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Sample records for carbides

  1. Silicon carbide ceramic production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suzuki, K.; Shinohara, N.

    1984-01-01

    A method to produce sintered silicon carbide ceramics in which powdery carbonaceous components with a dispersant are mixed with silicon carbide powder, shaped as required with or without drying, and fired in nonoxidation atmosphere is described. Carbon black is used as the carbonaceous component.

  2. Microwave sintering of boron carbide

    DOEpatents

    Blake, R.D.; Katz, J.D.; Petrovic, J.J.; Sheinberg, H.

    1988-06-10

    A method for forming boron carbide into a particular shape and densifying the green boron carbide shape. Boron carbide in powder form is pressed into a green shape and then sintered, using a microwave oven, to obtain a dense boron carbide body. Densities of greater than 95% of theoretical density have been obtained. 1 tab.

  3. Improved toughness of silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palm, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    Impact energy absorbing layers (EALs) comprised of partially densified silicon carbide were formed in situ on fully sinterable silicon carbide substrates. After final sintering, duplex silicon carbide structures resulted which were comprised of a fully sintered, high density silicon carbide substrate or core, overlayed with an EAL of partially sintered silicon carbide integrally bonded to its core member. Thermal cycling tests proved such structures to be moderately resistant to oxidation and highly resistant to thermal shock stresses. The strength of the developed structures in some cases exceeded but essentially it remained the same as the fully sintered silicon carbide without the EAL. Ballistic impact tests indicated that substantial improvements in the toughness of sintered silicon carbide were achieved by the use of the partially densified silicon carbide EALs.

  4. Silicon carbide thyristor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmond, John A. (Inventor); Palmour, John W. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    The SiC thyristor has a substrate, an anode, a drift region, a gate, and a cathode. The substrate, the anode, the drift region, the gate, and the cathode are each preferably formed of silicon carbide. The substrate is formed of silicon carbide having one conductivity type and the anode or the cathode, depending on the embodiment, is formed adjacent the substrate and has the same conductivity type as the substrate. A drift region of silicon carbide is formed adjacent the anode or cathode and has an opposite conductivity type as the anode or cathode. A gate is formed adjacent the drift region or the cathode, also depending on the embodiment, and has an opposite conductivity type as the drift region or the cathode. An anode or cathode, again depending on the embodiment, is formed adjacent the gate or drift region and has an opposite conductivity type than the gate.

  5. Silicon carbide reinforced silicon carbide composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, Sai-Kwing (Inventor); Calandra, Salvatore J. (Inventor); Ohnsorg, Roger W. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    This invention relates to a process comprising the steps of: a) providing a fiber preform comprising a non-oxide ceramic fiber with at least one coating, the coating comprising a coating element selected from the group consisting of carbon, nitrogen, aluminum and titanium, and the fiber having a degradation temperature of between 1400.degree. C. and 1450.degree. C., b) impregnating the preform with a slurry comprising silicon carbide particles and between 0.1 wt % and 3 wt % added carbon c) providing a cover mix comprising: i) an alloy comprising a metallic infiltrant and the coating element, and ii) a resin, d) placing the cover mix on at least a portion of the surface of the porous silicon carbide body, e) heating the cover mix to a temperature between 1410.degree. C. and 1450.degree. C. to melt the alloy, and f) infiltrating the fiber preform with the melted alloy for a time period of between 15 minutes and 240 minutes, to produce a ceramic fiber reinforced ceramic composite.

  6. Composition Comprising Silicon Carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehregany, Mehran (Inventor); Zorman, Christian A. (Inventor); Fu, Xiao-An (Inventor); Dunning, Jeremy L. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A method of depositing a ceramic film, particularly a silicon carbide film, on a substrate is disclosed in which the residual stress, residual stress gradient, and resistivity are controlled. Also disclosed are substrates having a deposited film with these controlled properties and devices, particularly MEMS and NEMS devices, having substrates with films having these properties.

  7. Improved toughness of silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palm, J. A.

    1975-01-01

    Several techniques were employed to apply or otherwise form porous layers of various materials on the surface of hot-pressed silicon carbide ceramic. From mechanical properties measurements and studies, it was concluded that although porous layers could be applied to the silicon carbide ceramic, sufficient damage was done to the silicon carbide surface by the processing required so as to drastically reduce its mechanical strength. It was further concluded that there was little promise of success in forming an effective energy absorbing layer on the surface of already densified silicon carbide ceramic that would have the mechanical strength of the untreated or unsurfaced material. Using a process for the pressureless sintering of silicon carbide powders it was discovered that porous layers of silicon carbide could be formed on a dense, strong silicon carbide substrate in a single consolidation process.

  8. AES XPS study of chromium carbides and chromium iron carbides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detroye, M.; Reniers, F.; Buess-Herman, C.; Vereecken, J.

    1999-04-01

    The nature of chromium rich carbides which precipitate at grain boundaries in steels is still not perfectly understood. We performed a multitechnique approach on model chromium carbide and chromium-iron carbide samples: Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), and High Energy Electron Diffraction (HEED) were used to characterise the samples. Significant chemical shifts were observed for the Cr, Fe and C XPS peaks in the M 7C 3 compound (M stands for metal), indicating unambiguously that the compound formed is a mixed iron-chromium carbide.

  9. Modified silicon carbide whiskers

    DOEpatents

    Tiegs, Terry N.; Lindemer, Terrence B.

    1991-01-01

    Silicon carbide whisker-reinforced ceramic composites are fabricated in a highly reproducible manner by beneficating the surfaces of the silicon carbide whiskers prior to their usage in the ceramic composites. The silicon carbide whiskers which contain considerable concentrations of surface oxides and other impurities which interact with the ceramic composite material to form a chemical bond are significantly reduced so that only a relatively weak chemical bond is formed between the whisker and the ceramic material. Thus, when the whiskers interact with a crack propagating into the composite the crack is diverted or deflected along the whisker-matrix interface due to the weak chemical bonding so as to deter the crack propagation through the composite. The depletion of the oxygen-containing compounds and other impurities on the whisker surfaces and near surface region is effected by heat treating the whiskers in a suitable oxygen sparaging atmosphere at elevated temperatures. Additionally, a sedimentation technique may be utilized to remove whiskers which suffer structural and physical anomalies which render them undesirable for use in the composite. Also, a layer of carbon may be provided on the surface of the whiskers to further inhibit chemical bonding of the whiskers to the ceramic composite material.

  10. Modified silicon carbide whiskers

    DOEpatents

    Tiegs, T.N.; Lindemer, T.B.

    1991-05-21

    Silicon carbide whisker-reinforced ceramic composites are fabricated in a highly reproducible manner by beneficating the surfaces of the silicon carbide whiskers prior to their usage in the ceramic composites. The silicon carbide whiskers which contain considerable concentrations of surface oxides and other impurities which interact with the ceramic composite material to form a chemical bond are significantly reduced so that only a relatively weak chemical bond is formed between the whisker and the ceramic material. Thus, when the whiskers interact with a crack propagating into the composite the crack is diverted or deflected along the whisker-matrix interface due to the weak chemical bonding so as to deter the crack propagation through the composite. The depletion of the oxygen-containing compounds and other impurities on the whisker surfaces and near surface region is effected by heat treating the whiskers in a suitable oxygen sparging atmosphere at elevated temperatures. Additionally, a sedimentation technique may be utilized to remove whiskers which suffer structural and physical anomalies which render them undesirable for use in the composite. Also, a layer of carbon may be provided on the surface of the whiskers to further inhibit chemical bonding of the whiskers to the ceramic composite material.

  11. Process for microwave sintering boron carbide

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, C.E.; Morrow, M.S.

    1993-10-12

    A method of microwave sintering boron carbide comprises leaching boron carbide powder with an aqueous solution of nitric acid to form a leached boron carbide powder. The leached boron carbide powder is coated with a glassy carbon precursor to form a coated boron carbide powder. The coated boron carbide powder is consolidated in an enclosure of boron nitride particles coated with a layer of glassy carbon within a container for microwave heating to form an enclosed coated boron carbide powder. The enclosed coated boron carbide powder is sintered within the container for microwave heating with microwave energy.

  12. Process for microwave sintering boron carbide

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, Cressie E.; Morrow, Marvin S.

    1993-01-01

    A method of microwave sintering boron carbide comprises leaching boron carbide powder with an aqueous solution of nitric acid to form a leached boron carbide powder. The leached boron carbide powder is coated with a glassy carbon precursor to form a coated boron carbide powder. The coated boron carbide powder is consolidated in an enclosure of boron nitride particles coated with a layer of glassy carbon within a container for microwave heating to form an enclosed coated boron carbide powder. The enclosed coated boron carbide powder is sintered within the container for microwave heating with microwave energy.

  13. Silicon carbide sewing thread

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawko, Paul M. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Composite flexible multilayer insulation systems (MLI) were evaluated for thermal performance and compared with currently used fibrous silica (baseline) insulation system. The systems described are multilayer insulations consisting of alternating layers of metal foil and scrim ceramic cloth or vacuum metallized polymeric films quilted together using ceramic thread. A silicon carbide thread for use in the quilting and the method of making it are also described. These systems provide lightweight thermal insulation for a variety of uses, particularly on the surface of aerospace vehicles subject to very high temperatures during flight.

  14. Methods of producing continuous boron carbide fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Garnier, John E.; Griffith, George W.

    2015-12-01

    Methods of producing continuous boron carbide fibers. The method comprises reacting a continuous carbon fiber material and a boron oxide gas within a temperature range of from approximately 1400.degree. C. to approximately 2200.degree. C. Continuous boron carbide fibers, continuous fibers comprising boron carbide, and articles including at least a boron carbide coating are also disclosed.

  15. Hydrogen-silicon carbide interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckel, Andrew J.; Misra, Ajay K.; Humphrey, Donald L.; Jacobson, Nathan S.

    1990-01-01

    A study of the thermochemistry and kinetics of hydrogen environmental attack of silicon carbide was conducted for temperatures in the range from 1100 C to 1400 C. Thermodynamics maps based on the parameters of pressure and oxygen/moisture content were constructed. With increasing moisture levels, four distinct regions of attack were identified. Each region is defined by the thermodynamically stable solid phases. The theoretically stable solid phases of region 1 are silicon carbide and silicon. Experimental evidence is provided to support this thermodynamic prediction. Silicone carbide is the single stable solid phase in region 2. Active attack of the silicon carbide in this region occurs by the formation of gases of SiO, CO, CH4, SiH4 and SiH. Analyses of the kinetics of reaction for region 2 at 1300 C show the attack of the silicon carbide to be controlled by gas phase diffusion of H2O to the sample. Silicon carbide and silica are the stable phases common to regions 3 and 4. These two regions are characterized by the passive oxidation of silicon carbide and formation of a protective silica layer.

  16. Hydrogen-silicon carbide interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckel, Andrew J.; Jacobson, Nathan S.; Misra, Ajay K.; Humphrey, Donald L.

    1989-01-01

    A study of the thermochemistry and kinetics of hydrogen environmental attack of silicon carbide was conducted for temperatures in the range from 1100 C to 1400 C. Thermodynamic maps based on the parameters of pressure and oxygen/moisture content were constructed. With increasing moisture levels, four distinct regions of attack were identified. Each region is defined by the thermodynamically stable solid phases. The theoretically stable solid phases of Region 1 are silicon carbide and silicon. Experimental evidence is provided to support this thermodynamic prediction. Silicon carbide is the single stable solid phase in Region 2. Active attack of the silicon carbide in this region occurs by the formation of gases of SiO, CO, CH4, SiH4, and SiH. Analysis of the kinetics of reaction for Region 2 at 1300 C show the attack of the silicon carbide to be controlled by gas phase diffusion of H2O to the sample. Silicon carbide and silica are the stable phases common to Regions 3 and 4. These two regions are characterized by the passive oxidation of silicon carbide and formation of a protective silica layer.

  17. Fivefold twinned boron carbide nanowires.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xin; Jiang, Jun; Liu, Chao; Yuan, Jun

    2009-09-01

    Chemical composition and crystal structure of fivefold twinned boron carbide nanowires have been determined by electron energy-loss spectroscopy and electron diffraction. The fivefold cyclic twinning relationship is confirmed by systematic axial rotation electron diffraction. Detailed chemical analysis reveals a carbon-rich boron carbide phase. Such boron carbide nanowires are potentially interesting because of their intrinsic hardness and high temperature thermoelectric property. Together with other boron-rich compounds, they may form a set of multiply twinned nanowire systems where the misfit strain could be continuously tuned to influence their mechanical properties.

  18. Silicon Carbide Electronic Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neudeck, P. G.

    2001-01-01

    The status of emerging silicon carbide (SiC) widebandgap semiconductor electronics technology is briefly surveyed. SiC-based electronic devices and circuits are being developed for use in high-temperature, high-power, and/or high-radiation conditions under which conventional semiconductors cannot function. Projected performance benefits of SiC electronics are briefly illustrated for several applications. However, most of these operational benefits of SiC have yet to be realized in actual systems, primarily owing to the fact that the growth techniques of SiC crystals are relatively immature and device fabrication technologies are not yet sufficiently developed to the degree required for widespread, reliable commercial use. Key crystal growth and device fabrication issues that limit the performance and capability of high-temperature and/or high-power SiC electronics are identified. The electrical and material quality differences between emerging SiC and mature silicon electronics technology are highlighted.

  19. Studies of silicon carbide and silicon carbide nitride thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alizadeh, Zhila

    Silicon carbide semiconductor technology is continuing to advance rapidly. The excellent physical and electronic properties of silicon carbide recently take itself to be the main focused power device material for high temperature, high power, and high frequency electronic devices because of its large band gap, high thermal conductivity, and high electron saturation drift velocity. SiC is more stable than Si because of its high melting point and mechanical strength. Also the understanding of the structure and properties of semiconducting thin film alloys is one of the fundamental steps toward their successful application in technologies requiring materials with tunable energy gaps, such as solar cells, flat panel displays, optical memories and anti-reflecting coatings. Silicon carbide and silicon nitrides are promising materials for novel semiconductor applications because of their band gaps. In addition, they are "hard" materials in the sense of having high elastic constants and large cohesive energies and are generally resistant to harsh environment, including radiation. In this research, thin films of silicon carbide and silicon carbide nitride were deposited in a r.f magnetron sputtering system using a SiC target. A detailed analysis of the surface chemistry of the deposited films was performed using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy whereas structure and morphology was studied atomic force microscopy (AFM), and nonoindentation.

  20. Silicon Carbide Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Andrew Trunek has focused on supporting the Sic team through the growth of Sic crystals, making observations and conducting research that meets the collective needs and requirements of the team while fulfilling program commitments. Cancellation of the Ultra Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) program has had a significant negative impact on resources and research goals. This report highlights advancements and achievements made with this cooperative agreement over the past year. NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) continues to make advances in silicon carbide (SiC) research during the past year. Step free surfaces were used as substrates for the deposition of GaN epilayers that yielded very low dislocation densities. Defect free 3C- SiC was successfully nucleated on step free mesas and test diodes were fabricated. Web growth techniques were used to increase the usable surface area of dislocation free SiC by approximately equal to 40%. The greatest advancement has been attained on stepped surfaces of SiC. A metrology standard was developed using high temperature etching techniques titled "Nanometer Step Height Standard". This development culminated in being recognized for a 2004 R&D100 award and the process to produce the steps received a NASA Space Act award.

  1. Laser melting of uranium carbides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utton, C. A.; De Bruycker, F.; Boboridis, K.; Jardin, R.; Noel, H.; Guéneau, C.; Manara, D.

    2009-03-01

    In the context of the material research aimed at supporting the development of nuclear plants of the fourth Generation, renewed interest has recently arisen in carbide fuels. A profound understanding of the behaviour of nuclear materials in extreme conditions is of prime importance for the analysis of the operation limits of nuclear fuels, and prediction of possible nuclear reactor accidents. In this context, the main goal of the present paper is to demonstrate the feasibility of laser induced melting experiments on stoichiometric uranium carbides; UC, UC1.5 and UC2. Measurements were performed, at temperatures around 3000 K, under a few bars of inert gas in order to minimise vaporisation and oxidation effects, which may occur at these temperatures. Moreover, a recently developed investigation method has been employed, based on in situ analysis of the sample surface reflectivity evolution during melting. Current results, 2781 K for the melting point of UC, 2665 K for the solidus and 2681 K for the liquidus of U2C3, 2754 K for the solidus and 2770 K for the liquidus of UC2, are in fair agreement with early publications where the melting behaviour of uranium carbides was investigated by traditional furnace melting methods. Further information has been obtained in the current research about the non-congruent (solidus-liquidus) melting of certain carbides, which suggest that a solidus-liquidus scheme is followed by higher ratio carbides, possibly even for UC2.

  2. Porous silicon carbide (SIC) semiconductor device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shor, Joseph S. (Inventor); Kurtz, Anthony D. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    Porous silicon carbide is fabricated according to techniques which result in a significant portion of nanocrystallites within the material in a sub 10 nanometer regime. There is described techniques for passivating porous silicon carbide which result in the fabrication of optoelectronic devices which exhibit brighter blue luminescence and exhibit improved qualities. Based on certain of the techniques described porous silicon carbide is used as a sacrificial layer for the patterning of silicon carbide. Porous silicon carbide is then removed from the bulk substrate by oxidation and other methods. The techniques described employ a two-step process which is used to pattern bulk silicon carbide where selected areas of the wafer are then made porous and then the porous layer is subsequently removed. The process to form porous silicon carbide exhibits dopant selectivity and a two-step etching procedure is implemented for silicon carbide multilayers.

  3. CVD tungsten carbide and titanium carbide coatings for aerospace components

    SciTech Connect

    Dyer, P.N.; Garg, D.; Pellman, M.A.; Sheridan, J.J. III.

    1989-01-01

    Commercial applications of ceramic coatings for improving the wear resistance and tribology of stainless steel components such as compressor blades and ball bearings are under development. This paper reviews two coating systems: a proprietary erosion-resistant tungsten carbide coating system and a licensed wear-resistant titanium carbide coating, which as been qualified for use in several critical navigational gyroscope systems in the U.S. and European aerospace industries. Both have demonstrated performance and applicability superior to other protective coatings. 27 refs.

  4. Thermal conductivity of boron carbides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, C.; Emin, D.; Gray, P. E.

    1985-01-01

    Knowledge of the thermal conductivity of boron carbide is necessary to evaluate its potential for high-temperature thermoelectric energy conversion applications. Measurements have been conducted of the thermal diffusivity of hot-pressed boron carbide BxC samples as a function of composition (x in the range from 4 to 9), temperature (300-1700 K), and temperature cycling. These data, in concert with density and specific-heat data, yield the thermal conductivities of these materials. The results are discussed in terms of a structural model that has been previously advanced to explain the electronic transport data. Some novel mechanisms for thermal conduction are briefly discussed.

  5. Reinforcement of tungsten carbide grains by nanoprecipitates in cemented carbides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xingwei; Song, Xiaoyan; Wang, Haibin; Hou, Chao; Liu, Xuemei; Wang, Xilong

    2016-10-01

    In contrast to the conventional method that obtains a high fracture strength of tungsten carbide-cobalt (WC-Co) cemented carbides by reducing WC grain size to near-nano or nanoscale, a new approach has been developed to achieve ultrahigh fracture strength by strengthening the WC grains through precipitate reinforcement. The cemented carbides were prepared by liquid-state sintering the in situ synthesized WC-Co composite powders with a little excess carbon and pre-milled Cr3C2 particles having different size scales. It was found that the nanoscale dispersed particles precipitate in the WC grains, which mainly have a coherent or semi-coherent interface with the matrix. The pinning effect of the nanoparticles on the motion of dislocations within the WC grains was observed. The mechanisms for the precipitation of nanoparticles in the WC grains were discussed, based on which a new method to enhance the resistance against the transgranular fracture of cemented carbides was proposed.

  6. Reinforcement of tungsten carbide grains by nanoprecipitates in cemented carbides.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xingwei; Song, Xiaoyan; Wang, Haibin; Hou, Chao; Liu, Xuemei; Wang, Xilong

    2016-10-14

    In contrast to the conventional method that obtains a high fracture strength of tungsten carbide-cobalt (WC-Co) cemented carbides by reducing WC grain size to near-nano or nanoscale, a new approach has been developed to achieve ultrahigh fracture strength by strengthening the WC grains through precipitate reinforcement. The cemented carbides were prepared by liquid-state sintering the in situ synthesized WC-Co composite powders with a little excess carbon and pre-milled Cr3C2 particles having different size scales. It was found that the nanoscale dispersed particles precipitate in the WC grains, which mainly have a coherent or semi-coherent interface with the matrix. The pinning effect of the nanoparticles on the motion of dislocations within the WC grains was observed. The mechanisms for the precipitation of nanoparticles in the WC grains were discussed, based on which a new method to enhance the resistance against the transgranular fracture of cemented carbides was proposed.

  7. Reinforcement of tungsten carbide grains by nanoprecipitates in cemented carbides.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xingwei; Song, Xiaoyan; Wang, Haibin; Hou, Chao; Liu, Xuemei; Wang, Xilong

    2016-10-14

    In contrast to the conventional method that obtains a high fracture strength of tungsten carbide-cobalt (WC-Co) cemented carbides by reducing WC grain size to near-nano or nanoscale, a new approach has been developed to achieve ultrahigh fracture strength by strengthening the WC grains through precipitate reinforcement. The cemented carbides were prepared by liquid-state sintering the in situ synthesized WC-Co composite powders with a little excess carbon and pre-milled Cr3C2 particles having different size scales. It was found that the nanoscale dispersed particles precipitate in the WC grains, which mainly have a coherent or semi-coherent interface with the matrix. The pinning effect of the nanoparticles on the motion of dislocations within the WC grains was observed. The mechanisms for the precipitation of nanoparticles in the WC grains were discussed, based on which a new method to enhance the resistance against the transgranular fracture of cemented carbides was proposed. PMID:27609195

  8. Anisotropic Tribological Properties of Silicon Carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1980-01-01

    The anisotropic friction, deformation and fracture behavior of single crystal silicon carbide surfaces were investigated in two categories. The categories were called adhesive and abrasive wear processes, respectively. In the adhesive wear process, the adhesion, friction and wear of silicon carbide were markedly dependent on crystallographic orientation. The force to reestablish the shearing fracture of adhesive bond at the interface between silicon carbide and metal was the lowest in the preferred orientation of silicon carbide slip system. The fracturing of silicon carbide occurred near the adhesive bond to metal and it was due to primary cleavages of both prismatic (10(-1)0) and basal (0001) planes.

  9. Thermoelectric properties of boron carbides

    SciTech Connect

    Aselage, T.; Emin, D.; Wood, C.

    1988-01-01

    Boron carbides are ceramic materials with unusual properties and applications. These refractory materials (T/sub m/ > 2600K) exist as a single phase over a wide range of stoichiometries, from 20 a/o carbon to less than 10 a/o carbon (Bouchacourt and Thevenot 1981). The relatively low density (approx.2.5 g/cm/sup 3/) and exceptional hardness lead to applications in the area of ceramic armor. In addition, /sup 10/B has a large capture cross section for thermal neutrons. This fact, along with the robust nature of the structure in a high radiation environment, leads to the use of boron carbides as nuclear reactor control materials. Because of a combination of unusual high temperature electronic and thermal properties, boron carbides also make efficient very high temperature (p-type) thermoelectrics. In this paper, we shall review the electrical and thermal properties of boron carbides and describe recent progress in understanding these properties. 13 refs., 4 figs.

  10. Testing Boron Carbide and Silicon Carbide under Triaxial Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Charles; Chocron, Sidney; Nicholls, Arthur

    2011-06-01

    Boron Carbide (B4C) and silicon carbide (SiC-N) are extensively used as armor materials. The strength of these ceramics depends mainly on surface defects, hydrostatic pressure and strain rate. This article focuses on the pressure dependence and summarizes the characterization work conducted on intact and predamaged specimens by using compression under confinement in a pressure vessel and in a thick steel sleeve. The techniques used for the characterization will be described briefly. The failure curves obtained for the two materials will be presented, although the data are limited for SiC. The data will also be compared to experimental data from Wilkins (1969), and Meyer and Faber (1997). Additionally, the results will be compared with plate-impact data.

  11. Diamond-silicon carbide composite

    DOEpatents

    Qian, Jiang; Zhao, Yusheng

    2006-06-13

    Fully dense, diamond-silicon carbide composites are prepared from ball-milled microcrystalline diamond/amorphous silicon powder mixture. The ball-milled powder is sintered (P=5–8 GPa, T=1400K–2300K) to form composites having high fracture toughness. A composite made at 5 GPa/1673K had a measured fracture toughness of 12 MPa.dot.m1/2. By contrast, liquid infiltration of silicon into diamond powder at 5 GPa/1673K produces a composite with higher hardness but lower fracture toughness. X-ray diffraction patterns and Raman spectra indicate that amorphous silicon is partially transformed into nanocrystalline silicon at 5 GPa/873K, and nanocrystalline silicon carbide forms at higher temperatures.

  12. [Calcium carbide of different crystal formation synthesized by calcium carbide residue].

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhong-yuan; Kang, Ming; Jiang, Cai-rong; Tu, Ming-jing

    2006-04-01

    To recycle calcium carbide residue effectively, calcium carbide of different crystal form, including global aragonite, calcite and acicular calcium carbide was synthesized. Both the influence of pretreatment in the purity of calcium carbide, and the influence of temperatures of carbonization reaction, release velocity of carbon dioxide in the apparition of calcium carbide of different crystal form were studied with DTA-TG and SEM. The result shows that calcium carbide residue can take place chemistry reaction with ammonia chlorinate straight. Under the condition that pH was above 7, the purity of calcium carbide was above 97%, and the whiteness was above 98. Once provided the different temperatures of carbonization reaction and the proper release velocity of carbon dioxide, global aragonite, calcite and acicular calcium carbide were obtained.

  13. Conduction mechanism in boron carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, C.; Emin, D.

    1984-01-01

    Electrical conductivity, Seebeck-coefficient, and Hall-effect measurements have been made on single-phase boron carbides, B(1-x)C(x), in the compositional range from 0.1 to 0.2 X, and between room temperature and 1273 K. The results indicate that the predominant conduction mechanism is small-polaron hopping between carbon atoms at geometrically inequivalent sites.

  14. Microwave processing of silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Akerman, M.A.; Baity, F.W. Jr.; Caughman, J.B.; Forrester, S.C.; Kass, M.D.; Morrow, M.S.; Holcombe, C.E. Jr.; Moyer, M.W.; Dews, T.W.

    1994-12-31

    Reaction-bonded silicon carbide ({alpha}-SiC) armor tiles were annealed at 2100{degree}C using microwave radiation at 2.45 GHz. Ultrasonic velocity measurements showed that the longitudinal and shear velocities, acoustic impedances, and acoustic moduli of the post-annealed tiles were statistically higher than for the unannealed tiles. However, the exposed surfaces of the annealed tiles experienced slight degradation, which was attributed to the high annealing temperatures.

  15. Advanced microstructure of boron carbide.

    PubMed

    Werheit, Helmut; Shalamberidze, Sulkhan

    2012-09-26

    The rhombohedral elementary cell of the complex boron carbide structure is composed of B(12) or B(11)C icosahedra and CBC, CBB or B□B (□, vacancy) linear arrangements, whose shares vary depending on the actual chemical compound. The evaluation of the IR phonon spectra of isotopically pure boron carbide yields the quantitative concentrations of these components within the homogeneity range. The structure formula of B(4.3)C at the carbon-rich limit of the homogeneity range is (B(11)C) (CBC)(0.91) (B□B)(0.09) (□, vacancy); and the actual structure formula of B(13)C(2) is (B(12))(0.5)(B(11)C)(0.5)(CBC)(0.65)(CBB)(0.16) (B□B)(0.19), and deviates fundamentally from (B(12))CBC, predicted by theory to be the energetically most favourable structure of boron carbide. In reality, it is the most distorted structure in the homogeneity range. The spectra of (nat)B(x)C make it evident that boron isotopes are not randomly distributed in the structure. However, doping with 2% silicon brings about a random distribution.

  16. Abrasive slurry composition for machining boron carbide

    DOEpatents

    Duran, E.L.

    1984-11-29

    An abrasive slurry particularly suited for use in drilling or machining boron carbide consists essentially of a suspension of boron carbide and/or silicon carbide grit in a carrier solution consisting essentially of a dilute solution of alkylaryl polyether alcohol in octyl alcohol. The alkylaryl polyether alcohol functions as a wetting agent which improves the capacity of the octyl alcohol for carrying the grit in suspension, yet without substantially increasing the viscosity of the carrier solution.

  17. Abrasive slurry composition for machining boron carbide

    DOEpatents

    Duran, Edward L.

    1985-01-01

    An abrasive slurry particularly suited for use in drilling or machining boron carbide consists essentially of a suspension of boron carbide and/or silicon carbide grit in a carrier solution consisting essentially of a dilute solution of alkylaryl polyether alcohol in octyl alcohol. The alkylaryl polyether alcohol functions as a wetting agent which improves the capacity of the octyl alcohol for carrying the grit in suspension, yet without substantially increasing the viscosity of the carrier solution.

  18. METHOD OF JOINING CARBIDES TO BASE METALS

    DOEpatents

    Krikorian, N.H.; Farr, J.D.; Witteman, W.G.

    1962-02-13

    A method is described for joining a refractory metal carbide such as UC or ZrC to a refractory metal base such as Ta or Nb. The method comprises carburizing the surface of the metal base and then sintering the base and carbide at temperatures of about 2000 deg C in a non-oxidizing atmosphere, the base and carbide being held in contact during the sintering step. To reduce the sintering temperature and time, a sintering aid such as iron, nickel, or cobait is added to the carbide, not to exceed 5 wt%. (AEC)

  19. Methods for producing silicon carbide fibers

    DOEpatents

    Garnier, John E.; Griffith, George W.

    2016-03-01

    Methods of producing silicon carbide fibers. The method comprises reacting a continuous carbon fiber material and a silicon-containing gas in a reaction chamber at a temperature ranging from approximately 1500.degree. C. to approximately 2000.degree. C. A partial pressure of oxygen in the reaction chamber is maintained at less than approximately 1.01.times.10.sup.2 Pascal to produce continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers. Continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers and articles formed from the continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers are also disclosed.

  20. Silicon carbide fibers and articles including same

    SciTech Connect

    Garnier, John E; Griffith, George W

    2015-01-27

    Methods of producing silicon carbide fibers. The method comprises reacting a continuous carbon fiber material and a silicon-containing gas in a reaction chamber at a temperature ranging from approximately 1500.degree. C. to approximately 2000.degree. C. A partial pressure of oxygen in the reaction chamber is maintained at less than approximately 1.01.times.10.sup.2 Pascal to produce continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers. Continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers and articles formed from the continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers are also disclosed.

  1. Structural prediction for scandium carbide monolayer sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hong-Man; Wang, Jing; Zhao, Hui-Yan; Zhang, Dong-Bo; Liu, Ying

    2016-09-01

    A two-dimensional tetragonal scandium carbide monolayer sheet has been constructed and studied using density functional theory. The results show that the scandium carbide sheet is stable and exhibits a novel tetracoordinated quasiplanar structure, as favored by the hybridization between Sc-3d orbitals and C-2p orbitals. Calculations of the phonon dispersion as well as molecular dynamics simulations also demonstrate the structural stability of this scandium carbide monolayer sheet. Electronic properties show that the scandium carbide monolayer sheet is metallic and non-magnetic.

  2. Silicon nitride/silicon carbide composite powders

    DOEpatents

    Dunmead, Stephen D.; Weimer, Alan W.; Carroll, Daniel F.; Eisman, Glenn A.; Cochran, Gene A.; Susnitzky, David W.; Beaman, Donald R.; Nilsen, Kevin J.

    1996-06-11

    Prepare silicon nitride-silicon carbide composite powders by carbothermal reduction of crystalline silica powder, carbon powder and, optionally, crystalline silicon nitride powder. The crystalline silicon carbide portion of the composite powders has a mean number diameter less than about 700 nanometers and contains nitrogen. The composite powders may be used to prepare sintered ceramic bodies and self-reinforced silicon nitride ceramic bodies.

  3. Titanium carbide bipolar plate for electrochemical devices

    DOEpatents

    LaConti, Anthony B.; Griffith, Arthur E.; Cropley, Cecelia C.; Kosek, John A.

    2000-07-04

    A corrosion resistant, electrically conductive, non-porous bipolar plate is made from titanium carbide for use in an eletrochemical device. The process involves blending titanium carbide powder with a suitable binder material, and molding the mixture, at an elevated temperature and pressure.

  4. Boron carbide whiskers produced by vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Boron carbide whiskers have an excellent combination of properties for use as a reinforcement material. They are produced by vaporizing boron carbide powder and condensing the vapors on a substrate. Certain catalysts promote the growth rate and size of the whiskers.

  5. Titanium Carbide Bipolar Plate for Electrochemical Devices

    SciTech Connect

    LaConti, Anthony B.; Griffith, Arthur E.; Cropley, Cecelia C.; Kosek, John A.

    1998-05-08

    Titanium carbide comprises a corrosion resistant, electrically conductive, non-porous bipolar plate for use in an electrochemical device. The process involves blending titanium carbide powder with a suitable binder material, and molding the mixture, at an elevated temperature and pressure.

  6. Process for making silicon carbide reinforced silicon carbide composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, Sai-Kwing (Inventor); Calandra, Salavatore J. (Inventor); Ohnsorg, Roger W. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A process comprising the steps of: a) providing a fiber preform comprising a non-oxide ceramic fiber with at least one coating, the coating comprising a coating element selected from the group consisting of carbon, nitrogen, aluminum and titanium, and the fiber having a degradation temperature of between 1400.degree. C. and 1450.degree. C., b) impregnating the preform with a slurry comprising silicon carbide particles and between 0.1 wt % and 3 wt % added carbon c) providing a cover mix comprising: i) an alloy comprising a metallic infiltrant and the coating element, and ii) a resin, d) placing the cover mix on at least a portion of the surface of the porous silicon carbide body, e) heating the cover mix to a temperature between 1410.degree. C. and 1450.degree. C. to melt the alloy, and f) infiltrating the fiber preform with the melted alloy for a time period of between 15 minutes and 240 minutes, to produce a ceramic fiber reinforced ceramic composite.

  7. Preparation of silicon carbide fibers

    DOEpatents

    Wei, G.C.

    1983-10-12

    Silicon carbide fibers suitable for use in the fabrication of dense, high-strength, high-toughness SiC composites or as thermal insulating materials in oxidizing environments are fabricated by a new, simplified method wherein a mixture of short-length rayon fibers and colloidal silica is homogenized in a water slurry. Water is removed from the mixture by drying in air at 120/sup 0/C and the fibers are carbonized by (pyrolysis) heating the mixture to 800 to 1000/sup 0/C in argon. The mixture is subsequently reacted at 1550 to 1900/sup 0/C in argon to yield pure ..beta..-SiC fibers.

  8. Manufacture of silicon carbide using solar energy

    DOEpatents

    Glatzmaier, Gregory C.

    1992-01-01

    A method is described for producing silicon carbide particles using solar energy. The method is efficient and avoids the need for use of electrical energy to heat the reactants. Finely divided silica and carbon are admixed and placed in a solar-heated reaction chamber for a time sufficient to cause a reaction between the ingredients to form silicon carbide of very small particle size. No grinding of silicon carbide is required to obtain small particles. The method may be carried out as a batch process or as a continuous process.

  9. Thermal Expansion of Hafnium Carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grisaffe, Salvatore J.

    1960-01-01

    Since hafnium carbide (HfC) has a melting point of 7029 deg. F, it may have many high-temperature applications. A literature search uncovered very little information about the properties of HfC, and so a program was initiated at the Lewis Research Center to determine some of the physical properties of this material. This note presents the results of the thermal expansion investigation. The thermal-expansion measurements were made with a Gaertner dilatation interferometer calibrated to an accuracy of +/- 1 deg. F. This device indicates expansion by the movement of fringes produced by the cancellation and reinforcement of fixed wave-length light rays which are reflected from the surfaces of two parallel quartz glass disks. The test specimens which separate these disks are three small cones, each approximately 0.20 in. high.

  10. Improved consolidation of silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freedman, M. R.; Millard, M. L.

    1986-01-01

    Alpha silicon carbide powder was consolidated by both dry and wet methods. Dry pressing in a double acting steel die yielded sintered test bars with an average flexural strength of 235.6 MPa with a critical flaw size of approximately 100 micro m. An aqueous slurry pressing technique produced sintered test bars with an average flexural strength of 440.8 MPa with a critical flaw size of approximately 25 micro m. Image analysis revealed a reduction in both pore area and pore size distribution in the slurry pressed sintered test bars. The improvements in the slurry pressed material properties are discussed in terms of reduced agglomeration and improved particle packing during consolidation.

  11. Structural diversity in lithium carbides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yangzheng; Strobel, Timothy A.; Cohen, R. E.

    2015-12-01

    The lithium-carbon binary system possesses a broad range of chemical compounds, which exhibit fascinating chemical bonding characteristics, which give rise to diverse and technologically important properties. While lithium carbides with various compositions have been studied or suggested previously, the crystal structures of these compounds are far from well understood. In this work, we present the first comprehensive survey of all ground state (GS) structures of lithium carbides over a broad range of thermodynamic conditions, using ab initio density functional theory (DFT) crystal structure searching methods. Thorough searches were performed for 29 stoichiometries ranging from Li12C to LiC12 at 0 and 40 GPa. Based on formation enthalpies from optimized van der Waals density functional calculations, three thermodynamically stable phases (Li4C3 , Li2C2 , and LiC12) were identified at 0 GPa, and seven thermodynamically stable phases (Li8C , Li6C , Li4C , Li8C3 , Li2C , Li3C4 , and Li2C3 ) were predicted at 40 GPa. A rich diversity of carbon bonding, including monomers, dimers, trimers, nanoribbons, sheets, and frameworks, was found within these structures, and the dimensionality of carbon connectivity existing within each phase increases with increasing carbon concentration. We find that the well-known composition LiC6 is actually a metastable one. We also find a unique coexistence of carbon monomers and dimers within the predicted thermodynamically stable phase Li8C3 , and different widths of carbon nanoribbons coexist in a metastable phase of Li2C2 (Imm2). Interesting mixed sp2-sp3 carbon frameworks are predicted in metastable phases with composition LiC6.

  12. Electroextraction of boron from boron carbide scrap

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Ashish; Anthonysamy, S.; Ghosh, C.; Ravindran, T.R.; Divakar, R.; Mohandas, E.

    2013-10-15

    Studies were carried out to extract elemental boron from boron carbide scrap. The physicochemical nature of boron obtained through this process was examined by characterizing its chemical purity, specific surface area, size distribution of particles and X-ray crystallite size. The microstructural characteristics of the extracted boron powder were analyzed by using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Raman spectroscopic examination of boron powder was also carried out to determine its crystalline form. Oxygen and carbon were found to be the major impurities in boron. Boron powder of purity ∼ 92 wt. % could be produced by the electroextraction process developed in this study. Optimized method could be used for the recovery of enriched boron ({sup 10}B > 20 at. %) from boron carbide scrap generated during the production of boron carbide. - Highlights: • Recovery of {sup 10}B from nuclear grade boron carbide scrap • Development of process flow sheet • Physicochemical characterization of electroextracted boron • Microscopic examination of electroextracted boron.

  13. Method for preparing boron-carbide articles

    DOEpatents

    Benton, S.T.; Masters, D.R.

    1975-10-21

    The invention is directed to the preparation of boron carbide articles of various configurations. A stoichiometric mixture of particulate boron and carbon is confined in a suitable mold, heated to a temperature in the range of about 1250 to 1500$sup 0$C for effecting a solid state diffusion reaction between the boron and carbon for forming the boron carbide (B$sub 4$C), and thereafter the resulting boron-carbide particles are hot-pressed at a temperature in the range of about 1800 to 2200$sup 0$C and a pressure in the range of about 1000 to 4000 psi for densifying and sintering the boron carbide into the desired article.

  14. Calcium carbide poisoning via food in childhood.

    PubMed

    Per, Hüseyin; Kurtoğlu, Selim; Yağmur, Fatih; Gümüş, Hakan; Kumandaş, Sefer; Poyrazoğlu, M Hakan

    2007-02-01

    The fast ripening of fruits means they may contain various harmful properties. A commonly used agent in the ripening process is calcium carbide, a material most commonly used for welding purposes. Calcium carbide treatment of food is extremely hazardous because it contains traces of arsenic and phosphorous. Once dissolved in water, the carbide produces acetylene gas. Acetylene gas may affect the neurological system by inducing prolonged hypoxia. The findings are headache, dizziness, mood disturbances, sleepiness, mental confusion, memory loss, cerebral edema and seizures. We report the case of a previously healthy 5 year-old girl with no chronic disease history who was transferred to our Emergency Department with an 8-h history of coma and delirium. A careful history from her father revealed that the patient ate unripe dates treated with calcium carbide.

  15. Stabilization of boron carbide via silicon doping.

    PubMed

    Proctor, J E; Bhakhri, V; Hao, R; Prior, T J; Scheler, T; Gregoryanz, E; Chhowalla, M; Giulani, F

    2015-01-14

    Boron carbide is one of the lightest and hardest ceramics, but its applications are limited by its poor stability against a partial phase separation into separate boron and carbon. Phase separation is observed under high non-hydrostatic stress (both static and dynamic), resulting in amorphization. The phase separation is thought to occur in just one of the many naturally occurring polytypes in the material, and this raises the possibility of doping the boron carbide to eliminate this polytype. In this work, we have synthesized boron carbide doped with silicon. We have conducted a series of characterizations (transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction) on pure and silicon-doped boron carbide following static compression to 50 GPa non-hydrostatic pressure. We find that the level of amorphization under static non-hydrostatic pressure is drastically reduced by the silicon doping.

  16. Silicon carbide material sintered bodies manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suzuki, K.; Shinohara, N.

    1984-01-01

    A method is described for producing a high density silicon carbide sintering substance which contains aluminum oxide. The sintering is done in CO gas atmosphere, which is kept at 2 to 20 atmospheric pressures.

  17. Selective etching of silicon carbide films

    DOEpatents

    Gao, Di; Howe, Roger T.; Maboudian, Roya

    2006-12-19

    A method of etching silicon carbide using a nonmetallic mask layer. The method includes providing a silicon carbide substrate; forming a non-metallic mask layer by applying a layer of material on the substrate; patterning the mask layer to expose underlying areas of the substrate; and etching the underlying areas of the substrate with a plasma at a first rate, while etching the mask layer at a rate lower than the first rate.

  18. Whatever happened to silicon carbide. [semiconductor devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, R. B.

    1981-01-01

    The progress made in silicon carbide semiconductor devices in the 1955 to 1975 time frame is examined and reasons are given for the present lack of interest in the material. Its physical and chemical properties and methods of preparation are discussed. Fabrication techniques and the characteristics of silicon carbide devices are reviewed. It is concluded that a combination of economic factors and the lack of progress in fabrication techniques leaves no viable market for SiC devices in the near future.

  19. Fabrication of thorium bearing carbide fuels

    DOEpatents

    Gutierrez, R.L.; Herbst, R.J.; Johnson, K.W.R.

    Thorium-uranium carbide and thorium-plutonium carbide fuel pellets have been fabricated by the carbothermic reduction process. Temperatures of 1750/sup 0/C and 2000/sup 0/C were used during the reduction cycle. Sintering temperatures of 1800/sup 0/C and 2000/sup 0/C were used to prepare fuel pellet densities of 87% and > 94% of theoretical, respectively. The process allows the fabrication of kilogram quantities of fuel with good reproductibility of chemical and phase composition.

  20. 64. INTERIOR VIEW OF THE CARBIDE COOLING SHED. VIEW IS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    64. INTERIOR VIEW OF THE CARBIDE COOLING SHED. VIEW IS SHOWING CALCIUM CARBIDE IN COOLING CARS ON THE FLOOR. DECEMBER 26, 1918. - United States Nitrate Plant No. 2, Reservation Road, Muscle Shoals, Muscle Shoals, Colbert County, AL

  1. Method of fabricating porous silicon carbide (SiC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shor, Joseph S. (Inventor); Kurtz, Anthony D. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Porous silicon carbide is fabricated according to techniques which result in a significant portion of nanocrystallites within the material in a sub 10 nanometer regime. There is described techniques for passivating porous silicon carbide which result in the fabrication of optoelectronic devices which exhibit brighter blue luminescence and exhibit improved qualities. Based on certain of the techniques described porous silicon carbide is used as a sacrificial layer for the patterning of silicon carbide. Porous silicon carbide is then removed from the bulk substrate by oxidation and other methods. The techniques described employ a two-step process which is used to pattern bulk silicon carbide where selected areas of the wafer are then made porous and then the porous layer is subsequently removed. The process to form porous silicon carbide exhibits dopant selectivity and a two-step etching procedure is implemented for silicon carbide multilayers.

  2. The diffusion bonding of silicon carbide and boron carbide using refractory metals

    SciTech Connect

    Cockeram, B.V.

    1999-10-01

    Joining is an enabling technology for the application of structural ceramics at high temperatures. Metal foil diffusion bonding is a simple process for joining silicon carbide or boron carbide by solid-state, diffusive conversion of the metal foil into carbide and silicide compounds that produce bonding. Metal diffusion bonding trials were performed using thin foils (5 {micro}m to 100 {micro}m) of refractory metals (niobium, titanium, tungsten, and molybdenum) with plates of silicon carbide (both {alpha}-SiC and {beta}-SiC) or boron carbide that were lapped flat prior to bonding. The influence of bonding temperature, bonding pressure, and foil thickness on bond quality was determined from metallographic inspection of the bonds. The microstructure and phases in the joint region of the diffusion bonds were evaluated using SEM, microprobe, and AES analysis. The use of molybdenum foil appeared to result in the highest quality bond of the metal foils evaluated for the diffusion bonding of silicon carbide and boron carbide. Bonding pressure appeared to have little influence on bond quality. The use of a thinner metal foil improved the bond quality. The microstructure of the bond region produced with either the {alpha}-SiC and {beta}-SiC polytypes were similar.

  3. Silicon Carbide Solar Cells Investigated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Sheila G.; Raffaelle, Ryne P.

    2001-01-01

    The semiconductor silicon carbide (SiC) has long been known for its outstanding resistance to harsh environments (e.g., thermal stability, radiation resistance, and dielectric strength). However, the ability to produce device-quality material is severely limited by the inherent crystalline defects associated with this material and their associated electronic effects. Much progress has been made recently in the understanding and control of these defects and in the improved processing of this material. Because of this work, it may be possible to produce SiC-based solar cells for environments with high temperatures, light intensities, and radiation, such as those experienced by solar probes. Electronics and sensors based on SiC can operate in hostile environments where conventional silicon-based electronics (limited to 350 C) cannot function. Development of this material will enable large performance enhancements and size reductions for a wide variety of systems--such as high-frequency devices, high-power devices, microwave switching devices, and high-temperature electronics. These applications would supply more energy-efficient public electric power distribution and electric vehicles, more powerful microwave electronics for radar and communications, and better sensors and controls for cleaner-burning, more fuel-efficient jet aircraft and automobile engines. The 6H-SiC polytype is a promising wide-bandgap (Eg = 3.0 eV) semiconductor for photovoltaic applications in harsh solar environments that involve high-temperature and high-radiation conditions. The advantages of this material for this application lie in its extremely large breakdown field strength, high thermal conductivity, good electron saturation drift velocity, and stable electrical performance at temperatures as high as 600 C. This behavior makes it an attractive photovoltaic solar cell material for devices that can operate within three solar radii of the Sun.

  4. Deposition method for producing silicon carbide high-temperature semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, George C.; Rohatgi, Naresh K.

    1987-01-01

    An improved deposition method for producing silicon carbide high-temperature semiconductor material comprising placing a semiconductor substrate composed of silicon carbide in a fluidized bed silicon carbide deposition reactor, fluidizing the bed particles by hydrogen gas in a mildly bubbling mode through a gas distributor and heating the substrate at temperatures around 1200.degree.-1500.degree. C. thereby depositing a layer of silicon carbide on the semiconductor substrate.

  5. Mechanical Properties of Crystalline Silicon Carbide Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huan; Ding, Weiqiang; Aidun, Daryush K

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, the mechanical properties of crystalline silicon carbide nanowires, synthesized with a catalyst-free chemical vapor deposition method, were characterized with nanoscale tensile testing and mechanical resonance testing methods inside a scanning electron microscope. Tensile testing of individual silicon carbide nanowire was performed to determine the tensile properties of the material including the tensile strength, failure strain and Young's modulus. The silicon carbide nanowires were also excited to mechanical resonance in the scanning electron microscope vacuum chamber using mechanical excitation and electrical excitation methods, and the corresponding resonance frequencies were used to determine the Young's modulus of the material according to the simple beam theory. The Young's modulus values from tensile tests were in good agreement with the ones obtained from the mechanical resonance tests.

  6. Joining of porous silicon carbide bodies

    DOEpatents

    Bates, Carl H.; Couhig, John T.; Pelletier, Paul J.

    1990-05-01

    A method of joining two porous bodies of silicon carbide is disclosed. It entails utilizing an aqueous slip of a similar silicon carbide as was used to form the porous bodies, including the sintering aids, and a binder to initially join the porous bodies together. Then the composite structure is subjected to cold isostatic pressing to form a joint having good handling strength. Then the composite structure is subjected to pressureless sintering to form the final strong bond. Optionally, after the sintering the structure is subjected to hot isostatic pressing to further improve the joint and densify the structure. The result is a composite structure in which the joint is almost indistinguishable from the silicon carbide pieces which it joins.

  7. Silicon carbide, an emerging high temperature semiconductor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matus, Lawrence G.; Powell, J. Anthony

    1991-01-01

    In recent years, the aerospace propulsion and space power communities have expressed a growing need for electronic devices that are capable of sustained high temperature operation. Applications for high temperature electronic devices include development instrumentation within engines, engine control, and condition monitoring systems, and power conditioning and control systems for space platforms and satellites. Other earth-based applications include deep-well drilling instrumentation, nuclear reactor instrumentation and control, and automotive sensors. To meet the needs of these applications, the High Temperature Electronics Program at the Lewis Research Center is developing silicon carbide (SiC) as a high temperature semiconductor material. Research is focussed on developing the crystal growth, characterization, and device fabrication technologies necessary to produce a family of silicon carbide electronic devices and integrated sensors. The progress made in developing silicon carbide is presented, and the challenges that lie ahead are discussed.

  8. Varying potential silicon carbide gas sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shields, Virgil B. (Inventor); Ryan, Margaret A. (Inventor); Williams, Roger M. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A hydrocarbon gas detection device operates by dissociating or electro-chemically oxidizing hydrocarbons adsorbed to a silicon carbide detection layer. Dissociation or oxidation are driven by a varying potential applied to the detection layer. Different hydrocarbon species undergo reaction at different applied potentials so that the device is able to discriminate among various hydrocarbon species. The device can operate at temperatures between 100.degree. C. and at least 650.degree. C., allowing hydrocarbon detection in hot exhaust gases. The dissociation reaction is detected either as a change in a capacitor or, preferably, as a change of current flow through an FET which incorporates the silicon carbide detection layers. The silicon carbide detection layer can be augmented with a pad of catalytic material which provides a signal without an applied potential. Comparisons between the catalytically produced signal and the varying potential produced signal may further help identify the hydrocarbon present.

  9. METHOD FOR COATING GRAPHITE WITH METALLIC CARBIDES

    DOEpatents

    Steinberg, M.A.

    1960-03-22

    A method for producing refractory coatings of metallic carbides on graphite was developed. In particular, the graphite piece to be coated is immersed in a molten solution of 4 to 5% by weight of zirconium, titanium, or niobium dissolved in tin. The solution is heated in an argon atmosphere to above 1400 deg C, whereby the refractory metal reacts with the surface of the graphite to form a layer of metalic carbide. The molten solution is cooled to 300 to 400 deg C, and the graphite piece is removed. Excess tin is wiped from the graphite, which is then heated in vacuum to above 2300 deg C. The tin vaporizes from the graphite surface, leaving the surface coated with a tenacious layer of refractory metallic carbide.

  10. Carbides composite surface layers produced by (PTA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajoure, Meloud; Tajouri, Ali; Abuzriba, Mokhtar; Akreem, Mosbah

    2013-12-01

    The plasma transferred arc technique was applied to deposit a composite layer of nickel base with tungsten carbide in powder form on to surface of low alloy steel 18G2A type according to polish standard. Results showed that, plasma transferred arc hard facing process was successfully conducted by using Deloro alloy 22 plus tungsten carbide powders. Maximum hardness of 1489 HV and minimum dilution of 8.4 % were achieved by using an arc current of 60 A. However, when the current was further increased to 120 A & the dilution increases with current increase while the hardness decreases. Microstructure of the nickel base deposit with tungsten carbide features uniform distribution of reinforcement particles with regular grain shape half - dissolved in the matrix.

  11. Fabrication of thorium bearing carbide fuels

    DOEpatents

    Gutierrez, Rueben L.; Herbst, Richard J.; Johnson, Karl W. R.

    1981-01-01

    Thorium-uranium carbide and thorium-plutonium carbide fuel pellets have been fabricated by the carbothermic reduction process. Temperatures of 1750.degree. C. and 2000.degree. C. were used during the reduction cycle. Sintering temperatures of 1800.degree. C. and 2000.degree. C. were used to prepare fuel pellet densities of 87% and >94% of theoretical, respectively. The process allows the fabrication of kilogram quantities of fuel with good reproducibility of chemicals and phase composition. Methods employing liquid techniques that form carbide microspheres or alloying-techniques which form alloys of thorium-uranium or thorium-plutonium suffer from limitation on the quantities processed of because of criticality concerns and lack of precise control of process conditions, respectively.

  12. Carbides composite surface layers produced by (PTA)

    SciTech Connect

    Tajoure, Meloud; Tajouri, Ali E-mail: dr.mokhtarphd@yahoo.com; Abuzriba, Mokhtar E-mail: dr.mokhtarphd@yahoo.com; Akreem, Mosbah

    2013-12-16

    The plasma transferred arc technique was applied to deposit a composite layer of nickel base with tungsten carbide in powder form on to surface of low alloy steel 18G2A type according to polish standard. Results showed that, plasma transferred arc hard facing process was successfully conducted by using Deloro alloy 22 plus tungsten carbide powders. Maximum hardness of 1489 HV and minimum dilution of 8.4 % were achieved by using an arc current of 60 A. However, when the current was further increased to 120 A and the dilution increases with current increase while the hardness decreases. Microstructure of the nickel base deposit with tungsten carbide features uniform distribution of reinforcement particles with regular grain shape half - dissolved in the matrix.

  13. Carbide to close HDPE recycling plant

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-24

    Union Carbide says it will close its high-density polyethylene (HDPE) recycling facility in Piscataway, New Jersey on October 1 because of unacceptable earnings potential. The plant closure--which will affect about 50 Carbide jobs--follows the announcement that another HDPE producer, Quantum Chemical, plans to bow out of recycling (CW, April 17, p.28). The sale of Quantum`s 32-million lbs/year HDPE recycling plant in Health, OH to 3DM fell through early this summer, and the facility has been put back on the market.

  14. On the sintering of silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gugel, E.

    1986-01-01

    This document deals with the sintering of silicon carbide using pressureless sintering. This technique makes it possible to sinter a primarily covalent material to usable densities up to over 98% thD without having to use a high amount of sinter additives as is the case with other non-oxide ceramic materials. The process takes place rapidly, and it is also possible to produce relatively thick-walled structural parts without major problems. This sheds more light on the true characteristics of silicon carbide in one structural part, since there is no second or nearly no second phase. Heat pressing has improved stability.

  15. Liquid phase sintering of silicon carbide

    DOEpatents

    Cutler, R.A.; Virkar, A.V.; Hurford, A.C.

    1989-05-09

    Liquid phase sintering is used to densify silicon carbide based ceramics using a compound comprising a rare earth oxide and aluminum oxide to form liquids at temperatures in excess of 1,600 C. The resulting sintered ceramic body has a density greater than 95% of its theoretical density and hardness in excess of 23 GPa. Boron and carbon are not needed to promote densification and silicon carbide powder with an average particle size of greater than one micron can be densified via the liquid phase process. The sintered ceramic bodies made by the present invention are fine grained and have secondary phases resulting from the liquid phase. 4 figs.

  16. Thermal conductivity behavior of boron carbides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, C.; Zoltan, A.; Emin, D.; Gray, P. E.

    1983-01-01

    Knowledge of the thermal conductivity of boron carbides is necessary to evaluate its potential for high temperature thermoelectric energy conversion applications. The thermal diffusivity of hot pressed boron carbide B/sub 1-x/C/sub x/ samples as a function of composition, temperature and temperature cycling was measured. These data in concert with density and specific heat data yield the thermal conductivities of these materials. The results in terms of a structural model to explain the electrical transport data and novel mechanisms for thermal conduction are discussed.

  17. Liquid phase sintering of silicon carbide

    DOEpatents

    Cutler, Raymond A.; Virkar, Anil V.; Hurford, Andrew C.

    1989-01-01

    Liquid phase sintering is used to densify silicon carbide based ceramics using a compound comprising a rare earth oxide and aluminum oxide to form liquids at temperatures in excess of 1600.degree. C. The resulting sintered ceramic body has a density greater than 95% of its theoretical density and hardness in excess of 23 GPa. Boron and carbon are not needed to promote densification and silicon carbide powder with an average particle size of greater than one micron can be densified via the liquid phase process. The sintered ceramic bodies made by the present invention are fine grained and have secondary phases resulting from the liquid phase.

  18. Prealloyed catalyst for growing silicon carbide whiskers

    DOEpatents

    Shalek, Peter D.; Katz, Joel D.; Hurley, George F.

    1988-01-01

    A prealloyed metal catalyst is used to grow silicon carbide whiskers, especially in the .beta. form. Pretreating the metal particles to increase the weight percentages of carbon or silicon or both carbon and silicon allows whisker growth to begin immediately upon reaching growth temperature.

  19. Bioactivation of biomorphous silicon carbide bone implants.

    PubMed

    Will, Julia; Hoppe, Alexander; Müller, Frank A; Raya, Carmen T; Fernández, Julián M; Greil, Peter

    2010-12-01

    Wood-derived silicon carbide (SiC) offers a specific biomorphous microstructure similar to the cellular pore microstructure of bone. Compared with bioactive ceramics such as calcium phosphate, however, silicon carbide is considered not to induce spontaneous interface bonding to living bone. Bioactivation by chemical treatment of biomorphous silicon carbide was investigated in order to accelerate osseointegration and improve bone bonding ability. Biomorphous SiC was processed from sipo (Entrandrophragma utile) wood by heating in an inert atmosphere and infiltrating the resulting carbon replica with liquid silicon melt at 1450°C. After removing excess silicon by leaching in HF/HNO₃ the biomorphous preform consisted of β-SiC with a small amount (approximately 6wt.%) of unreacted carbon. The preform was again leached in HCl/HNO₃ and finally exposed to CaCl₂ solution. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared analyses proved that oxidation of the residual carbon at the surface induced formation of carboxyl [COO⁻] groups, which triggered adsorption of Ca(2+), as confirmed by XPS and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy measurements. A local increase in Ca(2+) concentration stimulated in vitro precipitation of Ca₅(PO₄)₃OH (HAP) on the silicon carbide preform surface during exposure to simulated body fluid, which indicates a significantly increased bone bonding activity compared with SiC.

  20. Power MOSFETs Formed In Silicon Carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmour, John W.

    1995-01-01

    High-performance power metal/oxide/semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) fabricated in silicon carbide. Devices offer potential advantages over silicon-based MOSFETs, including lower "on" - state resistances at same rated voltages, ability to operate at higher temperatures, and higher thermal conductivity. Also more resistant to damage by ionizing radiation, an advantage for switching appications in nuclear facilities.

  1. High Q silicon carbide microdisk resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Xiyuan; Lee, Jonathan Y.; Feng, Philip X.-L.; Lin, Qiang

    2014-05-05

    We demonstrate a silicon carbide (SiC) microdisk resonator with optical Q up to 5.12 × 10{sup 4}. The high optical quality, together with the diversity of whispering-gallery modes and the tunability of external coupling, renders SiC microdisk a promising platform for integrated quantum photonics applications.

  2. Boron Carbides As Thermo-electric Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Charles

    1988-01-01

    Report reviews recent theoretical and experimental research on thermoelectric materials. Recent work with narrow-band semiconductors demonstrated possibility of relatively high thermoelectric energy-conversion efficiencies in materials withstanding high temperatures needed to attain such efficiencies. Among promising semiconductors are boron-rich borides, especially boron carbides.

  3. Boron carbide morphology changing under purification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmatullin, I. A.; Sivkov, A. A.

    2015-10-01

    Boron carbide synthesized by using coaxial magnetoplasma accelerator with graphite electrodes was purified by two different ways. XRD-investigations showed content changing and respectively powder purification. Moreover TEM-investigations demonstrated morphology changing of product under purification that was discussed in the work.

  4. PWR cores with silicon carbide cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Dobisesky, J. P.; Carpenter, D.; Pilat, E.; Kazimi, M. S.

    2012-07-01

    The feasibility of using silicon carbide rather than Zircaloy cladding, to reach higher power levels and higher discharge burnups in PWRs has been evaluated. A preliminary fuel design using fuel rods with the same dimensions as in the Westinghouse Robust Fuel Assembly but with fuel pellets having 10 vol% central void has been adopted to mitigate the higher fuel temperatures that occur due to the lower thermal conductivity of the silicon carbide and to the persistence of the open clad-pellet gap over most of the fuel life. With this modified fuel design, it is possible to achieve 18 month cycles that meet present-day operating constraints on peaking factor, boron concentration, reactivity coefficients and shutdown margin, while allowing batch average discharge burnups up to 80 MWD/kgU and peak rod burnups up to 100 MWD/kgU. Power uprates of 10% and possibly 20% also appear feasible. For non-uprated cores, the silicon carbide-clad fuel has a clear advantage that increases with increasing discharge burnup. Even for comparable discharge burnups, there is a savings in enriched uranium. Control rod configuration modifications may be required to meet the shutdown margin criterion for the 20% up-rate. Silicon carbide's ability to sustain higher burnups than Zircaloy also allows the design of a licensable two year cycle with only 96 fresh assemblies, avoiding the enriched uranium penalty incurred with use of larger batch sizes due to their excessive leakage. (authors)

  5. Silicon carbide, a high temperature semiconductor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    Electronic applications are described that would benefit from the availability of high temperature semiconductor devices. Comparisons are made among potential materials for these devices and the problems of each are discussed. Recent progress in developing silicon carbide as a high temperature semiconductor is described.

  6. Producing Silicon Carbide/Silicon Nitride Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Manufacturing process makes CxSiyNz fibers. Precursor fibers spun from extruding machine charged with polycarbosilazane resin. When pyrolyzed, resin converted to cross-linked mixture of silicon carbide and silicon nitride, still in fiber form. CxSiyNz fibers promising substitutes for carbon fibers in high-strength, low-weight composites where high electrical conductivity unwanted.

  7. Ceramic Fabric Coated With Silicon Carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riccitiello, S. R.; Smith, M.; Goldstein, H.; Zimmerman, N.

    1988-01-01

    Material used as high-temperature shell. Ceramic fabric coated with silicon carbide (SiC) serves as tough, heat-resistant covering for other refractory materials. Developed to protect reusable insulating tiles on advanced space transportation systems. New covering makes protective glaze unnecessary. Used on furnace bricks or on insulation for engines.

  8. Boron carbide nanowires: Synthesis and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Zhe

    Bulk boron carbide has been widely used in ballistic armored vest and the property characterization has been heavily focused on mechanical properties. Even though boron carbides have also been projected as a promising class of high temperature thermoelectric materials for energy harvesting, the research has been limited in this field. Since the thermal conductivity of bulk boron carbide is still relatively high, there is a great opportunity to take advantage of the nano effect to further reduce it for better thermoelectric performance. This dissertation work aims to explore whether improved thermoelectric performance can be found in boron carbide nanowires compared with their bulk counterparts. This dissertation work consists of four main parts. (1) Synthesis of boron carbide nanowires. Boron carbide nanowires were synthesized by co-pyrolysis of diborane and methane at low temperatures (with 879 °C as the lowest) in a home-built low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) system. The CVD-based method is energy efficient and cost effective. The as-synthesized nanowires were characterized by electron microscopy extensively. The transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results show the nanowires are single crystalline with planar defects. Depending on the geometrical relationship between the preferred growth direction of the nanowire and the orientation of the defects, the as-synthesized nanowires could be further divided into two categories: transverse fault (TF) nanowires grow normal to the defect plane, while axial fault (AF) ones grow within the defect plane. (2) Understanding the growth mechanism of as-synthesized boron carbide nanowires. The growth mechanism can be generally considered as the famous vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism. TF and AF nanowires were found to be guided by Ni-B catalysts of two phases. A TF nanowire is lead by a hexagonal phase catalyst, which was proved to be in a liquid state during reaction. While an AF nanowires is catalyzed by a

  9. Processing development of 4 tantalum carbide-hafnium carbide and related carbides and borides for extreme environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaballa, Osama Gaballa Bahig

    Carbides, nitrides, and borides ceramics are of interest for many applications because of their high melting temperatures and good mechanical properties. Wear-resistant coatings are among the most important applications for these materials. Materials with high wear resistance and high melting temperatures have the potential to produce coatings that resist degradation when subjected to high temperatures and high contact stresses. Among the carbides, Al4SiC4 is a low density (3.03 g/cm3), high melting temperature (>2000°C) compound, characterized by superior oxidation resistance, and high compressive strength. These desirable properties motivated this investigation to (1) obtain high-density Al4SiC4 at lower sintering temperatures by hot pressing, and (2) to enhance its mechanical properties by adding WC and TiC to the Al4SiC4. Also among the carbides, tantalum carbide and hafnium carbide have outstanding hardness; high melting points (3880°C and 3890°C respectively); good resistance to chemical attack, thermal shock, and oxidation; and excellent electronic conductivity. Tantalum hafnium carbide (Ta4HfC 5) is a 4-to-1 ratio of TaC to HfC with an extremely high melting point of 4215 K (3942°C), which is the highest melting point of all currently known compounds. Due to the properties of these carbides, they are considered candidates for extremely high-temperature applications such as rocket nozzles and scramjet components, where the operating temperatures can exceed 3000°C. Sintering bulk components comprised of these carbides is difficult, since sintering typically occurs above 50% of the melting point. Thus, Ta4 HfC5 is difficult to sinter in conventional furnaces or hot presses; furnaces designed for very high temperatures are expensive to purchase and operate. Our research attempted to sinter Ta4HfC5 in a hot press at relatively low temperature by reducing powder particle size and optimizing the powder-handling atmosphere, milling conditions, sintering

  10. Method for fabricating boron carbide articles

    DOEpatents

    Ardary, Zane L.; Reynolds, Carl D.

    1980-01-01

    The present invention is directed to the fabrication of boron carbide articles having length-to-diameter or width ratios greater than 2 to 1. The process of the present invention is practiced by the steps comprising hot pressing boron carbide powder into article segments or portions in which the segments have a length-to-diameter or width ratio less than 1.5, aligning a plurality of the initially hot-pressed segments in a hot-pressing die with the end surfaces of the segments placed in intimate contact with one another, and then hot pressing the aligned segments into an article of the desired configuration. The resulting article exhibits essentially uniform density throughout the structure with the bonds between the segments being equivalent in hardness, strength, and density to the remainder of the article.

  11. Predicted wear resistances of binary carbide coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, B.M.

    1986-11-01

    A mechanistic model of the tool wear process has been presented (B. M. Kramer and P. K. Judd, J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 3, 2439 (1985)) that includes the effects of both the abrasion of the tool material by inclusions within the workpiece and the chemical dissolution of the tool material into the matrix of the workpiece. Machining tests have been run on steel with titanium carbide coated tooling and the resulting test data have been employed to produce a rough calibration of the proposed model. This model has been used to predict the wear resistances of the other group IV B carbides and of the (Ti,Hf)C system in the machining of steel.

  12. Behavior of disordered boron carbide under stress.

    PubMed

    Fanchini, Giovanni; McCauley, James W; Chhowalla, Manish

    2006-07-21

    Gibbs free-energy calculations based on density functional theory have been used to determine the possible source of failure of boron carbide just above the Hugoniot elastic limit (HEL). A range of B4C polytypes is found to be stable at room pressure. The energetic barrier for shock amorphization of boron carbide is by far the lowest for the B12(CCC) polytype, requiring only 6 GPa approximately = P(HEL) for collapse under hydrostatic conditions. The results clearly demonstrate that the collapse of the B12(CCC) phase leads to segregation of B12 and amorphous carbon in the form of 2-3 nm bands along the (113) lattice direction, in excellent agreement with recent transmission electron microscopy results.

  13. Ultrasonic ranking of toughness of tungsten carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.; Hull, D. R.

    1983-01-01

    The feasibility of using ultrasonic attenuation measurements to rank tungsten carbide alloys according to their fracture toughness was demonstrated. Six samples of cobalt-cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co) were examined. These varied in cobalt content from approximately 2 to 16 weight percent. The toughness generally increased with increasing cobalt content. Toughness was first determined by the Palmqvist and short rod fracture toughness tests. Subsequently, ultrasonic attenuation measurements were correlated with both these mechanical test methods. It is shown that there is a strong increase in ultrasonic attenuation corresponding to increased toughness of the WC-Co alloys. A correlation between attenuation and toughness exists for a wide range of ultrasonic frequencies. However, the best correlation for the WC-Co alloys occurs when the attenuation coefficient measured in the vicinity of 100 megahertz is compared with toughness as determined by the Palmqvist technique.

  14. METHOD FOR PRODUCING CEMENTED CARBIDE ARTICLES

    DOEpatents

    Onstott, E.I.; Cremer, G.D.

    1959-07-14

    A method is described for making molded materials of intricate shape where the materials consist of mixtures of one or more hard metal carbides or oxides and matrix metals or binder metals thereof. In one embodiment of the invention 90% of finely comminuted tungsten carbide powder together with finely comminuted cobalt bonding agent is incorporated at 60 deg C into a slurry with methyl alcohol containing 1.5% paraffin, 3% camphor, 3.5% naphthalene, and 1.8% toluene. The compact is formed by the steps of placing the slurry in a mold at least one surface of which is porous to the fluid organic system, compacting the slurry, removing a portion of the mold from contact with the formed object and heating the formed object to remove the remaining organic matter and to sinter the compact.

  15. High temperature silicon carbide impregnated insulating fabrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schomburg, C.; Dotts, R. L. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    High temperature insulating articles having improved performance characteristics are described. The articles comprise fabrics of closely woven refractory or heat resistant fibers having particles of silicon carbide dispersed at least partially through the fabric and bonded to the fibers with an emulsifiable polyethylene wax. Such articles exhibit significantly increased high temperature emittance characteristics and an improved retention of integrity and flexibility after prolonged exposure to high temperature.

  16. Low blow Charpy impact of silicon carbides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abe, H.; Chandan, H. C.; Bradt, R. C.

    1978-01-01

    The room-temperature impact resistance of several commercial silicon carbides was examined using an instrumented pendulum-type machine and Charpy-type specimens. Energy balance compliance methods and fracture toughness approaches, both applicable to other ceramics, were used for analysis. The results illustrate the importance of separating the machine and the specimen energy contributions and confirm the equivalence of KIc and KId. The material's impact energy was simply the specimen's stored elastic strain energy at fracture.

  17. Diamond-silicon carbide composite and method

    DOEpatents

    Zhao, Yusheng

    2011-06-14

    Uniformly dense, diamond-silicon carbide composites having high hardness, high fracture toughness, and high thermal stability are prepared by consolidating a powder mixture of diamond and amorphous silicon. A composite made at 5 GPa/1673K had a measured fracture toughness of 12 MPam.sup.1/2. By contrast, liquid infiltration of silicon into diamond powder at 5 GPa/1673K produces a composite with higher hardness but lower fracture toughness.

  18. Electron-Spin Resonance in Boron Carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Charles; Venturini, Eugene L.; Azevedo, Larry J.; Emin, David

    1987-01-01

    Samples exhibit Curie-law behavior in temperature range of 2 to 100 K. Technical paper presents studies of electron-spin resonance of samples of hot pressed B9 C, B15 C2, B13 C2, and B4 C. Boron carbide ceramics are refractory solids with high melting temperatures, low thermal conductives, and extreme hardnesses. They show promise as semiconductors at high temperatures and have unusually large figures of merit for use in thermoelectric generators.

  19. Nonlinear optical imaging of defects in cubic silicon carbide epilayers.

    PubMed

    Hristu, Radu; Stanciu, Stefan G; Tranca, Denis E; Matei, Alecs; Stanciu, George A

    2014-06-11

    Silicon carbide is one of the most promising materials for power electronic devices capable of operating at extreme conditions. The widespread application of silicon carbide power devices is however limited by the presence of structural defects in silicon carbide epilayers. Our experiment demonstrates that optical second harmonic generation imaging represents a viable solution for characterizing structural defects such as stacking faults, dislocations and double positioning boundaries in cubic silicon carbide layers. X-ray diffraction and optical second harmonic rotational anisotropy were used to confirm the growth of the cubic polytype, atomic force microscopy was used to support the identification of silicon carbide defects based on their distinct shape, while second harmonic generation microscopy revealed the detailed structure of the defects. Our results show that this fast and noninvasive investigation method can identify defects which appear during the crystal growth and can be used to certify areas within the silicon carbide epilayer that have optimal quality.

  20. Friction and deformation behavior of single-crystal silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1977-01-01

    Friction and deformation studies were conducted with single-crystal silicon carbide in sliding contact with diamond. When the radius of curvature of the spherical diamond rider was large (0.3), deformation of silicon carbide was primarily elastic. Under these conditions the friction coefficient was low and did not show a dependence on the silicon carbide orientation. Further, there was no detectable cracking of the silicon carbide surfaces. When smaller radii of curvature of the spherical diamond riders (0.15 and 0.02 mm) or a conical diamond rider was used, plastic grooving occured and the silicon carbide exhibited anisotropic friction and deformation behavior. Under these conditions the friction coefficient depended on load. Anisotropic friction and deformation of the basal plane of silicon carbide was controlled by the slip system. 10101120and cleavage of1010.

  1. Carbide coated fibers in graphite-aluminum composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imprescia, R. J.; Levinson, L. S.; Reiswig, R. D.; Wallace, T. C.; Williams, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    The study of protective-coupling layers of refractory metal carbides on the graphite fibers prior to their incorporation into composites is presented. Such layers should be directly wettable by liquid aluminum and should act as diffusion barriers to prevent the formation of aluminum carbide. Chemical vapor deposition was used to uniformly deposit thin, smooth, continuous coats of ZrC on the carbon fibers of tows derived from both rayon and polyacrylonitrile. A wet chemical coating of the fibers, followed by high-temperature treatment, was used, and showed promise as an alternative coating method. Experiments were performed to demonstrate the ability of aluminum alloys to wet carbide surfaces. Titanium carbide, zirconium carbide and carbide-coated graphite surfaces were successfully wetted. Results indicate that initial attempts to wet surfaces of ZrC-coated carbon fibers appear successful.

  2. Mechanical Properties of Nanoceramic Silicon Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojo, Ipidapo; Abunaemeh, Malek; Smith, Cydale; Muntele, Claudiu; Ila, Daryush

    2009-03-01

    Generation IV nuclear reactors will use the TRISO fuels, a type of micro fuel particle. It consists of a fuel kernel coated with four layers of isotropic material. One of the materials considered for these layers is silicon carbide ceramic. This lightweight material can maintain chemical and dimensional stability in adverse environments at very high temperatures up to 3000 C, and it is chemically inert. It is widely used as a semiconductor material in electronics because of its high thermo conductivity, high electric field break down strength, and high maximum current density, which makes it more desirable than silicon. Silicon carbide has a very low coefficient of thermal expansion and has no phase transition that would discontinue its thermal expansion. At the Center for Irradiation of Materials (C.I.M.) we are developing a new fabrication process for nanopowdered silicon carbide for TRISO fuel coating purposes. We also study the mechanical properties of the material produced. Among the different test being performed are particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) an Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS). The mechanical properties of interest are hardness (measured by Vickers Hardness machine), toughness (measured by the Anstis equation, KIC= 1.6 x 10-2(E/H)^1/2(P/C0^3/2, where P=load, C0=crack length, E=Young's modulus and H=Vickers Hardness), tensile strength and flexural strength (measured by a three point bend test). Results will be presented during the meeting.

  3. Cohort study of silicon carbide production workers.

    PubMed

    Infante-Rivard, C; Dufresne, A; Armstrong, B; Bouchard, P; Thériault, G

    1994-12-01

    Silicon carbide is produced by a chemical reaction at high temperature between free crystalline silica and petroleum coke. The process generates airborne fibers and fibrogenic dusts such as alpha-quartz and cristobalite, which are also potentially carcinogenic. The authors report that this is the first cohort study in this industry. The study was carried out among 585 Québec silicon carbide production workers who had worked at any time from 1950 to 1980. Follow-up was to December 31, 1989, and 167 deaths were observed. The standardized mortality ratio (SMR) for all causes of death was 1.05 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.90-1.23); for nonmalignant respiratory diseases it was 2.03 (95% CI 1.21-3.22); and for lung cancer it was 1.69 (95% CI 1.09-2.52). Controlling for smoking status using a Cox regression analysis, the risk for nonmalignant respiratory diseases and for lung cancer increased with exposure to total dust; in the highest exposure category, rate ratios (RR) were 4.08 (95% CI 1.11-14.96) for nonmalignant respiratory diseases and 1.67 (95% CI 0.57-4.83) for lung cancer. Results were in the expected direction, but the power of the study was low, because of small sample size and use of cumulative total dust as the exposure variable, which may be a poor indicator of lung irritants and other potential carcinogens in this industry, notably silicon carbide ceramic fibers.

  4. Delivering carbide ligands to sulfide-rich clusters.

    PubMed

    Reinholdt, Anders; Herbst, Konrad; Bendix, Jesper

    2016-02-01

    The propensity of the terminal ruthenium carbide Ru(C)Cl2(PCy3)2 (RuC) to form carbide bridges to electron-rich transition metals enables synthetic routes to metal clusters with coexisting carbide and sulfide ligands. Electrochemical experiments show the Ru≡C ligand to exert a relatively large electron-withdrawing effect compared with PPh3, effectively shifting redox potentials.

  5. Characterization of boron carbide with an electron microprobe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matteudi, G.; Ruste, J.

    1983-01-01

    Within the framework of a study of heterogeneous materials (Matteudi et al., 1971: Matteudi and Verchery, 1972) thin deposits of boron carbide were characterized. Experiments using an electronic probe microanalyzer to analyze solid boron carbide or boron carbide in the form of thick deposits are described. Quantitative results on boron and carbon are very close to those obtained when applying the Monte Carlo-type correction calculations.

  6. Boron-carbide-aluminum and boron-carbide-reactive metal cermets

    DOEpatents

    Halverson, Danny C.; Pyzik, Aleksander J.; Aksay, Ilhan A.

    1986-01-01

    Hard, tough, lightweight boron-carbide-reactive metal composites, particularly boron-carbide-aluminum composites, are produced. These composites have compositions with a plurality of phases. A method is provided, including the steps of wetting and reacting the starting materials, by which the microstructures in the resulting composites can be controllably selected. Starting compositions, reaction temperatures, reaction times, and reaction atmospheres are parameters for controlling the process and resulting compositions. The ceramic phases are homogeneously distributed in the metal phases and adhesive forces at ceramic-metal interfaces are maximized. An initial consolidation step is used to achieve fully dense composites. Microstructures of boron-carbide-aluminum cermets have been produced with modulus of rupture exceeding 110 ksi and fracture toughness exceeding 12 ksi.sqroot.in. These composites and methods can be used to form a variety of structural elements.

  7. Silicon carbide sintered body manufactured from silicon carbide powder containing boron, silicon and carbonaceous additive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanaka, Hidehiko

    1987-01-01

    A silicon carbide powder of a 5-micron grain size is mixed with 0.15 to 0.60 wt% mixture of a boron compound, i.e., boric acid, boron carbide (B4C), silicon boride (SiB4 or SiB6), aluminum boride, etc., and an aluminum compound, i.e., aluminum, aluminum oxide, aluminum hydroxide, aluminum carbide, etc., or aluminum boride (AlB2) alone, in such a proportion that the boron/aluminum atomic ratio in the sintered body becomes 0.05 to 0.25 wt% and 0.05 to 0.40 wt%, respectively, together with a carbonaceous additive to supply enough carbon to convert oxygen accompanying raw materials and additives into carbon monoxide.

  8. 40 CFR 415.30 - Applicability; description of the calcium carbide production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... calcium carbide production subcategory. 415.30 Section 415.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Calcium Carbide Production Subcategory § 415.30 Applicability; description of the calcium... the production of calcium carbide in uncovered furnaces....

  9. 40 CFR 415.30 - Applicability; description of the calcium carbide production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... calcium carbide production subcategory. 415.30 Section 415.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Calcium Carbide Production Subcategory § 415.30 Applicability; description of the calcium... the production of calcium carbide in uncovered furnaces....

  10. 40 CFR 415.30 - Applicability; description of the calcium carbide production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... calcium carbide production subcategory. 415.30 Section 415.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Calcium Carbide Production Subcategory § 415.30 Applicability; description of the calcium... the production of calcium carbide in uncovered furnaces....

  11. 40 CFR 415.30 - Applicability; description of the calcium carbide production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... calcium carbide production subcategory. 415.30 Section 415.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Calcium Carbide Production Subcategory § 415.30 Applicability; description of the calcium... the production of calcium carbide in uncovered furnaces....

  12. 40 CFR 415.30 - Applicability; description of the calcium carbide production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... calcium carbide production subcategory. 415.30 Section 415.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Calcium Carbide Production Subcategory § 415.30 Applicability; description of the calcium... the production of calcium carbide in uncovered furnaces....

  13. Silicon Carbide- Based Materials for Joining Silicon Carbide Composites for Fusion Energy Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lewinsohn, Charles A. ); Jones, Russell H. ); Colombo, Paolo; Riccardi, B

    2002-12-01

    This paper describes issues related to using silicon carbide derived from inorganic polymer precursors for joining silicon carbide composites for fusion energy applications. Evolution of gases and shrinkage during processing are identified as critical processes that may control the presence of strength limiting flaws and residual stresses. Precursor composition and structure effect the amount of gaseous species evolved during processing, chemical compatibility with substrates, and processing environments. Results from the literature and from the authors' investigations are used to illustrate the use of polymer derived material for joining.

  14. Electronic structure and elastic properties of scandium carbide and yttrium carbide: A first principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maibam, Jameson; Indrajit Sharma, B.; Bhattacharjee, Ramendu; Thapa, R. K.; Brojen Singh, R. K.

    2011-11-01

    We have studied the electronic, structural, and elastic properties of scandium carbide and yttrium carbide by means of accurate first principles total energy calculations using the full-potential linearized plane wave method (FP-LAPW). We have used the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) for the exchange and correlation potential. Volume optimization, energy band structure, and density of states (DOS) of the systems are presented. The second order elastic constants have been calculated and other related quantities such as the Zener anisotropy factor, Poisson's ratio, Young's modulus, Kleinman parameter, Debye temperature, and sound velocities have been determined. The band gap calculation shows that YC is relatively more ionic than ScC.

  15. Improved silicon carbide for advanced heat engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, T. J.; Winterbottom, W. L.

    1986-01-01

    Work performed to develop silicon carbide materials of high strength and to form components of complex shape and high reliability is described. A beta-SiC powder and binder system was adapted to the injection molding process and procedures and process parameters developed capable of providing a sintered silicon carbide material with improved properties. The initial effort has been to characterize the baseline precursor materials (beta silicon carbide powder and boron and carbon sintering aids), develop mixing and injection molding procedures for fabricating test bars, and characterize the properties of the sintered materials. Parallel studies of various mixing, dewaxing, and sintering procedures have been carried out in order to distinguish process routes for improving material properties. A total of 276 MOR bars of the baseline material have been molded, and 122 bars have been fully processed to a sinter density of approximately 95 percent. The material has a mean MOR room temperature strength of 43.31 ksi (299 MPa), a Weibull characteristic strength of 45.8 ksi (315 MPa), and a Weibull modulus of 8.0. Mean values of the MOR strengths at 1000, 1200, and 14000 C are 41.4, 43.2, and 47.2 ksi, respectively. Strength controlling flaws in this material were found to consist of regions of high porosity and were attributed to agglomerates originating in the initial mixing procedures. The mean stress rupture lift at 1400 C of five samples tested at 172 MPa (25 ksi) stress was 62 hours and at 207 MPa (30 ksi) stress was 14 hours. New fluid mixing techniques have been developed which significantly reduce flaw size and improve the strength of the material. Initial MOR tests indicate the strength of the fluid-mixed material exceeds the baseline property by more than 33 percent.

  16. Surface and Bulk Carbide Transformations in High-Speed Steel.

    PubMed

    Godec, M; Večko Pirtovšek, T; Šetina Batič, B; McGuiness, P; Burja, J; Podgornik, B

    2015-01-01

    We have studied the transformation of carbides in AISI M42 high-speed steels in the temperature window used for forging. The annealing was found to result in the partial transformation of the large, metastable M2C carbides into small, more stable grains of M6C, with an associated change in the crystal orientation. In addition, MC carbides form during the transformation of M2C to M6C. From the high-speed-steel production point of view, it is beneficial to have large, metastable carbides in the cast structure, which later during annealing, before the forging, transform into a structure of polycrystalline carbides. Such carbides can be easily decomposed into several small carbides, which are then randomly distributed in the microstructure. The results also show an interesting difference in the carbide-transformation reactions on the surface versus the bulk of the alloy, which has implications for in-situ studies of bulk phenomena that are based on surface observations. PMID:26537780

  17. Method for producing silicon nitride/silicon carbide composite

    DOEpatents

    Dunmead, Stephen D.; Weimer, Alan W.; Carroll, Daniel F.; Eisman, Glenn A.; Cochran, Gene A.; Susnitzky, David W.; Beaman, Donald R.; Nilsen, Kevin J.

    1996-07-23

    Silicon carbide/silicon nitride composites are prepared by carbothermal reduction of crystalline silica powder, carbon powder and optionally crsytalline silicon nitride powder. The crystalline silicon carbide portion of the composite has a mean number diameter less than about 700 nanometers and contains nitrogen.

  18. Method of coating graphite tubes with refractory metal carbides

    DOEpatents

    Wohlberg, C.

    1973-12-11

    A method of coating graphite tubes with a refractory metal carbide is described. An alkali halide is reacted with a metallic oxide, the metallic portion being selected from the IVth or Vth group of the Periodic Table, the resulting salt reacting in turn with the carbon to give the desired refractory metal carbide coating. (Official Gazette)

  19. METHOD OF COATING GRAPHITE WITH STABLE METAL CARBIDES AND NITRIDES

    DOEpatents

    Gurinsky, D.H.

    1959-10-27

    A method is presented for forming protective stable nitride and carbide compounds on the surface of graphite. This is accomplished by contacting the graphite surface with a fused heavy liquid metal such as bismuth or leadbismuth containing zirconium, titanium, and hafnium dissolved or finely dispersed therein to form a carbide and nitride of at least one of the dissolved metals on the graphite surface.

  20. Molybdenum disilicide composites reinforced with zirconia and silicon carbide

    DOEpatents

    Petrovic, J.J.

    1995-01-17

    Compositions are disclosed consisting essentially of molybdenum disilicide, silicon carbide, and a zirconium oxide component. The silicon carbide used in the compositions is in whisker or powder form. The zirconium oxide component is pure zirconia or partially stabilized zirconia or fully stabilized zirconia.

  1. Molybdenum disilicide composites reinforced with zirconia and silicon carbide

    DOEpatents

    Petrovic, John J.

    1995-01-01

    Compositions consisting essentially of molybdenum disilicide, silicon carbide, and a zirconium oxide component. The silicon carbide used in the compositions is in whisker or powder form. The zirconium oxide component is pure zirconia or partially stabilized zirconia or fully stabilized zirconia.

  2. Method of forming impermeable carbide coats on graphite

    DOEpatents

    Wohlberg, C.

    1973-12-11

    A method of forming an impermeable refractory metal carbide coating on graphite is described in which a metal containing oxidant and a carbide former are applied to the surface of the graphite, heated to a temperature of between 1200 and 1500 deg C in an inert gas, under a vacuum and continuing to heat to about 2300 deg C. (Official Gazette)

  3. Development and characterization of solid solution tri-carbides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Travis; Anghaie, Samim

    2001-02-01

    Solid-solution, binary uranium/refractory metal carbide fuels have been shown to be capable of performing at high temperatures for nuclear thermal propulsion applications. More recently, tri-carbide fuels such as (U, Zr, Nb)C1+x with less than 10% metal mole fraction uranium have been studied for their application in ultra-high temperature, high performance space nuclear power systems. These tri-carbide fuels require high processing temperatures greater than 2600 K owing to their high melting points in excess of 3600 K. This paper presents the results of recent studies involving hypostoichiometric, single-phase tri-carbide fuels. Processing techniques of cold uniaxial pressing and sintering were investigated to optimize the processing parameters necessary to produce high density (low porosity), single phase, solid solution mixed carbide nuclear fuels for testing. Scanning electron microscopy and xray diffraction were used to analyze samples. Liquid phase sintering with UC1+x at temperatures near 2700 K was shown to be instrumental in achieving good densification in hyper- and near-stoichiometric mixed carbides. Hypostoichiometric carbides require even higher processing temperatures greater than 2800 K in order to achieve liquid phase sintering with a UC liquid phase and good densification of the final solid solution, tri-carbide fuel. .

  4. Brazed boron-silicon carbide/aluminum structural panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, W. E., Jr.; Bales, T. T.; Brooks, T. G.; Lawson, A. G.; Mitchell, P. D.; Royster, D. M.; Wiant, R.

    1978-01-01

    Fluxless brazing process minimizes degradation of mechanical properties composite material of silicon carbide coated boron fibers in an aluminum matrix. Process is being used to fabricate full-scale Boron-Silicon Carbide/Aluminum-Titanium honeycomb core panels for flight testing and ground testing.

  5. The chemical vapor deposition of zirconium carbide onto ceramic substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, John A, Jr.; Palmisiano, Nick, Jr.; Welsh, R. Edward

    1999-07-01

    Zirconium carbide is an attractive ceramic material due to its unique properties such as high melting point, good thermal conductivity, and chemical resistance. The controlled preparation of zirconium carbide films of superstoichiometric, stoichiometric, and substoichiometric compositions has been achieved utilizing zirconium tetrachloride and methane precursor gases in an atmospheric pressure high temperature chemical vapor deposition system.

  6. Surface and Bulk Carbide Transformations in High-Speed Steel

    PubMed Central

    Godec, M.; Večko Pirtovšek, T.; Šetina Batič, B.; McGuiness, P.; Burja, J.; Podgornik, B.

    2015-01-01

    We have studied the transformation of carbides in AISI M42 high-speed steels in the temperature window used for forging. The annealing was found to result in the partial transformation of the large, metastable M2C carbides into small, more stable grains of M6C, with an associated change in the crystal orientation. In addition, MC carbides form during the transformation of M2C to M6C. From the high-speed-steel production point of view, it is beneficial to have large, metastable carbides in the cast structure, which later during annealing, before the forging, transform into a structure of polycrystalline carbides. Such carbides can be easily decomposed into several small carbides, which are then randomly distributed in the microstructure. The results also show an interesting difference in the carbide-transformation reactions on the surface versus the bulk of the alloy, which has implications for in-situ studies of bulk phenomena that are based on surface observations. PMID:26537780

  7. METHOD FOR COATING GRAPHITE WITH NIOBIUM CARBIDE

    DOEpatents

    Kane, J.S.; Carpenter, J.H.; Krikorian, O.H.

    1962-01-16

    A method is given for coating graphite with a hard, tenacious layer of niobium carbide up to 30 mils or more thick. The method makes use of the discovery that niobium metal, if degassed and heated rapidly below the carburization temperature in contact with graphite, spreads, wets, and penetrates the graphite without carburization. The method includes the obvious steps of physically contacting niobium powders or other physical forms of niobium with graphite, degassing the assembly below the niobium melting point, e.g., 1400 deg C, heating to about 2200 to 2400 deg C within about 15 minutes while outgassing at a high volume throughput, and thereafter carburizing the niobium. (AEC)

  8. Synthesis and characterisation of chromium carbides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detroye, M.; Reniers, F.; Buess-Herman, C.; Vereecken, J.

    1997-11-01

    This paper presents the synthesis and the characterisation of various chromium carbide compounds. Thin Cr 23C 6 films were deposited by reactive sputtering while Cr 7C 3 films were formed by the carburisation of chromium films in a CH 4/H 2 atmosphere. Cr xC y powders were synthesised from various precursors (Cr, CrN, Cr 2O 3) by reaction with CH 4/H 2 at high temperature. The samples were characterised by AES, XRD and electron diffraction. The effects of the experimental parameters (gas composition, temperature, reaction time) on the purity, the phase formed and the composition of the product of reaction are examined and discussed.

  9. Structural and mechanical properties of thorium carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Aynyas, Mahendra; Pataiya, Jagdeesh; Arya, B. S.; Singh, A.; Sanyal, S. P.

    2015-06-24

    We have investigated the cohesive energies, equilibrium lattice constants, pressure-volume relationship, phase transition pressure and elastic constant for thorium carbide using an interionic potential theory with modified ionic charge, which includes Coulomb screening effect due to d-electrons. This compound undergoes structural phase transition from NaCl (B{sub 1}) to CsCl (B{sub 2}) structure at high pressure 40 GPa. We have also calculated bulk, Young, and shear moduli, Poisson ratio and anisotropic ratio in NaCl (B{sub 1}) structure and compared them with other experimental and theoretical results which show a good agreement.

  10. Corrosion behavior of porous chromium carbide in supercritical water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Ziqiang; Chen, Weixing; Zheng, Wenyue; Guzonas, Dave

    2012-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of highly porous chromium carbide (Cr 3C 2) prepared by a reactive sintering process was characterized at temperatures ranging from 375 °C to 625 °C in a supercritical water environment with a pressure of 25-30 MPa. The test results show that porous chromium carbide is stable in SCW environments at temperatures under 425 °C, above which disintegration occurred. The porous carbide was also tested under hydrothermal conditions of pressures between 12 MPa and 50 MPa at constant temperatures of 400 °C and 415 °C, respectively. The pressure showed little effect on the stability of chromium carbide in the tests at those temperatures. The mechanism of disintegration of chromium carbide in SCW environments is discussed.

  11. Electrocatalysis using transition metal carbide and oxide nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regmi, Yagya N.

    Carbides are one of the several families of transition metal compounds that are considered economic alternatives to catalysts based on noble metals and their compounds. Phase pure transition metal carbides of group 4-6 metals, in the first three periods, were synthesized using a common eutectic salt flux synthesis method, and their electrocatalytic activities compared under uniform electrochemical conditions. Mo2C showed highest hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activities among the nine metal carbides investigated, but all other metal carbides also showed substantial activities. All the metal carbides showed remarkable enhancement in catalytic activities as supports, when compared to traditional graphitic carbon as platinum support. Mo2C, the most active transition metal carbide electrocatalyst, was prepared using four different synthesis routes, and the synthesis route dependent activities compared. Bifunctional Mo 2C that is HER as well as oxygen evolution reaction (OER) active, was achieved when the carbide was templated on a multiwalled carbon nanotube using carbothermic reduction method. Bimetallic carbides of Fe, Co, and Ni with Mo or W were prepared using a common carbothermic reduction method. Two different stoichiometries of bimetallic carbides were obtained for each system within a 60 °C temperature window. While the bimetallic carbides showed relatively lower electrocatalytic activities towards HER and ORR in comparison to Mo2C and WC, they revealed remarkably higher OER activities than IrO2 and RuO2, the state-of-the-art OER catalysts. Bimetallic oxides of Fe, Co, and Ni with Mo and W were also prepared using a hydrothermal synthesis method and they also revealed OER activities that are much higher than RuO2 and IrO2. Additionally, the OER activities were dependent on the degree and nature of hydration in the bimetallic oxide crystal lattice, with the completely hydrated, as synthesized, cobalt molybdate and nickel

  12. Modification of σ-Donor Properties of Terminal Carbide Ligands Investigated Through Carbide-Iodine Adduct Formation.

    PubMed

    Reinholdt, Anders; Vosch, Tom; Bendix, Jesper

    2016-09-26

    The terminal carbide ligands in [(Cy3 P)2 X2 Ru≡C] complexes (X=halide or pseudohalide) coordinate molecular iodine, affording charge-transfer complexes rather than oxidation products. Crystallographic and vibrational spectroscopic data show the perturbations of iodine to vary with the auxiliary ligand sphere on ruthenium, demonstrating the σ-donor properties of carbide complexes to be tunable.

  13. Corrosion and wear resistance of tungsten carbide-cobalt and tungsten carbide-cobalt-chromium thermal spray coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Quets, J.; Alford, J.R.

    1999-07-01

    Tungsten carbide thermal spray coatings provide wear surfaces to new and overhauled components for various industries. Their wear resistance is obtained by incorporating small tungsten carbide particles into a metal matrix. This presentation will show what parameters influence their corrosion resistance in the ASTM B-117 Salt Spray Corrosion Test,

  14. Ultrasmall Carbide Nanospheres - Formation and Electronic Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinke, Petra; Monazami, Ehsan; McClimon, John

    2015-03-01

    Metallic nanoparticles are highly coveted but are subject to rapid Ostwald ripening even at moderate temperatures limiting study of their properties. Ultrasmall transition metal carbide ``nanospheres'' are synthesized by a solid-state reaction between fullerene as carbon scaffold, and a W surface. This produces nanospheres with a narrow size distribution below 2.5 nm diameter. The nanosphere shape is defined by the scaffold and densely packed arrays can be achieved. The metal-fullerene reaction is temperature driven and progresses through an intermediate semiconducting phase until the fully metallic nanospheres are created at about 350 C. The reaction sequence is observed with STM, and STS maps yield the local density of states. The reaction presumably progresses by stepwise introduction of W-atoms in the carbon scaffold. The results of high resolution STM/STS in combination with DFT calculations are used to unravel the reaction mechanism. We will discuss the transfer of this specific reaction mechanism to other transition metal carbides. The nanospheres are an excellent testbed for the physics and chemistry of highly curved surfaces.

  15. Improved silicon carbide for advanced heat engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, Thomas J.

    1988-01-01

    This is the third annual technical report for the program entitled, Improved Silicon Carbide for Advanced Heat Engines, for the period February 16, 1987 to February 15, 1988. The objective of the original program was the development of high strength, high reliability silicon carbide parts with complex shapes suitable for use in advanced heat engines. Injection molding is the forming method selected for the program because it is capable of forming complex parts adaptable for mass production on an economically sound basis. The goals of the revised program are to reach a Weibull characteristic strength of 550 MPa (80 ksi) and a Weibull modulus of 16 for bars tested in 4-point loading. Two tasks are discussed: Task 1 which involves materials and process improvements, and Task 2 which is a MOR bar matrix to improve strength and reliability. Many statistically designed experiments were completed under task 1 which improved the composition of the batches, the mixing of the powders, the sinter and anneal cycles. The best results were obtained by an attritor mixing process which yielded strengths in excess of 550 MPa (80 ksi) and an individual Weibull modulus of 16.8 for a 9-sample group. Strengths measured at 1200 and 1400 C were equal to the room temperature strength. Annealing of machined test bars significantly improved the strength. Molding yields were measured and flaw distributions were observed to follow a Poisson process. The second iteration of the Task 2 matrix experiment is described.

  16. Development of silicon carbide composites for fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Snead, L.L. )

    1993-08-01

    The use of silicon carbide composites for structural materials is of growing interest in the fusion community. However, radiation effects in these materials are virtually unexplored, and the general state of ceramic matrix composites for nonnuclear applications is still in its infancy. Research into the radiation response of the most popular silicon carbide composite, namely, the chemically vapor-deposited (CVD) SiC-carbon-Nicalon fiber system is discussed. Three areas of interest are the stability of the fiber and matrix materials, the stability of the fiber-matrix interface, and the true activation of these [open quotes]reduced activity[close quotes] materials. Two methods are presented that quantitatively measure the effect of radiation on fiber and matrix elastic modulus as well as the fiber-matrix interfacial strength. The results of these studies show that the factor limiting the radiation performance of the CVD SiC-carbon-Nicalon system is degradation of the Nicalon fiber, which leads to a weakened carbon interface. The activity of these composites is significantly higher than expected and is dominated by impurity isotopes. 52 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. High temperature intermetallic binders for HVOF carbides

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, K.G.; Gruninger, M.F.; Jarosinski, W.J.

    1994-12-31

    Gas turbines technology has a long history of employing the desirable high temperature physical attributes of ceramic-metallic (cermet) materials. The most commonly used coatings incorporate combinations of WC-Co and Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}-NiCr, which have also been successfully utilized in other non-turbine coating applications. Increased turbine operating temperatures and other high temperature service conditions have made apparent the attractive notion of increasing the temperature capability and corrosion resistance of these coatings. In this study the intermetallic binder NiAl has been used to replace the cobalt and NiCr constituents of conventional WC and Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2} cermet powders. The composite carbide thermal spray powders were fabricated for use in the HVOF coating process. The structure of HVOF deposited NiAl-carbide coatings are compared directly to the more familiar WC-Co and Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}-NiCr coatings using X-ray diffraction, back-scattered electron imaging (BEI) and electron dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Hardness variations with temperature are reported and compared between the NiAl and Co/NiCr binders.

  18. Improved silicon carbide for advanced heat engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, Thomas J.; Mangels, J. A.

    1986-01-01

    The development of silicon carbide materials of high strength was initiated and components of complex shape and high reliability were formed. The approach was to adapt a beta-SiC powder and binder system to the injection molding process and to develop procedures and process parameters capable of providing a sintered silicon carbide material with improved properties. The initial effort was to characterize the baseline precursor materials, develop mixing and injection molding procedures for fabricating test bars, and characterize the properties of the sintered materials. Parallel studies of various mixing, dewaxing, and sintering procedures were performed in order to distinguish process routes for improving material properties. A total of 276 modulus-of-rupture (MOR) bars of the baseline material was molded, and 122 bars were fully processed to a sinter density of approximately 95 percent. Fluid mixing techniques were developed which significantly reduced flaw size and improved the strength of the material. Initial MOR tests indicated that strength of the fluid-mixed material exceeds the baseline property by more than 33 percent. the baseline property by more than 33 percent.

  19. Dispersion aspects of silicon carbide gelcasting

    SciTech Connect

    Bleier, A.

    1991-09-01

    The principal objective of this research was to increase the solid loading of silicon carbide (SiC) powder, in an appropriate liquid medium, to a level that is useful for gelcasting technology. A number of factors that determine the maximum concentration of silicon carbide that can be incorporated into a pourable ceramic suspension have been identified. The pH of the system is the most critical processing parameter. Its proper adjustment (pH 11 to 13) allows SiC concentrations exceeding 50%, based on volume, to be routinely achieved without the use of additional dispersing agents. The particle size of SiC was also found to affect the maximum, attainable concentration. The surface area of the powder and the presence of free carbon in the powder, though not significantly influencing the suspension properties, determine the concentration of initiator required to induce polymerization and gelation. SiC specimens have been gelcast for powders in the size range of 0.8 to 8.5 {mu}m; the powders employed contain either {approximately} 0 or 19% carbon by weight. Finally, the generation of bubbles, typically encountered by the use of ammonia to adjust pH has been circumvented by the use of tetramethylammonium hydroxide.

  20. Dynamic compaction of tungsten carbide powder.

    SciTech Connect

    Gluth, Jeffrey Weston; Hall, Clint Allen; Vogler, Tracy John; Grady, Dennis Edward

    2005-04-01

    The shock compaction behavior of a tungsten carbide powder was investigated using a new experimental design for gas-gun experiments. This design allows the Hugoniot properties to be measured with reasonably good accuracy despite the inherent difficulties involved with distended powders. The experiments also provide the first reshock state for the compacted powder. Experiments were conducted at impact velocities of 245, 500, and 711 m/s. A steady shock wave was observed for some of the sample thicknesses, but the remainder were attenuated due to release from the back of the impactor or the edge of the sample. The shock velocity for the powder was found to be quite low, and the propagating shock waves were seen to be very dispersive. The Hugoniot density for the 711 m/s experiment was close to ambient crystal density for tungsten carbide, indicating nearly complete compaction. When compared with quasi-static compaction results for the same material, the dynamic compaction data is seen to be significantly stiffer for the regime over which they overlap. Based on these initial results, recommendations are made for improving the experimental technique and for future work to improve our understanding of powder compaction.

  1. Improved silicon carbide for advanced heat engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, Thomas J.

    1987-01-01

    This is the second annual technical report entitled, Improved Silicon Carbide for Advanced Heat Engines, and includes work performed during the period February 16, 1986 to February 15, 1987. The program is conducted for NASA under contract NAS3-24384. The objective is the development of high strength, high reliability silicon carbide parts with complex shapes suitable for use in advanced heat engines. The fabrication methods used are to be adaptable for mass production of such parts on an economically sound basis. Injection molding is the forming method selected. This objective is to be accomplished in a two-phase program: (1) to achieve a 20 percent improvement in strength and a 100 percent increase in Weibull modulus of the baseline material; and (2) to produce a complex shaped part, a gas turbine rotor, for example, with the improved mechanical properties attained in the first phase. Eight tasks are included in the first phase covering the characterization of the properties of a baseline material, the improvement of those properties and the fabrication of complex shaped parts. Activities during the first contract year concentrated on two of these areas: fabrication and characterization of the baseline material (Task 1) and improvement of material and processes (Task 7). Activities during the second contract year included an MOR bar matrix study to improve mechanical properties (Task 2), materials and process improvements (Task 7), and a Ford-funded task to mold a turbocharger rotor with an improved material (Task 8).

  2. Salt flux synthesis of single and bimetallic carbide nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, Brian M.; Waetzig, Gregory R.; Clouser, Dale A.; Schmuecker, Samantha M.; Harris, Daniel P.; Stacy, John M.; Duffee, Kyle D.; Wan, Cheng

    2016-07-01

    Metal carbide compounds have a broad range of interesting properties and are some of the hardest and highest melting point compounds known. However, their high melting points force very high reaction temperatures and thus limit the formation of high surface area nanomaterials. To avoid the extreme synthesis temperatures commonly associated with these materials, a new salt flux technique has been employed to reduce reaction temperatures and form these materials in the nanometer regime. Additionally, the use of multiwall carbon nanotubes as a reactant further reduces the diffusion distance and provides a template for the final carbide materials. The metal carbide compounds produced through this low temperature salt flux technique maintain the nanowire morphology of the carbon nanotubes but increase in size to ˜15-20 nm diameter due to the incorporation of metal in the carbon lattice. These nano-carbides not only have nanowire like shape but also have much higher surface areas than traditionally prepared metal carbides. Finally, bimetallic carbides with composition control can be produced with this method by simply using two metal precursors in the reaction. This method provides the ability to produce nano sized metal carbide materials with size, morphology, and composition control and will allow for these compounds to be synthesized and studied in a whole new size and temperature regime.

  3. Salt flux synthesis of single and bimetallic carbide nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, Brian M.; Waetzig, Gregory R.; Clouser, Dale A.; Schmuecker, Samantha M.; Harris, Daniel P.; Stacy, John M.; Duffee, Kyle D.; Wan, Cheng

    2016-07-01

    Metal carbide compounds have a broad range of interesting properties and are some of the hardest and highest melting point compounds known. However, their high melting points force very high reaction temperatures and thus limit the formation of high surface area nanomaterials. To avoid the extreme synthesis temperatures commonly associated with these materials, a new salt flux technique has been employed to reduce reaction temperatures and form these materials in the nanometer regime. Additionally, the use of multiwall carbon nanotubes as a reactant further reduces the diffusion distance and provides a template for the final carbide materials. The metal carbide compounds produced through this low temperature salt flux technique maintain the nanowire morphology of the carbon nanotubes but increase in size to ∼15–20 nm diameter due to the incorporation of metal in the carbon lattice. These nano-carbides not only have nanowire like shape but also have much higher surface areas than traditionally prepared metal carbides. Finally, bimetallic carbides with composition control can be produced with this method by simply using two metal precursors in the reaction. This method provides the ability to produce nano sized metal carbide materials with size, morphology, and composition control and will allow for these compounds to be synthesized and studied in a whole new size and temperature regime.

  4. Computational Studies of Physical Properties of Boron Carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Lizhi Ouyang

    2011-09-30

    The overall goal is to provide valuable insight in to the mechanisms and processes that could lead to better engineering the widely used boron carbide which could play an important role in current plight towards greener energy. Carbon distribution in boron carbide, which has been difficult to retrieve from experimental methods, is critical to our understanding of its structure-properties relation. For modeling disorders in boron carbide, we implemented a first principles method based on supercell approach within our G(P,T) package. The supercell approach was applied to boron carbide to determine its carbon distribution. Our results reveal that carbon prefers to occupy the end sites of the 3-atom chain in boron carbide and further carbon atoms will distribute mainly on the equatorial sites with a small percentage on the 3-atom chains and the apex sites. Supercell approach was also applied to study mechanical properties of boron carbide under uniaxial load. We found that uniaxial load can lead to amorphization. Other physical properties of boron carbide were calculated using the G(P,T) package.

  5. Preparation and Fatigue Properties of Functionally Graded Cemented Carbides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yong; Liu, Fengxiao; Liaw, Peter K.; He, Yuehui

    2008-02-01

    Cemented carbides with a functionally graded structure have significantly improved mechanical properties and lifetimes in cutting, drilling and molding. In this work, WC-6 wt.% Co cemented carbides with three-layer graded structure (surface layer rich in WC, mid layer rich in Co and the inner part of the average composition) were prepared by carburizing pre-sintered η-phase-containing cemented carbides. The three-point bending fatigue tests based on the total-life approach were conducted on both WC-6wt%Co functionally graded cemented carbides (FGCC) and conventional WC-6wt%Co cemented carbides. The functionally graded cemented carbide shows a slightly higher fatigue limit (˜100 MPa) than the conventional ones under the present testing conditions. However, the fatigue crack nucleation behavior of FGCC is different from that of the conventional ones. The crack nucleates preferentially along the Co-gradient and perpendicular to the tension surface in FGCC, while parallel to the tension surface in conventional cemented carbides.

  6. Preparation and Fatigue Properties of Functionally Graded Cemented Carbides

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Yong; Liu Fengxiao; Liaw, Peter K.; He Yuehui

    2008-02-15

    Cemented carbides with a functionally graded structure have significantly improved mechanical properties and lifetimes in cutting, drilling and molding. In this work, WC-6 wt.% Co cemented carbides with three-layer graded structure (surface layer rich in WC, mid layer rich in Co and the inner part of the average composition) were prepared by carburizing pre-sintered {eta}-phase-containing cemented carbides. The three-point bending fatigue tests based on the total-life approach were conducted on both WC-6wt%Co functionally graded cemented carbides (FGCC) and conventional WC-6wt%Co cemented carbides. The functionally graded cemented carbide shows a slightly higher fatigue limit ({approx}100 MPa) than the conventional ones under the present testing conditions. However, the fatigue crack nucleation behavior of FGCC is different from that of the conventional ones. The crack nucleates preferentially along the Co-gradient and perpendicular to the tension surface in FGCC, while parallel to the tension surface in conventional cemented carbides.

  7. Combustion synthesis of oxide-carbide composites

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L.L.; Munir, Z.A. . Div. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1990-02-01

    Synthesis of an oxide-carbide composite material through a self- propagating reaction process can be achieved by coupling a highly exothermic thermite reaction and a weakly exothermic carbide reaction. Two systems, one with Al and the other with Mg as the reducing agent in the presence of B{sub 2}O{sub 3} and carbon, are used as the reaction models for this investigation. Based on the experimental results, the formation Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-B{sub 4}C and MgO-N{sub 4}C composites is proposed to involve a two-step sequential reaction mechanism. The highly exothermic thermite reaction between the reducing agent and B{sub 2}O{sub 3} occurs first, and the heat generated subsequently brings about the formation of B{sub 4}C between the liberated boron and the carbon. The exothermic reaction between Al and B{sub 2}O{sub 3} is initiated at about 850{degrees}C. In the reaction between Mg and B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, however, the interaction between Mg and B{sub 2}O{sub 3} depends on the surrounding inert gas pressure due to the high volatility of Mg. The interaction changes from one involving gaseous Mg and liquid B{sub 2}O{sub 3} to one involving liquid Mg and liquid B{sub 2}O{sub 3} as the pressure increases. In both systems, reactions between the metallic oxides (i.e. Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} or MgO) and B{sub 2}O{sub 3} compete with the thermite reaction. Although it is possible to synthesize B{sub 4}C from carbon fibers in the 6Mg+B{sub 2+}O{sub 3}+C system, the carbon fiber is only partially converted, and the carbide formed is loosely attached to the unreacted carbon core. 17 refs., 23 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Plasma metallurgical production of nanocrystalline borides and carbides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galevsky, G. V.; Rudneva, V. V.; Cherepanov, A. N.; Galevsky, S. G.; Efimova, K. A.

    2016-09-01

    he experience in production and study of properties of nanocrystalline borides and chromium carbides, titanium, silicon was summarized. The design and features of the vertical three-jet once-through reactor with power 150 kW, used in the plasma metallurgical production, was described. The technological, thermotechnical and resource characteristics of the reactor were identified. The parameters of borides and carbides synthesis, their main characteristics in the nanodispersed state and equipment-technological scheme of production were provided. Evaluation of engineering-and-economical performance of the laboratory and industrial levels of borides and carbides production and the state corresponding to the segment of the world market was carried out.

  9. Colloidal characterization of ultrafine silicon carbide and silicon nitride powders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitman, Pamela K.; Feke, Donald L.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of various powder treatment strategies on the colloid chemistry of aqueous dispersions of silicon carbide and silicon nitride are examined using a surface titration methodology. Pretreatments are used to differentiate between the true surface chemistry of the powders and artifacts resulting from exposure history. Silicon nitride powders require more extensive pretreatment to reveal consistent surface chemistry than do silicon carbide powders. As measured by titration, the degree of proton adsorption from the suspending fluid by pretreated silicon nitride and silicon carbide powders can both be made similar to that of silica.

  10. Pulmonary dust retention in a silicon carbide worker.

    PubMed

    Dufresne, A; Loosereewanich, P; Harrigan, M; Sébastien, P; Perrault, G; Bégin, R

    1993-06-01

    This paper reports on pulmonary dust retention in a man who worked 42 years in the vicinity of an Acheson furnace of a silicon carbide plant and had a carborundum pneumoconiosis. Special attention is paid to the retained silicon carbide fibers in the lung parenchyma. The concentration of silicon carbide fibers longer than 5 microns is 39,300 fibers/mg dry lung. These fibers have a similar morphology to fibers observed in the working environment. The result is compared to pulmonary retention of workers exposed to asbestos.

  11. Separation of Nuclear Fuel Surrogates from Silicon Carbide Inert Matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Ronald Baney

    2008-12-15

    The objective of this project has been to identify a process for separating transuranic species from silicon carbide (SiC). Silicon carbide has become one of the prime candidates for the matrix in inert matrix fuels, (IMF) being designed to reduce plutonium inventories and the long half-lives actinides through transmutation since complete reaction is not practical it become necessary to separate the non-transmuted materials from the silicon carbide matrix for ultimate reprocessing. This work reports a method for that required process.l

  12. Hugoniot equation of state and dynamic strength of boron carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grady, Dennis E.

    2015-04-01

    Boron carbide ceramics have been particularly problematic in attempts to develop adequate constitutive model descriptions for purposes of analysis of dynamic response in the shock and impact environment. Dynamic strength properties of boron carbide ceramic differ uniquely from comparable ceramics. Furthermore, boron carbide is suspected, but not definitely shown, to undergoing polymorphic phase transformation under shock compression. In the present paper, shock-wave compression measurements conducted over the past 40 years are assessed for the purpose of achieving improved understanding of the dynamic equation of state and strength of boron carbide. In particular, attention is focused on the often ignored Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Hugoniot measurements performed on porous sintered boron carbide ceramic. The LANL data are shown to exhibit two compression anomalies on the shock Hugoniot within the range of 20-60 GPa that may relate to crystallographic structure transitions. More recent molecular dynamics simulations on the compressibility of the boron carbide crystal lattice reveal compression transitions that bear similarities to the LANL Hugoniot results. The same Hugoniot data are complemented with dynamic isentropic compression data for boron carbide extracted from Hugoniot measurements on boron carbide and copper granular mixtures. Other Hugoniot measurements, however, performed on near-full-density boron carbide ceramic differ markedly from the LANL Hugoniot data. These later data exhibit markedly less compressibility and tend not to show comparable anomalies in compressibility. Alternative Hugoniot anomalies, however, are exhibited by the near-full-density data. Experimental uncertainty, Hugoniot strength, and phase transformation physics are all possible explanations for the observed discrepancies. It is reasoned that experimental uncertainty and Hugoniot strength are not likely explanations for the observed differences. The notable mechanistic

  13. Hugoniot equation of state and dynamic strength of boron carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Grady, Dennis E.

    2015-04-28

    Boron carbide ceramics have been particularly problematic in attempts to develop adequate constitutive model descriptions for purposes of analysis of dynamic response in the shock and impact environment. Dynamic strength properties of boron carbide ceramic differ uniquely from comparable ceramics. Furthermore, boron carbide is suspected, but not definitely shown, to undergoing polymorphic phase transformation under shock compression. In the present paper, shock-wave compression measurements conducted over the past 40 years are assessed for the purpose of achieving improved understanding of the dynamic equation of state and strength of boron carbide. In particular, attention is focused on the often ignored Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Hugoniot measurements performed on porous sintered boron carbide ceramic. The LANL data are shown to exhibit two compression anomalies on the shock Hugoniot within the range of 20–60 GPa that may relate to crystallographic structure transitions. More recent molecular dynamics simulations on the compressibility of the boron carbide crystal lattice reveal compression transitions that bear similarities to the LANL Hugoniot results. The same Hugoniot data are complemented with dynamic isentropic compression data for boron carbide extracted from Hugoniot measurements on boron carbide and copper granular mixtures. Other Hugoniot measurements, however, performed on near-full-density boron carbide ceramic differ markedly from the LANL Hugoniot data. These later data exhibit markedly less compressibility and tend not to show comparable anomalies in compressibility. Alternative Hugoniot anomalies, however, are exhibited by the near-full-density data. Experimental uncertainty, Hugoniot strength, and phase transformation physics are all possible explanations for the observed discrepancies. It is reasoned that experimental uncertainty and Hugoniot strength are not likely explanations for the observed differences. The notable

  14. Creep behavior of uranium carbide-based alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seltzer, M. S.; Wright, T. R.; Moak, D. P.

    1975-01-01

    The present work gives the results of experiments on the influence of zirconium carbide and tungsten on the creep properties of uranium carbide. The creep behavior of high-density UC samples follows the classical time-dependence pattern of (1) an instantaneous deformation, (2) a primary creep region, and (3) a period of steady-state creep. Creep rates for unalloyed UC-1.01 and UC-1.05 are several orders of magnitude greater than those measured for carbide alloys containing a Zr-C and/or W dispersoid. The difference in creep strength between alloyed and unalloyed materials varies with temperature and applied stress.

  15. Effects of processing on tribological properties of carbide derived carbon on silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Allen

    The physical, mechanical, and tribological properties of carbide derived carbon (CDC) were investigated. CDC is a new form of carbon, which can be produced from carbide ceramics by the reaction with chlorine gas at elevated temperatures much lower than those used for sintering or graphitization. The thickness of CDC formed from SiC in a 3.5% Cl2-Ar mixture at 1000°C and 900°C fits a parabolic rate equation. The rate of CDC growth is controlled primarily by diffusion through the CDC layer. Ball-on-disk measurements have shown that CDC has lower friction coefficient (0.1-0.2) than sintered carbides and better wear resistance than graphite. The wear rate of CDC sliding against a harder material such as a Si3 N4 ball is approximately 10-5 mm3/N-m, which is an order of magnitude less than SiC sliding against a Si3N 4 ball under similar conditions. The wear rate of CDC in room temperature BOD tests decays with sliding distance and can be fit to a logarithmic equation. The hydrogen treatment of CDC at 800°C for 8 hours in the 5% H 2-Ar mixture after the CDC has cooled down to room temperature improves the tribological properties by decreasing the friction coefficient to half of its original value and the wear rate to roughly a third of its original value.

  16. Method of preparing silicon carbide particles dispersed in an electrolytic bath for composite electroplating of metals

    DOEpatents

    Peng, Yu-Min; Wang, Jih-Wen; Liue, Chun-Ying; Yeh, Shinn-Horng

    1994-01-01

    A method for preparing silicon carbide particles dispersed in an electrolytic bath for composite electroplating of metals includes the steps of washing the silicon carbide particles with an organic solvent; washing the silicon carbide particles with an inorganic acid; grinding the silicon carbide particles; and heating the silicon carbide particles in a nickel-containing solution at a boiling temperature for a predetermined period of time.

  17. Method of producing silicon carbide articles

    DOEpatents

    Milewski, John V.

    1985-01-01

    A method of producing articles comprising reaction-bonded silicon carbide (SiC) and graphite (and/or carbon) is given. The process converts the graphite (and/or carbon) in situ to SiC, thus providing the capability of economically obtaining articles made up wholly or partially of SiC having any size and shape in which graphite (and/or carbon) can be found or made. When the produced articles are made of an inner graphite (and/or carbon) substrate to which SiC is reaction bonded, these articles distinguish SiC-coated graphite articles found in the prior art by the feature of a strong bond having a gradual (as opposed to a sharply defined) interface which extends over a distance of mils. A method for forming SiC whisker-reinforced ceramic matrices is also given. The whisker-reinforced articles comprise SiC whiskers which substantially retain their structural integrity.

  18. Polymeric synthesis of silicon carbide with microwaves.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, Juan; Urueta, Luis; Valdez, Zarel

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this work is conducting polymeric synthesis with microwaves for producing beta-SiC. A polymeric precursor was prepared by means of hydrolysis and condensation reactions from pheniltrimethoxysilane, water, methanol, ammonium hydroxide and chloride acid. The precursor was placed into a quartz tube in vacuum; pyrolysis was carried out conventionally in a tube furnace, and by microwaves at 2.45 GHz in a multimode cavity. Conventional tests took place in a scheme where temperature was up to 1500 degrees C for 120 minutes. Microwave heating rate was not controlled and tests lasted 60 and 90 minutes, temperature was around 900 degrees C. Products of the pyrolysis were analyzed by means of x-ray diffraction; in the microwave case the diffraction patterns showed a strong background of either very fine particles or amorphous material, then infrared spectroscopy was also employed for confirming carbon bonds. In both processes beta-SiC was found as the only produced carbide.

  19. Radiation damage of transition metal carbides

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, G.

    1991-01-01

    In this grant period we have investigated electrical properties of transition metal carbides and radiation-induced defects produced by low-temperature electron irradiation in them. Special attention has been given to the composition VC[sub 0.88] in which the vacancies on the carbon sublattice of this fcc crystal order to produce a V[sub 8]C[sub 7] superlattice. The existence of this superlattice structure was found to make the crystal somewhat resistant to radiation damage at low doses and/or at ambient temperature. At larger doses significant changes in the resistivity are produced. Annealing effects were observed which we believe to be connected with the reconstitution of the superlattice structure.

  20. Silicon carbide - Progress in crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, J. Anthony

    1987-01-01

    Recent progress in the development of two processes for producing large-area high-quality single crystals of SiC is described: (1) a modified Lely process for the growth of the alpha polytypes (e.g., 6H SiC) initially developed by Tairov and Tsvetkov (1978, 1981) and Ziegler et al. (1983), and (2) a process for the epitaxial growth of the beta polytype on single-crystal silicon or other substrates. Growth of large-area cubic SiC on Si is described together with growth of defect-free beta-SiC films on alpha-6H SiC crystals and TiC lattice. Semiconducting qualities of silicon carbide crystals grown by various techniques are discussed.

  1. Silicon carbide nanotubes growth: an original approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latu-Romain, L.; Ollivier, M.; Thiney, V.; Chaix-Pluchery, O.; Martin, M.

    2013-03-01

    Because of their unique properties, silicon carbide nanotubes (SiC-NTs) have aroused particular research interest. In this letter, a new approach to fabricate SiC-NTs via the carburization of Si-NWs is presented. By controlling the pressure during the carburization process, out-diffusion of Si through the SiC layer can be monitored. Finally, 3C-SiC-NTs with faceted {2 0 0} sidewall planes are obtained with an excellent crystalline quality. The external diameter is about 300 nm (nearly the same than the etched Si-NWs used) and the thickness of the sidewalls is about 40-100 nm. The crystalline quality as well as the good reproducibility of the process may lead to various applications in physics, chemistry, energy storage and biology.

  2. Amorphization of silicon carbide by carbon displacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devanathan, R.; Gao, F.; Weber, W. J.

    2004-05-01

    We have used molecular dynamics simulations to examine the possibility of amorphizing silicon carbide (SiC) by exclusively displacing C atoms. At a defect generation corresponding to 0.2 displacements per atom, the enthalpy surpasses the level of melt-quenched SiC, the density decreases by about 15%, and the radial distribution function shows a lack of long-range order. Prior to amorphization, the surviving defects are mainly C Frenkel pairs (67%), but Si Frenkel pairs (18%) and antisite defects (15%) are also present. The results indicate that SiC can be amorphized by C sublattice displacements. Chemical short-range disorder, arising mainly from Frenkel pair production, plays a significant role in the amorphization.

  3. An overview of silicon carbide device technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neudeck, Philip G.; Matus, Lawrence G.

    1992-01-01

    Recent progress in the development of silicon carbide (SiC) as a semiconductor is briefly reviewed. This material shows great promise towards providing electronic devices that can operate under the high-temperature, high-radiation, and/or high-power conditions where current semiconductor technologies fail. High quality single crystal wafers have become available, and techniques for growing high quality epilayers have been refined to the point where experimental SiC devices and circuits can be developed. The prototype diodes and transistors that have been produced to date show encouraging characteristics, but by the same token they also exhibit some device-related problems that are not unlike those faced in the early days of silicon technology development. Although these problems will not prevent the implementation of some useful circuits, the performance and operating regime of SiC electronics will be limited until these device-related issues are solved.

  4. Stored energy in irradiated silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Snead, L.L.; Burchell, T.D.

    1997-04-01

    This report presents a short review of the phenomenon of Wigner stored energy release from irradiated graphite and discusses it in relation to neutron irradiation of silicon carbide. A single published work in the area of stored energy release in SiC is reviewed and the results are discussed. It appears from this previous work that because the combination of the comparatively high specific heat of SiC and distribution in activation energies for recombining defects, the stored energy release of SiC should only be a problem at temperatures lower than those considered for fusion devices. The conclusion of this preliminary review is that the stored energy release in SiC will not be sufficient to cause catastrophic heating in fusion reactor components, though further study would be desirable.

  5. Silicon Carbide Nanotube Oxidation at High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahlborg, Nadia; Zhu, Dongming

    2012-01-01

    Silicon Carbide Nanotubes (SiCNTs) have high mechanical strength and also have many potential functional applications. In this study, SiCNTs were investigated for use in strengthening high temperature silicate and oxide materials for high performance ceramic nanocomposites and environmental barrier coating bond coats. The high · temperature oxidation behavior of the nanotubes was of particular interest. The SiCNTs were synthesized by a direct reactive conversion process of multiwall carbon nanotubes and silicon at high temperature. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was used to study the oxidation kinetics of SiCNTs at temperatures ranging from 800degC to1300degC. The specific oxidation mechanisms were also investigated.

  6. Development of a silicon carbide radiation detector

    SciTech Connect

    Ruddy, F.H.; Dulloo, A.R.; Seidel, J.G.; Seshadri, S.; Rowland, L.B.

    1998-06-01

    The radiation detection properties of semiconductor detectors made of 4H silicon carbide were evaluated. Both Schottky and p-n junction devices were tested. Exposure to alpha particles from a {sup 238}Pu source led to robust signals from the detectors. The resolution of the Schottky SiC detector was 5.8% (FWHM) at an energy of 294 keV, while that of the p-n junction was 6.6% (FWHM) at 260 keV. No effect of temperature in the range of 22 to 89 C was observed on the characteristics of the {sup 238}Pu alpha-induced signal from the SiC detector. In addition, testing in a gamma field of 10,000 rad-Si h{sup {minus}1} showed that the alpha-induced signal was separable from the gamma signal.

  7. Neutron irradiation induced amorphization of silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Snead, L.L.; Hay, J.C.

    1998-09-01

    This paper provides the first known observation of silicon carbide fully amorphized under neutron irradiation. Both high purity single crystal hcp and high purity, highly faulted (cubic) chemically vapor deposited (CVD) SiC were irradiated at approximately 60 C to a total fast neutron fluence of 2.6 {times} 10{sup 25} n/m{sup 2}. Amorphization was seen in both materials, as evidenced by TEM, electron diffraction, and x-ray diffraction techniques. Physical properties for the amorphized single crystal material are reported including large changes in density ({minus}10.8%), elastic modulus as measured using a nanoindentation technique ({minus}45%), hardness as measured by nanoindentation ({minus}45%), and standard Vickers hardness ({minus}24%). Similar property changes are observed for the critical temperature for amorphization at this neutron dose and flux, above which amorphization is not possible, is estimated to be greater than 130 C.

  8. Plastic deformation of polycrystalline zirconium carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darolia, R.; Archbold, T. F.

    1976-01-01

    The compressive yield strength of arc-melted polycrystalline zirconium carbide has been found to vary from 77 kg per sq mm at 1200 C to 19 kg per sq mm at 1800 C. Yield drops were observed with plastic strain-rates greater than 0.003/sec but not with slower strain rates. Strain-rate change experiments yielded values for the strain-rate sensitivity parameter m which range from 6.5 at 1500 C to 3.8 at 1800 C, and the product dislocation velocity stress exponent times T was found to decrease linearly with increasing temperature. The deformation rate results are consistent with the Kelly-Rowcliffe model in which the diffusion of carbon assists the motion of dislocations.

  9. Development of a silicon carbide sewing thread

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawko, Paul M.; Vasudev, Anand

    1989-01-01

    A silicon carbide (SiC) sewing thread has been designed which consists of a two-ply yarn in a 122 turns-per-meter-twist construction. Two processing aids in thread construction were evaluated. Prototype blankets were sewn using an SiC thread prepared either with polytetrafluoroethylene sizing or with an overwrap of rayon/dacron service yarn. The rayon/dacron-wrapped SiC thread was stronger, as shown by higher break-strength retention and less damage to the outer-mold-line fabric. This thread enables thermal protection system articles to be sewn or joined, or have perimeter close-out of assembled parts when using SiC fabric for high-temperature applications.

  10. Process for preparing fine grain silicon carbide powder

    DOEpatents

    Wei, G.C.

    Method of producing fine-grain silicon carbide powder comprises combining methyltrimethoxysilane with a solution of phenolic resin, acetone and water or sugar and water, gelling the resulting mixture, and then drying and heating the obtained gel.

  11. Conventional and Microwave Joining of Silicon Carbide Using Displacement Reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kingsley, J.; Yiin, T.; Barmatz, M.

    1995-01-01

    Microwave heating was used to join Silicon Carbide rods using a thin TiC /Si tape interlayer . Microwaves quickly heated the rods and tape to temperatures where solid-state displacement reactions between TiC and Si occurred.

  12. Status of advanced carbide fuels: Past, present, and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anghaie, Samim; Knight, Travis

    2002-01-01

    Solid solution, mixed uranium/refractory metal carbide fuels such as (U, Zr, Nb)C, so called ternary carbide or tri-carbide fuels have great potential for applications in next generation advanced nuclear power reactors. Because of their high melting points, high thermal conductivity, improved resistance to hot hydrogen corrosion, and good fission product retention, these advanced nuclear fuels have great potential for high performance reactors with increased safety margins. Despite these many benefits, some concerns regarding carbide fuels include compatibility issues with coolant and/or cladding materials and their endurance under the extreme conditions associated with nuclear thermal propulsion. The status of these fuels is reviewed to characterize their performance for space nuclear power applications. Results of current investigations are presented and as well as future directions of study for these advanced nuclear fuels. .

  13. 44. NORTHEAST VIEW OF IRON DESULPHERIZATION BUILDING, WITH CALCIUM CARBIDE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    44. NORTHEAST VIEW OF IRON DESULPHERIZATION BUILDING, WITH CALCIUM CARBIDE SILO ADJACENT TO BUILDING ON RIGHT. (Jet Lowe) - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Blast Furnace Plant, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

  14. Radial furnace shows promise for growing straight boron carbide whiskers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feingold, E.

    1967-01-01

    Radial furnace, with a long graphite vaporization tube, maintains a uniform thermal gradient, favoring the growth of straight boron carbide whiskers. This concept seems to offer potential for both the quality and yield of whiskers.

  15. On surface Raman scattering and luminescence radiation in boron carbide.

    PubMed

    Werheit, H; Filipov, V; Schwarz, U; Armbrüster, M; Leithe-Jasper, A; Tanaka, T; Shalamberidze, S O

    2010-02-01

    The discrepancy between Raman spectra of boron carbide obtained by Fourier transform Raman and conventional Raman spectrometry is systematically investigated. While at photon energies below the exciton energy (1.560 eV), Raman scattering of bulk phonons of boron carbide occurs, photon energies exceeding the fundamental absorption edge (2.09 eV) evoke additional patterns, which may essentially be attributed to luminescence or to the excitation of Raman-active processes in the surface region. The reason for this is the very high fundamental absorption in boron carbide inducing a very small penetration depth of the exciting laser radiation. Raman excitations essentially restricted to the boron carbide surface region yield spectra which considerably differ from bulk phonon ones, thus indicating structural modifications.

  16. Carbide-reinforced metal matrix composite by direct metal deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novichenko, D.; Thivillon, L.; Bertrand, Ph.; Smurov, I.

    Direct metal deposition (DMD) is an automated 3D laser cladding technology with co-axial powder injection for industrial applications. The actual objective is to demonstrate the possibility to produce metal matrix composite objects in a single-step process. Powders of Fe-based alloy (16NCD13) and titanium carbide (TiC) are premixed before cladding. Volume content of the carbide-reinforced phase is varied. Relationships between the main laser cladding parameters and the geometry of the built-up objects (single track, 2D coating) are discussed. On the base of parametric study, a laser cladding process map for the deposition of individual tracks was established. Microstructure and composition of the laser-fabricated metal matrix composite objects are examined. Two different types of structures: (a) with the presence of undissolved and (b) precipitated titanium carbides are observed. Mechanism of formation of diverse precipitated titanium carbides is studied.

  17. Crystallography and metallography of carbides in high alloy steels

    SciTech Connect

    Hetzner, Dennis W. Van Geertruyden, William

    2008-07-15

    The carbides in high carbon, high chromium bearing steels, high chromium carburizing steels, newly developed easily carburizable low carbon, low chromium high speed steels and M62 high speed steel fabricated by powder metal processing were studied. The particular steels evaluated include 440C, BG42. M50-Nil, CHS1, CHS50, Pyrowear 675 , CSS-42L{sup TM} and M62. The morphology and structure of the carbides were evaluated by means of metallography, X-ray diffraction and electron beam backscattered diffraction. The combination of these three techniques has provided new insight into how different carbide morphologies form during processing and the carbide structures that can be expected to be present in components fabricated from these steels by various types of heat treating.

  18. Single-Event Effects in Silicon Carbide Power Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Casey, Megan C.; LaBel, Kenneth A.; Ikpe, Stanley; Topper, Alyson D.; Wilcox, Edward P.; Kim, Hak; Phan, Anthony M.

    2015-01-01

    This report summarizes the NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging Program Silicon Carbide Power Device Subtask efforts in FY15. Benefits of SiC are described and example NASA Programs and Projects desiring this technology are given. The current status of the radiation tolerance of silicon carbide power devices is given and paths forward in the effort to develop heavy-ion single-event effect hardened devices indicated.

  19. Superconductivity in Ca-intercalated epitaxial graphene on silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kang; Feng, Xiao; Zhang, Wenhao; Ou, Yunbo; Chen, Lianlian; He, Ke; Wang, Li-Li; Guo, Liwei; Liu, Guodong; Xue, Qi-Kun; Ma, Xucun

    2013-08-01

    We have prepared Ca-intercalated multilayer epitaxial graphene films on silicon carbide and observed superconductivity in them with both magnetic and transport measurements. Superconducting transition has been detected at temperature up to 7 K in Ca-intercalated epitaxial graphene with the thickness down to 10 layers grown on both Si-face and C-face of silicon carbide. The result demonstrates intercalated epitaxial graphene as a good platform to study graphene-based superconductivity.

  20. Process for preparing fine-grain metal carbide powder

    DOEpatents

    Kennedy, C.R.; Jeffers, F.P.

    Fine-grain metal carbide powder suitable for use in the fabrication of heat resistant products is prepared by coating bituminous pitch on SiO/sub 2/ or Ta/sub 2/O/sub 5/ particles, heating the coated particles to convert the bituminous pitch to coke, and then heating the particles to a higher temperature to convert the particles to a carbide by reaction of said coke therewith.

  1. Dynamic compaction of boron carbide by a shock wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzyurkin, Andrey E.; Kraus, Eugeny I.; Lukyanov, Yaroslav L.

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents experiments on explosive compaction of boron carbide powder and modeling of the stress state behind the shock front at shock loading. The aim of this study was to obtain a durable low-porosity compact sample. The explosive compaction technology is used in this problem because the boron carbide is an extremely hard and refractory material. Therefore, its compaction by traditional methods requires special equipment and considerable expenses.

  2. Tribological properties of silicon carbide in metal removal process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1980-01-01

    Material properties are considered as they relate to adhesion, friction, and wear of single crystal silicon carbide in contact with metals and alloys that are likely to be involved in a metal removal process such as grinding. Metal removal from adhesion between sliding surfaces in contact and metal removal as a result of the silicon carbide sliding against a metal, indenting into it, and plowing a series of grooves or furrows are discussed. Fracture and deformation characteristics of the silicon carbide surface are also covered. The adhesion, friction, and metal transfer to silicon carbide is related to the relative chemical activity of the metals. The more active the metal, the higher the adhesion and friction, and the greater the metal transfer to silicon carbide. Atomic size and content of alloying elements play a dominant role in controlling adhesion, friction, and abrasive wear properties of alloys. The friction and abrasive wear (metal removal) decrease linearly as the shear strength of the bulk metal increases. They decrease as the solute to solvent atomic radius ratio increases or decreases linearly from unity, and with an increase of solute content. The surface fracture of silicon carbide is due to cleavages of 0001, 10(-1)0, and/or 11(-2)0 planes.

  3. Silicon nano-carbide in strengthening and ceramic technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudneva, V. V.; Galevsky, G. V.; Kozyrev, N. A.

    2015-09-01

    Technological advantages and conditions of new quality assurance of coatings and products, provided by silicon nano-carbide, have been ascertained in the course of composite electrodeposition of coatings, structural ceramics patterning, and surface hardening of steels via electro-explosive alloying. Silicon nano-carbide has been recommended to be used as a component of wear and corrosion resistant chromium carbide electrodeposited coatings, which can be operated at high temperatures and used for strengthening tools and equipment including those with a complex microrelief of functional surfaces. Silicon nano-carbide as a component of composite “silicon carbide - boron - carbon” can be applied to produce ceramic half products via solid phase sintering in argon under pressure of 0.1 MPa and temperature 2273 K. Application of silicon nano-carbide in technology of tool steel surface hardening via electroexplosive alloying ensures obtaining of a high micro-hard, wear and heat resistant shielding layer which is about 20 μm deep.

  4. Modification of σ-Donor Properties of Terminal Carbide Ligands Investigated Through Carbide-Iodine Adduct Formation.

    PubMed

    Reinholdt, Anders; Vosch, Tom; Bendix, Jesper

    2016-09-26

    The terminal carbide ligands in [(Cy3 P)2 X2 Ru≡C] complexes (X=halide or pseudohalide) coordinate molecular iodine, affording charge-transfer complexes rather than oxidation products. Crystallographic and vibrational spectroscopic data show the perturbations of iodine to vary with the auxiliary ligand sphere on ruthenium, demonstrating the σ-donor properties of carbide complexes to be tunable. PMID:27612099

  5. Understanding the Irradiation Behavior of Zirconium Carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Motta, Arthur; Sridharan, Kumar; Morgan, Dane; Szlufarska, Izabela

    2013-10-11

    Zirconium carbide (ZrC) is being considered for utilization in high-temperature gas-cooled reactor fuels in deep-burn TRISO fuel. Zirconium carbide possesses a cubic B1-type crystal structure with a high melting point, exceptional hardness, and good thermal and electrical conductivities. The use of ZrC as part of the TRISO fuel requires a thorough understanding of its irradiation response. However, the radiation effects on ZrC are still poorly understood. The majority of the existing research is focused on the radiation damage phenomena at higher temperatures (>450{degree}C) where many fundamental aspects of defect production and kinetics cannot be easily distinguished. Little is known about basic defect formation, clustering, and evolution of ZrC under irradiation, although some atomistic simulation and phenomenological studies have been performed. Such detailed information is needed to construct a model describing the microstructural evolution in fast-neutron irradiated materials that will be of great technological importance for the development of ZrC-based fuel. The goal of the proposed project is to gain fundamental understanding of the radiation-induced defect formation in zirconium carbide and irradiation response by using a combination of state-of-the-art experimental methods and atomistic modeling. This project will combine (1) in situ ion irradiation at a specialized facility at a national laboratory, (2) controlled temperature proton irradiation on bulk samples, and (3) atomistic modeling to gain a fundamental understanding of defect formation in ZrC. The proposed project will cover the irradiation temperatures from cryogenic temperature to as high as 800{degree}C, and dose ranges from 0.1 to 100 dpa. The examination of this wide range of temperatures and doses allows us to obtain an experimental data set that can be effectively used to exercise and benchmark the computer calculations of defect properties. Combining the examination of radiation

  6. Nanostructured carbide catalysts for the hydrogen economy

    SciTech Connect

    Ram Seshadri, Susannah Scott, Juergen Eckert

    2008-07-21

    The above quote, taken from the executive summary of the Report from the US DOE Basic Energy Sciences Workshop held August 6–8, 2007,[1] places in context the research carried out at the University of California, Santa Barbara, which is reported in this document. The enormous impact of heterogeneous catalysis is exemplified by the Haber process for the synthesis of ammonia, which consumes a few % of the world’s energy supply and natural gas, and feeds as many as a third of the world’s population. While there have been numerous advances in understanding the process,[2] culminating in the awarding of the Nobel Prize to Gerhard Ertl in 2007, it is interesting to note that the catalysts themselves have changed very little since they were discovered heuristically in the the early part of the 20th century. The thesis of this report is that modern materials chemistry, with all the empirical knowledge of solid state chemistry, combined with cutting edge structural tools, can help develop and better heterogeneous catalysis. The first part of this report describes research in the area of early transition metal carbides (notably of Mo and W), potentially useful catalysts for water gas shift (WGS) and related reactions of use to the hydrogen economy. Although these carbides have been known to be catalytically useful since the 1970s,[3] further use of these relatively inexpensive materials have been plagued by issues of low surface areas and ill-defined, and often unreactive surfaces, in conjunction with deactivation. We have employed for the first time, a combination of constant-wavelength and time-of-flight neutron scattering, including a total scattering analysis of the latter data, to better understand what happens in these materials, in a manner that for the first time, reveals surface graphitic carbon in these materials in a quantitative manner. Problems of preparation, surface stability, and irreversible reactivity have become manifest in this class of materials

  7. Thermal properties of wood-derived silicon carbide and copper-silicon carbide composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappecena, Kristen E.

    Wood-derived ceramics and composites have been of interest in recent years due to their unique microstructures, which lead to tailorable properties. The porosity and pore size distribution of each wood type is different, which yields variations in properties in the resultant materials. The thermal properties of silicon carbide ceramics and copper-silicon carbide composites derived from wood were studied as a function of their pore structures. Wood was pyrolyzed at temperatures ranging from 300-2400°C to yield porous carbon. The progression toward long-range order was studied as a function of pyrolyzation temperature. Biomorphic silicon carbide (bioSiC) is a porous ceramic material resulting from silicon melt infiltration of these porous carbon materials. BioSiC has potential applicability in many high temperature environments, particularly those in which rapid temperature changes occur. To understand the behavior of bioSiC at elevated temperatures, the thermal and thermo-mechanical properties were studied. The thermal conductivity of bioSiC from five precursors was determined using flash diffusivity at temperatures up to 1100°C. Thermal conductivity results varied with porosity, temperature and orientation, and decreased from 42-13 W/mK for porosities of 43-69%, respectively, at room temperature. The results were compared with to object-oriented finite-element analysis (OOF). OOF was also used to model and understand the heat-flow paths through the complex bioSiC microstructures. The thermal shock resistance of bioSiC was also studied, and no bioSiC sample was found to fail catastrophically after up to five thermal shock cycles from 1400°C to room temperature oil. Copper-silicon carbide composites have potential uses in thermal management applications due to the high thermal conductivity of each phase. Cu-bioSiC composites were created by electrodeposition of copper into bioSiC pores. The detrimental Cu-SiC reaction was avoided by using this room temperature

  8. Crystal structural and diffusion property in titanium carbides: A molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Yanan; Gao, Weimin

    2016-09-01

    Titanium carbides were studied via molecular dynamics simulation to characterize TiCx structures with respect to the carbon diffusion properties in this study. The effect of carbon concentration on atomic structures of titanium carbides was investigated through discussing the structure variation and the radial distribution functions of carbon atoms in titanium carbides. The carbon diffusion in titanium carbides was also analyzed, focusing on the dependence on carbon concentration and carbide structure. Carbon diffusivity with different carbon concentrations was determined by molecular dynamics (MD) calculations and compared with the available experimental data. The simulation results showed an atomic exchange mechanism for carbon diffusion in titanium carbide.

  9. Cs diffusion in cubic silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrader, David; Szlufarska, Izabela; Morgan, Dane

    2012-02-01

    Undesired release of Cs through a silicon carbide coating of nuclear fuel is a significant concern for the design of the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR). However, mechanisms of Cs transport are currently unclear. To better understand the possible mechanisms of Cs release here we use density functional theory to study diffusion of Cs in crystalline bulk SiC. Cs point defects and Cs - vacancy clusters have been investigated for stability and structure. The most stable state for the Cs impurity in SiC, under n-type doping conditions, is found to be a negatively charged Cs atom substituting for a C atom and bound to two Si vacancies ( Cs-2VSi3-). Bulk diffusion coefficients are estimated for several Cs impurity states. The Cs-2VSi3- defect structure is found to have the lowest overall activation energy for diffusion with a value of approximately 5.14 eV. This activation energy agrees well with diffusion activation energies estimated for Cs in SiC based on high temperature integral release experiments.

  10. High Resolution Laser Spectroscopy of Rhenium Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, Allan G.; Hall, Ryan M.; Linton, Colan; Tokaryk, Dennis

    2014-06-01

    The first spectroscopic study of rhenium carbide, ReC, has been performed using both low and high resolution techniques to collect rotationally resolved electronic spectra from 420 to 500nm. Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF), and dispersed fluorescence (DF) techniques were employed. ReC was formed in our laser ablation molecular jet apparatus by ablating a rhenium target rod in the presence of 1% methane in helium. The low resolution spectrum identified four bands of an electronic system belonging to ReC, three of which have been studied so far. Extensive hyperfine structure composed of six hyperfine components was observed in the high resolution spectrum, as well as a clear distinction between the 187ReC and 185ReC isotopologues. The data seems consistent with a ^4Π - ^4Σ- transition, as was predicted before experimentation. Dispersed fluorescence spectra allowed us to determine the ground state vibrational frequency (ωe"=994.4 ± 0.3 wn), and to identify a low-lying electronically excited state at Te"=1118.4 ± 0.4 wn with a vibrational frequency of ωe"=984 ± 2 wn. Personal communication, F. Grein, University of New Brunswick

  11. Predicting Two-Dimensional Silicon Carbide Monolayers.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhiming; Zhang, Zhuhua; Kutana, Alex; Yakobson, Boris I

    2015-10-27

    Intrinsic semimetallicity of graphene and silicene largely limits their applications in functional devices. Mixing carbon and silicon atoms to form two-dimensional (2D) silicon carbide (SixC1-x) sheets is promising to overcome this issue. Using first-principles calculations combined with the cluster expansion method, we perform a comprehensive study on the thermodynamic stability and electronic properties of 2D SixC1-x monolayers with 0 ≤ x ≤ 1. Upon varying the silicon concentration, the 2D SixC1-x presents two distinct structural phases, a homogeneous phase with well dispersed Si (or C) atoms and an in-plane hybrid phase rich in SiC domains. While the in-plane hybrid structure shows uniform semiconducting properties with widely tunable band gap from 0 to 2.87 eV due to quantum confinement effect imposed by the SiC domains, the homogeneous structures can be semiconducting or remain semimetallic depending on a superlattice vector which dictates whether the sublattice symmetry is topologically broken. Moreover, we reveal a universal rule for describing the electronic properties of the homogeneous SixC1-x structures. These findings suggest that the 2D SixC1-x monolayers may present a new "family" of 2D materials, with a rich variety of properties for applications in electronics and optoelectronics. PMID:26394207

  12. Ductile intermetallic toughened carbide matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Plucknett, K.P.; Tiegs, T.N.; Becher, P.F.; Waters, S.B.; Menchhofer, P.A.

    1996-08-01

    Ductile Ni{sub 3}Al alloys have been used as binder phase for fabrication of TiC and WC matrix composites. Ni{sub 3}Al has good corrosion resistance to aqueous acidic environments, and its yield strength increases with temperature to a max at 700-800 C; this combined with high tensile ductilities (up to 50% strain) make Ni{sub 3}Al attractive for replacing Co in cemented carbides. Materials have been fabricated by both hot pressing and vacuum sintering, with Ni{sub 3}Al contents of 15 to 95 vol%. Vacuum sintering cycles, similar to those used for WC/Co and TiC/Ni (1450-1600 C), resulted in sintered densities >95% theoretical. WC/Ni{sub 3}Al materials showed an order of magnitude improvement in corrosion resistance over WC/Co, in sulfuric/nitric acid. These materials also had improved high temperature strength retention compared to WC/Co cermets, though initial RT strengths were lower. Fracture toughness varied between 8 and 25 MPa.m{sup 1/2} and depended primarily on Ni{sub 3}Al content and composition.

  13. Predicting Two-Dimensional Silicon Carbide Monolayers.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhiming; Zhang, Zhuhua; Kutana, Alex; Yakobson, Boris I

    2015-10-27

    Intrinsic semimetallicity of graphene and silicene largely limits their applications in functional devices. Mixing carbon and silicon atoms to form two-dimensional (2D) silicon carbide (SixC1-x) sheets is promising to overcome this issue. Using first-principles calculations combined with the cluster expansion method, we perform a comprehensive study on the thermodynamic stability and electronic properties of 2D SixC1-x monolayers with 0 ≤ x ≤ 1. Upon varying the silicon concentration, the 2D SixC1-x presents two distinct structural phases, a homogeneous phase with well dispersed Si (or C) atoms and an in-plane hybrid phase rich in SiC domains. While the in-plane hybrid structure shows uniform semiconducting properties with widely tunable band gap from 0 to 2.87 eV due to quantum confinement effect imposed by the SiC domains, the homogeneous structures can be semiconducting or remain semimetallic depending on a superlattice vector which dictates whether the sublattice symmetry is topologically broken. Moreover, we reveal a universal rule for describing the electronic properties of the homogeneous SixC1-x structures. These findings suggest that the 2D SixC1-x monolayers may present a new "family" of 2D materials, with a rich variety of properties for applications in electronics and optoelectronics.

  14. Reaction Kinetics of Nanostructured Silicon Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallis, Kendra; Zerda, T. W.

    2006-10-01

    Nanostructured silicon carbide (SiC) is of interest particularly for use in nanocomposites that demonstrate high hardness as well as for use in semiconductor applications. Reaction kinetics studies of solid-solid reactions are relatively recent and present a method of determining the reaction mechanism and activation energy by measuring reaction rates. We have used induction heating to heat quickly, thus reducing the error in reaction time measurements. Data will be presented for reactions using silicon nanopowder (< 30 nm) and carbon multi-walled nanotubes with diameter 60 - 100 nm at five different temperatures below the melting point of silicon. Using the well-known Avrami-Erofeev model, a two-parameter chi- square fit of the data provided a rate constant (k) and parameter (n), related to the reaction mechanism, for each temperature. From these data, an activation energy of 138 kJ/mol was calculated. In addition, the parameter n suggests the reaction mechanism, which will also be discussed. Experiments are continuing at higher temperatures to consider the liquid- solid reaction as well.

  15. In situ ion irradiation of zirconium carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulmer, Christopher J.; Motta, Arthur T.; Kirk, Mark A.

    2015-11-01

    Zirconium carbide (ZrC) is a candidate material for use in one of the layers of TRISO coated fuel particles to be used in the Generation IV high-temperature, gas-cooled reactor, and thus it is necessary to study the effects of radiation damage on its structure. The microstructural evolution of ZrCx under irradiation was studied in situ using the Intermediate Voltage Electron Microscope (IVEM) at Argonne National Laboratory. Samples of nominal stoichiometries ZrC0.8 and ZrC0.9 were irradiated in situ using 1 MeV Kr2+ ions at various irradiation temperatures (T = 20 K-1073 K). In situ experiments made it possible to continuously follow the evolution of the microstructure during irradiation using diffraction contrast imaging. Images and diffraction patterns were systematically recorded at selected dose points. After a threshold dose during irradiations conducted at room temperature and below, black-dot defects were observed which accumulated until saturation. Once created, the defect clusters did not move or get destroyed during irradiation so that at the final dose the low temperature microstructure consisted only of a saturation density of small defect clusters. No long-range migration of the visible defects or dynamic defect creation and elimination were observed during irradiation, but some coarsening of the microstructure with the formation of dislocation loops was observed at higher temperatures. The irradiated microstructure was found to be only weakly dependent on the stoichiometry.

  16. Methods for producing silicon carbide architectural preforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiCarlo, James A. (Inventor); Yun, Hee (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Methods are disclosed for producing architectural preforms and high-temperature composite structures containing high-strength ceramic fibers with reduced preforming stresses within each fiber, with an in-situ grown coating on each fiber surface, with reduced boron within the bulk of each fiber, and with improved tensile creep and rupture resistance properties for each fiber. The methods include the steps of preparing an original sample of a preform formed from a pre-selected high-strength silicon carbide ceramic fiber type, placing the original sample in a processing furnace under a pre-selected preforming stress state and thermally treating the sample in the processing furnace at a pre-selected processing temperature and hold time in a processing gas having a pre-selected composition, pressure, and flow rate. For the high-temperature composite structures, the method includes additional steps of depositing a thin interphase coating on the surface of each fiber and forming a ceramic or carbon-based matrix within the sample.

  17. Bright Single Photon Emitter in Silicon Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lienhard, Benjamin; Schroeder, Tim; Mouradian, Sara; Dolde, Florian; Trong Tran, Toan; Aharonovich, Igor; Englund, Dirk

    Efficient, on-demand, and robust single photon emitters are of central importance to many areas of quantum information processing. Over the past 10 years, color centers in solids have emerged as excellent single photon emitters. Color centers in diamond are among the most intensively studied single photon emitters, but recently silicon carbide (SiC) has also been demonstrated to be an excellent host material. In contrast to diamond, SiC is a technologically important material that is widely used in optoelectronics, high power electronics, and microelectromechanical systems. It is commercially available in sizes up to 6 inches and processes for device engineering are well developed. We report on a visible-spectrum single photon emitter in 4H-SiC. The emitter is photostable at both room and low temperatures, and it enables 2 million photons/second from unpatterned bulk SiC. We observe two classes of orthogonally polarized emitters, each of which has parallel absorption and emission dipole orientations. Low temperature measurements reveal a narrow zero phonon line with linewidth < 0.1 nm that accounts for more than 30% of the total photoluminescence spectrum. To our knowledge, this SiC color emitter is the brightest stable room-temperature single photon emitter ever observed.

  18. Improved silicon carbide for advanced heat engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, Thomas J.

    1989-01-01

    The development of high strength, high reliability silicon carbide parts with complex shapes suitable for use in advanced heat engines is studied. Injection molding was the forming method selected for the program because it is capable of forming complex parts adaptable for mass production on an economically sound basis. The goals were to reach a Weibull characteristic strength of 550 MPa (80 ksi) and a Weibull modulus of 16 for bars tested in four-point loading. Statistically designed experiments were performed throughout the program and a fluid mixing process employing an attritor mixer was developed. Compositional improvements in the amounts and sources of boron and carbon used and a pressureless sintering cycle were developed which provided samples of about 99 percent of theoretical density. Strengths were found to improve significantly by annealing in air. Strengths in excess of 550 MPa (80 ksi) with Weibull modulus of about 9 were obtained. Further improvements in Weibull modulus to about 16 were realized by proof testing. This is an increase of 86 percent in strength and 100 percent in Weibull modulus over the baseline data generated at the beginning of the program. Molding yields were improved and flaw distributions were observed to follow a Poisson process. Magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectra were found to be useful in characterizing the SiC powder and the sintered samples. Turbocharger rotors were molded and examined as an indication of the moldability of the mixes which were developed in this program.

  19. Analysis of boron carbides' electronic structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Iris A.; Beckel, Charles L.

    1986-01-01

    The electronic properties of boron-rich icosahedral clusters were studied as a means of understanding the electronic structure of the icosahedral borides such as boron carbide. A lower bound was estimated on bipolaron formation energies in B12 and B11C icosahedra, and the associated distortions. While the magnitude of the distortion associated with bipolaron formation is similar in both cases, the calculated formation energies differ greatly, formation being much more favorable on B11C icosahedra. The stable positions of a divalent atom relative to an icosahedral borane was also investigated, with the result that a stable energy minimum was found when the atom is at the center of the borane, internal to the B12 cage. If incorporation of dopant atoms into B12 cages in icosahedral boride solids is feasible, novel materials might result. In addition, the normal modes of a B12H12 cluster, of the C2B10 cage in para-carborane, and of a B12 icosahedron of reduced (D sub 3d) symmetry, such as is found in the icosahedral borides, were calculated. The nature of these vibrational modes will be important in determining, for instance, the character of the electron-lattice coupling in the borides, and in analyzing the lattice contribution to the thermal conductivity.

  20. Casimir forces from conductive silicon carbide surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedighi, M.; Svetovoy, V. B.; Broer, W. H.; Palasantzas, G.

    2014-05-01

    Samples of conductive silicon carbide (SiC), which is a promising material due to its excellent properties for devices operating in severe environments, were characterized with the atomic force microscope for roughness, and the optical properties were measured with ellipsometry in a wide range of frequencies. The samples show significant far-infrared absorption due to concentration of charge carriers and a sharp surface phonon-polariton peak. The Casimir interaction of SiC with different materials is calculated and discussed. As a result of the infrared structure and beyond to low frequencies, the Casimir force for SiC-SiC and SiC-Au approaches very slowly the limit of ideal metals, while it saturates significantly below this limit if interaction with insulators takes place (SiC-SiO2). At short separations (<10 nm) analysis of the van der Waals force yielded Hamaker constants for SiC-SiC interactions lower but comparable to those of metals, which is of significance to adhesion and surface assembly processes. Finally, bifurcation analysis of microelectromechanical system actuation indicated that SiC can enhance the regime of stable equilibria against stiction.

  1. Casimir force measurements from silicon carbide surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedighi, M.; Svetovoy, V. B.; Palasantzas, G.

    2016-02-01

    Using an atomic force microscope we performed measurements of the Casimir force between a gold- coated (Au) microsphere and doped silicon carbide (SiC) samples. The last of these is a promising material for devices operating under severe environments. The roughness of the interacting surfaces was measured to obtain information for the minimum separation distance upon contact. Ellipsometry data for both systems were used to extract optical properties needed for the calculation of the Casimir force via the Lifshitz theory and for comparison to the experiment. Special attention is devoted to the separation of the electrostatic contribution to the measured total force. Our measurements demonstrate large contact potential V0(≈0.67 V ) , and a relatively small density of charges trapped in SiC. Knowledge of both Casimir and electrostatic forces between interacting materials is not only important from the fundamental point of view, but also for device applications involving actuating components at separations of less than 200 nm where surface forces play dominant role.

  2. Material testing of silicon carbide mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witkin, David B.; Palusinski, Iwona A.

    2009-08-01

    The Aerospace Corporation is developing a space qualification method for silicon carbide optical systems that covers material verification through system development. One of the initial efforts has been to establish testing protocols for material properties. Three different tests have been performed to determine mechanical properties of SiC: modulus of rupture, equibiaxial flexural strength and fracture toughness. Testing materials and methods have been in accordance with the respective ASTM standards. Material from four vendors has been tested to date, as part of the MISSE flight program and other programs. Data analysis has focused on the types of issues that are important when building actual components- statistical modeling of test results, understanding batch-to-batch or other source material variations, and relating mechanical properties to microstructures. Mechanical properties are needed as inputs to design trade studies and development and analysis of proof tests, and to confirm or understand the results of non-destructive evaluations of the source materials. Measuring these properties using standardized tests on a statistically valid number of samples is intended to increase confidence for purchasers of SiC spacecraft components that materials and structures will perform as intended at the highest level of reliability.

  3. Processing and characterization of boron carbide-hafnium diboride ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown-Shaklee, Harlan James

    Hafnium diboride based ceramics are promising candidate materials for advanced aerospace and nuclear reactor components. The effectiveness of boron carbide and carbon as HfB2 sintering additives was systematically evaluated. In the first stage of the research, boron carbide and carbon additives were found to improve the densification behavior of milled HfB2 powder in part by removing oxides at the HfB2 surface during processing. Boron carbide additives reduced the hot pressing temperature of HfB2 by 150°C compared to carbon, which reduced the hot pressing temperature by ˜50°C. Reduction of oxide impurities alone could not explain the difference in sintering enhancement, however, and other mechanisms of enhancement were evaluated. Boron carbides throughout the homogeneity range were characterized to understand other mechanisms of sintering enhancement in HfB2. Heavily faulted carbon rich and boron rich boron carbides were synthesized for addition to HfB2. The greatest enhancement to densification was observed in samples containing boron- and carbon-rich compositions whereas B6.5 C provided the least enhancement to densification. It is proposed that carbon rich and boron rich boron carbides create boron and hafnium point defects in HfB2, respectively, which facilitate densification. Evaluation of the thermal conductivity (kth) between room temperature and 2000°C suggested that the stoichiometry of the boron carbide additives did not significantly affect kth of HfB2-BxC composites. The improved sinterability and the high kth (˜110 W/m-K at 300K and ˜90 W/m-K at 1000°C ) of HfB2-BxC ceramics make them excellent candidates for isotopically enriched reactor control materials.

  4. Occurrence of airborne silicon carbide fibers during industrial production of silicon carbide.

    PubMed

    Bye, E; Eduard, W; Gjønnes, J; Sørbrøden, E

    1985-04-01

    Airborne dust from the production of silicon carbide has been analyzed for particle morphology and composition. Fibers of alpha silicon carbide were identified by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) combined with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with selected area electron diffraction techniques (SAED). Micrographs taken at high magnification revealed several stacking periods along the fiber axis, and one or more of the polytypes 2H, 4H, or 6H could be distinguished. Preliminary investigations applying SEM showed that 80% of the fibers had diameters of less than 0.5 micron and a length greater than 5 micron. Fiber concentrations were examined by the counting of stationary and personal samples in an optical phase contrast microscope. The fiber levels in the three plants investigated were low and less than 1 fiber/cc of air (10(6) fibers/m3). Dust samples from the handling of raw material, including recycled material, contained up to 5 fibers/cc (5 X 10(6) fibers/m3). PMID:4001899

  5. Occurrence of airborne silicon carbide fibers during industrial production of silicon carbide.

    PubMed

    Bye, E; Eduard, W; Gjønnes, J; Sørbrøden, E

    1985-04-01

    Airborne dust from the production of silicon carbide has been analyzed for particle morphology and composition. Fibers of alpha silicon carbide were identified by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) combined with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with selected area electron diffraction techniques (SAED). Micrographs taken at high magnification revealed several stacking periods along the fiber axis, and one or more of the polytypes 2H, 4H, or 6H could be distinguished. Preliminary investigations applying SEM showed that 80% of the fibers had diameters of less than 0.5 micron and a length greater than 5 micron. Fiber concentrations were examined by the counting of stationary and personal samples in an optical phase contrast microscope. The fiber levels in the three plants investigated were low and less than 1 fiber/cc of air (10(6) fibers/m3). Dust samples from the handling of raw material, including recycled material, contained up to 5 fibers/cc (5 X 10(6) fibers/m3).

  6. Converting a carbon preform object to a silicon carbide object

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levin, Harry (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A process for converting in depth a carbon or graphite preform object to a silicon carbide object, silicon carbide/silicon object, silicon carbide/carbon-core object, or a silicon carbide/silicon/carbon-core object, by contacting it with silicon liquid and vapor over various lengths of contact time in a reaction chamber. In the process, a stream comprised of a silicon-containing precursor material in gaseous phase below the decomposition temperature of said gas and a coreactant, carrier or diluent gas such as hydrogen is passed through a hole within a high emissivity, thin, insulating septum into the reaction chamber above the melting point of silicon. The thin septum has one face below the decomposition temperature of the gas and an opposite face exposed to the reaction chamber. Thus, the precursor gas is decomposed directly to silicon in the reaction chamber. Any stream of decomposition gas and any unreacted precursor gas from the reaction chamber is removed. A carbon or graphite preform object placed in the reaction chamber is contacted with the silicon. The carbon or graphite preform object is recovered from the reactor chamber after it has been converted to a desired silicon carbide, silicon and carbon composition.

  7. Phase Behavior of Pseudobinary Precious Metal-Carbide Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gregoire, John M.; Tague, Michele E.; Smith, Eva H.; Dale, Darren; DiSalvo, Francis J.; Abruña, Héctor D.; Hennig, Richard G.; van Dover, R. Bruce

    2010-11-15

    Transition metal carbides exhibit a variety of interesting material properties, including electrochemical stability. When combined with precious metals, Ta and W carbides have shown promise as fuel cell electrode materials; yet, the phase behavior of these precious metal-carbide systems is largely unexplored. We investigated P-M-C phase behavior with P = Pt, Pd, and Ru and M = Ta and W using composition spread thin films. We attained limited control of the deposited carbide phase through variation of the sputter atmosphere and demonstrated decreased corrosion of W-C materials with increasing C content. A high-throughput X-ray diffraction and X-ray fluorescence experiment was employed for thin film characterization, which revealed solubility of Pt, Pd, and Ru in cubic WC. Density functional calculations of the lattice parameter dependence on carbon concentration enabled the determination of carbon concentration from the X-ray data as a function of transition metal stoichiometry. Our measurement of variations in the C stoichiometry and evolution of thin film texture with transition metal composition yielded surprising results. We detail how the combination of the composition spread technique, the high-throughput thin film characterization, and the density functional modeling of ternary carbide alloys provided a deep understanding of the chemical systems.

  8. Microwave versus conventional sintering of silicon carbide tiles

    SciTech Connect

    Kass, M.D.; Caughman, J.B.O.; Forrester, S.C.; Akerman, A.

    1997-05-07

    Silicon carbide is being evaluated as an armor material because of its lightweight, high-hardness, and excellent armor efficiency. However, one of the problems associated with silicon carbide is the high cost associated with achieving fully dense tiles. Full density requires either hot pressing and sintering or reaction bonding. Past efforts have shown that hot pressed tiles have a higher armor efficiency than those produced by reaction bonded sintering. An earlier stuy showed that the acoustic properties of fully-dense silicon carbide tiles were enhanced through the use of post-sintered microwave heat treatments. One of the least expensive forming techniques is to isostatically press-and-sinter. In this study, the authors have used microwave energy to densify silicon carbide green bodies. Microwave sintering has been demonstrated to be a very quick way to sinter ceramics such as alumina to exceptionally high densities. Previous work has shown that microwave post treatment of fully-dense reaction bonded silicon carbide tiles significantly improves the acoustic properties of the tiles. These properties include Poisson`s ratio, Young`s modulus, shear modulus, and bulk modulus.

  9. Pulsed energy synthesis and doping of silicon carbide

    DOEpatents

    Truher, J.B.; Kaschmitter, J.L.; Thompson, J.B.; Sigmon, T.W.

    1995-06-20

    A method for producing beta silicon carbide thin films by co-depositing thin films of amorphous silicon and carbon onto a substrate is disclosed, whereafter the films are irradiated by exposure to a pulsed energy source (e.g. excimer laser) to cause formation of the beta-SiC compound. Doped beta-SiC may be produced by introducing dopant gases during irradiation. Single layers up to a thickness of 0.5-1 micron have been produced, with thicker layers being produced by multiple processing steps. Since the electron transport properties of beta silicon carbide over a wide temperature range of 27--730 C is better than these properties of alpha silicon carbide, they have wide application, such as in high temperature semiconductors, including HETEROJUNCTION-junction bipolar transistors and power devices, as well as in high bandgap solar arrays, ultra-hard coatings, light emitting diodes, sensors, etc.

  10. A study of silicon carbide synthesis from waste serpentine.

    PubMed

    Cheng, T W; Hsu, C W

    2006-06-01

    There are 60000 tons of serpentine wastes produced in year 2004 in Taiwan. This is due to the well-developed joints in the serpentine ore body as well as the stringent requirements of the particle size and chemical composition of serpentine by iron making company. The waste also creates considerable environmental problems. The purpose of this study is reutilization of waste serpentine to produce a high value silica powder after acid leaching. These siliceous microstructure products obtained from serpentine would be responsible for high reactivity and characteristic molecular sieving effect. In this study, the amorphous silica powder was then synthesized to silicon carbide with the C/SiO(2) molar ratio of 3. The experiment results show that silicon carbide can be synthesized in 1550 degrees C. The formed silicon carbide was whisker beta type SiC which can be used as raw materials for industry.

  11. Surface Figure Measurement of Silicon Carbide Mirrors at Cryogenic Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, Peter; Mink, Ronald G.; Chambers, John; Robinson, F. David; Content, David; Davila, Pamela

    2005-01-01

    The surface figure of a developmental silicon carbide mirror, cooled to 87 K and then 20 K within a cryostat, was measured with unusually high precision at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The concave spherical mirror, with a radius of 600 mm and a clear aperture of 150 mm, was fabricated of sintered silicon carbide. The mirror was mounted to an interface plate representative of an optical bench, made of the material Cesic@, a composite of silicon, carbon, and silicon carbide. The change in optical surface figure as the mirror and interface plate cooled from room temperature to 20 K was 3.7 nm rms, with a standard uncertainty of 0.23 nm in the rms statistic. Both the cryo-change figure and the uncertainty are among the lowest such figures yet published. This report describes the facilities, experimental methods, and uncertainty analysis of the measurements.

  12. Atomic structure of amorphous shear bands in boron carbide.

    PubMed

    Reddy, K Madhav; Liu, P; Hirata, A; Fujita, T; Chen, M W

    2013-01-01

    Amorphous shear bands are the main deformation and failure mode of super-hard boron carbide subjected to shock loading and high pressures at room temperature. Nevertheless, the formation mechanisms of the amorphous shear bands remain a long-standing scientific curiosity mainly because of the lack of experimental structure information of the disordered shear bands, comprising light elements of carbon and boron only. Here we report the atomic structure of the amorphous shear bands in boron carbide characterized by state-of-the-art aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy. Distorted icosahedra, displaced from the crystalline matrix, were observed in nano-sized amorphous bands that produce dislocation-like local shear strains. These experimental results provide direct experimental evidence that the formation of amorphous shear bands in boron carbide results from the disassembly of the icosahedra, driven by shear stresses.

  13. Pulmonary response, in vivo, to silicon carbide whiskers.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, G L; Trently, S A; Wilson, R B

    1993-11-01

    Fischer rats were exposed to silicon carbide whiskers (SiCW), boron carbide whiskers (BCW), silicon carbide platelets (SiCP), or crocidolite asbestos separately administered by intratracheal instillation. SiCW proved to be the most toxic material within the test group. Dramatic increases in alveolar macrophage populations within 1 week of exposure to SiCW persisted for at least 28 days, evidence of the chronic inflammation observed in necropsies during the first months of the study. The most common finding in histological preparations of tissues taken from animals 18 months after exposure to SiCW was a high incidence (frequency > 0.85) of multiple pulmonary granulomas which occasionally occluded airways. Lesions associated with crocidolite were similar to those found with SiCW. Equivalent treatment with BCW and SiCP produced no significant histological changes within 18 months of exposure.

  14. Structure-Property Relationship in Metal Carbides and Bimetallic Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jingguan

    2014-03-04

    The primary objective of our DOE/BES sponsored research is to use carbide and bimetallic catalysts as model systems to demonstrate the feasibility of tuning the catalytic activity, selectivity and stability. Our efforts involve three parallel approaches, with the aim at studying single crystal model surfaces and bridging the “materials gap” and “pressure gap” between fundamental surface science studies and real world catalysis. The utilization of the three parallel approaches has led to the discovery of many intriguing catalytic properties of carbide and bimetallic surfaces and catalysts. During the past funding period we have utilized these combined research approaches to explore the possibility of predicting and verifying bimetallic and carbide combinations with enhanced catalytic activity, selectivity and stability.

  15. Characterization of carbides composite surface layers produced by PTA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajoure, M.; Tajouri, A.

    2015-03-01

    Composite surface layer of nickel base with titanium carbide in powder form was deposited on to surface of low alloy steel 18G2A type according to polish standard by using plasma transferred arc technique. Results showed that, plasma transferred arc hardfacin process was successfully conducted by using PMNICr50P alloy plus titanium carbide powders. Maximum hardness of 754 HV and minimum dilution of 4.6 % were achieved by using an arc current of 80 A. However, when the current was further increased to 120 A& the dilution increases with current increase while the hardness decreases. Microstructure of the nickel base with titanium carbide feature uniform distribution of reinforcement particles with irregular grain shape and relatively small particles size, and regular boundary line between the substrate and over layer with presence of black area along the boundary line. A few micro - porosities are located in the matrix.

  16. Some observations on uranium carbide alloy/tungsten compatibility.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, W. M.

    1972-01-01

    Results of chemical compatibility tests between both pure tungsten and thoriated tungsten run at 1800 C for up to 3300 hours with uranium carbide alloys. Alloying with zirconium carbide appeared to widen the homogeneity range of uranium carbide, making additional carbon available for reaction with the tungsten. Reaction layers were formed both by vapor phase reaction and by physical contact, producing either or both UWC2 and W2C, depending upon the phases present in the starting fuel alloy. Formation of UWC2 results in slow growth of the reaction layer with time, while W2C reaction layers grow rapidly, allowing equilibrium to be reached in less than 2500 hours at 1800 C. Neither the presence of a thermal gradient nor the presence of thoria in the tungsten clad affect the reactions observed.

  17. Some observations on uranium carbide alloy/tungsten compatibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, W. M.

    1972-01-01

    Chemical compatibility between both pure and thoriated tungsten and uranium carbide alloys was studied at 1800 C for up to 3300 hours. Alloying with zirconium carbide appeared to widen the homogeneity range of uranium carbide, making additional carbon available for reaction with the tungsten. Reaction layers were formed both by vapor phase reaction and by physical contact, producing either or both UWC2 and W2C, dependent upon the phases present in the starting fuel alloy. Formation of UWC2 results in slow growth of the reaction layer with time, while W2C reaction layers grow rapidly, allowing equilibrium to be reached in less than 2500 hours at 1800 C. The presence of a thermal gradient had no effect on the reactions observed nor did the presence of thoria in the tungsten clad.

  18. Thermal shock and erosion resistant tantalum carbide ceramic material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Honeycutt, L., III; Manning, C. R. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Ceramic tantalum carbide artifacts with high thermal shock and mechanical erosion resistance are provided by incorporating tungsten-rhenium and carbon particles in a tantalum carbide matrix. The mix is sintered by hot pressing to form the ceramic article which has a high fracture strength relative to its elastic modulus and thus has an improved thermal shock and mechanical erosion resistance. The tantalum carbide is preferable less than minus 100 mesh, the carbon particles are preferable less than minus 100 mesh, and the tungsten-rhenium particles are preferable elongate, having a length to thickness ratio of at least 2/1. Tungsten-rhenium wire pieces are suitable as well as graphite particles.

  19. Pulsed energy synthesis and doping of silicon carbide

    DOEpatents

    Truher, Joel B.; Kaschmitter, James L.; Thompson, Jesse B.; Sigmon, Thomas W.

    1995-01-01

    A method for producing beta silicon carbide thin films by co-depositing thin films of amorphous silicon and carbon onto a substrate, whereafter the films are irradiated by exposure to a pulsed energy source (e.g. excimer laser) to cause formation of the beta-SiC compound. Doped beta-SiC may be produced by introducing dopant gases during irradiation. Single layers up to a thickness of 0.5-1 micron have been produced, with thicker layers being produced by multiple processing steps. Since the electron transport properties of beta silicon carbide over a wide temperature range of 27.degree.-730.degree. C. is better than these properties of alpha silicon carbide, they have wide application, such as in high temperature semiconductors, including hetero-junction bipolar transistors and power devices, as well as in high bandgap solar arrays, ultra-hard coatings, light emitting diodes, sensors, etc.

  20. Semiconducting boron carbide polymers devices for neutron detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echeverria, Elena; Pasquale, Frank L.; James, Robinson; Colón Santana, Juan A.; Adenwalla, Shireen; Kelber, Jeffry A.; Dowben, Peter A.

    2014-03-01

    Boron carbide materials, with aromatic compounds included, prove to be effective materials as solid state neutron detector detectors. The I-V characteristic curves for these heterojunction diodes with silicon show that these modified boron carbides, in the presence of these linking groups such as 1,4-diaminobenzene (DAB) and pyridine, are p-type. Cadmium was used as shield to discriminate between neutron-induced signals and thermal neutrons, and thermal neutron capture is evident, while gamma detection was not realized. Neutron detection signals for these heterojunction diode were observed, a measurable zero bias current noted, even without complete electron-hole collection. This again illustrates that boron carbide devices can be considered a neutron voltaic.

  1. Method for making hot-pressed fiber-reinforced carbide-graphite composite

    DOEpatents

    Riley, Robert E.; Wallace Sr., Terry C.

    1979-01-01

    A method for the chemical vapor deposition of a uniform coating of tantalum metal on fibers of a woven graphite cloth is described. Several layers of the coated cloth are hot pressed to produce a tantalum carbide-graphite composite having a uniformly dispersed, fine grained tantalum carbide in graphite with compositions in the range of 15 to 40 volume percent tantalum carbide.

  2. 40 CFR 424.50 - Applicability; description of the other calcium carbide furnaces subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... calcium carbide furnaces subcategory. 424.50 Section 424.50 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Other Calcium Carbide Furnaces Subcategory § 424.50 Applicability; description of the other calcium carbide furnaces subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  3. 40 CFR 424.50 - Applicability; description of the other calcium carbide furnaces subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... calcium carbide furnaces subcategory. 424.50 Section 424.50 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Other Calcium Carbide Furnaces Subcategory § 424.50 Applicability; description of the other calcium carbide furnaces subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  4. 40 CFR 424.50 - Applicability; description of the other calcium carbide furnaces subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... calcium carbide furnaces subcategory. 424.50 Section 424.50 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Other Calcium Carbide Furnaces Subcategory § 424.50 Applicability; description of the other calcium carbide furnaces subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  5. 40 CFR 424.50 - Applicability; description of the other calcium carbide furnaces subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... other calcium carbide furnaces subcategory. 424.50 Section 424.50 Protection of Environment... SOURCE CATEGORY Other Calcium Carbide Furnaces Subcategory § 424.50 Applicability; description of the other calcium carbide furnaces subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  6. 40 CFR 424.50 - Applicability; description of the other calcium carbide furnaces subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... calcium carbide furnaces subcategory. 424.50 Section 424.50 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Other Calcium Carbide Furnaces Subcategory § 424.50 Applicability; description of the other calcium carbide furnaces subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  7. The growth mechanism of grain boundary carbide in Alloy 690

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hui; Xia, Shuang; Zhou, Bangxin; Peng, Jianchao

    2013-07-15

    The growth mechanism of grain boundary M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides in nickel base Alloy 690 after aging at 715 °C was investigated by high resolution transmission electron microscopy. The grain boundary carbides have coherent orientation relationship with only one side of the matrix. The incoherent phase interface between M{sub 23}C{sub 6} and matrix was curved, and did not lie on any specific crystal plane. The M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbide transforms from the matrix phase directly at the incoherent interface. The flat coherent phase interface generally lies on low index crystal planes, such as (011) and (111) planes. The M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbide transforms from a transition phase found at curved coherent phase interface. The transition phase has a complex hexagonal crystal structure, and has coherent orientation relationship with matrix and M{sub 23}C{sub 6}: (111){sub matrix}//(0001){sub transition}//(111){sub carbide}, <112{sup ¯}>{sub matrix}//<21{sup ¯}10>{sub transition}//<112{sup ¯}>{sub carbide}. The crystal lattice constants of transition phase are c{sub transition}=√(3)×a{sub matrix} and a{sub transition}=√(6)/2×a{sub matrix}. Based on the experimental results, the growth mechanism of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} and the formation mechanism of transition phase are discussed. - Highlights: • A transition phase was observed at the coherent interfaces of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} and matrix. • The transition phase has hexagonal structure, and is coherent with matrix and M{sub 23}C{sub 6}. • The M{sub 23}C{sub 6} transforms from the matrix directly at the incoherent phase interface.

  8. Evolution of carbides in cold-work tool steels

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hoyoung; Kang, Jun-Yun; Son, Dongmin; Lee, Tae-Ho; Cho, Kyung-Mox

    2015-09-15

    This study aimed to present the complete history of carbide evolution in a cold-work tool steel along its full processing route for fabrication and application. A sequence of processes from cast to final hardening heat treatment was conducted on an 8% Cr-steel to reproduce a typical commercial processing route in a small scale. The carbides found at each process step were then identified by electron diffraction with energy dispersive spectroscopy in a scanning or transmission electron microscope. After solidification, MC, M{sub 7}C{sub 3} and M{sub 2}C carbides were identified and the last one dissolved during hot compression at 1180 °C. In a subsequent annealing at 870 °C followed by slow cooling, M{sub 6}C and M{sub 23}C{sub 6} were added, while they were dissolved in the following austenitization at 1030 °C. After the final tempering at 520 °C, fine M{sub 23}C{sub 6} precipitated again, thus the final microstructure was the tempered martensite with MC, M{sub 7}C{sub 3} and M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbide. The transient M{sub 2}C and M{sub 6}C originated from the segregation of Mo and finally disappeared due to attenuated segregation and the consequent thermodynamic instability. - Highlights: • The full processing route of a cold-work tool steel was simulated in a small scale. • The carbides in the tool steel were identified by chemical–crystallographic analyses. • MC, M{sub 7}C{sub 3}, M{sub 2}C, M{sub 6}C and M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides were found during the processing of the steel. • M{sub 2}C and M{sub 6}C finally disappeared due to thermodynamic instability.

  9. Wear particles of single-crystal silicon carbide in vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1980-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments, conducted in vacuum with silicon carbide /000/ surface in contact with iron based binary alloys are described. Multiangular and spherical wear particles of silicon carbide are observed as a result of multipass sliding. The multiangular particles are produced by primary and secondary cracking of cleavage planes /000/, /10(-1)0/, and /11(-2)0/ under the Hertzian stress field or local inelastic deformation zone. The spherical particles may be produced by two mechanisms: (1) a penny shaped fracture along the circular stress trajectories under the local inelastic deformation zone, and (2) attrition of wear particles.

  10. Process for preparing fine grain titanium carbide powder

    DOEpatents

    Janey, Mark A.

    1986-01-01

    A method for preparing finely divided titanium carbide powder in which an organotitanate is reacted with a carbon precursor polymer to provide an admixture of the titanium and the polymer at a molecular-level due to a crosslinking reaction between the organotitanate and the polymer. The resulting gel is dried, pyrolyzed to drive off volatile components and provide carbon. The resulting solids are then heated at an elevated temperature to convert the titanium and carbon to high-purity titanium carbide powder in a submicron size range.

  11. Magnetron sputter deposition of boron and boron carbide

    SciTech Connect

    McKernan, M.A.; Makowiecki, D.; Ramsey, P.; Jankowski, A.

    1991-03-13

    The fabrication of x-ray optical coatings with greater reflectivity required the development of sputter deposition processes for boron and boron carbide. The use of high density boron and boron carbide and a vacuum brazed target design was required to achieve the required sputter process stability and resistance to the thermal stress created by high rate sputtering. The results include a description of the target fabrication procedures and sputter process parameters necessary to fabricate B{sub 4}C{sup (1)} and B{sup (2)} modulated thin film structures. 3 refs., 6 figs.

  12. Process for synthesizing titanium carbide, titanium nitride and titanium carbonitride

    DOEpatents

    Koc, R.; Glatzmaier, G.C.

    1995-05-23

    A process is disclosed for synthesizing titanium carbide, titanium nitride or titanium carbonitride. The process comprises placing particles of titanium, a titanium salt or titanium dioxide within a vessel and providing a carbon-containing atmosphere within the vessel. The vessel is heated to a pyrolysis temperature sufficient to pyrolyze the carbon to thereby coat the particles with a carbon coating. Thereafter, the carbon-coated particles are heated in an inert atmosphere to produce titanium carbide, or in a nitrogen atmosphere to produce titanium nitride or titanium carbonitride, with the heating being of a temperature and time sufficient to produce a substantially complete solid solution.

  13. Electronic states in epitaxial graphene fabricated on silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Davydov, S. Yu.

    2011-08-15

    An analytical expression for the density of states of a graphene monolayer interacting with a silicon carbide surface (epitaxial graphene) is derived. The density of states of silicon carbide is described within the Haldane-Anderson model. It is shown that the graphene-substrate interaction results in a narrow gap of {approx}0.01-0.06 eV in the density of states of graphene. The graphene atom charge is estimated; it is shown that the charge transfer from the substrate is {approx}10{sup -3}-10{sup -2}e per graphene atom.

  14. Shock-induced localized amorphization in boron carbide.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mingwei; McCauley, James W; Hemker, Kevin J

    2003-03-01

    High-resolution electron microscope observations of shock-loaded boron carbide have revealed the formation of nanoscale intragranular amorphous bands that occur parallel to specific crystallographic planes and contiguously with apparent cleaved fracture surfaces. This damage mechanism explains the measured, but not previously understood, decrease in the ballistic performance of boron carbide at high impact rates and pressures. The formation of these amorphous bands is also an example of how shock loading can result in the synthesis of novel structures and materials with substantially altered properties.

  15. Catalytic carbide formation at aluminium-carbon interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maruyama, B.; Rabenberg, L.; Ohuchi, F. S.

    1990-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy investigations of the reaction of several monolayer-thick films of aluminum with glassy carbon substrates are presented. The influence of molecular oxygen and water vapor on the rate of reaction is examined. It is concluded that water vapor catalyzed the formation of aluminum carbide from aluminum and carbon by forming active sites which weakened carbon-carbon bonds at the glassy carbon surface, thus assisting their cleavage. The rate of carbide formation for undosed and molecular oxygen-dosed examples was less as neither metallic aluminum nor oxygen-formed alumina could bond to the carbon atom with sufficient strength to dissociate it quickly.

  16. Process for forming silicon carbide films and microcomponents

    DOEpatents

    Hamza, A.V.; Balooch, M.; Moalem, M.

    1999-01-19

    Silicon carbide films and microcomponents are grown on silicon substrates at surface temperatures between 900 K and 1700 K via C{sub 60} precursors in a hydrogen-free environment. Selective crystalline silicon carbide growth can be achieved on patterned silicon-silicon oxide samples. Patterned SiC films are produced by making use of the high reaction probability of C{sub 60} with silicon at surface temperatures greater than 900 K and the negligible reaction probability for C{sub 60} on silicon dioxide at surface temperatures less than 1250 K. 5 figs.

  17. Process for forming silicon carbide films and microcomponents

    DOEpatents

    Hamza, Alex V.; Balooch, Mehdi; Moalem, Mehran

    1999-01-01

    Silicon carbide films and microcomponents are grown on silicon substrates at surface temperatures between 900 K and 1700 K via C.sub.60 precursors in a hydrogen-free environment. Selective crystalline silicon carbide growth can be achieved on patterned silicon-silicon oxide samples. Patterned SiC films are produced by making use of the high reaction probability of C.sub.60 with silicon at surface temperatures greater than 900 K and the negligible reaction probability for C.sub.60 on silicon dioxide at surface temperatures less than 1250 K.

  18. Process for preparing fine grain titanium carbide powder

    DOEpatents

    Janney, M.A.

    1985-03-12

    A method for preparing finely divided titanium carbide powder in which an organotitanate is reacted with a carbon precursor polymer to provide an admixture of the titanium and the polymer at a molecular level due to a crosslinking reaction between the organotitanate and the polymer. The resulting gel is dried, pyrolyzed to drive off volatile components and provide carbon. The resulting solids are then heated at an elevated temperature to convert the titanium and carbon to high-purity titanium carbide powder in a submicron size range.

  19. Method for forming fibrous silicon carbide insulating material

    DOEpatents

    Wei, George C.

    1984-01-01

    A method whereby silicon carbide-bonded SiC fiber composites are prepared from carbon-bonded C fiber composites is disclosed. Carbon-bonded C fiber composite material is treated with gaseous silicon monoxide generated from the reaction of a mixture of colloidal silica and carbon black at an elevated temperature in an argon atmosphere. The carbon in the carbon bond and fiber is thus chemically converted to SiC resulting in a silicon carbide-bonded SiC fiber composite that can be used for fabricating dense, high-strength high-toughness SiC composites or as thermal insulating materials in oxidizing environments.

  20. Method for forming fibrous silicon carbide insulating material

    DOEpatents

    Wei, G.C.

    1983-10-12

    A method whereby silicon carbide-bonded SiC fiber composites are prepared from carbon-bonded C fiber composites is disclosed. Carbon-bonded C fiber composite material is treated with gaseous silicon monoxide generated from the reaction of a mixture of colloidal silica and carbon black at an elevated temperature in an argon atmosphere. The carbon in the carbon bond and fiber is thus chemically converted to SiC resulting in a silicon carbide-bonded SiC fiber composite that can be used for fabricating dense, high-strength high-toughness SiC composites or as thermal insulating materials in oxidizing environments.

  1. Flaw imaging and ultrasonic techniques for characterizing sintered silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baaklini, George Y.; Abel, Phillip B.

    1987-01-01

    The capabilities were investigated of projection microfocus x-radiography, ultrasonic velocity and attenuation, and reflection scanning acoustic microscopy for characterizing silicon carbide specimens. Silicon carbide batches covered a range of densities and different microstructural characteristics. Room temperature, four point flexural strength tests were conducted. Fractography was used to identify types, sizes, and locations of fracture origins. Fracture toughness values were calculated from fracture strength and flaw characterization data. Detection capabilities of radiography and acoustic microscopy for fracture-causing flaws were evaluated. Applicability of ultrasonics for verifying material strength and toughness was examined.

  2. High-Q silicon carbide photonic-crystal cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jonathan Y.; Lu, Xiyuan; Lin, Qiang

    2015-01-26

    We demonstrate one-dimensional photonic-crystal nanobeam cavities in amorphous silicon carbide. The fundamental mode exhibits intrinsic optical quality factor as high as 7.69 × 10{sup 4} with mode volume ∼0.60(λ/n){sup 3} at wavelength 1.5 μm. A corresponding Purcell factor value of ∼10{sup 4} is the highest reported to date in silicon carbide optical cavities. The device exhibits great potential for integrated nonlinear photonics and cavity nano-optomechanics.

  3. Process for synthesizing titanium carbide, titanium nitride and titanium carbonitride

    DOEpatents

    Koc, Rasit; Glatzmaier, Gregory C.

    1995-01-01

    A process for synthesizing titanium carbide, titanium nitride or titanium carbonitride. The process comprises placing particles of titanium, a titanium salt or titanium dioxide within a vessel and providing a carbon-containing atmosphere within the vessel. The vessel is heated to a pyrolysis temperature sufficient to pyrolyze the carbon to thereby coat the particles with a carbon coating. Thereafter, the carbon-coated particles are heated in an inert atmosphere to produce titanium carbide, or in a nitrogen atmosphere to produce titanium nitride or titanium carbonitride, with the heating being of a temperature and time sufficient to produce a substantially complete solid solution.

  4. Boron-carbide-aluminum and boron-carbide-reactive metal cermets. [B/sub 4/C-Al

    DOEpatents

    Halverson, D.C.; Pyzik, A.J.; Aksay, I.A.

    1985-05-06

    Hard, tough, lighweight boron-carbide-reactive metal composites, particularly boron-carbide-aluminum composites, are produced. These composites have compositions with a plurality of phases. A method is provided, including the steps of wetting and reacting the starting materials, by which the microstructures in the resulting composites can be controllably selected. Starting compositions, reaction temperatures, reaction times, and reaction atmospheres are parameters for controlling the process and resulting compositions. The ceramic phases are homogeneously distributed in the metal phases and adhesive forces at ceramic-metal interfaces are maximized. An initial consolidated step is used to achieve fully dense composites. Microstructures of boron-carbide-aluminum cermets have been produced with modules of rupture exceeding 110 ksi and fracture toughness exceeding 12 ksi..sqrt..in. These composites and methods can be used to form a variety of structural elements.

  5. SILICON CARBIDE JOINING. FINAL TOPICAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    1998-10-01

    Future energy systems will be required to fire lower-grade fuels and meet higher energy conversion efficiencies than today's systems. The steam cycle used at present is limited to a maximum temperature of 550 C because above that, the stainless steel tubes deform and corrode excessively. To boost efficiency significantly, much higher working fluid temperatures are required. Although high-temperature alloys will suffice for the construction of these components in the near term, the greatest efficiency increases can be reached only with the use of advanced structural ceramics such as silicon carbide (SiC). However, SiC does not melt, but instead sublimes at temperatures over 2000 C. Therefore, it is not possible to join pieces of it through welding, and most brazing compounds have much lower melting points, so the joints lose strength at temperatures much lower than the maximum use temperature of the SiC. Since larger objects such as heat exchangers cannot be easily created from smaller ceramic pieces, the size of the SiC structures that can presently be manufactured are limited by the size of the sintering furnaces (approximately 10 feet for sintered alpha SiC). In addition, repair of the objects will require the use of field-joining techniques. Some success has been had by causing silicon and carbon to react at 1400--1500 C to form SiC in a joint (Rabin, 1995), but these joints contain continuous channels of unreacted silicon, which cause the joints to corrode and creep excessively at temperatures below 1260 C (Breder and Parten, 1996). The objective of this work conducted at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) is to develop a patentable technique for joining large SiC structures in the field. The key to developing a successful technique will be the use of reactive joining compounds to lower the joining temperature without leaving continuous channels of unreacted compounds that can weaken the joint at temperatures below 1260 C or serve as conduits for

  6. Process for preparing metal-carbide-containing microspheres from metal-loaded resin beads

    DOEpatents

    Beatty, Ronald L.

    1976-01-01

    An improved method for treating metal-loaded resin microspheres is described which comprises heating a metal-loaded resin charge in an inert atmosphere at a pre-carbide-forming temperature under such conditions as to produce a microsphere composition having sufficient carbon as to create a substantially continuous carbon matrix and a metal-carbide or an oxide-carbide mixture as a dispersed phase(s) during carbide-forming conditions, and then heating the thus treated charge to a carbide-forming temperature.

  7. Method for homogenizing alloys susceptible to the formation of carbide stringers and alloys prepared thereby

    DOEpatents

    Braski, David N.; Leitnaker, James M.

    1980-01-01

    A novel fabrication procedure prevents or eliminates the reprecipitation of segregated metal carbides such as stringers in Ti-modified Hastelloy N and stainless steels to provide a novel alloy having carbides uniformly dispersed throughout the matrix. The fabrication procedure is applicable to other alloys prone to the formation of carbide stringers. The process comprises first annealing the alloy at a temperature above the single phase temperature for sufficient time to completely dissolve carbides and then annealing the single phase alloy for an additional time to prevent the formation of carbide stringers upon subsequent aging or thermomechanical treatment.

  8. Tungsten-yttria carbide coating for conveying copper

    DOEpatents

    Rothman, Albert J.

    1993-01-01

    A method is provided for providing a carbided-tungsten-yttria coating on the interior surface of a copper vapor laser. The surface serves as a wick for the condensation of liquid copper to return the condensate to the interior of the laser for revolatilization.

  9. Nuclear breeder reactor fuel element with silicon carbide getter

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, David W.; Karnesky, Richard A.

    1987-01-01

    An improved cesium getter 28 is provided in a breeder reactor fuel element or pin in the form of an extended surface area, low density element formed in one embodiment as a helically wound foil 30 located with silicon carbide, and located at the upper end of the fertile material upper blanket 20.

  10. Protective infrared antireflection coating based on sputtered germanium carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Des; Waddell, Ewan; Placido, Frank

    2011-09-01

    This paper describes optical, durablility and environmental performance of a germanium carbide based durable antireflection coating. The coating has been demonstrated on germanium and zinc selenide infra-red material however is applicable to other materials such as zinc sulphide. The material is deposited using a novel reactive closed field magnetron sputtering technique, offering significant advantages over conventional evaporation processes for germanium carbide such as plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition. The sputtering process is "cold", making it suitable for use on a wide range of substrates. Moreover, the drum format provide more efficient loading for high throughput production. The use of the closed field and unbalanced magnetrons creates a magnetic confinement that extends the electron mean free path leading to high ion current densities. The combination of high current densities with ion energies in the range ~30eV creates optimum thin film growth conditions. As a result the films are dense, spectrally stable, supersmooth and low stress. Films incorporate low hydrogen content resulting in minimal C-H absorption bands within critical infra-red passbands such as 3 to 5um and 8 to 12um. Tuning of germanium carbide (Ge(1-x)Cx) film refractive index from pure germanium (refractive index 4) to pure germanium carbide (refractive index 1.8) will be demonstrated. Use of film grading to achieve single and dual band anti-reflection performance will be shown. Environmental and durability levels are shown to be suitable for use in harsh external environments.

  11. Method of deposition of silicon carbide layers on substrates

    DOEpatents

    Angelini, P.; DeVore, C.E.; Lackey, W.J.; Blanco, R.E.; Stinton, D.P.

    1982-03-19

    A method for direct chemical vapor deposition of silicon carbide to substrates, especially nuclear waste particles, is provided by the thermal decomposition of methylsilane at 800 to 1050/sup 0/C when the substrates have been confined within a suitable coating environment.

  12. Structural chemistry of complex carbides and related compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowotny, Hans; Rogl, Peter; Schuster, Julius C.

    1982-08-01

    Complex carbides formed in ternary systems of a transition element ( M), a B-group element ( M'), and carbon and having a formula M2M'C (H-phase) or M3M'C (perovskite carbide) occur frequently. This reflects the simple geometry of the atomic arrangement of the metals and the filling mode by an interstitial stabilizer such as carbon or nitrogen. The phase relationship of the ternary combinations {Ti, Zr, Hf, V, Nb, Ta, Cr, Mn, and Ni}-aluminum-carbon was investigated. New complex carbides were found with the corresponding zirconium, hafnium, and tantalum combinations. The crystal structures in the case of Zr- and Hf-containing complex carbides can be characterized by a twelve-metal-layer sequence and by a ten-metal-layer sequence with carbon atoms again filling octahedral voids. The transition of structure types from TiC, Ti 2AlC, Ti 3SiC 2, ZrAlC 2, Zr 2Al 3C 5, to Al 4C 3 is also discussed.

  13. 62. Photocopied August 1978. 'CARBIDE' OR SECOND FLOOR LOOKING EAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    62. Photocopied August 1978. 'CARBIDE' OR SECOND FLOOR LOOKING EAST FROM WEST END, OCTOBER 29, 1902. THE STAIRS TO THE POWER COMPANY'S SUPPLEMENTAL THIRD FLOOR APPEARS AT THE RIGHT; THE HOLLOW TILES WHICH FORMED THIS FLOOR AT THE TOP. (435) - Michigan Lake Superior Power Company, Portage Street, Sault Ste. Marie, Chippewa County, MI

  14. Development of Bulk Nanocrystalline Cemented Tungsten Carbide for Industrial Applicaitons

    SciTech Connect

    Z. Zak Fang, H. Y. Sohn

    2009-03-10

    This report contains detailed information of the research program entitled "Development of Bulk Nanocrystalline Cemented Tungsten Carbide Materials for Industrial Applications". The report include the processes that were developed for producing nanosized WC/Co composite powders, and an ultrahigh pressure rapid hot consolidation process for sintering of nanosized powders. The mechanical properties of consolidated materials using the nanosized powders are also reported.

  15. Hafnium carbide formation in oxygen deficient hafnium oxide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodenbücher, C.; Hildebrandt, E.; Szot, K.; Sharath, S. U.; Kurian, J.; Komissinskiy, P.; Breuer, U.; Waser, R.; Alff, L.

    2016-06-01

    On highly oxygen deficient thin films of hafnium oxide (hafnia, HfO2-x) contaminated with adsorbates of carbon oxides, the formation of hafnium carbide (HfCx) at the surface during vacuum annealing at temperatures as low as 600 °C is reported. Using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy the evolution of the HfCx surface layer related to a transformation from insulating into metallic state is monitored in situ. In contrast, for fully stoichiometric HfO2 thin films prepared and measured under identical conditions, the formation of HfCx was not detectable suggesting that the enhanced adsorption of carbon oxides on oxygen deficient films provides a carbon source for the carbide formation. This shows that a high concentration of oxygen vacancies in carbon contaminated hafnia lowers considerably the formation energy of hafnium carbide. Thus, the presence of a sufficient amount of residual carbon in resistive random access memory devices might lead to a similar carbide formation within the conducting filaments due to Joule heating.

  16. Dynamic strength of reaction-sintered boron carbide ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savinykh, A. S.; Garkushin, G. V.; Razorenov, S. V.; Rumyantsev, V. I.

    2015-06-01

    The shock compression wave profiles in three modifications of boron carbide ceramic are studied in the compressive stress range 3-19 GPa. The Hugoniot elastic limit and the spall strength of the materials are determined. It is confirmed that the spall strength of high-hardness ceramic changes nonmonotonically with the compressive stress in a shock wave.

  17. Sintered silicon carbide molded body and method for its production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omori, M.; Sendai, M.; Ohira, K.

    1984-01-01

    Sintered silicon carbide shapes are described. They are produced by using a composition containing an oxide of at least one element chosen from the group: Li, Be, Mg, Si, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Zn, Nb, Mo, Ba, Tc, Ta, W and Th as a supplement to known sintering aids.

  18. Interaction of tungsten with tungsten carbide in a copper melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodrova, L. E.; Goida, E. Yu.; Pastukhov, E. A.; Marshuk, L. A.; Popova, E. A.

    2013-07-01

    The chemical interaction between tungsten and tungsten carbide in a copper melt with the formation of W2C at 1300°C is studied. It is shown that the mechanical activation of a composition consisting of copper melt + W and WC powders by low-temperature vibrations initiates not only the chemical interaction of its solid components but also their refinement.

  19. Carbon, carbides, and methane in an apollo 12 sample.

    PubMed

    Chang, S; Kvenvolden, K; Lawless, J; Ponnamperuma, C; Kaplan, I R

    1971-02-01

    Total carbon in the Apollo 12 sample 12023 fines was 110 micrograms per gram of sample with a carbon isotopic abundance delta(13)C (relative to the Pee Dee belemnite standard) of +12 per mil. Hydrolysis of the fines with deuterium chloride yielded undeuterated methane along with deuterated hydrocarbons, thus confirming the presence of 7 to 21 micrograms of carbon per gram of sample as carbide and about 2 micrograms of carbon per gram of sample as indigenous methane. After vacuum pyrolysis of the fines to 1100 degrees C the following gases were detected in the relative abundance: carbon monoxide carbon dioxide methane. Variations of the delta(13)C value with the pyrolysis temperature indicated the presence of carbon with more than one range of isotopic values. The observed delta(13)C value of +14 per mil for lunar carbide is much higher than that of carbide in meteorites. These results suggest that lunar carbide is either indigenous to the moon or a meteoritic contribution that has been highly fractionated isotopically.

  20. Carbide/fluoride/silver self-lubricating composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A self-lubricating, friction and wear reducing composite material for use over a wide temperature spectrum from cryogenic temperature to about 900.degree. C. in a chemically reactive environment comprising silver, barium fluoride/calcium fluoride eutectic, and metal bonded chromium carbide.

  1. Carbide-fluoride-silver self-lubricating composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A self-lubricating, friction and wear reducing composite material is described for use over a wide temperature spectrum from cryogenic temperature to about 900 C in a chemically reactive environment comprising silver, barium fluoride/calcium fluoride eutectic, and metal bonded chromium carbide.

  2. Silicon carbide and other films and method of deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehregany, Mehran (Inventor); Zorman, Christian A. (Inventor); Fu, Xiao-An (Inventor); Dunning, Jeremy L. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A method of depositing a ceramic film, particularly a silicon carbide film, on a substrate is disclosed in which the residual stress, residual stress gradient, and resistivity are controlled. Also disclosed are substrates having a deposited film with these controlled properties and devices, particularly MEMS and NEMS devices, having substrates with films having these properties.

  3. Silicon carbide and other films and method of deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehregany, Mehran (Inventor); Zorman, Christian A. (Inventor); Fu, Xiao-An (Inventor); Dunning, Jeremy (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A method of depositing a ceramic film, particularly a silicon carbide film, on a substrate is disclosed in which the residual stress, residual stress gradient, and resistivity are controlled. Also disclosed are substrates having a deposited film with these controlled properties and devices, particularly MEMS and NEMS devices, having substrates with films having these properties.

  4. Growth characteristics of primary M7C3 carbide in hypereutectic Fe-Cr-C alloy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sha; Zhou, Yefei; Xing, Xiaolei; Wang, Jibo; Ren, Xuejun; Yang, Qingxiang

    2016-01-01

    The microstructure of the hypereutectic Fe-Cr-C alloy is observed by optical microscopy (OM). The initial growth morphology, the crystallographic structure, the semi-molten morphology and the stacking faults of the primary M7C3 carbide are observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The in-suit growth process of the primary M7C3 carbide was observed by confocal laser microscope (CLM). It is found that the primary M7C3 carbide in hypereutectic Fe-Cr-C alloy is irregular polygonal shape with several hollows in the center and gaps on the edge. Some primary M7C3 carbides are formed by layers of shell or/and consist of multiple parts. In the initial growth period, the primary M7C3 carbide forms protrusion parallel to {} crystal planes. The extending and revolving protrusion forms the carbide shell. The electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) maps show that the primary M7C3 carbide consists of multiple parts. The semi-molten M7C3 carbide contains unmelted shell and several small-scale carbides inside, which further proves that the primary M7C3 carbide is not an overall block. It is believed that the coalescence of the primary M7C3 carbides is ascribed to the growing condition of the protrusion and the gap filling process. PMID:27596718

  5. Growth characteristics of primary M7C3 carbide in hypereutectic Fe-Cr-C alloy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sha; Zhou, Yefei; Xing, Xiaolei; Wang, Jibo; Ren, Xuejun; Yang, Qingxiang

    2016-09-06

    The microstructure of the hypereutectic Fe-Cr-C alloy is observed by optical microscopy (OM). The initial growth morphology, the crystallographic structure, the semi-molten morphology and the stacking faults of the primary M7C3 carbide are observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The in-suit growth process of the primary M7C3 carbide was observed by confocal laser microscope (CLM). It is found that the primary M7C3 carbide in hypereutectic Fe-Cr-C alloy is irregular polygonal shape with several hollows in the center and gaps on the edge. Some primary M7C3 carbides are formed by layers of shell or/and consist of multiple parts. In the initial growth period, the primary M7C3 carbide forms protrusion parallel to {} crystal planes. The extending and revolving protrusion forms the carbide shell. The electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) maps show that the primary M7C3 carbide consists of multiple parts. The semi-molten M7C3 carbide contains unmelted shell and several small-scale carbides inside, which further proves that the primary M7C3 carbide is not an overall block. It is believed that the coalescence of the primary M7C3 carbides is ascribed to the growing condition of the protrusion and the gap filling process.

  6. Study of Metallic Carbide (MC) in a Ni-Co-Cr-Based Powder Metallurgy Superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Wen-Bin; Liu, Guo-Quan; Hu, Ben-Fu; Hu, Peng-Hui; Zhang, Yi-Wen

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of carbides in a Ni-Cr-Co-based powder metallurgy (PM) superalloy in the as-atomized, as-atomized + annealed, hot isostatic pressed (HIPed) and HIPed + annealed conditions were systematically analyzed to understand the formation of blocky metallic carbide (MC) along the previous particle boundary (PPB). The results show that the carbides both on the powder surfaces and in the bulk of the powder particles are mainly fan-shaped MC whose decomposition temperatures are in the range of 1473 K to 1493 K (1200 °C to 1220 °C). PPB carbides in the HIPed alloy are mainly block-shaped MC, and the fan-shaped MC densely distributed in the area that have not been consumed by the recrystallized grains. The formation mechanism of PPB carbides can be described as follows: When the powders are HIPed at 1453 K (1180 °C), the fan-shaped carbides are decomposed at the migrating boundaries of recrystallized grains, and the preferential precipitation of block-shaped MC at PPB is promoted by the carbide-forming elements released by the fan-shaped carbides. When the HIPed alloy is annealed at 1453 K (1180 °C), the area fraction of PPB carbides increases with an increase in annealing time but that of the fan-shaped carbides exhibits opposite behavior. This proves the above formation mechanism of PPB carbides.

  7. Growth characteristics of primary M7C3 carbide in hypereutectic Fe-Cr-C alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Sha; Zhou, Yefei; Xing, Xiaolei; Wang, Jibo; Ren, Xuejun; Yang, Qingxiang

    2016-09-01

    The microstructure of the hypereutectic Fe-Cr-C alloy is observed by optical microscopy (OM). The initial growth morphology, the crystallographic structure, the semi-molten morphology and the stacking faults of the primary M7C3 carbide are observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The in-suit growth process of the primary M7C3 carbide was observed by confocal laser microscope (CLM). It is found that the primary M7C3 carbide in hypereutectic Fe-Cr-C alloy is irregular polygonal shape with several hollows in the center and gaps on the edge. Some primary M7C3 carbides are formed by layers of shell or/and consist of multiple parts. In the initial growth period, the primary M7C3 carbide forms protrusion parallel to {} crystal planes. The extending and revolving protrusion forms the carbide shell. The electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) maps show that the primary M7C3 carbide consists of multiple parts. The semi-molten M7C3 carbide contains unmelted shell and several small-scale carbides inside, which further proves that the primary M7C3 carbide is not an overall block. It is believed that the coalescence of the primary M7C3 carbides is ascribed to the growing condition of the protrusion and the gap filling process.

  8. Growth characteristics of primary M7C3 carbide in hypereutectic Fe-Cr-C alloy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Sha; Zhou, Yefei; Xing, Xiaolei; Wang, Jibo; Ren, Xuejun; Yang, Qingxiang

    2016-01-01

    The microstructure of the hypereutectic Fe-Cr-C alloy is observed by optical microscopy (OM). The initial growth morphology, the crystallographic structure, the semi-molten morphology and the stacking faults of the primary M7C3 carbide are observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The in-suit growth process of the primary M7C3 carbide was observed by confocal laser microscope (CLM). It is found that the primary M7C3 carbide in hypereutectic Fe-Cr-C alloy is irregular polygonal shape with several hollows in the center and gaps on the edge. Some primary M7C3 carbides are formed by layers of shell or/and consist of multiple parts. In the initial growth period, the primary M7C3 carbide forms protrusion parallel to {} crystal planes. The extending and revolving protrusion forms the carbide shell. The electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) maps show that the primary M7C3 carbide consists of multiple parts. The semi-molten M7C3 carbide contains unmelted shell and several small-scale carbides inside, which further proves that the primary M7C3 carbide is not an overall block. It is believed that the coalescence of the primary M7C3 carbides is ascribed to the growing condition of the protrusion and the gap filling process. PMID:27596718

  9. Raman spectroscopic characterization of the core-rim structure in reaction bonded boron carbide ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Jannotti, Phillip; Subhash, Ghatu; Zheng, James Q.; Halls, Virginia; Karandikar, Prashant G.; Salamone, S.; Aghajanian, Michael K.

    2015-01-26

    Raman spectroscopy was used to characterize the microstructure of reaction bonded boron carbide ceramics. Compositional and structural gradation in the silicon-doped boron carbide phase (rim), which develops around the parent boron carbide region (core) due to the reaction between silicon and boron carbide, was evaluated using changes in Raman peak position and intensity. Peak shifting and intensity variation from the core to the rim region was attributed to changes in the boron carbide crystal structure based on experimental Raman observations and ab initio calculations reported in literature. The results were consistent with compositional analysis determined by energy dispersive spectroscopy. The Raman analysis revealed the substitution of silicon atoms first into the linear 3-atom chain, and then into icosahedral units of the boron carbide structure. Thus, micro-Raman spectroscopy provided a non-destructive means of identifying the preferential positions of Si atoms in the boron carbide lattice.

  10. Carbides in a High-Chromium Ferritic/Martensitic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yin Zhong; Ji, Bo; Zhou, Xiao Ling; Zhu, Jun

    2014-06-01

    The precipitate phases in an 11 pct Cr ferritic/martensitic steel normalized at 1323 K (1050 °C) for 0.5 hour and tempered at 1053 K (780 °C) for 1.5 hours have been investigated. Except for dominant phases, Cr-rich M23C6 carbide and Nb-rich, Ta-Nb-rich, and V-rich MC carbides, needle-like precipitates with a typical size of 70 to 310 and 10 to 30 nm for the length of the long and short axis of the needles, respectively, were also observed on the extraction carbon replica of the steel. The typical metallic element composition of the needle-like precipitates is about 53-82Fe, 14-26Cr, 0.5-18Ta, 1-6W, and 2-5Co in atomic pct. Through energy dispersive X-ray analysis and electron diffraction along with calculations regarding lattice parameter and interplanar spacing, the needle-like precipitates were identified as a Fe-rich M5C2 carbide, which is not known to have been reported previously in high-chromium steels. The M5C2 carbide has a base-centered monoclinic crystal structure with the approximate lattice parameters a/ b/ c = 1.142/0.5186/0.5383 nm and β = 104.68 deg. The formation of the Fe-rich M5C2 carbides in the steel has been discussed. The effect of chromium content in matrix and boron addition on the precipitate phases in ferritic/martensitic steels has also been discussed.

  11. Fabrication and properties of silicon carbide nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Hyun Woo

    2008-12-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC), with excellent electrical, thermal, and mechanical properties, is a promising material candidate for future devices such as high-temperature electronics and super-strong lightweight structures. Combined with superior intrinsic properties, the nanomaterials of SiC show further advantages thanks to nanoscale effects. This thesis reports the growth mechanism, the self-integration, and the friction of SiC nanowires. The study involves nanowires fabrication using thermal evaporation, structure characterization using electron microscopy, friction measurement, and theoretical modeling. The study on nanowire growth mechanism requires understanding of the surfaces and interfaces of nanowire crystal. The catalyzed growth of SiC nanowires involves interfaces between source vapor, catalytic liquid, and nanowire solid. Our experimental observation includes the periodical twinning in a faceted SiC nanowire and three stage structure transitions during the growth. The proposed theoretical model shows that such phenomenon is the result of surface energy minimization process during the catalytic growth. Surface interactions also exist between nanowires, leading to their self-integration. Our parametric growth study reveals novel self-integration of SiC-SiO 2 core-shell nanowires as a result of SiO2 joining. Attraction between nanowires through van der Waals force and enhanced SiO2 diffusion at high temperature transform individual nanowires to the integrated nanojunctions, nanocables, and finally nanowebs. We also show that such joining process becomes effective either during growth or by annealing. The solid friction is a result of the interaction between two solid surfaces, and it depends on the adhesion and the deformation of two contacting solids among other factors. Having strong adhesion as shown from gecko foot-hairs, nanostructured materials should also have strong friction; this study is the first to investigate friction of nanostructures under

  12. The Active Oxidation of Silicon Carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Myers, Dwight L.

    2009-01-01

    The high temperature oxidation of silicon carbide occurs in two very different modes. Passive oxidation forms a protective oxide film which limits further attack of the SiC: SiC(s) + 3/2 O2(g) = SiO2(s) + CO(g) Active oxidation forms a volatile oxide and may lead to extensive attack of the SiC: SiC(s) + O2(g) = SiO(g) + CO(g) Generally passive oxidation occurs at higher oxidant pressures and active oxidation occurs at lower oxidant pressures and elevated temperatures. Active oxidation is a concern for reentry, where the flight trajectory involves the latter conditions. Thus the transition points and rates of active oxidation are a major concern. Passive/active transitions have been studied by a number of investigators. An examination of the literature indicates many questions remain regarding the effect of impurity, the hysteresis of the transition (i.e. the difference between active-to-passive and passive-toactive), and the effect of total pressure. In this study we systematically investigate each of these effects. Experiments were done in both an alumina furnace tube and a quartz furnace tube. It is known that alumina tubes release impurities such as sodium and increase the kinetics in the passive region [1]. We have observed that the active-to-passive transition occurs at a lower oxygen pressure when the experiment is conducted in alumina tubes and the resultant passive silica scale contains sodium. Thus the tests in this study are conducted in quartz tubes. The hysteresis of the transition has been discussed in the detail in the original theoretical treatise of this problem for pure silicon by Wagner [2], yet there is little mention of it in subsequent literature. Essentially Wagner points out that the active-to-passive transition is governed by the criterion for a stable Si/SiO2 equilibria and the passive-to-active transition is governed by the decomposition of the SiO2 film. A series of experiments were conducted for active-to-passive and passive

  13. Effects of space exposure on ion-beam-deposited silicon-carbide and boron-carbide coatings.

    PubMed

    Keski-Kuha, R A; Blumenstock, G M; Fleetwood, C M; Schmitt, D R

    1998-12-01

    Two recently developed optical coatings, ion-beam-deposited silicon carbide and ion-beam-deposited boron carbide, are very attractive as coatings on optical components for instruments for space astronomy and earth sciences operating in the extreme-UV spectral region because of their high reflectivity, significantly higher than any conventional coating below 105 nm. To take full advantage of these coatings in space applications, it is important to establish their ability to withstand exposure to the residual atomic oxygen and other environmental effects at low-earth-orbit altitudes. The first two flights of the Surface Effects Sample Monitor experiments flown on the ORFEUS-SPAS and the CRISTA-SPAS Shuttle missions provided the opportunity to study the effects of space exposure on these materials. The results indicate a need to protect ion-beam-deposited silicon-carbide-coated optical components from environmental effects in a low-earth orbit. The boron-carbide thin-film coating is a more robust coating able to withstand short-term exposure to atomic oxygen in a low-earth-orbit environment.

  14. Spark plasma sintering of tantalum carbide and graphene reinforced tantalum carbide composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalluri, Ajith Kumar

    Tantalum carbide (TaC), an ultra-high temperature ceramic (UHTC), is well known for its exceptional properties such as high hardness (15-19 GPa), melting point (3950 °C), elastic modulus (537 GPa), chemical resistance, and thermal shock resistance. To make TaC to be the future material for hypersonic vehicles, it is required to improve its thermal conductivity, strength, and fracture toughness. Researchers have previously reinforced TaC ceramic with carbides of silicon and boron as well as carbon nanotubes (CNTs), however, these reinforcements either undergo chemical changes or induce defects in the matrix during processing. In addition, these reinforcements exhibit a very minimal improvement in the properties. In the present work, we attempted to improve TaC fracture toughness by reinforcing with graphene nano-platelets (GNPs) and processing through spark plasma sintering at high temperature of 2000 °C, pressure of 70 MPa, and soaking time of 10 min. In addition, we investigated the active densification mechanism during SPS of TaC powder and the effect of ball milling time on mechanical properties of sintered TaC. A relative density of >96% was achieved using SPS of monolithic TaC (<3 μm). Ball milling improved the sintering kinetics and improved the mechanical properties (microhardness, bi-axial flexural strength, and indentation fracture toughness). Activation energy (100 kJ/mol) and stress exponent (1.2) were obtained using the analytical model developed for power-law creep. Grain boundary sliding is proposed as active densification mechanism based on these calculations. Reinforcing GNPs (2-6 vol.% ) in the TaC matrix improved relative density (99.8% for TaC-6 vol.% GNP). Also ˜150% and ˜180% increase in flexural strength and fracture toughness, respectively, was observed for TaC-6 vol.% GNP composite. The significant improvement in these properties is attributed to improved densification and toughening mechanisms such as sheet pull-out and crack

  15. STATUS OF HIGH FLUX ISOTOPE REACTOR IRRADIATION OF SILICON CARBIDE/SILICON CARBIDE JOINTS

    SciTech Connect

    Katoh, Yutai; Koyanagi, Takaaki; Kiggans, Jim; Cetiner, Nesrin; McDuffee, Joel

    2014-09-01

    Development of silicon carbide (SiC) joints that retain adequate structural and functional properties in the anticipated service conditions is a critical milestone toward establishment of advanced SiC composite technology for the accident-tolerant light water reactor (LWR) fuels and core structures. Neutron irradiation is among the most critical factors that define the harsh service condition of LWR fuel during the normal operation. The overarching goal of the present joining and irradiation studies is to establish technologies for joining SiC-based materials for use as the LWR fuel cladding. The purpose of this work is to fabricate SiC joint specimens, characterize those joints in an unirradiated condition, and prepare rabbit capsules for neutron irradiation study on the fabricated specimens in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Torsional shear test specimens of chemically vapor-deposited SiC were prepared by seven different joining methods either at Oak Ridge National Laboratory or by industrial partners. The joint test specimens were characterized for shear strength and microstructures in an unirradiated condition. Rabbit irradiation capsules were designed and fabricated for neutron irradiation of these joint specimens at an LWR-relevant temperature. These rabbit capsules, already started irradiation in HFIR, are scheduled to complete irradiation to an LWR-relevant dose level in early 2015.

  16. Novel fabrication of silicon carbide based ceramics for nuclear applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Abhishek Kumar

    Advances in nuclear reactor technology and the use of gas-cooled fast reactors require the development of new materials that can operate at the higher temperatures expected in these systems. These materials include refractory alloys based on Nb, Zr, Ta, Mo, W, and Re; ceramics and composites such as SiC--SiCf; carbon--carbon composites; and advanced coatings. Besides the ability to handle higher expected temperatures, effective heat transfer between reactor components is necessary for improved efficiency. Improving thermal conductivity of the fuel can lower the center-line temperature and, thereby, enhance power production capabilities and reduce the risk of premature fuel pellet failure. Crystalline silicon carbide has superior characteristics as a structural material from the viewpoint of its thermal and mechanical properties, thermal shock resistance, chemical stability, and low radioactivation. Therefore, there have been many efforts to develop SiC based composites in various forms for use in advanced energy systems. In recent years, with the development of high yield preceramic precursors, the polymer infiltration and pyrolysis (PIP) method has aroused interest for the fabrication of ceramic based materials, for various applications ranging from disc brakes to nuclear reactor fuels. The pyrolysis of preceramic polymers allow new types of ceramic materials to be processed at relatively low temperatures. The raw materials are element-organic polymers whose composition and architecture can be tailored and varied. The primary focus of this study is to use a pyrolysis based process to fabricate a host of novel silicon carbide-metal carbide or oxide composites, and to synthesize new materials based on mixed-metal silicocarbides that cannot be processed using conventional techniques. Allylhydridopolycarbosilane (AHPCS), which is an organometal polymer, was used as the precursor for silicon carbide. Inert gas pyrolysis of AHPCS produces near-stoichiometric amorphous

  17. Development and Processing of Nickel Aluminide-Carbide Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newport, Timothy Scott

    1996-01-01

    With the upper temperature limit of the Ni-based superalloys attained, a new class of materials is required. Intermetallics appear as likely candidates because of their attractive physical properties. With a relatively low density, high thermal conductivity, excellent oxidation resistance, high melting point, and simple crystal structure, nickel aluminide (NiAl) appears to be a potential candidate. However, NiAl is limited in structural applications due to its low room temperature fracture toughness and poor elevated temperature strength. One approach to improving these properties has been through the application of eutectic composites. Researchers have shown that containerless directional solidification of NiAl-based eutectic alloys can provide improvement in both the creep strength and fracture toughness. Although these systems have shown improvements in the mechanical properties, the presence of refractory metals increases the density significantly in some alloys. Lower density systems, such as the carbides, nitrides, and borides, may provide NiAl-based eutectic structure. With little or no information available on these systems, experimental investigation is required. The objective of this research was to locate and develop NiAl-carbide eutectic alloys. Exploratory arc-melts were performed in NiAl-refractory metal-C systems. Refractory metal systems investigated included Co, Cr, Fe, Hf, Mo, Nb, Ta, Ti, W, and Zr. Systems containing carbides with excellent stability (i.e.,HfC, NbC, TaC, TiC, and ZrC) produced large blocky cubic carbides in an NiAl matrix. The carbides appeared to have formed in the liquid state and were randomly distributed throughout the polycrystalline NiAl. The Co, Cr, Fe, Mo, and W systems contained NiAl dendrites with a two-phase interdendritic microconstituent present. Of these systems, the NiAl-Mo-C system had the most promising microstructure for in-situ composites. Three processing techniques were used to evaluate the NiAl-Mo-C system

  18. SILICON CARBIDE CERAMICS FOR COMPACT HEAT EXCHANGERS

    SciTech Connect

    DR. DENNIS NAGLE; DR. DAJIE ZHANG

    2009-03-26

    Silicon carbide (SiC) materials are prime candidates for high temperature heat exchangers for next generation nuclear reactors due to their refractory nature and high thermal conductivity at elevated temperatures. This research has focused on demonstrating the potential of liquid silicon infiltration (LSI) for making SiC to achieve this goal. The major advantage of this method over other ceramic processing techniques is the enhanced capability of making high dense, high purity SiC materials in complex net shapes. For successful formation of net shape SiC using LSI techniques, the carbon preform reactivity and pore structure must be controlled to allow the complete infiltration of the porous carbon structure which allows complete conversion of the carbon to SiC. We have established a procedure for achieving desirable carbon properties by using carbon precursors consisting of two readily available high purity organic materials, crystalline cellulose and phenolic resin. Phenolic resin yields a glassy carbon with low chemical reactivity and porosity while the cellulose carbon is highly reactive and porous. By adjusting the ratio of these two materials in the precursor mixtures, the properties of the carbons produced can be controlled. We have identified the most favorable carbon precursor composition to be a cellulose resin mass ratio of 6:4 for LSI formation of SiC. The optimum reaction conditions are a temperature of 1800 C, a pressure of 0.5 Torr of argon, and a time of 120 minutes. The fully dense net shape SiC material produced has a density of 2.96 g cm{sup -3} (about 92% of pure SiC) and a SiC volume fraction of over 0.82. Kinetics of the LSI SiC formation process was studied by optical microscopy and quantitative digital image analysis. This study identified six reaction stages and provided important understanding of the process. Although the thermal conductivity of pure SiC at elevated temperatures is very high, thermal conductivities of most commercial Si

  19. Friction, deformation and fracture of single-crystal silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1977-01-01

    Friction experiments were conducted with hemispherical and conical diamond riders sliding on the basal plane of silicon carbide. The results indicate that, when deformation is primarily elastic, the friction does not depend on crystallographic orientation and there is no detectable fracture or cracking. When, however, plastic deformation occurs, silicon carbide exhibits anisotropic friction and deformation behavior. Surface fracture crack patterns surrounding wear tracks are observed to be of three types. The crack-geometries of two types are generally independent of orientation, the third crack, however, depends on the orientation. All surface cracks extend into subsurface. Anisotropic friction, deformation and fracture on the basal plane are primarily controlled by the slip system and cleavage.

  20. Carbide coated fibers in graphite-aluminum composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imprescia, R. J.; Levinson, L. S.; Reiswig, R. D.; Wallace, T. C.; Williams, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    Thin, uniform coats of titanium carbide, deposited on graphite fibers by chemical vapor deposition with thicknesses up to approximately 0.1 microns were shown to improve fiber strength significantly. For greater thicknesses, strength was degraded. The coats promote wetting of the fibers and infiltration of the fiber yarns with aluminum alloys, and act as protective barriers to inhibit reaction between the fibers and the alloys. Chemical vapor deposition was used to produce silicon carbide coats on graphite fibers. In general, the coats were nonuniform and were characterized by numerous surface irregularities. Despite these irregularities, infiltration of these fibers with aluminum alloys was good. Small graphite-aluminum composite samples were produced by vacuum hot-pressing of aluminum-infiltrated graphite yarn at temperatures above the metal liquidus.

  1. Diffusion Bonding of Silicon Carbide for MEMS-LDI Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halbig, Michael C.; Singh, Mrityunjay; Shpargel, Tarah P.; Kiser, J. Douglas

    2007-01-01

    A robust joining approach is critically needed for a Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems-Lean Direct Injector (MEMS-LDI) application which requires leak free joints with high temperature mechanical capability. Diffusion bonding is well suited for the MEMS-LDI application. Diffusion bonds were fabricated using titanium interlayers between silicon carbide substrates during hot pressing. The interlayers consisted of either alloyed titanium foil or physically vapor deposited (PVD) titanium coatings. Microscopy shows that well adhered, crack free diffusion bonds are formed under optimal conditions. Under less than optimal conditions, microcracks are present in the bond layer due to the formation of intermetallic phases. Electron microprobe analysis was used to identify the reaction formed phases in the diffusion bond. Various compatibility issues among the phases in the interlayer and substrate are discussed. Also, the effects of temperature, pressure, time, silicon carbide substrate type, and type of titanium interlayer and thickness on the microstructure and composition of joints are discussed.

  2. Diffusion Bonding of Silicon Carbide Ceramics using Titanium Interlayers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halbig, Michael C.; Singh, Mrityunjay; Shpargel, Tarah P.; Kiser, James D.

    2006-01-01

    Robust joining approaches for silicon carbide ceramics are critically needed to fabricate leak free joints with high temperature mechanical capability. In this study, titanium foils and physical vapor deposited (PVD) titanium coatings were used to form diffusion bonds between SiC ceramics using hot pressing. Silicon carbide substrate materials used for bonding include sintered SiC and two types of CVD SiC. Microscopy results show the formation of well adhered diffusion bonds. The bond strengths as determined from pull tests are on the order of several ksi, which is much higher than required for a proposed application. Microprobe results show the distribution of silicon, carbon, titanium, and other minor elements across the diffusion bond. Compositions of several phases formed in the joint region were identified. Potential issues of material compatibility and optimal bond formation will also be discussed.

  3. Colloidal characterization of silicon nitride and silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feke, Donald L.

    1986-01-01

    The colloidal behavior of aqueous ceramic slips strongly affects the forming and sintering behavior and the ultimate mechanical strength of the final ceramic product. The colloidal behavior of these materials, which is dominated by electrical interactions between the particles, is complex due to the strong interaction of the solids with the processing fluids. A surface titration methodology, modified to account for this interaction, was developed and used to provide fundamental insights into the interfacial chemistry of these systems. Various powder pretreatment strategies were explored to differentiate between true surface chemistry and artifacts due to exposure history. The colloidal behavior of both silicon nitride and carbide is dominated by silanol groups on the powder surfaces. However, the colloid chemistry of silicon nitride is apparently influenced by an additional amine group. With the proper powder treatments, silicon nitride and carbide powder can be made to appear colloidally equivalent. The impact of these results on processing control will be discussed.

  4. Diamond-Silicon Carbide Composite And Method For Preparation Thereof

    DOEpatents

    Qian, Jiang; Zhao, Yusheng

    2005-09-06

    Fully dense, diamond-silicon carbide composites are prepared from ball-milled microcrystalline diamond/amorphous silicon powder mixture. The ball-milled powder is sintered (P=5-8 GPa, T=1400K-2300K) to form composites having high fracture toughness. A composite made at 5 GPa/1673K had a measured fracture toughness of 12 MPa.multidot.m.sup.1/2. By contrast, liquid infiltration of silicon into diamond powder at 5 GPa/1673K produces a composite with higher hardness but lower fracture toughness. X-ray diffraction patterns and Raman spectra indicate that amorphous silicon is partially transformed into nanocrystalline silicon at 5 GPa/873K, and nanocrystalline silicon carbide forms at higher temperatures.

  5. Process for coating an object with silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levin, Harry (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A process for coating a carbon or graphite object with silicon carbide by contacting it with silicon liquid and vapor over various lengths of contact time. In the process, a stream of silicon-containing precursor material in gaseous phase below the decomposition temperature of said gas and a co-reactant, carrier or diluent gas such as hydrogen is passed through a hole within a high emissivity, thin, insulating septum into a reaction chamber above the melting point of silicon. The thin septum has one face below the decomposition temperature of the gas and an opposite face exposed to the reaction chamber. The precursor gas is decomposed directly to silicon in the reaction chamber. A stream of any decomposition gas and any unreacted precursor gas from said reaction chamber is removed. The object within the reaction chamber is then contacted with silicon, and recovered after it has been coated with silicon carbide.

  6. Electronic structure calculations of hexaborides and boron carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Ripplinger, H.; Schwarz, K.; Blaha, P.

    1997-10-01

    The electronic structures of several CaB{sub 6}-type hexaborides and boron carbide, B{sub 4}C, are studied by the full potential linearized-augmented plane-wave (LAPW) method within density functional theory. The hexaborides contain inter- and intra-octahedral boron-boron bonds, which under pressure decrease approximately linearly; however, the former shrinks more than the latter, consistent with Raman spectra and a simple spring constant model. The boron-boron dumbbell is stronger than the intraoctahedral bonds. For boron carbide several substitutions of the three-atom chain are simulated (BBC, BCB, CBC, CCB, and CCC). Trends in the charge distribution are analyzed and electric field gradient calculations compared to nuclear quadrupole coupling constant measurements show that B must be in the center position.

  7. Atomic-Level Understanding of "Asymmetric Twins" in Boron Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Kelvin Y.; An, Qi; Toksoy, M. Fatih; McCauley, James W.; Haber, Richard A.; Goddard, William A.; Hemker, Kevin J.

    2015-10-01

    Recent observations of planar defects in boron carbide have been shown to deviate from perfect mirror symmetry and are referred to as "asymmetric twins." Here, we demonstrate that these asymmetric twins are really phase boundaries that form in stoichiometric B4C (i.e., B12C3 ) but not in B13C2 . TEM observations and ab initio simulations have been coupled to show that these planar defects result from an interplay of stoichiometry, atomic positioning, icosahedral twinning, and structural hierarchy. The composition of icosahedra in B4C is B11C and translation of the carbon atom from a polar to equatorial site leads to a shift in bonding and a slight distortion of the lattice. No such distortion is observed in boron-rich B13C2 because the icosahedra do not contain carbon. Implications for tailoring boron carbide with stoichiometry and extrapolations to other hierarchical crystalline materials are discussed.

  8. Infrared absorption spectra of metal carbides, nitrides and sulfides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kammori, O.; Sato, K.; Kurosawa, F.

    1981-01-01

    The infrared absorption spectra of 12 kinds of metal carbides, 11 kinds of nitrides, and 7 kinds of sulfides, a total of 30 materials, were measured and the application of the infrared spectra of these materials to analytical chemistry was discussed. The measurements were done in the frequency (wave length) range of (1400 to 400/cm (7 to 25 mu). The carbides Al4C3, B4C, the nitrides AlN, BN, Si3N4, WB, and the sulfides Al2S3, FeS2, MnS, NiS and PbS were noted to have specific absorptions in the measured region. The sensitivity of Boron nitride was especially good and could be detected at 2 to 3 micrograms in 300 mg of potassium bromide.

  9. Boron carbide (B4C) coating. Deposition and testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azizov, E.; Barsuk, V.; Begrambekov, L.; Buzhinsky, O.; Evsin, A.; Gordeev, A.; Grunin, A.; Klimov, N.; Kurnaev, V.; Mazul, I.; Otroshchenko, V.; Putric, A.; Sadovskiy, Ya.; Shigin, P.; Vergazov, S.; Zakharov, A.

    2015-08-01

    Boron carbide was proposed as a material of in-situ protecting coating for tungsten tiles of ITER divertor. To prove this concept the project including investigation of regimes of plasma deposition of B4C coating on tungsten and tests of boron carbide layer in ITER-like is started recently. The paper contends the first results of the project. The results of B4C coating irradiation by the plasma pulses of QSPU-T plasma accelerator are presented. The new device capable of B4C film deposition on tungsten and testing of the films and materials with ITER-like heat loads and ion- and electron irradiation is described. The results of B4C coating deposition and testing of both tungsten substrate and coating are shown and discussed.

  10. Atomic-Level Understanding of "Asymmetric Twins" in Boron Carbide.

    PubMed

    Xie, Kelvin Y; An, Qi; Toksoy, M Fatih; McCauley, James W; Haber, Richard A; Goddard, William A; Hemker, Kevin J

    2015-10-23

    Recent observations of planar defects in boron carbide have been shown to deviate from perfect mirror symmetry and are referred to as "asymmetric twins." Here, we demonstrate that these asymmetric twins are really phase boundaries that form in stoichiometric B(4)C (i.e., B(12)C(3)) but not in B(13)C(2). TEM observations and ab initio simulations have been coupled to show that these planar defects result from an interplay of stoichiometry, atomic positioning, icosahedral twinning, and structural hierarchy. The composition of icosahedra in B(4)C is B(11)C and translation of the carbon atom from a polar to equatorial site leads to a shift in bonding and a slight distortion of the lattice. No such distortion is observed in boron-rich B(13)C(2) because the icosahedra do not contain carbon. Implications for tailoring boron carbide with stoichiometry and extrapolations to other hierarchical crystalline materials are discussed.

  11. Carbide and carbonitride surface treatment method for refractory metals

    DOEpatents

    Meyer, G.A.; Schildbach, M.A.

    1996-12-03

    A carbide and carbonitride surface treatment method for refractory metals is provided, in steps including, heating a part formed of boron, chromium, hafnium, molybdenum, niobium, tantalum, titanium, tungsten or zirconium, or alloys thereof, in an evacuated chamber and then introducing reaction gases including nitrogen and hydrogen, either in elemental or water vapor form, which react with a source of elemental carbon to form carbon-containing gaseous reactants which then react with the metal part to form the desired surface layer. Apparatus for practicing the method is also provided, in the form of a carbide and carbonitride surface treatment system including a reaction chamber, a source of elemental carbon, a heating subassembly and a source of reaction gases. Alternative methods of providing the elemental carbon and the reaction gases are provided, as well as methods of supporting the metal part, evacuating the chamber with a vacuum subassembly and heating all of the components to the desired temperature. 5 figs.

  12. Carbon-rich icosahedral boron carbide designed from first principles

    SciTech Connect

    Jay, Antoine; Vast, Nathalie; Sjakste, Jelena; Duparc, Olivier Hardouin

    2014-07-21

    The carbon-rich boron-carbide (B{sub 11}C)C-C has been designed from first principles within the density functional theory. With respect to the most common boron carbide at 20% carbon concentration B{sub 4}C, the structural modification consists in removing boron atoms from the chains linking (B{sub 11}C) icosahedra. With C-C instead of C-B-C chains, the formation of vacancies is shown to be hindered, leading to enhanced mechanical strength with respect to B{sub 4}C. The phonon frequencies and elastic constants turn out to prove the stability of the carbon-rich phase, and important fingerprints for its characterization have been identified.

  13. Antifriction properties of gas thermal coatings of clad carbide powders

    SciTech Connect

    Borisov, Y.S.; Geleyshvili, T.P.; Gorbatov, L.N.; Molyar, A.G.; Kulgavyy, E.A.; Polishchuk, I.Y.

    1984-12-01

    A study is made of the antifriction properties of atomized coatings on VI-22 titanium alloy. Atomization was performed with carbides of titanium and chromium clad with cobalt, copper or nickel. Cladding was performed by the autoclave method by reducing copper, cobalt, and nickel from a solution of their salts with hydrogen under pressure. The clad coating thickness was 3 to 5 micro m. Electrolytically chrome plated titanium alloy and coatings of oxides were also tested for comparison. The structure of the coatings after atomization consisted of carbide particles uniformly distributed in a metal matrix. In friction the coatings worked in well, at relatively low coefficient of friction and slight wear. The most effective antifriction properties, minimum wear, and minimum coefficient of friction were achieved in coatings of composite TiC-Co and TiC-Cu powders.

  14. Protective coating for alumina-silicon carbide whisker composites

    DOEpatents

    Tiegs, Terry N.

    1989-01-01

    Ceramic composites formed of an alumina matrix reinforced with silicon carbide whiskers homogenously dispersed therein are provided with a protective coating for preventing fracture strength degradation of the composite by oxidation during exposure to high temperatures in oxygen-containing atmospheres. The coating prevents oxidation of the silicon carbide whiskers within the matrix by sealing off the exterior of the matrix so as to prevent oxygen transport into the interior of the matrix. The coating is formed of mullite or mullite plus silicon oxide and alumina and is formed in place by heating the composite in air to a temperature greater than 1200.degree. C. This coating is less than about 100 microns thick and adequately protects the underlying composite from fracture strength degradation due to oxidation.

  15. Atomic-Level Understanding of "Asymmetric Twins" in Boron Carbide.

    PubMed

    Xie, Kelvin Y; An, Qi; Toksoy, M Fatih; McCauley, James W; Haber, Richard A; Goddard, William A; Hemker, Kevin J

    2015-10-23

    Recent observations of planar defects in boron carbide have been shown to deviate from perfect mirror symmetry and are referred to as "asymmetric twins." Here, we demonstrate that these asymmetric twins are really phase boundaries that form in stoichiometric B(4)C (i.e., B(12)C(3)) but not in B(13)C(2). TEM observations and ab initio simulations have been coupled to show that these planar defects result from an interplay of stoichiometry, atomic positioning, icosahedral twinning, and structural hierarchy. The composition of icosahedra in B(4)C is B(11)C and translation of the carbon atom from a polar to equatorial site leads to a shift in bonding and a slight distortion of the lattice. No such distortion is observed in boron-rich B(13)C(2) because the icosahedra do not contain carbon. Implications for tailoring boron carbide with stoichiometry and extrapolations to other hierarchical crystalline materials are discussed. PMID:26551123

  16. Anodic etching of p-type cubic silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, G. L.; Fekade, K.; Wongchotigul, K.

    1992-01-01

    p-Type cubic silicon carbide was anodically etched using an electrolyte of HF:HCl:H2O. The etching depth was determined versus time with a fixed current density of 96.4 mA/sq cm. It was found that the etching was very smooth and very uniform. An etch rate of 22.7 nm/s was obtained in a 1:1:50 HF:HCl:H2O electrolyte.

  17. Process for growing silicon carbide whiskers by undercooling

    DOEpatents

    Shalek, P.D.

    1987-10-27

    A method of growing silicon carbide whiskers, especially in the [beta] form, is disclosed using a heating schedule wherein the temperature of the atmosphere in the growth zone of a furnace is first heated to or beyond the growth temperature and then is cooled to or below the growth temperature to induce nucleation of whiskers at catalyst sites at a desired point in time which results in the selection. 3 figs.

  18. Process for growing silicon carbide whiskers by undercooling

    DOEpatents

    Shalek, Peter D.

    1987-01-01

    A method of growing silicon carbide whiskers, especially in the .beta. form, using a heating schedule wherein the temperature of the atmosphere in the growth zone of a furnace is first heated to or beyond the growth temperature and then is cooled to or below the growth temperature to induce nucleation of whiskers at catalyst sites at a desired point in time which results in the selection.

  19. Method of making carbide/fluoride/silver composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E. (Inventor); Dellacorte, Christopher (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A composition containing 30 to 70 percent chromium carbide, 5 to 20 percent soft noble metal, 5 to 20 percent metal fluorides, and 20 to 60 percent metal binder is used in a powdered metallurgy process for the production of self-lubricating components, such as bearings. The use of the material allows the self-lubricating bearing to maintain its low friction properties over an extended range of operating temperatures.

  20. Synthesis of multifilament silicon carbide fibers by chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Revankar, Vithal; Hlavacek, Vladimir

    1991-01-01

    A process for development of clean silicon carbide fiber with a small diameter and high reliability is presented. An experimental evaluation of operating conditions for SiC fibers of good mechanical properties and devising an efficient technique which will prevent welding together of individual filaments are discussed. The thermodynamic analysis of a different precursor system was analyzed vigorously. Thermodynamically optimum conditions for stoichiometric SiC deposit were obtained.

  1. Isotopic effects on the phonon modes in boron carbide.

    PubMed

    Werheit, H; Kuhlmann, U; Rotter, H W; Shalamberidze, S O

    2010-10-01

    The effect of isotopes ((10)B-(11)B; (12)C-(13)C) on the infrared- and Raman-active phonons of boron carbide has been investigated. For B isotopes, the contributions of the virtual crystal approximation, polarization vector and isotopical disorder are separated. Boron and carbon isotope effects are largely opposite to one another and indicate the share of the particular atoms in the atomic assemblies vibrating in specific phonon modes. Some infrared-active phonons behave as expected for monatomic boron crystals.

  2. Phonon spectrum, mechanical and thermophysical properties of thorium carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez Daroca, D.; Jaroszewicz, S.; Llois, A. M.; Mosca, H. O.

    2013-06-01

    In this work, we study, by means of density functional perturbation theory and the pseudopotential method, mechanical and thermophysical properties of thorium carbide. These properties are derived from the lattice dynamics in the quasi-harmonic approximation. The phonon spectrum of ThC presented in this article, to the best authors' knowledge, have not been studied, neither experimentally, nor theoretically. We compare mechanical properties, volume thermal expansion and molar specific capacities with previous results and find a very good agreement.

  3. Wear Resistant Coating on Tungsten Carbide Hard Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oskolkova, T. N.

    2015-09-01

    The article reveals new knowledge about the role of zirconium in the composition of (Ti, Zr)N ion-plasma coating applied on WC10KS alloy. It is determined that when zirconium is introduced into ion-plasma coating TiN (50%) wear resistance and adhesion strength grow, nanohardness increases by 23% (up to 38500MPa), Yung's modulus rises by 67%, friction coefficient reduces to p = 0.07 and performance characteristics of a carbide alloy improve.

  4. Formation Mechanism of Titanium Carbide Crystal in Laser Synthesized Metal-Ceramic Composite Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Baoshuai; Zhang, Zhongwen; Wang, Xinhong; Zou, Zengda

    In situ titanium carbide reinforced iron-based composite coating was deposited on mild carbon steel using laser surface engineering (LSE) with ferrotitanium and graphite as precursor. The microstructure and phase constituents of the deposited coating were characterized. Formation mechanism of titanium carbide crystal in the composite coating was elucidated by correlating the morphology of titanium carbide and the thermal cycle experienced by the precursor during the laser treatment. It was demonstrated that titanium carbide was formed in situ as a result of the metallurgical reaction between ferrotitanium and graphite following a liquid-precipitation route. Different morphologies of titanium carbide crystal (dendrite and fishbone) correspond to the primary and eutectic titanium carbide respectively.

  5. Comparative investigation on HVOF sprayed carbide-based coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Mingxiang; Zhang, Shihong; Li, Mingxi

    2013-05-01

    In this work, WC-17Co, WC-10Co-4Cr, WC-12Co and Cr3C2-25NiCr coatings were deposited on stainless steel using WOKAStar-640 HVOF spraying system. Three WC-based coatings were studied and compared with a chromium carbide-based coating. The microstructure, porosity, micro-hardness, indentation fracture toughness and adhesion strength of the coatings were investigated. The wear test was done by using silica grits as abrasive medium using a load of 20 N. The result shows that HVOF sprayed carbide-based coating possesses low porosity, high micro-hardness and high adhesion strength. Three WC-based coatings have higher micro-hardness and indentation fracture toughness compared to the Cr3C2-25NiCr coating. HVOF sprayed carbide coating has good wear resistance under 500 °C. The decarburization of WC-based coating has great effect on coating wear resistance. In addition, WC-17Co coating has best wear resistance.

  6. Disorder and defects are not intrinsic to boron carbide.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Swastik; Bykova, Elena; Dey, Somnath; Ali, Sk Imran; Dubrovinskaia, Natalia; Dubrovinsky, Leonid; Parakhonskiy, Gleb; van Smaalen, Sander

    2016-01-01

    A unique combination of useful properties in boron-carbide, such as extreme hardness, excellent fracture toughness, a low density, a high melting point, thermoelectricity, semi-conducting behavior, catalytic activity and a remarkably good chemical stability, makes it an ideal material for a wide range of technological applications. Explaining these properties in terms of chemical bonding has remained a major challenge in boron chemistry. Here we report the synthesis of fully ordered, stoichiometric boron-carbide B13C2 by high-pressure-high-temperature techniques. Our experimental electron-density study using high-resolution single-crystal synchrotron X-ray diffraction data conclusively demonstrates that disorder and defects are not intrinsic to boron carbide, contrary to what was hitherto supposed. A detailed analysis of the electron density distribution reveals charge transfer between structural units in B13C2 and a new type of electron-deficient bond with formally unpaired electrons on the C-B-C group in B13C2. Unprecedented bonding features contribute to the fundamental chemistry and materials science of boron compounds that is of great interest for understanding structure-property relationships and development of novel functional materials. PMID:26777140

  7. Nanoscale fullerene compression of an yttrium carbide cluster.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianyuan; Fuhrer, Tim; Fu, Wujun; Ge, Jiechao; Bearden, Daniel W; Dallas, Jerry; Duchamp, James; Walker, Kenneth; Champion, Hunter; Azurmendi, Hugo; Harich, Kim; Dorn, Harry C

    2012-05-23

    The nanoscale parameters of metal clusters and lattices have a crucial influence on the macroscopic properties of materials. Herein, we provide a detailed study on the size and shape of isolated yttrium carbide clusters in different fullerene cages. A family of diyttrium endohedral metallofullerenes with the general formula of Y(2)C(2n) (n = 40-59) are reported. The high field (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and density functional theory (DFT) methods are employed to examine this yttrium carbide cluster in certain family members, Y(2)C(2)@D(5)(450)-C(100), Y(2)C(2)@D(3)(85)-C(92), Y(2)C(2)@C(84), Y(2)C(2)@C(3v)(8)-C(82), and Y(2)C(2)@C(s)(6)-C(82). The results of this study suggest that decreasing the size of a fullerene cage with the same (Y(2)C(2))(4+) cluster results in nanoscale fullerene compression (NFC) from a nearly linear stretched geometry to a constrained "butterfly" structure. The (13)C NMR chemical shift and scalar (1)J(YC) coupling parameters provide a very sensitive measure of this NFC effect for the (Y(2)C(2))(4+) cluster. The crystal structural parameters of a previously reported metal carbide, Y(2)C(3) are directly compared to the (Y(2)C(2))(4+) cluster in the current metallofullerene study.

  8. Carbide coated fibers in graphite-aluminum composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imprescia, R. J.; Levinson, L. S.; Reiswig, R. D.; Wallace, T. C.; Williams, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    The NASA-supported program at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) to develop carbon fiber-aluminum matrix composites is described. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was used to uniformly deposit thin, smooth, continuous coats of TiC on the fibers of graphite tows. Wet chemical coating of fibers, followed by high-temperature treatment, was also used, but showed little promise as an alternative coating method. Strength measurements on CVD coated fiber tows showed that thin carbide coats can add to fiber strength. The ability of aluminum alloys to wet TiC was successfully demonstrated using TiC-coated graphite surfaces. Pressure-infiltration of TiC- and ZrC-coated fiber tows with aluminum alloys was only partially successful. Experiments were performed to evaluate the effectiveness of carbide coats on carbon as barriers to prevent reaction between alluminum alloys and carbon. Initial results indicate that composites of aluminum and carbide-coated graphite are stable for long periods of time at temperatures near the alloy solidus.

  9. A new design of tungsten carbide tools with diamond coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Weihnacht, V.; Fan, W.D.; Jagannadham, K.; Narayan, J.; Liu, C.

    1996-09-01

    We have designed tungsten carbide tools with a new binder, which makes them suitable for advanced diamond tool coatings. The new tool substrates, made of tungsten carbide and nickel aluminide as binder phase, are produced by sintering and hot isostatic pressing, and also by combustion synthesis. The high temperature strength of nickel aluminide is key to superior tool performance at elevated temperatures. More importantly, nickel aluminides reduce the formation of graphite and promote diamond growth during chemical vapor deposition. Diamond films are deposited on the new tool substrates to investigate the nucleation density, adhesion, and wear resistance. The diamond coatings are characterized by scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The graphitizing tendency due to cobalt in the tungsten carbide tools was found to be a limitation to improve adhesion of diamond films. The new tool substrates with nickel aluminide binder have been found to exhibit good adhesion and wear resistance. The implications of these results in advanced cutting tools are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1996 Materials Research Society.}

  10. Palladium-defect complexes in diamond and silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abiona, A. A.; Kemp, W.; Timmers, H.; Bharuth-Ram, K.

    2015-04-01

    Time Differential Perturbed Angular Correlations (TDPAC) studies, supported by Density Functional Theory (DFT) modelling, have shown that palladium atoms in silicon and germanium pair with vacancies. Building on these results, here we present DFT predictions and some tentative TDPAC results on palladium-defect complexes and site locations of palladium impurities in diamond and silicon carbide. For both diamond and silicon carbide, the DFT calculations predict that a split-vacancy V-PdBI-V complex is favoured, with the palladium atom on a bond-centred interstitial site having a nearest-neighbour semi-vacancy on either side. Consistent with experimental results, this configuration is also assigned to palladium complexes in silicon and germanium. For silicon carbide, the DFT modelling predicts furthermore that a palladium atom in replacing a carbon atom moves to a bond-centred interstitial site and pairs with a silicon vacancy to form a complex that is more stable than that of a palladium atom which replaces a silicon atom and then moves to a bond-centred interstitial site pairings with a carbon vacancy. These two competing alternatives differ by 8.94 eV. The favourable pairing with a silicon vacancy is also supported independently by TRIM Monte Carlo calculations, which predict that more silicon vacancies than carbon vacancies are created during heavy ion. implantation.

  11. Ceramic composites reinforced with modified silicon carbide whiskers

    DOEpatents

    Tiegs, Terry N.; Lindemer, Terrence B.

    1990-01-01

    Silicon carbide whisker-reinforced ceramic composites are fabricated in a highly reproducible manner by beneficating the surfaces of the silicon carbide whiskers prior to their usage in the ceramic composites. The silicon carbide whiskers which contain considerable concentrations of surface oxides and other impurities which interact with the ceramic composite material to form a chemical bond are significantly reduced so that only a relatively weak chemical bond is formed between the whisker and the ceramic material. Thus, when the whiskers interact with a crack propagating into the composite the crack is diverted or deflected along the whisker-matrix interface due to the weak chemical bonding so as to deter the crack propagation through the composite. The depletion of the oxygen-containing compounds and other impurities on the whisker surfaces and near surface region is effected by heat treating the whiskers in a suitable oxygen sparaging atmosphere at elevated temperatures. Additionally, a sedimentation technique may be utilized to remove whiskers which suffer structural and physical anomalies which render them undesirable for use in the composite. Also, a layer of carbon may be provided on the surface of the whiskers to further inhibit chemical bonding of the whiskers to the ceramic composite material.

  12. Calcium Carbide: A Unique Reagent for Organic Synthesis and Nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Rodygin, Konstantin S; Werner, Georg; Kucherov, Fedor A; Ananikov, Valentine P

    2016-04-01

    Acetylene, HC≡CH, is one of the primary building blocks in synthetic organic and industrial chemistry. Several highly valuable processes have been developed based on this simplest alkyne and the development of acetylene chemistry has had a paramount impact on chemical science over the last few decades. However, in spite of numerous useful possible reactions, the application of gaseous acetylene in everyday research practice is rather limited. Moreover, the practical implementation of high-pressure acetylene chemistry can be very challenging, owing to the risk of explosion and the requirement for complex equipment; special safety precautions need to be taken to store and handle acetylene under high pressure, which limit its routine use in a standard laboratory setup. Amazingly, recent studies have revealed that calcium carbide, CaC2 , can be used as an easy-to-handle and efficient source of acetylene for in situ chemical transformations. Thus, calcium carbide is a stable and inexpensive acetylene precursor that is available on the ton scale and it can be handled with standard laboratory equipment. The application of calcium carbide in organic synthesis will bring a new dimension to the powerful acetylene chemistry.

  13. Method for removing oxide contamination from silicon carbide powders

    DOEpatents

    Brynestad, J.; Bamberger, C.E.

    1984-08-01

    The described invention is directed to a method for removing oxide contamination in the form of oxygen-containing compounds such as SiO/sub 2/ and B/sub 2/O/sub 3/ from a charge of finely divided silicon carbide. The silicon carbide charge is contacted with a stream of hydrogen fluoride mixed with an inert gas carrier such as argon at a temperature in the range of about 200/sup 0/ to 650/sup 0/C. The oxides in the charge react with the heated hydrogen fluoride to form volatile gaseous fluorides such as SiF/sub 4/ and BF/sub 3/ which pass through the charge along with unreacted hydrogen fluoride and the carrier gas. Any residual gaseous reaction products and hydrogen fluoride remaining in the charge are removed by contacting the charge with the stream of inert gas which also cools the powder to room temperature. The removal of the oxygen contamination by practicing the present method provides silicon carbide powders with desirable pressing and sintering characteristics. 1 tab.

  14. Fabrication of Carbon Nanotube - Chromium Carbide Composite Through Laser Sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ze; Gao, Yibo; Liang, Fei; Wu, Benxin; Gou, Jihua; Detrois, Martin; Tin, Sammy; Yin, Ming; Nash, Philip; Tang, Xiaoduan; Wang, Xinwei

    2016-03-01

    Ceramics often have high hardness and strength, and good wear and corrosion resistance, and hence have many important applications, which, however, are often limited by their poor fracture toughness. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) may enhance ceramic fracture toughness, but hot pressing (which is one typical approach of fabricating CNT-ceramic composites) is difficult to apply for applications that require localized heat input, such as fabricating composites as surface coatings. Laser beam may realize localized material sintering with little thermal effect on the surrounding regions. However, for the typical ceramics for hard coating applications (as listed in Ref.[1]), previous work on laser sintering of CNT-ceramic composites with mechanical property characterizations has been very limited. In this paper, research work has been reported on the fabrication and characterization of CNT-ceramic composites through laser sintering of mixtures of CNTs and chromium carbide powders. Under the studied conditions, it has been found that laser-sintered composites have a much higher hardness than that for plasma-sprayed composites reported in the literature. It has also been found that the composites obtained by laser sintering of CNTs and chromium carbide powder mixtures have a fracture toughness that is ~23 % higher than the material obtained by laser sintering of chromium carbide powders without CNTs.

  15. Silicon Carbide Mounts for Fabry-Perot Interferometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindemann, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Etalon mounts for tunable Fabry- Perot interferometers can now be fabricated from reaction-bonded silicon carbide structural components. These mounts are rigid, lightweight, and thermally stable. The fabrication of these mounts involves the exploitation of post-casting capabilities that (1) enable creation of monolithic structures having reduced (in comparison with prior such structures) degrees of material inhomogeneity and (2) reduce the need for fastening hardware and accommodations. Such silicon carbide mounts could be used to make lightweight Fabry-Perot interferometers or could be modified for use as general lightweight optical mounts. Heretofore, tunable Fabry-Perot interferometer structures, including mounting hardware, have been made from the low-thermal-expansion material Invar (a nickel/iron alloy) in order to obtain the thermal stability required for spectroscopic applications for which such interferometers are typically designed. However, the high mass density of Invar structures is disadvantageous in applications in which there are requirements to minimize mass. Silicon carbide etalon mounts have been incorporated into a tunable Fabry-Perot interferometer of a prior design that originally called for Invar structural components. The strength, thermal stability, and survivability of the interferometer as thus modified are similar to those of the interferometer as originally designed, but the mass of the modified interferometer is significantly less than the mass of the original version.

  16. Novel silicon carbide/polypyrrole composites; preparation and physicochemical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Omastova, Maria . E-mail: upolmaom@savba.sk; Boukerma, Kada; Chehimi, Mohamed M.; Trchova, Miroslava

    2005-05-18

    Novel silicon carbide/polypyrrole (SiC/PPy) conducting composites were prepared using silicon carbide as inorganic substrate. The surface modification of SiC was performed in aqueous solution by oxidative polymerization of pyrrole using ferric chloride as oxidant. Elemental analysis was used to determine the mass loading of polypyrrole in the SiC/PPy composites. Scanning electron microscopy showed the surface modification of SiC by PPy. PPy in composites was confirmed by the presence of PPy bands in the infrared spectra of SiC/PPy containing various amounts of conducting polymer. The conductivity of SiC/PPy composites depends on PPy content on the surface. The composite containing 35 wt.% PPy showed conductivity about 2 S cm{sup -1}, which is in the same range as the conductivity of pure polypyrrole powder prepared under the same conditions using the same oxidant. PPy in the composites was clearly detected by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements by its N1s and Cl2p peaks. High resolution scans of the C1s regions distinguished between silicon carbide and polypyrrole carbons. The fraction of polypyrrole at the composite surface was estimated from the silicon and nitrogen levels. The combination of XPS and conductivity measurements suggests that the surface of the SiC/PPy composites is polypyrrole-rich for a conducting polymer mass loading of at least 12.6 wt.%.

  17. Characterization of a boron carbide-based polymer neutron sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Chuting; James, Robinson; Dong, Bin; Driver, M. Sky; Kelber, Jeffry A.; Downing, Greg; Cao, Lei R.

    2015-12-01

    Boron is used widely in thin-film solid-state devices for neutron detection. The film thickness and boron concentration are important parameters that relate to a device's detection efficiency and capacitance. Neutron depth profiling was used to determine the film thicknesses and boron-concentration profiles of boron carbide-based polymers grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) of ortho-carborane (1,2-B10C2H12), resulting in a pure boron carbide film, or of meta-carborane (1,7-B10C2H12) and pyridine (C5H5N), resulting in a pyridine composite film, or of pyrimidine (C4H4N2) resulting in a pure pyrimidine film. The pure boron carbide film had a uniform surface appearance and a constant thickness of 250 nm, whereas the thickness of the composite film was 250-350 nm, measured at three different locations. In the meta-carborane and pyridine composite film the boron concentration was found to increase with depth, which correlated with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS)-derived atomic ratios. A proton peak from 14N (n,p)14C reaction was observed in the pure pyrimidine film, indicating an additional neutron sensitivity to nonthermal neutrons from the N atoms in the pyrimidine.

  18. Predicted boron-carbide compounds: a first-principles study.

    PubMed

    Wang, De Yu; Yan, Qian; Wang, Bing; Wang, Yuan Xu; Yang, Jueming; Yang, Gui

    2014-06-14

    By using developed particle swarm optimization algorithm on crystal structural prediction, we have explored the possible crystal structures of B-C system. Their structures, stability, elastic properties, electronic structure, and chemical bonding have been investigated by first-principles calculations with density functional theory. The results show that all the predicted structures are mechanically and dynamically stable. An analysis of calculated enthalpy with pressure indicates that increasing of boron content will increase the stability of boron carbides under low pressure. Moreover, the boron carbides with rich carbon content become more stable under high pressure. The negative formation energy of predicted B5C indicates its high stability. The density of states of B5C show that it is p-type semiconducting. The calculated theoretical Vickers hardnesses of B-C exceed 40 GPa except B4C, BC, and BC4, indicating they are potential superhard materials. An analysis of Debye temperature and electronic localization function provides further understanding chemical and physical properties of boron carbide.

  19. Disorder and defects are not intrinsic to boron carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Swastik; Bykova, Elena; Dey, Somnath; Ali, Sk Imran; Dubrovinskaia, Natalia; Dubrovinsky, Leonid; Parakhonskiy, Gleb; van Smaalen, Sander

    2016-01-01

    A unique combination of useful properties in boron-carbide, such as extreme hardness, excellent fracture toughness, a low density, a high melting point, thermoelectricity, semi-conducting behavior, catalytic activity and a remarkably good chemical stability, makes it an ideal material for a wide range of technological applications. Explaining these properties in terms of chemical bonding has remained a major challenge in boron chemistry. Here we report the synthesis of fully ordered, stoichiometric boron-carbide B13C2 by high-pressure–high-temperature techniques. Our experimental electron-density study using high-resolution single-crystal synchrotron X-ray diffraction data conclusively demonstrates that disorder and defects are not intrinsic to boron carbide, contrary to what was hitherto supposed. A detailed analysis of the electron density distribution reveals charge transfer between structural units in B13C2 and a new type of electron-deficient bond with formally unpaired electrons on the C–B–C group in B13C2. Unprecedented bonding features contribute to the fundamental chemistry and materials science of boron compounds that is of great interest for understanding structure-property relationships and development of novel functional materials.

  20. Disorder and defects are not intrinsic to boron carbide.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Swastik; Bykova, Elena; Dey, Somnath; Ali, Sk Imran; Dubrovinskaia, Natalia; Dubrovinsky, Leonid; Parakhonskiy, Gleb; van Smaalen, Sander

    2016-01-18

    A unique combination of useful properties in boron-carbide, such as extreme hardness, excellent fracture toughness, a low density, a high melting point, thermoelectricity, semi-conducting behavior, catalytic activity and a remarkably good chemical stability, makes it an ideal material for a wide range of technological applications. Explaining these properties in terms of chemical bonding has remained a major challenge in boron chemistry. Here we report the synthesis of fully ordered, stoichiometric boron-carbide B13C2 by high-pressure-high-temperature techniques. Our experimental electron-density study using high-resolution single-crystal synchrotron X-ray diffraction data conclusively demonstrates that disorder and defects are not intrinsic to boron carbide, contrary to what was hitherto supposed. A detailed analysis of the electron density distribution reveals charge transfer between structural units in B13C2 and a new type of electron-deficient bond with formally unpaired electrons on the C-B-C group in B13C2. Unprecedented bonding features contribute to the fundamental chemistry and materials science of boron compounds that is of great interest for understanding structure-property relationships and development of novel functional materials.

  1. Disorder and defects are not intrinsic to boron carbide

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Swastik; Bykova, Elena; Dey, Somnath; Ali, Sk Imran; Dubrovinskaia, Natalia; Dubrovinsky, Leonid; Parakhonskiy, Gleb; van Smaalen, Sander

    2016-01-01

    A unique combination of useful properties in boron-carbide, such as extreme hardness, excellent fracture toughness, a low density, a high melting point, thermoelectricity, semi-conducting behavior, catalytic activity and a remarkably good chemical stability, makes it an ideal material for a wide range of technological applications. Explaining these properties in terms of chemical bonding has remained a major challenge in boron chemistry. Here we report the synthesis of fully ordered, stoichiometric boron-carbide B13C2 by high-pressure–high-temperature techniques. Our experimental electron-density study using high-resolution single-crystal synchrotron X-ray diffraction data conclusively demonstrates that disorder and defects are not intrinsic to boron carbide, contrary to what was hitherto supposed. A detailed analysis of the electron density distribution reveals charge transfer between structural units in B13C2 and a new type of electron-deficient bond with formally unpaired electrons on the C–B–C group in B13C2. Unprecedented bonding features contribute to the fundamental chemistry and materials science of boron compounds that is of great interest for understanding structure-property relationships and development of novel functional materials. PMID:26777140

  2. Carbide-Derived Carbon Films for Integrated Electrochemical Energy Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heon, Min

    Active RFID tags, which can communicate over tens or even hundreds of meters, MEMS devices of several microns in size, which are designed for the medical and pharmaceutical purposes, and sensors working in wireless monitoring systems, require microscale power sources that are able to provide enough energy and to satisfy the peak power demands in those applications. Supercapacitors have not been an attractive candidate for micro-scale energy storage, since most nanoporous carbon electrode materials are not compatible with micro-fabrication techniques and have failed to meet the requirements of high volumetric energy density and small form factor for power supplies for integrated circuits or microelectronic devices or sensors. However, supercapacitors can provide high power density, because of fast charging/discharging, which can enable self-sustaining micro-modules when combined with energy-harvesting devices, such as solar cell, piezoelectric or thermoelectric micro-generators. In this study, carbide-derived carbon (CDC) films were synthesized via vacuum decomposition of carbide substrates and gas etching of sputtered carbide thin films. This approach allowed manufacturing of porous carbon films on SiC and silicon substrates. CDC films were studied for micro-supercapacitor electrodes, and showed good double layer capacitance. Since the gas etching technique is compatible with conventional micro-device fabrication processes, it can be implemented to manufacture integrated on-chip supercapacitors on silicon wafers.

  3. New catalysts for hydroprocessing: Transition metal carbides and nitrides

    SciTech Connect

    Ramanathan, S.; Oyama, S.T. |

    1995-11-02

    A series of moderate surface area transition metal carbides and nitrides of molybdenum, tungsten, vanadium, niobium, and titanium were prepared by temperature-programmed reaction of the oxide precursor with a reactant gas (20% CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2} for the carbides and 100% NH{sub 3} for the nitrides). The phase purity and composition of the samples were established by X-ray diffraction photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), while surface properties were determined by N{sub 2} BET and CO chemisorption measurements. The catalysts were tested in three-phase trickle-bed reactor for their activity in hydrodenitrogenation (HDN), hydrodesulfurization, and hydrodeoxygenation, with particular emphasis on HDN. The catalytic tests were carried out using a model liquid feed mixture containing 3000 ppm sulfur (dibenzothiophene), 2000 ppm nitrogen (quinoline), 500 ppm oxygen (benzofuran), 20 wt% aromatics (tetralin), and balance aliphatics (tetradecane). The carbides and nitrides were found to be active for HDN of quinoline with activity following the order group 6 > group 5 > group 4. Notably, Mo{sub 2}C showed superior areal HDN activity than a commercial sulfided Ni-Mo/Al{sub 2} O{sub 3} catalyst (shell 324). The XRD analysis of the spent catalysts indicated no change in the bulk structure, while XPS results showed little incorporation of sulfur in the surface region of the catalysts, suggesting that these materials are tolerant of sulfur. 42 refs., 11 figs., 7 tabs.

  4. Barrier properties of nano silicon carbide designed chitosan nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Gopal C; Dash, Satyabrata; Swain, Sarat K

    2015-12-10

    Nano silicon carbide (SiC) designed chitosan nanocomposites were prepared by solution technique. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used for studying structural interaction of nano silicon carbide (SiC) with chitosan. The morphology of chitosan/SiC nanocomposites was investigated by field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), and high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM). The thermal stability of chitosan was substantially increased due to incorporation of stable silicon carbide nanopowder. The oxygen permeability of chitosan/SiC nanocomposites was reduced by three folds as compared to the virgin chitosan. The chemical resistance properties of chitosan were enhanced due to the incorporation of nano SiC. The biodegradability was investigated using sludge water. The tensile strength of chitosan/SiC nanocomposites was increased with increasing percentage of SiC. The substantial reduction in oxygen barrier properties in combination with increased thermal stability, tensile strength and chemical resistance properties; the synthesized nanocomposite may be suitable for packaging applications.

  5. Fatigue of alumina-based ceramics and chrome carbide composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kireitseu, Maksim V.; Yerakhavets, Liudmila; Nemerenco, Ion; Basenuk, Vladimir L.

    2003-10-01

    The paper was revealed a fatigue in the alumina-chrome carbide composite. The trapped crack front resembles a collinear array of microcracks interspersed by grains rich in transformable precipitates. This micromechanical model provides a reasonable explanation for the observed fatigue crack growth. A numerical procedure similar to the one used in the analysis of the array of collinear cracks, based on complex potentials and dislocation formalism is also used to simulate fatigue of composite coatings based on oxide ceramics and chrome carbide. Assuming power-law crack growth, it is found that the crack growth rate decreases with the applied stress intensity factor in the initial stage of fatigue crack growth. Depending on the applied load and the amount of transformation, the growth rate either goes through a minimum before increasing to the normal crack regime, or the rate continues to decrease until the crack is arrested. A detailed parametric study of the phenomenon of fatigue crack arrest in composite coatings based on oxide ceramics and chrome carbide reveals that the combination of transformation strength parameter and applied load determines whether or not crack arrest will occur, irrespective of the initial crack length. Based on the parametric study a simple linear relationship between the applied load and the minimum transformation strength parameter necessary to cause crack arrest has been developed. it will be found useful in the design against fatigue by predicting the maximum toad at which crack arrest can be expected.

  6. The Development of Silicon Carbide Based Hydrogen and Hydrocarbon Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Chung-Chiun

    1994-01-01

    Silicon carbide is a high temperature electronic material. Its potential for development of chemical sensors in a high temperature environment has not been explored. The objective of this study is to use silicon carbide as the substrate material for the construction of chemical sensors for high temperature applications. Sensors for the detection of hydrogen and hydrocarbon are developed in this program under the auspices of Lewis Research Center, NASA. Metal-semiconductor or metal-insulator-semiconductor structures are used in this development. Specifically, using palladium-silicon carbide Schottky diodes as gas sensors in the temperature range of 100 to 400 C are designed, fabricated and assessed. The effect of heat treatment on the Pd-SiC Schottky diode is examined. Operation of the sensors at 400 C demonstrate sensitivity of the sensor to hydrogen and hydrocarbons. Substantial progress has been made in this study and we believe that the Pd-SiC Schottky diode has potential as a hydrogen and hydrocarbon sensor over a wide range of temperatures. However, the long term stability and operational life of the sensor need to be assessed. This aspect is an important part of our future continuing investigation.

  7. Predicted boron-carbide compounds: A first-principles study

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, De Yu; Yan, Qian; Wang, Bing; Wang, Yuan Xu Yang, Jueming; Yang, Gui

    2014-06-14

    By using developed particle swarm optimization algorithm on crystal structural prediction, we have explored the possible crystal structures of B-C system. Their structures, stability, elastic properties, electronic structure, and chemical bonding have been investigated by first-principles calculations with density functional theory. The results show that all the predicted structures are mechanically and dynamically stable. An analysis of calculated enthalpy with pressure indicates that increasing of boron content will increase the stability of boron carbides under low pressure. Moreover, the boron carbides with rich carbon content become more stable under high pressure. The negative formation energy of predicted B{sub 5}C indicates its high stability. The density of states of B{sub 5}C show that it is p-type semiconducting. The calculated theoretical Vickers hardnesses of B-C exceed 40 GPa except B{sub 4}C, BC, and BC{sub 4}, indicating they are potential superhard materials. An analysis of Debye temperature and electronic localization function provides further understanding chemical and physical properties of boron carbide.

  8. Visible-blind ultraviolet photodetectors on porous silicon carbide substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Naderi, N.; Hashim, M.R.

    2013-06-01

    Highlights: • Highly reliable UV detectors are fabricated on porous silicon carbide substrates. • The optical properties of samples are enhanced by increasing the current density. • The optimized sample exhibits enhanced sensitivity to the incident UV radiation. - Abstract: Highly reliable visible-blind ultraviolet (UV) photodetectors were successfully fabricated on porous silicon carbide (PSC) substrates. High responsivity and high photoconductive gain were observed in a metal–semiconductor–metal ultraviolet photodetector that was fabricated on an optimized PSC substrate. The PSC samples were prepared via the UV-assisted photo-electrochemical etching of an n-type hexagonal silicon carbide (6H-SiC) substrate using different etching current densities. The optical results showed that the current density is an outstanding etching parameter that controls the porosity and uniformity of PSC substrates. A highly porous substrate was synthesized using a suitable etching current density to enhance its light absorption, thereby improving the sensitivity of UV detector with this substrate. The electrical characteristics of fabricated devices on optimized PSC substrates exhibited enhanced sensitivity and responsivity to the incident radiation.

  9. Bonding and Integration Technologies for Silicon Carbide Based Injector Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halbig, Michael C.; Singh, Mrityunjay

    2008-01-01

    Advanced ceramic bonding and integration technologies play a critical role in the fabrication and application of silicon carbide based components for a number of aerospace and ground based applications. One such application is a lean direct injector for a turbine engine to achieve low NOx emissions. Ceramic to ceramic diffusion bonding and ceramic to metal brazing technologies are being developed for this injector application. For the diffusion bonding, titanium interlayers (PVD and foils) were used to aid in the joining of silicon carbide (SiC) substrates. The influence of such variables as surface finish, interlayer thickness (10, 20, and 50 microns), processing time and temperature, and cooling rates were investigated. Microprobe analysis was used to identify the phases in the bonded region. For bonds that were not fully reacted an intermediate phase, Ti5Si3Cx, formed that is thermally incompatible in its thermal expansion and caused thermal stresses and cracking during the processing cool-down. Thinner titanium interlayers and/or longer processing times resulted in stable and compatible phases that did not contribute to microcracking and resulted in an optimized microstructure. Tensile tests on the joined materials resulted in strengths of 13-28 MPa depending on the SiC substrate material. Non-destructive evaluation using ultrasonic immersion showed well formed bonds. For the joining technology of brazing Kovar fuel tubes to silicon carbide, preliminary development of the joining approach has begun. Various technical issues and requirements for the injector application are addressed.

  10. CVD silicon carbide characterization. Final report, August 1992-October 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, G.A.; Iden, D.

    1994-08-01

    Chemically vapor deposited (CVD) silicon carbide is a candidate material for high quality ground and space-based mirror substrates and high quality reflective optics. Statistically valid material property data has not been available, however, to make durability and lifetime predictions for such optics. The primary purpose of this study was to determine the Weibull and slow crack growth parameters for CVD silicon carbide. Specimens were cut from various locations in a 25 mm thick, 50 cm diameter piece of SiC to analyze bulk material property homogeneity. Flexural strength was measured using a four-point bend technique. In addition to mechanical testing for strength, hardness, and fracture toughness, the material crystallography and microstructure were studied. Thermal expansion, thermal diffusivity, specific heat, optical absorption, and infrared reflectivity measurements were also conducted. Raman spectroscopy was used to check for any residual stress. Test results show this CVD silicon carbide is a high-purity, homogeneous, fine-grained substrate material with very good mechanical, optical, and thermal properties.

  11. Refining the pathway of carbide insertion into the nitrogenase M-cluster.

    PubMed

    Wiig, Jared A; Hu, Yilin; Ribbe, Markus W

    2015-08-11

    Carbide insertion plays a pivotal role in the biosynthesis of M-cluster, the cofactor of nitrogenase. Previously, we proposed a carbide insertion pathway involving methyltransfer from SAM to a FeS precursor and hydrogen abstraction from this methyl group that initiates the radical-based precursor maturation. Here we demonstrate that the methyl group is transferred to a precursor-associated sulfur before hydrogen abstraction, thereby refining the initial steps of the carbide insertion pathway.

  12. A Study of Current Chopping Characteristics in Metal-Carbide Composite Contact Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Atsushi; Kusano, Takashi; Okutomi, Tsutomu; Yokokura, Kunio; Homma, Mitsutaka

    To clarify the effect of carbides on current chopping characteristics chopping current was evaluated for various metalcarbide contact materials. As a result, it was found that the chopping current of metal-carbide contacts was related to the vapor pressure of metals and the work function of carbides. It was also found that the chopping current was reduced by the heat treatment when the melting point of contacts is lower than the temperature of heat teatment.

  13. Refining the pathway of carbide insertion into the nitrogenase M-cluster

    PubMed Central

    Wiig, Jared A.; Hu, Yilin; Ribbe, Markus W.

    2015-01-01

    Carbide insertion plays a pivotal role in the biosynthesis of M-cluster, the cofactor of nitrogenase. Previously, we proposed a carbide insertion pathway involving methyltransfer from SAM to a FeS precursor and hydrogen abstraction from this methyl group that initiates the radical-based precursor maturation. Here we demonstrate that the methyl group is transferred to a precursor-associated sulfur before hydrogen abstraction, thereby refining the initial steps of the carbide insertion pathway. PMID:26259825

  14. Method of making silicon carbide-silicon composite having improved oxidation resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luthra, Krishan Lal (Inventor); Wang, Hongyu (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A Silicon carbide-silicon matrix composite having improved oxidation resistance at high temperatures in dry or water-containing environments is provided. A method is given for sealing matrix cracks in situ in melt infiltrated silicon carbide-silicon matrix composites. The composite cracks are sealed by the addition of various additives, such as boron compounds, into the melt infiltrated silicon carbide-silicon matrix.

  15. Rapid accurate isotopic measurements on boron in boric acid and boron carbide.

    PubMed

    Duchateau, N L; Verbruggen, A; Hendrickx, F; De Bièvre, P

    1986-04-01

    A procedure is described whereby rapid and accurate isotopic measurements can be performed on boron in boric acid and boron carbide after fusion of these compounds with calcium carbonate. It allows the determination of the isotopic composition of boron in boric acid and boron carbide and the direct assay of boron or the (10)B isotope in boron carbide by isotope-dilution mass spectrometry.

  16. Silicon carbide-silicon composite having improved oxidation resistance and method of making

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luthra, Krishan Lal (Inventor); Wang, Hongyu (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A Silicon carbide-silicon matrix composite having improved oxidation resistance at high temperatures in dry or water-containing environments is provided. A method is given for sealing matrix cracks in situ in melt infiltrated silicon carbide-silicon matrix composites. The composite cracks are sealed by the addition of various additives, such as boron compounds, into the melt infiltrated silicon carbide-silicon matrix.

  17. Extreme-Environment Silicon-Carbide (SiC) Wireless Sensor Suite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Phase II objectives: Develop an integrated silicon-carbide wireless sensor suite capable of in situ measurements of critical characteristics of NTP engine; Compose silicon-carbide wireless sensor suite of: Extreme-environment sensors center, Dedicated high-temperature (450 deg C) silicon-carbide electronics that provide power and signal conditioning capabilities as well as radio frequency modulation and wireless data transmission capabilities center, An onboard energy harvesting system as a power source.

  18. Effect of carbide distribution on rolling-element fatigue life of AMS 5749

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. J.; Bamberger, E. N.

    1983-01-01

    Endurance tests with ball bearings made of corrosion resistant bearing steel which resulted in fatigue lives much lower than were predicted are discussed. Metallurgical analysis revealed an undesirable carbide distribution in the races. It was shown in accelerated fatigue tests in the RC rig that large, banded carbides can reduce rolling element fatigue life by a factor of approximately four. The early spalling failures on the bearing raceways are attributed to the large carbide size and banded distribution.

  19. Effect of carbide size, area, density on rolling-element fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chevalier, J. L.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1972-01-01

    A carbide parameter that can be used to predict rolling element fatigue life was developed.The parameter is based on a statistical life analysis and incorporates the total number of particles per unit area, particle size, and percent carbide area. These were determined from quantimet image analyzing computer examinations of random samples selected from eight lots of material previously tested in rolling fatigue. The carbide parameter is independent of chemical composition, heat treatment, and hardening mechanism of the materials investigated.

  20. Steam Reforming on Transition-metal Carbides from Density-functional Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Vojvodic, Aleksandra

    2012-05-11

    A screening study of the steam reforming reaction on clean and oxygen covered early transition-metal carbides surfaces is performed by means of density-functional theory calculations. It is found that carbides provide a wide spectrum of reactivities, from too reactive via suitable to too inert. Several molybdenum-based systems are identified as possible steam reforming catalysts. The findings suggest that carbides provide a playground for reactivity tuning, comparable to the one for pure metals.

  1. Characterization of the carbides and the martensite phase in powder-metallurgy high-speed steel

    SciTech Connect

    Godec, Matjaz; Batic, Barbara Setina; Mandrino, Djordje; Nagode, Ales; Leskovsek, Vojteh; Skapin, Sreco D.; Jenko, Monika

    2010-04-15

    A microstructural characterization of the powder-metallurgy high-speed-steel S390 Microclean was performed based on an elemental distribution of the carbide phase as well as crystallographic analyses. The results showed that there were two types of carbides present: vanadium-rich carbides, which were not chemically homogeneous and exhibited a tungsten-enriched or tungsten-depleted central area; and chemically homogeneous tungsten-rich M{sub 6}C-type carbides. Despite the possibility of chemical inhomogenities, the crystallographic orientation of each of the carbides was shown to be uniform. Using electron backscatter diffraction the vanadium-rich carbides were determined to be either cubic VC or hexagonal V{sub 6}C{sub 5}, while the tungsten-rich carbides were M{sub 6}C. The electron backscatter diffraction results were also verified using X-ray diffraction. Several electron backscatter diffraction pattern maps were acquired in order to define the fraction of each carbide phase as well as the amount of martensite phase. The fraction of martensite was estimated using band-contrast images, while the fraction of carbides was calculated using the crystallographic data.

  2. Selective encapsulation of the carbides of yttrium and titanium into carbon nanoclusters

    SciTech Connect

    Seraphin, S.; Zhou, D. ); Jiao, J. ); Withers, J.C.; Loutfy, R. )

    1993-10-11

    Characterization of the arc-discharge deposits at the cathode from anodes containing yttrium oxide and titanium by transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction shows different results with respect to an encapsulation of the metal carbides into carbon clusters. Yttrium carbide is encapsulated into carbon nanoclusters in a crystalline phase. The formation of titanium carbide, on the other hand, preempts the formation of the carbon---carbon bonds necessary to form the carbon cages, so that only titanium carbide clusters are observed. Thermodynamic data support the interpretation of the results.

  3. Selective encapsulation of the carbides of yttrium and titanium into carbon nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seraphin, Supapan; Zhou, Dan; Jiao, Jun; Withers, James C.; Loutfy, Raouf

    1993-10-01

    Characterization of the arc-discharge deposits at the cathode from anodes containing yttrium oxide and titanium by transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction shows different results with respect to an encapsulation of the metal carbides into carbon clusters. Yttrium carbide is encapsulated into carbon nanoclusters in a crystalline phase. The formation of titanium carbide, on the other hand, preempts the formation of the carbon—carbon bonds necessary to form the carbon cages, so that only titanium carbide clusters are observed. Thermodynamic data support the interpretation of the results.

  4. Adherent Ti(C,N) Coatings on Cemented Carbide Substrates with Fe/Ni/Co Binder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhixing; Xiong, Ji; Yang, Mei; Bi, Siqin

    2009-12-01

    Both hard CVD coatings deposited on cemented carbides and the use of innovative binders for Co-bonded cemented carbide attract worldwide interest. In this article, ISO grade P30 cemented carbides are prepared with Fe Ni and Co binder, and adherent Ti(C,N) coatings are deposited on all the substrates by moderate-temperature chemical vapor deposition (MTCVD). The microstructure and properties of the cemented carbides before and after coating process are studied. The results show that Ti(C,N) coatings on all the substrate show compact and well-developed columnar structures, and high adhesion strength can be achieved.

  5. Tunable carbon nanotube-tungsten carbide nanoparticles heterostructures by vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Min; Guo, Hongyan; Ge, Changchun; Yan, Qingzhi Lang, Shaoting

    2014-05-14

    A simple, versatile route for the synthesis of carbon nanotube (CNT)-tungsten carbide nanoparticles heterostructures was set up via vapor deposition process. For the first time, amorphous CNTs (α-CNTs) were used to immobilized tungsten carbide nanoparticles. By adjusting the synthesis and annealing temperature, α-CNTs/amorphous tungsten carbide, α-CNTs/W{sub 2}C, and CNTs/W{sub 2}C/WC heterostructures were prepared. This approach provides an efficient method to attach other metal carbides and other nanoparticles to carbon nanotubes with tunable properties.

  6. A study of the effect of grain size on the ballistic performance of silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Cline, C.F.

    1995-03-01

    The depth of penetration method was used to ballistically evaluate the performance of silicon carbide as a function of grain size. The hot-pressed silicon carbide was backed by 4340 steel Rc = 35 and impacted by tungsten heavy metal projectiles of L/D = 4 at velocities of 1.6 and 1/75 km/s. The hot-pressed silicon carbide was also compared with reaction-sintered silicon carbide of identical thickness in the current study. Results are compared with data previously reported by others.

  7. Tungsten Carbide-Cobalt with Nano-Crystalline Tungsten Carbide Platelets ---Synthesis, Processing, Sintering and Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Yang

    Tungsten Carbide --- Cobalt (WC-Co) is one of the most important ceramic-metal composites, which has been used in variety areas of different industries. Future applications of WC-Co in more areas of industries require higher hardness and fracture toughness. Current technology of synthesis, processing and sintering of WC-Co barely enhances the hardness and fracture toughness of WC-Co simultaneously (including nanostructured WC-Co). Within this project, a new approach of effectively controlling the structure of WC to lead to the simultaneous enhancement of hardness and fracture toughness has been investigated. The nano-WC platelet is proposed to be promising for the simultaneous enhancement. Several different aspects related to the formation of nano-WC platelets are studied. A new and effective method to produce nanostructured WC-Co powder is established in this study. This method is a combination of high energy milling and carbothermic reduction of the mixture of tungsten oxide (WO 3) and cobalt oxide (Co3O4). The condition to remove the free carbon without decarburization of WC has been achieved by thermodynamic analysis and coupled experiments. By the utilization of density functional theory simulations and Wulff construction, the equilibrium shape of WC crystals inside WC-Co is predicted to be bulky structure instead of platelet structure. The growth mechanisms for the WC in commercial coarse grained WC-Co under different heating conditions are observed. It is found that the heating temperature is a critical factor affecting the structure of WC inside WC-Co. Higher temperature will lead to the layer-by-layer structure formation due to higher thermodynamic driving force. The in situ formation of nano-WC platelet is achieved using different W containing sources. The formation mechanism has been studied. Bulk WC-Co samples with nano-WC platelets are obtained through sintering of WC-Co nano-powder at relatively low sintering temperatures. The mechanical properties of

  8. Exposure to Fibres, Crystalline Silica, Silicon Carbide and Sulphur Dioxide in the Norwegian Silicon Carbide Industry

    PubMed Central

    Føreland, S.; Bye, E.; Bakke, B.; Eduard, W.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess personal exposure to fibres, crystalline silica, silicon carbide (SiC) and sulphur dioxide in the Norwegian SiC industry. Methods: Approximately 720 fibre samples, 720 respirable dust samples and 1400 total dust samples were collected from randomly chosen workers from the furnace, processing and maintenance departments in all three Norwegian SiC plants. The respirable dust samples were analysed for quartz, cristobalite and non-fibrous SiC content. Approximately 240 sulphur dioxide samples were collected from workers in the furnace department. Results: The sorting operators from all plants, control room and cleaning operators in Plant A and charger, charger/mix and payloader operators in Plant C had a geometric mean (GM) of fibre exposure above the Norwegian occupational exposure limit (OEL) (0.1 fibre cm−3). The cleaner operators in Plant A had the highest GM exposure to respirable quartz (20 μg m−3). The charger/mix operators in Plant C had the highest GM exposure to respirable cristobalite (38 μg m−3) and the refinery crusher operators in Plant A had the highest GM exposure to non-fibrous SiC (0.65 mg m−3). Exposure to the crystalline silica and non-fibrous SiC was generally low and between 0.4 and 2.1% of the measurements exceeded the OELs. The cleaner operators in Plant A had the highest GM exposure to respirable dust (1.3 mg m−3) and total dust (21 mg m−3). GM exposures for respirable dust above the Norwegian SiC industry-specific OEL of 0.5 mg m−3 were also found for refinery crusher operators in all plants and mix, charger, charger/mix and sorting operators in Plant C. Only 4% of the total dust measurements exceeded the OEL for nuisance dust of (10 mg m−3). Exposure to sulphur dioxide was generally low. However, peaks in the range of 10–100 p.p.m. were observed for control room and crane operators in Plants A and B and for charger and charger/mix operators in Plant C. Conclusion: Workers in

  9. Nuclear transformation of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii with silicon carbide fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Dunahay, T.G. )

    1992-01-01

    Efficient nuclear transformation of cell wall-deficient strains of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii can be accomplished by vortexing the cells in the presence of glass beads and polyethylene glycol (Kindle 1990 PNAS 87:1228). Intact (walled) cells can also be transformed using this protocol, but at very low efficiencies. Two recent reports have described the use of silicon carbide fibers to mediate DNA entry into plant suspension cells (Kaeppler et al. 1990 Plant Cell Rep. 9:414; Asano et al. 1991 Plant Sci. 79:247). The author has found that nuclear transformation efficiencies of walled cells of C. reinhardtii can be increased 3 to 10 fold by vortexing the cells in the presence of silicon carbide fibers and PEG. Using a modification of the glass bead transformation procedure, the wild-type nitrate reductase structural gene was used to complement a NR-deficient mutant of C. reinhardtii, nit-1-305. The transformation efficiency increased with longer vortexing times, although the absolute number of transformants varied between experiments, ranging from 10 to 40 transformants per 10[sup 7] cells. In contrast to vortexing with glass beads, cell viability was very high, with greater than 80% cell survival even after vortexing for 10 minutes. Neither cell death nor transformation efficiency increased when cell wall-deficient mutants (cw15 nit-1-305) were used as compared to intact cells. Experiments are in progress to test the applicability of silicon carbide-mediated transformation to other algal strains for which cell wall mutants or protoplasting procedures are unavailabile.

  10. Irradiation and annealing of p-type silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedev, Alexander A.; Bogdanova, Elena V.; Grigor'eva, Maria V.; Lebedev, Sergey P.; Kozlovski, Vitaly V.

    2014-02-21

    The development of the technology of semiconductor devices based on silicon carbide and the beginning of their industrial manufacture have made increasingly topical studies of the radiation hardness of this material on the one hand and of the proton irradiation to form high-receptivity regions on the other hand. This paper reports on a study of the carrier removal rate (V{sub d}) in p-6H-SiC under irradiation with 8 MeV protons and of the conductivity restoration in radiation- compensated epitaxial layers of various p-type silicon carbide polytypes. V{sub d} was determined by analysis of capacitance-voltage characteristics and from results of Hall effect measurements. It was found that the complete compensation of samples with the initial value of Na - Nd ≈ 1.5 × 10{sup 18} cm{sup −3} occurs at an irradiation dose of ∼1.1 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup −2}. It is shown that specific features of the sublimation layer SiC (compared to CVD layers) are clearly manifested upon the gamma and electron irradiation and are hardly noticeable under the proton and neutron irradiation. It was also found that the radiation-induced compensation of SiC is retained after its annealing at ≤1000°C. The conductivity is almost completely restored at T ≥ 1200°C. This character of annealing of the radiation compensation is independent of a silicon carbide polytype and the starting doping level of the epitaxial layer. The complete annealing temperatures considerably exceed the working temperatures of SiC-based devices. It is shown that the radiation compensation is a promising method in the technology of high-temperature devices based on SiC.

  11. Promotion of the Growth of Boron-Carbide Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kranov, Yanko; Zhang, Daqing; McIlroy, David; Norton, Grant

    2000-03-01

    Boron carbide, is a wide bandgap semiconductor (2.1eV) with a high melting temperature in excess of 2400^circC. Initial studies indicate that nanowires of boron carbide approximately 25 ~30 μm in length and less than 100 nm in diameter can be grown by the technique of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition by a mode of the vapor-liquid-solid mechanism [1] at relatively low temperatures ( ~1150^circC). Through the use of boron based eutectics such as FeB, NiB and PtB nanowire growth at temperatures below 1150^circC. These metal borides have successively lower melting temperatures, respectively. In this paper we will discuss a simple technique for making submicron metal boride particles, as well as a simple means of depositing them onto a surface. In addition, the effect of droplet size on nanowire diameter and the stability of the size of the metal boride droplet during growth will be discussed. These studies demonstrate that the surface can be selectively seeded thereby controlling the location of the nanowires, i.e. select area deposition. Lastly, the techniques and materials used to grow boron carbide nanowires can easily be used to grow other types of nanowires, as well as carbon nanotubes. [1]. D. N. McIlroy, Daqing Zhang, Robert M. Cohen, J. Wharton, Yongjun Geng, M. Grant Norton, G. De Stasio, B.Gilbert, L.Perfetti, J.H.Streiff, B.Broocks and J.L. McHale, Phys. Rev. B 60 (1999) 4874

  12. Silicon nitride/silicon carbide composite densified materials prepared using composite powders

    DOEpatents

    Dunmead, Stephen D.; Weimer, Alan W.; Carroll, Daniel F.; Eisman, Glenn A.; Cochran, Gene A.; Susnitzky, David W.; Beaman, Donald R.; Nilsen, Kevin J.

    1997-07-01

    Prepare silicon nitride-silicon carbide composite powders by carbothermal reduction of crystalline silica powder, carbon powder and, optionally, crystalline silicon nitride powder. The crystalline silicon carbide portion of the composite powders has a mean number diameter less than about 700 nanometers and contains nitrogen. The composite powders may be used to prepare sintered ceramic bodies and self-reinforced silicon nitride ceramic bodies.

  13. Preparation of molybdenum carbides with multiple morphologies using surfactants as carbon sources

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hongfen; Wang, Zhiqi; Chen, Shougang

    2012-10-15

    Molybdenum carbides with surfactants as carbon sources were prepared using the carbothermal reduction of the appropriate precursors (molybdenum oxides deposited on surfactant micelles) at 1023 K under hydrogen gas. The carburized products were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction and BET surface area measurements. From the SEM images, hollow microspherical and rod-like molybdenum carbides were observed. X-ray diffraction patterns showed that the annealing time of carburization had a large effect on the conversion of molybdenum oxides to molybdenum carbides. And BET surface area measurements indicated that the difference of carbon sources brought a big difference in specific surface areas of molybdenum carbides. - Graphical abstract: Molybdenum carbides having hollow microspherical and hollow rod-like morphologies that are different from the conventional monodipersed platelet-like morphologies. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Molybdenum carbides were prepared using surfactants as carbon sources. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The kinds of surfactants affected the morphologies of molybdenum carbides. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The time of heat preservation at 1023 K affected the carburization process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Molybdenum carbides with hollow structures had larger specific surface areas.

  14. Powdered materials, products, and coating: Finely disperse cemented carbides WC-Ni. II. Physical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Sverdel, V.V.; Shatov, A.V.; Yurchuk, N.A.

    1994-09-01

    A change of the conditions of sintering of ceneted carbides will lead to a change in the completeness and speed of the sintering process forming the structure of the material. Changes in structure affect the mechanical and physical properties. Investigations were performed on tungsten carbides and nickel systems.

  15. Process for preparing metal-carbide-containing microspheres from metal-loaded resin beads

    DOEpatents

    Beatty, Ronald L.

    1977-01-01

    An improved process for producing porous spheroidal particles consisting of a metal carbide phase dispersed within a carbon matrix is described. According to the invention metal-loaded ion-exchange resin microspheres which have been carbonized are coated with a buffer carbon layer prior to conversion of the oxide to carbide in order to maintain porosity and avoid other adverse sintering effects.

  16. Chromium Carbide Thin Films Synthesized by Pulsed Nd:YAG Laser Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suda, Yoshiaki; Kawasaki, Hiroharu; Terajima, Ryou; Emura, Masanari

    1999-06-01

    Chromium carbide thin films are synthesized on Si(100)substrates by a pulsed Nd:YAG laser deposition method at differentsubstrate temperatures. Glancing-angle X-ray diffraction shows that acrystalline chromium carbide film can be prepared at the substratetemperature of 700°C. Grain size of the films, examined witha field-emission secondary electron microscope, increases withincreasing substrate temperature.

  17. Carbide phases in a multicomponent superalloy Ni-Co-W-Cr-Ta-Re

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pigrova, G. D.; Rybnikov, A. I.

    2013-07-01

    Physicochemical phase analysis is used to investigate carbide phases in a high-temperature nickelbased alloy ZhS32 after the alloy has been subjected to various heat treatments and aging regimes within a temperature range of 850-1250°C. The MC, M23C6, and M6C carbide phases have been identified.

  18. Specific Nature of Application of Various Carbon Components for Mechanochemical Synthesis of Titanium Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reva, V. P.; Yagofarov, V. U.; Gulevskii, D. A.; Filatenkov, A. E.; Mansurov, Yu N.

    2016-08-01

    It has been established that structure of carbon modifications, obtained via pyrolysis of vegetable feed, and ash content of natural graphite are crucial factors during mechanochemical synthesis of titanium carbide under vibratory conditions. The possibility of synthesis of titanium carbide with minimal sulfur content has been shown.

  19. Development of a Robust Tri-Carbide Fueled Reactor for Multimegawatt Space Power and Propulsion Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Samim Anghaie; Travis W. Knight; Johann Plancher; Reza Gouw

    2004-08-11

    An innovative reactor core design based on advanced, mixed carbide fuels was analyzed for nuclear space power applications. Solid solution, mixed carbide fuels such as (U,Zr,Nb)c and (U,Zr, Ta)C offer great promise as an advanced high temperature fuel for space power reactors.

  20. Method of enhanced lithiation of doped silicon carbide via high temperature annealing in an inert atmosphere

    DOEpatents

    Hersam, Mark C.; Lipson, Albert L.; Bandyopadhyay, Sudeshna; Karmel, Hunter J; Bedzyk, Michael J

    2014-05-27

    A method for enhancing the lithium-ion capacity of a doped silicon carbide is disclosed. The method utilizes heat treating the silicon carbide in an inert atmosphere. Also disclosed are anodes for lithium-ion batteries prepared by the method.

  1. Zirconium carbide as an electrocatalyst for the chromous-chromic redox couple

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gahn, R. F.; Reid, M. A.; Yang, C. Y. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    Zirconium carbide is used as a catalyst in a REDOX cell for the oxidation of chromous ions to chromic ions and for the reduction of chromic ions to chromous ions. The zirconium carbide is coated on an inert electronically conductive electrode which is present in the anode fluid of the cell.

  2. Ion-beam-deposited boron carbide coatings for the extreme ultraviolet.

    PubMed

    Blumenstock, G M; Keski-Kuha, R A

    1994-09-01

    The normal-incidence reflectance of ion-beam-deposited boron carbide thin films has been evaluated in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectral region. High-reflectance coatings have been produced with reflectances greater than 30% between 67 and 121.6 nm. This high reflectance makes ion-beam-deposited boron carbide an attractive coating for EUV applications.

  3. Molecular dynamics investigation of the interaction of dislocations with carbides in BCC Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granberg, F.; Terentyev, D.; Nordlund, K.

    2015-06-01

    Different types of carbides are present in many steels used as structural materials. To safely use steel in demanding environments, like nuclear power plants, it is important to know how defects will affect the mechanical properties of the material. In this study, the effect of carbide precipitates on the edge dislocation movement is investigated. Three different types of carbides were investigated by means of molecular dynamics, with a Tersoff-like bond order interatomic potential by Henriksson et al. The obstacles were 4 nm in diameter and were of Fe3C- (cementite-), Fe23C6- and Cr23C6-type. The critical unpinning stress was calculated for each type at different temperatures, to get the temperature-dependent obstacle strength. The results showed a decreasing critical stress with increasing temperature, consistent with previous studies. The critical unpinning stress was seen to be dependent on the type of carbide, but the differences were small. A difference was also observed between the obstacles with the same structure, but with different composition. This study shows the relation between the existing Cr23C6 carbide and the experimentally non-existing Fe23C6 carbide, which needs to be used as a model system for investigations with interatomic potentials not able to describe the interaction of Cr in the Fe-C-system. We found the difference to be a between 7% and 10% higher critical unpinning stress for the chromium carbide, than for the iron carbide of the same type.

  4. Method of fabricating silicon carbide coatings on graphite surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Varacalle, D.J. Jr.; Herman, H.; Burchell, T.D.

    1994-07-26

    The vacuum plasma spray process produces well-bonded, dense, stress-free coatings for a variety of materials on a wide range of substrates. The process is used in many industries to provide for the excellent wear, corrosion resistance, and high temperature behavior of the fabricated coatings. In this application, silicon metal is deposited on graphite. This invention discloses the optimum processing parameters for as-sprayed coating qualities. The method also discloses the effect of thermal cycling on silicon samples in an inert helium atmosphere at about 1,600 C which transforms the coating to silicon carbide. 3 figs.

  5. RBS study of amorphous silicon carbide films deposited by PECVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huran, J.; Hotovy, I.; Kobzev, A. P.; Balalykin, N. I.

    2004-03-01

    We present properties of nitrogen-doped amorphous silicon carbide films that were grown by a plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) technique and annealed by pulsed electron beam. Samples with different amounts of N were achieved by a small addition of ammonia NH3 into the gas mixture of silane SiH4 and methane CH4, which were directly introduced into the reaction chamber. The actual amount of nitrogen in the SiC films was determined by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS). A simulation of the RBS spectra was used to calculate the concentration of carbon, silicon and nitrogen.

  6. Method of fabricating silicon carbide coatings on graphite surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Varacalle, Jr., Dominic J.; Herman, Herbert; Burchell, Timothy D.

    1994-01-01

    The vacuum plasma spray process produces well-bonded, dense, stress-free coatings for a variety of materials on a wide range of substrates. The process is used in many industries to provide for the excellent wear, corrosion resistance, and high temperature behavior of the fabricated coatings. In this application, silicon metal is deposited on graphite. This invention discloses the optimum processing parameters for as-sprayed coating qualities. The method also discloses the effect of thermal cycling on silicon samples in an inert helium atmosphere at about 1600.degree.C. which transforms the coating to silicon carbide.

  7. PROCESS OF COATING GRAPHITE WITH NIOBIUM-TITANIUM CARBIDE

    DOEpatents

    Halden, F.A.; Smiley, W.D.; Hruz, F.M.

    1961-07-01

    A process of coating graphite with niobium - titanium carbide is described. It is found that the addition of more than ten percent by weight of titanium to niobium results in much greater wetting of the graphite by the niobium and a much more adherent coating. The preferred embodiment comprises contacting the graphite with a powdered alloy or mixture, degassing simultaneously the powder and the graphite, and then heating them to a high temperature to cause melting, wetting, spreading, and carburization of the niobium-titanium powder.

  8. Improved Silicon Carbide Crystals Grown From Atomically Flat Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neudeck, Philip G.

    2003-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center is demonstrating that atomically flat (i.e., step-free) silicon carbide (SiC) surfaces are ideal for realizing greatly improved wide bandgap semiconductor films with lower crystal defect densities. Further development of these improved films could eventually enable harsh-environment electronics beneficial to jet engine and other aerospace and automotive applications, as well as much more efficient and compact power distribution and control. The technique demonstrated could also improve blue-light lasers and light-emitting-diode displays.

  9. NDT characterization of boron carbide for ballistic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Liaptsis, D.; Cooper, I.; Ludford, N.; Gunner, A.; Williams, Mike; Willis, David

    2011-06-23

    Boron Carbide (B{sub 4}C) is widely used to provide ballistic protection in challenging service environments. This work was carried out to develop non-destructive testing (NDT) for B{sub 4}C characterization. Deliberate flaws were introduced within the B{sub 4}C tiles during manufacturing. An experimental program was undertaken to determine the best method to detect defects in ceramic tiles and material characterization. Ultrasonic characterization of the material was found to be able to detect both density variation and defects within the material.

  10. Catalytic synthesis of silicon carbide preceramic polymers: Polycarbosilanes

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, D.H.

    1991-11-01

    Polycarbosilanes are the most successful and widely studied class of polymer precursors for silicon carbide, but traditional methods for thier synthesis are inefficient and nonselective. This project is focused on developing transition metal catalysts for the synthesis of polycarbosilanes and other perceramic polymers. In recent work we have developed the first homogeneous transition metal catalysts for the dehydrogenative coupling of simple alkyl silanes to oligomeric and polymeric carbosilanes, H-(SiR{sub 2}CR{prime}{sub 2}){sub n}-SiR{sub 3}. Future work will help elucidate the mechanism of the catalytic process, explore the use of hydrogen acceptors as reaction accelerators, and develop new and more active catalysts.

  11. Synthesis of functional acetylene derivatives from calcium carbide.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhewang; Yu, Dingyi; Sum, Yin Ngai; Zhang, Yugen

    2012-04-01

    AHA Erlebnis: CaC(2), used to produce acetylene until several decades ago, is re-emerging as a cheap, sustainable resource synthesized from coal and lignocellulosic biomass. We report efficient catalytic protocols for the synthesis of functional acetylene derivatives from CaC(2) through aldehyde, alkyne, and amine (AAA) as well as alkyne, haloalkane, and amine (AHA) couplings, and in addition demonstrate its use in click and Sonogashira chemistry, showing that calcium carbide is a sustainable and cost-efficient carbon source.

  12. Computational Design Study for Recovery of Shock Damaged Silicon Carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Iyer, K.; Dandekar, D.

    2006-07-28

    The paper presents a computational study for design of experimental configurations that may permit the recovery of weak-shock loaded high-strength brittle ceramics such as silicon carbide with controlled amounts of damage. A set of 8 configurations involving momentum traps, and subjected to a nominal shock pressure of 4 GPa, is analyzed using finite element analysis with linear elastic and damage material models. The analyses identify influences of: (i) introducing a hole in the specimen center (ii) specimen size, and (iii) impedance graded trapping.

  13. Dynamic consolidation of aluminum-silicon carbide composites

    SciTech Connect

    Rabin, B.H.; Korth, G.E.; Williamson, R.L.

    1990-01-01

    Dynamic consolidation was investigated as a potential method for producing P/M metal matrix composites. In this study, 2124 aluminum powders were mixed with silicon carbide particulate and consolidated using explosives. Numerical simulations were performed to provide insight into the consolidation process and to aid in the selection of experimental conditions. The microstructure of the as-consolidated product was dependent upon processing variables. Careful control of the shock parameters allowed full density, crack free composites to be achieved in cylindrical geometries. Although full density was obtained, low fracture strengths suggested a lack of interparticle bonding, probably resulting from the limited ability to redistribute surface oxides during consolidation. 10 refs., 9 figs.

  14. PROPERTIES OF DEFECTS AND IMPLANTS IN Mg+ IMPLANTED SILICON CARBIDE

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Weilin; Zhu, Zihua; Varga, Tamas; Bowden, Mark E.; Manandhar, Sandeep; Roosendaal, Timothy J.; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Henager, Charles H.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Wang, Yongqiang

    2013-09-25

    As a candidate material for fusion reactor designs, silicon carbide (SiC) under high-energy neutron irradiation undergoes atomic displacement damage and transmutation reactions that create magnesium as one of the major metallic products. The presence of Mg and lattice disorder in SiC is expected to affect structural stability and degrade thermo-mechanical properties that could limit SiC lifetime for service. We have initiated a combined experimental and computational study that uses Mg+ ion implantation and multiscale modeling to investigate the structural and chemical effects in Mg implanted SiC and explore possible property degradation mechanisms.

  15. Scanning acoustic microscopy of SCS-6 silicon carbide fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Sathish, S.; Cantrell, J.H.; Yost, W.T.

    1996-01-01

    Scanning acoustic microscopy of SCS-6 silicon carbide fiber reveals large radial variations in acoustic reflectivity associated with the chemical composition and microstructure of a given fiber region. Rayleigh wave fringe patterns observed in each of five subregions are used to calculate the average Young modulus of that subregion. The Young modulus is found to increase monotonically from 40 GPa in the carbon core to a value of 413 GPa in the stoichiometric SiC region. The effective Young modulus of the fiber as a whole is estimated from the moduli of the individual regions and it is compared with mechanical measurements reported in the literature.

  16. Depressurization amorphization of single-crystal boron carbide.

    PubMed

    Yan, X Q; Tang, Z; Zhang, L; Guo, J J; Jin, C Q; Zhang, Y; Goto, T; McCauley, J W; Chen, M W

    2009-02-20

    We report depressurization amorphization of single-crystal boron carbide (B4C) investigated by in situ high-pressure Raman spectroscopy. It was found that localized amorphization of B4C takes place during unloading from high pressures, and nonhydrostatic stresses play a critical role in the high-pressure phase transition. First-principles molecular dynamics simulations reveal that the depressurization amorphization results from pressure-induced irreversible bending of C-B-C atomic chains cross-linking 12 atom icosahedra at the rhombohedral vertices.

  17. Diffusion of ion implanted aluminum in silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Tajima, Y.; Kijima, K.; Kingery, W.D.

    1982-09-01

    Diffusion of aluminum in silicon carbide was studied by Al implantation into single crystal SiC and subsequent profile analyses by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). The bulk diffusion coefficient of Al at temperatures between 1350 and 1800 /sup 0/C was determined to be D(cm/sup 2//s) = 1.3 x 10/sup -8/ exp (-231 kJ/mol/RT). The results were characterized by a low activation energy and a low pre-exponential constant compared with previously reported results. Dislocation enhanced diffusion was suggested from the appearance of the tails observed in the annealed concentration profiles.

  18. Net shape fabrication of Alpha Silicon Carbide turbine components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storm, R. S.

    1982-01-01

    Development of Alpha Silicon Carbide components by net shape fabrication techniques has continued in conjunction with several turbine engine programs. Progress in injection molding of simple parts has been extended to much larger components. Turbine rotors fabricated by a one piece molding have been successfully spin tested above design speeds. Static components weighing up to 4.5 kg and 33 cc in diameter have also been produced using this technique. Use of sintering fixtures significantly improves dimensional control. A new Si-SiC composite material has also been developed with average strengths up to 1000 MPa (150 ksi) at 1200 C.

  19. Process for preparing fine grain silicon carbide powder

    DOEpatents

    Wei, G.C.

    Finely divided silicon carbide powder is obtained by mixing colloidal silica and unreacted phenolic resin in either acetone or methanol, evaporating solvent from the obtained solution to form a gel, drying and calcining the gel to polymerize the phenolic resin therein, pyrolyzing the dried and calcined gel at a temperature in the range of 500 to 1000/sup 0/C, and reacting silicon and carbon in the pyrolyzed gel at a temperature in the range of 1550 to 1700/sup 0/C to form the powder.

  20. Temperature Induced Voltage Offset Drifts in Silicon Carbide Pressure Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okojie, Robert S.; Lukco, Dorothy; Nguyen, Vu; Savrun, Ender

    2012-01-01

    We report the reduction of transient drifts in the zero pressure offset voltage in silicon carbide (SiC) pressure sensors when operating at 600 C. The previously observed maximum drift of +/- 10 mV of the reference offset voltage at 600 C was reduced to within +/- 5 mV. The offset voltage drifts and bridge resistance changes over time at test temperature are explained in terms of the microstructure and phase changes occurring within the contact metallization, as analyzed by Auger electron spectroscopy and field emission scanning electron microscopy. The results have helped to identify the upper temperature reliable operational limit of this particular metallization scheme to be 605 C.

  1. Heat transfer to a silicon carbide/water nanofluid.

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, W.; France , D. M.; Smith, D. S.; Singh, D.; Timofeeva, E. V.; Routbort, J. L.; Univ. of Illinois at Chicago

    2009-07-01

    Heat transfer experiments were performed with a water-based nanofluid containing 170-nm silicon carbide particles at a 3.7% volume concentration and having potential commercial viability. Heat transfer coefficients for the nanofluid are presented for Reynolds numbers ranging from 3300 to 13,000 and are compared to the base fluid water on the bases of constant Reynolds number, constant velocity, and constant pumping power. Results were also compared to predictions from standard liquid correlations and a recently altered nanofluid correlation. The slip mechanisms of Brownian diffusion and thermophoresis postulated in the altered correlation were investigated in a series of heating and cooling experiments.

  2. The Oxidation of CVD Silicon Carbide in Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opila, Elizabeth J.; Nguyen, QuynchGiao N.

    1997-01-01

    Chemically-vapor-deposited silicon carbide (CVD SiC) was oxidized in carbon dioxide (CO2) at temperatures of 1200-1400 C for times between 100 and 500 hours at several gas flow rates. Oxidation weight gains were monitored by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and were found to be very small and independent of temperature. Possible rate limiting kinetic laws are discussed. Oxidation of SiC by CO2 is negligible compared to the rates measured for other oxidants typically found in combustion environments: oxygen and water vapor.

  3. Ndt Characterization of Boron Carbide for Ballistic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liaptsis, D.; Cooper, I.; Ludford, N.; Gunner, A.; Williams, Mike; Willis, David

    2011-06-01

    Boron Carbide (B4C) is widely used to provide ballistic protection in challenging service environments. This work was carried out to develop non-destructive testing (NDT) for B4C characterization. Deliberate flaws were introduced within the B4C tiles during manufacturing. An experimental program was undertaken to determine the best method to detect defects in ceramic tiles and material characterization. Ultrasonic characterization of the material was found to be able to detect both density variation and defects within the material.

  4. Harsh Environment Silicon Carbide Sensor Technology for Geothermal Instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Pisano, Albert P.

    2013-04-26

    This project utilizes Silicon Carbide (SiC) materials platform to fabricate advanced sensors to be used as high-temperature downhole instrumentation for the DOE’s Geothermal Technologies Program on Enhanced Geothermal Systems. The scope of the proposed research is to 1) develop a SiC pressure sensor that can operate in harsh supercritical conditions, 2) develop a SiC temperature sensor that can operate in harsh supercritical conditions, 3) develop a bonding process for adhering SiC sensor die to well casing couplers, and 4) perform experimental exposure testing of sensor materials and the sensor devices.

  5. Dissociation of Cr-rich M 23C 6 carbide in Alloy 617 by severe plastic deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Tae Sun; Lim, Jeong Hun; Kim, Young Do

    2010-11-01

    In this study, the dissociation of Cr-rich M 23C 6 carbides in Alloy 617 was investigated using 50% cold rolling. The major carbides in Alloy 617 consisted primarily of M 23C 6 carbide and a small amount of M 6C carbide. The lattice parameters of the carbides were determined as 1.070 nm (M 23C 6) and 1.121 nm (M 6C). The area fraction of the total carbides in Alloy 617 decreased from 3.50% to 1.66% after 50% cold rolling. The M 23C 6 carbide was dissociated by the carbon traps in dislocations generated during the severe plastic deformation. Alternatively, the area fraction of M 6C carbide increased from 0.06% to 0.37% during the dissociation of M 23C 6 carbide. The area fraction of M 6C carbide increased due to the formation of M 6C carbide as a result of the relative changes in chemical composition, such as Cr and Mo, during the dissociation of M 23C 6 carbide.

  6. ε-Iron carbide as a low-temperature Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalyst.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ke; Sun, Bo; Lin, Jun; Wen, Wen; Pei, Yan; Yan, Shirun; Qiao, Minghua; Zhang, Xiaoxin; Zong, Baoning

    2014-12-12

    ε-Iron carbide has been predicted to be promising for low-temperature Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (LTFTS) targeting liquid fuel production. However, directional carbidation of metallic iron to ε-iron carbide is challenging due to kinetic hindrance. Here we show how rapidly quenched skeletal iron featuring nanocrystalline dimensions, low coordination number and an expanded lattice may solve this problem. We find that the carbidation of rapidly quenched skeletal iron occurs readily in situ during LTFTS at 423-473 K, giving an ε-iron carbide-dominant catalyst that exhibits superior activity to literature iron and cobalt catalysts, and comparable to more expensive noble ruthenium catalyst, coupled with high selectivity to liquid fuels and robustness without the aid of electronic or structural promoters. This finding may permit the development of an advanced energy-efficient and clean fuel-oriented FTS process on the basis of a cost-effective iron catalyst.

  7. Accelerated carbide spheroidisation of 1.2343 tool steel by induction heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dlouhý, J.; Kövér, M.

    2015-12-01

    Tool steels undergo spheroidisation or soft annealing to enhance machinability and cold formability. Conventional soft annealing takes several hours. The final microstructure is composed of globular carbides in a ferritic matrix. We present an alternative process of carbide spheroidisation and steel softening. Accelerated carbide spheroidisation and refinement (ASR) was achieved by induction heating at temperatures close to the A1 temperature. The spheroidised structure was obtained in less than 5 minutes. The carbide particles that formed during the ASR were significantly finer than for the conventional soft annealing. The hardness after ASR was higher than the hardness after soft annealing because of the dispersion strengthening by finer and more densely distributed carbide particles. On the other hand, the fine structure is favourable for hardening. It enables smaller austenite grains and martensite laths to be obtained.

  8. ε-Iron carbide as a low-temperature Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalyst.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ke; Sun, Bo; Lin, Jun; Wen, Wen; Pei, Yan; Yan, Shirun; Qiao, Minghua; Zhang, Xiaoxin; Zong, Baoning

    2014-01-01

    ε-Iron carbide has been predicted to be promising for low-temperature Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (LTFTS) targeting liquid fuel production. However, directional carbidation of metallic iron to ε-iron carbide is challenging due to kinetic hindrance. Here we show how rapidly quenched skeletal iron featuring nanocrystalline dimensions, low coordination number and an expanded lattice may solve this problem. We find that the carbidation of rapidly quenched skeletal iron occurs readily in situ during LTFTS at 423-473 K, giving an ε-iron carbide-dominant catalyst that exhibits superior activity to literature iron and cobalt catalysts, and comparable to more expensive noble ruthenium catalyst, coupled with high selectivity to liquid fuels and robustness without the aid of electronic or structural promoters. This finding may permit the development of an advanced energy-efficient and clean fuel-oriented FTS process on the basis of a cost-effective iron catalyst. PMID:25503569

  9. Carbides in iron-rich Fe-Mn-Cr-Mo-Al-Si-C systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemkey, F. D.; Gupta, H.; Nowotny, H.; Wayne, S. F.

    1984-01-01

    The optimization of high carbon iron-base superalloy properties with duplex microstructure gamma + M7C3 carbide requires analysis in the context of a seven-component system. Data are first provided here for the Fe-Mn-Cr-Mo-C quinary system, at 30 at. pct carbon. A characterization of competing carbides, according to a pseudoternary phase diagram at 35 wt pct iron, is made from isothermal sections. It is noted that while M7C3 and M3C carbides' occurrences are respectively favored at the Cr and Mn corners, the M2C carbide and molybdenum cementite are predominant with increasing amounts of Mo. Lattice parameters are reported for the various carbides.

  10. Development of refractory armored silicon carbide by infrared transient liquid phase processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinoki, Tatsuya; Snead, Lance L.; Blue, Craig A.

    2005-12-01

    Tungsten (W) and molybdenum (Mo) were coated on silicon carbide (SiC) for use as a refractory armor using a high power plasma arc lamp at powers up to 23.5 MW/m 2 in an argon flow environment. Both tungsten powder and molybdenum powder melted and formed coating layers on silicon carbide within a few seconds. The effect of substrate pre-treatment (vapor deposition of titanium (Ti) and tungsten, and annealing) and sample heating conditions on microstructure of the coating and coating/substrate interface were investigated. The microstructure was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical microscopy (OM). The mechanical properties of the coated materials were evaluated by four-point flexural tests. A strong tungsten coating was successfully applied to the silicon carbide substrate. Tungsten vapor deposition and pre-heating at 5.2 MW/m 2 made for a refractory layer containing no cracks propagating into the silicon carbide substrate. The tungsten coating was formed without the thick reaction layer. For this study, small tungsten carbide grains were observed adjacent to the interface in all conditions. In addition, relatively large, widely scattered tungsten carbide grains and a eutectic structure of tungsten and silicon were observed through the thickness in the coatings formed at lower powers and longer heating times. The strength of the silicon carbide substrate was somewhat decreased as a result of the processing. Vapor deposition of tungsten prior to powder coating helped prevent this degradation. In contrast, molybdenum coating was more challenging than tungsten coating due to the larger coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) mismatch as compared to tungsten and silicon carbide. From this work it is concluded that refractory armoring of silicon carbide by Infrared Transient Liquid Phase Processing is possible. The tungsten armored silicon carbide samples proved uniform, strong, and capable of withstanding thermal fatigue testing.

  11. Critical Analysis of Wear Mechanisms in Cemented Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewangan, Saurabh; Chattopadhyaya, Somnath

    2015-07-01

    Wear phenomena of cemented carbide (94 wt.% WC, 6 wt.% Co) tip of conical picks have been observed by field emission scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and x-ray diffraction analysis (XRD). The conical pick is one type of the cutters which are used to excavate soft structure like coal. It has a cone-shaped abrasive part made of cemented carbide (CC). The picks, under study, have been used for coal mining in an underground mine through a continuous miner machine. During the critical analysis of four picks, wear mechanisms are categorized into four parts, such as, cracks, cavity formation in WC grains, grinding effect, and roughness of WC surface. Through a careful examination, the cracking mechanism has been further divided into three parts. They are cracks with overlapping surfaces, crack on a large surface of CC, and cracks in WC grains. In addition, the severe crushing and tearing of WC grains have also been clearly examined. The possible causes of each wear phenomenon have been explained comprehensively. Crushing and corrosion are the two wearing processes which have severely deteriorated the condition of the CC. Corrosion has been easily identified by observing a number of pores and triangular notches in the WC surface. The oxidation of WC grains due to corrosion has been established by EDS and XRD.

  12. High Input Voltage, Silicon Carbide Power Processing Unit Performance Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozak, Karin E.; Pinero, Luis R.; Scheidegger, Robert J.; Aulisio, Michael V.; Gonzalez, Marcelo C.; Birchenough, Arthur G.

    2015-01-01

    A silicon carbide brassboard power processing unit has been developed by the NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. The power processing unit operates from two sources: a nominal 300 Volt high voltage input bus and a nominal 28 Volt low voltage input bus. The design of the power processing unit includes four low voltage, low power auxiliary supplies, and two parallel 7.5 kilowatt (kW) discharge power supplies that are capable of providing up to 15 kilowatts of total power at 300 to 500 Volts (V) to the thruster. Additionally, the unit contains a housekeeping supply, high voltage input filter, low voltage input filter, and master control board, such that the complete brassboard unit is capable of operating a 12.5 kilowatt Hall effect thruster. The performance of the unit was characterized under both ambient and thermal vacuum test conditions, and the results demonstrate exceptional performance with full power efficiencies exceeding 97%. The unit was also tested with a 12.5kW Hall effect thruster to verify compatibility and output filter specifications. With space-qualified silicon carbide or similar high voltage, high efficiency power devices, this would provide a design solution to address the need for high power electric propulsion systems.

  13. High Input Voltage, Silicon Carbide Power Processing Unit Performance Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozak, Karin E.; Pinero, Luis R.; Scheidegger, Robert J.; Aulisio, Michael V.; Gonzalez, Marcelo C.; Birchenough, Arthur G.

    2015-01-01

    A silicon carbide brassboard power processing unit has been developed by the NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. The power processing unit operates from two sources - a nominal 300-Volt high voltage input bus and a nominal 28-Volt low voltage input bus. The design of the power processing unit includes four low voltage, low power supplies that provide power to the thruster auxiliary supplies, and two parallel 7.5 kilowatt power supplies that are capable of providing up to 15 kilowatts of total power at 300-Volts to 500-Volts to the thruster discharge supply. Additionally, the unit contains a housekeeping supply, high voltage input filter, low voltage input filter, and master control board, such that the complete brassboard unit is capable of operating a 12.5 kilowatt Hall Effect Thruster. The performance of unit was characterized under both ambient and thermal vacuum test conditions, and the results demonstrate the exceptional performance with full power efficiencies exceeding 97. With a space-qualified silicon carbide or similar high voltage, high efficiency power device, this design could evolve into a flight design for future missions that require high power electric propulsion systems.

  14. Fatigue behavior of continuous fiber silicon-carbide-aluminum composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.; Wallis, R. R.

    1984-01-01

    Four lay-ups of continuous fiber silicon carbide (SCS2) fiber/aluminum matrix composites were tested to assess fatigue mechanisms including stiffness loss when cycled below their respective fatigue limits. The lay-ups were 0 (sub 8), 0(sub 2)/ + or - 45 (sub 2s), 0/90 (sub 2s),and 0/ + or 45/90 (subs). The data were compared with predictions from the author's previously published shakedown model which predicts fatigue-induced stiffness loss in metal matrix composites. A fifth lay-up, + or - 45 (sub 2s), was tested to compare shakedown and fatigue limits. The particular batch of silicon-carbide fibers tested in this program had a somewhat lower modulus (340 GPa) than expected and displayed poor bonding to the aluminum matrix. Good agreement was obtained between the stiffness loss model and the test data. The fatigue damage below the fatigue limit was primarily in the form of matrix cracking. The fatigue limit corresponded to the laminate shakedown for the + or - 45 (sub 2s) laminate.

  15. High-strength silicon carbides by hot isostatic pressing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutta, Sunil

    1989-01-01

    Silicon carbide has strong potential for heat engine hardware and other high-temperature applications because of its low density, good strength, high oxidation resistance, and good high-temperature creep resistance. Hot isostatic pressing (HIP) was used for producing alpha and beta silicon carbide (SiC) bodies with near-theoretical density, ultrafine grain size, and high strength at processing temperatures of 1900 to 2000 C. The HIPed materials exhibited ultrafine grain size. Furthermore, no phase transformation from beta to alpha was observed in HIPed beta-SiC. Both materials exhibited very high average flexural strength. It was also shown that alpha-SiC bodies without any sintering aids, when HIPed to high final density, can exhibit very high strength. Fracture toughness K (sub C) values were determined to be 3.6 to 4.0 MPa m (sup 1/2) for HIPed alpha-SiC and 3.7 to 4.1 MPa m (sup 1/2) for HIPed beta-SiC. In the HIPed specimens strength-controlling flaws were typically surface related. In spite of improvements in material properties such as strength and fracture toughness by elimination of the larger strength-limiting flaws and by grain size refinement, HIPing has no effect on the Weibull modulus.

  16. Usability of calcium carbide gas pressure method in hydrological sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsoy, S.; Ozgur, M.; Keskin, E.; Yilmaz, C.

    2013-10-01

    Soil moisture is a key engineering variable with major influence on ecological and hydrological processes as well as in climate, weather, agricultural, civil and geotechnical applications. Methods for quantification of the soil moisture are classified into three main groups: (i) measurement with remote sensing, (ii) estimation via (soil water balance) simulation models, and (iii) measurement in the field (ground based). Remote sensing and simulation modeling require rapid ground truthing with one of the ground based methods. Calcium carbide gas pressure (CCGP) method is a rapid measurement procedure for obtaining soil moisture and relies on the chemical reaction of the calcium carbide reagent with the water in soil pores. However, the method is overlooked in hydrological science applications. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to evaluate the usability of the CCGP method in comparison with standard oven-drying and dielectric methods in terms of accuracy, time efficiency, operational ease, cost effectiveness and safety for quantification of the soil moisture over a wide range of soil types. The research involved over 250 tests that were carried out on 15 different soil types. It was found that the accuracy of the method is mostly within ±1% of soil moisture deviation range in comparison to oven-drying, and that CCGP method has significant advantages over dielectric methods in terms of accuracy, cost, operational ease and time efficiency for the purpose of ground truthing.

  17. Carbide-based fuel system for undersea vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, A. Alan; Carreiro, Louis G.; Greene, Eric S.

    In underwater applications such as unmanned undersea vehicle (UUV) propulsion, mass and volume constraints often dictate system energy density and specific energy, which are targeted to exceed 300 Wh L -1 and 300 Wh kg -1, respectively, in order to compete with state-of-the-art battery technologies. To address this need, a novel carbide-based fuel system (CFS) intended for use with a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) is under development that is capable of achieving these energy metrics as well as sequestering carbon dioxide. The proposed CFS uses calcium carbide and calcium hydride that react with water to generate acetylene and hydrogen as the fuel and calcium hydroxide as a carbon dioxide scrubber. The acetylene is hydrogenated to ethane and then reformed to syngas (carbon monoxide and hydrogen) before being utilized by the SOFC. Carbon dioxide effluent from the SOFC is reacted with the calcium hydroxide to produce a storable solid, calcium carbonate, thus eliminating gas evolution from the UUV. A system configuration is proposed and discussion follows concerning energy storage metrics, operational parameters and preliminary safety analysis.

  18. Growth of chromium carbide in a hot wall DLICVD reactor.

    PubMed

    Boisselier, G; Maury, F; Schuster, F

    2011-09-01

    Chromium carbide coatings were grown at 748 K in a hot wall CVD reactor fed by sublimation of bis(benzene)chromium, BBC (MOCVD) and by direct liquid injection using a BBC/toluene solution (DLICVD). The two types of coatings exhibit an amorphous structure and the same C content (22 at.%). DLICVD permits delivering higher mass flow rate of precursors and consequently the growth rate is 3 times higher and the thickness uniformity is better than using MOCVD. Chromium metal deposition has also been investigated by DLICVD in this hot wall reactor using BBC/toluene/additive as precursor. The purpose of the additive is to block carbide formation. Two additives have been studied: (i) hexachlorobenzene (C6Cl6) and (ii) thiophenol (C6H5SH). The ratio additive/BBC required for Cr metal deposition is a few percent. In this process, C6Cl6 is not decomposed and only traces of Cl (0.4 at.%) are found in the coatings. For a ratio C6Cl6/BBC > 27% the growth of any coating is blocked. The gas phase containing C6H5SH is more reactive since the onset of deposition occurs approximately 50 K before the temperature of the chlorinated compound. Furthermore, a sulfur contamination of 3 at.% has been analyzed in the coatings revealing a partial decomposition of the additive. The results are detailed and discussed in relation with previous works. PMID:22097571

  19. Delayed failure in a shock-loaded silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Millett, J.C.F.; Bourne, N.K.; Dandekar, D.P.

    2005-06-01

    The shock response of a silicon carbide has been investigated using the methods of plate impact, and monitored using manganin stress gauges mounted so as to be responsive to lateral stress. Close to the impact face, a two-step stress response is observed, indicating the presence of delayed failure at the impact face. As the shock front moves through the target, the failure wave appears to slow, before arresting between 4 and 6 mm from the impact face. Measured shear stresses (ahead of the failure front) are in good agreement with the calculated elastic response, and with similar measurements made by both ourselves in other grades of silicon carbide and other authors. In gauge traces where the failure wave was not observed, a slight decrease in lateral stress (and thus a corresponding increase in shear strength) has been noticed. A similar response in some metals (in combination with recovery work in other ceramics) has led us to suggest that a degree of plastic deformation, in combination with a more brittle response, has occurred.

  20. Energy loss mechanics in the erosion of cemented tungsten carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Freinkel, D.M. ); Luyckx, S.B. )

    1989-05-01

    The erosion of tungsten carbide has been studied by several researchers under various conditions: the cobalt content of the cemented carbide has been varied from 4.5 to 11.3 wt % Co, the size of the WC grains varied from 0.9 to 5.1 {mu}m, the size of the erodant particles varied from 30 to 630 {mu}m, the velocity of the particles varied from 30 to 507 m/s, and particle incidence angle varied from 15{degrees} to 90{degrees}. While it is generally agreed that with increasing cobalt content and increasing particle velocity the erosion rate of WC-Co increases, there is disagreement on the effect of grain size and angle of incidence. More work was clearly required to explain this disagreement, thus the present investigation was undertaken. The present work differs from previous experimental work in that the erodant particles are 4 mm average diameter and that the present investigation does not neglect the role of plastic deformation in the erosion process and the energy lost in damage to the erodant particles. These two additional energy loss mechanisms have been found to contribute significantly to the interpretation of the present results and of the results previously reported in the literature.

  1. Replacing precious metals with carbide catalysts for hydrogenation reactions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ruijun, Hou; Chen, Jingguang G.; Chang, Kuan; Wang, Tiefeng

    2015-03-03

    Molybdenum carbide (Mo₂C and Ni/Mo₂C) catalysts were compared with Pd/SiO₂ for the hydrogenation of several diene molecules, 1,3- butadiene, 1,3- and 1,4-cyclohexadiene (CHD). Compared to Pd/SiO₂, Mo₂C showed similar hydrogenation rate for 1,3-butadiene and 1,3-CHD and even higher rate for 1,4-CHD, but with significant deactivation rate for 1,3-CHD hydrogenation. However, the hydrogenation activity of Mo₂C could be completely regenerated by H₂ treatment at 723 K for the three molecules. The Ni modified Mo₂C catalysts retained similar activity for 1,3-butadiene hydrogenation with significantly enhanced selectivity for 1-butene production. The 1-butene selectivity increased with increasing Ni loading below 15%. Among the Nimore » modified Mo₂C catalysts, 8.6%Ni/Mo₂C showed the highest selectivity to 1-butene, which was even higher selectivity than that over Pd/SiO₂. Compared to Pd/SiO₂, both Mo₂C and Ni/Mo₂C showed combined advantages in hydrogenation activity and catalyst cost reduction, demonstrating the potential to use less expensive carbide catalysts to replace precious metals for hydrogenation reactions.« less

  2. Replacing precious metals with carbide catalysts for hydrogenation reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ruijun, Hou; Chen, Jingguang G.; Chang, Kuan; Wang, Tiefeng

    2015-03-03

    Molybdenum carbide (Mo₂C and Ni/Mo₂C) catalysts were compared with Pd/SiO₂ for the hydrogenation of several diene molecules, 1,3- butadiene, 1,3- and 1,4-cyclohexadiene (CHD). Compared to Pd/SiO₂, Mo₂C showed similar hydrogenation rate for 1,3-butadiene and 1,3-CHD and even higher rate for 1,4-CHD, but with significant deactivation rate for 1,3-CHD hydrogenation. However, the hydrogenation activity of Mo₂C could be completely regenerated by H₂ treatment at 723 K for the three molecules. The Ni modified Mo₂C catalysts retained similar activity for 1,3-butadiene hydrogenation with significantly enhanced selectivity for 1-butene production. The 1-butene selectivity increased with increasing Ni loading below 15%. Among the Ni modified Mo₂C catalysts, 8.6%Ni/Mo₂C showed the highest selectivity to 1-butene, which was even higher selectivity than that over Pd/SiO₂. Compared to Pd/SiO₂, both Mo₂C and Ni/Mo₂C showed combined advantages in hydrogenation activity and catalyst cost reduction, demonstrating the potential to use less expensive carbide catalysts to replace precious metals for hydrogenation reactions.

  3. Cavity-Enhanced Measurements of Defect Spins in Silicon Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calusine, Greg; Politi, Alberto; Awschalom, David D.

    2016-07-01

    The identification of new solid-state defect-qubit candidates in widely used semiconductors has the potential to enable the use of nanofabricated devices for enhanced qubit measurement and control operations. In particular, the recent discovery of optically active spin states in silicon carbide thin films offers a scalable route for incorporating defect qubits into on-chip photonic devices. Here, we demonstrate the use of 3C silicon carbide photonic crystal cavities for enhanced excitation of color-center defect spin ensembles in order to increase measured photoluminescence signal count rates, optically detected magnetic-resonance signal intensities, and optical spin initialization rates. We observe an up to a factor of 30 increase in the photoluminescence and optically detected magnetic-resonance signals from Ky5 color centers excited by cavity-resonant excitation and increase the rate of ground-state spin initialization by approximately a factor of 2. Furthermore, we show that the 705-fold reduction in excitation mode volume and enhanced excitation and collection efficiencies provided by the structures can be used to overcome inhomogenous broadening in order to facilitate the study of defect-qubit subensemble properties. These results highlight some of the benefits that nanofabricated devices offer for engineering the local photonic environment of color-center defect qubits to enable applications in quantum information and sensing.

  4. High capacitance of coarse-grained carbide derived carbon electrodes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dyatkin, Boris; Gogotsi, Oleksiy; Malinovskiy, Bohdan; Zozulya, Yuliya; Simon, Patrice; Gogotsi, Yury

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report exceptional electrochemical properties of supercapacitor electrodes composed of large, granular carbide-derived carbon (CDC) particles. We synthesized 70–250 μm sized particles with high surface area and a narrow pore size distribution, using a titanium carbide (TiC) precursor. Electrochemical cycling of these coarse-grained powders defied conventional wisdom that a small particle size is strictly required for supercapacitor electrodes and allowed high charge storage densities, rapid transport, and good rate handling ability. Moreover, the material showcased capacitance above 100 F g-1 at sweep rates as high as 250 mV s-1 in organic electrolyte. 250–1000 micron thick dense CDC films withmore » up to 80 mg cm-2 loading showed superior areal capacitances. The material significantly outperformed its activated carbon counterpart in organic electrolytes and ionic liquids. Furthermore, large internal/external surface ratio of coarse-grained carbons allowed the resulting electrodes to maintain high electrochemical stability up to 3.1 V in ionic liquid electrolyte. In addition to presenting novel insights into the electrosorption process, these coarse-grained carbons offer a pathway to low-cost, high-performance implementation of supercapacitors in automotive and grid-storage applications.« less

  5. High capacitance of coarse-grained carbide derived carbon electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Dyatkin, Boris; Gogotsi, Oleksiy; Malinovskiy, Bohdan; Zozulya, Yuliya; Simon, Patrice; Gogotsi, Yury

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report exceptional electrochemical properties of supercapacitor electrodes composed of large, granular carbide-derived carbon (CDC) particles. We synthesized 70–250 μm sized particles with high surface area and a narrow pore size distribution, using a titanium carbide (TiC) precursor. Electrochemical cycling of these coarse-grained powders defied conventional wisdom that a small particle size is strictly required for supercapacitor electrodes and allowed high charge storage densities, rapid transport, and good rate handling ability. Moreover, the material showcased capacitance above 100 F g-1 at sweep rates as high as 250 mV s-1 in organic electrolyte. 250–1000 micron thick dense CDC films with up to 80 mg cm-2 loading showed superior areal capacitances. The material significantly outperformed its activated carbon counterpart in organic electrolytes and ionic liquids. Furthermore, large internal/external surface ratio of coarse-grained carbons allowed the resulting electrodes to maintain high electrochemical stability up to 3.1 V in ionic liquid electrolyte. In addition to presenting novel insights into the electrosorption process, these coarse-grained carbons offer a pathway to low-cost, high-performance implementation of supercapacitors in automotive and grid-storage applications.

  6. High-strength silicon carbides by hot isostatic pressing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutta, Sunil

    1988-01-01

    Silicon carbide has strong potential for heat engine hardware and other high-temperature applications because of its low density, good strength, high oxidation resistance, and good high-temperature creep resistance. Hot isostatic pressing (HIP) was used for producing alpha and beta silicon carbide (SiC) bodies with near-theoretical density, ultrafine grain size, and high strength at processing temperatures of 1900 to 2000 C. The HIPed materials exhibited ultrafine grain size. Furthermore, no phase transformation from beta to alpha was observed in HIPed beta-SiC. Both materials exhibited very high average flexural strength. It was also shown that alpha-SiC bodies without any sintering aids, when HIPed to high final density, can exhibit very high strength. Fracture toughness K (sub C) values were determined to be 3.6 to 4.0 MPa m (sup 1/2) for HIPed alpha-SiC and 3.7 to 4.1 MPa m (sup 1/2) for HIPed beta-SiC. In the HIPed specimens strength-controlling flaws were typically surface related. In spite of improvements in material properties such as strength and fracture toughness by elimination of the larger strength-limiting flaws and by grain size refinement, HIPing has no effect on the Weibull modulus.

  7. High capacitance of coarse-grained carbide derived carbon electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyatkin, Boris; Gogotsi, Oleksiy; Malinovskiy, Bohdan; Zozulya, Yuliya; Simon, Patrice; Gogotsi, Yury

    2016-02-01

    We report exceptional electrochemical properties of supercapacitor electrodes composed of large, granular carbide-derived carbon (CDC) particles. Using a titanium carbide (TiC) precursor, we synthesized 70-250 μm sized particles with high surface area and a narrow pore size distribution. Electrochemical cycling of these coarse-grained powders defied conventional wisdom that a small particle size is strictly required for supercapacitor electrodes and allowed high charge storage densities, rapid transport, and good rate handling ability. The material showcased capacitance above 100 F g-1 at sweep rates as high as 250 mV s-1 in organic electrolyte. 250-1000 micron thick dense CDC films with up to 80 mg cm-2 loading showed superior areal capacitances. The material significantly outperformed its activated carbon counterpart in organic electrolytes and ionic liquids. Furthermore, large internal/external surface ratio of coarse-grained carbons allowed the resulting electrodes to maintain high electrochemical stability up to 3.1 V in ionic liquid electrolyte. In addition to presenting novel insights into the electrosorption process, these coarse-grained carbons offer a pathway to low-cost, high-performance implementation of supercapacitors in automotive and grid-storage applications.

  8. Atom-probe analysis of cemented carbides and cermets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrén, H.-O.; Rolander, U.; Lindahl, P.

    1994-03-01

    For many years we have studied the detailed microstructure of cemented carbides (WC-Co and WC-MC-Co) and cermets (TiC-TiN-Mo 2C-Ni/Co and (Ti, W, Ta)(C, N)-(Co, Ni)), using mainly atom-probe field ion microscopy. This paper contains an overview of our experimental methods and results. All investigated materials were found to have a hard-phase skeleton with about half a monolayer of binder metal grain boundary segregation. The binder phase contained metal atoms from hard phases, which dissolve during sintering, but was almost completely free of C and N. Depleted zones existed close to hard phases due to diffusion during cooling after sintering. Cobalt binder phase contains W and Mo but little Ti, nickel binder phase Ti and Mo. The amount of Ti did not vary much with N content in the alloy, whereas the Mo content increased substantially with total N content. Carbide or carbonitride grains in materials containing more than one hard phase formed a core-rim structure. Rims precipitated epitaxially onto cores during sintering, and compositional gradients reflect the sequence of hard-phase dissolution. No diffusion of metal atoms occurred in the hard phases during sintering so the material is far from thermodynamic equilibrium. However, C and N may diffuse so that the system approaches equilibrium with respect to these elements during sintering.

  9. Development of the SOFIA silicon carbide secondary mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fruit, Michel; Antoine, Pascal; Varin, Jean-Luc; Bittner, Hermann; Erdmann, Matthias

    2003-02-01

    The SOFIA telescope is ajoint NASA-DLR project for a 2.5 m airborne Stratospheric Observatory for IR Astronomy to be flown in a specially adapted Boeing 747 SP plane, Kayser-Threde being resopinsible for the development of the Telescope Optics. The φ 352 mm Secondary Mirror is mounted ona chopping mechanism to allow avoidance of background noise during IR observations. Stiffness associated to lightness is a major demand for such a mirror to achieve high frequency chopping. This leads to select SIlicon Carbide for the mirror blank. Its development has been run by the ASTRIUM/BOOSTEC joint venture SiCSPACE, taking full benefit of the instrinsic properties of the BOOSTEC SiC-100 sintered material, associated to qualified processes specifically developed for space borne mirrors by ASTRIUM. Achieved performances include a low mass of 1.97 kg, a very high stiffness with a first resonant frequency of 1865 Hz and a measured optical surface accuracy of 39 nm rms, using Ion Beam Figuring. It is proposed here to present the major design features of the SOFIA Secondary Mirror, highlighting the main advantages of using Silicon Carbide, the main steps of its development and the achieved optomechanical performances of the developed mirror.

  10. Cobalt exposure in a carbide tip grinding process.

    PubMed

    Stebbins, A I; Horstman, S W; Daniell, W E; Atallah, R

    1992-03-01

    Reports relating hard metal disease or nonspecific respiratory symptoms to tungsten or cobalt exposure have been published in the past 20 yr. This report discusses a work site investigation of a small company, employing approximately 50 workers, producing carbide tip saw blades for the woodworking industry. Cobalt exposure was characterized by ambient air monitoring (area and personnel), particle size determination, and biological monitoring. Area sampling for cadmium, cobalt, and tungsten indicated low ambient air levels in all manufacturing areas except the grinding department, which had cobalt air levels approaching the threshold limit value of 0.05 mg/m3. Area airborne cobalt exposure levels measured over six shifts in the grinding department ranged from 0.017 to 0.12 mg/m3 for the total collection method and 0.002 to 0.028 mg/m3 for the method collecting respirable particles. Cobalt content in the total and respirable fractions was similar. Urine monitoring indicated production workers have elevated cobalt levels, and the grinders' levels were higher than other production workers. The grinding coolant was found to have elevated cobalt concentrations. A survey of coolants from nine carbide grinding shops indicated the elevated cobalt concentrations may be common.

  11. Carbide and carbonitride surface treatment method for refractory metals

    DOEpatents

    Meyer, Glenn A.; Schildbach, Marcus A.

    1996-01-01

    A carbide and carbonitride surface treatment method for refractory metals is provided, in steps including, heating a part formed of boron, chromium, hafnium, molybdenum, niobium, tantalum, titanium, tungsten or zirconium, or alloys thereof, in an evacuated chamber and then introducing reaction gases including nitrogen and hydrogen, either in elemental or water vapor form, which react with a source of elemental carbon to form carbon-containing gaseous reactants which then react with the metal part to form the desired surface layer. Apparatus for practicing the method is also provided, in the form of a carbide and carbonitride surface treatment system (10) including a reaction chamber (14), a source of elemental carbon (17), a heating subassembly (20) and a source of reaction gases (23). Alternative methods of providing the elemental carbon (17) and the reaction gases (23) are provided, as well as methods of supporting the metal part (12), evacuating the chamber (14) with a vacuum subassembly (18) and heating all of the components to the desired temperature.

  12. Microwave processing of silicon carbide. CRADA final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kimrey, H.D.; Kiggans, J.O.; Ness, E.A.; Rafaniello, W.

    1998-02-01

    A Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (LMES) and Dow Chemical Company was initiated on May 3, 1993. (Lockheed Martin Energy Research Inc. (LMER) replaced LMES). The completion date for the Agreement was December 1996. The purpose of this project is to develop microwave processing techniques to produce superior silicon carbide. Sintered silicon carbide is an attractive material for use in high-stress, high-temperature, high-wear, or highly corrosive applications. However, use in these applications has been hampered by a lack of consistency in strength, density, and other physical properties. It is proposed that the enhanced sintering that has been achieved using microwaves in oxide and halide systems be applied to the sintering of these materials to produce a more highly controlled density and microstructure. This will, in turn, increase the strength and Weibull modulus of the sintered body. The use of microwave energy to anneal for a moderate temperature (1,400--1,600 C) anneal in a high vacuum (< 10{sup {minus}4} Torr) results in an improvement in the sintered density and density distribution. These changes in turn result in improved properties of the sintered compacts. Further, scale up of the process has resulted in the routine production of 3 kg components in excess of 4 cm in thickness.

  13. Hydrogen adsorption in metal-decorated silicon carbide nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ram Sevak; Solanki, Ankit

    2016-09-01

    Hydrogen storage for fuel cell is an active area of research and appropriate materials with excellent hydrogen adsorption properties are highly demanded. Nanotubes, having high surface to volume ratio, are promising storage materials for hydrogen. Recently, silicon carbide nanotubes have been predicted as potential materials for future hydrogen storage application, and studies in this area are ongoing. Here, we report a systematic study on hydrogen adsorption properties in metal (Pt, Ni and Al) decorated silicon carbide nanotubes (SiCNTs) using first principles calculations based on density functional theory. The hydrogen adsorption properties are investigated by calculations of adsorption energy, electronic band structure, density of states (DOS) and Mulliken charge population analysis. Our findings show that hydrogen adsorptions on Pt, Ni and Al-decorated SiCNTs undergo spontaneous exothermic reactions with significant modulation of electronic structure of SiCNTs in all cases. Importantly, according to the Mulliken charge population analysis, dipole-dipole interaction causes chemisorptions of hydrogen in Pt, Ni and Al decorated SiCNTs with formation of chemical bonds. The study is a platform for the development of metal decorated SiCNTs for hydrogen adsorption or hydrogen storage application.

  14. Oxidation Behavior of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Silicon Carbide Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valentin, Victor M.

    1995-01-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced Silicon Carbide (C-SiC) composites offer high strength at high temperatures and good oxidation resistance. However, these composites present some matrix microcracks which allow the path of oxygen to the fiber. The aim of this research was to study the effectiveness of a new Silicon Carbide (SiC) coating developed by DUPONT-LANXIDE to enhance the oxidation resistance of C-SiC composites. A thermogravimetric analysis was used to determine the oxidation rate of the samples at different temperatures and pressures. The Dupont coat proved to be a good protection for the SiC matrix at temperatures lower than 1240 C at low and high pressures. On the other hand, at temperatures above 1340 C the Dupont coat did not seem to give good protection to the composite fiber and matrix. Even though some results of the tests have been discussed, because of time restraints, only a small portion of the desired tests could be completed. Therefore, no major conclusions or results about the effectiveness of the coat are available at this time.

  15. Two-Dimensional, Ordered, Double Transition Metals Carbides (MXenes).

    PubMed

    Anasori, Babak; Xie, Yu; Beidaghi, Majid; Lu, Jun; Hosler, Brian C; Hultman, Lars; Kent, Paul R C; Gogotsi, Yury; Barsoum, Michel W

    2015-10-27

    The higher the chemical diversity and structural complexity of two-dimensional (2D) materials, the higher the likelihood they possess unique and useful properties. Herein, density functional theory (DFT) is used to predict the existence of two new families of 2D ordered, carbides (MXenes), M'2M″C2 and M'2M″2C3, where M' and M″ are two different early transition metals. In these solids, M' layers sandwich M″ carbide layers. By synthesizing Mo2TiC2Tx, Mo2Ti2C3Tx, and Cr2TiC2Tx (where T is a surface termination), we validated the DFT predictions. Since the Mo and Cr atoms are on the outside, they control the 2D flakes' chemical and electrochemical properties. The latter was proven by showing quite different electrochemical behavior of Mo2TiC2Tx and Ti3C2Tx. This work further expands the family of 2D materials, offering additional choices of structures, chemistries, and ultimately useful properties.

  16. Genesis Silicon Carbide Concentrator Target 60003 Preliminary Ellipsometry Mapping Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calaway, M. J.; Rodriquez, M. C.; Stansbery, E. K.

    2007-01-01

    The Genesis concentrator was custom designed to focus solar wind ions primarily for terrestrial isotopic analysis of O-17/O-16 and O-18/O-16 to +/-1%, N-15/N-14 to +/-1%, and secondarily to conduct elemental and isotopic analysis of Li, Be, and B. The circular 6.2 cm diameter concentrator target holder was comprised of four quadrants of highly pure semiconductor materials that included one amorphous diamond-like carbon, one C-13 diamond, and two silicon carbide (SiC). The amorphous diamond-like carbon quadrant was fractured upon impact at Utah Test and Training Range (UTTR), but the remaining three quadrants survived fully intact and all four quadrants hold an important collection of solar wind. The quadrants were removed from the target holder at NASA Johnso n Space Center Genesis Curation Laboratory in April 2005, and have been housed in stainless steel containers under continual nitrogen purge since time of disintegration. In preparation for allocation of a silicon carbide target for oxygen isotope analyses at UCLA, the two SiC targets were photographed for preliminary inspection of macro particle contamination from the hard non-nominal landing as well as characterized by spectroscopic ellipsometry to evaluate thin film contamination. This report is focused on Genesis SiC target sample number 60003.

  17. Thermal conductivity and emissivity measurements of uranium carbides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corradetti, S.; Manzolaro, M.; Andrighetto, A.; Zanonato, P.; Tusseau-Nenez, S.

    2015-10-01

    Thermal conductivity and emissivity measurements on different types of uranium carbide are presented, in the context of the ActiLab Work Package in ENSAR, a project within the 7th Framework Program of the European Commission. Two specific techniques were used to carry out the measurements, both taking place in a laboratory dedicated to the research and development of materials for the SPES (Selective Production of Exotic Species) target. In the case of thermal conductivity, estimation of the dependence of this property on temperature was obtained using the inverse parameter estimation method, taking as a reference temperature and emissivity measurements. Emissivity at different temperatures was obtained for several types of uranium carbide using a dual frequency infrared pyrometer. Differences between the analyzed materials are discussed according to their compositional and microstructural properties. The obtainment of this type of information can help to carefully design materials to be capable of working under extreme conditions in next-generation ISOL (Isotope Separation On-Line) facilities for the generation of radioactive ion beams.

  18. Demonstration of Minimally Machined Honeycomb Silicon Carbide Mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, William

    2012-01-01

    Honeycomb silicon carbide composite mirrors are made from a carbon fiber preform that is molded into a honeycomb shape using a rigid mold. The carbon fiber honeycomb is densified by using polymer infiltration pyrolysis, or through a reaction with liquid silicon. A chemical vapor deposit, or chemical vapor composite (CVC), process is used to deposit a polishable silicon or silicon carbide cladding on the honeycomb structure. Alternatively, the cladding may be replaced by a freestanding, replicated CVC SiC facesheet that is bonded to the honeycomb. The resulting carbon fiber-reinforced silicon carbide honeycomb structure is a ceramic matrix composite material with high stiffness and mechanical strength, high thermal conductivity, and low CTE (coefficient of thermal expansion). This innovation enables rapid, inexpensive manufacturing. The web thickness of the new material is less than 1 millimeter, and core geometries tailored. These parameters are based on precursor carbon-carbon honeycomb material made and patented by Ultracor. It is estimated at the time of this reporting that the HoneySiC(Trademark) will have a net production cost on the order of $38,000 per square meter. This includes an Ultracor raw material cost of about $97,000 per square meter, and a Trex silicon carbide deposition cost of $27,000 per square meter. Even at double this price, HoneySiC would beat NASA's goal of $100,000 per square meter. Cost savings are estimated to be 40 to 100 times that of current mirror technologies. The organic, rich prepreg material has a density of 56 kilograms per cubic meter. A charred carbon-carbon panel (volatile organics burnt off) has a density of 270 kilograms per cubic meter. Therefore, it is estimated that a HoneySiC panel would have a density of no more than 900 kilograms per cubic meter, which is about half that of beryllium and about onethird the density of bulk silicon carbide. It is also estimated that larger mirrors could be produced in a matter of weeks

  19. Semiconducting boron carbides with better charge extraction through the addition of pyridine moieties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echeverria, Elena; Dong, Bin; Peterson, George; Silva, Joseph P.; Wilson, Ethiyal R.; Sky Driver, M.; Jun, Young-Si; Stucky, Galen D.; Knight, Sean; Hofmann, Tino; Han, Zhong-Kang; Shao, Nan; Gao, Yi; Mei, Wai-Ning; Nastasi, Michael; Dowben, Peter A.; Kelber, Jeffry A.

    2016-09-01

    The plasma-enhanced chemical vapor (PECVD) co-deposition of pyridine and 1,2 dicarbadodecaborane, 1,2-B10C2H12 (orthocarborane) results in semiconducting boron carbide composite films with a significantly better charge extraction than plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited semiconducting boron carbide synthesized from orthocarborane alone. The PECVD pyridine/orthocarborane based semiconducting boron carbide composites, with pyridine/orthocarborane ratios ~3:1 or 9:1 exhibit indirect band gaps of 1.8 eV or 1.6 eV, respectively. These energies are less than the corresponding exciton energies of 2.0 eV–2.1 eV. The capacitance/voltage and current/voltage measurements indicate the hole carrier lifetimes for PECVD pyridine/orthocarborane based semiconducting boron carbide composites (3:1) films of ~350 µs compared to values of  ⩽35 µs for the PECVD semiconducting boron carbide films fabricated without pyridine. The hole carrier lifetime values are significantly longer than the initial exciton decay times in the region of ~0.05 ns and 0.27 ns for PECVD semiconducting boron carbide films with and without pyridine, respectively, as suggested by the time-resolved photoluminescence. These data indicate enhanced electron–hole separation and charge carrier lifetimes in PECVD pyridine/orthocarborane based semiconducting boron carbide and are consistent with the results of zero bias neutron voltaic measurements indicating significantly enhanced charge collection efficiency.

  20. Semiconducting boron carbides with better charge extraction through the addition of pyridine moieties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echeverria, Elena; Dong, Bin; Peterson, George; Silva, Joseph P.; Wilson, Ethiyal R.; Sky Driver, M.; Jun, Young-Si; Stucky, Galen D.; Knight, Sean; Hofmann, Tino; Han, Zhong-Kang; Shao, Nan; Gao, Yi; Mei, Wai-Ning; Nastasi, Michael; Dowben, Peter A.; Kelber, Jeffry A.

    2016-09-01

    The plasma-enhanced chemical vapor (PECVD) co-deposition of pyridine and 1,2 dicarbadodecaborane, 1,2-B10C2H12 (orthocarborane) results in semiconducting boron carbide composite films with a significantly better charge extraction than plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited semiconducting boron carbide synthesized from orthocarborane alone. The PECVD pyridine/orthocarborane based semiconducting boron carbide composites, with pyridine/orthocarborane ratios ~3:1 or 9:1 exhibit indirect band gaps of 1.8 eV or 1.6 eV, respectively. These energies are less than the corresponding exciton energies of 2.0 eV-2.1 eV. The capacitance/voltage and current/voltage measurements indicate the hole carrier lifetimes for PECVD pyridine/orthocarborane based semiconducting boron carbide composites (3:1) films of ~350 µs compared to values of  ⩽35 µs for the PECVD semiconducting boron carbide films fabricated without pyridine. The hole carrier lifetime values are significantly longer than the initial exciton decay times in the region of ~0.05 ns and 0.27 ns for PECVD semiconducting boron carbide films with and without pyridine, respectively, as suggested by the time-resolved photoluminescence. These data indicate enhanced electron-hole separation and charge carrier lifetimes in PECVD pyridine/orthocarborane based semiconducting boron carbide and are consistent with the results of zero bias neutron voltaic measurements indicating significantly enhanced charge collection efficiency.

  1. Transitions in carbide morphology in a ternary Fe-C-W steel

    SciTech Connect

    Hackenberg, R.E.; Shiflet, G.J.

    1998-08-01

    A ternary steel of composition Fe-0.20C-6.3W (wt pct) was examined with the purpose of characterizing the carbide morphologies that arise during the diffusional decomposition of austenite. Interphase precipitation of M{sub 6}C with ferrite in the 700 C to 800 C temperature range was observed, as previously reported. At higher temperatures (800 C to 920 C), precipitation of M{sub 6}C in austenite in a nodular fashion was also observed, never before seen in this alloy. The carbides inside such nodules exhibited a highly degenerate, quasilamellar morphology, and the evidence suggested a discontinuous precipitation mechanism. Comparison with a calculated phase diagram showed that this quasilamellar carbide precipitation reaction dominated both in the stable and metastable ferrite + austenite + carbide three-phase field, since full equilibrium, for a variety of reasons, is not obtained at the short reaction times over which this kinetically competitive reaction dominates the microstructural evolution. The formation of carbide-free ferrite preceding the onset of carbide precipitation (found in both cases) is seen to be instrumental in the occurrence of the quasilamellar carbide precipitation reaction, and a simple diffusion model is advanced in support of this view. Finally, the austenite inside these nodules was seen to revert to ferrite at long times, indicating that full equilibrium is not attained at the initial stages of austenite decomposition, in accord with expectation.

  2. XPS, AES and friction studies of single-crystal silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1982-01-01

    The surface chemistry and friction behavior of a single crystal silicon carbide surface parallel to the 0001 plane in sliding contact with iron at various temperatures to 1500 C in a vacuum of 3 x 10 nPa are investigated using X-ray photoelectron and Auger electron spectroscopy. Results show that graphite and carbide-type carbon are seen primarily on the silicon carbide surface in addition to silicon at temperatures to 800 C by both types of spectroscopy. The coefficients of friction for iron sliding against a silicon carbide surface parallel to the 0001 plane surface are found to be high at temperatures up to 800 C, with the silicon and carbide-type carbon at maximum intensity in the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy at 800 C. The concentration of the graphite increases rapidly on the surface as the temperature is increased above 800 C, while the concentrations of the carbide-type carbon and silicon decrease rapidly and this presence of graphite is accompanied by a significant decrease in friction. Preheating the surfaces to 1500 C also gives dramatically lower coefficients of friction when reheating in the sliding temperature range of from room temperature to 1200 C, with this reduction in friction due to the graphite layer on the silicon carbide surface.

  3. SOLID SOLUTION CARBIDES ARE THE KEY FUELS FOR FUTURE NUCLEAR THERMAL PROPULSION

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panda, Binayak; Hickman, Robert R.; Shah, Sandeep

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear thermal propulsion uses nuclear energy to directly heat a propellant (such as liquid hydrogen) to generate thrust for space transportation. In the 1960 s, the early Rover/Nuclear Engine for Rocket Propulsion Application (NERVA) program showed very encouraging test results for space nuclear propulsion but, in recent years, fuel research has been dismal. With NASA s renewed interest in long-term space exploration, fuel researchers are now revisiting the RoverMERVA findings, which indicated several problems with such fuels (such as erosion, chemical reaction of the fuel with propellant, fuel cracking, and cladding issues) that must be addressed. It is also well known that the higher the temperature reached by a propellant, the larger the thrust generated from the same weight of propellant. Better use of fuel and propellant requires development of fuels capable of reaching very high temperatures. Carbides have the highest melting points of any known material. Efforts are underway to develop carbide mixtures and solid solutions that contain uranium carbide, in order to achieve very high fuel temperatures. Binary solid solution carbides (U, Zr)C have proven to be very effective in this regard. Ternary carbides such as (U, Zr, X) carbides (where X represents Nb, Ta, W, and Hf) also hold great promise as fuel material, since the carbide mixtures in solid solution generate a very hard and tough compact material. This paper highlights past experience with early fuel materials and bi-carbides, technical problems associated with consolidation of the ingredients, and current techniques being developed to consolidate ternary carbides as fuel materials.

  4. Characterization of M23C6 Carbides Precipitating at Grain Boundaries in 100Mn13 Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhenfeng; Ding, Zhimin; Dong, Linnan; Liang, Bo

    2016-10-01

    Characteristics of the formation, the interfacial structure, and the defects of M23C6 carbides in 100Mn13 steel after 1323 K (1050 °C) solution treatment and subsequent aging treatment were investigated by transmission electron microscope (TEM). The results show that M23C6 carbides precipitated on both sides of the grain boundaries. Each M23C6 carbide particle possesses a coherent interface and the cube-cube orientation relationship with the one austenite grain which M23C6 precipitated from. The orientation relationships between the M23C6 carbides and the austenite matrix were determined as follows: (1) [211]γ allel [211]M23C6, ( 1bar{1}bar{1} )γ allel ( 1bar{1}bar{1} )M23C6, (02 bar{2} )γ allel (02 bar{2} )M23C6, (2) [110]γ allel [110]M23C6, ( bar{1}1bar{1} )γ allel ( bar{1}1bar{1} )M23C6, ( bar{1} 11)γ allel ( bar{1} 11)M23C6. The M23C6 carbide also possesses an incoherent interface with the other austenite grain which the M23C6 carbide grew into by ledge mechanism. The precipitation of the M23C6 carbides along the boundaries can improve the hardness of the high-manganese steel to some extent. Besides, twinning and stacking faults were observed in M23C6 carbides. The reports about twinning and stacking faults in the M23C6 carbides have not been found.

  5. Fabrication and characterization of carbon and boron carbide nanostructured materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynaud, Sara

    Carbon is present in nature in a variety of allotropes and chemical compounds. Due to reduced dimensionality, nanostructured carbon materials, i.e. single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), are characterized by unique physical and chemical properties. There is a potential for SWNTs use as biological probes and assists for tunable tissue growth in biomedical applications. However, the presumed cytotoxicity of SWNTs requires investigation of the risks of their incorporation into living systems. Boron is not found in nature in elementary form. Boron based materials are chemically complex and exist in various polymorphic forms, i.e. boron carbide (BC). Because BC is a lightweight material with exceptional mechanical and elastic properties, it is the ideal candidate for armor and ballistic applications. However, practical use of BC as armor material is limited because of its anomalous glass-like behaviour at high velocity impacts, which has been linked to stress-induced structural instability in one of BC polymorphs, B12(CCC). Theoretical calculations suggest that formation of B12(CCC) in BC could be suppressed by silicon doping. In the first part of this thesis, biocompatibility of SWNTs is investigated. It is shown that under normal cell implantation conditions, the electrical conductivity of the SWNTs decreases due to an increase in structural disorder. This research suggests that SWNTs can be functionalized by protein and biological cells reducing the risk of cytotoxicity. In the second part of this thesis, boron carbide nanostructured materials are synthesized and investigated. Radio frequency sputtering deposition technique is employed for fabrication of BC (Si free) and BC:Si thin films. Variation of plasma conditions and temperature are found to affect chemical composition, adhesion to the substrate and morphology of the films. It is shown that BC films are predominantly amorphous and a small addition of Si largely improves their mechanical properties. In addition

  6. Rapid Fabrication of Carbide Matrix/Carbon Fiber Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Brian E.; Bernander, Robert E.

    2007-01-01

    Composites of zirconium carbide matrix material reinforced with carbon fibers can be fabricated relatively rapidly in a process that includes a melt infiltration step. Heretofore, these and other ceramic matrix composites have been made in a chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) process that takes months. The finished products of the CVI process are highly porous and cannot withstand temperatures above 3,000 F (approx.1,600 C). In contrast, the melt-infiltration-based process takes only a few days, and the composite products are more nearly fully dense and have withstood temperatures as high as 4,350 F (approx.2,400 C) in a highly oxidizing thrust chamber environment. Moreover, because the melt- infiltration-based process takes much less time, the finished products are expected to cost much less. Fabrication begins with the preparation of a carbon fiber preform that, typically, is of the size and shape of a part to be fabricated. By use of low-temperature ultraviolet-enhanced chemical vapor deposition, the carbon fibers in the preform are coated with one or more interfacial material(s), which could include oxides. The interfacial material helps to protect the fibers against chemical attack during the remainder of the fabrication process and against oxidation during subsequent use; it also enables slippage between the fibers and the matrix material, thereby helping to deflect cracks and distribute loads. Once the fibers have been coated with the interfacial material, the fiber preform is further infiltrated with a controlled amount of additional carbon, which serves as a reactant for the formation of the carbide matrix material. The next step is melt infiltration. The preform is exposed to molten zirconium, which wicks into the preform, drawn by capillary action. The molten metal fills most of the interstices of the preform and reacts with the added carbon to form the zirconium carbide matrix material. The zirconium does not react with the underlying fibers because they

  7. Method for silicon carbide production by reacting silica with hydrocarbon gas

    DOEpatents

    Glatzmaier, Gregory C.

    1994-01-01

    A method is described for producing silicon carbide particles using a silicon source material and a hydrocarbon. The method is efficient and is characterized by high yield. Finely divided silicon source material is contacted with hydrocarbon at a temperature of 400.degree. C. to 1000.degree. C. where the hydrocarbon pyrolyzes and coats the particles with carbon. The particles are then heated to 1100.degree. C. to 1600.degree. C. to cause a reaction between the ingredients to form silicon carbide of very small particle size. No grinding of silicon carbide is required to obtain small particles. The method may be carried out as a batch process or as a continuous process.

  8. Method for silicon carbide production by reacting silica with hydrocarbon gas

    DOEpatents

    Glatzmaier, G.C.

    1994-06-28

    A method is described for producing silicon carbide particles using a silicon source material and a hydrocarbon. The method is efficient and is characterized by high yield. Finely divided silicon source material is contacted with hydrocarbon at a temperature of 400 C to 1000 C where the hydrocarbon pyrolyzes and coats the particles with carbon. The particles are then heated to 1100 C to 1600 C to cause a reaction between the ingredients to form silicon carbide of very small particle size. No grinding of silicon carbide is required to obtain small particles. The method may be carried out as a batch process or as a continuous process. 5 figures.

  9. SANS and TEM studies of carbide precipitation and creep damage in type 304 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, M.H.; Ogle, J.C.; Schneibel, J.H.; Swindeman, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies were performed to characterize the carbide (M/sub 23/C/sub 6/) precipitation and creep damage induced in type 304 stainless steel in the primary creep stage. The size distribution of matrix carbides evaluated from SANS analyses was consistent with TEM data, and the expected accelerated kinetics of precipitation under applied stress was confirmed. Additional SANS measurements after the postcreep solution annealing were made in order to differentiate cavities from the carbides. Potential advantages and difficulties associated with characterization of creep-induced cavitation by the SANS techniques are discussed.

  10. Role of silicon dangling bonds in the electronic properties of epitaxial graphene on silicon carbide.

    PubMed

    Ridene, Mohamed; Kha, Calvin S; Flipse, Cees F J

    2016-03-29

    In this paper, we study the electronic properties of epitaxial graphene (EG) on silicon carbide by means of ab initio calculations based on the local spin density approximation + U method taking into account the Coulomb interaction between Si localized electrons. We show that this interaction is not completely suppressed but is screened by carbon layers grown on-top of silicon carbide. This finding leads to a good qualitative understanding of the experimental results reported on EG on silicon carbide. Our results highlight the presence of the Si localized states and might explain the anomalous Hanle curve and the high values of spin relaxation time in EG.

  11. Affordable Fabrication and Properties of Silicon Carbide-Based Interpenetrating Phase Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Mrityunjay

    1998-01-01

    An affordable processing technique for the fabrication of silicon carbide-based interpenetrating phase composites (IPCs) is presented. This process consists of the production of microporous carbon preforms and subsequent infiltration with liquid silicon or silicon-refractory metal alloys. The microporous preforms are made by the pyrolysis of a polymerized resin mixture for which methods to control pore volume and pore size have been established. The process gives good control of microstructure and morphology of silicon carbide-based composite materials. Room and high temperature mechanical properties (flexural strength, compressive strength, and flexural creep) of low and high silicon-silicon carbide composites will be discussed.

  12. Synthesis and characterization of transition metal carbides and their catalytic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Cheng

    Transition metal (both monometallic and bimetallic) carbides have been synthesized by an amine-metal oxide composite (AMOC) method. The composite reduces the diffusion distances among each element and allows the formation of carbides to take place as low as 610°C, which is significantly lower than traditional carbide synthesis methods (above 1500°C). Additionally, amines act not only as carbon sources and reducing agents, but also morphological templates which helps to make uniform transition metal carbide (TMC) nanocrystals with various shapes. Beyond morphology control, AMOC method can also help to synthesize multiple phases of monometallic carbides, which includes four phases of molybdenum carbides (alpha-MoC1-x, beta-Mo2C, eta-MoC, and gamma-MoC), two phases of tungsten carbides (W2C and WC), and three phases of chromium carbides (Cr3C2-x, Cr7C3, and Cr3C2). Molybdenum carbide has been proposed as a possible alternative to platinum for catalyzing the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). Previous studies were limited to only one phase, which is beta-Mo2C with an Fe 2N structure. Here, four molybdenum carbide materials including gamma-MoC with a WC type structure which was stabilized for the first time as a phase pure nanomaterial. Moreover, a wide range of magnetic iron-doped molybdenum carbide (Mo2-xFexC) nanomaterials were also synthesized, which exhibits a better HER activity to non-doped beta-Mo2C. A group of (CrxFe1-x)7C3 (0.2< x<1) solid solutions have also been synthesized for the first time as nanomaterials via AMOC method, which demonstrate excellent catalytic activities for both oxygen evolution reaction (OER) and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Other carbides/nitrides made from AMOCs include WN1-x, Fe3C, Fe3-xN, Fe3Mo3C, N 2Mo3C, Ni3Mo3C, Ni6Mo 6C, and Mo0.5W0.5C.

  13. Role of silicon dangling bonds in the electronic properties of epitaxial graphene on silicon carbide.

    PubMed

    Ridene, Mohamed; Kha, Calvin S; Flipse, Cees F J

    2016-03-29

    In this paper, we study the electronic properties of epitaxial graphene (EG) on silicon carbide by means of ab initio calculations based on the local spin density approximation + U method taking into account the Coulomb interaction between Si localized electrons. We show that this interaction is not completely suppressed but is screened by carbon layers grown on-top of silicon carbide. This finding leads to a good qualitative understanding of the experimental results reported on EG on silicon carbide. Our results highlight the presence of the Si localized states and might explain the anomalous Hanle curve and the high values of spin relaxation time in EG. PMID:26891244

  14. Vibrational frequencies associated with the carbide ligand in iron butterfly clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Stanghellini, P.L.; Sailor, M.J.; Kuznesof, P.; Whitmire, K.H.; Hriljac, J.A.; Kolis, J.W.; Zheng, Y.; Shriver, D.F.

    1987-09-09

    The vibrational frequencies associated with the exposed carbon atom in several tetranuclear iron carbide clusters with a butterfly arrangement of atoms were investigated by infrared and Raman spectroscopy. Vibrational assignments were confirmed in most cases by /sup 13/C labeling of the carbide carbon atom. The characteristic feature of the iron butterfly carbides is a readily observed band in the infrared spectrum around 900 cm/sup -1/. An approximate normal-coordinate analysis on these molecules yields values of the metal-carbon force constant of about 250 N m/sup -1/. 29 references, 6 figures, 5 tables.

  15. Priority compositions of boron carbide crystals obtained by self-propagating high-temperature synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomarev, V. I.; Konovalikhin, S. V.; Kovalev, I. D.; Vershinnikov, V. I.

    2015-09-01

    Splitting of reflections from boron carbide has been found for the first time by an X-ray diffraction study of polycrystalline mixture of boron carbide В15- х С х , (1.5 ≤ x ≤ 3) and its magnesium derivative C4B25Mg1.42. An analysis of reflection profiles shows that this splitting is due to the presence of boron carbide phases of different compositions in the sample, which are formed during crystal growth. The composition changes from В12.9С2.1 to В12.4С2.6.

  16. Structural and phase changes in carbides of the high-speed steel upon heat treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaus, A. S.

    2016-07-01

    The effect of austenitizing temperature on structural and phase changes in carbides of the tungsten-molybdenum high-speed steel has been studied. The results of metallographic analysis and energy dispersive microanalysis have been discussed. It has been shown that an increase in austenitizing temperature from 1180 to 1260°C causes structural transformations in carbide particles of eutectic origin crushed upon hot plastic deformation, which are related to their dissolution and coalescence, and changes in the phase composition of the carbides themselves.

  17. Development of Processing Windows for HVOF Carbide-Based Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ang, Andrew Siao Ming; Howse, Hugo; Wade, Scott A.; Berndt, Christopher C.

    2016-01-01

    Optimized processing windows for spraying high-quality metal carbide-based coatings are developed using particle diagnostic technology. The cermet coatings were produced via the high-velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) spray process and are proposed for service applications such as marine hydraulics. The traditional "trial and error" method for developing coating process parameters is not technically robust, as well as being costly and time consuming. Instead, this contribution investigated the use of real-time monitoring of parameters associated with the HVOF flame jets and particles using in-flight particle diagnostics. Subsequently, coatings can be produced with knowledge concerning the molten particle size, temperature, and velocity profile. The analytical results allow identification of optimized coating process windows, which translate to coatings of lower porosity and improved mechanical performance.

  18. Surface wave accelerator based on silicon carbide: theoretical study

    SciTech Connect

    Kalmykov, S.; Korobkin, D.; Neuner, B.; Shvets, G.

    2009-01-22

    Compact near-field solid-state accelerating structure powered by a carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) laser is considered. The accelerating luminous transverse magnetic mode is excited in a few-micron wide evacuated planar channel between two silicon carbide (SiC) films grown on silicon (Si) wafers. Laser coupling to this mode is accomplished through the properly designed Si gratings. Operating wavelength is dictated by the frequency-dependent dielectric permittivity of SiC and the channel width. The geometric loss factor {kappa} of the accelerating mode is computed. It is found that the unwanted excitation of the guided modes in Si wafers reduces the laser coupling efficiency and increases the fields inside the Si wafer.

  19. Monolithic carbide-derived carbon films for micro-supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Chmiola, John; Largeot, Celine; Taberna, Pierre-Louis; Simon, Patrice; Gogotsi, Yury

    2010-04-23

    Microbatteries with dimensions of tens to hundreds of micrometers that are produced by common microfabrication techniques are poised to provide integration of power sources onto electronic devices, but they still suffer from poor cycle lifetime, as well as power and temperature range of operation issues that are alleviated with the use of supercapacitors. There have been a few reports on thin-film and other micro-supercapacitors, but they are either too thin to provide sufficient energy or the technology is not scalable. By etching supercapacitor electrodes into conductive titanium carbide substrates, we demonstrate that monolithic carbon films lead to a volumetric capacity exceeding that of micro- and macroscale supercapacitors reported thus far, by a factor of 2. This study also provides the framework for integration of high-performance micro-supercapacitors onto a variety of devices.

  20. Optical thermometry based on level anticrossing in silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anisimov, A. N.; Simin, D.; Soltamov, V. A.; Lebedev, S. P.; Baranov, P. G.; Astakhov, G. V.; Dyakonov, V.

    2016-09-01

    We report a giant thermal shift of 2.1 MHz/K related to the excited-state zero-field splitting in the silicon vacancy centers in 4H silicon carbide. It is obtained from the indirect observation of the optically detected magnetic resonance in the excited state using the ground state as an ancilla. Alternatively, relative variations of the zero-field splitting for small temperature differences can be detected without application of radiofrequency fields, by simply monitoring the photoluminescence intensity in the vicinity of the level anticrossing. This effect results in an all-optical thermometry technique with temperature sensitivity of 100 mK/Hz1/2 for a detection volume of approximately 10‑6 mm3. In contrast, the zero-field splitting in the ground state does not reveal detectable temperature shift. Using these properties, an integrated magnetic field and temperature sensor can be implemented on the same center.

  1. High surface area silicon carbide-coated carbon aerogel

    DOEpatents

    Worsley, Marcus A; Kuntz, Joshua D; Baumann, Theodore F; Satcher, Jr, Joe H

    2014-01-14

    A metal oxide-carbon composite includes a carbon aerogel with an oxide overcoat. The metal oxide-carbon composite is made by providing a carbon aerogel, immersing the carbon aerogel in a metal oxide sol under a vacuum, raising the carbon aerogel with the metal oxide sol to atmospheric pressure, curing the carbon aerogel with the metal oxide sol at room temperature, and drying the carbon aerogel with the metal oxide sol to produce the metal oxide-carbon composite. The step of providing a carbon aerogel can provide an activated carbon aerogel or provide a carbon aerogel with carbon nanotubes that make the carbon aerogel mechanically robust. Carbon aerogels can be coated with sol-gel silica and the silica can be converted to silicone carbide, improved the thermal stability of the carbon aerogel.

  2. Optical limiting effects in nanostructured silicon carbide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Borshch, A A; Starkov, V N; Volkov, V I; Rudenko, V I; Boyarchuk, A Yu; Semenov, A V

    2013-12-31

    We present the results of experiments on the interaction of nanosecond laser radiation at 532 and 1064 nm with nanostructured silicon carbide thin films of different polytypes. We have found the effect of optical intensity limiting at both wavelengths. The intensity of optical limiting at λ = 532 nm (I{sub cl} ∼ 10{sup 6} W cm{sup -2}) is shown to be an order of magnitude less than that at λ = 1064 nm (I{sub cl} ∼ 10{sup 7} W cm{sup -2}). We discuss the nature of the nonlinearity, leading to the optical limiting effect. We have proposed a method for determining the amount of linear and two-photon absorption in material media. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  3. Anisotropic electronic conduction in stacked two-dimensional titanium carbide.

    PubMed

    Hu, Tao; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Jiemin; Li, Zhaojin; Hu, Minmin; Tan, Jun; Hou, Pengxiang; Li, Feng; Wang, Xiaohui

    2015-11-09

    Stacked two-dimensional titanium carbide is an emerging conductive material for electrochemical energy storage which requires an understanding of the intrinsic electronic conduction. Here we report the electronic conduction properties of stacked Ti3C2T2 (T = OH, O, F) with two distinct stacking sequences (Bernal and simple hexagonal). On the basis of first-principles calculations and energy band theory analysis, both stacking sequences give rise to metallic conduction with Ti 3d electrons contributing most to the conduction. The conduction is also significantly anisotropic due to the fact that the effective masses of carriers including electrons and holes are remarkably direction-dependent. Such an anisotropic electronic conduction is evidenced by the I-V curves of an individual Ti3C2T2 particulate, which demonstrates that the in-plane electrical conduction is at least one order of magnitude higher than that vertical to the basal plane.

  4. Silicon carbide tritium permeation barrier for steel structural components.

    SciTech Connect

    Causey, Rion A.; Garde, Joseph Maurico; Buchenauer, Dean A.; Calderoni, Pattrick; Holschuh, Thomas, Jr.; Youchison, Dennis Lee; Wright, Matt; Kolasinski, Robert D.

    2010-09-01

    Chemical vapor deposited (CVD) silicon carbide (SiC) has superior resistance to tritium permeation even after irradiation. Prior work has shown Ultrametfoam to be forgiving when bonded to substrates with large CTE differences. The technical objectives are: (1) Evaluate foams of vanadium, niobium and molybdenum metals and SiC for CTE mitigation between a dense SiC barrier and steel structure; (2) Thermostructural modeling of SiC TPB/Ultramet foam/ferritic steel architecture; (3) Evaluate deuterium permeation of chemical vapor deposited (CVD) SiC; (4) D testing involved construction of a new higher temperature (> 1000 C) permeation testing system and development of improved sealing techniques; (5) Fabricate prototype tube similar to that shown with dimensions of 7cm {theta} and 35cm long; and (6) Tritium and hermeticity testing of prototype tube.

  5. First-principles study of point defects in thorium carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez Daroca, D.; Jaroszewicz, S.; Llois, A. M.; Mosca, H. O.

    2014-11-01

    Thorium-based materials are currently being investigated in relation with their potential utilization in Generation-IV reactors as nuclear fuels. One of the most important issues to be studied is their behavior under irradiation. A first approach to this goal is the study of point defects. By means of first-principles calculations within the framework of density functional theory, we study the stability and formation energies of vacancies, interstitials and Frenkel pairs in thorium carbide. We find that C isolated vacancies are the most likely defects, while C interstitials are energetically favored as compared to Th ones. These kind of results for ThC, to the best authors' knowledge, have not been obtained previously, neither experimentally, nor theoretically. For this reason, we compare with results on other compounds with the same NaCl-type structure.

  6. Silicon Carbide-Based Hydrogen and Hydrocarbon Gas Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Gary W.; Neudeck, Philip G.; Chen, Liang-Yu; Knight, D.; Liu, C. C.; Wu, Q. H.R

    1995-01-01

    Hydrogen and hydrocarbon detection in aeronautical applications is important for reasons of safety and emissions control. The use of silicon carbide as a semiconductor in a metal-semiconductor or metal-insulator-semiconductor structure opens opportunities to measure hydrogen and hydrocarbons in high temperature environments beyond the capabilities of silicon-based devices. The purpose of this paper is to explore the response and stability of Pd-SiC Schottky diodes as gas sensors in the temperature range from 100 to 400 C. The effect of heat treating on the diode properties as measured at 100 C is explored. Subsequent operation at 400 C demonstrates the diodes' sensitivity to hydrogen and hydrocarbons. It is concluded that the Pd-SiC Schottky diode has potential as a hydrogen and hydrocarbon sensor over a wide range of temperatures but further studies are necessary to determine the diodes' long term stability.

  7. DECODING THE MESSAGE FROM METEORITIC STARDUST SILICON CARBIDE GRAINS

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Karen M.; Lugaro, Maria; Gibson, Brad K.; Pilkington, Kate E-mail: karen.michelle.lewis@gmail.com E-mail: kpilkington@uclan.ac.uk

    2013-05-01

    Micron-sized stardust grains that originated in ancient stars are recovered from meteorites and analyzed using high-resolution mass spectrometry. The most widely studied type of stardust is silicon carbide (SiC). Thousands of these grains have been analyzed with high precision for their Si isotopic composition. Here we show that the distribution of the Si isotopic composition of the vast majority of stardust SiC grains carries the imprints of a spread in the age-metallicity distribution of their parent stars and of a power-law increase of the relative formation efficiency of SiC dust with the metallicity. This result offers a solution for the long-standing problem of silicon in stardust SiC grains, confirms the necessity of coupling chemistry and dynamics in simulations of the chemical evolution of our Galaxy, and constrains the modeling of dust condensation in stellar winds as a function of the metallicity.

  8. Radiation damage of transition metal carbides. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, G.

    1991-12-31

    In this grant period we have investigated electrical properties of transition metal carbides and radiation-induced defects produced by low-temperature electron irradiation in them. Special attention has been given to the composition VC{sub 0.88} in which the vacancies on the carbon sublattice of this fcc crystal order to produce a V{sub 8}C{sub 7} superlattice. The existence of this superlattice structure was found to make the crystal somewhat resistant to radiation damage at low doses and/or at ambient temperature. At larger doses significant changes in the resistivity are produced. Annealing effects were observed which we believe to be connected with the reconstitution of the superlattice structure.

  9. Joining of Silicon Carbide Through the Diffusion Bonding Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halbig, Michael .; Singh, Mrityunjay

    2009-01-01

    In order for ceramics to be fully utilized as components for high-temperature and structural applications, joining and integration methods are needed. Such methods will allow for the fabrication the complex shapes and also allow for insertion of the ceramic component into a system that may have different adjacent materials. Monolithic silicon carbide (SiC) is a ceramic material of focus due to its high temperature strength and stability. Titanium foils were used as an interlayer to form diffusion bonds between chemical vapor deposited (CVD) SiC ceramics with the aid of hot pressing. The influence of such variables as interlayer thickness and processing time were investigated to see which conditions contributed to bonds that were well adhered and crack free. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and electron microprobe analysis were used to characterize the bonds and to identify the reaction formed phases.

  10. Catalytic synthesis of silicon carbide preceramic polymers: Polycarbosilanes

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, D.H.

    1992-10-01

    Polycarbosilanes are the most successful and widely studied class of polymer precursors for silicon carbide, but traditional methods for their synthesis are inefficient and nonselective. This project is focused on developing transition metal catalysts for the synthesis of polycarbosilanes and other preceramic polymers. In recent work we have developed the first homogeneous transition metal catalysts for the dehydrogenative coupling of simple alkyl silanes to oligomeric and polymeric carbosilanes, H-(SiR[sub 2]CR[prime][sub 2])n-SiR[sub 3]. The coupling of alkylgermanes, however, yields the corresponding oligomeric poly(germanes) (Ge-Ge). Future work will help elucidate the mechanisms of these catalytic process, explore the use of hydrogen acceptors as reaction accelerators, and develop new and more active catalysts.

  11. Single-photon emitting diode in silicon carbide.

    PubMed

    Lohrmann, A; Iwamoto, N; Bodrog, Z; Castelletto, S; Ohshima, T; Karle, T J; Gali, A; Prawer, S; McCallum, J C; Johnson, B C

    2015-01-01

    Electrically driven single-photon emitting devices have immediate applications in quantum cryptography, quantum computation and single-photon metrology. Mature device fabrication protocols and the recent observations of single defect systems with quantum functionalities make silicon carbide an ideal material to build such devices. Here, we demonstrate the fabrication of bright single-photon emitting diodes. The electrically driven emitters display fully polarized output, superior photon statistics (with a count rate of >300 kHz) and stability in both continuous and pulsed modes, all at room temperature. The atomic origin of the single-photon source is proposed. These results provide a foundation for the large scale integration of single-photon sources into a broad range of applications, such as quantum cryptography or linear optics quantum computing.

  12. Single-photon emitting diode in silicon carbide.

    PubMed

    Lohrmann, A; Iwamoto, N; Bodrog, Z; Castelletto, S; Ohshima, T; Karle, T J; Gali, A; Prawer, S; McCallum, J C; Johnson, B C

    2015-01-01

    Electrically driven single-photon emitting devices have immediate applications in quantum cryptography, quantum computation and single-photon metrology. Mature device fabrication protocols and the recent observations of single defect systems with quantum functionalities make silicon carbide an ideal material to build such devices. Here, we demonstrate the fabrication of bright single-photon emitting diodes. The electrically driven emitters display fully polarized output, superior photon statistics (with a count rate of >300 kHz) and stability in both continuous and pulsed modes, all at room temperature. The atomic origin of the single-photon source is proposed. These results provide a foundation for the large scale integration of single-photon sources into a broad range of applications, such as quantum cryptography or linear optics quantum computing. PMID:26205309

  13. Hydrothermal corrosion of silicon carbide joints without radiation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Koyanagi, Takaaki; Katoh, Yutai; Terrani, Kurt A.; Kim, Young-Jin; Kiggans, James O.; Hinoki, Tatsuya

    2016-09-28

    In this paper, hydrothermal corrosion of four types of the silicon carbide (SiC) to SiC plate joints were investigated under pressurized water reactor and boiling water reactor relevant chemical conditions without irradiation. The joints were formed by metal diffusion bonding using molybdenum or titanium interlayer, reaction sintering using Ti—Si—C system, and SiC nanopowder sintering. Most of the joints withstood the corrosion tests for five weeks. The recession of the SiC substrates was limited. Based on the recession of the bonding layers, it was concluded that all the joints except for the molybdenum diffusion bond are promising under the reducing environmentsmore » without radiation. Finally, the SiC nanopowder sintered joint was the most corrosion tolerant under the oxidizing environment among the four joints.« less

  14. Method of Assembling a Silicon Carbide High Temperature Anemometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okojie, Robert S. (Inventor); Fralick, Gustave C. (Inventor); Saad, George J. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A high temperature anemometer includes a pair of substrates. One of the substrates has a plurality of electrodes on a facing surface, while the other of the substrates has a sensor cavity on a facing surface. A sensor is received in the sensor cavity, wherein the sensor has a plurality of bondpads, and wherein the bondpads contact the plurality of electrodes when the facing surfaces are mated with one another. The anemometer further includes a plurality of plug-in pins, wherein the substrate with the cavity has a plurality of trenches with each one receiving a plurality of plug-in pins. The plurality of plug-in pins contact the plurality of electrodes when the substrates are mated with one another. The sensor cavity is at an end of one of the substrates such that the sensor partially extends from the substrate. The sensor and the substrates are preferably made of silicon carbide.

  15. Silicon Carbide Sensors and Electronics for Harsh Environment Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Laura J.

    2007-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) semiconductor has been studied for electronic and sensing applications in extreme environment (high temperature, extreme vibration, harsh chemical media, and high radiation) that is beyond the capability of conventional semiconductors such as silicon. This is due to its near inert chemistry, superior thermomechanical and electronic properties that include high breakdown voltage and wide bandgap. An overview of SiC sensors and electronics work ongoing at NASA Glenn Research Center (NASA GRC) will be presented. The main focus will be two technologies currently being investigated: 1) harsh environment SiC pressure transducers and 2) high temperature SiC electronics. Work highlighted will include the design, fabrication, and application of SiC sensors and electronics, with recent advancements in state-of-the-art discussed as well. These combined technologies are studied for the goal of developing advanced capabilities for measurement and control of aeropropulsion systems, as well as enhancing tools for exploration systems.

  16. Optical thermometry based on level anticrossing in silicon carbide.

    PubMed

    Anisimov, A N; Simin, D; Soltamov, V A; Lebedev, S P; Baranov, P G; Astakhov, G V; Dyakonov, V

    2016-09-14

    We report a giant thermal shift of 2.1 MHz/K related to the excited-state zero-field splitting in the silicon vacancy centers in 4H silicon carbide. It is obtained from the indirect observation of the optically detected magnetic resonance in the excited state using the ground state as an ancilla. Alternatively, relative variations of the zero-field splitting for small temperature differences can be detected without application of radiofrequency fields, by simply monitoring the photoluminescence intensity in the vicinity of the level anticrossing. This effect results in an all-optical thermometry technique with temperature sensitivity of 100 mK/Hz(1/2) for a detection volume of approximately 10(-6) mm(3). In contrast, the zero-field splitting in the ground state does not reveal detectable temperature shift. Using these properties, an integrated magnetic field and temperature sensor can be implemented on the same center.

  17. Electromagnetic interference shielding with 2D transition metal carbides (MXenes)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahzad, Faisal; Alhabeb, Mohamed; Hatter, Christine B.; Anasori, Babak; Man Hong, Soon; Koo, Chong Min; Gogotsi, Yury

    2016-09-01

    Materials with good flexibility and high conductivity that can provide electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding with minimal thickness are highly desirable, especially if they can be easily processed into films. Two-dimensional metal carbides and nitrides, known as MXenes, combine metallic conductivity and hydrophilic surfaces. Here, we demonstrate the potential of several MXenes and their polymer composites for EMI shielding. A 45-micrometer-thick Ti3C2Tx film exhibited EMI shielding effectiveness of 92 decibels (>50 decibels for a 2.5-micrometer film), which is the highest among synthetic materials of comparable thickness produced to date. This performance originates from the excellent electrical conductivity of Ti3C2Tx films (4600 Siemens per centimeter) and multiple internal reflections from Ti3C2Tx flakes in free-standing films. The mechanical flexibility and easy coating capability offered by MXenes and their composites enable them to shield surfaces of any shape while providing high EMI shielding efficiency.

  18. Correlative microscopy of a carbide-free bainitic steel.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Christina; Bliznuk, Vitaliy; Verdiere, An; Petrov, Roumen; Winkelhofer, Florian; Clemens, Helmut; Primig, Sophie

    2016-02-01

    In this work a carbide-free bainitic steel was examined by a novel correlative microscopy approach using transmission Kikuchi diffraction (TKD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The individual microstructural constituents could be identified by TKD based on their different crystal structure for bainitic ferrite and retained austenite and by image quality for the martensite-austenite (M-A) constituent. Subsequently, the same area was investigated in the TEM and a good match of these two techniques regarding the identification of the area position and crystal orientation could be proven. Additionally, the M-A constituent was examined in the TEM for the first time after preceded unambiguous identification using a correlative microscopy approach. The selected area diffraction pattern showed satellites around the main reflexes which might indicate a structural modulation.

  19. Liquid-Liquid Phase Transition in Nanoconfined Silicon Carbide.

    PubMed

    Wu, Weikang; Zhang, Leining; Liu, Sida; Ren, Hongru; Zhou, Xuyan; Li, Hui

    2016-03-01

    We report theoretical evidence of a liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT) in liquid silicon carbide under nanoslit confinement. The LLPT is characterized by layering transitions induced by confinement and pressure, accompanying the rapid change in density. During the layering transition, the proportional distribution of tetracoordinated and pentacoordinated structures exhibits remarkable change. The tricoordinated structures lead to the microphase separation between silicon (with the dominant tricoordinated, tetracoordinated, and pentacoordinated structures) and carbon (with the dominant tricoordinated structures) in the layer close to the walls. A strong layer separation between silicon atoms and carbon atoms is induced by strong wall-liquid forces. Importantly, the pressure confinement phase diagram with negative slopes for LLPT lines indicates that, under high pressure, the LLPT is mainly confinement-induced, but under low pressure, it becomes dominantly pressure-induced.

  20. Incidence of cancer among workers producing calcium carbide.

    PubMed

    Kjuus, H; Andersen, A; Langård, S

    1986-04-01

    The overall mortality and the incidence of cancer have been studied among male employees at a plant producing calcium carbide. The cohort was defined as all men employed at the plant for at least 18 months in the period 1953 to 1970 and was classified according to 10 occupational categories. The 790 men have been observed from 1953 to 1983 and the incidence of cancer in the cohort has been compared with national incidence rates. A significant excess of colonic cancer (standardised incidence ratio, SIR = 2.09) and of prostatic cancer (SIR = 1.78) was found, and also a slight excess of lung cancer among furnace and maintenance workers (SIR = 1.56). The possible exposure of the workers to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, asbestos, and cadmium is discussed.

  1. Synthesis and characterization of titanium carbide, titanium boron carbonitride, titanium boride/titanium carbide and titanium carbide/chromium carbide multilayer coatings by reactive and ion beam assisted, electron beam-physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe, Douglas Edward

    The purpose of the present work was to investigate the synthesis of titanium carbide, TiBCN, TiB2/TiC and TiC/Cr23C6 multilayer coatings by several methods of electron beam-physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) and examine the affects of various processing parameters on the properties and microstructures of the coatings. TiC was successfully deposited by reactive ion beam assisted (RIBA), EB-PVD and the results were compared to various titanium carbide coatings deposited by a variety of techniques. The affects of substrate temperature and ion beam current density were correlated with composition, hardness, changes in the lattice parameter, degree of crystallographic texture, residual stress, surface morphology, and microstructure. The average Vicker's hardness number was found to increase with increasing ion beam current density and increase over the substrate temperature range of 250°C to 650°C. The average Vicker's hardness number decreased at a substrate temperature of 750°C as a result of texturing and microstructure. The present investigation shows that the average Vicker's hardness number is not only a function of the composition, but also the microstructure including the degree of crystallographic texture. TiB2/TiC multilayer coatings were deposited by argon ion beam assisted, EB-PVD with varying number of total layers to two different film thicknesses under slightly different deposition conditions. In both cases, the hardness of the coatings increased with increasing number of total layers. The adhesion of the coatings ranged from 30 N to 50 N, with the better adhesion values obtained with the thinner coatings. The crystallographic texture coefficients of both the TiC and TiB2 layers were found to change with increasing number of total layers. The multilayer design was found to significantly affect the microstructure and grain size of the deposited coatings. The fracture toughness was found to decrease with increasing number of total layers and was

  2. First principles investigation of chromium carbide, CrC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalemos, Apostolos; Dunning, Thom H.; Mavridis, Aristides

    2005-07-01

    We have investigated the electronic structure of 14 states of the experimentally unknown diatomic molecule chromium carbide, CrC, using standard multireference configuration interaction methods and high quality basis sets. We report potential curves, binding energies, and a number of spectroscopic parameters. The ground state of CrC, XΣ-3, displays triple-bond character with a binding energy of De=89kcal /mol and an internuclear separation of re=1.63Å. The first excited state (1Σ-5) lies 9.2kcal/mol higher. All the states studied are fairly ionic, featuring an electron transfer of 0.3-0.5e- from the metal atom to the carbon atom.

  3. First principles investigation of chromium carbide, CrC.

    PubMed

    Kalemos, Apostolos; Dunning, Thom H; Mavridis, Aristides

    2005-07-01

    We have investigated the electronic structure of 14 states of the experimentally unknown diatomic molecule chromium carbide, CrC, using standard multireference configuration interaction methods and high quality basis sets. We report potential curves, binding energies, and a number of spectroscopic parameters. The ground state of CrC, X 3Sigma-, displays triple-bond character with a binding energy of D(e)=89 kcal/mol and an internuclear separation of r(e)=1.63 A. The first excited state (1 5Sigma-) lies 9.2 kcal/mol higher. All the states studied are fairly ionic, featuring an electron transfer of 0.3-0.5e- from the metal atom to the carbon atom. PMID:16035830

  4. Chemical, Electrical and Thermal Characterization of Nanoceramic Silicon Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Hervie; Abunaemeh, Malek; Smith, Cydale; Muntele, Claudiu; Budak, Satilmish; Ila, Daryush

    2009-03-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is a lightweight high bandgap semiconductor material that can maintain dimensional and chemical stability in adverse environments and very high temperatures. These properties make it suitable for high temperature thermoelectric converters. At the Center for Irradiaton of Materials (CIM) we design, manufacture and fabricate nanoceramic SiC, and perform electrical, thermal and chemical characterization of the material using particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE), Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS), Seebeck coefficient, electrical conductivity, and thermal conductivity measurements to calculate its efficiency as a thermoelectric generator. We are looking to compare the electrical and thermal properties of SiC ceramics with some other materials used for the same purposes.

  5. In situ electrochemical dilatometry of carbide-derived carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Hantel, M M; Presser, Volker; Gogotsi, Yury

    2011-01-01

    The long life durability and extraordinary stability of supercapacitors are ascribed to the common concept that the charge storage is purely based on double-layer charging. Therefore the ideal supercapacitor electrode should be free of charge induced microscopic structural changes. However, recent in-situ investigations on different carbon materials for supercapacitor electrodes have shown that the charge and discharge is accompanied by dimensional changes of the electrode up to several percent. This work studies the influence of the pore size on the expansion behavior of carbon electrodes derived from titanium carbide-derived carbons with an average pore size between 5 and 8 Using tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate in acetonitrile, the swelling of the electrodes was measured by in situ dilatometry. The experiments revealed an increased expansion on the negatively charged electrode for pores below 6 , which could be described with pore swelling.

  6. Anisotropic electronic conduction in stacked two-dimensional titanium carbide

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Tao; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Jiemin; Li, Zhaojin; Hu, Minmin; Tan, Jun; Hou, Pengxiang; Li, Feng; Wang, Xiaohui

    2015-01-01

    Stacked two-dimensional titanium carbide is an emerging conductive material for electrochemical energy storage which requires an understanding of the intrinsic electronic conduction. Here we report the electronic conduction properties of stacked Ti3C2T2 (T = OH, O, F) with two distinct stacking sequences (Bernal and simple hexagonal). On the basis of first-principles calculations and energy band theory analysis, both stacking sequences give rise to metallic conduction with Ti 3d electrons contributing most to the conduction. The conduction is also significantly anisotropic due to the fact that the effective masses of carriers including electrons and holes are remarkably direction-dependent. Such an anisotropic electronic conduction is evidenced by the I−V curves of an individual Ti3C2T2 particulate, which demonstrates that the in-plane electrical conduction is at least one order of magnitude higher than that vertical to the basal plane. PMID:26548439

  7. Method of producing novel silicon carbide articles. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Milewski, J.V.

    1982-06-18

    A method of producing articles comprising reaction-bonded silicon carbide (SiC) and graphite (and/or carbon) is given. The process converts the graphite (and/or carbon) in situ to SiC, thus providing the capability of economically obtaining articles made up wholly or partially of SiC having any size and shape in which graphite (and/or carbon) can be found or made. When the produced articles are made of an inner graphite (and/or carbon) substrate to which SiC is reaction bonded, these articles distinguish SiC-coated graphite articles found in the prior art by the feature of a strong bond having a gradual (as opposed to a sharply defined) interface which extends over a distance of mils. A method for forming SiC whisker-reinforced ceramic matrices is also given. The whisker-reinforced articles comprise SiC whiskers which substantially retain their structural integrity.

  8. Transition Metal Carbides and Nitrides in Energy Storage and Conversion

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Yu; Shi, Fan; Zhan, Jiye; Tu, Jiangping

    2016-01-01

    High‐performance electrode materials are the key to advances in the areas of energy conversion and storage (e.g., fuel cells and batteries). In this Review, recent progress in the synthesis and electrochemical application of transition metal carbides (TMCs) and nitrides (TMNs) for energy storage and conversion is summarized. Their electrochemical properties in Li‐ion and Na‐ion batteries as well as in supercapacitors, and electrocatalytic reactions (oxygen evolution and reduction reactions, and hydrogen evolution reaction) are discussed in association with their crystal structure/morphology/composition. Advantages and benefits of nanostructuring (e.g., 2D MXenes) are highlighted. Prospects of future research trends in rational design of high‐performance TMCs and TMNs electrodes are provided at the end. PMID:27812464

  9. Cryogenic Performance of a Lightweight Silicon Carbide Mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eng, Ron; Carpenter, James; Haight, Harlan; Hogue, William; Kegley, Jeff; Stahl, H. Philip; Wright, Ernie; Kane, Dave; Hadaway, James

    2005-01-01

    Low cost, high performance lightweight Silicon Carbide (SiC) mirrors provide an alternative to Beryllium mirrors. A Trex Enterprises 0.25m diameter lightweight SiC mirror using its patented Chemical Vapor Composites (CVC) technology was evaluated for its optical performance. CVC SiC is chemically pure, thermally stable, and mechanically stiff. CVC technology yields higher growth rate than that of CVD SiC. NASA has funded lightweight optical materials technology development efforts involving SiC mirrors for future space based telescope programs. As part of these efforts, a Trex SiC was measured interferometrically from room temperature to 30 degrees Kelvin. This paper will discuss the test goals, the test instrumentation, test results, and lessons learned.

  10. Liquid-Liquid Phase Transition in Nanoconfined Silicon Carbide.

    PubMed

    Wu, Weikang; Zhang, Leining; Liu, Sida; Ren, Hongru; Zhou, Xuyan; Li, Hui

    2016-03-01

    We report theoretical evidence of a liquid-liquid phase transition (LLPT) in liquid silicon carbide under nanoslit confinement. The LLPT is characterized by layering transitions induced by confinement and pressure, accompanying the rapid change in density. During the layering transition, the proportional distribution of tetracoordinated and pentacoordinated structures exhibits remarkable change. The tricoordinated structures lead to the microphase separation between silicon (with the dominant tricoordinated, tetracoordinated, and pentacoordinated structures) and carbon (with the dominant tricoordinated structures) in the layer close to the walls. A strong layer separation between silicon atoms and carbon atoms is induced by strong wall-liquid forces. Importantly, the pressure confinement phase diagram with negative slopes for LLPT lines indicates that, under high pressure, the LLPT is mainly confinement-induced, but under low pressure, it becomes dominantly pressure-induced. PMID:26859609

  11. Porous silicon carbide (SiC) semiconductor device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shor, Joseph S. (Inventor); Kurtz, Anthony D. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A semiconductor device employs at least one layer of semiconducting porous silicon carbide (SiC). The porous SiC layer has a monocrystalline structure wherein the pore sizes, shapes, and spacing are determined by the processing conditions. In one embodiment, the semiconductor device is a p-n junction diode in which a layer of n-type SiC is positioned on a p-type layer of SiC, with the p-type layer positioned on a layer of silicon dioxide. Because of the UV luminescent properties of the semiconducting porous SiC layer, it may also be utilized for other devices such as LEDs and optoelectronic devices.

  12. Silicon carbide, a semiconductor for space power electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, J. Anthony; Matus, Lawrence G.

    1991-01-01

    After many years of promise as a high temperature semiconductor, silicon carbide (SiC) is finally emerging as a useful electronic material. Recent significant progress that has led to this emergence has been in the areas of crystal growth and device fabrication technology. High quality single-crystal SiC wafers, up to 25 mm in diameter, can now be produced routinely from boules grown by a high temperature (2700 K) sublimation process. Device fabrication processes, including chemical vapor deposition (CVD), in situ doping during CVD, reactive ion etching, oxidation, metallization, etc. have been used to fabricate p-n junction diodes and MOSFETs. The diode was operated to 870 K and the MOSFET to 770 K.

  13. Silicon carbide, a semiconductor for space power electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, J. A.; Matus, Lawrence G.

    1991-01-01

    After many years of promise as a high temperature semiconductor, silicon carbide (SiC) is finally emerging as a useful electronic material. Recent significant progress that has led to this emergence has been in the area of crystal growth and device fabrication technology. High quality of single-crystal SiC wafers, up to 25 mm in diameter, can now be produced routinely from boules grown by a high temperature (2700 K) sublimation process. Device fabrication processes, including chemical vapor deposition (CVD), in situ doping during CVD, reactive ion etching, oxidation, metallization, etc. have been used to fabricate p-n junction diodes and MOSFETs. The diode was operated to 870 K and the MOSFET to 770 K.

  14. Deposition of tantalum carbide coatings on graphite by laser interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veligdan, James; Branch, D.; Vanier, P. E.; Barietta, R. E.

    1994-01-01

    Graphite surfaces can be hardened and protected from erosion by hydrogen at high temperatures by refractory metal carbide coatings, which are usually prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or chemical vapor reaction (CVR) methods. These techniques rely on heating the substrate to a temperature where a volatile metal halide decomposes and reacts with either a hydrocarbon gas or with carbon from the substrate. For CVR techniques, deposition temperatures must be in excess of 2000 C in order to achieve favorable deposition kinetics. In an effort to lower the bulk substrate deposition temperature, the use of laser interactions with both the substrate and the metal halide deposition gas has been employed. Initial testing involved the use of a CO2 laser to heat the surface of a graphite substrate and a KrF excimer laser to accomplish a photodecomposition of TaCl5 gas near the substrate. The results of preliminary experiments using these techniques are described.

  15. New method for synthesis of metal carbides, nitrides and carbonitrides

    SciTech Connect

    Koc, R.; Folmer, J.S.; Kodambaka, S.K.

    1997-04-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop a novel synthesis method using a carbothermic reduction reaction of carbon coated precursors for producing high purity, submicron, non-agglomerated powders of metal carbide, metal nitride and metal boride systems. The authors also want to demonstrate the advantages of the process and provide information on the applicability of the process for synthesizing related advanced ceramic powders (e.g. SiC, WC, TiN, TiB{sub 2}, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}). During the FY96 of the project, steps are taken to investigate the reaction mechanisms and phase evolution during the formation of TiC from carbon coated titania precursors and to produce submicron TiC powders with desired stoichiometries. Depending on the carbon content in the coated titania precursor, TiC powder was produced with different stoichiometries (different amount of oxygen and free carbon).

  16. Structural phase transitions in boron carbide under stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korotaev, P.; Pokatashkin, P.; Yanilkin, A.

    2016-01-01

    Structural transitions in boron carbide B4C under stress were studied by means of first-principles molecular dynamics in the framework of density functional theory. The behavior depends strongly on degree of non-hydrostatic stress. Under hydrostatic stress continuous bending of the three-atom C-B-C chain was observed up to 70 GPa. The presence of non-hydrostatic stress activates abrupt reversible chain bending, which is displacement of the central boron atom in the chain with the formation of weak bonds between this atom and atoms in the nearby icosahedra. Such structural change can describe a possible reversible phase transition in dynamical loading experiments. High non-hydrostatic stress achieved in uniaxial loading leads to disordering of the initial structure. The formation of carbon chains is observed as one possible transition route.

  17. Development of silicon carbide semiconductor devices for high temperature applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matus, Lawrence G.; Powell, J. Anthony; Petit, Jeremy B.

    1991-01-01

    The semiconducting properties of electronic grade silicon carbide crystals, such as wide energy bandgap, make it particularly attractive for high temperature applications. Applications for high temperature electronic devices include instrumentation for engines under development, engine control and condition monitoring systems, and power conditioning and control systems for space platforms and satellites. Discrete prototype SiC devices were fabricated and tested at elevated temperatures. Grown p-n junction diodes demonstrated very good rectification characteristics at 870 K. A depletion-mode metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor was also successfully fabricated and tested at 770 K. While optimization of SiC fabrication processes remain, it is believed that SiC is an enabling high temperature electronic technology.

  18. Frequency mixing in boron carbide laser ablation plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oujja, M.; Benítez-Cañete, A.; Sanz, M.; Lopez-Quintas, I.; Martín, M.; de Nalda, R.; Castillejo, M.

    2015-05-01

    Nonlinear frequency mixing induced by a bichromatic field (1064 nm + 532 nm obtained from a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser) in a boron carbide (B4C) plasma generated through laser ablation under vacuum is explored. A UV beam at the frequency of the fourth harmonic of the fundamental frequency (266 nm) was generated. The dependence of the efficiency of the process as function of the intensities of the driving lasers differs from the expected behavior for four-wave mixing, and point toward a six-wave mixing process. The frequency mixing process was strongly favored for parallel polarizations of the two driving beams. Through spatiotemporal mapping, the conditions for maximum efficiency were found for a significant delay from the ablation event (200 ns), when the medium is expected to be a low-ionized plasma. No late components of the harmonic signal were detected, indicating a largely atomized medium.

  19. Dynamical conductivity of boron carbide: heavily damped plasma vibrations.

    PubMed

    Werheit, Helmut; Gerlach, Guido

    2014-10-22

    The FIR reflectivity spectra of boron carbide, measured down to ω~10 cm(-1) between 100 and 800 K, are essentially determined by heavily damped plasma vibrations. The spectra are fitted applying the classical Drude-Lorentz theory of free carriers. The fitting Parameter Π=ωp/ωτ yields the carrier densities, which are immediately correlated with the concentration of structural defects in the homogeneity range. This correlation is proved for band-type and hopping conductivity. The effective mass of free holes in the valence band is estimated at m*/me~2.5. The mean free path of the free holes has the order of the cell parameters.

  20. Microalloying Boron Carbide with Silicon to Achieve Dramatically Improved Ductility.

    PubMed

    An, Qi; Goddard, William A

    2014-12-01

    Boron carbide (B4C) is a hard material whose value for extended engineering applications such as body armor; is limited by its brittleness under impact. To improve the ductility while retaining hardness, we used density functional theory to examine modifying B4C ductility through microalloying. We found that replacing the CBC chain in B4C with Si-Si, denoted as (B11Cp)-Si2, dramatically improves the ductility, allowing a continuous shear to a large strain of 0.802 (about twice of B4C failure strain) without brittle failure. Moreover, (B11C)-Si2 retains low density and high hardness. This ductility improvement arises because the Si-Si linkages enable the icosahedra accommodate additional shear by rotating instead of breaking bonds.

  1. Joining and Integration of Silicon Carbide for Turbine Engine Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halbig, Michael C.; Singh, Mrityunjay; Coddington, Bryan; Asthana, Rajiv

    2010-01-01

    The critical need for ceramic joining and integration technologies is becoming better appreciated as the maturity level increases for turbine engine components fabricated from ceramic and ceramic matrix composite materials. Ceramic components offer higher operating temperatures and reduced cooling requirements. This translates into higher efficiencies and lower emissions. For fabricating complex shapes, diffusion bonding of silicon carbide (SiC) to SiC is being developed. For the integration of ceramic parts to the surrounding metallic engine system, brazing of SiC to metals is being developed. Overcoming the chemical, thermal, and mechanical incompatibilities between dissimilar materials is very challenging. This presentation will discuss the types of ceramic components being developed by researchers and industry and the benefits of using ceramic components. Also, the development of strong, crack-free, stable bonds will be discussed. The challenges and progress in developing joining and integration approaches for a specific application, i.e. a SiC injector, will be presented.

  2. Interferometric measurements of silicon carbide mirrors at liquid helium temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robb, Paul N.; Huff, Lynn W.; Forney, Paul B.; Petrovsky, Gury T.; Ljubarsky, Sergey V.; Khimitch, Yuri P.

    1995-10-01

    This paper presents the results of interferometric tests of two silicon carbide mirrors tested at room temperature and 6 K. The first mirror has a spherical f/1.73 surface, a diameter of 170 mm, and is of solid, plano-concave construction. The other mirror, a plano measuring 308 mm by 210 mm, is of lightweighted, closed-back construction. The mirrors were manufactured by the Vavilov State Optical Institute, St. Petersburg, Russia, and were loaned to Lockheed for these tests. Optical tests on both mirrors were performed using the Lockheed cryogenic optical test facility at liquid helium temperature and a Zygo Mark II interferometer. There was no change in the surface figure of the mirrors, within the test uncertainty of approximately plus or minus 0.02 waves at 0.6328-micrometer wavelength.

  3. Irradiation studies on carbon nanotube-reinforced boron carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aitkaliyeva, Assel; McCarthy, Michael C.; Jeong, Hae-Kwon; Shao, Lin

    2012-02-01

    Radiation response of carbon nanotube (CNT) reinforced boron carbide composite has been studied for its application as a structural component in nuclear engineering. The composite was bombarded by 140 keV He ions at room temperature to a fluence ranging from 1 × 10 14 to 1 × 10 17 cm -2. Two-dimensional Raman mapping shows inhomogeneous distribution of CNTs, and was used to select regions of interest for damage characterization. For CNTs, the intensities ratio of D-G bands ( ID/ IG) increased with fluence up to a certain value, and decreased at the fluence of 5 × 10 16 cm -2. This fluence also corresponds to a trend break in the plot of FWHM (full width at half maximum) of G band vs. ID/ IG ratio, which indicates amorphization of CNTs. The study shows that Raman spectroscopy is a powerful tool to quantitatively characterize radiation damage in CNT-reinforced composites.

  4. Size-scaling of tensile failure stress in boron carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Wereszczak, Andrew A; Kirkland, Timothy Philip; Strong, Kevin T; Jadaan, Osama M.; Thompson, G. A.

    2010-01-01

    Weibull strength-size-scaling in a rotary-ground, hot-pressed boron carbide is described when strength test coupons sampled effective areas from the very small (~ 0.001 square millimeters) to the very large (~ 40,000 square millimeters). Equibiaxial flexure and Hertzian testing were used for the strength testing. Characteristic strengths for several different specimen geometries are analyzed as a function of effective area. Characteristic strength was found to substantially increase with decreased effective area, and exhibited a bilinear relationship. Machining damage limited strength as measured with equibiaxial flexure testing for effective areas greater than ~ 1 mm2 and microstructural-scale flaws limited strength for effective areas less than 0.1 mm2 for the Hertzian testing. The selections of a ceramic strength to account for ballistically-induced tile deflection and to account for expanding cavity modeling are considered in context with the measured strength-size-scaling.

  5. Two-dimensional, ordered, double transition metals carbides (MXenes)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, Paul; Anasori, Babak; Xie, Yu; Beidaghi, Majid; Lu, Jun; Hosler, Brian; Hultman, Lars; Gogotsi, Yury; Barsoum, Michel

    We use density functional theory to predict the existence of two new families of 2D ordered carbides (MXenes), M'2M''C2 and M'2M''2C3, where each M is a different early transition metal. Synthesizing Mo2TiC2Tx, Mo2Ti2C3Tx, and Cr2TiC2Tx (where T is a surface termination), we validated the DFT predictions. Since the Mo and Cr atoms are on the outside, they control the 2D flakes' chemical and electrochemical properties. The latter was proven by showing quite different electrochemical behavior of Mo2TiC2Tx and Ti3C2Tx. This work further expands the family of 2D materials, offering additional choices of structures, chemistries, and ultimately useful properties.

  6. Correlative microscopy of a carbide-free bainitic steel.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Christina; Bliznuk, Vitaliy; Verdiere, An; Petrov, Roumen; Winkelhofer, Florian; Clemens, Helmut; Primig, Sophie

    2016-02-01

    In this work a carbide-free bainitic steel was examined by a novel correlative microscopy approach using transmission Kikuchi diffraction (TKD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The individual microstructural constituents could be identified by TKD based on their different crystal structure for bainitic ferrite and retained austenite and by image quality for the martensite-austenite (M-A) constituent. Subsequently, the same area was investigated in the TEM and a good match of these two techniques regarding the identification of the area position and crystal orientation could be proven. Additionally, the M-A constituent was examined in the TEM for the first time after preceded unambiguous identification using a correlative microscopy approach. The selected area diffraction pattern showed satellites around the main reflexes which might indicate a structural modulation. PMID:26642344

  7. Application of silicon carbide to synchrotron-radiation mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Takacs, P.Z.; Hursman, T.L.; Williams, J.T.

    1983-09-01

    Damage to conventional mirror materials exposed to the harsh synchrotron radiation (SR) environment has prompted the SR user community to search for more suitable materials. Next-generation insertion devices, with their attendant flux increases, will make the problem of mirror design even more difficult. A parallel effort in searching for better materials has been underway within the laser community for several years. The technology for dealing with high thermal loads is highly developed among laser manufacturers. Performance requirements for laser heat exchangers are remarkably similar to SR mirror requirements. We report on the application of laser heat exchanger technology to the solution of typical SR mirror design problems. The superior performance of silicon carbide for laser applications is illustrated by various material trades studies, and its superior performance for SR applications is illustrated by means of model calculations.

  8. Infiltration kinetics of aluminum in silicon carbide compacts. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, G.R.; Olson, D.L.

    1987-07-01

    Although metal-matrix composites have been fabricated by various techniques, the most successful are solid state processes such as powder metallurgy and diffusion bonding. Liquid-metal processes such as compucasting, pultrusion, and infiltration, while less successful, are potentially more economical. The advantages of producing silicon carbide-aluminum matrix composites by liquid-metal infiltration techniques can not be fully realized without an improved understanding of the infiltration behavior and the fiber/matrix bonding mechanisms. This paper reports on infiltration models which consider the physical properties of the liquid and preform (either porous compact or capillary/tube bundle). These properties include viscosity, density, surface tension, and wettability (pore shape and size in the case of the porous compact). The models have been assessed in terms of their ability to predict infiltration behavior from known physical properties of the materials.

  9. Dynamic SEM wear studies of tungsten carbide cermets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainard, W. A.; Buckley, D. H.

    1975-01-01

    Dynamic friction and wear experiments were conducted in a scanning electron microscope. The wear behavior of pure tungsten carbide and composite with 6 and 15 weight percent cobalt binder was examined. Etching of the binder was done to selectively determine the role of the binder in the wear process. Dynamic experiments were conducted as the WC and bonded WC cermet surfaces were transversed by a 50 micron radiused diamond stylus. These studies show that the predominant wear process in WC is fracture initiated by plastic deformation. The wear of the etched cermets is similar to pure WC. The presence of the cobalt binder reduces both friction and wear. The cementing action of the cobalt reduces granular separation and promotes a dense polished layer because of its low shear strength film-forming properties. The wear debris generated from unetched surface is approximately the same composition as the bulk.

  10. Incidence of cancer among workers producing calcium carbide.

    PubMed Central

    Kjuus, H; Andersen, A; Langård, S

    1986-01-01

    The overall mortality and the incidence of cancer have been studied among male employees at a plant producing calcium carbide. The cohort was defined as all men employed at the plant for at least 18 months in the period 1953 to 1970 and was classified according to 10 occupational categories. The 790 men have been observed from 1953 to 1983 and the incidence of cancer in the cohort has been compared with national incidence rates. A significant excess of colonic cancer (standardised incidence ratio, SIR = 2.09) and of prostatic cancer (SIR = 1.78) was found, and also a slight excess of lung cancer among furnace and maintenance workers (SIR = 1.56). The possible exposure of the workers to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, asbestos, and cadmium is discussed. PMID:3964572

  11. Band Anticrossing in Dilute Germanium Carbides Using Hybrid Density Functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephenson, Chad A.; O'brien, William A.; Qi, Meng; Penninger, Michael; Schneider, William F.; Wistey, Mark A.

    2016-04-01

    Dilute germanium carbides (Ge1- x C x ) offer a direct bandgap for compact silicon photonics, but widely varying properties have been reported. This work reports improved band structure calculations for Ge1- x C x using ab initio simulations that employ the HSE06 exchange-correlation density functional. Contrary to Vegard's law, the conduction band minimum at Γ is consistently found to decrease with increasing C content, while L and X valleys change much more slowly. The calculated Ge bandgap is within 11% of experimental values. A decrease in energy at the Γ conduction band valley of (170 meV ± 50)/%C is predicted, leading to a direct bandgap for x > 0.008. These results indicate a promising material for Group IV lasers.

  12. Advanced Measurements of Silicon Carbide Ceramic Matrix Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Farhad Farzbod; Stephen J. Reese; Zilong Hua; Marat Khafizov; David H. Hurley

    2012-08-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is being considered as a fuel cladding material for accident tolerant fuel under the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program sponsored by the Nuclear Energy Division of the Department of Energy. Silicon carbide has many potential advantages over traditional zirconium based cladding systems. These include high melting point, low susceptibility to corrosion, and low degradation of mechanical properties under neutron irradiation. In addition, ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) made from SiC have high mechanical toughness enabling these materials to withstand thermal and mechanical shock loading. However, many of the fundamental mechanical and thermal properties of SiC CMCs depend strongly on the fabrication process. As a result, extrapolating current materials science databases for these materials to nuclear applications is not possible. The “Advanced Measurements” work package under the LWRS fuels pathway is tasked with the development of measurement techniques that can characterize fundamental thermal and mechanical properties of SiC CMCs. An emphasis is being placed on development of characterization tools that can used for examination of fresh as well as irradiated samples. The work discuss in this report can be divided into two broad categories. The first involves the development of laser ultrasonic techniques to measure the elastic and yield properties and the second involves the development of laser-based techniques to measurement thermal transport properties. Emphasis has been placed on understanding the anisotropic and heterogeneous nature of SiC CMCs in regards to thermal and mechanical properties. The material properties characterized within this work package will be used as validation of advanced materials physics models of SiC CMCs developed under the LWRS fuels pathway. In addition, it is envisioned that similar measurement techniques can be used to provide process control and quality assurance as well as measurement of

  13. Expanding the versatility of silicon carbide thin films and nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna, Lunet

    Silicon carbide (SiC) based electronics and sensors hold promise for pushing past the limits of current technology to achieve small, durable devices that can function in high-temperature, high-voltage, corrosive, and biological environments. SiC is an ideal material for such conditions due to its high mechanical strength, excellent chemical stability, and its biocompatibility. Consequently, SiC thin films and nanowires have attracted interest in applications such as micro- and nano-electromechanical systems, biological sensors, field emission cathodes, and energy storage devices. However to fully realize SiC in such technologies, the reliability of metal contacts to SiC at high temperatures must be improved and the nanowire growth mechanism must be understood to enable strict control of nanowire crystal structure and orientation. Here, we present a novel metallization scheme, utilizing solid-state graphitization of SiC, to improve the long-term reliability of Pt/Ti contacts to polycrystalline n-type SiC films at high temperature. The metallization scheme includes an alumina protection layer and exhibits low, stable contact resistivity even after long-term (500 hr) testing in air at 450 ºC. We also report the crystal structure and growth mechanism of Ni-assisted silicon carbide nanowires using single-source precursor, methyltrichlorosilane. The effects of growth parameters, such as substrate and temperature, on the structure and morphology of the resulting nanowires will also be presented. Overall, this study provides new insights towards the realization of novel SiC technologies, enabled by advanced electron microscopy techniques located in the user facilities at the Molecular Foundry in Berkeley, California. This work was performed in part at the Molecular Foundry, supported by the Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  14. The 11 micron Silicon Carbide Feature in Carbon Star Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speck, A. K.; Barlow, M. J.; Skinner, C. J.

    1996-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is known to form in circumstellar shells around carbon stars. SiC can come in two basic types - hexagonal alpha-SiC or cubic beta-SiC. Laboratory studies have shown that both types of SiC exhibit an emission feature in the 11-11.5 micron region, the size and shape of the feature varying with type, size and shape of the SiC grains. Such a feature can be seen in the spectra of carbon stars. Silicon carbide grains have also been found in meteorites. The aim of the current work is to identity the type(s) of SiC found in circumstellar shells and how they might relate to meteoritic SiC samples. We have used the CGS3 spectrometer at the 3.8 m UKIRT to obtain 7.5-13.5 micron spectra of 31 definite or proposed carbon stars. After flux-calibration, each spectrum was fitted using a chi(exp 2)-minimisation routine equipped with the published laboratory optical constants of six different samples of small SiC particles, together with the ability to fit the underlying continuum using a range of grain emissivity laws. It was found that the majority of observed SiC emission features could only be fitted by alpha-SiC grains. The lack of beta-SiC is surprising, as this is the form most commonly found in meteorites. Included in the sample were four sources, all of which have been proposed to be carbon stars, that appear to show the SiC feature in absorption.

  15. Task 6.3/6.7.4 - Silicon Carbide Joining

    SciTech Connect

    John P. Hurley; John P. Kay

    1998-02-01

    Future energy systems will be required to fire low-grade fuels and meet higher energy conversion efficiencies than today's systems. The steam cycle used at present is limited to a maximum temperature of 550 "C, because above that the stainless steel tubes deform and corrode excessively. To boost efficiency significantly, much higher working fluid temperatures are required. Although high-temperature alloys will suffice for the construction of these components in the near-term, the greatest efficiency increases can only be reached with the use of advanced structural ceramics such as silicon carbide (SiC). However, SiC does not melt, but instead sublimes at temperatures over 2000 "C. Therefore, it is not possible to join pieces of it through welding, and most brazing compounds have much lower melting points so the joints lose strength at temperatures much lower than the maximum use temperature of the SiC. Since larger objects, such as heat exchangers, cannot be easily created from smaller ceramic pieces, the size of the SiC structures that can presently be manufactured are limited by the size of the sintering furnaces (approximately 10 feet for sintered alpha silicon carbide). In addition, repair of the objects will require the use of field joining techniques. Some success has been made by causing silicon and carbon to react at 1400 0-1 500 "C to form SiC in a joint (Rabin, 1995) but these joints contain continuous channels of unreacted silicon which cause the joints to corrode and creep excessively at temperatures below 1260 "C (Breder, 1996). At present, no joining techniques are available that allow sintered alpha SiC to be used to its full potential.

  16. Structural evolution of molybdenum carbides in hot aqueous environments and impact on low-temperature hydroprocessing of acetic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jae -Soon; Schwartz, Viviane; Santillan-Jimenez, Eduardo; Crocker, Mark; Lewis, Sr., Samuel A.; Lance, Michael J.; Meyer, III, Harry M.; More, Karren L.

    2015-03-13

    In this paper, we investigated the structural evolution of molybdenum carbides subjected to hot aqueous environments and their catalytic performance in low-temperature hydroprocessing of acetic acid. While bulk structures of Mo carbides were maintained after aging in hot liquid water, a portion of carbidic Mo sites were converted to oxidic sites. Water aging also induced changes to the non-carbidic carbon deposited during carbide synthesis and increased surface roughness, which in turn affected carbide pore volume and surface area. The extent of these structural changes was sensitive to the initial carbide structure and was lower under actual hydroprocessing conditions indicating the possibility of further improving the hydrothermal stability of Mo carbides by optimizing catalyst structure and operating conditions. Mo carbides were active in acetic acid conversion in the presence of liquid water, their activity being comparable to that of Ru/C. Finally, the results suggest that effective and inexpensive bio-oil hydroprocessing catalysts could be designed based on Mo carbides, although a more detailed understanding of the structure-performance relationships is needed, especially in upgrading of more complex reaction mixtures or real bio-oils.

  17. Structural evolution of molybdenum carbides in hot aqueous environments and impact on low-temperature hydroprocessing of acetic acid

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Choi, Jae -Soon; Schwartz, Viviane; Santillan-Jimenez, Eduardo; Crocker, Mark; Lewis, Sr., Samuel A.; Lance, Michael J.; Meyer, III, Harry M.; More, Karren L.

    2015-03-13

    In this paper, we investigated the structural evolution of molybdenum carbides subjected to hot aqueous environments and their catalytic performance in low-temperature hydroprocessing of acetic acid. While bulk structures of Mo carbides were maintained after aging in hot liquid water, a portion of carbidic Mo sites were converted to oxidic sites. Water aging also induced changes to the non-carbidic carbon deposited during carbide synthesis and increased surface roughness, which in turn affected carbide pore volume and surface area. The extent of these structural changes was sensitive to the initial carbide structure and was lower under actual hydroprocessing conditions indicating themore » possibility of further improving the hydrothermal stability of Mo carbides by optimizing catalyst structure and operating conditions. Mo carbides were active in acetic acid conversion in the presence of liquid water, their activity being comparable to that of Ru/C. Finally, the results suggest that effective and inexpensive bio-oil hydroprocessing catalysts could be designed based on Mo carbides, although a more detailed understanding of the structure-performance relationships is needed, especially in upgrading of more complex reaction mixtures or real bio-oils.« less

  18. Utility-Scale Silicon Carbide Semiconductor: Monolithic Silicon Carbide Anode Switched Thyristor for Medium Voltage Power Conversion

    SciTech Connect

    2010-09-01

    ADEPT Project: GeneSiC is developing an advanced silicon-carbide (SiC)-based semiconductor called an anode-switched thyristor. This low-cost, compact SiC semiconductor conducts higher levels of electrical energy with better precision than traditional silicon semiconductors. This efficiency will enable a dramatic reduction in the size, weight, and volume of the power converters and electronic devices it's used in.GeneSiC is developing its SiC-based semiconductor for utility-scale power converters. Traditional silicon semiconductors can't process the high voltages that utility-scale power distribution requires, and they must be stacked in complicated circuits that require bulky insulation and cooling hardware. GeneSiC's semiconductors are well suited for high-power applications like large-scale renewable wind and solar energy installations.

  19. Wear of single-crystal silicon carbide in contact with various metals in vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1978-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted in vacuum with single crystal silicon carbide (0001) surface in contact with transition metals (tungsten, iron, rhodium, nickel, titanium, and cobalt), copper, and aluminum. The hexagon shaped cracking and fracturing of silicon carbide that occurred is believed to be due to cleavages of both the prismatic and basal planes. The silicon carbide wear debris, which was produced by brittle fracture, slides or rolls on both the metal and silicon carbide and produces grooves and indentations on these surfaces. The wear scars of aluminum and titanium, which have much stronger chemical affinity for silicon and carbon, are generally rougher than those of the other metals. Fracturing and cracking along the grain boundary of rhodium and tungsten were observed. These may be primarily due to the greater shear moduli of the metals.

  20. Friction and wear behavior of single-crystal silicon carbide in sliding contact with various metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1978-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with single-crystal silicon carbide in contact with various metals. Results indicate the coefficient of friction is related to the relative chemical activity of the metals. The more active the metal, the higher the coefficient of friction. All the metals examined transferred to silicon carbide. The chemical activity of the metal and its shear modulus may play important roles in metal transfer, the form of the wear debris and the surface roughness of the metal wear scar. The more active the metal, and the less resistance to shear, the greater the transfer to silicon carbide and the rougher the wear scar on the surface of the metal. Hexagon shaped cracking and fracturing formed by cleavage of both prismatic and basal planes is observed on the silicon carbide surface.