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Sample records for carbohydrate binding specificities

  1. The Multiple Carbohydrate Binding Specificities of Helicobacter pylori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teneberg, Susann

    Persistent colonization of the human stomach by Helicobacter pylori is a risk factor for the development of peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. Adhesion of microbes to the target tissue is an important determinant for successful initiation, establishment and maintenance of infection, and a variety of different candidate carbohydrate receptors for H. pylori have been identified. Here the different the binding specifities, and their potential role in adhesion to human gastric epithelium are described. Finally, recent findings on the roles of sialic acid binding SabA adhesin in interactions with human neutrophils and erythrocytes are discussed.

  2. Structural basis for the unusual carbohydrate-binding specificity of jacalin towards galactose and mannose.

    PubMed

    Bourne, Yves; Astoul, Corinne Houlès; Zamboni, Véronique; Peumans, Willy J; Menu-Bouaouiche, Laurence; Van Damme, Els J M; Barre, Annick; Rougé, Pierre

    2002-05-15

    Evidence is presented that the specificity of jacalin, the seed lectin from jack fruit (Artocarpus integrifolia), is not directed exclusively against the T-antigen disaccharide Galbeta1,3GalNAc, lactose and galactose, but also against mannose and oligomannosides. Biochemical analyses based on surface-plasmon-resonance measurements, combined with the X-ray-crystallographic determination of the structure of a jacalin-alpha-methyl-mannose complex at 2 A resolution, demonstrated clearly that jacalin is fully capable of binding mannose. Besides mannose, jacalin also interacts readily with glucose, N-acetylneuraminic acid and N-acetylmuramic acid. Structural analyses demonstrated that the relatively large size of the carbohydrate-binding site enables jacalin to accommodate monosaccharides with different hydroxyl conformations and provided unambiguous evidence that the beta-prism structure of jacalin is a sufficiently flexible structural scaffold to confer different carbohydrate-binding specificities to a single lectin.

  3. Structural basis for the unusual carbohydrate-binding specificity of jacalin towards galactose and mannose.

    PubMed Central

    Bourne, Yves; Astoul, Corinne Houlès; Zamboni, Véronique; Peumans, Willy J; Menu-Bouaouiche, Laurence; Van Damme, Els J M; Barre, Annick; Rougé, Pierre

    2002-01-01

    Evidence is presented that the specificity of jacalin, the seed lectin from jack fruit (Artocarpus integrifolia), is not directed exclusively against the T-antigen disaccharide Galbeta1,3GalNAc, lactose and galactose, but also against mannose and oligomannosides. Biochemical analyses based on surface-plasmon-resonance measurements, combined with the X-ray-crystallographic determination of the structure of a jacalin-alpha-methyl-mannose complex at 2 A resolution, demonstrated clearly that jacalin is fully capable of binding mannose. Besides mannose, jacalin also interacts readily with glucose, N-acetylneuraminic acid and N-acetylmuramic acid. Structural analyses demonstrated that the relatively large size of the carbohydrate-binding site enables jacalin to accommodate monosaccharides with different hydroxyl conformations and provided unambiguous evidence that the beta-prism structure of jacalin is a sufficiently flexible structural scaffold to confer different carbohydrate-binding specificities to a single lectin. PMID:11988090

  4. Identification of a novel family of carbohydrate-binding modules with broad ligand specificity

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Cheng-Jie; Feng, Yu-Liang; Cao, Qi-Long; Huang, Ming-Yue; Feng, Jia-Xun

    2016-01-01

    Most enzymes that act on carbohydrates include non-catalytic carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) that recognize and target carbohydrates. CBMs bring their appended catalytic modules into close proximity with the target substrate and increase the hydrolytic rate of enzymes acting on insoluble substrates. We previously identified a novel CBM (CBMC5614-1) at the C-terminus of endoglucanase C5614-1 from an uncultured microorganism present in buffalo rumen. In the present study, that the functional region of CBMC5614-1 involved in ligand binding was localized to 134 amino acids. Two representative homologs of CBMC5614-1, sharing the same ligand binding profile, targeted a range of β-linked polysaccharides that adopt very different conformations. Targeted substrates included soluble and insoluble cellulose, β-1,3/1,4-mixed linked glucans, xylan, and mannan. Mutagenesis revealed that three conserved aromatic residues (Trp-380, Tyr-411, and Trp-423) play an important role in ligand recognition and targeting. These results suggest that CBMC5614-1 and its homologs form a novel CBM family (CBM72) with a broad ligand-binding specificity. CBM72 members can provide new insight into CBM-ligand interactions and may have potential in protein engineering and biocatalysis. PMID:26765840

  5. Differential recognition of plant cell walls by microbial xylan-specific carbohydrate-binding modules.

    PubMed

    McCartney, Lesley; Blake, Anthony W; Flint, James; Bolam, David N; Boraston, Alisdair B; Gilbert, Harry J; Knox, J Paul

    2006-03-21

    Glycoside hydrolases that degrade plant cell walls have complex molecular architectures in which one or more catalytic modules are appended to noncatalytic carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs). CBMs promote binding to polysaccharides and potentiate enzymic hydrolysis. Although there are diverse sequence-based families of xylan-binding CBMs, these modules, in general, recognize both decorated and unsubstituted forms of the target polysaccharide, and thus the evolutionary rationale for this diversity is unclear. Using immunohistochemistry to interrogate the specificity of six xylan-binding CBMs for their target polysaccharides in cell walls has revealed considerable differences in the recognition of plant materials between these protein modules. Family 2b and 15 CBMs bind to xylan in secondary cell walls in a range of dicotyledon species, whereas family 4, 6, and 22 CBMs display a more limited capability to bind to secondary cell walls. A family 35 CBM, which displays more restricted ligand specificity against purified xylans than the other five protein modules, reveals a highly distinctive binding pattern to plant material including the recognition of primary cell walls of certain dicotyledons, a feature shared with CBM15. Differences in the specificity of the CBMs toward walls of wheat grain and maize coleoptiles were also evident. The variation in CBM specificity for ligands located in plant cell walls provides a biological rationale for the repertoire of structurally distinct xylan-binding CBMs present in nature, and points to the utility of these modules in probing the molecular architecture of cell walls.

  6. Related lectins from snowdrop and maize differ in their carbohydrate-binding specificity.

    PubMed

    Fouquaert, Elke; Smith, David F; Peumans, Willy J; Proost, Paul; Balzarini, Jan; Savvides, Savvas N; Damme, Els J M Van

    2009-03-01

    Searches in an EST database from maize revealed the expression of a protein related to the Galanthus nivalis (GNA) agglutinin, referred to as GNA(maize). Heterologous expression of GNA(maize) in Pichia pastoris allowed characterization of the first nucleocytoplasmic GNA homolog from plants. GNA(maize) is a tetrameric protein which shares 64% sequence similarity with GNA. Glycan microarray analyses revealed important differences in the specificity. Unlike GNA, which binds strongly to high-mannose N-glycans, the lectin from maize reacts almost exclusively with more complex glycans. Interestingly, GNA(maize) prefers complex glycans containing beta1-2 GlcNAc residues. The obvious difference in carbohydrate-binding properties is accompanied by a 100-fold reduced anti-HIV activity. Although the sequences of GNA and GNA(maize) are clearly related they show only 28% sequence identity. Our results indicate that gene divergence within the family of GNA-related lectins leads to changes in carbohydrate-binding specificity, as shown on N-glycan arrays.

  7. Understanding How Noncatalytic Carbohydrate Binding Modules Can Display Specificity for Xyloglucan*

    PubMed Central

    Luís, Ana S.; Venditto, Immacolata; Temple, Max J.; Rogowski, Artur; Baslé, Arnaud; Xue, Jie; Knox, J. Paul; Prates, José A.M.; Ferreira, Luís M. A.; Fontes, Carlos M. G. A.; Najmudin, Shabir; Gilbert, Harry J.

    2013-01-01

    Plant biomass is central to the carbon cycle and to environmentally sustainable industries exemplified by the biofuel sector. Plant cell wall degrading enzymes generally contain noncatalytic carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) that fulfil a targeting function, which enhances catalysis. CBMs that bind β-glucan chains often display broad specificity recognizing β1,4-glucans (cellulose), β1,3-β1,4-mixed linked glucans and xyloglucan, a β1,4-glucan decorated with α1,6-xylose residues, by targeting structures common to the three polysaccharides. Thus, CBMs that recognize xyloglucan target the β1,4-glucan backbone and only accommodate the xylose decorations. Here we show that two closely related CBMs, CBM65A and CBM65B, derived from EcCel5A, a Eubacterium cellulosolvens endoglucanase, bind to a range of β-glucans but, uniquely, display significant preference for xyloglucan. The structures of the two CBMs reveal a β-sandwich fold. The ligand binding site comprises the β-sheet that forms the concave surface of the proteins. Binding to the backbone chains of β-glucans is mediated primarily by five aromatic residues that also make hydrophobic interactions with the xylose side chains of xyloglucan, conferring the distinctive specificity of the CBMs for the decorated polysaccharide. Significantly, and in contrast to other CBMs that recognize β-glucans, CBM65A utilizes different polar residues to bind cellulose and mixed linked glucans. Thus, Gln106 is central to cellulose recognition, but is not required for binding to mixed linked glucans. This report reveals the mechanism by which β-glucan-specific CBMs can distinguish between linear and mixed linked glucans, and show how these CBMs can exploit an extensive hydrophobic platform to target the side chains of decorated β-glucans. PMID:23229556

  8. Carbohydrate binding specificity of the B-cell maturation mitogen from Artocarpus integrifolia seeds.

    PubMed

    Misquith, S; Rani, P G; Surolia, A

    1994-12-01

    Artocarpin, a mannose-specific lectin, is a homotetrameric protein (M(r) 65,000) devoid of covalently attached carbohydrates and consists of four isolectins with pI in the range 5-6.5. Investigations of its carbohydrate binding specificity reveal that among monosaccharides, mannose is preferred over glucose. Among mannooligosaccharides, mannotriose (Man alpha 1-3[Man alpha 1-6]Man) and mannopentaose are the strongest ligands followed by Man alpha 1-3Man. Extension of these ligands by GlcNAc at the reducing ends of mannooligosaccharides tested remarkably improves their inhibitory potencies, while substitution of both the alpha 1-3 and alpha 1-6 mannosyl residues of mannotriose and the core pentasaccharide of N-linked glycans (Man alpha 1-3[Man alpha 1-6]Man beta 1-4GlcNAc beta 1-4GlcNAc) by GlcNAc or N-acetyllactosamine in beta 1-2 linkage diminishes their inhibitory potencies. Sialylated oligosaccharides are non-inhibitory. Moreover, the substitution of either alpha 1-3 or alpha 1-6 linked mannosyl residues of M5Gn or both by mannose in alpha 1-2 linkage leads to a considerable reduction of their inhibitory power. Addition of a xylose residue in beta 1-2 linkage to the core pentasaccharide improves the inhibitory activity. Considering the fact that artocarpin has the strongest affinity for the xylose containing hepasaccharide from horseradish peroxidase, which differs significantly from all the mannose/glucose-specific lectins, it should prove a useful tool for the isolation and characterization of glycoproteins displaying such structure.

  9. Mutated Leguminous Lectin Containing a Heparin-Binding like Motif in a Carbohydrate-Binding Loop Specifically Binds to Heparin

    PubMed Central

    Abo, Hirohito; Soga, Keisuke; Tanaka, Atsuhiro; Tateno, Hiroaki; Hirabayashi, Jun; Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    We previously introduced random mutations in the sugar-binding loops of a leguminous lectin and screened the resulting mutated lectins for novel specificities using cell surface display. Screening of a mutated peanut agglutinin (PNA), revealed a mutated PNA with a distinct preference for heparin. Glycan microarray analyses using the mutated lectin fused to the Fc region of human immunoglobulin, revealed that a particular sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAG), heparin, had the highest binding affinity for mutated PNA among 97 glycans tested, although wild-type PNA showed affinity towards Galβ1-3GalNAc and similar galactosylated glycans. Further analyses of binding specificity using an enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay demonstrated that the mutated PNA specifically binds to heparin, and weakly to de-2-O-sulfated heparin, but not to other GAG chains including de-6-O-sulfated and de-N-sulfated heparins. The mutated PNA had six amino acid substitutions within the eight amino acid-long sugar-binding loop. In this loop, the heparin-binding like motif comprised three arginine residues at positions 124, 128, and 129, and a histidine at position 125 was present. Substitution of each arginine or histidine residue to alanine reduced heparin-binding ability, indicating that all of these basic amino acid residues contributed to heparin binding. Inhibition assay demonstrated that heparin and dextran sulfate strongly inhibited mutated PNA binding to heparin in dose-dependent manner. The mutated PNA could distinguish between CHO cells and proteoglycan-deficient mutant cells. This is the first report establishing a novel leguminous lectin that preferentially binds to highly sulfated heparin and may provide novel GAG-binding probes to distinguish between heterogeneous GAG repeating units. PMID:26714191

  10. Mutated Leguminous Lectin Containing a Heparin-Binding like Motif in a Carbohydrate-Binding Loop Specifically Binds to Heparin.

    PubMed

    Abo, Hirohito; Soga, Keisuke; Tanaka, Atsuhiro; Tateno, Hiroaki; Hirabayashi, Jun; Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    We previously introduced random mutations in the sugar-binding loops of a leguminous lectin and screened the resulting mutated lectins for novel specificities using cell surface display. Screening of a mutated peanut agglutinin (PNA), revealed a mutated PNA with a distinct preference for heparin. Glycan microarray analyses using the mutated lectin fused to the Fc region of human immunoglobulin, revealed that a particular sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAG), heparin, had the highest binding affinity for mutated PNA among 97 glycans tested, although wild-type PNA showed affinity towards Galβ1-3GalNAc and similar galactosylated glycans. Further analyses of binding specificity using an enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay demonstrated that the mutated PNA specifically binds to heparin, and weakly to de-2-O-sulfated heparin, but not to other GAG chains including de-6-O-sulfated and de-N-sulfated heparins. The mutated PNA had six amino acid substitutions within the eight amino acid-long sugar-binding loop. In this loop, the heparin-binding like motif comprised three arginine residues at positions 124, 128, and 129, and a histidine at position 125 was present. Substitution of each arginine or histidine residue to alanine reduced heparin-binding ability, indicating that all of these basic amino acid residues contributed to heparin binding. Inhibition assay demonstrated that heparin and dextran sulfate strongly inhibited mutated PNA binding to heparin in dose-dependent manner. The mutated PNA could distinguish between CHO cells and proteoglycan-deficient mutant cells. This is the first report establishing a novel leguminous lectin that preferentially binds to highly sulfated heparin and may provide novel GAG-binding probes to distinguish between heterogeneous GAG repeating units.

  11. Specificity of O-glycosylation in enhancing the stability and cellulose binding affinity of Family 1 carbohydrate-binding modules.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liqun; Drake, Matthew R; Resch, Michael G; Greene, Eric R; Himmel, Michael E; Chaffey, Patrick K; Beckham, Gregg T; Tan, Zhongping

    2014-05-27

    The majority of biological turnover of lignocellulosic biomass in nature is conducted by fungi, which commonly use Family 1 carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) for targeting enzymes to cellulose. Family 1 CBMs are glycosylated, but the effects of glycosylation on CBM function remain unknown. Here, the effects of O-mannosylation are examined on the Family 1 CBM from the Trichoderma reesei Family 7 cellobiohydrolase at three glycosylation sites. To enable this work, a procedure to synthesize glycosylated Family 1 CBMs was developed. Subsequently, a library of 20 CBMs was synthesized with mono-, di-, or trisaccharides at each site for comparison of binding affinity, proteolytic stability, and thermostability. The results show that, although CBM mannosylation does not induce major conformational changes, it can increase the thermolysin cleavage resistance up to 50-fold depending on the number of mannose units on the CBM and the attachment site. O-Mannosylation also increases the thermostability of CBM glycoforms up to 16 °C, and a mannose disaccharide at Ser3 seems to have the largest themostabilizing effect. Interestingly, the glycoforms with small glycans at each site displayed higher binding affinities for crystalline cellulose, and the glycoform with a single mannose at each of three positions conferred the highest affinity enhancement of 7.4-fold. Overall, by combining chemical glycoprotein synthesis and functional studies, we show that specific glycosylation events confer multiple beneficial properties on Family 1 CBMs. PMID:24821760

  12. Specificity of O-glycosylation in enhancing the stability and cellulose binding affinity of Family 1 carbohydrate-binding modules

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Liqun; Drake, Matthew R.; Resch, Michael G.; Greene, Eric R.; Himmel, Michael E.; Chaffey, Patrick K.; Beckham, Gregg T.; Tan, Zhongping

    2014-01-01

    The majority of biological turnover of lignocellulosic biomass in nature is conducted by fungi, which commonly use Family 1 carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) for targeting enzymes to cellulose. Family 1 CBMs are glycosylated, but the effects of glycosylation on CBM function remain unknown. Here, the effects of O-mannosylation are examined on the Family 1 CBM from the Trichoderma reesei Family 7 cellobiohydrolase at three glycosylation sites. To enable this work, a procedure to synthesize glycosylated Family 1 CBMs was developed. Subsequently, a library of 20 CBMs was synthesized with mono-, di-, or trisaccharides at each site for comparison of binding affinity, proteolytic stability, and thermostability. The results show that, although CBM mannosylation does not induce major conformational changes, it can increase the thermolysin cleavage resistance up to 50-fold depending on the number of mannose units on the CBM and the attachment site. O-Mannosylation also increases the thermostability of CBM glycoforms up to 16 °C, and a mannose disaccharide at Ser3 seems to have the largest themostabilizing effect. Interestingly, the glycoforms with small glycans at each site displayed higher binding affinities for crystalline cellulose, and the glycoform with a single mannose at each of three positions conferred the highest affinity enhancement of 7.4-fold. Overall, by combining chemical glycoprotein synthesis and functional studies, we show that specific glycosylation events confer multiple beneficial properties on Family 1 CBMs. PMID:24821760

  13. Specificity of O-glycosylation in enhancing the stability and cellulose binding affinity of Family 1 carbohydrate-binding modules.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liqun; Drake, Matthew R; Resch, Michael G; Greene, Eric R; Himmel, Michael E; Chaffey, Patrick K; Beckham, Gregg T; Tan, Zhongping

    2014-05-27

    The majority of biological turnover of lignocellulosic biomass in nature is conducted by fungi, which commonly use Family 1 carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) for targeting enzymes to cellulose. Family 1 CBMs are glycosylated, but the effects of glycosylation on CBM function remain unknown. Here, the effects of O-mannosylation are examined on the Family 1 CBM from the Trichoderma reesei Family 7 cellobiohydrolase at three glycosylation sites. To enable this work, a procedure to synthesize glycosylated Family 1 CBMs was developed. Subsequently, a library of 20 CBMs was synthesized with mono-, di-, or trisaccharides at each site for comparison of binding affinity, proteolytic stability, and thermostability. The results show that, although CBM mannosylation does not induce major conformational changes, it can increase the thermolysin cleavage resistance up to 50-fold depending on the number of mannose units on the CBM and the attachment site. O-Mannosylation also increases the thermostability of CBM glycoforms up to 16 °C, and a mannose disaccharide at Ser3 seems to have the largest themostabilizing effect. Interestingly, the glycoforms with small glycans at each site displayed higher binding affinities for crystalline cellulose, and the glycoform with a single mannose at each of three positions conferred the highest affinity enhancement of 7.4-fold. Overall, by combining chemical glycoprotein synthesis and functional studies, we show that specific glycosylation events confer multiple beneficial properties on Family 1 CBMs.

  14. Binding of Sperm to the Zona Pellucida Mediated by Sperm Carbohydrate-Binding Proteins is not Species-Specific in Vitro between Pigs and Cattle.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kazuya; Kikuchi, Kazuhiro; Uchida, Yasuomi; Kanai-Kitayama, Saeko; Suzuki, Reiichiro; Sato, Reiko; Toma, Kazunori; Geshi, Masaya; Akagi, Satoshi; Nakano, Minoru; Yonezawa, Naoto

    2013-01-01

    Carbohydrates are candidates for the basis of species-selective interaction of gametes during mammalian fertilization. In this study, we sought to clarify the roles of sugar residues in the species-selective, sperm-oocyte interaction in pigs and cattle. Acrosome-intact porcine and bovine sperm exhibited their strongest binding affinities for β-Gal and α-Man residues, respectively. Porcine-sperm specificity changed from β-Gal to α-Man after the acrosome reaction, while bovine-sperm specificity did not. Binding of acrosome-intact and acrosome-reacted sperm decreased after trypsinization, indicating that the carbohydrate-binding components are proteins. While immature oocytes bound homologous sperm preferentially to heterologous sperm, oocytes matured in vitro bound similar numbers of homologous and heterologous sperm. Lectin staining revealed the aggregation of α-Man residues on the outer surface of the porcine zona during maturation. In both species, zona-free, mature oocytes bound homologous sperm preferentially to heterologous sperm. The lectin-staining patterns of the zona pellucida and zona-free oocytes coincided with the carbohydrate-binding specificities of acrosome-intact and acrosome-reacted sperm, respectively, supporting the involvement of carbohydrates in gamete recognition in pigs and cattle. These results also indicate that sperm-zona pellucida and sperm-oolemma bindings are not strictly species-specific in pigs and cattle, and further suggest that sperm penetration into the zona and/or fusion with oolemma may be species-specific between pigs and cattle.

  15. Primary structure and carbohydrate binding specificity of a potent anti-HIV lectin isolated from the filamentous cyanobacterium Oscillatoria agardhii.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yuichiro; Okuyama, Satomi; Hori, Kanji

    2007-04-13

    The primary structure of a lectin, designated Oscillatoria agardhii agglutinin (OAA), isolated from the freshwater cyanobacterium O. agardhii NIES-204 was determined by the combination of Edman degradation and electron spray ionization-mass spectrometry. OAA is a polypeptide (Mr 13,925) consisting of two tandem repeats. Interestingly, each repeat sequence of OAA showed a high degree of similarity to those of a myxobacterium, Myxococcus xanthus hemagglutinin, and a marine red alga Eucheuma serra lectin. A systematic binding assay with pyridylaminated oligosaccharides revealed that OAA exclusively binds to high mannose (HM)-type N-glycans but not to other N-glycans, including complex types, hybrid types, and the pentasaccharide core or oligosaccharides from glycolipids. OAA did not interact with any of free mono- and oligomannoses that are constituents of the branched oligomannosides. These results suggest that the core disaccharide, GlcNAc-GlcNAc, is also essential for binding to OAA. The binding activity of OAA to HM type N-glycans was dramatically decreased when alpha1-2 Man was attached to alpha1-3 Man branched from the alpha1-6 Man of the pentasaccharide core. This specificity of OAA for HM-type oligosaccharides is distinct from other HM-binding lectins. Kinetic analysis with an HM heptasaccharide revealed that OAA possesses two carbohydrate binding sites per molecule, with an association constant of 2.41x10(8) m-1. Furthermore, OAA potently inhibits human immunodeficiency virus replication in MT-4 cells (EC50=44.5 nm). Thus, we have found a novel lectin family sharing similar structure and carbohydrate binding specificity among bacteria, cyanobacteria, and marine algae. PMID:17314091

  16. Redefinition of the Carbohydrate Binding Specificity of Helicobacter pylori BabA Adhesin*

    PubMed Central

    Benktander, John; Ångström, Jonas; Breimer, Michael E.; Teneberg, Susann

    2012-01-01

    Certain Helicobacter pylori strains adhere to the human gastric epithelium using the blood group antigen-binding adhesin (BabA). All BabA-expressing H. pylori strains bind to the blood group O determinants on type 1 core chains, i.e. to the Lewis b antigen (Fucα2Galβ3(Fucα4)GlcNAc; Leb) and the H type 1 determinant (Fucα2Galβ3GlcNAc). Recently, BabA strains have been categorized into those recognizing only Leb and H type 1 determinants (designated specialist strains) and those that also bind to A and B type 1 determinants (designated generalist strains). Here, the structural requirements for carbohydrate recognition by generalist and specialist BabA were further explored by binding of these types of strains to a panel of different glycosphingolipids. Three glycosphingolipids recognized by both specialist and generalist BabA were isolated from the small intestine of a blood group O pig and characterized by mass spectrometry and proton NMR as H type 1 pentaglycosylceramide (Fucα2Galβ3GlcNAcβ3Galβ4Glcβ1Cer), Globo H hexaglycosylceramide (Fucα2Galβ3GalNAcβ3Galα4Galβ4Glcβ1Cer), and a mixture of three complex glycosphingolipids (Fucα2Galβ4GlcNAcβ6(Fucα2Galβ3GlcNAcβ3)Galβ3GlcNAcβ3Galβ4Glcβ1Cer, Fucα2Galβ3GlcNAcβ6(Fucα2Galβ3GlcNAcβ3)Galβ3GlcNAcβ3Galβ4Glcβ1Cer, and Fucα2Galβ4(Fucα3)GlcNAcβ6(Fucα2Galβ3GlcNAcβ3)Galβ3GlcNAcβ3Galβ4Glcβ1Cer). In addition to the binding of both strains to the Globo H hexaglycosylceramide, i.e. a blood group O determinant on a type 4 core chain, the generalist strain bound to the Globo A heptaglycosylceramide (GalNAcα3(Fucα2)Galβ3GalNAcβ3Galα4Galβ4Glcβ1Cer), i.e. a blood group A determinant on a type 4 core chain. The binding of BabA to the two sets of isoreceptors is due to conformational similarities of the terminal disaccharides of H type 1 and Globo H and of the terminal trisaccharides of A type 1 and Globo A. PMID:22822069

  17. Effects of lectins with different carbohydrate-binding specificities on hepatoma, choriocarcinoma, melanoma and osteosarcoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Ng, T B; Ooi, V E; Liu, W K

    2000-03-01

    The effects of lectins with different carbohydrate-binding specificities on human hepatoma (H3B), human choriocarcinoma (JAr), mouse melanoma (B16) and rat osteosarcoma (ROS) cell lines were investigated. Cell viability was estimated by uptake of crystal violet. Wheat germ lectin was the lectin with the most deleterious effect on the viability of H3B, JAr and ROS cell lines. The cytotoxicity of lectins with similar sugar-binding specificity to wheat germ lectin, including Maackia amurensis lectin and Solanum tuberosum lectin, was weaker than that of wheat germ lectin. N-acetylgalactosamine-and galactose-binding Tricholoma mongolicum lectin ranked third, after wheat germ lectin and Maackia amurensis lectin, with regard to its effect on H3B, and ranked, together with Maackia amurensis lectin, as the lectins with the second most pronounced effects on ROS. However, the cytotoxic effects of Tricholoma mongolicum lectin on JAr were much weaker than those of Maackia amurensis lectin, Solanum tuberosum lectin and Anguilla anguilla lectin. Artocarpus integrifolia lectin, Lens culinaris lectin and Anguilla anguilla lectin possessed milder cytotoxicity than the remaining lectins. which were approximately equipotent. The mannose-binding Narcissus pseudonarcissus and Lens culinaris lectins were only weakly cytotoxic, the exception being a stronger effect on H3B. The N-acetylgalactosamine-binding Glycine max lectin and methylgalactose-binding Artocarpus integrifolia lectin similarly exhibited low cytotoxicity. It can thus be concluded that in general the ranking was wheat germ lectin > Maackia amurensis lectin approximately Trichloma mongolicum lectins > other aforementioned lectins in cytotoxicity. A particular lectin may manifest more conspicuous toxicity on certain cell lines and less on others.

  18. Conformational Analysis of the Streptococcus pneumoniae Hyaluronate Lyase and Characterization of Its Hyaluronan-specific Carbohydrate-binding Module*

    PubMed Central

    Suits, Michael D. L.; Pluvinage, Benjamin; Law, Adrienne; Liu, Yan; Palma, Angelina S.; Chai, Wengang; Feizi, Ten; Boraston, Alisdair B.

    2014-01-01

    For a subset of pathogenic microorganisms, including Streptococcus pneumoniae, the recognition and degradation of host hyaluronan contributes to bacterial spreading through the extracellular matrix and enhancing access to host cell surfaces. The hyaluronate lyase (Hyl) presented on the surface of S. pneumoniae performs this role. Using glycan microarray screening, affinity electrophoresis, and isothermal titration calorimetry we show that the N-terminal module of Hyl is a hyaluronan-specific carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) and the founding member of CBM family 70. The 1.2 Å resolution x-ray crystal structure of CBM70 revealed it to have a β-sandwich fold, similar to other CBMs. The electrostatic properties of the binding site, which was identified by site-directed mutagenesis, are distinct from other CBMs and complementary to its acidic ligand, hyaluronan. Dynamic light scattering and solution small angle x-ray scattering revealed the full-length Hyl protein to exist as a monomer/dimer mixture in solution. Through a detailed analysis of the small angle x-ray scattering data, we report the pseudoatomic solution structures of the monomer and dimer forms of the full-length multimodular Hyl. PMID:25100731

  19. Specific Carbohydrate Diet: Does It Work?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Specific Carbohydrate Diet (SCD) Go Back The Specific Carbohydrate Diet (SCD) Email Print + Share There is no ... diet that has received attention is the Specific Carbohydrate Diet. This diet limits poorly digestible carbohydrates to ...

  20. Carbohydrate-binding motifs in a novel type lectin from the sea mussel Crenomytilus grayanus: Homology modeling study and site-specific mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Kovalchuk, Svetlana N; Golotin, Vasily A; Balabanova, Larissa A; Buinovskaya, Nina S; Likhatskaya, Galina N; Rasskazov, Valery A

    2015-11-01

    The GalNAc/Gal-specific lectin from the sea mussel Crenomytilus grayanus (CGL) was shown to represent a novel family of lectins and to be characterized by three amino acid tandem repeats with high (up to 73%) sequence similarities to each other. We have used homology modeling approach to predict CGL sugar-binding sites. In silico analysis of CGL-GalNAc complexes showed that CGL contained three binding sites, each of which included conserved HPY(K)G motif. In silico substitutions of histidine, proline and glycine residues by alanine in the HPY(K)G motifs of the Sites 1-3 was shown to lead to loss of hydrogen bonds between His and GalNAc and to the increasing the calculated CGL-GalNAc binding energies. We have obtained recombinant CGL and used site-specific mutagenesis to experimentally examine the role of HPK(Y)G motifs in hemagglutinating and carbohydrate binding activities of CGL. Substitutions of histidine, proline and glycine residues by alanine in the HPYG motif of Site 1 and Site 2 was found to led to complete loss of CGL hemagglutinating and mucin-binding activities. The same mutations in HPKG motif of the Site 3 resulted in decreasing the mucin-binding activity in 6-folds in comparison with the wild type lectin. The mutagenesis and in silico analysis indicates the importance of the all three HPY(K)G motifs in the carbohydrate-binding and hemagglutinating activities of CGL. PMID:26439416

  1. Role of carbohydrates in thyrotropin binding sites.

    PubMed

    Pekonen, F

    1980-07-01

    The role of carbohydrates in thyrotropin binding was studied by glycosidase treatment of human thyroid membranes. Removal of over 75% of membrane sialic acid resulted in a 50% increase of TSH binding, measured in 10 mM Tris-HCl, 50 mM NaCl, 0.1% bSA, pH 7.4, 37 degrees C (buffer A). This augmentation was due to an increase in binding to high affinity sites (Ka 1 X 10(10)M-1). The binding was highly specific and was not significantly inhibited by gangliosides. In contrast, low affinity binding of TSH was unchanged either in buffer A or in 10 mM Tris-acetate, 0.1% bSA pH 6.0, 4 degrees C (buffer B) and was inhibited by gangliosides. Treatment of membranes with beta-galactosidase, beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase and alpha-L-fucosidase had little effect on TSH binding. The data suggests that membrane-associated sialic acid inhibits TSH binding to high affinity receptors and that gangliosides are not involved in tthis TSH-receptor interaction.

  2. A platform to screen for C-type lectin receptor-binding carbohydrates and their potential for cell-specific targeting and immune modulation.

    PubMed

    Maglinao, Maha; Eriksson, Magdalena; Schlegel, Mark K; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Johannssen, Timo; Götze, Sebastian; Seeberger, Peter H; Lepenies, Bernd

    2014-02-10

    Myeloid C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) in innate immunity represent a superfamily of pattern recognition receptors that recognize carbohydrate structures on pathogens and self-antigens. The primary interaction of an antigen-presenting cell and a pathogen shapes the following immune response. Therefore, the identification of CLR ligands that can either enhance or modulate the immune response is of interest. We have developed a screening platform based on glycan arrays to identify immune modulatory carbohydrate ligands of CLRs. A comprehensive library of CLRs was expressed by fusing the extracellular part of each respective CLR, the part containing the carbohydrate-recognition domain (CRD), to the Fc fragment of human IgG1 molecules. CLR-Fc fusion proteins display the CRD in a dimeric form, are properly glycosylated, and can be detected by a secondary antibody with a conjugated fluorophore. Thus, they are valuable tools for high-throughput screening. We were able to identify novel carbohydrate binders of CLRs using the glycan array technology. These CLR-binding carbohydrates were then covalently attached to the model antigen ovalbumin. The ovalbumin neoglycoconjugates were used in a dendritic cell/T cell co-culture assay to stimulate transgenic T cells in vitro. In addition, mice were immunized with these conjugates to analyze the immune modulatory properties of the CLR ligands in vivo. The CLR ligands induced an increased Th1 cytokine production in vitro and modulated the humoral response in vivo. The platform described here allows for the identification of CLR ligands, as well as the evaluation of each ligand's cell-specific targeting and immune modulatory properties.

  3. Significance of the carbohydrate moiety of the rat ovarian luteinizing-hormone/chorionic-gonadotropin receptor for ligand-binding specificity and signal transduction.

    PubMed Central

    Petäjä-Repo, U E; Merz, W E; Rajaniemi, H J

    1993-01-01

    The contribution of the carbohydrate moiety of the rat ovarian luteinizing-hormone (LH)/chorionic-gonadotropin (CG) receptor to ligand-binding specificity and signal transduction was investigated by using glycosidases. Purified membranes from pseudo-pregnant rat ovaries were treated with neuraminidase or peptide N-glycosidase F, to remove terminal sialic acids and N-linked oligosaccharides of the receptor, respectively. Ligand blotting and densitometric scanning of the autoradiograms showed that 90-95% of the receptors were deglycosylated, and that desialylation was virtually complete. Neither the desialylated nor the deglycosylated receptors were able to bind human follicle-stimulating hormone or bovine thyroid-stimulating hormone, as revealed by competition binding experiments. The 50% effective dose of hCG for adenylate cyclase activation, as determined by measuring the formation of cyclic [32P]AMP from [alpha-32P]ATP for 15 min at 30 degrees C, was similar in the control and deglycosylated membranes: 10.2 +/- 3.3 nM and 12.2 +/- 3.8 nM respectively. The same was true for the time course of the basal, hCG- and forskolin-stimulated enzyme activity. In addition, removal of oligosaccharides from the receptor did not restore the ability of desialylated hCG, nor of the deglycosylated hormone, to stimulate adenylate cyclase. In conclusion, the carbohydrate moiety of the native membrane-inserted rat ovarian LH/CG receptor does not contribute to the ligand-binding specificity, and it is not required for the functional coupling of the occupied receptor and the adenylate cyclase system. These functions are associated with the polypeptide portion of the receptor. Images Figure 1 PMID:8318013

  4. Pre-B cell receptor binding to galectin-1 modifies galectin-1/carbohydrate affinity to modulate specific galectin-1/glycan lattice interactions.

    PubMed

    Bonzi, Jeremy; Bornet, Olivier; Betzi, Stephane; Kasper, Brian T; Mahal, Lara K; Mancini, Stephane J; Schiff, Claudine; Sebban-Kreuzer, Corinne; Guerlesquin, Francoise; Elantak, Latifa

    2015-01-01

    Galectins are glycan-binding proteins involved in various biological processes including cell/cell interactions. During B-cell development, bone marrow stromal cells secreting galectin-1 (GAL1) constitute a specific niche for pre-BII cells. Besides binding glycans, GAL1 is also a pre-B cell receptor (pre-BCR) ligand that induces receptor clustering, the first checkpoint of B-cell differentiation. The GAL1/pre-BCR interaction is the first example of a GAL1/unglycosylated protein interaction in the extracellular compartment. Here we show that GAL1/pre-BCR interaction modifies GAL1/glycan affinity and particularly inhibits binding to LacNAc containing epitopes. GAL1/pre-BCR interaction induces local conformational changes in the GAL1 carbohydrate-binding site generating a reduction in GAL1/glycan affinity. This fine tuning of GAL1/glycan interactions may be a strategic mechanism for allowing pre-BCR clustering and pre-BII cells departure from their niche. Altogether, our data suggest a novel mechanism for a cell to modify the equilibrium of the GAL1/glycan lattice involving GAL1/unglycosylated protein interactions. PMID:25708191

  5. Many pulmonary pathogenic bacteria bind specifically to the carbohydrate sequence GalNAc beta 1-4Gal found in some glycolipids.

    PubMed Central

    Krivan, H C; Roberts, D D; Ginsburg, V

    1988-01-01

    Pneumonia is one of the most common causes of death from infectious disease in the United States. To examine the possible role of carbohydrates as adhesion receptors for infection, several pulmonary pathogenic bacteria were studied for binding to glycosphingolipids. Radiolabeled bacteria were layered on thin-layer chromatograms of separated glycosphingolipids, and bound bacteria were detected by autoradiography. The classic triad of infectious bacteria found in cystic fibrosis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Haemophilus influenzae, and Staphylococcus aureus, along with other bacteria commonly implicated in typical pneumonia, such as Streptococcus pneumoniae, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and certain Escherichia coli, bind specifically to fucosylasialo-GM1 (Fuc alpha 1-2Gal beta 1-3GalNAc beta 1-4Gal beta 1-4Cer), asialo-GM1 (Gal beta 1-3GalNAc beta 1-4Gal beta-1-4Galc beta 1-1Cer), and asialo-GM2 (GalNAc beta 1-4Gal beta 1-4Glc beta 1-1Cer). Bacteria maintained in nutrient medium bind better than the same cells suspended in buffer. They do not bind to galactosylceramide, glucosylceramide, lactosylceramide, trihexosylceramide, globoside, paragloboside, Forssman glycosphingolipid, or several other glycosphingolipids tested, including the gangliosides GM1, GM2, GM3, GD1a, GD1b, GT1b, and Cad. The finding that these pathogens do not bind to lactosylceramide suggests that beta 1-4-linked GalNAc, which is positioned internally in fucosylasialo-GM1 and asialo-GM1 and terminally in asialo-GM2, is required for binding. beta-N-Acetylgalactosamine itself, however, is not sufficient for binding, as the bacteria did not bind to globoside, which contains the terminal sequence GalNAc beta 1-3Gal. These data suggest that these bacteria require at least terminal or internal GalNAc beta 1-4Gal sequences unsubstituted with sialyl residues for binding. Other bacteria, including Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Streptococcus pyogenes, Salmonella species, and some E. coli, do not bind to the GalNAc beta 1-4Gal

  6. Carbohydrate binding specificities and crystal structure of the cholera toxin-like B-subunit from Citrobacter freundii.

    PubMed

    Jansson, Lena; Angström, Jonas; Lebens, Michael; Imberty, Anne; Varrot, Annabelle; Teneberg, Susann

    2010-05-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli and Vibrio cholerae are well known causative agents of severe diarrheal diseases. Both pathogens produce AB(5) toxins, with one enzymatically active A-subunit and a pentamer of receptor-binding B-subunits. The primary receptor for both B-subunits is the GM1 ganglioside (Galbeta3GalNAcbeta4(NeuAcalpha3)Galbeta4GlcbetaCer), but the B-subunits from porcine isolates of E. coli also bind neolacto-(Galbeta4GlcNAcbeta-)terminated glycoconjugates and the B-subunits from human isolates of E. coli (hLTB) have affinity for blood group A type 2-(GalNAcalpha3(Fucalpha2)Galbeta4GlcNAcbeta-)terminated glycoconjugates. A B-subunit with 73% sequence identity to the B-subunits of cholera toxin and the heat-labile toxin of E. coli is produced by certain strains of enteropathogenic E. coli and by Citrobacter freundii. This C. freundii B-subunit (CFXB) has now been expressed in V. cholerae, and isolated in high yields. Glycosphingolipid binding studies show that CFXB binds to the GM1 ganglioside with high affinity. In addition, CFXB has high affinity for both neolacto-terminated and blood group A type 2-terminated glycoconjugates. The crystal structure of the pentameric arrangement of C. freundii B-subunits display high structural similarity with related proteins from E. coli and V. cholerae and oligosaccharide binding sites can be identified on the protein surface. Small changes in the 88-95 loop connecting the GM1 and blood group A binding sites explains the minor changes in affinity seen for these two ligands. However, the enhanced affinity of CFXB for neolacto-terminated structures can be sought in the Lys34Tyr substitution affording additional hydrogen bond interactions between the tyrosyl side chain and the GlcNAcbeta3Galb4Glcbeta1 segment of neolactotetraosylceramide via bridging water molecules.

  7. Tissue-specific response of carbohydrate-responsive element binding protein (ChREBP) to mammalian hibernation in 13-lined ground squirrels.

    PubMed

    Logan, Samantha M; Storey, Kenneth B

    2016-10-01

    Mammalian hibernation is characterized by a general suppression of energy expensive processes and a switch to lipid oxidation as the primary fuel source. Glucose-responsive carbohydrate responsive element binding protein (ChREBP) has yet to be studied in hibernating organisms, which prepare for the cold winter months by feeding until they exhibit an obesity-like state that is accompanied by naturally-induced and completely reversible insulin resistance. Studying ChREBP expression and activity in the hibernating 13-lined ground squirrel is important to better understand the molecular mechanisms that regulate energy metabolism under cellular stress. Immunoblotting was used to determine the relative expression level and subcellular localization of ChREBP, as well as serine phosphorylation at 95 kDa, comparing euthermic and late torpid ground squirrel liver, kidney, heart and muscle. DNA-binding ELISAs and RT-PCR were used to explore ChREBP transcriptional activity during cold stress. ChREBP activity seemed generally suppressed in liver and kidney. During torpor, ChREBP total protein levels decreased to 44% of EC in liver, phosphoserine levels increased 2.1-fold of EC in kidney, and downstream Fasn/Pkl transcript levels decreased to <60% of EC in liver. By contrast, ChREBP activity generally increased during torpor in cardiac and skeletal muscle, where ChREBP total protein levels increased over 1.5-fold and 5-fold of EC in muscle and heart, respectively; where DNA-binding increased by ∼2-fold of EC in muscle; and where Fasn transcript levels increased over 3-fold and 7-fold in both muscle and heart, respectively. In summary, ChREBP has a tissue-specific role in regulating energy metabolism during hibernation.

  8. Tissue-specific response of carbohydrate-responsive element binding protein (ChREBP) to mammalian hibernation in 13-lined ground squirrels.

    PubMed

    Logan, Samantha M; Storey, Kenneth B

    2016-10-01

    Mammalian hibernation is characterized by a general suppression of energy expensive processes and a switch to lipid oxidation as the primary fuel source. Glucose-responsive carbohydrate responsive element binding protein (ChREBP) has yet to be studied in hibernating organisms, which prepare for the cold winter months by feeding until they exhibit an obesity-like state that is accompanied by naturally-induced and completely reversible insulin resistance. Studying ChREBP expression and activity in the hibernating 13-lined ground squirrel is important to better understand the molecular mechanisms that regulate energy metabolism under cellular stress. Immunoblotting was used to determine the relative expression level and subcellular localization of ChREBP, as well as serine phosphorylation at 95 kDa, comparing euthermic and late torpid ground squirrel liver, kidney, heart and muscle. DNA-binding ELISAs and RT-PCR were used to explore ChREBP transcriptional activity during cold stress. ChREBP activity seemed generally suppressed in liver and kidney. During torpor, ChREBP total protein levels decreased to 44% of EC in liver, phosphoserine levels increased 2.1-fold of EC in kidney, and downstream Fasn/Pkl transcript levels decreased to <60% of EC in liver. By contrast, ChREBP activity generally increased during torpor in cardiac and skeletal muscle, where ChREBP total protein levels increased over 1.5-fold and 5-fold of EC in muscle and heart, respectively; where DNA-binding increased by ∼2-fold of EC in muscle; and where Fasn transcript levels increased over 3-fold and 7-fold in both muscle and heart, respectively. In summary, ChREBP has a tissue-specific role in regulating energy metabolism during hibernation. PMID:27614289

  9. The lectin domains of polypeptide GalNAc-transferases exhibit carbohydrate-binding specificity for GalNAc: lectin binding to GalNAc-glycopeptide substrates is required for high density GalNAc-O-glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Wandall, Hans H; Irazoqui, Fernando; Tarp, Mads Agervig; Bennett, Eric P; Mandel, Ulla; Takeuchi, Hideyuki; Kato, Kentaro; Irimura, Tatsuro; Suryanarayanan, Ganesh; Hollingsworth, Michael A; Clausen, Henrik

    2007-04-01

    Initiation of mucin-type O-glycosylation is controlled by a large family of UDP GalNAc:polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferases (GalNAc-transferases). Most GalNAc-transferases contain a ricin-like lectin domain in the C-terminal end, which may confer GalNAc-glycopeptide substrate specificity to the enzyme. We have previously shown that the lectin domain of GalNAc-T4 modulates its substrate specificity to enable unique GalNAc-glycopeptide specificities and that this effect is selectively inhibitable by GalNAc; however, direct evidence of carbohydrate binding of GalNAc-transferase lectins has not been previously presented. Here, we report the direct carbohydrate binding of two GalNAc-transferase lectin domains, GalNAc-T4 and GalNAc-T2, representing isoforms reported to have distinct glycopeptide activity (GalNAc-T4) and isoforms without apparent distinct GalNAc-glycopeptide specificity (GalNAc-T2). Both lectins exhibited specificity for binding of free GalNAc. Kinetic and time-course analysis of GalNAc-T2 demonstrated that the lectin domain did not affect transfer to initial glycosylation sites, but selectively modulated velocity of transfer to subsequent sites and affected the number of acceptor sites utilized. The results suggest that GalNAc-transferase lectins serve to modulate the kinetic properties of the enzymes in the late stages of the initiation process of O-glycosylation to accomplish dense or complete O-glycan occupancy.

  10. Partial identification of carbohydrate-binding sites of a Galalpha1,3Galbeta1,4GlcNAc-specific lectin from the mushroom Marasmius oreades by site-directed mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Tateno, Hiroaki; Goldstein, Irwin J

    2004-07-01

    The Galalpha1,3Galbeta1,4GlcNAc-specific lectin from the mushroom Marasmius oreades (MOA) contains a ricin B chain-like (QXW)(3) domain at its N-terminus that is composed of three identical subdomains (alpha, beta, and gamma) and a C-terminal domain of unknown function. Here, we investigate the structure-function relationship of MOA to define the number and location of its carbohydrate-binding sites. Based on the sequence alignment of MOA to the ricin B-chain lactose-binding sites, we systematically constructed mutants by site-directed mutagenesis. We have used precipitation and hemagglutination assay for the primary analyses, and surface plasmon resonance for the kinetic analysis. Among amino acid residues at the putative carbohydrate-binding sites, Gln(46) in the alpha subdomain and Trp(138) in the gamma subdomain have been identified to be important amino acid residues directly or indirectly involved in carbohydrate recognition. By surface plasmon resonance, Q46A and W138A were 2.4- and 4.3-fold less active than that of the wild-type MOA (K(a) = 2 x 10(7)), respectively. A double-site mutant (Q46A/W138A) had activity similar to W138A. The C-terminal deletion mutant MOADeltaC showed hemagglutination and precipitation activity, although its binding constant was 12.5-fold less active (K(a) = 1.6 x 10(6)) than that of the wild-type MOA. A C-terminal deletion mutant with mutations at both Gln(46) and Trp(138) (MOADeltaC-Q46A/W138A) was 12,500-fold less active (K(a) = 1.6 x 10(3)) than that of the wild-type MOA. On the basis of this observation, we conclude that both alpha and gamma subdomains are most probably involved in carbohydrate binding, but the beta subdomain appears to be inactive.

  11. Cello-oligomer-binding dynamics and directionality in family 4 carbohydrate-binding modules.

    PubMed

    Kognole, Abhishek A; Payne, Christina M

    2015-10-01

    Carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) play significant roles in modulating the function of cellulases, and understanding the protein-carbohydrate recognition mechanisms by which CBMs selectively bind substrate is critical to development of enhanced biomass conversion technology. CBMs exhibit a limited range of specificity and appear to bind polysaccharides in a directional fashion dictated by the position of the ring oxygen relative to the protein fold. The two family 4 CBMs of Cellulomonas fimi Cel9B (CfCBM4) are reported to preferentially bind cellulosic substrates. However, experimental evidence suggests that these CBMs may not exhibit a thermodynamic preference for a particular orientation. We use molecular dynamics (MD) and free energy calculations to investigate protein-carbohydrate recognition mechanisms in CfCBM4-1 and CfCBM4-2 and to elucidate preferential ligand-binding orientation. We evaluate four cellopentaose orientations including that of the crystal structure and three others suggested by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). These four orientations differ based on position of the ligand reducing end (RE) and pyranose ring orientations relative to the protein core. MD simulations indicate that the plausible orientations reduce to two conformations. Calculated ligand-binding free energy discerns each of the orientations is equally favorable. The calculated free energies are in excellent agreement with isothermal titration calorimetry measurements from the literature. MD simulations further reveal the approximate structural symmetry of the oligosaccharides relative to the amino acids along the binding cleft plays a role in the promiscuity of ligand binding. A survey of ligand-bound structures suggests this phenomenon may be characteristic of the broader class of proteins belonging to the β-sandwich fold.

  12. Cello-oligomer-binding dynamics and directionality in family 4 carbohydrate-binding modules.

    PubMed

    Kognole, Abhishek A; Payne, Christina M

    2015-10-01

    Carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) play significant roles in modulating the function of cellulases, and understanding the protein-carbohydrate recognition mechanisms by which CBMs selectively bind substrate is critical to development of enhanced biomass conversion technology. CBMs exhibit a limited range of specificity and appear to bind polysaccharides in a directional fashion dictated by the position of the ring oxygen relative to the protein fold. The two family 4 CBMs of Cellulomonas fimi Cel9B (CfCBM4) are reported to preferentially bind cellulosic substrates. However, experimental evidence suggests that these CBMs may not exhibit a thermodynamic preference for a particular orientation. We use molecular dynamics (MD) and free energy calculations to investigate protein-carbohydrate recognition mechanisms in CfCBM4-1 and CfCBM4-2 and to elucidate preferential ligand-binding orientation. We evaluate four cellopentaose orientations including that of the crystal structure and three others suggested by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). These four orientations differ based on position of the ligand reducing end (RE) and pyranose ring orientations relative to the protein core. MD simulations indicate that the plausible orientations reduce to two conformations. Calculated ligand-binding free energy discerns each of the orientations is equally favorable. The calculated free energies are in excellent agreement with isothermal titration calorimetry measurements from the literature. MD simulations further reveal the approximate structural symmetry of the oligosaccharides relative to the amino acids along the binding cleft plays a role in the promiscuity of ligand binding. A survey of ligand-bound structures suggests this phenomenon may be characteristic of the broader class of proteins belonging to the β-sandwich fold. PMID:26153106

  13. Diversified Carbohydrate-Binding Lectins from Marine Resources

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Tomohisa; Watanabe, Mizuki; Naganuma, Takako; Muramoto, Koji

    2011-01-01

    Marine bioresources produce a great variety of specific and potent bioactive molecules including natural organic compounds such as fatty acids, polysaccharides, polyether, peptides, proteins, and enzymes. Lectins are also one of the promising candidates for useful therapeutic agents because they can recognize the specific carbohydrate structures such as proteoglycans, glycoproteins, and glycolipids, resulting in the regulation of various cells via glycoconjugates and their physiological and pathological phenomenon through the host-pathogen interactions and cell-cell communications. Here, we review the multiple lectins from marine resources including fishes and sea invertebrate in terms of their structure-activity relationships and molecular evolution. Especially, we focus on the unique structural properties and molecular evolution of C-type lectins, galectin, F-type lectin, and rhamnose-binding lectin families. PMID:22312473

  14. Pyrrolic tripodal receptors for carbohydrates. Role of functional groups and binding geometry on carbohydrate recognition.

    PubMed

    Cacciarini, Martina; Nativi, Cristina; Norcini, Martina; Staderini, Samuele; Francesconi, Oscar; Roelens, Stefano

    2011-02-21

    The contribution from several H-bonding groups and the impact of geometric requirements on the binding ability of benzene-based tripodal receptors toward carbohydrates have been investigated by measuring the affinity of a set of structures toward octyl β-D-glucopyranoside, selected as a representative monosaccharide. The results reported in the present study demonstrate that a judicious choice of correct geometry and appropriate functional groups is critical to achieve the complementary hydrogen bonding interactions required for an effective carbohydrate recognition.

  15. Carbohydrate-binding modules from a thermostable Rhodothermus marinus xylanase: cloning, expression and binding studies.

    PubMed Central

    Abou Hachem, M; Nordberg Karlsson, E; Bartonek-Roxâ, E; Raghothama, S; Simpson, P J; Gilbert, H J; Williamson, M P; Holst, O

    2000-01-01

    The two N-terminally repeated carbohydrate-binding modules (CBM4-1 and CBM4-2) encoded by xyn10A from Rhodothermus marinus were produced in Escherichia coli and purified by affinity chromatography. Binding assays to insoluble polysaccharides showed binding to insoluble xylan and to phosphoric-acid-swollen cellulose but not to Avicel or crystalline cellulose. Binding to insoluble substrates was significantly enhanced by the presence of Na(+) and Ca(2+) ions. The binding affinities for soluble polysaccharides were tested by affinity electrophoresis; strong binding occurred with different xylans and beta-glucan. CBM4-2 displayed a somewhat higher binding affinity than CBM4-1 for both soluble and insoluble substrates but both had similar specificities. Binding to short oligosaccharides was measured by NMR; both modules bound with similar affinities. The binding of the modules was shown to be dominated by enthalpic forces. The binding modules did not contribute with any significant synergistic effects on xylan hydrolysis when incubated with a Xyn10A catalytic module. This is the first report of family 4 CBMs with affinity for both insoluble xylan and amorphous cellulose. PMID:10600638

  16. Computational Investigation of Glycosylation Effects on a Family 1 Carbohydrate-Binding Module

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, C. B.; Talib, M. F.; McCabe, C.; Bu, L.; Adney, W. S.; Himmel, M. E.; Crowley, M. F.; Beckham, G. T.

    2012-01-27

    Carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) are ubiquitous components of glycoside hydrolases, which degrade polysaccharides in nature. CBMs target specific polysaccharides, and CBM binding affinity to cellulose is known to be proportional to cellulase activity, such that increasing binding affinity is an important component of performance improvement. To ascertain the impact of protein and glycan engineering on CBM binding, we use molecular simulation to quantify cellulose binding of a natively glycosylated Family 1 CBM. To validate our approach, we first examine aromatic-carbohydrate interactions on binding, and our predictions are consistent with previous experiments, showing that a tyrosine to tryptophan mutation yields a 2-fold improvement in binding affinity. We then demonstrate that enhanced binding of 3-6-fold over a nonglycosylated CBM is achieved by the addition of a single, native mannose or a mannose dimer, respectively, which has not been considered previously. Furthermore, we show that the addition of a single, artificial glycan on the anterior of the CBM, with the native, posterior glycans also present, can have a dramatic impact on binding affinity in our model, increasing it up to 140-fold relative to the nonglycosylated CBM. These results suggest new directions in protein engineering, in that modifying glycosylation patterns via heterologous expression, manipulation of culture conditions, or introduction of artificial glycosylation sites, can alter CBM binding affinity to carbohydrates and may thus be a general strategy to enhance cellulase performance. Our results also suggest that CBM binding studies should consider the effects of glycosylation on binding and function.

  17. Computational Investigation of Glycosylation Effects on a Family 1 Carbohydrate-binding Module*

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Courtney B.; Talib, M. Faiz; McCabe, Clare; Bu, Lintao; Adney, William S.; Himmel, Michael E.; Crowley, Michael F.; Beckham, Gregg T.

    2012-01-01

    Carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) are ubiquitous components of glycoside hydrolases, which degrade polysaccharides in nature. CBMs target specific polysaccharides, and CBM binding affinity to cellulose is known to be proportional to cellulase activity, such that increasing binding affinity is an important component of performance improvement. To ascertain the impact of protein and glycan engineering on CBM binding, we use molecular simulation to quantify cellulose binding of a natively glycosylated Family 1 CBM. To validate our approach, we first examine aromatic-carbohydrate interactions on binding, and our predictions are consistent with previous experiments, showing that a tyrosine to tryptophan mutation yields a 2-fold improvement in binding affinity. We then demonstrate that enhanced binding of 3–6-fold over a nonglycosylated CBM is achieved by the addition of a single, native mannose or a mannose dimer, respectively, which has not been considered previously. Furthermore, we show that the addition of a single, artificial glycan on the anterior of the CBM, with the native, posterior glycans also present, can have a dramatic impact on binding affinity in our model, increasing it up to 140-fold relative to the nonglycosylated CBM. These results suggest new directions in protein engineering, in that modifying glycosylation patterns via heterologous expression, manipulation of culture conditions, or introduction of artificial glycosylation sites, can alter CBM binding affinity to carbohydrates and may thus be a general strategy to enhance cellulase performance. Our results also suggest that CBM binding studies should consider the effects of glycosylation on binding and function. PMID:22147693

  18. Carbohydrate Binding Modules: Biochemical Properties and Novel Applications

    PubMed Central

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shani, Ziv; Levy, Ilan

    2006-01-01

    Polysaccharide-degrading microorganisms express a repertoire of hydrolytic enzymes that act in synergy on plant cell wall and other natural polysaccharides to elicit the degradation of often-recalcitrant substrates. These enzymes, particularly those that hydrolyze cellulose and hemicellulose, have a complex molecular architecture comprising discrete modules which are normally joined by relatively unstructured linker sequences. This structure is typically comprised of a catalytic module and one or more carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) that bind to the polysaccharide. CBMs, by bringing the biocatalyst into intimate and prolonged association with its substrate, allow and promote catalysis. Based on their properties, CBMs are grouped into 43 families that display substantial variation in substrate specificity, along with other properties that make them a gold mine for biotechnologists who seek natural molecular “Velcro” for diverse and unusual applications. In this article, we review recent progress in the field of CBMs and provide an up-to-date summary of the latest developments in CBM applications. PMID:16760304

  19. Using Carbohydrate Interaction Assays to Reveal Novel Binding Sites in Carbohydrate Active Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Cockburn, Darrell; Wilkens, Casper; Dilokpimol, Adiphol; Nakai, Hiroyuki; Lewińska, Anna; Abou Hachem, Maher; Svensson, Birte

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrate active enzymes often contain auxiliary binding sites located either on independent domains termed carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) or as so-called surface binding sites (SBSs) on the catalytic module at a certain distance from the active site. The SBSs are usually critical for the activity of their cognate enzyme, though they are not readily detected in the sequence of a protein, but normally require a crystal structure of a complex for their identification. A variety of methods, including affinity electrophoresis (AE), insoluble polysaccharide pulldown (IPP) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) have been used to study auxiliary binding sites. These techniques are complementary as AE allows monitoring of binding to soluble polysaccharides, IPP to insoluble polysaccharides and SPR to oligosaccharides. Here we show that these methods are useful not only for analyzing known binding sites, but also for identifying new ones, even without structural data available. We further verify the chosen assays discriminate between known SBS/CBM containing enzymes and negative controls. Altogether 35 enzymes are screened for the presence of SBSs or CBMs and several novel binding sites are identified, including the first SBS ever reported in a cellulase. This work demonstrates that combinations of these methods can be used as a part of routine enzyme characterization to identify new binding sites and advance the study of SBSs and CBMs, allowing them to be detected in the absence of structural data. PMID:27504624

  20. Using Carbohydrate Interaction Assays to Reveal Novel Binding Sites in Carbohydrate Active Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Wilkens, Casper; Dilokpimol, Adiphol; Nakai, Hiroyuki; Lewińska, Anna; Abou Hachem, Maher; Svensson, Birte

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrate active enzymes often contain auxiliary binding sites located either on independent domains termed carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) or as so-called surface binding sites (SBSs) on the catalytic module at a certain distance from the active site. The SBSs are usually critical for the activity of their cognate enzyme, though they are not readily detected in the sequence of a protein, but normally require a crystal structure of a complex for their identification. A variety of methods, including affinity electrophoresis (AE), insoluble polysaccharide pulldown (IPP) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) have been used to study auxiliary binding sites. These techniques are complementary as AE allows monitoring of binding to soluble polysaccharides, IPP to insoluble polysaccharides and SPR to oligosaccharides. Here we show that these methods are useful not only for analyzing known binding sites, but also for identifying new ones, even without structural data available. We further verify the chosen assays discriminate between known SBS/CBM containing enzymes and negative controls. Altogether 35 enzymes are screened for the presence of SBSs or CBMs and several novel binding sites are identified, including the first SBS ever reported in a cellulase. This work demonstrates that combinations of these methods can be used as a part of routine enzyme characterization to identify new binding sites and advance the study of SBSs and CBMs, allowing them to be detected in the absence of structural data. PMID:27504624

  1. Biophysical studies on calcium and carbohydrate binding to carbohydrate recognition domain of Gal/GalNAc lectin from Entamoeba histolytica: insights into host cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Rupali; Verma, Kuldeep; Chandra, Mintu; Mukherjee, Madhumita; Datta, Sunando

    2016-09-01

    Entamoeba histolytica, an enteric parasite expresses a Gal/GalNAc-specific lectin that contributes to its virulence by establishing adhesion to host cell. In this study, carbohydrate recognition domain of Hgl (EhCRD) was purified and biophysical studies were conducted to understand the thermodynamic basis of its binding to carbohydrate and Ca(++) Here, we show that carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) of the lectin binds to calcium through DPN motif. To decipher the role of calcium in carbohydrate binding and host cell adhesion, biophysical and cell-based studies were carried out. We demonstrated that the presence of the cation neither change the affinity of the lectin for carbohydrates nor alters its conformation. Mutation of the calcium-binding motif in EhCRD resulted in complete loss of ability to bind calcium but retained its affinity for carbohydrates. Purified EhCRD significantly diminished adhesion of the amebic trophozoites to Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells as well as triggered red blood cell agglutination. The calcium-binding defective mutant abrogated amebic adhesion to CHO cells similar to the wild-type protein, but it failed to agglutinate RBCs suggesting a differential role of the cation in these two processes. This study provides the first molecular description of the role of calcium in Gal/GalNAc mediated host cell adhesion. PMID:27008865

  2. Biophysical studies on calcium and carbohydrate binding to carbohydrate recognition domain of Gal/GalNAc lectin from Entamoeba histolytica: insights into host cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Rupali; Verma, Kuldeep; Chandra, Mintu; Mukherjee, Madhumita; Datta, Sunando

    2016-09-01

    Entamoeba histolytica, an enteric parasite expresses a Gal/GalNAc-specific lectin that contributes to its virulence by establishing adhesion to host cell. In this study, carbohydrate recognition domain of Hgl (EhCRD) was purified and biophysical studies were conducted to understand the thermodynamic basis of its binding to carbohydrate and Ca(++) Here, we show that carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) of the lectin binds to calcium through DPN motif. To decipher the role of calcium in carbohydrate binding and host cell adhesion, biophysical and cell-based studies were carried out. We demonstrated that the presence of the cation neither change the affinity of the lectin for carbohydrates nor alters its conformation. Mutation of the calcium-binding motif in EhCRD resulted in complete loss of ability to bind calcium but retained its affinity for carbohydrates. Purified EhCRD significantly diminished adhesion of the amebic trophozoites to Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells as well as triggered red blood cell agglutination. The calcium-binding defective mutant abrogated amebic adhesion to CHO cells similar to the wild-type protein, but it failed to agglutinate RBCs suggesting a differential role of the cation in these two processes. This study provides the first molecular description of the role of calcium in Gal/GalNAc mediated host cell adhesion.

  3. Modeling of Carbohydrate Binding Modules Complexed to Cellulose

    SciTech Connect

    Nimlos, M. R.; Beckham, G. T.; Bu, L.; Himmel, M. E.; Crowley, M. F.; Bomble, Y. J.

    2012-01-01

    Modeling results are presented for the interaction of two carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) with cellulose. The family 1 CBM from Trichoderma reesei's Cel7A cellulase was modeled using molecular dynamics to confirm that this protein selectively binds to the hydrophobic (100) surface of cellulose fibrils and to determine the energetics and mechanisms for locating this surface. Modeling was also conducted of binding of the family 4 CBM from the CbhA complex from Clostridium thermocellum. There is a cleft in this protein, which may accommodate a cellulose chain that is detached from crystalline cellulose. This possibility is explored using molecular dynamics.

  4. Rapid characterization of sugar-binding specificity by in-solution proximity binding with photosensitizers.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chuan-Fa; Pan, Jia-Fu; Lin, Chun-Nan; Wu, I-Lin; Wong, Chi-Huey; Lin, Chun-Hung

    2011-07-01

    Cell-surface carbohydrates are known to participate in many important physiological and pathological activities by interacting with their corresponding proteins or receptors. Although several methods have been developed for studying carbohydrate-protein interactions, one major problem originates from the weak bindings of carbohydrates/proteins that are often lost during repeating wash steps. Herein, we established a homogeneous solution carbohydrate array in which polyacrylamide-based glycans are used for offering a multivalent environment. The method requires no wash step and can be carried out in a high-throughput manner. We characterized the carbohydrate-binding specificities of 11 lectins and 7 antibodies, the majority of which displayed the binding patterns in consistence with previous reports. These results demonstrate that our developed solution carbohydrate array provides a useful alternative that is better than or comparable with the current available methods.

  5. Rapid characterization of sugar-binding specificity by in-solution proximity binding with photosensitizers.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chuan-Fa; Pan, Jia-Fu; Lin, Chun-Nan; Wu, I-Lin; Wong, Chi-Huey; Lin, Chun-Hung

    2011-07-01

    Cell-surface carbohydrates are known to participate in many important physiological and pathological activities by interacting with their corresponding proteins or receptors. Although several methods have been developed for studying carbohydrate-protein interactions, one major problem originates from the weak bindings of carbohydrates/proteins that are often lost during repeating wash steps. Herein, we established a homogeneous solution carbohydrate array in which polyacrylamide-based glycans are used for offering a multivalent environment. The method requires no wash step and can be carried out in a high-throughput manner. We characterized the carbohydrate-binding specificities of 11 lectins and 7 antibodies, the majority of which displayed the binding patterns in consistence with previous reports. These results demonstrate that our developed solution carbohydrate array provides a useful alternative that is better than or comparable with the current available methods. PMID:21325337

  6. Photonic crystal borax competitive binding carbohydrate sensing motif†

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Qingzhou; Muscatello, Michelle M. Ward; Asher, Sanford A.

    2009-01-01

    We developed a photonic crystal sensing method for diol containing species such as carbohydrates based on a poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) hydrogel containing an embedded crystalline colloidal array (CCA). The polymerized CCA (PCCA) diffracts visible light. We show that in the presence of borax the diffraction wavelength shifts as the concentration of glucose changes. The diffraction shifts result from the competitive binding of glucose to borate, which reduces the concentration of borate bound to the PVA diols. PMID:19381378

  7. Photonic crystal borax competitive binding carbohydrate sensing motif.

    PubMed

    Cui, Qingzhou; Ward Muscatello, Michelle M; Asher, Sanford A

    2009-05-01

    We developed a photonic crystal sensing method for diol containing species such as carbohydrates based on a poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) hydrogel containing an embedded crystalline colloidal array (CCA). The polymerized CCA (PCCA) diffracts visible light. We show that in the presence of borax the diffraction wavelength shifts as the concentration of glucose changes. The diffraction shifts result from the competitive binding of glucose to borate, which reduces the concentration of borate bound to the PVA diols.

  8. Entirely Carbohydrate-Based Vaccines: An Emerging Field for Specific and Selective Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Nishat, Sharmeen; Andreana, Peter R.

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrates are regarded as promising targets for vaccine development against infectious disease because cell surface glycans on many infectious agents are attributed to playing an important role in pathogenesis. In addition, oncogenic transformation of normal cells, in many cases, is associated with aberrant glycosylation of the cell surface glycan generating tumor associated carbohydrate antigens (TACAs). Technological advances in glycobiology have added a new dimension to immunotherapy when considering carbohydrates as key targets in developing safe and effective vaccines to combat cancer, bacterial infections, viral infections, etc. Many consider effective vaccines induce T-cell dependent immunity with satisfactory levels of immunological memory that preclude recurrence. Unfortunately, carbohydrates alone are poorly immunogenic as they do not bind strongly to the MHCII complex and thus fail to elicit T-cell immunity. To increase immunogenicity, carbohydrates have been conjugated to carrier proteins, which sometimes can impede carbohydrate specific immunity as peptide-based immune responses can negate antibodies directed at the targeted carbohydrate antigens. To overcome many challenges in using carbohydrate-based vaccine design and development approaches targeting cancer and other diseases, zwitterionic polysaccharides (ZPSs), isolated from the capsule of commensal anaerobic bacteria, will be discussed as promising carriers of carbohydrate antigens to achieve desired immunological responses. PMID:27213458

  9. The overall architecture and receptor binding of pneumococcal carbohydrate-antigen-hydrolyzing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Melanie A; Ficko-Blean, Elizabeth; Meloncelli, Peter J; Lowary, Todd L; Boraston, Alisdair B

    2011-09-01

    The TIGR4 and SP3-BS71 strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae each produce family 98 glycoside hydrolases, called Sp4GH98 and Sp3GH98, respectively, which have different modular architectures and substrate specificities. Sp4GH98 degrades the Lewis(Y) antigen and possesses three C-terminal family 47 carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) that bind to this substrate. Sp3GH98 degrades the blood group A/B antigens and has two N-terminal family 51 CBMs that are of unknown function. Here, we examine the complex carbohydrate-binding specificity of the family 51 CBMs from Sp3GH98 (referred to as CBM51-1 and CBM51-2), the structural basis of this interaction, and the overall solution conformations of both Sp3GH98 and Sp4GH98, which are shown to be fully secreted proteins. Through glycan microarray binding analysis and isothermal titration calorimetry, CBM51-1 is found to bind specifically to the blood group A/B antigens. However, due to a series of relatively small structural rearrangements that were revealed in structures determined by X-ray crystallography, CBM51-2 appears to be incapable of binding carbohydrates. Analysis of small-angle X-ray scattering data in combination with the available high-resolution X-ray crystal structures of the Sp3GH98 and Sp4GH98 catalytic modules and their CBMs yielded models of the biological solution structures of the full-length enzymes. These studies reveal the complex architectures of the two enzymes and suggest that carbohydrate recognition by the CBMs and the activity of the catalytic modules are not directly coupled. PMID:21767550

  10. Dissociation of the carbohydrate-binding and splicing activities of galectin-1.

    PubMed

    Voss, Patricia G; Gray, Richard M; Dickey, Seth W; Wang, Weizhong; Park, Jung W; Kasai, Ken-Ichi; Hirabayashi, Jun; Patterson, Ronald J; Wang, John L

    2008-10-01

    Galectin-1 (Gal1) and galectin-3 (Gal3) are two members of a family of carbohydrate-binding proteins that are found in the nucleus and that participate in pre-mRNA splicing assayed in a cell-free system. When nuclear extracts (NE) of HeLa cells were subjected to adsorption on a fusion protein containing glutathione S-transferase (GST) and Gal3, the general transcription factor II-I (TFII-I) was identified by mass spectrometry as one of the polypeptides specifically bound. Lactose and other saccharide ligands of the galectins inhibited GST-Gal3 pull-down of TFII-I while non-binding carbohydrates failed to yield the same effect. Similar results were also obtained using GST-Gal1. Site-directed mutants of Gal1, expressed and purified as GST fusion proteins, were compared with the wild-type (WT) in three assays: (a) binding to asialofetuin-Sepharose as a measure of the carbohydrate-binding activity; (b) pull-down of TFII-I from NE; and (c) reconstitution of splicing in NE depleted of galectins as a test of the in vitro splicing activity. The binding of GST-Gal1(N46D) to asialofetuin-Sepharose was less than 10% of that observed for GST-Gal1(WT), indicating that the mutant was deficient in carbohydrate-binding activity. In contrast, both GST-Gal1(WT) and GST-Gal1(N46D) were equally efficient in pull-down of TFII-I and in reconstitution of splicing activity in the galectin-depleted NE. Moreover, while the splicing activity of the wild-type protein can be inhibited by saccharide ligands, the carbohydrate-binding deficient mutant was insensitive to such inhibition. Together, all of the results suggest that the carbohydrate-binding and the splicing activities of Gal1 can be dissociated and therefore, saccharide-binding, per se, is not required for the splicing activity. PMID:18662664

  11. Recognition of xyloglucan by the crystalline cellulose-binding site of a family 3a carbohydrate-binding module.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Gomez, Mercedes C; Rydahl, Maja G; Rogowski, Artur; Morland, Carl; Cartmell, Alan; Crouch, Lucy; Labourel, Aurore; Fontes, Carlos M G A; Willats, William G T; Gilbert, Harry J; Knox, J Paul

    2015-08-19

    Type A non-catalytic carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs), exemplified by CtCBM3acipA, are widely believed to specifically target crystalline cellulose through entropic forces. Here we have tested the hypothesis that type A CBMs can also bind to xyloglucan (XG), a soluble β-1,4-glucan containing α-1,6-xylose side chains. CtCBM3acipA bound to xyloglucan in cell walls and arrayed on solid surfaces. Xyloglucan and cellulose were shown to bind to the same planar surface on CBM3acipA. A range of type A CBMs from different families were shown to bind to xyloglucan in solution with ligand binding driven by enthalpic changes. The nature of CBM-polysaccharide interactions is discussed. PMID:26193423

  12. Porphyrin binding to jacalin is facilitated by the inherent plasticity of the carbohydrate-binding site: novel mode of lectin-ligand interaction.

    PubMed

    Goel, M; Anuradha, P; Kaur, K J; Maiya, B G; Swamy, M J; Salunke, D M

    2004-02-01

    The crystal structure of the complex of meso-tetrasulfonatophenylporphyrin (H(2)TPPS) with jack fruit (Artocarpus integriflora) agglutinin (jacalin) has been determined at 1.8 A resolution. A porphyrin pair is sandwiched between two symmetry-related jacalin monomers in the crystal, leading to a cross-linking network of protein molecules. Apart from the stacking interactions, H(2)TPPS also forms hydrogen bonds, some involving water bridges, with jacalin at the carbohydrate-binding site. The residues that are involved in rendering galactopyranoside specificity to jacalin undergo conformational adjustments in order to accommodate the H(2)TPPS molecule. The water molecules at the carbohydrate-binding site of jacalin cement the jacalin-porphyrin interactions, optimizing their complementarity. Interactions of porphyrin with jacalin are relatively weak compared with those observed between galactopyranoside and jacalin, perhaps because the former largely involves water-mediated hydrogen bonds. While H(2)TPPS binds to jacalin at the carbohydrate-binding site as in the case of ConA, its mode of interaction with jacalin is very different. H(2)TPPS does not enter the carbohydrate-binding cavity of jacalin. Instead, it sits over the binding site. While the porphyrin binding is mediated by replicating the hydrogen-bonding network of mannopyranoside through the sulfonate atoms in the case of ConA, the plasticity associated with the carbohydrate-binding site accommodates the pluripotent porphyrin molecule in the case of jacalin through an entirely different set of interactions.

  13. Detection of weak-binding sugar activity using membrane-based carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kazuo; Kawasaki, Norihito

    2010-01-01

    Protein-sugar interactions underlie many biological events. Although protein-sugar interactions are weak, they are regulated in physiological conditions including clustering, association with other proteins, pH condition, and so on. The elucidation of the precise specificities of sugar-binding proteins is essential for understanding their biological functions. To detect the weak-binding activity of carbohydrate-binding proteins to sugar ligands, we studied lectin tetramer binding to cell-surface carbohydrates by flow cytometry. Tetramerization of lectins enhanced their avidity for sugar ligands, and sugar chains displayed on the cell surfaces were easily accessible to such soluble lectins. In this chapter, we describe methods to (1) prepare biotinylated soluble lectin, (2) obtain R-phycoerythrin-labeled lectin tetramer, and (3) measure tetramer binding to various lectin-resistant cell lines or cells treated with sugar-processing inhibitors. This approach enabled us to detect the weak sugar-binding activity of lectins (K(a) approximately 10(4)M(-1)), especially those from animals, and also to elucidate their specificity for sugar ligands.

  14. Affinity labeling of the carbohydrate binding site of the lectin discoidin I using a photoactivatable radioiodinated monosaccharide

    SciTech Connect

    Kohnken, R.E.; Berger, E.A.

    1987-12-29

    N-(4-Azidosalicyl) galactosamine (GalNASA), a photoactivatable, radioiodinatable analog of N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc), has been prepared and characterized. The authors have used this reagent for labeling of the carbohydrate binding site of discoidin I, an endogenous lectin produced by Dictyostelium discoideum. GalNASA behaved as a ligand for discoidin I, as judged by its ability to compete in an assay measuring the carbohydrate binding activity of discoidin I. In this assay, it exhibited a K/sub i,app/ of 800 ..mu..M, comparable to that of GalNAc. The K/sub i,app/ of GalNASA decreased to 40 ..mu..m upon prior photolysis with ultraviolet light. In contrast, N-(4-azidosalicyl) ethanolamine produced no inhibition of carbohydrate binding regardless of photolysis. Covalent labeling of discoidin I with /sup 125/I-GalNASA was entirely dependent upon ultraviolet light. A portion of labeling, representing 40-60% of the total, was sensitive to reagents which were known to inhibit carbohydrate binding by discoidin I, including GalNAc, asialofetuin, and ethyl-enediaminetetraacetic acid. The carbohydrate-sensitive fraction of discoidin I photolabeling with /sup 125/I-GalNASA exhibited a K/sub d/ of 15-40 ..mu..M, in agreement with the K/sub i,app/ of prephotolyzed GalNASA observed in the carbohydrate binding assay. Partial proteolytic digestion of photolabeled discoidin I revealed specific fragments whose labeling was completely blocked by GalNAc. This indicated that the location of carbohydrate-sensitive labeling within the structure of discoidin I was restricted. One particular tryptic fragment, Tr1, was examined in detail. These data suggest that Tr1 is derived from the carbohydrate binding site of discoidin I.

  15. DOPI and PALM imaging of single carbohydrate binding modules bound to cellulose nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagel, D. J.; Liu, Y.-S.; Zhong, L.; Luo, Y.; Zeng, Y.; Himmel, M.; Ding, S.-Y.; Smith, S.

    2011-03-01

    We use single molecule imaging methods to study the binding characteristics of carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) to cellulose crystals. The CBMs are carbohydrate specific binding proteins, and a functional component of most cellulase enzymes, which in turn hydrolyze cellulose, releasing simple sugars suitable for fermentation to biofuels. The CBM plays the important role of locating the crystalline face of cellulose, a critical step in cellulase action. A biophysical understanding of the CBM action aids in developing a mechanistic picture of the cellulase enzyme, important for selection and potential modification. Towards this end, we have genetically modified cellulose-binding CBM derived from bacterial source with green fluorescent protein (GFP), and photo-activated fluorescence protein PAmCherry tags, respectively. Using the single molecule method known as Defocused Orientation and Position Imaging (DOPI), we observe a preferred orientation of the CBM-GFP complex relative to the Valonia cellulose nanocrystals. Subsequent analysis showed the CBMs bind to the opposite hydrophobic <110> faces of the cellulose nanocrystals with a welldefined cross-orientation of about { 70°. Photo Activated Localization Microscopy (PALM) is used to localize CBMPAmCherry with a localization accuracy of { 10nm. Analysis of the nearest neighbor distributions along and perpendicular to the cellulose nanocrystal axes are consistent with single-file CBM binding along the fiber axis, and microfibril bundles consisting of close packed { 20nm or smaller cellulose microfibrils.

  16. Crystallization, neutron data collection, initial structure refinement and analysis of a xyloglucan heptamer bound to an engineered carbohydrate-binding module from xylanase.

    PubMed

    Ohlin, Mats; von Schantz, Laura; Schrader, Tobias E; Ostermann, Andreas; Logan, Derek T; Fisher, S Zoë

    2015-08-01

    Carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) are discrete parts of carbohydrate-hydrolyzing enzymes that bind specific types of carbohydrates. Ultra high-resolution X-ray crystallographic studies of CBMs have helped to decipher the basis for specificity in carbohydrate-protein interactions. However, additional studies are needed to better understand which structural determinants confer which carbohydrate-binding properties. To address these issues, neutron crystallographic studies were initiated on one experimentally engineered CBM derived from a xylanase, X-2 L110F, a protein that is able to bind several different plant carbohydrates such as xylan, β-glucan and xyloglucan. This protein evolved from a CBM present in xylanase Xyn10A of Rhodothermus marinus. The protein was complexed with a branched xyloglucan heptasaccharide. Large single crystals of hydrogenous protein (∼1.6 mm(3)) were grown at room temperature and subjected to H/D exchange. Both neutron and X-ray diffraction data sets were collected to 1.6 Å resolution. Joint neutron and X-ray refinement using phenix.refine showed significant density for residues involved in carbohydrate binding and revealed the details of a hydrogen-bonded water network around the binding site. This is the first report of a neutron structure of a CBM and will add to the understanding of protein-carbohydrate binding interactions.

  17. Binding Preferences, Surface Attachment, Diffusivity, and Orientation of a Family 1 Carbohydrate-Binding Module on Cellulose

    SciTech Connect

    Nimlos, M. R.; Beckham, G. T.; Matthews, J. F.; Bu, L.; Himmel, M. E.; Crowley, M. F.

    2012-06-08

    Cellulase enzymes often contain carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) for binding to cellulose. The mechanisms by which CBMs recognize specific surfaces of cellulose and aid in deconstruction are essential to understand cellulase action. The Family 1 CBM from the Trichoderma reesei Family 7 cellobiohydrolase, Cel7A, is known to selectively bind to hydrophobic surfaces of native cellulose. It is most commonly suggested that three aromatic residues identify the planar binding face of this CBM, but several recent studies have challenged this hypothesis. Here, we use molecular simulation to study the CBM binding orientation and affinity on hydrophilic and hydrophobic cellulose surfaces. Roughly 43 {mu}s of molecular dynamics simulations were conducted, which enables statistically significant observations. We quantify the fractions of the CBMs that detach from crystal surfaces or diffuse to other surfaces, the diffusivity along the hydrophobic surface, and the overall orientation of the CBM on both hydrophobic and hydrophilic faces. The simulations demonstrate that there is a thermodynamic driving force for the Cel7A CBM to bind preferentially to the hydrophobic surface of cellulose relative to hydrophilic surfaces. In addition, the simulations demonstrate that the CBM can diffuse from hydrophilic surfaces to the hydrophobic surface, whereas the reverse transition is not observed. Lastly, our simulations suggest that the flat faces of Family 1 CBMs are the preferred binding surfaces. These results enhance our understanding of how Family 1 CBMs interact with and recognize specific cellulose surfaces and provide insights into the initial events of cellulase adsorption and diffusion on cellulose.

  18. Evidence for carbohydrate recognition and homotypic and heterotypic binding by the TIM family.

    PubMed

    Wilker, Peter R; Sedy, John R; Grigura, Vadim; Murphy, Theresa L; Murphy, Kenneth M

    2007-06-01

    The T cell Ig domain and mucin domain (TIM) proteins form a conserved family of transmembrane cell-surface glycoproteins expressed by a variety of tissues. Each TIM protein contains a single V-type Ig domain, a glycosylated mucin-like domain, a transmembrane domain and a cytoplasmic domain. TIM proteins recognize a diverse array of ligands, including H-ferritin, galectin-9 as well as other TIM family members. In this study, we demonstrate that the Ig domains of murine TIM-1, -3 and -4 display calcium-dependent binding to ligands expressed by murine splenocytes and several non-murine cell lines, indicating non-species-specific ligand recognition. Further, the intrafamilial interaction of various TIM family Ig domains with surface-expressed TIM-1 and TIM-4 requires an intact TIM-1 and TIM-4 glycosylated mucin stalk. Importantly, we also uncovered the previously unrecognized potential for homotypic TIM interactions in forming ligand-receptor pairs. Using a glycan array screen, we identified the novel capacity of the TIM-3 Ig domain to recognize specific carbohydrate moieties, suggesting a role for carbohydrate modification along with protein epitopes in TIM ligand recognition. Identification of the carbohydrate-binding capacity of TIM proteins helps explain the diversity of ligands recognized by this family and adds to our understanding of homotypic and heterotypic interactions between TIM family members.

  19. Norwalk Virus–specific Binding to Oyster Digestive Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Loisy, Fabienne; Atmar, Robert L.; Hutson, Anne M.; Estes, Mary K.; Ruvoën-Clouet, Nathalie; Pommepuy, Monique; Le Pendu, Jacques

    2006-01-01

    The primary pathogens related to shellfishborne gastroenteritis outbreaks are noroviruses. These viruses show persistence in oysters, which suggests an active mechanism of virus concentration. We investigated whether Norwalk virus or viruslike particles bind specifically to oyster tissues after bioaccumulation or addition to tissue sections. Since noroviruses attach to carbohydrates of the histo-blood group family, tests using immunohistochemical analysis were performed to evaluate specific binding of virus or viruslike particles to oyster tissues through these ligands. Viral particles bind specifically to digestive ducts (midgut, main and secondary ducts, and tubules) by carbohydrate structures with a terminal N-acetylgalactosamine residue in an α linkage (same binding site used for recognition of human histo-blood group antigens). These data show that the oyster can selectively concentrate a human pathogen and that conventional depuration will not eliminate noroviruses from oyster tissue. PMID:16707048

  20. Carbohydrates

    MedlinePlus

    Carbohydrates are one of the main types of nutrients. They are the most important source of energy for your body. Your digestive system changes carbohydrates into glucose (blood sugar). Your body uses this ...

  1. Multifunctional cellulase catalysis targeted by fusion to different carbohydrate-binding modules

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Johnnie A.; Takasuka, Taichi E.; Deng, Kai; Bianchetti, Christopher M.; Udell, Hannah S.; Prom, Ben M.; Kim, Hyunkee; Adams, Paul D.; Northen, Trent R.; Fox, Brian G.

    2015-12-21

    Carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) bind polysaccharides and help target glycoside hydrolases catalytic domains to their appropriate carbohydrate substrates. To better understand how CBMs can improve cellulolytic enzyme reactivity, representatives from each of the 18 families of CBM found in Ruminoclostridium thermocellum were fused to the multifunctional GH5 catalytic domain of CelE (Cthe_0797, CelEcc), which can hydrolyze numerous types of polysaccharides including cellulose, mannan, and xylan. Since CelE is a cellulosomal enzyme, none of these fusions to a CBM previously existed. CelEcc_CBM fusions were assayed for their ability to hydrolyze cellulose, lichenan, xylan, and mannan. Several CelEcc_CBM fusions showed enhanced hydrolytic activity with different substrates relative to the fusion to CBM3a from the cellulosome scaffoldin, which has high affinity for binding to crystalline cellulose. Additional binding studies and quantitative catalysis studies using nanostructure-initiator mass spectrometry (NIMS) were carried out with the CBM3a, CBM6, CBM30, and CBM44 fusion enzymes. In general, and consistent with observations of others, enhanced enzyme reactivity was correlated with moderate binding affinity of the CBM. Numerical analysis of reaction time courses showed that CelEcc_CBM44, a combination of a multifunctional enzyme domain with a CBM having broad binding specificity, gave the fastest rates for hydrolysis of both the hexose and pentose fractions of ionic-liquid pretreated switchgrass. In conclusion, we have shown that fusions of different CBMs to a single multifunctional GH5 catalytic domain can increase its rate of reaction with different pure polysaccharides and with pretreated biomass. This fusion approach, incorporating domains with broad specificity for binding and catalysis, provides a new avenue to improve reactivity of simple combinations of enzymes within the complexity of plant biomass.

  2. Multifunctional cellulase catalysis targeted by fusion to different carbohydrate-binding modules

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Walker, Johnnie A.; Takasuka, Taichi E.; Deng, Kai; Bianchetti, Christopher M.; Udell, Hannah S.; Prom, Ben M.; Kim, Hyunkee; Adams, Paul D.; Northen, Trent R.; Fox, Brian G.

    2015-12-21

    Carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) bind polysaccharides and help target glycoside hydrolases catalytic domains to their appropriate carbohydrate substrates. To better understand how CBMs can improve cellulolytic enzyme reactivity, representatives from each of the 18 families of CBM found in Ruminoclostridium thermocellum were fused to the multifunctional GH5 catalytic domain of CelE (Cthe_0797, CelEcc), which can hydrolyze numerous types of polysaccharides including cellulose, mannan, and xylan. Since CelE is a cellulosomal enzyme, none of these fusions to a CBM previously existed. CelEcc_CBM fusions were assayed for their ability to hydrolyze cellulose, lichenan, xylan, and mannan. Several CelEcc_CBM fusions showed enhanced hydrolyticmore » activity with different substrates relative to the fusion to CBM3a from the cellulosome scaffoldin, which has high affinity for binding to crystalline cellulose. Additional binding studies and quantitative catalysis studies using nanostructure-initiator mass spectrometry (NIMS) were carried out with the CBM3a, CBM6, CBM30, and CBM44 fusion enzymes. In general, and consistent with observations of others, enhanced enzyme reactivity was correlated with moderate binding affinity of the CBM. Numerical analysis of reaction time courses showed that CelEcc_CBM44, a combination of a multifunctional enzyme domain with a CBM having broad binding specificity, gave the fastest rates for hydrolysis of both the hexose and pentose fractions of ionic-liquid pretreated switchgrass. In conclusion, we have shown that fusions of different CBMs to a single multifunctional GH5 catalytic domain can increase its rate of reaction with different pure polysaccharides and with pretreated biomass. This fusion approach, incorporating domains with broad specificity for binding and catalysis, provides a new avenue to improve reactivity of simple combinations of enzymes within the complexity of plant biomass.« less

  3. Genetically Encoded Fragment-Based Discovery of Glycopeptide Ligands for Carbohydrate-Binding Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Simon; Lin, Edith; Kitov, Pavel I.; Tjhung, Katrina F.; Gerlits, Oksana O.; Deng, Lu; Kasper, Brian; Sood, Amika; Paschal, Beth M.; Zhang, Ping; Ling, Chang-Chun; Klassen, John S.; Noren, Christopher J.; Mahal, Lara K.; Woods, Robert J.; Coates, Leighton; Derda, Ratmir

    2015-04-10

    Here we describe an approach to accelerate the search for competitive inhibitors for carbohydrate-recognition domains (CRDs). Genetically encoded fragment-based-discovery (GE-FBD) uses selection of phagedisplayed glycopeptides to dock a glycan fragment at the CRD and guide selection of Synergistic peptide motifs adjacent to the CRD. Starting from concanavalin A (ConA), a mannose (Man)-binding protein, as a bait, we narrowed a library of 108 glycopeptides to 86 leads that share a consensus motif, Man-WYD. Validation of synthetic leads yielded Man-WYDLF that exhibited 40 50-fold enhancement in affinity over methyl α-D-mannopyranoside (MeMan). Lectin array Suggested specificity: Man-WYD derivative bound only to 3 out of 17 proteins-ConA, LcH, and PSA-that bind to Man. An X-ray structure of ConA.:Man-WYD proved that the trimannoside core and Man-WYD exhibit identical CRD docking; but their extra-CRD binding modes are significantly. different. Still, they have comparable affinity and selectivity for various Man-binding proteins. The intriguing observation provides new insight into functional mimicry :of carbohydrates by peptide ligands. GE-FBD may provide an alternative to rapidly search for competitive inhibitors for lectins.

  4. Genetically Encoded Fragment-Based Discovery of Glycopeptide Ligands for Carbohydrate-Binding Proteins

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ng, Simon; Lin, Edith; Kitov, Pavel I.; Tjhung, Katrina F.; Gerlits, Oksana O.; Deng, Lu; Kasper, Brian; Sood, Amika; Paschal, Beth M.; Zhang, Ping; et al

    2015-04-10

    Here we describe an approach to accelerate the search for competitive inhibitors for carbohydrate-recognition domains (CRDs). Genetically encoded fragment-based-discovery (GE-FBD) uses selection of phagedisplayed glycopeptides to dock a glycan fragment at the CRD and guide selection of Synergistic peptide motifs adjacent to the CRD. Starting from concanavalin A (ConA), a mannose (Man)-binding protein, as a bait, we narrowed a library of 108 glycopeptides to 86 leads that share a consensus motif, Man-WYD. Validation of synthetic leads yielded Man-WYDLF that exhibited 40 50-fold enhancement in affinity over methyl α-D-mannopyranoside (MeMan). Lectin array Suggested specificity: Man-WYD derivative bound only to 3 outmore » of 17 proteins-ConA, LcH, and PSA-that bind to Man. An X-ray structure of ConA.:Man-WYD proved that the trimannoside core and Man-WYD exhibit identical CRD docking; but their extra-CRD binding modes are significantly. different. Still, they have comparable affinity and selectivity for various Man-binding proteins. The intriguing observation provides new insight into functional mimicry :of carbohydrates by peptide ligands. GE-FBD may provide an alternative to rapidly search for competitive inhibitors for lectins.« less

  5. Characterization of a chimeric enzyme comprising feruloyl esterase and family 42 carbohydrate-binding module.

    PubMed

    Koseki, Takuya; Mochizuki, Keiji; Kisara, Hiroe; Miyanaga, Akimasa; Fushinobu, Shinya; Murayama, Tetsuya; Shiono, Yoshihito

    2010-03-01

    We engineered a chimeric enzyme (AwFaeA-CBM42) comprising of type-A feruloyl esterase from Aspergillus awamori (AwFaeA) and family 42 carbohydrate-binding module (AkCBM42) from glycoside hydrolase family 54 alpha-L-arabinofuranosidase of Aspergillus kawachii. The chimeric enzyme was successfully produced in Pichia pastoris and accumulated in the culture broth. The purified chimeric enzyme had an apparent relative molecular mass (M(r)) of 53,000. The chimeric enzyme binds to arabinoxylan; this indicates that the AkCBM42 in AwFaeA-CBM42 binds to arabinofuranose side chain moiety of arabinoxylan. The thermostability of the chimeric enzyme was greater than that of AwFaeA. No significant difference of the specific activity toward methyl ferulate was observed between the AwFaeA and chimeric enzyme, but the release of ferulic acid from insoluble arabinoxylan by the chimeric enzyme was approximately 4-fold higher than that achieved by AwFaeA alone. In addition, the chimeric enzyme and xylanase acted synergistically for the degradation of arabinoxylan. In conclusion, the findings of our study demonstrated that the components of the AwFaeA-CBM42 chimeric enzyme act synergistically to bring about the degradation of complex substrates and that the family 42 carbohydrate-binding module has potential for application in the degradation of polysaccharides.

  6. Hepatitis C Virus Resistance to Carbohydrate-Binding Agents

    PubMed Central

    Izquierdo, Laure; Oliveira, Catarina; Fournier, Carole; Descamps, Véronique; Morel, Virginie; Dubuisson, Jean; Brochot, Etienne; Francois, Catherine; Castelain, Sandrine; Duverlie, Gilles; Helle, Francois

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrate binding agents (CBAs), including natural lectins, are more and more considered as broad-spectrum antivirals. These molecules are able to directly inhibit many viruses such as Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), Hepatitis C Virus (HCV), Dengue Virus, Ebola Virus or Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus through binding to envelope protein N-glycans. In the case of HIV, it has been shown that CBAs select for mutant viruses with N-glycosylation site deletions which are more sensitive to neutralizing antibodies. In this study we aimed at evaluating the HCV resistance to CBAs in vitro. HCV was cultivated in the presence of increasing Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA), Cyanovirin-N, Concanavalin-A or Griffithsin concentrations, during more than eight weeks. At the end of lectin exposure, the genome of the isolated strains was sequenced and several potential resistance mutations in the E1E2 envelope glycoproteins were identified. The effect of these mutations on viral fitness as well as on sensitivity to inhibition by lectins, soluble CD81 or the 3/11 neutralizing antibody was assessed. Surprisingly, none of these mutations, alone or in combination, conferred resistance to CBAs. In contrast, we observed that some mutants were more sensitive to 3/11 or CD81-LEL inhibition. Additionally, several mutations were identified in the Core and the non-structural proteins. Thus, our results suggest that in contrast to HIV, HCV resistance to CBAs is not directly conferred by mutations in the envelope protein genes but could occur through an indirect mechanism involving mutations in other viral proteins. Further investigations are needed to completely elucidate the underlying mechanisms. PMID:26871442

  7. Hepatitis C Virus Resistance to Carbohydrate-Binding Agents.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo, Laure; Oliveira, Catarina; Fournier, Carole; Descamps, Véronique; Morel, Virginie; Dubuisson, Jean; Brochot, Etienne; Francois, Catherine; Castelain, Sandrine; Duverlie, Gilles; Helle, Francois

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrate binding agents (CBAs), including natural lectins, are more and more considered as broad-spectrum antivirals. These molecules are able to directly inhibit many viruses such as Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), Hepatitis C Virus (HCV), Dengue Virus, Ebola Virus or Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus through binding to envelope protein N-glycans. In the case of HIV, it has been shown that CBAs select for mutant viruses with N-glycosylation site deletions which are more sensitive to neutralizing antibodies. In this study we aimed at evaluating the HCV resistance to CBAs in vitro. HCV was cultivated in the presence of increasing Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA), Cyanovirin-N, Concanavalin-A or Griffithsin concentrations, during more than eight weeks. At the end of lectin exposure, the genome of the isolated strains was sequenced and several potential resistance mutations in the E1E2 envelope glycoproteins were identified. The effect of these mutations on viral fitness as well as on sensitivity to inhibition by lectins, soluble CD81 or the 3/11 neutralizing antibody was assessed. Surprisingly, none of these mutations, alone or in combination, conferred resistance to CBAs. In contrast, we observed that some mutants were more sensitive to 3/11 or CD81-LEL inhibition. Additionally, several mutations were identified in the Core and the non-structural proteins. Thus, our results suggest that in contrast to HIV, HCV resistance to CBAs is not directly conferred by mutations in the envelope protein genes but could occur through an indirect mechanism involving mutations in other viral proteins. Further investigations are needed to completely elucidate the underlying mechanisms. PMID:26871442

  8. Probing the mechanism of ligand recognition in family 29 carbohydrate-binding modules.

    PubMed

    Flint, James; Bolam, David N; Nurizzo, Didier; Taylor, Edward J; Williamson, Michael P; Walters, Christopher; Davies, Gideon J; Gilbert, Harry J

    2005-06-24

    The recycling of photosynthetically fixed carbon, by the action of microbial plant cell wall hydrolases, is integral to one of the major geochemical cycles and is of considerable industrial importance. Non-catalytic carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) play a key role in this degradative process by targeting hydrolytic enzymes to their cognate substrate within the complex milieu of polysaccharides that comprise the plant cell wall. Family 29 CBMs have, thus far, only been found in an extracellular multienzyme plant cell wall-degrading complex from the anaerobic fungus Piromyces equi, where they exist as a CBM29-1:CBM29-2 tandem. Here we present both the structure of the CBM29-1 partner, at 1.5 A resolution, and examine the importance of hydrophobic stacking interactions as well as direct and solvent-mediated hydrogen bonds in the binding of CBM29-2 to different polysaccharides. CBM29 domains display unusual binding properties, exhibiting specificity for both beta-manno- and beta-gluco-configured ligands such as mannan, cellulose, and glucomannan. Mutagenesis reveals that "stacking" of tryptophan residues in the n and n+2 subsites plays a critical role in ligand binding, whereas the loss of tyrosine-mediated stacking in the n+4 subsite reduces, but does not abrogate, polysaccharide recognition. Direct hydrogen bonds to ligand, such as those provided by Arg-112 and Glu-78, play a pivotal role in the interaction with both mannan and cellulose, whereas removal of water-mediated interactions has comparatively little effect on carbohydrate binding. The interactions of CBM29-2 with the O2 of glucose or mannose contribute little to binding affinity, explaining why this CBM displays dual gluco/manno specificity. PMID:15784618

  9. Flow cytometric analysis of lectin binding to in vitro-cultured Perkinsus marinus surface carbohydrates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gauthier, J.D.; Jenkins, J.A.; La Peyre, Jerome F.

    2004-01-01

    Parasite surface glycoconjugates are frequently involved in cellular recognition and colonization of the host. This study reports on the identification of Perkinsus marinus surface carbohydrates by flow cytometric analyses of fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated lectin binding. Lectin-binding specificity was confirmed by sugar inhibition and Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistics. Clear, measurable fluorescence peaks were discriminated, and no parasite autofluorescence was observed. Parasites (GTLA-5 and Perkinsus-1 strains) harvested during log and stationary phases of growth in a protein-free medium reacted strongly with concanavalin A and wheat germ agglutinin, which bind to glucose-mannose and N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (GlcNAc) moieties, respectively. Both P. marinus strains bound with lower intensity to Maclura pomifera agglutinin, Bauhinia purpurea agglutinin, soybean agglutinin (N-acetyl-D-galactosamine-specific lectins), peanut agglutinin (PNA) (terminal galactose specific), and Griffonia simplicifolia II (GlcNAc specific). Only background fluorescence levels were detected with Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (L-fucose specific) and Limulus polyphemus agglutinin (sialic acid specific). The lectin-binding profiles were similar for the 2 strains except for a greater relative binding intensity of PNA for Perkinsus-1 and an overall greater lectin-binding capacity of Perkinsus-1 compared with GTLA-5. Growth stage comparisons revealed increased lectin-binding intensities during stationary phase compared with log phase of growth. This is the first report of the identification of surface glycoconjugates on a Perkinsus spp. by flow cytometry and the first to demonstrate that differential surface sugar expression is growth phase and strain dependent. ?? American Society of Parasitologists 2004.

  10. Glycosylated aniline polymer sensor: Amine to imine conversion on protein–carbohydrate binding

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhe; Sun, Chunyan; Vegesna, Giri; Liu, Haiying; Liu, Yang; Li, Jinghong; Zeng, Xiangqun

    2013-01-01

    In this report, functionalized mannosylated aniline polymer (manno-PANI) was investigated as an electrochemical platform to study carbohydrate–protein interactions by exploiting the conductivity change of manno-PANI when the specific lectin binding occurs. A systematic study was performed to characterize the interconversion of polyaniline content (from amine to imine) in manno-PANI by UV–vis spectroscopy during its binding with concanavalin A (Con A). Both X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS) and UV–vis results suggest that Con A binding with the manno-PANI film triggers the switching of amine functionalities in the polyaniline backbone, converting them to imine forms. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to quantify the specific interactions between Con A and mannose by measuring the impedance change of manno-PANI film for the detection of Con A. A linear relationship between the impedance and Con A concentration was obtained, and the detection limit reaches to 0.12 nM Con A in a buffer solution (pH=7.4), whereas the addition of nonspecific control lectins to the same manno-PANI film gave very little impedance variations. Stability characterization of the manno-PANI film over 20 weeks shows a maximum drift of only 3% from the original signal. Thus, the uniquely constructed carbohydrate–PANI hybrid is a promising new carbohydrate recognition moiety for studying carbohydrate-protein interactions, presumably leading to a new electrochemical method for characterization of carbohydrate–protein interactions and carbohydrate-mediated intercellular recognitions. PMID:23563436

  11. Screening method of carbohydrate-binding proteins in biological sources by capillary affinity electrophoresis and its application to determination of Tulipa gesneriana agglutinin in tulip bulbs.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Kazuki; Kinoshita, Mitsuhiro; Oda, Yasuo; Masuko, Takashi; Kaku, Hanae; Shibuya, Naoto; Kakehi, Kazuaki

    2004-09-01

    We developed capillary affinity electrophoresis (CAE) to analyze the molecular interaction between carbohydrate chains and proteins in solution state. A mixture of oligosaccharides derived from a glycoprotein was labeled with 8-aminopyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonate (APTS), and used as glycan library without isolation. Interaction of a carbohydrate-binding protein with each oligosaccharide in the mixture could be simultaneously observed, and relative affinities of oligosaccharides toward the protein were accurately determined. In this study, we applied CAE to detect the presence of lectins in some plants (Japanese elderberry bark and tulip bulb). In the crude extract of the elderberry bark, binding activity toward sialo-carbohydrate chains could be easily detected. We also examined the presence of lectins in the crude extract of tulip bulbs and determined the detailed carbohydrate-binding specificity of Tulipa gesneriana agglutinin (TGA), one of the lectins from tulip bulbs. Kinetic studies demonstrated that TGA showed novel carbohydrate-binding specificity and preferentially recognized triantennary oligosaccharides with Gal residues at nonreducing termini and a Fuc residue linked through alpha(1-6) linkage at chitobiose portion of the reducing termini but not tetraantennary carbohydrates. The results described here indicate that CAE will be a valuable method for both screening of lectins in natural sources and determination of their detailed carbohydrate-binding specificities.

  12. Glycan microarray analysis of the carbohydrate-recognition specificity of native and recombinant forms of the lectin ArtinM

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Y.; Cecílio, N.T.; Carvalho, F.C.; Roque-Barreira, M.C.; Feizi, T.

    2015-01-01

    This article contains data related to the researc.h article entitled “Yeast-derived ArtinM shares structure, carbohydrate recognition, and biological effects with native ArtinM” by Cecílio et al. (2015) [1]. ArtinM, a D-mannose-binding lectin isolated from the seeds of Artocarpus heterophyllus, exerts immunomodulatory and regenerative activities through its Carbohydrate Recognition Domain (CRD) (Souza et al., 2013; Mariano et al., 2014 [2], [3]). The limited availability of the native lectin (n-ArtinM) led us to characterize a recombinant form of the protein, obtained by expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (y-ArtinM). We compared the carbohydrate-binding specificities of y-ArtinM and n-ArtinM by analyzing the binding of biotinylated preparations of the two lectin forms using a neoglycolipid (NGL)-based glycan microarray. Data showed that y-ArtinM mirrored the specificity exhibited by n-ArtinM. PMID:26793748

  13. Glycan microarray analysis of the carbohydrate-recognition specificity of native and recombinant forms of the lectin ArtinM.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Cecílio, N T; Carvalho, F C; Roque-Barreira, M C; Feizi, T

    2015-12-01

    This article contains data related to the researc.h article entitled "Yeast-derived ArtinM shares structure, carbohydrate recognition, and biological effects with native ArtinM" by Cecílio et al. (2015) [1]. ArtinM, a D-mannose-binding lectin isolated from the seeds of Artocarpus heterophyllus, exerts immunomodulatory and regenerative activities through its Carbohydrate Recognition Domain (CRD) (Souza et al., 2013; Mariano et al., 2014 [2], [3]). The limited availability of the native lectin (n-ArtinM) led us to characterize a recombinant form of the protein, obtained by expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (y-ArtinM). We compared the carbohydrate-binding specificities of y-ArtinM and n-ArtinM by analyzing the binding of biotinylated preparations of the two lectin forms using a neoglycolipid (NGL)-based glycan microarray. Data showed that y-ArtinM mirrored the specificity exhibited by n-ArtinM. PMID:26793748

  14. Glycan microarray analysis of the carbohydrate-recognition specificity of native and recombinant forms of the lectin ArtinM.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Cecílio, N T; Carvalho, F C; Roque-Barreira, M C; Feizi, T

    2015-12-01

    This article contains data related to the researc.h article entitled "Yeast-derived ArtinM shares structure, carbohydrate recognition, and biological effects with native ArtinM" by Cecílio et al. (2015) [1]. ArtinM, a D-mannose-binding lectin isolated from the seeds of Artocarpus heterophyllus, exerts immunomodulatory and regenerative activities through its Carbohydrate Recognition Domain (CRD) (Souza et al., 2013; Mariano et al., 2014 [2], [3]). The limited availability of the native lectin (n-ArtinM) led us to characterize a recombinant form of the protein, obtained by expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (y-ArtinM). We compared the carbohydrate-binding specificities of y-ArtinM and n-ArtinM by analyzing the binding of biotinylated preparations of the two lectin forms using a neoglycolipid (NGL)-based glycan microarray. Data showed that y-ArtinM mirrored the specificity exhibited by n-ArtinM.

  15. Photo-Activated Localization Microscopy of Single Carbohydrate Binding Modules on Cellulose Nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hor, Amy; Dagel, Daryl; Luu, Quocanh; Savaikar, Madhusudan; Ding, Shi-You; Smith, Steve

    2015-03-01

    Photo Activated Localization Microscopy (PALM) is used to conduct an in vivo study of the binding affinity of polysaccharide-specific Carbohydrate Binding Modules (CBMs) to insoluble cellulose substrates. Two families of CBMs, namely TrCBM1 and CtCBM3, were modified to incorporate photo-activatable mCherry fluorescent protein (PAmCherry), and exposed to highly crystalline Valonia cellulose nano-fibrils. The resulting PALM images show CBMs binding along the nano-fibril long axis in a punctuated linear array, localized with, on average, 10 nm precision. Statistical analysis of the binding events results in nearest neighbor distributions between CBMs. A comparison between TrCBM1 and CtCBM3 reveals a similarity in the nearest neighbor distribution peaks but differences in the overall binding density. The former is attributed to steric hindrance among the CBMs on the nano-fibril whereas the latter is attributed to differences in the CBMs' binding strength. These results are compared to similar distributions derived from TEM measurements of dried samples of CtCBM3-CdSs quantum dot bioconjugates and AFM images of CtCBM3-GFP bound to similar Valonia nano-fibrils. Funding provided by NSF MPS/DMR/BMAT Award # 1206908.

  16. Binding Preferences, Surface Attachment, Diffusivity, and Orientation of a Family 1 Carbohydrate-binding Module on Cellulose*

    PubMed Central

    Nimlos, Mark R.; Beckham, Gregg T.; Matthews, James F.; Bu, Lintao; Himmel, Michael E.; Crowley, Michael F.

    2012-01-01

    Cellulase enzymes often contain carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) for binding to cellulose. The mechanisms by which CBMs recognize specific surfaces of cellulose and aid in deconstruction are essential to understand cellulase action. The Family 1 CBM from the Trichoderma reesei Family 7 cellobiohydrolase, Cel7A, is known to selectively bind to hydrophobic surfaces of native cellulose. It is most commonly suggested that three aromatic residues identify the planar binding face of this CBM, but several recent studies have challenged this hypothesis. Here, we use molecular simulation to study the CBM binding orientation and affinity on hydrophilic and hydrophobic cellulose surfaces. Roughly 43 μs of molecular dynamics simulations were conducted, which enables statistically significant observations. We quantify the fractions of the CBMs that detach from crystal surfaces or diffuse to other surfaces, the diffusivity along the hydrophobic surface, and the overall orientation of the CBM on both hydrophobic and hydrophilic faces. The simulations demonstrate that there is a thermodynamic driving force for the Cel7A CBM to bind preferentially to the hydrophobic surface of cellulose relative to hydrophilic surfaces. In addition, the simulations demonstrate that the CBM can diffuse from hydrophilic surfaces to the hydrophobic surface, whereas the reverse transition is not observed. Lastly, our simulations suggest that the flat faces of Family 1 CBMs are the preferred binding surfaces. These results enhance our understanding of how Family 1 CBMs interact with and recognize specific cellulose surfaces and provide insights into the initial events of cellulase adsorption and diffusion on cellulose. PMID:22496371

  17. Species differences in the carbohydrate binding preferences of surfactant protein D.

    PubMed

    Crouch, Erika C; Smith, Kelly; McDonald, Barbara; Briner, David; Linders, Bruce; McDonald, Joseph; Holmskov, Uffe; Head, James; Hartshorn, Kevan

    2006-07-01

    Interactions of surfactant protein D (SP-D) with micro-organisms and organic antigens involve binding to the trimeric neck plus carbohydrate recognition domain (neck+CRD). In these studies, we compared the ligand binding of homologous human, rat, and mouse trimeric neck+CRD fusion proteins, each with identical N-terminal tags remote from the ligand-binding surface. Although rat and mouse showed similar affinities for saccharide competitors, both differed markedly from the human protein. The human neck+CRD preferentially recognized N-acetyl-mannosamine, whereas the rat and mouse proteins showed greater affinity for myoinositol, maltose, and glucose. Although human neck+CRDs bound to maltosyl-agarose and fungal mannan, only rat and mouse neck+CRDs showed significant binding to maltosyl-Toyopearl beads, solid-phase maltosyl-albumin neo-glycoprotein, or the Phil82 strain of influenza A virus. Likewise, human SP-D dodecamers and trimeric subunits of full-length rat, but not full-length human SP-D trimers, bound to maltosyl-Toyopearl. Site-directed mutagenesis of the human neck+CRD demonstrated an important role of Asp324-Asp325 in the recognition of N-acetyl-mannosamine, and substitution of the corresponding murine sequence (Asn324-Asn325) conferred a capacity to interact with immobilized maltose. Thus, ligand recognition by human SP-D involves a complex interplay between saccharide presentation, the valency of trimeric subunits, and species-specific residues that flank the primary carbohydrate binding site.

  18. Circular Permutation Provides an Evolutionary Link between Two Families of Calcium-dependent Carbohydrate Binding Modules*

    PubMed Central

    Montanier, Cedric; Flint, James E.; Bolam, David N.; Xie, Hefang; Liu, Ziyuan; Rogowski, Artur; Weiner, David P.; Ratnaparkhe, Supriya; Nurizzo, Didier; Roberts, Shirley M.; Turkenburg, Johan P.; Davies, Gideon J.; Gilbert, Harry J.

    2010-01-01

    The microbial deconstruction of the plant cell wall is a critical biological process, which also provides important substrates for environmentally sustainable industries. Enzymes that hydrolyze the plant cell wall generally contain non-catalytic carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) that contribute to plant cell wall degradation. Here we report the biochemical properties and crystal structure of a family of CBMs (CBM60) that are located in xylanases. Uniquely, the proteins display broad ligand specificity, targeting xylans, galactans, and cellulose. Some of the CBM60s display enhanced affinity for their ligands through avidity effects mediated by protein dimerization. The crystal structure of vCBM60, displays a β-sandwich with the ligand binding site comprising a broad cleft formed by the loops connecting the two β-sheets. Ligand recognition at site 1 is, exclusively, through hydrophobic interactions, whereas binding at site 2 is conferred by polar interactions between a protein-bound calcium and the O2 and O3 of the sugar. The observation, that ligand recognition at site 2 requires only a β-linked sugar that contains equatorial hydroxyls at C2 and C3, explains the broad ligand specificity displayed by vCBM60. The ligand-binding apparatus of vCBM60 displays remarkable structural conservation with a family 36 CBM (CBM36); however, the residues that contribute to carbohydrate recognition are derived from different regions of the two proteins. Three-dimensional structure-based sequence alignments reveal that CBM36 and CBM60 are related by circular permutation. The biological and evolutionary significance of the mechanism of ligand recognition displayed by family 60 CBMs is discussed. PMID:20659893

  19. High-throughput carbohydrate microarray profiling of 27 antibodies demonstrates widespread specificity problems.

    PubMed

    Manimala, Joseph C; Roach, Timothy A; Li, Zhitao; Gildersleeve, Jeffrey C

    2007-08-01

    Progress toward understanding the biological roles of carbohydrates has been remarkably slow, and efforts to exploit this class of biopolymers as diagnostic and therapeutic targets have proven extremely challenging. Both basic and clinical research rely heavily on identifying and monitoring expression levels of carbohydrates. Over the last 30 years, the majority of expression information has been derived from antibody- and lectin-binding studies. Using a carbohydrate microarray containing 80 different glycans and glycoproteins, the specificities of 27 antiglycan antibodies were evaluated, including antibodies to histo-blood group A, B, and H antigens (81FR2.2, CLCP-19B, B389, 92FR-A2, B480, B460, B376, and B393), Lewis antigens (7LE, 15C02, 28, ZC-18C, 121SLE, CA199.02, PR.5C5, 2-25LE, BR55, T174, T218, F3, A70-C/C8, FR4A5, and K21), and other tumor-associated antigens (B389, 1A4, B1.1, and 5B5). In total, evaluation of over 2000 individual carbohydrate-protein interactions was carried out. More than half of the antibodies considered to be specific for their designated antigen were found to cross-react with other glycans. The cross-reactive glycans could be mistaken for the designated antigen in biopsy samples or other biological samples, leading to inaccurate conclusions. PMID:17483136

  20. Carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Cocinero, Emilio J; Çarçabal, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Although carbohydrates represent one of the most important families of biomolecules, they remain under-studied in comparison to the other biomolecular families (peptides, nucleobases). Beyond their best-known function of energy source in living systems, they act as mediator of molecular recognition processes, carrying molecular information in the so-called "sugar code," just to name one of their countless functions. Owing to their high conformational flexibility, they encode extremely rich information conveyed via the non-covalent hydrogen bonds within the carbohydrate and with other biomolecular assemblies, such as peptide subunits of proteins. Over the last decade there has been tremendous progress in the study of the conformational preferences of neutral oligosaccharides, and of the interactions between carbohydrates and various molecular partners (water, aromatic models, and peptide models), using vibrational spectroscopy as a sensitive probe. In parallel, other spectroscopic techniques have recently become available to the study of carbohydrates in the gas phase (microwave spectroscopy, IRMPD on charged species).

  1. Novel characteristics of a carbohydrate-binding module 20 from hyperthermophilic bacterium.

    PubMed

    Oh, Il-Nam; Jane, Jay-Lin; Wang, Kan; Park, Jong-Tae; Park, Kwan-Hwa

    2015-03-01

    In this study, a gene fragment coding carbohydrate-binding module 20 (CBM20) in the amylopullulanase (APU) gene was cloned from the hyperthermophilic bacteria Thermoanaerobacter pseudoethanolicus 39E and expressed in Escherichia coli. The protein, hereafter Tp39E, possesses very low sequence similarity with the CBM20s previously reported and has no starch binding site 2. Tp39E did not demonstrate thermal denaturation at 50 °C; however, thermal unfolding of the protein was observed at 59.5 °C. A binding assay with Tp39E was conducted using various soluble and insoluble substrates, and starch was the best binding polysaccharide. Intriguingly, Tp39E bound, to a lesser extent, to soluble and insoluble xylan as well. The dissociation constant (K d) and the maximum specific binding (B max) of Tp39E to corn starch granules were 0.537 μM and 5.79 μM/g, respectively, at pH 5.5 and 20 °C. 99APU1357 with a Tp39E domain exhibited 2.2-fold greater activity than a CBM20-truncation mutant when starch granules were the substrate. Tp39E was an independently thermostable CBM and had a considerable effect on APU activity in the hydrolysis of insoluble substrates. PMID:25575613

  2. Novel characteristics of a carbohydrate-binding module 20 from hyperthermophilic bacterium.

    PubMed

    Oh, Il-Nam; Jane, Jay-Lin; Wang, Kan; Park, Jong-Tae; Park, Kwan-Hwa

    2015-03-01

    In this study, a gene fragment coding carbohydrate-binding module 20 (CBM20) in the amylopullulanase (APU) gene was cloned from the hyperthermophilic bacteria Thermoanaerobacter pseudoethanolicus 39E and expressed in Escherichia coli. The protein, hereafter Tp39E, possesses very low sequence similarity with the CBM20s previously reported and has no starch binding site 2. Tp39E did not demonstrate thermal denaturation at 50 °C; however, thermal unfolding of the protein was observed at 59.5 °C. A binding assay with Tp39E was conducted using various soluble and insoluble substrates, and starch was the best binding polysaccharide. Intriguingly, Tp39E bound, to a lesser extent, to soluble and insoluble xylan as well. The dissociation constant (K d) and the maximum specific binding (B max) of Tp39E to corn starch granules were 0.537 μM and 5.79 μM/g, respectively, at pH 5.5 and 20 °C. 99APU1357 with a Tp39E domain exhibited 2.2-fold greater activity than a CBM20-truncation mutant when starch granules were the substrate. Tp39E was an independently thermostable CBM and had a considerable effect on APU activity in the hydrolysis of insoluble substrates.

  3. Ion mobility studies of carbohydrates as group I adducts: isomer specific collisional cross section dependence on metal ion radius.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuting; Dodds, Eric D

    2013-10-15

    Carbohydrates play numerous critical roles in biological systems. Characterization of oligosaccharide structures is essential to a complete understanding of their functions in biological processes; nevertheless, their structural determination remains challenging in part due to isomerism. Ion mobility spectrometry provides the means to resolve gas phase ions on the basis of their shape-to-charge ratios, thus providing significant potential for separation and differentiation of carbohydrate isomers. Here, we report on the determination of collisional cross sections for four groups of isomeric carbohydrates (including five isomeric disaccharides, four isomeric trisaccharides, two isomeric pentasaccharides, and two isomeric hexasaccharides) as their group I metal ion adducts (i.e., [M + Li](+), [M + Na](+), [M + K](+), [M + Rb](+), and [M + Cs](+)). In all, 65 collisional cross sections were measured, the great majority of which have not been previously reported. As anticipated, the collisional cross sections of the carbohydrate metal ion adducts generally increase with increasing metal ion radius; however, the collisional cross sections were found to scale with the group I cation size in isomer specific manners. Such measurements are of substantial analytical value, as they illustrate how the selection of charge carrier influences carbohydrate ion mobility determinations. For example, certain pairs of isomeric carbohydrates assume unique collisional cross sections upon binding one metal ion, but not another. On the whole, these data suggest a role for the charge carrier as a probe of carbohydrate structure and thus have significant implications for the continued development and application of ion mobility spectrometry for the distinction and resolution of isomeric carbohydrates.

  4. An Adenovirus Vector Incorporating Carbohydrate Binding Domains Utilizes Glycans for Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, Masaharu; Ak, Ferhat; Ugai, Hideyo; Curiel, David T.

    2013-01-01

    Background Vectors based on human adenovirus serotype 5 (HAdV-5) continue to show promise as delivery vehicles for cancer gene therapy. Nevertheless, it has become clear that therapeutic benefit is directly linked to tumor-specific vector localization, highlighting the need for tumor-targeted gene delivery. Aberrant glycosylation of cell surface glycoproteins and glycolipids is a central feature of malignant transformation, and tumor-associated glycoforms are recognized as cancer biomarkers. On this basis, we hypothesized that cancer-specific cell-surface glycans could be the basis of a novel paradigm in HAdV-5-based vector targeting. Methodology/Principal Findings As a first step toward this goal, we constructed a novel HAdV-5 vector encoding a unique chimeric fiber protein that contains the tandem carbohydrate binding domains of the fiber protein of the NADC-1 strain of porcine adenovirus type 4 (PAdV-4). This glycan-targeted vector displays augmented CAR-independent gene transfer in cells with low CAR expression. Further, we show that gene transfer is markedly decreased in cells with genetic glycosylation defects and by inhibitors of glycosylation in normal cells. Conclusions/Significance These data provide the initial proof-of-concept for HAdV-5 vector-mediated gene delivery based on the presence of cell-surface carbohydrates. Further development of this new targeting paradigm could provide targeted gene delivery based on vector recognition of disease-specific glycan biomarkers. PMID:23383334

  5. A role for carbohydrate recognition in mammalian sperm-egg binding

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Gary F.

    2014-08-01

    Highlights: • Mammalian sperm-egg binding as a carbohydrate dependent species recognition event. • The role of carbohydrate recognition in human, mouse and pig sperm-egg binding. • Historical perspective and future directions for research focused on gamete binding. - Abstract: Mammalian fertilization usually requires three sequential cell–cell interactions: (i) initial binding of sperm to the specialized extracellular matrix coating the egg known as the zona pellucida (ZP); (ii) binding of sperm to the ZP via the inner acrosomal membrane that is exposed following the induction of acrosomal exocytosis; and (iii) adhesion of acrosome-reacted sperm to the plasma membrane of the egg cell, enabling subsequent fusion of these gametes. The focus of this review is on the initial binding of intact sperm to the mammalian ZP. Evidence collected over the past fifty years has confirmed that this interaction relies primarily on the recognition of carbohydrate sequences presented on the ZP by lectin-like egg binding proteins located on the plasma membrane of sperm. There is also evidence that the same carbohydrate sequences that mediate binding also function as ligands for lectins on lymphocytes that can inactivate immune responses, likely protecting the egg and the developing embryo up to the stage of blastocyst hatching. The literature related to initial sperm-ZP binding in the three major mammalian models (human, mouse and pig) is discussed. Historical perspectives and future directions for research related to this aspect of gamete adhesion are also presented.

  6. Development of screening methods for detection of carbohydrate-binding proteins by use of soluble glycosylated polyacrylamide-based copolymers.

    PubMed

    Chadli, A; Caron, M; Tichá, M; Joubert, R; Bladier, D; Kocourek, J

    1992-07-01

    Mammalian endogenous carbohydrate-binding proteins (lectins) play fundamental roles in a variety of mechanisms of interactions both at the molecular and cellular levels. We have investigated the binding of one of them (human brain lectin) to soluble acrylamide copolymerized with derivatives of either lactose (O-beta-lactosyloxyallylallylaminoacrylamide copolymer) or D-mannose (D-alpha-mannosyloxyallylallylaminoacrylamide copolymer) in direct enzyme affinoassays, in an attempt to develop simple procedures for detection and estimation of its carbohydrate-binding activity. Biotinylated plant lectins were utilized as reference standards. Affinoassays employed the polymer dotted on nitrocellulose and the polymer coated on microtiter plates as well as detection of bound biotinylated lectin by streptavidin/horseradish peroxidase reagent. Both assays provided reproducible binding, inhibitable by specific sugars. The microtiter plate assay is well suited to sensitive detection of the negative endogenous lectin by competition with biotinylated brain lectin. We conclude that the use of derivatized acrylamide in dotting and microtiter plate assays may prove practical for detection of endogenous lectins and that such polymers may serve as model substances in the study of biological partners of these carbohydrate-binding proteins.

  7. Surface plasmon resonance imaging analysis of protein binding to a sialoside-based carbohydrate microarray.

    PubMed

    Linman, Matthew J; Yu, Hai; Chen, Xi; Cheng, Quan

    2012-01-01

    Monitoring multiple biological interactions in a multiplexed array format has numerous advantages. However, converting well-developed surface chemistry for spectroscopic measurements to array-based, high-throughput screening is not a trivial process and often proves to be the bottleneck in method development. This chapter reports the fabrication and characterization of a new carbohydrate microarray with synthetic sialosides for surface plasmon resonance imaging analysis of lectin-carbohydrate interactions. Contact printing of functional sialosides on neutravidin-coated surfaces was carried out and the properties of the resulting elements were characterized by fluorescence microscopy. Sambucus nigra agglutinin (SNA) was used for testing on four different carbohydrate-functionalized surfaces and differential binding was analyzed. Multiplexed detection of SNA/biotinylated sialoside interactions on arrays up to 400 elements has been performed with good data correlation, demonstrating the effectiveness of the biotin-neutravidin-based biointerface to control probe orientation for reproducible and efficient protein binding to carbohydrates.

  8. Involvement of N-linked carbohydrate chains of pig zona pellucida in sperm-egg binding.

    PubMed

    Yonezawa, N; Aoki, H; Hatanaka, Y; Nakano, M

    1995-10-01

    The sperm receptor activity of pig zona pellucida has been previously shown to exist in one of the components, pig zona protein 3 alpha (PZP3 alpha), that can be purified after the removal of sialylated and/or sulfated N-acetylpoly(lactosamine) by digestion with endo-beta-galactosidase. In this study, we examined whether N-linked or O-linked carbohydrate chains are involved in the sperm receptor activity of pig zona pellucida. The elimination of N-linked carbohydrate chains from endo-beta-galactosidase-digested PZP3 alpha by digestion with N-glycanase markedly reduced its inhibitory effect on sperm-egg binding in an in vitro competition assay, whereas the elimination of O-linked carbohydrate chains by alkali treatment hardly reduced the inhibitory effect. These results indicate that N-linked carbohydrate chains of PZP3 alpha play a major role in mediating the sperm binding of zona pellucida in pig.

  9. The Structural Basis of Alpha-Glucan Recognition by a Family 41 Carbohydrate-Binding Module from Therotoga Maritima

    SciTech Connect

    van Bueren,A.; Boraston, A.

    2006-01-01

    Starch recognition by carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) is important for the activity of starch-degrading enzymes. The N-terminal family 41 CBM, TmCBM41 (from pullulanase PulA secreted by Thermotoga maritima) was shown to have {alpha}-glucan binding activity with specificity for {alpha}-1, 4-glucans but was able to tolerate the {alpha}-1, 6-linkages found roughly every three or four glucose units in pullulan. Using X-ray crystallography, the structures were solved for TmCBM41 in an uncomplexed form and in complex with maltotetraose and 63-{alpha}-d-glucosyl-maltotriose (GM3). Ligand binding was facilitated by stacking interactions between the {alpha}-faces of the glucose residues and two tryptophan side-chains in the two main subsites of the carbohydrate-binding site. Overall, this mode of starch binding is quite well conserved by other starch-binding modules. The structure in complex with GM3 revealed a third binding subsite with the flexibility to accommodate an {alpha}-1, 4- or an {alpha}-1, 6-linked glucose.

  10. Potential of carbohydrate-binding agents as therapeutics against enveloped viruses.

    PubMed

    François, K O; Balzarini, J

    2012-03-01

    Twenty-seven years after the discovery of HIV as the cause of AIDS more than 25 drugs directed against four different viral targets (i.e. reverse transcriptase, protease, integrase, envelope gp41) and one cellular target (i.e. CCR5 co-receptor) are available for treatment. However, the search for an efficient vaccine is still ongoing. One of the main problems is the presence of a continuously evolving dense carbohydrate shield, consisting of N-linked glycans that surrounds the virion and protects it against efficient recognition and persistent neutralization by the immune system. However, several lectins from the innate immune system specifically bind to these glycans in an attempt to process the virus antigens to provoke an immune response. Across a wide variety of different species in nature lectins can be found that can interact with the glycosylated envelope of HIV-1 and can block the infection of susceptible cells by the virus. In this review, we will give an overview of the lectins from non-mammalian origin that are endowed with antiviral properties and discuss the complex interactions between lectins of the innate immune system and HIV-1. Also, attention will be given to different carbohydrate-related modalities that can be exploited for antiviral chemotherapy.

  11. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG SpaC pilin subunit binds to the carbohydrate moieties of intestinal glycoconjugates.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Keita; Ueno, Shintaro; Sugiyama, Makoto; Yamamoto, Yuji; Mukai, Takao

    2016-06-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) is a well-established probiotic strain. The beneficial properties of this strain are partially dependent on its prolonged residence in the gastrointestinal tract, and are likely influenced by its adhesion to the intestinal mucosa. The pilin SpaC subunit, located within the Spa pili structure, is the most well studied LGG adhesion factor. However, the binding epitopes of SpaC remain largely unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the binding properties of SpaC to the carbohydrate moieties of intestinal glycoconjugates using a recombinant SpaC protein. In a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, SpaC binding was markedly reduced by addition of purified mucin and the mucin oligosaccharide fraction. Histochemical staining revealed that the binding of SpaC was drastically reduced by periodic acid treatment. Moreover, in the surface plasmon resonance-based Biacore assay, SpaC bound strongly to the carbohydrate moieties containing β-galactoside at the non-reducing terminus of glycolipids. We here provide the first demonstration that SpaC binds to the oligosaccharide chains of mucins, and that the carbohydrate moieties containing β-galactoside at the non-reducing termini of glycoconjugates play a crucial role in this binding. Our results demonstrate the importance of carbohydrates of SpaC for mucus interactions.

  12. A Structural Model for Binding of the Serine-Rich Repeat Adhesin GspB to Host Carbohydrate Receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Pyburn, Tasia M.; Bensing, Barbara A.; Xiong, Yan Q.; Melancon, Bruce J.; Tomasiak, Thomas M.; Ward, Nicholas J.; Yankovskaya, Victoria; Oliver, Kevin M.; Cecchini, Gary; Sulikowski, Gary A.; Tyska, Matthew J.; Sullam, Paul M.; Iverson, T.M.

    2014-10-02

    GspB is a serine-rich repeat (SRR) adhesin of Streptococcus gordonii that mediates binding of this organism to human platelets via its interaction with sialyl-T antigen on the receptor GPIb{alpha}. This interaction appears to be a major virulence determinant in the pathogenesis of infective endocarditis. To address the mechanism by which GspB recognizes its carbohydrate ligand, we determined the high-resolution x-ray crystal structure of the GspB binding region (GspB{sub BR}), both alone and in complex with a disaccharide precursor to sialyl-T antigen. Analysis of the GspB{sub BR} structure revealed that it is comprised of three independently folded subdomains or modules: (1) an Ig-fold resembling a CnaA domain from prokaryotic pathogens; (2) a second Ig-fold resembling the binding region of mammalian Siglecs; (3) a subdomain of unique fold. The disaccharide was found to bind in a pocket within the Siglec subdomain, but at a site distinct from that observed in mammalian Siglecs. Confirming the biological relevance of this binding pocket, we produced three isogenic variants of S. gordonii, each containing a single point mutation of a residue lining this binding pocket. These variants have reduced binding to carbohydrates of GPIb{alpha}. Further examination of purified GspB{sub BR}-R484E showed reduced binding to sialyl-T antigen while S. gordonii harboring this mutation did not efficiently bind platelets and showed a significant reduction in virulence, as measured by an animal model of endocarditis. Analysis of other SRR proteins revealed that the predicted binding regions of these adhesins also had a modular organization, with those known to bind carbohydrate receptors having modules homologous to the Siglec and Unique subdomains of GspBBR. This suggests that the binding specificity of the SRR family of adhesins is determined by the type and organization of discrete modules within the binding domains, which may affect the tropism of organisms for different tissues.

  13. Localizing Carbohydrate Binding Sites in Proteins Using Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingjing; Kitova, Elena N.; Li, Jun; Eugenio, Luiz; Ng, Kenneth; Klassen, John S.

    2016-01-01

    The application of hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) to localize ligand binding sites in carbohydrate-binding proteins is described. Proteins from three bacterial toxins, the B subunit homopentamers of Cholera toxin and Shiga toxin type 1 and a fragment of Clostridium difficile toxin A, and their interactions with native carbohydrate receptors, GM1 pentasaccharides (β-Gal-(1→3)-β-GalNAc-(1→4)[α-Neu5Ac-(2→3)]-β-Gal-(1→4)-Glc), Pk trisaccharide (α-Gal-(1→4)-β-Gal-(1→4)-Glc) and CD-grease (α-Gal-(1→3)-β-Gal-(1→4)-β-GlcNAcO(CH2)8CO2CH3), respectively, served as model systems for this study. Comparison of the differences in deuterium uptake for peptic peptides produced in the absence and presence of ligand revealed regions of the proteins that are protected against deuterium exchange upon ligand binding. Notably, protected regions generally coincide with the carbohydrate binding sites identified by X-ray crystallography. However, ligand binding can also result in increased deuterium exchange in other parts of the protein, presumably through allosteric effects. Overall, the results of this study suggest that HDX-MS can serve as a useful tool for localizing the ligand binding sites in carbohydrate-binding proteins. However, a detailed interpretation of the changes in deuterium exchange upon ligand binding can be challenging because of the presence of ligand-induced changes in protein structure and dynamics.

  14. Localizing Carbohydrate Binding Sites in Proteins Using Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingjing; Kitova, Elena N; Li, Jun; Eugenio, Luiz; Ng, Kenneth; Klassen, John S

    2016-01-01

    The application of hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) to localize ligand binding sites in carbohydrate-binding proteins is described. Proteins from three bacterial toxins, the B subunit homopentamers of Cholera toxin and Shiga toxin type 1 and a fragment of Clostridium difficile toxin A, and their interactions with native carbohydrate receptors, GM1 pentasaccharides (β-Gal-(1→3)-β-GalNAc-(1→4)[α-Neu5Ac-(2→3)]-β-Gal-(1→4)-Glc), Pk trisaccharide (α-Gal-(1→4)-β-Gal-(1→4)-Glc) and CD-grease (α-Gal-(1→3)-β-Gal-(1→4)-β-GlcNAcO(CH2)8CO2CH3), respectively, served as model systems for this study. Comparison of the differences in deuterium uptake for peptic peptides produced in the absence and presence of ligand revealed regions of the proteins that are protected against deuterium exchange upon ligand binding. Notably, protected regions generally coincide with the carbohydrate binding sites identified by X-ray crystallography. However, ligand binding can also result in increased deuterium exchange in other parts of the protein, presumably through allosteric effects. Overall, the results of this study suggest that HDX-MS can serve as a useful tool for localizing the ligand binding sites in carbohydrate-binding proteins. However, a detailed interpretation of the changes in deuterium exchange upon ligand binding can be challenging because of the presence of ligand-induced changes in protein structure and dynamics.

  15. Production and purification of the isolated family 2a carbohydrate-binding module from Cellulomonas fimi.

    PubMed

    Jing, Haiqiang; Cockburn, Darrell; Zhang, Qinxian; Clarke, Anthony J

    2009-03-01

    Cellulose is the most abundant polymer on Earth and in recent years, renewed interest has developed in its use for the production of biofuels and other value added products. Cellulose is degraded to glucose by the concerted action of cellulolytic enzymes that include cellulases, cellobiohydrolases, and beta-glucosidases. In many cases, these enzymes are multi-modular, being comprised of distinct catalytic and carbohydrate-binding modules. The latter appear to aid in both the adsorption of the enzymes to the insoluble cellulose substrate and the destabilization of the hydrogen-bonding network within the crystalline substrate. To better understand these dynamic processes, we have engineered a carbohydrate-binding module that can be attached to the probe of an atomic force microscope. Thus, the coding sequence for the leader peptide and carbohydrate-binding module from the Cellulomonas fimi cellulase A (cenA) was cloned and over-expressed in Escherichia coli. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to replace Thr87 of this module with Cys to facilitate covalent binding of the module to gold-plated AFM probes. The recombinant proteins with cleavable N-terminal His-tags were purified to apparent homogeneity by a combination of affinity and anion-exchange chromatographies using Ni(2+)-NTA-agarose and Source Q, respectively. Their ability to bind insoluble cellulose was demonstrated using a cellulose-binding assay involving the micro-crystalline cellulose, Avicel.

  16. A tricatecholic receptor for carbohydrate recognition: synthesis and binding studies.

    PubMed

    Cacciarini, Martina; Cordiano, Elisa; Nativi, Cristina; Roelens, Stefano

    2007-05-11

    A new tripodal receptor bearing three catechol subunits on a benzene platform has been synthesized in four steps from 1,3,5-triethylbenzene and pyrogallol. The binding ability of the tricatecholic receptor was investigated toward several monosaccharides in CDCl3, where multiple equilibria were detected, and compared to that of a previously reported trisureidic receptor of analogous structure. Association constants were measured by 1H NMR titrations, and the corresponding affinities were assessed through the BC50 parameter, a binding descriptor univocally defining the affinity of a host for a guest in multi-equilibrium systems. Results show that the tripodal catecholic receptor binds the octyl glycosides with affinities ranging from 0.87 to 5.2 mM and with a 6-fold selectivity factor for the alpha-mannoside over the beta-glucoside. Although the affinity for glycosides was not appreciably improved with respect to the ureidic receptor, a significant change in selectivity was obtained by the H-bonding group replacement.

  17. Unique carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions are required for high affinity binding between FcgammaRIII and antibodies lacking core fucose.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, Claudia; Grau, Sandra; Jäger, Christiane; Sondermann, Peter; Brünker, Peter; Waldhauer, Inja; Hennig, Michael; Ruf, Armin; Rufer, Arne Christian; Stihle, Martine; Umaña, Pablo; Benz, Jörg

    2011-08-01

    Antibody-mediated cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), a key immune effector mechanism, relies on the binding of antigen-antibody complexes to Fcγ receptors expressed on immune cells. Antibodies lacking core fucosylation show a large increase in affinity for FcγRIIIa leading to an improved receptor-mediated effector function. Although afucosylated IgGs exist naturally, a next generation of recombinant therapeutic, glycoenginereed antibodies is currently being developed to exploit this finding. In this study, the crystal structures of a glycosylated Fcγ receptor complexed with either afucosylated or fucosylated Fc were determined allowing a detailed, molecular understanding of the regulatory role of Fc-oligosaccharide core fucosylation in improving ADCC. The structures reveal a unique type of interface consisting of carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions between glycans of the receptor and the afucosylated Fc. In contrast, in the complex structure with fucosylated Fc, these contacts are weakened or nonexistent, explaining the decreased affinity for the receptor. These findings allow us to understand the higher efficacy of therapeutic antibodies lacking the core fucose and also suggest a unique mechanism by which the immune system can regulate antibody-mediated effector functions.

  18. Secretin: specific binding to rat brain membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Fremeau, R.T. Jr.; Jensen, R.T.; Charlton, C.G.; Miller, R.L.; O'Donohue, T.L.; Moody, T.W.

    1983-08-01

    The binding of (/sup 125/I)secretin to rat brain membranes was investigated. Radiolabeled secretin bound with high affinity (KD . 0.2 nM) to a single class of noninteracting sites. Binding was specific, saturable, and reversible. Regional distribution studies indicated that the specific binding was greatest in the cerebellum, intermediate in the cortex, thalamus, striatum, hippocampus, and hypothalamus, and lowest in the midbrain and medulla/pons. Pharmacological studies indicated that only secretin, but not other peptides, inhibits binding of (/sup 125/I)secretin with high affinity. Also, certain guanine nucleotides inhibited high affinity binding. These data indicate that rat brain membranes possess high affinity binding sites specific for secretin and that with the use of (/sup 125/I) secretin the kinetics, stoichiometry, specificity, and distribution of secretin receptors can be directly investigated.

  19. New insights into enzymatic hydrolysis of heterogeneous cellulose by using carbohydrate-binding module 3 containing GFP and carbohydrate-binding module 17 containing CFP

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The in-depth understanding of the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose with heterogeneous morphology (that is, crystalline versus amorphous) may help develop better cellulase cocktail mixtures and biomass pretreatment, wherein cost-effective release of soluble sugars from solid cellulosic materials remains the largest obstacle to the economic viability of second generation biorefineries. Results In addition to the previously developed non-hydrolytic fusion protein, GC3, containing a green fluorescent protein (GFP) and a family 3 carbohydrate-binding module (CBM3) that can bind both surfaces of amorphous and crystalline celluloses, we developed a new protein probe, CC17, which contained a mono-cherry fluorescent protein (CFP) and a family 17 carbohydrate-binding module (CBM17) that can bind only amorphous cellulose surfaces. Via these two probes, the surface accessibilities of amorphous and crystalline celluloses were determined quantitatively. Our results for the enzymatic hydrolysis of microcrystalline cellulose (Avicel) suggested that: 1) easily accessible amorphous cellulose on the surface of Avicel is preferentially hydrolyzed at the very early period of hydrolysis (that is, several minutes with a cellulose conversion of 2.8%); 2) further hydrolysis of Avicel is a typical layer-by-layer mechanism, that is, amorphous and crystalline cellulose regions were hydrolyzed simultaneously; and 3) most amorphous cellulose within the interior of the Avicel particles cannot be accessed by cellulase. Conclusions The crystallinity index (CrI), reflecting a mass-average (three-dimensional) cellulose characteristic, did not represent the key substrate surface (two-dimensional) characteristic related to enzymatic hydrolysis. PMID:24552554

  20. The Contribution of Non-catalytic Carbohydrate Binding Modules to the Activity of Lytic Polysaccharide Monooxygenases*

    PubMed Central

    Crouch, Lucy I.; Labourel, Aurore; Walton, Paul H.; Davies, Gideon J.; Gilbert, Harry J.

    2016-01-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass is a sustainable industrial substrate. Copper-dependent lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) contribute to the degradation of lignocellulose and increase the efficiency of biofuel production. LPMOs can contain non-catalytic carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs), but their role in the activity of these enzymes is poorly understood. Here we explored the importance of CBMs in LPMO function. The family 2a CBMs of two monooxygenases, CfLPMO10 and TbLPMO10 from Cellulomonas fimi and Thermobispora bispora, respectively, were deleted and/or replaced with CBMs from other proteins. The data showed that the CBMs could potentiate and, surprisingly, inhibit LPMO activity, and that these effects were both enzyme-specific and substrate-specific. Removing the natural CBM or introducing CtCBM3a, from the Clostridium thermocellum cellulosome scaffoldin CipA, almost abolished the catalytic activity of the LPMOs against the cellulosic substrates. The deleterious effect of CBM removal likely reflects the importance of prolonged presentation of the enzyme on the surface of the substrate for efficient catalytic activity, as only LPMOs appended to CBMs bound tightly to cellulose. The negative impact of CtCBM3a is in sharp contrast with the capacity of this binding module to potentiate the activity of a range of glycoside hydrolases including cellulases. The deletion of the endogenous CBM from CfLPMO10 or the introduction of a family 10 CBM from Cellvibrio japonicus LPMO10B into TbLPMO10 influenced the quantity of non-oxidized products generated, demonstrating that CBMs can modulate the mode of action of LPMOs. This study demonstrates that engineered LPMO-CBM hybrids can display enhanced industrially relevant oxygenations. PMID:26801613

  1. The Contribution of Non-catalytic Carbohydrate Binding Modules to the Activity of Lytic Polysaccharide Monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Crouch, Lucy I; Labourel, Aurore; Walton, Paul H; Davies, Gideon J; Gilbert, Harry J

    2016-04-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass is a sustainable industrial substrate. Copper-dependent lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) contribute to the degradation of lignocellulose and increase the efficiency of biofuel production. LPMOs can contain non-catalytic carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs), but their role in the activity of these enzymes is poorly understood. Here we explored the importance of CBMs in LPMO function. The family 2a CBMs of two monooxygenases,CfLPMO10 andTbLPMO10 fromCellulomonas fimiandThermobispora bispora, respectively, were deleted and/or replaced with CBMs from other proteins. The data showed that the CBMs could potentiate and, surprisingly, inhibit LPMO activity, and that these effects were both enzyme-specific and substrate-specific. Removing the natural CBM or introducingCtCBM3a, from theClostridium thermocellumcellulosome scaffoldin CipA, almost abolished the catalytic activity of the LPMOs against the cellulosic substrates. The deleterious effect of CBM removal likely reflects the importance of prolonged presentation of the enzyme on the surface of the substrate for efficient catalytic activity, as only LPMOs appended to CBMs bound tightly to cellulose. The negative impact ofCtCBM3a is in sharp contrast with the capacity of this binding module to potentiate the activity of a range of glycoside hydrolases including cellulases. The deletion of the endogenous CBM fromCfLPMO10 or the introduction of a family 10 CBM fromCellvibrio japonicusLPMO10B intoTbLPMO10 influenced the quantity of non-oxidized products generated, demonstrating that CBMs can modulate the mode of action of LPMOs. This study demonstrates that engineered LPMO-CBM hybrids can display enhanced industrially relevant oxygenations.

  2. Thermodynamics of binding of the core trimannoside of asparagine-linked carbohydrates and deoxy analogs to Dioclea grandiflora lectin.

    PubMed

    Dam, T K; Oscarson, S; Brewer, C F

    1998-12-01

    The Man/Glc-specific seed lectin from Dioclea grandiflora (DGL) is a member of the Diocleinae subtribe that includes the jack bean lectin concanavalin A (ConA). Both DGL and ConA bind with high affinity to the "core" trimannoside moiety, 3, 6-di-O-(alpha-D-mannopyranosyl)-alpha-D-mannopyranoside, which is present in asparagine-linked carbohydrates. Recent hemagglutination inhibition studies suggest that DGL and ConA recognize similar epitopes of the trisaccharide but possess different binding specificities for complex carbohydrates (Gupta, D., Oscarson, S., Raju, T. S., Stanley, P., Toone, E. J., and Brewer, C. F. (1996) Eur. J. Biochem. 242, 320-326). In the present study, we have used isothermal titration microcalorimetry to determine the thermodynamics of binding of DGL to a complete set of monodeoxy analogs of the core trimannoside as well as a tetradeoxy analog. The thermodynamic data indicate that DGL recognizes the 2-, 3-, 4-, and 6-hydroxyl groups of the alpha(1,6) Man residue, the 3- and 4-hydroxyl group of the alpha(1, 3) Man residue, and the 2- and 4-hydroxyl groups of the central Man residue of the trimannoside. The thermodynamic data for the tetradeoxy analog lacking the 3- and 4-hydroxyl group of the alpha(1, 3) Man residue, and the 2- and 4-hydroxyl groups of the central Man residue of the trimannoside are consistent with the involvement of these hydroxyl groups in binding. While the overall pattern of data for DGL binding to the deoxy analogs is similar to that for ConA (Gupta, D., Dam, T. K., Oscarson, S., and Brewer, C. F. (1997) J. Biol. Chem. 272, 6388-6392), differences exist in the data for certain monodeoxy analogs binding to the two lectins. Differences are also observed in the thermodynamics of binding of DGL and ConA to a biantennary complex carbohydrate. In the following paper (Rozwarski, D. A., Swami, B. M., Brewer, C. F., and Sacchettini, J. C. (1998) J. Biol. Chem. 273, 32818-32825), the x-ray crystal structure of DGL complexed to the

  3. Hydration Repulsion between Carbohydrate Surfaces Mediated by Temperature and Specific Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hsieh; Cox, Jason R.; Ow, Hooisweng; Shi, Rena; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z.

    2016-06-01

    Stabilizing colloids or nanoparticles in solution involves a fine balance between surface charges, steric repulsion of coating molecules, and hydration forces against van der Waals attractions. At high temperature and electrolyte concentrations, the colloidal stability of suspensions usually decreases rapidly. Here, we report a new experimental and simulation discovery that the polysaccharide (dextran) coated nanoparticles show ion-specific colloidal stability at high temperature, where we observed enhanced colloidal stability of nanoparticles in CaCl2 solution but rapid nanoparticle-nanoparticle aggregation in MgCl2 solution. The microscopic mechanism was unveiled in atomistic simulations. The presence of surface bound Ca2+ ions increases the carbohydrate hydration and induces strongly polarized repulsive water structures beyond at least three hydration shells which is farther-reaching than previously assumed. We believe leveraging the binding of strongly hydrated ions to macromolecular surfaces represents a new paradigm in achieving absolute hydration and colloidal stability for a variety of materials, particularly under extreme conditions.

  4. Structural and functional insight into the carbohydrate receptor binding of F4 fimbriae-producing enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Moonens, Kristof; Van den Broeck, Imke; De Kerpel, Maia; Deboeck, Francine; Raymaekers, Hanne; Remaut, Han; De Greve, Henri

    2015-03-27

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains are important causes of intestinal disease in humans and lead to severe production losses in animal farming. A range of fimbrial adhesins in ETEC strains determines host and tissue tropism. ETEC strains expressing F4 fimbriae are associated with neonatal and post-weaning diarrhea in piglets. Three naturally occurring variants of F4 fimbriae (F4ab, F4ac, and F4ad) exist that differ in the primary sequence of their major adhesive subunit FaeG, and each features a related yet distinct receptor binding profile. Here the x-ray structure of FaeGad bound to lactose provides the first structural insight into the receptor specificity and mode of binding by the poly-adhesive F4 fimbriae. A small D'-D″-α1-α2 subdomain grafted on the immunoglobulin-like core of FaeG hosts the carbohydrate binding site. Two short amino acid stretches Phe(150)-Glu(152) and Val(166)-Glu(170) of FaeGad bind the terminal galactose in the lactosyl unit and provide affinity and specificity to the interaction. A hemagglutination-based assay with E. coli expressing mutant F4ad fimbriae confirmed the elucidated co-complex structure. Interestingly, the crucial D'-α1 loop that borders the FaeGad binding site adopts a different conformation in the two other FaeG variants and hints at a heterogeneous binding pocket among the FaeG serotypes. PMID:25631050

  5. Binding Sites for Acylated Trehalose Analogs of Glycolipid Ligands on an Extended Carbohydrate Recognition Domain of the Macrophage Receptor Mincle*

    PubMed Central

    Feinberg, Hadar; Rambaruth, Neela D. S.; Jégouzo, Sabine A. F.; Jacobsen, Kristian M.; Djurhuus, Rasmus; Poulsen, Thomas B.; Weis, William I.; Taylor, Maureen E.; Drickamer, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    The macrophage receptor mincle binds to trehalose dimycolate on the surface of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Signaling initiated by this interaction leads to cytokine production, which underlies the ability of mycobacteria to evade the immune system and also to function as adjuvants. In previous work the mechanism for binding of the sugar headgroup of trehalose dimycolate to mincle has been elucidated, but the basis for enhanced binding to glycolipid ligands, in which hydrophobic substituents are attached to the 6-hydroxyl groups, has been the subject of speculation. In the work reported here, the interaction of trehalose derivatives with bovine mincle has been probed with a series of synthetic mimics of trehalose dimycolate in binding assays, in structural studies by x-ray crystallography, and by site-directed mutagenesis. Binding studies reveal that, rather than reflecting specific structural preference, the apparent affinity of mincle for ligands with hydrophobic substituents correlates with their overall size. Structural and mutagenesis analysis provides evidence for interaction of the hydrophobic substituents with multiple different portions of the surface of mincle and confirms the presence of three Ca2+-binding sites. The structure of an extended portion of the extracellular domain of mincle, beyond the minimal C-type carbohydrate recognition domain, also constrains the way the binding domains may interact on the surface of macrophages. PMID:27542410

  6. Characterization of the carbohydrate binding and ADP-ribosyltransferase activities of chemically detoxified pertussis toxins.

    PubMed

    Oh, Hokyung; Kim, Byoung-Guk; Nam, Kyung-Tak; Hong, Seung-Hwa; Ahn, Dong-Ho; Choi, Gi-Sub; Kim, Hyungjin; Hong, Jin-Tae; Ahn, Byung-Yoon

    2013-06-24

    Pertussis toxin (PTx) is an essential component of the acellular pertussis (aP) vaccine. However, because PTx in its native form is considered too toxic for human vaccine use, it must be inactivated into a stable, nontoxic form by treatment with chemical detoxifying agents or by genetic modification. Therefore, testing for the residual PTx in the aP vaccine is a major quality control step for vaccine manufacturers and regulatory authorities. The histamine sensitization test is currently the standard safety test method for all aP vaccines, regardless of the vaccine formula or the detoxification process, except for those with genetically modified PTx. However, test result variability and ethical concerns regarding animal use necessitate an alternative method. In vitro assays based on the biochemical properties of PTx have been considered as potential alternatives to the histamine sensitization test. In this study, the suitability of assays based on the ADP-ribosyltransferase and carbohydrate binding activities of PTx was assessed for PTx after treatment with formaldehyde, glutaraldehyde or both denaturants in sequence. The results indicated a distinctive pattern of the biochemical activities depending on the detoxification methods and storage conditions. These results suggest that although a more careful study is needed, these in vitro biochemical assays can be considered potential alternatives to the histamine sensitization test, as they might provide more specific safety information of aP vaccines.

  7. Mutational analysis of the pumpkin (Cucurbita maxima) phloem exudate lectin, PP2 reveals Ser-104 is crucial for carbohydrate binding.

    PubMed

    Bobbili, Kishore Babu; Bandari, Shyam; Grobe, Kay; Swamy, Musti J

    2014-07-18

    The pumpkin phloem lectin (PP2) is an RNA-binding, defense-related, chitooligosaccharide-specific, homodimeric lectin of Mr 48 kDa expressed at high concentrations in the sieve elements and companion cells of pumpkin (Cucurbita maxima). In the present study, PP2 was expressed in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris with the Saccharomyces α-factor sequence to direct the recombinant protein into the secretory pathway as a prerequisite for unimpaired folding and posttranslational glycosylation of recombinant PP2. Previous computational modeling and ligand docking studies predicted a putative chitooligosaccharide-binding site on the PP2 surface, which was divided into three subsites, with two amino acid residues in each subsite identified as possible candidates for interaction with chitooligosaccharides (CHOs). In this work, mutational analysis and hemagglutination assays were employed to verify the role of the predicted residues in the carbohydrate binding activity of the protein. The results obtained revealed that mutation of Ser-104 to Ala (S104A) at subsite-2 resulted in about 90% loss of agglutination activity of the protein, indicating that Ser-104 is crucial for the binding of CHOs to PP2. Also, L100A (at subsite-1) and K200A (at subsite-3) independently decreased the lectin activity by about 40%, indicating that these two residues also contribute significantly to sugar binding by PP2. Together, these findings confirm that all the three subsites contribute to varying degrees toward PP2-carbohydrate interaction, and confirm the validity of the computational model, as proposed earlier.

  8. Stability and Sugar Recognition Ability of Ricin-Like Carbohydrate Binding Domains

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Jianzhuang; Nellas, Ricky B; Glover, Mary M; Shen, Tongye

    2011-01-01

    Lectins are a class of proteins known for their novel binding to saccharides. Understanding this sugar recognition process can be crucial in creating structure-based designs of proteins with various biological roles. We focus on the sugar binding of a particular lectin, ricin, which has two -trefoil carbohydrate-binding domains (CRDs) found in several plant protein toxins. The binding ability of possible sites of ricin-like CRD has been puzzling. The apo and various (multiple) ligand-bound forms of the sugar-binding domains of ricin were studied by molecular dynamics simulations. By evaluating structural stability, hydrogen bond dynamics, flexibility, and binding energy, we obtained a detailed picture of the sugar recognition of the ricin-like CRD. Unlike what was previously believed, we found that the binding abilities of the two known sites are not independent of each other. The binding ability of one site is positively affected by the other site. While the mean positions of different binding scenarios are not altered significantly, the flexibility of the binding pockets visibly decreases upon multiple ligand binding. This change in flexibility seems to be the origin of the binding cooperativity. All the hydrogen bonds that are strong in the monoligand state are also strong in the double-ligand complex, although the stability is much higher in the latter form due to cooperativity. These strong hydrogen bonds in a monoligand state are deemed to be the essential hydrogen bonds. Furthermore, by examining the structural correlation matrix, the two domains are structurally one entity. Galactose hydroxyl groups, OH4 and OH3, are the most critical parts in both site 1 and site 2 recognition.

  9. Analysis of the carbohydrate-binding-module from Fragaria x ananassa α-L-arabinofuranosidase 1.

    PubMed

    Sin, I N; Perini, M A; Martínez, G A; Civello, P M

    2016-10-01

    α-L-arabinofuranosidases (EC 3.2.1.55) are enzymes involved in the catabolism of several cell-wall polysaccharides such as pectins and hemicelluloses, catalyzing the hydrolysis of terminal non-reducing α-L-arabinofuranosil residues. Bioinformatic analysis of the aminoacidic sequences of Fragaria x ananassa α-L-arabinofuranosidases predict a putative carbohydrate-binding-module of the family CBM_4_9, associated to a wide range of carbohydrate affinities. In this study, we report the characterization of the binding affinity profile to different cell wall polysaccharides of the putative CBM of α-L-arabinofuranosidase 1 from Fragaria x ananassa (CBM-FaARA1). The sequence encoding for the putative CBM was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, and the resultant recombinant protein was purified from inclusion bodies by a Nickel affinity chromatography under denaturing conditions. The refolded recombinant protein was then subjected to binding assays and affinity gel electrophoresis, which indicated its ability to bind cellulose and also high affinity for homogalacturonans.

  10. Analysis of the carbohydrate-binding-module from Fragaria x ananassa α-L-arabinofuranosidase 1.

    PubMed

    Sin, I N; Perini, M A; Martínez, G A; Civello, P M

    2016-10-01

    α-L-arabinofuranosidases (EC 3.2.1.55) are enzymes involved in the catabolism of several cell-wall polysaccharides such as pectins and hemicelluloses, catalyzing the hydrolysis of terminal non-reducing α-L-arabinofuranosil residues. Bioinformatic analysis of the aminoacidic sequences of Fragaria x ananassa α-L-arabinofuranosidases predict a putative carbohydrate-binding-module of the family CBM_4_9, associated to a wide range of carbohydrate affinities. In this study, we report the characterization of the binding affinity profile to different cell wall polysaccharides of the putative CBM of α-L-arabinofuranosidase 1 from Fragaria x ananassa (CBM-FaARA1). The sequence encoding for the putative CBM was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, and the resultant recombinant protein was purified from inclusion bodies by a Nickel affinity chromatography under denaturing conditions. The refolded recombinant protein was then subjected to binding assays and affinity gel electrophoresis, which indicated its ability to bind cellulose and also high affinity for homogalacturonans. PMID:27262101

  11. Measurement of monovalent and polyvalent carbohydrate-lectin binding by back-scattering interferometry.

    PubMed

    Kussrow, Amanda; Kaltgrad, Eiton; Wolfenden, Mark L; Cloninger, Mary J; Finn, M G; Bornhop, Darryl J

    2009-06-15

    Carbohydrate-protein binding is important to many areas of biochemistry. Here, backscattering interferometry (BSI) has been shown to be a convenient and sensitive method for obtaining quantitative information about the strengths and selectivities of such interactions. The surfaces of glass microfluidic channels were covalently modified with extravidin, to which biotinylated lectins were subsequently attached by incubation and washing. The binding of unmodified carbohydrates to the resulting avidin-immobilized lectins was monitored by BSI. Dose-response curves that were generated within several minutes and were highly reproducible in multiple wash/measure cycles provided adsorption coefficients that showed mannose to bind to concanavalin A (conA) with 3.7 times greater affinity than glucose consistent with literature values. Galactose was observed to bind selectively and with similar affinity to the lectin BS-1. The avidities of polyvalent sugar-coated virus particles for immobilized conA were much higher than monovalent glycans, with increases of 60-200 fold per glycan when arrayed on the exterior surface of cowpea mosaic virus or bacteriophage Qbeta. Sugar-functionalized PAMAM dendrimers showed size-dependent adsorption, which was consistent with the expected density of lectins on the surface. The sensitivity of BSI matches or exceeds that of surface plasmon resonance and quartz crystal microbalance techniques, and is sensitive to the number of binding events, rather than changes in mass. The operational simplicity and generality of BSI, along with the near-native conditions under which the target binding proteins are immobilized, make BSI an attractive method for the quantitative characterization of the binding functions of lectins and other proteins.

  12. Structural Insight of a Trimodular Halophilic Cellulase with a Family 46 Carbohydrate-Binding Module

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Chaoxiang; Junaid, Muhammad; Lu, Zhenghui; Zhang, Houjin; Ma, Yanhe

    2015-01-01

    Cellulases are the key enzymes used in the biofuel industry. A typical cellulase contains a catalytic domain connected to a carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) through a flexible linker. Here we report the structure of an atypical trimodular cellulase which harbors a catalytic domain, a CBM46 domain and a rigid CBM_X domain between them. The catalytic domain shows the features of GH5 family, while the CBM46 domain has a sandwich-like structure. The catalytic domain and the CBM46 domain form an extended substrate binding cleft, within which several tryptophan residues are well exposed. Mutagenesis assays indicate that these residues are essential for the enzymatic activities. Gel affinity electrophoresis shows that these tryptophan residues are involved in the polysaccharide substrate binding. Also, electrostatic potential analysis indicates that almost the entire solvent accessible surface of CelB is negatively charged, which is consistent with the halophilic nature of this enzyme. PMID:26562160

  13. Structural Insight of a Trimodular Halophilic Cellulase with a Family 46 Carbohydrate-Binding Module.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huaidong; Zhang, Guimin; Yao, Chaoxiang; Junaid, Muhammad; Lu, Zhenghui; Zhang, Houjin; Ma, Yanhe

    2015-01-01

    Cellulases are the key enzymes used in the biofuel industry. A typical cellulase contains a catalytic domain connected to a carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) through a flexible linker. Here we report the structure of an atypical trimodular cellulase which harbors a catalytic domain, a CBM46 domain and a rigid CBM_X domain between them. The catalytic domain shows the features of GH5 family, while the CBM46 domain has a sandwich-like structure. The catalytic domain and the CBM46 domain form an extended substrate binding cleft, within which several tryptophan residues are well exposed. Mutagenesis assays indicate that these residues are essential for the enzymatic activities. Gel affinity electrophoresis shows that these tryptophan residues are involved in the polysaccharide substrate binding. Also, electrostatic potential analysis indicates that almost the entire solvent accessible surface of CelB is negatively charged, which is consistent with the halophilic nature of this enzyme.

  14. Carbohydrate specificity of sea urchin sperm bindin: a cell surface lectin mediating sperm-egg adhesion.

    PubMed

    Glabe, C G; Grabel, L B; Vacquier, V D; Rosen, S D

    1982-07-01

    We have examined the carbohydrate specificity of bindin, a sperm protein responsible for the adhesion of sea urchin sperm to eggs, by investigating the interaction of a number of polysaccharides and glycoconjugates with isolated bindin. Several of these polysaccharides inhibit the agglutination of eggs by bindin particles. An egg surface polysaccharide was found to be the most potent inhibitor of bindin-mediated egg agglutination. Fucoidin, a sulfated fucose heteropolysaccharide, was the next most potent inhibitor, followed by the egg jelly fucan, a sulfated fucose homopolysaccharide, and xylan, a beta(1 leads to 4) linked xylose polysaccharide. A wide variety of other polysaccharides and glycoconjugates were found to have no effect on egg agglutination. We also report that isolated bindin has a soluble lectinlike activity which is assayed by agglutination of erythrocytes. The bindin lectin activity is inhibited by the same polysaccharides that inhibit egg agglutination by particulate bindin. This suggests that the egg adhesion activity of bindin is directly related to its lectin activity. We have established that fucoidin binds specifically to bindin particles with a high apparent affinity (Kd = 5.5 X 10(-8) M). The other polysaccharides that inhibit egg agglutination also inhibit the binding of 125I-fucoidin to bindin particles, suggesting that they compete for the same site on bindin. The observation that polysaccharides of different composition and linkage type interact with bindin suggests that the critical structural features required for binding may reside at a higher level of organization. Together, these findings strengthen the hypothesis that sperm-egg adhesion in sea urchins is mediated by a lectin-polysaccharide type of interaction.

  15. Novel interactions of complex carbohydrates with peanut (PNA), Ricinus communis (RCA-I), Sambucus nigra (SNA-I) and wheat germ (WGA) agglutinins as revealed by the binding specificities of these lectins towards mucin core-2 O-linked and N-linked glycans and related structures.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, E V; Xue, Jun; Xia, Jie; Khaja, Siraj D; Piskorz, Conrad F; Locke, Robert D; Neelamegham, Sriram; Matta, Khushi L

    2016-10-01

    Plant lectins through their multivalent quaternary structures bind intrinsically flexible oligosaccharides. They recognize fine structural differences in carbohydrates and interact with different sequences in mucin core 2 or complex-type N-glycan chain and also in healthy and malignant tissues. They are used in characterizing cellular and extracellular glycoconjugates modified in pathological processes. We study here, the complex carbohydrate-lectin interactions by determining the effects of substituents in mucin core 2 tetrasaccharide Galβ1-4GlcNAcβ1-6(Galβ1-3)GalNAcα-O-R and fetuin glycopeptides on their binding to agarose-immobilized lectins PNA, RCA-I, SNA-I and WGA. Briefly, in mucin core 2 tetrasaccharide (i) structures modified by α2-3/6-Sialyl LacNAc, LewisX and α1-3-Galactosyl LacNAc resulted in regular binding to PNA whereas compounds with 6-sulfo LacNAc displayed no-binding; (ii) strucures bearing α2-6-sialyl 6-sulfo LacNAc, or 6-sialyl LacdiNAc carbohydrates displayed strong binding to SNA-I; (iii) structures with α2-3/6-sialyl, α1-3Gal LacNAc or LewisX were non-binder to RCA-I and compounds with 6-sulfo LacNAc only displayed weak binding; (iv) structures containing LewisX, 6-Sulfo LewisX, α2-3/6-sialyl LacNAc, α2-3/6-sialyl 6-sulfo LacNAc and GalNAc Lewis-a were non-binding to WGA, those with α1-2Fucosyl, α1-3-Galactosyl LacNAc, α2-3-sialyl T-hapten plus 3'/6'sulfo LacNAc displayed weak binding, and compounds with α2-3-sialyl T-hapten, α2.6-Sialyl LacdiNAc, α2-3-sialyl D-Fucβ1-3 GalNAc and Fucα-1-2 D-Fucβ-1-3GalNAc displaying regular binding and GalNAc LewisX and LacdiNAc plus D-Fuc β-1-3 GalNAcα resulting in tight binding. RCA-I binds Fetuin triantennary asialoglycopeptide 100 % after α-2-3 and 25 % after α-2-6 sialylation, 30 % after α-1-2 and 100 % after α-1-3 fucosylation, and 50 % after α-1-3 galactosylation. WGA binds 3-but not 6-Fucosyl chitobiose core. Thus, information on the influence of complex carbohydrate

  16. In silico analysis of molecular mechanisms of Galanthus nivalis agglutinin-related lectin-induced cancer cell death from carbohydrate-binding motif evolution hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qi-Jia; Li, Zi-Yue; Yao, Shun; Ming, Miao; Wang, Shu-Ya; Liu, Bo; Bao, Jin-Ku

    2011-10-01

    Galanthus nivalis agglutinin-related lectins, a superfamily of strictly mannose-binding-specific lectins widespread amongst monotyledonous plants, have drawn a rising attention for their remarkable anti-proliferative and apoptosis-inducing activities toward various types of cancer cells; however, the precise molecular mechanisms by which they induce tumor cell apoptosis are still only rudimentarily understood. Herein, we found that the three conserved motifs "QXDXNXVXY," the mannose-specific binding sites, could mutate at one or more amino acid sites, which might be a driving force for the sequential evolution and thus ultimately leading to the complete disappearance of the three conserved motifs. In addition, we found that the motif evolution could result in the diversification of sugar-binding types that G. nivalis agglutinin-related lectins could bind from specific mannose receptors to more types of sugar-containing receptors in cancer cells. Subsequently, we indicated that some sugar-containing receptors such as TNFR1, EGFR, Hsp90, and Hsp70 could block downstream anti-apoptotic or survival signaling pathways, which, in turn, resulted in tumor cell apoptosis. Taken together, our hypothesis that carbohydrate-binding motif evolution may impact the G. nivalis agglutinin-related lectin-induced survival or anti-apoptotic pathways would provide a new perspective for further elucidating the intricate relationships between the carbohydrate-binding specificities and complex molecular mechanisms by which G. nivalis agglutinin-related lectins induce cancer cell death.

  17. Monoclonal antibodies, carbohydrate-binding modules, and the detection of polysaccharides in plant cell walls.

    PubMed

    Hervé, Cécile; Marcus, Susan E; Knox, J Paul

    2011-01-01

    Plant cell walls are diverse composites of complex polysaccharides. Molecular probes such as monoclonal antibodies (MABs) and carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) are important tools to detect and dissect cell wall structures in plant materials. We provide an account of methods that can be used to detect cell wall polysaccharide structures (epitopes) in plant materials and also describe treatments that can provide information on the masking of sets of polysaccharides that may prevent detection. These masking -phenomena may indicate potential interactions between sets of cell wall polysaccharides, and methods to uncover them are an important aspect of cell wall immunocytochemistry.

  18. Carbohydrate Recognition Specificity of Trans-sialidase Lectin Domain from Trypanosoma congolense

    PubMed Central

    Waespy, Mario; Gbem, Thaddeus T.; Elenschneider, Leroy; Jeck, André-Philippe; Day, Christopher J.; Hartley-Tassell, Lauren; Bovin, Nicolai; Tiralongo, Joe; Haselhorst, Thomas; Kelm, Sørge

    2015-01-01

    Fourteen different active Trypanosoma congolense trans-sialidases (TconTS), 11 variants of TconTS1 besides TconTS2, TconTS3 and TconTS4, have been described. Notably, the specific transfer and sialidase activities of these TconTS differ by orders of magnitude. Surprisingly, phylogenetic analysis of the catalytic domains (CD) grouped each of the highly active TconTS together with the less active enzymes. In contrast, when aligning lectin-like domains (LD), the highly active TconTS grouped together, leading to the hypothesis that the LD of TconTS modulates its enzymatic activity. So far, little is known about the function and ligand specificity of these LDs. To explore their carbohydrate-binding potential, glycan array analysis was performed on the LD of TconTS1, TconTS2, TconTS3 and TconTS4. In addition, Saturation Transfer Difference (STD) NMR experiments were done on TconTS2-LD for a more detailed analysis of its lectin activity. Several mannose-containing oligosaccharides, such as mannobiose, mannotriose and higher mannosylated glycans, as well as Gal, GalNAc and LacNAc containing oligosaccharides were confirmed as binding partners of TconTS1-LD and TconTS2-LD. Interestingly, terminal mannose residues are not acceptor substrates for TconTS activity. This indicates a different, yet unknown biological function for TconTS-LD, including specific interactions with oligomannose-containing glycans on glycoproteins and GPI anchors found on the surface of the parasite, including the TconTS itself. Experimental evidence for such a scenario is presented. PMID:26474304

  19. Structural Insights into the Affinity of Cel7A Carbohydrate-binding Module for Lignin*

    PubMed Central

    Strobel, Kathryn L.; Pfeiffer, Katherine A.; Blanch, Harvey W.; Clark, Douglas S.

    2015-01-01

    The high cost of hydrolytic enzymes impedes the commercial production of lignocellulosic biofuels. High enzyme loadings are required in part due to their non-productive adsorption to lignin, a major component of biomass. Despite numerous studies documenting cellulase adsorption to lignin, few attempts have been made to engineer enzymes to reduce lignin binding. In this work, we used alanine-scanning mutagenesis to elucidate the structural basis for the lignin affinity of Trichoderma reesei Cel7A carbohydrate binding module (CBM). T. reesei Cel7A CBM mutants were produced with a Talaromyces emersonii Cel7A catalytic domain and screened for their binding to cellulose and lignin. Mutation of aromatic and polar residues on the planar face of the CBM greatly decreased binding to both cellulose and lignin, supporting the hypothesis that the cellulose-binding face is also responsible for lignin affinity. Cellulose and lignin affinity of the 31 mutants were highly correlated, although several mutants displayed selective reductions in lignin or cellulose affinity. Four mutants with increased cellulose selectivity (Q2A, H4A, V18A, and P30A) did not exhibit improved hydrolysis of cellulose in the presence of lignin. Further reduction in lignin affinity while maintaining a high level of cellulose affinity is thus necessary to generate an enzyme with improved hydrolysis capability. This work provides insights into the structural underpinnings of lignin affinity, identifies residues amenable to mutation without compromising cellulose affinity, and informs engineering strategies for family one CBMs. PMID:26209638

  20. Structural insights into the affinity of Cel7A carbohydrate-binding module for lignin.

    PubMed

    Strobel, Kathryn L; Pfeiffer, Katherine A; Blanch, Harvey W; Clark, Douglas S

    2015-09-11

    The high cost of hydrolytic enzymes impedes the commercial production of lignocellulosic biofuels. High enzyme loadings are required in part due to their non-productive adsorption to lignin, a major component of biomass. Despite numerous studies documenting cellulase adsorption to lignin, few attempts have been made to engineer enzymes to reduce lignin binding. In this work, we used alanine-scanning mutagenesis to elucidate the structural basis for the lignin affinity of Trichoderma reesei Cel7A carbohydrate binding module (CBM). T. reesei Cel7A CBM mutants were produced with a Talaromyces emersonii Cel7A catalytic domain and screened for their binding to cellulose and lignin. Mutation of aromatic and polar residues on the planar face of the CBM greatly decreased binding to both cellulose and lignin, supporting the hypothesis that the cellulose-binding face is also responsible for lignin affinity. Cellulose and lignin affinity of the 31 mutants were highly correlated, although several mutants displayed selective reductions in lignin or cellulose affinity. Four mutants with increased cellulose selectivity (Q2A, H4A, V18A, and P30A) did not exhibit improved hydrolysis of cellulose in the presence of lignin. Further reduction in lignin affinity while maintaining a high level of cellulose affinity is thus necessary to generate an enzyme with improved hydrolysis capability. This work provides insights into the structural underpinnings of lignin affinity, identifies residues amenable to mutation without compromising cellulose affinity, and informs engineering strategies for family one CBMs. PMID:26209638

  1. Structural insights into the affinity of Cel7A carbohydrate-binding module for lignin.

    PubMed

    Strobel, Kathryn L; Pfeiffer, Katherine A; Blanch, Harvey W; Clark, Douglas S

    2015-09-11

    The high cost of hydrolytic enzymes impedes the commercial production of lignocellulosic biofuels. High enzyme loadings are required in part due to their non-productive adsorption to lignin, a major component of biomass. Despite numerous studies documenting cellulase adsorption to lignin, few attempts have been made to engineer enzymes to reduce lignin binding. In this work, we used alanine-scanning mutagenesis to elucidate the structural basis for the lignin affinity of Trichoderma reesei Cel7A carbohydrate binding module (CBM). T. reesei Cel7A CBM mutants were produced with a Talaromyces emersonii Cel7A catalytic domain and screened for their binding to cellulose and lignin. Mutation of aromatic and polar residues on the planar face of the CBM greatly decreased binding to both cellulose and lignin, supporting the hypothesis that the cellulose-binding face is also responsible for lignin affinity. Cellulose and lignin affinity of the 31 mutants were highly correlated, although several mutants displayed selective reductions in lignin or cellulose affinity. Four mutants with increased cellulose selectivity (Q2A, H4A, V18A, and P30A) did not exhibit improved hydrolysis of cellulose in the presence of lignin. Further reduction in lignin affinity while maintaining a high level of cellulose affinity is thus necessary to generate an enzyme with improved hydrolysis capability. This work provides insights into the structural underpinnings of lignin affinity, identifies residues amenable to mutation without compromising cellulose affinity, and informs engineering strategies for family one CBMs.

  2. Bioinspired assemblies of plant cell wall polymers unravel the affinity properties of carbohydrate-binding modules.

    PubMed

    Paës, Gabriel; von Schantz, Laura; Ohlin, Mats

    2015-09-01

    Lignocellulose-acting enzymes play a central role in the biorefinery of plant biomass to make fuels, chemicals and materials. These enzymes are often appended to carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) that promote substrate targeting. When used in plant materials, which are complex assemblies of polymers, the binding properties of CBMs can be difficult to understand and predict, thus limiting the efficiency of enzymes. In order to gain more information on the binding properties of CBMs, some bioinspired model assemblies that contain some of the polymers and covalent interactions found in the plant cell walls have been designed. The mobility of three engineered CBMs has been investigated by FRAP in these assemblies, while varying the parameters related to the polymer concentration, the physical state of assemblies and the oligomerization state of CBMs. The features controlling the mobility of the CBMs in the assemblies have been quantified and hierarchized. We demonstrate that the parameters can have additional or opposite effects on mobility, depending on the CBM tested. We also find evidence of a relationship between the mobility of CBMs and their binding strength. Overall, bioinspired assemblies are able to reveal the unique features of affinity of CBMs. In particular, the results show that oligomerization of CBMs and the presence of ferulic acid motifs in the assemblies play an important role in the binding affinity of CBMs. Thus we propose that these features should be finely tuned when CBMs are used in plant cell walls to optimise bioprocesses. PMID:26189625

  3. Evaluation of Selected Classical Force Fields for Alchemical Binding Free Energy Calculations of Protein-Carbohydrate Complexes.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Sushil K; Calabró, Gaetano; Loeffler, Hannes H; Michel, Julien; Koča, Jaroslav

    2015-07-14

    Protein-carbohydrate recognition is crucial in many vital biological processes including host-pathogen recognition, cell-signaling, and catalysis. Accordingly, computational prediction of protein-carbohydrate binding free energies is of enormous interest for drug design. However, the accuracy of current force fields (FFs) for predicting binding free energies of protein-carbohydrate complexes is not well understood owing to technical challenges such as the highly polar nature of the complexes, anomerization, and conformational flexibility of carbohydrates. The present study evaluated the performance of alchemical predictions of binding free energies with the GAFF1.7/AM1-BCC and GLYCAM06j force fields for modeling protein-carbohydrate complexes. Mean unsigned errors of 1.1 ± 0.06 (GLYCAM06j) and 2.6 ± 0.08 (GAFF1.7/AM1-BCC) kcal·mol(-1) are achieved for a large data set of monosaccharide ligands for Ralstonia solanacearum lectin (RSL). The level of accuracy provided by GLYCAM06j is sufficient to discriminate potent, moderate, and weak binders, a goal that has been difficult to achieve through other scoring approaches. Accordingly, the protocols presented here could find useful applications in carbohydrate-based drug and vaccine developments. PMID:26575767

  4. PROCARB: A Database of Known and Modelled Carbohydrate-Binding Protein Structures with Sequence-Based Prediction Tools

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Adeel; Firoz, Ahmad; Jha, Vivekanand; Ahmad, Shandar

    2010-01-01

    Understanding of the three-dimensional structures of proteins that interact with carbohydrates covalently (glycoproteins) as well as noncovalently (protein-carbohydrate complexes) is essential to many biological processes and plays a significant role in normal and disease-associated functions. It is important to have a central repository of knowledge available about these protein-carbohydrate complexes as well as preprocessed data of predicted structures. This can be significantly enhanced by tools de novo which can predict carbohydrate-binding sites for proteins in the absence of structure of experimentally known binding site. PROCARB is an open-access database comprising three independently working components, namely, (i) Core PROCARB module, consisting of three-dimensional structures of protein-carbohydrate complexes taken from Protein Data Bank (PDB), (ii) Homology Models module, consisting of manually developed three-dimensional models of N-linked and O-linked glycoproteins of unknown three-dimensional structure, and (iii) CBS-Pred prediction module, consisting of web servers to predict carbohydrate-binding sites using single sequence or server-generated PSSM. Several precomputed structural and functional properties of complexes are also included in the database for quick analysis. In particular, information about function, secondary structure, solvent accessibility, hydrogen bonds and literature reference, and so forth, is included. In addition, each protein in the database is mapped to Uniprot, Pfam, PDB, and so forth. PMID:20671979

  5. Carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) revisited: reduced amount of water counterbalances the need for CBMs

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A vast number of organisms are known to produce structurally diversified cellulases capable of degrading cellulose, the most abundant biopolymer on earth. The generally accepted paradigm is that the carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) of cellulases are required for efficient saccharification of insoluble substrates. Based on sequence data, surprisingly more than 60% of the cellulases identified lack carbohydrate-binding modules or alternative protein structures linked to cellulases (dockerins). This finding poses the question about the role of the CBMs: why would most cellulases lack CBMs, if they are necessary for the efficient hydrolysis of cellulose? Results The advantage of CBMs, which increase the affinity of cellulases to substrates, was found to be diminished by reducing the amount of water in the hydrolytic system, which increases the probability of enzyme-substrate interaction. At low substrate concentration (1% w/w), CBMs were found to be more important in the catalytic performance of the cellobiohydrolases TrCel7A and TrCel6A of Trichoderma reesei as compared to that of the endoglucanases TrCel5A and TrCel7B. Increasing the substrate concentration while maintaining the enzyme-to-substrate ratio enhanced adsorption of TrCel7A, independent of the presence of the CBM. At 20% (w/w) substrate concentration, the hydrolytic performance of cellulases without CBMs caught up with that of cellulases with CBMs. This phenomenon was more noticeable on the lignin-containing pretreated wheat straw as compared to the cellulosic Avicel, presumably due to unproductive adsorption of enzymes to lignin. Conclusions Here we propose that the water content in the natural environments of carbohydrate-degrading organisms might have led to the evolution of various substrate-binding structures. In addition, some well recognized problems of economical saccharification such as unproductive binding of cellulases, which reduces the hydrolysis rate and prevents recycling of

  6. Specific Ion Binding at Phospholipid Membrane Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Calero, Carles; Bonomi, Massimiliano; Martí, Jordi

    2015-09-01

    Metal cations are ubiquitous components in biological environments and play an important role in regulating cellular functions and membrane properties. By applying metadynamics simulations, we have performed systematic free energy calculations of Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+), and Mg(2+) bound to phospholipid membrane surfaces for the first time. The free energy landscapes unveil specific binding behaviors of metal cations on phospholipid membranes. Na(+) and K(+) are more likely to stay in the aqueous solution and can bind easily to a few lipid oxygens by overcoming low free energy barriers. Ca(2+) is most stable when it is bound to four lipid oxygens of the membrane rather than being hydrated in the aqueous solution. Mg(2+) is tightly hydrated, and it shows hardly any loss of a hydration water or binding directly to the membrane. When bound to the membrane, the cations' most favorable total coordination numbers with water and lipid oxygens are the same as their corresponding hydration numbers in aqueous solution, indicating a competition between ion binding to water and lipids. The binding specificity of metal cations on membranes is highly correlated with the hydration free energy and the size of the hydration shell.

  7. Hydration Repulsion between Carbohydrate Surfaces Mediated by Temperature and Specific Ions

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hsieh; Cox, Jason R.; Ow, Hooisweng; Shi, Rena; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z.

    2016-01-01

    Stabilizing colloids or nanoparticles in solution involves a fine balance between surface charges, steric repulsion of coating molecules, and hydration forces against van der Waals attractions. At high temperature and electrolyte concentrations, the colloidal stability of suspensions usually decreases rapidly. Here, we report a new experimental and simulation discovery that the polysaccharide (dextran) coated nanoparticles show ion-specific colloidal stability at high temperature, where we observed enhanced colloidal stability of nanoparticles in CaCl2 solution but rapid nanoparticle-nanoparticle aggregation in MgCl2 solution. The microscopic mechanism was unveiled in atomistic simulations. The presence of surface bound Ca2+ ions increases the carbohydrate hydration and induces strongly polarized repulsive water structures beyond at least three hydration shells which is farther-reaching than previously assumed. We believe leveraging the binding of strongly hydrated ions to macromolecular surfaces represents a new paradigm in achieving absolute hydration and colloidal stability for a variety of materials, particularly under extreme conditions. PMID:27334145

  8. Lectin mapping reveals stage-specific display of surface carbohydrates in in vitro and haemolymph-derived cells of the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana.

    PubMed

    Wanchoo, Arun; Lewis, Michael W; Keyhani, Nemat O

    2009-09-01

    The entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana and its insect host target represent a model system with which to examine host-pathogen interactions. Carbohydrate epitopes on the surfaces of fungal cells play diverse roles in processes that include adhesion, non-self recognition and immune invasion with respect to invertebrate hosts. B. bassiana produces a number of distinct cell types that include aerial conidia, submerged conidia, blastospores and haemolymph-derived cells termed in vivo blastospores or hyphal bodies. In order to characterize variations in the surface carbohydrate epitopes among these cells, a series of fluorescently labelled lectins, combined with confocal microscopy and flow cytometry to quantify the response, was used. Aerial conidia displayed the most diverse lectin binding characteristics, showing reactivity against concanavalin A (ConA), Galanthus nivalis (GNL), Griffonia simplicifolia (GSII), Helix pomatia (HPA), Griffonia simplicifolia isolectin (GSI), peanut agglutinin (PNA), Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEAI) and wheatgerm agglutinin (WGA), and weak reactivity against Ricinus communis I (RCA), Sambucus nigra (SNA), Limax flavus (LFA) and Sophora japonica (SJA) lectins. Lectin binding to submerged conidia was similar to that to aerial conidia, except that no reactivity against UEAI, HPA and SJA was noted, and WGA appeared to bind strongly at specific polar spots. In contrast, the majority of in vitro blastospores were not bound by ConA, GNL, GSII, GSI, SNA, UEAI, LFA or SJA, with PNA binding in large patches, and some polarity in WGA binding noted. Significant changes in lectin binding also occurred after aerial conidial germination and in cells grown on either lactose or trehalose. For germinated conidia, differential lectin binding was noted between the conidial base, the germ tube and the hyphal tip. Fungal cells isolated from the haemolymph of the infected insect hosts Manduca sexta and Heliothis virescens appeared to shed most

  9. A photo-cleavable biotin affinity tag for the facile release of a photo-crosslinked carbohydrate-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Chang, Tsung-Che; Adak, Avijit K; Lin, Ting-Wei; Li, Pei-Jhen; Chen, Yi-Ju; Lai, Chain-Hui; Liang, Chien-Fu; Chen, Yu-Ju; Lin, Chun-Cheng

    2016-03-15

    The use of photo-crosslinking glycoprobes represents a powerful strategy for the covalent capture of labile protein complexes and allows detailed characterization of carbohydrate-mediated interactions. The selective release of target proteins from solid support is a key step in functional proteomics. We envisaged that light activation can be exploited for releasing labeled protein in a dual photo-affinity probe-based strategy. To investigate this possibility, we designed a trifunctional, galactose-based, multivalent glycoprobe for affinity labeling of carbohydrate-binding proteins. The resulting covalent protein-probe adduct is attached to a photo-cleavable biotin affinity tag; the biotin moiety enables specific presentation of the conjugate on streptavidin-coated beads, and the photolabile linker allows the release of the labeled proteins. This dual probe promotes both the labeling and the facile cleavage of the target protein complexes from the solid surfaces and the remainder of the cell lysate in a completely unaltered form, thus eliminating many of the common pitfalls associated with traditional affinity-based purification methods.

  10. Visualization of Nanofibrillar Cellulose in Biological Tissues Using a Biotinylated Carbohydrate Binding Module of β-1,4-Glycanase.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, Kristina Bram; Kofoed, Christian; Espersen, Roall; Højgaard, Casper; Winther, Jakob Rahr; Willemoës, Martin; Wedin, Irene; Nuopponen, Markus; Vilske, Sara; Aimonen, Kukka; Weydahl, Ingrid Elise Konow; Alenius, Harri; Norppa, Hannu; Wolff, Henrik; Wallin, Håkan; Vogel, Ulla

    2015-08-17

    Nanofibrillar cellulose is a very promising innovation with diverse potential applications including high quality paper, coatings, and drug delivery carriers. The production of nanofibrillar cellulose on an industrial scale may lead to increased exposure to nanofibrillar cellulose both in the working environment and the general environment. Assessment of the potential health effects following exposure to nanofibrillar cellulose is therefore required. However, as nanofibrillar cellulose primarily consists of glucose moieties, detection of nanofibrillar cellulose in biological tissues is difficult. We have developed a simple and robust method for specific and sensitive detection of cellulose fibers, including nanofibrillar cellulose, in biological tissue, using a biotinylated carbohydrate binding module (CBM) of β-1,4-glycanase (EXG:CBM) from the bacterium Cellulomonas fimi. EXG:CBM was expressed in Eschericia coli, purified, and biotinylated. EXG:CBM was shown to bind quantitatively to five different cellulose fibers including four different nanofibrillar celluloses. Biotinylated EXG:CBM was used to visualize cellulose fibers by either fluorescence- or horse radish peroxidase (HRP)-tagged avidin labeling. The HRP-EXG:CBM complex was used to visualize cellulose fibers in both cryopreserved and paraffin embedded lung tissue from mice dosed by pharyngeal aspiration with 10-200 μg/mouse. Detection was shown to be highly specific, and the assay appeared very robust. The present method represents a novel concept for the design of simple, robust, and highly specific detection methods for the detection of nanomaterials, which are otherwise difficult to visualize. PMID:26208679

  11. Effect of carbohydrate modifications of factor VIII/von Willebrand factor on binding to platelets.

    PubMed

    Goudemand, J; Mazurier, C; Samor, B; Bouquelet, S; Montreuil, J; Goudemand, M

    1985-06-24

    This study compares the ability of unmodified and carbohydrate-modified forms of factor VIII/von Willebrand factor (FVIII/vWF) protein to bind to platelets in the presence of ristocetin or thrombin. Treatment of intact FVIII/vWF with alpha-D-neuraminidase results in more than 95% desialylation. Asialo FVIII/vWF retains total activity in ristocetin- and thrombin-mediated binding to platelets as demonstrated by direct and competitive binding assays. Examination of its multimeric pattern by sodium dodecyl sulfate-agarose electrophoresis reveals a normal multimeric structure. Treatment of intact FVIII/vWF with beta-D-galactosidase results in the removal of 20% of galactose (agalacto FVIII/vWF) whereas 55% of galactose is released from asialo FVIII/vWF (asialo agalacto FVIII/vWF). Agalacto and asialo-agalacto FVIII/vWF are both unable to bind to platelets in the presence of ristocetin. In contrast, they still bind to thrombin-stimulated human (except thrombasthenic) platelets. Removal of either ultimate (agalacto FVIII/vWF) or ultimate and penultimate (asialo-agalacto FVIII/vWF) galactose results in the same loss of the larger molecular weight multimers and in an increase of smaller multimers. These results suggest (1) that sialic acid does not play a significant role in ristocetin- or thrombin-mediated FVIII/vWF-platelets interactions and multimeric structure of FVIII/vWF (2) that ultimate beta-linked galactose residues are essential for the maintenance of a normal multimer organization (3) that ristocetin- and thrombin-mediated binding of FVIII/vWF to platelets differ in FVIII/vWF galactose requirement.

  12. Comprehensive list of lectins: origins, natures, and carbohydrate specificities.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yuka; Tateno, Hiroaki; Ogawa, Haruko; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Hirabayashi, Jun

    2014-01-01

    More than 100 years have passed since the first lectin ricin was discovered. Since then, a wide variety of lectins (lect means "select" in Latin) have been isolated from plants, animals, fungi, bacteria, as well as viruses, and their structures and properties have been characterized. At present, as many as 48 protein scaffolds have been identified as functional lectins from the viewpoint of three-dimensional structures as described in this chapter. In this chapter, representative 53 lectins are selected, and their major properties that include hemagglutinating activity, mitogen activity, blood group specificity, molecular weight, metal requirement, and sugar specificities are summarized as a comprehensive table. The list will provide a practically useful, comprehensive list for not only experienced lectin users but also many other non-expert researchers, who are not familiar to lectins and, therefore, have no access to advanced lectin biotechnologies described in other chapters. PMID:25117264

  13. Crystal structures of artocarpin, a Moraceae lectin with mannose specificity, and its complex with methyl-alpha-D-mannose: implications to the generation of carbohydrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Pratap, J V; Jeyaprakash, A Arockia; Rani, P Geetha; Sekar, K; Surolia, A; Vijayan, M

    2002-03-22

    The seeds of jack fruit (Artocarpus integrifolia) contain two tetrameric lectins, jacalin and artocarpin. Jacalin was the first lectin found to exhibit the beta-prism I fold, which is characteristic of the Moraceae plant lectin family. Jacalin contains two polypeptide chains produced by a post-translational proteolysis which has been shown to be crucial for generating its specificity for galactose. Artocarpin is a single chain protein with considerable sequence similarity with jacalin. It, however, exhibits many properties different from those of jacalin. In particular, it is specific to mannose. The structures of two crystal forms, form I and form II, of the native lectin have been determined at 2.4 and 2.5 A resolution, respectively. The structure of the lectin complexed with methyl-alpha-mannose, has also been determined at 2.9 A resolution. The structure is similar to jacalin, although differences exist in details. The crystal structures and detailed modelling studies indicate that the following differences between the carbohydrate binding sites of artocarpin and jacalin are responsible for the difference in the specificities of the two lectins. Firstly, artocarpin does not contain, unlike jacalin, an N terminus generated by post-translational proteolysis. Secondly, there is no aromatic residue in the binding site of artocarpin whereas there are four in that of jacalin. A comparison with similar lectins of known structures or sequences, suggests that, in general, stacking interactions with aromatic residues are important for the binding of galactose while such interactions are usually absent in the carbohydrate binding sites of mannose-specific lectins with the beta-prism I fold.

  14. The Effects of Noncellulosic Compounds on the Nanoscale Interaction Forces Measured between Carbohydrate-Binding Module and Lignocellulosic Biomass.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Baran; Colpan, Mert; Ju, Xiaohui; Zhang, Xiao; Kostyukova, Alla; Abu-Lail, Nehal I

    2016-05-01

    The lack of fundamental understanding of the types of forces that govern how cellulose-degrading enzymes interact with cellulosic and noncellulosic components of lignocellulosic surfaces limits the design of new strategies for efficient conversion of biomass to bioethanol. In a step to improve our fundamental understanding of such interactions, nanoscale forces acting between a model cellulase-a carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) of cellobiohydrolase I (CBH I)-and a set of lignocellulosic substrates with controlled composition were measured using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The three model substrates investigated were kraft (KP), sulfite (SP), and organosolv (OPP) pulped substrates. These substrates varied in their surface lignin coverage, lignin type, and xylan and acetone extractives' content. Our results indicated that the overall adhesion forces of biomass to CBM increased linearly with surface lignin coverage with kraft lignin showing the highest forces among lignin types investigated. When the overall adhesion forces were decoupled into specific and nonspecific component forces via the Poisson statistical model, hydrophobic and Lifshitz-van der Waals (LW) forces dominated the binding forces of CBM to kraft lignin, whereas permanent dipole-dipole interactions and electrostatic forces facilitated the interactions of lignosulfonates to CBM. Xylan and acetone extractives' content increased the attractive forces between CBM and lignin-free substrates, most likely through hydrogen bonding forces. When the substrates treated differently were compared, it was found that both the differences in specific and nonspecific forces between lignin-containing and lignin-free substrates were the least for OPP. Therefore, cellulase enzymes represented by CBM would weakly bind to organosolv lignin. This will facilitate an easy enzyme recovery compared to other substrates treated with kraft or sulfite pulping. Our results also suggest that altering the surface hydrophobicity

  15. Recognition of the Helical Structure of β-1,4-Galactan by a New Family of Carbohydrate-binding Modules*

    PubMed Central

    Cid, Melissa; Pedersen, Henriette Lodberg; Kaneko, Satoshi; Coutinho, Pedro M.; Henrissat, Bernard; Willats, William G. T.; Boraston, Alisdair B.

    2010-01-01

    The microbial enzymes that depolymerize plant cell wall polysaccharides, ultimately promoting energy liberation and carbon recycling, are typically complex in their modularity and often contain carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs). Here, through analysis of an unknown module from a Thermotoga maritima endo-β-1,4-galactanase, we identify a new family of CBMs that are most frequently found appended to proteins with β-1,4-galactanase activity. Polysaccharide microarray screening, immunofluorescence microscopy, and biochemical analysis of the isolated module demonstrate the specificity of the module, here called TmCBM61, for β-1,4-linked galactose-containing ligands, making it the founding member of family CBM61. The ultra-high resolution x-ray crystal structures of TmCBM61 (0.95 and 1.4 Å resolution) in complex with β-1,4-galactotriose reveal the molecular basis of the specificity of the CBM for β-1,4-galactan. Analysis of these structures provides insight into the recognition of an unexpected helical galactan conformation through a mode of binding that resembles the recognition of starch. PMID:20826814

  16. Characterization of the Carbohydrate Binding Module 18 gene family in the amphibian pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peng; Stajich, Jason E

    2015-04-01

    Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) is the causative agent of chytridiomycosis responsible for worldwide decline in amphibian populations. Previous analysis of the Bd genome revealed a unique expansion of the carbohydrate-binding module family 18 (CBM18) predicted to be a sub-class of chitin recognition domains. CBM expansions have been linked to the evolution of pathogenicity in a variety of fungal species by protecting the fungus from the host. Based on phylogenetic analysis and presence of additional protein domains, the gene family can be classified into 3 classes: Tyrosinase-, Deacetylase-, and Lectin-like. Examination of the mRNA expression levels from sporangia and zoospores of nine of the cbm18 genes found that the Lectin-like genes had the highest expression while the Tyrosinase-like genes showed little expression, especially in zoospores. Heterologous expression of GFP-tagged copies of four CBM18 genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae demonstrated that two copies containing secretion signal peptides are trafficked to the cell boundary. The Lectin-like genes cbm18-ll1 and cbm18-ll2 co-localized with the chitinous cell boundaries visualized by staining with calcofluor white. In vitro assays of the full length and single domain copies from CBM18-LL1 demonstrated chitin binding and no binding to cellulose or xylan. Expressed CBM18 domain proteins were demonstrated to protect the fungus, Trichoderma reeseii, in vitro against hydrolysis from exogenously added chitinase, likely by binding and limiting exposure of fungal chitin. These results demonstrate that cbm18 genes can play a role in fungal defense and expansion of their copy number may be an important pathogenicity factor of this emerging infectious disease of amphibians. PMID:25819009

  17. Characterization of the Carbohydrate Binding Module 18 gene family in the amphibian pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peng; Stajich, Jason E

    2015-04-01

    Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) is the causative agent of chytridiomycosis responsible for worldwide decline in amphibian populations. Previous analysis of the Bd genome revealed a unique expansion of the carbohydrate-binding module family 18 (CBM18) predicted to be a sub-class of chitin recognition domains. CBM expansions have been linked to the evolution of pathogenicity in a variety of fungal species by protecting the fungus from the host. Based on phylogenetic analysis and presence of additional protein domains, the gene family can be classified into 3 classes: Tyrosinase-, Deacetylase-, and Lectin-like. Examination of the mRNA expression levels from sporangia and zoospores of nine of the cbm18 genes found that the Lectin-like genes had the highest expression while the Tyrosinase-like genes showed little expression, especially in zoospores. Heterologous expression of GFP-tagged copies of four CBM18 genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae demonstrated that two copies containing secretion signal peptides are trafficked to the cell boundary. The Lectin-like genes cbm18-ll1 and cbm18-ll2 co-localized with the chitinous cell boundaries visualized by staining with calcofluor white. In vitro assays of the full length and single domain copies from CBM18-LL1 demonstrated chitin binding and no binding to cellulose or xylan. Expressed CBM18 domain proteins were demonstrated to protect the fungus, Trichoderma reeseii, in vitro against hydrolysis from exogenously added chitinase, likely by binding and limiting exposure of fungal chitin. These results demonstrate that cbm18 genes can play a role in fungal defense and expansion of their copy number may be an important pathogenicity factor of this emerging infectious disease of amphibians.

  18. Determination of sugar specificity of jackfruit lectin by a simple sugar-lectin binding assay using microtiter plate.

    PubMed

    Wetprasit, N; Chulavatnatol, M

    1997-06-01

    Sugar-lectin binding assay was developed as a simple method which employed direct coating of microtiter plate with galactose-binding lectins. Biotin-galactose conjugate was used to bind to the immobilized lectins. The bound conjugate was then detected using streptavidin-horseradish peroxidase. Using the assay in conjunction with various competing carbohydrates, jackfruit lectin from Artocarpus heterophyllus was found to be specific for alpha-anomer of galactoside with an aromatic residue.

  19. Exquisite binding specificity of Sclerotium rolfsii lectin toward TF-related O-linked mucin-type glycans.

    PubMed

    Chachadi, Vishwanath B; Inamdar, Shashikala R; Yu, Lu-Gang; Rhodes, Jonathan M; Swamy, Bale M

    2011-01-01

    Sclerotium rolfsii lectin (SRL), a secretory protein from the soil borne phytopathogenic fungus Sclerotium rolfsii, has shown in our previous studies to bind strongly to the oncofetal Thomson-Friedenreich carbohydrate (Galβ1-3GalNAc-ser/thr, T or TF) antigen. TF antigen is widely expressed in many types of human cancers and the strong binding of SRL toward such a cancer-associated carbohydrate structure led us to characterize the carbohydrate binding specificity of SRL. Glycan array analysis, which included 285 glycans, shows exclusive binding of SRL to the O-linked mucin type but not N-linked glycans and amongst the mucin type O-glycans, lectin recognizes only mucin core 1, core 2 and weakly core 8 but not to other mucin core structures. It binds with high specificity to "α-anomers" but not the "β-anomers" of the TF structure. The axial C4-OH group of GalNAc and C2-OH group of Gal is both essential for SRL interaction with TF disaccharide, and substitution on C3 of galactose by sulfate or sialic acid or N-acetylglucosamine, significantly enhances the avidity of the lectin. SRL differs in its binding to TF structures compared to other known TF-binding lectins such as the Arachis hypogea (peanut) agglutinin, Agaricus bisporus (mushroom) lectin, Jackfruit, Artocarpus integrifolia (jacalin) and Amaranthus caudatus (Amaranthin) lectin. Thus, SRL has unique carbohydrate-binding specificity toward TF-related O-linked carbohydrate structures. Such a binding specificity will make this lectin a very useful tool in future structural as well as functional analysis of the cellular glycans in cancer studies.

  20. An intermolecular binding mechanism involving multiple LysM domains mediates carbohydrate recognition by an endopeptidase

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Jaslyn E. M. M.; Midtgaard, Søren Roi; Gysel, Kira; Thygesen, Mikkel B.; Sørensen, Kasper K.; Jensen, Knud J.; Stougaard, Jens; Thirup, Søren; Blaise, Mickaël

    2015-03-01

    The crystal and solution structures of the T. thermophilus NlpC/P60 d, l-endopeptidase as well as the co-crystal structure of its N-terminal LysM domains bound to chitohexaose allow a proposal to be made regarding how the enzyme recognizes peptidoglycan. LysM domains, which are frequently present as repetitive entities in both bacterial and plant proteins, are known to interact with carbohydrates containing N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) moieties, such as chitin and peptidoglycan. In bacteria, the functional significance of the involvement of multiple LysM domains in substrate binding has so far lacked support from high-resolution structures of ligand-bound complexes. Here, a structural study of the Thermus thermophilus NlpC/P60 endopeptidase containing two LysM domains is presented. The crystal structure and small-angle X-ray scattering solution studies of this endopeptidase revealed the presence of a homodimer. The structure of the two LysM domains co-crystallized with N-acetyl-chitohexaose revealed a new intermolecular binding mode that may explain the differential interaction between LysM domains and short or long chitin oligomers. By combining the structural information with the three-dimensional model of peptidoglycan, a model suggesting how protein dimerization enhances the recognition of peptidoglycan is proposed.

  1. Glucose-6-phosphate mediates activation of the carbohydrate responsive binding protein (ChREBP)

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ming V.; Chen, Weiqin; Harmancey, Romain N.; Nuotio-Antar, Alli M.; Imamura, Minako; Saha, Pradip; Taegtmeyer, Heinrich; Chan, Lawrence

    2010-05-07

    Carbohydrate response element binding protein (ChREBP) is a Mondo family transcription factor that activates a number of glycolytic and lipogenic genes in response to glucose stimulation. We have previously reported that high glucose can activate the transcriptional activity of ChREBP independent of the protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A)-mediated increase in nuclear entry and DNA binding. Here, we found that formation of glucose-6-phosphate (G-6-P) is essential for glucose activation of ChREBP. The glucose response of GAL4-ChREBP is attenuated by D-mannoheptulose, a potent hexokinase inhibitor, as well as over-expression of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase); kinetics of activation of GAL4-ChREBP can be modified by exogenously expressed GCK. Further metabolism of G-6-P through the two major glucose metabolic pathways, glycolysis and pentose-phosphate pathway, is not required for activation of ChREBP; over-expression of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) diminishes, whereas RNAi knockdown of the enzyme enhances, the glucose response of GAL4-ChREBP, respectively. Moreover, the glucose analogue 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG), which is phosphorylated by hexokinase, but not further metabolized, effectively upregulates the transcription activity of ChREBP. In addition, over-expression of phosphofructokinase (PFK) 1 and 2, synergistically diminishes the glucose response of GAL4-ChREBP. These multiple lines of evidence support the conclusion that G-6-P mediates the activation of ChREBP.

  2. Recent advances in Employing Molecular Modelling to Determine the Specificity of Glycan-Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Oliver C.; Woods, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Impressive improvements in docking performance can be achieved by applying energy bonuses to poses in which glycan hydroxyl groups occupy positions otherwise preferred by bound waters. In addition, inclusion of glycosidic conformational energies allows unlikely glycan conformations to be appropriately penalized. A method for predicting the binding specificity of glycan-binding proteins has been developed, which is based on grafting glycan branches onto a minimal binding determinant in the binding site. Grafting can be used either to screen virtual libraries of glycans, such as the known glycome, or to identify docked poses of minimal binding determinants that are consistent with specificity data. The reviewed advances allow accurate modelling of carbohydrate-protein 3D co-complexes, but challenges remain in ranking the affinity of congeners. PMID:25108191

  3. Purification and simultaneous immobilization of Arabidopsis thaliana hydroxynitrile lyase using a family 2 carbohydrate-binding module.

    PubMed

    Kopka, Benita; Diener, Martin; Wirtz, Astrid; Pohl, Martina; Jaeger, Karl-Erich; Krauss, Ulrich

    2015-05-01

    Tedious, time- and labor-intensive protein purification and immobilization procedures still represent a major bottleneck limiting the widespread application of enzymes in synthetic chemistry and industry. We here exemplify a simple strategy for the direct site-specific immobilization of proteins from crude cell extracts by fusion of a family 2 carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) derived from the exoglucanase/xylanase Cex from Cellulomonas fimi to a target enzyme. By employing a tripartite fusion protein consisting of the CBM, a flavin-based fluorescent protein (FbFP), and the Arabidopsis thaliana hydroxynitrile lyase (AtHNL), binding to cellulosic carrier materials can easily be monitored via FbFP fluorescence. Adsorption properties (kinetics and quantities) were studied for commercially available Avicel PH-101 and regenerated amorphous cellulose (RAC) derived from Avicel. The resulting immobilizates showed similar activities as the wild-type enzyme but displayed increased stability in the weakly acidic pH range. Finally, Avicel, RAC and cellulose acetate (CA) preparations were used for the synthesis of (R)-mandelonitrile in micro-aqueous methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) demonstrating the applicability and stability of the immobilizates for biotransformations in both aqueous and organic reaction systems.

  4. Carbohydrate-binding modules promote the enzymatic deconstruction of intact plant cell walls by targeting and proximity effects.

    PubMed

    Hervé, Cécile; Rogowski, Artur; Blake, Anthony W; Marcus, Susan E; Gilbert, Harry J; Knox, J Paul

    2010-08-24

    Cell wall degrading enzymes have a complex molecular architecture consisting of catalytic modules and noncatalytic carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs). The function of CBMs in cell wall degrading processes is poorly understood. Here, we have evaluated the potential enzyme-targeting function of CBMs in the context of intact primary and secondary cell wall deconstruction. The capacity of a pectate lyase to degrade pectic homogalacturonan in primary cell walls was potentiated by cellulose-directed CBMs but not by xylan-directed CBMs. Conversely, the arabinofuranosidase-mediated removal of side chains from arabinoxylan in xylan-rich and cellulose-poor wheat grain endosperm cell walls was enhanced by a xylan-binding CBM but less so by a crystalline cellulose-specific module. The capacity of xylanases to degrade xylan in secondary cell walls was potentiated by both xylan- and cellulose-directed CBMs. These studies demonstrate that CBMs can potentiate the action of a cognate catalytic module toward polysaccharides in intact cell walls through the recognition of nonsubstrate polysaccharides. The targeting actions of CBMs therefore have strong proximity effects within cell wall structures, explaining why cellulose-directed CBMs are appended to many noncellulase cell wall hydrolases.

  5. Carbohydrate-binding module 74 is a novel starch-binding domain associated with large and multidomain α-amylase enzymes.

    PubMed

    Valk, Vincent; Lammerts van Bueren, Alicia; van der Kaaij, Rachel M; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert

    2016-06-01

    Microbacterium aurum B8.A is a bacterium that originates from a potato starch-processing plant and employs a GH13 α-amylase (MaAmyA) enzyme that forms pores in potato starch granules. MaAmyA is a large and multi-modular protein that contains a novel domain at its C terminus (Domain 2). Deletion of Domain 2 from MaAmyA did not affect its ability to degrade starch granules but resulted in a strong reduction in granular pore size. Here, we separately expressed and purified this Domain 2 in Escherichia coli and determined its likely function in starch pore formation. Domain 2 independently binds amylose, amylopectin, and granular starch but does not have any detectable catalytic (hydrolytic or oxidizing) activity on α-glucan substrates. Therefore, we propose that this novel starch-binding domain is a new carbohydrate-binding module (CBM), the first representative of family CBM74 that assists MaAmyA in efficient pore formation in starch granules. Protein sequence-based BLAST searches revealed that CBM74 occurs widespread, but in bacteria only, and is often associated with large and multi-domain α-amylases containing family CBM25 or CBM26 domains. CBM74 may specifically function in binding to granular starches to enhance the capability of α-amylase enzymes to degrade resistant starches (RSs). Interestingly, the majority of family CBM74 representatives are found in α-amylases originating from human gut-associated Bifidobacteria, where they may assist in resistant starch degradation. The CBM74 domain thus may have a strong impact on the efficiency of RS digestion in the mammalian gastrointestinal tract. PMID:27101946

  6. Probing the Functions of Carbohydrate Binding Modules in the CBEL Protein from the Oomycete Phytophthora parasitica

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Thomas; Texier, Hélène; Nahoum, Virginie; Lafitte, Claude; Cioci, Gianluca; Heux, Laurent; Dumas, Bernard; O’Donohue, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Oomycetes are microorganisms that are distantly related to true fungi and many members of this phylum are major plant pathogens. Oomycetes express proteins that are able to interact with plant cell wall polysaccharides, such as cellulose. This interaction is thought to be mediated by carbohydrate-binding modules that are classified into CBM family 1 in the CAZy database. In this study, the two CBMs (1–1 and 1–2) that form part of the cell wall glycoprotein, CBEL, from Phytophthora parasitica have been submitted to detailed characterization, first to better quantify their interaction with cellulose and second to determine whether these CBMs can be useful for biotechnological applications, such as biomass hydrolysis. A variety of biophysical techniques were used to study the interaction of the CBMs with various substrates and the data obtained indicate that CBEL’s CBM1-1 exhibits much greater cellulose binding ability than CBM1-2. Engineering of the family 11 xylanase from Talaromyces versatilis (TvXynB), an enzyme that naturally bears a fungal family 1 CBM, has produced two variants. The first one lacks its native CBM, whereas the second contains the CBEL CBM1-1. The study of these enzymes has revealed that wild type TvXynB binds to cellulose, via its CBM1, and that the substitution of its CBM by oomycetal CBM1-1 does not affect its activity on wheat straw. However, intriguingly the addition of CBEL during the hydrolysis of wheat straw actually potentiates the action of TvXynB variant lacking a CBM1. This suggests that the potentiating effect of CBM1-1 might not require the formation of a covalent linkage to TvXynB. PMID:26390127

  7. A comparison of the fine saccharide-binding specificity of Dioclea grandiflora lectin and concanavalin A.

    PubMed

    Gupta, D; Oscarson, S; Raju, T S; Stanley, P; Toone, E J; Brewer, C F

    1996-12-01

    The lectin from the seeds of Dioclea grandiflora (DGL) is a Man/Glc-specific tetrameric protein with physical and saccharide-binding properties reported to be similar to that of the jack bean lectin concanavalin A (ConA). Unlike other plant lectins, both DGL and ConA bind with high affinity to the core trimannoside moiety, 3,6-di-O-(alpha-D-mannopyranosyl)-alpha-D-mannopyranoside, which is present in all asparagine-linked carbohydrates. In the present study, hemagglutination inhibition techniques have been used to investigate binding of DGL and ConA to a series of mono- and dideoxy analogs of methyl 3,6-di-O-(alpha-D-mannopyranosyl)-alpha-D-mannopyranoside and to a series of asparagine-linked oligomannose and complex oligosaccharides and glycopeptides. The results indicate that both DGL and ConA recognize epitopes on all three residues of the trimannoside: the 3-, 4-, and 6-hydroxyl groups of the alpha(1-6)Man residue, the 3-hydroxyl group of the alpha(1-3)Man residue, and the 2- and 4-hydroxyl groups of the central Man residue of the core trimannoside. However, unlike ConA, DGL does not bind to biantennary complex carbohydrates. This was confirmed by showing that biantennary complex glycopeptides do not bind to a DGL-Sepharose affinity column. Unlike ConA, DGL does not show enhanced affinity for a large N-linked oligomannose carbohydrate (Man9 glycopeptide) relative to the trimannoside. Thus, DGL and ConA share similar epitope recognition of the core trimannoside moiety. However, they exhibit differences in their fine specificities for larger N-linked oligomannose and complex carbohydrates.

  8. A crystal structure-guided rational design switching non-carbohydrate inhibitors' specificity between two β-GlcNAcase homologs

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tian; Guo, Peng; Zhou, Yong; Wang, Jing; Chen, Lei; Yang, Huibin; Qian, Xuhong; Yang, Qing

    2014-01-01

    Selective inhibition of function-specific β-GlcNAcase has great potential in terms of drug design and biological research. The symmetrical bis-naphthalimide M-31850 was previously obtained by screening for specificity against human glycoconjugate-lytic β-GlcNAcase. Using protein-ligand co-crystallization and molecular docking, we designed an unsymmetrical dyad of naphthalimide and thiadiazole, Q2, that changes naphthalimide specificity from against a human glycoconjugate-lytic β-GlcNAcase to against insect and bacterial chitinolytic β-GlcNAcases. The crystallographic and in silico studies reveal that the naphthalimide ring can be utilized to bind different parts of these enzyme homologs, providing a new starting point to design specific inhibitors. Moreover, Q2-induced closure of the substrate binding pocket is the structural basis for its 13-fold increment in inhibitory potency. Q2 is the first non-carbohydrate inhibitor against chitinolytic β-GlcNAcases. This study provides a useful example of structure-based rationally designed inhibitors as potential pharmaceuticals or pesticides. PMID:25155420

  9. Antiviral activity of carbohydrate-binding agents against Nidovirales in cell culture.

    PubMed

    van der Meer, F J U M; de Haan, C A M; Schuurman, N M P; Haijema, B J; Peumans, W J; Van Damme, E J M; Delputte, P L; Balzarini, J; Egberink, H F

    2007-10-01

    Coronaviruses are important human and animal pathogens, the relevance of which increased due to the emergence of new human coronaviruses like SARS-CoV, HKU1 and NL63. Together with toroviruses, arteriviruses, and roniviruses the coronaviruses belong to the order Nidovirales. So far antivirals are hardly available to combat infections with viruses of this order. Therefore, various antiviral strategies to counter nidoviral infections are under evaluation. Lectins, which bind to N-linked oligosaccharide elements of enveloped viruses, can be considered as a conceptionally new class of virus inhibitors. These agents were recently evaluated for their antiviral activity towards a variety of enveloped viruses and were shown in most cases to inhibit virus infection at low concentrations. However, limited knowledge is available for their efficacy towards nidoviruses. In this article the application of the plant lectins Hippeastrum hybrid agglutinin (HHA), Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA), Cymbidium sp. agglutinin (CA) and Urtica dioica agglutinin (UDA) as well as non-plant derived pradimicin-A (PRM-A) and cyanovirin-N (CV-N) as potential antiviral agents was evaluated. Three antiviral tests were compared based on different evaluation principles: cell viability (MTT-based colorimetric assay), number of infected cells (immunoperoxidase assay) and amount of viral protein expression (luciferase-based assay). The presence of carbohydrate-binding agents strongly inhibited coronaviruses (transmissible gastroenteritis virus, infectious bronchitis virus, feline coronaviruses serotypes I and II, mouse hepatitis virus), arteriviruses (equine arteritis virus and porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome virus) and torovirus (equine Berne virus). Remarkably, serotype II feline coronaviruses and arteriviruses were not inhibited by PRM-A, in contrast to the other viruses tested.

  10. Addition of a carbohydrate-binding module enhances cellulase penetration into cellulose substrates

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Cellulases are of great interest for application in biomass degradation, yet the molecular details of the mode of action of glycoside hydrolases during degradation of insoluble cellulose remain elusive. To further improve these enzymes for application at industrial conditions, it is critical to gain a better understanding of not only the details of the degradation process, but also the function of accessory modules. Method We fused a carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) from family 2a to two thermophilic endoglucanases. We then applied neutron reflectometry to determine the mechanism of the resulting enhancements. Results Catalytic activity of the chimeric enzymes was enhanced up to three fold on insoluble cellulose substrates as compared to wild type. Importantly, we demonstrate that the wild type enzymes affect primarily the surface properties of an amorphous cellulose film, while the chimeras containing a CBM alter the bulk properties of the amorphous film. Conclusion Our findings suggest that the CBM improves the efficiency of these cellulases by enabling digestion within the bulk of the film. PMID:23819686

  11. Computer simulation of protein—carbohydrate complexes: application to arabinose-binding protein and pea lectin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, V. S. R.; Biswas, Margaret; Mukhopadhyay, Chaitali; Balaji, P. V.

    1989-03-01

    The CCEM method (Contact Criteria and Energy Minimisation) has been developed and applied to study protein-carbohydrate interactions. The method uses available X-ray data even on the native protein at low resolution (above 2.4 Å) to generate realistic models of a variety of proteins with various ligands. The two examples discussed in this paper are arabinose-binding protein (ABP) and pea lectin. The X-ray crystal structure data reported on ABP-β- L-arabinose complex at 2.8, 2.4 and 1.7 Å resolution differ drastically in predicting the nature of the interactions between the protein and ligand. It is shown that, using the data at 2.4 Å resolution, the CCEM method generates complexes which are as good as the higher (1.7 Å) resolution data. The CCEM method predicts some of the important hydrogen bonds between the ligand and the protein which are missing in the interpretation of the X-ray data at 2.4 Å resolution. The theoretically predicted hydrogen bonds are in good agreement with those reported at 1.7 Å resolution. Pea lectin has been solved only in the native form at 3 Å resolution. Application of the CCEM method also enables us to generate complexes of pea lectin with methyl-α- D-glucopyranoside and methyl-2,3-dimethyl-α- D-glucopyranoside which explain well the available experimental data in solution.

  12. Antiviral Activity of Synthetic Aminopyrrolic Carbohydrate Binding Agents: Targeting the Glycans of Viral gp120 to Inhibit HIV Entry.

    PubMed

    Francesconi, Oscar; Nativi, Cristina; Gabrielli, Gabriele; De Simone, Irene; Noppen, Sam; Balzarini, Jan; Liekens, Sandra; Roelens, Stefano

    2015-07-01

    The binding abilities of a set of structurally related aminopyrrolic synthetic receptors for mannosides, endowed with antimycotic activity against yeast and yeast-like pathogens bearing mannoproteins on their cell surface, have been investigated towards the highly mannosylated gp120 and gp41 glycoproteins of the HIV envelope. A pronounced binding interaction with both glycoproteins was observed by SPR for most of the investigated compounds. Comparison of their binding properties towards the glycoproteins with their binding affinities toward mannosides revealed a direct correlation, supporting their role as carbohydrate binding agents (CBAs). Cytostatic activity studies revealed antiproliferative activity dependent on the nature and the structure of compounds. Antiviral activity studies against a broad panel of DNA and RNA viruses showed inhibitory effect against HIV infection of the T-lymphocyte CEM cell line for two compounds, suggesting antiviral activity similar to other CBAs, such as the nonpeptidic pradimicin antibiotics.

  13. Low protein-high carbohydrate diet induces alterations in the serum thyronine-binding proteins in the rat.

    PubMed

    Young, R A; Braverman, L E; Rajatanavin, R

    1982-05-01

    The serum T3 concentration was increased in 8-week-old lean Zucker rats fed a low protein-high carbohydrate diet for 2 weeks. This increase was secondary to the generation of a binding protein migrating in the postalbumin zone in polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis employing 125I-labeled T3 and is termed rat thyronine-binding globulin. The presence of this T3-binding protein in serum resulted in a marked decrease in the percent free T3 assessed by equilibrium dialysis and a normal free T3 concentration. An increase in the binding of T4 in the postalbumin zone was also observed, but no changes in the dialyzable fraction of T4 or the total and free T4 concentrations occurred. In contrast to these findings in lean Zucker rats fed the low protein-high carbohydrate diet, no change in the pattern of 125I-labeled T3 and T4 binding, the dialyzable fraction of T3 or T4, or total and free T3 or T4 concentrations were observed in the obese Zucker rats fed this diet. The present findings suggest that diet-induced alterations in thyroid hormone-binding proteins must be considered in the interpretation of data which involve alterations in total thyroid hormone concentrations in serum and their role in affecting tissue metabolism.

  14. Reduced steric hindrance and optimized spatial arrangement of carbohydrate ligands in imprinted monolayers for enhanced protein binding.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Haifu; Du, Xuezhong

    2013-02-01

    Imprinted monolayers provide several advantages over bulk imprinting methods. This is especially important for large templates such as proteins. Concanavalin A (Con A)-imprinted binary monolayers consisting of glycolipids with oligo(ethylene glycol) (OEG) spacers and zwitterionic phospholipids (DPPC) were constructed and investigated. The shorter phosphorylcholine (PC) headgroups with an almost flat-on orientation in the binary monolayers gave rise to reduced steric hindrance favorable to the accommodation of Con A with greater ease and facilitated the access of the OEG-linked mannose moieties for enhanced protein binding. Further enhanced binding resulted from optimized spatial rearrangement of the glycolipids at the air-water interface directed by Con A in the subphase to create bivalent binding sites and to minimize steric crowding of neighboring mannose ligands. The combination of the exposed carbohydrate ligands from biologically inert surfaces and the optimized ligand arrangement is the most reasonable solution to enhancement of protein affinity. The bivalent carbohydrate binding sites protruding from the imprinted monolayers were created to be complementary to the Con A binding pockets. This strategy generates tailor-made surfaces with enhanced protein binding and opens the possibility of controlled assembly of intellectual biomaterials and preparation of biosensors.

  15. Carbohydrate-Binding Non-Peptidic Pradimicins for the Treatment of Acute Sleeping Sickness in Murine Models

    PubMed Central

    Castillo-Acosta, Víctor M.; Ruiz-Pérez, Luis M.; Reichardt, Niels C.; Igarashi, Yasuhiro; Liekens, Sandra; Balzarini, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Current treatments available for African sleeping sickness or human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) are limited, with poor efficacy and unacceptable safety profiles. Here, we report a new approach to address treatment of this disease based on the use of compounds that bind to parasite surface glycans leading to rapid killing of trypanosomes. Pradimicin and its derivatives are non-peptidic carbohydrate-binding agents that adhere to the carbohydrate moiety of the parasite surface glycoproteins inducing parasite lysis in vitro. Notably, pradimicin S has good pharmaceutical properties and enables cure of an acute form of the disease in mice. By inducing resistance in vitro we have established that the composition of the sugars attached to the variant surface glycoproteins are critical to the mode of action of pradimicins and play an important role in infectivity. The compounds identified represent a novel approach to develop drugs to treat HAT. PMID:27662652

  16. The ion dependence of carbohydrate binding of CBM36: an MD and 3D-RISM study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanimoto, Shoichi; Higashi, Masahiro; Yoshida, Norio; Nakano, Haruyuki

    2016-09-01

    The molecular recognition process of the carbohydrate-binding module family 36 (CBM36) was examined theoretically. The mechanism of xylan binding by CBM36 and the role of Ca2+ were investigated by the combined use of molecular dynamics simulations and the 3D reference interaction site model method. The CBM36 showed affinity for xylan after Ca2+ binding, but not after Mg2+ binding. Free-energy component analysis of the xylan-binding process revealed that the major factor for xylan-binding affinity is the electrostatic interaction between the Ca2+ and the hydroxyl oxygens of xylan. The van der Waals interaction between the hydrophobic side chain of CBM36 and the glucopyranose ring of xylan also contributes to the stabilization of the xylan-binding state. Dehydration on the formation of the complex has the opposite effect on these interactions. The affinity of CBM36 for xylan results from a balance of the interactions between the binding ion and solvents, hydrophilic residues around xylan, and the hydroxyl oxygens of xylan. When CBM binds Ca2+, these interactions are well balanced; in contrast, when CBM binds Mg2+, the dehydration penalty is excessively large.

  17. Malectin: A Novel Carbohydrate-binding Protein of the Endoplasmic Reticulum and a Candidate Player in the Early Steps of Protein N-Glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    Schallus, Thomas; Jaeckh, Christine; Fehér, Krisztina; Palma, Angelina S.; Liu, Yan; Simpson, Jeremy C.; Mackeen, Mukram; Stier, Gunter; Gibson, Toby J.; Feizi, Ten; Pieler, Tomas

    2008-01-01

    N-Glycosylation starts in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) where a 14-sugar glycan composed of three glucoses, nine mannoses, and two N-acetylglucosamines (Glc3Man9GlcNAc2) is transferred to nascent proteins. The glucoses are sequentially trimmed by ER-resident glucosidases. The Glc3Man9GlcNAc2 moiety is the substrate for oligosaccharyltransferase; the Glc1Man9GlcNAc2 and Man9GlcNAc2 intermediates are signals for glycoprotein folding and quality control in the calnexin/calreticulin cycle. Here, we report a novel membrane-anchored ER protein that is highly conserved in animals and that recognizes the Glc2-N-glycan. Structure determination by nuclear magnetic resonance showed that its luminal part is a carbohydrate binding domain that recognizes glucose oligomers. Carbohydrate microarray analyses revealed a uniquely selective binding to a Glc2-N-glycan probe. The localization, structure, and binding specificity of this protein, which we have named malectin, open the way to studies of its role in the genesis, processing and secretion of N-glycosylated proteins. PMID:18524852

  18. Tissue specificity of endothelin binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Bolger, G.T.; Liard, F.; Krogsrud, R.; Thibeault, D.; Jaramillo, J. )

    1990-09-01

    A measurement was made of the binding of 125I-labeled endothelin (125I-ET) to crude membrane fractions prepared from rat aorta, atrium, ventricle, portal vein, trachea, lung parenchyma, vas deferens, ileum, bladder, and guinea-pig taenia coli and lung parenchyma. Scatchard analysis of 125I-ET binding in all tissues indicated binding to a single class of saturable sites. The affinity and density of 125I-ET binding sites varied between tissues. The Kd of 125I-ET binding was approximately 0.5 nM for rat aorta, trachea, lung parenchyma, ventricle, bladder, and vas deferens, and guinea-pig taenia coli and lung parenchyma, 1.8 nM for rat portal vein and atrium, and 3.3 nM for ileum. The Bmax of 125I-ET binding had the following rank order of density in rat tissues: trachea greater than lung parenchyma = vas deferens much greater than aorta = portal vein = atrium greater than bladder greater than ventricle = ileum. The properties of 125I-ET endothelin binding were characterized in rat ventricular membranes. 125I-ET binding was time dependent, reaching a maximum within 45-60 min at 25 degrees C. The calculated microassociation constant was 9.67 x 10(5) s-1 M-1. Only 15-20% of 125I-ET dissociated from its binding site even when dissociation was studied as long as 3 h. Preincubation of ventricular membranes with ET prevented binding of 125I-ET. 125I-ET binding was destroyed by boiling of ventricular membranes and was temperature, pH, and cation (Ca2+, Mg2+, and Na+) dependent.

  19. Structural basis of the carbohydrate specificities of jacalin: an X-ray and modeling study.

    PubMed

    Jeyaprakash, A Arockia; Katiyar, S; Swaminathan, C P; Sekar, K; Surolia, A; Vijayan, M

    2003-09-01

    The structures of the complexes of tetrameric jacalin with Gal, Me-alpha-GalNAc, Me-alpha-T-antigen, GalNAcbeta1-3Gal-alpha-O-Me and Galalpha1-6Glc (mellibiose) show that the sugar-binding site of jacalin has three components: the primary site, secondary site A, and secondary site B. In these structures and in the two structures reported earlier, Gal or GalNAc occupy the primary site with the anomeric carbon pointing towards secondary site A. The alpha-substituents, when present, interact, primarily hydrophobically, with secondary site A which has variable geometry. O-H..., centered pi and C-H...pi hydrogen bonds involving this site also exist. On the other hand, beta-substitution leads to severe steric clashes. Therefore, in complexes involving beta-linked disaccharides, the reducing sugar binds at the primary site with the non-reducing end located at secondary site B. The interactions at secondary site B are primarily through water bridges. Thus, the nature of the linkage determines the mode of the association of the sugar with jacalin. The interactions observed in the crystal structures and modeling based on them provide a satisfactory qualitative explanation of the available thermodynamic data on jacalin-carbohydrate interactions. They also lead to fresh insights into the nature of the binding of glycoproteins by jacalin.

  20. Trimethoxybenzene- and trimethylbenzene-based compounds bearing imidazole, indole and pyrrole groups as recognition units: synthesis and evaluation of the binding properties towards carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Rosien, Jan-Ruven; Seichter, Wilhelm; Mazik, Monika

    2013-10-14

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the potential of trimethoxybenzene- and trimethylbenzene-based compounds bearing imidazole or indole groups as recognition sites in the complexation of carbohydrates. Representatives of these compounds were prepared and their binding properties toward selected carbohydrates evaluated. The results of the binding studies were compared with those obtained for the prepared pyrrole bearing analogues and for the previously described triethylbenzene-based receptors.

  1. Energy Landscape for the Interaction of the Family 1 Carbohydrate-Binding Module and the Cellulose Surface is Altered by Hydrolyzed Glycosidic Bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Bu, L.; Beckham, G. T.; Crowley, M. F.; Chang, C. H.; Matthews, J. F.; Bomble, Y. J.; Adney, W. S.; Himmel, M. E.; Nimlos, M. R.

    2009-01-01

    A multiscale simulation model is used to construct potential and free energy surfaces for the carbohydrate-binding module [CBM] from an industrially important cellulase, Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolase I, on the hydrophobic face of a coarse-grained cellulose I{beta} polymorph. We predict from computation that the CBM alone exhibits regions of stability on the hydrophobic face of cellulose every 5 and 10 {angstrom}, corresponding to a glucose unit and a cellobiose unit, respectively. In addition, we predict a new role for the CBM: specifically, that in the presence of hydrolyzed cellulose chain ends, the CBM exerts a thermodynamic driving force to translate away from the free cellulose chain ends. This suggests that the CBM is not only required for binding to cellulose, as has been known for two decades, but also that it has evolved to both assist the enzyme in recognizing a cellulose chain end and exert a driving force on the enzyme during processive hydrolysis of cellulose.

  2. Inhibition of IgE binding to cross-reactive carbohydrate determinants enhances diagnostic selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Holzweber, F; Svehla, E; Fellner, W; Dalik, T; Stubler, S; Hemmer, W; Altmann, F

    2013-01-01

    Background Allergy diagnosis by determination of allergen-specific IgE is complicated by clinically irrelevant IgE, of which the most prominent example is IgE against cross-reactive carbohydrate determinants (CCDs) that occur on allergens from plants and insects. Therefore, CCDs cause numerous false-positive results. Inhibition of CCDs has been proposed as a remedy, but has not yet found its way into the routine diagnostic laboratory. We sought to provide a simple and affordable procedure to overcome the CCD problem. Methods Serum samples from allergic patients were analysed for allergen-specific IgEs by different commercial tests (from Mediwiss, Phadia and Siemens) with and without a semisynthetic CCD blocker with minimized potential for nonspecific interactions that was prepared from purified bromelain glycopeptides and human serum albumin. Results Twenty two per cent of about 6000 serum samples reacted with CCD reporter proteins. The incidence of anti-CCD IgE reached 35% in the teenage group. In patients with anti-CCD IgE, application of the CCD blocker led to a clear reduction in read-out values, often below the threshold level. A much better correlation between laboratory results and anamnesis and skin tests was achieved in many cases. The CCD blocker did not affect test results where CCDs were not involved. Conclusion Eliminating the effect of IgEs directed against CCDs by inhibition leads to a significant reduction in false-positive in vitro test results without lowering sensitivity towards relevant sensitizations. Application of the CCD blocker may be worthwhile wherever natural allergen extracts or components are used. PMID:24107260

  3. The role of individual carbohydrate-binding sites in the function of the potent anti-HIV lectin Griffithsin

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Jie; Gao, Yongguang; Hoorelbeke, Bart; Kagiampakis, Ioannis; Zhao, Bo; Demeler, Borries; Balzarini, Jan; LiWang, Patricia J.

    2012-01-01

    Griffithsin (GRFT) is a lectin that has been shown to inhibit HIV infection by binding to high mannose glycan structures on the surface of gp120, and is among the most potent HIV entry inhibitors reported so far. However, important biochemical details on the antiviral mechanism of GRFT action remain unexplored. In order to understand the role of the three individual carbohydrate-binding sites (CBS) in GRFT, mutations were made at each site (D30A, D70A, and D112A), and the resulting mutants were investigated. NMR studies revealed that each GRFT variant was folded but showed significant peak movement on the carbohydrate-binding face of the protein. The wild-type and each point mutant protein appeared as tight dimers with a Kd below 4.2 µM. Mutation of any individual CBS on GRFT reduced binding of the protein to mannose, and ELISA assays revealed a partial loss of ability of each GRFT point mutant to bind gp120, with a near-complete loss of binding by the triple mutant D30A/D70A/D112A GRFT. A more quantitative surface plasmon resonance (SPR) examination showed a rather small loss of binding to gp120 for the individual GRFT point mutants (KD: 123 to 245 pM range versus 73 pM for wild-type GRFT), but dramatic loss of the triple mutant to bind gp120 derived from R5 and X4 strains (KD > 12 nM). In contrast to the 2- to 3-fold loss of binding to gp120, the single CBS point mutants of GRFT were significantly less able to inhibit viral infection, exhibiting a 26- to 1900-fold loss of potency, while the triple mutant was at least 875 fold less effective against HIV-1 infection. The disparity between HIV-1 gp120 binding ability and HIV inhibitory potency for these GRFT variants indicates that gp120 binding and virus neutralization do not necessarily correlate, and suggests a mechanism that is not based on simple gp120 binding. PMID:22827601

  4. Fusion of carbohydrate binding modules from Thermotoga neapolitana with a family 10 xylanase from Bacillus halodurans S7.

    PubMed

    Mamo, Gashaw; Hatti-Kaul, Rajni; Mattiasson, Bo

    2007-01-01

    Xylanase A of Thermotoga neapolitana contains binding domains both at the N- and C-terminal ends of the catalytic domain. In the N-terminal position it contains two carbohydrate-binding modules (CBM) which belong to family 22. These CBMs bind xylan but not to cellulose. The gene encoding the mature peptide of these CBMs was fused with an alkaline active GH10 xylanase from Bacillus halodurans S7 and expressed in Escherichia coli. The (His)(6) tagged hybrid protein was purified by immobilized metal affinity chromatography and characterized. Xylan binding by the chimeric protein was influenced by NaCl concentration and pH of the binding medium. Binding increased with increasing salt concentration up to 200 mM. Higher extent of binding was observed under acidic conditions. The fusion of the CBM structures enhanced the hydrolytic efficiency of the xylanase against insoluble xylan, but decreased the stability of the enzyme. The optimum temperature and pH for the activity of the xylanase did not change.

  5. Aminopyrrolic synthetic receptors for monosaccharides: a class of carbohydrate-binding agents endowed with antibiotic activity versus pathogenic yeasts.

    PubMed

    Nativi, Cristina; Francesconi, Oscar; Gabrielli, Gabriele; De Simone, Irene; Turchetti, Benedetta; Mello, Tommaso; Di Cesare Mannelli, Lorenzo; Ghelardini, Carla; Buzzini, Pietro; Roelens, Stefano

    2012-04-16

    The biological activity of a set of structurally related aminopyrrolic synthetic receptors for monosaccharides has been tested versus yeast and yeast-like microorganisms and compared to their binding affinity toward mannosides. Antibiotic activity comparable to that of well-known polyene (amphotericin B) or azole (ketoconazole) drugs has been found for some members of the family, along with a general correlation with binding abilities. A systematic structure-activity-affinity investigation shed light on the structural and functional requirements necessary for antibiotic activity and identified the tripodal compound 1 as the most potent compound of the set. Together with toxicity tests and inhibitor localization experiments performed through fluorescence microscopy, these studies led to the characterization of a new class of carbohydrate binding agents possessing antibiotic activity, in which pyrrolic groups precisely structured on a tripodal architecture appear to be responsible for permeability through the cell wall of pathogens, as well as for antibiotic activity inside the cytoplasm.

  6. Cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the VP8* carbohydrate-binding protein of the human rotavirus strain Wa

    SciTech Connect

    Kraschnefski, Mark J.; Scott, Stacy A.; Holloway, Gavan; Coulson, Barbara S.; Itzstein, Mark von; Blanchard, Helen

    2005-11-01

    The carbohydrate-binding component (VP8*{sub 64–223}) of the human Wa rotavirus spike protein has been overexpressed in E. coli, purified and crystallized in two different crystal forms. X-ray diffraction data have been collected that have enabled determination of the Wa VP8*{sub 64–223} structure by molecular replacement. Rotaviruses exhibit host-specificity and the first crystallographic information on a rotavirus strain that infects humans is reported here. Recognition and attachment to host cells, leading to invasion and infection, is critically linked to the function of the outer capsid spike protein of the rotavirus particle. In some strains the VP8* component of the spike protein is implicated in recognition and binding of sialic-acid-containing cell-surface carbohydrates, thereby enabling infection by the virus. The cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and initial X-ray diffraction analysis of the VP8* core from human Wa rotavirus is reported. Two crystal forms (trigonal P3{sub 2}21 and monoclinic P2{sub 1}) have been obtained and X-ray diffraction data have been collected, enabling determination of the VP8*{sub 64–223} structure by molecular replacement.

  7. Metabolite Regulation of Nuclear Localization of Carbohydrate-response Element-binding Protein (ChREBP): ROLE OF AMP AS AN ALLOSTERIC INHIBITOR.

    PubMed

    Sato, Shogo; Jung, Hunmin; Nakagawa, Tsutomu; Pawlosky, Robert; Takeshima, Tomomi; Lee, Wan-Ru; Sakiyama, Haruhiko; Laxman, Sunil; Wynn, R Max; Tu, Benjamin P; MacMillan, John B; De Brabander, Jef K; Veech, Richard L; Uyeda, Kosaku

    2016-05-13

    The carbohydrate-response element-binding protein (ChREBP) is a glucose-responsive transcription factor that plays an essential role in converting excess carbohydrate to fat storage in the liver. In response to glucose levels, ChREBP is regulated by nuclear/cytosol trafficking via interaction with 14-3-3 proteins, CRM-1 (exportin-1 or XPO-1), or importins. Nuclear localization of ChREBP was rapidly inhibited when incubated in branched-chain α-ketoacids, saturated and unsaturated fatty acids, or 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide. Here, we discovered that protein-free extracts of high fat-fed livers contained, in addition to ketone bodies, a new metabolite, identified as AMP, which specifically activates the interaction between ChREBP and 14-3-3. The crystal structure showed that AMP binds directly to the N terminus of ChREBP-α2 helix. Our results suggest that AMP inhibits the nuclear localization of ChREBP through an allosteric activation of ChREBP/14-3-3 interactions and not by activation of AMPK. AMP and ketone bodies together can therefore inhibit lipogenesis by restricting localization of ChREBP to the cytoplasm during periods of ketosis. PMID:26984404

  8. Monomerization of viral entry inhibitor griffithsin elucidates the relationship between multivalent binding to carbohydrates and anti-HIV activity.

    PubMed

    Moulaei, Tinoush; Shenoy, Shilpa R; Giomarelli, Barbara; Thomas, Cheryl; McMahon, James B; Dauter, Zbigniew; O'Keefe, Barry R; Wlodawer, Alexander

    2010-09-01

    Mutations were introduced to the domain-swapped homodimer of the antiviral lectin griffithsin (GRFT). Whereas several single and double mutants remained dimeric, insertion of either two or four amino acids at the dimerization interface resulted in a monomeric form of the protein (mGRFT). Monomeric character of the modified proteins was confirmed by sedimentation equilibrium ultracentrifugation and by their high resolution X-ray crystal structures, whereas their binding to carbohydrates was assessed by isothermal titration calorimetry. Cell-based antiviral activity assays utilizing different variants of mGRFT indicated that the monomeric form of the lectin had greatly reduced activity against HIV-1, suggesting that the antiviral activity of GRFT stems from crosslinking and aggregation of viral particles via multivalent interactions between GRFT and oligosaccharides present on HIV envelope glycoproteins. Atomic resolution crystal structure of a complex between mGRFT and nonamannoside revealed that a single mGRFT molecule binds to two different nonamannoside molecules through all three carbohydrate-binding sites present on the monomer.

  9. Monomerization of viral entry inhibitor griffithsin elucidates the relationship between multivalent binding to carbohydrates and anti-HIV activity

    SciTech Connect

    Moulaei, Tinoush; Shenoy, Shilpa R.; Giomarelli, Barbara; Thomas, Cheryl; McMahon, James B.; Dauter, Zbigniew; O'Keefe, Barry R.; Wlodawer, Alexander

    2010-10-28

    Mutations were introduced to the domain-swapped homodimer of the antiviral lectin griffithsin (GRFT). Whereas several single and double mutants remained dimeric, insertion of either two or four amino acids at the dimerization interface resulted in a monomeric form of the protein (mGRFT). Monomeric character of the modified proteins was confirmed by sedimentation equilibrium ultracentrifugation and by their high resolution X-ray crystal structures, whereas their binding to carbohydrates was assessed by isothermal titration calorimetry. Cell-based antiviral activity assays utilizing different variants of mGRFT indicated that the monomeric form of the lectin had greatly reduced activity against HIV-1, suggesting that the antiviral activity of GRFT stems from crosslinking and aggregation of viral particles via multivalent interactions between GRFT and oligosaccharides present on HIV envelope glycoproteins. Atomic resolution crystal structure of a complex between mGRFT and nonamannoside revealed that a single mGRFT molecule binds to two different nonamannoside molecules through all three carbohydrate-binding sites present on the monomer.

  10. Carbohydrate specificity of a lectin isolated from the fungus Sclerotium rolfsii.

    PubMed

    Wu, A M; Wu, J H; Tsai, M S; Hegde, G V; Inamdar, S R; Swamy, B M; Herp, A

    2001-09-14

    In order to investigate the functional roles of a phytopathogenic fungal lectin (SRL) isolated from the bodies of Sclerotium rolfsii, the binding properties of SRL were studied by enzyme linked lectinosorbent assay and by inhibition of SRL-glycan interaction. Among glycoproteins (gp) tested for binding, SRL reacted strongly with GalNAc alpha1-->4Ser/Thr (Tn) and/or Gal beta1-->3GalNAc alpha1-->(T(alpha)) containing gps: human T(alpha) and Tn glycophorin, asialo salivary gps, and asialofetuin, but its reactivity toward sialylated glycoproteins was reduced significantly. Of the sugar ligands tested for inhibition of SRL-asialofetuin binding, Thomsen-Friedenreich residue (T(alpha)) was the best, being 22.4 and 2.24 x 10(3) more active than GalNAc and Gal beta1--> residues, respectively. Other ligands tested were inactive. When the glycans used as inhibitors, T(alpha), and/or Tn containing gps, especially asialo PSM, asialo BSM, asialo OSM, active antifreeze gp, asialo glycophorin and Tn-glycophorin were very active, and 1.0 x 10(4) times more potent than GalNAc. From these results, it is clear that the combining site of SRL should be of a cavity type and recognizes only Tn and T(alpha) residues of glycans; it is suggested that T(alpha) and Tn glycotopes, which are present only in abnormal carbohydrate sequences of higher orders of mammal, are the most likely sites for phytopathogenic fungal attachment as an initial step of infection. The affinity of SRL for ligands can be ranked in decreasing order as follows: multivalent T(alpha) and Tn > monomeric T(alpha) and Tn > GalNAc > II (Gal beta1-->4GlcNAc), L (Gal beta1-->4Glc), and Gal. PMID:11589519

  11. Effects on sialic acid recognition of amino acid mutations in the carbohydrate-binding cleft of the rotavirus spike protein.

    PubMed

    Kraschnefski, Mark J; Bugarcic, Andrea; Fleming, Fiona E; Yu, Xing; von Itzstein, Mark; Coulson, Barbara S; Blanchard, Helen

    2009-03-01

    The rotavirus spike protein VP4 mediates attachment to host cells and subsequent membrane penetration. The VP8(*) domain of VP4 forms the spike tips and is proposed to recognize host-cell surface glycans. For sialidase-sensitive rotaviruses such as rhesus (RRV), this recognition involves terminal sialic acids. We show here that the RRV VP8(*)(64-224) protein competes with RRV infection of host cells, demonstrating its relevance to infection. In addition, we observe that the amino acids revealed by X-ray crystallography to be in direct contact with the bound sialic acid derivative methyl alpha-D-N-acetylneuraminide, and that are highly conserved amongst sialidase-sensitive rotaviruses, are residues that are also important in interactions with host-cell carbohydrates. Residues Arg101 and Ser190 of the RRV VP8(*) carbohydrate-binding site were mutated to assess their importance for binding to the sialic acid derivative and their competition with RRV infection of host cells. The crystallographic structure of the Arg(101)Ala mutant crystallized in the presence of the sialic acid derivative was determined at 295 K to a resolution of 1.9 A. Our multidisciplinary study using X-ray crystallography, saturation transfer difference nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry, and competitive virus infectivity assays to investigate RRV wild-type and mutant VP8(*) proteins has provided the first evidence that the carbohydrate-binding cavity in RRV VP8(*) is used for host-cell recognition, and this interaction is not only with the sialic acid portion but also with other parts of the glycan structure.

  12. Tailoring GalNAcα1-3Galβ-specific lectins from a multi-specific fungal galectin: dramatic change of carbohydrate specificity by a single amino-acid substitution.

    PubMed

    Hu, Dan; Tateno, Hiroaki; Sato, Takashi; Narimatsu, Hisashi; Hirabayashi, Jun

    2013-07-15

    Galectins exhibit multiple roles through recognition of diverse structures of β-galactosides. However, this broad specificity often hinders their practical use as probes. In the present study we report a dramatic improvement in the carbohydrate specificity of a multi-specific fungal galectin from the mushroom Agrocybe cylindricea, which binds not only to simple β-galactosides, but also to their derivatives. Site-directed mutagenesis targeting five residues involved in β-galactose binding revealed that replacement of Asn46 with alanine (N46A) increased the binding to GalNAcα1-3Galβ-containing glycans, while eliminating binding to all other β-galactosides, as shown by glycoconjugate microarray analysis. Quantitative analysis by frontal affinity chromatography showed that the mutant N46A had enhanced affinity towards blood group A tetraose (type 2), A hexaose (type 1) and Forssman pentasaccharide with dissociation constants of 5.0 × 10⁻⁶ M, 3.8 × 10⁻⁶ M and 1.0 × 10⁻⁵ M respectively. Surprisingly, all the other mutants generated by saturation mutagenesis of Asn46 exhibited essentially the same specificity as N46A. Moreover, alanine substitution for Pro45, which forms the cis-conformation upon β-galactose binding, exhibited the same specificity as N46A. From a practical viewpoint, the derived N46A mutant proved to be unique as a specific probe to detect GalNAcα1-3Galβ-containing glycans by methods such as flow cytometry, cell staining and lectin microarray.

  13. Significant conformational changes in an antigenic carbohydrate epitope upon binding to a monoclonal antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Glaudemans, C.P.J.; Lerner, L.; Daves, G.D. Jr.; Kovac, P.; Bax, A. ); Venable, R. )

    1990-12-01

    Transferred nulcear Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy (TRNOE) was used to observe changes in a ligand's conformation upon binding to its specific antibody. The ligands studied were methyl O-{beta}-D-galactopyranosyl(1{yields}6)-4-deoxy-4-fluoro-{beta}-D galactopyranoside (me4FGal{sub 2}) and its selectively deuteriated analogue, methyl O-{beta}-D-galactopyranosyl(1{yields}6)-4-deoxy-2-deuterio-4-fluoro-{beta}-D-galactopyranoside (me4F2dGal{sub 2}). The monoclonal antibody was mouse IgA X24. The solution conformation of the free ligand me4F2dGal{sub 2} was inferred from measurements of vicinal {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H coupling constants, long-range {sup 1}H-{sup 13}C coupling constants, and NOE cross-peak intensities. For free ligand, both galactosyl residues adopt a regular chair conformation, but the NMR spectra are incompatible with a single unique conformation of the glycosidic linkage. Analysis of {sup 1}H-{sup 1}H and {sup 1}H-{sup 13}C constants indicates that the major conformer has an extended conformation. TRNOE measurements on me4FGal{sub 2} and me4F2dGal{sub 2} in the presence of the specific antibody indicate that the pyranose ring pucker of each galactose ring remains unchanged, but rotations about the glycosidic linkage occur upon binding to X24. Computer calculations indicate that there are two sets of torsion angles that satisfy the observed NMR constraints. A new method, based on changes in the fluorine longitudinal relaxation rate, is used to measure the ligand-antibody dissociation rate constant.

  14. The impact of Trichoderma reesei Cel7A carbohydrate binding domain mutations on its binding to a cellulose surface: a molecular dynamics free energy study.

    PubMed

    Li, Tong; Yan, Shihai; Yao, Lishan

    2012-04-01

    A critical role of the Family 7 cellobiohydrolase (Cel7A) carbohydrate binding domain (CBD) is to bind to a cellulose surface and increase the enzyme concentration on the surface. Several residues of Trichoderma reesei Cel7A CBD, including Y5, N29, Y31, Y32 and Q34, contribute to cellulose binding, as revealed by early experimental studies. To investigate the interactions between these important residues and cellulose, we applied a thermodynamic integration method to calculate the cellulose-Cel7A CBD binding free energy changes caused by Y5A, N29A, Y31A, Y32A and Q34A mutations. The experimental binding trend was successfully predicted, proving the effectiveness of the complex model. For the two polar residue mutants N29A and Q34A, the changes in the electrostatics are comparable to those of van der Waals, while for three Y to A mutants, the free energy differences mainly come from van der Waals interactions. However, in both cases, the electrostatics dominates the interactions between individual residues and cellulose. The side chains of these residues are rigidified after the complex is formed. The binding free energy changes for the two mutants Y5W and Y31W were also determined, and for these the van der Waals interaction was strengthened but the electrostatics was weakened.

  15. Examining the response of larch needle carbohydrates to climate using compound-specific δ13C and concentration analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinne, Katja T.; Saurer, Matthias; Kirdyanov, Alexander V.; Bryukhanova, Marina V.; Prokushkin, Anatoly S.; Churakova Sidorova, Olga V.; Siegwolf, Rolf T. W.

    2016-04-01

    Little is known about the dynamics of concentrations and carbon isotope ratios of individual carbohydrates in leaves in response to climatic and physiological factors. Improved knowledge of the isotopic ratio in sugars will enhance our understanding of the tree ring isotope ratio and will help to decipher environmental conditions in retrospect more reliably. Carbohydrate samples from larch (Larix gmelinii) needles of two sites in the continuous permafrost zone of Siberia with differing growth conditions were analysed with the Compound-Specific Isotope Analysis (CSIA). We compared concentrations and carbon isotope values (δ13C) of sucrose, fructose, glucose and pinitol combined with phenological data. The results for the variability of the needle carbohydrates show high dynamics with distinct seasonal characteristics between and within the studied years with a clear link to the climatic conditions, particularly vapour pressure deficit. Compound-specific differences in δ13C values as a response to climate were detected. The δ13C of pinitol, which contributes up to 50% of total soluble carbohydrates, was almost invariant during the whole growing season. Our study provides the first in-depth characterization of compound-specific needle carbohydrate isotope variability, identifies involved mechanisms and shows the potential of such results for linking tree physiological responses to different climatic conditions.

  16. Specific binding of beta-endorphin to normal human erythrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Chenet, B.; Hollis, V. Jr.; Kang, Y.; Simpkins, C.

    1986-03-05

    Beta-endorphin (BE) exhibits peripheral functions which may not be mediated by interactions with receptors in the brain. Recent studies have demonstrated binding of BE to both opioid and non-opioid receptors on lymphocytes and monocytes. Abood has reported specific binding of /sup 3/H-dihydromorphine in erythrocytes. Using 5 x 10/sup -11/M /sup 125/I-beta-endorphin and 10/sup -5/M unlabeled BE, they have detected 50% specific binding to human erythrocytes. This finding is supported by results from immunoelectron microscopy using rabbit anti-BE antibody and biotinylated secondary antibody with avidin-biotin complexes horseradish peroxidase. Binding is clearly observed and is confined to only one side of the cells. Conclusions: (1) BE binding to human erythrocytes was demonstrated by radioreceptor assay and immunoelectron microscopy, and (2) BE binding sites exist on only one side of the cells.

  17. Specific binding of lactoferrin to brush-border membrane: Ontogeny and effect of glycan chain

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, L.A.; Loennerdal, B. )

    1988-04-01

    Bioavailability of iron from human milk is exceptionally high. It has been suggested that lactoferrin, the major iron-binding protein in human milk, may participate in this high iron bioavailability from milk. The authors examined the interaction of lactoferrin with the intestinal brush-border membrane using the rhesus monkeys as a model. Brush-border membrane vesicles were prepared from monkeys of various ages. Binding studies with {sup 59}Fe-labeled human and monkey lactoferrin were performed to examine interaction of lactoferrin with the brush-border membrane. Specific saturable binding of lactoferrin was found at all ages studied. The dissociation constant for lactoferrin-receptor binding was 9 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} M. In contrast, no binding of serum transferrin or bovine lactoferrin occurred. Removal of fucose from the lactoferrin glycans resulted in a significant decrease in binding. It was concluded that lactoferrin in milk may function in the process of iron absorption through interaction with a small intestinal receptor and that fucosylated glycans on the carbohydrate chain of lactoferrin are necessary for receptor recognition.

  18. Sequence-Specific DNA Binding by a Short Peptide Dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talanian, Robert V.; McKnight, C. James; Kim, Peter S.

    1990-08-01

    A recently described class of DNA binding proteins is characterized by the "bZIP" motif, which consists of a basic region that contacts DNA and an adjacent "leucine zipper" that mediates protein dimerization. A peptide model for the basic region of the yeast transcriptional activator GCN4 has been developed in which the leucine zipper has been replaced by a disulfide bond. The 34-residue peptide dimer, but not the reduced monomer, binds DNA with nanomolar affinity at 4^circC. DNA binding is sequence-specific as judged by deoxyribonuclease I footprinting. Circular dichroism spectroscopy suggests that the peptide adopts a helical structure when bound to DNA. These results demonstrate directly that the GCN4 basic region is sufficient for sequence-specific DNA binding and suggest that a major function of the GCN4 leucine zipper is simply to mediate protein dimerization. Our approach provides a strategy for the design of short sequence-specific DNA binding peptides.

  19. Carbohydrate-Dependent Binding of Langerin to SodC, a Cell Wall Glycoprotein of Mycobacterium leprae

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee Jin; Brennan, Patrick J.; Heaslip, Darragh; Udey, Mark C.; Modlin, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    Langerhans cells participate in the immune response in leprosy by their ability to activate T cells that recognize the pathogen, Mycobacterium leprae, in a langerin-dependent manner. We hypothesized that langerin, the distinguishing C-type lectin of Langerhans cells, would recognize the highly mannosylated structures in pathogenic Mycobacterium spp. The coding region for the extracellular and neck domain of human langerin was cloned and expressed to produce a recombinant active trimeric form of human langerin (r-langerin). Binding assays performed in microtiter plates, by two-dimensional (2D) Western blotting, and by surface plasmon resonance demonstrated that r-langerin possessed carbohydrate-dependent affinity to glycoproteins in the cell wall of M. leprae. This lectin, however, yielded less binding to mannose-capped lipoarabinomannan (ManLAM) and even lower levels of binding to phosphatidylinositol mannosides. However, the superoxide dismutase C (SodC) protein of the M. leprae cell wall was identified as a langerin-reactive ligand. Tandem mass spectrometry verified the glycosylation of a recombinant form of M. leprae SodC (rSodC) produced in Mycobacterium smegmatis. Analysis of r-langerin affinity by surface plasmon resonance revealed a carbohydrate-dependent affinity of rSodC (equilibrium dissociation constant [KD] = 0.862 μM) that was 20-fold greater than for M. leprae ManLAM (KD = 18.69 μM). These data strongly suggest that a subset of the presumptively mannosylated M. leprae glycoproteins act as ligands for langerin and may facilitate the interaction of M. leprae with Langerhans cells. PMID:25422308

  20. Affinity Purification of Sequence-Specific DNA Binding Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadonaga, James T.; Tjian, Robert

    1986-08-01

    We describe a method for affinity purification of sequence-specific DNA binding proteins that is fast and effective. Complementary chemically synthesized oligodeoxynucleotides that contain a recognition site for a sequence-specific DNA binding protein are annealed and ligated to give oligomers. This DNA is then covalently coupled to Sepharose CL-2B with cyanogen bromide to yield the affinity resin. A partially purified protein fraction is combined with competitor DNA and subsequently passed through the DNA-Sepharose resin. The desired sequence-specific DNA binding protein is purified because it preferentially binds to the recognition sites in the affinity resin rather than to the nonspecific competitor DNA in solution. For example, a protein fraction that is enriched for transcription factor Sp1 can be further purified 500- to 1000-fold by two sequential affinity chromatography steps to give Sp1 of an estimated 90% homogeneity with 30% yield. In addition, the use of tandem affinity columns containing different protein binding sites allows the simultaneous purification of multiple DNA binding proteins from the same extract. This method provides a means for the purification of rare sequence-specific DNA binding proteins, such as Sp1 and CAAT-binding transcription factor.

  1. Characterizing carbohydrate-protein interactions by NMR

    PubMed Central

    Bewley, Carole A.; Shahzad-ul-Hussan, Syed

    2013-01-01

    Interactions between proteins and soluble carbohydrates and/or surface displayed glycans are central to countless recognition, attachment and signaling events in biology. The physical chemical features associated with these binding events vary considerably, depending on the biological system of interest. For example, carbohydrate-protein interactions can be stoichiometric or multivalent, the protein receptors can be monomeric or oligomeric, and the specificity of recognition can be highly stringent or rather promiscuous. Equilibrium dissociation constants for carbohydrate binding are known to vary from micromolar to millimolar, with weak interactions being far more prevalent; and individual carbohydrate binding sites can be truly symmetrical or merely homologous, and hence, the affinities of individual sites within a single protein can vary, as can the order of binding. Several factors, including the weak affinities with which glycans bind their protein receptors, the dynamic nature of the glycans themselves, and the non-equivalent interactions among oligomeric carbohydrate receptors, have made NMR an especially powerful tool for studying and defining carbohydrate-protein interactions. Here we describe those NMR approaches that have proven to be the most robust in characterizing these systems, and explain what type of information can (or cannot) be obtained from each. Our goal is to provide to the reader the information necessary for selecting the correct experiment or sets of experiments to characterize their carbohydrate-protein interaction of interest. PMID:23784792

  2. Pulmonary surfactant protein A (SP-A) specifically binds dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine

    SciTech Connect

    Kuroki, Y.; Akino, T. )

    1991-02-15

    Phospholipids are the major components of pulmonary surfactant. Dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine is believed to be especially essential for the surfactant function of reducing the surface tension at the air-liquid interface. Surfactant protein A (SP-A) with a reduced denatured molecular mass of 26-38 kDa, characterized by a collagen-like structure and N-linked glycosylation, interacts strongly with a mixture of surfactant-like phospholipids. In the present study the direct binding of SP-A to phospholipids on a thin layer chromatogram was visualized using 125I-SP-A as a probe, so that the phospholipid specificities of SP-A binding and the structural requirements of SP-A and phospholipids for the binding could be examined. Although 125I-SP-A bound phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyeline, it was especially strong in binding dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, but failed to bind phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylethanolamine, and phosphatidylserine. Labeled SP-A also exhibited strong binding to distearoylphosphatidylcholine, but weak binding to dimyristoyl-, 1-palmitoyl-2-linoleoyl-, and dilinoleoylphosphatidylcholine. Unlabeled SP-A readily competed with labeled SP-A for phospholipid binding. SP-A strongly bound dipalmitoylglycerol produced by phospholipase C treatment of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, but not palmitic acid. This protein also failed to bind lysophosphatidylcholine produced by phospholipase A2 treatment of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine. 125I-SP-A shows almost no binding to dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol and dipalmitoylphosphatidylethanolamine. The addition of 10 mM EGTA into the binding buffer reduced much of the 125I-SP-A binding to phospholipids. Excess deglycosylated SP-A competed with labeled SP-A for binding to dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, but the excess collagenase-resistant fragment of SP-A failed.

  3. Low or No Inhibitory Potency of the Canonical Galectin Carbohydrate-binding Site by Pectins and Galactomannans*

    PubMed Central

    Lepur, Adriana; Kahl-Knutson, Barbro; Aguilar-Moncayo, Matilde; Klyosov, Anatole A.; Field, Robert A.; Oredsson, Stina; Nilsson, Ulf J.

    2016-01-01

    Some complex plant-derived polysaccharides, such as modified citrus pectins and galactomannans, have been shown to have promising anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer effects. Most reports propose or claim that these effects are due to interaction of the polysaccharides with galectins because the polysaccharides contain galactose-containing side chains that might bind this class of lectin. However, their direct binding to and/or inhibition of the evolutionarily conserved galactoside-binding site of galectins has not been demonstrated. Using a well established fluorescence anisotropy assay, we tested the direct interaction of several such polysaccharides with physiological concentrations of a panel of galectins. The bioactive pectic samples tested were very poor inhibitors of the canonical galactoside-binding site for the tested galectins, with IC50 values >10 mg/ml for a few or in most cases no inhibitory activity at all. The galactomannan Davanat® was more active, albeit not a strong inhibitor (IC50 values ranging from 3 to 20 mg/ml depending on the galectin). Pure synthetic oligosaccharide fragments found in the side chains and backbone of pectins and galactomannans were additionally tested. The most commonly found galactan configuration in pectins had no inhibition of the galectins tested. Galactosylated tri- and pentamannosides, representing the structure of Davanat®, had an inhibitory effect of galectins comparable with that of free galactose. Further evaluation using cell-based assays, indirectly linked to galectin-3 inhibition, showed no inhibition of galectin-3 by the polysaccharides. These data suggest that the physiological effects of these plant polysaccharides are not due to inhibition of the canonical galectin carbohydrate-binding site. PMID:27129206

  4. Response to strict and liberalized specific carbohydrate diet in pediatric Crohn’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Burgis, Jennifer C; Nguyen, Kaylie; Park, KT; Cox, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the specific carbohydrate diet (SCD) as nutritional therapy for maintenance of remission in pediatric Crohn’s disease (CD). METHODS: Retrospective chart review was conducted in 11 pediatric patients with CD who initiated the SCD as therapy at time of diagnosis or flare. Two groups defined as SCD simple (diet alone, antibiotics or 5-ASA) or SCD with immunomodulators (corticosteroids and/or stable thiopurine dosing) were followed for one year and compared on disease characteristics, laboratory values and anthropometrics. RESULTS: The mean age at start of the SCD was 11.8 ± 3.0 years (range 6.6-17.6 years) with five patients starting the SCD within 5 wk of diagnosis. Three patients maintained a strict SCD diet for the study period and the mean time for liberalization was 7.7 ± 4.0 mo (range 1-12) for the remaining patients. In both groups, hematocrit, albumin and ESR values improved while on strict SCD and appeared stable after liberalization (P-value 0.006, 0.002, 0.002 respectively). The majority of children gained in weight and height percentile while on strict SCD, with small loss in weight percentile documented with liberalization. CONCLUSION: Disease control may be attainable with the SCD in pediatric CD. Further studies are needed to assess adherence, impact on mucosal healing and growth. PMID:26877615

  5. The ingestion of combined carbohydrates does not alter metabolic responses or performance capacity during soccer-specific exercise in the heat compared to ingestion of a single carbohydrate.

    PubMed

    Clarke, N D; Campbell, I T; Drust, B; Evans, L; Reilly, T; Maclaren, D P M

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effect of ingesting a glucose plus fructose solution on the metabolic responses to soccer-specific exercise in the heat and the impact on subsequent exercise capacity. Eleven male soccer players performed a 90 min soccer-specific protocol on three occasions. Either 3 ml · kg(-1) body mass of a solution containing glucose (1 g · min(-1) glucose) (GLU), or glucose (0.66 g · min(-1)) plus fructose (0.33 g · min(-1)) (MIX) or placebo (PLA) was consumed every 15 minutes. Respiratory measures were undertaken at 15-min intervals, blood samples were drawn at rest, half-time and on completion of the protocol, and muscle glycogen concentration was assessed pre- and post-exercise. Following the soccer-specific protocol the Cunningham and Faulkner test was performed. No significant differences in post-exercise muscle glycogen concentration (PLA, 62.99 ± 8.39 mmol · kg wet weight(-1); GLU 68.62 ± 2.70; mmol · kg wet weight(-1) and MIX 76.63 ± 6.92 mmol · kg wet weight(-1)) or exercise capacity (PLA, 73.62 ± 8.61 s; GLU, 77.11 ± 7.17 s; MIX, 83.04 ± 9.65 s) were observed between treatments (P > 0.05). However, total carbohydrate oxidation was significantly increased during MIX compared with PLA (P < 0.05). These results suggest that when ingested in moderate amounts, the type of carbohydrate does not influence metabolism during soccer-specific intermittent exercise or affect performance capacity after exercise in the heat.

  6. Organic solvents identify specific ligand binding sites on protein surfaces.

    PubMed

    Liepinsh, E; Otting, G

    1997-03-01

    Enzymes frequently recognize substrates and pharmaceutical drugs through specific binding interactions in deep pockets on the protein surface. We show how the specificity-determining substrate binding site of hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL) can be readily identified in aqueous solution by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy using small organic solvent molecules as detection probes. Exchange of magnetization between the 1H nuclei of the protein and the ligands through dipole-dipole interactions is observed which allows the modeling of their position and orientation at the binding site. Combined with site-specific binding constants measured by titration experiments with different organic solvents, the method can provide important information for rational drug design. In addition, the lifetime of nonspecific interactions of HEWL with organic solvents is shown to be in the sub-nanosecond time range. PMID:9062927

  7. TAL Effector DNA-Binding Principles and Specificity.

    PubMed

    Richter, Annekatrin; Streubel, Jana; Boch, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) are proteins with a unique DNA-binding domain that confers both a predictable and programmable specificity. The DNA-binding domain consists typically of 34-amino acid near-identical repeats. The repeats form a right-handed superhelical structure that wraps around the DNA double helix and exposes the variable amino acids at position 13 of each repeat to the sense strand DNA bases. Each repeat binds one base in a highly specific, non-overlapping, and comma-free fashion. Although TALE specificities are encoded in a simple way, sophisticated rules can be taken into account to build highly efficient DNA-binding modules for biotechnological use. PMID:26443210

  8. TAL Effector DNA-Binding Principles and Specificity.

    PubMed

    Richter, Annekatrin; Streubel, Jana; Boch, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) are proteins with a unique DNA-binding domain that confers both a predictable and programmable specificity. The DNA-binding domain consists typically of 34-amino acid near-identical repeats. The repeats form a right-handed superhelical structure that wraps around the DNA double helix and exposes the variable amino acids at position 13 of each repeat to the sense strand DNA bases. Each repeat binds one base in a highly specific, non-overlapping, and comma-free fashion. Although TALE specificities are encoded in a simple way, sophisticated rules can be taken into account to build highly efficient DNA-binding modules for biotechnological use.

  9. Overexpression of the carbohydrate binding module of strawberry expansin2 in Arabidopsis thaliana modifies plant growth and cell wall metabolism.

    PubMed

    Nardi, Cristina F; Villarreal, Natalia M; Rossi, Franco R; Martínez, Santiago; Martínez, Gustavo A; Civello, Pedro M

    2015-05-01

    Several cell wall enzymes are carbohydrate active enzymes that contain a putative Carbohydrate Binding Module (CBM) in their structures. The main function of these non-catalitic modules is to facilitate the interaction between the enzyme and its substrate. Expansins are non-hydrolytic proteins present in the cell wall, and their structure includes a CBM in the C-terminal that bind to cell wall polymers such as cellulose, hemicelluloses and pectins. We studied the ability of the Expansin2 CBM (CBMFaEXP2) from strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa, Duch) to modify the cell wall of Arabidopsis thaliana. Plants overexpressing CBMFaEXP2 were characterized phenotypically and biochemically. Transgenic plants were taller than wild type, possibly owing to a faster growth of the main stem. Cell walls of CBMFaEXP2-expressing plants were thicker and contained higher amount of pectins. Lower activity of a set of enzymes involved in cell wall degradation (PG, β-Gal, β-Xyl) was found, and the expression of the corresponding genes (AtPG, Atβ-Gal, Atβ-Xyl5) was reduced also. In addition, a decrease in the expression of two A. thaliana Expansin genes (AtEXP5 and AtEXP8) was observed. Transgenic plants were more resistant to Botrytis cinerea infection than wild type, possibly as a consequence of higher cell wall integrity. Our results support the hypothesis that the overexpression of a putative CBM is able to modify plant cell wall structure leading to modulation of wall loosening and plant growth. These findings might offer a tool to controlling physiological processes where cell wall disassembly is relevant, such as fruit softening. PMID:25837738

  10. Overexpression of the carbohydrate binding module of strawberry expansin2 in Arabidopsis thaliana modifies plant growth and cell wall metabolism.

    PubMed

    Nardi, Cristina F; Villarreal, Natalia M; Rossi, Franco R; Martínez, Santiago; Martínez, Gustavo A; Civello, Pedro M

    2015-05-01

    Several cell wall enzymes are carbohydrate active enzymes that contain a putative Carbohydrate Binding Module (CBM) in their structures. The main function of these non-catalitic modules is to facilitate the interaction between the enzyme and its substrate. Expansins are non-hydrolytic proteins present in the cell wall, and their structure includes a CBM in the C-terminal that bind to cell wall polymers such as cellulose, hemicelluloses and pectins. We studied the ability of the Expansin2 CBM (CBMFaEXP2) from strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa, Duch) to modify the cell wall of Arabidopsis thaliana. Plants overexpressing CBMFaEXP2 were characterized phenotypically and biochemically. Transgenic plants were taller than wild type, possibly owing to a faster growth of the main stem. Cell walls of CBMFaEXP2-expressing plants were thicker and contained higher amount of pectins. Lower activity of a set of enzymes involved in cell wall degradation (PG, β-Gal, β-Xyl) was found, and the expression of the corresponding genes (AtPG, Atβ-Gal, Atβ-Xyl5) was reduced also. In addition, a decrease in the expression of two A. thaliana Expansin genes (AtEXP5 and AtEXP8) was observed. Transgenic plants were more resistant to Botrytis cinerea infection than wild type, possibly as a consequence of higher cell wall integrity. Our results support the hypothesis that the overexpression of a putative CBM is able to modify plant cell wall structure leading to modulation of wall loosening and plant growth. These findings might offer a tool to controlling physiological processes where cell wall disassembly is relevant, such as fruit softening.

  11. Computational Analysis of the Binding Specificities of PH Domains

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhi; Liang, Zhongjie; Shen, Bairong; Hu, Guang

    2015-01-01

    Pleckstrin homology (PH) domains share low sequence identities but extremely conserved structures. They have been found in many proteins for cellular signal-dependent membrane targeting by binding inositol phosphates to perform different physiological functions. In order to understand the sequence-structure relationship and binding specificities of PH domains, quantum mechanical (QM) calculations and sequence-based combined with structure-based binding analysis were employed in our research. In the structural aspect, the binding specificities were shown to correlate with the hydropathy characteristics of PH domains and electrostatic properties of the bound inositol phosphates. By comparing these structure properties with sequence-based profiles of physicochemical properties, PH domains can be classified into four functional subgroups according to their binding specificities and affinities to inositol phosphates. The method not only provides a simple and practical paradigm to predict binding specificities for functional genomic research but also gives new insight into the understanding of the basis of diseases with respect to PH domain structures. PMID:26881206

  12. Solution structure and binding specificity of the p63 DNA binding domain

    PubMed Central

    Enthart, Andreas; Klein, Christian; Dehner, Alexander; Coles, Murray; Gemmecker, Gerd; Kessler, Horst; Hagn, Franz

    2016-01-01

    p63 is a close homologue of p53 and, together with p73, is grouped into the p53 family of transcription factors. p63 is known to be involved in the induction of controlled apoptosis important for differentiation processes, germ line integrity and development. Despite its high homology to p53, especially within the DNA binding domain (DBD), p63-DBD does not show cooperative DNA binding properties and is significantly more stable against thermal and chemical denaturation. Here, we determined the solution structure of p63-DBD and show that it is markedly less dynamic than p53-DBD. In addition, we also investigate the effect of a double salt bridge present in p53-DBD, but not in p63-DBD on the cooperative binding behavior and specificity to various DNA sites. Restoration of the salt bridges in p63-DBD by mutagenesis leads to enhanced binding affinity to p53-specific, but not p63-specific response elements. Furthermore, we show that p63-DBD is capable of binding to anti-apoptotic BclxL via its DNA binding interface, a feature that has only been shown for p53 so far. These data suggest that all p53 family members - despite alterations in the specificity and binding affinity - are capable of activating pro-apoptotic pathways in a tissue specific manner. PMID:27225672

  13. Solution structure and binding specificity of the p63 DNA binding domain.

    PubMed

    Enthart, Andreas; Klein, Christian; Dehner, Alexander; Coles, Murray; Gemmecker, Gerd; Kessler, Horst; Hagn, Franz

    2016-01-01

    p63 is a close homologue of p53 and, together with p73, is grouped into the p53 family of transcription factors. p63 is known to be involved in the induction of controlled apoptosis important for differentiation processes, germ line integrity and development. Despite its high homology to p53, especially within the DNA binding domain (DBD), p63-DBD does not show cooperative DNA binding properties and is significantly more stable against thermal and chemical denaturation. Here, we determined the solution structure of p63-DBD and show that it is markedly less dynamic than p53-DBD. In addition, we also investigate the effect of a double salt bridge present in p53-DBD, but not in p63-DBD on the cooperative binding behavior and specificity to various DNA sites. Restoration of the salt bridges in p63-DBD by mutagenesis leads to enhanced binding affinity to p53-specific, but not p63-specific response elements. Furthermore, we show that p63-DBD is capable of binding to anti-apoptotic BclxL via its DNA binding interface, a feature that has only been shown for p53 so far. These data suggest that all p53 family members - despite alterations in the specificity and binding affinity - are capable of activating pro-apoptotic pathways in a tissue specific manner. PMID:27225672

  14. Inhibition of cell-to-cell transmission of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 in vitro by carbohydrate-binding agents.

    PubMed

    Balestrieri, Emanuela; Ascolani, Arianna; Igarashi, Yasuhiro; Oki, Toshikazu; Mastino, Antonio; Balzarini, Jan; Macchi, Beatrice

    2008-08-01

    Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from healthy individuals can be infected by human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) upon cocultivation of the PBMCs with irradiated HTLV-1-transformed human MT-2 cells. This model system closely mimics HTLV-1 transmission through cell-to-cell contact. Carbohydrate-binding agents (CBAs) such as the alpha(1,3)/alpha(1,6)mannose-specific Hippeastrum hybrid agglutinin and the GlcNAc-specific Urtica dioica agglutinin, and also the small, nonpeptidic alpha(1,2)-mannose-specific antibiotic pradimicin A, were able to efficiently prevent cell-to-cell HTLV-1 transmission at nontoxic concentrations, as evidenced by the lack of appearance of virus-specific mRNA and of the viral protein Tax in the acceptor cells. Consistently, antivirally active doses of CBAs fully prevented HTLV-1-induced stimulation of PBMC growth. The inhibitory effects of CBAs on HTLV-1 transmission were also evident when HTLV-1-infected C5MJ cells were used in place of MT-2 cells as a virus donor cell line. The anti-HTLV-1 properties of the CBAs highlight the importance of the envelope glycans in events underlying HTLV-1 passage from cell to cell and indicate that CBAs should be further investigated for their potential to prevent HTLV-1 infection, including mother-to-child virus transmission by cell-to-cell contact through breast milk feeding. PMID:18505856

  15. Probing carbohydrate product expulsion from a processive cellulase with multiple absolute binding free energy methods.

    PubMed

    Bu, Lintao; Beckham, Gregg T; Shirts, Michael R; Nimlos, Mark R; Adney, William S; Himmel, Michael E; Crowley, Michael F

    2011-05-20

    Understanding the enzymatic mechanism that cellulases employ to degrade cellulose is critical to efforts to efficiently utilize plant biomass as a sustainable energy resource. A key component of cellulase action on cellulose is product inhibition from monosaccharide and disaccharides in the product site of cellulase tunnel. The absolute binding free energy of cellobiose and glucose to the product site of the catalytic tunnel of the Family 7 cellobiohydrolase (Cel7A) of Trichoderma reesei (Hypocrea jecorina) was calculated using two different approaches: steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations and alchemical free energy perturbation molecular dynamics (FEP/MD) simulations. For the SMD approach, three methods based on Jarzynski's equality were used to construct the potential of mean force from multiple pulling trajectories. The calculated binding free energies, -14.4 kcal/mol using SMD and -11.2 kcal/mol using FEP/MD, are in good qualitative agreement. Analysis of the SMD pulling trajectories suggests that several protein residues (Arg-251, Asp-259, Asp-262, Trp-376, and Tyr-381) play key roles in cellobiose and glucose binding to the catalytic tunnel. Five mutations (R251A, D259A, D262A, W376A, and Y381A) were made computationally to measure the changes in free energy during the product expulsion process. The absolute binding free energies of cellobiose to the catalytic tunnel of these five mutants are -13.1, -6.0, -11.5, -7.5, and -8.8 kcal/mol, respectively. The results demonstrated that all of the mutants tested can lower the binding free energy of cellobiose, which provides potential applications in engineering the enzyme to accelerate the product expulsion process and improve the efficiency of biomass conversion. PMID:21454590

  16. Probing Carbohydrate Product Expulsion from a Processive Cellulase with Multiple Absolute Binding Free Energy Methods*

    PubMed Central

    Bu, Lintao; Beckham, Gregg T.; Shirts, Michael R.; Nimlos, Mark R.; Adney, William S.; Himmel, Michael E.; Crowley, Michael F.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the enzymatic mechanism that cellulases employ to degrade cellulose is critical to efforts to efficiently utilize plant biomass as a sustainable energy resource. A key component of cellulase action on cellulose is product inhibition from monosaccharide and disaccharides in the product site of cellulase tunnel. The absolute binding free energy of cellobiose and glucose to the product site of the catalytic tunnel of the Family 7 cellobiohydrolase (Cel7A) of Trichoderma reesei (Hypocrea jecorina) was calculated using two different approaches: steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations and alchemical free energy perturbation molecular dynamics (FEP/MD) simulations. For the SMD approach, three methods based on Jarzynski's equality were used to construct the potential of mean force from multiple pulling trajectories. The calculated binding free energies, −14.4 kcal/mol using SMD and −11.2 kcal/mol using FEP/MD, are in good qualitative agreement. Analysis of the SMD pulling trajectories suggests that several protein residues (Arg-251, Asp-259, Asp-262, Trp-376, and Tyr-381) play key roles in cellobiose and glucose binding to the catalytic tunnel. Five mutations (R251A, D259A, D262A, W376A, and Y381A) were made computationally to measure the changes in free energy during the product expulsion process. The absolute binding free energies of cellobiose to the catalytic tunnel of these five mutants are −13.1, −6.0, −11.5, −7.5, and −8.8 kcal/mol, respectively. The results demonstrated that all of the mutants tested can lower the binding free energy of cellobiose, which provides potential applications in engineering the enzyme to accelerate the product expulsion process and improve the efficiency of biomass conversion. PMID:21454590

  17. Quantification of Cooperativity in Heterodimer-DNA Binding Improves the Accuracy of Binding Specificity Models*

    PubMed Central

    Isakova, Alina; Berset, Yves; Hatzimanikatis, Vassily; Deplancke, Bart

    2016-01-01

    Many transcription factors (TFs) have the ability to cooperate on DNA elements as heterodimers. Despite the significance of TF heterodimerization for gene regulation, a quantitative understanding of cooperativity between various TF dimer partners and its impact on heterodimer DNA binding specificity models is still lacking. Here, we used a novel integrative approach, combining microfluidics-steered measurements of dimer-DNA assembly with mechanistic modeling of the implicated protein-protein-DNA interactions to quantitatively interrogate the cooperative DNA binding behavior of the adipogenic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ):retinoid X receptor α (RXRα) heterodimer. Using the high throughput MITOMI (mechanically induced trapping of molecular interactions) platform, we derived equilibrium DNA binding data for PPARγ, RXRα, as well as the PPARγ:RXRα heterodimer to more than 300 target DNA sites and variants thereof. We then quantified cooperativity underlying heterodimer-DNA binding and derived an integrative heterodimer DNA binding constant. Using this cooperativity-inclusive constant, we were able to build a heterodimer-DNA binding specificity model that has superior predictive power than the one based on a regular one-site equilibrium. Our data further revealed that individual nucleotide substitutions within the target site affect the extent of cooperativity in PPARγ:RXRα-DNA binding. Our study therefore emphasizes the importance of assessing cooperativity when generating DNA binding specificity models for heterodimers. PMID:26912662

  18. Coupled Folding and Specific Binding: Fishing for Amphiphilicity

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Vikas P.; Tu, Raymond S.

    2011-01-01

    Proteins are uniquely capable of identifying targets with unparalleled selectivity, but, in addition to the precision of the binding phenomenon, nature has the ability to find its targets exceptionally quickly. Transcription factors for instance can bind to a specific sequence of nucleic acids from a soup of similar, but not identical DNA strands, on a timescale of seconds. This is only possible with the enhanced kinetics provided for by a natively disordered structure, where protein folding and binding are cooperative processes. The secondary structures of many proteins are disordered under physiological conditions. Subsequently, the disordered structures fold into ordered structures only when they bind to their specific targets. Induced folding of the protein has two key biological advantages. First, flexible unstructured domains can result in an intrinsic plasticity that allows them to accommodate targets of various size and shape. And, second, the dynamics of this folding process can result in enhanced binding kinetics. Several groups have hypothesized the acceleration of binding kinetics is due to induced folding where a “fly-casting” effect has been shown to break the diffusion-limited rate of binding. This review describes experimental results in rationally designed peptide systems where the folding is coupled to amphiphilicity and biomolecular activity. PMID:21673899

  19. Specific serum binding of morphine, levorphanol and heroin

    PubMed Central

    Herndon, B. L.; Baeder, D. H.; Ringle, D. A.

    1976-01-01

    Effects of repeated subcutaneous pellet implantation of a series of narcotic drugs on the serum binding of [14C]morphine was studied in rabbits. Three of the compounds, morphine, heroin and levorphanol, elicited production of a morphine-binding globulin in the implanted rabbits. This serum response did not occur with several other compounds tested, including the potent analgesic methadone, and the narcotic antagonist naloxone. The time course of production of this globulin response, as well as the specificity of the binding for the drug that induced the response are both characteristic of an immunological reaction.

  20. Carbohydrate-binding agents cause deletions of highly conserved glycosylation sites in HIV GP120: a new therapeutic concept to hit the achilles heel of HIV.

    PubMed

    Balzarini, Jan; Van Laethem, Kristel; Hatse, Sigrid; Froeyen, Matheus; Peumans, Willy; Van Damme, Els; Schols, Dominique

    2005-12-01

    Mannose-binding proteins derived from several plants (i.e. Hippeastrum hybrid and Galanthus nivalis agglutinin) or prokaryotes (i.e. cyanovirin-N) inhibit human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) replication and select for drug-resistant viruses that show profound deletion of N-glycosylation sites in the GP120 envelope (Balzarini, J., Van Laethem, K., Hatse, S., Vermeire, K., De Clercq, E., Peumans, W., Van Damme, E., Vandamme, A.-M., Bolmstedt, A., and Schols, D. (2004) J. Virol. 78, 10617-10627; Balzarini, J., Van Laethem, K., Hatse, S., Froeyen, M., Van Damme, E., Bolmstedt, A., Peumans, W., De Clercq, E., and Schols, D. (2005) Mol. Pharmacol. 67, 1556-1565). Here we demonstrated that the N-acetylglucosamine-binding protein from Urtica dioica (UDA) prevents HIV entry and eventually selects for viruses in which conserved N-glycosylation sites in GP120 were deleted. In contrast to the mannose-binding proteins, which have a 50-100-fold decreased antiviral activity against the UDA-exposed mutant viruses, UDA has decreased anti-HIV activity to a very limited extent, even against those mutant virus strains that lack at least 9 of 22 ( approximately 40%) glycosylation sites in their GP120 envelope. Therefore, UDA represents the prototype of a new conceptual class of carbohydrate-binding agents with an unusually specific and targeted drug resistance profile. It forces HIV to escape drug pressure by deleting the indispensable glycans on its GP120, thereby obligatorily exposing previously hidden immunogenic epitopes on its envelope.

  1. Specific binding of atrial natriuretic factor in brain microvessels

    SciTech Connect

    Chabrier, P.E.; Roubert, P.; Braquet, P.

    1987-04-01

    Cerebral capillaries constitute the blood-brain barrier. Studies of specific receptors (neurotransmitters or hormones) located on this structure can be performed by means of radioligand-binding techniques on isolated brain microvessels. The authors examined on pure bovine cerebral microvessel preparations the binding of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF), using /sup 125/I-labeled ANF. Saturation and competition experiments demonstrated the presence of a single class of ANF-binding sites with high affinity and with a binding capacity of 58 fmol/mg of protein. The binding of /sup 125/I-labeled ANF to brain microvessels is specific, reversible, and time dependent, as is shown by association-dissociation experiments. The demonstration of specific ANF-binding sites on brain microvessels supposes a physiological role of ANF on brain microvasculature. The coexistence of ANF and angiotensin II receptors on this cerebrovascular tissue suggests that the two circulating peptides may act as mutual antagonists in the regulation of brain microcirculation and/or blood-brain barrier function.

  2. Non-DNA-binding cofactors enhance DNA-binding specificity of a transcriptional regulatory complex.

    PubMed

    Siggers, Trevor; Duyzend, Michael H; Reddy, Jessica; Khan, Sidra; Bulyk, Martha L

    2011-12-06

    Recruitment of cofactors to specific DNA sites is integral for specificity in gene regulation. As a model system, we examined how targeting and transcriptional control of the sulfur metabolism genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is governed by recruitment of the transcriptional co-activator Met4. We developed genome-scale approaches to measure transcription factor (TF) DNA-binding affinities and cofactor recruitment to >1300 genomic binding site sequences. We report that genes responding to the TF Cbf1 and cofactor Met28 contain a novel 'recruitment motif' (RYAAT), adjacent to Cbf1 binding sites, which enhances the binding of a Met4-Met28-Cbf1 regulatory complex, and that abrogation of this motif significantly reduces gene induction under low-sulfur conditions. Furthermore, we show that correct recognition of this composite motif requires both non-DNA-binding cofactors Met4 and Met28. Finally, we demonstrate that the presence of an RYAAT motif next to a Cbf1 site, rather than Cbf1 binding affinity, specifies Cbf1-dependent sulfur metabolism genes. Our results highlight the need to examine TF/cofactor complexes, as novel specificity can result from cofactors that lack intrinsic DNA-binding specificity.

  3. Cloning, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray studies of a carbohydrate-binding module from family 64 (StX).

    PubMed

    Campos, Bruna Medeia; Liberato, Marcelo Vizona; Polikarpov, Igor; Zeri, Ana Carolina de Mattos; Squina, Fabio Marcio

    2015-03-01

    In recent years, biofuels have attracted great interest as a source of renewable energy owing to the growing global demand for energy, the dependence on fossil fuels, limited natural resources and environmental pollution. However, the cost-effective production of biofuels from plant biomass is still a challenge. In this context, the study of carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs), which are involved in guiding the catalytic domains of glycoside hydrolases to polysaccharides, is crucial for enzyme development. Aiming at the structural and functional characterization of novel CBMs involved in plant polysaccharide deconstruction, an analysis of the CAZy database was performed and CBM family 64 was chosen owing to its capacity to bind with high specificity to microcrystalline cellulose and to the fact that is found in thermophilic microorganisms. In this communication, the CBM-encoding module named StX was expressed, purified and crystallized, and X-ray diffraction data were collected from native and derivatized crystals to 1.8 and 2.0 Å resolution, respectively. The crystals, which were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method, belonged to space group P3121, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 43.42, c = 100.96 Å for the native form. The phases were found using the single-wavelength anomalous diffraction method.

  4. Cloning, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray studies of a carbohydrate-binding module from family 64 (StX).

    PubMed

    Campos, Bruna Medeia; Liberato, Marcelo Vizona; Polikarpov, Igor; Zeri, Ana Carolina de Mattos; Squina, Fabio Marcio

    2015-03-01

    In recent years, biofuels have attracted great interest as a source of renewable energy owing to the growing global demand for energy, the dependence on fossil fuels, limited natural resources and environmental pollution. However, the cost-effective production of biofuels from plant biomass is still a challenge. In this context, the study of carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs), which are involved in guiding the catalytic domains of glycoside hydrolases to polysaccharides, is crucial for enzyme development. Aiming at the structural and functional characterization of novel CBMs involved in plant polysaccharide deconstruction, an analysis of the CAZy database was performed and CBM family 64 was chosen owing to its capacity to bind with high specificity to microcrystalline cellulose and to the fact that is found in thermophilic microorganisms. In this communication, the CBM-encoding module named StX was expressed, purified and crystallized, and X-ray diffraction data were collected from native and derivatized crystals to 1.8 and 2.0 Å resolution, respectively. The crystals, which were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method, belonged to space group P3121, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 43.42, c = 100.96 Å for the native form. The phases were found using the single-wavelength anomalous diffraction method. PMID:25760706

  5. Exploring the interactions between bacteriophage-encoded glycan binding proteins and carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Simpson, David J; Sacher, Jessica C; Szymanski, Christine M

    2015-10-01

    There is an unprecedented interest in glycobiology due to the increasing appreciation of its impact on all aspects of life. Likewise, bacteriophage biology is enjoying a new renaissance as the post-antibiotic era fuels the search for novel ways to control harmful bacteria. Phages have spent the last 3 billion years developing ways of recognizing and manipulating bacterial surface glycans. Therefore, phages comprise a massive reservoir of glycan-binding and -hydrolyzing proteins with the potential to be exploited for glycan analysis, bacterial diagnostics and therapeutics. We discuss phage tail proteins that recognize bacterial surface polysaccharides, endolysins that bind and cleave peptidoglycan, Ig-like proteins that attach to mucin glycans, and phage effector proteins that recognize both bacterial and eukaryotic oligosaccharides.

  6. Alpha-galactosidase stimulates acetylcholine receptor aggregation in skeletal muscle cells via PNA-binding carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Parkhomovskiy, N; Martin, P T

    2000-04-21

    Aggregation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) in skeletal muscle is an essential step in the formation of the mammalian neuromuscular junction. While proteins that bind to myotube receptors such as agrin and laminin can stimulate AChR aggregation in cultured myotubes, removal of cell surface sialic acids stimulates aggregation in a ligand-independent manner. Here, we show that removal of cell surface alpha-galactosides also stimulates AChR aggregation in the absence of added laminin or agrin. AChR aggregation stimulated by alpha-galactosidase was blocked by peanut agglutinin (PNA), which binds to lactosamine-containing disaccharides, but not by the GalNAc-binding lectin Vicia villosa agglutinin (VVA-B4). AChR aggregation stimulated by alpha-galactosidase potentiated AChR clustering induced by either neural agrin or laminin-1 and could be inhibited by muscle agrin. These data suggest that capping of cell surface lactosamines or N-acetyllactosamines with alpha-galactose affects AChR aggregation much as capping with sialic acids does.

  7. RNA binding specificity of Ebola virus transcription factor VP30.

    PubMed

    Schlereth, Julia; Grünweller, Arnold; Biedenkopf, Nadine; Becker, Stephan; Hartmann, Roland K

    2016-09-01

    The transcription factor VP30 of the non-segmented RNA negative strand Ebola virus balances viral transcription and replication. Here, we comprehensively studied RNA binding by VP30. Using a novel VP30:RNA electrophoretic mobility shift assay, we tested truncated variants of 2 potential natural RNA substrates of VP30 - the genomic Ebola viral 3'-leader region and its complementary antigenomic counterpart (each ∼155 nt in length) - and a series of other non-viral RNAs. Based on oligonucleotide interference, the major VP30 binding region on the genomic 3'-leader substrate was assigned to the internal expanded single-stranded region (∼ nt 125-80). Best binding to VP30 was obtained with ssRNAs of optimally ∼ 40 nt and mixed base composition; underrepresentation of purines or pyrimidines was tolerated, but homopolymeric sequences impaired binding. A stem-loop structure, particularly at the 3'-end or positioned internally, supports stable binding to VP30. In contrast, dsRNA or RNAs exposing large internal loops flanked by entirely helical arms on both sides are not bound. Introduction of a 5´-Cap(0) structure impaired VP30 binding. Also, ssDNAs bind substantially weaker than isosequential ssRNAs and heparin competes with RNA for binding to VP30, indicating that ribose 2'-hydroxyls and electrostatic contacts of the phosphate groups contribute to the formation of VP30:RNA complexes. Our results indicate a rather relaxed RNA binding specificity of filoviral VP30, which largely differs from that of the functionally related transcription factor of the Paramyxoviridae which binds to ssRNAs as short as 13 nt with a preference for oligo(A) sequences. PMID:27315567

  8. Ancestral Protein Reconstruction Yields Insights into Adaptive Evolution of Binding Specificity in Solute-Binding Proteins.

    PubMed

    Clifton, Ben E; Jackson, Colin J

    2016-02-18

    The promiscuous functions of proteins are an important reservoir of functional novelty in protein evolution, but the molecular basis for binding promiscuity remains elusive. We used ancestral protein reconstruction to experimentally characterize evolutionary intermediates in the functional expansion of the polar amino acid-binding protein family, which has evolved to bind a variety of amino acids with high affinity and specificity. High-resolution crystal structures of an ancestral arginine-binding protein in complex with l-arginine and l-glutamine show that the promiscuous binding of l-glutamine is enabled by multi-scale conformational plasticity, water-mediated interactions, and selection of an alternative conformational substate productive for l-glutamine binding. Evolution of specialized glutamine-binding proteins from this ancestral protein was achieved by displacement of water molecules from the protein-ligand interface, reducing the entropic penalty associated with the promiscuous interaction. These results provide a structural and thermodynamic basis for the co-option of a promiscuous interaction in the evolution of binding specificity.

  9. Ipomoelin, a Jacalin-Related Lectin with a Compact Tetrameric Association and Versatile Carbohydrate Binding Properties Regulated by Its N Terminus

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Wei-Chieh; Liu, Kai-Lun; Hsu, Fang-Ciao; Jeng, Shih-Tong; Cheng, Yi-Sheng

    2012-01-01

    Many proteins are induced in the plant defense response to biotic stress or mechanical wounding. One group is lectins. Ipomoelin (IPO) is one of the wound-inducible proteins of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas cv. Tainung 57) and is a Jacalin-related lectin (JRL). In this study, we resolved the crystal structures of IPO in its apo form and in complex with carbohydrates such as methyl α-D-mannopyranoside (Me-Man), methyl α-D-glucopyranoside (Me-Glc), and methyl α-D-galactopyranoside (Me-Gal) in different space groups. The packing diagrams indicated that IPO might represent a compact tetrameric association in the JRL family. The protomer of IPO showed a canonical β-prism fold with 12 strands of β-sheets but with 2 additional short β-strands at the N terminus. A truncated IPO (ΔN10IPO) by removing the 2 short β-strands of the N terminus was used to reveal its role in a tetrameric association. Gel filtration chromatography confirmed IPO as a tetrameric form in solution. Isothermal titration calorimetry determined the binding constants (KA) of IPO and ΔN10IPO against various carbohydrates. IPO could bind to Me-Man, Me-Glc, and Me-Gal with similar binding constants. In contrast, ΔN10IPO showed high binding ability to Me-Man and Me-Glc but could not bind to Me-Gal. Our structural and functional analysis of IPO revealed that its compact tetrameric association and carbohydrate binding polyspecificity could be regulated by the 2 additional N-terminal β-strands. The versatile carbohydrate binding properties of IPO might play a role in plant defense. PMID:22808208

  10. Binding studies of a sialic acid-specific lectin from the horseshoe crab Carcinoscorpius rotunda cauda with various sialoglycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Mohan, S; Thambi Dorai, D; Srimal, S; Bachhawat, B K

    1982-04-01

    Interaction of the sialic acid-specific lectin carcinoscorpin with various sialoglycoproteins was studied by using radioiodinated lectin. The binding of carcinoscorpin was dependent not only on sialic acid content but also on the type of glycosidic linkage and form (branched or linear) of the carbohydrate chains. Carcinoscorpin has different classes of binding sites, and binding follows a phenomenon of positive co-operativity. The effect of Ca2+ concentration on the binding was studied, and the optimal concentration was found to be 0.02 M. Effect of pH, temperature and other bivalent metal ions are also reported. From haemagglutination- and precipitation-inhibition studies, it was concluded that carcinoscorpin has multispecificity towards acidic sugars, and its relation to the biological role of the lectin in the horseshoe crab is discussed.

  11. Receptor specificity of influenza viruses from birds and mammals: new data on involvement of the inner fragments of the carbohydrate chain.

    PubMed

    Gambaryan, Alexandra; Yamnikova, Svetlana; Lvov, Dmitryi; Tuzikov, Alexander; Chinarev, Alexander; Pazynina, Galina; Webster, Robert; Matrosovich, Mikhail; Bovin, Nicolai

    2005-04-10

    We studied receptor-binding properties of influenza virus isolates from birds and mammals using polymeric conjugates of sialooligosaccharides terminated with common Neu5Ac alpha2-3Gal beta fragment but differing by the structure of the inner part of carbohydrate chain. Viruses isolated from distinct avian species differed by their recognition of the inner part of oligosaccharide receptor. Duck viruses displayed high affinity for receptors having beta1-3 rather than beta1-4 linkage between Neu5Ac alpha2-3Gal-disaccharide and penultimate N-acetylhexosamine residue. Fucose and sulfate substituents at this residue had negative and low effect, respectively, on saccharide binding to duck viruses. By contrast, gull viruses preferentially bound to receptors bearing fucose at N-acetylglucosamine residue, whereas chicken and mammalian viruses demonstrated increased affinity for oligosaccharides that harbored sulfo group at position 6 of (beta1-4)-linked GlcNAc. These data suggest that although all avian influenza viruses preferentially bind to Neu5Ac alpha2-3Gal-terminated receptors, the fine receptor specificity of the viruses varies depending on the avian species. Further studies are required to determine whether observed host-dependent differences in the receptor specificity of avian viruses can affect their ability to infect humans.

  12. Enhanced Polysaccharide Binding and Activity on Linear β-Glucans through Addition of Carbohydrate-Binding Modules to Either Terminus of a Glucooligosaccharide Oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Foumani, Maryam; Vuong, Thu V.; MacCormick, Benjamin; Master, Emma R.

    2015-01-01

    The gluco-oligosaccharide oxidase from Sarocladium strictum CBS 346.70 (GOOX) is a single domain flavoenzyme that favourably oxidizes gluco- and xylo- oligosaccharides. In the present study, GOOX was shown to also oxidize plant polysaccharides, including cellulose, glucomannan, β-(1→3,1→4)-glucan, and xyloglucan, albeit to a lesser extent than oligomeric substrates. To improve GOOX activity on polymeric substrates, three carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) from Clostridium thermocellum, namely CtCBM3 (type A), CtCBM11 (type B), and CtCBM44 (type B), were separately appended to the amino and carboxy termini of the enzyme, generating six fusion proteins. With the exception of GOOX-CtCBM3 and GOOX-CtCBM44, fusion of the selected CBMs increased the catalytic activity of the enzyme (kcat) on cellotetraose by up to 50%. All CBM fusions selectively enhanced GOOX binding to soluble and insoluble polysaccharides, and the immobilized enzyme on a solid cellulose surface remained stable and active. In addition, the CBM fusions increased the activity of GOOX on soluble glucomannan by up to 30 % and on insoluble crystalline as well as amorphous cellulose by over 50 %. PMID:25932926

  13. Characterization of XYN10B, a modular xylanase from the ruminal protozoan Polyplastron multivesiculatum, with a family 22 carbohydrate-binding module that binds to cellulose.

    PubMed Central

    Devillard, Estelle; Bera-Maillet, Christel; Flint, Harry J; Scott, Karen P; Newbold, C James; Wallace, R John; Jouany, Jean-Pierre; Forano, Evelyne

    2003-01-01

    A new xylanase gene, xyn10B, was isolated from the ruminal protozoan Polyplastron multivesiculatum and the gene product was characterized. XYN10B is the first protozoan family 10 glycoside hydrolase characterized so far and is a modular enzyme comprising a family 22 carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) preceding the catalytic domain. The CBM22 was shown to be a true CBM. It showed high affinity for soluble arabinoxylan and is the first example of a CBM22 that binds strongly to celluloses of various crystallinities. The enzymic properties of XYN10B were also analysed. Its optimal temperature and pH for activity were 39 degrees C and 7.0 respectively; these values being close to those of the ruminal ecosystem. The phylogenetic relationships between the XYN10B CBM22 or catalytic domain and related sequences from ruminal and non-ruminal bacteria and eukaryotes are reported. The xyn10B gene is shown to lack introns. PMID:12693992

  14. Characterization of Thermobifida fusca cutinase-carbohydrate-binding module fusion proteins and their potential application in bioscouring.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yao; Chen, Sheng; Xu, Meng; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur; Cavoco-Paulo, Artur; Wu, Jing; Chen, Jian

    2010-10-01

    Cutinase from Thermobifida fusca is thermally stable and has potential application in the bioscouring of cotton in the textile industry. In the present study, the carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) from T. fusca cellulase Cel6A (CBM(Cel6A)) and Cellulomonas fimi cellulase CenA (CBM(CenA)) were fused, separately, to the carboxyl terminus of T. fusca cutinase. Both fusion enzymes, cutinase-CBM(Cel6A) and cutinase-CBM(CenA), were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. Enzyme characterization showed that both displayed similar catalytic properties and pH stabilities in response to T. fusca cutinase. In addition, both fusion proteins displayed an activity half-life of 53 h at their optimal temperature of 50°C. Compared to T. fusca cutinase, in the absence of pectinase, the binding activity on cotton fiber was enhanced by 2% for cutinase-CBM(Cel6A) and by 28% for cutinase-CBM(CenA), whereas in the presence of pectinase, the binding activity was enhanced by 40% for the former and 45% for the latter. Notably, a dramatic increase of up to 3-fold was observed in the amount of released fatty acids from cotton fiber by both cutinase-CBM fusion proteins when acting in concert with pectinase. This is the first report of improving the scouring efficiency of cutinase by fusing it with CBM. The improvement in activity and the strong synergistic effect between the fusion proteins and pectinase suggest that they may have better applications in textile bioscouring than the native cutinase. PMID:20729325

  15. Anther-specific carbohydrate supply and restoration of metabolically engineered male sterility

    PubMed Central

    Engelke, T.; Hirsche, J.; Roitsch, T.

    2010-01-01

    Male-sterile plants are used in hybrid breeding as well as for gene confinement for genetically modified plants in field trials and agricultural production. Apart from naturally occurring mutations leading to male sterility, biotechnology has added new possibilities for obtaining male-sterile plants, although so far only one system is used in practical breeding due to limitations in propagating male-sterile plants without segregations in the next generation or insufficient restoration of fertility when fruits or seeds are to be harvested from the hybrid varieties. Here a novel mechanism of restoration for male sterility is presented that has been achieved by interference with extracellular invertase activity, which is normally specifically expressed in the anthers to supply the developing microspores with carbohydrates. Microspores are symplastically isolated in the locular space of the anthers, and thus an unloading pathway of assimilates via the apoplasmic space is mandatory for proper development of pollen. Antisense repression of the anther-specific cell wall invertase or interference with invertase activity by expressing a proteinacious inhibitor under the control of the anther-specific invertase promoter results in a block during early stages of pollen development, thus causing male sterility without having any pleiotropic effects. Restoration of fertility was successfully achieved by substituting the down-regulated endogenous plant invertase activity by a yeast invertase fused to the N-terminal portion of potato-derived vacuolar protein proteinase II (PiII–ScSuc2), under control of the orthologous anther-specific invertase promoter Nin88 from tobacco. The chimeric fusion PiII–ScSuc2 is known to be N-glycosylated and efficiently secreted from plant cells, leading to its apoplastic location. Furthermore, the Nin88::PiII-ScSuc2 fusion does not show effects on pollen development in the wild-type background. Thus, such plants can be used as paternal parents

  16. pH-dependent specific binding and combing of DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Allemand, J F; Bensimon, D; Jullien, L; Bensimon, A; Croquette, V

    1997-01-01

    Recent developments in the rapid sequencing, mapping, and analysis of DNA rely on the specific binding of DNA to specially treated surfaces. We show here that specific binding of DNA via its unmodified extremities can be achieved on a great variety of surfaces by a judicious choice of the pH. On hydrophobic surfaces the best binding efficiency is reached at a pH of approximately 5.5. At that pH a approximately 40-kbp DNA is 10 times more likely to bind by an extremity than by a midsegment. A model is proposed to account for the differential adsorption of the molecule extremities and midsection as a function of pH. The pH-dependent specific binding can be used to align anchored DNA molecules by a receding meniscus, a process called molecular combing. The resulting properties of the combed molecules will be discussed. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 PMID:9336201

  17. Specific [(3)H]tryptophan binding sites in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Wong, P T; Lee, H S; Tan, C H; Teo, W L

    1989-01-01

    [(3)H]Tryptophan binds to a single population of sites in the rat cortical synaptosomal membranes. The binding is reversible and follows the law of mass action. By saturation studies using increasing concentration of [(3)H]tryptophan with decreasing specific radioactivity, the apparent K(d) obtained was approx. 0.8 ?M and the B(max) 110 pmol/mg protein. However, the IC(50) obtained for unlabelled tryptophan in displacing [(3)H]tryptophan binding (3.5 nM) was 0.26 ?M. All six naturally occurring aromatic amino acids studied displaced [(3)H]tryptophan binding with tryptophan and phenylalanine showing higher apparent affinity than histidine, tyrosine, dihydroxyphenylalanine and 5-hydroxytryptophan. These binding sites are proteins in nature as they are sensitive to trypsin and ?-chymotrypsin. It is observed that about 37% of the sites seem to be protected from the proteolytic enzymes by the membrane structure. Furthermore, they are extremely sensitive to phospholipase A(2) presumably because altered membrane phospholipids conduce a conformational change in the binding protein. A considerable degree of stereospecificity was demonstrated with the affinity for l-tryptophan about 90 times higher than that for d-tryptophan. The affinity for l-phenylalanine was 8 times higher than that for d-phenylalanine. Ligand specificity for the aromatic amino acids is remarkable as hydrocinnamic acid, 2-phenylethylamine, 5-hydroxytryptamine, histamine, dopamine, ?-aminobutyric acid, glutamic acid and taurine did not displace [(3)H]tryptophan binding. Therefore, these sites are termed aromatic amino acid binding sites (AABS). Whether or not AABS are involved in neuromodulation at the synapse awaits clarification. If so, the endogenous ligand for the AABS may well be tryptophan.

  18. Carbohydrate-Based Nanocarriers Exhibiting Specific Cell Targeting with Minimum Influence from the Protein Corona.

    PubMed

    Kang, Biao; Okwieka, Patricia; Schöttler, Susanne; Winzen, Svenja; Langhanki, Jens; Mohr, Kristin; Opatz, Till; Mailänder, Volker; Landfester, Katharina; Wurm, Frederik R

    2015-06-15

    Whenever nanoparticles encounter biological fluids like blood, proteins adsorb on their surface and form a so-called protein corona. Although its importance is widely accepted, information on the influence of surface functionalization of nanocarriers on the protein corona is still sparse, especially concerning how the functionalization of PEGylated nanocarriers with targeting agents will affect protein corona formation and how the protein corona may in turn influence the targeting effect. Herein, hydroxyethyl starch nanocarriers (HES-NCs) were prepared, PEGylated, and modified on the outer PEG layer with mannose to target dendritic cells (DCs). Their interaction with human plasma was then studied. Low overall protein adsorption with a distinct protein pattern and high specific affinity for DC binding were observed, thus indicating an efficient combination of "stealth" and targeting behavior.

  19. Serum carbohydrate-binding IgM are present in Vietnamese striped catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus) but not in North African catfish (Clarias gariepinus).

    PubMed

    Giang, Duong Thi Huong; Van Driessche, Edilbert; Beeckmans, Sonia

    2012-02-01

    Pangasianodon hypophthalmus serum was fractionated by affinity chromatography on 12 different Sepharose-carbohydrate columns and proteins eluted by the corresponding sugar. Binding to the affinity matrices is dependent on Ca(2+) ions. Upon gel filtration using Superose-12, essentially one fraction was obtained, eluting as a protein with a molecular mass of about 900 kDa. SDS-PAGE in reducing conditions revealed the presence of large (72 kDa) subunits (H-chains) and one up to three small (24, 26 and/or 28-29 kDa) subunits (L-chains). The isolated proteins were shown to be IgM since they bind monoclonal anti-P. hypophthalmus IgM antibodies. Rabbit polyclonal anti-galactose-binding IgM only cross-react with some sugar-binding IgM. The H-chains of the anti-carbohydrate IgM are glycosylated. Circular dichroism studies revealed that the IgMs have an "all-β" type of structure, and that Ca(2+) ions, though essential for carbohydrate-binding activity, are not required for the structural integrity of the molecules. In non-reducing SDS-PAGE, only monomers and halfmers were obtained, showing that there are no disulfide bonds linking the monomers, and that a disulfide bond connecting both H-chains within one monomer is only present in 45% of the molecules. Both the monomers and the halfmers display molecular mass heterogeneity which is indicative for redox forms at the level of the intradomain disulfide bonds. The native carbohydrate-binding IgMs agglutinate erythrocytes from different animals, as well as fish pathogenic bacteria. Similar proteins could not be isolated from another catfish, Clarias gariepinus. PMID:21911003

  20. Specificity in Transition State Binding: The Pauling Model Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Amyes, Tina L.; Richard, John P.

    2013-01-01

    Linus Pauling proposed that the large rate accelerations for enzymes are due to the high specificity of the protein catalyst for binding the reaction transition state. The observation that stable analogs of the transition states for enzymatic reactions often act as tight-binding binding inhibitors provided early support for this simple and elegant proposal. We review experimental results which support the proposal that Pauling’s model provides a satisfactory explanation for the rate accelerations for many heterolytic enzymatic reactions through high energy reaction intermediates, such as proton transfer and decarboxylation. Specificity in transition state binding is obtained when the total intrinsic binding energy of the substrate is significantly larger than the binding energy observed at the Michaelis complex. The results of recent studies to characterize the specificity in binding of the enolate oxygen at the transition state for the 1,3-isomerization reaction catalyzed by ketosteroid isomerase are reviewed. Interactions between pig heart succinyl-CoA:3-oxoacid coenzyme A transferase (SCOT) and the nonreacting portions of CoA are responsible for a rate increase of 3 × 1012-fold, which is close to the estimated total 5 × 1013-fold enzymatic rate acceleration. Studies that partition the interactions between SCOT and CoA into their contributing parts are reviewed. Interactions of the protein with the substrate phosphodianion group provide a ca. 12 kcal/mol stabilization of the transition state for the reactions catalyzed by triosephosphate isomerase, orotidine 5′-monophosphate decarboxylase and α-glycerol phosphate dehydrogenase. The interactions of these enzymes with the substrate piece phosphite dianion provide a 6 – 8 kcal/mol stabilization of the transition state for reaction of the appropriate truncated substrate. Enzyme activation by phosphite dianion reflects the higher dianion affinity for binding to the enzyme-transition state complex compared

  1. Fusing a carbohydrate-binding module into the Aspergillus usamii β-mannanase to improve its thermostability and cellulose-binding capacity by in silico design.

    PubMed

    Tang, Cun-Duo; Li, Jian-Fang; Wei, Xi-Huan; Min, Rou; Gao, Shu-Juan; Wang, Jun-Qing; Yin, Xin; Wu, Min-Chen

    2013-01-01

    The AuMan5A, an acidophilic glycoside hydrolase (GH) family 5 β-mannanase derived from Aspergillus usamii YL-01-78, consists of an only catalytic domain (CD). To perfect enzymatic properties of the AuMan5A, a family 1 carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) of the Trichoderma reesei cellobiohydrolase I (TrCBH I), having the lowest binding free energy with cellobiose, was selected by in silico design, and fused into its C-terminus forming a fusion β-mannanase, designated as AuMan5A-CBM. Then, its encoding gene, Auman5A-cbm, was constructed as it was designed theoretically, and expressed in Pichia pastoris GS115. SDS-PAGE analysis displayed that both recombinant AuMan5A-CBM (reAuMan5A-CBM) and AuMan5A (reAuMan5A) were secreted into the cultured media with apparent molecular masses of 57.3 and 49.8 kDa, respectively. The temperature optimum of the reAuMan5A-CBM was 75°C, being 5°C higher than that of the reAuMan5A. They were stable at temperatures of 68 and 60°C, respectively. Compared with reAuMan5A, the reAuMan5A-CBM showed an obvious decrease in K m and a slight alteration in V max. In addition, the fusion of a CBM of the TrCBH I into the AuMan5A contributed to its cellulose-binding capacity.

  2. Binding kinetics of lock-key colloids: surface diffusion enhancement of the rate of specific binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colon-Melendez, Laura; Beltran-Villegas, Daniel J.; van Anders, Greg; Liu, Jun; Spellings, Matthew; Sacanna, Stefano; Pine, David J.; Glotzer, Sharon C.; Larson, Ronald G.; Solomon, Michael J.

    2014-03-01

    The kinetics of anisotropic particle assembly are expected to be slow due to specific directional interactions between the assembly building blocks. We investigate the lock-and-key colloidal system (Sacanna et al, Nature 464, 575-578 (2010)), to identify and understand the mechanisms that lead to specific lock-key pair binding. For lock pockets of a particular shape, we experimentally identify the importance of nonspecific lock-key binding as a pathway to specific lock-key pair formation. In this pathway, key particles can diffuse on the surface of the lock and bind specifically to the dimple of the lock. We find that this mechanism can be more important to specific bond formation than the direct binding mechanism. We model the surface diffusion mechanism as a mean first-passage time problem. Using an anisotropic interaction potential between a lock and key particle pair (van Anders et al, arXiv:1309.1187), we compare Stokesian dynamics simulations of lock and key binding to the experiments. We propose that nonspecific interactions can play an important role in accelerating anisotropic particle assembly. This work is supported by the U.S. Army Research Office under Grant Award W911NF-10-1-0518.

  3. Binding of C-reactive protein to human lymphocytes. I. Requirement for a binding specificity.

    PubMed

    James, K; Hansen, B; Gewurz, H

    1981-12-01

    Our laboratory previously reported that C-reactive protein (CRP) binds selectively to T lymphocytes and inhibits certain of their reactivities in vitro. However, these findings could not be repeated using more highly purified CRP preparations even under a variety of experimental conditions. Purified CRP alone did not bind to peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL); however, in the presence of a ligand such as pneumococcal C-polysaccharide (CPS), CRP binding was readily detectable both by immunofluorescence and by a radioassay established for this purpose. The optimal concentration of CRP, ratio of CRP:CPS, and time and temperature for reactivity were determined using both assays. A markedly enhanced rate of binding was observed after pre-equilibration of CRP with calcium. A small percentage (mean 3.0%; range 0.5 to 8.0%) of PBL bound complexed CRP, and saturation was reached with 200 microgram CRP/ml. Reactivity of CRP with a multimeric form of phosphocholine (PC) (KLH-PC44) led to binding comparable to that observed with CPS, whereas monomeric PC inhibited the binding. Thus, in the presence of a multimeric binding specificity, CRP binds to a small fraction of peripheral blood lymphocytes, which are characterized in the accompanying paper.

  4. Computational redesign of endonuclease DNA binding and cleavage specificity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashworth, Justin; Havranek, James J.; Duarte, Carlos M.; Sussman, Django; Monnat, Raymond J.; Stoddard, Barry L.; Baker, David

    2006-06-01

    The reprogramming of DNA-binding specificity is an important challenge for computational protein design that tests current understanding of protein-DNA recognition, and has considerable practical relevance for biotechnology and medicine. Here we describe the computational redesign of the cleavage specificity of the intron-encoded homing endonuclease I-MsoI using a physically realistic atomic-level forcefield. Using an in silico screen, we identified single base-pair substitutions predicted to disrupt binding by the wild-type enzyme, and then optimized the identities and conformations of clusters of amino acids around each of these unfavourable substitutions using Monte Carlo sampling. A redesigned enzyme that was predicted to display altered target site specificity, while maintaining wild-type binding affinity, was experimentally characterized. The redesigned enzyme binds and cleaves the redesigned recognition site ~10,000 times more effectively than does the wild-type enzyme, with a level of target discrimination comparable to the original endonuclease. Determination of the structure of the redesigned nuclease-recognition site complex by X-ray crystallography confirms the accuracy of the computationally predicted interface. These results suggest that computational protein design methods can have an important role in the creation of novel highly specific endonucleases for gene therapy and other applications.

  5. Structural Analysis of Semi-specific Oligosaccharide Recognition by a Cellulose-binding Protein of Thermotoga maritima Reveals Adaptations for Functional Diversification of the Oligopeptide Periplasmic Binding Protein Fold

    SciTech Connect

    Cuneo, Matthew J.; Beese, Lorena S.; Hellinga, Homme W.

    2010-05-25

    Periplasmic binding proteins (PBPs) constitute a protein superfamily that binds a wide variety of ligands. In prokaryotes, PBPs function as receptors for ATP-binding cassette or tripartite ATP-independent transporters and chemotaxis systems. In many instances, PBPs bind their cognate ligands with exquisite specificity, distinguishing, for example, between sugar epimers or structurally similar anions. By contrast, oligopeptide-binding proteins bind their ligands through interactions with the peptide backbone but do not distinguish between different side chains. The extremophile Thermotoga maritima possesses a remarkable array of carbohydrate-processing metabolic systems, including the hydrolysis of cellulosic polymers. Here, we present the crystal structure of a T. maritima cellobiose-binding protein (tm0031) that is homologous to oligopeptide-binding proteins. T. maritima cellobiose-binding protein binds a variety of lengths of {beta}(1 {yields} 4)-linked glucose oligomers, ranging from two rings (cellobiose) to five (cellopentaose). The structure reveals that binding is semi-specific. The disaccharide at the nonreducing end binds specifically; the other rings are located in a large solvent-filled groove, where the reducing end makes several contacts with the protein, thereby imposing an upper limit of the oligosaccharides that are recognized. Semi-specific recognition, in which a molecular class rather than individual species is selected, provides an efficient solution for the uptake of complex mixtures.

  6. Determination of Carbohydrate Structure Recognized by Prostate-specific F77 Monoclonal Antibody through Expression Analysis of Glycosyltransferase Genes*

    PubMed Central

    Nonaka, Motohiro; Fukuda, Michiko N.; Gao, Chao; Li, Zhen; Zhang, Hongtao; Greene, Mark I.; Peehl, Donna M.; Feizi, Ten; Fukuda, Minoru

    2014-01-01

    This study reports the determination of the carbohydrate epitope of monoclonal antibody F77 previously raised against human prostate cancer PC-3 cells (Zhang, G., Zhang, H., Wang, Q., Lal, P., Carroll, A. M., de la Llera-Moya, M., Xu, X., and Greene, M. I. (2010) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 107, 732–737). We performed a series of co-transfections using mammalian expression vectors encoding specific glycosyltransferases. We thereby identified branching enzymes and FUT1 (required for Fucα1→2Gal linkage) as being essential for F77 antigen formation. When immortalized normal prostate 267B1 cells were transfected with FUT1 alone, cells showed weak expression of F77 antigen. By contrast, cells co-transfected with FUT1 plus either GCNT1, GCNT2, or GCNT3 (an enzyme required to form GlcNAcβ1→6Gal/GalNAc) showed robust F77 antigen expression, suggesting that F77 specifically binds to Fucα1→2Galβ1→4GlcNAcβ1→6Gal/GalNAc. RT-PCR for FUT1, GCNT1, GCNT2, and GCNT3 showed that F77-positive cell lines indeed express transcripts encoding FUT1 plus one GCNT. F77-positive prostate cancer cells transfected with siRNAs targeting FUT1, GCNT2, and GCNT3 showed significantly reduced F77 antigen, confirming the requirement of these enzymes for epitope synthesis. We also found that hypoxia induces F77 epitope expression in immortalized prostate RWPE1 cells, which express F77 antigen moderately under normoxia but at an elevated level under hypoxia. Quantitative RT-PCR demonstrated up-regulation of FUT1, GCNT2, and GCNT3 transcripts in RWPE1 cells under hypoxia, suggesting that hypoxia up-regulates glycosyltransferase expression required for F77 antigen synthesis. These results define the F77 epitope and provide a potential mechanism for F77 antigen synthesis in malignant prostate cancer. PMID:24753248

  7. ¹H, ¹³C and ¹⁵N backbone and side-chain resonance assignments of a family 36 carbohydrate binding module of xylanase from Paenibacillus campinasensis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Sheng; Ko, Chun-Han; Chang, Hao-Ting; Yang, Kai-Jay; Chen, Yu-Jen; Huang, Shing-Jong; Fang, Pei-Ju; Chang, Chi-Fon; Tzou, Der-Lii M

    2014-10-01

    Paenibacillus campinasensis BL11 isolated from black liquor secretes multiple glycoside hydrolases (GHs) against all kinds of polysaccharides. GH consists of a catalytic module and non-catalytic carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs), in which CBMs append to the catalytic module, mediating specific interactions with insoluble carbohydrates to promote the hydrolysis efficiency of the cognate enzyme. Endo-β-1,4-xylanase (XylX) is one of the GHs reveals high enzymatic activity in a wide range of pH and thermal endurance, suitable for bioconversion and bio-refinement applications. In this work, we report the resonance assignments of a family 36 CBM (characterized as CBM36) derived from XylX. Our investigations will facilitate molecular structure determination and molecular dynamics analysis of CBMs.

  8. Specific binding sites for muramyl peptides on murine macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Silverman, D.H.S.; Krueger, J.M.; Karnovsky, M.L.

    1986-03-15

    Two radiolabeled (/sup 125/I) muramyl peptide derivatives of high specific activity were prepared: a tripeptide with an iodinated C-terminal tyrosine methyl ester (Ligand I), and a muramyl tripeptide with a C-terminal lysine derivatized with Bolton-Hunter reagent (Ligand II). These were used to characterize binding of muramyl peptides to monolayers of murine macrophages. Saturable high-affinity binding to resident, caseinate-elicited, and Listeria-activated peritoneal cells was observed with both radioligands. Binding affinities varied with the state of activation of the macrophages, and K/sub D/ values ranged from 48 +/- 33 pM (for resident macrophages, Ligand I) to 1020 +/- 90 pM (for activated macrophages, Ligand II). Specific binding sites were also found on a macrophage-derived cell line. The ability of several unlabeled muramyl peptides to compete with Ligands I and II for their binding sites was tested. Competition was stereospecific and correlated with known biological activities of these compounds (i.e., immunoadjuvanticity, pyrogenicity, and somnogenicity). The sites identified here for Ligands I and II may mediate some of the effects that muramyl peptides have previously been demonstrated to have on macrophages.

  9. Allosteric regulation of the carbohydrate-binding ability of a novel conger eel galectin by D-mannoside.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Mizuki; Nakamura, Osamu; Muramoto, Koji; Ogawa, Tomohisa

    2012-09-01

    Conger eel has two galectins, termed congerins I and II (Con I and II), that function in mucus as biodefense molecules. Con I and II have acquired a novel protein fold via domain swapping and a new ligand-binding site by accelerated evolution, which enables recognition of some marine bacteria. In this study, we identified a new congerin isotype, congerin P (Con-P), from the peritoneal cells of conger eel. Although Con-P displayed obvious homology with galectins, we observed substitution of 7 out of 8 amino acid residues in the carbohydrate recognition domain that are conserved in all other known galectins. To understand the structure-function relationships of this unique galectin, recombinant Con-P was successfully expressed in Escherichia coli by using a Con II-tagged fusion protein system and subsequently characterized. In the presence of D-mannose, Con-P displayed 30-fold greater hemagglutinating activity than Con I; however, no activity was observed without mannose, indicating that D-mannoside can act as a modulator of Con-P. Frontal affinity chromatography analysis showed that activated Con-P, allosterically induced by mannose, displayed affinity for oligomannose-type sugars as well as N-acetyllactosamine-type β-galactosides. Thus, Con-P represents a new member of the galectin family with unique properties. PMID:22810239

  10. Carbohydrate functionalized carbon nanotubes and their applications.

    PubMed

    Gorityala, Bala Kishan; Ma, Jimei; Wang, Xin; Chen, Peng; Liu, Xue-Wei

    2010-08-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have attracted tremendous attention in biomedical applications due to their molecular size and unique properties. This tutorial review summarizes the strategies to functionalize CNTs with bioactive carbohydrates, which improve their solubility, biocompatibility and biofunctionalities while preserving their desired properties. In addition, studies on the usage of carbohydrate functionalized CNTs to detect bacteria, to bind to specific lectins, to deliver glycomimetic drug molecules into cells and to probe cellular activities as biosensors are reviewed. Improvement in biocompatibility and introduction of bio-functionalities by integration of carbohydrate with CNTs are paving the way to glyconanotechnology and may provide new tools for glycobiological studies. PMID:20585681

  11. Carbohydrate functionalized carbon nanotubes and their applications.

    PubMed

    Gorityala, Bala Kishan; Ma, Jimei; Wang, Xin; Chen, Peng; Liu, Xue-Wei

    2010-08-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have attracted tremendous attention in biomedical applications due to their molecular size and unique properties. This tutorial review summarizes the strategies to functionalize CNTs with bioactive carbohydrates, which improve their solubility, biocompatibility and biofunctionalities while preserving their desired properties. In addition, studies on the usage of carbohydrate functionalized CNTs to detect bacteria, to bind to specific lectins, to deliver glycomimetic drug molecules into cells and to probe cellular activities as biosensors are reviewed. Improvement in biocompatibility and introduction of bio-functionalities by integration of carbohydrate with CNTs are paving the way to glyconanotechnology and may provide new tools for glycobiological studies.

  12. Thymocyte plasma membrane: the location of specific glucocorticoid binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Sergeev, P.V.; Kalinin, G.V.; Dukhanin, A.S.

    1987-01-01

    In modern molecular endocrinology it is now possible to determine the localization of receptors for biologically active substances with the aid of ligands, with high affinity for the receptor, immobilized on polymers. The purpose of this paper is to study the ability of hydrocortisone (HC), immobilized on polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP-HC), to reduce binding of tritium-HC by thymocytes of adrenalectomized rats. It is determined that specific binding sites for HC on rat thymocytes are also accessible for PVP-HC, which, due to the fact that this immobilized version of HC does not penetrate into the cell, leads to the conclusion that the binding sites for HC itself are located in the plasma membrane.

  13. Carbohydrate ingestion and pre-cooling improves exercise capacity following soccer-specific intermittent exercise performed in the heat.

    PubMed

    Clarke, N D; Maclaren, D P M; Reilly, T; Drust, B

    2011-07-01

    Ingestion of carbohydrate and reducing core body temperature pre-exercise, either separately or combined, may have ergogenic effects during prolonged intermittent exercise in hot conditions. The aim of this investigation was to examine the effect of carbohydrate ingestion and pre-cooling on the physiological responses to soccer-specific intermittent exercise and the impact on subsequent high-intensity exercise performance in the heat. Twelve male soccer players performed a soccer-specific intermittent protocol for 90 min in the heat (30.5°C and 42.2% r.h.) on four occasions. On two occasions, the participants underwent a pre-cooling manoeuvre. During these sessions either a carbohydrate-electrolyte solution (CHOc) or a placebo was consumed at (PLAc). During the remaining sessions either the carbohydrate-electrolyte solution (CHO) or placebo (PLA) was consumed. At 15-min intervals throughout the protocol participants performed a mental concentration test. Following the soccer-specific protocol participants performed a self-chosen pace test and a test of high-intensity exercise capacity. The period of pre-cooling significantly reduced core temperature, muscle temperature and thermal sensation (P < 0.05). Self-chosen pace was greater with CHOc (12.5 ± 0.5 km h(-1)) compared with CHO (11.3 ± 0.4 km h(-1)), PLA (11.3 ± 0.4 km h(-1)) and PLAc (11.6 ± 0.5 km h(-1)) (P < 0.05). High-intensity exercise capacity was improved with CHOc and CHO when compared with PLA (CHOc; 79.8 ± 7 s, CHO; 72.1 ± 5 s, PLAc; 70.1 ± 8 s, PLA; 57.1 ± 5 s; P < 0.05). Mental concentration during the protocol was also enhanced during CHOc compared with PLA (P < 0.05). These results suggest pre-cooling in conjunction with the ingestion of carbohydrate during exercise enhances exercise capacity and helps maintain mental performance during intermittent exercise in hot conditions.

  14. Sensitivity of transmitted and founder human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelopes to carbohydrate-binding agents griffithsin, cyanovirin-N and Galanthus nivalis agglutinin.

    PubMed

    Hu, Bodan; Du, Tao; Li, Chang; Luo, Sukun; Liu, Yalan; Huang, Xin; Hu, Qinxue

    2015-12-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transmission often results from infection by a single transmitted/founder (T/F) virus. Here, we investigated the sensitivity of T/F HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Envs) to microbicide candidate carbohydrate-binding agents (CBAs) griffithsin (GRFT), cyanovirin-N (CV-N) and Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA), showing that T/F Envs demonstrated different sensitivity to CBAs, with IC50 values ranging from 0.006 ± 0.0003 to >10 nM for GRFT, from 0.6 ± 0.2 to 28.9 ± 2.9 nM for CV-N and from 1.3 ± 0.2 to >500 nM for GNA. We further revealed that deglycosylation at position 295 or 448 decreased the sensitivity of T/F Env to GRFT, and at 339 to both CV-N and GNA. Mutation of all the three glcyans rendered a CBA-sensitive T/F Env largely resistant to GRFT, indicating that the sensitivity of T/F Env to GRFT is mainly determined by glycans at 295, 339 and 448. Our study identified specific T/F Env residues associated with CBA sensitivity.

  15. Tissue Specific Effects of Dietary Carbohydrates and Obesity on ChREBPα and ChREBPβ Expression.

    PubMed

    Stamatikos, Alexis D; da Silva, Robin P; Lewis, Jamie T; Douglas, Donna N; Kneteman, Norman M; Jacobs, René L; Paton, Chad M

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrate response element binding protein (ChREBP) regulates insulin-independent de novo lipogenesis. Recently, a novel ChREBPβ isoform was identified. The purpose of the current study was to define the effect of dietary carbohydrates (CHO) and obesity on the transcriptional activity of ChREBP isoforms and their respective target genes. Mice were subjected to fasting-refeeding of high-CHO diets. In all three CHO-refeeding groups, mice failed to induce ChREBPα, yet ChREBPβ increased 10- to 20-fold. High-fat fed mice increased hepatic ChREBPβ mRNA expression compared to chow-fed along with increased protein expression. To better assess the independent effect of fructose on ChREBPα/β activity, HepG2 cells were treated with fructose ± a fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase inhibitor to suppress gluconeogenesis. Fructose treatment in the absence of gluconeogenesis resulted in increased ChREBP activity. To confirm the existence of ChREBPβ in human tissue, primary hepatocytes were incubated with high-glucose and the expression of ChREBPα and -β was determined. As with the animal models, glucose induced ChREBPβ expression while ChREBPα was decreased. Taken together, ChREBPβ is more responsive to changes in dietary CHO availability than the -α isoform. Diet-induced obesity increases basal expression of ChREBPβ, which may increase the risk of developing hepatic steatosis, and fructose-induced activation is independent of gluconeogenesis.

  16. Isolation of an Aptamer that Binds Specifically to E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Cleto, Fernanda; Krieger, Marco Aurélio; Cardoso, Josiane

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a bacterial species found ubiquitously in the intestinal flora of animals, although pathogenic variants cause major public health problems. Aptamers are short oligonucleotides that bind to targets with high affinity and specificity, and have great potential for use in diagnostics and therapy. We used cell-based Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment (cell-SELEX) to isolate four single stranded DNA (ssDNA) aptamers that bind strongly to E. coli cells (ATCC generic strain 25922), with Kd values in the nanomolar range. Fluorescently labeled aptamers label the surface of E. coli cells, as viewed by fluorescent microscopy. Specificity tests with twelve different bacterial species showed that one of the aptamers–called P12-31—is highly specific for E. coli. Importantly, this aptamer binds to Meningitis/sepsis associated E. coli (MNEC) clinical isolates, and is the first aptamer described with potential for use in the diagnosis of MNEC-borne pathologies. PMID:27104834

  17. The SEB-1 Transcription Factor Binds to the STRE Motif in Neurospora crassa and Regulates a Variety of Cellular Processes Including the Stress Response and Reserve Carbohydrate Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Fernanda Zanolli; Virgilio, Stela; Cupertino, Fernanda Barbosa; Kowbel, David John; Fioramonte, Mariana; Gozzo, Fabio Cesar; Glass, N. Louise; Bertolini, Maria Célia

    2016-01-01

    When exposed to stress conditions, all cells induce mechanisms resulting in an attempt to adapt to stress that involve proteins which, once activated, trigger cell responses by modulating specific signaling pathways. In this work, using a combination of pulldown assays and mass spectrometry analyses, we identified the Neurospora crassa SEB-1 transcription factor that binds to the Stress Response Element (STRE) under heat stress. Orthologs of SEB-1 have been functionally characterized in a few filamentous fungi as being involved in stress responses; however, the molecular mechanisms mediated by this transcription factor may not be conserved. Here, we provide evidences for the involvement of N. crassa SEB-1 in multiple cellular processes, including response to heat, as well as osmotic and oxidative stress. The Δseb-1 strain displayed reduced growth under these conditions, and genes encoding stress-responsive proteins were differentially regulated in the Δseb-1 strain grown under the same conditions. In addition, the SEB-1-GFP protein translocated from the cytosol to the nucleus under heat, osmotic, and oxidative stress conditions. SEB-1 also regulates the metabolism of the reserve carbohydrates glycogen and trehalose under heat stress, suggesting an interconnection between metabolism control and this environmental condition. We demonstrated that SEB-1 binds in vivo to the promoters of genes encoding glycogen metabolism enzymes and regulates their expression. A genome-wide transcriptional profile of the Δseb-1 strain under heat stress was determined by RNA-seq, and a broad range of cellular processes was identified that suggests a role for SEB-1 as a protein interconnecting these mechanisms. PMID:26994287

  18. Specific binding of gibberellic acid by cytokinin-specific binding proteins: a new aspect of plant hormone-binding proteins with the PR-10 fold.

    PubMed

    Ruszkowski, Milosz; Sliwiak, Joanna; Ciesielska, Agnieszka; Barciszewski, Jakub; Sikorski, Michal; Jaskolski, Mariusz

    2014-07-01

    Pathogenesis-related proteins of class 10 (PR-10) are a family of plant proteins with the same fold characterized by a large hydrophobic cavity that allows them to bind various ligands, such as phytohormones. A subfamily with only ~20% sequence identity but with a conserved canonical PR-10 fold have previously been recognized as Cytokinin-Specific Binding Proteins (CSBPs), although structurally the binding mode of trans-zeatin (a cytokinin phytohormone) was found to be quite diversified. Here, it is shown that two CSBP orthologues from Medicago truncatula and Vigna radiata bind gibberellic acid (GA3), which is an entirely different phytohormone, in a conserved and highly specific manner. In both cases a single GA3 molecule is found in the internal cavity of the protein. The structural data derived from high-resolution crystal structures are corroborated by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), which reveals a much stronger interaction with GA3 than with trans-zeatin and pH dependence of the binding profile. As a conclusion, it is postulated that the CSBP subfamily of plant PR-10 proteins should be more properly linked with general phytohormone-binding properties and termed phytohormone-binding proteins (PhBP).

  19. Further characterization and immunochemical studies on the carbohydrate specificity of jackfruit (Artocarpus integrifolia) lectin.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, H; Chatterjee, B P

    1989-06-01

    The lectin from jackfruit (Artocarpus integrifolia) seeds has been purified by Rivanol (6,9-diamino-2-ethoxyacridine lactate) treatment. The specific activity, molecular weights of parent lectin and its subunit, its glycoprotein nature, and hemagglutination-inhibition assays suggest that this preparation is identical to that obtained by affinity chromatography on melibiose-agarose adsorbent (Ahmed, H., and Chatterjee, B. P. (1986) in Lectins, Biology, Biochemistry, Clinical Biochemistry (Bøg-Hansen, T. C., and van Driessche, E., eds) Vol. 5, pp. 125-133, Walter de Gruyter, New York). The lectin strongly agglutinates human and several animal erythrocytes. The lectin contains five isolectins of pI values 7.1, 6.85, 5.5, 5.3, and 5.1. It is thermally stable and loses its activity above 75 degrees C. The hemagglutinating activity remains unchanged in the presence of bivalent cations viz., Ca2+, Mg2+, Mn2+, etc. It is a metalloprotein. The lectin retains its activity by dialysis with acetic acid followed by EDTA. It agglutinates Ehrlich ascites cells. Equilibrium dialysis of lectin with melibiose and quenching of fluorescence of 4-methylumbelliferyl-alpha-D-galactopyranoside by the lectin show that homotetrameric jackfruit lectin has two sugar-binding sites. The lectin precipitates well several galactomannans and glycoproteins having terminal D-Gal-alpha-(1----6)- or D-Gal-beta-(1----3)-D-GalNAc residues. It hardly or does not precipitate polysaccharides having terminal D-Gal-alpha-(1----3) residues. Quantitative precipitin-inhibition studies using various haptens suggest that the -OCH2- group at C-1 and -OH groups at C-4 and partially at C-6 in the alpha-glycoside of D-galactose configuration are important for lectin-sugar interaction.

  20. The Atomic Structure of the Phage Tuc2009 Baseplate Tripod Suggests that Host Recognition Involves Two Different Carbohydrate Binding Modules

    PubMed Central

    Legrand, Pierre; Collins, Barry; Blangy, Stéphanie; Murphy, James; Spinelli, Silvia; Gutierrez, Carlos; Richet, Nicolas; Kellenberger, Christine; Desmyter, Aline; Mahony, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Gram-positive bacterium Lactococcus lactis, used for the production of cheeses and other fermented dairy products, falls victim frequently to fortuitous infection by tailed phages. The accompanying risk of dairy fermentation failures in industrial facilities has prompted in-depth investigations of these phages. Lactococcal phage Tuc2009 possesses extensive genomic homology to phage TP901-1. However, striking differences in the baseplate-encoding genes stimulated our interest in solving the structure of this host’s adhesion device. We report here the X-ray structures of phage Tuc2009 receptor binding protein (RBP) and of a “tripod” assembly of three baseplate components, BppU, BppA, and BppL (the RBP). These structures made it possible to generate a realistic atomic model of the complete Tuc2009 baseplate that consists of an 84-protein complex: 18 BppU, 12 BppA, and 54 BppL proteins. The RBP head domain possesses a different fold than those of phages p2, TP901-1, and 1358, while the so-called “stem” and “neck” domains share structural features with their equivalents in phage TP901-1. The BppA module interacts strongly with the BppU N-terminal domain. Unlike other characterized lactococcal phages, Tuc2009 baseplate harbors two different carbohydrate recognition sites: one in the bona fide RBP head domain and the other in BppA. These findings represent a major step forward in deciphering the molecular mechanism by which Tuc2009 recognizes its saccharidic receptor(s) on its host. PMID:26814179

  1. Improving antibody binding affinity and specificity for therapeutic development.

    PubMed

    Bostrom, Jenny; Lee, Chingwei V; Haber, Lauric; Fuh, Germaine

    2009-01-01

    Affinity maturation is an important part of the therapeutic antibody development process as in vivo activity often requires high binding affinity. Here, we describe a targeted approach for affinity improvement of therapeutic antibodies. Sets of CDR residues that are solvent accessible and relatively diverse in natural antibodies are targeted for diversification. Degenerate oligonucleotides are used to generate combinatorial phage-displayed antibody libraries with varying degree of diversity at randomized positions from which high-affinity antibodies can be selected. An advantage of using antibodies for therapy is their exquisite target specificity, which enables selective antigen binding and reduces off-target effects. However, it can be useful, and often it is necessary, to generate cross-reactive antibodies binding to not only the human antigen but also the corresponding non-human primate or rodent orthologs. Such cross-reactive antibodies can be used to validate the therapeutic targeting and examine the safety profile in preclinical animal models before committing to a costly development track. We show how affinity improvement and cross-species binding can be achieved in a one-step process.

  2. Studies on a novel macrophage-specific calmodulin binding glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Orlow, S.J.

    1986-01-01

    The murine macrophage-like cell line J774 and peritoneal exudate cells elicited with thioglycollate or starch contain a major calmodulin-binding protein which is absent in trifluoperazine-resistant variants of J774, resident peritoneal macrophages and these elicited with concanavalin A, lipopolysaccharide, proteose peptone or Bacillus Clamette Guerin. Resident murine peritoneal cells maintained in tissue culture for 3 days begin to accumulate this protein as do human peripheral blood monocytes after 7 days of culture. A specific competitive displacement radioimmunoassay was developed using a rabbit antiserum raised to the partially purified calmodulin binding protein and (/sup 125/I) calmodulin covalently crosslinked to the principal calmodulin binding protein in the preparation. The radioimmunoassay confirmed the unique cellular distribution of this protein suggesting that it may be a marker for certain stages of macrophage differentiation. Monoclonal antibodies were prepared and one of these was used to further purify the protein by immunoaffinity chromatography. A protein of molecular weight 50,000 to 60,000 was isolated. It could be selectively adsorbed to wheat germ agglutinin agarose and subsequently eluted with N-acetyl glucosamine. This property plus its sensitivity to endoglycosidase F led to the conclusion that it is a glycoprotein. The cellular distribution, subcellular localization and evidence of glycosylation suggest that this protein may be a macrophage-specific receptor with a high affinity for calcium-calmodulin.

  3. Determinants of affinity and specificity in RNA-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Helder, Stephanie; Blythe, Amanda J; Bond, Charles S; Mackay, Joel P

    2016-06-01

    Emerging data suggest that the mechanisms by which RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) interact with RNA and the rules governing specificity might be substantially more complex than those underlying their DNA-binding counterparts. Even our knowledge of what constitutes the RNA-bound proteome is contentious; recent studies suggest that 10-30% of RBPs contain no known RNA-binding domain. Adding to this situation is a growing disconnect between the avalanche of identified interactions between proteins and long noncoding RNAs and the absence of biophysical data on these interactions. RNA-protein interactions are also at the centre of what might emerge as one of the biggest shifts in thinking about cell and molecular biology this century, following from recent reports of ribonucleoprotein complexes that drive reversible membrane-free phase separation events within the cell. Unexpectedly, low-complexity motifs are important in the formation of these structures. Here we briefly survey recent advances in our understanding of the specificity of RBPs. PMID:27315040

  4. Specific and non-specific folate binding protein in normal and malignant human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Corrocher, R.; De Sandre, G.; Ambrosetti, A.; Pachor, M. L.; Bambara, L. M.; Hoffbrand, A. V.

    1978-01-01

    Binding of tritiated folic acid by supernatants prepared from extracts of normal and leukaemic leucocytes, normal mucosa, and malignant tumours from different parts of the gastrointestinal tract has been measured using Sephadex-gel filtration and albumin-coated charcoal techniques. Non-specific binding (measured by Sephadex G-75 gel filtration) was almost invariably greater than specific binding measured by albumin-coated charcoal separation of bound and unbound folate. In nine normal leucocyte extracts, binding measured by Sephadex G-75 filtration ranged from 1·3 to 18·2 (mean 8·2) pg/mg protein and by albumin-coated charcoal from 1·0 to 14·8 (mean 6·7) pg/mg protein. Raised specific binding was found in the extracts from leucocytes of eight of 14 patients with chronic granulocytic leukaemia, in four substantially so (389, 121, 108, 59·7 pg/mg protein), but was only marginally increased in one of eight cases of acute myeloid leukaemia and in two of five cases of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia. Binding was normal in the extracts of all three cases of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia tested. Among the tissues of the gastrointestinal tract binding was greatest by the duodenal mucosa and liver. Extracts of carcinoma of the stomach and colon bound greater amounts of 3H-folic acid than the corresponding normal mucosal extracts but the differences were not large. Sephadex G-200 gel chromatography showed more than one binding peak in the extracts of liver and duodenum but only one peak in the other tissues of the gastrointestinal tract, and only one peak, of molecular weight either about 50 000 or over 200 000, in the leucocyte extracts. PMID:670421

  5. Demonstration of specific binding of cocaine to human spermatozoa

    SciTech Connect

    Yazigi, R.A.; Odem, R.R.; Polakoski, K.L. )

    1991-10-09

    Exposure of males to cocaine has been linked to abnormal development of their offspring. To investigate the possible role of sperm, this study examined the interaction of cocaine with human spermatozoa. Washed sperm were incubated with tritiated cocaine and the samples were filtered and the remaining radioactivity quantitated. The specific binding was optimal at 20 minutes and 23C. Competition studies with tritiated cocaine indicated the presence of approximately 3.6 {times} 10{sup 3} binding sites per cell, with a high affinity receptor dissociation constant. Cocaine concentrations as high as 670 {mu}mol/L had no detectable effect on either the motility or viability of the cells. These results support the hypothesis that the sperm may act as a vector to transport cocaine into an ovum. This novel mechanism could be involved in the abnormal development of offspring of cocaine-exposed males.

  6. Specific mutagenesis of a chlorophyll-binding protein. Progress report.

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton-Rye, Dr., Julian; Shen, Gaozhong

    1990-01-01

    During the first phase of the project regarding specific mutagenesis of the chlorophyll-binding protein CP47 in photosystem II (PS II) most of the time has been devoted to (1) establishment of an optimal procedure for the reintroduction of psbB (the gene encoding CP47) carrying a site-directed mutation into the experimental organism, the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, (2) preparations for site-directed mutagenesis, and (3) creation and analysis of chimaeric spinach/cyanobacterial CP47 mutants of Synechocystis. In the coming year, psbB constructs with site-directed mutations in potential chlorophyll-binding regions of CP47 will be introduced into the Synechocystis genome, and site-directed mutants will be characterized according to procedures described in the original project description. In addition, analysis of chimaeric CP47 mutants will be continued.

  7. Carbohydrate recognition factors of a Talpha (Galbeta1-->3GalNAcalpha1-->Ser/Thr) and Tn (GalNAcalpha1-->Ser/Thr) specific lectin isolated from the seeds of Artocarpus lakoocha.

    PubMed

    Singh, Tanuja; Chatterjee, Urmimala; Wu, June H; Chatterjee, Bishnu P; Wu, Albert M

    2005-01-01

    Artocarpus lakoocha agglutinin (ALA), isolated from the seeds of A. lakoocha fruit, is a galactose-binding lectin and a potent mitogen of T and B cells. Knowledge obtained from previous studies on the affinity of ALA was limited to molecular and submolecular levels of Galbeta1-->3GalNAc (T) and its derivatives. In the present study, the carbohydrate specificity of ALA was characterized at the macromolecular level according to the mammalian Gal/GalNAc structural units and corresponding glycoconjugates by an enzyme-linked lectinosorbent (ELLSA) and inhibition assays. The results indicate that ALA binds specifically to tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens GalNAcalpha1-->Ser/Thr (Tn) and Galbeta1-->3 GalNAcalpha1-->Ser/Thr (Talpha). It barely cross-reacts with other common glycotopes on glycoproteins, including ABH blood group antigens, Galbeta1-->3/4GlcNAc (I/II) determinants, T/Tn covered by sialic acids, and N-linked plasma glycoproteins. Dense clustering structure of Tn/Talpha-containing glycoproteins tested resulted in 2.4 x 10(5)-6.7 x 10(5)-fold higher affinities to ALA than the respective GalNAc and Gal monomer. According to our results, the overall affinity of ALA for glycans can be ranked respectively: polyvalent Tn/Talpha glycotopes > monomeric Talpha and simple clustered Tn > monomeric Tn > GalNAc > Gal; while other glycotopes: Galalpha1-->3/4Gal (B/E), Galbeta1-->3/4GlcNAc (I/II), GalNAcalpha1-->3Gal/GalNAc (A/F), and GalNAcbeta1-->3/4Gal (P/S) were inactive. The strong specificity of ALA for Tn/Talpha cluster suggests the importance of glycotope polyvalency during carbohydrate-receptor interactions and emphasizes its value as an anti-Tn/T lectin for analysis of glycoconjugate mixtures or transformed carbohydrates.

  8. The size, shape and specificity of the sugar-binding site of the jacalin-related lectins is profoundly affected by the proteolytic cleavage of the subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Houlès Astoul, Corinne; Peumans, Willy J; van Damme, Els J M; Barre, Annick; Bourne, Yves; Rougé, Pierre

    2002-01-01

    Mannose-specific lectins with high sequence similarity to jacalin and the Maclura pomifera agglutinin have been isolated from species belonging to the families Moraceae, Convolvulaceae, Brassicaceae, Asteraceae, Poaceae and Musaceae. Although these novel mannose-specific lectins are undoubtedly related to the galactose-specific Moraceae lectins there are several important differences. Apart from the obvious differences in specificity, the mannose- and galactose-specific jacalin-related lectins differ in what concerns their biosynthesis and processing, intracellular location and degree of oligomerization of the protomers. Taking into consideration that the mannose-specific lectins are widely distributed in higher plants, whereas their galactose-specific counterparts are confined to a subgroup of the Moraceae sp. one can reasonably assume that the galactose-specific Moraceae lectins are a small-side group of the main family. The major change that took place in the structure of the binding site of the diverging Moraceae lectins concerns a proteolytic cleavage close to the N-terminus of the protomer. To corroborate the impact of this change, the specificity of jacalin was re-investigated using surface plasmon resonance analysis. This approach revealed that in addition to galactose and N -acetylgalactosamine, the carbohydrate-binding specificity of jacalin extends to mannose, glucose, N -acetylmuramic acid and N -acetylneuraminic acid. Owing to this broad carbohydrate-binding specificity, jacalin is capable of recognizing complex glycans from plant pathogens or predators. PMID:12169094

  9. The size, shape and specificity of the sugar-binding site of the jacalin-related lectins is profoundly affected by the proteolytic cleavage of the subunits.

    PubMed

    Houlès Astoul, Corinne; Peumans, Willy J; van Damme, Els J M; Barre, Annick; Bourne, Yves; Rougé, Pierre

    2002-11-01

    Mannose-specific lectins with high sequence similarity to jacalin and the Maclura pomifera agglutinin have been isolated from species belonging to the families Moraceae, Convolvulaceae, Brassicaceae, Asteraceae, Poaceae and Musaceae. Although these novel mannose-specific lectins are undoubtedly related to the galactose-specific Moraceae lectins there are several important differences. Apart from the obvious differences in specificity, the mannose- and galactose-specific jacalin-related lectins differ in what concerns their biosynthesis and processing, intracellular location and degree of oligomerization of the protomers. Taking into consideration that the mannose-specific lectins are widely distributed in higher plants, whereas their galactose-specific counterparts are confined to a subgroup of the Moraceae sp. one can reasonably assume that the galactose-specific Moraceae lectins are a small-side group of the main family. The major change that took place in the structure of the binding site of the diverging Moraceae lectins concerns a proteolytic cleavage close to the N-terminus of the protomer. To corroborate the impact of this change, the specificity of jacalin was re-investigated using surface plasmon resonance analysis. This approach revealed that in addition to galactose and N -acetylgalactosamine, the carbohydrate-binding specificity of jacalin extends to mannose, glucose, N -acetylmuramic acid and N -acetylneuraminic acid. Owing to this broad carbohydrate-binding specificity, jacalin is capable of recognizing complex glycans from plant pathogens or predators.

  10. Binding of Yersinia enterocolitica to purified, native small intestinal mucins from rabbits and humans involves interactions with the mucin carbohydrate moiety.

    PubMed Central

    Mantle, M; Husar, S D

    1994-01-01

    Plasmid-bearing (but not plasmid-cured) Yersinia enterocolitica is known to bind to purified small intestinal mucins from rabbits and humans. This study examined which region(s) of the mucin molecule is important for bacterial adherence. Pronase digestion of mucin and removal of nonglycosylated or poorly glycosylated peptide regions had no effect on bacterial binding, suggesting that plasmid-bearing Y. enterocolitica interacts with mucin carbohydrate. Periodate oxidation also did not alter bacterial adherence, indicating that vicinal hydroxyl groups in the mucin sugars are not important for binding. Boiling of mucin, depolymerization by reduction of disulfide bonds, or removal of noncovalently associated lipid actually enhanced bacterial adherence, suggesting that plasmid-bearing Y. enterocolitica can interact with additional domains in the mucin molecule revealed by these treatments. These domains were destroyed by pronase digestion. In delipidated mucin (but not in reduced or boiled mucin), binding to these domains appeared to be hydrophobic since it could be prevented by treatment of bacteria with tetramethyl urea. Oligosaccharides obtained from both human and rabbit small intestinal mucins were capable of inhibiting attachment of plasmid-bearing (but not plasmid-cured) Y. enterocolitica to mucin. After removal of terminal and backbone sugar residues by treatment of mucin with trifluoromethanesulfonic acid, binding of plasmid-bearing bacteria increased significantly when N-acetylgalactosamine, either alone or with galactose attached, was revealed, indicating that core regions of the sugar side chains are involved in bacterial binding. Adherence of plasmid-cured organisms was unaffected by trifluoromethanesulfonic acid treatment of mucin. We concluded that virulent Y. enterocolitica interacts with the carbohydrate moiety of native small intestinal mucin through a plasmid-mediated process. When mucin becomes denatured, binding of the organism can increase through

  11. An olive pollen protein with allergenic activity, Ole e 10, defines a novel family of carbohydrate-binding modules and is potentially implicated in pollen germination

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    CBMs (carbohydrate-binding modules) are the most common non-catalytic modules associated with enzymes active in plant cell-wall hydrolysis. They have been frequently identified by amino acid sequence alignments, but only a few have been experimentally established to have a carbohydrate-binding activity. A small olive pollen protein, Ole e 10 (10 kDa), has been described as a major inducer of type I allergy in humans. In the present study, the ability of Ole e 10 to bind several polysaccharides has been analysed by affinity gel electrophoresis, which demonstrated that the protein bound 1,3-β-glucans preferentially. Analytical ultracentrifugation studies confirmed binding to laminarin, at a protein/ligand ratio of 1:1. The interaction of Ole e 10 with laminarin induced a conformational change in the protein, as detected by CD and fluorescence analyses, and an increase of 3.6 °C in the thermal denaturation temperature of Ole e 10 in the presence of the glycan. These results, and the absence of alignment of the sequence of Ole e 10 with that of any classified CBM, indicate that this pollen protein defines a novel family of CBMs, which we propose to name CBM43. Immunolocalization of Ole e 10 in mature and germinating pollen by transmission electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy demonstrated the co-localization of Ole e 10 and callose (1,3-β-glucan) in the growing pollen tube, suggesting a role for this protein in the metabolism of carbohydrates and in pollen tube wall re-formation during germination. PMID:15882149

  12. Family 46 Carbohydrate-binding Modules Contribute to the Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Xyloglucan and β-1,3–1,4-Glucans through Distinct Mechanisms*♦

    PubMed Central

    Venditto, Immacolata; Najmudin, Shabir; Luís, Ana S.; Ferreira, Luís M. A.; Sakka, Kazuo; Knox, J. Paul; Gilbert, Harry J.; Fontes, Carlos M. G. A.

    2015-01-01

    Structural carbohydrates comprise an extraordinary source of energy that remains poorly utilized by the biofuel sector as enzymes have restricted access to their substrates within the intricacy of plant cell walls. Carbohydrate active enzymes (CAZYmes) that target recalcitrant polysaccharides are modular enzymes containing noncatalytic carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) that direct enzymes to their cognate substrate, thus potentiating catalysis. In general, CBMs are functionally and structurally autonomous from their associated catalytic domains from which they are separated through flexible linker sequences. Here, we show that a C-terminal CBM46 derived from BhCel5B, a Bacillus halodurans endoglucanase, does not interact with β-glucans independently but, uniquely, acts cooperatively with the catalytic domain of the enzyme in substrate recognition. The structure of BhCBM46 revealed a β-sandwich fold that abuts onto the region of the substrate binding cleft upstream of the active site. BhCBM46 as a discrete entity is unable to bind to β-glucans. Removal of BhCBM46 from BhCel5B, however, abrogates binding to β-1,3–1,4-glucans while substantially decreasing the affinity for decorated β-1,4-glucan homopolymers such as xyloglucan. The CBM46 was shown to contribute to xyloglucan hydrolysis only in the context of intact plant cell walls, but it potentiates enzymatic activity against purified β-1,3–1,4-glucans in solution or within the cell wall. This report reveals the mechanism by which a CBM can promote enzyme activity through direct interaction with the substrate or by targeting regions of the plant cell wall where the target glucan is abundant. PMID:25713075

  13. A carbohydrate-binding affinity ligand for the specific enrichment of glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; El Khoury, Graziella; Zhang, Peiqing; Rudd, Pauline M; Lowe, Christopher R

    2016-04-29

    One challenge facing the production of glycoprotein therapeutics is the lack of stable and selective affinity ligands for their enrichment. Synthetic affinity ligands based on the solid phase multi-component Ugi reaction represent a desirable option, particularly those incorporating benzoboroxole and its derivatives, which have been shown to enrich glycoproteins under physiological conditions. Thus, an Ugi ligand, A21C11I8, comprising 5-amino-2-hydroxymethylphenylboronic acid was synthesised on aldehyde-functionalised Sepharose™. Immobilised A21C11I8 displayed affinity for the glycosylated protein, glucose oxidase (GOx), which bound primarily through its glycan moiety. The ligand had a preference for sugar alcohols and the furanose form of the monosaccharides tested. Compared with immobilised 3-aminophenylboronic acid and Concanavalin A, the Ugi ligand was able to purify GOx from spiked Escherichia coli supernatants with retention of its maximum enzymatic activity and protein recovery. Glycan profiles of human immunoglobulin G tested on A21C11I8 columns suggested that the adsorbent possesses the potential to resolve sialylated and neutral glycoforms. The benzoboroxole-functionalised Ugi ligand may find application in selective glycoform separation.

  14. Tissue Specific Effects of Dietary Carbohydrates and Obesity on ChREBPα and ChREBPβ Expression.

    PubMed

    Stamatikos, Alexis D; da Silva, Robin P; Lewis, Jamie T; Douglas, Donna N; Kneteman, Norman M; Jacobs, René L; Paton, Chad M

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrate response element binding protein (ChREBP) regulates insulin-independent de novo lipogenesis. Recently, a novel ChREBPβ isoform was identified. The purpose of the current study was to define the effect of dietary carbohydrates (CHO) and obesity on the transcriptional activity of ChREBP isoforms and their respective target genes. Mice were subjected to fasting-refeeding of high-CHO diets. In all three CHO-refeeding groups, mice failed to induce ChREBPα, yet ChREBPβ increased 10- to 20-fold. High-fat fed mice increased hepatic ChREBPβ mRNA expression compared to chow-fed along with increased protein expression. To better assess the independent effect of fructose on ChREBPα/β activity, HepG2 cells were treated with fructose ± a fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase inhibitor to suppress gluconeogenesis. Fructose treatment in the absence of gluconeogenesis resulted in increased ChREBP activity. To confirm the existence of ChREBPβ in human tissue, primary hepatocytes were incubated with high-glucose and the expression of ChREBPα and -β was determined. As with the animal models, glucose induced ChREBPβ expression while ChREBPα was decreased. Taken together, ChREBPβ is more responsive to changes in dietary CHO availability than the -α isoform. Diet-induced obesity increases basal expression of ChREBPβ, which may increase the risk of developing hepatic steatosis, and fructose-induced activation is independent of gluconeogenesis. PMID:26526060

  15. Counting carbohydrates

    MedlinePlus

    Carb counting; Carbohydrate-controlled diet; Diabetic diet; Diabetes-counting carbohydrates ... Many foods contain carbohydrates (carbs), including: Fruit and fruit juice Cereal, bread, pasta, and rice Milk and milk products, soy milk Beans, legumes, ...

  16. Hierarchical mechanisms build the DNA-binding specificity of FUSE binding protein.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, Lawrence R; Chung, Hye-Jung; Sanford, Suzanne; Kouzine, Fedor; Liu, Juhong; Levens, David

    2008-11-25

    The far upstream element (FUSE) binding protein (FBP), a single-stranded nucleic acid binding protein, is recruited to the c-myc promoter after melting of FUSE by transcriptionally generated dynamic supercoils. Via interactions with TFIIH and FBP-interacting repressor (FIR), FBP modulates c-myc transcription. Here, we investigate the contributions of FBP's 4 K Homology (KH) domains to sequence selectivity. EMSA and missing contact point analysis revealed that FBP contacts 4 separate patches spanning a large segment of FUSE. A SELEX procedure using paired KH-domains defined the preferred subsequences for each KH domain. Unexpectedly, there was also a strong selection for the noncontacted residues between these subsequences, showing that the contact points must be optimally presented in a backbone that minimizes secondary structure. Strategic mutation of contact points defined in this study disabled FUSE activity in vivo. Because the biological specificity of FBP is tuned at several layers: (i) accessibility of the site; (ii) supercoil-driven melting; (iii) presentation of unhindered bases for recognition; and (iv) modular interaction of KH-domains with cognate bases, the FBP-FIR system and sequence-specific, single-strand DNA binding proteins in general are likely to prove versatile tools for adjusting gene expression.

  17. Minisatellite binding protein Msbp-1 is a sequence-specific single-stranded DNA-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Collick, A; Dunn, M G; Jeffreys, A J

    1991-01-01

    Msbp-1 is a minisatellite-specific DNA-binding protein. Using synthetic binding substrates, we now show that Msbp-1 binds not to double-stranded DNA, but exclusively to single-stranded DNA. Binding is specific to the guanine-rich strand of the minisatellite duplex, interactions with the cytosine-rich strand being undetectable by southwestern analysis. Furthermore, the binding site required for successful DNA-protein interactions appears to be two or more minisatellite repeat units. We have also isolated, by whole-genome PCR and cloning, one Msbp-1 binding site from the human genome. Again, the binding strand of this molecule contains a repetitive G-rich structure equivalent to that of a small minisatellite. These observations are discussed with respect to other single-stranded DNA-binding proteins known to play a role in recombination processes. Images PMID:1754375

  18. Distinct Roles for Carbohydrate-Binding Modules of Glycoside Hydrolase 10 (GH10) and GH11 Xylanases from Caldicellulosiruptor sp. Strain F32 in Thermostability and Catalytic Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Dong-Dong; Ying, Yu; Chen, Xiao-Hua; Lu, Ming; Ning, Kang; Wang, Lu-Shan

    2015-01-01

    Xylanases are crucial for lignocellulosic biomass deconstruction and generally contain noncatalytic carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) accessing recalcitrant polymers. Understanding how multimodular enzymes assemble can benefit protein engineering by aiming at accommodating various environmental conditions. Two multimodular xylanases, XynA and XynB, which belong to glycoside hydrolase families 11 (GH11) and GH10, respectively, have been identified from Caldicellulosiruptor sp. strain F32. In this study, both xylanases and their truncated mutants were overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified, and characterized. GH11 XynATM1 lacking CBM exhibited a considerable improvement in specific activity (215.8 U nmol−1 versus 94.7 U nmol−1) and thermal stability (half-life of 48 h versus 5.5 h at 75°C) compared with those of XynA. However, GH10 XynB showed higher enzyme activity and thermostability than its truncated mutant without CBM. Site-directed mutagenesis of N-terminal amino acids resulted in a mutant, XynATM1-M, with 50% residual activity improvement at 75°C for 48 h, revealing that the disordered region influenced protein thermostability negatively. The thermal stability of both xylanases and their truncated mutants were consistent with their melting temperature (Tm), which was determined by using differential scanning calorimetry. Through homology modeling and cross-linking analysis, we demonstrated that for XynB, the resistance against thermoinactivation generally was enhanced through improving both domain properties and interdomain interactions, whereas for XynA, no interdomain interactions were observed. Optimized intramolecular interactions can accelerate thermostability, which provided microbes a powerful evolutionary strategy to assemble catalysts that are adapted to various ecological conditions. PMID:25576604

  19. Binding theory and grammatical specific language impairment in children.

    PubMed

    van der Lely, H K; Stollwerck, L

    1997-03-01

    This study investigates the intrasentential assignment of reference to pronouns (him, her) and anaphors (himself, herself) as characterized by Binding Theory in a subgroup of "Grammatical specifically language-impaired" (SLI) children. The study aims to (1) provide further insight into the underlying nature of Grammatical SLI in children and (2) elucidate the relationship between different sources of knowledge, that is, syntactic knowledge versus knowledge of lexical properties and pragmatic inference in the assignment of intrasentential coreference. In two experiments, using a picture-sentence pair judgement task, the children's knowledge of the lexical properties versus syntactic knowledge (Binding Principles A and B) in the assignment of reflexives and pronouns was investigated. The responses of 12 Grammatical SLI children (aged 9:3 to 12:10) and three language ability (LA) control groups of 12 children (aged 5:9 to 9:1) were compared. The results indicated that the SLI children and the LA controls may use a combination of conceptual-lexical and pragmatic knowledge (e.g., semantic gender, reflexive marking of the predicate, and assignment of theta roles) to help assign reference to anaphors and pronouns. The LA controls also showed appropriate use of the syntactic knowledge. In contrast, the SLI children performed at chance when syntactic information was crucially required to rule out inappropriate coreference. The data are consistent with an impairment with the (innate) syntactic knowledge characterized by Binding Theory which underlies reference assignment to anaphors and pronouns. We conclude that the SLI children's syntactic representation is underspecified with respect to coindexation between constituents and the syntactic properties of pronouns. Support is provided for the proposal that Grammatical SLI children have a modular language deficit with syntactic dependent structural relationships between constituents, that is, a Representational Deficit with

  20. Utilizing Fibronectin Integrin-Binding Specificity to Control Cellular Responses

    PubMed Central

    Bachman, Haylee; Nicosia, John; Dysart, Marilyn; Barker, Thomas H.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Cells communicate with the extracellular matrix (ECM) protein fibronectin (Fn) through integrin receptors on the cell surface. Controlling integrin–Fn interactions offers a promising approach to directing cell behavior, such as adhesion, migration, and differentiation, as well as coordinated tissue behaviors such as morphogenesis and wound healing. Recent Advances: Several different groups have developed recombinant fragments of Fn that can control epithelial to mesenchymal transition, sequester growth factors, and promote bone and wound healing. It is thought that these physiological responses are, in part, due to specific integrin engagement. Furthermore, it has been postulated that the integrin-binding domain of Fn is a mechanically sensitive switch that drives binding of one integrin heterodimer over another. Critical Issues: Although computational simulations have predicted the mechano-switch hypothesis and recent evidence supports the existence of varying strain states of Fn in vivo, experimental evidence of the Fn integrin switch is still lacking. Future Directions: Evidence of the integrin mechano-switch will enable the development of new Fn-based peptides in tissue engineering and wound healing, as well as deepen our understanding of ECM pathologies, such as fibrosis. PMID:26244106

  1. B lymphocyte binding to E- and P-selectins is mediated through the de novo expression of carbohydrates on in vitro and in vivo activated human B cells.

    PubMed Central

    Postigo, A A; Marazuela, M; Sánchez-Madrid, F; de Landázuri, M O

    1994-01-01

    Cell adhesion to endothelium regulates the trafficking and recruitment of leukocytes towards lymphoid organs and sites of inflammation. This phenomenon is mediated by the expression of a number of adhesion molecules on both the endothelium and circulating cells. Activation of endothelial cells (EC) with different stimuli induces the expression of several adhesion molecules (E- and P-selectins, ICAM-1, VCAM-1), involved in their interaction with circulating cells. In this report, we have studied the binding of nonactivated and activated B cells to purified E- and P-selectins. Activated but not resting B cells were able to interact with both selectins. This binding capacity of activated B cells paralleled the induction of different carbohydrate epitopes (Lewisx, sialyl-Lewisx, CD57 and CDw65) as well as other molecules bearing these or related epitopes in myeloid cells (L-selectin, alpha L beta 2 and alpha X beta 2 integrins, and CD35) involved in the interaction of different cell types with selectins. B cells infiltrating inflamed tissues like in Hashimoto's thyroiditis, also expressed these selectin-binding carbohydrates in parallel with the expression of E-selectin by surrounding follicular dendritic cells. Moreover, the crosslinking of these selectin-binding epitopes resulted in an increased binding of B cells to different integrin ligands. Thus, in addition to the involvement of integrins, E- and P-selectins could play an important role in the interaction of B lymphocytes with the endothelium during B cell extravasation into lymphoid tissues and inflammatory foci as well as in their organization into lymphoid organs. Images PMID:7523454

  2. Engineering a uranyl specific binding protein from NikR.

    SciTech Connect

    Wegner, S. V.; Boyaci, H.; Chen, H.; Jensen, M. P.; He, C.

    2009-03-16

    The first uranyl-selective DNA-binding protein is designed using the E. coli nickel(II)-responsive protein NikR as the template. The resulting NikR? protein binds uranyl (see picture) with a dissociation constant Kd=53?nM and selectively binds to DNA in the presence of uranyl.

  3. Differential binding properties of Gal/GalNAc specific lectins available for characterization of glycoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Wu, A M; Song, S C; Sugii, S; Herp, A

    1997-01-01

    Differentiating the binding properties of applied lectins should facilitate the selection of lectins for characterization of glycoreceptors on the cell surface. Based on the binding specificities studied by inhibition assays of lectin-glycan interactions, over twenty Gal and/or GalNAc specific lectins have been divided into eight groups according to their specificity for structural units (lectin determinants), which are the disaccharide as all or part of the determinants and of GalNAc alpha 1-->Ser (Thr) of the peptide chain. A scheme of codes for lectin determinants is illustrated as follows: (1) F (GalNAc alpha 1-->3GalNAc), Forssman specific disaccharide--Dolichos biflorus (DBL), Helix pomatia (HPL) and Wistaria floribunda (WFL) lectins. (2) A (GalNAc alpha 1-->3 Gal), blood group A specific disaccharide--Codium fragile subspecies tomentosoides (CFT), Soy bean (SBL), Vicia villosa-A4 (VVL-A4), and Wistaria floribunda (WFL) lectins. (3) Tn (GalNAc alpha 1-->Ser (Thr) of the protein core)--Vicia villosa B4 (VVL-B4), Salvia sclarea (SSL), Maclura pomifera (MPL), Bauhinia purpurea alba (BPL) and Artocarpus integrifolia (Jacalin, AIL). (4) T (Gal beta 1-->3GalNAc), the mucin type sugar sequences on the human erythrocyte membrane(T alpha), T antigen or the disaccharides at the terminal nonreducing end of gangliosides (T beta)--Peanut (PNA), Bauhinia purpurea alba (BPL), Maclura pomifera (MPL), Sophora japonica (SJL), Artocarpus lakoocha (Artocarpin) lectins and Abrus precatorius agglutinin (APA).(5) I and II (Gal beta 1-->3(4)GlcNAc)--the disaccharide residue at the nonreducing end of the carbohydrate chains derived from either N- or O-glycosidic linkage--Ricinus communis agglutinin (RCA1), Datura stramonium (TAL, Thorn apple), Erythrina cristagalli (ECL, Coral tree), and Geodia cydonium (GCL). (6) B (Gal alpha 1-->3Gal), human blood group B specific disaccharide--Griffonia(Banderiaea) simplicifolia B4 (GSI-B4). (7) E (Gal alpha 1-->4Gal), receptors for pathogenic E

  4. Electrical detection of specific versus non-specific binding events in breast cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Benjamin C.; Clark, Michael; Burkhead, Thomas; Sethu, Palaniappan; Rai, Shesh; Kloecker, Goetz; Panchapakesan, Balaji

    2012-10-01

    Detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from patient blood samples offers a desirable alternative to invasive tissue biopsies for screening of malignant carcinomas. A rigorous CTC detection method must identify CTCs from millions of other formed elements in blood and distinguish them from healthy tissue cells also present in the blood. CTCs are known to overexpress surface receptors, many of which aid them in invading other tissue, and these provide an avenue for their detection. We have developed carbon nanotube (CNT) thin film devices to specifically detect these receptors in intact cells. The CNT sidewalls are functionalized with antibodies specific to Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule (EpCAM), a marker overexpressed by breast and other carcinomas. Specific binding of EpCAM to anti-EpCAM antibodies causes a change in the local charge environment of the CNT surface which produces a characteristic electrical signal. Two cell lines were tested in the device: MCF7, a mammary adenocarcinoma line which overexpresses EpCAM, and MCF10A, a non-tumorigenic mammary epithelial line which does not. Introduction of MCF7s caused significant changes in the electrical conductance of the devices due to specific binding and associated charge environment change near the CNT sidewalls. Introduction of MCF10A displays a different profile due to purely nonspecific interactions. The profile of specific vs. nonspecific interaction signatures using carbon based devices will guide development of this diagnostic tool towards clinical sample volumes with wide variety of markers.

  5. Molecular characterization of endo-1,3-β-glucanase from Cellulosimicrobium cellulans: effects of carbohydrate-binding module on enzymatic function and stability.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Yoichi; Oda, Masayuki

    2011-12-01

    An endo-1,3-β-glucanase was purified from Tunicase®, a crude enzyme preparation from Cellulosimicrobium cellulans DK-1, and determined to be a 383-residue protein (Ala1-Leu383), comprising a catalytic domain of the glycoside hydrolase family 16 and a C-terminal carbohydrate-binding module family 13. The Escherichia coli expression system of the catalytic domain (Ala1-Thr256) was constructed, and the protein with N-terminal polyhistidine tag was purified using a Ni-nitrilotriacetic acid column. We analyzed enzymatic properties of the recombinant catalytic domain, its variants, and the Tunicase®-derived full-length endo-1,3-β-glucanase. Substitution of Glu119 with Ala and deletion of Met123, both of the residues are located in the catalytic motif, resulted in the loss of hydrolytic activity. In comparison between the full-length enzyme and isolated catalytic domain, their hydrolytic activities for soluble substrates such as laminarin and laminarioligosaccharides were similar. In contrast, the hydrolytic activity of the full-length enzyme for insoluble substrates such as curdlan and yeast-glucan was significantly higher than that of the catalytic domain. It should be noted that the acid stabilities for the hydrolysis of laminarin were clearly different. Secondary structure analysis using circular dichroism showed that the full-length enzyme was more acid stable than was the catalytic domain, possibly because of domain interactions between the catalytic domain and the carbohydrate-binding module.

  6. Real-time and label-free analysis of binding thermodynamics of carbohydrate-protein interactions on unfixed cancer cell surfaces using a QCM biosensor.

    PubMed

    Li, Xueming; Song, Siyu; Shuai, Qi; Pei, Yihan; Aastrup, Teodor; Pei, Yuxin; Pei, Zhichao

    2015-01-01

    A novel approach to the study of binding thermodynamics and kinetics of carbohydrate-protein interactions on unfixed cancer cell surfaces using a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) biosensor was developed, in which binding events take place at the cell surface, more closely mimicking a biologically relevant environment. In this study, colon adenocarcinoma cells (KM-12) and ovary adenocarcinoma cells (SKOV-3) grew on the optimized polystyrene-coated biosensor chip without fixation. The association and dissociation between the cell surface carbohydrates and a range of lectins, including WGA, Con A, UEA-I, GS-II, PNA and SBA, were monitored in real time and without label for evaluation of cell surface glycosylation. Furthermore, the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters of the interaction between lectins and cell surface glycan were studied, providing detailed information about the interactions, such as the association rate constant, dissociation rate constant, affinity constant, as well as the changes of entropy, enthalpy and Gibbs free energy. This application provides an insight into the cell surface glycosylation and the complex molecular recognition on the intact cell surface, which may have impacts on disease diagnosis and drug discovery.

  7. A starch-binding domain identified in α-amylase (AmyP) represents a new family of carbohydrate-binding modules that contribute to enzymatic hydrolysis of soluble starch.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hui; Zheng, Yunyun; Chen, Maojiao; Wang, Ying; Xiao, Yazhong; Gao, Yi

    2014-04-01

    A novel starch-binding domain (SBD) that represents a new carbohydrate-binding module family (CBM69) was identified in the α-amylase (AmyP) of the recently established alpha-amylase subfamily GH13_37. The SBD and its homologues come mostly from marine bacteria, and phylogenetic analysis indicates that they are closely related to the CBM20 and CBM48 families. The SBD exhibited a binding preference toward raw rice starch, but the truncated mutant (AmyPΔSBD) still retained similar substrate preference. Kinetic analyses revealed that the SBD plays an important role in soluble starch hydrolysis because different catalytic efficiencies have been observed in AmyP and the AmyPΔSBD.

  8. Discrimination of rat Brunner's gland carbohydrate antigens by site-specific monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Chimuro, Tomoyuki; Kuroyama, Hiroyuki; Goso, Yukinobu; Ishihara, Kazuhiko; Kurihara, Makoto

    2016-09-01

    Mucus produced and secreted by gastrointestinal mucosa contains various types of mucins equipped with unique sugar chains considered to play critical roles in protecting mucous membranes; therefore, the identification and verification of mucin sugar chains is important for understanding the underlying mechanisms. In our previous work, we generated three monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), RGM22, RGM26, and RGM42, which recognize sugar chains in rat gastric mucin. Here, we immunohistochemically analyzed the rat gastrointestinal mucosa and found that the antigens recognized by RGM22 and RGM42 were expressed in the rat antrum and Brunner's glands, whereas that recognized by RGM26 was detected in the antrum, but rarely in Brunner's glands. We found that these antibodies reacted with porcine gastric mucin-derived oligosaccharides bearing a common structure: GalNAcα1-3(Fucα1-2)Galβ1-4GlcNAcβ1-6GalNAc-ol. Moreover, epitope analysis revealed that RGM42 and RGM22 recognized α-linked GalNAc and GalNAcα1-3Gal, respectively, on the GalNAcα1-3(Fucα1-2)Gal structure, whereas RGM26 was specific for GalNAcα1-3(Fucα1-2)Gal. These results indicate that rat Brunner's glands express specific antigens bearing GalNAcα1-3Gal that are recognized by RGM22 and RGM42. Thus, RGM22, RGM26, and RGM42 with their unique antigen specificities could be useful tools for investigation of oligosaccharide diversity among mucins. PMID:27454489

  9. Inhibition of human GLUT1 and GLUT5 by plant carbohydrate products; insights into transport specificity

    PubMed Central

    George Thompson, Alayna M.; Iancu, Cristina V.; Nguyen, Thi Thanh Hanh; Kim, Doman; Choe, Jun-yong

    2015-01-01

    Glucose transporters GLUT1 (transports glucose) and GLUT5 (transports fructose), in addition to their functions in normal metabolism, have been implicated in several diseases including cancer and diabetes. While GLUT1 has several inhibitors, none have been described for GLUT5. By transport activity assays we found two plant products, rubusoside (from Rubus suavissimus) and astragalin-6-glucoside (a glycosylated derivative of astragalin, from Phytolacca americana) that inhibited human GLUT5. These plants are utilized in traditional medicine: R. suavissimus for weight loss and P. americana for cancer treatment, but the molecular interactions of these products are unknown. Rubusoside also inhibited human GLUT1, but astragalin-6-glucoside did not. In silico analysis of rubusoside:protein interactions pinpointed a major difference in substrate cavity between these transporters, a residue that is a tryptophan in GLUT1 but an alanine in GLUT5. Investigation of mutant proteins supported the importance of this position in ligand specificity. GLUT1W388A became susceptible to inhibition by astragalin-6-glucoside and resistant to rubusoside. GLUT5A396W transported fructose and also glucose, and maintained inhibition by rubusoside and astragalin-6-glucoside. Astragalin-6-glucoside can serve as a starting point in the design of specific inhibitors for GLUT5. The application of these studies to understanding glucose transporters and their interaction with substrates and ligands is discussed. PMID:26306809

  10. Inhibition of human GLUT1 and GLUT5 by plant carbohydrate products; insights into transport specificity.

    PubMed

    George Thompson, Alayna M; Iancu, Cristina V; Nguyen, Thi Thanh Hanh; Kim, Doman; Choe, Jun-yong

    2015-01-01

    Glucose transporters GLUT1 (transports glucose) and GLUT5 (transports fructose), in addition to their functions in normal metabolism, have been implicated in several diseases including cancer and diabetes. While GLUT1 has several inhibitors, none have been described for GLUT5. By transport activity assays we found two plant products, rubusoside (from Rubus suavissimus) and astragalin-6-glucoside (a glycosylated derivative of astragalin, from Phytolacca americana) that inhibited human GLUT5. These plants are utilized in traditional medicine: R. suavissimus for weight loss and P. americana for cancer treatment, but the molecular interactions of these products are unknown. Rubusoside also inhibited human GLUT1, but astragalin-6-glucoside did not. In silico analysis of rubusoside:protein interactions pinpointed a major difference in substrate cavity between these transporters, a residue that is a tryptophan in GLUT1 but an alanine in GLUT5. Investigation of mutant proteins supported the importance of this position in ligand specificity. GLUT1W388A became susceptible to inhibition by astragalin-6-glucoside and resistant to rubusoside. GLUT5A396W transported fructose and also glucose, and maintained inhibition by rubusoside and astragalin-6-glucoside. Astragalin-6-glucoside can serve as a starting point in the design of specific inhibitors for GLUT5. The application of these studies to understanding glucose transporters and their interaction with substrates and ligands is discussed. PMID:26306809

  11. Carbohydrates on Proteins: Site-Specific Glycosylation Analysis by Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhikai; Desaire, Heather

    2015-07-01

    Glycosylation on proteins adds complexity and versatility to these biologically vital macromolecules. To unveil the structure-function relationship of glycoproteins, glycopeptide-centric analysis using mass spectrometry (MS) has become a method of choice because the glycan is preserved on the glycosylation site and site-specific glycosylation profiles of proteins can be readily determined. However, glycopeptide analysis is still challenging given that glycopeptides are usually low in abundance and relatively difficult to detect and the resulting data require expertise to analyze. Viewing the urgent need to address these challenges, emerging methods and techniques are being developed with the goal of analyzing glycopeptides in a sensitive, comprehensive, and high-throughput manner. In this review, we discuss recent advances in glycoprotein and glycopeptide analysis, with topics covering sample preparation, analytical separation, MS and tandem MS techniques, as well as data interpretation and automation.

  12. Structures and binding specificity of galactose- and mannose-binding lectins from champedak: differences from jackfruit lectins.

    PubMed

    Gabrielsen, Mads; Abdul-Rahman, Puteri Shafinaz; Othman, Shatrah; Hashim, Onn H; Cogdell, Richard J

    2014-06-01

    Galactose-binding and mannose-binding lectins from the champedak fruit, which is native to South-east Asia, exhibit useful potential clinical applications. The specificity of the two lectins for their respective ligands allows the detection of potential cancer biomarkers and monitoring of the glycosylated state of proteins in human serum and/or urine. To fully understand and expand the use of these natural proteins, their complete sequences and crystal structures are presented here, together with details of sugar binding.

  13. Refining small intestinal bacterial overgrowth diagnosis by means of carbohydrate specificity: a proof-of-concept study

    PubMed Central

    Enko, Dietmar; Halwachs-Baumann, Gabriele; Stolba, Robert; Mangge, Harald; Kriegshäuser, Gernot

    2015-01-01

    Background: Diagnosis of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) remains challenging. This study aimed at proving the diagnostic concept of carbohydrate-specific SIBO (cs-SIBO) using glucose, fructose and sorbitol hydrogen (H2)/methane (CH4) breath testing (HMBT). Methods: In this study 125 patients referred to our outpatient clinic for SIBO testing were included. All individuals underwent glucose (50 g), fructose (25 g) and sorbitol (12.5 g) HMBT at 3 consecutive days. Patients with cs-SIBO (i.e. early H2/CH4 peak) were given rifaximin (600 mg/day) in a 10-day treatment. HMBT results were reassessed in a subset of patients 3–6 months after antibiotic therapy. In view of cs-SIBO diagnosis, agreements between HMBT results obtained for different sugars were calculated using Cohen’s kappa (κ) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results: A total of 59 (47.2%) patients presented an early H2/CH4 peak with one or more sugars. Among these, 21 (16.8%), 10 (8.0%) and 7 (5.6%) individuals had a positive HMBT result with either glucose, fructose or sorbitol, respectively. Another 21 (16.8%) patients with a positive glucose HMBT result were also found positive with an early H2/CH4 peak obtained after ingestion of fructose and/or sorbitol. Fair agreement was observed between glucose and fructose (κ = 0.26, p = 0.0018) and between glucose and sorbitol (κ = 0.18, p = 0.0178) HMBT results. Slight agreement was observed between fructose and sorbitol (κ = 0.03, p = 0.6955) HMBT results only. Successful antibiotic therapy with rifaximin could be demonstrated in 26/30 (86.7%) of patients as indicated by normal HMBT results and symptom remission. Conclusions: Combined glucose, fructose and sorbitol HMBT has the potential to optimize cs-SIBO diagnosis. Furthermore, the majority of patients with cs-SIBO seem to benefit from rifaximin therapy regardless of its carbohydrate specificity. PMID:27134657

  14. Characterization of a Cellulase Containing a Family 30 Carbohydrate-Binding Module (CBM) Derived from Clostridium thermocellum CelJ: Importance of the CBM to Cellulose Hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Arai, Takamitsu; Araki, Rie; Tanaka, Akiyoshi; Karita, Shuichi; Kimura, Tetsuya; Sakka, Kazuo; Ohmiya, Kunio

    2003-01-01

    Clostridium thermocellum CelJ is a modular enzyme containing a family 30 carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) and a family 9 catalytic module at its N-terminal moiety. To investigate the functions of the CBM and the catalytic module, truncated derivatives of CelJ were constructed and characterized. Isothermal titration calorimetric studies showed that the association constants (Ka) of the CBM polypeptide (CBM30) for the binding of cellopentaose and cellohexaose were 1.2 × 104 and 6.4 × 104 M−1, respectively, and that the binding of CBM30 to these ligands is enthalpically driven. Qualitative analyses showed that CBM30 had strong affinity for cellulose and β-1,3-1,4-mixed glucan such as barley β-glucan and lichenan. Analyses of the hydrolytic action of the enzyme comprising the CBM and the catalytic module showed that the enzyme is a processive endoglucanse with strong activity towards carboxymethylcellulose, barley β-glucan and lichenan. By contrast, the catalytic module polypeptide devoid of the CBM showed negligible activity toward these substrates. These observations suggest that the CBM is extremely important not only because it mediates the binding of the enzyme to the substrates but also because it participates in the catalytic function of the enzyme or contributes to maintaining the correct tertiary structure of the family 9 catalytic module for expressing enzyme activity. PMID:12511497

  15. Specific sulfation and glycosylation—a structural combination for the anticoagulation of marine carbohydrates

    PubMed Central

    Pomin, Vitor H.; Mourão, Paulo A. S.

    2014-01-01

    Based on considered achievements of the last 25 years, specific combinations of sulfation patterns and glycosylation types have been proved to be key structural players for the anticoagulant activity of certain marine glycans. These conclusions were obtained from comparative and systematic analyses on the structure-anticoagulation relationships of chemically well-defined sulfated polysaccharides of marine invertebrates and red algae. These sulfated polysaccharides are known as sulfated fucans (SFs), sulfated galactans (SGs) and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). The structural combinations necessary for the anticoagulant activities are the 2-sulfation in α-L-SGs, the 2,4-di-sulfation in α-L-fucopyranosyl units found as composing units of certain sea-urchin and sea-cucumber linear SFs, or as branching units of the fucosylated chondroitin sulfate, a unique GAG from sea-cucumbers. Another unique GAG type from marine organisms is the dermatan sulfate isolated from ascidians. The high levels of 4-sulfation at the galactosamine units combined with certain levels of 2-sulfation at the iduronic acid units is the anticoagulant structural requirements of these GAGs. When the backbones of red algal SGs are homogeneous, the anticoagulation is proportionally dependent of their sulfation content. Finally, 4-sulfation was observed to be the structural motif required to enhance the inhibition of thrombin via heparin cofactor-II by invertebrate SFs. PMID:24639954

  16. Specific sulfation and glycosylation-a structural combination for the anticoagulation of marine carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Pomin, Vitor H; Mourão, Paulo A S

    2014-01-01

    Based on considered achievements of the last 25 years, specific combinations of sulfation patterns and glycosylation types have been proved to be key structural players for the anticoagulant activity of certain marine glycans. These conclusions were obtained from comparative and systematic analyses on the structure-anticoagulation relationships of chemically well-defined sulfated polysaccharides of marine invertebrates and red algae. These sulfated polysaccharides are known as sulfated fucans (SFs), sulfated galactans (SGs) and glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). The structural combinations necessary for the anticoagulant activities are the 2-sulfation in α-L-SGs, the 2,4-di-sulfation in α-L-fucopyranosyl units found as composing units of certain sea-urchin and sea-cucumber linear SFs, or as branching units of the fucosylated chondroitin sulfate, a unique GAG from sea-cucumbers. Another unique GAG type from marine organisms is the dermatan sulfate isolated from ascidians. The high levels of 4-sulfation at the galactosamine units combined with certain levels of 2-sulfation at the iduronic acid units is the anticoagulant structural requirements of these GAGs. When the backbones of red algal SGs are homogeneous, the anticoagulation is proportionally dependent of their sulfation content. Finally, 4-sulfation was observed to be the structural motif required to enhance the inhibition of thrombin via heparin cofactor-II by invertebrate SFs.

  17. High-throughput screening of monoclonal antibodies against plant cell wall glycans by hierarchical clustering of their carbohydrate microarray binding profiles

    PubMed Central

    Moller, Isabel; Marcus, Susan E.; Haeger, Ash; Verhertbruggen, Yves; Verhoef, Rene; Schols, Henk; Ulvskov, Peter; Mikkelsen, Jørn Dalgaard; Knox, J. Paul

    2007-01-01

    Antibody-producing hybridoma cell lines were created following immunisation with a crude extract of cell wall polymers from the plant Arabidopsis thaliana. In order to rapidly screen the specificities of individual monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), their binding to microarrays containing 50 cell wall glycans immobilized on nitrocellulose was assessed. Hierarchical clustering of microarray binding profiles from newly produced mAbs, together with the profiles for mAbs with previously defined specificities allowed the rapid assignments of mAb binding to antigen classes. mAb specificities were further investigated using subsequent immunochemical and biochemical analyses and two novel mAbs are described in detail. mAb LM13 binds to an arabinanase-sensitive pectic epitope and mAb LM14, binds to an epitope occurring on arabinogalactan-proteins. Both mAbs display novel patterns of recognition of cell walls in plant materials. PMID:17629746

  18. Human DC-SIGN Binds Specific Human Milk Glycans

    PubMed Central

    Noll, Alexander J.; Yu, Ying; Lasanajak, Yi; Duska-McEwen, Geralyn; Buck, Rachael H.; Smith, David F.; Cummings, Richard D.

    2016-01-01

    Human milk glycans (HMGs) are prebiotics, pathogen receptor decoys, and regulators of host physiology and immune responses. Mechanistically, human lectins (glycan-binding proteins, hGBPs) expressed by dendritic cells (DC) are of major interest, as these cells directly contact HMGs. To explore such interactions, we screened many C-type lectins and Siglecs expressed by DC for glycan binding on microarrays presenting over 200 HMGs. Unexpectedly, DC-SIGN showed robust binding to many HMGs, whereas other C-type lectins failed to bind, and Siglecs-5 and -9 showed weak binding to a few glycans. By contrast, most hGBPs bound to multiple glycans on other microarrays lacking HMGs. An α-linked fucose residue was characteristic of HMGs bound by DC-SIGN. Binding of DC-SIGN to the simple HMGs 2′-fucosyllactose (2′-FL) and 3-fucosyllactose (3-FL) was confirmed by flow cytometry to beads conjugated with 2′-FL or 3-FL, as well as the ability of the free glycans to inhibit DC-SIGN binding. 2′-FL had an IC50 of ~1 mM for DC-SIGN, which is within the physiological concentration of 2′-FL in human milk. These results demonstrate that DC-SIGN among the many hGBPs expressed by DC binds to α-fucosylated HMGs, and suggest that such interactions may be important in influencing immune responses in the developing infant. PMID:26976925

  19. Quantitative analysis of pheromone-binding protein specificity

    PubMed Central

    Katti, S.; Lokhande, N.; González, D.; Cassill, A.; Renthal, R.

    2012-01-01

    Many pheromones have very low water solubility, posing experimental difficulties for quantitative binding measurements. A new method is presented for determining thermodynamically valid dissociation constants for ligands binding to pheromone-binding proteins (OBPs), using β-cyclodextrin as a solubilizer and transfer agent. The method is applied to LUSH, a Drosophila OBP that binds the pheromone 11-cis vaccenyl acetate (cVA). Refolding of LUSH expressed in E. coli was assessed by measuring N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine (NPN) binding and Förster resonance energy transfer between LUSH tryptophan 123 (W123) and NPN. Binding of cVA was measured from quenching of W123 fluorescence as a function of cVA concentration. The equilibrium constant for transfer of cVA between β-cyclodextrin and LUSH was determined from a linked equilibria model. This constant, multiplied by the β-cyclodextrin-cVA dissociation constant, gives the LUSH-cVA dissociation constant: ~100 nM. It was also found that other ligands quench W123 fluorescence. The LUSH-ligand dissociation constants were determined to be ~200 nM for the silk moth pheromone bombykol and ~90 nM for methyl oleate. The results indicate that the ligand-binding cavity of LUSH can accommodate a variety ligands with strong binding interactions. Implications of this for the pheromone receptor model proposed by Laughlin et al. (Cell 133: 1255–65, 2008) are discussed. PMID:23121132

  20. Protein−DNA binding in the absence of specific base-pair recognition

    PubMed Central

    Afek, Ariel; Schipper, Joshua L.; Horton, John; Gordân, Raluca; Lukatsky, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Until now, it has been reasonably assumed that specific base-pair recognition is the only mechanism controlling the specificity of transcription factor (TF)−DNA binding. Contrary to this assumption, here we show that nonspecific DNA sequences possessing certain repeat symmetries, when present outside of specific TF binding sites (TFBSs), statistically control TF−DNA binding preferences. We used high-throughput protein−DNA binding assays to measure the binding levels and free energies of binding for several human TFs to tens of thousands of short DNA sequences with varying repeat symmetries. Based on statistical mechanics modeling, we identify a new protein−DNA binding mechanism induced by DNA sequence symmetry in the absence of specific base-pair recognition, and experimentally demonstrate that this mechanism indeed governs protein−DNA binding preferences. PMID:25313048

  1. Carbohydrates as allergens.

    PubMed

    Commins, Scott P

    2015-01-01

    Complex carbohydrates are effective inducers of Th2 responses, and carbohydrate antigens can stimulate the production of glycan-specific antibodies. In instances where the antigen exposure occurs through the skin, the resulting antibody production can contain IgE class antibody. The glycan-stimulated IgE may be non-specific but may also be antigen specific. This review focuses on the production of cross-reactive carbohydrate determinants, the recently identified IgE antibody response to a mammalian oligosaccharide epitope, galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose (alpha-gal), as well as discusses practical implications of carbohydrates in allergy. In addition, the biological effects of carbohydrate antigens are reviewed in setting of receptors and host recognition.

  2. Phosphoenolpyruvate:carbohydrate phosphotransferase systems of bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Postma, P W; Lengeler, J W; Jacobson, G R

    1993-01-01

    Numerous gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria take up carbohydrates through the phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP):carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS). This system transports and phosphorylates carbohydrates at the expense of PEP and is the subject of this review. The PTS consists of two general proteins, enzyme I and HPr, and a number of carbohydrate-specific enzymes, the enzymes II. PTS proteins are phosphoproteins in which the phospho group is attached to either a histidine residue or, in a number of cases, a cysteine residue. After phosphorylation of enzyme I by PEP, the phospho group is transferred to HPr. The enzymes II are required for the transport of the carbohydrates across the membrane and the transfer of the phospho group from phospho-HPr to the carbohydrates. Biochemical, structural, and molecular genetic studies have shown that the various enzymes II have the same basic structure. Each enzyme II consists of domains for specific functions, e.g., binding of the carbohydrate or phosphorylation. Each enzyme II complex can consist of one to four different polypeptides. The enzymes II can be placed into at least four classes on the basis of sequence similarity. The genetics of the PTS is complex, and the expression of PTS proteins is intricately regulated because of the central roles of these proteins in nutrient acquisition. In addition to classical induction-repression mechanisms involving repressor and activator proteins, other types of regulation, such as antitermination, have been observed in some PTSs. Apart from their role in carbohydrate transport, PTS proteins are involved in chemotaxis toward PTS carbohydrates. Furthermore, the IIAGlc protein, part of the glucose-specific PTS, is a central regulatory protein which in its nonphosphorylated form can bind to and inhibit several non-PTS uptake systems and thus prevent entry of inducers. In its phosphorylated form, P-IIAGlc is involved in the activation of adenylate cyclase and thus in the

  3. Sequence-specific binding of luzopeptin to DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Fox, K R; Davies, H; Adams, G R; Portugal, J; Waring, M J

    1988-01-01

    We have examined the binding of luzopeptin, an antitumor antibiotic, to five DNA fragments of varying base composition. The drug forms a tight, possibly covalent, complex with the DNA causing a reduction in mobility on nondenaturing polyacrylamide gels and some smearing of the bands consistent with intramolecular cross-linking of DNA duplexes. DNAase I and micrococcal nuclease footprinting experiments suggest that the drug binds best to regions containing alternating A and T residues, although no consensus di- or trinucleotide sequence emerges. Binding to other sites is not excluded and at moderate ligand concentrations the DNA is almost totally protected from enzyme attack. Ligand-induced enhancement of DNAase I cleavage is observed at both AT and GC-rich regions. The sequence selectivity and characteristics of luzopeptin binding are quite different from those of echinomycin, a bifunctional intercalator of related structure. Images PMID:3362673

  4. The role of the glucose-sensing transcription factor carbohydrate-responsive element-binding protein pathway in termite queen fertility.

    PubMed

    Sillam-Dussès, David; Hanus, Robert; Poulsen, Michael; Roy, Virginie; Favier, Maryline; Vasseur-Cognet, Mireille

    2016-05-01

    Termites are among the few animals that themselves can digest the most abundant organic polymer, cellulose, into glucose. In mice and Drosophila, glucose can activate genes via the transcription factor carbohydrate-responsive element-binding protein (ChREBP) to induce glucose utilization and de novo lipogenesis. Here, we identify a termite orthologue of ChREBP and its downstream lipogenic targets, including acetyl-CoA carboxylase and fatty acid synthase. We show that all of these genes, including ChREBP, are upregulated in mature queens compared with kings, sterile workers and soldiers in eight different termite species. ChREBP is expressed in several tissues, including ovaries and fat bodies, and increases in expression in totipotent workers during their differentiation into neotenic mature queens. We further show that ChREBP is regulated by a carbohydrate diet in termite queens. Suppression of the lipogenic pathway by a pharmacological agent in queens elicits the same behavioural alterations in sterile workers as observed in queenless colonies, supporting that the ChREBP pathway partakes in the biosynthesis of semiochemicals that convey the signal of the presence of a fertile queen. Our results highlight ChREBP as a likely key factor for the regulation and signalling of queen fertility. PMID:27249798

  5. Purification and crystallographic studies of a putative carbohydrate-binding module from the Ruminococcus flavefaciens FD-1 endoglucanase Cel5A.

    PubMed

    Pires, Ana José; Ribeiro, Teresa; Thompson, Andrew; Venditto, Immacolata; Fernandes, Vânia O; Bule, Pedro; Santos, Helena; Alves, Victor D; Pires, Virginia; Ferreira, Luis M A; Fontes, Carlos M G A; Najmudin, Shabir

    2015-08-01

    Ruminant herbivores meet their carbon and energy requirements from a symbiotic relationship with cellulosome-producing anaerobic bacteria that efficiently degrade plant cell-wall polysaccharides. The assembly of carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZymes) into cellulosomes enhances protein stability and enzyme synergistic interactions. Cellulosomes comprise diverse CAZymes displaying a modular architecture in which a catalytic domain is connected, via linker sequences, to one or more noncatalytic carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs). CBMs direct the appended catalytic modules to their target substrates, thus facilitating catalysis. The genome of the ruminal cellulolytic bacterium Ruminococcus flavefaciens strain FD-1 contains over 200 modular proteins containing the cellulosomal signature dockerin module. One of these is an endoglucanase Cel5A comprising two family 5 glycoside hydrolase catalytic modules (GH5) flanking an unclassified CBM (termed CBM-Rf2) and a C-terminal dockerin. This novel CBM-Rf2 has been purified and crystallized, and data from cacodylate-derivative crystals were processed to 1.02 and 1.29 Å resolution. The crystals belonged to the orthorhombic space group P212121. The CBM-Rf2 structure was solved by a single-wavelength anomalous dispersion experiment at the As edge.

  6. The role of the glucose-sensing transcription factor carbohydrate-responsive element-binding protein pathway in termite queen fertility

    PubMed Central

    Sillam-Dussès, David; Hanus, Robert; Poulsen, Michael; Roy, Virginie; Favier, Maryline

    2016-01-01

    Termites are among the few animals that themselves can digest the most abundant organic polymer, cellulose, into glucose. In mice and Drosophila, glucose can activate genes via the transcription factor carbohydrate-responsive element-binding protein (ChREBP) to induce glucose utilization and de novo lipogenesis. Here, we identify a termite orthologue of ChREBP and its downstream lipogenic targets, including acetyl-CoA carboxylase and fatty acid synthase. We show that all of these genes, including ChREBP, are upregulated in mature queens compared with kings, sterile workers and soldiers in eight different termite species. ChREBP is expressed in several tissues, including ovaries and fat bodies, and increases in expression in totipotent workers during their differentiation into neotenic mature queens. We further show that ChREBP is regulated by a carbohydrate diet in termite queens. Suppression of the lipogenic pathway by a pharmacological agent in queens elicits the same behavioural alterations in sterile workers as observed in queenless colonies, supporting that the ChREBP pathway partakes in the biosynthesis of semiochemicals that convey the signal of the presence of a fertile queen. Our results highlight ChREBP as a likely key factor for the regulation and signalling of queen fertility. PMID:27249798

  7. Sex-specific effects of protein and carbohydrate intake on reproduction but not lifespan in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Kim; McClure, Colin; Priest, Nicholas K; Hunt, John

    2015-01-01

    Modest dietary restriction extends lifespan (LS) in a diverse range of taxa and typically has a larger effect in females than males. Traditionally, this has been attributed to a stronger trade-off between LS and reproduction in females than in males that is mediated by the intake of calories. Recent studies, however, suggest that it is the intake of specific nutrients that extends LS and mediates this trade-off. Here, we used the geometric framework (GF) to examine the sex-specific effects of protein (P) and carbohydrate (C) intake on LS and reproduction in Drosophila melanogaster. We found that LS was maximized at a high intake of C and a low intake of P in both sexes, whereas nutrient intake had divergent effects on reproduction. Male offspring production rate and LS were maximized at the same intake of nutrients, whereas female egg production rate was maximized at a high intake of diets with a P:C ratio of 1:2. This resulted in larger differences in nutrient-dependent optima for LS and reproduction in females than in males, as well as an optimal intake of nutrients for lifetime reproduction that differed between the sexes. Under dietary choice, the sexes followed similar feeding trajectories regulated around a P:C ratio of 1:4. Consequently, neither sex reached their nutritional optimum for lifetime reproduction, suggesting intralocus sexual conflict over nutrient optimization. Our study shows clear sex differences in the nutritional requirements of reproduction in D. melanogaster and joins the growing list of studies challenging the role of caloric restriction in extending LS. PMID:25808180

  8. Sex-specific effects of protein and carbohydrate intake on reproduction but not lifespan in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Kim; McClure, Colin; Priest, Nicholas K; Hunt, John

    2015-08-01

    Modest dietary restriction extends lifespan (LS) in a diverse range of taxa and typically has a larger effect in females than males. Traditionally, this has been attributed to a stronger trade-off between LS and reproduction in females than in males that is mediated by the intake of calories. Recent studies, however, suggest that it is the intake of specific nutrients that extends LS and mediates this trade-off. Here, we used the geometric framework (GF) to examine the sex-specific effects of protein (P) and carbohydrate (C) intake on LS and reproduction in Drosophila melanogaster. We found that LS was maximized at a high intake of C and a low intake of P in both sexes, whereas nutrient intake had divergent effects on reproduction. Male offspring production rate and LS were maximized at the same intake of nutrients, whereas female egg production rate was maximized at a high intake of diets with a P:C ratio of 1:2. This resulted in larger differences in nutrient-dependent optima for LS and reproduction in females than in males, as well as an optimal intake of nutrients for lifetime reproduction that differed between the sexes. Under dietary choice, the sexes followed similar feeding trajectories regulated around a P:C ratio of 1:4. Consequently, neither sex reached their nutritional optimum for lifetime reproduction, suggesting intralocus sexual conflict over nutrient optimization. Our study shows clear sex differences in the nutritional requirements of reproduction in D. melanogaster and joins the growing list of studies challenging the role of caloric restriction in extending LS.

  9. Critical ligand binding reagent preparation/selection: when specificity depends on reagents.

    PubMed

    Rup, Bonita; O'Hara, Denise

    2007-05-11

    Throughout the life cycle of biopharmaceutical products, bioanalytical support is provided using ligand binding assays to measure the drug product for pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, and immunogenicity studies. The specificity and selectivity of these ligand binding assays are highly dependent on the ligand binding reagents. Thus the selection, characterization, and management processes for ligand binding reagents are crucial to successful assay development and application. This report describes process considerations for selection and characterization of ligand binding reagents that are integral parts of the different phases of assay development. Changes in expression, purification, modification, and storage of the ligand binding reagents may have a profound effect on the ligand binding assay performance. Thus long-term management of the critical ligand binding assay reagents is addressed including suggested characterization criteria that allow ligand binding reagents to be used in as consistent a manner as possible. Examples of challenges related to the selection, modification, and characterization of ligand binding reagents are included.

  10. Carbohydrate-Responsive Element-Binding Protein (ChREBP) Is a Negative Regulator of ARNT/HIF-1β Gene Expression in Pancreatic Islet β-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Noordeen, Nafeesa A.; Khera, Tarnjit K.; Sun, Gao; Longbottom, E. Rebecca; Pullen, Timothy J.; da Silva Xavier, Gabriela; Rutter, Guy A.; Leclerc, Isabelle

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Carbohydrate-responsive element-binding protein (ChREBP) is a transcription factor that has been shown to regulate carbohydrate metabolism in the liver and pancreatic β-cells in response to elevated glucose concentrations. Because few genes have been identified so far as bona fide ChREBP-target genes, we have performed a genome-wide analysis of the ChREBP transcriptome in pancreatic β-cells. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Chromatin immunoprecipitation and high-density oligonucleotide tiling arrays (ChIP-chip; Agilent Technologies) using MIN6 pancreatic β-cell extracts were performed together with transcriptional and other analysis using standard techniques. RESULTS One of the genes identified by ChIP-chip and linked to glucose sensing and insulin secretion was aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT)/hypoxia-inducible factor-1β (HIF-1β), a transcription factor implicated in altered gene expression and pancreatic-islet dysfunction in type 2 diabetes. We first confirmed that elevated glucose concentrations decreased ARNT/HIF-1β levels in INS-1 (832/13) cells and primary mouse islets. Demonstrating a role for ChREBP in ARNT gene regulation, ChREBP silencing increased ARNT mRNA levels in INS-1 (832/13) cells, and ChREBP overexpression decreased ARNT mRNA in INS-1 (832/13) cells and primary mouse islets. We demonstrated that ChREBP and Max-like protein X (MLX) bind on the ARNT/HIF-1β promoter on the proximal region that also confers the negative glucose responsiveness. CONCLUSIONS These results demonstrate that ChREBP acts as a novel repressor of the ARNT/HIF-1β gene and might contribute to β-cell dysfunction induced by glucotoxicity. PMID:19833882

  11. Cooperative non-specific DNA binding by octamerizing lambda cI repressors: a site-specific thermodynamic analysis.

    PubMed

    Pray, T R; Burz, D S; Ackers, G K

    1998-10-01

    Relationships between dimerization and site-specific binding have been characterized previously for wild-type and mutant cI repressors at the right operator (OR) of bacteriophage lambda DNA. However, the roles of higher-order oligomers (tetramers and octamers) that are also formed from these cI molecules have remained elusive. In this study, a clear correlation has been established between repressor oligomerization and non-specific DNA-binding activity. A modification of the quantitative DNase I footprint titration technique has been used to evaluate the degree of saturation of non-specific, OR-flanking lambda DNA by cI repressor oligomers. With the exception of one mutant, only those repressors capable of octamerizing were found to exhibit non-specific DNA-binding activity. The non-specific interaction was accurately modeled using either a one-dimensional, univalent, site-specific Ising lattice approximation, or a more traditional, multivalent lattice approach. It was found that non-specific DNA-binding by repressor oligomers is highly cooperative and energetically independent from site-specific binding at OR. Furthermore, the coupling free energy resolved for non-specific binding was similar to that of site-specific binding for each repressor, suggesting that similar structural elements may mediate the cooperative component of both binding processes. It is proposed that the state of assembly of the repressor molecule modulates its relative affinity for specific and non-specific DNA sequences. These specificities are allosterically regulated by the transmission of assembly-state information from the C-terminal domain, which mediates self-association and cooperativity, to the N-terminal domain, which primarily mediates DNA-binding. While dimers have a high affinity for their cognate sites within OR, tetramers and octamers may preferentially recognize non-specific DNA sequences. The concepts and findings developed in this study may facilitate quantitative

  12. Tropomodulin isoforms utilize specific binding functions to modulate dendrite development.

    PubMed

    Gray, Kevin T; Suchowerska, Alexandra K; Bland, Tyler; Colpan, Mert; Wayman, Gary; Fath, Thomas; Kostyukova, Alla S

    2016-06-01

    Tropomodulins (Tmods) cap F-actin pointed ends and have altered expression in the brain in neurological diseases. The function of Tmods in neurons has been poorly studied and their role in neurological diseases is entirely unknown. In this article, we show that Tmod1 and Tmod2, but not Tmod3, are positive regulators of dendritic complexity and dendritic spine morphology. Tmod1 increases dendritic branching distal from the cell body and the number of filopodia/thin spines. Tmod2 increases dendritic branching proximal to the cell body and the number of mature dendritic spines. Tmods utilize two actin-binding sites and two tropomyosin (Tpm)-binding sites to cap F-actin. Overexpression of Tmods with disrupted Tpm-binding sites indicates that Tmod1 and Tmod2 differentially utilize their Tpm- and actin-binding sites to affect morphology. Disruption of Tmod1's Tpm-binding sites abolished the overexpression phenotype. In contrast, overexpression of the mutated Tmod2 caused the same phenotype as wild type overexpression. Proximity ligation assays indicate that the mutated Tmods are shuttled similarly to wild type Tmods. Our data begins to uncover the roles of Tmods in neural development and the mechanism by which Tmods alter neural morphology. These observations in combination with altered Tmod expression found in several neurological diseases also suggest that dysregulation of Tmod expression may be involved in the pathology of these diseases. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27126680

  13. Platelet-derived growth factor binds specifically to receptors on vascular smooth muscle cells and the binding becomes nondissociable.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, L T; Tremble, P; Antoniades, H N

    1982-01-01

    Radioiodinated platelet-derived growth factor (125I-PDGF) was used in studies of PDGF binding sites on vascular smooth muscle cells. There was an excellent correlation between the ability of 125I-PDGF to stimulate cell proliferation and to bind specifically to cultured vascular smooth muscle cells. The half-maximal concentration for both processes was 0.1 nM. There were 50,000 binding sites per cell. Reduced PDGF, prepared by treatment of PDGF with 20 mM dithiothreitol, had neither the ability to bind to smooth muscle cells nor to stimulate cellular proliferation. Epidermal growth factor, nerve growth factor, fibroblast growth factor, and histone B did not compete for the binding sites at a concentration of 10 nM. 125I-PDGF binding was slowly reversible at 4 degrees C and was rapidly and totally reversible after a 1-min incubation at 37 degrees C. After continued incubation at 37 degrees C, the binding became irreversible. The half-time for formation of the nondissociable state of 125I-PDGF binding was approximately equal to 5 min at 37 degrees C. The nondissociable state of binding was not formed at 4 degrees C even after 1 hr of incubation. These data suggest that the sites we labeled are the PDGF receptors that mediate PDGF's mitogenic action and that a nondissociable state of PDGF binding is formed at 37 degrees C. It is likely that nondissociable PDGF represents internalized ligand or binding to sites that are converted to a high-affinity state after the ligand binds. PMID:6310551

  14. Specific binding of /sup 3/H-naloxone with isolated rat enterocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Yarygin, K.N.; Shitin, A.G.; Suiridov, D.D.; Titov, M.I.; Vinogradov, V.A.

    1985-12-01

    This paper presents data on the specific binding of naloxone with isolated rat enterocytes. Naloxone was bound with the cells in medium 199 containing 1 mg/ml of BSA. The incubation mixture contained 5 x 100 mM /sup 3/H-naloxone and, if indicated, other substances also. Dose dependence of binding of naloxone with rat enterocytes is shown. The kinetics of specific binding of naloxone with enterocytes at different temperatures is also shown, as is the irreversibility of binding of /sup 3/H-naloxone with isolated rat enterocytes. It was found that different ligands of opioid receptors can inhibit binding of naloxone competitively.

  15. Coordinate regulation/localization of the carbohydrate responsive binding protein (ChREBP) by two nuclear export signal sites: Discovery of a new leucine-rich nuclear export signal site

    SciTech Connect

    Fukasawa, Masashi; Ge, Qing; Wynn, R. Max; Ishii, Seiji; Uyeda, Kosaku

    2010-01-08

    Carbohydrate response element binding protein (ChREBP) is responsible for conversion of dietary carbohydrate to storage fat in liver by coordinating expression of the enzymes that channel glycolytic pyruvate into lipogenesis. The activation of ChREBP in response to high glucose is nuclear localization and transcription, and the inactivation of ChREBP under low glucose involves export from the nucleus to the cytosol. Here we report a new nuclear export signal site ('NES1') of ChREBP. Together these signals provide ChREBP with two NES sequences, both the previously reported NES2 and now the new NES1 coordinate to interact together with CRM1 (exportin) for nuclear export of the carbohydrate response element binding protein.

  16. Carbohydrate Recognition Properties of Human Ficolins

    PubMed Central

    Gout, Evelyne; Garlatti, Virginie; Smith, David F.; Lacroix, Monique; Dumestre-Pérard, Chantal; Lunardi, Thomas; Martin, Lydie; Cesbron, Jean-Yves; Arlaud, Gérard J.; Gaboriaud, Christine; Thielens, Nicole M.

    2010-01-01

    Ficolins are oligomeric innate immune recognition proteins consisting of a collagen-like region and a fibrinogen-like recognition domain that bind to pathogen- and apoptotic cell-associated molecular patterns. To investigate their carbohydrate binding specificities, serum-derived L-ficolin and recombinant H- and M-ficolins were fluorescently labeled, and their carbohydrate binding ability was analyzed by glycan array screening. L-ficolin preferentially recognized disulfated N-acetyllactosamine and tri- and tetrasaccharides containing terminal galactose or N-acetylglucosamine. Binding was sensitive to the position and orientation of the bond between N-acetyllactosamine and the adjacent carbohydrate. No significant binding of H-ficolin to any of the 377 glycans probed could be detected, providing further evidence for its poor lectin activity. M-ficolin bound preferentially to 9-O-acetylated 2-6-linked sialic acid derivatives and to various glycans containing sialic acid engaged in a 2-3 linkage. To further investigate the structural basis of sialic acid recognition by M-ficolin, point mutants were produced in which three residues of the fibrinogen domain were replaced by their counterparts in L-ficolin. Mutations G221F and A256V inhibited binding to the 9-O-acetylated sialic acid derivatives, whereas Y271F abolished interaction with all sialic acid-containing glycans. The crystal structure of the Y271F mutant fibrinogen domain was solved, showing that the mutation does not alter the structure of the ligand binding pocket. These analyses reveal novel ficolin ligands such as sulfated N-acetyllactosamine (L-ficolin) and gangliosides (M-ficolin) and provide precise insights into the sialic acid binding specificity of M-ficolin, emphasizing the essential role of Tyr271 in this respect. PMID:20032467

  17. Cadherin Domains in the Polysaccharide-Degrading Marine Bacterium Saccharophagus degradans 2-40 Are Carbohydrate-Binding Modules▿

    PubMed Central

    Fraiberg, Milana; Borovok, Ilya; Bayer, Edward A.; Weiner, Ronald M.; Lamed, Raphael

    2011-01-01

    The complex polysaccharide-degrading marine bacterium Saccharophagus degradans strain 2-40 produces putative proteins that contain numerous cadherin and cadherin-like domains involved in intercellular contact interactions. The current study reveals that both domain types exhibit reversible calcium-dependent binding to different complex polysaccharides which serve as growth substrates for the bacterium. PMID:21036994

  18. The carbohydrate-binding module of Fragaria × ananassa expansin 2 (CBM-FaExp2) binds to cell wall polysaccharides and decreases cell wall enzyme activities "in vitro".

    PubMed

    Nardi, Cristina; Escudero, Cristian; Villarreal, Natalia; Martínez, Gustavo; Civello, Pedro Marcos

    2013-01-01

    A putative carbohydrate binding module (CBM) from strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa Duch.) expansin 2 (CBM-FaExp2) was cloned and the encoding protein was over-expressed in Escherichia coli and purified in order to evaluate its capacity to bind different cell wall polysaccharides "in vitro". The protein CBM-FaExp2 bound to microcrystalline cellulose, xylan and pectin with different affinities (K(ad) = 33.6 ± 0.44 mL g(-1), K(ad) = 11.37 ± 0.87 mL g(-1), K(ad) = 10.4 ± 0.19 mL g(-1), respectively). According to "in vitro" enzyme assays, this CBM is able to decrease the activity of cell wall degrading enzymes such as polygalacturonase, endo-glucanase, pectinase and xylanase, probably because the binding of CBM-FaExp2 to the different substrates interferes with enzyme activity. The results suggest that expansins would bind not only cellulose but also a wide range of cell wall polymers.

  19. Amino Acid Change in the Carbohydrate Response Element Binding Protein is associated with lower triglycerides and myocardial infarction incidence depending on level of adherence to the Mediterranean diet in the PREDIMED trial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A variant (rs3812316, C771G, and Gln241His) in the MLXIPL (Max-like protein X interacting protein-like) gene encoding the carbohydrate response element binding protein has been associated with lower triglycerides. However, its association with cardiovascular diseases and gene-diet interactions modul...

  20. Structures and binding specificity of galactose- and mannose-binding lectins from champedak: differences from jackfruit lectins

    PubMed Central

    Gabrielsen, Mads; Abdul-Rahman, Puteri Shafinaz; Othman, Shatrah; Hashim, Onn H.; Cogdell, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Galactose-binding and mannose-binding lectins from the champedak fruit, which is native to South-east Asia, exhibit useful potential clinical applications. The specificity of the two lectins for their respective ligands allows the detection of potential cancer biomarkers and monitoring of the glycosylated state of proteins in human serum and/or urine. To fully understand and expand the use of these natural proteins, their complete sequences and crystal structures are presented here, together with details of sugar binding. PMID:24915077

  1. Structures and binding specificity of galactose- and mannose-binding lectins from champedak: differences from jackfruit lectins.

    PubMed

    Gabrielsen, Mads; Abdul-Rahman, Puteri Shafinaz; Othman, Shatrah; Hashim, Onn H; Cogdell, Richard J

    2014-06-01

    Galactose-binding and mannose-binding lectins from the champedak fruit, which is native to South-east Asia, exhibit useful potential clinical applications. The specificity of the two lectins for their respective ligands allows the detection of potential cancer biomarkers and monitoring of the glycosylated state of proteins in human serum and/or urine. To fully understand and expand the use of these natural proteins, their complete sequences and crystal structures are presented here, together with details of sugar binding. PMID:24915077

  2. MONKEY: Identifying conserved transcription-factor binding sitesin multiple alignments using a binding site-specific evolutionarymodel

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, Alan M.; Chiang, Derek Y.; Pollard, Daniel A.; Iyer, VenkyN.; Eisen, Michael B.

    2004-10-28

    We introduce a method (MONKEY) to identify conserved transcription-factor binding sites in multispecies alignments. MONKEY employs probabilistic models of factor specificity and binding site evolution, on which basis we compute the likelihood that putative sites are conserved and assign statistical significance to each hit. Using genomes from the genus Saccharomyces, we illustrate how the significance of real sites increases with evolutionary distance and explore the relationship between conservation and function.

  3. Specific bindings of glycine peptides of distinctly different chain length on dynamic papain surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Katsuhiko

    2011-06-01

    We investigated the specific bindings of peptides of 1-10 glycine residues (1-10GLY) on dynamic papain surfaces via molecular dynamics and docking simulations. Although the binding specificities of 1-5GLY on papain fluctuated little with time, the binding specificities of 6-10GLY on papain considerably fluctuated with time. Some residues had a significant impact on bindings of 6-10GLY to sites near active center of papain, and some of their residues were specific for each 6GLY, 8GLY, and 10GLY. Modification of these specific residues should allow for control of binding specificity of 6GLY, 8GLY, and 10GLY to the active center.

  4. Statistical analysis of structural determinants for protein-DNA-binding specificity.

    PubMed

    Corona, Rosario I; Guo, Jun-Tao

    2016-08-01

    DNA-binding proteins play critical roles in biological processes including gene expression, DNA packaging and DNA repair. They bind to DNA target sequences with different degrees of binding specificity, ranging from highly specific (HS) to nonspecific (NS). Alterations of DNA-binding specificity, due to either genetic variation or somatic mutations, can lead to various diseases. In this study, a comparative analysis of protein-DNA complex structures was carried out to investigate the structural features that contribute to binding specificity. Protein-DNA complexes were grouped into three general classes based on degrees of binding specificity: HS, multispecific (MS), and NS. Our results show a clear trend of structural features among the three classes, including amino acid binding propensities, simple and complex hydrogen bonds, major/minor groove and base contacts, and DNA shape. We found that aspartate is enriched in HS DNA binding proteins and predominately binds to a cytosine through a single hydrogen bond or two consecutive cytosines through bidentate hydrogen bonds. Aromatic residues, histidine and tyrosine, are highly enriched in the HS and MS groups and may contribute to specific binding through different mechanisms. To further investigate the role of protein flexibility in specific protein-DNA recognition, we analyzed the conformational changes between the bound and unbound states of DNA-binding proteins and structural variations. The results indicate that HS and MS DNA-binding domains have larger conformational changes upon DNA-binding and larger degree of flexibility in both bound and unbound states. Proteins 2016; 84:1147-1161. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Inhibitors of serotonin reuptake and specific imipramine binding in human blood plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Brusov, O.S.; Fomenko, A.M.; Katasonov, A.B.; Lidemann, R.R.

    1985-12-01

    This paper describes a method of extraction of endogenous inhibitors of specific IMI binding and of 5-HT reuptake, from human blood plasma and the heterogeneity of these compounds is demonstrated. Specific binding was determined as the difference between binding of /sup 3/H-IMI in the absence and in the presence of 50 microM IMI. Under these conditions, specific binding amounted to 70-80% of total binding of /sup 3/H-IMI. It is shown that extract obtained from human blood contains a material which inhibits dose-dependently both 5-HT reuptake and specific binding of /sup 3/H-IMI. Gel-chromatography of extracts of human blood plasma on Biogel P-2 is also shown.

  6. Carbohydrate Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bemiller, James N.

    Carbohydrates are important in foods as a major source of energy, to impart crucial textural properties, and as dietary fiber which influences physiological processes. Digestible carbohydrates, which are converted into monosaccharides, which are absorbed, provide metabolic energy. Worldwide, carbohydrates account for more than 70% of the caloric value of the human diet. It is recommended that all persons should limit calories from fat (the other significant source) to not more than 30% and that most of the carbohydrate calories should come from starch. Nondigestible polysaccharides (all those other than starch) comprise the major portion of dietary fiber (Sect. 10.5). Carbohydrates also contribute other attributes, including bulk, body, viscosity, stability to emulsions and foams, water-holding capacity, freeze-thaw stability, browning, flavors, aromas, and a range of desirable textures (from crispness to smooth, soft gels). They also provide satiety. Basic carbohydrate structures, chemistry, and terminology can be found in references (1, 2).

  7. Demonstration of specific binding sites for /sup 3/H-RRR-alpha-tocopherol on human erythrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kitabchi, A.E.; Wimalasena, J.

    1982-01-01

    Previous work from our laboratory demonstrated specific binding sites for /sup 3/H-RRR-alpha-tocopherol (/sup 3/H-d alpha T) in membranes of rat adrenal cells. As tocopherol deficiency is associated with increased susceptibility of red blood cells to hemolysis, we investigated tocopherol binding sites in human RBCs. Erythrocytes were found to have specific binding sites for /sup 3/H-d alpha T that exhibited saturability and time and cell-concentration dependence as well as reversibility of binding. Kinetic studies of binding demonstrated two binding sites--one with high affinity (Ka of 2.6 x 10(7) M-1), low capacity (7,600 sites per cell) and the other with low affinity (1.2 x 10(6) M-1), high capacity (150,000 sites per cell). In order to localize the binding sites further, RBCs were fractionated and greater than 90% of the tocopherol binding was located in the membranes. Similar to the findings in intact RBCs, the membranes exhibited two binding sites with a respective Ka of 3.3 x 10(7) M-1 and 1.5 x 10(6) M-1. Specificity data for binding demonstrated 10% binding for RRR-gamma-tocopherol, but not other tocopherol analog exhibited competition for /sup 3/H-d alpha T binding sites. Instability data suggested a protein nature for these binding sites. Preliminary studies on Triton X-100 solubilized fractions resolved the binding sites to a major component with an Mr of 65,000 and a minor component with an Mr of 125,000. We conclude that human erythrocyte membranes contain specific binding sites for RRR-alpha-tocopherol. These sites may be of physiologic significance in the function of tocopherol on the red blood cell membrane.

  8. The Use of Carbohydrate Binding Modules (CBMs) to Monitor Changes in Fragmentation and Cellulose Fiber Surface Morphology during Cellulase- and Swollenin-induced Deconstruction of Lignocellulosic Substrates*

    PubMed Central

    Gourlay, Keith; Hu, Jinguang; Arantes, Valdeir; Penttilä, Merja; Saddler, Jack N.

    2015-01-01

    Although the actions of many of the hydrolytic enzymes involved in cellulose hydrolysis are relatively well understood, the contributions that amorphogenesis-inducing proteins might contribute to cellulose deconstruction are still relatively undefined. Earlier work has shown that disruptive proteins, such as the non-hydrolytic non-oxidative protein Swollenin, can open up and disaggregate the less-ordered regions of lignocellulosic substrates. Within the cellulosic fraction, relatively disordered, amorphous regions known as dislocations are known to occur along the length of the fibers. It was postulated that Swollenin might act synergistically with hydrolytic enzymes to initiate biomass deconstruction within these dislocation regions. Carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) that preferentially bind to cellulosic substructures were fluorescently labeled. They were imaged, using confocal microscopy, to assess the distribution of crystalline and amorphous cellulose at the fiber surface, as well as to track changes in surface morphology over the course of enzymatic hydrolysis and fiber fragmentation. Swollenin was shown to promote targeted disruption of the cellulosic structure at fiber dislocations. PMID:25527502

  9. An efficient arabinoxylan-debranching α-L-arabinofuranosidase of family GH62 from Aspergillus nidulans contains a secondary carbohydrate binding site.

    PubMed

    Wilkens, Casper; Andersen, Susan; Petersen, Bent O; Li, An; Busse-Wicher, Marta; Birch, Johnny; Cockburn, Darrell; Nakai, Hiroyuki; Christensen, Hans E M; Kragelund, Birthe B; Dupree, Paul; McCleary, Barry; Hindsgaul, Ole; Hachem, Maher Abou; Svensson, Birte

    2016-07-01

    An α-L-arabinofuranosidase of GH62 from Aspergillus nidulans FGSC A4 (AnAbf62A-m2,3) has an unusually high activity towards wheat arabinoxylan (WAX) (67 U/mg; k cat = 178/s, K m = 4.90 mg/ml) and arabinoxylooligosaccharides (AXOS) with degrees of polymerisation (DP) 3-5 (37-80 U/mg), but about 50 times lower activity for sugar beet arabinan and 4-nitrophenyl-α-L-arabinofuranoside. α-1,2- and α-1,3-linked arabinofuranoses are released from monosubstituted, but not from disubstituted, xylose in WAX and different AXOS as demonstrated by NMR and polysaccharide analysis by carbohydrate gel electrophoresis (PACE). Mutants of the predicted general acid (Glu(188)) and base (Asp(28)) catalysts, and the general acid pK a modulator (Asp(136)) lost 1700-, 165- and 130-fold activities for WAX. WAX, oat spelt xylan, birchwood xylan and barley β-glucan retarded migration of AnAbf62A-m2,3 in affinity electrophoresis (AE) although the latter two are neither substrates nor inhibitors. Trp(23) and Tyr(44), situated about 30 Å from the catalytic site as seen in an AnAbf62A-m2,3 homology model generated using Streptomyces thermoviolaceus SthAbf62A as template, participate in carbohydrate binding. Compared to wild-type, W23A and W23A/Y44A mutants are less retarded in AE, maintain about 70 % activity towards WAX with K i of WAX substrate inhibition increasing 4-7-folds, but lost 77-96 % activity for the AXOS. The Y44A single mutant had less effect, suggesting Trp(23) is a key determinant. AnAbf62A-m2,3 seems to apply different polysaccharide-dependent binding modes, and Trp(23) and Tyr(44) belong to a putative surface binding site which is situated at a distance of the active site and has to be occupied to achieve full activity. PMID:26946172

  10. Proline-rich sequences that bind to Src homology 3 domains with individual specificities.

    PubMed Central

    Alexandropoulos, K; Cheng, G; Baltimore, D

    1995-01-01

    To study the binding specificity of Src homology 3 (SH3) domains, we have screened a mouse embryonic expression library for peptide fragments that interact with them. Several clones were identified that express fragments of proteins which, through proline-rich binding sites, exhibit differential binding specificity to various SH3 domains. Src-SH3-specific binding uses a sequence of 7 aa of the consensus RPLPXXP, in which the N-terminal arginine is very important. The SH3 domains of the Src-related kinases Fyn, Lyn, and Hck bind to this sequence with the same affinity as that of the Src SH3. In contrast, a quite different proline-rich sequence from the Btk protein kinase binds to the Fyn, Lyn, and Hck SH3 domains, but not to the Src SH3. Specific binding of the Abl SH3 requires a longer, more proline-rich sequence but no arginine. One clone that binds to both Src and Abl SH3 domains through a common site exhibits reversed binding orientation, in that an arginine indispensable for binding to all tested SH3 domains occurs at the C terminus. Another clone contains overlapping yet distinct Src and Abl SH3 binding sites. Binding to the SH3 domains is mediated by a common PXXP amino acid sequence motif present on all ligands, and specificity comes about from other interactions, often ones involving arginine. The rules governing in vivo usage of particular sites by particular SH3 domains are not clear, but one binding orientation may be more specific than another. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7536925

  11. High Glucose-induced O-GlcNAcylated Carbohydrate Response Element-binding Protein (ChREBP) Mediates Mesangial Cell Lipogenesis and Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Min-Jung; Kim, Dong-Il; Lim, Seul-Ki; Choi, Joo-Hee; Han, Ho-Jae; Yoon, Kyung-Chul; Park, Soo-Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Carbohydrate response element-binding protein (ChREBP) is a transcription factor responsible for carbohydrate metabolism in the liver. However, the role of ChREBP in diabetic nephropathy has not been elucidated. Thus, we investigated the role of ChREBP in mesangial cells in diabetic nephropathy. Treatment with 25 mm glucose (high glucose; HG) increased cellular O-GlcNAc and O-GlcNAcylated ChREBP in mesangial cells compared with normal 5.5 mm glucose. O-(2-acetamido-2-deoxy-d-glucopyranosylidene) amino N-phenylcarbamate (PUGNAc), a drug that increases O-GlcNAc, augmented the expression of ChREBP targets, whereas DON, a drug that decreases O-GlcNAc and O-GlcNAcase overexpression, mitigated the increase with HG. O-GlcNAc augmented the protein stability, transcriptional activity, and nuclear translocation of ChREBP. HG treatment also stimulated lipid accumulation and the contents of triglyceride and cholesterol in mesangial cells. In addition, HG triggered expression of hypoxia-inducible factor 1-α, vascular endothelial growth factor, and extracellular matrix components related to nephrosclerosis. The ChREBP mutant, W130A, did not exhibit HG-induced lipid accumulation and fibrotic proteins, suggesting that the Trp-130 residue in the MCR3 domain is important in the development of glomerulosclerosis. O-GlcNAcylated ChREBP was elevated in mesangium cells of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. In conclusion, HG increased the O-GlcNAcylated ChREBP level, which resulted in lipid accumulation and up-regulation of fibrotic proteins in mesangial cells. These effects may lead mesangial cells to an ultimately pathological state. PMID:24616092

  12. In-silico and in-vitro elucidation of BH3 binding specificity towards Bcl-2

    PubMed Central

    London, Nir; Gullá, Stefano; Keating, Amy E.; Schueler-Furman, Ora

    2013-01-01

    Interactions between Bcl-2 like proteins and BH3 domains play a key role in the regulation of apoptosis. Despite the overall structural similarity of their interaction with helical BH3 domains, Bcl-2 like proteins exhibit an intricate spectrum of binding specificities whose underlying basis is not well understood. Here, we characterize these interactions using Rosetta FlexPepBind, a protocol for the prediction of peptide binding specificity that evaluates the binding potential of different peptides based on structural models of the corresponding peptide-receptor complexes. For two prominent players, Bcl-xL and Mcl-1, we obtain good agreement with a large set of experimental SPOT array measurements and recapitulate the binding specificity of peptides derived by yeast display in a previous study. We extend our approach to a third member of this family, Bcl-2: we test our blind prediction of the binding of 180 BIM-derived peptides with a corresponding experimental SPOT array. Both prediction and experiment reveal a Bcl-2 binding specificity pattern that resembles that of Bcl-xL. Finally, we extend this application to accurately predict the specificity pattern of additional human BH3-only derived peptides. This study characterizes the distinct patterns of binding specificity of BH3-only derived peptides for the Bcl-2 like proteins Bcl-xL, Mcl-1 and Bcl-2, and provides insight into the structural basis of determinants of specificity. PMID:22702834

  13. Immunocytological localization of the HNK-1 carbohydrate in murine cerebellum, hippocampus and spinal cord using monoclonal antibodies with different epitope specificities.

    PubMed

    Rollenhagen, A; Czaniera, R; Albert, M; Wintergerst, E S; Schachner, M

    2001-04-01

    The HNK-1 carbohydrate, an unusual 3'-sulfated glucuronic acid epitope characteristic of many neural recognition molecules, serves as a ligand in neural cell interactions and is differentially expressed in the quadriceps and saphenous branches of the femoral nerve in the PNS of adult mice. Based on these observations, we investigated the possibility that the HNK-1 carbohydrate may be differentially distributed in neurons and fiber tracts also in the CNS thereby contributing to different targeting and guidance mechanisms. We have used antibodies with different HNK-1 epitope specificities to probe for subtle differences in expression patterns. In the adult mouse cerebellum the HNK-1 carbohydrate is detectable in stripe-like compartments in the molecular and Purkinje cell layers, whereas N-CAM and its associated alpha2,8 polysialic acid does not show this compartmentation. In the adult hippocampus, the HNK-1 carbohydrate localizes to perineuronal nets of inhibitory interneurons and marks the inner third of the molecular layer of the dentate gyrus. In the adult spinal cord, HNK-1 labeling is most pronounced in gray matter areas. White matter enriched regions show differential labeling with regard to fiber tracts and antibody specificity. Whereas the different antibodies do not show differences in staining in the cerebellum and the hippocampus, they show differences in staining pattern of fiber tracts and motoneurons in the spinal cord. The HNK-1 expression pattern also differed in the adult spinal cord from that observed at embryonic day 14 and postnatal day 14. Our observations suggest a functional role in the specification of functionally discrete compartments in different areas of the CNS and during development.

  14. Quantitative determination of protein molecular weight with an acoustic sensor; significance of specific versus non-specific binding.

    PubMed

    Mitsakakis, Konstantinos; Tsortos, Achilleas; Gizeli, Electra

    2014-08-21

    Surface acoustic wave sensors with integrated microfluidics for multi-sample sensing have been implemented in this work towards the quantitative correlation of the acoustic signal with the molecular weight of surface bound proteins investigating different interaction/binding conditions. The results are presented for: (i) four different biotinylated molecules (30 ≤ Mw ≤ 150 kDa) specifically binding to neutravidin; (ii) the same four non-biotinylated molecules, as well as neutravidin, adsorbing onto gold; and (iii) four cardiac marker proteins (86 ≤ Mw ≤ 540 kDa) specifically binding to their homologous antibodies. Surface plasmon resonance was employed as an independent optical mass sensor. A linear relationship was found to exist between the phase change of the acoustic signal and the molecular weight of the proteins in both cases of specific binding. In contrast, non-specific binding of proteins directly onto gold exhibited no such linear relationship. In all three cases phase change was correlated with the bound mass per area. The underlying mechanism behind the different behavior between specific and non-specific binding is discussed by taking into account the geometrical restrictions imposed by the size of the specific biorecognition molecule and the corresponding bound protein. Our results emphasize the quantitative nature of the phase of the acoustic signal in determining the Mw (in the case of specific binding) with a resolution of 15% and the mass of the bound proteins (in all cases), as well as the significance of the biorecognition molecules in deriving the molecular weight from acoustic or optical detectors.

  15. Identification of a Male-Specific RNA Binding Protein That Regulates Sex-Specific Splicing of Bmdsx by Increasing RNA Binding Activity of BmPSI▿ §

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Masataka G.; Imanishi, Shigeo; Dohmae, Naoshi; Asanuma, Miwako; Matsumoto, Shogo

    2010-01-01

    Bmdsx is a sex-determining gene in the silkworm and is alternatively spliced in males and females. CE1 is a splicing silencer element responsible for the sex-specific splicing of Bmdsx. To identify sex-specific factors implicated in the sex-specific splicing of Bmdsx, we performed RNA affinity chromatography using CE1 RNA as a ligand. We have identified BmIMP, a Bombyx homolog of IGF-II mRNA binding protein (IMP), as a male-specific factor that specifically binds to CE1. The gene encoding BmIMP is localized on the Z chromosome and is male-specifically expressed in various tissues. Antisense inhibition of BmIMP expression increased female-specific splicing of Bmdsx pre-mRNA. Coimmunoprecipitation and glutathione S-transferase (GST) pulldown analyses demonstrated that BmIMP physically interacts with BmPSI, which has been identified as a factor implicated in the sex-specific splicing of Bmdsx, through the KH domains of BmIMP. The functional consequence of this interaction was examined using RNA mobility shift analysis. BmIMP increased BmPSI-CE1 RNA binding activity by decreasing the rate of BmPSI dissociation from CE1 RNA. Truncation analysis of BmIMP suggested that the KH domains are responsible for enhancing BmPSI-CE1 RNA binding activity. These results suggest that BmIMP may enhance the male-specific splicing of Bmdsx pre-mRNA by increasing RNA binding activity of BmPSI. PMID:20956562

  16. Carbohydrate Loading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Csernus, Marilyn

    Carbohydrate loading is a frequently used technique to improve performance by altering an athlete's diet. The objective is to increase glycogen stored in muscles for use in prolonged strenuous exercise. For two to three days, the athlete consumes a diet that is low in carbohydrates and high in fat and protein while continuing to exercise and…

  17. Carbohydrate binding properties of banana (Musa acuminata) lectin I. Novel recognition of internal alpha1,3-linked glucosyl residues.

    PubMed

    Mo, H; Winter, H C; Van Damme, E J; Peumans, W J; Misaki, A; Goldstein, I J

    2001-05-01

    Examination of lectins of banana (Musa acuminata) and the closely related plantain (Musa spp.) by the techniques of quantitative precipitation, hapten inhibition of precipitation, and isothermal titration calorimetry showed that they are mannose/glucose binding proteins with a preference for the alpha-anomeric form of these sugars. Both generate precipitin curves with branched chain alpha-mannans (yeast mannans) and alpha-glucans (glycogens, dextrans, and starches), but not with linear alpha-glucans containing only alpha1,4- and alpha1,6-glucosidic bonds (isolichenan and pullulan). The novel observation was made that banana and plantain lectins recognize internal alpha1,3-linked glucosyl residues, which occur in the linear polysaccharides elsinan and nigeran. Concanavalin A and lectins from pea and lentil, also mannose/glucose binding lectins, did not precipitate with any of these linear alpha-glucans. This is, the authors believe, the first report of the recognition of internal alpha1,3-glucosidic bonds by a plant lectin. It is possible that these lectins are present in the pulp of their respective fruit, complexed with starch.

  18. Specificity of human anti-carbohydrate IgG antibodies as probed with polyacrylamide-based glycoconjugates.

    PubMed

    Smorodin, E P; Kurtenkov, O A; Sergeyev, B L; Pazynina, G V; Bovin, N V

    2004-01-01

    The TF, Tn, and SiaTn glycotopes are frequently expressed in cancer-associated mucins. Antibodies to these glycotopes were found in human serum. A set of polyacrylamide (PAA)--based glycoconjugates was applied to the direct and competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) to characterize the specificity of serum IgG antibodies. The anti-TF, -Tn and -SiaTn IgG were affinity purified from serum of cancer patients and characterized using PAA-conjugates and free saccharides. The anti-TF and -Tn antibodies were shown to be specific. The anti-TF IgG bound both Galbeta1-3GalNAcalpha- and Galbeta1-3GalNAcbeta-PAA, the latter was three-four times more effective inhibitor of antibody binding. The anti-Tn IgG reacted only with GalNAcalpha-PAA. The anti-SiaTn IgG cross-reacted with Tn-PAA but SiaTn-PAA was five-six times more effective inhibitor in a competitive assay. The IC50 values for PAA-conjugates with the corresponding antibodies typically ranged from 2 to 5 x 10(-8) M. The antibodies display a low specificity to mucin-type glycoconjugates in comparison with PAA-conjugates as was shown for mucins isolated from human malignant tumor tissues, ovine submaxillary mucin (OSM) and asialo-OSM. The unusual IgG-antibody specificity to GalNAcbeta and GalNAcbeta1-3GalNAcbeta ligands was found in human serum.

  19. Specificity of human anti-carbohydrate IgG antibodies as probed with polyacrylamide-based glycoconjugates.

    PubMed

    Smorodin, E P; Kurtenkov, O A; Sergeyev, B L; Pazynina, G V; Bovin, N V

    2004-01-01

    The TF, Tn, and SiaTn glycotopes are frequently expressed in cancer-associated mucins. Antibodies to these glycotopes were found in human serum. A set of polyacrylamide (PAA)--based glycoconjugates was applied to the direct and competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) to characterize the specificity of serum IgG antibodies. The anti-TF, -Tn and -SiaTn IgG were affinity purified from serum of cancer patients and characterized using PAA-conjugates and free saccharides. The anti-TF and -Tn antibodies were shown to be specific. The anti-TF IgG bound both Galbeta1-3GalNAcalpha- and Galbeta1-3GalNAcbeta-PAA, the latter was three-four times more effective inhibitor of antibody binding. The anti-Tn IgG reacted only with GalNAcalpha-PAA. The anti-SiaTn IgG cross-reacted with Tn-PAA but SiaTn-PAA was five-six times more effective inhibitor in a competitive assay. The IC50 values for PAA-conjugates with the corresponding antibodies typically ranged from 2 to 5 x 10(-8) M. The antibodies display a low specificity to mucin-type glycoconjugates in comparison with PAA-conjugates as was shown for mucins isolated from human malignant tumor tissues, ovine submaxillary mucin (OSM) and asialo-OSM. The unusual IgG-antibody specificity to GalNAcbeta and GalNAcbeta1-3GalNAcbeta ligands was found in human serum. PMID:15001840

  20. Carbohydrates and T cells: a sweet twosome.

    PubMed

    Avci, Fikri Y; Li, Xiangming; Tsuji, Moriya; Kasper, Dennis L

    2013-04-01

    Carbohydrates as T cell-activating antigens have been generating significant interest. For many years, carbohydrates were thought of as T-independent antigens, however, more recent research had demonstrated that mono- or oligosaccharides glycosidically linked to peptides can be recognized by T cells. T cell recognition of these glycopeptides depends on the structure of both peptide and glycan portions of the antigen. Subsequently, it was discovered that natural killer T cells recognized glycolipids when presented by the antigen presenting molecule CD1d. A transformative insight into glycan-recognition by T cells occurred when zwitterionic polysaccharides were discovered to bind to and be presented by MHCII to CD4+ T cells. Based on this latter observation, the role that carbohydrate epitopes generated from glycoconjugate vaccines had in activating helper T cells was explored and it was found that these epitopes are presented to specific carbohydrate recognizing T cells through a unique mechanism. Here we review the key interactions between carbohydrate antigens and the adaptive immune system at the molecular, cellular and systems levels exploring the significant biological implications in health and disease.

  1. Biologically-Inspired Peptide Reagents for Enhancing IMS-MS Analysis of Carbohydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohrer, Brian C.; Clemmer, David E.

    2011-09-01

    The binding properties of a peptidoglycan recognition protein are translated via combinatorial chemistry into short peptides. Non-adjacent histidine, tyrosine, and arginine residues in the protein's binding cleft that associate specifically with the glycan moiety of a peptidoglycan substrate are incorporated into linear sequences creating a library of 27 candidate tripeptide reagents (three possible residues permutated across three positions). Upon electrospraying the peptide library and carbohydrate mixtures, some noncovalent complexes are observed. The binding efficiencies of the peptides vary according to their amino acid composition as well as the disaccharide linkage and carbohydrate ring-type. In addition to providing a charge-carrier for the carbohydrate, peptide reagents can also be used to differentiate carbohydrate isomers by ion mobility spectrometry. The utility of these peptide reagents as a means of enhancing ion mobility analysis of carbohydrates is illustrated by examining four glucose-containing disaccharide isomers, including a pair that is not resolved by ion mobility alone. The specificity and stoichiometry of the peptide-carbohydrate complexes are also investigated. Trihistidine demonstrates both suitable binding efficiency and successful resolution of disaccharides isomers, suggesting it may be a useful reagent in IMS analyses of carbohydrates.

  2. A lectin affinity workflow targeting glycosite-specific, cancer-related carbohydrate structures in trypsin-digested human plasma1

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Penelope M.; Schilling, Birgit; Niles, Richard K.; Braten, Miles; Johansen, Eric; Liu, Haichuan; Lerch, Michael; Sorensen, Dylan J.; Li, Bensheng; Allen, Simon; Hall, Steven C.; Witkowska, H. Ewa; Regnier, Fred E.; Gibson, Bradford W.; Fisher, Susan J.

    2011-01-01

    Glycans are cell-type specific, post-translational protein modifications that are modulated during developmental and disease processes. As such, glycoproteins are attractive biomarker candidates. Here, we describe a mass spectrometry-based workflow that incorporates lectin affinity chromatography to enrich for proteins that carry specific glycan structures. As increases in sialylation and fucosylation are prominent among cancer-associated modifications, we focused on Sambucus nigra agglutinin (SNA) and Aleuria aurantia lectin (AAL), lectins which bind sialic acid- and fucose-containing structures, respectively. Fucosylated and sialylated glycopeptides from human lactoferrin served as positive controls, and high mannose structures from yeast invertase served as negative controls. The standards were spiked into Multiple Affinity Removal System (MARS) 14-depleted, trypsin-digested human plasma from healthy donors. Samples were loaded onto lectin columns, separated by HPLC into flow-through and bound fractions, and treated with peptide: N-glycosidase F to remove N-linked glycans. The deglycosylated peptide fractions were interrogated by ESI HPLC-MS/MS. We identified a total of 122 human plasma glycoproteins containing 247 unique glycosites. Importantly, several of the observed glycoproteins (e.g., cadherin 5 and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin) typically circulate in plasma at low ng/mL levels. Together, these results provide mass spectrometry-based evidence of the utility of incorporating lectin-separation platforms into cancer biomarker discovery pipelines. PMID:20705048

  3. Assessing Bacterial Interactions Using Carbohydrate-Based Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Flannery, Andrea; Gerlach, Jared Q.; Joshi, Lokesh; Kilcoyne, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Carbohydrates play a crucial role in host-microorganism interactions and many host glycoconjugates are receptors or co-receptors for microbial binding. Host glycosylation varies with species and location in the body, and this contributes to species specificity and tropism of commensal and pathogenic bacteria. Additionally, bacterial glycosylation is often the first bacterial molecular species encountered and responded to by the host system. Accordingly, characterising and identifying the exact structures involved in these critical interactions is an important priority in deciphering microbial pathogenesis. Carbohydrate-based microarray platforms have been an underused tool for screening bacterial interactions with specific carbohydrate structures, but they are growing in popularity in recent years. In this review, we discuss carbohydrate-based microarrays that have been profiled with whole bacteria, recombinantly expressed adhesins or serum antibodies. Three main types of carbohydrate-based microarray platform are considered; (i) conventional carbohydrate or glycan microarrays; (ii) whole mucin microarrays; and (iii) microarrays constructed from bacterial polysaccharides or their components. Determining the nature of the interactions between bacteria and host can help clarify the molecular mechanisms of carbohydrate-mediated interactions in microbial pathogenesis, infectious disease and host immune response and may lead to new strategies to boost therapeutic treatments. PMID:27600247

  4. Assessing Bacterial Interactions Using Carbohydrate-Based Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Flannery, Andrea; Gerlach, Jared Q.; Joshi, Lokesh; Kilcoyne, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Carbohydrates play a crucial role in host-microorganism interactions and many host glycoconjugates are receptors or co-receptors for microbial binding. Host glycosylation varies with species and location in the body, and this contributes to species specificity and tropism of commensal and pathogenic bacteria. Additionally, bacterial glycosylation is often the first bacterial molecular species encountered and responded to by the host system. Accordingly, characterising and identifying the exact structures involved in these critical interactions is an important priority in deciphering microbial pathogenesis. Carbohydrate-based microarray platforms have been an underused tool for screening bacterial interactions with specific carbohydrate structures, but they are growing in popularity in recent years. In this review, we discuss carbohydrate-based microarrays that have been profiled with whole bacteria, recombinantly expressed adhesins or serum antibodies. Three main types of carbohydrate-based microarray platform are considered; (i) conventional carbohydrate or glycan microarrays; (ii) whole mucin microarrays; and (iii) microarrays constructed from bacterial polysaccharides or their components. Determining the nature of the interactions between bacteria and host can help clarify the molecular mechanisms of carbohydrate-mediated interactions in microbial pathogenesis, infectious disease and host immune response and may lead to new strategies to boost therapeutic treatments.

  5. Heterologous expression of newly identified galectin-8 from sea urchin embryos produces recombinant protein with lactose binding specificity and anti-adhesive activity

    PubMed Central

    Karakostis, Kostantinos; Costa, Caterina; Zito, Francesca; Matranga, Valeria

    2015-01-01

    Galectin family members specifically bind beta-galactoside derivatives and are involved in different cellular events, including cell communication, signalling, apoptosis, and immune responses. Here, we report a tandem-repeat type galectin from the Paracentrotus lividus sea urchin embryo, referred to as Pl-GAL-8. The 933nt sequence encodes a protein of 34.73 kDa, containing the conserved HFNPRF and WGxExR motifs in the two highly similar carbohydrate-recognition domains (CRD). The three-dimensional protein structure model of the N-CRD confirms the high evolutionary conservation of carbohydrate binding sites. The temporal gene expression is regulated during development and transcripts localize at the tip of the archenteron at gastrula stage, in a subset of the secondary mesenchyme cells that differentiate into blastocoelar (immune) cells. Functional studies using a recombinant Pl-GAL-8 expressed in bacteria demonstrate its hemo-agglutinating activity on human red blood cells through the binding to lactose, as well as its ability in inhibiting the adhesion of human Hep-G2 cells to the substrate. The recent implications in autoimmune diseases and inflammatory disorders make Gal-8 an attractive candidate for therapeutic purposes. Our results offer a solid basis for addressing the use of the new Pl-GAL-8 in functional and applicative studies, respectively in the developmental and biomedical fields. PMID:26640155

  6. Effect of dietary carbohydrate on non-specific immune response, hepatic antioxidative abilities and disease resistance of juvenile golden pompano (Trachinotus ovatus).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chuanpeng; Ge, Xianping; Lin, Heizhao; Niu, Jin

    2014-12-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary carbohydrate (CHO) levels on non-specific immune responses, hepatic antioxidative status and disease resistance of juvenile golden pompano. Fish were fed six isonitrogenous and isoenergetic diets containing various CHO levels for 8 weeks. After the feeding trial, fish were challenged by Vibrio harveyi and survival rate was recorded for the next 12 days. Plasma total protein and albumin content, respiratory burst activity, alkaline phosphatase, slightly increased with dietary starch level from 0% to 16.8%, but significantly decreased at dietary starch levels of 16.8%-28%. Plasma lysozyme, complement 3 and complement 4 levels increased with increasing dietary carbohydrate up to 11.2% and then declined (P < 0.05). Contrary to glutamic-oxalacetic transaminase and triiodothyronine, plasma cortisol content increased with increasing dietary carbohydrate up to 22.4%, and then levelled off. The hepatic total antioxidative capacity, reduced glutathione and catalase levels reached the peak at the fish fed diet with 16.8% carbohydrate (P < 0.05). This also held true for hepatic superoxide dismutase activities, whereas the hepatic malondialdehyde content of fish fed dietary starch level of 16.8% was significantly lower than that of fish fed no CHO diet, but showed little difference (P > 0.05) with those of the other treatments. After challenge, fish fed 11.2% and 16.8% dietary CHO showed higher survival rate than that of fish in 0% CHO group (P < 0.05). However, survival rate showed little difference among 0%, 5.6%, 22.4% and 28% CHO groups (P > 0.05). The results of this study suggest that ingestion of 11.2-16.8% dietary CHO can enhance the non-specific immune responses, increase the hepatic antioxidant abilities, and improve resistance to V. harveyi infection of juvenile golden pompano. PMID:25181652

  7. Effect of dietary carbohydrate on non-specific immune response, hepatic antioxidative abilities and disease resistance of juvenile golden pompano (Trachinotus ovatus).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chuanpeng; Ge, Xianping; Lin, Heizhao; Niu, Jin

    2014-12-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary carbohydrate (CHO) levels on non-specific immune responses, hepatic antioxidative status and disease resistance of juvenile golden pompano. Fish were fed six isonitrogenous and isoenergetic diets containing various CHO levels for 8 weeks. After the feeding trial, fish were challenged by Vibrio harveyi and survival rate was recorded for the next 12 days. Plasma total protein and albumin content, respiratory burst activity, alkaline phosphatase, slightly increased with dietary starch level from 0% to 16.8%, but significantly decreased at dietary starch levels of 16.8%-28%. Plasma lysozyme, complement 3 and complement 4 levels increased with increasing dietary carbohydrate up to 11.2% and then declined (P < 0.05). Contrary to glutamic-oxalacetic transaminase and triiodothyronine, plasma cortisol content increased with increasing dietary carbohydrate up to 22.4%, and then levelled off. The hepatic total antioxidative capacity, reduced glutathione and catalase levels reached the peak at the fish fed diet with 16.8% carbohydrate (P < 0.05). This also held true for hepatic superoxide dismutase activities, whereas the hepatic malondialdehyde content of fish fed dietary starch level of 16.8% was significantly lower than that of fish fed no CHO diet, but showed little difference (P > 0.05) with those of the other treatments. After challenge, fish fed 11.2% and 16.8% dietary CHO showed higher survival rate than that of fish in 0% CHO group (P < 0.05). However, survival rate showed little difference among 0%, 5.6%, 22.4% and 28% CHO groups (P > 0.05). The results of this study suggest that ingestion of 11.2-16.8% dietary CHO can enhance the non-specific immune responses, increase the hepatic antioxidant abilities, and improve resistance to V. harveyi infection of juvenile golden pompano.

  8. Molecular-Scale Features that Govern the Effects of O-Glycosylation on a Carbohydrate-Binding Module

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Guan, Xiaoyang; Chaffey, Patrick K.; Zeng, Chen; Greene, Eric R.; Chen, Liqun; Drake, Matthew R.; Chen, Claire; Groobman, Ari; Resch, Michael G.; Himmel, Michael E.; et al

    2015-09-21

    The protein glycosylation is a ubiquitous post-translational modification in all kingdoms of life. Despite its importance in molecular and cellular biology, the molecular-level ramifications of O-glycosylation on biomolecular structure and function remain elusive. Here, we took a small model glycoprotein and changed the glycan structure and size, amino acid residues near the glycosylation site, and glycosidic linkage while monitoring any corresponding changes to physical stability and cellulose binding affinity. The results of this study reveal the collective importance of all the studied features in controlling the most pronounced effects of O-glycosylation in this system. This study suggests the possibility ofmore » designing proteins with multiple improved properties by simultaneously varying the structures of O-glycans and amino acids local to the glycosylation site.« less

  9. Molecular-Scale Features that Govern the Effects of O-Glycosylation on a Carbohydrate-Binding Module

    SciTech Connect

    Guan, Xiaoyang; Chaffey, Patrick K.; Zeng, Chen; Greene, Eric R.; Chen, Liqun; Drake, Matthew R.; Chen, Claire; Groobman, Ari; Resch, Michael G.; Himmel, Michael E.; Beckham, Gregg T.; Tan, Zhongping

    2015-09-21

    The protein glycosylation is a ubiquitous post-translational modification in all kingdoms of life. Despite its importance in molecular and cellular biology, the molecular-level ramifications of O-glycosylation on biomolecular structure and function remain elusive. Here, we took a small model glycoprotein and changed the glycan structure and size, amino acid residues near the glycosylation site, and glycosidic linkage while monitoring any corresponding changes to physical stability and cellulose binding affinity. The results of this study reveal the collective importance of all the studied features in controlling the most pronounced effects of O-glycosylation in this system. This study suggests the possibility of designing proteins with multiple improved properties by simultaneously varying the structures of O-glycans and amino acids local to the glycosylation site.

  10. Widespread generation of alternative UTRs contributes to sex-specific RNA binding by UNR

    PubMed Central

    Mihailovich, Marija; Wurth, Laurence; Zambelli, Federico; Abaza, Irina; Militti, Cristina; Mancuso, Francesco M.; Roma, Guglielmo; Pavesi, Giulio; Gebauer, Fátima

    2012-01-01

    Upstream of N-ras (UNR) is a conserved RNA-binding protein that regulates mRNA translation and stability by binding to sites generally located in untranslated regions (UTRs). In Drosophila, sex-specific binding of UNR to msl2 mRNA and the noncoding RNA roX is believed to play key roles in the control of X-chromosome dosage compensation in both sexes. To investigate broader sex-specific functions of UNR, we have identified its RNA targets in adult male and female flies by high-throughput RNA binding and transcriptome analysis. Here we show that UNR binds to a large set of protein-coding transcripts and to a smaller set of noncoding RNAs in a sex-specific fashion. The analyses also reveal a strong correlation between sex-specific binding of UNR and sex-specific differential expression of UTRs in target genes. Validation experiments indicate that UNR indeed recognizes sex-specifically processed transcripts. These results suggest that UNR exploits the transcript diversity generated by alternative processing and alternative promoter usage to bind and regulate target genes in a sex-specific manner. PMID:22101243

  11. Widespread generation of alternative UTRs contributes to sex-specific RNA binding by UNR.

    PubMed

    Mihailovic, Marija; Mihailovich, Marija; Wurth, Laurence; Zambelli, Federico; Abaza, Irina; Militti, Cristina; Mancuso, Francesco M; Roma, Guglielmo; Pavesi, Giulio; Gebauer, Fátima

    2012-01-01

    Upstream of N-ras (UNR) is a conserved RNA-binding protein that regulates mRNA translation and stability by binding to sites generally located in untranslated regions (UTRs). In Drosophila, sex-specific binding of UNR to msl2 mRNA and the noncoding RNA roX is believed to play key roles in the control of X-chromosome dosage compensation in both sexes. To investigate broader sex-specific functions of UNR, we have identified its RNA targets in adult male and female flies by high-throughput RNA binding and transcriptome analysis. Here we show that UNR binds to a large set of protein-coding transcripts and to a smaller set of noncoding RNAs in a sex-specific fashion. The analyses also reveal a strong correlation between sex-specific binding of UNR and sex-specific differential expression of UTRs in target genes. Validation experiments indicate that UNR indeed recognizes sex-specifically processed transcripts. These results suggest that UNR exploits the transcript diversity generated by alternative processing and alternative promoter usage to bind and regulate target genes in a sex-specific manner.

  12. Global changes in the RNA binding specificity of HIV-1 Gag regulate virion genesis

    PubMed Central

    Kutluay, Sebla B.; Zang, Trinity; Blanco-Melo, Daniel; Powell, Chelsea; Jannain, David; Errando, Manel; Bieniasz, Paul D.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The HIV-1 Gag protein orchestrates all steps of virion genesis, including membrane targeting and RNA recruitment into virions. Using crosslinking-immunoprecipitation (CLIP) sequencing, we uncover several dramatic changes in the RNA binding properties of Gag that occur during virion genesis, coincident with membrane binding, multimerization and proteolytic maturation. Prior to assembly, and after virion assembly and maturation, the nucleocapsid domain of Gag preferentially binds to psi and Rev Response elements in the viral genome, and GU-rich mRNA sequences. However, during virion genesis, this specificity transiently changes in a manner that facilitates genome packaging; nucleocapsid binds to many sites on the HIV-1 genome and to mRNA sequences with a HIV-1-like, A-rich nucleotide composition. Additionally, we find that the matrix domain of Gag binds almost exclusively to specific tRNAs in the cytosol, and this association regulates Gag binding to cellular membranes. PMID:25416948

  13. Global changes in the RNA binding specificity of HIV-1 gag regulate virion genesis.

    PubMed

    Kutluay, Sebla B; Zang, Trinity; Blanco-Melo, Daniel; Powell, Chelsea; Jannain, David; Errando, Manel; Bieniasz, Paul D

    2014-11-20

    The HIV-1 Gag protein orchestrates all steps of virion genesis, including membrane targeting and RNA recruitment into virions. Using crosslinking-immunoprecipitation (CLIP) sequencing, we uncover several dramatic changes in the RNA-binding properties of Gag that occur during virion genesis, coincident with membrane binding, multimerization, and proteolytic maturation. Prior to assembly, and after virion assembly and maturation, the nucleocapsid domain of Gag preferentially binds to psi and Rev Response elements in the viral genome, and GU-rich mRNA sequences. However, during virion genesis, this specificity transiently changes in a manner that facilitates genome packaging; nucleocapsid binds to many sites on the HIV-1 genome and to mRNA sequences with a HIV-1-like, A-rich nucleotide composition. Additionally, we find that the matrix domain of Gag binds almost exclusively to specific tRNAs in the cytosol, and this association regulates Gag binding to cellular membranes.

  14. ATP-dependent specific binding of Tn3 transposase to Tn3 inverted repeats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wishart, W. L.; Broach, J. R.; Ohtsubo, E.

    1985-04-01

    Transposons are discrete segments of DNA which are capable of moving from one site in a genome to many different sites1,2. Tn3 is a prokaryotic transposon which is 4,957 base pairs (bp) long and encodes a transposase protein which is essential for transposition3-7. We report here a simple method for purifying Tn3 transposase and demonstrate that the transposase protein binds specifically to the ends of the Tn3 transposon in an ATP-dependent manner. The transposase protein binds to linear double-stranded DNA both nonspecifically and specifically; the nonspecific DNA binding activity is sensitive to challenge with heparin. Site-specific DNA binding to the ends (inverted repeats) of Tn3 is observed only when binding is performed in the presence of ATP; this ATP-dependent site-specific DNA binding activity is resistant to heparin challenge. Our results indicate that ATP qualitatively alters the DNA binding activity of the transposase protein so that the protein is able to bind specifically to the ends of the Tn3 transposon.

  15. alpha-Galactoside binding lectin from Artocarpus hirsuta: characterization of the sugar specificity and binding site.

    PubMed

    Gurjar, M M; Khan, M I; Gaikwad, S M

    1998-07-23

    The hemagglutinin from the seeds of Artocarpus hirsuta was purified to homogeneity by ion-exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose and CM-sephadex. The native protein of molecular mass 60,000 (gel filtration) is made up of two pairs of unidentical subunits, alpha and beta with molecular masses of 15,800 and 14,130. The lectin is basic in nature (pI 8.5) and a glycoprotein with neutral sugar content of 6.25%. Rabbit as well as human erythrocytes (A, B and O) are agglutinated by the lectin. The lectin activity is neither affected by Ca2+, Mg2+ or Mn2+ nor by EDTA. Methyl alpha-D-galactopyranoside, pNP-alpha-D-galactopyranoside and pNP-alpha-D-N-acetylgalactosamine are the best inhibitors of the lectin. 4-Methylumbelliferyl-alpha-galactopyranoside fluorescence was quenched on binding to A. hirsuta lectin. The sugar has two binding sites per tetramer of the lectin with a Ka of 3.5x105 M-1 at 25 degrees C. Chemical modification studies indicate that the net positive charge associated with epsilon-NH2 of lysine residues and the phenyl ring of tyrosine are essential for the sugar binding activity of A. hirsuta lectin.

  16. Glycosaminoglycan binding by Borrelia burgdorferi adhesin BBK32 specifically and uniquely promotes joint colonization

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yi-Pin; Chen, Qiang; Ritchie, Jennifer A.; Dufour, Nicholas P.; Fischer, Joshua R.; Coburn, Jenifer; Leong, John M.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Microbial pathogens that colonize multiple tissues commonly produce adhesive surface proteins that mediate attachment to cells and/or extracellular matrix in target organs. Many of these ‘adhesins’ bind to multiple ligands, complicating efforts to understand the role of each ligand-binding activity. Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease, produces BBK32, first identified as a fibronectin-binding adhesin that promotes skin and joint colonization. BBK32 also binds to glycosaminoglycan (GAG), which, like fibronectin is ubiquitously present on cell surfaces. To determine which binding activity is relevant for BBK32-promoted infectivity, we generated a panel of BBK32 truncation and internal deletion mutants, and identified variants specifically defective for binding to either fibronectin or GAG. These variants promoted bacterial attachment to different mammalian cell types in vitro, suggesting that fibronectin and GAG binding may play distinct roles during infection. Intravenous inoculation of mice with a high-passage non-infectious B. burgdorferi strain that produced wild type BBK32 or BBK32 mutants defective for GAG or fibronectin binding, revealed that only GAG-binding activity was required for significant localization to joints at 60 minutes post-infection. An otherwise infectious B. burgdorferi strain producing BBK32 specifically deficient in fibronectin binding was fully capable of both skin and joint colonization in the murine model, whereas a strain producing BBK32 selectively attenuated for GAG binding colonized the inoculation site but not knee or tibiotarsus joints. Thus, the BBK32 fibronectin- and GAG-binding activities are separable in vivo, and BBK32-mediated GAG binding, but not fibronectin binding, contributes to joint colonization. PMID:25486989

  17. Target-specific binding of immunoliposomes in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Holmberg, E.; Maruyama, K.; Kennel, S.; Klibanov, A.; Torchilin, V.; Ryan, U.; Huang, L.

    1989-01-01

    Our group at the University of Tennessee has been concentrating on using monoclonal antibody for targeting of a liposomal drug carrier system. This paper discusses our initial effort to target these liposomes using an organ-specific monoclonal antibody. 9 refs., 9 figs.

  18. OB protein binds specifically to the choroid plexus of mice and rats.

    PubMed

    Devos, R; Richards, J G; Campfield, L A; Tartaglia, L A; Guisez, Y; van der Heyden, J; Travernier, J; Plaetinck, G; Burn, P

    1996-05-28

    Binding studies were conducted to identify the anatomical location of brain target sites for OB protein, the ob gene product. 125I-labeled recombinant mouse OB protein or alkaline phosphatase-OB fusion proteins were used for in vitro and in vivo binding studies. Coronal brain sections or fresh tissue from lean, obese ob/ob, and obese db/db mice as well as lean and obese Zucker rats were probed to identify potential central OB protein-binding sites. We report here that recombinant OB protein binds specifically to the choroid plexus. The binding of OB protein (either radiolabeled or the alkaline phosphatase-OB fusion protein) and its displacement by unlabeled OB protein was similar in lean, obese ob/ob, and obese db/db mice as well as lean and obese Zucker rats. These findings suggest that OB protein binds with high affinity to a specific receptor in the choroid plexus. After binding to the choroid plexus receptor, OB protein may then be transported across the blood-brain barrier into the cerebrospinal fluid. Alternatively, binding of OB protein to a specific receptor in the choroid plexus may activate afferent neural inputs to the neural network that regulates feeding behavior and energy balance or may result in the clearance or degradation of OB protein. The identification of the choroid plexus as a brain binding site for OB protein will provide the basis for the construction of expression libraries and facilitate the rapid cloning of the choroid plexus OB receptor.

  19. KM+, a mannose-binding lectin from Artocarpus integrifolia: amino acid sequence, predicted tertiary structure, carbohydrate recognition, and analysis of the beta-prism fold.

    PubMed

    Rosa, J C; De Oliveira, P S; Garratt, R; Beltramini, L; Resing, K; Roque-Barreira, M C; Greene, L J

    1999-01-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of the lectin KM+ from Artocarpus integrifolia (jackfruit), which contains 149 residues/mol, is reported and compared to those of other members of the Moraceae family, particularly that of jacalin, also from jackfruit, with which it shares 52% sequence identity. KM+ presents an acetyl-blocked N-terminus and is not posttranslationally modified by proteolytic cleavage as is the case for jacalin. Rather, it possesses a short, glycine-rich linker that unites the regions homologous to the alpha- and beta-chains of jacalin. The results of homology modeling implicate the linker sequence in sterically impeding rotation of the side chain of Asp141 within the binding site pocket. As a consequence, the aspartic acid is locked into a conformation adequate only for the recognition of equatorial hydroxyl groups on the C4 epimeric center (alpha-D-mannose, alpha-D-glucose, and their derivatives). In contrast, the internal cleavage of the jacalin chain permits free rotation of the homologous aspartic acid, rendering it capable of accepting hydrogen bonds from both possible hydroxyl configurations on C4. We suggest that, together with direct recognition of epimeric hydroxyls and the steric exclusion of disfavored ligands, conformational restriction of the lectin should be considered to be a new mechanism by which selectivity may be built into carbohydrate binding sites. Jacalin and KM+ adopt the beta-prism fold already observed in two unrelated protein families. Despite presenting little or no sequence similarity, an analysis of the beta-prism reveals a canonical feature repeatedly present in all such structures, which is based on six largely hydrophobic residues within a beta-hairpin containing two classic-type beta-bulges. We suggest the term beta-prism motif to describe this feature.

  20. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the carbohydrate-binding region of the Streptococcus gordonii adhesin GspB

    SciTech Connect

    Pyburn, Tasia M.; Yankovskaya, Victoria; Bensing, Barbara A.; Cecchini, Gary; Sullam, Paul M.; Iverson, T.M.

    2012-07-11

    The carbohydrate-binding region of the bacterial adhesin GspB from Streptococcus gordonii strain M99 (GspB{sub BR}) was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified using affinity and size-exclusion chromatography. Separate sparse-matrix screening of GspB{sub BR} buffered in either 20 mM Tris pH 7.4 or 20 mM HEPES pH 7.5 resulted in different crystallographic behavior such that different precipitants, salts and additives supported crystallization of GspB{sub BR} in each buffer. While both sets of conditions supported crystal growth in space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, the crystals had distinct unit-cell parameters of a = 33.3, b = 86.7, c = 117.9 {angstrom} for crystal form 1 and a = 34.6, b = 98.3, c = 99.0 {angstrom} for crystal form 2. Additive screening improved the crystals grown in both conditions such that diffraction extended to beyond 2 {angstrom} resolution. A complete data set has been collected to 1.3 {angstrom} resolution with an overall R{sub merge} value of 0.04 and an R{sub merge} value of 0.33 in the highest resolution shell.

  1. Chimeric cellulase matrix for investigating intramolecular synergism between non-hydrolytic disruptive functions of carbohydrate-binding modules and catalytic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuguo; Tang, Rentao; Tao, Jin; Wang, Xiaonan; Zheng, Baisong; Feng, Yan

    2012-08-24

    The conversion of renewable cellulosic biomass is of considerable interest for the production of biofuels and materials. The bottleneck in the efficient conversion is the compactness and resistance of crystalline cellulose. Carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs), which disrupt crystalline cellulose via non-hydrolytic mechanisms, are expected to overcome this bottleneck. However, the lack of convenient methods for quantitative analysis of the disruptive functions of CBMs have hindered systematic studies and molecular modifications. Here we established a practical and systematic platform for quantifying and comparing the non-hydrolytic disruptive activities of CBMs via the synergism of CBMs and a catalytic module within designed chimeric cellulase molecules. Bioinformatics and computational biology were also used to provide a deeper understanding. A convenient vector was constructed to serve as a cellulase matrix into which heterologous CBM sequences can be easily inserted. The resulting chimeric cellulases were suitable for studying disruptive functions, and their activities quantitatively reflected the disruptive functions of CBMs on crystalline cellulose. In addition, this cellulase matrix can be used to construct novel chimeric cellulases with high hydrolytic activities toward crystalline cellulose. PMID:22778256

  2. Clostridium thermocellum cellulase CelT, a family 9 endoglucanase without an Ig-like domain or family 3c carbohydrate-binding module.

    PubMed

    Kurokawa, J; Hemjinda, E; Arai, T; Kimura, T; Sakka, K; Ohmiya, K

    2002-08-01

    The celT gene of Clostridium thermocellum strain F1 was found downstream of the mannanase gene man26B [Kurokawa J et al. (2001) Biosci Biotechnol Biochem 65:548-554] in pKS305. The open reading frame of celT consists of 1,833 nucleotides encoding a protein of 611 amino acids with a predicted molecular weight of 68,510. The mature form of CelT consists of a family 9 cellulase domain and a dockerin domain responsible for cellulosome assembly, but lacks a family 3c carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) and an immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domain, which are often found with family 9 catalytic domains. CelT devoid of the dockerin domain (CelTDeltadoc) was constructed and purified from a recombinant Escherichia coli, and its enzyme properties were examined. CelTDeltadoc showed strong activity toward carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) and barley beta-glucan, and low activity toward xylan. The V(max) and K(m) values were 137 micro mol min(-1) mg(-1) and 16.7 mg/ml, respectively, for CMC. Immunological analysis indicated that CelT is a catalytic component of the C. thermocellum F1 cellulosome. This is the first report describing the characterization of a family 9 cellulase without an Ig-like domain or family 3c CBM.

  3. Cloning, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray studies of a carbohydrate-binding module (CBM_E1) derived from sugarcane soil metagenome.

    PubMed

    Campos, Bruna Medeia; Alvarez, Thabata Maria; Liberato, Marcelo Vizona; Polikarpov, Igor; Gilbert, Harry J; Zeri, Ana Carolina de Mattos; Squina, Fabio Marcio

    2014-09-01

    In recent years, owing to the growing global demand for energy, dependence on fossil fuels, limited natural resources and environmental pollution, biofuels have attracted great interest as a source of renewable energy. However, the production of biofuels from plant biomass is still considered to be an expensive technology. In this context, the study of carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs), which are involved in guiding the catalytic domains of glycoside hydrolases for polysaccharide degradation, is attracting growing attention. Aiming at the identification of new CBMs, a sugarcane soil metagenomic library was analyzed and an uncharacterized CBM (CBM_E1) was identified. In this study, CBM_E1 was expressed, purified and crystallized. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 1.95 Å resolution. The crystals, which were obtained by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method, belonged to space group I23, with unit-cell parameters a = b = c = 88.07 Å. PMID:25195898

  4. Characterization of binding specificities of Bovine Leucocyte class I molecules: Impacts for rational epitope discovery

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The binding of peptides to classical major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class-I proteins is the single most selective step in antigen presentation. However, the peptide binding specificity of cattle MHC (bovine leucocyte antigen, BoLA) class I (BoLA-I) molecules remains poorly characterized. Her...

  5. Isoform-specific interactions of Na,K-ATPase subunits are mediated via extracellular domains and carbohydrates

    PubMed Central

    Schmalzing, Günther; Ruhl, Karina; Gloor, Sergio M.

    1997-01-01

    The functional unit of the Na,K-ATPase consists of a catalytic α subunit noncovalently linked with a glycoprotein subunit, β. Using ouabain binding assays and immunoprecipitation of rodent α/β complexes, we show here that all six possible isozymes between three α and two β isoforms can be formed in Xenopus oocytes. Two isoform-specific differences in α/β interactions are observed: (i) α1/β1 and α2/β2 complexes, in contrast to α1/β2 complexes, are stable against Triton X-100-mediated dissociation, and (ii) β2 subunits must carry N-glycans to combine with α1 but not with α2. The interacting surfaces are mainly exposed to the extracellular side because coexpression of a truncated β1 subunit comprising the ectodomain results in assembly with α1 and α2, but not with α3; the β2 ectodomain combines with α2 only. A chimera consisting of 81% and 19% of the α1 N terminus and α2 C terminus, respectively, behaves like α2 and coprecipitates with the β2 ectodomain. In contrast, the reciprocal chimera does not coprecipitate with the β2 ectodomain. These results provide evidence for a selective interaction of Na,K-ATPase α and β subunits. PMID:9037019

  6. A structural approach reveals how neighbouring C2H2 zinc fingers influence DNA binding specificity.

    PubMed

    Garton, Michael; Najafabadi, Hamed S; Schmitges, Frank W; Radovani, Ernest; Hughes, Timothy R; Kim, Philip M

    2015-10-30

    Development of an accurate protein-DNA recognition code that can predict DNA specificity from protein sequence is a central problem in biology. C2H2 zinc fingers constitute by far the largest family of DNA binding domains and their binding specificity has been studied intensively. However, despite decades of research, accurate prediction of DNA specificity remains elusive. A major obstacle is thought to be the inability of current methods to account for the influence of neighbouring domains. Here we show that this problem can be addressed using a structural approach: we build structural models for all C2H2-ZF-DNA complexes with known binding motifs and find six distinct binding modes. Each mode changes the orientation of specificity residues with respect to the DNA, thereby modulating base preference. Most importantly, the structural analysis shows that residues at the domain interface strongly and predictably influence the binding mode, and hence specificity. Accounting for predicted binding mode significantly improves prediction accuracy of predicted motifs. This new insight into the fundamental behaviour of C2H2-ZFs has implications for both improving the prediction of natural zinc finger-binding sites, and for prioritizing further experiments to complete the code. It also provides a new design feature for zinc finger engineering. PMID:26384429

  7. DNA-binding specificity changes in the evolution of forkhead transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, So; Gisselbrecht, Stephen S; Rogers, Julia M; Hartl, Daniel L; Bulyk, Martha L

    2013-07-23

    The evolution of transcriptional regulatory networks entails the expansion and diversification of transcription factor (TF) families. The forkhead family of TFs, defined by a highly conserved winged helix DNA-binding domain (DBD), has diverged into dozens of subfamilies in animals, fungi, and related protists. We have used a combination of maximum-likelihood phylogenetic inference and independent, comprehensive functional assays of DNA-binding capacity to explore the evolution of DNA-binding specificity within the forkhead family. We present converging evidence that similar alternative sequence preferences have arisen repeatedly and independently in the course of forkhead evolution. The vast majority of DNA-binding specificity changes we observed are not explained by alterations in the known DNA-contacting amino acid residues conferring specificity for canonical forkhead binding sites. Intriguingly, we have found forkhead DBDs that retain the ability to bind very specifically to two completely distinct DNA sequence motifs. We propose an alternate specificity-determining mechanism whereby conformational rearrangements of the DBD broaden the spectrum of sequence motifs that a TF can recognize. DNA-binding bispecificity suggests a previously undescribed source of modularity and flexibility in gene regulation and may play an important role in the evolution of transcriptional regulatory networks.

  8. Reading RNA methylation codes through methyl-specific binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao; He, Chuan

    2014-01-01

    N (6)-methyladenosine (m (6)A) is a prevalent modification of eukaryotic mRNAs. It regulates yeast cell fate and is essential to the development and fertility of metazoans. Although its presence in mRNA has been known since the early 1970s, the function of m (6)A remained a mystery until the spate of discoveries in the past three years. Here, we focus on the discovery of m (6)A "readers" (proteins that specifically recognize m (6)A), and their functions in tuning mRNA stability, as well as the broader significance of such m (6)A-dependent regulation of gene expression. PMID:24823649

  9. Confined housing system increased abdominal and subcutaneous fat deposition and gene expressions of carbohydrate response element-binding protein and sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1 in chicken.

    PubMed

    Li, Q; Zhao, X L; Gilbert, E R; Liu, Y P; Wang, Y; Qiu, M H; Zhu, Q

    2015-01-01

    Free-range production system is increasingly being used in poultry breeding and feed production in many countries. The objective of the current experiment was to evaluate the effects of different raising systems on fat-related traits and mRNA levels of liver lipogenesis genes in Erlang Mountainous chicken. Each of 10 birds (91 day old) from caged, indoor-floor housed, and free-range housing systems was slaughtered, and fat-related traits, live body weight (BW), subcutaneous fat thickness (SFT), abdominal fat weight (AFW), abdominal fat percentage (AFP), and intramuscular fat content were determined. The mRNA levels of liver X receptor α, carbohydrate response element-binding protein (ChREBP), sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 (SREBP1), and fatty acid synthase were detected. The caged chicken exhibited significantly higher BW, SFT, and AFW than those of free-ranged chicken (P < 0.05). All the 4 genes had a similar expression pattern, and they showed the highest level in caged chicken, while the lowest level was found in free-ranged chicken. Association analysis indicated that there were significant (P < 0.05) or highly significant (P < 0.01) positive correlations between the mRNA levels of ChREBP, SREBP1, and fat traits of SFT, AFW, and AFP. Thus, we deduced that increased fat deposition in caged chicken was probably induced by increased gene expression of ChREBP and SREBP1 in the liver. PMID:25730060

  10. Confined housing system increased abdominal and subcutaneous fat deposition and gene expressions of carbohydrate response element-binding protein and sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1 in chicken.

    PubMed

    Li, Q; Zhao, X L; Gilbert, E R; Liu, Y P; Wang, Y; Qiu, M H; Zhu, Q

    2015-02-06

    Free-range production system is increasingly being used in poultry breeding and feed production in many countries. The objective of the current experiment was to evaluate the effects of different raising systems on fat-related traits and mRNA levels of liver lipogenesis genes in Erlang Mountainous chicken. Each of 10 birds (91 day old) from caged, indoor-floor housed, and free-range housing systems was slaughtered, and fat-related traits, live body weight (BW), subcutaneous fat thickness (SFT), abdominal fat weight (AFW), abdominal fat percentage (AFP), and intramuscular fat content were determined. The mRNA levels of liver X receptor α, carbohydrate response element-binding protein (ChREBP), sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 (SREBP1), and fatty acid synthase were detected. The caged chicken exhibited significantly higher BW, SFT, and AFW than those of free-ranged chicken (P < 0.05). All the 4 genes had a similar expression pattern, and they showed the highest level in caged chicken, while the lowest level was found in free-ranged chicken. Association analysis indicated that there were significant (P < 0.05) or highly significant (P < 0.01) positive correlations between the mRNA levels of ChREBP, SREBP1, and fat traits of SFT, AFW, and AFP. Thus, we deduced that increased fat deposition in caged chicken was probably induced by increased gene expression of ChREBP and SREBP1 in the liver.

  11. Detection of a novel minisatellite-specific DNA-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Collick, A; Jeffreys, A J

    1990-01-01

    We describe the detection of a ubiquitous DNA-binding protein which appears to interact specifically with tandem-repeated minisatellites. The murine 40 kd protein, which we term Msbp-1, was found to be present in all mouse tissues tested. This protein was bound specifically and with high affinity by double-stranded DNA containing a repeat sequence related to the minisatellite 'core' sequence, and binding required the presence of multiple repeat units. Corresponding minisatellite-specific DNA-binding proteins could also be detected in species ranging from Drosophila to man. This analysis represents the first direct evidence that minisatellites can function as a specific recognition signal for an endogenous DNA-binding protein. Images PMID:2308848

  12. Low affinity binding site clusters confer hox specificity and regulatory robustness.

    PubMed

    Crocker, Justin; Abe, Namiko; Rinaldi, Lucrezia; McGregor, Alistair P; Frankel, Nicolás; Wang, Shu; Alsawadi, Ahmad; Valenti, Philippe; Plaza, Serge; Payre, François; Mann, Richard S; Stern, David L

    2015-01-15

    In animals, Hox transcription factors define regional identity in distinct anatomical domains. How Hox genes encode this specificity is a paradox, because different Hox proteins bind with high affinity in vitro to similar DNA sequences. Here, we demonstrate that the Hox protein Ultrabithorax (Ubx) in complex with its cofactor Extradenticle (Exd) bound specifically to clusters of very low affinity sites in enhancers of the shavenbaby gene of Drosophila. These low affinity sites conferred specificity for Ubx binding in vivo, but multiple clustered sites were required for robust expression when embryos developed in variable environments. Although most individual Ubx binding sites are not evolutionarily conserved, the overall enhancer architecture-clusters of low affinity binding sites-is maintained and required for enhancer function. Natural selection therefore works at the level of the enhancer, requiring a particular density of low affinity Ubx sites to confer both specific and robust expression. PMID:25557079

  13. Ascorbic acid reduction of compound I of mammalian catalases proceeds via specific binding to the NADPH binding pocket.

    PubMed

    Korth, Hans-Gert; Meier, Ann-Cathérine; Auferkamp, Oliver; Sicking, Willi; de Groot, Herbert; Sustmann, Reiner; Kirsch, Michael

    2012-06-12

    Mammalian (Clade 3) catalases utilize NADPH as a protective cofactor to prevent one-electron reduction of the central reactive intermediate Compound I (Cpd I) to the catalytically inactive Compound II (Cpd II) species by re-reduction of Cpd I to the enzyme's resting state (ferricatalase). It has long been known that ascorbate/ascorbic acid is capable of reducing Cpd I of NADPH-binding catalases to Cpd II, but the mode of this one-electron reduction had hitherto not been explored. We here demonstrate that ascorbate-mediated reduction of Cpd I, generated by addition of peroxoacetic acid to NADPH-free bovine liver catalase (BLC), requires specific binding of the ascorbate anion to the NADPH binding pocket. Ascorbate-mediated Cpd II formation was found to be suppressed by added NADPH in a concentration-dependent manner, for the achievement of complete suppression at a stoichiometric 1:1 NADPH:heme concentration ratio. Cpd I → Cpd II reduction by ascorbate was similarly inhibited by addition of NADH, NADP(+), thio-NADP(+), or NAD(+), though with 0.5-, 0.1-, 0.1-, and 0.01-fold reduced efficiencies, respectively, in agreement with the relative binding affinities of these dinucleotides. Unexpected was the observation that although Cpd II formation is not observed in the presence of NADP(+), the decay of Cpd I is slightly accelerated by ascorbate rather than retarded, leading to direct regeneration of ferricatalase. The experimental findings are supported by molecular mechanics docking computations, which show a similar binding of NADPH, NADP(+), and NADH, but not NAD(+), as found in the X-ray structure of NADPH-loaded human erythrocyte catalase. The computations suggest that two ascorbate molecules may occupy the empty NADPH pocket, preferably binding to the adenine binding site. The biological relevance of these findings is discussed. PMID:22616883

  14. [Carbohydrates in clinical nutrition].

    PubMed

    Lysikov, Iu A

    2013-01-01

    The article presents data on role of carbohydrate in clinical nutrition. The review described carbohydrate metabolism, hormonal regulation of carbohydrate, carbohydrate energy source role, carbohydrate requirements in critical study.

  15. Elucidating the evolutionary conserved DNA-binding specificities of WRKY transcription factors by molecular dynamics and in vitro binding assays

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Luise H.; Fischer, Nina M.; Harter, Klaus; Kohlbacher, Oliver; Wanke, Dierk

    2013-01-01

    WRKY transcription factors constitute a large protein family in plants that is involved in the regulation of developmental processes and responses to biotic or abiotic stimuli. The question arises how stimulus-specific responses are mediated given that the highly conserved WRKY DNA-binding domain (DBD) exclusively recognizes the ‘TTGACY’ W-box consensus. We speculated that the W-box consensus might be more degenerate and yet undetected differences in the W-box consensus of WRKYs of different evolutionary descent exist. The phylogenetic analysis of WRKY DBDs suggests that they evolved from an ancestral group IIc-like WRKY early in the eukaryote lineage. A direct descent of group IIc WRKYs supports a monophyletic origin of all other group II and III WRKYs from group I by loss of an N-terminal DBD. Group I WRKYs are of paraphyletic descent and evolved multiple times independently. By homology modeling, molecular dynamics simulations and in vitro DNA–protein interaction-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with AtWRKY50 (IIc), AtWRKY33 (I) and AtWRKY11 (IId) DBDs, we revealed differences in DNA-binding specificities. Our data imply that other components are essentially required besides the W-box-specific binding to DNA to facilitate a stimulus-specific WRKY function. PMID:23975197

  16. Dual DNA binding specificity of a petal epidermis-specific MYB transcription factor (MYB.Ph3) from Petunia hybrida.

    PubMed Central

    Solano, R; Nieto, C; Avila, J; Cañas, L; Diaz, I; Paz-Ares, J

    1995-01-01

    The MYB.Ph3 protein recognized two DNA sequences that resemble the two known types of MYB DNA binding site: consensus I (MBSI), aaaAaaC(G/C)-GTTA, and consensus II (MBSII), aaaAGTTAGTTA. Optimal MBSI was recognized by animal c-MYB and not by Am305 from Antirrhinum, whereas MBSII showed the reverse behaviour. Different constraints on MYB.Ph3 binding to the two classes of sequences were demonstrated. DNA binding studies with mutated MBSI and MBSII and hydroxyl radical footprinting analysis, pointed to the N-terminal MYB repeat (R2) as the most involved in determining the dual DNA binding specificity of MYB.Ph3 and supported the idea that binding to MBSI and MBSII does not involve alternative orientations of the two repeats of MYB.Ph3. Minimal promoters containing either MBSI and MBSII were activated to the same extent by MYB.Ph3 in yeast, indicating that both types of binding site can be functionally equivalent. MYB.Ph3 binding sites are present in the promoter of flavonoid biosynthetic genes, such as the Petunia chsJ gene, which was transcriptionally activated by MYB.Ph3 in tobacco protoplasts. MYB.Ph3 was immunolocalized in the epidermal cell layer of petals, where flavonoid biosynthetic genes are actively expressed. This strongly suggests a role for MYB.Ph3 in the regulation of flavonoid biosynthesis. Images PMID:7737128

  17. High-Resolution Specificity from DNA Sequencing Highlights Alternative Modes of Lac Repressor Binding

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Zheng; Stormo, Gary D.

    2014-01-01

    Knowing the specificity of transcription factors is critical to understanding regulatory networks in cells. The lac repressor–operator system has been studied for many years, but not with high-throughput methods capable of determining specificity comprehensively. Details of its binding interaction and its selection of an asymmetric binding site have been controversial. We employed a new method to accurately determine relative binding affinities to thousands of sequences simultaneously, requiring only sequencing of bound and unbound fractions. An analysis of 2560 different DNA sequence variants, including both base changes and variations in operator length, provides a detailed view of lac repressor sequence specificity. We find that the protein can bind with nearly equal affinities to operators of three different lengths, but the sequence preference changes depending on the length, demonstrating alternative modes of interaction between the protein and DNA. The wild-type operator has an odd length, causing the two monomers to bind in alternative modes, making the asymmetric operator the preferred binding site. We tested two other members of the LacI/GalR protein family and find that neither can bind with high affinity to sites with alternative lengths or shows evidence of alternative binding modes. A further comparison with known and predicted motifs suggests that the lac repressor may be unique in this ability and that this may contribute to its selection. PMID:25209146

  18. Metal ligand-binding specificities of the tyrosinase-related proteins.

    PubMed

    Furumura, M; Solano, F; Matsunaga, N; Sakai, C; Spritz, R A; Hearing, V J

    1998-01-26

    The production of pigment in mammalian melanocytes requires the interaction of at least 3 melanogenic enzymes, which regulate the type and amount of melanins produced. All 3 known enzymes belong to the TRP gene family and share many common structural features, including two metal binding domains thought to be important to their catalytic functions. This study used radiolabeled metal ligand binding with autoradiography as well as reconstitution protocols to analyze the binding of metal cations to these enzymes. The results demonstrate that all 3 enzymes are capable of binding divalent metal cations; copper is bound to tyrosinase but not to TRP1 or TRP2. TRP2 requires zinc as its metal ligand, and small amounts of iron bound to TRP2; TRP1 did not bind copper, zinc or iron. Clearly, the specific binding of different metals by the TRPs is responsible for their distinct catalytic functions in melanogenesis. PMID:9464259

  19. Actinomycin D specifically inhibits the interaction between transcription factor Sp1 and its binding site.

    PubMed

    Czyz, M; Gniazdowski, M

    1998-01-01

    The mode of action of many anticancer drugs involves DNA interactions. We here examine the ability of actinomycin D to alter the specific binding of transcription factors Spl and NFkappaB to their DNA sequences. Employing an electrophoretic mobility shift assay, it is shown that actinomycin D inhibits complex formation between nuclear proteins present in the extracts from stimulated human umbilical vein endothelial cells and the Sp1-binding site. Actinomycin D is also able to induce disruption of preformed DNA-protein complexes, pointing to the importance of an equilibrium of three components: actinomycin D, protein and DNA for drug action. The effect of actinomycin D is sequence-specific, since no inhibition is observed for interaction of nuclear proteins with the NFkappaB binding site. The results support the view that DNA-binding drugs displaying high sequence-selectivity can exhibit distinct effects on the interaction between DNA and different DNA-binding proteins. PMID:9701497

  20. Pharmacological specificity of some psychotomimetic and antipsychotic agents for the sigma and PCP binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Itzhak, Y.

    1988-01-01

    The pharmacological specificity of representative psychotomimetic agents such a phencyclidine (PCP) analogs, opiate benzomorphans and several antipsychotic agents was assessed for the sigma and PCP binding sites. In a series of binding experiments, in rat brain membranes, sigma and PCP binding sites were labeled with (/sup 3/H)-1-(1-(3-hydroxyphenyl) cyclohexyl) piperidine ((/sup 3/H)PCP-3-OH), (+)(/sup 3/H)-N-allylnormetazocine ((+)(/sup 3/H)SKF 10047) and (+) (/sup 3/H)-3-(3-hydroxy-phenyl)-N-(1-propyl) piperidine and ((+)(/sup 3/H)-3-PPP). PCP analogs inhibit potently high affinity (/sup 3/H)PCP-3-OH binding and (+)(/sup 3/H)SKF 10047 binding, moderately the low affinity binding component of (/sup 3/H)PCP-3-OH and very weakly (+) (/sup 3/H)-3-PPP binding. (+)SKF 10047 and cyclazocine are potent to moderate inhibitors of (+)(/sup 3/H)SKF 10047, high affinity (/sup 3/H)PCP-3-OH and (+)(/sup 3/H)-3-PCP-3-OH binding. The antipsychotic agents display high affinity for (+)(/sup 3/H)-3-PPP binding sites, moderate affinity for (+)(/sup 3/H)SKF 10047 sites and have no effect on either the high or low affinity (/sup 3/H)PCP-3-OH binding. 20 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

  1. Functional Equivalence of Retroviral MA Domains in Facilitating Psi RNA Binding Specificity by Gag

    PubMed Central

    Rye-McCurdy, Tiffiny; Olson, Erik D.; Liu, Shuohui; Binkley, Christiana; Reyes, Joshua-Paolo; Thompson, Brian R.; Flanagan, John M.; Parent, Leslie J.; Musier-Forsyth, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Retroviruses specifically package full-length, dimeric genomic RNA (gRNA) even in the presence of a vast excess of cellular RNA. The “psi” (Ψ) element within the 5′-untranslated region (5′UTR) of gRNA is critical for packaging through interaction with the nucleocapsid (NC) domain of Gag. However, in vitro Gag binding affinity for Ψ versus non-Ψ RNAs is not significantly different. Previous salt-titration binding assays revealed that human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Gag bound to Ψ RNA with high specificity and relatively few charge interactions, whereas binding to non-Ψ RNA was less specific and involved more electrostatic interactions. The NC domain was critical for specific Ψ binding, but surprisingly, a Gag mutant lacking the matrix (MA) domain was less effective at discriminating Ψ from non-Ψ RNA. We now find that Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) Gag also effectively discriminates RSV Ψ from non-Ψ RNA in a MA-dependent manner. Interestingly, Gag chimeras, wherein the HIV-1 and RSV MA domains were swapped, maintained high binding specificity to cognate Ψ RNAs. Using Ψ RNA mutant constructs, determinants responsible for promoting high Gag binding specificity were identified in both systems. Taken together, these studies reveal the functional equivalence of HIV-1 and RSV MA domains in facilitating Ψ RNA selectivity by Gag, as well as Ψ elements that promote this selectivity. PMID:27657107

  2. T-cell hybridoma specific for a cytochrome c peptide: specific antigen binding and interleukin 2 production.

    PubMed Central

    Carel, S; Bron, C; Corradin, G

    1983-01-01

    T-cell hybridomas were obtained after fusion of BW 5147 thymoma and long-term cultured T cells specific for cytochrome c peptide 66-80 derivatized with a 2,4-dinitroaminophenyl (DNAP) group. The resulting hybridomas were selected for their capacity to specifically bind to soluble radiolabeled peptide antigen. One T-cell hybrid was positive for antigen binding. This hybrid T cell exhibits surface phenotypic markers of the parent antigen-specific T cells. The binding could be inhibited either by an excess of unlabeled homologous antigen or by cytochrome c peptide 11-25 derivatized with a 2-nitrophenylsulfenyl group. Several other peptide antigens tested failed to inhibit binding of the radioactive peptide. This suggests that a specific amino acid sequence, modified by a DNAP group, is the antigenic structure recognized by the putative T-cell receptor. In addition, direct interaction of DNAP-66-80 peptide with the hybridoma cell line induced production of the T-cell growth factor interleukin 2. Furthermore, supernatants derived from syngeneic macrophages pulsed with the relevant peptide also induced the antigen-specific hybridoma to produce interleukin 2. Images PMID:6192442

  3. P. falciparum: merozoite surface protein-8 peptides bind specifically to human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Puentes, Alvaro; García, Javier; Ocampo, Marisol; Rodríguez, Luis; Vera, Ricardo; Curtidor, Hernando; López, Ramsés; Suarez, Jorge; Valbuena, John; Vanegas, Magnolia; Guzman, Fanny; Tovar, Diana; Patarroyo, Manuel E

    2003-07-01

    This work determined Plasmodium falciparum merozoite surface protein-8 (MSP-8) regions specifically binding to membrane surface receptors on human erythrocytes. Five high activity binding peptides (HABPs), whose binding to erythrocytes became saturable and sensitive on being treated with neuraminidase and chymotrypsin were identified from the MSP-8 protein. Those amino acids directly involved in interaction with erythrocytes were also determined for each one of the HABPs. Some of them specifically recognized 28, 46, and 73 kDa erythrocyte membrane proteins. Some HABPs inhibited in vitro P. falciparum merozoite invasion of erythrocytes by up to 98%, suggesting the MSP-8 protein's possible role in the invasion process.

  4. Continuous directed evolution of DNA-binding proteins to improve TALEN specificity

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, Basil P.; Badran, Ahmed H.; Zuris, John A.; Guilinger, John P.; Davis, Kevin M.; Chen, Liwei; Tsai, Shengdar Q.; Sander, Jeffry D.; Joung, J. Keith; Liu, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Nucleases containing programmable DNA-binding domains can alter the genomes of model organisms and have the potential to become human therapeutics. Here we present DNA-binding phage-assisted continuous evolution (DB-PACE) as a general approach for the laboratory evolution of DNA-binding activity and specificity. We used this system to generate TALE nucleases with broadly improved DNA cleavage specificity, establishing DB-PACE as a versatile approach for improving the accuracy of genome-editing agents. PMID:26258293

  5. Specific binding of ethanol to cholesterol in organic solvents.

    PubMed

    Daragan, V A; Voloshin, A M; Chochina, S V; Khazanovich, T N; Wood, W G; Avdulov, N A; Mayo, K H

    2000-07-01

    Although ethanol has been reported to affect cholesterol homeostasis in biological membranes, the molecular mechanism of action is unknown. Here, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic techniques have been used to investigate possible direct interactions between ethanol and cholesterol in various low dielectric solvents (acetone, methanol, isopropanol, DMF, DMSO, chloroform, and CCl(4)). Measurement of (13)C chemical shifts, spin-lattice and multiplet relaxation times, as well as self-diffusion coefficients, indicates that ethanol interacts weakly, yet specifically, with the HC-OH moiety and the two flanking methylenes in the cyclohexanol ring of cholesterol. This interaction is most strong in the least polar-solvent carbon tetrachloride where the ethanol-cholesterol equilibrium dissociation constant is estimated to be 2 x 10(-3) M. (13)C-NMR spin-lattice relaxation studies allow insight into the geometry of this complex, which is best modeled with the methyl group of ethanol sandwiched between the two methylenes in the cyclohexanol ring and the hydroxyl group of ethanol hydrogen bonded to the hydroxyl group of cholesterol.

  6. Novel method for identifying sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Levens, D; Howley, P M

    1985-01-01

    We developed a general method for the enrichment and identification of sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins. A well-characterized protein-DNA interaction is used to isolate from crude cellular extracts or fractions thereof proteins which bind to specific DNA sequences; the method is based solely on this binding property of the proteins. The DNA sequence of interest, cloned adjacent to the lac operator DNA segment is incubated with a lac repressor-beta-galactosidase fusion protein which retains full operator and inducer binding properties. The DNA fragment bound to the lac repressor-beta-galactosidase fusion protein is precipitated by the addition of affinity-purified anti-beta-galactosidase immobilized on beads. This forms an affinity matrix for any proteins which might interact specifically with the DNA sequence cloned adjacent to the lac operator. When incubated with cellular extracts in the presence of excess competitor DNA, any protein(s) which specifically binds to the cloned DNA sequence of interest can be cleanly precipitated. When isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside is added, the lac repressor releases the bound DNA, and thus the protein-DNA complex consisting of the specific restriction fragment and any specific binding protein(s) is released, permitting the identification of the protein by standard biochemical techniques. We demonstrate the utility of this method with the lambda repressor, another well-characterized DNA-binding protein, as a model. In addition, with crude preparations of the yeast mitochondrial RNA polymerase, we identified a 70,000-molecular-weight peptide which binds specifically to the promoter region of the yeast mitochondrial 14S rRNA gene. Images PMID:3016526

  7. A Pro to Gly mutation in the hinge of the arabinose-binding protein enhances binding and alters specificity. Sugar-binding and crystallographic studies.

    PubMed

    Vermersch, P S; Tesmer, J J; Lemon, D D; Quiocho, F A

    1990-09-25

    The L-arabinose-binding protein (ABP) of Escherichia coli consists structurally of two distinct globular domains connected by a hinge of three separate peptide segments. Arabinose is bound and completely sequestered within the deep cleft between the two domains. With reduced affinity, ABP also binds D-galactose (approximately 2-fold reduction) and D-fucose (approximately 40-fold reduction). Experiments have been conducted to explore the role in sugar binding of the hinge connecting the two domains of ABP. To increase the flexibility of the hinge region, a glycine was substituted for a proline at position 254 by site-directed mutagenesis. Unexpectedly, this mutation resulted in the dramatic enhancement of galactose binding over that of arabinose. The affinity of the mutant ABP for galactose increased by over 20-fold, while that for arabinose and fucose remained relatively unchanged. We have measured association and dissociation rates of the Gly-254 ABP with L-arabinose, D-galactose, and D-fucose and have determined the crystallographic structure of the protein complexed with each of the three sugars. Both the ligand-binding kinetic measurements and structure analysis indicate that the altered specificity is due to an effective increase in the rigidity of the hinge in the closed conformation which is induced upon galactose binding. Stabilizing contacts are formed between the strands of the hinge in the Gly-254 ABP when galactose is bound which are not found in complexes with the other sugars or the liganded wild-type protein.

  8. Classification and purification of proteins of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles by RNA-binding specificities

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, M.S.; Dreyfuss, G.

    1988-05-01

    Several proteins of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) particles display very high binding affinities for different ribonucleotide homopolymers. The specificity of some of these proteins at high salt concentrations and in the presence of heparin allows for their rapid one-step purification from HeLa nucleoplasm. The authors show that the hnRNP proteins are poly(U)-binding proteins and compare their specificity to that of the previously described cytoplasmic poly(A)-binding protein. These findings provide a useful tool for the classification and purification of hnRNP proteins from various tissues and organisms and indicate that different hnRNP proteins have different RNA-binding specificities.

  9. Spec-seq: determining protein–DNA-binding specificity by sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Zheng; Chang, Yiming Kenny

    2015-01-01

    The specificity of protein–DNA interactions can be determined directly by sequencing the bound and unbound fractions in a standard binding reaction. The procedure is easy and inexpensive, and the accuracy can be high for thousands of sequences assayed in parallel. From the measurements, simple models of specificity, such as position weight matrices, can be assessed for their accuracy and more complex models developed if useful. Those may provide more accurate predictions of in vivo binding sites and can help us to understand the details of recognition. As an example, we demonstrate new information gained about the binding of lac repressor. One can apply the same method to combinations of factors that bind simultaneously to a single DNA and determine both the specificity of the individual factors and the cooperativity between them. PMID:25362070

  10. Conservation of transcription factor binding specificities across 600 million years of bilateria evolution

    PubMed Central

    Nitta, Kazuhiro R; Jolma, Arttu; Yin, Yimeng; Morgunova, Ekaterina; Kivioja, Teemu; Akhtar, Junaid; Hens, Korneel; Toivonen, Jarkko; Deplancke, Bart; Furlong, Eileen E M; Taipale, Jussi

    2015-01-01

    Divergent morphology of species has largely been ascribed to genetic differences in the tissue-specific expression of proteins, which could be achieved by divergence in cis-regulatory elements or by altering the binding specificity of transcription factors (TFs). The relative importance of the latter has been difficult to assess, as previous systematic analyses of TF binding specificity have been performed using different methods in different species. To address this, we determined the binding specificities of 242 Drosophila TFs, and compared them to human and mouse data. This analysis revealed that TF binding specificities are highly conserved between Drosophila and mammals, and that for orthologous TFs, the similarity extends even to the level of very subtle dinucleotide binding preferences. The few human TFs with divergent specificities function in cell types not found in fruit flies, suggesting that evolution of TF specificities contributes to emergence of novel types of differentiated cells. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04837.001 PMID:25779349

  11. Specificity of cellular DNA-binding sites of microbial populations in a Florida reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, J.H.; Pichard, S.L. )

    1989-11-01

    The substrate specificity of the DNA-binding mechanism(s) of bacteria in a Florida reservoir was investigated in short- and long-term uptake studies with radiolabeled DNA and unlabeled competitors. Thymine oligonucleotides ranging in size from 2 base pairs to 19 to 24 base pairs inhibited DNA binding in 20-min incubations by 43 to 77%. Deoxynucleoside monophosphates, thymidine, and thymine had little effect on short-term DNA binding, although several of these compounds inhibited the uptake of the radiolabel from DNA in 4-h incubations. Inorganic phosphate and glucose-1-phosphate inhibited neither short- nor long-term binding of ({sup 3}H)- or ({sup 32}P)DNA, indicating that DNA was not utilized as a phosphorous source in this reservoir. RNA inhibited both short- and long-term radiolabeled DNA uptake as effectively as unlabeled DNA. Collectively these results indicate that aquatic bacteria possess a generalized nuclei acid uptake/binding mechanism specific for compounds containing phosphodiester bonds and capable of recognizing oligonucleotides as short as dinucleotides. This binding site is distinct from nucleoside-, nucleotide-, phosphomonoester-, and inorganic phosphate-binding sites. Such a nucleic acid-binding mechanism may have evolved for the utilization of extracellular DNA (and perhaps RNA), which is abundant in many marine and freshwater environments.

  12. Serotonin binds specifically and saturably to an actin-like protein isolated from rat brain synaptosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Small, D H; Wurtman, R J

    1984-01-01

    A soluble serotonin-binding protein was identified in a high-speed supernatant fraction of an osmotically shocked rat brain synaptosome (P2) preparation. The binding of serotonin was saturable (Bmax = 6.0 nmol per mg of protein) and was specific for serotonin and a few structurally related compounds including dopamine and norepinephrine. Binding of serotonin (1 microM) was inhibited approximately equal to 40% by chlorpromazine (10 microM). The affinity of serotonin for the binding protein was low in the crude extract (Kd = 1.7 X 10(-3)M). However, on purification by chromatography on a column of phenothiazine agarose, a higher affinity (Kd = 10(-5) M) binding component was also observed. The purified protein was greatly enriched in a polypeptide of Mr of 43,000 that comigrated on polyacrylamide gel with skeletal muscle actin. Muscle actin also bound serotonin, and the binding to actin was similar to that of the purified protein in both the specificity of the binding and the affinity for serotonin. It is likely that the serotonin-binding protein is identical to cytoplasmic G-actin or an actin-like protein of similar molecular weight. PMID:6583691

  13. Distinct specificity for corticosteroid binding sites in amphibian cytosol, neuronal membranes, and plasma.

    PubMed

    Orchinik, M; Matthews, L; Gasser, P J

    2000-05-01

    To address mechanisms of corticosteroid action, one needs tools for distinguishing between the major classes of corticosteroid binding sites: neuronal membrane-associated receptors, intracellular ligand-activated transcription factors, and corticosteroid binding globulins (CBG) in plasma. We characterized the binding parameters for three classes of binding sites in an amphibian, Ambystoma tigrinum, and found that each class had a distinct pharmacological specificity. Equilibrium saturation and kinetic experiments indicated that [3H]corticosterone binds to neuronal membranes with high affinity (Kd approximately 0.37 nM). Aldosterone and two synthetic ligands for mammalian intracellular receptors, dexamethasone and RU486, displayed low affinity for brain membrane sites. In cytosol prepared from brain and liver, [3H]corticosterone bound to a single class of receptors with high affinity (Kd approximately 0.75 and 4.69 nM, respectively) and the rank order potencies for steroid inhibition of [3H]corticosterone binding was RU486 > dexamethasone approximately = corticosterone > aldosterone. In kidney and skin cytosol, [3H]corticosterone binding was best fit with a model having a high-affinity and a lower-affinity site; these sites are not consistent with the pharmacology of mammalian Type I (MR) and Type II (GR) receptors. [3H]Corticosterone also bound to presumed CBG in plasma with high affinity (Kd approximately 2.7 nM), but dexamethasone and androgens bound to plasma CBG with equivalently high affinity. These data demonstrate that pharmacological specificity can be a useful tool for distinguishing corticosteroid binding to different classes of binding sites. These data also indicate that there may be marked species differences in the specificity of corticosteroid binding sites.

  14. Position specific variation in the rate of evolution intranscription factor binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, Alan M.; Chiang, Derek Y.; Kellis, Manolis; Lander, EricS.; Eisen, Michael B.

    2003-08-28

    The binding sites of sequence specific transcription factors are an important and relatively well-understood class of functional non-coding DNAs. Although a wide variety of experimental and computational methods have been developed to characterize transcription factor binding sites, they remain difficult to identify. Comparison of non-coding DNA from related species has shown considerable promise in identifying these functional non-coding sequences, even though relatively little is known about their evolution. Here we analyze the genome sequences of the budding yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae, S. bayanus, S. paradoxus and S. mikataeto study the evolution of transcription factor binding sites. As expected, we find that both experimentally characterized and computationally predicted binding sites evolve slower than surrounding sequence, consistent with the hypothesis that they are under purifying selection. We also observe position-specific variation in the rate of evolution within binding sites. We find that the position-specific rate of evolution is positively correlated with degeneracy among binding sites within S. cerevisiae. We test theoretical predictions for the rate of evolution at positions where the base frequencies deviate from background due to purifying selection and find reasonable agreement with the observed rates of evolution. Finally, we show how the evolutionary characteristics of real binding motifs can be used to distinguish them from artifacts of computational motif finding algorithms. As has been observed for protein sequences, the rate of evolution in transcription factor binding sites varies with position, suggesting that some regions are under stronger functional constraint than others. This variation likely reflects the varying importance of different positions in the formation of the protein-DNA complex. The characterization of the pattern of evolution in known binding sites will likely contribute to the effective use of comparative

  15. The RNA Binding Specificity of Human APOBEC3 Proteins Resembles That of HIV-1 Nucleocapsid.

    PubMed

    York, Ashley; Kutluay, Sebla B; Errando, Manel; Bieniasz, Paul D

    2016-08-01

    The APOBEC3 (A3) cytidine deaminases are antiretroviral proteins, whose targets include human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1). Their incorporation into viral particles is critical for antiviral activity and is driven by interactions with the RNA molecules that are packaged into virions. However, it is unclear whether A3 proteins preferentially target RNA molecules that are destined to be packaged and if so, how. Using cross-linking immunoprecipitation sequencing (CLIP-seq), we determined the RNA binding preferences of the A3F, A3G and A3H proteins. We found that A3 proteins bind preferentially to RNA segments with particular properties, both in cells and in virions. Specifically, A3 proteins target RNA sequences that are G-rich and/or A-rich and are not scanned by ribosomes during translation. Comparative analyses of HIV-1 Gag, nucleocapsid (NC) and A3 RNA binding to HIV-1 RNA in cells and virions revealed the striking finding that A3 proteins partially mimic the RNA binding specificity of the HIV-1 NC protein. These findings suggest a model for A3 incorporation into HIV-1 virions in which an NC-like RNA binding specificity is determined by nucleotide composition rather than sequence. This model reconciles the promiscuity of A3 RNA binding that has been observed in previous studies with a presumed advantage that would accompany selective binding to RNAs that are destined to be packaged into virions. PMID:27541140

  16. The RNA Binding Specificity of Human APOBEC3 Proteins Resembles That of HIV-1 Nucleocapsid

    PubMed Central

    Errando, Manel; Bieniasz, Paul D.

    2016-01-01

    The APOBEC3 (A3) cytidine deaminases are antiretroviral proteins, whose targets include human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1). Their incorporation into viral particles is critical for antiviral activity and is driven by interactions with the RNA molecules that are packaged into virions. However, it is unclear whether A3 proteins preferentially target RNA molecules that are destined to be packaged and if so, how. Using cross-linking immunoprecipitation sequencing (CLIP-seq), we determined the RNA binding preferences of the A3F, A3G and A3H proteins. We found that A3 proteins bind preferentially to RNA segments with particular properties, both in cells and in virions. Specifically, A3 proteins target RNA sequences that are G-rich and/or A-rich and are not scanned by ribosomes during translation. Comparative analyses of HIV-1 Gag, nucleocapsid (NC) and A3 RNA binding to HIV-1 RNA in cells and virions revealed the striking finding that A3 proteins partially mimic the RNA binding specificity of the HIV-1 NC protein. These findings suggest a model for A3 incorporation into HIV-1 virions in which an NC-like RNA binding specificity is determined by nucleotide composition rather than sequence. This model reconciles the promiscuity of A3 RNA binding that has been observed in previous studies with a presumed advantage that would accompany selective binding to RNAs that are destined to be packaged into virions. PMID:27541140

  17. n-Dodecyl β-D-maltoside specifically competes with general anesthetics for anesthetic binding sites.

    PubMed

    Xu, Longhe; Matsunaga, Felipe; Xi, Jin; Li, Min; Ma, Jingyuan; Liu, Renyu

    2014-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that the anionic detergent sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) specifically interacts with the anesthetic binding site in horse spleen apoferritin, a soluble protein which models anesthetic binding sites in receptors. This raises the possibility of other detergents similarly interacting with and occluding such sites from anesthetics, thereby preventing the proper identification of novel anesthetic binding sites. n-Dodecyl β-D-maltoside (DDM) is a non-ionic detergent commonly used during protein-anesthetic studies because of its mild and non-denaturing properties. In this study, we demonstrate that SDS and DDM occupy anesthetic binding sites in the model proteins human serum albumin (HSA) and horse spleen apoferritin and thereby inhibit the binding of the general anesthetics propofol and isoflurane. DDM specifically interacts with HSA (Kd = 40 μM) with a lower affinity than SDS (Kd = 2 μM). DDM exerts all these effects while not perturbing the native structures of either model protein. Computational calculations corroborated the experimental results by demonstrating that the binding sites for DDM and both anesthetics on the model proteins overlapped. Collectively, our results indicate that DDM and SDS specifically interact with anesthetic binding sites and may thus prevent the identification of novel anesthetic sites. Special precaution should be taken when undertaking and interpreting results from protein-anesthetic investigations utilizing detergents like SDS and DDM.

  18. Glutaraldehyde cross-linking of lectins to marker enzymes: protection of binding site by specific sugars.

    PubMed

    Appukuttan, P S; Chacko, B K; Geetha, M; Annamma, K I; Mathai, J

    2000-04-01

    The role of bound specific sugars in protecting the sugar binding activity of several galactose binding proteins during their covalent conjugation to horse radish peroxidase by glutaraldehyde-mediated cross-linking was examined by: a) affinity matrix binding of the conjugate, b) enzyme linked lectin assay and c) hemagglutination assay. During conjugation using 1% glutaraldehyde, protection of jack fruit (Artocarpus integrifolia) lectin (jacalin) activity depended on concentration of specific sugar present during conjugation; optimum protection was offered by 50 mM galactose. This indicated the presence of one or more primary groups at the binding site of jacalin, which is (are) essential for sugar binding. On the other hand, such essential amino group(s) was not indicated at the sugar binding site of the peanut lectin, bovine heart galectin or of the human serum anti alpha-galactoside antibody, since exclusion of sugar during their conjugation to HRP did not diminish sugar binding activity. The differential behavior is discussed in the light of reported differences in sugar specificities. Results indicated that sugar mediated blocking of active site may be used in characterization of the latter in lectins.

  19. Specific binding of victorin to a 100-kDa protein from oats

    SciTech Connect

    Wolpert, T.J.; Macko, V. )

    1989-06-01

    Susceptibility of oats to victoria blight, caused by the fungus Cochliobolus victoriae, and sensitivity to the host-specific toxin victorin, produced by the fungus, are controlled by the dominant allele at the Vb locus. It has been postulated that the Vb locus encodes a toxin receptor, although direct evidence for such a receptor is not available. Recent studies on structure-activity relationships of the toxin established a methodology for producing {sup 125}I-labeled victorin. Electrophoretic analysis of proteins from isogenic susceptible and resistant oat genotypes following treatment of leaves with radiolabeled victorin showed that victorin binds in a covalent and a genotype-specific manner to a 100-kDa protein only in susceptible oat leaf slices. This in vivo binding was competitively displaced by reduced victorin, a nontoxic protective compound, and appeared to be correlated with biological activity. In vitro binding to the 100-kDa protein in leaf extracts showed several differences from in vivo binding. Binding was not genotype specific and required a reducing agent that was not required for in vivo binding. Differential centrifugation showed that the 100-kDa victorin binding protein was not a cytosolic protein but was enriched in a high-speed particulate fraction. The data support the hypothesis that the 100-kDa protein is the victorin receptor.

  20. Specific binding of leukotriene B4 to a receptor on human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Kreisle, R A; Parker, C W

    1983-02-01

    In this paper we have described the binding of nanomoler concentrations of [3H]leukotriene B4 (LTB4) to human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Because up to 80% of the total [3H]LTB4 binding was blocked by excess (greater than 100 times) [14C]LTB4, the majority of binding is specific. Stereospecificity of the LTB4 binding is demonstrated by the diminished relative abilities of the 6-trans-and 12-epi-6-trans- isomers of LTB4 to block [3H]LTB4 binding. With these two isomers 3-10-fold higher than [14C]LTB4 concentrations were needed for equivalent inhibition of [3H]LTB4 binding. This difference is quantitatively less dramatic than the differences between these isomers in many in vitro functional assays such as chemokinesis, chemotaxis, and degranulation. Binding of [3H]FMLP is not blocked at greater than 100-fold excess of LTB4. The binding of [3H]LTB4 to cells appears to be essentially irreversible at 4 degrees C, but not at 37 degrees C where initially bound LTB4 is rapidly converted to metabolites which then enter the medium. These results suggest the presence of a saturable, stereospecific site for LTB4 on PMN. The association of LTB4 binding and the initiation of pharmacological responses to LTB4 will require further studies.

  1. Specificity of the binding of trifluoperazine to the calcium-dependent activator of phosphodiesterase and to a series of other calcium-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Levin, R M; Weiss, B

    1978-05-01

    Trifluoperazine inhibits the activation of phosphodiesterase by binding to the calcium-dependent activator. To determine further the specificity by which trifluoperazine binds to activator, we compared the binding of trifluoperazine to activator prepared from several species and tissues and to a number of other calcium-binding proteins devoid of activator activity. Trifluoperazine binds to activator prepared from human, bovine, rat and rabbit brain and from chick embryo fibroblasts. In each case, the binding of trifluoperazine to activator was qualitatively similar and related quantitatively to the ability of the preparation to activate phosphodiesterase. Of the other calcium-binding proteins examined, namely, troponin-C, S-100 protein, phospholipase A, phospholipase B and myosin light chain, only troponin-C displayed any significant calcium-specific binding of trifluoperazine. The binding to troponin-C, however, appeared to be different from the binding to activator; whereas the binding of trifluoperazine to actovator showed no cooperativity, the binding to troponin-C showed positive cooperatively. These results and earlier data showing that trifluoperazine fails to bind to a variety of other proteins, indicate that the binding of trifluoperazine to the calcium-dependent activator of phosphodiesterase is selective and suggest that this binding may explain some of the biochemical and pharmacological actions of this antipsychotic agent.

  2. Construction of a novel selection system for endoglucanases exhibiting carbohydrate-binding modules optimized for biomass using yeast cell-surface engineering

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    To permit direct cellulose degradation and ethanol fermentation, Saccharomyces cerevisiae BY4741 (Δsed1) codisplaying 3 cellulases (Trichoderma reesei endoglucanase II [EG], T. reesei cellobiohydrolase II [CBH], and Aspergillus aculeatus β-glucosidase I [BG]) was constructed by yeast cell-surface engineering. The EG used in this study consists of a family 1 carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) and a catalytic module. A comparison with family 1 CBMs revealed conserved amino acid residues and flexible amino acid residues. The flexible amino acid residues were at positions 18, 23, 26, and 27, through which the degrading activity for various cellulose structures in each biomass may have been optimized. To select the optimal combination of CBMs of EGs, a yeast mixture with comprehensively mutated CBM was constructed. The mixture consisted of yeasts codisplaying EG with mutated CBMs, in which 4 flexible residues were comprehensively mutated, CBH, and BG. The yeast mixture was inoculated in selection medium with newspaper as the sole carbon source. The surviving yeast consisted of RTSH yeast (the mutant sequence of CBM: N18R, S23T, S26S, and T27H) and wild-type yeast (CBM was the original) in a ratio of 1:46. The mixture (1 RTSH yeast and 46 wild-type yeasts) had a fermentation activity that was 1.5-fold higher than that of wild-type yeast alone in the early phase of saccharification and fermentation, which indicates that the yeast mixture with comprehensively mutated CBM could be used to select the optimal combination of CBMs suitable for the cellulose of each biomass. PMID:23092441

  3. [Expression of prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA) and selection of its specific binding peptide].

    PubMed

    Hou, Li-Hua; Du, Yong; Zhang, Xiao-Peng; An, Xiao-Ping; Chen, Wei

    2004-09-01

    Prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA), a homologue of the Ly-6/Thy-1 family of cell surface antigen, is expressed by a majority of human prostate cancers and is a promising target for prostate cancer immunotherapy. To obtain the specific peptide binding with PSCA for targeted immunotherapy, PSCA gene was obtained by RT-PCR from human prostate cancer cell line DU145 and the transcated PSCA (tPSCA) gene was cloned into vector pQE30 for soluble expression in E. coli. The identity of recombinant tPSCA was confirmed through ELISA and western blot by use of anti-PSCA monoclonal antibody. Then the 12-peptide phage display library was screened with the purified tPSCA protein for its specific binding peptide through 3 rounds panning. For identifying the peptide's specificity, the peptide was coupled with EGFP (enhanced green fluorecent protein) by recombinant DNA technology and the recombinant coupled protein was termed 11-EGFP. The binding specificity with tPSCA of 11-EGFP was further confirmed by ELISA and competitive inhibition experiment. Flow cytometry demonstrated its binding specificity with cell line DU145. In conclusion, a 12-amino-acid peptide which could bind with PSCA specifically was found and it may be a potential tool for targeted immunotherapy of prostate carcinoma. PMID:15973992

  4. New fluorescent reagents specific for Ca{sup 2+}-binding proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Hail, Danya; Lemelson, Daniela; Israelson, Adrian; Shoshan-Barmatz, Varda

    2012-09-14

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer New reagents specifically inhibit the activity of Ca{sup 2+}-dependent proteins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FITC-Ru and EITC-Ru allow for mechanism-independent probing of Ca{sup 2+}-binding proteins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Changes in reagents fluorescence allow characterization of protein Ca{sup 2+}-binding properties. -- Abstract: Ca{sup 2+} carries information pivotal to cell life and death via its interactions with specific binding sites in a protein. We previously developed a novel photoreactive reagent, azido ruthenium (AzRu), which strongly inhibits Ca{sup 2+}-dependent activities. Here, we synthesized new fluorescent ruthenium-based reagents containing FITC or EITC, FITC-Ru and EITC-Ru. These reagents were purified, characterized and found to specifically interact with and markedly inhibit Ca{sup 2+}-dependent activities but not the activity of Ca{sup 2+}-independent reactions. In contrast to many reagents that serve as probes for Ca{sup 2+}, FITC-Ru and EITC-Ru are the first fluorescent divalent cation analogs to be synthesized and characterized that specifically bind to Ca{sup 2+}-binding proteins and inhibit their activity. Such reagents will assist in characterizing Ca{sup 2+}-binding proteins, thereby facilitating better understanding of the function of Ca{sup 2+} as a key bio-regulator.

  5. Specific strychnine binding sites on acrosome-associated membranes of golden hamster spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Llanos, Miguel N; Ronco, Ana M; Aguirre, María C

    2003-06-27

    This study demonstrates for the first time, that membrane vesicles originated from the hamster sperm head after the occurrence of the acrosome reaction, possess specific strychnine binding sites. [3H]Strychnine binding was saturable and reversible, being displaced by unlabeled strychnine (IC(50)=26.7+/-2.3 microM). Kinetic analysis revealed one binding site with K(d)=120nM and B(max)=142fmol/10(6) spermatozoa. Glycine receptor agonists beta-alanine and taurine inhibited strychnine binding by 20-30%. Surprisingly, glycine stimulated binding by about 40-50%. Results obtained in this study strongly suggest the presence of glycine receptors-with distinctive kinetic properties on the periacrosomal plasma membrane of hamster spermatozoa. Localization of this receptor fits well with its previously proposed role in acrosomal exocytosis during mammalian fertilization.

  6. Sequence-specific DNA binding by glucocorticoid receptor "zinc finger peptides".

    PubMed

    Archer, T K; Hager, G L; Omichinski, J G

    1990-10-01

    Steroid hormone receptors can activate or repress transcription from responsive loci by binding to DNA. We have examined the mechanism of DNA binding by individually synthesizing the putative "zinc finger peptides" from the rat glucocorticoid receptor. Atomic absorption studies show that the peptides will bind zinc on an equimolar basis, and circular dichroism experiments demonstrate a significant alteration in secondary structure in the presence of zinc. The results from a series of experiments establish that metal ion is required for binding to DNA and that the amino-terminal zinc finger shows a significantly greater affinity for glucocorticoid response element-containing DNA over control DNA. These observations indicate that a single synthetic "zinc finger peptide" is able to bind to DNA in a sequence-specific manner. PMID:2120703

  7. An Engineered Switch in T Cell Receptor Specificity Leads to an Unusual but Functional Binding Geometry.

    PubMed

    Harris, Daniel T; Singh, Nishant K; Cai, Qi; Smith, Sheena N; Vander Kooi, Craig W; Procko, Erik; Kranz, David M; Baker, Brian M

    2016-07-01

    Utilizing a diverse binding site, T cell receptors (TCRs) specifically recognize a composite ligand comprised of a foreign peptide and a major histocompatibility complex protein (MHC). To help understand the determinants of TCR specificity, we studied a parental and engineered receptor whose peptide specificity had been switched via molecular evolution. Altered specificity was associated with a significant change in TCR-binding geometry, but this did not impact the ability of the TCR to signal in an antigen-specific manner. The determinants of binding and specificity were distributed among contact and non-contact residues in germline and hypervariable loops, and included disruption of key TCR-MHC interactions that bias αβ TCRs toward particular binding modes. Sequence-fitness landscapes identified additional mutations that further enhanced specificity. Our results demonstrate that TCR specificity arises from the distributed action of numerous sites throughout the interface, with significant implications for engineering therapeutic TCRs with novel and functional recognition properties. PMID:27238970

  8. OB protein binds specifically to the choroid plexus of mice and rats.

    PubMed Central

    Devos, R; Richards, J G; Campfield, L A; Tartaglia, L A; Guisez, Y; van der Heyden, J; Travernier, J; Plaetinck, G; Burn, P

    1996-01-01

    Binding studies were conducted to identify the anatomical location of brain target sites for OB protein, the ob gene product. 125I-labeled recombinant mouse OB protein or alkaline phosphatase-OB fusion proteins were used for in vitro and in vivo binding studies. Coronal brain sections or fresh tissue from lean, obese ob/ob, and obese db/db mice as well as lean and obese Zucker rats were probed to identify potential central OB protein-binding sites. We report here that recombinant OB protein binds specifically to the choroid plexus. The binding of OB protein (either radiolabeled or the alkaline phosphatase-OB fusion protein) and its displacement by unlabeled OB protein was similar in lean, obese ob/ob, and obese db/db mice as well as lean and obese Zucker rats. These findings suggest that OB protein binds with high affinity to a specific receptor in the choroid plexus. After binding to the choroid plexus receptor, OB protein may then be transported across the blood-brain barrier into the cerebrospinal fluid. Alternatively, binding of OB protein to a specific receptor in the choroid plexus may activate afferent neural inputs to the neural network that regulates feeding behavior and energy balance or may result in the clearance or degradation of OB protein. The identification of the choroid plexus as a brain binding site for OB protein will provide the basis for the construction of expression libraries and facilitate the rapid cloning of the choroid plexus OB receptor. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8643634

  9. OB protein binds specifically to the choroid plexus of mice and rats.

    PubMed

    Devos, R; Richards, J G; Campfield, L A; Tartaglia, L A; Guisez, Y; van der Heyden, J; Travernier, J; Plaetinck, G; Burn, P

    1996-05-28

    Binding studies were conducted to identify the anatomical location of brain target sites for OB protein, the ob gene product. 125I-labeled recombinant mouse OB protein or alkaline phosphatase-OB fusion proteins were used for in vitro and in vivo binding studies. Coronal brain sections or fresh tissue from lean, obese ob/ob, and obese db/db mice as well as lean and obese Zucker rats were probed to identify potential central OB protein-binding sites. We report here that recombinant OB protein binds specifically to the choroid plexus. The binding of OB protein (either radiolabeled or the alkaline phosphatase-OB fusion protein) and its displacement by unlabeled OB protein was similar in lean, obese ob/ob, and obese db/db mice as well as lean and obese Zucker rats. These findings suggest that OB protein binds with high affinity to a specific receptor in the choroid plexus. After binding to the choroid plexus receptor, OB protein may then be transported across the blood-brain barrier into the cerebrospinal fluid. Alternatively, binding of OB protein to a specific receptor in the choroid plexus may activate afferent neural inputs to the neural network that regulates feeding behavior and energy balance or may result in the clearance or degradation of OB protein. The identification of the choroid plexus as a brain binding site for OB protein will provide the basis for the construction of expression libraries and facilitate the rapid cloning of the choroid plexus OB receptor. PMID:8643634

  10. Non-steady-state measurement of in vivo radioligand binding with positron emission tomography: specificity analysis and comparison with in vitro binding

    SciTech Connect

    Perlmutter, J.S.; Moerlein, S.M.; Hwang, D.R.; Todd, R.D. )

    1991-05-01

    We previously have developed a non-steady-state method for in vivo measurement of radioligand-receptor binding in brain using positron emission tomography (PET) and {sup 18}F-spiperone ({sup 18}F-SP). This method has proven to be highly sensitive to the detection of decreases in the apparent number of available specific binding sites. The purposes of this investigation are to demonstrate the specificity of this PET assay and compare findings to in vitro binding assays. Three to six studies were performed in each of five male baboons. Each animal was pretreated with either ketanserin (serotonergic (S2)), eticlopride (dopaminergic (D2)), or unlabeled SP to compete with {sup 18}F-SP for specific binding sites. Sequential PET scans and arterial-blood samples were collected for 3 hr after intravenous injection of {sup 18}F-SP. Data were analyzed with a three-compartment model that considered the accumulation of radiolabeled metabolites in arterial blood. Five baboons were killed, and radioligand-receptor binding in vitro was measured by homogenate techniques. There was no detectable in vitro or in vivo specific binding of SP in cerebellum. The specific binding of SP in striatal tissue in vitro was approximately 74% to D2 sites and 26% to S2 sites, whereas ketanserin displaced all specific binding in frontal cortex. In close agreement, specific binding measured in vivo with PET revealed that 68% of apparent striatal binding could be blocked by pretreatment with eticlopride, and 34% by ketanserin.

  11. Impact of Dietary Carbohydrate and Protein Levels on Carbohydrate Metabolism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lasker, Denise Ann

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this dissertation was to investigate the impact of changing dietary carbohydrate (CARB) intakes within recommended dietary guidelines on metabolic outcomes specifically associated with glycemic regulations and carbohydrate metabolism. This research utilized both human and animal studies to examine changes in metabolism across a wide…

  12. Syntax compensates for poor binding sites to encode tissue specificity of developmental enhancers.

    PubMed

    Farley, Emma K; Olson, Katrina M; Zhang, Wei; Rokhsar, Daniel S; Levine, Michael S

    2016-06-01

    Transcriptional enhancers are short segments of DNA that switch genes on and off in response to a variety of intrinsic and extrinsic signals. Despite the discovery of the first enhancer more than 30 y ago, the relationship between primary DNA sequence and enhancer activity remains obscure. In particular, the importance of "syntax" (the order, orientation, and spacing of binding sites) is unclear. A high-throughput screen identified synthetic notochord enhancers that are activated by the combination of ZicL and ETS transcription factors in Ciona embryos. Manipulation of these enhancers elucidated a "regulatory code" of sequence and syntax features for notochord-specific expression. This code enabled in silico discovery of bona fide notochord enhancers, including those containing low-affinity binding sites that would be excluded by standard motif identification methods. One of the newly identified enhancers maps upstream of the known enhancer that regulates Brachyury (Ci-Bra), a key determinant of notochord specification. This newly identified Ci-Bra shadow enhancer contains binding sites with very low affinity, but optimal syntax, and therefore mediates surprisingly strong expression in the notochord. Weak binding sites are compensated by optimal syntax, whereas enhancers containing high-affinity binding affinities possess suboptimal syntax. We suggest this balance has obscured the importance of regulatory syntax, as noncanonical binding motifs are typically disregarded by enhancer detection methods. As a result, enhancers with low binding affinities but optimal syntax may be a vastly underappreciated feature of the regulatory genome.

  13. Syntax compensates for poor binding sites to encode tissue specificity of developmental enhancers.

    PubMed

    Farley, Emma K; Olson, Katrina M; Zhang, Wei; Rokhsar, Daniel S; Levine, Michael S

    2016-06-01

    Transcriptional enhancers are short segments of DNA that switch genes on and off in response to a variety of intrinsic and extrinsic signals. Despite the discovery of the first enhancer more than 30 y ago, the relationship between primary DNA sequence and enhancer activity remains obscure. In particular, the importance of "syntax" (the order, orientation, and spacing of binding sites) is unclear. A high-throughput screen identified synthetic notochord enhancers that are activated by the combination of ZicL and ETS transcription factors in Ciona embryos. Manipulation of these enhancers elucidated a "regulatory code" of sequence and syntax features for notochord-specific expression. This code enabled in silico discovery of bona fide notochord enhancers, including those containing low-affinity binding sites that would be excluded by standard motif identification methods. One of the newly identified enhancers maps upstream of the known enhancer that regulates Brachyury (Ci-Bra), a key determinant of notochord specification. This newly identified Ci-Bra shadow enhancer contains binding sites with very low affinity, but optimal syntax, and therefore mediates surprisingly strong expression in the notochord. Weak binding sites are compensated by optimal syntax, whereas enhancers containing high-affinity binding affinities possess suboptimal syntax. We suggest this balance has obscured the importance of regulatory syntax, as noncanonical binding motifs are typically disregarded by enhancer detection methods. As a result, enhancers with low binding affinities but optimal syntax may be a vastly underappreciated feature of the regulatory genome. PMID:27155014

  14. Immunoprecipitation and characterization of a binding protein specific for the peptide, intestinal trefoil factor.

    PubMed

    Chinery, R; Cox, H M

    1995-01-01

    Recombinant rat intestinal trefoil factor (rITF) and human spasmolytic polypeptide (hSP) were irreversibly cross-linked to specific binding sites in solubilized rat intestinal epithelial membranes and human adenocarcinoma cells. Analysis of the immunoprecipitates by immunoblotting identified a cross-linked protein complex of approximately 45 kDa, which under reducing conditions appeared as a approximately 28-kDa band and the latter displayed ligand-stimulated phosphorylation of a tyrosine, but not a threonine or serine, residue in the binding complex. [125I]rITF was used to localize binding sites by autoradiography of frozen sections from rat gastrointestinal tissues. A high density of specific [125I]rITF binding sites was present within gastric, colonic, and jejunal mucosal glands. Unlabeled hSP partially inhibited [125I]rITF binding at a concentration of 1 microM when compared with the same concentration of unlabeled rITF. These studies support earlier observations for the existence of trefoil binding sites in the gastrointestinal tract and further suggest that hSP has affinity for the mucosal rITF binding site.

  15. Elucidation of the DNA binding specificity of the natural plant alkaloid chelerythrine: a biophysical approach.

    PubMed

    Basu, Pritha; Suresh Kumar, Gopinatha

    2014-09-01

    Interaction of the anticancer plant alkaloid chelerythrine with four sequence specific synthetic polynucleotides was studied by spectroscopy and calorimetry experiments. The binding resulted in strong hypochromic and bathochromic effects in the absorption spectrum of the alkaloid, enhancement in the fluorescence with the AT polynucleotides and the homo-GC polynucleotide and quenching with the hetero-GC polynucleotide. Cooperative binding was observed with all the polynucleotides. Fluorescence polarization anisotropy, iodide quenching and viscosity results confirmed intercalative binding of the alkaloid. The binding resulted in the thermal stabilization of the polynucleotides and moderate perturbations in the B-conformation of the DNA. The high binding affinity values (∼10(6) M(-1)) evaluated from the spectroscopic data was in excellent agreement with those obtained from calorimetry. The binding was exothermic and favoured by negative standard molar enthalpy and positive standard molar entropic contributions in all cases other than homo-AT polynucleotide, where it was endothermic and entropy driven. Salt-dependent calorimetry data revealed that the binding reaction was driven mostly by non-polyelectrolytic forces. The magnitude of the negative heat capacity values confirmed the role of significant hydrophobic effects in the interaction profile of the alkaloid with the polynucleotides. The results revealed the specificity of chelerythrine to follow homo-GC>hetero-GC>hetero-AT=homo-AT polynucleotide. PMID:25010289

  16. Systematic Determination of Transcription Factor DNA-Binding Specificities in Yeast.

    PubMed

    Peña-Castillo, Lourdes; Badis, Gwenael

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how genes are regulated, decoding their "regulome", is one of the main challenges of the post-genomic era. Here, we describe the in vitro method we used to associate cis-regulatory sites with cognate trans-regulators by characterizing the DNA-binding specificity of the vast majority of yeast transcription factors using Protein Binding Microarrays. This approach can be implemented to any given organism.

  17. Affinity binding of inclusion bodies on supermacroporous monolithic cryogels using labeling with specific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ahlqvist, Josefin; Kumar, Ashok; Sundström, Heléne; Ledung, Erika; Hörnsten, E Gunnar; Enfors, Sven-Olof; Mattiasson, Bo

    2006-03-23

    A new chromatographic method based on affinity supermacroporous monolithic cryogels is developed for binding and analyzing inclusion bodies during fermentation. The work demonstrated that it is possible to bind specific IgG and IgY antibodies to the 15 and 17 amino acids at the terminus ends of a 33 kDa target protein aggregated as inclusion bodies. The antibody treated inclusion bodies from lysed fermentation broth can be specifically retained in protein A and pseudo-biospecific ligand sulfamethazine modified supermacroporous cryogels. The degree of binding of IgG and IgY treated inclusion bodies to the Protein A and sulfamethazine gels are investigated, as well as the influence of pH on the sulfamethazine ligand. Optimum binding of 78 and 72% was observed on both protein A and sulfamethazine modified cryogel columns, respectively, using IgG labeling of the inclusion bodies. The antibody treated inclusion bodies pass through unretained in the sulfamethazine supermacroporous gel at pH that does not favour the binding between the ligand on the gel and the antibodies on the surface of inclusion bodies. Also the unlabeled inclusion bodies went through the gel unretained, showing no non-specific binding or trapping within the gel. These findings may very well be the foundation for the building of a powerful analytical tool during fermentation of inclusion bodies as well as a convenient way to purify them from fermentation broth. These results also support our earlier findings [Kumar, A., Plieva, F.M., Galaev, I.Yu., Mattiasson, B., 2003. Affinity fractionation of lymphocytes using a monolithic cyogel. J. Immunol. Methods 283, 185-194] with mammalian cells that were surface labeled with specific antibodies and recognized on protein A supermacroporous gels. A general binding and separation system can be established on antibody binding cryogel affinity matrices.

  18. Specific binding of nucleotides and NAD+ to Clostridium difficile toxin A.

    PubMed

    Lobban, M D; Borriello, S P

    1992-02-24

    Binding of nucleotides, a tetrapolyphosphate, and NAD+ to purified toxin A of Clostridium difficile was determined by monitoring changes in intrinsic fluorescence following excitation at 280 nm, and recording emissions at 340 nm. Binding was specific for concentrations over the range 5 to 100 microM for ATP, GTP, and their respective non-hydrolysable analogues AMP-PNP and Gpp(NH)p, tetrapolyphosphate and NAD+. PMID:1544441

  19. Transcriptional Regulation in Mammalian Cells by Sequence-Specific DNA Binding Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Pamela J.; Tjian, Robert

    1989-07-01

    The cloning of genes encoding mammalian DNA binding transcription factors for RNA polymerase II has provided the opportunity to analyze the structure and function of these proteins. This review summarizes recent studies that define structural domains for DNA binding and transcriptional activation functions in sequence-specific transcription factors. The mechanisms by which these factors may activate transcriptional initiation and by which they may be regulated to achieve differential gene expression are also discussed.

  20. Specific binding and biological effects of tumor promoting phorbol esters on sponges.

    PubMed

    Mazzorana, M; Garrone, R; Martel, N; Yamasaki, H

    1984-01-01

    Sponges grown in the presence of 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) show deep alterations of their structure and development. Their aquiferous system (flagellated cells and canals) is largely altered and the tissues show an unusually high cell density. This focalized effect of TPA on the aquiferous system seems specific and is reversible at low concentrations (100 ng/ml). A toxic, non-specific effect is also noted, particularly at high concentrations (5000 ng/ml). Using 3H-phorbol-12, 13-dibutyrate (3H-PDBu), we demonstrate a class of specific binding sites for phorbol esters in the homogenates of sponges. These binding sites have high affinity (Kd = 26.0 nM) for PDBu and at saturation about 20 pmoles of 3H-PDBu is bound per mg protein of sponge homogenates. The binding of 3H-PDBu was inhibited by other phorbol esters and their congeners, and there was a good correlation between their potency in binding inhibition and their tumor promoting activity. It is concluded that sponges have a class of specific saturable and high affinity receptors for phorbol esters and that there is a very high conservation of these receptors during evolution. Such specific binding may be responsible for subsequent biological effect of TPA on sponges.

  1. Characterization and partial purification of a male specific hepatic estrogen binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Rogerson, B.J.

    1987-01-01

    In order to characterize the estrogen binding protein (MEB) binding site and its interaction with steroids, the effect of single substituent variations of estradiol on MEB affinity was tested. As assessed by relative binding affinities, MEB exhibits a unique specificity for steroidal estrogens. Free C(3) and C(17) hydroxyl groups are required for an effective binding interaction. Androgens do not bind as effectively as estrogens, whereas nonsteroidal estrogens such as DES, antiestrogens such as tamoxifen and 4-hydroxytamoxifen, progestins and glucocorticoids do not interact with the MEB estradiol binding site. Several physicochemical characteristics of MEB were determined. MEB has a molecular weight of 25-30 kDa. The kinetics of (/sup 3/H)E/sub 2/ association and dissociation at 4/sup 0/C are very rapid, with t/sub 1/2/ values of less than 5 seconds. These rapid binding kinetics are also observed for (/sup 3/H)E/sub 3/, (/sup 3/H)E/sub 1/, (/sup 3/H)5..cap alpha..-androstan-3..cap alpha.., 17..beta..-diol, and (/sup 3/H)2-OMeE/sub 3/. Divalent cations inhibit MEB estradiol binding, an effect reversed by EDTA. Other characteristics such as temperature and pH stability, and absence from the nuclear fraction of the hepatocyte further distinguish it from the estrogen receptor.

  2. Binding properties of a mannose-specific lectin from the snowdrop (Galanthus nivalis) bulb.

    PubMed

    Shibuya, N; Goldstein, I J; Van Damme, E J; Peumans, W J

    1988-01-15

    Carbohydrate binding properties of a new plant lectin (GNA) isolated from snowdrop bulbs were studied using the technique of quantitative precipitation, hapten inhibition, and affinity chromatography on immobilized lectin. Purified GNA precipitated highly branched yeast mannans but did not react with most glucans. Hapten inhibition experiments showed that D-mannose is an inhibitor of GNA-mannan interaction but neither N-acetyl-D-mannosamine nor D-glucose is an inhibitor. Hapten inhibition with various sugars showed that GNA requires the presence of equatorial hydroxyl groups at the C-3 and C-4 positions and an axial group at the C-2 position of the D-pyranose ring. A nonreducing terminal D-mannose residue is necessary for the interaction of oligosaccharides, and oligosaccharides with terminal Man(alpha-1-3)Man units showed the highest inhibitory potency (10-30 times greater than D-mannose) among the manno-oligosaccharides tested. The presence of the hydrophobic p-nitrophenyl aglycone increased the affinity of D-mannose only slightly. Immobilized GNA bound yeast mannan but did not bind glycogen. The behavior of glycoproteins with high mannose type glycan chains depended on the density and the structure of their glycan chains. Glycopeptides which carry Man(alpha 1-3)Man units were retarded on the immobilized GNA column whereas those lacking this unit or with hybrid type glycan chains were not retarded on the column.

  3. Mechanisms of specific and nonspecific binding of architectural proteins in prokaryotic gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Benevides, James M; Danahy, Jessica; Kawakami, Jessica; Thomas, George J

    2008-03-25

    IHF and HU are small basic proteins of eubacteria that bind as homodimers to double-stranded DNA and bend the duplex to promote architectures required for gene regulation. These architectural proteins share a common alpha/beta fold but exhibit different nucleic acid binding surfaces and distinct functional roles. With respect to DNA-binding specificity, for example, IHF is sequence specific, while HU is not. We have employed Raman difference spectroscopy and gel mobility assays to characterize the molecular mechanisms underlying such differences in DNA recognition. Parallel studies of solution complexes of IHF and HU with the same DNA nonadecamer (5' --> 3' sequence: TC TAAGTAGTTGATTCATA, where the phage lambda H1 consensus sequence of IHF is underlined) show the following. (i) The structure of the targeted DNA site is altered much more dramatically by IHF than by HU binding. (ii) In the IHF complex, the structural perturbations encompass both the sugar-phosphate backbone and the bases of the consensus sequence, whereas only the DNA backbone is altered by HU binding. (iii) In the presence of excess protein, complexes of order higher than 1 dimer per duplex are detected for HU:DNA, though not for IHF:DNA. The results differentiate structural motifs of IHF:DNA and HU:DNA solution complexes, provide Raman signatures of prokaryotic sequence-specific and nonspecific recognition, and suggest that the architectural role of HU may involve the capability to recruit additional binding partners to even relatively short DNA sequences. PMID:18302340

  4. Rational design of an estrogen receptor mutant with altered DNA-binding specificity

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Denis; Bail, Martine; Pesant, Genevieve; Dupont, Virginie N.; Rouault, Étienne; Deschênes, Julie; Rocha, Walter; Melançon, Geneviève; Steinberg, Sergey V.; Mader, Sylvie

    2007-01-01

    Although artificial C2-H2 zinc fingers can be designed to recognize specific DNA sequences, it remains unclear to which extent nuclear receptor C4 zinc fingers can be tailored to bind novel DNA elements. Steroid receptors bind as dimers to palindromic response elements differing in the two central base pairs of repeated motifs. Predictions based on one amino acid—one base-pair relationships may not apply to estrogen receptors (ERs), which recognize the two central base pairs of estrogen response elements (EREs) via two charged amino acids, each contacting two bases on opposite DNA strands. Mutagenesis of these residues, E203 and K210 in ERα, indicated that both contribute to ERE binding. Removal of the electric charge and steric constraints associated with K210 was required for full loss of parental DNA-binding specificity and recognition of novel sequences by E203 mutants. Although some of the new binding profiles did not match predictions, the double mutation E203R-K210A generated as predicted a mutant ER that was transcriptionally active on palindromes of PuGCTCA motifs, but not on consensus EREs. This study demonstrates the feasibility of designing C4 zinc finger mutants with novel DNA-binding specificity, but also uncovers limitations of this approach. PMID:17478511

  5. Compact, universal DNA microarrays to comprehensively determine transcription-factor binding site specificities

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Michael F.; Philippakis, Anthony A.; Qureshi, Aaron M.; He, Fangxue S.; Estep, Preston W.; Bulyk, Martha L.

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) regulate the expression of genes involved in myriad cellular processes through sequence-specific interactions with DNA. In order to predict DNA regulatory elements and the TFs targeting them with greater accuracy, detailed knowledge of the binding preferences of TFs is needed. Protein binding microarray (PBM) technology permits rapid, high-throughput characterization of the in vitro DNA binding specificities of proteins1. Here, we present a novel, maximally compact, synthetic DNA sequence design that represents all possible DNA sequence variants of a given length k (i.e., all “k-mers”) on a single, universal microarray. We constructed such all k-mer microarrays covering all 10 base pair (bp) binding sites by converting high-density single-stranded oligonucleotide arrays to double-stranded DNA arrays. Using these microarrays, we comprehensively determined the binding specificities over a full range of affinities for five TFs of diverse structural classes from yeast, worm, mouse, and human. Importantly, the unbiased coverage of all k-mers permits an interrogation of binding site preferences, including nucleotide interdependencies, at unprecedented resolution. PMID:16998473

  6. A Conserved Three-nucleotide Core Motif Defines Musashi RNA Binding Specificity*

    PubMed Central

    Zearfoss, N. Ruth; Deveau, Laura M.; Clingman, Carina C.; Schmidt, Eric; Johnson, Emily S.; Massi, Francesca; Ryder, Sean P.

    2014-01-01

    Musashi (MSI) family proteins control cell proliferation and differentiation in many biological systems. They are overexpressed in tumors of several origins, and their expression level correlates with poor prognosis. MSI proteins control gene expression by binding RNA and regulating its translation. They contain two RNA recognition motif (RRM) domains, which recognize a defined sequence element. The relative contribution of each nucleotide to the binding affinity and specificity is unknown. We analyzed the binding specificity of three MSI family RRM domains using a quantitative fluorescence anisotropy assay. We found that the core element driving recognition is the sequence UAG. Nucleotides outside of this motif have a limited contribution to binding free energy. For mouse MSI1, recognition is determined by the first of the two RRM domains. The second RRM adds affinity but does not contribute to binding specificity. In contrast, the recognition element for Drosophila MSI is more extensive than the mouse homolog, suggesting functional divergence. The short nature of the binding determinant suggests that protein-RNA affinity alone is insufficient to drive target selection by MSI family proteins. PMID:25368328

  7. Stereoselective synthesis of light-activatable perfluorophenylazide-conjugated carbohydrates for glycoarray fabrication and evaluation of structural effects on protein binding by SPR imaging†

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Lingquan; Norberg, Oscar; Uppalapati, Suji; Yan, Mingdi; Ramström, Olof

    2014-01-01

    A series of light-activatable perfluorophenylazide (PFPA)-conjugated carbohydrate structures have been synthesized and applied to glycoarray fabrication. The glycoconjugates were structurally varied with respect to anomeric attachment, S-, and O-linked carbohydrates, respectively, as well as linker structure and length. Efficient stereoselective synthetic routes were developed, leading to the formation of the PFPA-conjugated structures in good yields over few steps. The use of glycosyl thiols as donors proved especially efficient and provided the final compounds in up to 70% total yield with high anomeric purities. PFPA-based photochemistry was subsequently used to generate carbohydrate arrays on a polymeric surface, and surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) was applied for evaluation of carbohydrate-protein interactions using the plant lectin Concanavalin A (Con A) as a probe. The results indicate better performance and equal efficiency of S- and O-linked structures with intermediate linker length. PMID:21423935

  8. Healthy carbohydrates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Functional foods include dietary fiber consisting of health-promoting carbohydrates. We have produced novel prebiotics from orange peel and observed that they extend the shelf life of probiotic bacteria in synbiotics. Some pectic-oligosaccharides and xyloglucan-oligosaccharides also have anti-adhesi...

  9. Identification and characterization of specific binding proteins for growth hormone in normal human sera.

    PubMed Central

    Herington, A C; Ymer, S; Stevenson, J

    1986-01-01

    The well-recognized "big" forms (45,000-100,000 mol wt) of immunoreactive human growth hormone (hGH) in human serum have been reported to be random aggregates or formal polymers. However, we have now investigated the possibility that they are protein-bound forms. After incubation of monomeric 125I-hGH with normal serum, gel chromatography indicated a peak of bound 125I-hGH (at approximately 120,000 mol wt), which was completely displaced by excess unlabeled hGH. When serum alone was chromatographed two peaks of specific binding were subsequently detected, the major peak, eluting between 74,000 and 85,000 mol wt corresponded to the 125I-hGH-binding protein complex observed at approximately 120,000 mol wt. Using a mini-gel filtration system for separating bound from free hormone, binding of 125I-hGH by normal human serum was dependent on time (equilibrium was reached in 2 h at 21 degrees C), temperature (21 degrees C greater than 37 degrees C), Ca2+ and serum concentrations. Binding was reversible and highly specific for hGH, not being displayed by GH or prolactins from several species. Scatchard analysis revealed linear plots with an affinity (KA) of 0.32 +/- 0.06 X 10(9) M-1 (n = 7). Human serum with low endogenous hGH levels, when added to rabbit liver membranes, decreased the binding of 125I-hGH in this tissue in a dose-dependent manner. These data indicate that human sera contain a specific, high affinity binding protein for hGH and that this may account, at least in part, for the known size heterogeneity of GH in serum. Its effect on GH binding to target tissues may indicate a role for the binding protein in the regulation of GH action. PMID:3711337

  10. Specific Lipid Binding of Membrane Proteins in Detergent Micelles Characterized by NMR and Molecular Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Linlin; Wang, Shuqing; Run, Changqing; OuYang, Bo; Chou, James J

    2016-09-27

    Many membrane proteins bind specifically to lipids as an integral component of their structures. The ability of detergents to support lipid binding is thus an important consideration when solubilizing membrane proteins for structural studies. In particular, the zwitterionic phosphocholine (PC)-based detergents, which have been widely used in solution NMR studies of channels and transporters, are controversial because of their strong solubilization power and thus perceived as more denaturing than nonionic detergents such as the maltosides. Here, we investigate the ability of the mitochondrial ADP/ATP carrier (AAC) to specifically bind cardiolipin, a mitochondrial lipid important for the carrier function, in dodecylphosphocholine (DPC) micelles. We found that in DPC, the AAC specifically binds cardiolipin in a manner consistent with the bound cardiolipins found in the crystal structures of the AAC determined in n-decyl β-d-maltoside. Our results suggest that PC detergent is compatible with specific lipid binding and that PC detergent mixed with the relevant lipid represents a viable solubilization system for NMR studies of membrane proteins. PMID:27625145

  11. Single molecule study of non-specific binding kinetics of LacI in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Caccianini, Laura; Normanno, Davide; Izeddin, Ignacio; Dahan, Maxime

    2015-01-01

    Many key cellular processes are controlled by the association of DNA-binding proteins (DBPs) to specific sites. The kinetics of the search process leading to the binding of DBPs to their target locus are largely determined by transient interactions with non-cognate DNA. Using single-molecule microscopy, we studied the dynamics and non-specific binding to DNA of the Lac repressor (LacI) in the environment of mammalian nuclei. We measured the distribution of the LacI-DNA binding times at non-cognate sites and determined the mean residence time to be τ(1D) = 182 ms. This non-specific interaction time, measured in the context of an exogenous system such as that of human U2OS cells, is remarkably different compared to that reported for the LacI in its native environment in E. coli (<5 ms). Such a striking difference (more than 30 fold) suggests that the genome, its organization, and the nuclear environment of mammalian cells play important roles on the dynamics of DBPs and their non-specific DNA interactions. Furthermore, we found that the distribution of off-target binding times follows a power law, similar to what was reported for TetR in U2OS cells. We argue that a possible molecular origin of such a power law distribution of residence times is the large variability of non-cognate sequences found in the mammalian nucleus by the diffusing DBPs. PMID:26387491

  12. Human Lineage-Specific Transcriptional Regulation through GA-Binding Protein Transcription Factor Alpha (GABPa)

    PubMed Central

    Perdomo-Sabogal, Alvaro; Nowick, Katja; Piccini, Ilaria; Sudbrak, Ralf; Lehrach, Hans; Yaspo, Marie-Laure; Warnatz, Hans-Jörg; Querfurth, Robert

    2016-01-01

    A substantial fraction of phenotypic differences between closely related species are likely caused by differences in gene regulation. While this has already been postulated over 30 years ago, only few examples of evolutionary changes in gene regulation have been verified. Here, we identified and investigated binding sites of the transcription factor GA-binding protein alpha (GABPa) aiming to discover cis-regulatory adaptations on the human lineage. By performing chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing experiments in a human cell line, we found 11,619 putative GABPa binding sites. Through sequence comparisons of the human GABPa binding regions with orthologous sequences from 34 mammals, we identified substitutions that have resulted in 224 putative human-specific GABPa binding sites. To experimentally assess the transcriptional impact of those substitutions, we selected four promoters for promoter-reporter gene assays using human and African green monkey cells. We compared the activities of wild-type promoters to mutated forms, where we have introduced one or more substitutions to mimic the ancestral state devoid of the GABPa consensus binding sequence. Similarly, we introduced the human-specific substitutions into chimpanzee and macaque promoter backgrounds. Our results demonstrate that the identified substitutions are functional, both in human and nonhuman promoters. In addition, we performed GABPa knock-down experiments and found 1,215 genes as strong candidates for primary targets. Further analyses of our data sets link GABPa to cognitive disorders, diabetes, KRAB zinc finger (KRAB-ZNF), and human-specific genes. Thus, we propose that differences in GABPa binding sites played important roles in the evolution of human-specific phenotypes. PMID:26814189

  13. DNA-binding specificity of the Lon protease alpha-domain from Brevibacillus thermoruber WR-249.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Ching; Lee, Huai-Cheng; Wang, Iren; Hsu, Chun-Hua; Liao, Jiahn-Haur; Lee, Alan Yueh-Luen; Chen, Chinpan; Wu, Shih-Hsiung

    2009-10-01

    Lon protease has been well studied in many aspects; however, the DNA-binding specificity of Lon in prokaryotes has not been clearly identified. Here we examined the DNA-binding activity of Lon protease alpha-domains from Brevibacillus thermoruber (Bt), Bacillus subtilis (Bs), and Escherichia coli (Ec). MALDI-TOF mass spectroscopy showed that the alpha-domain from Bt-Lon binds to the duplex nucleotide sequence 5'-CTGTTAGCGGGC-3' (ms1) and protected it from DNase I digestion. Surface plasmon resonance showed that the Bt-Lon alpha-domain binds with ms1 double-stranded DNA tighter than Bs- and Ec-Lon alpha-domains, whereas the Bt-Lon alpha-domain has dramatically lower affinity for double-stranded DNA with 0 and 50% identity to the ms1 binding sequence. Our results indicated that Bt-Lon alpha-domain plays a critical role with ms1 sequence in the DNA-binding specificity.

  14. The Fanconi anemia associated protein FAAP24 uses two substrate specific binding surfaces for DNA recognition.

    PubMed

    Wienk, Hans; Slootweg, Jack C; Speerstra, Sietske; Kaptein, Robert; Boelens, Rolf; Folkers, Gert E

    2013-07-01

    To maintain the integrity of the genome, multiple DNA repair systems exist to repair damaged DNA. Recognition of altered DNA, including bulky adducts, pyrimidine dimers and interstrand crosslinks (ICL), partially depends on proteins containing helix-hairpin-helix (HhH) domains. To understand how ICL is specifically recognized by the Fanconi anemia proteins FANCM and FAAP24, we determined the structure of the HhH domain of FAAP24. Although it resembles other HhH domains, the FAAP24 domain contains a canonical hairpin motif followed by distorted motif. The HhH domain can bind various DNA substrates; using nuclear magnetic resonance titration experiments, we demonstrate that the canonical HhH motif is required for double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) binding, whereas the unstructured N-terminus can interact with single-stranded DNA. Both DNA binding surfaces are used for binding to ICL-like single/double-strand junction-containing DNA substrates. A structural model for FAAP24 bound to dsDNA has been made based on homology with the translesion polymerase iota. Site-directed mutagenesis, sequence conservation and charge distribution support the dsDNA-binding model. Analogous to other HhH domain-containing proteins, we suggest that multiple FAAP24 regions together contribute to binding to single/double-strand junction, which could contribute to specificity in ICL DNA recognition. PMID:23661679

  15. Binding of porphyrins by the tumor-specific lectin, jacalin [Jack fruit (Artocarpus integrifolia) agglutinin].

    PubMed

    Komath, S S; Bhanu, K; Maiya, B G; Swamy, M J

    2000-08-01

    Jacalin (Artocarpus integrifolia agglutinin) specifically recognizes the tumor-associated T-antigenic disaccharide structure, Gal beta13GalNAc. Porphyrins and their derivatives are currently used as photosensitizers in photodynamic therapy to treat malignant tumors. In this study, the interaction of several free base porphyrins and their metal derivatives with jacalin is investigated by absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. Each lectin subunit was found to bind one porphyrin molecule and the association constants were estimated to be in the range of 2.4 x 10(3) M(-1) to 1.3 x 10(5) M(-1) at room temperature for the interaction of different porphyrins with jacalin. These values are in the same range as those obtained for the interaction of monosaccharides to jacalin. Both free lectin and lectin saturated with the specific saccharide were found to bind different porphyrins with comparable binding strength indicating that porphyrin binding takes place at a site different from the sugar binding site. Further, both anionic and cationic porphyrins were found to interact with the lectin with comparable affinity, clearly indicating that the charge on the porphyrin does not play any role in the binding process and that most likely the interaction is mediated by hydrophobic forces. These results suggest that jacalin and other lectins may potentially be useful for targeted delivery of porphyrins to tumor tissues in photodynamic therapy.

  16. Learning about Carbohydrates

    MedlinePlus

    ... Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Learning About Carbohydrates KidsHealth > For Kids > Learning About Carbohydrates Print A ... of energy for the body. Two Types of Carbohydrates There are two major types of carbohydrates (or ...

  17. Ligand Binding and Structural Changes Associated with Allostery in Yeast NAD+-specific Isocitrate Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Lee, McAlister-Henn

    2011-01-01

    Yeast NAD+-specific isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) is an octameric enzyme composed of four each of regulatory IDH1 and catalytic IDH2 subunits that share 42% sequence identity. IDH2 contains catalytic isocitrate/Mg2+ and NAD+ binding sites whereas IDH1 contains homologous binding sites, respectively, for cooperative binding of isocitrate and for allosteric binding of AMP. Ligand binding is highly ordered in vitro, and IDH exhibits the unusual property of half-site binding for all ligands. The structures of IDH solved in the absence or presence of ligands have shown: (a) a heterodimer to be the basic structural/functional unit of the enzyme, (b) the organization of heterodimers to form tetramer and octamer structures, (c) structural differences that may underlie cooperative and allosteric regulatory mechanisms, and (d) the possibility for formation of a disulfide bond that could reduce catalytic activity. In vivo analyses of mutant enzymes have elucidated the physiological importance of catalytic activity and allosteric regulation of this tricarboxylic acid cycle enzyme. Other studies have established the importance of a disulfide bond in regulation of IDH activity in vivo, as well as contributions of this bond to the property of half-site ligand binding exhibited by the wild-type enzyme. PMID:22008468

  18. Zinc specifically stimulates the selective binding of a peptide analog of bindin to sulfated fucans.

    PubMed

    DeAngelis, P L; Glabe, C G

    1990-01-01

    A synthetic nonapeptide (Leu-Arg-His-Leu-Arg-His-His-Ser-Asn) derived from the sequence of the sea urchin sperm adhesive protein, bindin, has been shown to bind sulfated fucans in high ionic strength (seawater) conditions. The binding is enhanced by approximately 100-fold in the presence of zinc ions, and no other transition metal tested demonstrates any enhancement. Bindin isolated from sperm contains zinc ion at roughly equimolar concentrations. In the presence of Zn++, the synthetic nonapeptide binds to eggs and inhibits fertilization with a half-maximal effective concentration of 300 microM. The polysaccharide binding selectivity of the peptide/Zn++ complex is similar to bindin but less stringent. Although the order of effectiveness of the inhibitory polysaccharides is the same for bindin and the synthetic peptide, polysaccharides that are only weak inhibitors of fucan binding to bindin show greater effectiveness against the peptide. The effect of chemical modification, pH, and amino acid substitution on the binding properties of the peptide suggest that arginine guanido moieties interact with the sulfated fucans, while histidine groups chelate zinc ions. Although the mechanism of zinc-specific stimulation of fucan binding is not yet clear, one potential explanation is that zinc may stabilize a peptide secondary structure that has a high affinity for fucans.

  19. Selection of RNA aptamers that bind specifically to the NS3 protease of hepatitis C virus.

    PubMed

    Urvil, P T; Kakiuchi, N; Zhou, D M; Shimotohno, K; Kumar, P K; Nishikawa, S

    1997-08-15

    The RNA genome of human hepatitis C virus (HCV) is translated into a large precursor polyprotein. The NS3 protease of HCV has a crucial role in the processing of the polyprotein into functional viral proteins. We have used an in vitro genetic-selection strategy to isolate high-affinity RNA aptamers that bind to the NS3 protein, especially to its protease domain. Starting from a RNA pool that had a random sequence core of 12-18 nucleotides, aptamers that bind specifically to the NS3 protein were selected after 10 rounds of selection and amplification. A single aptamer, 10G-1, was found predominantly (71%) in the selected pool. This aptamer could bind to the NS3 protein with a binding constant of 650 nM and inhibit the proteolytic activity in vitro. By phosphate-modification-interference analysis we showed that the phosphate residues that are critical for the binding of 10G-1 to NS3 lie within the selected regions of the aptamer and that binding involves electrostatic contacts with the phosphates of regions G28-U34 and A47-A55. The NS3-binding region in 10G-1 can serve as a basis for designing more potential inhibitors of the NS3 protein.

  20. Blockade of invariant TCR-CD1d interaction specifically inhibits antibody production against blood group A carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Tazawa, Hirofumi; Irei, Toshimitsu; Tanaka, Yuka; Igarashi, Yuka; Tashiro, Hirotaka; Ohdan, Hideki

    2013-10-10

    Previously, we detected B cells expressing receptors for blood group A carbohydrates in the CD11b(+)CD5(+) B-1a subpopulation in mice, similar to that in blood group O or B in humans. In the present study, we demonstrate that CD1d-restricted natural killer T (NKT) cells are required to produce anti-A antibodies (Abs), probably through collaboration with B-1a cells. After immunization of wild-type (WT) mice with human blood group A red blood cells (A-RBCs), interleukin (IL)-5 exclusively and transiently increased and the anti-A Abs were elevated in sera. However, these reactions were not observed in CD1d(-/-) mice, which lack NKT cells. Administration of anti-mouse CD1d blocking monoclonal Abs (mAb) prior to immunization abolished IL-5 production by NKT cells and anti-A Ab production in WT mice. Administration of anti-IL-5 neutralizing mAb also diminished anti-A Ab production in WT mice, suggesting that IL-5 secreted from NKT cells critically regulates anti-A Ab production by B-1a cells. In nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient (NOD/SCID/γc(null)) mice, into which peripheral blood mononuclear cells from type O human volunteers were engrafted, administration of anti-human CD1d mAb prior to A-RBC immunization completely inhibited anti-A Ab production. Thus, anti-CD1d treatment might constitute a novel approach that could help in evading Ab-mediated rejection in ABO-incompatible transplant recipients.

  1. Mechanistic insights into the distribution of carbohydrate clusters on cell membranes revealed by dSTORM imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Junling; Gao, Jing; Cai, Mingjun; Xu, Haijiao; Jiang, Junguang; Tian, Zhiyuan; Wang, Hongda

    2016-07-01

    Cell surface carbohydrates play significant roles in many physiological processes and act as primary markers to indicate various cellular physiological states. The functions of carbohydrates are always associated with their expression and distribution on cell membranes. Based on our previous work, we found that carbohydrates tend to form clusters; however, the underlying mechanism of these clusters remains unknown. Through the direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM) strategy, we found that with the contributions of lipid raft as a stable factor and actin cytoskeleton as a restrictive factor, carbohydrate clusters can stably exist with restricted size. Additionally, we revealed that the formation of most carbohydrate clusters (Gal and GlcANc clusters) depended on the carbohydrate-binding proteins (i.e., galectins) cross-linking their specific carbohydrate ligands. Our results clarify the organizational mechanism of carbohydrates on cell surfaces from their formation, stable existence and size-restriction, which promotes a better understanding of the relationship between the function and distribution of carbohydrates, as well as the structure of cell membranes.Cell surface carbohydrates play significant roles in many physiological processes and act as primary markers to indicate various cellular physiological states. The functions of carbohydrates are always associated with their expression and distribution on cell membranes. Based on our previous work, we found that carbohydrates tend to form clusters; however, the underlying mechanism of these clusters remains unknown. Through the direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM) strategy, we found that with the contributions of lipid raft as a stable factor and actin cytoskeleton as a restrictive factor, carbohydrate clusters can stably exist with restricted size. Additionally, we revealed that the formation of most carbohydrate clusters (Gal and GlcANc clusters) depended on the

  2. A pollen-specific novel calmodulin-binding protein with tetratricopeptide repeats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Safadi, F.; Reddy, V. S.; Reddy, A. S.

    2000-01-01

    Calcium is essential for pollen germination and pollen tube growth. A large body of information has established a link between elevation of cytosolic Ca(2+) at the pollen tube tip and its growth. Since the action of Ca(2+) is primarily mediated by Ca(2+)-binding proteins such as calmodulin (CaM), identification of CaM-binding proteins in pollen should provide insights into the mechanisms by which Ca(2+) regulates pollen germination and tube growth. In this study, a CaM-binding protein from maize pollen (maize pollen calmodulin-binding protein, MPCBP) was isolated in a protein-protein interaction-based screening using (35)S-labeled CaM as a probe. MPCBP has a molecular mass of about 72 kDa and contains three tetratricopeptide repeats (TPR) suggesting that it is a member of the TPR family of proteins. MPCBP protein shares a high sequence identity with two hypothetical TPR-containing proteins from Arabidopsis. Using gel overlay assays and CaM-Sepharose binding, we show that the bacterially expressed MPCBP binds to bovine CaM and three CaM isoforms from Arabidopsis in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. To map the CaM-binding domain several truncated versions of the MPCBP were expressed in bacteria and tested for their ability to bind CaM. Based on these studies, the CaM-binding domain was mapped to an 18-amino acid stretch between the first and second TPR regions. Gel and fluorescence shift assays performed with CaM and a CaM-binding synthetic peptide further confirmed MPCBP binding to CaM. Western, Northern, and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis have shown that MPCBP expression is specific to pollen. MPCBP was detected in both soluble and microsomal proteins. Immunoblots showed the presence of MPCBP in mature and germinating pollen. Pollen-specific expression of MPCBP, its CaM-binding properties, and the presence of TPR motifs suggest a role for this protein in Ca(2+)-regulated events during pollen germination and growth.

  3. Non-ionic detergents facilitate non-specific binding of M13 bacteriophage to polystyrene surfaces.

    PubMed

    Hakami, Abdulrahim R; Ball, Jonathan K; Tarr, Alexander W

    2015-09-01

    Phage-displayed random peptide libraries are widely used for identifying peptide interactions with proteins and other substrates. Selection of peptide ligands involves iterative rounds of affinity enrichment. The binding properties of the selected phage clones are routinely tested using immunoassay after propagation to high titre in a bacterial host and precipitation using polyethylene glycol (PEG) and high salt concentration. These immunoassays can suffer from low sensitivity and high background signals. Polysorbate 20 (Tween(®) 20) is a non-ionic detergent commonly used in immunoassay washing buffers to reduce non-specific binding, and is also used as a blocking reagent. We have observed that Tween 20 enhances non-specific M13 library phage binding in a peptide-independent manner. Other non-ionic detergents were also found to promote significant, dose-dependent non-specific phage binding in ELISA. This effect was not observed for assays using phage concentrated by ultracentrifugation, suggesting that interactions occur between detergents and the PEG-precipitated phage, irrespective of the displayed peptide motif. This artefact may impact on successful affinity selection of peptides from phage-display libraries. We propose alternative methods for screening phage libraries for identifying binding interactions with target ligands.

  4. Mechanism of sequence-specific template binding by the DNA primase of bacteriophage T7

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Joo; Zhu, Bin; Hamdan, Samir M.; Richardson, Charles C.

    2010-01-01

    DNA primases catalyze the synthesis of the oligoribonucleotides required for the initiation of lagging strand DNA synthesis. Biochemical studies have elucidated the mechanism for the sequence-specific synthesis of primers. However, the physical interactions of the primase with the DNA template to explain the basis of specificity have not been demonstrated. Using a combination of surface plasmon resonance and biochemical assays, we show that T7 DNA primase has only a slightly higher affinity for DNA containing the primase recognition sequence (5′-TGGTC-3′) than for DNA lacking the recognition site. However, this binding is drastically enhanced by the presence of the cognate Nucleoside triphosphates (NTPs), Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and Cytosine triphosphate (CTP) that are incorporated into the primer, pppACCA. Formation of the dimer, pppAC, the initial step of sequence-specific primer synthesis, is not sufficient for the stable binding. Preformed primers exhibit significantly less selective binding than that observed with ATP and CTP. Alterations in subdomains of the primase result in loss of selective DNA binding. We present a model in which conformational changes induced during primer synthesis facilitate contact between the zinc-binding domain and the polymerase domain. PMID:20350931

  5. Peptide binding landscapes: Specificity and homophilicity across sequence space in a lattice model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Joohyun; Shell, M. Scott

    2016-10-01

    Peptide aggregation frequently involves sequences with strong homophilic binding character, i.e., sequences that self-assemble with like species in a crowded cellular environment, in the face of a multitude of other peptides or proteins as potential heterophilic binding partners. What kinds of sequences display a strong tendency towards homophilic binding and self-assembly, and what are the origins of this behavior? Here, we consider how sequence specificity in oligomerization processes plays out in a simple two-dimensional (2D) lattice statistical-thermodynamic peptide model that permits exhaustive examination of the entire sequence and configurational landscapes. We find that sequences with strong self-specificities have either alternating hydrophobic and hydrophilic residues or short patches of hydrophobic residues, both which minimize intramolecular hydrophobic interactions in part due to the constraints of the 2D lattice. We also find that these specificities are highly sensitive to entropic and free energetic features of the unbound conformational state, such that direct binding interaction energies alone do not capture the complete behavior. These results suggest that the ability of particular peptide sequences to self-assemble and aggregate in a many-protein environment reflects a precise balance of direct binding interactions and behavior in the unbound (monomeric) state.

  6. Carbohydrate intake.

    PubMed

    Leturque, Armelle; Brot-Laroche, Edith; Le Gall, Maude

    2012-01-01

    Carbohydrates represent more than 50% of the energy sources present in most human diets. Sugar intake is regulated by metabolic, neuronal, and hedonic factors, and gene polymorphisms are involved in determining sugar preference. Nutrigenomic adaptations to carbohydrate availability have been evidenced in metabolic diseases, in the persistence of lactose digestion, and in amylase gene copy number. Furthermore, dietary oligosaccharides, fermentable by gut flora, can modulate the microbiotal diversity to the benefit of the host. Genetic diseases linked to mutations in the disaccharidase genes (sucrase-isomaltase, lactase) and in sugar transporter genes (sodium/glucose cotransporter 1, glucose transporters 1 and 2) severely impact carbohydrate intake. These diseases are revealed upon exposure to food containing the offending sugar, and withdrawal of this sugar from the diet prevents disease symptoms, failure to thrive, and premature death. Tailoring the sugar composition of diets to optimize wellness and to prevent the chronic occurrence of metabolic diseases is a future goal that may yet be realized through continued development of nutrigenetics and nutrigenomics approaches. PMID:22656375

  7. The influence of surface integrin binding patterns on specific biomaterial-cell interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beranek, Maggi Marie

    As the future of biomaterials progresses toward bioactivity, the biomaterial surface must control non-specific protein adsorption and encourage selective protein and cell adsorption. Integrins alphavbeta3, alpha 1beta1, alpha5beta1 and alpha Mbeta2 are expressed on cells involved in endothelialization, inflammation, and intimal hyperplasia. These cellular events play a vital role in biomaterial biocompatibility, especially in the vascular environment. The overall hypothesis of these studies is that biomaterial surfaces exhibit selective integrin binding, which then specifies differential cell binding. To test this hypothesis, four specific aims were developed. The first aim was designed to determine whether metal and polymeric biomaterials exhibit selective integrin binding. The tested materials included 316L stainless steel, nitinol, gold, Elgiloy RTM, poly(D, L-lactide-co-glycolide), polycarbonate urethane and expanded polytetrafluoroethylene. Discrete integrin binding patterns were detected microscopically using integrin specific fluorescent antibodies. Stainless steel exhibited high level integrin alpha1beta 1 and low level integrin alphaMbeta2 binding pattern. This suggests that this metal surface should selectively encourage endothelial cell to inflammatory cell binding. In contrast, gold bound ten times the amount of integrin alphaMbeta2 compared to integrin alpha1beta1, which should encourage inflammatory cell adhesion. The 65/35 poly(D, L-lactide-co-glycolide) was the only polymeric biomaterial tested that had integrin binding levels comparable to metal biomaterials. Based on these observations, a combinational biomaterial with a surface pattern of 65/35 poly(D, L-lactide-co-glycolide) dots on a 316L stainless steel background was created. A pattern of high level integrin alpha1beta1 binding and low level integrin alpha Mbeta2 binding on this combinational surface indicates that this surface should selectively favor endothelial cell binding. In the second

  8. Massive parallel analysis of DNA - Hoechst 33258 binding specificity with a generic oligonucleotide microchip.

    SciTech Connect

    Drobyshev, A. L.; Zasedatelev, A. S.; Yershov, G. M.; Mirzabekov, A. D.; Biochip Technology Center

    1999-10-15

    A generic oligodeoxyribonucleotide microchip was used to determine the sequence specificity of Hoechst 33258 binding to double-stranded DNA. The generic microchip contained 4096 oxctadeoxynucleo-tides in which all possible 4(6)= 4096 hexadeoxy-nucleotide sequences are flanked on both the 3'- and 5'-ends with equimolar mixtures of four bases. The microchip was manufactured by chemical immobilization of presynthesized 8mers within polyacrylamide gel pads. A selected set of immobilized 8mers was converted to double-stranded form by hybridization with a mixture of fluorescently labeled complementary 8mers. Massive parallel measurements of melting curves were carried out for the majority of 2080 6mer duplexes, in both the absence and presence of the Hoechst dye. The sequence-specific affinity for Hoechst 33258 was calculated as the increase in melting temperature caused by ligand binding. The dye exhibited specificity for A:T but not G:C base pairs. The affinity is low for two A:T base pairs, increases significantly for three, and reaches a plateau for four A:T base pairs. The relative ligand affinity for all trinucleotide and tetranucleotide sequences (A/T)(3)and (A/T)(4)was estimated. The free energy of dye binding to several duplexes was calculated from the equilibrium melting curves of the duplexes formed on the oligonucleotide microchips. This method can be used as a general approach for massive screening of the sequence specificity of DNA-binding compounds.

  9. Toward a new twist in Hox and TALE DNA-binding specificity.

    PubMed

    Merabet, Samir; Lohmann, Ingrid

    2015-02-01

    Hox proteins gain specificity by interacting with TALE-class cofactors. In a recent issue of Cell and in this issue of Developmental Cell, Crocker et al. (2015) and Amin et al. (2015), respectively, demonstrate that non-canonical Hox/TALE binding sequences play a major role in the regionalized regulation of target gene expression in vivo.

  10. Sequence specific recognition of ssDNA by a lupus autoantibody: kinetics and mechanism of binding.

    PubMed

    Beckingham, J A; Glick, G D

    2001-09-01

    11F8 is a pathogenic anti-ssDNA monoclonal autoantibody isolated from a lupus-prone mouse. Previous studies have established that 11F8 is sequence specific. To determine the basis for the observed binding specificity, stopped-flow fluorescence spectroscopy was used to measure the kinetic parameters and establish the mechanisms for the association of 11F8 with its target sequence, noncognate, and nonspecific ssDNA ligands. The data revealed that sequence-specific binding follows a two-step mechanism where the initial association step is second order. Values of k(1) are fast and above the modified Smoluchowski limit for a diffusion limited interaction (10(5)-10(6)M(-1)s(-1)). The dependency of k(1) on [salt] and solvent polarity indicates that electrostatic steering is responsible for this rapid association rate. The second association step is rate limiting and is characteristic of an isomerization process during which binding interfaces are optimized. This step apparently is driven by the desolvation of hydrophobic surfaces within the binding interface. The differences in the rate of dissociation for the various DNA ligands suggest that specificity is governed primarily through the dissociation of the final complexes.

  11. The TAGteam motif facilitates binding of 21 sequence-specific transcription factors in the Drosophila embryo

    PubMed Central

    Satija, Rahul; Bradley, Robert K.

    2012-01-01

    Highly overlapping patterns of genome-wide binding of many distinct transcription factors have been observed in worms, insects, and mammals, but the origins and consequences of this overlapping binding remain unclear. While analyzing chromatin immunoprecipitation data sets from 21 sequence-specific transcription factors active in the Drosophila embryo, we found that binding of all factors exhibits a dose-dependent relationship with “TAGteam” sequence motifs bound by the zinc finger protein Vielfaltig, also known as Zelda, a recently discovered activator of the zygotic genome. TAGteam motifs are present and well conserved in highly bound regions, and are associated with transcription factor binding even in the absence of canonical recognition motifs for these factors. Furthermore, levels of binding in promoters and enhancers of zygotically transcribed genes are correlated with RNA polymerase II occupancy and gene expression levels. Our results suggest that Vielfaltig acts as a master regulator of early development by facilitating the genome-wide establishment of overlapping patterns of binding of diverse transcription factors that drive global gene expression. PMID:22247430

  12. Specific induction of fibronectin binding activity by hemoglobin in Candida albicans grown in defined media.

    PubMed

    Yan, S; Nègre, E; Cashel, J A; Guo, N; Lyman, C A; Walsh, T J; Roberts, D D

    1996-08-01

    Fibronectin (FN) is a major component of host extracellular matrix that may play an important role in the initiation and dissemination of Candida albicans infections. Expression of FN binding requires growth of C albicans blastoconidia in complex medium, and the regulation of FN receptor expression is poorly understood. We now demonstrate that hemoglobin is a potent and specific inducer of FN receptor expression and describe a defined medium supplemented with hemoglobin that greatly and stably enhances the binding activity of C. albicans for soluble FN. Enhancement of FN binding by hemoglobin in strain 44807 was concentration dependent and was maximal at 0.1% hemoglobin with 20- to 80-fold enhancement. The hemoglobin-induced FN binding to C. albicans was saturable, with a Kd of 2.7 X 10(-8) M. Enhancement required growth of C. albicans in hemoglobin-containing medium, since simply exposing blastoconidia to hemoglobin in a nongrowing status did not enhance binding. Induction was reversible following removal of hemoglobin from the growth medium and not associated with germination. Inorganic or protein-bound iron was not sufficient for the induction, since other iron-containing proteins or inorganic iron salts were inactive. Growth in the simple medium yeast nitrogen base supplemented with hemoglobin increased cell adhesion to immobilized FN and to cultured monolayers of bovine corneal endothelial cells. These data suggest that hemoglobin may be an important regulator of FN binding activity in C. albicans and thus may play a role in its pathogenesis. PMID:8757815

  13. The PP1 binding code: a molecular-lego strategy that governs specificity.

    PubMed

    Heroes, Ewald; Lesage, Bart; Görnemann, Janina; Beullens, Monique; Van Meervelt, Luc; Bollen, Mathieu

    2013-01-01

    Ser/Thr protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) is a single-domain hub protein with nearly 200 validated interactors in vertebrates. PP1-interacting proteins (PIPs) are ubiquitously expressed but show an exceptional diversity in brain, testis and white blood cells. The binding of PIPs is mainly mediated by short motifs that dock to surface grooves of PP1. Although PIPs often contain variants of the same PP1 binding motifs, they differ in the number and combination of docking sites. This molecular-lego strategy for binding to PP1 creates holoenzymes with unique properties. The PP1 binding code can be described as specific, universal, degenerate, nonexclusive and dynamic. PIPs control associated PP1 by interference with substrate recruitment or access to the active site. In addition, some PIPs have a subcellular targeting domain that promotes dephosphorylation by increasing the local concentration of PP1. The diversity of the PP1 interactome and the properties of the PP1 binding code account for the exquisite specificity of PP1 in vivo.

  14. Optimal fusion of antibody binding domains resulted in higher affinity and wider specificity.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jinhua; Kojima, Tomoki; Ohashi, Hiroyuki; Ueda, Hiroshi

    2015-11-01

    Antibody is a very important protein in biotechnological and biomedical fields because of its high affinity and specificity to various antigens. Due to the rise of human antibody therapeutics, its cost-effective purification is an urgent issue for bio-industry. In this study, we made novel fusion proteins PAxPG with a flexible (DDAKK)n linker between the two Ig binding domains derived from Staphylococcus protein A and Streptococcus protein G. The fusion proteins bound human and mouse IgGs and their fragments with up to 58-times higher affinity and wider specificity than the parental binding domains. Interestingly, the optimal linker for human Fab fragment was n = 4, which was close to the modeled distance between the termini of domains bound to heavy chain, implying increased avidity as a possible mechanism. For binding to Fc, the longest n=6 linker gave the highest affinity, implying longer interchain distance between the two binding sites. The novel fusion protein with optimized interdomain linker length will be a useful tool for the purification and detection of various IgGs including mouse IgG1 that binds only weakly to natural protein A. PMID:25910963

  15. Lectin specificity and binding characteristics of human C-reactive protein.

    PubMed

    Köttgen, E; Hell, B; Kage, A; Tauber, R

    1992-07-15

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is thought to play an important role in immunomodulation. The exact biologic function of this pentraxin protein is, however, still unclear. Here we report experiments designed to further characterize the binding properties of CRP. Using purified human CRP it could be shown that CRP immobilized onto polystyrene surfaces or onto latex beads binds distinct plasma glycoproteins including IgG, asialofetuin, asialo-beta 2-glycoprotein I and, likewise, synthetic glycoproteins as a lectin, exhibiting binding specificity for terminal galactosyl residues of the glycoprotein glycans. Binding of CRP to IgA, IgM, IgG, asialofetuin, asialo-beta 2-glycoprotein I and to synthetic glycoproteins requires immobilization onto surfaces of both CRP and the ligand. Fibronectin and fibrinogen are bound by surface-immobilized CRP also in soluble phase. Comparing various mono-, di-, and trisaccharides as competitive inhibitors of the lectin binding activity of CRP, only beta-D-Gal-(1-3)-D-GalNAc, beta-D-Gal-(1-4)-D-GalNAc, and beta-D-Gal-(1-4)-beta-D-Gal-(1-4)-D-GlcNAc had significant inhibitory power at a concentration of 8 mmol/liter. Binding activity of CRP was pH-dependent with an optimum at pH 5 to 6 and was reduced by 90% when pH was shifted from 6 to the physiologic pH value of 7.4. CRP exhibited lectin-like properties with binding specificity for galactosyl residues also when bound to K-562 erythroleukemia cells. It is therefore suggested that CRP immobilized onto surfaces exhibits lectin activity toward galactosyl groups preferentially in a mildly acidic environment as present at sites of inflammation.

  16. Specific Internalisation of Gold Nanoparticles into Engineered Porous Protein Cages via Affinity Binding.

    PubMed

    Paramelle, David; Peng, Tao; Free, Paul; Fernig, David G; Lim, Sierin; Tomczak, Nikodem

    2016-01-01

    Porous protein cages are supramolecular protein self-assemblies presenting pores that allow the access of surrounding molecules and ions into their core in order to store and transport them in biological environments. Protein cages' pores are attractive channels for the internalisation of inorganic nanoparticles and an alternative for the preparation of hybrid bioinspired nanoparticles. However, strategies based on nanoparticle transport through the pores are largely unexplored, due to the difficulty of tailoring nanoparticles that have diameters commensurate with the pores size and simultaneously displaying specific affinity to the cages' core and low non-specific binding to the cages' outer surface. We evaluated the specific internalisation of single small gold nanoparticles, 3.9 nm in diameter, into porous protein cages via affinity binding. The E2 protein cage derived from the Geobacillus stearothermophilus presents 12 pores, 6 nm in diameter, and an empty core of 13 nm in diameter. We engineered the E2 protein by site-directed mutagenesis with oligohistidine sequences exposing them into the cage's core. Dynamic light scattering and electron microscopy analysis show that the structures of E2 protein cages mutated with bis- or penta-histidine sequences are well conserved. The surface of the gold nanoparticles was passivated with a self-assembled monolayer made of a mixture of short peptidols and thiolated alkane ethylene glycol ligands. Such monolayers are found to provide thin coatings preventing non-specific binding to proteins. Further functionalisation of the peptide coated gold nanoparticles with Ni2+ nitrilotriacetic moieties enabled the specific binding to oligohistidine tagged cages. The internalisation via affinity binding was evaluated by electron microscopy analysis. From the various mutations tested, only the penta-histidine mutated E2 protein cage showed repeatable and stable internalisation. The present work overcomes the limitations of currently

  17. Determinants of BH3 binding specificity for Mcl-1 versus Bcl-xL.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Sanjib; Gullá, Stefano; Chen, T Scott; Fire, Emiko; Grant, Robert A; Keating, Amy E

    2010-05-21

    Interactions among Bcl-2 family proteins are important for regulating apoptosis. Prosurvival members of the family interact with proapoptotic BH3 (Bcl-2-homology-3)-only members, inhibiting execution of cell death through the mitochondrial pathway. Structurally, this interaction is mediated by binding of the alpha-helical BH3 region of the proapoptotic proteins to a conserved hydrophobic groove on the prosurvival proteins. Native BH3-only proteins exhibit selectivity in binding prosurvival members, as do small molecules that block these interactions. Understanding the sequence and structural basis of interaction specificity in this family is important, as it may allow the prediction of new Bcl-2 family associations and/or the design of new classes of selective inhibitors to serve as reagents or therapeutics. In this work, we used two complementary techniques--yeast surface display screening from combinatorial peptide libraries and SPOT peptide array analysis--to elucidate specificity determinants for binding to Bcl-x(L)versus Mcl-1, two prominent prosurvival proteins. We screened a randomized library and identified BH3 peptides that bound to either Mcl-1 or Bcl-x(L) selectively or to both with high affinity. The peptides competed with native ligands for binding into the conserved hydrophobic groove, as illustrated in detail by a crystal structure of a specific peptide bound to Mcl-1. Mcl-1-selective peptides from the screen were highly specific for binding Mcl-1 in preference to Bcl-x(L), Bcl-2, Bcl-w, and Bfl-1, whereas Bcl-x(L)-selective peptides showed some cross-interaction with related proteins Bcl-2 and Bcl-w. Mutational analyses using SPOT arrays revealed the effects of 170 point mutations made in the background of a peptide derived from the BH3 region of Bim, and a simple predictive model constructed using these data explained much of the specificity observed in our Mcl-1 versus Bcl-x(L) binders. PMID:20363230

  18. Host Tissue and Glycan Binding Specificities of Avian Viral Attachment Proteins Using Novel Avian Tissue Microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Ambepitiya Wickramasinghe, Iresha N.; de Vries, Robert P.; Eggert, Amber M.; Wandee, Nantaporn; de Haan, Cornelis A. M.; Gröne, Andrea; Verheije, Monique H.

    2015-01-01

    The initial interaction between viral attachment proteins and the host cell is a critical determinant for the susceptibility of a host for a particular virus. To increase our understanding of avian pathogens and the susceptibility of poultry species, we developed novel avian tissue microarrays (TMAs). Tissue binding profiles of avian viral attachment proteins were studied by performing histochemistry on multi-species TMA, comprising of selected tissues from ten avian species, and single-species TMAs, grouping organ systems of each species together. The attachment pattern of the hemagglutinin protein was in line with the reported tropism of influenza virus H5N1, confirming the validity of TMAs in profiling the initial virus-host interaction. The previously believed chicken-specific coronavirus (CoV) M41 spike (S1) protein displayed a broad attachment pattern to respiratory tissues of various avian species, albeit with lower affinity than hemagglutinin, suggesting that other avian species might be susceptible for chicken CoV. When comparing tissue-specific binding patterns of various avian coronaviral S1 proteins on the single-species TMAs, chicken and partridge CoV S1 had predominant affinity for the trachea, while pigeon CoV S1 showed marked preference for lung of their respective hosts. Binding of all coronaviral S1 proteins was dependent on sialic acids; however, while chicken CoV S1 preferred sialic acids type I lactosamine (Gal(1-3)GlcNAc) over type II (Gal(1-4)GlcNAc), the fine glycan specificities of pigeon and partridge CoVs were different, as chicken CoV S1-specific sialylglycopolymers could not block their binding to tissues. Taken together, TMAs provide a novel platform in the field of infectious diseases to allow identification of binding specificities of viral attachment proteins and are helpful to gain insight into the susceptibility of host and organ for avian pathogens. PMID:26035584

  19. Specific Internalisation of Gold Nanoparticles into Engineered Porous Protein Cages via Affinity Binding

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Tao; Free, Paul; Fernig, David G.; Lim, Sierin; Tomczak, Nikodem

    2016-01-01

    Porous protein cages are supramolecular protein self-assemblies presenting pores that allow the access of surrounding molecules and ions into their core in order to store and transport them in biological environments. Protein cages’ pores are attractive channels for the internalisation of inorganic nanoparticles and an alternative for the preparation of hybrid bioinspired nanoparticles. However, strategies based on nanoparticle transport through the pores are largely unexplored, due to the difficulty of tailoring nanoparticles that have diameters commensurate with the pores size and simultaneously displaying specific affinity to the cages’ core and low non-specific binding to the cages’ outer surface. We evaluated the specific internalisation of single small gold nanoparticles, 3.9 nm in diameter, into porous protein cages via affinity binding. The E2 protein cage derived from the Geobacillus stearothermophilus presents 12 pores, 6 nm in diameter, and an empty core of 13 nm in diameter. We engineered the E2 protein by site-directed mutagenesis with oligohistidine sequences exposing them into the cage’s core. Dynamic light scattering and electron microscopy analysis show that the structures of E2 protein cages mutated with bis- or penta-histidine sequences are well conserved. The surface of the gold nanoparticles was passivated with a self-assembled monolayer made of a mixture of short peptidols and thiolated alkane ethylene glycol ligands. Such monolayers are found to provide thin coatings preventing non-specific binding to proteins. Further functionalisation of the peptide coated gold nanoparticles with Ni2+ nitrilotriacetic moieties enabled the specific binding to oligohistidine tagged cages. The internalisation via affinity binding was evaluated by electron microscopy analysis. From the various mutations tested, only the penta-histidine mutated E2 protein cage showed repeatable and stable internalisation. The present work overcomes the limitations of

  20. Specific Internalisation of Gold Nanoparticles into Engineered Porous Protein Cages via Affinity Binding.

    PubMed

    Paramelle, David; Peng, Tao; Free, Paul; Fernig, David G; Lim, Sierin; Tomczak, Nikodem

    2016-01-01

    Porous protein cages are supramolecular protein self-assemblies presenting pores that allow the access of surrounding molecules and ions into their core in order to store and transport them in biological environments. Protein cages' pores are attractive channels for the internalisation of inorganic nanoparticles and an alternative for the preparation of hybrid bioinspired nanoparticles. However, strategies based on nanoparticle transport through the pores are largely unexplored, due to the difficulty of tailoring nanoparticles that have diameters commensurate with the pores size and simultaneously displaying specific affinity to the cages' core and low non-specific binding to the cages' outer surface. We evaluated the specific internalisation of single small gold nanoparticles, 3.9 nm in diameter, into porous protein cages via affinity binding. The E2 protein cage derived from the Geobacillus stearothermophilus presents 12 pores, 6 nm in diameter, and an empty core of 13 nm in diameter. We engineered the E2 protein by site-directed mutagenesis with oligohistidine sequences exposing them into the cage's core. Dynamic light scattering and electron microscopy analysis show that the structures of E2 protein cages mutated with bis- or penta-histidine sequences are well conserved. The surface of the gold nanoparticles was passivated with a self-assembled monolayer made of a mixture of short peptidols and thiolated alkane ethylene glycol ligands. Such monolayers are found to provide thin coatings preventing non-specific binding to proteins. Further functionalisation of the peptide coated gold nanoparticles with Ni2+ nitrilotriacetic moieties enabled the specific binding to oligohistidine tagged cages. The internalisation via affinity binding was evaluated by electron microscopy analysis. From the various mutations tested, only the penta-histidine mutated E2 protein cage showed repeatable and stable internalisation. The present work overcomes the limitations of currently

  1. Determinants of BH3 binding specificity for Mcl-1 vs. Bcl-xL

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Sanjib; Gullá, Stefano; Chen, T. Scott; Fire, Emiko; Grant, Robert A.; Keating, Amy E.

    2010-01-01

    Interactions among Bcl-2 family proteins are important for regulating apoptosis. Pro-survival members of the family interact with pro-apoptotic BH3-only members, inhibiting execution of cell death through the mitochondrial pathway. Structurally, this interaction is mediated by binding of the alpha-helical BH3 region of the pro-apoptotic proteins to a conserved hydrophobic groove on the pro-survival proteins. Native BH3-only proteins exhibit selectivity in binding pro-survival members, as do small molecules that block these interactions. Understanding the sequence and structural basis of interaction specificity in this family is important, as it may allow the prediction of new Bcl-2 family associations and/or the design of new classes of selective inhibitors to serve as reagents or therapeutics. In this work we used two complementary techniques, yeast surface display screening from combinatorial peptide libraries and SPOT peptide array analysis, to elucidate specificity determinants for binding to Bcl-xL vs. Mcl-1, two prominent pro-survival proteins. We screened a randomized library and identified BH3 peptides that bound to either Mcl-1 or Bcl-xL selectively, or to both with high affinity. The peptides competed with native ligands for binding into the conserved hydrophobic groove, as illustrated in detail by a crystal structure of a specific peptide bound to Mcl-1. Mcl-1 selective peptides from the screen were highly specific for binding Mcl-1 in preference to Bcl-xL, Bcl-2, Bcl-w and Bfl-1, whereas Bcl-xL selective peptides showed some cross-interaction with related proteins Bcl-2 and Bcl-w. Mutational analyses using SPOT arrays revealed the effects of 170 point mutations made in the background of a peptide derived from the BH3 region of Bim, and a simple predictive model constructed using these data explained much of the specificity observed in our Mcl-1 vs. Bcl-xL binders. PMID:20363230

  2. Determinants of BH3 Binding Specificity for Mcl-1 versus Bcl-x[subscript L

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, Sanjib; Gullá, Stefano; Chen, T. Scott; Fire, Emiko; Grant, Robert A.; Keating, Amy E.

    2010-06-25

    Interactions among Bcl-2 family proteins are important for regulating apoptosis. Prosurvival members of the family interact with proapoptotic BH3 (Bcl-2-homology-3)-only members, inhibiting execution of cell death through the mitochondrial pathway. Structurally, this interaction is mediated by binding of the {alpha}-helical BH3 region of the proapoptotic proteins to a conserved hydrophobic groove on the prosurvival proteins. Native BH3-only proteins exhibit selectivity in binding prosurvival members, as do small molecules that block these interactions. Understanding the sequence and structural basis of interaction specificity in this family is important, as it may allow the prediction of new Bcl-2 family associations and/or the design of new classes of selective inhibitors to serve as reagents or therapeutics. In this work, we used two complementary techniques - yeast surface display screening from combinatorial peptide libraries and SPOT peptide array analysis - to elucidate specificity determinants for binding to Bcl-x{sub L} versus Mcl-1, two prominent prosurvival proteins. We screened a randomized library and identified BH3 peptides that bound to either Mcl-1 or Bcl-x{sub L} selectively or to both with high affinity. The peptides competed with native ligands for binding into the conserved hydrophobic groove, as illustrated in detail by a crystal structure of a specific peptide bound to Mcl-1. Mcl-1-selective peptides from the screen were highly specific for binding Mcl-1 in preference to Bcl-x{sub L}, Bcl-2, Bcl-w, and Bfl-1, whereas Bcl-x{sub L}-selective peptides showed some cross-interaction with related proteins Bcl-2 and Bcl-w. Mutational analyses using SPOT arrays revealed the effects of 170 point mutations made in the background of a peptide derived from the BH3 region of Bim, and a simple predictive model constructed using these data explained much of the specificity observed in our Mcl-1 versus Bcl-x{sub L} binders.

  3. Analysis of saccharide binding to Artocarpus integrifolia lectin reveals specific recognition of T-antigen (beta-D-Gal(1----3)D-GalNAc).

    PubMed

    Sastry, M V; Banarjee, P; Patanjali, S R; Swamy, M J; Swarnalatha, G V; Surolia, A

    1986-09-01

    The binding of Artocarpus integrifolia lectin to N-dansylgalactosamine (where dansyl is 5-dimethylaminonaphthalene-1-sulfonyl) leads to a 100% increase in dansyl fluorescence with a concomitant blue shift in the emission maximum by 10 nm. This binding is carbohydrate-specific and has an association constant of 1.74 X 10(4) M-1 at 20 degrees C. The lectin has two binding sites for N-dansylgalactosamine. The values of -delta H and -delta S for the binding of N-dansylgalactosamine are in the range of values reported for several lectin-monosaccharide interactions, indicating an absence of nonpolar interaction of the dansyl moiety of the sugar with the combining region of the protein. Dissociation of the bound N-dansylgalactosamine from its complex with the lectin and the consequent change in its fluorescence on addition of nonfluorescent sugars allowed evaluation of the association constant for competing ligands. The thermodynamic parameters for the binding of monosaccharides suggest that the OH groups at C-2, C-3, C-4, and C-6 in the D-galactose configuration are important loci for interaction with the lectin. The acetamido group at C-2 of 2-acetamido-2-deoxygalactopyranose and a methoxyl group at C-1 of methyl-alpha-D-galactopyranoside are presumably also involved in binding through nonpolar and van der Waals' interactions. The T-antigenic disaccharide Gal beta 1----3GalNAc binds very strongly to the lectin when compared with methyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside, the beta(1----3)-linked disaccharides such as Gal beta 1----3GlcNAc, and the beta(1----4)-linked disaccharides, N-acetyllactosamine and lactose. The major stabilizing force for the avid binding of T-antigenic disaccharide appears to be a favorable enthalpic contribution. The combining site of the lectin is, therefore, extended. These data taken together suggest that the Artocarpus lectin is specific toward the Thomsen-Friedenreich (T) antigen. There are subtle differences in the overall topography of its

  4. Transferrin Binding to Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes Activated by Phytohemagglutinin Involves a Specific Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Galbraith, Robert M.; Werner, Phillip; Arnaud, Philippe; Galbraith, Gillian M. P.

    1980-01-01

    Immunohistological studies have indicated that membrane sites binding transferrin are present upon activated human peripheral blood lymphocytes. In this study, we have investigated transferrin uptake in human lymphocytes exposed to phytohemagglutinin (PHA), by quantitative radiobinding and immunofluorescence in parallel. In stimulated lymphocytes, binding was maximal after a 30-min incubation, being greatest at 37°C, and greater at 22°C than at 4°C. Although some shedding and endocytosis of transferrin occurred at 22° and 37°C, these factors, and resulting synthesis of new sites, did not affect measurement of binding which was found to be saturable, reversible, and specific for transferrin (Ka 0.5-2.5 × 108 M−1). Binding was greater after a 48-h exposure to PHA than after 24 h, and was maximal at 66 h. Sequential Scatchard analysis revealed no significant elevation in affinity of interaction. However, although the total number of receptors increased, the proportion of cells in which binding of ligand was detected immunohistologically increased in parallel, and after appropriate correction, the cellular density of receptors remained relatively constant throughout (60,000-80,000 sites/cell). Increments in binding during the culture period were thus due predominantly to expansion of a population of cells bearing receptors. Similar differences in binding were apparent upon comparison of cells cultured in different doses of PHA, and in unstimulated cells binding was negligible. Transferrin receptors appear, therefore, to be readily detectable only upon lymphocytes that have been activated. Images PMID:6253523

  5. Autoradiographic localization of specific [3H]dexamethasone binding in fetal lung.

    PubMed

    Beer, D G; Butley, M S; Cunha, G R; Malkinson, A M

    1984-10-01

    The cellular and subcellular localization of specific [3H]dexamethasone binding was examined in fetal mouse lung at various stages of development and in human fetal lung at 8 weeks of gestation using a rapid in vitro steroid incubation technique followed by thaw-mount autoradiography. Competition studies with unlabeled steroids demonstrate the specificity of [3H]dexamethasone labeling, and indicate that fetal lung mesenchyme is a primary glucocorticoid target during lung development. Quantitative binding studies, involving incubation of intact tissue with competing ligand and subsequent subcellular fractionation, show this to be specific, nuclear binding characteristic of glucocorticoid receptors. Autoradiographs of [3H]dexamethasone binding in lung tissue at early stages of development demonstrate that the mesenchyme directly adjacent to the more proximal portions of the bronchiolar network is heavily labeled. In contrast, the epithelium which will later differentiate into bronchi and bronchioles, is relatively unlabeled. Distal portions of the growing epithelium, destined to become alveolar ducts and alveoli, do show nuclear localization of [3H]dexamethasone. Because of the known importance of the mesenchyme in controlling lung development and the ability of glucocorticoids to stimulate lung development, these results suggest that many of the growth-promoting effects of glucocorticoids may be mediated through the mesenchyme. In addition, by utilizing a technique which allows the simultaneous examination of extracellular matrix components and [3H]dexamethasone binding, a relationship is observed between extensive mesenchymal [3H]dexamethasone binding and extensive extracellular matrix accumulation. Since glucocorticoids stimulate the synthesis of many extracellular matrix components, these results suggest a role for these hormones in affecting mesenchymal-epithelial interactions during lung morphogenesis.

  6. Specific cell components of Bacteroides gingivalis mediate binding and degradation of human fibrinogen

    SciTech Connect

    Lantz, M.S.; Allen, R.D.; Vail, T.A.; Switalski, L.M.; Hook, M. )

    1991-01-01

    Bacteroides (Porphyromonas) gingivalis, which has been implicated as an etiologic agent in human periodontal diseases, has been shown to bind and degrade human fibrinogen. B. gingivalis strains bind fibrinogen reversibly and with high affinity and bind to a specific region of the fibrinogen molecule that appears to be located between the D and E domains. The authors now report that human fibrinogen is bound and then degraded by specific B. gingivalis components that appear to be localized at the cell surface. Fibrinogen binding to bacterial cells occurred at 4, 22, and 37{degree}C. A functional fibrinogen-binding component (M{sub r}, 150 000) was identified when sodium dodecyl sulfate-solubilized bacteria were fractionated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, transferred to nitrocellulose membranes, and probed with {sup 125}I-fibrinogen. Fibrinogen degradation did not occur at 4{degree}C but did occur at 22 and 37{degree}C. When bacteria and iodinated fibrinogen were incubated at 37{degree}C, two major fibrinogen fragments (M{sub r}, 97 000 and 50 000) accumulated in incubation mixture supernatant fractions. Two major fibrinogen-degrading components (M{sub r}, 120 000 and 150 000) have been identified by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in substrate-containing gels. Fibrinogen degradation by the M{sub r}-120 000 and -150 000 proteases was enhanced by reducing agents, completely inhibited by N-{alpha}-p-tosyl-L-lysyl chloromethyl ketone, and partially inhibited by n-ethyl maleimide, suggesting that these enzymes are thiol-dependent proteases with trypsinlike substrate specificity. The fibrinogen-binding component could be separated from the fibrinogen-degrading components by selective solubilization of bacteria in sodium deoxycholate.

  7. Site-specific fab fragment biotinylation at the conserved nucleotide binding site for enhanced Ebola detection.

    PubMed

    Mustafaoglu, Nur; Alves, Nathan J; Bilgicer, Basar

    2015-07-01

    The nucleotide binding site (NBS) is a highly conserved region between the variable light and heavy chains at the Fab domains of all antibodies, and a small molecule that we identified, indole-3-butyric acid (IBA), binds specifically to this site. Fab fragment, with its small size and simple production methods compared to intact antibody, is good candidate for use in miniaturized diagnostic devices and targeted therapeutic applications. However, commonly used modification techniques are not well suited for Fab fragments as they are often more delicate than intact antibodies. Fab fragments are of particular interest for sensor surface functionalization but immobilization results in damage to the antigen binding site and greatly reduced activity due to their truncated size that allows only a small area that can bind to surfaces without impeding antigen binding. In this study, we describe an NBS-UV photocrosslinking functionalization method (UV-NBS(Biotin) in which a Fab fragment is site-specifically biotinylated with an IBA-EG11-Biotin linker via UV energy exposure (1 J/cm(2)) without affecting its antigen binding activity. This study demonstrates successful immobilization of biotinylated Ebola detecting Fab fragment (KZ52 Fab fragment) via the UV-NBS(Biotin) method yielding 1031-fold and 2-fold better antigen detection sensitivity compared to commonly used immobilization methods: direct physical adsorption and NHS-Biotin functionalization, respectively. Utilization of the UV-NBS(Biotin) method for site-specific conjugation to Fab fragment represents a proof of concept use of Fab fragment for various diagnostic and therapeutic applications with numerous fluorescent probes, affinity molecules and peptides.

  8. Specific cell components of Bacteroides gingivalis mediate binding and degradation of human fibrinogen.

    PubMed Central

    Lantz, M S; Allen, R D; Vail, T A; Switalski, L M; Hook, M

    1991-01-01

    Bacteroides (Porphyromonas) gingivalis, which has been implicated as an etiologic agent in human periodontal diseases, has been shown to bind and degrade human fibrinogen. B. gingivalis strains bind fibrinogen reversibly and with high affinity and bind to a specific region of the fibrinogen molecule that appears to be located between the D and E domains (M. S. Lantz, R. D. Allen, P. Bounelis, L. M. Switalski, and M. Hook, J. Bacteriol. 172:716-726, 1990). We now report that human fibrinogen is bound and then degraded by specific B. gingivalis components that appear to be localized at the cell surface. Fibrinogen binding to bacterial cells occurred at 4, 22, and 37 degrees C. A functional fibrinogen-binding component (Mr, 150,000) was identified when sodium dodecyl sulfate-solubilized bacteria were fractionated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, transferred to nitrocellulose membranes, and probed with 125I-fibrinogen. Fibrinogen degradation did not occur at 4 degrees C but did occur at 22 and 37 degrees C. When bacteria and iodinated fibrinogen were incubated at 37 degrees C, two major fibrinogen fragments (Mr, 97,000 and 50,000) accumulated in incubation mixture supernatant fractions. Two major fibrinogen-degrading components (Mr, 120,000 and 150,000) have been identified by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in substrate-containing gels. Fibrinogen degradation by the Mr-120,000 and -150,000 proteases was enhanced by reducing agents, completely inhibited by N-alpha-p-tosyl-L-lysyl chloromethyl ketone, and partially inhibited by n-ethyl maleimide, suggesting that these enzymes are thiol-dependent proteases with trypsinlike substrate specificity. The fibrinogen-binding component could be separated from the fibrinogen-degrading components by selective solubilization of bacteria in sodium deoxycholate. Images PMID:1987144

  9. The lipopolysaccharide-binding protein participating in hemocyte nodule formation in the silkworm Bombyx mori is a novel member of the C-type lectin superfamily with two different tandem carbohydrate-recognition domains.

    PubMed

    Koizumi, N; Imamura, M; Kadotani, T; Yaoi, K; Iwahana, H; Sato, R

    1999-01-25

    We recently isolated and characterized the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-binding protein, BmLBP, from the larval hemolymph of the silkworm Bombyx mori. BmLBP is a pattern recognition molecule that recognizes the lipid A portion of LPS and participates in a cellular defense reaction. This paper describes the cDNA cloning of BmLBP. The deduced amino acid sequence of BmLBP revealed that BmLBP is a novel member of the C-type lectin superfamily with a unique structural feature that consists of two different carbohydrate-recognition domains in tandem, a short and a long form. PMID:9989592

  10. Neural networks for determining protein specificity and multiple alignment of binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Heumann, J.M.; Lapedes, A.S.; Stormo, G.D.

    1994-12-31

    We use a quantitative definition of specificity to develop a neural network for the identification of common protein binding sites in a collection of unaligned DNA fragments. We demonstrate the equivalence of the method to maximizing Information Content of the aligned sites when simple models of the binding energy and the genome are employed. The network method subsumes those simple models and is capable of working with more complicated ones. This is demonstrated using a Markov model of the E. coli genome and a sampling method to approximate the partition function. A variation of Gibbs sampling aids in avoiding local minima.

  11. A quantitative understanding of lac repressor’s binding specificity and flexibility

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Zheng; Chang, Yiming; Stormo, Gary D.

    2015-01-01

    Lac repressor, the first discovered transcriptional regulator, has been shown to confer multiple-modes of binding to its operator sites depending on the central spacer length. Other homolog members in the LacI/GalR family (PurR and YcjW) cannot bind their operator sites with similar structural flexibility. To decipher the underlying mechanism for this unique property, we used Spec-seq approach combined with site-directed mutagenesis to quantify the DNA binding specificity of multiple hybrids of lacI and PurR. We find that lac repressor’s recognition di-residues YQ and its hinge helix loop regions are both critical for its structural flexibility. Also, specificity profiling of the whole lac operator suggests that a simple additive model from single variants suffice to predict other multivariant sites’ energy reasonably well, and the genome occupancy model based on this specificity data correlates well with in vivo lac repressor binding profile. PMID:26752632

  12. Linkage-specific avidity defines the lysine 63-linked polyubiquitin binding preference of Rap80

    PubMed Central

    Sims, Joshua J.; Cohen, Robert E.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Linkage-specific polyubiquitin recognition is thought to make possible the diverse set of functional outcomes associated with ubiquitination. Thus far, mechanistic insight into this selectivity has been largely limited to single domains that preferentially bind to lysine 48-linked polyubiquitin (K48-polyUb) in isolation. Here we propose a mechanism, linkage-specific avidity, in which multiple ubiquitin binding domains are arranged in space so that simultaneous, high-affinity interactions are optimum with one polyUb linkage, but unfavorable or impossible with other polyUb topologies and monoUb. Our model is human Rap80, which contains tandem ubiquitin interacting motifs (UIMs) that bind to K63-polyUb at DNA double-strand breaks. We show how the sequence between the Rap80 UIMs positions the domains for efficient, avid binding across a single K63 linkage, thus defining selectivity. We also demonstrate K48-specific avidity in a different protein, ataxin-3. Using tandem UIMs, we establish the general principles governing polyUb linkage selectivity and affinity in multivalent ubiquitin receptors. PMID:19328070

  13. Sequence specificity of formaldehyde-mediated covalent binding of anthracycline derivatives to DNA.

    PubMed

    Szulawska, Agata; Gniazdowski, Marek; Czyz, Malgorzata

    2005-01-01

    Daunorubicin (DRB) and doxorubicin (DOX) in the presence of formaldehyde (CH2O) form covalent adducts with DNA. A G-specific adduct is formed by producing an aminal bridge between the C-3' of daunosamine and the C-2 of guanine. New derivatives of DRB, DOX and epidoxorubicin (EDOX) with an amidine group bonded to the C-3' of the daunosamine moiety, with either a morpholine or hexamethyleneimine ring attached to the amidine group, were studied in this paper. DNase I footprinting and analyses with restriction endonucleases were applied to compare the specificity of adduct formed by the amidine derivatives and their parent compounds. These approaches provide consistent results, proving that a GC pair is required for covalent binding of anthracycline derivatives to DNA and that different flanking sequences are able to modify the sequence preference of the drugs. The 5'-GC-3', 5'-CG-3' and 5'-TC-3' sequences were protected most efficiently by the parent compounds and their morpholine derivatives and some increased protection of 5'-TC-3' sequence was observed for morpholine analogues. Hexamethyleneimine derivatives bind to DNA with much lower efficiency. Finally, the sequence specificity of anthracycline derivatives was correlated with their ability to inhibit binding of transcription factors Sp1 and AP-1 to their DNA recognition sequences. The anthracycline derivatives were more potent in inhibiting Sp1 binding to its cognate GC box than in preventing AP-1 from binding to its mixed A.T and G.C site. Overall, the results indicate that the amidine derivatives of anthracyclines show similar, but not identical sequence specificity as parent compounds, though they exert their effect at a higher concentration. PMID:15588709

  14. High affinity binding of /sup 125/I-labeled mouse interferon to a specific cell surface receptor. II. Analysis of binding properties

    SciTech Connect

    Aguet, M.; Blanchard, B.

    1981-12-01

    Direct ligand-binding studies with highly purified /sup 125/I-labeled virus-induced mouse interferon on mouse lymphoma L 1210 cells revealed a direct correlation of specific high-affinity binding with the biologic response to interferon. Neutralization of the antiviral effect by anti-interferon gamma globulin occurred at the same antibody concentration as the inhibition of specific binding. These results suggest that specific high-affinity binding of /sup 125/I-interferon occurred at a biologically functional interferon receptor. Competitive inhibition experiments using /sup 125/I- and /sup 127/I-labeled interferon provided strong evidence that the fraction of /sup 125/I-interferon inactivated upon labeling did not bind specifically. Scatchard analysis of the binding data yielded linear plots and thus suggested that interferon binds to homogeneous noncooperative receptor sites. In contrast to a characteristic property of several peptide hormone systems, binding of /sup 125/I-interferon to its specific receptor did not induce subsequent ligand degradation. At 37/sup o/ bound interferon was rapidly released in a biologically active form without evidence for molecular degradation. The expression of interferon receptors was not modified by treatment with interferon. Trypsin treatment of target cells and inhibition of protein synthesis abolished the specific binding of /sup 125/I-interferon. Three major molecular weight species of Newcastle disease virus-induced mouse C 243 cell interferon were isolated, separated, and identified as mouse ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. interferons. These interferons were shown to inhibit competitively the specific binding of the highly purified labeled starting material thus providing evidence for a common receptor site for mouse interferon.

  15. Antibody Binding Specificity for Kappa (Vκ) Light Chain-containing Human (IgM) Antibodies: Polysialic Acid (PSA) Attached to NCAM as a Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Watzlawik, Jens O.; Kahoud, Robert J.; Wootla, Bharath; Painter, Meghan M.; Warrington, Arthur E.; Carey, William A.; Rodriguez, Moses

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies of the IgM isotype are often neglected as potential therapeutics in human trials, animal models of human diseases as well as detecting agents in standard laboratory techniques. In contrast, several human IgMs demonstrated proof of efficacy in cancer models and models of CNS disorders including multiple sclerosis (MS) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Reasons for their lack of consideration include difficulties to express, purify and stabilize IgM antibodies, challenge to identify (non-protein) antigens, low affinity binding and fundamental knowledge gaps in carbohydrate and lipid research. This manuscript uses HIgM12 as an example to provide a detailed protocol to detect antigens by Western blotting, immunoprecipitations and immunocytochemistry. HIgM12 targets polysialic acid (PSA) attached to the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM). Early postnatal mouse brain tissue from wild type (WT) and NCAM knockout (KO) mice lacking the three major central nervous system (CNS) splice variants NCAM180, 140 and 120 was used to evaluate the importance of NCAM for binding to HIgM12. Further enzymatic digestion of CNS tissue and cultured CNS cells using endoneuraminidases led us to identify PSA as the specific binding epitope for HIgM12. PMID:27404858

  16. Displacement of specific serotonin and lysergic acid diethylamide binding by Ergalgin, a new antiserotonin drug.

    PubMed

    Oelszner, W

    1980-01-01

    [3H]-serotonin and [3H]-lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) bind with a high affinity, KD = 12 nM and 6 nM, respectively, to distinct receptors of rat caudate membranes in vitro. Displacement experiments with unlabeled serotonin and LSD support the hypothesis of serotonin receptors existing in an agonist and antagonist state. Methysergide and Ergalgin display quite similar potencies in displacing [3H]-serotonin and [3H]-LSD from their specific binding sites (Ki = 46,7 and 53,4 nM; 22,3 and 36,5 nM, respectively). Contrary to pharmacological findings these binding results are in favour of mixed agonist/antagonist properties of these compounds.

  17. Periplasmic maltose-binding protein confers specificity on the outer membrane maltose pore of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Heuzenroeder, M W; Reeves, P

    1980-01-01

    ompB mutants of Escherichia coli K-12 are markedly deficient in porin in their outer membrane. This results in a decreased rate of uptake for many substrates: the maltose pore (lambda receptor) can in some circumstances, in the absence of the periplasmic maltose-binding protein, compensate for the consequent defects in permeability to lactose, mannitol, glycylglycyl-L-valine, and tri-L-ornithine. It is postulated that the maltose-binding protein associates with the maltose pore and confers on it the specificity for maltose, and that the absence of the maltose-binding protein leaves the pore open and results in enhanced transmembrane diffusion of molecules other than maltose. This paper presents evidence to support this hypothesis. PMID:6444941

  18. Site-Specific Oligonucleotide Binding Represses Transcription of the Human c-myc Gene in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooney, Michael; Czernuszewicz, Graznya; Postel, Edith H.; Flint, S. Jane; Hogan, Michael E.

    1988-07-01

    A 27-base-long DNA oligonucleotide was designed that binds to duplex DNA at a single site within the 5' end of the human c-myc gene, 115 base pairs upstream from the transcription origin P1. On the basis of the physical properties of its bound complex, it was concluded that the oligonucleotide forms a colinear triplex with the duplex binding site. By means of an in vitro assay system, it was possible to show a correlation between triplex formation at -115 base pairs and repression of c-myc transcription. The possibility is discussed that triplex formation (site-specific RNA binding to a DNA duplex) could serve as the basis for an alternative program of gene control in vivo.

  19. Specific and non-specific interactions of integration host factor with DNA: thermodynamic evidence for disruption of multiple IHF surface salt-bridges coupled to DNA binding.

    PubMed

    Holbrook, J A; Tsodikov, O V; Saecker, R M; Record, M T

    2001-07-01

    Site-specific DNA binding of architectural protein integration host factor (IHF) is involved in formation of functional multiprotein-DNA assemblies in Escherichia coli, while non-specific binding of IHF and other histone-like proteins serves to structure the nucleoid. Here, we report an isothermal titration calorimetry study of the thermodynamics of binding IHF to a 34 bp fragment composed entirely of the specific H' site from lambda-phage DNA. At low to moderate [K(+)] (60-100 mM), strong competition is observed between specific and non-specific binding as a result of a low specificity ratio (approximately 10(2)) and a very small non-specific site size. In this [K(+)] range, both specific and non-specific binding are enthalpy-driven, with large negative enthalpy, entropy and heat capacity changes and binding constants that are insensitive to [K(+)]. Above 100 mM K(+), only specific binding is observed, and both the binding constant and the magnitudes of enthalpy, entropy and heat capacity changes all decrease strongly with increasing [K(+)]. When interpreted in the context of the structure of the specific complex, the thermodynamics provide compelling evidence for a previously unrecognized design principle by which proteins that form extensive binding interfaces with nucleic acids control binding constants, binding site sizes and effects of temperature and ion concentrations on stability and specificity. We propose that up to 22 of the 23 IHF cationic side-chains that are located within 6 A of DNA phosphate oxygen atoms in the complex, are masked in the absence of DNA by pairing with anionic carboxylate groups in intramolecular salt-bridges (dehydrated ion-pairs). These salt-bridges increase in stability with increasing temperature and decreasing [K(+)]. To explain the unusual thermodynamics of IHF-DNA interactions, we propose that both specific and non-specific binding at low [K(+)] require disruption of salt-bridges (as many as 18 for specific binding) whereupon

  20. A replicator-specific binding protein essential for site-specific initiation of DNA replication in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ya; Huang, Liang; Fu, Haiqing; Smith, Owen K.; Lin, Chii Mei; Utani, Koichi; Rao, Mishal; Reinhold, William C.; Redon, Christophe E.; Ryan, Michael; Kim, RyangGuk; You, Yang; Hanna, Harlington; Boisclair, Yves; Long, Qiaoming; Aladjem, Mirit I.

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian chromosome replication starts from distinct sites; however, the principles governing initiation site selection are unclear because proteins essential for DNA replication do not exhibit sequence-specific DNA binding. Here we identify a replication-initiation determinant (RepID) protein that binds a subset of replication-initiation sites. A large fraction of RepID-binding sites share a common G-rich motif and exhibit elevated replication initiation. RepID is required for initiation of DNA replication from RepID-bound replication origins, including the origin at the human beta-globin (HBB) locus. At HBB, RepID is involved in an interaction between the replication origin (Rep-P) and the locus control region. RepID-depleted murine embryonic fibroblasts exhibit abnormal replication fork progression and fewer replication-initiation events. These observations are consistent with a model, suggesting that RepID facilitates replication initiation at a distinct group of human replication origins. PMID:27272143

  1. The N-terminal domain determines the affinity and specificity of H1 binding to chromatin

    SciTech Connect

    Oeberg, Christine; Belikov, Sergey

    2012-04-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer wt Human histone H1.4 and hH1.4 devoid of N-terminal domain, {Delta}N-hH1.4, were compared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both histones bind to chromatin, however, {Delta}N-hH1.4 displays lower binding affinity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interaction of {Delta}N-hH1.4 with chromatin includes a significant unspecific component. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer N-terminal domain is a determinant of specificity of histone H1 binding to chromatin. -- Abstract: Linker histone H1, one of the most abundant nuclear proteins in multicellular eukaryotes, is a key component of the chromatin structure mainly due to its role in the formation and maintenance of the 30 nm chromatin fiber. It has a three-domain structure; a central globular domain flanked by a short N-terminal domain