. neomycin, but not amoxycillin. These data indicate that (i.p.) neomycin can inhibit visceral hypersensitivity to distension in a nonbactericidal manner and suggest that TRPV1-modulation may be involved.

  14. Protons stabilize the closed conformation of gain-of-function mutants of the TRPV1 channel.

    PubMed

    Boukalova, Stepana; Teisinger, Jan; Vlachova, Viktorie

    2013-03-01

    The vanilloid transient receptor potential channel TRPV1 is a molecular integrator of noxious stimuli, including capsaicin, heat and protons. Despite clear similarities between the overall architecture of TRPV1 and voltage-dependent potassium (Kv) channels, the extent of conservation in the molecular logic for gating is unknown. In Kv channels, a small contact surface between S1 and the pore-helix is required for channel functioning. To explore the function of S1 in TRPV1, we used tryptophan-scanning mutagenesis and characterized the responses to capsaicin and protons. Wild-type-like currents were generated in 9 out of 17 mutants; three mutants (M445W, A452W, R455W) were non-functional. The conservative mutation R455K in the extracellular extent of S1 slowed down capsaicin-induced activation and prevented normal channel closure. This mutant was neither activated nor potentiated by protons, on the contrary, protons promoted a rapid deactivation of its currents. Similar phenotypes were found in two other gain-of-function mutants and also in the pore-helix mutant T633A, known to uncouple proton activation. We propose that the S1 domain contains a functionally important region that may be specifically involved in TRPV1 channel gating, and thus be important for the energetic coupling between S1-S4 sensor activation and gate opening. Analogous to Kv channels, the S1-pore interface might serve to stabilize conformations associated with TRPV1 channel gating.

  15. Hypernatremia-induced vasopressin secretion is not altered in TRPV1-/- rats.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Andrew Blake; Stocker, Sean D

    2016-09-01

    Changes in osmolality or extracellular NaCl concentrations are detected by specialized neurons in the hypothalamus to increase vasopressin (VP) and stimulate thirst. Recent in vitro evidence suggests this process is mediated by an NH2-terminal variant of the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) channel expressed by osmosensitive neurons of the lamina terminalis and vasopressinergic neurons of the supraoptic nucleus. The present study tested this hypothesis in vivo by analysis of plasma VP levels during acute hypernatremia in awake control and TRPV1(-/-) rats. TRPV1(-/-) rats were produced by a Zinc-finger-nuclease 2-bp deletion in exon 13. Intravenous injection of the TRPV1 agonist capsaicin produced hypotension and bradycardia in control rats, but this response was absent in TRPV1(-/-) rats. Infusion of 2 M NaCl (1 ml/h iv) increased plasma osmolality, electrolytes, and VP levels in both control and TRPV1(-/-) rats. However, plasma VP levels did not differ between strains at any time. Furthermore, a linear regression between plasma VP versus osmolality revealed a significant correlation in both control and TRPV1(-/-) rats, but the slope of the regression lines was not attenuated in TRPV1(-/-) versus control rats. Hypotension produced by intravenous injection of minoxidil decreased blood pressure and increased plasma VP levels similarly in both groups. Finally, both treatments stimulated thirst; however, cumulative water intakes in response to hypernatremia or hypotension were not different between control and TRPV1(-/-) rats. These findings suggest that TRPV1 channels are not necessary for VP secretion and thirst stimulated by hypernatremia. PMID:27335281

  16. Novel therapeutics in the field of capsaicin and pain.

    PubMed

    Evangelista, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Capsaicin, a pharmacologically active agent found in chili peppers, causes burning and itching sensation due to binding at the transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV-1) receptor, a polymodal receptor critical to the sensing of a variety of stimuli (e.g., noxious heat, bidirectional pH), and subsequent activation of polymodal C and A-δ nociceptive fibers. Acutely, TRPV-1 activation with peripheral capsaicin produces pronociceptive effects, which extends to the development of hyperalgesia and allodynia. However, capsaicin has been reported to display antinociceptive properties as well, largely through TRPV-1-dependent mechanisms. Local application of high concentration of capsaicin is used for neuropathic pain and repeated stimulation of TRPV-1 induced an improvement of epigastric pain in irritable bowel syndrome and dyspepsia patients by desensitization of nociceptive pathways. New TRPV-1 agonists are currently under preclinical study and TRPV-1 antagonists are in early clinical development as analgesics. The TRPV-1 pathway might be a novel target for therapeutics in pain sensitivity. PMID:25959004

  17. Novel therapeutics in the field of capsaicin and pain.

    PubMed

    Evangelista, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Capsaicin, a pharmacologically active agent found in chili peppers, causes burning and itching sensation due to binding at the transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV-1) receptor, a polymodal receptor critical to the sensing of a variety of stimuli (e.g., noxious heat, bidirectional pH), and subsequent activation of polymodal C and A-δ nociceptive fibers. Acutely, TRPV-1 activation with peripheral capsaicin produces pronociceptive effects, which extends to the development of hyperalgesia and allodynia. However, capsaicin has been reported to display antinociceptive properties as well, largely through TRPV-1-dependent mechanisms. Local application of high concentration of capsaicin is used for neuropathic pain and repeated stimulation of TRPV-1 induced an improvement of epigastric pain in irritable bowel syndrome and dyspepsia patients by desensitization of nociceptive pathways. New TRPV-1 agonists are currently under preclinical study and TRPV-1 antagonists are in early clinical development as analgesics. The TRPV-1 pathway might be a novel target for therapeutics in pain sensitivity.

  18. Effect of chirality and lipophilicity in the functional activity of evodiamine and its analogues at TRPV1 channels

    PubMed Central

    De Petrocellis, Luciano; Schiano Moriello, Aniello; Fontana, Gabriele; Sacchetti, Alessandro; Passarella, Daniele; Appendino, Giovanni; Di Marzo, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Evodiamine, a racemic quinazolinocarboline alkaloid isolated from the traditional Chinese medicine Evodiae fructus, has been reported to act as an agonist of the transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1 (TRPV1) cation channel both in vitro and in vivo. Evodiamine is structurally different from all known TRPV1 activators, and has significant clinical potential as a thermogenic agent. Nevertheless, the molecular bases for its actions are still poorly understood. Experimental Approach To investigate the structure-activity relationships of evodiamine, the natural racemate was resolved, and a series of 23 synthetic analogues was prepared, using as the end point the intracellular Ca2+ elevation in HEK-293 cells stably overexpressing either the human or the rat recombinant TRPV1. Key Results S-(+) evodiamine was more efficacious and potent than R-(−) evodiamine, and a new potent lead (Evo30) was identified, more potent than the reference TRPV1 agonist, capsaicin. In general, potency and efficacy correlated with the lipophilicity of the analogues. Like other TRPV1 agonists, several synthetic analogues could efficiently desensitize TRPV1 to activation by capsaicin. Conclusions and Implications Evodiamine qualifies as structurally unique lead structure to develop new potent TRPV1 agonists/desensitizers. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on the pharmacology of TRP channels. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-10 PMID:23902373

  19. Distinct properties of Ca2+-calmodulin binding to N- and C-terminal regulatory regions of the TRPV1 channel

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, Sze-Yi; Procko, Erik; Gaudet, Rachelle

    2012-11-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is a molecular pain receptor belonging to the TRP superfamily of nonselective cation channels. As a polymodal receptor, TRPV1 responds to heat and a wide range of chemical stimuli. The influx of calcium after channel activation serves as a negative feedback mechanism leading to TRPV1 desensitization. The cellular calcium sensor calmodulin (CaM) likely participates in the desensitization of TRPV1. Two CaM-binding sites are identified in TRPV1: the N-terminal ankyrin repeat domain (ARD) and a short distal C-terminal (CT) segment. Here, we present the crystal structure of calcium-bound CaM (Ca2+–CaM) in complex with the TRPV1-CT segment, determined to 1.95-Å resolution. The two lobes of Ca2+–CaM wrap around a helical TRPV1-CT segment in an antiparallel orientation, and two hydrophobic anchors, W787 and L796, contact the C-lobe and N-lobe of Ca2+–CaM, respectively. This structure is similar to canonical Ca2+–CaM-peptide complexes, although TRPV1 contains no classical CaM recognition sequence motif. Using structural and mutational studies, we established the TRPV1 C terminus as a high affinity Ca2+–CaM-binding site in both the isolated TRPV1 C terminus and in full-length TRPV1. Although a ternary complex of CaM, TRPV1-ARD, and TRPV1-CT had previously been postulated, we found no biochemical evidence of such a complex. In electrophysiology studies, mutation of the Ca2+–CaM-binding site on TRPV1-ARD abolished desensitization in response to repeated application of capsaicin, whereas mutation of the Ca2+–CaM-binding site in TRPV1-CT led to a more subtle phenotype of slowed and reduced TRPV1 desensitization. In summary, our results show that the TRPV1-ARD is an important mediator of TRPV1 desensitization, whereas TRPV1-CT has higher affinity for CaM and is likely involved in separate regulatory mechanisms.

  20. Vanilloids selectively sensitize thermal glutamate release from TRPV1 expressing solitary tract afferents.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Mackenzie E; Andresen, Michael C

    2016-02-01

    Vanilloids, high temperature, and low pH activate the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptor. In spinal dorsal root ganglia, co-activation of one of these gating sites on TRPV1 sensitized receptor gating by other modes. Here in rat brainstem slices, we examined glutamate synaptic transmission in nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) neurons where most cranial primary afferents express TRPV1, but TRPV1 sensitization is unknown. Electrical shocks to the solitary tract (ST) evoked EPSCs (ST-EPSCs). Activation of TRPV1 with capsaicin (100 nM) increased spontaneous EPSCs (sEPSCs) but inhibited ST-EPSCs. High concentrations of the ultra-potent vanilloid resiniferatoxin (RTX, 1 nM) similarly increased sEPSC rates but blocked ST-EPSCs. Lowering the RTX concentration to 150 pM modestly increased the frequency of the sEPSCs without causing failures in the evoked ST-EPSCs. The sEPSC rate increased with raising bath temperature to 36 °C. Such thermal responses were larger in 150 pM RTX, while the ST-EPSCs remained unaffected. Vanilloid sensitization of thermal responses persisted in TTX but was blocked by the TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine. Our results demonstrate that multimodal activation of TRPV1 facilitates sEPSC responses in more than the arithmetic sum of the two activators, i.e. co-activation sensitizes TRPV1 control of spontaneous glutamate release. Since action potential evoked glutamate release is unaltered, the work provides evidence for cooperativity in gating TRPV1 plus a remarkable separation of calcium mechanisms governing the independent vesicle pools responsible for spontaneous and evoked release at primary afferents in the NTS.

  1. Activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) influences how retinal ganglion cell neurons respond to pressure-related stress

    PubMed Central

    Sappington, Rebecca M; Sidorova, Tatiana; Ward, Nicholas J; Chakravarthy, Rohini; Ho, Karen W; Calkins, David J

    2015-01-01

    Our recent studies implicate the transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) channel as a mediator of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) function and survival. With elevated pressure in the eye, TRPV1 increases in RGCs, supporting enhanced excitability, while Trpv1 -/- accelerates RGC degeneration in mice. Here we find TRPV1 localized in monkey and human RGCs, similar to rodents. Expression increases in RGCs exposed to acute changes in pressure. In retinal explants, contrary to our animal studies, both Trpv1 -/- and pharmacological antagonism of the channel prevented pressure-induced RGC apoptosis, as did chelation of extracellular Ca2+. Finally, while TRPV1 and TRPV4 co-localize in some RGC bodies and form a protein complex in the retina, expression of their mRNA is inversely related with increasing ocular pressure. We propose that TRPV1 activation by pressure-related insult in the eye initiates changes in expression that contribute to a Ca2+-dependent adaptive response to maintain excitatory signaling in RGCs. PMID:25713995

  2. Permeation and block of TRPV1 channels by the cationic lidocaine derivative QX-314

    PubMed Central

    Puopolo, Michelino; Binshtok, Alexander M.; Yao, Gui-Lan; Oh, Seog Bae; Woolf, Clifford J.

    2013-01-01

    QX-314 (N-ethyl-lidocaine) is a cationic lidocaine derivative that blocks voltage-dependent sodium channels when applied internally to axons or neuronal cell bodies. Coapplication of external QX-314 with the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 protein (TRPV1) agonist capsaicin produces long-lasting sodium channel inhibition in TRPV1-expressing neurons, suggestive of QX-314 entry into the neurons. We asked whether QX-314 entry occurs directly through TRPV1 channels or through a different pathway (e.g., pannexin channels) activated downstream of TRPV1 and whether QX-314 entry requires the phenomenon of “pore dilation” previously reported for TRPV1. With external solutions containing 10 or 20 mM QX-314 as the only cation, inward currents were activated by stimulation of both heterologously expressed and native TRPV1 channels in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons. QX-314-mediated inward current did not require pore dilation, as it activated within several seconds and in parallel with Cs-mediated outward current, with a reversal potential consistent with PQX-314/PCs = 0.12. QX-314-mediated current was no different when TRPV1 channels were expressed in C6 glioma cells, which lack expression of pannexin channels. Rapid addition of QX-314 to physiological external solutions produced instant partial inhibition of inward currents carried by sodium ions, suggesting that QX-314 is a permeant blocker. Maintained coapplication of QX-314 with capsaicin produced slowly developing reduction of outward currents carried by internal Cs, consistent with intracellular accumulation of QX-314 to concentrations of 50–100 μM. We conclude that QX-314 is directly permeant in the “standard” pore formed by TRPV1 channels and does not require either pore dilation or activation of additional downstream channels for entry. PMID:23303863

  3. Vanilloids induce oral cancer apoptosis independent of TRPV1

    PubMed Central

    Gonzales, Cara B.; Kirma, Nameer B.; De La Chapa, Jorge J.; Chen, Richard; Henry, Michael A.; Luo, Songjiang; Hargreaves, Kenneth M.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Objective To investigate the mechanisms of vanilloid cytotoxicity and anti-tumor effects in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Materials and methods Immunohistochemistry and qPCR analyses demonstrated expression of the TRP vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptor in OSCC. Using cell proliferation assays, calcium imaging, and three mouse xenograft models, prototypical vanilloid agonist (capsaicin) and antagonist (capsazepine) were evaluated for cytotoxic and anti-tumor effects in OSCC. Results OSCC cell lines treated with capsaicin displayed significantly reduced cell viability. Pre-treatment with capsazepine failed to reverse these effects. Moreover, capsazepine alone was significantly cytotoxic to tumor cells, suggesting the mechanism-of-action is independent of TRPV1 activation. This was further confirmed by calcium imaging indicating that TRPV1 channels are not functional in the cell lines tested. We then examined whether the observed vanilloid cytotoxicity was due to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and subsequent apoptosis. Induction of ROS was confirmed by flow cytometry and reversed by co-treatment with the antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC). NAC also significantly reversed vanilloid cytotoxicity in cell proliferation assays. Dose-dependent induction of apoptosis with capsazepine treatment was demonstrated by FACS analyses and c-PARP expression in treated cells. Our in vivo xenograft studies showed that intra-tumoral injections of capsazepine exhibited high effectiveness in suppressing tumor growth with no identifiable toxicities. Conclusions These findings confirm TRPV1 channel expression in OSCC. However anti-tumor effects of vanilloids are independent of TRPV1 activation and are most likely due to ROS induction and subsequent apoptosis. Importantly, these studies demonstrate capsazepine is a potential therapeutic candidate for OSCC. PMID:24434067

  4. Biphasic modulation by mGlu5 receptors of TRPV1-mediated intracellular calcium elevation in sensory neurons contributes to heat sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Masuoka, T; Nakamura, T; Kudo, M; Yoshida, J; Takaoka, Y; Kato, N; Ishibashi, T; Imaizumi, N; Nishio, M

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Elevation of glutamate, an excitatory amino acid, during inflammation and injury plays a crucial role in the reception and transmission of sensory information via ionotropic and metabotropic receptors. This study aimed to investigate the mechanisms underlying the biphasic effects of metabotropic glutamate mGlu5 receptor activation on responses to noxious heat. Experimental Approach We assessed the effects of intraplantar quisqualate, a non-selective glutamate receptor agonist, on heat and mechanical pain behaviours in mice. In addition, the effects of quisqualate on the intracellular calcium response and on membrane currents mediated by TRPV1 channels, were examined in cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons from mice. Key Results Activation of mGlu5 receptors in hind paw transiently increased, then decreased, the response to noxious heat. In sensory neurons, activation of mGlu5 receptors potentiated TRPV1-mediated intracellular calcium elevation, while terminating activation of mGlu5 receptors depressed it. TRPV1-induced currents were potentiated by activation of mGlu5 receptors under voltage clamp conditions and these disappeared after washout. However, voltage-gated calcium currents were inhibited by the mGlu5 receptor agonist, even after washout. Conclusions and Implications These results suggest that, in sensory neurons, mGlu5 receptors biphasically modulate TRPV1-mediated intracellular calcium response via transient potentiation of TRPV1 channel-induced currents and persistent inhibition of voltage-gated calcium currents, contributing to heat hyper- and hypoalgesia. PMID:25297838

  5. ZO-1 and -2 Are Required for TRPV1-Modulated Paracellular Permeability.

    PubMed

    Li, J; Cong, X; Zhang, Y; Xiang, R L; Mei, M; Yang, N Y; Su, Y C; Choi, S; Park, K; Zhang, L W; Wu, L L; Yu, G Y

    2015-12-01

    The tight junction-based paracellular pathway plays an important role in saliva secretion. Zonula occludens (ZO) proteins are submembranous proteins of tight junction complex; however, their function in salivary epithelium is poorly understood. Here, we found that activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1) by capsaicin increased rat saliva secretion both in vivo and ex vivo. Meanwhile, TRPV1 activation enlarged the width of tight junctions between neighboring acinar cells, increased the paracellular flux of 4-kDa fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-dextran in submandibular gland (SMG) tissues, and decreased transepithelial electric resistance (TER) in SMG-C6 cells. ZO-1, -2, and -3 were distributed principally to the apical lateral region of acinar cells in SMG tissues and continuously encircled the peripheries of SMG-C6 cells in the untreated condition. TRPV1 activation obviously diminished ZO-1 and -2 staining, but not ZO-3 or β-catenin, at the cell-cell contacts ex vivo and in vitro. Moreover, in untreated SMG-C6 cells, ZO-1 and -2 single or double knockdown by small interfering RNA (siRNA) increased the paracellular flux of 4-kDa FITC-dextran. In capsaicin-treated cells, ZO-1 and -2 single or double knockdown abolished, whereas their re-expression restored, the capsaicin-induced increase in paracellular permeability. Furthermore, TRPV1 activation increased RhoA activity, and inhibition of either RhoA or Rho kinase (ROCK) abolished the capsaicin-induced TER decrease as well as ZO-1 and -2 redistribution. These results indicate that ZO-1 and -2 play crucial roles in both basal salivary epithelial barrier function and TRPV1-modulated paracellular transport. RhoA-ROCK signaling pathway is responsible for TRPV1-modulated paracellular permeability as well as ZO-1 and -2 redistribution.

  6. Effects of single swim stress on changes in TRPV1-mediated plasticity in the amygdala.

    PubMed

    Kulisch, Christoph; Albrecht, Doris

    2013-01-01

    By examining the involvement of transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) in the stress modulation of learning and memory processes in mice, we evaluated the effects of endovanilloid N-oleoyldopamine (OLDA) on the long-term potentiation (LTP) of the lateral nucleus of the amygdala (LA). After high-frequency stimulation of external capsule fibers we found that LA-LTP is reduced in OLDA-treated slices derived from adult C57BL/6 control mice. The specificity of the TRPV1 receptor activation by OLDA was confirmed by blocking the OLDA-induced inhibitory effect on LA-LTP with the specific TRPV1 receptor antagonist AMG 9810. The specificity of OLDA was further supported by using TRPV1 deficient mice, where the effect of OLDA on LA-LTP was missing. Following exposure to a forced swim test (FST) OLDA enhanced LA-LTP in control but not TRPV1-deficient mice. The results also show that a short period of acute stress significantly impairs LA-LTP. Since we have recently shown the involvement of cannabinoid CB1 receptors in the mediation of capsaicin-induced inhibitory effects on LA-LTP ([23] Zschenderlein et al., 2011), it is reasonable to assume that the OLDA-induced enhancement of LA-LTP after the forced swim test can be attributed to the up-regulation of TRPV1 and the action of ligands such as anandamide on TRPV1. As a result, stimulation of TRPV1 receptors rescues LTP in slices derived from swim-stressed mice.

  7. Transient activation of specific neurons in mice by selective expression of the capsaicin receptor

    PubMed Central

    Güler, Ali D.; Rainwater, Aundrea; Parker, Jones G.; Jones, Graham L.; Argilli, Emanuela; Arenkiel, Benjamin R.; Ehlers, Michael D.; Bonci, Antonello; Zweifel, Larry s.; Palmiter, Richard D.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to control the electrical activity of a neuronal subtype is a valuable tool in deciphering the role of discreet cell populations in complex neural circuits. Recent techniques that allow remote control of neurons are either labor intensive and invasive or indirectly coupled to neural electrical potential with low temporal resolution. Here we show the rapid, reversible and direct activation of genetically identified neuronal subpopulations by generating two inducible transgenic mouse models. Confined expression of the capsaicin receptor, TRPV1, allows cell-specific activation after peripheral or oral delivery of ligand in freely moving mice. Capsaicin-induced activation of dopaminergic or serotonergic neurons reversibly alters both physiological and behavioural responses within minutes, and lasts ~10 min. These models showcase a robust and remotely controllable genetic tool that modulates a distinct cell population without the need for invasive and labour-intensive approaches. PMID:22434189

  8. Spicing up the sensation of stretch: TRPV1 controls mechanosensitive Piezo channels.

    PubMed

    Altier, Christophe

    2015-02-10

    Piezo proteins--a family of mammalian cation-selective ion channels that respond to mechanical stretch--are molecular mediators of biological processes, including vascular tone, hearing, touch, and pain. In this issue of Science Signaling, Rohacs and colleagues demonstrate that activation of the heat-sensitive transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), another cation channel, inhibits Piezo channels through a calcium-induced depletion of phosphoinositides. This regulation could contribute to the cellular mechanisms by which the TRPV1 activator capsaicin mitigates mechanical hypersensitivity.

  9. Osmoregulatory thirst in mice lacking the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) and/or type 4 (TRPV4) receptor.

    PubMed

    Kinsman, Brian; Cowles, James; Lay, Jennifer; Simmonds, Sarah S; Browning, Kirsteen N; Stocker, Sean D

    2014-11-01

    Recent studies suggest the ability of the central nervous system to detect changes in osmolality is mediated by products of the genes encoding the transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) or vanilloid-4 (TRPV4) channel. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether deletion of TRPV1 and/or TRPV4 channels altered thirst responses to cellular dehydration in mice. Injection of 0.5 or 1.0 M NaCl produced dose-dependent increases in cumulative water intakes of wild-type (WT), TRPV1-/-, TRPV4-/-, and TRPV1-/-V4-/- mice. However, there were no differences in cumulative water intakes between WT versus any other strain despite similar increases in plasma electrolytes and osmolality. Similar results were observed after injection of hypertonic mannitol. This was a consistent finding regardless of the injection route (intraperitoneal vs. subcutaneous) or timed access to water (delayed vs. immediate). There were also no differences in cumulative intakes across strains after injection of 0.15 M NaCl or during a time-controlled period (no injection). Chronic hypernatremia produced by sole access to 2% NaCl for 48 h also produced similar increases in water intake across strains. In a final set of experiments, subcutaneous injection of 0.5 M NaCl produced similar increases in the number of Fos-positive nuclei within the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis and median preoptic nucleus across strains but significantly smaller number in the subfornical organ of WT versus TRPV1-/-V4-/- mice. Collectively, these findings suggest that TRPV1 and/or TRPV4 channels are not the primary mechanism by which the central nervous system responds to cellular dehydration during hypernatremia or hyperosmolality to increase thirst.

  10. Propofol Restores Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid Receptor Subtype-1 Sensitivity via Activation of Transient Receptor Potential Ankyrin Receptor Subtype-1 in Sensory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongyu; Wickley, Peter J.; Sinha, Sayantani; Bratz, Ian N.; Damron, Derek S.

    2011-01-01

    Background Crosstalk between peripheral nociceptors belonging to the transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor subtype-1 (TRPV1) and ankyrin subtype-1 (TRPA1) family has recently been demonstrated. Moreover, the intravenous anesthetic propofol has been shown to directly activate TRPA1 receptors, and indirectly restore sensitivity of TRPV1 receptors in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) sensory neurons. Our objective was to determine the extent to which TRPA1 activation is involved in mediating the propofol-induced restoration of TRPV1 sensitivity. Methods Mouse DRG neurons were isolated by enzymatic dissociation and grown for 24 h. F-11 cells were transfected with complementary DNA for both TRPV1 and TRPA1 or TRPV1 only. Intracellular Ca2+ concentration was measured in individual cells via fluorescence microscopy. Following TRPV1 de-sensitization with capsaicin (100 nM), cells were treated with propofol (1, 5 and 10 μM) alone, propofol in the presence of the TRPA1 antagonist, HC-030031 (0.5 μM) or the TRPA1 agonist, Allyl isothiocyanate (AITC, 100 μM) and capsaicin was then reapplied. Results In DRG neurons that contain both TRPV1 and TRPA1, propofol and AITC restored TRPV1 sensitivity. However, in DRG neurons containing only TRPV1 receptors, exposure to propofol or AITC following de-sensitization did not restore capsaicin-induced TRPV1 sensitivity. Similarly, in F-11 cells transfected with both TRPV1 and TRPA1, propofol and AITC restored TRPV1 sensitivity. However, in F-11 cells transfected with TRPV1 only, neither propofol nor AITC were capable of restoring TRPV1 sensitivity. Conclusions These data demonstrate that propofol restores TRPV1 sensitivity in primary DRG neurons and in cultured F-11 cells transfected with both the TRPV1 and TRPA1 receptors via a TRPA1-dependent process. Propofol’s effects on sensory neurons may be clinically important and contribute to peripheral sensitization to nociceptive stimuli in traumatized tissue. PMID:21364461

  11. The effects of cannabinoid CB1, CB2 and vanilloid TRPV1 receptor antagonists on cocaine addictive behavior in rats.

    PubMed

    Adamczyk, Przemysław; Miszkiel, Joanna; McCreary, Andrew C; Filip, Małgorzata; Papp, Mariusz; Przegaliński, Edmund

    2012-03-20

    There is evidence that indicates that tonic activation of cannabinoid CB1 receptors plays a role in extinction/reinstatement of cocaine seeking-behavior but is not involved in the maintenance of cocaine self-administration. To further explore the importance of other endocannabinoid-related receptors in an animal model of cocaine addiction, the present paper examines cannabinoid CB2 receptor antagonist N-((1S)-endo-1,3,3-trimethylbicyclo(2.2.1)heptan-2-yl)-5-(4-chloro-3-methylphenyl)-1-(4-methylbenzyl)-pyrazole-3-carboxamide (SR144528) and the transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1 (TRPV1) receptor antagonist N-(3-methoxyphenyl)-4-chlorocinnamide (SB366791) on intravenous (i.v.) cocaine self-administration and extinction/reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behavior in rats. For comparison and reference purposes, the effect of the cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist N-(piperidin-1-yl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide (AM251) was also examined. Moreover, for comparison effects of those drugs on operant lever responding for artificial (cocaine) vs. natural (food) reward, food self-administration was also evaluated. Our findings show that AM251 (1-3mg/kg), SR144528 (0.1-1mg/kg) and SB366791 (0.3-1mg/kg) did not affect cocaine self-administration. However, AM251 (0.1-1mg/kg), SR144528 (0.1-1mg/kg) and SB366791 (0.1-1mg/kg) decreased cocaine-induced reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behavior, and AM251 (0.3-1mg/kg) decreased cue-induced reinstatement. Moreover, AM251 (3mg/kg), SR144528 (0.1-1mg/kg) and SB366791 (0.1-1mg/kg) slightly decreased food self-administration behavior, but only AM251 (3mg/kg) reduced food reward. In conclusion, our results indicate for the first time, that tonic activation of CB2 or TRPV1 receptors is involved in cocaine-induced reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behavior, but their activity is not necessary for the rewarding effect of this psychostimulant. In contrast to CB1 receptors, neither CB2 nor

  12. The unsilent majority-TRPV1 drives "spontaneous" transmission of unmyelinated primary afferents within cardiorespiratory NTS.

    PubMed

    Andresen, Michael C; Hofmann, Mackenzie E; Fawley, Jessica A

    2012-12-15

    Cranial primary afferent sensory neurons figure importantly in homeostatic control of visceral organ systems. Of the two broad classes of visceral afferents, the role of unmyelinated or C-type class remains poorly understood. This review contrasts key aspects of peripheral discharge properties of C-fiber afferents and their glutamate transmission mechanisms within the solitary tract nucleus (NTS). During normal prevailing conditions, most information arrives at the NTS through myelinated A-type nerves. However, most of visceral afferent axons (75-90%) in NTS are unmyelinated, C-type axons. Centrally, C-type solitary tract (ST) afferent terminals have presynaptic transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptors. Capsaicin activation of TRPV1 blocks phasic or synchronous release of glutamate but facilitates release of glutamate from a separate pool of vesicles. This TRPV1-operated pool of vesicles is active at normal temperatures and is responsible for actively driving a 10-fold higher release of glutamate at TRPV1 compared with TRPV1- terminals even in the absence of afferent action potentials. This novel TRPV1 mechanism is responsible for an additional asynchronous release of glutamate that is not present in myelinated terminals. The NTS is rich with presynaptic G protein-coupled receptors, and the implications of TRPV1-operated glutamate offer unique targets for signaling in C-type sensory afferent terminals from neuropeptides, inflammatory mediators, lipid metabolites, cytokines, and cannabinoids. From a homeostatic view, this combination could have broad implications for integration in chronic pathological disturbances in which the numeric dominance of C-type endings and TRPV1 would broadly disturb multisystem control mechanisms.

  13. Functionally important amino acid residues in the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) ion channel – an overview of the current mutational data

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This review aims to create an overview of the currently available results of site-directed mutagenesis studies on transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptor. Systematization of the vast number of data on the functionally important amino acid mutations of TRPV1 may provide a clearer picture of this field, and may promote a better understanding of the relationship between the structure and function of TRPV1. The review summarizes information on 112 unique mutated sites along the TRPV1, exchanged to multiple different residues in many cases. These mutations influence the effect or binding of different agonists, antagonists, and channel blockers, alter the responsiveness to heat, acid, and voltage dependence, affect the channel pore characteristics, and influence the regulation of the receptor function by phosphorylation, glycosylation, calmodulin, PIP2, ATP, and lipid binding. The main goal of this paper is to publish the above mentioned data in a form that facilitates in silico molecular modelling of the receptor by promoting easier establishment of boundary conditions. The better understanding of the structure-function relationship of TRPV1 may promote discovery of new, promising, more effective and safe drugs for treatment of neurogenic inflammation and pain-related diseases and may offer new opportunities for therapeutic interventions. PMID:23800232

  14. The Effect of Capsaicin on Salivary Gland Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Shin, Yong-Hwan; Kim, Jin Man; Park, Kyungpyo

    2016-01-01

    Capsaicin (trans-8-methyl-N-vanilyl-6-nonenamide) is a unique alkaloid isolated from hot chili peppers of the capsicum family. Capsaicin is an agonist of transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1), which is expressed in nociceptive sensory neurons and a range of secretory epithelia, including salivary glands. Capsaicin has analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties in sensory neurons. Recently, increasing evidence has indicated that capsaicin also affects saliva secretion and inflammation in salivary glands. Applying capsaicin increases salivary secretion in human and animal models. Capsaicin appears to increase salivation mainly by modulating the paracellular pathway in salivary glands. Capsaicin activates TRPV1, which modulates the permeability of tight junctions (TJ) by regulating the expression and function of putative intercellular adhesion molecules in an ERK (extracelluar signal-regulated kinase) -dependent manner. Capsaicin also improved dysfunction in transplanted salivary glands. Aside from the secretory effects of capsaicin, it has anti-inflammatory effects in salivary glands. The anti-inflammatory effect of capsaicin is, however, not mediated by TRPV1, but by inhibition of the NF-κB pathway. In conclusion, capsaicin might be a potential drug for alleviating dry mouth symptoms and inflammation of salivary glands. PMID:27347918

  15. The Effect of Capsaicin on Salivary Gland Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Shin, Yong-Hwan; Kim, Jin Man; Park, Kyungpyo

    2016-01-01

    Capsaicin (trans-8-methyl-N-vanilyl-6-nonenamide) is a unique alkaloid isolated from hot chili peppers of the capsicum family. Capsaicin is an agonist of transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1), which is expressed in nociceptive sensory neurons and a range of secretory epithelia, including salivary glands. Capsaicin has analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties in sensory neurons. Recently, increasing evidence has indicated that capsaicin also affects saliva secretion and inflammation in salivary glands. Applying capsaicin increases salivary secretion in human and animal models. Capsaicin appears to increase salivation mainly by modulating the paracellular pathway in salivary glands. Capsaicin activates TRPV1, which modulates the permeability of tight junctions (TJ) by regulating the expression and function of putative intercellular adhesion molecules in an ERK (extracelluar signal-regulated kinase) -dependent manner. Capsaicin also improved dysfunction in transplanted salivary glands. Aside from the secretory effects of capsaicin, it has anti-inflammatory effects in salivary glands. The anti-inflammatory effect of capsaicin is, however, not mediated by TRPV1, but by inhibition of the NF-κB pathway. In conclusion, capsaicin might be a potential drug for alleviating dry mouth symptoms and inflammation of salivary glands.

  16. A painful link between the TRPV1 channel and lysophosphatidic acid.

    PubMed

    Morales-Lázaro, Sara L; Rosenbaum, Tamara

    2015-03-15

    The Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) ion channel is expressed mainly by sensory neurons that detect noxious stimuli from the environment such as high temperatures and pungent compounds (such as allicin and capsaicin) and has been extensively linked to painful and inflammatory processes. This extraordinary protein also responds to endogenous stimuli among which we find molecules of a lipidic nature. We recently described that lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a bioactive lysophospholipid linked to the generation and maintenance of pain, can directly activate TRPV1 and produce pain by binding to the channels' C-terminal region, specifically to residue K710. In an effort to further understand how activation of TRPV1 is achieved by this negatively-charged lipid, we used several synthetic and naturally-occurring lipids to determine the structural requirements that need to be met by these charged lipids in order to produce the activation of TRPV1. In this review, we detail the findings obtained by other research groups and our own on the field of TRPV1-regulation by negatively-charged lipids and discuss the possible therapeutic relevance of these findings on the basis of the role of TRPV1 in pathophysiological processes. PMID:25445434

  17. Inhibition of TRPV1 channels by a naturally occurring omega-9 fatty acid reduces pain and itch

    PubMed Central

    Morales-Lázaro, Sara L.; Llorente, Itzel; Sierra-Ramírez, Félix; López-Romero, Ana E.; Ortíz-Rentería, Miguel; Serrano-Flores, Barbara; Simon, Sidney A.; Islas, León D.; Rosenbaum, Tamara

    2016-01-01

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) ion channel is mainly found in primary nociceptive afferents whose activity has been linked to pathophysiological conditions including pain, itch and inflammation. Consequently, it is important to identify naturally occurring antagonists of this channel. Here we show that a naturally occurring monounsaturated fatty acid, oleic acid, inhibits TRPV1 activity, and also pain and itch responses in mice by interacting with the vanilloid (capsaicin)-binding pocket and promoting the stabilization of a closed state conformation. Moreover, we report an itch-inducing molecule, cyclic phosphatidic acid, that activates TRPV1 and whose pruritic activity, as well as that of histamine, occurs through the activation of this ion channel. These findings provide insights into the molecular basis of oleic acid inhibition of TRPV1 and also into a way of reducing the pathophysiological effects resulting from its activation. PMID:27721373

  18. Repeated dosing of ABT-102, a potent and selective TRPV1 antagonist, enhances TRPV1-mediated analgesic activity in rodents, but attenuates antagonist-induced hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Honore, Prisca; Chandran, Prasant; Hernandez, Gricelda; Gauvin, Donna M; Mikusa, Joseph P; Zhong, Chengmin; Joshi, Shailen K; Ghilardi, Joseph R; Sevcik, Molly A; Fryer, Ryan M; Segreti, Jason A; Banfor, Patricia N; Marsh, Kennan; Neelands, Torben; Bayburt, Erol; Daanen, Jerome F; Gomtsyan, Arthur; Lee, Chih-Hung; Kort, Michael E; Reilly, Regina M; Surowy, Carol S; Kym, Philip R; Mantyh, Patrick W; Sullivan, James P; Jarvis, Michael F; Faltynek, Connie R

    2009-03-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) is a ligand-gated ion channel that functions as an integrator of multiple pain stimuli including heat, acid, capsaicin and a variety of putative endogenous lipid ligands. TRPV1 antagonists have been shown to decrease inflammatory pain in animal models and to produce limited hyperthermia at analgesic doses. Here, we report that ABT-102, which is a potent and selective TRPV1 antagonist, is effective in blocking nociception in rodent models of inflammatory, post-operative, osteoarthritic, and bone cancer pain. ABT-102 decreased both spontaneous pain behaviors and those evoked by thermal and mechanical stimuli in these models. Moreover, we have found that repeated administration of ABT-102 for 5-12 days increased its analgesic activity in models of post-operative, osteoarthritic, and bone cancer pain without an associated accumulation of ABT-102 concentration in plasma or brain. Similar effects were also observed with a structurally distinct TRPV1 antagonist, A-993610. Although a single dose of ABT-102 produced a self-limiting increase in core body temperature that remained in the normal range, the hyperthermic effects of ABT-102 effectively tolerated following twice-daily dosing for 2 days. Therefore, the present data demonstrate that, following repeated administration, the analgesic activity of TRPV1 receptor antagonists is enhanced, while the associated hyperthermic effects are attenuated. The analgesic efficacy of ABT-102 supports its advancement into clinical studies.

  19. β-arrestin-2-biased agonism of delta opioid receptors sensitizes transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) in primary sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Rowan, Matthew P; Szteyn, Kalina; Doyle, Allison P; Gomez, Ruben; Henry, Michael A; Jeske, Nathaniel A

    2014-01-01

    Despite advances in understanding the signaling mechanisms involved in the development and maintenance of chronic pain, the pharmacologic treatment of chronic pain has seen little advancement. Agonists at the mu opioid receptor (MOPr) continue to be vital in the treatment of many forms of chronic pain, but side-effects limit their clinical utility and range from relatively mild, such as constipation, to major, such as addiction and dependence. Additionally, chronic activation of MOPr results in pain hypersensitivity known as opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH), and we have shown recently that recruitment of β-arrestin2 to MOPr, away from transient potential vanilloid eceptor type 1 (TRPV1) in primary sensory neurons contributes to this phenomenon. The delta opioid receptor (DOPr) has become a promising target for the treatment of chronic pain, but little is known about the effects of chronic activation of DOPr on nociceptor sensitivity and OIH. Here we report that chronic activation of DOPr by the DOPr-selective agonist, SNC80, results in the sensitization of TRPV1 and behavioral signs of OIH via β-arrestin2 recruitment to DOPr and away from TRPV1. Conversely, chronic treatment with ARM390, a DOPr-selective agonist that does not recruit β-arrestin2, neither sensitized TRPV1 nor produced OIH. Interestingly, the effect of SNC80 to sensitize TRPV1 is species-dependent, as rats developed OIH but mice did not. Taken together, the reported data identify a novel side-effect of chronic administration of β-arrestin2-biased DOPr agonists and highlight the importance of potential species-specific effects of DOPr agonists.

  20. The Cancer Chemotherapeutic Paclitaxel Increases Human and Rodent Sensory Neuron Responses to TRPV1 by Activation of TLR4

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Adamek, Pavel; Zhang, Haijun; Tatsui, Claudio Esteves; Rhines, Laurence D.; Mrozkova, Petra; Li, Qin; Kosturakis, Alyssa K.; Cassidy, Ryan M.; Harrison, Daniel S.; Cata, Juan P.; Sapire, Kenneth; Zhang, Hongmei; Kennamer-Chapman, Ross M.; Jawad, Abdul Basit; Ghetti, Andre; Yan, Jiusheng; Palecek, Jiri

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is dose limiting in paclitaxel cancer chemotherapy and can result in both acute pain during treatment and chronic persistent pain in cancer survivors. The hypothesis tested was that paclitaxel produces these adverse effects at least in part by sensitizing transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1) through Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling. The data show that paclitaxel-induced behavioral hypersensitivity is prevented and reversed by spinal administration of a TRPV1 antagonist. The number of TRPV1+ neurons is increased in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) in paclitaxel-treated rats and is colocalized with TLR4 in rat and human DRG neurons. Cotreatment of rats with lipopolysaccharide from the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides (LPS-RS), a TLR4 inhibitor, prevents the increase in numbers of TRPV1+ neurons by paclitaxel treatment. Perfusion of paclitaxel or the archetypal TLR4 agonist LPS activated both rat DRG and spinal neurons directly and produced acute sensitization of TRPV1 in both groups of cells via a TLR4-mediated mechanism. Paclitaxel and LPS sensitize TRPV1 in HEK293 cells stably expressing human TLR4 and transiently expressing human TRPV1. These physiological effects also are prevented by LPS-RS. Finally, paclitaxel activates and sensitizes TRPV1 responses directly in dissociated human DRG neurons. In summary, TLR4 was activated by paclitaxel and led to sensitization of TRPV1. This mechanism could contribute to paclitaxel-induced acute pain and chronic painful neuropathy. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In this original work, it is shown for the first time that paclitaxel activates peripheral sensory and spinal neurons directly and sensitizes these cells to transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1)-mediated capsaicin responses via Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in multiple species. A direct functional interaction between TLR4 and TRPV1 is shown in rat and human dorsal root ganglion neurons, TLR4/TRPV1

  1. Involvement of peripheral TRPV1 channels in the analgesic effects of thalidomide.

    PubMed

    Song, Tieying; Wang, Liwen; Gu, Kunfeng; Yang, Yunliang; Yang, Lijun; Ma, Pengyu; Ma, Xiaojing; Zhao, Jianhui; Yan, Ruyv; Guan, Jiao; Wang, Chunping; Qi, Yan; Ya, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Thalidomide was introduced to the market in 1957 as a sedative and antiemetic agent, and returned to the market for the treatment of myelodysplastic syndrome and multiple myeloma. There are reports and studies of thalidomide as an analgesic or analgesic adjuvant in clinic. However, the underlying mechanism is quite elusive. Many studies suggest that the analgesic effect of thalidomide may be due to its immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties as it suppresses the production of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) selectively. However, it is not clear whether any other mechanisms are implicated in the pain relief. In this study, we demonstrated that the peripheral vanilloid receptor 1 (TRPV1) channel was also involved in the analgesic effect of thalidomide in different cell and animal models. During the activation by its agonist capsaicin, the cation inward influx through TRPV1 channels and the whole-cell current significantly decreased after TRPV1-overexpressed HEK293 cells or dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons were pre-treated with thalidomide for 20 minutes. And such attenuation in the TRPV1 activity was in a dose-dependent manner of thalidomide. In an acetic acid writhing test, pre-treatment of thalidomide decreased the writhing number in the wild type mice, while it did not happen in TRPV1 knockout mice, suggesting that the TRPV1 channel was involved in the pain relief by thalidomide. Taken together, the study showed that TRPV1 channels were involved in the analgesic effects of thalidomide. Such alteration in the action of TRPV1 channels by thalidomide may help understand how thalidomide takes analgesic effect in the body in addition to its selective inhibition of TNF-α production.

  2. Involvement of peripheral TRPV1 channels in the analgesic effects of thalidomide.

    PubMed

    Song, Tieying; Wang, Liwen; Gu, Kunfeng; Yang, Yunliang; Yang, Lijun; Ma, Pengyu; Ma, Xiaojing; Zhao, Jianhui; Yan, Ruyv; Guan, Jiao; Wang, Chunping; Qi, Yan; Ya, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Thalidomide was introduced to the market in 1957 as a sedative and antiemetic agent, and returned to the market for the treatment of myelodysplastic syndrome and multiple myeloma. There are reports and studies of thalidomide as an analgesic or analgesic adjuvant in clinic. However, the underlying mechanism is quite elusive. Many studies suggest that the analgesic effect of thalidomide may be due to its immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties as it suppresses the production of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) selectively. However, it is not clear whether any other mechanisms are implicated in the pain relief. In this study, we demonstrated that the peripheral vanilloid receptor 1 (TRPV1) channel was also involved in the analgesic effect of thalidomide in different cell and animal models. During the activation by its agonist capsaicin, the cation inward influx through TRPV1 channels and the whole-cell current significantly decreased after TRPV1-overexpressed HEK293 cells or dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons were pre-treated with thalidomide for 20 minutes. And such attenuation in the TRPV1 activity was in a dose-dependent manner of thalidomide. In an acetic acid writhing test, pre-treatment of thalidomide decreased the writhing number in the wild type mice, while it did not happen in TRPV1 knockout mice, suggesting that the TRPV1 channel was involved in the pain relief by thalidomide. Taken together, the study showed that TRPV1 channels were involved in the analgesic effects of thalidomide. Such alteration in the action of TRPV1 channels by thalidomide may help understand how thalidomide takes analgesic effect in the body in addition to its selective inhibition of TNF-α production. PMID:25929448

  3. Activation of CB1 inhibits NGF-induced sensitization of TRPV1 in adult mouse afferent neurons.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z-Y; McDowell, T; Wang, P; Alvarez, R; Gomez, T; Bjorling, D E

    2014-09-26

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1)-containing afferent neurons convey nociceptive signals and play an essential role in pain sensation. Exposure to nerve growth factor (NGF) rapidly increases TRPV1 activity (sensitization). In the present study, we investigated whether treatment with the selective cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) agonist arachidonyl-2'-chloroethylamide (ACEA) affects NGF-induced sensitization of TRPV1 in adult mouse dorsal root ganglion (DRG) afferent neurons. We found that CB1, NGF receptor tyrosine kinase A (trkA), and TRPV1 are present in cultured adult mouse small- to medium-sized afferent neurons and treatment with NGF (100ng/ml) for 30 min significantly increased the number of neurons that responded to capsaicin (as indicated by increased intracellular Ca(2 +) concentration). Pretreatment with the CB1 agonist ACEA (10nM) inhibited the NGF-induced response, and this effect of ACEA was reversed by a selective CB1 antagonist. Further, pretreatment with ACEA inhibited NGF-induced phosphorylation of AKT. Blocking PI3 kinase activity also attenuated the NGF-induced increase in the number of neurons that responded to capsaicin. Our results indicate that the analgesic effect of CB1 activation may in part be due to inhibition of NGF-induced sensitization of TRPV1 and also that the effect of CB1 activation is at least partly mediated by attenuation of NGF-induced increased PI3 signaling.

  4. Breathtaking TRP Channels: TRPA1 and TRPV1 in Airway Chemosensation and Reflex Control

    PubMed Central

    Bessac, Bret F.; Jordt, Sven-Eric

    2009-01-01

    New studies have revealed an essential role for TRPA1, a sensory neuronal TRP ion channel, in airway chemosensation and inflammation. TRPA1 is activated by chlorine, reactive oxygen species and noxious constituents of smoke and smog, initiating irritation and airway reflex responses. Together with TRPV1, the capsaicin receptor, TRPA1 may contribute to chemical hypersensitivity, chronic cough and airway inflammation in asthma, COPD and reactive airway dysfunction syndrome. PMID:19074743

  5. Breathtaking TRP channels: TRPA1 and TRPV1 in airway chemosensation and reflex control.

    PubMed

    Bessac, Bret F; Jordt, Sven-Eric

    2008-12-01

    New studies have revealed an essential role for TRPA1, a sensory neuronal TRP ion channel, in airway chemosensation and inflammation. TRPA1 is activated by chlorine, reactive oxygen species, and noxious constituents of smoke and smog, initiating irritation and airway reflex responses. Together with TRPV1, the capsaicin receptor, TRPA1 may contribute to chemical hypersensitivity, chronic cough, and airway inflammation in asthma, COPD, and reactive airway dysfunction syndrome. PMID:19074743

  6. Up-regulation of TRPV1 in mononuclear cells of end-stage kidney disease patients increases susceptibility to N-arachidonoyl-dopamine (NADA)-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Cassandra I; Fassett, Robert G; Geraghty, Dominic P

    2009-10-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) 1 channels function as sensors for a variety of noxious and inflammatory signals, including capsaicin, heat and protons, and are up-regulated under inflammatory conditions. As end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) is associated with chronic inflammation, impaired immunity and depressed lymphocyte numbers, we sought to determine whether altered TRPV1 (and related TRPV2) expression in immune cells might be a contributing factor. TRPV1 and TRPV2 mRNA expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) was similar in controls and ESKD patients by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. However, using immunocytochemistry, TRPV1-immunoreactivity was significantly higher and TRPV2-immunoreactivity was significantly lower in PBMC from ESKD patients compared to controls. The plant-derived TRPV1 agonists, capsaicin and resiniferatoxin (RTX) and the putative endovanilloid/endocannabinoids, N-arachidonoyl-dopamine (NADA) and N-oleoyl-dopamine (OLDA), induced concentration-dependent death of PBMC from healthy donors with a rank order of potency of RTX>NADA>OLDA>capsaicin. TRPV1 (5'-iodoresiniferatoxin) and cannabinoid (CB2; AM630) receptor antagonists blocked the cytotoxic effect of NADA. In subsequent experiments, PBMC from ESKD patients exhibited significantly increased susceptibility to NADA-induced death compared to PBMC from controls. The apparent up-regulation of TRPV1 may be a response to the inflammatory milieu in which PBMC exist in ESKD and may be responsible for the increased susceptibility of these cells to NADA-induced death, providing a possible explanation as to why ESKD patients have reduced lymphocyte counts and impaired immune function. Thus, TRPV1 (and possibly CB2) antagonists may have potential for the treatment of immune dysfunction in ESKD.

  7. An alternative splicing product of the murine trpv1 gene dominant negatively modulates the activity of TRPV1 channels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunbo; Hu, Hong-Zhen; Colton, Craig K; Wood, Jackie D; Zhu, Michael X

    2004-09-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), or vanilloid receptor 1, is the founding member of the vanilloid type of TRP superfamily of nonselective cation channels. TRPV1 is activated by noxious heat, acid, and alkaloid irritants as well as several endogenous ligands and is sensitized by inflammatory factors, thereby serving important functions in detecting noxious stimuli in the sensory system and pathological states in different parts of the body. Whereas numerous studies have been carried out using the rat and human TRPV1 cDNA, the mouse TRPV1 cDNA has not been characterized. Here, we report molecular cloning of two TRPV1 cDNA variants from dorsal root ganglia of C57BL/6 mice. The deduced proteins are designated TRPV1alpha and TRPV1beta and contain 839 and 829 amino acids, respectively. TRPV1beta arises from an alternative intron recognition signal within exon 7 of the trpv1 gene. We found a predominant expression of TRPV1alpha in many tissues and significant expression of TRPV1beta in dorsal root ganglia, skin, stomach, and tongue. When expressed in HEK 293 cells or Xenopus oocytes, TRPV1alpha formed a Ca(2+)-permeable channel activated by ligands known to stimulate TRPV1. TRPV1beta was not functional by itself but its co-expression inhibited the function of TRPV1alpha. Furthermore, although both isoforms were synthesized at a similar rate, less TRPV1beta than TRPV1alpha protein was found in cells and on the cell surface, indicating that the beta isoform is highly unstable. Our data suggest that TRPV1beta is a naturally occurring dominant-negative regulator of the responses of sensory neurons to noxious stimuli. PMID:15234965

  8. Discovery of SB-705498: a potent, selective and orally bioavailable TRPV1 antagonist suitable for clinical development.

    PubMed

    Rami, Harshad K; Thompson, Mervyn; Stemp, Geoffrey; Fell, Steve; Jerman, Jeffrey C; Stevens, Alexander J; Smart, Darren; Sargent, Becky; Sanderson, Dominic; Randall, Andrew D; Gunthorpe, Martin J; Davis, John B

    2006-06-15

    Small molecule antagonists of the vanilloid receptor TRPV1 (also known as VR1) are disclosed. Pyrrolidinyl ureas such as 8 and 15 (SB-705498) emerged as lead compounds following optimisation of the previously described urea SB-452533. Pharmacological studies using electrophysiological and FLIPR-Ca2+-based assays showed that compounds such as 8 and 15 were potent antagonists versus the multiple chemical and physical modes of TRPV1 activation (namely capsaicin, acid and noxious heat). Furthermore, 15 possessed suitable developability properties to enable progression of this compound into in vivo studies and subsequently clinical development. PMID:16580202

  9. TRPV1 channels are functionally coupled with BK(mSlo1) channels in rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ying; Liu, Yongfeng; Hou, Panpan; Yan, Zonghe; Kong, Wenjuan; Liu, Beiying; Li, Xia; Yao, Jing; Zhang, Yuexuan; Qin, Feng; Ding, Jiuping

    2013-01-01

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor 1 (TRPV1) channel is a nonselective cation channel activated by a variety of exogenous and endogenous physical and chemical stimuli, such as temperature (≥42 °C), capsaicin, a pungent compound in hot chili peppers, and allyl isothiocyanate. Large-conductance calcium- and voltage-activated potassium (BK) channels regulate the electric activities and neurotransmitter releases in excitable cells, responding to changes in membrane potentials and elevation of cytosolic calcium ions (Ca(2+)). However, it is unknown whether the TRPV1 channels are coupled with the BK channels. Using patch-clamp recording combined with an infrared laser device, we found that BK channels could be activated at 0 mV by a Ca(2+) influx through TRPV1 channels not the intracellular calcium stores in submilliseconds. The local calcium concentration around BK is estimated over 10 μM. The crosstalk could be affected by 10 mM BAPTA, whereas 5 mM EGTA was ineffectual. Fluorescence and co-immunoprecipitation experiments also showed that BK and TRPV1 were able to form a TRPV1-BK complex. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the TRPV1-BK coupling also occurs in dosal root ganglion (DRG) cells, which plays a critical physiological role in regulating the "pain" signal transduction pathway in the peripheral nervous system. PMID:24147119

  10. Palmitoylethanolamide normalizes intestinal motility in a model of post-inflammatory accelerated transit: involvement of CB1 receptors and TRPV1 channels

    PubMed Central

    Capasso, Raffaele; Orlando, Pierangelo; Pagano, Ester; Aveta, Teresa; Buono, Lorena; Borrelli, Francesca; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Izzo, Angelo A

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Palmitoylethanolamide (PEA), a naturally occurring acylethanolamide chemically related to the endocannabinoid anandamide, interacts with targets that have been identified in peripheral nerves controlling gastrointestinal motility, such as cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors, TRPV1 channels and PPARα. Here, we investigated the effect of PEA in a mouse model of functional accelerated transit which persists after the resolution of colonic inflammation (post-inflammatory irritable bowel syndrome). Experimental Approach Intestinal inflammation was induced by intracolonic administration of oil of mustard (OM). Mice were tested for motility and biochemical and molecular biology changes 4 weeks later. PEA, oleoylethanolamide and endocannabinoid levels were measured by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and receptor and enzyme mRNA expression by qRT-PCR. Key Results OM induced transient colitis and a functional post-inflammatory increase in upper gastrointestinal transit, associated with increased intestinal anandamide (but not 2-arachidonoylglycerol, PEA or oleoylethanolamide) levels and down-regulation of mRNA for TRPV1 channels. Exogenous PEA inhibited the OM-induced increase in transit and tended to increase anandamide levels. Palmitic acid had a weaker effect on transit. Inhibition of transit by PEA was blocked by rimonabant (CB1 receptor antagonist), further increased by 5′-iodoresiniferatoxin (TRPV1 antagonist) and not significantly modified by the PPARα antagonist GW6471. Conclusions and Implications Intestinal endocannabinoids and TRPV1 channel were dysregulated in a functional model of accelerated transit exhibiting aspects of post-inflammatory irritable bowel syndrome. PEA counteracted the accelerated transit, the effect being mediated by CB1 receptors (possibly via increased anandamide levels) and modulated by TRPV1 channels. PMID:24818658

  11. A pain-inducing centipede toxin targets the heat activation machinery of nociceptor TRPV1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shilong; Yang, Fan; Wei, Ningning; Hong, Jing; Li, Bowen; Luo, Lei; Rong, Mingqiang; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Zheng, Jie; Wang, Kewei; Lai, Ren

    2015-09-01

    The capsaicin receptor TRPV1 ion channel is a polymodal nociceptor that responds to heat with exquisite sensitivity through an unknown mechanism. Here we report the identification of a novel toxin, RhTx, from the venom of the Chinese red-headed centipede that potently activates TRPV1 to produce excruciating pain. RhTx is a 27-amino-acid small peptide that forms a compact polarized molecule with very rapid binding kinetics and high affinity for TRPV1. We show that RhTx targets the channel's heat activation machinery to cause powerful heat activation at body temperature. The RhTx-TRPV1 interaction is mediated by the toxin's highly charged C terminus, which associates tightly to the charge-rich outer pore region of the channel where it can directly interact with the pore helix and turret. These findings demonstrate that RhTx binding to the outer pore can induce TRPV1 heat activation, therefore providing crucial new structural information on the heat activation machinery.

  12. A pain-inducing centipede toxin targets the heat activation machinery of nociceptor TRPV1.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shilong; Yang, Fan; Wei, Ningning; Hong, Jing; Li, Bowen; Luo, Lei; Rong, Mingqiang; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Zheng, Jie; Wang, KeWei; Lai, Ren

    2015-09-30

    The capsaicin receptor TRPV1 ion channel is a polymodal nociceptor that responds to heat with exquisite sensitivity through an unknown mechanism. Here we report the identification of a novel toxin, RhTx, from the venom of the Chinese red-headed centipede that potently activates TRPV1 to produce excruciating pain. RhTx is a 27-amino-acid small peptide that forms a compact polarized molecule with very rapid binding kinetics and high affinity for TRPV1. We show that RhTx targets the channel's heat activation machinery to cause powerful heat activation at body temperature. The RhTx-TRPV1 interaction is mediated by the toxin's highly charged C terminus, which associates tightly to the charge-rich outer pore region of the channel where it can directly interact with the pore helix and turret. These findings demonstrate that RhTx binding to the outer pore can induce TRPV1 heat activation, therefore providing crucial new structural information on the heat activation machinery.

  13. A pain-inducing centipede toxin targets the heat activation machinery of nociceptor TRPV1.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shilong; Yang, Fan; Wei, Ningning; Hong, Jing; Li, Bowen; Luo, Lei; Rong, Mingqiang; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Zheng, Jie; Wang, KeWei; Lai, Ren

    2015-01-01

    The capsaicin receptor TRPV1 ion channel is a polymodal nociceptor that responds to heat with exquisite sensitivity through an unknown mechanism. Here we report the identification of a novel toxin, RhTx, from the venom of the Chinese red-headed centipede that potently activates TRPV1 to produce excruciating pain. RhTx is a 27-amino-acid small peptide that forms a compact polarized molecule with very rapid binding kinetics and high affinity for TRPV1. We show that RhTx targets the channel's heat activation machinery to cause powerful heat activation at body temperature. The RhTx-TRPV1 interaction is mediated by the toxin's highly charged C terminus, which associates tightly to the charge-rich outer pore region of the channel where it can directly interact with the pore helix and turret. These findings demonstrate that RhTx binding to the outer pore can induce TRPV1 heat activation, therefore providing crucial new structural information on the heat activation machinery. PMID:26420335

  14. A pain-inducing centipede toxin targets the heat activation machinery of nociceptor TRPV1

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shilong; Yang, Fan; Wei, Ningning; Hong, Jing; Li, Bowen; Luo, Lei; Rong, Mingqiang; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Zheng, Jie; Wang, KeWei; Lai, Ren

    2015-01-01

    The capsaicin receptor TRPV1 ion channel is a polymodal nociceptor that responds to heat with exquisite sensitivity through an unknown mechanism. Here we report the identification of a novel toxin, RhTx, from the venom of the Chinese red-headed centipede that potently activates TRPV1 to produce excruciating pain. RhTx is a 27-amino-acid small peptide that forms a compact polarized molecule with very rapid binding kinetics and high affinity for TRPV1. We show that RhTx targets the channel's heat activation machinery to cause powerful heat activation at body temperature. The RhTx–TRPV1 interaction is mediated by the toxin's highly charged C terminus, which associates tightly to the charge-rich outer pore region of the channel where it can directly interact with the pore helix and turret. These findings demonstrate that RhTx binding to the outer pore can induce TRPV1 heat activation, therefore providing crucial new structural information on the heat activation machinery. PMID:26420335

  15. Mechanisms and clinical uses of capsaicin.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Surinder Kumar; Vij, Amarjit Singh; Sharma, Mohit

    2013-11-15

    Capsaicin is the active ingredient of chili peppers and gives them the characteristic pungent flavor. Understanding the actions of capsaicin led to the discovery of its receptor, transient receptor potential vanilloid subfamily member 1 (TRPV1). This receptor is found on key sensory afferents, and so the use of capsaicin to selectively activate pain afferents has been studied in animal and human models for various indications. Capsaicin is unique among naturally occurring irritant compounds because the initial neuronal excitation evoked by it is followed by a long-lasting refractory period, during which the previously excited neurons are no longer responsive to a broad range of stimuli. This process known as defunctionalisation has been exploited for therapeutic use of capsaicin in various painful conditions. We reviewed different studies on mechanisms of action of capsaicin and its utility in different clinical conditions. A beneficial role of capsaicin has been reported in obesity, cardiovascular and gastrointestinal conditions, various cancers, neurogenic bladder, and dermatologic conditions. Various theories have been put forth to explain these effects. Interestingly many of these pharmacological actions are TRPV1 independent. This review is aimed at providing an overview of these mechanisms and to also present literature which contradicts the proposed beneficial effects of capsaicin. Most of the literature comes from animal studies and since many of these mechanisms are poorly understood, more investigation is required in human subjects. PMID:24211679

  16. P2X₃ and TRPV1 functionally interact and mediate sensitization of trigeminal sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Saloman, J L; Chung, M-K; Ro, J Y

    2013-03-01

    Musculoskeletal pain conditions, particularly those associated with temporomandibular disorders (TMD) affect a large percentage of the population. Identifying mechanisms underlying hyperalgesia could contribute to the development of new treatment strategies for the management of TMD and other muscle pain conditions. In this study, we provide evidence of functional interactions between two ligand-gated channels, P2X₃ and transient receptor potential V1 (TRPV1), in trigeminal sensory neurons, and propose that the interactions serve as an underlying mechanism for the development of mechanical hyperalgesia. Mechanical sensitivity of the masseter muscle was assessed in lightly anesthetized rats via an electronic anesthesiometer (Ro et al., 2009). Direct intramuscular injection of a selective P2X₃ agonist, alpha,beta-methylene adenosine triphosphate (αβmeATP), induced a dose- and time-dependent hyperalgesia. Mechanical sensitivity in the contralateral muscle was unaffected suggesting local P2X₃ mediate hyperalgesia. Anesthetizing the overlying skin had no effect on αβmeATP-induced hyperalgesia confirming the contribution of P2X₃ from the muscle. Importantly, the αβmeATP-induced hyperalgesia was prevented by pretreatment of the muscle with a TRPV1 antagonist, AMG9810. P2X₃ was co-expressed with TRPV1 in the masseter muscle afferents confirming the possibility for intracellular interactions. Additionally, in a subpopulation of P2Xv/TRPV1 positive neurons, capsaicin-induced Ca(2+) transients were significantly amplified following P2X₃ activation. Finally, activation of P2X₃ induced phosphorylation of serine, but not threonine, residues in TRPV1 in trigeminal ganglia cultures. Significant phosphorylation was observed at 15 min, the time point at which behavioral hyperalgesia was prominent. Previously, activation of either P2X₃ or TRPV1 had been independently implicated in the development of mechanical hyperalgesia. Our data propose P2X₃ and TRPV1

  17. Hyaluronan modulates TRPV1 channel opening, reducing peripheral nociceptor activity and pain

    PubMed Central

    Caires, Rebeca; Luis, Enoch; Taberner, Francisco J.; Fernandez-Ballester, Gregorio; Ferrer-Montiel, Antonio; Balazs, Endre A.; Gomis, Ana; Belmonte, Carlos; de la Peña, Elvira

    2015-01-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) is present in the extracellular matrix of all body tissues, including synovial fluid in joints, in which it behaves as a filter that buffers transmission of mechanical forces to nociceptor nerve endings thereby reducing pain. Using recombinant systems, mouse-cultured dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons and in vivo experiments, we found that HA also modulates polymodal transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1) channels. HA diminishes heat, pH and capsaicin (CAP) responses, thus reducing the opening probability of the channel by stabilizing its closed state. Accordingly, in DRG neurons, HA decreases TRPV1-mediated impulse firing and channel sensitization by bradykinin. Moreover, subcutaneous HA injection in mice reduces heat and capsaicin nocifensive responses, whereas the intra-articular injection of HA in rats decreases capsaicin joint nociceptor fibres discharge. Collectively, these results indicate that extracellular HA reduces the excitability of the ubiquitous TRPV1 channel, thereby lowering impulse activity in the peripheral nociceptor endings underlying pain. PMID:26311398

  18. Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 Activation Enhances Gut Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Secretion and Improves Glucose Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peijian; Yan, Zhencheng; Zhong, Jian; Chen, Jing; Ni, Yinxing; Li, Li; Ma, Liqun; Zhao, Zhigang; Liu, Daoyan; Zhu, Zhiming

    2012-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is rapidly prevailing as a serious global health problem. Current treatments for T2DM may cause side effects, thus highlighting the need for newer and safer therapies. We tested the hypothesis that dietary capsaicin regulates glucose homeostasis through the activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1)-mediated glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion in the intestinal cells and tissues. Wild-type (WT) and TRPV1 knockout (TRPV1−/−) mice were fed dietary capsaicin for 24 weeks. TRPV1 was localized in secretin tumor cell-1 (STC-1) cells and ileum. Capsaicin stimulated GLP-1 secretion from STC-1 cells in a calcium-dependent manner through TRPV1 activation. Acute capsaicin administration by gastric gavage increased GLP-1 and insulin secretion in vivo in WT but not in TRPV1−/− mice. Furthermore, chronic dietary capsaicin not only improved glucose tolerance and increased insulin levels but also lowered daily blood glucose profiles and increased plasma GLP-1 levels in WT mice. However, this effect was absent in TRPV1−/− mice. In db/db mice, TRPV1 activation by dietary capsaicin ameliorated abnormal glucose homeostasis and increased GLP-1 levels in the plasma and ileum. The present findings suggest that TRPV1 activation–stimulated GLP-1 secretion could be a promising approach for the intervention of diabetes. PMID:22664955

  19. The TRPV1 channel in rodents is a major target for antinociceptive effect of the probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri DSM 17938

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Burgos, Azucena; Wang, Lu; McVey Neufeld, Karen-Anne; Mao, Yu-Kang; Ahmadzai, Mustafa; Janssen, Luke J; Stanisz, Andrew M; Bienenstock, John; Kunze, Wolfgang A

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Certain bacteria exert visceral antinociceptive activity, but the mechanisms involved are not determined. Lactobacillus reuteri DSM 17938 was examined since it may be antinociceptive in children. Since transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channel activity may mediate nociceptive signals, we hypothesized that TRPV1 current is inhibited by DSM. We tested this by examining the effect of DSM on the firing frequency of spinal nerve fibres in murine jejunal mesenteric nerve bundles following serosal application of capsaicin. We also measured the effects of DSM on capsaicin-evoked increase in intracellular Ca2+ or ionic current in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Furthermore, we tested the in vivo antinociceptive effects of oral DSM on gastric distension in rats. Live DSM reduced the response of capsaicin- and distension-evoked firing of spinal nerve action potentials (238 ± 27.5% vs. 129 ± 17%). DSM also reduced the capsaicin-evoked TRPV1 ionic current in DRG neuronal primary culture from 83 ± 11% to 41 ± 8% of the initial response to capsaicin only. Another lactobacillus (Lactobacillus rhamnosus JB-1) with known visceral anti-nociceptive activity did not have these effects. DSM also inhibited capsaicin-evoked Ca2+ increase in DRG neurons; an increase in Ca2+ fluorescence intensity ratio of 2.36 ± 0.31 evoked by capsaicin was reduced to 1.25 ± 0.04. DSM releasable products (conditioned medium) mimicked DSM inhibition of capsaicin-evoked excitability. The TRPV1 antagonist 6-iodonordihydrocapsaicin or the use of TRPV1 knock-out mice revealed that TRPV1 channels mediate about 80% of the inhibitory effect of DSM on mesenteric nerve response to high intensity gut distension. Finally, feeding with DSM inhibited perception in rats of painful gastric distension. Our results identify a specific target channel for a probiotic with potential therapeutic properties. Key points Certain probiotic bacteria have been shown to reduce distension

  20. Capsaicin and sensory neurones: a historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Szolcsányi, János

    2014-01-01

    Capsaicin, the pungent ingredient of red pepper has become not only a "hot" topic in neuroscience but its new target-related unique actions have opened the door for the drug industry to introduce a new chapter of analgesics. After several lines of translational efforts with over 1,000 patents and clinical trials, the 8% capsaicin dermal patch reached the market and its long-lasting local analgesic effect in some severe neuropathic pain states is now well established. This introductory chapter outlines on one hand the historical background based on the author's 50 years of experience in this field and on the other hand emphasizes new scopes, fascinating perspectives in pharmaco-physiology, and molecular pharmacology of nociceptive sensory neurons. Evidence for the effect of capsaicin on C-polymodal nociceptors (CMH), C-mechanoinsensitive (CHMi), and silent C-nociceptors are listed and the features of the capsaicin-induced blocking effects of nociceptors are demonstrated. Common and different characteristics of nociceptor-blocking actions after systemic, perineural, local, intrathecal, and in vitro treatments are summarized. Evidence for the misleading conclusions drawn from neonatal capsaicin pretreatment is presented. Perspectives opened from cloning the capsaicin receptor "Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1" (TRPV1) are outlined and potential molecular mechanisms behind the long-lasting functional, ultrastructural, and nerve terminal-damaging effects of capsaicin and other TRPV1 agonists are summarized. Neurogenic inflammation and the long-list of "capsaicin-sensitive" tissue responses are mediated by an unorthodox dual sensory-efferent function of peptidergic TRPV1-expressing nerve terminals which differ from the classical efferent and sensory nerve endings that have a unidirectional role in neuroregulation. Thermoregulatory effects of capsaicin are discussed in detail. It is suggested that since hyperthermia and burn risk due to enhanced noxious heat

  1. Capsaicin and sensory neurones: a historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Szolcsányi, János

    2014-01-01

    Capsaicin, the pungent ingredient of red pepper has become not only a "hot" topic in neuroscience but its new target-related unique actions have opened the door for the drug industry to introduce a new chapter of analgesics. After several lines of translational efforts with over 1,000 patents and clinical trials, the 8% capsaicin dermal patch reached the market and its long-lasting local analgesic effect in some severe neuropathic pain states is now well established. This introductory chapter outlines on one hand the historical background based on the author's 50 years of experience in this field and on the other hand emphasizes new scopes, fascinating perspectives in pharmaco-physiology, and molecular pharmacology of nociceptive sensory neurons. Evidence for the effect of capsaicin on C-polymodal nociceptors (CMH), C-mechanoinsensitive (CHMi), and silent C-nociceptors are listed and the features of the capsaicin-induced blocking effects of nociceptors are demonstrated. Common and different characteristics of nociceptor-blocking actions after systemic, perineural, local, intrathecal, and in vitro treatments are summarized. Evidence for the misleading conclusions drawn from neonatal capsaicin pretreatment is presented. Perspectives opened from cloning the capsaicin receptor "Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1" (TRPV1) are outlined and potential molecular mechanisms behind the long-lasting functional, ultrastructural, and nerve terminal-damaging effects of capsaicin and other TRPV1 agonists are summarized. Neurogenic inflammation and the long-list of "capsaicin-sensitive" tissue responses are mediated by an unorthodox dual sensory-efferent function of peptidergic TRPV1-expressing nerve terminals which differ from the classical efferent and sensory nerve endings that have a unidirectional role in neuroregulation. Thermoregulatory effects of capsaicin are discussed in detail. It is suggested that since hyperthermia and burn risk due to enhanced noxious heat

  2. The capsaicin receptor participates in artificial sweetener aversion.

    PubMed

    Riera, Céline E; Vogel, Horst; Simon, Sidney A; Damak, Sami; le Coutre, Johannes

    2008-11-28

    Artificial sweeteners such as saccharin, aspartame, acesulfame-K, and cyclamate produce at high concentrations an unpleasant after-taste that is generally attributed to bitter and metallic taste sensations. To identify receptors involved with the complex perception of the above compounds, preference tests were performed in wild-type mice and mice lacking the TRPV1 channel or the T1R3 receptor, the latter being necessary for the perception of sweet taste. The sweeteners, including cyclamate, displayed a biphasic response profile, with the T1R3 mediated component implicated in preference. At high concentrations imparting off-taste, omission of TRPV1 reduced aversion. In a heterologous expression system the Y511A point mutation in the vanilloid pocket of TRPV1 did not affect saccharin and aspartame responses but abolished cyclamate and acesulfame-K activities. The results rationalize artificial sweetener tastes and off-tastes by showing that at low concentrations, these molecules stimulate the gustatory system through the hedonically positive T1R3 pathway, and at higher concentrations, their aversion is partly mediated by TRPV1.

  3. Effect of capsaicin on thermoregulation: an update with new aspects

    PubMed Central

    Szolcsányi, János

    2015-01-01

    Capsaicin, a selective activator of the chemo- and heat-sensitive transient receptor potential (TRP) V1 cation channel, has characteristic feature of causing long-term functional and structural impairment of neural elements supplied by TRPV1/capsaicin receptor. In mammals, systemic application of capsaicin induces complex heat-loss response characteristic for each species and avoidance of warm environment. Capsaicin activates cutaneous warm receptors and polymodal nociceptors but has no effect on cold receptors or mechanoreceptors. In this review, thermoregulatory features of capsaicin-pretreated rodents and TRPV1-mediated neural elements with innocuous heat sensitivity are summarized. Recent data support a novel hypothesis for the role of visceral warmth sensors in monitoring core body temperature. Furthermore, strong evidence suggests that central presynaptic nerve terminals of TRPV1-expressing cutaneous, thoracic and abdominal visceral receptors are activated by innocuous warmth stimuli and capsaicin. These responses are absent in TRPV1 knockout mice. Thermoregulatory disturbance induced by systemic capsaicin pretreatment lasts for months and is characterized by a normal body temperature at cool environment up to a total dose of 150 mg/kg s.c. Upward differential shift of set points for activation vasodilation, other heat-loss effectors and thermopreference develops. Avoidance of warm ambient temperature (35°C, 40°C) is severely impaired but thermopreference at cool ambient temperatures (Tas) are not altered. TRPV1 knockout or knockdown and genetically altered TRPV1, TRPV2 and TRPM8 knockout mice have normal core temperature in thermoneutral or cool environments, but the combined mutant mice have impaired regulation in warm or cold (4°C) environments. Several lines of evidence support that in the preoptic area warmth sensitive neurons are activated and desensitized by capsaicin, but morphological evidence for it is controversial. It is suggested that these

  4. Effect of capsaicin on thermoregulation: an update with new aspects.

    PubMed

    Szolcsányi, János

    2015-01-01

    Capsaicin, a selective activator of the chemo- and heat-sensitive transient receptor potential (TRP) V1 cation channel, has characteristic feature of causing long-term functional and structural impairment of neural elements supplied by TRPV1/capsaicin receptor. In mammals, systemic application of capsaicin induces complex heat-loss response characteristic for each species and avoidance of warm environment. Capsaicin activates cutaneous warm receptors and polymodal nociceptors but has no effect on cold receptors or mechanoreceptors. In this review, thermoregulatory features of capsaicin-pretreated rodents and TRPV1-mediated neural elements with innocuous heat sensitivity are summarized. Recent data support a novel hypothesis for the role of visceral warmth sensors in monitoring core body temperature. Furthermore, strong evidence suggests that central presynaptic nerve terminals of TRPV1-expressing cutaneous, thoracic and abdominal visceral receptors are activated by innocuous warmth stimuli and capsaicin. These responses are absent in TRPV1 knockout mice. Thermoregulatory disturbance induced by systemic capsaicin pretreatment lasts for months and is characterized by a normal body temperature at cool environment up to a total dose of 150 mg/kg s.c. Upward differential shift of set points for activation vasodilation, other heat-loss effectors and thermopreference develops. Avoidance of warm ambient temperature (35°C, 40°C) is severely impaired but thermopreference at cool ambient temperatures (Tas) are not altered. TRPV1 knockout or knockdown and genetically altered TRPV1, TRPV2 and TRPM8 knockout mice have normal core temperature in thermoneutral or cool environments, but the combined mutant mice have impaired regulation in warm or cold (4°C) environments. Several lines of evidence support that in the preoptic area warmth sensitive neurons are activated and desensitized by capsaicin, but morphological evidence for it is controversial. It is suggested that these

  5. Effect of capsaicin on thermoregulation: an update with new aspects.

    PubMed

    Szolcsányi, János

    2015-01-01

    Capsaicin, a selective activator of the chemo- and heat-sensitive transient receptor potential (TRP) V1 cation channel, has characteristic feature of causing long-term functional and structural impairment of neural elements supplied by TRPV1/capsaicin receptor. In mammals, systemic application of capsaicin induces complex heat-loss response characteristic for each species and avoidance of warm environment. Capsaicin activates cutaneous warm receptors and polymodal nociceptors but has no effect on cold receptors or mechanoreceptors. In this review, thermoregulatory features of capsaicin-pretreated rodents and TRPV1-mediated neural elements with innocuous heat sensitivity are summarized. Recent data support a novel hypothesis for the role of visceral warmth sensors in monitoring core body temperature. Furthermore, strong evidence suggests that central presynaptic nerve terminals of TRPV1-expressing cutaneous, thoracic and abdominal visceral receptors are activated by innocuous warmth stimuli and capsaicin. These responses are absent in TRPV1 knockout mice. Thermoregulatory disturbance induced by systemic capsaicin pretreatment lasts for months and is characterized by a normal body temperature at cool environment up to a total dose of 150 mg/kg s.c. Upward differential shift of set points for activation vasodilation, other heat-loss effectors and thermopreference develops. Avoidance of warm ambient temperature (35°C, 40°C) is severely impaired but thermopreference at cool ambient temperatures (Tas) are not altered. TRPV1 knockout or knockdown and genetically altered TRPV1, TRPV2 and TRPM8 knockout mice have normal core temperature in thermoneutral or cool environments, but the combined mutant mice have impaired regulation in warm or cold (4°C) environments. Several lines of evidence support that in the preoptic area warmth sensitive neurons are activated and desensitized by capsaicin, but morphological evidence for it is controversial. It is suggested that these

  6. TRPA1 contributes to capsaicin-induced facial cold hyperalgesia in rats.

    PubMed

    Honda, Kuniya; Shinoda, Masamichi; Furukawa, Akihiko; Kita, Kozue; Noma, Noboru; Iwata, Koichi

    2014-12-01

    Orofacial cold hyperalgesia is known to cause severe persistent pain in the face following trigeminal nerve injury or inflammation, and transient receptor potential (TRP) vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) and TRP ankylin 1 (TRPA1) are thought to be involved in cold hyperalgesia. However, how these two receptors are involved in cold hyperalgesia is not fully understood. To clarify the mechanisms underlying facial cold hyperalgesia, nocifensive behaviors to cold stimulation, the expression of TRPV1 and TRPA1 in trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons, and TG neuronal excitability to cold stimulation following facial capsaicin injection were examined in rats. The head-withdrawal reflex threshold (HWRT) to cold stimulation of the lateral facial skin was significantly decreased following facial capsaicin injection. This reduction of HWRT was significantly recovered following local injection of TRPV1 antagonist as well as TRPA1 antagonist. Approximately 30% of TG neurons innervating the lateral facial skin expressed both TRPV1 and TRPA1, and about 64% of TRPA1-positive neurons also expressed TRPV1. The TG neuronal excitability to noxious cold stimulation was significantly increased following facial capsaicin injection and this increase was recovered by pretreatment with TRPA1 antagonist. These findings suggest that TRPA1 sensitization via TRPV1 signaling in TG neurons is involved in cold hyperalgesia following facial skin capsaicin injection.

  7. Gastrin-releasing peptide acts via postsynaptic BB2 receptors to modulate inward rectifier K+ and TRPV1-like conductances in rat paraventricular thalamic neurons.

    PubMed

    Hermes, M L H J; Kolaj, M; Coderre, E M; Renaud, L P

    2013-04-01

    Gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) is a bombesin-like peptide with a widespread distribution in mammalian CNS, where it has a role in food intake, circadian rhythm generation, fear memory, itch sensation and sexual behaviour. While it has been established that GRP predominantly excites neurons, details of the membrane mechanism involved in this action remain largely undefined. We used perforated patch clamp recording in acute brain slice preparations to investigate GRP-affected receptors and ionic conductances in neurons of the rat paraventricular thalamic nucleus (PVT). PVT is a component of the midline and intralaminar thalamus that participates in arousal, motivational drives and stress responses, and exhibits a prominence of GRP-like immunoreactive fibres. Exposure of PVT neurons to low nanomolar concentrations of GRP induced sustained TTX-resistant membrane depolarizations that could trigger rhythmic burst discharges or tonic firing. Membrane current analyses in voltage clamp revealed an underlying postsynaptic bombesin type 2 receptor-mediated inward current that resulted from the simultaneous suppression of a Ba(2+)-sensitive inward rectifier K(+) conductance and activation of a non-selective cation conductance with biophysical and pharmacological properties reminiscent of transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) 1. A role for a TRPV1-like conductance was further implied by a significant suppressant influence of a TRPV1 antagonist on GRP-induced membrane depolarization and rhythmic burst or tonic firing. The results provide a detailed picture of the receptor and ionic conductances that are involved in GRP's excitatory action in midline thalamus.

  8. Acid evoked thermal hyperalgesia involves peripheral P2Y1 receptor mediated TRPV1 phosphorylation in a rodent model of thrombus induced ischemic pain

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background We previously developed a thrombus-induced ischemic pain (TIIP) animal model, which was characterized by chronic bilateral mechanical allodynia without thermal hyperalgesia (TH). On the other hand we had shown that intraplantar injection of acidic saline facilitated ATP-induced pain, which did result in the induction of TH in normal rats. Because acidic pH and increased ATP are closely associated with ischemic conditions, this study is designed to: (1) examine whether acidic saline injection into the hind paw causes the development of TH in TIIP, but not control, animals; and (2) determine which peripheral mechanisms are involved in the development of this TH. Results Repeated intraplantar injection of pH 4.0 saline, but not pH 5.5 and 7.0 saline, for 3 days following TIIP surgery resulted in the development of TH. After pH 4.0 saline injections, protein levels of hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and carbonic anhydrase II (CA II) were elevated in the plantar muscle indicating that acidic stimulation intensified ischemic insults with decreased tissue acidity. At the same time point, there were no changes in the expression of TRPV1 in hind paw skin, whereas a significant increase in TRPV1 phosphorylation (pTRPV1) was shown in acidic saline (pH 4.0) injected TIIP (AS-TIIP) animals. Moreover, intraplantar injection of chelerythrine (a PKC inhibitor) and AMG9810 (a TRPV1 antagonist) effectively alleviated the established TH. In order to investigate which proton- or ATP-sensing receptors contributed to the development of TH, amiloride (an ASICs blocker), AMG9810, TNP-ATP (a P2Xs antagonist) or MRS2179 (a P2Y1 antagonist) were pre-injected before the pH 4.0 saline. Only MRS2179 significantly prevented the induction of TH, and the increased pTRPV1 ratio was also blocked in MRS2179 injected animals. Conclusion Collectively these data show that maintenance of an acidic environment in the ischemic hind paw of TIIP rats results in the phosphorylation of

  9. Activation of transient receptor potential A1 by a non-pungent capsaicin-like compound, capsiate

    PubMed Central

    Shintaku, Kenji; Uchida, Kunitoshi; Suzuki, Yoshiro; Zhou, Yiming; Fushiki, Tohru; Watanabe, Tatsuo; Yazawa, Susumu; Tominaga, Makoto

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Capsiate is produced by ‘CH-19 Sweet’ (Capsicum annuun L.), a non-pungent cultivar of red pepper. Like capsaicin, capsiate is thought to enhance energy metabolism by activating the sympathetic nervous system and suppressing inflammation, but the underlying mechanisms for this are uncertain. We previously reported that capsiate could activate transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), a capsaicin receptor. The purpose of the present study is to investigate whether capsinoids activate other TRP channels. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Using Ca2+ imaging and whole-cell patch-clamp methods, we analysed the response of TRP channels to three kinds of capsinoids, capsiate, dihydrocapsiate and nordihydrocapsiate, in HEK293T cells expressing TRP channels or in primary cultures of mouse dorsal root ganglion neurons. KEY RESULTS We found that in both cell types TRP ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) had a slightly weaker response to capsinoids compared with TRPV1, with the capsiate EC50 for TRPA1 activation being more than that for TRPV1 activation, and that the capsinoid-evoked action was blocked by a specific TRPA1 antagonist. TRPA1 was activated by capsinoids, but not by their degradation products. Amino acids known to participate in TRPA1 activation following cysteine covalent modification or zinc treatment were not involved in the activation of TRPA1 by capsinoid. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Taken together, these results indicate that capsinoids activate TRPA1 by an as yet unknown mechanism, and TRPA1 could be involved in physiological phenomena associated with capsinoid treatment. PMID:21883144

  10. Increased function of the TRPV1 channel in small sensory neurons after local inflammation or in vitro exposure to the pro-inflammatory cytokine GRO/KC

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Fei; Du, Yi-Ru; Xie, Wenrui; Strong, Judith A.; He, Xi-Jing; Zhang, Jun-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Objective Inflammation at the level of the sensory dorsal root ganglia (DRG) leads to robust mechanical pain behaviors and the local inflammation has direct excitatory effects on sensory neurons including small, primarily nociceptive, neurons. These neurons express the TRPV1 channel, which integrates multiple signals of pain and inflammation. The aim of this study was to characterize regulation of the TRPV1 channel by local DRG inflammation and by GRO/KC (CXCL1), a cytokine known to be upregulated in inflamed DRGs. Methods Activation of the TRPV1 receptor with capsaicin was studied with patch clamp methods in acutely isolated small diameter rat sensory neurons in primary culture. In vivo, behavioral effects of TRPV1 and GRO/KC were examined by paw injections. Results Neurons isolated from lumbar DRGs 3 days after local inflammation showed enhanced TRPV1 function: tachyphylaxis (the decline in response to repeated applications of capsaicin) was significantly reduced. A similar effect on tachyphylaxis was observed in neurons pre-treated for 4 hours in vitro with GRO/KC. This effect was blocked by H-89, a protein kinase A inhibitor. Consistent with the in vitro results, in vivo behavioral responses to paw injection of capsaicin were enhanced and prolonged by pre-injecting the paw with GRO/KC 4 hours before the capsaicin injection. GRO/KC paw injections alone did not elicit pain behaviors. Conclusions Function of the TRPV1 channel is enhanced by DRG inflammation and these effects are preserved in vitro during short-term culture. The effects (decreased tachyphylaxis) are mimicked by incubation with GRO/KC, which has previously been found to be strongly upregulated in this and other pain models. PMID:22466126

  11. Molecular determinants of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2) binding to transient receptor potential V1 (TRPV1) channels.

    PubMed

    Poblete, Horacio; Oyarzún, Ingrid; Olivero, Pablo; Comer, Jeffrey; Zuñiga, Matías; Sepulveda, Romina V; Báez-Nieto, David; González Leon, Carlos; González-Nilo, Fernando; Latorre, Ramón

    2015-01-23

    Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2) has been recognized as an important activator of certain transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. More specifically, TRPV1 is a pain receptor activated by a wide range of stimuli. However, whether or not PI(4,5)P2 is a TRPV1 agonist remains open to debate. Utilizing a combined approach of mutagenesis and molecular modeling, we identified a PI(4,5)P2 binding site located between the TRP box and the S4-S5 linker. At this site, PI(4,5)P2 interacts with the amino acid residues Arg-575 and Arg-579 in the S4-S5 linker and with Lys-694 in the TRP box. We confirmed that PI(4,5)P2 behaves as a channel agonist and found that Arg-575, Arg-579, and Lys-694 mutations to alanine reduce PI(4,5)P2 binding affinity. Additionally, in silico mutations R575A, R579A, and K694A showed that the reduction in binding affinity results from the delocalization of PI(4,5)P2 in the binding pocket. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that PI(4,5)P2 binding induces conformational rearrangements of the structure formed by S6 and the TRP domain, which cause an opening of the lower TRPV1 channel gate.

  12. Molecular Determinants of Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-Bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2) Binding to Transient Receptor Potential V1 (TRPV1) Channels*

    PubMed Central

    Poblete, Horacio; Oyarzún, Ingrid; Olivero, Pablo; Comer, Jeffrey; Zuñiga, Matías; Sepulveda, Romina V.; Báez-Nieto, David; González Leon, Carlos; González-Nilo, Fernando; Latorre, Ramón

    2015-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2) has been recognized as an important activator of certain transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. More specifically, TRPV1 is a pain receptor activated by a wide range of stimuli. However, whether or not PI(4,5)P2 is a TRPV1 agonist remains open to debate. Utilizing a combined approach of mutagenesis and molecular modeling, we identified a PI(4,5)P2 binding site located between the TRP box and the S4-S5 linker. At this site, PI(4,5)P2 interacts with the amino acid residues Arg-575 and Arg-579 in the S4-S5 linker and with Lys-694 in the TRP box. We confirmed that PI(4,5)P2 behaves as a channel agonist and found that Arg-575, Arg-579, and Lys-694 mutations to alanine reduce PI(4,5)P2 binding affinity. Additionally, in silico mutations R575A, R579A, and K694A showed that the reduction in binding affinity results from the delocalization of PI(4,5)P2 in the binding pocket. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that PI(4,5)P2 binding induces conformational rearrangements of the structure formed by S6 and the TRP domain, which cause an opening of the lower TRPV1 channel gate. PMID:25425643

  13. Expression of transient receptor potential channel vanilloid (TRPV) 1–4, melastin (TRPM) 5 and 8, and ankyrin (TRPA1) in the normal and methimazole-treated mouse olfactory epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Nakashimo, Yousuke; Takumida, Masaya; Fukuiri, Takashi; Anniko, Matti; Hirakawa, Katsuhiro

    2010-01-01

    Conclusion: It is suggested that TRPV1, 2, 3, and 4, TRPM5 and 8, and TRPA1 may play several roles in the olfactory epithelium (OE), contributing to olfactory chemosensation, olfactory adaptation, olfactory-trigeminal interaction, and OE fluid homeostasis. In patients with olfactory disturbance, TRPV1 and TRPM8 may be closely related to a high rate of recognition of curry and menthol odors, while TRPV2 may also play a crucial role in the regeneration of olfactory receptor neurons. Objective: Expression of TRPV1–4, TRPM5 and 8, and TRPA1 in the normal and methimazole-treated mouse OE was analyzed. Methods: The localization of TRPV1–4, TRPM5 and 8, and TRPA1 in the OE of normal and methimazole-treated CBA/J mice was investigated by immunohistochemistry. Results: Normal OE showed a positive immunofluorescent reaction to TRPV1–4, TRPM5 and 8, and TRPA1. In lamina propria, the nerve fibers displayed TRPV 1, 2, and 3, TRPM8 and TRPA1. In the pathological condition, the expression of TRPV3, TRPV4, TRPM5, and TRPA1 was markedly reduced and took a long time to recover. In contrast, expression of TRPM8 was scarcely affected, even in the pathological condition, while TRPV1 and TRPV2 showed early recovery following methimazole treatment. PMID:20586674

  14. Transient receptor potential vanilloid-1-mediated calcium responses are inhibited by the alkylamine antihistamines dexbrompheniramine and chlorpheniramine.

    PubMed

    Sadofsky, Laura R; Campi, Barbara; Trevisani, Marcello; Compton, Steven J; Morice, Alyn H

    2008-12-01

    American guidelines, unlike European guidelines, support the use of antihistamines as a first line of treatment for some causes of chronic cough. Transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) is an ion channel activated by the tussive agents capsaicin, resiniferatoxin, and protons. It is predominantly expressed by C-fiber and some Adelta -fiber sensory neurons and is thought to be a cough receptor. By measuring increases in intracellular calcium as an indicator of TRPV1 activation, the authors sought to determine whether antihistamines could antagonise TRPV1 permanently expressed in HEK and Pro5 cells and TRPV1 endogenously expressed in rat dorsal root ganglia neurons. In human TRPV1-expressing HEK cells (hTRPV1-HEK), diphenhydramine and fexofenadine failed to inhibit capsaicin-triggered calcium responses. However, both dexbrompheniramine and chlorpheniramine significantly inhibited capsaicin-evoked responses in hTRPV1-HEK. Dexbrompheniramine also inhibited activation of rat TRPV1 expressed in HEK and Pro5 cells, without interfering with TRPA1 and proteinase-activated receptor-2 (PAR(2)) activation. Finally, in rat dorsal root ganglia neuron preparations, dexbrompheniramine dose-dependently inhibited capsaicin-evoked calcium responses. Thus, the inhibition of TRPV1 activation by dexbrompheniramine may provide one potential mechanism whereby this antihistamine exerts its therapeutic effect in chronic cough.

  15. Capsaicin may have important potential for promoting vascular and metabolic health

    PubMed Central

    McCarty, Mark F; DiNicolantonio, James J; O'Keefe, James H

    2015-01-01

    Capsaicin, the phytochemical responsible for the spiciness of peppers, has the potential to modulate metabolism via activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) receptors, which are found not only on nociceptive sensory neurons, but also in a range of other tissues. TRPV1 activation induces calcium influx, and in certain tissues this is associated with increased activation or expression of key proteins such as endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2), KLF2, PPARdelta, PPARgamma, and LXRα. The calcium influx triggered by TRPV1 activation in endothelial cells mimics the impact of shear stress in this regard, activating and increasing the expression of eNOS—but also increasing expression of cox-2, thrombomodulin, and nrf2-responsive antioxidant enzymes, while decreasing expression of proinflammatory proteins. Hence, dietary capsaicin has favourably impacted endothelium-dependent vasodilation in rodents. TRPV1-mediated induction of LXRα in foam cells promotes cholesterol export, antagonising plaque formation. Capsaicin-mediated activation of TRPV1-expressing neurons in the gastrointestinal tract promotes sympathetically mediated stimulation of brown fat, raising metabolic rate. The increased expression of UCP2 induced by TRPV1 activation exerts a protective antioxidant effect on the liver in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and on vascular endothelium in the context of hyperglycaemia. In rodent studies, capsaicin-rich diets have shown favourable effects on atherosclerosis, metabolic syndrome, diabetes, obesity, non-alcoholic fatty liver, cardiac hypertrophy, hypertension and stroke risk. Clinically, ingestion of capsaicin—or its less stable non-pungent analogue capsiate—has been shown to boost metabolic rate modestly. Topical application of capsaicin via patch was found to increase exercise time to ischaemic threshold in patients with angina. Further clinical studies with capsaicin administered in food, capsules

  16. Sensory attributes of complex tasting divalent salts are mediated by TRPM5 and TRPV1 channels.

    PubMed

    Riera, Céline E; Vogel, Horst; Simon, Sidney A; Damak, Sami; le Coutre, Johannes

    2009-02-25

    Complex tasting divalent salts (CTDS) are present in our daily diet, contributing to multiple poorly understood taste sensations. CTDS evoking metallic, bitter, salty, and astringent sensations include the divalent salts of iron, zinc, copper, and magnesium. To identify pathways involved with the complex perception of the above salts, taste preference tests (two bottles, brief access) were performed in wild-type (WT) mice and in mice lacking (1) the T1R3 receptor, (2) TRPV1, the capsaicin receptor, or (3) the TRPM5 channel, the latter being necessary for the perception of sweet, bitter, and umami tasting stimuli. At low concentrations, FeSO(4) and ZnSO(4) were perceived as pleasant stimuli by WT mice, and this effect was fully reversed in TRPM5 knock-out mice. In contrast, MgSO(4) and CuSO(4) were aversive to WT mice, but for MgSO(4) the aversion was abolished in TRPM5 knock-out animals, and for CuSO(4), aversion decreased in both TRPV1- and TRPM5-deficient animals. Behavioral tests revealed that the T1R3 subunit of the sweet and umami receptors is implicated in the hedonically positive perception of FeSO(4) and ZnSO(4). For high concentrations of CTDS, the omission of TRPV1 reduced aversion. Imaging studies on heterologously expressed TRPM5 and TRPV1 channels are consistent with the behavioral experiments. Together, these results rationalize the complexity of metallic taste by showing that at low concentrations, compounds such as FeSO(4) and ZnSO(4) stimulate the gustatory system through the hedonically positive T1R3-TRPM5 pathway, and at higher concentrations, their aversion is mediated, in part, by the activation of TRPV1. PMID:19244541

  17. Abundant expression and functional participation of TRPV1 at Zusanli acupoint (ST36) in mice: mechanosensitive TRPV1 as an “acupuncture-responding channel”

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Acupuncture is a therapy that involves applying mechanical stimulation to acupoints using needles. Although acupuncture is believed to trigger neural regulation by opioids or adenosine, still little is known about how physical stimulation is turned into neurological signaling. The transient receptor potential vanilloid receptors 1 and 4 (TRPV1 and TRPV4) and the acid-sensing ion channel 3 (ASIC3) are regarded as mechanosensitive channels. This study aimed to clarify their role at the Zusanli acupoint (ST36) and propose possible sensing pathways linking channel activation to neurological signaling. Methods First, tissues from different anatomical layers of ST36 and the sham point were sampled, and channel expressions between the two points were compared using western blotting. Second, immunofluorescence was performed at ST36 to reveal distribution pattern of the channels. Third, agonist of the channels were injected into ST36 and tested in a mouse inflammatory pain model to seek if agonist injection could replicate acupuncture-like analgesic effect. Last, the components of proposed downstream sensing pathway were tested with western blotting to determine if they were expressed in tissues with positive mechanosensitive channel expression. Results The results from western blotting demonstrated an abundance of TRPV1, TRPV4, and ASIC3 in anatomical layers of ST36. Furthermore, immunofluorescence showed these channels were expressed in both neural and non-neural cells at ST36. However, only capsaicin, a TRPV1 agonist, replicated the analgesic effect of acupuncture when injected into ST36. Components of calcium wave propagation (CWP, the proposed downstream sensing pathway) were also expressed in tissues with abundant TRPV1 expression, the muscle and epimysium layers. Conclusions The results demonstrated mechanosensitive channel TRPV1 is highly expressed at ST36 and possibly participated in acupuncture related analgesia. Since CWP was reported by other to occur

  18. Some like it hot: The emerging role of spicy food (capsaicin) in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yaxiong; Huang, Xin; Wu, Haijing; Zhao, Ming; Lu, Qianjin; Israeli, Eitan; Dahan, Shani; Blank, Miri; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2016-05-01

    Autoimmune diseases refer to a spectrum of diseases characterized by an active immune response against the host, which frequently involves increased autoantibody production. The pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases is multifactorial and the exploitation of novel effective treatment is urgent. Capsaicin is a nutritional factor, the active component of chili peppers, which is responsible for the pungent component of chili pepper. As a stimuli, capsaicin selectively activate transient receptor potential vanilloid subfamily 1(TRPV1) and exert various biological effects. This review discusses the effect of capsaicin through its receptor on the development and modulation of autoimmune diseases, which may shed light upon potential therapies in capsaicin-targeted approaches. PMID:26812350

  19. Some like it hot: The emerging role of spicy food (capsaicin) in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yaxiong; Huang, Xin; Wu, Haijing; Zhao, Ming; Lu, Qianjin; Israeli, Eitan; Dahan, Shani; Blank, Miri; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2016-05-01

    Autoimmune diseases refer to a spectrum of diseases characterized by an active immune response against the host, which frequently involves increased autoantibody production. The pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases is multifactorial and the exploitation of novel effective treatment is urgent. Capsaicin is a nutritional factor, the active component of chili peppers, which is responsible for the pungent component of chili pepper. As a stimuli, capsaicin selectively activate transient receptor potential vanilloid subfamily 1(TRPV1) and exert various biological effects. This review discusses the effect of capsaicin through its receptor on the development and modulation of autoimmune diseases, which may shed light upon potential therapies in capsaicin-targeted approaches.

  20. Characterizing the PK/PD relationship for inhibition of capsaicin-induced dermal vasodilatation by MK-3207, an oral calcitonin gene related peptide receptor antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chi-Chung; Vermeersch, Steve; Denney, William S; Kennedy, William P; Palcza, John; Gipson, Adrianna; Han, Tae H; Blanchard, Rebecca; De Lepeleire, Inge; Depré, Marleen; Murphy, M Gail; Van Dyck, Kristien; de Hoon, Jan N

    2015-01-01

    Aims Calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonists are effective acute migraine treatments. A capsaicin-induced dermal vasodilatation (CIDV) model has been developed to provide target-engagement information in healthy volunteers. In the model, CGRP release is provoked after dermal capsaicin application, by activating transient receptor potential vanilloid-type-1 (TRPV1) receptors at peripheral sensory nerves. Laser Doppler imaging is used to quantify CIDV and subsequent inhibition by CGRP receptor antagonists. We sought to evaluate a CGRP receptor antagonist, MK-3207, in the biomarker model and to assess the predictability of the CIDV response to migraine clinical efficacy. Methods An integrated population pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) model was developed to describe the exposure−response relationship for CIDV inhibition by CGRP and TRPV1 receptor antagonists. MK-3207 dose−response predictions were made based on estimated potency from the PK/PD model and mean plasma concentrations observed at the doses investigated. Results The results suggested that a 20 mg dose of MK-3207 (EC50 of 1.59 nm) would be required to attain the peripheral CIDV response at a target level that was shown previously to correlate with 2 h clinical efficacy based on phase 3 telcagepant clinical data, and that a plateau of the dose−response would be reached around 40–100 mg. These predictions provided a quantitative rationale for dose selection in a phase 2 clinical trial of MK-3207 and helped with interpretation of the efficacy results from the trial. Conclusions The integrated CIDV PK/PD model provides a useful platform for characterization of PK/PD relationships and predictions of dose−response relationships to aid in future development of CGRP and TRPV1 receptor antagonists. PMID:25377933

  1. Activation of TRPV1 channels inhibits mechanosensitive Piezo channel activity by depleting membrane phosphoinositides.

    PubMed

    Borbiro, Istvan; Badheka, Doreen; Rohacs, Tibor

    2015-02-10

    Capsaicin is an activator of the heat-sensitive TRPV1 (transient receptor potential vanilloid 1) ion channels and has been used as a local analgesic. We found that activation of TRPV1 channels with capsaicin either in dorsal root ganglion neurons or in a heterologous expression system inhibited the mechanosensitive Piezo1 and Piezo2 channels by depleting phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] and its precursor phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate [PI(4)P] from the plasma membrane through Ca(2+)-induced phospholipase Cδ (PLCδ) activation. Experiments with chemically inducible phosphoinositide phosphatases and receptor-induced activation of PLCβ indicated that inhibition of Piezo channels required depletion of both PI(4)P and PI(4,5)P2. The mechanically activated current amplitudes decreased substantially in the excised inside-out configuration, where the membrane patch containing Piezo1 channels is removed from the cell. PI(4,5)P2 and PI(4)P applied to these excised patches inhibited this decrease. Thus, we concluded that Piezo channel activity requires the presence of phosphoinositides, and the combined depletion of PI(4,5)P2 and PI(4)P reduces channel activity. In addition to revealing a role for distinct membrane lipids in mechanosensitive ion channel regulation, these data suggest that inhibition of Piezo2 channels may contribute to the analgesic effect of capsaicin.

  2. An HSV-based library screen identifies PP1α as a negative TRPV1 regulator with analgesic activity in models of pain

    PubMed Central

    Reinhart, Bonnie; Goins, William F; Harel, Asaff; Chaudhry, Suchita; Goss, James R; Yoshimura, Naoki; de Groat, William C; Cohen, Justus B; Glorioso, Joseph C

    2016-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is a pronociceptive cation channel involved in persistent inflammatory and neuropathic pain. Herpes simplex virus (HSV) vector expression of TRPV1 causes cell death in the presence of capsaicin, thereby completely blocking virus replication. Here we describe a selection system for negative regulators of TRPV1 based on rescue of virus replication. HSV-based coexpression of TRPV1 and a PC12 cell-derived cDNA library identified protein phosphatase 1α (PP1α) as a negative regulator of TRPV1, mimicking the activity of “poreless” (PL), a dominant-negative mutant of TRPV1. Vectors expressing PP1α or PL reduced thermal sensitivity following virus injection into rat footpads, but failed to reduce the nocifensive responses to menthol/icilin-activated cold pain or formalin, demonstrating that the activity identified in vitro is functional in vivo with a degree of specificity. This system should prove powerful for identifying other cellular factors that can inhibit ion channel activity. PMID:27382601

  3. Identification of a Binding Motif in the S5 Helix That Confers Cholesterol Sensitivity to the TRPV1 Ion Channel*

    PubMed Central

    Picazo-Juárez, Giovanni; Romero-Suárez, Silvina; Nieto-Posadas, Andrés; Llorente, Itzel; Jara-Oseguera, Andrés; Briggs, Margaret; McIntosh, Thomas J.; Simon, Sidney A.; Ladrón-de-Guevara, Ernesto; Islas, León D.; Rosenbaum, Tamara

    2011-01-01

    The TRPV1 ion channel serves as an integrator of noxious stimuli with its activation linked to pain and neurogenic inflammation. Cholesterol, a major component of cell membranes, modifies the function of several types of ion channels. Here, using measurements of capsaicin-activated currents in excised patches from TRPV1-expressing HEK cells, we show that enrichment with cholesterol, but not its diastereoisomer epicholesterol, markedly decreased wild-type rat TRPV1 currents. Substitutions in the S5 helix, rTRPV1-R579D, and rTRPV1-F582Q, decreased this cholesterol response and rTRPV1-L585I was insensitive to cholesterol addition. Two human TRPV1 variants, with different amino acids at position 585, had different responses to cholesterol with hTRPV1-Ile585 being insensitive to this molecule. However, hTRPV1-I585L was inhibited by cholesterol addition similar to rTRPV1 with the same S5 sequence. In the absence of capsaicin, cholesterol enrichment also inhibited TRPV1 currents induced by elevated temperature and voltage. These data suggest that there is a cholesterol-binding site in TRPV1 and that the functions of TRPV1 depend on the genetic variant and membrane cholesterol content. PMID:21555515

  4. Structure-activity relationship studies and discovery of a potent transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV1) antagonist 4-[3-chloro-5-[(1S)-1,2-dihydroxyethyl]-2-pyridyl]-N-[5-(trifluoromethyl)-2-pyridyl]-3,6-dihydro-2H-pyridine-1-carboxamide (V116517) as a clinical candidate for pain management.

    PubMed

    Tafesse, Laykea; Kanemasa, Toshiyuki; Kurose, Noriyuki; Yu, Jianming; Asaki, Toshiyuki; Wu, Gang; Iwamoto, Yuka; Yamaguchi, Yoshitaka; Ni, Chiyou; Engel, John; Tsuno, Naoki; Patel, Aniket; Zhou, Xiaoming; Shintani, Takuya; Brown, Kevin; Hasegawa, Tsuyoshi; Shet, Manjunath; Iso, Yasuyoshi; Kato, Akira; Kyle, Donald J

    2014-08-14

    A series of novel tetrahydropyridinecarboxamide TRPV1 antagonists were prepared and evaluated in an effort to optimize properties of previously described lead compounds from piperazinecarboxamide series. The compounds were evaluated for their ability to block capsaicin and acid-induced calcium influx in CHO cells expressing human TRPV1. The most potent of these TRPV1 antagonists were further characterized in pharmacokinetic, efficacy, and body temperature studies. On the basis of its pharmacokinetic, in vivo efficacy, safety, and toxicological properties, compound 37 was selected for further evaluation in human clinical trials.

  5. TRPV1 expression level in isolectin B₄-positive neurons contributes to mouse strain difference in cutaneous thermal nociceptive sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Ono, Kentaro; Ye, Yi; Viet, Chi T; Dang, Dongmin; Schmidt, Brian L

    2015-05-01

    Differential thermal nociception across inbred mouse strains has genetic determinants. Thermal nociception is largely attributed to the heat/capsaicin receptor transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1); however, the contribution of this channel to the genetics of thermal nociception has not been revealed. In this study we compared TRPV1 expression levels and electrophysiological properties in primary sensory neurons and thermal nociceptive behaviors between two (C57BL/6 and BALB/c) inbred mouse strains. Using immunofluorescence and patch-clamp physiology methods, we demonstrated that TRPV1 expression was significantly higher in isolectin B4 (IB4)-positive trigeminal sensory neurons of C57BL/6 relative to BALB/c; the expression in IB4-negative neurons was similar between the strains. Furthermore, using electrophysiological cell classification (current signature method), we showed differences between the two strains in capsaicin sensitivity in IB4-positive neuronal cell types 2 and 13, which were previously reported as skin nociceptors. Otherwise electrophysiological membrane properties of the classified cell types were similar in the two mouse strains. In publicly available nocifensive behavior data and our own behavior data from the using the two mouse strains, C57BL/6 exhibited higher sensitivity to heat stimulation than BALB/c, independent of sex and anatomical location of thermal testing (the tail, hind paw, and whisker pad). The TRPV1-selective antagonist JNJ-17203212 inhibited thermal nociception in both strains; however, removing IB4-positive trigeminal sensory neurons with IB4-conjugated saporin inhibited thermal nociception on the whisker pad in C57BL/6 but not in BALB/c. These results suggest that TRPV1 expression levels in IB4-positive type 2 and 13 neurons contributed to differential thermal nociception in skin of C57BL/6 compared with BALB/c.

  6. Esophageal Submucosal Injection of Capsaicin but Not Acid Induces Symptoms in Normal Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Robert H; Korsapati, Hariprasad; Bhalla, Vikas; Varki, Nissi; Mittal, Ravinder K

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) is a candidate for mediating acid-induced symptoms in the esophagus. We conducted studies to determine if the presence of acid in the mucosa/submucosa and direct activation of TRPV1 by capsaicin elicited symptoms in normal healthy subjects. We also studied the presence of TRPV1 receptors in the esophagus. Methods Unsedated endoscopy was performed on healthy subjects with no symptoms. Using a sclerotherapy needle, normal saline (pH 2.0–7.5) was injected into the mucosa/submucosa, 5 cm above the Z line. In a separate group of healthy subjects, injection of capsaicin and vehicle was also studied. Quality of symptoms was reported using the McGill Pain Questionnaire, and symptom intensity using the visual analogue scale (VAS). Immunohistochemistry was performed on 8 surgical esophagus specimens using TRPV1 antibody. Results Acid injection either did not elicit or elicited mild symptoms in subjects at all pH solutions. Capsaicin but not the vehicle elicited severe heartburn/chest pain in all subjects. Mean VAS for capsaicin was 91 ± 3 and symptoms lasted for 25 ± 1 minutes. Immunohistochemistry revealed a linear TRPV1 staining pattern between the epithelial layer and the submucosa that extended into the papillae. Eighty-five percent of papillae stained positive for TRPV1 with a mean 1.1 positive papillae per high-powered field. Conclusions The mechanism of acid-induced heartburn and chest pain is not the simple interaction of hydrogen ions with afferents located in the esophageal mucosa and submucosa. TRPV1 receptors are present in the lamina propria and their activation induces heartburn and chest pain. PMID:26932896

  7. No relevant modulation of TRPV1-mediated trigeminal pain by intranasal carbon dioxide in healthy humans

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Nasal insufflation of CO2 has been shown to exert antinociceptive respectively antihyperalgesic effects in animal pain models using topical capsaicin with activation of TRPV1-receptor positive nociceptive neurons. Clinical benefit from CO2 inhalation in patients with craniofacial pain caused by a putative activation of TRPV1 receptor positive trigeminal neurons has also been reported. These effects are probably mediated via an activation of TRPV1 receptor - positive neurons in the nasal mucosa with subsequent central inhibitory effects (such as conditioned pain modulation). In this study, we aimed to examine the effects of intranasal CO2 on a human model of craniofacial pain elicited by nasal application of capsaicin. Methods In a first experiment, 48 healthy volunteers without previous craniofacial pain received intranasal capsaicin to provoke trigeminal pain elicited by activation of TRVP1 positive nociceptive neurons. Then, CO2 or air was insufflated alternatingly into the nasal cavity at a flow rate of 1 l/min for 60 sec each. In the subsequent experiment, all participants were randomized into 2 groups of 24 each and received either continuous nasal insufflation of CO2 or placebo for 18:40 min after nociceptive stimulation with intranasal capsaicin. In both experiments, pain was rated on a numerical rating scale every 60 sec. Results Contrary to previous animal studies, the effects of CO2 on experimental trigeminal pain were only marginal. In the first experiment, CO2 reduced pain ratings only minimally by 5.3% compared to air if given alternatingly with significant results for the main factor GROUP (F1,47 = 4.438; p = 0.041) and the interaction term TIME*GROUP (F2.6,121.2 = 3.3; p = 0.029) in the repeated-measures ANOVA. However, these effects were abrogated after continuous insufflation of CO2 or placebo with no significant changes for the main factors or the interaction term. Conclusions Although mild modulatory effects of low

  8. Protective effect of transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1) modulator, against behavioral, biochemical and structural damage in experimental models of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Jayant, Shalini; Sharma, B M; Sharma, Bhupesh

    2016-07-01

    Alzheime's disease (AD) is an overwhelming neurodegenerative disorder, characterized by synaptic dysfunction, memory loss, neuro-inflammation and neural cell death. Very few treatments are in hand for the management of AD and they are only concentrating on peculiar aspects. Hence, an immense thrust is required to find utmost therapeutic targets to conquer this condition. This study investigates a potential role of vanillin, a selective agonist of transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1) in the experimental models of AD viz. intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) streptozotocin (STZ) and aluminum trichloride (AlCl3)+d-galactose induced AD in mice. The i.c.v. administration of STZ and intraperitoneally administration of AlCl3+d-galactose have significantly impaired learning-memory (Morris water maze and attentional set-shifting test), brain structure (hematoxylin, eosin and Congo red staining), enhanced brain oxidative stress (thiobarbituric acid reactive substance - TBARS and glutathione - GSH), nitrosative stress (nitrite/nitrate), acetylcholinesterase activity (AChE), inflammation (MPO), and calcium levels (Ca(++)). Treatment with vanillin in different doses and donepezil have significantly ameliorated i.c.v. STZ and AlCl3+d-galactose induced reduction in executive function, impaired reversal learning, cognition, memory and brain damage. Treatment with these drugs has also reduced the brain oxidative stress (TBARS and GSH), nitrosative stress (nitrite/nitrate), and AChE, MPO, and Ca(++) levels. These results indicate that vanillin, a selective agonist of TRPV1 and donepezil, a potent acetylcholine esterase inhibitor have attenuated i.c.v. STZ and AlCl3+d-galactose induced experimental AD. Hence, pharmacological positive modulation of TRPV1 channels may be a potential research target for mitigation of AD. PMID:27084583

  9. α,β-Unsaturated aldehyde pollutant acrolein suppresses cardiomyocyte contractile function: Role of TRPV1 and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhenbiao; He, Emily Y; Scott, Glenda I; Ren, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Air pollution is associated with an increased prevalence of heart disease and is known to trigger a proinflammatory response via stimulation of transient receptor potential vanilloid cation channels (TRPV1, also known as the capsaicin receptor). This study was designed to examine the effect of acrolein, an essential α,β-unsaturated aldehyde pollutant, on myocardial contractile function and the underlying mechanism involved with a focus on TRPV1 and oxidative stress. Cardiomyocyte mechanical and intracellular Ca(2+) properties were evaluated using an IonOptix MyoCam® system including peak shortening (PS), maximal velocity of shortening/relengthening (± dL/dt), time-to-PS (TPS), time-to-90% relengthening (TR90 ), fura-2 fluorescence intensity (FFI) and intracellular Ca(2+) decay. Changes in apoptosis and TRPV1 were evaluated using Western blot analysis. The degree of oxidative stress was assessed using the ratio between reduced and oxidized glutathione. Results obtained revealed that exposure of cardiomyocytes to acrolein acutely compromised contractile and intracellular Ca(2+) properties including depressed PS, ± dL/dt and ΔFFI, as well as prolonged TR90 and intracellular Ca(2+) decay. In addition, acrolein exposure upregulated TRPV1 associated with an increase in both apoptosis and oxidative stress. However, the acrolein-induced cardiomyocyte contractile and intracellular Ca(2+) anomalies, as well as apoptosis (as evidenced by Bcl-2, Bax, FasL, Caspase-3 and -8), were negated by the reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger glutathione or the TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine. Collectively these data suggest that the α,β-unsaturated aldehyde pollutant acrolein may play a role in the pathogenesis and sequelae of air pollution-induced heart disease via a TRPV1- and oxidative stress-dependent mechanism.

  10. Blockade of peripheral P2Y1 receptors prevents the induction of thermal hyperalgesia via modulation of TRPV1 expression in carrageenan-induced inflammatory pain rats: involvement of p38 MAPK phosphorylation in DRGs.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Soon-Gu; Roh, Dae-Hyun; Yoon, Seo-Yeon; Moon, Ji-Young; Choi, Sheu-Ran; Choi, Hoon-Seong; Kang, Suk-Yun; Han, Ho-Jae; Beitz, Alvin J; Lee, Jang-Hern

    2014-04-01

    Although previous reports have suggested that P2Y1 receptors (P2Y1Rs) are involved in cutaneous nociceptive signaling, it remains unclear how P2Y1Rs contribute to peripheral sensitization. The current study was designed to delineate the role of peripheral P2Y1Rs in pain and to investigate potential linkages to mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in DRGs and Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) expression in a rodent inflammatory pain model. Following injection of 2% carrageenan into the hind paw, expressions of P2Y1 and TRPV1 and the phosphorylation rates of both p38 MAPK and ERK but not JNK were increased and peaked at day 2 post-injection. Blockade of peripheral P2Y1Rs by the P2Y1R antagonist, MRS2500 injection (i.pl, D0 to D2) significantly reduced the induction of thermal hyperalgesia, but not mechanical allodynia. Simultaneously, MRS2500 injections suppressed upregulated TRPV1 expression and DRG p38 phosphorylation, while pERK signaling was not affected. Furthermore, inhibition of p38 activation in the DRGs by SB203580 (a p38 inhibitor, i.t, D0 to D2) prevented the upregulation of TRPV1 and a single i.t injection of SB203580 reversed the established thermal hyperalgesia, but not mechanical allodynia. Lastly, to identify the mechanism of action of P2Y1Rs, we repeatedly injected the P2Y1 agonist, MRS2365 into the naïve rat's hind paw and observed a dose-dependent increase in TRPV1 expression and p38 MAPK phosphorylation. These data demonstrate a sequential role for P2Y1R, p38 MAPK and TRPV1 in inflammation-induced thermal hyperalgesia; thus, peripheral P2Y1Rs activation modulates p38 MAPK signaling and TRPV1 expression, which ultimately leads to the induction of thermal hyperalgesia. PMID:24333674

  11. Osmotic and thermal control of magnocellular neurosecretory neurons--role of an N-terminal variant of trpv1.

    PubMed

    Sudbury, Jessica R; Ciura, Sorana; Sharif-Naeini, Reza; Bourque, Charles W

    2010-12-01

    The release of vasopressin (antidiuretic hormone) plays a key role in the osmoregulatory response of mammals to changes in salt or water intake and in the rate of water loss through evaporation during thermoregulatory cooling. Previous work has shown that the hypothalamus encloses the sensory elements that modulate vasopressin release during systemic changes in fluid osmolality or body temperature. These responses depend in part on a synaptic regulation of vasopressin neurons by afferent inputs arising from osmosensory and thermosensory neurons in the preoptic area. However, recent studies in rats and mice have shown that vasopressin neurons in the supraoptic nucleus also display intrinsic osmosensory and thermosensory properties. Isolated vasopressin neurons exposed to increases in perfusate temperature or osmolality generate increases in non-selective cation channel activity that cause membrane depolarization and increase neuronal excitability. These channels are calcium-permeable and can be blocked by ruthenium red. Moreover, intrinsic responses to osmotic and thermal stimuli are absent in magnocellular neurosecretory cells isolated from mice lacking the transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (trpv1) gene, which encodes the capsaicin receptor. Immunostaining of vasopressin-releasing neurons with anti-TRPV1 antibodies reveals the presence of amino acids present in the carboxy terminus of the protein, but not those lying in the amino terminal domain. Thus, magnocellular neurosecretory neurons appear to express an N-terminal variant of trpv1 which lacks sensitivity to capsaicin, but which enables osmosensing and thermosensing.

  12. Osmotic and thermal control of magnocellular neurosecretory neurons--role of an N-terminal variant of trpv1.

    PubMed

    Sudbury, Jessica R; Ciura, Sorana; Sharif-Naeini, Reza; Bourque, Charles W

    2010-12-01

    The release of vasopressin (antidiuretic hormone) plays a key role in the osmoregulatory response of mammals to changes in salt or water intake and in the rate of water loss through evaporation during thermoregulatory cooling. Previous work has shown that the hypothalamus encloses the sensory elements that modulate vasopressin release during systemic changes in fluid osmolality or body temperature. These responses depend in part on a synaptic regulation of vasopressin neurons by afferent inputs arising from osmosensory and thermosensory neurons in the preoptic area. However, recent studies in rats and mice have shown that vasopressin neurons in the supraoptic nucleus also display intrinsic osmosensory and thermosensory properties. Isolated vasopressin neurons exposed to increases in perfusate temperature or osmolality generate increases in non-selective cation channel activity that cause membrane depolarization and increase neuronal excitability. These channels are calcium-permeable and can be blocked by ruthenium red. Moreover, intrinsic responses to osmotic and thermal stimuli are absent in magnocellular neurosecretory cells isolated from mice lacking the transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (trpv1) gene, which encodes the capsaicin receptor. Immunostaining of vasopressin-releasing neurons with anti-TRPV1 antibodies reveals the presence of amino acids present in the carboxy terminus of the protein, but not those lying in the amino terminal domain. Thus, magnocellular neurosecretory neurons appear to express an N-terminal variant of trpv1 which lacks sensitivity to capsaicin, but which enables osmosensing and thermosensing. PMID:21143657

  13. TLR4 enhances histamine-mediated pruritus by potentiating TRPV1 activity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent studies have indicated that Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), a pathogen-recognition receptor that triggers inflammatory signals in innate immune cells, is also expressed on sensory neurons, implicating its putative role in sensory signal transmission. However, the possible function of sensory neuron TLR4 has not yet been formally addressed. In this regard, we investigated the role of TLR4 in itch signal transmission. Results TLR4 was expressed on a subpopulation of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) sensory neurons that express TRPV1. In TLR4-knockout mice, histamine-induced itch responses were compromised while TLR4 activation by LPS did not directly elicit an itch response. Histamine-induced intracellular calcium signals and inward currents were comparably reduced in TLR4-deficient sensory neurons. Reduced histamine sensitivity in the TLR4-deficient neurons was accompanied by a decrease in TRPV1 activity. Heterologous expression experiments in HEK293T cells indicated that TLR4 expression enhanced capsaicin-induced intracellular calcium signals and inward currents. Conclusions Our data show that TLR4 on sensory neurons enhances histamine-induced itch signal transduction by potentiating TRPV1 activity. The results suggest that TLR4 could be a novel target for the treatment of enhanced itch sensation. PMID:25139109

  14. α,β-Unsaturated aldehyde crotonaldehyde triggers cardiomyocyte contractile dysfunction: role of TRPV1 and mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Pei, Zhaohui; Zhuang, Zhiqiang; Sang, Hanfei; Wu, Zhenbiao; Meng, Rongsen; He, Emily Y; Scott, Glenda I; Maris, Jackie R; Li, Ruiman; Ren, Jun

    2014-04-01

    Recent evidence has suggested that cigarette smoking is associated with an increased prevalence of heart diseases. Given that cigarette smoking triggers proinflammatory response via stimulation of the capsaicin-sensitive transient receptor potential cation channel TRPV1, this study was designed to evaluate the effect of an essential α,β-unsaturated aldehyde from cigarette smoke crotonaldehyde on myocardial function and the underlying mechanism with a focus on TRPV1 and mitochondria. Cardiomyocyte mechanical and intracellular Ca2+ properties were evaluated including peak shortening (PS), maximal velocity of shortening/relengthening (±dL/dt), time-to-PS (TPS), time-to-90% relengthening (TR90), fura-2 fluorescence intensity (FFI), intracellular Ca2+ decay and SERCA activity. Apoptosis and TRPV1 were evaluated using Western blot analysis. Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and DNA damage were measured using the intracellular fluoroprobe 5-(6)-chloromethyl-2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), respectively. Our data revealed that crotonaldehyde interrupted cardiomyocyte contractile and intracellular Ca2+ property including depressed PS, ±dL/dt, ΔFFI and SERCA activity, as well as prolonged TR90 and intracellular Ca2+ decay. Crotonaldehyde exposure increased TRPV1 and NADPH oxidase levels, promoted apoptosis, mitochondrial injury (decreased aconitase activity, PGC-1α and UCP-2) as well as production of ROS and 8-OHdG. Interestingly, crotonaldehyde-induced cardiac defect was obliterated by the ROS scavenger glutathione and the TRPV1 inhibitor capsazepine. Capsazepine (not glutathione) ablated crotonaldehyde-induced mitochondrial damage. Capsazepine, glutathione and the NADPH inhibitor apocynin negated crotonaldehyde-induced ROS accumulation. Our data suggest a role of crotonaldehyde compromises cardiomyocyte mechanical function possibly through a TRPV1- and mitochondria-dependent oxidative stress mechanism.

  15. Differential regulation of TRPV1 channels by H2O2: implications for diabetic microvascular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    DelloStritto, Daniel J; Connell, Patrick J; Dick, Gregory M; Fancher, Ibra S; Klarich, Brittany; Fahmy, Joseph N; Kang, Patrick T; Chen, Yeong-Renn; Damron, Derek S; Thodeti, Charles K; Bratz, Ian N

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrated previously that TRPV1-dependent coupling of coronary blood flow (CBF) to metabolism is disrupted in diabetes. A critical amount of H2O2 contributes to CBF regulation; however, excessive H2O2 impairs responses. We sought to determine the extent to which differential regulation of TRPV1 by H2O2 modulates CBF and vascular reactivity in diabetes. We used contrast echocardiography to study TRPV1 knockout (V1KO), db/db diabetic, and wild type C57BKS/J (WT) mice. H2O2 dose-dependently increased CBF in WT mice, a response blocked by the TRPV1 antagonist SB366791. H2O2-induced vasodilation was significantly inhibited in db/db and V1KO mice. H2O2 caused robust SB366791-sensitive dilation in WT coronary microvessels; however, this response was attenuated in vessels from db/db and V1KO mice, suggesting H2O2-induced vasodilation occurs, in part, via TRPV1. Acute H2O2 exposure potentiated capsaicin-induced CBF responses and capsaicin-mediated vasodilation in WT mice, whereas prolonged luminal H2O2 exposure blunted capsaicin-induced vasodilation. Electrophysiology studies re-confirms acute H2O2 exposure activated TRPV1 in HEK293A and bovine aortic endothelial cells while establishing that H2O2 potentiate capsaicin-activated TRPV1 currents, whereas prolonged H2O2 exposure attenuated TRPV1 currents. Verification of H2O2-mediated activation of intrinsic TRPV1 specific currents were found in isolated mouse coronary endothelial cells from WT mice and decreased in endothelial cells from V1KO mice. These data suggest prolonged H2O2 exposure impairs TRPV1-dependent coronary vascular signaling. This may contribute to microvascular dysfunction and tissue perfusion deficits characteristic of diabetes.

  16. Involvement of TRPV1 channels in the activity of the cannabinoid WIN 55,212-2 in an acute rat model of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Carletti, Fabio; Gambino, Giuditta; Rizzo, Valerio; Ferraro, Giuseppe; Sardo, Pierangelo

    2016-05-01

    The exogenous cannabinoid agonist WIN 55,212-2, (R)-(+)-[2,3-dihydro-5-methyl-3-(4-morpholinylmethyl) pyrrolo[1,2,3-de]-1,4-benzoxazin-6-Yl]-1-naphthalenylmethanone (WIN), has revealed to play a role on modulating the hyperexcitability phenomena in the hippocampus. Cannabinoid-mediated mechanisms of neuroprotection have recently been found to imply the modulation of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), a cationic channel subfamily that regulate synaptic excitation. In our study, we assessed the influence of pharmacological manipulation of TRPV1 function, alone and on WIN antiepileptic activity, in the Maximal Dentate Activation (MDA) acute model of temporal lobe epilepsy. Our results showed that the TRPV1 agonist, capsaicin, increased epileptic outcomes; whilst antagonizing TRPV1 with capsazepine exerts a protective role on paroxysmal discharge. When capsaicin is co-administered with WIN effective dose of 10mg/kg is able to reduce its antiepileptic strength, especially on the triggering of MDA response. Accordingly, capsazepine at the protective dose of 2mg/kg managed to potentiate WIN antiepileptic effects, when co-treated. Moreover, WIN subeffective dose of 5mg/kg was turned into effective when capsazepine comes into play. This evidence suggests that systemic administration of TRPV1-active drugs influences electrically induced epilepsy, with a noticeable protective activity for capsazepine. Furthermore, results from the pharmacological interaction with WIN support an interplay between cannabinoid and TRPV1 signaling that could represent a promising approach for a future pharmacological strategy to challenge hyperexcitability-based diseases.

  17. Cigarette smoke has sensory effects through nicotinic and TRPA1 but not TRPV1 receptors on the isolated mouse trachea and larynx

    PubMed Central

    Kichko, Tatjana I.; Kobal, Gerd

    2015-01-01

    Cigarette smoke (CS) exposes chemosensory nerves in the airways to a multitude of chemicals, some acting through the irritant receptors TRPV1 and TRPA1 but potentially also through nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR). Our aim was to characterize the differences in sensory neuronal effects of CS, gas phase, and particulate matter as well as of typical constituents, such as nicotine and reactive carbonyls. Isolated mouse trachea and larynx were employed to measure release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) as an index of sensory neuron activation evoked by CS, by filtered CS gas phase essentially free of nicotine, and by dilute total particulate matter (TPM) containing defined nicotine concentrations. With CS stimulation of the superfused trachea, TRPV1 null mutants showed about the same large responses as wild-type mice, whereas both TRPA1−/− and double knockouts exhibited 80% reduction; the retained 20% response was abolished by mecamylamine (10 μM), indicating a distinct contribution of nAChRs. These phenotypes were accentuated by using TPM to stimulate the immersed trachea; 50% of response was retained in TRPA1−/− and abolished by mecamylamine. In contrast, the gas phase acted like a sheer TRPA1 agonist, consistent with its composition, among other compounds, of volatile reactive carbonyls like formaldehyde and acrolein. In the trachea, the gas phase and CS were equally effective in releasing CGRP, whereas the larynx showed much larger CS than gas phase responses. Thus nicotinic receptors contribute to the sensory effects of cigarette smoke on the trachea, which are dominated by TRPA1. How this translates to human perception affords future research. PMID:26472811

  18. Cigarette smoke has sensory effects through nicotinic and TRPA1 but not TRPV1 receptors on the isolated mouse trachea and larynx.

    PubMed

    Kichko, Tatjana I; Kobal, Gerd; Reeh, Peter W

    2015-10-15

    Cigarette smoke (CS) exposes chemosensory nerves in the airways to a multitude of chemicals, some acting through the irritant receptors TRPV1 and TRPA1 but potentially also through nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR). Our aim was to characterize the differences in sensory neuronal effects of CS, gas phase, and particulate matter as well as of typical constituents, such as nicotine and reactive carbonyls. Isolated mouse trachea and larynx were employed to measure release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) as an index of sensory neuron activation evoked by CS, by filtered CS gas phase essentially free of nicotine, and by dilute total particulate matter (TPM) containing defined nicotine concentrations. With CS stimulation of the superfused trachea, TRPV1 null mutants showed about the same large responses as wild-type mice, whereas both TRPA1(-/-) and double knockouts exhibited 80% reduction; the retained 20% response was abolished by mecamylamine (10 μM), indicating a distinct contribution of nAChRs. These phenotypes were accentuated by using TPM to stimulate the immersed trachea; 50% of response was retained in TRPA1(-/-) and abolished by mecamylamine. In contrast, the gas phase acted like a sheer TRPA1 agonist, consistent with its composition, among other compounds, of volatile reactive carbonyls like formaldehyde and acrolein. In the trachea, the gas phase and CS were equally effective in releasing CGRP, whereas the larynx showed much larger CS than gas phase responses. Thus nicotinic receptors contribute to the sensory effects of cigarette smoke on the trachea, which are dominated by TRPA1. How this translates to human perception affords future research.

  19. Different types of toxins targeting TRPV1 in pain.

    PubMed

    Min, Jia-Wei; Liu, Wan-Hong; He, Xiao-Hua; Peng, Bi-Wen

    2013-09-01

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1(TRPV1) channels are members of the transient receptor potential (TRP) superfamily. Members of this family are expressed in primary sensory neurons and are best known for their role in nociception and sensory transmission. Multiple painful stimuli can activate these channels. In this review, we discussed the mechanisms of different types of venoms that target TRPV1, such as scorpion venom, botulinum neurotoxin, spider toxin, ciguatera fish poisoning (CFP) and neurotoxic shellfish poisoning (NSP). Some of these toxins activate TRPV1; however, some do not. Regardless of TRPV1 inhibition or activation, they occur through different pathways. For example, BoNT/A decreases TRPV1 expression levels by blocking TRPV1 trafficking to the plasma membrane, although the exact mechanism is still under debate. Vanillotoxins from tarantula (Psalmopoeus cambridgei) are proposed to activate TRPV1 via interaction with a region of TRPV1 that is homologous to voltage-dependent ion channels. Here, we offer a description of the present state of knowledge for this complex subject.

  20. Different types of toxins targeting TRPV1 in pain.

    PubMed

    Min, Jia-Wei; Liu, Wan-Hong; He, Xiao-Hua; Peng, Bi-Wen

    2013-09-01

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1(TRPV1) channels are members of the transient receptor potential (TRP) superfamily. Members of this family are expressed in primary sensory neurons and are best known for their role in nociception and sensory transmission. Multiple painful stimuli can activate these channels. In this review, we discussed the mechanisms of different types of venoms that target TRPV1, such as scorpion venom, botulinum neurotoxin, spider toxin, ciguatera fish poisoning (CFP) and neurotoxic shellfish poisoning (NSP). Some of these toxins activate TRPV1; however, some do not. Regardless of TRPV1 inhibition or activation, they occur through different pathways. For example, BoNT/A decreases TRPV1 expression levels by blocking TRPV1 trafficking to the plasma membrane, although the exact mechanism is still under debate. Vanillotoxins from tarantula (Psalmopoeus cambridgei) are proposed to activate TRPV1 via interaction with a region of TRPV1 that is homologous to voltage-dependent ion channels. Here, we offer a description of the present state of knowledge for this complex subject. PMID:23732125

  1. Role of thermo TRPA1 and TRPV1 channels in heat, cold, and mechanical nociception of rats.

    PubMed

    Nozadze, Ivliane; Tsiklauri, Nana; Gurtskaia, Gulnazi; Tsagareli, Merab G

    2016-02-01

    A sensitive response of the nervous system to changes in temperature is of predominant importance for homeotherms to maintain a stable body temperature. A number of temperature-sensitive transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels have been studied as nociceptors that respond to extreme temperatures and harmful chemicals. Recent findings in the field of pain have established a family of six thermo-TRP channels (TRPA1, TRPM8, TRPV1, TRPV2, TRPV3, and TRPV4) that exhibit sensitivity to increases or decreases in temperature, as well as to chemical substances eliciting the respective hot or cold sensations. In this study, we used behavioral methods to investigate whether mustard oil (allyl isothiocyanate) and capsaicin affect the sensitivity to heat, innocuous and noxious cold, and mechanical stimuli in male rats. The results obtained indicate that TRPA1 and TRPV1 channels are clearly involved in pain reactions, and the TRPA1 agonist allyl isothiocyanate enhances the heat pain sensitivity, possibly by indirectly modulating TRPV1 channels coexpressed in nociceptors with TRPA1. Overall, our data support the role of thermosensitive TRPA1 and TRPV1 channels in pain modulation and show that these two thermoreceptor channels are in a synergistic and/or conditional relationship with noxious heat and cold cutaneous stimulation.

  2. CT-guided injection of a TRPV1 agonist around dorsal root ganglia decreases pain transmission in swine

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Jacob D.; Saeed, Maythem; Do, Loi; Braz, Joao; Basbaum, Allan I.; Iadarola, Michael J.; Wilson, David M.; Dillon, William P.

    2016-01-01

    One approach to analgesia is to block pain at the site of origin or along the peripheral pathway by selectively ablating pain-transmitting neurons or nerve terminals directly. The heat/capsaicin receptor (TRPV1) expressed by nociceptive neurons is a compelling target for selective interventional analgesia because it leaves somatosensory and proprioceptive neurons intact. Resiniferatoxin (RTX), like capsaicin, is a TRPV1 agonist but has greater potency. We combine RTX-mediated inactivation with the precision of computed tomography (CT)–guided delivery to ablate peripheral pain fibers in swine. Under CT guidance, RTX was delivered unilaterally around the lumbar dorsal root ganglia (DRG), and vehicle only was administered to the contralateral side. During a 4-week observation period, animals demonstrated delayed or absent withdrawal responses to infrared laser heat stimuli delivered to sensory dermatomes corresponding to DRG receiving RTX treatment. Motor function was unimpaired as assessed by disability scoring and gait analysis. In treated DRG, TRPV1 mRNA expression was reduced, as were nociceptive neuronal perikarya in ganglia and their nerve terminals in the ipsilateral dorsal horn. CT guidance to precisely deliver RTX to sites of peripheral pain transmission in swine may be an approach that could be tailored to block an array of clinical pain conditions in patients. PMID:26378245

  3. Nicotinic acid is a common regulator of heat-sensing TRPV1-4 ion channels.

    PubMed

    Ma, Linlin; Lee, Bo Hyun; Clifton, Heather; Schaefer, Saul; Zheng, Jie

    2015-03-10

    Nicotinic acid (NA, a.k.a. vitamin B3 or niacin) can reduce blood cholesterol and low-density lipoproteins whereas increase high-density lipoproteins. However, when NA is used to treat dyslipidemias, it causes a strong side effect of cutaneous vasodilation, commonly called flushing. A recent study showed that NA may cause flushing by lowering activation threshold temperature of the heat-sensitive capsaicin receptor TRPV1 ion channel, leading to its activation at body temperature. The finding calls into question whether NA might also interact with the homologous heat-sensitive TRPV2-4 channels, particularly given that TRPV3 and TRPV4 are abundantly expressed in keratinocytes of the skin where much of the flushing response occurs. We found that NA indeed potentiated TRPV3 while inhibited TRPV2 and TRPV4. Consistent with these gating effects, NA lowered the heat-activation threshold of TRPV3 but elevated that of TRPV4. We further found that activity of TRPV1 was substantially prolonged by extracellular NA, which may further enhance the direct activation effect. Consistent with the broad gating effect on TRPV1-4 channels, evidence from the present study hints that NA may share the same activation pathway as 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB), a common agonist for these TRPV channels. These findings shed new light on the molecular mechanism underlying NA regulation of TRPV channels.

  4. Capsaicin Induces “Brite” Phenotype in Differentiating 3T3-L1 Preadipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Baboota, Ritesh K.; Singh, Dhirendra P.; Sarma, Siddhartha M.; Kaur, Jaspreet; Sandhir, Rajat; Boparai, Ravneet K.; Kondepudi, Kanthi K.; Bishnoi, Mahendra

    2014-01-01

    Objective Targeting the energy storing white adipose tissue (WAT) by pharmacological and dietary means in order to promote its conversion to energy expending “brite” cell type holds promise as an anti-obesity approach. Present study was designed to investigate/revisit the effect of capsaicin on adipogenic differentiation with special reference to induction of “brite” phenotype during differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. Methods Multiple techniques such as Ca2+ influx assay, Oil Red-O staining, nutrigenomic analysis in preadipocytes and matured adipocytes have been employed to understand the effect of capsaicin at different doses. In addition to in-vitro experiments, in-vivo studies were carried out in high-fat diet (HFD) fed rats treated with resiniferatoxin (RTX) (a TRPV1 agonist) and in mice administered capsaicin. Results TRPV1 channels are expressed in preadipocytes but not in adipocytes. In preadipocytes, both capsaicin and RTX stimulate Ca2+ influx in dose-dependent manner. This stimulation may be prevented by capsazepine, a TRPV1 antagonist. At lower doses, capsaicin inhibits lipid accumulation and stimulates TRPV1 gene expression, while at higher doses it enhances accumulation of lipids and suppresses expression of its receptor. In doses of 0.1–100 µM, capsaicin promotes expression of major pro-adipogenic factor PPARγ and some of its downstream targets. In concentrations of 1 µM, capsaicin up-regulates anti-adipogenic genes. Low-dose capsaicin treatment of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes differentiating into adipocytes results in increased expression of brown fat cell marker genes. In white adipose of mice, capsaicin administration leads to increase in browning-specific genes. Global TRPV1 ablation (i.p. by RTX administration) leads to increase in locomotor activity with no change in body weight. Conclusion Our findings suggest the dual modulatory role of capsaicin in adipogenesis. Capsaicin inhibits adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 via TRPV1 activation and

  5. Involvement of the TRPV1 channel in the modulation of spontaneous locomotor activity, physical performance and physical exercise-induced physiological responses

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, A.S.R.; Kunstetter, A.C.; Damasceno, W.C.; Wanner, S.P.

    2016-01-01

    Physical exercise triggers coordinated physiological responses to meet the augmented metabolic demand of contracting muscles. To provide adequate responses, the brain must receive sensory information about the physiological status of peripheral tissues and organs, such as changes in osmolality, temperature and pH. Most of the receptors involved in these afferent pathways express ion channels, including transient receptor potential (TRP) channels, which are usually activated by more than one type of stimulus and are therefore considered polymodal receptors. Among these TRP channels, the TRPV1 channel (transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 or capsaicin receptor) has well-documented functions in the modulation of pain sensation and thermoregulatory responses. However, the TRPV1 channel is also expressed in non-neural tissues, suggesting that this channel may perform a broad range of functions. In this review, we first present a brief overview of the available tools for studying the physiological roles of the TRPV1 channel. Then, we present the relationship between the TRPV1 channel and spontaneous locomotor activity, physical performance, and modulation of several physiological responses, including water and electrolyte balance, muscle hypertrophy, and metabolic, cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and inflammatory responses. Altogether, the data presented herein indicate that the TPRV1 channel modulates many physiological functions other than nociception and thermoregulation. In addition, these data open new possibilities for investigating the role of this channel in the acute effects induced by a single bout of physical exercise and in the chronic effects induced by physical training. PMID:27191606

  6. Involvement of the TRPV1 channel in the modulation of spontaneous locomotor activity, physical performance and physical exercise-induced physiological responses.

    PubMed

    Hudson, A S R; Kunstetter, A C; Damasceno, W C; Wanner, S P

    2016-01-01

    Physical exercise triggers coordinated physiological responses to meet the augmented metabolic demand of contracting muscles. To provide adequate responses, the brain must receive sensory information about the physiological status of peripheral tissues and organs, such as changes in osmolality, temperature and pH. Most of the receptors involved in these afferent pathways express ion channels, including transient receptor potential (TRP) channels, which are usually activated by more than one type of stimulus and are therefore considered polymodal receptors. Among these TRP channels, the TRPV1 channel (transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 or capsaicin receptor) has well-documented functions in the modulation of pain sensation and thermoregulatory responses. However, the TRPV1 channel is also expressed in non-neural tissues, suggesting that this channel may perform a broad range of functions. In this review, we first present a brief overview of the available tools for studying the physiological roles of the TRPV1 channel. Then, we present the relationship between the TRPV1 channel and spontaneous locomotor activity, physical performance, and modulation of several physiological responses, including water and electrolyte balance, muscle hypertrophy, and metabolic, cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and inflammatory responses. Altogether, the data presented herein indicate that the TPRV1 channel modulates many physiological functions other than nociception and thermoregulation. In addition, these data open new possibilities for investigating the role of this channel in the acute effects induced by a single bout of physical exercise and in the chronic effects induced by physical training. PMID:27191606

  7. Involvement of the TRPV1 channel in the modulation of spontaneous locomotor activity, physical performance and physical exercise-induced physiological responses.

    PubMed

    Hudson, A S R; Kunstetter, A C; Damasceno, W C; Wanner, S P

    2016-01-01

    Physical exercise triggers coordinated physiological responses to meet the augmented metabolic demand of contracting muscles. To provide adequate responses, the brain must receive sensory information about the physiological status of peripheral tissues and organs, such as changes in osmolality, temperature and pH. Most of the receptors involved in these afferent pathways express ion channels, including transient receptor potential (TRP) channels, which are usually activated by more than one type of stimulus and are therefore considered polymodal receptors. Among these TRP channels, the TRPV1 channel (transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 or capsaicin receptor) has well-documented functions in the modulation of pain sensation and thermoregulatory responses. However, the TRPV1 channel is also expressed in non-neural tissues, suggesting that this channel may perform a broad range of functions. In this review, we first present a brief overview of the available tools for studying the physiological roles of the TRPV1 channel. Then, we present the relationship between the TRPV1 channel and spontaneous locomotor activity, physical performance, and modulation of several physiological responses, including water and electrolyte balance, muscle hypertrophy, and metabolic, cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and inflammatory responses. Altogether, the data presented herein indicate that the TPRV1 channel modulates many physiological functions other than nociception and thermoregulation. In addition, these data open new possibilities for investigating the role of this channel in the acute effects induced by a single bout of physical exercise and in the chronic effects induced by physical training.

  8. Role of TRPV1 channels of the dorsal periaqueductal gray in the modulation of nociception and open elevated plus maze-induced antinociception in mice.

    PubMed

    Mascarenhas, Diego Cardozo; Gomes, Karina Santos; Nunes-de-Souza, Ricardo Luiz

    2015-10-01

    Recent findings have identified the presence of transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) channels within the dorsal portion of the periaqueductal gray (dPAG), suggesting their involvement in the control of pain and environmentally-induced antinociception. Environmentally, antinociception may be achieved through the use of an open elevated plus maze (oEPM, an EPM with 4 open arms), a highly aversive environmental situation. Here, we investigated the role of these TRPV1 channels within the dPAG in the modulation of a tonic pain and in the oEPM-induced antinociception. Male Swiss mice, under the nociceptive effect of 2.5% formalin injected into the right hind paw, received intra-dPAG injections of the TRPV1 agonist (capsaicin: 0, 0.01, 0.1 or 1.0 nmol/0.2 μL; Experiment 1) or antagonist (capsazepine: 0, 10 or 30 nmol/0.2 μL; Experiment 2) or combined injections of capsazepine (30 nmol) and capsaicin (1.0 nmol) (Experiment 3) and the time spent licking the formalin-injected paw was recorded. In Experiment 4, mice received intra-dPAG capsazepine (0 or 30 nmol) and were exposed to the oEPM or to a control situation, an enclosed EPM (eEPM; an EPM with 4 enclosed arms). Results showed that while capsaicin (1 nmol) decreased the time spent licking the formalin-injected paw, capsazepine did not change nociceptive response. Capsazepine (30 nmol) blocked pain inhibition induced by capsaicin and mildly attenuated the oEPM-induced antinociception. Our results revealed an important role of TRPV1 channels within the dPAG in the modulation of pain and in the phenomenon known as fear-induced antinociception in mice. PMID:26183651

  9. Phenotyping the Function of TRPV1-Expressing Sensory Neurons by Targeted Axonal Silencing

    PubMed Central

    Brenneis, Christian; Kistner, Katrin; Puopolo, Michelino; Segal, David; Roberson, David; Sisignano, Marco; Labocha, Sandra; Ferreirós, Nerea; Strominger, Amanda; Cobos, Enrique J.; Ghasemlou, Nader; Geisslinger, Gerd; Reeh, Peter W.; Bean, Bruce P.; Woolf, Clifford J.

    2013-01-01

    Specific somatosensations may be processed by different subsets of primary afferents. C-fibers expressing heat-sensitive TRPV1 channels are proposed, for example, to be heat but not mechanical pain detectors. To phenotype in rats the sensory function of TRPV1+ afferents, we rapidly and selectively silenced only their activity, by introducing the membrane-impermeant sodium channel blocker QX-314 into these axons via the TRPV1 channel pore. Using tandem mass spectrometry we show that upon activation with capsaicin, QX-314 selectively accumulates in the cytosol only of TRPV1-expressing cells, and not in control cells. Exposure to QX-314 and capsaicin induces in small DRG neurons a robust sodium current block within 30 s. In sciatic nerves, application of extracellular QX-314 with capsaicin persistently reduces C-fiber but not A-fiber compound action potentials and this effect does not occur in TRPV1−/− mice. Behavioral phenotyping after selectively silencing TRPV1+ sciatic nerve axons by perineural injections of QX-314 and capsaicin reveals deficits in heat and mechanical pressure but not pinprick or light touch perception. The response to intraplantar capsaicin is substantially reduced, as expected. During inflammation, silencing TRPV1+ axons abolishes heat, mechanical, and cold hyperalgesia but tactile and cold allodynia remain following peripheral nerve injury. These results indicate that TRPV1-expressing sensory neurons process particular thermal and mechanical somatosensations, and that the sensory channels activated by mechanical and cold stimuli to produce pain in naive/inflamed rats differ from those in animals after peripheral nerve injury. PMID:23283344

  10. Neuroprotection induced by N-acetylcysteine against cytosolic glutathione depletion-induced Ca2+ influx in dorsal root ganglion neurons of mice: role of TRPV1 channels.

    PubMed

    Nazıroğlu, M; Ciğ, B; Ozgül, C

    2013-07-01

    Glutathione (GSH) and N-acetylcysteine (NAC) are thiol-containing antioxidants, and also act through a direct reaction with free radicals. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is the principal transduction channel serving as a polymodal detector. Despite the importance of oxidative stress in pain sensitivity, its role in TRPV1 modulation is poorly understood. NAC may also have a regulator role on TRPV1 channel activity in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neuron. Therefore, we tested the effects of GSH and NAC on TRPV1 channel current, Ca(2+) influx, oxidative stress and caspase activity in the DRG of mice. DRG neurons were freshly isolated from mice and the neurons were incubated for 6 and 24h with buthionine sulfoximine (BSO). Pretreatment of cultured DRG neurons with NAC, results in a protection against oxidative damages. This neuroprotection is associated with the attenuation of a Ca(2+) influx triggered by oxidative agents such as H2O2, 5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) and GSH depletion via BSO. Here, we demonstrate the contribution of cytosolic factors (related to thiol group depletion) on the activation of TRPV1 channels in this mechanism. TRPV1 channels are activated by various agents including capsaicin (CAP), the pungent component of hot chili peppers, and are blocked by capsazepine. An oxidative environment also increased CAP-evoked TRPV1 currents in the neurons. When NAC and GSH were included in the patch pipette as well as extracellularly in the chamber, TRPV1 channels were not activated by CAP and H2O2. TRPV1 inhibitors, 2-aminoethyl diphenylborinate and N-(p-amylcinnamoyl)anthranilic acid strongly reduced BSO-induced oxidative toxicity and Ca(2+) influx, in a manner similar to pretreatment with NAC and GSH. Caspase-3 and -9 activities of all groups were not changed by the agonists or antagonists. In conclusion, in our experimental model, TRPV1 channels are involved in the oxidative stress-induced neuronal death, and negative modulation

  11. Sphingosine 1-phosphate to p38 signaling via S1P1 receptor and Gαi/o evokes augmentation of capsaicin-induced ionic currents in mouse sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Langeslag, Michiel; Quarta, Serena; Leitner, Michael G; Kress, Michaela; Mair, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    The perception of painful thermal stimuli by sensory neurons is largely mediated by TRPV1. Upon tissue injury or inflammation, S1P is secreted by thrombocytes as part of an inflammatory cocktail, which sensitizes nociceptive neurons towards thermal stimuli. S1P acts on G-protein coupled receptors that are expressed in sensory neurons and sensitize TRPV1 channels towards thermal stimuli. In this study, the S1P mediated signaling pathway required for sensitization of TRPV1 channels was explored.The capsaicin induced peak inward current (ICAPS) of sensory neurons was significantly increased after S1P stimulation within minutes after application. The potentiation of ICAPS resulted from activation of Gαi through G-protein coupled receptors for S1P. Consequently, Gαi led to a signaling cascade, involving phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) and protein kinase C, which augmented ICAPS in nociceptive neurons. The S1P1 receptor agonist SEW2871 resulted in activation of the same signaling pathway and potentiation of ICAPS. Furthermore, the mitogen-activated protein kinase p38 was phosphorylated after S1P stimulation and inhibition of p38 signaling by SB203580 prevented the S1P-induced ICAPS potentiation. The current data suggest that S1P sensitized ICAPS through G-protein coupled S1P1 receptor activation of Gαi-PI3K-PKC-p38 signaling pathway in sensory neurons. PMID:25431213

  12. Modality-specific mechanisms of protein kinase C-induced hypersensitivity of TRPV1: S800 is a polymodal sensitization site.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sen; Joseph, John; Ro, Jin Y; Chung, Man-Kyo

    2015-05-01

    TRPV1 is a nociceptive ion channel activated by polymodal stimuli such as capsaicin, proton, and noxious heat. Multiple inflammatory mediators activate protein kinases, especially protein kinase C (PKC), which phosphorylates TRPV1. Emerging evidence suggests that phosphorylation of TRPV1 constitutes specific signals underpinning pathological nociception. Although the mechanisms of hypersensitivity of TRPV1 to capsaicin are well studied, the phosphorylation residues that contribute to hypersensitivity to heat or acid have not been identified. In this study, we investigated modality-specific mechanisms of PKC-induced hypersensitivity using mutagenic ablation of PKC-associated phosphorylation sites in TRPV1. In heterologous systems, TRPV1 S502 and S800, but not T704, are known to be involved in hypersensitivity to capsaicin after the application of phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), a PKC agonist. Unlike capsaicin, PMA-induced hypersensitivity to heat was attenuated in TRPV1 mutants T704A and S800A, but not in S502A. In contrast, PMA-induced hypersensitivity to acid was attenuated only in S800A. To examine the roles of these phosphorylation sites in more physiologically relevant conditions, TRPV1 and mutants were tested in sensory neurons from TRPV1-null mice. In sensory neurons expressing mutated TRPV1, we found that alanine mutation of S800 commonly attenuates PMA-induced hypersensitivity to capsaicin, heat, and acid. Moreover, bradykinin-induced hypersensitivity to capsaicin was largely attenuated by the S800A mutation. These results suggest that mechanisms of PKC-induced hypersensitivity of TRPV1 are modality specific and that S800 is a polymodal sensitization site integrating multiple inflammatory signals in nociceptors. Our data provide a rationale for a novel approach targeting TRPV1 S800 for antihyperalgesia.

  13. Chronic alteration in phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate levels regulates capsaicin and mustard oil responses

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Mayur J.; Belugin, Sergei; Akopian, Armen N.

    2011-01-01

    There is an agreement that acute (in minutes) hydrolysis and accumulation of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) modulate TRPV1 and TRPA1 activities. Since inflammation results in PIP2 depletion, persisting for long periods (hours-to-days) in pain models and in clinic, we examined whether chronic depletion and accumulation of PIP2 affects capsaicin and mustard oil responses. In addition we also wanted to evaluate whether the effects of PIP2 depend on TRPV1 and TRPA1 co-expression, and whether the PIP2 actions vary in expression cells versus sensory neurons. Chronic PIP2 production was stimulated by over-expression of phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate-5-kinase, while PIP2-specific phospholipid 5′-phosphatase was selected to reduce plasma membrane levels of PIP2. Our results demonstrate that capsaicin (100 nM; CAP) responses and receptor tachyphylaxis are not significantly influenced by chronic changes in PIP2 levels in wild-type (WT) or TRPA1 null-mutant sensory neurons, as well as CHO cells expressing TRPV1 alone or with TRPA1. However, low concentrations of CAP (20 nM) produced a higher response after PIP2 depletion in cells containing TRPV1 alone, but not TRPV1 together with TRPA1. Mustard oil (25 μM; MO) responses were also not affected by PIP2 in WT sensory neurons and cells co-expressing TRPA1 and TRPV1. In contrast, PIP2 reduction leads to pronounced tachyphylaxis to MO in cells with both channels. Chronic effect of PIP2 on TRPA1 activity depends on presence of the TRPV1 channel and cell type (CHO vs. sensory neurons). In summary, chronic alterations in PIP2 levels regulate magnitude of CAP and MO responses, as well as MO-tachyphylaxis. This regulation depends on co-expression profile of TRPA1 and TRPV1 and cell type. PMID:21337373

  14. Maresin 1 Inhibits TRPV1 in Temporomandibular Joint-Related Trigeminal Nociceptive Neurons and TMJ Inflammation-Induced Synaptic Plasticity in the Trigeminal Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chul-Kyu

    2015-01-01

    In the trigeminal system, disruption of acute resolution processing may lead to uncontrolled inflammation and chronic pain associated with the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Currently, there are no effective treatments for TMJ pain. Recently, it has been recognized that maresin 1, a newly identified macrophage-derived mediator of inflammation resolution, is a potent analgesic for somatic inflammatory pain without noticeable side effects in mice and a potent endogenous inhibitor of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) in the somatic system. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the analgesic actions of maresin 1 on TMJ pain are unclear in the trigeminal system. Here, by performing TMJ injection of a retrograde labeling tracer DiI (a fluorescent dye), I showed that maresin 1 potently inhibits capsaicin-induced TRPV1 currents and neuronal activity via Gαi-coupled G-protein coupled receptors in DiI-labeled trigeminal nociceptive neurons. Further, maresin 1 blocked TRPV1 agonist-evoked increases in spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic current frequency and abolished TMJ inflammation-induced synaptic plasticity in the trigeminal nucleus. These results demonstrate the potent actions of maresin 1 in regulating TRPV1 in the trigeminal system. Thus, maresin 1 may serve as a novel endogenous inhibitor for treating TMJ-inflammatory pain in the orofacial region. PMID:26617436

  15. Jellyfish and other cnidarian envenomations cause pain by affecting TRPV1 channels

    PubMed Central

    Cuypers, Eva; Yanagihara, Angel; Karlsson, Evert; Tytgat, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Cnidarian envenomations cause a burning-pain sensation of which the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Activation of TRPV1, a non-selective cation channel expressed in nociceptive neurons, leads to cell depolarisation and pain. Here, we show in vitro and in vivo evidence for desensitization-dependent TRPV1 activation in cnidarian envenomations. Cnidarian venom induced a nociceptive reactivity, comparable to capsaicin, in laboratory rats, which could be reduced by the selective TRPV1 antagonist, BCTC. These findings are the first to explain at least part of the symptomology of cnidarian envenomations and provide insights into the design of more effective treatments for this global public health problem. PMID:17010344

  16. Synthesis of novel 13α-18-norandrostane-ferrocene conjugates via homogeneous catalytic methods and their investigation on TRPV1 receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Szánti-Pintér, Eszter; Wouters, Johan; Gömöry, Ágnes; Sághy, Éva; Szőke, Éva; Helyes, Zsuzsanna; Kollár, László; Skoda-Földes, Rita

    2015-12-01

    13α-Steroid-ferrocene derivatives were synthesized via two reaction pathways starting from an unnatural 16-keto-18-nor-13α-steroid. The unnatural steroid was converted to ferrocene derivatives via copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition or palladium-catalyzed aminocarbonylation. 16-Azido- and 16-N-(prop-2-ynyl)-carboxamido-steroids were synthesized as starting materials for azide-alkyne cycloaddition with the appropriate ferrocene derivatives. Based on our earlier work, aminocarbonylation of 16-iodo-16-ene and 16-iodo-15-ene derivatives was studied with ferrocenylmethylamine. The new products were obtained in moderate to good yields and were characterized by (1)H and (13)C NMR, IR and MS. The solid state structure of the starting material 13α-18-norandrostan-16-one and two carboxamide products were determined by X-ray crystallography. Evidences were provided that the N-propargyl-carboxamide compound as well as its ferrocenylmethyltriazole derivative are able to decrease the activation of TRPV1 receptor on TRG neurons.

  17. Direct action of capsaicin in brown adipogenesis and activation of brown adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Kida, Ryosuke; Yoshida, Hirofumi; Murakami, Masaru; Shirai, Mitsuyuki; Hashimoto, Osamu; Kawada, Teruo; Matsui, Tohru; Funaba, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    The ingestion of capsaicin, the principle pungent component of red and chili peppers, induces thermogenesis, in part, through the activation of brown adipocytes expressing genes related to mitochondrial biogenesis and uncoupling such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (Ppar) γ coactivator-1α (Pgc-1α) and uncoupling protein 1 (Ucp1). Capsaicin has been suggested to induce the activation of brown adipocytes, which is mediated by the stimulation of sympathetic nerves. However, capsaicin may directly affect the differentiation of brown preadipocytes, brown adipocyte function, or both, through its significant absorption. We herein demonstrated that Trpv1, a capsaicin receptor, is expressed in brown adipose tissue, and that its expression level is increased during the differentiation of HB2 brown preadipocytes. Furthermore, capsaicin induced calcium influx in brown preadipocytes. A treatment with capsaicin in the early stage of brown adipogenesis did not affect lipid accumulation or the expression levels of Fabp4 (a gene expressed in mature adipocytes), Pparγ2 (a master regulator of adipogenesis) or brown adipocyte-selective genes. In contrast, a treatment with capsaicin in the late stage of brown adipogenesis slightly increased the expression levels of Fabp4, Pparγ2 and Pgc-1α. Although capsaicin did not affect the basal expression level of Ucp1, Ucp1 induction by forskolin was partially inhibited by capsaicin, irrespective of the dose of capsaicin. The results of the present study suggest the direct effects of capsaicin on brown adipocytes or in the late stage of brown adipogenesis. PMID:26781688

  18. Direct action of capsaicin in brown adipogenesis and activation of brown adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Kida, Ryosuke; Yoshida, Hirofumi; Murakami, Masaru; Shirai, Mitsuyuki; Hashimoto, Osamu; Kawada, Teruo; Matsui, Tohru; Funaba, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    The ingestion of capsaicin, the principle pungent component of red and chili peppers, induces thermogenesis, in part, through the activation of brown adipocytes expressing genes related to mitochondrial biogenesis and uncoupling such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (Ppar) γ coactivator-1α (Pgc-1α) and uncoupling protein 1 (Ucp1). Capsaicin has been suggested to induce the activation of brown adipocytes, which is mediated by the stimulation of sympathetic nerves. However, capsaicin may directly affect the differentiation of brown preadipocytes, brown adipocyte function, or both, through its significant absorption. We herein demonstrated that Trpv1, a capsaicin receptor, is expressed in brown adipose tissue, and that its expression level is increased during the differentiation of HB2 brown preadipocytes. Furthermore, capsaicin induced calcium influx in brown preadipocytes. A treatment with capsaicin in the early stage of brown adipogenesis did not affect lipid accumulation or the expression levels of Fabp4 (a gene expressed in mature adipocytes), Pparγ2 (a master regulator of adipogenesis) or brown adipocyte-selective genes. In contrast, a treatment with capsaicin in the late stage of brown adipogenesis slightly increased the expression levels of Fabp4, Pparγ2 and Pgc-1α. Although capsaicin did not affect the basal expression level of Ucp1, Ucp1 induction by forskolin was partially inhibited by capsaicin, irrespective of the dose of capsaicin. The results of the present study suggest the direct effects of capsaicin on brown adipocytes or in the late stage of brown adipogenesis.

  19. Electroacupuncture at ST25 inhibits jejunal motility: Role of sympathetic pathways and TRPV1

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhi; Zhang, Na; Lu, Chun-Xia; Pang, Ting-Ting; Wang, Kai-Yue; Jiang, Jing-Feng; Zhu, Bing; Xu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether electroacupuncture (EA) at ST25 affects jejunal motility in vivo and if so, whether a sympathetic pathway is involved. METHODS: Jejunal motility was assessed using a manometric balloon placed in the jejunum approximately about 3-5 cm away from the suspensory ligament of the duodenum in anesthetized animals. The effects of EA at ST25 were measured in male Sprague-Dawley rats, some of which were treated with propranolol or clenbuterol (EA intensities: 1, 3, 5, 7, and 9 mA), and in male transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) (capsaicin receptor) knockout mice (EA intensities: 1, 2, and 4 mA). RESULTS: Anesthetized rats exhibited three types of fasting jejunal motor patterns (types A, B, and C), and only type C rats responded to EA stimulation. In type C rats, EA at ST25 significantly suppressed the motor activity of the jejunum in an intensity-dependent manner. The inhibitory effect of EA was weakened by propranolol (β adrenoceptor antagonist) and disappeared with clenbuterol (β adrenoceptor agonist) induced inhibition of motility, suggesting that the effect of EA on motility is mediated via a sympathetic pathway. Compared with wild-type mice, EA at ST25 was less effective in TRPV1 knockout mice, suggesting that this multi-modal sensor channel participates in the mechanism. CONCLUSION: EA at ST25 was found to inhibit jejunal motility in an intensity-dependent manner, via a mechanism in which sympathetic nerves and TRPV1 receptors play an important role. PMID:26855542

  20. Pharmacology of modality-specific transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 antagonists that do not alter body temperature.

    PubMed

    Reilly, Regina M; McDonald, Heath A; Puttfarcken, Pamela S; Joshi, Shailen K; Lewis, LaGeisha; Pai, Madhavi; Franklin, Pamela H; Segreti, Jason A; Neelands, Torben R; Han, Ping; Chen, Jun; Mantyh, Patrick W; Ghilardi, Joseph R; Turner, Teresa M; Voight, Eric A; Daanen, Jerome F; Schmidt, Robert G; Gomtsyan, Arthur; Kort, Michael E; Faltynek, Connie R; Kym, Philip R

    2012-08-01

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) channel is involved in the development and maintenance of pain and participates in the regulation of temperature. The channel is activated by diverse agents, including capsaicin, noxious heat (≥ 43°C), acidic pH (< 6), and endogenous lipids including N-arachidonoyl dopamine (NADA). Antagonists that block all modes of TRPV1 activation elicit hyperthermia. To identify efficacious TRPV1 antagonists that do not affect temperature antagonists representing multiple TRPV1 pharmacophores were evaluated at recombinant rat and human TRPV1 channels with Ca(2+) flux assays, and two classes of antagonists were identified based on their differential ability to inhibit acid activation. Although both classes of antagonists completely blocked capsaicin- and NADA-induced activation of TRPV1, select compounds only partially inhibited activation of the channel by protons. Electrophysiology and calcitonin gene-related peptide release studies confirmed the differential pharmacology of these antagonists at native TRPV1 channels in the rat. Comparison of the in vitro pharmacological properties of these TRPV1 antagonists with their in vivo effects on core body temperature confirms and expands earlier observations that acid-sparing TRPV1 antagonists do not significantly increase core body temperature. Although both classes of compounds elicit equivalent analgesia in a rat model of knee joint pain, the acid-sparing antagonist tested is not effective in a mouse model of bone cancer pain.

  1. Bradykinin Induces TRPV1 Exocytotic Recruitment in Peptidergic Nociceptors

    PubMed Central

    Mathivanan, Sakthikumar; Devesa, Isabel; Changeux, Jean-Pierre; Ferrer-Montiel, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid I (TRPV1) sensitization in peripheral nociceptors is a prominent phenomenon that occurs in inflammatory pain conditions. Pro-algesic agents can potentiate TRPV1 activity in nociceptors through both stimulation of its channel gating and mobilization of channels to the neuronal surface in a context dependent manner. A recent study reported that ATP-induced TRPV1 sensitization in peptidergic nociceptors involves the exocytotic release of channels trafficked by large dense core vesicles (LDCVs) that cargo alpha-calcitonin gene related peptide alpha (αCGRP). We hypothesized that, similar to ATP, bradykinin may also use different mechanisms to sensitize TRPV1 channels in peptidergic and non-peptidergic nociceptors. We found that bradykinin notably enhances the excitability of peptidergic nociceptors, and sensitizes TRPV1, primarily through the bradykinin receptor 2 pathway. Notably, bradykinin sensitization of TRPV1 in peptidergic nociceptors was significantly blocked by inhibiting Ca2+-dependent neuronal exocytosis. In addition, silencing αCGRP gene expression, but not substance P, drastically reduced bradykinin-induced TRPV1 sensitization in peptidergic nociceptors. Taken together, these findings indicate that bradykinin-induced sensitization of TRPV1 in peptidergic nociceptors is partially mediated by the exocytotic mobilization of new channels trafficked by αCGRP-loaded LDCVs to the neuronal membrane. Our findings further imply a central role of αCGRP peptidergic nociceptors in peripheral algesic sensitization, and substantiate that inhibition of LDCVs exocytosis is a valuable therapeutic strategy to treat pain, as it concurrently reduces the release of pro-inflammatory peptides and the membrane recruitment of thermoTRP channels. PMID:27445816

  2. Biological Activities of Red Pepper (Capsicum annuum) and Its Pungent Principle Capsaicin: A Review.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Krishnapura

    2016-07-01

    Capsaicin, the pungent alkaloid of red pepper (Capsicum annuum) has been extensively studied for its biological effects which are of pharmacological relevance. These include: cardio protective influence, antilithogenic effect, antiinflammatory, and analgesia, thermogenic influence, and beneficial effects on gastrointestinal system. Therefore, capsaicinoids may have the potential clinical value for pain relief, cancer prevention and weight loss. It has been shown that capsaicinoids are potential agonists of capsaicin receptor (TRPV1). They could exert the effects not only through the receptor-dependent pathway but also through the receptor-independent one. The involvement of neuropeptide Substance P, serotonin, and somatostatin in the pharmacological actions of capsaicin has been extensively investigated. Topical application of capsaicin is proved to alleviate pain in arthritis, postoperative neuralgia, diabetic neuropathy, psoriasis, etc. Toxicological studies on capsaicin administered by different routes are documented. Capsaicin inhibits acid secretion, stimulates alkali and mucus secretion and particularly gastric mucosal blood flow which helps in prevention and healing of gastric ulcers. Antioxidant and antiinflammatory properties of capsaicin are established in a number of studies. Chemopreventive potential of capsaicin is evidenced in cell line studies. The health beneficial hypocholesterolemic influence of capsaicin besides being cardio protective has other implications, viz., prevention of cholesterol gallstones and protection of the structural integrity of erythrocytes under conditions of hypercholesterolemia. Beneficial influences of capsaicin on gastrointestinal system include digestive stimulant action and modulation of intestinal ultrastructure so as to enhance permeability to micronutrients.

  3. Biological Activities of Red Pepper (Capsicum annuum) and Its Pungent Principle Capsaicin: A Review.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Krishnapura

    2016-07-01

    Capsaicin, the pungent alkaloid of red pepper (Capsicum annuum) has been extensively studied for its biological effects which are of pharmacological relevance. These include: cardio protective influence, antilithogenic effect, antiinflammatory, and analgesia, thermogenic influence, and beneficial effects on gastrointestinal system. Therefore, capsaicinoids may have the potential clinical value for pain relief, cancer prevention and weight loss. It has been shown that capsaicinoids are potential agonists of capsaicin receptor (TRPV1). They could exert the effects not only through the receptor-dependent pathway but also through the receptor-independent one. The involvement of neuropeptide Substance P, serotonin, and somatostatin in the pharmacological actions of capsaicin has been extensively investigated. Topical application of capsaicin is proved to alleviate pain in arthritis, postoperative neuralgia, diabetic neuropathy, psoriasis, etc. Toxicological studies on capsaicin administered by different routes are documented. Capsaicin inhibits acid secretion, stimulates alkali and mucus secretion and particularly gastric mucosal blood flow which helps in prevention and healing of gastric ulcers. Antioxidant and antiinflammatory properties of capsaicin are established in a number of studies. Chemopreventive potential of capsaicin is evidenced in cell line studies. The health beneficial hypocholesterolemic influence of capsaicin besides being cardio protective has other implications, viz., prevention of cholesterol gallstones and protection of the structural integrity of erythrocytes under conditions of hypercholesterolemia. Beneficial influences of capsaicin on gastrointestinal system include digestive stimulant action and modulation of intestinal ultrastructure so as to enhance permeability to micronutrients. PMID:25675368

  4. Thermoregulatory phenotype of the Trpv1 knockout mouse: thermoeffector dysbalance with hyperkinesis.

    PubMed

    Garami, Andras; Pakai, Eszter; Oliveira, Daniela L; Steiner, Alexandre A; Wanner, Samuel P; Almeida, M Camila; Lesnikov, Vladimir A; Gavva, Narender R; Romanovsky, Andrej A

    2011-02-01

    This study aimed at determining the thermoregulatory phenotype of mice lacking transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) channels. We used Trpv1 knockout (KO) mice and their genetically unaltered littermates to study diurnal variations in deep body temperature (T(b)) and thermoeffector activities under basal conditions, as well as thermoregulatory responses to severe heat and cold. Only subtle alterations were found in the basal T(b) of Trpv1 KO mice or in their T(b) responses to thermal challenges. The main thermoregulatory abnormality of Trpv1 KO mice was a different pattern of thermoeffectors used to regulate T(b). On the autonomic side, Trpv1 KO mice were hypometabolic (had a lower oxygen consumption) and hypervasoconstricted (had a lower tail skin temperature). In agreement with the enhanced skin vasoconstriction, Trpv1 KO mice had a higher thermoneutral zone. On the behavioral side, Trpv1 KO mice preferred a lower ambient temperature and expressed a higher locomotor activity. Experiments with pharmacological TRPV1 agonists (resiniferatoxin and anandamide) and a TRPV1 antagonist (AMG0347) confirmed that TRPV1 channels located outside the brain tonically inhibit locomotor activity. With age (observed for up to 14 months), the body mass of Trpv1 KO mice exceeded that of controls, sometimes approaching 60 g. In summary, Trpv1 KO mice possess a distinct thermoregulatory phenotype, which is coupled with a predisposition to age-associated overweight and includes hypometabolism, enhanced skin vasoconstriction, decreased thermopreferendum, and hyperkinesis. The latter may be one of the primary deficiencies in Trpv1 KO mice. We propose that TRPV1-mediated signals from the periphery tonically suppress the general locomotor activity.

  5. [Capsaicin in treatment of neuropathic pain].

    PubMed

    Kamchatnov, P R; Evzelman, M A; Abusueva, B A; Volkov, A I

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of neuropathic pain (NP) is a serious medical problem. Antiepileptic drugs and antidepressants, used to relief pain, act on the central pain mechanisms and cause several side-effects, thus substantially restricting possibilities of their clinical application.At the same time, NP often has a peripheral component. Ligand-associated channels, including vanilloid receptors TRPV1, play a key role in the development of regional NP syndromes. Capsaicin, a component of chili pepper and several other plants, is a highly selective ligand of TRPV1 receptors and has long been used in treatment of pain syndromes. However, its using is limited by short-term action and relatively low efficacy. Recently it has been shown that the local use of single high doses of capsaicin during 30-60 min causes a marked stable(> 12 weeks) effect. The decrease in NP (>50%) is seen in about half of patients. Current studies will allow to single out groups of patients with the maximal treatment effect of capsaicin. PMID:25629137

  6. Coarse architecture of the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) ion channel determined by fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    De-la-Rosa, Víctor; Rangel-Yescas, Gisela E; Ladrón-de-Guevara, Ernesto; Rosenbaum, Tamara; Islas, León D

    2013-10-11

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 ion channel is responsible for the perception of high temperatures and low extracellular pH, and it is also involved in the response to some pungent compounds. Importantly, it is also associated with the perception of pain and noxious stimuli. Here, we attempt to discern the molecular organization and location of the N and C termini of the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 ion channel by measuring FRET between genetically attached enhanced yellow and cyan fluorescent protein to the N or C terminus of the channel protein, expressed in transfected HEK 293 cells or Xenopus laevis oocytes. The static measurements of the domain organization were mapped into an available cryo-electron microscopy density of the channel with good agreement. These measurements also provide novel insights into the organization of terminal domains and their proximity to the plasma membrane. PMID:23965996

  7. Structure-Driven Pharmacology of Transient Receptor Potential Channel Vanilloid 1.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Franulic, Ignacio; Caceres-Molina, Javier; Sepulveda, Romina V; Gonzalez-Nilo, Fernando; Latorre, Ramon

    2016-09-01

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) ion channel is a polymodal receptor that mediates the flux of cations across the membrane in response to several stimuli, including heat, voltage, and ligands. The best known agonist of TRPV1 channels is capsaicin, the pungent component of "hot" chili peppers. In addition, peptides found in the venom of poisonous animals, along with the lipids phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate, lysophosphatidic acid, and cholesterol, bind to TRPV1 with high affinity to modulate channel gating. Here, we discuss the functional evidence regarding ligand-dependent activation of TRPV1 channels in light of structural data recently obtained by cryoelectron microscopy. This review focuses on the mechanistic insights into ligand binding and allosteric gating of TRPV1 channels and the relevance of accurate polymodal receptor biophysical characterization for drug design in novel pain therapies. PMID:27335334

  8. Structure-Driven Pharmacology of Transient Receptor Potential Channel Vanilloid 1.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Franulic, Ignacio; Caceres-Molina, Javier; Sepulveda, Romina V; Gonzalez-Nilo, Fernando; Latorre, Ramon

    2016-09-01

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) ion channel is a polymodal receptor that mediates the flux of cations across the membrane in response to several stimuli, including heat, voltage, and ligands. The best known agonist of TRPV1 channels is capsaicin, the pungent component of "hot" chili peppers. In addition, peptides found in the venom of poisonous animals, along with the lipids phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate, lysophosphatidic acid, and cholesterol, bind to TRPV1 with high affinity to modulate channel gating. Here, we discuss the functional evidence regarding ligand-dependent activation of TRPV1 channels in light of structural data recently obtained by cryoelectron microscopy. This review focuses on the mechanistic insights into ligand binding and allosteric gating of TRPV1 channels and the relevance of accurate polymodal receptor biophysical characterization for drug design in novel pain therapies.

  9. TRPV1 Channels and Gastric Vagal Afferent Signalling in Lean and High Fat Diet Induced Obese Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kentish, Stephen J.; Frisby, Claudine L.; Kritas, Stamatiki; Li, Hui; Hatzinikolas, George; O’Donnell, Tracey A.; Wittert, Gary A.; Page, Amanda J.

    2015-01-01

    Aim Within the gastrointestinal tract vagal afferents play a role in control of food intake and satiety signalling. Activation of mechanosensitive gastric vagal afferents induces satiety. However, gastric vagal afferent responses to mechanical stretch are reduced in high fat diet mice. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 channels (TRPV1) are expressed in vagal afferents and knockout of TRPV1 reduces gastro-oesophageal vagal afferent responses to stretch. We aimed to determine the role of TRPV1 on gastric vagal afferent mechanosensitivity and food intake in lean and HFD-induced obese mice. Methods TRPV1+/+ and -/- mice were fed either a standard laboratory diet or high fat diet for 20wks. Gastric emptying of a solid meal and gastric vagal afferent mechanosensitivity was determined. Results Gastric emptying was delayed in high fat diet mice but there was no difference between TRPV1+/+ and -/- mice on either diet. TRPV1 mRNA expression in whole nodose ganglia of TRPV1+/+ mice was similar in both dietary groups. The TRPV1 agonist N-oleoyldopamine potentiated the response of tension receptors in standard laboratory diet but not high fat diet mice. Food intake was greater in the standard laboratory diet TRPV1-/- compared to TRPV1+/+ mice. This was associated with reduced response of tension receptors to stretch in standard laboratory diet TRPV1-/- mice. Tension receptor responses to stretch were decreased in high fat diet compared to standard laboratory diet TRPV1+/+ mice; an effect not observed in TRPV1-/- mice. Disruption of TRPV1 had no effect on the response of mucosal receptors to mucosal stroking in mice on either diet. Conclusion TRPV1 channels selectively modulate gastric vagal afferent tension receptor mechanosensitivity and may mediate the reduction in gastric vagal afferent mechanosensitivity in high fat diet-induced obesity. PMID:26285043

  10. The ion channel TRPV1 regulates the activation and proinflammatory properties of CD4+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Bertin, Samuel; Aoki-Nonaka, Yukari; de Jong, Petrus Rudolf; Stanwood, Shawna R.; Srikanth, Sonal; Lee, Jihyung; To, Keith; Abramson, Lior; Yu, Timothy; Han, Tiffany; Touma, Ranim; Li, Xiangli; González-Navajas, José M.; Herdman, Scott; Corr, Maripat; Fu, Guo; Dong, Hui; Gwack, Yousang; Franco, Alessandra; Jefferies, Wilfred A.; Raz, Eyal

    2016-01-01

    TRPV1 is a Ca2+-permeable channel mostly studied as a pain receptor in sensory neurons. However, its role in other cell types is poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that TRPV1 is functionally expressed in CD4+ T cells where it acts as a non-store-operated Ca2+ channel and contributes to T cell receptor (TCR)-induced Ca2+ influx, TCR signaling and T cell activation. In models of T cell-mediated colitis, TRPV1 promotes colitogenic T cell responses and intestinal inflammation. Furthermore, genetic and pharmacological inhibition of TRPV1 in human CD4+ T cells recapitulates the phenotype of murine Trpv1−/− CD4+ T cells. These findings suggest that TRPV1 inhibition could represent a new therapeutic strategy to restrain proinflammatory T cell responses. PMID:25282159

  11. TRPV1 dysfunction in cystinosis patients harboring the homozygous 57 kb deletion

    PubMed Central

    Buntinx, L.; Voets, T.; Morlion, B.; Vangeel, L.; Janssen, M.; Cornelissen, E.; Vriens, J.; de Hoon, J.; Levtchenko, E.

    2016-01-01

    Cystinosis is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by lysosomal cystine accumulation due to loss of function of the lysosomal cystine transporter (CTNS). The most common mutation in cystinosis patients of Northern Europe consists of a 57-kb deletion. This deletion not only inactivates the CTNS gene but also extends into the non-coding region upstream of the start codon of the TRPV1 gene, encoding the capsaicin- and heat-sensitive ion channel TRPV1. To evaluate the consequences of the 57-kb deletion on functional TRPV1 expression, we compared thermal, mechanical and chemical sensitivity of cystinosis patients with matched healthy controls. Whereas patients heterozygous for the 57-kb deletion showed normal sensory responses, homozygous subjects exhibited a 60% reduction in vasodilation and pain evoked by capsaicin, as well as an increase in heat detection threshold. Responses to cold, mechanical stimuli or cinnamaldehyde, an agonist of the related nociceptor channel TRPA1, were unaltered. We conclude that cystinosis patients homozygous for the 57-kb deletion exhibit a strong reduction of TRPV1 function, leading to sensory deficiencies akin to the phenotype of TRPV1-deficient mice. These deficits may account for the reported sensory alterations and thermoregulatory deficits in these patients, and provide a paradigm for life-long TRPV1 deficiency in humans. PMID:27734949

  12. Iron overload causes osteoporosis in thalassemia major patients through interaction with transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) channels.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Francesca; Perrotta, Silverio; Bellini, Giulia; Luongo, Livio; Tortora, Chiara; Siniscalco, Dario; Francese, Matteo; Torella, Marco; Nobili, Bruno; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Maione, Sabatino

    2014-12-01

    The pathogenesis of bone resorption in β-thalassemia major is multifactorial and our understanding of the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms remains incomplete. Considering the emerging importance of the endocannabinoid/endovanilloid system in bone metabolism, it may be instructive to examine a potential role for this system in the development of osteoporosis in patients with β-thalassemia major and its relationship with iron overload and iron chelation therapy. This study demonstrates that, in thalassemic-derived osteoclasts, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase expression inversely correlates with femoral and lumbar bone mineral density, and directly correlates with ferritin levels and liver iron concentration. The vanilloid agonist resiniferatoxin dramatically reduces cathepsin K levels and osteoclast numbers in vitro, without affecting tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase expression. The iron chelators deferoxamine, deferiprone and deferasirox decrease both tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase and cathepsin K expression, as well as osteoclast activity. Taken together, these data show that transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 activation/desensitization influences tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase expression and activity, and this effect is dependent on iron, suggesting a pivotal role for iron overload in the dysregulation of bone metabolism in patients with thalassemia major. Our applied pharmacology provides evidence for the potential of iron chelators to abrogate these effects by reducing osteoclast activity. Whether iron chelation therapy is capable of restoring bone health in humans requires further study, but the potential to provide dual benefits for patients with β-thalassemia major -preventing iron-overload and alleviating associated osteoporotic changes - is exciting.

  13. Iron overload causes osteoporosis in thalassemia major patients through interaction with transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) channels

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Francesca; Perrotta, Silverio; Bellini, Giulia; Luongo, Livio; Tortora, Chiara; Siniscalco, Dario; Francese, Matteo; Torella, Marco; Nobili, Bruno; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Maione, Sabatino

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of bone resorption in β-thalassemia major is multifactorial and our understanding of the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms remains incomplete. Considering the emerging importance of the endocannabinoid/endovanilloid system in bone metabolism, it may be instructive to examine a potential role for this system in the development of osteoporosis in patients with β-thalassemia major and its relationship with iron overload and iron chelation therapy. This study demonstrates that, in thalassemic-derived osteoclasts, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase expression inversely correlates with femoral and lumbar bone mineral density, and directly correlates with ferritin levels and liver iron concentration. The vanilloid agonist resiniferatoxin dramatically reduces cathepsin K levels and osteoclast numbers in vitro, without affecting tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase expression. The iron chelators deferoxamine, deferiprone and deferasirox decrease both tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase and cathepsin K expression, as well as osteoclast activity. Taken together, these data show that transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 activation/desensitization influences tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase expression and activity, and this effect is dependent on iron, suggesting a pivotal role for iron overload in the dysregulation of bone metabolism in patients with thalassemia major. Our applied pharmacology provides evidence for the potential of iron chelators to abrogate these effects by reducing osteoclast activity. Whether iron chelation therapy is capable of restoring bone health in humans requires further study, but the potential to provide dual benefits for patients with β-thalassemia major –preventing iron-overload and alleviating associated osteoporotic changes – is exciting. PMID:25216685

  14. Synergic Effects of Doxorubicin and Melatonin on Apoptosis and Mitochondrial Oxidative Stress in MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cells: Involvement of TRPV1 Channels.

    PubMed

    Koşar, Pınar Aslan; Nazıroğlu, Mustafa; Övey, İshak Suat; Çiğ, Bilal

    2016-04-01

    Transient receptor transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is a Ca(2+)-permeable channel gated by oxidative stress and capsaicin (CAP) and modulated by melatonin (MEL) and capsazepine (CPZ). A combination of doxorubicin (DOX) and MEL may offer a potential therapy for breast cancer by exerting antitumor and anti-apoptotic effects and modulating Ca(2+) influx and TRPV1 activity. We aimed to investigate the effects of MEL and DOX on the oxidative toxicity of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells, in addition to the activity of the TRPV1 channel and apoptosis. The MCF-7 cells were divided into the following six treatment groups: control, incubated with MEL (0.3 mM), incubated with 0.5 μM DOX, incubated with 1 μM DOX, incubated with MEL + 0.5 μM DOX, or incubated with MEL + 1 μM DOX. The intracellular free Ca(2+) concentration was higher in the DOX groups than in the control, and the concentration was decreased by MEL. The intracellular free Ca(2+) concentration was further increased by treatment with the TRPV1 channel activator CAP (0.01 mM), and it was decreased by the CPZ (0.1 mM). The intracellular production of reactive oxygen species, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, apoptosis level, procaspase 9 and PARP activities, and caspase 3 and caspase 9 activities were higher in the DOX and MEL groups than in the control. Apoptosis and the activity of caspase 9 were further increased in the DOX plus MEL groups. Taken together, the findings indicate that MEL supported the effects of DOX by activation of TRPV1 and apoptosis, as well as by inducing MCF-7 cell death. As the apoptosis and caspase activity of cancer cells increase because of their elevated metabolism, MEL may be useful in supporting their apoptotic capacity. PMID:26525975

  15. Angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT2R) localization and antagonist-mediated inhibition of capsaicin responses and neurite outgrowth in human and rat sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Anand, U; Facer, P; Yiangou, Y; Sinisi, M; Fox, M; McCarthy, T; Bountra, C; Korchev, YE; Anand, P

    2013-01-01

    Background The angiotensin II (AngII) receptor subtype 2 (AT2R) is expressed in sensory neurons and may play a role in nociception and neuronal regeneration. Methods We used immunostaining with characterized antibodies to study the localization of AT2R in cultured human and rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and a range of human tissues. The effects of AngII and AT2R antagonist EMA401 on capsaicin responses in cultured human and rat (DRG) neurons were measured with calcium imaging, on neurite length and density with Gap43 immunostaining, and on cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) expression using immunofluorescence. Results AT2R expression was localized in small-/medium-sized cultured neurons of human and rat DRG. Treatment with the AT2R antagonist EMA401 resulted in dose-related functional inhibition of capsaicin responses (IC50 = 10 nmol/L), which was reversed by 8-bromo-cAMP, and reduced neurite length and density; AngII treatment significantly enhanced capsaicin responses, cAMP levels and neurite outgrowth. The AT1R antagonist losartan had no effect on capsaicin responses. AT2R was localized in sensory neurons of human DRG, and nerve fibres in peripheral nerves, skin, urinary bladder and bowel. A majority sub-population (60%) of small-/medium-diameter neuronal cells were immunopositive in both control post-mortem and avulsion-injured human DRG; some very small neurons appeared to be intensely immunoreactive, with TRPV1 co-localization. While AT2R levels were reduced in human limb peripheral nerve segments proximal to injury, they were preserved in painful neuromas. Conclusions AT2R antagonists could be particularly useful in the treatment of chronic pain and hypersensitivity associated with abnormal nerve sprouting. PMID:23255326

  16. Hypericum perforatum Attenuates Spinal Cord Injury-Induced Oxidative Stress and Apoptosis in the Dorsal Root Ganglion of Rats: Involvement of TRPM2 and TRPV1 Channels.

    PubMed

    Özdemir, Ümit Sinan; Nazıroğlu, Mustafa; Şenol, Nilgün; Ghazizadeh, Vahid

    2016-08-01

    Oxidative stress and cytosolic Ca(2+) overload have important roles on apoptosis in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons after spinal cord injury (SCI). Hypericum perforatum (HP) has an antioxidant property in the DRGs due to its ability to modulate NADPH oxidase and protein kinase C pathways. We aimed to investigate the protective property of HP on oxidative stress, apoptosis, and Ca(2+) entry through transient receptor potential melastatin 2 (TRPM2) and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channels in SCI-induced DRG neurons of rats. Rats were divided into four groups as control, HP, SCI, and SCI + HP. The HP groups received 30 mg/kg HP for three concessive days after SCI induction. The SCI-induced TRPM2 and TRPV1 currents and cytosolic free Ca(2+) concentration were reduced by HP. The SCI-induced decrease in glutathione peroxidase and cell viability values were ameliorated by HP treatment, and the SCI-induced increase in apoptosis, caspase 3, caspase 9, cytosolic reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and mitochondrial membrane depolarization values in DRG of SCI group were overcome by HP treatment. In conclusion, we observed a protective role of HP on SCI-induced oxidative stress, apoptosis, and Ca(2+) entry through TRPM2 and TRPV1 in the DRG neurons. Our findings may be relevant to the etiology and treatment of SCI by HP. Graphical Abstract Possible molecular pathways of involvement of Hypericum perforatum (HP) on apoptosis, oxidative stress, and calcium accumulation through TRPM2 and TRPV1 channels in DRG neurons of SCI-induced rats. The TRPM2 channel is activated by ADP-ribose and oxidative stress through activation of ADP-ribose pyrophosphate although it was inhibited by N-(p-amylcinnamoyl) anthranilic acid (ACA) and 2-aminoethyl diphenylborinate (2APB). The TRPV1 channel is activated by oxidative stress and capsaicin and it is blocked by capsazepine. Injury in the DRG can result in augmented ROS release, leading to Ca(2+) uptake through

  17. Blocking of TRPV-1 in the parodontium relieves orthodontic pain by inhibiting the expression of TRPV-1 in the trigeminal ganglion during experimental tooth movement in rats.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yunan; Liu, Yingfei; Zhu, Kun; Zhang, Zhichao; Qiao, Hu; Lu, Zhen; Zhong, Tianyu; Liu, Yong; Zhou, Hong

    2016-08-15

    Orthodontic pain has confused the orthodontics for a long time, and recent research demonstrated that transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) had crucial functions in transduction of painful stimuli. The present research investigated the analgesia effects of the blocking TRPV1 on orthodontic pain during experimental tooth movement. Under challenge with experimental tooth movement, the expression of TRPV1 in the parodontium was increased in a time-dependent and force-dependent manner. And treatment with selective TRPV1 antagonist AMG-9810 in the parodontium reduced the expression of TRPV1 in the trigeminal ganglion (TG) and decreased the secretion of IL-1β in the gingival crevicular fluid. Furthermore, AMG-9810 could relieve orthodontic pain arising from experimental tooth movement in rats. We suggest that TRPV1 both in the parodontium and trigeminal ganglion are involved in orthodontic pain, and TRPV1 in the parodontium influence on orthodontic pain through reducing the expression of TRPV1 in trigeminal ganglion. Our finding may help to develop strategies for relieving orthodontic pain after orthodontics. PMID:27267133

  18. ΔN-TRPV1: A Molecular Co-detector of Body Temperature and Osmotic Stress.

    PubMed

    Zaelzer, Cristian; Hua, Pierce; Prager-Khoutorsky, Masha; Ciura, Sorana; Voisin, Daniel L; Liedtke, Wolfgang; Bourque, Charles W

    2015-10-01

    Thirst and antidiuretic hormone secretion occur during hyperthermia or hypertonicity to preserve body hydration. These vital responses are triggered when hypothalamic osmoregulatory neurons become depolarized by ion channels encoded by an unknown product of the transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 gene (Trpv1). Here, we show that rodent osmoregulatory neurons express a transcript of Trpv1 that mediates the selective translation of a TRPV1 variant that lacks a significant portion of the channel's amino terminus (ΔN-TRPV1). The mRNA transcript encoding this variant (Trpv1dn) is widely expressed in the brains of osmoregulating vertebrates, including the human hypothalamus. Transfection of Trpv1dn into heterologous cells induced the expression of ion channels that could be activated by either hypertonicity or by heating in the physiological range. Moreover, expression of Trpv1dn rescued the osmosensory and thermosensory responses of single hypothalamic neurons obtained from Trpv1 knockout mice. ΔN-TRPV1 is therefore a co-detector of core body temperature and fluid tonicity.

  19. ΔN-TRPV1: A Molecular Co-detector of Body Temperature and Osmotic Stress.

    PubMed

    Zaelzer, Cristian; Hua, Pierce; Prager-Khoutorsky, Masha; Ciura, Sorana; Voisin, Daniel L; Liedtke, Wolfgang; Bourque, Charles W

    2015-10-01

    Thirst and antidiuretic hormone secretion occur during hyperthermia or hypertonicity to preserve body hydration. These vital responses are triggered when hypothalamic osmoregulatory neurons become depolarized by ion channels encoded by an unknown product of the transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 gene (Trpv1). Here, we show that rodent osmoregulatory neurons express a transcript of Trpv1 that mediates the selective translation of a TRPV1 variant that lacks a significant portion of the channel's amino terminus (ΔN-TRPV1). The mRNA transcript encoding this variant (Trpv1dn) is widely expressed in the brains of osmoregulating vertebrates, including the human hypothalamus. Transfection of Trpv1dn into heterologous cells induced the expression of ion channels that could be activated by either hypertonicity or by heating in the physiological range. Moreover, expression of Trpv1dn rescued the osmosensory and thermosensory responses of single hypothalamic neurons obtained from Trpv1 knockout mice. ΔN-TRPV1 is therefore a co-detector of core body temperature and fluid tonicity. PMID:26387947

  20. Interleukin-6-mediated functional upregulation of TRPV1 receptors in dorsal root ganglion neurons through the activation of JAK/PI3K signaling pathway: roles in the development of bone cancer pain in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Fang, Dong; Kong, Ling-Yu; Cai, Jie; Li, Song; Liu, Xiao-Dan; Han, Ji-Sheng; Xing, Guo-Gang

    2015-06-01

    Primary and metastatic cancers that affect bone are frequently associated with severe and intractable pain. The mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of bone cancer pain still remain largely unknown. Previously, we have reported that sensitization of primary sensory dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons contributes to the pathogenesis of bone cancer pain in rats. In addition, numerous preclinical and clinical studies have revealed the pathological roles of interleukin-6 (IL-6) in inflammatory and neuropathic hyperalgesia. In this study, we investigated the role and the underlying mechanisms of IL-6 in the development of bone cancer pain using in vitro and in vivo approaches. We first demonstrated that elevated IL-6 in DRG neurons plays a vital role in the development of nociceptor sensitization and bone cancer-induced pain in a rat model through IL-6/soluble IL-6 receptor (sIL-6R) trans-signaling. Moreover, we revealed that functional upregulation of transient receptor potential vanilloid channel type 1 (TRPV1) in DRG neurons through the activation of Janus kinase (JAK)/phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling pathway contributes to the effects of IL-6 on the pathogenesis of bone cancer pain. Therefore, suppression of functional upregulation of TRPV1 in DRG neurons by the inhibition of JAK/PI3K pathway, either before surgery or after surgery, reduces the hyperexcitability of DRG neurons and pain hyperalgesia in bone cancer rats. We here disclose a novel intracellular pathway, the IL-6/JAK/PI3K/TRPV1 signaling cascade, which may underlie the development of peripheral sensitization and bone cancer-induced pain.

  1. Cannabinoid receptor 1 suppresses transient receptor potential vanilloid 1-induced inflammatory responses to corneal injury

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Y.; Yang, H.; Wang, Z.; Varadaraj, K.; Kumari, S.S.; Mergler, S.; Okada, Y.; Saika, S.; Kingsley, P.J.; Marnett, L.J.; Reinach, P.S.

    2013-01-01

    Cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1)-induced suppression of transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) activation provides a therapeutic option to reduce inflammation and pain in different animal disease models through mechanisms involving dampening of TRPV1 activation and signaling events. As we found in both mouse corneal epithelium and human corneal epithelial cells (HCEC) that there is CB1 and TRPV1 expression colocalization based on overlap of coimmunostaining, we determined in mouse corneal wound healing models and in human corneal epithelial cells (HCEC) if they interact with one another to reduce TRPV1-induced inflammatory and scarring responses. Corneal epithelial debridement elicited in vivo a more rapid wound healing response in wildtype (WT) than in CB1−/− mice suggesting functional interaction between CB1 and TRPV1. CB1 activation by injury is tenable based on the identification in mouse corneas of 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG) with tandem LC–MS/MS, a selective endocannabinoid CB1 ligand. Suppression of corneal TRPV1 activation by CB1 is indicated since following alkali burning, CB1 activation with WIN55,212-2 (WIN) reduced immune cell stromal infiltration and scarring. Western blot analysis of coimmunoprecipitates identified protein–protein interaction between CB1 and TRPV1. Other immunocomplexes were also identified containing transforming growth factor kinase 1 (TAK1), TRPV1 and CB1. CB1 siRNA gene silencing prevented suppression by WIN of TRPV1-induced TAK1–JNK1 signaling. WIN reduced TRPV1-induced Ca2+ transients in fura2-loaded HCEC whereas pertussis toxin (PTX) preincubation obviated suppression by WIN of such rises caused by capsaicin (CAP). Whole cell patch clamp analysis of HCEC showed that WIN blocked subsequent CAP-induced increases in nonselective outward currents. Taken together, CB1 activation by injury-induced release of endocannabinoids such as 2-AG downregulates TRPV1 mediated inflammation and corneal opacification

  2. Structural Insight into Tetrameric hTRPV1 from Homology Modeling, Molecular Docking, Molecular Dynamics Simulation, Virtual Screening, and Bioassay Validations

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Zhiwei; Pearce, Larry V.; Xu, Xiaomeng; Yang, Xiaole; Yang, Peng; Blumberg, Peter M.; Xie, Xiang-Qun

    2015-01-01

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) is a heat-activated cation channel protein, which contributes to inflammation, acute and persistent pain. Antagonists of human TRPV1 (hTRPV1) represent a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of pain. Developing various antagonists of hTRPV1, however, has been hindered by the unavailability of a 3D structure of hTRPV1. Recently, the 3D structures of rat TRPV1 (rTRPV1) in the presence and absence of ligand have been reported as determined by cryo-EM. rTRPV1 shares 85.7% sequence identity with hTRPV1. In the present work, we constructed and reported the 3D homology tetramer model of hTRPV1 based on the cryo-EM structures of rTRPV1. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, energy minimizations, and prescreen were applied to select and validate the best model of hTRPV1. The predicted binding pocket of hTRPV1 consists of two adjacent monomers subunits, which were congruent with the experimental rTRPV1 data and the cyro-EM structures of rTRPV1. The detailed interactions between hTRPV1 and its antagonists or agonists were characterized by molecular docking, which helped us to identify the important residues. Conformational changes of hTRPV1 upon antagonist/agonist binding were also explored by MD simulation. The different movements of compounds led to the different conformational changes of monomers in hTRPV1, indicating that TRPV1 works in a concerted way, resembling some other channel proteins such as aquaporins. We observed that the selective filter was open when hTRPV1 bound with an agonist during MD simulation. For the lower gate of hTRPV1, we observed large similarities between hTRPV1 bound with antagonist and with agonist. A five-point pharmacophore model based on several antagonists was established, and the structural model was used to screen in silico for new antagonists for hTRPV1. By using the 3D TRPV1 structural model above, the pilot in silico screening has begun to yield promising hits with

  3. Structural insight into tetrameric hTRPV1 from homology modeling, molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulation, virtual screening, and bioassay validations.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhiwei; Pearce, Larry V; Xu, Xiaomeng; Yang, Xiaole; Yang, Peng; Blumberg, Peter M; Xie, Xiang-Qun

    2015-03-23

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) is a heat-activated cation channel protein, which contributes to inflammation, acute and persistent pain. Antagonists of human TRPV1 (hTRPV1) represent a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of pain. Developing various antagonists of hTRPV1, however, has been hindered by the unavailability of a 3D structure of hTRPV1. Recently, the 3D structures of rat TRPV1 (rTRPV1) in the presence and absence of ligand have been reported as determined by cryo-EM. rTRPV1 shares 85.7% sequence identity with hTRPV1. In the present work, we constructed and reported the 3D homology tetramer model of hTRPV1 based on the cryo-EM structures of rTRPV1. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, energy minimizations, and prescreen were applied to select and validate the best model of hTRPV1. The predicted binding pocket of hTRPV1 consists of two adjacent monomers subunits, which were congruent with the experimental rTRPV1 data and the cyro-EM structures of rTRPV1. The detailed interactions between hTRPV1 and its antagonists or agonists were characterized by molecular docking, which helped us to identify the important residues. Conformational changes of hTRPV1 upon antagonist/agonist binding were also explored by MD simulation. The different movements of compounds led to the different conformational changes of monomers in hTRPV1, indicating that TRPV1 works in a concerted way, resembling some other channel proteins such as aquaporins. We observed that the selective filter was open when hTRPV1 bound with an agonist during MD simulation. For the lower gate of hTRPV1, we observed large similarities between hTRPV1 bound with antagonist and with agonist. A five-point pharmacophore model based on several antagonists was established, and the structural model was used to screen in silico for new antagonists for hTRPV1. By using the 3D TRPV1 structural model above, the pilot in silico screening has begun to yield promising hits with

  4. Ion channel TRPV1-dependent activation of PTP1B suppresses EGFR-associated intestinal tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    de Jong, Petrus R.; Takahashi, Naoki; Harris, Alexandra R.; Lee, Jihyung; Bertin, Samuel; Jeffries, James; Jung, Michael; Duong, Jen; Triano, Amy I.; Lee, Jongdae; Niv, Yaron; Herdman, David S.; Taniguchi, Koji; Kim, Chang-Whan; Dong, Hui; Eckmann, Lars; Stanford, Stephanie M.; Bottini, Nunzio; Corr, Maripat; Raz, Eyal

    2014-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium has a high rate of turnover, and dysregulation of pathways that regulate regeneration can lead to tumor development; however, the negative regulators of oncogenic events in the intestinal epithelium are not fully understood. Here we identified a feedback loop between the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a known mediator of proliferation, and the transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily V, member 1 (TRPV1), in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). We found that TRPV1 was expressed by IECs and was intrinsically activated upon EGFR stimulation. Subsequently, TRPV1 activation inhibited EGFR-induced epithelial cell proliferation via activation of Ca2+/calpain and resulting activation of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B). In a murine model of multiple intestinal neoplasia (ApcMin/+ mice), TRPV1 deficiency increased adenoma formation, and treatment of these animals with an EGFR kinase inhibitor reversed protumorigenic phenotypes, supporting a functional association between TRPV1 and EGFR signaling in IECs. Administration of a TRPV1 agonist suppressed intestinal tumorigenesis in ApcMin/+ mice, similar to — as well as in conjunction with — a cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor, which suggests that targeting both TRPV1 and COX-2 has potential as a therapeutic approach for tumor prevention. Our findings implicate TRPV1 as a regulator of growth factor signaling in the intestinal epithelium through activation of PTP1B and subsequent suppression of intestinal tumorigenesis. PMID:25083990

  5. TRPV1: ON THE ROAD TO PAIN RELIEF

    PubMed Central

    Jara-Oseguera, Andrés; Simon, Sidney A.

    2009-01-01

    Historically, drug research targeted to pain treatment has focused on trying to prevent the propagation of action potentials in the periphery from reaching the brain rather than pinpointing the molecular basis underlying the initial detection of the nociceptive stimulus: the receptor itself. This has now changed, given that many receptors of nociceptive stimuli have been identified and/or cloned. Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) channels have been implicated in several physiological processes such as mechanical, chemical and thermal stimuli detection. Ten years after the cloning of TRPV1, compelling data has been gathered on the role of this channel in inflammatory and neuropathic states. TRPV1 activation in nociceptive neurons, where it is normally expressed, triggers the release of neuropeptides and transmitters resulting in the generation of action potentials that will be sent to higher CNS areas where they will often be perceived as pain. Its activation also will evoke the peripheral release of pro-inflammatory compounds that may sensitize other neurons to physical, thermal or chemical stimuli. For these reasons as well as because its continuous activation causes analgesia, TRPV1 has become a viable drug target for clinical use in the management of pain. This review will provide a general picture of the physiological and pathophysiological roles of the TRPV1 channel and of its structural, pharmacological and biophysical properties. Finally, it will provide the reader with an overall view of the status of the discovery of potential therapeutic agents for the management of chronic and neuropathic pain. PMID:20021438

  6. Fufang Kushen injection inhibits sarcoma growth and tumor-induced hyperalgesia via TRPV1 signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhizheng; Fan, Huiting; Higgins, Tim; Qi, Jia; Haines, Diana; Trivett, Anna; Oppenheim, Joost J.; Wei, Hou; Li, Jie; Lin, Hongsheng; Howard, O.M. Zack

    2014-01-01

    Cancer pain is a deleterious consequence of tumor growth and related inflammation. Opioids and antiinflammatory drugs provide first line treatment for cancer pain, but both are limited by side effects. Fufang Kushen injection (FKI) is GMP produced, traditional Chinese medicine used alone or with chemotherapy to reduce cancer-associated pain. FKI limited mouse sarcoma growth both in vivo and in vitro, in part, by reducing the phosphorylation of ERK and AKT kinases and BAD. FKI inhibited TRPV1 mediated capsaicin-induced ERK phosphorylation and reduced tumor-induced proinflammatory cytokine production. Thus, FKI limited cancer pain both directly by blocking TRPV1 signaling and indirectly by reducing tumor growth. PMID:25242356

  7. TRPV1 regulates activation and modulation of TRPA1 by Ca2+

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Mayur J.; Jeske, Nathaniel A.; Akopian, Armen N.

    2010-01-01

    The transient receptor potential A1 (TRPA1) channel contributes to nociceptive signaling in certain pain models. It has been suggested that Ca2+, which activates and modulates TRPA1, could play a critical regulatory role in this process. Since TRPA1 and TRPV1 channels are co-expressed and interact in neurons, we investigated whether activation and modulation of TRPA1 by Ca2+ is regulated by TRPV1. Cell-attached recordings showed that TRPA1 is activated by extracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]e) in concentration-response fashion. This activation, especially by 2mM [Ca2+]e was substantially suppressed by co-expression with TRPV1. Inside-out recordings demonstrated that intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i)-triggered activation of TRPA1 was attenuated by the presence of TRPV1 only at 2 mM [Ca2+]e, but not in Ca2+-free conditions. Further, depletion of internal Ca2+ stores by thapsigargin generated TRPA1-mediated currents, which is affected by TRPV1 in both Chinee hamster ovary cells and sensory neurons. Since mustard oil current (IMO) is modulated by [Ca2+]e, we next examined whether alterations in the Ca2+-permeability of TRPV1 by mutating Y671 effect IMO properties. First it was demonstrated that the mutations in TRPV1 did not affect association of the TRPA1 and TRPV1 channels. However, these TRPV1 mutations, particularly Y671K, altered the following characteristics of TRPA1: magnitude of IMO in presence and absence of [Ca2+]e; the influence of [Ca2+]e on the voltage-dependency of IMO, and open probability of single-channel IMO. In summary, activation of TRPA1 by [Ca2+]e and [Ca2+]i is controlled by the TRPV1 channel, and characteristics of IMO depend on Ca2+ permeability of the TRPV1 channel. PMID:20884333

  8. Topical capsaicin for pain management: therapeutic potential and mechanisms of action of the new high-concentration capsaicin 8% patch

    PubMed Central

    Anand, P.; Bley, K.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Topical capsaicin formulations are used for pain management. Safety and modest efficacy of low-concentration capsaicin formulations, which require repeated daily self-administration, are supported by meta-analyses of numerous studies. A high-concentration capsaicin 8% patch (Qutenza™) was recently approved in the EU and USA. A single 60-min application in patients with neuropathic pain produced effective pain relief for up to 12 weeks. Advantages of the high-concentration capsaicin patch include longer duration of effect, patient compliance, and low risk for systemic effects or drug–drug interactions. The mechanism of action of topical capsaicin has been ascribed to depletion of substance P. However, experimental and clinical studies show that depletion of substance P from nociceptors is only a correlate of capsaicin treatment and has little, if any, causative role in pain relief. Rather, topical capsaicin acts in the skin to attenuate cutaneous hypersensitivity and reduce pain by a process best described as ‘defunctionalization’ of nociceptor fibres. Defunctionalization is due to a number of effects that include temporary loss of membrane potential, inability to transport neurotrophic factors leading to altered phenotype, and reversible retraction of epidermal and dermal nerve fibre terminals. Peripheral neuropathic hypersensitivity is mediated by diverse mechanisms, including altered expression of the capsaicin receptor TRPV1 or other key ion channels in affected or intact adjacent peripheral nociceptive nerve fibres, aberrant re-innervation, and collateral sprouting, all of which are defunctionalized by topical capsaicin. Evidence suggests that the utility of topical capsaicin may extend beyond painful peripheral neuropathies. PMID:21852280

  9. Heat generates oxidized linoleic acid metabolites that activate TRPV1 and produce pain in rodents.

    PubMed

    Patwardhan, Amol M; Akopian, Armen N; Ruparel, Nikita B; Diogenes, Anibal; Weintraub, Susan T; Uhlson, Charis; Murphy, Robert C; Hargreaves, Kenneth M

    2010-05-01

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channel is the principal detector of noxious heat in the peripheral nervous system. TRPV1 is expressed in many nociceptors and is involved in heat-induced hyperalgesia and thermoregulation. The precise mechanism or mechanisms mediating the thermal sensitivity of TRPV1 are unknown. Here, we have shown that the oxidized linoleic acid metabolites 9- and 13-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid (9- and 13-HODE) are formed in mouse and rat skin biopsies by exposure to noxious heat. 9- and 13-HODE and their metabolites, 9- and 13-oxoODE, activated TRPV1 and therefore constitute a family of endogenous TRPV1 agonists. Moreover, blocking these substances substantially decreased the heat sensitivity of TRPV1 in rats and mice and reduced nociception. Collectively, our results indicate that HODEs contribute to the heat sensitivity of TRPV1 in rodents. Because oxidized linoleic acid metabolites are released during cell injury, these findings suggest a mechanism for integrating the hyperalgesic and proinflammatory roles of TRPV1 and linoleic acid metabolites and may provide the foundation for investigating new classes of analgesic drugs.

  10. Moderate extracellular acidification inhibits capsaicin-induced cell death through regulating calcium mobilization, NF-{kappa}B translocation and ROS production in synoviocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Fen; Yang, Shuang; Zhao, Dan; Zhu, Shuyan; Wang, Yuxiang; Li, Junying

    2012-07-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Moderate extracellular acidification regulates intracellular Ca{sup 2+} mobilization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Moderate acidification activates NF-{kappa}B nuclear translocation in synoviocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Moderate acidification depresses the ROS production induced by capsaicin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Moderate acidification inhibits capsaicin-caused synoviocyte death. -- Abstract: We previously show the expression of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) in primary synoviocytes from collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) rats. Capsaicin and lowered extracellular pH from 7.4 to 5.5 induce cell death through TRPV1-mediated Ca{sup 2+} entry and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. However, under the pathological condition in rheumatoid arthritis, the synovial fluid is acidified to a moderate level (about pH 6.8). In the present study, we examined the effects of pH 6.8 on the TRPV1-mediated cell death. Our finding is different or even opposite from what was observed at pH 5.5. We found that the moderate extracellular acidification (from pH 7.4 to 6.8) inhibited the capsaicin-induced Ca{sup 2+} entry through attenuating the activity of TRPV1. In the mean time, it triggered a phospholipse C (PLC)-related Ca{sup 2+} release from intracellular stores. The nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B was found at pH 6.8, and this also depends on PLC activation. Moreover, the capsaicin-evoked massive ROS production and cell death were depressed at pH 6.8, both of which are dependent on the activation of PLC and NF-{kappa}B. Taken together, these results suggested that the moderate extracellular acidification inhibited the capsaicin-induced synoviocyte death through regulating Ca{sup 2+} mobilization, activating NF-{kappa}B nuclear translocation and depressing ROS production.

  11. Shp-1 dephosphorylates TRPV1 in dorsal root ganglion neurons and alleviates CFA-induced inflammatory pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xing; Zhao, Xiao-Tao; Xu, Ling-Chi; Yue, Lu-Peng; Liu, Feng-Yu; Cai, Jie; Liao, Fei-Fei; Kong, Jin-Ge; Xing, Guo-Gang; Yi, Ming; Wan, You

    2015-04-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) receptors are expressed in nociceptive neurons of rat dorsal root ganglions (DRGs) and mediate inflammatory pain. Nonspecific inhibition of protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) increases the tyrosine phosphorylation of TRPV1 and sensitizes TRPV1. However, less is known about tyrosine phosphorylation's implication in inflammatory pain, compared with that of serine/threonine phosphorylation. Src homology 2 domain-containing tyrosine phosphatase 1 (Shp-1) is a key phosphatase dephosphorylating TRPV1. In this study, we reported that Shp-1 colocalized with and bound to TRPV1 in nociceptive DRG neurons. Shp-1 inhibitors, including sodium stibogluconate and PTP inhibitor III, sensitized TRPV1 in cultured DRG neurons. In naive rats, intrathecal injection of Shp-1 inhibitors increased both TRPV1 and tyrosine-phosphorylated TRPV1 in DRGs and induced thermal hyperalgesia, which was abolished by pretreatment with TRPV1 antagonists capsazepine, BCTC, or AMG9810. Complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced inflammatory pain in rats significantly increased the expression of Shp-1, TRPV1, and tyrosine-phosphorylated TRPV1, as well as the colocalization of Shp-1 and TRPV1 in DRGs. Intrathecal injection of sodium stibogluconate aggravated CFA-induced inflammatory pain, whereas Shp-1 overexpression in DRG neurons alleviated it. These results suggested that Shp-1 dephosphorylated and inhibited TRPV1 in DRG neurons, contributing to maintain thermal nociceptive thresholds in normal rats, and as a compensatory mechanism, Shp-1 increased in DRGs of rats with CFA-induced inflammatory pain, which was involved in protecting against excessive thermal hyperalgesia.

  12. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 controls TRPV1 membrane trafficking and the heat sensitivity of nociceptors through KIF13B.

    PubMed

    Xing, Bao-Ming; Yang, Yan-Rui; Du, Jun-Xia; Chen, Hai-Jing; Qi, Cai; Huang, Zhi-Hua; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Yun

    2012-10-17

    The number of functional transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channels at the surface, especially at the peripheral terminals of primary sensory neurons, regulates heat sensitivity, and increased surface localization of TRPV1s contributes to heat hyperalgesia. However, the mechanisms for regulating TRPV1 surface localization are essentially unknown. Here, we show that cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5), a new player in thermal pain sensation, positively regulates TRPV1 surface localization. Active Cdk5 was found to promote TRPV1 anterograde transport in vivo, suggesting a regulatory role of Cdk5 in TRPV1 membrane trafficking. TRPV1-containing vesicles bind to the forkhead-associated (FHA) domain of the KIF13B (kinesin-3 family member 13B) and are thus delivered to the cell surface. Overexpression of Cdk5 or its activator p35 promoted and inhibition of Cdk5 activity prevented the KIF13B-TRPV1 association, indicating that Cdk5 promotes TRPV1 anterograde transport by mediating the motor-cargo association. Cdk5 phosphorylates KIF13B at Thr-506, a residue located in the FHA domain. T506A mutation reduced the motor-cargo interaction and the cell-permeable TAT-T506 peptide, targeting to the Thr-506, decreased TRPV1 surface localization, demonstrating the essential role of Thr-506 phosphorylation in TRPV1 transport. Moreover, complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) injection-induced activation of Cdk5 increased the anterograde transport of TRPV1s, contributing to the development and possibly the maintenance of heat hyperalgesia, whereas intrathecal delivery of the TAT-T506 peptide alleviated CFA-induced heat hyperalgesia in rats. Thus, Cdk5 regulation of TRPV1 membrane trafficking is a fundamental mechanism controlling the heat sensitivity of nociceptors, and moderate inhibition of Thr-506 phosphorylation during inflammation might be helpful for the treatment of inflammatory thermal pain.

  13. Physiological and behavioral evidence of a capsaicin-sensitive TRPV-like channel in the medicinal leech.

    PubMed

    Summers, Torrie; Holec, Sara; Burrell, Brian D

    2014-12-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) channels are found throughout the animal kingdom, where they play an important role in sensory transduction. In this study, we combined physiological studies with in vivo behavioral experiments to examine the presence of a putative TRPV-like receptor in the medicinal leech, building upon earlier studies in this lophotrochozoan invertebrate. The leech polymodal nociceptive neuron was activated by both peripheral and central application of the TRPV1-activator capsaicin in a concentration-dependent manner, with 100 μmol l(-1) being the lowest effective concentration. Responses to capsaicin were inhibited by the selective TRPV1 antagonist SB366791. The polymodal nociceptive neuron also responded to noxious thermal stimuli (>40°C), and this response was also blocked by SB366791. Capsaicin sensitivity was selective to the polymodal nociceptor with no direct response being elicited in the mechanical nociceptive neuron or in the non-nociceptive touch- or pressure-sensitive neurons. Capsaicin also elicited nocifensive behavioral responses (withdrawals and locomotion) in a concentration-dependent manner, and these behavioral responses were significantly attenuated with SB366791. These results suggest the presence of a capsaicin-sensitive TRPV-like channel in the medicinal leech central nervous system and are relevant to the evolution of nociceptive signaling.

  14. TRPV1-mediated presynaptic transmission in basolateral amygdala contributes to visceral hypersensitivity in adult rats with neonatal maternal deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Ying; Chen, Xiaoqi; Zhang, Ping-An; Xu, Qiya; Zheng, Hang; Xu, Guang-Yin

    2016-01-01

    The central mechanisms of visceral hypersensitivity remain largely unknown. It’s reported that there are highest densities of TRPV1 labeled neurons within basolateral amygdala (BLA). The aim of this study was to explore the role and mechanisms of TRPV1 in BLA in development of visceral hypersensitivity. Visceral hypersensitivity was induced by neonatal maternal deprivation (NMD) and was quantified by abdominal withdrawal reflex. Expression of TRPV1 was determined by Western blot. The synaptic transmission of neurons in BLA was recorded by patch clamping. It was found that the expression of TRPV1 in BLA was significantly upregulated in NMD rats; glutamatergic synaptic activities in BLA were increased in NMD rats; application of capsazepine (TRPV1 antagonist) decreased glutamatergic synaptic activities of BLA neurons in NMD slices through a presynaptic mechanism; application of capsaicin (TRPV1 agonist) increased glutamatergic synaptic activities of BLA neurons in control slices through presynaptic mechanism without affecting GABAergic synaptic activities; microinjecting capsazepine into BLA significantly increased colonic distension threshold both in control and NMD rats. Our data suggested that upregulation of TRPV1 in BLA contributes to visceral hypersensitivity of NMD rats through enhancing excitation of BLA, thus identifying a potential target for treatment of chronic visceral pain. PMID:27364923

  15. Novel transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 receptor antagonists for the treatment of pain: structure-activity relationships for ureas with quinoline, isoquinoline, quinazoline, phthalazine, quinoxaline, and cinnoline moieties.

    PubMed

    Gomtsyan, Arthur; Bayburt, Erol K; Schmidt, Robert G; Zheng, Guo Zhu; Perner, Richard J; Didomenico, Stanley; Koenig, John R; Turner, Sean; Jinkerson, Tammie; Drizin, Irene; Hannick, Steven M; Macri, Bryan S; McDonald, Heath A; Honore, Prisca; Wismer, Carol T; Marsh, Kennan C; Wetter, Jill; Stewart, Kent D; Oie, Tetsuro; Jarvis, Michael F; Surowy, Carol S; Faltynek, Connie R; Lee, Chih-Hung

    2005-02-10

    Novel transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) receptor antagonists with various bicyclic heteroaromatic pharmacophores were synthesized, and their in vitro activity in blocking capsaicin activation of TRPV1 was assessed. On the basis of the contribution of these pharmacophores to the in vitro potency, they were ranked in the order of 5-isoquinoline > 8-quinoline = 8-quinazoline > 8-isoquinoline > or = cinnoline approximately phthalazine approximately quinoxaline approximately 5-quinoline. The 5-isoquinoline-containing compound 14a (hTRPV1 IC50 = 4 nM) exhibited 46% oral bioavailability and in vivo activity in animal models of visceral and inflammatory pain. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacological properties of 14a are substantial improvements over the profile of the high-throughput screening hit 1 (hTRPV1 IC50 = 22 nM), which was not efficacious in animal pain models and was not orally bioavailable.

  16. LE135, a retinoid acid receptor antagonist, produces pain through direct activation of TRP channels

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Shijin; Luo, Jialie; Qian, Aihua; Yu, Weihua; Hu, Hongzhen

    2014-01-01

    Background and PurposeRetinoids, through their activation of retinoic acid receptors (RARs) and retinoid X receptors, regulate diverse cellular processes, and pharmacological intervention in their actions has been successful in the treatment of skin disorders and cancers. Despite the many beneficial effects, administration of retinoids causes irritating side effects with unknown mechanisms. Here, we demonstrate that LE135 [4-(7,8,9,10-tetrahydro-5,7,7,10,10-pentamethyl-5H-benzo[e]naphtho[2,3-b][1,4]diazepin-13-yl)benzoic acid], a selective antagonist of RARβ, is a potent activator of the capsaicin (TRPV1) and wasabi (TRPA1) receptors, two critical pain-initiating cation channels. Experimental ApproachWe performed to investigate the excitatory effects of LE135 on TRPV1 and TRPA1 channels expressed in HEK293T cells and in dorsal root ganglia neurons with calcium imaging and patch-clamp recordings. We also used site-directed mutagenesis of the channels to determine the structural basis of LE135-induced activation of TRPV1 and TRPA1 channels and behavioural testing to examine if pharmacological inhibition and genetic deletion of the channels affected LE135-evoked pain-related behaviours. Key ResultsLE135 activated both the capsaicin receptor (TRPV1) and the allyl isothiocyanate receptor (TRPA1) heterologously expressed in HEK293T cells and endogenously expressed by sensory nociceptors. Mutations disrupting the capsaicin-binding site attenuated LE135 activation of TRPV1 channels and a single mutation (K170R) eliminated TRPA1 activity evoked by LE135. Intraplantar injection of LE135 evoked pain-related behaviours. Both TRPV1 and TRPA1 channels were involved in LE135-elicited pain-related responses, as shown by pharmacological and genetic ablation studies. Conclusions and ImplicationsThis blocker of retinoid acid signalling also exerted non-genomic effects through activating the pain-initiating TRPV1 and TRPA1 channels. PMID:24308840

  17. P2X3 and TRPV1 functionally interact and mediate sensitization of trigeminal sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Saloman, Jami L.; Chung, Man-Kyo; Ro, Jin Y.

    2012-01-01

    Musculoskeletal pain conditions, particularly those associated with temporomandibular joint and muscle disorders (TMD) affect a large percentage of the population. Identifying mechanisms underlying hyperalgesia could contribute to the development of new treatment strategies for the management of TMD and other muscle pain conditions. In this study, we provide evidence of functional interactions between two ligand-gated channels, P2X3 and TRPV1, in trigeminal sensory neurons, and propose that the interactions serve as an underlying mechanism for the development of mechanical hyperalgesia. Mechanical sensitivity of the masseter muscle was assessed in lightly anesthetized rats via an electronic anesthesiometer (Ro et al., 2009). Direct intramuscular injection of a selective P2X3 agonist, αβmeATP, induced a dose- and time-dependent hyperalgesia. Mechanical sensitivity in the contralateral muscle was unaffected suggesting local P2X3 mediate the hyperalgesia. Anesthetizing the overlying skin had no effect on αβmeATP-induced hyperalgesia confirming the contribution of P2X3 from muscle. Importantly, the αβmeATP-induced hyperalgesia was prevented by pretreatment of the muscle with a TRPV1 antagonist, AMG9810. P2X3 was co-expressed with TRPV1 in masseter muscle afferents confirming the possibility for intracellular interactions. Additionally, in a subpopulation of P2X3/TRPV1 positive neurons, capsaicin-induced Ca2+ transients were significantly amplified following P2X3 activation. Finally, activation of P2X3 induced phosphorylation of serine, but not threonine, residues in TRPV1 in trigeminal ganglia cultures. Significant phosphorylation was observed at 15 min, the time point at which behavioral hyperalgesia was prominent. Previously, activation of either P2X3 or TRPV1 had been independently implicated in the development of mechanical hyperalgesia. Our data propose P2X3 and TRPV1 interact in a facilitatory manner, which could contribute to the peripheral sensitization

  18. Selective Activation of hTRPV1 by N-Geranyl Cyclopropylcarboxamide, an Amiloride-Insensitive Salt Taste Enhancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Jung; Son, Hee Jin; Kim, Yiseul; Kweon, Hae-Jin; Suh, Byung-Chang; Lyall, Vijay; Rhyu, Mee-Ra

    2014-01-01

    TRPV1t, a variant of the transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) has been proposed as a constitutively active, non-selective cation channel as a putative amiloride-insensitive salt taste receptor and shares many properties with TRPV1. Based on our previous chorda tympani taste nerve recordings in rodents and human sensory evaluations, we proposed that N-geranylcyclopropylcarboxamide (NGCC), a novel synthetic compound, acts as a salt taste enhancer by modulating the amiloride/benzamil-insensitive Na+ entry pathways. As an extension of this work, we investigated NGCC-induced human TRPV1 (hTRPV1) activation using a Ca2+-flux signaling assay in cultured cells. NGCC enhanced Ca2+ influx in hTRPV1-expressing cells in a dose-dependent manner (EC50 = 115 µM). NGCC-induced Ca2+ influx was significantly attenuated by ruthenium red (RR; 30 µM), a non-specific blocker of TRP channels and capsazepine (CZP; 5 µM), a specific antagonist of TRPV1, implying that NGCC directly activates hTRPV1. TRPA1 is often co-expressed with TRPV1 in sensory neurons. Therefore, we also investigated the effects of NGCC on hTRPA1-expressing cells. Similar to hTRPV1, NGCC enhanced Ca2+ influx in hTRPA1-expressing cells (EC50 = 83.65 µM). The NGCC-induced Ca2+ influx in hTRPA1-expressing cells was blocked by RR (30 µM) and HC-030031 (100 µM), a specific antagonist of TRPA1. These results suggested that NGCC selectively activates TRPV1 and TRPA1 in cultured cells. These data may provide additional support for our previous hypothesis that NGCC interacts with TRPV1 variant cation channel, a putative amiloride/benzamil-insensitive salt taste pathway in the anterior taste receptive field. PMID:24586504

  19. Selective activation of hTRPV1 by N-geranyl cyclopropylcarboxamide, an amiloride-insensitive salt taste enhancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Jung; Son, Hee Jin; Kim, Yiseul; Kweon, Hae-Jin; Suh, Byung-Chang; Lyall, Vijay; Rhyu, Mee-Ra

    2014-01-01

    TRPV1t, a variant of the transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) has been proposed as a constitutively active, non-selective cation channel as a putative amiloride-insensitive salt taste receptor and shares many properties with TRPV1. Based on our previous chorda tympani taste nerve recordings in rodents and human sensory evaluations, we proposed that N-geranylcyclopropylcarboxamide (NGCC), a novel synthetic compound, acts as a salt taste enhancer by modulating the amiloride/benzamil-insensitive Na(+) entry pathways. As an extension of this work, we investigated NGCC-induced human TRPV1 (hTRPV1) activation using a Ca(2+)-flux signaling assay in cultured cells. NGCC enhanced Ca(2+) influx in hTRPV1-expressing cells in a dose-dependent manner (EC50 = 115 µM). NGCC-induced Ca(2+) influx was significantly attenuated by ruthenium red (RR; 30 µM), a non-specific blocker of TRP channels and capsazepine (CZP; 5 µM), a specific antagonist of TRPV1, implying that NGCC directly activates hTRPV1. TRPA1 is often co-expressed with TRPV1 in sensory neurons. Therefore, we also investigated the effects of NGCC on hTRPA1-expressing cells. Similar to hTRPV1, NGCC enhanced Ca(2+) influx in hTRPA1-expressing cells (EC50 = 83.65 µM). The NGCC-induced Ca(2+) influx in hTRPA1-expressing cells was blocked by RR (30 µM) and HC-030031 (100 µM), a specific antagonist of TRPA1. These results suggested that NGCC selectively activates TRPV1 and TRPA1 in cultured cells. These data may provide additional support for our previous hypothesis that NGCC interacts with TRPV1 variant cation channel, a putative amiloride/benzamil-insensitive salt taste pathway in the anterior taste receptive field. PMID:24586504

  20. Resolvin E1 Inhibits Substance P-Induced Potentiation of TRPV1 in Primary Sensory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Youn Yi; Lee, Ji Yeon

    2016-01-01

    The neuropeptide substance P (SP) is expressed in primary sensory neurons and is commonly regarded as a “pain” neurotransmitter. Upon peripheral inflammation, SP activates the neurokinin-1 (NK-1) receptor and potentiates activity of transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1), which is coexpressed by nociceptive neurons. Therefore, SP functions as an important neurotransmitter involved in the hypersensitization of inflammatory pain. Resolvin E1 (RvE1), derived from omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, inhibits TRPV1 activity via activation of the chemerin 23 receptor (ChemR23)—an RvE1 receptor located in dorsal root ganglion neurons—and therefore exerts an inhibitory effect on inflammatory pain. We demonstrate here that RvE1 regulates the SP-induced potentiation of TRPV1 via G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) on peripheral nociceptive neurons. SP-induced potentiation of TRPV1 inhibited by RvE1 was blocked by the Gαi-coupled GPCR inhibitor pertussis toxin and the G-protein inhibitor GDPβ-S. These results indicate that a low concentration of RvE1 strongly inhibits the potentiation of TRPV1, induced by the SP-mediated activation of NK-1, via a GPCR signaling pathway activated by ChemR23 in nociceptive neurons. RvE1 might represent a new therapeutic target for the treatment of inflammatory pain as a prospective endogenous inhibitor that strongly inhibits TRPV1 activity associated with peripheral inflammation. PMID:27738388

  1. Heat hyperalgesia after incision requires TRPV1 and is distinct from pure inflammatory pain.

    PubMed

    Pogatzki-Zahn, Esther M; Shimizu, Isao; Caterina, Michael; Raja, Srinivasa N

    2005-06-01

    Postoperative pain significantly impacts patient recovery. However, postoperative pain management remains suboptimal, perhaps because treatment strategies are based mainly on studies using inflammatory pain models. We used a recently developed mouse model of incisional pain to investigate peripheral and spinal mechanisms contributing to heat hyperalgesia after incision. Behavioral experiments involving TRPV1 KO mice demonstrate that, as previously observed in inflammatory models, TRPV1 is necessary for heat (but not mechanical) hyperalgesia after incision. However, in WT mice, neither the proportion of TRPV1 immunoreactive neurons in the DRG nor the intensity of TRPV1 staining in the sciatic nerve was different from that in controls up to 4 days after incision. This result was corroborated by immunoblot analysis of sciatic nerve in rats subjected to an incision, and is distinct from that following inflammation of the rat hind paw, a situation in which TRPV1 expression levels in sciatic nerve increases. In the absence of heat exposure, spinal c-Fos staining was similar between incised TRPV1 KO and WT mice. However, differences in c-Fos staining between heat exposed TRPV1 KO and WT mice after incision suggest that the incision-mediated enhancement of heat-evoked signaling to the spinal cord involves a TRPV1-dependent mechanism. Finally, heat hyperalgesia after incision was reversed by antagonism of spinal non-NMDA receptors, unlike inflammatory hyperalgesia, which is mediated via NMDA receptors . Thus, TRPV1 is important for the generation of thermal hyperalgesia after incision. Our observations suggest that all experimental pain models may not be equally appropriate to guide the development of postoperative pain therapies.

  2. TRPV1 Gates Tissue Access and Sustains Pathogenicity in Autoimmune Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Paltser, Geoffrey; Liu, Xue Jun; Yantha, Jason; Winer, Shawn; Tsui, Hubert; Wu, Ping; Maezawa, Yuko; Cahill, Lindsay S; Laliberté, Christine L; Ramagopalan, Sreeram V; DeLuca, Gabriele C; Sadovnick, A Dessa; Astsaturov, Igor; Ebers, George C; Henkelman, R Mark; Salter, Michael W; Dosch, H-Michael

    2013-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic progressive, demyelinating condition whose therapeutic needs are unmet, and whose pathoetiology is elusive. We report that transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) expressed in a major sensory neuron subset, controls severity and progression of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in mice and likely in primary progressive MS. TRPV1−/− B6 congenics are protected from EAE. Increased survival reflects reduced central nervous systems (CNS) infiltration, despite indistinguishable T cell autoreactivity and pathogenicity in the periphery of TRPV1-sufficient and -deficient mice. The TRPV1+ neurovascular complex defining the blood-CNS barriers promoted invasion of pathogenic lymphocytes without the contribution of TRPV1-dependent neuropeptides such as substance P. In MS patients, we found a selective risk-association of the missense rs877610 TRPV1 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in primary progressive disease. Our findings indicate that TRPV1 is a critical disease modifier in EAE, and we identify a predictor of severe disease course and a novel target for MS therapy. PMID:23689362

  3. Capsaicin for Rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Fokkens, Wytske; Hellings, Peter; Segboer, Christine

    2016-08-01

    Rhinitis is a multifactorial disease characterized by symptoms of sneezing, rhinorrhea, postnasal drip, and nasal congestion. Non-allergic rhinitis is characterized by rhinitis symptoms without systemic sensitization of infectious etiology. Based on endotypes, we can categorize non-allergic rhinitis into an inflammatory endotype with usually eosinophilic inflammation encompassing at least NARES and LAR and part of the drug induced rhinitis (e.g., aspirin intolerance) and a neurogenic endotype encompassing idiopathic rhinitis, gustatory rhinitis, and rhinitis of the elderly. Patients with idiopathic rhinitis have a higher baseline TRPV1 expression in the nasal mucosa than healthy controls. Capsaicin (8-methyl-N-vanillyl-6-nonenamide) is the active component of chili peppers, plants of the genus Capsicum. Capsaicin is unique among naturally occurring irritant compounds because the initial neuronal excitation evoked by it is followed by a long-lasting refractory period, during which the previously excited neurons are no longer responsive to a broad range of stimuli. Patients with idiopathic rhinitis benefit from intranasal treatment with capsaicin. Expression of TRPV1 is reduced in patients with idiopathic rhinitis after capsaicin treatment. Recently, in a Cochrane review, the effectiveness of capsaicin in the management of idiopathic rhinitis was evaluated and the authors concluded that given that many other options do not work well in non-allergic rhinitis, capsaicin is a reasonable option to try under physician supervision. Capsaicin has not been shown to be effective in allergic rhinitis nor in other forms of non-allergic rhinitis like the inflammatory endotypes or other neurogenic endotypes like rhinitis of the elderly or smoking induced rhinitis. PMID:27485456

  4. Capsaicin for Rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Fokkens, Wytske; Hellings, Peter; Segboer, Christine

    2016-08-01

    Rhinitis is a multifactorial disease characterized by symptoms of sneezing, rhinorrhea, postnasal drip, and nasal congestion. Non-allergic rhinitis is characterized by rhinitis symptoms without systemic sensitization of infectious etiology. Based on endotypes, we can categorize non-allergic rhinitis into an inflammatory endotype with usually eosinophilic inflammation encompassing at least NARES and LAR and part of the drug induced rhinitis (e.g., aspirin intolerance) and a neurogenic endotype encompassing idiopathic rhinitis, gustatory rhinitis, and rhinitis of the elderly. Patients with idiopathic rhinitis have a higher baseline TRPV1 expression in the nasal mucosa than healthy controls. Capsaicin (8-methyl-N-vanillyl-6-nonenamide) is the active component of chili peppers, plants of the genus Capsicum. Capsaicin is unique among naturally occurring irritant compounds because the initial neuronal excitation evoked by it is followed by a long-lasting refractory period, during which the previously excited neurons are no longer responsive to a broad range of stimuli. Patients with idiopathic rhinitis benefit from intranasal treatment with capsaicin. Expression of TRPV1 is reduced in patients with idiopathic rhinitis after capsaicin treatment. Recently, in a Cochrane review, the effectiveness of capsaicin in the management of idiopathic rhinitis was evaluated and the authors concluded that given that many other options do not work well in non-allergic rhinitis, capsaicin is a reasonable option to try under physician supervision. Capsaicin has not been shown to be effective in allergic rhinitis nor in other forms of non-allergic rhinitis like the inflammatory endotypes or other neurogenic endotypes like rhinitis of the elderly or smoking induced rhinitis.

  5. TRPV1 and SP: key elements for sepsis outcome?

    PubMed Central

    Bodkin, Jennifer Victoria; Fernandes, Elizabeth Soares

    2013-01-01

    Sensory neurons play important roles in many disorders, including inflammatory diseases, such as sepsis. Sepsis is a potentially lethal systemic inflammatory reaction to a local bacterial infection, affecting thousands of patients annually. Although associated with a high mortality rate, sepsis outcome depends on the severity of systemic inflammation, which can be directly influenced by several factors, including the immune response of the patient. Currently, there is a lack of effective drugs to treat sepsis, and thus there is a need to develop new drugs to improve sepsis outcome. Several mediators involved in the formation of sepsis have now been identified, but the mechanisms underlying the pathology remain poorly understood. The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) receptor and the neuropeptide substance P (SP) have recently been demonstrated as important targets for sepsis and are located on sensory neurones and non-neuronal cells. Herein, we highlight and review the importance of sensory neurones for the modulation of sepsis, with specific focus on recent findings relating to TRPV1 and SP, with their distinct abilities to alter the transition from local to systemic inflammation and also modify the overall sepsis outcome. We also emphasize the protective role of TRPV1 in this context. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Neuropeptides. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2013.170.issue-7 PMID:23145480

  6. The role of TRPV1 in the CD4+ T cell-mediated inflammatory response of allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Samivel, Ramachandran; Kim, Dae Woo; Son, Hye Ran; Rhee, Yun-Hee; Kim, Eun Hee; Kim, Ji Hye; Bae, Jun-Sang; Chung, Young-Jun; Chung, Phil-Sang; Raz, Eyal; Mo, Ji-Hun

    2016-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), which has been identified as a molecular target for the activation of sensory neurons by various painful stimuli, was reported to regulate the signaling and activation of CD4+ T cells. However, the role of TRPV1 in CD4+ T cell in allergic rhinitis remains poorly understood. In this study, TRPV1 expression was localized in CD4+ T cells. Both knockout and chemical inhibition of TRPV1 suppressed Th2/Th17 cytokine production in CD4 T cells and Jurkat T cells, respectively, and can suppress T cell receptor signaling pathways including NF-κB, MAP kinase, and NFAT. In TRPV1 knockout allergic rhinitis (AR) mice, eosinophil infiltration, Th2/Th17 cytokines in the nasal mucosa, and total and ova-specific IgE levels in serum decreased, compared with wild-type AR mice. The TRPV1 antagonists, BCTC or theobromine, showed similar inhibitory immunologic effects on AR mice models. In addition, the number of TRPV1+/CD4+ inflammatory cells increased in the nasal mucosa of patients with AR, compared with that of control subjects. Thus, TRPV1 activation on CD4+ T cells is involved in T cell receptor signaling, and it could be a novel therapeutic target in AR.

  7. The role of TRPV1 in the CD4+ T cell-mediated inflammatory response of allergic rhinitis

    PubMed Central

    Son, Hye Ran; Rhee, Yun-Hee; Kim, Eun Hee; Kim, Ji Hye; Bae, Jun-Sang; Chung, Young-Jun; Chung, Phil-Sang; Raz, Eyal; Mo, Ji-Hun

    2016-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), which has been identified as a molecular target for the activation of sensory neurons by various painful stimuli, was reported to regulate the signaling and activation of CD4+ T cells. However, the role of TRPV1 in CD4+ T cell in allergic rhinitis remains poorly understood. In this study, TRPV1 expression was localized in CD4+ T cells. Both knockout and chemical inhibition of TRPV1 suppressed Th2/Th17 cytokine production in CD4 T cells and Jurkat T cells, respectively, and can suppress T cell receptor signaling pathways including NF-κB, MAP kinase, and NFAT. In TRPV1 knockout allergic rhinitis (AR) mice, eosinophil infiltration, Th2/Th17 cytokines in the nasal mucosa, and total and ova-specific IgE levels in serum decreased, compared with wild-type AR mice. The TRPV1 antagonists, BCTC or theobromine, showed similar inhibitory immunologic effects on AR mice models. In addition, the number of TRPV1+/CD4+ inflammatory cells increased in the nasal mucosa of patients with AR, compared with that of control subjects. Thus, TRPV1 activation on CD4+ T cells is involved in T cell receptor signaling, and it could be a novel therapeutic target in AR. PMID:26700618

  8. TRPV1 ligands with hyperthermic, hypothermic and no temperature effects in rats.

    PubMed

    Gomtsyan, Arthur; McDonald, Heath A; Schmidt, Robert G; Daanen, Jerome F; Voight, Eric A; Segreti, Jason A; Puttfarcken, Pamela S; Reilly, Regina M; Kort, Michael E; Dart, Michael J; Kym, Philip R

    2015-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is a multifunctional ion channel playing important roles in a numerous biological processes including the regulation of body temperature. Within distinct and tight chemical space of chromanyl ureas TRPV1 ligands were identified that exhibit distinctive pharmacology and a spectrum of thermoregulatory effects ranging from hypothermia to hyperthermia. The ability to manipulate these effects by subtle structural modifications of chromanyl ureas may serve as a productive approach in TRPV1 drug discovery programs addressing either side effect or desired target profiles of the compounds. Because chromanyl ureas in the TRPV1 context are generally antagonists, we verified observed partial agonist effects of a subset of compounds within that chemotype by comparing the in vitro profile of Compound 3 with known partial agonist 5'-I-RTX.

  9. Characterization of 2-(2,6-dichloro-benzyl)-thiazolo[5,4-d]pyrimidin-7-yl]-(4-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-amine (JNJ-39729209) as a novel TRPV1 antagonist.

    PubMed

    Maher, Michael P; Bhattacharya, Anindya; Ao, Hong; Swanson, Nadia; Wu, Nyan-Tsz; Freedman, Jamie; Kansagara, Mena; Scott, Brian; Li, Dong H; Eckert, William A; Liu, Yi; Sepassi, Kia; Rizzolio, Michele; Fitzgerald, Anne; Liu, Jing; Branstetter, Bryan J; Rech, Jason C; Lebsack, Alec D; Breitenbucher, J Guy; Wickenden, Alan D; Chaplan, Sandra R

    2011-08-01

    As an integrator of multiple nociceptive and/or inflammatory stimuli, TRPV1 is an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of various painful disorders. Several TRPV1 antagonists have been advanced into clinical trials and the initial observations suggest that TRPV1 antagonism may be associated with mild hyperthermia and thermal insensitivity in man. However, no clinical efficacy studies have been described to date, making an assessment of risk:benefit impossible. Furthermore, it is not clear whether these early observations are representative of all TRPV1 antagonists and whether additional clinical studies with novel TRPV1 antagonists are required in order to understand optimal compound characteristics. In the present study we describe 2-(2,6-dichloro-benzyl)-thiazolo[5,4-d]pyrimidin-7-yl]-(4-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-amine (JNJ-39729309) as a novel, TRPV1 antagonist. JNJ-39729209 displaced tritiated resiniferotoxin binding to TRPV1 and prevented TRPV1 activation by capsaicin, protons and heat. In-vivo, JNJ-39729209 blocked capsaicin-induced hypotension, induced a mild hyperthermia and inhibited capsaicin-induced hypothermia in a dose dependent manner. JNJ-39729209 showed significant efficacy against carrageenan- and CFA-evoked thermal hyperalgesia and exhibited significant anti-tussive activity in a guinea-pig model of capsaicin-induced cough. In pharmacokinetic studies, JNJ-39729209 was found to have low clearance, a moderate volume of distribution, good oral bioavailability and was brain penetrant. On the basis of these findings, JNJ-39729209 represents a structurally novel TRPV1 antagonist with potential for clinical development. The advancement of JNJ-39729209 into human clinical trials could be useful in further understanding the analgesic potential of TRPV1 antagonists. PMID:21575625

  10. TRPV1 mediates cell death in rat synovial fibroblasts through calcium entry-dependent ROS production and mitochondrial depolarization

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Fen; Sun Wenwu; Zhao Xiao Ting; Cui Zongjie Yang Wenxiu

    2008-05-16

    Synoviocyte hyperplasia is critical for rheumatoid arthritis, therefore, potentially an important target for therapeutics. It was found in this work that a TRPV1 agonist capsaicin, and acidic solution (pH 5.5) induced increases in cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c}) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in synoviocytes isolated from a rat model of collagen-induced arthritis. The increases in both [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c} and ROS production were completely abolished in calcium-free buffer or by a TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine. Further experiments revealed that capsaicin and pH 5.5 solution caused mitochondrial membrane depolarization and reduction in cell viability; such effects were inhibited by capsazepine, or the NAD(P)H oxidase inhibitor diphenylene iodonium. Both capsaicin and pH 5.5 buffer induced apoptosis as shown by nuclear condensation and fragmentation. Furthermore, RT-PCR readily detected TRPV1 mRNA expression in the isolated synoviocytes. Taken together, these data indicated that TRPV1 activation triggered synoviocyte death by [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c} elevation, ROS production, and mitochondrial membrane depolarization.

  11. Resiniferatoxin and its analogs provide novel insights into the pharmacology of the vanilloid (capsaicin) receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Szallasi, A.; Blumberg, P.M. )

    1990-01-01

    Capsaicin, the pungent constituent of chili peppers, represents the paradigm for the capsaicinoids or vanilloids, a family of compounds shown to stimulate and then desensitize specific subpopulations of sensory receptors, including C-polymodal nociceptors, A-delta mechanoheat nociceptors and warm receptors of the skin, as well as enteroceptors of thin afferent fibers. An exciting recent advance in the field has been the finding that resiniferatoxin (RTX), a naturally occurring diterpene containing a homovanillic acid ester, a key structural motif of capsaicin, functions as an ultrapotent capsaicin analog. For most of the responses characteristic of capsaicin, RTX is 100-10,000 fold more potent. Structure/activity analysis indicates, however, that RTX and related homovanillyl-diterpene esters display distinct spectra of activity. Specific ({sup 3}H)RTX binding provides the first direct proof for the existence of vanilloid receptors. We expect that the RTX class of vanilloids will promote rapid progress in understanding of vanilloid structure/activity requirements and mechanism.

  12. NOX3 NADPH oxidase couples transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 to signal transducer and activator of transcription 1-mediated inflammation and hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Mukherjea, Debashree; Jajoo, Sarvesh; Sheehan, Kelly; Kaur, Tejbeer; Sheth, Sandeep; Bunch, Jennifer; Perro, Christopher; Rybak, Leonard P; Ramkumar, Vickram

    2011-03-15

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is implicated in cisplatin ototoxicity. Activation of this channel by cisplatin increases reactive oxygen species generation, which contribute to loss of outer hair cells in the cochlea. Knockdown of TRPV1 by short interfering RNA protected against cisplatin ototoxicity. In this study, we examined the mechanism underlying TRPV1-mediated ototoxicity using cultured organ of Corti transformed cells (UB/OC-1) and rats. Trans-tympanic injections of capsaicin produced transient hearing loss within 24 h, which recovered by 72 h. In UB/OC-1 cells, capsaicin increased NOX3 NADPH oxidase activity and activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1). Intratympanic administration of capsaicin transiently increased STAT1 activity and expression of downstream proinflammatory molecules. Capsaicin produced a transient increase in CD14-positive inflammatory cells into the cochlea, which mimicked the temporal course of STAT1 activation but did not alter the expression of apoptotic genes or damage to outer hair cells. In addition, trans-tympanic administration of STAT1 short interfering RNA protected against capsaicin-induced hearing loss. These data suggest that activation of TRPV1 mediates temporary hearing loss by initiating an inflammatory process in the cochlea via activation of NOX3 and STAT1. Thus, these proteins represent reasonable targets for ameliorating hearing loss.

  13. NOX3 NADPH Oxidase Couples Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 to Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 1-Mediated Inflammation and Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjea, Debashree; Jajoo, Sarvesh; Sheehan, Kelly; Kaur, Tejbeer; Sheth, Sandeep; Bunch, Jennifer; Perro, Christopher; Rybak, Leonard P.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is implicated in cisplatin ototoxicity. Activation of this channel by cisplatin increases reactive oxygen species generation, which contribute to loss of outer hair cells in the cochlea. Knockdown of TRPV1 by short interfering RNA protected against cisplatin ototoxicity. In this study, we examined the mechanism underlying TRPV1-mediated ototoxicity using cultured organ of Corti transformed cells (UB/OC-1) and rats. Trans-tympanic injections of capsaicin produced transient hearing loss within 24 h, which recovered by 72 h. In UB/OC-1 cells, capsaicin increased NOX3 NADPH oxidase activity and activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1). Intratympanic administration of capsaicin transiently increased STAT1 activity and expression of downstream proinflammatory molecules. Capsaicin produced a transient increase in CD14-positive inflammatory cells into the cochlea, which mimicked the temporal course of STAT1 activation but did not alter the expression of apoptotic genes or damage to outer hair cells. In addition, trans-tympanic administration of STAT1 short interfering RNA protected against capsaicin-induced hearing loss. These data suggest that activation of TRPV1 mediates temporary hearing loss by initiating an inflammatory process in the cochlea via activation of NOX3 and STAT1. Thus, these proteins represent reasonable targets for ameliorating hearing loss. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 14, 999–1010. PMID:20712533

  14. NOX3 NADPH oxidase couples transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 to signal transducer and activator of transcription 1-mediated inflammation and hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Mukherjea, Debashree; Jajoo, Sarvesh; Sheehan, Kelly; Kaur, Tejbeer; Sheth, Sandeep; Bunch, Jennifer; Perro, Christopher; Rybak, Leonard P; Ramkumar, Vickram

    2011-03-15

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is implicated in cisplatin ototoxicity. Activation of this channel by cisplatin increases reactive oxygen species generation, which contribute to loss of outer hair cells in the cochlea. Knockdown of TRPV1 by short interfering RNA protected against cisplatin ototoxicity. In this study, we examined the mechanism underlying TRPV1-mediated ototoxicity using cultured organ of Corti transformed cells (UB/OC-1) and rats. Trans-tympanic injections of capsaicin produced transient hearing loss within 24 h, which recovered by 72 h. In UB/OC-1 cells, capsaicin increased NOX3 NADPH oxidase activity and activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1). Intratympanic administration of capsaicin transiently increased STAT1 activity and expression of downstream proinflammatory molecules. Capsaicin produced a transient increase in CD14-positive inflammatory cells into the cochlea, which mimicked the temporal course of STAT1 activation but did not alter the expression of apoptotic genes or damage to outer hair cells. In addition, trans-tympanic administration of STAT1 short interfering RNA protected against capsaicin-induced hearing loss. These data suggest that activation of TRPV1 mediates temporary hearing loss by initiating an inflammatory process in the cochlea via activation of NOX3 and STAT1. Thus, these proteins represent reasonable targets for ameliorating hearing loss. PMID:20712533

  15. The functions of TRPA1 and TRPV1: moving away from sensory nerves

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, ES; Fernandes, MA; Keeble, JE

    2012-01-01

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 and ankyrin 1 (TRPV1 and TRPA1, respectively) channels are members of the TRP superfamily of structurally related, non-selective cation channels. It is rapidly becoming clear that the functions of TRPV1 and TRPA1 interlink with each other to a considerable extent. This is especially clear in relation to pain and neurogenic inflammation where TRPV1 is coexpressed on the vast majority of TRPA1-expressing sensory nerves and both integrate a variety of noxious stimuli. The more recent discovery that both TRPV1 and TRPA1 are expressed on a multitude of non-neuronal sites has led to a plethora of research into possible functions of these receptors. Non-neuronal cells on which TRPV1 and TRPA1 are expressed vary from vascular smooth muscle to keratinocytes and endothelium. This review will discuss the expression, functionality and roles of these non-neuronal TRP channels away from sensory nerves to demonstrate the diverse nature of TRPV1 and TRPA1 in addition to a direct role in pain and neurogenic inflammation. PMID:22233379

  16. TRPV1 channels in the nucleus of the solitary tract mediate thermal prolongation of the LCR in decerebrate piglets

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Luxi; Bartlett, Donald; Leiter, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    Elevating body temperature or just the temperature of the dorsal medulla by approximately 2 °C prolongs the laryngeal chemoreflex (LCR) in decerebrate neonatal piglets. We tested the hypothesis that transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) receptors in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) mediate thermal prolongation of the LCR. We studied the effect of a selective TRPV1 receptor antagonist on thermal prolongation of the LCR, and we tested the effect of a TRPV1 agonist on the duration of the LCR under normothermic conditions. We studied 37 decerebrate neonatal piglets between the ages of post-natal days 4 and 7. The TRPV1 receptor antagonist, 5−iodoresiniferatoxin (65 microM/L in 100 nL), blocked thermal prolongation of the LCR when injected bilaterally into the region of the NTS. The TRPV1 agonist, resiniferatoxin (0.65-1.0 mM/L in 100 nL), prolonged the LCR after bilateral injection into the NTS even when the body temperature of each piglet was normal. The effect of the TRPV1 agonists could be blocked by treatment with the GABAA receptor antagonist, bicuculline, whether given intravenously (0.3 mg/kg) or focally injected bilaterally into the NTS (10 mM in 100nL). We conclude that TRPV1 receptors in the NTS mediate thermal prolongation of the LCR. PMID:21276877

  17. Ameliorating Endothelial Mitochondrial Dysfunction Restores Coronary Function via Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1-Mediated Protein Kinase A/Uncoupling Protein 2 Pathway.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Shiqiang; Wang, Peijian; Ma, Liqun; Gao, Peng; Gong, Liuping; Li, Li; Li, Qiang; Sun, Fang; Zhou, Xunmei; He, Hongbo; Chen, Jing; Yan, Zhencheng; Liu, Daoyan; Zhu, Zhiming

    2016-02-01

    Coronary heart disease arising from atherosclerosis is a leading cause of cardiogenic death worldwide. Mitochondria are the principal source of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and defective oxidative phosphorylation by the mitochondrial respiratory chain contributes to ROS generation. Uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2), an adaptive antioxidant defense factor, protects against mitochondrial ROS-induced endothelial dysfunction in atherosclerosis. The activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) attenuates vascular dysfunction. Therefore, whether TRPV1 activation antagonizes coronary lesions by alleviating endothelial mitochondrial dysfunction and enhancing the activity of the protein kinase A/UCP2 pathway warrants examination. ApoE(-/-), ApoE(-/-)/TRPV1(-/-), and ApoE(-/-)/UCP2(-/-) mice were fed standard chow, a high-fat diet (HFD), or the HFD plus 0.01% capsaicin. HFD intake profoundly impaired coronary vasodilatation and myocardial perfusion and shortened the survival duration of ApoE(-/-) mice. TRPV1 or UCP2 deficiency exacerbated HFD-induced coronary dysfunction and was associated with increased ROS generation and reduced nitric oxide production in the endothelium. The activation of TRPV1 by capsaicin upregulated UCP2 expression via protein kinase A phosphorylation, thereby alleviating endothelial mitochondrial dysfunction and inhibiting mitochondrial ROS generation. In vivo, dietary capsaicin supplementation enhanced coronary relaxation and prolonged the survival duration of HFD-fed ApoE(-/-) mice. These effects were not observed in ApoE(-/-) mice lacking the TRPV1 or UCP2 gene. The upregulation of protein kinase A /UCP2 via TRPV1 activation ameliorates coronary dysfunction and prolongs the lifespan of atherosclerotic mice by ameliorating endothelial mitochondrial dysfunction. Dietary capsaicin supplementation may represent a promising intervention for the primary prevention of coronary heart disease. PMID:26667415

  18. TRPV1 channel-mediated bilateral allodynia induced by unilateral masseter muscle inflammation in rats

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Pain in masticatory muscles is among the most prominent symptoms of temperomandibular disorders (TMDs) that have diverse and complex etiology. A common complaint of TMD is that unilateral pain of craniofacial muscle can cause a widespread of bilateral pain sensation, although the underlying mechanism remains unknown. To investigate whether unilateral inflammation of masseter muscle can cause a bilateral allodynia, we generated masseter muscle inflammation induced by unilateral injection of complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) in rats, and measured the bilateral head withdrawal threshold at different time points using a von Frey anesthesiometer. After behavioral assessment, both right and left trigeminal ganglia (TRG) were dissected and examined for histopathology and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) mRNA expression using quantitative real-time PCR analysis. A significant increase in TRPV1 mRNA expression occurred in TRG ipsilateral to CFA injected masseter muscle, whereas no significant alteration in TRPV1 occurred in the contralateral TRG. Interestingly, central injection of TRPV1 antagonist 5-iodoresiniferatoxin into the hippocampus significantly attenuated the head withdrawal response of both CFA injected and non-CFA injected contralateral masseter muscle. Our findings show that unilateral inflammation of masseter muscle is capable of inducing bilateral allodynia in rats. Upregulation of TRPV1 at the TRG level is due to nociception caused by inflammation, whereas contralateral nocifensive behavior in masticatory muscle nociception is likely mediated by central TRPV1, pointing to the involvement of altered information processing in higher centers. PMID:24377488

  19. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 modulates nociceptive signaling through direct phosphorylation of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1

    PubMed Central

    Pareek, Tej K.; Keller, Jason; Kesavapany, Sashi; Agarwal, Nitin; Kuner, Rohini; Pant, Harish C.; Iadarola, Michael J.; Brady, Roscoe O.; Kulkarni, Ashok B.

    2007-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), a ligand-gated cation channel highly expressed in small-diameter sensory neurons, is activated by heat, protons, and capsaicin. The phosphorylation of TRPV1 provides a versatile regulation of intracellular calcium levels and is critical for TRPV1 function in responding to a pain stimulus. We have previously reported that cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) activity regulates nociceptive signaling. In this article we report that the Cdk5-mediated phosphorylation of TRPV1 at threonine-407 can modulate agonist-induced calcium influx. Inhibition of Cdk5 activity in cultured dorsal root ganglia neurons resulted in a significant reduction of TRPV1-mediated calcium influx, and this effect could be reversed by restoring Cdk5 activity. Primary nociceptor-specific Cdk5 conditional-knockout mice showed reduced TRPV1 phosphorylation, resulting in significant hypoalgesia. Thus, the present study indicates that Cdk5-mediated TRPV1 phosphorylation is important in the regulation of pain signaling. PMID:17194758

  20. Fixative composition alters distributions of immunoreactivity for glutaminase and two markers of nociceptive neurons, Nav1.8 and TRPV1, in the rat dorsal root ganglion.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, E Matthew; Schechter, Ruben; Miller, Kenneth E

    2010-04-01

    Most, if not all, dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons use the neurotransmitter glutamate. There are, however, conflicting reports of the percentages of DRG neurons that express glutaminase (GLS), the enzyme that synthesizes glutamate, ranging from 30% to 100% of DRG neurons. Defining DRG neuron populations by the expression of proteins like GLS, which indicates function, is routinely accomplished with immunolabeling techniques. Proper characterization of DRG neuron populations relies on accurate detection of such antigens. It is known intuitively that fixation can alter immunoreactivity (IR). In this study, we compared the effects of five formaldehyde concentrations between 0.25% and 4.0% (w/v) and five picric acid concentrations between 0.0% and 0.8% (w/v) on the IR of GLS, the voltage-gated sodium channel 1.8 (Na(v)1.8), and the capsaicin receptor TRPV1. We also compared the effects of five incubation time lengths from 2 to 192 hr, in primary antiserum on IR. Lowering formaldehyde concentration elevated IR for all three antigens, while raising picric acid concentration increased Na(v)1.8 and TRPV1 IR. Increasing IR improved detection sensitivity, which led to higher percentages of labeled DRG neurons. By selecting fixation conditions that optimized IR, we found that all DRG neurons express GLS, 69% of neurons express Na(v)1.8, and 77% of neurons express TRPV1, indicating that some previous studies may have underestimated the percentages of DRG neurons expressing these proteins. This manuscript contains online supplemental material at http://www.jhc.org. Please visit this article online to view these materials. PMID:20026672

  1. TRPV1 structures in nanodiscs reveal mechanisms of ligand and lipid action.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yuan; Cao, Erhu; Julius, David; Cheng, Yifan

    2016-06-16

    When integral membrane proteins are visualized in detergents or other artificial systems, an important layer of information is lost regarding lipid interactions and their effects on protein structure. This is especially relevant to proteins for which lipids have both structural and regulatory roles. Here we demonstrate the power of combining electron cryo-microscopy with lipid nanodisc technology to ascertain the structure of the rat TRPV1 ion channel in a native bilayer environment. Using this approach, we determined the locations of annular and regulatory lipids and showed that specific phospholipid interactions enhance binding of a spider toxin to TRPV1 through formation of a tripartite complex. Furthermore, phosphatidylinositol lipids occupy the binding site for capsaicin and other vanilloid ligands, suggesting a mechanism whereby chemical or thermal stimuli elicit channel activation by promoting the release of bioactive lipids from a critical allosteric regulatory site. PMID:27281200

  2. Influence of influenza A infection on capsaicin-induced responses in murine airways.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Samuel J; Mann, Tracy S; Henry, Peter J

    2012-02-01

    The principal aim of the study was to determine the influence of influenza A virus infection on capsaicin-induced relaxation responses in mouse isolated tracheal segments and clarify the underlying mechanisms. Anesthetized mice were intranasally inoculated with influenza A/PR-8/34 virus (VIRUS) or vehicle (SHAM), and 4 days later tracheal segments were harvested for isometric tension recording and biochemical and histologic analyses. Capsaicin induced dose-dependent relaxation responses in carbachol-contracted SHAM trachea (e.g., 10 μM capsaicin produced 66 ± 4% relaxation; n = 11), which were significantly inhibited by capsazepine [transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) antagonist], (2S,3S)-3-{[3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]methoxy}-2-phenylpiperidine hydrochloride (L-733,060) [neurokinin 1 (NK₁) receptor antagonist], indomethacin [cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor], and the combination of 6-isopropoxy-9-oxoxanthene-2-carboxylic acid (AH6809) and 7-[5α-([1S,1α(Z)-biphenyl]-4-ylmethoxy)-2β-(4-morpholinyl)-3-oxocyclopentyl]-4-heptenoic acid, calcium salt, hydrate (AH23848) [E-prostanoid (EP)₂ and EP₄ receptor antagonists, respectively], indicating that capsaicin-induced relaxation involved the TRPV1-mediated release of substance P (SP), activation of epithelial NK₁ receptors, and production of COX products capable of activating relaxant EP₂/EP₄ receptors. Consistent with this postulate, capsaicin-induced relaxation was associated with the significant release of SP and prostaglandin E₂ (PGE₂) from mouse tracheal segments. As expected, influenza A virus infection was associated with widespread disruption of the tracheal epithelium. Tracheal segments from VIRUS mice responded weakly to capsaicin (7 ± 3% relaxation) and were 25-fold less responsive to SP than tracheas from SHAM mice. In contrast, relaxation responses to exogenous PGE₂ and the β-adrenoceptor agonist isoprenaline were not inhibited in VIRUS trachea. Virus infection

  3. Subgroup-Elimination Transcriptomics Identifies Signaling Proteins that Define Subclasses of TRPV1-Positive Neurons and a Novel Paracrine Circuit

    PubMed Central

    Isensee, Jörg; Wenzel, Carsten; Buschow, Rene; Weissmann, Robert; Kuss, Andreas W.; Hucho, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Normal and painful stimuli are detected by specialized subgroups of peripheral sensory neurons. The understanding of the functional differences of each neuronal subgroup would be strongly enhanced by knowledge of the respective subgroup transcriptome. The separation of the subgroup of interest, however, has proven challenging as they can hardly be enriched. Instead of enriching, we now rapidly eliminated the subgroup of neurons expressing the heat-gated cation channel TRPV1 from dissociated rat sensory ganglia. Elimination was accomplished by brief treatment with TRPV1 agonists followed by the removal of compromised TRPV1(+) neurons using density centrifugation. By differential microarray and sequencing (RNA-Seq) based expression profiling we compared the transcriptome of all cells within sensory ganglia versus the same cells lacking TRPV1 expressing neurons, which revealed 240 differentially expressed genes (adj. p<0.05, fold-change>1.5). Corroborating the specificity of the approach, many of these genes have been reported to be involved in noxious heat or pain sensitization. Beyond the expected enrichment of ion channels, we found the TRPV1 transcriptome to be enriched for GPCRs and other signaling proteins involved in adenosine, calcium, and phosphatidylinositol signaling. Quantitative population analysis using a recent High Content Screening (HCS) microscopy approach identified substantial heterogeneity of expressed target proteins even within TRPV1-positive neurons. Signaling components defined distinct further subgroups within the population of TRPV1-positive neurons. Analysis of one such signaling system showed that the pain sensitizing prostaglandin PGD2 activates DP1 receptors expressed predominantly on TRPV1(+) neurons. In contrast, we found the PGD2 producing prostaglandin D synthase to be expressed exclusively in myelinated large-diameter neurons lacking TRPV1, which suggests a novel paracrine neuron-neuron communication. Thus, subgroup analysis based

  4. Phosphorylation of TRPV1 by cyclin-dependent kinase 5 promotes TRPV1 surface localization, leading to inflammatory thermal hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiao; Du, Junxie; Yang, Yanrui; Wang, Yun

    2015-11-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) is an important serine/threonine kinase that plays critical roles in many physiological processes. Recently, Cdk5 has been reported to phosphorylate TRPV1 at threonine 407 (Thr-407) in humans (Thr-406 in rats), which enhances the function of TRPV1 channel and promotes thermal hyperalgesia in the complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced inflammatory pain rats. However, the underlying mechanisms are still unknown. Here, we demonstrate that Cdk5 phosphorylates TRPV1 at Threonine 406 and promotes the surface localization of TRPV1, leading to inflammatory thermal hyperalgesia. The mutation of Thr-406 of TRPV1 to alanine reduced the interaction of TRPV1 with the cytoskeletal elements and decreased the binding of TRPV1 with the motor protein KIF13B, which led to reduced surface distribution of TRPV1. Disrupting the phosphorylation of TRPV1 at Thr-406 dramatically reduced the surface level of TRPV1 in HEK 293 cells after transient expression and the channel function in cultured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Notably, intrathecal administration of the interfering peptide against the phosphorylation of Thr-406 alleviated heat hyperalgesia and reduced the surface level of TRPV1 in inflammatory pain rats. Together, these results demonstrate that Cdk5-mediated phosphorylation of TRPV1 at Thr-406 increases the surface level and the function of TRPV1, while the TAT-T406 peptide can effectively attenuate thermal hyperalgesia. Our studies provide a potential therapy for inflammatory pain.

  5. Targeting TRPV1 for Body Weight Control using TRPV1−/− Mice and Electroacupuncture

    PubMed Central

    Choowanthanapakorn, Monchanok; Lu, Kung-Wen; Yang, Jun; Hsieh, Ching-Liang; Lin, Yi-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a global social medical problem resulting in morbidity as high as 20–30%. Here we investigated whether the manipulation of TRPV1 can control mice body weight through electroacupuncture (EA). The results demonstrated that body weight increased with time in the control group (108.19 ± 1.31%, n = 7). The increase of mice body weight was significantly less in the EA group (104.41 ± 0.76%, p < 0.05, compared with the control group, n = 7) but not in the sham EA group (109.1 ± 0.63%, p < 0.05, compared with EA group, n = 7). EA did not decrease the gain of body weight in TRPV1 knock mice (107.94 ± 0.41% and 107.79 ± 1.04% for TRPV1−/− and TRPV1−/− with EA, respectively, p > 0.05). The visceral white adipose tissue (WAT) weight was lower in the EA group at 4 weeks after manipulation. Moreover, the protein levels of TRPV1, pPKA, pPKC, and pERK were increased in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and spinal cord (SC) after EA treatment but not in the sham EA and TRPV1−/− mice. This study suggests that targeting TRPV1 is beneficial in controlling body weight and TRPV1-associated mechanisms in mice. PMID:26621679

  6. TRPV1 is crucial for proinflammatory STAT3 signaling and thermoregulation-associated pathways in the brain during inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Ayaka; Furube, Eriko; Mannari, Tetsuya; Takayama, Yasunori; Kittaka, Hiroki; Tominaga, Makoto; Miyata, Seiji

    2016-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor 1 (TRPV1) is a non-selective cation channel that is stimulated by heat (>43 °C), mechanical/osmotic stimuli, and low pH. The importance of TRPV1 in inflammatory responses has been demonstrated, whereas its participation in brains remains unclear. In the present study, the intracerebroventricular (icv) administration of the TRPV1 agonist resiniferatoxin (RTX) induced the activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) in circumventricular organs (CVOs) and thermoregulation-associated brain regions with a similar patttern to the peripheral and icv administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). With the peripheral and icv LPS stimuli, STAT3 activation was significantly lower in Trpv1−/− mice than in Trpv1+/+ mice. The icv administration of RTX induced transient hypothermia, whereas that of the TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine enhanced the magnitude and period of LPS-induced hyperthermia. These results indicate that TRPV1 is important for activating proinflammatory STAT3 signaling and thermoregulation-associated brain pathways in the brain. PMID:27188969

  7. The Effects of Capsaicin and Capsiate on Energy Balance: Critical Review and Meta-analyses of Studies in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Ludy, Mary-Jon; Moore, George E.

    2012-01-01

    Consumption of spicy foods containing capsaicin, the major pungent principle in hot peppers, reportedly promotes negative energy balance. However, many individuals abstain from spicy foods due to the sensory burn and pain elicited by the capsaicin molecule. A potential alternative for nonusers of spicy foods who wish to exploit this energy balance property is consumption of nonpungent peppers rich in capsiate, a recently identified nonpungent capsaicin analog contained in CH-19 Sweet peppers. Capsiate activates transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1) receptors in the gut but not in the oral cavity. This paper critically evaluates current knowledge on the thermogenic and appetitive effects of capsaicin and capsiate from foods and in supplemental form. Meta-analyses were performed on thermogenic outcomes, with a systematic review conducted for both thermogenic and appetitive outcomes. Evidence indicates that capsaicin and capsiate both augment energy expenditure and enhance fat oxidation, especially at high doses. Furthermore, the balance of the literature suggests that capsaicin and capsiate suppress orexigenic sensations. The magnitude of these effects is small. Purposeful inclusion of these compounds in the diet may aid weight management, albeit modestly. PMID:22038945

  8. The effects of capsaicin and capsiate on energy balance: critical review and meta-analyses of studies in humans.

    PubMed

    Ludy, Mary-Jon; Moore, George E; Mattes, Richard D

    2012-02-01

    Consumption of spicy foods containing capsaicin, the major pungent principle in hot peppers, reportedly promotes negative energy balance. However, many individuals abstain from spicy foods due to the sensory burn and pain elicited by the capsaicin molecule. A potential alternative for nonusers of spicy foods who wish to exploit this energy balance property is consumption of nonpungent peppers rich in capsiate, a recently identified nonpungent capsaicin analog contained in CH-19 Sweet peppers. Capsiate activates transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1) receptors in the gut but not in the oral cavity. This paper critically evaluates current knowledge on the thermogenic and appetitive effects of capsaicin and capsiate from foods and in supplemental form. Meta-analyses were performed on thermogenic outcomes, with a systematic review conducted for both thermogenic and appetitive outcomes. Evidence indicates that capsaicin and capsiate both augment energy expenditure and enhance fat oxidation, especially at high doses. Furthermore, the balance of the literature suggests that capsaicin and capsiate suppress orexigenic sensations. The magnitude of these effects is small. Purposeful inclusion of these compounds in the diet may aid weight management, albeit modestly.

  9. Measuring distances between TRPV1 and the plasma membrane using a noncanonical amino acid and transition metal ion FRET

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Moshe T.; Senning, Eric N.; Munari, Mika A.

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent advances, the structure and dynamics of membrane proteins in cell membranes remain elusive. We implemented transition metal ion fluorescence resonance energy transfer (tmFRET) to measure distances between sites on the N-terminal ankyrin repeat domains (ARDs) of the pain-transducing ion channel TRPV1 and the intracellular surface of the plasma membrane. To preserve the native context, we used unroofed cells, and to specifically label sites in TRPV1, we incorporated a fluorescent, noncanonical amino acid, L-ANAP. A metal chelating lipid was used to decorate the plasma membrane with high-density/high-affinity metal-binding sites. The fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) efficiencies between L-ANAP in TRPV1 and Co2+ bound to the plasma membrane were consistent with the arrangement of the ARDs in recent cryoelectron microscopy structures of TRPV1. No change in tmFRET was observed with the TRPV1 agonist capsaicin. These results demonstrate the power of tmFRET for measuring structure and rearrangements of membrane proteins relative to the cell membrane. PMID:26755770

  10. Measuring distances between TRPV1 and the plasma membrane using a noncanonical amino acid and transition metal ion FRET.

    PubMed

    Zagotta, William N; Gordon, Moshe T; Senning, Eric N; Munari, Mika A; Gordon, Sharona E

    2016-02-01

    Despite recent advances, the structure and dynamics of membrane proteins in cell membranes remain elusive. We implemented transition metal ion fluorescence resonance energy transfer (tmFRET) to measure distances between sites on the N-terminal ankyrin repeat domains (ARDs) of the pain-transducing ion channel TRPV1 and the intracellular surface of the plasma membrane. To preserve the native context, we used unroofed cells, and to specifically label sites in TRPV1, we incorporated a fluorescent, noncanonical amino acid, L-ANAP. A metal chelating lipid was used to decorate the plasma membrane with high-density/high-affinity metal-binding sites. The fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) efficiencies between L-ANAP in TRPV1 and Co(2+) bound to the plasma membrane were consistent with the arrangement of the ARDs in recent cryoelectron microscopy structures of TRPV1. No change in tmFRET was observed with the TRPV1 agonist capsaicin. These results demonstrate the power of tmFRET for measuring structure and rearrangements of membrane proteins relative to the cell membrane.

  11. Microtopographical features generated by photopolymerization recruit RhoA/ROCK through TRPV1 to direct cell and neurite growth

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shufeng; Tuft, Bradley; Xu, Linjing; Polacco, Marc; Clarke, Joseph C.; Guymon, C. Allan; Hansen, Marlan R.

    2015-01-01

    Cell processes, including growth cones, respond to biophysical cues in their microenvironment to establish functional tissue architecture and intercellular networks. The mechanisms by which cells sense and translate biophysical cues into directed growth are unknown. We used photopolymerization to fabricate methacrylate platforms with patterned microtopographical features that precisely guide neurite growth and Schwann cell alignment. Pharmacologic inhibition of the transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1) or reduced expression of TRPV1 by RNAi significantly disrupts neurite guidance by these microtopographical features. Exogenous expression of TRPV1 induces alignment of NIH3T3 fibroblasts that fail to align in the absence of TRPV1, further implicating TRPV1 channels as critical mediators of cellular responses to biophysical cues. Microtopographic features increase RhoA activity in growth cones and in TRPV1-expressing NIH3T3 cells. Further, Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) phosphorylation is elevated in growth cones and neurites on micropatterned surfaces. Inhibition of RhoA/ROCK by pharmacological compounds or reduced expression of either ROCKI or ROCKII isoforms by RNAi abolishes neurite and cell alignment, confirming that RhoA/ROCK signaling mediates neurite and cell alignment to microtopographic features. These studies demonstrate that microtopographical cues recruit TRPV1 channels and downstream signaling pathways, including RhoA and ROCK, to direct neurite and cell growth. PMID:25890710

  12. Mechanisms of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 activation and sensitization by allyl isothiocyanate.

    PubMed

    Gees, Maarten; Alpizar, Yeranddy A; Boonen, Brett; Sanchez, Alicia; Everaerts, Wouter; Segal, Andrei; Xue, Fenqin; Janssens, Annelies; Owsianik, Grzegorz; Nilius, Bernd; Voets, Thomas; Talavera, Karel

    2013-09-01

    Allyl isothiocyanate (AITC; aka, mustard oil) is a powerful irritant produced by Brassica plants as a defensive trait against herbivores and confers pungency to mustard and wasabi. AITC is widely used experimentally as an inducer of acute pain and neurogenic inflammation, which are largely mediated by the activation of nociceptive cation channels transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1). Although it is generally accepted that electrophilic agents activate these channels through covalent modification of cytosolic cysteine residues, the mechanism underlying TRPV1 activation by AITC remains unknown. Here we show that, surprisingly, AITC-induced activation of TRPV1 does not require interaction with cysteine residues, but is largely dependent on S513, a residue that is involved in capsaicin binding. Furthermore, AITC acts in a membrane-delimited manner and induces a shift of the voltage dependence of activation toward negative voltages, which is reminiscent of capsaicin effects. These data indicate that AITC acts through reversible interactions with the capsaicin binding site. In addition, we show that TRPV1 is a locus for cross-sensitization between AITC and acidosis in nociceptive neurons. Furthermore, we show that residue F660, which is known to determine the stimulation by low pH in human TRPV1, is also essential for the cross-sensitization of the effects of AITC and low pH. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that not all reactive electrophiles stimulate TRPV1 via cysteine modification and help understanding the molecular bases underlying the surprisingly large role of this channel as mediator of the algesic properties of AITC.

  13. TRPV1-Dependent and -Independent Alterations in the Limbic Cortex of Neuropathic Mice: Impact on Glial Caspases and Pain Perception

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, Catia; Cristino, Luigia; Luongo, Livio; Siniscalco, Dario; Petrosino, Stefania; Piscitelli, Fabiana; Marabese, Ida; Gatta, Luisa; Rossi, Francesca; Imperatore, Roberta; Palazzo, Enza; de Novellis, Vito; Di Marzo, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    During neuropathic pain, caspases are activated in the limbic cortex. We investigated the role of TRPV1 channels and glial caspases in the mouse prelimbic and infralimbic (PL-IL) cortex after spared nerve injury (SNI). Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, western blots, and immunfluorescence showed overexpression of several caspases in the PL-IL cortex 7 days postinjury. Caspase-3 release and upregulation of AMPA receptors in microglia, caspase-1 and IL-1β release in astrocytes, and upregulation of Il-1 receptor-1, TRPV1, and VGluT1 in glutamatergic neurons, were also observed. Of these alterations, only those in astrocytes persisted in SNI Trpv1−/− mice. A pan-caspase inhibitor, injected into the PL-IL cortex, reduced mechanical allodynia, this effect being reduced but not abolished in Trpv1−/− mice. Single-unit extracellular recordings in vivo following electrical stimulation of basolateral amygdala or application of pressure on the hind paw, showed increased excitatory pyramidal neuron activity in the SNI PL-IL cortex, which also contained higher levels of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol. Intra-PL-IL cortex injection of mGluR5 and NMDA receptor antagonists and AMPA exacerbated, whereas TRPV1 and AMPA receptor antagonists and a CB1 agonist inhibited, allodynia. We suggest that SNI triggers both TRPV1-dependent and independent glutamate- and caspase-mediated cross-talk among IL-PL cortex neurons and glia, which either participates or counteracts pain. PMID:22139792

  14. TRPV1-dependent and -independent alterations in the limbic cortex of neuropathic mice: impact on glial caspases and pain perception.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Catia; Cristino, Luigia; Luongo, Livio; Siniscalco, Dario; Petrosino, Stefania; Piscitelli, Fabiana; Marabese, Ida; Gatta, Luisa; Rossi, Francesca; Imperatore, Roberta; Palazzo, Enza; de Novellis, Vito; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Maione, Sabatino

    2012-11-01

    During neuropathic pain, caspases are activated in the limbic cortex. We investigated the role of TRPV1 channels and glial caspases in the mouse prelimbic and infralimbic (PL-IL) cortex after spared nerve injury (SNI). Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, western blots, and immunfluorescence showed overexpression of several caspases in the PL-IL cortex 7 days postinjury. Caspase-3 release and upregulation of AMPA receptors in microglia, caspase-1 and IL-1β release in astrocytes, and upregulation of Il-1 receptor-1, TRPV1, and VGluT1 in glutamatergic neurons, were also observed. Of these alterations, only those in astrocytes persisted in SNI Trpv1(-/-) mice. A pan-caspase inhibitor, injected into the PL-IL cortex, reduced mechanical allodynia, this effect being reduced but not abolished in Trpv1(-/-) mice. Single-unit extracellular recordings in vivo following electrical stimulation of basolateral amygdala or application of pressure on the hind paw, showed increased excitatory pyramidal neuron activity in the SNI PL-IL cortex, which also contained higher levels of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol. Intra-PL-IL cortex injection of mGluR5 and NMDA receptor antagonists and AMPA exacerbated, whereas TRPV1 and AMPA receptor antagonists and a CB(1) agonist inhibited, allodynia. We suggest that SNI triggers both TRPV1-dependent and independent glutamate- and caspase-mediated cross-talk among IL-PL cortex neurons and glia, which either participates or counteracts pain.

  15. Role of the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 receptor and stretch-activated ion channels in nitric oxide release from endothelial cells of the aorta and heart in rats

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Narváez, Juan Carlos; Mondragón, Leonardo del Valle; Varela López, Elvira; Pérez-Torres, Israel; Díaz Juárez, Julieta Anabell; Suárez, Jorge; Hernández, Gustavo Pastelín

    2012-01-01

    Shear stress stimulates nitric oxide (NO) release in endothelial cells. Stretch-activated ion channels (SACs) and the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptor respond to mechanical stimulus and are permeable to Na+, Ca2+ and K+. The influence of SACs and the TRPV1 receptor on NO release on the heart and on the vascular reactivity of the thoracic aorta (TA) was studied. Experiments were performed in isolated perfused heart, cultured endothelial cells and TA rings from Wistar rats. Capsaicin (10 μM, 30 μM) was used as a NO release stimulator, capsazepine (6 μM, 10 μM) was used as a capsaicin antagonist and gadolinium (3 μM, 5 μM) was used as an inhibitor of SACs. NO was measured by the Kelm and Tenorio methods. Left ventricular pressure was recorded and coronary vascular resistance was calculated. Capsaicin increased NO release in the heart by 58% (395±8 pmol/mL to 627±23 pmol/mL). Capsazepine and gadolinium inhibited NO release by 74% and 82%, respectively. This tendency was similar in all experimental models. Capsaicin attenuated the effects of norepinephrine (10 M to 7 M) on TA and had no effect in the presence of Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester. Therefore, the authors conclude that SACs and the TRPV1 receptor are both present in the coronary endothelium and that both participate in Ca2+-dependent NO release. PMID:23620694

  16. Role of the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 receptor and stretch-activated ion channels in nitric oxide release from endothelial cells of the aorta and heart in rats.

    PubMed

    Torres-Narváez, Juan Carlos; Mondragón, Leonardo Del Valle; Varela López, Elvira; Pérez-Torres, Israel; Díaz Juárez, Julieta Anabell; Suárez, Jorge; Hernández, Gustavo Pastelín

    2012-09-01

    Shear stress stimulates nitric oxide (NO) release in endothelial cells. Stretch-activated ion channels (SACs) and the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptor respond to mechanical stimulus and are permeable to Na(+), Ca(2+) and K(+). The influence of SACs and the TRPV1 receptor on NO release on the heart and on the vascular reactivity of the thoracic aorta (TA) was studied. Experiments were performed in isolated perfused heart, cultured endothelial cells and TA rings from Wistar rats. Capsaicin (10 μM, 30 μM) was used as a NO release stimulator, capsazepine (6 μM, 10 μM) was used as a capsaicin antagonist and gadolinium (3 μM, 5 μM) was used as an inhibitor of SACs. NO was measured by the Kelm and Tenorio methods. Left ventricular pressure was recorded and coronary vascular resistance was calculated. Capsaicin increased NO release in the heart by 58% (395±8 pmol/mL to 627±23 pmol/mL). Capsazepine and gadolinium inhibited NO release by 74% and 82%, respectively. This tendency was similar in all experimental models. Capsaicin attenuated the effects of norepinephrine (10 M to 7 M) on TA and had no effect in the presence of N (ω)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester. Therefore, the authors conclude that SACs and the TRPV1 receptor are both present in the coronary endothelium and that both participate in Ca(2+)-dependent NO release. PMID:23620694

  17. Acute heat-evoked temperature sensation is impaired but not abolished in mice lacking TRPV1 and TRPV3 channels.

    PubMed

    Marics, Irène; Malapert, Pascale; Reynders, Ana; Gaillard, Stéphane; Moqrich, Aziz

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of heat-sensitive Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid ion channels (ThermoTRPVs) greatly advanced our molecular understanding of acute and injury-evoked heat temperature sensation. ThermoTRPV channels are activated by partially overlapping temperatures ranging from warm to supra-threshold noxious heat. TRPV1 is activated by noxious heat temperature whereas TRPV3 can be activated by warm as well as noxious heat temperatures. Loss-of-function studies in single TRPV1 and TRPV3 knock-out mice have shown that heat temperature sensation is not completely abolished suggesting functional redundancies among these two channels and highlighting the need of a detailed analysis of TRPV1::TRPV3 double knock-out mice (V1V3dKO) which is hampered by the close proximity of the loci expressing the two channels. Here we describe the generation of a novel mouse model in which trpv1 and trpv3 genes have been inactivated using bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-based homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells. In these mice, using classical thermosensory tests such hot plate, tail flick and the thermotaxis gradient paradigms, we confirm that TRPV1 is the master channel for sensing noxious heat temperatures and identify a cooperative role of TRPV1 and TRPV3 for sensing a well-defined window of acute moderate heat temperature. Using the dynamic hot plate assay, we unravel an intriguing and unexpected pronounced escape behavior in TRPV1 knock-out mice that was attenuated in the V1V3dKO. Together, and in agreement with the temperature activation overlap between TRPV1 and TRPV3 channels, our data provide in vivo evidence of a cooperative role between skin-derived TRPV3 and primary sensory neurons-enriched TRPV1 in modulation of moderate and noxious heat temperature sensation and suggest that other mechanisms are required for heat temperature sensation.

  18. Capsaicin Fluidifies the Membrane and Localizes Itself near the Lipid-Water Interface.

    PubMed

    Torrecillas, Alejandro; Schneider, Monika; Fernández-Martínez, Ana M; Ausili, Alessio; de Godos, Ana M; Corbalán-García, Senena; Gómez-Fernández, Juan C

    2015-10-21

    Capsaicin is the chemical responsible for making some peppers spicy hot, but additionally it is used as a pharmaceutical to alleviate different pain conditions. Capsaicin binds to the vanilloid receptor TRPV1, which plays a role in coordinating chemical and physical painful stimuli. A number of reports have also shown that capsaicin inserts in membranes and its capacity to modify them may be part of its molecular mode of action, affecting the activity of other membrane proteins. We have used differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction, (31)P NMR, and (2)H NMR spectroscopy to show that capsaicin increases the fluidity and disorder of 1,2-palmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine membrane models. By using (1)H NOESY MAS NMR based on proton-proton cross-peaks between capsaicin and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine resonances, we determined the location profile of this molecule in a fluid membrane concluding that it occupies the upper part of the phospholipid monolayer, between the lipid-water interface and the double bond of the acyl chain in position sn-2. This location explains the disorganization of the membrane of both the lipid-water interface and the hydrophobic palisade.

  19. Osthole inhibits histamine-dependent itch via modulating TRPV1 activity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Niu-Niu; Shi, Hao; Yu, Guang; Wang, Chang-Ming; Zhu, Chan; Yang, Yan; Yuan, Xiao-Lin; Tang, Min; Wang, Zhong-li; Gegen, Tana; He, Qian; Tang, Kehua; Lan, Lei; Wu, Guan-Yi; Tang, Zong-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Osthole, an active coumarin isolated from Cnidium monnieri (L.) Cusson, has long been used in China as an antipruritic herbal medicine; however, the antipruitic mechanism of osthole is unknown. We studied the molecular mechanism of osthole in histamine-dependent itch by behavioral test, Ca2+ imaging, and electrophysiological experiments. First, osthole clearly remitted the scratching behaviors of mice induced with histamine, HTMT, and VUF8430. Second, in cultured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, osthole showed a dose-dependent inhibitory effect to histamine. On the same neurons, osthole also decreased the response to capsaicin and histamine. In further tests, the capsaicin-induced inward currents were inhibited by osthole. These results revealed that osthole inhibited histamine-dependent itch by modulating TRPV1 activity. This study will be helpful in understanding how osthole exerts anti-pruritus effects and suggests that osthole may be a useful treatment medicine for histamine-dependent itch. PMID:27160770

  20. Exploring functional roles of TRPV1 intracellular domains with unstructured peptide-insertion screening

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Linlin; Yang, Fan; Vu, Simon; Zheng, Jie

    2016-01-01

    TRPV1 is a polymodal nociceptor for diverse physical and chemical stimuli that interact with different parts of the channel protein. Recent cryo-EM studies revealed detailed channel structures, opening the door for mapping structural elements mediating activation by each stimulus. Towards this goal, here we have combined unstructured peptide-insertion screening (UPS) with electrophysiological and fluorescence recordings to explore structural and functional roles of the intracellular regions of TRPV1 in mediating various activation stimuli. We found that most of the tightly packed protein regions did not tolerate structural perturbation by UPS when tested, indicating that structural integrity of the intracellular region is critical. In agreement with previous reports, Ca2+-dependent desensitization is strongly dependent on both intracellular N- and C-terminal domains; insertions of an unstructured peptide between these domains and the transmembrane core domain nearly eliminated Ca2+-dependent desensitization. In contrast, channel activations by capsaicin, low pH, divalent cations, and even heat are mostly intact in mutant channels containing the same insertions. These observations suggest that the transmembrane core domain of TRPV1, but not the intracellular domains, is responsible for sensing these stimuli. PMID:27666400

  1. Anti-calmodulins and tricyclic adjuvants in pain therapy block the TRPV1 channel.

    PubMed

    Oláh, Zoltán; Jósvay, Katalin; Pecze, László; Letoha, Tamás; Babai, Norbert; Budai, Dénes; Otvös, Ferenc; Szalma, Sándor; Vizler, Csaba

    2007-06-20

    Ca(2+)-loaded calmodulin normally inhibits multiple Ca(2+)-channels upon dangerous elevation of intracellular Ca(2+) and protects cells from Ca(2+)-cytotoxicity, so blocking of calmodulin should theoretically lead to uncontrolled elevation of intracellular Ca(2+). Paradoxically, classical anti-psychotic, anti-calmodulin drugs were noted here to inhibit Ca(2+)-uptake via the vanilloid inducible Ca(2+)-channel/inflamatory pain receptor 1 (TRPV1), which suggests that calmodulin inhibitors may block pore formation and Ca(2+) entry. Functional assays on TRPV1 expressing cells support direct, dose-dependent inhibition of vanilloid-induced (45)Ca(2+)-uptake at microM concentrations: calmidazolium (broad range) > or = trifluoperazine (narrow range) chlorpromazine/amitriptyline>fluphenazine>W-7 and W-13 (only partially). Most likely a short acidic domain at the pore loop of the channel orifice functions as binding site either for Ca(2+) or anti-calmodulin drugs. Camstatin, a selective peptide blocker of calmodulin, inhibits vanilloid-induced Ca(2+)-uptake in intact TRPV1(+) cells, and suggests an extracellular site of inhibition. TRPV1(+), inflammatory pain-conferring nociceptive neurons from sensory ganglia, were blocked by various anti-psychotic and anti-calmodulin drugs. Among them, calmidazolium, the most effective calmodulin agonist, blocked Ca(2+)-entry by a non-competitive kinetics, affecting the TRPV1 at a different site than the vanilloid binding pocket. Data suggest that various calmodulin antagonists dock to an extracellular site, not found in other Ca(2+)-channels. Calmodulin antagonist-evoked inhibition of TRPV1 and NMDA receptors/Ca(2+)-channels was validated by microiontophoresis of calmidazolium to laminectomised rat monitored with extracellular single unit recordings in vivo. These unexpected findings may explain empirically noted efficacy of clinical pain adjuvant therapy that justify efforts to develop hits into painkillers, selective to sensory Ca(2

  2. [TRPV1 channel-mediated thermogenesis is a common mode for the Chinese pungent-hot or pungent-warm herbs to demonstrate their natures].

    PubMed

    Sui, Feng; Dai, Li; Li, Qian; Zhou, Hai-yu; Zhan, Hong-dan; Huo, Hai-ru; Jiang, Ting-liang

    2015-07-01

    To further uncover the scientific significance and molecular mechanism of the Chinese herbs with pungent hot or warm natures, endogenous and exogenous expression systems were established by isolation of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and transfection of HEK293 cells with TRPV1 channel gene separately. On this basis, the regulation action of capsaicin, one main ingredient from chili pepper, on TRPV1 channel was further explored by using confocal microscope. Besides, the three-sites one-unit technique and method were constructed based on the brown adipose tissue (BAT), anal and tail skin temperatures. Then the effect of capsaicin on mouse energy metabolism was evaluated. Both endogenous and exogenous TRPV1 channel could be activated and this action could be specifically blocked by the TRPV1 channel inhibitor capsazepine. Simultaneously, the mice's core body temperature and BAT temperature fall down and then go up, accompanied by the increase of temperature of the mice's tail skin. Promotion of the energy metabolism by activation of TRPV1 channel might be the common way for the pungent-hot (warm) herbs to demonstrate their natures. PMID:26552144

  3. [TRPV1 channel-mediated thermogenesis is a common mode for the Chinese pungent-hot or pungent-warm herbs to demonstrate their natures].

    PubMed

    Sui, Feng; Dai, Li; Li, Qian; Zhou, Hai-yu; Zhan, Hong-dan; Huo, Hai-ru; Jiang, Ting-liang

    2015-07-01

    To further uncover the scientific significance and molecular mechanism of the Chinese herbs with pungent hot or warm natures, endogenous and exogenous expression systems were established by isolation of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and transfection of HEK293 cells with TRPV1 channel gene separately. On this basis, the regulation action of capsaicin, one main ingredient from chili pepper, on TRPV1 channel was further explored by using confocal microscope. Besides, the three-sites one-unit technique and method were constructed based on the brown adipose tissue (BAT), anal and tail skin temperatures. Then the effect of capsaicin on mouse energy metabolism was evaluated. Both endogenous and exogenous TRPV1 channel could be activated and this action could be specifically blocked by the TRPV1 channel inhibitor capsazepine. Simultaneously, the mice's core body temperature and BAT temperature fall down and then go up, accompanied by the increase of temperature of the mice's tail skin. Promotion of the energy metabolism by activation of TRPV1 channel might be the common way for the pungent-hot (warm) herbs to demonstrate their natures.

  4. Capsaicin stimulates the non-store-operated Ca{sup 2+} entry but inhibits the store-operated Ca{sup 2+} entry in neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.-P. . E-mail: w1994@vghtc.gov.tw; Tseng, C.-S.; Sun, S.-P.; Chen, Y.-S.; Tsai, C.-R.; Hsu, M.-F.

    2005-12-01

    Rat neutrophils express the mRNA encoding for transient receptor potential (TRP) V1. However, capsaicin-stimulated [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} elevation occurred only at high concentrations ({>=}100 {mu}M). This response was substantially decreased in a Ca{sup 2+}-free medium. Vanilloids displayed similar patterns of Ca{sup 2+} response with the rank order of potency as follows: scutigeral>resiniferatoxin>capsazepine>capsaicin=olvanil>isovelleral. Arachidonyl dopamine (AAD), an endogenous ligand for TRPV1, failed to desensitize the subsequent capsaicin challenge. Capsaicin-induced Ca{sup 2+} response was not affected by 8-bromo-cyclic ADP-ribose (8-Br-cADPR), the ryanodine receptor blocker, but was slightly attenuated by 1-[6-[17{beta}-3-methoxyestra-1,3,5(10)-trien-17-yl]amino]hexyl]-1H-pyrrole-2,= 5-dione (U-73122), the inhibitor of phospholipase C-coupled processes, 1-[{beta}-[3-(4-methoxyphenyl)propoxy]-4-methoxyphenethyl]-1H-imidazole (SKF-96365), the blocker of receptor-gated and store-operated Ca{sup 2+} (SOC) channels, 2-aminoethyldiphenyl borate (2-APB), the blocker of D-myo-inositol 1,4,5-trisphospahte (IP{sub 3}) receptor and Ca{sup 2+} influx, and by ruthenium red, a blocker of TRPV channels, and enhanced by the Ca{sup 2+} channels blocker, cis-N-(2-phenylcyclopentyl)azacyclotridec-1-en-2-amine (MDL-12330A) and Na{sup +}-deprivation. In addition, capsaicin had no effect on the plasma membrane Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase activity or the production of nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) or on the total thiols content. Capsaicin ({>=}100 {mu}M) inhibited the cyclopiazonic acid (CPA)-induced store-operated Ca{sup 2+} entry (SOCE). In the absence of external Ca{sup 2+}, the robust Ca{sup 2+} entry after subsequent addition of Ca{sup 2+} was decreased by capsaicin in CPA-activated cells. Capsaicin alone increased the actin cytoskeleton, and also increased the actin filament content in cell activation with CPA. These results indicate that capsaicin

  5. Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 Expression and Functionality in MCF-7 Cells: A Preliminary Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Barbero, Raffaella; Cuniberti, Barbara; Racca, Silvia; Abbadessa, Giuliana; Piccione, Francesca; Re, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is a nonselective cation channel belonging to the transient receptor potential family, and it is expressed in different neoplastic tissues. Its activation is associated with regulation of cancer growth and progression. The aim of this research was to study the expression and pharmacological characteristics of TRPV1 in cells derived from human breast cancer MCF-7 cells. Methods TRPV1 presence was assessed by binding studies and Western blotting. Receptor binding characteristics were evaluated through competition assays, while 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5,-dipheyltetrazolium bromide reduction assays were performed to confirm an early hypothesis regarding the modulation of cancer cell proliferation. The functionality of TRPV1 was evaluated by measuring Ca2+ uptake in the presence of increasing concentrations of TRPV1 agonists and antagonists. Results Binding studies identified a single class of TRPV1 (Bmax 1,492±192 fmol/mg protein), and Western blot showed a signal at 100 kDa corresponding to the molecular weight of human TRPV1. Among the different tested agonists and antagonists, anandamide (Ki: 2.8×10-11 M) and 5-iodoresiniferatoxin (5-I-RTX) (Ki: 5.6×10-11 M) showed the highest degrees of affinity for TRPV1, respectively. All tested TRPV1 agonists and antagonists caused a significant (p<0.05) decrease in cell growth rate in MCF-7 cells. For agonists and antagonists, the efficacy of tested compounds displayed the following rank order: resiniferatoxin>anandamide>capsaicin and 5-I-RTX=capsazepine, respectively. Conclusion These data indicate that both TRPV1 agonists and antagonists induce significant inhibition of MCF-7 cell growth. Even though the mechanisms involved in the antiproliferative effects of TRPV1 agonists and antagonists should be further investigated, it has been suggested that agonists cause desensitization of the receptor, leading to alteration in Ca2+-influx regulation. By contrast

  6. Acid potentiation of the capsaicin receptor determined by a key extracellular site.

    PubMed

    Jordt, S E; Tominaga, M; Julius, D

    2000-07-01

    The capsaicin (vanilloid) receptor, VR1, is a sensory neuron-specific ion channel that serves as a polymodal detector of pain-producing chemical and physical stimuli. The response of VR1 to capsaicin or noxious heat is dynamically potentiated by extracellular protons within a pH range encountered during tissue acidosis, such as that associated with arthritis, infarction, tumor growth, and other forms of injury. A molecular determinant for this important physiological activity was localized to an extracellular Glu residue (E600) in the region linking the fifth transmembrane domain with the putative pore-forming region of the channel. We suggest that this residue serves as a key regulatory site of the receptor by setting sensitivity to other noxious stimuli in response to changes in extracellular proton concentration. We also demonstrate that protons, vanilloids, and heat promote channel opening through distinct pathways, because mutations at a second site (E648) selectively abrogate proton-evoked channel activation without diminishing responses to other noxious stimuli. Our findings provide molecular evidence for stimulus-specific steps in VR1 activation and offer strategies for the development of novel analgesic agents. PMID:10859346

  7. Role of the outer pore domain in transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 dynamic permeability to large cations.

    PubMed

    Munns, Clare H; Chung, Man-Kyo; Sanchez, Yuly E; Amzel, L Mario; Caterina, Michael J

    2015-02-27

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) has been shown to alter its ionic selectivity profile in a time- and agonist-dependent manner. One hallmark of this dynamic process is an increased permeability to large cations such as N-methyl-D-glucamine (NMDG). In this study, we mutated residues throughout the TRPV1 pore domain to identify loci that contribute to dynamic large cation permeability. Using resiniferatoxin (RTX) as the agonist, we identified multiple gain-of-function substitutions within the TRPV1 pore turret (N628P and S629A), pore helix (F638A), and selectivity filter (M644A) domains. In all of these mutants, maximum NMDG permeability was substantially greater than that recorded in wild type TRPV1, despite similar or even reduced sodium current density. Two additional mutants, located in the pore turret (G618W) and selectivity filter (M644I), resulted in significantly reduced maximum NMDG permeability. M644A and M644I also showed increased and decreased minimum NMDG permeability, respectively. The phenotypes of this panel of mutants were confirmed by imaging the RTX-evoked uptake of the large cationic fluorescent dye YO-PRO1. Whereas none of the mutations selectively altered capsaicin-induced changes in NMDG permeability, the loss-of-function phenotypes seen with RTX stimulation of G618W and M644I were recapitulated in the capsaicin-evoked YO-PRO1 uptake assay. Curiously, the M644A substitution resulted in a loss, rather than a gain, in capsaicin-evoked YO-PRO1 uptake. Modeling of our mutations onto the recently determined TRPV1 structure revealed several plausible mechanisms for the phenotypes observed. We conclude that side chain interactions at a few specific loci within the TRPV1 pore contribute to the dynamic process of ionic selectivity.

  8. Role of the Outer Pore Domain in Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 Dynamic Permeability to Large Cations*

    PubMed Central

    Munns, Clare H.; Chung, Man-Kyo; Sanchez, Yuly E.; Amzel, L. Mario; Caterina, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) has been shown to alter its ionic selectivity profile in a time- and agonist-dependent manner. One hallmark of this dynamic process is an increased permeability to large cations such as N-methyl-d-glucamine (NMDG). In this study, we mutated residues throughout the TRPV1 pore domain to identify loci that contribute to dynamic large cation permeability. Using resiniferatoxin (RTX) as the agonist, we identified multiple gain-of-function substitutions within the TRPV1 pore turret (N628P and S629A), pore helix (F638A), and selectivity filter (M644A) domains. In all of these mutants, maximum NMDG permeability was substantially greater than that recorded in wild type TRPV1, despite similar or even reduced sodium current density. Two additional mutants, located in the pore turret (G618W) and selectivity filter (M644I), resulted in significantly reduced maximum NMDG permeability. M644A and M644I also showed increased and decreased minimum NMDG permeability, respectively. The phenotypes of this panel of mutants were confirmed by imaging the RTX-evoked uptake of the large cationic fluorescent dye YO-PRO1. Whereas none of the mutations selectively altered capsaicin-induced changes in NMDG permeability, the loss-of-function phenotypes seen with RTX stimulation of G618W and M644I were recapitulated in the capsaicin-evoked YO-PRO1 uptake assay. Curiously, the M644A substitution resulted in a loss, rather than a gain, in capsaicin-evoked YO-PRO1 uptake. Modeling of our mutations onto the recently determined TRPV1 structure revealed several plausible mechanisms for the phenotypes observed. We conclude that side chain interactions at a few specific loci within the TRPV1 pore contribute to the dynamic process of ionic selectivity. PMID:25568328

  9. TRPV1-dependent regulation of synaptic activity in the mouse dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve

    PubMed Central

    Anwar, Imran J.; Derbenev, Andrei V.

    2013-01-01

    The dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMV) is a key integrative point of the parasympathetic neuronal network localized in the dorsal vagal complex. Activity of neurons in the DMV is closely regulated by synaptic inputs, and regulation of excitatory and inhibitory synapsis by transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) has been demonstrated. Activation of TRPV1 by heat, protons, endovanilloids, endocannabinoids, and inflammatory mediators is well established. In our study we hypothesized that TRPV1 contributes to the synaptic transmission of DMV neurons at physiological range of temperature without additional stimuli. Using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings we evaluated the effect of a rapid increase of temperature on excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission and the contribution of TRPV1 to this response. Rapid increase of temperature from 25 to 37°C increased the frequency of miniature excitatory post-synaptic currents (mEPSC) by 351.7%. The frequency of miniature inhibitory post-synaptic currents (mIPSC) also increased by 184.7%. 5′-iodoresiniferatoxin (5′-iRFT), a selective TRPV1 antagonist, prevented the increase of mEPSC and mIPSC frequency. In summary, our data demonstrate that at physiological range of temperature TRPV1 contributes to presynaptic neurotransmission of DMV neurons. PMID:24379754

  10. Involvement of TRPV1 in the Olfactory Bulb in Rimonabant-Induced Olfactory Discrimination Deficit.

    PubMed

    Hu, Sherry Shu-Jung

    2016-02-29

    Rimonabant is well recognized as a cannabinoid CB₁ receptor antagonist/inverse agonist. Rimonabant not only antagonizes the effects induced by exogenous cannabinoids and endocannabinoids at CB₁ receptors, it also exerts several pharmacological and behavioral effects independent of CB₁ receptor inactivation. For example, rimonabant can function as a low-potency mixed agonist/antagonist of the transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor 1 (TRPV1). Hence, it is important to explain the underlying mechanisms of the diverse physiological effects induced by rimonabant with caution. Interestingly, CB₁ receptor has recently been suggested to play a role in olfactory functions. Olfaction not only is involved in food intake, visual perception and social interaction, but also is proposed as a putative marker for schizophrenia and autism. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate whether CB₁ receptor and TRPV1 played a role in olfactory functions. We first used the genetic disruption approach to examine the role of CB₁ receptor in olfactory functions and found that CB₁ knockout mice exhibited olfactory discrimination deficit. However, it is important to point out that these CB₁ knockout mice, despite their normal locomotivity, displayed deficiencies in the olfactory foraging and novel object exploration tasks. These results imply that general exploratory behaviors toward odorant and odorless objects are compromised in CB₁ knockout mice. We next turned to the pharmacological approach to examine the role of CB₁ receptor and TRPV1 in olfactory functions. We found that the short-term administration of rimonabant, injected systemically or directly into the olfactory bulb (OB), impaired olfactory discrimination that was rescued by the TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine (CPZ), via the same route of rimonabant, in wild-type mice. These results suggest that TRPV1 in the OB is involved in rimonabant-induced olfactory discrimination deficit. However, the

  11. Capsaicin, acid and heat-evoked currents in rat trigeminal ganglion neurons: relationship to functional VR1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Liu, L; Simon, S A

    2000-05-01

    Activation of primary trigeminal (TG) neurons by protons, capsaicin, or heat can evoke a variety of sensations, including tingling, stinging, warmth, and burning. Capsaicin and acid are trigeminal stimulants that are important in gustatory physiology. These stimuli can activate H(+)-gated ion channels and heterologously expressed VR1 receptors (vanilloid receptor 1). We have obtained evidence by using electrophysiological and pharmacological measurements on TG neurons that these three stimuli can activate many receptors, and we have determined the extent they behave similarly to VR1 receptors and H(+)-gated channels from the DEGenerin/ENaC superfamily. Whole-cell recordings from rat TG neurons revealed that protons evoked transient (Tp), sustained (Sp), and biphasic (TSp) currents. Tp currents had reversal potentials (Vr) of 24-45 mV, a pH(0.5) range from 5.5 to 6.5, and were inhibited by amiloride, suggesting the presence of functional H(+)-gated channels. Sp currents were inhibited by the VR1 antagonist capsazepine, had Vr's approximately 0 mV, and had pH(0.5) = 6.4. Capsaicin also activated transient (Tc), sustained (Sc), and biphasic (TSc) currents. At pH 5.9, the sensitivity of the Sc currents increased by about a factor of 10, which may partially account for the synergistic responses of acid in foods containing capsaicin. Heating TG neurons evoked a thermally active, capsazepine-inhibitable current with threshold temperature of 43 degrees C and Vr = 5 mV that is also present in neurons activated by and protons (Sp) and capsaicin (Sc). These data suggest that TG neurons have functional receptors that behave similarly to VR1. Activation of such receptors should result in a burning sensation, whereas activation of the transient and biphasic currents should result in other taste descriptors.

  12. Hydrogen sulfide prevents ethanol-induced gastric damage in mice: role of ATP-sensitive potassium channels and capsaicin-sensitive primary afferent neurons.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, Jand Venes R; Bezerra, Víctor H; Gomes, Antoniella S; Barbosa, André Luiz R; Lima-Júnior, Roberto César P; Soares, Pedro Marcos G; Brito, Gerly Anne C; Ribeiro, Ronaldo A; Cunha, Fernando Q; Souza, Marcellus H L P

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the protective effect of hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) on ethanol-induced gastric lesions in mice and the influence of ATP-sensitive potassium (K(ATP)) channels, capsaicin-sensitive sensory afferent neurons, and transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) 1 receptors on such an effect. Saline and L-cysteine alone or with propargylglycine, sodium hydrogen sulfide (NaHS), or Lawesson's reagent were administrated for testing purposes. For other experiments, mice were pretreated with glibenclamide, neurotoxic doses of capsaicin, or capsazepine. Afterward, mice received L-cysteine, NaHS, or Lawesson's reagent. After 30 min, 50% ethanol was administrated by gavage. After 1 h, mice were sacrificed, and gastric damage was evaluated by macroscopic and microscopic analyses. L-cysteine, NaHS, and Lawesson's reagent treatment prevented ethanol-induced macroscopic and microscopic gastric damage in a dose-dependent manner. Administration of propargylglycine, an inhibitor of endogenous H(2)S synthesis, reversed gastric protection induced by L-cysteine. Glibenclamide reversed L-cysteine, NaHS, or Lawesson's reagent gastroprotective effects against ethanol-induced macroscopic damage in a dose-dependent manner. Chemical ablation of sensory afferent neurons by capsaicin reversed gastroprotective effects of L-cysteine or H(2)S donors (NaHS or Lawesson's reagent) in ethanol-induced macroscopic gastric damage. Likewise, in the presence of the TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine, the gastroprotective effects of L-cysteine, NaHS, or Lawesson's reagent were also abolished. Our results suggest that H(2)S prevents ethanol-induced gastric damage. Although there are many mechanisms through which this effect can occur, our data support the hypothesis that the activation of K(ATP) channels and afferent neurons/TRPV1 receptors is of primary importance. PMID:19491326

  13. Effect of capsaicin on potassium conductance and electromotility of guinea pig outer hair cell

    PubMed Central

    Wu, T; Song, L; Shi, X; Jiang, Z; Santos-Sacchi, J; Nuttall, A.L

    2012-01-01

    Capsaicin, the classic activator of TRPV-1 channels in primary sensory neurons, evokes nociception. Interestingly, auditory reception is also modulated by this chemical, possibly by direct actions on outer hair cells (OHCs). Surprisingly, we find two novel actions of capsaicin unrelated to TRPV-1 channels, which likely contribute to its auditory effects in vivo. First, capsaicin is a potent blocker of OHC K conductances (IK and IK,n). Second, capsaicin substantially alters OHC nonlinear capacitance, the signature of electromotility – a basis of cochlear amplification. These new findings of capsaicin have ramifications for our understanding of the pharmacological properties of OHC IK, IK,n and electromotility and for interpretation of capsaicin pharmacological actions. PMID:21044673

  14. Emerging Role of Spinal Cord TRPV1 in Pain Exacerbation

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Seung-In; Lim, Ji Yeon; Yoo, Sungjae; Kim, Hyun; Hwang, Sun Wook

    2016-01-01

    TRPV1 is well known as a sensor ion channel that transduces a potentially harmful environment into electrical depolarization of the peripheral terminal of the nociceptive primary afferents. Although TRPV1 is also expressed in central regions of the nervous system, its roles in the area remain unclear. A series of recent reports on the spinal cord synapses have provided evidence that TRPV1 plays an important role in synaptic transmission in the pain pathway. Particularly, in pathologic pain states, TRPV1 in the central terminal of sensory neurons and interneurons is suggested to commonly contribute to pain exacerbation. These observations may lead to insights regarding novel synaptic mechanisms revealing veiled roles of spinal cord TRPV1 and may offer another opportunity to modulate pathological pain by controlling TRPV1. In this review, we introduce historical perspectives of this view and details of the recent promising results. We also focus on extended issues and unsolved problems to fully understand the role of TRPV1 in pathological pain. Together with recent findings, further efforts for fine analysis of TRPV1's plastic roles in pain synapses at different levels in the central nervous system will promote a better understanding of pathologic pain mechanisms and assist in developing novel analgesic strategies. PMID:26885404

  15. Increased TRPV1 and PAR2 mRNA expression levels are associated only with the esophageal reflux symptoms, but not with the extraesophageal reflux symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Joo; Kim, Nayoung; Choi, Yoon Jin; Kim, Joo Sung; Jung, Hyun Chae

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) receptor and proteinase-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) have been implicated in the mechanism of acid-induced inflammation in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). We aimed to evaluate TRPV1 and PAR2 mRNA expression levels in the GERD patients and their relationship with endoscopic findings and reflux symptoms. Sixteen healthy controls, 45 patients with erosive reflux disease (ERD), and 14 nonerosive reflux disease (NERD) patients received endoscopy and completed questionnaires. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reactions (qPCR) of TRPV1, glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), nerve growth factor (NGF), PAR2, and interleukin (IL)-8 were performed in the distal esophagus specimen. The levels of TRPV1, GDNF, NGF, PAR2, and IL-8 mRNA expression were highest in the ERD group followed by NERD and control groups and the differences between control and ERD groups were statistically significant. Within the ERD group, patients with grade B in Los Angeles (LA) classification showed significantly higher levels of TRPV1, GDNF, and NGF mRNA expression than those with grade A. Presence of reflux symptoms was associated with significant higher levels of TRPV1, PAR2, and IL-8. Notably not extraesophageal but esophageal reflux symptoms were significantly associated with them. Upregulation of TRPV1 and PAR2 pathways might play a role in the development of distal esophageal inflammation and reflux symptoms. And extraesophageal reflux symptoms might not be associated with these processes. PMID:27512850

  16. CPEB3 Deficiency Elevates TRPV1 Expression in Dorsal Root Ganglia Neurons to Potentiate Thermosensation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chih-Cheng; Huang, Yi-Shuian

    2016-01-01

    Cytoplasmic polyadenylation element binding protein 3 (CPEB3) is a sequence-specific RNA-binding protein that downregulates translation of multiple plasticity-related proteins (PRPs) at the glutamatergic synapses. Activity-induced synthesis of PRPs maintains long-lasting synaptic changes that are critical for memory consolidation and chronic pain manifestation. CPEB3-knockout (KO) mice show aberrant hippocampus-related plasticity and memory, so we investigated whether CPEB3 might have a role in nociception-associated plasticity. CPEB3 is widely expressed in the brain and peripheral afferent sensory neurons. CPEB3-KO mice with normal mechanosensation showed hypersensitivity to noxious heat. In the complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced inflammatory pain model, CPEB3-KO animals showed normal thermal hyperalgesia and transiently enhanced mechanical hyperalgesia. Translation of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) RNA was suppressed by CPEB3 in dorsal root ganglia (DRG), whereas CFA-induced inflammation reversed this inhibition. Moreover, CPEB3/TRPV1 double-KO mice behaved like TRPV1-KO mice, with severely impaired thermosensation and thermal hyperalgesia. An enhanced thermal response was recapitulated in non-inflamed but not inflamed conditional-KO mice, with cpeb3 gene ablated mostly but not completely, in small-diameter nociceptive DRG neurons. CPEB3-regulated translation of TRPV1 RNA may play a role in fine-tuning thermal sensitivity of nociceptors. PMID:26915043

  17. 7-tert-Butyl-6-(4-chloro-phenyl)-2-thioxo-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidin-4-one, a classic polymodal inhibitor of transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 with a reduced liability for hyperthermia, is analgesic and ameliorates visceral hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Nash, Mark S; McIntyre, Peter; Groarke, Alex; Lilley, Elliot; Culshaw, Andrew; Hallett, Allan; Panesar, Moh; Fox, Alyson; Bevan, Stuart

    2012-08-01

    The therapeutic potential of transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) antagonists for chronic pain has been recognized for more than a decade. However, preclinical and clinical data revealed that acute pharmacological blockade of TRPV1 perturbs thermoregulation, resulting in hyperthermia, which is a major hurdle for the clinical development of these drugs. Here, we describe the properties of 7-tert-butyl-6-(4-chloro-phenyl)-2-thioxo-2,3-dihydro-1H-pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidin-4-one (BCTP), a TRPV1 antagonist with excellent analgesic properties that does not induce significant hyperthermia in rodents at doses providing maximal analgesia. BCTP is a classic polymodal inhibitor of TRPV1, blocking activation of the human channel by capsaicin and low pH with IC(50) values of 65.4 and 26.4 nM, respectively. Similar activity was observed with rat TRPV1, and the inhibition by BCTP was competitive and reversible. BCTP also blocked heat-induced activation of TRPV1. In rats, the inhibition of capsaicin-induced mechanical hyperalgesia was observed with a D(50) value of 2 mg/kg p.o. BCTP also reversed visceral hypersensitivity and somatic inflammatory pain, and using a model of neuropathic pain in TRPV1 null mice we confirmed that its analgesic properties were solely through the inhibition of TRPV1. We were surprised to find that BCTP administered orally induced only a maximal 0.6°C increase in core body temperature at the highest tested doses (30 and 100 mg/kg), contrasting markedly with N-[4-({6-[4-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]pyrimidin-4-yl}oxy)-1,3-benzothiazol-2-yl]acetamide (AMG517), a clinically tested TRPV1 antagonist, which induced marked hyperthermia (>1°C) at doses eliciting submaximal reversal of capsaicin-induced hyperalgesia. The combined data indicate that TRPV1 antagonists with a classic polymodal inhibition profile can be identified where the analgesic action is separated from the effects on body temperature.

  18. Capsaicin receptors are colocalized with sweet/bitter receptors in the taste sensing cells of circumvallate papillae

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Young Wha; Lee, Jong-Ho; Yoo, Sang Bae

    2009-01-01

    We examined co-localization of vanilloid receptor (VR1) with sweet receptors T1R2, T1R3, or bitter receptor T2R6 in taste receptor cells of rat circumvallate papillae. Tissue sections of rat circumvallate papillae were doubly reacted with anti-VR1 antibodies and anti-T1R2, anti-T1R3 or anti-T2R6 antibodies, using double-immunofluorescence histochemistry technique. Localizations of VR1, T1Rs and T2R6 in the vallate taste cells containing α-gustducin were also examined. VR1 immunoreactivities (-ir) were observed in subsets of taste cells in the circumvallate papillae, and 96–99% of the vallate taste cells exhibiting T1R2-, T1R3- or T2R6-ir co-exhibited VR1-ir. Approximately half of T2R6-ir cells (~49%), and 50–58% of T1Rs-ir cells, co-exhibited α-gustducin-ir in the vallate taste buds. About 58% of VR1-ir cells in the vallate exhibited α-gustducin-ir as well. Results support the idea that capsaicin may interact with the transduction pathways of sweet and bitter taste stimuli, possibly in mediation of its receptor VR1 localized in taste receptor cells. Additionally, the partial co-localization of α-gustducin with VR1 suggests that a tentative modulatory function of capsaicin in sweet and bitter transductions in the rat circumvallate comprises of both α-gustducin-mediated and non-mediated transduction pathways. PMID:20016958

  19. TRPA1 is functionally co-expressed with TRPV1 in cardiac muscle: Co-localization at z-discs, costameres and intercalated discs

    PubMed Central

    Andrei, Spencer R.; Sinharoy, Pritam; Bratz, Ian N.; Damron, Derek S.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Transient receptor potential channels of the ankyrin subtype-1 (TRPA1) and vanilloid subtype-1 (TRPV1) are structurally related, non-selective cation channels that show a high permeability to calcium. Previous studies indicate that TRP channels play a prominent role in the regulation of cardiovascular dynamics and homeostasis, but also contribute to the pathophysiology of many diseases and disorders within the cardiovascular system. However, no studies to date have identified the functional expression and/or intracellular localization of TRPA1 in primary adult mouse ventricular cardiomyocytes (CMs). Although TRPV1 has been implicated in the regulation of cardiac function, there is a paucity of information regarding functional expression and localization of TRPV1 in adult CMs. Our current studies demonstrate that TRPA1 and TRPV1 ion channels are co-expressed at the protein level in CMs and both channels are expressed throughout the endocardium, myocardium and epicardium. Moreover, immunocytochemical localization demonstrates that both channels predominantly colocalize at the Z-discs, costameres and intercalated discs. Furthermore, specific TRPA1 and TRPV1 agonists elicit dose-dependent, transient rises in intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) that are abolished in CMs obtained from TRPA1−/− and TRPV1−/− mice. Similarly, we observed a dose-dependent attenuation of the TRPA1 and TRPV1 agonist-induced increase in [Ca2+]i when WT CMs were pretreated with increasing concentrations of selective TRPA1 or TRPV1 channel antagonists. In summary, these findings demonstrate functional expression and the precise ultrastructural localization of TRPA1 and TRPV1 ion channels in freshly isolated mouse CMs. Crosstalk between TRPA1 and TRPV1 may be important in mediating cellular signaling events in cardiac muscle. PMID:27144598

  20. Mechanism for phosphoinositide selectivity and activation of TRPV1 ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Ufret-Vincenty, Carmen A.; Klein, Rebecca M.; Collins, Marcus D.; Rosasco, Mario G.; Martinez, Gilbert Q.

    2015-01-01

    Although PI(4,5)P2 is believed to play an essential role in regulating the activity of numerous ion channels and transporters, the mechanisms by which it does so are unknown. Here, we used the ability of the TRPV1 ion channel to discriminate between PI(4,5)P2 and PI(4)P to localize the region of TRPV1 sequence that interacts directly with the phosphoinositide. We identified a point mutation in the proximal C-terminal region after the TRP box, R721A, that inverted the selectivity of TRPV1. Although the R721A mutation produced only a 30% increase in the EC50 for activation by PI(4,5)P2, it decreased the EC50 for activation by PI(4)P by more than two orders of magnitude. We used chemically induced and voltage-activated phosphatases to determine that PI(4)P continued to support TRPV1 activity even after depletion of PI(4,5)P2 from the plasma membrane. Our data cannot be explained by a purely electrostatic mechanism for interaction between the phosphoinositide and the protein, similar to that of the MARCKS (myristoylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate) effector domain or the EGF receptor. Rather, conversion of a PI(4,5)P2-selective channel to a PI(4)P-selective channel indicates that a structured phosphoinositide-binding site mediates the regulation of TRPV1 activity and that the amino acid at position 721 likely interacts directly with the moiety at the 5′ position of the phosphoinositide. PMID:25918361

  1. The distribution of TRPV1 and TRPV2 in the rat pharynx.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Rika; Sato, Tadasu; Yajima, Takehiro; Kano, Mitsuhiro; Suzuki, Toshihiko; Ichikawa, Hiroyuki

    2013-07-01

    Immunohistochemistry for two nociceptive transducers, the transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V members 1 (TRPV1) and 2 (TRPV2), was performed on the pharynx and its adjacent regions. TRPV1-immunoreactivity (IR) was detected in nerve fibers beneath and within the epithelium and/or taste bud-like structure. In the pharynx, these nerve fibers were abundant in the naso-oral part and at the border region of naso-oral and laryngeal parts. They were also numerous on the laryngeal side of the epiglottis and in the soft palate. TRPV2-IR was expressed by dendritic cells in the pharynx and epiglottis, as well as in the root of the tongue and soft palate. These cells were located in the epithelium and lamina propria. TRPV2-immunoreactive (IR) dendritic cells were numerous in the naso-oral part of the pharynx, epiglottis, and tongue. Abundance of TRPV2-IR dendritic processes usually obscured the presence of TRPV2-IR nerve fibers in these portions. However, some TRPV2-IR nerve fibers could be observed in the epithelium of the soft palate. Retrograde tracing method also revealed that sensory neurons which innervate the pharynx or soft palate were abundant in the jugular-petrosal ganglion complex and relatively rare in the nodose ganglion. In the jugular-petrosal ganglion complex, TRPV1- and TRPV2-IR were expressed by one-third of pharyngeal and soft palate neurons. TRPV2-IR was also detected in 11.5 % pharyngeal and 30.9 % soft palate neurons in the complex. Coexpression of TRPV1 and CGRP was frequent among pharyngeal and soft palate neurons. The present study suggests that TRPV1- and TRPV2-IR jugular-petrosal neurons may be associated with the regulation of the swallowing reflex.

  2. Progesterone receptor chaperone complex-based highthroughput screening assay: identification of capsaicin as inhibitor of Hsp90 machine

    PubMed Central

    Patwardhan, Chaitanya A.; Alfa, Eyad; Lu, Su; Chadli, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Hsp90 and its co-chaperones are known to be important for cancer cell survival. The N-terminal inhibitors of Hsp90 that are in ongoing clinical trials as anti-tumor agents have unfortunately shown disappointing efficacies in the clinic. Thus, novel inhibitors of the Hsp90 machine with different mechanism of action are urgently needed. We report here the development of a novel high-throughput drug-screening (HTS) assay platform to identify small molecule inhibitors of Hsp90 and its co-chaperones. This assay quantitatively measures the ability of Hsp90 and its co-chaperones to refold/protect the progesterone receptor (PR), a physiological client of Hsp90, in 96-well plate format. We screened the NIH clinical collection drug library and identified capsaicin as a hit molecule. Capsaicin is an FDA-approved drug for topical use in pain management. Cell survival assays showed that capsaicin selectively kills cancer cells and destabilizes several Hsp90 client proteins. Thus, our data may explain the seemingly pleotropic effect of capsaicin. PMID:25184514

  3. Palvanil, a non-pungent capsaicin analogue, inhibits inflammatory and neuropathic pain with little effects on bronchopulmonary function and body temperature.

    PubMed

    Luongo, Livio; Costa, Barbara; D'Agostino, Bruno; Guida, Francesca; Comelli, Francesca; Gatta, Luisa; Matteis, Maria; Sullo, Nikol; De Petrocellis, Luciano; de Novellis, Vito; Maione, Sabatino; Di Marzo, Vincenzo

    2012-09-01

    N-Palmitoyl-vanillamide (palvanil) is a non-pungent capsaicinoid, found in low amounts in Capsicum and shown to rapidly desensitize transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1 (TRPV1) channels to the action of capsaicin and to exert analgesic effects after local administration. We have investigated here if systemic administration of palvanil to mice causes two typical adverse events of TRPV1 agonists, i.e. profound changes in body temperature and bronchoconstriction, and if it can still produce effective inhibition of inflammatory and chronic pain in different experimental models. Varying doses of palvanil were tested subcutaneously and acutely on body temperature in vivo or, or as a bolus, on bronchopulmunary function ex vivo, in comparison with capsaicin. Intraperitoneal palvanil was also tested against formalin-induced nocifensive behavior and carrageenan-induced oedema and thermal hyperalgesia, acutely, and against mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in mice with spared nerve injury (SNI) of the sciatic nerve, after repeated administration over 7 days from SNI. Palvanil, at therapeutically relevant doses, produced significantly less hypothermia and bronchoconstriction than capsaicin. Palvanil (0.5-2.5 mg/kg) abolished formalin-induced nocifensive behavior and strongly attenuated SNI-induced mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia and carrageenan-induced oedema and thermal hyperalgesia. Systemic administration of the non-pungent capsaicinoid, palvanil, produces, at least in mice, much less of those side effects typical of TRPV1 agonists (hypothermia and bronchoconstriction), whilst being very effective at reducing pain and oedema. Thus, palvanil might be developed further as a novel pharmacological treatment for chronic abnormal pain.

  4. Involvement of peripheral TRPV1 in TMJ hyperalgesia induced by ethanol withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Urtado, Marília Bertoldo; Gameiro, Gustavo Hauber; Tambeli, Cláudia Herrera; Fischer, Luana; Urtado, Christiano Bertoldo; de Arruda Veiga, Maria Cecília Ferraz

    2007-11-30

    Ethanol withdrawal increases nociception after the injection of formalin into the rat's temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Little is known about the neurological basis for hyperalgesia induced by ethanol withdrawal, but it has been reported that ethanol can potentiate the response of transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor-1 (TRPV1) in superficial tissues. The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that peripheral TRPV1 could be involved on nociceptive behavioral responses induced by the injection of formalin into the TMJ region of rats exposed to chronic ethanol administration and ethanol withdrawal. Behavioral hyperalgesia was verified 12 h after ethanol withdrawal in rats that drank an ethanol solution (6.5%) for 10 days. In another group submitted to the same ethanol regimen, the selective vanilloid receptor antagonist capsazepine (300, 600 or 1200 microg/25 microl) or an equal volume of vehicle were injected into the TMJ regions 30 min before the TMJ formalin test. The local injections of capsazepine reduced the increased nociceptive responses induced by ethanol withdrawal. The effect of capsazepine on rats that did not drink ethanol was not significant. These results indicate that the peripheral TRPV1 can contribute to the hyperalgesia induced by ethanol withdrawal on deep pain conditions.

  5. Adrenergic stimulation sensitizes TRPV1 through upregulation of cystathionine β-synthetase in a rat model of visceral hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Liyan; Zhao, Liting; Qu, Ruobing; Zhu, Hong-Yan; Wang, Yongmeng; Jiang, Xinghong; Xu, Guang-Yin

    2015-11-03

    The pathogenesis of pain in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is poorly understood and treatment remains difficult. The present study was designed to investigate roles of adrenergic signaling and the endogenous hydrogen sulfide producing enzyme cystathionine β-synthetase (CBS) in a previously validated rat model of IBS induced by neonatal colonic inflammation (NCI). Here we showed that NCI-induced visceral hypersensitivity (VH) was significantly attenuated by β2 subunit inhibitor but not by β1 or β3 or α subunit inhibitor. NCI markedly elevated plasma norepinephrine (NE) concentration without alteration in expression of β2 subunit receptors in dorsal root ganglion (DRGs) innervating the colon. In addition, NCI markedly enhanced TRPV1 and CBS expression in the colon DRGs. CBS inhibitor AOAA reversed the upregulation of TRPV1 in NCI rats. In vitro experiments showed that incubation of DRG cells with NE markedly enhanced expression of TRPV1, which was reversed by application of AOAA. Incubation of DRG cells with the H2S donor NaHS greatly enhanced TRPV1 expression. Collectively, these data suggest that activation of adrenergic signaling by NCI sensitizes TRPV1 channel activity, which is likely mediated by upregulation of CBS expression in peripheral sensory neurons, thus contributing to chronic visceral hypersensitivity.

  6. Hypertonicity sensing in organum vasculosum lamina terminalis neurons: a mechanical process involving TRPV1 but not TRPV4.

    PubMed

    Ciura, Sorana; Liedtke, Wolfgang; Bourque, Charles W

    2011-10-12

    Primary osmosensory neurons in the mouse organum vasculosum lamina terminalis (OVLT) transduce hypertonicity via the activation of nonselective cation channels that cause membrane depolarization and increased action potential discharge, and this effect is absent in mice lacking expression of the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (Trpv1) gene (Ciura and Bourque, 2006). However other experiments have indicated that channels encoded by Trpv4 also contribute to central osmosensation in mice (Liedtke and Friedman, 2003; Mizuno et al., 2003). At present, the mechanism by which hypertonicity modulates cation channels in OVLT neurons is unknown, and it remains unclear whether Trpv1 and Trpv4 both contribute to this process. Here, we show that physical shrinking is necessary and sufficient to mediate hypertonicity sensing in OVLT neurons isolated from adult mice. Steps coupling progressive decreases in cell volume to increased neuronal activity were quantitatively equivalent whether shrinking was evoked by osmotic pressure or mechanical aspiration. Finally, modulation of OVLT neurons by tonicity or mechanical stimulation was unaffected by deletion of trpv4 but was abolished in cells lacking Trpv1 or wild-type neurons treated with the TRPV1 antagonist SB366791. Thus, hypertonicity sensing is a mechanical process requiring Trpv1, but not Trpv4. PMID:21994383

  7. Adrenergic stimulation sensitizes TRPV1 through upregulation of cystathionine β-synthetase in a rat model of visceral hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Liyan; Zhao, Liting; Qu, Ruobing; Zhu, Hong-Yan; Wang, Yongmeng; Jiang, Xinghong; Xu, Guang-Yin

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of pain in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is poorly understood and treatment remains difficult. The present study was designed to investigate roles of adrenergic signaling and the endogenous hydrogen sulfide producing enzyme cystathionine β-synthetase (CBS) in a previously validated rat model of IBS induced by neonatal colonic inflammation (NCI). Here we showed that NCI-induced visceral hypersensitivity (VH) was significantly attenuated by β2 subunit inhibitor but not by β1 or β3 or α subunit inhibitor. NCI markedly elevated plasma norepinephrine (NE) concentration without alteration in expression of β2 subunit receptors in dorsal root ganglion (DRGs) innervating the colon. In addition, NCI markedly enhanced TRPV1 and CBS expression in the colon DRGs. CBS inhibitor AOAA reversed the upregulation of TRPV1 in NCI rats. In vitro experiments showed that incubation of DRG cells with NE markedly enhanced expression of TRPV1, which was reversed by application of AOAA. Incubation of DRG cells with the H2S donor NaHS greatly enhanced TRPV1 expression. Collectively, these data suggest that activation of adrenergic signaling by NCI sensitizes TRPV1 channel activity, which is likely mediated by upregulation of CBS expression in peripheral sensory neurons, thus contributing to chronic visceral hypersensitivity. PMID:26527188

  8. Adrenergic stimulation sensitizes TRPV1 through upregulation of cystathionine β-synthetase in a rat model of visceral hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Liyan; Zhao, Liting; Qu, Ruobing; Zhu, Hong-Yan; Wang, Yongmeng; Jiang, Xinghong; Xu, Guang-Yin

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of pain in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is poorly understood and treatment remains difficult. The present study was designed to investigate roles of adrenergic signaling and the endogenous hydrogen sulfide producing enzyme cystathionine β-synthetase (CBS) in a previously validated rat model of IBS induced by neonatal colonic inflammation (NCI). Here we showed that NCI-induced visceral hypersensitivity (VH) was significantly attenuated by β2 subunit inhibitor but not by β1 or β3 or α subunit inhibitor. NCI markedly elevated plasma norepinephrine (NE) concentration without alteration in expression of β2 subunit receptors in dorsal root ganglion (DRGs) innervating the colon. In addition, NCI markedly enhanced TRPV1 and CBS expression in the colon DRGs. CBS inhibitor AOAA reversed the upregulation of TRPV1 in NCI rats. In vitro experiments showed that incubation of DRG cells with NE markedly enhanced expression of TRPV1, which was reversed by application of AOAA. Incubation of DRG cells with the H2S donor NaHS greatly enhanced TRPV1 expression. Collectively, these data suggest that activation of adrenergic signaling by NCI sensitizes TRPV1 channel activity, which is likely mediated by upregulation of CBS expression in peripheral sensory neurons, thus contributing to chronic visceral hypersensitivity. PMID:26527188

  9. The genetic ablation or pharmacological inhibition of TRPV1 signalling is beneficial for the restoration of quiescent osteoclast activity in ovariectomized mice

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, F; Bellini, G; Torella, M; Tortora, C; Manzo, I; Giordano, C; Guida, F; Luongo, L; Papale, F; Rosso, F; Nobili, B; Maione, S

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Osteoporosis is a condition characterized by a decrease in bone density, which decreases its strength and results in fragile bones. The endocannabinoid/endovanilloid system has been shown to be involved in the regulation of skeletal remodelling. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible modulation of bone mass mediated by the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 channel (TRPV1) in vivo and in vitro. Experimental Approach A multidisciplinary approach, including biomolecular, biochemical and morphological analysis, was used to investigate the involvement of TRPV1 in changes in bone density in vivo and osteoclast activity in vitro, in wild-type and Trpv1−/− mice, that had undergone ovariectomy or had a sham operation. Key Results Genetic deletion of Trpv1 as well as pharmacological inhibition/desensitization of TRPV1 signalling dramatically reduced the osteoclast activity in vitro and prevented the ovariectomy-induced bone loss in vivo, whereas the expression of cannabinoid type 2 (CB2) receptors was increased. Conclusions and Implications These findings highlight the pivotal role TRPV1 channels play in bone resorption and suggest a possible cross-talk between TRPV1 and CB2 receptors. Based on these results, hybrid compounds acting on both TRPV1 and CB2 receptors in an opposite manner could provide a future pharmacological tool for the treatment of diseases associated with disturbances in the bone remodelling process. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on the pharmacology of TRP channels. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-10 PMID:24308803

  10. Pharmacology and antitussive efficacy of 4-(3-trifluoromethyl-pyridin-2-yl)-piperazine-1-carboxylic acid (5-trifluoromethyl-pyridin-2-yl)-amide (JNJ17203212), a transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 antagonist in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Anindya; Scott, Brian P; Nasser, Nadia; Ao, Hong; Maher, Michael P; Dubin, Adrienne E; Swanson, Devin M; Shankley, Nigel P; Wickenden, Alan D; Chaplan, Sandra R

    2007-11-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) plays an integral role in modulating the cough reflex, and it is an attractive antitussive drug target. The purpose of this study was to characterize a TRPV1 antagonist, 4-(3-trifluoromethyl-pyridin-2-yl)-piperazine-1-carboxylic acid (5-trifluoromethyl-pyridin-2-yl)-amide (JNJ17203212), against the guinea pig TRPV1 receptor in vitro followed by a proof-of-principle study in an acid-induced model of cough. The affinity of JNJ17203212 for the recombinant guinea pig TRPV1 receptor was estimated by radioligand binding, and it was functionally characterized by antagonism of low-pH and capsaicin-induced activation of the ion channel (fluorometric imaging plate reader and electrophysiology). The nature of antagonism was further tested against the native channel in isolated guinea pig tracheal rings. Following pharmacokinetic characterization of JNJ17203212 in guinea pigs, pharmacodynamic and efficacy studies were undertaken to establish the antitussive efficacy of the TRPV1 antagonist. The pK(i) of JNJ17203212 for recombinant guinea pig TRPV1 was 7.14 +/- 0.06. JNJ17203212 inhibited both pH (pIC(50) of 7.23 +/- 0.05) and capsaicin (pIC(50) of 6.32 +/- 0.06)-induced channel activation. In whole-cell patch clamp, the pIC(50) for inhibition of guinea pig TRPV1 was 7.3 +/- 0.01. JNJ17203212 demonstrated surmountable antagonism in isolated trachea, with a pK(B) value of 6.2 +/- 0.1. Intraperitoneal administration of 20 mg/kg JNJ17203212 achieved a maximal plasma exposure of 8.0 +/- 0.4 microM, and it attenuated capsaicin evoked coughs with similar efficacy to codeine (25 mg/kg). Last, JNJ17203212 dose-dependently produced antitussive efficacy in citric acid-induced experimental cough in guinea pigs. Our data provide preclinical support for developing TRPV1 antagonists for the treatment of cough.

  11. Effects of the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 antagonist A-425619 on body temperature and thermoregulation in the rat.

    PubMed

    Mills, C; McMackin, M; Jaffe, R; Yu, J; Zininberg, E; Slee, D; Gogas, K; Bradbury, M

    2008-09-22

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) receptor antagonists have gained much attention for their potential to treat inflammatory and neuropathic pain. However, systemic administration of TRPV1 antagonists induces a period of hyperthermia, a potential liability for small molecule development. Here we characterize the effects of the TRPV1 antagonist A-425619 on body temperature (T(b)) in the rat when administered: (1) alone at different times of the circadian cycle, (2) as repeated hourly or daily treatment, (3) as pre-treatment to prevent capsaicin-induced hypothermia, (4) to capsaicin-desensitized animals, and (5) prior to a heat challenge. Changes in T(b) were compared with compound exposure data, locomotor activity, and time course of efficacy in inflammatory pain models. Without affecting locomotor activity, oral administration of A-425619 induced a transient period of hyperthermia that was followed by a period of hypothermia, a profile unique among reported TRPV1 antagonists. Repeated hourly administration of A-425619 produced an increase in T(b) similar to a single administration. A-425619 had no effect on T(b) when administered to capsaicin-desensitized rats. The duration of A-425619-induced hyperthermia, but not hypothermia, was dependent on the time of the circadian cycle when administered. Pre-treatment with A-425619 attenuated capsaicin-induced hypothermia and did not potentiate T(b) or alter thermoregulatory behavioral responses during a heat challenge. These results indicate that A-425619-induced hyperthermia is transient, circadian-dependent, not related to exposure levels, locomotor activity, or time course of analgesic action, and does not affect the ability to thermoregulate during a heat challenge.

  12. Energetics of Ion Permeation in an Open-Activated TRPV1 Channel.

    PubMed

    Jorgensen, Christian; Furini, Simone; Domene, Carmen

    2016-09-20

    Ion channels enable diffusion of ions down physiological electrochemical gradients. Modulation of ion permeation is crucial for the physiological functioning of cells, and misregulation of ion channels is linked to a myriad of channelopathies. The ion permeation mechanism in the transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channel family is currently not understood at an atomistic level. In this work, we employed a simulation strategy for ion permeation (molecular-dynamics simulations with bias-exchange metadynamics) to study and compare monovalent (Na(+), K(+)) ion permeation in the open-activated TRP vanniloid-1 (TRPV1) ion channel. Using ∼3.6 μs of simulation trajectories, we obtained atomistic evidence for the nonselective nature of TRPV1. Our analysis shows that solvated monovalent ions permeate through the selectivity filter with comparable energetic barriers via a two-site mechanism. Finally, we confirmed that an intracellular binding site is located between the intracellular gate residues I679 and E684. PMID:27653480

  13. Energetics of Ion Permeation in an Open-Activated TRPV1 Channel.

    PubMed

    Jorgensen, Christian; Furini, Simone; Domene, Carmen

    2016-09-20

    Ion channels enable diffusion of ions down physiological electrochemical gradients. Modulation of ion permeation is crucial for the physiological functioning of cells, and misregulation of ion channels is linked to a myriad of channelopathies. The ion permeation mechanism in the transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channel family is currently not understood at an atomistic level. In this work, we employed a simulation strategy for ion permeation (molecular-dynamics simulations with bias-exchange metadynamics) to study and compare monovalent (Na(+), K(+)) ion permeation in the open-activated TRP vanniloid-1 (TRPV1) ion channel. Using ∼3.6 μs of simulation trajectories, we obtained atomistic evidence for the nonselective nature of TRPV1. Our analysis shows that solvated monovalent ions permeate through the selectivity filter with comparable energetic barriers via a two-site mechanism. Finally, we confirmed that an intracellular binding site is located between the intracellular gate residues I679 and E684.

  14. Assessment of the biological similarity of three capsaicin analogs (Capsinoids) found in non-pungent chili pepper (CH-19 Sweet) fruits.

    PubMed

    Sasahara, Ikuko; Furuhata, Yasufumi; Iwasaki, Yusaku; Inoue, Naohiko; Sato, Hitoshi; Watanabe, Tatsuo; Takahashi, Michio

    2010-01-01

    CH-19 Sweet is a newly found chili pepper breed bearing much less pungent fruits. Because CH-19 Sweet fruits were found to contain three analogs (capsinoids) of capsaicin, a major component of pungency of hot peppers (the analogs are capsiate or CST, dihydrocapsiate or DCT, and nordihydrocapsiate or NDCT), we assessed in this study the bio-potencies of these three capsinoids by comparing them with capsaicin. The three capsinoids bound to transient potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) receptors expressed in cultured cells and activated Ca(2+) influx in a concentration-dependent manner with similar magnitudes. In contrast to capsaicin, capsinoids at the same concentration induced virtually no nociceptive responses when applied to the eyes or the oral cavities of mice. Intravenous administration of capsaicin or 20-fold increased doses of each capsinoid to rats induced significant increases in plasma catecholamine levels. Orally administered, each capsinoid enhanced oxygen consumption in mice. Based on the present results, capsaicin and these three capsinoids should have similar bio-potency, though capsinoids do not generate pungency or sensory irritation.

  15. Excitation and Modulation of TRPA1, TRPV1, and TRPM8 Channel-expressing Sensory Neurons by the Pruritogen Chloroquine*

    PubMed Central

    Than, Jonathan Y.-X. L.; Li, Lin; Hasan, Raquibul; Zhang, Xuming

    2013-01-01

    The sensations of pain, itch, and cold often interact with each other. Pain inhibits itch, whereas cold inhibits both pain and itch. TRPV1 and TRPA1 channels transduce pain and itch, whereas TRPM8 transduces cold. The pruritogen chloroquine (CQ) was reported to excite TRPA1, leading to the sensation of itch. It is unclear how CQ excites and modulates TRPA1+, TRPV1+, and TRPM8+ neurons and thus affects the sensations of pain, itch, and cold. Here, we show that only 43% of CQ-excited dorsal root ganglion neurons expressed TRPA1; as expected, the responses of these neurons were completely prevented by the TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031. The remaining 57% of CQ-excited neurons did not express TRPA1, and excitation was not prevented by either a TRPA1 or TRPV1 antagonist but was prevented by the general transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) channel blocker BTP2 and the selective TRPC3 inhibitor Pyr3. Furthermore, CQ caused potent sensitization of TRPV1 in 51.9% of TRPV1+ neurons and concomitant inhibition of TRPM8 in 48.8% of TRPM8+ dorsal root ganglion neurons. Sensitization of TRPV1 is caused mainly by activation of the phospholipase C-PKC pathway following activation of the CQ receptor MrgprA3. By contrast, inhibition of TRPM8 is caused by a direct action of activated Gαq independent of the phospholipase C pathway. Our data suggest the involvement of the TRPC3 channel acting together with TRPA1 to mediate CQ-induced itch. CQ not only elicits itch by directly exciting itch-encoding neurons but also exerts previously unappreciated widespread actions on pain-, itch-, and cold-sensing neurons, leading to enhanced pain and itch. PMID:23508958

  16. Reduced expression of SynGAP, a neuronal GTPase-activating protein, enhances capsaicin-induced peripheral sensitization

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, Djane Braz; Duan, Jian-Hong; Nicol, Grant D.; Vasko, Michael R.

    2011-01-01

    Synaptic GTPase-activating protein (SynGAP) is a neuronal-specific Ras/Rap-GAP that increases the hydrolysis rate of GTP to GDP, converting Ras/Rap from the active into the inactive form. The Ras protein family modulates a wide range of cellular pathways including those involved in sensitization of sensory neurons. Since GAPs regulate Ras activity, SynGAP might be an important regulator of peripheral sensitization and pain. Therefore, we evaluated excitability, stimulus-evoked release of the neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), and nociception from wild-type (WT) mice and those with a heterozygous mutation of the SynGAP gene (SynGAP+/−). Our results demonstrate that SynGAP is expressed in primary afferent sensory neurons and that the capsaicin-stimulated CGRP release from spinal cord slices was two-fold higher from SynGAP+/− mice than that observed from WT mouse tissue, consistent with an increase in expression of the capsaicin receptor, transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1), in SynGAP+/− dorsal root ganglia. However, there was no difference between the two genotypes in potassium-stimulated release of CGRP, the number of action potentials generated by a ramp of depolarizing current, or mechanical hypernociception elicited by intraplantar injection of capsaicin. In contrast, capsaicin-induced thermal hypernociception occurred at lower doses of capsaicin and had a longer duration in SynGAP+/− mice than WT mice. These results provide the first evidence that SynGAP is an important regulator of neuropeptide release from primary sensory neurons and can modulate capsaicin-induced hypernociception, demonstrating the importance of GAP regulation in signaling pathways that play a role in peripheral sensitization. PMID:21525372

  17. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 channels modulate the anxiolytic effect of diazepam.

    PubMed

    Manna, Shyamshree S S; Umathe, Sudhir N

    2011-11-24

    The present study investigated the interaction between the vanilloid and GABAergic systems on anxiety. Swiss mice were subjected to social interaction test, an animal model for assessing anxiety-related behavior, after intracerebroventricular administration of capsaicin, (TRPV1 agonist) or capsazepine, (TRPV1 antagonist) either alone or in combination with traditional anxiolytic drug, diazepam. Results showed that capsaicin (1, 10, and 100 μg/mouse) decreased the interaction time exhibiting an anxiogenic-like response, while capsazepine (10, and 100 μg/mouse) produced anxiolytic-like response similar to that of diazepam (0.25-4 mg/kg, i.p). Prior administration of capsaicin at a dose, inactive per se (0.1 μg/mouse) attenuated the anxiolytic effect of diazepam, whereas, co-administration of capsazepine and diazepam both in their sub-effective as well as effective doses exhibited significant anxiolytic-like effect. Interestingly, the combined treatment of diazepam (2mg/kg) and capsazepine (100μg/mouse) produced no sedative or locomotor deficit effects. On the contrary, a higher dose of diazepam (>2mg/kg) alone was found to be a sedative or locomotor depressant, indicating that the anxiolytic effect of diazepam, at least in part involve TRPV1 receptor. Morever, capsazepine pretreatment blocked the anxiogenic effect of capsaicin (1, and 100 μg/mouse). Taken together, these findings suggest that blockade of TRPV1 might be a functional tool to prevent the risks associated with the long-term use of benzodiazepines.

  18. TRPV1 and TRPM8 in Treatment of Chronic Cough.

    PubMed

    Millqvist, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Chronic cough is common in the population, and among some there is no evident medical explanation for the symptoms. Such a refractory or idiopathic cough is now often regarded as a neuropathic disease due to dysfunctional airway ion channels, though the knowledge in this field is still limited. Persistent coughing and a cough reflex easily triggered by irritating stimuli, often in combination with perceived dyspnea, are characteristics of this disease. The patients have impaired quality of life and often reduced work capacity, followed by social and economic consequences. Despite the large number of individuals suffering from such a persisting cough, there is an unmet clinical need for effective cough medicines. The cough treatment available today often has little or no effect. Adverse effects mostly follow centrally acting cough drugs comprised of morphine and codeine, which demands the physician's awareness. The possibilities of modulating airway transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels may indicate new ways to treat the persistent cough "without a reason". The TRP ion channel vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) and the TRP melastin 8 (TRPM8) appear as two candidates in the search for cough therapy, both as single targets and in reciprocal interaction. PMID:27483288

  19. TRPV1 and TRPM8 in Treatment of Chronic Cough

    PubMed Central

    Millqvist, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Chronic cough is common in the population, and among some there is no evident medical explanation for the symptoms. Such a refractory or idiopathic cough is now often regarded as a neuropathic disease due to dysfunctional airway ion channels, though the knowledge in this field is still limited. Persistent coughing and a cough reflex easily triggered by irritating stimuli, often in combination with perceived dyspnea, are characteristics of this disease. The patients have impaired quality of life and often reduced work capacity, followed by social and economic consequences. Despite the large number of individuals suffering from such a persisting cough, there is an unmet clinical need for effective cough medicines. The cough treatment available today often has little or no effect. Adverse effects mostly follow centrally acting cough drugs comprised of morphine and codeine, which demands the physician’s awareness. The possibilities of modulating airway transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels may indicate new ways to treat the persistent cough “without a reason”. The TRP ion channel vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) and the TRP melastin 8 (TRPM8) appear as two candidates in the search for cough therapy, both as single targets and in reciprocal interaction. PMID:27483288

  20. Cigarette smoke-induced neurogenic inflammation is mediated by alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes and the TRPA1 receptor in rodents.

    PubMed

    Andrè, Eunice; Campi, Barbara; Materazzi, Serena; Trevisani, Marcello; Amadesi, Silvia; Massi, Daniela; Creminon, Christophe; Vaksman, Natalya; Nassini, Romina; Civelli, Maurizio; Baraldi, Pier Giovanni; Poole, Daniel P; Bunnett, Nigel W; Geppetti, Pierangelo; Patacchini, Riccardo

    2008-07-01

    Cigarette smoke (CS) inhalation causes an early inflammatory response in rodent airways by stimulating capsaicin-sensitive sensory neurons that express transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily V, member 1 (TRPV1) through an unknown mechanism that does not involve TRPV1. We hypothesized that 2 alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes present in CS, crotonaldehyde and acrolein, induce neurogenic inflammation by stimulating TRPA1, an excitatory ion channel coexpressed with TRPV1 on capsaicin-sensitive nociceptors. We found that CS aqueous extract (CSE), crotonaldehyde, and acrolein mobilized Ca2+ in cultured guinea pig jugular ganglia neurons and promoted contraction of isolated guinea pig bronchi. These responses were abolished by a TRPA1-selective antagonist and by the aldehyde scavenger glutathione but not by the TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine or by ROS scavengers. Treatment with CSE or aldehydes increased Ca2+ influx in TRPA1-transfected cells, but not in control HEK293 cells, and promoted neuropeptide release from isolated guinea pig airway tissue. Furthermore, the effect of CSE and aldehydes on Ca2+ influx in dorsal root ganglion neurons was abolished in TRPA1-deficient mice. These data identify alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes as the main causative agents in CS that via TRPA1 stimulation mediate airway neurogenic inflammation and suggest a role for TRPA1 in the pathogenesis of CS-induced diseases.

  1. Cigarette smoke–induced neurogenic inflammation is mediated by α,β-unsaturated aldehydes and the TRPA1 receptor in rodents

    PubMed Central

    Andrè, Eunice; Campi, Barbara; Materazzi, Serena; Trevisani, Marcello; Amadesi, Silvia; Massi, Daniela; Creminon, Christophe; Vaksman, Natalya; Nassini, Romina; Civelli, Maurizio; Baraldi, Pier Giovanni; Poole, Daniel P.; Bunnett, Nigel W.; Geppetti, Pierangelo; Patacchini, Riccardo

    2008-01-01

    Cigarette smoke (CS) inhalation causes an early inflammatory response in rodent airways by stimulating capsaicin-sensitive sensory neurons that express transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily V, member 1 (TRPV1) through an unknown mechanism that does not involve TRPV1. We hypothesized that 2 α,β-unsaturated aldehydes present in CS, crotonaldehyde and acrolein, induce neurogenic inflammation by stimulating TRPA1, an excitatory ion channel coexpressed with TRPV1 on capsaicin-sensitive nociceptors. We found that CS aqueous extract (CSE), crotonaldehyde, and acrolein mobilized Ca2+ in cultured guinea pig jugular ganglia neurons and promoted contraction of isolated guinea pig bronchi. These responses were abolished by a TRPA1-selective antagonist and by the aldehyde scavenger glutathione but not by the TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine or by ROS scavengers. Treatment with CSE or aldehydes increased Ca2+ influx in TRPA1-transfected cells, but not in control HEK293 cells, and promoted neuropeptide release from isolated guinea pig airway tissue. Furthermore, the effect of CSE and aldehydes on Ca2+ influx in dorsal root ganglion neurons was abolished in TRPA1-deficient mice. These data identify α,β-unsaturated aldehydes as the main causative agents in CS that via TRPA1 stimulation mediate airway neurogenic inflammation and suggest a role for TRPA1 in the pathogenesis of CS-induced diseases. PMID:18568077

  2. Conserved residues within the putative S4-S5 region serve distinct functions among thermosensitive vanilloid transient receptor potential (TRPV) channels.

    PubMed

    Boukalova, Stepana; Marsakova, Lenka; Teisinger, Jan; Vlachova, Viktorie

    2010-12-31

    The vanilloid transient receptor potential channel TRPV1 is a tetrameric six-transmembrane segment (S1-S6) channel that can be synergistically activated by various proalgesic agents such as capsaicin, protons, heat, or highly depolarizing voltages, and also by 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB), a common activator of the related thermally gated vanilloid TRP channels TRPV1, TRPV2, and TRPV3. In these channels, the conserved charged residues in the intracellular S4-S5 region have been proposed to constitute part of a voltage sensor that acts in concert with other stimuli to regulate channel activation. The molecular basis of this gating event is poorly understood. We mutated charged residues all along the S4 and the S4-S5 linker of TRPV1 and identified four potential voltage-sensing residues (Arg(557), Glu(570), Asp(576), and Arg(579)) that, when specifically mutated, altered the functionality of the channel with respect to voltage, capsaicin, heat, 2-APB, and/or their interactions in different ways. The nonfunctional charge-reversing mutations R557E and R579E were partially rescued by the charge-swapping mutations R557E/E570R and D576R/R579E, indicating that electrostatic interactions contribute to allosteric coupling between the voltage-, temperature- and capsaicin-dependent activation mechanisms. The mutant K571E was normal in all aspects of TRPV1 activation except for 2-APB, revealing the specific role of Lys(571) in chemical sensitivity. Surprisingly, substitutions at homologous residues in TRPV2 or TRPV3 had no effect on temperature- and 2-APB-induced activity. Thus, the charged residues in S4 and the S4-S5 linker contribute to voltage sensing in TRPV1 and, despite their highly conserved nature, regulate the temperature and chemical gating in the various TRPV channels in different ways.

  3. Structure of the TRPV1 ion channel determined by electron cryo-microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Maofu; Cao, Erhu; Julius, David; Cheng, Yifan

    2014-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels are sensors for a wide range of cellular and environmental signals, but elucidating how these channels respond to physical and chemical stimuli has been hampered by a lack of detailed structural information. Here, we exploit advances in electron cryo-microscopy to determine the structure of a mammalian TRP channel, TRPV1, at 3.4Å resolution, breaking the side-chain resolution barrier for membrane proteins without crystallization. Like voltage-gated channels, TRPV1 exhibits four-fold symmetry around a central ion pathway formed by transmembrane helices S5–S6 and the intervening pore loop, which is flanked by S1–S4 voltage sensor-like domains. TRPV1 has a wide extracellular ‘mouth’ with short selectivity filter. The conserved ‘TRP domain’ interacts with the S4–S5 linker, consistent with its contribution to allosteric modulation. Subunit organization is facilitated by interactions among cytoplasmic domains, including N-terminal ankyrin repeats. These observations provide a structural blueprint for understanding unique aspects of TRP channel function. PMID:24305160

  4. Synergistic Role of TRPV1 and TRPA1 in Pancreatic Pain and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Erica S.; Christianson, Julie A.; Chen, Xiaowei; La, Jun-Ho; Davis, Brian M.; Albers, Kathryn M.; Gebhart, G.F.

    2011-01-01

    Background & Aims The transient receptor potential (TRP) channels TRPV1 and TRPA1 have each been associated with regulation of efferent properties of primary afferent neurons that initiate neurogenic inflammation and are required for the development of inflammatory hyperalgesia. To evaluate the role of these channels in producing pain during pancreatic inflammation, we studied pancreatic nodose (NG) and dorsal root (DRG) ganglion sensory neurons (identified by content of retrograde tracer) and behavioral outcomes in a mouse model of acute pancreatitis. Methods Pancreatic inflammation was induced by 8 hourly injections of caerulein (50 μg/kg). The extent of inflammation, pancreatic neuron TRP channel expression and function and excitability, and pain-related behaviors were evaluated over the course of the following week. Results Histology and myeloperoxidase activity confirmed pancreatic inflammation that was associated with increased excitability and mRNA expression of the TRP channels in NG and DRG pancreatic neurons. Calcium imaging of pancreatic NG and DRG neurons from mice given caerulein revealed increased responses to TRP agonists. TRPV1 and TRPA1 antagonists attenuated caerulein-induced pain behaviors and pancreatic inflammation; they had a synergistic effect. Conclusions Pancreatic inflammation significantly increased the expression and functional properties of TRPV1 and TRPA1, as well as the excitability of pancreatic sensory neurons in vagal and spinal pathways. TRP channel antagonists acted synergistically to reverse pancreatic inflammation and associated pain behaviors; reagents that target interactions between these channels might be developed to reduce pain in patients with acute pancreatitis. PMID:21185837

  5. Ganglion-specific splicing of TRPV1 underlies infrared sensation in vampire bats.

    PubMed

    Gracheva, Elena O; Cordero-Morales, Julio F; González-Carcacía, José A; Ingolia, Nicholas T; Manno, Carlo; Aranguren, Carla I; Weissman, Jonathan S; Julius, David

    2011-08-03

    Vampire bats (Desmodus rotundus) are obligate blood feeders that have evolved specialized systems to suit their sanguinary lifestyle. Chief among such adaptations is the ability to detect infrared radiation as a means of locating hotspots on warm-blooded prey. Among vertebrates, only vampire bats, boas, pythons and pit vipers are capable of detecting infrared radiation. In each case, infrared signals are detected by trigeminal nerve fibres that innervate specialized pit organs on the animal's face. Thus, vampire bats and snakes have taken thermosensation to the extreme by developing specialized systems for detecting infrared radiation. As such, these creatures provide a window into the molecular and genetic mechanisms underlying evolutionary tuning of thermoreceptors in a species-specific or cell-type-specific manner. Previously, we have shown that snakes co-opt a non-heat-sensitive channel, vertebrate TRPA1 (transient receptor potential cation channel A1), to produce an infrared detector. Here we show that vampire bats tune a channel that is already heat-sensitive, TRPV1, by lowering its thermal activation threshold to about 30 °C. This is achieved through alternative splicing of TRPV1 transcripts to produce a channel with a truncated carboxy-terminal cytoplasmic domain. These splicing events occur exclusively in trigeminal ganglia, and not in dorsal root ganglia, thereby maintaining a role for TRPV1 as a detector of noxious heat in somatic afferents. This reflects a unique organization of the bat Trpv1 gene that we show to be characteristic of Laurasiatheria mammals (cows, dogs and moles), supporting a close phylogenetic relationship with bats. These findings reveal a novel molecular mechanism for physiological tuning of thermosensory nerve fibres.

  6. Ganglion-specific splicing of TRPV1 underlies infrared sensation in vampire bats.

    PubMed

    Gracheva, Elena O; Cordero-Morales, Julio F; González-Carcacía, José A; Ingolia, Nicholas T; Manno, Carlo; Aranguren, Carla I; Weissman, Jonathan S; Julius, David

    2011-08-01

    Vampire bats (Desmodus rotundus) are obligate blood feeders that have evolved specialized systems to suit their sanguinary lifestyle. Chief among such adaptations is the ability to detect infrared radiation as a means of locating hotspots on warm-blooded prey. Among vertebrates, only vampire bats, boas, pythons and pit vipers are capable of detecting infrared radiation. In each case, infrared signals are detected by trigeminal nerve fibres that innervate specialized pit organs on the animal's face. Thus, vampire bats and snakes have taken thermosensation to the extreme by developing specialized systems for detecting infrared radiation. As such, these creatures provide a window into the molecular and genetic mechanisms underlying evolutionary tuning of thermoreceptors in a species-specific or cell-type-specific manner. Previously, we have shown that snakes co-opt a non-heat-sensitive channel, vertebrate TRPA1 (transient receptor potential cation channel A1), to produce an infrared detector. Here we show that vampire bats tune a channel that is already heat-sensitive, TRPV1, by lowering its thermal activation threshold to about 30 °C. This is achieved through alternative splicing of TRPV1 transcripts to produce a channel with a truncated carboxy-terminal cytoplasmic domain. These splicing events occur exclusively in trigeminal ganglia, and not in dorsal root ganglia, thereby maintaining a role for TRPV1 as a detector of noxious heat in somatic afferents. This reflects a unique organization of the bat Trpv1 gene that we show to be characteristic of Laurasiatheria mammals (cows, dogs and moles), supporting a close phylogenetic relationship with bats. These findings reveal a novel molecular mechanism for physiological tuning of thermosensory nerve fibres. PMID:21814281

  7. Polymorphisms in TRPV1 and TAS2Rs associate with sensations from sampled ethanol

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Alissa L.; McGeary, John E.; Hayes, John E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Genetic variation in chemosensory genes can explain variability in individual’s perception of and preference for many foods and beverages. To gain insight into variable preference and intake of alcoholic beverages, we explored individual variability in the responses to sampled ethanol. In humans, ethanol elicits sweet, bitter and burning sensations. Here, we explore the relationship between variation in ethanol sensations and polymorphisms in genes encoding bitter taste receptors (TAS2Rs) and a polymodal nociceptor (TRPV1). Methods Caucasian participants (n=93) were genotyped for 16 SNPs in TRPV1, 3 SNPs in TAS2R38 and 1 SNP in TAS2R13. Participants rated sampled ethanol on a generalized Labeled Magnitude Scale. Two stimuli were presented: a 16% ethanol whole mouth sip-and-spit solution with a single time-point rating of overall intensity, and a cotton swab saturated with 50% ethanol on the circumvallate papillae (CV) with repeated ratings made over 3 minutes. Area under the curve (AUC) was calculated for the time-intensity data. Results The ethanol whole mouth solution had overall intensity ratings near ‘very strong’. Burning/stinging had the highest mean AUC values, followed by bitterness and sweetness. Whole mouth intensity ratings were significantly associated with burning/stinging and bitterness AUC values on the CV. Three TRPV1 SNPs (rs224547, rs4780521, rs161364) were associated with ethanol sensations on the CV, with two (rs224547 and rs4780521) exhibiting strong linkage disequilibrium. Additionally, the TAS2R38 SNPs rs713598, rs1726866, and rs10246939 formed a haplotype, and were associated with bitterness on the CV. Lastly, overall intensity for whole mouth ethanol associated with the TAS2R13 SNP rs1015443. Conclusions These data suggest genetic variations in TRPV1 and TAS2Rs influence sensations from sampled ethanol and may potentially influence how individuals initially respond to alcoholic beverages. PMID:25257701

  8. Vitamin B complex attenuated heat hyperalgesia following infraorbital nerve constriction in rats and reduced capsaicin in vivo and in vitro effects.

    PubMed

    Kopruszinski, Caroline M; Reis, Renata C; Bressan, Elisangela; Reeh, Peter W; Chichorro, Juliana G

    2015-09-01

    Vitamins of the B complex attenuate some neuropathic pain sensory aspects in various animal models and in patients, but the mechanisms underlying their effects remain to be elucidated. Herein it was investigated if the treatment with a vitamin B complex (VBC) reduces heat hyperalgesia in rats submitted to infraorbital nerve constriction and the possibility that TRPV1 receptors represent a target for B vitamins. In the present study, the VBC refers to a combination of vitamins B1, B6 and B12 at low- (18, 18 and 1.8mg/kg, respectively) or high- (180, 180 and 18mg/kg, respectively) doses. Acute treatment of rats with either the low- or the high-doses combination reduced heat hyperalgesia after nerve injury, but the high-doses combination resulted in a long-lasting effect. Repeated treatment with the low-dose combination reduced heat hyperalgesia on day four after nerve injury and showed a synergist effect with a single injection of carbamazepine (3 or 10mg/kg), which per se failed to modify the heat threshold. In naïve rats, acute treatment with the high-dose of VBC or B1 and B12 vitamins independently reduced heat hyperalgesia evoked by capsaicin (3µg into the upper lip). Moreover, the VBC, as well as, each one of the B vitamins independently reduced the capsaicin-induced calcium responses in HEK 293 cells transiently transfected with the human TRPV1 channels. Altogether, these results indicate that B vitamins can be useful to control heat hyperalgesia associated with trigeminal neuropathic pain and that modulation of TRPV1 receptors may contribute to their anti-hyperalgesic effects.

  9. Reduced thermal sensitivity and Nav1.8 and TRPV1 channel expression in sensory neurons of aged mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuying; Davis, Brian M; Zwick, Melissa; Waxman, Stephen G; Albers, Kathryn M

    2006-06-01

    Sensory neurons in aging mammals undergo changes in anatomy, physiology and gene expression that correlate with reduced sensory perception. In this study we compared young and aged mice to identify proteins that might contribute to this loss of sensation. We first show using behavioral testing that thermal sensitivity in aged male and female mice is reduced. Expression of sodium channel (Nav1.8 and Nav1.9) and transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) channels in DRG and peripheral nerves of young and old male mice was then examined. Immunoblotting and RT-PCR assays showed reduced Nav1.8 levels in aged mice. No change was measured in TRPV1 mRNA levels in DRG though TRPV1 protein appeared reduced in the DRG and peripheral nerves. The GFRalpha3 receptor, which binds the growth factor artemin and is expressed by TRPV1-positive neurons, was also decreased in the DRG of aged animals. These findings indicate that loss of thermal sensitivity in aging animals may result from a decreased level of TRPV1 and Nav1.8 and decreased trophic support that inhibits efficient transport of channel proteins to peripheral afferents. PMID:15979214

  10. Selective Activation of Nociceptor TRPV1 Channel and Reversal of Inflammatory Pain in Mice by a Novel Coumarin Derivative Muralatin L from Murraya alata.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ning-Ning; Lv, Hai-Ning; Wu, Yang; Yang, Shi-Long; Sun, Xiao-Ying; Lai, Ren; Jiang, Yong; Wang, KeWei

    2016-01-01

    Coumarin and its derivatives are fragrant natural compounds isolated from the genus Murraya that are flowering plants widely distributed in East Asia, Australia, and the Pacific Islands. Murraya plants have been widely used as medicinal herbs for relief of pain, such as headache, rheumatic pain, toothache, and snake bites. However, little is known about their analgesic components and the molecular mechanism underlying pain relief. Here, we report the bioassay-guided fractionation and identification of a novel coumarin derivative, named muralatin L, that can specifically activate the nociceptor transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channel and reverse the inflammatory pain in mice through channel desensitization. Muralatin L was identified from the active extract of Murraya alata against TRPV1 transiently expressed in HEK-293T cells in fluorescent calcium FlexStation assay. Activation of TRPV1 current by muralatin L and its selectivity were further confirmed by whole-cell patch clamp recordings of TRPV1-expressing HEK-293T cells and dorsal root ganglion neurons isolated from mice. Furthermore, muralatin L could reverse inflammatory pain induced by formalin and acetic acid in mice but not in TRPV1 knock-out mice. Taken together, our findings show that muralatin L specifically activates TRPV1 and reverses inflammatory pain, thus highlighting the potential of coumarin derivatives from Murraya plants for pharmaceutical and medicinal applications such as pain therapy. PMID:26515068

  11. Selective Activation of Nociceptor TRPV1 Channel and Reversal of Inflammatory Pain in Mice by a Novel Coumarin Derivative Muralatin L from Murraya alata.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ning-Ning; Lv, Hai-Ning; Wu, Yang; Yang, Shi-Long; Sun, Xiao-Ying; Lai, Ren; Jiang, Yong; Wang, KeWei

    2016-01-01

    Coumarin and its derivatives are fragrant natural compounds isolated from the genus Murraya that are flowering plants widely distributed in East Asia, Australia, and the Pacific Islands. Murraya plants have been widely used as medicinal herbs for relief of pain, such as headache, rheumatic pain, toothache, and snake bites. However, little is known about their analgesic components and the molecular mechanism underlying pain relief. Here, we report the bioassay-guided fractionation and identification of a novel coumarin derivative, named muralatin L, that can specifically activate the nociceptor transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channel and reverse the inflammatory pain in mice through channel desensitization. Muralatin L was identified from the active extract of Murraya alata against TRPV1 transiently expressed in HEK-293T cells in fluorescent calcium FlexStation assay. Activation of TRPV1 current by muralatin L and its selectivity were further confirmed by whole-cell patch clamp recordings of TRPV1-expressing HEK-293T cells and dorsal root ganglion neurons isolated from mice. Furthermore, muralatin L could reverse inflammatory pain induced by formalin and acetic acid in mice but not in TRPV1 knock-out mice. Taken together, our findings show that muralatin L specifically activates TRPV1 and reverses inflammatory pain, thus highlighting the potential of coumarin derivatives from Murraya plants for pharmaceutical and medicinal applications such as pain therapy.

  12. A multi-target approach for pain treatment: dual inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase and TRPV1 in a rat model of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Malek, Natalia; Mrugala, Monika; Makuch, Wioletta; Kolosowska, Natalia; Przewlocka, Barbara; Binkowski, Marcin; Czaja, Martyna; Morera, Enrico; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Starowicz, Katarzyna

    2015-05-01

    The pharmacological inhibition of anandamide (AEA) hydrolysis by fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) attenuates pain in animal models of osteoarthritis (OA) but has failed in clinical trials. This may have occurred because AEA also activates transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1), which contributes to pain development. Therefore, we investigated the effectiveness of the dual FAAH-TRPV1 blocker OMDM-198 in an MIA-model of osteoarthritic pain. We first investigated the MIA-induced model of OA by (1) characterizing the pain phenotype and degenerative changes within the joint using X-ray microtomography and (2) evaluating nerve injury and inflammation marker (ATF-3 and IL-6) expression in the lumbar dorsal root ganglia of osteoarthritic rats and differences in gene and protein expression of the cannabinoid CB1 receptors FAAH and TRPV1. Furthermore, we compared OMDM-198 with compounds acting exclusively on FAAH or TRPV1. Osteoarthritis was accompanied by the fragmentation of bone microstructure and destroyed cartilage. An increase of the mRNA levels of ATF3 and IL-6 and an upregulation of AEA receptors and FAAH in the dorsal root ganglia were observed. OMDM-198 showed antihyperalgesic effects in the OA model, which were comparable with those of a selective TRPV1 antagonist, SB-366,791, and a selective FAAH inhibitor, URB-597. The effect of OMDM-198 was attenuated by the CB1 receptor antagonist, AM-251, and by the nonpungent TRPV1 agonist, olvanil, suggesting its action as an "indirect" CB1 agonist and TRPV1 antagonist. These results suggest an innovative strategy for the treatment of OA, which may yield more satisfactory results than those obtained so far with selective FAAH inhibitors in human OA.

  13. Increased TRPV1 and PAR2 mRNA expression levels are associated only with the esophageal reflux symptoms, but not with the extraesophageal reflux symptoms.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Joo; Kim, Nayoung; Choi, Yoon Jin; Kim, Joo Sung; Jung, Hyun Chae

    2016-08-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) receptor and proteinase-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) have been implicated in the mechanism of acid-induced inflammation in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). We aimed to evaluate TRPV1 and PAR2 mRNA expression levels in the GERD patients and their relationship with endoscopic findings and reflux symptoms.Sixteen healthy controls, 45 patients with erosive reflux disease (ERD), and 14 nonerosive reflux disease (NERD) patients received endoscopy and completed questionnaires. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reactions (qPCR) of TRPV1, glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), nerve growth factor (NGF), PAR2, and interleukin (IL)-8 were performed in the distal esophagus specimen.The levels of TRPV1, GDNF, NGF, PAR2, and IL-8 mRNA expression were highest in the ERD group followed by NERD and control groups and the differences between control and ERD groups were statistically significant. Within the ERD group, patients with grade B in Los Angeles (LA) classification showed significantly higher levels of TRPV1, GDNF, and NGF mRNA expression than those with grade A. Presence of reflux symptoms was associated with significant higher levels of TRPV1, PAR2, and IL-8. Notably not extraesophageal but esophageal reflux symptoms were significantly associated with them.Upregulation of TRPV1 and PAR2 pathways might play a role in the development of distal esophageal inflammation and reflux symptoms. And extraesophageal reflux symptoms might not be associated with these processes. PMID:27512850

  14. An exploration of the estrogen receptor transcription activity of capsaicin analogues via an integrated approach based on in silico prediction and in vitro assays.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Ma, Duo; Lin, Yuan; Fu, Jianjie; Zhang, Aiqian

    2014-06-16

    Capsaicin has been considered as an alternative template of dichlorodiphenyl trichloroethane (DDT) in antifouling paint. However, information regarding the estrogenic activity of capsaicin analogues is rather limited in comparison to that of DDT analogues and their metabolites. We here explore the ER transcription activity of selected capsaicin analogues via an integrated approach based on in silico prediction and in vitro assays. Molecular simulation and the agonist/antagonist differential-docking screening identified 6-iodonordihydrocapsaicin (6-I-CPS) as a weak ERα agonist, while anti-estrogenicity was expected for N-arachidonoyldopamine, capsazepine, dihydrocapsaicin, trichostatin A, and capsaicin. On the contrary, the large volume of analogues, such as phorbol 12-phenylacetate 13-acetate 20-homovanillate and phorbol 12,13-dinonanoate 20-homovanillate, cannot fit well with the ER cavity. The result of MVLN assay was in accord with the in silico prediction. 6-I-CPS was demonstrated to induce luciferase gene expression, while the other analogues of relatively small molecular volume reduced luciferase gene expression in MVLN cells, both in the absence and presence of estradiol. This finding suggested that the ER transcription activity of capsaicin analogues is generated at least partly through the ERα-mediated pathway. Moreover, receptor polymorphism analysis indicated that capsaicin analogues may exhibit diverse species selectivity for human beings and marine species.

  15. Capsaicin causes inactivation and degradation of the androgen receptor by inducing the restoration of miR-449a in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Long; Chen, Jiaqi; Ma, Zhenkun; Liu, Wei; Yang, Fei; Yang, Zhao; Wang, Ke; Wang, Xinyang; He, Dalin; Li, Lei

    2015-08-01

    Capsaicin, a novel antitumor agent extracted from chili peppers, has been proven to induce growth inhibition in various types of cancer including prostate cancer. However, the detailed mechanisms remain largely undiscovered. In the present study, we explored the regulation of the androgen receptor (AR) by capsaicin and further researched the mechanisms of their interaction in AR-positive prostate cancer cells. In the present study, cell viability was assessed by MTT assay. Cell cycle distribution was determined using flow cytometry. Expression levels of cyclin D1, miR-449a, AR and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) were assessed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction or western blot analysis. To further confirm the relationship among miR-449a, AR and prostate cancer proliferation, miR-449a was overexpressed by a lentivirus in prostate cancer cells. We discovered that capsaicin prevented tumor proliferation and cell cycle progression through inactivation and degradation of AR. We also found that restoration of miR-449a induced by capsaicin treatment resulted in the inhibition of AR signaling. Finally, we demonstrated that increased expression of miR-449a sensitized prostate cancer to capsaicin treatment. Finally, our experimental results indicated that capsaicin negatively modulates the activity of AR at the mRNA and protein levels by restoring miR-449a profiling in prostate cancer. In addition, increased expression of miR-449a may facilitate the sensitivity of prostate cancer to capsaicin treatment. Thus, capsaicin may be developed as a novel anti-AR drug for the therapy of prostate cancer. PMID:26081756

  16. Capsaicin causes inactivation and degradation of the androgen receptor by inducing the restoration of miR-449a in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Long; Chen, Jiaqi; Ma, Zhenkun; Liu, Wei; Yang, Fei; Yang, Zhao; Wang, Ke; Wang, Xinyang; He, Dalin; Li, Lei

    2015-08-01

    Capsaicin, a novel antitumor agent extracted from chili peppers, has been proven to induce growth inhibition in various types of cancer including prostate cancer. However, the detailed mechanisms remain largely undiscovered. In the present study, we explored the regulation of the androgen receptor (AR) by capsaicin and further researched the mechanisms of their interaction in AR-positive prostate cancer cells. In the present study, cell viability was assessed by MTT assay. Cell cycle distribution was determined using flow cytometry. Expression levels of cyclin D1, miR-449a, AR and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) were assessed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction or western blot analysis. To further confirm the relationship among miR-449a, AR and prostate cancer proliferation, miR-449a was overexpressed by a lentivirus in prostate cancer cells. We discovered that capsaicin prevented tumor proliferation and cell cycle progression through inactivation and degradation of AR. We also found that restoration of miR-449a induced by capsaicin treatment resulted in the inhibition of AR signaling. Finally, we demonstrated that increased expression of miR-449a sensitized prostate cancer to capsaicin treatment. Finally, our experimental results indicated that capsaicin negatively modulates the activity of AR at the mRNA and protein levels by restoring miR-449a profiling in prostate cancer. In addition, increased expression of miR-449a may facilitate the sensitivity of prostate cancer to capsaicin treatment. Thus, capsaicin may be developed as a novel anti-AR drug for the therapy of prostate cancer.

  17. Temperature-sensitive gating of TRPV1 channel as probed by atomistic simulations of its trans- and juxtamembrane domains.

    PubMed

    Chugunov, Anton O; Volynsky, Pavel E; Krylov, Nikolay A; Nolde, Dmitry E; Efremov, Roman G

    2016-01-01

    Heat-activated transient receptor potential channel TRPV1 is one of the most studied eukaryotic proteins involved in temperature sensation. Upon heating, it exhibits rapid reversible pore gating, which depolarizes neurons and generates action potentials. Underlying molecular details of such effects in the pore region of TRPV1 is of a crucial importance to control temperature responses of the organism. Despite the spatial structure of the channel in both open (O) and closed (C) states is known, microscopic nature of channel gating and mechanism of thermal sensitivity are still poorly understood. In this work, we used unrestrained atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of TRPV1 (without N- and C-terminal cytoplasmic domains) embedded into explicit lipid bilayer in its O- and C-states. We found that the pore domain with its neighboring loops undergoes large temperature-dependent conformational transitions in an asymmetric way, when fragments of only one monomer move with large amplitude, freeing the pore upon heating. Such an asymmetrical gating looks rather biologically relevant because it is faster and more reliable than traditionally proposed "iris-like" symmetric scheme of channel opening. Analysis of structural, dynamic, and hydrophobic organization of the pore domain revealed entropy growth upon TRPV1 gating, which is in line with current concepts of thermal sensitivity. PMID:27612191

  18. Temperature-sensitive gating of TRPV1 channel as probed by atomistic simulations of its trans- and juxtamembrane domains

    PubMed Central

    Chugunov, Anton O.; Volynsky, Pavel E.; Krylov, Nikolay A.; Nolde, Dmitry E.; Efremov, Roman G.

    2016-01-01

    Heat-activated transient receptor potential channel TRPV1 is one of the most studied eukaryotic proteins involved in temperature sensation. Upon heating, it exhibits rapid reversible pore gating, which depolarizes neurons and generates action potentials. Underlying molecular details of such effects in the pore region of TRPV1 is of a crucial importance to control temperature responses of the organism. Despite the spatial structure of the channel in both open (O) and closed (C) states is known, microscopic nature of channel gating and mechanism of thermal sensitivity are still poorly understood. In this work, we used unrestrained atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of TRPV1 (without N- and C-terminal cytoplasmic domains) embedded into explicit lipid bilayer in its O- and C-states. We found that the pore domain with its neighboring loops undergoes large temperature-dependent conformational transitions in an asymmetric way, when fragments of only one monomer move with large amplitude, freeing the pore upon heating. Such an asymmetrical gating looks rather biologically relevant because it is faster and more reliable than traditionally proposed “iris-like” symmetric scheme of channel opening. Analysis of structural, dynamic, and hydrophobic organization of the pore domain revealed entropy growth upon TRPV1 gating, which is in line with current concepts of thermal sensitivity. PMID:27612191

  19. The Pore Loop Domain of TRPV1 Is Required for Its Activation by the Volatile Anesthetics Chloroform and Isoflurane.

    PubMed

    Kimball, Corinna; Luo, Jialie; Yin, Shijin; Hu, Hongzhen; Dhaka, Ajay

    2015-07-01

    The environmental irritant chloroform, a naturally occurring small volatile organohalogen, briefly became the world's most popular volatile general anesthetic (VGA) before being abandoned because of its low therapeutic index. When chloroform comes in contact with skin or is ingested, it causes a painful burning sensation. The molecular basis for the pain associated with chloroform remains unknown. In this study, we assessed the role of transient receptor potential (TRP) channel family members in mediating chloroform activation and the molecular determinants of VGA activation of TRPV1. We identified the subpopulation of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons that are activated by chloroform. Additionally, we transiently expressed wild-type or specifically mutated TRP channels in human embryonic kidney cells and used calcium imaging or whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology to assess the effects of chloroform or the VGA isoflurane on TRP channel activation. The results revealed that chloroform activates DRG neurons via TRPV1 activation. Furthermore, chloroform activates TRPV1, and it also activates TRPM8 and functions as a potent inhibitor of the noxious chemical receptor TRPA1. The results also indicate that residues in the outer pore region of TRPV1 previously thought to be required for either proton or heat activation of the channel are also required for activation by chloroform and isoflurane. In addition to identifying the molecular basis of DRG neuron activation by chloroform and the opposing effects chloroform has on different TRP channel family members, the findings of this study provide novel insights into the structural basis for the activation of TRPV1 by VGAs.

  20. Identification of a prostaglandin D2 metabolite as a neuritogenesis enhancer targeting the TRPV1 ion channel

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, Takahiro; Takahashi, Katsuhiro; Matsubara, Yui; Inuzuka, Emi; Nakashima, Fumie; Takahashi, Nobuaki; Kozai, Daisuke; Mori, Yasuo; Uchida, Koji

    2016-01-01

    Mast cells play important roles in allergic inflammation by secreting various mediators. In the present study, based on the finding that the medium conditioned by activated RBL-2H3 mast cells enhanced the nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced neuritogenesis of PC12 cells, we attempted to isolate an active compound from the mast cell conditioned culture medium. Our experiment identified 15-deoxy-Δ12,14-PGJ2 (15d-PGJ2), one of the PGD2 metabolites, as a potential enhancer of neuritogenesis. 15d-PGJ2 strongly enhanced the neuritogenesis elicited by a low-concentration of NGF that alone was insufficient to induce the neuronal differentiation. This 15d-PGJ2 effect was exerted in a Ca2+-dependent manner, but independently of the NGF receptor TrkA. Importantly, 15d-PGJ2 activated the transient receptor potential vanilloid-type 1 (TRPV1), a non-selective cation channel, leading to the Ca2+ influx. In addition, we observed that (i) NGF promoted the insertion of TRPV1 into the cell surface membrane and (ii) 15d-PGJ2 covalently bound to TRPV1. These findings suggest that the NGF/15d-PGJ2-induced neuritogenesis may be regulated by two sets of mechanisms, one for the translocation of TRPV1 into the cell surface by NGF and one for the activation of TRPV1 by 15d-PGJ2. Thus, there is most likely a link between allergic inflammation and activation of the neuronal differentiation. PMID:26879669

  1. Epilepsy but not mobile phone frequency (900 MHz) induces apoptosis and calcium entry in hippocampus of epileptic rat: involvement of TRPV1 channels.

    PubMed

    Nazıroğlu, Mustafa; Özkan, Fatma Feyza; Hapil, Seher Rabia; Ghazizadeh, Vahid; Çiğ, Bilal

    2015-02-01

    Electromagnetic radiation (EMR) and epilepsy are reported to mediate the regulation of apoptosis and oxidative stress through Ca(2+) influx. Results of recent reports indicated that EMR can increase temperature and oxidative stress of body cells, and TRPV1 channel is activated by noxious heat, oxidative stress, and capsaicin (CAP). We investigated the effects of mobile phone (900 MHz) EMR exposure on Ca(2+) influx, apoptosis, oxidative stress, and TRPV1 channel activations in the hippocampus of pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-induced epileptic rats. Freshly isolated hippocampal neurons of twenty-one rats were used in study within three groups namely control, PTZ, and PTZ + EMR. The neurons in the three groups were stimulated by CAP. Epilepsy was induced by PTZ administration. The neurons in PTZ + EMR group were exposed to the 900 MHz EMR for 1 h. The apoptosis, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), and caspase-3 and caspase-9 values were higher in PTZ and PTZ + EMR groups than in control. However, EMR did not add additional increase effects on the values in the hippocampal neurons. Intracellular-free Ca(2+) concentrations in fura-2 analyses were also higher in PTZ + CAP group than in control although their concentrations were decreased by TRPV1 channel blocker, capsazepine. However, there were no statistical changes on the Ca(2+) concentrations between epilepsy and EMR groups. In conclusion, apoptosis, mitochondrial, ROS, and Ca(2+) influx via TRPV1 channel were increased in the hippocampal neurons by epilepsy induction although the mobile phone did not change the values. The results indicated that TRPV1 channels in hippocampus may possibly be a novel target for effective target of epilepsy.

  2. Neuropeptide Y Y1 receptor effects on pulpal nociceptors.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, J L; Hargreaves, K M

    2008-10-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is an important modulatory neuropeptide that regulates several physiological systems, including the activity of sensory neurons. We evaluated whether activation of the NPY Y1 receptor could modulate the activity of capsaicin-sensitive nociceptors in trigeminal ganglia and dental pulp. We tested this hypothesis by measuring capsaicin-stimulated calcitonin gene-related peptide release (CGRP) as a measure of nociceptor activity. Capsaicin-evoked CGRP release was inhibited by 50% (p < 0.05) in trigeminal ganglia and by 26% (p < 0.05) in dental pulp when tissues were pre-treated with [Leu(31),Pro(34)]NPY. The Y1 receptor was found to co-localize with the capsaicin receptor TRPV1 in trigeminal ganglia. These results demonstrate that activation of the Y1 receptor results in the inhibition of the activity of capsaicin-sensitive nociceptors in the trigeminal ganglia and dental pulp. These findings are relevant to the physiological modulation of dental nociceptors by endogenous NPY and demonstrate an important novel analgesic target for the treatment of dental pain.

  3. Decreased miR-199 augments visceral pain in patients with IBS through translational upregulation of TRPV1

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, QiQi; Yang, Liuqing; Larson, Scott; Basra, Sapreet; Merwat, Shehzad; Tan, Alai; Croce, Carlo; Verne, G Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Objective Many patients with irritable bowel syndrome IBS not only have abdominal pain but also may suffer from visceral hypersensitivity and heighted visceral nociception. Moreover, IBS has few effective therapeutic agents and mechanisms of disease are unclear. Our goals were to (i) identify microRNA (miRNA) expression, signalling and targets in human colon (controls; patients with IBS); (ii) verify in vitro, IBS-associated changes in miRNAs, especially miR-199, which is complementary to the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) gene; and (iii) determine whether modulating the expression of miRNAs in vivo, especially miR-199, reverses associated changes and pathological hallmarks of visceral hypersensitivity via TRPV1 signalling. Design We evaluated 45 patients with diarrhoea-predominant IBS (IBS-D) and 40 controls with (1) visceral pain severity score and (2) colonoscopy with biopsies. miRNA expression was evaluated in human colon following miRNA array analysis. Luciferase assays were done to confirm relationships between miR-199 and TRPV1 expression. A rat model of visceral hypersensitivity was used to study miR-199 and its target gene (TRPV1) expression in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and colon in vivo. Results Gut miR-199a/b expression in IBS-D was significantly decreased, which correlated directly with both increased visceral pain scores and TRPV1 expression. In vivo upregulation of miR-199a by intraperitoneal injection of lenti-miR-199a precursors decreased visceral hypersensitivity via diminished TRPV1 signalling. Conclusions Decreased colonic miR-199a/b correlates with visceral pain in patients with IBS-D. Similarly, reduced miR-199a expression in rat DRG and colon tissue is associated with heightened visceral hypersensitivity. In vivo upregulation of miR-199a decreases visceral pain via inhibition of TRPV1 signalling. Thus, miR-199 precursors may be promising therapeutic candidates for the treatment in patients with visceral pain. PMID

  4. Combined genetic and pharmacological inhibition of TRPV1 and P2X3 attenuates colorectal hypersensitivity and afferent sensitization

    PubMed Central

    Kiyatkin, Michael E.; Feng, Bin; Schwartz, Erica S.

    2013-01-01

    The ligand-gated channels transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) and P2X3 have been reported to facilitate colorectal afferent neuron sensitization, thus contributing to organ hypersensitivity and pain. In the present study, we hypothesized that TRPV1 and P2X3 cooperate to modulate colorectal nociception and afferent sensitivity. To test this hypothesis, we employed TRPV1-P2X3 double knockout (TPDKO) mice and channel-selective pharmacological antagonists and evaluated combined channel contributions to behavioral responses to colorectal distension (CRD) and afferent fiber responses to colorectal stretch. Baseline responses to CRD were unexpectedly greater in TPDKO compared with control mice, but zymosan-produced CRD hypersensitivity was absent in TPDKO mice. Relative to control mice, proportions of mechanosensitive and -insensitive pelvic nerve afferent classes were not different in TPDKO mice. Responses of mucosal and serosal class afferents to mechanical probing were unaffected, whereas responses of muscular (but not muscular/mucosal) afferents to stretch were significantly attenuated in TPDKO mice; sensitization of both muscular and muscular/mucosal afferents by inflammatory soup was also significantly attenuated. In pharmacological studies, the TRPV1 antagonist A889425 and P2X3 antagonist TNP-ATP, alone and in combination, applied onto stretch-sensitive afferent endings attenuated responses to stretch; combined antagonism produced greater attenuation. In the aggregate, these observations suggest that 1) genetic manipulation of TRPV1 and P2X3 leads to reduction in colorectal mechanosensation peripherally and compensatory changes and/or disinhibition of other channels centrally, 2) combined pharmacological antagonism produces more robust attenuation of mechanosensation peripherally than does antagonism of either channel alone, and 3) the relative importance of these channels appears to be enhanced in colorectal hypersensitivity. PMID:23989007

  5. Combined genetic and pharmacological inhibition of TRPV1 and P2X3 attenuates colorectal hypersensitivity and afferent sensitization.

    PubMed

    Kiyatkin, Michael E; Feng, Bin; Schwartz, Erica S; Gebhart, G F

    2013-11-01

    The ligand-gated channels transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) and P2X3 have been reported to facilitate colorectal afferent neuron sensitization, thus contributing to organ hypersensitivity and pain. In the present study, we hypothesized that TRPV1 and P2X3 cooperate to modulate colorectal nociception and afferent sensitivity. To test this hypothesis, we employed TRPV1-P2X3 double knockout (TPDKO) mice and channel-selective pharmacological antagonists and evaluated combined channel contributions to behavioral responses to colorectal distension (CRD) and afferent fiber responses to colorectal stretch. Baseline responses to CRD were unexpectedly greater in TPDKO compared with control mice, but zymosan-produced CRD hypersensitivity was absent in TPDKO mice. Relative to control mice, proportions of mechanosensitive and -insensitive pelvic nerve afferent classes were not different in TPDKO mice. Responses of mucosal and serosal class afferents to mechanical probing were unaffected, whereas responses of muscular (but not muscular/mucosal) afferents to stretch were significantly attenuated in TPDKO mice; sensitization of both muscular and muscular/mucosal afferents by inflammatory soup was also significantly attenuated. In pharmacological studies, the TRPV1 antagonist A889425 and P2X3 antagonist TNP-ATP, alone and in combination, applied onto stretch-sensitive afferent endings attenuated responses to stretch; combined antagonism produced greater attenuation. In the aggregate, these observations suggest that 1) genetic manipulation of TRPV1 and P2X3 leads to reduction in colorectal mechanosensation peripherally and compensatory changes and/or disinhibition of other channels centrally, 2) combined pharmacological antagonism produces more robust attenuation of mechanosensation peripherally than does antagonism of either channel alone, and 3) the relative importance of these channels appears to be enhanced in colorectal hypersensitivity.

  6. A combined coarse-grained and all-atom simulation of TRPV1 channel gating and heat activation

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Feng

    2015-01-01

    The transient receptor potential (TRP) channels act as key sensors of various chemical and physical stimuli in eukaryotic cells. Despite years of study, the molecular mechanisms of TRP channel activation remain unclear. To elucidate the structural, dynamic, and energetic basis of gating in TRPV1 (a founding member of the TRPV subfamily), we performed coarse-grained modeling and all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulation based on the recently solved high resolution structures of the open and closed form of TRPV1. Our coarse-grained normal mode analysis captures two key modes of collective motions involved in the TRPV1 gating transition, featuring a quaternary twist motion of the transmembrane domains (TMDs) relative to the intracellular domains (ICDs). Our transition pathway modeling predicts a sequence of structural movements that propagate from the ICDs to the TMDs via key interface domains (including the membrane proximal domain and the C-terminal domain), leading to sequential opening of the selectivity filter followed by the lower gate in the channel pore (confirmed by modeling conformational changes induced by the activation of ICDs). The above findings of coarse-grained modeling are robust to perturbation by lipids. Finally, our MD simulation of the ICD identifies key residues that contribute differently to the nonpolar energy of the open and closed state, and these residues are predicted to control the temperature sensitivity of TRPV1 gating. These computational predictions offer new insights to the mechanism for heat activation of TRPV1 gating, and will guide our future electrophysiology and mutagenesis studies. PMID:25918362

  7. Secreted herpes simplex virus-2 glycoprotein G alters thermal pain sensitivity by modifying NGF effects on TRPV1.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Jorge Rubén; Viejo-Borbolla, Abel; Alcamí, Antonio; Wandosell, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Genital herpes is a painful disease frequently caused by the neurotropic pathogen herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2). We have recently shown that HSV-2-secreted glycoprotein G (SgG2) interacts with and modulates the activity of the neurotrophin nerve growth factor (NGF). This interaction modifies the response of the NGF receptor TrkA, increasing NGF-dependent axonal growth. NGF is not only an axonal growth modulator but also an important mediator of pain and inflammation regulating the amount, localization, and activation of the thermal pain receptor transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1). In this work, we addressed whether SgG2 could contribute to HSV-2-induced pain. Injection of SgG2 in the mouse hindpaw produced a rapid and transient increase in thermal pain sensitivity. At the molecular level, this acute increase in thermal pain induced by SgG2 injection was dependent on differential NGF-induced phosphorylation and in changes in the amount of TrkA and TRPV1 in the dermis. These results suggest that SgG2 alters thermal pain sensitivity by modulating TRPV1 receptor. PMID:27576911

  8. Secreted herpes simplex virus-2 glycoprotein G alters thermal pain sensitivity by modifying NGF effects on TRPV1.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Jorge Rubén; Viejo-Borbolla, Abel; Alcamí, Antonio; Wandosell, Francisco

    2016-08-30

    Genital herpes is a painful disease frequently caused by the neurotropic pathogen herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2). We have recently shown that HSV-2-secreted glycoprotein G (SgG2) interacts with and modulates the activity of the neurotrophin nerve growth factor (NGF). This interaction modifies the response of the NGF receptor TrkA, increasing NGF-dependent axonal growth. NGF is not only an axonal growth modulator but also an important mediator of pain and inflammation regulating the amount, localization, and activation of the thermal pain receptor transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1). In this work, we addressed whether SgG2 could contribute to HSV-2-induced pain. Injection of SgG2 in the mouse hindpaw produced a rapid and transient increase in thermal pain sensitivity. At the molecular level, this acute increase in thermal pain induced by SgG2 injection was dependent on differential NGF-induced phosphorylation and in changes in the amount of TrkA and TRPV1 in the dermis. These results suggest that SgG2 alters thermal pain sensitivity by modulating TRPV1 receptor.

  9. The effect of topical capsaicin-induced sensitization on heat-evoked cutaneous vasomotor responses

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Thomas A; da Silva, Larissa Bittencourt; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Gazerani, Parisa

    2013-01-01

    Brief, localized, cutaneous, non-painful thermal stimuli can evoke a transient vasomotor response, causing increased cutaneous blood flow and elevated skin temperature. The aims of this study were to investigate 1) if cutaneous sensitization by topical application of capsaicin (TRPV1 receptor agonist) can facilitate the size, duration and spatial extent of this vasomotor response and 2) if males and females respond differently. Thermal pulses (43°C for 60 seconds) were applied on left/right volar forearms of 15 age-matched males and females. Skin temperature and cutaneous blood flow were measured 1, 5, 10, 15, and 30 minutes after heat application before and after topical capsaicin (1%, 30 min application) with contralateral arm serving as the control. Recordings were made from the region of interest at distances of 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 cm from the capsaicin application site. Sensitization significantly enhanced skin temperature for up to 30 min and compared with non-sensitized skin at 10 min. Females showed the strongest response after sensitization, but the response lasted longer and spread more widely in males. The blood flow responses were significantly longer after capsaicin (from 5 to 30 minutes after thermal application). This increased blood flow extended outside the treated area up to 10 min after stimulation. After sensitization, the area under the blood flow response curves showed significantly stronger responses in females, spreading 4 cm outside the stimulation site. Cutaneous sensitizing caused prolonged and spatially expanded vasomotor responses to standardized thermal stimulation with sex specific differences. PMID:24044034

  10. Thermo-Sensitive Receptor Protein: Role of TRPVs in Control of Body Temperature under Heat Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki-Oda, Noriko; Kusuno, Tomoyuki; Hanada, Tsunehisa; Tominaga, Makoto; Tominaga, Tomoko; Suzuki, Makoto; Yamada, Hisao; Yamada, Hironari

    2007-03-01

    In vertebrate peripheral nervous system, skin heating and cooling are detected by thermo-sensitive neurons tuned to respond over distinct temperature ranges. TRP-family is thermo-sensitive receptor protein which is Ca2+-permeable ion channels expressing in cellular membrane. TRPV1 is activated by noxious heat above 42 °C, whereas TRPV3 and TRPV4 are sensitive to moderate temperatures (<34 °C). Although the amino acid sequence and the channel properties have been characterized, the molecular mechanism of temperature sensation remains poorly understood. In environment, mid and far infrared radiation act as physical stimuli. Here we examined the role of TRPV1 and TRPV4 in regulation of body temperature (BT) by using infrared laser as mild heat stimuli. In wild type mouse, the laser irradiation which caused the increase in skin temperature up to 55 °C did not induce the change in BT without any treatment of TRPVs. However, desensitization of TRPV1 with capsaicin resulted in the increase in BT by laser irradiation. On the other hand, in TRPV4-knockout mouse, moder