Science.gov

Sample records for capture decay rates

  1. Radioactive decay speedup at T=5 K: electron-capture decay rate of (7)Be encapsulated in C(60).

    PubMed

    Ohtsuki, T; Ohno, K; Morisato, T; Mitsugashira, T; Hirose, K; Yuki, H; Kasagi, J

    2007-06-22

    The electron-capture (EC) decay rate of (7)Be in C(60) at the temperature of liquid helium (T=5 K) was measured and compared with the rate in Be metal at T=293 K. We found that the half-life of (7)Be in endohedral C(60) ((7)Be@C(60)) at a temperature close to T=5 K is 52.47+/-0.04 d, a value that is 0.34% faster than that at T=293 K. In this environment, the half-life of (7)Be is nearly 1.5% faster than that inside Be metal at room temperature (T=293 K). We then interpreted our observations in terms of calculations of the electron density at the (7)Be nucleus position inside the C(60); further, we estimate theoretically the temperature dependence (at T=0 K and 293 K) of the electron density at the Be nucleus position in the stable center inside C(60). The theoretical estimates were almost in agreement with the experimental observations.

  2. Time Modulation of the K-Shell Electron Capture Decay Rates of H-like Heavy Ions at GSI Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, A. N.; Kienle, P.

    2009-08-07

    According to experimental data at GSI, the rates of the number of daughter ions, produced by the nuclear K shell electron capture decays of the H-like heavy ions with one electron in the K shell, such as {sup 140}Pr{sup 58+}, {sup 142}Pm{sup 60+}, and {sup 122}I{sup 52+}, are modulated in time with periods T{sub EC} of the order of a few seconds, obeying an A scaling T{sub EC}=A/20 s, where A is the mass number of the mother nuclei, and with amplitudes a{sub d}{sup EC}approx0.21. We show that these data can be explained in terms of the interference of two massive neutrino mass eigenstates. The appearance of the interference term is due to overlap of massive neutrino mass eigenstate energies and of the wave functions of the daughter ions in two-body decay channels, caused by the energy and momentum uncertainties introduced by time differential detection of the daughter ions in GSI experiments.

  3. Measurement of the {beta}{sup +} and Orbital Electron-Capture Decay Rates in Fully Ionized, Hydrogenlike, and Heliumlike {sup 140}Pr Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinov, Yu. A.; Geissel, H.; Winckler, N.; Knoebel, R.; Litvinov, S. A.; Scheidenberger, C.; Bosch, F.; Beckert, K.; Brandau, C.; Dimopoulou, C.; Hess, S.; Kozhuharov, C.; Mazzocco, M.; Nociforo, C.; Nolden, F.; Prochazka, A.; Reuschl, R.; Steck, M.; Stoehlker, T.; Trassinelli, M.

    2007-12-31

    We report on the first measurement of the {beta}{sup +} and orbital electron-capture decay rates of {sup 140}Pr nuclei with the simplest electron configurations: bare nuclei, hydrogenlike, and heliumlike ions. The measured electron-capture decay constant of hydrogenlike {sup 140}Pr{sup 58+} ions is about 50% larger than that of heliumlike {sup 140}Pr{sup 57+} ions. Moreover, {sup 140}Pr ions with one bound electron decay faster than neutral {sup 140}Pr{sup 0+} atoms with 59 electrons. To explain this peculiar observation one has to take into account the conservation of the total angular momentum, since only particular spin orientations of the nucleus and of the captured electron can contribute to the allowed decay.

  4. ELECTRON-CAPTURE AND β-DECAY RATES FOR sd-SHELL NUCLEI IN STELLAR ENVIRONMENTS RELEVANT TO HIGH-DENSITY O–NE–MG CORES

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Toshio; Toki, Hiroshi; Nomoto, Ken’ichi

    2016-02-01

    Electron-capture and β-decay rates for nuclear pairs in the sd-shell are evaluated at high densities and high temperatures relevant to the final evolution of electron-degenerate O–Ne–Mg cores of stars with initial masses of 8–10 M{sub ⊙}. Electron capture induces a rapid contraction of the electron-degenerate O–Ne–Mg core. The outcome of rapid contraction depends on the evolutionary changes in the central density and temperature, which are determined by the competing processes of contraction, cooling, and heating. The fate of the stars is determined by these competitions, whether they end up with electron-capture supernovae or Fe core-collapse supernovae. Since the competing processes are induced by electron capture and β-decay, the accurate weak rates are crucially important. The rates are obtained for pairs with A = 20, 23, 24, 25, and 27 by shell-model calculations in the sd-shell with the USDB Hamiltonian. Effects of Coulomb corrections on the rates are evaluated. The rates for pairs with A = 23 and 25 are important for nuclear Urca processes that determine the cooling rate of the O–Ne–Mg core, while those for pairs with A = 20 and 24 are important for the core contraction and heat generation rates in the core. We provide these nuclear rates at stellar environments in tables with fine enough meshes at various densities and temperatures for studies of astrophysical processes sensitive to the rates. In particular, the accurate rate tables are crucially important for the final fates of not only O–Ne–Mg cores but also a wider range of stars, such as C–O cores of lower-mass stars.

  5. Capture and decay of electroweak WIMPonium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asadi, Pouya; Baumgart, Matthew; Fitzpatrick, Patrick J.; Krupczak, Emmett; Slatyer, Tracy R.

    2017-02-01

    The spectrum of Weakly-Interacting-Massive-Particle (WIMP) dark matter generically possesses bound states when the WIMP mass becomes sufficiently large relative to the mass of the electroweak gauge bosons. The presence of these bound states enhances the annihilation rate via resonances in the Sommerfeld enhancement, but they can also be produced directly with the emission of a low-energy photon. In this work we compute the rate for SU(2) triplet dark matter (the wino) to bind into WIMPonium—which is possible via single-photon emission for wino masses above 5 TeV for relative velocity v < O(10‑2) —and study the subsequent decays of these bound states. We present results with applications beyond the wino case, e.g. for dark matter inhabiting a nonabelian dark sector; these include analytic capture and transition rates for general dark sectors in the limit of vanishing force carrier mass, efficient numerical routines for calculating positive and negative-energy eigenstates of a Hamiltonian containing interactions with both massive and massless force carriers, and a study of the scaling of bound state formation in the short-range Hulth&apos{e}n potential. In the specific case of the wino, we find that the rate for bound state formation is suppressed relative to direct annihilation, and so provides only a small correction to the overall annihilation rate. The soft photons radiated by the capture process and by bound state transitions could permit measurement of the dark matter's quantum numbers; for wino-like dark matter, such photons are rare, but might be observable by a future ground-based gamma-ray telescope combining large effective area and a low energy threshold.

  6. Comment on 'Time modulation of K-shell electron capture decay rates of H-like heavy ions at GSI experiments.'

    SciTech Connect

    Lipkin, H. J.; Physics; Weizmann Inst. of Science; Tel Aviv Univ.

    2010-04-16

    A Comment on the Letter by A.N. Ivanov and P. Kienle, Physical Review Letters volume 103, Issue 6, 062502 (2009). The authors of the Letter offer a Reply to experimental data at GSI, the rates of the number of daughter ions, produced by the nuclear K shell electron capture decays of the H-like heavy ions with one electron in the K shell, such as {sup 140}Pr{sup 58+}, {sup 142}Pm{sup 60+}, and {sup 122}I{sup 52+}, are modulated in time with periods T{sub EC} of the order of a few seconds, obeying an A scaling T{sub EX}=A/20 s, where A is the mass number of the mother nuclei, and with amplitudes a{sub d {sup EC}}{approx}0.21. We show that these data can be explained in terms of the interference of two massive neutrino mass eigenstates. The appearance of the interference term is due to overlap of massive neutrino mass eigenstate energies and of the wave functions of the daughter ions in two-body decay channels, caused by the energy and momentum uncertainties introduced by time differential detection of the daughter ions in GSI experiments.

  7. Decay curve study in a standard electron capture decay

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, D.; Fukuda, M.; Kisamori, K.; Kuwada, Y.; Makisaka, K.; Matsumiya, R.; Matsuta, K.; Mihara, M.; Takagi, A.; Yokoyama, R.; Izumikawa, T.; Ohtsubo, T.; Suzuki, T.; Yamaguchi, T.

    2010-05-12

    We have searched for a time-modulated decay in a standard electron capture experiment for {sup 140}Pr, in order to confirm a report from GSI, where an oscillatory decay has been observed for hydrogen-like {sup 140}Pr and {sup 142}Pm ions in the cooler storage ring. {sup 140}Pr has been produced with the {sup 140}Ce(p, n) reaction by a pulsed proton beam accelerated from the Van de Graaff accelerator at Osaka University. Resultant time dependence of the K{sub a}lpha and K{sub b}eta X-ray intensities from the daughter shows no oscillatory behavior.

  8. Structure and Decay at Rapid Proton Capture Waiting Points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hove, D.; Garrido, E.; Jensen, A. S.; Fynbo, H. O. U.; Fedorov, D. V.; Zinner, N. T.

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the region of the nuclear chart around A ˜eq 70 from a three-body perspective, where we compute reaction rates for the radiative capture of two protons. One key quantity is here the photon dissociation cross section for the inverse process where two protons are liberated from the borromean nucleus by photon bombardment. We find a number of peaks at low photon energy in this cross section where each peak is located at the energy corresponding to population of a three-body resonance. Thus, for these energies the decay or capture processes proceed through these resonances. However, the next step in the dissociation process still has the option of following several paths, that is either sequential decay by emission of one proton at a time with an intermediate two-body resonance as stepping stone, or direct decay into the continuum of both protons simultaneously. The astrophysical reaction rate is obtained by folding of the cross section as function of energy with the occupation probability for a Maxwell-Boltzmann temperature distribution. The reaction rate is then a function of temperature, and of course depending on the underlying three-body bound state and resonance structures. We show that a very simple formula at low temperature reproduces the elaborate numerically computed reaction rate.

  9. Precision Measurement of Nuclear Electron Capture Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koltick, David; Liu, Shih-Chieh; Wang, Haoyu; Heim, Jordan; Nistor, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    The method of accurately measuring the radioactive decay constant of a isotope by measuring the decay rate as a function of time requires that both the detector and environment be stable over time periods comparable to the life-time of the isotope. In addition statistical accuracy requires initial counting rates be high but limited by the dead time capability of the data collection system and the detectors double-event resolving time. A High Purity Germanium (HPGe) spectrometer, sensitive to radiation from 3-KeV to over 3-MeV, has been built to measure radioactive decay constants to a level of 10-5 10-6 at a location only 6 meters from the core of the High Flux Isotope Reactor located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Such accuracy requires understanding of, background, signal-processing algorithms, and both the double and triple event pile-up in the observed spectrum. The approach taken is to fit the collected energy spectrum with invariant shapes, independent of event rate. By fixing the source-detector geometry and environmental conditions, the invariant shapes are (1) ideal energy spectrum without pile-up and background, (2) the ideal double event pile-up spectrum, (3) the ideal triple event pile-up spectrum, and (4) the stable background spectrum. A method is presented that finds these ideal shapes using the collected data in situ. Taking this approach the HPGe detector photopeak shape in the absence of background and pile-up is presented showing associated structure over a range of 7 orders of magnitude.

  10. Measuring radiative capture rates at DRAGON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hager, U.; Davids, B.; Fallis, J.; Greife, U.; Hutcheon, D. A.; Rojas, A.; Ruiz, C.

    2013-04-01

    The DRAGON recoil separator facility is located at the ISAC facility at TRIUMF, Vancouver. It is designed to measure radiative alpha and proton capture reactions of astrophysical importance in inverse kinematics. The Supernanogan ion source at ISAC provides stable beams of high intensities. The DRAGON collaboration has taken advantage of this over the last years by measuring several reactions requiring high-intensity stable oxygen beams. In particular,the ^17O(p,γ) and ^16O(α,γ) reaction rates were recently measured. The former reaction is part of the hot CNO cycle, and strongly influences the abundance of ^18F in classical novae. Because of its relatively long lifetime, ^18F is a possible target for satellite-based gamma-ray spectroscopy. The ^16O(α,γ) reaction plays a role in steady-state helium burning in massive stars, where it follows the ^12C(α,γ) reaction. At astrophysically relevant energies, the reaction proceeds exclusively via direct capture, resulting in a low rate. In both cases, the unique capabilities of DRAGON enabled determination not only of the total reaction rates, but also of decay branching ratios. Results from both experiments will be presented.

  11. Searching for Experimental Verification of the Oscillation of Electron Capture Decay Probability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetter, Paul

    2009-05-01

    A group from Gesellschaft f"ur Schwerionenforschung (GSI) last year published an observation of time oscillations of the electron capture decay rate of stored hydrogen-like ions of ^142Pm and ^140Pr.(Phys. Lett. B 664, 162 (2008)). They proposed that the oscillating decay rate was caused by interference between momentum states of the ion caused by neutrino mass and flavor mixing. This hypothesis has been controversial, with several authors arguing either that neutrino mixing can or cannot be responsible. If neutrino mixing is responsible for the decay rate oscillations, then it should be possible to detect these oscillations in a simpler experiment without using stored hydrogenic ions, by observing an electron capture decay rate with an appropriate experiment time structure. If this were possible, it could revolutionize the study of neutrino mixing by allowing much simpler experiments to make precise measurements of mass differences and mixing angles. At LBNL, we performed an experiment to search for oscillations in electron capture rate using ^142Pm produced with a time short compared to the oscillation period, and counting ^142Nd Kα x-rays from the daughter. The decay time spectrum is well-described by a simple exponential, and we observed no statistically significant decay rate oscillations at a level much lower than proposed. A literature search for previous experiments that might have been sensitive to the reported modulation uncovered a candidate in ^142Eu. A reanalysis of that published data shows no decay rate oscillation. A recent experiment at Munich also did not observe decay rate oscillations in decays of ^180Re. Other potential explanations for the GSI decay oscillation data have been proposed, including quantum beats by nearly degenerate initial parent ion states and Thomas precession in the stored ions. I will discuss the status of experimental results, and possibilities for experimental confirmation of the various models. This work was supported by

  12. On decay constants and orbital distance to the Sun—part III: beta plus and electron capture decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pommé, S.; Stroh, H.; Paepen, J.; Van Ammel, R.; Marouli, M.; Altzitzoglou, T.; Hult, M.; Kossert, K.; Nähle, O.; Schrader, H.; Juget, F.; Bailat, C.; Nedjadi, Y.; Bochud, F.; Buchillier, T.; Michotte, C.; Courte, S.; van Rooy, M. W.; van Staden, M. J.; Lubbe, J.; Simpson, B. R. S.; Fazio, A.; De Felice, P.; Jackson, T. W.; Van Wyngaardt, W. M.; Reinhard, M. I.; Golya, J.; Bourke, S.; Roy, T.; Galea, R.; Keightley, J. D.; Ferreira, K. M.; Collins, S. M.; Ceccatelli, A.; Verheyen, L.; Bruggeman, M.; Vodenik, B.; Korun, M.; Chisté, V.; Amiot, M.-N.

    2017-02-01

    The hypothesis that seasonal changes in proximity to the Sun cause variation of decay constants at permille level has been tested for radionuclides disintegrating through electron capture and beta plus decay. Activity measurements of 22Na, 54Mn, 55Fe, 57Co, 65Zn, 82+85Sr, 90Sr, 109Cd, 124Sb, 133Ba, 152Eu, and 207Bi sources were repeated over periods from 200 d up to more than four decades at 14 laboratories across the globe. Residuals from the exponential nuclear decay curves were inspected for annual oscillations. Systematic deviations from a purely exponential decay curve differ from one data set to another and appear attributable to instabilities in the instrumentation and measurement conditions. Oscillations in phase with Earth’s orbital distance to the sun could not be observed within 10-4-10-5 range precision. The most stable activity measurements of β + and EC decaying sources set an upper limit of 0.006% or less to the amplitude of annual oscillations in the decay rate. There are no apparent indications for systematic oscillations at a level of weeks or months.

  13. Top-down holographic glueball decay rates

    SciTech Connect

    Brünner, F.; Parganlija, D.; Rebhan, A.

    2016-01-22

    We present new results on the decay patterns of scalar and tensor glueballs in the top-down holographic Witten-Sakai-Sugimoto model. This model, which has only one free dimensionless parameter, gives semi-quantitative predictions for the vector meson spectrum, their decay widths, and also a gluon condensate in agreement with SVZ sum rules. The holographic predictions for scalar glueball decay rates are compared with experimental data for the widely discussed gluon candidates f{sub 0}(1500) and f{sub 0}(1710)

  14. Systematic muon capture rates in PQRPA

    SciTech Connect

    Samana, A. R.; Sande, D.; Krmpotić, F.

    2015-05-15

    In this work we performed a systematic study of the inclusive muon capture rates for several nuclei with A < 60 using the Projected Random Quasi-particle Phase Approximation (PQRPA) as nuclear model, because it is the only RPA model that treats the Pauli Principle correctly. We reckon that the comparison between theory and data for the inclusive muon capture is not a fully satisfactory test on the nuclear model that is used. The exclusive muon transitions are more robust for such a purpose.

  15. Calculation of doublet capture rate for muon capture in deuterium within chiral effective field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, J.; Tater, M.; Truhlík, E.; Epelbaum, E.; Machleidt, R.; Ricci, P.

    2012-03-01

    The doublet capture rate Λ1 / 2 of the negative muon capture in deuterium is calculated employing the nuclear wave functions generated from accurate nucleon-nucleon (NN) potentials constructed at next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order of heavy-baryon chiral perturbation theory and the weak meson exchange current operator derived within the same formalism. All but one of the low-energy constants that enter the calculation were fixed from pion-nucleon and nucleon-nucleon scattering data. The low-energy constant dˆR (cD), which cannot be determined from the purely two-nucleon data, was extracted recently from the triton β-decay and the binding energies of the three-nucleon systems. The calculated values of Λ1 / 2 show a rather large spread for the used values of the dˆR. Precise measurement of Λ1 / 2 in the future will not only help to constrain the value of dˆR, but also provide a highly nontrivial test of the nuclear chiral EFT framework. Besides, the precise knowledge of the constant dˆR will allow for consistent calculations of other two-nucleon weak processes, such as proton-proton fusion and solar neutrino scattering on deuterons, which are important for astrophysics.

  16. Aftershock Decay Rates in the Iranian Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ommi, S.; Zafarani, H.; Zare, M.

    2016-07-01

    Motivated by the desire to have more information following the occurrence of damaging events, the main purpose of this article is to study aftershock sequence parameters in the Iranian plateau. To this end, the catalogue of the Iranian earthquakes between 2002 to the end of 2013 has been collected and homogenized among which 15 earthquakes have been selected to study their aftershock decay rates. For different tectonic provinces, the completeness magnitudes ( M c) of the earthquake catalogue have been calculated in different time intervals. Also, the M c variability in spatial and temporal windows has been determined for each selected event. For major Iranian earthquakes, catalogue of aftershocks has been collected thanks to three declustering methods: first, the classical windowing method of Gardner and Knopoff (Bull Seismol Soc Am 64:1363-1367, 1974); second, a modified version of this using spatial windowing based on the Wells and Coppersmith (Bull Seismol Soc Am 84:974-1002, 1994) relations; and third, the Burkhard and Grünthal (Swiss J Geosci 102:149-188, 2009) scheme. Effects of the temporal windows also have been investigated using the time periods of 1 month, 100 days, and 1 year in the declustering method of Gardner and Knopoff (Bull Seismol Soc Am 64:1363-1367, 1974). In the next step, the modified Omori law coefficients have been calculated for the 15 selected earthquakes. The calibrated regional generic model describing the temporal and magnitude distribution of aftershocks is of interest for time-dependent seismic hazard forecasts. The regional characteristics of the aftershock decay rates have been studied for the selected Iranian earthquakes in the Alborz, Zagros and Central Iran regions considering their different seismotectonics regimes. However, due to the lack of sufficient data, no results have been reported for the Kopeh-Dagh and Makran seismotectonic regions.

  17. Gamow-Teller strength and lepton captures rates on 66‑71Ni in stellar matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabi, Jameel-Un; Majid, Muhammad

    Charge-changing transitions play a significant role in stellar weak-decay processes. The fate of the massive stars is decided by these weak-decay rates including lepton (positron and electron) captures rates, which play a consequential role in the dynamics of core collapse. As per previous simulation results, weak interaction rates on nickel (Ni) isotopes have significant influence on the stellar core vis-à-vis controlling the lepton content of stellar matter throughout the silicon shell burning phases of high mass stars up to the presupernova stages. In this paper, we perform a microscopic calculation of Gamow-Teller (GT) charge-changing transitions, in the β-decay and electron capture (EC) directions, for neutron-rich Ni isotopes (66‑71Ni). We further compute the associated weak-decay rates for these selected Ni isotopes in stellar environment. The computations are accomplished by employing the deformed proton-neutron quasiparticle random phase approximation (pn-QRPA) model. A recent study showed that the deformed pn-QRPA theory is well suited for the estimation of GT transitions. The astral weak-decay rates are determined over densities in the range of 10-1011g/cm3 and temperatures in the range of 0.01 × 109-30 × 109K. The calculated lepton capture rates are compared with the previous calculation of Pruet and Fuller (PF). The overall comparison demonstrates that, at low stellar densities and high temperatures, our EC rates are bigger by as much as two orders of magnitude. Our results show that, at higher temperatures, the lepton capture rates are the dominant mode for the stellar weak rates and the corresponding lepton emission rates may be neglected.

  18. Weak {gamma}-transition intensities in the electron capture decay of {sup 144}Pm

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, S.J.; Altgilbers, A.S.; Hindi, M.M.; Norman, E.B.; Larimer, R.

    1996-09-01

    We have determined the absolute intensity of weak {gamma} transitions in the level scheme of {sup 144}Nd, observed following the electron capture decay of {sup 144}Pm. The absolute intensity of the 1397-keV {ital E}3 branch from the 2093-keV (5{sub 1}{sup {minus}}) level was determined to be (4.9 {plus_minus} 0.7) {times} 10{sup {minus}4}{percent}. This leads to a revised absolute transition rate of {ital B}({ital E}3;5{sub 1}{sup {minus}}{r_arrow}2{sup +}{sub 1})=26{sub {minus}12}{sup +15} Weisskopf units, which is still consistent with an interpretation of the 5{sub 1}{sup {minus}} level based on quadrupole-octupole coupling. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  19. Detection and assessment of wood decay in glulam beams using a decay rate approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senalik, Adam; Beall, Frank C.; Reis, Henrique

    2010-04-01

    A glulam beam retired from the field and without visible indications of wood decay was used. Towards detection and assessing wood decay, X-ray computer tomography and ultrasonic measurements were carried out. It was observed that decrease in mass density with increasing levels of wood decay affects x-rays attenuation and allows radioscopy to detect and assess wood decay. To detect and assess decay when only one lateral side of the beam is available, a modified impulse-echo is presented. The modified impulse-echo approach is based on observing the dynamic response of each lamina in the glulam beam to the drop of a steel sphere onto a steel plate coupled to the glulam beam lamina and upon a decay rate analysis of the corresponding time domain signal in a frequency band of interest. The selection of the frequency band of interest only requires knowledge of the nominal transverse dimensions of each lamina in the beam and of the corresponding wood species. It was observed that decay rate analysis allows detection and assessment of wood decay. The decay rate approach leads to an overall rate of false calls of 7.2%. Considering the variability that exists in wood including the presence of splits, orientation and thickness of growth rings, etc., this relative low rate of false calls makes this approach very attractive. Results show that results from both X-ray computer tomography and impulse-echo decay-rated based measurements are consistent with each other and can be used to detect and assess wood decay in structural lumber.

  20. Decay rates of the magnetohydrodynamic model for quantum plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Xueke; Xu, Xiuli

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we consider the quantum magnetohydrodynamic model for quantum plasmas. We prove the optimal decay rates for the solution to the constant state in the whole space in the Lp-norm with 2≤ p≤ 6 and its first derivatives in L2-norm. The proof is based on the optimal decay of the linearized equation and nonlinear energy estimates.

  1. 40 CFR 1065.644 - Vacuum-decay leak rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Vacuum-decay leak rate. 1065.644 Section 1065.644 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calculations and Data Requirements § 1065.644 Vacuum-decay leak...

  2. 40 CFR 1065.644 - Vacuum-decay leak rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Vacuum-decay leak rate. 1065.644 Section 1065.644 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calculations and Data Requirements § 1065.644 Vacuum-decay leak...

  3. 40 CFR 1065.644 - Vacuum-decay leak rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Vacuum-decay leak rate. 1065.644 Section 1065.644 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calculations and Data Requirements § 1065.644 Vacuum-decay leak...

  4. 40 CFR 1065.644 - Vacuum-decay leak rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Vacuum-decay leak rate. 1065.644 Section 1065.644 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calculations and Data Requirements § 1065.644 Vacuum-decay leak...

  5. 40 CFR 1065.644 - Vacuum-decay leak rate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Vacuum-decay leak rate. 1065.644 Section 1065.644 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calculations and Data Requirements § 1065.644 Vacuum-decay leak...

  6. Sensitivity studies for the main r process: β-decay rates

    SciTech Connect

    Mumpower, M.; Cass, J.; Passucci, G.; Aprahamian, A.; Surman, R.

    2014-04-15

    The pattern of isotopic abundances produced in rapid neutron capture, or r-process, nucleosynthesis is sensitive to the nuclear physics properties of thousands of unstable neutron-rich nuclear species that participate in the process. It has long been recognized that the some of the most influential pieces of nuclear data for r-process simulations are β-decay lifetimes. In light of experimental advances that have pushed measurement capabilities closer to the classic r-process path, we revisit the role of individual β-decay rates in the r process. We perform β-decay rate sensitivity studies for a main (A > 120) r process in a range of potential astrophysical scenarios. We study the influence of individual rates during (n, γ)-(γ, n) equilibrium and during the post-equilibrium phase where material moves back toward stability. We confirm the widely accepted view that the most important lifetimes are those of nuclei along the r-process path for each astrophysical scenario considered. However, we find in addition that individual β-decay rates continue to shape the final abundance pattern through the post-equilibrium phase, for as long as neutron capture competes with β decay. Many of the lifetimes important for this phase of the r process are within current or near future experimental reach.

  7. Modern Measurements of Uranium Decay Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons-Moss, T.; Faye, S. A.; Williams, R. W.; Wang, T. F.; Renne, P. R.; Mundil, R.; Harrison, M.; Bandong, B. B.; Moody, K.; Knight, K. B.

    2015-12-01

    It has been widely recognized that accurate and precise decay constants (λ) are critical to geochronology as highlighted by the EARTHTIME initiative, particularly the calibration benchmarks λ235U and λ238U. [1] Alpha counting experiments in 1971[2] measured λ235U and λ238U with ~0.1% precision, but have never been independently validated. We are embarking on new direct measurements of λ235U, λ238U, λ234Th, and λ234U using independent approaches for each nuclide. For the measurement of λ235U, highly enriched 235U samples will be chemically purified and analyzed for U concentration and isotopic composition by multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS). Thin films will be electrodeposited from these solutions and the α activity will be measured in an α-γ coincidence counting apparatus, which allows reduced uncertainty in counting efficiency while achieving adequate counting statistics. For λ238U measurement we will measure ingrowth of 234Th in chemically purified, isotopically enriched 238U solutions, by quantitatively separating the Th and allowing complete decay to 234U. All of the measurements will be done using MC-ICP-MS aiming at 0.05% precision. This approach is expected to result in values of λ238U with less than 0.1% uncertainty, if combined with improved λ234Th measements. These will be achieved using direct decay measurements with an E-∆E charged particle telescope in coincidence with a gamma detector. This system allows measurement of 234Th β-decay and simultaneous detection and identification of α particles emitted by the 234U daughter, thus observing λ234U at the same time. The high-precision λ234U obtained by the direct activity measurements can independently verify the commonly used values obtained by indirect methods.[3] An overarching goal of the project is to ensure the quality of results including metrological traceability in order to facilitate implementation across diverse disciplines. [1] T

  8. Experimental Neutron Capture Rate Constraint Far from Stability.

    PubMed

    Liddick, S N; Spyrou, A; Crider, B P; Naqvi, F; Larsen, A C; Guttormsen, M; Mumpower, M; Surman, R; Perdikakis, G; Bleuel, D L; Couture, A; Crespo Campo, L; Dombos, A C; Lewis, R; Mosby, S; Nikas, S; Prokop, C J; Renstrom, T; Rubio, B; Siem, S; Quinn, S J

    2016-06-17

    Nuclear reactions where an exotic nucleus captures a neutron are critical for a wide variety of applications, from energy production and national security, to astrophysical processes, and nucleosynthesis. Neutron capture rates are well constrained near stable isotopes where experimental data are available; however, moving far from the valley of stability, uncertainties grow by orders of magnitude. This is due to the complete lack of experimental constraints, as the direct measurement of a neutron-capture reaction on a short-lived nucleus is extremely challenging. Here, we report on the first experimental extraction of a neutron capture reaction rate on ^{69}Ni, a nucleus that is five neutrons away from the last stable isotope of Ni. The implications of this measurement on nucleosynthesis around mass 70 are discussed, and the impact of similar future measurements on the understanding of the origin of the heavy elements in the cosmos is presented.

  9. Inverse method for estimating respiration rates from decay time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forney, D. C.; Rothman, D. H.

    2012-09-01

    Long-term organic matter decomposition experiments typically measure the mass lost from decaying organic matter as a function of time. These experiments can provide information about the dynamics of carbon dioxide input to the atmosphere and controls on natural respiration processes. Decay slows down with time, suggesting that organic matter is composed of components (pools) with varied lability. Yet it is unclear how the appropriate rates, sizes, and number of pools vary with organic matter type, climate, and ecosystem. To better understand these relations, it is necessary to properly extract the decay rates from decomposition data. Here we present a regularized inverse method to identify an optimally-fitting distribution of decay rates associated with a decay time series. We motivate our study by first evaluating a standard, direct inversion of the data. The direct inversion identifies a discrete distribution of decay rates, where mass is concentrated in just a small number of discrete pools. It is consistent with identifying the best fitting "multi-pool" model, without prior assumption of the number of pools. However we find these multi-pool solutions are not robust to noise and are over-parametrized. We therefore introduce a method of regularized inversion, which identifies the solution which best fits the data but not the noise. This method shows that the data are described by a continuous distribution of rates, which we find is well approximated by a lognormal distribution, and consistent with the idea that decomposition results from a continuum of processes at different rates. The ubiquity of the lognormal distribution suggest that decay may be simply described by just two parameters: a mean and a variance of log rates. We conclude by describing a procedure that estimates these two lognormal parameters from decay data. Matlab codes for all numerical methods and procedures are provided.

  10. Inverse method for estimating respiration rates from decay time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forney, D. C.; Rothman, D. H.

    2012-03-01

    Long-term organic matter decomposition experiments typically measure the mass lost from decaying organic matter as a function of time. These experiments can provide information about the dynamics of carbon dioxide input to the atmosphere and controls on natural respiration processes. Decay slows down with time, suggesting that organic matter is composed of components (pools) with varied lability. Yet it is unclear how the appropriate rates, sizes, and number of pools vary with organic matter type, climate, and ecosystem. To better understand these relations, it is necessary to properly extract the decay rates from decomposition data. Here we present a regularized inverse method to identify an optimally-fitting distribution of decay rates associated with a decay time series. We motivate our study by first evaluating a standard, direct inversion of the data. The direct inversion identifies a discrete distribution of decay rates, where mass is concentrated in just a small number of discrete pools. It is consistent with identifying the best fitting "multi-pool" model, without prior assumption of the number of pools. However we find these multi-pool solutions are not robust to noise and are over-parametrized. We therefore introduce a method of regularized inversion, which identifies the solution which best fits the data but not the noise. This method shows that the data are described by a continuous distribution of rates which we find is well approximated by a lognormal distribution, and consistent with the idea that decomposition results from a continuum of processes at different rates. The ubiquity of the lognormal distribution suggest that decay may be simply described by just two parameters; a mean and a variance of log rates. We conclude by describing a procedure that estimates these two lognormal parameters from decay data. Matlab codes for all numerical methods and procedures are provided.

  11. A comparison of radiative capture with decay gamma-ray method in bore hole logging for economic minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senftle, F.E.; Moxham, R.M.; Tanner, A.B.

    1972-01-01

    The recent availability of borehole logging sondes employing a source of neutrons and a Ge(Li) detector opens up the possibility of analyzing either decay or capture gamma rays. The most efficient method for a given element can be predicted by calculating the decay-to-capture count ratio for the most prominent peaks in the respective spectra. From a practical point of view such a calculation must be slanted toward short irradiation and count times at each station in a borehole. A simplified method of computation is shown, and the decay-to-capture count ratio has been calculated and tabulated for the optimum value in the decay mode irrespective of the irradiation time, and also for a ten minute irradiation time. Based on analysis of a single peak in each spectrum, the results indicate the preferred technique and the best decay or capture peak to observe for those elements of economic interest. ?? 1972.

  12. Decay rate of the second radiation belt.

    PubMed

    Badhwar, G D; Robbins, D E

    1996-01-01

    Variations in the Earth's trapped (Van Allen) belts produced by solar flare particle events are not well understood. Few observations of increases in particle populations have been reported. This is particularly true for effects in low Earth orbit, where manned spaceflights are conducted. This paper reports the existence of a second proton belt and it's subsequent decay as measured by a tissue-equivalent proportional counter and a particle spectrometer on five Space Shuttle flights covering an eighteen-month period. The creation of this second belt is attributed to the injection of particles from a solar particle event which occurred at 2246 UT, March 22, 1991. Comparisons with observations onboard the Russian Mir space station and other unmanned satellites are made. Shuttle measurements and data from other spacecraft are used to determine that the e-folding time of the peak of the second proton belt. It was ten months. Proton populations in the second belt returned to values of quiescent times within eighteen months. The increase in absorbed dose attributed to protons in the second belt was approximately 20%. Passive dosimeter measurements were in good agreement with this value.

  13. Decay rate of the second radiation belt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, G. D.; Robbins, D. E.

    1996-01-01

    Variations in the Earth's trapped (Van Allen) belts produced by solar flare particle events are not well understood. Few observations of increases in particle populations have been reported. This is particularly true for effects in low Earth orbit, where manned spaceflights are conducted. This paper reports the existence of a second proton belt and it's subsequent decay as measured by a tissue-equivalent proportional counter and a particle spectrometer on five Space Shuttle flights covering an eighteen-month period. The creation of this second belt is attributed to the injection of particles from a solar particle event which occurred at 2246 UT, March 22, 1991. Comparisons with observations onboard the Russian Mir space station and other unmanned satellites are made. Shuttle measurements and data from other spacecraft are used to determine that the e-folding time of the peak of the second proton belt. It was ten months. Proton populations in the second belt returned to values of quiescent times within eighteen months. The increase in absorbed dose attributed to protons in the second belt was approximately 20%. Passive dosimeter measurements were in good agreement with this value.

  14. Uncertainties in the calculation of solar-neutrino capture rates

    SciTech Connect

    Filippone, B.W.

    1981-01-01

    A detailed estimate is presented of the possible uncertainty range for the neutrino flux from a standard solar model. Using present estimated errors in the key input parameters, detailed solar models are calculated to give an uncertainty in the theoretical nu/sub e/ capture rate in both the on-going /sup 37/Cl experiment and the proposed experiment using /sup 71/Ga. The uncertainty in capture rate is investigated by considering individual parameter variations about a mean model, by simultaneously varying several key parameters to yield upper and lower limits, and by a Monte Carlo method.

  15. Effects of vacuum fluctuation suppression on atomic decay rates

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, L.H.; Roman, Thomas A.

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: > Excited atoms are shot through a cavity containing an electromagnetic field. > Cavity is in the lowest mode in a non-classical state. > Such a state can suppress the decay rate of the atoms in certain situations. > We show that this effect can be correlated with periods of negative energy density. - Abstract: The use of atomic decay rates as a probe of sub-vacuum phenomena will be studied. Because electromagnetic vacuum fluctuations are essential for radiative decay of excited atomic states, decay rates can serve as a measure of the suppression of vacuum fluctuations in non-classical states, such as squeezed vacua. In such states, the renormalized expectation value of the square of the electric field or the energy density can be periodically negative, representing suppression of vacuum fluctuations. We explore the extent to which atomic decays can be used to measure the mean squared electric field or energy density. We consider a scheme in which atoms in an excited state transit a closed cavity whose lowest mode contains photons in a non-classical state. A crucial feature of our analysis is that we do not employ the rotating wave approximation. The change in the decay probability of the atom in the cavity due to the non-classical state can, under certain circumstances, serve as a measure of the mean squared electric field or energy density in the cavity. We make some estimates of the magnitude of this effect, which indicate that an experimental test might be possible, although very challenging.

  16. Observations of HF backscatter decay rates from HAARP generated FAI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bristow, William; Hysell, David

    2016-07-01

    Suitable experiments at the High-frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facilities in Gakona, Alaska, create a region of ionospheric Field-Aligned Irregularities (FAI) that produces strong radar backscatter observed by the SuperDARN radar on Kodiak Island, Alaska. Creation of FAI in HF ionospheric modification experiments has been studied by a number of authors who have developed a rich theoretical background. The decay of the irregularities, however, has not been so widely studied yet it has the potential for providing estimates of the parameters of natural irregularity diffusion, which are difficult measure by other means. Hysell, et al. [1996] demonstrated using the decay of radar scatter above the Sura heating facility to estimate irregularity diffusion. A large database of radar backscatter from HAARP generated FAI has been collected over the years. Experiments often cycled the heater power on and off in a way that allowed estimates of the FAI decay rate. The database has been examined to extract decay time estimates and diffusion rates over a range of ionospheric conditions. This presentation will summarize the database and the estimated diffusion rates, and will discuss the potential for targeted experiments for aeronomy measurements. Hysell, D. L., M. C. Kelley, Y. M. Yampolski, V. S. Beley, A. V. Koloskov, P. V. Ponomarenko, and O. F. Tyrnov, HF radar observations of decaying artificial field aligned irregularities, J. Geophys. Res. , 101, 26,981, 1996.

  17. Radiative decay rates of impurity states in semiconductor nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turkov, Vadim K.; Baranov, Alexander V.; Fedorov, Anatoly V.; Rukhlenko, Ivan D.

    2015-10-01

    Doped semiconductor nanocrystals is a versatile material base for contemporary photonics and optoelectronics devices. Here, for the first time to the best of our knowledge, we theoretically calculate the radiative decay rates of the lowest-energy states of donor impurity in spherical nanocrystals made of four widely used semiconductors: ZnS, CdSe, Ge, and GaAs. The decay rates were shown to vary significantly with the nanocrystal radius, increasing by almost three orders of magnitude when the radius is reduced from 15 to 5 nm. Our results suggest that spontaneous emission may dominate the decay of impurity states at low temperatures, and should be taken into account in the design of advanced materials and devices based on doped semiconductor nanocrystals.

  18. Radiative decay rates of impurity states in semiconductor nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Turkov, Vadim K.; Baranov, Alexander V.; Fedorov, Anatoly V.; Rukhlenko, Ivan D.

    2015-10-15

    Doped semiconductor nanocrystals is a versatile material base for contemporary photonics and optoelectronics devices. Here, for the first time to the best of our knowledge, we theoretically calculate the radiative decay rates of the lowest-energy states of donor impurity in spherical nanocrystals made of four widely used semiconductors: ZnS, CdSe, Ge, and GaAs. The decay rates were shown to vary significantly with the nanocrystal radius, increasing by almost three orders of magnitude when the radius is reduced from 15 to 5 nm. Our results suggest that spontaneous emission may dominate the decay of impurity states at low temperatures, and should be taken into account in the design of advanced materials and devices based on doped semiconductor nanocrystals.

  19. A New Decay Path in the {sup 12}C+{sup 16}O Radiative Capture Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Courtin, S.; Lebhertz, D.; Haas, F.; Beck, C.; Michalon, A.; Salsac, M.-D.; Jenkins, D. G.; Marley, P.; Lister, C. J.

    2009-03-04

    The {sup 12}C({sup 16}O,{gamma}){sup 28}Si radiative capture reaction has been studied at energies close to the Coulomb barrier at Triumf (Vancouver) using the Dragon spectrometer and its associated BGO array. It has been observed that the {gamma} decay flux proceeds mainly via states around 10-11 MeV and via the direct feeding of the {sup 28}Si 3{sub 1}{sup -}(6879 keV) and 4{sub 2}{sup +}(6888 keV) deformed states. A discussion is presented about this selective feeding as well as perspectives for the use of novel detection systems for the study of light heavy-ion radiative capture reactions.

  20. Influences of the astrophysical environment on nuclear decay rates

    SciTech Connect

    Norman, E.B.

    1987-09-01

    In many astronomical environments, physical conditions are so extreme that nuclear decay rates can be significantly altered from their laboratory values. Such effects are relevant to a number of current problems in nuclear astrophysics. Experiments related to these problems are now being pursued, and will be described in this talk. 19 refs., 5 figs.

  1. Uncertainties in Astrophysical β-decay Rates from the FRDM

    SciTech Connect

    Bertolli, M.G.; Möller, P.; Jones, S.

    2014-06-15

    β{sup −}-decay rates are of crucial importance in stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis, as they are a key component in stellar processes. Tabulated values of the decay rates as functions of both temperature T and density ρ are necessary input to stellar evolution codes such as MESA, or largescale nucleosynthesis simulations such as those performed by the NuGrid collaboration. Therefore, it is interesting to know the uncertainties in these rates and the effects of these uncertainties on stellar structure and isotopic yields. We have calculated β-strength functions and reaction rates for nuclei ranging from {sup 16}O to {sup 339}136, extending from the proton drip line to the neutron drip line based on a quasi-particle random-phase approximation (QRPA) in a deformed folded-Yukawa single-particle model. Q values are determined from the finite-range droplet mass model (FRDM). We have investigated the effect of model uncertainty on astrophysical β{sup −}-decay rates calculated by the FRDM. The sources of uncertainty considered are Q values and deformation. The rates and their uncertainties are generated for a variety of temperature and density ranges, corresponding to key stellar processes. We demonstrate the effects of these rate uncertainties on isotopic abundances using the NuGrid network calculations.

  2. Beta-decay rates: towards a self-consistent approach

    SciTech Connect

    Borzov, I. N.; Goriely, S.; Pearson, J. M.

    1998-02-15

    An approximation to a self-consistent model of the ground state properties and spin-isospin excitations of neutron-rich nuclides is outlined. The structure of the Gamow-Teller strength functions in stable nuclei and short-lived nuclides undergoing high-energy {beta}-decay is discussed. The results of large-scale calculations of the {beta}-decay rates for spherical and slightly deformed nuclides of relevance to the r-process are analysed and compared with the results of existing global calculations.

  3. Power Spectrum Analysis of BNL Decay-Rate Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    93524, USA d Department of Physics, United States Air Force Academy, CO 80920, USA Keywords: Sun, Neutrinos • Corresponding author. Tel +1...irradiance data have been found to be closely related to rotation rate estimates derived from low-energy solar- neutrino data, this result supports the...recent conjecture that solar neutrinos may be responsible for variations in nuclear decay rates. We also carry out a similar comparison with local

  4. Decay strength distributions in {sup 12}C({sup 12}C,{gamma}) radiative capture

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, D. G.; Fulton, B. R.; Marley, P.; Fox, S. P.; Glover, R.; Wadsworth, R.; Watson, D. L.; Courtin, S.; Haas, F.; Lebhertz, D.; Beck, C.; Papka, P.; Rousseau, M.; Sanchez i Zafra, A.; Hutcheon, D. A.; Davis, C.; Ottewell, D.; Pavan, M. M.; Pearson, J.; Ruiz, C.

    2007-10-15

    The heavy-ion radiative capture reaction, {sup 12}C({sup 12}C,{gamma}), has been investigated at energies both on- and off-resonance, with a particular focus on known resonances at E{sub c.m.}=6.0, 6.8, 7.5, and 8.0 MeV. Gamma rays detected in a BGO scintillator array were recorded in coincidence with {sup 24}Mg residues at the focal plane of the DRAGON recoil separator at TRIUMF. In this manner, the relative strength of all decay pathways through excited states up to the particle threshold could be examined for the first time. Isovector M1 transitions are found to be a important component of the radiative capture from the E{sub c.m.}=6.0 and 6.8 MeV resonances. Comparison with Monte Carlo simulations suggests that these resonances may have either J=0 or 2, with a preference for J=2. The higher energy resonances at E{sub c.m.}=7.5 and 8.0 MeV have a rather different decay pattern. The former is a clear candidate for a J=4 resonance, whereas the latter has a dominant J=4 character superposed on a J=2 resonant component underneath. The relationship between these resonances and the well-known quasimolecular resonances as well as resonances in breakup and electrofission of {sup 24}Mg into two {sup 12}C nuclei are discussed.

  5. Materials Outgassing Rate Decay in Vacuum at Isothermal Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Alvin Y.; Kastanas, George N.; Kramer, Leonard; Soares, Carlos E.; Mikatarian, Ronald R.

    2016-01-01

    As a laboratory for scientific research, the International Space Station has been in Low Earth Orbit for nearly 20 years and is expected to be on-orbit for another 10 years. The ISS has been maintaining a relatively pristine contamination environment for science payloads. Materials outgassing induced contamination is currently the dominant source for sensitive surfaces on ISS and modeling the outgassing rate decay over a 20 to 30 year period is challenging. Materials outgassing is described herein as a diffusion-reaction process using ASTM E 1559 rate data. The observation of -1/2 (diffusion) or non-integers (reaction limited) as rate decay exponents for common ISS materials indicate classical reaction kinetics is unsatisfactory in modeling materials outgassing. Non-randomness of reactant concentrations at the interface is the source of this deviation from classical reaction kinetics. A diffusion limited decay was adopted as the result of the correlation of the contaminant layer thicknesses on returned ISS hardware, the existence of high outgassing silicone exhibiting near diffusion limited decay, and the confirmation of non-depleted material after ten years in the Low Earth Orbit.Keywords: Materials Outgassing, ASTM E 1559, Reaction Kinetics, Diffusion, Space Environments Effects, Contamination

  6. Materials outgassing rate decay in vacuum at isothermal conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Alvin Y.; Kastanas, George N.; Kramer, Leonard; Soares, Carlos E.; Mikatarian, Ronald R.

    2016-09-01

    As a laboratory for scientific research, the International Space Station has been in Low Earth Orbit for over 17 years and is planned to be on-orbit for another 10 years. The ISS has been maintaining a relatively pristine contamination environment for science payloads. Materials outgassing induced contamination is currently the dominant source for sensitive surfaces on ISS and modelling the outgassing rate decay over a 20 to 30 year period is challenging. Using ASTM E 1559 rate data, materials outgassing is described herein as a diffusion-reaction process with the interface playing a key role. The observation of -1/2 (diffusion) or non-integers (reaction limited) as rate decay exponents for common ISS materials indicate classical reaction kinetics is unsatisfactory in modelling materials outgassing. Nonrandomness of reactant concentrations at the interface is the source of this deviation from classical reaction kinetics. A t-1/2 decay is adopted as the result of the correlation of the contaminant layer thicknesses and composition on returned ISS hardware, the existence of high outgassing silicone exhibiting near diffusion limited decay, the confirmation of nondepleted material after ten years in Low Earth Orbit, and a potential slowdown of long term materials outgassing kinetics due to silicone contaminants at the interface.

  7. Capturing relic neutrinos with {beta}- and double {beta}-decaying nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Hodak, Rastislav; Kovalenko, Sergey; Simkovic, Fedor

    2009-11-09

    Neutrinos are probably one of the most important structural constituents of the Universe. The Big Bang Theory predicts that the significant component of them is formed by the cosmic neutrino background, an analogues of the big bang relic photons comprising the cosmic microwave background radiation, which has been measured with amazing accuracy. Properties of the relic neutrino background are closely related to the ones of the cosmic microwave radiation. Relic neutrinos pervade space, but their temperature is extremely small, being of the order of 0.1 meV. Although belonging to the most abundant particles of the Universe, the relic neutrinos evade direct detection so far. This is because the low-energy neutrinos interact only very weakly with matter. In this contribution, we explore the feasibility to detect the cosmic neutrino background by means of {beta}-decaying ({sup 3}H and {sup 187}Re) and double beta decaying ({sup 100}Mo) nuclei. In addition, we address the question whether double relic neutrino capture on nuclei can be an obstacle for observation of neutrinoless double {beta}-decay.

  8. Time Modulation of the {beta}{sup +}-Decay Rate of H-Like {sup 140}Pr{sup 58+} Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, A. N.; Kryshen, E. L.; Pitschmann, M.; Kienle, P.

    2008-10-31

    Recent experimental data at GSI on the rates of the number of daughter ions, produced by the nuclear K-shell electron capture (EC) decays of the H-like ions {sup 140}Pr{sup 58+} and {sup 142}Pm{sup 60+}, suggest that they are modulated in time with periods T{sub EC}{approx_equal}7 sec and amplitudes a{sub EC}{approx_equal}0.20. Since it is known that these ions are unstable also under the nuclear positron ({beta}{sup +}) decays, we study a possible time dependence of the nuclear {beta}{sup +}-decay rate of the H-like {sup 140}Pr{sup 58+} ion. We show that the time dependence of the {beta}{sup +}-decay rate of the H-like {sup 140}Pr{sup 58+} ion as well as any H-like heavy ions cannot be observed.

  9. Effects of fog droplets on wake vortex decay rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moulden, T. H.; Frost, W.

    1976-01-01

    A simple model for the motion of particles in a laminar line vortex is discussed. The energy required to accelerate a set of these particles was determined and shown to be only a small fraction of the energy content of the vortex flow. It is shown that this energy transfer is unlikely to be sufficient to significantly modify the vortex decay rate. It is further argued that the effect of the particle on the viscous properties of the resulting two phase fluid leads to a slower decay rate than in single phase air flow. However, this conclusion may not necessarily follow for turbulence flows. Results show that the migration of particles to the outer flow results in a redistribution of the velocity profile in the vortex and in a non-uniform two phase viscosity across the core. It is suggested that these effects may accelerate vortex bursting.

  10. New search for double electron capture in {sup 106}Cd decay with the TGV-2 spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Briançon, Ch.; Brudanin, V. B.; Egorov, V. G.; Jose, J. M.; Klimenko, A. A.; Kovalik, A.; Rosov, S. V.; Rukhadze, E. N.; Rukhadze, N. I. Salamatin, A. V.; Timkin, V. V.; Fajt, L.; Hodak, R.; Šimkovic, F.; Shitov, Yu. A.; Špavorova, M.; Štekl, I.; Yakushev, E. A.

    2015-09-15

    A new experiment devoted to searches for double electron capture in {sup 106}Cd decay is being performed at the Modane underground laboratory (4800 mwe) with the 32-detector TGV-2 spectrometer. The limit T{sub 1/2}(2νEC/EC) > 2.0×10{sup 20} yr at a 90%confidence level (C.L.) was obtained from a preliminary analysis of data obtained over 2250 h of measurements with about 23.2 g sample enriched in the isotope {sup 106}Cd to 99.57%. The limits T{sub 1/2}(KL, 2741 keV) > 0.9 × 10{sup 20} yr and T{sub 1/2}(KK, 2718 keV) ≫ 1.4 × 10{sup 20} yr at a 90% C.L. on the neutrinoless decay of {sup 106}Cd were obtained from measurements performed with the Obelix low-background spectrometer from high-purity germanium (HPGe spectrometer) for a sample of mass about 23.2 g enriched in the isotope {sup 106}Cd.

  11. The MuCap experiment: A measurement of the muon capture rate in hydrogen gas

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, T. I.

    2007-10-26

    We have recently measured the rate of nuclear muon capture by the proton, using a novel technique which involves a time projection chamber operating in ultraclean, deuterium-depleted hydrogen gas. The target's low gas density of 1% compared to liquid hydrogen is key to avoiding uncertainties that arise from the formation of muonic molecules. The capture rate from the hyperfine singlet ground state of the {mu}p atom was obtained from the difference between the {mu}{sup -} disappearance rate in hydrogen and the world average for the {mu}{sup +} decay rate, yielding {lambda}{sub S} = 725.0{+-}17.4 s{sup -1}, from which the induced pseudoscalar coupling of the nucleon, g{sub P}(q{sup 2} = 0.88m{sub {mu}}{sup 2}) = 7.3{+-}1.1, is extracted. This result is consistent with theoretical predictions for g{sub P} that are based on the approximate chiral symmetry of QCD.

  12. 31Cl beta decay and the 30P31S reaction rate in nova nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Michael; Wrede, C.; Brown, B. A.; Liddick, S. N.; Pérez-Loureiro, D.; NSCL e12028 Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The 30P31S reaction rate is critical for modeling the final isotopic abundances of ONe nova nucleosynthesis, identifying the origin of presolar nova grains, and calibrating proposed nova thermometers. Unfortunately, this rate is essentially experimentally unconstrained because the strengths of key 31S proton capture resonances are not known, due to uncertainties in their spins and parities. Using a 31Cl beam produced at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, we have populated several 31S states for study via beta decay and devised a new decay scheme which includes updated beta feedings and gamma branchings as well as multiple states previously unobserved in 31Cl beta decay. Results of this study, including the unambiguous identification due to isospin mixing of a new l = 0 , Jπ = 3 /2+ 31S resonance directly in the middle of the Gamow Window, will be presented, and significance to the evaluation of the 30P31S reaction rate will be discussed. Work supported by U.S. Natl. Sci. Foundation (Grants No. PHY-1102511, PHY-1404442, PHY-1419765, and PHY-1431052); U.S. Dept. of Energy, Natl. Nucl. Security Administration (Award No. DE-NA0000979); Nat. Sci. and Eng. Research Council of Canada.

  13. Excited states in 168Yb from electron-capture decay of 168Lum (T1/2=6.7 min)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barci, V.; Ardisson, G.; Trubert, D.; Hussonnois, M.

    1999-08-01

    The electron-capture decay of the 168Lum (T1/2=6.7 min, Jπ=3+) isomer was studied with high purity sources, obtained by using a new radiochemical method consisting of fast continous on-line separation of reaction products. A complex spectrum composed of about 200 γ rays was observed. From these, 162 transitions were assigned to a level scheme of 39 excited levels of 168Yb, primarily by γ-γ coincidence spectroscopic measurements. About 60 transitions were placed for the first time and >90% of the decay intensity was clearly identified. The structure of the levels directly fed by the electron-capture decay was reviewed as particle-hole excitations of the core.

  14. Solvent Polarity Effect on Nonradiative Decay Rate of Thioflavin T.

    PubMed

    Stsiapura, Vitali I; Kurhuzenkau, Siarhei A; Kuzmitsky, Valery A; Bouganov, Oleg V; Tikhomirov, Sergey A

    2016-07-21

    It has been established earlier that fluorescence quantum yield of thioflavin T (ThT)-a probe widely used for amyloid fibrils detection-is viscosity-dependent, and photophysical properties of ThT can be well-described by the fluorescent molecular rotor model, which associates twisted internal charge transfer (TICT) reaction with the main nonradiative decay process in the excited state of the dye. Solutions of ThT in a range of polar solvents were studied using steady-state fluorescence and sub-picosecond transient absorption spectroscopy methods, and we showed that solvent effect on nonradiative transition rate knr cannot be reduced to the dependence on viscosity only and that ∼3 times change of knr can be observed for ThT in aprotic solvents and water, which correlates with solvent polarity. Different behavior was observed in alcohol solutions, particularly in longer n-alcohols, where TICT rate was mainly determined by rotational diffusion of ThT fragments. Quantum-chemical calculations of S0 → S1 transition energy were performed to get insight of polar solvent contribution to the excited-state energy stabilization. Effect of polar solvent on electronic energy levels of ThT was simulated by applying homogeneous electric field according to the Onsager cavity model. Static solvent effect on the excited-state potential energy surface, where charge transfer reaction takes place, was not essential to account for experimentally observed TICT rate differences in water and aprotic solvents. From the other side, nonradiative decay rate of ThT in water, ethylene glycol, and aprotic solvents was found to follow dynamics of polar solvation knr ∼ τS(-1), which can explain dependence of the TICT rate on both polarity and viscosity of the solvents.

  15. Strong neutrino cooling by cycles of electron capture and decay in neutron star crusts

    SciTech Connect

    Schatz, Hendrik; Gupta, Sanjib; Moeller, Peter; Beard, Mary; Brown, Edward; Deibel, A. T.; Gasques, Leandro; Hix, William Raphael; Keek, Laurens; Lau, Rita; Steiner, Andrew M; Wiescher, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The temperature in the crust of an accreting neutron star, which comprises its outermost kilometre, is set by heating from nuclear reactions at large densities, neutrino cooling and heat transport from the interior. The heated crust has been thought to affect observable phenomena at shallower depths, such as thermonuclear bursts in the accreted envelope. Here we report that cycles of electron capture and its inverse, decay, involving neutron-rich nuclei at a typical depth of about 150 metres, cool the outer neutron star crust by emitting neutrinos while also thermally decoupling the surface layers from the deeper crust. This Urca mechanism has been studied in the context of white dwarfs13 and type Ia supernovae, but hitherto was not considered in neutron stars, because previous models1, 2 computed the crust reactions using a zero-temperature approximation and assumed that only a single nuclear species was present at any given depth. The thermal decoupling means that X-ray bursts and other surface phenomena are largely independent of the strength of deep crustal heating. The unexpectedly short recurrence times, of the order of years, observed for very energetic thermonuclear superbursts are therefore not an indicator of a hot crust, but may point instead to an unknown local heating mechanism near the neutron star surface.

  16. No evidence for a decrease of nuclear decay rates with increasing heliocentric distance based on radiochronology of meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Matthias M. M.; Wieler, Rainer

    2014-03-01

    . Moreover, the oldest U-Pb ages of meteorites agree with the main-sequence age of the sun derived from helioseismology within the formal ˜1% uncertainty of the latter. Meteorite ages also provide no evidence for a decrease of decay rates with heliocentric distance for nuclides such as 87Rb (decay mode β-) 40K (β- and electron capture), and 147Sm (α).

  17. Precision measurements of positronium decay rate and energy level

    SciTech Connect

    Asai, S.; Kataoka, Y.; Kobayashi, T.; Namba, T.; Suehara, T.; Akimoto, G.; Ishida, A.; Hashimoto, M. M.; Saito, H.; Idehara, T.; Yoshida, M.

    2008-08-08

    Positronium is an ideal system for the research of the bound state QED. New precise measurement of orthopositronium decay rate has been performed with an accuracy of 150 ppm, and the result combined with the last three is 7.0401{+-}0.0007 {mu}s{sup -1}. It is the first result to validate the 2nd order correction. The Hyper Fine Splitting of positronium is sensitive to the higher order corrections of the QED prediction and also to the new physics beyond Standard Model via the quantum oscillation into virtual photon. The discrepancy of 3.5{sigma} is found recently between the measured values and the QED prediction (O({alpha}{sup 3})). It might be due to the contribution of the new physics or the systematic problems in the previous measurements: (non-thermalized Ps and non-uniformity of the magnetic field). We propose new methods to measure HFS precisely without the these uncertainties.

  18. Decay rates of human remains in an arid environment.

    PubMed

    Galloway, A; Birkby, W H; Jones, A M; Henry, T E; Parks, B O

    1989-05-01

    The environment of southern Arizona with mild winters and hot, dry summers produces great variability in decay rates of human remains. Summer temperatures, which range well over 38 degrees C (100 degrees F), induce rapid bloating as a result of the accumulation of decompositional gases. However, in certain circumstances, the aridity can lead to extensive mummification, allowing preservation of remains for hundreds of years. A retrospective study of 189 cases, concentrating on remains found on the desert floor or in the surrounding mountains and on remains found within closed structures, outlines the time frame and sequences of the decay process. Remains can retain a fresh appearance for a considerable time in the winter, but the onset of marked decomposition is rapid in the summer months. Bloating of the body usually is present two to seven days following death. Following this, within structures, there is frequently rapid decomposition and skeletonization. With outdoor exposure, remains are more likely to pass through a long period of dehydration of outer tissues, mummification, and reduction of desiccated tissue. Exposure of large portions of the skeleton usually does not occur until four to six months after death. Bleaching and exfoliation of bone--the beginning stages of destruction of the skeletal elements--begins at about nine months' exposure. Insect activity, including that of maggot and beetle varieties, may accelerate decomposition, but this process is greatly affected by location of the body, seasonal weather, and accessibility of the soft tissues. Carnivores and other scavengers also are contributing factors, as are clothing or covering of the body, substrate, elevation, and latitude.

  19. New decay branches of the radiative capture reaction {sup 12}C({sup 16}O,{gamma}){sup 28}Si

    SciTech Connect

    Lebhertz, D.; Courtin, S.; Haas, F.; Salsac, M.-D.; Beck, C.; Michalon, A.; Rousseau, M.; Marley, P. L.; Glover, R. G.; Kent, P. E.; Hutcheon, D. A.; Davis, C.; Pearson, J. E.

    2009-01-28

    Resonances in the {sup 12}C({sup 16}O,{gamma}){sup 28}Si radiative capture process at energies around the Coulomb barrier have been probed using the very selective 0 deg. Dragon spectrometer at Triumf and its associated BGO {gamma}-array. For the first time the full level scheme involved in this process has been measured and shows previously unobserved {gamma}-decay to doorway states around 11 MeV in {sup 28}Si.

  20. Parametric control of collision rates and capture rates in geometrically enhanced differential immunocapture (GEDI) microfluidic devices for rare cell capture

    PubMed Central

    Smith, James P.; Lannin, Timothy B.; Syed, Yusef A.; Santana, Steven M.; Kirby, Brian J.

    2013-01-01

    The enrichment and isolation of rare cells from complex samples, such as circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from whole blood, is an important engineering problem with widespread clinical applications. One approach uses a microfluidic obstacle array with an antibody surface functionalization to both guide cells into contact with the capture surface and to facilitate adhesion; geometrically enhanced differential immunocapture is a design strategy in which the array is designed to promote target cell–obstacle contact and minimize other interactions (Gleghorn et al., 2010; Kirby et al., 2012). We present a simulation that uses capture experiments in a simple Hele-Shaw geometry (Santana et al., 2012) to inform a target-cell-specific capture model that can predict capture probability in immunocapture microdevices of any arbitrary complex geometry. We show that capture performance is strongly dependent on the array geometry, and that it is possible to select an obstacle array geometry that maximizes capture efficiency (by creating combinations of frequent target cell–obstacle collisions and shear stress low enough to support capture), while simulatenously enhancing purity by minimizing non-specific adhesion of both smaller contaminant cells (with infrequent cell–obstacle collisions) and larger contaminant cells (by focusing those collisions into regions of high shear stress). PMID:24078270

  1. Formation and decay of C - 60 following free electron capture by C60

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matejčik, Štefan; Märk, Tilmann D.; Španěl, Patrik; Smith, David; Jaffke, Thomas; Illenberger, Eugen

    1995-02-01

    The results of a detailed crossed electron/molecular beam study of electron attachment to C60 molecules and electron detachment from C-60 over the range of electron energies from near zero to about 15 eV are described. It is shown by comparing the experimental data for the attachment cross sections (normalized to the absolute thermal cross sections determined using the flowing afterglow/Langmuir probe apparatus) with quantum calculations that attachment occurs at low energies in the p-wave channel, and in the d- and f-wave channels (and probably higher-order partial waves) at the higher electron energies. At electron energies above 7 eV, thermal detachment of electrons from the hot C-60 negative ions is seen to occur, and the unimolecular rate coefficients for detachment, kd, have been determined as a function of the energy of the attaching electron. Hence, by relating kd to the derived temperature of the hot C-60 ions, the electron detachment energy, Ed, has been determined as 2.6 eV, which is close to the electron affinity of C60 as measured by photodetachment from cold C-60 ions. Additionally, by combining the measured attachment rate coefficients, ka, from the previous flowing afterglow/Langmuir probe study with the kd data determined in this study, equilibrium constants for the detachment/attachment reactions have been obtained which are reconciled with those calculated using total partition functions. An important conclusion to be drawn from all these studies is that C60 very efficiently captures electrons over the wide electron energy range from about 0.2 eV to around 15 eV and retains them if the energy released in the electron capture process can be removed before thermal detachment can occur.

  2. 12C(16O,γ)28Si radiative capture: Structural and statistical aspects of the γ decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebhertz, D.; Courtin, S.; Haas, F.; Jenkins, D. G.; Simenel, C.; Salsac, M.-D.; Hutcheon, D. A.; Beck, C.; Cseh, J.; Darai, J.; Davis, C.; Glover, R. G.; Goasduff, A.; Kent, P. E.; Levai, G.; Marley, P. L.; Michalon, A.; Pearson, J. E.; Rousseau, M.; Rowley, N.; Ruiz, C.

    2012-03-01

    The heavy-ion radiative capture reaction 12C(16O,γ)28Si has been studied at three energies Ec.m.=8.5, 8.8, and 9 MeV which are close to the Coulomb barrier. The weak radiative capture process has been identified by measuring the 28Si recoils in the highly selective 0∘ spectrometer DRAGON at TRIUMF (Vancouver). The coincident γ rays have been recorded in the associated BGO array. This has allowed a complete measurement of the γ spectrum and the relative strength of all decay pathways. An important part of the decay through quasibound states close to the particle threshold and the feeding of bound states with particular deformation have been identified for the first time. Comparisons with Monte Carlo simulations allowed the extraction of the full experimental radiative capture cross section. Our results suggest an important contribution of spins Jπ=5- and 6+ in the entrance channel. The surprisingly large cross sections from 12 μb at Ec.m.=8.5 MeV to 25 μb at Ec.m.=9.0 MeV for the heavy-ion radiative capture process are discussed in terms of the interplay between statistical and structural aspects of the process.

  3. Decay rates of spherical and deformed proton emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Davids, C. N.; Esbensen, H.

    1999-11-23

    Using Green's function techniques, the authors derive expressions for the width of a proton decaying state in spherical and deformed nuclei. The authors show that the proton decay widths calculated by the exact expressions of Maglione et al. are equivalent to the distorted wave expressions of Bugrov et al., and that of {angstrom} berg et al. in the spherical case.

  4. Accumulation and decay of visual capture and the ventriloquism aftereffect caused by brief audio-visual disparities.

    PubMed

    Bosen, Adam K; Fleming, Justin T; Allen, Paul D; O'Neill, William E; Paige, Gary D

    2017-02-01

    Visual capture and the ventriloquism aftereffect resolve spatial disparities of incongruent auditory visual (AV) objects by shifting auditory spatial perception to align with vision. Here, we demonstrated the distinct temporal characteristics of visual capture and the ventriloquism aftereffect in response to brief AV disparities. In a set of experiments, subjects localized either the auditory component of AV targets (A within AV) or a second sound presented at varying delays (1-20 s) after AV exposure (A2 after AV). AV targets were trains of brief presentations (1 or 20), covering a ±30° azimuthal range, and with ±8° (R or L) disparity. We found that the magnitude of visual capture generally reached its peak within a single AV pair and did not dissipate with time, while the ventriloquism aftereffect accumulated with repetitions of AV pairs and dissipated with time. Additionally, the magnitude of the auditory shift induced by each phenomenon was uncorrelated across listeners and visual capture was unaffected by subsequent auditory targets, indicating that visual capture and the ventriloquism aftereffect are separate mechanisms with distinct effects on auditory spatial perception. Our results indicate that visual capture is a 'sample-and-hold' process that binds related objects and stores the combined percept in memory, whereas the ventriloquism aftereffect is a 'leaky integrator' process that accumulates with experience and decays with time to compensate for cross-modal disparities.

  5. Enhanced capture rate for haze defects in production wafer inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auerbach, Ditza; Shulman, Adi; Rozentsvige, Moshe

    2010-03-01

    involved scanning with three different recipe types: Standard Inspection: Nominal recipe with a low false alarm rate was used to scan the wafer and repeaters were extracted from the final defect map. Haze Monitoring Application: Recipe sensitivity was enhanced and run on a single field column from which on repeating defects were extracted. Enhanced Repeater Extractor: Defect processing included the two parallel routes: a nominal recipe for the random defects and the new high sensitive repeater extractor algorithm. The results showed that the new application (recipe #3) had the highest capture rate on haze defects and detected new repeater defects not found in the first two recipes. In addition, the recipe was much simpler to setup since repeaters are filtered separately from random defects. We expect that in the future, with the advent of mask-less lithography and EUV lithography, the monitoring of field and die repeating defects on the wafer will become a necessity for process control in the semiconductor fab.

  6. Evaluating orangutan census techniques using nest decay rates: implications for population estimates.

    PubMed

    Mathewson, P D; Spehar, S N; Meijaard, E; Nardiyono; Purnomo; Sasmirul, A; Sudiyanto; Oman; Sulhnudin; Jasary; Jumali; Marshall, A J

    2008-01-01

    An accurate estimate for orangutan nest decay time is a crucial factor in commonly used methods for estimating orangutan population size. Decay rates are known to vary, but the decay process and, thus, the temporal and spatial variation in decay time are poorly understood. We used established line-transect methodology to survey orangutan nests in a lowland forest in East Kalimantan, Indonesia, and monitored the decay of 663 nests over 20 months. Using Markov chain analysis we calculated a decay time of 602 days, which is significantly longer than times found in other studies. Based on this, we recalculated the orangutan density estimate for a site in East Kalimantan; the resulting density is much lower than previous estimates (previous estimates were 3-8 times higher than our recalculated density). Our data suggest that short-term studies where decay times are determined using matrix mathematics may produce unreliable decay times. Our findings have implications for other parts of the orangutan range where population estimates are based on potentially unreliable nest decay rate estimates, and we recommend that for various parts of the orangutan range census estimates be reexamined. Considering the high variation in decay rates there is a need to move away from using single-number decay time estimates and, preferably, to test methods that do not rely on nest decay times as alternatives for rapid assessments of orangutan habitat for conservation in Borneo.

  7. How to calculate α-decay rates in the future?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlsson, B. Gillis; Ward, Daniel E.; Åberg, Sven

    2016-12-01

    New elements discovered during past decades have been created in fusion reactions where a lighter nucleus is collided with a heavier one. The new elements created often decay by emitting α particles. From the half-lives of the decays and the energies of the emitted particles one may extract some properties of the new elements. In this talk the recent work performed by the Lund group to model α decay starting from nuclear density-functional theory is reviewed and a possible extension is mentioned.

  8. Electron-capture branch of {sup 100}Tc and tests of nuclear wave functions for double-{beta} decays.

    SciTech Connect

    Sjue, S. K. L.; Melconian, D.; Garcia, A.; Ahmad, I.; Algora, A.; Aysto, J.; Elomaa, V.-V.; Eronen, T.; Hakala, J.; Hoedl, S.; Kankainen, A.; Kessler, T.; Moore, I. D.; Naabe, F.; Penttila, H.; Rahaman, S.; Saastamoinen, A.; Swanson, H. E.; Weber, C.; Triambak, S.; Deryckx, K.; Physics; Univ. of Washington; Texas A&M Univ.; Univ. of Valencia; Hungarian Academy of Sciences; Univ. of Jyvaskyla; Univ. of Michigan

    2008-12-30

    We present a measurement of the electron-capture branch of {sup 100}Tc. Our value, B(EC) = (2.6 {+-} 0.4) x 10{sup -5}, implies that the {sup 100}Mo neutrino absorption cross section to the ground state of {sup 100}Tc is roughly 50% larger than previously thought. Disagreement between the experimental value and QRPA calculations relevant to double-{beta} decay matrix elements persists. We find agreement with previous measurements of the 539.5- and 590.8-keV {gamma}-ray intensities.

  9. Renormalization-scale uncertainty in the decay rate of false vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Motoi; Moroi, Takeo; Nojiri, Mihoko M.; Shoji, Yutaro

    2016-01-01

    We study radiative corrections to the decay rate of false vacua, paying particular attention to the renormalization-scale dependence of the decay rate. The decay rate exponentially depends on the bounce action. The bounce action itself is renormalization-scale dependent. To make the decay rate scale-independent, radiative corrections, which are due to the field fluctuations around the bounce, have to be included. We show quantitatively that the inclusion of the fluctuations suppresses the scale dependence, and hence is important for the precise calculation of the decay rate. We also apply our analysis to a supersymmetric model and show that the radiative corrections are important for the Higgs-stau system with charge breaking minima.

  10. Radiative capture studies of the electromagnetic decays of highly excited states

    SciTech Connect

    Snover, K.A.

    1980-01-01

    Selected examples of interesting E1, M1, and E2 resonance studies in (p,..gamma..) and (..cap alpha..,..gamma..) reactions are discussed. These include a unique determination of E1 amplitudes in the /sup 12/C(P,..gamma../sub 0/)/sup 13/N reaction, E2 strength in light nuclei, M1 decays to the ground states and to the excited O/sup +/ states of the doubly magic /sup 16/O and /sup 40/Ca nuclei, second harmonic E1 resonances in (p,..gamma..), and M1 ..gamma..-decay of stretched particle-hole states in /sup 16/O and /sup 28/Si.

  11. The 2νβ-β- decay rates within Pyatov's restoration method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ünlü, Serdar; Çakmak, Neçla; Selam, Cevad

    2017-01-01

    We try to give a detailed analysis of the 2 νβ-β- decay rates to the final ground states for decay emitters: 70Zn, 80Se, 86Kr, 94Zr, 104Ru, 110Pd, 114Cd and 124Sn. The nucleon-nucleon residual interaction potential is defined according to Pyatov's restoration method. The nuclear matrix element for 2 νβ-β- decay is obtained by including the virtual contributions coming from the isobar analogue excitations within the framework of proton-neutron quasi-particle random phase approximation (pnQRPA). The calculated decay rates are compared with mean field, schematic model and other calculations.

  12. Estimation of waste component-specific landfill decay rates using laboratory-scale decomposition data.

    PubMed

    De la Cruz, Florentino B; Barlaz, Morton A

    2010-06-15

    The current methane generation model used by the U.S. EPA (Landfill Gas Emissions Model) treats municipal solid waste (MSW) as a homogeneous waste with one decay rate. However, component-specific decay rates are required to evaluate the effects of changes in waste composition on methane generation. Laboratory-scale rate constants, k(lab), for the major biodegradable MSW components were used to derive field-scale decay rates (k(field)) for each waste component using the assumption that the average of the field-scale decay rates for each waste component, weighted by its composition, is equal to the bulk MSW decay rate. For an assumed bulk MSW decay rate of 0.04 yr(-1), k(field) was estimated to be 0.298, 0.171, 0.015, 0.144, 0.033, 0.02, 0.122, and 0.029 yr(-1), for grass, leaves, branches, food waste, newsprint, corrugated containers, coated paper, and office paper, respectively. The effect of landfill waste diversion programs on methane production was explored to illustrate the use of component-specific decay rates. One hundred percent diversion of yard waste and food waste reduced the year 20 methane production rate by 45%. When a landfill gas collection schedule was introduced, collectable methane was most influenced by food waste diversion at years 10 and 20 and paper diversion at year 40.

  13. Investigation of photoneutron and capture gamma-ray production in Pb and W under irradiation from 16N decay radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kebwaro, Jeremiah Monari; Zhao, Yaolin; He, Chaohui

    2015-09-01

    Lead and tungsten are potential alternative materials for shielding reactor ex-core components with high 16N activity when available space limits application of concrete. Since the two materials are vulnerable to photonuclear reactions, the nature and intensity of the secondary radiation resulting from (γ,n) and (n,γ) reactions when 16N decay radiation interact with these materials need to be well known for effective shielding design. In this study the MCNP code was used to calculate the photoneutron and capture gamma-ray spectra in the two materials when irradiated by 16N decay radiation. It was observed that some of the photoneutrons generated in the two materials lie in the low-energy range which is considered optimum for (n,γ) reactions. Lead is more transparent to the photoneutrons when compared to tungsten. The calculations also revealed that the bremsstrahlung generated by the beta spectrum was not sufficient to trigger any additional photoneutrons. Both energetic and less energetic capture gamma-rays are observed when photoneutrons interact with nuclei of the two materials. Depending on the strength of the 16N source term, the secondary radiation could affect the effectiveness of the shield and need to be considered during design.

  14. Factors influencing the variation in capture rates of shrews in southern California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laakkonen, Juha; Fisher, Robert N.; Case, Ted J.

    2003-01-01

    We examined the temporal variation in capture rates of shrewsNotiosorex crawfordi (Coues, 1877) and Sorex ornatus (Merriam, 1895) in 20 sites representing fragmented and continuous habitats in southern California, USA. InN. crawfordi, the temporal variation was significantly correlated with the mean capture rates. Of the 6 landscape variables analyzed (size of the landscape, size of the sample area, altitude, edge, longitude and latitude), sample area was positively correlated with variation in capture rates ofN. crawfordi. InS. ornatus, longitude was negatively correlated with variation in capture rates. Analysis of the effect of precipitation on the short- and long-term capture rates at 2 of the sites showed no correlation between rainfall and capture rates of shrews even though peak number of shrews at both sites were reached during the year of highest amount of rainfall. A key problem confounding capture rates of shrews in southern California is the low overall abundance of both shrew species in all habitats and seasons.

  15. The use of decay rates to analyse the performance of railway track in rolling noise generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, C. J. C.; Thompson, D. J.; Diehl, R. J.

    2006-06-01

    Through the development and testing of theoretical models for rolling noise in the past, it has been well demonstrated that the rate of decay of vibration along the rail is closely linked to the noise performance of the track, since it controls the effective radiating length of the rail. The decay rates of vibration along the rail have long been used by researchers as an intermediate, measurable parameter by which to test and improve the accuracy of prediction models. Recently, it has been suggested that the decay rates should be used as a criterion for the selection of track for noise measurements that are part of the acceptance testing of interoperable trains in Europe. In this context, a more detailed understanding of the factors that affect the measurement of decay rates and a consistent approach to the data processing have become important topics. Here, a method is suggested for the calculation of decay rates from frequency response measurements. Different effects are shown in the measured decay rates of a ballasted track with mono-bloc sleepers, a slab track and a ballasted track with bi-bloc sleepers. In the last case, a model for a periodically supported track is used to study the effects observed. It is shown that a peak in the decay rate just above the pinned-pinned frequency may be overestimated because of the measurement procedure that has been used.

  16. Coping with mist-net capture-rate bias: Canopy height and several extrinsic factors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mallory, Elizabeth P.; Brokaw, Nicholas V. L.; Hess, Steven C.

    2004-01-01

    Many factors other than a species' actual abundance can affect mist-net capture rates. We used ANCOVA models to quantify some potential biases and control their effects, producing adjusted estimates of capture rates that are more directly comparable among mist-net stations. Data came from 46 two-day mist-net sessions from September 1990 to May 1992 at six subtropical forest stations in the Rio Bravo Conservation and Management Area, northwest Belize. Factors evaluated included canopy height at net sites, long-term net shyness (days elapsed between first and last netting day of the entire study period), season (wet vs. dry), total rainfall during a netting session, and temperature. Number of individuals and species captured/10 net-h declined at each net with increasing canopy height above the net. Capture rates differed significantly among some of the stations. Elapsed days and rainfall caused significant bias in capture rates, which were statistically controlled within the ANCOVA, whereas season and temperature did not. Capture rates varied among sessions, but there was a slight and significant decline over the entire study period for all stations combined. Rainfall significantly depressed capture rates somewhat on a daily basis, but capture rates did not differ between wet and dry seasons. When we replaced the station variable in the ANCOVA with mean canopy height, the model was still highly significant, but did not explain as much of the variation in capture rates. Statistical analysis provides an objective means of interpreting data and estimating reliability, but only if statistical assumptions of the analyses are met. We discuss the need for including randomization in the experimental design, standardizing netting protocol, and quantifying sources of bias in the field, before ANCOVA or other parametric statistical techniques can be used to partition effects of biases.

  17. The microscopic approach to the rates of radioactive decay by emission of heavy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivaşcu, M.; Silişteanu, I.

    1988-08-01

    We have applied a simple microscopic decay theory to the analysis of the rare decay modes. The absolute decay rates are estimated by using the shell model and resonance formation factors and optical model penetrabilities. The resonance formation factors are deduced from the strong interaction form of the theory where the wave function in the internal region is represented in terms of compound nucleus decay. In order to account fully for the data, the implication of internal degrees of freedom was found to be necessary, but no adjustment of Gamow factor was needed. The results have been discussed in the light of the previously reported results and data.

  18. Neutron-capture rates for explosive nucleosynthesis: the case of 68Ni(n, γ)69Ni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spyrou, A.; Larsen, A. C.; Liddick, S. N.; Naqvi, F.; Crider, B. P.; Dombos, A. C.; Guttormsen, M.; Bleuel, D. L.; Couture, A.; Crespo Campo, L.; Lewis, R.; Mosby, S.; Mumpower, M. R.; Perdikakis, G.; Prokop, C. J.; Quinn, S. J.; Renstrøm, T.; Siem, S.; Surman, R.

    2017-04-01

    Neutron-capture reactions play an important role in heavy element nucleosynthesis, since they are the driving force for the two processes that create the vast majority of the heavy elements. When a neutron capture occurs on a short-lived nucleus, it is extremely challenging to study the reaction directly and therefore the use of indirect techniques is essential. The present work reports on such an indirect measurement that provides strong constraints on the 68Ni(n, γ)69Ni reaction rate. This is done by populating the compound nucleus 69Ni via the β decay of 69Co and measuring the γ-ray deexcitation of excited states in 69Ni. The β-Oslo method was used to extract the γ-ray strength function and the nuclear level density. In addition the half-life of 69Co was extracted and found to be in agreement with previous literature values. Before the present results, the 68Ni(n, γ)69Ni reaction was unconstrained and the purely theoretical reaction rate was highly uncertain. The new uncertainty on the reaction rate based on the present experiment (variation between upper and lower limit) is approximately a factor of 3. The commonly used reaction libraries JINA-REACLIB and BRUSLIB are in relatively good agreement with the experimental rate. The impact of the new rate on weak r-process calculations is discussed.

  19. Biomass decay rates and tissue nutrient loss in bloom and non-bloom-forming macroalgal species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conover, Jessie; Green, Lindsay A.; Thornber, Carol S.

    2016-09-01

    Macroalgal blooms occur in shallow, low-wave energy environments and are generally dominated by fast-growing ephemeral macroalgae. When macroalgal mats undergo senescence and decompose they can cause oxygen depletion and release nutrients into the surrounding water. There are relatively few studies that examine macroalgal decomposition rates in areas impacted by macroalgal blooms. Understanding the rate of macroalgal bloom decomposition is essential to understanding the impacts of macroalgal blooms following senescence. Here, we examined the biomass, organic content, nitrogen decay rates and δ15N values for five macroalgal species (the bloom-forming Agardhiella subulata, Gracilaria vermiculophylla, Ulva compressa, and Ulva rigida and the non-bloom-forming Fucus vesiculosus) in Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island, U.S.A. using a litterbag design. Bloom-forming macroalgae had similar biomass decay rates (0.34-0.51 k d-1) and decayed significantly faster than non-bloom-forming macroalgae (0.09 k d-1). Biomass decay rates also varied temporally, with a significant positive correlation between biomass decay rate and water temperature for U. rigida. Tissue organic content decreased over time in all species, although A. subulata and G. vermiculophylla displayed significantly higher rates of organic content decay than U. compressa, U. rigida, and F. vesiculosus. Agardhiella subulata had a significantly higher rate of tissue nitrogen decay (0.35 k d-1) than all other species. By contrast, only the δ15N of F. vesiculosus changed significantly over the decay period. Overall, our results indicate that bloom-forming macroalgal species decay more rapidly than non-bloom-forming species.

  20. The anharmonic phonon decay rate in group-III nitrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, G. P.

    2009-04-01

    Measured lifetimes of hot phonons in group-III nitrides have been explained theoretically by considering three-phonon anharmonic interaction processes. The basic ingredients of the theory include full phonon dispersion relations obtained from the application of an adiabatic bond charge model and crystal anharmonic potential within the isotropic elastic continuum model. The role of various decay routes, such as Klemens, Ridley, Vallée-Bogani and Barman-Srivastava channels, in determining the lifetimes of the Raman active zone-centre longitudinal optical (LO) modes in BN (zincblende structure) and A1(LO) modes in AlN, GaN and InN (wurtzite structure) has been quantified.

  1. Calculations on decay rates of various proton emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Yibin; Ren, Zhongzhou

    2016-03-01

    Proton radioactivity of neutron-deficient nuclei around the dripline has been systematically studied within the deformed density-dependent model. The crucial proton-nucleus potential is constructed via the single-folding integral of the density distribution of daughter nuclei and the effective M3Y nucleon-nucleon interaction or the proton-proton Coulomb interaction. After the decay width is obtained by the modified two-potential approach, the final decay half-lives can be achieved by involving the spectroscopic factors from the relativistic mean-field (RMF) theory combined with the BCS method. Moreover, a simple formula along with only one adjusted parameter is tentatively proposed to evaluate the half-lives of proton emitters, where the introduction of nuclear deformation is somewhat discussed as well. It is found that the calculated results are in satisfactory agreement with the experimental values and consistent with other theoretical studies, indicating that the present approach can be applied to the case of proton emission. Predictions on half-lives are made for possible proton emitters, which may be useful for future experiments.

  2. Seasonal determinations of algal virus decay rates reveal overwintering in a temperate freshwater pond.

    PubMed

    Long, Andrew M; Short, Steven M

    2016-07-01

    To address questions about algal virus persistence (i.e., continued existence) in the environment, rates of decay of infectivity for two viruses that infect Chlorella-like algae, ATCV-1 and CVM-1, and a virus that infects the prymnesiophyte Chrysochromulina parva, CpV-BQ1, were estimated from in situ incubations in a temperate, seasonally frozen pond. A series of experiments were conducted to estimate rates of decay of infectivity in all four seasons with incubations lasting 21 days in spring, summer and autumn, and 126 days in winter. Decay rates observed across this study were relatively low compared with previous estimates obtained for other algal viruses, and ranged from 0.012 to 11% h(-1). Overall, the virus CpV-BQ1 decayed most rapidly whereas ATCV-1 decayed most slowly, but for all viruses the highest decay rates were observed during the summer and the lowest were observed during the winter. Furthermore, the winter incubations revealed the ability of each virus to overwinter under ice as ATCV-1, CVM-1 and CpV-BQ1 retained up to 48%, 19% and 9% of their infectivity after 126 days, respectively. The observed resilience of algal viruses in a seasonally frozen freshwater pond provides a mechanism that can support the maintenance of viral seed banks in nature. However, the high rates of decay observed in the summer demonstrate that virus survival and therefore environmental persistence can be subject to seasonal bottlenecks.

  3. Beta decay rates of neutron-rich nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Marketin, Tomislav; Huther, Lutz; Martínez-Pinedo, Gabriel

    2015-10-15

    Heavy element nucleosynthesis models involve various properties of thousands of nuclei in order to simulate the intricate details of the process. By necessity, as most of these nuclei cannot be studied in a controlled environment, these models must rely on the nuclear structure models for input. Of all the properties, the beta-decay half-lives are one of the most important ones due to their direct impact on the resulting abundance distributions. Currently, a single large-scale calculation is available based on a QRPA calculation with a schematic interaction on top of the Finite Range Droplet Model. In this study we present the results of a large-scale calculation based on the relativistic nuclear energy density functional, where both the allowed and the first-forbidden transitions are studied in more than 5000 neutron-rich nuclei.

  4. Continuum-state and bound-state β--decay rates of the neutron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faber, M.; Ivanov, A. N.; Ivanova, V. A.; Marton, J.; Pitschmann, M.; Serebrov, A. P.; Troitskaya, N. I.; Wellenzohn, M.

    2009-09-01

    For the β--decay of the neutron we analyze the continuum-state and bound-state decay modes. We calculate the decay rates, the electron energy spectrum for the continuum-state decay mode, and angular distributions of the decay probabilities for the continuum-state and bound-state decay modes. The theoretical results are obtained for the new value for the axial coupling constant gA=1.2750(9), obtained recently by H. Abele [Prog. Part. Nucl. Phys. 60, 1 (2008)] from the fit of the experimental data on the coefficient of the correlation of the neutron spin and the electron momentum of the electron energy spectrum of the continuum-state decay mode. We take into account the contribution of radiative corrections and the scalar and tensor weak couplings. The calculated angular distributions of the probabilities of the bound-state decay modes of the polarized neutron can be used for the experimental measurements of the bound-state β--decays into the hyperfine states with total angular momentum F=1 and scalar and tensor weak coupling constants.

  5. Electron capture decay of 58-min U-229(92) and levels in Pa-229(91)

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, I.; Chasman, R. R.; Greene, J. P.; Kondev, F. G.; Zhu, S.

    2015-08-17

    Electron capture decay of U-229 is investigated by measuring the gamma-ray and conversion electron spectra of mass-separated and unseparated U-229 sources with high-resolution germanium and silicon detectors, respectively. Gamma-gamma coincidence measurements are also performed using germanium detectors. These studies provide level energies and level ordering in Pa-229. Single-particle assignments are given to these levels which are in agreement with the systematics in this region and also with theory. In a previous study, we report the observation of a 5/2(+/-) parity doublet in the Pa-229 ground state, which is a signature of octupole deformation. The present analysis of the data still shows a splitting of 60 +/- 50 eV, but with this large uncertainty the existence of the doublet is not certain.

  6. Capture-recapture estimation of prebreeding survival rate for birds exhibiting delayed maturation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, J.D.; Spendelow, J.A.; Hines, J.E.

    1990-01-01

    Many species of seabirds exhibit delayed maturity and do not return to the natal colony to breed for several years after fledging. Capture-recapture studies are frequently conducted at such breeding colonies and often include marking of young birds. However, because of the absence of these birds from the natal colony during the first few years after banding, the data do not fit neatly into existing capture-recapture models. Here we present a method for estimating prebreeding survival rate from capture-recapture studies on species exhibiting such patterns of delayed maturation. We illustrate the method using data from a capture-recapture study of Roseate Terns (Sterna dougallii ) on Falkner Island, Connecticut. The method appears to work well and emphasizes the potential to tailor capture-recapture models to specific field situations.

  7. Constraining spacetime variations of nuclear decay rates from light curves of type Ia supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpikov, Ivan; Piskunov, Maxim; Sokolov, Anton; Troitsky, Sergey

    2015-06-01

    The luminosity of fading type Ia supernovae is governed by radioactive decays of Ni 56 and Co 56 . The decay rates are proportional to the Fermi coupling constant GF and, therefore, are determined by the vacuum expectation value v of the Brout-Englert-Higgs field. We use publicly available sets of light curves of type Ia supernova at various redshifts to constrain possible spacetime variations of the Ni 56 decay rate. The resulting constraint is not very tight; however, it is the only direct bound on the variation of the decay rate for redshifts up to z ˜1 . We discuss potential applications of the result to searches for nonconstancy of GF and v .

  8. Predator-prey encounter and capture rates for plankton in turbulent environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pécseli, H. L.; Trulsen, J.; Fiksen, Ø.

    2012-08-01

    Turbulence plays an important role for predator-prey interactions in aquatic environments. In one sense turbulence benefits the predator by increasing its encounter rate with prey, but on the other hand it can benefit the prey by making them more difficult to catch. In the present study of this problem, a turbulent flow field is obtained by direct numerical solution of the Navier-Stokes equation. The analysis includes the effects of the turbulence on the encounter rate between passively moving predators and prey, and at the same time also models the capture probability depending on the relative turbulent motions of predator and prey. Analytical results for scaling laws for planktonic encounter and capture rates in turbulent environments are obtained in terms of the basic parameters for the problem, and the results are compared with related findings reported in the literature. For large values of the specific energy dissipation rates ɛ the turbulence reduces the capture probability significantly, in part also because the effective capture range reduces for increasing turbulence intensity. The results presented here predict the parameters for an optimum turbulence level for the predator capture rate. For enhanced turbulence levels sudden bursts in the space-time varying velocity field contribute to a noise level that can reduce the probability for capturing prey. We consider cases where the capture range of an organism is comparable to or smaller than the effective Kolmogorov length scale, as well as the opposite limit of larger capture ranges in the inertial range of the turbulence. The reference model assumes spherical interception volumes, but it is demonstrated that the results remain basically valid also for the case where these volumes are hemispherical or conical: the consequences of having a shape of the interception surface deviating from a sphere can be accounted for by an empirical scaling factor, which depends solely on the opening angle of the cone.

  9. Examination of the calorimetric spectrum to determine the neutrino mass in low-energy electron capture decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, R. G. H.

    2015-03-01

    Background: The standard kinematic method for determining neutrino mass from the β decay of tritium or other isotope is to measure the shape of the electron spectrum near the endpoint. A similar distortion of the "visible energy" remaining after electron capture is caused by neutrino mass. There has been a resurgence of interest in using this method with 163Ho, driven by technological advances in microcalorimetry. Recent theoretical analyses offer reassurance that there are no significant theoretical uncertainties. Purpose: The theoretical analyses consider only single vacancy states in the daughter 163Dy atom. It is necessary to consider configurations with more than one vacancy that can be populated owing to the change in nuclear charge. Method: The shakeup and shake-off theory of Carlson and Nestor is used as a basis for estimating the population of double-vacancy states. Results: A spectrum of satellites associated with each primary vacancy created by electron capture is presented. Conclusions: The theory of the calorimetric spectrum is more complicated than has been described heretofore. There are numerous shakeup and shake-off satellites present across the spectrum, and some may be very near the endpoint. The spectrum shape is presently not understood well enough to permit a sensitive determination of the neutrino mass in this way.

  10. Dose point kernel for boron-11 decay and the cellular S values in boron neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yunzhi; Geng, JinPeng; Gao, Song; Bao, Shanglian

    2006-12-01

    The study of the radiobiology of boron neutron capture therapy is based on the cellular level dosimetry of boron-10's thermal neutron capture reaction 10B(n,alpha)7Li, in which one 1.47 MeV helium-4 ion and one 0.84 MeV lithium-7 ion are spawned. Because of the chemical preference of boron-10 carrier molecules, the dose is heterogeneously distributed in cells. In the present work, the (scaled) dose point kernel of boron-11 decay, called 11B-DPK, was calculated by GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation code. The DPK curve drops suddenly at the radius of 4.26 microm, the continuous slowing down approximation (CSDA) range of a lithium-7 ion. Then, after a slight ascending, the curve decreases to near zero when the radius goes beyond 8.20 microm, which is the CSDA range of a 1.47 MeV helium-4 ion. With the DPK data, S values for nuclei and cells with the boron-10 on the cell surface are calculated for different combinations of cell and nucleus sizes. The S value for a cell radius of 10 microm and a nucleus radius of 5 microm is slightly larger than the value published by Tung et al. [Appl. Radiat. Isot. 61, 739-743 (2004)]. This result is potentially more accurate than the published value since it includes the contribution of a lithium-7 ion as well as the alpha particle.

  11. Determining neutron capture cross sections with the Surrogate Reaction Technique: Measuring decay probabilities with STARS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Church, J. A.; Ahle, L.; Bernstein, L. A.; Cooper, J.; Dietrich, F. S.; Escher, J.; Forssen, C.; Ai, H.; Amro, H.; Babilon, M.; et al.

    2005-07-01

    Neutron-induced reaction cross sections are sometimes difficult to measure due to target or beam limitations. For two-step reactions proceeding through an equilibrated intermediate state, an alternate "surrogate reaction" technique [J.D. Cramer and H.C. Britt, Nucl. Sci. Eng. 41, 177 (1970), H.C. Britt and J.B. Wilhelmy, Nucl. Sci. Eng. 72, 222 (1979), W.Younes and H.C. Britt, Phys. Rev. C 67, 024610 (2003)] can be applicable, and is currently undergoing investigation at LLNL. Measured decay probabilities for the intermediate nucleus formed in a light-ion reaction can be combined with optical-model calculations for the formation of the same intermediate nucleus via the neutron-induced reaction. The result is an estimation for overall (n,γ/n/2n) cross sections. As a bench-mark, the reaction 92Zr(α, α'), surrogate for n+91Zr, was studied at the A.W. Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory at Yale. Particles were detected in the silicon telescope STARS (Silicon Telescope Array for Reaction Studies) and γ-ray energies measured with germanium clover detectors from the YRAST (Yale Rochester Array for SpecTroscopy) ball. The experiment and preliminary observations will be discussed.

  12. Determining neutron capture cross sections with the Surrogate Reaction Technique: Measuring decay probabilities with STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Church, J A; Ahle, L; Bernstein, L A; Cooper, J; Dietrich, F S; Escher, J; Forssen, C; Ai, H; Amro, H; Babilon, M; Beausang, C; Caggiano, J; Heinz, A; Hughes, R; McCutchan, E; Meyer, D; Plettner, C; Ressler, J; Zamfir, V

    2004-07-14

    Neutron-induced reaction cross sections are sometimes difficult to measure due to target or beam limitations. For two-step reactions proceeding through an equilibrated intermediate state, an alternate ''surrogate reaction'' technique can be applicable, and is currently undergoing investigation at LLNL. Measured decay probabilities for the intermediate nucleus formed in a light-ion reaction can be combined with optical-model calculations for the formation of the same intermediate nucleus via the neutron-induced reaction. The result is an estimation for overall (n,{gamma}/n/2n) cross sections. As a benchmark, the reaction {sup 92}Zr({alpha},{alpha}'), surrogate, for n+{sup 91}Zr, was studied at the A.W. Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory at Yale. Particles were detected in the silicon telescope STARS (Silicon Telescope Array for Reaction Studies) and {gamma}-ray energies measured with germanium clover detectors from the YRAST (Yale Rochester Array for SpecTroscopy) ball. The experiment and preliminary observations will be discussed.

  13. Neutron capture cross-section studies of Tellurium isotopes for neutrinoless double beta decay applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhike, Megha; Tornow, Werner

    2014-09-01

    The CUORE detector at Gran Sasso, aimed at searching for neutrinoless double-beta decay of 130Te, employs an array of TeO2 bolometer modules. To understand and identify the contribution of muon and (α,n) induced neutrons to the CUORE background, fast neutron cature cross-section data of the tellurium isotopes 126Te, 128Te and 130Te have been measured with the activation method at eight different energies in the neutron energy range 0.5-7.5 MeV. Plastic pill boxes of diameter 1.6 cm and width 1 cm containing Te were irradiated with mono-energetic neutrons produced via the 3H(p,n)3He and 2H(d,n)3He reactions. The cross-sections were determined relative to the 197Au(n, γ)198Au and 115In(n,n')115m In standard cross sections. The activities of the products were measured using 60% lead-shielded HPGe detectors at TUNL's low background counting facility. The present results are compared with the evaluated data from TENDL-2012, ENDF/B-VII.1, JEFF-3.2 and JENDL-4.0, as well as with literature data.

  14. Mesh size and bird capture rates in Mato Grosso do Sul State, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Piratelli, A

    2003-02-01

    Mist-nets alternating 36-mm and 61-mm mesh in woods and low vegetation of "cerrado" (Brazilian savanna) tested bird-capture efficiency relative to bird length and mass. Of 1,296 birds captured and 102 species, 785 (93 species) were with 36-m mesh and 511 (69 species) with 61-mm mesh. The 61-mm mesh improved capture rates only for some larger species; so, in general, 36-mm mesh mist-nets are more appropriate for field work in "cerrado" areas.

  15. Prolonged decay of molecular rate estimates for metazoan mitochondrial DNA

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Simon Y.W.

    2015-01-01

    Evolutionary timescales can be estimated from genetic data using the molecular clock, often calibrated by fossil or geological evidence. However, estimates of molecular rates in mitochondrial DNA appear to scale negatively with the age of the clock calibration. Although such a pattern has been observed in a limited range of data sets, it has not been studied on a large scale in metazoans. In addition, there is uncertainty over the temporal extent of the time-dependent pattern in rate estimates. Here we present a meta-analysis of 239 rate estimates from metazoans, representing a range of timescales and taxonomic groups. We found evidence of time-dependent rates in both coding and non-coding mitochondrial markers, in every group of animals that we studied. The negative relationship between the estimated rate and time persisted across a much wider range of calibration times than previously suggested. This indicates that, over long time frames, purifying selection gives way to mutational saturation as the main driver of time-dependent biases in rate estimates. The results of our study stress the importance of accounting for time-dependent biases in estimating mitochondrial rates regardless of the timescale over which they are inferred. PMID:25780773

  16. WEST NILE VIRUS ANTIBODY DECAY RATE IN FREE-RANGING BIRDS.

    PubMed

    McKee, Eileen M; Walker, Edward D; Anderson, Tavis K; Kitron, Uriel D; Brawn, Jeffrey D; Krebs, Bethany L; Newman, Christina; Ruiz, Marilyn O; Levine, Rebecca S; Carrington, Mary E; McLean, Robert G; Goldberg, Tony L; Hamer, Gabriel L

    2015-07-01

    Antibody duration, following a humoral immune response to West Nile virus (WNV) infection, is poorly understood in free-ranging avian hosts. Quantifying antibody decay rate is important for interpreting serologic results and for understanding the potential for birds to serorevert and become susceptible again. We sampled free-ranging birds in Chicago, Illinois, US, from 2005 to 2011 and Atlanta, Georgia, US, from 2010 to 2012 to examine the dynamics of antibody decay following natural WNV infection. Using serial dilutions in a blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, we quantified WNV antibody titer in repeated blood samples from individual birds over time. We quantified a rate of antibody decay for 23 Northern Cardinals (Cardinalis cardinalis) of 0.198 natural log units per month and 24 individuals of other bird species of 0.178 natural log units per month. Our results suggest that juveniles had a higher rate of antibody decay than adults, which is consistent with nonlinear antibody decay at different times postexposure. Overall, most birds had undetectable titers 2 yr postexposure. Nonuniform WNV antibody decay rates in free-ranging birds underscore the need for cautious interpretation of avian serology results in the context of arbovirus surveillance and epidemiology.

  17. Comparative capture rate responses of mosquito vectors to light trap and human landing collection methods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Landing rates (LR) of female Anopheles quadrimaculatus, Culex nigripalpus, Cx. quinquefasciatus, Ochlerotatus triseriatus and Aedes albopictus on human hosts were compared with capture rates responses by the same species to CDC-type light traps (LT) augmented with CO2. A significant relationship be...

  18. Hawking-Moss Bounces and Vacuum Decay Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberg, Erick J.

    2007-06-22

    The conventional interpretation of the Hawking-Moss (HM) solution implies a transition rate between vacua that depends only on the values of the potential in the initial vacuum and at the top of a potential barrier, leading to the implausible conclusion that transitions to distant vacua can be as likely as those to a nearby one. I analyze this issue using a nongravitational example with analogous properties. I show that such HM bounces do not give reliable rate calculations, but are instead related to the probability of finding a quasistable configuration at a local potential maximum.

  19. A measurement of the gluon splitting rate into /cc¯ pairs in hadronic Z decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ALEPH Collaboration; Heister, A.; Schael, S.; Barate, R.; Brunelière, R.; de Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Goy, C.; Jezequel, S.; Lees, J.-P.; Martin, F.; Merle, E.; Minard, M.-N.; Pietrzyk, B.; Trocmé, B.; Bravo, S.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Martinez, M.; Pacheco, A.; Ruiz, H.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Filippis, N.; de Palma, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Barklow, T.; Buchmüller, O.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Clerbaux, B.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Gianotti, F.; Hansen, J. B.; Harvey, J.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kado, M.; Mato, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Valassi, A.; Videau, I.; Badaud, F.; Dessagne, S.; Falvard, A.; Fayolle, D.; Gay, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Pallin, D.; Pascolo, J. M.; Perret, P.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Kraan, A.; Nilsson, B. S.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Brient, J.-C.; Machefert, F.; Rougé, A.; Swynghedauw, M.; Tanaka, R.; Videau, H.; Ciulli, V.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Antonelli, A.; Antonelli, M.; Bencivenni, G.; Bossi, F.; Capon, G.; Chiarella, V.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Kennedy, J.; Lynch, J. G.; Negus, P.; O'Shea, V.; Thompson, A. S.; Wasserbaech, S.; Cavanaugh, R.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Leibenguth, G.; Putzer, A.; Stenzel, H.; Tittel, K.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Cameron, W.; Davies, G.; Dornan, P. J.; Girone, M.; Hill, R. D.; Marinelli, N.; Nowell, J.; Rutherford, S. A.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Thompson, J. C.; White, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bouhova-Thacker, E.; Bowdery, C. K.; Clarke, D. P.; Ellis, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Pearson, M. R.; Robertson, N. A.; Smizanska, M.; van der Aa, O.; Delaere, C.; Lemaitre, V.; Blumenschein, U.; Hölldorfer, F.; Jakobs, K.; Kayser, F.; Kleinknecht, K.; Müller, A.-S.; Renk, B.; Sander, H.-G.; Schmeling, S.; Wachsmuth, H.; Zeitnitz, C.; Ziegler, T.; Bonissent, A.; Coyle, P.; Curtil, C.; Ealet, A.; Fouchez, D.; Payre, P.; Tilquin, A.; Ragusa, F.; David, A.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Hüttmann, K.; Lütjens, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Settles, R.; Villegas, M.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Jacholkowska, A.; Serin, L.; Veillet, J.-J.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Boccali, T.; Foà, L.; Giammanco, A.; Giassi, A.; Ligabue, F.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Tenchini, R.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Awunor, O.; Blair, G. A.; Cowan, G.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Green, M. G.; Jones, L. T.; Medcalf, T.; Misiejuk, A.; Strong, J. A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Norton, P. R.; Tomalin, I. R.; Ward, J. J.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Boumediene, D.; Colas, P.; Fabbro, B.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M.-C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Tuchming, B.; Vallage, B.; Konstantinidis, N.; Litke, A. M.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Hodgson, P. N.; Lehto, M.; Thompson, L. F.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Grupen, C.; Hess, J.; Ngac, A.; Prange, G.; Borean, C.; Giannini, G.; He, H.; Putz, J.; Rothberg, J.; Armstrong, S. R.; Berkelman, K.; Cranmer, K.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y.; González, S.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; Kile, J.; McNamara, P. A.; Nielsen, J.; Pan, Y. B.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wu, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Zobernig, G.; Dissertori, G.

    2003-05-01

    The rate of gluon splitting into /cc¯ pairs in hadronic Z decays is measured using the data sample collected by ALEPH from 1991 to 1995. The selection is based on the identification of leptons (electrons and muons) originating from semileptonic charm decays, and on the topological properties of signal events. The result derived from the selected sample is gcc¯=(3.26+/-0.23(stat)+/-0.42(syst))%.

  20. Excited states in the doubly odd 168Lu nucleus fed by electron-capture decay of 168Hf (T1/2=25.95 min)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barci, V.; Ardisson, G.; Trubert, D.; Hussonnois, M.

    1997-05-01

    The low-spin levels of the odd-odd nucleus 168Lu from 168Hf (T1/2=25.95 min) electron-capture decay were investigated by direct γ and γ-γ coincidence measurements. The sources of 168Hf were produced with the 156Gd(16O,4n) reaction and radiochemically separated using chromatographic methods. A level scheme of 39 new levels in the 168Lu nucleus was proposed, accounting for 107 of 119 observed γ transitions assigned to 168Hf electron-capture decay. Transition multipolarities, level-spins, and parities were deduced or proposed. A tentative decay scheme was proposed. Level structure was discussed in the framework of the particle-rotor and Nilsson models.

  1. Beyond the bucket: testing the effect of experimental design on rate and sequence of decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabbott, Sarah; Murdock, Duncan; Purnell, Mark

    2016-04-01

    Experimental decay has revealed the potential for profound biases in our interpretations of exceptionally preserved fossils, with non-random sequences of character loss distorting the position of fossil taxa in phylogenetic trees. By characterising these sequences we can rewind this distortion and make better-informed interpretations of the affinity of enigmatic fossil taxa. Equally, rate of character loss is crucial for estimating the preservation potential of phylogentically informative characters, and revealing the mechanisms of preservation themselves. However, experimental decay has been criticised for poorly modeling 'real' conditions, and dismissed as unsophisticated 'bucket science'. Here we test the effect of a differing experimental parameters on the rate and sequence of decay. By doing so, we can test the assumption that the results of decay experiments are applicable to informing interpretations of exceptionally preserved fossils from diverse preservational settings. The results of our experiments demonstrate the validity of using the sequence of character loss as a phylogenetic tool, and sheds light on the extent to which environment must be considered before making decay-informed interpretations, or reconstructing taphonomic pathways. With careful consideration of experimental design, driven by testable hypotheses, decay experiments are robust and informative - experimental taphonomy needn't kick the bucket just yet.

  2. Evidence from Voyager and ISEE-3 spacecraft. Data for the decay of secondary K-electron capture isotopes during the propagation of cosmic rays in the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soutoul, A.; Legrain, R.; Lukasiak, A.; McDonald, F. B.; Webber, W. R.

    1998-08-01

    New data from the cosmic ray experiment on the Voyager spacecraft confirms and extends earlier data from a similar experiment on the ISEE-3 spacecraft which indicates the possibility of the decay of certain K-capture isotopes during the interstellar propagation of galactic cosmic rays. These cosmic ray measurements, along with the cross section measurements, indicate that ~ 25% of the K-capture isotopes (51Cr and (49V produced as secondaries have decayed at interstellar energy of ~ 400 MeV/nuc. This suggests a possible interstellar energy gain ~ 100 MeV/nuc out of the current interstellar energy ~ 500 MeV/nuc. This measurement suggests that the study of the K-capture isotopes may now have reached a level that will soon provide definitive information on the amount of re-acceleration that may occur during cosmic-ray propagation after an initial acceleration in the cosmic ray sources.

  3. Coordinate-dependent diffusion coefficients: Decay rate in open quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sargsyan, V. V.; Palchikov, Yu. V.; Antonenko, N. V.; Kanokov, Z.; Adamian, G. G.

    2007-06-15

    Based on a master equation for the reduced density matrix of an open quantum collective system, the influence of coordinate-dependent microscopical diffusion coefficients on the decay rate from a metastable state is treated. For various frictions and temperatures larger than a crossover temperature, the quasistationary decay rates obtained with the coordinate-dependent microscopical set of diffusion coefficients are compared with those obtained with the coordinate-independent microscopical set of diffusion coefficients and coordinate-independent and -dependent phenomenological sets of diffusion coefficients. Neglecting the coordinate dependence of diffusion coefficients, one can strongly overestimate or underestimate the decay rate at low temperature. The coordinate-dependent phenomenological diffusion coefficient in momentum are shown to be suitable for applications.

  4. Fluorescence decay rate statistics of a single molecule in a disordered cluster of nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Froufe-Perez, L. S.; Carminati, R.; Saenz, J. J.

    2007-07-15

    The statistical properties of the fluorescence lifetime of single emitters in disordered systems are discussed. The contribution of radiative and nonradiative processes to the spontaneous decay rate is analyzed using a simple analytical model, in full agreement with exact numerical simulations. The relative fluctuations of the decay rate are shown to exhibit two well-defined regimes dominated either by near-field scattering or by absorption processes. In both regimes, the averaged apparent quantum yield remains high enough to permit practical measurements. Lifetime fluctuations could thus be used a probe of the local environment in complex systems at the nanometer scale.

  5. Design of cycler trajectories and analysis of solar influences on radioactive decay rates during space missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Blake A.

    This thesis investigates the design of interplanetary missions for the continual habitation of Mars via Earth-Mars cyclers and for the detection of variations in nuclear decay rates due to solar influences. Several cycler concepts have been proposed to provide safe and comfortable quarters for astronauts traveling between the Earth and Mars. However, no literature has appeared to show how these massive vehicles might be placed into their cycler trajectories. Trajectories are designed that use either Vinfinity leveraging or low thrust to establish cycler vehicles in their desired orbits. In the cycler trajectory cases considered, the use of Vinfinity leveraging or low thrust substantially reduces the total propellant needed to achieve the cycler orbit compared to direct orbit insertion. In the case of the classic Aldrin cycler, the propellant savings due to Vinfinity leveraging can be as large as a 24 metric ton reduction for a cycler vehicle with a dry mass of 75 metric tons, and an additional 111 metric ton reduction by instead using low thrust. The two-synodic period cyclers considered benefit less from Vinfinity leveraging, but have a smaller total propellant mass due to their lower approach velocities at Earth and Mars. It turns out that, for low-thrust establishment, the propellant required is approximately the same for each of the cycler trajectories. The Aldrin cycler has been proposed as a transportation system for human missions between Earth and Mars. However, the hyperbolic excess velocity values at the planetary encounters for these orbits are infeasibly large, especially at Mars. In a new version of the Aldrin cycler, low thrust is used in the interplanetary trajectories to reduce the encounter velocities. Reducing the encounter velocities at both planets reduces the propellant needed by the taxis (astronauts use these taxis to transfer between the planetary surfaces and the cycler vehicle) to perform hyperbolic rendezvous. While the propellant

  6. Comparative capture rate responses of mosquito vectors to light trap and human landing collection methods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Capture rate responses of female Aedes albopictus Skuse, Anopheles quadrimaculatus Say, Culex nigripalpus Theobald, Culex quinquefasciatus Say, and Ochlerotatus triseriatus (Wiedemann) to CDC-type light trap (LT) and human landing (HL) collection methods were observed and evaluated for congruency wi...

  7. Blackbody-induced decay, excitation and ionization rates for Rydberg states in hydrogen and helium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glukhov, I. L.; Nekipelov, E. A.; Ovsiannikov, V. D.

    2010-06-01

    New features of the blackbody-induced radiation processes on Rydberg atoms were discovered on the basis of numerical data for the blackbody-induced decay Pdnl(T), excitation Penl(T) and ionization Pionnl(T) rates of nS, nP and nD Rydberg states calculated together with the spontaneous decay rates Pspnl in neutral hydrogen, and singlet and triplet helium atoms for some values of the principal quantum number n from 10 to 500 at temperatures from T = 100 K to 2000 K. The fractional rates Rd(e, ion)nl(T) = Pnld(e, ion)(T)/Pspnl equal to the ratio of the induced decay (excitation, ionization) rates to the rate of spontaneous decay were determined as functions of T and n in every series of states with a given angular momentum l = 0, 1, 2. The calculated data reveal an essential difference between the asymptotic dependence of the ionization rate Pionnl(T) and the rates of decay and excitation Pd(e)nl(T)~T/n2. The departures appear in each Rydberg series for n > 100 and introduce appreciable corrections to the formula of Cooke and Gallagher. Two different approximation formulae are proposed on the basis of the numerical data, one for Rd(e)nl(T) and another one for Rionnl(T), which reproduce the calculated values in wide ranges of principal quantum number from n = 10 to 1000 and temperatures between T = 100 K and T = 2000 K with an accuracy of 2% or better. Modified Fues' model potential approach was used for calculating matrix elements of bound-bound and bound-free radiation transitions in helium.

  8. Simple estimation of thermal capture rates for ion-dipole collisions by canonical effective potential methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marković, Nikola; Nordholm, Sture

    1989-07-01

    Thermal capture rate coefficients are considered for collision partners which at long range interact by ion-dipole plus polarization potentials. The simple Langevin-Gioumousis-Stevenson theory is extended by mapping the true asymmetric multidimensional interaction potential onto an effective spherically symmetric potential obtained by analysis of canonical probability or flux equalities. Bound states are eliminated in the mapping as well as in the final rate coefficient. Capture rate coefficients are calculated for H 3+ ions colliding with HCl, CS and HCN in a model where the ion is represented as a point charge and the target as a diatomic molecule. Corresponding calculations are carried out using canonical variational transition state theory. The theoretical results are compared with corresponding results obtained in classical trajectory calculations wherein the diatomic target (HCl, CS or HCN) is modeled as two point charges.

  9. Capture locations and growth rates of Atlantic sturgeon in the Chesapeake Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Welsh, S.A.; Eyler, S.M.; Mangold, M.F.; Spells, A.J.

    2002-01-01

    Little information exists on temporal and spatial distributions of wild and hatchery-reared Atlantic sturgeon Acipenser oxyrinchus oxyrinchus in the Chesapeake Bay. Approximately 3,300 hatchery-reared Atlantic sturgeon comprised of two size groups were released into the Nanticoke River, a tributary of the Chesapeake Bay, on 8 July 1996. During January 1996-May 2000, 1099 Atlantic sturgeon were captured incidentally (i.e., bycatch) by commercial watermen in the Chesapeake Bay, including 420 hatchery-reared individuals. Wild and hatchery-reared Atlantic sturgeon were captured primarily in pound nets and gill nets. Biologists tagged each fish and recorded weight, length, and location of capture. Although two adults greater than 2000 mm fork length (FL) were captured in Maryland waters, wild sturgeon were primarily juveniles from Maryland and Virginia waters (415 and 259 individuals below 1000 mm FL, respectively). A growth rate of 0.565 mm/d (N = 15, SE = 0.081) was estimated for wild individuals (487-944 mm TL at release) at liberty from 30 to 622 d. The average growth of the group of hatchery-reared Atlantic sturgeon raised at 10??C exceeded that of the group raised at 17??C. Our distributional data based on capture locations are biased by fishery dependence and gear selectivity. These data are informative to managers, however, because commercial effort is widely distributed in the Chesapeake Bay, and little distributional data were available before this study.

  10. Efficacy of trap modifications for increasing capture rates of aquatic snakes in floating aquatic funnel traps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Halstead, Brian J.; Wylie, Glenn D.; Casazza, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    Increasing detection and capture probabilities of rare or elusive herpetofauna of conservation concern is important to inform the scientific basis for their management and recovery. The Giant Gartersnake (Thamnophis gigas) is an example of a secretive, wary, and generally difficult-to-sample species about which little is known regarding its patterns of occurrence and demography. We therefore evaluated modifications to existing traps to increase the detection and capture probabilities of the Giant Gartersnake to improve the precision with which occurrence, abundance, survival, and other demographic parameters are estimated. We found that adding a one-way valve constructed of cable ties to the small funnel opening of traps and adding hardware cloth extensions to the wide end of funnels increased capture rates of the Giant Gartersnake by 5.55 times (95% credible interval = 2.45–10.51) relative to unmodified traps. The effectiveness of these modifications was insensitive to the aquatic habitat type in which they were deployed. The snout-vent length of the smallest and largest captured snakes did not vary among trap modifications. These trap modifications are expected to increase detection and capture probabilities of the Giant Gartersnake, and show promise for increasing the precision with which demographic parameters can be estimated for this species. We anticipate that the trap modifications found effective in this study will be applicable to a variety of aquatic and semi-aquatic reptiles and amphibians and improve conservation efforts for these species.

  11. High-Rate Data-Capture for an Airborne Lidar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valett, Susan; Hicks, Edward; Dabney, Philip; Harding, David

    2012-01-01

    A high-rate data system was required to capture the data for an airborne lidar system. A data system was developed that achieved up to 22 million (64-bit) events per second sustained data rate (1408 million bits per second), as well as short bursts (less than 4 s) at higher rates. All hardware used for the system was off the shelf, but carefully selected to achieve these rates. The system was used to capture laser fire, single-photon detection, and GPS data for the Slope Imaging Multi-polarization Photo-counting Lidar (SIMPL). However, the system has applications for other laser altimeter systems (waveform-recording), mass spectroscopy, xray radiometry imaging, high-background- rate ranging lidar, and other similar areas where very high-speed data capture is needed. The data capture software was used for the SIMPL instrument that employs a micropulse, single-photon ranging measurement approach and has 16 data channels. The detected single photons are from two sources those reflected from the target and solar background photons. The instrument is non-gated, so background photons are acquired for a range window of 13 km and can comprise many times the number of target photons. The highest background rate occurs when the atmosphere is clear, the Sun is high, and the target is a highly reflective surface such as snow. Under these conditions, the total data rate for the 16 channels combined is expected to be approximately 22 million events per second. For each photon detection event, the data capture software reads the relative time of receipt, with respect to a one-per-second absolute time pulse from a GPS receiver, from an event timer card with 0.1-ns precision, and records that information to a RAID (Redundant Array of Independent Disks) storage device. The relative time of laser pulse firings must also be read and recorded with the same precision. Each of the four event timer cards handles the throughput from four of the channels. For each detection event, a flag is

  12. First measurements of muon production rate using a novel pion capture system at MuSIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, S.; D'Arcy, R.; Fukuda, M.; Hatanaka, K.; Hino, Y.; Kuno, Y.; Lancaster, M.; Mori, Y.; Nam, T. H.; Ogitsu, T.; Sakamoto, H.; Sato, A.; Truong, N. M.; Yamamoto, A.; Yoshida, M.; Wing, M.

    2013-02-01

    The MuSIC (Muon Science Innovative Channel) beam line at RCNP (Research Centre for Nuclear Physics), Osaka will be the most intense source of muons in the world. A proton beam is incident on a target and, by using a novel capture solenoid, guides the produced pions into the beam line where they subsequently decay to muons. This increased muon flux will allow more precise measurements of cLFV (charged Lepton Flavour Violation) as well as making muon beams more economically feasible. Currently the first 36° of solenoid beam pipe have been completed and installed for testing with low proton current of 1 nA. Measurements of the total particle flux and the muon life time were made. The measurements were taken using thin plastic scintillators coupled to MPPCs (Multi-Pixel Photon Counter) that surrounded a magnesium or copper stopping target. The scintillators were used to record which particles stopped and their subsequent decay times giving a muon yield of 8.5 × 105 muons W-1proton beam or 3 × 108 muons s-1 when using the RCNP's full power (400 W).

  13. False vacuum transitions —Analytical solutions and decay rate values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correa, R. A. C.; Moraes, P. H. R. S.; da Rocha, Roldão

    2015-08-01

    In this work we show a class of oscillating configurations for the evolution of the domain walls in Euclidean space. The solutions are obtained analytically. Phase transitions are achieved from the associated fluctuation determinant, by the decay rates of the false vacuum.

  14. Estimate Of The Decay Rate Constant of Hydrogen Sulfide Generation From Landfilled Drywall

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research was conducted to investigate the impact of particle size on H2S gas emissions and estimate a decay rate constant for H2S gas generation from the anaerobic decomposition of drywall. Three different particle sizes of regular drywall and one particle size of paperless drywa...

  15. Neutron Capture Rates near A=130 which Effect a Global Change to the r-Process Abundance Distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Surman, Rebecca; Beun, Joshua; Mclaughlin, Gail C; Hix, William Raphael

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the impact of neutron capture rates near the A=130 peak on the r-process abundance pattern. We show that these capture rates can alter the abundances of individual nuclear species, not only in the region of A=130 peak but also throughout the abundance pattern. We discuss in general the nonequilibrium processes that produce these abundance changes and determine which capture rates have the most significant impact.

  16. Determination of the neutron-capture rate of 17C for r -process nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heine, M.; Typel, S.; Wu, M.-R.; Adachi, T.; Aksyutina, Y.; Alcantara, J.; Altstadt, S.; Alvarez-Pol, H.; Ashwood, N.; Atar, L.; Aumann, T.; Avdeichikov, V.; Barr, M.; Beceiro-Novo, S.; Bemmerer, D.; Benlliure, J.; Bertulani, C. A.; Boretzky, K.; Borge, M. J. G.; Burgunder, G.; Caamano, M.; Caesar, C.; Casarejos, E.; Catford, W.; Cederkäll, J.; Chakraborty, S.; Chartier, M.; Chulkov, L. V.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Crespo, R.; Datta Pramanik, U.; Diaz Fernandez, P.; Dillmann, I.; Elekes, Z.; Enders, J.; Ershova, O.; Estrade, A.; Farinon, F.; Fraile, L. M.; Freer, M.; Freudenberger, M.; Fynbo, H. O. U.; Galaviz, D.; Geissel, H.; Gernhäuser, R.; Göbel, K.; Golubev, P.; Gonzalez Diaz, D.; Hagdahl, J.; Heftrich, T.; Heil, M.; Heinz, A.; Henriques, A.; Holl, M.; Ickert, G.; Ignatov, A.; Jakobsson, B.; Johansson, H. T.; Jonson, B.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kanungo, R.; Kelic-Heil, A.; Knöbel, R.; Kröll, T.; Krücken, R.; Kurcewicz, J.; Kurz, N.; Labiche, M.; Langer, C.; Le Bleis, T.; Lemmon, R.; Lepyoshkina, O.; Lindberg, S.; Machado, J.; Marganiec, J.; Martínez-Pinedo, G.; Maroussov, V.; Mostazo, M.; Movsesyan, A.; Najafi, A.; Neff, T.; Nilsson, T.; Nociforo, C.; Panin, V.; Paschalis, S.; Perea, A.; Petri, M.; Pietri, S.; Plag, R.; Prochazka, A.; Rahaman, A.; Rastrepina, G.; Reifarth, R.; Ribeiro, G.; Ricciardi, M. V.; Rigollet, C.; Riisager, K.; Röder, M.; Rossi, D.; Sanchez del Rio, J.; Savran, D.; Scheit, H.; Simon, H.; Sorlin, O.; Stoica, V.; Streicher, B.; Taylor, J. T.; Tengblad, O.; Terashima, S.; Thies, R.; Togano, Y.; Uberseder, E.; Van de Walle, J.; Velho, P.; Volkov, V.; Wagner, A.; Wamers, F.; Weick, H.; Weigand, M.; Wheldon, C.; Wilson, G.; Wimmer, C.; Winfield, J. S.; Woods, P.; Yakorev, D.; Zhukov, M. V.; Zilges, A.; Zuber, K.; R3B Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    With the R 3B -LAND setup at GSI we have measured exclusive relative-energy spectra of the Coulomb dissociation of 18C at a projectile energy around 425 A MeV on a lead target, which are needed to determine the radiative neutron-capture cross sections of 17C into the ground state of 18C. Those data have been used to constrain theoretical calculations for transitions populating excited states in 18C. This allowed to derive the astrophysical cross section σnγ * accounting for the thermal population of 17C target states in astrophysical scenarios. The experimentally verified capture rate is significantly lower than those of previously obtained Hauser-Feshbach estimations at temperatures T9≤ 1 GK. Network simulations with updated neutron-capture rates and hydrodynamics according to the neutrino-driven wind model as well as the neutron-star merger scenario reveal no pronounced influence of neutron capture of 17C on the production of second- and third-peak elements in contrast to earlier sensitivity studies.

  17. Rate-based process modeling study of CO{sub 2} capture with aqueous monoethanolamine solution

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Chen, H.; Chen, C.C.; Plaza, J.M.; Dugas, R.; Rochelle, G.T.

    2009-10-15

    Rate-based process modeling technology has matured and is increasingly gaining acceptance over traditional equilibrium-stage modeling approaches. Recently comprehensive pilot plant data for carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) capture with aqueous monoethanolamine (MEA) solution have become available from the University of Texas at Austin. The pilot plant data cover key process variables including CO{sub 2} concentration in the gas stream, CO{sub 2} loading in lean MEA solution, liquid to gas ratio, and packing type. In this study, we model the pilot plant operation with Aspen RateSep, a second generation rate-based multistage separation unit operation model in Aspen Plus. After a brief review of rate-based modeling, thermodynamic and kinetic models for CO{sub 2} absorption with the MEA solution, and transport property models, we show excellent match of the rate-based model predictions against the comprehensive pilot plant data and we validate the superiority of the rate-based models over the traditional equilibrium-stage models. We further examine the impacts of key rate-based modeling options, i.e., film discretization options and flow model options. The rate-based model provides excellent predictive capability, and it should be very useful for design and scale-up of CO{sub 2} capture processes.

  18. Electron-capture Rates for pf-shell Nuclei in Stellar Environments and Nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Toshio; Honma, Michio; Mori, Kanji; Famiano, Michael A.; Kajino, Toshitaka; Hidakai, Jun; Otsuka, Takaharu

    Gamow-Teller strengths in pf-shell nuclei obtained by a new shell-model Hamltonian, GXPF1J, are used to evaluate electron-capture rates in pf-shell nuclei at stellar environments. The nuclear weak rates with GXPF1J, which are generally smaller than previous evaluations for proton-rich nuclei, are applied to nucleosynthesis in type Ia supernova explosions. The updated rates are found to lead to less production of neutron-rich nuclei such as 58Ni and 54Cr, thus toward a solution of the problem of over-production of neutron-rich isotopes of iron-group nuclei compared to the solar abundance.

  19. Fine-grid calculations for stellar electron and positron capture rates on Fe isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Nabi, Jameel-Un; Tawfik, Abdel Nasser

    2013-03-15

    The acquisition of precise and reliable nuclear data is a prerequisite to success for stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis studies. Core-collapse simulators find it challenging to generate an explosion from the collapse of the core of massive stars. It is believed that a better understanding of the microphysics of core-collapse can lead to successful results. The weak interaction processes are able to trigger the collapse and control the lepton-to-baryon ratio (Y{sub e}) of the corematerial. It is suggested that the temporal variation of Y{sub e} within the core of a massive star has a pivotal role to play in the stellar evolution and a fine-tuning of this parameter at various stages of presupernova evolution is the key to generate an explosion. During the presupernova evolution of massive stars, isotopes of iron, mainly {sup 54-56}Fe, are considered to be key players in controlling Y{sub e} ratio via electron capture on these nuclides. Recently an improved microscopic calculation of weak-interaction-mediated rates for iron isotopes was introduced using the proton-neutron quasiparticle random-phase-approximation (pn-QRPA) theory. The pn-QRPA theory allows a microscopic state-by-state calculation of stellar capture rates which greatly increases the reliability of calculated rates. The results were suggestive of some fine-tuning of the Y{sub e} ratio during various phases of stellar evolution. Here we present for the first time the fine-grid calculation of the electron and positron capture rates on {sup 54-56}Fe. The sensitivity of the pn-QRPA calculated capture rates to the deformation parameter is also studied in this work. Core-collapse simulators may find this calculation suitable for interpolation purposes and for necessary incorporation in the stellar evolution codes.

  20. Characterization of decay and emission rates of ultrafine particles in indoor ice rink.

    PubMed

    Kim, J; Lee, K

    2013-08-01

    The purposes of this study were to determine indoor ultrafine particle (UFP, diameter <100 nm) levels in ice rinks and to characterize UFP decay and emission rates. All 15 public ice rinks in Seoul were investigated for UFP and carbon monoxide (CO) concentrations. Three ice rinks did not show peaks in UFP concentrations, and one ice rink used two resurfacers simultaneously. High peaks of UFP and CO concentrations were observed when the resurfacer was operated. The average air change rate in the 11 ice rinks was 0.21 ± 0.13/h. The average decay rates of UFP number concentrations measured by the P-Trak and DiSCmini were 0.54 ± 0.21/h and 0.85 ± 0.34/h, respectively. The average decay rate of UFP surface area concentration was 0.33 ± 0.15/h. The average emission rates of UFP number concentrations measured by P-Trak and DiSCmini were 1.2 × 10(14) ± 6.5 × 10(13) particles/min and 3.3 × 10(14) ± 2.4 × 10(14) particles/min, respectively. The average emission rate of UFP surface area concentration was 3.1 × 10(11) ± 2.0 × 10(11) μm(2)/min. UFP emission rate was associated with resurfacer age. DiSCmini measured higher decay and emission rates than P-Trak due to their different measuring mechanisms and size ranges.

  1. Measurement of the decay rate of the SiH feature as a function of temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuth, Joseph A., III; Kraus, George F.

    1994-01-01

    We have previously suggested that the SiH fundamental stretch could serve as a diagnostic indicator of the oxidation state of silicate surfaces exposed to the solar wind for prolonged periods. We have now measured the primary decay rate of SiH in vacuo as a function of temperature and find that the primary rate constant for the decay can be characterized by the following equation: k(min(exp -1)) approximately equals 0.186 exp(-9/RT) min(exp -1), where R = 2 x 10(exp -3) kcal deg(exp -1) mole(exp -1). This means that the half-life for the decay of the SiH feature at room temperature is approximately 20 yrs, whereas the half-life at a peak lunar regolith temperature of approximately 500K would be only approximately 20 days. At the somewhat lower temperature of approximately 400K the half-life for the decay is on the order of 200 days. The rate of loss of SiH as a function of temperature provides an upper limit to the quantity of H implanted by the solar wind which can be retained by a silicate grain in a planetary regolith. This will be discussed in more detail here.

  2. Beta-decay rate and beta-delayed neutron emission probability of improved gross theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koura, Hiroyuki

    2014-09-01

    A theoretical study has been carried out on beta-decay rate and beta-delayed neutron emission probability. The gross theory of the beta decay is based on an idea of the sum rule of the beta-decay strength function, and has succeeded in describing beta-decay half-lives of nuclei overall nuclear mass region. The gross theory includes not only the allowed transition as the Fermi and the Gamow-Teller, but also the first-forbidden transition. In this work, some improvements are introduced as the nuclear shell correction on nuclear level densities and the nuclear deformation for nuclear strength functions, those effects were not included in the original gross theory. The shell energy and the nuclear deformation for unmeasured nuclei are adopted from the KTUY nuclear mass formula, which is based on the spherical-basis method. Considering the properties of the integrated Fermi function, we can roughly categorized energy region of excited-state of a daughter nucleus into three regions: a highly-excited energy region, which fully affect a delayed neutron probability, a middle energy region, which is estimated to contribute the decay heat, and a region neighboring the ground-state, which determines the beta-decay rate. Some results will be given in the presentation. A theoretical study has been carried out on beta-decay rate and beta-delayed neutron emission probability. The gross theory of the beta decay is based on an idea of the sum rule of the beta-decay strength function, and has succeeded in describing beta-decay half-lives of nuclei overall nuclear mass region. The gross theory includes not only the allowed transition as the Fermi and the Gamow-Teller, but also the first-forbidden transition. In this work, some improvements are introduced as the nuclear shell correction on nuclear level densities and the nuclear deformation for nuclear strength functions, those effects were not included in the original gross theory. The shell energy and the nuclear deformation for

  3. Rates for neutron-capture reactions on tungsten isotopes in iron meteorites. [Abstract only

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masarik, J.; Reedy, R. C.

    1994-01-01

    High-precision W isotopic analyses by Harper and Jacobsen indicate the W-182/W-183 ratio in the Toluca iron meteorite is shifted by -(3.0 +/- 0.9) x 10(exp -4) relative to a terrestrial standard. Possible causes of this shift are neutron-capture reactions on W during Toluca's approximately 600-Ma exposure to cosmic ray particles or radiogenic growth of W-182 from 9-Ma Hf-182 in the silicate portion of the Earth after removal of W to the Earth's core. Calculations for the rates of neutron-capture reactions on W isotopes were done to study the first possibility. The LAHET Code System (LCS) which consists of the Los Alamos High Energy Transport (LAHET) code and the Monte Carlo N-Particle(MCNP) transport code was used to numerically simulate the irradiation of the Toluca iron meteorite by galactic-cosmic-ray (GCR) particles and to calculate the rates of W(n, gamma) reactions. Toluca was modeled as a 3.9-m-radius sphere with the composition of a typical IA iron meteorite. The incident GCR protons and their interactions were modeled with LAHET, which also handled the interactions of neutrons with energies above 20 MeV. The rates for the capture of neutrons by W-182, W-183, and W-186 were calculated using the detailed library of (n, gamma) cross sections in MCNP. For this study of the possible effect of W(n, gamma) reactions on W isotope systematics, we consider the peak rates. The calculated maximum change in the normalized W-182/W-183 ratio due to neutron-capture reactions cannot account for more than 25% of the mass 182 deficit observed in Toluca W.

  4. A predator equalizes rate of capture of a schooling prey in a patchy environment.

    PubMed

    Vijayan, Sundararaj; Kotler, Burt P; Abramsky, Zvika

    2017-02-20

    Prey individuals are often distributed heterogeneously in the environment, and their abundances and relative availabilities vary among patches. A foraging predator should maximize energetic gains by selectively choosing patches with higher prey density. However, catching behaviorally responsive and group-forming prey in patchy environments can be a challenge for predators. First, they have to identify the profitable patches, and second, they must manage the prey's sophisticated anti-predator behavior. Thus, the forager and its prey have to continuously adjust their behavior to that of their opponent. Given these conditions, the foraging predator's behavior should be dynamic with time in terms of foraging effort and prey capture rates across different patches. Theoretically, the allocation of its time among patches of behaviorally responsive prey should be such that it equalizes its prey capture rates across patches through time. We tested this prediction in a model system containing a predator (little egret) and group-forming prey (common gold fish) in two sets of experiments in which (1) patches (pools) contained equal numbers of prey, or in which (2) patches contained unequal densities of prey. The egret equalized the prey capture rate through time in both equal and different density experiments.

  5. β+ Gamow-Teller transition strengths from 46Ti and stellar electron-capture rates.

    PubMed

    Noji, S; Zegers, R G T; Austin, Sam M; Baugher, T; Bazin, D; Brown, B A; Campbell, C M; Cole, A L; Doster, H J; Gade, A; Guess, C J; Gupta, S; Hitt, G W; Langer, C; Lipschutz, S; Lunderberg, E; Meharchand, R; Meisel, Z; Perdikakis, G; Pereira, J; Recchia, F; Schatz, H; Scott, M; Stroberg, S R; Sullivan, C; Valdez, L; Walz, C; Weisshaar, D; Williams, S J; Wimmer, K

    2014-06-27

    The Gamow-Teller strength in the β(+) direction to (46)Sc was extracted via the (46)Ti(t,(3)He + γ) reaction at 115  MeV/u. The γ-ray coincidences served to precisely measure the very weak Gamow-Teller transition to a final state at 991 keV. Although this transition is weak, it is crucial for accurately estimating electron-capture rates in astrophysical scenarios with relatively low stellar densities and temperatures, such as presupernova stellar evolution. Shell-model calculations with different effective interactions in the pf shell-model space do not reproduce the experimental Gamow-Teller strengths, which is likely due to sd-shell admixtures. Calculations in the quasiparticle random phase approximation that are often used in astrophysical simulations also fail to reproduce the experimental Gamow-Teller strength distribution, leading to strongly overestimated electron-capture rates. Because reliable theoretical predictions of Gamow-Teller strengths are important for providing astrophysical electron-capture reaction rates for a broad set of nuclei in the lower pf shell, we conclude that further theoretical improvements are required to match astrophysical needs.

  6. A Measurement of the Rate of Muon Capture in Hydrogen Gas andDetermination of the Proton's Induced Pseudoscalar Coupling gP

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, Thomas Ira

    2007-07-01

    This dissertation describes a measurement of the rate ofnuclear muon capture by the proton, performed by the MuCap Collaborationusing a new technique based on a time projection chamber operating inultraclean, deuterium-depleted hydrogen gas at room temperature and 1 MPapressure. The hydrogen target's low gas density of 1 percent compared toliquid hydrogen is key to avoiding uncertainties that arise from theformation of muonic molecules. The capture rate was obtained from thedifference between the μ- disappearance rate in hydrogen--as determinedfrom data collected in the experiment's first physics run in fall2004--and the world averagefor the μ+ decay rate. After combining theresults of my analysis with the results from another independent analysisof the 2004 data, the muon capture rate from the hyperfine singlet groundstate of the mu-p atom is found to be ΛS = 725.0 ± 17.4 1/s, fromwhich the induced pseudoscalar coupling of the nucleon, gP(q2 = -0.88m$2\\atop{μ}$)= 7.3 ± 1.1, is extracted. This result for gP is consistent withtheoretical predictions that are based on the approximate chiral symmetryof QCD.

  7. Core hole screening and decay rates of double core ionized first row hydrides.

    PubMed

    Inhester, L; Groenhof, G; Grubmüller, H

    2013-04-28

    Because of the high intensity, X-ray free electron lasers allow one to create and probe double core ionized states in molecules. The decay of these multiple core ionized states crucially determines the evolution of radiation damage in single molecule diffractive imaging experiments. Here we have studied the Auger decay in hydrides of first row elements after single and double core ionization by quantum mechanical ab initio calculations. In our approach the continuum wave function of the emitted Auger electron is expanded into spherical harmonics on a radial grid. The obtained decay rates of double K-shell vacancies were found to be systematically larger than those for the respective single K-shell vacancies, markedly exceeding the expected factor of two. This enhancement is attributed to the screening effects induced by the core hole. We propose a simple model, which is able to predict core hole decay rates in molecules with low Z elements based on the electron density in the vicinity of the core hole.

  8. A study of the fully differential inclusive semileptonic B meson decay rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipeles, Elliot

    2004-12-01

    We present a study of the fully differential inclusive semileptonic B meson decay rate. Using a maximum likelihood fit, we extract the fractional contributions from the B → X clnu processes with Xc = D, D*, D**, and nonresonant Xc, and the process B → Xulnu. From the fit results, we extract moments of B → Xclnu differential decay rate and the partial branching fraction of the B → Xulnu decay in a restricted region of phase space. The region in which the B → Xulnu partial branching fraction is measured is MX < 1.5 GeV/c2, q2 > 11 GeV2/c4. This measurement is used to extract CKM parameter |Vub| = (4.73 +/- 0.23 +/- 0.82 +/- 0.18 +/- 0.56 +/- 0.66) x 10-3, where the uncertainties are due to statistics, detector systematics, B → Xcl nu model dependence, B → Xulnu model dependence, and theoretical uncertainties. From the < M2X-M2D > moment, the first moment of the photon energy spectrum in B → Xsgamma, and the semileptonic B branching fraction, we extract the CKM parameter |V cb| = (4.12 +/- .10 +/- 0.09 +/- 0.16) x 10-2, where the uncertainties are due to the measurement of the semileptonic B decay rate, the moments measurements, and theoretical uncertainties. Both CKM parameter extractions use Heavy Quark Effective Theory (HQET) predictions for inclusive semileptonic B decay. The measured moments are also used to test related predictions.

  9. Measurement of the solar neutrino capture rate with gallium metal, part III

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, Steven Ray

    2008-01-01

    The Russian-American experiment SAGE began to measure the solar neutrino capture rate with a target of gallium metal in December 1989. Measurements have continued with only a few brief interruptions since that time. In this article we present the experimental improvements in SAGE since its last published data summary in December 2001. Assuming the solar neutrino production rate was constant during the period of data collection, combined analysis of 168 extractions through December 2007 gives a capture rate of solar neutrinos with energy more than 233 keY of 65.4{sup +3.1}{sub 3.0} (stat) {sup +2.6}{sub -2.8} (syst) SNU. The weighted average of the results of all three Ga solar neUlrino experiments, SAGE, Gallex, and GNO, is now 66.1 {+-} 3.1 SNU, where statistical and systematic uncertainties have been combined in quadrature. During the recent period of data collection a new test of SAGE was made with a reactor-produced {sup 37}Ar neutrino source. The ratio of observed to calculated rates in this experiment, combined with the measured rates in the three prior {sup 51}Cr neutrino-source experiments with Ga, is 0.88 {+-} 0.05. A probable explanation for this low result is that the cross section for neutrino capture by the two lowest-lying excited states in {sup 71}Ge has been overestimated. If we assume these cross sections are zero, then the standard solar model including neutrino oscillations predicts a total capture rate in Ga in the range of 63--67 SNU with an uncertainly of about 5%, in good agreement with experiment. We derive the current value of the pp neutrino flux produced in the Sun to be {phi}{sup {circle_dot}}{sub pp} = (6.1 {+-} 0.8) x 10{sup 10}/(cm{sup 2} s), which agrees well with the flux predicted by the standard solar model. Finally, we make several tests and show that the data are consistent with the assumption that the solar neutrino production rate is constant in time.

  10. The electron temperature and 44Ti decay rate in Cassiopeia A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laming, J. Martin

    2001-11-01

    The effects of plasma elemental composition and ionization state on the effective decay rate of 44Ti are investigated. We essentially follow the methods of the first authors to treat this topic, Mochizuki et al., but use more realistic plasma models, including radiative cooling, to compute the evolution of the charge state distribution behind the reverse shock. For uniform density ejecta (i.e., no clumps or bubbles) we find a negligible change to the decay rate of 44Ti. We discuss the effects of non-uniform ejecta. We also briefly consider the effects on these calculations of collisionless electron heating associated with weak secondary shocks propagating throughout the Cas A shell as a result of foward or reverse shock encounters with density inhomogeneities, recently suggested as an explanation for the hard X-ray tail seen in BeppoSAX and RXTE/OSSE spectra. .

  11. Relativistic two-photon decay rates of 2s12 hydrogenic ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, S. P.; Drake, G. W. F.

    1981-07-01

    Rates are calculated for the decay of metastable 2s12 ions to the ground state by the simultaneous emission of two photons. The calculation includes all relativistic and retardation effects, and all combinations of photon multipoles which make significant contributions up to Z=100. Summations over intermediate states are performed by constructing a finite-basis-set representation of the Dirac Green's function. The estimated accuracy of the results is +/- 10 ppm for all Z up to 100. The decay rates are about 20 (αZ)2% larger than an earlier calculation by Johnson owing to the inclusion of higher-order retardation effects. The general question of gauge invariance in two-photon transitions is discussed.

  12. Casimir-Polder shift and decay rate in the presence of nonreciprocal media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Sebastian; Crosse, J. A.; Buhmann, Stefan Yoshi

    2017-02-01

    We calculate the Casimir-Polder frequency shift and decay rate for an atom in front of a nonreciprocal medium by using macroscopic quantum electrodynamics. The results are a generalization of the respective quantities for matter with broken time-reversal symmetry which does not fulfill the Lorentz reciprocity principle. As examples, we contrast the decay rates, the resonant and nonresonant frequency shifts of a perfectly conducting (reciprocal) mirror with those of a perfectly reflecting nonreciprocal mirror. We find different power laws for the distance dependence of all quantities in the retarded and nonretarded limits. As an example of a more realistic nonreciprocal medium, we investigate a topological insulator subject to a time-symmetry-breaking perturbation.

  13. Optimal decay rates of classical solutions for the full compressible MHD equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jincheng; Tao, Qiang; Yao, Zheng-an

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we are concerned with optimal decay rates for higher-order spatial derivatives of classical solutions to the full compressible MHD equations in three-dimensional whole space. If the initial perturbation is small in {H^3}-norm and bounded in {L^q(qin [1, 6/5 ))}-norm, we apply the Fourier splitting method by Schonbek (Arch Ration Mech Anal 88:209-222, 1985) to establish optimal decay rates for the second-order spatial derivatives of solutions and the third-order spatial derivatives of magnetic field in {L^2}-norm. These results improve the work of Pu and Guo (Z Angew Math Phys 64:519-538, 2013).

  14. Stellar electron capture rates on neutron-rich nuclei and their impact on stellar core collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raduta, Ad. R.; Gulminelli, F.; Oertel, M.

    2017-02-01

    During the late stages of gravitational core-collapse of massive stars, extreme isospin asymmetries are reached within the core. Due to the lack of microscopic calculations of electron-capture (EC) rates for all relevant nuclei, in general simple analytic parametrizations are employed. We study here several extensions of these parametrizations, allowing for a temperature, electron density, and isospin dependence as well as for odd-even effects. The latter extra degrees of freedom considerably improve the agreement with large-scale microscopic rate calculations. We find, in particular, that the isospin dependence leads to a significant reduction of the global EC rates during core collapse with respect to fiducial results, where rates optimized on calculations of stable f p -shell nuclei are used. Our results indicate that systematic microscopic calculations and experimental measurements in the N ≈50 neutron-rich region are desirable for realistic simulations of the core collapse.

  15. Optimal decay rate for the wave equation on a square with constant damping on a strip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stahn, Reinhard

    2017-04-01

    We consider the damped wave equation with Dirichlet boundary conditions on the unit square parametrized by Cartesian coordinates x and y. We assume the damping a to be strictly positive and constant for x<σ and zero for x>σ . We prove the exact t^{-4/3}-decay rate for the energy of classical solutions. Our main result (Theorem 1) answers question (1) of Anantharaman and Léautaud (Anal PDE 7(1):159-214, 2014, Section 2C).

  16. Measurement of HOx• production rate due to radon decay in air

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Huiling

    1993-08-01

    Radon in indoor air may cause the exposure of the public to excessive radioactivity. Radiolysis of water vapor in indoor air due to radon decay could produce (•OH and HO2 •) that may convert atmospheric constituents to compounds of lower vapor pressure. These lower vapor pressure compounds might then nucleate to form new particles in the indoor atmosphere. Chemical amplification was used to determine HOx• production rate in indoor air caused by radon decay. Average HOx• production rate was found to be (4.31±0.07) x 105 HOx• per Rn decay per second (Bq) 3.4 to 55.0% at 22C. This work provided G(HOx•)-value, 7.86±0.13 No./100 eV in air by directly measuring [HOx•] formed from the radiolysis procedure. This G value implies that HOx• produced by radon decay in air might be formed by multiple processes and may be result of positive ion-molecule reactions, primary radiolysis, and radical reactions. There is no obvious relation between HOx• production rate and relative humidity. A laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) system has been used for •OH production rate measurement; it consists of an excimer laser, a dye laser, a frequency doubler, a gaseous fluorescence chamber, and other optical and electronic parts. This system needs to be improved to eliminate the interferences of light scattering and artificial •OH produced from the photolysis of O3/H2O.

  17. Initial cooperative decay rate and cooperative Lamb shift of resonant atoms in an infinite cylindrical geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Friedberg, Richard; Manassah, Jamal T.

    2011-08-15

    We obtain in both the scalar and vector photon models the analytical expressions for the initial cooperative decay rate and the cooperative Lamb shift for an ensemble of resonant atoms distributed uniformly in an infinite cylindrical geometry for the case that the initial state of the system is prepared in a phased state modulated in the direction of the cylindrical axis. We find that qualitatively the scalar and vector theories give different results.

  18. Concentrations and decay rates of ozone in indoor air in dependence on building and surface materials.

    PubMed

    Moriske, H J; Ebert, G; Konieczny, L; Menk, G; Schöndube, M

    1998-08-01

    The decay of ozone in indoor air was measured in a closed chamber after contact with different building materials and residential surfaces. The tested materials were: vinyl wall paper, woodchip paper, plywood, latex paint, fitted carpet, and plaster. In the summer of 1996, the entry of ozone from ambient air into indoor air during ventilation and the ozone decay in indoor air, after windows had been closed again, were studied. Measurements were done in a residential house on the outskirts of Berlin. The following results were gained: the chamber measurements showed a decay of ozone after contact with most of the materials put inside the chamber. Higher decay rates have been obtained for wall papers, plywood, fitted carpet and plaster. As described in the literature, ozone is able to react with olefines inside the materials and is able to form formaldehyde and other components. This formation of formaldehyde could also be confirmed in our investigations. Thus, in most cases, the formaldehyde concentrations were lower than the German guideline value of 0.1 ppm. The formation of formaldehyde could be prevented when a special wall paper that was coated with activated carbon was used. In the house, a complete ozone diffusion into indoor air took place during ventilation within 30 min. After closing the windows, the ozone concentrations decreased to the basic level before ventilation within 60-90 min.

  19. Direct Measurement of the Unimolecular Decay Rate of Criegee Intermediates to OH Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fang; Fang, Yi; Klippenstein, Stephen; McCoy, Anne; Lester, Marsha

    Ozonolysis of alkenes is an important non-photolytic source of OH radicals in the troposphere. The production of OH radicals proceeds though formation and unimolecular decay of Criegee intermediates such as syn-CH3CHOO and (CH3)2COO. These alkyl-substituted Criegee intermediates can undergo a 1,4-H transfer reaction to form an energized vinyl hydroperoxide species, which breaks apart to OH and vinoxy products. Recently, this laboratory used IR excitation in the C-H stretch overtone region to initiate the unimolecular decay of syn-CH3CHOO and (CH3)2COO Criegee intermediates, leading to OH formation. Here, direct time-domain measurements are performed to observe the rate of appearance of OH products under collision-free conditions utilizing UV laser-induced fluorescence for detection. The experimental rates are in excellent agreement with statistical RRKM calculations using barrier heights predicted from high-level electronic structure calculations. Accurate determination of the rates and barrier heights for unimolecular decay of Criegee intermediates is essential for modeling the kinetics of alkene ozonolysis reactions, a significant OH radical source in atmospheric chemistry, as well as the steady-state concentration of Criegee intermediates in the atmosphere. This research was supported through the National Science Foundation under grant CHE-1362835.

  20. A realistic model of neutrino masses with a large neutrinoless double beta decay rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Aguila, Francisco; Aparici, Alberto; Bhattacharya, Subhaditya; Santamaria, Arcadi; Wudka, Jose

    2012-05-01

    The minimal Standard Model extension with the Weinberg operator does accommodate the observed neutrino masses and mixing, but predicts a neutrinoless double beta (0 νββ) decay rate proportional to the effective electron neutrino mass, which can be then arbitrarily small within present experimental limits. However, in general 0 νββ decay can have an independent origin and be near its present experimental bound; whereas neutrino masses are generated radiatively, contributing negligibly to 0 νββ decay. We provide a realization of this scenario in a simple, well defined and testable model, with potential LHC effects and calculable neutrino masses, whose two-loop expression we derive exactly. We also discuss the connection of this model to others that have appeared in the literature, and remark on the significant differences that result from various choices of quantum number assignments and symmetry assumptions. In this type of models lepton flavor violating rates are also preferred to be relatively large, at the reach of foreseen experiments. Interestingly enough, in our model this stands for a large third mixing angle, {{si}}{{{n}}^{{2}}}{θ_{{{13}}}}{˜}}}{ > }}0.00{8} , when μ→ eee is required to lie below its present experimental limit.

  1. Nuclear mass inventory, photon dose rate and thermal decay heat of spent research reactor fuel assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Pond, R.B.; Matos, J.E.

    1996-12-31

    This document has been prepared to assist research reactor operators possessing spent fuel containing enriched uranium of United States origin to prepare part of the documentation necessary to ship this fuel to the United States. Data are included on the nuclear mass inventory, photon dose rate, and thermal decay heat of spent research reactor fuel assemblies. Isotopic masses of U, Np, Pu and Am that are present in spent research reactor fuel are estimated for MTR, TRIGA and DIDO-type fuel assembly types. The isotopic masses of each fuel assembly type are given as functions of U-235 burnup in the spent fuel, and of initial U-235 enrichment and U-235 mass in the fuel assembly. Photon dose rates of spent MTR, TRIGA and DIDO-type fuel assemblies are estimated for fuel assemblies with up to 80% U-235 burnup and specific power densities between 0.089 and 2.857 MW/kg[sup 235]U, and for fission product decay times of up to 20 years. Thermal decay heat loads are estimated for spent fuel based upon the fuel assembly irradiation history (average assembly power vs. elapsed time) and the spent fuel cooling time.

  2. Comparing the effectiveness of heat rate improvements in different coal-fired power plants utilizing carbon dioxide capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Martin Jeremy

    New Congressional legislation may soon require coal-fired power generators to pay for their CO2 emissions and capture a minimum level of their CO2 output. Aminebased CO2 capture systems offer plants the most technically proven and commercially feasible option for CO2 capture at this time. However, these systems require a large amount of heat and power to operate. As a result, amine-based CO2 capture systems significantly reduce the net power of any units in which they are installed. The Energy Research Center has compiled a list of heat rate improvements that plant operators may implement before installing a CO2 capture system. The goal of these improvements is to upgrade the performance of existing units and partially offset the negative effects of adding a CO2 capture system. Analyses were performed in Aspen Plus to determine the effectiveness of these heat rate improvements in preserving the net power and net unit heat rate (NUHR) of four different power generator units. For the units firing high-moisture sub-bituminous coal, the heat rate improvements reduced NUHR by an average of 13.69% across a CO 2 capture level range of 50% to 90%. For the units firing bituminous coal across the same CO2 capture range, the heat rate improvements reduced NUHR by an average of 12.30%. Regardless of the units' coal or steam turbine cycle type, the heat rate improvements preserved 9.7% to 11.0% of each unit's net power across the same CO2 capture range. In general, the heat rate improvements were found to be most effective in improving the performance of units firing high-moisture sub-bituminous. The effect of the CO2 capture system on these units and the reasons for the improvements' greater effectiveness in them are described in this thesis.

  3. Nucleation rates of Lennard-Jones clusters from growth and decay simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vehkamäki, Hanna; Ford, Ian J.

    2000-08-01

    We have studied singles clusters of Lennard-Jones atoms using a novel Monte Carlo simulation technique. We computed canonical ensemble averages of the grand canonical growth and decay probabilities of the cluster as a function of the cluster size. The critical size is identified as the one for which growth and decay are equally probable. The size and average internal energy the critical cluster was found for different temperatures and vapor chemical potentials. We used this information together with nucleation theorems to predict the behavior of the nucleation rate as function of the two external parameters. Our results are in line with the results found in the literature, and roughly correspond to the predictions of classical theory.

  4. Variation in radical decay rates in epoxy as a function of crosslink density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kent, G. M.; Memory, J. M.; Gilbert, R. D.; Fornes, R. E.

    1983-01-01

    A study was made of the behavior of radicals generated by Co-60 gamma radiation in the epoxy system tetraglycidyl-4,4'-diaminodiphenyl methane (TGDDM) cured with 4,4'-diaminodiphenyl sulfone (DDS). The molar ratio of TGDDM to DDS was varied in the epoxy samples, and they were prepared under the same curing conditions to obtain various extents of crosslinking. ESR spectrometry data suggest that the rate of decay of radicals is related to inhomogeneities in the resin, with radicals in the highly crosslinked regions having long decay times. The inhomogeneities are thought to be due to statistical variation associated with the complex crosslinking reactions or to difficulties in mixing the reactants.

  5. Combined Results on b-Hadron Production Rates and Decay Properties

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Dong

    2002-09-11

    Combined results on b-hadron lifetimes, b-hadron production rates, B{sub d}{sup 0}-{bar B}{sub d}{sup 0} and B{sub s}{sup 0}-{bar B}{sub s}{sup 0} oscillations, the decay width difference between the mass eigenstates of the B{sub s}{sup 0}-{bar B}{sub s}{sup 0} system, the average number of c and {bar c} quarks in b-hadron decays, and searches for CP violation in the B{sub d}{sup 0}-{bar B}{sub d}{sup 0} system are presented. They have been obtained from published and preliminary measurements available in Summer 2000 from the ALEPH, CDF, DELPHI, L3, OPAL and SLD Collaborations. These results have been used to determine the parameters of the CKM unitarity triangle.

  6. Aftershock decay, productivity, and stress rates in Hawaii: Indicators of temperature and stress from magma sources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klein, Fred W.; Wright, Tom; Nakata, Jennifer

    2006-01-01

    We examined dozens of aftershock sequences in Hawaii in terms of Gutenberg-Richter and modified Omori law parameters. We studied p, the rate of aftershock decay; Ap, the aftershock productivity, defined as the observed divided by the expected number of aftershocks; and c, the time delay when aftershock rates begin to fall. We found that for earthquakes shallower than 20 km, p values >1.2 are near active magma centers. We associate this high decay rate with higher temperatures and faster stress relaxation near magma reservoirs. Deep earthquakes near Kilauea's inferred magma transport path show a range of p values, suggesting the absence of a large, deep magma reservoir. Aftershock productivity is >4.0 for flank earthquakes known to be triggered by intrusions but is normal (0.25 to 4.0) for isolated main shocks. We infer that continuing, post-main shock stress from the intrusion adds to the main shock's stress step and causes higher Ap. High Ap in other zones suggests less obvious intrusions and pulsing magma pressure near Kilauea's feeding conduit. We calculate stress rates and stress rate changes from pre-main shock and aftershock rates. Stress rate increased after many intrusions but decreased after large M7–8 earthquakes. Stress rates are highest in the seismically active volcano flanks and lowest in areas far from volcanic centers. We found sequences triggered by intrusions tend to have high Ap, high (>0.10 day) c values, a stress rate increase, and sometimes a peak in aftershock rate hours after the main shock. We interpret these values as indicating continuing intrusive stress after the main shock.

  7. Instrument for precision long-term β-decay rate measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ware, M. J.; Bergeson, S. D.; Ellsworth, J. E.; Groesbeck, M.; Hansen, J. E.; Pace, D.; Peatross, J.

    2015-07-01

    We describe an experimental setup for making precision measurements of relative β-decay rates of 22Na, 36Cl, 54Mn, 60Co, 90Sr, 133Ba, 137Cs, 152Eu, and 154Eu. The radioactive samples are mounted in two automated sample changers that sequentially position the samples with high spatial precision in front of sets of detectors. The set of detectors for one sample changer consists of four Geiger-Müller (GM) tubes and the other set of detectors consists of two NaI scintillators. The statistical uncertainty in the count rate is few times 0.01% per day for the GM detectors and about 0.01% per hour on the NaI detectors. The sample changers, detectors, and associated electronics are housed in a sealed chamber held at constant absolute pressure, humidity, and temperature to isolate the experiment from environmental variations. The apparatus is designed to accumulate statistics over many years in a regulated environment to test recent claims of small annual variations in the decay rates. We demonstrate that absent this environmental regulation, uncontrolled natural atmospheric pressure variations at our location would imprint an annual signal of 0.1% on the Geiger-Müller count rate. However, neither natural pressure variations nor plausible indoor room temperature variations cause a discernible influence on our NaI scintillator detector count rate.

  8. Precision long-term measurements of beta-decay-rate ratios in a controlled environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeson, S. D.; Peatross, J.; Ware, M. J.

    2017-04-01

    We report on measurements of relative beta-decay rates of Na-22, Cl-36, Co-60, Sr-90, Cs-137 monitored for more than one year. The radioactive samples are mounted in an automated sample changer that sequentially positions the five samples in turn, with high spatial precision, in front of each of four Geiger-Müller tubes. The sample wheel, detectors, and associated electronics are housed inside a sealed chamber held at constant absolute pressure, humidity, and temperature to isolate the experiment from environmental variations. The statistical uncertainty in the count rate approaches a few times 0.01% with two weeks of averaging. Other sources of error are on a similar scale. The data are analyzed in variety of ways, comparing count rates of the various samples on one or more detectors, and comparing count rates of a particular sample across multiple detectors. We observe no statistically significant variations in the ratios of decay rates, either annual or at higher-frequency, at a level above 0.01%.

  9. Instrument for precision long-term β-decay rate measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Ware, M. J. Bergeson, S. D.; Ellsworth, J. E.; Groesbeck, M.; Hansen, J. E.; Pace, D.; Peatross, J.

    2015-07-15

    We describe an experimental setup for making precision measurements of relative β-decay rates of {sup 22}Na, {sup 36}Cl, {sup 54}Mn, {sup 60}Co, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 133}Ba, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 152}Eu, and {sup 154}Eu. The radioactive samples are mounted in two automated sample changers that sequentially position the samples with high spatial precision in front of sets of detectors. The set of detectors for one sample changer consists of four Geiger-Müller (GM) tubes and the other set of detectors consists of two NaI scintillators. The statistical uncertainty in the count rate is few times 0.01% per day for the GM detectors and about 0.01% per hour on the NaI detectors. The sample changers, detectors, and associated electronics are housed in a sealed chamber held at constant absolute pressure, humidity, and temperature to isolate the experiment from environmental variations. The apparatus is designed to accumulate statistics over many years in a regulated environment to test recent claims of small annual variations in the decay rates. We demonstrate that absent this environmental regulation, uncontrolled natural atmospheric pressure variations at our location would imprint an annual signal of 0.1% on the Geiger-Müller count rate. However, neither natural pressure variations nor plausible indoor room temperature variations cause a discernible influence on our NaI scintillator detector count rate.

  10. Effects of Purge-Flow Rate on Microbubble Capture in Radial Arterial-Line Filters

    PubMed Central

    Herbst, Daniel P.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: The process of microbubble filtration from blood is complex and highly dependent on the forces of flow and buoyancy. To protect the patient from air emboli, arterial-line filters commonly use a micropore screen, a large volume housing with purpose-built shape, and a purge port to trap, separate, and remove circulating microbubbles. Although it has been proposed that an insufficient buoyancy force renders the purge port ineffective at removing microbubbles smaller than 500 μm, this research attempts to investigate the purge flow of an arterial-line filter to better understand the microbubble removal function in a typical radial filter design. As its primary objective, the study aims to determine the effect of purge-flow rate on bubble capture using air bolus injections from a syringe pump with 22-gauge needle and Doppler ultrasound bubble detection. The measureable bubble size generated in the test circuit ranged between 30 and 500 μm, while purge flow was varied between .1 and .5 L/min for testing. Statistical analysis of the test data was handled using a repeated measures design with significance set at p < .05 level. Outcomes demonstrated that higher purge flows yielded higher bubble counts, but the effect of purge-flow rate on bubble capture decreased as bubble size increased. Results also showed that purge flow from the test filter was capable of capturing all bubble sizes being generated over the entire flow range tested, and confirms utility of the purge port in removing microbubbles smaller than 500 μm. By analyzing bubble counts in the purge flow of a typical radial-filter design, this study demonstrates that currently available micropore filter technology is capable of removing the size range of bubbles that commonly pass through modern pump-oxygenator systems and should continue to be considered during extracorporeal circulation as a measure to improve patient safety. PMID:27729703

  11. Effects of Purge-Flow Rate on Microbubble Capture in Radial Arterial-Line Filters.

    PubMed

    Herbst, Daniel P

    2016-09-01

    The process of microbubble filtration from blood is complex and highly dependent on the forces of flow and buoyancy. To protect the patient from air emboli, arterial-line filters commonly use a micropore screen, a large volume housing with purpose-built shape, and a purge port to trap, separate, and remove circulating microbubbles. Although it has been proposed that an insufficient buoyancy force renders the purge port ineffective at removing microbubbles smaller than 500 μm, this research attempts to investigate the purge flow of an arterial-line filter to better understand the microbubble removal function in a typical radial filter design. As its primary objective, the study aims to determine the effect of purge-flow rate on bubble capture using air bolus injections from a syringe pump with 22-gauge needle and Doppler ultrasound bubble detection. The measureable bubble size generated in the test circuit ranged between 30 and 500 μm, while purge flow was varied between .1 and .5 L/min for testing. Statistical analysis of the test data was handled using a repeated measures design with significance set at p < .05 level. Outcomes demonstrated that higher purge flows yielded higher bubble counts, but the effect of purge-flow rate on bubble capture decreased as bubble size increased. Results also showed that purge flow from the test filter was capable of capturing all bubble sizes being generated over the entire flow range tested, and confirms utility of the purge port in removing microbubbles smaller than 500 μm. By analyzing bubble counts in the purge flow of a typical radial-filter design, this study demonstrates that currently available micropore filter technology is capable of removing the size range of bubbles that commonly pass through modern pump-oxygenator systems and should continue to be considered during extracorporeal circulation as a measure to improve patient safety.

  12. Electron capture and positron decay of /sup 206/Fr and /sup 208/Fr and the energy levels of /sup 206/Rn and /sup 208/Rn

    SciTech Connect

    Ritchie, B.G.; Avignone, F.T. III; Carter, H.K.; Mlekodaj, R.L.; Spejewski, E.H.

    1981-04-01

    The isotopes /sup 206/Fr and /sup 208/Fr were produced by the reactions Ir(/sup 20/Ne,xn)/sup 206,208/Fr and mass separated on-line. The electron-capture and positron decays to /sup 206/Rn and /sup 208/Rn were studied by collecting ..gamma.. ray and internal conversion electron singles spectra as a function of decay time as well as ..gamma..-..gamma.., ..gamma..-e/sup -/, and ..gamma..-x ray coincidence spectra. The energies and many of the spins were determined for 18 excited, even parity states in /sup 208/Rn and for 10 excited, even parity states in /sup 206/Rn. These nuclei appear to be excellent candidates for interpretation in terms of a weak coupling shell model. The energy levels were also compared to the predictions of the interacting boson approximation model.

  13. Decay rate of critical fluctuations in ethane+carbon dioxide mixtures near the critical line including the critical azeotrope

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, R.F.; Doiron, T.; Pegg, I.L.; Hanley, H.J.M.; Cezairliyan, A.

    1986-03-01

    Using the technique of photon correlation spectroscopy we have measured the decay rate of critical fluctuations in mixtures of ethane and carbon dioxide of various compositions including a near-azeotropic mixture. Our experimental data indicate that there is only one dominant mode of fluctuations and the decay rate is well described by the predictions of the mode-coupling theory with the exponent v=0.63 for all compositions. The decay rate, its background contributions, the shear viscosity, and the correlation length for the mixtures appear to interpolate simply between those of ethane and carbon dioxide.

  14. Astrophysical reaction rates for {sup 58,60}Ni(n,{gamma}) from new neutron capture cross section measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Guber, K. H.; Derrien, H.; Leal, L. C.; Arbanas, G.; Wiarda, D.; Koehler, P. E.; Harvey, J. A.

    2010-11-15

    New neutron capture cross sections of {sup 58,60}Ni were measured in the energy range from 100 eV to 600 keV using the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator. The combination of these new neutron capture data with previous transmission data allowed a resonance analysis up to 900 keV using R-matrix theory. The theoretically determined direct capture cross sections were included in the analyses. From these resonance parameters and the direct capture contribution, new (n,{gamma}) astrophysical reaction rates were determined over the entire energy range needed by the latest stellar models describing the so-called weak s process.

  15. Rate-dependent interface capture beyond the coffee-ring effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yanan; Yang, Qiang; Li, Mingzhu; Song, Yanlin

    2016-04-01

    The mechanism of droplet drying is a widely concerned fundamental issue since controlling the deposition morphology of droplet has significant influence on printing, biology pattern, self-assembling and other solution-based devices fabrication. Here we reveal a striking different kinetics-controlled deposition regime beyond the ubiquitous coffee-ring effect that suspended particles tend to kinetically accumulate at the air-liquid interface and deposit uniformly. As the interface shrinkage rate exceeds the particle average diffusion rate, particles in vertical evaporation flow will be captured by the descending surface, producing surface particle jam and forming viscous quasi-solid layer, which dramatically prevents the trapped particles from being transported to drop edge and results in uniform deposition. This simple, robust drying regime will provide a versatile strategy to control the droplet deposition morphology, and a novel direction of interface assembling for fabricating superlattices and high quality photonic crystal patterns.

  16. Rate-dependent interface capture beyond the coffee-ring effect

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanan; Yang, Qiang; Li, Mingzhu; Song, Yanlin

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism of droplet drying is a widely concerned fundamental issue since controlling the deposition morphology of droplet has significant influence on printing, biology pattern, self-assembling and other solution-based devices fabrication. Here we reveal a striking different kinetics-controlled deposition regime beyond the ubiquitous coffee-ring effect that suspended particles tend to kinetically accumulate at the air-liquid interface and deposit uniformly. As the interface shrinkage rate exceeds the particle average diffusion rate, particles in vertical evaporation flow will be captured by the descending surface, producing surface particle jam and forming viscous quasi-solid layer, which dramatically prevents the trapped particles from being transported to drop edge and results in uniform deposition. This simple, robust drying regime will provide a versatile strategy to control the droplet deposition morphology, and a novel direction of interface assembling for fabricating superlattices and high quality photonic crystal patterns. PMID:27090820

  17. Age-specificity of black-capped chickadee survival rates: Analysis of capture-recapture data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Loery, G.; Pollock, K.H.; Nichols, J.D.; Hines, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    The ornithological literature indicates a widespread belief in two generalizations about the age-specificity of avian survival rates: (1) survival rates of young birds for some period following fledging are lower than those of adults, and (2) after reaching adulthood survival rates are constant for birds of all ages. There is a growing body of evidence in support of the first generalization, although little is known about how long the survival difference between young and adults lasts. This latter question can be addressed with capture-recapture or band recovery studies based on birds marked in the winter, but the inability to determine age in many species during winter has prevented the use of standard methods. There is very little evidence supporting the second generalization, and we are in need of methods and actual analyses that address this question. In the present paper we restate the two generalizations as hypotheses and test them using data from a wintering Black-capped Chickadee (Parus atricapillus) population in Connecticut, which has been studied by Loery for 26 yr. We use a cohort-based Jolly-Seber approach, which should be useful in other investigations of this nature. We found strong evidence of lower survival rates in 1st-yr birds than in adults, but could not determine whether this was the result of higher mortality rates, higher emigration rates, or a combination of the two. We also found evidence that survival rates of adult birds were not constant with age but decreased at a rate of ? 3.5%/yr. As adult birds are very faithful to their wintering areas, we believe that almost all this decrease can be attributed to an increase in mortality with age. Simulation results suggest that heterogeneity of capture probabilities could not explain the magnitude of the decrease in survival with age. Age-dependent tag loss is also discussed as an alternative explanation, but is dismissed as very unlikely in this situation. This analysis thus provides some of the

  18. The impact of sea-level rise on organic matter decay rates in Chesapeake Bay brackish tidal marshes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kirwanm, M.L.; Langley, J.A.; Guntenspergen, Gleen R.; Megonigal, J.P.

    2013-01-01

    The balance between organic matter production and decay determines how fast coastal wetlands accumulate soil organic matter. Despite the importance of soil organic matter accumulation rates in influencing marsh elevation and resistance to sea-level rise, relatively little is known about how decomposition rates will respond to sea-level rise. Here, we estimate the sensitivity of decomposition to flooding by measuring rates of decay in 87 bags filled with milled sedge peat, including soil organic matter, roots and rhizomes. Experiments were located in field-based mesocosms along 3 mesohaline tributaries of the Chesapeake Bay. Mesocosm elevations were manipulated to influence the duration of tidal inundation. Although we found no significant influence of inundation on decay rate when bags from all study sites were analyzed together, decay rates at two of the sites increased with greater flooding. These findings suggest that flooding may enhance organic matter decay rates even in water-logged soils, but that the overall influence of flooding is minor. Our experiments suggest that sea-level rise will not accelerate rates of peat accumulation by slowing the rate of soil organic matter decay. Consequently, marshes will require enhanced organic matter productivity or mineral sediment deposition to survive accelerating sea-level rise.

  19. Theoretical simulation of carrier capture and relaxation rates in quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yunhu; Zhang, Guoping; Guo, Ling; Qi, Guoqun; Li, Xiaoming

    2014-06-14

    Based on Auger scattering mechanism, carrier-carrier scattering dynamics between the two-dimensional carrier reservoir (also called wetting layer, i.e., WL) and the confined quantum dot ground and first excited state in quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifiers (QD-SOAs) are investigated theoretically in this paper. The scattering rates for independent electron and hole densities are calculated. The results show an ultra-fast carrier capture (relaxation) rate up to 1 ps{sup −1}, and there is a complex dependence of the Coulomb scattering rates on the WL electron and hole densities. In addition, due to the different effective mass and the level distribution, the scattering rates for electron and hole are very different. Finally, in order to provide a direction to control (increase or decrease) the input current in realistic QD-SOA systems, a simple method is proposed to determine the trends of the carrier recovery rates with the WL carrier densities in the vicinity of the steady-state.

  20. Comparison of nonmesonic hypernuclear decay rates computed in laboratory and center-of-mass coordinates

    SciTech Connect

    De Conti, C.; Barbero, C.; Galeão, A. P.; Krmpotić, F.

    2014-11-11

    In this work we compute the one-nucleon-induced nonmesonic hypernuclear decay rates of {sub Λ}{sup 5}He, {sub Λ}{sup 12}C and {sub Λ}{sup 13}C using a formalism based on the independent particle shell model in terms of laboratory coordinates. To ascertain the correctness and precision of the method, these results are compared with those obtained using a formalism in terms of center-of-mass coordinates, which has been previously reported in the literature. The formalism in terms of laboratory coordinates will be useful in the shell-model approach to two-nucleon-induced transitions.

  1. An Examination of Sunspot Number Rates of Growth and Decay in Relation to the Sunspot Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.; Hathaway, David H.

    2006-01-01

    On the basis of annual sunspot number averages, sunspot number rates of growth and decay are examined relative to both minimum and maximum amplitudes and the time of their occurrences using cycles 12 through present, the most reliably determined sunspot cycles. Indeed, strong correlations are found for predicting the minimum and maximum amplitudes and the time of their occurrences years in advance. As applied to predicting sunspot minimum for cycle 24, the next cycle, its minimum appears likely to occur in 2006, especially if it is a robust cycle similar in nature to cycles 17-23.

  2. Precision measurement of the ratio of the charged kaon leptonic decay rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    NA62 Collaboration; Lazzeroni, C.; Romano, A.; Ceccucci, A.; Danielsson, H.; Falaleev, V.; Gatignon, L.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hallgren, B.; Maier, A.; Peters, A.; Piccini, M.; Riedler, P.; Frabetti, P. L.; Gersabeck, E.; Kekelidze, V.; Madigozhin, D.; Misheva, M.; Molokanova, N.; Movchan, S.; Potrebenikov, Yu.; Shkarovskiy, S.; Zinchenko, A.; Rubin, P.; Baldini, W.; Cotta Ramusino, A.; Dalpiaz, P.; Fiorini, M.; Gianoli, A.; Norton, A.; Petrucci, F.; Savrié, M.; Bizzeti, A.; Bucci, F.; Iacopini, E.; Lenti, M.; Veltri, M.; Antonelli, A.; Moulson, M.; Raggi, M.; Spadaro, T.; Eppard, K.; Hita-Hochgesand, M.; Kleinknecht, K.; Renk, B.; Wanke, R.; Winhart, A.; Winston, R.; Bolotov, V.; Duk, V.; Gushchin, E.; Ambrosino, F.; Di Filippo, D.; Massarotti, P.; Napolitano, M.; Palladino, V.; Saracino, G.; Anzivino, G.; Imbergamo, E.; Piandani, R.; Sergi, A.; Cenci, P.; Pepe, M.; Costantini, F.; Doble, N.; Giudici, S.; Pierazzini, G.; Sozzi, M.; Venditti, S.; Balev, S.; Collazuol, G.; DiLella, L.; Gallorini, S.; Goudzovski, E.; Lamanna, G.; Mannelli, I.; Ruggiero, G.; Cerri, C.; Fantechi, R.; Kurshetsov, V.; Obraztsov, V.; Popov, I.; Semenov, V.; Yushchenko, O.; D'Agostini, G.; Leonardi, E.; Serra, M.; Valente, P.; Fucci, A.; Salamon, A.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Peyaud, B.; Engelfried, J.; Coward, D.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Arcidiacono, R.; Bifani, S.; Biino, C.; Dellacasa, G.; Marchetto, F.; Numao, T.; Retière, F.

    2013-02-01

    A precision measurement of the ratio RK of the rates of kaon leptonic decays K±→e±ν and K±→μ±ν with the full data sample collected by the NA62 experiment at CERN in 2007-2008 is reported. The result, obtained by analysing ˜150000 reconstructed K±→e±ν candidates with 11% background contamination, is RK=(2.488±0.010)×10-5, in agreement with the Standard Model expectation.

  3. Precision measurement of the ratio of the charged kaon leptonic decay rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazzeroni, C.; Romano, A.; Ceccucci, A.; Danielsson, H.; Falaleev, V.; Gatignon, L.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hallgren, B.; Maier, A.; Peters, A.; Piccini, M.; Riedler, P.; Frabetti, P. L.; Gersabeck, E.; Kekelidze, V.; Madigozhin, D.; Misheva, M.; Molokanova, N.; Movchan, S.; Potrebenikov, Yu.; Shkarovskiy, S.; Zinchenko, A.; Rubin, P.; Baldini, W.; Cotta Ramusino, A.; Dalpiaz, P.; Fiorini, M.; Gianoli, A.; Norton, A.; Petrucci, F.; Savrié, M.; Bizzeti, A.; Bucci, F.; Iacopini, E.; Lenti, M.; Veltri, M.; Antonelli, A.; Moulson, M.; Raggi, M.; Spadaro, T.; Eppard, K.; Hita-Hochgesand, M.; Kleinknecht, K.; Renk, B.; Wanke, R.; Winhart, A.; Winston, R.; Bolotov, V.; Duk, V.; Gushchin, E.; Ambrosino, F.; Di Filippo, D.; Massarotti, P.; Napolitano, M.; Palladino, V.; Saracino, G.; Anzivino, G.; Imbergamo, E.; Piandani, R.; Sergi, A.; Cenci, P.; Pepe, M.; Costantini, F.; Doble, N.; Giudici, S.; Pierazzini, G.; Sozzi, M.; Venditti, S.; Balev, S.; Collazuol, G.; DiLella, L.; Gallorini, S.; Goudzovski, E.; Lamanna, G.; Mannelli, I.; Ruggiero, G.; Cerri, C.; Fantechi, R.; Kurshetsov, V.; Obraztsov, V.; Popov, I.; Semenov, V.; Yushchenko, O.; D'Agostini, G.; Leonardi, E.; Serra, M.; Valente, P.; Fucci, A.; Salamon, A.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Peyaud, B.; Engelfried, J.; Coward, D.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Arcidiacono, R.; Bifani, S.; Biino, C.; Dellacasa, G.; Marchetto, F.; Numao, T.; Retière, F.; NA62 Collaboration

    2013-02-01

    A precision measurement of the ratio RK of the rates of kaon leptonic decays K± →e± ν and K± →μ± ν with the full data sample collected by the NA62 experiment at CERN in 2007-2008 is reported. The result, obtained by analysing ∼ 150 000 reconstructed K± →e± ν candidates with 11% background contamination, is RK = (2.488 ± 0.010) ×10-5, in agreement with the Standard Model expectation.

  4. Thermal decay analysis of fiber Bragg gratings at different temperature annealing rates using demarcation energy approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunawardena, Dinusha Serandi; Lai, Man-Hong; Lim, Kok-Sing; Ahmad, Harith

    2017-03-01

    In this study the thermal degradation of gratings inscribed in three types of fiber namely, PS 1250/1500, SM 1500 and zero water peak single mode fiber is demonstrated. A comparative investigation is carried out on the aging characteristics of the gratings at three different temperature ramping rates of 3 °C/min, 6 °C/min and 9 °C/min. During the thermal annealing treatment, a significant enhancement in the grating reflectivity is observed for PS 1250/1500 fiber from ∼1.2 eV until 1.4 eV which indicates a thermal induced reversible effect. Higher temperature ramping rates lead to a higher regeneration temperature. In addition, the investigation also reflects that regardless of the temperature ramping rate the thermal decay behavior of a specific fiber can be successfully characterized when represented in a demarcation energy domain. Moreover, this technique can be accommodated when predicting the thermal decay characteristics of a specific fiber.

  5. Analysis of flow decay potential on Galileo. [oxidizer flow rate reduction by iron nitrate precipitates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, T. W.; Frisbee, R. H.; Yavrouian, A. H.

    1987-01-01

    The risks posed to the NASA's Galileo spacecraft by the oxidizer flow decay during its extended mission to Jupiter is discussed. The Galileo spacecraft will use nitrogen tetroxide (NTO)/monomethyl hydrazine bipropellant system with one large engine thrust-rated at a nominal 400 N, and 12 smaller engines each thrust-rated at a nominal 10 N. These smaller thrusters, because of their small valve inlet filters and small injector ports, are especially vulnerable to clogging by iron nitrate precipitates formed by NTO-wetted stainless steel components. To quantify the corrosion rates and solubility levels which will be seen during the Galileo mission, corrosion and solubility testing experiments were performed with simulated Galileo materials, propellants, and environments. The results show the potential benefits of propellant sieving in terms of iron and water impurity reduction.

  6. Toward Capturing Momentary Changes of Heart Rate Variability by a Dynamic Analysis Method

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haoshi; Zhu, Mingxing; Zheng, Yue; Li, Guanglin

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) has been performed on long-term electrocardiography (ECG) recordings (12~24 hours) and short-term recordings (2~5 minutes), which may not capture momentary change of HRV. In this study, we present a new method to analyze the momentary HRV (mHRV). The ECG recordings were segmented into a series of overlapped HRV analysis windows with a window length of 5 minutes and different time increments. The performance of the proposed method in delineating the dynamics of momentary HRV measurement was evaluated with four commonly used time courses of HRV measures on both synthetic time series and real ECG recordings from human subjects and dogs. Our results showed that a smaller time increment could capture more dynamical information on transient changes. Considering a too short increment such as 10 s would cause the indented time courses of the four measures, a 1-min time increment (4-min overlapping) was suggested in the analysis of mHRV in the study. ECG recordings from human subjects and dogs were used to further assess the effectiveness of the proposed method. The pilot study demonstrated that the proposed analysis of mHRV could provide more accurate assessment of the dynamical changes in cardiac activity than the conventional measures of HRV (without time overlapping). The proposed method may provide an efficient means in delineating the dynamics of momentary HRV and it would be worthy performing more investigations. PMID:26172953

  7. Neutron capture production rates of cosmogenic 60Co, 59Ni and 36Cl in stony meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spergel, M. S.; Reedy, R. C.; Lazareth, O. W.; Levy, P. W.

    1986-01-01

    Results for neutron flux calculations in stony meteoroids (of various radii and compositions) and production rates for Cl-36, Ni-59, and Co-60 are reported. The Ni-59/Co-60 ratio is nearly constant with depth in most meteorites: this effect is consistent with the neutron flux and capture cross section properties. The shape of the neutron flux energy spectrum, varies little with depth in a meteorite. The size of the parent meteorite can be determined from one of its fragments, using the Ni-59/Co-60 ratios, if the parent meteorite was less than 75 g/cm(2) in radius. If the parent meteorite was larger, a lower limit on the size of the parent meteorite can be determined from a fragment. In C3 chondrites this is not possible. In stony meteorites with R less than 50 g/cm(2) the calculated Co-60 production rates (mass less than 4 kg), are below 1 atom/min g-Co. The highest Co-60 production rates occur in stony meteorites with radius about 250 g/cm(2) (1.4 m across). In meteorites with radii greater than 400 g/cm(2), the maximum Co-60 production rate occurs at a depth of about 175 g/cm(2) in L-chondrite, 125 g/cm(2) in C3 chrondrite, and 190 g/cm(2) in aubrites.

  8. Viral decay and viral production rates in continental-shelf and deep-sea sediments of the Mediterranean Sea.

    PubMed

    Corinaldesi, Cinzia; Dell'Anno, Antonio; Magagnini, Mirko; Danovaro, Roberto

    2010-05-01

    Here, for the first time, we have carried out synoptic measurements of viral production and decay rates in continental-shelf and deep-sea sediments of the Mediterranean Sea to explore the viral balance. The net viral production and decay rates (1.1-61.2 and 0.6-13.5 x 10(7) viruses g(-1) h(-1), respectively) were significantly correlated, and were also related to prokaryotic heterotrophic production. The addition of enzymes increased the decay rates in the surface sediments, but not in the subsurface sediments. Both the viral production and the decay rates decreased significantly in the deeper sediment layers, while the virus-to-prokaryote abundance ratio increased, suggesting a high preservation of viruses in the subsurface sediments. Viral decay did not balance viral production at any of the sites investigated, accounting on average for c. 32% of the gross viral production in the marine sediments. We estimate that the carbon (C) released by viral decay contributed 6-23% to the total C released by the viral shunt. Because only c. 2% of the viruses produced can infect other prokaryotes, the majority is not subjected to direct lysis and potentially remains as a food source for benthic consumers. The results reported here suggest that viral decay can play an important role in biogeochemical cycles and benthic trophodynamics.

  9. Simultaneous use of mark-recapture and radiotelemetry to estimate survival, movement, and capture rates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Powell, L.A.; Conroy, M.J.; Hines, J.E.; Nichols, J.D.; Krementz, D.G.

    2000-01-01

    Biologists often estimate separate survival and movement rates from radio-telemetry and mark-recapture data from the same study population. We describe a method for combining these data types in a single model to obtain joint, potentially less biased estimates of survival and movement that use all available data. We furnish an example using wood thrushes (Hylocichla mustelina) captured at the Piedmont National Wildlife Refuge in central Georgia in 1996. The model structure allows estimation of survival and capture probabilities, as well as estimation of movements away from and into the study area. In addition, the model structure provides many possibilities for hypothesis testing. Using the combined model structure, we estimated that wood thrush weekly survival was 0.989 ? 0.007 ( ?SE). Survival rates of banded and radio-marked individuals were not different (alpha hat [S_radioed, ~ S_banded]=log [S hat _radioed/ S hat _banded]=0.0239 ? 0.0435). Fidelity rates (weekly probability of remaining in a stratum) did not differ between geographic strata (psi hat=0.911 ? 0.020; alpha hat [psi11, psi22]=0.0161 ? 0.047), and recapture rates ( = 0.097 ? 0.016) banded and radio-marked individuals were not different (alpha hat [p_radioed, p_banded]=0.145 ? 0.655). Combining these data types in a common model resulted in more precise estimates of movement and recapture rates than separate estimation, but ability to detect stratum or mark-specific differences in parameters was week. We conducted simulation trials to investigate the effects of varying study designs on parameter accuracy and statistical power to detect important differences. Parameter accuracy was high (relative bias [RBIAS] <2 %) and confidence interval coverage close to nominal, except for survival estimates of banded birds for the 'off study area' stratum, which were negatively biased (RBIAS -7 to -15%) when sample sizes were small (5-10 banded or radioed animals 'released' per time interval). To provide

  10. Search for D0-D(-)0 mixing and a measurement of the doubly Cabibbo-suppressed decay rate in D0-->Kpi decays.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Gaillard, J-M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Robbe, P; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kral, J F; Kukartsev, G; LeClerc, C; Levi, M E; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Romosan, A; Ronan, M T; Shelkov, V G; Telnov, A V; Wenzel, W A; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Knowles, D J; Penny, R C; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Deppermann, T; Goetzen, K; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schmuecker, H; Steinke, M; Barlow, N R; Bhimji, W; Boyd, J T; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Mackay, C; Wilson, F F; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Kyberd, P; McKemey, A K; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Chao, M; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; McMahon, S; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, Sh; Schwanke, U; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Kuznetsova, N; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beringer, J; Eisner, A M; Grothe, M; Heusch, C A; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Turri, M; Walkowiak, W; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dorsten, M P; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Barillari, T; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Clark, P J; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Roy, J; Smith, J G; van Hoek, W C; Zhang, L; Harton, J L; Hu, T; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zhang, J; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Colberg, T; Dickopp, M; Dubitzky, R S; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Maly, E; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Wilden, L; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Khan, A; Lavin, D; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Swain, J E; Tinslay, J; Bozzi, C; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Treadwell, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Falciai, D; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Pastore, F C; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Morii, M; Grenier, G J; Lee, S-J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Yi, J; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Laplace, S; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Tantot, L; Wormser, G; Bionta, R M; Brigljević, V; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Kay, M; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Aspinwall, M L; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Eschrich, I; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Sanders, P; Taylor, G P; Back, J J; Bellodi, G; Harrison, P F; Shorthouse, H W; Strother, P; Vidal, P B; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; George, S; Green, M G; Kurup, A; Marker, C E; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Vaitsas, G; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, R J; Forti, A C; Hart, P A; Jackson, F; Lafferty, G D; Lyon, A J; Weatherall, J H; Williams, J C; Farbin, A; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Mangeol, D J J; Milek, M; Patel, P M; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Hast, C; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cartaro, C; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; LoSecco, J M; Gabriel, T A; Brau, B; Pulliam, T; Brau, J; Frey, R; Iwasaki, M; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Tiozzo, G; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; de la Vaissière, Ch; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Ocariz, J; Pivk, M; Roos, L; Stark, J; T'Jampens, S; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Martinez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lu, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Varnes, E W; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; del Re, D; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Leonardi, E; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Pierini, M; Piredda, G; Safai Tehrani, F; Serra, M; Voena, C; Christ, S; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Xella, S M; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Langer, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Schott, G; Vasseur, G; Yeche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Yumiceva, F X; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Convery, M R; Coupal, D P; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Grauges-Pous, E; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Jessop, C P; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Langenegger, U; Leith, D W G S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Menke, S; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Ratcliff, B N; Robertson, S H; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Simi, G; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Tanaka, H A; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wright, D H; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Meyer, T I; Roat, C; Ahmed, S; Ernst, J A; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Borean, C; Bosisio, L; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Hu, H; Johnson, J R; Liu, R; Lodovico, F Di; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Sekula, S J; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2003-10-24

    We present results of a search for D0-D(-)0 mixing and a measurement of R(D), the ratio of doubly Cabibbo-suppressed decays to Cabibbo-favored decays, using D0-->K+pi- decays from 57.1 fb(-1) of data collected near sqrt[s]=10.6 GeV with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II collider. At the 95% confidence level, allowing for CP violation, we find the mixing parameters x('2)<0.0022 and -0.056rate R(M)<0.16%. In the limit of no mixing, R(D)=[0.357+/-0.022(stat)+/-0.027(syst)]% and the CP-violating asymmetry A(D)=0.095+/-0.061(stat)+/-0.083(syst).

  11. Search for D0-D¯0 Mixing and a Measurement of the Doubly Cabibbo-Suppressed Decay Rate in D0→Kπ Decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Gaillard, J.-M.; Hicheur, A.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Robbe, P.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Palano, A.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J. C.; Qi, N. D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y. S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.; Abrams, G. S.; Borgland, A. W.; Breon, A. B.; Brown, D. N.; Button-Shafer, J.; Cahn, R. N.; Charles, E.; Day, C. T.; Gill, M. S.; Gritsan, A. V.; Groysman, Y.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Kadel, R. W.; Kadyk, J.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Kral, J. F.; Kukartsev, G.; Leclerc, C.; Levi, M. E.; Lynch, G.; Mir, L. M.; Oddone, P. J.; Orimoto, T. J.; Pripstein, M.; Roe, N. A.; Romosan, A.; Ronan, M. T.; Shelkov, V. G.; Telnov, A. V.; Wenzel, W. A.; Harrison, T. J.; Hawkes, C. M.; Knowles, D. J.; Penny, R. C.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, N. K.; Deppermann, T.; Goetzen, K.; Koch, H.; Lewandowski, B.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peters, K.; Schmuecker, H.; Steinke, M.; Barlow, N. R.; Bhimji, W.; Boyd, J. T.; Chevalier, N.; Cottingham, W. N.; Mackay, C.; Wilson, F. F.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Thiessen, D.; Kyberd, P.; McKemey, A. K.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Golubev, V. B.; Ivanchenko, V. N.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Yushkov, A. N.; Best, D.; Chao, M.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; McMahon, S.; Mommsen, R. K.; Roethel, W.; Stoker, D. P.; Buchanan, C.; Hadavand, H. K.; Hill, E. J.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Paar, H. P.; Rahatlou, Sh.; Schwanke, U.; Sharma, V.; Berryhill, J. W.; Campagnari, C.; Dahmes, B.; Kuznetsova, N.; Levy, S. L.; Long, O.; Lu, A.; Mazur, M. A.; Richman, J. D.; Verkerke, W.; Beringer, J.; Eisner, A. M.; Grothe, M.; Heusch, C. A.; Lockman, W. S.; Schalk, T.; Schmitz, R. E.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Turri, M.; Walkowiak, W.; Williams, D. C.; Wilson, M. G.; Albert, J.; Chen, E.; Dorsten, M. P.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dvoretskii, A.; Hitlin, D. G.; Narsky, I.; Porter, F. C.; Ryd, A.; Samuel, A.; Yang, S.; Jayatilleke, S.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Barillari, T.; Blanc, F.; Bloom, P.; Clark, P. J.; Ford, W. T.; Nauenberg, U.; Olivas, A.; Rankin, P.; Roy, J.; Smith, J. G.; van Hoek, W. C.; Zhang, L.; Harton, J. L.; Hu, T.; Soffer, A.; Toki, W. H.; Wilson, R. J.; Zhang, J.; Altenburg, D.; Brandt, T.; Brose, J.; Colberg, T.; Dickopp, M.; Dubitzky, R. S.; Hauke, A.; Lacker, H. M.; Maly, E.; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R.; Nogowski, R.; Otto, S.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Spaan, B.; Wilden, L.; Bernard, D.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Brochard, F.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Thiebaux, Ch.; Vasileiadis, G.; Verderi, M.; Khan, A.; Lavin, D.; Muheim, F.; Playfer, S.; Swain, J. E.; Tinslay, J.; Bozzi, C.; Piemontese, L.; Sarti, A.; Treadwell, E.; Anulli, F.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Falciai, D.; Finocchiaro, G.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Zallo, A.; Buzzo, A.; Contri, R.; Crosetti, G.; Vetere, M. Lo; Macri, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Pastore, F. C.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Santroni, A.; Tosi, S.; Bailey, S.; Morii, M.; Grenier, G. J.; Lee, S.-J.; Mallik, U.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Lamsa, J.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Yi, J.; Davier, M.; Grosdidier, G.; Höcker, A.; Laplace, S.; Le Diberder, F.; Lepeltier, V.; Lutz, A. M.; Petersen, T. C.; Plaszczynski, S.; Schune, M. H.; Tantot, L.; Wormser, G.; Bionta, R. M.; Brigljević, V.; Cheng, C. H.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Bevan, A. J.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; Kay, M.; Payne, D. J.; Sloane, R. J.; Touramanis, C.; Aspinwall, M. L.; Bowerman, D. A.; Dauncey, P. D.; Egede, U.; Eschrich, I.; Morton, G. W.; Nash, J. A.; Sanders, P.; Taylor, G. P.; Back, J. J.; Bellodi, G.; Harrison, P. F.; Shorthouse, H. W.; Strother, P.; Vidal, P. B.; Cowan, G.; Flaecher, H. U.; George, S.; Green, M. G.; Kurup, A.; Marker, C. E.; McMahon, T. R.; Ricciardi, S.; Salvatore, F.; Vaitsas, G.; Winter, M. A.; Brown, D.; Davis, C. L.; Allison, J.; Barlow, R. J.; Forti, A. C.; Hart, P. A.; Jackson, F.; Lafferty, G. D.; Lyon, A. J.; Weatherall, J. H.; Williams, J. C.; Farbin, A.; Jawahery, A.; Kovalskyi, D.; Lae, C. K.; Lillard, V.; Roberts, D. A.; Blaylock, G.; Dallapiccola, C.; Flood, K. T.; Hertzbach, S. S.; Kofler, R.; Koptchev, V. B.; Moore, T. B.; Staengle, H.; Willocq, S.; Cowan, R.; Sciolla, G.; Taylor, F.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Mangeol, D. J.; Milek, M.; Patel, P. M.; Lazzaro, A.; Palombo, F.; Bauer, J. M.; Cremaldi, L.; Eschenburg, V.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Reidy, J.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D. J.; Zhao, H. W.; Hast, C.; Taras, P.; Nicholson, H.; Cartaro, C.; Cavallo, N.; de Nardo, G.; Fabozzi, F.; Gatto, C.; Lista, L.; Paolucci, P.; Piccolo, D.; Sciacca, C.; Baak, M. A.; Raven, G.; Losecco, J. M.; Gabriel, T. A.; Brau, B.; Pulliam, T.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Iwasaki, M.; Potter, C. T.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Torrence, E.; Colecchia, F.; Dorigo, A.; Galeazzi, F.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Tiozzo, G.; Voci, C.; Benayoun, M.; Briand, H.; Chauveau, J.; David, P.; de La Vaissière, Ch.; del Buono, L.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Ocariz, J.; Pivk, M.; Roos, L.; Stark, J.; T'jampens, S.; Manfredi, P. F.; Re, V.; Gladney, L.; Guo, Q. H.; Panetta, J.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bondioli, M.; Bucci, F.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Marchiori, G.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Morganti, M.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rama, M.; Rizzo, G.; Sandrelli, F.; Walsh, J.; Haire, M.; Judd, D.; Paick, K.; Wagoner, D. E.; Danielson, N.; Elmer, P.; Lu, C.; Miftakov, V.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J.; Varnes, E. W.; Bellini, F.; Cavoto, G.; del Re, D.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Leonardi, E.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Morganti, S.; Pierini, M.; Piredda, G.; Tehrani, F. Safai; Serra, M.; Voena, C.; Christ, S.; Wagner, G.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; de Groot, N.; Franek, B.; Geddes, N. I.; Gopal, G. P.; Olaiya, E. O.; Xella, S. M.; Aleksan, R.; Emery, S.; Gaidot, A.; Ganzhur, S. F.; Giraud, P.-F.; de Monchenault, G. Hamel; Kozanecki, W.; Langer, M.; London, G. W.; Mayer, B.; Schott, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yeche, Ch.; Zito, M.; Purohit, M. V.; Weidemann, A. W.; Yumiceva, F. X.; Aston, D.; Bartoldus, R.; Berger, N.; Boyarski, A. M.; Buchmueller, O. L.; Convery, M. R.; Coupal, D. P.; Dong, D.; Dorfan, J.; Dujmic, D.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Glanzman, T.; Gowdy, S. J.; Grauges-Pous, E.; Hadig, T.; Halyo, V.; Hryn'ova, T.; Innes, W. R.; Jessop, C. P.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Langenegger, U.; Leith, D. W.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; Marsiske, H.; Menke, S.; Messner, R.; Muller, D. R.; O'Grady, C. P.; Ozcan, V. E.; Perazzo, A.; Perl, M.; Petrak, S.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Robertson, S. H.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Schwiening, J.; Simi, G.; Snyder, A.; Soha, A.; Stelzer, J.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Tanaka, H. A.; Va'Vra, J.; Wagner, S. R.; Weaver, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wright, D. H.; Young, C. C.; Burchat, P. R.; Meyer, T. I.; Roat, C.; Ahmed, S.; Ernst, J. A.; Bugg, W.; Krishnamurthy, M.; Spanier, S. M.; Eckmann, R.; Kim, H.; Ritchie, J. L.; Schwitters, R. F.; Izen, J. M.; Kitayama, I.; Lou, X. C.; Ye, S.; Bianchi, F.; Bona, M.; Gallo, F.; Gamba, D.; Borean, C.; Bosisio, L.; Della Ricca, G.; Dittongo, S.; Grancagnolo, S.; Lanceri, L.; Poropat, P.; Vitale, L.; Vuagnin, G.; Panvini, R. S.; Banerjee, Sw.; Brown, C. M.; Fortin, D.; Jackson, P. D.; Kowalewski, R.; Roney, J. M.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Datta, M.; Eichenbaum, A. M.; Hu, H.; Johnson, J. R.; Liu, R.; Di Lodovico, F.; Mohapatra, A. K.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Sekula, S. J.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Wu, J.; Wu, S. L.; Yu, Z.; Neal, H.

    2003-10-01

    We present results of a search for D0-D¯0 mixing and a measurement of RD, the ratio of doubly Cabibbo-suppressed decays to Cabibbo-favored decays, using D0→K+π- decays from 57.1 fb-1 of data collected near (s)=10.6 GeV with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II collider. At the 95% confidence level, allowing for CP violation, we find the mixing parameters x'2<0.0022 and -0.056rate RM<0.16%. In the limit of no mixing, RD=[0.357±0.022(stat)±0.027(syst)]% and the CP-violating asymmetry AD=0.095±0.061(stat)±0.083(syst).

  12. Sensitivity of β -decay rates to the radial dependence of the nucleon effective mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severyukhin, A. P.; Margueron, J.; Borzov, I. N.; Van Giai, N.

    2015-03-01

    We analyze the sensitivity of β -decay rates in 78Ni and Sn,132100 to a correction term in Skyrme energy-density functionals (EDFs) which modifies the radial shape of the nucleon effective mass. This correction is added on top of several Skyrme parametrizations which are selected from their effective mass properties and predictions about the stability properties of 132Sn . The impact of the correction on high-energy collective modes is shown to be moderate. From the comparison of the effects induced by the surface-peaked effective mass in the three doubly magic nuclei, it is found that 132Sn is largely impacted by the correction, while 78Ni and 100Sn are only moderately affected. We conclude that β -decay rates in these nuclei can be used as a test of different parts of the nuclear EDF: 78Ni and 100Sn are mostly sensitive to the particle-hole interaction through the B (GT) values, while 132Sn is sensitive to the radial shape of the effective mass. Possible improvements of these different parts could therefore be better constrained in the future.

  13. Size and shape dependent photoluminescence and excited state decay rates of diamondoids.

    PubMed

    Richter, Robert; Wolter, David; Zimmermann, Tobias; Landt, Lasse; Knecht, Andre; Heidrich, Christoph; Merli, Andrea; Dopfer, Otto; Reiss, Philipp; Ehresmann, Arno; Petersen, Jens; Dahl, Jeremy E; Carlson, Robert M K; Bostedt, Christoph; Möller, Thomas; Mitric, Roland; Rander, Torbjörn

    2014-02-21

    We present photoluminescence spectra and excited state decay rates of a series of diamondoids, which represent molecular structural analogues to hydrogen-passivated bulk diamond. Specific isomers of the five smallest diamondoids (adamantane-pentamantane) have been brought into the gas phase and irradiated with synchrotron radiation. All investigated compounds show intrinsic photoluminescence in the ultraviolet spectral region. The emission spectra exhibit pronounced vibrational fine structure which is analyzed using quantum chemical calculations. We show that the geometrical relaxation of the first excited state of adamantane, exhibiting Rydberg character, leads to the loss of Td symmetry. The luminescence of adamantane is attributed to a transition from the delocalized first excited state into different vibrational modes of the electronic ground state. Similar geometrical changes of the excited state structure have also been identified in the other investigated diamondoids. The excited state decay rates show a clear dependence on the size of the diamondoid, but are independent of the particle geometry, further indicating a loss of particle symmetry upon electronic excitation.

  14. Two-dimensional treatment of the level shift and decay rate in photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fussell, D. P.; McPhedran, R. C.; Martijn de Sterke, C.

    2005-10-01

    We present a comprehensive treatment of the level shift and decay rate of a model line source in a two-dimensional photonic crystal (2D PC) composed of circular cylinders. The quantities in this strictly two-dimensional system are determined by the two-dimensional local density of states (2D LDOS), which we compute using Rayleigh-multipole methods. We extend the critical point analysis that is traditionally applied to the 2D DOS (or decay rate) to the level shift. With this, we unify the crucial quantity for experiment—the 2D LDOS in a finite PC—with the band structure and the 2D DOS, 2D LDOS, and level shift in infinite PC’s. Consistent with critical point analysis, large variations in the level shift are associated with large variations in the 2D DOS (and 2D LDOS), corroborating a giant anomalous Lamb shift. The boundary of a finite 2D PC can produce resonances that cause the 2D LDOS in a finite 2D PC to differ markedly from the 2D LDOS in an infinite 2D PC.

  15. Two-dimensional treatment of the level shift and decay rate in photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Fussell, D.P.; McPhedran, R.C.; Martijn de Sterke, C.

    2005-10-01

    We present a comprehensive treatment of the level shift and decay rate of a model line source in a two-dimensional photonic crystal (2D PC) composed of circular cylinders. The quantities in this strictly two-dimensional system are determined by the two-dimensional local density of states (2D LDOS), which we compute using Rayleigh-multipole methods. We extend the critical point analysis that is traditionally applied to the 2D DOS (or decay rate) to the level shift. With this, we unify the crucial quantity for experiment - the 2D LDOS in a finite PC - with the band structure and the 2D DOS, 2D LDOS, and level shift in infinite PC's. Consistent with critical point analysis, large variations in the level shift are associated with large variations in the 2D DOS (and 2D LDOS), corroborating a giant anomalous Lamb shift. The boundary of a finite 2D PC can produce resonances that cause the 2D LDOS in a finite 2D PC to differ markedly from the 2D LDOS in an infinite 2D PC.

  16. Two-dimensional treatment of the level shift and decay rate in photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Fussell, D P; McPhedran, R C; Martijn de Sterke, C

    2005-10-01

    We present a comprehensive treatment of the level shift and decay rate of a model line source in a two-dimensional photonic crystal (2D PC) composed of circular cylinders. The quantities in this strictly two-dimensional system are determined by the two-dimensional local density of states (2D LDOS), which we compute using Rayleigh-multipole methods. We extend the critical point analysis that is traditionally applied to the 2D DOS (or decay rate) to the level shift. With this, we unify the crucial quantity for experiment--the 2D LDOS in a finite PC--with the band structure and the 2D DOS, 2D LDOS, and level shift in infinite PC's. Consistent with critical point analysis, large variations in the level shift are associated with large variations in the 2D DOS (and 2D LDOS), corroborating a giant anomalous Lamb shift. The boundary of a finite 2D PC can produce resonances that cause the 2D LDOS in a finite 2D PC to differ markedly from the 2D LDOS in an infinite 2D PC.

  17. Mixture models for estimating the size of a closed population when capture rates vary among individuals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dorazio, R.M.; Royle, J. Andrew

    2003-01-01

    We develop a parameterization of the beta-binomial mixture that provides sensible inferences about the size of a closed population when probabilities of capture or detection vary among individuals. Three classes of mixture models (beta-binomial, logistic-normal, and latent-class) are fitted to recaptures of snowshoe hares for estimating abundance and to counts of bird species for estimating species richness. In both sets of data, rates of detection appear to vary more among individuals (animals or species) than among sampling occasions or locations. The estimates of population size and species richness are sensitive to model-specific assumptions about the latent distribution of individual rates of detection. We demonstrate using simulation experiments that conventional diagnostics for assessing model adequacy, such as deviance, cannot be relied on for selecting classes of mixture models that produce valid inferences about population size. Prior knowledge about sources of individual heterogeneity in detection rates, if available, should be used to help select among classes of mixture models that are to be used for inference.

  18. Can a first-order exponential decay model fit heart rate recovery after resistance exercise?

    PubMed

    Bartels-Ferreira, Rhenan; de Sousa, Élder D; Trevizani, Gabriela A; Silva, Lilian P; Nakamura, Fábio Y; Forjaz, Cláudia L M; Lima, Jorge Roberto P; Peçanha, Tiago

    2015-03-01

    The time-constant of postexercise heart rate recovery (HRRτ ) obtained by fitting heart rate decay curve by a first-order exponential fitting has being used to assess cardiac autonomic recovery after endurance exercise. The feasibility of this model was not tested after resistance exercise (RE). The aim of this study was to test the goodness of fit of the first-order exponential decay model to fit heart rate recovery (HRR) after RE. Ten healthy subjects participated in the study. The experimental sessions occurred in two separated days and consisted of performance of 1 set of 10 repetitions at 50% or 80% of the load achieved on the one-repetition maximum test [low-intensity (LI) and high-intensity (HI) sessions, respectively]. Heart rate (HR) was continuously registered before and during exercise and also for 10 min of recovery. A monoexponential equation was used to fit the HRR curve during the postexercise period using different time windows (i.e. 30, 60, 90, … 600 s). For each time window, (i) HRRτ was calculated and (ii) variation of HR explained by the model (R(2) goodness of fit index) was assessed. The HRRτ showed stabilization from 360 and 420 s on LI and HI, respectively. Acceptable R(2) values were observed from the 360 s on LI (R(2) > 0.65) and at all tested time windows on HI (R(2) > 0.75). In conclusion, this study showed that using a minimum length of monitoring (~420 s) HRR after RE can be adequately modelled by a first-order exponential fitting.

  19. Initial measurements of O-ion and He-ion decay rates observed from the Van Allen probes RBSPICE instrument

    PubMed Central

    Gerrard, Andrew; Lanzerotti, Louis; Gkioulidou, Matina; Mitchell, Donald; Manweiler, Jerry; Bortnik, Jacob; Keika, Kunihiro

    2014-01-01

    H-ion (∼45 keV to ∼600 keV), He-ion (∼65 keV to ∼520 keV), and O-ion (∼140 keV to ∼1130 keV) integral flux measurements, from the Radiation Belt Storm Probe Ion Composition Experiment (RBSPICE) instrument aboard the Van Allan Probes spacecraft B, are reported. These abundance data form a cohesive picture of ring current ions during the first 9 months of measurements. Furthermore, the data presented herein are used to show injection characteristics via the He-ion/H-ion abundance ratio and the O-ion/H-ion abundance ratio. Of unique interest to ring current dynamics are the spatial-temporal decay characteristics of the two injected populations. We observe that He-ions decay more quickly at lower L shells, on the order of ∼0.8 day at L shells of 3–4, and decay more slowly with higher L shell, on the order of ∼1.7 days at L shells of 5–6. Conversely, O-ions decay very rapidly (∼1.5 h) across all L shells. The He-ion decay time are consistent with previously measured and calculated lifetimes associated with charge exchange. The O-ion decay time is much faster than predicted and is attributed to the inclusion of higher-energy (> 500 keV) O-ions in our decay rate estimation. We note that these measurements demonstrate a compelling need for calculation of high-energy O-ion loss rates, which have not been adequately studied in the literature to date. Key Points We report initial observations of ring current ions We show that He-ion decay rates are consistent with theory We show that O-ions with energies greater than 500 keV decay very rapidly PMID:26167435

  20. Rate Equation Theory for Island Sizes and Capture Zone Areas in Submonolayer Deposition: Realistic Treatment of Spatial Aspects of Nucleation

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J W; Li, M; Bartelt, M C

    2002-12-05

    Extensive information on the distribution of islands formed during submonolayer deposition is provided by the joint probability distribution (JPD) for island sizes, s, and capture zone areas, A. A key ingredient determining the form of the JPD is the impact of each nucleation event on existing capture zone areas. Combining a realistic characterization of such spatial aspects of nucleation with a factorization ansatz for the JPD, we provide a concise rate equation formulation for the variation with island size of both the capture zone area and the island density.

  1. The minimum energy decay rate in quasi-isotropic grid turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, P. A.

    2011-08-01

    We consider high Reynolds number, freely-decaying, isotropic turbulence in which the large scales evolve in a self-similar manner when normalized by the integral scales, u and ℓ. As it is well known, a range of possible behaviors may be observed depending on the form of the longitudinal velocity correlation at large separation, uf∞=u 2f(r →∞). We consider the cases u2f∞=cmr-m,2≤m ≤6, whose spectral counterpart is E(k →0)~cmkm -1 for m <6, with or without a lnk correction, and E(k →0)~I k4 for m =6. (I is Loitsyansky's integral.) It has long been known that the cmm=constant during the decay. This, in turn, sets the energy decay rate as u2~t-(1-p)2m /(m+2), where p is the power-law exponent for the normalized dissipation rate, εℓ/εℓu3u3~t-p, observed empirically to be a small positive number in grid turbulence. We systematically explore the properties of these different classes of turbulence and arrive at the following conclusions. (i) The invariance of cm is a direct consequence of linear momentum conservation for m ≤4, and angular momentum conservation for m =5. (ii) The classical spectra of Saffman, E(k →0)~c3k2, and Batchelor, E(k →0)~Ik4, are robust in the sense that they emerge from a broad class of initial conditions. In particular, it is necessary only that <ωi ω'j >∞ ≤O(r-8) at t =0. The non-classical spectra (m =2,4,5), on the other hand, require very specific initial conditions in order to be realized, of the form <ωiω'j>∞=O(r-(m +2)). (Note the equality rather than the inequality here.) This makes the non-classical spectra less likely to be observed in practice. (iii) The case of m =2, which is usually associated with the u2~t-1 decay law, is pathological in a number of respects. For example, its spectral tensor diverges as k →0, and the long-range correlations ∞=O(r-2) are too strong to be a consequence of the Biot-Savart law. (It is the Biot-Savart law that lies behind the long-range correlations in the

  2. Lepton-violating β-β-, β+β+ decays, (e -, e +) conversion and double electron capture in gauge theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergados, J. D.

    1983-05-01

    The lepton violating processes β-β-, β+β+, (e -, e +) and double electron capture have been investigated in the context of modern gauge theories. Mechanisms involving light or heavy intermediate Majorana neutrinos, with or without right-handed currents, as well as Higgs particles, have been studied. The lepton-violating emission of light bosons, recently proposed by Georgi, Glashow and Nussinov, has also been analyzed. From the analysis of the 48Ca → 48Ti data the following limits emerge: ∣ < m v > ∣ < 80 eV, m N > (2-20) × 10 3GeV, m W R > 400 GeVand g v eoverlinevex 0 < 5 × 10 -3. The above limits are then used to predict the lifetimes for β+β+, (e -, e +) and double electron capture in the A = 58, 92 and 96 systems employing realistic nuclear models.

  3. Tracing nitrogen accumulation in decaying wood and examining its impact on wood decomposition rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinne, Katja T.; Rajala, Tiina; Peltoniemi, Krista; Chen, Janet; Smolander, Aino; Mäkipää, Raisa

    2016-04-01

    Decomposition of dead wood, which is controlled primarily by fungi is important for ecosystem carbon cycle and has potentially a significant role in nitrogen fixation via diazotrophs. Nitrogen content has been found to increase with advancing wood decay in several studies; however, the importance of this increase to decay rate and the sources of external nitrogen remain unclear. Improved knowledge of the temporal dynamics of wood decomposition rate and nitrogen accumulation in wood as well as the drivers of the two processes would be important for carbon and nitrogen models dealing with ecosystem responses to climate change. To tackle these questions we applied several analytical methods on Norway spruce logs from Lapinjärvi, Finland. We incubated wood samples (density classes from I to V, n=49) in different temperatures (from 8.5oC to 41oC, n=7). After a common seven day pre-incubation period at 14.5oC, the bottles were incubated six days in their designated temperature prior to CO2 flux measurements with GC to determine the decomposition rate. N2 fixation was measured with acetylene reduction assay after further 48 hour incubation. In addition, fungal DNA, (MiSeq Illumina) δ15N and N% composition of wood for samples incubated at 14.5oC were determined. Radiocarbon method was applied to obtain age distribution for the density classes. The asymbiotic N2 fixation rate was clearly dependent on the stage of wood decay and increased from stage I to stage IV but was substantially reduced in stage V. CO2 production was highest in the intermediate decay stage (classes II-IV). Both N2 fixation and CO2 production were highly temperature sensitive having optima in temperature 25oC and 31oC, respectively. We calculated the variation of annual levels of respiration and N2 fixation per hectare for the study site, and used the latter data together with the 14C results to determine the amount of N2 accumulated in wood in time. The proportion of total nitrogen in wood

  4. Indoor acrolein emission and decay rates resulting from domestic cooking events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seaman, Vincent Y.; Bennett, Deborah H.; Cahill, Thomas M.

    2009-12-01

    Acrolein (2-propenal) is a common constituent of both indoor and outdoor air, can exacerbate asthma in children, and may contribute to other chronic lung diseases. Recent studies have found high indoor levels of acrolein and other carbonyls compared to outdoor ambient concentrations. Heated cooking oils produce considerable amounts of acrolein, thus cooking is likely an important source of indoor acrolein. A series of cooking experiments were conducted to determine the emission rates of acrolein and other volatile carbonyls for different types of cooking oils (canola, soybean, corn and olive oils) and deep-frying different food items. Similar concentrations and emission rates of carbonyls were found when different vegetable oils were used to deep-fry the same food product. The food item being deep-fried was generally not a significant source of carbonyls compared to the cooking oil. The oil cooking events resulted in high concentrations of acrolein that were in the range of 26.4-64.5 μg m -3. These concentrations exceed all the chronic regulatory exposure limits and many of the acute exposure limits. The air exchange rate and the decay rate of the carbonyls were monitored to estimate the half-life of the carbonyls. The half-life for acrolein was 14.4 ± 2.6 h, which indicates that indoor acrolein concentrations can persist for considerable time after cooking in poorly-ventilated homes.

  5. Combined results on b-hadron production rates, lifetimes, oscillations and semileptonic decays

    SciTech Connect

    WIllocq, stephane

    2000-08-02

    Combined results on b-hadron lifetimes, b-hadron production rates B{sub d}{sup 0}--Anti-B{sub d}{sup 0} and B{sub s}{sup 0}--Anti-B{sub s}{sup 0} oscillations, the decay width difference between the mass eigenstates of the B{sub s}{sup 0}--Anti-B{sub s}{sup 0} system, and the values of the CKM matrix elements {vert_bar}V{sub cb}{vert_bar} and {vert_bar}V{sub ub}{vert_bar} are obtained from published and preliminary measurements available in Summer 99 from the ALEPH, CDF, DELPHI, L3, OPAL and SLD Collaborations.

  6. Cooperative Lamb shift and the cooperative decay rate for an initially detuned phased state

    SciTech Connect

    Friedberg, Richard; Manassah, Jamal T.

    2010-04-15

    The cooperative Lamb shift (CLS) is hard to measure because in samples much larger than a resonant wavelength it is much smaller, for an initially prepared resonantly phased state, than the cooperative decay rate (CDR). We show, however, that if the phasing of the initial state is detuned so that the spatial wave vector is k{sub 1} congruent with k{sub 0{+-}}O((1/R)) (where k{sub 0}={omega}{sub 0}/c is the resonant frequency), the CLS grows to 'giant' magnitudes making it comparable to the CDR. Moreover, for certain controlled values of detuning, the initial CDR becomes small so that the dynamical Lamb shift (DLS) can be measured over a considerable period of time.

  7. Spatio-temporal attributes of left ventricular pressure decay rate during isovolumic relaxation.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Erina; Kovács, Sándor J

    2012-03-01

    Global left ventricular (LV) isovolumic relaxation rate has been characterized: 1) via the time constant of isovolumic relaxation τ or 2) via the logistic time constant τ(L). An alternate kinematic method, characterizes isovolumic relaxation (IVR) in accordance with Newton's Second Law. The model's parameters, stiffness E(k), and damping/relaxation μ result from best fit of model-predicted pressure to in vivo data. All three models (exponential, logistic, and kinematic) characterize global relaxation in terms of pressure decay rates. However, IVR is inhomogeneous and anisotropic. Apical and basal LV wall segments untwist at different times and rates, and transmural strain and strain rates differ due to the helically variable pitch of myocytes and sheets. Accordingly, we hypothesized that the exponential model (τ) or kinematic model (μ and E(k)) parameters will elucidate the spatiotemporal variation of IVR rate. Left ventricular pressures in 20 subjects were recorded using a high-fidelity, multipressure transducer (3 cm apart) catheter. Simultaneous, dual-channel pressure data was plotted in the pressure phase-plane (dP/dt vs. P) and τ, μ, and E(k) were computed in 1631 beats (average: 82 beats per subject). Tau differed significantly between the two channels (P < 0.05) in 16 of 20 subjects, whereas μ and E(k) differed significantly (P < 0.05) in all 20 subjects. These results show that quantifying the relaxation rate from data recorded at a single location has limitations. Moreover, kinematic model based analysis allows characterization of restoring (recoil) forces and resistive (crossbridge uncoupling) forces during IVR and their spatio-temporal dependence, thereby elucidating the relative roles of stiffness vs. relaxation as IVR rate determinants.

  8. Graphene plasmonics for tuning photon decay rate near metallic split-ring resonator in a multilayered substrate.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yongpin P; Sha, Wei E I; Jiang, Lijun; Hu, Jun

    2015-02-09

    Study of photon decay rate is essential to various optical devices, where graphene is an emerging building block due to its electrical tunability. In this paper, we study photon decay rate of a quantum emitter near a metallic split-ring resonator, which is embedded in a multilayered substrate incorporating a graphene layer. Analyzing photon decay rate in such a complex multilayered system is not only computationally challenging but also highly important to experimentally realizable devices. First, the dispersion relation of graphene plasmonics supported at a dieletric/graphene/dielectric structure is investigated systematically. Meanwhile, the dispersion relation of metallic plasmonics supported at a dielectric/metal structure is studied comparatively. According to our investigation, graphene offers several flexible tuning routes for manipulating photon decay rate, including tunable chemical potential and the emitter's position and polarization. Next, considering plasmonic waves in a graphene sheet occur in the infrared regime, we carefully design a metallic split ring resonating around the same frequency range. Consequently, this design enables a mutual interaction between graphene plasmonics and metallic plasmonics. The boundary element method with a multilayered medium Green's function is adopted in the numerical simulation. Blue-shifted and splitting resonance peaks are theoretically observed, which suggests a strong mode coupling. Moreover, the mode coupling has a switch on-off feature via electrostatically doping the graphene sheet. This work is helpful to dynamically manipulate photon decay rate in complex optical devices.

  9. Origin of meteoritic stardust unveiled by a revised proton-capture rate of 17O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugaro, M.; Karakas, A. I.; Bruno, C. G.; Aliotta, M.; Nittler, L. R.; Bemmerer, D.; Best, A.; Boeltzig, A.; Broggini, C.; Caciolli, A.; Cavanna, F.; Ciani, G. F.; Corvisiero, P.; Davinson, T.; Depalo, R.; di Leva, A.; Elekes, Z.; Ferraro, F.; Formicola, A.; Fülöp, Zs.; Gervino, G.; Guglielmetti, A.; Gustavino, C.; Gyürky, Gy.; Imbriani, G.; Junker, M.; Menegazzo, R.; Mossa, V.; Pantaleo, F. R.; Piatti, D.; Prati, P.; Scott, D. A.; Straniero, O.; Strieder, F.; Szücs, T.; Takács, M. P.; Trezzi, D.

    2017-01-01

    Stardust grains recovered from meteorites provide high-precision snapshots of the isotopic composition of the stellar environment in which they formed 1 . Attributing their origin to specific types of stars, however, often proves difficult. Intermediate-mass stars of 4-8 solar masses are expected to have contributed a large fraction of meteoritic stardust 2,3 . Yet, no grains have been found with the characteristic isotopic compositions expected for such stars 4,5 . This is a long-standing puzzle, which points to serious gaps in our understanding of the lifecycle of stars and dust in our Galaxy. Here we show that the increased proton-capture rate of 17O reported by a recent underground experiment 6 leads to 17O/16O isotopic ratios that match those observed in a population of stardust grainsfor proton-burning temperatures of 60-80 MK. These temperatures are achieved at the base of the convective envelope during the late evolution of intermediate-mass stars of 4-8 solar masses 7-9 , which reveals them as the most likely site of origin of the grains. This result provides direct evidence that these stars contributed to the dust inventory from which the Solar System formed.

  10. Capture-recapture-adjusted prevalence rates of type 2 diabetes are related to social deprivation.

    PubMed

    Ismail, A A; Beeching, N J; Gill, G V; Bellis, M A

    1999-12-01

    We examined the prevalence of type 2 diabetes and social deprivation in one urban district in Liverpool from October 1995 to September 1996 inclusive. This area has a stable Caucasian population of 176, 682. Lists were made of all known diabetics attending six different medical points of contact during the year, and were condensed and aggregated to eliminate duplicates. From postcode data, each patient was assigned to residence in one of the 14 electoral wards in the district, for which demographic structure and standardized measures of social deprivation were known (Townsend index). The crude period prevalences of type 1 and type 2 diabetes were estimated for each ward. Crude prevalence data were then corrected by applying capture-recapture (CR) techniques to the different patient datasets to allow for undercount. The crude period prevalence (95%CI) of diabetes was 1.5% (1.4-1.5%), or 2585/176, 682. The mean age of people with diabetes was not significantly different between electoral wards. The crude period prevalence of type 2 diabetes within individual wards ranged from 0.4% (0.3-0.6%) in the least deprived area to 4.1% (3.6-4.6%) in the most deprived area. The corresponding range of CR-adjusted period prevalence rates of type 2 diabetes was from 3.2% (2.8-3.6%) to 6.7% (6.1-7.4%), and there was strong correlation between both crude and CR-adjusted prevalence and social deprivation in each ward (r=0.76, p<0.001 for crude; and r=0. 49, p<0.005 for CR-adjusted prevalence). There was no correlation between the crude or CR-adjusted period prevalence rates of type 1 diabetes and Townsend index (r=0.14, p=NS). This strong correlation between the prevalence of type 2 diabetes and social deprivation has important implications for the planning of health-care delivery.

  11. Pressure Decay Testing Methodology for Quantifying Leak Rates of Full-Scale Docking System Seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunlap, Patrick H., Jr.; Daniels, Christopher C.; Wasowski, Janice L.; Garafolo, Nicholas G.; Penney, Nicholas; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    2010-01-01

    NASA is developing a new docking system to support future space exploration missions to low-Earth orbit and the Moon. This system, called the Low Impact Docking System, is a mechanism designed to connect the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle to the International Space Station, the lunar lander (Altair), and other future Constellation Project vehicles. NASA Glenn Research Center is playing a key role in developing the main interface seal for this docking system. This seal will be relatively large with an outside diameter in the range of 54 to 58 in. (137 to 147 cm). As part of this effort, a new test apparatus has been designed, fabricated, and installed to measure leak rates of candidate full-scale seals under simulated thermal, vacuum, and engagement conditions. Using this test apparatus, a pressure decay testing and data processing methodology has been developed to quantify full-scale seal leak rates. Tests performed on untreated 54 in. diameter seals at room temperature in a fully compressed state resulted in leak rates lower than the requirement of less than 0.0025 lbm, air per day (0.0011 kg/day).

  12. Decay Rates and Semi-stable Fraction Formation after 12 years of Foliar Litter Decomposition in Canadian Forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trofymow, J. A.; Smyth, C.; Moore, T.; Prescott, C.; Titus, B.; Siltanen, M.; Visser, S.; Preston, C. M.; Nault, J.

    2009-12-01

    Litter decay in early and midphases of decomposition have been shown to highly influenced by climate and substrate quality, however factors affecting decay during the late semi-stable phase are less well understood. The Canadian Intersite Decomposition Experiment (CIDET) was established in 1992 with the objective of providing data on the long-term rates of litter decomposition and nutrient mineralization for a range of forested ecoclimatic regions in Canada. Such data were needed to help verify models used for national C accounting, as well as aid in the development of other soil C models. CIDET examined the annual decay, over a 12-year period, of 10 standard foliar litters and 2 wood substrates at 18 forested upland and 3 wetland sites ranging from the cool temperate to subarctic regions, a nearly 20oC span in temperature. On a subset of sites and litter types, changes in litter C chemistry over time were also determined. Over the first 6 years, C/N ratio and iron increased, NMR showed an overall decline in O-alkyl C (carbohydrates) and increase in alkyl, aromatic, phenolic, and carboxyl C. Proximate analysis showed the acid unhydrolyzable residue (AUR) increases, but true lignin did not accumulate, in contrast to the conceptual ligno-cellulose model of decomposition. Litter decay during first phase was related to initial litter quality (AUR and water soluble extract), winter precipitation, but not temperature, suggesting the importance of leaching during this phase. Decay rate “k” during the mid phase was related to temperature, initial litter quality (AUR and AUR/N), summer precipitation, but not soil N. In most cases decay had approached an asymptote before end of experiment. Although annual temperature was the best single predictor for 12-year asymptotes, summer precipitation and forest floor pH and C/N ratio were the best set of combined predictors. The changes in the decay factors during different phases may explain some of the discrepancies in the

  13. Deprotonation yields, pKa, and aci-nitro decay rates in some substituted o-nitrobenzaldehydes.

    PubMed

    Abbruzzetti, Stefania; Carcelli, Mauro; Rogolino, Dominga; Viappiani, Cristiano

    2003-07-01

    In this paper we report the deprotonation yields, the pKa, and decay kinetics of the aci-nitro intermediates of some substituted 2-nitrobenzaldehydes that can be used as photoactivatable caged proton compounds. The decay of the aci-nitro absorbance for 2-nitrobenzaldehyde occurs within a few nanoseconds from photoexcitation. Addition of electron donating methoxy substituents at positions 4 and 5 leads to lower deprotonation yields, higher pKa, and slower decays of the aci-nitro intermediates. On the contrary, the decay rate is accelerated by the introduction of an electron-withdrawing Cl atom at position 4 in the phenyl ring, with little influence on the deprotonation yield and pKa of the aci-nitro intermediate.

  14. Relationship between mosquito (Diptera: Culicidae) landing rates on a human subject and numbers captured using CO2-baited light traps.

    PubMed

    Barnard, D R; Knue, G J; Dickerson, C Z; Bernier, U R; Kline, D L

    2011-06-01

    Capture rates of insectary-reared female Aedes albopictus (Skuse), Anopheles quadrimaculatus Say, Culex nigripalpus Theobald, Culex quinquefasciatus Say and Aedes triseriatus (Say) in CDC-type light traps (LT) supplemented with CO2 and using the human landing (HL) collection method were observed in matched-pair experiments in outdoor screened enclosures. Mosquito responses were compared on a catch-per-unit-effort basis using regression analysis with LT and HL as the dependent and independent variables, respectively. The average number of mosquitoes captured in 1 min by LT over a 24-h period was significantly related to the average number captured in 1 min by HL only for Cx. nigripalpus and Cx. quinquefasciatus. Patterns of diel activity indicated by a comparison of the mean response to LT and HL at eight different times in a 24-h period were not superposable for any species. The capture rate efficiency of LT when compared with HL was ≤15% for all mosquitoes except Cx. quinquefasciatus (43%). Statistical models of the relationship between mosquito responses to each collection method indicate that, except for Ae. albopictus, LT and HL capture rates are significantly related only during certain times of the diel period. Estimates of mosquito activity based on observations made between sunset and sunrise were most precise in this regard for An. quadrimaculatus and Cx. nigripalpus, as were those between sunrise and sunset for Cx. quinquefasciatus and Ae. triseriatus.

  15. Coupled-Channels Study of α-DECAY Rates for Deformed Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Dongdong; Ren, Zhongzhou

    The generalized density-dependent cluster model is devoted to calculate α-decay half-lives of spherical and deformed nuclei. The multi-channel cluster model is developed to describe the α-decay fine structure in heavy deformed nuclei, including half-lives and branching ratios. After a brief review of these two models, special cases of the α-decay fine structure are presented. Calculations are separately performed using the coupled-channels and WKB approaches.

  16. SU(3) flavor symmetry and CP violating rate differences for charmless B{yields}PV decays

    SciTech Connect

    Deshpande, N. G.; He, Xiao-Gang; Shi, Jian-Qing

    2000-08-01

    We derive several relations between CP violating rate differences {delta}(B{yields}PV)={gamma}(B{yields}PV)-{gamma}(B(bar sign){yields}P(bar sign)V(bar sign)) for charmless B{yields}PV decays in the standard model using SU(3) flavor symmetry. It is found that although the relations between branching ratios of {delta}S=0 and {delta}S=-1 processes are complicated, there are simple relations independent of hadronic models between some of the {delta}S=0 and {delta}S=-1 rate differences due to the unitarity property of the Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix, such as {delta}(B{yields}{pi}{sup +}{rho}{sup -})=-{delta}(B{yields}{pi}{sup +}K{sup *-}), {delta}(B{yields}{pi}{sup -}{rho}{sup +})=-{delta}(B{yields}K{sup -}{rho}{sup +}). SU(3) breaking effects are also estimated using the factorization approximation. These relations can be tested at B factories in the near future. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  17. Relationship between mosquito (Diptera: Culicidae) landing rates on a human subject and numbers captured using CO2-baited light traps

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Capture rates of female Aedes albopictus Skuse, Aedes triseriatus (Say), Anopheles quadrimaculatus Say, Culex nigripalpus Theobald, and Culex quinquefasciatus Say in CDC-type light traps supplemented with CO2 (LT) and using the human landing (HL) collection method were observed in matched-pair exper...

  18. A halo-independent lower bound on the dark matter capture rate in the Sun from a direct detection signal

    SciTech Connect

    Blennow, Mattias; Herrero-Garcia, Juan; Schwetz, Thomas

    2015-05-21

    We show that a positive signal in a dark matter (DM) direct detection experiment can be used to place a lower bound on the DM capture rate in the Sun, independent of the DM halo. For a given particle physics model and DM mass we obtain a lower bound on the capture rate independent of the local DM density, velocity distribution, galactic escape velocity, as well as the scattering cross section. We illustrate this lower bound on the capture rate by assuming that upcoming direct detection experiments will soon obtain a significant signal. When comparing the lower bound on the capture rate with limits on the high-energy neutrino flux from the Sun from neutrino telescopes, we can place upper limits on the branching fraction of DM annihilation channels leading to neutrinos. With current data from IceCube and Super-Kamiokande non-trivial limits can be obtained for spin-dependent interactions and direct annihilations into neutrinos. In some cases also annihilations into ττ or bb start getting constrained. For spin-independent interactions current constraints are weak, but they may become interesting for data from future neutrino telescopes.

  19. A Correlation Between Intrinsic Brightness and Average Decay Rate of Swift UVOT GRB Optical/UV Light Curves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oates, S. R.; Page, M. J.; De Pasquale, M.; Schady, P.; Breeveld, A. A.; Holland, S. T.; Kuin, N. P. M.; Marshall, F. E.

    2012-01-01

    We examine a sample of 48 Swift/UVOT long Gamma-ray Burst light curves and find a correlation between the logarithmic luminosity at 200s and average decay rate determined from 200s onwards, with a Spearman rank coefficient of -0.58 at a significance of 99.998% (4.2 sigma ). We discuss the causes of the log L200s - alpha (greater than) 200s correlation, finding it to be an intrinsic property of long GRBs, and not resulting from the selection criteria. We find two ways to produce the correlation. One possibility is that there is some property of the central engine, outflow or external medium that affects the rate of energy release so that the bright afterglows release their energy more quickly and decay faster than the fainter afterglows. Alternatively, the correlation may be produced by variation of the observers viewing angle, with observers at large viewing angles observing fainter and slower decaying light curves.

  20. Relaxation of the CH stretch in liquid CHBr3: Solvent effects and decay rates using classical nonequilibrium simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesh, Sai G.; Sibert, Edwin L.

    2006-12-01

    This article addresses two questions regarding the decay of the CH stretch in liquid CHBr3. The first is whether the initial steps of the relaxation primarily involve energy redistribution within the excited molecule alone. Gas phase quantum mechanical and classical calculations are performed to examine the role of the solvent in this process. At the fundamental excitation level, it is found that CH stretch decay is, in fact, strongly solvent driven. The second question is on the applicability of a fully classical approach to the calculation of CH stretch condensed phase decay rates. To this end, nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations are performed. The results are compared with quantum mechanical rates computed previously. The two methods are found to be in fair agreement with each other. However, care must be exercised in the interpretation of the classical results.

  1. Initial measurements of O-ion and He-ion decay rates observed from the Van Allen probes RBSPICE instrument.

    PubMed

    Gerrard, Andrew; Lanzerotti, Louis; Gkioulidou, Matina; Mitchell, Donald; Manweiler, Jerry; Bortnik, Jacob; Keika, Kunihiro

    2014-11-01

    H-ion (∼45 keV to ∼600 keV), He-ion (∼65 keV to ∼520 keV), and O-ion (∼140 keV to ∼1130 keV) integral flux measurements, from the Radiation Belt Storm Probe Ion Composition Experiment (RBSPICE) instrument aboard the Van Allan Probes spacecraft B, are reported. These abundance data form a cohesive picture of ring current ions during the first 9 months of measurements. Furthermore, the data presented herein are used to show injection characteristics via the He-ion/H-ion abundance ratio and the O-ion/H-ion abundance ratio. Of unique interest to ring current dynamics are the spatial-temporal decay characteristics of the two injected populations. We observe that He-ions decay more quickly at lower L shells, on the order of ∼0.8 day at L shells of 3-4, and decay more slowly with higher L shell, on the order of ∼1.7 days at L shells of 5-6. Conversely, O-ions decay very rapidly (∼1.5 h) across all L shells. The He-ion decay time are consistent with previously measured and calculated lifetimes associated with charge exchange. The O-ion decay time is much faster than predicted and is attributed to the inclusion of higher-energy (> 500 keV) O-ions in our decay rate estimation. We note that these measurements demonstrate a compelling need for calculation of high-energy O-ion loss rates, which have not been adequately studied in the literature to date.

  2. Approaches for the direct estimation of rate of increase in population size using capture-recapture data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, J.D.; Sillett, T. Scott; Hines, J.E.; Holmes, Richard T.; Ralph, C. John; Rich, Terrell D.

    2005-01-01

    Recent developments in the modeling of capture-recapture data permit the direct estimation and modeling of population growth rate Pradel (1996). Resulting estimates reflect changes in numbers of birds on study areas, and such changes result from movement as well as survival and reproductive recruitment. One measure of the 'importance' of a demographic vital rate to population growth is based on temporal covariation (i.e., do changes in population growth follow changes in vital rates). If data are available to estimate vital rates or their components, then such data can be combined with capture-recapture data in order to estimate parameters of the relationship between population growth and the vital rate. These methods are illustrated using capture-recapture and nest observation data for Black-throated Blue Warblers, Dendroica caerulescens, from a long-term study at Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, New Hampshire, USA. Population growth rate was found to be positively associated with the proportion of birds that double-brood. We encourage use of these methods and believe they will prove to be very useful in research on, and management of, migratory bird populations.

  3. Probing Anderson localization of light via decay rate statistics in aperiodic Vogel spirals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christofi, Aristi; Pinheiro, Felipe A.; Dal Negro, Luca

    We systematically investigate the spectral properties of different types of two-dimensional aperiodic Vogel spiral arrays of pointlike scatterers and three-dimensional metamaterials with Vogel spiral chirality using rigorous Green's function spectral method. We considered an efficient T-matrix approach to analyze multiple-scattering effects, including all scattering orders, and to understand localization properties through the statistics of the Green's matrix eigenvalues. The knowledge of the spectrum of the Green matrix of multi-particle scattering systems provides important information on the character of light propagation and localization in chiral media with deterministic aperiodic geometry. In particular, we analyze for the first time the statistics of the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the Green matrix and extract the decay rates of the eigenmodes, their inverse participation ratio (IPR), the Wigner delay times and their quality factors. We emphasize the unique properties of aperiodic Vogel spirals with respect to random scattering media, which have been investigated so far. This work was supported by the Army Research Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement Number W911NF-12-2-0023.

  4. Precision measurement of the decay rate of the negative positronium ion Ps{sup -}

    SciTech Connect

    Ceeh, Hubert; Hugenschmidt, Christoph; Schreckenbach, Klaus; Gaertner, Stefan A.; Thirolf, Peter G.; Fleischer, Frank; Schwalm, Dirk

    2011-12-15

    The negative positronium ion Ps{sup -} is a bound system consisting of two electrons and a positron. Its three constituents are pointlike leptonic particles of equal mass, which are subject only to the electroweak and gravitational force. Hence, Ps{sup -} is an ideal object in which to study the quantum mechanics of a three-body system. The ground state of Ps{sup -} is stable against dissociation but unstable against annihilation into photons. We report here on a precise measurement of the Ps{sup -} ground-state decay rate {Gamma}, which was carried out at the high-intensity NEutron induced POsitron source MUniCh (NEPOMUC) at the research reactor FRM II in Garching. A value of {Gamma}=2.0875(50) ns{sup -1} was obtained, which is three times more precise than previous experiments and in agreement with most recent theoretical predictions. The achieved experimental precision is at the level of the leading corrections in the theoretical predictions.

  5. Using the Inflection Points and Rates of Growth and Decay to Predict Levels of Solar Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.; Hathaway, David H.

    2008-01-01

    The ascending and descending inflection points and rates of growth and decay at specific times during the sunspot cycle are examined as predictors for future activity. On average, the ascending inflection point occurs about 1-2 yr after sunspot minimum amplitude (Rm) and the descending inflection point occurs about 6-7 yr after Rm. The ascending inflection point and the inferred slope (including the 12-mo moving average (12-mma) of (Delta)R (the month-to-month change in the smoothed monthly mean sunspot number (R)) at the ascending inflection point provide strong indications as to the expected size of the ongoing cycle s sunspot maximum amplitude (RM), while the descending inflection point appears to provide an indication as to the expected length of the ongoing cycle. The value of the 12-mma of (Delta)R at elapsed time T = 27 mo past the epoch of RM (E(RM)) seems to provide a strong indication as to the expected size of Rm for the following cycle. The expected Rm for cycle 24 is 7.6 +/- 4.4 (the 90-percent prediction interval), occurring before September 2008. Evidence is also presented for secular rises in selected cycle-related parameters and for preferential grouping of sunspot cycles by amplitude and/or period.

  6. Determination of plate wave velocities and diffuse field decay rates with braod-band acousto-ultrasonic signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kautz, Harold E.

    1993-01-01

    Lowest symmetric and lowest antisymmetric plate wave modes were excited and identified in broad-band acousto-ultrasonic (AU) signals collected from various high temperature composite materials. Group velocities have been determined for these nearly nondispersive modes. An algorithm has been developed and applied to determine phase velocities and hence dispersion curves for the frequency ranges of the broad-band pulses. It is demonstrated that these data are sensitive to changes in the various stiffness moduli of the materials, in agreement by analogy, with the theoretical and experimental results of Tang and Henneke on fiber reinforced polymers. Diffuse field decay rates have been determined in the same specimen geometries and AU configuration as for the plate wave measurements. These decay rates are of value in assessing degradation such as matrix cracking in ceramic matrix composites. In addition, we verify that diffuse field decay rates respond to fiber/matrix interfacial shear strength and density in ceramic matrix composites. This work shows that velocity/stiffness and decay rate measurements can be obtained in the same set of AU experiments for characterizing materials and in specimens with geometries useful for mechanical measurements.

  7. Decay rates of a molecule in the vicinity of a spherical surface of an isotropic magnetodielectric material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, H. Y.; Leung, P. T.; Tsai, D. P.

    2012-10-01

    A comprehensive study is presented on the decay rates of excited molecules in the vicinity of a magnetodielectric material of spherical geometry via electrodynamic modeling. Both the models based on a driven-damped harmonic oscillator and on energy transfers will be applied so that the total decay rates can be rigorously decomposed into the radiative and the nonradiative rates. Clarifications of the equivalence of these two models for arbitrary geometry will be provided. Different possible orientations and locations of the molecule are studied with the molecule being placed near a spherical particle or a cavity. Among other results, TE modes are observed which can be manifested via nonradiative transfer from a tangential dipole within a small range of dissipation parameters set for the spherical particle. In addition, spectral analysis shows that decay rates at such a particle with small absorption are largely dominated by radiative transfer except at multipolar resonances when nonradiative transfer becomes prominent, and relatively unmodified decay is possible when negative refraction takes place.

  8. Astrophysical reaction rates for Ni-58,Ni-60(n,gamma) from new neutron capture cross section measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Guber, Klaus H; Derrien, Herve; Leal, Luiz C; Arbanas, Goran; Wiarda, Dorothea; Koehler, Paul; Harvey, John A

    2010-01-01

    New neutron capture cross section of 58,60Ni were measured in the energy range from 100 eV to 600 keV using the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA). The combination of these new neutron capture data with previous transmission data allowed a resonance analysis up to 900 keV using R-matrix theory. The theoretically determined direct capture (DC) cross sections were included in the analyses. From these resonance parameters and the DC contribution, new (n,y) astrophysical reaction rates were determined over the entire energy range needed by the lastest stellar models describing the so-called weak s process. PACS numbers: 25.40.Lw, 26.20Kn, 27.40.+z, 27.50.+e, 97.10.Cv

  9. Exact evaluation of the rates of electrostatic decay and scattering off thermal ions for an unmagnetized Maxwellian plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Layden, B.; Cairns, Iver H.; Robinson, P. A.

    2013-08-15

    Electrostatic decay of Langmuir waves into Langmuir and ion sound waves (L→L′+S) and scattering of Langmuir waves off thermal ions (L+i→L′+i′, also called “nonlinear Landau damping”) are important nonlinear weak-turbulence processes. The rates for these processes depend on the quadratic longitudinal response function α{sup (2)} (or, equivalently, the quadratic longitudinal susceptibility χ{sup (2)}), which describes the second-order response of a plasma to electrostatic wave fields. Previous calculations of these rates for an unmagnetized Maxwellian plasma have relied upon an approximate form for α{sup (2)} that is valid where two of the wave fields are fast (i.e., v{sub φ}=ω/k≫V{sub e} where ω is the angular frequency, k is the wavenumber, and V{sub e} is the electron thermal speed) and one is slow (v{sub φ}≪V{sub e}). Recently, an exact expression was derived for α{sup (2)} that is valid for any phase speeds of the three waves in an unmagnetized Maxwellian plasma. Here, this exact α{sup (2)} is applied to the calculation of the three-dimensional rates for electrostatic decay and scattering off thermal ions, and the resulting exact rates are compared with the approximate rates. The calculations are performed using previously derived three-dimensional rates for electrostatic decay given in terms of a general α{sup (2)}, and newly derived three-dimensional rates for scattering off thermal ions; the scattering rate is derived assuming a Maxwellian ion distribution, and both rates are derived assuming arc distributions for the wave spectra. For most space plasma conditions, the approximate rate is found to be accurate to better than 20%; however, for sufficiently low Langmuir phase speeds (v{sub φ}/V{sub e}≈3) appropriate to some spatial domains of the foreshock regions of planetary bow shocks and type II solar radio bursts, the use of the exact rate may be necessary for accurate calculations. The relative rates of electrostatic decay

  10. Factors Influencing Male Plutella xylostella (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae) Capture Rates in Sex Pheromone-Baited Traps on Canola in Western Canada.

    PubMed

    Miluch, C E; Dosdall, L M; Evenden, M L

    2014-12-01

    Optimization of male moth trapping rates in sex pheromone-baited traps plays a key role in managing Plutella xylostella (L.). We investigated various ways to increase the attractiveness of pheromone-baited traps to P. xylostella in canola agroecosystems in AB, Canada. Factors tested included pheromone blend and dose, addition of a green leaf volatile to the pheromone at different times during the season, lure type, trap color, and height. The industry standard dose of 100 μg of pheromone (four-component blend) per lure (ConTech Enterprises Inc., Delta, British Columbia [BC], Canada) captured the most moths in the two lure types tested. Traps baited with pheromone released from gray rubber septa captured more males than those baited with red rubber septa. Traps baited with lures in which Z11-16: Ac is the main component attracted significantly more moths than those in which Z11-16: Ald is the main component. The addition of the green leaf volatile, (Z)-3-hexenyl acetate, to pheromone at a range of doses, did not increase moth capture at any point during the canola growing season. Unpainted white traps captured significantly more male moths than pheromone-baited traps that were painted yellow. Trap height had no significant effect on moth capture. Recommendations for monitoring P. xylostella in canola agroecosystems of western Canada include using a pheromone blend with Z11-16: Ac as the main component released from gray rubber septa at a dose of 100 μg.

  11. A coupled deterministic/stochastic method for computing neutron capture therapy dose rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, Thomas Richard

    Neutron capture therapy (NCT) is an experimental method of treating brain tumors and other cancers by: (1) injecting or infusing the patient with a tumor-seeking, neutron target-labeled drug; and (2) irradiating the patient in an intense epithermal neutron fluence. The nuclear reaction between the neutrons and the target nuclei (e.g. sp{10}B(n,alpha)sp7Lirbrack releases energy in the form of high-LET (i.e. energy deposited within the range of a cell diameter) reaction particles which selectively kill the tumor cell. The efficacy of NCT is partly dependent on the delivery of maximum thermal neutron fluence to the tumor and the minimization of radiation dose to healthy tissue. Since the filtered neutron source (e.g. research reactor) usually provides a broad energy spectrum of highly-penetrating neutron and gamma-photon radiation, detailed transport calculations are necessary in order to plan treatments that use optimal treatment facility configurations and patient positioning. Current computational methods for NCT use either discrete ordinates calculation or, more often, Monte Carlo simulation to predict neutron fluences in the vicinity of the tumor. These methods do not, however, accurately calculate the transport of radiation throughout the entire facility or the deposition of dose in all the various parts of the body due to shortcomings of using either method alone. A computational method, specifically designed for NCT problems, has been adapted from the MASH methodology and couples a forward discrete ordinates (Ssb{n}) calculation with an adjoint Monte Carlo run to predict the dose at any point within the patient. The transport from the source through the filter/collimator is performed with a forward DORT run, and this is then coupled to adjoint MORSE results at a selected coupling parallelepiped which surrounds human phantom. Another routine was written to allow the user to generate the MORSE models at various angles and positions within the treatment room. The

  12. Exact estimate of the α -decay rate and semiclassical approach in deformed nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delion, D. S.; Liotta, R. J.; Wyss, R.

    2015-11-01

    We compare the quantum mechanical procedures to estimate the total α -decay width from deformed nuclei in the laboratory and intrinsic systems of coordinates. Our analysis shows that the total half-life estimated in the intrinsic frame by neglecting the rotational motion of the core (adiabatic approach) is one order of magnitude smaller at β2=0.3 than the corresponding value in the spherical case. A similar calculation in the laboratory system of coordinates by considering the core motion (giving the correct theoretical estimate) predicts a reduction by only a factor of 2. The widely used "angular WKB" (Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin) semiclassical procedure provides decay widths which are comparable to the adiabatic approach. We propose a new and very simple semiclassical "angular momentum WKB" procedure to evaluate the decay width in deformed nuclei. It provides decay widths very close to the ones obtained by the exact laboratory coupling channels procedure.

  13. Decay rates of Gaussian-type I-balls and Bose-enhancement effects in 3+1 dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Kawasaki, Masahiro; Yamada, Masaki

    2014-02-03

    I-balls/oscillons are long-lived spatially localized lumps of a scalar field which may be formed after inflation. In the scalar field theory with monomial potential nearly and shallower than quadratic, which is motivated by chaotic inflationary models and supersymmetric theories, the scalar field configuration of I-balls is approximately Gaussian. If the I-ball interacts with another scalar field, the I-ball eventually decays into radiation. Recently, it was pointed out that the decay rate of I-balls increases exponentially by the effects of Bose enhancement under some conditions and a non-perturbative method to compute the exponential growth rate has been derived. In this paper, we apply the method to the Gaussian-type I-ball in 3+1 dimensions assuming spherical symmetry, and calculate the partial decay rates into partial waves, labelled by the angular momentum of daughter particles. We reveal the conditions that the I-ball decays exponentially, which are found to depend on the mass and angular momentum of daughter particles and also be affected by the quantum uncertainty in the momentum of daughter particles.

  14. Modification of magicity toward the dripline and its impact on electron-capture rates for stellar core collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raduta, Ad. R.; Gulminelli, F.; Oertel, M.

    2016-02-01

    The importance of microphysical inputs from laboratory nuclear experiments and theoretical nuclear structure calculations in the understanding of core-collapse dynamics and the subsequent supernova explosion is largely recognized in the recent literature. In this work, we analyze the impact of the masses of very neutron-rich nuclei on the matter composition during collapse and the corresponding electron-capture rate. To this end, we introduce an empirical modification of the popular Duflo-Zuker mass model to account for possible shell quenching far from stability. We study the effect of this quenching on the average electron-capture rate. We show that the pre-eminence of the closed shells with N =50 and N =82 in the collapse dynamics is considerably decreased if the shell gaps are reduced in the region of 78Ni and beyond. As a consequence, local modifications of the overall electron-capture rate of up to 30% can be expected, depending on the strength of magicity quenching. This finding has potentially important consequences on the entropy generation, the neutrino emissivity, and the mass of the core at bounce. Our work underlines the importance of new experimental measurements in this region of the nuclear chart, the most crucial information being the nuclear mass and the Gamow-Teller strength. Reliable microscopic calculations of the associated elementary rate, in a wide range of temperatures and electron densities, optimized on these new empirical information, will be additionally needed to get quantitative predictions of the collapse dynamics.

  15. Neutron capture by Ru: Neutron cross sections of {sup 96,102,104}Ru and gamma-ray spectroscopy in the decays of {sup 97,103,105}Ru

    SciTech Connect

    Krane, K. S.

    2010-04-15

    Cross sections for radiative capture of neutrons have been measured for stable isotopes of Ru with mass numbers 96,102, and 104. From separate irradiations using thermal and epithermal neutrons, independent values for the thermal cross section and effective resonance integral have been determined. Spectroscopic studies of the gamma rays emitted in the decays of {sup 97,103,105}Ru have enabled improvements in the precision of the energies and intensities of the radiations along with corresponding improvements in the beta-decay feeding intensities and the energies of the levels in the respective daughter nuclei. Similar spectroscopic measurements of the decays of {sup 105}Rh (daughter of {sup 105}Ru) and {sup 96}Tc (produced from n,p reactions on {sup 96}Ru) have resulted in improved gamma-ray energies and intensities in those decays.

  16. Searches for massive neutrino emission in 14C beta and 55Fe electron-capture decays

    SciTech Connect

    Wietfeldt, Fred Eberhardt

    1994-05-01

    In 1985 Simpson reported evidence for the emission of a 17 keV mass neutrino in a small fraction of tritium beta decays. An experimental controversy ensued in which a number of both positive and negative results were reported. The beta spectrum of 14C was collected in a unique 14C-doped planar germanium detector and a distortion was observed that initially confirmed Simpson`s result. Further tests linked this distortion to a splitting of the collected charge between the central detector and the surrounding guard ring in a fraction of the events. A second 14C measurement showed no evidence for emission of a 17 keV mass neutrino. In a related experiment, a high statistics electron-capture internal-bremsstrahlung photon spectrum of 55Fe was collected with a coaxial germanium detector. A local search for departures from a smooth shape near the endpoint was performed, using a second-derivative technique. An upper limit of 0.65% (95% C.L.) for the mixing Of a neutrino in the mass range 5--25 keV was established. The upper limit on the mixing of a 17 keV mass neutrino was 0.14% (95% C.L.).

  17. Large O(m-2c) nonperturbative corrections to the inclusive rate of the decay B -> Xsγ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voloshin, M. B.

    1997-02-01

    It is shown that the inclusive rate of the rare weak radiative decays B -> Xsγ contains a series of nonperturbative corrections, whose `short distance' scale is set by m-1c, rather than bym-1b . The first correction in this series is expressed through the chromomagnetic interaction of the b quark inside the B meson and the relative magnitude of the effect is determined by the ratio /m2c. Though the magnitude of this first correction is suppressed by a numerical coefficient, the sensitivity of the decay rate to the distance scale m-1c may significantly limit the accuracy of purely perturbative predictions for the rate.

  18. Environmental Controls on Cumulative and Yearly Litter Decay Rates Over Four Years in Forested and Harvested Sites Across Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trofymow, J. A.; Thompson, E.; Cameron, A.; Pare, D.; Amiro, B. D.; Lavigne, M.; Smyth, C.; Black, T. A.; Barr, A. G.; Margolis, H. A.

    2010-12-01

    weak. Both temperature and moisture accounted for differences in cumulative decay rates and mass loss of surface litter among forest site type and cover, though soil microenvironment accounted for more variation than did site climate. Forest site type and cover effects were still significant even when controlled for microenvironment, suggesting other soil or biotic factors need to be accounted for in predicting litter decay.

  19. Enhanced Dark Matter Annihilation Rate for Positron and Electron Excesses from Q-Ball Decay

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, John

    2009-10-09

    We show that Q-ball decay in Affleck-Dine baryogenesis models can account for dark matter when the annihilation cross section is sufficiently enhanced to explain the positron and electron excesses observed by PAMELA, ATIC, and PPB-BETS. For Affleck-Dine baryogenesis along a d=6 flat direction, the reheating temperature is approximately 30 GeV and the Q-ball decay temperature is in the range of 10-100 MeV. The lightest supersymmetric particles produced by Q-ball decay annihilate down to the observed dark matter density if the cross section is enhanced by a factor approx10{sup 3} relative to the thermal relic cross section.

  20. Detailed microscopic calculation of stellar electron and positron capture rates on 24Mg for O+Ne+Mg core simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabi, Jameel-Un

    2008-09-01

    A few white dwarfs, located in binary systems, may acquire sufficiently high mass-accretion rates resulting in the burning of carbon and oxygen under nondegenerate conditions forming an O+Ne+Mg core. These O+Ne+Mg cores are gravitationally less bound than more massive progenitor stars and can release more energy due to the nuclear burning. They are also amongst the probable candidates for low entropy r-process sites. Recent observations of subluminous Type II-P supernovae (e.g. 2005cs, 2003gd, 1999br and 1997D) were able to rekindle the interest in 8-10 Modot which develop O+Ne+Mg cores. Microscopic calculations of capture rates on 24Mg, which may contribute significantly to the collapse of O+Ne+Mg cores, using the shell model and the proton-neutron quasiparticle random-phase approximation (pn-QRPA) theory, were performed earlier and comparisons made. Simulators, however, may require these capture rates on a fine scale. For the first time, a detailed microscopic calculation of the electron and positron capture rates on 24Mg on an extensive temperature-density scale is presented here. This type of scale is more appropriate for interpolation purposes and of greater utility for simulation codes. The calculations are done using the pn-QRPA theory using a separable interaction. The deformation parameter, believed to be a key parameter in QRPA calculations, is adopted from experimental data to increase the reliability of the QRPA results further. The resulting calculated rates are up to a factor of 14 or more enhanced as compared to shell model rates and may lead to some interesting scenarios for core collapse simulators.

  1. Rates, polarizations, and asymmetries in charmless vector-vector B meson decays.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Gaillard, J-M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Robbe, P; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kral, J F; Kukartsev, G; LeClerc, C; Levi, M E; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Romosan, A; Ronan, M T; Shelkov, V G; Telnov, A V; Wenzel, W A; Ford, K; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Knowles, D J; Morgan, S E; Penny, R C; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Deppermann, T; Goetzen, K; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schmuecker, H; Steinke, M; Barlow, N R; Boyd, J T; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; Mackay, C; Wilson, F F; Abe, K; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Kyberd, P; McKemey, A K; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Chao, M; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; McMahon, S; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, Sh; Schwanke, U; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Kuznetsova, N; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Beringer, J; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Turri, M; Walkowiak, W; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Abe, T; Barillari, T; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Clark, P J; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Roy, J; Smith, J G; van Hoek, W C; Zhang, L; Harton, J L; Hu, T; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zhang, J; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Colberg, T; Dickopp, M; Dubitzky, R S; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Maly, E; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Wilden, L; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Khan, A; Lavin, D; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Swain, J E; Tinslay, J; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Treadwell, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Falciai, D; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Pastore, F C; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Morii, M; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Eschrich, I; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Sanders, P; Taylor, G P; Grenier, G J; Lee, S-J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Yi, J; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Laplace, S; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Tantot, L; Wormser, G; Brigljević, V; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Coleman, J P; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Kay, M; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Shorthouse, H W; Strother, P; Vidal, P B; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flaecher, H U; George, S; Green, M G; Kurup, A; Marker, C E; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Vaitsas, G; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, R J; Forti, A C; Hart, P A; Jackson, F; Lafferty, G D; Lyon, A J; Weatherall, J H; Williams, J C; Farbin, A; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Mangeol, D J J; Milek, M; Patel, P M; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Hast, C; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cartaro, C; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; LoSecco, J M; Gabriel, T A; Brau, B; Pulliam, T; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Tiozzo, G; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; de la Vaissière, Ch; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Ocariz, J; Pivk, M; Roos, L; Stark, J; T'Jampens, S; Therin, G; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Martinez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lu, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Tanaka, H A; Varnes, E W; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Pierini, M; Piredda, G; Tehrani, F Safai; Voena, C; Christ, S; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Xella, S M; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Hamel De Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Langer, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Schott, G; Vasseur, G; Yeche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Yumiceva, F X; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Convery, M R; Coupal, D P; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Grauges-Pous, E; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Jessop, C P; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Langenegger, U; Leith, D W G S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Menke, S; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Ratcliff, B N; Robertson, S H; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Simi, G; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wright, D H; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Meyer, T I; Roat, C; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Borean, C; Bosisio, L; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Hu, H; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Di Lodovico, F; Mihalyi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Sekula, S J; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2003-10-24

    With a sample of approximately 89 x 10(6) B(-)B pairs collected with the BABAR detector, we perform a search for B meson decays into pairs of charmless vector mesons (phi, rho, and K*). We measure the branching fractions, determine the degree of longitudinal polarization, and search for CP violation asymmetries in the processes B+-->phiK(*+), B0-->phiK(*0), B+-->rho(0)K(*+), and B+-->rho(0)rho(+). We also set an upper limit on the branching fraction for the decay B0-->rho(0)rho(0).

  2. Rates, Polarizations, and Asymmetries in Charmless Vector-Vector B Meson Decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Gaillard, J.-M.; Hicheur, A.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Robbe, P.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Palano, A.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J. C.; Qi, N. D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y. S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.; Abrams, G. S.; Borgland, A. W.; Breon, A. B.; Brown, D. N.; Button-Shafer, J.; Cahn, R. N.; Charles, E.; Day, C. T.; Gill, M. S.; Gritsan, A. V.; Groysman, Y.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Kadel, R. W.; Kadyk, J.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Kral, J. F.; Kukartsev, G.; Leclerc, C.; Levi, M. E.; Lynch, G.; Mir, L. M.; Oddone, P. J.; Orimoto, T. J.; Pripstein, M.; Roe, N. A.; Romosan, A.; Ronan, M. T.; Shelkov, V. G.; Telnov, A. V.; Wenzel, W. A.; Ford, K.; Harrison, T. J.; Hawkes, C. M.; Knowles, D. J.; Morgan, S. E.; Penny, R. C.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, N. K.; Deppermann, T.; Goetzen, K.; Koch, H.; Lewandowski, B.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peters, K.; Schmuecker, H.; Steinke, M.; Barlow, N. R.; Boyd, J. T.; Chevalier, N.; Cottingham, W. N.; Kelly, M. P.; Latham, T. E.; Mackay, C.; Wilson, F. F.; Abe, K.; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Thiessen, D.; Kyberd, P.; McKemey, A. K.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Golubev, V. B.; Ivanchenko, V. N.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Yushkov, A. N.; Best, D.; Chao, M.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; McMahon, S.; Mommsen, R. K.; Roethel, W.; Stoker, D. P.; Buchanan, C.; del Re, D.; Hadavand, H. K.; Hill, E. J.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Paar, H. P.; Rahatlou, Sh.; Schwanke, U.; Sharma, V.; Berryhill, J. W.; Campagnari, C.; Dahmes, B.; Kuznetsova, N.; Levy, S. L.; Long, O.; Lu, A.; Mazur, M. A.; Richman, J. D.; Verkerke, W.; Beck, T. W.; Beringer, J.; Eisner, A. M.; Heusch, C. A.; Lockman, W. S.; Schalk, T.; Schmitz, R. E.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Turri, M.; Walkowiak, W.; Williams, D. C.; Wilson, M. G.; Albert, J.; Chen, E.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dvoretskii, A.; Hitlin, D. G.; Narsky, I.; Porter, F. C.; Ryd, A.; Samuel, A.; Yang, S.; Jayatilleke, S.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Abe, T.; Barillari, T.; Blanc, F.; Bloom, P.; Chen, S.; Clark, P. J.; Ford, W. T.; Nauenberg, U.; Olivas, A.; Rankin, P.; Roy, J.; Smith, J. G.; van Hoek, W. C.; Zhang, L.; Harton, J. L.; Hu, T.; Soffer, A.; Toki, W. H.; Wilson, R. J.; Zhang, J.; Altenburg, D.; Brandt, T.; Brose, J.; Colberg, T.; Dickopp, M.; Dubitzky, R. S.; Hauke, A.; Lacker, H. M.; Maly, E.; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R.; Nogowski, R.; Otto, S.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Spaan, B.; Wilden, L.; Bernard, D.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Brochard, F.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Thiebaux, Ch.; Vasileiadis, G.; Verderi, M.; Khan, A.; Lavin, D.; Muheim, F.; Playfer, S.; Swain, J. E.; Tinslay, J.; Andreotti, M.; Azzolini, V.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Luppi, E.; Negrini, M.; Piemontese, L.; Sarti, A.; Treadwell, E.; Anulli, F.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Falciai, D.; Finocchiaro, G.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Zallo, A.; Buzzo, A.; Contri, R.; Crosetti, G.; Lo Vetere, M.; Macri, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Pastore, F. C.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Santroni, A.; Tosi, S.; Bailey, S.; Morii, M.; Bhimji, W.; Bowerman, D. A.; Dauncey, P. D.; Egede, U.; Eschrich, I.; Gaillard, J. R.; Morton, G. W.; Nash, J. A.; Sanders, P.; Taylor, G. P.; Grenier, G. J.; Lee, S.-J.; Mallik, U.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Lamsa, J.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Yi, J.; Davier, M.; Grosdidier, G.; Höcker, A.; Laplace, S.; Le Diberder, F.; Lepeltier, V.; Lutz, A. M.; Petersen, T. C.; Plaszczynski, S.; Schune, M. H.; Tantot, L.; Wormser, G.; Brigljević, V.; Cheng, C. H.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Bevan, A. J.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; Kay, M.; Parry, R. J.; Payne, D. J.; Sloane, R. J.; Touramanis, C.; Back, J. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Shorthouse, H. W.; Strother, P.; Vidal, P. B.; Brown, C. L.; Cowan, G.; Flack, R. L.; Flaecher, H. U.; George, S.; Green, M. G.; Kurup, A.; Marker, C. E.; McMahon, T. R.; Ricciardi, S.; Salvatore, F.; Vaitsas, G.; Winter, M. A.; Brown, D.; Davis, C. L.; Allison, J.; Barlow, R. J.; Forti, A. C.; Hart, P. A.; Jackson, F.; Lafferty, G. D.; Lyon, A. J.; Weatherall, J. H.; Williams, J. C.; Farbin, A.; Jawahery, A.; Kovalskyi, D.; Lae, C. K.; Lillard, V.; Roberts, D. A.; Blaylock, G.; Dallapiccola, C.; Flood, K. T.; Hertzbach, S. S.; Kofler, R.; Koptchev, V. B.; Moore, T. B.; Saremi, S.; Staengle, H.; Willocq, S.; Cowan, R.; Sciolla, G.; Taylor, F.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Mangeol, D. J.; Milek, M.; Patel, P. M.; Lazzaro, A.; Palombo, F.; Bauer, J. M.; Cremaldi, L.; Eschenburg, V.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Reidy, J.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D. J.; Zhao, H. W.; Hast, C.; Taras, P.; Nicholson, H.; Cartaro, C.; Cavallo, N.; de Nardo, G.; Fabozzi, F.; Gatto, C.; Lista, L.; Paolucci, P.; Piccolo, D.; Sciacca, C.; Baak, M. A.; Raven, G.; Losecco, J. M.; Gabriel, T. A.; Brau, B.; Pulliam, T.; Wong, Q. K.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Potter, C. T.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Torrence, E.; Colecchia, F.; Dorigo, A.; Galeazzi, F.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Tiozzo, G.; Voci, C.; Benayoun, M.; Briand, H.; Chauveau, J.; David, P.; de La Vaissière, Ch.; del Buono, L.; Hamon, O.; John, M. J.; Leruste, Ph.; Ocariz, J.; Pivk, M.; Roos, L.; Stark, J.; T'jampens, S.; Therin, G.; Manfredi, P. F.; Re, V.; Gladney, L.; Guo, Q. H.; Panetta, J.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bondioli, M.; Bucci, F.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Marchiori, G.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Morganti, M.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rama, M.; Rizzo, G.; Sandrelli, F.; Walsh, J.; Haire, M.; Judd, D.; Paick, K.; Wagoner, D. E.; Danielson, N.; Elmer, P.; Lu, C.; Miftakov, V.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J.; Tanaka, H. A.; Varnes, E. W.; Bellini, F.; Cavoto, G.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Morganti, S.; Pierini, M.; Piredda, G.; Tehrani, F. Safai; Voena, C.; Christ, S.; Wagner, G.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; de Groot, N.; Franek, B.; Geddes, N. I.; Gopal, G. P.; Olaiya, E. O.; Xella, S. M.; Aleksan, R.; Emery, S.; Gaidot, A.; Ganzhur, S. F.; Giraud, P.-F.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Kozanecki, W.; Langer, M.; London, G. W.; Mayer, B.; Schott, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yeche, Ch.; Zito, M.; Purohit, M. V.; Weidemann, A. W.; Yumiceva, F. X.; Aston, D.; Bartoldus, R.; Berger, N.; Boyarski, A. M.; Buchmueller, O. L.; Convery, M. R.; Coupal, D. P.; Dong, D.; Dorfan, J.; Dujmic, D.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Glanzman, T.; Gowdy, S. J.; Grauges-Pous, E.; Hadig, T.; Halyo, V.; Hryn'ova, T.; Innes, W. R.; Jessop, C. P.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Langenegger, U.; Leith, D. W.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; Marsiske, H.; Menke, S.; Messner, R.; Muller, D. R.; O'Grady, C. P.; Ozcan, V. E.; Perazzo, A.; Perl, M.; Petrak, S.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Robertson, S. H.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Schwiening, J.; Simi, G.; Snyder, A.; Soha, A.; Stelzer, J.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va'Vra, J.; Wagner, S. R.; Weaver, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wright, D. H.; Young, C. C.; Burchat, P. R.; Edwards, A. J.; Meyer, T. I.; Roat, C.; Ahmed, S.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Saleem, M.; Wappler, F. R.; Bugg, W.; Krishnamurthy, M.; Spanier, S. M.; Eckmann, R.; Kim, H.; Ritchie, J. L.; Schwitters, R. F.; Izen, J. M.; Kitayama, I.; Lou, X. C.; Ye, S.; Bianchi, F.; Bona, M.; Gallo, F.; Gamba, D.; Borean, C.; Bosisio, L.; Della Ricca, G.; Dittongo, S.; Grancagnolo, S.; Lanceri, L.; Poropat, P.; Vitale, L.; Vuagnin, G.; Panvini, R. S.; Banerjee, Sw.; Brown, C. M.; Fortin, D.; Jackson, P. D.; Kowalewski, R.; Roney, J. M.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Datta, M.; Eichenbaum, A. M.; Hu, H.; Johnson, J. R.; Kutter, P. E.; Li, H.; Liu, R.; di Lodovico, F.; Mihalyi, A.; Mohapatra, A. K.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Sekula, S. J.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Wu, J.; Wu, S. L.; Yu, Z.; Neal, H.

    2003-10-01

    With a sample of approximately 89×106 BB¯ pairs collected with the BABAR detector, we perform a search for B meson decays into pairs of charmless vector mesons (φ, ρ, and K*). We measure the branching fractions, determine the degree of longitudinal polarization, and search for CP violation asymmetries in the processes B+→φK*+, B0→φK*0, B+→ρ0K*+, and B+→ρ0ρ+. We also set an upper limit on the branching fraction for the decay B0→ρ0ρ0.

  3. Shell-model calculations of beta-decay rates for s- and r-process nucleosyntheses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, K.; Mathews, G. J.; Bloom, S. D.

    1985-10-01

    Examples of large-basis shell-model calculations of Gamow-Teller (BETA)-decay properties of specific interest in the astrophysical s- and r- processes are presented. Numerical results are given for: (1) the GT-matrix elements for the excited state decays of the unstable s-process nucleus Tc-99; and (2) the GT-strength function for the neutron-rich nucleus Cd-130, which lies on the r-process path. The results are discussed in conjunction with the astrophysics problems.

  4. Modelling the Effects of Prey Size and Distribution on Prey Capture Rates of Two Sympatric Marine Predators

    PubMed Central

    Thaxter, Chris B.; Daunt, Francis; Grémillet, David; Harris, Mike P.; Benvenuti, Silvano; Watanuki, Yutaka; Hamer, Keith C.; Wanless, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Understanding how prey capture rates are influenced by feeding ecology and environmental conditions is fundamental to assessing anthropogenic impacts on marine higher predators. We compared how prey capture rates varied in relation to prey size, prey patch distribution and prey density for two species of alcid, common guillemot (Uria aalge) and razorbill (Alca torda) during the chick-rearing period. We developed a Monte Carlo approach parameterised with foraging behaviour from bird-borne data loggers, observations of prey fed to chicks, and adult diet from water-offloading, to construct a bio-energetics model. Our primary goal was to estimate prey capture rates, and a secondary aim was to test responses to a set of biologically plausible environmental scenarios. Estimated prey capture rates were 1.5±0.8 items per dive (0.8±0.4 and 1.1±0.6 items per minute foraging and underwater, respectively) for guillemots and 3.7±2.4 items per dive (4.9±3.1 and 7.3±4.0 items per minute foraging and underwater, respectively) for razorbills. Based on species' ecology, diet and flight costs, we predicted that razorbills would be more sensitive to decreases in 0-group sandeel (Ammodytes marinus) length (prediction 1), but guillemots would be more sensitive to prey patches that were more widely spaced (prediction 2), and lower in prey density (prediction 3). Estimated prey capture rates increased non-linearly as 0-group sandeel length declined, with the slope being steeper in razorbills, supporting prediction 1. When prey patches were more dispersed, estimated daily energy expenditure increased by a factor of 3.0 for guillemots and 2.3 for razorbills, suggesting guillemots were more sensitive to patchier prey, supporting prediction 2. However, both species responded similarly to reduced prey density (guillemot expenditure increased by 1.7; razorbill by 1.6), thus not supporting prediction 3. This bio-energetics approach complements other foraging models in predicting likely

  5. Modelling the effects of prey size and distribution on prey capture rates of two sympatric marine predators.

    PubMed

    Thaxter, Chris B; Daunt, Francis; Grémillet, David; Harris, Mike P; Benvenuti, Silvano; Watanuki, Yutaka; Hamer, Keith C; Wanless, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Understanding how prey capture rates are influenced by feeding ecology and environmental conditions is fundamental to assessing anthropogenic impacts on marine higher predators. We compared how prey capture rates varied in relation to prey size, prey patch distribution and prey density for two species of alcid, common guillemot (Uria aalge) and razorbill (Alca torda) during the chick-rearing period. We developed a Monte Carlo approach parameterised with foraging behaviour from bird-borne data loggers, observations of prey fed to chicks, and adult diet from water-offloading, to construct a bio-energetics model. Our primary goal was to estimate prey capture rates, and a secondary aim was to test responses to a set of biologically plausible environmental scenarios. Estimated prey capture rates were 1.5 ± 0.8 items per dive (0.8 ± 0.4 and 1.1 ± 0.6 items per minute foraging and underwater, respectively) for guillemots and 3.7 ± 2.4 items per dive (4.9 ± 3.1 and 7.3 ± 4.0 items per minute foraging and underwater, respectively) for razorbills. Based on species' ecology, diet and flight costs, we predicted that razorbills would be more sensitive to decreases in 0-group sandeel (Ammodytes marinus) length (prediction 1), but guillemots would be more sensitive to prey patches that were more widely spaced (prediction 2), and lower in prey density (prediction 3). Estimated prey capture rates increased non-linearly as 0-group sandeel length declined, with the slope being steeper in razorbills, supporting prediction 1. When prey patches were more dispersed, estimated daily energy expenditure increased by a factor of 3.0 for guillemots and 2.3 for razorbills, suggesting guillemots were more sensitive to patchier prey, supporting prediction 2. However, both species responded similarly to reduced prey density (guillemot expenditure increased by 1.7; razorbill by 1.6), thus not supporting prediction 3. This bio-energetics approach complements other foraging models in

  6. Estimating Suicide Rates in Developing Nations: A Low-Cost Newspaper Capture-Recapture Approach in Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Harris, Keith M; Thandrayen, Joanne; Samphoas, Chien; Se, Pros; Lewchalermwongse, Boontriga; Ratanashevorn, Rattanakorn; Perry, Megan L; Britts, Choloe

    2016-04-01

    This study tested a low-cost method for estimating suicide rates in developing nations that lack adequate statistics. Data comprised reported suicides from Cambodia's 2 largest newspapers. Capture-recapture modeling estimated a suicide rate of 3.8/100 000 (95% CI = 2.5-6.7) for 2012. That compares to World Health Organization estimates of 1.3 to 9.4/100 000 and a Cambodian government estimate of 3.5/100 000. Suicide rates of males were twice that of females, and rates of those <40 years were twice that of those ≥40 years. Capture-recapture modeling with newspaper reports proved a reasonable method for estimating suicide rates for countries with inadequate official data. These methods are low-cost and can be applied to regions with at least 2 newspapers with overlapping reports. Means to further improve this approach are discussed. These methods are applicable to both recent and historical data, which can benefit epidemiological work, and may also be applicable to homicides and other statistics.

  7. Experimental investigation of effects of jet decay rate on jet-induced pressures on a flat plate: Tabulated data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhlman, J. M.; Ousterhout, D. S.; Warcup, R. W.

    1978-01-01

    Tabular data are presented for an experimental study of the effects of jet decay rate on the jet-induced pressure distribution on a flat plate for a single jet issuing at right angle to the flat plate into a uniform crossflow. The data are presented in four sections: (1) presents the static nozzle calibration data; (2) lists the plate surface static pressure data and integrated loads; (3) lists the jet centerline trajectory data; and (4) lists the centerline dynamic pressure data.

  8. Measurement of the Branching Fraction and Decay Rate Asymmetry of B to D_pi+ pi- pi0 K-

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Oregon U. /SLAC /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Stony Brook /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Vanderbilt U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U.

    2005-06-10

    The authors report the observation of the decay B{sup -} {yields} D{sub {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}}K{sup -}, where D{sub {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}} indicates a neutral D meson detected in the final state {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}, excluding K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}. This doubly Cabibbo-suppressed decay chain can be used to measure the CKM phase {gamma}. Using about 229 million e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} B{bar B} events recorded by the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring, they measure the branching fraction {Beta}(B{sup -} {yields} D{sub {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}K{sup -}}) = (5.5 {+-} 1.0 (stat.) {+-} 0.7 (syst.)) x 10{sup -6} and the decay rate asymmetry A = -0.02 {+-} 0.16 (stat.) {+-} 0.03 (syst.) for the full decay chain.

  9. Real-Time Imaging of Ground Cover: Relationships with Radiation Capture, Canopy Photosynthesis, and Daily Growth Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klassen, S. P.; Ritchie, G.; Frantz, J. M.; Pinnock, D.; Bugbee, B.

    2003-01-01

    Cumulative absorbed radiation is highly correlated with crop biomass and yield. In this chapter we describe the use of a digital camera and commercial imaging software for estimating daily radiation capture, canopy photosynthesis, and relative growth rate. Digital images were used to determine percentage of ground cover of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) communities grown at five temperatures. Plants were grown in a steady-state, 10-chamber CO2 gas exchange system, which was used to measure canopy photosynthesis and daily carbon gain. Daily measurements of percentage of ground cover were highly correlated with daily measurements of both absorbed radiation (r(sup 2) = 0.99) and daily carbon gain (r(sup 2) = 0.99). Differences among temperature treatments indicated that these relationships were influenced by leaf angle, leaf area index, and chlorophyll content. An analysis of the daily images also provided good estimates of relative growth rates, which were verified by gas exchange measurements of daily carbon gain. In a separate study we found that images taken at hourly intervals were effective for monitoring real-time growth. Our data suggests that hourly images can be used for early detection of plant stress. Applications, limitations, and potential errors are discussed. We have long known that crop yield is determined by the efficiency of four component processes: (i) radiation capture, (ii) quantum yield, (iii) carbon use efficiency, and (iv) carbon partitioning efficiency (Charles-Edwards, 1982; Penning de Vries & van Laar, 1982; Thornley, 1976). More than one-half century ago, Watson (1947, 1952) showed that variation in radiation capture accounted for almost all of the variation in yield between sites in temperate regions, because the three other components are relatively constant when the crop is not severely stressed. More recently, Monteith (1977) reviewed the literature on the close correlation between radiation capture and yield. Bugbee and Monje (1992

  10. Monitoring oral temperature, heart rate, and respiration rate of West Indian manatees (Trichechus manatus) during capture and handling in the field

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wong, Arthur W.; Bonde, Robert K.; Siegal-Willott, Jessica; Stamper, M. Andrew; Colee, James; Powell, James A.; Reid, James P.; Deutsch, Charles J.; Harr, Kendal E.

    2012-01-01

    West Indian manatees (Trichechus manatus) are captured, handled, and transported to facilitate conservation, research, and rehabilitation efforts. Monitoring manatee oral temperature (OT), heart rate (HR), and respiration rate (RR) during out-of-water handling can assist efforts to maintain animal well-being and improve medical response to evidence of declining health. To determine effects of capture on manatee vital signs, we monitored OT, HR, and RR continuously for a 50-min period in 38 healthy, awake, juvenile and adult Florida manatees (T. m. latirostris) and 48 similar Antillean manatees (T. m. manatus). We examined creatine kinase (CK), potassium (K+), serum amyloid A (SAA), and lactate values for each animal to assess possible systemic inflammation and muscular trauma. OT range was 29.5 to 36.2° C, HR range was 32 to 88 beats/min, and RR range was 0 to 17 breaths/5 min. Antillean manatees had higher initial OT, HR, and RR than Florida manatees (p < 0.001). As monitoring time progressed, mean differences between the subspecies were no longer significant. High RR over monitoring time was associated with high lactate concentration. Antillean manatees had higher overall lactate values ([mean ± SD] 20.6 ± 7.8 mmol/L) than Florida manatees (13.7 ± 6.7 mmol/L; p < 0.001). We recommend monitoring manatee OT, HR, and RR during capture and handling in the field or in a captive care setting.

  11. Auger decay rates of core hole states using equation of motion coupled cluster method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Aryya; Vaval, Nayana; Pal, Sourav

    2017-01-01

    The recent development of Linac coherent light source high intense X-ray laser makes it possible to create double core ionization in the molecule. The generation of double core hole state and its decay is identified by Auger spectroscopy. The decay of this double core hole (DCH) states can be used as a powerful spectroscopic tool in chemical analysis. In the present work, we have implemented a promising approach, known as CAP-EOMCC method, which is a combination of complex absorbing potential (CAP) and equation-of-motion coupled cluster (EOMCC) approach to calculate the lifetime of single and double core hole states. We have applied this method to calculate the lifetime of the single core hole (K-LL) and double core hole (KK-KLL) states of CH4, NH3 and HF molecules. The predicted lifetime is found to be extremely short.

  12. Evidence for CP violation in time-integrated D0→h(-)h(+) decay rates.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Abellan Beteta, C; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amhis, Y; Anderson, J; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Arrabito, L; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Bailey, D S; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bates, A; Bauer, C; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Benayoun, M; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blanks, C; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bobrov, A; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Büchler-Germann, A; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chiapolini, N; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Constantin, F; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Corti, G; Cowan, G A; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; De Bonis, I; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Lorenzi, F; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Degaudenzi, H; Del Buono, L; Deplano, C; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Dickens, J; Dijkstra, H; Diniz Batista, P; Domingo Bonal, F; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisele, F; Eisenhardt, S; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; Elsasser, Ch; Elsby, D; Esperante Pereira, D; Estève, L; Falabella, A; Fanchini, E; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Fave, V; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garnier, J-C; Garofoli, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gascon, D; Gaspar, C; Gauvin, N; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harji, R; Harnew, N; Harrison, J; Harrison, P F; Hartmann, T; He, J; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicks, E; Holubyev, K; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Huston, R S; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Ilten, P; Imong, J; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jahjah Hussein, M; Jans, E; Jansen, F; Jaton, P; Jean-Marie, B; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Keaveney, J; Kenyon, I R; Kerzel, U; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kim, Y M; Knecht, M; Koopman, R; Koppenburg, P; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kruzelecki, K; Kucharczyk, M; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Li, L; Li Gioi, L; Lieng, M; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; von Loeben, J; Lopes, J H; Lopez Asamar, E; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Luisier, J; Mac Raighne, A; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Magnin, J; Malde, S; Mamunur, R M D; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Mangiafave, N; Marconi, U; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martin, L; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinez Santos, D; Massafferri, A; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Matveev, M; Maurice, E; Maynard, B; Mazurov, A; McGregor, G; McNulty, R; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Merkel, J; Messi, R; Miglioranzi, S; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Musy, M; Mylroie-Smith, J; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Nedos, M; Needham, M; Neufeld, N; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Nikitin, N; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Pal, K; Palacios, J; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Paterson, S K; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perego, D L; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pessina, G; Petrella, A; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pie Valls, B; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Plackett, R; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pugatch, V; Navarro, A Puig; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Rinnert, K; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, E; Rodrigues, F; Rodriguez Perez, P; Rogers, G J; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Rosello, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruiz, H; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salzmann, C; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santinelli, R; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schleich, S; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, A C; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Sobczak, K; Soler, F J P; Solomin, A; Soomro, F; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Swientek, S; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'jampens, S; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tran, M T; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urquijo, P; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Viaud, B; Videau, I; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Visniakov, J; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Voss, H; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wishahi, J; Witek, M; Witzeling, W; Wotton, S A; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, F; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yushchenko, O; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhong, L; Zverev, E; Zvyagin, A

    2012-03-16

    A search for time-integrated CP violation in D(0)→h(-)h(+) (h=K, π) decays is presented using 0.62 fb(-1) of data collected by LHCb in 2011. The flavor of the charm meson is determined by the charge of the slow pion in the D(*+)→D(0)π(+) and D(*-)→D[over ¯](0)π(-) decay chains. The difference in CP asymmetry between D(0)→K(-)K(+) and D(0)→π(-)π(+), ΔA(CP)≡A(CP)(K(-)K(+))-A(CP)(π(-)π(+)), is measured to be [-0.82±0.21(stat)±0.11(syst)]%. This differs from the hypothesis of CP conservation by 3.5 standard deviations.

  13. Computing decay rates for new physics theories with FEYNRULES and MADGRAPH 5_AMC@NLO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alwall, Johan; Duhr, Claude; Fuks, Benjamin; Mattelaer, Olivier; Öztürk, Deniz Gizem; Shen, Chia-Hsien

    2015-12-01

    We present new features of the FEYNRULES and MADGRAPH 5_AMC@NLO programs for the automatic computation of decay widths that consistently include channels of arbitrary final-state multiplicity. The implementations are generic enough so that they can be used in the framework of any quantum field theory, possibly including higher-dimensional operators. We extend at the same time the conventions of the Universal FEYNRULES Output (or UFO) format to include decay tables and information on the total widths. We finally provide a set of representative examples of the usage of the new functions of the different codes in the framework of the Standard Model, the Higgs Effective Field Theory, the Strongly Interacting Light Higgs model and the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model and compare the results to available literature and programs for validation purposes.

  14. Evidence for CP Violation in Time-Integrated D0→h-h+ Decay Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Abellan Beteta, C.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Adrover, C.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A., Jr.; Amato, S.; Amhis, Y.; Anderson, J.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; Arrabito, L.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Bailey, D. S.; Balagura, V.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Bates, A.; Bauer, C.; Bauer, Th.; Bay, A.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Benayoun, M.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjørnstad, P. M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blanks, C.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bobrov, A.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; van den Brand, J.; Bressieux, J.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brook, N. H.; Brown, H.; Büchler-Germann, A.; Burducea, I.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Callot, O.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chiapolini, N.; Ciba, K.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coca, C.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Constantin, F.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Corti, G.; Cowan, G. A.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; de Bonis, I.; de Capua, S.; de Cian, M.; de Lorenzi, F.; de Miranda, J. M.; de Paula, L.; de Simone, P.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Degaudenzi, H.; Del Buono, L.; Deplano, C.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dickens, J.; Dijkstra, H.; Diniz Batista, P.; Domingo Bonal, F.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dupertuis, F.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; van Eijk, D.; Eisele, F.; Eisenhardt, S.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; Elsasser, Ch.; Elsby, D.; Esperante Pereira, D.; Estève, L.; Falabella, A.; Fanchini, E.; Färber, C.; Fardell, G.; Farinelli, C.; Farry, S.; Fave, V.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Furcas, S.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garnier, J.-C.; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gauvin, N.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gibson, V.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gordon, H.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hampson, T.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harji, R.; Harnew, N.; Harrison, J.; Harrison, P. F.; Hartmann, T.; He, J.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Hicks, E.; Holubyev, K.; Hopchev, P.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Huse, T.; Huston, R. S.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Iakovenko, V.; Ilten, P.; Imong, J.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jahjah Hussein, M.; Jans, E.; Jansen, F.; Jaton, P.; Jean-Marie, B.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Jost, B.; Kaballo, M.; Kandybei, S.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Keaveney, J.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kerzel, U.; Ketel, T.; Keune, A.; Khanji, B.; Kim, Y. M.; Knecht, M.; Koopman, R.; Koppenburg, P.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kruzelecki, K.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanciotti, E.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Li, L.; Li Gioi, L.; Lieng, M.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Liu, B.; Liu, G.; von Loeben, J.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Lopez-March, N.; Lu, H.; Luisier, J.; Mac Raighne, A.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Magnin, J.; Malde, S.; Mamunur, R. M. D.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Mangiafave, N.; Marconi, U.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martens, A.; Martin, L.; Martín Sánchez, A.; Martinez Santos, D.; Massafferri, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Matveev, M.; Maurice, E.; Maynard, B.; Mazurov, A.; McGregor, G.; McNulty, R.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Merkel, J.; Messi, R.; Miglioranzi, S.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Moran, D.; Morawski, P.; Mountain, R.; Mous, I.; Muheim, F.; Müller, K.; Muresan, R.; Muryn, B.; Muster, B.; Musy, M.; Mylroie-Smith, J.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Nedos, M.; Needham, M.; Neufeld, N.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nicol, M.; Niess, V.; Nikitin, N.; Nomerotski, A.; Novoselov, A.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Oggero, S.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Orlandea, M.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Owen, P.; Pal, K.; Palacios, J.; Palano, A.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Parkes, C.; Parkinson, C. J.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Paterson, S. K.; Patrick, G. N.; Patrignani, C.; Pavel-Nicorescu, C.; Pazos Alvarez, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perego, D. L.; Perez Trigo, E.; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Perret, P.; Perrin-Terrin, M.; Pessina, G.; Petrella, A.; Petrolini, A.; Phan, A.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pie Valls, B.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Plackett, R.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Polok, G.; Poluektov, A.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Powell, A.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pugatch, V.; Navarro, A. Puig; Qian, W.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Raven, G.; Redford, S.; Reid, M. M.; Dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Rinnert, K.; Roa Romero, D. A.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodrigues, F.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Rogers, G. J.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Rosello, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz, H.; Sabatino, G.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salzmann, C.; Sannino, M.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santinelli, R.; Santovetti, E.; Sapunov, M.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Savrie, M.; Savrina, D.; Schaack, P.; Schiller, M.; Schleich, S.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Seco, M.; Semennikov, A.; Senderowska, K.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shatalov, P.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, O.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, A. C.; Smith, N. A.; Smith, E.; Sobczak, K.; Soler, F. J. P.; Solomin, A.; Soomro, F.; Souza de Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Sparkes, A.; Spradlin, P.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Subbiah, V. K.; Swientek, S.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teodorescu, E.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tran, M. T.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tuning, N.; Ubeda Garcia, M.; Ukleja, A.; Urquijo, P.; Uwer, U.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Viaud, B.; Videau, I.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Visniakov, J.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Voss, H.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Webber, A. D.; Websdale, D.; Whitehead, M.; Wiedner, D.; Wiggers, L.; Wilkinson, G.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilson, F. F.; Wishahi, J.; Witek, M.; Witzeling, W.; Wotton, S. A.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, F.; Xing, Z.; Yang, Z.; Young, R.; Yushchenko, O.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W. C.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zverev, E.; Zvyagin, A.

    2012-03-01

    A search for time-integrated CP violation in D0→h-h+ (h=K, π) decays is presented using 0.62fb-1 of data collected by LHCb in 2011. The flavor of the charm meson is determined by the charge of the slow pion in the D*+→D0π+ and D*-→D¯0π- decay chains. The difference in CP asymmetry between D0→K-K+ and D0→π-π+, ΔACP≡ACP(K-K+)-ACP(π-π+), is measured to be [-0.82±0.21(stat)±0.11(syst)]%. This differs from the hypothesis of CP conservation by 3.5 standard deviations.

  15. Increasing capture efficiency of pallid sturgeon Scaphirhynchus albus (Forbes and Richardson, 1905) and the reliability of catch rate estimates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeVries, R. J.; Hann, D. A.; Schramm, H.L.

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of environmental parameters on the probability of capturing endangered pallid sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus albus) using trotlines in the lower Mississippi River. Pallid sturgeon were sampled by trotlines year round from 2008 to 2011. A logistic regression model indicated water temperature (T; P < 0.01) and depth (D; P = 0.03) had significant effects on capture probability (Y = −1.75 − 0.06T + 0.10D). Habitat type, surface current velocity, river stage, stage change and non-sturgeon bycatch were not significant predictors (P = 0.26–0.63). Although pallid sturgeon were caught throughout the year, the model predicted that sampling should focus on times when the water temperature is less than 12°C and in deeper water to maximize capture probability; these water temperature conditions commonly occur during November to March in the lower Mississippi River. Further, the significant effect of water temperature which varies widely over time, as well as water depth indicate that any efforts to use the catch rate to infer population trends will require the consideration of temperature and depth in standardized sampling efforts or adjustment of estimates.

  16. Decay rates of faecal indicator bacteria from sewage and ovine faeces in brackish and freshwater microcosms with contrasting suspended particulate matter concentrations.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Tracy L; Perrow, Karen; Rajko-Nenow, Paulina; Jago, Colin F; Jones, Davey L; Malham, Shelagh K; McDonald, James E

    2016-12-01

    To safeguard human health, legislative measures require the monitoring of faecal indicator bacteria (FIB) concentrations in recreational and shellfish waters. Consequently, numerous studies have focussed on FIB survival in the water column and more recently in estuarine sediments. However, there is a paucity of information regarding the influence of contrasting suspended particulate matter (SPM) concentrations on the survival of FIB in the water column of estuaries. Here, microcosms containing freshwater or brackish water with low, high and extreme SPM concentrations were inoculated with sewage and ovine faeces and the decay rate of Escherichia coli, coliforms and enterococci were determined by enumeration over five consecutive days. E. coli derived from ovine faeces proliferated and persisted at high levels in both freshwater and brackish microcosms (no decay), whereas ovine enterococci demonstrated a net decay over the duration of the experiment. Furthermore, SPM concentration had a significant effect on the decay rates of both E. coli and enterococci from ovine faeces in brackish microcosms, but decay rate was greater at low SPM concentrations for E. coli, whereas the opposite was observed for enterococci, whose decay rates increased as SPM concentration increased. E. coli, enterococci and coliforms derived from wastewater demonstrated a net decay in both freshwater and brackish microcosms, with contrasting effects of SPM concentration on decay rate. In addition, some FIB groups demonstrated contrasting responses (decay or proliferation) in the first 24h following inoculation into freshwater versus brackish microcosms. Overall, SPM concentrations influenced the proliferation and decay rates of FIB in brackish waters, but had minimal influence in freshwater. These results demonstrate that the survival rates of FIB in aquatic environments are system specific, species and source dependent, and influenced by SPM concentration. This study has important implications

  17. A variable reaction rate model for chlorine decay in drinking water due to the reaction with dissolved organic matter.

    PubMed

    Hua, Pei; Vasyukova, Ekaterina; Uhl, Wolfgang

    2015-05-15

    A second order kinetic model for simulating chlorine decay in bulk water due to the reaction with dissolved organic matter (DOM) was developed. It takes into account the decreasing reactivity of dissolved organic matter using a variable reaction rate coefficient (VRRC) which decreases with an increasing conversion. The concentration of reducing species is surrogated by the maximum chlorine demand. Temperature dependency, respectively, is described by the Arrhenius-relationship. The accuracy and adequacy of the proposed model to describe chlorine decay in bulk water were evaluated and shown for very different waters and different conditions such as water mixing or rechlorination by applying statistical tests. It is thus very well suited for application in water quality modeling for distribution systems.

  18. Development of a water boil-off spent-fuel calorimeter system. [To measure decay heat generation rate

    SciTech Connect

    Creer, J.M.; Shupe, J.W. Jr.

    1981-05-01

    A calorimeter system was developed to measure decay heat generation rates of unmodified spent fuel assemblies from commercial nuclear reactors. The system was designed, fabricated, and successfully tested using the following specifications: capacity of one BWR or PWR spent fuel assembly; decay heat generation range 0.1 to 2.5 kW; measurement time of < 12 h; and an accuracy of +-10% or better. The system was acceptance tested using a dc reference heater to simulate spent fuel assembly heat generation rates. Results of these tests indicated that the system could be used to measure heat generation rates between 0.5 and 2.5 kW within +- 5%. Measurements of heat generation rates of approx. 0.1 kW were obtained within +- 15%. The calorimeter system has the potential to permit measurements of heat generation rates of spent fuel assemblies and other devices in the 12- to 14-kW range. Results of calorimetry of a Turkey Point spent fuel assembly indicated that the assembly was generating approx. 1.55 kW.

  19. Ground-state proton decay of 69Br and implications for the 68Se astrophysical rapid proton-capture process waiting point.

    PubMed

    Rogers, A M; Famiano, M A; Lynch, W G; Wallace, M S; Amorini, F; Bazin, D; Charity, R J; Delaunay, F; de Souza, R T; Elson, J; Gade, A; Galaviz, D; van Goethem, M-J; Hudan, S; Lee, J; Lobastov, S; Lukyanov, S; Matoš, M; Mocko, M; Schatz, H; Shapira, D; Sobotka, L G; Tsang, M B; Verde, G

    2011-06-24

    We report on the first direct measurement of the proton separation energy for the proton-unbound nucleus (69)Br. Bypassing the (68)Se waiting point in the rp process is directly related to the 2p-capture rate through (69)Br, which depends exponentially on the proton separation energy. We find a proton separation energy for (69)Br of Sp((69)Br )= -785(-40)(+34) keV; this is less bound compared to previous predictions which have relied on uncertain theoretical calculations. The influence of the extracted proton separation energy on the rp process occurring in type I x-ray bursts is examined within the context of a one-zone burst model.

  20. Global existence and energy decay rates for a Kirchhoff-type wave equation with nonlinear dissipation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Daewook; Kim, Dojin; Hong, Keum-Shik; Jung, Il Hyo

    2014-01-01

    The first objective of this paper is to prove the existence and uniqueness of global solutions for a Kirchhoff-type wave equation with nonlinear dissipation of the form Ku'' + M(|A (1/2) u|(2))Au + g(u') = 0 under suitable assumptions on K, A, M(·), and g(·). Next, we derive decay estimates of the energy under some growth conditions on the nonlinear dissipation g. Lastly, numerical simulations in order to verify the analytical results are given.

  1. Global Existence and Energy Decay Rates for a Kirchhoff-Type Wave Equation with Nonlinear Dissipation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dojin; Hong, Keum-Shik; Jung, Il Hyo

    2014-01-01

    The first objective of this paper is to prove the existence and uniqueness of global solutions for a Kirchhoff-type wave equation with nonlinear dissipation of the form Ku′′ + M(|A1/2u|2)Au + g(u′) = 0 under suitable assumptions on K, A, M(·), and g(·). Next, we derive decay estimates of the energy under some growth conditions on the nonlinear dissipation g. Lastly, numerical simulations in order to verify the analytical results are given. PMID:24977217

  2. Reaction rate calibration techniques at ZPPR for /sup 239/Pu fission, /sup 235/U fission, /sup 238/U fission, and /sup 238/U capture

    SciTech Connect

    Brumbach, S.B.; Maddison, D.W.

    1982-06-10

    Reaction-rate calibration techniques used at ZPPR are described for /sup 239/Pu fission, /sup 235/U fission, /sup 238/U fission and /sup 238/U capture. In addition to these absolute reaction rates, calibration techniques are described for fission-rate ratios and the ratio of /sup 238/U capture to /sup 239/U capture to /sup 239/Pu fission. Uncertainty estimates are presented for all calibrations. Intercomparison measurements are reported which support the validity of the calibration techniques and their estimated uncertainties.

  3. A measurement of the 2 neutrino double beta decay rate of tellurium-130 in the CUORICINO experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogler, Laura Katherine

    CUORICINO was a cryogenic bolometer experiment designed to search for neutrinoless double beta decay and other rare processes, including double beta decay with two neutrinos (2nubetabeta). The experiment was located at Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso and ran for a period of about 5 years, from 2003 to 2008. The detector consisted of an array of 62 TeO2 crystals arranged in a tower and operated at a temperature of ˜10 mK. Events depositing energy in the detectors, such as radioactive decays or impinging particles, produced thermal pulses in the crystals which were read out using sensitive thermistors. The experiment included 4 enriched crystals, 2 enriched with 130Te and 2 with 128Te, in order to aid in the measurement of the 2nubetabeta rate. The enriched crystals contained a total of ˜350 g 130Te. The 128-enriched (130-depleted) crystals were used as background monitors, so that the shared backgrounds could be subtracted from the energy spectrum of the 130-enriched crystals. Residual backgrounds in the subtracted spectrum were fit using spectra generated by Monte-Carlo simulations of natural radioactive contaminants located in and on the crystals. The 2nubetabeta half-life was measured to be T1/2 = [9.81 +/- 0.96(stat) +/- 0.49(syst)] x 1020 y.

  4. Improving rate capability and decelerating voltage decay of Li-rich layered oxide cathodes via selenium doping to stabilize oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Quanxin; Li, Ruhong; Zheng, Rujuan; Liu, Yuanlong; Huo, Hua; Dai, Changsong

    2016-11-01

    To improve the rate performance and decelerate the voltage decay of Li-rich layered oxide cathode materials, a series of cathode materials Li1.2[Mn0.7Ni0.2Co0.1]0.8-xSexO2 (x = 0, 0.07, 0.14 and 0.21) was synthesized via co-precipitation. Based on the characterization results, it can be concluded that uniform Se6+ doping can improve the degree of crystallinity of Li2MnO3, resulting in a better ordering of atoms in the transition metal layer of this type of cathode materials. In the electrochemical experiments, compared to un-doped samples, one of the Se doped samples (LLMO-Se0.14) exhibited a longer sloping region and shorter potential plateau in the initial charge curves, a larger first coulombic efficiency (ca. 77%), better rate capability (178 mAhm g-1 at 10 C) and higher mid-point voltage (MPV) retention (ca. 95%) after 100 cycles. These results prove that Se doping can effectively improve the rate capability and decelerate the voltage decay process of these cathode materials during cycling via suppressing the oxidation process of O2- to O2 and curbing a layered-to-spinel phase transformation. The above-mentioned functions of Se doping are probably due to the higher bonding energy of Sesbnd O than that of Mnsbnd O.

  5. Measurement of branching fractions and rate asymmetries in the rare decays B→K(*)l⁺l⁻

    DOE PAGES

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; ...

    2012-08-24

    In a sample of 471×10⁶ BB¯¯¯ events collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e⁺e⁻ collider we study the rare decays B→K(*)l⁺l⁻, where l⁺l⁻ is either e⁺e⁻ or μ⁺μ⁻. We report results on partial branching fractions and isospin asymmetries in seven bins of dilepton mass-squared. We further present CP and lepton-flavor asymmetries for dilepton masses below and above the J/ψ resonance. We find no evidence for CP or lepton-flavor violation. The partial branching fractions and isospin asymmetries are consistent with the Standard Model predictions and with results from other experiments.

  6. Moments of the B meson inclusive semileptonic decay rate using neutrino reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csorna, S. E.; Bonvicini, G.; Cinabro, D.; Dubrovin, M.; Bornheim, A.; Lipeles, E.; Pappas, S. P.; Shapiro, A.; Weinstein, A. J.; Briere, R. A.; Chen, G. P.; Ferguson, T.; Tatishvili, G.; Vogel, H.; Watkins, M. E.; Adam, N. E.; Alexander, J. P.; Berkelman, K.; Boisvert, V.; Cassel, D. G.; Duboscq, J. E.; Ecklund, K. M.; Ehrlich, R.; Galik, R. S.; Gibbons, L.; Gittelman, B.; Gray, S. W.; Hartill, D. L.; Heltsley, B. K.; Hsu, L.; Jones, C. D.; Kandaswamy, J.; Kreinick, D. L.; Kuznetsov, V. E.; Magerkurth, A.; Mahlke-Krüger, H.; Meyer, T. O.; Patterson, J. R.; Pedlar, T. K.; Peterson, D.; Pivarski, J.; Riley, D.; Sadoff, A. J.; Schwarthoff, H.; Shepherd, M. R.; Sun, W. M.; Thayer, J. G.; Urner, D.; Wilksen, T.; Weinberger, M.; Athar, S. B.; Avery, P.; Breva-Newell, L.; Potlia, V.; Stoeck, H.; Yelton, J.; Eisenstein, B. I.; Gollin, G. D.; Karliner, I.; Lowrey, N.; Naik, P.; Sedlack, C.; Selen, M.; Thaler, J. J.; Williams, J.; Edwards, K. W.; Besson, D.; Gao, K. Y.; Gong, D. T.; Kubota, Y.; Li, S. Z.; Poling, R.; Scott, A. W.; Smith, A.; Stepaniak, C. J.; Urheim, J.; Metreveli, Z.; Seth, K. K.; Tomaradze, A.; Zweber, P.; Ernst, J.; Arms, K.; Eckhart, E.; Gan, K. K.; Gwon, C.; Severini, H.; Skubic, P.; Asner, D. M.; Dytman, S. A.; Mehrabyan, S.; Mueller, J. A.; Nam, S.; Savinov, V.; Huang, G. S.; Miller, D. H.; Pavlunin, V.; Sanghi, B.; Shibata, E. I.; Shipsey, I. P.; Adams, G. S.; Chasse, M.; Cummings, J. P.; Danko, I.; Napolitano, J.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Park, C. S.; Park, W.; Thayer, J. B.; Thorndike, E. H.; Coan, T. E.; Gao, Y. S.; Liu, F.; Stroynowski, R.; Artuso, M.; Boulahouache, C.; Blusk, S.; Butt, J.; Dambasuren, E.; Dorjkhaidav, O.; Haynes, J.; Menaa, N.; Mountain, R.; Muramatsu, H.; Nandakumar, R.; Redjimi, R.; Sia, R.; Skwarnicki, T.; Stone, S.; Wang, J. C.; Zhang, Kevin; Mahmood, A. H.

    2004-08-01

    We present a measurement of the composition of B meson inclusive semileptonic decays using 9.4 fb-1 of e+e- data taken with the CLEO detector at the Υ(4S) resonance. In addition to measuring the charged lepton kinematics, the neutrino four-vector is inferred using the hermiticity of the detector. We perform a maximum likelihood fit over the full three-dimensional differential decay distribution for the fractional contributions from the B→Xclν processes with Xc=D, D*, D**, and nonresonant Xc, and the process B→Xulν. From the fit results we extract the first and second moments of the M2X and q2 distributions with minimum lepton-energy requirements of 1.0 GeV and 1.5 GeV. We find =(0.456±0.014±0.045±0.109) GeV2/c4 with a minimum lepton energy of 1.0 GeV and =(0.293±0.012±0.033±0.048) GeV2/c4 with minimum lepton energy of 1.5 GeV. The uncertainties are from statistics, detector systematic effects, and model dependence, respectively. As a test of the HQET and OPE calculations, the results for the M2X moment as a function of the minimum lepton energy requirement are compared to the predictions.

  7. Capturing Age-group Differences and Developmental Change with the BASC Parent Rating Scales

    PubMed Central

    Barbot, Baptiste; Hein, Sascha; Luthar, Suniya S.; Grigorenko, Elena L.

    2014-01-01

    Estimation of age-group differences and intra-individual change across distinct developmental periods is often challenged by the use of age-appropriate (but non-parallel) measures. We present a short version of the Behavior Assessment System (Reynolds & Kamphaus, 1998), Parent Rating Scales for Children (PRS-C) and Adolescents (PRS-A), which uses only their common-items to derive estimates of the initial constructs optimized for developmental studies. Measurement invariance of a three-factor model (Externalizing, Internalizing, Adaptive Skills) was tested across age-groups (161 mothers using PRS-C; 200 mothers using PRS-A) and over time (115 mothers using PRS-C at baseline and PRS-A five years later) with the original versus short PRS. Results indicated that the short PRS holds a sufficient level of invariance for a robust estimation of age-group differences and intra-individual change, as compared to the original PRS, which held only weak invariance leading to flawed developmental inferences. Importance of test-content parallelism for developmental studies is discussed. PMID:25045196

  8. EFFECTS OF TURBULENCE, ECCENTRICITY DAMPING, AND MIGRATION RATE ON THE CAPTURE OF PLANETS INTO MEAN MOTION RESONANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Ketchum, Jacob A.; Adams, Fred C.; Bloch, Anthony M.

    2011-01-01

    Pairs of migrating extrasolar planets often lock into mean motion resonance as they drift inward. This paper studies the convergent migration of giant planets (driven by a circumstellar disk) and determines the probability that they are captured into mean motion resonance. The probability that such planets enter resonance depends on the type of resonance, the migration rate, the eccentricity damping rate, and the amplitude of the turbulent fluctuations. This problem is studied both through direct integrations of the full three-body problem and via semi-analytic model equations. In general, the probability of resonance decreases with increasing migration rate, and with increasing levels of turbulence, but increases with eccentricity damping. Previous work has shown that the distributions of orbital elements (eccentricity and semimajor axis) for observed extrasolar planets can be reproduced by migration models with multiple planets. However, these results depend on resonance locking, and this study shows that entry into-and maintenance of-mean motion resonance depends sensitively on the migration rate, eccentricity damping, and turbulence.

  9. Effects of Biogents Sentinel Trap Field Placement on Capture Rates of Adult Asian Tiger Mosquitoes, Aedes albopictus

    PubMed Central

    Crepeau, Taryn N.; Healy, Sean P.; Bartlett-Healy, Kristen; Unlu, Isik; Farajollahi, Ary; Fonseca, Dina M.

    2013-01-01

    The Biogents® Sentinel (BGS) trap is the standard tool to monitor adult Aedes (Stegomyia) albopictus (Skuse) (Diptera: Culicidae), the Asian tiger mosquito. BGS traps are commonly placed in residential properties during surveillance operations, but locations within properties may have significant differences in ambient light, temperature, and humidity (e.g. between a sunlit lawn and shady underbrush). We examined the effect of BGS trap placement on Ae. albopictus capture rates in three residential properties in Monmouth County, New Jersey, USA. In each property we visually selected locations as shade, partial shade, and sun. Traps in “partial shade” locations were under vegetation and were exposed to filtered sunlight during some parts of the day while “shaded” locations were never exposed to direct sunlight. Locations defined as “sun” were exposed to direct sunlight for large parts of the day. We placed a BGS trap in each of the three location types and used small data loggers to measure temperature, relative humidity, and light exposure at each trap during a 24-hour deployment. To address temporal variability, we made seven separate measurements from 31 August to 22 September 2010. We found that “partial shade” and “full shade” locations did not differ but that “full sun” locations had significantly higher light exposure, higher temperature, and lower humidity. Importantly, Ae. albopictus catches (males, females, or both) were consistently and significantly over 3 times higher in traps located in shaded locations. To further investigate the effects of local temperature and humidity on surveillance we examined Ae. albopictus collections from 37 BGS traps fitted with data loggers and deployed weekly from August through mid October, during the 2009 season, in three urban sites in Mercer County, NJ. We confirmed that local climate influences capture rates and that Ae. albopictus surveillance projects need to monitor trap placement carefully

  10. A measurement of the 2 neutrino double beta decay rate of Te-130 in the CUORICINO experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Kogler, Laura K.

    2011-11-30

    CUORICINO was a cryogenic bolometer experiment designed to search for neutrinoless double beta decay and other rare processes, including double beta decay with two neutrinos (2vββ). The experiment was located at Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso and ran for a period of about 5 years, from 2003 to 2008. The detector consisted of an array of 62 TeO2 crystals arranged in a tower and operated at a temperature of 10 mK. Events depositing energy in the detectors, such as radioactive decays or impinging particles, produced thermal pulses in the crystals which were read out using sensitive thermistors. The experiment included 4 enriched crystals, 2 enriched with 130Te and 2 with 128Te, in order to aid in the measurement of the 2vββ rate. The enriched crystals contained a total of 350 g 130Te. The 128-enriched (130-depleted) crystals were used as background monitors, so that the shared backgrounds could be subtracted from the energy spectrum of the 130- enriched crystals. Residual backgrounds in the subtracted spectrum were fit using spectra generated by Monte-Carlo simulations of natural radioactive contaminants located in and on the crystals. The 2vββ half-life was measured to be T2v1/2 = [9.81± 0.96(stat)± 0.49(syst)] x1020 y.

  11. Precision measurement of the decay rate of {sup 7}Be in host materials

    SciTech Connect

    Nir-El, Y.; Haquin, G.; Yungreiss, Z.; Hass, M.; Goldring, G.; Chamoli, S. K.; Singh, B. S. Nara; Lakshmi, S.; Koester, U.; Champault, N.; Dorsival, A.; Fedoseyev, V. N.; Georgiev, G.; Schumann, D.; Heidenreich, G.; Teichmann, S.

    2007-01-15

    A controlled and precise determination of the cross sections of the fusion reactions {sup 7}Be(p,{gamma}){sup 8}B and {sup 3}He({sup 4}He,{gamma}){sup 7}Be, which play an important role in determining the solar neutrino flux, necessitates the knowledge of a precise value of the electron-capture half-life of {sup 7}Be. This half-life may depend on the material hosting the {sup 7}Be atoms via small modifications of the electron density around the {sup 7}Be nucleus. In this brief communication we report on the measurement of {sup 7}Be implanted in four materials: copper, aluminum, sapphire, and PVC. The four results are consistent with a null host dependence within two standard deviations and their weighted average of 53.236(39) d agrees very well with the adopted value in the literature, 53.22(6) d. The present results may exhibit a slight (0.22%) increase of the half-life at room temperature for metals compared to insulators that requires further studies.

  12. Damping rates of surface plasmons for particles of size from nano- to micrometers; reduction of the nonradiative decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolwas, K.; Derkachova, A.

    2013-01-01

    Damping rates of multipolar, localized surface plasmons (SPs) of gold and silver nanospheres of radii up to 1000 nm were found with the tools of classical electrodynamics. The significant increase in damping rates followed by noteworthy decrease for larger particles takes place along with substantial red-shift of plasmon resonance frequencies as a function of particle size. We also introduced interface damping into our modeling, which substantially modifies the plasmon damping rates of smaller particles. We demonstrate unexpected reduction of the multipolar SP damping rates in certain size ranges. This effect can be explained by the suppression of the nonradiative decay channel as a result of the lost competition with the radiative channel. We show that experimental dipole damping rates [H. Baida, et al., Nano Lett. 9(10) (2009) 3463, and C. Sönnichsen, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 88 (2002) 077402], and the resulting resonance quality factors can be described in a consistent and straightforward way within our modeling extended to particle sizes still unavailable experimentally.

  13. Λ_{c}→Λl^{+}ν_{l} Form Factors and Decay Rates from Lattice QCD with Physical Quark Masses.

    PubMed

    Meinel, Stefan

    2017-02-24

    The first lattice QCD calculation of the form factors governing Λ_{c}→Λℓ^{+}ν_{ℓ} decays is reported. The calculation was performed with two different lattice spacings and includes one ensemble with a pion mass of 139(2) MeV. The resulting predictions for the Λ_{c}→Λe^{+}ν_{e} and Λ_{c}→Λμ^{+}ν_{μ} decay rates divided by |V_{cs}|^{2} are 0.2007(71)(74) and 0.1945(69)(72)  ps^{-1}, respectively, where the two uncertainties are statistical and systematic. Taking the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix element |V_{cs}| from a global fit and the Λ_{c} lifetime from experiments, this translates to branching fractions of B(Λ_{c}→Λe^{+}ν_{e})=0.0380(19)_{LQCD}(11)_{τ_{Λ_{c}}} and B(Λ_{c}→Λμ^{+}ν_{μ})=0.0369(19)_{LQCD}(11)_{τ_{Λ_{c}}}. These results are consistent with, and two times more precise than, the measurements performed recently by the BESIII Collaboration. Using instead the measured branching fractions together with the lattice calculation to determine the CKM matrix element gives |V_{cs}|=0.949(24)_{LQCD}(14)_{τ_{Λ_{c}}}(49)_{B}.

  14. Λc→Λ l+νl Form Factors and Decay Rates from Lattice QCD with Physical Quark Masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinel, Stefan

    2017-02-01

    The first lattice QCD calculation of the form factors governing Λc→Λ ℓ+νℓdecays is reported. The calculation was performed with two different lattice spacings and includes one ensemble with a pion mass of 139(2) MeV. The resulting predictions for the Λc→Λe +νe and Λc→Λ μ+νμ decay rates divided by |Vc s|2 are 0.2007(71)(74) and 0.1945 (69 )(72 ) ps-1 , respectively, where the two uncertainties are statistical and systematic. Taking the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix element |Vc s| from a global fit and the Λc lifetime from experiments, this translates to branching fractions of B (Λc→Λ e+νe)=0.0380 (19 )LQCD(11 )τ Λ c and B (Λc→Λ μ+νμ)=0.0369 (19 )LQCD(11 )τΛc . These results are consistent with, and two times more precise than, the measurements performed recently by the BESIII Collaboration. Using instead the measured branching fractions together with the lattice calculation to determine the CKM matrix element gives |Vc s|=0.949 (24 )LQCD(14 )τΛc(49 )B .

  15. Nuclear mass inventory, photon dose rate and thermal decay heat of spent research reactor fuel assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Pond, R.B.; Matos, J.E.

    1996-05-01

    As part of the Department of Energy`s spent nuclear fuel acceptance criteria, the mass of uranium and transuranic elements in spent research reactor fuel must be specified. These data are, however, not always known or readily determined. It is the purpose of this report to provide estimates of these data for some of the more common research reactor fuel assembly types. The specific types considered here are MTR, TRIGA and DIDO fuel assemblies. The degree of physical protection given to spent fuel assemblies is largely dependent upon the photon dose rate of the spent fuel material. These data also, are not always known or readily determined. Because of a self-protecting dose rate level of radiation (dose rate greater than 100 ren-x/h at I m in air), it is important to know the dose rate of spent fuel assemblies at all time. Estimates of the photon dose rate for spent MTR, TRIGA and DIDO-type fuel assemblies are given in this report.

  16. Joint Inversion of Gravity and Gravity Tensor Data Using the Structural Index as Weighting Function Rate Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ialongo, S.; Cella, F.; Fedi, M.; Florio, G.

    2011-12-01

    Most geophysical inversion problems are characterized by a number of data considerably higher than the number of the unknown parameters. This corresponds to solve highly underdetermined systems. To get a unique solution, a priori information must be therefore introduced. We here analyze the inversion of the gravity gradient tensor (GGT). Previous approaches to invert jointly or independently more gradient components are by Li (2001) proposing an algorithm using a depth weighting function and Zhdanov et alii (2004), providing a well focused inversion of gradient data. Both the methods give a much-improved solution compared with the minimum length solution, which is invariably shallow and not representative of the true source distribution. For very undetermined problems, this feature is due to the role of the depth weighting matrices used by both the methods. Recently, Cella and Fedi (2011) showed however that for magnetic and gravity data the depth weighting function has to be defined carefully, under a preliminary application of Euler Deconvolution or Depth from Extreme Point methods, yielding the appropriate structural index and then using it as the rate decay of the weighting function. We therefore propose to extend this last approach to invert jointly or independently the GGT tensor using the structural index as weighting function rate decay. In case of a joint inversion, gravity data can be added as well. This multicomponent case is also relevant because the simultaneous use of several components and gravity increase the number of data and reduce the algebraic ambiguity compared to the inversion of a single component. The reduction of such ambiguity was shown in Fedi et al, (2005) decisive to get an improved depth resolution in inverse problems, independently from any form of depth weighting function. The method is demonstrated to synthetic cases and applied to real cases, such as the Vredefort impact area (South Africa), characterized by a complex density

  17. Discriminating the drivers of edge effects on nest predation: forest edges reduce capture rates of ship rats (Rattus rattus), a globally invasive nest predator, by altering vegetation structure.

    PubMed

    Ruffell, Jay; Didham, Raphael K; Barrett, Paul; Gorman, Nic; Pike, Rhonda; Hickey-Elliott, Andrée; Sievwright, Karin; Armstrong, Doug P

    2014-01-01

    Forest edges can strongly affect avian nest success by altering nest predation rates, but this relationship is inconsistent and context dependent. There is a need for researchers to improve the predictability of edge effects on nest predation rates by examining the mechanisms driving their occurrence and variability. In this study, we examined how the capture rates of ship rats, an invasive nest predator responsible for avian declines globally, varied with distance from the forest edge within forest fragments in a pastoral landscape in New Zealand. We hypothesised that forest edges would affect capture rates by altering vegetation structure within fragments, and that the strength of edge effects would depend on whether fragments were grazed by livestock. We measured vegetation structure and rat capture rates at 488 locations ranging from 0-212 m from the forest edge in 15 forest fragments, seven of which were grazed. Contrary to the vast majority of previous studies of edge effects on nest predation, ship rat capture rates increased with increasing distance from the forest edge. For grazed fragments, capture rates were estimated to be 78% lower at the forest edge than 118 m into the forest interior (the farthest distance for grazed fragments). This relationship was similar for ungrazed fragments, with capture rates estimated to be 51% lower at the forest edge than 118 m into the forest interior. A subsequent path analysis suggested that these 'reverse' edge effects were largely or entirely mediated by changes in vegetation structure, implying that edge effects on ship rats can be predicted from the response of vegetation structure to forest edges. We suggest the occurrence, strength, and direction of edge effects on nest predation rates may depend on edge-driven changes in local habitat when the dominant predator is primarily restricted to forest patches.

  18. Alpha-decay branching ratios of near-threshold states in 19Ne and the astrophysical rate of 15O(α,γ)19Ne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davids, B.; van den Berg, A. M.; Dendooven, P.; Fleurot, F.; Hunyadi, M.; de Huu, M. A.; Rehm, K. E.; Segel, R. E.; Siemssen, R. H.; Wilschut, H. W.; Wörtche, H. J.; Wuosmaa, A. H.

    2003-05-01

    The 15O(α, γ)19Ne reaction is one of two routes for breakout from the hot CNO cycles into the rp process in accreting neutron stars. Its astrophysical rate depends critically on the decay properties of excited states in 19Ne lying just above the 15O + α threshold. We have measured the α-decay branching ratios for these states using the p(21Ne,t)19Ne reaction at 43 MeV/u.

  19. Periodic solutions of piecewise affine gene network models with non uniform decay rates: the case of a negative feedback loop.

    PubMed

    Farcot, Etienne; Gouzé, Jean-Luc

    2009-12-01

    This paper concerns periodic solutions of a class of equations that model gene regulatory networks. Unlike the vast majority of previous studies, it is not assumed that all decay rates are identical. To handle this more general situation, we rely on monotonicity properties of these systems. Under an alternative assumption, it is shown that a classical fixed point theorem for monotone, concave operators can be applied to these systems. The required assumption is expressed in geometrical terms as an alignment condition on so-called focal points. As an application, we show the existence and uniqueness of a stable periodic orbit for negative feedback loop systems in dimension 3 or more, and of a unique stable equilibrium point in dimension 2. This extends a theorem of Snoussi, which showed the existence of these orbits only.

  20. The β-decay rates of 59Fe isotopes in shell burning environments and their influences on the production of 60Fe in massive star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, K.; Lam, Y. H.; Qi, C.; Tang, X.; Zhang, N.

    2016-02-01

    The experimental B(GT) strengths of the 59Fe excited states were employed to determine the transition strengths which greatly contribute 59Fe stellar β-decay at typical carbon shell burning temperature. The result has been compared with the theoretical rates FFN (Fuller-Fowler-Newman) and LMP (Langanke&Martinez-Pinedo). Impact of the newly determined rate on the synthesis of cosmic γ emitter 60Fe has also been studied using one-zone model calculation. Our results show 59Fe stellar β-decay rate plays an important role in the 60Fe nucleosynthesis. However the uncertainty of the decay rate is rather large due to the error of B(GT) strength that requires further studies.

  1. The effects of ultra-strong magnetic fields on electron capture rates for iron group nuclei in the outer crust of magnetars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Jun; Luo, Zhi-Quan; Zhang, Jie

    2014-06-01

    Based on the work of Wang et al. (Chin. Phys. Lett. 29:049701, 2012), we re-investigated electron capture on iron group nuclei in the outer crust of magnetars and studied magnetar evolution. Effects of ultra-strong magnetic field on electron capture rates for 57Co have been analyzed in the nuclear shell model and under the Landau-level-quantization approximation, and the electron capture rates and the neutrino energy loss rates on iron group nuclei in the outer crust of magnetar have been calculated. The results show that electron capture rates on 57Co are increase greatly in the ultra-strong magnetic field, and above 3 orders of magnitude generally; and the neutrino energy loss rates by electron capture on iron group nuclei increase above 3 orders of magnitude in the range from B=4.414×1013 G to B=4.414×1015 G. These conclusions play an important role in future studying the evolution of magnetar. Furthermore, we modify the expressions of the electron chemical potential (Fermi energy) and phase space factor by introducing Dirac δ-function, and select appropriate parameters of temperature T, magnetic field B and matter density ρ in the our crust, thus our results will be reliable than those of Wang et al.

  2. Wobbly strings: calculating the capture rate of a webcam using the rolling shutter effect in a guitar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunnah, David

    2014-07-01

    In this paper I propose a method of calculating the time between line captures in a standard complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) webcam using the rolling shutter effect when filming a guitar. The exercise links the concepts of wavelength and frequency, while outlining the basic operation of a CMOS camera through vertical line capture.

  3. Wobbly Strings: Calculating the Capture Rate of a Webcam Using the Rolling Shutter Effect in a Guitar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunnah, David

    2014-01-01

    In this paper I propose a method of calculating the time between line captures in a standard complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) webcam using the rolling shutter effect when filming a guitar. The exercise links the concepts of wavelength and frequency, while outlining the basic operation of a CMOS camera through vertical line capture.

  4. Collision rates for rare cell capture in periodic obstacle arrays strongly depend on density of cell suspension.

    PubMed

    Cimrák, I

    2016-11-01

    Recently, computational modelling has been successfully used for determination of collision rates for rare cell capture in periodic obstacle arrays. The models were based on particle advection simulations where the cells were advected according to velocity field computed from two dimensional Navier-Stokes equations. This approach may be used under the assumption of very dilute cell suspensions where no mutual cell collisions occur. We use the object-in-fluid framework to demonstrate that even with low cell-to-fluid ratio, the optimal geometry of the obstacle array significantly changes. We show computational simulations for ratios of 3.5, 6.9 and 10.4% determining the optimal geometry of the periodic obstacle arrays. It was already previously demonstrated that cells in periodic obstacle arrays follow trajectories in two modes: the colliding mode and the zig-zag mode. The colliding mode maximizes the cell-obstacle collision frequency. Our simulations reveal that for dilute suspensions and for suspensions with cell-to-fluid ratio 3.5%, there is a range of column shifts for which the cells follow colliding trajectories. However we showed, that for 6.9 and 10.4%, the cells never follow colliding trajectories.

  5. Decay Rates to Equilibrium for Nonlinear Plate Equations with Degenerate, Geometrically-Constrained Damping

    SciTech Connect

    Geredeli, Pelin G.; Webster, Justin T.

    2013-12-15

    We analyze the convergence to equilibrium of solutions to the nonlinear Berger plate evolution equation in the presence of localized interior damping (also referred to as geometrically constrained damping). Utilizing the results in (Geredeli et al. in J. Differ. Equ. 254:1193–1229, 2013), we have that any trajectory converges to the set of stationary points N . Employing standard assumptions from the theory of nonlinear unstable dynamics on the set N , we obtain the rate of convergence to an equilibrium. The critical issue in the proof of convergence to equilibria is a unique continuation property (which we prove for the Berger evolution) that provides a gradient structure for the dynamics. We also consider the more involved von Karman evolution, and show that the same results hold assuming a unique continuation property for solutions, which is presently a challenging open problem.

  6. The integrated statistical rate function for superallowed Fermi ß-decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szybisz, Leszek

    1984-09-01

    The impact that recently pointed out differences between the two sets of imtegrated statistical rate functions, i.e. f- values, calculated according to the widely adopted methods of Behrens, Jänecke and Bühring and Towner and Hardy have on the internal consistency of Ft-values of the eight best measured superallowed Fermi ß-transitions is analyzed. We find that, due to the dramatic improvement in the accuracy of experimental data, both sets of Ft-values show a statistical difference. In addition, we evaluate the second-forbidden corrections using an alternative way proposed by Jaus. This latter prescription yields results in good agreement with those obtained using the procedure of Behrens, Jänecke and Bühring. The author thanks Dr. H. Behrens for enlightening discussions.

  7. Results of experiments devoted to searches for 2K capture on {sup 78}Kr and for the double-beta decay of {sup 136}Xe with the aid of proportional counters

    SciTech Connect

    Gavrilyuk, Yu. M.; Gangapshev, A. M.; Zhantudueva, Dj. A.; Kazalov, V. V.; Kuz'minov, V. V.; Panasenko, S. I.; Ratkevich, S. S.; Efendiev, K. V.; Yakimenko, S. P.

    2013-09-15

    A brief description of two low-background setups deployed at the Baksan Neutrino Observatory (Institute for Nuclear Research, Russian Academy of Sciences) and intended for searches for two types of double-beta decay of inert-gas isotopes-2K capture on {sup 78}Kr and the double-beta decay of {sup 136}Xe-is given. The two setups in question have similar structures and employ identical large high-pressure copper proportional counters as detectors. Upon a treatment of data from measurements with krypton samples differing in the content of the isotope {sup 78}Kr, the spectrum for an enriched sample revealed an excess of events at a statistical-significance level of about two standard deviations (2{sigma}). If one attributes this excess to 2K(2{nu}) capture on {sup 78}Kr, the respective half-life is T{sub 1/2} = 1.4{sub -0.7}{sup +2.3} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 22} yr at a 90% C.L. A treatment of data from measurements with xenon samples differing in content of the isotope {sup 136}Xe led to the appearance of an excess of events in the spectrum for an enriched sample at a statistical-significance level of about 2.2{sigma}. If one assumes that this excess is due to the two-neutrino double-beta decay of {sup 136}Xe, then the respective half-life is T{sub 1/2} = 5.8{sub -1.8}{sup +4.7} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 21} yr.

  8. Time since death and decay rate constants of Norway spruce and European larch deadwood in subalpine forests determined using dendrochronology and radiocarbon dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrillo, M.; Cherubini, P.; Fravolini, G.; Ascher, J.; Schärer, M.; Synal, H.-A.; Bertoldi, D.; Camin, F.; Larcher, R.; Egli, M.

    2015-09-01

    Due to the large size and highly heterogeneous spatial distribution of deadwood, the time scales involved in the coarse woody debris (CWD) decay of Picea abies (L.) Karst. and Larix decidua Mill. in Alpine forests have been poorly investigated and are largely unknown. We investigated the CWD decay dynamics in an Alpine valley in Italy using the five-decay class system commonly employed for forest surveys, based on a macromorphological and visual assessment. For the decay classes 1 to 3, most of the dendrochronological samples were cross-dated to assess the time that had elapsed since tree death, but for decay classes 4 and 5 (poorly preserved tree rings) and some others not having enough tree rings, radiocarbon dating was used. In addition, density, cellulose and lignin data were measured for the dated CWD. The decay rate constants for spruce and larch were estimated on the basis of the density loss using a single negative exponential model. In the decay classes 1 to 3, the ages of the CWD were similar varying between 1 and 54 years for spruce and 3 and 40 years for larch with no significant differences between the classes; classes 1-3 are therefore not indicative for deadwood age. We found, however, distinct tree species-specific differences in decay classes 4 and 5, with larch CWD reaching an average age of 210 years in class 5 and spruce only 77 years. The mean CWD rate constants were 0.012 to 0.018 yr-1 for spruce and 0.005 to 0.012 yr-1 for larch. Cellulose and lignin time trends half-lives (using a multiple-exponential model) could be derived on the basis of the ages of the CWD. The half-lives for cellulose were 21 yr for spruce and 50 yr for larch. The half-life of lignin is considerably higher and may be more than 100 years in larch CWD.

  9. β -decay rate of 59Fe in shell burning environment and its influence on the production of 60Fe in a massive star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, K. A.; Lam, Y. H.; Qi, C.; Tang, X. D.; Zhang, N. T.

    2016-12-01

    We deduced the stellar β -decay rate of 59Fe at typical carbon-shell burning temperature by taking the experimental Gamow-Teller transition strengths of the 59Fe excited states. The result is also compared with those derived from large-scale shell model calculations. The new rate is up to a factor of 2.5 lower than the theoretical rate of Fuller, Fowler, and Newman (FFN) and up to a factor of 5 higher than decay rate of Langanke and Martínez-Pinedo (LMP) in the temperature region 0.5 ≤T ≤2 GK. We estimated the impact of the newly determined rate on the synthesis of cosmic γ emitter 60Fe in C-shell burning and explosive C/Ne burning using a one-zone model calculation. Our results show that 59Fe stellar β decay plays an important role in 60Fe nucleosynthesis, even though the uncertainty of the decay rate is rather large due to the error of B (GT) strengths.

  10. Trophic position and metabolic rate predict the long-term decay process of radioactive cesium in fish: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Doi, Hideyuki; Takahara, Teruhiko; Tanaka, Kazuya

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the long-term behavior of radionuclides in organisms is important for estimating possible associated risks to human beings and ecosystems. As radioactive cesium (¹³⁷Cs) can be accumulated in organisms and has a long physical half-life, it is very important to understand its long-term decay in organisms; however, the underlying mechanisms determining the decay process are little known. We performed a meta-analysis to collect published data on the long-term ¹³⁷Cs decay process in fish species to estimate biological (metabolic rate) and ecological (trophic position, habitat, and diet type) influences on this process. From the linear mixed models, we found that 1) trophic position could predict the day of maximum ¹³⁷Cs activity concentration in fish; and 2) the metabolic rate of the fish species and environmental water temperature could predict ecological half-lives and decay rates for fish species. These findings revealed that ecological and biological traits are important to predict the long-term decay process of ¹³⁷Cs activity concentration in fish.

  11. Time since death and decay rate constants of Norway spruce and European larch deadwood in subalpine forests determined using dendrochronology and radiocarbon dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrillo, Marta; Cherubini, Paolo; Fravolini, Giulia; Marchetti, Marco; Ascher-Jenull, Judith; Schärer, Michael; Synal, Hans-Arno; Bertoldi, Daniela; Camin, Federica; Larcher, Roberto; Egli, Markus

    2016-03-01

    Due to the large size (e.g. sections of tree trunks) and highly heterogeneous spatial distribution of deadwood, the timescales involved in the coarse woody debris (CWD) decay of Picea abies (L.) Karst. and Larix decidua Mill. in Alpine forests are largely unknown. We investigated the CWD decay dynamics in an Alpine valley in Italy using the chronosequence approach and the five-decay class system that is based on a macromorphological assessment. For the decay classes 1-3, most of the dendrochronological samples were cross-dated to assess the time that had elapsed since tree death, but for decay classes 4 and 5 (poorly preserved tree rings) radiocarbon dating was used. In addition, density, cellulose, and lignin data were measured for the dated CWD. The decay rate constants for spruce and larch were estimated on the basis of the density loss using a single negative exponential model, a regression approach, and the stage-based matrix model. In the decay classes 1-3, the ages of the CWD were similar and varied between 1 and 54 years for spruce and 3 and 40 years for larch, with no significant differences between the classes; classes 1-3 are therefore not indicative of deadwood age. This seems to be due to a time lag between the death of a standing tree and its contact with the soil. We found distinct tree-species-specific differences in decay classes 4 and 5, with larch CWD reaching an average age of 210 years in class 5 and spruce only 77 years. The mean CWD rate constants were estimated to be in the range 0.018 to 0.022 y-1 for spruce and to about 0.012 y-1 for larch. Snapshot sampling (chronosequences) may overestimate the age and mean residence time of CWD. No sampling bias was, however, detectable using the stage-based matrix model. Cellulose and lignin time trends could be derived on the basis of the ages of the CWD. The half-lives for cellulose were 21 years for spruce and 50 years for larch. The half-life of lignin is considerably higher and may be more than

  12. The in vivo efficacy of neuraminidase inhibitors cannot be determined from the decay rates of influenza viral titers observed in treated patients

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, John; Dobrovolny, Hana M.; Beauchemin, Catherine A. A.

    2017-01-01

    Antiviral therapy is a first line of defence against new influenza strains. Current pandemic preparations involve stock- piling oseltamivir, an oral neuraminidase inhibitor (NAI), so rapidly determining the effectiveness of NAIs against new viral strains is vital for deciding how to use the stockpile. Previous studies have shown that it is possible to extract the drug efficacy of antivirals from the viral decay rate of chronic infections. In the present work, we use a nonlinear mathematical model representing the course of an influenza infection to explore the possibility of extracting NAI drug efficacy using only the observed viral titer decay rates seen in patients. We first show that the effect of a time-varying antiviral concentration can be accurately approximated by a constant efficacy. We derive a relationship relating the true treatment dose and time elapsed between doses to the constant drug dose required to approximate the time- varying dose. Unfortunately, even with the simplification of a constant drug efficacy, we show that the viral decay rate depends not just on drug efficacy, but also on several viral infection parameters, such as infection and production rate, so that it is not possible to extract drug efficacy from viral decay rate alone. PMID:28067324

  13. The in vivo efficacy of neuraminidase inhibitors cannot be determined from the decay rates of influenza viral titers observed in treated patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, John; Dobrovolny, Hana M.; Beauchemin, Catherine A. A.

    2017-01-01

    Antiviral therapy is a first line of defence against new influenza strains. Current pandemic preparations involve stock- piling oseltamivir, an oral neuraminidase inhibitor (NAI), so rapidly determining the effectiveness of NAIs against new viral strains is vital for deciding how to use the stockpile. Previous studies have shown that it is possible to extract the drug efficacy of antivirals from the viral decay rate of chronic infections. In the present work, we use a nonlinear mathematical model representing the course of an influenza infection to explore the possibility of extracting NAI drug efficacy using only the observed viral titer decay rates seen in patients. We first show that the effect of a time-varying antiviral concentration can be accurately approximated by a constant efficacy. We derive a relationship relating the true treatment dose and time elapsed between doses to the constant drug dose required to approximate the time- varying dose. Unfortunately, even with the simplification of a constant drug efficacy, we show that the viral decay rate depends not just on drug efficacy, but also on several viral infection parameters, such as infection and production rate, so that it is not possible to extract drug efficacy from viral decay rate alone.

  14. THE LONG-TERM DECAY IN PRODUCTION RATES FOLLOWING THE EXTREME OUTBURST OF COMET 17P/HOLMES

    SciTech Connect

    Schleicher, David G.

    2009-10-15

    Numerous sets of narrowband filter photometry were obtained of Comet 17P/Holmes from Lowell Observatory during the interval of 2007 November 1 to 2008 March 5. Observations began 8 days following its extreme outburst, at which time the derived water production rate, based on OH measurements, was 5 x 10{sup 29} molecule s{sup -1} and the derived proxy of dust production, A({theta})f{rho}, was about 5 x 10{sup 5} cm. Relative production rates for the other gas species, CN, C{sub 2}, C{sub 3}, and NH, are consistent with 'typical' composition (based on our update to the classifications by A'Hearn et al.). An exponential decay in the logarithm of measured production rates as a function of time was observed for all species, with each species dropping by factors of about 200-500 after 125 days. All gas species exhibited clear trends with aperture size, and these trends are consistent with larger apertures having a greater proportion of older material that was released when production rates were higher. Much larger aperture trends were measured for the dust, most likely because the dust grains have smaller outflow velocities and longer lifetimes than the gas species; therefore, a greater proportion of older, i.e., higher production dust is contained within a given aperture. By extrapolating to a sufficiently small aperture size, we derive near-instantaneous water and dust production rates throughout the interval of observation, and also estimate values immediately following the outburst. The finite lifetime of the gas species requires that much higher ice vaporization rates were taking place throughout the observation interval than occurred prior to the outburst, likely due to the continued release of icy grains from the nucleus. The relatively small aperture trends for the gas species also imply that the bulk of fresh, excess volatiles are confined to the nucleus and near-nucleus regime, rather than being associated with the outburst ejecta cloud. A minimum of about 0

  15. β-DECAY of Key Titanium Isotopes in Stellar Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabi, Jameel-Un; Bakhadir, Irgaziev

    Amongst iron regime nuclei, β-decay rates on titanium isotopes are considered to be important during the late phases of evolution of massive stars. The key β-decay isotopes during presupernova evolution were searched from available literature and a microscopic calculation of the decay rates were performed using the proton-neutron quasiparticle random phase approximation (pn-QRPA) theory. As per earlier simulation results, electron capture and β-decay on certain isotopes of titanium are considered to be important for the presupernova evolution of massive stars. Earlier the stellar electron capture rates and neutrino energy loss rates due to relevant titanium isotopes were presented. In this paper we finally present the β-decay rates of key titanium isotopes in stellar environment. The results are also compared against previous calculations. The pn-QRPA β-decay rates are bigger at high stellar temperatures and smaller at high stellar densities compared to the large scale shell model results. This study can prove useful for the core-collapse simulators.

  16. Global Well-Posedness and Decay Rates of Strong Solutions to a Non-Conservative Compressible Two-Fluid Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evje, Steinar; Wang, Wenjun; Wen, Huanyao

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we consider a compressible two-fluid model with constant viscosity coefficients and unequal pressure functions {P^+neq P^-}. As mentioned in the seminal work by Bresch, Desjardins, et al. (Arch Rational Mech Anal 196:599-629, 2010) for the compressible two-fluid model, where {P^+=P^-} (common pressure) is used and capillarity effects are accounted for in terms of a third-order derivative of density, the case of constant viscosity coefficients cannot be handled in their settings. Besides, their analysis relies on a special choice for the density-dependent viscosity [refer also to another reference (Commun Math Phys 309:737-755, 2012) by Bresch, Huang and Li for a study of the same model in one dimension but without capillarity effects]. In this work, we obtain the global solution and its optimal decay rate (in time) with constant viscosity coefficients and some smallness assumptions. In particular, capillary pressure is taken into account in the sense that {Δ P=P^+ - P^-=fneq 0} where the difference function {f} is assumed to be a strictly decreasing function near the equilibrium relative to the fluid corresponding to {P^-}. This assumption plays an key role in the analysis and appears to have an essential stabilization effect on the model in question.

  17. The influence of hook type, angler experience, and fish size on injury rates and the duration of capture in an Alaskan catch-and-release rainbow trout fishery

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meka, Julie M.

    2004-01-01

    Owing to concerns about the high incidence of past hooking injuries in Alagnak River rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss, fish were captured with spin- and fly-fishing gear with barbed and barbless circle and "J" hooks to determine gear types contributing to injury. Landing and hook removal times were measured for a portion of fish captured, and the anatomical hooking location, hooking scar locations, bleeding intensity, angler experience, and fish size were recorded for all captured fish. Approximately 62% of fish captured experienced at least one new hooking injury, and 29% of fish had at least one past hooking injury. Small fish sustained higher new injury and bleeding rates, but large fish had higher past injury rates. Injury rates were higher for barbed J hooks, barbed J hooks took longer to remove, and fish caught by spin-fishing were injured more frequently than fish caught by fly-fishing. Fewer fly-fishing-caught fish were injured using circle hooks, and circle hooks tended to hook fish in only one location, generally in the jaw. Barbed J hooks were more efficient at landing fish, and J hooks were more efficient at landing fish than circle hooks. Novice anglers injured proportionally more fish than experienced anglers, primarily during hook removal. Landing time was positively correlated with fish size, and experienced anglers took longer to land fish than novices because they captured larger fish. These results suggest that a reduction in hooking injuries may be achieved by using circle hooks as an alternative to J hooks and barbless J hooks to reduce injury and handling time, yet catch efficiency for both methods would be reduced. Although fish captured with barbless J hooks and circle hooks had fewer injuries, it is important to note that each hook type also caused significant injury, and angler education is recommended to promote proper hook removal techniques.

  18. Probability of passing through a parabolic barrier and thermal decay rate: Case of linear coupling both in momentum and in coordinate

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzyakin, R. A.; Sargsyan, V. V.; Adamian, G. G.; Antonenko, N. V.

    2011-09-15

    With the quantum diffusion approach, the probability of passing through the parabolic barrier and the quasistationary thermal decay rate from a metastable state are examined in the limit of linear coupling both in momentum and in coordinate between a collective subsystem and the environment. An increase of passing probability with friction coefficient is demonstrated to occur at subbarrier energies.

  19. Gamow-Teller transitions from Mg24 and their impact on the electron capture rates in the O+Ne+Mg cores of stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabi, Jameel-Un; Rahman, Muneeb-Ur

    2007-03-01

    Electron captures on nuclei play an important role in the collapse of stellar core in the stages leading to a type-II supernova. Recent observations of subluminous Type II-P supernovae (e.g., 2005cs, 2003gd, 1999br) were able to rekindle the interest in 8 10 M⊙ which develop O+Ne+Mg cores. We used the proton-neutron quasiparticle random phase approximation (pn-QRPA) theory to calculate the B(GT) strength for Mg24 →Na24 and its associated electron capture rates for incorporation in simulation calculations. The calculated rates, in this article, have differences with the earlier reported shell model and Fuller, Fowler, and Newman (hereafter FN2) rates. We compared Gamow-Teller (GT) strength distribution functions and found fairly good agreement with experiment and shell model. However, the GT centroid and the total GT strength, which are useful in the calculation of electron capture rates in the core of massive presupernova stars, lead to the enhancement of our rate up to a factor of 4 compared to the shell model rates at high temperatures and densities.

  20. HOLMES: The electron capture decay of [Formula: see text]Ho to measure the electron neutrino mass with sub-eV sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Alpert, B; Balata, M; Bennett, D; Biasotti, M; Boragno, C; Brofferio, C; Ceriale, V; Corsini, D; Day, P K; De Gerone, M; Dressler, R; Faverzani, M; Ferri, E; Fowler, J; Gatti, F; Giachero, A; Hays-Wehle, J; Heinitz, S; Hilton, G; Köster, U; Lusignoli, M; Maino, M; Mates, J; Nisi, S; Nizzolo, R; Nucciotti, A; Pessina, G; Pizzigoni, G; Puiu, A; Ragazzi, S; Reintsema, C; Gomes, M Ribeiro; Schmidt, D; Schumann, D; Sisti, M; Swetz, D; Terranova, F; Ullom, J

    The European Research Council has recently funded HOLMES, a new experiment to directly measure the neutrino mass. HOLMES will perform a calorimetric measurement of the energy released in the decay of [Formula: see text]Ho. The calorimetric measurement eliminates systematic uncertainties arising from the use of external beta sources, as in experiments with beta spectrometers. This measurement was proposed in 1982 by A. De Rujula and M. Lusignoli, but only recently the detector technological progress allowed to design a sensitive experiment. HOLMES will deploy a large array of low temperature microcalorimeters with implanted [Formula: see text]Ho nuclei. The resulting mass sensitivity will be as low as 0.4 eV. HOLMES will be an important step forward in the direct neutrino mass measurement with a calorimetric approach as an alternative to spectrometry. It will also establish the potential of this approach to extend the sensitivity down to 0.1 eV. We outline here the project with its technical challenges and perspectives.

  1. High-Resolution Neutron Capture and Total Cross-Section Measurements, and the Astrophysical 95Mo(n,gamma) Reaction Rate at s-process Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Koehler, Paul Edward; Guber, Klaus H; Harvey, John A; Wiarda, Dorothea

    2008-01-01

    Abundances of Mo isotopes predicted by stellar models of the s process are, except for {sup 95}Mo, in good agreement with data from single grains of mainstream presolar SiC. Because the meteorite data seemed sound and no reasonable modification to stellar theory resulted in good agreement for {sup 95}Mo, it has been suggested that the recommended neutron capture reaction rate for this nuclide is 30% too low. Therefore, we have made a new determination of the {sup 95}Mo(n,{gamma}) reaction rate via high-resolution measurements of the neutron-capture and total cross sections of {sup 95}Mo at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator. These data were analyzed with the R-matrix code SAMMY to obtain parameters for resonances up to E{sub n} = 10 keV. Also, a small change to our capture apparatus allowed us to employ a new technique to vastly improve resonance spin and parity assignments. These new resonance parameters, together with our data in the unresolved range, were used to calculate the {sup 95}Mo(n,{gamma}) reaction rate at s-process temperatures. We compare the currently recommended rate to our new results and discuss their astrophysical impact.

  2. Analysis of D0 -> K+ pi- pi0 Decays: Search for D0-D0bar Mixing, and Measurements of the Doubly Cabibbo-Suppressed Decay Rate and Resonance Contributions

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Michael Galante

    2005-12-13

    Analyzing D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} decays, herein are presented the methods and results of a search for D{sup 0}-{bar D}{sup 0} mixing, a measurement of the branching ratio R {equivalent_to} {Lambda}(D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0})/{Lambda}(D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}), and measurements of the contributions from D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{rho}{sup -}, K*{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, K*{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}; 230.4 fb{sup -1} of data collected from the BABAR detector at the PEP-II collider during 2000-2004 (Runs 1-4) are analyzed. An event-level tagging technique is developed, which facilitates the accurate determination of doubly Cabibbo-suppressed resonance contributions by suppressing background from Cabibbo-favored decays. The branching ratio is measured as R = (0.214 {+-} 0.008 (stat) {+-} 0.008 (syst))%, with (46.1 {+-} 3.3 (stat) {+-} 2.9 (syst))% of D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} decays proceeding through the channel D{sup 0} {yields} K*{sup +}{pi}{sup -}. The data are consistent with the null-D-mixing hypothesis at a confidence level of 10%, and the expected value of {+-} {radical}(x{sup 2} + y{sup 2}) is measured as -0.013 {+-} 0.010 (stat), indicating negative interference between mixing and doubly Cabibbo-suppressed decay. The expected value of the integrated mixing rate is (x{sup 2} + y{sup 2})/2 = (0.013 {+-} 0.013 (stat))%.

  3. Estimation of decay rates for fecal indicator bacteria and bacterial pathogens in agricultural field-applied manure

    EPA Science Inventory

    Field-applied manure is an important source of pathogenic exposure in surface water bodies for humans and ecological receptors. We analyzed the persistence and decay of fecal indicator bacteria and bacterial pathogens from three sources (cattle, poultry, swine) for agricultural f...

  4. A unified approach via convexity for optimal energy decay rates of finite and infinite dimensional vibrating damped systems with applications to semi-discretized vibrating damped systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alabau-Boussouira, Fatiha

    The Liapunov method is celebrated for its strength to establish strong decay of solutions of damped equations. Extensions to infinite dimensional settings have been studied by several authors (see e.g. Haraux, 1991 [11], and Komornik and Zuazua, 1990 [17] and references therein). Results on optimal energy decay rates under general conditions of the feedback is far from being complete. The purpose of this paper is to show that general dissipative vibrating systems have structural properties due to dissipation. We present a general approach based on convexity arguments to establish sharp optimal or quasi-optimal upper energy decay rates for these systems, and on comparison principles based on the dissipation property, and interpolation inequalities (in the infinite dimensional case) for lower bounds of the energy. We stress the fact that this method works for finite as well as infinite dimensional vibrating systems and as well as for applications to semi-discretized nonlinear damped vibrating PDE's. A part of this approach has been introduced in Alabau-Boussouira (2004, 2005) [1,2]. In the present paper, we identify a new, simple and explicit criteria to select a class of nonlinear feedbacks, for which we prove a simplified explicit energy decay formula comparatively to the more general but also more complex formula we give in Alabau-Boussouira (2004, 2005) [1,2]. Moreover, we prove optimality of the decay rates for this class, in the finite dimensional case. This class includes a wide range of feedbacks, ranging from very weak nonlinear dissipation (exponentially decaying in a neighborhood of zero), to polynomial, or polynomial-logarithmic decaying feedbacks at the origin. In the infinite dimensional case, we establish a comparison principle on the energy of sufficiently smooth solutions through the dissipation relation. This principle relies on suitable interpolation inequalities. It allows us to give lower bounds for the energy of smooth initial data for the one

  5. Measurement of the solar neutrino capture rate with gallium metal. III. Results for the 2002-2007 data-taking period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdurashitov, J. N.; Gavrin, V. N.; Gorbachev, V. V.; Gurkina, P. P.; Ibragimova, T. V.; Kalikhov, A. V.; Khairnasov, N. G.; Knodel, T. V.; Mirmov, I. N.; Shikhin, A. A.; Veretenkin, E. P.; Yants, V. E.; Zatsepin, G. T.; Bowles, T. J.; Elliott, S. R.; Teasdale, W. A.; Nico, J. S.; Cleveland, B. T.; Wilkerson, J. F.

    2009-07-01

    The Russian-American experiment SAGE began to measure the solar neutrino capture rate with a target of gallium metal in December 1989. Measurements have continued with only a few brief interruptions since that time. In this article we present the experimental improvements in SAGE since its last published data summary in December 2001. Assuming the solar neutrino production rate was constant during the period of data collection, combined analysis of 168 extractions through December 2007 gives a capture rate of solar neutrinos with energy more than 233 keV of 65.4-3.0+3.1 (stat) -2.8+2.6 (syst) SNU. The weighted average of the results of all three Ga solar neutrino experiments, SAGE, Gallex, and GNO, is now 66.1±3.1 SNU, where statistical and systematic uncertainties have been combined in quadrature. During the recent period of data collection a new test of SAGE was made with a reactor-produced Ar37 neutrino source. The ratio of observed to calculated rates in this experiment, combined with the measured rates in the three prior Cr51 neutrino-source experiments with Ga, is 0.87±0.05. A probable explanation for this low result is that the cross section for neutrino capture by the two lowest-lying excited states in Ge71 has been overestimated. If we assume these cross sections are zero, then the standard solar model including neutrino oscillations predicts a total capture rate in Ga in the range of 63 SNU to 66 SNU with an uncertainty of about 4%, in good agreement with experiment. We derive the current value of the neutrino flux produced in the Sun by the proton-proton fusion reaction to be ϕpp⊙=(6.0±0.8)×1010/(cm2s), which agrees well with the pp flux predicted by the standard solar model. Finally, we make several tests and show that the data are consistent with the assumption that the solar neutrino production rate is constant in time.

  6. Measurement of the solar neutrino capture rate with gallium metal. III. Results for the 2002-2007 data-taking period

    SciTech Connect

    Abdurashitov, J. N.; Gavrin, V. N.; Gorbachev, V. V.; Gurkina, P. P.; Ibragimova, T. V.; Kalikhov, A. V.; Khairnasov, N. G.; Knodel, T. V.; Mirmov, I. N.; Shikhin, A. A.; Veretenkin, E. P.; Yants, V. E.; Zatsepin, G. T.; Bowles, T. J.; Elliott, S. R.; Teasdale, W. A.; Nico, J. S.; Cleveland, B. T.; Wilkerson, J. F.

    2009-07-15

    The Russian-American experiment SAGE began to measure the solar neutrino capture rate with a target of gallium metal in December 1989. Measurements have continued with only a few brief interruptions since that time. In this article we present the experimental improvements in SAGE since its last published data summary in December 2001. Assuming the solar neutrino production rate was constant during the period of data collection, combined analysis of 168 extractions through December 2007 gives a capture rate of solar neutrinos with energy more than 233 keV of 65.4{sub -3.0}{sup +3.1} (stat) {sub -2.8}{sup +2.6} (syst) SNU. The weighted average of the results of all three Ga solar neutrino experiments, SAGE, Gallex, and GNO, is now 66.1{+-}3.1 SNU, where statistical and systematic uncertainties have been combined in quadrature. During the recent period of data collection a new test of SAGE was made with a reactor-produced {sup 37}Ar neutrino source. The ratio of observed to calculated rates in this experiment, combined with the measured rates in the three prior {sup 51}Cr neutrino-source experiments with Ga, is 0.87{+-}0.05. A probable explanation for this low result is that the cross section for neutrino capture by the two lowest-lying excited states in {sup 71}Ge has been overestimated. If we assume these cross sections are zero, then the standard solar model including neutrino oscillations predicts a total capture rate in Ga in the range of 63 SNU to 66 SNU with an uncertainty of about 4%, in good agreement with experiment. We derive the current value of the neutrino flux produced in the Sun by the proton-proton fusion reaction to be {phi}{sub pp}{sup {center_dot}}=(6.0{+-}0.8)x10{sup 10}/(cm{sup 2} s), which agrees well with the pp flux predicted by the standard solar model. Finally, we make several tests and show that the data are consistent with the assumption that the solar neutrino production rate is constant in time.

  7. Injection deep level transient spectroscopy: An improved method for measuring capture rates of hot carriers in semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, R. M.; Seager, C. H.; Lang, D. V.; Campbell, J. M.

    2015-07-02

    In this study, an improved method for measuring the cross sections for carrier trapping at defects in semiconductors is described. This method, a variation of deep level transient spectroscopy(DLTS) used with bipolar transistors, is applied to hot carrier trapping at vacancy-oxygen, carbon-oxygen, and three charge states of divacancy centers (V2) in n- and p-type silicon. Unlike standard DLTS, we fill traps by injecting carriers into the depletion region of a bipolar transistor diode using a pulse of forward bias current applied to the adjacent diode. We show that this technique is capable of accurately measuring a wide range of capture cross sections at varying electric fields due to the control of the carrier density it provides. Because this technique can be applied to a variety of carrier energy distributions, it should be valuable in modeling the effect of radiation-induced generation-recombination currents in bipolar devices.

  8. Injection deep level transient spectroscopy: An improved method for measuring capture rates of hot carriers in semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleming, R. M.; Seager, C. H.; Lang, D. V.; Campbell, J. M.

    2015-07-01

    An improved method for measuring the cross sections for carrier trapping at defects in semiconductors is described. This method, a variation of deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) used with bipolar transistors, is applied to hot carrier trapping at vacancy-oxygen, carbon-oxygen, and three charge states of divacancy centers (V2) in n- and p-type silicon. Unlike standard DLTS, we fill traps by injecting carriers into the depletion region of a bipolar transistor diode using a pulse of forward bias current applied to the adjacent diode. We show that this technique is capable of accurately measuring a wide range of capture cross sections at varying electric fields due to the control of the carrier density it provides. Because this technique can be applied to a variety of carrier energy distributions, it should be valuable in modeling the effect of radiation-induced generation-recombination currents in bipolar devices.

  9. Injection deep level transient spectroscopy: An improved method for measuring capture rates of hot carriers in semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, R. M.; Seager, C. H.; Lang, D. V.; Campbell, J. M.

    2015-07-07

    An improved method for measuring the cross sections for carrier trapping at defects in semiconductors is described. This method, a variation of deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) used with bipolar transistors, is applied to hot carrier trapping at vacancy-oxygen, carbon-oxygen, and three charge states of divacancy centers (V{sub 2}) in n- and p-type silicon. Unlike standard DLTS, we fill traps by injecting carriers into the depletion region of a bipolar transistor diode using a pulse of forward bias current applied to the adjacent diode. We show that this technique is capable of accurately measuring a wide range of capture cross sections at varying electric fields due to the control of the carrier density it provides. Because this technique can be applied to a variety of carrier energy distributions, it should be valuable in modeling the effect of radiation-induced generation-recombination currents in bipolar devices.

  10. Transition in the decay rates of stationary distributions of Lévy motion in an energy landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaleta, Kamil; Lőrinczi, József

    2016-02-01

    The time evolution of random variables with Lévy statistics has the ability to develop jumps, displaying very different behaviors from continuously fluctuating cases. Such patterns appear in an ever broadening range of examples including random lasers, non-Gaussian kinetics, or foraging strategies. The penalizing or reinforcing effect of the environment, however, has been little explored so far. We report a new phenomenon which manifests as a qualitative transition in the spatial decay behavior of the stationary measure of a jump process under an external potential, occurring on a combined change in the characteristics of the process and the lowest eigenvalue resulting from the effect of the potential. This also provides insight into the fundamental question of what is the mechanism of the spatial decay of a ground state.

  11. α-decay branching ratios of near-threshold states in 19Ne and the astrophysical rate of 15O(α,γ)19Ne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davids, B.; van den Berg, A. M.; Dendooven, P.; Fleurot, F.; Hunyadi, M.; de Huu, M. A.; Rehm, K. E.; Segel, R. E.; Siemssen, R. H.; Wilschut, H. W.; Wörtche, H. J.; Wuosmaa, A. H.

    2003-01-01

    The 15O(α,γ)19Ne reaction is one of two routes for breakout from the hot CNO cycles into the rp process in accreting neutron stars. Its astrophysical rate depends critically on the decay properties of excited states in 19Ne lying just above the 15O+α threshold. We have measured the α-decay branching ratios for these states using the p(21Ne,t)19Ne reaction at 43 MeV/nucleon. Combining our measurements with previous determinations of the radiative widths of these states, we conclude that no significant breakout from the hot CNO cycle into the rp process in novas is possible via 15O(α,γ)19Ne, assuming that current models accurately represent their temperature and density conditions.

  12. Regional stressing rate appears to control duration and decay of off-fault aftershocks in the 2011 M=9.0 Tohoku-oki, Japan, earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toda, S.; Stein, R. S.

    2013-12-01

    The 11 March 2001 M=9.0 Tohoku-oki, Japan, earthquake brought the unprecedented broad increase in seismicity over inland Japan and far offshore. The seismicity rate increase was observed at distances of up to 425 km from the locus of high seismic slip on the megathrust, which roughly corresponds to the areas over 0.1 bar Coulomb stress increase (e.g., Toda et al., 2011). Such stress perturbation in the entire eastern Honshu island gives us a great opportunity to test one of the hypotheses in rate and state friction of Dieterich (1994): aftershock duration (ta) is inversely proportional to fault stressing rate. The Tohoku-oki mainshock indeed started a stopwatch simultaneously for all the off-fault and on-fault aftershocks in various tectonic situations. We have carefully examined the aftershock decays fitting the Omori-Utsu formula in several activated regions, including on the 2011 source fault, several inland areas of Tohoku (Akita, Iwaki, northern Sendai, and Fukushima), Tokyo metropolitan area, Choshi (east of Tokyo), Izu Peninsula, and areas along the most active Itoigawa-Shizuoka Tectonic Line (ISTL) central Honshu. Comparing the regional aftershock decays with the background rates of seismicity estimated from the JMA catalog from 2000 to 2010, we measured ta. One of the extreme short duration was measured at the Izu Peninsula where the heightened seismicity was rapidly toned down to the normal in one month. Overall seismicity in the Tohoku mainshock zone has been mostly closing to normal in 2 - 3 years. Both regions are characterized by high loading rate due to plate collision and subduction. Seismicity beneath Tokyo, also characterized by complex plate interfaces and brought average 1 bar closer to failure, has not followed the simple Omori decay but being settled a new higher rate after a rapid decay. In contrast to these highly deformed regions, current seismicity in slowly loading Tohoku inland regions are still much higher than background rate, which

  13. An all-aqueous route to polymer brush-modified membranes with remarkable permeabilites and protein capture rates

    PubMed Central

    Anuraj, Nishotha; Bhattacharjee, Somnath; Geiger, James H.; Baker, Gregory L.; Bruening, Merlin L.

    2011-01-01

    Microporous membranes are attractive for protein purification because convection rapidly brings proteins to binding sites. However, the low binding capacity of such membranes limits their applications. This work reports a rapid, aqueous procedure to create highly permeable, polymer brush-modified membranes that bind large amounts of protein. The synthetic method includes a 10-min adsorption of a macroinitiator in a hydroxylated nylon membrane and a subsequent 5-min aqueous atom transfer radical polymerization of 2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl succinate from the immobilized initiator to form poly(acid) brushes. This procedure likely leads to more swollen, less dense brushes than polymerization from silane initiators, and thus requires less polymer to achieve the same binding capacity. The hydraulic permeability of the poly(acid) membranes is 4-fold higher than that of similar membranes prepared by growing brushes from immobilized silane initiators. These brush-containing nylon membranes bind 120 mg/cm3 of lysozyme using solution residence times as short as 35 ms, and when functionalized with nitrilotriacetate (NTA)-Ni2+ complexes, they capture 85 mg/cm3 of histidine6-tagged (His-tagged) Ubiquitin. Additionally the NTA-Ni2+-functionalized membranes isolate His-tagged myo-inositol-1-phosphate synthase directly from cell extracts and show >90% recovery of His-tagged proteins. PMID:22287817

  14. Effect of release rate and ratio of (Z)-11-hexadecen-1-ol from synthetic pheromone blends on trap capture ofHeliothis subflexa (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).

    PubMed

    Heath, R R; Mitchell, E R; Cibrian Tovar, J

    1990-04-01

    Response of maleHeliothis subflexa to pheromone-baited traps containing blends of tetradecanal, (Z)-9-tetradecanal, hexadecanal, (Z)-7-hexadecenal, (Z)-9-hexadecenal, (Z)-11-hexadecenal, hexadecan-1-ol acetate, (Z)-7-hexadecen-1-ol acetate, (Z)-9-hexadecen-1-ol acetate, (Z)-11-hexadecen-1-ol acetate, (Z)-9-hexadecen-1-ol, and (Z)-11-hexadecen-1-ol was evaluated. Analysis of trap capture data indicated that (Z)-11-hexadecen-1-ol was a critical component of the pheromone blend. It was determined from emission rate data and measurements of the ratio of pheromone components emitted from rubber septa tested that a significant increase in trap capture of maleH. subflexa occurred when the blends investigated released the alcohol in a narrow range relative to the total amount of pheromone emitted. The optimum range of release ratio of the alcohol for the capture of males in sticky traps was determined to be 0.9-3.5% of the pheromone blend. This release ratio range was reduced to 0.9-1.6% when bucket traps were used.

  15. Radiative capture versus Coulomb dissociation.

    SciTech Connect

    Esbensen, H.; Physics

    2006-01-01

    Measurements of the Coulomb dissociation of {sup 8}B have been used to infer the rate of the inverse radiative proton capture on {sup 7}Be. The analysis is usually based on the assumptions that the two processes are related by detailed balance and described by E1 transitions. However, there are corrections to this relation. The Coulomb form factors for the two processes, for example, are not identical. There are also E2 transitions and higher-order effects in the Coulomb dissociation, and the nuclear induced breakup cannot always be ignored. While adding first-order E2 transitions enhances the decay energy spectrum, the other mechanisms cause a suppression at low relative energies. The net result may accidentally be close to the conventional first-order E1 calculation, but there are differences which cannot be ignored if accuracies of 10% or better are needed.

  16. A method to characterize in vivo tendon force-strain relationship by combining ultrasonography, motion capture and loading rates.

    PubMed

    Gerus, Pauline; Rao, Guillaume; Berton, Eric

    2011-08-11

    The ultrasonography contributes to investigate in vivo tendon force-strain relationship during isometric contraction. In previous studies, different methods are available to estimate the tendon strain, using different loading rates and models to fit the tendon force-strain relationship. This study was aimed to propose a standard method to characterize the in vivo tendon force-strain relationship. We investigated the influence on the force-strain relationship for medialis gastrocnemius (MG) of (1) one method which takes into account probe and joint movements to estimate the instantaneous tendon length, (2) models used to fit the force-strain relationship for uniaxial test (polynomial vs. Ogden), and (3) the loading rate on tendon strain. Subjects performed ramp-up contraction during isometric contractions at two different target speeds: 1.5s and minimal time with ultrasound probe fixed over the muscle-tendon junction of the MG muscle. The used method requires three markers on ultrasound probe and a marker on calcaneum to take into account all movements, and was compared to the strain estimated using ultrasound images only. The method using ultrasound image only overestimated the tendon strain from 40% of maximal force. The polynomial model showed similar fitting results than the Ogden model (R²=0.98). A loading rate effect was found on tendon strain, showing a higher strain when loading rate decreases. The characterization of tendon force-strain relationship needs to be standardized by taking into account all movements to estimate tendon strain and controlling the loading rate. The polynomial model appears to be appropriate to represent the tendon force-strain relationship.

  17. Comparative study of Gamow-Teller strength distributions in the odd-odd nucleus V50 and its impact on electron capture rates in astrophysical environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabi, Jameel-Un; Sajjad, Muhammad

    2007-11-01

    Gamow-Teller (GT) strength transitions are an ideal probe for testing nuclear structure models. In addition to nuclear structure, GT transitions in nuclei directly affect the early phases of Type Ia and Type-II supernovae core collapse since the electron capture rates are partly determined by these GT transitions. In astrophysics, GT transitions provide an important input for model calculations and element formation during the explosive phase of a massive star at the end of its life-time. Recent nucleosynthesis calculations show that odd-odd and odd-A nuclei cause the largest contribution in the rate of change of lepton-to-baryon ratio. In the present manuscript, we have calculated the GT strength distributions and electron capture rates for odd-odd nucleus V50 by using the pn-QRPA theory. At present V50 is the first experimentally available odd-odd nucleus in fp-shell nuclei. We also compare our GT strength distribution with the recently measured results of a V50(d, He2)Ti50 experiment, with the earlier work of Fuller, Fowler, and Newman (referred to as FFN) and subsequently with the large-scale shell model calculations. One curious finding of the paper is that the Brink's hypothesis, usually employed in large-scale shell model calculations, is not a good approximation to use at least in the case of V50. SNe Ia model calculations performed using FFN rates result in overproduction of Ti50, and were brought to a much acceptable value by employing shell model results. It might be interesting to study how the composition of the ejecta using presently reported QRPA rates compare with the observed abundances.

  18. Bivariate distributions in statistical spectroscopy studies: IV. Interacting particle Gamow-Teller strength densities and β-decay rates of fp-shell nuclei for presupernova stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kota, V. K. B.; Majumdar, D.

    1995-12-01

    A method to calculate temperature dependent β-decay rates is developed by writing the expression for the rates explicitly in terms of bivariate GT strength densities ( I {/O H } ( GT)) for a given hamiltonian H=h+V and state densities of the parent nucleus besides having the usual phase space factors. The theory developed in the preceding paper (III) for constructing NIP strength densities is applied for generating I {/O h } ( GT) and then I {/O H } ( GT) is constructed using the bivariate convolution form I {/O H } ( GT)=Σ S I {/O(GT) h,S }⊗ρ{/O(GT) V, S }; BIV-G . The spreading bivariate Gaussian ρ{/O(GT) V}; BIV-G, for fp-shell nuclei, is constructed by assuming that the marginal centroids are zero, the marginal variances are same as the corresponding state density variances and fixing the bivariate correlation coefficientbar ζ using experimental β-decay half lifes. With the deduced values ofbar ζ bar ζ ˜ 0.67, β-S-decay rates for61,62Fe and62 64Co isotopes are calculated at presupernova matter densities ρ=107 109 gm/cc, temperatures T=(3 5)×109 ∘K and electron fractions Ye=0.43 0.5. The convolution form for I {O(GT)/ H } led to a simple expression for calculating GT non-energy weighted sum rule strength and it describes (within 10%) the shell model results of fp-shell nuclei.

  19. Precision evaluation of the 71Ga(νe,e- ) solar neutrino capture rate from the (3He,t ) charge-exchange reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frekers, D.; Adachi, T.; Akimune, H.; Alanssari, M.; Brown, B. A.; Cleveland, B. T.; Ejiri, H.; Fujita, H.; Fujita, Y.; Fujiwara, M.; Gavrin, V. N.; Harakeh, M. N.; Hatanaka, K.; Holl, M.; Iwamoto, C.; Lennarz, A.; Okamoto, A.; Okamura, H.; Suzuki, T.; Tamii, A.

    2015-03-01

    A precision measurement of the 71Ga(3He,t ) 71Ge charge-exchange reaction was performed. By using a rather complete set of theoretical form factors to describe the cross-section angular distributions over a large angular range, the Gamow-Teller strength distribution up to the effective neutron-separation energy in 71Ge was extracted. The data and the analysis constrain the 71Ga(νe,e- ) solar neutrino rate in a neutrino nonoscillation scenario. For nonoscillating neutrinos we report a solar neutrino capture rate of 122.4 ±3.4 (stat ) ±1.1 (sys ) SNU, which is lower than the presently accepted value of 132 ±18 SNU, though not in disagreement given the quoted errors.

  20. Symmetry relations in nucleon decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurlbert, Anya; Wilczek, Frank

    1980-05-01

    Some experimental consequences of the structure of the effective hamiltonian for nucleon decay are presented. New results concern relations among inclusive decay rates, a striking test of the kinship hypothesis involving μ+ polarization, and soft π theorems.

  1. Measurement of branching fractions and rate asymmetries in the rare decays B→K(*)l⁺l⁻

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Yushkov, A. N.; Bondioli, M.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Atmacan, H.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Chao, D. S.; Cheng, C. H.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Rakitin, A. Y.; Andreassen, R.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sun, L.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Spaan, B.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Munerato, M.; Negrini, M.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Lee, C. L.; Morii, M.; Edwards, A. J.; Adametz, A.; Uwer, U.; Lacker, H. M.; Lueck, T.; Dauncey, P. D.; Behera, P. K.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rubin, A. E.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Chavez, C. A.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Griessinger, K.; Hafner, A.; Prencipe, E.; Barlow, R. J.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; Behn, E.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Dallapiccola, C.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Sciolla, G.; Cheaib, R.; Lindemann, D.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Biassoni, P.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Stracka, S.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Nguyen, X.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Martinelli, M.; Raven, G.; Jessop, C. P.; LoSecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Torrence, E.; Feltresi, E.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simi, G.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Sitt, S.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Pacetti, S.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Perez, A.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Piredda, G.; Bünger, C.; Grünberg, O.; Hartmann, T.; Leddig, T.; Schröder, H.; Voss, C.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Bartoldus, R.; Benitez, J. F.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Field, R. C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Lewis, P.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, S.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va’vra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Young, C. C.; Ziegler, V.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Miyashita, T. S.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D. R.; Soffer, A.; Lund, P.; Spanier, S. M.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Schwitters, R. F.; Wray, B. C.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; Gamba, D.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Ahmed, H.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Choi, H. H. F.; King, G. J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Tasneem, N.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S. L.

    2012-08-24

    In a sample of 471×10⁶ BB¯¯¯ events collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e⁺e⁻ collider we study the rare decays B→K(*)l⁺l⁻, where l⁺l⁻ is either e⁺e⁻ or μ⁺μ⁻. We report results on partial branching fractions and isospin asymmetries in seven bins of dilepton mass-squared. We further present CP and lepton-flavor asymmetries for dilepton masses below and above the J/ψ resonance. We find no evidence for CP or lepton-flavor violation. The partial branching fractions and isospin asymmetries are consistent with the Standard Model predictions and with results from other experiments.

  2. Improving Dengue Virus Capture Rates in Humans and Vectors in Kamphaeng Phet Province, Thailand, Using an Enhanced Spatiotemporal Surveillance Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Stephen J.; Aldstadt, Jared; Jarman, Richard G.; Buddhari, Darunee; Yoon, In-Kyu; Richardson, Jason H.; Ponlawat, Alongkot; Iamsirithaworn, Sopon; Scott, Thomas W.; Rothman, Alan L.; Gibbons, Robert V.; Lambrechts, Louis; Endy, Timothy P.

    2015-01-01

    Dengue is of public health importance in tropical and sub-tropical regions. Dengue virus (DENV) transmission dynamics was studied in Kamphaeng Phet Province, Thailand, using an enhanced spatiotemporal surveillance of 93 hospitalized subjects with confirmed dengue (initiates) and associated cluster individuals (associates) with entomologic sampling. A total of 438 associates were enrolled from 208 houses with household members with a history of fever, located within a 200-m radius of an initiate case. Of 409 associates, 86 (21%) had laboratory-confirmed DENV infection. A total of 63 (1.8%) of the 3,565 mosquitoes collected were dengue polymerase chain reaction positive (PCR+). There was a significant relationship between spatial proximity to the initiate case and likelihood of detecting DENV from associate cases and Aedes mosquitoes. The viral detection rate from human hosts and mosquito vectors in this study was higher than previously observed by the study team in the same geographic area using different methodologies. We propose that the sampling strategy used in this study could support surveillance of DENV transmission and vector interactions. PMID:25986580

  3. Improving dengue virus capture rates in humans and vectors in Kamphaeng Phet Province, Thailand, using an enhanced spatiotemporal surveillance strategy.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Stephen J; Aldstadt, Jared; Jarman, Richard G; Buddhari, Darunee; Yoon, In-Kyu; Richardson, Jason H; Ponlawat, Alongkot; Iamsirithaworn, Sopon; Scott, Thomas W; Rothman, Alan L; Gibbons, Robert V; Lambrechts, Louis; Endy, Timothy P

    2015-07-01

    Dengue is of public health importance in tropical and sub-tropical regions. Dengue virus (DENV) transmission dynamics was studied in Kamphaeng Phet Province, Thailand, using an enhanced spatiotemporal surveillance of 93 hospitalized subjects with confirmed dengue (initiates) and associated cluster individuals (associates) with entomologic sampling. A total of 438 associates were enrolled from 208 houses with household members with a history of fever, located within a 200-m radius of an initiate case. Of 409 associates, 86 (21%) had laboratory-confirmed DENV infection. A total of 63 (1.8%) of the 3,565 mosquitoes collected were dengue polymerase chain reaction positive (PCR+). There was a significant relationship between spatial proximity to the initiate case and likelihood of detecting DENV from associate cases and Aedes mosquitoes. The viral detection rate from human hosts and mosquito vectors in this study was higher than previously observed by the study team in the same geographic area using different methodologies. We propose that the sampling strategy used in this study could support surveillance of DENV transmission and vector interactions.

  4. On collisional capture rates of irregular satellites around the gas-giant planets and the minimum mass of the solar nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, F. Elliott; Hansen, Bradley M. S.

    2011-09-01

    We investigate the probability that an inelastic collision of planetesimals within the Hill sphere of the Jovian planets could explain the presence and orbits of observed irregular satellites. Capture of satellites via this mechanism is highly dependent on not only the mass of the protoplanetary disc, but also the shape of the planetesimal size distribution. We performed 2000 simulations for integrated time intervals ˜2 Myr and found that, given the currently accepted value for the minimum mass solar nebula and planetesimal number density based upon the Nesvorný et al. and Charnoz & Morbidelli size distribution dN˜D-3.5dD, the collision rates for the different Jovian planets range between ˜0.6 and ≳170 Myr-1 for objects with radii 1 km ≤r≤ 10 km. Additionally, we found that the probability that these collisions remove enough orbital energy to yield a bound orbit was ≲10-5 and had very little dependence on the relative size of the planetesimals. Of these collisions, the collision energy between two objects was ≳103 times the gravitational binding energy for objects with radii ˜100 km. We find that capturing irregular satellites via collisions between unbound objects can only account for ˜0.1 per cent of the observed population, hence this cannot be the sole method of producing irregular satellites.

  5. TrapTech R-Octenol Lure Does Not Improve the Capture Rates of Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae) and Other Container-Inhabiting Species in Biogents Sentinel Traps.

    PubMed

    Unlu, Isik; Faraji, Ary; Indelicato, Nicholas; Rochlin, Ilia

    2016-07-01

    Aedes albopictus (Skuse) and other container-inhabiting species have become important public health concerns due to the transmission of dengue, chikungunya, and Zika viruses. Effective surveillance is dependent on the ability to collect a sufficient number of mosquitoes for population monitoring and pathogen isolation. The Biogents Sentinel (BGS) trap supplied with a proprietary human skin lure has become the standard tool for container-inhabiting Aedes species collections worldwide. Recently, R-octenol, a single isomer of the well characterized mosquito attractant octenol, was shown to greatly improve the capture rate of some Aedes species when utilized with the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) light traps and Mosquito Magnet traps. This study evaluated the effectiveness of the TrapTech lure (TT lure), containing R-octenol, alone or in combination with the human skin lure in a BGS trap to capture Ae. albopictus and other species. BGS traps with human skin lures or a combination of the two lures collected approximately twice as many Ae. albopictus females compared to those with TT lures. Unlike previous studies, baiting BGS traps with TT lures did not result in increased diversity of mosquito species, or in higher numbers of other container-inhabiting Aedes species. Although human skin lures were clearly superior to TT R-octenol lures in BGS traps, R-octenol lures are more widely available and might still be used as an alternative lure, especially when Ae. albopictus populations are high.

  6. Investigation and modeling of biomass decay rate in the dark and its potential influence on net productivity of solar photobioreactors for microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and cyanobacterium Arthrospira platensis.

    PubMed

    Le Borgne, François; Pruvost, Jérémy

    2013-06-01

    Biomass decay rate (BDR) in the dark was investigated for Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (microalga) and Arthrospira platensis (cyanobacterium). A specific setup based on a torus photobioreactor with online gas analysis was validated, enabling us to follow the time course of the specific BDR using oxygen monitoring and mass balance. Various operating parameters that could limit respiration rates, such as culture temperature and oxygen deprivation, were then investigated. C. reinhardtii was found to present a higher BDR in the dark than A. platensis, illustrating here the difference between eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. In both cases, temperature proved an influential parameter, and the Arrhenius law was found to efficiently relate specific BDR to culture temperature. The utility of decreasing temperature at night to increase biomass productivity in a solar photobioreactor is also illustrated.

  7. mRNA decay rates in late-developing Dictyostelium discoideum cells are heterogeneous, and cyclic AMP does not act directly to stabilize cell-type-specific mRNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Manrow, R E; Jacobson, A

    1988-01-01

    We reevaluated the use of 32PO4 pulse-chases for analyzing mRNA decay rates in late-developing Dictyostelium cells. We found that completely effective PO4 chases could not be obtained in developing cells and that, as a consequence, the decay rates exhibited by some mRNAs were influenced by the rates at which they were transcribed. In developing cells disaggregated in the presence of cyclic AMP, the poly(A)+ mRNA population turned over with an apparent half-life of 4 h, individual mRNA decay rates were heterogeneous, and some prestalk and prespore mRNAs appeared to decay with biphasic kinetics. In cells disaggregated in the absence of cyclic AMP, all prestalk and prespore mRNAs decayed with biphasic kinetics. During the first 1 to 1.5 h after disaggregation in the absence of cyclic AMP, the cell-type-specific mRNAs were selectively degraded, decaying with half-lives of 20 to 30 min; thereafter, the residual prestalk and prespore mRNA molecules decayed at rates that were similar to those measured in the presence of cyclic AMP. This short-term labilization of cell-type-specific mRNAs was observed even for those species not requiring cyclic AMP for their accumulation in developing cells. The observation that cell-type specific mRNAs can decay at similar rates in disaggregated cells with or without cyclic AMP indicates that this compound does not act directly to stabilize prestalk and prespore mRNAs during development and that its primary role in the maintenance of cyclic-AMP-dependent mRNAs is likely to be transcriptional. Images PMID:2847029

  8. Photonuclear and radiative-capture reaction rates for nuclear astrophysics and transmutation: 92-100Mo, 88Sr, 90Zr, and 139La

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beard, M.; Frauendorf, S.; Kämpfer, B.; Schwengner, R.; Wiescher, M.

    2012-06-01

    Experimental photoabsorption cross sections for the nuclei 92,94,96,98,100Mo, 88Sr, 90Zr, and 139La are used as an input for calculations of (γ,n), (γ,p), and (γ,α), as well as (n,γ), (p,γ), and (α,γ) cross sections and reaction rates at energies and temperatures relevant for nucleosynthesis network models and transmutation projects. The calculations are performed with the statistical-model code talys. The results are compared with those obtained by using different analytic standard parametrizations of γ-ray strength functions implemented in talys and with an energy-damped double-Lorentzian model. The radiative capture reaction cross sections are enhanced by the pygmy resonances in 88Sr, 90Zr, and 139La.

  9. Radioactive Decay

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Radioactive decay is the emission of energy in the form of ionizing radiation. Example decay chains illustrate how radioactive atoms can go through many transformations as they become stable and no longer radioactive.

  10. Tooth Decay

    MedlinePlus

    You call it a cavity. Your dentist calls it tooth decay or dental caries. They're all names for a hole in your tooth. The cause of tooth decay is plaque, a sticky substance in your mouth made up mostly of germs. Tooth decay starts in the outer layer, called the enamel. Without ...

  11. Determination of rate constants and branching ratios for TCE degradation by zero-valent iron using a chain decay multispecies model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Hyoun-Tae; Jeen, Sung-Wook; Sudicky, Edward A.; Illman, Walter A.

    2015-06-01

    The applicability of a newly-developed chain-decay multispecies model (CMM) was validated by obtaining kinetic rate constants and branching ratios along the reaction pathways of trichloroethene (TCE) reduction by zero-valent iron (ZVI) from column experiments. Changes in rate constants and branching ratios for individual reactions for degradation products over time for two columns under different geochemical conditions were examined to provide ranges of those parameters expected over the long-term. As compared to the column receiving deionized water, the column receiving dissolved CaCO3 showed higher mean degradation rates for TCE and all of its degradation products. However, the column experienced faster reactivity loss toward TCE degradation due to precipitation of secondary carbonate minerals, as indicated by a higher value for the ratio of maximum to minimum TCE degradation rate observed over time. From the calculated branching ratios, it was found that TCE and cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) were dominantly dechlorinated to chloroacetylene and acetylene, respectively, through reductive elimination for both columns. The CMM model, validated by the column test data in this study, provides a convenient tool to determine simultaneously the critical design parameters for permeable reactive barriers and natural attenuation such as rate constants and branching ratios.

  12. Determination of rate constants and branching ratios for TCE degradation by zero-valent iron using a chain decay multispecies model.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hyoun-Tae; Jeen, Sung-Wook; Sudicky, Edward A; Illman, Walter A

    2015-01-01

    The applicability of a newly-developed chain-decay multispecies model (CMM) was validated by obtaining kinetic rate constants and branching ratios along the reaction pathways of trichloroethene (TCE) reduction by zero-valent iron (ZVI) from column experiments. Changes in rate constants and branching ratios for individual reactions for degradation products over time for two columns under different geochemical conditions were examined to provide ranges of those parameters expected over the long-term. As compared to the column receiving deionized water, the column receiving dissolved CaCO3 showed higher mean degradation rates for TCE and all of its degradation products. However, the column experienced faster reactivity loss toward TCE degradation due to precipitation of secondary carbonate minerals, as indicated by a higher value for the ratio of maximum to minimum TCE degradation rate observed over time. From the calculated branching ratios, it was found that TCE and cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) were dominantly dechlorinated to chloroacetylene and acetylene, respectively, through reductive elimination for both columns. The CMM model, validated by the column test data in this study, provides a convenient tool to determine simultaneously the critical design parameters for permeable reactive barriers and natural attenuation such as rate constants and branching ratios.

  13. Modification of the 3H-leucine Incorporation Technique for Quantifying Rates of Bacterial Secondary Production on Decaying Wetland Plant Litter: Effectiveness of Microdialysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillies, J. E.; Francoeur, S. N.; Kuehn, K. A.

    2005-05-01

    The radiolabelled 3H-leucine incorporation technique for quantifying rates of bacterial production has increased in popularity since its original description for bacterioplankton communities. Prior studies addressing incorporation conditions (e.g., substrate saturation) for bacterial communities in other habitats, such as decaying plant litter, have reported a wide range of final leucine concentrations (400nM to 50,000nM) to achieve saturation-level uptake. We assessed the application of the 3H-leucine incorporation procedure for measuring bacterial production on decaying wetland plant litter. Substrate saturation experiments (9 concentrations, 10nM to 50,000nM final leucine) were conducted for bacterial communities colonizing submerged litter of three emergent plant species (Typha angustifolia, Schoenoplectus validus, and Phragmites australis). A modified 3H-leucine protocol was developed by coupling previously described incubation and extraction protocols with microdialysis (500MWCO) of the final radiolabelled protein extract. Incorporation of 3H-leucine into protein exhibited a biphasic saturation curve, with lower Km values ranging from 400nM to 1200nM depending on the plant species studied. Upper Km values ranged from 4000nM to 6000nM. Dialysis of the crude protein extract significantly improved counting precision and the signal-to-noise ratio. These results suggest differential uptake by litter associated microbial assemblages, with lower Km values possibly representing bacterial uptake and higher Km values representing non-bacterial uptake.

  14. Theory of weak hypernuclear decay

    SciTech Connect

    Dubach, J.F.; Feldman, G.B.; Holstein, B.R. |; de la Torre, L.

    1996-07-01

    The weak nomesonic decay of {Lambda}-hypernuclei is studied in the context of a one-meson-exchange model. Predictions are made for the decay rate, the {ital p}/{ital n} stimulation ratio and the asymmetry in polarized hypernuclear decay. Copyright {copyright} 1996 Academic Press, Inc.

  15. Measurement of muon capture on the proton to 1% precision and determination of the pseudoscalar coupling gP.

    PubMed

    Andreev, V A; Banks, T I; Carey, R M; Case, T A; Clayton, S M; Crowe, K M; Deutsch, J; Egger, J; Freedman, S J; Ganzha, V A; Gorringe, T; Gray, F E; Hertzog, D W; Hildebrandt, M; Kammel, P; Kiburg, B; Knaack, S; Kravtsov, P A; Krivshich, A G; Lauss, B; Lynch, K R; Maev, E M; Maev, O E; Mulhauser, F; Petitjean, C; Petrov, G E; Prieels, R; Schapkin, G N; Semenchuk, G G; Soroka, M A; Tishchenko, V; Vasilyev, A A; Vorobyov, A A; Vznuzdaev, M E; Winter, P

    2013-01-04

    The MuCap experiment at the Paul Scherrer Institute has measured the rate Λ(S) of muon capture from the singlet state of the muonic hydrogen atom to a precision of 1%. A muon beam was stopped in a time projection chamber filled with 10-bar, ultrapure hydrogen gas. Cylindrical wire chambers and a segmented scintillator barrel detected electrons from muon decay. Λ(S) is determined from the difference between the μ(-) disappearance rate in hydrogen and the free muon decay rate. The result is based on the analysis of 1.2 × 10(10) μ(-) decays, from which we extract the capture rate Λ(S) = (714.9 ± 5.4(stat) ± 5.1(syst)) s(-1) and derive the proton's pseudoscalar coupling g(P)(q(0)(2) = -0.88 m(μ)(2)) = 8.06 ± 0.55.

  16. EFFECT OF VENTILATION SYSTEMS AND AIR FILTERS ON DECAY RATES OF PARTICLES PRODUCED BY INDOOR SOURCES IN AN OCCUPIED TOWNHOUSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several studies have shown the importance of particle losses in real homes due to deposition and filtration; however, none have quantitatively shown the impact of using a central forced air fan and in-duct filter on particle loss rates. In an attempt to provide such data, we me...

  17. Effect of ventilation systems and air filters on decay rates of particles produced by indoor sources in an occupied townhouse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard-Reed, Cynthia; Wallace, Lance A.; Emmerich, Steven J.

    Several studies have shown the importance of particle losses in real homes due to deposition and filtration; however, none have quantitatively shown the impact of using a central forced air fan and in-duct filter on particle loss rates. In an attempt to provide such data, we measured the deposition of particles ranging from 0.3 to 10 μm in an occupied townhouse and also in an unoccupied test house. Experiments were run with three different sources (cooking with a gas stove, citronella candle, pouring kitty litter), with the central heating and air conditioning (HAC) fan on or off, and with two different types of in-duct filters (electrostatic precipitator and ordinary furnace filter). Particle size, HAC fan operation, and the electrostatic precipitator had significant effects on particle loss rates. The standard furnace filter had no effect. Surprisingly, the type of source (combustion vs. mechanical generation) and the type of furnishings (fully furnished including carpet vs. largely unfurnished including mostly bare floor) also had no measurable effect on the deposition rates of particles of comparable size. With the HAC fan off, average deposition rates varied from 0.3 h -1 for the smallest particle range (0.3-0.5 μm) to 5.2 h -1 for particles greater than 10 μm. Operation of the central HAC fan approximately doubled these rates for particles <5 μm, and increased rates by 2 h -1 for the larger particles. An in-duct electrostatic precipitator increased the loss rates compared to the fan-off condition by factors of 5-10 for particles <2.5 μm, and by a factor of 3 for 2.5-5.0 μm particles. In practical terms, use of the central fan alone could reduce indoor particle concentrations by 25-50%, and use of an in-duct ESP could reduce particle concentrations by 55-85% compared to fan-off conditions.

  18. Spin-forbidden radiative decay rates from the 3 {sup 3}P{sub 1,2} and 3 {sup 1}P{sub 1} states of helium

    SciTech Connect

    Morton, Donald C.; Drake, G. W. F.

    2011-04-15

    We have calculated atomic helium spontaneous decay rates and absorption oscillator strengths for the spin-forbidden transitions from 3 {sup 3}P{sub 1,2} and 3 {sup 1}P{sub 1} to all lower {sup 1}S{sub 0} and {sup 3}S{sub 1} states. In particular we found A{sub 10}=44.33(4) s{sup -1} for the E1 transition 3 {sup 3}P{sub 1}-1 {sup 1}S{sub 0} and 0.1147(1) s{sup -1} for the M2 transition 3 {sup 3}P{sub 2}-1 {sup 1}S{sub 0}.

  19. Comparing the stress change characteristics and aftershock decay rate of the 2011 Mineral, VA, earthquake with similar earthquakes from a variety of tectonic settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, L. S.; Montesi, L. G.; Sauber, J. M.; Watters, T. R.; Kim, W.; Martin, A. J.; Anderson, R.

    2011-12-01

    On August 23, 2011, the magnitude 5.8 Mineral, VA, earthquake rocked the U.S. national capital region (Washington, DC) drawing worldwide attention to the occurrence of intraplate earthquakes. Using regional Coulomb stress change, we evaluate to what extent slip on faults during the Mineral, VA, earthquake and its aftershocks may have increased stress on notable Cenozoic fault systems in the DC metropolitan area: the central Virginia seismic zone, the DC fault zone, and the Stafford fault system. Our Coulomb stress maps indicate that the transfer of stress from the Mineral, VA, mainshock was at least 500 times greater than that produced from the magnitude 3.4 Germantown, MD, earthquake that occurred northwest of DC on July 16, 2010. Overall, the Mineral, VA, earthquake appears to have loaded faults of optimum orientation in the DC metropolitan region, bringing them closer to failure. The distribution of aftershocks of the Mineral, VA, earthquake will be compared with Coulomb stress change maps. We further characterize the Mineral, VA, earthquake by comparing its aftershock decay rate with that of blind thrust earthquakes with similar magnitude, focal mechanism, and depth from a variety of tectonic settings. In particular, we compare aftershock decay relations of the Mineral, VA, earthquake with two well studied California reverse faulting events, the August 4, 1985 Kettleman Hills (Mw = 6.1) and October 1, 1987 Whittier Narrow (Mw = 5.9) earthquakes. Through these relations we test the hypothesis that aftershock duration is inversely proportional to fault stressing rate, suggesting that aftershocks in active tectonic margins may last only a few years while aftershocks in intraplate regions could endure for decades to a century.

  20. Capturing the Future: Direct and Indirect Probes of Neutron Capture

    SciTech Connect

    Couture, Aaron Joseph

    2016-08-31

    This report documents aspects of direct and indirect neutron capture. The importance of neutron capture rates and methods to determine them are presented. The following conclusions are drawn: direct neutron capture measurements remain a backbone of experimental study; work is being done to take increased advantage of indirect methods for neutron capture; both instrumentation and facilities are making new measurements possible; more work is needed on the nuclear theory side to understand what is needed furthest from stability.

  1. A theoretical investigation of the influence of gold nanosphere size on the decay and energy transfer rates and efficiencies of quantum emitters.

    PubMed

    Marocico, Cristian A; Zhang, Xia; Bradley, A Louise

    2016-01-14

    We present in this contribution a comprehensive investigation of the effect of the size of gold nanospheres on the decay and energy transfer rates of quantum systems placed close to these nanospheres. These phenomena have been investigated before, theoretically and experimentally, but no comprehensive study of the influence of the nanoparticle size on important dependences of the decay and energy transfer rates, such as the dependence on the donor-acceptor spectral overlap and the relative positions of the donor, acceptor, and nanoparticle, exists. As such, different accounts of the energy transfer mechanism have been presented in the literature. We perform an investigation of the energy transfer mechanisms between emitters and gold nanospheres and between donor-acceptor pairs in the presence of the gold nanospheres using a Green's tensor formalism, experimentally verified in our lab. We find that the energy transfer rate to small nanospheres is greatly enhanced, leading to a strong quenching of the emission of the emitter. When the nanosphere size is increased, it acts as an antenna, increasing the emission of the emitter. We also investigate the emission wavelength and intrinsic quantum yield dependence of the energy transfer to the nanosphere. As evidenced from the literature, the energy transfer process between the quantum system and the nanosphere can have a complicated distance dependence, with a r(-6) regime, characteristic of the Förster energy transfer mechanism, but also exhibiting other distance dependences. In the case of a donor-acceptor pair of quantum systems in the presence of a gold nanosphere, when the donor couples strongly to the nanosphere, acting as an enhanced dipole; the donor-acceptor energy transfer rate then follows a Förster trend, with an increased Förster radius. The coupling of the acceptor to the nanosphere has a different distance dependence. The angular dependence of the energy transfer efficiency between donor and acceptor

  2. A theoretical investigation of the influence of gold nanosphere size on the decay and energy transfer rates and efficiencies of quantum emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marocico, Cristian A.; Zhang, Xia; Bradley, A. Louise

    2016-01-01

    We present in this contribution a comprehensive investigation of the effect of the size of gold nanospheres on the decay and energy transfer rates of quantum systems placed close to these nanospheres. These phenomena have been investigated before, theoretically and experimentally, but no comprehensive study of the influence of the nanoparticle size on important dependences of the decay and energy transfer rates, such as the dependence on the donor-acceptor spectral overlap and the relative positions of the donor, acceptor, and nanoparticle, exists. As such, different accounts of the energy transfer mechanism have been presented in the literature. We perform an investigation of the energy transfer mechanisms between emitters and gold nanospheres and between donor-acceptor pairs in the presence of the gold nanospheres using a Green's tensor formalism, experimentally verified in our lab. We find that the energy transfer rate to small nanospheres is greatly enhanced, leading to a strong quenching of the emission of the emitter. When the nanosphere size is increased, it acts as an antenna, increasing the emission of the emitter. We also investigate the emission wavelength and intrinsic quantum yield dependence of the energy transfer to the nanosphere. As evidenced from the literature, the energy transfer process between the quantum system and the nanosphere can have a complicated distance dependence, with a r-6 regime, characteristic of the Förster energy transfer mechanism, but also exhibiting other distance dependences. In the case of a donor-acceptor pair of quantum systems in the presence of a gold nanosphere, when the donor couples strongly to the nanosphere, acting as an enhanced dipole; the donor-acceptor energy transfer rate then follows a Förster trend, with an increased Förster radius. The coupling of the acceptor to the nanosphere has a different distance dependence. The angular dependence of the energy transfer efficiency between donor and acceptor

  3. A theoretical investigation of the influence of gold nanosphere size on the decay and energy transfer rates and efficiencies of quantum emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Marocico, Cristian A.; Zhang, Xia; Bradley, A. Louise

    2016-01-14

    We present in this contribution a comprehensive investigation of the effect of the size of gold nanospheres on the decay and energy transfer rates of quantum systems placed close to these nanospheres. These phenomena have been investigated before, theoretically and experimentally, but no comprehensive study of the influence of the nanoparticle size on important dependences of the decay and energy transfer rates, such as the dependence on the donor-acceptor spectral overlap and the relative positions of the donor, acceptor, and nanoparticle, exists. As such, different accounts of the energy transfer mechanism have been presented in the literature. We perform an investigation of the energy transfer mechanisms between emitters and gold nanospheres and between donor-acceptor pairs in the presence of the gold nanospheres using a Green’s tensor formalism, experimentally verified in our lab. We find that the energy transfer rate to small nanospheres is greatly enhanced, leading to a strong quenching of the emission of the emitter. When the nanosphere size is increased, it acts as an antenna, increasing the emission of the emitter. We also investigate the emission wavelength and intrinsic quantum yield dependence of the energy transfer to the nanosphere. As evidenced from the literature, the energy transfer process between the quantum system and the nanosphere can have a complicated distance dependence, with a r{sup −6} regime, characteristic of the Förster energy transfer mechanism, but also exhibiting other distance dependences. In the case of a donor-acceptor pair of quantum systems in the presence of a gold nanosphere, when the donor couples strongly to the nanosphere, acting as an enhanced dipole; the donor-acceptor energy transfer rate then follows a Förster trend, with an increased Förster radius. The coupling of the acceptor to the nanosphere has a different distance dependence. The angular dependence of the energy transfer efficiency between donor and

  4. Radioactive decay.

    PubMed

    Groch, M W

    1998-01-01

    When a parent radionuclide decays to its daughter radionuclide by means of alpha, beta, or isomeric transition, the decay follows an exponential form, which is characterized by the decay constant lambda. The decay constant represents the probability per unit time that a single radioatom will decay. The decay equation can be used to provide a useful expression for radionuclide decay, the half-life, the time when 50% of the radioatoms present will have decayed. Radiotracer half-life has direct implications in nuclear imaging, radiation therapy, and radiation safety because radionuclide half-life affects the ability to evaluate tracer kinetics and create appropriate nuclear images and also affects organ, tumor, and whole-body radiation dose. The number of radioatoms present in a sample is equal to the activity, defined as the number of transitions per unit time, divided by the decay constant; the mass of radioatoms present in a sample can be calculated to determine the specific activity (activity per unit mass). The dynamic relationship between the number of parent and daughter atoms present over time may lead to radioactive equilibrium, which takes two forms--secular and transient--and has direct relevance to generator-produced radionuclides.

  5. Conservation laws, radiative decay rates, and excited state localization in organometallic complexes with strong spin-orbit coupling.

    PubMed

    Powell, B J

    2015-06-30

    There is longstanding fundamental interest in 6-fold coordinated d(6) (t(2g)(6)) transition metal complexes such as [Ru(bpy)3](2+) and Ir(ppy)3, particularly their phosphorescence. This interest has increased with the growing realisation that many of these complexes have potential uses in applications including photovoltaics, imaging, sensing, and light-emitting diodes. In order to design new complexes with properties tailored for specific applications a detailed understanding of the low-energy excited states, particularly the lowest energy triplet state, T1, is required. Here we describe a model of pseudo-octahedral complexes based on a pseudo-angular momentum representation and show that the predictions of this model are in excellent agreement with experiment - even when the deviations from octahedral symmetry are large. This model gives a natural explanation of zero-field splitting of T1 and of the relative radiative rates of the three sublevels in terms of the conservation of time-reversal parity and total angular momentum modulo two. We show that the broad parameter regime consistent with the experimental data implies significant localization of the excited state.

  6. Real-time capture of seismic waves using high-rate multi-GNSS observations: Application to the 2015 Mw 7.8 Nepal earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Tao; Xie, Xin; Fang, Rongxin; Su, Xing; Zhao, Qile; Liu, Gang; Li, Heng; Shi, Chuang; Liu, Jingnan

    2016-01-01

    The variometric approach is investigated to measure real-time seismic waves induced by the 2015 Mw 7.8 Nepal earthquake with high-rate multi-GNSS observations, especially with the contribution of newly available BDS. The velocity estimation using GPS + BDS shows an additional improvement of around 20% with respect to GPS-only solutions. We also reconstruct displacements by integrating GNSS-derived velocities after a linear trend removal (IGV). The displacement waveforms with accuracy of better than 5 cm are derived when postprocessed GPS precise point positioning results are used as ground truth, even if those stations have strong ground motions and static offsets of up to 1-2 m. GNSS-derived velocity and displacement waveforms with the variometric approach are in good agreement with results from strong motion data. We therefore conclude that it is feasible to capture real-time seismic waves with multi-GNSS observations using the IGV-enhanced variometric approach, which has critical implications for earthquake early warning, tsunami forecasting, and rapid hazard assessment.

  7. Radiative B Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Bard, D.; /Imperial Coll., London

    2011-11-23

    I discuss recent results in radiative B decays from the Belle and BaBar collaborations. I report new measurements of the decay rate and CP asymmetries in b {yields} s{gamma} and b {yields} d{gamma} decays, and measurements of the photon spectrum in b {yields} s{gamma}. Radiative penguin decays are flavour changing neutral currents which do not occur at tree level in the standard model (SM), but must proceed via one loop or higher order diagrams. These transitions are therefore suppressed in the SM, but offer access to poorlyknown SM parameters and are also a sensitive probe of new physics. In the SM, the rate is dominated by the top quark contribution to the loop, but non-SM particles could also contribute with a size comparable to leading SM contributions. The new physics effects are potentially large which makes them theoretically very interesting, but due to their small branching fractions they are typically experimentally challenging.

  8. Shear wave attenuation estimated from the spectral decay rate in the vicinity of the Petropavlovsk station, Kamchatka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusev, A. A.; Guseva, E. M.

    2016-07-01

    The parameters of S-wave attenuation (the total effect of absorption and scattering) near the Petropavlovsk (PET) station in Kamchatka were estimated by means of the spectral method through an original procedure. The spectral method typically analyzes the changes with distance of the shape of spectra of the acceleration records assuming that the acceleration spectrum at the earthquake source is flat. In reality, this assumption is violated: the source acceleration spectra often have a high-frequency cutoff (the source-controlled f max) which limits the spectral working bandwidth. Ignoring this phenomenon not only leads to a broad scatter of the individual estimates but also causes systematic errors in the form of overestimation of losses. In the approach applied in the present study, we primarily estimated the frequency of the mentioned high-frequency cutoff and then constructed the loss estimates only within the frequency range where the source spectrum is approximately flat. The shape of the source spectrum was preliminarily assessed by the approximate loss compensation technique. For this purpose, we used the tentative attenuation estimates which are close to the final ones. The difference in the logarithms of the spectral amplitudes at the edges of the working bandwidth is the input for calculating the attenuation. We used the digital accelerograms from the PET station, with 80 samples per second digitization rate, and based on them, we calculated the averaged spectrum of the S-waves as the root mean square along two horizontal components. Our analysis incorporates 384 spectra from the local earthquakes with M = 4-6.5 at the hypocentral distances ranging from 80 to 220 km. By applying the nonlinear least-square method, we found the following parameters of the loss model: the Q-factor Q 0 = 156 ± 33 at frequency f = 1 Hz for the distance interval r = 0-100 km; the exponent in the power-law relationship describing the growth of the Q-factor with frequency,

  9. Muon capture in deuterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricci, P.; Truhlík, E.; Mosconi, B.; Smejkal, J.

    2010-06-01

    Model dependence of the capture rates of the negative muon capture in deuterium is studied starting from potential models and the weak two-body meson exchange currents constructed in the tree approximation and also from an effective field theory. The tree one-boson exchange currents are derived from the hard pion chiral Lagrangians of the NΔπρωa system. If constructed in conjunction with the one-boson exchange potentials, the capture rates can be calculated consistently. On the other hand, the effective field theory currents, constructed within the heavy baryon chiral perturbation theory, contain a low energy constant d that cannot be extracted from data at the one-particle level nor determined from the first principles. Comparative analysis of the results for the doublet transition rate allows us to extract the constant d.

  10. Few body hypernuclear systems: Weak decays

    SciTech Connect

    Dover, C.B.

    1987-01-01

    The experimental and theoretical situation regarding mesonic and non-mesonic decays of light hypernuclei is reviewed. Although some models give reasonable results for pionic decays as well as the total weak decay rate, no existing approach explains, even qualitatively, the observed spin-isospin dependence of ..lambda..N ..-->.. NN non-mesonic weak decays. 31 refs., 2 figs.

  11. Robust estimates of environmental effects on population vital rates: an integrated capture-recapture model of seasonal brook trout growth, survival and movement in a stream network.

    PubMed

    Letcher, Benjamin H; Schueller, Paul; Bassar, Ronald D; Nislow, Keith H; Coombs, Jason A; Sakrejda, Krzysztof; Morrissey, Michael; Sigourney, Douglas B; Whiteley, Andrew R; O'Donnell, Matthew J; Dubreuil, Todd L

    2015-03-01

    Modelling the effects of environmental change on populations is a key challenge for ecologists, particularly as the pace of change increases. Currently, modelling efforts are limited by difficulties in establishing robust relationships between environmental drivers and population responses. We developed an integrated capture-recapture state-space model to estimate the effects of two key environmental drivers (stream flow and temperature) on demographic rates (body growth, movement and survival) using a long-term (11 years), high-resolution (individually tagged, sampled seasonally) data set of brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) from four sites in a stream network. Our integrated model provides an effective context within which to estimate environmental driver effects because it takes full advantage of data by estimating (latent) state values for missing observations, because it propagates uncertainty among model components and because it accounts for the major demographic rates and interactions that contribute to annual survival. We found that stream flow and temperature had strong effects on brook trout demography. Some effects, such as reduction in survival associated with low stream flow and high temperature during the summer season, were consistent across sites and age classes, suggesting that they may serve as robust indicators of vulnerability to environmental change. Other survival effects varied across ages, sites and seasons, indicating that flow and temperature may not be the primary drivers of survival in those cases. Flow and temperature also affected body growth rates; these responses were consistent across sites but differed dramatically between age classes and seasons. Finally, we found that tributary and mainstem sites responded differently to variation in flow and temperature. Annual survival (combination of survival and body growth across seasons) was insensitive to body growth and was most sensitive to flow (positive) and temperature (negative

  12. CP-violation reach of an electron capture neutrino beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orme, Christopher

    2010-07-01

    This article extends the work of Bernabeu and Espinoza by examining the CP-violation reach of a 150Dy electron capture beam through the variation of the two Lorentz boosts, the number of useful electron capture decays, the relative run time of each boost and the number of atmospheric backgrounds. The neutrinos are assumed to be sourced at CERN with an upgraded SPS and are directed towards a 440 kton Water Cerenkov detector located at the Canfranc laboratory. Two large ‘CP-coverage’ choices for the boost pairings are found; a δ-symmetrical coverage for ( γ 1, γ 2) = (280, 160) and an δ-asymmetric coverage for ( γ 1 , γ 2) = (440,150). With a nominal useful decay rate of N ions = 1018 ions per year, the δ-symmetric setup can rule out CP-conservation down to sin2 2 θ 13 = 3•10-4. To reach sin2 2 θ 13 =1•10-3 for both δ < 0 and δ > 0 requires a useful decay rate of N ions = 6•1017 ions per year.

  13. Determinants of mRNA stability in Dictyostelium discoideum amoebae: differences in poly(A) tail length, ribosome loading, and mRNA size cannot account for the heterogeneity of mRNA decay rates.

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, R A; Herrick, D; Manrow, R E; Blinder, D; Jacobson, A

    1988-01-01

    As an approach to understanding the structures and mechanisms which determine mRNA decay rates, we have cloned and begun to characterize cDNAs which encode mRNAs representative of the stability extremes in the poly(A)+ RNA population of Dictyostelium discoideum amoebae. The cDNA clones were identified in a screening procedure which was based on the occurrence of poly(A) shortening during mRNA aging. mRNA half-lives were determined by hybridization of poly(A)+ RNA, isolated from cells labeled in a 32PO4 pulse-chase, to dots of excess cloned DNA. Individual mRNAs decayed with unique first-order decay rates ranging from 0.9 to 9.6 h, indicating that the complex decay kinetics of total poly(A)+ RNA in D. discoideum amoebae reflect the sum of the decay rates of individual mRNAs. Using specific probes derived from these cDNA clones, we have compared the sizes, extents of ribosome loading, and poly(A) tail lengths of stable, moderately stable, and unstable mRNAs. We found (i) no correlation between mRNA size and decay rate; (ii) no significant difference in the number of ribosomes per unit length of stable versus unstable mRNAs, and (iii) a general inverse relationship between mRNA decay rates and poly(A) tail lengths. Collectively, these observations indicate that mRNA decay in D. discoideum amoebae cannot be explained in terms of random nucleolytic events. The possibility that specific 3'-structural determinants can confer mRNA instability is suggested by a comparison of the labeling and turnover kinetics of different actin mRNAs. A correlation was observed between the steady-state percentage of a given mRNA found in polysomes and its degree of instability; i.e., unstable mRNAs were more efficiently recruited into polysomes than stable mRNAs. Since stable mRNAs are, on average, "older" than unstable mRNAs, this correlation may reflect a translational role for mRNA modifications that change in a time-dependent manner. Our previous studies have demonstrated both a time

  14. Final Report: Part 1. In-Place Filter Testing Instrument for Nuclear Material Containers. Part 2. Canister Filter Test Standards for Aerosol Capture Rates.

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Austin Douglas; Runnels, Joel T.; Moore, Murray E.; Reeves, Kirk Patrick

    2014-11-02

    ) fouling of o-rings, (B) leakage through simulated cracks in o-rings, and (C) air leakage due to inadequately tightened canister lids. The Los Alamos POC instrument determined pertinent air flow and pressure quantities, and this knowledge was used to specify a customized Isaac® (Z axis, Salt Lake City, UT) leak test module. The final Los Alamos IPFT (incorporating the Isaac® leak test module) was used to repeat the tests in the Instrument Development Plan (with simulated filter clogging tests and canister leak pathway tests). The Los Alamos IPFT instrument is capable of determining filter clogging and leak rate conditions, without requiring removal of the container lid. The IPFT measures pressure decay rate from 1.7E-03 in WC/sec to 1.7E-01 in WC/sec. On the same unit scale, helium leak testing of canisters has a range from 5.7E-07 in WC/sec to 1.9E-03 in WC/sec. For a 5-quart storage canister, the IPFT measures equivalent leak flow rates from 0.03 to 3.0 cc/sec. The IPFT does not provide the same sensitivity as helium leak testing, but is able to gauge the assembled condition of as-found and in-situ canisters.

  15. Rare decays and CP asymmetries in charged B decays

    SciTech Connect

    Deshpande, N.G.

    1991-01-01

    The theory of loop induced rare decays and the rate asymmetry due to CP violation in charged B Decays in reviewed. After considering b {yields} s{gamma} and b {yields} se{sup +}e{sup {minus}} decays, the asymmetries for pure penguin process are estimated first. A larger asymmetry can result in those modes where a tree diagram and a penguin diagram interfere, however these estimates are necessarily model dependent. Estimates of Cabbibo suppressed penguins are also considered.

  16. Rare Z decays and new physics

    SciTech Connect

    Glover, E.W.N.

    1990-04-01

    Although the signatures for rare Z decays are often spectacular, the predicted standard model rates are usually extremely small. In many cases, however, rare decays are very sensitive to new phenomena and may lead to an observable rate. In this talk, I select some interesting rare decays and discuss how new physics might be identified. 25 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Nuclear structure and weak rates of heavy waiting point nuclei under rp-process conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabi, Jameel-Un; Böyükata, Mahmut

    2017-01-01

    The structure and the weak interaction mediated rates of the heavy waiting point (WP) nuclei 80Zr, 84Mo, 88Ru, 92Pd and 96Cd along N = Z line were studied within the interacting boson model-1 (IBM-1) and the proton-neutron quasi-particle random phase approximation (pn-QRPA). The energy levels of the N = Z WP nuclei were calculated by fitting the essential parameters of IBM-1 Hamiltonian and their geometric shapes were predicted by plotting potential energy surfaces (PESs). Half-lives, continuum electron capture rates, positron decay rates, electron capture cross sections of WP nuclei, energy rates of β-delayed protons and their emission probabilities were later calculated using the pn-QRPA. The calculated Gamow-Teller strength distributions were compared with previous calculation. We present positron decay and continuum electron capture rates on these WP nuclei under rp-process conditions using the same model. For the rp-process conditions, the calculated total weak rates are twice the Skyrme HF+BCS+QRPA rates for 80Zr. For remaining nuclei the two calculations compare well. The electron capture rates are significant and compete well with the corresponding positron decay rates under rp-process conditions. The finding of the present study supports that electron capture rates form an integral part of the weak rates under rp-process conditions and has an important role for the nuclear model calculations.

  18. Thermal Neutron Capture Cross Section of {sup 22}Ne

    SciTech Connect

    Belgya, T.; Uberseder, E.; Petrich, D.; Kaeppeler, F.

    2009-01-28

    The radiative thermal neutron capture cross section of the astrophysically important {sup 22}Ne nucleus has been measured at the guided cold neutron beam of the Budapest Research Reactor. High-pressure gas-bottles filled with mixtures of enriched {sup 22}Ne and CH{sub 4} were used. The cross section was determined by means of the comparator method, and an improved decay-scheme obtained in this work. The new value for the thermal neutron cross section is 52.7{+-}0.7 mb, 18% larger than the accepted value. The influence of the new cross section on the astrophysical reaction rate is under investigation.

  19. Measurements of transfer process in pion capture by a series of alcohols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinohara, Atsushi; Muroyama, Toshiharu; Shintai, Junichirou; Taniguchi, Eugene; Saito, Tadashi; Miura, Taichi; Imanishi, Nobutsugu; Yoshimura, Yoshio; Furukawa, Michiaki

    1994-12-01

    The transfer of negative pions captured by hydrogen to heavier atoms has been investigated in a series of alcohols by measuring both 2γ rays from π0 decay and pionic X rays. Capture rates for the pionic hydrogen of different chemical states in the molecule were determined from a comparison between the data for the ordinary compound and the deuterated one. The external transfer in the condensed phase was revealed by the dependence of the capture rate of hydrogen on the number of carbon atoms in the alkyl group. The influence of the chemical structure on the transfer process is discussed with respect to the large difference between the relative transfer rates, Λ C=1.5±0.2 and Λ O = 4.5±0.4, corresponding to carbon and oxygen, respectively.

  20. Penguin diagram dominance in radiative weak decays of bottom baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Kohara, Yoji

    2005-05-01

    Radiative weak decays of antitriplet bottom baryons are studied under the assumption of penguin diagram dominance and flavor-SU(3) (or SU(2)) symmetry. Relations among decay rates of various decay modes are derived.

  1. Measurements of the Higgs boson production and decay rates and coupling strengths using pp collision data at [Formula: see text] and 8 TeV in the ATLAS experiment.

    PubMed

    Aad, G; Abbott, B; Abdallah, J; Abdinov, O; Aben, R; Abolins, M; AbouZeid, O S; Abramowicz, H; Abreu, H; Abreu, R; Abulaiti, Y; Acharya, B S; Adamczyk, L; Adams, D L; Adelman, J; Adomeit, S; Adye, T; Affolder, A A; Agatonovic-Jovin, T; Aguilar-Saavedra, J A; Ahlen, S P; Ahmadov, F; Aielli, G; Akerstedt, H; Åkesson, T P A; Akimoto, G; Akimov, A V; Alberghi, G L; Albert, J; Albrand, S; Alconada Verzini, M J; Aleksa, M; Aleksandrov, I N; Alexa, C; Alexander, G; Alexopoulos, T; Alhroob, M; Alimonti, G; Alio, L; Alison, J; Alkire, S P; Allbrooke, B M M; Allport, P P; Aloisio, A; Alonso, A; Alonso, F; Alpigiani, C; Altheimer, A; Alvarez Gonzalez, B; Álvarez Piqueras, D; Alviggi, M G; Amadio, B T; Amako, K; Amaral Coutinho, Y; Amelung, C; Amidei, D; Amor Dos Santos, S P; Amorim, A; Amoroso, S; Amram, N; Amundsen, G; Anastopoulos, C; Ancu, L S; Andari, N; Andeen, T; Anders, C F; Anders, G; Anders, J K; Anderson, K J; Andreazza, A; Andrei, V; Angelidakis, S; Angelozzi, I; Anger, P; Angerami, A; Anghinolfi, F; Anisenkov, A V; Anjos, N; Annovi, A; Antonelli, M; Antonov, A; Antos, J; Anulli, F; Aoki, M; Aperio Bella, L; Arabidze, G; Arai, Y; Araque, J P; Arce, A T H; Arduh, F A; Arguin, J-F; Argyropoulos, S; Arik, M; Armbruster, A J; Arnaez, O; Arnal, V; Arnold, H; Arratia, M; Arslan, O; Artamonov, A; Artoni, G; Asai, S; Asbah, N; Ashkenazi, A; Åsman, B; Asquith, L; Assamagan, K; Astalos, R; Atkinson, M; Atlay, N B; Auerbach, B; Augsten, K; Aurousseau, M; Avolio, G; Axen, B; Ayoub, M K; Azuelos, G; Baak, M A; Baas, A E; Bacci, C; Bachacou, H; Bachas, K; Backes, M; Backhaus, M; Bagiacchi, P; Bagnaia, P; Bai, Y; Bain, T; Baines, J T; Baker, O K; Balek, P; Balestri, T; Balli, F; Banas, E; Banerjee, Sw; Bannoura, A A E; Bansil, H S; Barak, L; Barberio, E L; Barberis, D; Barbero, M; Barillari, T; Barisonzi, M; Barklow, T; Barlow, N; Barnes, S L; Barnett, B M; Barnett, R M; Barnovska, Z; Baroncelli, A; Barone, G; Barr, A J; Barreiro, F; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J; Bartoldus, R; Barton, A E; 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    Combined analyses of the Higgs boson production and decay rates as well as its coupling strengths to vector bosons and fermions are presented. The combinations include the results of the analyses of the [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] decay modes, and the constraints on the associated production with a pair of top quarks and on the off-shell coupling strengths of the Higgs boson. The results are based on the LHC proton-proton collision datasets, with integrated luminosities of up to 4.7 [Formula: see text] at [Formula: see text] TeV and 20.3 [Formula: see text] at [Formula: see text] TeV, recorded by the ATLAS detector in 2011 and 2012. Combining all production modes and decay channels, the measured signal yield, normalised to the Standard Model expectation, is [Formula: see text]. The observed Higgs boson production and decay rates are interpreted in a leading-order coupling framework, exploring a wide range of benchmark coupling models both with and without assumptions on the Higgs boson width and on the Standard Model particle content in loop processes. The data are found to be compatible with the Standard Model expectations for a Higgs boson at a mass of 125.36 GeV for all models considered.

  2. Measurements of the Higgs boson production and decay rates and coupling strengths using pp collision data at √s = 7 and 8 TeV in the ATLAS experiment

    SciTech Connect

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E.; Primavera, M.; Prince, S.; Proissl, M.; Prokofiev, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Protopapadaki, E.; Protopopescu, S.; Proudfoot, J.; Przybycien, M.; Ptacek, E.; Puddu, D.; Pueschel, E.; Puldon, D.; Purohit, M.; Puzo, P.; Qian, J.; Qin, G.; Qin, Y.; Quadt, A.; Quarrie, D. R.; Quayle, W. B.; Queitsch-Maitland, M.; Quilty, D.; Raddum, S.; Radeka, V.; Radescu, V.; Radhakrishnan, S. K.; Radloff, P.; Rados, P.; Ragusa, F.; Rahal, G.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rammensee, M.; Rangel-Smith, C.; Rauscher, F.; Rave, S.; Ravenscroft, T.; Raymond, M.; Read, A. L.; Readioff, N. P.; Rebuzzi, D. M.; Redelbach, A.; Redlinger, G.; Reece, R.; Reeves, K.; Rehnisch, L.; Reisin, H.; Relich, M.; Rembser, C.; Ren, H.; Renaud, A.; Rescigno, M.; Resconi, S.; Rezanova, O. L.; Reznicek, P.; Rezvani, R.; Richter, R.; Richter, S.; Richter-Was, E.; Ricken, O.; Ridel, M.; Rieck, P.; Riegel, C. J.; Rieger, J.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rimoldi, A.; Rinaldi, L.; Ristić, B.; Ritsch, E.; Riu, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rizvi, E.; Robertson, S. H.; Robichaud-Veronneau, A.; Robinson, D.; Robinson, J. E. M.; Robson, A.; Roda, C.; Roe, S.; Røhne, O.; Rolli, S.; Romaniouk, A.; Romano, M.; Romano Saez, S. M.; Romero Adam, E.; Rompotis, N.; Ronzani, M.; Roos, L.; Ros, E.; Rosati, S.; Rosbach, K.; Rose, P.; Rosendahl, P. L.; Rosenthal, O.; Rossetti, V.; Rossi, E.; Rossi, L. P.; Rosten, R.; Rotaru, M.; Roth, I.; Rothberg, J.; Rousseau, D.; Royon, C. R.; Rozanov, A.; Rozen, Y.; Ruan, X.; Rubbo, F.; Rubinskiy, I.; Rud, V. I.; Rudolph, C.; Rudolph, M. S.; Rühr, F.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakovich, N. A.; Ruschke, A.; Russell, H. L.; Rutherfoord, J. P.; Ruthmann, N.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Rybar, M.; Rybkin, G.; Ryder, N. C.; Saavedra, A. F.; Sabato, G.; Sacerdoti, S.; Saddique, A.; Sadrozinski, H. F-W.; Sadykov, R.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Saimpert, M.; Sakamoto, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Saleem, M.; Salek, D.; Sales De Bruin, P. H.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sampsonidis, D.; Sanchez, A.; Sánchez, J.; Sanchez Martinez, V.; Sandaker, H.; Sandbach, R. L.; Sander, H. G.; Sanders, M. P.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandoval, C.; Sandstroem, R.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sannino, M.; Sansoni, A.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, H.; Santoyo Castillo, I.; Sapp, K.; Sapronov, A.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarrazin, B.; Sasaki, O.; Sasaki, Y.; Sato, K.; Sauvage, G.; Sauvan, E.; Savage, G.; Savard, P.; Sawyer, C.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, J.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scanlon, T.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Scarcella, M.; Scarfone, V.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schaefer, D.; Schaefer, R.; Schaeffer, J.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schäfer, U.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Schiavi, C.; Schillo, C.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmidt, E.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, B.; Schnellbach, Y. J.; Schnoor, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoening, A.; Schoenrock, B. D.; Schopf, E.; Schorlemmer, A. L. S.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schramm, S.; Schreyer, M.; Schroeder, C.; Schuh, N.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultz-Coulon, H. -C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwarz, T. A.; Schwegler, Ph.; Schweiger, H.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Schwoerer, M.; Sciacca, F. G.; Scifo, E.; Sciolla, G.; Scuri, F.; Scutti, F.; Searcy, J.; Sedov, G.; Sedykh, E.; Seema, P.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekhon, K.; Sekula, S. J.; Selbach, K. E.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Serre, T.; Sessa, M.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfiligoj, T.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shang, R.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Shaw, S. M.; Shcherbakova, A.; Shehu, C. Y.; Sherwood, P.; Shi, L.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shoaleh Saadi, D.; Shochet, M. J.; Shojaii, S.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Shushkevich, S.; Sicho, P.; Sidiropoulou, O.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simon, D.; Simoniello, R.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Siragusa, G.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinner, M. B.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Slawinska, M.; Sliwa, K.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, M. N. K.; Smith, R. W.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snidero, G.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Song, H. Y.; Soni, N.; Sood, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sopko, B.; Sopko, V.; Sorin, V.; Sosa, D.; Sosebee, M.; Sotiropoulou, C. L.; Soualah, R.; Soueid, P.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Sowden, B. C.; Spagnolo, S.; Spalla, M.; Spanò, F.; Spearman, W. R.; Spettel, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; St. Denis, R. D.; Staerz, S.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staszewski, R.; Stavina, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stern, S.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Subramaniam, R.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Suhr, C.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Suzuki, Y.; Svatos, M.; Swedish, S.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tannoury, N.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Therhaag, J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thun, R. P.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; True, P.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; Van Der Leeuw, R.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Velz, T.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Warsinsky, M.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, A.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yao, L.; Yao, W-M.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.

    2016-01-05

    In this study, combined analyses of the Higgs boson production and decay rates as well as its coupling strengths to vector bosons and fermions are presented. The combinations include the results of the analyses of the H → γγ, ZZ*, WW*, Zγ, bb¯, ττ and μμ decay modes, and the constraints on the associated production with a pair of top quarks and on the off-shell coupling strengths of the Higgs boson. The results are based on the LHC proton-proton collision datasets, with integrated luminosities of up to 4.7 fb–1 at √s = 7 TeV and 20.3 fb–1 at √s = 8 TeV, recorded by the ATLAS detector in 2011 and 2012. Combining all production modes and decay channels, the measured signal yield, normalised to the Standard Model expectation, is 1.18+0.15-0.14. The observed Higgs boson production and decay rates are interpreted in a leading-order coupling framework, exploring a wide range of benchmark coupling models both with and without assumptions on the Higgs boson width and on the Standard Model particle content in loop processes. The data are found to be compatible with the Standard Model expectations for a Higgs boson at a mass of 125.36 GeV for all models considered.

  3. Measurements of the Higgs boson production and decay rates and coupling strengths using pp collision data at √s = 7 and 8 TeV in the ATLAS experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; ...

    2016-01-05

    In this study, combined analyses of the Higgs boson production and decay rates as well as its coupling strengths to vector bosons and fermions are presented. The combinations include the results of the analyses of the H → γγ, ZZ*, WW*, Zγ, bb¯, ττ and μμ decay modes, and the constraints on the associated production with a pair of top quarks and on the off-shell coupling strengths of the Higgs boson. The results are based on the LHC proton-proton collision datasets, with integrated luminosities of up to 4.7 fb–1 at √s = 7 TeV and 20.3 fb–1 at √s =more » 8 TeV, recorded by the ATLAS detector in 2011 and 2012. Combining all production modes and decay channels, the measured signal yield, normalised to the Standard Model expectation, is 1.18+0.15-0.14. The observed Higgs boson production and decay rates are interpreted in a leading-order coupling framework, exploring a wide range of benchmark coupling models both with and without assumptions on the Higgs boson width and on the Standard Model particle content in loop processes. The data are found to be compatible with the Standard Model expectations for a Higgs boson at a mass of 125.36 GeV for all models considered.« less

  4. Measurements of the Higgs boson production and decay rates and coupling strengths using pp collision data at $\\sqrt{s} = 7$ and 8 TeV in the ATLAS experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.; Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin,

    2016-01-07

    Combined analyses of the Higgs boson production and decay rates as well as its coupling strengths to vector bosons and fermions are presented. The combinations include the results of the analyses of the H → γγ,ZZ*,WW*,Zγ, $b\\bar{b}$,ττ and μμ decay modes, and the constraints on the associated production with a pair of top quarks and on the off-shell coupling strengths of the Higgs boson. The results are based on the LHC proton-proton collision datasets, with integrated luminosities of up to 4.7 fb-1 at s√ = 7 TeV and 20.3 fb-1 at s√ = 8 TeV, recorded by the ATLAS detector in 2011 and 2012. Combining all production modes and decay channels, the measured signal yield, normalised to the Standard Model expectation, is 1.18+0.15-0.14. The observed Higgs boson production and decay rates are interpreted in a leading-order coupling framework, exploring a wide range of benchmark coupling models both with and without assumptions on the Higgs boson width and on the Standard Model particle content in loop processes. The data are found to be compatible with the Standard Model expectations for a Higgs boson at a mass of 125.36 GeV for all models considered.

  5. Energy-Dependent Scintillation Pulse Shape and Proportionality of Decay Components for CsI:Tl: Modeling with Transport and Rate Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, X.; Gridin, S.; Williams, R. T.; Mayhugh, M. R.; Gektin, A.; Syntfeld-Kazuch, A.; Swiderski, L.; Moszynski, M.

    2017-01-01

    Relatively recent experiments on the scintillation response of CsI:Tl have found that there are three main decay times of about 730 ns, 3 μ s , and 16 μ s , i.e., one more principal decay component than had been previously reported; that the pulse shape depends on gamma-ray energy; and that the proportionality curves of each decay component are different, with the energy-dependent light yield of the 16 -μ s component appearing to be anticorrelated with that of the 0.73 -μ s component at room temperature. These observations can be explained by the described model of carrier transport and recombination in a particle track. This model takes into account processes of hot and thermalized carrier diffusion, electric-field transport, trapping, nonlinear quenching, and radiative recombination. With one parameter set, the model reproduces multiple observables of CsI:Tl scintillation response, including the pulse shape with rise and three decay components, its energy dependence, the approximate proportionality, and the main trends in proportionality of different decay components. The model offers insights on the spatial and temporal distributions of carriers and their reactions in the track.

  6. Evidence against solar influence on nuclear decay constants.

    PubMed

    Pommé, S; Stroh, H; Paepen, J; Van Ammel, R; Marouli, M; Altzitzoglou, T; Hult, M; Kossert, K; Nähle, O; Schrader, H; Juget, F; Bailat, C; Nedjadi, Y; Bochud, F; Buchillier, T; Michotte, C; Courte, S; van Rooy, M W; van Staden, M J; Lubbe, J; Simpson, B R S; Fazio, A; De Felice, P; Jackson, T W; Van Wyngaardt, W M; Reinhard, M I; Golya, J; Bourke, S; Roy, T; Galea, R; Keightley, J D; Ferreira, K M; Collins, S M; Ceccatelli, A; Unterweger, M; Fitzgerald, R; Bergeron, D E; Pibida, L; Verheyen, L; Bruggeman, M; Vodenik, B; Korun, M; Chisté, V; Amiot, M-N

    2016-10-01

    The hypothesis that proximity to the Sun causes variation of decay constants at permille level has been tested and disproved. Repeated activity measurements of mono-radionuclide sources were performed over periods from 200 days up to four decades at 14 laboratories across the globe. Residuals from the exponential nuclear decay curves were inspected for annual oscillations. Systematic deviations from a purely exponential decay curve differ from one data set to another and are attributable to instabilities in the instrumentation and measurement conditions. The most stable activity measurements of alpha, beta-minus, electron capture, and beta-plus decaying sources set an upper limit of 0.0006% to 0.008% to the amplitude of annual oscillations in the decay rate. Oscillations in phase with Earth's orbital distance to the Sun could not be observed within a 10(-6) to 10(-5) range of precision. There are also no apparent modulations over periods of weeks or months. Consequently, there is no indication of a natural impediment against sub-permille accuracy in half-life determinations, renormalisation of activity to a distant reference date, application of nuclear dating for archaeology, geo- and cosmochronology, nor in establishing the SI unit becquerel and seeking international equivalence of activity standards.

  7. Evidence against solar influence on nuclear decay constants

    PubMed Central

    Pommé, S.; Stroh, H.; Paepen, J.; Van Ammel, R.; Marouli, M.; Altzitzoglou, T.; Hult, M.; Kossert, K.; Nähle, O.; Schrader, H.; Juget, F.; Bailat, C.; Nedjadi, Y.; Bochud, F.; Buchillier, T.; Michotte, C.; Courte, S.; van Rooy, M.W.; van Staden, M.J.; Lubbe, J.; Simpson, B.R.S.; Fazio, A.; De Felice, P.; Jackson, T.W.; Van Wyngaardt, W.M.; Reinhard, M.I.; Golya, J.; Bourke, S.; Roy, T.; Galea, R.; Keightley, J.D.; Ferreira, K.M.; Collins, S.M.; Ceccatelli, A.; Unterweger, M.; Fitzgerald, R.; Bergeron, D.E.; Pibida, L.; Verheyen, L.; Bruggeman, M.; Vodenik, B.; Korun, M.; Chisté, V.; Amiot, M.-N.

    2016-01-01

    The hypothesis that proximity to the Sun causes variation of decay constants at permille level has been tested and disproved. Repeated activity measurements of mono-radionuclide sources were performed over periods from 200 days up to four decades at 14 laboratories across the globe. Residuals from the exponential nuclear decay curves were inspected for annual oscillations. Systematic deviations from a purely exponential decay curve differ from one data set to another and are attributable to instabilities in the instrumentation and measurement conditions. The most stable activity measurements of alpha, beta-minus, electron capture, and beta-plus decaying sources set an upper limit of 0.0006% to 0.008% to the amplitude of annual oscillations in the decay rate. Oscillations in phase with Earth’s orbital distance to the Sun could not be observed within a 10−6 to 10−5 range of precision. There are also no apparent modulations over periods of weeks or months. Consequently, there is no indication of a natural impediment against sub-permille accuracy in half-life determinations, renormalisation of activity to a distant reference date, application of nuclear dating for archaeology, geo- and cosmochronology, nor in establishing the SI unit becquerel and seeking international equivalence of activity standards. PMID:28057978

  8. Evidence against solar influence on nuclear decay constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pommé, S.; Stroh, H.; Paepen, J.; Van Ammel, R.; Marouli, M.; Altzitzoglou, T.; Hult, M.; Kossert, K.; Nähle, O.; Schrader, H.; Juget, F.; Bailat, C.; Nedjadi, Y.; Bochud, F.; Buchillier, T.; Michotte, C.; Courte, S.; van Rooy, M. W.; van Staden, M. J.; Lubbe, J.; Simpson, B. R. S.; Fazio, A.; De Felice, P.; Jackson, T. W.; Van Wyngaardt, W. M.; Reinhard, M. I.; Golya, J.; Bourke, S.; Roy, T.; Galea, R.; Keightley, J. D.; Ferreira, K. M.; Collins, S. M.; Ceccatelli, A.; Unterweger, M.; Fitzgerald, R.; Bergeron, D. E.; Pibida, L.; Verheyen, L.; Bruggeman, M.; Vodenik, B.; Korun, M.; Chisté, V.; Amiot, M.-N.

    2016-10-01

    The hypothesis that proximity to the Sun causes variation of decay constants at permille level has been tested and disproved. Repeated activity measurements of mono-radionuclide sources were performed over periods from 200 days up to four decades at 14 laboratories across the globe. Residuals from the exponential nuclear decay curves were inspected for annual oscillations. Systematic deviations from a purely exponential decay curve differ from one data set to another and are attributable to instabilities in the instrumentation and measurement conditions. The most stable activity measurements of alpha, beta-minus, electron capture, and beta-plus decaying sources set an upper limit of 0.0006% to 0.008% to the amplitude of annual oscillations in the decay rate. Oscillations in phase with Earth's orbital distance to the Sun could not be observed within a 10-6 to 10-5 range of precision. There are also no apparent modulations over periods of weeks or months. Consequently, there is no indication of a natural impediment against sub-permille accuracy in half-life determinations, renormalisation of activity to a distant reference date, application of nuclear dating for archaeology, geo- and cosmochronology, nor in establishing the SI unit becquerel and seeking international equivalence of activity standards.

  9. Rare B Decays at Babar

    SciTech Connect

    Palombo, Fernando; Collaboration, for the BABAR

    2009-01-12

    The author presents some of the most recent BABAR measurements for rare B decays. These include rate asymmetries in the B decays to K{sup (*)}l{sup +}l{sup -} and K{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and branching fractions in the B decays to l{sup +}{nu}{sub l}, K{sub 1}(1270){sup +}{pi}{sup -} and K{sub 1}(1400){sup +}{pi}{sup -}. The author also reports a search for the B{sup +} decay to K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}.

  10. Independent measurement of the neutrino mixing angle θ13 via neutron capture on hydrogen at Daya Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, F. P.; Balantekin, A. B.; Band, H. R.; Beriguete, W.; Bishai, M.; Blyth, S.; Butorov, I.; Cao, G. F.; Cao, J.; Chan, Y. L.; Chang, J. F.; Chang, L. C.; Chang, Y.; Chasman, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, Q. Y.; Chen, S. M.; Chen, X.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y. X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, Y. P.; Cherwinka, J. J.; Chu, M. C.; Cummings, J. P.; de Arcos, J.; Deng, Z. Y.; Ding, Y. Y.; Diwan, M. V.; Draeger, E.; Du, X. F.; Dwyer, D. A.; Edwards, W. R.; Ely, S. R.; Fu, J. Y.; Ge, L. Q.; Gill, R.; Gonchar, M.; Gong, G. H.; Gong, H.; Gu, W. Q.; Guan, M. Y.; Guo, X. H.; Hackenburg, R. W.; Han, G. H.; Hans, S.; He, M.; Heeger, K. M.; Heng, Y. K.; Hinrichs, P.; Hor, Y. K.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Hu, B. Z.; Hu, L. M.; Hu, L. J.; Hu, T.; Hu, W.; Huang, E. C.; Huang, H.; Huang, X. T.; Huber, P.; Hussain, G.; Isvan, Z.; Jaffe, D. E.; Jaffke, P.; Jen, K. L.; Jetter, S.; Ji, X. P.; Ji, X. L.; Jiang, H. J.; Jiao, J. B.; Johnson, R. A.; Kang, L.; Kettell, S. H.; Kramer, M.; Kwan, K. K.; Kwok, M. W.; Kwok, T.; Lai, W. C.; Lau, K.; Lebanowski, L.; Lee, J.; Lei, R. T.; Leitner, R.; Leung, A.; Leung, J. K. C.; Lewis, C. A.; Li, D. J.; Li, F.; Li, G. S.; Li, Q. J.; Li, W. D.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, Y. F.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Lin, C. J.; Lin, G. L.; Lin, P. Y.; Lin, S. K.; Lin, Y. C.; Ling, J. J.; Link, J. M.; Littenberg, L.; Littlejohn, B. R.; Liu, D. W.; Liu, H.; Liu, J. L.; Liu, J. C.; Liu, S. S.; Liu, Y. B.; Lu, C.; Lu, H. Q.; Luk, K. B.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, X. Y.; Ma, X. B.; Ma, Y. Q.; McDonald, K. T.; McFarlane, M. C.; McKeown, R. D.; Meng, Y.; Mitchell, I.; Monari Kebwaro, J.; Nakajima, Y.; Napolitano, J.; Naumov, D.; Naumova, E.; Nemchenok, I.; Ngai, H. Y.; Ning, Z.; Ochoa-Ricoux, J. P.; Olshevski, A.; Patton, S.; Pec, V.; Peng, J. C.; Piilonen, L. E.; Pinsky, L.; Pun, C. S. J.; Qi, F. Z.; Qi, M.; Qian, X.; Raper, N.; Ren, B.; Ren, J.; Rosero, R.; Roskovec, B.; Ruan, X. C.; Shao, B. B.; Steiner, H.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. L.; Tam, Y. H.; Tang, X.; Themann, H.; Tsang, K. V.; Tsang, R. H. M.; Tull, C. E.; Tung, Y. C.; Viren, B.; Vorobel, V.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, L. Y.; Wang, M.; Wang, N. Y.; Wang, R. G.; Wang, W.; Wang, W. W.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. M.; Webber, D. M.; Wei, H. Y.; Wei, Y. D.; Wen, L. J.; Whisnant, K.; White, C. G.; Whitehead, L.; Wise, T.; Wong, H. L. H.; Wong, S. C. F.; Worcester, E.; Wu, Q.; Xia, D. M.; Xia, J. K.; Xia, X.; Xing, Z. Z.; Xu, J. Y.; Xu, J. L.; Xu, J.; Xu, Y.; Xue, T.; Yan, J.; Yang, C. C.; Yang, L.; Yang, M. S.; Yang, M. T.; Ye, M.; Yeh, M.; Yeh, Y. S.; Young, B. L.; Yu, G. Y.; Yu, J. Y.; Yu, Z. Y.; Zang, S. L.; Zeng, B.; Zhan, L.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, F. H.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, Q. M.; Zhang, Q.; Zhang, S. H.; Zhang, Y. C.; Zhang, Y. M.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Y. X.; Zhang, Z. J.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, J.; Zhao, Q. W.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zheng, L.; Zhong, W. L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, Z. Y.; Zhuang, H. L.; Zou, J. H.; Daya Bay Collaboration

    2014-10-01

    A new measurement of the θ13 mixing angle has been obtained at the Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment via the detection of inverse beta decays tagged by neutron capture on hydrogen. The antineutrino events for hydrogen capture are distinct from those for gadolinium capture with largely different systematic uncertainties, allowing a determination independent of the gadolinium-capture result and an improvement on the precision of the θ13 measurement. With a 217-day antineutrino data set obtained with six antineutrino detectors and from six 2.9 GWth reactors, the rate deficit observed at the far hall is interpreted as sin22θ13=0.083±0.018 in the three-flavor oscillation model. When combined with the gadolinium-capture result from Daya Bay, we obtain sin22θ13=0.089±0.008 as the final result for the six-antineutrino-detector configuration of the Daya Bay experiment.

  11. Yukawa radiative corrections to the triple self-couplings of neutral CP-even Higgs bosons and to the H {sup {yields}} hh decay rate within the minimal supersymmetric standard model

    SciTech Connect

    Philippov, Yu. P.

    2007-07-15

    Within the minimal supersymmetric standard model, four self-couplings, {lambda}{sub hhh}, {lambda}{sub hhH}, {lambda}{sub hHH}, and {lambda}{sub HHH}, and the decay rate {gamma}(H {sup {yields}} hh) are calculated with allowance for one-loop corrections induced by the contribution of the t, b, and c quarks, the {tau} lepton, and the corresponding superpartners and with the aid of the on-shell renormalization scheme. An analysis of the dependences of these features on tan{beta} and the mass of the A Higgs boson, M{sub A}, shows that, in a specific region of the model-parameter space, the calculated corrections can make a significant contribution to the couplings and decay rate in the one-loop approximation. The inclusion of the radiative corrections in question is mandatory in reconstructing the Higgs potential.

  12. Decay of Solar Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, David H.; Choudhary, Debi Prasad

    2005-01-01

    We examine the record of sunspot group areas observed over a period of 100 years to determine the rate of decay of solar active regions. We exclude observations of groups when they are more than 60deg in longitude from the central meridian and only include data when at least three days of observations are available following the date of maximum area for a spot group's disk passage. This leaves data for some 24,000 observations of active region decay. We find that the decay rate is a constant 20 microHem/day for spots smaller than about 200 microHem (about the size of a supergranule). This decay rate increases linearly to about 90 microHem/day for spots with areas of 1000 microHem. We find no evidence for significant variations in active region decay from one solar cycle to another. However, we do find that the decay rate is slower at lower latitudes. This gives a slower decay rate during the declining phase of sunspot cycles.

  13. Radiative capture reactions in astrophysics

    DOE PAGES

    Brune, Carl R.; Davids, Barry

    2015-08-07

    Here, the radiative capture reactions of greatest importance in nuclear astrophysics are identified and placed in their stellar contexts. Recent experimental efforts to estimate their thermally averaged rates are surveyed.

  14. Weak radiative baryonic decays of B mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Kohara, Yoji

    2004-11-01

    Weak radiative baryonic B decays B{yields}B{sub 1}B{sub 2}-bar{gamma} are studied under the assumption of the short-distance b{yields}s{gamma} electromagnetic penguin transition dominance. The relations among the decay rates of various decay modes are derived.

  15. Capturing Callisto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The New Horizons Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) captured these two images of Jupiter's outermost large moon, Callisto, as the spacecraft flew past Jupiter in late February. New Horizons' closest approach distance to Jupiter was 2.3 million kilometers (1.4 million miles), not far outside Callisto's orbit, which has a radius of 1.9 million kilometers (1.2 million miles). However, Callisto happened to be on the opposite side of Jupiter during the spacecraft's pass through the Jupiter system, so these images, taken from 4.7 million kilometers (3.0 million miles) and 4.2 million kilometers (2.6 million miles) away, are the closest of Callisto that New Horizons obtained.

    Callisto's ancient, crater-scarred surface makes it very different from its three more active sibling satellites, Io, Europa and Ganymede. Callisto, 4,800 kilometers (3000 miles) in diameter, displays no large-scale geological features other than impact craters, and every bright spot in these images is a crater. The largest impact feature on Callisto, the huge basin Valhalla, is visible as a bright patch at the 10 o'clock position. The craters are bright because they have excavated material relatively rich in water ice from beneath the dark, dusty material that coats most of the surface.

    The two images show essentially the same side of Callisto -- the side that faces Jupiter -- under different illumination conditions. The images accompanied scans of Callisto's infrared spectrum with New Horizons' Linear Etalon Imaging Spectral Array (LEISA). The New Horizons science team designed these scans to study how the infrared spectrum of Callisto's water ice changes as lighting and viewing conditions change, and as the ice cools through Callisto's late afternoon. The infrared spectrum of water ice depends slightly on its temperature, and a goal of New Horizons when it reaches the Pluto system (in 2015) is to use the water ice features in the spectrum of Pluto's moon Charon, and

  16. Decay Study of {sup 257}Rf

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, J.; Heinz, A.; Winkler, R.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Khoo, T. L.; Seweryniak, D.; Peterson, D.; Back, B. B.; Carpenter, M. P.; Greene, J. P.; Jiang, C. L.; Kondev, F. G.; Lauritsen, T.; Lister, C. J.; Pardo, R. C.; Robinson, A.; Scott, R.; Vondrasek, R.; Wang, X.; Zhu, S.

    2009-03-04

    The isotope {sup 257}Rf was produced in the fusion-evaporation reaction {sup 208}Pb({sup 50}Ti, n){sup 257}Rf. Reaction products were separated by the Argonne Fragment Mass Analyzer. Radioactive decay and spontaneous fission of {sup 257}Rf and its decay products were investigated. An isomeric state in {sup 257}Rf, with a half-life of 160{sub -31}{sup 42} {mu}S, was discovered by detecting internal conversion electrons followed by alpha decays. It is interpreted as a three-quasiparticle high-K isomer. A second group of internal-conversion electrons which were succeeded by alpha decay, with a half-life of 4.1{sub -1.3}{sup +2.4} s, was observed. These events might originate from the decay of excited states in {sup 257}Lr, populated by electron-capture decay of {sup 257}Rf, or from another isomer in {sup 257}Rf.

  17. Annual recapture and survival rates of two non-breeding adult populations of Roseate Terns Stema dougallii captured on the Great Barrier Reef, Australia, and estimates of their population sizes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Neill, P.; Minton, C.D.T.; Nisbet, I.C.T.; Hines, J.E.

    2008-01-01

    Capture-recapture data from two disparate breeding populations of Roseate Terns (Sterna dougallii) captured together as non-breeding individuals from 2002 to 2007 in the southern Great Barrier Reef. Australia were analyzed for both survival rate and recapture rate. The average annual survival rate for the birds from the Asian population (S. d. bangsi) (0.901) is higher than that of the other population of unknown breeding origin (0.819). There was large variability in survival in both populations among years, but the average survival rate of 0.85 is similar to estimates for the same species in North America. The Cormack-Jolly-Seber models used in program MARK to estimate survival rates also produced estimated of recapture probabilities and population sizes. These estimates of population size were 29,000 for S. D. bangsi and 8,300 for the study area and much larger than the documented numbers in the likely breeding areas, suggesting that many breeding sites are currently unknown.

  18. Publisher's Note: Evidence for CP Violation in Time-Integrated D0→h-h+ decay rates [Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 111602 (2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Abellan Beteta, C.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Adrover, C.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A., Jr.; Amato, S.; Amhis, Y.; Anderson, J.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; Arrabito, L.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Bailey, D. S.; Balagura, V.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Bates, A.; Bauer, C.; Bauer, Th.; Bay, A.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Benayoun, M.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjørnstad, P. M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blanks, C.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bobrov, A.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; van den Brand, J.; Bressieux, J.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brook, N. H.; Brown, H.; Büchler-Germann, A.; Burducea, I.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Callot, O.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chiapolini, N.; Ciba, K.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coca, C.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Constantin, F.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Corti, G.; Cowan, G. A.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; de Bonis, I.; de Capua, S.; de Cian, M.; de Lorenzi, F.; de Miranda, J. M.; de Paula, L.; de Simone, P.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Degaudenzi, H.; Del Buono, L.; Deplano, C.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dickens, J.; Dijkstra, H.; Diniz Batista, P.; Domingo Bonal, F.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dupertuis, F.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; van Eijk, D.; Eisele, F.; Eisenhardt, S.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; Elsasser, Ch.; Elsby, D.; Esperante Pereira, D.; Estève, L.; Falabella, A.; Fanchini, E.; Färber, C.; Fardell, G.; Farinelli, C.; Farry, S.; Fave, V.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Furcas, S.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garnier, J.-C.; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gauvin, N.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gibson, V.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gordon, H.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hampson, T.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harji, R.; Harnew, N.; Harrison, J.; Harrison, P. F.; Hartmann, T.; He, J.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Hicks, E.; Holubyev, K.; Hopchev, P.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Huse, T.; Huston, R. S.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Iakovenko, V.; Ilten, P.; Imong, J.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jahjah Hussein, M.; Jans, E.; Jansen, F.; Jaton, P.; Jean-Marie, B.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Jost, B.; Kaballo, M.; Kandybei, S.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Keaveney, J.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kerzel, U.; Ketel, T.; Keune, A.; Khanji, B.; Kim, Y. M.; Knecht, M.; Koopman, R.; Koppenburg, P.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kruzelecki, K.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanciotti, E.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Li, L.; Li Gioi, L.; Lieng, M.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Liu, B.; Liu, G.; von Loeben, J.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Lopez-March, N.; Lu, H.; Luisier, J.; Mac Raighne, A.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Magnin, J.; Malde, S.; Mamunur, R. M. D.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Mangiafave, N.; Marconi, U.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martens, A.; Martin, L.; Martín Sánchez, A.; Martinez Santos, D.; Massafferri, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Matveev, M.; Maurice, E.; Maynard, B.; Mazurov, A.; McGregor, G.; McNulty, R.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Merkel, J.; Messi, R.; Miglioranzi, S.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Moran, D.; Morawski, P.; Mountain, R.; Mous, I.; Muheim, F.; Müller, K.; Muresan, R.; Muryn, B.; Muster, B.; Musy, M.; Mylroie-Smith, J.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Nedos, M.; Needham, M.; Neufeld, N.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nicol, M.; Niess, V.; Nikitin, N.; Nomerotski, A.; Novoselov, A.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Oggero, S.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Orlandea, M.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Owen, P.; Pal, K.; Palacios, J.; Palano, A.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Parkes, C.; Parkinson, C. J.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Paterson, S. K.; Patrick, G. N.; Patrignani, C.; Pavel-Nicorescu, C.; Pazos Alvarez, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perego, D. L.; Perez Trigo, E.; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Perret, P.; Perrin-Terrin, M.; Pessina, G.; Petrella, A.; Petrolini, A.; Phan, A.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pie Valls, B.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Plackett, R.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Polok, G.; Poluektov, A.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Powell, A.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pugatch, V.; Navarro, A. Puig; Qian, W.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Raven, G.; Redford, S.; Reid, M. M.; Dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Rinnert, K.; Roa Romero, D. A.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodrigues, F.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Rogers, G. J.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Rosello, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz, H.; Sabatino, G.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salzmann, C.; Sannino, M.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santinelli, R.; Santovetti, E.; Sapunov, M.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Savrie, M.; Savrina, D.; Schaack, P.; Schiller, M.; Schleich, S.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Seco, M.; Semennikov, A.; Senderowska, K.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shatalov, P.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, O.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, A. C.; Smith, N. A.; Smith, E.; Sobczak, K.; Soler, F. J. P.; Solomin, A.; Soomro, F.; Souza de Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Sparkes, A.; Spradlin, P.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Subbiah, V. K.; Swientek, S.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teodorescu, E.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tran, M. T.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tuning, N.; Ubeda Garcia, M.; Ukleja, A.; Urquijo, P.; Uwer, U.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Viaud, B.; Videau, I.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Visniakov, J.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Voss, H.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Webber, A. D.; Websdale, D.; Whitehead, M.; Wiedner, D.; Wiggers, L.; Wilkinson, G.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilson, F. F.; Wishahi, J.; Witek, M.; Witzeling, W.; Wotton, S. A.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, F.; Xing, Z.; Yang, Z.; Young, R.; Yushchenko, O.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W. C.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zverev, E.; Zvyagin, A.

    2012-03-01

    A search for time-integrated CP violation in D0 -> h-h+ (h=K, pi) decays is presented using 0.62 fb^-1 of data collected by LHCb in 2011. The flavor of the charm meson is determined by the charge of the slow pion in the D*+ -> D0 pi+ and D*- -> D0bar pi- decay chains. The difference in CP asymmetry between D0 -> K-K+ and D0 -> pi-pi+, Delta ACP = ACP(K-K+) - ACP(pi-pi+), is measured to be [-0.82 \\pm 0.21(stat.) \\pm 0.11(syst.)]%. This differs from the hypothesis of CP conservation by 3.5 standard deviations.

  19. QED based on self-energy: The relativistic 2 S sub 1/2 r arrow 1 S sub 1/2 +1. gamma. decay rates of hydrogenlike atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Barut, A.O.; Salamin, Y.I. )

    1991-03-01

    Within the framework of the recently advanced formulation of QED based on self-energy, we calculate the relativistic rates of the 2{ital S}{sub 1/2}{r arrow}1{ital S}{sub 1/2}+1{gamma} transition in the hydrogen isoelectronic sequence for values of {ital Z} ranging between 1 and 92. We compare our results with those of Johnson (Phys. Rev. Lett. 29, 1123 (1972)) and Parpia and Johnson (Phys. Rev. A 26, 1142 (1982)), analytically and numerically. Although the two approaches are quite different, the formulas for decay rates are shown to be equivalent.

  20. Limits on the decay-rate difference of neutral B mesons and on CP, T, and CPT violation in B(0-0)B oscillations.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Gaillard, J-M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Robbe, P; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kral, J F; Kukartsev, G; LeClerc, C; Levi, M E; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Romosan, A; Ronan, M T; Shelkov, V G; Telnov, A V; Wenzel, W A; Ford, K; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Knowles, D J; Morgan, S E; Penny, R C; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Deppermann, T; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schmuecker, H; Steinke, M; Barlow, N R; Boyd, J T; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; Mackay, C; Wilson, F F; Abe, K; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Kyberd, P; McKemey, A K; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Shen, B C; del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, Sh; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Beringer, J; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Turri, M; Walkowiak, W; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Abe, T; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Clark, P J; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Roy, J; Smith, J G; van Hoek, W C; Zhang, L; Harton, J L; Hu, T; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zhang, J; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Colberg, T; Dickopp, M; Dubitzky, R S; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Maly, E; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Wilden, L; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Grenier, P; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Khan, A; Lavin, D; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Swain, J E; Tinslay, J; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Treadwell, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Biasini, M; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Falciai, D; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Pioppi, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Morii, M; Won, E; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Eschrich, I; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Sanders, P; Taylor, G P; Grenier, G J; Lee, S-J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Yi, J; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Laplace, S; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Tantot, L; Wormser, G; Brigljević, V; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Coleman, J P; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Kay, M; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Shorthouse, H W; Strother, P; Vidal, P B; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flaecher, H U; George, S; Green, M G; Kurup, A; Marker, C E; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Vaitsas, G; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, R J; Forti, A C; Hart, P A; Jackson, F; Lafferty, G D; Lyon, A J; Weatherall, J H; Williams, J C; Farbin, A; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Mangeol, D J J; Milek, M; Patel, P M; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Cote-Ahern, D; Hast, C; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cartaro, C; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; LoSecco, J M; Gabriel, T A; Brau, B; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Tiozzo, G; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; de la Vaissière, Ch; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Ocariz, J; Pivk, M; Roos, L; Stark, J; T'Jampens, S; Therin, G; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Martinez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lu, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Tanaka, H A; Varnes, E W; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Pierini, M; Piredda, G; Safai Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Christ, S; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Xella, S M; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Langer, M; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Schott, G; Vasseur, G; Yeche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Yumiceva, F X; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Convery, M R; Coupal, D P; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Granges-Pous, E; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Jessop, C P; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Langenegger, U; Leith, D W G S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Ratcliff, B N; Robertson, S H; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Simi, G; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wright, D H; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Meyer, T I; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, M; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Borean, C; Bosisio, L; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Di Lodovico, F; Mihalyi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Sekula, S J; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2004-05-07

    Using events in which one of two neutral B mesons from the decay of an Upsilon(4S) meson is fully reconstructed, we determine parameters governing decay (DeltaGamma(d)/Gamma(d)), CP, and T violation (|q/p|), and CP and CPT violation (Re z,Im z). The results, obtained from an analysis of 88 x 10(6) Upsilon(4S) decays recorded by BABAR, are sgn(Re lambda(CP))DeltaGamma(d)/Gamma(d)=-0.008+/-0.037(stat)+/-0.018(syst)[-0.084,0.068],|q/p|=1.029+/-0.013(stat)+/-0.011(syst)[1.001,1.057],(Re lambda(CP)/|lambda(CP)|) Re z=0.014+/-0.035(stat)+/-0.034(syst)[-0.072,0.101],Im z=0.038+/-0.029(stat)+/-0.025(syst)[-0.028,0.104]. The values inside the square brackets indicate the 90% confidence-level intervals. These results are consistent with standard model expectations.

  1. Limits on the Decay-Rate Difference of Neutral B Mesons and on CP, T, and CPT Violation in B0B¯0 Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Gaillard, J.-M.; Hicheur, A.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Robbe, P.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Palano, A.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J. C.; Qi, N. D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y. S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.; Abrams, G. S.; Borgland, A. W.; Breon, A. B.; Brown, D. N.; Button-Shafer, J.; Cahn, R. N.; Charles, E.; Day, C. T.; Gill, M. S.; Gritsan, A. V.; Groysman, Y.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Kadel, R. W.; Kadyk, J.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Kral, J. F.; Kukartsev, G.; Leclerc, C.; Levi, M. E.; Lynch, G.; Mir, L. M.; Oddone, P. J.; Orimoto, T. J.; Pripstein, M.; Roe, N. A.; Romosan, A.; Ronan, M. T.; Shelkov, V. G.; Telnov, A. V.; Wenzel, W. A.; Ford, K.; Harrison, T. J.; Hawkes, C. M.; Knowles, D. J.; Morgan, S. E.; Penny, R. C.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, N. K.; Deppermann, T.; Goetzen, K.; Held, T.; Koch, H.; Lewandowski, B.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peters, K.; Schmuecker, H.; Steinke, M.; Barlow, N. R.; Boyd, J. T.; Chevalier, N.; Cottingham, W. N.; Kelly, M. P.; Latham, T. E.; Mackay, C.; Wilson, F. F.; Abe, K.; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Thiessen, D.; Kyberd, P.; McKemey, A. K.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Golubev, V. B.; Ivanchenko, V. N.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Yushkov, A. N.; Best, D.; Bruinsma, M.; Chao, M.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Mommsen, R. K.; Roethel, W.; Stoker, D. P.; Buchanan, C.; Hartfiel, B. L.; Shen, B. C.; del Re, D.; Hadavand, H. K.; Hill, E. J.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Paar, H. P.; Rahatlou, Sh.; Sharma, V.; Berryhill, J. W.; Campagnari, C.; Dahmes, B.; Levy, S. L.; Long, O.; Lu, A.; Mazur, M. A.; Richman, J. D.; Verkerke, W.; Beck, T. W.; Beringer, J.; Eisner, A. M.; Heusch, C. A.; Lockman, W. S.; Schalk, T.; Schmitz, R. E.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Turri, M.; Walkowiak, W.; Williams, D. C.; Wilson, M. G.; Albert, J.; Chen, E.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dvoretskii, A.; Hitlin, D. G.; Narsky, I.; Porter, F. C.; Ryd, A.; Samuel, A.; Yang, S.; Jayatilleke, S.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Abe, T.; Blanc, F.; Bloom, P.; Chen, S.; Clark, P. J.; Ford, W. T.; Nauenberg, U.; Olivas, A.; Rankin, P.; Roy, J.; Smith, J. G.; van Hoek, W. C.; Zhang, L.; Harton, J. L.; Hu, T.; Soffer, A.; Toki, W. H.; Wilson, R. J.; Zhang, J.; Altenburg, D.; Brandt, T.; Brose, J.; Colberg, T.; Dickopp, M.; Dubitzky, R. S.; Hauke, A.; Lacker, H. M.; Maly, E.; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R.; Nogowski, R.; Otto, S.; Schubert, J.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Spaan, B.; Wilden, L.; Bernard, D.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Brochard, F.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Grenier, P.; Thiebaux, Ch.; Vasileiadis, G.; Verderi, M.; Khan, A.; Lavin, D.; Muheim, F.; Playfer, S.; Swain, J. E.; Tinslay, J.; Andreotti, M.; Azzolini, V.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Luppi, E.; Negrini, M.; Piemontese, L.; Sarti, A.; Treadwell, E.; Anulli, F.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Biasini, M.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Falciai, D.; Finocchiaro, G.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Pioppi, M.; Zallo, A.; Buzzo, A.; Capra, R.; Contri, R.; Crosetti, G.; Lo Vetere, M.; Macri, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Santroni, A.; Tosi, S.; Bailey, S.; Morii, M.; Won, E.; Bhimji, W.; Bowerman, D. A.; Dauncey, P. D.; Egede, U.; Eschrich, I.; Gaillard, J. R.; Morton, G. W.; Nash, J. A.; Sanders, P.; Taylor, G. P.; Grenier, G. J.; Lee, S.-J.; Mallik, U.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Lamsa, J.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Yi, J.; Davier, M.; Grosdidier, G.; Höcker, A.; Laplace, S.; Le Diberder, F.; Lepeltier, V.; Lutz, A. M.; Petersen, T. C.; Plaszczynski, S.; Schune, M. H.; Tantot, L.; Wormser, G.; Brigljević, V.; Cheng, C. H.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Bevan, A. J.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; Kay, M.; Parry, R. J.; Payne, D. J.; Sloane, R. J.; Touramanis, C.; Back, J. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Shorthouse, H. W.; Strother, P.; Vidal, P. B.; Brown, C. L.; Cowan, G.; Flack, R. L.; Flaecher, H. U.; George, S.; Green, M. G.; Kurup, A.; Marker, C. E.; McMahon, T. R.; Ricciardi, S.; Salvatore, F.; Vaitsas, G.; Winter, M. A.; Brown, D.; Davis, C. L.; Allison, J.; Barlow, R. J.; Forti, A. C.; Hart, P. A.; Jackson, F.; Lafferty, G. D.; Lyon, A. J.; Weatherall, J. H.; Williams, J. C.; Farbin, A.; Jawahery, A.; Kovalskyi, D.; Lae, C. K.; Lillard, V.; Roberts, D. A.; Blaylock, G.; Dallapiccola, C.; Flood, K. T.; Hertzbach, S. S.; Kofler, R.; Koptchev, V. B.; Moore, T. B.; Saremi, S.; Staengle, H.; Willocq, S.; Cowan, R.; Sciolla, G.; Taylor, F.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Mangeol, D. J.; Milek, M.; Patel, P. M.; Lazzaro, A.; Palombo, F.; Bauer, J. M.; Cremaldi, L.; Eschenburg, V.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Reidy, J.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D. J.; Zhao, H. W.; Brunet, S.; Cote-Ahern, D.; Hast, C.; Taras, P.; Nicholson, H.; Cartaro, C.; Cavallo, N.; de Nardo, G.; Fabozzi, F.; Gatto, C.; Lista, L.; Paolucci, P.; Piccolo, D.; Sciacca, C.; Baak, M. A.; Raven, G.; Losecco, J. M.; Gabriel, T. A.; Brau, B.; Gan, K. K.; Honscheid, K.; Hufnagel, D.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Pulliam, T.; Wong, Q. K.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Potter, C. T.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Torrence, E.; Colecchia, F.; Dorigo, A.; Galeazzi, F.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Tiozzo, G.; Voci, C.; Benayoun, M.; Briand, H.; Chauveau, J.; David, P.; de La Vaissière, Ch.; del Buono, L.; Hamon, O.; John, M. J.; Leruste, Ph.; Ocariz, J.; Pivk, M.; Roos, L.; Stark, J.; T'jampens, S.; Therin, G.; Manfredi, P. F.; Re, V.; Behera, P. K.; Gladney, L.; Guo, Q. H.; Panetta, J.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bondioli, M.; Bucci, F.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Marchiori, G.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Morganti, M.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rama, M.; Rizzo, G.; Sandrelli, F.; Walsh, J.; Haire, M.; Judd, D.; Paick, K.; Wagoner, D. E.; Danielson, N.; Elmer, P.; Lu, C.; Miftakov, V.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J.; Tanaka, H. A.; Varnes, E. W.; Bellini, F.; Cavoto, G.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Morganti, S.; Pierini, M.; Piredda, G.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Voena, C.; Christ, S.; Wagner, G.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; de Groot, N.; Franek, B.; Geddes, N. I.; Gopal, G. P.; Olaiya, E. O.; Xella, S. M.; Aleksan, R.; Emery, S.; Gaidot, A.; Ganzhur, S. F.; Giraud, P.-F.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Kozanecki, W.; Langer, M.; Legendre, M.; London, G. W.; Mayer, B.; Schott, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yeche, Ch.; Zito, M.; Purohit, M. V.; Weidemann, A. W.; Yumiceva, F. X.; Aston, D.; Bartoldus, R.; Berger, N.; Boyarski, A. M.; Buchmueller, O. L.; Convery, M. R.; Coupal, D. P.; Dong, D.; Dorfan, J.; Dujmic, D.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Glanzman, T.; Gowdy, S. J.; Granges-Pous, E.; Hadig, T.; Halyo, V.; Hryn'ova, T.; Innes, W. R.; Jessop, C. P.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Langenegger, U.; Leith, D. W.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; Marsiske, H.; Messner, R.; Muller, D. R.; O'Grady, C. P.; Ozcan, V. E.; Perazzo, A.; Perl, M.; Petrak, S.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Robertson, S. H.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Schwiening, J.; Simi, G.; Snyder, A.; Soha, A.; Stelzer, J.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va'Vra, J.; Wagner, S. R.; Weaver, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wright, D. H.; Young, C. C.; Burchat, P. R.; Edwards, A. J.; Meyer, T. I.; Petersen, B. A.; Roat, C.; Ahmed, M.; Ahmed, S.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Saleem, M.; Wappler, F. R.; Bugg, W.; Krishnamurthy, M.; Spanier, S. M.; Eckmann, R.; Kim, H.; Ritchie, J. L.; Schwitters, R. F.; Izen, J. M.; Kitayama, I.; Lou, X. C.; Ye, S.; Bianchi, F.; Bona, M.; Gallo, F.; Gamba, D.; Borean, C.; Bosisio, L.; della Ricca, G.; Dittongo, S.; Grancagnolo, S.; Lanceri, L.; Poropat, P.; Vitale, L.; Vuagnin, G.; Panvini, R. S.; Banerjee, Sw.; Brown, C. M.; Fortin, D.; Jackson, P. D.; Kowalewski, R.; Roney, J. M.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Datta, M.; Eichenbaum, A. M.; Johnson, J. R.; Kutter, P. E.; Li, H.; Liu, R.; Lodovico, F. Di; Mihalyi, A.; Mohapatra, A. K.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Sekula, S. J.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Wu, J.; Wu, S. L.; Yu, Z.; Neal, H.

    2004-05-01

    Using events in which one of two neutral B mesons from the decay of an \\upsih(4S) meson is fully reconstructed, we determine parameters governing decay (ΔΓd/Γd), CP, and T violation (|q/p|), and CP and CPT violation (Re z,Im z). The results, obtained from an analysis of 88×106 \\upsih(4S) decays re-corded by BABAR, are sgn(Re λCP)ΔΓd/Γd=-0.008±0.037(stat)±0.018(syst)[-0.084,0.068],|q/p|=1.029±0.013(stat)±0.011(syst)[1.001,1.057],(Re λCP/|λCP|) Re z=0.014±0.035(stat)±0.034(syst)×[-0.072,0.101],Im z=0.038±0.029(stat)±0.025(syst)[-0.028,0.104]. The values inside the square brackets indicate the 90% confidence-level intervals. These results are consistent with standard model expectations.

  2. Improving the luminescence properties of aequorin by conjugating to CdSe/ZnS quantum dot nanoparticles: Red shift and slowing decay rate.

    PubMed

    Jalilian, Nezam; Shanehsaz, Maryam; Sajedi, Reza H; Gharaat, Morteza; Ghahremanzadeh, Ramin

    2016-09-01

    Changing the properties of photoprotein aequorin such as the wavelength emission and decay half-life by using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) phenomenon is the main aim in this paper. BRET system was set up with CdSe/ZnS quantum dot nanoparticles as an acceptor molecule and photoprotein as an energy donor molecule. Quantum dots are semiconductor nanoparticles with very interesting optical properties, including broad excitation spectra, narrow and the symmetric band width emission spectra, tunable by their sizes, compositions, negligible photo-bleaching and good chemical and photo-stability. In this QD-BRET system, aequorin is conjugated to the carboxyl groups on quantum dot surface by EDC/NHS chemistry as cross linker. Bioluminescence energy generates by aequorin upon adding Ca(2+) and transfers to the quantum dots in a radiationless manner and emits at a longer wavelength. The determined bioluminescent parameters for this method included aequorin activity, emission spectra and decay half-life time. In fact, this spectrum tuning strategy resulted in a change in bioluminescent properties of photoprotein, therefore, the maximum emission wavelength shifted from 455 to 540nm and the decay time increased from 3.76 to 12.11s. Nowadays, photoproteins with different characteristics are capable of being employed as a reporter in multi-analyte detections and in vivo imaging.

  3. Comparison of the environmental effects on variation in yearly litter decay and soil respiration rates over four years in forested and harvested sites across Canada.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trofymow, J. A.; Thompson, E.; Cameron, A.; Pare', D.; Lavigne, M.; Amiro, B.; Smyth, C.; Black, A.; Barr, A.; Margolis, H.

    2008-12-01

    Soil respiration includes CO2 respired by plant roots and by soil biota decomposing plant detritus. Detrital C stocks and fluxes are being studied at 16 sites at 7 stations of the Fluxnet Canada Research Network, including paired mature and clearcut forest sites at 5 upland stations (BC, SK, ON, QC, NB). All sites were instrumented for in situ measurements of soil moisture and temperature and many sites also included coincident measurements of soil respiration by chambers. Cumulative litter decay was measured using surface placed litterbags with one of four standard material types (aspen leaves -AL, black spruce needles BS, Douglas fir needles DF and birch wood sticks BW). Six replicate plots were located at each site, each plot contained sufficient numbers of surface litterbags of each material type to allow for four annual collections (2004 - 2007). As well unconfined birch chopsticks were placed at three depths down the soil profile (surface, 5cm, 15cm) and replaced annually to examine interannual variability of decay. After four years cumulative decay, litter rank by %mass remaining had AL

  4. A Correlation between the Intrinsic Brightness and Average Decay Rate of Gamma-Ray Burst X-Ray Afterglow Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Racusin, J. L.; Oates, S. R.; de Pasquale, M.; Kocevski, D.

    2016-07-01

    We present a correlation between the average temporal decay ({α }{{X},{avg},\\gt 200{{s}}}) and early-time luminosity ({L}{{X},200{{s}}}) of X-ray afterglows of gamma-ray bursts as observed by the Swift X-ray Telescope. Both quantities are measured relative to a rest-frame time of 200 s after the γ-ray trigger. The luminosity-average decay correlation does not depend on specific temporal behavior and contains one scale-independent quantity minimizing the role of selection effects. This is a complementary correlation to that discovered by Oates et al. in the optical light curves observed by the Swift Ultraviolet Optical Telescope. The correlation indicates that, on average, more luminous X-ray afterglows decay faster than less luminous ones, indicating some relative mechanism for energy dissipation. The X-ray and optical correlations are entirely consistent once corrections are applied and contamination is removed. We explore the possible biases introduced by different light-curve morphologies and observational selection effects, and how either geometrical effects or intrinsic properties of the central engine and jet could explain the observed correlation.

  5. Development of a carbonate absorption-based process for post-combustion CO2 capture: The role of biocatalyst to promote CO2 absorption rate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Y.; Ye, X.; Zhang, Z.; Khodayari, A.; Djukadi, T.

    2011-01-01

    An Integrated Vacuum Carbonate Absorption Process (IVCAP) for post-combustion carbon dioxide (CO2) capture is described. IVCAP employs potassium carbonate (PC) as a solvent, uses waste or low quality steam from the power plant for CO2 stripping, and employs a biocatalyst, carbonic anhydrase (CA) enzyme, for promoting the CO2 absorption into PC solution. A series of experiments were performed to evaluate the activity of CA enzyme mixed in PC solutions in a stirred tank reactor system under various temperatures, CA dosages, CO2 loadings, CO2 partial pressures, and the presence of major flue gas contaminants. It was demonstrated that CA enzyme is an effective biocatalyst for CO2 absorption under IVCAP conditions. ?? 2011 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Measurements of the Higgs boson production and decay rates and constraints on its couplings from a combined ATLAS and CMS analysis of the LHC pp collision data at √{s}=7 and 8 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; Aben, R.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abraham, N. L.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allen, B. W.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Alstaty, M.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Armitage, L. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Artz, S.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barranco Navarro, L.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bedognetti, M.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, A. S.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Belyaev, N. L.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez, J.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Beringer, J.; Berlendis, S.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertram, I. A.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bielski, R.; Biesuz, N. V.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Blunier, S.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Boerner, D.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bokan, P.; Bold, T.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortoletto, D.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Bossio Sola, J. D.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Boutle, S. K.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Broughton, J. H.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brunt, BH; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryant, P.

    2016-08-01

    Combined ATLAS and CMS measurements of the Higgs boson production and decay rates, as well as constraints on its couplings to vector bosons and fermions, are presented. The combination is based on the analysis of five production processes, namely gluon fusion, vector boson fusion, and associated production with a W or a Z boson or a pair of top quarks, and of the six decay modes H → ZZ, W W , γγ , ττ, bb, and μμ. All results are reported assuming a value of 125 .09 GeV for the Higgs boson mass, the result of the combined measurement by the ATLAS and CMS experiments. The analysis uses the CERN LHC proton-proton collision data recorded by the ATLAS and CMS experiments in 2011 and 2012, corresponding to integrated luminosities per experiment of approximately 5 fb-1 at √{s}=7 TeV and 20 fb-1 at √{s}=8 TeV. The Higgs boson production and decay rates measured by the two experiments are combined within the context of three generic parameterisations: two based on cross sections and branching fractions, and one on ratios of coupling modifiers. Several interpretations of the measurements with more model-dependent parameterisations are also given. The combined signal yield relative to the Standard Model prediction is measured to be 1 .09 ± 0 .11. The combined measurements lead to observed significances for the vector boson fusion production process and for the H → ττ decay of 5 .4 and 5 .5 standard deviations, respectively. The data are consistent with the Standard Model predictions for all parameterisations considered. [Figure not available: see fulltext.][Figure not available: see fulltext.

  7. Measurements of the Higgs boson production and decay rates and constraints on its couplings from a combined ATLAS and CMS analysis of the LHC pp collision data at $$\\sqrt{s}=7 $$ and 8 TeV

    DOE PAGES

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; ...

    2016-08-05

    Combined ATLAS and CMS measurements of the Higgs boson production and decay rates, as well as constraints on its couplings to vector bosons and fermions, are presented. The combination is based on the analysis of five production processes, namely gluon fusion, vector boson fusion, and associated production with a W or a Z boson or a pair of top quarks, and of the six decay modes H → ZZ, W W , γγ, ττ, bb, and μμ. All results are reported assuming a value of 125.09 GeV for the Higgs boson mass, the result of the combined measurement by the ATLAS and CMS experiments. The analysis uses the CERN LHC proton-proton collision data recorded by the ATLAS and CMS experiments in 2011 and 2012, corresponding to integrated luminosities per experiment of approximately 5 fbmore » $$^{–1}$$ at $$ \\sqrt{s}=7 $$ TeV and 20 fb$$^{–1}$$ at $$ \\sqrt{s}=8 $$ TeV. The Higgs boson production and decay rates measured by the two experiments are combined within the context of three generic parameterisations: two based on cross sections and branching fractions, and one on ratios of coupling modifiers. Several interpretations of the measurements with more model-dependent parameterisations are also given. The combined signal yield relative to the Standard Model prediction is measured to be 1.09 ± 0.11. The combined measurements lead to observed significances for the vector boson fusion production process and for the H → ττ decay of 5.4 and 5.5 standard deviations, respectively. In conclusion, the data are consistent with the Standard Model predictions for all parameterisations considered.« less

  8. Measurements of the Higgs boson production and decay rates and constraints on its couplings from a combined ATLAS and CMS analysis of the LHC pp collision data at $$\\sqrt{s}=7 $$ and 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; Aben, R.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abraham, N. L.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allen, B. W.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Alstaty, M.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Armitage, L. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Artz, S.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barranco Navarro, L.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bedognetti, M.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, A. S.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Belyaev, N. L.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez, J.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Beringer, J.; Berlendis, S.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertram, I. A.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bielski, R.; Biesuz, N. V.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J. -B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Blunier, S.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Boerner, D.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bokan, P.; Bold, T.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortoletto, D.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Bossio Sola, J. D.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Boutle, S. K.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Broughton, J. H.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brunt, BH; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryant, P.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bullock, D.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgard, C. D.; Burghgrave, B.; Burka, K.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Butler, J. M.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cairo, V. M.; Cakir, O.; Calace, N.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Calvet, T. P.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Camincher, C.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Camplani, A.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Carbone, R. M.; Cardarelli, R.; Cardillo, F.; Carli, I.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Casper, D. W.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelijn, R.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavallaro, E.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerda Alberich, L.; Cerio, B. C.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, S. K.; Chan, Y. L.; Chang, P.; Chapman, J. D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chatterjee, A.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Che, S.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, S.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, H. J.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Chiarelli, G.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choi, K.; Chomont, A. R.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christodoulou, V.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chudoba, J.; Chuinard, A. J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Cioara, I. A.; Ciocio, A.; Cirotto, F.; Citron, Z. H.; Citterio, M.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, B. L.; Clark, M. R.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Colasurdo, L.; Cole, B.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cormier, K. J. R.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Crawley, S. J.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Crispin Ortuzar, M.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cúth, J.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; D’amen, G.; D’Auria, S.; D’Onofrio, M.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dado, T.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dandoy, J. R.; Dang, N. P.; Daniells, A. C.; Dann, N. S.; Danninger, M.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J.; Dattagupta, A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, M.; Davison, P.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Benedetti, A.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Maria, A.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dedovich, D. V.; Dehghanian, N.; Deigaard, I.; Del Gaudio, M.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delgove, D.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. M.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell’Acqua, A.; Dell’Asta, L.; Dell’Orso, M.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; DeMarco, D. A.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Denisov, S. P.; Denysiuk, D.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deterre, C.; Dette, K.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dhaliwal, S.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Clemente, W. K.; Di Donato, C.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Di Valentino, D.; Diaconu, C.; Diamond, M.; Dias, F. A.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Diglio, S.; Dimitrievska, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Djuvsland, J. I.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Dobos, D.; Dobre, M.; Doglioni, C.; Dohmae, T.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. 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C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Coubez, X.; Fontaine, J. -C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Le Bihan, A. -C.; Merlin, J. A.; Skovpen, K.; Van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Bernet, C.; Boudoul, G.; Bouvier, E.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Courbon, B.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grenier, G.; Ille, B.; Lagarde, F.; Laktineh, I. B.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Pequegnot, A. L.; Perries, S.; Popov, A.; Sabes, D.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Toriashvili, T.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Feld, L.; Heister, A.; Kiesel, M. K.; Klein, K.; Lipinski, M.; Ostapchuk, A.; Preuten, M.; Raupach, F.; Schael, S.; Schomakers, C.; Schulte, J. F.; Schulz, J.; Verlage, T.; Weber, H.; Zhukov, V.; Brodski, M.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Endres, M.; Erdmann, M.; Erdweg, S.; Esch, T.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Knutzen, S.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Millet, P.; Mukherjee, S.; Olschewski, M.; Padeken, K.; Papacz, P.; Pook, T.; Radziej, M.; Reithler, H.; Rieger, M.; Scheuch, F.; Sonnenschein, L.; Teyssier, D.; Thüer, S.; Cherepanov, V.; Erdogan, Y.; Flügge, G.; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Künsken, A.; Lingemann, J.; Nehrkorn, A.; Nowack, A.; Nugent, I. M.; Pistone, C.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Asin, I.; Beernaert, K.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Bin Anuar, A. A.; Borras, K.; Campbell, A.; Connor, P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Costanza, F.; Diez Pardos, C.; Dolinska, G.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Eichhorn, T.; Gallo, E.; Garay Garcia, J.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Grados Luyando, J. M.; Gunnellini, P.; Harb, A.; Hauk, J.; Hempel, M.; Jung, H.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Karacheban, O.; Kasemann, M.; Keaveney, J.; Kieseler, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Korol, I.; Lange, W.; Lelek, A.; Leonard, J.; Lipka, K.; Lobanov, A.; Lohmann, W.; Mankel, R.; Melzer-Pellmann, I. -A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mittag, G.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Ntomari, E.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Raspereza, A.; Roland, B.; Sahin, M. Ö.; Saxena, P.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Seitz, C.; Spannagel, S.; Stefaniuk, N.; Trippkewitz, K. D.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Blobel, V.; Centis Vignali, M.; Draeger, A. R.; Dreyer, T.; Erfle, J.; Garutti, E.; Goebel, K.; Gonzalez, D.; Görner, M.; Haller, J.; Hoffmann, M.; Höing, R. S.; Junkes, A.; Klanner, R.; Kogler, R.; Kovalchuk, N.; Lapsien, T.; Lenz, T.; Marchesini, I.; Marconi, D.; Meyer, M.; Niedziela, M.; Nowatschin, D.; Ott, J.; Pantaleo, F.; Peiffer, T.; Perieanu, A.; Pietsch, N.; Poehlsen, J.; Sander, C.; Scharf, C.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schmidt, A.; Schumann, S.; Schwandt, J.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Stober, F. M.; Stöver, M.; Tholen, H.; Troendle, D.; Usai, E.; Vanelderen, L.; Vanhoefer, A.; Vormwald, B.; Barth, C.; Baus, C.; Berger, J.; Butz, E.; Chwalek, T.; Colombo, F.; De Boer, W.; Dierlamm, A.; Fink, S.; Friese, R.; Giffels, M.; Gilbert, A.; Haitz, D.; Hartmann, F.; Heindl, S. M.; Husemann, U.; Katkov, I.; Kornmayer, A.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Maier, B.; Mildner, H.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, T.; Müller, Th.; Plagge, M.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Röcker, S.; Roscher, F.; Schröder, M.; Sieber, G.; Simonis, H. J.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wayand, S.; Weber, M.; Weiler, T.; Williamson, S.; Wöhrmann, C.; Wolf, R.; Anagnostou, G.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Giakoumopoulou, V. A.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Topsis-Giotis, I.; Agapitos, A.; Kesisoglou, S.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Tziaferi, E.; Evangelou, I.; Flouris, G.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Loukas, N.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Paradas, E.; Filipovic, N.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Zsigmond, A. J.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Karancsi, J.; Molnar, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Bartók, M.; Makovec, A.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Bahinipati, S.; Choudhury, S.; Mal, P.; Mandal, K.; Nayak, A.; Sahoo, D. K.; Sahoo, N.; Swain, S. K.; Bansal, S.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Chawla, R.; Gupta, R.; Bhawandeep, U.; Kalsi, A. K.; Kaur, A.; Kaur, M.; Kumar, R.; Mehta, A.; Mittal, M.; Singh, J. B.; Walia, G.; Kumar, Ashok; Bhardwaj, A.; Choudhary, B. C.; Garg, R. B.; Keshri, S.; Kumar, A.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Nishu, N.; Ranjan, K.; Sharma, R.; Sharma, V.; Bhattacharya, R.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chatterjee, K.; Dey, S.; Dutt, S.; Dutta, S.; Ghosh, S.; Majumdar, N.; Modak, A.; Mondal, K.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Nandan, S.; Purohit, A.; Roy, A.; Roy, D.; Roy Chowdhury, S.; Sarkar, S.; Sharan, M.; Thakur, S.; Behera, P. K.; Chudasama, R.; Dutta, D.; Jha, V.; Kumar, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Topkar, A.; Aziz, T.; Dugad, S.; Kole, G.; Mahakud, B.; Mitra, S.; Mohanty, G. B.; Sur, N.; Sutar, B.; Banerjee, S.; Bhowmik, S.; Dewanjee, R. K.; Ganguly, S.; Guchait, M.; Jain, Sa.; Kumar, S.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Parida, B.; Sarkar, T.; Wickramage, N.; Chauhan, S.; Dube, S.; Kapoor, A.; Kothekar, K.; Rane, A.; Sharma, S.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Behnamian, H.; Chenarani, S.; Eskandari Tadavani, E.; Etesami, S. M.; Fahim, A.; Khakzad, M.; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M.; Naseri, M.; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S.; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, F.; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Felcini, M.; Grunewald, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Calabria, C.; Caputo, C.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; Cristella, L.; De Filippis, N.; De Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Miniello, G.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Radogna, R.; Ranieri, A.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Venditti, R.; Abbiendi, G.; Battilana, C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Campanini, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Chhibra, S. S.; Codispoti, G.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Perrotta, A.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G. P.; Tosi, N.; Albergo, S.; Chiorboli, M.; Costa, S.; Di Mattia, A.; Giordano, F.; Potenza, R.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Barbagli, G.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D’Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Gori, V.; Lenzi, P.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Sguazzoni, G.; Viliani, L.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Fabbri, F.; Piccolo, D.; Primavera, F.; Calvelli, V.; Ferro, F.; Vetere, M. Lo; Monge, M. R.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Brianza, L.; Dinardo, M. E.; Fiorendi, S.; Gennai, S.; Ghezzi, A.; Govoni, P.; Malvezzi, S.; Manzoni, R. A.; Marzocchi, B.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Paganoni, M.; Pedrini, D.; Pigazzini, S.; Ragazzi, S.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Buontempo, S.; Cavallo, N.; De Nardo, G.; Di Guida, S.; Esposito, M.; Fabozzi, F.; Iorio, A. O. M.; Lanza, G.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Sciacca, C.; Thyssen, F.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Benato, L.; Bisello, D.; Boletti, A.; Carlin, R.; Carvalho Antunes De Oliveira, A.; Checchia, P.; Dall’Osso, M.; De Castro Manzano, P.; Dorigo, T.; Dosselli, U.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Gozzelino, A.; Lacaprara, S.; Margoni, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Pazzini, J.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Tosi, M.; Zanetti, M.; Zotto, P.; Zucchetta, A.; Zumerle, G.; Braghieri, A.; Magnani, A.; Montagna, P.; Ratti, S. P.; Re, V.; Riccardi, C.; Salvini, P.; Vai, I.; Vitulo, P.; Alunni Solestizi, L.; Bilei, G. M.; Ciangottini, D.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Leonardi, R.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Androsov, K.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bernardini, J.; Boccali, T.; Castaldi, R.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell’Orso, R.; Donato, S.; Fedi, G.; Giassi, A.; Grippo, M. T.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzi, A.; SavoyNavarro, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; Cipriani, M.; D’imperio, G.; Del Re, D.; Diemoz, M.; Gelli, S.; Jorda, C.; Longo, E.; Margaroli, F.; Meridiani, P.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Preiato, F.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Santanastasio, F.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Bartosik, N.; Bellan, R.; Biino, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Costa, M.; Covarelli, R.; Degano, A.; Demaria, N.; Finco, L.; Kiani, B.; Mariotti, C.; Maselli, S.; Migliore, E.; Monaco, V.; Monteil, E.; Obertino, M. M.; Pacher, L.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Pinna Angioni, G. L.; Ravera, F.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Shchelina, K.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Traczyk, P.; Belforte, S.; Candelise, V.; Casarsa, M.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; La Licata, C.; Schizzi, A.; Zanetti, A.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, M. S.; Lee, S.; Lee, S. W.; Oh, Y. D.; Sekmen, S.; Son, D. C.; Yang, Y. C.; Kim, H.; Lee, A.; Brochero Cifuentes, J. A.; Kim, T. J.; Cho, S.; Choi, S.; Go, Y.; Gyun, D.; Ha, S.; Hong, B.; Jo, Y.; Kim, Y.; Lee, B.; Lee, K.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S.; Lim, J.; Park, S. K.; Roh, Y.; Almond, J.; Kim, J.; Oh, S. B.; Seo, S. h.; Yang, U. K.; Yoo, H. D.; Yu, G. B.; Choi, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, H.; Kim, J. H.; Lee, J. S. H.; Park, I. C.; Ryu, G.; Ryu, M. S.; Choi, Y.; Goh, J.; Kim, D.; Kwon, E.; Lee, J.; Yu, I.; Dudenas, V.; Juodagalvis, A.; Vaitkus, J.; Ahmed, I.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Komaragiri, J. R.; Md Ali, M. A. B.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Yusli, M. N.; Zolkapli, Z.; Casimiro Linares, E.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Hernandez-Almada, A.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Mejia Guisao, J.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Carrillo Moreno, S.; Vazquez Valencia, F.; Pedraza, I.; Salazar Ibarguen, H. A.; Uribe Estrada, C.; Morelos Pineda, A.; Krofcheck, D.; Butler, P. H.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmad, M.; Hassan, Q.; Hoorani, H. R.; Khan, W. A.; Khurshid, T.; Qazi, S.; Waqas, M.; Bialkowska, H.; Bluj, M.; Boimska, B.; Frueboes, T.; Górski, M.; Kazana, M.; Nawrocki, K.; Romanowska-Rybinska, K.; Szleper, M.; Zalewski, P.; Bunkowski, K.; Byszuk, A.; Doroba, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Konecki, M.; Krolikowski, J.; Misiura, M.; Olszewski, M.; Walczak, M.; Bargassa, P.; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, C.; Di Francesco, A.; Faccioli, P.; Ferreira Parracho, P. G.; Gallinaro, M.; Hollar, J.; Leonardo, N.; Lloret Iglesias, L.; Nemallapudi, M. V.; Rodrigues Antunes, J.; Seixas, J.; Toldaiev, O.; Vadruccio, D.; Varela, J.; Vischia, P.; Afanasiev, S.; Gavrilenko, M.; Golutvin, I.; Gorbunov, I.; Karjavin, V.; Kozlov, G.; Lanev, A.; Malakhov, A.; Matveev, V.; Moisenz, P.; Palichik, V.; Perelygin, V.; Savina, M.; Shmatov, S.; Shulha, S.; Skatchkov, N.; Smirnov, V.; Voytishin, N.; Zarubin, A.; Chtchipounov, L.; Golovtsov, V.; Ivanov, Y.; Kim, V.; Kuznetsova, E.; Murzin, V.; Oreshkin, V.; Sulimov, V.; Vorobyev, A.; Andreev, Yu.; Dermenev, A.; Gninenko, S.; Golubev, N.; Karneyeu, A.; Kirsanov, M.; Krasnikov, N.; Pashenkov, A.; Tlisov, D.; Toropin, A.; Epshteyn, V.; Gavrilov, V.; Lychkovskaya, N.; Popov, V.; Pozdnyakov, I.; Safronov, G.; Spiridonov, A.; Toms, M.; Vlasov, E.; Zhokin, A.; Chistov, R.; Markin, O.; Rusinov, V.; Andreev, V.; Azarkin, M.; Dremin, I.; Kirakosyan, M.; Leonidov, A.; Rusakov, S. V.; Terkulov, A.; Baskakov, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Bunichev, V.; Dubinin, M.; Dudko, L.; Ershov, A.; Gribushin, A.; Klyukhin, V.; Kodolova, O.; Lokhtin, I.; Miagkov, I.; Obraztsov, S.; Petrushanko, S.; Savrin, V.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Elumakhov, D.; Kachanov, V.; Kalinin, A.; Konstantinov, D.; Krychkine, V.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Cirkovic, P.; Devetak, D.; Milosevic, J.; Rekovic, V.; Alcaraz Maestre, J.; Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo Llatas, M.; Colino, N.; De La Cruz, B.; Delgado Peris, A.; Escalante Del Valle, A.; Fernandez Bedoya, C.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Navarro De Martino, E.; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Puerta Pelayo, J.; Quintario Olmeda, A.; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Soares, M. S.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Missiroli, M.; Moran, D.; Cuevas, J.; Fernandez Menendez, J.; Gonzalez Caballero, I.; Palencia Cortezon, E.; Sanchez Cruz, S.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Cabrillo, I. J.; Calderon, A.; Castiñeiras De Saa, J. R.; Curras, E.; Fernandez, M.; Garcia-Ferrero, J.; Gomez, G.; Lopez Virto, A.; Marco, J.; Martinez Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Piedra Gomez, J.; Rodrigo, T.; Ruiz-Jimeno, A.; Scodellaro, L.; Trevisani, N.; Vila, I.; Vilar Cortabitarte, R.; Abbaneo, D.; Auffray, E.; Auzinger, G.; Bachtis, M.; Baillon, P.; Ball, A. H.; Barney, D.; Bloch, P.; Bocci, A.; Bonato, A.; Botta, C.; Camporesi, T.; Castello, R.; Cepeda, M.; Cerminara, G.; D’Alfonso, M.; d’Enterria, D.; Dabrowski, A.; Daponte, V.; David, A.; De Gruttola, M.; De Guio, F.; De Roeck, A.; Di Marco, E.; Dobson, M.; Dordevic, M.; Dorney, B.; du Pree, T.; Duggan, D.; Dünser, M.; Dupont, N.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; Fartoukh, S.; Franzoni, G.; Fulcher, J.; Funk, W.; Gigi, D.; Gill, K.; Girone, M.; Glege, F.; Gundacker, S.; Guthoff, M.; Hammer, J.; Harris, P.; Hegeman, J.; Innocente, V.; Janot, P.; Kirschenmann, H.; Knünz, V.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Kousouris, K.; Krammer, M.; Lecoq, P.; Lourenço, C.; Lucchini, M. T.; Magini, N.; Malgeri, L.; Mannelli, M.; Martelli, A.; Meijers, F.; Mersi, S.; Meschi, E.; Moortgat, F.; Morovic, S.; Mulders, M.; Neugebauer, H.; Orfanelli, S.; Orsini, L.; Pape, L.; Perez, E.; Peruzzi, M.; Petrilli, A.; Petrucciani, G.; Pfeiffer, A.; Pierini, M.; Racz, A.; Reis, T.; Rolandi, G.; Rovere, M.; Ruan, M.; Sakulin, H.; Sauvan, J. B.; Schäfer, C.; Schwick, C.; Seidel, M.; Sharma, A.; Silva, P.; Simon, M.; Sphicas, P.; Steggemann, J.; Stoye, M.; Takahashi, Y.; Treille, D.; Triossi, A.; Tsirou, A.; Veckalns, V.; Veres, G. I.; Wardle, N.; Zagozdzinska, A.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Rohe, T.; Bachmair, F.; Bäni, L.; Bianchini, L.; Casal, B.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Donegà, M.; Eller, P.; Grab, C.; Heidegger, C.; Hits, D.; Hoss, J.; Kasieczka, G.; Lecomte, P.; Lustermann, W.; Mangano, B.; Marionneau, M.; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P.; Masciovecchio, M.; Meinhard, M. T.; Meister, D.; Micheli, F.; Musella, P.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pata, J.; Pauss, F.; Perrin, G.; Perrozzi, L.; Quittnat, M.; Rossini, M.; Schönenberger, M.; Starodumov, A.; Takahashi, M.; Tavolaro, V. R.; Theofilatos, K.; Wallny, R.; Aarrestad, T. K.; Amsler, C.; Caminada, L.; Canelli, M. F.; Chiochia, V.; De Cosa, A.; Galloni, C.; Hinzmann, A.; Hreus, T.; Kilminster, B.; Lange, C.; Ngadiuba, J.; Pinna, D.; Rauco, G.; Robmann, P.; Salerno, D.; Yang, Y.; Doan, T. H.; Jain, Sh.; Khurana, R.; Konyushikhin, M.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W.; Lu, Y. J.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Yu, S. S.; Kumar, Arun; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. H.; Chang, Y. W.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Chen, P. H.; Dietz, C.; Fiori, F.; Hsiung, Y.; Liu, Y. F.; Lu, R. -S.; Miñano Moya, M.; Paganis, E.; Psallidas, A.; Tsai, J. f.; Tzeng, Y. M.; Asavapibhop, B.; Singh, G.; Srimanobhas, N.; Suwonjandee, N.; Adiguzel, A.; Bakirci, M. N.; Damarseckin, S.; Demiroglu, Z. S.; Dozen, C.; Dumanoglu, I.; Girgis, S.; Gokbulut, G.; Guler, Y.; Gurpinar, E.; Hos, I.; Kangal, E. E.; Kayis Topaksu, A.; Onengut, G.; Ozdemir, K.; Sunar Cerci, D.; Tali, B.; Zorbilmez, C.; Bilin, B.; Bilmis, S.; Isildak, B.; Karapinar, G.; Yalvac, M.; Zeyrek, M.; Gülmez, E.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Yetkin, E. A.; Yetkin, T.; Cakir, A.; Cankocak, K.; Sen, S.; Vardarlı, F. I.; Grynyov, B.; Levchuk, L.; Sorokin, P.; Aggleton, R.; Ball, F.; Beck, L.; Brooke, J. J.; Burns, D.; Clement, E.; Cussans, D.; Flacher, H.; Goldstein, J.; Grimes, M.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Jacob, J.; Kreczko, L.; Lucas, C.; Meng, Z.; Newbold, D. M.; Paramesvaran, S.; Poll, A.; Sakuma, T.; Seif El Nasr-storey, S.; Senkin, S.; Smith, D.; Smith, V. J.; Bell, K. W.; Belyaev, A.; Brew, C.; Brown, R. M.; Calligaris, L.; Cieri, D.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Coughlan, J. A.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Olaiya, E.; Petyt, D.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Thea, A.; Tomalin, I. R.; Williams, T.; Baber, M.; Bainbridge, R.; Buchmuller, O.; Bundock, A.; Burton, D.; Casasso, S.; Citron, M.; Colling, D.; Corpe, L.; Dauncey, P.; Davies, G.; De Wit, A.; Della Negra, M.; Dunne, P.; Elwood, A.; Futyan, D.; Haddad, Y.; Hall, G.; Iles, G.; Lane, R.; Laner, C.; Lucas, R.; Lyons, L.; Magnan, A. -M.; Malik, S.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Nash, J.; Nikitenko, A.; Pela, J.; Penning, B.; Pesaresi, M.; Raymond, D. M.; Richards, A.; Rose, A.; Seez, C.; Tapper, A.; Uchida, K.; Vazquez Acosta, M.; Virdee, T.; Zenz, S. C.; Cole, J. E.; Hobson, P. R.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Leslie, D.; Reid, I. D.; Symonds, P.; Teodorescu, L.; Turner, M.; Borzou, A.; Call, K.; Dittmann, J.; Hatakeyama, K.; Liu, H.; Pastika, N.; Charaf, O.; Cooper, S. I.; Henderson, C.; Rumerio, P.; Arcaro, D.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Gastler, D.; Rankin, D.; Richardson, C.; Rohlf, J.; Sulak, L.; Zou, D.; Benelli, G.; Berry, E.; Cutts, D.; Ferapontov, A.; Garabedian, A.; Hakala, J.; Heintz, U.; Jesus, O.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Mao, Z.; Narain, M.; Piperov, S.; Sagir, S.; Spencer, E.; Syarif, R.; Breedon, R.; Breto, G.; Burns, D.; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, M.; Chauhan, S.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. T.; Erbacher, R.; Flores, C.; Funk, G.; Gardner, M.; Ko, W.; Lander, R.; Mclean, C.; Mulhearn, M.; Pellett, D.; Pilot, J.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Shalhout, S.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Stolp, D.; Tripathi, M.; Wilbur, S.; Yohay, R.; Cousins, R.; Everaerts, P.; Florent, A.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Saltzberg, D.; Takasugi, E.; Valuev, V.; Weber, M.; Burt, K.; Clare, R.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Hanson, G.; Heilman, J.; Jandir, P.; Kennedy, E.; Lacroix, F.; Long, O. R.; Malberti, M.; Olmedo Negrete, M.; Paneva, M. I.; Shrinivas, A.; Wei, H.; Wimpenny, S.; Yates, B. R.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Cittolin, S.; D’Agnolo, R. T.; Derdzinski, M.; Gerosa, R.; Holzner, A.; Kelley, R.; Klein, D.; Letts, J.; Macneill, I.; Olivito, D.; Padhi, S.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Tadel, M.; Vartak, A.; Wasserbaech, S.; Welke, C.; Wood, J.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Zevi Della Porta, G.; Bhandari, R.; Bradmiller-Feld, J.; Campagnari, C.; Dishaw, A.; Dutta, V.; Flowers, K.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Geffert, P.; George, C.; Golf, F.; Gouskos, L.; Gran, J.; Heller, R.; Incandela, J.; Mccoll, N.; Mullin, S. D.; Ovcharova, A.; Richman, J.; Stuart, D.; Suarez, I.; West, C.; Yoo, J.; Anderson, D.; Apresyan, A.; Bendavid, J.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Chen, Y.; Duarte, J.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Pena, C.; Spiropulu, M.; Vlimant, J. R.; Xie, S.; Zhu, R. Y.; Andrews, M. B.; Azzolini, V.; Calamba, A.; Carlson, B.; Ferguson, T.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Sun, M.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Ford, W. T.; Jensen, F.; Johnson, A.; Krohn, M.; Mulholland, T.; Stenson, K.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chaves, J.; Chu, J.; Dittmer, S.; Mirman, N.; Nicolas Kaufman, G.; Patterson, J. R.; Rinkevicius, A.; Ryd, A.; Skinnari, L.; Sun, W.; Tan, S. M.; Tao, Z.; Thom, J.; Tucker, J.; Wittich, P.; Winn, D.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Apollinari, G.; Banerjee, S.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bolla, G.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Cremonesi, M.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gottschalk, E.; Gray, L.; Green, D.; Grünendahl, S.; Gutsche, O.; Hare, D.; Harris, R. M.; Hasegawa, S.; Hirschauer, J.; Hu, Z.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Klima, B.; Kreis, B.; Lammel, S.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Liu, T.; Lopes De Sá, R.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Merkel, P.; Mrenna, S.; Nahn, S.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O’Dell, V.; Pedro, K.; Prokofyev, O.; Rakness, G.; Ristori, L.; SextonKennedy, E.; Soha, A.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Stoynev, S.; Strobbe, N.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vernieri, C.; Verzocchi, M.; Vidal, R.; Wang, M.; Weber, H. A.; Whitbeck, A.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bortignon, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Carnes, A.; Carver, M.; Curry, D.; Das, S.; Field, R. D.; Furic, I. K.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Ma, P.; Matchev, K.; Mei, H.; Milenovic, P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Rank, D.; Shchutska, L.; Sperka, D.; Thomas, L.; Wang, J.; Wang, S.; Yelton, J.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Ackert, A.; Adams, J. R.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bein, S.; Diamond, B.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Johnson, K. F.; Khatiwada, A.; Prosper, H.; Santra, A.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Bhopatkar, V.; Colafranceschi, S.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Noonan, D.; Roy, T.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Berry, D.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Kurt, P.; O’Brien, C.; Sandoval Gonzalez, I. D.; Turner, P.; Varelas, N.; Wu, Z.; Zakaria, M.; Zhang, J.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Durgut, S.; Gandrajula, R. P.; Haytmyradov, M.; Khristenko, V.; Merlo, J. -P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Snyder, C.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yi, K.; Anderson, I.; Blumenfeld, B.; Cocoros, A.; Eminizer, N.; Fehling, D.; Feng, L.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Osherson, M.; Roskes, J.; Sarica, U.; Swartz, M.; Xiao, M.; Xin, Y.; You, C.; Al-bataineh, A.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Bowen, J.; Bruner, C.; Castle, J.; Kenny, R. P.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Majumder, D.; Mcbrayer, W.; Murray, M.; Sanders, S.; Stringer, R.; Tapia Takaki, J. D.; Wang, Q.; Ivanov, A.; Kaadze, K.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Mohammadi, A.; Saini, L. K.; Skhirtladze, N.; Toda, S.; Lange, D.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Anelli, C.; Baden, A.; Baron, O.; Belloni, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Ferraioli, C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Jabeen, S.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kolberg, T.; Kunkle, J.; Lu, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Shin, Y. H.; Skuja, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Apyan, A.; Barbieri, R.; Baty, A.; Bi, R.; Bierwagen, K.; Brandt, S.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; Demiragli, Z.; Di Matteo, L.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gulhan, D.; Hsu, D.; Iiyama, Y.; Innocenti, G. M.; Klute, M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Krajczar, K.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y. -J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Marini, A. C.; Mcginn, C.; Mironov, C.; Narayanan, S.; Niu, X.; Paus, C.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sumorok, K.; Tatar, K.; Varma, M.; Velicanu, D.; Veverka, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, T. W.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Zhukova, V.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Chatterjee, R. M.; Dahmes, B.; Evans, A.; Finkel, A.; Gude, A.; Hansen, P.; Kalafut, S.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Lesko, Z.; Mans, J.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rusack, R.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bartek, R.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Fangmeier, C.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kamalieddin, R.; Knowlton, D.; Kravchenko, I.; Meier, F.; Monroy, J.; Siado, J. E.; Snow, G. R.; Stieger, B.; Alyari, M.; Dolen, J.; George, J.; Godshalk, A.; Harrington, C.; Iashvili, I.; Kaisen, J.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Parker, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Roozbahani, B.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Hortiangtham, A.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Teixeira De Lima, R.; Trocino, D.; Wang, R. -J.; Wood, D.; Bhattacharya, S.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Low, J. F.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Schmitt, M. H.; Sung, K.; Trovato, M.; Velasco, M.; Dev, N.; Hildreth, M.; Hurtado Anampa, K.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Marinelli, N.; Meng, F.; Mueller, C.; Musienko, Y.; Planer, M.; Reinsvold, A.; Ruchti, R.; Rupprecht, N.; Smith, G.; Taroni, S.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Alimena, J.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Francis, B.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Ji, W.; Liu, B.; Luo, W.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wulsin, H. W.; Cooperstein, S.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Luo, J.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Palmer, C.; Piroué, P.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Zuranski, A.; Malik, S.; Barker, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Folgueras, S.; Gutay, L.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, A. W.; Jung, K.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shi, X.; Sun, J.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Chen, Z.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Guilbaud, M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Northup, M.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Rorie, J.; Tu, Z.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Duh, Y. t.; Ferbel, T.; Galanti, M.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Han, J.; Hindrichs, O.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Lo, K. H.; Tan, P.; Verzetti, M.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Gershtein, Y.; Gómez Espinosa, T. A.; Halkiadakis, E.; Heindl, M.; Hidas, D.; Hughes, E.; Kaplan, S.; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, R.; Kyriacou, S.; Lath, A.; Nash, K.; Saka, H.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Sheffield, D.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Foerster, M.; Heideman, J.; Riley, G.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; Thapa, K.; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.; Celik, A.; Dalchenko, M.; De Mattia, M.; Delgado, A.; Dildick, S.; Eusebi, R.; Gilmore, J.; Huang, T.; Juska, E.; Kamon, T.; Krutelyov, V.; Mueller, R.; Pakhotin, Y.; Patel, R.; Perloff, A.; Perniè, L.; Rathjens, D.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Tatarinov, A.; Ulmer, K. A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kunori, S.; Lamichhane, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Undleeb, S.; Volobouev, I.; Wang, Z.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Janjam, R.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Melo, A.; Ni, H.; Sheldon, P.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Xu, Q.; Arenton, M. W.; Barria, P.; Cox, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Neu, C.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Sun, X.; Wang, Y.; Wolfe, E.; Xia, F.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Gomber, B.; Grothe, M.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Levine, A.; Long, K.; Loveless, R.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ruggles, T.; Savin, A.; Sharma, A.; Smith, N.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Verwilligen, P.; Woods, N.

    2016-08-05

    Combined ATLAS and CMS measurements of the Higgs boson production and decay rates, as well as constraints on its couplings to vector bosons and fermions, are presented. The combination is based on the analysis of five production processes, namely gluon fusion, vector boson fusion, and associated production with a W or a Z boson or a pair of top quarks, and of the six decay modes H → ZZ, W W , γγ, ττ, bb, and μμ. All results are reported assuming a value of 125.09 GeV for the Higgs boson mass, the result of the combined measurement by the ATLAS and CMS experiments. The analysis uses the CERN LHC proton-proton collision data recorded by the ATLAS and CMS experiments in 2011 and 2012, corresponding to integrated luminosities per experiment of approximately 5 fb$^{–1}$ at $ \\sqrt{s}=7 $ TeV and 20 fb$^{–1}$ at $ \\sqrt{s}=8 $ TeV. The Higgs boson production and decay rates measured by the two experiments are combined within the context of three generic parameterisations: two based on cross sections and branching fractions, and one on ratios of coupling modifiers. Several interpretations of the measurements with more model-dependent parameterisations are also given. The combined signal yield relative to the Standard Model prediction is measured to be 1.09 ± 0.11. The combined measurements lead to observed significances for the vector boson fusion production process and for the H → ττ decay of 5.4 and 5.5 standard deviations, respectively. In conclusion, the data are consistent with the Standard Model predictions for all parameterisations considered.

  9. Decay Dynamics of Tumors

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The fractional cell kill is a mathematical expression describing the rate at which a certain population of cells is reduced to a fraction of itself. We investigate the mathematical function that governs the rate at which a solid tumor is lysed by a cell population of cytotoxic lymphocytes. We do it in the context of enzyme kinetics, using geometrical and analytical arguments. We derive the equations governing the decay of a tumor in the limit in which it is plainly surrounded by immune cells. A cellular automaton is used to test such decay, confirming its validity. Finally, we introduce a modification in the fractional cell kill so that the expected dynamics is attained in the mentioned limit. We also discuss the potential of this new function for non-solid and solid tumors which are infiltrated with lymphocytes. PMID:27310010

  10. River Capture in Disequilibrium Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, S. W.; Perron, J.; Willett, S.; Goren, L.

    2013-12-01

    The process of river piracy or river capture has long drawn interest as a potential mechanism by which drainage basins large and small evolve towards an equilibrium state. River capture transfers both drainage area and drainage lines from one river basin to another, which can cause large, abrupt shifts in network topology, drainage divide positions, and river incision rates. Despite numerous case studies in which river capture has been proposed to have occurred, there is no general, mechanistic framework for understanding the controls on river capture, nor are there quantitative criteria for determining if capture has occurred. Here we use new metrics of landscape disequilibrium to first identify landscapes in which drainage reorganization is occurring. These metrics are based on a balance between an integral of the contributing drainage area and elevation. In an analysis of rivers in the Eastern United States we find that many rivers are in a state of disequilibrium and are experiencing recent or ongoing area exchange between basins. In these disequilibrium basins we find widespread evidence for network rearrangement via river capture at multiple scales. We then conduct numerical experiments with a 2-D landscape evolution model to explore the conditions in which area exchange among drainage basins is likely to occur as discrete capture events as opposed to continuous divide migration. These experiments indicate that: (1) capture activity increases with the degree of disequilibrium induced by persistent spatial gradients in tectonic forcing or by temporal changes in climate or tectonic forcing; (2) capture activity is strongly controlled by the initial planform drainage network geometry; and (3) capture activity scales with the fluvial incision rate constant in the river power erosion law.

  11. Decay Data Evaluation Project: Evaluation of (52)Fe nuclear decay data.

    PubMed

    Luca, Aurelian

    2016-03-01

    Within the Decay Data Evaluation Project (DDEP) and the IAEA Coordinated Research Project no. F41029, the evaluation of the nuclear decay data of (52)Fe, a radionuclide of interest in nuclear medicine, was performed. The main nuclear decay data evaluated are: the half-life, decay energy, energies and probabilities of the electron capture and β(+) transitions, internal conversion coefficients and gamma-ray energies and emission intensities. This new evaluation, made using the DDEP methodology and tools, was included in the DDEP database NUCLEIDE.

  12. Active and sterile neutrino mass effects on beta decay spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Boillos, Juan Manuel; Moya de Guerra, Elvira

    2013-06-10

    We study the spectra of the emitted charged leptons in charge current weak nuclear processes to analyze the effect of neutrino masses. Standard active neutrinos are studied here, with masses of the order of 1 eV or lower, as well as sterile neutrinos with masses of a few keV. The latter are warm dark matter (WDM) candidates hypothetically produced or captured as small mixtures with the active neutrinos. We compute differential decay or capture rates spectra in weak charged processes of different nuclei ({sup 3}H, {sup 187}Re, {sup 107}Pd, {sup 163}Ho, etc) using different masses of both active and sterile neutrinos and different values of the mixing parameter.

  13. Search for anomalies in the decay of radioactive Mn-54

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverman, M. P.

    2016-06-01

    Recent papers have reported that 54Mn, which decays by electron capture (a weak nuclear interaction) with half-life ∼312 days, is influenced by solar activity. Should this actually occur, new physics would be needed to explain it. This paper reports results of an analysis of 54Mn activity measured over a time interval of ∼3.6 half-lives. If standard nuclear physics applies, the logarithmic residuals of 54Mn activities should form a stationary set of independent random variables whose statistics are determined solely by a constant decay rate λ and initial mean count μ. Analysis of the time-variation, autocorrelation, and power spectra of the 54Mn logarithmic residuals agrees exquisitely with standard nuclear physics. Computer-simulated activities exhibiting periodic decay of amplitude A=αλ show that anomalies would be detectable by these statistical tests for values of α as low as ∼1 part in 104. This limit is about 10 times lower than reported deviations from exponential decay.

  14. Neutron capture in the r-process

    SciTech Connect

    Surman, Rebecca; Mclaughlin, Gail C; Mumpower, Matthew; Hix, William Raphael; Jones, K. L.

    2010-01-01

    Recently we have shown that neutron capture rates on nuclei near stability significantly influence the r-process abundance pattern. We discuss the different mechanisms by which the abundance pattern is sensitive to the capture rates and identify key nuclei whose rates are of particular im- portance. Here we consider nuclei in the A = 130 and A = 80 regions.

  15. Muon Capture on ^3H

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golak, Jacek; Skibiński, Roman; Witała, Henryk; Topolnicki, Kacper; Kamada, Hiroyuki; Nogga, Andreas; Marcucci, Laura E.

    2017-01-01

    The μ ^- + ^3H → ν _μ + n + n + n capture reaction is studied under full inclusion of final-state interactions with the AV18 nucleon-nucleon potential and the Urbana IX three-nucleon force. We employ the single nucleon weak current operator comprising the dominant relativistic corrections to obtain first estimates of the total capture rates based on realistic forces. Our results are compared with older theoretical predictions.

  16. Decoherence delays false vacuum decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachlechner, Thomas C.

    2013-05-01

    We show that gravitational interactions between massless thermal modes and a nucleating Coleman-de Luccia bubble may lead to efficient decoherence and strongly suppress metastable vacuum decay for bubbles that are small compared to the Hubble radius. The vacuum decay rate including gravity and thermal photon interactions has the exponential scaling \\Gamma \\sim \\Gamma _{CDL}^{2}, where ΓCDL is the Coleman-de Luccia decay rate neglecting photon interactions. For the lowest metastable initial state an efficient quantum Zeno effect occurs due to thermal radiation of temperatures as low as the de Sitter temperature. This strong decoherence effect is a consequence of gravitational interactions with light external mode. We argue that efficient decoherence does not occur for the case of Hawking-Moss decay. This observation is consistent with requirements set by Poincaré recurrence in de Sitter space.

  17. Weak decay processes in pre-supernova core evolution within the gross theory

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira, R. C.; Dimarco, A. J.; Samana, A. R.; Barbero, C. A.

    2014-03-20

    The beta decay and electron capture rates are of fundamental importance in the evolution of massive stars in a pre-supernova core. The beta decay process gives its contribution by emitting electrons in the plasma of the stellar core, thereby increasing pressure, which in turn increases the temperature. From the other side, the electron capture removes free electrons from the plasma of the star core contributing to the reduction of pressure and temperature. In this work we calculate the beta decay and electron capture rates in stellar conditions for 63 nuclei of relevance in the pre-supernova stage, employing Gross Theory as the nuclear model. We use the abundances calculated with the Saha equations in the hypothesis of nuclear statistical equilibrium to evaluate the time derivative of the fraction of electrons. Our results are compared with other evaluations available in the literature. They have shown to be one order less or equal than the calculated within other models. Our results indicate that these differences may influence the evolution of the star in the later stages of pre-supernova.

  18. Does the specific time of day used to capture data on ventilator-days have an impact on the documented rates of ventilator-associated pneumonia?

    PubMed

    Talbot, Thomas R; Starmer, John M

    2010-05-01

    Definitions of ventilator-associated pneumonia do not note a preferred daily time for obtaining denominator data. We examined collecting data on the number of ventilator-days at different times of day in 7 intensive care units. Rates of ventilator-associated pneumonia did not significantly differ when denominator data were collected at midnight, 8 am, or 4 pm, supporting standard definitions.

  19. Frequency Drift Rate Investigation of Solar Radio Burst Type II Due to Coronal Mass Ejections Occurrence on 4th November 2015 Captured by CALLISTO at Sumedang-Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batubara, M.; Manik, T.; Suryana, R.; Lathif, M.; Sitompul, P.; Zamzam, M.; Mumtahana, F.

    2017-03-01

    The formations type of solar radio bursts can be known base on the frequency range that is detected. The CALLISTO system works with a wide band of the frequency making it possible to detect several types of solar burst. Indonesia exactly at Sumedang, CALLISTO system detected the formation of solar radio bursts forms of type II for the first time on 5 November 2014. On the other side, CALLISTO spectrometer detects and traces the phenomenon of CME (Coronal Mass Ejections) which causes the solar radio burst type II occurrence. In this paper will be calculated frequency drift rate during the occurrence of solar radio bursts of type II phenomenon on 4th November 2015 at 03:30 UT. The results of these calculations will be discussed as a related study of drift rate during the phenomenon of burst type II radio bursts associated with CME. The obtained drift rate during the solar radio bursts events above 2.8 MHz / s with low drift rate so that the speed of the CME that occurred only about 790 km / s as shown from LASCO.

  20. Charm and bottom semileptonic decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'donnell, Patrick J.; Turan, Gürsevil

    1997-07-01

    We review the present status of theoretical attempts to calculate the semileptonic charm and bottom decays and then present a calculation of these decays in the light-front frame at the kinematic point q2=0. This allows us to evaluate the form factors at the same value of q2, even though the allowed kinematic ranges for charm and bottom decays are very different. Also, at this kinematic point the decay is given in terms of only one form factor A0(0). For the ratio of the decay rates given by the E653 collaboration we show that the determination of the ratio of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix elements is consistent with that obtained from the unitarity constraint, though a new measurement by the E687 Collaboration is about two standard deviations too high. At present, though, the unitarity method still has greater accuracy. Since comparisons of the semileptonic decays into ρ and either electrons or muons will be available soon from the E791 Fermilab experiment, we also look at the massive muon case. We show that for a range of q2 the SU(3)F symmetry breaking is small even though the contributions of the various helicity amplitudes becomes more complicated. For B decays, the decay B-->K*ll¯ at q2=0 involves an extra form factor coming from the photon contribution and so is not amenable to the same kind of analysis, leaving only the decay B-->K*νν¯ as a possibility. As the mass of the decaying particle increases we note that the SU(3) symmetry becomes badly broken at q2=0.

  1. Analysis of beta-decay rates for Ag 108, Ba 133, Eu 152, Eu 154, Kr 85, Ra 226, and Sr 90, measured at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt from 1990 to 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Sturrock, P. A.; Fischbach, E.; Jenkins, J.

    2014-10-10

    We present the results of an analysis of measurements of the beta-decay rates of Ag 108, Ba 133, Eu 152, Eu 154, Kr 85, Ra 226, and Sr 90 acquired at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt from 1990 through 1995. Although the decay rates vary over a range of 165 to 1 and the measured detector current varies over a range of 19 to 1, the detrended and normalized count rate measurements exhibit a sinusoidal annual variation with amplitude in the small range 0.068%-0.088% (mean 0.081%, standard deviation 0.0072%, a rejection of the zero-amplitude hypothesis) and phase-of-maximum in the small range 0.062-0.083 (January 23 to January 30). In comparing these results with those of other related experiments that yield different results, it may be significant that this experiment, at a standards laboratory, seems to be unique in using a 4π detector. These results are compatible with a solar influence, and do not appear to be compatible with an experimental or environmental influence. It is possible that Ba 133 measurements are also subject to a non-solar (possibly cosmic) influence.

  2. Antenna size dependence of fluorescence decay in the core antenna of photosystem I: estimates of charge separation and energy transfer rates.

    PubMed Central

    Owens, T G; Webb, S P; Mets, L; Alberte, R S; Fleming, G R

    1987-01-01

    We have examined the photophysics of energy migration and trapping in photosystem I by investigating the spectral and temporal properties of the fluorescence from the core antenna chlorophylls as a function of the antenna size. Time-correlated single photon counting was used to determine the fluorescence lifetimes in the isolated P700 chlorophyll a-protein complex and in a mutant of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that lacks the photosystem II reaction center complex. The fluorescence decay in both types of sample is dominated by a fast (15-45 psec) component that is attributed to the lifetime of excitations in the photosystem I core antenna. These excitations decay primarily by an efficient photochemical quenching on P700. The measured lifetimes show a linear relationship to the core antenna size. A linear dependence of the excitation lifetime on antenna size was predicted previously in a lattice model for excitation migration and trapping in arrays of photosynthetic pigments [Pearlstein, R.M. (1982) Photochem. Photobiol. 35, 835-844]. Based on this model, our data predict a time constant for photochemical charge separation in the photosystem I reaction center of 2.8 +/- 0.7 or 3.4 +/- 0.7 psec, assuming monomeric or dimeric P700, respectively. The predicted average single-step transfer time for excitation transfer between core antenna pigments is 0.21 +/- 0.04 psec. Under these conditions, excitation migration in photosystem I is near the diffusion limit, with each excitation making an average of 2.4 visits to the reaction center before photoconversion. PMID:3550793

  3. Measurement of neutron capture on 136Xe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, J. B.; Daugherty, S. J.; Johnson, T. N.; O'Conner, T.; Kaufman, L. J.; Couture, A.; Ullmann, J. L.; Krtička, M.

    2016-09-01

    136Xe is a 0 ν β β decay candidate isotope, and is used in multiple experiments searching for this hypothetical decay mode. These experiments require precise information about neutron capture for their background characterization and minimization. Thermal and resonant neutron capture on 136Xe have been measured at the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. A neutron beam ranging from thermal energy to greater than 100 keV was incident on a gas cell filled with isotopically pure 136Xe. The relative neutron capture cross sections for neutrons at thermal energies and the first resonance at 2.154 keV have been measured, yielding a new absolute measurement of 0.238 ±0.019 b for the thermal neutron capture cross section. Additionally, the γ cascades for captures at both energies have been measured, and cascade models have been developed which may be used by 0 ν β β experiments using 136Xe.

  4. Localized pulses exhibiting a missilelike slow decay.

    PubMed

    Shaarawi, Amr M; Maged, Maha A; Besieris, Ioannis M; Hashish, Essam

    2006-08-01

    We investigate the quasi-missile behavior of known localized wave solutions, such as the modified power spectrum and splash pulses. We demonstrate that source-free localized waves can exhibit slow decay rates analogous to Wu's missile solutions, which are characterized by an amplitude decay rate slower than 1/R over an unlimited range. When excited from a finite aperture, the missilelike decay is not exhibited by all localized waves showing such behavior in the source-free situation. On the other hand, localized wave missiles generated from a finite aperture have peaks that exhibit quasi-missile decay. In an extended intermediate range between the near- and the far-field regions, these pulses decay at a rate slower than 1/R before switching to the usual 1/R decay.

  5. Localized pulses exhibiting a missilelike slow decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaarawi, Amr M.; Maged, Maha A.; Besieris, Ioannis M.; Hashish, Essam

    2006-08-01

    We investigate the quasi-missile behavior of known localized wave solutions, such as the modified power spectrum and splash pulses. We demonstrate that source-free localized waves can exhibit slow decay rates analogous to Wu's missile solutions, which are characterized by an amplitude decay rate slower than 1/R over an unlimited range. When excited from a finite aperture, the missilelike decay is not exhibited by all localized waves showing such behavior in the source-free situation. On the other hand, localized wave missiles generated from a finite aperture have peaks that exhibit quasi-missile decay. In an extended intermediate range between the near- and the far-field regions, these pulses decay at a rate slower than 1/R before switching to the usual 1/R decay.

  6. Semileptonic Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Luth, Vera G.; /SLAC

    2012-10-02

    The following is an overview of the measurements of the CKM matrix elements |V{sub cb}| and |V{sub ub}| that are based on detailed studies of semileptonic B decays by the BABAR and Belle Collaborations and major advances in QCD calculations. In addition, a new and improved measurement of the ratios R(D{sup (*)}) = {Beta}({bar B} {yields} D{sup (*)}{tau}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}})/{Beta}({bar B} {yields} D{sup (*)}{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}}) is presented. Here D{sup (*)} refers to a D or a D* meson and {ell} is either e or {mu}. The results, R(D) = 0.440 {+-} 0.058 {+-} 0.042 and R(D*) = 0.332 {+-} 0.024 {+-} 0.018, exceed the Standard Model expectations by 2.0{sigma} and 2.7{sigma}, respectively. Taken together, they disagree with these expectations at the 3.4{sigma} level. The excess of events cannot be explained by a charged Higgs boson in the type II two-Higgs-doublet model.

  7. Neutron captures and the r-process

    SciTech Connect

    Farouqi, K.; Kratz, K.-L.; Pfeiffer, B.; Rauscher, T.; Thielemann, F.-K.

    2006-03-13

    In order to study possible neutron-capture effects during an r-process, it is necessary to perform fully dynamical simulations. We have performed such calculations within the model of an adiabatically expanding high-entropy bubble of a SN II, using temperature-dependent reaction rates including the NON-SMOKER neutron-capture rates of Rauscher et al.

  8. Atomic alchemy: Weak decays of muonic and pionic atoms into other atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Greub, C.; Wyler, D.; Brodsky, S.J.; Munger, C.T.

    1995-10-01

    The rates of weak transitions between electromagnetic bound states, for example, ({pi}{sup +}{ital e}{sup {minus}}){r_arrow}({mu}{sup +}{ital e}{sup {minus}}){nu}{sub {mu}}, and the exclusive weak decay of a muonic atom into an electronic atom, ({ital Z}{mu}{sup {minus}}){r_arrow}({ital Ze}{sup {minus}}){nu}{sub {mu}}{bar {nu}}{sub {ital e}}, are calculated. For {ital Z}=80, relativistic effects are shown to increase the latter rate by a factor of 50 compared to the results of a nonrelativistic calculation. It is argued that the conditions for producing the muonic decay in neon gas ({ital Z}=10), where the branching ratio for the decay per captured muon is 1.7{times}10{sup {minus}9}, can be realized using cyclotron traps, though the prospect for a practical experiment seems remote. In lead the same ratio would be approximately {similar_to}1{times}10{sup {minus}6}. In addition to providing detailed information on the high momentum tail of the wave functions in atomic physics, these decays of QED bound states provide a simple toy model for investigating kinematically analogous situations in exclusive heavy hadronic decays in quantum chromodynamics, such as {ital B}{r_arrow}{ital K}{sup *}{gamma} or {ital B}{r_arrow}{pi}{ital e}{nu}.

  9. Competition between α and β decays for heavy deformed neutron-deficient Pa, U, Np, and Pu isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Dongdong; Ren, Zhongzhou

    2017-01-01

    The competition between α and β decays is investigated for neutron-deficient Pa, U, Np, and Pu isotopes. β+/electron-capture (EC) decay rates are calculated within the deformed quasiparticle random-phase approximation with realistic nucleon-nucleon (N N ) interactions. Contributions from allowed Gamow-Teller and Fermi transitions as well as first-forbidden transitions are considered. α -decay calculations are performed within the generalized density-dependent cluster model. Effects of differences between neutron and proton distributions and nuclear deformation are taken into account. In the calculations, Reid-93 N N interactions are used for β+/EC decays, while Michigan three-range Yukawa effective interactions, based on the G -matrix elements of Reid N N potentials, are used for α decay. The calculated β -decay half-lives show good agreement with the experimental data over a range of magnitude from 102 to 105 s. The resulting total half-lives including α and β contributions are found to be in good agreement with the experimental data, together with the α /β -decay branching ratios.

  10. Effect of acid-catalyzed formation rates of benzimidazole-linked polymers on porosity and selective CO2 capture from gas mixtures.

    PubMed

    Altarawneh, Suha; İslamoğlu, Timur; Sekizkardes, Ali Kemal; El-Kaderi, Hani M

    2015-04-07

    Benzimidazole-linked polymers (BILPs) are emerging candidates for gas storage and separation applications; however, their current synthetic methods offer limited control over textural properties which are vital for their multifaceted use. In this study, we investigate the impact of acid-catalyzed formation rates of the imidazole units on the porosity levels of BILPs and subsequent effects on CO2 and CH4 binding affinities and selective uptake of CO2 over CH4 and N2. Treatment of 3,3'-Diaminobenzidine tetrahydrochloride hydrate with 1,2,4,5-tetrakis(4-formylphenyl)benzene and 1,3,5-(4-formylphenyl)-benzene in anhydrous DMF afforded porous BILP-15 (448 m(2) g(-1)) and BILP-16 (435 m(2) g(-1)), respectively. Alternatively, the same polymers were prepared from the neutral 3,3'-Diaminobenzidine and catalytic amounts of aqueous HCl. The resulting polymers denoted BILP-15(AC) and BILP-16(AC) exhibited optimal surface areas; 862 m(2) g(-1) and 643 m(2) g(-1), respectively, only when 2 equiv of HCl (0.22 M) was used. In contrast, the CO2 binding affinity (Qst) dropped from 33.0 to 28.9 kJ mol(-1) for BILP-15 and from 32.0 to 31.6 kJ mol(-1) for BILP-16. According to initial slope calculations at 273 K/298 K, a notable change in CO2/N2 selectivity was observed for BILP-15(AC) (61/50) compared to BILP-15 (83/63). Similarly, ideal adsorbed solution theory (IAST) calculations also show the higher specific surface area of BILP-15(AC) and BILP-16(AC) compromises their CO2/N2 selectivity.

  11. Decay of correlation for random intermittent maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahsoun, Wael; Bose, Christopher; Duan, Yuejiao

    2014-07-01

    We study a class of random transformations built over finitely many intermittent maps sharing a common indifferent fixed point. Using a Young-tower technique, we show that the map with the fastest relaxation rate dominates the asymptotics. In particular, we prove that the rate of correlation decay for the annealed dynamics of the random map is the same as the sharp rate of correlation decay for the map with the fastest relaxation rate.

  12. Disintegration rate measurement of a 192Ir solution.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, K A; Koskinas, M F; Dias, M S

    2001-01-01

    The disintegration rate of 192Ir has been measured using the 4pibeta-gamma coincidence technique. This radionuclide decays by electron capture (EC) and beta-emission. Since the EC contribution is low (4.5%), it has been corrected using decay scheme data taken from the literature. This measurement has been performed in collaboration with the Laboratório Nacional de Metrologia das Radiações Ionizantes (IRDDM),