Science.gov

Sample records for capture negative ionization

  1. Detection of trace levels of triclopyr using capillary gas chromatography-electron-capture negative-ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Begley, P; Foulger, B E

    1988-04-01

    Triclopyr, after esterification, is shown to be a suitable candidate for detection by gas chromatography-electron-capture negative-ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry forming a characteristic carboxylate anion which offers a high detection sensitivity. A detection limit of 70 fg reaching the ionizer is indicated. Low backgrounds and an absence of chemical interferences are shown for vegetation extracts, using a simple method of extraction and derivatisation. A similar behaviour is demonstrated for 2,4-D and 2,4,5-T.

  2. Structural determination of zinc dithiophosphates in lubricating oils by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with electron impact and electron-capture negative ion chemical ionization.

    PubMed

    Becchi, M; Perret, F; Carraze, B; Beziau, J F; Michel, J P

    2001-01-05

    Pentafluorobenzyl ester derivatives were used to identify zinc dialkyldithiophosphates and diaryldithiophosphates antiwear engine oil additives by GC-electron impact ionization (EI) MS and GC-electron-capture negative ion chemical ionization (ECNCI) MS analysis. GC-EI-MS of the dialkyldithiophosphate-pentafluorobenzyl derivatives afforded characteristic fragment ions corresponding to the cleavage of one and two alkyl radicals. In most cases, information was only obtained on one alkyl chain. Additional and complete information was obtained with retention time indices using synthetic derivatives and with GC-ECNCI-MS analysis. ECNCI afforded characteristic dithiophosphate anions which allowed the determination of the total number of carbon atoms in the alkyl radicals. The diastereoisomer mixtures of 2-hydroxy-sec.-alkyl radicals were completely separated on GC analysis.

  3. Determination of the enantiomer fraction of PBB 149 by gas chromatography/electron capture negative ionization tandem mass spectrometry in the selected reaction monitoring mode.

    PubMed

    von der Recke, Roland; Mariussen, Espen; Berger, Urs; Götsch, Arntraut; Herzke, Dorte; Vetter, Walter

    2005-01-01

    Enantioselective determination of the atropisomers of 2,2',3,4',5',6-hexabromobiphenyl (PBB 149) in a purified sample from a bird egg was attempted in this work. By application of the classic method for PBB determination, i.e. gas chromatography coupled to electron capture negative ionization mass spectrometry (GC/ECNI-MS) using the bromide ions, the enantiomers interfered with another brominated compound. Subsequent measurements clarified that this interference did not occur in the mass chromatogram of the molecular ion of PBB 149. Therefore, a GC/ECNI tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) method was developed, based on the fragmentation of [M]-. A suitable precursor-product ion transition was found for m/z 627.5 --> 80 +/- 1.5, representing the most abundant ion trace of the molecular ion and the bromide ions. Optimization of the ion source temperature, the methane gas pressure, and the collision voltages resulted in a robust method that could solve the problem. Subsequent injections of a technical PBB product (Firemaster BP-6) resulted in the anticipated racemic proportion (enantiomer fraction (EF) = 0.50 +/- 0.02 (n = 8)). By contrast, the EF in the purified extract of a bird egg was found to be 0.42 +/- 0.02 (n = 10), indicative of a significant enantioenrichment of the second eluting atropisomer. Additional measurements were performed on a non-chiral column. These measurements allowed for the detection of 16 hexabromobiphenyls (hexa-BBs) in Firemaster BP-6. These comparisons verified that PBB 149 enantiomers did not interfere with an isomer that could falsify the enantiomer fraction in the sample. The novel method using GC/ECNI-MS/MS in the selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode was eight times more sensitive than application of conventional GC/ECNI-MS selected ion monitoring (SIM) analysis of the molecular ion.

  4. Mechanism of branching in negative ionization fronts.

    PubMed

    Arrayás, Manuel; Fontelos, Marco A; Trueba, José L

    2005-10-14

    When a strong electric field is applied to nonconducting matter, narrow channels of plasma called streamers may form. Branchlike patterns of streamers have been observed in anode directed discharges. We explain a mechanism for branching as the result of a balance between the destabilizing effect of impact ionization and the stabilizing effect of electron diffusion on ionization fronts. The dispersion relation for transversal perturbation of a planar negative front is obtained analytically when the ratio D between the electron diffusion coefficient and the intensity of the externally imposed electric field is small. We estimate the spacing lambda between streamers and deduce a scaling law lambda approximately D(1/3).

  5. Oxidative Ionization Under Certain Negative-Ion Mass Spectrometric Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Isra; Pavlov, Julius; Errabelli, Ramu; Attygalle, Athula B.

    2017-02-01

    1,4-Hydroquinone and several other phenolic compounds generate (M - 2) -• radical-anions, rather than deprotonated molecules, under certain negative-ion mass spectrometric conditions. In fact, spectra generated under helium-plasma ionization (HePI) conditions from 1,4-hydroquinone and 1,4-benzoquinone (by electron capture) were practically indistinguishable. Because this process involves a net loss of H• and H+, it can be termed oxidative ionization. The superoxide radical-anion (O2 -•), known to be present in many atmospheric-pressure plasma ion sources operated in the negative mode, plays a critical role in the oxidative ionization process. The presence of a small peak at m/z 142 in the spectrum of 1,4-hydroquinone, but not in that of 1,4-benzoquinone, indicated that the initial step in the oxidative ionization process is the formation of an O2 -• adduct. On the other hand, under bona fide electrospray ionization (ESI) conditions, 1,4-hydroquinone generates predominantly an (M - 1) - ion. It is known that at sufficiently high capillary voltages, corona discharges begin to occur even in an ESI source. At lower ESI capillary voltages, deprotonation predominates; as the capillary voltage is raised, the abundance of O2 -• present in the plasma increases, and the source in turn increasingly behaves as a composite ESI/APCI source. While maintaining post-ionization ion activation to a minimum (to prevent fragmentation), and monitoring the relative intensities of the m/z 109 (due to deprotonation) and 108 (oxidative ionization) peaks recorded from 1,4-hydroquinone, a semiquantitative estimation of the APCI contribution to the overall ion-generation process can be obtained.

  6. Oxidative Ionization Under Certain Negative-Ion Mass Spectrometric Conditions.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Isra; Pavlov, Julius; Errabelli, Ramu; Attygalle, Athula B

    2017-02-01

    1,4-Hydroquinone and several other phenolic compounds generate (M - 2) (-•) radical-anions, rather than deprotonated molecules, under certain negative-ion mass spectrometric conditions. In fact, spectra generated under helium-plasma ionization (HePI) conditions from 1,4-hydroquinone and 1,4-benzoquinone (by electron capture) were practically indistinguishable. Because this process involves a net loss of H(•) and H(+), it can be termed oxidative ionization. The superoxide radical-anion (O2(-•)), known to be present in many atmospheric-pressure plasma ion sources operated in the negative mode, plays a critical role in the oxidative ionization process. The presence of a small peak at m/z 142 in the spectrum of 1,4-hydroquinone, but not in that of 1,4-benzoquinone, indicated that the initial step in the oxidative ionization process is the formation of an O2(-•) adduct. On the other hand, under bona fide electrospray ionization (ESI) conditions, 1,4-hydroquinone generates predominantly an (M - 1) (-) ion. It is known that at sufficiently high capillary voltages, corona discharges begin to occur even in an ESI source. At lower ESI capillary voltages, deprotonation predominates; as the capillary voltage is raised, the abundance of O2(-•) present in the plasma increases, and the source in turn increasingly behaves as a composite ESI/APCI source. While maintaining post-ionization ion activation to a minimum (to prevent fragmentation), and monitoring the relative intensities of the m/z 109 (due to deprotonation) and 108 (oxidative ionization) peaks recorded from 1,4-hydroquinone, a semiquantitative estimation of the APCI contribution to the overall ion-generation process can be obtained. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  7. Capillary atmospheric pressure electron capture ionization (cAPECI): a highly efficient ionization method for nitroaromatic compounds.

    PubMed

    Derpmann, Valerie; Mueller, David; Bejan, Iustinian; Sonderfeld, Hannah; Wilberscheid, Sonja; Koppmann, Ralf; Brockmann, Klaus J; Benter, Thorsten

    2014-03-01

    We report on a novel method for atmospheric pressure ionization of compounds with elevated electron affinity (e.g., nitroaromatic compounds) or gas phase acidity (e.g., phenols), respectively. The method is based on the generation of thermal electrons by the photo-electric effect, followed by electron capture of oxygen when air is the gas matrix yielding O2(-) or of the analyte directly with nitrogen as matrix. Charge transfer or proton abstraction by O2(-) leads to the ionization of the analytes. The interaction of UV-light with metals is a clean method for the generation of thermal electrons at atmospheric pressure. Furthermore, only negative ions are generated and neutral radical formation is minimized, in contrast to discharge- or dopant assisted methods. Ionization takes place inside the transfer capillary of the mass spectrometer leading to comparably short transfer times of ions to the high vacuum region of the mass spectrometer. This strongly reduces ion transformation processes, resulting in mass spectra that more closely relate to the neutral analyte distribution. cAPECI is thus a soft and selective ionization method with detection limits in the pptV range. In comparison to standard ionization methods (e.g., PTR), cAPECI is superior with respect to both selectivity and achievable detection limits. cAPECI demonstrates to be a promising ionization method for applications in relevant fields as, for example, explosives detection and atmospheric chemistry.

  8. Simulation of the Partially Ionized Negative Hydrogen Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averkin, Sergey; Gatsonis, Nikolaos; Olson, Lynn

    2012-10-01

    A High Pressure Discharge Negative Ion Source (HPDNIS) operating on hydrogen is been under investigation. The Negative Ion Production (NIP) section of the HPDNIS attaches to the 10-100 Torr RF-discharge chamber with a micronozzle and ends with a grid that extracts the negative ion beam. The partially ionized and reacting plasma flow in the NIP section is simulated using an unstructured three-dimensional Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (U3DSMC) code. The NIP section contains a low-pressure plasma that includes H2, vibrationally-rotationally excited H2^*, negative hydrogen atoms H^-, and electrons. Primary reactions in the NIP section are dissociate attachment, H2^*+e->H^0+H^-and electron collisional detachment, e+H^-->H+2e. The U3DSMC computational domain includes the entrance to the NIP nozzle and the extraction grid at the exit. The flow parameters at the entrance are based on conditions in the RF-discharge chamber and are implemented in U3DSMC using a Kinetic-Moment subsonic boundary conditions method. Neutral--neutral, ion-neutral, Coulomb collisions and charge-neutralizing collisions are implemented in U3DSMC using the no time counter method, electron-molecule collisions are treated by the constant timestep method. Simulations cover the regime of operation of the HPDNIS and examine the flow characteristics inside the NIP section.

  9. Multiple ionization and capture in relativistic heavy-ion atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Meyerhof, W.E.; Anholt, R.; Xu, Xiang-Yuan; Gould, H.; Feinberg, B.; McDonald, R.J.; Wegner, H.E.; Thieberger, P.

    1987-02-01

    We show that in relativistic heavy-ion collisions the independent electron model can be used to predict cross sections for multiple inner-shell ionization and capture in a single collision. Charge distributions of 82- to 200-MeV/amu Xe and 105- to 955-MeV/amu U ion beams emerging from thin solid targets were used to obtain single- and multiple-electron stripping and capture cross sections. The probabilities of stripping electrons from the K, L, or M shells were calculated using the semiclassical approximation and Dirac hydrogenic wavefunctions. For capture, a simplified model for electron capture was uded. The data generally agree with theory.

  10. Electron capture and single ionization in H+ + Ar collisions: classical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frémont, F.

    2016-03-01

    A classical model is used to study electron capture and single ionization (SI) following H+ + Ar collisions at projectile energies varying from 400 to 40 keV. In the present model, the Ar electrons are treated independently from each other, and only the 3s and 3p electrons are supposed to be captured by the projectile. In addition, a Coulombic potential with an effective charge Z eff = 6.75, derived from Slater rules, is used in the calculations to simulate the screening of the Ar nucleus due to the presence of the core and 2l electrons. Total cross sections for single electron capture and SI are calculated and compared with previous experiments and earlier calculations based on a semiclassical approach. The reasonable agreement we observed allows a preliminary study of double electron capture (DC). The total cross section for DC is found to be much larger than the experimental one. Possible reasons for this disagreement are discussed.

  11. Comparison of Internal Energy Distributions of Ions Created by Electrospray Ionization and Laser Ablation-Liquid Vortex Capture-Electrospray Ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Cahill, John F.; Kertesz, Vilmos; Ovchinnikova, Olga S.; Van Berkel, Gary J.

    2015-06-27

    Recently a number of techniques have combined laser ablation with liquid capture for mass spectrometry spot sampling and imaging applications. The newly developed non-contact liquid-vortex capture probe has been used to efficiently collect 355 nm UV laser ablated material in a continuous flow solvent stream in which the captured material dissolves and then undergoes electrospray ionization. This sampling and ionization approach has produced what appear to be classic electrospray ionization spectra; however, the softness of this sampling/ionization process versus simple electrospray ionization has not been definitely determined. A series of benzlypyridinium salts, known as thermometer ions, were used to compare internal energy distributions between electrospray ionization and the UV laser ablation liquid-vortex capture probe electrospray combination. Measured internal energy distributions were identical between the two techniques, even with differences in laser fluence (0.7-3.1 J cm-2) and when using UV-absorbing or non-UV-absorbing sample substrates. This data indicates ions formed directly by UV laser ablation, if any, are likely an extremely small constituent of the total ion signal observed. Instead, neutral molecules, clusters or particulates ejected from the surface during laser ablation, subsequently captured and dissolved in the flowing solvent stream then electrosprayed are the predominant source of ion signal observed. The electrospray ionization process used controls the softness of the technique.

  12. Comparison of Internal Energy Distributions of Ions Created by Electrospray Ionization and Laser Ablation-Liquid Vortex Capture-Electrospray Ionization

    DOE PAGES

    Cahill, John F.; Kertesz, Vilmos; Ovchinnikova, Olga S.; ...

    2015-06-27

    Recently a number of techniques have combined laser ablation with liquid capture for mass spectrometry spot sampling and imaging applications. The newly developed non-contact liquid-vortex capture probe has been used to efficiently collect 355 nm UV laser ablated material in a continuous flow solvent stream in which the captured material dissolves and then undergoes electrospray ionization. This sampling and ionization approach has produced what appear to be classic electrospray ionization spectra; however, the softness of this sampling/ionization process versus simple electrospray ionization has not been definitely determined. A series of benzlypyridinium salts, known as thermometer ions, were used to comparemore » internal energy distributions between electrospray ionization and the UV laser ablation liquid-vortex capture probe electrospray combination. Measured internal energy distributions were identical between the two techniques, even with differences in laser fluence (0.7-3.1 J cm-2) and when using UV-absorbing or non-UV-absorbing sample substrates. This data indicates ions formed directly by UV laser ablation, if any, are likely an extremely small constituent of the total ion signal observed. Instead, neutral molecules, clusters or particulates ejected from the surface during laser ablation, subsequently captured and dissolved in the flowing solvent stream then electrosprayed are the predominant source of ion signal observed. The electrospray ionization process used controls the softness of the technique.« less

  13. Unexplained features of capture and ionization for ion-aligned-Rydberg-atom collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perumal, A. N.; Tripathi, D. N.

    2001-10-01

    Observed but unexplained features, namely, oscillations in the capture cross sections and an unexpected increase in the ionization cross sections at lower velocities, are discussed using classical trajectory Monte Carlo simulated results for ion-aligned-Rydberg-atom collisions. The initial alignment (m=0, 1, and 2) dependence of the cross sections shows evidence of ``capture through quasimolecular ion formation,'' identified as the most likely cause for the oscillations. Spatial overlap, in addition to the velocity matching mechanism, is shown to play an important role in the collision process. The unexpected rise in the ionization cross section toward lower reduced velocities is explained qualitatively in terms of the multiple encounter model [Perumal and Tripathi, Nucl. Instrum. Methods B 143, 429 (1998)].

  14. Serum total testosterone: immunoassay compared with negative chemical ionization gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, R L; Herold, D A

    1996-05-01

    We have developed an electron capture negative chemical ionization gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) procedure to quantify serum testosterone in the clinically relevant range 0.69-69.3 nmol/L and used this procedure to assess Ciba Corning Diagnostics ACS:180 testosterone immunoassay. The GC-MS method involves liquid-liquid extraction of serum samples and synthesis of a pentafluorobenzyloxime/silyl ether derivative of testosterone with excellent chromatographic and electron capturing properties. The ACS testosterone assay is the first fully automated nonradioactive testosterone immunoassay approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. Patients' specimens (101, 57 males, 44 females) were analyzed by both techniques. A plot of the GC-MS (x) vs ACS (y) testosterone concentrations for men was linear (y = 1.07x + 0.19 nmol/L), showing excellent correlation (r2 = 0.98) between the two assays. Agreement of the two assays for female specimens was poor (y = 0.72x + 1.2 nmol/L), with a poor correlation (r2 = 0.31).

  15. Coincidence studies of capture and ionization in highly charged Iq+-He and Uq+-He collisions at medium velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datz, S.; Hippler, R.; Andersen, L. H.; Dittner, P. F.; Knudsen, H.; Krause, H. F.; Miller, P. D.; Pepmiller, P. L.; Rosseel, T.; Schuch, R.; Stolterfoht, N.; Yamazaki, Y.; Vane, C. R.

    1990-04-01

    Electron capture and ionization processes were investigated for Iq+-He and Uq+-He collisions at incident energies 0.1-1.0 MeV/nucleon and for incident charge states q=5-44. Cross sections for single-electron capture, transfer ionization, single ionization, and double ionization were obtained using a projectile-ion recoil-ion coincidence technique. A pronounced interplay among the different electronic processes was observed. Cross sections for single ionization show a rather weak charge-state dependence, in disagreement with recent calculations of McKenzie and Olson [Phys. Rev. A 35, 2863 (1987)]. In a second experiment, photon recoil-ion coincidences were measured to obtain partial cross sections for capture into certain projectile n states. These measurements provide strong evidence that transfer ionization populates lower projectile n states than does single-electron capture. Zero-degree electron spectroscopy, coincident with charge capture for 0.5 MeV/nucleon U30+ projectiles revealed that the free electron in transfer ionization is released from the projectile to its continuum and from high-lying Rydberg states of the projectile.

  16. A Benign, Low Z Electron Capture Agent for Negative Ion TPCs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martoff, C. J.; Dion, M. P.; Hosack, M.; Barton, D.; Black, J. K.

    2008-01-01

    We have identified nitromethane (CH3NO2) as an effective electron capture agent for negative ion TPCs (NITPCs). We present drift velocity and longitudinal diffusion measurements for negative ion gas mixtures using nitromethane as the capture agent. Not only is nitromethane substantially more benign than the only other identified capture agent, CS2, but its low atomic number will enable the use of the NITPC as a photoelectric X-ray polarimeter in the 1-10 keV band.

  17. Single ionization and capture cross sections from biological molecules by bare projectile impact*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinto, Michele A.; Monti, Juan M.; Montenegro, Pablo D.; Fojón, Omar A.; Champion, Christophe; Rivarola, Roberto D.

    2017-02-01

    We report calculations on single differential and total cross sections for single ionization and single electron capture from biological targets, namely, vapor water and DNA nucleobasese molecules, by bare projectile impact: H+, He2+, and C6+. They are performed within the Continuum Distorted Wave - Eikonal Initial State approximation and compared to several existing experimental data. This study is oriented to the obtention of a reliable set of theoretical data to be used as input in a Monte Carlo code destined to micro- and nano- dosimetry.

  18. The effect of negative air ionization on the growth of four generations of laboratory rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinsull, S. M.; Bellamy, D.; Head, E. L.

    1984-06-01

    Initial work indicated an inhibition of pre-weaning growth in the first generation of rats born and raised at high negative ion levels. This effect, however, was not carried through to the successive generations. Negative ionization had little apparent effect on post-weaning growth throughout the four generations studied.

  19. Fully Automated Laser Ablation Liquid Capture Sample Analysis using NanoElectrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, Matthias; Ovchinnikova, Olga S; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2014-01-01

    RATIONALE: Laser ablation provides for the possibility of sampling a large variety of surfaces with high spatial resolution. This type of sampling when employed in conjunction with liquid capture followed by nanoelectrospray ionization provides the opportunity for sensitive and prolonged interrogation of samples by mass spectrometry as well as the ability to analyze surfaces not amenable to direct liquid extraction. METHODS: A fully automated, reflection geometry, laser ablation liquid capture spot sampling system was achieved by incorporating appropriate laser fiber optics and a focusing lens into a commercially available, liquid extraction surface analysis (LESA ) ready Advion TriVersa NanoMate system. RESULTS: Under optimized conditions about 10% of laser ablated material could be captured in a droplet positioned vertically over the ablation region using the NanoMate robot controlled pipette. The sampling spot size area with this laser ablation liquid capture surface analysis (LA/LCSA) mode of operation (typically about 120 m x 160 m) was approximately 50 times smaller than that achievable by direct liquid extraction using LESA (ca. 1 mm diameter liquid extraction spot). The set-up was successfully applied for the analysis of ink on glass and paper as well as the endogenous components in Alstroemeria Yellow King flower petals. In a second mode of operation with a comparable sampling spot size, termed laser ablation/LESA , the laser system was used to drill through, penetrate, or otherwise expose material beneath a solvent resistant surface. Once drilled, LESA was effective in sampling soluble material exposed at that location on the surface. CONCLUSIONS: Incorporating the capability for different laser ablation liquid capture spot sampling modes of operation into a LESA ready Advion TriVersa NanoMate enhanced the spot sampling spatial resolution of this device and broadened the surface types amenable to analysis to include absorbent and solvent resistant

  20. Functionalized magnetic iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles for capturing gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Reddy, P Muralidhar; Chang, Kai-Chih; Liu, Zhen-Jun; Chen, Cheng-Tung; Ho, Yen-Peng

    2014-08-01

    The development of nanotechnology in biology and medicine has raised the need for conjugation of nanoparticles (NPs) to biomolecules. In this study, magnetic and functionalized magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles were synthesized and used as affinity probes to capture Gram-positive/negative bacteria. The morphology and properties of the magnetic NPs were examined by transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and zeta potential measurements. Furthermore, this study investigated the interaction between functionalized magnetic nanoparticles and Gram positive/negative bacteria. The positively and negatively charged magnetic nanoparticles include functionalities of Fe3O4, SiO2, TiO2, ZrO2, poly ethyleneimine (PEI) and poly acrylic acid. Their capture efficiencies for bacteria were investigated based on factors such as zeta potential, concentration and pH value. PEI particles carry a positive charge over a range of pH values from 3 to 10, and the particles were found to be an excellent candidate for capturing bacteria over such pH range. Since the binding force is mainly electrostatic, the architecture and orientation of the functional groups on the NP surface are not critical. Finally the captured bacteria were analyzed using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry. The minimum detection limit was 10(4) CFU/mL and the analysis time was reduced to be less than 1 hour. In addition, the detection limit could be reduced to an extremely low concentration of 50 CFU/mL when captured bacteria were cultivated.

  1. Cross sections of electron capture and electron capture with ionization of argon atoms by fast 3He2+ ions at various impact parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afrosimov, V. V.; Basalaev, A. A.; Panov, M. N.

    2017-01-01

    The absolute differential cross sections of scattering of fast particles formed in processes with capture of one or two electrons from Ar atoms have been measured for 6-keV He2+ ions in the interval of scattering angles within 0°-2.5°. The cross sections of electron capture and electron capture with ionization have been determined as functions of the impact parameter. The probabilities of these processes are compared to the distribution of electron density in various shells of target atoms. Applicability of the models of screened Coulomb interaction potentials to description of the scattering of recharged particles is assessed.

  2. Atmospheric CO2 capture by algae: Negative carbon dioxide emission path.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Diana; Pires, José C M

    2016-09-01

    Carbon dioxide is one of the most important greenhouse gas, which concentration increase in the atmosphere is associated to climate change and global warming. Besides CO2 capture in large emission point sources, the capture of this pollutant from atmosphere may be required due to significant contribution of diffuse sources. The technologies that remove CO2 from atmosphere (creating a negative balance of CO2) are called negative emission technologies. Bioenergy with Carbon Capture and Storage may play an important role for CO2 mitigation. It represents the combination of bioenergy production and carbon capture and storage, keeping carbon dioxide in geological reservoirs. Algae have a high potential as the source of biomass, as they present high photosynthetic efficiencies and high biomass yields. Their biomass has a wide range of applications, which can improve the economic viability of the process. Thus, this paper aims to assess the atmospheric CO2 capture by algal cultures.

  3. An Ultra-Trace Analysis Technique for SF6 Using Gas Chromatography with Negative Ion Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jong, Edmund C; Macek, Paul V; Perera, Inoka E; Luxbacher, Kray D; McNair, Harold M

    2015-07-01

    Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) is widely used as a tracer gas because of its detectability at low concentrations. This attribute of SF6 allows the quantification of both small-scale flows, such as leakage, and large-scale flows, such as atmospheric currents. SF6's high detection sensitivity also facilitates greater usage efficiency and lower operating cost for tracer deployments by reducing quantity requirements. The detectability of SF6 is produced by its high molecular electronegativity. This property provides a high potential for negative ion formation through electron capture thus naturally translating to selective detection using negative ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry (NCI-MS). This paper investigates the potential of using gas chromatography (GC) with NCI-MS for the detection of SF6. The experimental parameters for an ultra-trace SF6 detection method utilizing minimal customizations of the analytical instrument are detailed. A method for the detection of parts per trillion (ppt) level concentrations of SF6 for the purpose of underground ventilation tracer gas analysis was successfully developed in this study. The method utilized a Shimadzu gas chromatography with negative ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry system equipped with an Agilent J&W HP-porous layer open tubular column coated with an alumina oxide (Al2O3) S column. The method detection limit (MDL) analysis as defined by the Environmental Protection Agency of the tracer data showed the method MDL to be 5.2 ppt.

  4. ELECTRON AFFINITIES OF POLYNUCLEAR AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS AND NEGATIVE ION CHEMICAL IONIZATION SENSITIVITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Negative-ion chemical-ionization mass spectrometry (NICI MS) has the potential to be a very useful technique in identifying various polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in soil and sediment samples. Some PAHs give much stronger signals under NICI MS conditions than others. On ...

  5. Biomolecular analysis and cancer diagnostics by negative mode probe electrospray ionization.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Mridul Kanti; Saha, Subhrakanti; Yoshimura, Kentaro; Shida, Yasuo; Takeda, Sen; Nonami, Hiroshi; Hiraoka, Kenzo

    2013-03-21

    We have examined several combinations of solvents and probes with the aim of optimizing the ionization conditions for biomolecules e.g., proteins, peptides and lipids by negative mode probe electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (PESI-MS). With the data presented in this study, negative-mode PESI-MS can be considered as a potential tool for biomolecular analysis and cancer diagnostics because of its simplicity in instrumental configuration. A sharper sampling probe was found to be better for obtaining high quality mass spectra because it can generate stable electrospray without the occurrence of gas breakdown. Although the best conditions may depend on each sample, aqueous organic solvent solutions, especially isopropanol-H(2)O (1/1) with a pH of ≥7, are shown to be preferable for negative-mode PESI-MS, which was successfully applied to colon cancer diagnosis.

  6. Electron capture by U(91+) and U(92+) and ionization of U(90+) and U(91+)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gould, H.; Greiner, D.; Lindstrom, P.; Symons, T. J. M.; Crawford, H.

    1984-01-01

    U(92+)/U(91+) and U(91+)/U(90+) electron-capture and ionization cross sections and equilibrium charge-state distributions are measured experimentally in mylar, Cu and Ta of varying thickness. Relativistic U(68+) ions at 437 or 962 MeV/nucleon are produced by a heavy-ion linear accelerator and synchrotron in tandem and passed through the target material into a magnetic specrometer and position-sensitive proportional counter for evaluation of charge states. The results are presented graphically and discussed. At 962 MeV/nucleon, beams containing 85 percent bare U(92+) nuclei are obtained using 150-mg/sq cm Cu or 85-mg/sq cm Ta; at 437 MeV/nucleon, 50 percent bare U(92+) nuclei are obtained with 90-mg/sq cm Cu. The techniques decribed can be applied to produce beams of bare U nuclei for acceleration to ultrarelativistic speeds or beams of few-electron U for atomic-physics experiments on quantum electrodynamics.

  7. The influence of negative ionization of the air on motor activity in Syrian hamsters ( Masocricetus auratus Waterhouse) in light conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenkiewicz, Zofia; Dabrowska, Barbara; Schiffer, Zofia

    1989-12-01

    The motor activity of Syrian hamsters ( Mesocricetus auratus Waterhouse) under the influence of negative ionization of the atmosphere applied for 10, 20 or 30 min per day was investigated. An ionizer with output of 14000 light negative ions per 1 cm3 of air was used. Studies carried out in the light phase of a 12∶12 h light/dark regime revealed a relation between the reaction of the animal and the time of day at which ionization was applied. Ionization for 20 or 30 min in the light phase decreased motor activity, while 10 min of ionization increased it compared to control animals. Ionization in the dark phase gave a more distinct rise in activity than that applied in the light phase for all three durations of ionization.

  8. Negative air ionization improves memory and attention in learning-disabled and mentally retarded children.

    PubMed

    Morton, L L; Kershner, J R

    1984-06-01

    The effect of increased concentrations of ambient negative air ions on incidental visual memory for words and purposive auditory memory for dichotic digits was investigated in 20 normal grade 4 children, 8 learning-disabled children, and 8 mildly mentally retarded children. Half in each group were assigned randomly to an unmodified air-placebo condition under double-blind testing procedures. All of the children breathing negatively ionized air were superior in incidental memory. In dichotic listening, the negative ions produced a counter-priming effect in the two learning-impaired groups, offsetting the difficulties that they showed under placebo in switching attention selectively from one ear to the other. The action of negative ions on the neurotransmitter, serotonin, may be the mechanism by which negative ions produce such behavioral effects. In view of the important environmental and remedial implications of these novel findings, interpretations should be made cautiously pending larger-scale replications.

  9. Rapid differentiation of refined fuels using negative electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rostad, C.E.; Hostettler, F.D.

    2005-01-01

    Negative electrospray ionization/MS enabled rapid, specific, and selective screening for unique polar components at parts per million concentrations in commercial hydrocarbon products without extensive sample preparation, separation, chromatography, or quantitation. Commercial fuel types were analyzed with this method, including kerosene, jet fuel, white gas, charcoal lighter fluid, on-road and off-road diesel fuels, and various grades and brands of gasolines. The different types of fuels produced unique and relatively simple spectra. These analyses were then applied to hydrocarbon samples from a large, long-term fuel spill. Although the alkane, isoprenoid, and alkylcyclohexane portions began to biodegrade or weather, the polar components in these samples remained relatively unchanged. The type of fuel involved was readily identified by negative electrospray ionization/MS. This is an abstract of a paper presented at the 230th ACS National Meeting (Washington, DC 8/28/2005-9/1/2005).

  10. A new concept positive (negative) surface ionization source for RIB applications

    SciTech Connect

    Alton, G.D.; Welton, R.F.; Cui, B.

    1996-12-31

    A versatile, new concept, spherical-geometry, positive (negative) surface-ionization source has been designed. fabricated, and tests completed which can operate in either positive- or negative-ion beam generation modes without mechanical changes to the source. The highly permeable, composite Ir/C has an intrinsic work function of 0 = 5.29 eV and can be used directly for the generation of positive-ion beams of highly electropositive elements. For negative-surface ionization, the work function is lowered by dynamic flow of a highly electropositive adsorbate such as Cs through the ionizer matrix. The results of initial testing indicate that the source is reliable, stable and easy to operate, with efficiencies for Cs{sup +} estimated to exceed 60% and as high as {approximately}50% for F{sup -} generation. The design features, operational principles, and initial performance of the source for generating Cs{sup +} and F{sup -}, when operated with Cs, are discussed in this article.

  11. 20-150-keV proton-impact-induced ionization of uracil: Fragmentation ratios and branching ratios for electron capture and direct ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Tabet, J.; Eden, S.; Feil, S.; Abdoul-Carime, H.; Farizon, B.; Farizon, M.; Ouaskit, S.; Maerk, T. D.

    2010-01-15

    Fragmentation ratios and branching ratios are measured for ionization and dissociative ionization for 20-150 keV (0.9-2.4v{sub 0}) proton collisions with gas-phase uracil molecules. Through event-by-event determination of the postcollision projectile charge, it is possible for such a key biomolecule to distinguish between electron capture (EC) by the incident proton and direct ionization (DI) without projectile neutralization. While the same fragment ion groups are observed in the mass spectra for both processes, EC induces dissociation with greater efficiency than DI in the impact energy range of 35-150 keV (1.2-2.4v{sub 0}). In this range EC is also less abundant than DI with a branching ratio for EC/total ionization of <50%. Moreover, whereas fragmentation ratios do not change with energy in the case of EC, DI mass spectra show a tendency for increased fragmentation at lower impact energies.

  12. Upper-Room Ultraviolet Light and Negative Air Ionization to Prevent Tuberculosis Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Escombe, A. Roderick; Moore, David A. J; Gilman, Robert H; Navincopa, Marcos; Ticona, Eduardo; Mitchell, Bailey; Noakes, Catherine; Martínez, Carlos; Sheen, Patricia; Ramirez, Rocio; Quino, Willi; Gonzalez, Armando; Friedland, Jon S; Evans, Carlton A

    2009-01-01

    Background Institutional tuberculosis (TB) transmission is an important public health problem highlighted by the HIV/AIDS pandemic and the emergence of multidrug- and extensively drug-resistant TB. Effective TB infection control measures are urgently needed. We evaluated the efficacy of upper-room ultraviolet (UV) lights and negative air ionization for preventing airborne TB transmission using a guinea pig air-sampling model to measure the TB infectiousness of ward air. Methods and Findings For 535 consecutive days, exhaust air from an HIV-TB ward in Lima, Perú, was passed through three guinea pig air-sampling enclosures each housing approximately 150 guinea pigs, using a 2-d cycle. On UV-off days, ward air passed in parallel through a control animal enclosure and a similar enclosure containing negative ionizers. On UV-on days, UV lights and mixing fans were turned on in the ward, and a third animal enclosure alone received ward air. TB infection in guinea pigs was defined by monthly tuberculin skin tests. All guinea pigs underwent autopsy to test for TB disease, defined by characteristic autopsy changes or by the culture of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from organs. 35% (106/304) of guinea pigs in the control group developed TB infection, and this was reduced to 14% (43/303) by ionizers, and to 9.5% (29/307) by UV lights (both p < 0.0001 compared with the control group). TB disease was confirmed in 8.6% (26/304) of control group animals, and this was reduced to 4.3% (13/303) by ionizers, and to 3.6% (11/307) by UV lights (both p < 0.03 compared with the control group). Time-to-event analysis demonstrated that TB infection was prevented by ionizers (log-rank 27; p < 0.0001) and by UV lights (log-rank 46; p < 0.0001). Time-to-event analysis also demonstrated that TB disease was prevented by ionizers (log-rank 3.7; p = 0.055) and by UV lights (log-rank 5.4; p = 0.02). An alternative analysis using an airborne infection model demonstrated that ionizers prevented 60% of

  13. A Negative-Surface Ionization for Generation of Halogen Radioactive Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Zaim, H.

    2001-04-16

    A simple and efficient negative surface ionization source has been designed, fabricated and initially tested for on-line generation of radioactive ion beams of the halogens (Cl, Br, I, and At) for use in the nuclear-structure and nuclear-astrophysics research programs at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility. The source utilizes a solid, spherical geometry LaB{sub 6} surface ionizer for forming highly electronegative atoms and molecules. Despite its widely publicized propensity for being easily poisoned, no evidences of this effect were experienced during testing of the source. Nominal efficiencies of 15% for Br{sup {minus}} beam generation were obtained during off-line evaluation of the source with AlBr3 feed material when account is taken of the fractional dissociation of the molecule. Principles of operation, design features, operational parameter data, initial performance results, and beam quality data (emittance) are presented in this article.

  14. Feasibility study of nuclear transmutation by negative muon capture reaction using the PHITS code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Shin-ichiro; Sato, Tatsuhiko

    2016-06-01

    Feasibility of nuclear transmutation of fission products in high-level radioactive waste by negative muon capture reaction is investigated using the Particle and Heave Ion Transport code System (PHITS). It is found that about 80 % of stopped negative muons contribute to transmute target nuclide into stable or short-lived nuclide in the case of 135Cs, which is one of the most important nuclide in the transmutation. The simulation result also indicates that the position of transmutation is controllable by changing the energy of incident negative muon. Based on our simulation, it takes approximately 8.5 × 108years to transmute 500 g of 135Cs by negative muon beam with the highest intensity currently available.

  15. Rapid differentiation of refined fuels using negative electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rostad, C.E.; Hostettler, F.D.

    2005-01-01

    An application of electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry for identification of various commercially refined fuels using the unique signature of polar components, was investigated. The samples were analyzed by mass spectrometry using negative electrospray on an Agilent Series 1100 liquid chromatograph/mass spectrometer. These analysis were applied to hydrocarbon samples from a large, long-term fuel spill which were taken from the subsurface and different extent of biodegradation or weathering. The technique provided rapid identification of hydrocarbons released into the environment because these polar compounds are unique in different fuels.

  16. Ionization Efficiency of Doubly Charged Ions Formed from Polyprotic Acids in Electrospray Negative Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liigand, Piia; Kaupmees, Karl; Kruve, Anneli

    2016-07-01

    The ability of polyprotic acids to give doubly charged ions in negative mode electrospray was studied and related to physicochemical properties of the acids via linear discriminant analysis (LDA). It was discovered that the compound has to be strongly acidic (low p K a1 and p K a2) and to have high hydrophobicity (log P ow) to become multiply charged. Ability to give multiply charged ions in ESI/MS cannot be directly predicted from the solution phase acidities. Therefore, for the first time, a quantitative model to predict the charge state of the analyte in ESI/MS is proposed and validated for small anions. Also, a model to predict ionization efficiencies of these analytes was developed. Results indicate that acidity of the analyte, its octanol-water partition coefficient, and charge delocalization are important factors that influence ionization efficiencies as well as charge states of the analytes. The pH of the solvent was also found to be an important factor influencing the ionization efficiency of doubly charged ions.

  17. The Effect of Salts on Electrospray Ionization of Amino Acids in the Negative Mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, H. I.; Johnson, P. V.; Beegle, L. W.; Kanik, I.

    2004-01-01

    The continued search for organics on Mars will require the development of simplified procedures for handling and processing of soil or rock core samples prior to analysis by onboard instrumentation. Extraction of certain organic molecules such as amino acids from rock and soil samples using a liquid solvent (H2O) has been shown to be more efficient (by approximately an order of magnitude) than heat extraction methods. As such, liquid extraction (using H2O) of amino acid molecules from rock cores or regolith material is a prime candidate for the required processing. In this scenario, electrospray ionization (ESI) of the liquid extract would be a natural choice for ionization of the analyte prior to interrogation by one of a variety of potential analytical separation techniques (mass spectroscopy, ion mobility spectroscopy, etc.). Aside from the obvious compatibility of ESI and liquid samples, ESI offers simplicity and a soft ionization capability. In order to demonstrate that liquid extraction and ESI can work as part of an in situ instrument on Mars, we must better understand and quantify the effect salts have on the ESI process. In the current work, we have endeavored to investigate the feasibility and limitations of negative mode ESI of Martian surface samples in the context of sample salt content using ion mobility spectroscopy (IMS).

  18. Distracted by pleasure: Effects of positive versus negative valence on emotional capture under load.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rashmi; Hur, Young-Jin; Lavie, Nilli

    2016-04-01

    We report 3 experiments examining the effects of positive versus negative valence and perceptual load in determining attention capture by irrelevant emotional distractors. Participants performed a letter search task searching for 1 of 2 target letters (X or N) in conditions of either low perceptual load (circular nontarget letters) or high perceptual load (angular nontarget letters that are similar to the target letters). On 25% of the trials an irrelevant emotional distractor was presented at the display center and participants were instructed to ignore it. The distractor stimulus was either positive or negative and was selected from 3 different classes: IAPS pictures of erotica or mutilated bodies (Experiment 1), happy or angry faces (Experiment 2), and faces associated with gain or loss in a prior value-learning phase involving a betting game (Experiment 3). The results showed a consistent pattern of interaction of load and valence across the 3 experiments. Irrelevant emotional distractors produced interference effects on search reaction time (RT) in conditions of low load, with no difference between negative and positive valence. High perceptual load, however, consistently reduced interference from the negative-valence distractors, but had no effect on the positive-valence distractors. As these results were consistently found across 3 different categories of emotional distractors, they suggest the general conclusion that attentional capture by irrelevant emotional distractors depends on both their valence and the level of perceptual load in the task and highlight the special status of distractors associated with pleasure.

  19. Microbial Electrolytic Carbon Capture for Carbon Negative and Energy Positive Wastewater Treatment.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lu; Huang, Zhe; Rau, Greg H; Ren, Zhiyong Jason

    2015-07-07

    Energy and carbon neutral wastewater management is a major goal for environmental sustainability, but current progress has only reduced emission rather than using wastewater for active CO2 capture and utilization. We present here a new microbial electrolytic carbon capture (MECC) approach to potentially transform wastewater treatment to a carbon negative and energy positive process. Wastewater was used as an electrolyte for microbially assisted electrolytic production of H2 and OH(-) at the cathode and protons at the anode. The acidity dissolved silicate and liberated metal ions that balanced OH(-), producing metal hydroxide, which transformed CO2 in situ into (bi)carbonate. Results using both artificial and industrial wastewater show 80-93% of the CO2 was recovered from both CO2 derived from organic oxidation and additional CO2 injected into the headspace, making the process carbon-negative. High rates and yields of H2 were produced with 91-95% recovery efficiency, resulting in a net energy gain of 57-62 kJ/mol-CO2 captured. The pH remained stable without buffer addition and no toxic chlorine-containing compounds were detected. The produced (bi)carbonate alkalinity is valuable for wastewater treatment and long-term carbon storage in the ocean. Preliminary evaluation shows promising economic and environmental benefits for different industries.

  20. Aptamer Conjugated Multifunctional Nanoflowers as a Platform for Targeting, Capture and Detection in Laser Desorption Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Ocsoy, Ismail; Gulbakan, Basri; Shukoor, Mohammed Ibrahim; Xiong, Xiangling; Chen, Tao; Powell, David H.; Tan, Weihong

    2013-01-01

    Although many different nanomaterials have been tested as substrates for laser desorption and ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS), this emerging field still requires more efficient multifuncional nanomaterials for targeting, enrichment and detection. Here, we report the use of gold-manganese oxide (Au@MnO) hybrid nanoflowers as an efficient matrix for LDI–MS. The nanoflowers were also functionalized with two different aptamers to target cancer cells and capture adenosine triphosphate (ATP), respectively. These nanoflowers were successfully used for metabolite extraction from cancer cell lysates. Thus, in one system, our multifunctional nanoflowers can 1) act as an ionization substrate for mass spectrometry, 2) target cancer cells, and 3) detect and analyze metabolites from cancer cells. PMID:23211039

  1. Aptamer-conjugated multifunctional nanoflowers as a platform for targeting, capture, and detection in laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ocsoy, Ismail; Gulbakan, Basri; Shukoor, Mohammed Ibrahim; Xiong, Xiangling; Chen, Tao; Powell, David H; Tan, Weihong

    2013-01-22

    Although many different nanomaterials have been tested as substrates for laser desorption and ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS), this emerging field still requires more efficient multifuncional nanomaterials for targeting, enrichment, and detection. Here, we report the use of gold manganese oxide (Au@MnO) hybrid nanoflowers as an efficient matrix for LDI-MS. The nanoflowers were also functionalized with two different aptamers to target cancer cells and capture adenosine triphosphate (ATP). These nanoflowers were successfully used for metabolite extraction from cancer cell lysates. Thus, in one system, our multifunctional nanoflowers can (1) act as an ionization substrate for mass spectrometry, (2) target cancer cells, and (3) detect and analyze metabolites from cancer cells.

  2. Search for deeply bound pionic states in 208Pb via radiative atomic capture of negative pions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raywood, K. J.; Lange, J. B.; Jones, G.; Pavan, M.; Sevior, M. E.; Hutcheon, D. A.; Olin, A.; Ottewell, D.; Yen, S.; Lee, S. J.; Sim, K. S.; Altman, A.; Friedman, E.; Trudel, A.

    1997-05-01

    A search for narrow, deeply bound pionic atom states via atomic radiative capture of negative pions in a target of 208Pb was carried out for pion kinetic energies of 20 and 25 MeV. Although no clear signature of any such gamma ray emission could be observed in the data, fits of the gamma ray spectra between the energies of 12 and 42 MeV involving a quadratic background together with a pair of peaks (1s, 2p) whose relative intensity was taken from theory yielded an overall strength for the peaks which are consistent (to a 67% confidence level) with radiative capture whose integrated cross section is 20.0 +/- 10.0 μb/sr at 90° for 20 MeV incident pions. A lower probability (40% confidence level) result was obtained when the fit was carried out without the peaks included, just the continuum background.

  3. Simulation of the Partially Ionized Reacting Plasma Flow in a Negative Hydrogen Ion Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatsonis, Nikolaos; Averkin, Sergey; Olson, Lynn

    2012-10-01

    A High Pressure Discharge Negative Ion Source (HPDNIS) operating on hydrogen is been under investigation. The Negative Ion Production (NIP) section of the HPDNIS attaches to the 10-100 Torr RF-discharge chamber with a micronozzle and ends with a grid that extracts the negative ion beam. The partially ionized and reacting plasma flow in the NIP section is simulated using an unstructured three-dimensional Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (U3DSMC) code. The NIP section contains a low-pressure plasma that includes H2, vibrationally-rotationally excited H2^*, negative hydrogen atoms H^-, and electrons. Primary reactions in the NIP section are dissociate attachment, H2^*+e->H^0+H^-and electron collisional detachment, e+H^-->H+2e. The U3DSMC computational domain includes the entrance to the NIP nozzle and the extraction grid at the exit. The flow parameters at the entrance are based on conditions in the RF-discharge chamber and are implemented in U3DSMC using a Kinetic-Moment subsonic boundary conditions method. The rotational and vibrational degrees of freedom in U3DSMC are implemented using the Larsen-Borgnakke model. Chemical reactions are implemented in U3DSMC using the Quantum-Kinetic model. Simulations cover the regime of operation of the HPDNIS and examine the flow characteristics inside the NIP section.

  4. Analysis of pesticide residues by fast gas chromatography in combination with negative chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Húsková, Renáta; Matisová, Eva; Hrouzková, Svetlana; Svorc, Lubomír

    2009-08-28

    A combination of fast GC with narrow-bore column and bench top quadrupole mass spectrometer (MS) detector in negative chemical ionization (NCI) mode (with methane as reagent gas) is set up and utilized for the ultratrace analysis of 25 selected pesticides. The observed pesticides, belonging to the endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), were from different chemical classes. A comparative study with electron impact (EI) ionization was also carried out (both techniques in selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode). The programmed temperature vaporizer (PTV) injector in solvent vent mode and narrow-bore column (15mx0.15mm I.D.x0.15microm film of 5% diphenyl 95% dimethylsiloxane stationary phase) were used for effective and fast separation. Heptachlor (HPT) as internal standard (I.S.) was applied for the comparison of results obtained from absolute and normalized peak areas. Non-fatty food matrices were investigated. Fruit (apple - matrix-matched standards; orange, strawberry, plum - real samples) and vegetable (lettuce - real sample) extracts were prepared by a quick and effective QuEChERS sample preparation technique. Very good results were obtained for the characterization of fast GC-NCI-MS method analysing EDCs pesticides. Analyte response was linear from 0.01 to 150microgkg(-1) with the R(2) values in the range from 0.9936 to 1.0000 (calculated from absolute peak areas) and from 0.9956 to 1.0000 (calculated from peak areas normalized to HPT). Instrument limits of detection (LODs) and quantification (LOQs) were found at pgmL(-1) level and for the majority of analytes were up to three orders of magnitude lower for NCI compared to EI mode. In both ionization modes, repeatability of measurements expressed as relative standard deviation (RSDs) was less than 10% which is in very good agreement with the criterion of European Union.

  5. Fragmentation of peptide negative molecular ions induced by resonance electron capture

    SciTech Connect

    Vasil'ev, Yury V.; Figard, Benjamin J.; Morre, Jeff; Deinzer, Max L.

    2009-07-28

    A simple robust method to study resonance gas-phase reactions between neutral peptides of low volatility and free electrons has been designed and implemented. Resonance electron capture (REC) experiments were performed by several neutral model peptides and two naturally occurring peptides. The assignment of negative ions (NIs) formed in these gas-phase reactions was based on high mass-resolving power experiments. From these accurate mass measurements, it was concluded that fragment NIs formed by low (1-2 eV) energy REC are of the same types as those observed in electron capture/transfer dissociation, where the positive charge is a factor. The main feature resulting from these REC experiments by peptides is the occurrence of z{sub n}-1 ions, which are invariably of the highest abundances in the negative ion mass spectra of larger peptides. [M-H]{sup -} NIs presumably the carboxylate anion structure dominate the REC spectra of smaller peptides. There was no evidence for the occurrence of the complementary reaction, i.e., the formations of c{sub n}+1 ions. Instead, c{sub n} ions arose without hydrogen/proton transfer albeit with lower abundances than that observed for z{sub n}-1 ions. Only the amide forms of small peptides showed more abundant ion peaks for the c{sub n} ions than for the z{sub n}-1 ions. The mechanisms for the N-C{sub {alpha}} bond cleavage are discussed.

  6. Negative Ion In-Source Decay Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry for Sequencing Acidic Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillen, Chelsea L.; Wright, Patience M.; Cassady, Carolyn J.

    2016-05-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) in-source decay was studied in the negative ion mode on deprotonated peptides to determine its usefulness for obtaining extensive sequence information for acidic peptides. Eight biological acidic peptides, ranging in size from 11 to 33 residues, were studied by negative ion mode ISD (nISD). The matrices 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, 2-aminobenzoic acid, 2-aminobenzamide, 1,5-diaminonaphthalene, 5-amino-1-naphthol, 3-aminoquinoline, and 9-aminoacridine were used with each peptide. Optimal fragmentation was produced with 1,5-diaminonphthalene (DAN), and extensive sequence informative fragmentation was observed for every peptide except hirudin(54-65). Cleavage at the N-Cα bond of the peptide backbone, producing c' and z' ions, was dominant for all peptides. Cleavage of the N-Cα bond N-terminal to proline residues was not observed. The formation of c and z ions is also found in electron transfer dissociation (ETD), electron capture dissociation (ECD), and positive ion mode ISD, which are considered to be radical-driven techniques. Oxidized insulin chain A, which has four highly acidic oxidized cysteine residues, had less extensive fragmentation. This peptide also exhibited the only charged localized fragmentation, with more pronounced product ion formation adjacent to the highly acidic residues. In addition, spectra were obtained by positive ion mode ISD for each protonated peptide; more sequence informative fragmentation was observed via nISD for all peptides. Three of the peptides studied had no product ion formation in ISD, but extensive sequence informative fragmentation was found in their nISD spectra. The results of this study indicate that nISD can be used to readily obtain sequence information for acidic peptides.

  7. Specific interaction between negative atmospheric ions and organic compounds in atmospheric pressure corona discharge ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sekimoto, Kanako; Sakai, Mami; Takayama, Mitsuo

    2012-06-01

    The interaction between negative atmospheric ions and various types of organic compounds were investigated using atmospheric pressure corona discharge ionization (APCDI) mass spectrometry. Atmospheric negative ions such as O(2)(-), HCO(3)(-), COO(-)(COOH), NO(2)(-), NO(3)(-), and NO(3)(-)(HNO(3)) having different proton affinities served as the reactant ions for analyte ionization in APCDI in negative-ion mode. The individual atmospheric ions specifically ionized aliphatic and aromatic compounds with various functional groups as atmospheric ion adducts and deprotonated analytes. The formation of the atmospheric ion adducts under certain discharge conditions is most likely attributable to the affinity between the analyte and atmospheric ion and the concentration of the atmospheric ion produced under these conditions. The deprotonated analytes, in contrast, were generated from the adducts of the atmospheric ions with higher proton affinity attributable to efficient proton abstraction from the analyte by the atmospheric ion.

  8. Electron capture of dopants in two-photonic ionization in a poly(methyl methacrylate) solid

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuchida, Akira; Sakai, Wataru; Nakano, Mitsuru; Yamamoto, Masahide

    1992-10-29

    Behavior of the electron produced by two-photonic excitation of an aromatic donor in a poly(methyl methacrylate) solid was studied by the addition of the electron scavengers to the system. According to the Perrin type analysis for the two-photonically ejected electron, the capture radii (R{sub c}) of the scavengers examined were estimated to be from 8 to 40 {Angstrom}. For the two-photonically ejected electrons, R{sub c} is a capture radius for thermalized electrons. In this case the parent electron donor is not necessarily within this radius. On the other hand, for the fluorescence quenching, the distance between the donor and acceptor is within the static quenching radius (R{sub q}) of the donor. 13 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Double-electron capture by highly-ionized atoms isolated at very low energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogwell Hoogerheide, Shannon; Dreiling, Joan M.; Sahiner, Arda; Tan, Joseph N.

    2016-05-01

    Charge exchange with background gases, also known as electron capture processes, is important in the study of comets, controlled fusion energy, anti-matter atoms, and proposed one-electron ions in Rydberg states. However, there are few experiments in the very low energy regime that could be useful for further theoretical development. At NIST, highly-charged ions extracted from an electron-beam ion trap can be isolated with energy < 10 eV in a compact Penning trap. By controlling the background gas pressure and composition, the charge exchange rates can be studied. Fully stripped neon or other ions are held in the trap for varying lengths of time and allowed to interact with different background gases at multiple pressures. The ions are then pulsed to a time-of-flight detector to count the population of each charge state. Analysis using a system of rate equations yields information about the ion cloud expansion and single-electron capture rates. A substantial amount of double-electron capture is also observed. We present the relative rates and discuss the error budget. SFH and JMD were funded by National Research Council Research Associateship Awards during some of this work.

  10. Electron emission from single-electron capture with simultaneous single-ionization reactions in 30-keV/u He{sup 2+}-on-argon collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, X.; Zhang, S. F.; Zhu, X. L.; Feng, W. T.; Li, B.; Liu, H. P.; Zhang, R. T.; Guo, D. L.; Yan, S. C.; Zhang, P. J.; Wang, Q.; Li, C. Y.; Wang, J. G.

    2011-05-15

    Electron emission from the single-electron capture with simultaneous single ionization in 30 keV/u He{sup 2+} on argon was investigated using a reaction microscope, providing the electron energy spectra and momentum distributions. Intensive peaks for electrons with near-zero kinetic energies have been observed. It is demonstrated that mechanisms contributing to the electron emission include direct transfer ionization (DTI), double-electron capture with autoionization (DECA), and single-electron capture with autoionization (SECA) of target. Comparison of resonance energies shows that Ar{sup +} ions in SECA decay mainly through the 3s3p{sup 5}3d states by emitting Auger electrons, and He** in DECA decay through the 2l2l' states. The dependence of electron emission on the transverse momentum exchange has been studied. In the transfer ionization channel studied here, the DTI process dominates the electron emission, and no saddle point electron mechanism has been found.

  11. Electron emission from single-electron capture with simultaneous single-ionization reactions in 30-keV/u He2+-on-argon collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, X.; Zhang, R. T.; Zhang, S. F.; Zhu, X. L.; Feng, W. T.; Guo, D. L.; Li, B.; Liu, H. P.; Li, C. Y.; Wang, J. G.; Yan, S. C.; Zhang, P. J.; Wang, Q.

    2011-05-01

    Electron emission from the single-electron capture with simultaneous single ionization in 30 keV/u He2+ on argon was investigated using a reaction microscope, providing the electron energy spectra and momentum distributions. Intensive peaks for electrons with near-zero kinetic energies have been observed. It is demonstrated that mechanisms contributing to the electron emission include direct transfer ionization (DTI), double-electron capture with autoionization (DECA), and single-electron capture with autoionization (SECA) of target. Comparison of resonance energies shows that Ar+ ions in SECA decay mainly through the 3s3p53d states by emitting Auger electrons, and He** in DECA decay through the 2l2l' states. The dependence of electron emission on the transverse momentum exchange has been studied. In the transfer ionization channel studied here, the DTI process dominates the electron emission, and no saddle point electron mechanism has been found.

  12. Ambient air analyses using nonspecific flame ionization and electron capture detection compared to specific detection by mass spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Pleil, J.D.; Oliver, K.D.; McClenny, W.A.

    1988-08-01

    Ambient air samples from various studies were analyzed for a specific set of trace-level volatile organic compounds by using a gas chromatograph (GC) equipped with a flame ionization detector (FID) in parallel with an electron capture detector (ECD). The samples were then reanalyzed on a second GC system equipped with a mass selective detector (MSD). GC-FID/ECD data were compared to the nominally correct GC-MSD data to determine the accuracy of the nonspecific detectors, which often do not differentiate the targeted compound from interfering compounds. Qualitative accuracy (capability for correctly identifying compounds on the basis of retention time only) and quantitative accuracy (capability for correctly measuring the concentration of an identified compound on the basis of peak area) were evaluated. Data are presented on a per-compound basis to provide the combined typical results from air samples collected in three geographic regions: Kanawha Valley, WV; Los Angeles, CA, area; and Houston, TX.

  13. CO capture and conversion to HOCO radical by ionized water clusters.

    PubMed

    Lee, Han Myoung; Youn, Il-Seung; Kim, Kwang S

    2014-09-04

    The CO molecule can interact with the hydroxyl radical ((•)OH) via either a weak noncovalent interaction or strong covalent bonding. Upon the ionization of neutral water clusters, the resulting water cluster cations produce protonated water clusters and hydroxyl radicals. In this regard, we investigate the interactions of a CO molecule with water dimer and trimer cations using density functional theory (DFT), Möller-Plesset second-order perturbation theory (MP2), and coupled cluster theory with single, double, and perturbative triple excitations [CCSD(T)]. It is found that the reaction products of CO by the water dimer and trimer cations form a HOĊO radical solvated by a protonated water monomer and dimer, respectively. These radicals are useful intermediates to make oxalic acids, formic acids, metal ligands, and so on, which is important in green chemistry.

  14. Characterization of a Hybrid Optical Microscopy/Laser Ablation Liquid Vortex Capture/Electrospray Ionization System for Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    DOE PAGES

    Cahill, John F.; Kertesz, Vilmos; Van Berkel, Gary J.

    2015-10-22

    Herein, a commercial optical microscope, laser microdissection instrument was coupled with an electrospray ionization mass spectrometer via a low profile liquid vortex capture probe to yield a hybrid optical microscopy/mass spectrometry imaging system. The instrument has bright-field and fluorescence microscopy capabilities in addition to a highly focused UV laser beam that is utilized for laser ablation of samples. With this system, material laser ablated from a sample using the microscope was caught by a liquid vortex capture probe and transported in solution for analysis by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Both lane scanning and spot sampling mass spectral imaging modes weremore » used. The smallest area the system was able to ablate was ~0.544 μm × ~0.544 μm, achieved by oversampling of the smallest laser ablation spot size that could be obtained (~1.9 μm). With use of a model photoresist surface, known features as small as ~1.5 μm were resolved. The capabilities of the system with real world samples were demonstrated first with a blended polymer thin film containing poly(2-vinylpyridine) and poly(N-vinylcarbazole). Using spot sampling imaging, sub-micrometer sized features (0.62, 0.86, and 0.98 μm) visible by optical microscopy were clearly distinguished in the mass spectral images. A second real world example showed the imaging of trace amounts of cocaine in mouse brain thin tissue sections. Lastly, with use of a lane scanning mode with ~6 μm × ~6 μm data pixels, features in the tissue as small as 15 μm in size could be distinguished in both the mass spectral and optical images.« less

  15. Characterization of a Hybrid Optical Microscopy/Laser Ablation Liquid Vortex Capture/Electrospray Ionization System for Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Cahill, John F.; Kertesz, Vilmos; Van Berkel, Gary J.

    2015-10-22

    Herein, a commercial optical microscope, laser microdissection instrument was coupled with an electrospray ionization mass spectrometer via a low profile liquid vortex capture probe to yield a hybrid optical microscopy/mass spectrometry imaging system. The instrument has bright-field and fluorescence microscopy capabilities in addition to a highly focused UV laser beam that is utilized for laser ablation of samples. With this system, material laser ablated from a sample using the microscope was caught by a liquid vortex capture probe and transported in solution for analysis by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Both lane scanning and spot sampling mass spectral imaging modes were used. The smallest area the system was able to ablate was ~0.544 μm × ~0.544 μm, achieved by oversampling of the smallest laser ablation spot size that could be obtained (~1.9 μm). With use of a model photoresist surface, known features as small as ~1.5 μm were resolved. The capabilities of the system with real world samples were demonstrated first with a blended polymer thin film containing poly(2-vinylpyridine) and poly(N-vinylcarbazole). Using spot sampling imaging, sub-micrometer sized features (0.62, 0.86, and 0.98 μm) visible by optical microscopy were clearly distinguished in the mass spectral images. A second real world example showed the imaging of trace amounts of cocaine in mouse brain thin tissue sections. Lastly, with use of a lane scanning mode with ~6 μm × ~6 μm data pixels, features in the tissue as small as 15 μm in size could be distinguished in both the mass spectral and optical images.

  16. Fragmentation of peptide negative molecular ions induced by resonance electron capture

    PubMed Central

    Vasil’ev, Yury V.; Figard, Benjamin J.; Morré, Jeff; Deinzer, Max L.

    2009-01-01

    A simple robust method to study resonance gas-phase reactions between neutral peptides of low volatility and free electrons has been designed and implemented. Resonance electron capture (REC) experiments were performed by several neutral model peptides and two naturally occurring peptides. The assignment of negative ions (NIs) formed in these gas-phase reactions was based on high mass-resolving power experiments. From these accurate mass measurements, it was concluded that fragment NIs formed by low (1–2 eV) energy REC are of the same types as those observed in electron capture∕transfer dissociation, where the positive charge is a factor. The main feature resulting from these REC experiments by peptides is the occurrence of zn−1 ions, which are invariably of the highest abundances in the negative ion mass spectra of larger peptides. [M–H]− NIs presumably the carboxylate anion structure dominate the REC spectra of smaller peptides. There was no evidence for the occurrence of the complementary reaction, i.e., the formations of cn+1 ions. Instead, cn ions arose without hydrogen∕proton transfer albeit with lower abundances than that observed for zn−1 ions. Only the amide forms of small peptides showed more abundant ion peaks for the cn ions than for the zn−1 ions. The mechanisms for the N–Cα bond cleavage are discussed. PMID:19655877

  17. CHLORIDEDETERMINATION IN HIGH IONIC STRENGTH SOLUTION OF AMMONIUM ACETATE USING NEGATIVE ION ELECTRON SPRAY IONIZATION (HPLC/MS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A precise ion chromatography method has been developed for the determination of chloride in high ionic strength ammonium acetate solutions (10-5 M-5 M) using sodium carbonate/sodium bicarbonate as eluent. Negative ion electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry was used for q...

  18. Determination of BROMATE AT PARTS-PER-TRILLION LEVELS BY GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY-MASS SPECTROMETRY WITH NEGATIVE CHEMICAL IONIZATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ozonation of bromide-containing source waters produces bromate as a class 2B carcinogenic disinfection by-product. The present work describes the determination of bromate by gas chromatography-negative chemical ionization mass spectrometry (GC-NCIMS) following a bromate react...

  19. Negative chemical ionization studied of human and food chain contamination with xenobiotic chemicals.

    PubMed Central

    Dougherty, R C; Whitaker, M J; Smith, L M; Stalling, D L; Kuehl, D W

    1980-01-01

    Negative chemical ionization mass spectrometry with a mixture of isobutane, methylene chloride, and oxygen as the reagent gas has been used to explore contamination of environmental substrates with xenobiotic chemicals. The substrates in question, fish tissue, human seminal plasma, and human adipose tissue, were cleaned up by one of the following three cleanup procedures: (1) continuous liquid-liquid extraction steam distillation; (2) gel-permeation chromatography; and (3) adsorption on activated carbon followed by elution with toluene. The third procedure was used only for the examination of planar polychlorinated aromatic hydrocarbons in environmental samples. Using these techniques, we have found evidence for contamination of fish samples with polychloronaphthalenes, polychlorostyrenes, polychlorobiphenyls, polychlorodibenzofurans, and polychlorodibenzodioxins among other chemicals. The polychlorodibenzodioxins appeared only in the spectra of extracts of fish obtained from the Tittabawassee River at Midland Michigan. The polychlorodibenzofuran ions appeared in NCI mass spectra of fish that were significantly contaminated (above 2 ppm) with polychlorobiphenyls. Toxic substances occurring in human seminal plasma included pentachlorophenol, hexachlorobenzene, DDT metabolites, and polychlorobiphenyls. We have investigated toxic substances in human seminal plasma because of the apparent decrease in sperm density in U.S. males over the last 30 years. Results of screening human adipose tissue for contamination with xenobiotic chemicals have been largely coincident with result of the EPA human monitoring program. Polychlorobiphenyls, DDT metabolites, nonachlor, and chlordane have appeared in most samples examined. Detection limits for all of these chemicals were of the order of 1 ppb. PMID:7428739

  20. A study of resonance electron capture ionization on a quadrupole tandem mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Wei, J; Liu, S; Fedoreyev, S A; Voinov, V G

    2000-01-01

    Procedures that allow the realization of resonance electron capture (REC) mode on a commercial triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer, after some simple modifications, are described. REC mass spectrometry (MS) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) experiments were performed and spectra for some compounds were recorded. In particular, the charge-remote fragmentation (CRF) spectra of [M - H](-) ions of docosanoic and docosenoic acids under low-energy collisionally activated dissociation (CAD) conditions were obtained, and showed that there were no significant differences for [M - H](-) ions produced at different resonances (i.e. for [M - H](-) ions with different structures). This observation was explained on the basis of results obtained from deuterium-labeled fatty acids, which showed that different CRF ions (but with the same m/z value in the absence of labels) could be produced by different mechanisms, and all of them were obviously realized under CAD conditions that made spectra practically indistinguishable. The other example, which compared the REC-MS/MS spectrum of [M - H](-) ions and EI-MS/MS spectrum of M(+.) ions of daidzein, demonstrated the potential of the REC-MS/MS technique for more complex structure elucidation.

  1. Detection of stanozolol in hair by negative ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Höld, K M; Wilkins, D G; Crouch, D J; Rollins, D E; Maes, R A

    1996-10-01

    Stanozolol is an anabolic androgenic steroid occasionally abused by athletes. A sensitive, specific, and reproducible method for the quantitative determination of stanozolol in hair has been developed. After the addition of stanozolol-d3 as the internal standard, hair samples (10-25 mg) were digested with 2 mL of 1N NaOH at 65 degrees C for at least 2 h. Digest solutions were then extracted using solid-phase extraction. The eluents were evaporated, a mixture of N-methyl-N-trimethylsilylhepta-fluorobutryamide (MSHFBA) and trimethylsilylimidazole (TSIM) (1000:20, v/v) was added, and the mixture heated at 80 degrees C for 5 minutes. After cooling to room temperature, N-methyl-bisheptafluorobutyramide (MBHFBA) was added and the mixture heated at 80 degrees C for 30 min. The derivatized extracts were analyzed on a Finnigan MATTM 4500 mass spectrometer in the negative chemical ionization mode. Chromatographic separation was achieved with helium carrier gas on a HP-1 capillary column (15 m x 0.2-mm i.d.; 33-microns film thickness). The assay was capable of reliably quantitating 50 pg/mg of stanozolol and was linear to 2500 pg/mg. Intra-assay precision was 13.2% at 50 pg/mg and 6.6% at 2500 pg/mg. Interassay precision was 13.7% at 50 pg/mg and 6.1% at 2500 pg/mg. This method has been applied to the analysis of stanozolol incorporated into rat hair. Male Long-Evans rats were given stanozolol 20 mg/kg intraperitoneally once daily for 3 days. The mean concentrations of stanozolol in the rat hair collected on day 14 were 362.4 +/- 332.4 pg/mg in pigmented hair and 90.0 +/- 46.9 pg/mg in nonpigmented hair. These data demonstrate that stanozolol is incorporated preferentially into pigmented hair.

  2. Excitation, ionization, and electron capture cross sections for collisions of Li{sup 3+} with ground state and excited hydrogen atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, I. Yan, J.; Sato, H.; Kimura, M.; Janev, R.K.; Kato, T.

    2008-03-15

    Using the available experimental and theoretical data, as well as the established cross section scaling relationships, a comprehensive cross section database for excitation, ionization and electron capture in collisions of Li{sup 3+} ions with ground state and excited hydrogen atoms has been generated. The critically assessed cross sections are represented by analytic fit functions that have the correct asymptotic behavior both at low and high collision energies. The derived cross sections are also presented in graphical form.

  3. Simultaneous analysis of 17 organochlorine pesticides in natural medicines by GC/MS with negative chemical ionization.

    PubMed

    Tagami, Takaomi; Kajimura, Keiji; Takagi, Sokichi; Satsuki, Yuka; Nakamura, Akihiko; Okihashi, Masahiro; Akutsu, Kazuhiko; Obana, Hirotaka; Kitagawa, Mikiya

    2007-07-01

    Many methods for the determination of pesticide residues in food have been reported. Although natural medicines should be confirmed to be as safe as food, few methods for the determination of pesticide residues in natural medicines have been reported. In this study, 17 organochlorine pesticides were detected in natural medicines using GC/MS with negative chemical ionization (NCI). GC/MS with NCI can detect halogenated pesticides selectively and thus is suitable for the detection of organochlorine pesticides. This study indicates that GC/MS with NCI is useful for analyzing organochlorine pesticides in natural medicines.

  4. Separation and characterization of phenolic compounds in fennel (Foeniculum vulgare) using liquid chromatography-negative electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Parejo, Irene; Jauregui, Olga; Sánchez-Rabaneda, Ferran; Viladomat, Francesc; Bastida, Jaume; Codina, Carles

    2004-06-16

    Liquid chromatography (LC) diode array detection (DAD) coupled to negative electrospray ionization (ESI) tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) was used for the rapid and sensitive identification of water-soluble phenolic compounds in fennel waste. The plant material was first extracted and then chromatographed on Sephadex LH-20 to afford seven fractions, each of them being subjected to LC-MS analysis. Identification of the compounds was carried out by interpretation of UV, MS, and MS/MS spectra. Forty-two phenolic substances were identified, 27 of which had not previously been reported in fennel, including hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives, flavonoid glycosides, and flavonoid aglycons.

  5. Avolition and expressive deficits capture negative symptom phenomenology: Implications for DSM-5 and schizophrenia research

    PubMed Central

    Messinger, Julie W; Trémeau, Fabien; Antonius, Daniel; Mendelsohn, Erika; Prudent, Vasthie; Stanford, Arielle D; Malaspina, Dolores

    2010-01-01

    The DSM-5 formulation presents an opportunity to refine the negative symptom assessments that are crucial for a schizophrenia diagnosis. This review traces the history of negative symptom constructs in neuropsychiatry from their earliest conceptualizations in the 19th century. It presents the relevant literature for distinguishing between different types of negative symptoms. Although a National Institute of Mental Health consensus initiative proposed that there are five separate negative symptom domains, our review of the individual items demonstrates no more than three negative symptom domains. Indeed, numerous factor analyses of separate negative symptom scales routinely identify only two domains: 1) expressive deficits, which include affective, linguistic and paralinguistic expressions, and 2) avolition for daily-life and social activities. We propose that a focus on expressive deficits and avolition will be of optimum utility for diagnosis, treatment-considerations, and research purposes compared to other negative symptom constructs. We recommend that these two domains should be assessed as separate dimensions in the DSM-5 criteria. PMID:20889248

  6. Avolition and expressive deficits capture negative symptom phenomenology: implications for DSM-5 and schizophrenia research.

    PubMed

    Messinger, Julie W; Trémeau, Fabien; Antonius, Daniel; Mendelsohn, Erika; Prudent, Vasthie; Stanford, Arielle D; Malaspina, Dolores

    2011-02-01

    The DSM-5 formulation presents an opportunity to refine the negative symptom assessments that are crucial for a schizophrenia diagnosis. This review traces the history of negative symptom constructs in neuropsychiatry from their earliest conceptualizations in the 19th century. It presents the relevant literature for distinguishing between different types of negative symptoms. Although a National Institute of Mental Health consensus initiative proposed that there are five separate negative symptom domains, our review of the individual items demonstrates no more than three negative symptom domains. Indeed, numerous factor analyses of separate negative symptom scales routinely identify only two domains: 1) expressive deficits, which include affective, linguistic and paralinguistic expressions, and 2) avolition for daily life and social activities. We propose that a focus on expressive deficits and avolition will be of optimum utility for diagnosis, treatment-considerations, and research purposes compared to other negative symptom constructs. We recommend that these two domains should be assessed as separate dimensions in the DSM-5 criteria.

  7. MoS2/Ag nanohybrid: A novel matrix with synergistic effect for small molecule drugs analysis by negative-ion matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yaju; Deng, Guoqing; Liu, Xiaohui; Sun, Liang; Li, Hui; Cheng, Quan; Xi, Kai; Xu, Danke

    2016-09-21

    This paper reports a facile synthesis of molybdenum disulfide nanosheets/silver nanoparticles (MoS2/Ag) hybrid and its use as an effective matrix in negative ion matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). The nanohybrid exerts a strong synergistic effect, leading to high performance detection of small molecule analytes including amino acids, peptides, fatty acids and drugs. The enhancement of laser desorption/ionization (LDI) efficiency is largely attributed to the high surface roughness and large surface area for analyte adsorption, better dispersibility, increased thermal conductivity and enhanced UV energy absorption as compared to pure MoS2. Moreover, both Ag nanoparticles and the edge of the MoS2 layers function as deprotonation sites for proton capture, facilitating the charging process in negative ion mode and promoting formation of negative ions. As a result, the MoS2/Ag nanohybrid proves to be a highly attractive matrix in MALDI-TOF MS, with desired features such as high desorption/ionization efficiency, low fragmentation interference, high salt tolerance, and no sweet-spots for mass signal. These characteristic properties allowed for simultaneous analysis of eight different drugs and quantification of acetylsalicylic acid in the spiked human serum. This work demonstrates for the first time the fabrication and application of a novel MoS2/Ag hybrid, and provides a new platform for use in the rapid and high throughput analysis of small molecules by mass spectrometry.

  8. Model study of modern oil-based paint media by triacylglycerol profiling in positive and negative ionization modes.

    PubMed

    Degano, Ilaria; La Nasa, Jacopo; Ghelardi, Elisa; Modugno, Francesca; Colombini, Maria Perla

    2016-12-01

    Lipid binders have traditionally been determined in paintings by using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) to identify the characteristic profiles and ratios of fatty acids . However, the presence of mixtures in contemporary and modern oil paints makes the GC/MS determination of fatty acids insufficient to fully characterize the lipid binding media. In this study we prove that triacylglycerol (TAG) profiling by high-performance liquid chromatography with high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry, using ESI in positive and negative ionization modes is highly effective. We exploited this analytical approach to study the curing and degradation processes undergone by six plant oils used in the formulation of media in modern paints, using both natural and artificial ageing experiments. We believe that is the first time that a negative ionization mode has been applied for this purpose and that a survey with HPLC-ESI-Q-ToF has been carried out to study the ageing kinetics of plant oils. TAG profiling enabled us to study the evolution over time of the constituents of modern oils, with respect to curing and ageing. The data analyzed in this study demonstrate that our approach is efficient to study the oxidation of TAGs during ageing. The data also improve current knowledge on the properties of vegetable oils, which could lead to the development of new paint materials and conservation treatments for modern and contemporary works of art.

  9. Negative ionization of the secondary ions of silver and gold sputtered from their elemental surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sindona, A.; Riccardi, P.; Maletta, S.; Rudi, S. A.; Falcone, G.

    2007-03-01

    Calculations of the ionization probabilities of Ag- and Au- particles, ejected during sputtering of clean Ag(1 0 0) and Au(1 0 0) surfaces, respectively, are reported. An effective one-electron theory is used to describe: the plane metal surface, with a projected band gap, the secondary emitted atom, whose charge state is investigated, and its nearest-neighbor substrate atom, put in motion by the collision cascade generated by the primary ion beam. Suitable rectilinear trajectories are selected to describe the motion of these two atoms outside the solid. A good agreement is found with van Der Heide's experiments (P.A.W. van Der Heide, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 157 (1999) 126).

  10. Differentiation of commercial fuels based on polar components using negative electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rostad, C.E.

    2006-01-01

    Polar components in fuels may enable differentiation between fuel types or commercial fuel sources. A range of commercial fuels from numerous sources were analyzed by flow injection analysis/electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry without extensive sample preparation, separation, or chromatography. This technique enabled screening for unique polar components at parts per million levels in commercial hydrocarbon products, including a range of products from a variety of commercial sources and locations. Because these polar compounds are unique in different fuels, their presence may provide source information on hydrocarbons released into the environment. This analysis was then applied to mixtures of various products, as might be found in accidental releases into the environment. Copyright ?? Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  11. Sample pretreatment optimization for the analysis of short chain chlorinated paraffins in soil with gas chromatography-electron capture negative ion-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Laiguo; Huang, Yumei; Han, Shuang; Feng, Yongbin; Jiang, Guo; Tang, Caiming; Ye, Zhixiang; Zhan, Wei; Liu, Ming; Zhang, Sukun

    2013-01-25

    Accurately quantifying short chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs) in soil samples with gas chromatograph coupled with electron capture negative ionization mass spectrometry (GC-ECNI-MS) is difficult because many other polychlorinated pollutants are present in the sample matrices. These pollutants (e.g., polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and toxaphene) can cause serious interferences during SCCPs analysis with GC-MS. Four main columns packed with different adsorbents, including silica gel, Florisil and alumina, were investigated in this study to determine their performance for separating interfering pollutants from SCCPs. These experimental results suggest that the optimum cleanup procedure uses a silica gel column and a multilayer silica gel-Florisil composite column. This procedure completely separated 22 PCB congeners, 23 OCPs and three toxaphene congeners from SCCPs. However, p,p'-DDD, cis-nonachlor and o,p'-DDD were not completely removed and only 53% of the total toxaphene was removed. This optimized method was successfully and effectively applied for removing interfering pollutants from real soil samples. SCCPs in 17 soil samples from different land use areas within a suburban region were analyzed with the established method. The concentrations of SCCPs in these samples were between 7 and 541 ng g(-1) (mean: 84 ng g(-1)). Similar homologue SCCPs patterns were observed between the soil samples collected from different land use areas. In addition, lower chlorinated (Cl(6/7)) C(10)- and C(11)- SCCPs were the dominant congeners.

  12. Quantification of neurosteroids in rat plasma and brain following swim stress and allopregnanolone administration using negative chemical ionization gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Vallée, M; Rivera, J D; Koob, G F; Purdy, R H; Fitzgerald, R L

    2000-12-01

    A simplified method for the quantitative analysis of neurosteroids in rat plasma and brain is described. The method uses negative chemical ionization gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and involves the synthesis of pentafluorobenzyloxime/trimethylsilyl ether derivatives with excellent chromatographic and electron-capturing properties. Deuterium-labeled analogs of the steroids of interest were synthesized and used as internal standards. The steroids (allopregnanolone, epiallopregnanolone, pregnenolone, testosterone, and dehydroepiandrosterone) were isolated from the plasma or brain matrix by a rapid and straightforward solid-phase extraction procedure. The mass spectrometer was operated in a selective ion monitoring mode, allowing for picograms of neurosteroids to be quantified from biological extracts. The method was linear (typical R(2) = 0.999) over the concentration range (100 to 8000 pg from 0.3 ml plasma and 250 to 8000 pg from 100 mg brain tissue) with good precision and accuracy. In experimental protocols, the procedure was suitable for measuring concentrations of endogenous neurosteroids in rat plasma and brain. Significant elevations (P < 0.001) were observed in the frontal cortex for allopregnanolone and pregnenolone following a swim stress and for allopregnanolone and epiallopregnanolone following allopregnanolone injection (8 mg/kg, sc). The present method allows accurate determination of neurosteroids and will be helpful in elucidating the role of neurosteroids in health and disease.

  13. The analysis of high explosives by liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry: multiplexed detection of negative ion adducts.

    PubMed

    Mathis, John A; McCord, Bruce R

    2005-01-01

    The negative ion electrospray ionization mass spectrometric (ESI-MS) detection of adducts of high explosives with chloride, formate, acetate, and nitrate was used to demonstrate the gas-phase interaction of neutral explosives with these anions. The relative intensities of the adduct species were determined to compare the competitive formation of the selected high explosives and anions. The relative stability of the adduct species varies, yielding preferential formation of certain anionic adducts with different high explosives. To exploit this effect, an isocratic high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)/ESI-MS method was developed and used for the simultaneous analysis of high explosives using two different techniques for the addition of the anionic additives; pre- and post-column. The results show that the pre-column approach provides similar results with improved selectivity for specific explosives. By detecting characteristic adduct species for each explosive, this method provides a qualitative and quantitative approach for the analysis and identification of high explosives.

  14. Positive and negative-mode laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry (LDI-MS) for the detection of indigoids in archaeological purple.

    PubMed

    Ribechini, Erika; Pérez-Arantegui, Josefina; Colombini, Maria Perla

    2013-03-01

    Laser-based ionization techniques have demonstrated to be a valuable analytical tool to study organic pigments by mass spectrometric analyses. Though laser-based ionization techniques have identified several natural and synthetic organic dyes and pigments, they have never been used in the characterization of purple. In this work, positive and negative-mode laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS) was used for the first time to detect indigoids in shellfish purple. The method was used to study organic residues collected from archaeological ceramic fragments that were known to contain purple, as determined by a classical high-performance liquid chromatography-based procedure. LDI-MS provides a mass spectral fingerprint of shellfish purple, and it was found to be a rapid and successful tool for the identification of purple. In addition, a comparison between positive and negative mode ionization highlighted the complementarity of the two ionization modes. On the one hand, the negative-ion mode LDI-MS showed a better selectivity and sensitivity to brominated molecules, such as 6,6'-dibromoindigo, 6-monobromoindigo, 6,6'-dibromoindirubin, 6- and 6'-monobromoindirubin, thanks to their electronegativity, and produced simpler mass spectra. On the other hand, negative-ion mode LDI-MS was found to have a lower sensitivity to non-brominated compounds, such as indigo and indirubin, whose presence can be established in any case by collecting the complementary positive-ion LDI mass spectrum.

  15. Typing of blood-group antigens on neutral oligosaccharides by negative-ion electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongtao; Zhang, Shuang; Tao, Guanjun; Zhang, Yibing; Mulloy, Barbara; Zhan, Xiaobei; Chai, Wengang

    2013-06-18

    Blood-group antigens, such as those containing fucose and bearing the ABO(H)- and Lewis-type determinants expressed on the carbohydrate chains of glycoproteins and glycolipids, and also on unconjugated free oligosaccharides in human milk and other secretions, are associated with various biological functions. We have previously shown the utility of negative-ion electrospay ionization tandem mass spectrometry with collision-induced dissociation (ESI-CID-MS/MS) for typing of Lewis (Le) determinants, for example, Le(a), Le(x), Le(b), and Le(y) on neutral and sialylated oligosaccharide chains. In the present report, we extended the strategy to characterization of blood-group A-, B-, and H-determinants on type 1 and type 2 and also on type 4 globoside chains to provide a high sensitivity method for typing of all the major blood-group antigens, including the A, B, H, Le(a), Le(x), Le(b), and Le(y) determinants, present in oligosaccharides. Using the principles established, we identified two minor unknown oligosaccharide components present in the products of enzymatic synthesis by bacterial fermentation. We also demonstrated that the unique fragmentations derived from the D- and (0,2)A-type cleavages observed in ESI-CID-MS/MS, which are important for assigning blood-group and chain types, only occur under the negative-ion conditions for reducing sugars but not for reduced alditols or under positive-ion conditions.

  16. Fine structure and ionization energy of the 1s2s2p 4P state of the helium negative ion He-.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liming; Li, Chun; Yan, Zong-Chao; Drake, G W F

    2014-12-31

    The fine structure and ionization energy of the 1s2s2p (4)P state of the helium negative ion He(-) are calculated in Hylleraas coordinates, including relativistic and QED corrections up to O(α(4)mc(2)), O((μ/M)α(4)mc(2)), O(α(5)mc(2)), and O((μ/M)α(5)mc(2)). Higher order corrections are estimated for the ionization energy. A comparison is made with other calculations and experiments. We find that the present results for the fine structure splittings agree with experiment very well. However, the calculated ionization energy deviates from the experimental result by about 1 standard deviation. The estimated theoretical uncertainty in the ionization energy is much less than the experimental accuracy.

  17. Low-Resistance Dual-Purpose Air Filter Releasing Negative Ions and Effectively Capturing PM2.5.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xinglei; Li, Yuyao; Hua, Ting; Jiang, Pan; Yin, Xia; Yu, Jianyong; Ding, Bin

    2017-04-05

    The fatal danger of pollution due to particulate matter (PM) calls for both high-efficiency and low-resistance air purification materials, which also provide healthcare. This is however still a challenge. Herein, a low-resistance air filter capable of releasing negative ions (NIs) and efficiently capturing PM2.5 was prepared by electrospinning polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) fibers doped with negative ions powder (NIPs). The air-resistance of fibrous membranes decreased from 9.5 to 6 Pa (decrease of 36%) on decreasing the average fiber diameter from 1.16 to 0.41 μm. Moreover, the lower rising rate of air-resistance with reduction in pore size, for fibrous membranes with thinner fiber diameter was verified. In addition, a single PVDF/NIPs fiber was provided with strong surface potentials, due to high fluorine electronegativity, and tested using atomic force microscopy. This strong surface potential resulted in higher releasing amounts of NIs (RANIs). Interestingly, reduction of fiber diameter favored the alleviation of the shielding effects on electric field around fibers and promoted the RANIs from 798 to 1711 ions cc(-1). Moreover, by regulating the doping contents of NIPs, the RANIs increased from 1711 to 2818 ions cc(-1). The resultant fibrous membranes showed low air resistance of 40.5 Pa. Field-tests conducted in Shanghai showed stable PM2.5 purification efficiency of 99.99% at high RANIs, in the event of haze.

  18. Evaluation of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry for species identification of nonfermenting Gram-negative bacilli.

    PubMed

    Almuzara, Marisa; Barberis, Claudia; Traglia, Germán; Famiglietti, Angela; Ramirez, Maria Soledad; Vay, Carlos

    2015-05-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) to identify 396 Nonfermenting Gram-Negative Bacilli clinical isolates was evaluated in comparison with conventional phenotypic tests and/or molecular methods. MALDI-TOF MS identified to species level 256 isolates and to genus or complex level 112 isolates. It identified 29 genera including uncommon species.

  19. Study of the mass spectrometric behaviors of anthocyanins in negative ionization mode and its applications for characterization of anthocyanins and non-anthocyanin polyphenols

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study of the mass spectroscopic behaviors of anthocyanins in the negative ionization mode was reported and it can be used for differentiation anthocyanins from other non-anthocyanin polyphenols. For the study, an ultra-high performance liquid chromatography with high resolution mass spectrometry (...

  20. Charge enhancement of single-stranded DNA in negative electrospray ionization using the supercharging reagent meta-nitrobenzyl alcohol.

    PubMed

    Brahim, Bessem; Alves, Sandra; Cole, Richard B; Tabet, Jean-Claude

    2013-12-01

    Charge enhancement of single-stranded oligonucleotide ions in negative ESI mode is investigated. The employed reagent, meta-nitrobenzyl alcohol (m-NBA), was found to improve total signal intensity (Itot), increase the highest observed charge states (zhigh), and raise the average charge states (zavg) of all tested oligonucleotides analyzed in negative ESI. To quantify these increases, signal enhancement ratios (SER1%) and charge enhancement coefficients (CEC1%) were introduced. The SER1%, (defined as the quotient of total oligonucleotide ion abundances with 1% m-NBA divided by total oligonucleotide abundance without m-NBA) was found to be greater than unity for every oligonucleotide tested. The CEC1% values (defined as the average charge state in the presence of 1% m-NBA minus the average charge state in the absence of m-NBA) were found to be uniformly positive. Upon close inspection, the degree of charge enhancement for longer oligonucleotides was found to be dependent upon thymine density (i.e., the number and the location of phospho-thymidine units). A correlation between the charge enhancement induced by the presence of m-NBA and the apparent gas-phase acidity (largely determined by the sequence of thymine units but also by the presence of protons on other nucleobases) of multiply deprotonated oligonucleotide species, was thus established. Ammonium cations appeared to be directly involved in the m-NBA supercharging mechanism, and their role seems to be consistent with previously postulated ESI mechanisms describing desorption/ionization of single-stranded DNA into the gas phase.

  1. Charge Enhancement of Single-Stranded DNA in Negative Electrospray Ionization Using the Supercharging Reagent Meta-nitrobenzyl Alcohol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brahim, Bessem; Alves, Sandra; Cole, Richard B.; Tabet, Jean-Claude

    2013-12-01

    Charge enhancement of single-stranded oligonucleotide ions in negative ESI mode is investigated. The employed reagent, meta-nitrobenzyl alcohol (m-NBA), was found to improve total signal intensity (Itot), increase the highest observed charge states (zhigh), and raise the average charge states (zavg) of all tested oligonucleotides analyzed in negative ESI. To quantify these increases, signal enhancement ratios (SER1%) and charge enhancement coefficients (CEC1%) were introduced. The SER1%, (defined as the quotient of total oligonucleotide ion abundances with 1 % m-NBA divided by total oligonucleotide abundance without m-NBA) was found to be greater than unity for every oligonucleotide tested. The CEC1% values (defined as the average charge state in the presence of 1 % m-NBA minus the average charge state in the absence of m-NBA) were found to be uniformly positive. Upon close inspection, the degree of charge enhancement for longer oligonucleotides was found to be dependent upon thymine density (i.e., the number and the location of phospho-thymidine units). A correlation between the charge enhancement induced by the presence of m-NBA and the apparent gas-phase acidity (largely determined by the sequence of thymine units but also by the presence of protons on other nucleobases) of multiply deprotonated oligonucleotide species, was thus established. Ammonium cations appeared to be directly involved in the m-NBA supercharging mechanism, and their role seems to be consistent with previously postulated ESI mechanisms describing desorption/ionization of single-stranded DNA into the gas phase.

  2. Single electron ionization and electron capture cross sections for (C6+, H2O) interaction within the Classical Trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, H. N.; Dao, D. D.; Incerti, S.; Bernal, M. A.; Karamitros, M.; Nhan Hao, T. V.; Dang, T. M.; Francis, Z.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we present a derivation of cross sections for single ionization and electron capture processes within the Classical Trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) approach. Specifically, we have used a potential stemming from an ab initio calculation in Green et al.'s framework to describe the dynamics of the water molecule system. Proposing a modified version of the Classical Over-Barrier (COB) potential, we have found that a cut-off of roughly 28 a.u. on the initial distance of the projectile produced a reasonable accuracy. A global agreement has been obtained in our calculations compared to experimental and other theoretical results for C6+ ion energies ranging from 10 keV/u to 10 MeV/u.

  3. Inner-shell capture and ionization in collisions of H+, He2+, and Li3+ projectiles with neon and carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, A. L.; Reading, J. F.; Becker, R. L.

    1981-02-01

    Theoretical methods used previously for H+, He2+, and C6+ collisions with neutral argon atoms have been applied to collisions of H+, He2+, and Li3+ projectiles with neon, and to collisions of H+ with carbon targets. The energy range covered by the calculations is 0.4 to 4.0 MeV/amu for the neon target, and 0.2 to 2.0 MeV/amu for carbon. We calculate single-electron amplitudes for target K-shell ionization and target K- and L-shell, to projectile K-shell, charge transfer. These single-electron amplitudes are used, in an independent-particle model that allows for multielectron processes, to compute K-shell vacancy production cross sections σIPMVK, and cross sections σIPMC,VK for producing a charge-transfer state of the projectile in the coincidence with a K-shell vacancy in the target. These cross sections are in reasonable agreement with the recent experiments of Rødbro et al. at Aarhus. In particular, the calculated, as well as the experimental, σC,VK scale with projectile nuclear charge Zp less strongly than the Z5p of the Oppenheimer-Brinkman-Kramers (OBK) approximation. For He2+ and Li3+ projectiles at collision energies below where experimental data are available, our calculated multielectron corrections to the single-electron approximation for σC,VK are large.

  4. [Determination of four insecticide residues in honey and royal jelly by gas chromatography-negative chemical ionization mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Xia, Guanghui; Shen, Weijian; Yu, Keyao; Wu, Bin; Zhang, Rui; Shen, Chongyu; Zhao, Zengyun; Bian, Xiaohong; Xu, Jiyang

    2014-07-01

    A method was developed for the determination of four insecticide residues in honey and royal jelly by gas chromatography-negative chemical ionization mass spectrometry (GC-NCI/MS). The honey and royal jelly samples were treated with different preparation methods as the result of the different components. The honey sample was extracted with ethyl acetate and cleaned up with primary second amine, and the royal jelly sample was extracted with acetonitrile-water (1:1, v/v), and cleaned up with a C18 solid-phase extraction column. Finally, the extracts of the honey and royal jelly were analyzed by GC-NCI/MS in selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode separately. External standard calibration method was used for quantification. The linearities of calibration curves of the four insecticides were good with the correlation coefficients greater than 0.99 in the range of 50-500 microg/L. The limits of the detection (LODs) of the four insecticides were in the range of 0.12- 5.0 microg/kg, and the limits of the quantification (LOQs) were in the range of 0.40-16.5 microg/kg. The recoveries of the four insecticides spiked in honey and royal jelly at three spiked levels (10, 15 and 20 microg/kg) were in the range of 78.2 -110.0%, and the relative standard deviations (RSDs) were all below 14%. The sensitivity and selectivity of this method were good with no interfering peaks. The proposed method is simple quick and effective to analyze the four insecticide residues in honey and royal jelly.

  5. Quantitative analysis of THC, 11-OH-THC, and THCCOOH in human hair by negative ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, D; Haughey, H; Cone, E; Huestis, M; Foltz, R; Rollins, D

    1995-10-01

    A sensitive and specific method was developed for the quantitative analysis of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), 11 -hydroxy-THC (11-OH-THC), and 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THCCOOH) in human hair. Deuterated internal standards were added to hair samples, and samples were digested overnight in 1 N NaOH at 37 degrees C. Digest solutions were extracted with a liquid-liquid extraction procedure, which was previously developed in our laboratory for the analysis of plasma and whole blood. Derivatized extracts were analyzed on a Finnigan 4500" mass spectrometer in negative ion chemical ionization mode using methane as the reagent gas, hydrogen as the carrier gas, and a Restek Rtx 200-15M-0.25-microm capillary column. The assay was linear up to 50 ng/mg hair (r, 0.99) for all three compounds and was capable of detecting 10 pg THC and THCCOOH and 100 pg 11-OH-THC on column. The intra-assay precision ranged from 2.1 to 11.2% for the three analytes; the interassay precision ranged from 4.4 to 13.0%. The method was used to detect and quantitate the presence of THC, 11-OH-THC, and THCCOOH in human hair obtained from eight regular users of cannabis. THC, but not 11-OH-THC or THCCOOH, was detectable in the hair shaft above the assay limit of quantitation. Four laboratory wash procedures were also evaluated for their effect on the measured concentration of THC in hair. in seven of eight subjects, a methylene chloride wash procedure substantially reduced the measured THC concentration by up to 50%. The gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric assay is currently being used to support pharmacokinetic studies of drug disposition into the hair of humans and animals.

  6. Selective linkage detection of O-sialoglycan isomers by negative electrospray ionization ion trap tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Casal, Enriqueta; Lebrón-Aguilar, Rosa; Moreno, Francisco Javier; Corzo, Nieves; Quintanilla-López, Jesús Eduardo

    2010-04-15

    Sialylated O-linked oligosaccharides are involved in many biological processes, such as cell-cell interactions, cell-substance adhesion, and virus-host interactions. These activities depend on their structure, which is frequently determined by tandem mass spectrometry. However, these spectra are frequently analyzer-dependent, which makes it difficult to develop widely applicable analytical methods. In order to deepen the origin of this behavior, two couples of isomers of sialylated O-linked oligosaccharides, NeuAc alpha2-3Gal beta1-3GalNAc-ol/Gal beta1-3(NeuAc alpha2-6)GalNAc-ol and NeuGc alpha2-3Gal beta1-3GalNAc-ol/Gal beta1-3(NeuGc alpha2-6)GalNAc-ol, were analyzed by liquid chromatography/negative electrospray ionization ion trap tandem mass spectrometry (LC/ESI(-)-MS(n)) using both an ion trap and a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. Results clearly showed that while ions obtained in the triple quadrupole instrument fitted very well with the standard fragmentation routes, in the ion trap several intense ions could not be explained by these rules, specially a fragment at m/z 597. Furthermore, this ion was observed in the mass spectrum of those isomers that sialic acid binds to GalNAc by an alpha2-6 linkage. From the MS(3) spectrum of this ion an unexpected structure was deduced, and it led to propose alternative fragmentation pathways. Molecular mechanics calculations suggested that the found atypical route could be promoted by a hydrogen bond located only in alpha2-6-linked oligosaccharides. It has also been demonstrated that this process follows a slow kinetic, explaining why it cannot be observed using an ion beam-type mass analyzer. In conclusion, ion traps seem to be more appropriate than triple quadrupoles to develop a reliable analytical method to distinguish between isomeric O-linked glycans.

  7. Soft Ionization of Saturated Hydrocarbons, Alcohols and Nonpolar Compounds by Negative-Ion Direct Analysis in Real-Time Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cody, Robert B.; Dane, A. John

    2013-03-01

    Large polarizable n-alkanes (approximately C18 and larger), alcohols, and other nonpolar compounds can be detected as negative ions when sample solutions are injected directly into the sampling orifice of the atmospheric pressure interface of the time-of-flight mass spectrometer with the direct analysis in real time (DART) ion source operating in negative-ion mode. The mass spectra are dominated by peaks corresponding to [M + O2]‾•. No fragmentation is observed, making this a very soft ionization technique for samples that are otherwise difficult to analyze by DART. Detection limits for cholesterol were determined to be in the low nanogram range.

  8. Laser dissection sampling modes for direct mass spectral analysis [using a hybrid optical microscopy/laser ablation liquid vortex capture/electrospray ionization system

    SciTech Connect

    Cahill, John F.; Kertesz, Vilmos; Van Berkel, Gary J.

    2016-02-01

    Here, laser microdissection coupled directly with mass spectrometry provides the capability of on-line analysis of substrates with high spatial resolution, high collection efficiency, and freedom on shape and size of the sampling area. Establishing the merits and capabilities of the different sampling modes that the system provides is necessary in order to select the best sampling mode for characterizing analytically challenging samples. The capabilities of laser ablation spot sampling, laser ablation raster sampling, and laser 'cut and drop' sampling modes of a hybrid optical microscopy/laser ablation liquid vortex capture electrospray ionization mass spectrometry system were compared for the analysis of single cells and tissue. Single Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cells were monitored for their monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG) and diacylglyceryltrimethylhomo-Ser (DGTS) lipid content using the laser spot sampling mode, which was capable of ablating individual cells (4-15 m) even when agglomerated together. Turbid Allium Cepa cells (150 m) having unique shapes difficult to precisely measure using the other sampling modes could be ablated in their entirety using laser raster sampling. Intact microdissections of specific regions of a cocaine-dosed mouse brain tissue were compared using laser 'cut and drop' sampling. Since in laser 'cut and drop' sampling whole and otherwise unmodified sections are captured into the probe, 100% collection efficiencies were achieved. Laser ablation spot sampling has the highest spatial resolution of any sampling mode, while laser ablation raster sampling has the highest sampling area adaptability of the sampling modes. In conclusion, laser ablation spot sampling has the highest spatial resolution of any sampling mode, useful in this case for the analysis of single cells. Laser ablation raster sampling was best for sampling regions with unique shapes that are difficult to measure using other sampling modes. Laser 'cut and drop' sampling

  9. Laser dissection sampling modes for direct mass spectral analysis [using a hybrid optical microscopy/laser ablation liquid vortex capture/electrospray ionization system

    DOE PAGES

    Cahill, John F.; Kertesz, Vilmos; Van Berkel, Gary J.

    2016-02-01

    Here, laser microdissection coupled directly with mass spectrometry provides the capability of on-line analysis of substrates with high spatial resolution, high collection efficiency, and freedom on shape and size of the sampling area. Establishing the merits and capabilities of the different sampling modes that the system provides is necessary in order to select the best sampling mode for characterizing analytically challenging samples. The capabilities of laser ablation spot sampling, laser ablation raster sampling, and laser 'cut and drop' sampling modes of a hybrid optical microscopy/laser ablation liquid vortex capture electrospray ionization mass spectrometry system were compared for the analysis ofmore » single cells and tissue. Single Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cells were monitored for their monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG) and diacylglyceryltrimethylhomo-Ser (DGTS) lipid content using the laser spot sampling mode, which was capable of ablating individual cells (4-15 m) even when agglomerated together. Turbid Allium Cepa cells (150 m) having unique shapes difficult to precisely measure using the other sampling modes could be ablated in their entirety using laser raster sampling. Intact microdissections of specific regions of a cocaine-dosed mouse brain tissue were compared using laser 'cut and drop' sampling. Since in laser 'cut and drop' sampling whole and otherwise unmodified sections are captured into the probe, 100% collection efficiencies were achieved. Laser ablation spot sampling has the highest spatial resolution of any sampling mode, while laser ablation raster sampling has the highest sampling area adaptability of the sampling modes. In conclusion, laser ablation spot sampling has the highest spatial resolution of any sampling mode, useful in this case for the analysis of single cells. Laser ablation raster sampling was best for sampling regions with unique shapes that are difficult to measure using other sampling modes. Laser 'cut and drop

  10. Differential Lipid Profiles of Normal Human Brain Matter and Gliomas by Positive and Negative Mode Desorption Electrospray Ionization – Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Pirro, Valentina; Hattab, Eyas M.; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A.; Cooks, R. Graham

    2016-01-01

    Desorption electrospray ionization—mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) imaging was used to analyze unmodified human brain tissue sections from 39 subjects sequentially in the positive and negative ionization modes. Acquisition of both MS polarities allowed more complete analysis of the human brain tumor lipidome as some phospholipids ionize preferentially in the positive and others in the negative ion mode. Normal brain parenchyma, comprised of grey matter and white matter, was differentiated from glioma using positive and negative ion mode DESI-MS lipid profiles with the aid of principal component analysis along with linear discriminant analysis. Principal component–linear discriminant analyses of the positive mode lipid profiles was able to distinguish grey matter, white matter, and glioma with an average sensitivity of 93.2% and specificity of 96.6%, while the negative mode lipid profiles had an average sensitivity of 94.1% and specificity of 97.4%. The positive and negative mode lipid profiles provided complementary information. Principal component–linear discriminant analysis of the combined positive and negative mode lipid profiles, via data fusion, resulted in approximately the same average sensitivity (94.7%) and specificity (97.6%) of the positive and negative modes when used individually. However, they complemented each other by improving the sensitivity and specificity of all classes (grey matter, white matter, and glioma) beyond 90% when used in combination. Further principal component analysis using the fused data resulted in the subgrouping of glioma into two groups associated with grey and white matter, respectively, a separation not apparent in the principal component analysis scores plots of the separate positive and negative mode data. The interrelationship of tumor cell percentage and the lipid profiles is discussed, and how such a measure could be used to measure residual tumor at surgical margins. PMID:27658243

  11. Analysis of low molecular weight acids by negative mode matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Shroff, Rohit; Muck, Alexander; Svatos, Ales

    2007-01-01

    Free 9-aminoacridine base is demonstrated to be a suitable matrix for negative mode matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometric (MALDI-TOFMS) analysis of a wide range of low molecular weight organic acids including aliphatic (from acetic to palmitic acid), aromatic acids, phytohormones (e.g. jasmonic and salicylic acids), and amino acids. Low limits of quantitation in the femtomolar range (jasmonic - 250 fmol; caffeic - 160 fmol and salicylic - 12.5 fmol) and linear detector response over two concentration orders in the pico- and femtomolar range are extremely encouraging for the direct study of such acids in complex biological matrices.

  12. Measurement of low picomolar levels of triamcinolone acetonide in human bronchoalveolar lavage fluid by gas chromatography-electron-capture negative-ion mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, W C; Liu, M C; Bickel, C; Argenti, D; Heald, D; Schleimer, R P

    2001-03-01

    The intense inherent electron-capture properties of the C21 acetate derivative of triamcinolone acetonide (TAA) under methane chemical ionization mass spectrometric conditions were exploited for the development of a highly sensitive and selective gas chromatography-mass spectrometric (GC-MS) technique for measurement of levels of TAA in human bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid. After the addition of 3.0 ng of a heptadeuterated analog of TAA and varying concentrations of TAA to 2-ml aliquots of BAL fluid, the deuterium and protium forms of the steroid were extracted with diethyl ether, converted to the C21 acetate derivative, and purified via adsorptive chromatography prior to GC-MS analysis. Standard curves obtained from 2-ml aliquots of BAL fluid were linear over a wide range of concentrations of TAA from 0.0 to 24,600 pg/2-ml aliquots of BAL fluid. Levels as low as 6.0 pg/ml (13.8 pmol x L(-1)) in BAL fluid can be reliably determined in 2-ml aliquots of the biological fluid with <10% error. These findings suggest that the assay method exploiting the intense electron-capture properties of TAA is highly suitable for determination of the deposition pattern and in vivo kinetics of TAA in human airways following inhalation of the steroid.

  13. Comparison of Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry and Gas Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry with Electron Ionization and Negative-Ion Chemical Ionization for Analyses of Pesticides at Trace Levels in Atmospheric Samples

    PubMed Central

    Raina, Renata; Hall, Patricia

    2008-01-01

    A comparison of detection limits of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) in selected ion monitoring (SIM) with gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) in selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode with both electron ionization (EI) and negative-ion chemical ionization (NCI) are presented for over 50 pesticides ranging from organochlorines (OCs), organophosphorus pesticides (OPs) and pre-emergent herbicides used in the Canadian prairies (triallate, trifluralin, ethalfluralin). The developed GC-EI/SIM, GC-NCI/SIM, and GC-NCI/SRM are suitable for the determination of pesticides in air sample extracts at concentrations <100 pg μL−1 (<100 pg m−3 in air). No one method could be used to analyze the range of pre-emergent herbicides, OPs, and OCs investigated. In general GC-NCI/SIM provided the lowest method detection limits (MDLs commonly 2.5–10 pg μL−1) along with best confirmation (<25% RSD of ion ratio), while GC-NCI/SRM is recommended for use where added selectivity or confirmation is required (such as parathion-ethyl, tokuthion, carbofenothion). GC-EI/SRM at concentration <100 pg μL−1 was not suitable for most pesticides. GC-EI/SIM was more prone to interference issues than NCI methods, but gave good sensitivity (MDLs 1–10 pg μL−1) for pesticides with poor NCI response (OPs: sulfotep, phorate, aspon, ethion, and OCs: alachlor, aldrin, perthane, and DDE, DDD, DDT). PMID:19609395

  14. Comparison of negative-ion proton-transfer with iodide ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry for quantification of isocyanic acid in ambient air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodward-Massey, Robert; Taha, Youssef M.; Moussa, Samar G.; Osthoff, Hans D.

    2014-12-01

    Isocyanic acid (HNCO) is a trace gas pollutant of potential importance to human health whose measurement has recently become possible through the development of negative-ion proton-transfer chemical ionization mass spectrometry (NI-PT-CIMS) with acetate reagent ion. In this manuscript, an alternative ionization and detection scheme, in which HNCO is quantified by iodide CIMS (iCIMS) as a cluster ion at m/z 170, is described. The sensitivity was inversely proportional to water vapor concentration but could be made independent of humidity changes in the sampled air by humidifying the ion-molecule reaction (IMR) region of the CIMS. The performance of the two ionization schemes was compared and contrasted using ambient air measurements of HNCO mixing ratios in Calgary, AB, Canada, by NI-PT-CIMS with acetate reagent ion from Dec 16 to 20, 2013, and by the same CIMS operated in iCIMS mode from Feb 3 to 7, 2014. The iCIMS exhibited a greater signal-to-noise ratio than the NI-PT-CIMS, not because of its sensitivity, which was lower (˜0.083 normalized counts per second (NCPS) per parts-per-trillion by volume (pptv) compared to ˜9.7 NCPS pptv-1), but because of a much lower and more stable background (3 ± 4 compared to a range of ˜2 × 103 to ˜6 × 103 NCPS). For the Feb 2014 data set, the HNCO mixing ratios in Calgary air ranged from <12 to 94 pptv (median 34 pptv), were marginally higher at night than during day, and correlated with nitrogen oxide (NOx = NO + NO2) mixing ratios and submicron particle volume. The ratios of HNCO to NOx observed are within the range of emission ratios reported for gasoline-powered motor vehicles.

  15. Determination of triclosan metabolites by using in-source fragmentation from high-performance liquid chromatography/negative atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jian-lin; Liu, Jie; Cai, Zongwei

    2010-07-15

    Triclosan is a widely used broad-spectrum antibacterial agent that acts by specifically inhibiting enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase. An in vitro metabolic study of triclosan was performed by using Sprague-Dawley (SD) rat liver S9 and microsome, while the in vivo metabolism was investigated on SD rats. Twelve metabolites were identified by using in-source fragmentation from high-performance liquid chromatography/negative atmospheric pressure chemical ionization ion trap mass spectrometry (HPLC/APCI-ITMS) analysis. Compared to electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) that gave little fragmentation for triclosan and its metabolites, the in-source fragmentation under APCI provided intensive fragmentations for the structural identifications. The in vitro metabolic rate of triclosan was quantitatively determined by using HPLC/ESI-ITMS with the monitoring of the selected triclosan molecular ion. The metabolism results indicated that glucuronidation and sulfonation were the major pathways of phase II metabolism and the hydroxylated products were the major phase I metabolites. Moreover, glucose, mercapturic acid and cysteine conjugates of triclosan were also observed in the urine samples of rats orally administrated with triclosan.

  16. Determination of enantiomeric composition by negative-ion electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry using deprotonated N-(3,5-dinitrobenzoyl)amino acids as chiral selectors.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Bobby N; Zu, Chengli; Koscho, Michael E

    2005-10-01

    The ability to use mixtures of deprotonated N-(3,5-dinitrobenzoyl)amino acids as chiral selectors for the determination of enantiomeric composition by electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry is demonstrated. For each experiment, two N-(3,5-dinitrobenzoyl)amino acids were chosen such that each would have opposite selectivity for the enantiomers of the analyte. Electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry, monitored in the negative ion mode, of solutions containing the two N-(3,5-dinitrobenzoyl)amino acids, sodium hydroxide, and the analyte, in a one-to-one mixture of methanol and water, afford peaks in the mass spectrum that correspond to the deprotonated 1:1 analyte-selector complexes. The ratio of the intensities of the complexes in the mass spectrum can be related to the enantiomeric composition of the analyte. Additionally, the sense and extent of chiral recognition is consistent with chromatographic observations, using chiral stationary phases derived from N-(3,5-dinitrobenzoyl)amino acids. Each analysis of enantiomeric composition requires less than 10 s to complete, indicating that this method has great potential for the development of fast-/high-throughput chiral analyses.

  17. Negative Differential Resistance of CaF 2/CdF 2 Triple-Barrier Resonant-Tunneling Diode on Si(111) Grown by Partially Ionized Beam Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Masahiro; Aoki, Yuichi; Saito, Wataru; Tsuganezawa, Mika

    1999-02-01

    Room-temperature negative differential resistance (NDR) of triple-barrier cadmium di-fluoride (CdF2)/calcium di-fluoride (CaF2) heterostructure resonant-tunneling diode (RTD) on a Si(111) substrate has been demonstrated. CdF2/CaF2 multilayered heterostructures were grown on a Si(111) substrate using partially ionized beam epitaxy to obtain atomically flat interfaces. The RTD structures, which consist of triple CaF2 energy barriers and double CdF2 quantum wells, were fabricated by electron beam (EB) lithography and dry etching to avoid thermal and chemical damage to the CdF2 layers. In the current-voltage characteristics of the RTD, NDR was clearly observed even at room temperature and the maximum peak-to-valley (P/V) ratio was about 6.

  18. Linkage analysis of chromophore-labeled disaccharides and linear oligosaccharides by negative ion fast atom bombardment ionization and collisional-induced dissociation with B/E scanning.

    PubMed

    Li, D T; Her, G R

    1993-06-01

    Negative ion fast atom bombardment ionization in combination with collisional-induced dissociation mass spectrometry differentiates the linkage position(s) of chromophore-labeled di- and oligosaccharides. The formation of glycosylamines rather than the more popular reductive amination has been used to label the reducing end of sugars with ultraviolet or fluorescence tags. Two types of fragment ions were detected, one with the charge carried on the chromophore end and the other with the charge carried on the nonreducing terminus. These ions are essential to the determination of interglycosidic linkage and they are produced from the ring cleavage of the reducing end monosaccharide. Additionally, the anomeric configuration of the 1-4-linked residue could be assigned according to the relative abundance of the fragment ions.

  19. Validity of Saha's equation of thermal ionization for negatively charged spherical particles in complex plasmas in thermal equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Sodha, M. S.; Mishra, S. K.

    2011-04-15

    The authors have discussed the validity of Saha's equation for the charging of negatively charged spherical particles in a complex plasma in thermal equilibrium, even when the tunneling of the electrons, through the potential energy barrier surrounding the particle is considered. It is seen that the validity requires the probability of tunneling of an electron through the potential energy barrier surrounding the particle to be independent of the direction (inside to outside and vice versa) or in other words the Born's approximation should be valid.

  20. Ballpoint pen inks: characterization by positive and negative ion-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry for the forensic examination of writing inks.

    PubMed

    Ng, Lay-Keow; Lafontaine, Pierre; Brazeau, Luc

    2002-11-01

    A method based on profiling of dye components by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI/MS) is described for the characterization of ballpoint pen inks. The method involves benzyl alcohol (30 microL) extraction of ink from paper. The extracts of ink lines 1 and 5 mm in length are used for direct ESI/MS analysis in positive and negative modes, respectively. The instrumental analysis takes 3 min. Basic and acid dyes in the inks are detected in the positive and negative modes, respectively, with each dye yielding one or two characteristic ion peaks. The mass spectrum, which is mainly a compositional signature of the dyes in the ink, was not affected by the type of paper from which the ink was extracted, or by natural ageing of the ink on document in the absence of light. However, exposure to fluorescent illumination caused dealkylation of polyalkylated basic dyes and resulted in changes in the homologous distribution of the dyes. In this study, a total of 44 blue inks, 23 black inks, and 10 red inks have been analyzed, and the mass spectra were used to establish a searchable library. ESI/MS analysis provides a simple and fast way to compare ink specimens and in combination with on-line library search permits rapid screening of inks for forensic document investigations.

  1. Analysis of nitroaromatic compounds in complex samples using solid-phase microextraction and isotope dilution quantification gas chromatography-electron-capture negative ionisation mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jönsson, S; Gustavsson, L; van Bavel, B

    2007-09-14

    A solid-phase microextraction (SPME) method using gas chromatography-electron-capture negative ionisation mass spectrometry (GC-ECNI-MS) and isotope dilution quantification for the analysis of nitroaromatic compounds in complex, water based samples has been optimised. For ionisation, ECNI was the most sensitive and selective method. SPME was compared to solid-phase extraction (SPE) and found to be more sensitive for these small volume samples. LODs were in the range 0.02-38ngL(-1) for SPME and 6-184ngL(-1) for SPE, respectively. The SPME method was applied on samples in the ngL(-1) level from artificial reed beds treated with sludge containing residues from explosives and pharmaceuticals.

  2. Detection and quantitation of fatty acid acyl conjugates of triamcinolone acetonide via gas chromatography-electron-capture negative-ion mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Walter C; Blum, Andrew E; Bickel, Carol A; Heller, Nicola M; Schleimer, Robert P

    2003-11-15

    The inherent electron-capture properties of triamcinolone acetonide (TAA) fatty acid conjugates were exploited for development of a GC-MS technique for quantitation of C21 long-chain fatty esters of TAA synthesized in BEAS-2B cells, an immortalized airway epithelium cell line. TAA esters extracted from BEAS-2B cells were purified and detected via selected ion monitoring of the molecular anions generated from the TAA esters under electron-capture negative-ion mass spectrometric conditions. Standard curves were linear over a range of 0.0 to >4.5 ng/mg protein with r(2) values = 1. Levels of TAA conjugates extracted from BEAS-2B treated with 10(-5)M TAA for 24h ranged from 0.024 to 0.301 ng/mg protein. Further evidence for confirmation of the identity of TAA fatty esters formed in BEAS-2B cells was obtained via selected reaction monitoring. The transition monitored was formation of the carboxy anion generated from each of the respective molecular anions of the TAA esters during collision-induced decomposition. These findings indicate that the GC-MS analysis is suitable for studies of the kinetics of the TAA fatty acid conjugates formation in vitro and may be directly applicable to determination of the kinetics of TAA fatty acid conjugation in vivo.

  3. Simulation of Low Gain Avalanche Detector characteristics based on the concept of negative feedback in irradiated silicon detectors with carrier impact ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbitskaya, E.; Eremin, V.; Zabrodskii, A.; Luukka, P.

    2016-12-01

    In this study the main characteristics of silicon Low Gain Avalanche Detectors (LGAD), the dependencies of the collected charge versus bias voltage and fluence, are calculated to fit experimental data. The calculations are based on two previously developed Ioffe Institute models of radiation degradation in Si detectors: 1) a model of two effective energy levels of radiation-induced defects, and 2) a mechanism of internal negative feedback responsible for the gain degradation in irradiated Si detectors originating from the avalanche multiplication at the detector junction. The combination of these models describes well the properties of irradiated p-i-n detectors in a wide range of fluences. For simulating the LGAD characteristics the models are adapted to its n+-pbi-p-p+ structure, where the built-in boron-doped layer pbi produces high electric field sufficient for carrier impact ionization. It is shown that the developed models give adequate quantitative description of the experimental results for the LGADs up to the fluence of 2×1015 n/cm2 including the detector pulse response; however, additional boron removal from the pbi layer is required to have the best correlation with the experimental data. Similar to the physical model developed for silicon strip detectors operated at high voltage, the results are interpreted in terms of the internal negative feedback mechanism. It is shown that in irradiated LGADs this feedback leads to the transfer of a significant fraction of the potential drop from the built-in layer toward the p+ contact. It initiates two negative effects, which both cause the gain degradation with irradiation: the lowering of the electric field in the n+-pbi region that reduces the multiplication probability, and the increase of the collection time and trapping-related charge losses.

  4. Measurement of the {beta}{sup +} and Orbital Electron-Capture Decay Rates in Fully Ionized, Hydrogenlike, and Heliumlike {sup 140}Pr Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinov, Yu. A.; Geissel, H.; Winckler, N.; Knoebel, R.; Litvinov, S. A.; Scheidenberger, C.; Bosch, F.; Beckert, K.; Brandau, C.; Dimopoulou, C.; Hess, S.; Kozhuharov, C.; Mazzocco, M.; Nociforo, C.; Nolden, F.; Prochazka, A.; Reuschl, R.; Steck, M.; Stoehlker, T.; Trassinelli, M.

    2007-12-31

    We report on the first measurement of the {beta}{sup +} and orbital electron-capture decay rates of {sup 140}Pr nuclei with the simplest electron configurations: bare nuclei, hydrogenlike, and heliumlike ions. The measured electron-capture decay constant of hydrogenlike {sup 140}Pr{sup 58+} ions is about 50% larger than that of heliumlike {sup 140}Pr{sup 57+} ions. Moreover, {sup 140}Pr ions with one bound electron decay faster than neutral {sup 140}Pr{sup 0+} atoms with 59 electrons. To explain this peculiar observation one has to take into account the conservation of the total angular momentum, since only particular spin orientations of the nucleus and of the captured electron can contribute to the allowed decay.

  5. X-ray emission following K-L double ionization by electron impact and K capture: Vacancy-production probabilities and structure of the Kα satellite spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li-Scholz, Angela; Leiberich, A.; Scholz, W.

    1982-12-01

    Kα x-ray satellites following K-electron capture in 55Fe and electron impact on Mn have been measured with a high-resolution spectrometer. Ratios of double- to single-vacancy-production probability are found to be PKL=(2.5+/-0.5)×10-3 and (9.5+/-0.9)×10-3 for capture and impact, respectively. An evaluation of vacancy rearrangement in the L shell before satellite emission has been carried out with the use of published level widths. It is found that in electron impact, as distinct from K capture, essentially only satellites associated with a 2p spectator vacancy are observed. This observation is at variance with certain commonly used satellite assignments. Energies and intensities of the satellite transitions have been calculated in intermediate coupling and coordinations are proposed for the stronger lines.

  6. Desulfurization of phosphorothioate oligonucleotides via the sulfur-by-oxygen replacement induced by the hydroxyl radical during negative electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lianming; White, David E; Ye, Connie; Vogt, Frederick G; Terfloth, Gerald J; Matsuhashi, Hayao

    2012-07-01

    While the occurrence of desulfurization of phosphorothioate oligonucleotides in solution is well established, this study represents the first attempt to investigate the basis of the unexpected desulfurization via the net sulfur-by-oxygen (S-O) replacement during negative electrospray ionization (ESI). The current work, facilitated by quantitative mass deconvolution, demonstrates that considerable desulfurization can take place even under common negative ESI operating conditions. The extent of desulfurization is dependent on the molar phosphorothioate oligonucleotide-to-hydroxyl radical ratio, which is consistent with the corona discharge-induced origin of the hydroxyl radical leading to the S-O replacement. This hypothesis is supported by the fact that an increase of the high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) flow rate and the on-column concentration of a phosphorothioate oligonucleotide, as well as a decrease of the electrospray voltage reduce the degree of desulfurization. Comparative LC-tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) sequencing of a phosphorothioate oligonucleotide and its corresponding desulfurization product revealed evidence that the S-O replacement occurs at multiple phosphorothioate internucleotide linkage sites. In practice, the most convenient and effective strategy for minimizing this P = O artifact is to increase the LC flow rate and the on-column concentration of phosphorothioate oligonucleotides. Another approach to mitigate possible detrimental effects of the undesired desulfurization is to operate the ESI source at a very low electrospray voltage to diminish the corona discharge; however this will significantly compromise sensitivity when analyzing the low-level P = O impurities in phosphorothioate oligonucleotides.

  7. Liquid chromatography/negative electrospray ionization ion trap MS(2) mass spectrometry application for the determination of microcystins occurrence in Southern Portugal water reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, M A; Reis, M P; Mateus, M C

    2013-11-01

    Microcystins (MCs) are toxins produced by cyanobacteria which are common organisms in the phytoplankton of eutrophic lakes, rivers and freshwater reservoirs. In the present work, a novel method of liquid chromatography-electrospray ion trap tandem mass spectrometry (LC/ESI/Ion trap-MS/MS), operated in the negative ionization mode, was developed for the analysis of these cyanotoxins. The method was applied to determine the amounts of total microcystins-LR, -YR and -RR in two water reservoirs in Southern Portugal, namely Alqueva and Beliche. A total of 30 water samples were analysed along 2011. Solid phase extraction (SPE) was used for sample cleaning-up and analyte enrichment. The extracted toxins were separated on a C18 column with a gradient of acetonitrile/water with 0.1% formic acid. Detection of microcystins was carried out using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) in the negative polarity mode, as this method gave a higher selectivity. The MC-RR, YR and LR quantification limits were 17.9, 31.7 and 15.8 ng/L, respectively; quite below the limits recommended by WHO guidelines for drinking water (1 μg/L). Total MC highest concentrations were found in the warm months of June, July and September in Alqueva sampling sites, with concentrations of MC LR and RR ranging 17-344 and 25-212 ng/L, respectively, showing comparable results for MC-RR and LR and slightly lower concentration of MC-YR. Detected values for Beliche reservoir were below quantification limits.

  8. Determination of midazolam and 1-hydroxymidazolam from plasma by gas chromatography coupled to methane negative chemical ionization mass spectrometry after sublingual administration of midazolam.

    PubMed

    Kaartama, Ruut; Jarho, Pekka; Savolainen, Jouko; Kokki, Hannu; Lehtonen, Marko

    2011-06-01

    A sensitive and selective gas chromatographic mass spectrometric method for the determination of midazolam and its biologically active metabolite, 1-hydroxymidazolam, in rabbit plasma has been developed and validated. Sample preparation includes mixed-mode solid-phase extraction and derivatization with silylating reagents. Midazolam-d4 was used as an internal standard for the determination of parent drug and its active metabolite. The instrumentation consisted of a capillary column gas chromatography and a single quadrupole mass spectrometer with a negative chemical ionization. The method was found to be valid in terms of selectivity, linearity, precision, accuracy, and recovery over the concentration range of 2-200 ng/ml and 1-100 ng/ml for midazolam and 1-hydroxymidazolam, respectively. For both analytes, the lower limit of quantification was 2 ng/ml. Midazolam was stable in stock solutions stored three months at -20°C and in human plasma stored for three months at -80°C. In addition, no degradation of midazolam was found after three freeze-thaw cycles, in short-term stability at room temperature for 24h, or in post-preparative stability in the autosampler. The validity of the method was further tested by performing a pharmacokinetic study of sublingual administration of midazolam in rabbits. The method will be used in studies related to a formulation development of novel midazolam formulations for use in paediatric anaesthesia.

  9. Pentafluorobenzyl esterification of haloacetic acids in tap water for simple and sensitive analysis by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with negative chemical ionization.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Can; Fujii, Yukiko; Yan, Junxia; Harada, Kouji H; Koizumi, Akio

    2015-01-01

    Chlorine is the most widely used disinfectant for control of waterborne diseases in drinking water treatment. It can react with natural organic matter in water and form haloacetic acids (HAAs). For analysis of HAA levels, derivatization with diazomethane is commonly recommended as the standard methodology in Japan. However, diazomethane is a carcinogenic alkylating agent. Therefore, in this study, a safe, simple, and sensitive quantification method was developed to monitor HAAs in drinking water. Pentafluorobenzyl esterification was used for pretreatment. The pentafluorobenzyl-ester derivative was detected by gas chromatography-negative ion chemical ionization-mass spectrometry analysis with very high sensitivity for HAAs analysis. The method has low detection limits (8-94 ng L(-1)) and good recovery rates (89-99%) for HAAs. The method was applied to 30 tap water samples from 15 cities in the Kansai region of Japan. The levels of HAAs detected were in the range 0.54-7.83 μg L(-1). Dichloroacetic acid, trichloroacetic acid, and bromochloroacetic acid were the major HAAs detected in most of the tap water, and accounted for 29%, 20% and 19% of the total HAAs, respectively. This method could be used for routine monitoring of HAAs in drinking water without exposure of workers to occupational hazards.

  10. Negative Ion Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry for the Analysis of 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol in Saliva of Rats Exposed to Chlorpyrifos

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, James A.; Timchalk, Chuck; Kousba, Ahmed A.; Wu, Hong; Valenzuela, Blandina R.; Hoppe, Eric W.

    2005-05-01

    Organophosphorus (OP) insecticides (e.g. chlorpyrifos) are widely used in a variety of applications, and the potential exists for significant occupational and environmental exposures. They have been associated with more occupational poisoning cases than any other class of insecticides. One of the best approaches for accurately assessing human dosimetry and determining risk from both occupational and environmental exposure is biomonitoring. Biological matrices such as blood and urine have been routinely used for biomonitoring; however, other matrices such as saliva represent a simple and readily obtainable fluid. As a result, saliva has been suggested as an alternative biological matrix for the evaluation of a broad range of biomarkers such as environmental contaminants, drugs of abuse, hormones, chemotherapeutics, heavy metals, and pesticides. Chlorpyrifos (CPF), and its major metabolite, 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCP), have been quantified in urine and blood as a biomarker for exposure to OP insecticides. The purpose of this study was to develop an analytical approach for detecting and quantitating the levels of TCP in saliva obtained from rats exposed to CPF and to evaluate the potential of saliva as a non-invasive biomonitoring matrix. Adult male rats were administered CPF, and blood and saliva were humanely collected for analysis of TCP and CPF. TCP was detected and quantitated in saliva using negative ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry with selected ion monitoring. Initial results indicate that saliva may be potentially utilized as a non-invasive biomonitoring matrix to determine exposure to organophosphate insecticides.

  11. Optimization of quadrupole ion storage mass spectrometric conditions for the analysis of selected polybrominated diphenyl ethers. Comparative approach with negative chemical ionization and electron impact mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Larrazábal, David; Angeles Martínez, Ma; Eljarrat, Ethel; Barceló, Damiá; Fabrellas, Begoña

    2004-10-01

    Gas chromatography coupled to quadrupole ion storage mass spectrometry (QISTMS) operating in the non-resonant mode is presented as an innovative approach for the analysis of selected polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). Although reductions in complexity and time needed for optimization are achieved in comparison with the resonant option, precise adjustment of the mass spectrometric conditions is required. Differences in isolation and fragmentation patterns of target species with degree of bromination were observed. The reliability of the method was confirmed by using standard solutions through the evaluation of certain quality parameters such as accuracy (92-108%), injection repeatability and reproducibility (coefficient of variation below 10% and 15%, respectively). Detection limits ranged from 62 to 621 fg, providing sensitivity similar to that of negative chemical ionisation (NCIMS) and greater than that of electron ionization mass spectrometry. The applicability of QISTMS method to real samples and matrix effects were evaluated through the analysis of some PBDE congeners in a sewage sludge sample from a Spanish waste-water treatment plant. Comparable results were obtained using QISTMS and NCIMS. According to these observations, QISTMS performed in the non-resonant mode may constitute a low-cost, rapid and reliable alternative to high-resolution devices for the analysis of selected PBDEs in environmental samples.

  12. Quantification of low levels of organochlorine pesticides using small volumes (negative chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Rodríguez, Laura B; Rodríguez-Estrella, Ricardo; Ellington, James Jackson; Evans, John J

    2007-07-01

    A solid phase extraction and gas chromatography with negative chemical ionization mass spectrometry in scan mode (GC-NCI-MS) method was developed to identify and quantify for the first time low levels of organochlorine pesticides (OCs) in plasma samples of less than 100 microl from wild birds. The method detection limits ranged from 0.012 to 0.102 pg/microl and the method reporting limit from 0.036 to 0.307 pg/microl for alpha, gamma, beta and delta-hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH), heptachlor, aldrin, heptachlor epoxide, endosulfan I, 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethylene (p,p'-DDE), dieldrin, endrin, endosulfan-II, endrin-aldehyde and endosulfan-sulfate. Pesticide levels in small serum samples from individual Falco sparverius, Sturnella neglecta, Mimus polyglottos and Columbina passerina were quantified. Concentrations ranged from not detected (n/d) to 204.9 pg/microl for some OC pesticides. All levels in the food web in and around cultivated areas showed the presence of pesticides notwithstanding the small areas for agriculture existing in the desert of Baja California peninsula.

  13. Gas phase enantiomeric distinction of (R)- and (S)-aromatic hydroxy esters by negative ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry using a chiral reagent gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancel, Valérie; Sellier, Nicole; Lesage, Denis; Fournier, Françoise; Tabet, Jean-Claude

    2004-10-01

    Negative ion chemical ionization (NICI) using a chiral reagent gas such as (2S,3S) butanediol (GSS) allows the differentiation of chiral [alpha] hydroxy esters (MR or MS). The distinction is significantly enhanced by using CID on the deprotonated hetero dimer [M + (GSS-H)]-. The contribution of a non covalent [M + (GSS-H)]- competitive form is very minor. In fact, a covalent form appears favored. To produce a covalent adduct ion, an enantioselectivity of the alkoxide attack on the electrophilic ester site to form a tetravalent adduct is suggested by the product ion abundances. This observed steric control is consistent with the one observed in solution (Cram-Felkin addition/reduction orientation). The dissociations under collision conditions of the product deprotonated diastereomeric compounds show a stereospecific effect in the elimination of alcohol from the tetravalent adduct ions rather than a regeneration of the deprotonated diol reagent as expected from non-covalent heterodimer. This study shows an orientation with a chiral compound that allows, from an analytical point of view, the distinction of enantiomers and the attribution of chirality in the gas phase under NICI conditions.

  14. Development of an SPE method for the determination of zaleplon and zopiclone in hemolyzed blood using fast GC with negative-ion chemical ionization MS.

    PubMed

    Karlonas, Nerijus; Ramanavicius, Arunas; Ramanaviciene, Almira

    2014-03-01

    An SPE procedure for the determination of zaleplon and zopiclone in low-volume human hemolyzed blood using fast GC with negative-ion chemical ionization MS has been developed and validated. Both analytes were well retained on Oasis MCX and HLB columns, and sufficient extraction efficiency was achieved at pH 9.0. For further study a hydrophilic-lipophilic sorbent Oasis HLB was selected due to the polarity of sorbent surface and its large surface area in order to achieve efficient extraction of both analytes in a single step. Special attention has been paid to choosing washing and eluting solvents, resulting in a particularly/extremely clean and moisture-free extract. The mean extraction efficiency was higher than 90.1% for zaleplon and 82.9% for zopiclone. The precision for zaleplon and zopiclone was between 3.04-10.58% and 4.08-9.52%, respectively. Whereas the accuracy was in the range from -5.73 to 6.00%, and from -7.00 to 6.32% for zaleplon and zopiclone, respectively. The results show that the developed method is accurate, selective, precise, and very fast with excellent recovery and low LOD and LOQ.

  15. Bio-oil Analysis Using Negative Electrospray Ionization: Comparative Study of High-Resolution Mass Spectrometers and Phenolic versus Sugaric Components

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Erica A.; Park, Soojin; Klein, Adam T.; Lee, Young Jin

    2012-05-16

    We have previously demonstrated that a petroleomic analysis could be performed for bio-oils and revealed the complex nature of bio-oils for the nonvolatile phenolic compounds (Smith, E.; Lee, Y. J. Energy Fuels 2010, 24, 5190−5198). As a subsequent study, we have adapted electrospray ionization in negative-ion mode to characterize a wide variety of bio-oil compounds. A comparative study of three common high-resolution mass spectrometers was performed to validate the methodology and to investigate the differences in mass discrimination and resolution. The mass spectrum is dominated by low mass compounds with m/z of 100–250, with some compounds being analyzable by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS). We could characterize over 800 chemical compositions, with only about 40 of them being previously known in GC–MS. This unveiled a much more complex nature of bio-oils than typically shown by GC–MS. The pyrolysis products of cellulose and hemicellulose, particularly polyhydroxy cyclic hydrocarbons (or what we call “sugaric” compounds), such as levoglucosan, could be effectively characterized with this approach. Phenolic compounds from lignin pyrolysis could be clearly distinguished in a contour map of double bond equivalent (DBE) versus the number of carbons from these sugaric compounds.

  16. The effects of ionizing radiation and dexamethasone on the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) and blood-tumor-barrier (BTB): Implications for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) of brain tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Dorn, R.V. III; Spickard, J.H.; Griebenow, M.L.

    1988-01-01

    Currently envisioned techniques for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) of brain tumors rely on the increased permeability of the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) (more specifically, the blood-tumor-barrier (BTB)) which occurs around the malignant tumor. As a result of this increased permeability, higher boron concentrations (Na/sub 2/B/sub 12/H/sub 11/SH) should be obtainable in the tumor than in the surrounding normal brain. The effects on the BBB and BTB by the ionizing component of this radiation and by the steroid dexamethasone (almost universally used in the clinical management of these patients) must be considered in the formulation of this treatment technique. 32 refs., 5 tabs.

  17. Identification of coagulase-negative staphylococci from bovine intramammary infection by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tomazi, Tiago; Gonçalves, Juliano Leonel; Barreiro, Juliana Regina; de Campos Braga, Patrícia Aparecida; Prada e Silva, Luis Felipe; Eberlin, Marcos Nogueira; dos Santos, Marcos Veiga

    2014-05-01

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) are among the main pathogens causing bovine intramammary infection (IMI) in many countries. However, one of the limitations related to the specific diagnosis of CoNS is the lack of an accurate, rapid, and convenient method that can differentiate the bacterial species comprising this group. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) to accurately identify CoNS species in dairy cow IMI. In addition, the study aimed to determine the frequency of CoNS species causing bovine IMI. A total of 108 bacterial isolates were diagnosed as CoNS by microbiological cultures from two milk samples collected from 21 dairy herds; the first sample was collected at the cow level (i.e., 1,242 composite samples from all quarters), while the second sample was collected at the mammary quarter level (i.e., 1,140 mammary samples collected from 285 cows). After CoNS isolation was confirmed by microbiological culture for both samples, all CoNS isolates (n=108) were genotypically differentiated by PCR restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of a partial groEL gene sequence and subjected to the MALDI-TOF MS identification procedure. MALDI-TOF MS correctly identified 103 (95.4%) of the CoNS isolates identified by PCR-RFLP at the species level. Eleven CoNS species isolated from bovine IMI were identified by PCR-RFLP, and the most prevalent species was Staphylococcus chromogenes (n=80; 74.1%). In conclusion, MALDI-TOF MS may be a reliable alternative method for differentiating CoNS species causing bovine IMI.

  18. Ionization-based detectors for gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Poole, Colin F

    2015-11-20

    The gas phase ionization detectors are the most widely used detectors for gas chromatography. The column and makeup gases commonly used in gas chromatography are near perfect insulators. This facilitates the detection of a minute number of charge carriers facilitating the use of ionization mechanisms of low efficiency while providing high sensitivity. The main ionization mechanism discussed in this report are combustion in a hydrogen diffusion flame (flame ionization detector), surface ionization in a plasma (thermionic ionization detector), photon ionization (photoionization detector and pulsed discharge helium ionization detector), attachment of thermal electrons (electron-capture detector), and ionization by collision with metastable helium species (helium ionization detector). The design, response characteristics, response mechanism, and suitability for fast gas chromatography are the main features summarized in this report. Mass spectrometric detection and atomic emission detection, which could be considered as ionization detectors of a more sophisticated and complex design, are not discussed in this report.

  19. Zero-Net-Charge Air Ionizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, W. R., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Instrument monitors air supplied by air ionizer and regulates ionizer to ensure net charge neutral. High-impedance electrometer and nulling control amplifier regulate output of air ionizer. Primarily intended to furnish ionized air having no net charge, instrument adaptable to generating air with positive or negative net charge is so desired. Useful where integrated circuit chips are manufactured, inspected, tested or assembled.

  20. A multi-residue method for pesticides analysis in green coffee beans using gas chromatography-negative chemical ionization mass spectrometry in selective ion monitoring mode.

    PubMed

    Pizzutti, Ionara R; de Kok, Andre; Dickow Cardoso, Carmem; Reichert, Bárbara; de Kroon, Marijke; Wind, Wouter; Weber Righi, Laís; Caiel da Silva, Rosselei

    2012-08-17

    In this study, a new gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method, using the very selective negative chemical ionization (NCI) mode, was developed and applied in combination with a modified acetonitrile-based extraction method (QuEChERS) for the analysis of a large number of pesticide residues (51 pesticides, including isomers and degradation products) in green coffee beans. A previously developed integrated sample homogenization and extraction method for both pesticides and mycotoxins analysis was used. An homogeneous slurry of green milled coffee beans and water (ratio 1:4, w/w) was prepared and extracted with acetonitrile/acetic acid (1%), followed by magnesium sulfate addition for phase separation. Aliquots from this extract could be used directly for LC-MS/MS analysis of mycotoxins and LC-amenable pesticides. For GC-MS analysis, a further clean-up was necessary. C18- and PSA-bonded silica were tested as dispersive solid-phase extraction (d-SPE) sorbents, separate and as a mixture, and the best results were obtained using C18-bonded silica. For the optimal sensitivity and selectivity, GC-MS detection in the NCI-selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode had to be used to allow the fast analysis of the difficult coffee bean matrix. The validation was performed by analyzing recovery samples at three different spike concentrations, 10, 20 and 50 μg kg(-1), with 6 replicates (n=6) at each concentration. Linearity (r(2)) of calibration curves, estimated instrument and method limits of detection and limits of quantification (LOD(i), LOD(m), LOQ(i) and LOQ(m), respectively), accuracy (as recovery %), precision (as RSD%) and matrix effects (%) were determined for each individual pesticide. From the 51 analytes (42 parent pesticides, 4 isomers and 5 degradation products) determined by GC-MS (NCI-SIM), approximately 76% showed average recoveries between 70-120% and 75% and RSD ≤ 20% at the lowest spike concentration of 10 μg kg(-1), the target method LOQ. For the

  1. Method and apparatus to monitor a beam of ionizing radiation

    DOEpatents

    Blackburn, Brandon W.; Chichester, David L.; Watson, Scott M.; Johnson, James T.; Kinlaw, Mathew T.

    2015-06-02

    Methods and apparatus to capture images of fluorescence generated by ionizing radiation and determine a position of a beam of ionizing radiation generating the fluorescence from the captured images. In one embodiment, the fluorescence is the result of ionization and recombination of nitrogen in air.

  2. Matrix assisted ionization: new aromatic and nonaromatic matrix compounds producing multiply charged lipid, peptide, and protein ions in the positive and negative mode observed directly from surfaces.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Inutan, Ellen D; Wang, Beixi; Lietz, Christopher B; Green, Daniel R; Manly, Cory D; Richards, Alicia L; Marshall, Darrell D; Lingenfelter, Steven; Ren, Yue; Trimpin, Sarah

    2012-10-01

    Matrix assisted inlet ionization (MAII) is a method in which a matrix:analyte mixture produces mass spectra nearly identical to electrospray ionization without the application of a voltage or the use of a laser as is required in laserspray ionization (LSI), a subset of MAII. In MAII, the sample is introduced by, for example, tapping particles of dried matrix:analyte into the inlet of the mass spectrometer and, therefore, permits the study of conditions pertinent to the formation of multiply charged ions without the need of absorption at a laser wavelength. Crucial for the production of highly charged ions are desolvation conditions to remove matrix molecules from charged matrix:analyte clusters. Important factors affecting desolvation include heat, vacuum, collisions with gases and surfaces, and even radio frequency fields. Other parameters affecting multiply charged ion production is sample preparation, including pH and solvent composition. Here, findings from over 100 compounds found to produce multiply charged analyte ions using MAII with the inlet tube set at 450 °C are presented. Of the compounds tested, many have -OH or -NH(2) functionality, but several have neither (e.g., anthracene), nor aromaticity or conjugation. Binary matrices are shown to be applicable for LSI and solvent-free sample preparation can be applied to solubility restricted compounds, and matrix compounds too volatile to allow drying from common solvents. Our findings suggest that the physical properties of the matrix such as its morphology after evaporation of the solvent, its propensity to evaporate/sublime, and its acidity are more important than its structure and functional groups.

  3. Comparison Of Quantum Mechanical And Classical Trajectory Calculations Of Cross Sections For Ion-Atom Impact Ionization of Negative - And Positive -Ions For Heavy Ion Fusion Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Igor D. Kaganovich; Edward A. Startsev; Ronald C. Davidson

    2003-05-15

    Stripping cross sections in nitrogen have been calculated using the classical trajectory approximation and the Born approximation of quantum mechanics for the outer shell electrons of 3.2GeV I{sup -} and Cs{sup +} ions. A large difference in cross section, up to a factor of six, calculated in quantum mechanics and classical mechanics, has been obtained. Because at such high velocities the Born approximation is well validated, the classical trajectory approach fails to correctly predict the stripping cross sections at high energies for electron orbitals with low ionization potential.

  4. Flow reactor and triple quadrupole mass spectrometer investigations of negative ion reactions involving nitric acid - Implications for atmospheric HNO3 detection by chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moehler, O.; Arnold, F.

    1991-07-01

    The ion-molecule reactions on which Active Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (ACIMS) measurements of atmospheric nitric acid are based are presently subjected to product-ion distribution and rate coefficient measurements. The results obtained indicate that while previous stratospheric nitric acid measurements were not impared by collisional dissociation processes, these processes may have played a major role during previous tropospheric measurements: leading to an undereestimation of nitric acid concentrations. A novel ACIMS ion source has been developed in order to avoid these problems.

  5. Ionizing radiation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter gives a comprehensive review on ionizing irradiation of fresh fruits and vegetables. Topics include principles of ionizing radiation, its effects on pathogenic and spoilage microorganisms, shelf-life, sensory quality, nutritional and phytochemical composition, as well as physiologic and...

  6. EVALUATION OF N-METHYL-N-TERT-BUTYLDIMETHYLSILYLTRIFLUOROACETAMIDE FOR ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS UNDER BOTH EIMS AND ELECTRON CAPTURE NICIMS CONDITIONS AND COMPARISON TO TRIMETHYLSILYL REAGENTS UNDER EIMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sewage effluent was analyzed for 3,5,6-trichloropyridinol (TCP) by extracting one liter of water using liquid-liquid extraction and determined by GC/MS operated in the negative ion chemical ionization (electron capture) mode, TCP is the major metabolite of the commonly used insec...

  7. Direct correlation of the crystal structure of proteins with the maximum positive and negative charge states of gaseous protein ions produced by electrospray ionization.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Halan; Mazumdar, Shyamalava

    2005-09-01

    Electrospray mass spectrometric studies in native folded forms of several proteins in aqueous solution have been performed in the positive and negative ion modes. The mass spectra of the proteins show peaks corresponding to multiple charge states of the gaseous protein ions. The results have been analyzed using the known crystal structures of these proteins. Crystal structure analysis shows that among the surface exposed residues some are involved in hydrogen-bonding or salt-bridge interactions while some are free. The maximum positive charge state of the gaseous protein ions was directly related to the number of free surface exposed basic groups whereas the maximum negative charge state was related to the number of free surface exposed acidic groups of the proteins. The surface exposed basic groups, which are involved in hydrogen bonding, have lower propensity to contribute to the positive charge of the protein. Similarly, the surface exposed acidic groups involved in salt bridges have lower propensity to contribute to the negative charge of the protein. Analysis of the crystal structure to determine the maximum charge state of protein in the electrospray mass spectrum was also used to interpret the reported mass spectra of several proteins. The results show that both the positive and the negative ion mass spectra of the proteins could be interpreted by simple consideration of the crystal structure of the folded proteins. Moreover, unfolding of the protein was shown to increase the positive charge-state because of the availability of larger number of free basic groups at the surface of the unfolded protein.

  8. Ionizing air affects influenza virus infectivity and prevents airborne-transmission

    PubMed Central

    Hagbom, Marie; Nordgren, Johan; Nybom, Rolf; Hedlund, Kjell-Olof; Wigzell, Hans; Svensson, Lennart

    2015-01-01

    By the use of a modified ionizer device we describe effective prevention of airborne transmitted influenza A (strain Panama 99) virus infection between animals and inactivation of virus (>97%). Active ionizer prevented 100% (4/4) of guinea pigs from infection. Moreover, the device effectively captured airborne transmitted calicivirus, rotavirus and influenza virus, with recovery rates up to 21% after 40 min in a 19 m3 room. The ionizer generates negative ions, rendering airborne particles/aerosol droplets negatively charged and electrostatically attracts them to a positively charged collector plate. Trapped viruses are then identified by reverse transcription quantitative real-time PCR. The device enables unique possibilities for rapid and simple removal of virus from air and offers possibilities to simultaneously identify and prevent airborne transmission of viruses. PMID:26101102

  9. New Automated and High-Throughput Quantitative Analysis of Urinary Ketones by Multifiber Exchange-Solid Phase Microextraction Coupled to Fast Gas Chromatography/Negative Chemical-Electron Ionization/Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Pacenti, Marco; Dugheri, Stefano; Traldi, Pietro; Degli Esposti, Filippo; Perchiazzi, Nicola; Franchi, Elena; Calamante, Massimo; Kikic, Ireneo; Alessi, Paolo; Bonacchi, Alice; Salvadori, Edoardo; Arcangeli, Giulio; Cupelli, Vincenzo

    2010-01-01

    The present research is focused on automation, miniaturization, and system interaction with high throughput for multiple and specific Direct Immersion-Solid Phase Microextraction/Fast Gas Chromatography analysis of the urinary ketones. The specific Mass Spectrometry instrumentation, capable of supporting such the automated changeover from Negative Chemical to Electron Ionization mode, as well as the automation of the preparation procedure by new device called MultiFiber Exchange, through change of the fibers, allowed a friendly use of mass spectrometry apparatus with a number of advantages including reduced analyst time and greater reproducibility (2.01–5.32%). The detection limits for the seven ketones were less than 0.004 mg/L. For an innovative powerful meaning in high-throughput routine, the generality of the structurally informative Mass Spectrometry fragmentation patterns together with the chromatographic separation and software automation are also investigated. PMID:20628512

  10. Improved gas chromatography-negative ion chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometric method for determination of 11-nor-Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid in hair using mechanical pulverization and bead-assisted liquid-liquid extraction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Young; Cheong, Jae Chul; Lee, Jae Il; In, Moon Kyo

    2011-03-20

    A gas chromatography-negative ion chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometric (GC-NCI-MS/MS) method was developed and validated for the determination of 11-nor-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol-9-carboxylic acid (THC-COOH) in human hair. After decontamination, hair samples were weighed (25mg), mechanically pulverized with a bead mill, and incubated in 0.7 mL of 1.0M sodium hydroxide at 95 °C for 30 min. Bead-assisted liquid-liquid extraction was performed with n-hexane:ethyl acetate (9:1, v/v), a method developed in our laboratory. The extract was evaporated to dryness, derivatized with pentafluoropropanol and pentafluoropropionic anhydride, and analyzed by GC-MS/MS in the negative ion chemical ionization mode using methane as the reagent gas. The linear ranges were 0.05-10.0 pg/mg for THC-COOH with the coefficient of determination (r(2) = 0.9976). The intra-day and inter-day precisions were within 1.7 and 13.8%, respectively. The intra-day and inter-day accuracies were -4.8 to 10.0% and -3.9 to 3.8%, respectively. The limit of detection and quantification were 0.015 and 0.05 pg/mg, respectively. The recoveries were in the range of 79.4-87.1%. The results indicate that the proposed method is simple, rapid, accurate, and precise for determination of THC-COOH in hair. The method identified THC-COOH in hair specimens from suspected marijuana abusers.

  11. Comparison of Bruker Biotyper matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometer to BD Phoenix automated microbiology system for identification of gram-negative bacilli.

    PubMed

    Saffert, Ryan T; Cunningham, Scott A; Ihde, Sherry M; Jobe, Kristine E Monson; Mandrekar, Jayawant; Patel, Robin

    2011-03-01

    We compared the BD Phoenix automated microbiology system to the Bruker Biotyper (version 2.0) matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) system for identification of gram-negative bacilli, using biochemical testing and/or genetic sequencing to resolve discordant results. The BD Phoenix correctly identified 363 (83%) and 330 (75%) isolates to the genus and species level, respectively. The Bruker Biotyper correctly identified 408 (93%) and 360 (82%) isolates to the genus and species level, respectively. The 440 isolates were grouped into common (308) and infrequent (132) isolates in the clinical laboratory. For the 308 common isolates, the BD Phoenix and Bruker Biotyper correctly identified 294 (95%) and 296 (96%) of the isolates to the genus level, respectively. For species identification, the BD Phoenix and Bruker Biotyper correctly identified 93% of the common isolates (285 and 286, respectively). In contrast, for the 132 infrequent isolates, the Bruker Biotyper correctly identified 112 (85%) and 74 (56%) isolates to the genus and species level, respectively, compared to the BD Phoenix, which identified only 69 (52%) and 45 (34%) isolates to the genus and species level, respectively. Statistically, the Bruker Biotyper overall outperformed the BD Phoenix for identification of gram-negative bacilli to the genus (P < 0.0001) and species (P = 0.0005) level in this sample set. When isolates were categorized as common or infrequent isolates, there was statistically no difference between the instruments for identification of common gram-negative bacilli (P > 0.05). However, the Bruker Biotyper outperformed the BD Phoenix for identification of infrequently isolated gram-negative bacilli (P < 0.0001).

  12. Electronic dynamics by ultrafast pump photoelectron detachment probed by ionization: a dynamical simulation of negative-neutral-positive in LiH(-).

    PubMed

    Mignolet, B; Levine, R D; Remacle, F

    2014-08-21

    The control of electronic dynamics in the neutral electronic states of LiH before the onset of significant nuclei motion is investigated using a negative-neutral-positive (NeNePo) ultrafast IR pump-attoescond pulse train (APT) probe scheme. Starting from the ground state of the anion (LiH(-)), multiphoton ultrafast electron detachment and subsequent excitation of the neutral by a few femtosecond intense IR pulse produces a non-equilibrium electronic density in neutral LiH. The coherent electronic wave packet is then probed by angularly resolved photoionization to the cation by an APT generated from a replica of the pump IR pulse at several time delays. Realistic parameters for the pump and the APT are used. Several NeNePo schemes are simulated using different IR carrier frequencies, showing that the delay between the successive attosecond pulses in the train can be used as a filter to probe the different pairs of states present in the coherent electronic wave packet produced by the pump pulse. The dynamical simulations include the pump and the probe pulses to all orders by solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation using a coupled equation scheme for the manifolds of the anion, neutral, and cation subspaces. We show that an incomplete molecular orientation of the molecule in the laboratory frame does not prevent probing the electronic density localization by angularly resolved photoelectron maps.

  13. Gridded electron reversal ionizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A gridded electron reversal ionizer forms a three dimensional cloud of zero or near-zero energy electrons in a cavity within a filament structure surrounding a central electrode having holes through which the sample gas, at reduced pressure, enters an elongated reversal volume. The resultant negative ion stream is applied to a mass analyzer. The reduced electron and ion space-charge limitations of this configuration enhances detection sensitivity for material to be detected by electron attachment, such as narcotic and explosive vapors. Positive ions may be generated by generating electrons having a higher energy, sufficient to ionize the target gas and pulsing the grid negative to stop the electron flow and pulsing the extraction aperture positive to draw out the positive ions.

  14. Ionization chamber

    DOEpatents

    Walenta, Albert H.

    1981-01-01

    An ionization chamber has separate drift and detection regions electrically isolated from each other by a fine wire grid. A relatively weak electric field can be maintained in the drift region when the grid and another electrode in the chamber are connected to a high voltage source. A much stronger electric field can be provided in the detection region by connecting wire electrodes therein to another high voltage source. The detection region can thus be operated in a proportional mode when a suitable gas is contained in the chamber. High resolution output pulse waveforms are provided across a resistor connected to the detection region anode, after ionizing radiation enters the drift region and ionize the gas.

  15. IONIZATION CHAMBER

    DOEpatents

    Redman, W.C.; Shonka, F.R.

    1958-02-18

    This patent describes a novel ionization chamber which is well suited to measuring the radioactivity of the various portions of a wire as the wire is moved at a uniform speed, in order to produce the neutron flux traverse pattern of a reactor in which the wire was previously exposed to neutron radiation. The ionization chamber of the present invention is characterized by the construction wherein the wire is passed through a tubular, straight electrode and radiation shielding material is disposed along the wire except at an intermediate, narrow area where the second electrode of the chamber is located.

  16. An integrated strategy for rapid and accurate determination of free and cell-bound microcystins and related peptides in natural blooms by liquid chromatography-electrospray-high resolution mass spectrometry and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight/time-of-flight mass spectrometry using both positive and negative ionization modes.

    PubMed

    Flores, Cintia; Caixach, Josep

    2015-08-14

    An integrated high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) strategy has been developed for rapid and accurate determination of free and cell-bound microcystins (MCs) and related peptides in water blooms. The natural samples (water and algae) were filtered for independent analysis of aqueous and sestonic fractions. These fractions were analyzed by MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS and ESI-Orbitrap-HCD-MS. MALDI, ESI and the study of fragmentation sequences have been provided crucial structural information. The potential of combined positive and negative ionization modes, full scan and fragmentation acquisition modes (TOF/TOF and HCD) by HRMS and high resolution and accurate mass was investigated in order to allow unequivocal determination of MCs. Besides, a reliable quantitation has been possible by HRMS. This composition helped to decrease the probability of false positives and negatives, as alternative to commonly used LC-ESI-MS/MS methods. The analysis was non-target, therefore covered the possibility to analyze all MC analogs concurrently without any pre-selection of target MC. Furthermore, archived data was subjected to retrospective "post-targeted" analysis and a screening of other potential toxins and related peptides as anabaenopeptins in the samples was done. Finally, the MS protocol and identification tools suggested were applied to the analysis of characteristic water blooms from Spanish reservoirs.

  17. Implementation of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry in Routine Clinical Laboratories Improves Identification of Coagulase-Negative Staphylococci and Reveals the Pathogenic Role of Staphylococcus lugdunensis.

    PubMed

    Argemi, Xavier; Riegel, Philippe; Lavigne, Thierry; Lefebvre, Nicolas; Grandpré, Nicolas; Hansmann, Yves; Jaulhac, Benoit; Prévost, Gilles; Schramm, Frédéric

    2015-07-01

    The use of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) for staphylococcal identification is now considered routine in laboratories compared with the conventional phenotypical methods previously used. We verified its microbiological relevance for identifying the main species of coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) by randomly selecting 50 isolates. From 1 January 2007 to 31 August 2008, 12,479 staphylococci were isolated with phenotypic methods, of which 4,594 were identified as Staphylococcus aureus and 7,885 were coagulase negative staphylococci. Using MALDI-TOF MS from 1 January 2011 to 31 August 2012, 14,913 staphylococci were identified, with 5,066 as S. aureus and 9,847 as CoNS. MALDI-TOF MS allowed the identification of approximately 85% of the CoNS strains, whereas only 14% of the CoNS strains were identified to the species level with phenotypic methods because they were often considered contaminants. Furthermore, the use of MALDI-TOF MS revealed the occurrence of recently characterized Staphylococcus species, such as S. pettenkoferi, S. condimenti, and S. piscifermentans. Microbiological relevance analysis further revealed that some species displayed a high rate of microbiological significance, i.e., 40% of the S. lugdunensis strains included in the analysis were associated with infection risk. This retrospective microbiological study confirms the role of MALDI-TOF MS in clinical settings for the identification of staphylococci with clinical consequences. The species distribution reveals the occurrence of the recently identified species S. pettenkoferi and putative virulent species, including S. lugdunensis.

  18. Simultaneous determination of phentermine and topiramate in human plasma by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry with positive/negative ion-switching electrospray ionization and its application in pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Ni, Yang; Zhou, Ying; Xu, Mingzhen; He, Xiaomeng; Li, Huqun; Haseeb, Satter; Chen, Hui; Li, Weiyong

    2015-03-25

    A new method for simultaneous determination of phentermine and topiramate by liquid chromatography/electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) operated in positive and negative ionization switching modes was developed and validated. Protein precipitation with acetonitrile was selected for sample preparation. Analyses were performed on a liquid chromatography system employing a Kromasil 60-5CN column (2.1 mm × 100 mm, 5 μm) and an isocratic elution with mixed solution of acetonitrile-20mM ammonium formate containing 0.3% formic acid (40:60, v/v), at a flow rate of 0.35 mL/min. Doxazosin mesylate and pioglitazone were used as the internal standard (IS) respectively for quantification. The determination was carried out on an API 4000 triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer operated in multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode using the following transitions monitored simultaneously: positive m/z 150.0/91.0 for phentermine, m/z 452.1/344.3 for doxazosin, and negative m/z 338.3/77.9 for topiramate, m/z 355.0/41.9 for pioglitazone. The method was validated to be linear over the concentration range of 1-800 ng mL(-1) for phentermine, 1-1000 ng mL(-1) for topiramate. Within- and between-day accuracy and precision of the validated method at three different concentration levels were within the acceptable limits of <15% at all concentrations. Blood samples were collected into heparinized tubes before and after administration. The simple and robust LC/MS/MS method was successfully applied for the simultaneous determination of phentermine and topiramate in a pharmacokinetic study in healthy male Chinese volunteers.

  19. Competitive Deprotonation and Superoxide [O2 -•] Radical-Anion Adduct Formation Reactions of Carboxamides under Negative-Ion Atmospheric-Pressure Helium-Plasma Ionization (HePI) Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Isra; Pinto, Spencer; Weisbecker, Carl; Attygalle, Athula B.

    2016-03-01

    Carboxamides bearing an N-H functionality are known to undergo deprotonation under negative-ion-generating mass spectrometric conditions. Herein, we report that N-H bearing carboxamides with acidities lower than that of the hydroperoxyl radical (HO-O•) preferentially form superoxide radical-anion (O2 -•) adducts, rather than deprotonate, when they are exposed to the glow discharge of a helium-plasma ionization source. For example, the spectra of N-alkylacetamides show peaks for superoxide radical-anion (O2 -•) adducts. Conversely, more acidic amides, such as N-alkyltrifluoroacetamides, preferentially undergo deprotonation under similar experimental conditions. Upon collisional activation, the O2 -• adducts of N-alkylacetamides either lose the neutral amide or the hydroperoxyl radical (HO-O•) to generate the superoxide radical-anion ( m/z 32) or the deprotonated amide [ m/z (M - H)-], respectively. For somewhat acidic carboxamides, the association between the two entities is weak. Thus, upon mildest collisional activation, the adduct dissociates to eject the superoxide anion. Superoxide-adduct formation results are useful for structure determination purposes because carboxamides devoid of a N-H functionality undergo neither deprotonation nor adduct formation under HePI conditions.

  20. Determination of 2-, 3-, 4-methylpentanoic and cyclohexanecarboxylic acids in wine: development of a selective method based on solid phase extraction and gas chromatography-negative chemical ionization mass spectrometry and its application to different wines and alcoholic beverages.

    PubMed

    Gracia-Moreno, Elisa; Lopez, Ricardo; Ferreira, Vicente

    2015-02-13

    A method to analyse 2-methylpentanoic, 3-methylpentanoic and 4-methylpentanoic acids as well as cyclohexanecarboxylic acid has been developed and applied to wine and other alcoholic beverages. Selective isolation with solid phase extraction, derivatization with 2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl bromide at room temperature for 30 minutes, and further analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in negative chemical ionization mode provides detection limits between 0.4 and 2.4 ng/L. Good linearity up to 3.6 μg/L, satisfactory reproducibility (RSD<10%) and signal recovery of around 100% represent a robust method of analysis. Concentration data of these analytes in wine and other alcoholic beverages are reported for the first time. The levels found ranged from the method detection limits to 2630 ng/L, 2040 ng/L and 3810 ng/L for 2-, 3- and 4-methylpentanoic acids, respectively, and to 1780 ng/L for cyclohexanecarboxylic acid. There are significant differences depending on the type of wine or beverage. Distilled beverages, beer and aged wines have higher contents in methylpentanoic and cyclohexanecarboxylic acids.

  1. Muon capture in deuterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricci, P.; Truhlík, E.; Mosconi, B.; Smejkal, J.

    2010-06-01

    Model dependence of the capture rates of the negative muon capture in deuterium is studied starting from potential models and the weak two-body meson exchange currents constructed in the tree approximation and also from an effective field theory. The tree one-boson exchange currents are derived from the hard pion chiral Lagrangians of the NΔπρωa system. If constructed in conjunction with the one-boson exchange potentials, the capture rates can be calculated consistently. On the other hand, the effective field theory currents, constructed within the heavy baryon chiral perturbation theory, contain a low energy constant d that cannot be extracted from data at the one-particle level nor determined from the first principles. Comparative analysis of the results for the doublet transition rate allows us to extract the constant d.

  2. [Determination of short-chain chlorinated paraffins in ambient air using high-volume sampling combined with high resolutimi gas chromatography-electron capture negative ion-low resolution mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Shi, Loimeng; Gao, Yuan; Hou, Xiaohong; Zhang, Haijun; Zhang, Yichi; Chen, Jiping

    2016-02-01

    An analytical method for quantifying short-chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs) in ambient air using high-volume sampling combined with high resolution gas chromatography-electron capture negative ion-low resolution mass spectrometry ( HRGC-ECNI-LRMS) was developed. An acidified silica gel column and a basic alumina column were used to optimize the cleanup procedures. The results showed a good linearity (R2>0. 99) between the total response factors and the degree of chlorination of SCCPs in the content range of 58. 1%-63. 3%. The limits of detection (S/N ≥3) and the limits of quantification (S/N ≥ 10) were 4. 2 and 12 µg, respectively. The method detection limit (MDL) for SCCPs was 0. 34 ng/m3 (n = 7). The recoveries of SCCPs in air samples were in the range of 81. 9% to 94. 2%. It is demonstrated that the method is suitable for the quantitative analysis of SCCPs in air samples.

  3. Determination of chlorinated paraffins in sediments from the Firth of Clyde by gas chromatography with electron capture negative ionisation mass spectrometry and carbon skeleton analysis by gas chromatography with flame ionisation detection.

    PubMed

    Hussy, Ines; Webster, Lynda; Russell, Marie; Moffat, Colin

    2012-07-01

    Short chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs) are a group of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) of increasing concern, but are to date not widely investigated in the environment, largely due to the challenges involved in their quantification. Here, SCCPs were quantified in marine sediments from the Firth of Clyde, Scotland, by gas chromatography with electron capture negative ionisation mass spectrometry (GC-ECNIMS) and through carbon skeleton analysis by gas chromatography with flame ionisation detection (GC-FID), and the analytical challenges encountered are discussed. Concentrations in the sediments ranged from 0.4 to 69 μg kg(-1) when determined by GC-ECNIMS, and from 5.6 to 379 μg kg(-1) when determined by GC-FID. For 8 out of 11 samples, analysis by GC-FID gave higher results than analysis by GC-ECNIMS. Unexpected aspects of the analysis, such as the presence of high concentrations of longer chain chlorinated paraffins in the samples, are also presented.

  4. Unresolved issues in the analysis of F2-isoprostanes, F4-neuroprostanes, isofurans, neurofurans, and F2-dihomo-isoprostanes in body fluids and tissue using gas chromatography/negative-ion chemical-ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yen, H-C; Wei, H-J; Lin, C-L

    2015-01-01

    F2-isoprostanes (F2-IsoPs) generated from arachidonic acid (AA) have been recognized as the most reliable marker of nonenzymatic lipid peroxidation in vivo. F2-IsoPs are initially produced in esterified form on phospholipids, and then released into body fluids in free form. The same mechanism can lead to generation of F4-neuroprostanes (F4-NPs) and F2-dihomo-IsoPs from docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and adrenic acid, respectively. In addition, isofurans (IsoFs) and neurofurans (NFs) may be preferentially produced from AA and DHA, respectively, under high oxygen tension. The detection of F2-IsoPs using gas chromatography/negative-ion chemical-ionization mass spectrometry (GC/NICI-MS) has been widely employed, which is important for human body fluids containing low quantity of free-form F2-IsoPs. F4-NPs have also been detected using GC/NICI-MS, but multiple peaks need to be quantified. In this paper, we summarize the basic workflow of the GC/NICI-MS method for analyzing F2-IsoPs and F4-NPs, and various formats of assays conducted by different groups. We then discuss the feasibility of simultaneous analysis of IsoFs, NFs, and F2-dihomo-IsoPs with F2-IsoPs or F4-NPs. Representative GC chromatograms for analyzing these markers in human body fluids and rat brain tissue are demonstrated. Furthermore, we discuss several factors that may affect the performance of the analysis, such as those related to the sample processing steps, interference from specimens, types of GC liners used, and the addition of electron multiplier voltage in the method setting for the MS detector. Finally, we question the appropriateness of measuring total (free plus esterified) levels of these markers in body fluids.

  5. High-Precision Tungsten Isotopic Analysis by Multicollection Negative Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry Based on Simultaneous Measurement of W and (18)O/(16)O Isotope Ratios for Accurate Fractionation Correction.

    PubMed

    Trinquier, Anne; Touboul, Mathieu; Walker, Richard J

    2016-02-02

    Determination of the (182)W/(184)W ratio to a precision of ± 5 ppm (2σ) is desirable for constraining the timing of core formation and other early planetary differentiation processes. However, WO3(-) analysis by negative thermal ionization mass spectrometry normally results in a residual correlation between the instrumental-mass-fractionation-corrected (182)W/(184)W and (183)W/(184)W ratios that is attributed to mass-dependent variability of O isotopes over the course of an analysis and between different analyses. A second-order correction using the (183)W/(184)W ratio relies on the assumption that this ratio is constant in nature. This may prove invalid, as has already been realized for other isotope systems. The present study utilizes simultaneous monitoring of the (18)O/(16)O and W isotope ratios to correct oxide interferences on a per-integration basis and thus avoid the need for a double normalization of W isotopes. After normalization of W isotope ratios to a pair of W isotopes, following the exponential law, no residual W-O isotope correlation is observed. However, there is a nonideal mass bias residual correlation between (182)W/(i)W and (183)W/(i)W with time. Without double normalization of W isotopes and on the basis of three or four duplicate analyses, the external reproducibility per session of (182)W/(184)W and (183)W/(184)W normalized to (186)W/(183)W is 5-6 ppm (2σ, 1-3 μg loads). The combined uncertainty per session is less than 4 ppm for (183)W/(184)W and less than 6 ppm for (182)W/(184)W (2σm) for loads between 3000 and 50 ng.

  6. Ultrasound-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in negative chemical ionization mode for the determination of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in water.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Liang, Tao; Guan, Lili

    2013-04-01

    A simple and economical method for the determination of eight polybrominated diphenyl ethers (BDE-28, 47, 99, 100,153,154,183, and 209) in water was developed. This method involves the use of ultrasound-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction combined with GC-MS in negative chemical ionization mode. Various parameters affecting the extraction efficiency, including the type and volume of extraction and dispersive solvents, salt concentration, extraction time, and ultrasonic time, were investigated. A volume of 1.0 mL of acetone (dispersive solvent) containing 10 μL tetrachloroethylene (extraction solvent) was injected into 5.0 mL of water samples and then emulsified by ultrasound for 2.0 min to produce the cloudy solution. Under the optimal condition, the enrichment factors for the eight PBDEs were varied from 845- to 1050-folds. Good linearity was observed in the range of 1.0-200 ng L(-1) for BDE-28, 47, 99, and 100; 5.0-200 ng L(-1) for BDE-153, 154, and 183; and 5.0-500 ng L(-1) for BDE-209. The RSD values were in the range of 2.5-8.4% (n = 5) and the LODs ranged from 0.40 to 2.15 ng L(-1) (S/N = 3). The developed method was applied for the determination of eight BPDEs in the river and lake water samples, and the mean recoveries at spiking levels of 5.0 and 50.0 ng L(-1) were in the range of 70.6-105.1%.

  7. Sensitivity improvement in hydrophilic interaction chromatography negative mode electrospray ionization mass spectrometry using 2-(2-methoxyethoxy)ethanol as a post-column modifier for non-targeted metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Koch, Wendelin; Forcisi, Sara; Lehmann, Rainer; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe

    2014-09-26

    The application of ammonia acetate buffered liquid chromatography (LC) eluents is known to concomitantly lead to ion suppression when electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) detection is used. In negative ESI mode, post column infusion of 2-(2-methoxyethoxy)ethanol (2-MEE) was shown in the literature to help to compensate this adverse effect occurring in reversed phase liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (RP-LC-MS) analyses. Here a setup of direct infusion and hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) post-column infusion experiments was established in order to investigate systematically the beneficial effects of 2-MEE. We demonstrate that, 2-MEE can help to improve ESI-MS sensitivity in HILIC too and reveal analyte structure specific behaviors. Our study indicates that 2-MEE especially improves ESI response for small and polar molecules. The ESI response of stable isotope labeled amino acids spiked into biological matrices increases up to 50-fold (i.e. D5-l-glutamic acid) when post column infusion of 2-MEE is applied. A non-targeted analysis of a pooled urine sample via HILIC-ESI-QTOF-MS supports this hypothesis. In direct infusion, the combined application of an ammonia acetate buffered solution together with 2-MEE results in an improved ESI response compared to a non-buffered solution. We observed up to 60-fold increased ESI response of l-lysine. We propose this effect is putatively caused by the formation of smaller ESI droplets and stripping of positive charge from ESI droplets due to evaporation of acetic acid anions. In summary, post-column infusion of 2-MEE especially enhances ESI response of small and polar molecules. Therefore it can be regarded as a valuable add-on in targeted or non-targeted metabolomic HILIC-MS studies since this method sets a focus on this molecule category.

  8. Matrix-assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) as a Reliable Tool to Identify Species of Catalase-negative Gram-positive Cocci not Belonging to the Streptococcus Genus

    PubMed Central

    Almuzara, Marisa; Barberis, Claudia; Velázquez, Viviana Rojas; Ramirez, Maria Soledad; Famiglietti, Angela; Vay, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the performance of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) by using 190 Catalase-negative Gram-Positive Cocci (GPC) clinical isolates. Methods: All isolates were identified by conventional phenotypic tests following the proposed scheme by Ruoff and Christensen and MALDI-TOF MS (Bruker Daltonics, BD, Bremen, Germany). Two different extraction methods (direct transfer formic acid method on spot and ethanol formic acid extraction method) and different cut-offs for genus/specie level identification were used. The score cut-offs recommended by the manufacturer (≥ 2.000 for species-level, 1.700 to 1.999 for genus level and <1.700 no reliable identification) and lower cut-off scores (≥1.500 for genus level, ≥ 1.700 for species-level and score <1.500 no reliable identification) were considered for identification. A minimum difference of 10% between the top and next closest score was required for a different genus or species. MALDI-TOF MS identification was considered correct when the result obtained from MS database agreed with the phenotypic identification result. When both methods gave discordant results, the 16S rDNA or sodA genes sequencing was considered as the gold standard identification method. The results obtained by MS concordant with genes sequencing, although discordant with conventional phenotyping, were considered correct. MS results discordant with 16S or sodA identification were considered incorrect. Results: Using the score cut-offs recommended by the manufacturer, 97.37% and 81.05% were correctly identified to genus and species level, respectively. On the other hand, using lower cut-off scores for identification, 97.89% and 94.21% isolates were correctly identified to genus and species level respectively by MALDI-TOF MS and no significant differences between the results obtained with two extraction methods were obtained. Conclusion: The results obtained suggest that MALDI

  9. Negative ion source

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Ehlers, Kenneth W.

    1984-01-01

    An ionization vessel is divided into an ionizing zone and an extraction zone by a magnetic filter. The magnetic filter prevents high-energy electrons from crossing from the ionizing zone to the extraction zone. A small positive voltage impressed on a plasma grid, located adjacent an extraction grid, positively biases the plasma in the extraction zone to thereby prevent positive ions from migrating from the ionizing zone to the extraction zone. Low-energy electrons, which would ordinarily be dragged by the positive ions into the extraction zone, are thereby prevented from being present in the extraction zone and being extracted along with negative ions by the extraction grid. Additional electrons are suppressed from the output flux using ExB drift provided by permanent magnets and the extractor grid electrical field.

  10. Negative ion source

    DOEpatents

    Leung, K.N.; Ehlers, K.W.

    1982-08-06

    An ionization vessel is divided into an ionizing zone and an extraction zone by a magnetic filter. The magnetic filter prevents high-energy electrons from crossing from the ionizing zone to the extraction zone. A small positive voltage impressed on a plasma grid, located adjacent an extraction grid, positively biases the plasma in the extraction zone to thereby prevent positive ions from migrating from the ionizing zone to the extraction zone. Low-energy electrons, which would ordinarily be dragged by the positive ions into the extraction zone, are thereby prevented from being present in the extraction zone and being extracted along with negative ions by the extraction grid. Additional electrons are suppressed from the output flux using ExB drift provided by permanent magnets and the extractor grid electrical field.

  11. Negative ion source

    DOEpatents

    Leung, K.N.; Ehlers, K.W.

    1984-12-04

    An ionization vessel is divided into an ionizing zone and an extraction zone by a magnetic filter. The magnetic filter prevents high-energy electrons from crossing from the ionizing zone to the extraction zone. A small positive voltage impressed on a plasma grid, located adjacent an extraction grid, positively biases the plasma in the extraction zone to thereby prevent positive ions from migrating from the ionizing zone to the extraction zone. Low-energy electrons, which would ordinarily be dragged by the positive ions into the extraction zone, are thereby prevented from being present in the extraction zone and being extracted along with negative ions by the extraction grid. Additional electrons are suppressed from the output flux using ExB drift provided by permanent magnets and the extractor grid electrical field. 14 figs.

  12. New design of high performance ionizing bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ronggang; Sun, Yurong

    2013-03-01

    This paper introduces a new design of DC-pulse ionizing bar to solve the problem of imbalance offset voltage for the AC ionizing bar, which is easily affected by the environment, as well as indicate the final tests. The new design mainly includes five parts: power supply circuit, main control unit, logic circuit, high frequency transformer unit, and feedback unit. The ionizing bar can automatically adjust the discharge voltage, pulse frequency and pulse width to balance the positive and negative ions. The final test results indicate that the DC ionizing bar owns good effect in electrostatic elimination.

  13. An innovative ultrasound assisted extraction micro-scale cell combined with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry in negative chemical ionization to determine persistent organic pollutants in air particulate matter.

    PubMed

    Beristain-Montiel, E; Villalobos-Pietrini, R; Arias-Loaiza, G E; Gómez-Arroyo, S L; Amador-Muñoz, O

    2016-12-16

    New clean technologies are needed to determine concentration of organic pollutants without generating more pollution. A method to extract Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) from airborne particulate matter was developed using a novel technology recently patented called ultrasound assisted extraction micro-scale cell (UAE-MSC). This technology extracts, filters, collects the sample, and evaporates the solvent, on-line. No sample transfer is needed. The cell minimizes sample manipulation, solvent consumption, waste generation, time, and energy; fulfilling most of the analytical green chemistry protocol. The methodology was optimized applying a centred 2(3) factorial experimental design. Optimum conditions were used to validate and determine concentration of 16 organochlorine pesticides (OCls) and 6 polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). The best conditions achieved were 2 extractions with 5mL (each) of dichloromethane over 5min (each) at 60°C and 80% ultrasound potency. POPs were determined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry in negative chemical ionization (GC/MS-NCI). Analytical method validation was carried out on airborne particles spiked with POPs at seven concentration levels between 0.5 and 26.9pgm(-3). This procedure was done by triplicate (N=21). Recovery, ranged between 65.5±2.3% and 107.5±3.0% for OCls and between 79.1±6.5% and 105.2±3.8% for PBDEs. Linearity (r(2)) was ≥0.94 for all compounds. Method detection limits, ranged from 0.5 to 2.7pgm(-3), while limits of quantification (LOQ), ranged from 1.7 to 9.0pgm(-3). A Bias from -18.6% to 9% for PBDEs was observed in the Standard Reference Material (SRM) 2787. SRM 2787 did not contain OCls. OCls recoveries were equivalent by UAE-MSC and Soxhlet methods UAE-MSC optimized extraction conditions reduced 30 times less solvent and decreased the extraction time from several hours to ten minutes, respect to Soxhlet. UAE-MSC was applied to 15 samples of particles less than 2.5μm (PM2.5) from three

  14. Electron collisional detachment processes for a 250 keV D/sup -/ ion beam in a partially ionized hydrogen target

    SciTech Connect

    Savas, S.E.

    1980-09-01

    Neutral atom beams with energies above 200 keV may be required for various purposes in magnetic fusion devices following TFTR, JET and MFTF-B. These beams can be produced much more efficiently by electron detachment from negative ion beams than by electron capture by positive ions. We have investigated the efficiency with which such neutral atoms can be produced by electron detachment in partially ionized hydrogen plasma neutralizers.

  15. Atmospheric pressure ionization-tandem mass spectrometry of the phenicol drug family.

    PubMed

    Alechaga, Élida; Moyano, Encarnación; Galceran, M Teresa

    2013-11-01

    In this work, the mass spectrometry behaviour of the veterinary drug family of phenicols, including chloramphenicol (CAP) and its related compounds thiamphenicol (TAP), florfenicol (FF) and FF amine (FFA), was studied. Several atmospheric pressure ionization sources, electrospray (ESI), atmospheric pressure chemical ionization and atmospheric pressure photoionization were compared. In all atmospheric pressure ionization sources, CAP, TAP and FF were ionized in both positive and negative modes; while for the metabolite FFA, only positive ionization was possible. In general, in positive mode, [M + H](+) dominated the mass spectrum for FFA, while the other compounds, CAP, TAP and FF, with lower proton affinity showed intense adducts with species present in the mobile phase. In negative mode, ESI and atmospheric pressure photoionization showed the deprotonated molecule [M-H](-), while atmospheric pressure chemical ionization provided the radical molecular ion by electron capture. All these ions were characterized by tandem mass spectrometry using the combined information obtained by multistage mass spectrometry and high-resolution mass spectrometry in a quadrupole-Orbitrap instrument. In general, the fragmentation occurred via cyclization and losses or fragmentation of the N-(alkyl)acetamide group, and common fragmentation pathways were established for this family of compounds. A new chemical structure for the product ion at m/z 257 for CAP, on the basis of the MS(3) and MS(4) spectra is proposed. Thermally assisted ESI and selected reaction monitoring are proposed for the determination of these compounds by ultra high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry, achieving instrumental detection limits down to 0.1 pg.

  16. Capturing Callisto

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The New Horizons Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) captured these two images of Jupiter's outermost large moon, Callisto, as the spacecraft flew past Jupiter in late February. New Horizons' closest approach distance to Jupiter was 2.3 million kilometers (1.4 million miles), not far outside Callisto's orbit, which has a radius of 1.9 million kilometers (1.2 million miles). However, Callisto happened to be on the opposite side of Jupiter during the spacecraft's pass through the Jupiter system, so these images, taken from 4.7 million kilometers (3.0 million miles) and 4.2 million kilometers (2.6 million miles) away, are the closest of Callisto that New Horizons obtained.

    Callisto's ancient, crater-scarred surface makes it very different from its three more active sibling satellites, Io, Europa and Ganymede. Callisto, 4,800 kilometers (3000 miles) in diameter, displays no large-scale geological features other than impact craters, and every bright spot in these images is a crater. The largest impact feature on Callisto, the huge basin Valhalla, is visible as a bright patch at the 10 o'clock position. The craters are bright because they have excavated material relatively rich in water ice from beneath the dark, dusty material that coats most of the surface.

    The two images show essentially the same side of Callisto -- the side that faces Jupiter -- under different illumination conditions. The images accompanied scans of Callisto's infrared spectrum with New Horizons' Linear Etalon Imaging Spectral Array (LEISA). The New Horizons science team designed these scans to study how the infrared spectrum of Callisto's water ice changes as lighting and viewing conditions change, and as the ice cools through Callisto's late afternoon. The infrared spectrum of water ice depends slightly on its temperature, and a goal of New Horizons when it reaches the Pluto system (in 2015) is to use the water ice features in the spectrum of Pluto's moon Charon, and

  17. Simultaneous determination of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol and 11-nor-9-carboxy-delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol in human plasma by solid-phase extraction and gas chromatography-negative ion chemical ionization-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Huang, W; Moody, D E; Andrenyak, D M; Smith, E K; Foltz, R L; Huestis, M A; Newton, J F

    2001-10-01

    Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and 11-nor-9-carboxy-delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THCA) in human plasma can be simultaneously detected using solid-phase extraction with gas chromatography and negative ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry. THC-d3 and THCA-d3 are added as internal standards; protein is precipitated with acetonitrile and the resulting supernatants diluted with 0.1 M sodium acetate (pH 7.0) prior to application to the solid-phase extraction columns. THC and THCA were eluted separately and then pooled, dried under air, and derivatized with trifluoroacetic anhydride and hexafluoroisopropanol. The derivatized THC-d0 gives abundant molecular anions (m/z 410), and the derivatized THCA-d0 gives abundant fragment ions (m/z 422) formed by loss of (CF3)2CHOH from its molecular anion. The recoveries of THC and THCA were 74% and 17%, respectively. The lower and upper limits of quantitation were 0.5 and 100 ng/mL for THC and 2.5 ng/mL and 100 ng/mL for THCA. The within-run accuracy and precision for THC (measured at 0.5, 1, 10 and 75 ng/mL) ranged from 98 to 106% (% target) and 4.1 to 9.5 (%CV), respectively. For THCA, the within-run accuracy and precision (measured at 2.5, 5, 10, and 75 ng/mL) ranged from 89 to 101% and 4.3 to 7.5%, respectively. The between-run accuracy and precision for THC ranged from 92 to 110% and 0.4 to 12.4%, respectively. The between-run accuracy and precision for THCA ranged from 97 to 103% and 6.5 to 12.3%, respectively. In processed samples stored in reconstituted form at -20 degrees C, THC and THCA were stable for at least three days. THC and THCA stored in plasma were stable following three freeze/thaw cycles. THC and THCA in whole blood at room temperature for 6 h, or in plasma stored at room temperature for 24 h, did not show significant change. Storage in polypropylene containers for 7 days at -20 degrees C and the presence of 1% sodium fluoride or the cannabinoid receptor antagonist, SR141716, at 1 microg/mL did not

  18. Mass Spectral Investigations on Toxins. 2. Simultaneous Detection and Quantification of Ultra-Trace Levels of Simple Trichothecenes in Environmental and Fermentation Samples by Gas Chromatographic/Negative Ion Chemical Ionization-Mass Spectrometric Techniques

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    macrocyclic trichothecenes or semisynthetic compounds. Scirpentriol (3a-HOVER), deoxynivalenol (DON), fusarinon-X (FUSX), monoacetoxyscirpenol (MAS) and...S.R. Gas Chromhtog- raphy with Electron Capture and Mass Spectrometric Detection of Deoxynivalenol in Wheat and Other Grains. J. Assoc. Off. Anal. Chem

  19. Impact ionization in quantum well infrared photodetectors with different number of periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Shan; Li, Ning; Chen, Sihai; Liu, Xihui; Lu, Wei

    2012-02-01

    This paper presents the detailed investigation of the photocurrent accompanied with impact ionization effect in In0.15Ga0.85As/GaAs multiple quantum well infrared photodetectors (QWIPs) with 10 and 50 periods. The sample with 50 periods exhibits remarkable enhancement at high electric field while a negative differential conductivity (NDC) phenomenon is observed in the sample with 10 periods. The enhancement at high electric field is attributed to impact ionization across the conduction-band-edge discontinuity between incident hot electrons and the electrons confined in the wells. The different behavior of these two samples indicates that the length of the multiplication region strongly affects the multiplication factor M. We also measured the photocurrent of GaAs/Al0.15Ga0.85As QWIPs, which do not show an obvious multiplication phenomenon. This is attributed to a different impact ionization coefficient α. A theoretical model of the multiplication factor M varying with impact ionization coefficient α, capture probability pc, and well number N is provided to clarify these phenomena and compared with experimental result.

  20. Three chamber negative ion source

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Ehlers, Kenneth W.; Hiskes, John R.

    1985-01-01

    A negative ion vessel is divided into an excitation chamber, a negative ionization chamber and an extraction chamber by two magnetic filters. Input means introduces neutral molecules into a first chamber where a first electron discharge means vibrationally excites the molecules which migrate to a second chamber. In the second chamber a second electron discharge means ionizes the molecules, producing negative ions which are extracted into or by a third chamber. A first magnetic filter prevents high energy electrons from entering the negative ionization chamber from the excitation chamber. A second magnetic filter prevents high energy electrons from entering the extraction chamber from the negative ionizing chamber. An extraction grid at the end of the negative ion vessel attracts negative ions into the third chamber and accelerates them. Another grid, located adjacent to the extraction grid, carries a small positive voltage in order to inhibit positive ions from migrating into the extraction chamber and contour the plasma potential. Additional electrons can be suppressed from the output flux using ExB forces provided by magnetic field means and the extractor grid electric potential.

  1. Ionization potentials of seaborgium

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, E.; Pershina, V.; Fricke, B.

    1999-10-21

    Multiconfiguration relativistic Dirac-Fock values were calculated for the first six ionization potentials of seaborgium and of the other group 6 elements. No experimental ionization potentials are available for seaborgium. Accurate experimental values are not available for all of the other ionization potentials. Ionic radii for the 4+ through 6+ ions of seaborgium are also presented. The ionization potentials and ionic radii obtained will be used to predict some physiochemical properties of seaborgium and its compounds.

  2. Ionization Energies of Lanthanides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Peter F.; Smith, Barry C.

    2010-01-01

    This article describes how data are used to analyze the pattern of ionization energies of the lanthanide elements. Different observed pathways of ionization between different ground states are discussed, and the effects of pairing, exchange, and orbital interactions on ionization energies of the lanthanides are evaluated. When all the above…

  3. The effects of electric field and gate bias pulse on the migration and stability of ionized oxygen vacancies in amorphous In–Ga–Zn–O thin film transistors

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Young Jun; Noh, Hyeon-Kyun; Chang, Kee Joo

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen vacancies have been considered as the origin of threshold voltage instability under negative bias illumination stress in amorphous oxide thin film transistors. Here we report the results of first-principles molecular dynamics simulations for the drift motion of oxygen vacancies. We show that oxygen vacancies, which are initially ionized by trapping photoexcited hole carriers, can easily migrate under an external electric field. Thus, accumulated hole traps near the channel/dielectric interface cause negative shift of the threshold voltage, supporting the oxygen vacancy model. In addition, we find that ionized oxygen vacancies easily recover their neutral defect configurations by capturing electrons when the Fermi level increases. Our results are in good agreement with the experimental observation that applying a positive gate bias pulse of short duration eliminates hole traps and thus leads to the recovery of device stability from persistent photoconductivity. PMID:27877799

  4. The effects of electric field and gate bias pulse on the migration and stability of ionized oxygen vacancies in amorphous In-Ga-Zn-O thin film transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Young Jun; Noh, Hyeon-Kyun; Chang, Kee Joo

    2015-06-01

    Oxygen vacancies have been considered as the origin of threshold voltage instability under negative bias illumination stress in amorphous oxide thin film transistors. Here we report the results of first-principles molecular dynamics simulations for the drift motion of oxygen vacancies. We show that oxygen vacancies, which are initially ionized by trapping photoexcited hole carriers, can easily migrate under an external electric field. Thus, accumulated hole traps near the channel/dielectric interface cause negative shift of the threshold voltage, supporting the oxygen vacancy model. In addition, we find that ionized oxygen vacancies easily recover their neutral defect configurations by capturing electrons when the Fermi level increases. Our results are in good agreement with the experimental observation that applying a positive gate bias pulse of short duration eliminates hole traps and thus leads to the recovery of device stability from persistent photoconductivity.

  5. The effects of electric field and gate bias pulse on the migration and stability of ionized oxygen vacancies in amorphous In-Ga-Zn-O thin film transistors.

    PubMed

    Oh, Young Jun; Noh, Hyeon-Kyun; Chang, Kee Joo

    2015-06-01

    Oxygen vacancies have been considered as the origin of threshold voltage instability under negative bias illumination stress in amorphous oxide thin film transistors. Here we report the results of first-principles molecular dynamics simulations for the drift motion of oxygen vacancies. We show that oxygen vacancies, which are initially ionized by trapping photoexcited hole carriers, can easily migrate under an external electric field. Thus, accumulated hole traps near the channel/dielectric interface cause negative shift of the threshold voltage, supporting the oxygen vacancy model. In addition, we find that ionized oxygen vacancies easily recover their neutral defect configurations by capturing electrons when the Fermi level increases. Our results are in good agreement with the experimental observation that applying a positive gate bias pulse of short duration eliminates hole traps and thus leads to the recovery of device stability from persistent photoconductivity.

  6. Analytical instruments, ionization sources, and ionization methods

    DOEpatents

    Atkinson, David A.; Mottishaw, Paul

    2006-04-11

    Methods and apparatus for simultaneous vaporization and ionization of a sample in a spectrometer prior to introducing the sample into the drift tube of the analyzer are disclosed. The apparatus includes a vaporization/ionization source having an electrically conductive conduit configured to receive sample particulate which is conveyed to a discharge end of the conduit. Positioned proximate to the discharge end of the conduit is an electrically conductive reference device. The conduit and the reference device act as electrodes and have an electrical potential maintained between them sufficient to cause a corona effect, which will cause at least partial simultaneous ionization and vaporization of the sample particulate. The electrical potential can be maintained to establish a continuous corona, or can be held slightly below the breakdown potential such that arrival of particulate at the point of proximity of the electrodes disrupts the potential, causing arcing and the corona effect. The electrical potential can also be varied to cause periodic arcing between the electrodes such that particulate passing through the arc is simultaneously vaporized and ionized. The invention further includes a spectrometer containing the source. The invention is particularly useful for ion mobility spectrometers and atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometers.

  7. Surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry protein profiling identifies ubiquitin and ferritin light chain as prognostic biomarkers in node-negative breast cancer tumors.

    PubMed

    Ricolleau, Gabriel; Charbonnel, Catherine; Lodé, Laurence; Loussouarn, Delphine; Joalland, Marie-Pierre; Bogumil, Ralf; Jourdain, Sabine; Minvielle, Stéphane; Campone, Mario; Déporte-Fety, Régine; Campion, Loïc; Jézéquel, Pascal

    2006-03-01

    Novel prognostic biomarkers are imperatively needed to help direct treatment decisions by typing subgroups of node-negative breast cancer patients. The current study has used a proteomic approach of SELDI-TOF-MS screening to identify differentially cytosolic expressed proteins with a prognostic impact in 30 node-negative breast cancer patients with no relapse versus 30 patients with metastatic relapse. The data analysis took into account 73 peaks, among which 2 proved, by means of univariate Cox regression, to have a good cumulative prognostic-informative power. Repeated random sampling (n = 500) was performed to ensure the reliability of the peaks. Optimized thresholds were then computed to use both peaks as risk factors and, adding them to the St. Gallen ones, improve the prognostic classification of node-negative breast cancer patients. Identification of ubiquitin and ferritin light chain (FLC), corresponding to the two peaks of interest, was obtained using ProteinChip LDI-Qq-TOF-MS. Differential expression of the two proteins was further confirmed by Western blotting analyses and immunohistochemistry. SELDI-TOF-MS protein profiling clearly showed that a high level of cytosolic ubiquitin and/or a low level of FLC were associated with a good prognosis in breast cancer.

  8. Three chamber negative ion source

    DOEpatents

    Leung, K.N.; Ehlers, K.W.; Hiskes, J.R.

    1983-11-10

    It is an object of this invention provide a negative ion source which efficiently provides a large flux of negatively ionized particles. This invention provides a volume source of negative ions which has a current density sufficient for magnetic fusion applications and has electrons suppressed from the output. It is still another object of this invention to provide a volume source of negative ions which can be electrostatically accelerated to high energies and subsequently neutralized to form a high energy neutral beam for use with a magnetically confined plasma.

  9. Video Screen Capture Basics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunbar, Laura

    2014-01-01

    This article is an introduction to video screen capture. Basic information of two software programs, QuickTime for Mac and BlueBerry Flashback Express for PC, are also discussed. Practical applications for video screen capture are given.

  10. Simultaneous determination of histamine and prostaglandin D2 using an LC-ESI-MS/MS method with positive/negative ion-switching ionization modes: application to the study of anti-allergic flavonoids on the degranulation of KU812 cells.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Junko; Taga, Shiori; Shimizu, Kae; Shimizu, Maki; Morita, Izumi; Takeuchi, Atsuko

    2011-09-01

    A new method for simultaneous determination of histamine and prostaglandin D(2) (PGD(2)) by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry operated in positive and negative ionization switching modes was developed and validated without a previous derivatization step. This method was used to measure histamine and PGD(2) release following degranulation of KU812 human basophilic cells, using pyrazol and d(4)-PGD(2) as internal standards. Analyses were performed on a liquid chromatography system employing a Cosmosil 5C(18) PAQ column and an isocratic elution with mixed solution of methanol-water (7:3, v/v) with 0.0015% trifluoroacetic acid at a flow rate of 0.2 mL/min. A triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer operating in selected reaction monitoring mode simultaneously monitored using the following transitions: positive m/z 112/95 for histamine and negative m/z 351/271 for PGD(2). The retention times of histamine and pyrazol were 4.2 and 5.0 min, respectively. PGD(2) and d(4)-PGD(2) had retention times of 8.5 min. The limits of detection were 0.3 and 0.5 ng/mL for histamine and PGD(2), respectively. The relative standard deviations of the retention time and peak area for histamine were between 1.6% and 7.7%, and were 1.2% and 7.8% for PGD(2). This method was used to evaluate the anti-allergic effects of 26 flavonoids and sodium cromoglicate which are first-line anti-allergic drugs. Of these compounds, baicalein and morin were the most potent inhibitors.

  11. Iodine neutron capture therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Kazi Fariduddin

    A new technique, Iodine Neutron Capture Therapy (INCT) is proposed to treat hyperthyroidism in people. Present thyroid therapies, surgical removal and 131I treatment, result in hypothyroidism and, for 131I, involve protracted treatment times and excessive whole-body radiation doses. The new technique involves using a low energy neutron beam to convert a fraction of the natural iodine stored in the thyroid to radioactive 128I, which has a 24-minute half-life and decays by emitting 2.12-MeV beta particles. The beta particles are absorbed in and damage some thyroid tissue cells and consequently reduce the production and release of thyroid hormones to the blood stream. Treatment times and whole-body radiation doses are thus reduced substantially. This dissertation addresses the first of the several steps needed to obtain medical profession acceptance and regulatory approval to implement this therapy. As with other such programs, initial feasibility is established by performing experiments on suitable small mammals. Laboratory rats were used and their thyroids were exposed to the beta particles coming from small encapsulated amounts of 128I. Masses of 89.0 mg reagent-grade elemental iodine crystals have been activated in the ISU AGN-201 reactor to provide 0.033 mBq of 128I. This activity delivers 0.2 Gy to the thyroid gland of 300-g male rats having fresh thyroid tissue masses of ˜20 mg. Larger iodine masses are used to provide greater doses. The activated iodine is encapsulated to form a thin (0.16 cm 2/mg) patch that is then applied directly to the surgically exposed thyroid of an anesthetized rat. Direct neutron irradiation of a rat's thyroid was not possible due to its small size. Direct in-vivo exposure of the thyroid of the rat to the emitted radiation from 128I is allowed to continue for 2.5 hours (6 half-lives). Pre- and post-exposure blood samples are taken to quantify thyroid hormone levels. The serum T4 concentration is measured by radioimmunoassay at

  12. Can radiative forcing be limited to 2.6 Wm-2 without negative emissions from bioenergy Aand CO2 capture and storage?

    SciTech Connect

    Edmonds, James; Luckow, Patrick; Calvin, Katherine; Wise, Marshall; Dooley, Jim; Kyle, Page; Kim, Son H.; Patel, Pralit; Clarke, Leon

    2013-01-18

    Combining bioenergy and carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and storage (CCS) technologies (BECCS) has the potential to remove CO2 from the atmosphere while producing useful energy. BECCS has played a central role in scenarios that reduce climate forcing to low levels such as 2.6Wm-2. In this paper we consider whether BECCS is essential to limiting radiative forcing (RF) to 2.6Wm-2 by 2100 using the Global Change Assessment Model, a closely coupled model of biogeophysical and human Earth systems. We show that BECCS can potentially reduce the cost of limiting RF to 2.6Wm-2 by 2100 but that a variety of technology combinations that do not include BECCS can also achieve this goal, under appropriate emissions mitigation policies. We note that with appropriate supporting land-use policies terrestrial sequestration could deliver carbon storage ranging from 200 to 700 PgCO2-equiavalent over the 21st century. We explore substantial delays in participation by some geopolitical regions. We find that the value of BECCS is substantially higher under delay and that delay results in higher transient RF and climate change. However, when major regions postponed mitigation indefinitely, it was impossible to return RF to 2.6Wm-2 by 2100. Neither finite land resources nor finite potential geologic storage capacity represented a meaningful technical limit on the ability of BECCS to contribute to emissions mitigation in the numerical experiments reported in this paper.

  13. Capture Their Attention: Capturing Lessons Using Screen Capture Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drumheller, Kristina; Lawler, Gregg

    2011-01-01

    When students miss classes for university activities such as athletic and academic events, they inevitably miss important class material. Students can get notes from their peers or visit professors to find out what they missed, but when students miss new and challenging material these steps are sometimes not enough. Screen capture and recording…

  14. Cryogenic Carbon Capture

    SciTech Connect

    2010-07-15

    IMPACCT Project: SES is developing a process to capture CO2 from the exhaust gas of coal-fired power plants by desublimation - the conversion of a gas to a solid. Capturing CO2 as a solid and delivering it as a liquid avoids the large energy cost of CO2 gas compression. SES’ capture technology facilitates the prudent use of available energy resources. Coal is our most abundant energy resource and is an excellent fuel for baseline power production. SES capture technology can capture 99% of the CO2 emissions in addition to a wide range of other pollutants more efficiently and at lower costs than existing capture technologies. SES’ capture technology can be readily added to our existing energy infrastructure.

  15. Collective capture of released lithium ions in the solar wind

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winske, D.; Wu, C. S.; Li, Y. Y.; Zhou, G. C.

    1984-01-01

    The capture of newly ionized lithium ions in the solar wind by means of electromagnetic instabilities is investigated through linear analysis and computer simulation. Three instabilities, driven by a lithium velocity ring perpendicular to and drifting along the magnetic field, are considered. The capture time of the lithium by the solar wind is roughly 10 linear growth times, regardless of whether resonant or nonresonant modes dominate initially. Possible implications of the results for the Active Magnetosphere Particle Tracer Explorer (AMPTE) mission are discussed.

  16. Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Ingram, M.; Mason, W. B.; Whipple, G. H.; Howland, J. W.

    1952-04-07

    This report presents a review of present knowledge and concepts of the biological effects of ionizing radiations. Among the topics discussed are the physical and chemical effects of ionizing radiation on biological systems, morphological and physiological changes observed in biological systems subjected to ionizing radiations, physiological changes in the intact animal, latent changes following exposure of biological systems to ionizing radiations, factors influencing the biological response to ionizing radiation, relative effects of various ionizing radiations, and biological dosimetry.

  17. Thai Negation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alam, Samsul

    A study analyzed the structure of negative sentences in the Thai language, based on data gathered from two native speakers. It is shown that the Thai negative marker generally occurs between the noun phrase (subject) and the verb phrase in simple active sentences and in passive sentences. Negation of noun phrases is also allowed in Thai, with a…

  18. Surface-enhanced transmission mode desorption electrospray ionization: increasing the specificity of ambient ionization mass spectrometric analyses.

    PubMed

    Chipuk, Joseph E; Gelb, Michael H; Brodbelt, Jennifer S

    2010-01-01

    Fabrication and utilization of mesh materials specifically designed to capture analytes from solution facilitates the direct coupling of affinity capture and ambient ionization mass spectrometry via surface-enhanced transmission mode desorption electrospray ionization (TM-DESI). Incorporation of photolabile groups within the linkage between the mesh surface and the covalently modified reactive probe affords facile release of mass tagged analytes directly to mesh surfaces that have been rinsed free of matrix interferences. The approach introduces increased specificity to the already rapid TM-DESI analysis technique, resulting in a powerful tool for high-throughput screening of targeted analytes. Specific capture of thiols is discussed herein, but the surface-enhanced TM-DESI technique can be readily extended to other functional groups by alteration of the capture agent.

  19. Isotope separation by photoselective dissociative electron capture

    DOEpatents

    Stevens, Charles G. [Pleasanton, CA

    1978-08-29

    A method of separating isotopes based on photoselective electron capture dissociation of molecules having an electron capture cross section dependence on the vibrational state of the molecule. A molecular isotope source material is irradiated to selectively excite those molecules containing a desired isotope to a predetermined vibrational state having associated therewith an electron capture energy region substantially non-overlapping with the electron capture energy ranges associated with the lowest vibration states of the molecules. The isotope source is also subjected to electrons having an energy corresponding to the non-overlapping electron capture region whereby the selectively excited molecules preferentially capture electrons and dissociate into negative ions and neutrals. The desired isotope may be in the negative ion product or in the neutral product depending upon the mechanism of dissociation of the particular isotope source used. The dissociation product enriched in the desired isotope is then separated from the reaction system by conventional means. Specifically, .sup.235 UF.sub.6 is separated from a UF.sub.6 mixture by selective excitation followed by dissociative electron capture into .sup.235 UF.sub.5 - and F.

  20. Isotope separation by photoselective dissociative electron capture

    DOEpatents

    Stevens, C.G.

    1978-08-29

    Disclosed is a method of separating isotopes based on photoselective electron capture dissociation of molecules having an electron capture cross section dependence on the vibrational state of the molecule. A molecular isotope source material is irradiated to selectively excite those molecules containing a desired isotope to a predetermined vibrational state having associated therewith an electron capture energy region substantially non-overlapping with the electron capture energy ranges associated with the lowest vibration states of the molecules. The isotope source is also subjected to electrons having an energy corresponding to the non-overlapping electron capture region whereby the selectively excited molecules preferentially capture electrons and dissociate into negative ions and neutrals. The desired isotope may be in the negative ion product or in the neutral product depending upon the mechanism of dissociation of the particular isotope source used. The dissociation product enriched in the desired isotope is then separated from the reaction system by conventional means. Specifically, [sup 235]UF[sub 6] is separated from a UF[sub 6] mixture by selective excitation followed by dissociative electron capture into [sup 235]UF[sub 5]- and F. 2 figs.

  1. Radiation of partially ionized atomic hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soon, W. H.; Kunc, J. A.

    1990-01-01

    A nonlinear collisional-radiative model for determination of production of electrons, positive and negative ions, excited atoms, and spectral and continuum line intensities in stationary partially ionized atomic hydrogen is presented. Transport of radiation is included by coupling the rate equations for production of the electrons, ions, and excited atoms with the radiation escape factors, which are not constant but depend on plasma conditions. It is found that the contribution of the negative ion emission to the total continuum emission can be important. Comparison of the calculated total continuum emission coefficient, including the negative ion emission, is in good agreement with experimental results.

  2. Carbon nanodots as a matrix for the analysis of low-molecular-weight molecules in both positive- and negative-ion matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry and quantification of glucose and uric acid in real samples.

    PubMed

    Chen, Suming; Zheng, Huzhi; Wang, Jianing; Hou, Jian; He, Qing; Liu, Huihui; Xiong, Caiqiao; Kong, Xianglei; Nie, Zongxiu

    2013-07-16

    Carbon nanodots were applied for the first time as a new matrix for the analysis of low-molecular-weight compounds by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) in both positive- and negative-ion modes. A wide range of small molecules including amino acids, peptides, fatty acids, as well as β-agonists and neutral oligosaccharides were analyzed by MALDI MS with carbon nanodots as the matrix, and the lowest 0.2 fmol limits-of-detection were obtained for octadecanoic acid. Clear sodium and potassium adducts and deprotonated signals were produced in positive- and negative-ion modes. Furthermore, the glucose and uric acid in real samples were quantitatively determined by the internal standard method with the linear range of 0.5-9 mM and 0.1-1.8 mM (R(2) > 0.999), respectively. This work gives new insight into the application of carbon nanodots and provides a general approach for rapid analysis of low-molecular-weight compounds.

  3. Analysis of the residues of 20 organochlorine pesticides in Herba epimedii, a Chinese herbal medicine, by solid-phase extraction with gas chromatography/negative chemical ionization-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qing; Deng, Ming; Yu, Boyang; Tan, Li

    2010-01-01

    A multiresidue analytical method has been developed to simultaneously determine the residues of 20 organochlorine pesticides in Herba epimedii, a traditional Chinese medicine. The 20 pesticides are included in the list of regulated substances by the Food and Environmental Hygiene Department in Hong Kong. The method consists of solid-phase extraction for cleanup of samples and GC coupled on-line with negative chemical ion-MS to analyze the target pesticides. The chromatographic separation of the compounds was carried out on a DB-1701 column by using an optimal temperature program, and the quantitative analysis was conducted by selected ion monitoring. The LOD and LOQ values fell in the range of 0.0555-5.8821 and 0.1241-17.9333 ng/g, respectively. The average recoveries were between 75.4 and 90.7% (n=5) for the 20 organochlorine pesticides. The developed method proved to be reliable and accurate, and permits rapid determination of the 20 organochlorine pesticides in one run.

  4. An atmospheric pressure chemical ionization study of the positive and negative ion chemistry of the hydrofluorocarbons 1,1-difluoroethane (HFC-152a) and 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (HFC-134a) and of perfluoro-n-hexane (FC-72) in air plasma at atmospheric pressure.

    PubMed

    Marotta, Ester; Paradisi, Cristina; Scorrano, Gianfranco

    2004-07-01

    A report is given on the ionization/dissociation behavior of the title compounds within air plasmas produced by electrical corona discharges at atmospheric pressure: both positive and negative ions were investigated at different temperatures using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (APCI-MS). CHF(2)CH(3) (HFC-152a) undergoes efficient ionic oxidation to C(2)H(5)O(+), in which the oxygen comes from water present in the plasma. In contrast, CF(3)CH(2)F (HFC-134a) does not produce any characteristic positive ion under APCI conditions, its presence within the plasma being revealed only as a neutral ligand in ion-molecule complexes with ions of the background (H(3)O(+) and NO(+)). Analogously, the perfluorocarbon FC-72 (n-C(6)F(14)) does not produce significant positive ions at 30 degrees C: at high temperature, however, it undergoes dissociative ionization to form many product ions including C(3)F(6)(+), C(2)F(4)(+), C(n)F(2n+1)(+) and a few families of oxygen containing cations (C(n)F(2n+1)OH(2)(+), C(n)F(2n)OH(+), C(n)F(2n-1)O(+), C(n)F(2n-1)O(2)H(2)(+), C(n)F(2n-2)O(2)H(+)) which are suggested to derive from C(n)F(2n+1)(+) in a cascade of steps initiated by condensation with water followed by steps of HF elimination and H(2)O addition. Negative ions formed from the fluoroethanes CHF(2)CH(3) and CF(3)CH(2)F (M) include complexes with ions of the background, O(2)(-)(M), O(3)(-)(M) and some higher complexes involving also water, and complexes of the fluoride ion, F(-)(H(2)O), F(-)(M) and higher complexes with both M and H(2)O also together. The interesting product O(2)(-)(HF) is also formed from 1,1-difluoroethane. In contrast to the HFCs, perfluoro-n-hexane gives stable molecular anions, M(-), which at low source temperature or in humidified air are also detected as hydrates, M(-)(H(2)O). In addition, in humidified air F(-)(H(2)O)(n) complexes are also formed. The reactions leading to all major positive and negative product ions are discussed

  5. STRUCTURAL DETERMINATION AND QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS OF BACTERIAL PHOSPHOLIPIDS USING LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY/ELECTROSPRAY IONIZATION/MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents a comprehensive spectral analysis of common bacterial phospholipids using electrospray/mass spectrometry (ESI/MS) under both negative and positive ionization conditions. Phospholipids under positive ionization yield sodium-adduct molecular ions which are mos...

  6. Testing the Capture Magnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image of a model capture magnet was taken after an experiment in a Mars simulation chamber at the University of Aarhus, Denmark. It has some dust on it, but not as much as that on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit's capture magnet. The capture and filter magnets on both Mars Exploration Rovers were delivered by the magnetic properties team at the Center for Planetary Science, Copenhagen, Denmark.

  7. Spatial capture-recapture

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Royle, J. Andrew; Chandler, Richard B.; Sollmann, Rahel; Gardner, Beth

    2013-01-01

    Spatial Capture-Recapture provides a revolutionary extension of traditional capture-recapture methods for studying animal populations using data from live trapping, camera trapping, DNA sampling, acoustic sampling, and related field methods. This book is a conceptual and methodological synthesis of spatial capture-recapture modeling. As a comprehensive how-to manual, this reference contains detailed examples of a wide range of relevant spatial capture-recapture models for inference about population size and spatial and temporal variation in demographic parameters. Practicing field biologists studying animal populations will find this book to be a useful resource, as will graduate students and professionals in ecology, conservation biology, and fisheries and wildlife management.

  8. Electron ionization of acetylene.

    PubMed

    King, Simon J; Price, Stephen D

    2007-11-07

    Relative partial ionization cross sections and precursor specific relative partial ionization cross sections for fragment ions formed by electron ionization of C2H2 have been measured using time-of-flight mass spectrometry coupled with a 2D ion-ion coincidence technique. We report data for the formation of H+, H+2, C2+, C+/C2+ 2, CH+/C2H+2, CH+2, C+2, and C2H+ relative to the formation of C2H+2, as a function of ionizing electron energy from 30-200 eV. While excellent agreement is found between our data and one set of previously published absolute partial ionization cross sections, some discrepancies exist between the results presented here and two other recent determinations of these absolute partial ionization cross sections. We attribute these differences to the loss of some translationally energetic fragment ions in these earlier studies. Our relative precursor-specific partial ionization cross sections enable us, for the first time, to quantify the contribution to the yield of each fragment ion from single, double, and triple ionization. Analysis shows that at 50 eV double ionization contributes 2% to the total ion yield, increasing to over 10% at an ionizing energy of 100 eV. From our ion-ion coincidence data, we have derived branching ratios for charge separating dissociations of the acetylene dication. Comparison of our data to recent ab initio/RRKM calculations suggest that close to the double ionization potential C2H2+2 dissociates predominantly on the ground triplet potential energy surface (3Sigma*g) with a much smaller contribution from dissociation via the lowest singlet potential energy surface (1Delta g). Measurements of the kinetic energy released in the fragmentation reactions of C2H2+2 have been used to obtain precursor state energies for the formation of product ion pairs, and are shown to be in good agreement with available experimental data and with theory.

  9. Isobutane Made Practical as a Reagent Gas for Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newsome, G. Asher; Steinkamp, F. Lucus; Giordano, Braden C.

    2016-11-01

    As a reagent gas for positive- and negative-mode chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CI-MS), isobutane ( i-C4H10) produces superior analyte signal abundance to methane. Isobutane has never been widely adopted for CI-MS because it fouls the ion source more rapidly and produces positive CI spectra that are more strongly dependent on reagent gas pressure compared with methane. Isobutane was diluted to various concentrations in argon for use as a reagent gas with an unmodified commercial gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer. Analyte spectra were directly compared using methane, isobutane, and isobutane/argon mixtures. A mixture of 10% i-C4H10 in argon produced twice the positive-mode analyte signal of methane, equal to pure isobutane, and reduced spectral dependence on reagent gas pressure. Electron capture negative chemical ionization using 1% i-C4H10 in argon tripled analyte signal compared with methane and was reproducible, unlike pure isobutane. The operative lifetime of the ion source using isobutane/argon mixtures was extended exponentially compared with pure isobutane, producing stable and reproducible CI signal throughout. By diluting the reagent gas in an inert buffer gas, isobutane CI-MS experiments were made as practical to use as methane CI-MS experiments but with superior analytical performance.

  10. Pediatric Exposures to Ionizing Radiation: Carcinogenic Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Kutanzi, Kristy R.; Lumen, Annie; Koturbash, Igor; Miousse, Isabelle R.

    2016-01-01

    Children are at a greater risk than adults of developing cancer after being exposed to ionizing radiation. Because of their developing bodies and long life expectancy post-exposure, children require specific attention in the aftermath of nuclear accidents and when radiation is used for diagnosis or treatment purposes. In this review, we discuss the carcinogenic potential of pediatric exposures to ionizing radiation from accidental, diagnostic, and therapeutic modalities. Particular emphasis is given to leukemia and thyroid cancers as consequences of accidental exposures. We further discuss the evidence of cancers that arise as a result of radiotherapy and conclude the review with a summary on the available literature on the links between computer tomography (CT) and carcinogenesis. Appropriate actions taken to mitigate or minimize the negative health effects of pediatric exposures to ionizing radiation and future considerations are discussed. PMID:27801855

  11. Alkali metal ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Bauerle, James E.; Reed, William H.; Berkey, Edgar

    1978-01-01

    Variations in the conventional filament and collector electrodes of an alkali metal ionization detector, including the substitution of helical electrode configurations for either the conventional wire filament or flat plate collector; or, the substitution of a plurality of discrete filament electrodes providing an in situ capability for transferring from an operationally defective filament electrode to a previously unused filament electrode without removing the alkali metal ionization detector from the monitored environment. In particular, the helical collector arrangement which is coaxially disposed about the filament electrode, i.e. the thermal ionizer, provides an improved collection of positive ions developed by the filament electrode. The helical filament design, on the other hand, provides the advantage of an increased surface area for ionization of alkali metal-bearing species in a monitored gas environment as well as providing a relatively strong electric field for collecting the ions at the collector electrode about which the helical filament electrode is coaxially positioned. Alternatively, both the filament and collector electrodes can be helical. Furthermore, the operation of the conventional alkali metal ionization detector as a leak detector can be simplified as to cost and complexity, by operating the detector at a reduced collector potential while maintaining the sensitivity of the alkali metal ionization detector adequate for the relatively low concentration of alkali vapor and aerosol typically encountered in leak detection applications.

  12. "Magic" Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimpin, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The systematic study of the temperature and pressure dependence of matrix-assisted ionization (MAI) led us to the discovery of the seemingly impossible, initially explained by some reviewers as either sleight of hand or the misinterpretation by an overzealous young scientist of results reported many years before and having little utility. The "magic" that we were attempting to report was that with matrix assistance, molecules, at least as large as bovine serum albumin (66 kDa), are lifted into the gas phase as multiply charged ions simply by exposure of the matrix:analyte sample to the vacuum of a mass spectrometer. Applied heat, a laser, or voltages are not necessary to achieve charge states and ion abundances only previously observed with electrospray ionization (ESI). The fundamentals of how solid phase volatile or nonvolatile compounds are converted to gas-phase ions without added energy currently involves speculation providing a great opportunity to rethink mechanistic understanding of ionization processes used in mass spectrometry. Improved understanding of the mechanism(s) of these processes and their connection to ESI and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization may provide opportunities to further develop new ionization strategies for traditional and yet unforeseen applications of mass spectrometry. This Critical Insights article covers developments leading to the discovery of a seemingly magic ionization process that is simple to use, fast, sensitive, robust, and can be directly applied to surface characterization using portable or high performance mass spectrometers.

  13. "Magic" Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Trimpin, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The systematic study of the temperature and pressure dependence of matrix-assisted ionization (MAI) led us to the discovery of the seemingly impossible, initially explained by some reviewers as either sleight of hand or the misinterpretation by an overzealous young scientist of results reported many years before and having little utility. The “magic” that we were attempting to report was that with matrix assistance, molecules, at least as large as bovine serum albumin (66 kDa), are lifted into the gas phase as multiply charged ions simply by exposure of the matrix:analyte sample to the vacuum of a mass spectrometer. Applied heat, a laser, or voltages are not necessary to achieve charge states and ion abundances only previously observed with electrospray ionization (ESI). The fundamentals of how solid phase volatile or nonvolatile compounds are converted to gas-phase ions without added energy currently involves speculation providing a great opportunity to rethink mechanistic understanding of ionization processes used in mass spectrometry. Improved understanding of the mechanism(s) of these processes and their connection to ESI and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization may provide opportunities to further develop new ionization strategies for traditional and yet unforeseen applications of mass spectrometry. This Critical Insights article covers developments leading to the discovery of a seemingly magic ionization process that is simple to use, fast, sensitive, robust, and can be directly applied to surface characterization using portable or high performance mass spectrometers.

  14. NEGATIVE SYMPTOMS AND NEGATIVE SCHIZOPHRENIA

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, S.K.; Gopinath, P.S.; Mathai, P. John; Michael, Albert

    1984-01-01

    SUMMARY This study determines the frequency distribution of prominent negative symptoms in a group of chronic, hospitalised schizophrenics. Thirty chronic Schizophrenic (D.S.M. III) patients were rated on the scale for Assessment of Negative Symptoms (SANS) and the prominent negative symptoms were correlated with age, sex and certain illness variables. Majority (80%) of patients had some or the other negative symptom, except thought blocking which was found in none. The subjective awareness of the symptoms was poor. Most negative symptoms were present to a severe degree in about 40% of cases. However, no significant correlation was found between severe negative symptoms and age or sex. Similarly, duration of illness, duration of hospitalisation or current medications did not influence negative symptoms to any appreciable degree. The implications are discussed. PMID:21965985

  15. Production of negative hydrogen ions on metal grids

    SciTech Connect

    Oohara, W.; Maetani, Y.; Takeda, Takashi; Takeda, Toshiaki; Yokoyama, H.; Kawata, K.

    2015-03-15

    Negative hydrogen ions are produced on a nickel grid with positive-ion irradiation. In order to investigate the production mechanism, a copper grid without the chemisorption of hydrogen atoms and positive helium ions without negative ionization are used for comparison. Positive hydrogen ions reflected on the metal surface obtain two electrons from the surface and become negatively ionized. It is found that the production yield of negative ions by desorption ionization of chemisorbed hydrogen atoms seems to be small, and the production is a minor mechanism.

  16. Jupiter: its captured satellites.

    PubMed

    Bailey, J M

    1971-08-27

    Because of the small size and irregular orbits of the seven outer satellites of Jupiter, it is often assumed that they were derived by capture. The conditions whereby Jupiter can capture satellites have therefore been examined. Relationships derived on the basis of the three-body problem for planets in elliptical orbits enable the dimensions of the capture orbits around Jupiter to be calculated. It is found that Jupiter may capture satellites through the inner Lagrangian point when at perihelion or at aphelion. Captures at perihelion should give rise to satellites in direct orbits of 11.48 x 10(6) kilometers and capture at aphelion to retrograde orbits of 21.7 x 10(6) kilometers. The correspondence with the seven outer satellites suggests that Jupiter VI, VIl, and X in direct orbits at 11.47, 11.74, and 11.85 x 10(6) kilometers were captured at Jupiter perihelion, whereas Jupiter VIII, IX, XI, and XII in retrograde orbits of 23.5, 23.7, 22.5, and 21.2 x 10(6) kilometers were captured when Jupiter was at aphelion. Examination of the precapture orbits indicates that the seven outer satellites were derived from the asteroid belt.

  17. Demonstrating carbon capture

    SciTech Connect

    Qader, A.; Hooper, B.; Stevens, G.

    2009-11-15

    Australia is at the forefront of advancing CCS technology. The CO2CRC's H3 (Post-combustion) and Mulgrave (pre-combustion) capture projects are outlined. The capture technologies for these 2 demonstration projects are described. 1 map., 2 photos.

  18. Fuel cell with ionization membrane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Frank T. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A fuel cell is disclosed comprising an ionization membrane having at least one area through which gas is passed, and which ionizes the gas passing therethrough, and a cathode for receiving the ions generated by the ionization membrane. The ionization membrane may include one or more openings in the membrane with electrodes that are located closer than a mean free path of molecules within the gas to be ionized. Methods of manufacture are also provided.

  19. Negative ions of polyatomic molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Christophorou, L G

    1980-01-01

    In this paper general concepts relating to, and recent advances in, the study of negative ions of polyatomic molecules area discussed with emphasis on halocarbons. The topics dealt with in the paper are as follows: basic electron attachment processes, modes of electron capture by molecules, short-lived transient negative ions, dissociative electron attachment to ground-state molecules and to "hot" molecules (effects of temperature on electron attachment), parent negative ions, effect of density, nature, and state of the medium on electron attachment, electron attachment to electronically excited molecules, the binding of attached electrons to molecules ("electron affinity"), and the basic and the applied significance of negative-ion studies. PMID:7428744

  20. Negative ions of polyatomic molecules.

    PubMed

    Christophorou, L G

    1980-06-01

    In this paper general concepts relating to, and recent advances in, the study of negative ions of polyatomic molecules area discussed with emphasis on halocarbons. The topics dealt with in the paper are as follows: basic electron attachment processes, modes of electron capture by molecules, short-lived transient negative ions, dissociative electron attachment to ground-state molecules and to "hot" molecules (effects of temperature on electron attachment), parent negative ions, effect of density, nature, and state of the medium on electron attachment, electron attachment to electronically excited molecules, the binding of attached electrons to molecules ("electron affinity"), and the basic and the applied significance of negative-ion studies.

  1. Atmospheric Ionization Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slack, Thomas; Mayes, Riley

    2015-04-01

    The measurement of atmospheric ionization is a largely unexplored science that potentially holds the key to better understanding many different geophysical phenomena through this new and valuable source of data. Through the LaACES program, which is funded by NASA through the Louisiana Space Consortium, students at Loyola University New Orleans have pursued the goal of measuring high altitude ionization for nearly three years, and were the first to successfully collect ionization data at altitudes over 30,000 feet using a scientific weather balloon flown from the NASA Columbia Scientific Ballooning Facility in Palestine, TX. In order to measure atmospheric ionization, the science team uses a lightweight and highly customized sensor known as a Gerdien condenser. Among other branches of science the data is already being used for, such as the study of aerosol pollution levels in the atmosphere, the data may also be useful in meteorology and seismology. Ionization data might provide another variable with which to predict weather or seismic activity more accurately and further in advance. Thomas Slack and Riley Mayes have served as project managers for the experiment, and have extensive knowledge of the experiment from the ground up. LaSPACE Louisiana Space Consortium.

  2. IMPACCT: Carbon Capture Technology

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    IMPACCT Project: IMPACCT’s 15 projects seek to develop technologies for existing coal-fired power plants that will lower the cost of carbon capture. Short for “Innovative Materials and Processes for Advanced Carbon Capture Technologies,” the IMPACCT Project is geared toward minimizing the cost of removing carbon dioxide (CO2) from coal-fired power plant exhaust by developing materials and processes that have never before been considered for this application. Retrofitting coal-fired power plants to capture the CO2 they produce would enable greenhouse gas reductions without forcing these plants to close, shifting away from the inexpensive and abundant U.S. coal supply.

  3. Ambient ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, A. T.

    2015-07-01

    Ambient ionization mass spectrometry emerged as a new scientific discipline only about ten years ago. A considerable body of information has been reported since that time. Keeping the sensitivity, performance and informativity of classical mass spectrometry methods, the new approach made it possible to eliminate laborious sample preparation procedures and triggered the development of miniaturized instruments to work directly in the field. The review concerns the theoretical foundations and design of ambient ionization methods. Their advantages and drawbacks, as well as prospects for application in chemistry, biology, medicine, environmetal analysis, etc., are discussed. The bibliography includes 194 references.

  4. Ionizing potential waves and high-voltage breakdown streamers.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albright, N. W.; Tidman, D. A.

    1972-01-01

    The structure of ionizing potential waves driven by a strong electric field in a dense gas is discussed. Negative breakdown waves are found to propagate with a velocity proportional to the electric field normal to the wavefront. This causes a curved ionizing potential wavefront to focus down into a filamentary structure, and may provide the reason why breakdown in dense gases propagates in the form of a narrow leader streamer instead of a broad wavefront.

  5. DNA lesion can facilitate base ionization: vertical ionization energies of aqueous 8-oxoguanine and its nucleoside and nucleotide.

    PubMed

    Palivec, Vladimír; Pluhařová, Eva; Unger, Isaak; Winter, Bernd; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2014-12-04

    8-Oxoguanine is one of the key products of indirect radiation damage to DNA by reactive oxygen species. Here, we describe ionization of this damaged nucleobase and the corresponding nucleoside and nucleotide in aqueous phase, modeled by the nonequilibrium polarizable continuum model, establishing their lowest vertical ionization energies of 6.8-7.0 eV. We thus confirm that 8-oxoguanine has even lower ionization energy than the parental guanine, which is the canonical nucleobase with the lowest ionization energy. Therefore, it can act as a trap for the cationic hole formed by ionizing radiation and thus protect DNA from further radiation damage. We also model using time-dependent density functional theory and measure by liquid jet photoelectron spectroscopy the valence photoelectron spectrum of 8-oxoguanine in water. We show that the calculated higher lying ionization states match well the experiment which, however, is not sensitive enough to capture the electron signal corresponding to the lowest ionization process due to the low solubility of 8-oxoguanine in water.

  6. Ionizing radiation and life.

    PubMed

    Dartnell, Lewis R

    2011-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is a ubiquitous feature of the Cosmos, from exogenous cosmic rays (CR) to the intrinsic mineral radioactivity of a habitable world, and its influences on the emergence and persistence of life are wide-ranging and profound. Much attention has already been focused on the deleterious effects of ionizing radiation on organisms and the complex molecules of life, but ionizing radiation also performs many crucial functions in the generation of habitable planetary environments and the origins of life. This review surveys the role of CR and mineral radioactivity in star formation, generation of biogenic elements, and the synthesis of organic molecules and driving of prebiotic chemistry. Another major theme is the multiple layers of shielding of planetary surfaces from the flux of cosmic radiation and the various effects on a biosphere of violent but rare astrophysical events such as supernovae and gamma-ray bursts. The influences of CR can also be duplicitous, such as limiting the survival of surface life on Mars while potentially supporting a subsurface biosphere in the ocean of Europa. This review highlights the common thread that ionizing radiation forms between the disparate component disciplines of astrobiology.

  7. Alkali ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Hrizo, John; Bauerle, James E.; Witkowski, Robert E.

    1982-01-01

    A calibration filament containing a sodium-bearing compound is included in combination with the sensing filament and ion collector plate of a sodium ionization detector to permit periodic generation of sodium atoms for the in-situ calibration of the detector.

  8. Ionizing radiation from tobacco

    SciTech Connect

    Westin, J.B.

    1987-04-24

    Accidents at nuclear power facilities seem inevitably to bring in their wake a great deal of concern on the part of both the lay and medical communities. Relatively little attention, however, is given to what may be the largest single worldwide source of effectively carcinogenic ionizing radiation: tobacco. The risk of cancer deaths from the Chernobyl disaster are tobacco smoke is discussed.

  9. Microchip sonic spray ionization.

    PubMed

    Pól, Jaroslav; Kauppila, Tiina J; Haapala, Markus; Saarela, Ville; Franssila, Sami; Ketola, Raimo A; Kotiaho, Tapio; Kostiainen, Risto

    2007-05-01

    The first microchip version of sonic spray ionization (SSI) as an atmospheric pressure ionization source for mass spectrometry (MS) is presented. The microchip used for SSI has recently been developed in our laboratory, and it has been used before as an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) and atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) source. Now the ionization is achieved simply by applying high (sonic) speed nebulizer gas, without heat, corona discharge, or high voltage. The microchip SSI was applied to the analysis of tetra-N-butylammonium, verapamil, testosterone, angiotensin I, and ibuprofen. The limits of detection were in the range of 15 nM to 4 microM. The technique was found to be highly dependent on the position of the chip toward the mass spectrometer inlet, and on the gas and the sample solution flow rates. The microchip SSI provided dynamic linearity following a pattern similar to that used with electrospray, good quantitative repeatability (RSD=16%), and long-term signal stability.

  10. Modulated voltage metastable ionization detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carle, G. C.; Kojiro, D. R.; Humphrey, D. E. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    The output current from a metastable ionization detector (MID) is applied to a modulation voltage circuit. An adjustment is made to balance out the background current, and an output current, above background, is applied to an input of a strip chart recorder. For low level concentrations, i.e., low detected output current, the ionization potential will be at a maximum and the metastable ionization detector will operate at its most sensitive level. When the detected current from the metastable ionization detector increases above a predetermined threshold level, a voltage control circuit is activated which turns on a high voltage transistor which acts to reduce the ionization potential. The ionization potential applied to the metastable ionization detector is then varied so as to maintain the detected signal level constant. The variation in ionization potential is now related to the concentration of the constituent and a representative amplitude is applied to another input of said strip chart recorder.

  11. Prompt ionization in the CRIT II barium releases. [Critical Ionization Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torbert, R. B.; Kletzing, C. A.; Liou, K.; Rau, D.

    1992-01-01

    Observations of electron and ion distributions inside a fast neutral barium jet in the ionosphere show significant fluxes within 4 km of release, presumably related to beam plasma instability processes involved in the Critical Ionization Velocity (CIV) effect. Electron fluxes exceeding 5 x 10 exp 12/sq cm-str-sec-keV were responsible for ionizing both the streaming barium and ambient oxygen. Resulting ion fluxes seem to be consistent with 1-2 percent ionization of the fast barium, as reported by optical observations, although the extended spatial distribution of the optically observed ions is difficult to reconcile with the in situ observations. When the perpendicular velocity of the neutrals falls below critical values, these processes shut off. Although these observations resemble the earlier Porcupine experimental results (Haerendel, 1982), theoretical understanding of the differences between these data and that of earlier negative experiments is still lacking.

  12. Negative-ion formation in the explosives RDX, PETN, and TNT using the Reversal Electron Attachment Detection (READ) technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutijian, Ara; Boumsellek, S.; Alajajian, S. H.

    1992-01-01

    In the search for high sensitivity and direct atmospheric sampling of trace species, techniques have been developed such as atmospheric-sampling, glow-discharge ionization (ASGDI), corona discharge, atmospheric pressure ionization (API), electron-capture detection (ECD), and negative-ion chemical ionization (NICI) that are capable of detecting parts-per-billion to parts-per-trillion concentrations of trace species. These techniques are based on positive- or negative-ion formation via charge-transfer to the target, or electron capture under multiple-collision conditions in a Maxwellian distribution of electron energies at the source temperature. One drawback of the high-pressure, corona- or glow-discharge devices is that they are susceptible to interferences either through indistinguishable product masses, or through undesired ion-molecule reactions. The ASGDI technique is relatively immune from such interferences, since at target concentrations of less than 1 ppm the majority of negative ions arises via electron capture rather than through ion-molecule chemistry. A drawback of the conventional ECD, and possibly of the ASGDI, is that they exhibit vanishingly small densities of electrons with energies in the range 0-10 millielectron volts (meV), as can be seen from a typical Maxwellian electron energy distribution function at T = 300 K. Slowing the electrons to these subthermal (less than 10 meV) energies is crucial, since the cross section for attachment of several large classes of molecules is known to increase to values larger than 10(exp -12) sq cm at near-zero electron energies. In the limit of zero energy these cross sections are predicted to diverge as epsilon(exp -1/2), where epsilon is the electron energy. In order to provide a better 'match' between the electron energy distribution function and attachment cross section, a new concept of attachment in an electrostatic mirror was developed. In this scheme, electrons are brought to a momentary halt by

  13. Negative Certainty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ariso, José María

    2017-01-01

    The definitions of "negative knowledge" and the studies in this regard published to date have not considered the categorial distinction Wittgenstein established between knowledge and certainty. Hence, the important role that certainty, despite its omission, should have in these definitions and studies has not yet been shown. In this…

  14. Negative Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galbraith, Mary J.

    1974-01-01

    Examination of models for representing integers demonstrates that formal operational thought is required for establishing the operations on integers. Advocated is the use of many models for introducing negative numbers but, apart from addition, it is recommended that operations on integers be delayed until the formal operations stage. (JP)

  15. WARPED IONIZED HYDROGEN IN THE GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Cersosimo, J. C.; Figueroa, N. Santiago; Velez, S. Figueroa; Soto, C. Lozada; Mader, S.; Azcarate, D.

    2009-07-01

    We report observations of the H166{alpha} ({nu} = 1424.734 MHz) radio recombination line (RRL) emission from the Galactic plane in the longitude range l = 267 deg. - 302 deg. and latitude range b = -3.{sup 0}0 to +1.{sup 0}5. The line emission observed describes the Carina arm in the Galactic azimuth range from {theta} = 260 deg. to 190 deg. The structure is located at negative latitudes with respect to the formal Galactic plane. The observations are combined with RRL data from the first Galactic quadrant. Both quadrants show the signature of the warp for the ionized gas, but an asymmetry of the distribution is noted. In the fourth quadrant, the gas is located between Galactic radii R {approx} 7 and 10 kpc, and the amplitude of the warp is seen from the midplane to z {approx} -150 pc. In the first quadrant, the gas is found between R {approx} 8 and 13-16 kpc, and flares to z {approx} +350 pc. We confirm the warp of the ionized gas near the solar circle. The distribution of the ionized gas is compared with the maximum intensity H I emission (0.30 < n{sub HI} < 0.45 cm{sup -3}) at intervals of the Galactic ring. The ionized material is correlated with the H I maximum intensity in both quadrants, and both components show the same tilted behavior with respect to the mid-Galactic plane.

  16. Delayed acute capture myopathy in three roe deer.

    PubMed

    Montané, J; Marco, I; Manteca, X; López, J; Lavín, S

    2002-03-01

    Delayed acute capture myopathy is the term used to describe the clinical syndrome observed in three roe deer captured by drive-nets and transported to an enclosure for scientific purposes. The animals died 48 h, 60 h and 8 days after being captured. The simultaneous deaths coincided with a previous episode of deliberate human disturbance. The histopathological findings were indicative of acute myopathy and myoglobinaemic nephrosis. These could be related to an ataxic myoglobinuric syndrome brought on by capture and transport operations. The lack of clinical signs and negative prognosis indicators in the period between capture and just before death. the absence of gross muscular lesions in the animal that died after 8 days post-capture, the simultaneous deaths of animals captured at different times and the evidence of deliberate human disturbance in the enclosure are suggestive of death triggered by a second stress episode.

  17. Radiative pion capture by C12.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, W. C.; Gotow, K.; Macdonald, B.; Trower, W. P.; Anderson, D. K.

    1972-01-01

    The energy spectrum of neutrons from radiative pion capture by carbon is investigated. Radiative pion capture is identified by coincidence of a stop signal and a signal from one of six lead-glass gamma detectors when negative pions traverse a beam telescope and are stopped in a carbon target. The energy of the neutrons is measured using the time interval between a stop signal coincident with a gamma-counter signal and a signal from a liquid-oscillator neutron counter. Asymmetry in the neutron-photon angular correlation increases with neutron energy and is accounted for by direct neutron emission.

  18. Transfer ionization in collisions with a fast highly charged ion.

    PubMed

    Voitkiv, A B

    2013-07-26

    Transfer ionization in fast collisions between a bare ion and an atom, in which one of the atomic electrons is captured by the ion whereas another one is emitted, crucially depends on dynamic electron-electron correlations. We show that in collisions with a highly charged ion a strong field of the ion has a very profound effect on the correlated channels of transfer ionization. In particular, this field weakens (strongly suppresses) electron emission into the direction opposite (perpendicular) to the motion of the ion. Instead, electron emission is redirected into those parts of the momentum space which are very weakly populated in fast collisions with low charged ions.

  19. Contingent Attentional Capture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remington, Roger; Folk, Charles L.

    1994-01-01

    Four experiments address the degree of top-down selectivity in attention capture by feature singletons through manipulations of the spatial relationship and featural similarity of target and distractor singletons in a modified spatial cuing paradigm. Contrary to previous studies, all four experiments show that when searching for a singleton target, an irrelevant featural singleton captures attention only when defined by the same feature value as the target. Experiments 2, 3, and 4 provide a potential explanation for this empirical discrepancy by showing that irrelevant singletons can produce distraction effects that are independent of shifts of spatial attention. The results further support the notion that attentional capture is contingent on top-down attention control settings but indicates that such settings can be instantiated at the level of feature values.

  20. US Spacesuit Knowledge Capture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chullen, Cinda; Thomas, Ken; McMann, Joe; Dolan, Kristi; Bitterly, Rose; Lewis, Cathleen

    2011-01-01

    The ability to learn from both the mistakes and successes of the past is vital to assuring success in the future. Due to the close physical interaction between spacesuit systems and human beings as users, spacesuit technology and usage lends itself rather uniquely to the benefits realized from the skillful organization of historical information; its dissemination; the collection and identification of artifacts; and the education of those in the field. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), other organizations and individuals have been performing United States (U.S.) Spacesuit Knowledge Capture since the beginning of space exploration. Avenues used to capture the knowledge have included publication of reports; conference presentations; specialized seminars; and classes usually given by veterans in the field. More recently the effort has been more concentrated and formalized whereby a new avenue of spacesuit knowledge capture has been added to the archives in which videotaping occurs engaging both current and retired specialists in the field presenting technical scope specifically for education and preservation of knowledge. With video archiving, all these avenues of learning can now be brought to life with the real experts presenting their wealth of knowledge on screen for future learners to enjoy. Scope and topics of U.S. spacesuit knowledge capture have included lessons learned in spacesuit technology, experience from the Gemini, Apollo, Skylab and Shuttle programs, hardware certification, design, development and other program components, spacesuit evolution and experience, failure analysis and resolution, and aspects of program management. Concurrently, U.S. spacesuit knowledge capture activities have progressed to a level where NASA, the National Air and Space Museum (NASM), Hamilton Sundstrand (HS) and the spacesuit community are now working together to provide a comprehensive closed-looped spacesuit knowledge capture system which includes

  1. Adiabatic capture and debunching

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2012-03-01

    In the study of beam preparation for the g-2 experiment, adiabatic debunching and adiabatic capture are revisited. The voltage programs for these adiabbatic processes are derived and their properties discussed. Comparison is made with some other form of adiabatic capture program. The muon g-2 experiment at Fermilab calls for intense proton bunches for the creation of muons. A booster batch of 84 bunches is injected into the Recycler Ring, where it is debunched and captured into 4 intense bunches with the 2.5-MHz rf. The experiment requires short bunches with total width less than 100 ns. The transport line from the Recycler to the muon-production target has a low momentum aperture of {approx} {+-}22 MeV. Thus each of the 4 intense proton bunches required to have an emittance less than {approx} 3.46 eVs. The incoming booster bunches have total emittance {approx} 8.4 eVs, or each one with an emittance {approx} 0.1 eVs. However, there is always emittance increase when the 84 booster bunches are debunched. There will be even larger emittance increase during adiabatic capture into the buckets of the 2.5-MHz rf. In addition, the incoming booster bunches may have emittances larger than 0.1 eVs. In this article, we will concentrate on the analysis of the adiabatic capture process with the intention of preserving the beam emittance as much as possible. At this moment, beam preparation experiment is being performed at the Main Injector. Since the Main Injector and the Recycler Ring have roughly the same lattice properties, we are referring to adiabatic capture in the Main Injector instead in our discussions.

  2. Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Ryan T.; Marginean, Ioan; Tang, Keqi

    2014-06-13

    Electrospray Ionization (ESI) is a process whereby gas phase ions are created from molecules in solution. As a solution exits a narrow tube in the presence of a strong electric field, an aerosol of charged droplets are is formed that produces gas phase ions as they it desolvates. ESI-MS comprises the creation of ions by ESI and the determination of their mass to charge ratio (m/z) by MS.

  3. Hysteresis of ionization waves

    SciTech Connect

    Dinklage, A.; Bruhn, B.; Testrich, H.; Wilke, C.

    2008-06-15

    A quasi-logistic, nonlinear model for ionization wave modes is introduced. Modes are due to finite size of the discharge and current feedback. The model consists of competing coupled modes and it incorporates spatial wave amplitude saturation. The hysteresis of wave mode transitions under current variation is reproduced. Sidebands are predicted by the model and found in experimental data. The ad hoc model is equivalent to a general--so-called universal--approach from bifurcation theory.

  4. Alfvén ionization in an MHD-gas interactions code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, A. D.; Diver, D. A.

    2016-07-01

    A numerical model of partially ionized plasmas is developed in order to capture their evolving ionization fractions as a result of Alfvén ionization (AI). The mechanism of, and the parameter regime necessary for, AI is discussed and an expression for the AI rate based on fluid parameters, from a gas-MHD model, is derived. This AI term is added to an existing MHD-gas interactions' code, and the result is a linear, 2D, two-fluid model that includes momentum transfer between charged and neutral species as well as an ionization rate that depends on the velocity fields of both fluids. The dynamics of waves propagating through such a partially ionized plasma are investigated, and it is found that AI has a significant influence on the fluid dynamics as well as both the local and global ionization fraction.

  5. Neutron capture therapies

    SciTech Connect

    Yanch, Jacquelyn C.; Shefer, Ruth E.; Klinkowstein, Robert E.

    1999-01-01

    In one embodiment there is provided an application of the .sup.10 B(n,.alpha.).sup.7 Li nuclear reaction or other neutron capture reactions for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. This application, called Boron Neutron Capture Synovectomy (BNCS), requires substantially altered demands on neutron beam design than for instance treatment of deep seated tumors. Considerations for neutron beam design for the treatment of arthritic joints via BNCS are provided for, and comparisons with the design requirements for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) of tumors are made. In addition, exemplary moderator/reflector assemblies are provided which produce intense, high-quality neutron beams based on (p,n) accelerator-based reactions. In another embodiment there is provided the use of deuteron-based charged particle reactions to be used as sources for epithermal or thermal neutron beams for neutron capture therapies. Many d,n reactions (e.g. using deuterium, tritium or beryllium targets) are very prolific at relatively low deuteron energies.

  6. Neutron capture therapies

    SciTech Connect

    Yanch, J.C.; Shefer, R.E.; Klinkowstein, R.E.

    1999-11-02

    In one embodiment there is provided an application of the {sup 10}B(n,{alpha}){sup 7}Li nuclear reaction or other neutron capture reactions for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. This application, called Boron Neutron Capture Synovectomy (BNCS), requires substantially altered demands on neutron beam design than for instance treatment of deep seated tumors. Considerations for neutron beam design for the treatment of arthritic joints via BNCS are provided for, and comparisons with the design requirements for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) of tumors are made. In addition, exemplary moderator/reflector assemblies are provided which produce intense, high-quality neutron beams based on (p,n) accelerator-based reactions. In another embodiment there is provided the use of deuteron-based charged particle reactions to be used as sources for epithermal or thermal neutron beams for neutron capture therapies. Many d,n reactions (e.g. using deuterium, tritium or beryllium targets) are very prolific at relatively low deuteron energies.

  7. Attention Capture by Faces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langton, Stephen R. H.; Law, Anna S.; Burton, A. Mike; Schweinberger, Stefan R.

    2008-01-01

    We report three experiments that investigate whether faces are capable of capturing attention when in competition with other non-face objects. In Experiment 1a participants took longer to decide that an array of objects contained a butterfly target when a face appeared as one of the distracting items than when the face did not appear in the array.…

  8. Carbon Smackdown: Carbon Capture

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey Long

    2010-07-12

    In this July 9, 2010 Berkeley Lab summer lecture, Lab scientists Jeff Long of the Materials Sciences and Nancy Brown of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division discuss their efforts to fight climate change by capturing carbon from the flue gas of power plants, as well as directly from the air

  9. Capturing the Market

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramaswami, Rama

    2009-01-01

    Digital lecture capture and broadcast solutions have been around for only about 10 years, but are poised for healthy growth. Frost & Sullivan research analysts estimate that the market (which amounts to $25 million currently) will quadruple by 2013. It's still dominated by a few key players, however: Sonic Foundry holds a hefty 40 percent-plus…

  10. Carbon Smackdown: Carbon Capture

    ScienceCinema

    Jeffrey Long

    2016-07-12

    In this July 9, 2010 Berkeley Lab summer lecture, Lab scientists Jeff Long of the Materials Sciences and Nancy Brown of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division discuss their efforts to fight climate change by capturing carbon from the flue gas of power plants, as well as directly from the air

  11. Electronegative Plasma Equilibria with Spatially-Varying Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieberman, M. A.; Kawamura, E.; Lichtenberg, A. J.

    2012-10-01

    Electronegative inductive discharges in higher pressure ranges typically exhibit localized ionization near the coil structure, with decay of the ionization into the central discharge. We use a two-dimensional fluid code [1] with chlorine feedstock to determine the spatial profiles of the plasma parameters in a cylindrical transformer-coupled plasma device excited by a planar coil. To compare with one-dimensional (1D) analytic modeling, the results are area-averaged. The ionization is found to decay roughly exponentially along the axial direction, allowing the ansatz of an exponentially decaying ionization to be used in a 1D computational model. The model captures the main features of the axial variations of the area-averaged fluid simulation, indicating that the main diffusion mechanisms act along the axial direction. A simple analytic global discharge model is developed, accounting for the asymmetric density and ionization profiles. The global model gives the scalings with power and pressure of volume-averaged densities, electron temperature, and ionization decay rate, also in reasonable agreement with the scalings obtained by averaging the simulation results. [4pt] [1] E. Kawamura, D.B. Graves, and M.A. Lieberman, Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 20, 035009 (2012)

  12. Effectiveness of intact capture media

    SciTech Connect

    Tsou, P.; Aubert, J.; Brownlee, D.; Hrubesh, L.; Williams, J.; Albee, A.

    1989-01-01

    The possibility of capturing cosmic dust at hypervelocity has been demonstrated in the laboratory and in the unintended Solar Max spacecraft. This technology will enable a comet coma sample return mission and be important for the earth orbital cosmic dust collection mission, i.e., the Space Station Cosmic Dust Collection Facility. Since the only controllable factor in an intact capture of cosmic dust is the capturing medium, characterizing the effectiveness and properties of available capture media would be very important in the development of the technique for capturing hypervelocity cosmic dust intact. We have evaluated various capture underdense media for the relative effectiveness for intact capture. 2 refs., 2 figs.

  13. Non-linear photoelectron effect contributes to the formation of negative matrix ions in UV-MALDI.

    PubMed

    Alonso, E; Zenobi, R

    2016-07-20

    The mechanism of negative ion formation in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) is less well understood than that of positive ions: electron capture, disproportionation, and liberation of negatively charged sample molecules or clusters have been proposed to produce the initial anions in MALDI. Here, we propose that the non-linear photoelectric effect can explain the emission of electrons from the metallic target material. Moreover, electrons with sufficient kinetic energy (0-10 eV) could be responsible for the formation of initial negative ions. Gas-phase electron capture by neutral 2,5-dihydroxy benzoic acid (DHB) to yield M(-) is investigated on the basis of a coupled physical and chemical dynamics (CPCD) theory from the literature. A three-layer energy mass balance model is utilized to calculate the surface temperature of the matrix, which is used to determine the translational temperature, the number of desorbed matrix molecules per unit area, and the ion velocity. Calculations of dissociative attachment and autoionization rates of DHB are presented. It was found that both processes contribute significantly to the formation of [M - H](-) and [M - H2](-), although the predicted yield in the fluence range of 5-100 mJ cm(-2) is low, certainly less than that for positive ions M(+). This work represents the first proposal for a comprehensive theoretical description of negative ion formation in UV-MALDI.

  14. Anion formation in sputter ion sources by neutral resonant ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, J. S.

    2016-02-15

    Focused Cs{sup +} beams in sputter ion sources create mm-diameter pits supporting small plasmas that control anionization efficiencies. Sputtering produces overwhelmingly neutral products that the plasma can ionize as in a charge-change vapor. Electron capture between neutral atoms rises as the inverse square of the difference between the ionization potential of the Cs state and the electron affinity of the sputtered atom, allowing resonant ionization at very low energies. A plasma collision-radiation model followed electronic excitation up to Cs(7d). High modeled Cs(7d) in a 0.5 mm recess explains the 80 μA/mm{sup 2} C{sup −} current density compared to the 20 μA/mm{sup 2} from a 1 mm recess.

  15. Advanced Telemetry Data Capturing

    SciTech Connect

    Paschke, G.A.

    2000-05-16

    This project developed a new generation or advanced data capturing process specifically designed for use in future telemetry test systems at the Kansas City Plant (KCP). Although similar data capturing processes are performed both commercially and at other DOE weapon facilities, the equipment used is not specifically designed to perform acceptance testing requirements unique to the KCP. Commercially available equipment, despite very high cost (up to $125,000), is deficient in reliability and long-term maintainability necessary in test systems at this facility. There are no commercial sources for some requirements, specifically Terminal Data Analyzer (TDA) data processing. Although other custom processes have been developed to satisfy these test requirements, these designs have become difficult to maintain and upgrade.

  16. Calcium: total or ionized?

    PubMed

    Schenck, Patricia A; Chew, Dennis J

    2008-05-01

    Measurement of serum total calcium (tCa) has been relied on for assessment of calcium status, despite the fact that it is the ionized calcium (iCa) fraction that has biologic activity. Serum tCa does not accurately predict iCa status in many clinical conditions. For accurate assessment of iCa status, iCa should be directly measured. Anaerobic measurement of serum iCa under controlled conditions provides the most reliable assessment of calcium status; aerobic measurement of iCa with species-specific pH correction is highly correlated with anaerobic measurements.

  17. ECC study in positron impact ionization in molecular hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campeanu, R. I.; Zohouri Haghian, N.

    2012-12-01

    The electron capture to the continuum phenomenon in positron impact ionization of molecular hydrogen is studied with the distorted wave Born approximation. Our theoretical model produces results which are in better agreement with the experiment than the more elaborate models of [J. Fiol, V.D. Rodriguez, R.O. Barrachina, J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 34, 933 (2001)] and [A. Benedek, R.I. Campeanu, J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 40, 1589 (2007)] previously employed in this study.

  18. Capturing the Future: Direct and Indirect Probes of Neutron Capture

    SciTech Connect

    Couture, Aaron Joseph

    2016-08-31

    This report documents aspects of direct and indirect neutron capture. The importance of neutron capture rates and methods to determine them are presented. The following conclusions are drawn: direct neutron capture measurements remain a backbone of experimental study; work is being done to take increased advantage of indirect methods for neutron capture; both instrumentation and facilities are making new measurements possible; more work is needed on the nuclear theory side to understand what is needed furthest from stability.

  19. Electron impact ionization and attachment cross sections for H2S. [in comet and planetary atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, M. V. V. S.; Srivastava, S. K.

    1993-01-01

    Experiments were performed to measure, by electron impact, appearance potentials and the cross sections for ionization, dissociative ionization, and electron attachment for H2S. Results are presented, and discussed individually, for both positive and negative ions. A schematic diagram of the experimental setup is included.

  20. New effects of a long-lived negatively charged massive particle on big bang nucleosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusakabe, Motohiko; Kim, K. S.; Cheoun, Myung-Ki; Kajino, Toshitaka; Kino, Yasushi; Mathews, Grant J.

    2014-05-01

    Primordial 7Li abundance inferred from observations of metal-poor stars is a factor of about 3 lower than the theoretical value of standard big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) model. One of the solutions to the Li problem is 7Be destruction during the BBN epoch caused by a long-lived negatively charged massive particle, X-. The particle can bind to nuclei, and X-bound nuclei (X-nuclei) can experience new reactions. The radiative X- capture by 7Be nuclei followed by proton capture of the bound state of 7Be and X- (7Bex) is a possible 7Be destruction reaction. Since the primordial abundance of 7Li originates mainly from 7Li produced via the electron capture of 7Be after BBN, the 7Be destruction provides a solution to the 7Li problem. We suggest a new route of 7Bex formation, that is the 7Be charge exchange at the reaction of 7Be3+ ion and X-. The formation rate depends on the ionization fraction of 7Be3+ ion, the charge exchange cross section of 7Be3+, and the probability that excited states 7Bex* produced at the charge exchange are converted to the ground state. We find that this reaction can be equally important as or more important than ordinary radiative recombination of 7Be and X-. The effect of this new route is shown in a nuclear reaction network calculation.

  1. Atmospheric-pressure Penning ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hiraoka, Kenzo; Fujimaki, Susumu; Kambara, Shizuka; Furuya, Hiroko; Okazaki, Shigemitsu

    2004-01-01

    A preliminary study on the atmospheric-pressure Penning ionization (APP(e)I) of gaseous organic compounds with Ar* has been made. The metastable argon atoms (Ar*: 11.55 eV for (3)P(2) and 11.72 eV for (3)P(0)) were generated by the negative-mode corona discharge of atmospheric-pressure argon gas. By applying a high positive voltage (+500 to +1000 V) to the stainless steel capillary for the sample introduction (0.1 mm i.d., 0.3 mm o.d.), strong ion signals could be obtained. The ions formed were sampled through an orifice into the vacuum and mass-analyzed by an orthogonal time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The major ions formed by APP(e)I are found to be molecular-related ions for alkanes, aromatics, and oxygen-containing compounds. Because only the molecules with ionization energies less than the internal energy of Ar* are ionized, the present method will be a selective and highly sensitive interface for gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

  2. Desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry of intact bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) mass spectrometry (MS) was used to differentiate 7 bacterial species based on their measured DESI-mass spectral profile. Both Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria were tested and included Escherichia coli, Staphyloccocus aureus, Enterococcus sp., Bordete...

  3. Laser Capture Microdissection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmert-Buck, Michael R.; Bonner, Robert F.; Smith, Paul D.; Chuaqui, Rodrigo F.; Zhuang, Zhengping; Goldstein, Seth R.; Weiss, Rhonda A.; Liotta, Lance A.

    1996-11-01

    Laser capture microdissection (LCM) under direct microscopic visualization permits rapid one-step procurement of selected human cell populations from a section of complex, heterogeneous tissue. In this technique, a transparent thermoplastic film (ethylene vinyl acetate polymer) is applied to the surface of the tissue section on a standard glass histopathology slide; a carbon dioxide laser pulse then specifically activates the film above the cells of interest. Strong focal adhesion allows selective procurement of the targeted cells. Multiple examples of LCM transfer and tissue analysis, including polymerase chain reaction amplification of DNA and RNA, and enzyme recovery from transferred tissue are demonstrated.

  4. Capturing the Daylight Dividend

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Boyce; Claudia Hunter; Owen Howlett

    2006-04-30

    Capturing the Daylight Dividend conducted activities to build market demand for daylight as a means of improving indoor environmental quality, overcoming technological barriers to effective daylighting, and informing and assisting state and regional market transformation and resource acquisition program implementation efforts. The program clarified the benefits of daylight by examining whole building systems energy interactions between windows, lighting, heating, and air conditioning in daylit buildings, and daylighting's effect on the human circadian system and productivity. The project undertook work to advance photosensors, dimming systems, and ballasts, and provided technical training in specifying and operating daylighting controls in buildings. Future daylighting work is recommended in metric development, technology development, testing, training, education, and outreach.

  5. Ionizing radiation detector

    DOEpatents

    Thacker, Louis H.

    1990-01-01

    An ionizing radiation detector is provided which is based on the principle of analog electronic integration of radiation sensor currents in the sub-pico to nano ampere range between fixed voltage switching thresholds with automatic voltage reversal each time the appropriate threshold is reached. The thresholds are provided by a first NAND gate Schmitt trigger which is coupled with a second NAND gate Schmitt trigger operating in an alternate switching state from the first gate to turn either a visible or audible indicating device on and off in response to the gate switching rate which is indicative of the level of radiation being sensed. The detector can be configured as a small, personal radiation dosimeter which is simple to operate and responsive over a dynamic range of at least 0.01 to 1000 R/hr.

  6. Multiphoton ionization of Uracil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieto, Eladio; Martinez, Denhi; Guerrero, Alfonso; Alvarez, Ignacio; Cisneros, Carmen

    2016-05-01

    Multiphoton ionization and dissociation of Uracil using a Reflectron time of flight spectrometer was performed along with radiation from the second harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser. Uracil is one of the four nitrogen bases that belong to RNA. The last years special interest has been concentrated on the study of the effects under UV radiation in nucleic acids1 and also in the role that this molecule could have played in the origin and development of life on our planet.2 The MPI mass spectra show that the presence and intensity of the resulting ions strongly depend on the density power. The identification of the ions in the mass spectra is presented. The results are compared with those obtained in other laboratories under different experimental conditions and some of them show partial agreement.3 The present work was supported by CONACYT-Mexico Grant 165410 and DGAPA UNAM Grant IN101215 and IN102613.

  7. Ionized cluster beam deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkpatrick, A. R.

    1983-01-01

    Ionized Cluster Beam (ICB) deposition, a new technique originated by Takagi of Kyoto University in Japan, offers a number of unique capabilities for thin film metallization as well as for deposition of active semiconductor materials. ICB allows average energy per deposited atom to be controlled and involves impact kinetics which result in high diffusion energies of atoms on the growth surface. To a greater degree than in other techniques, ICB involves quantitative process parameters which can be utilized to strongly control the characteristics of films being deposited. In the ICB deposition process, material to be deposited is vaporized into a vacuum chamber from a confinement crucible at high temperature. Crucible nozzle configuration and operating temperature are such that emerging vapor undergoes supercondensation following adiabatic expansion through the nozzle.

  8. Ionization detection system for aerosols

    DOEpatents

    Jacobs, Martin E.

    1977-01-01

    This invention relates to an improved smoke-detection system of the ionization-chamber type. In the preferred embodiment, the system utilizes a conventional detector head comprising a measuring ionization chamber, a reference ionization chamber, and a normally non-conductive gas triode for discharging when a threshold concentration of airborne particulates is present in the measuring chamber. The improved system utilizes a measuring ionization chamber which is modified to minimize false alarms and reductions in sensitivity resulting from changes in ambient temperature. In the preferred form of the modification, an annular radiation shield is mounted about the usual radiation source provided to effect ionization in the measuring chamber. The shield is supported by a bimetallic strip which flexes in response to changes in ambient temperature, moving the shield relative to the source so as to vary the radiative area of the source in a manner offsetting temperature-induced variations in the sensitivity of the chamber.

  9. Absolute total and partial cross sections for ionization of nucleobases by proton impact in the Bragg peak velocity range

    SciTech Connect

    Tabet, J.; Eden, S.; Feil, S.; Abdoul-Carime, H.; Farizon, B.; Farizon, M.; Ouaskit, S.; Maerk, T. D.

    2010-08-15

    We present experimental results for proton ionization of nucleobases (adenine, cytosine, thymine, and uracil) based on an event-by-event analysis of the different ions produced combined with an absolute target density determination. We are able to disentangle in detail the various proton ionization channels from mass-analyzed product ion signals in coincidence with the charge-analyzed projectile. In addition we are able to determine a complete set of cross sections for the ionization of these molecular targets by 20-150 keV protons including the total and partial cross sections and the direct-ionization and electron-capture cross sections.

  10. Reduced Sampling Size with Nanopipette for Tapping-Mode Scanning Probe Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kohigashi, Tsuyoshi; Otsuka, Yoichi; Shimazu, Ryo; Matsumoto, Takuya; Iwata, Futoshi; Kawasaki, Hideya; Arakawa, Ryuichi

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) with ambient sampling and ionization can rapidly and easily capture the distribution of chemical components in a solid sample. Because the spatial resolution of MSI is limited by the size of the sampling area, reducing sampling size is an important goal for high resolution MSI. Here, we report the first use of a nanopipette for sampling and ionization by tapping-mode scanning probe electrospray ionization (t-SPESI). The spot size of the sampling area of a dye molecular film on a glass substrate was decreased to 6 μm on average by using a nanopipette. On the other hand, ionization efficiency increased with decreasing solvent flow rate. Our results indicate the compatibility between a reduced sampling area and the ionization efficiency using a nanopipette. MSI of micropatterns of ink on a glass and a polymer substrate were also demonstrated. PMID:28101441

  11. Measurement of laser activated electron tunneling from semiconductor zinc oxide to adsorbed organic molecules by a matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Hongying; Fu, Jieying; Wang, Xiaoli; Zheng, Shi

    2012-06-04

    Measurement of light induced heterogeneous electron transfer is important for understanding of fundamental processes involved in chemistry, physics and biology, which is still challenging by current techniques. Laser activated electron tunneling (LAET) from semiconductor metal oxides was observed and characterized by a MALDI (matrix assisted laser desorption ionization) mass spectrometer in this work. Nanoparticles of ZnO were placed on a MALDI sample plate. Free fatty acids and derivatives were used as models of organic compounds and directly deposited on the surface of ZnO nanoparticles. Irradiation of UV laser (λ=355 nm) with energy more than the band gap of ZnO produces ions that can be detected in negative mode. When TiO(2) nanoparticles with similar band gap but much lower electron mobility were used, these ions were not observed unless the voltage on the sample plate was increased. The experimental results indicate that laser induced electron tunneling is dependent on the electron mobility and the strength of the electric field. Capture of low energy electrons by charge-deficient atoms of adsorbed organic molecules causes unpaired electron-directed cleavages of chemical bonds in a nonergodic pathway. In positive detection mode, electron tunneling cannot be observed due to the reverse moving direction of electrons. It should be able to expect that laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry is a new technique capable of probing the dynamics of electron tunneling. LAET offers advantages as a new ionization dissociation method for mass spectrometry.

  12. Nurse Staffing Proportions and Negative Outcomes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-23

    a correlation to three specific diagnoses. The specific diagnoses were post operative wound infection, pneumonia, and decubitus ulcers , as captured...specific diagnoses were post operative wound infection, pneumonia, and decubitus ulcers , as captured from the hospital data repository (MHS MART or M2...pneumonia, and decubitus ulcers . These diagnoses were determined to be a negative outcome if they are the second through eighth diagnosis the patient

  13. Asteroid capture using lunar flyby

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Shengping; Li, Junfeng

    2015-09-01

    This paper focuses on the approach which enables us to capture an asteroid using the lunar flyby. Assume that the asteroid is able to enter the Earth-Moon system. The orbits of the asteroid before and after lunar flybys are investigated for different Jacobi constants in the restricted three body problem. The capture will happen when the post-flyby Jacobi constant reaches certain value due to the flyby. The capture regions of different pre-flyby initial Jacobi constants are numerically explored in the diagram that is represented by two defined angles. To give an intuitive description of the capture region, it is represented by the orbital elements of the asteroid. Based on this capture region, the asteroids that can be captured through lunar flybys are chosen from the asteroid database. Finally, the capture processes of selected asteroids are validated through the ephemerides model.

  14. Negative-ion plasma sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheehan, D. P.; Rynn, N.

    1988-08-01

    Three designs for negative-ion plasma sources are described. Two sources utilize metal hexafluorides such as SF6 and WF6 to scavenge electrons from electron-ion plasmas and the third relies upon surface ionization of alkali halide salts on heated alumina and zirconia. SF6 introduced into electron-ion plasmas yielded negative-ion plasma densities of 10 to the 10th/cu cm with low residual electron densities. On alumina, plasma densities of 10 to the 9th/cu cm were obtained for CsCl, CsI, and KI and 10 to the 9th/cu cm for KCl. On zirconia 10 to the 10th/cu cm densities were obtained for CsCl. For alkali halide sources, electron densities of less than about 10 to the -4th have been achieved.

  15. Particle capture device

    DOEpatents

    Jayne, John T.; Worsnop, Douglas R.

    2016-02-23

    In example embodiments, particle collection efficiency in aerosol analyzers and other particle measuring instruments is improved by a particle capture device that employs multiple collisions to decrease momentum of particles until the particles are collected (e.g., vaporized or come to rest). The particle collection device includes an aperture through which a focused particle beam enters. A collection enclosure is coupled to the aperture and has one or more internal surfaces against which particles of the focused beam collide. One or more features are employed in the collection enclosure to promote particles to collide multiple times within the enclosure, and thereby be vaporized or come to rest, rather than escape through the aperture.

  16. Robust automated knowledge capture.

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens-Adams, Susan Marie; Abbott, Robert G.; Forsythe, James Chris; Trumbo, Michael Christopher Stefan; Haass, Michael Joseph; Hendrickson, Stacey M. Langfitt

    2011-10-01

    This report summarizes research conducted through the Sandia National Laboratories Robust Automated Knowledge Capture Laboratory Directed Research and Development project. The objective of this project was to advance scientific understanding of the influence of individual cognitive attributes on decision making. The project has developed a quantitative model known as RumRunner that has proven effective in predicting the propensity of an individual to shift strategies on the basis of task and experience related parameters. Three separate studies are described which have validated the basic RumRunner model. This work provides a basis for better understanding human decision making in high consequent national security applications, and in particular, the individual characteristics that underlie adaptive thinking.

  17. Capture-ejector satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macconochie, I. O.; Eldred, C. H.; Martin, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    A satellite in the form of a large rotating rim which can be used to boost spacecraft from low-Earth orbit to higher orbits is described. The rim rotates in the plane of its orbit such that the lower portion of the rim is traveling at suborbital velocity, while the upper portion is travelling at greater than orbital velocity. Ascending spacecraft or payloads arrive at the lowest portion of the rim at suborbital velocities, where the payloads are released on a trajectory for higher orbits; descending payloads employ the reverse procedure. Electric thrusters placed on the rim maintain rim rotational speed and altitude. From the standpoint of currently known materials, the capture-ejector concept may be useful for relatively small velocity increments.

  18. Choosing between atmospheric pressure chemical ionization and electrospray ionization interfaces for the HPLC/MS analysis of pesticides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thurman, E.M.; Ferrer, I.; Barcelo, D.

    2001-01-01

    An evaluation of over 75 pesticides by high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS) clearly shows that different classes of pesticides are more sensitive using either atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) or electrospray ionization (ESI). For example, neutral and basic pesticides (phenylureas, triazines) are more sensitive using APCI (especially positive ion). While cationic and anionic herbicides (bipyridylium ions, sulfonic acids) are more sensitive using ESI (especially negative ion). These data are expressed graphically in a figure called an ionization-continuum diagram, which shows that protonation in the gas phase (proton affinity) and polarity in solution, expressed as proton addition or subtraction (pKa), is useful in selecting APCI or ESI. Furthermore, sodium adduct formation commonly occurs using positive ion ESI but not using positive ion APCI, which reflects the different mechanisms of ionization and strengthens the usefulness of the ionization-continuum diagram. The data also show that the concept of "wrong-way around" ESI (the sensitivity of acidic pesticides in an acidic mobile phase) is a useful modification of simple pKa theory for mobile-phase selection. Finally, this finding is used to enhance the chromatographic separation of oxanilic and sulfonic acid herbicides while maintaining good sensitivity in LC/MS using ESI negative.

  19. Analysis of solvent dyes in refined petroleum products by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rostad, C.E.

    2010-01-01

    Solvent dyes are used to color refined petroleum products to enable differentiation between gasoline, diesel, and jet fuels. Analysis for these dyes in the hydrocarbon product is difficult due to their very low concentrations in such a complex matrix. Flow injection analysis/electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry in both negative and positive mode was used to optimize ionization of ten typical solvent dyes. Samples of hydrocarbon product were analyzed under similar conditions. Positive electrospray ionization produced very complex spectra, which were not suitably specific for targeting only the dyes. Negative electrospray ionization produced simple spectra because aliphatic and aromatic moieties were not ionized. This enabled screening for a target dye in samples of hydrocarbon product from a spill.

  20. High pressure xenon ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Markey, J.K.

    1989-11-14

    A method is provided for detecting ionization comprising allowing particles that cause ionization to contact high pressure xenon maintained at or near its critical point and measuring the amount of ionization. An apparatus is provided for detecting ionization, the apparatus comprising a vessel containing a ionizable medium, the vessel having an inlet to allow high pressure ionizable medium to enter the vessel, a means to permit particles that cause ionization of the medium to enter the vessel, an anode, a cathode, a grid and a plurality of annular field shaping rings, the field shaping rings being electrically isolated from one another, the anode, cathode, grid and field shaping rings being electrically isolated from one another in order to form an electric field between the cathode and the anode, the electric field originating at the anode and terminating at the cathode, the grid being disposed between the cathode and the anode, the field shaping rings being disposed between the cathode and the grid, the improvement comprising the medium being xenon and the vessel being maintained at a pressure of 50 to 70 atmospheres and a temperature of 0 to 30 C. 2 figs.

  1. High pressure xenon ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Markey, John K.

    1989-01-01

    A method is provided for detecting ionization comprising allowing particles that cause ionization to contact high pressure xenon maintained at or near its critical point and measuring the amount of ionization. An apparatus is provided for detecting ionization, the apparatus comprising a vessel containing a ionizable medium, the vessel having an inlet to allow high pressure ionizable medium to enter the vessel, a means to permit particles that cause ionization of the medium to enter the vessel, an anode, a cathode, a grid and a plurality of annular field shaping rings, the field shaping rings being electrically isolated from one another, the anode, cathode, grid and field shaping rings being electrically isolated from one another in order to form an electric field between the cathode and the anode, the electric field originating at the anode and terminating at the cathode, the grid being disposed between the cathode and the anode, the field shaping rings being disposed between the cathode and the grid, the improvement comprising the medium being xenon and the vessel being maintained at a pressure of 50 to 70 atmospheres and a temperature of 0.degree. to 30.degree. C.

  2. Layered solid sorbents for carbon dioxide capture

    DOEpatents

    Li, Bingyun; Jiang, Bingbing; Gray, McMahan L; Fauth, Daniel J; Pennline, Henry W; Richards, George A

    2014-11-18

    A solid sorbent for the capture and the transport of carbon dioxide gas is provided having at least one first layer of a positively charged material that is polyethylenimine or poly(allylamine hydrochloride), that captures at least a portion of the gas, and at least one second layer of a negatively charged material that is polystyrenesulfonate or poly(acryclic acid), that transports the gas, wherein the second layer of material is in juxtaposition to, attached to, or crosslinked with the first layer for forming at least one bilayer, and a solid substrate support having a porous surface, wherein one or more of the bilayers is/are deposited on the surface of and/or within the solid substrate. A method of preparing and using the solid sorbent is provided.

  3. Layered solid sorbents for carbon dioxide capture

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Bingyun; Jiang, Bingbing; Gray, McMahan L; Fauth, Daniel J; Pennline, Henry W; Richards, George A

    2013-02-25

    A solid sorbent for the capture and the transport of carbon dioxide gas is provided having at least one first layer of a positively charged material that is polyethylenimine or poly(allylamine hydrochloride), that captures at least a portion of the gas, and at least one second layer of a negatively charged material that is polystyrenesulfonate or poly(acryclic acid), that transports the gas, wherein the second layer of material is in juxtaposition to, attached to, or crosslinked with the first layer for forming at least one bilayer, and a solid substrate support having a porous surface, wherein one or more of the bilayers is/are deposited on the surface of and/or within the solid substrate. A method of preparing and using the solid sorbent is provided.

  4. Iron ionization and recombination rates and ionization equilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnaud, M.; Raymond, J.

    1992-01-01

    In the past few years important progress has been made on the knowledge of ionization and recombination rates of iron, an astrophysically abundant heavy element and a major impurity in laboratory fusion devices. We make a critical review of the existing data on ionization and dielectronic recombination and present new computations of radiative recombination rate coefficients of Fe(+14) through Fe(+25) using the photoionization cross sections of Clark et al. (1986). We provide analytical fits to the recommended data (direct ionization and excitation-autoionization cross sections; radiative and dielectronic recombination rate coefficients). Finally we determine the iron ionic fractions at ionization equilibrium and compare them with previous computations as well as with observational data.

  5. Optical ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Wuest, Craig R.; Lowry, Mark E.

    1994-01-01

    An optical ionization detector wherein a beam of light is split so that one arm passes through a fiber optics and the other arm passes through a gas-filled region, and uses interferometry to detect density changes in a gas when charged particles pass through it. The gas-filled region of the detector is subjected to a high electric field and as a charged particle traverses this gas region electrons are freed from the cathode and accelerated so as to generate an electron avalanche which is collected on the anode. The gas density is effected by the electron avalanche formation and if the index or refraction is proportional to the gas density the index will change accordingly. The detector uses this index change by modulating the one arm of the split light beam passing through the gas, with respect to the other arm that is passed through the fiber optic. Upon recombining of the beams, interference fringe changes as a function of the index change indicates the passage of charged particles through the gaseous medium.

  6. Optical ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Wuest, C.R.; Lowry, M.E.

    1994-03-29

    An optical ionization detector wherein a beam of light is split so that one arm passes through a fiber optics and the other arm passes through a gas-filled region, and uses interferometry to detect density changes in a gas when charged particles pass through it. The gas-filled region of the detector is subjected to a high electric field and as a charged particle traverses this gas region electrons are freed from the cathode and accelerated so as to generate an electron avalanche which is collected on the anode. The gas density is effected by the electron avalanche formation and if the index or refraction is proportional to the gas density the index will change accordingly. The detector uses this index change by modulating the one arm of the split light beam passing through the gas, with respect to the other arm that is passed through the fiber optic. Upon recombining of the beams, interference fringe changes as a function of the index change indicates the passage of charged particles through the gaseous medium. 3 figures.

  7. Microwave reflectometer ionization sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seals, Joseph; Fordham, Jeffrey A.; Pauley, Robert G.; Simonutti, Mario D.

    1993-01-01

    The development of the Microwave Reflectometer Ionization Sensor (MRIS) Instrument for use on the Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE) spacecraft is described. The instrument contract was terminated, due to cancellation of the AFE program, subsequent to testing of an engineering development model. The MRIS, a four-frequency reflectometer, was designed for the detection and location of critical electron density levels in spacecraft reentry plasmas. The instrument would sample the relative magnitude and phase of reflected signals at discrete frequency steps across 4 GHz bandwidths centered at four frequencies: 20, 44, 95, and 140 GHz. The sampled data would be stored for later processing to calculate the distance from the spacecraft surface to the critical electron densities versus time. Four stepped PM CW transmitter receivers were located behind the thermal protection system of the spacecraft with horn antennas radiating and receiving through an insulating tile. Techniques were developed to deal with interference, including multiple reflections and resonance effects, resulting from the antenna configuration and operating environment.

  8. Ionizing radiation promotes protozoan reproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Luckey, T.D.

    1986-11-01

    This experiment was performed to determine whether ionizing radiation is essential for maximum growth rate in a ciliated protozoan. When extraneous ionizing radiation was reduced to 0.15 mrad/day, the reproduction rate of Tetrahymena pyriformis was significantly less (P less than 0.01) than it was at near ambient levels, 0.5 or 1.8 mrad/day. Significantly higher growth rates (P less than 0.01) were obtained when chronic radiation was increased. The data suggest that ionizing radiation is essential for optimum reproduction rate in this organism.

  9. Pulsed helium ionization detection system

    DOEpatents

    Ramsey, R.S.; Todd, R.A.

    1985-04-09

    A helium ionization detection system is provided which produces stable operation of a conventional helium ionization detector while providing improved sensitivity and linearity. Stability is improved by applying pulsed dc supply voltage across the ionization detector, thereby modifying the sampling of the detectors output current. A unique pulse generator is used to supply pulsed dc to the detector which has variable width and interval adjust features that allows up to 500 V to be applied in pulse widths ranging from about 150 nsec to about dc conditions.

  10. Pulsed helium ionization detection system

    DOEpatents

    Ramsey, Roswitha S.; Todd, Richard A.

    1987-01-01

    A helium ionization detection system is provided which produces stable operation of a conventional helium ionization detector while providing improved sensitivity and linearity. Stability is improved by applying pulsed dc supply voltage across the ionization detector, thereby modifying the sampling of the detectors output current. A unique pulse generator is used to supply pulsed dc to the detector which has variable width and interval adjust features that allows up to 500 V to be applied in pulse widths ranging from about 150 nsec to about dc conditions.

  11. Lunar Sulfur Capture System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berggren, Mark; Zubrin, Robert; Bostwick-White, Emily

    2013-01-01

    The Lunar Sulfur Capture System (LSCS) protects in situ resource utilization (ISRU) hardware from corrosion, and reduces contaminant levels in water condensed for electrolysis. The LSCS uses a lunar soil sorbent to trap over 98 percent of sulfur gases and about two-thirds of halide gases evolved during hydrogen reduction of lunar soils. LSCS soil sorbent is based on lunar minerals containing iron and calcium compounds that trap sulfur and halide gas contaminants in a fixed-bed reactor held at temperatures between 250 and 400 C, allowing moisture produced during reduction to pass through in vapor phase. Small amounts of Earth-based polishing sorbents consisting of zinc oxide and sodium aluminate are used to reduce contaminant concentrations to one ppm or less. The preferred LSCS configuration employs lunar soil beneficiation to boost concentrations of reactive sorbent minerals. Lunar soils contain sulfur in concentrations of about 0.1 percent, and halogen compounds including chlorine and fluorine in concentrations of about 0.01 percent. These contaminants are released as gases such as H2S, COS, CS2,HCl, and HF during thermal ISRU processing with hydrogen or other reducing gases. Removal of contaminant gases is required during ISRU processing to prevent hardware corrosion, electrolyzer damage, and catalyst poisoning. The use of Earth-supplied, single-use consumables to entirely remove contaminants at the levels existing in lunar soils would make many ISRU processes unattractive due to the large mass of consumables relative to the mass of oxygen produced. The LSCS concept of using a primary sorbent prepared from lunar soil was identified as a method by which the majority of contaminants could be removed from process gas streams, thereby substantially reducing the required mass of Earth-supplied consumables. The LSCS takes advantage of minerals containing iron and calcium compounds that are present in lunar soil to trap sulfur and halide gases in a fixedbed reactor

  12. Identification of Streptococcus intermedius central nervous system infection by use of PCR and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Nisha S; Farrell, John J; Sampath, Rangarajan; Ranken, Raymond; Rounds, Megan A; Ecker, David J; Bonomo, Robert A

    2012-12-01

    We describe the utility of PCR and electrospray ionization with mass spectrometry (PCR/ESI-MS) of culture-negative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in order to identify Gram-positive cocci noted on a Gram stain of CSF from a previously healthy 26-year-old man with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and multiple brain abscesses. CSF samples were obtained 2 weeks apart, first by lumbar puncture and 2 weeks later from an external ventricular drain that was inserted into the right ventricle. Both CSF cultures were negative. A Gram stain of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid was notable for many Gram-positive cocci (GPC), but cultures of BAL fluid and subcarinal lymph node biopsy tissue were negative. PCR/ESI-MS detected Streptococcus intermedius, a common cause of brain abscesses, in both CSF samples as well as in the fixed tissue from the biopsy. This unique case confirms S. intermedius pulmonary infection as the source of metastatic CNS infection and reveals the potential of PCR/ESI-MS to detect a streptococcal pathogen not captured by conventional cultures.

  13. Intact capture of hypervelocity projectiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsou, P.

    1990-01-01

    The ability to capture projectiles intact at hypervelocities opens new applications in science and technology that would either not be possible or would be very costly by other means. This capability has been demonstrated in the laboratory for aluminum projectiles of 1.6 mm diameter, captured at 6 km/s, in one unmelted piece, and retaining up to 95% of the original mass. Furthermore, capture was accomplished passively using microcellular underdense polymer foam. Another advantage of capturing projectiles in an underdense medium is the ability of such a medium to preserve a record of the projectile's original velocity components of speed and direction. A survey of these experimental results is described in terms of a dozen parameters which characterize the amount of capture and the effect on the projectile due to different capture media.

  14. Intact capture of hypervelocity projectiles.

    PubMed

    Tsou, P

    1990-01-01

    The ability to capture projectiles intact at hypervelocities opens new applications in science and technology that would either not be possible or would be very costly by other means. This capability has been demonstrated in the laboratory for aluminum projectiles of 1.6 mm diameter, captured at 6 km/s, in one unmelted piece, and retaining up to 95% of the original mass. Furthermore, capture was accomplished passively using microcellular underdense polymer foam. Another advantage of capturing projectiles in an underdense medium is the ability of such a medium to preserve a record of the projectile's original velocity components of speed and direction. A survey of these experimental results is described in terms of a dozen parameters which characterize the amount of capture and the effect on the projectile due to different capture media.

  15. Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-30

    Under low voltage El conditions sample sensitivity may drop by I or 2 orders of magnitude. In the negative ion mode, polyaromatic hydrocar- bons either...preparation involved placing a drop of solution con- taining the sample in a suitable solvent on the surface of the emitter using a 10 ut syringe...tween Ions and Molecules", P. Ausloos, Ed., Plenum Press, N. Y. (1974). 31. Eyring, C. F.; Mackeown, S. S.; and Millikan , R. A., Phys. Rev., (1928

  16. The Generic Data Capture Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, Edward B.; Barnes, William P.; Stallings, William H.

    1987-01-01

    The Generic Data Capture Facility, which can provide data capture support for a variety of different types of spacecraft while enabling operations costs to be carefully controlled, is discussed. The data capture functions, data protection, isolation of users from data acquisition problems, data reconstruction, and quality and accounting are addressed. The TDM and packet data formats utilized by the system are described, and the development of generic facilities is considered.

  17. Inland capture fisheries

    PubMed Central

    Welcomme, Robin L.; Cowx, Ian G.; Coates, David; Béné, Christophe; Funge-Smith, Simon; Halls, Ashley; Lorenzen, Kai

    2010-01-01

    The reported annual yield from inland capture fisheries in 2008 was over 10 million tonnes, although real catches are probably considerably higher than this. Inland fisheries are extremely complex, and in many cases poorly understood. The numerous water bodies and small rivers are inhabited by a wide range of species and several types of fisher community with diversified livelihood strategies for whom inland fisheries are extremely important. Many drivers affect the fisheries, including internal fisheries management practices. There are also many drivers from outside the fishery that influence the state and functioning of the environment as well as the social and economic framework within which the fishery is pursued. The drivers affecting the various types of inland water, rivers, lakes, reservoirs and wetlands may differ, particularly with regard to ecosystem function. Many of these depend on land-use practices and demand for water which conflict with the sustainability of the fishery. Climate change is also exacerbating many of these factors. The future of inland fisheries varies between continents. In Asia and Africa the resources are very intensely exploited and there is probably little room for expansion; it is here that resources are most at risk. Inland fisheries are less heavily exploited in South and Central America, and in the North and South temperate zones inland fisheries are mostly oriented to recreation rather than food production. PMID:20713391

  18. Inland capture fisheries.

    PubMed

    Welcomme, Robin L; Cowx, Ian G; Coates, David; Béné, Christophe; Funge-Smith, Simon; Halls, Ashley; Lorenzen, Kai

    2010-09-27

    The reported annual yield from inland capture fisheries in 2008 was over 10 million tonnes, although real catches are probably considerably higher than this. Inland fisheries are extremely complex, and in many cases poorly understood. The numerous water bodies and small rivers are inhabited by a wide range of species and several types of fisher community with diversified livelihood strategies for whom inland fisheries are extremely important. Many drivers affect the fisheries, including internal fisheries management practices. There are also many drivers from outside the fishery that influence the state and functioning of the environment as well as the social and economic framework within which the fishery is pursued. The drivers affecting the various types of inland water, rivers, lakes, reservoirs and wetlands may differ, particularly with regard to ecosystem function. Many of these depend on land-use practices and demand for water which conflict with the sustainability of the fishery. Climate change is also exacerbating many of these factors. The future of inland fisheries varies between continents. In Asia and Africa the resources are very intensely exploited and there is probably little room for expansion; it is here that resources are most at risk. Inland fisheries are less heavily exploited in South and Central America, and in the North and South temperate zones inland fisheries are mostly oriented to recreation rather than food production.

  19. Captured by Aliens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achenbach, Joel

    2000-03-01

    Captured by Aliens is a long and twisted voyage from science to the supernatural and back again. I hung out in Roswell, N.M., spent time with the Mars Society, met a guy who was figuring out the best way to build a spaceship to go to Alpha Centauri. I visited the set of the X-Files and talked to Mulder and Scully. One day over breakfast I was told by NASA administrator Dan Goldin, We live in a fog, man! He wants the big answers to the big questions. I spent a night in the base of a huge radio telescope in the boondocks of West Virginia, awaiting the signal from the aliens. I was hypnotized in a hotel room by someone who suspected that I'd been abducted by aliens and that this had triggered my interest in the topic. In the last months of his life, I talked to Carl Sagan, who believed that the galaxy riots with intelligent civilizations. He's my hero, for his steadfast adherence to the scientific method. What I found in all this is that the big question that needs immediate attention is not what's out THERE, but what's going on HERE, on Earth, and why we think the way we do, and how we came to be here in the first place.

  20. Capture-recapture methodology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gould, William R.; Kendall, William L.

    2013-01-01

    Capture-recapture methods were initially developed to estimate human population abundance, but since that time have seen widespread use for fish and wildlife populations to estimate and model various parameters of population, metapopulation, and disease dynamics. Repeated sampling of marked animals provides information for estimating abundance and tracking the fate of individuals in the face of imperfect detection. Mark types have evolved from clipping or tagging to use of noninvasive methods such as photography of natural markings and DNA collection from feces. Survival estimation has been emphasized more recently as have transition probabilities between life history states and/or geographical locations, even where some states are unobservable or uncertain. Sophisticated software has been developed to handle highly parameterized models, including environmental and individual covariates, to conduct model selection, and to employ various estimation approaches such as maximum likelihood and Bayesian approaches. With these user-friendly tools, complex statistical models for studying population dynamics have been made available to ecologists. The future will include a continuing trend toward integrating data types, both for tagged and untagged individuals, to produce more precise and robust population models.

  1. Vehicle capture system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tacke, Kenneth L.

    1998-12-01

    Primex Aerospace Company, under contract with the U.S. Army Armament Research Development & Engineering Center (ARDEC), has developed a portable vehicle capture system for use at vehicle checkpoints. Currently when a vehicle does not stop at a checkpoint, there are three possible reactions: let the vehicle go unchallenged, pursue the vehicle or stop the vehicle with lethal force. This system provides a non-lethal alternative that will stop and contain the vehicle. The system is completely portable with the heaviest component weighing less than 120 pounds. It can be installed with no external electrical power or permanent anchors required. In its standby mode, the system does not impede normal traffic, but on command erects a barrier in less than 1.5 seconds. System tests have been conducted using 5,100 and 8.400 pound vehicles, traveling at speeds up to 45 mph. The system is designed to minimize vehicle damage and occupant injury, typically resulting in deceleration forces of less than 2.5 gs on the vehicle. According to the drivers involved in tests at 45 mph, the stopping forces feel similar to a panic stop with the vehicle brakes locked. The system is completely reusable and be rapidly reset.

  2. The physics of intact capture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsou, Peter; Griffiths, D. J.; Albee, A. L.

    1994-01-01

    The ability to capture projectiles intact at hypervelocities in underdense media open a new area of study in physics. Underdense material behaves markedly different than solid, liquid, or gas upon hypervelocity impact. This new phenomenon enables applications in science that would either not be possible or would be very costly by other means. This phenomenon has been fully demonstrated in the laboratory and validated in space. Even more interesting is the fact that this hypervelocity intact capture was accomplished passively. A better understanding of the physics of intact capture will lead to improvements in intact capture. A collection of physical observations of this phenomenon is presented here.

  3. Resource capture by single leaves

    SciTech Connect

    Long, S.P.

    1992-05-01

    Leaves show a variety of strategies for maximizing CO{sub 2} and light capture. These are more meaningfully explained if they are considered in the context of maximizing capture relative to the utilization of water, nutrients and carbohydrates reserves. There is considerable variation between crops in their efficiency of CO{sub 2} and light capture at the leaf level. Understanding of these mechanisms indicate some ways in which efficiency of resource capture could be level cannot be meaningfully considered without simultaneous understanding of implications at the canopy level. 36 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Resonance ionization for analytical spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Hurst, George S.; Payne, Marvin G.; Wagner, Edward B.

    1976-01-01

    This invention relates to a method for the sensitive and selective analysis of an atomic or molecular component of a gas. According to this method, the desired neutral component is ionized by one or more resonance photon absorptions, and the resultant ions are measured in a sensitive counter. Numerous energy pathways are described for accomplishing the ionization including the use of one or two tunable pulsed dye lasers.

  5. Ionization oscillations in Hall accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barral, S.; Peradzyński, Z.

    2010-01-01

    The underlying mechanism of low-frequency oscillations in Hall accelerators is investigated theoretically. It is shown that relaxation oscillations arise from a competition between avalanche ionization and the advective transport of the working gas. The model derived recovers the slow progression and fast recession of the ionization front. Analytical approximations of the shape of current pulses and of the oscillation frequency are provided for the case of large amplitude oscillations.

  6. Materials design for electrocatalytic carbon capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Xin; Tahini, Hassan A.; Smith, Sean C.

    2016-05-01

    We discuss our philosophy for implementation of the Materials Genome Initiative through an integrated materials design strategy, exemplified here in the context of electrocatalytic capture and separation of CO2 gas. We identify for a group of 1:1 X-N graphene analogue materials that electro-responsive switchable CO2 binding behavior correlates with a change in the preferred binding site from N to the adjacent X atom as negative charge is introduced into the system. A reconsideration of conductive N-doped graphene yields the discovery that the N-dopant is able to induce electrocatalytic binding of multiple CO2 molecules at the adjacent carbon sites.

  7. Prompt ionization in the CRIT II barium releases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torbert, R. B.; Kletzing, C. A.; Liou, K.; Rau, D.

    1992-05-01

    Observations of electron and ion distributions inside a fast neutral barium jet in the ionosphere show significant fluxes within 4 km of release, presumably related to beam plasma instability processes involved in the Critical Ionization Velocity (CIV) effect. Electron fluxes exceeding 5 x 10 exp 12/sq cm-str-sec-keV were responsible for ionizing both the streaming barium and ambient oxygen. Resulting ion fluxes seem to be consistent with 1-2 percent ionization of the fast barium, as reported by optical observations, although the extended spatial distribution of the optically observed ions is difficult to reconcile with the in situ observations. When the perpendicular velocity of the neutrals falls below critical values, these processes shut off. Although these observations resemble the earlier Porcupine experimental results (Haerendel, 1982), theoretical understanding of the differences between these data and that of earlier negative experiments is still lacking.

  8. High pressure (>1 atm) electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lee Chuin; Mandal, Mridul Kanti; Hiraoka, Kenzo

    2011-03-01

    High pressure electrospray ionization mass spectrometry has been performed by pressurizing a custom made ion source chamber with compressed air to a pressure higher than the atmospheric pressure. The ion source was coupled to a commercial time-of-flight mass spectrometer using a nozzle-skimmer arrangement. The onset voltage for the electrospray of aqueous solution was found to be independent on the operating pressure. The onset voltage for the corona discharge, however, increased with the rise of pressure following the Paschen's law. Thus, besides having more working gas for the desolvation process, gaseous breakdown could also be avoided by pressurizing the ESI ion source with air to an appropriate level. Stable electrospray ionization has been achieved for the sample solution with high surface tension such as pure water in both positive and negative ion modes. Fragmentation of labile compounds during the ionization process could also be reduced by optimizing the operating pressure of the ion source.

  9. Negative thermal ion mass spectrometry of osmium, rhenium, and iridium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creaser, R. A.; Papanastassiou, D. A.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes a technique for obtaining, in a conventional surface ionization mass spectrometer, intense ion beams of negatively charged oxides of Os, Re, and Ir by thermal ionization. It is shown that the principal ion species of these ions are OsO3(-), ReO4(-), and IrO2(-), respectively. For Re-187/Os-187 studies, this technique offers the advantage of isotopic analyses without prior chemical separation of Re from Os.

  10. X-ray ionization differential ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kuklya, Andriy; Reinecke, Tobias; Uteschil, Florian; Kerpen, Klaus; Zimmermann, Stefan; Telgheder, Ursula

    2017-01-01

    X-ray was utilized as an ionization source for differential ion mobility spectrometry (DMS) for the first time. The utilization of this ionization source increases the potential of DMS system for on-site based applications. The influence of experimental parameters (e.g. accelerating voltage, filament current, and separation field) on the analysis of model compounds was investigated and discussed. It was found that both the positive and the negative reactive ion peaks [RIP(+) and RIP(-)] formed during X-ray ionization are identical with those observed with the traditional (63)Ni radioactive ion source. This is especially notable for RIP(-), because the chemistry provided by other nonradioactive sources in the negative mode is more complicated or even different than that observed with a (63)Ni source. Increase of either filament current or accelerating voltage resulted in increased intensity of both RIP(+) and RIP(-). However, because of the materials used for construction of X-ray adapter the maximal level of filament current and accelerating voltage used in this study were limited to 700mA and 5kV, respectively. Analytical performance was determined with two model compounds (acetone and methyl salicylate) using X-ray and directly compared to (63)Ni ionization source. When X-ray was coupled to DMS, calculated LOD values were found to be within the range of 0.17-1.52ppbv/v (concentration in the carrier gas). These values are competitive with those calculated for DMS equipped with traditional (63)Ni radioactive ionization source. The obtained results are promising enough to ensure the potential of X-ray as ionization source for DMS.

  11. Capture probabilities for secondary resonances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malhotra, Renu

    1990-01-01

    A perturbed pendulum model is used to analyze secondary resonances, and it is shown that a self-similarity between secondary and primary resonances exists. Henrard's (1982) theory is used to obtain formulas for the capture probability into secondary resonances. The tidal evolution of Miranda and Umbriel is considered as an example, and significant probabilities of capture into secondary resonances are found.

  12. Carbon Capture: A Technology Assessment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-21

    monoethanolamine (MEA) and ammonia ; pre- combustion capture (also via chemical solvents) from the synthesis gas produced in an integrated coal gasification...71 D. Heaven et al., “ Synthesis Gas Purification in Gasification to Ammonia /Urea Plants,” Gasification Technologies...32 Ammonia -Based Capture Processes

  13. Negative ion source with hollow cathode discharge plasma

    DOEpatents

    Hershcovitch, A.; Prelec, K.

    1980-12-12

    A negative ion source of the type where negative ions are formed by bombarding a low-work-function surface with positive ions and neutral particles from a plasma, wherein a highly ionized plasma is injected into an anode space containing the low-work-function surface is described. The plasma is formed by hollow cathode discharge and injected into the anode space along the magnetic field lines. Preferably, the negative ion source is of the magnetron type.

  14. Negative ion source with hollow cathode discharge plasma

    DOEpatents

    Hershcovitch, Ady; Prelec, Krsto

    1983-01-01

    A negative ion source of the type where negative ions are formed by bombarding a low-work-function surface with positive ions and neutral particles from a plasma, wherein a highly ionized plasma is injected into an anode space containing the low-work-function surface. The plasma is formed by hollow cathode discharge and injected into the anode space along the magnetic field lines. Preferably, the negative ion source is of the magnetron type.

  15. Effects of diagnostic ionizing radiation on pregnancy via TEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed, W. H.; Artoli, A. M.

    2008-08-01

    In Sudan, X-rays are routinely used at least once for measurements of pelvis during the gestation period, though this is highly prohibited worldwide, except for a few life threatening cases. To demonstrate the effect of diagnostic ionizing radiation on uterus, fetus and neighboring tissues to the ovaries, two independent experiments on pregnant rabbits were conducted. The first experiment was a proof of concept that diagnostic ionizing radiation is hazardous throughout the gestation period. The second experiment was done through Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) to elucidate the morphological changes in the ultra structure of samples taken from irradiated pregnant rabbits. This study uses TEM to test the effect of diagnostic radiation of less than 0.6 Gray on the cellular level. Morphological changes have been captured and the images were analyzed to quantify these effects.

  16. Intact capture of cosmic dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsou, P.

    1991-01-01

    The focus of this development effort is to capture dust particles at hypervelocities intact and unmelted in order to preserve volatile organics. At the same time, the capture process must minimize any organic elemental or compound contamination to prevent any compromise of exobiological analyses. Inorganic silicate aerogel has been developed as a successful capture medium to satisfy both requirements of intact capture and minimal organic contamination. Up to 6 km/s, silicate projectiles from a few microns up to 100 microns have been captured intact without any melting and with minimal loss of mass. Carbon in silicate aerogel can be reduced to less than 1 part in 1000 and hydrogen 3 parts in 1000 when baked in air. Under controlled inert gas environments, additional hydrocarbon reduction can be achieved.

  17. Carbon Capture and Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Friedmann, S

    2007-10-03

    Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) is the long-term isolation of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere through physical, chemical, biological, or engineered processes. This includes a range of approaches including soil carbon sequestration (e.g., through no-till farming), terrestrial biomass sequestration (e.g., through planting forests), direct ocean injection of CO{sub 2} either onto the deep seafloor or into the intermediate depths, injection into deep geological formations, or even direct conversion of CO{sub 2} to carbonate minerals. Some of these approaches are considered geoengineering (see the appropriate chapter herein). All are considered in the 2005 special report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC 2005). Of the range of options available, geological carbon sequestration (GCS) appears to be the most actionable and economic option for major greenhouse gas reduction in the next 10-30 years. The basis for this interest includes several factors: (1) The potential capacities are large based on initial estimates. Formal estimates for global storage potential vary substantially, but are likely to be between 800 and 3300 Gt of C (3000 and 10,000 Gt of CO{sub 2}), with significant capacity located reasonably near large point sources of the CO{sub 2}. (2) GCS can begin operations with demonstrated technology. Carbon dioxide has been separated from large point sources for nearly 100 years, and has been injected underground for over 30 years (below). (3) Testing of GCS at intermediate scale is feasible. In the US, Canada, and many industrial countries, large CO{sub 2} sources like power plants and refineries lie near prospective storage sites. These plants could be retrofit today and injection begun (while bearing in mind scientific uncertainties and unknowns). Indeed, some have, and three projects described here provide a great deal of information on the operational needs and field implementation of CCS. Part of this interest comes from several

  18. Zero Volt Paper Spray Ionization and Its Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wleklinski, Michael; Li, Yafeng; Bag, Soumabha; Sarkar, Depanjan; Narayanan, Rahul; Pradeep, T; Cooks, R Graham

    2015-07-07

    The analytical performance and a suggested mechanism for zero volt paper spray using chromatography paper are presented. A spray is generated by the action of the pneumatic force of the mass spectrometer (MS) vacuum at the inlet. Positive and negative ion signals are observed, and comparisons are made with standard kV paper spray (PS) ionization and nanoelectrospray ionization (nESI). While the range of analytes to which zero volt PS is applicable is very similar to kV PS and nESI, differences in the mass spectra of mixtures are interpreted in terms of the more significant effects of analyte surface activity in the gentler zero volt experiment than in the other methods due to the significantly lower charge. The signal intensity of zero volt PS is also lower than in the other methods. A Monte Carlo simulation based on statistical fluctuation of positive and negative ions in solution has been implemented to explain the production of ions from initially uncharged droplets. Uncharged droplets first break up due to aerodynamics forces until they are in the 2-4 μm size range and then undergo Coulombic fission. A model involving statistical charge fluctuations in both phases predicts detection limits similar to those observed experimentally and explains the effects of binary mixture components on relative ionization efficiencies. The proposed mechanism may also play a role in ionization by other voltage-free methods.

  19. River Capture in Disequilibrium Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, S. W.; Perron, J.; Willett, S.; Goren, L.

    2013-12-01

    The process of river piracy or river capture has long drawn interest as a potential mechanism by which drainage basins large and small evolve towards an equilibrium state. River capture transfers both drainage area and drainage lines from one river basin to another, which can cause large, abrupt shifts in network topology, drainage divide positions, and river incision rates. Despite numerous case studies in which river capture has been proposed to have occurred, there is no general, mechanistic framework for understanding the controls on river capture, nor are there quantitative criteria for determining if capture has occurred. Here we use new metrics of landscape disequilibrium to first identify landscapes in which drainage reorganization is occurring. These metrics are based on a balance between an integral of the contributing drainage area and elevation. In an analysis of rivers in the Eastern United States we find that many rivers are in a state of disequilibrium and are experiencing recent or ongoing area exchange between basins. In these disequilibrium basins we find widespread evidence for network rearrangement via river capture at multiple scales. We then conduct numerical experiments with a 2-D landscape evolution model to explore the conditions in which area exchange among drainage basins is likely to occur as discrete capture events as opposed to continuous divide migration. These experiments indicate that: (1) capture activity increases with the degree of disequilibrium induced by persistent spatial gradients in tectonic forcing or by temporal changes in climate or tectonic forcing; (2) capture activity is strongly controlled by the initial planform drainage network geometry; and (3) capture activity scales with the fluvial incision rate constant in the river power erosion law.

  20. Factors affecting European badger (Meles meles) capture numbers in one county in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Andrew W; O'Keeffe, James; Sleeman, D Paddy; Davenport, John; Martin, S Wayne

    2013-04-01

    Understanding factors affecting the number of badgers captured at and around badger setts (burrows) is of considerable applied importance. These factors could be used to estimate probable badger densities for bovine tuberculosis (bTB) control and also for monitoring badger populations from a conservation perspective. Furthermore, badger management and vaccination programs would benefit by increasing the probability of efficiently capturing the target badger populations. Within this context, it was investigated whether badger capture numbers can be estimated from field signs and previous capture histories. Badger capture records (initial and repeated capture numbers at a sett) from a large-scale removal program (405 km(2), 643 setts) were used. Univariable count models indicated that there were a number of significant potential predictors of badger numbers, during initial capture attempts. Using a multivariable zero-inflated Poisson (ZIP) model of initial captures we found that badger capture numbers were significantly affected by sett type, season, year, and the number of sett entrances in active use. Badger capture numbers were also affected by the total previous catch during repeated capture events and by the number of previous capture attempts. There was a significant negative trend in badger captures across events. Measures of the ability of these models to estimate badger captures suggested that the models might be useful in estimating badger numbers across a population; however the confidence intervals associated with these predictions were large.

  1. Single ionization of molecular iodine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Dale L.; Tagliamonti, Vincent; Dragan, James; Gibson, George N.

    2017-01-01

    We performed a study of the single ionization of iodine, I2 over a range of wavelengths. Single ionization of I2 is unexpectedly found to have a contribution from inner molecular orbitals involving the 5 s electrons. The I+I+ dissociation channel was recorded through velocity map imaging, and the kinetic-energy release of each channel was determined with two-dimensional fitting of the images. Most of the measured kinetic-energy data were inconsistent with ionization to the X , A , and B states of I2 + , implying ionization from deeper orbitals. A pump-probe Fourier transform technique was used to look for modulation at the X - and A -state vibrational frequencies to see if they were intermediate states in a two-step process. X - and A -state modulation was seen only for kinetic-energy releases below 0.2 eV, consistent with dissociation through the B state. From these results and intensity-, polarization-, and wavelength-dependent experiments we found no evidence of bond softening, electron rescattering, or photon mediation through the X or A states to higher-energy single-ionization channels.

  2. Liposomal boron delivery for neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Hiroyuki

    2009-01-01

    Tumor cell destruction in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is due to the nuclear reaction between (10)B and thermal neutrons. The thermal neutrons have an energy of 0.025 eV, clearly below the threshold energy required to ionize tissue components. However, neutron capture by (10)B produces lithium ion and helium (alpha-particles), which are high linear energy transfer (LET) particles, and dissipate their kinetic energy before traveling one cell diameter (5-9 microm) in biological tissues, ensuring their potential for precise cell killing. BNCT has been applied clinically for the treatment of malignant brain tumors, malignant melanoma, head and neck cancer, and hepatoma using two boron compounds: sodium borocaptate (Na(2)(10)B(12)H(11)SH; Na(2)(10)BSH) and l-p-boronophenylalanine (l-(10)BPA). These low molecular weight compounds are cleared easily from the cancer cells and blood. Therefore, high accumulation and selective delivery of boron compounds into tumor tissues are most important to achieve effective BNCT and to avoid damage of adjacent healthy cells. Much attention has been focused on the liposomal drug delivery system (DDS) as an attractive, intelligent technology of targeting and controlled release of (10)B compounds. Two approaches have been investigated for incorporation of (10)B into liposomes: (1) encapsulation of (10)B compounds into liposomes and (2) incorporation of (10)B-conjugated lipids into the liposomal bilayer. Our laboratory has developed boron ion cluster lipids for application of the latter approach. In this chapter, our boron lipid liposome approaches as well as recent developments of the liposomal boron delivery system are summarized.

  3. Neutron capture reactions at DANCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bredeweg, T. A.

    2008-05-01

    The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) is a 4π BaF2 array consisting of 160 active detector elements. The primary purpose of the array is to perform neutron capture cross section measurements on small (>~100 μg) and/or radioactive (<~100 mCi) species. The measurements made possible with this array will be useful in answering outstanding questions in the areas of national security, threat reduction, nuclear astrophysics, advanced reactor design and accelerator transmutation of waste. Since the commissioning of DANCE we have performed neutron capture cross section measurements on a wide array of medium to heavy mass nuclides. Measurements to date include neutron capture cross sections on 241,243Am, neutron capture and neutron-induced fission cross sections and capture-to-fission ratio (α = σγ/σf) for 235U using a new fission-tagging detector as well as neutron capture cross sections for several astrophysics branch-point nuclei. Results from several of these measurements will be presented along with a discussion of additional physics information that can be extracted from the DANCE data.

  4. Capture zones for simple aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McElwee, Carl D.

    1991-01-01

    Capture zones showing the area influenced by a well within a certain time are useful for both aquifer protection and cleanup. If hydrodynamic dispersion is neglected, a deterministic curve defines the capture zone. Analytical expressions for the capture zones can be derived for simple aquifers. However, the capture zone equations are transcendental and cannot be explicitly solved for the coordinates of the capture zone boundary. Fortunately, an iterative scheme allows the solution to proceed quickly and efficiently even on a modest personal computer. Three forms of the analytical solution must be used in an iterative scheme to cover the entire region of interest, after the extreme values of the x coordinate are determined by an iterative solution. The resulting solution is a discrete one, and usually 100-1000 intervals along the x-axis are necessary for a smooth definition of the capture zone. The presented program is written in FORTRAN and has been used in a variety of computing environments. No graphics capability is included with the program; it is assumed the user has access to a commercial package. The superposition of capture zones for multiple wells is expected to be satisfactory if the spacing is not too close. Because this program deals with simple aquifers, the results rarely will be the final word in a real application.

  5. Neutron capture reactions at DANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Bredeweg, T. A.

    2008-05-12

    The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) is a 4{pi} BaF{sub 2} array consisting of 160 active detector elements. The primary purpose of the array is to perform neutron capture cross section measurements on small (> or approx.100 {mu}g) and/or radioactive (< or approx. 100 mCi) species. The measurements made possible with this array will be useful in answering outstanding questions in the areas of national security, threat reduction, nuclear astrophysics, advanced reactor design and accelerator transmutation of waste. Since the commissioning of DANCE we have performed neutron capture cross section measurements on a wide array of medium to heavy mass nuclides. Measurements to date include neutron capture cross sections on {sup 241,243}Am, neutron capture and neutron-induced fission cross sections and capture-to-fission ratio ({alpha} = {sigma}{sub {gamma}}/{sigma}{sub f}) for {sup 235}U using a new fission-tagging detector as well as neutron capture cross sections for several astrophysics branch-point nuclei. Results from several of these measurements will be presented along with a discussion of additional physics information that can be extracted from the DANCE data.

  6. Intact capture of hypervelocity particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsou, P.; Brownlee, D. E.; Albee, A. L.

    1986-01-01

    Knowledge of the phase, structure, and crystallography of cosmic particles, as well as their elemental and isotopic compositions, would be very valuable information toward understanding the nature of our solar system. This information can be obtained from the intact capture of large mineral grains of cosmic particles from hypervelocity impacts. Hypervelocity experiments of intact capture in underdense media have indicated realistic potential in this endeaver. The recovery of the thermal blankets and louvers from the Solar Max spacecraft have independently verified this potential in the unintended capture of cosmic materials from hypervelocity impacts. Passive underdense media will permit relatively simple and inexpensive missions to capture cosmic particles intact, either by going to a planetary body or by waiting for the particles to come to the Shuttle or the Space Station. Experiments to explore the potential of using various underdense media for an intact comet sample capture up to 6.7 km/s were performed at NASA Ames Research Center Vertical Gun Range. Explorative hypervelocity experiments up to 7.9 km/s were also made at the Ernst Mach Institute. These experiments have proven that capturing intact particles at hypervelocity impacts is definitely possible. Further research is being conducted to achieve higher capture ratios at even higher hypervelocities for even smaller projectiles.

  7. Intact capture of hypervelocity particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsou, P.; Brownlee, D. E.; Albee, A. L.

    Knowledge of the phase, structure, and crystallography of cosmic particles, as well as their elemental and isotopic compositions, would be very valuable information toward understanding the nature of our solar system. This information can be obtained from the intact capture of large mineral grains of cosmic particles from hypervelocity impacts. Hypervelocity experiments of intact capture in underdense media have indicated realistic potential in this endeaver. The recovery of the thermal blankets and louvers from the Solar Max spacecraft have independently verified this potential in the unintended capture of cosmic materials from hypervelocity impacts. Passive underdense media will permit relatively simple and inexpensive missions to capture cosmic particles intact, either by going to a planetary body or by waiting for the particles to come to the Shuttle or the Space Station. Experiments to explore the potential of using various underdense media for an intact comet sample capture up to 6.7 km/s were performed at NASA Ames Research Center Vertical Gun Range. Explorative hypervelocity experiments up to 7.9 km/s were also made at the Ernst Mach Institute. These experiments have proven that capturing intact particles at hypervelocity impacts is definitely possible. Further research is being conducted to achieve higher capture ratios at even higher hypervelocities for even smaller projectiles.

  8. Gravitational ionization: a chaotic net in the Kepler system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chicone, C.; Mashhoon, B.; Retzloff, D. G.

    1997-03-01

    The long-term nonlinear dynamics of a Keplerian binary system under the combined influences of gravitational radiation damping and external tidal perturbations is analysed. Gravitational radiation reaction leads the binary system towards eventual collapse, while the external periodic perturbations could lead to the ionization of the system via Arnold diffusion. When these two opposing tendencies nearly balance each other, interesting chaotic behaviour occurs which is briefly studied in this paper. It is possible to show that periodic orbits can exist in this system for sufficiently small damping. Moreover, we employ the method of averaging to investigate the phenomenon of capture into resonance.

  9. Capture methods for Musk Ducks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCracken, K.G.; Hemmings, J.; Paton, D.C.; Afton, A.D.

    2003-01-01

    Musk Ducks Biziura lobata are endemic to wetlands, river systems and coastal oceanic waters of temperate Australia. Individuals of this species are difficult to capture because of their excellent swimming and diving abilities and frequent use of deep-water habitats. Night-lighting, baited clover-leaf traps and walk-in-nest-traps were used to capture Musk Ducks at Murray Lagoon, Cape Gantheaume Conservation Park, Kangaroo Island, South Australia. These techniques should be useful for capturing Musk Ducks at other locations in Australia.

  10. Provenance Datasets Highlighting Capture Disparities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    the Web pages of the universities and institutes.1 Notes are made and links pasted in a variety of formats. Files are saved on a shared drive. When...institutions/ 3. Capture Methods There are several capture methods that are available for use [4]: • Manual capture. • Scraping of logs or...the high-level user desktop. Save links App: Word, SharePoint User: Alice Web Data Web Data Web Data Web Data Web Data Web Data Notes.txt Create

  11. Ionizing gas breakdown waves in strong electric fields.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klingbeil, R.; Tidman, D. A.; Fernsler, R. F.

    1972-01-01

    A previous analysis by Albright and Tidman (1972) of the structure of an ionizing potential wave driven through a dense gas by a strong electric field is extended to include atomic structure details of the background atoms and radiative effects, especially, photoionization. It is found that photoionization plays an important role in avalanche propagation. Velocities, electron densities, and temperatures are presented as a function of electric field for both negative and positive breakdown waves in nitrogen.

  12. Novel analytical approach for brominated flame retardants based on the use of gas chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometry with emphasis in highly brominated congeners.

    PubMed

    Portolés, Tania; Sales, Carlos; Gómara, Belén; Sancho, Juan Vicente; Beltrán, Joaquim; Herrero, Laura; González, María José; Hernández, Félix

    2015-10-06

    The analysis of brominated flame retardants (BFRs) commonly relies on the use of gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS) operating in electron ionization (EI) and electron capture negative ionization (ECNI) modes using quadrupole, triple quadrupole, ion trap, and magnetic sector analyzers. However, these brominated contaminants are examples of compounds for which a soft and robust ionization technique might be favorable since they show high fragmentation in EI and low specificity in ECNI. In addition, the low limits of quantification (0.01 ng/g) required by European Commission Recommendation 2014/118/EU on the monitoring of traces of BFRs in food put stress on the use of highly sensitive techniques/methods. In this work, a new approach for the extremely sensitive determination of BFRs taking profit of the potential of atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) combined with GC and triple quadrupole (QqQ) mass analyzer is proposed. The objective was to explore the potential of this approach for the BFRs determination in samples at pg/g levels, taking marine samples and a cream sample as a model. Ionization and fragmentation behavior of 14 PBDEs (congeners 28, 47, 66, 85, 99, 100, 153, 154, 183, 184, 191, 196, 197, and 209) and two novel BFRs, decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE) and 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE), in the GC-APCI-MS system has been investigated. The formation of highly abundant (quasi) molecular ion was the main advantage observed in relation to EI. Thus, a notable improvement in sensitivity and specificity was observed when using it as precursor ion in tandem MS. The improved detectability (LODs < 10 fg) achieved when using APCI compared to EI has been demonstrated, which is especially relevant for highly brominated congeners. Analysis of samples from an intercomparison exercise and samples from the marine field showed the potential of this approach for the reliable identification and quantification at very low

  13. Multiplexed electronically programmable multimode ionization detector for chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Wise, Marcus B.; Buchanan, Michelle V.

    1989-01-01

    Method and apparatus for detecting and differentiating organic compounds based on their electron affinity. An electron capture detector cell (ECD) is operated in a plurality of multiplexed electroncially programmable operating modes to alter the detector response during a single sampling cycle to acquire multiple simultaneous chromatograms corresponding to each of the different operating modes. The cell is held at a constant subatmospheric pressure while the electron collection bias voltage applied to the cell is modulated electronically to allow acquisition of multiple chromatograms for a single sample elution from a chromatograph representing three distinctly different response modes. A system is provided which automatically controls the programmed application of bias pulses at different intervals and/or amplitudes to switch the detector from an ionization mode to the electron capture mode and various degrees therebetween to provide an improved means of tuning an ECD for multimode detection and improved specificity.

  14. Multiplexed electronically programmable multimode ionization detector for chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Wise, M.B.; Buchanan, M.V.

    1988-05-19

    Method and apparatus for detecting and differentiating organic compounds based on their electron affinity. An electron capture detector cell (ECD) is operated in a plurality of multiplexed electronically programmable operating modes to alter the detector response during a single sampling cycle to acquire multiple simultaneous chromatograms corresponding to each of the different operating modes. The cell is held at a constant subatmospheric pressure while the electron collection bias voltage applied to the cell is modulated electronically to allow acquisition of multiple chromatograms for a single sample elution from a chromatograph representing three distinctly different response modes. A system is provided which automatically controls the programmed application of bias pulses at different intervals and/or amplitudes to switch the detector from an ionization mode to the electron capture mode and various degrees therebetween to provide an improved means of tuning an ECD for multimode detection and improved specificity. 6 figs.

  15. ISS Update: Capturing a Dragon

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Josh Byerly talks with space station training instructors Jeff Tuxhorn and Graeme Newman, who trained the space station crews on how to capture SpaceX’s Dragon spacecr...

  16. Radiative capture reactions in astrophysics

    DOE PAGES

    Brune, Carl R.; Davids, Barry

    2015-08-07

    Here, the radiative capture reactions of greatest importance in nuclear astrophysics are identified and placed in their stellar contexts. Recent experimental efforts to estimate their thermally averaged rates are surveyed.

  17. ISS Update: Capturing a Dragon

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Josh Byerly talks with Melanie Miller, Robotics Officer, about the capture of the SpaceX Dragon commercial cargo craft by the Expedition 33 crew of the International Spa...

  18. Muon Capture on ^3H

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golak, Jacek; Skibiński, Roman; Witała, Henryk; Topolnicki, Kacper; Kamada, Hiroyuki; Nogga, Andreas; Marcucci, Laura E.

    2017-01-01

    The μ ^- + ^3H → ν _μ + n + n + n capture reaction is studied under full inclusion of final-state interactions with the AV18 nucleon-nucleon potential and the Urbana IX three-nucleon force. We employ the single nucleon weak current operator comprising the dominant relativistic corrections to obtain first estimates of the total capture rates based on realistic forces. Our results are compared with older theoretical predictions.

  19. Toward transformational carbon capture systems

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, David C.; Litynski, John T.; Brickett, Lynn A.; Morreale, Bryan D.

    2015-10-28

    This paper will briefly review the history and current state of Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) research and development and describe the technical barriers to carbon capture. it will argue forcefully for a new approach to R&D, which leverages both simulation and physical systems at the laboratory and pilot scales to more rapidly move the best technoogies forward, prune less advantageous approaches, and simultaneously develop materials and processes.

  20. The Capture of Jupiter Trojans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morbidelli, A.; Nesvorny, D.; Vokrouhlicky, D.

    2013-09-01

    The origin of Jupiter Trojans remained mysterious for decades. Particularly, it was difficult to explain the excitation of the inclinations of the Trojan population [1]. In 2005, Morbidelli et al. [2] proposed a scenario of capture from the trans-Neptunian disk, in the framework of the so-called "Nice model" [3,4]. This scenario explained in a natural way the observed orbital distribution of Trojans. The Nice model, however, evolved in the years, in order to satisfy an increasingly large number of constraints. It now appears that the dynamical evolution of the giant planets was different from that envisioned in [2]. Here, we assess again the process of capture of Trojans within this new evolution. We show that (6-8)×10 - 7 of the original trans-Neptunian planetesimals are captured in the Trojan region, with an orbital distribution consistent with the one observed. Relative to [2], the new capture mechanism has the potential of explaining the asymmetry between the L4 and L5 populations. Moreover, the resulting population of Trojans is consistent with that of the Irregular Satellites of Jupiter, which are captured in the same process; a few bodies from the main asteroid belt could also be captured in the Trojan cloud.

  1. Electrospray Ionization-Induced Protein Unfolding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hong; Kitova, Elena N.; Johnson, Margaret A.; Eugenio, Luiz; Ng, Kenneth K. S.; Klassen, John S.

    2012-12-01

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) measurements were performed under a variety of solution conditions on a highly acidic sub-fragment (B3C) of the C-terminal carbohydrate-binding repeat region of Clostridium difficile toxin B, and two mutants (B4A and B4B) containing fewer acidic residues. ESI-MS measurements performed in negative ion mode on aqueous ammonium acetate solutions of B3C at low ionic strength ( I < 80 mM) revealed evidence, based on the measured charge state distribution, of protein unfolding. In contrast, no evidence of unfolding was detected from ESI-MS measurements made in positive ion mode at low I or in either mode at higher I. The results of proton nuclear magnetic resonance and circular dichroism spectroscopy measurements and gel filtration chromatography performed on solutions of B3C under low and high I conditions suggest that the protein exists predominantly in a folded state in neutral aqueous solutions with I > 10 mM. The results of ESI-MS measurements performed on B3C in a series of solutions with high I at pH 5 to 9 rule out the possibility that the structural changes are related to ESI-induced changes in pH. It is proposed that unfolding of B3C, observed in negative mode for solutions with low I, occurs during the ESI process and arises due to Coulombic repulsion between the negatively charged residues and liquid/droplet surface charge. ESI-MS measurements performed in negative ion mode on B4A and B4B also reveal a shift to higher charge states at low I but the magnitude of the changes are smaller than observed for B3C.

  2. Electroencephalographic responses to ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    GARCIA, J; BUCHWALD, N A; BACH-Y-RITA, G; FEDER, B H; KOELLING, R A

    1963-04-19

    Electroencephalographic recordings made from chronically implanted cortical electrodes indicate that ionizing radiation has an immediate effect upon brain wave patterns. X-rays delivered at the rate of 0.2 roentgen per second produce an arousal effect resembling that which occurs as a result of stimulation through peripheral receptor systems.

  3. Ionization Cooling for Muon Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Alexahin, Y.; Neuffer, D.; Prebys, E.

    2014-09-18

    Possible application for muon experiments such as mu2e is discussed of the initial part of the ionization cooling channel originally developed for muon collider. It is shown that with the FNAL Booster as the proton driver the mu2e sensitivity can be increased by two orders of magnitude compared to the presently considered experiment.

  4. Ionization Potentials for Isoelectronic Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agmon, Noam

    1988-01-01

    Presents a quantitative treatment of ionization potentials of isoelectronic atoms. By looking at the single-electron view of calculating the total energy of an atom, trends in the screening and effective quantum number parameters are examined. Approaches the question of determining electron affinities. (CW)

  5. On Multiplying Negative Numbers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowley, Mary L.; Dunn, Kenneth A.

    1985-01-01

    Comments on the history of negative numbers, some methods that can be used to introduce the multiplication of negative numbers to students, and an explanation of why the product of two negative numbers is a positive number are included. (MNS)

  6. Electron Ionization Mass Spectrum of Tellurium Hexafluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Richard A.; McNamara, Bruce K.; Barinaga, Charles J.; Peterson, James M.; Govind, Niranjan; Andersen, Amity; Abrecht, David G.; Schwantes, Jon M.; Ballou, Nathan E.

    2015-05-18

    The first electron ionization mass spectrum of tellurium hexafluoride (TeF6) is reported. The starting material was produced by direct fluorination of Te metal or TeO2 with nitrogen trifluoride. Formation of TeF6 was confirmed through cryogenic capture of the tellurium fluorination product and analysis through Raman spectroscopy. The eight natural abundance isotopes were observed for each of the set of fragment ions: TeF5+, TeF4+ TeF3+, TeF2+, TeF1+, and Te+, Te2+. A trend in increasing abundance was observed for the even fluoride bearing ions: TeF1+ < TeF3+ < TeF5+, and a decreasing abundance was observed for the even fragment series: Te(0)+ > TeF2+ > TeF4+ > TeF6+, with the molecular ion TeF6+ not observed at all. Density functional theory based electronic structure calculations were used to calculate optimized ground state geometries of these gas phase species and their relative stabilities explain the trends in the data and the lack of observed signal for TeF6+.

  7. Capture by colour: evidence for dimension-specific singleton capture.

    PubMed

    Harris, Anthony M; Becker, Stefanie I; Remington, Roger W

    2015-10-01

    Previous work on attentional capture has shown the attentional system to be quite flexible in the stimulus properties it can be set to respond to. Several different attentional "modes" have been identified. Feature search mode allows attention to be set for specific features of a target (e.g., red). Singleton detection mode sets attention to respond to any discrepant item ("singleton") in the display. Relational search sets attention for the relative properties of the target in relation to the distractors (e.g., redder, larger). Recently, a new attentional mode was proposed that sets attention to respond to any singleton within a particular feature dimension (e.g., colour; Folk & Anderson, 2010). We tested this proposal against the predictions of previously established attentional modes. In a spatial cueing paradigm, participants searched for a colour target that was randomly either red or green. The nature of the attentional control setting was probed by presenting an irrelevant singleton cue prior to the target display and assessing whether it attracted attention. In all experiments, the cues were red, green, blue, or a white stimulus rapidly rotated (motion cue). The results of three experiments support the existence of a "colour singleton set," finding that all colour cues captured attention strongly, while motion cues captured attention only weakly or not at all. Notably, we also found that capture by motion cues in search for colour targets was moderated by their frequency; rare motion cues captured attention (weakly), while frequent motion cues did not.

  8. Clinical Application of Ambient Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li-Hua; Hsieh, Hua-Yi; Hsu, Cheng-Chih

    2017-01-01

    Ambient ionization allows mass spectrometry analysis directly on the sample surface under atmospheric pressure with almost zero sample pretreatment. Since the development of desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) in 2004, many other ambient ionization techniques were developed. Due to their simplicity and low operation cost, rapid and on-site clinical mass spectrometry analysis becomes real. In this review, we will highlight some of the most widely used ambient ionization mass spectrometry approaches and their applications in clinical study. PMID:28337399

  9. New effects of a long-lived negatively charged massive particle on big bang nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kusakabe, Motohiko; Kim, K. S.; Cheoun, Myung-Ki; Kajino, Toshitaka; Kino, Yasushi; Mathews, Grant J.

    2014-05-02

    Primordial {sup 7}Li abundance inferred from observations of metal-poor stars is a factor of about 3 lower than the theoretical value of standard big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) model. One of the solutions to the Li problem is {sup 7}Be destruction during the BBN epoch caused by a long-lived negatively charged massive particle, X{sup −}. The particle can bind to nuclei, and X-bound nuclei (X-nuclei) can experience new reactions. The radiative X{sup −} capture by {sup 7}Be nuclei followed by proton capture of the bound state of {sup 7}Be and X{sup −} ({sup 7}Be{sub x}) is a possible {sup 7}Be destruction reaction. Since the primordial abundance of {sup 7}Li originates mainly from {sup 7}Li produced via the electron capture of {sup 7}Be after BBN, the {sup 7}Be destruction provides a solution to the {sup 7}Li problem. We suggest a new route of {sup 7}Be{sub x} formation, that is the {sup 7}Be charge exchange at the reaction of {sup 7}Be{sup 3+} ion and X{sup −}. The formation rate depends on the ionization fraction of {sup 7}Be{sup 3+} ion, the charge exchange cross section of {sup 7}Be{sup 3+}, and the probability that excited states {sup 7}Be{sub x}* produced at the charge exchange are converted to the ground state. We find that this reaction can be equally important as or more important than ordinary radiative recombination of {sup 7}Be and X{sup −}. The effect of this new route is shown in a nuclear reaction network calculation.

  10. CHAOTIC CAPTURE OF NEPTUNE TROJANS

    SciTech Connect

    Nesvorny, David; Vokrouhlicky, David

    2009-06-15

    Neptune Trojans (NTs) are swarms of outer solar system objects that lead/trail planet Neptune during its revolutions around the Sun. Observations indicate that NTs form a thick cloud of objects with a population perhaps {approx}10 times more numerous than that of Jupiter Trojans and orbital inclinations reaching {approx}25 deg. The high inclinations of NTs are indicative of capture instead of in situ formation. Here we study a model in which NTs were captured by Neptune during planetary migration when secondary resonances associated with the mean-motion commensurabilities between Uranus and Neptune swept over Neptune's Lagrangian points. This process, known as chaotic capture, is similar to that previously proposed to explain the origin of Jupiter's Trojans. We show that chaotic capture of planetesimals from an {approx}35 Earth-mass planetesimal disk can produce a population of NTs that is at least comparable in number to that inferred from current observations. The large orbital inclinations of NTs are a natural outcome of chaotic capture. To obtain the {approx}4:1 ratio between high- and low-inclination populations suggested by observations, planetary migration into a dynamically excited planetesimal disk may be required. The required stirring could have been induced by Pluto-sized and larger objects that have formed in the disk.

  11. 29 CFR 1926.53 - Ionizing radiation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Ionizing radiation. 1926.53 Section 1926.53 Labor... § 1926.53 Ionizing radiation. (a) In construction and related activities involving the use of sources of ionizing radiation, the pertinent provisions of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Standards...

  12. 29 CFR 1926.53 - Ionizing radiation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Ionizing radiation. 1926.53 Section 1926.53 Labor... § 1926.53 Ionizing radiation. (a) In construction and related activities involving the use of sources of ionizing radiation, the pertinent provisions of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Standards...

  13. 29 CFR 1926.53 - Ionizing radiation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ionizing radiation. 1926.53 Section 1926.53 Labor... § 1926.53 Ionizing radiation. (a) In construction and related activities involving the use of sources of ionizing radiation, the pertinent provisions of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Standards...

  14. 29 CFR 1926.53 - Ionizing radiation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Ionizing radiation. 1926.53 Section 1926.53 Labor... § 1926.53 Ionizing radiation. (a) In construction and related activities involving the use of sources of ionizing radiation, the pertinent provisions of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Standards...

  15. 29 CFR 1926.53 - Ionizing radiation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Ionizing radiation. 1926.53 Section 1926.53 Labor... § 1926.53 Ionizing radiation. (a) In construction and related activities involving the use of sources of ionizing radiation, the pertinent provisions of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Standards...

  16. Electron-Impact Ionization and Dissociative Ionization of Biomolecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Chaban, Galina M.; Dateo, Christopher E.

    2006-01-01

    It is well recognized that secondary electrons play an important role in radiation damage to humans. Particularly important is the damage of DNA by electrons, potentially leading to mutagenesis. Molecular-level study of electron interaction with DNA provides information on the damage pathways and dominant mechanisms. Our study of electron-impact ionization of DNA fragments uses the improved binary-encounter dipole model and covers DNA bases, sugar phosphate backbone, and nucleotides. An additivity principle is observed. For example, the sum of the ionization cross sections of the separate deoxyribose and phosphate fragments is in close agreement with the C3(sup prime)- and C5 (sup prime)-deoxyribose-phospate cross sections, differing by less than 5%. Investigation of tandem double lesion initiated by electron-impact dissociative ionization of guanine, followed by proton reaction with the cytosine in the Watson-Crick pair, is currently being studied to see if tandem double lesion can be initiated by electron impact. Up to now only OH-induced tandem double lesion has been studied.

  17. Effect of nickel grid parameters on production of negative hydrogen ions

    SciTech Connect

    Oohara, W.; Yokoyama, H.; Takeda, Toshiaki; Maetani, Y.; Takeda, Takashi; Kawata, K.

    2014-06-15

    Negative hydrogen ions are produced by plasma-assisted catalytic ionization using a nickel grid. When positive ions passing through the grid are decelerated by an electric field, the extraction current density of passing positive ions is sharply reduced by neutralization and negative ionization of the ions. This phenomenon is found to depend on the specific surface area of the grid and the current density.

  18. Physiological ramifications for loggerhead turtles captured in pelagic longlines

    PubMed Central

    Williard, Amanda; Parga, Mariluz; Sagarminaga, Ricardo; Swimmer, Yonat

    2015-01-01

    Bycatch of endangered loggerhead turtles in longline fisheries results in high rates of post-release mortality that may negatively impact populations. The factors contributing to post-release mortality have not been well studied, but traumatic injuries and physiological disturbances experienced as a result of capture are thought to play a role. The goal of our study was to gauge the physiological status of loggerhead turtles immediately upon removal from longline gear in order to refine our understanding of the impacts of capture and the potential for post-release mortality. We analysed blood samples collected from longline- and hand-captured loggerhead turtles, and discovered that capture in longline gear results in blood loss, induction of the systemic stress response, and a moderate increase in lactate. The method by which turtles are landed and released, particularly if released with the hook or line still attached, may exacerbate stress and lead to chronic injuries, sublethal effects or delayed mortality. Our study is the first, to the best of our knowledge, to document the physiological impacts of capture in longline gear, and our findings underscore the importance of best practices gear removal to promote post-release survival in longline-captured turtles. PMID:26490415

  19. Physiological ramifications for loggerhead turtles captured in pelagic longlines.

    PubMed

    Williard, Amanda; Parga, Mariluz; Sagarminaga, Ricardo; Swimmer, Yonat

    2015-10-01

    Bycatch of endangered loggerhead turtles in longline fisheries results in high rates of post-release mortality that may negatively impact populations. The factors contributing to post-release mortality have not been well studied, but traumatic injuries and physiological disturbances experienced as a result of capture are thought to play a role. The goal of our study was to gauge the physiological status of loggerhead turtles immediately upon removal from longline gear in order to refine our understanding of the impacts of capture and the potential for post-release mortality. We analysed blood samples collected from longline- and hand-captured loggerhead turtles, and discovered that capture in longline gear results in blood loss, induction of the systemic stress response, and a moderate increase in lactate. The method by which turtles are landed and released, particularly if released with the hook or line still attached, may exacerbate stress and lead to chronic injuries, sublethal effects or delayed mortality. Our study is the first, to the best of our knowledge, to document the physiological impacts of capture in longline gear, and our findings underscore the importance of best practices gear removal to promote post-release survival in longline-captured turtles.

  20. Carbon Capture and Storage: concluding remarks.

    PubMed

    Maitland, G C

    2016-10-20

    This paper aims to pull together the main points, messages and underlying themes to emerge from the Discussion. It sets these remarks in the context of where Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) fits into the spectrum of carbon mitigation solutions required to meet the challenging greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions reduction targets set by the COP21 climate change conference. The Discussion focused almost entirely on carbon capture (21 out of 23 papers) and covered all the main technology contenders for this except biological processes. It included (chemical) scientists and engineers in equal measure and the Discussion was enriched by the broad content and perspectives this brought. The major underlying theme to emerge was the essential need for closer integration of materials and process design - the use of isolated materials performance criteria in the absence of holistic process modelling for design and optimisation can be misleading. Indeed, combining process and materials simulation for reverse materials molecular engineering to achieve the required process performance and cost constraints is now within reach and is beginning to make a significant impact on optimising CCS and CCU (CO2 utilisation) processes in particular, as it is on materials science and engineering generally. Examples from the Discussion papers are used to illustrate this potential. The take-home messages from a range of other underpinning research themes key to CCUS are also summarised: new capture materials, materials characterisation and screening, process innovation, membranes, industrial processes, net negative emissions processes, the effect of GHG impurities, data requirements, environment sustainability and resource management, and policy. Some key points to emerge concerning carbon transport, utilisation and storage are also included, together with some overarching conclusions on how to develop more energy- and cost-effective CCS processes through improved integration of approach across the

  1. Stability and capture of asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szebehely, V.

    1983-01-01

    The problem of stability of asteroids is treated from the point of view of Hill's stability-concept and using Lyapunov's Characteristic Numbers. The quantitative measure of stability (S) introduced earlier is evaluated for over 300 asteroids and a surprisingly simple relation is established between the semi-major axes of some of the asteroids' orbits and S. A detailed analysis is presented of the Lyapunov Characteristic Numbers for two minor planets and the time-variation of these numbers is discussed. The technology of capture of asteroids is vitally dependent on their orbital stability, therefore, these two problems, i.e., capture and stability, are closely related. In fact, some predictable instabilities may be properly utilized to capture and/or change asteroidal orbits to accomplish collisions with the Earth.

  2. Adaptive capture of expert behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.D.; Barrett, C.L.; Hand, U.; Gordon, R.C.

    1994-08-01

    The authors smoothed and captured a set of expert rules with adaptive networks. The motivation for doing this is discussed. (1) Smoothing leads to stabler control actions. (2) For some sets of rules, the evaluation of the rules can be sped up. This is important in large-scale simulations where many intelligent elements are present. (3) Variability of the intelligent elements can be achieved by adjusting the weights in an adaptive network. (4) After capture has occurred, the weights can be adjusted based on performance criteria. The authors thus have the capability of learning a new set of rules that lead to better performance. The set of rules the authors chose to capture were based on a set of threat determining rules for tank commanders. The approach in this paper: (1) They smoothed the rules. The rule set was converted into a simple set of arithmetic statements. Continuous, non-binary inputs, are now permitted. (2) An operational measure of capturability was developed. (3) They chose four candidate networks for the rule set capture: (a) multi-linear network, (b) adaptive partial least squares, (c) connectionist normalized local spline (CNLS) network, and (d) CNLS net with a PLS preprocessor. These networks were able to capture the rule set to within a few percent. For the simple tank rule set, the multi-linear network performed the best. When the rules were modified to include more nonlinear behavior, CNLS net performed better than the other three nets which made linear assumptions. (4) The networks were tested for robustness to input noise. Noise levels of plus or minus 10% had no real effect on the network performance. Noise levels in the plus or minus 30% range degraded performance by a factor of two. Some performance enhancement occurred when the networks were trained with noisy data. (5) The scaling of the evaluation time was calculated. (6) Human variation can be mimicked in all the networks by perturbing the weights.

  3. HUBBLE SNAPSHOT CAPTURES LIFE CYCLE OF STARS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In this stunning picture of the giant galactic nebula NGC 3603, the crisp resolution of NASA's Hubble Space Telescope captures various stages of the life cycle of stars in one single view. To the upper right of center is the evolved blue supergiant called Sher 25. The star has a unique circumstellar ring of glowing gas that is a galactic twin to the famous ring around the supernova 1987A. The grayish-bluish color of the ring and the bipolar outflows (blobs to the upper right and lower left of the star) indicates the presence of processed (chemically enriched) material. Near the center of the view is a so-called starburst cluster dominated by young, hot Wolf-Rayet stars and early O-type stars. A torrent of ionizing radiation and fast stellar winds from these massive stars has blown a large cavity around the cluster. The most spectacular evidence for the interaction of ionizing radiation with cold molecular-hydrogen cloud material are the giant gaseous pillars to the right and lower left of the cluster. These pillars are sculptured by the same physical processes as the famous pillars Hubble photographed in the M16 Eagle Nebula. Dark clouds at the upper right are so-called Bok globules, which are probably in an earlier stage of star formation. To the lower left of the cluster are two compact, tadpole-shaped emission nebulae. Similar structures were found by Hubble in Orion, and have been interpreted as gas and dust evaporation from possibly protoplanetary disks (proplyds). The 'proplyds' in NGC 3603 are 5 to 10 times larger in size and correspondingly also more massive. This single view nicely illustrates the entire stellar life cycle of stars, starting with the Bok globules and giant gaseous pillars, followed by circumstellar disks, and progressing to evolved massive stars in the young starburst cluster. The blue supergiant with its ring and bipolar outflow marks the end of the life cycle. The color difference between the supergiant's bipolar outflow and the diffuse

  4. Ionizing radiation and cancer prevention.

    PubMed Central

    Hoel, D G

    1995-01-01

    Ionizing radiation long has been recognized as a cause of cancer. Among environmental cancer risks, radiation is unique in the variety of organs and tissues that it can affect. Numerous epidemiological studies with good dosimetry provide the basis for cancer risk estimation, including quantitative information derived from observed dose-response relationships. The amount of cancer attributable to ionizing radiation is difficult to estimate, but numbers such as 1 to 3% have been suggested. Some radiation-induced cancers attributable to naturally occurring exposures, such as cosmic and terrestrial radiation, are not preventable. The major natural radiation exposure, radon, can often be reduced, especially in the home, but not entirely eliminated. Medical use of radiation constitutes the other main category of exposure; because of the importance of its benefits to one's health, the appropriate prevention strategy is to simply work to minimize exposures. PMID:8741791

  5. Asymmetric particle fluxes from drifting ionization zones in sputtering magnetrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panjan, Matjaž; Franz, Robert; Anders, André

    2014-04-01

    Electron and ion fluxes from direct current and high-power impulse magnetron sputtering (dcMS and HiPIMS) plasmas were measured in the plane of the target surface. Biased collector probes and a particle energy and mass analyzer showed asymmetric emission of electrons and of singly and doubly charged ions. For both HiPIMS and dcMS discharges, higher fluxes of all types of particles were observed in the direction of the electrons' E × B drift. These results are put in the context with ionization zones that drift over the magnetron's racetrack. The measured currents of time-resolving collector probes suggest that a large fraction of the ion flux originates from drifting ionization zones, while energy-resolving mass spectrometry indicates that a large fraction of the ion energy is due to acceleration by an electric field. This supports the recently proposed hypothesis that each ionization zone is associated with a negative-positive-negative space charge structure, thereby producing an electric field that accelerates ions from the location where they were formed.

  6. Capture of Tribolium castaneum and Tribolium confusum (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) in Floor Traps: The Effect of Previous Captures.

    PubMed

    Athanassiou, Christos G; Kavallieratos, Nickolas G; Campbell, James F

    2016-02-01

    The impact of prior captures on the trapping performance of floor traps was evaluated for the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae), and the confused flour beetle, Tribolium confusum Jacquelin du Val (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae), in laboratory conditions. The effect of trap seeding, adding adults of the same or different species, was evaluated in order to determine possible effects of prior captures in the trap on each species' behavioral responses. The presence of seeded beetles of the same species resulted in an increase in beetle captures for both T. castaneum and T. confusum, but when traps were seeded with the opposite species, there was no increase in beetle captures for either species, and for T. castaneum overall captures in both seeded and unseeded traps was reduced. Overall, T. castaneum tended to have greater captures than T. confusum regardless of the treatment. When the two species were released together, this negated the increased response to seeded traps observed in the single-species treatments. These findings suggest the potential that the presence of beetles in a trap may be influencing the response of beetles in a nearby trap and that T. castaneum and T. confusum when they occur together may influence each other's response to traps.

  7. High brilliance negative ion and neutral beam source

    DOEpatents

    Compton, Robert N.

    1991-01-01

    A high brilliance mass selected (Z-selected) negative ion and neutral beam source having good energy resolution. The source is based upon laser resonance ionization of atoms or molecules in a small gaseous medium followed by charge exchange through an alkali oven. The source is capable of producing microampere beams of an extremely wide variety of negative ions, and milliampere beams when operated in the pulsed mode.

  8. Low-density ionization behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, G.A. Jr.

    1995-04-01

    As part of a continuing study of the physics of matter under extreme conditions, I give some results on matter at extremely low density. In particular I compare a quantum mechanical calculation of the pressure for atomic hydrogen with the corresponding pressure given by Thomas-Fermi theory. (This calculation differs from the ``confined atom`` approximation in a physically significant way.) Since Thomas-Fermi theory in some sense, represents the case of infinite nuclear charge, these cases should represent extremes. Comparison is also made with Saha theory, which considers ionization from a chemical point of view, but is weak on excited-state effects. In this theory, the pressure undergoes rapid variation as electron ionization levels are passed. This effect is in contrast to the smooth behavior of the Thomas-Fermi fixed temperature, complete ionization occurs in the low density limit, I study the case where the temperature goes appropriately to zero with the density. Although considerable modification is required, Saha theory is closer to the actual results for this case than is Thomas-Fermi theory.

  9. Theory of dissociative tunneling ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svensmark, Jens; Tolstikhin, Oleg I.; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2016-05-01

    We present a theoretical study of the dissociative tunneling ionization process. Analytic expressions for the nuclear kinetic energy distribution of the ionization rates are derived. A particularly simple expression for the spectrum is found by using the Born-Oppenheimer (BO) approximation in conjunction with the reflection principle. These spectra are compared to exact non-BO ab initio spectra obtained through model calculations with a quantum mechanical treatment of both the electronic and nuclear degrees of freedom. In the regime where the BO approximation is applicable, imaging of the BO nuclear wave function is demonstrated to be possible through reverse use of the reflection principle, when accounting appropriately for the electronic ionization rate. A qualitative difference between the exact and BO wave functions in the asymptotic region of large electronic distances is shown. Additionally, the behavior of the wave function across the turning line is seen to be reminiscent of light refraction. For weak fields, where the BO approximation does not apply, the weak-field asymptotic theory describes the spectrum accurately.

  10. Polarization phenomena in multiphoton ionization of atoms.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, V. L.

    1973-01-01

    The theory of multiphoton ionization for an atomic system of arbitrary complexity is developed using a density matrix formalism. An expression is obtained which determines the differential N-photon ionization cross section as a function of the polarization states of the target atom and the incident radiation. The parameters which characterize the photo-electron angular distribution are related to the general reduced matrix elements for the N-photon transition. Two-photon ionization of unpolarized atoms is treated as an illustration of the use of the theory. The dependence of the multiphoton ionization cross section on the polarization state of the incident radiation, which has been observed in two- and three-photon ionization of Cs, is accounted for by the theory. Finally, the photoelectron spin polarization produced by the multiphoton ionization of unpolarized atoms, like the analogous polarization resulting from single-photon ionization, is found to depend on the circular polarization of the incident radiation.

  11. Polarization phenomena in multiphoton ionization of atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, V. L.

    1973-01-01

    The theory of multiphoton ionization for an atomic system of arbitrary complexity is developed using a density matrix formalism. An expression is obtained which determines the differential N-photon ionization cross section as a function of the polarization states of the target atom and the incident radiation. The parameters which characterize the photoelectron angular distribution are related to the general reduced matrix elements for the N-photon transition. Two-photon ionization of unpolarized atoms is treated as an illustration of the use of the theory. The dependence of the multiphoton ionization cross section on the polarization state of the incident radiation, which has been observed in two- and three-photon ionization of Cs, is accounted for by the theory. Finally, the photoelectron spin polarization produced by the multiphoton ionization of unpolarized atoms, like the analogous polarization resulting from single-photon ionization, is found to depend on the circular polarization of the incident radiation.

  12. Drifting potential humps in ionization zones: The ``propeller blades'' of high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anders, André; Panjan, Matjaž; Franz, Robert; Andersson, Joakim; Ni, Pavel

    2013-09-01

    Ion energy distribution functions measured for high power impulse magnetron sputtering show features, such as a broad peak at several 10 eV with an extended tail, as well as asymmetry with respect to E ×B, where E and B are the local electric and magnetic field vectors, respectively. Here it is proposed that those features are due to the formation of a potential hump of several 10 V in each of the traveling ionization zones. Potential hump formation is associated with a negative-positive-negative space charge that naturally forms in ionization zones driven by energetic drifting electrons.

  13. Ambient aerodynamic ionization source for remote analyte sampling and mass spectrometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Dixon, R Brent; Sampson, Jason S; Hawkridge, Adam M; Muddiman, David C

    2008-07-01

    The use of aerodynamic devices in ambient ionization source development has become increasingly prevalent in the field of mass spectrometry. In this study, an air ejector has been constructed from inexpensive, commercially available components to incorporate an electrospray ionization emitter within the exhaust jet of the device. This novel aerodynamic device, herein termed remote analyte sampling, transport, and ionization relay (RASTIR) was used to remotely sample neutral species in the ambient and entrain them into an electrospray plume where they were subsequently ionized and detected using a linear ion trap Fourier transform mass spectrometer. Two sets of experiments were performed in the ambient environment to demonstrate the device's utility. The first involved the remote (approximately 1 ft) vacuum collection of pure sample particulates (i.e., dry powder) from a glass slide, entrainment and ionization at the ESI emitter, and mass spectrometric detection. The second experiment involved the capture (vacuum collection) of matrix-assisted laser desorbed proteins followed by entrainment in the ESI emitter plume, multiple charging, and mass spectrometric detection. This approach is in principle a RASTIR-assisted matrix-assisted laser desorption electrospray ionization source (Sampson, J. S.; Hawkridge, A. M.; Muddiman, D. C. J. Am. Soc. Mass Spectrom. 2006, 17, 1712-1716; Rapid Commun. Mass Spectrom. 2007, 21, 1150-1154.). A detailed description of the device construction, operational parameters, and preliminary small molecule and protein data are presented.

  14. Nest visits and capture events affect breeding success of Yellow-billed and Pacific loons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Uher-Koch, Brian D.; Schmutz, Joel A.; Wright, Kenneth G.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate estimates of breeding success are essential for understanding population dynamics and for managing populations. Unfortunately, research activities to collect these data can negatively impact the breeding success of the study species and bias estimates of breeding success. Despite the potential for negative impacts, few studies have documented the effect of capturing incubating adults on nest survival or compared nest survival following different capture methods. In this study we evaluate the impacts of investigator disturbance associated with captures and nest visits on nest survival of Yellow-billed Loons (Gavia adamsii) and Pacific Loons (Gavia pacifica) in the National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska (NPR-A), an area of conservation concern, in 2011–2013. In an effort to reduce capture-related nest failures, we developed a new suspended dive net technique to catch territorial aquatic birds while off their nests. We then compared nest survival following suspended dive net captures to bow-net trap captures of breeding adult loons. Daily nest survival following bow-net trap or suspended dive net capture was about 30% lower than when adults were not captured. The effect of captures on nest survival was similar between bow-net trap and suspended dive net capture methods. Nest visits without captures also negatively impacted nest survival, although less than captures. If not accounted for, nest visitation biased daily survival rates of nests downward 6%. Effects of investigator disturbance did not differ by species or between years. Our results suggest that any source of disturbance that displaces incubating adult loons could potentially reduce nest survival. To maximize breeding success, human disturbance factors should be limited near loon nests.

  15. EDOS Data Capture for ALOS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLemore, Bruce; Cordier, Guy R.; Wood, Terri; Gamst, Harek

    2012-01-01

    In 2008, NASA's Earth Sciences Missions Operations (ESMO) at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) directed the Earth Observing System Data Operations System (EDOS) project to provide a prototype system to assess the feasibility of high rate data capture for the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's (JAXA) Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) spacecraft via NASA's Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS). The key objective of this collaborative effort between NASA and JAXA was to share science data collected over North and South America previously unavailable due to limitations in ALOS downlink capacity. EDOS provided a single system proof-of-concept in 4 months at White Sands TDRS Ground Terminal The system captured 6 ALOS events error-free at 277 Mbps and delivered the data to the Alaska Satellite Facility (ASF) within 3 hours (May/June '08). This paper describes the successful rapid prototyping approach which led to a successful demonstration and agreement between NASA and JAXA for operational support. The design of the operational system will be discussed with emphasis on concurrent high-rate data capture, Level-O processing, real-time display and high-rate delivery with stringent latency requirements. A similar solution was successfully deployed at Svalbard, Norway to support the Suomi NPP launch (October 2011) and capture all X-band data and provide a 30-day backup archive.

  16. Average local ionization energy generalized to correlated wavefunctions

    SciTech Connect

    Ryabinkin, Ilya G.; Staroverov, Viktor N.

    2014-08-28

    The average local ionization energy function introduced by Politzer and co-workers [Can. J. Chem. 68, 1440 (1990)] as a descriptor of chemical reactivity has a limited utility because it is defined only for one-determinantal self-consistent-field methods such as the Hartree–Fock theory and the Kohn–Sham density-functional scheme. We reinterpret the negative of the average local ionization energy as the average total energy of an electron at a given point and, by rewriting this quantity in terms of reduced density matrices, arrive at its natural generalization to correlated wavefunctions. The generalized average local electron energy turns out to be the diagonal part of the coordinate representation of the generalized Fock operator divided by the electron density; it reduces to the original definition in terms of canonical orbitals and their eigenvalues for one-determinantal wavefunctions. The discussion is illustrated with calculations on selected atoms and molecules at various levels of theory.

  17. Double gate impact ionization MOS transistor: Proposal and investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhaonian; Zhang, Yue; Yang, Yuan; Yu, Ningmei

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, a double gate impact ionization MOS (DG-IMOS) transistor with improved performance is proposed and investigated by TCAD simulation. In the proposed design, a second gate is introduced in a conventional impact ionization MOS (IMOS) transistor that lengthens the equivalent channel length and suppresses the band-to-band tunneling. The OFF-state leakage current is reduced by over four orders of magnitude. At the ON-state, the second gate is negatively biased in order to enhance the electric field in the intrinsic region. As a result, the operating voltage does not increase with the increase in the channel length. The simulation result verifies that the proposed DG-IMOS achieves a better switching characteristic than the conventional is achieved. Lastly, the application of the DG-IMOS is discussed theoretically.

  18. Reduced attentional capture in action video game players.

    PubMed

    Chisholm, Joseph D; Hickey, Clayton; Theeuwes, Jan; Kingstone, Alan

    2010-04-01

    Recent studies indicate that playing action video games improves performance on a number of attention-based tasks. However, it remains unclear whether action video game experience primarily affects endogenous or exogenous forms of spatial orienting. To examine this issue, action video game players and non-action video game players performed an attentional capture task. The results show that action video game players responded quicker than non-action video game players, both when a target appeared in isolation and when a salient, task-irrelevant distractor was present in the display. Action video game players additionally showed a smaller capture effect than did non-action video game players. When coupled with the findings of previous studies, the collective evidence indicates that extensive experience with action video games may enhance players' top-down attentional control, which, in turn, can modulate the negative effects of bottom-up attentional capture.

  19. Mycobacteriophage cell binding proteins for the capture of mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Arutyunov, Denis; Singh, Upasana; El-Hawiet, Amr; Seckler, Henrique dos Santos; Nikjah, Sanaz; Joe, Maju; Bai, Yu; Lowary, Todd L; Klassen, John S; Evoy, Stephane; Szymanski, Christine M

    2014-01-01

    Slow growing Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) causes a deadly condition in cattle known as Johne's disease where asymptomatic carriers are the major source of disease transmission. MAP was also shown to be associated with chronic Crohn's disease in humans. Mycobacterium smegmatis is a model mycobacterium that can cause opportunistic infections in a number of human tissues and, rarely, a respiratory disease. Currently, there are no rapid, culture-independent, reliable and inexpensive tests for the diagnostics of MAP or M. smegmatis infections. Bacteriophages are viruses producing a number of proteins that effectively and specifically recognize the cell envelopes of their bacterial hosts. We demonstrate that the mycobacterial phage L5 minor tail protein Gp6 and lysin Gp10 are useful tools for the rapid capture of mycobacteria. Immobilized Gp10 was able to bind both MAP and M. smegmatis cells whereas Gp6 was M. smegmatis specific. Neither of the 2 proteins was able to capture E. coli, salmonella, campylobacter or Mycobacterium marinum cells. Gp6 was detected previously as a component of the phage particle and shows no homology to proteins with known function. Therefore, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry was used to determine whether recombinant Gp6 could bind to a number of chemically synthesized fragments of mycobacterial surface glycans. These findings demonstrate that mycobacteriophage proteins could be used as a pathogen capturing platform that can potentially improve the effectiveness of existing diagnostic methods. PMID:26713219

  20. The susceptibility of TaOx-based memristors to high dose rate ionizing radiation and total ionizing dose

    DOE PAGES

    McLain, Michael Lee; Sheridan, Timothy J.; Hjalmarson, Harold Paul; ...

    2014-11-11

    This paper investigates the effects of high dose rate ionizing radiation and total ionizing dose (TID) on tantalum oxide (TaOx) memristors. Transient data were obtained during the pulsed exposures for dose rates ranging from approximately 5.0 ×107 rad(Si)/s to 4.7 ×108 rad(Si)/s and for pulse widths ranging from 50 ns to 50 μs. The cumulative dose in these tests did not appear to impact the observed dose rate response. Static dose rate upset tests were also performed at a dose rate of ~3.0 ×108 rad(Si)/s. This is the first dose rate study on any type of memristive memory technology. Inmore » addition to assessing the tolerance of TaOx memristors to high dose rate ionizing radiation, we also evaluated their susceptibility to TID. The data indicate that it is possible for the devices to switch from a high resistance off-state to a low resistance on-state in both dose rate and TID environments. The observed radiation-induced switching is dependent on the irradiation conditions and bias configuration. Furthermore, the dose rate or ionizing dose level at which a device switches resistance states varies from device to device; the enhanced susceptibility observed in some devices is still under investigation. As a result, numerical simulations are used to qualitatively capture the observed transient radiation response and provide insight into the physics of the induced current/voltages.« less

  1. Orbital electron capture by the nucleus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bambynek, W.; Behrens, H.; Chen, M. H.; Crasemann, B.; Fitzpatrick, M. L.; Ledingham, K. W. D.; Genz, H.; Mutterer, M.; Intemann, R. L.

    1976-01-01

    The theory of nuclear electron capture is reviewed in the light of current understanding of weak interactions. Experimental methods and results regarding capture probabilities, capture ratios, and EC/Beta(+) ratios are summarized. Radiative electron capture is discussed, including both theory and experiment. Atomic wave function overlap and electron exchange effects are covered, as are atomic transitions that accompany nuclear electron capture. Tables are provided to assist the reader in determining quantities of interest for specific cases.

  2. Culture-negative endocarditis

    MedlinePlus

    ... inflammation of the lining of one or more heart valves, but no endocarditis-causing germs can be found ... the heart, where they can settle on damaged heart valves. Alternative Names Endocarditis (culture-negative) Images Culture-negative ...

  3. Apparatus for separating particles utilizing engineered acoustic contrast capture particles

    DOEpatents

    Kaduchak, Gregory; Ward, Michael D

    2016-05-17

    An apparatus for separating particles from a medium includes a capillary defining a flow path therein that is in fluid communication with a medium source. The medium source includes engineered acoustic contrast capture particle having a predetermined acoustic contrast. The apparatus includes a vibration generator that is operable to produce at least one acoustic field within the flow path. The acoustic field produces a force potential minima for positive acoustic contrast particles and a force potential minima for negative acoustic contrast particles in the flow path and drives the engineered acoustic contrast capture particles to either the force potential minima for positive acoustic contrast particles or the force potential minima for negative acoustic contrast particles.

  4. Apparatus for separating particles utilizing engineered acoustic contrast capture particles

    DOEpatents

    Kaduchak, Gregory; Ward, Michael D.

    2011-12-27

    An apparatus for separating particles from a medium includes a capillary defining a flow path therein that is in fluid communication with a medium source. The medium source includes engineered acoustic contrast capture particle having a predetermined acoustic contrast. The apparatus includes a vibration generator that is operable to produce at least one acoustic field within the flow path. The acoustic field produces a force potential minima for positive acoustic contrast particles and a force potential minima for negative acoustic contrast particles in the flow path and drives the engineered acoustic contrast capture particles to either the force potential minima for positive acoustic contrast particles or the force potential minima for negative acoustic contrast particles.

  5. Apparatus for separating particles utilizing engineered acoustic contrast capture particles

    SciTech Connect

    Kaduchak, Gregory; Ward, Michael D

    2014-10-21

    An apparatus for separating particles from a medium includes a capillary defining a flow path therein that is in fluid communication with a medium source. The medium source includes engineered acoustic contrast capture particle having a predetermined acoustic contrast. The apparatus includes a vibration generator that is operable to produce at least one acoustic field within the flow path. The acoustic field produces a force potential minima for positive acoustic contrast particles and a force potential minima for negative acoustic contrast particles in the flow path and drives the engineered acoustic contrast capture particles to either the force potential minima for positive acoustic contrast particles or the force potential minima for negative acoustic contrast particles.

  6. Negative ion generator

    DOEpatents

    Stinnett, Regan W.

    1984-01-01

    A negative ion generator is formed from a magnetically insulated transmission line having a coating of graphite on the cathode for producing negative ions and a plurality of apertures on the opposed anode for the release of negative ions. Magnetic insulation keeps electrons from flowing from the cathode to the anode. A transverse magnetic field removes electrons which do escape through the apertures from the trajectory of the negative ions.

  7. Negative ion generator

    DOEpatents

    Stinnett, R.W.

    1984-05-08

    A negative ion generator is formed from a magnetically insulated transmission line having a coating of graphite on the cathode for producing negative ions and a plurality of apertures on the opposed anode for the release of negative ions. Magnetic insulation keeps electrons from flowing from the cathode to the anode. A transverse magnetic field removes electrons which do escape through the apertures from the trajectory of the negative ions. 8 figs.

  8. Comparison of the sensitivity of mass spectrometry atmospheric pressure ionization techniques in the analysis of porphyrinoids.

    PubMed

    Swider, Paweł; Lewtak, Jan P; Gryko, Daniel T; Danikiewicz, Witold

    2013-10-01

    The porphyrinoids chemistry is greatly dependent on the data obtained in mass spectrometry. For this reason, it is essential to determine the range of applicability of mass spectrometry ionization methods. In this study, the sensitivity of three different atmospheric pressure ionization techniques, electrospray ionization, atmospheric pressure chemical ionization and atmospheric pressure photoionization, was tested for several porphyrinods and their metallocomplexes. Electrospray ionization method was shown to be the best ionization technique because of its high sensitivity for derivatives of cyanocobalamin, free-base corroles and porphyrins. In the case of metallocorroles and metalloporphyrins, atmospheric pressure photoionization with dopant proved to be the most sensitive ionization method. It was also shown that for relatively acidic compounds, particularly for corroles, the negative ion mode provides better sensitivity than the positive ion mode. The results supply a lot of relevant information on the methodology of porphyrinoids analysis carried out by mass spectrometry. The information can be useful in designing future MS or liquid chromatography-MS experiments.

  9. Atomic electron excitation probabilities during orbital electron capture by the nucleus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crasemann, B.; Chen, M. H.; Briand, J. P.; Chevallier, P.; Chetioui, A.; Tavernier, M.

    1979-01-01

    Approximate probabilities of electron excitation (shakeup/shakeoff) from various atomic states during nuclear ns electron capture have been calculated in the sudden approximation, using Hartree-Fock wave functions. Total excitation probabilities are much lower than during inner-shell ionization by photons or electrons, and ns states are more likely to be excited than np states. This latter result is borne out by K-alpha X-ray satellite spectra.

  10. Sentential Negation in English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mowarin, Macaulay

    2009-01-01

    This paper undertakes a detailed analysis of sentential negation in the English language with Chomsky's Government-Binding theory of Transformational Grammar as theoretical model. It distinguishes between constituent and sentential negation in English. The essay identifies the exact position of Negation phrase in an English clause structure. It…

  11. An improved leakage current compensation technique for a 4πγ ionization chamber system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hino, Y.; Kawada, Y.; Nazaroh

    1996-02-01

    A current integration method using a small capacitor is most commonly employed for precise measurements of small currents from 4πγ ionization chambers for the secondary standardization of radionuclides. An improved technique has been developed for eliminating the possible effect due to the electrical leakage and/or current loss across the feedback capacitor used in the integration of the ionization current. This method is based upon charge integration from a fixed negative level of potential to nearly the same level of positive potential via the zero point. The validity of this method is demonstrated for some typical applications of 4πγ ionization chamber systems. This technique can contribute to the improvement of accuracy and to the extension of the intensity range of radioactive source in 4πγ ionization measurement.

  12. Ionizing Radiation and Its Risks

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Marvin

    1982-01-01

    Penetrating ionizing radiation fairly uniformly puts all exposed molecules and cells at approximately equal risk for deleterious consequences. Thus, the original deposition of radiation energy (that is, the dose) is unaltered by metabolic characteristics of cells and tissue, unlike the situation for chemical agents. Intensely ionizing radiations, such as neutrons and alpha particles, are up to ten times more damaging than sparsely ionizing sources such as x-rays or gamma rays for equivalent doses. Furthermore, repair in cells and tissues can ameliorate the consequences of radiation doses delivered at lower rates by up to a factor of ten compared with comparable doses acutely delivered, especially for somatic (carcinogenic) and genetic effects from x- and gamma-irradiation exposure. Studies on irradiated laboratory animals or on people following occupational, medical or accidental exposures point to an average lifetime fatal cancer risk of about 1 × 10-4 per rem of dose (100 per 106 person-rem). Leukemia and lung, breast and thyroid cancer seem more likely than other types of cancer to be produced by radiation. Radiation exposures from natural sources (cosmic rays and terrestrial radioactivity) of about 0.1 rem per year yield a lifetime cancer risk about 0.1 percent of the normally occurring 20 percent risk of cancer death. An increase of about 1 percent per rem in fatal cancer risk, or 200 rem to double the “background” risk rate, is compared with an estimate of about 100 rem to double the genetic risk. Newer data suggest that the risks for low-level radiation are lower than risks estimated from data from high exposures and that the present 5 rem per year limit for workers is adequate. PMID:6761969

  13. Natural materials for carbon capture.

    SciTech Connect

    Myshakin, Evgeniy M.; Romanov, Vyacheslav N.; Cygan, Randall Timothy

    2010-11-01

    Naturally occurring clay minerals provide a distinctive material for carbon capture and carbon dioxide sequestration. Swelling clay minerals, such as the smectite variety, possess an aluminosilicate structure that is controlled by low-charge layers that readily expand to accommodate water molecules and, potentially, carbon dioxide. Recent experimental studies have demonstrated the efficacy of intercalating carbon dioxide in the interlayer of layered clays but little is known about the molecular mechanisms of the process and the extent of carbon capture as a function of clay charge and structure. A series of molecular dynamics simulations and vibrational analyses have been completed to assess the molecular interactions associated with incorporation of CO2 in the interlayer of montmorillonite clay and to help validate the models with experimental observation.

  14. Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wefel, John P.

    1998-01-01

    This is the final report for NASA grant NAGW-4577, "Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC)". This grant covered a joint project between LSU and the University of Maryland for a Concept Study of a new type of fully active calorimeter to be used to measure the energy spectra of very high energy cosmic rays, particularly Hydrogen and Helium, to beyond 1014 eV. This very high energy region has been studied with emulsion chamber techniques, but never investigated with electronic calorimeters. Technology had advanced to the point that a fully active calorimeter based upon Bismuth Germanate (BGO) scintillating crystals appeared feasible for balloon flight (and eventually space) experiments.

  15. The Tevatron Ionization Profile Monitors

    SciTech Connect

    Jansson, A.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Bowie, K.; Kwarciany, R.; Lundberg, C.; Slimmer, D.; Valerio, L.; Zagel, J.; /Fermilab

    2006-05-01

    In designing an ionization profile monitor system for the Tevatron some novel approaches were taken, in particular for the readout electronics. This was motivated by the desire to resolve the individual bunches in both beams simultaneously. For this purpose, custom made electronics originally developed for Particle Physics experiments was used to provide a fast charge integration with very low noise. The various parts of the read-out electronics have been borrowed or adapted from the KTev, CMS, MINOS and BTev experiments. The detector itself also had to be modified to provide clean signals with sufficient bandwidth. The system design will be described along with the initial results.

  16. XUV ionization of aligned molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Kelkensberg, F.; Siu, W.; Gademann, G.; Rouzee, A.; Vrakking, M. J. J.; Johnsson, P.; Lucchini, M.; Lucchese, R. R.

    2011-11-15

    New extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) light sources such as high-order-harmonic generation (HHG) and free-electron lasers (FELs), combined with laser-induced alignment techniques, enable novel methods for making molecular movies based on measuring molecular frame photoelectron angular distributions. Experiments are presented where CO{sub 2} molecules were impulsively aligned using a near-infrared laser and ionized using femtosecond XUV pulses obtained by HHG. Measured electron angular distributions reveal contributions from four orbitals and the onset of the influence of the molecular structure.

  17. Superponderomotive regime of tunneling ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, D. F.; Palastro, J. P.; Hafizi, B.

    2017-03-01

    Ultrarelativistic photoelectron spectra exhibit unexpected characteristics in a paraxial laser focus. The photoelectron energy scales superponderomotively, and the usual parabolic momentum distribution is distorted into a variety of intricate patterns, depending on the location of the ion. These patterns include discrete contours, which in some cases can be easily identified with a particular subcycle burst of ionization current. An analytical formula for the maximum photoelectron energy in a paraxial radiation field is given, and high-resolution momentum distributions with narrowly peaked features are presented. These narrowly peaked features suggest application to electron injection into plasma-based accelerators.

  18. Proton Capture on 12C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goerres, Joachim; Kettner, Karl-Ulrich; Becker, Hans-Werner; Deboer, Richard J.; Uberseder, Ethan; Wiescher, Michael C.

    2014-09-01

    During explosive Hydrogen burning the 12C(p, γ)13N reaction is the entry point which injects 12C, newly produced by the triple α-process, into the hot CNO cycle. At solar temperatures this reaction is one of the two sources for neutrinos within the CNO cycle whose observation would provide a test for the SSM. The capture cross section is determined by 2 resonances, the direct capture to the ground state as well as interferences between these components. To investigate uncertainties found in the literature for the 1.7 MeV resonance we have measured this reaction in the energy of 1.2 to 2.5 MeV. Detailed excitation functions were measured at 0° and 55° and complemented by angular distributions measured in 100 keV steps. The results of this experiment will be reported together with R-matrix fits over the entire energy range of astrophysical interest. During explosive Hydrogen burning the 12C(p, γ)13N reaction is the entry point which injects 12C, newly produced by the triple α-process, into the hot CNO cycle. At solar temperatures this reaction is one of the two sources for neutrinos within the CNO cycle whose observation would provide a test for the SSM. The capture cross section is determined by 2 resonances, the direct capture to the ground state as well as interferences between these components. To investigate uncertainties found in the literature for the 1.7 MeV resonance we have measured this reaction in the energy of 1.2 to 2.5 MeV. Detailed excitation functions were measured at 0° and 55° and complemented by angular distributions measured in 100 keV steps. The results of this experiment will be reported together with R-matrix fits over the entire energy range of astrophysical interest. Supported by the Nation Science Foundation.

  19. Spacecraft capture and docking system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kong, Kinyuen (Inventor); Rafeek, Shaheed (Inventor); Myrick, Thomas (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A system for capturing and docking an active craft to a passive craft has a first docking assembly on the active craft with a first contact member and a spike projecting outwardly, a second docking assembly on the passive craft having a second contact member and a flexible net deployed over a target area with an open mesh for capturing the end of the spike of the active craft, and a motorized net drive for reeling in the net and active craft to mate with the passive craft's docking assembly. The spike has extendable tabs to allow it to become engaged with the net. The net's center is coupled to a net spool for reeling in. An alignment funnel has inclined walls to guide the net and captured spike towards the net spool. The passive craft's docking assembly includes circumferentially spaced preload wedges which are driven to lock the wedges against the contact member of the active craft. The active craft's docking assembly includes a rotary table and drive for rotating it to a predetermined angular alignment position, and mating connectors are then engaged with each other. The system may be used for docking spacecraft in zero or low-gravity environments, as well as for docking underwater vehicles, docking of ancillary craft to a mother craft in subsonic flight, in-flight refueling systems, etc.

  20. Electron ionization of H2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Simon J.; Price, Stephen D.

    2008-11-01

    Relative partial ionization cross-sections and precursor-specific relative partial ionization cross-sections for fragment ions formed by electron ionization of H2O have been measured using time-of-flight mass spectrometry coupled with a 2D ion coincidence technique. We report data for the formation of H+, H2+, O2+, O+ and OH+ relative to the formation of H2O+, as a function of ionizing electron energy from 30 to 200 eV. This data includes, for the first time, measurements on the formation all positive ion pairs and ion triples by dissociative multiple electron ionization of H2O. Through determinations of the kinetic energy release involved in ion pair formation we provide further evidence that indirect processes contribute significantly to the yield of H+ + OH+ ion pairs below the vertical double ionization threshold.

  1. Atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization source

    DOEpatents

    McLuckey, S.A.; Glish, G.L.

    1989-07-18

    An atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization source that can be used in combination with an analytical instrument which operates at high vacuum, such as a mass spectrometer. The atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization source comprises a chamber with at least one pair of electrodes disposed therein, an inlet for a gaseous sample to be analyzed and an outlet communicating with an analyzer which operates at subatmospheric pressure. The ionization chamber is maintained at a pressure below atmospheric pressure, and a voltage difference is applied across the electrodes to induce a glow discharge between the electrodes, so that molecules passing through the inlet are ionized by the glow discharge and directed into the analyzer. The ionization source accepts the sample under atmospheric pressure conditions and processes it directly into the high vacuum instrument, bridging the pressure gap and drawing off unwanted atmospheric gases. The invention also includes a method for analyzing a gaseous sample using the glow discharge ionization source described above. 3 figs.

  2. An experimental investigation of mesospheric ionization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    Mesospheric ionization and its variability are examined. Data were obtained primarily by the parachute-borne blunt probe technique conducted in coordinated rocket experiments at White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico and Wallops Island, Virginia. Electrical conductivity measurements and deduced charge density values from ten rocket launches are presented and discussed. Positive ion conductivity and electron density were found to be relatively invariant with height between 45 and 60 km. Variations in positive conductivity of a factor of two and enhancements in negative conductivity by as much as a factor of four were measured by the blunt probe. A simple lumped parameter ion chemistry model is shown to satisfactorily explain the charge density values for the undisturbed lower D-region. Implications of the data in terms of this model are considered. The principal loss mechanism for positive ions in the 45 to 60 km. region is concluded to be dissociative recombination. Electron densities deduced from the conductivity data are explained by detachment involving a minor neutral constituent which is mixed between 65 and 45 km. and then cuts off sharply below 45 km. A correlation study involving blunt probe measurements shows relatively good agreement between variations in positive conductivity and temperature.

  3. Negative symptoms: psychopathological models.

    PubMed Central

    Ananth, J; Djenderdjian, A; Shamasunder, P; Costa, J; Herrera, J; Sramek, J

    1991-01-01

    The psychopathological manifestations of schizophrenia have been broadly divided into positive and negative symptom groups. Even though there is no definitive consensus, psychomotor agitation, motor excitement, hallucinations, delusions and thought disorder constitute positive and psychomotor retardation, amotivation, apathy and decreased emotional expression are grouped into negative symptoms. The negative symptoms have been reported to appear late in the course of the illness and resistant to treatment with neuroleptics. While these claims have not been substantiated, the current interest on negative symptoms is related to the fact that many nonfunctioning institutionalized as well as ambulatory schizophrenics manifest negative symptoms. As chronic psychiatric beds have become scarce, many patients with negative symptoms who were harbored in the chronic mental hospitals have been released to the community care and some of these patients live on the streets. Thus their visibility has challenged psychiatry to focus its efforts on the etiology and treatment of negative symptoms. PMID:2049366

  4. Sequential binary collision ionization mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Boeyen, R. W.; Watanabe, N.; Doering, J. P.; Moore, J. H.; Coplan, M. A.; Cooper, J. W.

    2004-03-01

    Fully differential cross sections for the electron-impact ionization of the magnesium 3s orbital have been measured in a high-momentum-transfer regime wherein the ionization mechanisms can be accurately described by simple binary collision models. Measurements where performed at incident-electron energies from 400 to 3000 eV, ejected-electron energies of 62 eV, scattering angle of 20 °, and momentum transfers of 2 to 5 a.u. In the out-of-plane geometry of the experiment the cross section is observed far off the Bethe ridge. Both first- and second-order processes can be clearly distinguished as previously observed by Murray et al [Ref. 1] and Schulz et al [Ref. 2]. Owing to the relatively large momentum of the ejected electron, the second order processes can be modeled as sequential binary collisions involving a binary elastic collision between the incident electron and ionic core and a binary knock-out collision between the incident electron and target electron. At low incident-electron energies the cross section for both first and second order processes are comparable, while at high incident energies second-order processes dominate. *Supported by NSF under grant PHY-99-87870. [1] A. J. Murray, M. B. J. Woolf, and F. H. Read J. Phys. B 25, 3021 (1992). [2] M. Schulz, R. Moshammer, D. Fischer, H. Kollmus, D. H. Madison. S. Jones and J. Ullrich, Nature 422, 48 (2003).

  5. Ionizing radiation and orthopaedic prostheses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimnac, Clare M.; Kurtz, Steven M.

    2005-07-01

    Ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) materials have been used successfully as one half of the bearing couple (against metallic alloys or ceramics) in total hip and total knee joint replacements for four decades. This review describes the impact of ionizing radiation (used for sterilization and for microstructural modification via crosslinking) on the performance of UHMWPE total joint replacement components. Gamma radiation sterilization in air leads to oxidative degradation of UHMWPE joint components that occurs during shelf-aging and also during in vivo use. Efforts to mitigate oxidative degradation of UHMWPE joint components include gamma radiation sterilization in inert barrier-packaging and processing treatments to reduce free radicals. Ionizing radiation (both gamma and electron-beam) has recently been used to form highly crosslinked UHMWPEs that have better adhesive and abrasive wear resistance than non-crosslinked UHMWPE, thereby potentially improving the long-term performance of total joint replacements. Along with increased wear resistance, however, there are deleterious changes to ductility and fracture resistance of UHMWPE, and an increased risk of fracture of these components remains a clinical concern.

  6. Ionization probes of molecular structure and chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, P.M.

    1993-12-01

    Various photoionization processes provide very sensitive probes for the detection and understanding of the spectra of molecules relevant to combustion processes. The detection of ionization can be selective by using resonant multiphoton ionization or by exploiting the fact that different molecules have different sets of ionization potentials. Therefore, the structure and dynamics of individual molecules can be studied even in a mixed sample. The authors are continuing to develop methods for the selective spectroscopic detection of molecules by ionization, and to use these methods for the study of some molecules of combustion interest.

  7. Initial results of positron ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donohue, D. L.; Hulett, L. D., Jr.; Mcluckey, S. A.; Glish, G. L.; Eckenrode, B. A.

    1990-01-01

    The use of monoenergetic positrons for the ionization of organic molecules in the gas phase is described. The ionic products are analyzed with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer and detected to produce a mass spectrum. The ionization mechanisms which can be studied in this way include positron impact at energies above the ionization limit of the target molecules, positronium formation in the Ore gap energy range, and positron attachment at energies less than 1eV. The technique of positron ionization mass spectrometry (PIMS) may have analytical utility in that chemical selectivity is observed for one or more of these processes.

  8. Simulation Based on Ion Propulsion Rocket System with Using Negative ion - Negative Ion Pair Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathiyavel, C.

    2016-07-01

    Ion propulsion rocket system is expected to become popular with the development of ion-ion pair techniques because of their stimulated of low propellant, Design of Thrust range is 1N with low electric power and high efficiency. A Negative ion-Negative ion pair of ion propulsion rocket system is proposed in this work .Negative Ion Based Rocket system consists of three parts 1.ionization chamber 2. Repulsion force and ion accelerator 3. Exhaust of Nozzle. The Negative ions from electro negatively gas are produced by attachment of the gas ,such as chlorine with electron emitted from a Electron gun ionization chamber. The formulate of large stable negative ion is achievable in chlorine gas with respect to electron affinity (∆E). The electron affinity is a measure of the energy change when an electron is added to a neutral atom to form a negative ion. When a neutral chlorine atom in the gaseous form picks up an electron to form a Cl- ion, it releases energy of 349 kJ/mol or 3.6 ev/atom. It is said to have an electron affinity of -349 kJ/mol ,the negative sign indicating that energy is released during this process .The mechanisms of attachment involve the formation of intermediate states. In that reason for , the highly repulsive force created between the same negative ions. The distance between same negative ions is important for the evaluate of the rocket thrust and is also determined by the exhaust velocity of the propellant. The mass flow rate of propellant is achieved by the ratio of total mass of the propellant (Kg) needed for operation to time period(s). Accelerate the Negative ions to a high velocity in the thrust vector direction with a significantly intense Magnetic field and the exhaust of negative ions through Nozzle. The simulation of the ion propulsion system has been carried out by MATLAB. By comparing the simulation results with the theoretical and previous results, we have found that the proposed method is achieved of thrust value with estimated

  9. Influence of renormalization shielding on the electron-impact ionization process in dense partially ionized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Mi-Young; Yoon, Jung-Sik; Jung, Young-Dae

    2015-04-15

    The renormalization shielding effects on the electron-impact ionization of hydrogen atom are investigated in dense partially ionized plasmas. The effective projectile-target interaction Hamiltonian and the semiclassical trajectory method are employed to obtain the transition amplitude as well as the ionization probability as functions of the impact parameter, the collision energy, and the renormalization parameter. It is found that the renormalization shielding effect suppresses the transition amplitude for the electron-impact ionization process in dense partially ionized plasmas. It is also found that the renormalization effect suppresses the differential ionization cross section in the peak impact parameter region. In addition, it is found that the influence of renormalization shielding on the ionization cross section decreases with an increase of the relative collision energy. The variations of the renormalization shielding effects on the electron-impact ionization cross section are also discussed.

  10. Capture and decay of electroweak WIMPonium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asadi, Pouya; Baumgart, Matthew; Fitzpatrick, Patrick J.; Krupczak, Emmett; Slatyer, Tracy R.

    2017-02-01

    The spectrum of Weakly-Interacting-Massive-Particle (WIMP) dark matter generically possesses bound states when the WIMP mass becomes sufficiently large relative to the mass of the electroweak gauge bosons. The presence of these bound states enhances the annihilation rate via resonances in the Sommerfeld enhancement, but they can also be produced directly with the emission of a low-energy photon. In this work we compute the rate for SU(2) triplet dark matter (the wino) to bind into WIMPonium—which is possible via single-photon emission for wino masses above 5 TeV for relative velocity v < O(10‑2) —and study the subsequent decays of these bound states. We present results with applications beyond the wino case, e.g. for dark matter inhabiting a nonabelian dark sector; these include analytic capture and transition rates for general dark sectors in the limit of vanishing force carrier mass, efficient numerical routines for calculating positive and negative-energy eigenstates of a Hamiltonian containing interactions with both massive and massless force carriers, and a study of the scaling of bound state formation in the short-range Hulth&apos{e}n potential. In the specific case of the wino, we find that the rate for bound state formation is suppressed relative to direct annihilation, and so provides only a small correction to the overall annihilation rate. The soft photons radiated by the capture process and by bound state transitions could permit measurement of the dark matter's quantum numbers; for wino-like dark matter, such photons are rare, but might be observable by a future ground-based gamma-ray telescope combining large effective area and a low energy threshold.

  11. Elastomeric Capture Microparticles (ECmuPs) and Their use with Acoustophoresis to Perform Affinity Capture Assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cushing, Kevin Wallace

    This dissertation describes the development of elastomeric capture microparticles (ECmicroPs) and their use with acoustophoresis to perform affinity capture assays. ECμPs that function as negative acoustic contrast particles were developed by crosslinking emulsion-based droplets composed of commercially available silicone precursors followed by functionalization with avidin/biotin reagents. The size distribution of the ECμPs was very broad or narrow depending on the emulsion system that was used during the synthesis process. Elastomeric particles exhibited a very broad size distribution when a bulk-emulsion process was used; however, when microfluidic systems were utilized, their size distribution became comparatively narrow. The functionalization of elastomeric particles was accomplished by the non-specific adsorption of avidin protein followed by bovine serum albumin (BSA) blocking and bio-specific adsorption of a biotinylated-capture antibody. Polydisperse ECμPs were functionalized to bind prostate specific antigen (PSA) or IgG-phycoerythrin (PE) in aqueous media (buffer, plasma, blood); whereas monodisperse ECμPs were functionalized to bind a high density lipoprotein in the aqueous media. Polydisperse ECμPs functionalized to bind PSA in a physiological buffer (PBS pH 7.4) demonstrated nanomolar detection using flow cytometry analysis; whereas ECμPs functionalized to bind IgG-PE demonstrated picomolar detection in 10% porcine plasma. ECμPs have a specific density of ~1.03 and are more compressible than their surrounding aqueous media; which allowed the ECμPs to exhibit negative acoustic contrast properties under an ultrasonic acoustic standing wave field. The negative acoustic contrast property of ECμPs was advantageously utilized in an IgG-PE assay conducted in 0.1% whole porcine blood. The ligand-bound ECμPs suspended in the diluted blood sample were flowed through an acoustofluidic device where the application of an ultrasonic acoustic standing wave

  12. Angle-dependent strong-field molecular ionization rates with tuned range-separated time-dependent density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sissay, Adonay; Abanador, Paul; Mauger, François; Gaarde, Mette; Schafer, Kenneth J.; Lopata, Kenneth

    2016-09-01

    Strong-field ionization and the resulting electronic dynamics are important for a range of processes such as high harmonic generation, photodamage, charge resonance enhanced ionization, and ionization-triggered charge migration. Modeling ionization dynamics in molecular systems from first-principles can be challenging due to the large spatial extent of the wavefunction which stresses the accuracy of basis sets, and the intense fields which require non-perturbative time-dependent electronic structure methods. In this paper, we develop a time-dependent density functional theory approach which uses a Gaussian-type orbital (GTO) basis set to capture strong-field ionization rates and dynamics in atoms and small molecules. This involves propagating the electronic density matrix in time with a time-dependent laser potential and a spatial non-Hermitian complex absorbing potential which is projected onto an atom-centered basis set to remove ionized charge from the simulation. For the density functional theory (DFT) functional we use a tuned range-separated functional LC-PBE*, which has the correct asymptotic 1/r form of the potential and a reduced delocalization error compared to traditional DFT functionals. Ionization rates are computed for hydrogen, molecular nitrogen, and iodoacetylene under various field frequencies, intensities, and polarizations (angle-dependent ionization), and the results are shown to quantitatively agree with time-dependent Schrödinger equation and strong-field approximation calculations. This tuned DFT with GTO method opens the door to predictive all-electron time-dependent density functional theory simulations of ionization and ionization-triggered dynamics in molecular systems using tuned range-separated hybrid functionals.

  13. Current-voltage characteristic of parallel-plane ionization chamber with inhomogeneous ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoyanov, D. G.

    2007-08-01

    The balances of particles and charges in the volume of parallel-plane ionization chamber are considered. Differential equations describing the distribution of current densities in the chamber volume are obtained. As a result of the differential equations solution an analytical form of the current-voltage characteristic of parallel-plane ionization chamber with inhomogeneous ionization in the volume is obtained.

  14. Realistic costs of carbon capture

    SciTech Connect

    Al Juaied, Mohammed . Belfer Center for Science and International Affiaris); Whitmore, Adam )

    2009-07-01

    There is a growing interest in carbon capture and storage (CCS) as a means of reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. However there are substantial uncertainties about the costs of CCS. Costs for pre-combustion capture with compression (i.e. excluding costs of transport and storage and any revenue from EOR associated with storage) are examined in this discussion paper for First-of-a-Kind (FOAK) plant and for more mature technologies, or Nth-of-a-Kind plant (NOAK). For FOAK plant using solid fuels the levelised cost of electricity on a 2008 basis is approximately 10 cents/kWh higher with capture than for conventional plants (with a range of 8-12 cents/kWh). Costs of abatement are found typically to be approximately US$150/tCO2 avoided (with a range of US$120-180/tCO2 avoided). For NOAK plants the additional cost of electricity with capture is approximately 2-5 cents/kWh, with costs of the range of US$35-70/tCO2 avoided. Costs of abatement with carbon capture for other fuels and technologies are also estimated for NOAK plants. The costs of abatement are calculated with reference to conventional SCPC plant for both emissions and costs of electricity. Estimates for both FOAK and NOAK are mainly based on cost data from 2008, which was at the end of a period of sustained escalation in the costs of power generation plant and other large capital projects. There are now indications of costs falling from these levels. This may reduce the costs of abatement and costs presented here may be 'peak of the market' estimates. If general cost levels return, for example, to those prevailing in 2005 to 2006 (by which time significant cost escalation had already occurred from previous levels), then costs of capture and compression for FOAK plants are expected to be US$110/tCO2 avoided (with a range of US$90-135/tCO2 avoided). For NOAK plants costs are expected to be US$25-50/tCO2. Based on these considerations a likely representative range of costs of abatement from CCS excluding

  15. Negative hydrogen ion yields at plasma grid surface in a negative hydrogen ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Wada, M.; Kenmotsu, T.; Sasao, M.

    2015-04-08

    Negative hydrogen (H{sup −}) ion yield from the plasma grid due to incident hydrogen ions and neutrals has been evaluated with the surface collision cascade model, ACAT (Atomic Collision in Amorphous Target) coupled to a negative surface ionization models. Dependence of negative ion fractions upon the velocity component normal to the surface largely affect the calculation results of the final energy and angular distributions of the H{sup −} ions. The influence is particularly large for H{sup −} ions desorbed from the surface due to less than several eV hydrogen particle implact. The present calculation predicts that H{sup −} ion yield can be maximized by setting the incident angle of hydrogen ions and neutrals to be 65 degree. The Cs thickness on the plasma grid should also affect the yields and mean energies of surface produced H{sup −} ions by back scattering and ion induced desorption processes.

  16. Negative hydrogen ion yields at plasma grid surface in a negative hydrogen ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, M.; Kenmotsu, T.; Sasao, M.

    2015-04-01

    Negative hydrogen (H-) ion yield from the plasma grid due to incident hydrogen ions and neutrals has been evaluated with the surface collision cascade model, ACAT (Atomic Collision in Amorphous Target) coupled to a negative surface ionization models. Dependence of negative ion fractions upon the velocity component normal to the surface largely affect the calculation results of the final energy and angular distributions of the H- ions. The influence is particularly large for H- ions desorbed from the surface due to less than several eV hydrogen particle implact. The present calculation predicts that H- ion yield can be maximized by setting the incident angle of hydrogen ions and neutrals to be 65 degree. The Cs thickness on the plasma grid should also affect the yields and mean energies of surface produced H- ions by back scattering and ion induced desorption processes.

  17. Algal Energy Conversion and Capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazendonk, P.

    2015-12-01

    We address the potential for energy conversions and capture for: energy generation; reduction in energy use; reduction in greenhouse gas emissions; remediation of water and air pollution; protection and enhancement of soil fertility. These processes have the potential to sequester carbon at scales that may have global impact. Energy conversion and capture strategies evaluate energy use and production from agriculture, urban areas and industries, and apply existing and emerging technologies to reduce and recapture energy embedded in waste products. The basis of biocrude production from Micro-algal feedstocks: 1) The nutrients from the liquid fraction of waste streams are concentrated and fed into photo bioreactors (essentially large vessels in which microalgae are grown) along with CO2 from flue gasses from down stream processes. 2) The algae are processed to remove high value products such as proteins and beta-carotenes. The advantage of algae feedstocks is the high biomass productivity is 30-50 times that of land based crops and the remaining biomass contains minimal components that are difficult to convert to biocrude. 3) The remaining biomass undergoes hydrothermal liquefaction to produces biocrude and biochar. The flue gasses of this process can be used to produce electricity (fuel cell) and subsequently fed back into the photobioreactor. The thermal energy required for this process is small, hence readily obtained from solar-thermal sources, and furthermore no drying or preprocessing is required keeping the energy overhead extremely small. 4) The biocrude can be upgraded and refined as conventional crude oil, creating a range of liquid fuels. In principle this process can be applied on the farm scale to the municipal scale. Overall, our primary food production is too dependent on fossil fuels. Energy conversion and capture can make food production sustainable.

  18. Field ionization of free helium atoms: Correlation between the kinetic energy of ionized atoms and probability of their field ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piskur, J.; Borg, L.; Stupnik, A.; Leisch, M.; Ernst, W. E.; Holst, B.

    2008-05-01

    In this paper the correlation between the kinetic energy of helium atoms and the probability of field ionization is investigated by exploiting the narrow velocity distribution of supersonic molecular beams. Field ionization measurements were carried out on supersonic helium beams at 298 K and 95 K corresponding to energies of about 65 meV and 20 meV, respectively, for the individual atoms. The field ionization was performed with a tungsten tip, radius of curvature 12 nm, kept at room temperature. The ionization probability was found to increase by about a factor 10 when the beam was cooled from 298 K to 95 K. The results presented in this paper are of importance for improving the understanding of field ionization and for the development of a new detector for helium and other molecular beams.

  19. Negative Ion Density Fronts

    SciTech Connect

    Igor Kaganovich

    2000-12-18

    Negative ions tend to stratify in electronegative plasmas with hot electrons (electron temperature Te much larger than ion temperature Ti, Te > Ti ). The boundary separating a plasma containing negative ions, and a plasma, without negative ions, is usually thin, so that the negative ion density falls rapidly to zero-forming a negative ion density front. We review theoretical, experimental and numerical results giving the spatio-temporal evolution of negative ion density fronts during plasma ignition, the steady state, and extinction (afterglow). During plasma ignition, negative ion fronts are the result of the break of smooth plasma density profiles during nonlinear convection. In a steady-state plasma, the fronts are boundary layers with steepening of ion density profiles due to nonlinear convection also. But during plasma extinction, the ion fronts are of a completely different nature. Negative ions diffuse freely in the plasma core (no convection), whereas the negative ion front propagates towards the chamber walls with a nearly constant velocity. The concept of fronts turns out to be very effective in analysis of plasma density profile evolution in strongly non-isothermal plasmas.

  20. Ultrafast isomerization initiated by X-ray core ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liekhus-Schmaltz, Chelsea E.; Tenney, Ian; Osipov, Timur; Sanchez-Gonzalez, Alvaro; Berrah, Nora; Boll, Rebecca; Bomme, Cedric; Bostedt, Christoph; Bozek, John D.; Carron, Sebastian; Coffee, Ryan; Devin, Julien; Erk, Benjamin; Ferguson, Ken R.; Field, Robert W.; Foucar, Lutz; Frasinski, Leszek J.; Glownia, James M.; Gühr, Markus; Kamalov, Andrei; Krzywinski, Jacek; Li, Heng; Marangos, Jonathan P.; Martinez, Todd J.; McFarland, Brian K.; Miyabe, Shungo; Murphy, Brendan; Natan, Adi; Rolles, Daniel; Rudenko, Artem; Siano, Marco; Simpson, Emma R.; Spector, Limor; Swiggers, Michele; Walke, Daniel; Wang, Song; Weber, Thorsten; Bucksbaum, Philip H.; Petrovic, Vladimir S.

    2015-09-01

    Rapid proton migration is a key process in hydrocarbon photochemistry. Charge migration and subsequent proton motion can mitigate radiation damage when heavier atoms absorb X-rays. If rapid enough, this can improve the fidelity of diffract-before-destroy measurements of biomolecular structure at X-ray-free electron lasers. Here we study X-ray-initiated isomerization of acetylene, a model for proton dynamics in hydrocarbons. Our time-resolved measurements capture the transient motion of protons following X-ray ionization of carbon K-shell electrons. We Coulomb-explode the molecule with a second precisely delayed X-ray pulse and then record all the fragment momenta. These snapshots at different delays are combined into a `molecular movie' of the evolving molecule, which shows substantial proton redistribution within the first 12 fs. We conclude that significant proton motion occurs on a timescale comparable to the Auger relaxation that refills the K-shell vacancy.

  1. Carbon Capture and Storage, 2008

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    The U.S. Department of Energy is researching the safe implementation of a technology called carbon sequestration, also known as carbon capture and storage, or CCS. Based on an oilfield practice, this approach stores carbon dioxide, or CO2 generated from human activities for millennia as a means to mitigate global climate change. In 2003, the Department of Energys National Energy Technology Laboratory formed seven Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships to assess geologic formations suitable for storage and to determine the best approaches to implement carbon sequestration in each region. This video describes the work of these partnerships.

  2. Carbon Capture and Storage, 2008

    SciTech Connect

    2009-03-19

    The U.S. Department of Energy is researching the safe implementation of a technology called carbon sequestration, also known as carbon capture and storage, or CCS. Based on an oilfield practice, this approach stores carbon dioxide, or CO2 generated from human activities for millennia as a means to mitigate global climate change. In 2003, the Department of Energys National Energy Technology Laboratory formed seven Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships to assess geologic formations suitable for storage and to determine the best approaches to implement carbon sequestration in each region. This video describes the work of these partnerships.

  3. Chromosome Conformation Capture in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Li, Hua-Bing

    2016-01-01

    Linear chromatin fiber is packed inside the nuclei as a complex three-dimensional structure, and the organization of the chromatin has important roles in the appropriate spatial and temporal regulation of gene expression. To understand how chromatin organizes inside nuclei, and how regulatory proteins physically interact with genes, chromosome conformation capture (3C) technique provides a powerful and sensitive tool to detect both short- and long-range DNA-DNA interaction. Here I describe the 3C technique to detect the DNA-DNA interactions mediated by insulator proteins that are closely related to PcG in Drosophila, which is also broadly applicable to other systems.

  4. Astronauts Capture Moon Illusion Photo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Many odd looking moon photos have been captured over the years by astronauts aboard the International Space Station. Even so, this photograph, taken by the crew over Russia on May 11, 2003, must have come as a surprise. The moon which is really a quarter of a million miles away, appears to be floating inside the Earth's atmosphere. The picture is tricky because of its uneven lighting. With the sun's elevation angle at only 6 degrees, night is falling on the left side of the image while it is still broad daylight on the right side. This gradient of sunlight is the key to the illusion.

  5. Ionization effects and modeling considerations for sudden viscous dissipation in compressing plasma turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidovits, Seth; Fisch, Nat

    2016-10-01

    Turbulent plasma flow, amplified by rapid 3D compression, can be suddenly dissipated under continuing compression. This sudden dissipation comes about because the plasma viscosity is very sensitive to temperature, μ T 5 / 2 . We discuss approaches to constructing simple models to capture the turbulence energy growth and dissipation during rapid plasma compressions. Additionally, we explore the effects on compressing turbulence of plasma ionization during compression, to which the viscosity is also very sensitive. We show plasma ionization during compression enables larger turbulence growth, compared to when there is no plasma ionization. Further, ionization during compression can prevent the sudden dissipation effect, and can also make the difference between increasing and decreasing turbulence energy under compression. The influence exerted by ionization opens up the prospect for control of turbulence growth and sudden dissipation timing through choice of the plasma ion species. This work was supported by DOE through Contracts No. DE-AC02-09CH1-1466 and NNSA 67350-9960 (Prime # DOE DE-NA0001836), by DTRA HDTRA1-11-1-0037, and by NSF Contract No. PHY-1506122.

  6. Electrospray Ionization on Solid Substrates

    PubMed Central

    So, Pui-Kin; Hu, Bin; Yao, Zhong-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Development of electrospray ionization on solid substrates (solid-substrate ESI) avoids the clogging problem encountered in conventional capillary-based ESI, allows more convenient sampling and permits new applications. So far, solid-substrate ESI with various materials, e.g., metals, paper, wood, fibers and biological tissue, has been developed, and applications ranging from analysis of pure compounds to complex mixtures as well as in vivo study were demonstrated. Particularly, the capability of solid-substrate ESI in direct analysis of complex samples, e.g., biological fluids and foods, has significantly facilitated mass spectrometric analysis in real-life applications and led to increasingly important roles of these techniques nowadays. In this review, various solid-substrate ESI techniques and their applications are summarized and the prospects in this field are discussed. PMID:26819900

  7. Ionization in nearby interstellar gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frisch, P. C.; Welty, D. E.; York, D. G.; Fowler, J. R.

    1990-01-01

    Due to dielectric recombination, neutral magnesium represents an important tracer for the warm low-density gas around the solar system. New Mg I 2852 absorption-line data from IUE are presented, including detections in a few stars within 40 pc of the sun. The absence of detectable Mg I in Alpha CMa and other stars sets limits on the combined size and electron density of the interstellar cloud which gives rise to the local interstellar wind. For a cloud radius greater than 1 pc and density of 0.1/cu cm, the local cloud has a low fractional ionization, n(e)/n(tot) less than 0.05, if magnesium is undepleted, equilibrium conditions prevail, the cloud temperature is 11,750 K, and 80 percent of the magnesium in the sightline is Mg II.

  8. Ionization tube simmer current circuit

    DOEpatents

    Steinkraus, R.F. Jr.

    1994-12-13

    A highly efficient flash lamp simmer current circuit utilizes a fifty percent duty cycle square wave pulse generator to pass a current over a current limiting inductor to a full wave rectifier. The DC output of the rectifier is then passed over a voltage smoothing capacitor through a reverse current blocking diode to a flash lamp tube to sustain ionization in the tube between discharges via a small simmer current. An alternate embodiment of the circuit combines the pulse generator and inductor in the form of an FET off line square wave generator with an impedance limited step up output transformer which is then applied to the full wave rectifier as before to yield a similar simmer current. 6 figures.

  9. Ionization tube simmer current circuit

    DOEpatents

    Steinkraus, Jr., Robert F.

    1994-01-01

    A highly efficient flash lamp simmer current circuit utilizes a fifty percent duty cycle square wave pulse generator to pass a current over a current limiting inductor to a full wave rectifier. The DC output of the rectifier is then passed over a voltage smoothing capacitor through a reverse current blocking diode to a flash lamp tube to sustain ionization in the tube between discharges via a small simmer current. An alternate embodiment of the circuit combines the pulse generator and inductor in the form of an FET off line square wave generator with an impedance limited step up output transformer which is then applied to the full wave rectifier as before to yield a similar simmer current.

  10. Calculation of doublet capture rate for muon capture in deuterium within chiral effective field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, J.; Tater, M.; Truhlík, E.; Epelbaum, E.; Machleidt, R.; Ricci, P.

    2012-03-01

    The doublet capture rate Λ1 / 2 of the negative muon capture in deuterium is calculated employing the nuclear wave functions generated from accurate nucleon-nucleon (NN) potentials constructed at next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order of heavy-baryon chiral perturbation theory and the weak meson exchange current operator derived within the same formalism. All but one of the low-energy constants that enter the calculation were fixed from pion-nucleon and nucleon-nucleon scattering data. The low-energy constant dˆR (cD), which cannot be determined from the purely two-nucleon data, was extracted recently from the triton β-decay and the binding energies of the three-nucleon systems. The calculated values of Λ1 / 2 show a rather large spread for the used values of the dˆR. Precise measurement of Λ1 / 2 in the future will not only help to constrain the value of dˆR, but also provide a highly nontrivial test of the nuclear chiral EFT framework. Besides, the precise knowledge of the constant dˆR will allow for consistent calculations of other two-nucleon weak processes, such as proton-proton fusion and solar neutrino scattering on deuterons, which are important for astrophysics.

  11. 49 CFR 563.9 - Data capture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Data capture. 563.9 Section 563.9 Transportation..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EVENT DATA RECORDERS § 563.9 Data capture. The EDR must capture and record the data elements for events in accordance with the following conditions and circumstances: (a) In...

  12. 49 CFR 563.9 - Data capture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Data capture. 563.9 Section 563.9 Transportation..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EVENT DATA RECORDERS § 563.9 Data capture. The EDR must capture and record the data elements for events in accordance with the following conditions and circumstances: (a) In...

  13. 49 CFR 563.9 - Data capture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Data capture. 563.9 Section 563.9 Transportation..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EVENT DATA RECORDERS § 563.9 Data capture. The EDR must capture and record the data elements for events in accordance with the following conditions and circumstances: (a) In...

  14. 49 CFR 563.9 - Data capture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Data capture. 563.9 Section 563.9 Transportation..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EVENT DATA RECORDERS § 563.9 Data capture. Link to an amendment published at 76 FR 47489, Aug. 5, 2011. The EDR must capture and record the data elements for events in...

  15. The Effectiveness of Classroom Capture Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Maire B.; Burns, Colleen E.; Mitch, Nathan; Gomez, Melissa M.

    2012-01-01

    The use of classroom capture systems (systems that capture audio and video footage of a lecture and attempt to replicate a classroom experience) is becoming increasingly popular at the university level. However, research on the effectiveness of classroom capture systems in the university classroom has been limited due to the recent development and…

  16. Forensic applications of ambient ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ifa, Demian R; Jackson, Ayanna U; Paglia, Giuseppe; Cooks, R Graham

    2009-08-01

    This review highlights and critically assesses forensic applications in the developing field of ambient ionization mass spectrometry. Ambient ionization methods permit the ionization of samples outside the mass spectrometer in the ordinary atmosphere, with minimal sample preparation. Several ambient ionization methods have been created since 2004 and they utilize different mechanisms to create ions for mass-spectrometric analysis. Forensic applications of these techniques--to the analysis of toxic industrial compounds, chemical warfare agents, illicit drugs and formulations, explosives, foodstuff, inks, fingerprints, and skin--are reviewed. The minimal sample pretreatment needed is illustrated with examples of analysis from complex matrices (e.g., food) on various substrates (e.g., paper). The low limits of detection achieved by most of the ambient ionization methods for compounds of forensic interest readily offer qualitative confirmation of chemical identity; in some cases quantitative data are also available. The forensic applications of ambient ionization methods are a growing research field and there are still many types of applications which remain to be explored, particularly those involving on-site analysis. Aspects of ambient ionization currently undergoing rapid development include molecular imaging and increased detection specificity through simultaneous chemical reaction and ionization by addition of appropriate chemical reagents.

  17. Surface Ionization and Soft Landing Techniques in Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Futrell, Jean H.; Laskin, Julia

    2010-04-01

    The advent of soft ionization techniques, notably electrospray and laser desorption ionization methods, has extended mass spectrometric methods to large molecules and molecular complexes. This both greatly expands appli¬cations of mass spectrometry and makes the activation and dissociation of complex ions an integral part of large molecule mass spectrometry. A corollary of the much greater number of internal degrees of freedom and high density of states associated with molecular complexity is that internal energies much higher than the dissociation energies for competing fragmentation processes are required for observable fragmentation in time scales sampled by mass spectrometers. This article describes the kinetics of surface-induced dissociation (SID), a particularly efficient activation method for complex ions. Two very important characteristics of SID are very rapid, sub-picosecond activation and precise control of ion internal energy by varying ion collision energy. The nature of the surface plays an important role in SID, determining both efficiency and mechanism of ion activation. Surface composition and morphology strongly influence the relative importance of competing reactions of SID, ion capture (soft-landing), surface reaction and neutralization. The important features of SID and ion soft-landing are described briefly in this review and more fully in the recommended reading list.

  18. Surfaces for competitive selective bacterial capture from protein solutions.

    PubMed

    Fang, Bing; Gon, Saugata; Nüsslein, Klaus; Santore, Maria M

    2015-05-20

    Active surfaces that form the basis for bacterial sensors for threat detection, food safety, or certain diagnostic applications rely on bacterial adhesion. However, bacteria capture from complex fluids on the active surfaces can be reduced by the competing adsorption of proteins and other large molecules. Such adsorption can also interfere with device performance. As a result, multiple upstream processing steps are frequently employed to separate macromolecules from any cells, which remain in the buffer. Here, we present an economical approach to capture bacteria, without competitive adsorption by proteins, on engineered surfaces that do not employ biomolecular recognition, antibodies, or other molecules with engineered sequences. The surfaces are based on polyethylene glycol (PEG) brushes that, on their own, repel both proteins and bacteria. These PEG brushes backfill the surface around sparsely adsorbed cationic polymer coils (here, poly-L-lysine (PLL)). The PLL coils are effectively embedded within the brush and produce locally cationic nanoscale regions that attract negatively charged regions of proteins or cells against the steric background repulsion from the PEG brush. By carefully designing the surfaces to include just enough PLL to capture bacteria, but not enough to capture proteins, we achieve sharp selectivity where S. aureus is captured from albumin- or fibrinogen-containing solutions, but free albumin or fibrinogen molecules are rejected from the surface. Bacterial adhesion on these surfaces is not reduced by competitive protein adsorption, in contrast to performance of more uniformly cationic surfaces. Also, protein adsorption to the bacteria does not interfere with capture, at least for the case of S. aureus, to which fibrinogen binds through a specific receptor.

  19. Negative Human Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brannan, John M.

    1972-01-01

    This study is an effort to examine man's most negative experiences as he perceives them. The results indicated that teachers were involved more often than any other person in the most negative experience reported. Improved human relations skills are clearly indicated for those in higher education as well as in public schools. (Author)

  20. Astatine and Yttrium Resonant Ionization Laser Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teigelhoefer, Andrea

    Providing intense, contamination-free beams of rare isotopes to experiments is a challenging task. At isotope separator on-line facilities such as ISAC at TRIUMF, the choice of production target and ion source are key to the successful beam delivery. Due to their element-selectivity, high efficiency and versatility, resonant ionization laser ion sources (RILIS) gain increasingly in importance. The spectroscopic data available are typically incomplete in the region of excited- and autoionizing atomic states. In order to find the most efficient ionization scheme for a particular element, further spectroscopy is often required. The development of efficient laser resonant ionization schemes for yttrium and astatine is presented in this thesis. For yttrium, two ionization schemes with comparable relative intensities were found. Since for astatine, only two transitions were known, the focus was to provide data on atomic energy levels using resonance ionization spectroscopy. Altogether 41 previously unknown astatine energy levels were found.

  1. Reversal electron attachment ionizer for detection of trace species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernius, Mark T. (Inventor); Chutjian, Ara (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    An in-line reversal electron, high-current ionizer capable of focusing a beam of electrons to a reversal region and executing a reversal of said electrons, such that the electrons possess zero kinetic energy at the point of reversal, may be used to produce both negative and positive ions. A sample gas is introduced at the point of electron reversal for low energy electron-(sample gas) molecule attachment with high efficiency. The attachment process produces negative ions from the sample gas, which includes species present in trace (minute) amounts. These ions are extracted efficiently and directed to a mass analyzer where they may be detected and identified. The generation and detection of positive ions is accomplished in a similar fashion with minimal adjustment to potentials applied to the apparatus.

  2. Reversal electron attachment ionizer for detection of trace species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernius, Mark T. (Inventor); Chutjian, Ara (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    An in-line reversal electron, high-current ionizer capable of focusing a beam of electrons to a reversal region and executing a reversal of the electrons, such that the electrons possess zero kinetic energy at the point of reversal, may be used to produce both negative and positive ions. A sample gas is introduced at the point of electron reversal for low energy electron-(sample gas) molecule attachment with high efficiency. The attachment process produces negative ions from the sample gas, which includes species present in trace (minute) amounts. These ions are extracted efficiently and directed to a mass analyzer where they may be detected and identified. The generation and detection of positive ions is accomplished in a similar fashion with minimal adjustment to potentials applied to the apparatus.

  3. Characterization of a Distributed Plasma Ionization Source (DPIS) for Ion Mobility Spectrometry and Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Waltman, Melanie J.; Dwivedi, Prabha; Hill, Herbert; Blanchard, William C.; Ewing, Robert G.

    2008-10-15

    A recently developed atmospheric pressure ionization source, a distributed plasma ionization source (DPIS), was characterized and compared to commonly used atmospheric pressure ionization sources with both mass spectrometry and ion mobility spectrometry. The source consisted of two electrodes of different sizes separated by a thin dielectric. Application of a high RF voltage across the electrodes generated plasma in air yielding both positive and negative ions depending on the polarity of the applied potential. These reactant ions subsequently ionized the analyte vapors. The reactant ions generated were similar to those created in a conventional point-to-plane corona discharge ion source. The positive reactant ions generated by the source were mass identified as being solvated protons of general formula (H2O)nH+ with (H2O)2H+ as the most abundant reactant ion. The negative reactant ions produced were mass identified primarily as CO3-, NO3-, NO2-, O3- and O2- of various relative intensities. The predominant ion and relative ion ratios varied depending upon source construction and supporting gas flow rates. A few compounds including drugs, explosives and environmental pollutants were selected to evaluate the new ionization source. The source was operated continuously for several months and although deterioration was observed visually, the source continued to produce ions at a rate similar that of the initial conditions. The results indicated that the DPIS may have a longer operating life than a conventional corona discharge.

  4. Characterization of a distributed plasma ionization source (DPIS) for ion mobility spectrometry and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Waltman, Melanie J; Dwivedi, Prabha; Hill, Herbert H; Blanchard, William C; Ewing, Robert G

    2008-10-19

    A recently developed atmospheric pressure ionization source, a distributed plasma ionization source (DPIS), was characterized and compared to commonly used atmospheric pressure ionization sources with both mass spectrometry (MS) and ion mobility spectrometry (IMS). The source consisted of two electrodes of different sizes separated by a thin dielectric. Application of a high RF voltage across the electrodes generated plasma in air yielding both positive and negative ions. These reactant ions subsequently ionized the analyte vapors. The reactant ions generated were similar to those created in a conventional point-to-plane corona discharge ion source. The positive reactant ions generated by the source were mass identified as being solvated protons of general formula (H(2)O)(n)H(+) with (H(2)O)(2)H(+) as the most abundant reactant ion. The negative reactant ions produced were mass identified primarily as CO(3)(-), NO(3)(-), NO(2)(-), O(3)(-) and O(2)(-) of various relative intensities. The predominant ion and relative ion ratios varied depending upon source construction and supporting gas flow rates. A few compounds including drugs, explosives and amines were selected to evaluate the new ionization source. The source was operated continuously for 3 months and although surface deterioration was observed visually, the source continued to produce ions at a rate similar that of the initial conditions.

  5. Electron impact ionization and multiphoton ionization of doped superfluid helium droplets: A comparison.

    PubMed

    He, Yunteng; Zhang, Jie; Kong, Wei

    2016-02-28

    We compare characteristics of electron impact ionization (EI) and multiphoton ionization (MPI) of doped superfluid helium droplets using the same droplet source. Selected dopant ion fragments from the two ionization schemes demonstrate different dependence on the doping pressure, which could be attributed to the different ionization mechanisms. While EI directly ionizes helium atoms in a droplet therefore has higher yields for bigger droplets (within a limited size range), MPI is insensitive to the helium in a droplet and is only dependent on the number of dopant molecules. The optimal timing of the ionization pulse also varies with the doping pressure, implying a velocity slip among different sized droplets. Calculations of the doping statistics and ionization probabilities qualitatively agree with the experimental data. Our results offer a word of caution in interpreting the pressure and timing dependence of superfluid helium droplets, and we also devise a scheme in achieving a high degree of doping while limiting the contribution of dopant clusters.

  6. Electron impact ionization and multiphoton ionization of doped superfluid helium droplets: A comparison

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We compare characteristics of electron impact ionization (EI) and multiphoton ionization (MPI) of doped superfluid helium droplets using the same droplet source. Selected dopant ion fragments from the two ionization schemes demonstrate different dependence on the doping pressure, which could be attributed to the different ionization mechanisms. While EI directly ionizes helium atoms in a droplet therefore has higher yields for bigger droplets (within a limited size range), MPI is insensitive to the helium in a droplet and is only dependent on the number of dopant molecules. The optimal timing of the ionization pulse also varies with the doping pressure, implying a velocity slip among different sized droplets. Calculations of the doping statistics and ionization probabilities qualitatively agree with the experimental data. Our results offer a word of caution in interpreting the pressure and timing dependence of superfluid helium droplets, and we also devise a scheme in achieving a high degree of doping while limiting the contribution of dopant clusters. PMID:26931697

  7. The elements of design knowledge capture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, Michael S.

    1988-01-01

    This paper will present the basic constituents of a design knowledge capture effort. This will include a discussion of the types of knowledge to be captured in such an effort and the difference between design knowledge capture and more traditional knowledge base construction. These differences include both knowledge base structure and knowledge acquisition approach. The motivation for establishing a design knowledge capture effort as an integral part of major NASA programs will be outlined, along with the current NASA position on that subject. Finally the approach taken in design knowledge capture for Space Station will be contrasted with that used in the HSTDEK project.

  8. Factors that affect molecular weight distribution of Suwannee river fulvic acid as determined by electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rostad, C.E.; Leenheer, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    Effects of methylation, molar response, multiple charging, solvents, and positive and negative ionization on molecular weight distributions of aquatic fulvic acid were investigated by electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry. After preliminary analysis by positive and negative modes, samples and mixtures of standards were derivatized by methylation to minimize ionization sites and reanalyzed.Positive ionization was less effective and produced more complex spectra than negative ionization. Ionization in methanol/water produced greater response than in acetonitrile/water. Molar response varied widely for the selected free acid standards when analyzed individually and in a mixture, but after methylation this range decreased. After methylation, the number average molecular weight of the Suwannee River fulvic acid remained the same while the weight average molecular weight decreased. These differences are probably indicative of disaggregation of large aggregated ions during methylation. Since the weight average molecular weight decreased, it is likely that aggregate formation in the fulvic acid was present prior to derivatization, rather than multiple charging in the mass spectra. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Electron capture by bare ions on water molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivarola, Roberto; Montenegro, Pablo; Monti, Juan; Fojón, Omar

    2016-05-01

    Single electron capture from water molecules by impact of bare ions is theoretically investigated at intermediate and high collision energies. This reaction is of fundamental importance to determine the deposition of energy in biological matter irradiated with ion beams (hadrontherapy), dominating other ionizing processes of the target at low-intermediate impact velocities and giving principal contributions to the energetic region where electronic stopping power maximizes. The dynamics of the interaction between the aggregates is described within the one active-electron continuum distorted wave-eikonal initial state theory. The orbitals of the target in the ground state are represented using the approximate self-consistent complete neglect of differential orbitals (SC-CNDO) model. The contribution of different molecular orbitals on the partial cross sections to selected n-principal quantum number projectile states is discriminated as well as the collaboration of these n-states on total cross sections. The latter ones are dominated by capture to n=1 states at high enough energies decreasing their contribution as n increases.

  10. Attentional cueing: fearful body postures capture attention with saccades.

    PubMed

    Bannerman, Rachel L; Milders, Maarten; Sahraie, Arash

    2010-05-01

    According to theories of attention and emotion, threat-related stimuli (e.g., negative facial expressions) capture and hold attention. Despite these theories, previous examination of attentional cueing by threat showed no enhanced capture at brief durations. One explanation for the absence of attentional capture effects may be related to the sensitivity of the manual response measure employed. Here we extended beyond facial expressions and investigated the time course of orienting attention towards fearful body postures in the exogenous cueing task. Cue duration (20, 40, 60, or 100 ms), orientation (upright or inverted), and response mode (saccadic eye movement or manual keypress) were manipulated across three experiments. In the saccade mode, both enhanced attentional capture and impaired disengagement from fearful bodies were evident and limited to rapid cue durations (20 and 40 ms), suggesting that saccadic cueing effects emerge rapidly and are short lived. In the manual mode, fearful bodies impacted only upon the disengagement component of attention at 100 ms, suggesting that manual cueing effects emerge over longer periods of time. No cueing modulation was found for inverted presentation, suggesting that valence, not low-level image confounds, was responsible for the cueing effects. Importantly, saccades could reveal threat biases at brief cue durations consistent with current theories of emotion and attention.

  11. Materials with negative stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaglinski, Tim

    Negative stiffness, or a reversal in the usual assumed direction between causal forces and ensuing deformations, has been proposed as a pathway to materials which exceed theoretical performance bounds. Negative stiffness, as a concept, represents a relaxation of tacitly assumed material behavior, but it violates no natural laws. Negative stiffness, normally unstable without constraint, is permissible for stability under special conditions, for example a rigid boundary constraint so long as the material satisfies strong ellipticity in the parlance of elasticity. Hence, negative stiffness is not observed in materials or structures which are not constrained. If negative stiffness is allowed for inclusions of material, which are surrounded by a stabilizing positive stiffness matrix, composite theory predicts large increases in the mechanical damping and composite stiffness. The work herein explores several material systems which possess negative stiffness, and seeks to characterize the composite mechanical properties of these systems. Two metal matrix composite systems, namely Sn-VO2 and Sn-BaTIO3, were investigated. Here, negative stiffness arises from the ferroelastic phase transformations in the ceramic inclusions; stability is imparted by the tin matrix. Polycrystalline In-Tl and BaTIO 3 were also studied. Here, the entire material volume is phase transforming. Constraint is imparted on a small volume fraction of crystallites by the surrounding material. Various manifestations of negative stiffness were observed. Thermally broad damping peaks which depended upon thermal cycling were observed in the Sn-VO2 composites. Furthermore, mechanical instabilities were seen in composites intentionally designed to be unstable. Negative stiffness was indicated in the In-Tl alloy by magnification of damping peaks over those observed in single crystals, increases in damping peaks with increased cooling rates, occurrence of damping peaks before the appearance of martensite and

  12. Bad data packet capture device

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Dong; Gara, Alan; Heidelberger, Philip; Vranas, Pavlos

    2010-04-20

    An apparatus and method for capturing data packets for analysis on a network computing system includes a sending node and a receiving node connected by a bi-directional communication link. The sending node sends a data transmission to the receiving node on the bi-directional communication link, and the receiving node receives the data transmission and verifies the data transmission to determine valid data and invalid data and verify retransmissions of invalid data as corresponding valid data. A memory device communicates with the receiving node for storing the invalid data and the corresponding valid data. A computing node communicates with the memory device and receives and performs an analysis of the invalid data and the corresponding valid data received from the memory device.

  13. Neutron capture therapy for melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Coderre, J.A.; Glass, J.D.; Micca, P.; Fairchild, R.G.

    1988-01-01

    The development of boron-containing compounds which localize selectively in tumor may require a tumor-by-tumor type of approach that exploits any metabolic pathways unique to the particular type of tumor. Melanin-producing melanomas actively transport and metabolize aromatic amino acids for use as precursors in the synthesis of the pigment melanin. It has been shown that the boron-containing amino acid analog p-borono-phenylalanine (BPA) is selectively accumulated in melanoma tissue, producing boron concentrations in tumor that are within the range estimated to be necessary for successful boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). We report here the results of therapy experiments carried out at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR). 21 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Workshop on neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fairchild, R.G.; Bond, V.P.

    1986-01-01

    Potentially optimal conditions for Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT) may soon be in hand due to the anticipated development of band-pass filtered beams relatively free of fast neutron contaminations, and of broadly applicable biomolecules for boron transport such as porphyrins and monoclonal antibodies. Consequently, a number of groups in the US are now devoting their efforts to exploring NCT for clinical application. The purpose of this Workshop was to bring these groups together to exchange views on significant problems of mutual interest, and to assure a unified and effective approach to the solutions. Several areas of preclinical investigation were deemed to be necessary before it would be possible to initiate clinical studies. As neither the monomer nor the dimer of sulfhydryl boron hydride is unequivocally preferable at this time, studies on both compounds should be continued until one is proven superior.

  15. Subsurface capture of carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Blount, Gerald; Siddal, Alvin A.; Falta, Ronald W.

    2014-07-22

    A process and apparatus of separating CO.sub.2 gas from industrial off-gas source in which the CO.sub.2 containing off-gas is introduced deep within an injection well. The CO.sub.2 gases are dissolved in the, liquid within the injection well while non-CO.sub.2 gases, typically being insoluble in water or brine, are returned to the surface. Once the CO.sub.2 saturated liquid is present within the injection well, the injection well may be used for long-term geologic storage of CO.sub.2 or the CO.sub.2 saturated liquid can be returned to the surface for capturing a purified CO.sub.2 gas.

  16. Radiative capture versus Coulomb dissociation.

    SciTech Connect

    Esbensen, H.; Physics

    2006-01-01

    Measurements of the Coulomb dissociation of {sup 8}B have been used to infer the rate of the inverse radiative proton capture on {sup 7}Be. The analysis is usually based on the assumptions that the two processes are related by detailed balance and described by E1 transitions. However, there are corrections to this relation. The Coulomb form factors for the two processes, for example, are not identical. There are also E2 transitions and higher-order effects in the Coulomb dissociation, and the nuclear induced breakup cannot always be ignored. While adding first-order E2 transitions enhances the decay energy spectrum, the other mechanisms cause a suppression at low relative energies. The net result may accidentally be close to the conventional first-order E1 calculation, but there are differences which cannot be ignored if accuracies of 10% or better are needed.

  17. Small Particles Intact Capture Experiment (SPICE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishioka, Ken-Ji; Carle, G. C.; Bunch, T. E.; Mendez, David J.; Ryder, J. T.

    1994-01-01

    The Small Particles Intact Capture Experiment (SPICE) will develop technologies and engineering techniques necessary to capture nearly intact, uncontaminated cosmic and interplanetary dust particles (IDP's). Successful capture of such particles will benefit the exobiology and planetary science communities by providing particulate samples that may have survived unaltered since the formation of the solar system. Characterization of these particles may contribute fundamental data to our knowledge of how these particles could have formed into our planet Earth and, perhaps, contributed to the beginnings of life. The term 'uncontaminated' means that captured cosmic and IDP particles are free of organic contamination from the capture process and the term 'nearly intact capture' means that their chemical and elemental components are not materially altered during capture. The key to capturing cosmic and IDP particles that are organic-contamination free and nearly intact is the capture medium. Initial screening of capture media included organic foams, multiple thin foil layers, and aerogel (a silica gel); but, with the exception of aerogel, the requirements of no contamination or nearly intact capture were not met. To ensure no contamination of particles in the capture process, high-purity aerogel was chosen. High-purity aerogel results in high clarity (visual clearness), a useful quality in detection and recovery of embedded captured particles from the aerogel. P. Tsou at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) originally described the use of aerogel for this purpose and reported laboratory test results. He has flown aerogel as a 'GAS-can Lid' payload on STS-47 and is evaluating the results. The Timeband Capture Cell Experiment (TICCE), a Eureca 1 experiment, is also flying aerogel and is scheduled for recovery in late April.

  18. Negative tandem mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Poulsen, P.; Allen, S.L.; Casper, T.A.; Grubb, D.P.; Jong, R.A.; Nexsen, W.E.; Porter, G.D.; Simonen, T.C.

    1981-11-30

    A tandem mirror configuration can be created by combining hot electron end cell plasmas with neutral beam pumping. A region of large negative potential formed in each end cell confines electrons in the central cell. The requirement of charge neutrality causes the central cell potential to become negative with respect to ground in order to confine ions as well as electrons. We discuss the method of producing and calculating the desired axial potential profile, and show the calculated axial potential profile and plasma parameters for a negative configuration of TMX-Upgrade.

  19. Negative birefringent polyimide films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Frank W. (Inventor); Cheng, Stephen Z. D. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A negative birefringent film, useful in liquid crystal displays, and a method for controlling the negative birefringence of a polyimide film is disclosed which allows the matching of an application to a targeted amount of birefringence by controlling the degree of in-plane orientation of the polyimide by the selection of functional groups within both the diamine and dianhydride segments of the polyimide which affect the polyimide backbone chain rigidity, linearity, and symmetry. The higher the rigidity, linearity and symmetry of the polyimide backbone, the larger the value of the negative birefringence of the polyimide film.

  20. Ionization Cooling using Parametric Resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Rolland P.

    2008-06-07

    Ionization Cooling using Parametric Resonances was an SBIR project begun in July 2004 and ended in January 2008 with Muons, Inc., (Dr. Rolland Johnson, PI), and Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) (Dr. Yaroslav Derbenev, Subcontract PI). The project was to develop the theory and simulations of Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling (PIC) so that it could be used to provide the extra transverse cooling needed for muon colliders in order to relax the requirements on the proton driver, reduce the site boundary radiation, and provide a better environment for experiments. During the course of the project, the theoretical understanding of PIC was developed and a final exposition is ready for publication. Workshops were sponsored by Muons, Inc. in May and September of 2007 that were devoted to the PIC technique. One outcome of the workshops was the interesting and somewhat unexpected realization that the beam emittances using the PIC technique can get small enough that space charge forces can be important. A parallel effort to develop our G4beamline simulation program to include space charge effects was initiated to address this problem. A method of compensating for chromatic aberrations by employing synchrotron motion was developed and simulated. A method of compensating for spherical aberrations using beamline symmetry was also developed and simulated. Different optics designs have been developed using the OptiM program in preparation for applying our G4beamline simulation program, which contains all the power of the Geant4 toolkit. However, no PIC channel design that has been developed has had the desired cooling performance when subjected to the complete G4beamline simulation program. This is believed to be the consequence of the difficulties of correcting the aberrations associated with the naturally large beam angles and beam sizes of the PIC method that are exacerbated by the fringe fields of the rather complicated channel designs that have been

  1. Negative ions from alkali hydrides as a source for H(-) beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, S. K.

    1989-01-01

    The production of H(-) ions by heating LiH powder in a high-temperature crucible was investigated experimentally and theoretically. It is found that the efficiency of H(-) ion production by this method is high. However, the theory for the negative surface ionization indicates that such high efficiency is not possible at crucible temperatures of about 750 C. The need for a further study of LiH ionization is emphasized.

  2. Laser resonance ionization spectroscopy of antimony

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, R.; Lassen, J.; Ruczkowski, J.; Teigelhöfer, A.; Bricault, P.

    2017-02-01

    The resonant ionization laser ion source is an element selective, efficient and versatile ion source to generate radioactive ion beams at on-line mass separator facilities. For some elements with complex atomic structures and incomplete spectroscopic data, laser spectroscopic investigations are required for ionization scheme development. Laser resonance ionization spectroscopy using Ti:Sa lasers has been performed on antimony (Sb) at TRIUMF's off-line laser ion source test stand. Laser light of 230.217 nm (vacuum wavelength) as the first excitation step and light from a frequency-doubled Nd:YVO4 laser (532 nm) as the nonresonant ionization step allowed to search for suitable second excitation steps by continuous wavelength scans from 720 nm to 920 nm across the wavelength tuning range of a grating-tuned Ti:Sa laser. Upon the identification of efficient SES, the third excitation steps for resonance ionization were investigated by laser scans across Rydberg states, the ionization potential and autoionizing states. One Rydberg state and six AI states were found to be well suitable for efficient resonance ionization.

  3. Laser-induced ionization of Na vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, R.C.Y.; Judge, D.L.; Roussel, F.; Carre, B.; Breger, P.; Spiess, G.

    1982-01-01

    The production of Na/sub 2//sup +/ ions by off-resonant laser excitation in the 5800-6200A region mainly results from two-photon absorption by the Na/sub 2/ molecule to highly excited gerade states followed by (a) direct ionization by absorbing a third photon or (b) coupling to the molecular Na/sub 2/ D/sup 1/PI..mu.. Rydberg state which is subsequently ionized by absorbing a third photon. This mechanism, i.e., a two-photon resonance three photon ionization process, explains a recent experimental observation of Roussel et al. It is suggested that the very same mechanism is also responsible for a similar observation reported by Polak-Dingels et al in their work using two crossed Na beams. In the latter two studies the laser-induced associative ionization processes were reported to be responsible for producing the Na/sub 2//sup +/ ion. From the ratio of molecular to atomic concentration in the crossed beam experiment of Polak-Dingels et al we estimate that the cross section for producing Na/sub 2//sup +/ through laser-induced associative ionization is at least four orders of magnitude smaller than ionization through the two-photon resonance three photon ionization process in Na/sub 2/ molecules.

  4. Laser-induced ionization of Na vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C. Y. Robert; Judge, D. L.; Roussel, F.; Carré, B.; Breger, P.; Spiess, G.

    1982-09-01

    The production of Na2+ ions by off-resonant laser excitation in the 5800-6200Å region mainly results from two-photon absorption by the Na2 molecule to highly excited gerade states followed by (a) direct ionization by absorbing a third photon or (b) coupling to the molecular Na2 D1Πu Rydberg state which is subsequently ionized by absorbing a third photon. This mechanism, i.e., a two-photon resonance three photon ionization process, explains a recent experimental observation of Roussel et al. It is suggested that the very same mechanism is also responsible for a similar observation reported by Polak-Dingels et al in their work using two crossed Na beams. In the latter two studies the laser-induced associative ionization processes were reported to be responsible for producing the Na2+ ion. From the ratio of molecular to atomic concentration in the crossed beam experiment of Polak-Dingels et al. we estimate that the cross section for producing Na2+ through laser-induced associative ionization is at least four orders of magnitude smaller than ionization through the two-photon resonance three photon ionization process in Na2 molecules.

  5. Sub-cycle dynamics of multiphoton ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telnov, Dmitry A.; Nasiri Avanaki, K.; Chu, Shih-I.

    2014-05-01

    Sub-cycle oscillatory structures are revealed in calculated time-dependent multiphoton ionization rates. Both atomic and molecular targets manifest multiple ionization bursts per one optical cycle of the laser field. Using the accurate and efficient time-dependent generalized pseudospectral method to solve the time-dependent Schrödinger equation, we have performed calculations on H, He+, H2+,and HHe2+, for the laser fields with several intensities and wavelengths in the near-infrared range (750 nm to 1064 nm). The sub-cycle structures appear a universal feature of multiphoton ionization and become well pronounced for sufficiently strong laser fields depending on the target atom or molecule. Analysis of the electron density distributions on the sub-femtosecond time scale shows several time moments per optical cycle (not necessarily corresponding to the peak values of the laser field) when significant portions of the electron density move away from the nucleus giving rise to the bursts in the ionization rate. The nature of the phenomenon can be related to ionization through different pathways, including direct ionization as well as population of the excited states by the laser field with subsequent ionization at later times. This work is partially supported by DOE.

  6. Exertional myopathy in a grizzly bear (Ursus arctos) captured by leghold snare.

    PubMed

    Cattet, Marc; Stenhouse, Gordon; Bollinger, Trent

    2008-10-01

    We diagnosed exertional myopathy (EM) in a grizzly bear (Ursus arctos) that died approximately 10 days after capture by leghold snare in west-central Alberta, Canada, in June 2003. The diagnosis was based on history, post-capture movement data, gross necropsy, histopathology, and serum enzyme levels. We were unable to determine whether EM was the primary cause of death because autolysis precluded accurate evaluation of all tissues. Nevertheless, comparison of serum aspartate aminotransferase and creatine kinase concentrations and survival between the affected bear and other grizzly bears captured by leghold snare in the same research project suggests EM also occurred in other bears, but that it is not generally a cause of mortality. We propose, however, occurrence of nonfatal EM in grizzly bears after capture by leghold snare has potential implications for use of this capture method, including negative effects on wildlife welfare and research data.

  7. Novel CO{sub 2} capture. Final CRADA Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, S. W.; Energy Systems

    2009-11-30

    The goal of this work was to use electrochemically driven pH control to develop a second generation, enzyme-based contained liquid membrane (CLM) permeator to extract CO{sub 2} from a variety of coal-based flue gas streams more efficiently than does the CLM current design, while achieving performance coincident with DOE targets of less than 45% Cost of electricity (COE) in 2007 and less than 20% COE in 2012. Central to this goal the CLM would be alkaline (>pH 8) at the feed gas side and acid (capture and release using Argonne's resin-wafer electrode ionization (RW-EDI) system integrated with Carbozyme's carbonic anhydrase (CA) enzyme. Argonne developed RW-EDI for pH controlled desalination of process streams (e.g. Patents 7,452,920 & 7,306,934). In the current work, Argonne captured CO{sub 2} as HCO{sub 3}{sup -} and released it as CO{sub 2}. The goal is to both capture CO{sub 2} from a simulated flue gas stream and release it within the DOE targets for increase in COE. Initial performance results indicate that the 2012 COE targets are achievable with the developed technology. The design is subject to patent-hold. This task was funded in an exploratory phase, so no process optimization was attempted. Argonne believes that with optimization this performance could be significantly improved.

  8. Negative electrode composition

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.; Chilenskas, Albert A.

    1982-01-01

    A secondary electrochemical cell and a negative electrode composition for use therewith comprising a positive electrode containing an active material of a chalcogen or a transiton metal chalcogenide, a negative electrode containing a lithium-aluminum alloy and an amount of a ternary alloy sufficient to provide at least about 5 percent overcharge capacity relative to a negative electrode solely of the lithium-aluminum alloy, the ternary alloy comprising lithium, aluminum, and iron or cobalt, and an electrolyte containing lithium ions in contact with both of the positive and the negative electrodes. The ternary alloy is present in the electrode in the range of from about 5 percent to about 50 percent by weight of the electrode composition and may include lithium-aluminum-nickel alloy in combination with either the ternary iron or cobalt alloys. A plurality of series connected cells having overcharge capacity can be equalized on the discharge side without expensive electrical equipment.

  9. Logo and Negative Numbers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strawn, Candace A.

    1998-01-01

    Describes LOGO's turtle graphics capabilities based on a sixth-grade classroom's activities with negative numbers and Logo programming. A sidebar explains LOGO and offers suggestions to teachers for using LOGO effectively. (LRW)

  10. No to negative data

    SciTech Connect

    Wiley, H. S.

    2008-04-01

    A frequent criticism in biology is that we don’t publish our negative data. As a result, the literature has become biased towards papers that favor specific hypotheses1. Some scientists have become so concerned about this trend that they have created journals dedicated to publishing negative results (e.g. the Journal of Negative Results in Biomedicine). Personally, I don’t think they should bother. I say this because I believe negative results are not worth publishing. Rest assured that I do not include drug studies that show a lack of effectiveness towards a specific disease or condition. This type of finding is significant in a societal context, not a scientific one, and thus we all have a vested interest in seeing this type of result published. I am talking about a set of experimental results that fail to support a particular hypothesis. The problem with these types of negative results is that they don’t actually advance science. Science is a set of ideas that can be supported by observations. A negative result does not support any specific idea, but only tells you what isn’t right. Well, there are only a small number of potential hypotheses that are correct, but essentially an infinite number of ideas are not correct. I don’t want to waste my time reading a paper about what doesn’t happen, just about those things that do. I can remember a positive result because I can associate it with a specific concept. What do I do with a negative one? It is hard enough to following the current literature. A flood of negative results would make that task all but impossible

  11. High-Resolution Live-Cell Imaging and Analysis by Laser Desorption/Ionization Droplet Delivery Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Kyoo; Jansson, Erik T; Nam, Hong Gil; Zare, Richard N

    2016-05-17

    We have developed a new ambient-ionization mass spectrometric technique named laser desorption/ionization droplet delivery mass spectrometry (LDIDD-MS). LDIDD-MS permits high-resolution, high-sensitivity imaging of tissue samples as well as measurements of both single-cell apoptosis and live-cell exocytosis. A pulsed (15 Hz) UV laser beam (266 nm) is focused on a surface covered with target analytes to trigger their desorption and ionization. A spray of liquid droplets is simultaneously directed onto the laser-focused surface region to capture the ionized analytes and deliver them to a mass spectrometer. The approach of rapid and effective capturing of molecules after laser desorption/ionization allows the limit of detection for the amino acid lysine to be as low as 2 amol under ambient ionization conditions. Two-dimensional maps of the desorbed/ionized species are recorded by moving the sample on an XY translational stage. The spatial resolution for imaging with LDIDD-MS was determined to be 2.4 μm for an ink-printed pattern and 3 μm for mouse brain tissue. We applied LDIDD-MS to single-cell analysis of apoptotic HEK cells. Differences were observed in the profiles of fatty acids and lipids between healthy HEK cells and those undergoing apoptosis. We observed upregulation of phosphatidylcholine (PC) with a relatively shorter carbon chain length and downregulation of PC with a relatively longer carbon chain length. We also applied LDIDD-MS for a real-time direct measurements of live-cell exocytosis. The catecholamine dopamine and trace amines (phenethylamine and tyramine) were detected from live PC12 cells without damaging them.

  12. Ionizing radiation and hematopoietic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Fleenor, Courtney J; Marusyk, Andriy

    2010-01-01

    Somatic evolution, which underlies tumor progression, is driven by two essential components: (1) diversification of phenotypes through heritable mutations and epigenetic changes and (2) selection for mutant clones which possess higher fitness. Exposure to ionizing radiation (IR) is highly associated with increased risk of carcinogenesis. This link is traditionally attributed to causation of oncogenic mutations through the mutagenic effects of irradiation. On the other hand, potential effects of irradiation on altering fitness and increasing selection for mutant clones are frequently ignored. Recent studies bring the effects of irradiation on fitness and selection into focus, demonstrating that IR exposure results in stable reductions in the fitness of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell populations. These reductions of fitness are associated with alteration of the adaptive landscape, increasing the selective advantages conferred by certain oncogenic mutations. Therefore, the link between irradiation and carcinogenesis might be more complex than traditionally appreciated: while mutagenic effects of irradiation should increase the probability of occurrence of oncogenic mutations, IR can also work as a tumor promoter, increasing the selective expansion of clones bearing mutations which become advantageous in the irradiation-altered environment, such as activated mutations in Notch1 or disrupting mutations in p53. PMID:20676038

  13. Ionizing radiation and heart risks.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Souparno; Asaithamby, Aroumougame

    2016-10-01

    Cardiovascular disease and cancer are the two leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. As advancements in radiation therapy (RT) have significantly increased the number of cancer survivors, the risk of radiation-induced cardiovascular disease (RICD) in this group is a growing concern. Recent epidemiological data suggest that accidental or occupational exposure to low dose radiation, in addition to therapeutic ionizing radiation, can result in cardiovascular complications. The progression of radiation-induced cardiotoxicity often takes years to manifest but is also multifaceted, as the heart may be affected by a variety of pathologies. The risk of cardiovascular disease development in RT cancer survivors has been known for 40 years and several risk factors have been identified in the last two decades. However, most of the early work focused on clinical symptoms and manifestations, rather than understanding cellular processes regulating homeostatic processes of the cardiovascular system in response to radiation. Recent studies have suggested that a different approach may be needed to refute the risk of cardiovascular disease following radiation exposure. In this review, we will focus on how different radiation types and doses may induce cardiovascular complications, highlighting clinical manifestations and the mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of radiation-induced cardiotoxicity. We will finally discuss how current and future research on heart development and homeostasis can help reduce the incidence of RICD.

  14. Ionization and Triggered Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritschneder, M.; Lin, D. N. C.; Murray, S. D.; Burkert, A.

    2011-12-01

    We perform a set of high resolution simulations on the impact of the UV-radiation of massive stars on the turbulent interstellar medium with the tree-SPH code iVINE. This parameter study includes different levels and driving scales of the turbulence, different ionizing flux as well as different temperatures and densities of the cold gas. We find a clear correlation between the initial state of the turbulent cloud and the final morphology and physical properties of the structures adjacent to the HII region. From the simulations we are able to derive a criterion for the formation of pillar-like structures and thus the formation of cores and stars. Gravitational collapse occurs regularly on the tips of the structures. We also derive column densities and velocity profiles of our simulations and find these to be in very good agreement with the observations of trunks and cores. In addition, we investigate the further evolution of the pillars once the massive star explodes. This leads to a supernova triggered scenario for the formation of our Solar System.

  15. Probing Angular Correlations in Sequential Double Ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Fleischer, A.; Woerner, H. J.; Arissian, L.; Liu, L. R.; Meckel, M.; Rippert, A.; Doerner, R.; Villeneuve, D. M.; Corkum, P. B.; Staudte, A.

    2011-09-09

    We study electron correlation in sequential double ionization of noble gas atoms and HCl in intense, femtosecond laser pulses. We measure the photoelectron angular distributions of Ne{sup +} relative to the first electron in a pump-probe experiment with 8 fs, 800 nm, circularly polarized laser pulses at a peak intensity of a few 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}. Using a linear-linear pump-probe setup, we further study He, Ar, and HCl. We find a clear angular correlation between the two ionization steps in the sequential double ionization intensity regime.

  16. Non-equilibrium ionized blast wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.

    1974-01-01

    The structure of a cylindrical blast wave with ionization at non-LTE conditions was calculated using equations previously developed by Wu and Fu (1970). The degree of ionization was predicted by a modified Saha equation. Temperature profiles show that the temperature at non-LTE conditions is lower than at LTE near the shock front. This corresponds to a higher degree of ionization for the non-LTE limit, which indicates that the neutral gas absorption is much more efficient at non-LTE than at the LTE limit. The decaying velocity under non-LTE is approximately 15% less than under LTE.

  17. Epicyclic Twin-Helix Ionization Cooling Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Vasiliy Morozov, Yaroslav Derbenev, A. Afanaciev, R.P. Johnson

    2011-04-01

    Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling (PIC) is proposed as the final 6D cooling stage of a highluminosity muon collider. For the implementation of PIC, we earlier developed an epicyclic twin-helix channel with correlated behavior of the horizontal and vertical betatron motions and dispersion. We now insert absorber plates with short energy-recovering units located next to them at the appropriate locations in the twin-helix channel. We first demonstrate conventional ionization cooling in such a system with the optics uncorrelated. We then adjust the correlated optics state and induce a parametric resonance to study ionization cooling under the resonant condition.

  18. Charged-Particle Impact Ionization of Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Bartschat, Klaus; Guan Xiaoxu

    2008-08-08

    We have developed a hybrid method to treat charged-particle impact ionization of complex atoms and ions. The essential idea is to describe the interaction between a fast projectile and the target perturbatively, up to second order, while the initial bound state and the ejected-electron--residual-ion interaction can be handled via a convergent R-matrix with pseudo-states (close-coupling) expansion. Example results for ionization of the heavy noble gases (Ne-Xe) by positron and electron impact are presented. The general scheme for a distorted-wave treatment of ionization by heavy-particle impact is described.

  19. Ionization of excited xenon atoms by electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erwin, Daniel A.; Kunc, Joseph A.

    2004-08-01

    Measured cross sections for electron-impact ionization of excited Xe atoms are not presently available. Therefore, we combine in this work the formalisms of the binary encounter approximation and Sommerfeld’s quantization of atomic orbits and derive from first-principles cross sections for ionization of excited atoms by electrons of low and moderate energies (up to a few hundred eV ). The approach of this work can be used to calculate the cross sections for electron-impact ionization of excited atoms and atomic ions other than xenon.

  20. Re-ionization and decaying dark matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodelson, Scott; Jubas, Jay M.

    1991-01-01

    Gunn-Peterson tests suggest that the Universe was reionized after the standard recombination epoch. A systematic treatment is presented of the ionization process by deriving the Boltzmann equations appropriate to this regime. A compact solution for the photon spectrum is found in terms of the ionization ratio. These equations are then solved numerically for the Decaying Dark Matter scenario, wherein neutrinos with mass of order 30 eV radiatively decay producing photons which ionize the intergalactic medium. It was found that the neutrino mass and lifetime are severely constrained by Gunn-Peterson tests, observations of the diffuse photon spectrum in the ultraviolet regime, and the Hubble parameter.

  1. Direct-Semidirect Thermal Neutron Capture Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Arbanas, G; Dietrich, F S; Kerman, A K

    2005-12-20

    A method for computing direct-semidirect (DSD) neutron radiative capture is presented and applied to thermal neutron capture on {sup 19}F, {sup 27}Al, {sup 28,29.30}Si, {sup 35,37}Cl, {sup 39,41}K, {sup 56}Fe, and {sup 238}U, in support of data evaluation effort at the O.R.N.L. The DSD method includes both direct and semidirect capture; the latter is a core-polarization term in which the giant dipole resonance is formed. We study the effects of a commonly used ''density'' approximation to the EM operator and find it to be unsatisfactory for the nuclei considered here. We also study the magnitude of semidirect capture relative to the pure direct capture. Furthermore, we compare our results with those obtained from another direct capture code (Tedca [17]). We also compare our results with those obtained from analytical expression for external capture derived by Lane and Lynn [3], and its extension to include internal capture [7]. To estimate the effect of nuclear deformation on direct capture, we computed direct thermal capture on {sup 238}U with and without imposition of spherical symmetry. Direct capture for a spherically symmetric {sup 238}U was approximately 6 mb, while a quadrupole deformation of 0.215 on the shape of {sup 238}U lowers this cross section down to approximately 2 mb. This result suggests that effects of nuclear deformation on direct capture warrant a further study. We also find out that contribution to the direct capture on {sup 238}U from the nuclear interior significantly cancels that coming from the exterior region, and hence both contributions must be taken into account. We reproduced a well known discrepancy between the computed and observed branching ratios in {sup 56}Fe(n,{gamma}). This will lead us to revisit the concept of doorway states in the particle-hole model.

  2. Pre-capture multiplexing improves efficiency and cost-effectiveness of targeted genomic enrichment

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    to standard post-capture TGE. A decrease in capture efficiency is observed when using pre-capture multiplexing; however, it does not negatively impact variant detection and can be accommodated by the experimental design. PMID:23148716

  3. Negative admittance in resistive metal oxide gas sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varpula, A.; Novikov, S.; Sinkkonen, J.; Utriainen, M.

    2008-03-01

    The negative admittance effect is observed in a WO3-based resistive gas sensor MOS1 from Environics Oy. The effect is caused by electron trapping (i.e. oxygen ionization) at the grain boundary. The results show that the current component related to the modulation of the grain-boundary barrier dominates in dry clean air and the charging or discharging current dominates in humid air conditions. An equivalent electrical circuit model for the sensor response is presented.

  4. Interstellar propagation and electron capture processes of galactic cosmic ray heavy ions in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miltra, B.; Biswas, S.; Goswami, J. N.

    1995-01-01

    The new information on galactic cosmic rays (GCR) derived from the Spacelab-3 cosmic ray experiment 'Anuradha' shows that at 25-125 MeV/N GCR sub-iron and iron (Z = 21-28) particles consists of a mixture of partially ionized and fully ionized ions. Computation of electron capture and loss cross sections in hydrogen in 1-50 MeV/N energy range are made for Fe, Cr, Ti and Ni. From these it is concluded that: (1) these GCR particles must have captured orbital electrons at energies of about 1-5 MeV/N and (2) these particles are then reaccelerated to 300-500 MeV/N most probably in interstellar medium by collision with SNR shock fronts. Some reacceleration may take place also in heliospheric boundary region. It is suggested that these observations of partially ionized GCR ions of about 100 MeV/N in Spacelab-3 provide a direct evidence of reacceleration of GCR.

  5. Conductive Graphitic Carbon Nitride as an Ideal Material for Electrocatalytically Switchable CO2 Capture

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Xin; Kou, Liangzhi; Tahini, Hassan A.; Smith, Sean C.

    2015-01-01

    Good electrical conductivity and high electron mobility of the sorbent materials are prerequisite for electrocatalytically switchable CO2 capture. However, no conductive and easily synthetic sorbent materials are available until now. Here, we examined the possibility of conductive graphitic carbon nitride (g-C4N3) nanosheets as sorbent materials for electrocatalytically switchable CO2 capture. Using first-principle calculations, we found that the adsorption energy of CO2 molecules on g-C4N3 nanosheets can be dramatically enhanced by injecting extra electrons into the adsorbent. At saturation CO2 capture coverage, the negatively charged g-C4N3 nanosheets achieve CO2 capture capacities up to 73.9 × 1013 cm−2 or 42.3 wt%. In contrast to other CO2 capture approaches, the process of CO2 capture/release occurs spontaneously without any energy barriers once extra electrons are introduced or removed, and these processes can be simply controlled and reversed by switching on/off the charging voltage. In addition, these negatively charged g-C4N3 nanosheets are highly selective for separating CO2 from mixtures with CH4, H2 and/or N2. These predictions may prove to be instrumental in searching for a new class of experimentally feasible high-capacity CO2 capture materials with ideal thermodynamics and reversibility. PMID:26621618

  6. Conductive Graphitic Carbon Nitride as an Ideal Material for Electrocatalytically Switchable CO2 Capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Xin; Kou, Liangzhi; Tahini, Hassan A.; Smith, Sean C.

    2015-12-01

    Good electrical conductivity and high electron mobility of the sorbent materials are prerequisite for electrocatalytically switchable CO2 capture. However, no conductive and easily synthetic sorbent materials are available until now. Here, we examined the possibility of conductive graphitic carbon nitride (g-C4N3) nanosheets as sorbent materials for electrocatalytically switchable CO2 capture. Using first-principle calculations, we found that the adsorption energy of CO2 molecules on g-C4N3 nanosheets can be dramatically enhanced by injecting extra electrons into the adsorbent. At saturation CO2 capture coverage, the negatively charged g-C4N3 nanosheets achieve CO2 capture capacities up to 73.9 × 1013 cm-2 or 42.3 wt%. In contrast to other CO2 capture approaches, the process of CO2 capture/release occurs spontaneously without any energy barriers once extra electrons are introduced or removed, and these processes can be simply controlled and reversed by switching on/off the charging voltage. In addition, these negatively charged g-C4N3 nanosheets are highly selective for separating CO2 from mixtures with CH4, H2 and/or N2. These predictions may prove to be instrumental in searching for a new class of experimentally feasible high-capacity CO2 capture materials with ideal thermodynamics and reversibility.

  7. Conductive Graphitic Carbon Nitride as an Ideal Material for Electrocatalytically Switchable CO2 Capture.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xin; Kou, Liangzhi; Tahini, Hassan A; Smith, Sean C

    2015-12-01

    Good electrical conductivity and high electron mobility of the sorbent materials are prerequisite for electrocatalytically switchable CO2 capture. However, no conductive and easily synthetic sorbent materials are available until now. Here, we examined the possibility of conductive graphitic carbon nitride (g-C4N3) nanosheets as sorbent materials for electrocatalytically switchable CO2 capture. Using first-principle calculations, we found that the adsorption energy of CO2 molecules on g-C4N3 nanosheets can be dramatically enhanced by injecting extra electrons into the adsorbent. At saturation CO2 capture coverage, the negatively charged g-C4N3 nanosheets achieve CO2 capture capacities up to 73.9 × 10(13) cm(-2) or 42.3 wt%. In contrast to other CO2 capture approaches, the process of CO2 capture/release occurs spontaneously without any energy barriers once extra electrons are introduced or removed, and these processes can be simply controlled and reversed by switching on/off the charging voltage. In addition, these negatively charged g-C4N3 nanosheets are highly selective for separating CO2 from mixtures with CH4, H2 and/or N2. These predictions may prove to be instrumental in searching for a new class of experimentally feasible high-capacity CO2 capture materials with ideal thermodynamics and reversibility.

  8. Negative Plasma Densities Raise Questions

    SciTech Connect

    Hazi, A

    2006-01-26

    Nearly all the matter encountered on Earth is either a solid, liquid, or gas. Yet plasma-the fourth state of matter-comprises more than 99 percent of the visible universe. Understanding the physical characteristics of plasmas is important to many areas of scientific research, such as the development of fusion as a clean, renewable energy source. Lawrence Livermore scientists study the physics of plasmas in their pursuit to create fusion energy, because plasmas are an integral part of that process. When deuterium and tritium are heated to the extreme temperatures needed to achieve and sustain a fusion reaction (about 100 million degrees), the electrons in these light atoms become separated from the nuclei. This process of separation is called ionization, and the resulting collection of negatively charged free electrons and positively charged nuclei is known as a plasma. Although plasmas and gases have many similar properties, plasmas differ from gases in that they are good conductors of electricity and can generate magnetic fields. For the past decade, x-ray laser interferometry has been used in the laboratory for measuring a plasma's index of refraction to determine plasma density. (The index of refraction for a given material is defined as the wavelength of light in a vacuum divided by the wavelength of light traveling through the material.) Until now, plasma physicists expected to find an index of refraction less than one. Researchers from Livermore and Colorado State University recently conducted experiments on aluminum plasmas at the Laboratory's COMET laser facility and observed results in which the index of refraction was greater than one. This surprising result implied a negative electron density. Livermore physicist Joseph Nilsen and his colleagues from Livermore and the University of Notre Dame have performed sophisticated calculations to explain this phenomenon. Previously, researchers believed that only free electrons contributed to the index of

  9. Methods for capturing and banding Kalij Pheasants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vetter, J.P.

    2003-01-01

    We developed methods to capture and band Kalij Pheasants (Lophura leucomelanos) in their introduced range at Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, where they are not hunted and are relatively tame. Kalij were wary of foreign structures, such as traps, but readily took cracked corn bait and entered baited traps, provided they were introduced to them gradually. The majority of Kalij on the study site (53 of 64 birds) were captured using three trap designs: open-door trap, large box trap with hinged door, and drop trap. While the open-door trap was more mobile and easily set up in cramped forest spaces, only groups of as many as five birds could be captured at a time. The large, more cumber-some box traps captured groups of up to eight birds, whereas drop traps successfully captured only one bird at a time. Females were more difficult to capture than males. Band size was 7A for males and 6 for females.

  10. Characterization of the CDMS Ionization Readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phipps, Arran

    2007-10-01

    Current cosmological models predict that a large portion of the total mass of the universe, about eighty percent, consists of putative dark matter. Theory predicts this dark matter may be in the form of particles constantly passing through the Earth. A class of these particles may interact with ordinary matter, earning the name weakly-interacting massive particles (WIMPs). The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) aims to directly detect the existence of WIMPs. CDMS has designed ZIP (Z-dependent Ionization & Phonon) detectors which measure phonon production and ionization of an interaction, making it possible to determine the interacting particle. The low-energy threshold of the ZIP detectors is determined by the signal-to-noise ratio of the ionization readout. A characterization of the signal-to-noise ratio of the ionization readout, along with possible modifications for improved sensitivity will be presented.

  11. Ionization and positronium formation in noble gases

    SciTech Connect

    Marler, J.P.; Sullivan, J.P.; Surko, C.M.

    2005-02-01

    Absolute measurements are presented for the positron-impact cross sections for direct ionization and positronium formation of noble gas atoms in the range of energies from threshold to 90 eV. The experiment uses a cold, trap-based positron beam and the technique of studying positron scattering in a strong magnetic field. The current data show generally good, quantitative agreement with previous measurements taken using a qualitatively different method. However, significant differences in the cross sections for both direct ionization and positronium formation are also observed. An analysis is presented that yields another, independent measurement of the direct ionization and positronium formation cross sections that is in agreement with the present, direct measurements to within {+-}10% for argon, krypton, and xenon. Comparison with available theoretical predictions yields good quantitative agreement for direct ionization cross sections, and qualitative agreement in the case of positronium formation.

  12. Which Stars Are Ionizing the Orion Nebula?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O’Dell, C. R.; Kollatschny, W.; Ferland, G. J.

    2017-03-01

    The common assumption that {θ }1 {Ori} {{C}} is the dominant ionizing source for the Orion Nebula is critically examined. This assumption underlies much of the existing analysis of the nebula. In this paper we establish through comparison of the relative strengths of emission lines with expectations from Cloudy models and through the direction of the bright edges of proplyds that {θ }2 {Ori} {{A}}, which lies beyond the Bright Bar, also plays an important role. {θ }1 {Ori} {{C}} does dominate ionization in the inner part of the Orion Nebula, but outside of the Bright Bar as far as the southeast boundary of the Extended Orion Nebula, {θ }2 {Ori} {{A}} is the dominant source. In addition to identifying the ionizing star in sample regions, we were able to locate those portions of the nebula in 3D. This analysis illustrates the power of MUSE spectral imaging observations to identify sources of ionization in extended regions.

  13. The galactic cosmic ray ionization rate

    PubMed Central

    Dalgarno, A.

    2006-01-01

    The chemistry that occurs in the interstellar medium in response to cosmic ray ionization is summarized, and a review of the ionization rates that have been derived from measurements of molecular abundances is presented. The successful detection of large abundances of H3+ in diffuse clouds and the recognition that dissociative recombination of H3+ is fast has led to an upward revision of the derived ionization rates. In dense clouds the molecular abundances are sensitive to the depletion of carbon monoxide, atomic oxygen, nitrogen, water, and metals and the presence of large molecules and grains. Measurements of the relative abundances of deuterated species provide information about the ion removal mechanisms, but uncertainties remain. The models, both of dense and diffuse clouds, that are used to interpret the observations may be seriously inadequate. Nevertheless, it appears that the ionization rates differ in dense and diffuse clouds and in the intercloud medium. PMID:16894166

  14. (Resonance ionization spectroscopy and its applications)

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, J.M.

    1990-10-11

    The Fifth International Symposium in Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy and Its Applications was attended. The Joint Research Centre of the European Communities at Ispra, Italy was also visited. The traveler presented an invited talk, chaired a meeting session and gave an impromptu presentation on how current laser technology limits the development of commercial instrumentation based upon Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy. The conference was truely international with scientists from 19 countries and less than 1/4 from the US. The meeting also provided a health mixture of experimentalists and theoreticians. Technical developments reported included the use of electric field ionization from laser prepared Rydberg states as a way to reduce background signals and commercial development of an optical parametric oscillator for replacing pulsed dye laser. A speaker from the Soviet Union suggested their willingness to market hardware they have developed based upon the resonance ionization technique.

  15. The galactic cosmic ray ionization rate.

    PubMed

    Dalgarno, A

    2006-08-15

    The chemistry that occurs in the interstellar medium in response to cosmic ray ionization is summarized, and a review of the ionization rates that have been derived from measurements of molecular abundances is presented. The successful detection of large abundances of H(3)(+) in diffuse clouds and the recognition that dissociative recombination of H(3)(+) is fast has led to an upward revision of the derived ionization rates. In dense clouds the molecular abundances are sensitive to the depletion of carbon monoxide, atomic oxygen, nitrogen, water, and metals and the presence of large molecules and grains. Measurements of the relative abundances of deuterated species provide information about the ion removal mechanisms, but uncertainties remain. The models, both of dense and diffuse clouds, that are used to interpret the observations may be seriously inadequate. Nevertheless, it appears that the ionization rates differ in dense and diffuse clouds and in the intercloud medium.

  16. Ionization of NO at high temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, C. Frederick

    1991-01-01

    Space vehicles flying through the atmosphere at high speed are known to excite a complex set of chemical reactions in the atmospheric gases, ranging from simple vibrational excitation to dissociation, atom exchange, electronic excitation, ionization, and charge exchange. Simple arguments are developed for the temperature dependence of the reactions leading to ionization of NO, including the effect of vibrational electronic thermal nonequilibrium. NO ionization is the most important source of electrons at intermediate temperatures and at higher temperatures provides the trigger electrons that ionize atoms. Based on these arguments, recommendations are made for formulae which fit observed experimental results, and which include a dependence on both a heavy particle temperature and different vibration electron temperatures. In addition, these expressions will presumably provide the most reliable extrapolation of experimental results to much higher temperatures.

  17. Techniques for capturing bighorn sheep lambs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Joshua B.; Walsh, Daniel P.; Goldstein, Elise J.; Parsons, Zachary D.; Karsch, Rebekah C.; Stiver, Julie R.; Cain, James W.; Raedeke, Kenneth J.; Jenks, Jonathan A.

    2014-01-01

    Low lamb recruitment is a major challenge facing managers attempting to mitigate the decline of bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis), and investigations into the underlying mechanisms are limited because of the inability to readily capture and monitor bighorn sheep lambs. We evaluated 4 capture techniques for bighorn sheep lambs: 1) hand-capture of lambs from radiocollared adult females fitted with vaginal implant transmitters (VITs), 2) hand-capture of lambs of intensively monitored radiocollared adult females, 3) helicopter net-gunning, and 4) hand-capture of lambs from helicopters. During 2010–2012, we successfully captured 90% of lambs from females that retained VITs to ≤1 day of parturition, although we noted differences in capture rates between an area of high road density in the Black Hills (92–100%) of South Dakota, USA, and less accessible areas of New Mexico (71%), USA. Retention of VITs was 78% with pre-partum expulsion the main cause of failure. We were less likely to capture lambs from females that expelled VITs ≥1 day of parturition (range = 80–83%) or females that were collared without VITs (range = 60–78%). We used helicopter net-gunning at several sites in 1999, 2001–2002, and 2011, and it proved a useful technique; however, at one site, attempts to capture lambs led to lamb predation by golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos). We attempted helicopter hand-captures at one site in 1999, and they also were successful in certain circumstances and avoided risk of physical trauma from net-gunning; however, application was limited. In areas of low accessibility or if personnel lack the ability to monitor females and/or VITs for extended periods, helicopter capture may provide a viable option for lamb capture.

  18. Attentional Capture Can Depend on Search Mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remington, Roger W.; Folk, Charles L.; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    We have previously reported that an irrelevant singleton in one color does not capture attention when the target is defined by a singleton in a different color. Here, we show that when subjects are uncertain of the target color, capture occurs even when distractors and targets differ in color. The effects of target certainty on capture are explained in terms of the contingent involuntary orienting hypothesis of Folk, Remington, and Johnston (1992).

  19. Silica Aerogel Captures Cosmic Dust Intact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsou, P.

    1994-01-01

    The mesostructure of silica aerogel resembles stings of grapes, ranging in size from 10 to 100 angstrom. This fine mesostructure transmits nearly 90 percent of incident light in the visible, while providing sufficiently gentle dissipation of the kinetric energy of hypervelocity cosmic dust particles to permit their intact capture. We introduced silica aerogel in 1987 as capture medium to take advantage of its low density, fine mesostruicture and most importantly, its transparency, allowing optical location of captured micron sized particles.

  20. Capture of particles in soft porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louvet, N.; Höhler, R.; Pitois, O.

    2010-10-01

    We investigate the capture of particles in soft porous media. Liquid foam constitutes a model system for such a study, allowing the radii of passage in the pore space to be tuned over several orders of magnitude by adjusting the liquid volume fraction. We show how particle capture is determined by the coupling of interstitial liquid flow and network deformation, and present a simple model of the capture process that shows good agreement with our experimental data.

  1. Opportunity Captures 'Lion King' Panorama

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for Opportunity Captures 'Lion King' Panorama (QTVR)

    This approximate true-color panorama, dubbed 'Lion King,' shows 'Eagle Crater' and the surrounding plains of Meridiani Planum. It was obtained by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's panoramic camera on sols 58 and 60 using infrared (750-nanometer), green (530-nanometer) and blue (430-nanometer) filters.

    This is the largest panorama obtained yet by either rover. It was taken in eight segments using six filters per segment, for a total of 558 images and more than 75 megabytes of data. Additional lower elevation tiers were added to ensure that the entire crater was covered in the mosaic.

    This panorama depicts a story of exploration including the rover's lander, a thorough examination of the outcrop, a study of the soils at the near-side of the lander, a successful exit from Eagle Crater and finally the rover's next desination, the large crater dubbed 'Endurance'.

  2. Miniature Dual-Corona Ionizer for Bipolar Charging of Aerosol.

    PubMed

    Qi, Chaolong; Kulkarni, Pramod

    2013-01-01

    A corona-based bipolar charger has been developed for use in compact, field-portable mobility size spectrometers. The charger employs an aerosol flow cavity exposed to two corona ionizers producing ions of opposite polarity. Each corona ionizer houses two electrodes in parallel needle-mesh configuration and is operated at the same magnitude of corona current. Experimental measurement of detailed charge distribution of near-monodisperse particles of different diameter in the submicrometer size range showed that the charger is capable of producing well-defined, consistent bipolar charge distributions for flow rates up to 1.5 L/min and aerosol concentration up to 10(7) per cm(3). For particles with preexisting charge of +1, 0, and -1, the measured charge distributions agreed well with the theoretical distributions within the range of experimental and theoretical uncertainties. The transmission efficiency of the charger was measured to be 80% for 10 nm particles (at 0.3 L/min and 5 μA corona current) and increased with increasing diameter beyond this size. Measurement of uncharged fractions at various combinations of positive and negative corona currents showed the charger performance to be insensitive to fluctuations in corona current. Ion concentrations under positive and negative unipolar operation were estimated to be 8.2 × 10(7) and 3.37 × 10(8) cm(-3) for positive and negative ions; the n·t product value under positive corona operation was independently estimated to be 8.5 × 10(5) s/cm(3). The ion concentration estimates indicate the charger to be capable of "neutralizing" typical atmospheric and industrial aerosols in most measurement applications. The miniature size, simple and robust operation makes the charger suitable for portable mobility spectrometers.

  3. Miniature Dual-Corona Ionizer for Bipolar Charging of Aerosol

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Chaolong; Kulkarni, Pramod

    2015-01-01

    A corona-based bipolar charger has been developed for use in compact, field-portable mobility size spectrometers. The charger employs an aerosol flow cavity exposed to two corona ionizers producing ions of opposite polarity. Each corona ionizer houses two electrodes in parallel needle-mesh configuration and is operated at the same magnitude of corona current. Experimental measurement of detailed charge distribution of near-monodisperse particles of different diameter in the submicrometer size range showed that the charger is capable of producing well-defined, consistent bipolar charge distributions for flow rates up to 1.5 L/min and aerosol concentration up to 107 per cm3. For particles with preexisting charge of +1, 0, and −1, the measured charge distributions agreed well with the theoretical distributions within the range of experimental and theoretical uncertainties. The transmission efficiency of the charger was measured to be 80% for 10 nm particles (at 0.3 L/min and 5 μA corona current) and increased with increasing diameter beyond this size. Measurement of uncharged fractions at various combinations of positive and negative corona currents showed the charger performance to be insensitive to fluctuations in corona current. Ion concentrations under positive and negative unipolar operation were estimated to be 8.2 × 107 and 3.37 × 108 cm−3 for positive and negative ions; the n·t product value under positive corona operation was independently estimated to be 8.5 × 105 s/cm3. The ion concentration estimates indicate the charger to be capable of “neutralizing” typical atmospheric and industrial aerosols in most measurement applications. The miniature size, simple and robust operation makes the charger suitable for portable mobility spectrometers. PMID:26512158

  4. Ionization energy of acetone by vacuum ultraviolet mass-analyzed threshold ionization spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jae Han; Kang, Do Won; Hong, Yong Jun; Hwang, Hyonseok; Kim, Hong Lae; Kwon, Chan Ho

    2013-04-01

    Mass-analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) time-of-flight mass spectrometer using coherent vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) laser generated by four-wave difference frequency mixing (FWDFM) in Kr has been constructed and utilized to obtain the accurate ionization energy of acetone. From the MATI onsets measured from various applied pulsed fields, the ionization energy to the ionic ground state of acetone has been determined to be 9.7074 ± 0.0019 eV.

  5. Gas amplified ionization detector for gas chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Huston, Gregg C.

    1992-01-01

    A gas-amplified ionization detector for gas chromatrography which possesses increased sensitivity and a very fast response time. Solutes eluding from a gas chromatographic column are ionized by UV photoionization of matter eluting therefrom. The detector is capable of generating easily measured voltage signals by gas amplification/multiplication of electron products resulting from the UV photoionization of at least a portion of each solute passing through the detector.

  6. Diagnosing transient ionization in dynamic events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, J. G.; Giunta, A.; Madjarska, M. S.; Summers, H.; O'Mullane, M.; Singh, A.

    2013-09-01

    Aims: The present study aims to provide a diagnostic line ratio that will enable the observer to determine whether a plasma is in a state of transient ionization. Methods: We use the Atomic Data and Analysis Structure (ADAS) to calculate line contribution functions for two lines, Si iv 1394 Å and O iv 1401 Å, formed in the solar transition region. The generalized collisional-radiative theory is used. It includes all radiative and electron collisional processes, except for photon-induced processes. State-resolved direct ionization and recombination to and from the next ionization stage are also taken into account. Results: For dynamic bursts with a decay time of a few seconds, the Si iv 1394 Å line can be enhanced by a factor of 2-4 in the first fraction of a second with the peak in the line contribution function occurring initially at a higher electron temperature due to transient ionization compared to ionization equilibrium conditions. On the other hand, the O iv 1401 Å does not show such any enhancement. Thus the ratio of these two lines, which can be observed with the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph, can be used as a diagnostic of transient ionization. Conclusions: We show that simultaneous high-cadence observations of two lines formed in the solar transition region may be used as a direct diagnostic of whether the observed plasma is in transient ionization. The ratio of these two lines can change by a factor of four in a few seconds owing to transient ionization alone.

  7. TARGETED CAPTURE IN EVOLUTIONARY AND ECOLOGICAL GENOMICS

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Matthew R.; Good, Jeffrey M.

    2016-01-01

    The rapid expansion of next-generation sequencing has yielded a powerful array of tools to address fundamental biological questions at a scale that was inconceivable just a few years ago. Various genome partitioning strategies to sequence select subsets of the genome have emerged as powerful alternatives to whole genome sequencing in ecological and evolutionary genomic studies. High throughput targeted capture is one such strategy that involves the parallel enrichment of pre-selected genomic regions of interest. The growing use of targeted capture demonstrates its potential power to address a range of research questions, yet these approaches have yet to expand broadly across labs focused on evolutionary and ecological genomics. In part, the use of targeted capture has been hindered by the logistics of capture design and implementation in species without established reference genomes. Here we aim to 1) increase the accessibility of targeted capture to researchers working in non-model taxa by discussing capture methods that circumvent the need of a reference genome, 2) highlight the evolutionary and ecological applications where this approach is emerging as a powerful sequencing strategy, and 3) discuss the future of targeted capture and other genome partitioning approaches in light of the increasing accessibility of whole genome sequencing. Given the practical advantages and increasing feasibility of high-throughput targeted capture, we anticipate an ongoing expansion of capture-based approaches in evolutionary and ecological research, synergistic with an expansion of whole genome sequencing. PMID:26137993

  8. Effect of sample compositions on chemical analysis using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schriemer, David; Dai, Yuqin; Li, Liang

    1996-11-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) is an effective ionization technique for mass spectrometry. It take advantages of some unique properties of certain organic chemicals to provide entrapment, isolation, vaporization, and ionization of the analyte of interest. While the main application of the MALDI technique is currently in the area of biological molecule analysis, it is possible to use this technique for monitoring polymer chemistry such as degradation processes. This is potentially important for studying and developing environmentally degradable polymers. Direct analysis of the analyte in real-world samples is possible with MALDI. However, there is a significant effect of the overall composition of a sample on the detectability and performance of MALDI. Two examples are given to illustrate the positive and negative effects of buffers, salts, and additives on the MALDI sample preparation.

  9. Interference structure of above-threshold ionization versus above-threshold detachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korneev, Ph A.; Popruzhenko, S. V.; Goreslavski, S. P.; Becker, W.; Paulus, G. G.; Fetić, B.; Milošević, D. B.

    2012-05-01

    Laser-induced electron detachment or ionization of atoms and negative ions is considered. In the context of the saddle-point evaluation of the strong-field approximation (SFA), the velocity maps of the direct electrons (those that do not undergo rescattering) exhibit a characteristic structure due to the constructive and destructive interference of electrons liberated from their parent atoms/ions within certain windows of time. This structure is defined by the above-threshold ionization rings at fixed electron energy and by two sets of curves in momentum space on which destructive interference occurs. The spectra obtained with the SFA are compared with those obtained by numerical solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. For detachment, the agreement is excellent. For ionization, the effect of the Coulomb field is most pronounced for electrons emitted in a direction close to laser polarization, while for near-perpendicular emission the qualitative appearance of the spectrum is unaffected.

  10. Resonant effects in above-threshold ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertlein, Marcus P.

    2000-09-01

    The ionization of noble gases in high intensity laser fields produces an electron spectrum with characteristic peaks corresponding to atomic levels of the atom. While many of the features in the low energy part of the spectrum have been explained qualitatively, current models are incomplete and are not able to account for the recurrence of ionization probability for higher energy electrons. In particular, one of the basic questions arising is the importance of multiple ionization in these spectra. While the light intensities are in the regime where multiple ionization is known to occur, it was not clear whether the higher energy (or plateau) electrons are a result of this, and whether multiple ionization even leaves a signature in the electron spectrum. In this dissertation, we use several experimental techniques to explore this problem in argon. Our results show that although multiple ionization occurs, electrons from this process do not appear in the observed electron spectrum. Furthermore, the appearance intensities of the peaks visible in the plateau region of the electron spectrum and of the resonance peaks in the well- understood low energy part show a strong correlation, suggestion a common origin of production. Accurate computer simulations of the process, using a single- active-electron model, reproduce all essential features of the experimental spectra. Our results support the conclusion that all high energy electrons observed in our experiments can be explained with single-electron effects.

  11. Multiple ionization of argon by helium ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanari, C. C.; Miraglia, J. E.

    2016-09-01

    We apply the continuum distorted-wave eikonal initial state and the independent electron model to describe the multiple ionization of Ar by He2+ and He+ in the energy range 0.1-10 Mev amu-1. Auger-like post collisional processes are included, which enhance the high energy multiple ionization cross sections via ionization of the inner shells. All Ar electrons (K, L and M-shells) have been included in these calculations. The results agree well with the experimental data at high energies, where the post-collisional ionization is the main contribution. At intermediate impact energies the description is also good though it tends to overestimate the triple and quadruple ionization data at intermediate energies. We analyze this by comparing the present results for He+2 in Ar, with previous ones for He+2 in Ne and Kr. It was found that the theoretical description improves from Ne to Ar and Kr, with the latter being nicely described even at intermediate energies. The present formalism is also tested for Ar inner shell and total ionization cross sections. In all the cases the results above 0.1 MeV amu-1 are quite reasonable, as compared with the experimental data available and with the ECPSSR values.

  12. Neutral depletion versus repletion due to ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Fruchtman, A.; Makrinich, G.; Raimbault, J.-L.; Liard, L.; Rax, J.-M.; Chabert, P.

    2008-05-15

    Recent theoretical analyses which predicted unexpected effects of neutral depletion in both collisional and collisionless plasmas are reviewed. We focus on the depletion of collisionless neutrals induced by strong ionization of a collisionless plasma and contrast this depletion with the effect of strong ionization on thermalized neutrals. The collisionless plasma is analyzed employing a kinetic description. The collisionless neutrals and the plasma are coupled through volume ionization and wall recombination only. The profiles of density and pressure both of the plasma and of the neutral-gas and the profile of the ionization rate are calculated. It is shown that for collisionless neutrals the ionization results in neutral depletion, while when neutrals are thermalized the ionization induces a maximal neutral-density at the discharge center, which we call neutral repletion. The difference between the two cases stems from the relation between the neutral density and pressure. The pressure of the collisionless neutral-gas turns out to be maximal where its density is minimal, in contrast to the case of a thermalized neutral gas.

  13. Tunneling ionization of vibrationally excited nitrogen molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornev, Aleksei S.; Zon, Boris A.

    2015-09-01

    Ionization of molecular nitrogen plays an important role in the process of light-filament formation in air. In the present paper we theoretically investigated tunneling ionization of the valence 3 σg and 1 πu shells in a N2 molecule using a strong near-infrared laser field. This research is based on our previously proposed theory of anti-Stokes-enhanced tunneling ionization with quantum accounting for the vibrationally excited states of the molecules [A. S. Kornev and B. A. Zon, Phys. Rev. A 86, 043401 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevA.86.043401]. We demonstrated that if the N2 molecule is ionized from the ground vibrational state, then the contribution of the 1 πu orbital is 0.5%. In contrast, for vibrationally excited states with a certain angle between the light polarization vector and the molecule axis, both shells can compete and even reverse their contributions due to the anti-Stokes mechanism. The structure constants of molecular orbitals are extracted from numerical solutions to the Hartree-Fock equations. This approach correctly takes into account the exchange interaction. Quantum consideration of vibrational motion results in the occurrence of the critical vibrational state, the tunneling ionization from which has the maximum rate. The numbers of the critical vibrational states are different for different valence shells. In addition, quantum description of vibrations changes the rate of ionization from the ground vibrational state by 20%-40% in comparison with the quasiclassical results.

  14. Research in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy at MIT LABA

    SciTech Connect

    Yanch, J.C.; Shefer, R.E.; Klinkowstein, R.E.; Howard, W.B.; Song, H.; Blackburn, B.; Binello, E.

    1997-02-01

    A 4.1 MeV tandem electrostatic accelerator designed for research into Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) has recently been installed in the MIT Laboratory for Accelerator Beam Applications (LABA). This accelerator uses a very high current switch mode high voltage power supply in conjunction with a multi-cusp negative ion source to supply the multimilliampere current required for clinical BNCT applications. A number of individual research projects aimed at evaluating the potential of this accelerator design as a hospital-based neutron source for radiation therapy of both tumors and rheumatoid arthritis are described here. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Studies of nanosecond pulse surface ionization wave discharges over solid and liquid dielectric surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrishchev, Vitaly; Leonov, Sergey; Adamovich, Igor V.

    2014-12-01

    Surface ionization wave discharges generated by high-voltage nanosecond pulses, propagating over a planar quartz surface and over liquid surfaces (distilled water and 1-butanol) have been studied in a rectangular cross section test cell. The discharge was initiated using a custom-made, alternating polarity, high-voltage nanosecond pulse plasma generator, operated at a pulse repetition rate of 100-500 Hz, with a pulse peak voltage and current of 10-15 kV and 7-20 A, respectively, a pulse FWHM of ˜100 ns, and a coupled pulse energy of 2-9 mJ/pulse. Wave speed was measured using a capacitive probe. ICCD camera images demonstrated that the ionization wave propagated predominantly over the quartz wall or over the liquid surface adjacent to the grounded waveguide placed along the bottom wall of the test cell. Under all experimental conditions tested, the surface plasma ‘sheet’ was diffuse and fairly uniform, both for positive and negative polarities. The parameters of ionization wave discharge propagating over distilled water and 1-butanol surfaces were close to those of the discharge over a quartz wall. No perturbation of the liquid surface by the discharge was detected. In most cases, the positive polarity surface ionization wave propagated at a higher speed and over a longer distance compared to the negative polarity wave. For all three sets of experiments (surface ionization wave discharge over quartz, water and 1-butanol), wave speed and travel distance decreased with pressure. Diffuse, highly reproducible surface ionization wave discharge was also observed over the liquid butanol-saturated butanol vapor interface, as well as over the distilled water-saturated water vapor interface, without buffer gas flow. No significant difference was detected between surface ionization discharges sustained using single-polarity (positive or negative), or alternating polarity high-voltage pulses. Plasma emission images yielded preliminary evidence of charge removal from the

  16. Risk factors associated with capture-related death in eastern wild turkey hens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nicholson, D.S.; Lochmiller, R.L.; Stewart, M.D.; Masters, R.E.; Leslie, David M.

    2000-01-01

    Capture-related mortality has been a notable risk in the handling of eastern wild turkey (Meleagris gallopavo silvestris). Our objective was to evaluate how environmental factors influence risk and identify physiological correlates that could be used to identify susceptible birds. During winter (January-March) 1995-97, 130 eastern wild turkey hens were captured in southeastern Oklahoma and radiocollared. Of those, 20 hens died ??? 14 days of capture. Serum creatine kinase activity (CK; P < 0.01), body temperature (P < 0.01), processing time (P = 0.02), and ambient temperature (P < 0.01) showed a positive relationship with mortality that occurred within 14 days of capture. Plasma corticosterone concentration (P = 0.08) and relative humidity (P < 0.01) showed a negative relationship with mortalities that occurred within 14 days post-capture. Stepwise logistic regression selected CK activity, relative humidity, and ambient temperature as the best predictors of mortality within 14 days post-capture. Our data suggest that susceptible individuals may be identified from CK activity and that capture-related mortality may be minimized by establishing guidelines of when to curtail capture operations based on various weather conditions.

  17. Application of amine-tethered solid sorbents for direct CO2 capture from the ambient air.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sunho; Drese, Jeffrey H; Eisenberger, Peter M; Jones, Christopher W

    2011-03-15

    While current carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) technologies for large point sources can help address the impact of CO(2) buildup on global climate change, these technologies can at best slow the rate of increase of the atmospheric CO(2) concentration. In contrast, the direct CO(2) capture from ambient air offers the potential to be a truly carbon negative technology. We propose here that amine-based solid adsorbents have significant promise as key components of a hypothetical air capture process. Specifically, the CO(2) capture characteristics of hyperbranched aminosilica (HAS) materials are evaluated here using CO(2) mixtures that simulate ambient atmospheric concentrations (400 ppm CO(2) = "air capture") as well as more traditional conditions simulating flue gas (10% CO(2)). The air capture experiments demonstrate that the adsorption capacity of HAS adsorbents are only marginally influenced even with a significant dilution of the CO(2) concentration by a factor of 250, while capturing CO(2) reversibly without significant degradation of performance in multicyclic operation. These results suggest that solid amine-based air capture processes have the potential to be an effective approach to extracting CO(2) from the ambient air.

  18. Economic and energetic analysis of capturing CO2 from ambient air.

    PubMed

    House, Kurt Zenz; Baclig, Antonio C; Ranjan, Manya; van Nierop, Ernst A; Wilcox, Jennifer; Herzog, Howard J

    2011-12-20

    Capturing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere ("air capture") in an industrial process has been proposed as an option for stabilizing global CO(2) concentrations. Published analyses suggest these air capture systems may cost a few hundred dollars per tonne of CO(2), making it cost competitive with mainstream CO(2) mitigation options like renewable energy, nuclear power, and carbon dioxide capture and storage from large CO(2) emitting point sources. We investigate the thermodynamic efficiencies of commercial separation systems as well as trace gas removal systems to better understand and constrain the energy requirements and costs of these air capture systems. Our empirical analyses of operating commercial processes suggest that the energetic and financial costs of capturing CO(2) from the air are likely to have been underestimated. Specifically, our analysis of existing gas separation systems suggests that, unless air capture significantly outperforms these systems, it is likely to require more than 400 kJ of work per mole of CO(2), requiring it to be powered by CO(2)-neutral power sources in order to be CO(2) negative. We estimate that total system costs of an air capture system will be on the order of $1,000 per tonne of CO(2), based on experience with as-built large-scale trace gas removal systems.

  19. Laser Ablation with Vacuum Capture for MALDI Mass Spectrometry of Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnarumma, Fabrizio; Cao, Fan; Murray, Kermit K.

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a laser ablation sampling technique for matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) analyses of in-situ digested tissue proteins. Infrared laser ablation was used to remove biomolecules from tissue sections for collection by vacuum capture and analysis by MALDI. Ablation and transfer of compounds from tissue removes biomolecules from the tissue and allows further analysis of the collected material to facilitate their identification. Laser ablated material was captured in a vacuum aspirated pipette-tip packed with C18 stationary phase and the captured material was dissolved, eluted, and analyzed by MALDI. Rat brain and lung tissue sections 10 μm thick were processed by in-situ trypsin digestion after lipid and salt removal. The tryptic peptides were ablated with a focused mid-infrared laser, vacuum captured, and eluted with an acetonitrile/water mixture. Eluted components were deposited on a MALDI target and mixed with matrix for mass spectrometry analysis. Initial experiments were conducted with peptide and protein standards for evaluation of transfer efficiency: a transfer efficiency of 16% was obtained using seven different standards. Laser ablation vacuum capture was applied to freshly digested tissue sections and compared with sections processed with conventional MALDI imaging. A greater signal intensity and lower background was observed in comparison with the conventional MALDI analysis. Tandem time-of-flight MALDI mass spectrometry was used for compound identification in the tissue.

  20. Laser Ablation with Vacuum Capture for MALDI Mass Spectrometry of Tissue.

    PubMed

    Donnarumma, Fabrizio; Cao, Fan; Murray, Kermit K

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a laser ablation sampling technique for matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) analyses of in-situ digested tissue proteins. Infrared laser ablation was used to remove biomolecules from tissue sections for collection by vacuum capture and analysis by MALDI. Ablation and transfer of compounds from tissue removes biomolecules from the tissue and allows further analysis of the collected material to facilitate their identification. Laser ablated material was captured in a vacuum aspirated pipette-tip packed with C18 stationary phase and the captured material was dissolved, eluted, and analyzed by MALDI. Rat brain and lung tissue sections 10 μm thick were processed by in-situ trypsin digestion after lipid and salt removal. The tryptic peptides were ablated with a focused mid-infrared laser, vacuum captured, and eluted with an acetonitrile/water mixture. Eluted components were deposited on a MALDI target and mixed with matrix for mass spectrometry analysis. Initial experiments were conducted with peptide and protein standards for evaluation of transfer efficiency: a transfer efficiency of 16% was obtained using seven different standards. Laser ablation vacuum capture was applied to freshly digested tissue sections and compared with sections processed with conventional MALDI imaging. A greater signal intensity and lower background was observed in comparison with the conventional MALDI analysis. Tandem time-of-flight MALDI mass spectrometry was used for compound identification in the tissue.